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Sample records for citrus extracts benefit

  1. Effectivity of Kaffir lime (Citrus hystrix, Nasnaran Mandarin (Citrus amblycarpa, and Pomelo (Citrus maxima Leaf Extract Against Aedes aegypti Larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hebert Adrianto

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The used of chemicals as larvicidal may causing resistance, health problem, and environment problem. Leaf extracts of Citrus as biolarvicidal against Aedes aegypti larvae can be used as an alternative larvicidal. The aims of this study is to find out the species of Citrus in the study sample, which is the most effective as biolarvicidal. This study was conducted using nested experiment design, with six treatments and five replicates. Larvae mortality was observed after 24 and 48 hours. Then, data were analyzed by probit. The results of this study show that (1 the LC95 value after 24 hours of exposure of leaf extracts of Citrus hystrix, Citrus amblycarpa, and Citrus maxima, were each 3,176 ppm; 4,174 ppm; and 6,369 ppm. (2 the LC95 value after 48 hours of exposure of leaf extracts of Citrus hystrix, Citrus amblycarpa, and Citrus maxima, were each 2,499 ppm; 3,256 ppm; and 4,886 ppm. (3 leaf extract of Citrus hystrix is the most effective among others as biolarvicidal against Aedes aegypti larvae. Leaf extract of Citrus hystrix can be used as alternative biolarvicidal.

  2. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Citrus fruits (Citrus limon, Citrus reticulata and Citrus sinensis) aqueous extract and its characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujitha, Mohanan V.; Kannan, Soundarapandian

    2013-02-01

    This study reports the biological synthesis of gold nanoparticles by the reduction of HAuCl4 by using citrus fruits (Citrus limon, Citrus reticulata and Citrus sinensis) juice extract as the reducing and stabilizing agent. A various shape and size of gold nanoparticles were formed when the ratio of the reactants were altered with respect to 1.0 mM chloroauric acid solution. The gold nanoparticles obtained were characterized by UV-visible spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). TEM studies showed the particles to be of various shapes and sizes and particle size ranges from 15 to 80 nm. Selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern confirmed fcc phase and crystallinity of the particles. The X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the distinctive facets (1 1 1, 2 0 0, 2 2 0 and 2 2 2 planes) of gold nanoparticles. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies revealed that the average size for colloid gp3 of C. limon, C. reticulata and C. sinensis are 32.2 nm, 43.4 nm and 56.7 nm respectively. The DLS graph showed that the particles size was larger and more polydispersed compared to the one observed by TEM due to the fact that the measured size also includes the bio-organic compounds enveloping the core of the Au NPs. Zeta potential value for gold nanoparticles obtained from colloid gp3 of C. limon, C. reticulata and C. sinensis are -45.9, -37.9 and -31.4 respectively indicating the stability of the synthesized nanoparticles. Herein we propose a novel, previously unexploited method for the biological syntheses of polymorphic gold nanoparticles with potent biological applications.

  3. Effect of Melia azedarach (Sapindales: Meliaceae) fruit extracts on Citrus Leafminer Phyllocnistis citrella (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mckenna, Maher M; Hammad, Efat M Abou-Fakhr; Farran, Mohamad T

    2013-01-01

    Melia azedarach L. extracts were studied in comparison with selected biorational insecticides against the citrus leafminer Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton under field conditions. Citrus limon (L.) Burm. F...

  4. Effect of Aqueous Extracts of Eucalyptus Globulus, Citrus Sinensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eucalyptus), Citrus sinensis (Sweet orange) and Musa sapientium (Banana) on the cowpea bruchid, Callosobruchus maculatus was investigated in the laboratory. There were four treatments namely aqueous extracts of Eucalyptus, Orange, Banana, ...

  5. Citrus essential oils: Extraction, authentication and application in food preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, Neelima; Sharma, Kavita; Koteswararao, Rakoti; Sinha, Mukty; Baral, EkRaj; Cho, Moo Hwan

    2017-09-28

    Citrus EOs is an economic, eco-friendly and natural alternatives to chemical preservatives and other synthetic antioxidants, such as sodium nitrites, nitrates or benzoates, commonly utilized in food preservation. Citrus based EOs is obtained mainly from the peels of citrus fruits which are largely discarded as wastes and cause environmental problems. The extraction of citrus oils from the waste peels not only saves environment but can be used in various applications including food preservation. The present article presents elaborated viewpoints on the nature and chemical composition of different EOs present in main citrus varieties widely grown across the globe; extraction, characterization and authentication techniques/methods of the citrus EOs; and reviews the recent advances in the application of citrus EOs for the preservation of fruits, vegetables, meat, fish and processed food stuffs. The probable reaction mechanism of the EOs based thin films formation with biodegradable polymers is presented. Other formulation, viz., EOs microencapsulation incorporating biodegradable polymers, nanoemulsion coatings, spray applications and antibacterial action mechanism of the active compounds present in the EOs have been elaborated. Extensive research is required on overcoming the challenges regarding allergies and obtaining safer dosage limits. Shift towards greener technologies indicate optimistic future towards safer utilization of citrus based EOs in food preservation.

  6. Citrus peel extract incorporated ice cubes to protect the quality of common pandora: Fish storage in ice with citrus

    OpenAIRE

    Yerlikaya, Pinar; Ucak, Ilknur; Gumus, Bahar; Gokoglu, Nalan

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of ice with albedo and flavedo fragments of Citrus (Grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) and Bitter orange (Citrus aurantium L.)) extracts on the quality of common pandora (Pagellus erythrinus). Concentrated citrus extracts were diluted with distilled water (1/100 w/v) before making of ice. The ice cubes were spread on each layer of fishes and stored at 0 °C for 15 days. The pH value showed a regular increase in all samples. TVB-N levels of b...

  7. Kinetics study of oil extraction from Citrus auranticum L. by solvent-free microwave extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heri Septya Kusuma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Citrus and its oil are of high economic and medicinal value because of their multiple uses, such as in the food industry, cosmetics and folk medicine. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of solvent-free microwave extraction for the extraction of essential oils from Citrus auranticum L. peels. Specifically, this study verifies the kinetics based on second-order model and mechanism of solvent-free microwave extraction of Citrus auranticum L. peels. Solvent-free microwave extraction is used to extract essential oils from Citrus auranticum L. peels. The initial extraction rate, the extraction capacity and the second-order extraction rate constant were calculated using the model. Using a three-step experimental design of the kinetics of oil extraction from Citrus auranticum L. peels by solvent-free microwave extraction, this study showed that the extraction process was based on the second-order extraction model. The initial extraction rate (h, the extraction capacity (CS, the second-order extraction rate constant (k, and coefficient of determination (R2 was 0.7483 g L-1 min-1, 0.7291 g L-1, 1.4075 L g-1 min-1 and 0.9992, respectively.

  8. Evaluation of the Antioxidant Activity of Citrus Flavedo Extracts in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The worldwide trend to avoid the use of synthetic antioxidants has motivated scientists to unveil and exploit new sources of natural antioxidants. In this study, the antioxidant potential of the flavedo extracts of two locally grown citrus fruits namely, Mandarin fizu and Pamplemousse kaopan, was investigated in mayonnaise ...

  9. Extraction of low molecular weight RNA from Citrus trifolita tissues ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2010-12-20

    Dec 20, 2010 ... total RNA extraction from citrus tissues, then generation of LMW RNA using 4M LiCl, which ... In addition, the entire procedure can be completed within 4 hours with many samples being processed ... many higher plants, especially in mature tissues, ... Use of trizol is convenient and gives high quality end.

  10. Extraction of low molecular weight RNA from Citrus trifolita tissues ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most traditional methods for LMW RNA isolation involve many steps and chemical reagents which upon degradation may negatively affect results. We employed a simple and quick method involving trizol for total RNA extraction from citrus tissues, then generation of LMW RNA using 4M LiCl, which have been successfully ...

  11. In vivo anti-carcinogenic property of a formulated citrus peel extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiko Suzawa

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cancer is one of the two leading fatal diseases humans face. Synthesized drugs available for cancer intervention have many limitations in applications and effectiveness and are often associated with serious of side effects, which can further damage the patients’ quality of life. Recently, the development of natural-product-based and therapeutically sound anti-cancer agents have gained popularity in the fields of functional and medical foods, which may exhibit advantages of minimal toxicity and multiple active molecular components. Citrus peel or its extract has been reported to have potent pharmacological activities and health benefits because of abundant flavonoids present in citrus fruits, particularly in the peels. Results: The results of these studies demonstrated the efficacy of Gold Lotion (GL, an extract of multiple varieties of citrus peels that contains abundant flavonoids, including a high percentage of polymethoxylflavones (PMFs, which can protect against skin cancer, colon cancer, and prostate cancer in mice. These results are clearly promising and warrant a human trial with GL in future studies. Summary: Briefly, these data have demonstrated that GL is efficacious in preventing and treating cancer in several model systems. This review summarizes the results of currently available data regarding the in vivo anti-cancer activity of GL, and identifies opportunities for subsequent human clinical trials to assess preventive and therapeutic effects in the near future.

  12. Optimization of aqueous pectin extraction from Citrus medica peel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasandide, Bahare; Khodaiyan, Faramarz; Mousavi, Zeinab E; Hosseini, Seyed Saeid

    2017-12-15

    In this study, the effect of aqueous extraction conditions (temperature of 70-90°C, time of 60-180min, and liquid/solid ratio (LSR) of 20-40v/w) on the yield and degree of esterification (DE) of Citrus medica peel pectin was studied using a Box-Behnken design. The highest production yield of pectin (21.85±0.35%) was obtained at temperature of 90°C, extraction time of 180min and LSR of 40v/w as optimum extraction conditions which was close to the predicted value (24.13%). In these extraction conditions, the DE and the emulsifying activity were 77.2 and 46.5%, respectively. Also, the emulsions were 90.30 and 90% stable at 4°C, and 83.87 and 83.50% at 25°C after 1 and 30days, respectively. The determination of flow behavior showed that the pectin solutions had a Newtonian behavior at low concentrations (0.1, 0.5 and 1.0%w/v), while in higher concentration (2.0%w/v), the pseudoplastic flow behavior became dominant. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Citrus peel extract incorporated ice cubes to protect the quality of common pandora: Fish storage in ice with citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yerlikaya, Pinar; Ucak, Ilknur; Gumus, Bahar; Gokoglu, Nalan

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of ice with albedo and flavedo fragments of Citrus (Grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) and Bitter orange (Citrus aurantium L.)) extracts on the quality of common pandora (Pagellus erythrinus). Concentrated citrus extracts were diluted with distilled water (1/100 w/v) before making of ice. The ice cubes were spread on each layer of fishes and stored at 0 °C for 15 days. The pH value showed a regular increase in all samples. TVB-N levels of bitter orange treatment groups were recorded lower than the other groups reaching to 25.11 ± 0.02 mg/100 g at the end of the storage. The TMA-N values of bitter orange treatment groups were lower than that of control and grapefruit treatment groups. In terms of TBARS value, alteration was observed in the control samples and this value significantly (p bitter orange flavedo treatment. The results showed the bitter orange albedo and bitter orange flavedo extracts in combination with ice storage have more effectiveness in controlling the biochemical indices in common pandora.

  14. Citric acid compounds of tangerines peel extract (Citrus reticulata) as potential materials teeth whitening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratiwi, F.; Tinata, J. K.; Prakasa, A. W.; Istiqomah; Hartini, E.; Isworo, S.

    2017-04-01

    Peel of citrus fruit (Citrus reticulata) has a variety of possible chemical compounds that may serve as a potential whitening teeth. This research is conducted on a laboratory scale; therefore, it needs to be developed on an application scale. A quasi-experimental was employed in this study. Citric acid extraction was carried out on the type of Sweet Orange (Citrus Aurantium L), Tangerine (Citrus Reticulata Blanco or Citrus Nobilis), Pomelo (Citrus Maxima Merr, Citrus grandis Osbeck), and Lemon (Citrus Limon Linn). Citric acid’s ability test as teeth whitener was performed on premolar teeth with concentrations of 2.5%, 5%, and 10%. The experiments were replicated in 3 times, and teeth whiteness level was measured using Shade Guide VITA Classical. The result of this research showed that citric acid in every kind of orange peel with various concentration has different abilities on whitening teeth. The highest colour level obtained from Tangerine peel’s citric acid concentration of 5%. Orange peel extract has the best teeth whitening abilities tested by the method of Gass Chromatography to know the active ingredients.

  15. Simultaneous extraction and biotransformation process to obtain high bioactivity phenolic compounds from Brazilian citrus residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Jose Valdo; Macedo, Gabriela Alves

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have pointed to a reduction in the incidence of some cancers, diabetes, and neuro-degenerative diseases as a result of human health benefits from flavanones. Currently, flavanones are obtained by chemical synthesis or extraction from plants, and these processes are only produced in the glycosylated form. An interesting environmentally friendly alternative that deserves attention regarding phenolic compound production is the simultaneous extraction and biotransformation of these molecules. Orange juice consumption has become a worldwide dietary habit and Brazil is the largest producer of orange juice in the world. Approximately half of the citrus fruit is discarded after the juice is processed, thus generating large amounts of residues (peel and pectinolytic material). Hence, finding an environmentally clean technique to extract natural products and bioactive compounds from different plant materials has presented a challenging task over the last decades. The aim of this study was to obtain phenolics from Brazilian citrus residues with high bioactivity, using simultaneous extraction (cellulase and pectinase) and biotransformation (tannase) by enzymatic process. The highest hesperetin, naringenin and ellagic acid production in the experiment were 120, 80, and 11,250 µg g(-1), respectively, at 5.0 U mL(-1) of cellulase and 7.0 U mL(-1) of tannase at 40°C and 200 rpm. Also, the development of this process generated an increase of 77% in the total antioxidant capacity. These results suggest that the bioprocess obtained innovative results where the simultaneous enzymatic and biotransformatic extracted flavanones from agro-industrial residues was achieved without the use of organic solvents. The methodology can therefore be considered a green technology. © 2015 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  16. Comparison of DNA extraction methods for detection of citrus huanglongbing in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Evelio Ángel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Four DNA citrus plant tissue extraction protocols and three methods of DNA extraction from vector psyllid Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae were compared as part of the validation process and standardization for detection of huanglongbing (HLB. The comparison was done using several criterias such as integrity, purity and concentration. The best quality parameters presented in terms of extraction of DNA from plant midribs tissue of citrus, were cited by Murray and Thompson (1980 and Rodríguez et al. (2010, while for the DNA extraction from psyllid vectors of HLB, the best extraction method was suggested by Manjunath et al.(2008.

  17. Ultrasound-assisted extraction of Ca, K and Mg from in vitro citrus culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arruda Sandra C. C.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available An ultrasound extraction procedure for Ca, K and Mg from in vitro plant cultures is proposed, comparing cultures of different embryogenic levels of Citrus sinensis and Citrus limonia, employing ultrasound energy. Parameters related to metals extraction, such as plant material sampling, acid concentration and sonication time were investigated. For accuracy check, the proposed ultrasound extraction procedure was compared with a microwave-assisted digestion procedure and no differences in the results were verified at 95% of the confidence level. With this simple and accurate extraction procedure, it was possible to determine differences in Ca, K and Mg concentrations during Citrus embryo formation/development and between cultures (embryogenic and non-embryogenic. Finally, the ultrasound extraction method demonstrated to be an excellent alternative for handless sampling and operational costs.

  18. Gastrointestinal Absorption of Hesperidin and Hesperetin after Oral Administration of Immature Citrus Unshiu Extract to Rats

    OpenAIRE

    藤田, 忠; 川瀬, 篤史; 西島, 七恵; 増田, めぐみ; 松田, 秀秋; 岩城, 正宏; Tadashi, Fujita; Atsushi, Kawase; Nanae, Nishijima; Megumi, Masuda; Hideaki, Matsuda; Masahiro, Iwaki; 近畿大学薬学部; 近畿大学薬学部; 近畿大学薬学部

    2008-01-01

    Hesperidin and hesperetin having an antiallergic effect are contained abundantly in immature fruit of Citrus unshiu. However, the gastrointestinal absorption of hesperidin and hesperetin as an aglycone of hesperidin after oral administration of Citrus unshiu extract (CU-ext) has not been clarified. We developed a simultaneous HPLC analysis for hesperidin and hesperetin in plasma and investigated the pharmacokinetics of hesperidin and hesperetin after oral administration of CU-ext compared wit...

  19. Pectin extraction from Citron peel (Citrus medica Linn.) and its use in food system

    OpenAIRE

    Rojanakorn, T.; Lerkchaiyaphum, K.; Nantachai, K.; Tangwongchai, R.

    2006-01-01

    Screening experiments using 25-1 fractional factorial design showed that pH, temperature, and extracting time were the main factors affecting the amount and quality of extracted pectin from Citrus medica Linn. Optimum condition of pectin extraction was studied using central composite design (CCD). Mathematical models relating pH, temperature and extracted time to amount of extracted pectin, equivalent weight, methyl content and anhydrogalacturonic acid content were established. Based on the m...

  20. 100% citrus juice: Nutritional contribution, dietary benefits, and association with anthropometric measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampersaud, Gail C; Valim, M Filomena

    2017-01-02

    Citrus juices such as 100% orange (OJ) and grapefruit juice (GJ) are commonly consumed throughout the world. This review examines the contributions of OJ and GJ to nutrient intake, diet quality, and fruit intake, and supports citrus juices as nutrient-dense beverages. This review also explores the research examining associations between OJ and GJ intake and anthropometric measures. Citrus juices are excellent sources of vitamin C and contribute other key nutrients such as potassium, folate, magnesium, and vitamin A. OJ intake has been associated with better diet quality in children and adults. OJ intake has not been associated with adverse effects on weight or other body measures in observational studies in children and adults. In adults, some observational studies report more favorable body mass index or body measure parameters in OJ consumers compared to nonconsumers. Intervention studies in adults report no negative impacts of OJ or GJ consumption on anthropometric measures, although these measures were typically not the primary outcomes examined in the studies. Moderate consumption of citrus juices may provide meaningful nutritional and dietary benefits and do not appear to negatively impact body weight, body composition, or other anthropometric measures in children and adults.

  1. Effect of Melia azedarach (Sapindales: Meliaceae) fruit extracts on Citrus Leafminer Phyllocnistis citrella (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Maher M; Hammad, Efat M Abou-Fakhr; Farran, Mohamad T

    2013-12-01

    Melia azedarach L. extracts were studied in comparison with selected biorational insecticides against the citrus leafminer Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton under field conditions. Citrus limon (L.) Burm. F. trees were exposed to: Melia extracts of green and mature fruits, Neem oil (30% a.i.), abamectin (1.8% a.i.) and control. Two sprays of each treatment (except for Melia mature fruit extract) were executed at 10-d intervals. The live number of the 1(st) and later (2(nd) & 3(rd)) larval instars per leaf were recorded at initial sampling date and at 10-d intervals after each spray application. Results indicated that there were significant differences in the number of live larval instars among treatments. Melia extracts and the two biorationals, neem oil and abamectin, decreased the larvae population significantly to lower numbers than that of the control at 10 days after each spray application. However, the decrease caused by neem oil and abamectin was significantly higher than that of Melia extracts. Thus, these extracts might be considered as potential alternative with other biorational control methods in management of the leafminer. Further research including bioassays is needed to determine the factors responsible for reducing larvae population and whether these Melia extracts can be utilized in future citrus IPM programs as a tool for citrus leafminer management.

  2. Anticancer Potential of Citrus Juices and Their Extracts: A Systematic Review of Both Preclinical and Clinical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santa Cirmi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: During the last decades, a huge body of evidence has been accumulated suggesting that Citrus fruits and their juices might have a role in preventing many diseases including cancer.Objective: To summarize the numerous evidences on the potential of Citrus juices and their extracts as anticancer agents.Data sources: A systematic review of articles written in English using MEDLINE (1946-present, EMBASE (1974-present and Web of Sciences (1970-present was performed independently by two reviewers. Search terms included Citrus, Citrus aurantifolia, Citrus sinensis, Citrus paradisi, Citrus fruits, Citrus fruits extract, cancer, neoplasm, neoplasia, tumor, metastasis, carcinogenesis, proliferation. The last search was performed on March 16th, 2017.Study selection: Study selection and systematic review were carried out in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA statement. Prior to the beginning of the review, Authors defined a checklist for inclusion criteria, thus including articles which meet the following: (i published on peer-reviewed scientific journals; (ii Citrus juice used alone; (iii extracts derived from Citrus juice; (iii for preclinical studies, an exposure time to Citrus juices and their extracts more than 24 h. Reviews, meta-analyses, conference abstracts and book chapters were excluded.Data extraction: Three reviewers independently performed the extraction of articles.Data synthesis: 22 papers met our inclusion criteria and were eligible for inclusion in the final review. According to the kind of study, the selected ones were further divided in preclinical (n = 20 and observational (n = 2 studies.Conclusion: The studies discussed in this review strongly corroborate the role of Citrus juices and their derivatives as potential resource against cancer.

  3. Anticancer Potential of Citrus Juices and Their Extracts: A Systematic Review of Both Preclinical and Clinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirmi, Santa; Maugeri, Alessandro; Ferlazzo, Nadia; Gangemi, Sebastiano; Calapai, Gioacchino; Schumacher, Udo; Navarra, Michele

    2017-01-01

    Background: During the last decades, a huge body of evidence has been accumulated suggesting that Citrus fruits and their juices might have a role in preventing many diseases including cancer. Objective: To summarize the numerous evidences on the potential of Citrus juices and their extracts as anticancer agents. Data sources: A systematic review of articles written in English using MEDLINE (1946-present), EMBASE (1974-present) and Web of Sciences (1970-present) was performed independently by two reviewers. Search terms included Citrus, Citrus aurantifolia, Citrus sinensis, Citrus paradisi, Citrus fruits, Citrus fruits extract, cancer, neoplasm, neoplasia, tumor, metastasis, carcinogenesis, proliferation. The last search was performed on March 16th, 2017. Study selection: Study selection and systematic review were carried out in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement. Prior to the beginning of the review, Authors defined a checklist for inclusion criteria, thus including articles which meet the following: (i) published on peer-reviewed scientific journals; (ii) Citrus juice used alone; (iii) extracts derived from Citrus juice; (iii) for preclinical studies, an exposure time to Citrus juices and their extracts more than 24 h. Reviews, meta-analyses, conference abstracts and book chapters were excluded. Data extraction: Three reviewers independently performed the extraction of articles. Data synthesis: 22 papers met our inclusion criteria and were eligible for inclusion in the final review. According to the kind of study, the selected ones were further divided in preclinical (n = 20) and observational (n = 2) studies. Conclusion: The studies discussed in this review strongly corroborate the role of Citrus juices and their derivatives as potential resource against cancer.

  4. Evaluation of sweet orange peel aqueous extract ( citrus sinensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The toxic effect of sweet orange peel (Citrus sinensis) was compared with that of carbofuran, a synthetic nematicide, for the suppression of soil and root population of root-knot nematode Meloidogyne incognita on tomato. Field and laboratory experiments were conducted in year 2002 and repeated in the same period in year ...

  5. AND Citrus senensis PEEL EXTRACTS ON Aeromonas hydrophila ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    developed countries now prefer raw carrot instead of carotene compound based tablets, instead of vitamin. C tablet, they feel happy to use citrus fruits ..... Table 2 shows the phytochemical composition of the plant parts screen. Only steroids, glycosides and amino acids were absent in A. comosus peel but in C. senensis ...

  6. Extraction of low molecular weight RNA from Citrus trifolita tissues ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2010-12-20

    Dec 20, 2010 ... air-dried for a few minutes and then exposed to BIOMAX X-ray film for 48 h using an intensifying screen (Sunkar and Zhu, 2004). RESULTS AND DISSCUSSION. Size of LMW RNA obtained. After isolation, the pure LMW RNA of different citrus tissues obtained using the protocol described above was.

  7. Characterization of citrus pectin samples extracted under different conditions: influence of acid type and pH of extraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaya, Merve; Sousa, Antonio G.; Crepeau, Marie-Jeanne

    2014-01-01

    on fruit peel, a waste product from the juicing industry, in which thousands of tons of citrus are processed worldwide every year. This study examines how pectin components vary in relation to the plant source (orange, lemon, lime, grapefruit) and considers the influence of extraction conditions...... on the chemical and macromolecular characteristics of pectin samples. Methods Citrus peel (orange, lemon, lime and grapefruit) from a commercial supplier was used as raw material. Pectin samples were obtained on a bulk plant scale (kilograms; harsh nitric acid, mild nitric acid and harsh oxalic acid extraction...... to have short side chains compared with orange, lime and lemon. Orange and grapefruit pectin samples were both particularly rich in rhamnogalacturonan I backbones. Conclusions Structural, and hence macromolecular, variations within the different citrus pectin samples were mainly related...

  8. Hepatoprotective Effect of Citrus limon Fruit Extract against Carbofuran Induced Toxicity in Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Jaiswal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbofuran (2,3-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-7-benzofuranol methylcarbamate, is known to induce oxidative stress and to cause inhibition of acetylcholinesterase activity. The present work was envisaged to evaluate the effect of carbofuran on redox indices and its interactions with hepatic markers in rat. The ameliorating effect of Citrus limon fruit extract on carbofuran induced toxicity was also monitored. The results indicated that carbofuran treatment caused significant alterations in the levels of activities of AST, ALT, and LDH in liver tissues and serum. The levels of enzymatic oxidative stress markers such as SOD and catalase and nonenzymatic redox molecules such as total thiol, GSH, and protein thiol also showed significant perturbations in rat liver due to carbofuran treatment. The administration of Citrus limon fruit extract, however, was able to markedly ameliorate the toxicity of carbofuran by protecting the levels of aforesaid biomarkers to near normal levels. The ameliorative effect of Citrus limon fruit extract may be due to the presence of different antioxidants in it which may neutralize the ROS and RNS generated in the body tissue due to pesticide stress. These results suggested that Citrus limon fruit extract may be utilized as a potential supplement in proper management of pesticide intoxication in association with relevant therapeutics.

  9. Antifungal properties of organic extracts of eight Cistus L. species against postharvest citrus sour rot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, H; Boubaker, H; Askarne, L; Talibi, I; Msanda, F; Boudyach, E H; Saadi, B; Ait Ben Aoumar, A

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of methanol and chloroform extracts of eight Cistaceae species to control citrus sour rot decay, caused by Geotrichum citri-aurantii, was investigated in both in vitro and in vivo conditions. Methanol extracts of these plant species exhibited more interesting activity against G. citri-aurantii, in both in vitro and in vivo conditions, compared with chloroforme extracts. Under in vitro trials, obtained results showed that methanol extracts of all tested plants revealed a highest significant antifungal activity with inhibition zones that ranged between 12·33 and 16·33 mm in diameter. All tested methanol extracts totally inhibited spore germination when tested at 10 mg ml(-1) . Incidence of sour rot was significantly lowered to 11·11% when fruits were treated with Cistus populifolius and Cistus ladanifer methanol extracts compared with 100% in the control. The disease severity was lowered to 5·19% and 6·04% when fruits were treated with the same methanol extracts respectively. The methanol Cistus extracts had sufficient antifungal activities in vitro and in vivo against G. citri-aurantii to consider its use in the citrus industry after it has been tested under production and natural infection conditions. Such natural products therefore represent a viable alternative approaches for sour rot postharvest management of citrus. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  10. Antimicrobial Effects of Silver Nanoparticles Synthesized by Fatsia japonica Leaf Extracts for Preservation of Citrus Fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Si, Guoguo; Zou, Jun; Fan, Ruiliang; Guo, Ailing; Wei, Xuetuan

    2017-08-01

    Due to their potent antimicrobial activity, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized by biomass might be promising in food preservation, whereas effects of AgNPs on Penicillium italicum-induced rot of Citrus fruits have not been investigated. In this study, a novel AgNPs biosynthesis method was developed based on Fatsia japonica leaf extracts. It was revealed that concentrations of leaf extracts, AgNO3 and NaCl affected AgNPs yields and particle sizes obviously. Under the optimized conditions (8 mg/mL extracts, 2 mM AgNO3 and 1 mM NaCl), AgNPs, synthesized within 80 min, showed potent preservative effect against P. italicum-induced rot of Citrus fruits. Furthermore, inhibition test and TEM analysis indicated that as-synthesized AgNPs caused cell deformation, cytoplasmic leakage, and thereupon cell death of P. italicum. Moreover, AgNPs had significant antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus, which might be beneficial for Citrus fruits preservation. Altogether this study develops an efficient AgNPs synthesis method and a novel preservation method for Citrus fruits. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  11. Citrus limon extract: possible inhibitory mechanisms affecting testicular functions and fertility in male mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nidhi; Singh, Shio Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The effect of oral administration of 50% ethanolic leaf extract of Citrus limon (500 and 1,000 mg/kg body weight/day) for 35 days on fertility and various male reproductive endpoints was evaluated in Parkes strain of mice. Testicular indices such as histology, 3β- and 17β-HSD enzymes activity, immunoblot expression of StAR and P450scc, and germ cell apoptosis by TUNEL and CASP- 3 expression were assessed. Motility, viability, and number of spermatozoa in the cauda epididymidis, level of serum testosterone, fertility indices, and toxicological parameters were also evaluated. Histologically, testes in extract-treated mice showed nonuniform degenerative changes in the seminiferous tubules. Treatment had adverse effects on steroidogenic markers in the testis and induced germ cell apoptosis. Significant reductions were noted in epididymal sperm parameters and serum level of testosterone in Citrus-treated mice compared to controls. Fertility of the extract-treated males was also suppressed, but libido remained unaffected. By 56 days of treatment withdrawal, alterations induced in the above parameters returned to control levels suggesting that Citrus treatment causes reversible suppression of spermatogenesis and fertility in Parkes mice. Suppression of spermatogenesis may result from germ cell apoptosis because of decreased production of testosterone. The present work indicated that Citrus leaves can affect male reproduction.

  12. Biotransformed citrus extract as a source of anti-inflammatory polyphenols: Effects in macrophages and adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Vânia Mayumi; Moala, Tais; Caria, Cintia Rabelo E Paiva; Moura, Carolina Soares; Amaya-Farfan, Jaime; Gambero, Alessandra; Macedo, Gabriela Alves; Macedo, Juliana Alves

    2017-07-01

    Chronic non-communicable diseases such as obesity are preceded by increased macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue and greater secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. We evaluated the anti-inflammatory potential of Biotransformed extract, and two control extracts: In Natura and Autoclaved. The assays were performed using a cellular model with RAW264.7, 3T3-L1 cells, and RAW264.7 and 3T3-L1 co-culture. The innovation of the study was the use of Biotransformed extract, a unique phenolic extract of a bioprocessed citrus residue. LPS stimulated RAW264.7 cells treated with the Biotransformed extract exhibited lower secretion of TNF-α and NO and lower protein expression of NFκB. In RAW264.7 and 3T3-L1 co-culture, treatment with 1.0mg/mL of the Biotransformed extract reduced secretion of TNF-α (30.7%) and IL-6 (43.4%). Still, the Biotransformed extract caused higher increase in adiponectin in relation to control extracts. When the co-culture received a LPS stimulus, the Autoclaved extract at 1.0mg/mL reduced IL-6 and TNF-α concentrations, and raised adiponectin. However, it was noteworthy that the Biotransformed extract was also able to significantly reduce IL-6 concentration while the Natural extract was not. The Biotransformed citrus extract evaluated in this study showed anti-inflammatory activity in macrophages and in co-culture, indicating that bioprocess of citrus residue can contribute to new product development with anti-inflammatory potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of microwave, ultrasound and accelerated-assisted solvent extraction for recovery of polyphenols from Citrus sinensis peels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Balunkeswar; Dahmoune, Farid; Moussi, Kamal; Remini, Hocine; Dairi, Sofiane; Aoun, Omar; Khodir, Madani

    2015-11-15

    Peel of Citrus sinensis contains significant amounts of bioactive polyphenols that could be used as ingredients for a number of value-added products with health benefits. Extraction of polyphenols from the peels was performed using a microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) technique. The effects of aqueous acetone concentration, microwave power, extraction time and solvent-to-solid ratio on the total phenolic content (TPC), total antioxidant activity (TAA) (using DPPH and ORAC-values) and individual phenolic acids (IPA) were investigated using a response surface method. The TPC, TAA and IPA of peel extracts using MAE was compared with conventional, ultrasound-assisted and accelerated solvent extraction. The maximum predicted TPC under the optimal MAE conditions (51% acetone concentration in water (v/v), 500 W microwave power, 122 s extraction time and 25 mL g(-1) solvent to solid ratio), was 12.20 mg GAE g(-1) DW. The TPC and TAA in MAE extracts were higher than the other three extracts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. In Vitro Lipophilic Antioxidant Capacity, Antidiabetic and Antibacterial Activity of Citrus Fruits Extracts from Aceh, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernawita

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study reports in vitro lipophilic antioxidant, inhibition of α-amylase and antibacterial activities of extracts of peel and pulp of citrus samples from Aceh, Indonesia. HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography, phytochemical, and FTIR (fourier transform infrared analysis detected carotenoids, flavonoids, phenolic acids and terpenoids, contributing to the biological potencies. Most peel and pulp extracts contained lutein and lower concentrations of zeaxanthin, α-carotene, β-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin. The extracts also contained flavanone glycosides (hesperidin, naringin and neohesperidin, flavonol (quercetin and polymethoxylated flavones (sinensetin, tangeretin. L-TEAC (lipophilic trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity test determined for peel extracts higher antioxidant capacity compared to pulp extracts. All extracts presented α-amylase inhibitory activity, pulp extracts showing stronger inhibitory activity compared to peel extracts. All extracts inhibited the growth of both gram (+ and gram (− bacteria, with peel and pulp extracts of makin showing the strongest inhibitory activity. Therefore, local citrus species from Aceh are potential sources of beneficial compounds with possible health preventive effects.

  15. In Vitro Lipophilic Antioxidant Capacity, Antidiabetic and Antibacterial Activity of Citrus Fruits Extracts from Aceh, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernawita; Wahyuono, Ruri Agung; Hesse, Jana; Hipler, Uta-Christina; Elsner, Peter; Böhm, Volker

    2017-02-03

    This study reports in vitro lipophilic antioxidant, inhibition of α-amylase and antibacterial activities of extracts of peel and pulp of citrus samples from Aceh, Indonesia. HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography), phytochemical, and FTIR (fourier transform infrared) analysis detected carotenoids, flavonoids, phenolic acids and terpenoids, contributing to the biological potencies. Most peel and pulp extracts contained lutein and lower concentrations of zeaxanthin, α-carotene, β-carotene and β-cryptoxanthin. The extracts also contained flavanone glycosides (hesperidin, naringin and neohesperidin), flavonol (quercetin) and polymethoxylated flavones (sinensetin, tangeretin). L-TEAC (lipophilic trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity) test determined for peel extracts higher antioxidant capacity compared to pulp extracts. All extracts presented α-amylase inhibitory activity, pulp extracts showing stronger inhibitory activity compared to peel extracts. All extracts inhibited the growth of both gram (+) and gram (-) bacteria, with peel and pulp extracts of makin showing the strongest inhibitory activity. Therefore, local citrus species from Aceh are potential sources of beneficial compounds with possible health preventive effects.

  16. In vitro antifungal activity of Citrus spp. leaves extracts against Stemphyllium solani Weber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianella Iglesias

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Tomato is a horticultural crop with high acceptance worldwide, which is affected for several pathogens in those who find Stemphyllium solani Weber, responsible for the gray leaf spot. The control of this disease is based on application of chemical fungicides, which increase production costs and cause pollution to the environment, so the search for methods of agroecological control is necessary, as is the use of plant extracts. The aim of this work was to determine the "in vitro" antifungal activity of Critus spp. extracts against S. solani. The extracts were obtained by ultrasonic assisted extraction and then the total phenols content was quantified. For each extract was established the minimal inhibitory concentration, and then was determined the percentage of inhibition of micelial growth and the percentage of inhibition of conidial germination. In all extracts were obtained concentrations of totals phenols highest than 36 mg equivalent to galic acid mL-1 of extracts. The ethanolic extract of Citrus aurantium var. sinensis (L. Osbeck showed the lowest minimum inhibitory concentration against S. solani. The tested extracts, except C. aurantium L. in ethanol, showed percentages of inhibition of mycelial growth of S. solani of 100 %. However, only the extracts of C. aurantium var. sinensis in ethanol and Citrus reticulata Blanco in methanol showed percentages of inhibition of conidial germination of 100 %, so they were selected as the most effective in the in vitro control of S. solani.

  17. Chemical Composition of Hexane Extract of Citrus aurantifolia and Anti- Mycobacterium tuberculosis Activity of Some of Its Constituents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    María del Rayo Camacho-Corona; Laura Alvarez; Abraham García; Elvira Garza-González; Elizabeth Elizondo-Treviño; Nallely E. Sandoval-Montemayor

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to isolate and characterize the active compounds from the hexane extract of the fruit peels of Citrus aurantiifolia , which showed activity against one sensitive and three monoresistant...

  18. Chemical composition of hexane extract of Citrus aurantifolia and anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of some of its constituents

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sandoval-Montemayor, Nallely E; García, Abraham; Elizondo-Treviño, Elizabeth; Garza-González, Elvira; Alvarez, Laura; del Rayo Camacho-Corona, María

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to isolate and characterize the active compounds from the hexane extract of the fruit peels of Citrus aurantiifolia, which showed activity against one sensitive and three monoresistant...

  19. High pressure extraction of phenolic compounds from citrus peels†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casquete, R.; Castro, S. M.; Villalobos, M. C.; Serradilla, M. J.; Queirós, R. P.; Saraiva, J. A.; Córdoba, M. G.; Teixeira, P.

    2014-10-01

    This study evaluated the effect of high pressure processing on the recovery of high added value compounds from citrus peels. Overall, the total phenolic content in orange peel was significantly (P < .05) higher than that in lemon peel, except when pressure treated at 500 MPa. However, lemon peel demonstrated more antioxidant activity than orange peel. Pressure-treated samples (300 MPa, 10 min; 500 MPa, 3 min) demonstrated higher phenolic content and antioxidant activity comparatively to the control samples. For more severe treatments (500 MPa, 10 min), the phenolic content and antioxidant activity decreased in both lemon and orange peels. This paper was presented at the 8th International Conference on High Pressure Bioscience & Biotechnology (HPBB 2014), in Nantes (France), 15-18 July 2014.

  20. Pectin extraction from Citron peel (Citrus medica Linn. and its use in food system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojanakorn, T.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Screening experiments using 25-1 fractional factorial design showed that pH, temperature, and extracting time were the main factors affecting the amount and quality of extracted pectin from Citrus medica Linn. Optimum condition of pectin extraction was studied using central composite design (CCD. Mathematical models relating pH, temperature and extracted time to amount of extracted pectin, equivalent weight, methyl content and anhydrogalacturonic acid content were established. Based on the mathematics models, the condition of pH 2, 100ºC and 105 min was found to be the optimum conditions for pectin extraction from Citrus medica Linn. Mathematical and experimental results were verified. The use of extracted pectin as a gelling agent in pineapple jam revealed no significant difference in gel consistency compared to that of commercial pectin grade 150 (p>0.05. However, the commercial pectin had a higher liking score on the spreadability, texture and overall liking. As a stabilizer in chocolate pasteurised milk, 0.2% of the extracted pectin was required to prevent precipitation of chocolate powder with the similar viscosity obtained from 0.06% κ-carageenan

  1. Short communication: Effect of a citrus extract in lactating dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Y; Niu, M; Clarke, A R; Harvatine, K J

    2017-07-01

    Dry matter intake is a main driver of energy balance in lactating dairy cows, and some plant extracts have been commercially fed to dairy cows to stimulate feed intake. Citrus extracts contain several bioactive components and have been shown to modify metabolism in other animal models. Our hypothesis was that a citrus extract would increase dry matter intake. Two experiments were conducted to determine the effect of a citrus extract on intake and milk production in lactating dairy cows. In experiment one, 11 early-lactation dairy cows (experiment 1; 77 ± 15 d in milk, mean ± standard deviation) were used in a switchback design, and in experiment two, 15 mid-lactation Holstein cows (experiment 2; 157 ± 44 d in milk, mean ± standard deviation) were used in a crossover design. In both experiments, treatments were control (no supplement) or a citrus extract (4 g/d in experiment 1 and 4.5 g/d in experiment 2). Treatment periods were 21 and 14 d in experiment 1 and experiment 2, respectively, with the final 7 d used for sample and data collection. No effect was observed for treatment on dry matter intake, feeding behavior, milk yield, milk fat yield, milk protein yield, or milk composition in either experiment. Treatment also had no effect on milk trans fatty acid profile, but the extract increased total 16 carbon fatty acids 0.9 and 0.6 percentage points in experiment 1 and experiment 2, respectively. Plasma nonesterified fatty acids were decreased 6 h after feeding in both experiments (11.1 and 16.0 μEq/L in experiment 1 and experiment 2, respectively). Plasma insulin was increased 1 h before feeding compared with the control in experiment 1 (3.36 vs. 2.13 µIU/mL) and tended to increase 1.79 units 1 h before feeding in experiment 2. The citrus extract had no effect on feed intake or milk production at the dose investigated, but changed plasma insulin and nonesterified fatty acids, indicating some metabolic effects requiring further investigation. Copyright

  2. Safety, Efficacy, and Mechanistic Studies Regarding Citrus aurantium (Bitter Orange) Extract and p‐Synephrine

    OpenAIRE

    Stohs, Sidney J.

    2017-01-01

    Citrus aurantium L. (bitter orange) extracts that contain p‐synephrine as the primary protoalkaloid are widely used for weight loss/weight management, sports performance, appetite control, energy, and mental focus and cognition. Questions have been raised about the safety of p‐synephrine because it has some structural similarity to ephedrine. This review focuses on current human, animal, in vitro, and mechanistic studies that address the safety, efficacy, and mechanisms of action of bitter or...

  3. The information extraction of Gannan citrus orchard based on the GF-1 remote sensing image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Chen, Y. L.

    2017-02-01

    The production of Gannan oranges is the largest in China, which occupied an important part in the world. The extraction of citrus orchard quickly and effectively has important significance for fruit pathogen defense, fruit production and industrial planning. The traditional spectra extraction method of citrus orchard based on pixel has a lower classification accuracy, difficult to avoid the “pepper phenomenon”. In the influence of noise, the phenomenon that different spectrums of objects have the same spectrum is graveness. Taking Xunwu County citrus fruit planting area of Ganzhou as the research object, aiming at the disadvantage of the lower accuracy of the traditional method based on image element classification method, a decision tree classification method based on object-oriented rule set is proposed. Firstly, multi-scale segmentation is performed on the GF-1 remote sensing image data of the study area. Subsequently the sample objects are selected for statistical analysis of spectral features and geometric features. Finally, combined with the concept of decision tree classification, a variety of empirical values of single band threshold, NDVI, band combination and object geometry characteristics are used hierarchically to execute the information extraction of the research area, and multi-scale segmentation and hierarchical decision tree classification is implemented. The classification results are verified with the confusion matrix, and the overall Kappa index is 87.91%.

  4. Citrus Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talon, Manuel; Gmitter Jr., Fred G.

    2008-01-01

    Citrus is one of the most widespread fruit crops globally, with great economic and health value. It is among the most difficult plants to improve through traditional breeding approaches. Currently, there is risk of devastation by diseases threatening to limit production and future availability to the human population. As technologies rapidly advance in genomic science, they are quickly adapted to address the biological challenges of the citrus plant system and the world's industries. The historical developments of linkage mapping, markers and breeding, EST projects, physical mapping, an international citrus genome sequencing project, and critical functional analysis are described. Despite the challenges of working with citrus, there has been substantial progress. Citrus researchers engaged in international collaborations provide optimism about future productivity and contributions to the benefit of citrus industries worldwide and to the human population who can rely on future widespread availability of this health-promoting and aesthetically pleasing fruit crop. PMID:18509486

  5. Bitter orange (Citrus aurantium L.) extract subchronic 90-day safety study in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Deshmukh, N.S.; Stohs, S.J.; Magar, C.C.; Kale, A.; Sowmya, B.

    2017-01-01

    Bitter orange (Citrus aurantium L.) extracts are widely used in dietary supplements and bitter oranges are used in various juices and food products. p-Synephrine, the primary active constituent, comprises approximately 90% of total protoalkaloids. This study, performed per OECD 408 guidance, examined the 90-day subchronic safety/toxicity of an extract standardized to 50% p-synephrine at doses of 100, 300 and 1000 mg/kg/day to male and female rats. No adverse effects were observed with respect...

  6. Antimicrobial activity of wax and hexane extracts from Citrus spp. peels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Johann

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Antibacterial and antifungal properties of wax and hexane extracts of Citrus spp. peels were tested using bioautographic and microdilution techniques against three plant pathogenic fungi (Penicillium digitatum, Curvularia sp., and Colletotrichum sp., two human pathogens (Trichophyton mentagrophytes and Microsporum canis, and two opportunistic bacteria (Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Two polymethoxylated flavonoids and a coumarin derivative, were isolated and identified from peel extracts, which presented antimicrobial activity especially against M. canis and T. mentagrophytes: 4',5,6,7,8-pentamethoxyflavone (tangeritin and 3',4',5,6,7,8-hexamethoxyflavone (nobiletin from C. reticulata; and 6,7-dimethoxycoumarin (also known as escoparone, scoparone or scoparin from C. limon.

  7. AND Citrus senensis PEEL EXTRACTS ON Aeromonas hydrophila ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    antibacterial effect against typhoid fever and diarrhoea due to Aeromonas hydrophila. A. comosus and C. senensis peels were extracted using percolation method and ethanol solvent. The antibacterial .... precipitate /turbidity produce immediately indicated ... potassium hydroxide till complete saponification takes place.

  8. Volatile aroma components and antioxidant activities of the flavedo peel extract of unripe Shiikuwasha (Citrus depressa Hayata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asikin, Yonathan; Taira, Ikuko; Inafuku, Sayuri; Sumi, Hidekazu; Sawamura, Masayoshi; Takara, Kensaku; Wada, Koji

    2012-04-01

    The flavedo peel extracts of unripe Shiikuwasha (Citrus depressa Hayata) fruits were extracted using steam distillation (SD) or a cold-press (CP) system. Volatile aroma content and composition were determined using gas chromatography (GC) and each compound was identified using gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry (GC-MS). The major constituents of the extracts were monoterpene hydrocarbons (91.75-93.75%[709.32-809.05 mg/100 g of fresh flavedo peel]) including limonene (43.08-45.13%[341.46-379.81 mg/100 g of fresh flavedo peel]), γ-terpinene (27.88-29.06%[219.90-245.86 mg/100 g of fresh flavedo peel]), and p-cymene (8.13-11.02%[61.47-97.22 mg/100 g of fresh flavedo peel]). The extraction process used was determined to be a decisive factor that affects the composition of key citrus aroma components, as well as the antioxidant activities of the Shiikuwasha fruit. Antioxidant capabilities of the extracts were examined by assay of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical-scavenging activity and β-carotene bleaching inhibition. The cold-press extraction system may better retain the total phenolic content of the flavedo peel and display superior antioxidant activities, compared to the steam distillation extraction method. Shiikuwasha (Citrus depressa Hayata) is a type of small citrus fruit, and has been used as raw material for beverage and food additive productions in Japan. It had a unique aroma composition in which the limonene content of its peels is lower than that of other commonly known citrus peels. The present study detailed the volatile aroma composition, as well as antioxidant capabilities of Shiikuwasha peel extracts of different extraction methods, that are cold-press and steam distillation methods. The results of this study may provide a basis for selection of Shiikuwasha peel extracts in food industry for citrus flavor production. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  9. Absence of furanocoumarins in Advantra Z® (Citrus aurantium, bitter orange) extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohs, Sidney J; Miller, Howard; Romano, Felice

    2014-09-01

    Grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) juice is known for its ability to alter drug metabolism through inhibition of the cytochrome P450-3A4 (CYP3A4) system, and result in drug-food interactions that may be life threatening. The primary active ingredients in grapefruit responsible for these effects are the furanocoumarins bergapten, bergamottin, and 6',7'-dihydroxybergamottin (DHB). Bergamottin and DHB appear to be the most important in terms of adverse drug interactions. Furanocoumarins are present in the juices and fruits of other Citrus species including C. aurantium (bitter oranges). Bergapten is the predominant furanocoumarin in bitter orange. Bitter orange extracts are widely used in products associated with weight loss, sports performance, and energy production. Questions have been raised about the potential of bitter orange extracts to cause drug interactions. This study examined the furanocoumarin content of four standardized bitter orange extracts (Advantra Z®) by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The results indicated that the total furanocoumarin content of each of the four extracts was less than 20 μg/g, amounts insufficient to exert significant effects on the metabolism of susceptible drugs in human subjects at the doses commonly used for these extracts.

  10. AND Citrus senensis PEEL EXTRACTS ON Aeromonas hydrophila ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    combined extracts was 0.25-12.50mg/ml while the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was. 0.50-50.00mg/ml. ... 2003). It is mainly due to innumerable side effects being observed ..... Preliminary Study of Synergistic Action of. Dodonea ...

  11. The antimicrobial activities of extracts of Sidium guajava and Citrus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lime) leaves were demonstrated in vitro against some Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. An ethanolic extract from C. aurantifolia exhibited mean zones of inhibition of l 4.2mm, 9.2mm, 8.5mm, 8.1 mm and 7 .2mm on Bacillus subtilis.

  12. the antimicrobial activities of extracts of sidium guajava and citrus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BSN

    store of empirical information concerning the therapeutic values of spices and local plants. Following this, several published reports described the effects of certain bioactive .... infections and fevers arising from the activities of these pathogens. The water extracts of both plants were completely inhibitory to Sal111011ella spp ...

  13. Antidiabetic and renoprotective effect of Fagonia cretica L. methanolic extract and Citrus paradise Macfad. juice in alloxan induced diabetic rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sairah H. Kamran

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Context: Fagonia cretica is a medicinal herb reported to have flavanoids of potential therapeutic value and Citrus paradisi is a fruit, whose juice is of great therapeutic value due to its anti-hyperglycemic effects. Aims: To determine anti-hyperglycemic and renal protective effect of methanolic extract of Fagonia cretica and Citrus paradisi juice (grapefruit juice in alloxan induced diabetic rabbits. Methods: Diabetes was induced in rabbits by alloxan monohydrate (150 mg/kg, i.p.. The therapies including Fagonia cretica methanolic extract (500 mg/kg, Citrus paradisi juice (7 mL/kg and sitagliptin (10 mg/kg were administered (p.o. to diabetic groups for 14 days. The biochemical parameters, glucose, creatinine, urea, bilirubin, albumin, total protein, globulins and albumin/globulin ratio were estimated. Results: Fagonia cretica extract and grapefruit juice therapy significantly (p<0.05 reduced glucose levels in diabetic rats. Fagonia cretica extract was more effective anti-hyperglycemic agent than Citrus paradisi juice and sitagliptin. Significant (p<0.05 improvement in kidney function was observed in treated groups, the plant extract showing significant improvement as compared to the other two treatments. The histopathological results verified improvement in structural damage of kidney, liver and pancreas with these treatments. Conclusions: Fagonica cretica and Citrus paradisi juice therapy markedly improved hyperglycemia and kidney functions in alloxan-induced diabetic rabbits.

  14. Use of Cistus aqueous extracts as botanical fungicides in the control of Citrus sour rot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, H; Boubaker, H; Askarne, L; Cherifi, K; Lakhtar, H; Msanda, F; Boudyach, E H; Ait Ben Aoumar, A

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo antifungal activity of aqueous extracts obtained from eight Cistus plant species against the development of Geotrichum citri-aurantii, the causal agent of citrus sour rot. The results demonstrate the in vitro effectiveness of all tested Cistus species aqueous extracts against G. citri-aurantii, the inhibition of mycelial growth ranged between 80 and 100%. Furthermore, Cistus aqueous extracts totally inhibited germination of G. citri-aurantii arthrospores at a concentration of 5 mg/mL. Among the plant species tested, C. laurifolius, C. salviifolius, C. monspeliensis, C. ladanifer and C. populifolius displayed the best fungistatic activity since the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was ladanifer and C. populifolius aqueous extracts, respectively. Using such these biopesticides in a replacement for synthetic fungicides or in combination with other established disease management practices could help control citrus postharvest decay in a more sustainable and eco-friendly way. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of citrus aurantium mesocarp extract on shelf life of rainbow trout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nekuie Fard

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antioxidants are used to increase the shelf life of the food. Vegetables and fruits are good sources of antioxidants including polyphenols, vitamin E and vitamin C. Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of citrus aurantium mesocarp extract on shelf life of rainbow trout. Methods: This experimental study was conducted at the Urmia University of Medical Science in 2014. Forty five rainbow trouts were divided into two groups including control group (packed in vacuum without extract and treatment group (immersed in a solution of 5% extract for 30 min and packed in vacuum and were stored in a refrigerator (4±1℃. Sensory and chemical properties including pH, peroxide value (PV, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N, thiobarbituric acid (TBA, and free fatty acids (FFA were measured at days zero, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21. Data were analyzed using Levene's test, Duncan, and ANOVA. Findings: PH, TVB-N, PV, TBA, and FFA in the treatment group were significantly lower than the control group. Conclusion: With regards to the results, it seems that the citrus aurantium mesocarp extract reduces the oxidation process and increases the shelf life of rainbow trout and can be an appropriate alternative for artificial preservatives.

  16. Assessing the efficacy of citrus aurantifolia extract on smear layer removal with scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhari, Behnam; Sharifian, Mohammad Reza; Aminsobhani, Mohsen; Monsef Esfehani, Hamid Reza; Tavakolian, Pardis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of citrus aurantifolia (CA) extract on smear layer removal in different parts of root canals. Thirty-nine single-rooted human teeth were randomly divided into three experimental (n=12) and one control (n=3) groups. Teeth were instrumented using MTwo rotary instruments. Root canals were irrigated with NaOCl during instrumentation. The canals in each group were irrigated with one of the following: completed mixture of citrus aurantifolia extracts, 17% EDTA, and alcoholic extract of CA. Distilled water was used for the control group. The irrigants were left within the canal for 20 minutes, and then rinsed with normal saline solution. Teeth were subsequently split longitudinally into 2 halves, and the canals were examined by a scanning electron-microscope. Cleanliness was evaluated using a five point scoring system. Statistical significant difference was found between groups (Pcitrus aurantifolia extracts were not able to effectively remove smear layer compared with 17% EDTA during root canal therapy.

  17. Evaluation of Pectin Extraction Conditions and Polyphenol Profile from Citrus x lantifolia Waste: Potential Application as Functional Ingredients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa del Rosario Ayora-Talavera

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The citrus by-products pectin and polyphenols were obtained from Citrus x lantifolia residues. The use of acid type, solute-solvent ratio, temperature, and extraction time on pectin yield recovery was evaluated using a factorial design 34; pectin physicochemical characterization, polyphenol profile, and antioxidant activity were also determined. Results indicated a total polyphenol content of 3.92 ± 0.06 mg Galic Acid Equivalents (GAE/g of citrus waste flour in dry basis (DB, with antioxidant activity of 74%. The presence of neohesperidin (0.96 ± 0.09 mg/g of citrus flour DB, hesperidin (0.27 ± 0.0 mg/g of citrus flour DB, and ellagic acid (0.18 ± 0.03 mg/g of citrus flour DB as major polyphenols was observed. All of the factors evaluated in pectin recovery presented significant effects (p < 0.05, nevertheless the acid type and solute-solvent ratio showed the greatest effect. The highest yield of pectin recovery (36% was obtained at 90 °C for 90 min, at a ratio of 1:80 (w/v using citric acid. The evaluation of pectin used as a food ingredient in cookies elaboration, resulted in a reduction of 10% of fat material without significant texture differences (p < 0.05. The pectin extraction conditions and characterization from these residues allowed us to determine the future applications of these materials for use in several commercial applications.

  18. Volatile and Nonvolatile Constituents and Antioxidant Capacity of Oleoresins in Three Taiwan Citrus Varieties as Determined by Supercritical Fluid Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Hung Chen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available As local varieties of citrus fruit in Taiwan, Ponkan (Citrus reticulata Blanco, Tankan (C. tankan Hayata, and Murcott (C. reticulate × C. sinensis face substantial competition on the market. In this study, we used carbon dioxide supercritical technology to extract oleoresin from the peels of the three citrus varieties, adding alcohol as a solvent assistant to enhance the extraction rate. The supercritical fluid extraction was fractionated with lower terpene compounds in order to improve the oxygenated amounts of the volatile resins. The contents of oleoresin from the three varieties of citrus peels were then analyzed with GC/MS in order to identify 33 volatile compounds. In addition, the analysis results indicated that the non-volatile oleoresin extracted from the samples contains polymethoxyflavones (86.2~259.5 mg/g, limonoids (111.7~406.2 mg/g, and phytosterols (686.1~1316.4 μg/g. The DPPH (1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, ABTS [2,2′-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid] scavenging and inhibition of lipid oxidation, which test the oleoresin from the three kinds of citrus, exhibited significant antioxidant capacity. The component polymethoxyflavones contributed the greatest share of the overall antioxidant capacity, while the limonoid and phytosterol components effectively coordinated with its effects.

  19. Costs and benefits of insecticide and foliar nutrient applications to huanglongbing-infected citrus trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansey, James A; Vanaclocha, Pilar; Monzo, Cesar; Jones, Moneen; Stansly, Philip A

    2017-05-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), vectors Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus, which causes huanglongbing (HLB). In Florida, HLB incidence is approaching 100% statewide. Yields have decreased and production costs have increased since 2005. Despite this, some growers are maintaining a level of production and attribute this in part to aggressive psyllid control and foliar nutrition sprays. However, the value of these practices is debated. A replicated field study was initiated in 2008 in a commercial block of 'Valencia' sweet orange trees to evaluate individual and combined effects of foliar nutrition and ACP control. Results from 2012-2016 are presented. Insecticides consistently reduced ACP populations. However, neither insecticide nor nutrition applications significantly influenced HLB incidence or PCR copy number in mature trees. In reset trees, infection continued to build and reached 100% in all treatments. Greatest yields (kg fruit ha-1 ) and production (kg solids ha-1 ) were obtained from trees receiving both insecticides and foliar nutrition. All treatments resulted in production and financial gains relative to controls. However, material and application costs associated with the nutrition component offset these gains, resulting in lesser benefits than insecticides applied alone. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  20. Phytochemical characterization and bioactivity of ethanolic extracts on eggs of citrus blackfly

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    Bruno Marcus Freire Vieira Lima

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The main objectives of this study were to determine the content of secondary metabolites (carotenoids, flavonoids, phenolic compounds, and tannins of Argemone mexicana L., Ipomoea carnea Jacq. subsp. Fistulosa (Martius ex Choisy, Amorimia rigida (A.Juss. W. R. Anderson, Ricinus communis L. and Syzygium aromaticum (L. Merr. & L. M. Perry using UV-VIS spectroscopy, and evaluating the bioactivity of the ethanolic extracts on citrus blackfly eggs (Aleurocanthus woglumi Ashby, 1915. Pera sweet orange leaves infested with citrus blackfly eggs were treated by immersion in 0.5, 1.0, 5.0, and 10%; each replicate consisted of 30 eggs. The experimental design was completely randomized, with seven treatments and four replications. Three immersions of leaves with eggs were performed, and the mortality was evaluated seven days after the procedure. Leaves were placed in Petri dishes and kept in incubators [25±1°C; relative humidity (RH 60±5% and 12 hours]. S. aromaticum peduncle presented high content of tannins and phenolic compounds, while R. communis leaves showed high content of phenolic compounds. The commercial product Bioneem© caused egg infeasibility greater than 85% at all concentrations. Treatments (10% that caused the greatest egg mortality were Bioneem© (94.74%, R. communis extract (81.58%, and the extract of S. aromaticum peduncle (80.57%.

  1. Antioxidant effects of Citrus aurantifolia (Christm juice and peel extract on LDL oxidation

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    Maryam Boshtam

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We studied the antioxidant effects of fresh juice and peel extract of Citrus aurantifolia (Christm. Methods: Low density lipoprotein (LDL was separated from one hypercholesterolemic human serum by modified Bronzert and Brewer procedure. Oxidation of LDL was measured at 234 nm against 0, 5, 10, 20, 25, 30 and 40 μl of fresh lime juice and 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 μl of peel polyphenolic extract solution in DMSO. Results: 5 μl of lime juice didn′t change LDL oxidation. 10 μl of juice inhibited LDL oxidation, and with increasing the juice concentration, LDL was oxidized faster. The higher concentrations of peel extract prevented LDL oxidation better than the lower ones. Conclusions: Both juice and peel demonstrated antioxidant properties, but the excessive consumption of lime juice seems not to be beneficial. Regarding the intensity and type of flavonoids, lime juice and peel may show different effects.

  2. Antioxidant effects of Citrus aurantifolia (Christm) juice and peel extract on LDL oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshtam, Maryam; Moshtaghian, Jamal; Naderi, Gholamali; Asgary, Seddigheh; Nayeri, Hashem

    2011-07-01

    We studied the antioxidant effects of fresh juice and peel extract of Citrus aurantifolia (Christm). Low density lipoprotein (LDL) was separated from one hypercholesterolemic human serum by modified Bronzert and Brewer procedure. Oxidation of LDL was measured at 234 nm against 0, 5, 10, 20, 25, 30 and 40 μl of fresh lime juice and 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 μl of peel polyphenolic extract solution in DMSO. 5 μl of lime juice didn't change LDL oxidation. 10 μl of juice inhibited LDL oxidation, and with increasing the juice concentration, LDL was oxidized faster. The higher concentrations of peel extract prevented LDL oxidation better than the lower ones. Both juice and peel demonstrated antioxidant properties, but the excessive consumption of lime juice seems not to be beneficial. Regarding the intensity and type of flavonoids, lime juice and peel may show different effects.

  3. Bitter orange (Citrus aurantium L. extract subchronic 90-day safety study in rats

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    N.S. Deshmukh

    Full Text Available Bitter orange (Citrus aurantium L. extracts are widely used in dietary supplements and bitter oranges are used in various juices and food products. p-Synephrine, the primary active constituent, comprises approximately 90% of total protoalkaloids. This study, performed per OECD 408 guidance, examined the 90-day subchronic safety/toxicity of an extract standardized to 50% p-synephrine at doses of 100, 300 and 1000 mg/kg/day to male and female rats. No adverse effects were observed with respect to any of the observed parameters of clinical signs, functional observations of sensory reactivity, grip strength and motor activity, ophthalmology, body weights, hematology, food consumption, urinalysis, organ weights, as well as gross and microscopic pathology at termination at any of the doses in either sex. Treatment at 1000 mg/kg body weight/day of the extract resulted in non-adverse effects including fully reversible signs of repetitive head burrowing in the bedding material and piloerection for short periods of time in both sexes immediately after administration, which gradually disappeared by treatment day-81. A slight and reversible elevation of BUN and urea levels in male rats, and slight to mild increase in the relative but not absolute heart weights of male and female rats was observed. Based on these results, the no-observed-effect-level (NOEL for this bitter orange extract standardized to 50% p-synephrine was 300 mg/kg, while the no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL was 1000 mg/kg. The results indicate a high degree of safety for this bitter orange extract. Keywords: Citrus aurantium, Bitter orange, p-Synephrine, Subchronic toxicity, No-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL, No-observed-effect-level (NOEL

  4. Safety and toxicological evaluation of a novel Citrus sudachi extract powder

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    Yasuhiro Shikishima

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Citrus sudachi, an evergreen tree primarily found in the prefecture of Tokushima, Japan, is a widely used popular citrus fruit used in cooking and consumed as a juice. Citrus sudachi peels are rich in flavonoids including sudachitin (5,7,4’-trihydroxy- 6,8,3’- trimethoxyflavone, and exhibit potent antioxidant, antimicrobial and anti-diabetic properties; additionally, several limonoids and their glucosides are found in its seeds. We examined the broad spectrum safety of a novel light yellow to golden yellow Citrus sudachi Extract Powder (CSEP, organic, nutritive from the dried fruit rind (25:1 herbs to extract ratio containing no less than 1% sudachitin in various toxicology models in GLP-approved laboratories. Methods: The acute oral toxicity study was conducted in female Sprague-Dawley rats with an up and down procedure. The single dose acute dermal LD 50 of CSEP was assessed in both male and female rats. The primary skin irritation toxicity of CSEP was assessed in female New Zealand Albino rabbits in order to determine the potential for CSEP to produce irritation after a single topical application, while primary eye irritation index of CSEP was conducted in female New Zealand Albino rabbits. Ames’ bacterial reverse mutation assay was conducted to determine the ability of CSEP to induce reverse mutation at selected histidine loci in five tester strains of Salmonella typhimurium viz. TA1535, TA97a, TA98, TA100, and TA102 in the presence and absence of a metabolic activation system (S9 at the doses of 5000, 1500, 500, 150 and 50 mg/plate. The mutagenic potential of CSEP was also evaluated in an in vitro mammalian cell gene mutation test using the thymidine kinase gene of L5178 Tk+/- 3.7.2C mouse lymphoma cell line. Results: The acute oral LD 50 of CSEP was found to be greater than 5000 mg/kg body weight. The single dose acute dermal LD 50 of CSEP was found to be greater than 2000 mg/kg body weight in both male and female rats

  5. Preparation, Characterization, and Biological Activities of Topical Anti-Aging Ingredients in a Citrus junos Callus Extract

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    Deepak Adhikari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we prepared and characterized a callus extract from Citrus junos and assessed its utility as a source of topical anti-aging ingredients. Callus extract was produced by aqueous extraction from Citrus junos grown on Murashige and Skoog medium with picloram as a growth regulator. After measuring the total phenolic and flavonoid contents, the major phenolic compound in calli was identified as p-hydroxycinnamoylmalic acid (1 by spectroscopic analysis. The total phenol content in the extract was determined to be 24.50 ± 0.43 mg/g of gallic acid equivalents; however, the total flavonoid content of the extract was not determined. The biological activities of the callus extract, in terms of skin anti-aging, were assessed by measuring the anti-tyrosinase activity in, and melanogenesis by, melanoma cells; and proliferation of, and procollagen synthesis by, human fibroblasts. The callus extract was incorporated into nanoliposomes (NLs to improve its percutaneous absorption. Addition of the callus extract resulted in a 1.85-fold decrease in the melanin content of melanocytes compared with that with arbutin. The extract (500 μg/mL significantly promoted the proliferation of, and procollagen synthesis by, fibroblasts (by 154% and 176%, respectively. In addition, the flux through the human epidermis of Citrus junos callus extract incorporated into NLs was 17.67-fold higher than that of the callus extract alone. These findings suggest that Citrus junos callus extract-loaded NLs have promise as an anti-aging cosmetic, as well as having a skin-lightening effect.

  6. Preparation, Characterization, and Biological Activities of Topical Anti-Aging Ingredients in a Citrus junos Callus Extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Deepak; Panthi, Vijay Kumar; Pangeni, Rudra; Kim, Hyun Jung; Park, Jin Woo

    2017-12-11

    In this study, we prepared and characterized a callus extract from Citrus junos and assessed its utility as a source of topical anti-aging ingredients. Callus extract was produced by aqueous extraction from Citrus junos grown on Murashige and Skoog medium with picloram as a growth regulator. After measuring the total phenolic and flavonoid contents, the major phenolic compound in calli was identified as p-hydroxycinnamoylmalic acid (1) by spectroscopic analysis. The total phenol content in the extract was determined to be 24.50 ± 0.43 mg/g of gallic acid equivalents; however, the total flavonoid content of the extract was not determined. The biological activities of the callus extract, in terms of skin anti-aging, were assessed by measuring the anti-tyrosinase activity in, and melanogenesis by, melanoma cells; and proliferation of, and procollagen synthesis by, human fibroblasts. The callus extract was incorporated into nanoliposomes (NLs) to improve its percutaneous absorption. Addition of the callus extract resulted in a 1.85-fold decrease in the melanin content of melanocytes compared with that with arbutin. The extract (500 μg/mL) significantly promoted the proliferation of, and procollagen synthesis by, fibroblasts (by 154% and 176%, respectively). In addition, the flux through the human epidermis of Citrus junos callus extract incorporated into NLs was 17.67-fold higher than that of the callus extract alone. These findings suggest that Citrus junos callus extract-loaded NLs have promise as an anti-aging cosmetic, as well as having a skin-lightening effect.

  7. Citrus fruit extracts reduce advanced glycation end products (AGEs)- and H₂O₂-induced oxidative stress in human adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramful, Deena; Tarnus, Evelyne; Rondeau, Philippe; Da Silva, Christine Robert; Bahorun, Theeshan; Bourdon, Emmanuel

    2010-10-27

    Diabetes is a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated pathology, with a worldwide prevalence estimated to double by 2030. A major effort has been launched to find therapeutic means to improve health conditions of diabetic patients. Recent data show that supplemental natural antioxidants represent a potential strategy as adjunct therapy. Despite the major role of adipocytes in the etiology of diabetes, little is known about the effect of natural antioxidants on adipocyte response to oxidative stress. Using a diabetes-like oxidative stress model, the potential protective effect of antioxidative flavedo, albedo, and pulp extracts of (1) tangor Elendale (Citrus reticulata × Citrus sinensis) and (2) tangelo Minneola (C. reticulata × Citrus paradisis) was investigated on human adipocytes. Besides the retardation of free-radical-induced hemolysis of human erythrocytes, non-cytotoxic concentrations of tangelo and tangor flavedo extracts significantly reduced the levels of protein carbonyls in response to advanced glycation end products (AGEs) generated by albumin glycation in SW872 cells. Flavedo extracts lowered carbonyl accumulation in H2O2-treated adipocytes, while tangelo and tangor flavedo, albedo, and pulp extracts suppressed ROS production in SW872 cells with or without the addition of H2O2. Our results clearly show that Mauritian Citrus fruit extracts represent an important source of antioxidants, with a novel antioxidative role at the adipose tissue level.

  8. In vitro antimicrobial status of methanolic extract of Citrus sinensis Linn. fruit peel

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    Anju Dhiman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : The present investigation evaluated the antimicrobial potential of methanolic extract of Citrus sinensis Linn. (Rutaceae fruit peel. There is a basis for the traditional use of this plant for local health remedies. Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial activity of methanolic extract of C. sinensis fruit peel was tested against three bacterial and two fungal strains. Turbidimetric or tube dilution method and paper disc diffusion method were followed. Results are expressed as mean ± standard deviation. Results: The C. sinensis fruit peel methanolic extract exhibited antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli with minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.78 μg/ ml and minimum bactericidal concentration of 6.25 μg/ml, and appreciable antifungal activity with minimum inhibitory concentration of 12.5 μg/ml. The phytochemistry of C. sinensis fruit peel methanolic extract revealed the presence of carbohydrates (reducing sugars, hexose sugars, non-reducing polysaccharides, gums, and mucilages, flavonoid glycosides, coumarin glycosides, volatile oils, organic acids, fats and fixed oils. Conclusion: Most of the organic chemical constituents reported are aromatic phenolic compounds, which are known for their wide spectra of antimicrobial activity. Therefore, the bacteriostatic and fungistatic action of the tested extract may be attributed to the presence of polyphenolic compounds. In short, C. sinensis fruit peel methanolic extract is a potential source of natural antimicrobials.

  9. Enhanced production of triterpenoid in submerged cultures of Antrodia cinnamomea with the addition of citrus peel extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Te-Wei; Lai, Yueting; Yang, Fan-Chiang

    2014-11-01

    In recent years, Antrodia cinnamomea has become a well-known medicinal mushroom in Taiwan. Triterpenoids are considered one of the most biologically active components found in A. cinnamomea. The aim of this research is to investigate the feasibility of enhancing triterpenoid production in shake flask cultures of A. cinnamomea by adding citrus peel extract. As a result of its containing essential oils, citrus peel extract is inhibitory to mycelial growth. In the experiments, the appropriate adding time is determined to be on day 7. Of the various citrus peel extracts tested, tangerine proves to be the most effective in enhancing polyphenol and triterpenoid production. With an addition of 2% (v/v), the content and production of total polyphenols rises from 5.95 mg/g DW of the control and 56.73 mg/L to 23.52 mg/g DW and 224.39 mg/L, respectively, on day 28. The production of triterpenoids also increases from 99.93 to 1,028.02 mg/L, for more than a tenfold increase. An optimal level of tangerine peel additive is determined to be around 4%. Furthermore, when compared with the mycelia of the control culture, the profiles of the HPLC analysis show that the mycelia cultured with the tangerine-peel addition contain more kinds of triterpenoids. This study demonstrates that the addition of citrus peel extract effectively enhances the production of bioactive metabolites in the submerged cultures of A. cinnamomea.

  10. In-vitro evaluation of bioactive compounds, anti-oxidant, lipid peroxidation and lipoxygenase inhibitory potential of Citrus karna L. peel extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jagdeep; Sood, Shailja; Muthuraman, Arunachalam

    2014-01-01

    Many medicinal plants have been studied for their antioxidant and their pharmacological activity. Citrus species were well documented as potential antioxidant based therapy for cancer, inflammation, heart disease. Citrus seeds and peels have been shown to possess high antioxidant activity. Therefore, the present study to explore the antioxidant and lipid peroxidation & lipoxygenase inhibitory action of Citrus karna peel extracts were undertaken. Extraction was performed with different solvents of increasing polarity and yield was calculated. Peel extracts were also analyzed for the presence of phenols, flavonoids, vitamin C, and carotenoids. Then the Citrus karna peel extracts were evaluated for the antioxidant and lipid peroxidation & lipoxygenase inhibitory action In-Vitro. In further, the quantification of hesperidin and naringin was carried out by HPLC-DAD method. The results indicated the presence of phenols, flavonoids, vitamin C, carotenoids, hesperidin and naringin in Citrus karna peel extracts with maximum yield of (3.91% w/w). Citrus karna peel extracts were also found to have potential antioxidant and lipid peroxidation & lipoxygenase inhibitory action. Therefore, Citrus karna peel extracts could be used for the future therapeutic medicine due to presence of potential bioactive compounds.

  11. Safety, Efficacy, and Mechanistic Studies Regarding Citrus aurantium (Bitter Orange) Extract and p-Synephrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohs, Sidney J

    2017-10-01

    Citrus aurantium L. (bitter orange) extracts that contain p-synephrine as the primary protoalkaloid are widely used for weight loss/weight management, sports performance, appetite control, energy, and mental focus and cognition. Questions have been raised about the safety of p-synephrine because it has some structural similarity to ephedrine. This review focuses on current human, animal, in vitro, and mechanistic studies that address the safety, efficacy, and mechanisms of action of bitter orange extracts and p-synephrine. Numerous studies have been conducted with respect to p-synephrine and bitter orange extract because ephedra and ephedrine were banned from use in dietary supplements in 2004. Approximately 30 human studies indicate that p-synephrine and bitter orange extracts do not result in cardiovascular effects and do not act as stimulants at commonly used doses. Mechanistic studies suggest that p-synephrine exerts its effects through multiple actions, which are discussed. Because p-synephrine exhibits greater adrenergic receptor binding in rodents than humans, data from animals cannot be directly extrapolated to humans. This review, as well as several other assessments published in recent years, has concluded that bitter orange extract and p-synephrine are safe for use in dietary supplements and foods at the commonly used doses. Copyright © 2017 The Authors Phytotherapy Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Copyright © 2017 The Authors Phytotherapy Research Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Effect of sample pretreatment on the extraction of lemon (Citrus limon) components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-Escobar, Carlos A; Priego-Capote, Feliciano; Luque de Castro, María D

    2016-06-01

    A study on the key role of lemon sample pretreatment on the analytical results is here presented. The objective of the study was to analyze the differences between extracts obtained from lyophilized and air-dried samples-the most common sample pretreatment in citrus studies-in comparison to extracts from fresh samples. All the extracts were obtained with ultrasound assistance and analyzed by LC-QTOF MS/MS. The dataset, constituted by 74 tentative identified metabolites, was first evaluated by ANOVA, which showed significant differences in the concentration of 44 out of 74 metabolites (p≤0.01). Also, the pairwise mean comparison (Tukey HSD; p≤0.01) revealed that the concentration of metabolites in the extracts from fresh and air-dried samples was quite similar and differed from that in lyophilized samples. On the other hand, application of principal component analysis (PCA) showed a clear discrimination between pretreatments, explaining 86.20% of the total variability. The results of this study suggest that the main differences between extracts could be attributed to the effect of freezing or heating on metabolic pathways, and not only to thermolability of the compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Extraction and quantification of polyphenols from kinnow (Citrus reticulate L. peel using ultrasound and maceration techniques

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    Muhammad N. Safdar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available An investigation was carried out to extract polyphenols from the peel of kinnow (Citrus reticulate L. by maceration and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE techniques. The antioxidant potential of these polyphenols was evaluated using ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH, and superoxide radical scavenging assays; and their antimicrobial activity was assessed against bacterial strains Staphyloccoccus aureus, Bacillus cereus, and Salmonella typhimurium. The highest extraction yield was obtained through the solvent ethanol at 80% concentration level, whereas UAE was a more efficient technique and yielded comparatively higher polyphenol contents than maceration. Maximum polyphenols were extracted with 80% methanol [32.48 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE/g extract] using UAE, whereas minimum phenolics (8.64 mg GAE/g extract were obtained with 80% ethyl acetate through the maceration technique. Elevated antioxidant activity of kinnow peel extracts was exhibited in three antioxidant assays, where 80% methanolic extracts showed the highest antioxidant activity (27.67±1.11mM/100 g for FRAP and the highest scavenging activity, 72.83±0.65% and 64.80±0.91% for DPPH and superoxide anion radical assays, respectively. Strong correlations between total polyphenols and antioxidant activity were recorded. Eleven phenolic compounds—including five phenolic acids and six flavonoids—were identified and quantified by high performance liquid chromatography. Ferulic acid and hesperidin were the most abundant compounds whereas caffeic acid was the least abundant phenolic compound in kinnow peel extracts. Maximum inhibition zone was recorded against S. aureus (16.00±0.58 mm whereas minimum inhibition zone was noted against S. typhimurium (9.00±1.16 mm. It was concluded that kinnow mandarin peels, being a potential source of phenolic compounds with antioxidant and antimicrobial properties, may be used as an ingredient for

  14. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using citrus sinensis peel extract and its antibacterial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviya, S; Santhanalakshmi, J; Viswanathan, B; Muthumary, J; Srinivasan, K

    2011-08-01

    Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) was achieved by a novel, simple green chemistry procedure using citrus sinensis peel extract as a reducing and a capping agent. The effect of temperature on the synthesis of silver nanoparticles was carried out at room temperature (25°C) and 60°C. The successful formation of silver nanoparticles has been confirmed by UV-vis, FTIR, XRD, EDAX, FESEM and TEM analysis and their antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (gram-negative), and Staphylococcus aureus (gram-positive) has been studied. The results suggest that the synthesized AgNPs act as an effective antibacterial agent. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Effect of Consumption of Citrus Fruit and Olive Leaf Extract on Lipid Metabolism

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    Nicola Merola

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Citrus fruit and olive leaves are a source of bioactive compounds such as biophenols which have been shown to ameliorate obesity-related conditions through their anti-hyperlipidemic and anti-inflammatory effect, and by regulating lipoproteins and cholesterol body levels. Citrolive™ is a commercial extract which is obtained from the combination of both citrus fruit and olive leaf extracts; hence, it is hypothesised that Citrolive™ may moderate metabolic disorders that are related to obesity and their complications. Initially, an in vitro study of the inhibition of pancreatic lipase activity was made, however, no effect was found. Both preliminary and long-term evaluations of Citrolive™ on lipid metabolism were conducted in an animal model using Wistar rats. In the preliminary in vivo screening, Citrolive™ was tested on postprandial plasma triglyceride level after the administration of an oil emulsion, and a significant reduction in postprandial triacylglycerol (TAG levels was observed. In the long-term study, Citrolive™ was administered for 60 days on Wistar rats that were fed a high-fat diet. During the study, several associated lipid metabolism indicators were analysed in blood and faeces. At the end of the experiment, the livers were removed and weighed for group comparison. Citrolive™ treatment significantly reduced the liver-to-body-weight ratio, as supported by reduced plasma transaminases compared with control, but insignificantly reduced plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL and postprandial TAG plasma levels. In addition, faecal analysis showed that the treatment significantly increased total cholesterol excretion. On the other hand, no effect was found on faecal TAG and pancreatic lipase in vitro. In conclusion, treatment ameliorates liver inflammation symptoms that are worsened by the effects of high fat diet.

  16. The Effect of Consumption of Citrus Fruit and Olive Leaf Extract on Lipid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merola, Nicola; Castillo, Julián; Benavente-García, Obdulio; Ros, Gaspar; Nieto, Gema

    2017-09-26

    Citrus fruit and olive leaves are a source of bioactive compounds such as biophenols which have been shown to ameliorate obesity-related conditions through their anti-hyperlipidemic and anti-inflammatory effect, and by regulating lipoproteins and cholesterol body levels. Citrolive™ is a commercial extract which is obtained from the combination of both citrus fruit and olive leaf extracts; hence, it is hypothesised that Citrolive™ may moderate metabolic disorders that are related to obesity and their complications. Initially, an in vitro study of the inhibition of pancreatic lipase activity was made, however, no effect was found. Both preliminary and long-term evaluations of Citrolive™ on lipid metabolism were conducted in an animal model using Wistar rats. In the preliminary in vivo screening, Citrolive™ was tested on postprandial plasma triglyceride level after the administration of an oil emulsion, and a significant reduction in postprandial triacylglycerol (TAG) levels was observed. In the long-term study, Citrolive™ was administered for 60 days on Wistar rats that were fed a high-fat diet. During the study, several associated lipid metabolism indicators were analysed in blood and faeces. At the end of the experiment, the livers were removed and weighed for group comparison. Citrolive™ treatment significantly reduced the liver-to-body-weight ratio, as supported by reduced plasma transaminases compared with control, but insignificantly reduced plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) and postprandial TAG plasma levels. In addition, faecal analysis showed that the treatment significantly increased total cholesterol excretion. On the other hand, no effect was found on faecal TAG and pancreatic lipase in vitro. In conclusion, treatment ameliorates liver inflammation symptoms that are worsened by the effects of high fat diet.

  17. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activities of Citrus limon, Citrus reticulata, and Citrus grandis Against Pathogenic Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Sholeh Saeb; Mansour Amin; Reza Seyfi Gooybari; Nasrin Aghel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Microorganisms resistant to most antibiotics are rapidly spreading, and there is an urgent and continuous need for novel antimicrobial compounds. The genus Citrus belongs to the family Rutaceae has many biologically active secondary metabolites. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial activity of essential oil and extract of Lemon (Citrus limon), Mandarin (Citrus reticulata) and Pummelo (Citrus grandis) again...

  18. Inotropic effect of Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck leaf extracts on the guinea pig atrium

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    Oliveira E.D.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present investigation was to determine the contractile effect of crude and acetone leaf extracts of Citrus sinensis (L. Osb. on mammalian myocardium. Crude leaf extracts have been used in folk medicine to treat neurological disorders. Some flavonoids isolated from this plant presented a positive inotropic effect on myocardium. This motivated us to test the extracts on the atria of guinea pigs of both sexes (300-500 g and surprisingly we observed inotropic depression instead of an increase in force. The maximum effect of the crude extract was 79.4 ± 8.1% of the control force amplitude (N = 5 hearts, 10 trials, 27 ± 0.1ºC, stimulus: 2 Hz, 400 V, 0.5 ms. The EC50 for crude, ethanol, acetic, aqueous, and acetone extracts was 300, 300, 600, 1000, and 140 µg/ml, respectively, with a Hill constant of 1.8, 2.0, 2.5, 2.0, and 1.4, respectively. Blockade of cholinergic, beta-adrenergic, or opioid membrane receptors with 1.5 µM atropine sulfate, 1 µM propranolol, and 10 µM naloxone, respectively, did not change the effect of the crude extract. The acetone extract abolished the Bowditch positive staircase phenomenon (N = 5 hearts, 10 trials, 27 ± 0.1ºC, suggesting a possible reduction of the calcium inward current, and also promoted the so-called Woodworth phenomenon. The effect was concentration-dependent and indicated the existence of another inhibitory contractile mechanism such as the simultaneous activation of some of the membrane potassium channels reducing the myocardial action potential duration and further decreasing the cellular calcium entry.

  19. Antimicrobial activities of essential oils and crude extracts from tropical Citrus spp. against food-related microorganisms

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    Tipparat Hongpattarakere

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Ethyl acetate extracts and hydrodistillated-essential oils from peels of Citrus spp. were investigated for their antimicrobial activities against food related microorganisms by broth microdilution assay. Overall, ethyl acetate extracts from all citrus peels showed stronger antimicrobial activities than their essential oils obtained from hydrodistillation. The ethyl acetate extract of kaffir lime (Citrus hystrix DC. peel showed broad spectrum of inhibition against all Gram-positive bacteria, yeast and molds including Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. sake and Aspergillus fumigatus TISTR 3180. It exhibited minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC values of 0.28 and 0.56 mg/ml against Sac. cerevisiae var. sake and B. cereus, respectively while the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC values against both microbes were 0.56 mg/ml. The MIC values of the extract against L. monocytogenes, A. fumigatus TISTR 3180 and S. aureus were 1.13 mg/ml while the MBC values against L. monocytogenes as well as A. fumigatus TISTR 3180 and S. aureus were 2.25 and 1.13 mg/ml, respectively. The major components of the ethyl acetate extract from kaffir lime were limonene (31.64 %, citronellal (25.96 % and b-pinene (6.83 % whereas b-pinene (30.48 %, sabinene (22.75 % and citronellal (15.66 % appeared to be major compounds of the essential oil obtained from hydrodistillation.

  20. Citrus peel extract and powder attenuate hypercholesterolemia and hyperglycemia using rodent experimental modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humaira Ashraf

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: Conclusively, inclusion of citrus peel bioflavonoids in dietary therapies is a promising strategy to modulate lipidemic and glycemic attributes without imparting any deleterious effect on hematological parameters.

  1. Bitter orange (Citrus aurantiumL.) extract subchronic 90-day safety study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, N S; Stohs, S J; Magar, C C; Kale, A; Sowmya, B

    2017-01-01

    Bitter orange ( Citrus aurantium L.) extracts are widely used in dietary supplements and bitter oranges are used in various juices and food products. p -Synephrine, the primary active constituent, comprises approximately 90% of total protoalkaloids. This study, performed per OECD 408 guidance, examined the 90-day subchronic safety/toxicity of an extract standardized to 50% p -synephrine at doses of 100, 300 and 1000 mg/kg/day to male and female rats. No adverse effects were observed with respect to any of the observed parameters of clinical signs, functional observations of sensory reactivity, grip strength and motor activity, ophthalmology, body weights, hematology, food consumption, urinalysis, organ weights, as well as gross and microscopic pathology at termination at any of the doses in either sex. Treatment at 1000 mg/kg body weight/day of the extract resulted in non-adverse effects including fully reversible signs of repetitive head burrowing in the bedding material and piloerection for short periods of time in both sexes immediately after administration, which gradually disappeared by treatment day-81. A slight and reversible elevation of BUN and urea levels in male rats, and slight to mild increase in the relative but not absolute heart weights of male and female rats was observed. Based on these results, the no-observed-effect-level (NOEL) for this bitter orange extract standardized to 50% p -synephrine was 300 mg/kg, while the no-observed-adverse-effect-level (NOAEL) was 1000 mg/kg. The results indicate a high degree of safety for this bitter orange extract.

  2. Extraction and quantification of polyphenols from kinnow (Citrus reticulate L.) peel using ultrasound and maceration techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safdar, Muhammad N; Kausar, Tusneem; Jabbar, Saqib; Mumtaz, Amer; Ahad, Karam; Saddozai, Ambreen A

    2017-07-01

    An investigation was carried out to extract polyphenols from the peel of kinnow (Citrus reticulate L.) by maceration and ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) techniques. The antioxidant potential of these polyphenols was evaluated using ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), and superoxide radical scavenging assays; and their antimicrobial activity was assessed against bacterial strains Staphyloccoccus aureus, Bacillus cereus, and Salmonella typhimurium. The highest extraction yield was obtained through the solvent ethanol at 80% concentration level, whereas UAE was a more efficient technique and yielded comparatively higher polyphenol contents than maceration. Maximum polyphenols were extracted with 80% methanol [32.48 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g extract] using UAE, whereas minimum phenolics (8.64 mg GAE/g extract) were obtained with 80% ethyl acetate through the maceration technique. Elevated antioxidant activity of kinnow peel extracts was exhibited in three antioxidant assays, where 80% methanolic extracts showed the highest antioxidant activity (27.67±1.11mM/100 g for FRAP) and the highest scavenging activity, 72.83±0.65% and 64.80±0.91% for DPPH and superoxide anion radical assays, respectively. Strong correlations between total polyphenols and antioxidant activity were recorded. Eleven phenolic compounds-including five phenolic acids and six flavonoids-were identified and quantified by high performance liquid chromatography. Ferulic acid and hesperidin were the most abundant compounds whereas caffeic acid was the least abundant phenolic compound in kinnow peel extracts. Maximum inhibition zone was recorded against S. aureus (16.00±0.58 mm) whereas minimum inhibition zone was noted against S. typhimurium (9.00±1.16 mm). It was concluded that kinnow mandarin peels, being a potential source of phenolic compounds with antioxidant and antimicrobial properties, may be used as an ingredient for the

  3. Beneficial effect of Citrus limon peel aqueous methanol extract on experimentally induced urolithic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Badrinathan; Michael, Shiju T; Arya, Ramachandran; Mohana Roopan, Selvaraj; Ganesh, Rajesh N; Viswanathan, Pragasam

    2016-01-01

    Citrus limon (L.) Burm.f. (Rutaceace) is a commonly available fruit variety with high medicinal and industrial values. Lemon peel (LP) extract was studied as a potent preventive and curative agent for experimentally induced hyperoxaluric rats. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses and toxicity study were performed for aqueous methanol LP extract. Twenty-four Wistar rats were segregated into four groups. Group 1: Control; Group 2: Urolithic (ethylene glycol (EG) - 0.75%); Group 3: Preventive study (EG + LP extract administration from 0th to 7th week); Group 4: Curative study (EG + LP extract administration from 4th to 7th week). Animals received LP extract daily by oral administration (100 mg/kg body weight) for 7 weeks. GC-MS analyses revealed that compound 6 was abundant in the LP extract (32%) followed by compound 1 (∼21%). The LD50 value of LP extract was found to be >5000 mg/kg of body weight. Urolithic rats showed significantly higher urinary calcium and oxalate (4.47 ± 0.44 and 18.86 ± 0.55 mg/24 h, respectively) excretion compared with control and experimental rats. Renal function parameters like urea (84 ± 8.5 and 96.1 ± 3.6 mg/dL), creatinine (1.92 ± 0.27 and 1.52 ± 0.22 mg/dL), and urinary protein (2.03 ± 0.02 and 2.13 ± 0.16 mg/24 h) were also reduced by LP extract (p < 0.001) and corroborated with tissue analyses (SOD, catalase, and MDA levels) and histological studies in normal and experimental animals. Immunohistochemical staining of THP and NF-κB in urolithic animals showed elevated expression than the control, while LP extract suppressed the expression of these proteins. In conclusion, lemon peel is effective in curing kidney stone disease and also can be used to prevent the disease and its recurrence.

  4. Corn (Zea mays growth in petroleum contaminated soil, remediated with orange (Citrus sinensis peel extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Darío Marín Veláquez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil pollution has a strong impact when oil activity takes place within a savanna ecosystem. Any oil spill affects agricultural soils. Biostimulation with orange peel extract (Citrus sinensis is an alternative for remediation of soil contaminated with crude oil and in this research the corn plant (Zea mays was used as a biomarker of contamination level of a savanna soil after their treatment. Three samples of savannah soil contaminated with oil light crude were treated with dissolutions 1, 3 and 5% of extract of orange peel in water at a dose of 150 mL per kg of soil treated. The content of oils and fats was measured every 7 days, up to 42 days. Corn seeds were planted in soil samples, their growth was measured every 5 days for a period of 35 consecutive days, comparing their growth with seeds planted in a soil sample without contamination. According to an analysis of rank contrast, the plant growth was statistically the same in all samples up to 20 days; from there, evident differences regarding the pattern were shown.

  5. Antidiarrheal activity of hexane extract of Citrus limon peel in an experimental animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniyi, Olasupo Stephen; Omale, James; Omeje, Samuel Chukwuma; Edino, Victoria Ojimaojo

    2017-03-01

    Acute diarrhea is one of the major illnesses that cause death in children, despite clinical interventions and the use of oral rehydration therapy. Thus, there is need to discover other effective, affordable and accessible treatments for this disease. Therefore, this study was carried out to investigate the effects of hexane extract of Citrus limon peel (HECLP) on castor oil-induced diarrhea in rats. Diarrhea was induced in male albino Wistar rats weighing 100-150 g. The antidiarrheal activity of HECLP at different oral dosages (5, 10 and 20 mg/kg) was investigated by counting the number of wet fecal pellets. Animals were further treated with propranolol, prazosin, nifedipine and atropine to assess the effects of receptor blockers on the activities of the extract. The effects of HECLP on castor oil-induced enteropooling and the intestinal transit time of activated charcoal were also evaluated. Each of the 3 doses of C. limon significantly reduced (P limon peel possesses antidiarrheal effects through antisecretory and antimotility mechanisms that act through the β adrenergic system.

  6. A Review of the Human Clinical Studies Involving Citrus aurantium (Bitter Orange) Extract and its Primary Protoalkaloid p-Synephrine

    OpenAIRE

    Stohs, Sidney J.; Preuss, Harry G.; Shara, Mohd

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes the published as well as unpublished human studies involving Citrus aurantium (bitter orange) extract and its primary protoalkaloid p-synephrine, providing information and an assessment of the safety and efficacy of these widely used products. The results of over 20 studies involving a total of approximately 360 subjects that consumed p-synephrine alone or in combination with other ingredients are reviewed and critiqued. Over 50 % of the subjects involved in these studi...

  7. Accelerated extraction of pectin from orange citrus albedo using focused microwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    After removal of soluble sugars and other compounds by washing, citrus peel is largely composed of pectin, cellulose and hemicellulose. In order to utilize the greatest amount of citrus peel product, it would appear reasonable that one or all three of these polysaccharides be converted to a useful p...

  8. Preventive Effects of Citrus unshiu Peel Extracts on Bone and Lipid Metabolism in OVX Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wook Lim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dried Citrus unshiu peel has been widely used for various medicinal purposes in Oriental Medicine. This study evaluated the metabolic effects of dried C. unshiu peel in ovariectomized (OVX rats. The OVX rats were divided into five groups treated with distilled water, 17β-estradiol (E2 10 μg/kg, once daily, i.p. and dried C. unshiu peel extracts (DCPE 30, 100 and 300 mg/kg, once daily, p.o. for eight weeks. The treatments with high-dose DCPE significantly decreased the bone mineral density (BMD loss in the femur, which was reflected by the decrease in alkaline phosphatase (ALP, telopeptides of collagen type I (CTx and osteocalcin (OC serum levels. It also inhibited the increase in lipoprotein levels compared to the OVX-control group without elevating the serum levels of estradiol, aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alanine transaminase (ALT. Furthermore, DCPE exhibits a hepatoprotective effect in OVX-induced hepatic steatosis, indicated by reduced hepatic lipid contents. Taken together, our findings suggest that DCPE has the potential to improve both lipid and bone metabolism without influencing hormones such as estrogen in OVX rats.

  9. Imidacloprid Extraction from Citrus Leaves and Analysis by Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva, Jorge A; Nkedi-Kizza, Peter; Borejsza-Wysocki, Wlodzimierz S; Bauder, Victor S; Morgan, Kelly T

    2016-05-01

    A procedure was developed to extract Imidacloprid (IMD) from newly-flushed and fully-expanded citrus leaves. The extraction was conducted in a bullet blender, using a small sample mass (0.5 g of fresh tissue), stainless-steel beads (24 g), and methanol as extractant (10 mL). The extracts did not require further clean-up before analysis by HPLC-MS/MS. The method was validated with control samples from IMD-untreated Hamlin orange trees. The method limit of detection and limit of quantitation were 0.04 and 0.12 μg g(-1), respectively. IMD recoveries from fortified leaf tissue were between 92 % and 102 %, with relative standard deviations of <8 %. The method was further evaluated by extracting leaves from Hamlin orange trees treated with IMD. The treated trees showed maximum concentrations of 10.8 and 21.8 µg g(-1), observed at 20 days after applying two soil-drenching rates (0.51 and 1.02 kg IMD ha(-1)), respectively. This extraction technique will generate useful data on IMD plant uptake, foliar concentration, and correlations with Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) mortality or control. The method could be used to generate baseline data to improve IMD soil-drenching applications as the main management practice to control the ACP.

  10. Evaluation of the Inhibition of Carbohydrate Hydrolyzing Enzymes, the Antioxidant Activity, and the Polyphenolic Content of Citrus limetta Peel Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Padilla-Camberos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus is one of the most frequent causes of death in Mexico, characterized by chronic hyperglycemia. One alternative strategy for this metabolic abnormality is inhibiting the enzymes responsible for the metabolism of carbohydrates. We evaluated whether the aqueous Citrus limetta peel extract could inhibit the metabolism of carbohydrates. We found that this extract inhibited primarily the enzyme α-amylase by 49.6% at a concentration of 20 mg/mL and to a lesser extent the enzyme α-glucosidase with an inhibition of 28.2% at the same concentration. This inhibition is likely due to the high polyphenol content in the Citrus limetta peel (19.1 mg GAE/g. Antioxidant activity of the Citrus limetta peel demonstrated dose-dependent antioxidant activity, varying from 6.5% at 1.125 mg/mL to 42.5% at 20 mg/mL. The study of these polyphenolic compounds having both antihyperglycemic and antioxidant activities may provide a new approach to the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  11. Potencial antioxidante de extratos de sementes de limão (Citrus limon Antioxidant potential of lemon seed extracts (Citrus limon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Maria Moreno Luzia

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como principais objetivos avaliar o comportamento do óleo de soja acrescido de extratos de sementes de limão (Citrus limon, em diferentes concentrações, por meio da estabilidade oxidativa e medir a atividade antioxidante através do método do radical livre DPPH e compostos fenólicos totais. A concentração de 2.400 mg.kg-1 para o extrato de sementes de limão, variedade galego, foi a que conferiu melhor estabilidade oxidativa ao óleo de soja. As atividades antioxidantes máximas e os valores da concentração de extrato natural suficientes para obter 50% do efeito máximo, estimado em 100% (EC50, determinados pelo DPPH para o extrato e ácido gálico foram 70,58%, 69,94 μg.mL-1 e 75,07%, 64,73 μg.mL-1, respectivamente. A concentração de compostos fenólicos totais, determinada pelo método de Folin-Ciocalteu foi de 76 mg.g-1. Foi possível concluir que o extrato de sementes de limão galego possui ação antioxidante natural, podendo ser aplicado em alimentos.The present study aimed at evaluating the behavior of the soybean oil with the addition of lemon seed extracts (Citrus limon, in different concentrations, through oxidative stability and also at measuring the antioxidant activity using the DPPH free radical method and total phenolic compounds. The concentration of 2,400 mg.kg-1 for the lemon seed extract, galego variety, was the one that provided the soybean oil with the best oxidative stability. The maximum antioxidant activities and the concentration values of the natural extract sufficient to obtain 50% of maximum effect, estimated at 100% (EC50, determined by DPPH for the extract and gallic acid were 70.58%, 69.94 μg.mL-1 and 75.07%, 64.73 μg.mL-1, respectively. The concentration of total phenolic compounds, determined by the Folin-Ciocalteu method, was of 76 mg.g-1. Thus, it can be said that the lemon seed extract, galego, presents natural antioxidant action demonstrating potential to be used in

  12. A 60day double-blind, placebo-controlled safety study involving Citrus aurantium (bitter orange) extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaats, Gilbert R; Miller, Howard; Preuss, Harry G; Stohs, Sidney J

    2013-05-01

    Bitter orange (Citrus aurantium) extract and its primary protoalkaloid p-synephrine are widely consumed in dietary supplements for weight management and sports performance. p-Synephrine is also present in foods derived from a variety of Citrus species. Bitter orange extract is commonly used in combination with multiple herbal ingredients. Most clinical studies conducted on bitter orange extract alone have involved single doses. The purpose of this study was to assess the safety of bitter orange extract (approximately 49mg p-synephrine) alone or in combination with naringin and hesperidin twice daily given to 25 healthy subjects per group for 60days in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled protocol. No significant changes occurred in systolic or diastolic blood pressures, blood chemistries or blood cell counts in control or p-synephrine treated groups. Small, clinically insignificant differences in heart rates were observed between the p-synephrine plus naringin and hesperidin group and the p-synephrine alone as well as the placebo group. No adverse effects were reported in the three groups. Bitter orange extract and p-synephrine appear to be without adverse effects at a dose of up to 98mg daily for 60days based on the parameters measured. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Extraction of Pectin From Cui Lemon (Citrus Microcarpa) and Its Application in Pineapple Jam

    OpenAIRE

    Rompas, Veckie Frankie; Mamuaja, Christine F; Suryanto, Edi

    2016-01-01

    Cui lemon (Citrus microcarpa Bunge) is a type of small citrus variety that is widely available in North Sulawesi. It is very popular as a preservative and deodorizing agent of fishy odor in fish products, and it is used in traditional chilly sauce "Dabu-Dabu" with a very distinctive aroma arouse your appetite. Lemon cui contains vitamin C and phenolic compounds. Lemon is an important economic value and is rich in antioxidant phytochemicals particularly high content of vitamin C. The objective...

  14. Concentrations of p-synephrine in fruits and leaves of Citrus species (Rutaceae) and the acute toxicity testing of Citrus aurantium extract and p-synephrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbo, M D; Larentis, E R; Linck, V M; Aboy, A L; Pimentel, A L; Henriques, A T; Dallegrave, E; Garcia, S C; Leal, M B; Limberger, R P

    2008-08-01

    Dietary supplements containing bitter orange unripe fruit extract/p-synephrine are consumed worldwide for lose weight. This study were conducted to determine the concentration of p-synephrine in unripe fruits and leaves from Citrus aurantium Lin, C. sinensis Osbeck, C. deliciosa Ten, C. limon Burm and C. limonia Osbeck, collected in Southern Brazil, and to evaluate the acute toxicity of C. aurantium extract and p-synephrine. A high performance liquid chromatographic method with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) was optimized and validated for determination of p-synephrine. The results indicate that all of analyzed samples present p-synephrine in amounts that range from 0.012% to 0.099% in the unripe fruits and 0.029 to 0.438% in the leaves. Acute oral administration of C. aurantium extracts (2.5% p-synephrine, 300-5,000 mg/kg) in mice produced reduction of locomotor activity, p-synephrine (150-2,000 mg/kg) produced piloerection, gasping, salivation, exophtalmia and reduction in locomotor activity, which was confirmed in spontaneous locomotor activity test. All the effects were reversible and persisted for 3-4h. The toxic effects observed seem to be related with adrenergic stimulation and should alert for possible side effects of p-synephrine and C. aurantium.

  15. Citrus fruits as a treasure trove of active natural metabolites that potentially provide benefits for human health

    OpenAIRE

    Lv, Xinmiao; Zhao, Siyu; Ning, Zhangchi; Zeng, Honglian; Shu, Yisong; Tao, Ou; Xiao, Cheng; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Yuanyan

    2015-01-01

    Citrus fruits, which are cultivated worldwide, have been recognized as some of the most high-consumption fruits in terms of energy, nutrients and health supplements. What is more, a number of these fruits have been used as traditional medicinal herbs to cure diseases in several Asian countries. Numerous studies have focused on Citrus secondary metabolites as well as bioactivities and have been intended to develop new chemotherapeutic or complementary medicine in recent decades. Citrus-derived...

  16. Extraction process optimization of polyphenols from Indian Citrus sinensis - as novel antiglycative agents in the management of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakthi Deve, Asaithambi; Sathish Kumar, Thiyagarajan; Kumaresan, Kuppamuthu; Rapheal, Vinohar Stephen

    2014-01-07

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder characterized by increased blood glucose level. It has become an epidemic disease in the 21st century where, India leads the world with largest number of diabetic subjects. Non-enzymatic glycosylation (glycation) is severe form of diabetes, occurs between reducing sugar and proteins which results in the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that leads to the other complicated secondary disorders. In this context, Mangifera indica (Mango), Syzygium cumini (Jambul), Vitis vinifera (Grapes), Citrus sinensis (Orange), Artocarpus heterophyllus (Jackfruit), Manilkara zapota (Sapodilla) seeds were evaluated for their antiglyation activity. Attempts were made to isolate the polyphenols in the seeds that have recorded the maximum activity. Different extraction methods (shake flask, centrifugation and pressurized hot water) using various extractants (organic solvents, hot water and pressurized hot water) were adopted to investigate the in vitro antiglycation activity. Central composite (CCD) design based Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was espoused to optimize the extraction process of polyphenols from the fruit seeds that have recorded poor antiglycation activity. The PTLC analysis was performed to isolate the polyphenols (Flavonoids and phenolic acids) and LC-PDA-MS analysis was done for structure prediction. Pressurized hot water extraction of Artocarpus heterophyllus (87.52%) and Citrus sinensis seeds (74.79%) was found to possess high and low antiglycation activity, respectively. The RSM mediated optimization process adopted for the Citrus sinensis seeds have revealed that 1:15 solvent ratio (hexane to heptane), 6 minutes and 1:20 solid to liquid ratio as the optimal conditions for the extraction of polyphenols with a maximum antiglycation activity (89.79%). The LC-PDA-MS analysis of preparative thin layer chromatography (PTLC) eluates of Artocarpus heterophyllus seed has showed the presence of compounds

  17. Extraction process optimization of polyphenols from Indian Citrus sinensis – as novel antiglycative agents in the management of diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Diabetes mellitus is a chronic metabolic disorder characterized by increased blood glucose level. It has become an epidemic disease in the 21st century where, India leads the world with largest number of diabetic subjects. Non-enzymatic glycosylation (glycation) is severe form of diabetes, occurs between reducing sugar and proteins which results in the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) that leads to the other complicated secondary disorders. In this context, Mangifera indica (Mango), Syzygium cumini (Jambul), Vitis vinifera (Grapes), Citrus sinensis (Orange), Artocarpus heterophyllus (Jackfruit), Manilkara zapota (Sapodilla) seeds were evaluated for their antiglyation activity. Attempts were made to isolate the polyphenols in the seeds that have recorded the maximum activity. Methods Different extraction methods (shake flask, centrifugation and pressurized hot water) using various extractants (organic solvents, hot water and pressurized hot water) were adopted to investigate the in vitro antiglycation activity. Central composite (CCD) design based Response Surface Methodology (RSM) was espoused to optimize the extraction process of polyphenols from the fruit seeds that have recorded poor antiglycation activity. The PTLC analysis was performed to isolate the polyphenols (Flavonoids and phenolic acids) and LC-PDA-MS analysis was done for structure prediction. Results Pressurized hot water extraction of Artocarpus heterophyllus (87.52%) and Citrus sinensis seeds (74.79%) was found to possess high and low antiglycation activity, respectively. The RSM mediated optimization process adopted for the Citrus sinensis seeds have revealed that 1:15 solvent ratio (hexane to heptane), 6 minutes and 1:20 solid to liquid ratio as the optimal conditions for the extraction of polyphenols with a maximum antiglycation activity (89.79%). The LC-PDA-MS analysis of preparative thin layer chromatography (PTLC) eluates of Artocarpus heterophyllus seed has

  18. Comparative Study of the Effect of Sample Pretreatment and Extraction on the Determination of Flavonoids from Lemon (Citrus limon)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-Escobar, Carlos A.; Priego-Capote, Feliciano; Luque de Castro, María D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Flavonoids have shown to exert multiple beneficial effects on human health, being also appreciated by both food and pharmaceutical industries. Citrus fruits are a key source of flavonoids, thus promoting studies to obtain them. Characteristics of these studies are the discrepancies among sample pretreatments and among extraction methods, and also the scant number of comparative studies developed so far. Objective Evaluate the effect of both the sample pretreatment and the extraction method on the profile of flavonoids isolated from lemon. Results Extracts from fresh, lyophilized and air-dried samples obtained by shaking extraction (SE), ultrasound-assisted extraction (USAE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and superheated liquid extraction (SHLE) were analyzed by LC–QTOF MS/MS, and 32 flavonoids were tentatively identified using MS/MS information. ANOVA applied to the data from fresh and dehydrated samples and from extraction by the different methods revealed that 26 and 32 flavonoids, respectively, were significant (p≤0.01). The pairwise comparison (Tukey HSD; p≤0.01) showed that lyophilized samples are more different from fresh samples than from air-dried samples; also, principal component analysis (PCA) showed a clear discrimination among sample pretreatment strategies and suggested that such differences are mainly created by the abundance of major flavonoids. On the other hand, pairwise comparison of extraction methods revealed that USAE and MAE provided quite similar extracts, being SHLE extracts different from the other two. In this case, PCA showed a clear discrimination among extraction methods, and their position in the scores plot suggests a lower abundance of flavonoids in the extracts from SHLE. In the two PCA the loadings plots revealed a trend to forming groups according to flavonoid aglycones. Conclusions The present study shows clear discrimination caused by both sample pretreatments and extraction methods. Under the studied

  19. Comparative Study of the Effect of Sample Pretreatment and Extraction on the Determination of Flavonoids from Lemon (Citrus limon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma-Escobar, Carlos A; Priego-Capote, Feliciano; Luque de Castro, María D

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoids have shown to exert multiple beneficial effects on human health, being also appreciated by both food and pharmaceutical industries. Citrus fruits are a key source of flavonoids, thus promoting studies to obtain them. Characteristics of these studies are the discrepancies among sample pretreatments and among extraction methods, and also the scant number of comparative studies developed so far. Evaluate the effect of both the sample pretreatment and the extraction method on the profile of flavonoids isolated from lemon. Extracts from fresh, lyophilized and air-dried samples obtained by shaking extraction (SE), ultrasound-assisted extraction (USAE), microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) and superheated liquid extraction (SHLE) were analyzed by LC-QTOF MS/MS, and 32 flavonoids were tentatively identified using MS/MS information. ANOVA applied to the data from fresh and dehydrated samples and from extraction by the different methods revealed that 26 and 32 flavonoids, respectively, were significant (p≤0.01). The pairwise comparison (Tukey HSD; p≤0.01) showed that lyophilized samples are more different from fresh samples than from air-dried samples; also, principal component analysis (PCA) showed a clear discrimination among sample pretreatment strategies and suggested that such differences are mainly created by the abundance of major flavonoids. On the other hand, pairwise comparison of extraction methods revealed that USAE and MAE provided quite similar extracts, being SHLE extracts different from the other two. In this case, PCA showed a clear discrimination among extraction methods, and their position in the scores plot suggests a lower abundance of flavonoids in the extracts from SHLE. In the two PCA the loadings plots revealed a trend to forming groups according to flavonoid aglycones. The present study shows clear discrimination caused by both sample pretreatments and extraction methods. Under the studied conditions, liophilization provides extracts

  20. Comparative Study of the Effect of Sample Pretreatment and Extraction on the Determination of Flavonoids from Lemon (Citrus limon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A Ledesma-Escobar

    Full Text Available Flavonoids have shown to exert multiple beneficial effects on human health, being also appreciated by both food and pharmaceutical industries. Citrus fruits are a key source of flavonoids, thus promoting studies to obtain them. Characteristics of these studies are the discrepancies among sample pretreatments and among extraction methods, and also the scant number of comparative studies developed so far.Evaluate the effect of both the sample pretreatment and the extraction method on the profile of flavonoids isolated from lemon.Extracts from fresh, lyophilized and air-dried samples obtained by shaking extraction (SE, ultrasound-assisted extraction (USAE, microwave-assisted extraction (MAE and superheated liquid extraction (SHLE were analyzed by LC-QTOF MS/MS, and 32 flavonoids were tentatively identified using MS/MS information. ANOVA applied to the data from fresh and dehydrated samples and from extraction by the different methods revealed that 26 and 32 flavonoids, respectively, were significant (p≤0.01. The pairwise comparison (Tukey HSD; p≤0.01 showed that lyophilized samples are more different from fresh samples than from air-dried samples; also, principal component analysis (PCA showed a clear discrimination among sample pretreatment strategies and suggested that such differences are mainly created by the abundance of major flavonoids. On the other hand, pairwise comparison of extraction methods revealed that USAE and MAE provided quite similar extracts, being SHLE extracts different from the other two. In this case, PCA showed a clear discrimination among extraction methods, and their position in the scores plot suggests a lower abundance of flavonoids in the extracts from SHLE. In the two PCA the loadings plots revealed a trend to forming groups according to flavonoid aglycones.The present study shows clear discrimination caused by both sample pretreatments and extraction methods. Under the studied conditions, liophilization provides

  1. Citrus fruits as a treasure trove of active natural metabolites that potentially provide benefits for human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xinmiao; Zhao, Siyu; Ning, Zhangchi; Zeng, Honglian; Shu, Yisong; Tao, Ou; Xiao, Cheng; Lu, Cheng; Liu, Yuanyan

    2015-01-01

    Citrus fruits, which are cultivated worldwide, have been recognized as some of the most high-consumption fruits in terms of energy, nutrients and health supplements. What is more, a number of these fruits have been used as traditional medicinal herbs to cure diseases in several Asian countries. Numerous studies have focused on Citrus secondary metabolites as well as bioactivities and have been intended to develop new chemotherapeutic or complementary medicine in recent decades. Citrus-derived secondary metabolites, including flavonoids, alkaloids, limonoids, coumarins, carotenoids, phenolic acids and essential oils, are of vital importance to human health due to their active properties. These characteristics include anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, as well as cardiovascular protective effects, neuroprotective effects, etc. This review summarizes the global distribution and taxonomy, numerous secondary metabolites and bioactivities of Citrus fruits to provide a reference for further study. Flavonoids as characteristic bioactive metabolites in Citrus fruits are mainly introduced.

  2. GC-MS analysis of headspace and liquid extracts for metabolomic differentiation of citrus Huanglongbing and zinc deficiency in leaves of 'Valencia' sweet orange from commercial groves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevallos-Cevallos, Juan Manuel; García-Torres, Rosalía; Etxeberria, Edgardo; Reyes-De-Corcuera, José Ignacio

    2011-01-01

    Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB) is considered the most destructive citrus disease worldwide. Symptoms-based detection of HLB is difficult due to similarities with zinc deficiency. To find metabolic differences between leaves from HLB-infected, zinc-deficient, and healthy 'Valencia' orange trees by using GC-MS based metabolomics. Analysis based on GC-MS methods for untargeted metabolite analysis of citrus leaves was developed and optimized. Sample extracts from healthy, zinc deficient, or HLB-infected sweet orange leaves were submitted to headspace solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) and derivatization treatments prior to GC-MS analysis. Principal components analysis achieved correct classification of all the derivatized liquid extracts. Analysis of variance revealed 6 possible biomarkers for HLB, of which 5 were identified as proline, β-elemene, (-)trans- caryophyllene, and α-humulene. Significant (P HLB biomarkers for rapid differentiation of HLB from zinc deficiency. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Effect of an active packaging with citrus extract on lipid oxidation and sensory quality of cooked turkey meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contini, Claudia; Álvarez, Rocío; O'Sullivan, Michael; Dowling, Denis P; Gargan, Sean Óg; Monahan, Frank J

    2014-03-01

    An antioxidant active packaging was prepared by coating a citrus extract, consisting of a mixture of carboxylic acids and flavanones, on polyethylene terephthalate trays. The effect of the packaging in reducing lipid oxidation in cooked turkey meat and on meat pH, colour characteristics and sensorial parameters was investigated. An untrained sensory panel evaluated the odour, taste, tenderness, juiciness and overall acceptability of the meat, using triangle, paired preference and quantitative response scale tests. A comparison between the antioxidant effects of the different components of the extract was also carried out. The packaging led to a significant reduction in lipid oxidation. After 2 days of refrigerated storage the sensory panel detected differences in odour and, after 4 days, rated the meat stored in the active packaging higher for tenderness and overall acceptability. Citric acid appeared to be the most important component of the extract with regard to its antioxidant potency. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. In vitro α-amylase inhibitory activity and in vivo hypoglycemic effect of methanol extract of Citrus macroptera Montr. fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Nizam; Hasan, Md Rakib; Hossain, Md Monir; Sarker, Arjyabrata; Hasan, A H M Nazmul; Islam, A F M Mahmudul; Chowdhury, Mohd Motaher H; Rana, Md Sohel

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effects of methanol extract of Citrus macroptera Montr.fruit in α-amylase inhibitory activity (in vitro) and hypoglycemic activity in normal and glucose induced hyperglycemic rats (in vivo). Fruits of Citrus macroptera without rind was extracted with pure methanol following cold extraction and tested for presence of phytochemical constituents, α-amylase inhibitory activity, and hypoglycemic effect in normal rats and glucose induced hyperglycemic rats. Presence of saponin, steroid and terpenoid were identified in the extract. The results showed that fruit extract had moderate α-amylase inhibitory activity [IC50 value=(3.638±0.190) mg/mL] as compared to acarbose. Moreover at 500 mg/kg and 1 000 mg/kg doses fruit extract significantly (P<0.05 and P<0.01 respectively) reduced fasting blood glucose level in normal rats as compared to glibenclamide (5 mg/kg). In oral glucose tolerance test, 500 mg/kg dose significantly reduced blood glucose level (P<0.05) at 2 h but 1 000 mg/kg dose significantly reduced blood glucose level at 2 h and 3 h (P<0.05 and P<0.01 respectively) whereas glibenclamide (5 mg/kg) significantly reduced glucose level at every hour after administration. Overall time effect is also considered extremely significant with F value=23.83 and P value=0.0001 in oral glucose tolerance test. These findings suggest that the plant may be a potential source for the development of new oral hypoglycemic agent.

  5. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction of Flavonoids from Pomelo (Citrus grandis (L.) Osbeck) Peel and Their Antioxidant Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jin-Zhe; Shao, Ping; Liu, Jian-Hua; Ru, Qiao-Mei

    2012-01-01

    Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2) extraction of flavonoids from pomelo (Citrus grandis (L.) Osbeck) peel and their antioxidant activity were investigated. Box-Behnken design combined with response surface methodology was employed to maximize the extraction yield of flavonoids. Correlation analysis of the mathematical-regression model indicated that a quadratic polynomial model could be used to optimize the SC-CO2 extraction of flavonoids. The optimal conditions for obtaining the highest extraction yield of flavonoids from pomelo peel were a temperature of 80 °C, a pressure of 39 MPa and a static extraction time of 49 min in the presence of 85% ethanol as modifier. Under these conditions, the experimental yield was 2.37%, which matched positively with the value predicted by the model. Furthermore, flavonoids obtained by SC-CO2 extraction showed a higher scavenging activity on hydroxyl, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) radicals than those obtained by conventional solvent extraction (CSE). Therefore, SC-CO2 extraction can be considered as a suitable technique for the obtainment of flavonoids from pomelo peel. PMID:23202938

  6. Potential of Moringa oleifera root and Citrus sinensis fruit rind extracts in the treatment of ulcerative colitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholap, Prashant A; Nirmal, Sunil A; Pattan, Shashikant R; Pal, Subodh C; Mandal, Subhash C

    2012-10-01

    The plant Moringa oleifera Lam (Moringaceae), commonly known as the drumstick tree, is an indigenous species in India. This species has been of interest to researchers because traditionally its roots are reported in the treatment of ulcerative colitis (UC). Traditionally it is reported that Citrus sinensis Linn (Rutaceae) fruit rind when combined with M. oleifera will increase the efficacy of the plant in the treatment of UC. The present work was undertaken to determine the effectiveness of M. oleifera root alone and in combination with C. sinensis fruit rind in the treatment of UC. Ethanol and aqueous extracts of M. oleifera roots (100 and 200 mg/kg, body weight) were screened alone and in equal combination with ethanol extract of C. sinensis fruit rind, i.e., 50 mg/kg each of C. sinensis and M. oleifera for their activity on acetic acid-induced UC in mice. Treatment with combination of extracts of M. oleifera root and C. sinensis fruit rind (50 mg/kg, each) showed less ulceration and hyperemia than individual extract (200 mg/kg) in histopathological observation. Acetic acid increased myeloperoxidase (MPO) level in blood and colon tissue to 342 U/mL and 384 U/mg, respectively. Combination of ethanol extract of M. oleifera root with C. sinensis fruit rind extract significantly (poleifera root extracts with C. sinensis fruit rind extract is effective in the treatment of UC and results are comparable with the standard drug prednisolone.

  7. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction of Flavonoids from Pomelo (Citrus grandis (L. Osbeck Peel and Their Antioxidant Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao-Mei Ru

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO2 extraction of flavonoids from pomelo (Citrus grandis (L. Osbeck peel and their antioxidant activity were investigated. Box-Behnken design combined with response surface methodology was employed to maximize the extraction yield of flavonoids. Correlation analysis of the mathematical-regression model indicated that a quadratic polynomial model could be used to optimize the SC-CO2 extraction of flavonoids. The optimal conditions for obtaining the highest extraction yield of flavonoids from pomelo peel were a temperature of 80 °C, a pressure of 39 MPa and a static extraction time of 49 min in the presence of 85% ethanol as modifier. Under these conditions, the experimental yield was 2.37%, which matched positively with the value predicted by the model. Furthermore, flavonoids obtained by SC-CO2 extraction showed a higher scavenging activity on hydroxyl, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS radicals than those obtained by conventional solvent extraction (CSE. Therefore, SC-CO2 extraction can be considered as a suitable technique for the obtainment of flavonoids from pomelo peel.

  8. Reduction of Legionella spp. in Water and in Soil by a Citrus Plant Extract Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzbach, Elena; Score, Jodie; Tejpal, Jyoti; Chi Tangyie, George; Phillips, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a severe form of pneumonia caused by Legionella spp., organisms often isolated from environmental sources, including soil and water. Legionella spp. are capable of replicating intracellularly within free-living protozoa, and once this has occurred, Legionella is particularly resistant to disinfectants. Citrus essential oil (EO) vapors are effective antimicrobials against a range of microorganisms, with reductions of 5 log cells ml−1 on a variety of surfaces. The aim of this investigation was to assess the efficacy of a citrus EO vapor against Legionella spp. in water and in soil systems. Reductions of viable cells of Legionella pneumophila, Legionella longbeachae, Legionella bozemanii, and an intra-amoebal culture of Legionella pneumophila (water system only) were assessed in soil and in water after exposure to a citrus EO vapor at concentrations ranging from 3.75 mg/liter air to 15g/liter air. Antimicrobial efficacy via different delivery systems (passive and active sintering of the vapor) was determined in water, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the antimicrobial components (linalool, citral, and β-pinene) was conducted. There was up to a 5-log cells ml−1 reduction in Legionella spp. in soil after exposure to the citrus EO vapors (15 mg/liter air). The most susceptible strain in water was L. pneumophila, with a 4-log cells ml−1 reduction after 24 h via sintering (15 g/liter air). Sintering the vapor through water increased the presence of the antimicrobial components, with a 61% increase of linalool. Therefore, the appropriate method of delivery of an antimicrobial citrus EO vapor may go some way in controlling Legionella spp. from environmental sources. PMID:25063652

  9. Reduction of Legionella spp. in water and in soil by a citrus plant extract vapor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Katie; Kurzbach, Elena; Score, Jodie; Tejpal, Jyoti; Chi Tangyie, George; Phillips, Carol

    2014-10-01

    Legionnaires' disease is a severe form of pneumonia caused by Legionella spp., organisms often isolated from environmental sources, including soil and water. Legionella spp. are capable of replicating intracellularly within free-living protozoa, and once this has occurred, Legionella is particularly resistant to disinfectants. Citrus essential oil (EO) vapors are effective antimicrobials against a range of microorganisms, with reductions of 5 log cells ml(-1) on a variety of surfaces. The aim of this investigation was to assess the efficacy of a citrus EO vapor against Legionella spp. in water and in soil systems. Reductions of viable cells of Legionella pneumophila, Legionella longbeachae, Legionella bozemanii, and an intra-amoebal culture of Legionella pneumophila (water system only) were assessed in soil and in water after exposure to a citrus EO vapor at concentrations ranging from 3.75 mg/liter air to 15g/liter air. Antimicrobial efficacy via different delivery systems (passive and active sintering of the vapor) was determined in water, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the antimicrobial components (linalool, citral, and β-pinene) was conducted. There was up to a 5-log cells ml(-1) reduction in Legionella spp. in soil after exposure to the citrus EO vapors (15 mg/liter air). The most susceptible strain in water was L. pneumophila, with a 4-log cells ml(-1) reduction after 24 h via sintering (15 g/liter air). Sintering the vapor through water increased the presence of the antimicrobial components, with a 61% increase of linalool. Therefore, the appropriate method of delivery of an antimicrobial citrus EO vapor may go some way in controlling Legionella spp. from environmental sources. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. "Repellent Effect of Extracts and Essential Oils of Citrus limon (Rutaceae) and Melissa officinalis (Labiatae) Against Main Malaria Vector, Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae)"

    OpenAIRE

    "MA Oshaghi; R Ghalandari; H Vatandoost; M Shayeghi; M Kamali-nejad; H Tourabi-Khaledi; M Abolhassani; M Hashemzadeh"

    2003-01-01

    Repellet effect of extracts and essential oils of Citrus limon (L.) Burm.F., (lemon) and Melissa officinalis, (balm) were evaluated against Anopheles stephensi in laboratory on animal and human and compared with synthetic repellent, N,Ndiethyl- 3-methylbenzamide (Deet) as a standard. Results of statistical analysis revealed significant differences between oils and extracts (P< 0.05) against the tested species, thus oils were more effective than extracts. There was no significant difference...

  11. Inhibitory effect of a formulated extract from multiple citrus peels on LPS-induced inflammation in RAW 246.7 macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadahiro Etoh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTBackground: Formulated Citrus Peel Extract (GL made from the peels of six citrus fruits available in Japan, namely navel oranges, citrus hassaku, citrus limon, citrus natsudaidai, citrus miyauchi and satsuma, was initially developed as a cosmetic product to protect skin from UV irradiation. Anecdotal evidences of anti-cancer property of GL have been reported by consumers based on the cases such as topical application for melanoma, and oral ingestion for prostate, lung and liver cancers.Those anecdotal reports stimulated us to investigate anti-tumorigenesis activity of GL. In the previous study, we reported that the topical application of GL inhibited DMBA/TPA-induced skin tumor formation by decreasing inflammatory gene parameters.Objective: In this study, we mainly investigated the effect of GL on translocation of NF-kB together with production of nitric-oxide and TNF-α induced by LPS in RAW 264.7 cells.Results: This investigation showed that GL decreased the release of TNF-α and nitric oxide from macrophage RAW264.7 cells stimulated by LPS in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, GL suppressed the expression of iNOS and nuclear translocation of NF-kB in RAW264.7 cells, inhibited the degradation of IκB-α, and scavenged hydroxyl radicals (DMPO/OH adduct in vitro.Conclusions: Our findings suggest that GL suppresses the inflammation in vitro, and exerts chemopreventive activity through the inhibition of production of TNF-α and iNOS proteins due to the inhibition of nuclear translocation of NF-kB and oxidative stress. GL appears to be a novel functional natural product capable of preventing inflammation and inflammation-associated tumorigenesis.Keywords: GL, Citrus peel extract, anti-inflammation, Nitric oxide, iNOS, NF-kB, TNF-α

  12. 77 FR 59709 - Citrus Greening and Asian Citrus Psyllid; Quarantine and Interstate Movement Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    ... within a few years and may never produce usable fruit. The bacterial pathogen causing citrus greening can... on the Internet, at http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health/plant_pest_info/citrus_greening/index... spread of ACP and citrus greening will serve to benefit to other citrus producing areas. List of Subjects...

  13. Effects of Citrus aurantium (bitter orange) fruit extracts and p-synephrine on metabolic fluxes in the rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Jéssica Sereno; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Moreira, Caroline Tessaro; Soares, Andréia Assunção; de Oliveira, Andrea Luiza; Bracht, Adelar; Peralta, Rosane Marina

    2012-05-16

    The fruit extracts of Citrus aurantium (bitter orange) are traditionally used as weight-loss products and as appetite supressants. An important fruit component is p-synephrine, which is structurally similar to the adrenergic agents. Weight-loss and adrenergic actions are always related to metabolic changes and this work was designed to investigate a possible action of the C. aurantium extract on liver metabolism. The isolated perfused rat liver was used to measure catabolic and anabolic pathways, including oxygen uptake and perfusion pressure. The C. aurantium extract and p-synephrine increased glycogenolysis, glycolysis, oxygen uptake and perfusion pressure. These changes were partly sensitive to α- and β-adrenergic antagonists. p-Synephrine (200 μM) produced an increase in glucose output that was only 15% smaller than the increment caused by the extract containing 196 μM p-synephrine. At low concentrations the C. aurantium extract tended to increase gluconeogenesis, but at high concentrations it was inhibitory, opposite to what happened with p-synephrine. The action of the C. aurantium extract on liver metabolism is similar to the well known actions of adrenergic agents and can be partly attributed to its content in p-synephrine. Many of these actions are catabolic and compatible with the weight-loss effects usually attributed to C. aurantium.

  14. A Citrus bergamia Extract Decreases Adipogenesis and Increases Lipolysis by Modulating PPAR Levels in Mesenchymal Stem Cells from Human Adipose Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Lo Furno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to assess the impact of a well-characterized extract from Citrus bergamia juice on adipogenesis and/or lipolysis using mesenchymal stem cells from human adipose tissue as a cell model. To evaluate the effects on adipogenesis, some cell cultures were treated with adipogenic medium plus 10 or 100 μg/mL of extract. To determine the properties on lipolysis, additional mesenchymal stem cells were cultured with adipogenic medium for 14 days and after this time added with Citrus bergamia for further 14 days. To verify adipogenic differentiation, oil red O staining at 7, 14, 21, and 28 days was performed. Moreover, the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ, adipocytes fatty acid-binding protein (A-FABP, adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL, hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL, monoglyceride lipase (MGL, 5′-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPKα1/2, and pAMPKα1/2 was evaluated by Western blot analysis and the release of glycerol by colorimetric assay. Citrus bergamia extract suppressed the accumulation of intracellular lipids in mesenchymal stem cells during adipogenic differentiation and promoted lipolysis by repressing the expression of adipogenic genes and activating lipolytic genes. Citrus bergamia extract could be a useful natural product for improving adipose mobilization in obesity-related disorders.

  15. Preliminary in vitro antisickilng properties of crude juice extracts of Persia Americana, Citrus sinensis, Carica papaya and Ciklavit®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iweala, E E J; Uhegbu, F O; Ogu, G N

    2009-12-30

    The antisickling properties of crude juice extracts of the edible portions of three commonly consumed tropical fruits namely Persia americana, Citrus sinensis, and Carica papaya were investigated in vitro alongside a new drug preparation called Ciklavit® that has antisickling activity. Four different solvent extracts of the crude juice of each fruit including aqueous, acidic, alkaline and alcoholic extracts were prepared and their antisickling effects on sickle cell trait (HbAS) and sickle cell disease (HbSS) blood samples checked alongside Ciklavit®. Blood samples were stabilized using normal saline and the antisickling effects were checked by counting the number of sickle cells remaining after incubation of the blood samples with the crude fruit extracts and Ciklavit® for twenty-four hours. The results showed that Ciklavit® produced a sustained reduction in the number of sickle cells in both HbAS and HbSS blood samples. Also the alkaline and alcoholic extracts of P. americana and C. papaya produced significant reduction in the number of sickle cells.

  16. Seasonal variations of antimicrobial activity and chemical composition of essential oils extracted from three Citrus limon L. Burm. cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settanni, L; Randazzo, W; Palazzolo, E; Moschetti, M; Aleo, A; Guarrasi, V; Mammina, C; San Biagio, P L; Marra, F P; Moschetti, G; Germanà, M A

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the seasonal variations of antimicrobial properties and chemical composition of essential oils (EOs), three different cultivars of Citrus limon L. Burm. spp. (Femminello Santa Teresa, Monachello and Femminello Continella) were collected at 6-week intervals, from December 2012 to April 2013, for a total of four harvests. The EOs were extracted from lemon peel by hydro-distillation. The antimicrobial activity, tested by paper disc diffusion method, was evaluated against common food-related pathogenic bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella enterica and Enterobacter spp.). EOs were more effective against Gram-positive than Gram-negative bacteria at each collection time, but a strong strain dependence was evidenced. Monachello EOs showed the highest inhibition power. The chemical characterisation of the EOs performed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry identified from 36 to 42 molecules. The chemical difference registered among samples and seasons may explain the different antimicrobial efficacies recorded.

  17. Acute and subchronic toxicity study of the water extract from root of Citrus aurantifolia (Christm. et Panz. Swingle in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanjana Jaijoy

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute and subchronic toxicities of the water extract from the roots of Citrus aurantifolia were studied in both male and female rats. Oral administration of the extract at a single dose of 5,000 mg/kg body weight (5 male, 5 female did not produce signs of toxicity, behavioral changes, mortality or differences on gross appearance of internal organs. The subchronic toxicity was determined by oral feeding the test substance at the doses of 300, 600 and 1,200 mg/kg body weight for 90 days (10 male, 10 female. The examinations of signs, animal behavior and health monitoring showed no signs of abnormalities in the test groups as compared to the controls. The test and control groups (on the 90th day and the satellite group (on the 118th day were analyzed by measuring their final body and organ weights, taking necropsy, and examining hematological parameters, blood clinical chemistry and histopathology features. The oral administration of 1,200 mg/kg/ day of the extract of C. aurantifolia in male and female rats caused a significant increase in the liver enzymes, which remained within the normal range, but did not produce a significant histopathological change in the internal organs. In conclusion, the extract from the roots of C. aurantifolia administered orally did not cause acute or subchronic toxicities to male and female rats.

  18. Investigating herb-drug interactions: the effect of Citrus aurantium fruit extract on the pharmacokinetics of amiodarone in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Márcio; Alves, Gilberto; Falcão, Amílcar

    2013-10-01

    Citrus aurantium extract has been largely used in weight loss and sports performance dietary supplements. However, the safety of C. aurantium-containing products has been questioned mainly due to the association of its use with adverse events in the cardiovascular system. Therefore, this work aimed to assess the potential for herb-drug interactions among a standardized C. aurantium extract (GMP certificate) and amiodarone (narrow therapeutic index drug) in rats. In a first pharmacokinetic study, rats were simultaneously co-administered with a single-dose of C. aurantium (164 mg/kg, p.o.) and amiodarone (50 mg/kg, p.o.); in a second study, rats were pre-treated during 14 days with C. aurantium (164 mg/kg/day, p.o.) and received amiodarone (50 mg/kg, p.o.) on the 15th day. Rats of the control groups received the corresponding volume of vehicle. Overall, after analysis of the pharmacokinetic data, it deserves to be highlighted the significant increase of the peak plasma concentration of amiodarone in rats pre-treated with C. aurantium extract, while the extent of systemic exposure was comparable between both groups. This paper reports, for the first time, data on the potential of herb-drug interaction between C. aurantium extract and amiodarone. However, specific clinical trials should be performed to confirm these results in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Citrus floral extracts on the foraging behavior of the stingless bee Scaptotrigona pectoralis (Dalla Torre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Grajales-Conesa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Effect of Citrus floral extracts on the foraging behavior of the stingless bee Scaptotrigona pectoralis (Dalla Torre. Stingless bees have an important role as pollinators of many wild and cultivated plant species in tropical regions. Little is known, however, about the interaction between floral fragrances and the foraging behavior of meliponine species. Thus we investigated the chemical composition of the extracts of citric (lemon and orange flowers and their effects on the foraging behavior of the stingless bee Scaptotrigona pectoralis. We found that each type of flower has its own specific blend of major compounds: limonene (62.9% for lemon flowers, and farnesol (26.5%, (E-nerolidol (20.8%, and linalool (12.7% for orange flowers. In the foraging experiments the S. pectoralis workers were able to use the flower extracts to orient to the food source, overlooking plates baited with hexane only. However, orange flower extracts were seemingly more attractive to these worker bees, maybe because of the particular blend present in it. Our results reveal that these fragrances are very attractive to S. pectoralis, so we can infer that within citric orchards they could be important visitors in the study area; however habitat destruction, overuse of pesticides and the competitive override by managed honeybees might have put at risk their populations and thus the ecological services they provide to us.

  20. Antimicrobial Effect of Citrus Aurantifolia Extract on Enterococcus Faecalis Within the Dentinal Tubules in The Presence of Smear Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharifian MR

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Instrumentation of the root canals results in formation of smear layer which covers the dentinal tubules. In infected teeth, it is ideal to achieve a material that has the ability to remove the smear layer besides antimicrobial activity. Therefore, this study was designed to evaluate the antimicrobial effect of Citrus aurantifolia extracts (lime juice and rind extract on Enterococcus faecalis within dentinal tubules in the presence of smear layer.Materials and Methods: One-hundred and forty dentin tubes were prepared from bovine incisors. After removal the smear layer, the specimens were infected with Enterococcus faecalis. Then, the smear layer was reformed. Test solutions were used as the irrigants in study roups as follows: group 1: 5.25% NaOCl; group 2: 17% EDTA; group 3: NaOCl+EDTA; group 4: Lime juice; group 5: ethanolic rind extract of C.aurantifolia; group 6: 96% ethanol. Dentin chips were collected from inner and outer layers of dentinal walls and optical density was measured. The data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tamhane tests.Results: In outer layer of dentin, the efficacy of rind extract was less than that of NaOCl+EDTA (P<0.05. Also Lime juice was less effective than EDTA, NaOCl and NaOCl+EDTA (P<0.05. In inner layer of dentin, Lime juice was significantly less effective than NaOCl and NaOCl+EDTA (P<0.05. The efficacy of rind extract was less than that of NaOCl+EDTA (P<0.05.Conclusion: In the presence of smear layer, the antimicrobial activity of Lime juice was less than that of NaOCl but the efficacy of rind extract was similar to that of NaOCl.

  1. Protective effects of ethanolic peel and pulp extracts of Citrus macroptera fruit against isoproterenol-induced myocardial infarction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sudip; Das, Sagarika; Tanvir, E M; Hossen, Md Sakib; Saha, Moumoni; Afroz, Rizwana; Islam, Md Aminul; Hossain, Md Sabir; Gan, Siew Hua; Ibrahim Khalil, Md

    2017-10-01

    Increases in the incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) have aroused strong interest in identifying antioxidants from natural sources for use in preventive medicine. Citrus macroptera (C. macroptera), commonly known as "Satkara", is an important herbal and medicinal plant reputed for its antioxidant, nutritious and therapeutic uses. The aim of the present study was to investigate the cardio-protective effects of ethanol extracts of C. macroptera peel and pulp against isoproterenol (ISO)-induced myocardial infarction (MI) in rats. Male albino Wistar rats (n=36) were pre-treated with peel and pulp extracts (500mg/kg) for 45days. They received a challenge with ISO (85mg/kg) on the 44th and 45th days. Our findings indicated that subcutaneous injection of ISO induced severe myocardial injuries associated with oxidative stress, as confirmed by elevated lipid peroxidation (LPO) and decreased cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) and anti-peroxidative enzymes, including glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and glutathione-S-transferase, compared with levels observed in control animals. Pre-treatment with C. macroptera peel and pulp extracts prior to ISO administration however, significantly improved many of the investigated biochemical parameters, i.e., cardiac troponin I, cardiac marker enzymes, lipid profile and oxidative stress markers. The fruit peel extract showed stronger cardio-protective effects than the pulp extract. The biochemical findings were further confirmed by histopathological examinations. Overall, the increased endogenous antioxidant enzyme activity against heightened oxidative stress in the myocardium is strongly suggestive of the cardio-protective potential of C. macroptera. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Anti-inflammatory Activity of Methanoilc and Ethanolic Extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    certain citrus peel extracts (Haiquing et al.,. 2004).Sweet orange oil is a byproduct of the juice industry produced by pressing the peel. It consist of about 90% d-limonene (Omodamiro et al., 2013). Citrus sinensis is widely known for health benefits and have found to produce antimicrobial effects, hence current research was ...

  3. Evaluation of Citrus aurantifolia peel and leaves extracts for their chemical composition, antioxidant and anti-cholinesterase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Tundis, Rosa; Bonesi, Marco; Menichini, Federica; De Luca, Damiano; Colica, Carmela; Menichini, Francesco

    2012-12-01

    The replacement of synthetic antioxidants by safe natural antioxidants fosters research on the screening of vegetables and food as sources of new antioxidants. Moreover, oxidative degeneration of cells is associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. On the basis of these considerations this work aimed to investigate the antioxidant properties [by using the diphenyl picryl hydrazyl, 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) and ferric reducing ability of plasma assays, and the β-carotene bleaching test] and the anti-cholinesterase activity of Citrus aurantifolia peel and leaves from different areas of growth. Methanol extracts of the peel and leaves demonstrated the strongest radical scavenging activity. A similar trend was observed with the reducing ability, with values from 112.1 to 146.0 µmol L(-1) Fe(II) g(-1). The relationship between phenol and flavonoid contents and antioxidant activity was statistically investigated. Based on analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography, the most abundant flavonoids found in C. aurantifolia extracts were apigenin, rutin, quercetin, kaempferol and nobiletin. n-Hexane fractions of both peel and leaves showed a good acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity with IC(50) values in the range 91.4-107.4 µg mL(-1). Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis revealed the presence of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes as most common components. The findings of this study suggest a potential use of C. aurantifolia peel and leaves for supplements for human health. Copyright © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. Effect of different levels of dietary sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) peel extract on humoral immune system responses in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhossein, Zohreh; Qotbi, Ali Ahmad Alaw; Seidavi, Alireza; Laudadio, Vito; Centoducati, Gerardo; Tufarelli, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of different levels of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) peel extract (SOPE) on humoral immune system responses in broiler chickens. Three hundred 1-day broilers (Ross-308) were randomly allocated to treatments varying in supplemental SOPE added in the drinking water. The experimental groups consisted of three treatments fed for 42 days as follows: a control treatment without feed extract, a treatment containing 1000 ppm of SOPE and a treatment containing 1250 ppm of SOPE. All treatments were isocaloric and isonitrogenous. Broilers were vaccinated with Newcastle disease virus (NDV), avian influenza (AI), infectious bursal disease (IBD) and infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) vaccines. Antibody titer response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) was higher in the group fed 1250 ppm of SOPE (P < 0.05) as well as for immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM. Similarly, antibody titer responses to all vaccines were constantly elevated (P < 0.05) by SOPE enrichment in a dose-dependent manner. Relative weights of spleen and bursa of Fabricius were unaffected by treatments. Dietary SOPE supplementation may improve the immune response and diseases resistance, indicating that it can constitute a useful additive in broiler feeding. Thus, supplying SOPE in rations may help to improve relative immune response in broiler chickens. © 2014 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  5. Chemical composition of hexane extract of Citrus aurantifolia and anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis activity of some of its constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Montemayor, Nallely E; García, Abraham; Elizondo-Treviño, Elizabeth; Garza-González, Elvira; Alvarez, Laura; del Rayo Camacho-Corona, María

    2012-09-19

    The main aim of this study was to isolate and characterize the active compounds from the hexane extract of the fruit peels of Citrus aurantiifolia, which showed activity against one sensitive and three monoresistant (isoniazid, streptomycin or ethambutol) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. The active extract was fractionated by column chromatography, yielding the following major compounds: 5-geranyloxypsoralen (1); 5-geranyloxy-7-methoxycoumarin (2); 5,7-dimethoxycoumarin (3); 5-methoxypsoralen (4); and 5,8-dimethoxypsoralen (5). The structures of these compounds were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy. In addition, GC-MS analysis of the hexane extract allowed the identification of 44 volatile compounds, being 5,7-dimethoxycoumarin (15.79%), 3-methyl-1,2-cyclopentanedione (8.27%), 1-methoxy-ciclohexene (8.0%), corylone (6.93%), palmitic acid (6.89%), 5,8-dimethoxypsoralen (6.08%), a-terpineol (5.97%), and umbelliferone (4.36%), the major constituents. Four isolated coumarins and 16 commercial compounds identified by GC-MS were tested against M. tuberculosis H37Rv and three multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains using the Microplate Alamar Blue Assay. The constituents that showed activity against all strains were 5 (MICs = 25-50 mg/mL), 1 (MICs = 50-100 mg/mL), palmitic acid (MICs = 25-50 mg/mL), linoleic acid (MICs = 50-100 mg/mL), oleic acid (MICs = 100 mg/mL), 4-hexen-3-one (MICs = 50-100 mg/mL), and citral (MICs = 50-100 mg/mL). Compound 5 and palmitic acid were the most active ones. The antimycobacterial activity of the hexane extract of C. aurantifolia could be attributed to these compounds.

  6. A review of the human clinical studies involving Citrus aurantium (bitter orange) extract and its primary protoalkaloid p-synephrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohs, Sidney J; Preuss, Harry G; Shara, Mohd

    2012-01-01

    This review summarizes the published as well as unpublished human studies involving Citrus aurantium (bitter orange) extract and its primary protoalkaloid p-synephrine, providing information and an assessment of the safety and efficacy of these widely used products. The results of over 20 studies involving a total of approximately 360 subjects that consumed p-synephrine alone or in combination with other ingredients are reviewed and critiqued. Over 50 % of the subjects involved in these studies were overweight/obese, and approximately two-thirds of these overweight/obese subjects consumed caffeine (132-528 mg/day) in conjunction with p-synephrine (10-53 mg/day). Bitter orange/p-synephrine containing products were consumed for up to 12 weeks. Approximately 44 % of the subjects consumed a bitter orange/p-synephrine only product, while the remainder consumed a complex product that contained multiple ingredients in addition to p-synephrine. In general, bitter orange extract alone (p-synephrine) or in combination with other herbal ingredients did not produce significant adverse events as an increase in heart rate or blood pressure, or alter electrocardiographic data, serum chemistry, blood cell counts or urinalysis. p-Synephrine alone as well as in combination products were shown to increase resting metabolic rate and energy expenditure, and modest increases in weight loss were observed with bitter orange extract/p-synephrine-containing products when given for six to 12 weeks. Longer term studies are needed to further assess the efficacy of these products and affirm their safety under these conditions.

  7. Comparison of heat and mass transfer of different microwave-assisted extraction methods of essential oil from Citrus limon (Lisbon variety) peel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golmakani, Mohammad-Taghi; Moayyedi, Mahsa

    2015-11-01

    Dried and fresh peels of Citrus limon were subjected to microwave-assisted hydrodistillation (MAHD) and solvent-free microwave extraction (SFME), respectively. A comparison was made between MAHD and SFME with the conventional hydrodistillation (HD) method in terms of extraction kinetic, chemical composition, and antioxidant activity. Higher yield results from higher extraction rates by microwaves and could be due to a synergy of two transfer phenomena: mass and heat acting in the same way. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis did not indicate any noticeable differences between the constituents of essential oils obtained by MAHD and SFME, in comparison with HD. Antioxidant analysis of the extracted essential oils indicated that microwave irradiation did not have adverse effects on the radical scavenging activity of the extracted essential oils. The results of this study suggest that MAHD and SFME can be termed as green technologies because of their less energy requirements per ml of essential oil extraction.

  8. Characteristics of Se’i (Rotenesse Smoked Meat Treated with Coconut Shell Liquid Smoked and Citrus aurantifolia Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. M. Malelak

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of Citrus aurantifolia extract (CAE, coconut shell liquid smoke (CSLS and the combination of CAE and CSLS (CACS on se’i characteristics. A completely randomized design was assigned in this experiment. Treatments used were: se’i treated with 5% (v/v CAE, CSLS 5% (v/v, (CAE : CSL 1:1 / (CACS and untreated se’i as a control (C. Parameters measured were: aroma, color, taste, pH, residual nitrite, total bacterial count, Coliform, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella. The data of aroma, color, and taste were analyzed by using Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Mann-Whitney test. The pH, residual nitrite, and bacterial data were analyzed with analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by least significant differences test. Results showed that CAE caused the highest score at both aroma and taste (P<0.05. CSLS caused the lowest residual nitrite (27 ppm (P<0.05. Application of CAE and CACS could reduce total bacteria (P<0.05 at least 1 log. Color, pH, and Coliform number were not significantly different. S. aureus, E. coli, and Salmonella were negative in all se’i samples. CAE gives the best organoleptics and bacteriological characteristics while CSLS is more effective in reducing nitrite.

  9. Biomimetic synthesis of silver nanoparticles by Citrus limon (lemon) aqueous extract and theoretical prediction of particle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prathna, T C; Chandrasekaran, N; Raichur, Ashok M; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, silver nanoparticles were rapidly synthesized at room temperature by treating silver ions with the Citrus limon (lemon) extract. The effect of various process parameters like the reductant concentration, mixing ratio of the reactants and the concentration of silver nitrate were studied in detail. In the standardized process, 10(-2)M silver nitrate solution was interacted for 4h with lemon juice (2% citric acid concentration and 0.5% ascorbic acid concentration) in the ratio of 1:4 (vol:vol). The formation of silver nanoparticles was confirmed by Surface Plasmon Resonance as determined by UV-Visible spectra in the range of 400-500 nm. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed the distinctive facets (111, 200, 220, 222 and 311 planes) of silver nanoparticles. We found that citric acid was the principal reducing agent for the nanosynthesis process. FT-IR spectral studies demonstrated citric acid as the probable stabilizing agent. Silver nanoparticles below 50 nm with spherical and spheroidal shape were observed from transmission electron microscopy. The correlation between absorption maxima and particle sizes were derived for different UV-Visible absorption maxima (corresponding to different citric acid concentrations) employing "MiePlot v. 3.4". The theoretical particle size corresponding to 2% citric acid concentration was compared to those obtained by various experimental techniques like X-ray diffraction analysis, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Apoptosis-mediated inhibition of human breast cancer cell proliferation by lemon citrus extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshatwi, Ali A; Shafi, Gowhar; Hasan, Tarique N; Al-Hazzani, Amal A; Alsaif, Mohammed A; Alfawaz, Mohammed A; Lei, K Y; Munshi, Anjana

    2011-01-01

    Dietary phytochemicals have a variety of antitumor properties. In the present study, the antitumor activity of methanolic extract of lemon fruit (lemon extract; LE) (LE) on the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line was investigated in vitro. Apoptotic cell death was analyzed using the TUNEL assay. In addition, the apoptosis mediated by LE extract in the MCF-7 cells was associated with the increased expression of the tumor suppressor p53 and caspase-3. Additionally, the expression of a pro-apoptotic gene, bax, was increased, and the expression of an anti-apoptotic gene, bcl-2, was decreased by LE extract treatment, resulting in a shift in the Bax:Bcl-2 ratio to one that favored apoptosis. The expression of a major apoptotic gene, caspase-3, was increased by LE extract treatment. In light of the above results, we concluded that LE extract can induce the apoptosis of MCF-7 breast cancer cells via Bax-related caspase-3 activation. This study provides experimental data that are relevant to the possible future clinical use of LE to treat breast cancer.

  11. Protective effects of an extract from Citrus bergamia against inflammatory injury in interferon-γ and histamine exposed human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graziano, Adriana C E; Cardile, Venera; Crascì, Lucia; Caggia, Sivia; Dugo, Paola; Bonina, Francesco; Panico, Annamaria

    2012-06-27

    The present work evaluated the anti-inflammatory/antioxidant activity of a well characterized extract from Citrus bergamia Risso and Poiteau (CBE), containing neoeriocitrin, naringin, neohesperidin and other flavonoids, on human NCTC 2544 keratinocytes treated with interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) and histamine (H). High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with diode array detectors was used to characterize and quantify phenolic compounds in CBE. Anti-inflammatory/antioxidant ability on keratinocytes was determined through evaluation of inter-cellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression by Western blot, production of nitric oxide (NO) with Griess reagent and concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by fluorescent quantitative analysis with 2',7'-dichlorfluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA). Cell viability was assessed using 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2 thiazoyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Antioxidant activity was also measured by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay. Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) were quantified using 1.9-dimethyl methylene blue (DMB). CBE exhibited high antioxidant activity confirmed by elevated ORAC values related to high capacity in oxygen radical scavenging. The assays on keratinocytes demonstrated that CBE does not inhibit cell proliferation and is shown to significantly reduce dose-dependently ICAM-1, iNOS, NO, ROS and GAG production in cells exposed to IFN-γ and H. Our study demonstrates that the pools of compounds of an extract from C. bergamia efficiently block the proinflammatory actions induced by IFN-γ and H on human keratinocytes. CBE may be used for topic employment in some inflammatory diseases of the skin and to represent an important opportunity for the essential oil processing industries. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Leaf Extracts of Selected Plants on Quality of Stored Citrus sinensis (Sweet Orange Juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwagbenga O. ADEOGUN

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reduction in the quality of fruits during storage has been a concern to the consumers and the effect can be felt on the economy of developing countries. Leaves of plants such as Canna indica, Megaphrynium macrostachyum and Thaumatococcus daniellii have been documented as food packaging materials in West Africa. Based on this, the quality of stored sweet orange juice was investigated using ethanolic extracts of leaves of C. indica, M. macrostachyum and T. daniellii to enhance the shelf life of the juice. The extracts were used to assess the quality of juice for 30 days using quantitative parameters such as total soluble solid, browning potential, pH, microbial analysis and turbidity at 4 oC and at room temperature (27-31 oC. The qualitative and quantitative phytochemical constituents of the extracts were determined. The extracts’ toxicity was determined using Brine shrimp. The quality assessment evidently revealed that the freshly squeezed orange juice with the extracts possess tolerable activity to enhance the shelf life of orange juice. The leaf extract of M. macrostachyum had the highest preservation rate on the juice after 30 days. The qualitative phytochemical screening revealed the presence of alkaloid, tannin, saponins, flavonoids, steroids and terpenoids in the three plants tested. The quantitative phytochemical analysis of the most active extracts in the three plants revealed that M. macrostachum had the highest contents of alkaloids (107.48 mg/g and flavonoids (56.92 mg/g.The study showed that the extracts were non-lethal on Brine shrimp. This study ascertained the potential preservative qualities of the test plants for enhancing the shelf-life of orange juice.

  13. Viability of and Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes in a delicatessen appetizer (yogurt-based) salad as affected by citrus extract (Citrox©) and storage temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiraki, Maria I; Yehia, Hany M; Elobeid, Tahra; Osaili, Tareq; Sakkas, Hercules; Savvaidis, Ioannis N

    2018-02-01

    The antimicrobial effect of citrus extract (at 1 mL/kg [C1] and 2 mL/kg [C2]) on naturally occurring microbiota and inoculated pathogens (E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes at ca. 6 log cfu/g) in the traditional Greek yogurt-based salad Tzatziki stored at 4, 10, or 21 °C, was examined. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were high (8.0-8.5 log cfu/g) and varied only minimally for both the control (untreated) and the citrus extract-treated salad samples, whereas the higher citrus extract concentration yielded the lowest yeast populations, irrespective of temperature, during the entire storage period. Populations of inoculated E. coli (6 log cfu/g) declined in both untreated and citrus extract-treated samples from day 0-70, 35, and 15 at 4, 10, and 21 °C, respectively. Citrus extract had a significant effect on the survival of the inoculated E. coli O157:H7, with reductions of 2.8-4.8 log cfu/g in the citrus extract-treated samples at the end of the storage period. Our data show that L. monocytogenes survived in both untreated and citrus extract-treated samples during the entire storage period, irrespective of the storage temperature. The higher concentration of citrus extract had a significant effect on the survival of L. monocytogenes in the treated samples, and reductions of 1.5-3.0 logs were noted on final day 70, 35 and 15 at 4, 10 and 21 °C, respectively. The results of our study demonstrated the potential of citrus extract as a natural compound that can control the growth of food-borne pathogenic bacteria, such as E. coli O157:H7 and L. monocytogenes in Tzatziki, a yogurt-based salad. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Optimization of antimicrobial activity of flavonoid extracts from pomelo (Citrus grandis) peel as food wrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugumaran, Kamaraj; Zakaria, Nur Zatul-'Iffah; Abdullah, Rozaini; Jalani, Nur Syazana; Zati-Hanani, Sharifah; Ibrahim, Roshita; Zakaria, Zarina

    2017-09-01

    This study has been carried out to optimize an antimicrobial activity of flavonoid extract from pomelo peels against Staphyloccus aureus (S. aureus). A comparative analysis of total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC) and antioxidant activity were done on two parts of peel which are albedo (inner peel) and flavedo (outer peel). Based on the result obtained, flavedo showed higher TPC, TFC and antioxidant activity (304.20 mg /g, 74.30 mg /g and 46.86 % respectively) when compared to albedo (150.98 mg /g, 52.97 mg /g and 24.70 % respectively). The effects of different extract concentration and pH on inhibition zone of S. aureus were optimized using Research Surface Methodology (RSM). The optimal condition of parameters was obtained based on the maximum zone of S. aureus inhibition at extract concentration of 200 mg/mL and pH of 4.8. The antimicrobial film has been developed by using optimal conditions by incorporating the flavonoid extract into chitosan polymer.

  15. Comparative GC/MS analysis of essential oils extracted by 3 methods from the bud of Citrus aurantium L. var. amara Engl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ming-Hua; Yang, Li; Zhu, Liang; Piao, Jin-Hua; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2011-01-01

    A comparative study of steam distillation extraction (SDE), reflux extraction (RE), and ultrasound-assisted extraction (USE) was conducted for the extraction of essential oils from the bud of Citrus aurantium L. var. amara Engl. Each method was evaluated in terms of qualitative and quantitative composition of the isolated essential oil by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The extract yields of essential oil were 0.16%, 2.18%, and 2.34%, respectively. A total of 82 compounds were identified by GC/MS. The main components obtained by SDE were terpinen-4-ol (20.98%), dipentene (11.67%), terpinene (9.24%), those by RE were palmitic acid (20.61%), 2-chloroethyl linoleate (14.54%), tetracosane (12.26%), and α-linolenic acid (11.24%), and those by USE were tetracosane (11.32%), heneicosane (11.06%), and palmitic acid (8.76%). Comparative analysis indicated that SDE was favorable for the extraction of monoterpene hydrocarbons, sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, alcohols, and carbonyl compounds, RE and USE had certain advantages in the extraction of aliphatic saturated hydrocarbons, organic acids, and esters. It is concluded that different extraction methods may lead to different yields of essential oils; the choice of appropriate method is very important to obtain more desired components with higher physiological activities. C. aurantium oils from different plant parts have great economic, medicinal, and nutritional values because of their wide-spectrum biological activities. The essential oil from C. aurantium L. var amara is one of the best C. aurantium oils. The data presented in this article will help us understand the relationship between essential oils and its extraction methods and know more about the aromatic components of Citrus aurantium bud. The methods established in this study will provide useful reference information for further studies, and offer essential oil industries with helpful guidance in practice. © 2011 Institute of Food Technologists®

  16. 1 Evaluation of the antioxidant activity of citrus flavedo extracts in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-07-10

    Jul 10, 2015 ... soybean oil. The antioxidant activity of the mandarin extract at two concentrations (0.2% (m/m) and 0.4% (m/m)) was compared to 0.02% (m/m). BHT. Hydroperoxide formation was ..... phenolic compounds from grape showed that a higher yield was obtained at 60°C than at 45°C (Giorgia et al., 2007).

  17. Cold pressed versus solvent extracted lemon (Citrus limon L.) seed oils: yield and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Emin; Güneşer, Buket Aydeniz

    2017-06-01

    During the processing of lemon fruit, a large quantity of seeds is produced as a by-product. These seeds contain valuable components; therefore, required to be evaluated. This study aimed to compare the cold pressed with hexane-extracted lemon seed oils and determine their physicochemical and thermal properties. Cold pressing yielded significantly lower oil (36.84%) than hexane extraction (71.29%). In addition, the concentrations of free fatty acids, peroxides, and p-anisidine were lower in the cold pressed oil. Cold pressed oil showed higher total phenolics, α-tocopherol and antioxidant capacity. The major fatty acids found in the cold pressed oil were linoleic and palmitic acids, whereas β-sitosterol and campesterol were the dominant sterols. The crystallization and melting temperatures and enthalpies were also elucidated. In conclusion, this study proved that high quality of lemon seed oils can be produced by the cold pressing technique; this oil can be used in industries such as the food, cosmetic or chemical industries.

  18. Novel dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction combined with ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry to determine morpholine residues in citrus and apples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dawei; Miao, Hong; Zou, Jianhong; Cao, Pei; Ma, Ning; Zhao, Yunfeng; Wu, Yongning

    2015-01-21

    This paper presents a new analytical method for the determination of morpholine residues in citrus and apples using a novel dispersive micro-solid-phase extraction (DMSPE), followed by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS). Samples were extracted with 1% formic acid in acetonitrile/water (1:1, v/v) and then cleaned up using the DMSPE procedure. Morpholine from the extract was adsorbed to a polymer cation exchange sorbent and eluted with ammonium hydroxide/acetonitrile (3:97, v/v) through a 1 mL syringe with a 0.22 μm nylon syringe filter. All of the samples were analyzed by UHPLC-HRMS/MS on a Waters Acquity BEH hydrophilic interaction chromatography column using 0.1% formic acid and 4 mM ammonium formate in water/acetonitrile as the mobile phase with gradient elution. The method showed good linearity (R(2) > 0.999) in the range of 1-100 μg/L for the analyte. The limit of detection and limit of quantitation values of morpholine were 2 and 5 μg/kg, respectively. The average recoveries of morpholine from the citrus and apple samples spiked at three different concentrations (5, 20, and 100 μg/kg) were in a range from 78.4 to 102.7%.

  19. A combined spectroscopic and TDDFT study of natural dyes extracted from fruit peels of Citrus reticulata and Musa acuminata for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prima, Eka Cahya; Hidayat, Novianto Nur; Yuliarto, Brian; Suyatman; Dipojono, Hermawan Kresno

    2017-01-01

    This study reports the novel spectroscopic investigations and enhanced the electron transfers of Citrus reticulata and Musa acuminata fruit peels as the photosensitizers for the dye-sensitized solar cells. The calculated TD-DFT-UB3LYP/6-31 + G(d,p)-IEFPCM(UAKS), experiment spectra of ultra-violet-visible spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies indicate the main flavonoid (hesperidin and gallocatechin) structures of the dye extracts. The optimized flavonoid structures are calculated using Density functional theory (DFT) at 6-31 + G(d,p) level. The rutinosyl group of the hesperidin pigment (Citrus reticulata) will be further investigated compared to the gallocatechin (Musa acuminata) pigment. The acidity of the dye extract is treated by adding 2% acetic acid. The energy levels of the HOMO-LUMO dyes are measured by a combined Tauc plot and cyclic voltammetry contrasted with the DFT data. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy will be performed to model the dye electron transfer. As for the rutinosyl group presence and the acidic treatment, the acidified Citrus reticulata cell under continuous light exposure of 100 mW·cm- 2 yields a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 3.23 mA/cm2, a photovoltage (Voc) of 0.48 V, and a fill factor of 0.45 corresponding to an energy conversion efficiency (η) of 0.71% because the shifting down HOMO-LUMO edges and the broadening dye's absorbance evaluated by a combined spectroscopic and TD-DFT method. The result also leads to the longest diffusion length of 32.2 μm, the fastest electron transit of 0.22 ms, and the longest electron lifetime of 4.29 ms.

  20. Evaluation of Antibacterial Activities of Citrus limon, Citrus reticulata, and Citrus grandis Against Pathogenic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sholeh Saeb

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microorganisms resistant to most antibiotics are rapidly spreading, and there is an urgent and continuous need for novel antimicrobial compounds. The genus Citrus belongs to the family Rutaceae has many biologically active secondary metabolites. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial activity of essential oil and extract of Lemon (Citrus limon, Mandarin (Citrus reticulata and Pummelo (Citrus grandis against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella typhi. Materials and Methods: The fresh Citrus leaves were shade-dried and powdered. Antimicrobial metabolites were extracted from them by 80% methanol for extract and using a Clevenger-type apparatus for essential oil. Eight different concentrations of the each leaf extract and essential oil were prepared. The antimicrobial susceptibility assay of Citrus leaves metabolites were subjected against four bacterial strains by agar disc diffusion and E-test method. Results: In this study, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC of different Citrus leaf extracts were determined against all four food-borne pathogens. The C. grandis leaf essential oil had potent antimicrobial activity against all four pathogens, and the C. limon leaf essential oil was effective on Gram-positive bacteria. S. typhi was resistant against two leaves essential oils. Conclusions: The results showed that there was no antimicrobial activity effect in all extracts on tested bacteria. In this study, the antibacterial effect of essential oil of Citrus leaves on four strains of pathogenic microorganisms was confirmed. The C. grandis leaf essential oil had the most powerful antimicrobial properties, suggesting its potential application as natural preservative in foods or an effective medicine against different pathogenic microbes. Key words: Antibacterial activity, E-test, Citr

  1. Bergamot (Citrus bergamia Risso fruit extracts and identified components alter expression of interleukin 8 gene in cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacchetti Gianni

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic fibrosis (CF airway pathology is a fatal, autosomal, recessive genetic disease characterized by extensive lung inflammation. After induction by TNF-α, elevated concentrations of several pro-inflammatory cytokines (i.e. IL-6, IL-1β and chemokines (i.e. IL-8 are released from airway epithelial cells. In order to reduce the excessive inflammatory response in the airways of CF patients, new therapies have been developed and in this respect, medicinal plant extracts have been studied. In this article we have investigated the possible use of bergamot extracts (Citrus bergamia Risso and their identified components to alter the expression of IL-8 associated with the cystic fibrosis airway pathology. Methods The extracts were chemically characterized by 1H-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance, GC-FID (gas chromatography-flame ionization detector, GC-MS (gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and HPLC (high pressure liquid chromatography. Both bergamot extracts and main detected chemical constituents were assayed for their biological activity measuring (a cytokines and chemokines in culture supernatants released from cystic fibrosis IB3-1 cells treated with TNF-α by Bio-Plex cytokine assay; (b accumulation of IL-8 mRNA by real-time PCR. Results The extracts obtained from bergamot (Citrus bergamia Risso epicarps contain components displaying an inhibitory activity on IL-8. Particularly, the most active molecules were bergapten and citropten. These effects have been confirmed by analyzing mRNA levels and protein release in the CF cellular models IB3-1 and CuFi-1 induced with TNF-α or exposed to heat-inactivated Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Conclusions These obtained results clearly indicate that bergapten and citropten are strong inhibitors of IL-8 expression and could be proposed for further studies to verify possible anti-inflammatory properties to reduce lung inflammation in CF patients.

  2. Citrus pulp for cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthington, John D; Kunkle, William E; Martin, Amy M

    2002-07-01

    Citrus pulp is classified as an energy concentrate by-product feed. Citrus by-products fed to beef cattle include citrus molasses, citrus meal, wet citrus pulp, dried citrus pulp, and pelleted citrus pulp; however, in current production systems, pulp (wet, dry, and pelleted) is the only by-product commonly used. Citrus pulp production in the United States is limited to specific subtropical regions, of which south central Florida remains the largest with additional production in California and Texas.

  3. Profiles of free and bound phenolics extracted from Citrus fruits and their roles in biological systems: content, and antioxidant, anti-diabetic and anti-hypertensive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alu'datt, Muhammad H; Rababah, Taha; Alhamad, Mohammad N; Al-Mahasneh, Majdi A; Ereifej, Khalil; Al-Karaki, Ghazi; Al-Duais, Mohammed; Andrade, Juan E; Tranchant, Carole C; Kubow, Stan; Ghozlan, Kawther A

    2017-09-20

    This study of selected plants of the Rutaceae family was carried out to investigate their phenolic content, antioxidant activity, and the in vitro inhibitory potential of extracted phenolics towards enzymes relevant for hyperglycemia and hypertension. The phenolic content, antioxidant activity and phenolic extract-mediated inhibitory activities for α-glucosidase and α-amylase were evaluated by spectrophotometry. The content of individual phenolics and the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of the phenolic extracts were evaluated by LC/MS-MS and RP-HPLC methods, respectively. A higher percentage of free phenolic content was seen for all the selected plants of the Rutaceae family (85.43-92.82% of the total phenolic content) than of the bound form (7.18-14.57% of total phenolic content). The major predominant bound phenolic in lemon and red blood orange was hesperidin. The major predominant bound phenolic in pummelo, shamouti and clementine was ferulic acid. The highest ACE and α-glucosidase inhibitory activity of the extracted phenolics from lemon was associated with free phenolic extracts obtained at 30 °C with values of 100% inhibition. Red blood orange free phenolic extract (30 °C) elicited the highest α-amylase inhibition activity (32.3%). In contrast, extracted bound phenolics after acid and base hydrolysis from all selected plants from the Citrus species were shown to induce activation of the ACE and α-amylase enzymes.

  4. Spasmolytic effects of aqueous extract of mixture from Aframomumum melegueta (K Schum) - Citrus aurantifolia (Christm and Panzer) on isolated trachea from rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahounou, Judith F; Ouedraogo, Geoffroy G; Gbenou, Joachim D; Ouedraogo, Sylvin; Agbodjogbe, Wilfrid Kdd; Dansou, Pierre H; Moudachirou, Mansourou

    2012-01-01

    The spasmolytic properties of the aqueous extract of Aframomum melegueta (K Schum) and Citrus aurantifolia (Christm and Panzer) (AMCA) mixture were tested on isolated rat trachea. Inhibition of the contraction was observed the in presence of the AMCA (EC 50 = 1.80 ± 0.48 mg/mL) after a pre contraction of the trachea by acetylcholine (10⁻⁵ M). With propranolol (10⁻⁶ M), the spasmolytic activity of the mixture was inhibited and the concentration-response curve shifted to the right. The EC50 value was then 2.60 ± 0.41 mg/mL. AMCA also inhibited contraction induced by KCl (4.10⁻² M) with EC50 value = 1.86 ± 0.65 mg/mL. These results clearly show the relaxing effect of the aqueous extract on the isolated rat trachea. This effect involved some β-adrenergic receptor inhibition.

  5. Orange Juice Advertising by the Florida Department of Citrus: Estimates of 2006-07 Florida and Free-Rider Benefits

    OpenAIRE

    Mark G. Brown

    2007-01-01

    The benefits of OJ advertising result from 1) increased gallon sales and 2) higher prices. Advertising was estimated to increase the delivered-in price by $.083 per single strength equivalent (SSE) gallon in 2006-07. The with-advertising and without-advertising delivered-in prices were estimated at $1.981 and $1.898 per SSE gallon, respectively. With FDOC advertising focusing on the U.S. market, benefits due to advertising were estimated for the U.S market only. However, it should be recogniz...

  6. BENEFITS OF HERBAL EXTRACTS IN COSMETICS: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Amreen Fatima*, Shashi Alok, Parul Agarwal, Prem Prakash Singh and Amita Verma

    2013-01-01

    Herbal extracts are primarily added to the cosmetic formulations due to several associated properties such as antioxidant, anti inflammatory, antiseptic and antimicrobial properties. Even today, people in rural and urban areas depend upon herbs for traditional cosmetics. Information on the herbal cosmetics was collected via electronic search (using pub med, scifinder, Google Scholar and web of science) and library search for articles published in peer-reviewed journals. Furthermore, informati...

  7. Comparison of antifungal activities of Vietnamese citrus essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hung, Pham; Chi, Pham Thi Lan; Phi, Nguyen Thi Lan

    2013-03-01

    Citrus essential oils (EOs) are volatile compounds from citrus peels and widely used in perfumes, cosmetics, soaps and aromatherapy. In this study, inhibition of citrus EOs extracted from Vietnamese orange (Citrus sinensis), mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco), pomelo (Citrus grandis Osbeck) and lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle) on the growth of plant pathogenic fungi, Mucor hiemalis, Penicillium expansum and Fusarium proliferatum was investigated. The EOs of the citrus peels were obtained by cold-pressing method and the antifungal activity of EOs was evaluated using the agar dilution method. The results show that the EOs had significant antifungal activity. Lime EO was the best inhibitor of M. hiemalis and F. proliferatum while pomelo EO was the most effective against P. expansum. These results indicate that citrus EOs can be used as antifungal natural products in the food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries.

  8. Pharmacological Studies of Artichoke Leaf Extract and Their Health Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salem, Maryem; Affes, Hanen; Ksouda, Kamilia; Dhouibi, Raouia; Sahnoun, Zouheir; Hammami, Serria; Zeghal, Khaled Mounir

    2015-12-01

    Artichoke (Cynara scolymus) leaf extract was one of the few herbal remedies which the clinical and experimental trials have complemented each other. Both experimental and clinical effects have been verified through extensive biomedical herbal remedy research. Specifically, antioxidant, choleretic, hepatoprotective, bile-enhancing and lipid-lowering effects have been demonstrated, which corresponded with its historical use. Ongoing research seems to indicate that artichoke indeed have medicinal qualities. Most significant appears to be its beneficial effect on the liver. In animal studies, liquid extracts of the roots and leaves of artichoke have demonstrated an ability to protect the liver, with possibly even to help liver cells regenerate. Although research is not yet conclusive, scientists were optimistic that its long-standing use in humans for digestive and bowel problems was indeed justified. It may also play a role in lowering cholesterol and thus help to prevent heart disease. Boiled wild artichoke reduced postprandial glycemic and insulinemic responses in normal subjects but has no effect on metabolic syndrome patients. This article intended to review the wide ranging pharmacological effects of artichoke leaf extract.

  9. Phytochemical profile, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and hypoglycemic potential of hydroalcoholic extracts from Citrus medica L. cv Diamante flowers, leaves and fruits at two maturity stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menichini, Federica; Loizzo, Monica R; Bonesi, Marco; Conforti, Filomena; De Luca, Damiano; Statti, Giancarlo A; de Cindio, Bruno; Menichini, Francesco; Tundis, Rosa

    2011-07-01

    Since the past decade consumption of certain foods has been reported to have a positive effect on health. The object of the study was to determine for the first time the chemical composition and the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and hypoglycemic potential of Citrus medica L. cv Diamante flowers, leaves and fruits (endocarp and mesocarp) at two maturity stages. Flowers and leaves were characterized by the highest total phenols and flavonoids content. A declining trend was observed during maturity of fruits for both phenols and flavonoids. The antioxidant activity evaluated by the β-carotene bleaching test showed a strong activity for flowers and endocarp of mature fruits with IC50 values of 2.8 μg/mL and 3.5 μg/mL, respectively, after 30 min of incubation. Interestingly, the mature fruits endocarp (IC50 value of 426.0 μg/mL) could inhibit α-amylase with an IC50 value 2-fold higher than immature fruits. None of the tested extracts affected the proliferation of human skin fibroblasts 142BR. The obtained results suggest a potential use of C. medica L. cv Diamante as new valuable Citrus species with functional properties for food or nutraceutical product on the basis of high content of phytochemicals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparative toxicity effect of bush tea leaves (Hyptis suaveolens) and orange peel (Citrus sinensis) oil extract on larvae of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amusan, A A S; Idowu, A B; Arowolo, F S

    2005-09-01

    The ethanolic extracts of the orange peel (Citrus sinensis) and bush tea leaves (Hyptis suaveolens) were compared for their toxicity effect on the larvae of the yellow fever mosquito Aedes aegypti collected from disused tyres beside College of Natural Sciences building University of Agriculture, Abeokuta, Nigeria. Eight graded concentrations, 0.9ppm, 0.8ppm, 0.7ppm, 0.6ppm, 0.5ppm, 0.4ppm, 0.3ppm and 0.2ppm of both plant extracts were tested on the larvae. The mean lethal dose LD10, was 0.15 ppm for C. sinensis, 0.01 for H. suaveolens, while LD50 for C. sinensis was 0.4ppm, H. suaveolens 0.60ppm and LD90 for C. sinensis was 0.9ppm and H. suaveolens was 1.45ppm. LD10 for the control 0.65ppm, LD50 0.9ppm and LD90 2.0 ppm. The extract of C. sinensis peel caused higher mortality rate at concentrations 0.8ppm (95%) and 0.3ppm (90%) of the larvae while the extract of H. suaveolens caused high mortality rate on the larvae at concentrations of 0.9ppm (80%) and 0.3ppm (80%). Significant differences were observed between untreated and treated larvae (exposed to either of the extract) at the various concentrations (P< 0.05).

  11. Semantic Preview Benefit in English: Individual Differences in the Extraction and Use of Parafoveal Semantic Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldre, Aaron; Andrews, Sally

    2016-01-01

    Although there is robust evidence that skilled readers of English extract and use orthographic and phonological information from the parafovea to facilitate word identification, semantic preview benefits have been elusive. We sought to establish whether individual differences in the extraction and/or use of parafoveal semantic information could…

  12. Extract of Citrus maxima (pummelo) leaves improve hepatoprotective activity in Wistar rats submitted to the induction of non-alcoholic hepatic steatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feksa, Denise Lima; Coelho, Ritiéle Pinto; Aparecida da Costa Güllich, Angélica; Dal Ponte, Emanuelle S; da Costa Escobar Piccoli, Jacqueline; Manfredini, Vanusa

    2018-02-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a spectrum of liver changes, ranging from hepatic steatosis to hepatocellular carcinoma. The Citrus maxima (CM) has been shown to be beneficial to the organism, and these activities are attributed to the presence of phytochemical compounds. The objective of this study was to evaluate the n vitro antioxidant potential of the CM leaves extract and on Wistar rats submitted to hepatic steatosis induction by fructose-associated hyperlipid diet (FHD). For the evaluation of in vivo effects, the animals were distributed in G1 (normal diet - ND), G2 (FHD), G3 (ND + extract 50mg/kg) and G4 (FHD + extract 50 mg/kg). All the parameters were determined through classical methodologies. The extract showed a significant antioxidant potential in vitro. In the in vivo analysis, the diet used was able to induce the development of metabolic abnormalities that favored the formation of hepatic steatosis (G2). Changes in inflammatory markers, increase in markers of oxidative damage, and reduction of antioxidant defenses were also observed. In addition, the extract did not cause changes in the animals' weight gain and acted as an anti-inflammatory, since G4 animals exhibited significantly reduced levels of the inflammatory markers. In the liver, the extract significantly decreased the content of fat, cholesterol and triglycerides compared to G2. The extract also showed antioxidant activity (G4) when compared to G2. The results suggest that the extract of CM leaf showed hepatoprotective, hypolipidemic, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities and the presence of phenolic compounds is a probable cause for such activities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Chemical Composition of Hexane Extract of Citrus aurantifolia and Anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis Activity of Some of Its Constituents

    OpenAIRE

    Sandoval-Montemayor, Nallely E.; Abraham García; Elizabeth Elizondo-Treviño; Elvira Garza-González; Laura Alvarez; María del Rayo Camacho-Corona

    2012-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to isolate and characterize the active compounds from the hexane extract of the fruit peels of Citrus aurantiifolia, which showed activity against one sensitive and three monoresistant (isoniazid, streptomycin or ethambutol) strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. The active extract was fractionated by column chromatography, yielding the following major compounds: 5-geranyloxypsoralen (

  14. Citrus junos Tanaka Peel Extract Exerts Antidiabetic Effects via AMPK and PPAR-γ both In Vitro and In Vivo in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Hee Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The antidiabetic effect of the Citrus junos Tanaka (also known as yuja or yuzu was examined. Ethanol extract of yuja peel (YPEE significantly stimulated 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-ylamino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-NBDG uptake in C2C12 myotubes. However, ethanol extract of yuja pulp (YpEE and water extract of yuja peel (YPWE or pulp (YpWE did not stimulate glucose uptake. In addition, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activities were increased by YPEE in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of AMPK inhibitor decreased the glucose uptake stimulated by YPEE in C2C12 myotubes. We confirmed the anti-diabetic effect of YPEE in mice fed a high fat-diet (HFD. Compared with control mice on a normal diet (ND, these mice showed increased body weight, liver fat, insulin resistance, triacylglycerol (TG, and total cholesterol content. Addition of 5% YPEE significantly reduced the weight gain and rise in liver fat content, serum triacylglycerol (TG, total cholesterol, and insulin resistance found in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD. Moreover, YPEE reduced the secretion of HFD-induced adipocytokines such as leptin and resistin. YPEE also resulted in increased phosphorylation of AMPK in muscle tissues. These results suggest that ethanol extract of yuja peel exerts anti-diabetic effects via AMPK and PPAR-γ in both cell culture and mouse models.

  15. Chemical Profile and Antioxidant Properties of Extracts and Essential Oils from Citrus × limon (L.) Burm. cv. Femminello Comune.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Tundis, Rosa; Bonesi, Marco; Sanzo, Giuseppe Di; Verardi, Alessandra; Lopresto, Catia Giovanna; Pugliese, Alessandro; Menichini, Francesco; Balducchi, Roberto; Calabrò, Vincenza

    2016-05-01

    Citrus × limon cv. Femminello Comune (Rutaceae) from Rocca Imperiale (Italy), one of the six Protected Geographical Indication (PGI) Italian lemon crops, has been recently received renewed interest. In this work, fresh and dried peels and leaves were extracted by hydrodistillation, supercritical fluid extraction (SFE), and Soxhlet apparatus. Chemical profile was assessed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Except for leaves extracts obtained by Soxhlet apparatus, the monoterpene hydrocarbons fraction dominated. Limonene, γ-terpinene, and β-pinene were the main identified compounds. The antioxidant activity was investigated using different in vitro assays namely 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), ABTS, ferric reducing ability power (FRAP), and β-carotene bleaching test. In DPPH test, the essential oil obtained by hydrodistillation of fresh peel exhibited the highest activity (IC50 of 1.17 mg/ml). Leaves extracted by SFE showed a good activity in both DPPH and β-carotene bleaching test with IC50 values of 2.20 and 6.66 mg/ml, respectively. Monoterpene hydrocarbons fraction exhibited a positive Pearson's correlation coefficient with all antioxidant assays. Leaves, often considered waste material, should be considered from a different point because they represent a matrix of indisputable interest. © 2016 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  16. Citrus Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    An aerial color infrared (CIR) mapping system developed by Kennedy Space Center enables Florida's Charlotte County to accurately appraise its citrus groves while reducing appraisal costs. The technology was further advanced by development of a dual video system making it possible to simultaneously view images of the same area and detect changes. An image analysis system automatically surveys and photo interprets grove images as well as automatically counts trees and reports totals. The system, which saves both time and money, has potential beyond citrus grove valuation.

  17. Evaluation of antioxidant-associated efficacy of flavonoid extracts from a traditional Chinese medicine Hua Ju Hong (peels of Citrus grandis (L.) Osbeck).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianping; Shan, Letian; Chen, Zhiyun; Xu, Haishun; Wang, Jianping; Liu, Yuwen; Xiong, Yaokang

    2014-12-02

    Hua Ju Hong (HJH, peels of Citrus grandis (L.) Osbeck) is a popularly used traditional Chinese medicine recorded by "Compendium of Materia Medica" (Ben Cao Gang Mu) in Ming Dynasty of China (1578 A.D.). With flavonoid components, HJH possesses hypolipidemic effect associated with antioxidation action. However, no report was found regarding the flavonoid profile and antioxidant activity of HJH. Five purified flavonoid extracts (TFCA, TFCB, TFCC, TFCD and TFCE.) were obtained from HJH using Ca(OH)2 and HPD-300 macroporous resins, and their total flavonoids and representative flavonoid components were analyzed. In vitro tests of DPPH free radical scavenging activity, reducing power, and total antioxidant activity of each extract were evaluated. The most effective extract was selected for in vivo antioxidative evaluation using a rat hyperlipemia model. The total flavonoid content was varying among each HJH extract and decreased in an order of TFCB>TFCD>TFCC>TFCE>TFCA. TFCB, TFCD, and TFCC contained more than 50% of total flavonoids, the highest content of which was found in TFCB (80.7%). HPLC analysis showed that the contents of three flavonoid components, narirutin, naringin and neohesperidin, displayed a similar trend as that of total flavonoids. In vitro antioxidative tests determined that TFCB at 0.24 to 1.2mg/ml possessed the most significant antioxidant effects among other extracts and was also superior to BHT. In vivo experiment also revealed the significant antioxidant and antihyperlipidemic activities of TFCB started from 50 to 200mg/kg after oral administration to hyperlipemia rats. These results indicate that TFCB with the highest flavonoid contents has the strongest antioxidant-associated activities. This is the first report regarding antioxidant-associated activities and relevant flavonoid components of HJH extracts, providing a promising candidate of traditional Chinese medicine for antioxidative treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  18. Effects of Citrus aurantium (Bitter Orange Fruit Extracts and p-Synephrine on Metabolic Fluxes in the Rat Liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Marina Peralta

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The fruit extracts of Citrus aurantium (bitter orange are traditionally used as weight-loss products and as appetite supressants. An important fruit component is p-synephrine, which is structurally similar to the adrenergic agents. Weight-loss and adrenergic actions are always related to metabolic changes and this work was designed to investigate a possible action of the C. aurantium extract on liver metabolism. The isolated perfused rat liver was used to measure catabolic and anabolic pathways, including oxygen uptake and perfusion pressure. The C. aurantium extract and p-synephrine increased glycogenolysis, glycolysis, oxygen uptake and perfusion pressure. These changes were partly sensitive to a- and b-adrenergic antagonists. p-Synephrine (200 mM produced an increase in glucose output that was only 15% smaller than the increment caused by the extract containing 196 mM p-synephrine. At low concentrations the C. aurantium extract tended to increase gluconeogenesis, but at high concentrations it was inhibitory, opposite to what happened with p-synephrine. The action of the C. aurantium extract on liver metabolism is similar to the well known actions of adrenergic agents and can be partly attributed to its content in p-synephrine. Many of these actions are catabolic and compatible with the weight-loss effects usually attributed to C. aurantium.

  19. Citrus Sinensis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT: This study was carried out in Sokoto Metropolis to isolate and identify fungi associated with the deterioration of sweet orange fruits. A total of one hundred samples of fresh sweet Oranges (Citrus sinensis L) were used. First, a total of seventy samples were obtained from the three selected marketing centres in ...

  20. Comparison of two DNA extraction protocols from leave samples of Cotinus coggygria, Citrus sinensis and Genus juglans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, F; Minaei Chenar, H; Amiri, H; Omodipour, S; Shirbande Ghods, F; Kahrizi, D; Sohrabi, M; Ghorbani, T; Kazemi, E

    2017-02-28

    High quality DNA is essential for molecular research. Secondary metabolites can affect the quantity and quality DNA. In current research two DNA isolation methods including CTAB and Delaporta (protocols 1 & 2 respectively) were applied in three leave samples from Cotinus coggygria, Citrus sinensis and Genus juglans that their leaves are rich of secondary metabolites. We successfully isolated DNA from C. coggygria, C. sinensis and Genus Juglans using the two protocols described above. Good quality DNA was isolated from C. coggygria, C. sinensis and Genus Juglans using protocol 1, while protocol 2 failed to produce usable DNA from these sources. The highest amount of DNA (1.3-1.6) was obtained from them using protocol 1. As we discovered, procedure 1 may work better for plants with secondary metabolites.

  1. The effects of Nigella sativa (Ns), Anthemis hyalina (Ah) and Citrus sinensis (Cs) extracts on the replication of coronavirus and the expression of TRP genes family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulasli, Mustafa; Gurses, Serdar A; Bayraktar, Recep; Yumrutas, Onder; Oztuzcu, Serdar; Igci, Mehri; Igci, Yusuf Ziya; Cakmak, Ecir Ali; Arslan, Ahmet

    2014-03-01

    Extracts of Anthemis hyalina (Ah), Nigella sativa (Ns) and peels of Citrus sinensis (Cs) have been used as folk medicine to fight antimicrobial diseases. To evaluate the effect of extracts of Ah, Ns and Cs on the replication of coronavirus (CoV) and on the expression of TRP genes during coronavirus infection, HeLa-CEACAM1a (HeLa-epithelial carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 1a) cells were inoculated with MHV-A59 (mouse hepatitis virus-A59) at moi of 30. 1/50 dilution of the extracts was found to be the safe active dose. ELISA kits were used to detect the human IL-8 levels. Total RNA was isolated from the infected cells and cDNA was synthesized. Fluidigm Dynamic Array nanofluidic chip 96.96 was used to analyze the mRNA expression of 21 TRP genes and two control genes. Data was analyzed using the BioMark digital array software. Determinations of relative gene expression values were carried out by using the 2(-∆∆Ct) method (normalized threshold cycle (Ct) value of sample minus normalized Ct value of control). TCID50/ml (tissue culture infectious dose that will produce cytopathic effect in 50% of the inoculated tissue culture cells) was found for treatments to determine the viral loads. The inflammatory cytokine IL-8 level was found to increase for both 24 and 48 h time points following Ns extract treatment. TRPA1, TRPC4, TRPM6, TRPM7, TRPM8 and TRPV4 were the genes which expression levels changed significantly after Ah, Ns or Cs extract treatments. The virus load decreased when any of the Ah, Ns or Cs extracts was added to the CoV infected cells with Ah extract treatment leading to undetectable virus load for both 6 and 8 hpi. Although all the extract treatments had an effect on IL-8 secretion, TRP gene expression and virus load after CoV infection, it was the Ah extract treatment that showed the biggest difference in virus load. Therefore Ah extract is the best candidate in our hands that contains potential treatment molecule(s).

  2. Mobile helium-3 mining and extraction system and its benefits toward lunar base self-sufficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviatoslavsky, I. N.; Jacobs, M.

    The paper examines the issues of extracting He-3 from lunar regolith using mobile miners and its implications for the fusion-energy resupply of a lunar base. These issues include excavating, conveying, beneficiating, and heating the regloith, as well as collecting, transporting, and condensing the released solar-wind products. The benefits of such an operation toward lunar base self-sufficiency are described along with terrestrial benefits.

  3. Main Benefits and Applicability of Plant Extracts in Skin Care Products

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Sofia Ribeiro; Marilene Estanqueiro; M. Beatriz Oliveira; José Manuel Sousa Lobo

    2015-01-01

    Natural ingredients have been used for centuries for skin care purposes. Nowadays, they are becoming more prevalent in formulations, due to consumers’ concerns about synthetic ingredients/chemical substances. The main benefits reported for plant extracts, used in skin care, include antioxidant and antimicrobial activities and tyrosinase inhibition effect. In this review, some examples of plants from Portuguese flora, whose extracts have shown good properties for skin care are presented. Howev...

  4. Chemical constituents and antioxidant activity of essential oil and organic extract from the peel and kernel parts of Citrus japonica Thunb. (kumquat) from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouri, Amrah; Shafaghatlonbar, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The constituents of essential oils and organic extracts from peel and kernels of Citrus japonica were analysed by GC and GC/MS. The content of essential oil in peel and kernel was 1.1 and 0.8% based on dry weight. The essential oil of C. japonica peel and kernel was characterised by a higher amount of limonene (51.0 and 47.1%) and germacrene D (12.1 and 6.3%), and the hexane extracts of its peel and kernel were characterised by a higher amount of dodecanol-1(12.9 and 20.8%) and linolenic acid (13.1 and 16.3%), respectively. The antioxidant activities of oils were evaluated by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) method. The results indicate that both oils from different parts of C. japonica possess considerable antioxidant activity. The fruit peel and kernel essential oil could thus be useful in the industries, chiefly in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

  5. Main Benefits and Applicability of Plant Extracts in Skin Care Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Sofia Ribeiro

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural ingredients have been used for centuries for skin care purposes. Nowadays, they are becoming more prevalent in formulations, due to consumers’ concerns about synthetic ingredients/chemical substances. The main benefits reported for plant extracts, used in skin care, include antioxidant and antimicrobial activities and tyrosinase inhibition effect. In this review, some examples of plants from Portuguese flora, whose extracts have shown good properties for skin care are presented. However, despite the known properties of plant extracts, few studies reported the development of formulations with them. More work in this field can be accomplished to meet consumer demand.

  6. The effects of citrus extract (Citrox©) on the naturally occurring microflora and inoculated pathogens, Bacillus cereus and Salmonella enterica, in a model food system and the traditional Greek yogurt-based salad Tzatziki.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiraki, Maria I; Savvaidis, Ioannis N

    2016-02-01

    The antimicrobial effect of citrus extract (at 1 mL/kg [TC1] and 2 mL/kg [TC2]) on the naturally occurring microflora and inoculated pathogens (Bacillus cereus and Salmonella enterica, at ca. 6 log cfu/g) in the traditional Greek yogurt-based salad Tzatziki during storage under vacuum at 4 or 10 °C was examined. We also examined the effect of citrus extract (Citrox(©)) against the two aforementioned pathogens in tryptic soy broth (TSB). Of the two treatments, TC2 yielded the lowest yeast counts, irrespective of temperature, resulting in approximately 2 (4 °C) and 3 (10 °C) log reductions on the final day of storage (70 and 30 days, respectively). Although panelists preferred the TC1-treated salad, the TC2-treated product was sensorily acceptable. Therefore, at the concentrations used, Citrox had no negative sensorial effect on the Tzatziki. During storage, the Bacillus populations in the Citrox-treated Tzatziki samples progressively decreased, showing major declines from days 12 and 28 (at 10 and 4 °C, respectively). Citrox, especially at 2 mL/kg, had a significant effect on the survival of B. cereus. S. enterica showed major declines in all untreated Tzatziki samples from day 0-70 (4 °C) and from day 0-30 (10 °C), with averages of 2.5 and 2.8 log cfu/g, respectively. The results indicate that Citrox (at 1 and 2 mL/kg) is effective, from a safety standpoint, for reducing Bacillus and Salmonella spp. in Tzatziki. In addition, 2% citrus extract also showed a higher inhibitory effect against B. cereus and S. enterica grown in TSB than 1% citrus extract. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Topical Benefits of Two Fucoidan-Rich Extracts from Marine Macroalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Helen Fitton

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Two concentrated and well-characterized fucoidan-rich extracts were investigated to determine their benefits in topical applications. An Undaria pinnatifida extract, containing 85% fucoidan, and a Fucus vesiculosus co-extract, containing 60% fucoidan and 30% polyphenol, were assessed in a number of in vitro assays to measure the effect of the extracts on enzyme inhibition, glycation, antioxidant activity and Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1 protein expression. Double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical studies were also conducted to measure soothing, protection, wrinkle depth, brightness and skin spot intensity. Both extracts demonstrated marked inhibitory effects on processes linked to skin aging, including the increased expression of SIRT1 in vitro. Clinical testing established the efficacy of the extracts in a range of the tested applications, relative to placebo. The Fucus vesiculosus extract with high polyphenol content demonstrated additional in vitro antioxidant activity, as well as improved efficacy in skin brightening applications, relative to placebo. The major effects of the Undaria pinnatifida extract aided skin immunity, soothing and protection, while the Fucus vesiculosus extract most significantly affected age spot reduction and increased brightness, soothing and protection.

  8. 76 FR 23449 - Citrus Canker, Citrus Greening, and Asian Citrus Psyllid; Interstate Movement of Regulated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... Inspection Service 7 CFR Part 301 RIN 0579-AD29 Citrus Canker, Citrus Greening, and Asian Citrus Psyllid... regulated articles from areas quarantined for citrus canker, citrus greening, and/or Asian citrus psyllid... stock from an area quarantined for ACP, but not for citrus greening, to amend the existing regulatory...

  9. Protective effects of orange (Citrus sinensis L.) peel aqueous extract and hesperidin on oxidative stress and peptic ulcer induced by alcohol in rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmi, Slimen; Rtibi, Kais; Grami, Dhekra; Sebai, Hichem; Marzouki, Lamjed

    2017-08-14

    Massive alcohol drinking can lead to gastric ulcer. In the present study we investigated the gastroprotective effect of Citrus sinensis peel aqueous extract (CSPE) and Hesperidin (H) in ethanol (EtOH) induced oxidative stress and peptic ulcer in rats. Seventy adult male Wistar rats were divided into seven groups of 10 each: control, EtOH (4 g/kg b.w.), EtOH + various doses of CSPE (100, 200 and 400 mg/kg, b.w.), EtOH + Hesperidin (50 mg/kg, p.o.) and EtOH + Omeprazole (OM, 20 mg/kg, p.o.). Animals were perorally (p.o.) pre-treated with CSPE during 15 days and intoxicated with a single oral administration of EtOH (4 g/kg b.w.) during 2 h. Gastric ulcer was induced in rats with a single dose of ethanol (EtOH). Ulcer index, gene expression of gastric cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), malondialdhyde (MDA), hydrogen peroxide H 2 O 2 and Thiol groups (-SH) content in stomach and antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and gluthation peroxidise (GPx) were measured. Furthermore, histopathological examinations were performed. The results showed that ethanol induced gastric damage, improving oxidative stress markers level such as MDA (121 ± 4.45 nmol/mg proteins) and H 2 O 2 (24.62 ± 1.04 μmol/mg proteins), increased pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α level), as well as the expression of COX-2 in the ethanol group. However, a significant depletion of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants were observed, such as, GPx (72%), SOD (57.5%), CAT (41.6%) and -SH (50%). The lesions were associated with severe histopathological damage. The both Citrus sinensis peel aqueous extract (CSPE) and hesperidin significantly protect against all gastric damages caused by ethanol administration in rats. We propose that CSPE and hesperidin exhibit protective effects in EtOH-induced peptic ulcer in rat. This protection might be related in to part its antioxidant properties as well as its opposite effects on some studied

  10. Larvicidal, pupicidal, repellent and adulticidal activity of Citrus sinensis orange peel extract against Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Kadarkarai; Mahesh Kumar, Palanisamy; Kovendan, Kalimuthu; Amerasan, Duraisamy; Subrmaniam, Jayapal; Hwang, Jiang-Shiou

    2012-10-01

    Mosquitoes are the carriers of severe and well-known illnesses such as malaria, arboviral encephalitis, dengue fever, chikunguniya fever, West Nile virus and yellow fever. These diseases produce significant morbidity and mortality in humans and livestock around the world. The present study explored the effects of orange peel ethanol extract of Citrus sinensis on larvicidal, pupicidal, repellent and adulticidal activity against Anopheles stephensi, Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus. The orange peel material was shade dried at room temperature and powdered coarsely. From orange peel, 300 g powdered was macerated with 1 L of ethanol sequentially for a period of 72 h each and filtered. The yields of the orange peel ethanol crude extract of C. sinensis 13.86 g, respectively. The extracts were concentrated at reduced temperature on a rotary vacuum evaporator and stored at a temperature of 4 °C. The larvicidal, pupicidal and adult mortality was observed after 24 h of exposure; no mortality was observed in the control group. For C. sinensis, the median lethal concentration values (LC(50)) observed for the larvicidal and pupicidal activities against mosquito vector species A. stephensi first to fourth larval instars and pupae were 182.24, 227.93, 291.69, 398.00 and 490.84 ppm; A. aegypti values were 92.27, 106.60, 204.87, 264.26, 342.45, 436.93 and 497.41 ppm; and C. quinquefasciatus values were 244.70, 324.04, 385.32, 452.78 and 530.97 ppm, respectively. The results of maximum repellent activity were observed at 450 ppm in ethanol extracts of C. sinensis and the mean complete protection time ranged from 150 to 180 min was tested. The ethanol extract of C. sinensis showed 100% repellency in 150 min and showed complete protection in 90 min at 350 ppm against A. stephensi, A. aegypti and C. quinquefasciatus, respectively. The adult mortality was found in ethanol extract of C. sinensis with the LC(50) and LC(90) values of 272.19 and 457.14 ppm, A. stephensi; 289.62 and

  11. Study of the extraction procedure by experimental design and validation of a LC method for determination of flavonoids in Citrus bergamia juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrò, M L; Galtieri, V; Cutroneo, P; Tommasini, S; Ficarra, P; Ficarra, R

    2004-04-16

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) separation with photo-diode array detection was developed for the simultaneous determination of flavonoids extracted from Citrus bergamia juice. It employs a C18 reversed-phase column and a linear gradient elution system with methanol/water with 5% acetic acid (v/v), as mobile phase. The method was validated in terms of detection limits (LOD), quantitation limits (LOQ), linearity, precision and accuracy. Limits of detection ranged from a low of 0.007 mg ml(-1) (narirutin) to a high of 0.018 mg ml(-1) (didymin). The limits of quantitation were between a low of 0.011 mg ml(-1) (7-OH flavanone) and a high of 0.024 mg ml(-1) (didymin). An excellent linear response was observed over the range specified for all analytes, as confirmed by the correlation coefficient with ranged from 0.9982 and 0.9999. The intra-day R.S.D.% ranged from 0.11 to 3.64%. The intermediate precision R.S.D.% were not higher than 7.62%. The accuracy of the method was confirmed with an average recovery ranging, except for neoeriocitrin, between 88.07% and 102.45%. Since the extraction conditions can affect analyte recovery, a suitable optimization strategy of the procedure was needed. The experimental parameters optimized were extraction time, temperature, and solvents. A multivariate approach was used to provide direct evaluation of the selected variables and related interactions. The D-optimal design was constructed by applying the exchange algorithm. All experimental results were computed by NEMROD-W software. This methodology led us to obtain the best recovery for all the flavonoids in the least number of experiments.

  12. Optimization of low power ultrasound-assisted extraction of phenolic compounds from mandarin (Citrus reticulata Blanco cv. Sainampueng) peel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nipornram, Suriyaporn; Tochampa, Worasit; Rattanatraiwong, Puntarika; Singanusong, Riantong

    2018-02-15

    Mandarin peel is a good source of phenolic compounds, which can be extracted by the ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) method. This research was to optimize the UAE conditions for maximum mandarin peel extract (MPE) relating to the extract yield, total phenolic content and the content of a mandarin peel rich flavonoid, hesperidin, using a response surface method comparing with the maceration extraction (MAE) method. The results showed that the selected factors (temperature, time and power) have a significant influence on the extraction yield, total phenolic content and hesperidin content. The extraction at 48°C and 56.71W for 40min was considered the optimal UAE condition since it provided the maximum yield (26.52%), total phenolic (15,263.32mgEq gallic/100g DW) and hesperidin (6435.53mg/100g DW). At the same extraction temperature and time, UAE showed greater extraction efficiency than MAE with 1.77 times higher yield than that of MAE. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Phenolic compounds and biological activities of small-size citrus: Kumquat and calamondin

    OpenAIRE

    Lou, Shyi-Neng; Ho, Chi-Tang

    2016-01-01

    Kumquat and calamondin are two small-size citrus fruits. Owing to their health benefits, they are traditionally used as folk medicine in Asian countries. However, the research on flavonoids and biological activities of kumquat and calamondin have received less attention. This review summarizes the reported quantitative and qualitative data of phenolic compositions in these two fruits. Effects of maturity, harvest time, various solvent extractions and heat treatment of phenolic compositions, a...

  14. Anti-allergic effect of a combination of Citrus unshiu unripe fruits extract and prednisolone on picryl chloride-induced contact dermatitis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Tadashi; Shiura, Takehumi; Masuda, Megumi; Tokunaga, Masashi; Kawase, Atsushi; Iwaki, Masahiro; Gato, Takeshi; Fumuro, Masahiko; Sasaki, Katsuaki; Utsunomiya, Naoki; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2008-04-01

    Effect of 50% ethanolic extract of unripe fruits of Citrus unshiu (CU-ext) on type IV allergic reaction was examined by inhibitory activity of ear swelling of picryl chloride-induced contact dermatitis (PC-CD) in mice. Oral administration of CU-ext and subcutaneous administration of prednisolone showed inhibition of ear swelling during both induction and effector phases of PC-CD. The inhibitory activities of combinations of CU-ext (p.o.) and prednisolone (s.c.) during induction phase of PC-CD were more potent than those of CU-ext alone and prednisolone alone. Successive oral administration of hesperidin, a major flavanone glycoside of CU-ext, inhibited ear swelling during induction phase of PC-CD. The inhibitory activities of combinations of hesperidin (p.o.) and prednisolone (s.c.) were more potent than those of hesperidin alone and prednisolone alone. These results indicated that the combinations of prednisolone and CU-ext or hesperidin exerted a synergistic effect.

  15. An Extract of Chinpi, the Dried Peel of the Citrus Fruit Unshiu, Enhances Axonal Remyelination via Promoting the Proliferation of Oligodendrocyte Progenitor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Tokunaga

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aging-induced decrease in axonal myelination/remyelination is due to impaired recruitment and differentiation of oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs. Our previous studies have shown that a monoclonal antibody to DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp box polypeptide 54 (Ddx54, a member of the DEAD box family of RNA helicases, (1 specifically labels oligodendrocyte lineages, (2 binds to mRNA and protein isoforms of myelin basic proteins (MBP, and (3 regulates migration of OPCs from ventricular zone to corpus callosum in mice. It has also been demonstrated that specific loss of a 21.5 kDa MBP isoform (MBP21.5 reflects demyelination status, and oral administration of an extract of Chinpi, citrus unshiu peel, reversed the aging-induced demyelination. Here, we report that Chinpi treatment induced a specific increase in the MBP21.5, led to the reappearance of Ddx54-expressing cells in ventricular-subventricular zone and corpus callosum of aged mice, and promoted remyelination. Treatment of in vitro OPC cultures with Chinpi constituents, hesperidin plus narirutin, led to an increase in 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine incorporation in Ddx54-expressing OPCs, but not in NG2- or Olig2-expressing cell populations. The present study suggests that Ddx54 plays crucial role in remyelination. Furthermore, Chinpi and Chinpi-containing herbal medicines may be a therapeutic option for the aging-induced demyelination diseases.

  16. HPLC-PDA-MS and NMR characterization of C-glycosyl flavones in a hydroalcoholic extract of Citrus aurantifolia leaves with antiplatelet activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccinelli, Anna Lisa; García Mesa, Milagros; Armenteros, Dulce María; Alfonso, María Antonia; Arevalo, Ana Carolina; Campone, Luca; Rastrelli, Luca

    2008-03-12

    A hydroalcoholic extract of lime ( Citrus aurantifolia) leaves has been developed in Cuba to be used as a nutritional supplement and phytomedicine in the form of tincture (TLL). A HPLC-PDA-ESI/MS/MS method has been used for the comprehensive analysis of C-glycosyl flavones in TLL. Six C-glycosyl flavones were characterized and, to confirm the proposed structures and to elucidate the nature of the sugar units, a preparative procedure was applied, and isolated compounds were characterized by NMR. Apigenin-6,8-di-C-beta-D-glucopyranoside (vicenin II) (1), diosmetin-6,8-di- C-beta- d-glucopyranoside (2), apigenin-8-C-beta-D-glucopyranoside (vitexin) (3), apigenin-8-C-[alpha-L-arabinopyranosyl-(1-->6)]-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (4), apigenin-6-C-[alpha-l-arabinopyranosyl-(1-->6)]-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (5). and apigenin-6-C-beta-D-glucopyranoside (isovitexin) (6) were identified in TLL and quantified by HPLC-PDA. Compounds 4 and 5 were two new arabinosyl derivatives of vitexin and isovitexin. Inhibitor effect of TLL on platelet aggregation induced by physiological agonists of platelets was evaluated in human plasma. TLL inhibited significantly ADP and epinephrine-induced platelet aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner (IC 50=0.40 and 0.32 mg/mL, respectively).

  17. Influence of apple and citrus pectins, processed mango peels, a phenolic mango peel extract, and gallic Acid as potential feed supplements on in vitro total gas production and rumen methanogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerkens, Christian Hubert; Schweiggert, Ralf Martin; Steingass, Herbert; Boguhn, Jeannette; Rodehutscord, Markus; Carle, Reinhold

    2013-06-19

    Several food processing byproducts were assessed as potential feed and feed supplements. Since their chemical composition revealed a high nutritional potential for ruminants, the Hohenheim in vitro gas test was used to investigate total gas, methane, and volatile fatty acid production as well as protozoal numbers after ruminal digestion of different substrate levels. Processing byproducts used were low- and high-esterified citrus and apple pectins, integral mango peels, and depectinized mango peels. In addition, the effect of a phenolic mango peel extract and pure gallic acid was investigated. The highest decrease in methane production (19%) was achieved by supplementing high levels of low-esterified citrus pectin to the hay-based diet. Interestingly, total gas production was not affected at the same time. Showing valuable nutritional potential, all byproducts exhibited, e.g., high metabolizable energy (11.9-12.8 MJ/kg DM). In conclusion, all byproducts, particularly low-esterified citrus pectin, revealed promising potential as feed and feed supplements.

  18. Oxidative stability and alpha-tocopherol retention in soybean oil with lemon seed extract (Citrus limon) under thermoxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzia, Débora Maria Moreno; Jorge, Neuza

    2009-11-01

    The synergistic effect of lemon seed extract with tert-butylhydroquinone (TBHQ) in soybean oil subjected to thermoxidation by Rancimat was investigated, and the influence of these antioxidants on a-tocopherol degradation in thermoxidized soybean oil. Control, LSE (2400 mg/kg Lemon Seed Extract), TBHQ (50 mg/kg), Mixture 1 (LSE + 50 mg/kg TBHQ) and Mixture 2 (LSE + 25 mg/kg TBHQ) were subjected to 180 degrees C for 20 h. Samples were taken at time 0, 5, 10, 15 and 20 h intervals and analysed for oxidative stability and alpha-tocopherol content. LSE and Mixtures 1 and 2 showed the capacity of retarding lipid oxidation when added to soya oil and also contributed to alpha-tocopherol retention in oil heated at high temperatures. However, Mixtures 1 and 2 added to the oil presented a greater antioxidant power, consequently proving the antioxidants synergistic effect.

  19. Combination of Ethanolic Extract of Citrus aurantifolia Peels with Doxorubicin Modulate Cell Cycle and Increase Apoptosis Induction on MCF-7 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adina, Anugerah Budipratama; Goenadi, Fina Aryani; Handoko, Franciscus Feby; Nawangsari, Dwi Ana; Hermawan, Adam; Jenie, Riris Istighfari; Meiyanto, Edy

    2014-01-01

    New approach of breast cancer therapy is developed toward combination therapy with agents that have a specific molecular target. Our previous study showed that Citrus aurantifolia lime peels ethanolic extract (CPE) increased the sensitivity of MCF-7 cells againts doxorubicin. This study aims to observe the mechanism of combination CPE and doxorubicin in cell cycle modulation and apoptosis on MCF-7 cells. The assays were performed in the study were cell cycle assay, apoptosis induction, and immunocytochemistry of MCF-7 cells.The effect on the modulation of cell cycle and apoptosis were observed by flowcytometry assay in both single dose of CPE and its combination with Doxorubicin. Cell cycle distribution were observed with flowcytometer FACS-Calibur and its data was analyzed by Cell Quest program. Apoptotic induction in MCF-7 cells was examined using acrydine orange-ethidium bromide (AO-EtBr) double staining. Immunocytochemistry assay was done to observe the expression of apoptotic regulation protein p53 and Bcl-2. The result showed that CPE 6 μg/mL induced apoptosis and cell accumulation at G1 phase, while CPE 15 μg/mL induced apoptosis and cell accumulation at G2/M phase. The combination of doxorubicin 200 nM with CPE 6 μg/mL increased apoptosis induction than their single treatment, and cell accumulation at G2/M phase. Evidence of apoptosis and protein expression of p53 and Bcl-2 indicated that both single applications and combinations of CPE and doxorubicin are able to increase apoptotic bodies of MCF-7 cells by increasing the proteins expression. This result suggested that CPE could perform as co-chemotherapeutic agent with doxorubicin on breast cancer cells.

  20. Citrus Seed Oils Efficacy against Larvae ofAedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Hazrat; Akram, Waseem; Hassan, Soaib Ali; Din, Sadrud

    2017-09-01

    Dengue fever is a serious public health issue in Pakistan for many years. Globally plants have been reported to contain compounds with insecticidal properties. These properties have been demonstrated more recently on the larval stages of mosquitoes. Therefore, Citrus cultivar seeds were evaluated for larvicidal potential against the primary dengue vector Aedes aegypti . Extraction of oil was done by a steam distillation method and oils were evaluated according to WHO guidelines for larvicides 2005 for evaluation of insecticidal properties of citrus seed extracts against mosquito larvae. Among the Citrus cultivar seed oil, rough lemon ( Citrus jambhiri ) had the lowest LC 50 value (200.79ppm), while musambi ( C. sinensis var musambi ) had the highest LC 50 value (457.30ppm) after 24 h of exposure. Citrus cultivars have some larvicidal potential but C. jambhiri had the greatest potential against A. aegypti larvae. Further small-scale field trials using the extracts of C. jambhiri will be conducted to determine operational feasibility.

  1. Penicillium digitatum metabolites on synthetic media and citrus fruits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariza, M.R.; Larsen, Thomas Ostenfeld; Petersen, Bent O.

    2002-01-01

    Penicillium digitatum has been cultured on citrus fruits and yeast extract sucrose agar media (YES).Cultivation of fungal cultures on solid medium allowed the isolation of two novel tryptoquivaline-like metabolites, tryptoquialanine A (1) and tryptoquialanine B (2), also biosynthesized on citrus...

  2. Genetic Transformation in Citrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dicle Donmez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus is one of the world’s important fruit crops. Recently, citrus molecular genetics and biotechnology work have been accelerated in the world. Genetic transformation, a biotechnological tool, allows the release of improved cultivars with desirable characteristics in a shorter period of time and therefore may be useful in citrus breeding programs. Citrus transformation has now been achieved in a number of laboratories by various methods. Agrobacterium tumefaciens is used mainly in citrus transformation studies. Particle bombardment, electroporation, A. rhizogenes, and a new method called RNA interference are used in citrus transformation studies in addition to A. tumefaciens. In this review, we illustrate how different gene transformation methods can be employed in different citrus species.

  3. Quantitative analysis of flavanones from citrus fruits by using mesoporous molecular sieve-based miniaturized solid phase extraction coupled to ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography and quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wan; Ye, Li-Hong; Cao, Jun; Xu, Jing-Jing; Peng, Li-Qing; Zhu, Qiong-Yao; Zhang, Qian-Yun; Hu, Shuai-Shuai

    2015-08-07

    An analytical procedure based on miniaturized solid phase extraction (SPE) and ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry was developed and validated for determination of six flavanones in Citrus fruits. The mesoporous molecular sieve SBA-15 as a solid sorbent was characterised by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Additionally, compared with reported extraction techniques, the mesoporous SBA-15 based SPE method possessed the advantages of shorter analysis time and higher sensitivity. Furthermore, considering the different nature of the tested compounds, all of the parameters, including the SBA-15 amount, solution pH, elution solvent, and the sorbent type, were investigated in detail. Under the optimum condition, the instrumental detection and quantitation limits calculated were less than 4.26 and 14.29ngmL(-1), respectively. The recoveries obtained for all the analytes were ranging from 89.22% to 103.46%. The experimental results suggested that SBA-15 was a promising material for the purification and enrichment of target flavanones from complex citrus fruit samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Anacardium occidentale L. extract in cosmetic formulations: benefits for oily skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane G. Mercurio

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cashew (Annacardium occidentale L, family: Anacardiaceae. is a native plant from tropical America, and is widely cultivated in Asia and Africa. It has great socioeconomic importance for Brazil and for many other countries. Cashew apple (Anacardium occidentale L., extract (CAE is rich in tannins, flavonoids, amino acids, anacardic acids and vitamin C, which can provide desirable benefits to oily skin. The aim of this study was to assess the antioxidant activity of CAE and the improvement of oily skin after application of a sunscreen containing this extract. The antioxidant activity of CAE was evaluated by chemioluminescence assay. A sunscreen was developed and added (FC, or not (F, with 3.5% of CAE. Transepidermal water loss, stratum corneum water content, sebum content and skin microrelief were evaluated before and after two and four hours of a single application of the F or FC formulations. FC effects on skin were also evaluated after a 28 day-period of twice daily applications on the faces of 12 volunteers. Skin imaging techniques were used to evaluate skin pores and comedones, and sensory analysis was performed. CAE showed antioxidant activity and the FC formulation controlled the sebum secretion after two and four hours. FC reduced the number of skin pores (24% and did not increase the number of comedones. These results indicate that CAE is an innovative active ingredient from Brazilian biodiversity with antioxidant activity and efficacy to improve oily skin conditions.

  5. Citrus Waste Biomass Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karel Grohman; Scott Stevenson

    2007-01-30

    Renewable Spirits is developing an innovative pilot plant bio-refinery to establish the commercial viability of ehtanol production utilizing a processing waste from citrus juice production. A novel process based on enzymatic hydrolysis of citrus processing waste and fermentation of resulting sugars to ethanol by yeasts was successfully developed in collaboration with a CRADA partner, USDA/ARS Citrus and Subtropical Products Laboratory. The process was also successfully scaled up from laboratory scale to 10,000 gal fermentor level.

  6. Phenolic compounds and biological activities of small-size citrus: Kumquat and calamondin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyi-Neng Lou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Kumquat and calamondin are two small-size citrus fruits. Owing to their health benefits, they are traditionally used as folk medicine in Asian countries. However, the research on flavonoids and biological activities of kumquat and calamondin have received less attention. This review summarizes the reported quantitative and qualitative data of phenolic compositions in these two fruits. Effects of maturity, harvest time, various solvent extractions and heat treatment of phenolic compositions, and bioactivities were discussed; distributions of the forms of phenolic compounds existing in kumquat and calamondin were also summarized. Furthermore, biological activities, including antioxidant, antityrosinase, antimicrobial, antitumor, and antimetabolic disorder effects, have also been discussed. Effective phenolic components were proposed for a certain bioactivity. It was found that C-glycoside flavonoids are dominant phenolic compounds in kumquat and calamondin, unlike in other citrus fruits. Up to now, biological activities and chemical characteristics of C-glycoside flavonoids in kumquat and calamondin are largely unknown.

  7. Citrus pectin: structure and application in acid dairy drinks

    OpenAIRE

    Tanhatan Naseri, Abrisham; Thibault, Jean-François

    2008-01-01

    Pectin, a plant cell wall polysaccharide, is mainly used in food industries for its gelling and stabilizing properties. In industrial applications, pectin is usually widely extracted from citrus peels, and in some intances, apple pomace is also used. Lime and lemon are the preferred citrus species used in the extraction of pectin, while orange and grapefruit are used less often. In the food industry, pectin is widely employed in the production of jams and jellies, confectionary products a...

  8. Peliminary examination of herbal extracts on the inhibition of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This work aims at describing the traditional uses, to determine the antimicrobial potential of two different extracts hexane, acetone of the leaves of Citrus unshiu, Citrus sinensis, Citrus limon, Laurus nobilis, Citrus paradisi on clinical strain of H. pylori in a bid to identify potential sources of cheap starting materials ...

  9. Benefits and risks of the subcutaneous immunotherapy with acari extracts in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olimpio Rodríguez-Santos

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The records of patients from the Allergology Service in the Previsora Policlinic, Camagüey were revised to evaluate benefits and risks of the subcutaneous immunotherapy (ITSC with extracts of acari. The study was observational, analytic and retrospective of cases and controls in allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and bronchial asthma. A total of 160 subjects, older than 18 years old, were chosen. Eighty out of them had already received ITSC with dose increase during 13 weeks and maintenance with monthly injections during 18 months. A total of 80 patients who only received prevention measures and medications during the crises were paired. Questionnaires were applied for quality of rhinoconjunctivitis life and asthma, about the consumption of medications and the frequency of the crises. The adverse events were measured, as they were local and systemic to the cutaneous tests, to the ITSC and the different pharmacological treatments. There was a significant increase of the punctuation of life quality questionnaires, (p=0.011. The consumption of medications decreased in both the cases and the controls, without significant differences (p=0.083. The frequency of the rhinitis and asthma crises decrease in the group of ITSC (p=0.029. Slight local and systemic reactions were reported in both groups with Odds ratio (OR=2.029 in the ITSC group, with a 95% confidence interval of 1.114–3.967 (p=0.019. The results show that the subcutaneous immunotherapy with acari offers benefits and few risks to patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma.

  10. Cercosporoid diseases of Citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Feng; Groenewald, J Z; Zhu, Li; Crous, P W; Li, Hongye

    2015-01-01

    Citrus leaves and fruits exhibiting disease symptoms ranging from greasy spot, yellow spot, small or large brown spot, black dot, and brown dot were sampled from Fujian, Guangdong, Guizhou, Hunan, Jiangxi, Yunnan, Zhejiang provinces and the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region in China. In total 82 isolates representing various cercosporoid genera were isolated from these disease symptoms, which were supplemented with eight Citrus cercosporoid isolates collected from other countries. Based on a morphological and phylogenetic study using sequence data from the nuclear ribosomal DNA's ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 regions (ITS), and partial actin (act), β-tubulin (tub2), 28S nuclear ribosomal RNA (28S rDNA) and translation elongation factor 1-α (tef1) genes, these strains were placed in the following genera: Cercospora, Pallidocercospora, Passalora, Pseudocercospora, Verrucisporota and Zasmidium. All isolates tended to be sterile, except the Zasmidium isolates associated with citrus greasy spot-like symptoms, which subsequently were compared with phylogenetically similar isolates occurring on Citrus and other hosts elsewhere. From these results four Zasmidium species were recognized on Citrus, namely Z. indonesianum on Citrus in Indonesia, Z. fructicola and Z. fructigenum on Citrus in China and Z. citri-griseum, which appears to have a wide host range including Acacia, Citrus, Eucalyptus and Musa, as well as a global distribution. © 2015 by The Mycological Society of America.

  11. Volatile constituents of wild citrus Mangshanyegan (Citrus nobilis Lauriro) peel oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cuihua; Cheng, Yunjiang; Zhang, Hongyan; Deng, Xiuxin; Chen, Feng; Xu, Juan

    2012-03-14

    Volatiles of a wild mandarin, Mangshanyegan (Citrus nobilis Lauriro), were characterized by GC-MS, and their aroma active compounds were identified by aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) and gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O). The volatile profile of Mangshanyegan was compared with those of other four citrus species, Kaopan pummelo (Citrus grandis), Eureka lemon (Citrus limon), Huangyanbendizao tangerine (Citrus reticulata), and Seike navel orange (Citrus sinensis). Monoterpene hydrocarbons predominated in Mangshanyegan, in particular d-limonene and β-myrcene, which accounted for 85.75 and 10.89% of total volatiles, respectively. Among the 12 compounds with flavor dilution factors (FD) = 27, 8 oxygenated compounds, including (Z)- and (E)-linalool oxides, were present only in Mangshanyegan. The combined results of GC-O, quantitative analysis, odor activity values (OAVs), and omission tests revealed that β-myrcene and (Z)- and (E)-linalool oxides were the characteristic aroma compounds of Mangshanyegan, contributing to the balsamic and floral notes of its aroma.

  12. Citrus leprosis virus N: A New Dichorhavirus Causing Citrus Leprosis Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-González, Pedro Luis; Chabi-Jesus, Camila; Guerra-Peraza, Orlene; Tassi, Aline Daniele; Kitajima, Elliot Watanabe; Harakava, Ricardo; Salaroli, Renato Barbosa; Freitas-Astúa, Juliana

    2017-08-01

    Citrus leprosis (CL) is a viral disease endemic to the Western Hemisphere that produces local necrotic and chlorotic lesions on leaves, branches, and fruit and causes serious yield reduction in citrus orchards. Samples of sweet orange (Citrus × sinensis) trees showing CL symptoms were collected during a survey in noncommercial citrus areas in the southeast region of Brazil in 2013 to 2016. Transmission electron microscopy analyses of foliar lesions confirmed the presence of rod-like viral particles commonly associated with CL in the nucleus and cytoplasm of infected cells. However, every attempt to identify these particles by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction tests failed, even though all described primers for the detection of known CL-causing cileviruses and dichorhaviruses were used. Next-generation sequencing of total RNA extracts from three symptomatic samples revealed the genome of distinct, although highly related (>92% nucleotide sequence identity), viruses whose genetic organization is similar to that of dichorhaviruses. The genome sequence of these viruses showed citrus trees and those used for the transmission of one of the characterized isolates to Arabidopsis plants were anatomically recognized as Brevipalpus phoenicis sensu stricto. Molecular and biological features indicate that the identified viruses belong to a new species of CL-associated dichorhavirus, which we propose to call Citrus leprosis N dichorhavirus. Our results, while emphasizing the increasing diversity of viruses causing CL disease, lead to a reevaluation of the nomenclature of those viruses assigned to the genus Dichorhavirus. In this regard, a comprehensive discussion is presented.

  13. Estudo da termoestabilidade de peroxidases extraídas da polpa e casca de mexerica (Citrus deliciosa - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v20i0.4473 Thermostability studies of peroxidase extracts from tangerine (Citrus deliciosa pulp and peel - DOI: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v20i0.4473

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keli Cristina Alvim

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Extratos de peroxidase solúvel e peroxidase ionicamente ligada foram preparados a partir da polpa e casca de mexerica (Citrus deliciosa, sendo submetidos a tratamento térmico nas temperaturas de 60ºC, 65ºC e 70ºC, por um período de 0 a 10 minutos, para estudo do comportamento da atividade enzimática da peroxidase. Isoenzimas aniônicas e catiônicas, da fração solúvel da casca, foram separadas utilizando cromatografia de troca iônica (DEAE - Sepharose, sendo essa separação confirmada por eletroforese. Foram encontradas duas isoenzimas aniônicas e duas iosenzimas catiônicas na fração solúvel da casca. O estudo da atividade enzimática mostrou ser não-linear em relação ao aumento da temperatura.Extracts of the soluble and ionic-bound peroxidases were prepared from tangerine (Citrus deliciosa pulp and peel and submitted to heat treatments at 60ºC, 65ºC and 70ºC during a period of 0 to 10 minutes for the study of the peroxidase enzymatic activity. Ion exchange chromatography (DEAE-Sepharose was carried out in the soluble fraction of the peel to isolate cationic and anionic iso-enzymes. Separation was confirmed by electrophoresis. Two anionic and two cationic iso-enzymes were found in the soluble fraction of peel. Enzyme activity showed itself to be non-linear with increase of temperature.

  14. Citrus essential oils and their influence on the anaerobic digestion process: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, B; Flotats, X

    2014-11-01

    Citrus waste accounts for more than half of the whole fruit when processed for juice extraction. Among valorisation possibilities, anaerobic digestion for methane generation appears to be the most technically feasible and environmentally friendly alternative. However, citrus essential oils can inhibit this biological process. In this paper, the characteristics of citrus essential oils, as well as the mechanisms of their antimicrobial effects and potential adaptation mechanisms are reviewed. Previous studies of anaerobic digestion of citrus waste under different conditions are presented; however, some controversy exists regarding the limiting dosage of limonene for a stable process (24-192 mg of citrus essential oil per liter of digester and day). Successful strategies to avoid process inhibition by citrus essential oils are based either on recovery or removal of the limonene, by extraction or fungal pre-treatment respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Bioaccesibility Extraction of Hydrophobic Pollutants: Benefits of Separating Leaching Agent and Acceptor Medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cocovi-Solberg, D. J.; Miro, M.; Loibner, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Bioaccessibility extractions of organic pollutants from environmental solid samples are increasingly used in environmental risk assessment and management. Recent research has indicated that many bioaccessibility extraction methods have limited sink capacity for hydrophobic organic chemicals, whic......, the developed method was applied to PAH contaminated soils and the results compared to results obtained with other existing methods.......Bioaccessibility extractions of organic pollutants from environmental solid samples are increasingly used in environmental risk assessment and management. Recent research has indicated that many bioaccessibility extraction methods have limited sink capacity for hydrophobic organic chemicals, which...... can lead to underestimation of bioaccessibility. Therefore, several studies have proposed to add a sink to the extraction medium, including the so called contaminant trap, the silicon rod based sorptive bioaccessibility extraction and tenax beads-assisted extractions. While these methods certainly...

  16. The induction of differentially expressed proteins of Xylella fastidiosa with citrus extract Indução de proteínas de Xylella fastidiosa expressas diferencialmente com extrato de citros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia de M. Bellato

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available An in vitro system was developed to induce and identify Xylella fastidiosa proteins that were differentially expressed in the presence of callus-derived extracts from its host, the citrus cultivar Pêra. To optimize the induction, we first developed a single culture medium for the growth of both, host and bacteria. This medium, CPXPm7, which mimics the citrus xylem sap, showed that X. fastidiosa at 72 h post-incubation had 10(8 colony forming units mL-1, while Pêra cells had the highest fresh weight content (0.79 g. After testing various methods of co-cultivation of the bacteria and host callus grown in this single medium, the best induction procedure was to grow X. fastidiosa in a solid medium amended with an extract of Pêra callus grown in CPXPm7. Analysis, by two-dimensional electrophoresis, of the X. fastidiosa proteins (120 µg of total proteins grown in the presence of Pêra callus extract revealed 414 differentially expressed protein spots when compared to the protein profile obtained in the absence of the extract. The system developed in this study improves the induction and analysis of differentially expressed proteins of X. fastidiosa, which may be involved in pathogenicity.Estudos in vitro foram desenvolvidos para obter proteínas de Xylella fastidiosa expressas diferencialmente na presença de calos do hospedeiro, citros cultivar Pêra. Para otimizar a indução, desenvolveu-se um meio de cultura comum, o qual foi baseado na seiva do xilema de citros, para cultivar a bacteria e os calos de Pêra. Dados mostraram, após 72 h de cultivo neste meio, 10(8 unidades formadoras de colônias de X. fastidiosa por mL, e 0,79 g de peso seco de células de Pêra. Após testar diferentes métodos de co-cultivo da bactéria com calos de Pêra neste meio, observou-se que a melhor taxa de indução ocorreu quando X. fastidiosa foi cultivada em meio sólido enriquecido com um extrato derivado dos calos de Pêra. Análise em gel bidimensional (2DE

  17. Uji Aktivitas Antioksidan Ekstrak Etanolik Kulit Buah Jeruk Nipis (Citrus Aurantifolia) Dengan Metode Dpph (1,1-difenil-2- Pikrilhidrazil)

    OpenAIRE

    Khasanah, Ismiyyatun; Ulfah, Maria; sumantri, sumantri

    2014-01-01

    Citrus aurantifolia is known contains flavonoid compound and high Vitamin C. One of theeffects of flavonoid and Vitamin C are antioxidant. This research aims to knowing the antioxidantactivity of citrus aurantifolia etanolic extract by using the DPPH (1, 1-difenil-2-pikrilhidrazil) methodand to knowing the active compound that containing whithin.The research was done by making level series of citrus aurantifolia etanolic extract, they were10, 20, 40 and 80 μg/ml. As a standard of comparison w...

  18. Influence of Tangelo ( Citrus reticulata X Citrus paradisi ) varieties ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri Lush.) rootstocks were planted in citrus nursery at Ibadan to determine the best population density and the most compatible scion for good citrus nursery management practices. Rough lemon rootstock seedlings were planted at population densities of 62,500plants/ha (40cmX40cm), ...

  19. A Mixture of Ethanol Extracts of Persimmon Leaf and Citrus junos Sieb Improves Blood Coagulation Parameters and Ameliorates Lipid Metabolism Disturbances Caused by Diet-Induced Obesity in C57BL/6J Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ae Hyang; Kim, Hye Jin; Ryu, Ri; Han, Hye Jin; Han, Young Ji; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Choi, Myung-Sook; Park, Yong Bok

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of a flavonoid-rich ethanol extract of persimmon leaf (PL), an ethanol extract of Citrus junos Sieb (CJS), and a PL-CJS mixture (MPC) on mice fed a highfat diet (HFD). We sought to elucidate the mechanisms of biological activity of these substances using measurements of blood coagulation indices and lipid metabolism parameters. C57BL/6J mice were fed a HFD with PL (0.5% (w/w)), CJS (0.1% (w/w)), or MPC (PL 0.5%, CJS 0.1% (w/w)) for 10 weeks. In comparison with data obtained for mice in the untreated HFD group, consumption of MPC remarkably prolonged the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT), whereas exposure to PL prolonged aPTT only. Lower levels of plasma total cholesterol, hepatic cholesterol, and erythrocyte thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, hepatic HMG-CoA reductase, and decreased SREBP-1c gene expression were observed in mice that received PL and MPC supplements compared with the respective values detected in the untreated HFD animals. Our results indicate that PL and MPC may have beneficial effects on blood circulation and lipid metabolism in obese mice.

  20. Masquelier's grape seed extract: from basic flavonoid research to a well-characterized food supplement with health benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weseler, Antje R; Bast, Aalt

    2017-01-19

    Careful characterization and standardization of the composition of plant-derived food supplements is essential to establish a cause-effect relationship between the intake of that product and its health effect. In this review we follow a specific grape seed extract containing monomeric and oligomeric flavan-3-ols from its creation by Jack Masquelier in 1947 towards a botanical remedy and nutraceutical with proven health benefits. The preparation's research history parallels the advancing insights in the fields of molecular biology, medicine, plant and nutritional sciences during the last 70 years. Analysis of the extract's flavanol composition emerged from unspecific colorimetric assays to precise high performance liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry and proton nuclear magnetic resonance fingerprinting techniques. The early recognition of the preparation's auspicious effects on the permeability of vascular capillaries directed research to unravel the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. Recent clinical data revealed a multitude of favorable alterations in the vasculature upon an 8 weeks supplementation which summed up in a health benefit of the extract in healthy humans. Changes in gene expression of inflammatory pathways in the volunteers' leukocytes were suggested to be involved in this benefit. The historically grown scientific evidence for the preparation's health effects paves the way to further elucidate its metabolic fate and molecular action in humans.

  1. Physicochemical Characteristics of Citrus Seed Oils from Kerman, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reazai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been a great deal of attention on usage, byproducts, and wastes of the food industry. There have been many studies on the properties of citrus seeds and extracted oil from citrus grown in Kerman, Iran. The rate of oil content of citrus seeds varies between 33.4% and 41.9%. Linoleic acid (33.2% to 36.3% is the key fatty acid found in citrus seeds oil and oleic (24.8% to 29.3% and palmitic acids (23.5% to 29.4% are the next main fatty acids, respectively. There are also other acids found at trivial rates such as stearic, palmitoleic, and linolenic. With variation between 0.54 meg/kg and 0.77 mgq/kg in peroxide values of citrus seed oils, acidity value of the oil varies between 0.44% and 0.72%. The results of the study showed that citrus seeds under study (orange and sour lemon grown in Kerman province and the extracted oil have the potential of being used as the source of edible oil.

  2. Vitamin C and the role of citrus juices as functional food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, Nuria; Mena, Pedro; Cánovas, Jose Antonio; Micol, Vicente; Saura, Domingo

    2009-05-01

    The literature on the content and stability of vitamin C (ascorbic acid, AA) in citrus juices in relation to industrial practices is reviewed. The role of vitamin C from citrus juices in human diet is also reviewed. Citrus fruits and juices are rich in several types of bioactive compounds. Their antioxidant activity and related benefits derive not only from vitamin C but also from other phytochemicals, mainly flavonoids. During juice processing, temperature and oxygen are the main factors responsible for vitamin C losses. Non-thermal processed juices retain higher levels of vitamin C, but economic factors apparently delay the use of such methods in the citrus industry. Regarding packing material, vitamin C in fruit juice is quite stable when stored in metal or glass containers, whereas juice stored in plastic bottles has a much shorter shelf-life. The limiting step for vitamin C absorption in humans is transcellular active transport across the intestinal wall where AA may be oxidized to dehydroascorbic acid (DHAA), which is easily transported across the cell membrane and immediately reduced back to AA by two major pathways. AA bioavailability in the presence of flavonoids has yielded controversial results. Whereas flavonoids seem to inhibit intestinal absorption of AA, some studies have shown that AA in citrus extract was more available than synthetic ascorbic acid alone. DHAA is reported to possess equivalent biological activity to AA, so recent studies often consider the vitamin C activity in the diet as the sum of AA plus DHAA. However, this claimed equivalence should be carefully reexamined. Humans are one of the few species lacking the enzyme (L-gulonolactone oxidase, GLO) to convert glucose to vitamin C. It has been suggested that this is due to a mutation that provided a survival advantage to early primates, since GLO produces toxic H2O2. Furthermore, the high concentration of AA (and DHAA) in neural tissues could have been the key factor that caused

  3. Effects of Citrus aurantifolia concentrated extract on the spontaneous proliferation of MDA-MB-453 and RPMI-8866 tumor cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharagozloo, M; Doroudchi, M; Ghaderi, A

    2002-07-01

    The in vitro effects of concentrated lime juice (CLJ) extract on the spontaneous proliferation of a human breast carcinoma cell line (MDA-MB-453) and a human lymphoblastoid B cell line (RPMI-8866) were investigated. CLJ extract was prepared by freeze-drying fresh fruit juice and dialyzing the concentrated extract against phosphate buffered saline in order to deplete low molecular weight micronutrients such as flavonoids as well as adjusting the pH of the extract to the physiological range. The effects of different concentrations of the CLJ extract on the spontaneous proliferative responses of the cell lines were determined by 3H-thymidine incorporation after 24 hrs of incubation. CLJ extract had no significant effect on MDA-MB-453 cell line, however, using the concentrations of 125, 250, and 500 microg/ml of CLJ extract a significant inhibition of the spontaneous proliferation of RPMI-8866 cell line was detected (P < 0.05). Due to the protein nature of the biologically active macromolecules of the CLJ extract (Gharagozloo and Ghaderi, 2001), it is reasonable to assume that the protein components of the CLJ extract may have anti-proliferative effects on tumor cell lines.

  4. Citrus ichangensis Peel Extract Exhibits Anti-Metabolic Disorder Effects by the Inhibition of PPARγ and LXR Signaling in High-Fat Diet-Induced C57BL/6 Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobo Ding

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a common nutritional disorder associated with type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, dyslipidemia, and certain cancers. In this study, we investigated the effects of Citrus ichangensis peel extract (CIE in high-fat (HF diet-induced obesity mice. Female C57BL/6 mice were fed a chow diet or an HF diet alone or supplemented with 1% w/w CIE for 8 weeks. We found that CIE treatment could lower blood glucose level and improve glucose tolerance. In the HF+CIE group, body weight gain, serum total cholesterol (TC and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c levels, and liver triglyceride (TG and TC concentrations were significantly (P<0.05 decreased relative to those in the HF group. To elucidate the mechanism of CIE on the metabolism of glucose and lipid, related genes expression in liver were examined. In liver tissue, CIE significantly decreased the mRNA expression levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ and its target genes, such as fatty acid synthase (FAS and acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO. Moreover, CIE also decreased the expression of liver X receptor (LXR α and β which are involved in lipid and glucose metabolism. These results suggest that CIE administration could alleviate obesity and related metabolic disorders in HF diet-induced obesity mice through the inhibition of PPARγ and LXR signaling.

  5. Extracting Environmental Benefits from a New Canal in Nicaragua: Lessons from Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condit, Richard

    2015-07-01

    Biologists have raised objections to a new canal in Nicaragua, but in this Essay I argue that dire predictions of environmental catastrophe are exaggerated. I present an alternative view based on my research experience in Panama, where Canal operations foster forest conservation. Currently in Nicaragua, the rate of forest loss is so rapid that the canal cannot make it worse. Rather, I contend, adoption of international standards in canal construction could lead to net environmental and social benefits for the country.

  6. Citrus Seed Oils Efficacy against Larvae of Aedes aegypti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazrat Bilal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dengue fever is a serious public health issue in Pakistan for many years. Globally plants have been reported to contain compounds with insecticidal properties. These properties have been demonstrated more recently on the larval stages of mosquitoes. Therefore, Citrus cultivar seeds were evaluated for larvicidal potential against the primary dengue vector Aedes aegypti.Methods: Extraction of oil was done by a steam distillation method and oils were evaluated according to WHO guidelines for larvicides 2005 for evaluation of insecticidal properties of citrus seed extracts against mosquito larvae.Result: Among the Citrus cultivar seed oil, rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri had the lowest LC50 value (200.79ppm, while musambi (C. sinensis var musambi had the highest LC50 value (457.30ppm after 24 h of exposure.Conclusion: Citrus cultivars have some larvicidal potential but C. jambhiri had the greatest potential against A. ae­gypti larvae. Further small-scale field trials using the extracts of C. jambhiri will be conducted to determine opera­tional feasibility.

  7. Anti-adhesion and antibiotic modulatory evaluation of grapefruit (Citrus paradisi juice and seed extract on bacteria isolated from urine and catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Oluwole Osungunna

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Context: The in vivo use of grapefruit seed in the treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs has been reported but the mechanism of action is yet to be explained. Aims: Evaluate the anti-adhesion and antibiotic modulatory activities of grapefruit seed extract and juice as their possible mechanisms of action. Methods: Sub-inhibitory concentrations of 2.5 and 5 mg/mL as well as 10.3 and 5.15 mg/mL of grapefruit seed extract and juice respectively were evaluated for modulatory activity of ciprofloxacin, streptomycin and nalidixic acid against one hundred and twenty seven bacterial isolates from mid-stream urine (MSU (100, catheter-stream urine (CSU (14 and catheter tips (CT (13 using the agar dilution method. Anti-adhesion activity of grapefruit seed extract and juice at sub-inhibitory concentrations of 2.5 and 1.03 mg/mL respectively was evaluated against twenty three (23 moderately adherent bacterial isolates from MSU (10, CSU (7 and CT (6 using the tissue culture plate method. Results: The results revealed that grapefruit juice (5.15 mg/mL showed more effect on nalidixic acid activity than seed extract (2.5 mg/mL. Grapefruit juice showed more anti-adhesion activity than grapefruit seed extract at the concentration tested. Conclusions: The study concluded that grapefruit seed extract and juice had anti-adhesion and antibiotic modulatory effects on bacteria associated with UTIs.

  8. Induction of apoptosis by ethanol extract of Citrus unshiu Markovich peel in human bladder cancer T24 cells through ROS-mediated inactivation of the PI3K/Akt pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kyu Im; Choi, Eun Ok; Kwon, Da He; HwangBo, Hyun; Kim, Min Yeong; Kim, Hong Jae; Ji, Seon Yeong; Hong, Su-Hyun; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Park, Cheol; Kim, Nam Deuk; Kim, Wun Jae; Choi, Yung Hyun

    2017-11-20

    Citrus unshiu peel has been used to prevent and treat various diseases in traditional East-Asian medicine including in Korea. Extracts of C. unshiu peel are known to have various pharmacological effects including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial properties. Although the possibility of their anti-cancer activity has recently been reported, the exact mechanisms in human cancer cells have not been sufficiently studied. In this study, the inhibitory effect of ethanol extract of C. unshiu peel (EECU) on the growth of human bladder cancer T24 cells was evaluated and the underlying mechanism was investigated. The present study demonstrated that the suppression of T24 cell viability by EECU is associated with apoptosis induction. EECU-induced apoptosis was found to correlate with an activation of caspase-8, -9, and -3 in concomitance with a decrease in the expression of the inhibitor of apoptosis family of proteins and an increase in the Bax:Bcl-2 ratio accompanied by the proteolytic degradation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. EECU also increased the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential, and cytochrome c release to the cytosol, along with a truncation of Bid. In addition, EECU inactivated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) as well as Akt, a downstream molecular target of PI3K, and LY294002, a specific PI3K inhibitor significantly enhanced EECU-induced apoptosis and cell viability reduction. However, N-acetyl cysteine, a general ROS scavenger, completely reversed the EECU-induced dephosphorylation of PI3K and Akt, as well as cell apoptosis. Taken together, these findings suggest that EECU inhibits T24 cell proliferation by activating intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways through a ROS-mediated inactivation of the PI3K/Akt pathway.

  9. Citrus reticulata Blanco

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-24

    Oct 24, 2011 ... crops like citrus, induced mutation for seedlessness in Kinnow with gamma irradiation of dormant bud which was attempted at .... Table 2. Biochemical constituents of juice of Kinnow and its seedless mutant (range and mean value). Crop/year. TSS (%). Acidity. Vitzmin C (mg/100 g of pulp). TSS/acid. (ratio).

  10. mandarin ( Citrus reticulata Blanco )

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'Wuzishatangju'(Citrus reticulata Blanco) is an excellent cultivar derived from a bud sport of a seedy 'Shatangju' cultivar found in Guangdong Province in the 1980s. In this study, six molecular markers including random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD), inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR), simple sequence repeat (SSR) ...

  11. Cercosporoid diseases of Citrus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Feng; Groenewald, J.Z.; Zhu, Li; Crous, P.W.; Li, Hongye

    2015-01-01

    Citrus leaves and fruits exhibiting disease symptoms ranging from greasy spot, yellow spot, small or large brown spot, black dot, and brown dot were sampled from Fujian, Guangdong, Guizhou, Hunan, Jiangxi, Yunnan, Zhejiang provinces and the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region in China. In total 82

  12. Citrus reticulata Blanco.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RACHEL

    Blanco.) is the most far and wide-planted mandarin hybrid in Pakistan. Kinnow has inherited heat tolerance from the cultivar King which helps it to survive in ruthless hot summer of Punjab. This "easy peel" citrus has assumed special economic importance and export demand due to its high juice content, special flavor, and.

  13. Antihyperlipidemic effects of Citrus sinensis, Citrus paradisi, and their combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Mallick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hyperlipidemia, extensively contributes in the progression of coronary heart diseases and atherosclerosis, but may be managed through alterations in the nutritional pattern. Several studies show that diet rich in polyphenols and antioxidants have antiatherogenic effects. Citrus sinensis and Citrus paradisi are widely known for health benefits and have found to produce antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and hypolipidemic effects, hence current research was planned to determine the hypolipidemic effects of C. sinensis and C. paradisi in rats receiving diet rich in cholesterol. Materials and Methods: All rats were divided into 11 groups each comprising 10 animals: Normal control group and hyperlipidemic control. C. sinensis treated three groups, C. paradisi treated three groups, C. sinensis and C. paradisi combination treated two groups, and group treated atorvastatin. All rats in the respective groups were treated orally with sterile water, juices, and standard drug for 8 weeks and lipid profile was estimated at the end of dosing. Results: Cholesterol, triglycerides (TGs, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL were decreased at all the three doses of C. sinensis and C. paradisi but rise in high-density lipoprotein (HDL was only significant at 8 ml/kg, and 0.3 ml/kg, respectively. Animals received the combination doses of C. sinensis and C. paradisi also showed a highly significant fall in cholesterol, LDL, and TGs, however HDL level was significantly elevated by SPJ-2 combination. Conclusion: Results suggest that C. sinensis and C. paradisi possess antihyperlipidemic activity due to phytochemicals and other essential nutrients, hence may serve as cardioprotective by preventing thrombosis.

  14. Creatine co-ingestion with carbohydrate or cinnamon extract provides no added benefit to anaerobic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Hashim; Yorgason, Nick J; Hazell, Tom J

    2016-09-01

    The insulin response following carbohydrate ingestion enhances creatine transport into muscle. Cinnamon extract is promoted to have insulin-like effects, therefore this study examined if creatine co-ingestion with carbohydrates or cinnamon extract improved anaerobic capacity, muscular strength, and muscular endurance. Active young males (n = 25; 23.7 ± 2.5 y) were stratified into 3 groups: (1) creatine only (CRE); (2) creatine+ 70 g carbohydrate (CHO); or (3) creatine+ 500 mg cinnamon extract (CIN), based on anaerobic capacity (peak power·kg(-1)) and muscular strength at baseline. Three weeks of supplementation consisted of a 5 d loading phase (20 g/d) and a 16 d maintenance phase (5 g/d). Pre- and post-supplementation measures included a 30-s Wingate and a 30-s maximal running test (on a self-propelled treadmill) for anaerobic capacity. Muscular strength was measured as the one-repetition maximum 1-RM for chest, back, quadriceps, hamstrings, and leg press. Additional sets of the number of repetitions performed at 60% 1-RM until fatigue measured muscular endurance. All three groups significantly improved Wingate relative peak power (CRE: 15.4% P = .004; CHO: 14.6% P = .004; CIN: 15.7%, P = .003), and muscular strength for chest (CRE: 6.6% P < .001; CHO: 6.7% P < .001; CIN: 6.4% P < .001), back (CRE: 5.8% P < .001; CHO: 6.4% P < .001; CIN: 8.1% P < .001), and leg press (CRE: 11.7% P = .013; CHO: 10.0% P = .007; CIN: 17.3% P < .001). Only the CRE (10.4%, P = .021) and CIN (15.5%, P < .001) group improved total muscular endurance. No differences existed between groups post-supplementation. These findings demonstrate that three different methods of creatine ingestion lead to similar changes in anaerobic power, strength, and endurance.

  15. Chemical Composition of Hexane Extract of Citrus aurantifolia and Anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis Activity of Some of Its Constituents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Rayo Camacho-Corona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this study was to isolate and characterize the active compounds from the hexane extract of the fruit peels of Citrus aurantiifolia, which showed activity against one sensitive and three monoresistant (isoniazid, streptomycin or ethambutol strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv. The active extract was fractionated by column chromatography, yielding the following major compounds: 5-geranyloxypsoralen (1; 5-geranyloxy-7-methoxycoumarin (2; 5,7-dimethoxycoumarin (3; 5-methoxypsoralen (4; and 5,8-dimethoxypsoralen (5. The structures of these compounds were elucidated by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy. In addition, GC-MS analysis of the hexane extract allowed the identification of 44 volatile compounds, being 5,7-dimethoxycoumarin (15.79%, 3-methyl-1,2-cyclopentanedione (8.27%, 1-methoxy-ciclohexene (8.0%, corylone (6.93%, palmitic acid (6.89%, 5,8-dimethoxypsoralen (6.08%, a-terpineol (5.97%, and umbelliferone (4.36%, the major constituents. Four isolated coumarins and 16 commercial compounds identified by GC-MS were tested against M. tuberculosis H37Rv and three multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis strains using the Microplate Alamar Blue Assay. The constituents that showed activity against all strains were 5 (MICs = 25–50 mg/mL, 1 (MICs = 50–100 mg/mL, palmitic acid (MICs = 25–50 mg/mL, linoleic acid (MICs = 50–100 mg/mL, oleic acid (MICs = 100 mg/mL, 4-hexen-3-one (MICs = 50–100 mg/mL, and citral (MICs = 50–100 mg/mL. Compound 5 and palmitic acid were the most active ones. The antimycobacterial activity of the hexane extract of C. aurantifolia could be attributed to these compounds.

  16. Essential Oils from the Malaysian Citrus (Rutaceae) Medicinal Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Md Othman, Siti Nur Atiqah; Hassan, Muhammad Aizam; Nahar, Lutfun; Basar, Norazah; Jamil, Shajarahtunnur; Sarker, Satyajit D.

    2016-01-01

    This review article appraises the extraction methods, compositions, and bioactivities of the essential oils from the Citrus species (family: Rutaceae) endemic to Malaysia including C. aurantifolia, C. grandis, C. hystrix, and C. microcarpa. Generally, the fresh peels and leaves of the Citrus species were extracted using different methods such as steam and water distillation, Likens-Nikerson extraction, solvent extraction, and headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME). Most of the Citrus oils were found to be rich in monoterpene hydrocarbons with limonene (1) as the major component identified in the peels of C. aurantifolia (39.3%), C. grandis (81.6%–96.9%), and C. microcarpa (94.0%), while sabinene (19) was the major component in the peels of C. hystrix (36.4%–48.5%). In addition, citronellal (20) (61.7%–72.5%), linalool (18) (56.5%), and hedycaryol (23) (19.0%) were identified as the major components in the oil of C. hystrix leaves, C. grandis blossom and C. microcarpa leaves, respectively. The C. hystrix essential oil has been experimentally shown to have antimicrobial and antifeedant activities, while no bioactivity study has been reported on the essential oils of other Malaysian Citrus species. PMID:28930124

  17. Essential Oils from the Malaysian Citrus (Rutaceae Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Nur Atiqah Md Othman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This review article appraises the extraction methods, compositions, and bioactivities of the essential oils from the Citrus species (family: Rutaceae endemic to Malaysia including C. aurantifolia, C. grandis, C. hystrix, and C. microcarpa. Generally, the fresh peels and leaves of the Citrus species were extracted using different methods such as steam and water distillation, Likens-Nikerson extraction, solvent extraction, and headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME. Most of the Citrus oils were found to be rich in monoterpene hydrocarbons with limonene (1 as the major component identified in the peels of C. aurantifolia (39.3%, C. grandis (81.6%–96.9%, and C. microcarpa (94.0%, while sabinene (19 was the major component in the peels of C. hystrix (36.4%–48.5%. In addition, citronellal (20 (61.7%–72.5%, linalool (18 (56.5%, and hedycaryol (23 (19.0% were identified as the major components in the oil of C. hystrix leaves, C. grandis blossom and C. microcarpa leaves, respectively. The C. hystrix essential oil has been experimentally shown to have antimicrobial and antifeedant activities, while no bioactivity study has been reported on the essential oils of other Malaysian Citrus species.

  18. Essential Oils from the Malaysian Citrus (Rutaceae) Medicinal Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Md Othman, Siti Nur Atiqah; Hassan, Muhammad Aizam; Nahar, Lutfun; Basar, Norazah; Jamil, Shajarahtunnur; Sarker, Satyajit D

    2016-06-03

    This review article appraises the extraction methods, compositions, and bioactivities of the essential oils from the Citrus species (family: Rutaceae) endemic to Malaysia including C. aurantifolia, C. grandis, C. hystrix, and C. microcarpa. Generally, the fresh peels and leaves of the Citrus species were extracted using different methods such as steam and water distillation, Likens-Nikerson extraction, solvent extraction, and headspace solid-phase micro-extraction (HS-SPME). Most of the Citrus oils were found to be rich in monoterpene hydrocarbons with limonene (1) as the major component identified in the peels of C. aurantifolia (39.3%), C. grandis (81.6%-96.9%), and C. microcarpa (94.0%), while sabinene (19) was the major component in the peels of C. hystrix (36.4%-48.5%). In addition, citronellal (20) (61.7%-72.5%), linalool (18) (56.5%), and hedycaryol (23) (19.0%) were identified as the major components in the oil of C. hystrix leaves, C. grandis blossom and C. microcarpa leaves, respectively. The C. hystrix essential oil has been experimentally shown to have antimicrobial and antifeedant activities, while no bioactivity study has been reported on the essential oils of other Malaysian Citrus species.

  19. Potent anti-cancer effects of citrus peel flavonoids in human prostate xenograft tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ching-Shu; Li, Shiming; Miyauchi, Yutaka; Suzawa, Michiko; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2013-06-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent malignancies and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men. Fruit and vegetable consumption is a novel, non-toxic therapeutic approach that can be used to prevent and treat prostate cancer. Citrus peels and their extracts have been reported to have potent pharmacological activities and health benefits due to the abundance of flavonoids in citrus fruits, particularly in the peels. Our previous studies demonstrated that oral administration of Gold Lotion (GL), an extract of multiple varieties of citrus peels containing abundant flavonoids, including a large percentage of polymethoxyflavones (PMFs), effectively suppressed azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic tumorigenesis. However, the efficacy of GL against prostate cancer has not yet been investigated. Here, we explored the anti-tumor effects of GL using a human prostate tumor xenograft mouse model. Our data demonstrated that treatment with GL by both intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection and oral administration dramatically reduced both the weights (57%-100% inhibition) and volumes (78%-94% inhibition) of the tumors without any observed toxicity. These inhibitory effects were accompanied by mechanistic down-regulation of the protein levels of inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase, iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2, COX-2), metastasis (matrix metallopeptidase-2, MMP-2 and MMP-9), angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF), and proliferative molecules, as well as by the induction of apoptosis in prostate tumors. Our findings suggest that GL is an effective anti-cancer agent that may potentially serve as a novel therapeutic option for prostate cancer treatment.

  20. Juice components of a new pigmented citrus hybrid Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck x Citrus clementina Hort. ex Tan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapisarda, Paolo; Pannuzzo, Paolo; Romano, Gabriella; Russo, Giuseppe

    2003-03-12

    Fruit juice of a new pigmented citrus hybrid named Omo-31 and those of its parents clementine cv. Oroval (Citrus clementina Hort. ex Tan.) and Moro orange [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck] were analyzed during fruit maturation to determine juice yield, total soluble solids (TSS), total acidity (TA), TSS/TA ratio (classical parameters of quality), and potential health beneficial components, such as vitamin C, flavanones, anthocyanins, and phenolic acids. Results showed that juice yield, TA, TSS, and TSS/TA ratio values of Omo-31 were similar to those of the Moro orange. Vitamin C content of the new hybrid was slightly higher than that of clementine and lower than that of the Moro orange, but at maturity stage no differences were observed among the three genotypes. The phenolic compounds content of the new hybrid and those of the parents and their evolution during maturation were studied. At maturity stage the amount of anthocyanins, flavanones, and hydroxycinnamic acids in Omo-31 was found to be notably higher than those of the parents. The high level of antioxidant substances makes this new fruit important for its nutritional benefits.

  1. Benefits of mineralized bone cortical allograft for immediate implant placement in extraction sites: anin vivostudy in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orti, Valérie; Bousquet, Philippe; Tramini, Paul; Gaitan, Cesar; Mertens, Brenda; Cuisinier, Frédéric

    2016-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of using a mineralized bone cortical allograft (MBCA), with or without a resorbable collagenous membrane derived from bovine pericardium, on alveolar bone remodeling after immediate implant placement in a dog model. Six mongrel dogs were included. The test and control sites were randomly selected. Four biradicular premolars were extracted from the mandible. In control sites, implants without an allograft or membrane were placed immediately in the fresh extraction sockets. In the test sites, an MBCA was placed to fill the gap between the bone socket wall and implant, with or without a resorbable collagenous membrane. Specimens were collected after 1 and 3 months. The amount of residual particles and new bone quality were evaluated by histomorphometry. Few residual graft particles were observed to be closely embedded in the new bone without any contact with the implant surface. The allograft combined with a resorbable collagen membrane limited the resorption of the buccal wall in height and width. The histological quality of the new bone was equivalent to that of the original bone. The MBCA improved the quality of new bone formation, with few residual particles observed at 3 months. The preliminary results of this animal study indicate a real benefit in obtaining new bone as well as in enhancing osseointegration due to the high resorbability of cortical allograft particles, in comparison to the results of xenografts or other biomaterials (mineralized or demineralized cancellous allografts) that have been presented in the literature. Furthermore, the use of an MBCA combined with a collagen membrane in extraction and immediate implant placement limited the extent of post-extraction resorption.

  2. Weed population in citrus based cropping system as affected by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Growth of citrus was impaired by cassava intercrop, while citrus intercropped with the maize/cowpea, pineapple and sole citrus stands (sct) improved citrus growth. Forty-two months after transplanting citrus, sct, ct + m/cp and ct+ ca had 1.63, 1.45 and 0.05 citrus fruit t/ha, respectively. Citrus plants intercropped with ...

  3. Development of sparse-seeded mutant kinnow (Citrus reticulata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Kinnow is the major fruit of Pakistan and has a high export potential due to its excellent fruit and juice quality. However, high number of seeds (25 ± 5) per fruit is limiting its export on a large scale. Benefiting from the induced mutations for selectivity, especially in the vegetatively propagated fruit crops like citrus, induced ...

  4. Assessing genetic variability in male sterile and low fertile citrus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... accessions including male sterile, sterile, low fertile and fertile cultivars from Iran Citrus Research Institute, which is located in the west of Sari, Mazandaran Province, Iran. List of the accessions is shown in Table 1. DNA extraction. From each accession, four young leaves were taken and total genomic DNA ...

  5. Apoptotic properties of Citrus sudachi Hort, ex Shirai (Rutaceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and annexin V/propidium iodidle assay were used to test the antiproliferative activity and apoptosis of methanol extract of Citrus sudachi, respectively. Griess reaction and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were carried ...

  6. Fermentation potentials of Citrus limon and Hibiscus sabdariffa juice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to determine the fermentation potentials of yeast isolates from Citrus limon and Hibiscus sabdariffa for the fermentation of juice extracts of C. limon and H. sabdariffa. Isolation and morphological studies of yeast cells were carried out by standard protocols. Fourier Transform Infra-red (FT-IR) ...

  7. Recovery of naringin from kinnow (Citrus reticulata Blanco) peels by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    citrus) peels,which is a waste. The kinnow peels were boiled with water to extract naringin into water. It was adsorbed on an indigenous macroporous resin, Indion PA-500. Naringin was recovered from the saturated resin by desorption with ...

  8. Agreement: Citrus College Faculty Association and Citrus Community College District.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus Community Coll. District, Glendora, CA.

    The collective bargaining agreement between the Citrus Community College District Board of Trustees and the Citrus College Faculty/California Teachers Association/National Education Association is presented. This contract, covering the period from July 1988 through June 1990, deals with the following topics: bargaining agent recognition and…

  9. Monoclonal antibody-based serological methods for detecting Citrus tristeza virus in citrus groves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen; Chen, Zhe; Hong, Jian; Wang, Xuefeng; Zhou, Changyong; Zhou, Xueping; Wu, Jianxiang

    2016-08-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is one of the most economically important citrus viruses and harms the citrus industry worldwide. To develop reliable and effective serological detection assays of CTV, the major capsid protein (CP) gene of CTV was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) using the expression vector pET-28a and purified through Ni+-NTA affinity chromatography. The recombinant protein was used to immunize BALB/c mice. Four hybridoma cell lines (14B10, 14H11, 20D5, and 20G12) secreting monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against CTV were obtained through conventional hybridoma technology. The titers of MAb-containing ascitic fluids secreted by the four hybridoma lines ranged from 10(-6) to 10(-7) in indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Western blots showed that all four MAbs could specifically react with CTV CP. Using the prepared MAbs, dot-ELISA, Tissue print-ELISA, and triple antibody sandwich (TAS)-ELISA were developed to detect CTV in tree nurseries and epidemiological studies. The developed dot-ELISA and TAS-ELISA methods could detect CTV in crude extracts of infected citrus leaves with dilutions of 1:2560 and 1:10, 240 (w/v, g/mL), respectively. Tissue print-ELISA was particularly useful for large-scale field sample detection, mainly owing to its simplicity and lack of sample preparation requirements. The field survey revealed that CTV is prevalent on citrus trees in the Chongqing Municipality, Jiangxi Province, and Zhejiang Province of China. The coincidence rate of serological and RT-PCR test results reached more than 99.5%. The prepared MAbs against CTV and established sensitive and specific serological assays have a significant role in the detection and prevention and control of CTV in our country.

  10. Structure-activity relationship of citrus polymethoxylated flavones and their inhibitory effects on Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Xu, Xiaoyun; Cheng, Dan; Yao, Xiaolin; Pan, Siyi

    2012-05-02

    Citrus peels are rich in polymethoxylated flavones (PMFs) and are potential sources of natural preservatives. Six PMFs extracts, isolated and purified from the peels of three mandarins (Citrus reticulata) and three sweet oranges (Citrus sinensis), were identified and quantitated. Their inhibitory effects on Aspergillus niger were evaluated using a microbroth dilution assay. The Red tangerine variety exhibited the greatest antifungal activity (MIC = 0.2 mg/mL), while Jincheng showed the lowest activity (MIC = 1.8 mg/mL). An analysis of principal components was applied to the results in order to elucidate the structure-activity relationships of the citrus PMFs. The structure-activity relationship analysis revealed that, for good inhibitory effect, the 5-OH, 3-OCH₃, and 8-OCH₃ functionalities were essential, while the presence of 3-OH and 3'-OCH₃ greatly reduced inhibition. The findings of this study provide important information for the exploitation and utilization of citrus PMFs as natural biopreservatives.

  11. Occurrence of free fatty acids in the phloem sap of different citrus varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valim, Maria Filomena; Killiny, Nabil

    2017-06-03

    Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus is a phloem restricted bacterium that causes citrus greening disease or huanglongbing (HLB), a major treat to commercial citrus production in Florida. It is transmitted by the Asian citrus psyllid, a phloem sap-feeding insect. Studies conducted on the composition of citrus phloem sap revealed the presence amino acids, organic acids and sugars and of low amounts of free fatty acids. In the present study, the phloem sap of 12 citrus varieties with different degrees of tolerance to HLB were extracted with ethyl acetate and analyzed by GC-MS after derivatization with boron trifluoride, a fatty acid-specific reagent. Nine free fatty acids were detected in all varieties. Of the 9 fatty acids detected, only capric acid was significantly different among varieties.

  12. Cytological aspects on the effects of a nasal spray consisting of standardized extract of citrus lemon and essential oils in allergic rhinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Lydia; Naviglio, Daniele; Armone Caruso, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a new formulation of nasal spray was set up based on the extract of lemon pulp, obtained by using a new solid-liquid technology of extraction, added to pure Aloe juice, soluble propoli, and essential oils of Ravensara and Niaouly. It was tested in a clinical study in which 100 subjects were recruited for a period of one month. Nasal scraping was used for collecting samples and after the application of the May-Grünwald Giemsa standard technique, glass slides were analysed by using optical microscope with a 1000x oil immersion. A control group constituted of ten people was recruited as control and this group was administered with physiological solution (saline solution). The comparison of results obtained before and after the application of nasal spray showed a total reduction of eosinophils granulocytes and mast cells; clinical data were confirmed by improvement of clinical pictures of patients. The lemon-based nasal spray was a good alternative to conventional medicine for the treatment of perennial and seasonal allergic and vasomotor rhinopathy.

  13. Efficacy of three citrus oil formulations against solenopsis invicta buren (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), the red imported fire ant1,2

    Science.gov (United States)

    James T. Vogt; Thormas G. Shelton; Michael E. Merchant; Scott A. Russell; Marla J. Tanley; Arthur G. Appel

    2002-01-01

    Experiments were conducted in Alabama, Oklahoma, and Texas to assess efficacy of raw citrus peel extract (orange oil) and a commercial citrus oil formulation for control of Solenopsis invicta Buren, the red imported fire ant. A recipe containing orange oil (equal parts orange oil, cattlemen's molasses, and compost tea at 47 mL L1 water),...

  14. A TaqMan PCR method for routine diagnosis of the quarantine fungus guignardia citricarpa on citrus fruit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gent-Pelzer, van M.P.E.; Brouwershaven, van I.R.; Kox, L.F.F.; Bonants, P.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    With respect to disease risk for the quarantine fungus Guignardia citricarpa on citrus fruit an accurate diagnosis for routine analysis is required. Also, when inspections have to be performed on imported citrus fruits, a fast detection method is urgently needed. A fast automated DNA extraction

  15. The potential for citrus cryotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus collections of pathogen-free plants are needed for breeding, research, and distribution to the user community. The Citrus Research Board funded research project “Development of cryotherapy as an improved method of eliminating graft transmissible pathogens in Citrus” sought to use cryotherapy,...

  16. Widespread applications of citrus cryopreservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus genetic resources can now be successfully cryopreserved, which means that they can be placed into long-term storage at liquid nitrogen temperatures. This cryopreservation technology was specifically developed to address the immediate need to have secure long-term back-up storage for citrus co...

  17. Citrus aurantium (bitter orange) extract: Safety assessment by acute and 14-day oral toxicity studies in rats and the Ames Test for mutagenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, N S; Stohs, S J; Magar, C C; Kadam, S B

    2017-11-01

    The primary active constituent in bitter orange extract (BOE) is p-synephrine. This study assessed the safety of a BOE standardized to 50% p-synephrine following short-term exposure to rats and by the Ames Test. Following 5000 mg/kg of the extract orally to female rats all animals survived. Administration at 2000 mg/kg to female rats for four days yielded no signs of toxicity. Five male and five female rats were administered the BOE at 0, 250, 500, 1000 and 2000 mg/kg/day for 14 days. No significant effects were observed at any dose with respect to body weights, food intake, absolute and relative organ weights, hematology, clinical chemistry, and pathology. Two male rats died after 2000 mg/kg with gastrointestinal impaction at necropsy. During week two of 1000 mg/kg and 2000 mg/kg/day, rats exhibited transient signs of repetitive burrowing of heads in the bedding material (hypoactivity) for about 15 and 45 min, respectively. The no-observed-effect-level (NOEL) was 500 mg/kg/day. The mutagenic potential was assessed at and up to the limit dose of 5000 μg/plate in a Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation (Ames) test, performed in duplicate as a pre-incubation assay in the presence and absence of metabolic activation (S9). The BOE did not induce an increase in the frequency of revertant colonies at any dose in the five tester strains, and was therefore non-mutagenic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Disease stress detection on citrus using a leaf optical model and field spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badnakhe, Mrunalini R.; Durbha, Surya; Adinarayana, J.

    2015-10-01

    As citrus is progressively contributing to horticultural production, wealth and economy of a country, it is necessary to understand the factors impacting citrus production. Gummosis is one of the most serious diseases causing considerable loss of overall citrus production and yield quality. A qualitative and quantitative analysis of citrus leaf biochemical properties are necessary to monitor the crop health, disease /pest stress and production. Total leaf chlorophyll content (Cab) represents one of the key biochemical factors which contributes in water, carbon, and energy exchange processes. Photosynthesis process in citrus will be disturbed as gummosis disease life cycle progresses. It is important to study Cab to evaluate the photosynthesis rate and disease stress. In this study the potential of Radiative Transfer (RT) PROSPECT model to retrieve Cab in citrus orchards was undertaken at different sites. The main goal is to evaluate the relationship between Cab and gummosis disease stress for citrus at various phenological stages. Inversion of PROSPECT model on measured hyperspectral data is carried out to extract the leaf level parameters influencing the disease. This model was inverted with the ground truth hyperspectral reading. The testing was separately initiated for healthy and infected plant leaves. This can lead to understand the disease stress on citrus leaves. For accuracy, raw spectra are filtered and processed which is an input parameter for Inversion PROSPECT model. Here, retrieved Cab content was correlated with gummosis disease stress in terms of oozing with R2 = 0.6021 and RMSE= 0.481272.

  19. Citrus Tristeza Virus on the Island of Crete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shegani, M.; Tsikou, D.; Velimirovic, A.

    2012-01-01

    Over a period of two years, more than 5,000 citrus trees were tested for the presence of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) on the island of Crete, resulting in thirty eight positives. Comparisons of the relative transcript levels of CTV p23, coat protein (CP), polymerase (POL) and an intergenic (POL/p33......) region using quantitative RT-PCR, revealed consistent differences in abundance for each of these RNAs among flowers, stems, young fruits and leaves of infected orange trees. CTV p23 RNAs accumulated at highest levels, reaching a maximum in the flowers and the lowest levels in the leaves, while POL RNAs...... compared to leaf extracts. Taking into account Cretan geography and the importance of citrus to the island, systematic surveys for CTV eradication, sustainable control measurements and epidemiological studies need to be undertaken. The observations, materials and methods presented here may assist all three...

  20. Isolation, characterization and modification of citrus pectins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA KRATCHANOVA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Orange and lemon peels were used for obtaining pectic polysaccharides. Citrus peels were previously treated with 96% ethanol, and the obtained alcohol-insoluble solids (AIS were subjected to a sequential extraction with hot distilled water and hot 0.5% HCl. Water- and acid-extracted orange (WEOP and AEOP and lemon (WELP and AELP pectins were obtained. Acid extraction gave higher yields of pectin than water extraction and lemon peels were richer in pectin. Comparative investigations were carried out with chromatographically purified commercial citrus pectin (CPCP. Chemical and physicochemical characterization of all pectins was accomplished. It was found that pectins were similar in anhydrouronic acid content (AUАC, 69-81%, but differed in their degree of methylesterification (DM, 55-81%. Generally water-extracted pectins were with higher DM. Both orange pectins were with higher DM and degree of acetylation (DA, 2%, in comparison with the corresponding lemon pectins. Water-extracted pectins were with higher degree of feruloylation (DF, 0.12-0.34%. To our knowledge this is the first report on the estimation of ester-linked ferulic acid in orange and lemon peel pectins. Pectic polysaccharides differed in molecular weight and homogeneity. WELP was with the highest molecular weight and homogeneity. The pectins contained D-galacturonic and D-glucuronic acids, L-arabinose, D-galactose, L-fucose, L-rhamnose and D-xylose. All investigated pectins showed immunostimulating activity by complement activation in the classical pathway at 1.25 and 2.5 mg/mL. Pectic polysaccharides were modified with endopolygalacturonase. Enzyme-modified CPCP and WEOP had higher anti-complementary activity than the corresponding initial pectins.

  1. Phenolic compounds and biological activities of small-size citrus: Kumquat and calamondin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Shyi-Neng; Ho, Chi-Tang

    2017-01-01

    Kumquat and calamondin are two small-size citrus fruits. Owing to their health benefits, they are traditionally used as folk medicine in Asian countries. However, the research on flavonoids and biological activities of kumquat and calamondin have received less attention. This review summarizes the reported quantitative and qualitative data of phenolic compositions in these two fruits. Effects of maturity, harvest time, various solvent extractions and heat treatment of phenolic compositions, and bioactivities were discussed; distributions of the forms of phenolic compounds existing in kumquat and calamondin were also summarized. Furthermore, biological activities, including antioxidant, antityrosinase, antimicrobial, antitumor, and antimetabolic disorder effects, have also been discussed. Effective phenolic components were proposed for a certain bioactivity. It was found that C-glycoside flavonoids are dominant phenolic compounds in kumquat and calamondin, unlike in other citrus fruits. Up to now, biological activities and chemical characteristics of C-glycoside flavonoids in kumquat and calamondin are largely unknown. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Multiresidue method for the simultaneous determination of 16 acaricides by modified quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe extraction and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry in citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dali; Pang, Junxiao; Jiao, Bining; Zhao, Qiyang; Zhou, Zhiqin

    2015-09-10

    An ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry analytical method was developed for simultaneously determining 16 acaricides in citrus based on an optimized quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, safe strategy. Good linearities of the standard curve of 5-1000 μg/kg was obtained with regression coefficients higher than 0.9967. Recoveries for all compounds ranged from 72 to 111% with relative standard deviations lower than 14.4% at spiked levels of 5, 50, and 500 μg/kg. Low limits of detection and quantification were readily achieved ranging from 0.05 to 2.7 and 0.10 to 4.3 μg/kg, respectively. Matrix effects were also evaluated for 16 targets with most compounds achieved signal enhancement. Citrus peel gave the highest extent matrix effects, followed by whole citrus and pulp. Finally, this method was successfully applied to detect acaricides residues in real citrus samples. The results showed that pyridaben and quinalphos were the two most frequent and high-concentration compounds with concentrations exceeding the maximum residue limits in five samples, suggesting that the use of these acaricides should be regulated in China in the future. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Metabolomic analysis of primary metabolites in citrus leaf during defense responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Tomonori; Matsukawa, Tetsuya; Kajiyama, Shin'ichiro

    2017-03-01

    Mechanical damage is one of the unavoidable environmental stresses to plant growth and development. Plants induce a variety of reactions which defend against natural enemies and/or heal the wounded sites. Jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA), defense-related plant hormones, are well known to be involved in induction of defense reactions and play important roles as signal molecules. However, defense related metabolites are so numerous and diverse that roles of individual compounds are still to be elucidated. In this report, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of metabolic changes during wound response in citrus plants which are one of the most commercially important fruit tree families. Changes in amino acid, sugar, and organic acid profiles in leaves were surveyed after wounding, JA and SA treatments using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) in seven citrus species, Citrus sinensis, Citrus limon, Citrus paradisi, Citrus unshiu, Citrus kinokuni, Citrus grandis, and Citrus hassaku. GC/MS data were applied to multivariate analyses including hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), primary component analysis (PCA), and orthogonal partial least squares-discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) to extract stress-related compounds. HCA showed the amino acid cluster including phenylalanine and tryptophan, suggesting that amino acids in this cluster are concertedly regulated during responses against treatments. OPLS-DA exhibited that tryptophan was accumulated after wounding and JA treatments in all species tested, while serine was down regulated. Our results suggest that tryptophan and serine are common biomarker candidates in citrus plants for wound stress. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Phenolic content, antioxidant activities and stimulatory roles of citrus fruits on some lactic acid bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Irkin Reyhan; Dogan Serap; Degirmencioglu Nurcan; Diken Mehmet Emin; Guldas Metin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities in citrus fruits and their peels were determined, and their stimulatory roles on some lactic acid bacteria were investigated. Phenolic compounds in citrus fruits such as mandarin, lemon, orange and grapefruit were determined either in the juices or in the peel extracts. Total phenolic content was determined in a spectrophotometer at 685 nm using the adapted Folin-Ciocalteu method. Total flavonoid ...

  5. [Chemical composition and bioactive compounds of flour of orange (Citrus sinensis), tangerine (Citrus reticulata) and grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) peels cultivated in Venezuela].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón, Alicia M; Vásquez, A Marina; Padilla, Fanny C

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the chemical composition and some bioactive compounds in the peel's flour of some of the most consumed citrus fruits cultivated in Venezuela. Chemical composition as well as some trace elements, ascorbic acid, carotenoids dietary fiber, total polyphenols and their antiradical efficiency, using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhidracyl (DPPH) were assessed in the dried peels of orange (Citrus sinensis), tangerine (Citrus reticulata) and white grapefruit (Citrus paradisi). Moisture, fat, protein and ash content for all samples showed statistical differences (p peel showed the highest magnesium and carotenoid content, while highest ascorbic acid and carotenoid content was found in the grapefruit's peel. Dietary fiber content presented significant high value in the tangerine peel. All samples presented high content of extractable polyphenols (4.33; 7.6 and 5.1 g/100g). The highest antiradical efficiency was shown by the tangerine's peel, value which correlates with the polyphenol content. These results suggest that tangerine peel should be the most suitable, to reduce risk of some diseases such as cardiovascular and some associated to lipid oxidation. Studied samples are good sources of dietary fiber and phenolic compounds, whose use could be useful in the formulation of functional foods, taking advantage of the presence of dietary fiber and antioxidant compounds in only one ingredient.

  6. The citrus fruit proteome: insights into citrus fruit metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, E; Fon, M; Lee, Y J; Phinney, B S; Sadka, A; Blumwald, E

    2007-09-01

    Fruit development and ripening are key processes in the production of the phytonutrients that are essential for a balanced diet and for disease prevention. The pathways involved in these processes are unique to plants and vary between species. Climacteric fruit ripening, especially in tomato, has been extensively studied; yet, ripening of non-climacteric fruit is poorly understood. Although the different species share common pathways; developmental programs, physiological, anatomical, biochemical composition and structural differences must contribute to the operation of unique pathways, genes and proteins. Citrus has a non-climacteric fruit ripening behavior and has a unique anatomical fruit structure. For the last few years a citrus genome-wide ESTs project has been initiated and consists of 222,911 clones corresponding to 19,854 contigs and 37,138 singletons. Taking advantage of the citrus database we analyzed the citrus proteome. Using LC-MS/MS we analyzed soluble and enriched membrane fractions of mature citrus fruit to identify the proteome of fruit juice cells. We have identified ca. 1,400 proteins from these fractions by searching NCBI-nr (green plants) and citrus ESTs databases, classified these proteins according to their putative function and assigned function according to known biosynthetic pathways.

  7. HPLC-UV-MS Profiles of Phenolic Compounds and Antioxidant Activity of Fruits from Three Citrus Species Consumed in Northern Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Anghel Brito; Javier E. Ramirez; Carlos Areche; Beatriz Sepúlveda; Simirgiotis, Mario J.

    2014-01-01

    Peels and edible pulp from three species of citrus including Citrus aurantifolia (varieties pica and sutil) and Citrus x lemon var. Genova widely cultivated and consumed in Northern Chile (I and II region) were analyzed for phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity for the first time. A high performance electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-UV-ESI-MS) method was developed for the rapid identification of phenolics in extracts from peels and juices of all species. Several flavonoid...

  8. Antibacterial effect of citrus press-cakes dried by high speed and far-infrared radiation drying methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samarakoon, Kalpa; Senevirathne, Mahinda; Lee, Won-Woo; Kim, Young-Tae; Kim, Jae-Il; Oh, Myung-Cheol

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the antibacterial effect was evaluated to determine the benefits of high speed drying (HSD) and far-infrared radiation drying (FIR) compared to the freeze drying (FD) method. Citrus press-cakes (CPCs) are released as a by-product in the citrus processing industry. Previous studies have shown that the HSD and FIR drying methods are much more economical for drying time and mass drying than those of FD, even though FD is the most qualified drying method. The disk diffusion assay was conducted, and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) were determined with methanol extracts of the dried CPCs against 11 fish and five food-related pathogenic bacteria. The disk diffusion results indicated that the CPCs dried by HSD, FIR, and FD prevented growth of all tested bacteria almost identically. The MIC and MBC results showed a range from 0.5-8.0 mg/mL and 1.0-16.0 mg/mL respectively. Scanning electron microscopy indicated that the extracts changed the morphology of the bacteria cell wall, leading to destruction. These results suggest that CPCs dried by HSD and FIR showed strong antibacterial activity against pathogenic bacteria and are more useful drying methods than that of the classic FD method in CPCs utilization. PMID:22808341

  9. Pharmacognostical evaluation of Citrus jambhiri Lush. fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Swapnil Y.; Harisha, C. R.; Galib, Ruknuddin; Prajapati, P. K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Citrus jambhiri Lush., commonly known as Jambīra Nimbū in Sanskrit is medium to large indigenous tree with spreading habit, less spiny than lemon and belonging to the family Rutaceae. In Ayurveda, it is used in many pharmaceutical procedures of purification (Śodhana), calcination (Māraṇa) etc., Though it is an important plant, till date, no pharmacognostical reports have been available on its fruit. Materials and Methods: Study of fruit and its powder, histochemical tests and preliminary physicochemical investigations were done. Results and Conclusion: Results showed prismatic crystals of calcium oxalate, aerenchyma cells, oil globules, pitted vessels, scalariform vessels, juicy sac, etc., Preliminary physicochemical analysis revealed loss on drying (1.1%), ash value (1.4%), alcohol soluble extract (28.6%), and water soluble extract (53.3%). These observations can be of use in future studies. PMID:25861144

  10. Pharmacognostical evaluation of Citrus jambhiri Lush. fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnil Y Chaudhari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Citrus jambhiri Lush., commonly known as Jambīra Nimbū in Sanskrit is medium to large indigenous tree with spreading habit, less spiny than lemon and belonging to the family Rutaceae. In Ayurveda, it is used in many pharmaceutical procedures of purification (Śodhana, calcination (Māraṇa etc., Though it is an important plant, till date, no pharmacognostical reports have been available on its fruit. Materials and Methods: Study of fruit and its powder, histochemical tests and preliminary physicochemical investigations were done. Results and Conclusion: Results showed prismatic crystals of calcium oxalate, aerenchyma cells, oil globules, pitted vessels, scalariform vessels, juicy sac, etc., Preliminary physicochemical analysis revealed loss on drying (1.1%, ash value (1.4%, alcohol soluble extract (28.6%, and water soluble extract (53.3%. These observations can be of use in future studies.

  11. Phenolic Compounds Characterization and Biological Activities of Citrus aurantium Bloom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Oskoueian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus plants are known to possess beneficial biological activities for human health. In addition, ethnopharmacological application of plants is a good tool to explore their bioactivities and active compounds. This research was carried out to evaluate the phenolic and flavonoid analysis, antioxidant properties, anti inflammatory and anti cancer activity of Citrus aurantium bloom. The total phenolics and flavonoids results revealed that methanolic extract contained high total phenolics and flavonoids compared to ethanolic and boiling water extracts. The obtained total phenolics value for methanolic Citrus aurantium bloom extract was 4.55 ± 0.05 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE/g dry weight (DW, and for total flavonoids it was 3.83 ± 0.05 mg rutin equivalent/g DW. In addition, the RP-HPLC analyses of phenolics and flavonoids indicated the presence of gallic acid, pyrogallol, syringic acid, caffeic acid, rutin, quercetin and naringin as bioactive compounds. The antioxidant activity of Citrus aurantium bloom were examined by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH assay and the ferric reducing/antioxidant potential (FRAP. The free radical scavenging and ferric reducing power activities were higher for the methanolic extract of Citrus aurantium bloom at a concentration of 300 μg/mL, with values of 55.3% and 51.7%, respectively, as compared to the corresponding boiling water and ethanolic extracts, but the activities were lower than those of antioxidant standards such as BHT and α-tocopherol. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory result of methanolic extract showed appreciable reduction in nitric oxide production of stimulated RAW 264.7 cells at the presence of plant extract. Apart from that, the anticancer activity of the methanolic extract was investigated in vitro against human cancer cell lines (MCF-7; MDA-MB-231, human colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29 and Chang cell as a normal human hepatocyte. The obtained result demonstrated the moderate to

  12. 76 FR 8603 - Citrus Seed Imports; Citrus Greening and Citrus Variegated Chlorosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... of citrus. Caused by a strain of the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa, CVC causes severe chlorosis....D. Pria, Jr., P.M. Lacava, et al. Presence of Xylella fastidiosa in Sweet Orange Fruit and Seeds and...

  13. Citrus limonin glucoside supplementation decreased biomarkers of liver disease in overweight human subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orange juice and mixtures of citrus limonoid glucosides isolated from orange juice or its byproducts demonstrated health benefits in human and animal studies. However, the risks and benefits of purified limonin glucoside (LG) in humans are unknown. Aim of this study was to determine the safety and m...

  14. Larvicidal Activity of Citrus Limonoids against Aedes albopictus Larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazrat Bilal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Development of insecticide resistance occurred due to the continuous and misuse of synthetic insecticidestherefore, the recent study was conducted to explore eco-friendly plant extracts that have some potential to suppressmosquito larval population.Methods: WHO recommended mosquito larval bioassay method for insecticide was used while for the analysis of citrus oils for limonin and nomilin content HPLC was used.Results: Among the two citrus cultivars tested as larvicide against Aedes albopictus, valencia late (Citrus sinensis wasthe best in terms of LC50 (297 ppm, % mortality (97% and LT50 (18.49 hours then freutrall early (Citrus reticulatewith LC50 (377.4 ppm, % mortality (88% and LT50 (31 hours, While nomilin gave lowest LC50 (121.04 ppm than limonin (382.22 ppm after 72 hours of exposure. Valencia late also had more limonin and nomilin (377 μg/ml and 21.19 μg/ml than freutrall early (5.29 μg/ml and 3.89 μg/ml respectively.Conclusion: Valencia late showed best results in term of LC50, LT50 and percentage mortality against Aedes albopictus as it has more amount of nomilin then freutrall early, however further evaluation in the field conditions is required.

  15. Weeping dragon, a unique ornamenal citrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ‘Weeping Dragon’ is a new ornamental citrus cultivar developed by intercrossing of two unusual and unique citrus types, Poncirus trifoliata cultivated variety (cv.) Flying Dragon, and Citrus sinensis cv. ‘Cipo’. This new hybrid cultivar combines strongly contorted and weeping growth traits in a smal...

  16. Targeting excessive free radicals with peels and juices of citrus fruits: grapefruit, lemon, lime and orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Rafaela; Barros, Lillian; Barreira, João C M; Sousa, M João; Carvalho, Ana Maria; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2010-01-01

    A comparative study between the antioxidant properties of peel (flavedo and albedo) and juice of some commercially grown citrus fruit (Rutaceae), grapefruit (Citrus paradisi), lemon (Citrus limon), lime (Citrusxaurantiifolia) and sweet orange (Citrus sinensis) was performed. Different in vitro assays were applied to the volatile and polar fractions of peels and to crude and polar fraction of juices: 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging capacity, reducing power and inhibition of lipid peroxidation using beta-carotene-linoleate model system in liposomes and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay in brain homogenates. Reducing sugars and phenolics were the main antioxidant compounds found in all the extracts. Peels polar fractions revealed the highest contents in phenolics, flavonoids, ascorbic acid, carotenoids and reducing sugars, which certainly contribute to the highest antioxidant potential found in these fractions. Peels volatile fractions were clearly separated using discriminant analysis, which is in agreement with their lowest antioxidant potential. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Health costs caused by oil extraction air emissions and the benefits from abatement: the case of Kazakhstan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netalieva, I.; Wesseler, J.H.H.; Heijman, W.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    The methodology and results of a cost–benefit analysis of air quality control during oil production in the Caspian Region in Kazakhstan are presented. The benefits are defined as the decrease in health costs from reduced air pollution. The health costs are the income losses which depend on the

  18. Metabolic Interplay between the Asian Citrus Psyllid and Its Profftella Symbiont: An Achilles' Heel of the Citrus Greening Insect Vector.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John S Ramsey

    Full Text Available 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (CLas, the bacterial pathogen associated with citrus greening disease, is transmitted by Diaphorina citri, the Asian citrus psyllid. Interactions among D. citri and its microbial endosymbionts, including 'Candidatus Profftella armatura', are likely to impact transmission of CLas. We used quantitative mass spectrometry to compare the proteomes of CLas(+ and CLas(- populations of D. citri, and found that proteins involved in polyketide biosynthesis by the endosymbiont Profftella were up-regulated in CLas(+ insects. Mass spectrometry analysis of the Profftella polyketide diaphorin in D. citri metabolite extracts revealed the presence of a novel diaphorin-related polyketide and the ratio of these two polyketides was changed in CLas(+ insects. Insect proteins differentially expressed between CLas(+ and CLas(- D. citri included defense and immunity proteins, proteins involved in energy storage and utilization, and proteins involved in endocytosis, cellular adhesion, and cytoskeletal remodeling which are associated with microbial invasion of host cells. Insight into the metabolic interdependence between the insect vector, its endosymbionts, and the citrus greening pathogen reveals novel opportunities for control of this disease, which is currently having a devastating impact on citrus production worldwide.

  19. Metabolic Interplay between the Asian Citrus Psyllid and Its Profftella Symbiont: An Achilles’ Heel of the Citrus Greening Insect Vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, John S.; Johnson, Richard S.; Hoki, Jason S.; Kruse, Angela; Mahoney, Jaclyn; Hilf, Mark E.; Hunter, Wayne B.; Hall, David G.; Schroeder, Frank C.; MacCoss, Michael J.; Cilia, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (CLas), the bacterial pathogen associated with citrus greening disease, is transmitted by Diaphorina citri, the Asian citrus psyllid. Interactions among D. citri and its microbial endosymbionts, including ‘Candidatus Profftella armatura’, are likely to impact transmission of CLas. We used quantitative mass spectrometry to compare the proteomes of CLas(+) and CLas(-) populations of D. citri, and found that proteins involved in polyketide biosynthesis by the endosymbiont Profftella were up-regulated in CLas(+) insects. Mass spectrometry analysis of the Profftella polyketide diaphorin in D. citri metabolite extracts revealed the presence of a novel diaphorin-related polyketide and the ratio of these two polyketides was changed in CLas(+) insects. Insect proteins differentially expressed between CLas(+) and CLas(-) D. citri included defense and immunity proteins, proteins involved in energy storage and utilization, and proteins involved in endocytosis, cellular adhesion, and cytoskeletal remodeling which are associated with microbial invasion of host cells. Insight into the metabolic interdependence between the insect vector, its endosymbionts, and the citrus greening pathogen reveals novel opportunities for control of this disease, which is currently having a devastating impact on citrus production worldwide. PMID:26580079

  20. Synergy and Other Interactions between Polymethoxyflavones from Citrus Byproducts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benito F. García

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The citrus by-products released from citrus processing plants may contain high levels of potentially bioactive compounds such as flavonoids, which are a widely distributed group of polyphenolic compounds with health-related properties based on their antioxidant activity. In the study reported here, the potential bioactivities and antioxidant activities of extracts, fractions and compounds from citrus by-products were evaluated along with the chemical interactions of binary mixtures of compounds and complex mixtures. The bioactivities and interactions were evaluated in wheat coleoptile bioassays and the antioxidant activity was evaluated by the al DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhdrazyl radical radical scavenging assay. The extracts, fractions and most of the isolated compounds (mainly polymethoxyflavones showed high activity in the wheat coleoptile bioassay. However, the antioxidant activity was not consistently high, except in the acetone extract fractions. Moreover, a study of the interactions with binary mixtures of polymethoxyflavones showed the occurrence of synergistic effects. The complex mixtures of fractions composed mainly of polymethoxyflavones caused a synergistic effect when it was added to a bioactive compound such as anethole. The results reported here highlight a new application for the wheat coleoptile bioassay as a quick tool to detect potential synergistic effects in compounds or mixtures.

  1. Assessment of the potential health benefits of certain total extracts from Vitis vinifera, Aesculus hyppocastanum and Curcuma longa

    Science.gov (United States)

    MARGINĂ, DENISA; OLARU, OCTAVIAN TUDOREL; ILIE, MIHAELA; GRĂDINARU, DANIELA; GUȚU, CLAUDIA; VOICU, SORINA; DINISCHIOTU, ANCA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; TSATSAKIS, ARISTIDIS M.

    2015-01-01

    A number of recent studies have illustrated the active role of food/natural components in the prevention of chronic diseases and in the improvement of the quality of life. In the present study, we aimed to obtain and characterize certain extracts from Vitis vinifera L., Aesculus hippocastanum L. and Curcuma longa L., focusing on their antioxidant effects in vitro. Three vegetal extracts were obtained for each plant: in water, 50% water-alcohol and in 96% ethanol. These extracts were then analyzed for their qualitative composition by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) and total phenolic content by ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry (UV-VIS). The antioxidant activity of the extracts was assessed in vitro by 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay; the effects of lipid peroxidation on the cell membrane were evaluated using Jurkat cells in two experimental models: normoglycemic and hyperglycemic medium, in order for the results to be able to be translated into clinical practice. In addition, the resistance of the extracts to acid and alkaline hydrolysis was investigated. The obtained extracts had 0.4–39 µg phenolics/mg total extract. The largest amount of phenolics was found in the Cucurma longa extracts, while the lowest was found in the Aesculus hippocastanum extacts. HPTLC analysis identified the main phenolic compounds in the extracts which were ferulic acid, gallic acid, caffeic acid and coumaric acid, as well as quercetin, kaempferol, apigenin, curcumin, luteolin and esculetin. The Aesculus hippocastanum extracts had a low antioxidant efficacy, while both the Curcuma longa and Vitis vinifera extracts had a high antioxidant activity; the products resulting from alkaline hydrolisis were significantly more efficient in scavenging DPPH radicals compared to the products resulting from acid hydrolisis. The antioxidant effects of the Curcuma longa extracts exerted on the membranes of Jurkat cells were the most prominent under both normal and

  2. Angolan Cymbopogon citratus used for therapeutic benefits: nutritional composition and influence of solvents in phytochemicals content and antioxidant activity of leaf extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Marta O; Alves, Rita C; Pires, Pedro C; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Vinha, Ana F

    2013-10-01

    Folk medicine is a relevant and effective part of indigenous healthcare systems which are, in practice, totally dependent on traditional healers. An outstanding coincidence between indigenous medicinal plant uses and scientifically proved pharmacological properties of several phytochemicals has been observed along the years. This work focused on the leaves of a medicinal plant traditionally used for therapeutic benefits (Angolan Cymbopogon citratus), in order to evaluate their nutritional value. The bioactive phytochemical composition and antioxidant activity of leaf extracts prepared with different solvents (water, methanol and ethanol) were also evaluated. The plant leaves contained ∼60% of carbohydrates, protein (∼20%), fat (∼5%), ash (∼4%) and moisture (∼9%). The phytochemicals screening revealed the presence of tannins, flavonoids, and terpenoids in all extracts. Methanolic extracts also contained alkaloids and steroids. Several methods were used to evaluate total antioxidant capacity of the different extracts (DPPH·, NO·, and H₂O₂ scavenging assays, reducing power, and FRAP). Ethanolic extracts presented a significantly higher antioxidant activity (pextracts. Methanolic extracts showed the lowest radical scavenging activities for both DPPH· and NO· radicals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Polyphenolic content and bactericidal effect of Mexican Citrus limetta and Citrus reticulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damián-Reyna, Andrés Alejandro; González-Hernández, Juan Carlos; Maya-Yescas, Rafael; de Jesús Cortés-Penagos, Consuelo; Del Carmen Chávez-Parga, Ma

    2017-02-01

    In this study, total phenolics, total flavonoids, hesperidin and ascorbic acid contents in bagasse, juice and seed of mexican sweet lime (Citrus limetta) and mandarine (Citrus reticulata) were determined at two commercial maturity stages (maturation index), as well as their bactericidal effect on Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The results showed that bagasses had the highest total phenolics, total flavonoids, and hesperidin content for both, C. limetta, and C. reticulata; highest ascorbic acid contents were found in C. limetta juice (3.36 ± 0.25 mg g-1 DW) and C. reticulata bagasse (3.83 ± 0.37 mg g-1 DW). All tested extracts showed bacterial growth inhibition at 50 and 800 µg mL-1. Bagasse extracts of both fruits showed the highest inhibitions (>90%) on tested bacteria. Total phenolics, total flavonoids, and hesperidin contents, as well as bactericidal effect increased with maturity. Results indicated that both Mexican citric fruits (C. limetta and C. reticulata) were good sources of antioxidant and bactericidal agents.

  4. Coupled Hydro-Mechanical Simulations of CO2 Storage Supported by Pressure Management Demonstrate Synergy Benefits from Simultaneous Formation Fluid Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kempka Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the synergetic benefits of simultaneous formation fluid extraction during CO2 injection for reservoir pressure management by coupled hydro-mechanical simulations at the prospective Vedsted storage site located in northern Denmark. Effectiveness of reservoir pressure management was investigated by simulation of CO2 storage without any fluid extraction as well as with 66% and 100% equivalent volume formation fluid extraction from four wells positioned for geothermal heat recovery. Simulation results demonstrate that a total pressure reduction of up to about 1.1 MPa can be achieved at the injection well. Furthermore, the areal pressure perturbation in the storage reservoir can be significantly decreased compared to the simulation scenario without any formation fluid extraction. Following a stress regime analysis, two stress regimes were considered in the coupled hydro-mechanical simulations indicating that the maximum ground surface uplift is about 0.24 m in the absence of any reservoir pressure management. However, a ground uplift mitigation of up to 37.3% (from 0.24 m to 0.15 m can be achieved at the injection well by 100% equivalent volume formation fluid extraction. Well-based adaptation of fluid extraction rates can support achieving zero displacements at the proposed formation fluid extraction wells located close to urban infrastructure. Since shear and tensile failure do not occur under both stress regimes for all investigated scenarios, it is concluded that a safe operation of CO2 injection with simultaneous formation fluid extraction for geothermal heat recovery can be implemented at the Vedsted site.

  5. Developmental toxicity of Citrus aurantium in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Deborah K; Juliar, Beth E; White, Gene E; Pellicore, Linda S

    2011-06-01

    Ephedra was commonly used in herbal products marketed for weight loss until safety concerns forced its removal from products. Even before the ban, manufacturers had begun to replace ephedra with other compounds, including Citrus aurantium, or bitter orange. The major component in the bitter orange extract is synephrine which is chemically similar to ephedrine. The purpose of this study was to determine if relatively pure synephrine or synephrine present as a constituent of a bitter orange extract produced developmental toxicity in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed daily by gavage with one of several different doses of synephrine from one of two different extracts. Caffeine was added to some doses. Animals were sacrificed on GD 21, and fetuses were examined for the presence of various developmental toxic endpoints. At doses up to 100 mg synephrine/kg body weight, there were no adverse effects on embryolethality, fetal weight, or incidences of gross, visceral, or skeletal abnormalities. There was a decrease in maternal weight at 50 mg synephrine/kg body weight when given as the 6% synephrine extract with 25 mg caffeine/kg body weight; there was also a decrease in maternal weight in the caffeine only group. This decrease in body weight may have been due to decreased food consumption which was also observed in these two groups. Overall, doses of up to 100 mg synephrine/kg body weight did not produce developmental toxicity in Sprague-Dawley rats. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. EXTRACT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pafilis, Evangelos; Buttigieg, Pier Luigi; Ferrell, Barbra

    2016-01-01

    The microbial and molecular ecology research communities have made substantial progress on developing standards for annotating samples with environment metadata. However, sample manual annotation is a highly labor intensive process and requires familiarity with the terminologies used. We have the...... and text-mining-assisted curation revealed that EXTRACT speeds up annotation by 15-25% and helps curators to detect terms that would otherwise have been missed.Database URL: https://extract.hcmr.gr/......., organism, tissue and disease terms. The evaluators in the BioCreative V Interactive Annotation Task found the system to be intuitive, useful, well documented and sufficiently accurate to be helpful in spotting relevant text passages and extracting organism and environment terms. Comparison of fully manual...

  7. Development and validation of a multiplex reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay for the rapid detection of Citrus tristeza virus, Citrus psorosis virus, and Citrus leaf blotch virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Fatima; Hodzic, Emir; Kwon, Sun-Jung; Wang, Jinbo; Vidalakis, Georgios

    2015-08-01

    A single real-time multiplex reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) assay for the simultaneous detection of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), Citrus psorosis virus (CPsV), and Citrus leaf blotch virus (CLBV) was developed and validated using three different fluorescently labeled minor groove binding qPCR probes. To increase the detection reliability, coat protein (CP) genes from large number of different isolates of CTV, CPsV and CLBV were sequenced and a multiple sequence alignment was generated with corresponding CP sequences from the GenBank and a robust multiplex RT-qPCR assay was designed. The capacity of the multiplex RT-qPCR assay in detecting the viruses was compared to singleplex RT-qPCR designed specifically for each virus and was assessed using multiple virus isolates from diverse geographical regions and citrus species as well as graft-inoculated citrus plants infected with various combination of the three viruses. No significant difference in detection limits was found and specificity was not affected by the inclusion of the three assays in a multiplex RT-qPCR reaction. Comparison of the viral load for each virus using singleplex and multiplex RT-qPCR assays, revealed no significant differences between the two assays in virus detection. No significant difference in Cq values was detected when using one-step and two-step multiplex RT-qPCR detection formats. Optimizing the RNA extraction technique for citrus tissues and testing the quality of the extracted RNA using RT-qPCR targeting the cytochrome oxidase citrus gene as an RNA specific internal control proved to generate better diagnostic assays. Results showed that the developed multiplex RT-qPCR can streamline viruses testing of citrus nursery stock by replacing three separate singleplex assays, thus reducing time and labor while retaining the same sensitivity and specificity. The three targeted RNA viruses are regulated pathogens for California's mandatory "Section 3701

  8. Citrus species and hybrids depicted by near and mid infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Páscoa, Ricardo N M J; Moreira, Silvana; Lopes, João A; Sousa, Clara

    2018-01-31

    Citrus trees are one of the most cultivated plants around the world with high economic impact. The wide sexual compatibility among relatives gave rise to a large number of hybrids which are difficult to discriminate. This work sought to explore the ability of infrared spectroscopy to discriminate among Citrus species and/or hybrids and to contribute to the elucidation of its relatedness. Adults leaves of eighteen distinct Citrus plants were included in this work. Near and mid infrared (NIR and FTIR) leaves spectra were acquired after harvesting and a drying period of one month. Spectra were modelled by principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis. Both techniques revealed a high discrimination potential (78.5-95.9%) being the best results achieved with NIR spectroscopy and air-dried leaves (95.9%). Infrared spectroscopy was able to successfully discriminate several Citrus species and/or hybrids. Our results also contributed to enhance the insights about the studied Citrus species and/or hybrids. Despite the benefit of including additional samples, the results herein obtained clearly shown that infrared spectroscopy as a reliable technique for Citrus species and/or hybrids discrimination. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Changes of peel essential oil composition of four Tunisian citrus during fruit maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgou, Soumaya; Rahali, Fatma Zohra; Ourghemmi, Iness; Saïdani Tounsi, Moufida

    2012-01-01

    The present work investigates the effect of ripening stage on the chemical composition of essential oil extracted from peel of four citrus: bitter orange (Citrus aurantium), lemon (Citrus limon), orange maltaise (Citrus sinensis), and mandarin (Citrus reticulate) and on their antibacterial activity. Essential oils yields varied during ripening from 0.46 to 2.70%, where mandarin was found to be the richest. Forty volatile compounds were identified. Limonene (67.90-90.95%) and 1,8-cineole (tr-14.72%) were the most represented compounds in bitter orange oil while limonene (37.63-69.71%), β-pinene (0.63-31.49%), γ-terpinene (0.04-9.96%), and p-cymene (0.23-9.84%) were the highest ones in lemon. In the case of mandarin, the predominant compounds were limonene (51.81-69.00%), 1,8-cineole (0.01-26.43%), and γ-terpinene (2.53-14.06%). However, results showed that orange peel oil was dominated mainly by limonene (81.52-86.43%) during ripening. The results showed that ripening stage influenced significantly the antibacterial activity of the oils against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This knowledge could help establish the optimum harvest date ensuring the maximum essential oil, limonene, as well as antibacterial compounds yields of citrus.

  10. Changes of Peel Essential Oil Composition of Four Tunisian Citrus during Fruit Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumaya Bourgou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work investigates the effect of ripening stage on the chemical composition of essential oil extracted from peel of four citrus: bitter orange (Citrus aurantium, lemon (Citrus limon, orange maltaise (Citrus sinensis, and mandarin (Citrus reticulate and on their antibacterial activity. Essential oils yields varied during ripening from 0.46 to 2.70%, where mandarin was found to be the richest. Forty volatile compounds were identified. Limonene (67.90–90.95% and 1,8-cineole (tr-14.72% were the most represented compounds in bitter orange oil while limonene (37.63–69.71%, β-pinene (0.63–31.49%, γ-terpinene (0.04–9.96%, and p-cymene (0.23–9.84% were the highest ones in lemon. In the case of mandarin, the predominant compounds were limonene (51.81–69.00%, 1,8-cineole (0.01–26.43%, and γ-terpinene (2.53–14.06%. However, results showed that orange peel oil was dominated mainly by limonene (81.52–86.43% during ripening. The results showed that ripening stage influenced significantly the antibacterial activity of the oils against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This knowledge could help establish the optimum harvest date ensuring the maximum essential oil, limonene, as well as antibacterial compounds yields of citrus.

  11. Converting citrus wastes into value-added products: Economic and environmently friendly approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Kavita; Mahato, Neelima; Cho, Moo Hwan; Lee, Yong Rok

    2017-02-01

    Citrus fruits, including oranges, grapefruits, lemons, limes, tangerines, and mandarins, are among the most widely cultivated fruits around the globe. Its production is increasing every year due to rising consumer demand. Citrus-processing industries generate huge amounts of wastes every year, and citrus peel waste alone accounts for almost 50% of the wet fruit mass. Citrus waste is of immense economic value as it contains an abundance of various flavonoids, carotenoids, dietary fiber, sugars, polyphenols, essential oils, and ascorbic acid, as well as considerable amounts of some trace elements. Citrus waste also contains high levels of sugars suitable for fermentation for bioethanol production. However, compounds such as D-limonene must be removed for efficient bioethanol production. The aim of the present article was to review the latest advances in various popular methods of extraction for obtaining value-added products from citrus waste/byproducts and their potential utility as a source of various functional compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental Evidence and In Silico Identification of Tryptophan Decarboxylase in Citrus Genus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Masi, Luigi; Castaldo, Domenico; Pignone, Domenico; Servillo, Luigi; Facchiano, Angelo

    2017-02-11

    Plant tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC) converts tryptophan into tryptamine, precursor of indolealkylamine alkaloids. The recent finding of tryptamine metabolites in Citrus plants leads to hypothesize the existence of TDC activity in this genus. Here, we report for the first time that, in Citrus x limon seedlings, deuterium labeled tryptophan is decarboxylated into tryptamine, from which successively deuterated N,N,N-trimethyltryptamine is formed. These results give an evidence of the occurrence of the TDC activity and the successive methylation pathway of the tryptamine produced from the tryptophan decarboxylation. In addition, with the aim to identify the genetic basis for the presence of TDC, we carried out a sequence similarity search for TDC in the Citrus genomes using as a probe the TDC sequence reported for the plant Catharanthus roseus. We analyzed the genomes of both Citrus clementina and Citrus sinensis, available in public database, and identified putative protein sequences of aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase. Similarly, 42 aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase sequences from 23 plant species were extracted from public databases. Potential sequence signatures for functional TDC were then identified. With this research, we propose for the first time a putative protein sequence for TDC in the genus Citrus.

  13. Experimental Evidence and In Silico Identification of Tryptophan Decarboxylase in Citrus Genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi De Masi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC converts tryptophan into tryptamine, precursor of indolealkylamine alkaloids. The recent finding of tryptamine metabolites in Citrus plants leads to hypothesize the existence of TDC activity in this genus. Here, we report for the first time that, in Citrus x limon seedlings, deuterium labeled tryptophan is decarboxylated into tryptamine, from which successively deuterated N,N,N-trimethyltryptamine is formed. These results give an evidence of the occurrence of the TDC activity and the successive methylation pathway of the tryptamine produced from the tryptophan decarboxylation. In addition, with the aim to identify the genetic basis for the presence of TDC, we carried out a sequence similarity search for TDC in the Citrus genomes using as a probe the TDC sequence reported for the plant Catharanthus roseus. We analyzed the genomes of both Citrus clementina and Citrus sinensis, available in public database, and identified putative protein sequences of aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase. Similarly, 42 aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase sequences from 23 plant species were extracted from public databases. Potential sequence signatures for functional TDC were then identified. With this research, we propose for the first time a putative protein sequence for TDC in the genus Citrus.

  14. Natural products for cancer-targeted therapy: citrus flavonoids as potent chemopreventive agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiyanto, Edy; Hermawan, Adam; Anindyajati

    2012-01-01

    Targeted therapy has been a very promising strategy of drug development research. Many molecular mechanims of diseases have been known to be regulated by abundance of proteins, such as receptors and hormones. Chemoprevention for treatment and prevention of diseases are continuously developed. Pre-clinical and clinical studies in chemoprevention field yielded many valuable data in preventing the onset of disease and suppressing the progress of their growth, making chemoprevention a challenging and a very rational strategy in future researches. Natural products being rich of flavonoids are those fruits belong to the genus citrus. Ethanolic extract of Citrus reticulata and Citrus aurantiifolia peels showed anticarcinogenic, antiproliferative, co-chemotherapeutic and estrogenic effects. Several examples of citrus flavonoids that are potential as chemotherapeutic agents are tangeretin, nobiletin, hesperetin, hesperidin, naringenin, and naringin. Those flavonoids have been shown to possess inhibition activity on certain cancer cells' growth through various mechanisms. Moreover, citrus flavonoids also perform promising effect in combination with several chemotherapeutic agents against the growth of cancer cells. Some mechanisms involved in those activities are through cell cycle modulation, antiangiogenic effect, and apoptosis induction. Previous studies showed that tangeretin suppressed the growth of T47D breast cancer cells by inhibiting ERK phosphorylation. While in combination with tamoxifen, doxorubicin, and 5-FU, respectively, it was proven to be synergist on several cancer cells. Hesperidin and naringenin increased cytotoxicitity of doxorubicin on MCF-7 cells and HeLa cells. Besides, citrus flavonoids also performed estrogenic effect in vivo. One example is hesperidin having the ability to decrease the concentration of serum and hepatic lipid and reduce osteoporosis of ovariectomized rats. Those studies showed the great potential of citrus fruits as natural product

  15. Citrus bergamia essential oil: from basic research to clinical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele eNavarra

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Citrus bergamia Risso et Poiteau, also known as Bergamot, is a plant belonging to the Rutaceae family, defined as a hybrid of bitter orange and lemon. It is an endemic plant of the Calabria region (Italy. Bergamot fruit is primarily used for the extraction of its essential oil (bergamot essential oil: BEO, employed in perfume, cosmetics, food and confections.The aim of this review was to collect recent data from the literature on Citrus bergamia essential oil and, through a critical analysis, focus on safety and the beneficial effects on human health. Clinical studies on the therapeutic applications of BEO exclusively focus on the field of aromatherapy, suggesting that its use can be useful for reducing anxiety and stress.

  16. Antiradical, Antioxidant Activities and Anti-Inflammatory Potential of the Essential Oils of the Varieties of Citrus Limon and Citrus Aurantifolia Growing in Cameroon

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre Michel Jazet Dongmo; François Tchoumbougnang; Fabrice Fekam Boyom; Eliane Tchinda Sonwa; Paul Henri Amvam Zollo; Chantal Menut

    2013-01-01

    Essential oils of the leaves of Eureka, Lisbon and Meyer varieties of Citrus limon, as well as the Mexican, “Sans épines” and Bearss varieties of Citrus aurantifolia of Cameroon were extracted by hydrodistillation, with respective yields 0.64%, 0.90% and 0.46% 0.57%, 0.25% and 0.29%.Chemical composition analysis was carried out by gas chromatography and gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. As a whole, the six samples are very rich in monoterpenes, and limonene; thus proved to be...

  17. Strategic planning for the Florida citrus industry: addressing citrus greening disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2010-01-01

    ... $9.3 billion citrus industry. A successful citrus greening response will focus on earlier detection of diseased trees, so that these sources of new infections can be removed more quickly, and on new methods to control the insects...

  18. Improved shelf life of protein-rich tofu using Ocimum sanctum (tulsi) extracts to benefit Indian rural population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbarasu, K; Vijayalakshmi, G

    2007-10-01

    A nutrition survey carried out in India revealed that the diets of the rural population are inadequate and deficient in most of the nutrients especially protein. India being the 5th-largest producer of soybean, a protein-rich cereal, can redress protein-energy malnutrition through diversification of soybean uses by developing high-value and health-based food products. Tofu, a nonfermented soybean product rich in high-quality protein, B-vitamins, and isoflavones, could be an excellent substitute for meat in Indian recipes. Tofu being rich in protein has a very short shelf life. Hence an attempt was made to improve the shelf life using extracts of tulsi (Ocimum sanctum) commonly available in rural areas. Tofu was prepared traditionally using MgCl(2):CaSO(4) as coagulating agents. Aqueous extract of Ocimum sanctum (tulsi) was added during the preparation and storage of tofu to prolong its shelf life. Water used in this study was free from microflora, plant extract used contained mesophilic count of 2.527 x 10(4) CFU/g, and no yeasts and molds were detected. Tofu with tulsi extract had 76.4% moisture and was softer than control. Not much difference in mesophilic count was observed between control and treated samples during storage; however, treated tofu was organoleptically good until the end of the study with less lipid-peroxidation and exhibited 50% (4.7 units) less protease activity than control (9.6 units) after 7 d. By using extracts of naturally available, easily cultivable tulsi, the shelf life was successfully extended to 7 to 8 d from 3 to 4 d of normal storage without refrigeration.

  19. 78 FR 63369 - Citrus Canker, Citrus Greening, and Asian Citrus Psyllid; Interstate Movement of Regulated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ..., strains, varieties, or hybrids of the genera Citrus and Fortunella, and all clones, cultivars, strains, varieties and hybrids of the species Clausena lansium and Poncirus trifoliata. Plants and plant parts... direct human consumption. Accordingly, we do not consider it possible to extend the scope of the interim...

  20. Deliberating the perceived risks, benefits, and societal implications of shale gas and oil extraction by hydraulic fracturing in the US and UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Merryn; Partridge, Tristan; Harthorn, Barbara Herr; Pidgeon, Nick

    2017-04-01

    Shale gas and oil production in the US has increased rapidly in the past decade, while interest in prospective development has also arisen in the UK. In both countries, shale resources and the method of their extraction (hydraulic fracturing, or 'fracking') have been met with opposition amid concerns about impacts on water, greenhouse gas emissions, and health effects. Here we report the findings of a qualitative, cross-national deliberation study of public perceptions of shale development in UK and US locations not yet subject to extensive shale development. When presented with a carefully calibrated range of risks and benefits, participants' discourse focused on risks or doubts about benefits, and potential impacts were viewed as inequitably distributed. Participants drew on direct, place-based experiences as well as national contexts in deliberating shale development. These findings suggest that shale gas development already evokes a similar 'signature' of risk across the US and UK.

  1. Evaluation of resistance to asiatic citrus canker among selections of pera sweet orange (Citrus sinensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asiatic citrus canker (ACC, caused by the bacterium Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri) is a destructive disease of citrus in Brazil and in several other citrus-producing countries. ACC management is problematic, and bactericides such as copper can be reasonably efficacious but do not completely control...

  2. Application of natural colorants on citrus fruit as alternatives to Citrus Red II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warm field temperatures can often result in poor peel color of some citrus varieties, especially early in the harvest season. Under these conditions, Florida oranges, temples, tangelos, and K-Early citrus fruit are allowed to be treated with Citrus Red No.2 (CR2) to help produce a more acceptable pe...

  3. Invasive Diseases and Fruit Tree Production: Economic Tradeoffs of Citrus Greening Control on Florida's Citrus Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Robert A.; Muraro, Ronald P.; Spreen, Thomas H.

    2008-01-01

    An investment model of Florida oranges was used to evaluate various management strategies for controlling Huanglongbing, or citrus greening, a highly destructive disease. This analysis will enable the Florida citrus industry to make more informed decisions about the economic tradeoffs among current citrus greening management alternatives.

  4. Citrus nobiletin suppresses inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression in interleukin-1β-treated hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshigai, Emi [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life Sciences, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Ritsumeikan Global Innovation Research Organization (R-GIRO), Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Machida, Toru [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life Sciences, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Okuyama, Tetsuya [Ritsumeikan Global Innovation Research Organization (R-GIRO), Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Mori, Masatoshi; Murase, Hiromitsu; Yamanishi, Ryota [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life Sciences, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Okumura, Tadayoshi [Research Organization of Science and Technology, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Department of Surgery, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Osaka (Japan); Ikeya, Yukinobu [Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Nishino, Hoyoku [Ritsumeikan Global Innovation Research Organization (R-GIRO), Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Nishizawa, Mikio, E-mail: nishizaw@sk.ritsumei.ac.jp [Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life Sciences, Kusatsu, Shiga (Japan)

    2013-09-13

    Highlights: •Nobiletin is a polymethoxylated flavone that is abundant in citrus peels. •Nobiletin is a major constituent of the Citrus unshiu peel extract. •Nobiletin suppresses induction of NO and reduces iNOS expression in hepatocytes. •Nobiletin reduces the iNOS promoter activity and the DNA-binding activity of NF-κB. -- Abstract: Background: Nobiletin is a polymethoxylated flavone that is abundant in the peels of citrus fruits, such as Citrus unshiu (Satsuma mandarin) and Citrus sinensis. The dried peels of C. unshiu (chinpi) have been included in several formulae of Japanese Kampo medicines. Nobiletin may suppress the induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which synthesizes the inflammatory mediator nitric oxide (NO) in hepatocytes. Methods: A C. unshiu peel (CUP) extract was prepared. Primary cultured rat hepatocytes were treated with the CUP extract or nobiletin in the presence of interleukin 1β (IL-1β), which induces iNOS expression. NO production and iNOS gene expression were analyzed. Results: High-performance liquid chromatography analyses revealed that the nobiletin content in the CUP extract was 0.14%. Nobiletin dose-dependently reduced the NO levels and decreased iNOS expression at the protein, mRNA and antisense transcript levels. Flavone, which does not contain any methoxy groups, also suppressed iNOS induction. Nobiletin reduced the transcriptional activity of iNOS promoter-luciferase constructs and the DNA-binding activity of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) in the nuclei. Conclusions: The suppression of iNOS induction by nobiletin suggests that nobiletin may be responsible for the anti-inflammatory effects of citrus peels and have a therapeutic potential for liver diseases.

  5. The aconitate hydratase family from Citrus

    OpenAIRE

    Terol, Javier; Soler, Guillermo; Talon, Manuel; Cercos, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Research on citrus fruit ripening has received considerable attention because of the importance of citrus fruits for the human diet. Organic acids are among the main determinants of taste and organoleptic quality of fruits and hence the control of fruit acidity loss has a strong economical relevance. In citrus, organic acids accumulate in the juice sac cells of developing fruits and are catabolized thereafter during ripening. Aconitase, that transforms citrate to isocitrat...

  6. Automatic recognition of quarantine citrus diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Stegmayer, Georgina; Milone, Diego Humberto; Garran, Sergio; Burdyn, Lourdes

    2017-01-01

    Citrus exports to foreign markets are severely limited today by fruit diseases. Some of them, like citrus canker, black spot and scab, are quarantine for the markets. For this reason, it is important to perform strict controls before fruits are exported to avoid the inclusion of citrus affected by them. Nowadays, technical decisions are based on visual diagnosis of human experts, highly dependent on the degree of individual skills. This work presents a model capable of automatic recognize the...

  7. Embryogenic calli induction from nucellar tissue of Citrus cultivars Indução de calos embriogênicos a partir de nucelos de variedades de Citrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Januzzi Mendes-da-Glória

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucellar tissues of seven Citrus varieties were introduced onto three growth media to produce embryogenic callus. The media tested were: EME [MT, modified, with the addition of malt extract (500 mg.L-1]; 1/2-EME [half concentration of MT macronutrients + half concentration of BH3 macronutrients + 500 mg.L-1 malt extract + 1.55 g.L-1 of glutamine]; and EBA [EME + 0.44 muM 6-benzyladenine + 0.04 muM 2,4 D]. Soft friable calli were obtained from 'Cravo' and 'Ponkan' mandarins (Citrus reticulata, Blanco, 'Murcott' tangor (Citrus reticulata Blanco x Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck, 'Serra d'água' and 'Valencia' sweet oranges (Citrus sinensis, L. Osbeck 120 days after callus induction. 'Natal' and 'Pera' sweet oranges (Citrus sinensis, L. Osbeck produced hard non-friable calli in this period. EME and 1/2-EME media had the best results for 'Cravo' mandarin, 'Ponkan' mandarin and 'Serra d'água' sweet orange, whereas EBA was the best media composition to induce soft friable calli on 'Murcott' tangor and 'Valencia' sweet orange. Friable callus cultures of 'Cravo' and 'Ponkan' mandarins, and 'Murcott' tangor yielded high quality protoplasts after isolation. Abbreviations: a.c. - activated charcoal; BA - 6-benzyladenine; IAA - indole-acetic acid; 2,4-D - 2,4-diclorophenoxyacetic acid; MT - Murashige & Tucker basal medium.Nucelos de sete variedades de Citrus foram introduzidos em três meios de cultura para produção de calos embriogênicos. Os meios de cultura testados foram: EME [MT, modificado pela adição de extrato de malte (500 mg.L-1]; 1/2-EME [1/2 concentração de macronutrientes no meio MT + 1/2 concentração de macronutrientes no meio BH3 + 500 mg.L-1 extrato de malte + 1,55 g.L-1 de glutamina]; e EBA [EME + 0,44 miM 6-benziladenina + 0,04 miM 2,4 D]. Calos friáveis foram obtidos nas variedades tangerinas 'Cravo' e 'Ponkan' (Citrus reticulata, Blanco, tangor 'Murcote' (Citrus reticulata Blanco x Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck, laranja 'Valencia

  8. Citrus allergy from pollen to clinical symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Anna Iorio

    Full Text Available Allergy to citrus fruits is often associated with pollinosis and sensitization to other plants due to a phenomenon of cross-reactivity. The aims of the present study were to highlight the cross-reactivity among citrus and the major allergenic pollens/fruits, throughout clinical and molecular investigations, and to evaluate the sensitization frequency to citrus fruits in a population of children and adults with pollinosis. We found a relevant percentage of sensitisation (39% to citrus fruits in the patients recruited and in all of them the IgE-mediated mechanism has been confirmed by the positive response to the prick-to-prick test. RT-PCR experiments showed the expression of Cit s 1, Cit s 3 and a profilin isoform, already described in apple, also in Citrus clementine pollen. Data of multiple sequence alignments demonstrated that Citrus allergens shared high percentage identity values with other clinically relevant species (i.e. Triticum aestivum, Malus domestica, confirming the possible cross-allergenicity citrus/grasses and citrus/apple. Finally, a novelty of the present work has been the expression of two phospholipaseA2 isoforms (PLA2 α and β in Citrus as well as in Triticum pollens; being PLA2 able to generate pro-inflammatory factors, this enzyme could participate in the activation of the allergenic inflammatory cascade.

  9. Citrus pulp pellets as an additive for orange bagasse silage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Grizotto

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the fermentation profile of orange bagasse ensiled with three levels of dry matter (DM using citrus pulp pellets as a moisture-absorbing additive. Thirty experimental silos (3 treatments, 5 storage times, 2 replicates were prepared using 25-liter plastic buckets containing orange bagasse and three levels of pelleted citrus pulp (0, 6% and 20% as additive. A completely randomized design with repeated measures over time was used. The periods of anaerobic storage were 3, 7, 14, 28 and 56 days. Natural orange bagasse contained 13.9% DM, which increased to 19.1% and 25.5% with the inclusion of 6% and 20% citrus pulp pellets, respectively. The apparent density was inversely correlated with DM content and a higher level of compaction (982 kg/m3 was observed in the mass ensiled with the lowest DM level (13.9%. Additionally, lower compaction (910 kg/m3 was found in the mass ensiled with the additive. The chemical composition of the mass ensiled with or without citrus pulp pellets did not differ significantly in terms of protein, ether extract, neutral detergent fiber, lignin or in vitro DM digestibility (P≥0.05, as expected. Thus, it was possible to analyze only the effect of the inclusion of citrus pulp pellets on the increase in DM content. The inclusion of 20% of the additive reduced (P<0.01 losses due to effluent (98% less and gas production (81% less compared to the control treatment at the end of the anaerobic storage period. In this treatment, a higher (P≤0.05 log number of lactic acid bacteria (4.61 log CFU/g was also observed compared to the other treatments, indicating that the increase in DM favored the growth of these bacteria. In addition, the low yeast count (about 1 log CFU/g sample and the pH below 4.0, which were probably due to the production of lactic and acetic acids, show that the orange bagasse is rich in fermentable soluble carbohydrates and is indicated for ensiling. In conclusion, orange bagasse can be

  10. The Potential Health Benefits of Polyphenol-Rich Extracts from Cichorium intybus L. Studied on Caco-2 Cells Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Azzini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytochemicals can exert their bioactivity without reaching the systemic circulation; scarcely absorbed antioxidants might reach the large bowel contributing to protection from oxidative damage-induced gastrointestinal diseases. In the present work, we aimed to study the relationship between potential activity of polyphenol-rich extracts from Cichorium intybus L. and changes in morphological characteristics on Caco-2 cells. Phytochemicals content (carotenoids and flavonoids and total antioxidant activity of Red Chicory of Treviso and Variegated Chicory of Castelfranco were evaluated. The bioactivity of polyphenol-rich extracts from chicories was studied in in vitro Caco-2 cell monolayers model. Morphological characteristics changes to test the antioxidant and/or prooxidant effect were verified by histological analysis and observed by Electronic Scansion Microscopy (SEM. On Caco-2 cell model, the polyphenols fractions from chicories have indicated a moderate antioxidant behavior until 17 μM concentration, while 70 μM and 34 μM exert cytotoxic effects for Treviso’s and Castelfranco’s Chicory, respectively, highlighted by TEER decreasing, increased permeability, and alteration of epithelium. Our findings support the beneficial effects of these products in counteracting the oxidative stress and cellular damage, induced in vitro on Caco-2 cell model, through interaction with the mucopolysaccharide complexes in the glycocalyx, maintaining in vivo a healthy and effective intestinal barrier.

  11. The Potential Health Benefits of Polyphenol-Rich Extracts from Cichorium intybus L. Studied on Caco-2 Cells Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzini, Elena; Maiani, Giuseppe; Garaguso, Ivana; Polito, Angela; Foddai, Maria S.; Venneria, Eugenia; Durazzo, Alessandra; Intorre, Federica; Palomba, Lara; Rauseo, Maria L.; Lombardi-Boccia, Ginevra; Nobili, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Phytochemicals can exert their bioactivity without reaching the systemic circulation; scarcely absorbed antioxidants might reach the large bowel contributing to protection from oxidative damage-induced gastrointestinal diseases. In the present work, we aimed to study the relationship between potential activity of polyphenol-rich extracts from Cichorium intybus L. and changes in morphological characteristics on Caco-2 cells. Phytochemicals content (carotenoids and flavonoids) and total antioxidant activity of Red Chicory of Treviso and Variegated Chicory of Castelfranco were evaluated. The bioactivity of polyphenol-rich extracts from chicories was studied in in vitro Caco-2 cell monolayers model. Morphological characteristics changes to test the antioxidant and/or prooxidant effect were verified by histological analysis and observed by Electronic Scansion Microscopy (SEM). On Caco-2 cell model, the polyphenols fractions from chicories have indicated a moderate antioxidant behavior until 17 μM concentration, while 70 μM and 34 μM exert cytotoxic effects for Treviso's and Castelfranco's Chicory, respectively, highlighted by TEER decreasing, increased permeability, and alteration of epithelium. Our findings support the beneficial effects of these products in counteracting the oxidative stress and cellular damage, induced in vitro on Caco-2 cell model, through interaction with the mucopolysaccharide complexes in the glycocalyx, maintaining in vivo a healthy and effective intestinal barrier. PMID:26843906

  12. Effect of citrus pulp on the viability of Saccharomyces boulardii in the presence of enteric pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae subtype boulardii is frequently used as a dietary supplement to promote intestinal health and reduce the impact of growth of enteric pathogens in livestock, including cattle and swine. Citrus by-products are also fed as dietary supplements that have the additional benefit o...

  13. CITRUS AS A COMPONENT OF THE MEDITERRANEAN DIET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amilcar Duarte

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Citrus are native to southeastern Asia, but are present in the Mediterranean basin for centuries. This group of species has reached great importance in some of the Mediterranean countries and, in the case of orange, mandarin and lemon trees, they found here soil and climatic conditions which allows them to achieve a high level of fruit quality, even better than in the regions where they came from. Citrus fruits are present in the diet of the peoples living on the Mediterranean basin, at least since the time of the Roman Empire. In the 20th century they became the main crop in various agricultural areas of the Mediterranean, playing an important role in the landscape, in the diet of the overall population, and also in international trade. They are present in the gardens of palaces and monasteries, but also in the courtyards and orchards of the poorest families. Their fruits are not only a refreshing dessert, but also a condiment, or even a major component of many dishes. Citrus fruits have well-documented nutritional and health benefits. They can actually help prevent and cure some diseases and, above all, they are essential in a balanced and tasty diet.

  14. Identification of Secondary Metabolites in Citrus Fruit Using Gas Chromatography and Mass Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoie, Jean-Michel; Chornet, Esteban; Pelletier, Andre

    2008-01-01

    This experiment targets undergraduate students in an analytical or organic instructional context. Using a simple extraction, this protocol allows students to quantify and qualify monoterpenes in essential oils from citrus fruit peels. The procedures involve cooling down the peels by immersing them into icy water. After a few minutes, the chilled…

  15. Clarification of orange juice by crude fungal pectinase from citrus peel

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fungal pectinase enzyme was produced by Rhizopus oryzae on a solid culture containing citrus peel of orange (35% w/v). The crude extract with maximum pectinase activity of 1, 360 u/ml was used to clarify orange juice. The yield, turbidity and viscosity as well as pH, total soluble solids, ascorbic acids and total titratable ...

  16. Antifungal Edible Coatings for Fresh Citrus Fruit: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lluís Palou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available According to their origin, major postharvest losses of citrus fruit are caused by weight loss, fungal diseases, physiological disorders, and quarantine pests. Cold storage and postharvest treatments with conventional chemical fungicides, synthetic waxes, or combinations of them are commonly used to minimize postharvest losses. However, the repeated application of these treatments has led to important problems such as health and environmental issues associated with fungicide residues or waxes containing ammoniacal compounds, or the proliferation of resistant pathogenic fungal strains. There is, therefore, an increasing need to find non-polluting alternatives to be used as part of integrated disease management (IDM programs for preservation of fresh citrus fruit. Among them, the development of novel natural edible films and coatings with antimicrobial properties is a technological challenge for the industry and a very active research field worldwide. Chitosan and other edible coatings formulated by adding antifungal agents to composite emulsions based on polysaccharides or proteins and lipids are reviewed in this article. The most important antifungal ingredients are selected for their ability to control major citrus postharvest diseases like green and blue molds, caused by Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium italicum, respectively, and include low-toxicity or natural chemicals such as food additives, generally recognized as safe (GRAS compounds, plant extracts, or essential oils, and biological control agents such as some antagonistic strains of yeasts or bacteria.

  17. Antihypertensive potential of the aqueous extract which combine leaf of Persea americana Mill. (Lauraceae), stems and leaf of Cymbopogon citratus (D.C) Stapf. (Poaceae), fruits of Citrus medical L. (Rutaceae) as well as honey in ethanol and sucrose experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzeufiet, Paul Désiré Djomeni; Mogueo, Amélie; Bilanda, Danielle Claude; Aboubakar, Bibi-Farouck Oumarou; Tédong, Léonard; Dimo, Théophile; Kamtchouing, Pierre

    2014-12-17

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of the aqueous extract obtained from the mixture of fresh leaf of Persea americana, stems and fresh leaf of Cymbopogon citratus, fruits of Citrus medica and honey on ethanol and sucrose induced hypertension in rats. Rats were divided into eight groups of 6 rats each and daily treated for 5 weeks. The control group received distilled water (1 mL/kg) while rats of groups 2, 3 and 4 received ethanol 40 degrees (3 g/kg/day), 10% sucrose as drinking water and the two substances respectively. The remaining groups received in addition to sucrose and ethanol, the aqueous extract (50, 100 and 150 mg/kg) or nifedipine (10 mg/kg) respectively. Many parameters including hemodynamic, biochemical and histopathological were assessed at the end of the study. The concomitant consumption of ethanol and sucrose significantly (p < 0.001) increased the blood pressure and the heart rate compared to distilled water treated-rats. The levels of total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, triglycerides, atherogenic index, glucose, proteins, AST, ALT, creatinin, potassium, sodium and albumin increased while the HDL-cholesterol decreased under ethanol and sucrose feeding. Chronic ethanol and sucrose intake significantly decreased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) as well as the contents of reduced glutathione (GSH) and nitrites whereas elevated the malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. Histological analysis revealed among other vascular congestion, inflammation, tubular clarification and thickening of the vessel wall in rats treated with alcohol and sucrose. Administration of the aqueous extract or nifedipine prevented the hemodynamic, biochemical, oxidative and histological impairments induced chronic ethanol and sucrose consumption. Current results suggest that the aqueous extract used in this study possess antihypertensive activity against ethanol and sucrose induced hypertension in rats by the improvement of biochemical

  18. Financial Analysis Of Citrus “Keprok 55” In Coventional Way and Using Sprinkler Irrigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang Suharto

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Batu-Malang Government area is one of central production of citrus ”Keprok 55” in East Java. In dry season, citrus produce low production level, because there is unsufficient water inside the soil. Based on this facts, some efforts is needed in order to increase the citrus production especially to face the dry season, through sprinkle irrigation system to increase citrus production. Sprinkle irrigation system has been installed on citrus plantation in Selorejo Village, Batu. Citrus is one of the horticultural commodities which have priority to be developed. One type of citrus that favored consumers are mandarin (tangerine. During the period 2005-2009 tangerine imports reached 504,063 tonnes, or about 100,813 tonnes per year with a value of US $ 80,569,300. Management of commodity Citrus 55 in Selorejo village, subdistrict Dau, Malang not get maximum benefit due to the limitations of the use of technological innovation as well as the lack of capital. The experiment calculated HPP, BEP, NPV, R/C ratio, IRR and PP. This study was to compare the effect of management changes Citrus 55 between conventional and sprinkler irrigation. The financial viability of commodity management Citrus 55 in Selorejo Village declared eligible to run either conventionally or with sprinkler irrigation. Age commodity management business is ten years. Conventional management NVP value is IDR 1,234,468,408 and the value of NVP management with the use of sprinkler irrigation is IDR 5,200,599,957. PP value of conventional management is 5 years 2 months and sprinkler irrigation is 2 years and 5 months. Conventional management IRR value is 59.47% and value of management use sprinkle is 68.08%. R/C Ratio with conventional management is 1.4 and value R/C Ratio with sprinkle is 5.7. BEP value with management conventional is 5,719 kilograms and with sprinkle is 16,059 Kilograms. HPP value with management conventional is IDR 784 and with sprinkle is IDR 191.

  19. Combination of β-glucan and Morus alba L. Leaf Extract Promotes Metabolic Benefits in Mice Fed a High-Fat Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jie; Wang, Xiaojie; Cao, Ke; Dong, Zhizhong; Feng, Zhihui; Liu, Jiankang

    2017-10-12

    β-glucan (BG) and mulberry have received increasing attention for their benefits as natural sources of metabolic health. In the current study, we investigated the synergetic beneficial effects of BG and mulberry leaf extract (MLE) in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Male C57BL6 mice were fed a HFD for twelve weeks to induce significant obesity and insulin resistance. BG and MLE were administrated orally throughout the feeding period. The administration of BG resulted in a significant reduction in body weight gain, perirenal fat mass, fasting insulin, serum lipids, serum inflammation markers, and fatty liver, showing systemic health improvement. Likewise, the administration of MLE showed benefits similar to BG, with the exception of body weight gain. In addition to the systemic benefits, the combination of BG and MLE resulted in a synergetic improvement in insulin sensitivity. Meanwhile, only the combination of BG and MLE significantly enhanced liver GST (Glutathione S-Transferase) activity and CuZn-SOD (Superoxide dismutase (Cu-Zn)) activity, resulting in a significant reduction in GSH/GSSG (Glutathione disulfide) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in the liver. These results further confirm the beneficial effects of BG and MLE on metabolic disorders and show that the combination of BG and MLE has synergetic effects.

  20. Citrus Essential Oils: Current and Prospective Uses in the Food Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Nazik E M

    2015-01-01

    Citrus essential oils (CEOs) are gaining popularity in the food industry. This review summarises the chemical compositions of citrus essential oils (monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes and oxygenated derivatives) and explores their antimicrobial activities for use as preservatives in addition to highlight their uses as flavouring and antioxidant agents. The myriad uses of these compounds reflect a global trend towards the increased consumption of natural products. However, challenges such as production technologies, oxidation, chemical contamination by pesticides and consumption induced allergic effects still need to be addressed. Patents identified with CEO uses in food processing and those describe techniques of extraction are presented.

  1. Effect of Varieties and Budder Efficiency on Citrus scion ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In an effort to boost the availability of budded citrus seedlings, the effect of varieties and budder efficiency were evaluated to improve the performance of scion development. Three scions namely: Tangelo (Citrus paradisi x Citrus reticulata), Lemon (C. limon) and Valencia Sweet orange (Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbecks) were ...

  2. ENERGY USE IN CITRUS PRODUCTION OF MAZANDARAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    in mid-tropical and wet climate areas. Iran produces 4.216 million metric tonnes of citrus each year (Anon., 2008). Moreover, Mazandaran. Province has produce 40% of that amount. The aim of this study was to assess energy use in citrus production, and the efficiency of energy consumption. MATERIALS AND METHODS.

  3. Asian citrus psyllid RNAi pathway - RNAi evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    In silico analyses of the draft genome of Diaphorina citri, the Asian citrus psyllid, for genes within the Ribonucleic acid interference(RNAi), pathway was successful. The psyllid is the vector of the plant-infecting bacterium, Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), which is linked to citrus gree...

  4. Understanding the dynamics of citrus water use

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Taylor, NJ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The quantification of water use of citrus orchards is important in order to prevent stress developing in the orchard and to avoid wasting precious water resources. Measurement of citrus orchard water use is not possible under all environ...

  5. Rapid cyling plant breeding in citrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resistance or tolerance to huanglongbing (HLB) and other important traits have been identified in several citrus types and relatives and associated markers should be identified soon. What is urgently needed in addition is an accelerated strategy for citrus variety breeding. Identification and use of...

  6. Citrus Community College District Mentor Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Diane; Sprague, Caroline

    The Citrus College faculty and staff addressed the problem of lower career aspirations among women by establishing a support group, Citrus Women in Higher Education (CWHE). In addition to group meetings and special programs of interest, the CWHE has developed a mentor program to address the problem of blocked careers faced by women. The goals of…

  7. Control of virus diseases of citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Richard F

    2015-01-01

    Citrus is thought to have originated in Southeast Asia and horticulturally desirable clonal selections have been clonally cultivated for hundreds of years. While some citrus species have nucellar embryony, most cultivation of citrus has been by clonal propagation to ensure that propagated plants have the same traits as the parent selection. Clonal propagation also avoids juvenility, and the propagated plants produce fruit sooner. Because of the clonal propagation of citrus, citrus has accumulated a large number of viruses; many of these viruses are asymptomatic until a susceptible rootstock and/or scion is encountered. The viruses reported to occur in citrus will be summarized in this review. Methods of therapy to clean selected clones from viruses will be reviewed; the use of quarantine, clean stock, and certification programs for control of citrus viruses and other strategies to control insect spread citrus viruses, such as mild strain cross-protection and the use of pest management areas will be discussed. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. ( Citrus sinensis Osbeck) honey on ethanol metabolism

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of Nigerian citrus (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) honey on ethanol metabolism was tested using 45 consenting individuals in apparent good health and between the ages of 25 and 35 years. The subjects were moderate social drinkers matched in terms of body weight and build. The results obtained showed that on ...

  9. (Citrus jambhiri Lush) by direct organogenesis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-17

    Oct 17, 2011 ... Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of citrus stem segments and regeneration of transgenic plants. Plant Cell Rep. 11: 238-242. Moura TL de, Almeida WAB de, Mendes BMJ, Mourao AAFF de (2001). Citrus in vitro organogenesis related to BAP concentrations and explant section. Revista Brasileira de ...

  10. Cryopreservation and Cryotherapy of Citrus Cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long-term conservation of Citrus clones can be accomplished by cryopreservation. Shoot tips will survive liquid nitrogen exposure and storage when appropriately desiccated and treated with cryoprotectant solutions. In our research, vegetative Citrus budwood is shipped from Riverside to Fort Collin...

  11. Synthesis of core-shell molecularly imprinted polymer microspheres by precipitation polymerization for the inline molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction of thiabendazole from citrus fruits and orange juice samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Francisco; Turiel, Esther; Cormack, Peter A G; Martín-Esteban, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the synthesis of molecularly imprinted polymer microspheres with narrow particle size distributions and core-shell morphology by a two-step precipitation polymerization procedure is described. Polydivinylbenzene (poly DVB-80) core particles were used as seed particles in the production of molecularly imprinted polymer shells by copolymerization of divinylbenzene-80 with methacrylic acid in the presence of thiabendazole (TBZ) and an appropriate porogen. Thereafter, polymer particles were packed into refillable stainless steel HPLC columns used in the development of an inline molecularly imprinted SPE method for the determination of TBZ in citrus fruits and orange juice samples. Under optimized chromatographic conditions, recoveries of TBZ within the range 81.1-106.4%, depending upon the sample, were obtained, with RSDs lower than 10%. This novel method permits the unequivocal determination of TBZ in the samples under study, according to the maximum residue levels allowed within Europe, in less than 20 min and without any need for a clean-up step in the analytical protocol. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Occurrence and Distribution of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV in the Jordan Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Anfoka

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available In a survey conducted in 2002 and 2003, Citrus tristeza virus (CTV was detected in the Jordan Valley. The direct tissue blot immunoassay (DTBIA indicated that 12.7 and 15.2% of samples tested in the central and northern Jordan Valley respectively were infected with CTV. Similar results showed that all citrus species grown in the Jordan Valley were susceptible to CTV. DAS-ELISA analysis of samples from a citrus orchard in the Dir Alla area with severe CTV symptoms indicated that 49% of samples were infected with CTV. Using a CTV specific primer pair (CTV1/CTV10, the coat protein gene of the virus was successfully amplified from leaf extracts obtained from CTVinfected trees by IC-RT-PCR. After cloning and sequencing the coat protein gene, the sequence of the amplified product was deposited in the GenBank.

  13. C-Glycosyltransferases catalyzing the formation of di-C-glucosyl flavonoids in citrus plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takamitsu; Fujimoto, Shunsuke; Suito, Fumiaki; Shimosaka, Makoto; Taguchi, Goro

    2017-07-01

    Citrus plants accumulate many kinds of flavonoids, including di-C-glucosyl flavonoids, which have attracted considerable attention due to their health benefits. However, the biosynthesis of di-C-glucosyl flavonoids has not been elucidated at the molecular level. Here, we identified the C-glycosyltransferases (CGTs) FcCGT (UGT708G1) and CuCGT (UGT708G2) as the primary enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of di-C-glucosyl flavonoids in the citrus plants kumquat (Fortunella crassifolia) and satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu), respectively. The amino acid sequences of these CGTs were 98% identical, indicating that CGT genes are highly conserved in the citrus family. The recombinant enzymes FcCGT and CuCGT utilized 2-hydroxyflavanones, dihydrochalcone, and their mono-C-glucosides as sugar acceptors and produced corresponding di-C-glucosides. The Km and kcat values of FcCGT toward phloretin were flavonoid biosynthesis proceeds via a single enzyme using either 2-hydroxyflavanones or phloretin as a substrate in citrus plants. In addition, Escherichia coli cells expressing CGT genes were found to be capable of producing di-C-glucosyl flavonoids, which is promising for commercial production of these valuable compounds. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. CONTRIBUTION TO THE PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDY AND CHEMICAL TESTS OF THE EXTRACTS OF Citrus limonium (LEMON) and Capsicum frutescens L. (CHILLI PEPPER)/CONTRIBUIÇÃO AO ESTUDO FITOQUÍMICO E TESTES QUÍMICOS DOS EXTRATOS DE Citrus limonium (LIMÃO) e Capsicum frutescens L. (PIMENTA MALAGUETA)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    L C C Freire; E I M Araujo; F I S P Valdevino; F F M Silva; L A Alves; L M Bertini

    2015-01-01

    .... Thus, this study aims to make a comparator analysis regarding the phytochemical test, antioxidant activity and total phenolic content of the extracts of the leaves in ethanol and their respective...

  15. The WRKY Transcription Factor Family in Citrus: Valuable and Useful Candidate Genes for Citrus Breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayadi, M; Hanana, M; Kharrat, N; Merchaoui, H; Marzoug, R Ben; Lauvergeat, V; Rebaï, A; Mzid, R

    2016-10-01

    WRKY transcription factors belong to a large family of plant transcriptional regulators whose members have been reported to be involved in a wide range of biological roles including plant development, adaptation to environmental constraints and response to several diseases. However, little or poor information is available about WRKY's in Citrus. The recent release of completely assembled genomes sequences of Citrus sinensis and Citrus clementina and the availability of ESTs sequences from other citrus species allowed us to perform a genome survey for Citrus WRKY proteins. In the present study, we identified 100 WRKY members from C. sinensis (51), C. clementina (48) and Citrus unshiu (1), and analyzed their chromosomal distribution, gene structure, gene duplication, syntenic relation and phylogenetic analysis. A phylogenetic tree of 100 Citrus WRKY sequences with their orthologs from Arabidopsis has distinguished seven groups. The CsWRKY genes were distributed across all ten sweet orange chromosomes. A comprehensive approach and an integrative analysis of Citrus WRKY gene expression revealed variable profiles of expression within tissues and stress conditions indicating functional diversification. Thus, candidate Citrus WRKY genes have been proposed as potentially involved in fruit acidification, essential oil biosynthesis and abiotic/biotic stress tolerance. Our results provided essential prerequisites for further WRKY genes cloning and functional analysis with an aim of citrus crop improvement.

  16. Possible role of plant volatiles in tolerance against huanglongbing in citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijaz, Faraj; Nehela, Yasser; Killiny, Nabil

    2016-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC) play an important role in protecting plants from insect and pathogen attack. In this study, we investigated the leaf volatile profiles of 14 citrus varieties. The VOC in citrus leaves were extracted with n-hexane and analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Overall, 4six volatile compounds were identified in the n-hexane extract from citrus leaves. Most of the detected compounds belonged to 3 main groups (monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and aliphatic aldehydes). Principle component analysis was used to examine the relative distribution of the studied varieties to each other. Interestingly, volatile profiles of varieties that are tolerant to Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) were different from those of the susceptible ones. Tolerant and moderately-tolerant cultivars contained relatively higher amounts of volatiles than susceptible varieties. In addition, tolerant varieties were also higher in specific compounds which are known for their antimicrobial activities. These compounds include Aldehydes (undecanal, neral, geranial, and citronellal) and some monoterpenes such as linalool, d-limonene, myrcene, α- and β- phellandrene. In addition, some sesquiterpene compounds including t-caryophellene, γ-elemene, β-elemene, germacrene D, and geranyl acetate were higher in tolerant and moderately tolerant cultivars. Severinia buxifolia which is known for its tolerance to CLas and many other pathogens contained higher levels of santalenes and coumarins. Our results indicated that citrus leaf volatiles might play a role in citrus tolerance to CLas. The results of this study may help in understanding of the mechanism of citrus tolerance against CLas.

  17. Improved annotation of the insect vector of citrus greening disease: Biocuration by a diverse genomics community

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) is the insect vector of the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), the pathogen associated with citrus Huanglongbing (HLB, citrus greening). HLB threatens citrus production worldwide. Suppression or reduction of the insect vector usin...

  18. Breeding, genetic and genomic of citrus for disease resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos A. Machado

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the citriculture is one of the most important economic activities in Brazil, it is based on a small number of varieties. This fact has contributed for the vulnerability of the culture regarding the phytosanitary problems. A higher number of varieties/genotypes with potential for commercial growing, either for the industry or fresh market, has been one of the main objectives of citrus breeding programs. The genetic breeding of citrus has improved, in the last decades, due to the possibility of an association between biotechnological tools and classical methods of breeding. The use of molecular markers for early selection of zygotic seedlings from controlled crosses resulted in the possibility of selection of a high number of new combination and, as a consequence, the establishment of a great number of hybrids in field experiments. The faster new tools are incorporated in the program, the faster is possibility to reach new genotypes that can be tested as a new variety. Good traits should be kept or incorporate, whereas bad traits have to be excluded or minimized in the new genotype. Scion and rootstock can not be considered separately, and graft compatibility, fruit quality and productivity are essential traits to be evaluated in the last stages of the program. The mapping of QTLs has favored breeding programs of several perennial species and in citrus it was possible to map several characteristics with qualitative and quantitative inheritance. The existence of linkage maps and QTLs already mapped, the development of EST and BAC library and the sequencing of the Citrus complete genome altogether make very demanding and urgent the exploration of such data to launch a wider genetic study of citrus. The rising of information on genome of several organisms has opened new approaches looking for integration between breeding, genetic and genome. Genome assisted selection (GAS involves more than gene or complete genome sequencing and is becoming

  19. Citrus breeding, genetics and genomics in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, Mitsuo; Shimada, Takehiko

    2016-01-01

    Citrus is one of the most cultivated fruits in the world, and satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.) is a major cultivated citrus in Japan. Many excellent cultivars derived from satsuma mandarin have been released through the improvement of mandarins using a conventional breeding method. The citrus breeding program is a lengthy process owing to the long juvenility, and it is predicted that marker-assisted selection (MAS) will overcome the obstacle and improve the efficiency of conventional breeding methods. To promote citrus molecular breeding in Japan, a genetic mapping was initiated in 1987, and the experimental tools and resources necessary for citrus functional genomics have been developed in relation to the physiological analysis of satsuma mandarin. In this paper, we review the progress of citrus breeding and genome researches in Japan and report the studies on genetic mapping, expression sequence tag cataloguing, and molecular characterization of breeding characteristics, mainly in terms of the metabolism of bio-functional substances as well as factors relating to, for example, fruit quality, disease resistance, polyembryony, and flowering. PMID:27069387

  20. Signaling pathways in a Citrus EST database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Mehta

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus spp. are economically important crops, which in Brazil are grown mainly in the State of São Paulo. Citrus cultures are attacked by several pathogens, causing severe yield losses. In order to better understand this culture, the Millenium Project (IAC Cordeirópolis was launched in order to sequence Citrus ESTs (expressed sequence tags from different tissues, including leaf, bark, fruit, root and flower. Plants were submitted to biotic and abiotic stresses and investigated under different development stages (adult vs. juvenile. Several cDNA libraries were constructed and the sequences obtained formed the Citrus ESTs database with almost 200,000 sequences. Searches were performed in the Citrus database to investigate the presence of different signaling pathway components. Several of the genes involved in the signaling of sugar, calcium, cytokinin, plant hormones, inositol phosphate, MAPKinase and COP9 were found in the citrus genome and are discussed in this paper. The results obtained may indicate that similar mechanisms described in other plants, such as Arabidopsis, occur in citrus. Further experimental studies must be conducted in order to understand the different signaling pathways present.

  1. Health benefits of orange juice and citrus flavonoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    The main flavonoids found in orange juice are hesperidin and naringenin, which can affect several metabolic routes that improve blood serum antioxidant capacity and anti-inflammatory performance, while decreasing insulin resistance protecting against diabetes and metabolic syndrome. In addition, or...

  2. Comparative study of the hypocholesterolemic, antidiabetic effects of four agro-waste Citrus peels cultivars and their HPLC standardization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrin M. Fayek

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Citrus is an economically important fruit for Egypt, but its peel also is one of the major sources of agricultural waste. Due to its fermentation, this waste causes many economic and environmental problems. Therefore it is worthwhile to investigate ways to make use of this citrus waste generated by the juice industry. This study was aimed to explore the hypocholesterolemic, antidiabetic activities of four varieties of citrus peels agrowastes, to isolate the main flavonoids in the active fractions and to quantify them by HPLC method for nutraceutical purposes. All the tested samples of the agro-waste Citrus fruits peels showed significant decrease in cholesterol, triacylglyceride and glucose. The most decrease in cholesterol level was observed by mandarin peels aqueous homogenate and its hexane fraction (59.3% and 56.8%, respectively reaching the same effect as the reference drug used (54.7%. Mostly, all samples decrease triacylglyceride (by 36%–80.6% better than the reference drug used (by 35%, while, glucose was decreased (by 71.1%–82.8 and 68.6%–79.6%, respectively mostly by the aqueous homogenates (except lime and alcoholic extracts (except mandarin of Citrus fruits peels better than the reference drug used (by 68.3%. All the isolated pectin, from the four cultivars, has significant effect on the three parameters. The comparative HPLC rapid quantification of nobiletin in the different by-product citrus varieties hexane fractions revealed that nobiletin is present in higher concentration in mandarin (10.14% than the other species. Nobiletin and 4′,5,7,8-tetramethoxy flavone were isolated from mandarin peels hexane fraction by chromatographic fractionation. This is the first report of the comparative HPLC quantification of nobiletin and biological studies of different citrus peels species as agro-waste products. Based on these results, we suggest the possibility that Citrus fruits peels may be considered as an antidiabetic and

  3. Identification of Aging-Associated Food Quality Changes in Citrus Products Using Untargeted Chemical Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronningen, Ian G; Peterson, Devin G

    2018-01-24

    Chemometric techniques have seen wide application in biological and medical sciences, but they are still developing in the food sciences. This study illustrated the use of untargeted LC/MS chemometric methods to identify features (retention time_m/z) associated with food quality changes as products age (freshness). Extracts of three citrus fruit varietals aged over four time points that corresponded to noted changes in sensory attributes were chemically profiled and modeled by two discriminatory multivariate statistical techniques, projection partial least-squares discrimant analysis (PLS-DA) and machine learning random forest (RF). Age-associated compounds across the citrus platform were identified. Varietal was treated as a nuisance variable to emphasize aging chemistry, and further variable selection using age-related piecewise model generation and meta filtering to emphasize features associated with general aging chemistry common to all the citrus extracts. The identified features were further replicated in a validation study to illustrate the validity and persistence of these markers for applications in citrus food platforms.

  4. Citrus limon from Tunisia: Phytochemical and Physicochemical Properties and Biological Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Makni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural plant extracts contain a variety of phenolic compounds which are assigned various biological activities. Our work aims to make a quantitative and qualitative characterization of the Zest (ZL and the Flesh (FL of lemon (Citrus limon, to valorize the pharmacological uses of lemon, by evaluating in vitro activities (DPPH, free radical scavenging and reducing power. The antibacterial, antifungal, and antiproliferative activities were sought in the ability of Citrus limon extracts to protect DNA and protein. We found that the ZL contains high amounts of phenolics responsible for the important antioxidant properties of the extract. However, the FL is richer in flavonoids than the ZL. The FL extract was also found to be more effective than the ZL in protecting plasmid DNA against the strand breakage induced by hydroxyl radicals. We also concluded that the FL extract exhibited potent antibacterial activity unlike ZL. Analysis by LC/MS-MS identified 6 compounds (Caffeoyl N-Tryptophan, Hydroxycinnamoyl-Oglucoside acid, Vicenin 2, Eriocitrin, Kaempferol-3-O- rutinoside, and Quercetin-3-rutinoside. These preliminary results showed that Citrus limon has antibacterial and antioxidant activity in vitro. It would be interesting to conduct further studies to evaluate the in vivo potential in an animal model.

  5. 2004 SWFWMD Citrus County Lidar Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This metadata record describes the ortho & LIDAR mapping of Citrus County, FL. The mapping consists of LIDAR data collection, contour generation, and production...

  6. Pomegranate extract and exercise provide additive benefits on improvement of immune function by inhibiting inflammation and oxidative stress in high-fat-diet-induced obesity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fei; Pang, Wentao; Zhang, Ziyi; Zhao, Jialong; Wang, Xin; Liu, Ye; Wang, Xun; Feng, Zhihui; Zhang, Yong; Sun, Wenyan; Liu, Jiankang

    2016-06-01

    Obesity is reported to be associated with immune dysfunction and a state of low-grade, chronic inflammation. Either pomegranate extract (PomE) or exercise (Ex) has been shown to have antiobesity, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. Nevertheless, no study has addressed the additive benefits of PomE and Ex on the restoration of obesity-induced immune defects. The present work aims to study the effect of PomE and Ex as a combined intervention on immune function and the underlying mechanism involved in inflammation and oxidative stress in rats with high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Our results demonstrate that the combination of PomE and Ex showed additive benefits on inhibition of HFD-induced body weight increase and improvement of HFD-induced immune dysfunction, including (a) attenuating the abnormality of histomorphology of the spleen, (b) increasing the ratio of the CD4+:CD8+ T cell subpopulations in splenocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), (c) inhibition of apoptosis in splenocytes and PBMC, (d) normalizing peritoneal macrophage phenotypes and (e) restoring immunomodulating factors in serum. We also find that immune dysfunction in HFD-fed rats was associated with increased inflammatory cytokine secretion and oxidative stress biomarkers, and that the combination of PomE and Ex effectively inhibited the inflammatory response and decreased oxidative damage. The effect of PomE and Ex as a combined intervention is greater than the effect of either PomE or Ex alone, showing that PomE and Ex may be additively effective in improving immune function in HFD-fed rats by inhibiting inflammation and decreasing oxidative stress. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The aconitate hydratase family from Citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terol, Javier; Soler, Guillermo; Talon, Manuel; Cercos, Manuel

    2010-10-19

    Research on citrus fruit ripening has received considerable attention because of the importance of citrus fruits for the human diet. Organic acids are among the main determinants of taste and organoleptic quality of fruits and hence the control of fruit acidity loss has a strong economical relevance. In citrus, organic acids accumulate in the juice sac cells of developing fruits and are catabolized thereafter during ripening. Aconitase, that transforms citrate to isocitrate, is the first step of citric acid catabolism and a major component of the citrate utilization machinery. In this work, the citrus aconitase gene family was first characterized and a phylogenetic analysis was then carried out in order to understand the evolutionary history of this family in plants. Gene expression analyses of the citrus aconitase family were subsequently performed in several acidic and acidless genotypes to elucidate their involvement in acid homeostasis. Analysis of 460,000 citrus ESTs, followed by sequencing of complete cDNA clones, identified in citrus 3 transcription units coding for putatively active aconitate hydratase proteins, named as CcAco1, CcAco2 and CcAco3. A phylogenetic study carried on the Aco family in 14 plant species, shows the presence of 5 Aco subfamilies, and that the ancestor of monocot and dicot species shared at least one Aco gene. Real-time RT-PCR expression analyses of the three aconitase citrus genes were performed in pulp tissues along fruit development in acidic and acidless citrus varieties such as mandarins, oranges and lemons. While CcAco3 expression was always low, CcAco1 and CcAco2 genes were generally induced during the rapid phase of fruit growth along with the maximum in acidity and the beginning of the acid reduction. Two exceptions to this general pattern were found: 1) Clemenules mandarin failed inducing CcAco2 although acid levels were rapidly reduced; and 2) the acidless "Sucreña" orange showed unusually high levels of expression of

  8. The aconitate hydratase family from Citrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Research on citrus fruit ripening has received considerable attention because of the importance of citrus fruits for the human diet. Organic acids are among the main determinants of taste and organoleptic quality of fruits and hence the control of fruit acidity loss has a strong economical relevance. In citrus, organic acids accumulate in the juice sac cells of developing fruits and are catabolized thereafter during ripening. Aconitase, that transforms citrate to isocitrate, is the first step of citric acid catabolism and a major component of the citrate utilization machinery. In this work, the citrus aconitase gene family was first characterized and a phylogenetic analysis was then carried out in order to understand the evolutionary history of this family in plants. Gene expression analyses of the citrus aconitase family were subsequently performed in several acidic and acidless genotypes to elucidate their involvement in acid homeostasis. Results Analysis of 460,000 citrus ESTs, followed by sequencing of complete cDNA clones, identified in citrus 3 transcription units coding for putatively active aconitate hydratase proteins, named as CcAco1, CcAco2 and CcAco3. A phylogenetic study carried on the Aco family in 14 plant species, shows the presence of 5 Aco subfamilies, and that the ancestor of monocot and dicot species shared at least one Aco gene. Real-time RT-PCR expression analyses of the three aconitase citrus genes were performed in pulp tissues along fruit development in acidic and acidless citrus varieties such as mandarins, oranges and lemons. While CcAco3 expression was always low, CcAco1 and CcAco2 genes were generally induced during the rapid phase of fruit growth along with the maximum in acidity and the beginning of the acid reduction. Two exceptions to this general pattern were found: 1) Clemenules mandarin failed inducing CcAco2 although acid levels were rapidly reduced; and 2) the acidless "Sucreña" orange showed unusually high levels

  9. The aconitate hydratase family from Citrus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cercos Manuel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research on citrus fruit ripening has received considerable attention because of the importance of citrus fruits for the human diet. Organic acids are among the main determinants of taste and organoleptic quality of fruits and hence the control of fruit acidity loss has a strong economical relevance. In citrus, organic acids accumulate in the juice sac cells of developing fruits and are catabolized thereafter during ripening. Aconitase, that transforms citrate to isocitrate, is the first step of citric acid catabolism and a major component of the citrate utilization machinery. In this work, the citrus aconitase gene family was first characterized and a phylogenetic analysis was then carried out in order to understand the evolutionary history of this family in plants. Gene expression analyses of the citrus aconitase family were subsequently performed in several acidic and acidless genotypes to elucidate their involvement in acid homeostasis. Results Analysis of 460,000 citrus ESTs, followed by sequencing of complete cDNA clones, identified in citrus 3 transcription units coding for putatively active aconitate hydratase proteins, named as CcAco1, CcAco2 and CcAco3. A phylogenetic study carried on the Aco family in 14 plant species, shows the presence of 5 Aco subfamilies, and that the ancestor of monocot and dicot species shared at least one Aco gene. Real-time RT-PCR expression analyses of the three aconitase citrus genes were performed in pulp tissues along fruit development in acidic and acidless citrus varieties such as mandarins, oranges and lemons. While CcAco3 expression was always low, CcAco1 and CcAco2 genes were generally induced during the rapid phase of fruit growth along with the maximum in acidity and the beginning of the acid reduction. Two exceptions to this general pattern were found: 1 Clemenules mandarin failed inducing CcAco2 although acid levels were rapidly reduced; and 2 the acidless "Sucreña" orange

  10. Structures of antimutagenic constituents in the peels of Citrus limon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Takahashi, Kazuki; Kanayama, Sumire; Nakano, Yuka; Imai, Hiromi; Kibi, Masumi; Imahori, Daisuke; Hasei, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Tetsushi

    2017-07-11

    The methanolic extracts from the peels of Citrus limon were found to show antimutagenic effects against 3-amino-1,4-dimethyl-5H-pyrido[4,3-b]indole, and 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) in the Ames test. From the methanolic extracts, four new coumarins (wakayamalimonol A-D) and a new furanocoumarin (wakayamalimonol E) were isolated together with fifteen known compounds. The absolute stereostructures of the new compounds were determined by chemical synthesis and the modified Mosher's method. Among the isolated constituents, coumarins, furanocoumarins, and limonoids showed antimutagenic effects in the Ames test. One of the major constituent, limonin, showed significant antimutagenic effects against mitomycinC and PhIP in the micronucleus test in vivo.

  11. A Prospective, Descriptive Study to Assess the Clinical Benefits of Using Calendula officinalis Hydroglycolic Extract for the Topical Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzi, Marcelo; de Freitas, Franciele; Winter, Marcos

    2016-03-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) have a significant impact on patient quality of life. A prospective, descriptive pilot study was conducted between May 2012 and December 2013 through the dermatology outpatient unit in a Brazilian hospital to evaluate the clinical benefits of using Calendula officinalis hydroglycolic extract in the treatment of DFUs. Patients diagnosed with a stable neuropathic ulcer of >3 months' duration; ranging in size from 0.5-40 cm(2); without osteomyelitis, gangrene, bone exposure, cancer, or deep tissue infection; ages 18-90 years; with adequate glycemic control and no history of an allergy to C. officinalis were enrolled. Patients provided demographic and diabetes-related information and were evaluated biweekly for 30 weeks or until healing (ie, full epithelialization with no wound drainage). DFUs were measured and clinically examined for microbiological flora and presence of odor, tissue type (eg, granulation, fibrin sloth, necrosis), exudate, and retraction rate using planimetry images. Patients' blood tests and neuropathic pain assessment (the latter by clinician-directed questionnaire) were performed at baseline and the end of treatment; pain also was assessed during dressing changes using a 10-point rating scale. Patients' ulcers were treated twice daily with C. officinalis hydroglycolic extract spray solution and covered with saline-moistened, sterile, nonadherent gauze and bandages followed by foot offloading with adequate protective footwear. Patients received their first treatment in the clinic then performed care at home. From a potential population of 109 patients, 25 did not meet the inclusion criteria. Of the remaining 84 participants enrolled, 43 withdrew before study completion; cited reasons included lost to follow-up (16), medical judgment (2), failure to attend >3 scheduled visits (17), protocol violation (5), and death (3). Forty-one (41) - 17 women, average age 62 years (range 44-82 years), average glycemic level 153 mg

  12. Citrus leprosis transmission by Brevipalpus yothersi mites through non citrus hosts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo León M.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Citrus leprosis virus (C i LV was detected in Colombia at the eastern plains in 2004; it is a threat the disease spreads to other regions of the country. The main vector is Brevipalpus yothersi Baker (formerly identified as Brevipalpus phoenicis. This research determined the viability of B. yothersi to transmit C i LV to citrus plants, after been hosted in non-citrus plants. To virus acquisition, mites spent three days on symptomatic orange (Citrus x sinensis leaves positives to C i LV-C2; then mites were placed on six non-citrus plants (Dieffenbachia sp., Hibiscus rosa-sinensis,Codiaeum variegatum, Swinglea glutinosa, Sida acutaand Stachytarpheta cayennensis. A randomized design with 6 treatments and 4 replicates was carried out. After scheduled time in non-citrus plants, mites were three days relocated on C. x sinensis healthy plants. Leaves of receptor plants, were evaluated to the occurrence or absence of symptoms and collected for RT-PCR tests. B. yothersi mites were able to transmit the C i LV virus over 85 % of Valencia orange plants (Citrus x sinensis L., after feeding from 2-20 days on non-citrus host plants. The first leprosis symptoms on C. x sinensis leaves was confirmed from 14 to 51 days after transmission. The present research work further established that C i LV-C2 is a persistently transmitted virus. The implement quarantine diagnostic measures to prevent spread of CiLV to disease-free zones is suggested.

  13. H NMR analyses of Citrus macrophylla subjected to Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri Kuwayama) feeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) is a phloem feeding insect that can host and transmit the bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), which is the putative causative agent of the economically important citrus disease, Huanglongbing (HLB). ACP are widespread in Florida, and are spreading in Ca...

  14. Apparent tolerance to huanglongbing in citrus and citrus-related germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a Ft. Pierce, Florida field planting, growth and huanglongbing (HLB) severity were assessed as indicators of HLB-tolerance on progenies of 83 seed-source accessions of citrus and citrus-relatives from the Riverside, California genebank. The HLB-pathogen (Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus) and vec...

  15. Citrus County Schools Copyright Guidelines Recommended by the Citrus County Association of School Media Specialists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus County School District, Inverness, FL.

    This document contains copyright guidelines determined appropriate for the Citrus County School System (Florida) by the Citrus County Association of School Media Specialists in May, 1992. These guidelines are based on interpretation and understanding of current copyright law as applied to education and implemented in school districts in the United…

  16. Phagostimulants for the Asian citrus psyllid also elicit volatile release from citrus leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical cues that elicit orientation by the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), are of great interest because it is the primary vector of the causal pathogen of citrus greening disease. We identified an optimal blend ratio of formic and acetic acids that stimulate...

  17. Phyllosticta citriasiana sp. nov., the cause of Citrus tan spot of Citrus maxima in Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wulandari, N.F.; To-anun, C.; Hyde, K.D.; Duong, L.M.; Gruyter, de J.; Meffert, J.P.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Crous, P.W.

    2009-01-01

    Guignardia citricarpa, the causal agent of Citrus Black Spot, is subject to phytosanitary legislation in the European Union and the U.S.A. This species is frequently confused with G. mangiferae, which is a non-pathogenic, and is commonly isolated as an endophyte from citrus fruits and a wide range

  18. Phyllosticta citriasiana sp nov., the cause of Citrus tan spot of Citrus maxima in Asia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wulandari, N.F.; To-anun, C.; Hyde, K.D.; Duong, L.M.; de Gruyter, J.; Meffert, J.P.; Groenewald, J.Z.; Crous, P.W.

    2009-01-01

    Guignardia citricarpa, the causal agent of Citrus Black Spot, is subject to phytosanitary legislation in the European Union and the U.S.A. This species is frequently confused with G. mangiferae, which is a non-pathogenic, and is commonly isolated as an endophyte from citrus fruits and a wide range

  19. Evaluation of natural colorants and their application on citrus fruit as alternatives to citrus red II

    Science.gov (United States)

    The poor peel color of some varieties of oranges and the hybrids, especially for early season fruits, is caused by the subtropical climate of Florida, and has resulted in the use of a red dye on the peel to improve fruit appearance and marketability. Citrus Red II (CR2), the commercial citrus color ...

  20. Interrelations between citrus rust mite, Hirsutella thompsonii and greasy spot on citrus in Surinam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brussel, van E.W.

    1975-01-01

    Counts of citrus rust mite (Phyllocoptruta oleivora (Ashm.)) on leaves and fruit of citrus rose to a peak in the two dry seasons, the build up taking 4-5 weeks. It then decreased partly through infection by the entomogenous fungus

  1. 80 FR 24838 - Importation of Citrus From Peru; Expansion of Citrus-Growing Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    ... From Peru; Expansion of Citrus-Growing Area AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA... citrus fruit from the entire country of Peru into the continental United States. Currently, the... zones in Peru, subject to a systems approach. However, based on the findings of a pest list and...

  2. Freeze response of citrus and citrus-related genotypes in a Florida field planting

    Science.gov (United States)

    A test population consisting of progenies of 92 seed-source genotypes (hereafter called “parent genotypes”) of citrus and citrus relatives in the field in East-central Florida was assessed following natural freeze events in the winters of 2010 and 2011. Eight seedlings per parent genotype were plant...

  3. Identification of zygotic and nucellar seedlings in citrus interspecific ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , 67 hybrid and 160 nucellar seedlings were recognized. The results indicate that ISSR analyses are very efficient and reliable for identification of hybrids in polyembryonic citrus cultivars. Key words: Citrus, fruit breeding, molecular markers, ...

  4. Development of a green procedure of citrus fruits waste processing to recover carotenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meryem Boukroufa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an original and green procedure of processing waste of the citrus fruits was developed using the concept of bio-refinery, innovative techniques “ultrasound” and “micro-wave”, and a green solvent “limonene” to recover carotenoids. Essential oil extraction was performed by Solvent Free Microwave Extraction (SFME and compared to steam distillation (SD. The essential oil yields were comparable for both processes: 4.02 ± 0.23% for SFME and 4.16 ± 0.05% for SD. After that, carotenoid extraction from citrus peels was performed by ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE and conventional extraction (CE using d-limonene obtained starting from essential oil, as a solvent, and then compared to n-hexane extract. Response surface methodology (RSM using central composite designs (CCD approach was launched to investigate the influence of process variables on the ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE. The statistical analysis revealed that the optimized conditions of ultrasound power, temperature and time were 208 W cm−2, 20 °C and 5 min giving carotenoid content of 11.25 mg L−1. Compared to the conventional extraction, (UAE gave an increase of 40% in carotenoid content. The comparison to n-hexane extract gave no significant changes in carotenoid content. Combination of microwave, ultrasound and d-limonene obtained from a bio-refinery of a by-product of citrus fruits industry allow us to develop a very good environmental green approach giving high added values compounds, with a saving of time, and a complete valorisation of waste.

  5. Antibacterial Effects of Citrus aurantium on Bacteria Isolated from Urinary Tract Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Dadashi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background :  Emerging antibacterial resistance rates and beta-lactamase producing bacteria recovered from UTI is an increasing problem in different regions, limiting therapeutic options. Therefore, this survey consider to use the extract and essence of the citrus aurantium (which have a so many rate of planting in Iran and also survey on extract on bacteria whose cause urinary tract infections, and compare this with common antibiotics. Methods and Materials: This study was experimental design.We have been isolate the E.coli,Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus agalactiae and Enterococcus faecalis from UTI and then determine of antibacterial effect of Citrus aurantium against this bacteria with subculture and put the exact diagnosis on them. Antibacterial effects of the herb extract by well diffusion assay and  nalidixic acid and Co-trimoxazol were evaluated by method of agar disc diffusion. Results:Enterococcus faecalis had 100% sensitivity against of extract,essence and Co-trimoxazole , and 80% against nalidixic acid . E.coli had 100% sensitivity against Co-trimoxazol, nalidixic acid and it was totally resistance to extract and essence.Klebsiella Pneumonie had 80% to Co-trimoxazol, 75% to nalidixic acid and resistance against extract and essence.Streptococcus agalactiae was 100% sensitivity to essence and Co-trimoxazol and 90% against nalidixic acid and shown 80% sensitivity against extract.Staphylococcus aureus MRSA shown 100% sensitivity against Co-trimoxazol and 70% sensitivity against essence, extract and nalidixic acid. Conclusion: Detection of antibiotic resistance among isolates is important in prevention and control of infections. In this study, it was shown that extracts of citrus aurantium have high antibacterial effects on gram positive bacteria compare to gram negative bacteria.

  6. Dietary citrus pulp reduces lipid oxidation in lamb meat

    OpenAIRE

    Inserra, L.; Priolo, A.; L. Biondi; Lanza, M; Bognanno, M.; Gravador, R.; Luciano, G.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of replacing cereal concentrateswith high levels of dried citrus pulp in the diet on lamb meat oxidative stability. Over 56 days, lambs were fed a barley-based concentrate (Control) or concentrates inwhich 24% and 35% dried citrus pulpwere included to partially replace barley (Citrus 24% and Citrus 35%, respectively). Meat was aged under vacuum for 4 days and subsequently stored aerobically at 4 °C. The Control diet increased the redness, yellowness and satu...

  7. Genome wide selection in Citrus breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gois, I B; Borém, A; Cristofani-Yaly, M; de Resende, M D V; Azevedo, C F; Bastianel, M; Novelli, V M; Machado, M A

    2016-10-17

    Genome wide selection (GWS) is essential for the genetic improvement of perennial species such as Citrus because of its ability to increase gain per unit time and to enable the efficient selection of characteristics with low heritability. This study assessed GWS efficiency in a population of Citrus and compared it with selection based on phenotypic data. A total of 180 individual trees from a cross between Pera sweet orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) and Murcott tangor (Citrus sinensis Osbeck x Citrus reticulata Blanco) were evaluated for 10 characteristics related to fruit quality. The hybrids were genotyped using 5287 DArT_seq TM (diversity arrays technology) molecular markers and their effects on phenotypes were predicted using the random regression - best linear unbiased predictor (rr-BLUP) method. The predictive ability, prediction bias, and accuracy of GWS were estimated to verify its effectiveness for phenotype prediction. The proportion of genetic variance explained by the markers was also computed. The heritability of the traits, as determined by markers, was 16-28%. The predictive ability of these markers ranged from 0.53 to 0.64, and the regression coefficients between predicted and observed phenotypes were close to unity. Over 35% of the genetic variance was accounted for by the markers. Accuracy estimates with GWS were lower than those obtained by phenotypic analysis; however, GWS was superior in terms of genetic gain per unit time. Thus, GWS may be useful for Citrus breeding as it can predict phenotypes early and accurately, and reduce the length of the selection cycle. This study demonstrates the feasibility of genomic selection in Citrus.

  8. Proteomics analysis reveals novel host molecular mechanisms associated with thermotherapy of 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus'-infected citrus plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwugo, Chika C; Doud, Melissa S; Duan, Yong-Ping; Lin, Hong

    2016-11-14

    Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), which is linked to the bacterial pathogen 'Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las), is the most devastating disease of citrus plants, and longer-term control measures via breeding or genetic engineering have been unwieldy because all cultivated citrus species are susceptible to the disease. However, the degree of susceptibility varies among citrus species, which has prompted efforts to identify potential Las resistance/tolerance-related genes in citrus plants for application in breeding or genetic engineering programs. Plant exposure to one form of stress has been shown to serendipitously induce innate resistance to other forms of stress and a recent study showed that continuous heat treatment (40 to 42 °C) reduced Las titer and HLB-associated symptoms in citrus seedlings. The goal of the present study was to apply comparative proteomics analysis via 2-DE and mass spectrometry to elucidate the molecular processes associated with heat-induced mitigation of HLB in citrus plants. Healthy or Las-infected citrus grapefruit plants were exposed to room temperature or to continuous heat treatment of 40 °C for 6 days. An exhaustive total protein extraction process facilitated the identification of 107 differentially-expressed proteins in response to Las and/or heat treatment, which included a strong up-regulation of chaperones including small (23.6, 18.5 and 17.9 kDa) heat shock proteins, a HSP70-like protein and a ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase (RuBisCO)-binding 60 kDa chaperonin, particularly in response to heat treatment. Other proteins that were generally down-regulated due to Las infection but up-regulated in response to heat treatment include RuBisCO activase, chlorophyll a/b binding protein, glucosidase II beta subunit-like protein, a putative lipoxygenase protein, a ferritin-like protein, and a glutathione S-transferase. The differentially-expressed proteins identified in this study highlights a premier characterization

  9. Isolation and identification of an antioxidant flavonoid compound from citrus-processing by-product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiudong; Kang, Sung-Myung; Jeon, Byong-Tae; Kim, Yong-Deog; Ha, Jin-Hwan; Kim, Yong-Tae; Jeon, You-Jin

    2011-08-15

    Large amounts of citrus by-products are released from juice-processing plants every year. Most bioactive compounds are found in the peel and inner white pulp. Flavonoids are a widely distributed group of bioactive compounds. The methanolic extract of citrus peel powder has been shown to possess strong antioxidant activity. Therefore the aim of this study was to isolate the major antioxidant flavonoid compound from Citrus unshiu (satsuma) peel as citrus by-product and evaluate its antioxidant activity. The major flavonoid isolated from C. unshiu peel was identified as quercetagetin. The structure of the compound was determined by tandem mass spectrometry and ultraviolet spectroscopy. Its antioxidant activity was assessed by assays of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, hydroxyl radical and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging and DNA damage inhibition. Quercetagetin showed strong DPPH radical-scavenging activity (IC₅₀ 7.89 µmol L⁻¹) but much lower hydroxyl radical-scavenging activity (IC₅₀ 203.82 µmol L⁻¹). Furthermore, it significantly reduced ROS in Vero cells and showed a strong protective effect against hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage. The results of this study suggest that quercetagetin could be used in the functional food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. First report of citrus leprosis virus nuclear type in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus leprosis is a difficult viral disease causing significant damage to citrus fruit in South America and Central America. The disease is marked by dramatic lesions on fruit, leaves and stems resulting in unmarketable product. Citrus leprosis virus cytoplasmic types (CiLV-C and CiLV-C2) wer edete...

  11. Citrus Tristeza Virus: An Increasing Trend in the Virus Occurrence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Citrus tristeza clostervirus (CTV) is one of the most damaging fruit viruses playing havoc in citrus orchards around the world. Here, we report, an ELISA-based indexing of citrus trees over a period of eight years (2002 to 2010) in Northwest Pakistan, revealing that the incidence of CTV is increasing mainly with the distribution ...

  12. Converting citrus waste to ethanol and other co-products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conversion of citrus processing waste (CPW) generated during juice production into value added co-products is an important aspect of the juice industry as it offers a solution to waste disposal issues. Currently the practice of drying citrus waste to produce citrus pulp pellets (CPP) for use as catt...

  13. Wavelength and polarization affect phototaxis of the Asian citrus psyllid

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Asian citrus psyllid, D. citri, is a primary pest for citrus production due to its status as a vector of the citrus disease, huanglongbing. We investigated phototactic behavior of D. citri to evaluate effects of light of specific wavelength or polarization using a horizontal bioassay arena. Wave...

  14. 7 CFR 905.31 - Duties of Citrus Administrative Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Duties of Citrus Administrative Committee. 905.31 Section 905.31 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING....31 Duties of Citrus Administrative Committee. It shall be the duty of the Citrus Administrative...

  15. Biological Indexing of Graft Transmissible Diseases of Citrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological indexing for the detection of graft transmissible diseases of citrus is essential for maintaining a citrus certification program. Many of the graft transmissible diseases of citrus are harbored as latent infections in the scions, but when propagated on a susceptible rootstock that allow...

  16. Evaluation of natural colorants and their application on citrus fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warm temperatures can often result in poor peel color of some citrus varieties, especially early in the harvest season. Under these conditions, Florida oranges, temples, tangelos, and K-Early citrus fruit are allowed to be treated with Citrus Red No.2 (CR2) to help produce a more acceptable peel col...

  17. Evaluation of rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri Lush.) as rootstock for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lakesh.Sharma

    2013-10-30

    Oct 30, 2013 ... In vitro approach was adopted to study the effect of salinity on survival and growth of rough lemon. (Citrus jambhiri Lush.) seeds. North-West (Punjab) part of India has been facing a major problem of soil salinity for citrus orchards. Therefore, it is logical to study the salinity tolerance of common citrus.

  18. Antiproliferative activity of Citrus juices and HPLC evaluation of their flavonoid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarda, Lorenzo; Di Stefano, Vita; Del Bosco, Sergio Fatta; Schillaci, Domenico

    2007-09-01

    The antiproliferative activity of fresh fruit juices extracted from Citrus sinensis (cv. Washington Navel and cv. Sanguinello), C. deliciosa cv. Avana, C. clementina cv. Nules, C. aurantium subsp. myrtifolia , was evaluated against K562 (human chronic myelogenous leukemia), HL-60 (human leukemia) and MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma) cell lines. All the juices tested showed antiproliferative activity. Moreover, the pattern of the main flavanone compounds in the juices has been determined by HPLC analysis.

  19. The role of 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase and phytoene synthase gene family in citrus carotenoid accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Gang; Wang, Chunyan; Song, Song; Fu, Xiumin; Azam, Muhammad; Grierson, Don; Xu, Changjie

    2013-10-01

    Three 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthases (DXS) and three phytoene synthases (PSY) were identified in citrus, from Affymetrix GeneChip Citrus Genome Array, GenBank and public orange genome databases. Tissue-specific expression analysis of these genes was carried out on fruit peel and flesh, flower and leaf of Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.) in order to determine their roles in carotenoid accumulation in different tissues. Expression of CitDXS1 and CitPSY1 was highest in all test tissues, while that of CitDXS2 and CitPSY2 was lower, and that of CitDXS3 and CitPSY3 undetectable. The transcript profiles of CitDXS1 and CitPSY1 paralleled carotenoid accumulation in flesh of Satsuma mandarin and orange (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) during fruit development, and CitPSY1 expression was also associated with carotenoid accumulation in peel, while the CitDXS1 transcript level was only weakly correlated with carotenoid accumulation in peel. Similar results were obtained following correlation analysis between expression of CitDXS1 and CitPSY1 and carotenoid accumulation in peel and flesh of 16 citrus cultivars. These findings identify CitPSY1 and CitDXS1 as the main gene members controlling carotenoid biosynthesis in citrus fruit. Furthermore, chromoplasts were extracted from flesh tissue of these citrus, and chromoplasts of different shape (spindle or globular), different size, and color depth were observed in different cultivars, indicating chromoplast abundance, number per gram tissue, size and color depth were closely correlated with carotenoid content in most cultivars. The relationship between carotenoid biosynthesis and chromoplast development was discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Medicaid Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Policy and Program Topics Alternative Benefit Plan Coverage Autism Services Behavioral Health Services Dental Care Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic, and Treatment Hospice Benefits List of Medicaid Benefits ...

  1. Overexpression of a modified plant thionin enhances disease resistance to citrus canker and huanglongbing (HLB, citrus greening)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB or citrus greening disease) caused by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) is a great threat to the United States citrus industry. Citrus canker is also an economically important disease associated with a bacterial pathogen (Xanthomonas citri). In this study, we characterized e...

  2. Degradation products of citrus volatile organic compounds (VOCs) acting as phagostimulants that increase probing behavior of Asian citrus psyllid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volatile phytochemicals play a role in orientation by phytophagous insects. We studied antennal and behavioral responses of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama, vector of the citrus greening disease pathogen. Little or no response to citrus leaf volatiles was detected by electroanten...

  3. Evaluation of natural colorants and their application on citrus fruit as alternatives to Citrus Red No. 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warm field temperatures can often result in poor peel color of some citrus varieties, especially early in the harvest season. Under these conditions, Florida oranges, temples, tangelos, and K-Early citrus fruit are allowed to be treated with Citrus Red No.2 (CR2) to help produce a more acceptable pe...

  4. Antimicrobial nanoemulsion formulation with improved penetration of foliar spray through citrus leaf cuticles to control citrus Huanglongbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most serious citrus diseases that threaten citrus industry worldwide. Because Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (Las) resides in citrus phloem, it is difficult to deliver an effective chemical compound into the phloem for control of HLB. In this study, a transcuticu...

  5. Production of mono- and polyclonal antibodies to Citrus leprosis virus C2 and their application in triple antibody sandwich ELISA and immunocapture RT-PCR diagnostic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Nandlal; Roy, Avijit; Leon, M G; Wei, G; Nakhla, M K; Levy, L; Brlansky, R H

    2017-05-01

    The newly discovered Citrus leprosis virus cytoplasmic type 2 (CiLV-C2) is one of the causal virus of citrus leprosis disease complex; which leads to substantial loss of citrus production in the states of Meta and Casanare of Colombia. Specific and sensitive detection methods are needed to monitor the dissemination of CiLV-C2 in Colombia, and to prevent introduction of CiLV-C2 to other citrus growing countries. Toward this end, putative coat protein gene (CPG) of CiLV-C2 was amplified from CiLV-C2 infected citrus tissues. The CPG was cloned, expressed and purified a recombinant coat protein of ∼31kDa which used to generate monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal antisera. Four monoclonal antibodies and two polyclonal antisera were selected as being specific following Western blotting. The monoclonal antibody MAb E5 and polyclonal antiserum PAb UF715 were selected testing with an extract of CiLV-C2 infected leaves using triple antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (TAS-ELISA). In addition, an immunocapture RT-PCR was standardized using MAb E5 for specific and sensitive detection of CiLV-C2. The standardized TAS-ELISA and IC-RT-PCR were able to detect CiLV-C2 in the extracts of symptomatic citrus leprosis tissues up to the dilutions of 1:160 and 1:2580, respectively. Result demonstrated that CiLV-C2 is present in citrus orchards in Meta and Casanare citrus growing areas of Colombia. TAS-ELISA could be used for routine detection of CiLV-C2, epidemiological studies, and for border inspections for quarantine purposes. IC-RT-PCR could be valuable for CiLV-C2 validation and viral genome analysis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapid Molecular detection of citrus brown spot disease using ACT gene in Alternaria alternata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Moghimi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Using rapid detection methods is important for detection of plant pathogens and also prevention through spreading pests in agriculture. Citrus brown spot disease caused by pathogenic isolates of Alternaria alternata is a common disease in Iran. Materials and methods: In this study, for the first time a PCR based molecular method was used for rapid diagnosis of brown spot disease. Nine isolates of A. Alternata were isolated in PDA medium from different citrus gardens. The plant pathogenic activity was examined in tangerine leaves for isolates. Results showed that these isolates are the agents of brown spot disease. PCR amplification of specific ACT-toxin gene was performed for DNA extracted from A. alternata isolates, with 11 different fungal isolates as negative controls and 5 DNA samples extracted from soil. Results: Results showed that A. alternata, the causal agent of brown spot disease, can be carefully distinguished from other pathogenic agents by performing PCR amplification with specific primers for ACT toxin gene. Also, the results from Nested-PCR method confirmed the primary reaction and the specificity of A. alternata for brown spot disease. PCR results to control samples of the other standard fungal isolates, showed no amplification band. In addition, PCR with the DNA extracted from contaminated soils confirmed the presence of ACT toxin gene. Discussion and conclusion: Molecular procedure presented here can be used in rapid identification and prevention of brown spot infection in citrus gardens all over the country.

  7. Determination of exposure levels of honey bees foraging on flowers of mature citrus trees previously treated with imidacloprid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Frank J; Visscher, P Kirk; Leimkuehler, Bill; Fischer, Dave; Grafton-Cardwell, Elizabeth E; Morse, Joseph G

    2014-03-01

    Field and tunnel cage studies were undertaken to determine the extent to which honey bees foraging on citrus blossoms were exposed to imidacloprid and its metabolites when citrus trees were treated with soil applications of the insecticide. Residues were measured by LC/MS/MS in nectar and pollen samples from trees treated up to 232 days prior to bloom. Imidacloprid, imidacloprid olefin and 5-hydroxy imidacloprid were detected in nectar and pollen sampled from the flowers of citrus trees treated with imidacloprid up to 232 days prior to bloom. In tunnel studies, where foraging was restricted exclusively to citrus, imidacloprid residues in nectar extracted from flowers and from bee crops were similar (imidacloprid in nectar were higher in trees treated with higher application rates. Imidacloprid and its metabolites were detected in the nectar and pollen of citrus trees treated up to 232 days prior to the onset of bloom. However, based on published bioassay data, the imidacloprid concentrations in the floral nectar did not surpass levels that would compromise foraging activity under normal use conditions for imidacloprid. Further research is needed to assess the impact of elevated levels of imidacloprid within stored nectar in the comb. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. The Cytotoxic Effect of Essential Oil of Syrian Citrus limon Peel on Human Colorectal Carcinoma Cell Line (Lim1863

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Eyad Chatty

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Essential oils are the volatile fraction of aromatic and medicinal plants created after extraction by steam or water distillation. Species of the genus Citrus(Rutaceae have been widely used in traditional medicine as volatile oils and are currently the subject of numerous research. Citrus essential oil consists of different terpens that have antitumor activities. This study determines the cytotoxic effect of the essential oils of Citrus limon L. peels on a colorectal cancer cell line (LIM1863.Methods: We harvested four samples from four locations in Syria. Essential oils were prepared by hydrodistillation and analyzed by Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS.Various concentrations ofessential oils (0.5-48 μg/ml were added to cultured cells and incubated for 72 h. Cell viability was evaluated byMTT-basedcytotoxicity assay.Results: We noted 18 components that represented 98.81% of the total oil content. The major components were: limonene (61.8%-73.8%, γ-terpinene (9.4%-10.4%, β-pinene (3.7%-6.9%, O-cymene(1%-2.4%,and citral (0.8%-5.4%.The obtained IC50 value range of Citrus limon essential oils was 5.75-7.92 μg/ml against LIM1863.Conclusion: This study revealed that Syrian Citrus limon essential oil has a cytotoxic effect on the human colorectalcarcinoma cell line LIM1863 when studied in vitro.

  9. Anti-inflammatory Activity of Methanoilc and Ethanolic Extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aqueous ethanoic and methanolic extracts of Citrus Sinensis Peel were investigated for antiinflammatory activity in carrageenan induced paw oedema in wistar rats, and compared to a positive control drug, Indomethacin. These extracts were given(IP) in a concentration of 20, and 70mg/kg with extract with a concentration ...

  10. Laboratory Assessment of Bio-efficacies of Phytochemical Extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study assessed the bio-efficacies of phytochemical extracts from peels, pulp and seeds of citrus fruits species on adult Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles funestus under laboratory conditions. The assessment established the most potent extract(s) that could be adopted in sustainable control of malaria vectors.

  11. The effect of ethyl acetate fraction of Citrus limon peel on mesenchymal cell proliferation and polybacterial growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Marinna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oral diseases remain to be global health problem. The common therapy involved the use of modern medicines with their various side effects. Citrus limon are potentials as anti-inflammatory, anti-fungal, anti-oxidant, anti-viral and anti-bacterial. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of ethyl acetate fraction of citrus limon peel extract on human gingival mesenchymal cell proliferation and palm commensal polybacterial growth. Method: This study was experimental study with post test only control group design. Citrus limon peel extracted and partitioned in order to obtain ethyl acetate fraction of 3.125%, 2.75%, 2.375%, 2%, and 1.5625%. Toxicity test was performed after 24 hours using the MTT Assays. Cell viability was measured by optical density formazonand read by ELISA reader 620 nm. Results: All treatment groups showed less than 60% cell viability. The highest cell was 19.36 (1.5625% concentration and the lowest was 12.65 (3.125% concentration. The highest anti-bacterial inhibition value was 8.9125 mm (3.125% concentration and the lowest was 6.0625 mm (1.5625% concentration. Conclusion: The higher concentration of ethyl acetate fraction Citrus limon peel extract, the higher toxicity and inhibitory properties against commensal palm polybacteria.

  12. Life cycle greenhouse gas impacts of ethanol, biomethane and limonene production from citrus waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourbafrani, Mohammad; McKechnie, Jon; MacLean, Heather L.; Saville, Bradley A.

    2013-03-01

    The production of biofuel from cellulosic residues can have both environmental and financial benefits. A particular benefit is that it can alleviate competition for land conventionally used for food and feed production. In this research, we investigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the production of ethanol, biomethane, limonene and digestate from citrus waste, a byproduct of the citrus processing industry. The study represents the first life cycle-based evaluations of citrus waste biorefineries. Two biorefinery configurations are studied—a large biorefinery that converts citrus waste into ethanol, biomethane, limonene and digestate, and a small biorefinery that converts citrus waste into biomethane, limonene and digestate. Ethanol is assumed to be used as E85, displacing gasoline as a light-duty vehicle fuel; biomethane displaces natural gas for electricity generation, limonene displaces acetone in solvents, and digestate from the anaerobic digestion process displaces synthetic fertilizer. System expansion and two allocation methods (energy, market value) are considered to determine emissions of co-products. Considerable GHG reductions would be achieved by producing and utilizing the citrus waste-based products in place of the petroleum-based or other non-renewable products. For the large biorefinery, ethanol used as E85 in light-duty vehicles results in a 134% reduction in GHG emissions compared to gasoline-fueled vehicles when applying a system expansion approach. For the small biorefinery, when electricity is generated from biomethane rather than natural gas, GHG emissions are reduced by 77% when applying system expansion. The life cycle GHG emissions vary substantially depending upon biomethane leakage rate, feedstock GHG emissions and the method to determine emissions assigned to co-products. Among the process design parameters, the biomethane leakage rate is critical, and the ethanol produced in the large biorefinery would not meet EISA

  13. Detection of citrus canker and Huanglongbing using fluorescence imaging spectroscopy and support vector machine technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterich, Caio Bruno; Felipe de Oliveira Neves, Ruan; Belasque, José; Marcassa, Luis Gustavo

    2016-01-10

    Citrus canker and Huanglongbing (HLB) are citrus diseases that represent a serious threat to the citrus production worldwide and may cause large economic losses. In this work, we combined fluorescence imaging spectroscopy (FIS) and a machine learning technique to discriminate between these diseases and other ordinary citrus conditions that may be present at citrus orchards, such as citrus scab and zinc deficiency. Our classification results are highly accurate when discriminating citrus canker from citrus scab (97.8%), and HLB from zinc deficiency (95%). These results show that it is possible to accurately identify citrus diseases that present similar symptoms.

  14. Suspected citrus pulp toxicosis in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, G K; Blodgett, D J; Hutchins, T A; Prater, R M; Robertson, J L; Friday, P A; Scarratt, W K

    2000-05-01

    Thirteen lactating dairy cows from a herd of 650 died over a 6-week period. Most animals were down in milk production at 1 milking and were found dead at the next milking. Two cows had elevated heart rate and enlarged mandibular lymph nodes. Two others had azotemia, elevated heart rate, hyperglycemia, and weight loss. Necropsy of 10 cows revealed hemorrhages on the intestinal serosa and epicardium, lymphadenopathy, interstitial nephritis, small intestinal hemorrhage, and interstitial pneumonia. Histopathology showed lymphocytic to lymphogranulomatous inflammation in the heart, spleen, kidney, lymph nodes, liver, lung, pancreas, and adrenal gland. Phlebitis was present in 2 livers. The lesions resembled those of hairy vetch toxicosis, but no vetch was being fed. Similar lesions have been reported with the feeding of citrus pulp. Citrus pulp was being fed to the lactating cows and had been added to the diet 6 weeks before the first death. The syndrome resolved with elimination of citrus pulp from the diet.

  15. ENZYMATIC KINETIC STUDY HYDROLASE FROM CITRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Hernández

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the degrading activity of enzymes derived from orange peels (Citrus x sinensis, grapefruit (Citrus paradise and pineapple (Ananas comosus on the organic matter in wastewater is evaluated. This activity is measured indirectly by quantifying the biochemical oxygen demand (COD before and after degradation process based on a period of time using the HACH DR / 2010, and then the kinetic study was performed by the differential method and integral with the experimental data, obtaining a reaction order of 1 to pectinase (orange, and order 2 for bromelain (pineapple.

  16. Development of SSR markers from Citrus clementina (Rutaceae) BAC end sequences and interspecific transferability in Citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollitrault, Frédérique; Terol, Javier; Pina, Jose Antonio; Navarro, Luis; Talon, Manuel; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2010-11-01

    Microsatellite primers were developed from bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) end sequences of Citrus clementina and their transferability and polymorphism tested in the genus Citrus for future anchorage of physical and genetic maps and comparative interspecific genetic mapping. • Using PAGE and DNA silver staining, 79 primer pairs were selected for their transferability and polymorphism among 526 microsatellites mined in BES. A preliminary diversity study in Citrus was conducted with 18 of them, in C. reticulata, C. maxima, C. medica, C. sinensis, C. aurantium, C. paradisi, C. lemon, C. aurantifolia, and some papedas (wild citrus), using a capillary electrophoresis fragment analyzer. Intra- and interspecific polymorphism was observed, and heterozygous markers were identified for the different genotypes to be used for genetic mapping. • These results indicate the utility of the developed primers for comparative mapping studies and the integration of physical and genetic maps.

  17. The Types of Essentials Oil Components Isolated From the Leaves of Citrus Aurantifolia and Citrus Nobilis

    OpenAIRE

    Wulandari, Mutiara Juni; Mohammad Anwar Jamaludin,, Lailatul Riska, Agustin Laela Prunama; Mumun Nurmilawati, Indra Fauzi

    2015-01-01

    Essential oil or known as the eteris oil (etheric oil) was result from secondary metabolism of a plant. In general essential oil contains of citronellal, Citronelal, Citronelol, Limonen, β-Pinene dan sabinene. The components essential oil derived from citrus plants commonly used by perfume industry, on other hand it is used as essentials oil orange flavour addition in some drinks and food, and also as an antioxidant and anti cancer. One of the essential oil is produced by Citrus aurantifolia ...

  18. Anti-inflammatory activity of a new cyclic peptide, citrusin XI, isolated from the fruits of Citrus unshiu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Hyung Jun; Hwang, Dukhyun; Lee, Eun Suk; Hyun, Jae Wook; Yi, Pyoung Ho; Kim, Geum Soog; Lee, Seung Eun; Pang, Changhyun; Park, Yong Joo; Chung, Kyu Hyuck; Kim, Gun Do; Kim, Ki Hyun

    2015-04-02

    Citrus unshiu (Rutaceae) is an easy-peeling citrus fruit, which has been used as a traditional Korean medicine for improving skin elasticity, relieving fatigue and cough, and preventing bronchitis, flu, and various cancers. However, its active components associated with anti-inflammation and underlying mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the active constituents from the fruits of Citrus unshiu and evaluated the anti-inflammatory activity in order to support the traditional usage of Citrus unshiu. Repeated column chromatography, together with a semi-preparative HPLC purification was used to separate the bioactive constituent from the EtOAc soluble fraction of the EtOH extract of Citrus unshiu fruits. Anti-inflammatory effects of the isolated compounds on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced production of pro-inflammatory mediators were examined using RAW264.7 macrophage cells. A new cyclic peptide, citrusin XI (1), was isolated and identified from the fruits of Citrus unshiu. The structure of compound 1 was elucidated by spectroscopic analysis, including 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) ((1)H, (13)C, COSY, HMQC and HMBC experiments), and high resolution (HR)-mass spectrometry, and its absolute configurations were further confirmed by the Marfey׳s method. Compound 1 decreased NO production in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 70μM. Compound 1 suppressed NO production by decreasing iNOS expression but COX-2 expression was slightly associated with the reduction by compound 1 in LPS-induced RAW264.7 cells. Furthermore, compound 1 inhibited NF-κB activation by blocking IκBα degradation and NF-κB phosphorylation in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells. These results indicate that a new cyclic peptide, citrusin XI, from Citrus unshiu fruits has anti-inflammatory properties that inhibit the release of pro-inflammatory mediators. Compound 1 decreases NO production by decreasing iNOS expression and NF

  19. Oil Extraction and Benefit Sharing in an Illiberal Context: The Nenets and Komi-Izhemtsi Indigenous Peoples in the Russian Arctic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tysyachnyouk, M.; Henry, L.A.; Lamers, M.A.J.; Tatenhove, van J.P.M.

    2017-01-01

    How can indigenous communities in illiberal regimes benefit from oil production? This paper compares the experience of two indigenous peoples in the Russian Arctic, the Nenets and the Komi-Izhemtsi, in their quest for environmental protection and the development of benefit-sharing arrangements with

  20. Nutritional deficiency in citrus with symptoms of citrus variegated chlorosis disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ME. Silva-Stenico

    Full Text Available It is well known that citrus plants that have been infected by Xylella fastidiosa display nutritional deficiencies, probably caused by production of extracellular polymers by the bacteria that block normal nutrient flow through the xylem. The aim of this work was to study the mineral composition of specific foliar areas in different stages of infection in citrus. Thus, the concentrations of macro and micronutrients in leaves of citrus infected by X. fastidiosa were measured. Samples from four infected citrus orchards in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, were respectively collected from Santa Rita do Passa Quatro, Neves Paulista, Gavião Peixoto and Paraíso counties. The presence of X. fastidiosa in leaves was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR using specific PCR primers. To understand the variation in leaf-nutrient content in citrus plants, we used foliar nutrient values from control (non-symptomatic plants as a reference. Chemometric analysis showed that the deficiency of P and K in symptomatic trees for all orchards and high concentrations of Fe, Mn and Zn were observed in chlorotic areas, although other studies revealed deficiency of zinc in leaves. This is the first report showing that a correlation between chlorotic citrus leaf and higher concentrations of Fe, Mn and Zn are observed when infected and healthy plants were compared.

  1. Nutritional deficiency in citrus with symptoms of citrus variegated chlorosis disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Stenico, M E; Pacheco, F T H; Pereira-Filho, E R; Rodrigues, J L M; Souza, A N; Etchegaray, A; Gomes, J E; Tsai, S M

    2009-08-01

    It is well known that citrus plants that have been infected by Xylella fastidiosa display nutritional deficiencies, probably caused by production of extracellular polymers by the bacteria that block normal nutrient flow through the xylem. The aim of this work was to study the mineral composition of specific foliar areas in different stages of infection in citrus. Thus, the concentrations of macro and micronutrients in leaves of citrus infected by X. fastidiosa were measured. Samples from four infected citrus orchards in the State of São Paulo, Brazil, were respectively collected from Santa Rita do Passa Quatro, Neves Paulista, Gavião Peixoto and Paraíso counties. The presence of X. fastidiosa in leaves was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using specific PCR primers. To understand the variation in leaf-nutrient content in citrus plants, we used foliar nutrient values from control (non-symptomatic) plants as a reference. Chemometric analysis showed that the deficiency of P and K in symptomatic trees for all orchards and high concentrations of Fe, Mn and Zn were observed in chlorotic areas, although other studies revealed deficiency of zinc in leaves. This is the first report showing that a correlation between chlorotic citrus leaf and higher concentrations of Fe, Mn and Zn are observed when infected and healthy plants were compared.

  2. Bioactive Flavonoids, Antioxidant Behaviour, and Cytoprotective Effects of Dried Grapefruit Peels (Citrus paradisi Macf.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Castro-Vazquez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf. is an important cultivar of the Citrus genus which contains a number of nutrients beneficial to human health. The objective of the present study was to evaluate changes in bioactive flavonoids, antioxidant behaviour, and in vitro cytoprotective effect of processed white and pink peels after oven-drying (45°C–60°C and freeze-drying treatments. Comparison with fresh grapefruit peels was also assessed. Significant increases in DPPH, FRAPS, and ABTS values were observed in dried grapefruit peel samples in comparison with fresh peels, indicating the suitability of the treatments for use as tools to greatly enhance the antioxidant potential of these natural byproducts. A total of thirteen flavonoids were quantified in grapefruit peel extracts by HPLC-MS/MS. It was found that naringin, followed by isonaringin, was the main flavonoid occurring in fresh, oven-dried, and freeze-dried grapefruit peels. In vivo assay revealed that fresh and oven-dried grapefruit peel extracts (45°C exerted a strong cytoprotective effect on SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cell lines at concentrations ranging within 0.1–0.25 mg/mL. Our data suggest that grapefruit (Citrus paradisi Macf. peel has considerable potential as a source of natural bioactive flavonoids with outstanding antioxidant activity which can be used as agents in several therapeutic strategies.

  3. Flavonoids rich fraction of Citrus limetta fruit peels reduces proinflammatory cytokine production and attenuates malaria pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Shilpa; Maurya, Anil K; Jyotshna; Saxena, Archana; Shanker, Karuna; Pal, Anirban; Bawankule, Dnyaneshwar U

    2015-01-01

    Exploration of possible pharmacological effects along with characterisation of the bioactive compounds present in peels may have a key role in converting the fruit waste materials into therapeutic value added products. Extracts prepared from the Citrus limetta fruit peels were studied for antioxidant and anti- inflammatory activity using in-vitro bioassays. Among all, ClEt an ethanol extract of Citrus limetta fruit peels has shown promising anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. ClEt was further validated to ensure its safety evaluation at 2000mg/kg and anti-malarial efficacy at 100, 250, 500 mg/kg body weight with special reference to inflammatory mediators involved in malaria pathogenesis. In-vivo study revealed that ClEt was safe at higher dose and showed promising anti-malarial activity by inhibiting the parasitaemia and inflammatory mediators (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6) involved in malaria pathogenesis, able to improve the haemoglobin and glucose level and increase the survival time. Chemical fingerprint of ClEt revealed the presence of flavonoids. Results suggested the suitability of ClEt, a flavonoid rich fraction of Citrus limetta fruit peels as a candidate for further investigation towards the management of malaria pathogenesis.

  4. Botanical insecticides in controlling Kelly's citrus thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) on organic grapefruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliou, V A

    2011-12-01

    Kelly's citrus thrips, Pezothrips kellyanus (Bagnall) (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) was first recorded in Cyprus in 1996 and became an economic citrus pest. In Cyprus, Kelly's citrus thrips larvae cause feeding damage mainly on immature lemon and grapefruit fruits. Use of botanical insecticides is considered an alternative tool compared with synthetic chemicals, in offering solutions for healthy and sustainable citrus production. During 2008-2010, the efficacy of the botanical insecticides azadirachtin (Neemex 0.3%W/W and Oikos 10 EC), garlic extract (Alsa), and pyrethrins (Vioryl 5%SC) was evaluated in field trials against Kelly's citrus thrips larval stage I and II aiming at controlling the pest's population and damage to organic grapefruit fruits. In each of the trial years treatments with pyrethrins and azadirachtin (Neemex 0.3%W/W) were the most effective against Kelly's citrus thrips compared with the untreated control (for 2008: P < 0.018; for 2009: P < 0.000; for 2010: P < 0.008). In 2008, the mean number of damaged fruits in treatments with pyrethrins and Neemex was 9.6 (19.2%) and 9.7 (19.5%) respectively, compared with 12.2 (24.3%) in the untreated control. In 2009, the mean number of damaged fruits in treatment with pyrethrins was 3.7 (7.3%) and 3.9 (7.8%) in treatment with Neemex compared with 8.6 (17.3%) in the untreated control, while in 2010 the mean damaged fruits in these treatments was recorded at 18.7 (37.5%) and 19.6 (39.2), respectively, compared with 29.6 fruits (59.2%) in the control. Oikos 10 EC showed significant effect only in 2009 and 2010. In these years, the mean number of damaged fruits was recorded at 5.5 and 21.2 compared with 8.6 and 29.6 fruits in the untreated control, respectively. Garlic extract showed the lowest effect from all the botanicals used compared with the untreated control.

  5. Bioavailability is improved by enzymatic modification of the citrus flavonoid hesperidin in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Inge Lise F; Chee, Winnie S S; Poulsen, Lea

    2006-01-01

    Hesperidin is the predominant polyphenol consumed from citrus fruits and juices. However, hesperidin is proposed to have limited bioavailability due to the rutinoside moiety attached to the flavonoid. The aim of this study was to demonstrate in human subjects that the removal of the rhamnose group...... to yield the corresponding flavonoid glucoside (i.e., hesperetin-7-glucoside) will improve the bioavailability of the aglycone hesperetin. Healthy volunteers (n=16) completed the double-blind, randomized, crossover study. Subjects randomly consumed hesperetin equivalents supplied as orange juice...... that the bioavailability of hesperidin was modulated by enzymatic conversion to hesperetin-7-glucoside, thus changing the absorption site from the colon to the small intestine. This may affect future interventions concerning the health benefits of citrus flavonoids....

  6. Diversity of endophytic bacterial populations and their interaction with Xylella fastidiosa in citrus plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Araujo, W.L.; Marcon, J.; jr. Maccheroni, W.; Elsas, van J.D.; Vuurde, van J.W.L.; Azevedo, de J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Citrus variegated chlorosis (CVC) is caused by Xylella fastidiosa, a phytopathogenic bacterium that can infect all Citrus sinensis cultivars. The endophytic bacterial communities of healthy, resistant, and CVC-affected citrus plants were studied by using cultivation as well as

  7. 77 FR 41709 - Common Crop Insurance Regulations; Florida Citrus Fruit Crop Insurance Provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    ... quality of the human environment, health, or safety. Therefore, neither an Environmental Assessment nor an... commodities'' as ``oranges,'' ``grapefruit,'' ``tangelos,'' ``mandarins/tangerines,'' ``tangors,'' ``lemons... current ``citrus fruit crop'' named ``Citrus VI (Lemons and Limes)'' will become two separate ``citrus...

  8. Detection of Citrus Trees from Uav Dsms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, A. O.; Ozdarici-Ok, A.

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents an automated approach to detect citrus trees from digitals surface models (DSMs) as a single source. The DSMs in this study are generated from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), and the proposed approach first considers the symmetric nature of the citrus trees, and it computes the orientation-based radial symmetry in an efficient way. The approach also takes into account the local maxima (LM) information to verify the output of the radial symmetry. Our contributions in this study are twofold: (i) Such an integrated approach (symmetry + LM) has not been tested to detect (citrus) trees (in orchards), and (ii) the validity of such an integrated approach has not been experienced for an input, e.g. a single DSM. Experiments are performed on five test patches. The results reveal that our approach is capable of counting most of the citrus trees without manual intervention. Comparison to the state-of-the-art reveals that the proposed approach provides notable detection performance by providing the best balance between precision and recall measures.

  9. ENERGY USE IN CITRUS PRODUCTION OF MAZANDARAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    Energy is a fundamental ingredient in the process of economic development, as it provides essential services that maintain economic activity ... The aim of this study was to evaluate energy use in citrus production in the Mazandaran Province in Iran. Data used in this study ..... production of Turkey. Energy Conversion and.

  10. Founder lines for improved citrus biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article discusses the research needed to develop the RMCE strategy and molecular assays for site-specific recombinases as tools for genome manipulation. Explanation of genetic engineering used to generate transgenic citrus plants to exhibit a novel phenotype, but not to contain the recombinase...

  11. Digital PCR for detection of citrus pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus trees are often infected with multiple pathogens of economic importance, especially those with insect or mite vectors. Real-time/quantitative PCR (qPCR) has been used for high-throughput detection and relative quantification of pathogens; however, target reference or standards are required. I...

  12. Changes in Anthocyanin Production during Domestication of Citrus1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Lor, Andrés; Licciardello, Concetta; Las Casas, Giuseppina; Ramadugu, Chandrika; Krueger, Robert; Fanciullino, Anne-Laure; Froelicher, Yann

    2017-01-01

    Mandarin (Citrus reticulata), citron (Citrus medica), and pummelo (Citrus maxima) are important species of the genus Citrus and parents of the interspecific hybrids that constitute the most familiar commercial varieties of Citrus: sweet orange, sour orange, clementine, lemon, lime, and grapefruit. Citron produces anthocyanins in its young leaves and flowers, as do species in genera closely related to Citrus, but mandarins do not, and pummelo varieties that produce anthocyanins have not been reported. We investigated the activity of the Ruby gene, which encodes a MYB transcription factor controlling anthocyanin biosynthesis, in different accessions of a range of Citrus species and in domesticated cultivars. A white mutant of lemon lacks functional alleles of Ruby, demonstrating that Ruby plays an essential role in anthocyanin production in Citrus. Almost all the natural variation in pigmentation by anthocyanins in Citrus species can be explained by differences in activity of the Ruby gene, caused by point mutations and deletions and insertions of transposable elements. Comparison of the allelic constitution of Ruby in different species and cultivars also helps to clarify many of the taxonomic relationships in different species of Citrus, confirms the derivation of commercial varieties during domestication, elucidates the relationships within the subgenus Papeda, and allows a new genetic classification of mandarins. PMID:28196843

  13. Changes in Anthocyanin Production during Domestication ofCitrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butelli, Eugenio; Garcia-Lor, Andrés; Licciardello, Concetta; Las Casas, Giuseppina; Hill, Lionel; Recupero, Giuseppe Reforgiato; Keremane, Manjunath L; Ramadugu, Chandrika; Krueger, Robert; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiuxin; Fanciullino, Anne-Laure; Froelicher, Yann; Navarro, Luis; Martin, Cathie

    2017-04-01

    Mandarin ( Citrus reticulata ), citron ( Citrus medica ), and pummelo ( Citrus maxima ) are important species of the genus Citrus and parents of the interspecific hybrids that constitute the most familiar commercial varieties of Citrus : sweet orange, sour orange, clementine, lemon, lime, and grapefruit. Citron produces anthocyanins in its young leaves and flowers, as do species in genera closely related to Citrus , but mandarins do not, and pummelo varieties that produce anthocyanins have not been reported. We investigated the activity of the Ruby gene, which encodes a MYB transcription factor controlling anthocyanin biosynthesis, in different accessions of a range of Citrus species and in domesticated cultivars. A white mutant of lemon lacks functional alleles of Ruby , demonstrating that Ruby plays an essential role in anthocyanin production in Citrus Almost all the natural variation in pigmentation by anthocyanins in Citrus species can be explained by differences in activity of the Ruby gene, caused by point mutations and deletions and insertions of transposable elements. Comparison of the allelic constitution of Ruby in different species and cultivars also helps to clarify many of the taxonomic relationships in different species of Citrus , confirms the derivation of commercial varieties during domestication, elucidates the relationships within the subgenus Papeda , and allows a new genetic classification of mandarins. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  14. [Chemical variability of essential oils in peels collected in different time from Citrus reticulata 'Ponkan'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Chen, Hong-ping; Liu, You-ping; Wei, Zheng

    2013-12-01

    To study the chemical variation of essential oils in peels collected from Citrus reticulata' Ponkan' in different time. The volatile oils were extracted by steam distillation and analyzed by GC-MS. The oil components were identified by their mass spectra and Kovats retention indices (RIs) and quantified by the area normalization method. A total of 68 compounds were identified in 6 samples harvested in different time, and the total contents of identified compounds in each sample were from 94.27% to 97.12%. The highest content compounds were d-limonene, gamma-terpinene and linalool representing 56.862%-67.728%, 9.298%-11.081% and 4.792%-7.893%, respectively. There was little difference in the chemical components between different samples, but a great variation in quantitation between the former 2 samples and the latter 4 samples. The chemical variability of essential oils from 6 Citrus reticulata 'Ponkan' peel samples presents a regularity.

  15. Residues of Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck as agents that cause a change in antioxidant defense in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Mayra Pavan Nunes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to verify the allelopathic potential of the extract of Citrus seeds, for the purpose of adding a sustainable value to the fruit seeds toward their use as industrial residues. The extract was obtained with a Soxhlet apparatus by using hexane, chloroform, and methanol as solvents. The hexane extract of the Citrus seeds primarily consisted of linoleic acid (36.6%, followed by α-linoleic acid (25.3%, oleic acid (17.8%, palmitic acid (9.7%, and estearic acid (3.3%. The analysis results indicate that the oil is similar to those used in the cosmetics and food industries and has an economic value from its industrial application. In addition, the use of the oil causes changes in the oxidant balance, germination, and growth of plants.

  16. Citrus tristeza virus-host interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William O. Dawson

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Citrus tristeza virus (CTV is a phloem-limited virus whose natural host range is restricted to citrus and related species. Although the virus has killed millions of trees, almost destroying whole industries, and continually limits production in many citrus growing areas, most isolates are mild or symptomless in most of their host range. There is little understanding of how the virus causes severe disease in some citrus and none in others. Movement and distribution of CTV differs considerably from that of well-studied viruses of herbaceous plants where movement occurs largely through adjacent cells. In contrast, CTV systemically infects plants mainly by long-distance movement with only limited cell-to-cell movement. The virus is transported through sieve elements and occasionally enters an adjacent companion or phloem parenchyma cell where virus replication occurs. In some plants this is followed by cell-to-cell movement into only a small cluster of adjacent cells, while in others there is no cell-to-cell movement. Different proportions of cells adjacent to sieve elements become infected in different plant species. This appears to be related to how well viral gene products interact with specific hosts. CTV has three genes that are not necessary for infection of most of its hosts, but are needed in different combinations for infection of certain citrus species. These genes apparently were acquired by the virus to extend its host range. Some specific viral gene products have been implicated in symptom induction. Remarkably, the deletion of these genes from the virus genome can induce large increases in stem pitting symptoms. The p23 gene, which is a suppressor of RNA silencing and a regulator of viral RNA synthesis, has been shown to be the cause of seedling yellows symptoms in sour orange. Most isolates of CTV in nature are populations of different strains of CTV. The next frontier of CTV biology is the understanding how the virus variants in

  17. Traditional Small-Size Citrus from Taiwan: Essential Oils, Bioactive Compounds and Antioxidant Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Hung Chen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The calamondin (Citrus microcarpa Bunge and the kumquat (Fortunella crassifolia Swingle are two small-size citrus fruits that have traditionally been consumed in Taiwan; however, there has been a lack of scientific research regarding the active compounds and functionalities of these fruits. Methods: Analysis of volatile composition of essential oil and phytosterol was carried out using Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS. Flavonoid and limonoid were analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC. Moreover, antioxidant capacity from their essential oils and extracts were assessed in vitro. Results: The compositions of the essential oils of both fruits were identified, with the results showing that the calamondin and kumquat contain identified 43 and 44 volatile compounds, respectively. In addition, oxygenated compounds of volatiles accounted for 4.25% and 2.04%, respectively, consistent with the fact that oxygenated compounds are generally found in high content in citrus fruits. In terms of flavonoids, the calamondin exhibited higher content than the kumquat, with disomin-based flavonoids being predominant; on the other hand, phytosterol content of kumquat was higher than that of calamondin, with amyrin being the dominant phytosterol. Both of them contain high amounts of limonoids. The ethanol extracts and essential oils of small-sized citrus fruits have been shown to have antioxidant effects, with those effects being closely related to the flavonoid content of the fruit in question. Conclusions: The present study also reviewed antioxidant activity in terms of specific bioactive compounds in order to find the underlying biological activity of both fruits. The calamondin and kumquat have antioxidant effects, which are in turn very important for the prevention of chronic diseases.

  18. Detection and molecular identification protocols for Phyllosticta citricarpa from citrus matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariette Truter

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Strict quarantine measures for the export of South African citrus fruit to European and US markets require the development of sensitive and accurate detection methods for the pathogen Phyllosticta citricarpa – a fungus causing citrus black spot disease. Because of the presence of other, non-pathogenic Phyllosticta species, rapid and accurate verification of the Phyllosticta species present on exported citrus fruit is important to producers, exporters and regulatory authorities to prevent unnecessary losses. We have analysed over 800 samples collected over 7 years and have compared sample preparation and detection protocols applied in different environments: nurseries, production systems including phytosanitary inspections in orchards, pack houses and export terminals in order to compile protocols for the detection of P. citricarpa. Standard procedures of sample preparation and DNA extraction were adapted to suit diverse inoculum sources. Low pathogen numbers in symptomless green leaves, for example, obliged the use of a wet-dry enrichment technique constituting the stimulation of fungal growth for easier detection. Physical maceration was adapted for sturdy material using liquid nitrogen or bead beating. The use of a two-step polymerase chain reaction (PCR with nested primers significantly increased both the sensitivity and the specificity of the PCR performed on soil samples, overcoming problems with relatively impure DNA extracts and low pathogen numbers. The assays have proven to be highly consistent, thereby providing a reliable, reproducible and highly sensitive detection and diagnostic service to the southern African citrus industries in order to sustain market access.

  19. An Open, Pilot Study to Evaluate the Potential Benefits of Coenzyme Q10 Combined with Ginkgo Biloba extract in Fibromyalgia Syndrome

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lister, R.E

    2002-01-01

    An open, uncontrolled study was undertaken to measure the subjective effects of coenzyme Q10 combined with a Ginkgo biloba extract in volunteer subjects with clinically diagnosed fibromyalgia syndrome...

  20. Slight Fermentation with Lactobacillus fermentium Improves the Taste (Sugar:Acid Ratio) of Citrus (Citrus reticulata cv. chachiensis) Juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuanshan; Xiao, Gengsheng; Xu, Yujuan; Wu, Jijun; Fu, Manqin; Wen, Jing

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that fermentation with Lactobacillus fermentium, which can metabolize citric acid, could be applied in improving the taste (sugar:acid ratio) of citrus juice. During fermentation, the strain of L. fermentium can preferentially utilize citric acid of citrus (Citrus reticulata cv. Chachiensis) juice to support the growth without the consumption of sugar. After 6 h of fermentation with L. fermentium at 30 °C, the sugar:acid ratio of citrus juice increased to 22:1 from 12:1, which resulted in that the hedonic scores of sweetness, acidity and overall acceptability of fermented-pasteurized citrus juice were higher than the unfermented-pasteurized citrus juice. Compared with unfermented-pasteurized citrus juice, the ORAC value and total amino acid showed a reduction, and no significant change (P > 0.05) in the L*, a*, b*, total soluble phenolics and ascorbic acid (Vc) content in the fermented-pasteurized citrus juice was observed as compared with unfermented-pasteurized citrus juice. Hence, slight fermentation with L. fermentium can be used for improving the taste (sugar:acid ratio) of citrus juice with the well retaining of quality. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  1. Antioxidant properties of fresh and processed Citrus aurantium fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash J. Divya

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Edible components of Citrus aurantium (bitter orange fruit i.e. whole fruit, separated peel and pulp, and processed preserved products, namely salt pickle, chilli pickle, and sweet preserve were analyzed for antioxidant potential by various in vitro assays. The antioxidants components were extracted in different media and freeze dried. Methanol and aqueous media were comparatively more effective in extracting the antioxidant components. The total phenol content of the extracts ranged from 2.5 to 22.5 mg/g and 5.0 to 45.0 mg/g of pulp and peel fragments, respectively. The fruit components exhibited proton radical, oxyradical, and hydroxyl radical scavenging abilities and were effective in preventing lipid peroxidation. Regression analysis showed positive association between total phenolics and different antioxidant assays. In processed products, there was an initial decrease in antioxidant capacity, which showed an increase on storage. In conclusion, bitter orange exhibited high antioxidant capacity which was retained even in processed and stored products.

  2. Plant regeneration from protoplast of Brazilian citrus cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GLORIA FERNANDA JANUZZI MENDES DA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A procedure is described to regenerate plants from protoplasts of Brazilian citrus cultivars, after isolation, fusion and culture. Protoplasts were isolated from embryogenic cell suspension cultures and from leaf mesophyll of seedlings germinated in vitro. The enzyme solution for protoplast isolation was composed of mannitol (0.7 M, CaCl2 (24.5 mM, NaH2PO4 (0.92 mM, MES (6.15 mM, cellulase (Onozuka RS - Yakult, 1%, macerase (Onozuka R10 - Yakult, 1% and pectolyase Y-23 (Seishin, 0.2%. Protoplast culture in liquid medium after chemical fusion lead to the formation of callus colonies further adapted to solid medium. Somatic embryo formation occurred spontaneously after two subcultures, on modified MT medium supplemented with 500 mg/L of malt extract. Well defined embryos were germinated in modified MT medium with addition of GA3 (2.0 muM and malt extract (500 mg/L. Plant regeneration was also achieved by adventitious shoots obtained through direct organogenesis of not well defined embryos in modified MT medium with addition of malt extract (500 mg/L, BAP (1.32 muM, NAA (1.07 muM and coconut water (10 mL/L. Plantlets were transferred to root medium. Rooted plants were transferred to a greenhouse for further adaptation and development.

  3. Effects of citrus limon essential oil (Citrus limon L. on cytomorphometric changes of Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Prabajati

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most common fungal infection found in oral cavity is oral candidiasis, largely caused by Candida species, particularly Candida albicans (C. albicans. Candida infection can get worse since it is difficult to be treated and resistant with antifungal drugs. Therefore, new drugs and compounds as well as alternative therapies involving natural sources that have antifungal activities have continually been developed. Limonene, β-pinene, and ɣ-terpinene contained in Citrus limon essential oil have been known to have quite good antifungal activities against C. albicans. Purpose: This research aimed to examine and analyze the effects of Citrus limon essential oil on cytomorphometric changes of C. albicans. Method: The research used post test only control group design. Based on the results of the pre-elementary research on antifungal activities of Citrus limon essential oil against C. albicans, Citrus limon essential oil used in this research was on concentrations of 1.56%, 1.37%, 1.17%, 0.98%, and 0.78%. Citrus limon essential oil by C. albicans inoculum and incubated for 24 hours and 48 hours. After the incubation, those C. albicans cells were fixed, dried, and then observed using a scanning electron microscopy. Result: The most effective concentrations of Citrus limon essential oil triggering cytomorphometric changes of Candida albicans were at 1.37% and 1.56% with the incubation period of 48 hours. Conclusion: C. albicans can undergo necrosis process through cytomorphometric changes after the administration of Citrus limon essential oil at concentrations of 1.56% and 1.37% with the incubation period of 48 hours.

  4. HPTLC Fingerprinting and Cholinesterase Inhibitory and Metal-Chelating Capacity of Various Citrus Cultivars and Olea europaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma Sezer Senol

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitory activity of thirty-one ethanol extracts obtained from albedo, flavedo, seed and leaf parts of 17 cultivars of Citrus species from Turkey, the bark and leaves of Olea europaea L. from two locations (Turkey and Cyprus as well as caff eic acid and hesperidin was tested against acetylcholinesterase (AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, using ELISA microtiter assays at 500 μg/mL. Metal-chelating capacity of the extracts was also determined. BChE inhibitory effect of the Citrus sp. extracts was from (7.7±0.7 to (70.3±1.1 %, whereas they did not show any inhibition against AChE. Cholinesterase inhibitory activity of the leaf and bark ethanol extracts of O. europaea was very weak ((10.2±3.1 to (15.0±2.3 %. The extracts had either no or low metal-chelating capacity at 500 μg/mL. HPTLC fingerprinting of the extracts, which indicated a similar phytochemical pattern, was also done using the standards of caffeic acid and hesperidin with weak cholinesterase inhibition. Among the screened extracts, the albedo extract of C. limon ‘Interdonato’, the flavedo extracts of ‘Kara Limon’ and ‘Cyprus’ cultivars and the seed extract of C. maxima appear to be promising as natural BChE inhibitors.

  5. Digestion kinetics of carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashkari, Saman; Taghizadeh, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    The present experiment was carried out to determine the digestion kinetics of carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products. Grapefruit pulp (GP), lemon pulp (LE), lime pulp (LI) and orange pulp (OP) were the test feed. Digestion kinetic of whole citrus by-products and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) fraction and acid detergent fiber (ADF) fractions of citrus by-products were measured using the in vitro gas production technique. Fermentation kinetics of the neutral detergent soluble carbohydrates (NDSC) fraction and hemicelluloses were calculated using a curve subtraction. The fermentation rate of whole was the highest for the LE (p citrus by-products lag time was longer for hemicellulose than other carbohydrate fractions. There was no significant difference among potential gas production (A) volumes of whole test feeds (p citrus by-products have high potential for degradability. It could also be concluded that carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products have remarkable difference in digestion kinetics and digestive behavior.

  6. Chemical Compositions of the Peel Essential Oil of Citrus aurantium and its Natural Larvicidal Activity against the Malaria Vector Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae in Comparison with Citrus paradisi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Sanei-Dehkordi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently, essential oils and extracts derived from plants have received much interest as potential bioactive agents against mosquito vectors.Methods: The essential oils extract from fresh peel of ripe fruit of Citrus aurantium and Citrus paradisi were tested against mosquito vector Anopheles stephensi (Diptera: Culicidae under laboratory condition. Then chemical com­position of the essential oil of C. aurantium was analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC–MS.Results: The essential oils obtained from C. aurantium, and C. paradisi showed good larviciding effect against An. stephensi with LC50 values 31.20 ppm and 35.71 ppm respectively. Clear dose response relationships were established with the highest dose of 80 ppm plant extract evoking almost 100% mortality. Twenty-one (98.62% constituents in the leaf oil were identified. The main constituent of the leaf oil was Dl-limonene (94.81.Conclusion: The results obtained from this study suggest that the limonene of peel essential oil of C. aurantium is promising as larvicide against An. stephensi larvae and could be useful in the search for new natural larvicidal compounds.

  7. Citrus tissue culture employing vegetative explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, H C; Singh, S K; Sharma, A K; Agnihotri, S

    2001-11-01

    Citrus being a number one fruit of the world due to its high nutritional value, huge production of fruits and fruit products, the citrus industry may be considered a major fruit industry. Though citrus orchard area in India is comparable to USA, the produce is far less, while its export is nil. Biotechnology has played an outstanding role in boosting the citrus industry, e.g., in Spain, which is now the biggest exporter of citrus fruit with the application of micrografting. Amongst the fruit trees, perhaps the maximum tissue culture research has been done in citrus during the past four decades, however, the results of practical value are meagre. The shortfalls in citrus tissue culture research and some advancements made in this direction along with bright prospects are highlighted, restricting the review to vegetative explants only. Whilst utilization of nucellar embryogenesis is limited to rootstocks, the other aspects, like, regeneration and proliferation of shoot meristems measuring 200 microm in length--a global breakthrough--of two commercially important scion species, Citrus aurantifolia and C. sinensis and an important rootstock, C. limonia, improvement of micrografting technique, cloning of the same two scion species as well as some Indian rootstock species, employing nodal stem segments of mature trees, of immense practical value have been elaborated. A rare phenomenon of shift in the morphogenetic pattern of differentiation from shoot bud differentiation to embryoid formation occurred during the long-term culture of stem callus of C. grandis. Stem callus-regenerated plants of C. aurantifolia, C. sinensis and C. grandis showed variation in their ploidy levels and a somaclonal variant of C. sinensis, which produced seedless fruits was isolated. Tailoring of rooting in microshoots to a tap root-like system by changing the inorganic salt composition of the rooting medium, resulting in 100% transplant success, and germplasm preservation through normal growth

  8. Digestion kinetics of carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products

    OpenAIRE

    Lashkari, Saman; Taghizadeh, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    The present experiment was carried out to determine the digestion kinetics of carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products. Grapefruit pulp (GP), lemon pulp (LE), lime pulp (LI) and orange pulp (OP) were the test feed. Digestion kinetic of whole citrus by-products and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) fraction and acid detergent fiber (ADF) fractions of citrus by-products were measured using the in vitro gas production technique. Fermentation kinetics of the neutral detergent soluble carbohydrate...

  9. 21 CFR 74.302 - Citrus Red No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Citrus Red No. 2. 74.302 Section 74.302 Food and... ADDITIVES SUBJECT TO CERTIFICATION Foods § 74.302 Citrus Red No. 2. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive Citrus Red No. 2 is principally 1-(2,5-dimethoxyphenylazo)-2-naphthol. (2) The following diluents may be...

  10. Discrimination of Citrus reticulata Blanco and Citrus reticulata 'Chachi' by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry based metabolomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Li; Guo, Long; Dou, Li-Li; Zhou, Chang-Lin; Xu, Feng-Guo; Zheng, Guo-Dong; Li, Ping; Liu, E-Hu

    2016-12-01

    Citri Reticulatae Pericarpium, mainly including the pericarp of Citrus reticulata Blanco and the pericarp of Citrus reticulata 'Chachi', has been consumed daily as food and dietary supplement for centuries. In this study, GC-MS based metabolomics was employed to compare comprehensively the volatile constituents in Citrus reticulata Blanco and Citrus reticulata 'Chachi'. Principal component analysis and orthogonal partial least squares discrimination analysis indicated that samples could be distinguished effectively from one another. Fifteen metabolites were finally identified for use as chemical markers in discrimination of Citri Reticulatae Pericarpium samples. The antimicrobial activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria of the volatile oil from Citrus reticulata Blanco and Citrus reticulata 'Chachi' was investigated preliminarily. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Citrus Flavonoids as Regulators of Lipoprotein Metabolism and Atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulvihill, Erin E; Burke, Amy C; Huff, Murray W

    2016-07-17

    Citrus flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds with significant biological properties. This review summarizes recent advances in understanding the ability of citrus flavonoids to modulate lipid metabolism, other metabolic parameters related to the metabolic syndrome, and atherosclerosis. Citrus flavonoids, including naringenin, hesperitin, nobiletin, and tangeretin, have emerged as potential therapeutics for the treatment of metabolic dysregulation. Epidemiological studies reveal an association between the intake of citrus flavonoid-containing foods and a decreased incidence of cardiovascular disease. Studies in cell culture and animal models, as well as a limited number of clinical studies, reveal the lipid-lowering, insulin-sensitizing, antihypertensive, and anti-inflammatory properties of citrus flavonoids. In animal models, supplementation of rodent diets with citrus flavonoids prevents hepatic steatosis, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance primarily through inhibition of hepatic fatty acid synthesis and increased fatty acid oxidation. Citrus flavonoids blunt the inflammatory response in metabolically important tissues including liver, adipose, kidney, and the aorta. The mechanisms underlying flavonoid-induced metabolic regulation have not been completely established, although several potential targets have been identified. In mouse models, citrus flavonoids show marked suppression of atherogenesis through improved metabolic parameters as well as through direct impact on the vessel wall. Recent studies support a role for citrus flavonoids in the treatment of dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis, obesity, and atherosclerosis. Larger human studies examining dose, bioavailability, efficacy, and safety are required to promote the development of these promising therapeutic agents.

  12. Estimation of Fluoride Concentration of Various Citrus and Non-Citrus Fruits Commonly Consumed and Commercially Available in Mathura City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navin Anand Ingle

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Since fluoride is available from various sources, the total ingestion of fluoride by a person should be estimated taking into consideration the fluoride consumed from all the sources including fruits. There are very few epidemiological studies carried out associated with fluoride estimation in fruit samplesand especially in the Indian scenario Objective: To estimate and compare the fluoride concentration of different commercially available citrus and non-citrus fruits in Mathura city. Materials & Method: Fifteen different types of fruits commercially available and consumed by people ofMathura City were collected. Out of the 15 fruit samples 5 were citrus fruits and 10 were non-citrus fruits. The fluoride estimation of fruit samples was done at Central Laboratory,Lucknow. Juices of all 15 fruit samples were prepared, from each sample 10 ml of juice was measured and fluoride testing of each sample was carried out by using Orion 4 star -ion electrode analyzer. The collected data was analyzed using the statistical software program SPSS, version 17. Results: The fluoride concentration in citrus fruits ranged from 0.04ppm (Orange to 0.08 ppm (Tomato while in non-citrus fruits it ranged from 0.04ppm (chikoo to 0.18 ppm (Guava. No significant difference was observed between the mean fluoride concentration of citrus and non citrus fruits. Conclusions: Both citrus and non citrus fruits have fluorides. Guava was found to have the maximumamount of fluoridecontent (0.18 ppm among both the citrus and non citrus fruits.

  13. Performance of lactating dairy cows fed sunflower or corn silages and concentrate based on citrus pulp or ground corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Andrade Leite

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to evaluate the effect of diets containing sunflower or corn silages and concentrate based on citrus pulp or ground corn on intake, apparent digestibility, feeding behavior, microbial protein production, and production, composition, and fatty acid profile of milk from dairy cows. Eight multiparous lactating Holstein cows (586±61 kg live weight; 25.0±4.0 kg daily milk yield at 80 to 120 days in milk were randomly assigned to a double 4 × 4 Latin square design with a 2 × 2 factorial array. The experimental diets were: sunflower silage + citrus pulp-based concentrate; sunflower silage + ground corn-based concentrate; corn silage + citrus pulp-based concentrate; and corn silage + ground corn-based concentrate. The dry matter intake was highest for diets containing sunflower silage and lowest for diets with citrus pulp. Sunflower silage provided the highest intakes of crude protein, neutral detergent fiber, and ether extract. Except for the ether extract, the type of forage and carbohydrate did not influence the apparent nutrient digestibility. The forage and carbohydrate sources did not influence the feed eating time, but animals fed sunflower silage showed decreased rumination time and chewing activity. The microbial protein production was not altered with the diets. No differences were observed for milk production or composition, except for the milk urea nitrogen and lactose concentration. The type of forage influenced the milk fatty acid profile, to which corn silage presented higher values for fatty acids up to a 17-carbon chain length. The inclusion of sunflower silage and citrus pulp, compared with corn silage and ground corn, alters dry matter intake and ingestive behavior, but maintains milk production and composition with satisfactory characteristics of the milk fatty acid profile, providing an alternative feed for dairy cows.

  14. 7 CFR 51.1179 - Method of juice extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Method of juice extraction. 51.1179 Section 51.1179 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... of Common Sweet Oranges (citrus Sinensis (l) Osbeck) § 51.1179 Method of juice extraction. The juice...

  15. Selection of reference genes for expression analyses of red-fleshed sweet orange (Citrus sinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, T T; Nishimura, D S; De Nadai, F B; Figueira, A; Latado, R R

    2015-12-28

    Red-fleshed oranges (Citrus sinensis) contain high levels of carotenoids and lycopene. The growing consumer demand for products with health benefits has increased interest in these types of Citrus cultivars as a potential source of nutraceuticals. However, little is known about the physiology of these cultivars under Brazilian conditions. Transcriptome and gene expression analyses are important tools in the breeding and management of red-fleshed sweet orange cultivars. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction is a method of quantifying gene expression, but various standardizations are required to obtain precise, accurate, and specific results. Among the standardizations required, the choice of suitable stable reference genes is fundamental. The objective of this study was to evaluate the stability of 11 candidate genes using various tissue and organ samples from healthy plants or leaves from citrus greening disease (Huanglongbing)-symptomatic plants of a Brazilian red-fleshed cultivar ('Sanguínea de Mombuca'), in order to select the most suitable reference gene for investigating gene expression under these conditions. geNorm and NormFinder identified genes that encoded translation initiation factor 3, ribosomal protein L35, and translation initiation factor 5A as the most stable genes under the biological conditions tested, and genes coding actin (ACT) and the subunit of the PSI reaction center subunit III were the least stable. Phosphatase, malate dehydrogenase, and ACT were the most stable genes in the leaf samples of infected plants.

  16. Combination of multispectral remote sensing, variable rate technology and environmental modeling for citrus pest management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qian; Chang, Ni-Bin; Yang, Chenghai; Srilakshmi, Kanth R

    2008-01-01

    The Lower Rio Grande Valley (LRGV) of south Texas is an agriculturally rich area supporting intensive production of vegetables, fruits, grain sorghum, and cotton. Modern agricultural practices involve the combined use of irrigation with the application of large amounts of agrochemicals to maximize crop yields. Intensive agricultural activities in past decades might have caused potential contamination of soil, surface water, and groundwater due to leaching of pesticides in the vadose zone. In an effort to promote precision farming in citrus production, this paper aims at developing an airborne multispectral technique for identifying tree health problems in a citrus grove that can be combined with variable rate technology (VRT) for required pesticide application and environmental modeling for assessment of pollution prevention. An unsupervised linear unmixing method was applied to classify the image for the grove and quantify the symptom severity for appropriate infection control. The PRZM-3 model was used to estimate environmental impacts that contribute to nonpoint source pollution with and without the use of multispectral remote sensing and VRT. Research findings using site-specific environmental assessment clearly indicate that combination of remote sensing and VRT may result in benefit to the environment by reducing the nonpoint source pollution by 92.15%. Overall, this study demonstrates the potential of precision farming for citrus production in the nexus of industrial ecology and agricultural sustainability.

  17. Citrus pectin: characterization and inhibitory effect on fibroblast growth factor-receptor interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Ahmad, H; Luo, Y; Gardiner, D T; Gunasekera, R S; McKeehan, W L; Patil, B S

    2001-06-01

    This study was undertaken to characterize the pectin from four citrus species and to determine their in vitro inhibitory activities on the binding of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) to the FGF receptor (FGFR). Pectin from various parts of lemon, grapefruit, tangerine, and orange were isolated and characterized. Tangerine had the highest pectin content among the four citrus species. Segment membrane contained as much as or more pectin than flavedo/albedo. Anhydrogalacturonic content was highest in pectin from segment membrane of tangerine and flavedo/albedo of grapefruit. Lemon pectin contained the highest methoxyl content (MC), and grapefruit contained the largest proportion of lower molecular weight (lemon was the most potent inhibitor. The inhibition activity was significantly correlated with sugar content, MC, and size of pectin. Kinetic studies revealed a competitive nature of pectin inhibition with the heparin, a crucial component of the FGF signal transduction process. The observation that the heparin-dependent biological activity of FGF signal transduction is antagonized by citrus pectin should be further investigated for the use of these pectins as anti-growth factor agents for potential health benefits.

  18. Tyramine Pathways in Citrus Plant Defense: Glycoconjugates of Tyramine and Its N-Methylated Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servillo, Luigi; Castaldo, Domenico; Giovane, Alfonso; Casale, Rosario; D'Onofrio, Nunzia; Cautela, Domenico; Balestrieri, Maria Luisa

    2017-02-01

    Glucosylated forms of tyramine and some of its N-methylated derivatives are here reported for the first time to occur in Citrus genus plants. The compounds tyramine-O-β-d-glucoside, N-methyltyramine-O-β-d-glucoside, and N,N-dimethyltyramine-O-β-d-glucoside were detected in juice and leaves of sweet orange, bitter orange, bergamot, citron, lemon, mandarin, and pomelo. The compounds were identified by mass spectrometric analysis, enzymatic synthesis, and comparison with extracts of Stapelia hirsuta L., a plant belonging to the Apocynaceae family in which N,N-dimethyltyramine-O-β-d-glucoside was identified by others. Interestingly, in Stapelia hirsuta we discovered also tyramine-O-β-d-glucoside, N-methyltyramine-O-β-d-glucoside, and the tyramine metabolite, N,N,N-trimethyltyramine-O-β-glucoside. However, the latter tyramine metabolite, never described before, was not detected in any of the Citrus plants included in this study. The presence of N-methylated tyramine derivatives and their glucosylated forms in Citrus plants, together with octopamine and synephrine, also deriving from tyramine, supports the hypothesis of specific biosynthetic pathways of adrenergic compounds aimed to defend against biotic stress.

  19. Complete genome sequence of citrus huanglongbing bacterium, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' obtained through metagenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yongping; Zhou, Lijuan; Hall, David G; Li, Wenbin; Doddapaneni, Harshavardhan; Lin, Hong; Liu, Li; Vahling, Cheryl M; Gabriel, Dean W; Williams, Kelly P; Dickerman, Allan; Sun, Yijun; Gottwald, Tim

    2009-08-01

    Citrus huanglongbing is the most destructive disease of citrus worldwide. It is spread by citrus psyllids and is associated with a low-titer, phloem-limited infection by any of three uncultured species of alpha-Proteobacteria, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', 'Ca. L. americanus', and 'Ca. L. africanus'. A complete circular 'Ca. L. asiaticus' genome has been obtained by metagenomics, using the DNA extracted from a single 'Ca. L. asiaticus'-infected psyllid. The 1.23-Mb genome has an average 36.5% GC content. Annotation revealed a high percentage of genes involved in both cell motility (4.5%) and active transport in general (8.0%), which may contribute to its virulence. 'Ca. L. asiaticus' appears to have a limited ability for aerobic respiration and is likely auxotrophic for at least five amino acids. Consistent with its intracellular nature, 'Ca. L. asiaticus' lacks type III and type IV secretion systems as well as typical free-living or plant-colonizing extracellular degradative enzymes. 'Ca. L. asiaticus' appears to have all type I secretion system genes needed for both multidrug efflux and toxin effector secretion. Multi-protein phylogenetic analysis confirmed 'Ca. L. asiaticus' as an early-branching and highly divergent member of the family Rhizobiaceae. This is the first genome sequence of an uncultured alpha-proteobacteria that is both an intracellular plant pathogen and insect symbiont.

  20. The safety of Citrus aurantium (bitter orange) and its primary protoalkaloid p-synephrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohs, Sidney J; Preuss, Harry G; Shara, Mohd

    2011-10-01

    Citrus aurantium (bitter orange) extract and its principal protoalkaloidal constituent p-synephrine are widely used in weight loss and weight management as well as in sports performance products. However, questions are raised frequently regarding the safety of these ingredients. The potential inherent dangers associated with the use of products containing C. aurantium extract are frequently touted, while conversely, millions of doses of dietary supplements have been consumed by possibly millions of individuals in recent years. Furthermore, millions of people consume on a daily basis various juices and food products from Citrus species that contain p-synephrine. This review summarizes current information regarding the safety of C. aurantium (bitter orange) extract and p-synephrine based on human, animal and in vitro assessments as well as receptor binding and mechanistic studies. The data indicate that based on current knowledge, the use of bitter orange extract and p-synephrine appears to be exceedingly safe with no serious adverse effects being directly attributable to these ingredients. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Determination of Volatile Flavour Profiles of Citrus spp. Fruits by SDE-GC-MS and Enantiomeric Composition of Chiral Compounds by MDGC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Joon Ho; Khan, Naeem; Jamila, Nargis; Hong, Young Shin; Nho, Eun Yeong; Choi, Ji Yeon; Lee, Cheong Mi; Kim, Kyong Su

    2017-09-01

    Citrus fruits are known to have characteristic enantiomeric key compounds biosynthesised by highly stereoselective enzymatic mechanisms. In the past, evaluation of the enantiomeric ratios of chiral compounds in fruits has been applied as an effective indicator of adulteration by the addition of synthetic compounds or natural components of different botanical origin. To analyse the volatile flavour compounds of Citrus junos Sieb. ex Tanaka (yuzu), Citrus limon BURM. f. (lemon) and Citrus aurantifolia Christm. Swingle (lime), and determine the enantiomeric ratios of their chiral compounds for discrimination and authentication of extracted oils. Volatile flavour compounds of the fruits of the three Citrus species were extracted by simultaneous distillation extraction and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The enantiomeric composition (ee%) of chiral camphene, sabinene, limonene and β-phellandrene was analysed by heart-cutting multidimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Sixty-seven (C. junos), 77 (C. limon) and 110 (C. aurantifolia) volatile compounds were identified with limonene, γ-terpinene and linalool as the major compounds. Stereochemical analysis (ee%) revealed 1S,4R-(-) camphene (94.74, 98.67, 98.82), R-(+)-limonene (90.53, 92.97, 99.85) and S-(+)-β-phellandrene (98.69, 97.15, 92.13) in oil samples from all three species; R-(+)-sabinene (88.08) in C. junos; and S-(-)-sabinene (81.99, 79.74) in C. limon and C. aurantifolia, respectively. The enantiomeric composition and excess ratios of the chiral compounds could be used as reliable indicators of genuineness and quality assurance of the oils derived from the Citrus fruit species. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. PEMANFAATAN KULIT BUAH JERUK NIPIS (Citrus aurantifolia SEBAGAI LARVASIDA Aedes aegypti INSTAR III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    evy Ratnasari Ekawati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available DHF (Dengue disease is transmitted through mosquito vectorAedes aegypti.One way to do control the Dengue vector is to use insecticide made from natural materials and is environmentally friendly with lemon peel extract (Citrusaurantifolia. This study aims to determine the effectiveness of extracts of lemon peel (Citrus aurantifolia in killing the third instar larvae Aedesaegypti with various concentrations and time variations. This were an experimental laboratory researchs using various concentrations of extract limes peel (Citrusaurantifolia 1%, 2%, 3%, 4%, 5%, 6%, and 7% in which there 25 larvae Aedes aegypti and using a variation of 30, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240, 300, and 1440 minutes after contact with the extracts limes peel (Citrusaurantifolia. Effective concentration to kill larvae of Aedes aegypti by 50% (IC50 was the concentration of 3.419%.

  3. Anticancer Activity of Key Lime, Citrus aurantifolia

    OpenAIRE

    Nithithep Narang; Wannee Jiraungkoorskul

    2016-01-01

    Citrus aurantifolia (family: Rutaceae) is mainly used in daily consumption, in many cultural cuisines, and in juice production. It is widely used because of its antibacterial, anticancer, antidiabetic, antifungal, anti-hypertensive, anti-inflammation, anti-lipidemia, and antioxidant properties; moreover, it can protect heart, liver, bone, and prevent urinary diseases. Its secondary metabolites are alkaloids, carotenoids, coumarins, essential oils, flavonoids, phenolic acids, and triterpenoids...

  4. Effectiveness of Citrus Fruits on Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Mandalari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric carcinoma. Due to the increased side effects of the treatment regimens and the development of antimicrobial resistance, a number of natural compounds have been tested as potential alternatives. In this review, we will examine the current knowledge on the effect of Citrus fruits and their derivatives against H. pylori, highlighting the remaining outstanding questions on the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  5. Screening of Transgenic Citrus for HLB Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Dutt, M.; Omar, A.; Barthe, G. A.; Orbovic, V.; Irey, M.; Grosser, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    Transgenic citrus scion (mostly grapefruit and sweet orange) and rootstock cultivars (Carrizo and experimental complex tetraploids) were transformed with gene(s) encoding antimicrobial peptides or systemic acquired resistance (SAR) proteins. Each transgene was under control of an enhanced CaMV 35S promoter. Several genes were also under control of a phloem specific Arabidopsis SUC2 (AtSUC2) promoter.  A number of clones of each transgenic line (at least 3 replicate plants per clone) were eval...

  6. Core benefits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keith, Brian W

    2010-01-01

    This SPEC Kit explores the core employment benefits of retirement, and life, health, and other insurance -benefits that are typically decided by the parent institution and often have significant governmental regulation...

  7. Integrating ecosystem services into risk management decisions: case study with Spanish citrus and the insecticide chlorpyrifos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deacon, Samantha; Norman, Steve; Nicolette, Joseph; Reub, Gregory; Greene, Gretchen; Osborn, Rachel; Andrews, Paul

    2015-02-01

    The European regulatory system for the approval of pesticides includes a thorough evaluation of risks to the environment and is designed to be protective of ecosystems. However, a decision to ban an agrochemical could also potentially have a negative impact on the value of ecosystem services, if resulting changes in crop management are damaging to ecosystems or result in negative socio-economic impacts. To support regulatory decision-making, consideration of ecosystem services to identify best environmental management options could be a way forward. There is generally a growing trend for the consideration of ecosystem services in decision making. Ecosystems provide the conditions for growing food, regulate water and provide wildlife habitats; these, amongst others, are known as ecosystem services. The objectives of this case study were to bring a holistic approach to decision making by valuing the environmental, social and economic benefits derived from the use of chlorpyrifos in Valencian citrus production. Spanish growers harvest between 5 and 6 milliont of citrus annually, worth an estimated €5 to 7 billion in food markets throughout Europe. The approach highlighted the potential for unintended negative consequences of regulatory decisions if the full context is not considered. In this study, rather than a regulatory restriction, the best option was the continued use of chlorpyrifos together with vegetated conservation patches as refuges for non-target insects. The conservation patches offset potential insecticidal impacts to insects whilst maintaining citrus production, farm income and the amenity value of the citrus landscape of Valencia. This was an initial proof-of-concept study and illustrates the importance of a wider perspective; other cases may have different outcomes depending on policies, the pesticide, crop scenarios, farm economics and the region. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Citrus aurantium blossom and preoperative anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Mahmood; Shabanian, Gholamreza; Rafieian-Kopaei, Mahmoud; Parvin, Neda; Saadat, Mitra; Akhlaghi, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    Reducing anxiety is very important before operation. Preoperative visit and use of premedication are popular methods to achieve this goal, but the role of anxiolytic premedication remains unclear and postoperative side-effects may result from routine premedication. Citrus aurantium is used as an alternative medicine in some countries to treat anxiety, and recently the anxiolytic role of this medicinal plant was established in an animal model study. The aim of this study was to assess the anxiolytic effect of Citrus aurantium blossomon preoperative anxiety. We studied 60 ASA I patients undergoing minor operation. In a randomized double-blind design, two groups of 30 patients received one of the following oral premedication two hours before induction of anesthesia: 1) Citrus aurantium blossom distillate 1mL.kg(-1) (C-group); 2) Saline solution 1mL.kg(-1) as placebo (P-group). Anxiety was measured before and after premedication using the Spielberger state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI-state) and the Amsterdam preoperative anxiety and information scale (APAIS) before operation. After premedication, both the STAI-state and the APAIS scales were decreased in C-group (ppreoperative anxiety before minor operation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Economic consequences of improved temperature forecasts: An experiment with the Florida citrus growers (control group results). [weather forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    A demonstration experiment is being planned to show that frost and freeze prediction improvements are possible utilizing timely Synchronous Meteorological Satellite temperature measurements and that this information can affect Florida citrus grower operations and decisions. An economic experiment was carried out which will monitor citrus growers' decisions, actions, costs and losses, and meteorological forecasts and actual weather events and will establish the economic benefits of improved temperature forecasts. A summary is given of the economic experiment, the results obtained to date, and the work which still remains to be done. Specifically, the experiment design is described in detail as are the developed data collection methodology and procedures, sampling plan, data reduction techniques, cost and loss models, establishment of frost severity measures, data obtained from citrus growers, National Weather Service, and Federal Crop Insurance Corp., resulting protection costs and crop losses for the control group sample, extrapolation of results of control group to the Florida citrus industry and the method for normalization of these results to a normal or average frost season so that results may be compared with anticipated similar results from test group measurements.

  10. Non-enzymatic browning in citrus juice: chemical markers, their detection and ways to improve product quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharate, Sonali S; Bharate, Sandip B

    2014-10-01

    Citrus juices are widely consumed due to their nutritional benefits and variety of pharmacological properties. Non-enzymatic browning (NEB) is one of the most important chemical reactions responsible for quality and color changes during the heating or prolonged storage of citrus products. The present review covers various aspects of NEB in citrus juice viz. chemistry of NEB, identifiable markers of NEB, analytical methods to identify NEB markers and ways to improve the quality of citrus juice. 2,5-Dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone (DMHF) is one of the promising marker formed during browning process with number of analytical methods reported for its analysis; therefore it can be used as an indicator for NEB process. Amongst analytical methods reported, RP-HPLC is more sensitive and accurate method, which can be used as analytical tool. NEB can be prevented by removal of amino acids/ proteins (via ion exchange treatment) or by targeting NEB reactions (e.g. blockage of furfural/ HMF by sulphiting agent).

  11. Enhanced Materials from Nature: Nanocellulose from Citrus Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Mariño

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanocellulose is a relatively inexpensive, highly versatile bio-based renewable material with advantageous properties, including biodegradability and nontoxicity. Numerous potential applications of nanocellulose, such as its use for the preparation of high-performance composites, have attracted much attention from industry. Owing to the low energy consumption and the addition of significant value, nanocellulose extraction from agricultural waste is one of the best alternatives for waste treatment. Different techniques for the isolation and purification of nanocellulose have been reported, and combining these techniques influences the morphology of the resultant fibers. Herein, some of the extraction routes for obtaining nanocellulose from citrus waste are addressed. The morphology of nanocellulose was determined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM, while cellulose crystallinity indexes (CI from lyophilized samples were determined using solid-state Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD measurements. The resultant nanofibers had 55% crystallinity, an average diameter of 10 nm and a length of 458 nm.

  12. [Endophytic bacterial community in the symptoms and symptomless tissues of HLB-affected citrus plant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang; Yin, Youping; Sun, Liqin; Wu, Xiaofang; Wang, Zhongkang

    2014-08-04

    To analyze the endophytic bacteria in symptoms and symptomless tissues, reveal dominant bacterial population which may interact with Ca. Las. The population structure and diversity of endophytic bacteria in symptoms and symptomless tissues of single HLB-affected citrus plant were studied based on 16S rDNA sequences analyzed by PCR-DGGE (PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis). Quantitative analysis of Ca. Las, dominant bacteria and total amount of bacterial population in symptoms and symptomless tissues of branches, leaves and fruits was done by quantitative PCR. The amount of Ca. Las is significantly different in symptoms and symptomless tissues; bacterial population in symptoms citrus tissues was significantly higher than in symptomless tissues. PCR-DGGE analysis result shows that endophytic bacterial structures are basically the same in symptoms and symptomless tissues. Extraction, cloning and sequencing of 17 obvious bands in DGGE electrophoretogram reveal that 8 of 17 bands belonged to the genus Serratia, which accounted for 47.06%. Sequence alignment shows that they belonged to different strains of Serratia marcescens with the 99.63% similarity. Quantitative analysis of the total bacteria and Serratia marcescens shows that there is no significant difference in total bacterial count between symptoms and symptomless tissues whereas the amount of Serratia marcescens was negatively correlated with the amount of Las. The Ca. Las is heterogeneously distributed among various tissues of HLB-affected citrus plant. The amount of Ca. Las was negatively correlated with Serratia marcescens and total amount of endophytic bacteria have no relevance with symptom of HLB disease. How the interaction of Serratia marcescens and Ca. Las in tissue of citrus needs further study.

  13. Potential of biohydrogen production from effluents of citrus processing industry using anaerobic bacteria from sewage sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torquato, Lilian D M; Pachiega, Renan; Crespi, Marisa S; Nespeca, Maurílio Gustavo; de Oliveira, José Eduardo; Maintinguer, Sandra I

    2017-01-01

    Citrus crops are among the most abundant crops in the world, which processing is mainly based on juice extraction, generating large amounts of effluents with properties that turn them into potential pollution sources if they are improperly discarded. This study evaluated the potential for bioconversion of effluents from citrus-processing industry (wastewater and vinasse) into hydrogen through the dark fermentation process, by applying anaerobic sewage sludge as inoculum. The inoculum was previously heat treated to eliminate H2-consumers microorganisms and improve its activity. Anaerobic batch reactors were operated in triplicate with increasing proportions (50, 80 and 100%) of each effluent as substrate at 37°C, pH 5.5. Citrus effluents had different effects on inoculum growth and H2 yields, demonstrated by profiles of acetic acid, butyric acid, propionic acid and ethanol, the main by-products generated. It was verified that there was an increase in the production of biogas with the additions of either wastewater (7.3, 33.4 and 85.3mmolL-1) or vinasse (8.8, 12.7 and 13.4mmolL-1) in substrate. These effluents demonstrated remarkable energetic reuse perspectives: 24.0MJm-3 and 4.0MJm-3, respectively. Besides promoting the integrated management and mitigation of anaerobic sludge and effluents from citrus industry, the biohydrogen production may be an alternative for the local energy supply, reducing the operational costs in their own facilities, while enabling a better utilization of the biological potential contained in sewage sludges. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Citrus pulp as a dietary source of antioxidants for lactating holstein cows fed highly polyunsaturated Fatty Acid diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, G T; Lima, L S; Schogor, A L B; Romero, J V; De Marchi, F E; Grande, P A; Santos, N W; Santos, F S; Kazama, R

    2014-08-01

    The effects of feeding pelleted citrus pulp (PCP) as a natural antioxidant source on the performance and milk quality of dairy cows fed highly polyunsaturated fatty acid (FA) diets were evaluated. Four lactating Holstein cows were assigned to a 4×4 Latin-square. Treatments, on a dry matter (DM) basis, were i) control diet; ii) 3% soybean oil; iii) 3% soybean oil and 9% PCP and; iv) 3% soybean oil and 18% PCP. When cows fed on citrus pulp, the DM intake tended to decrease. The total tract apparent digestibility of DM and ether extract decreased when cows fed on the control diet compared to other diets. Cows fed PCP had higher polyphenols and flavonoids content and higher total ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) in milk compared to those fed no pelleted citrus pulp. Cows fed 18% PCP showed higher monounsaturated FA and lower saturated FA in milk fat compared with cows fed the other diets. The lowest n-6 FA proportion was in milk fat from cows fed control. The present study suggests that pelleted citrus pulp added to 9% to 18% DM increases total polyphenols and flavonoids concentration, and the FRAP in milk.

  15. Chlorophyll catabolism in senescing plant tissues: In vivo breakdown intermediates suggest different degradative pathways for Citrus fruit and parsley leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir-Shapira, Dekel; Goldschmidt, Eliezer E.; Altman, Arie

    1987-01-01

    High-pressure liquid chromatography was used to separate chlorophyll derivatives in acetone extracts from senescing Citrus fruit peel, autumnal Melia azedarach L. leaves, and dark-held detached parsley (Petroselinum sativum L.) leaves. Chlorophyllide a and another polar, dephytylated derivative accumulated in large amounts in senescing Citrus peel, particularly in fruit treated with ethylene. Ethylene also induced a 4-fold increase in the specific activity of Citrus chlorophyllase (chlorophyll chlorophyllidohydrolase, EC 3.1.1.14). Detailed kinetics based on a hexane/acetone solvent partition system showed that the in vivo increase in dephytylated derivatives coincided with the decrease in total chlorophyll. Polar, dephytylated derivatives accumulated also in senescing Melia leaves. Senescing parsley leaves revealed a very different picture. The gradual disappearance of chlorophyll a was accompanied by an increase in pheophytin a and by the transient appearance of several phytylated derivatives. Only pheophytin a and an adjacent peak were left when all the chlorophyll a had disappeared. The pathways for breakdown of chlorophyll in the Citrus and parsley senescence systems are discussed. PMID:16593821

  16. The antimicrobial effects of Citrus limonum and Citrus aurantium essential oils on multi-species biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Sarah Almeida Coelho; Zambrana, Jéssica Rabelo Mina; Di Iorio, Fernanda Bispo Reis; Pereira,Cristiane Aparecida; Jorge,Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Citrus limonum and Citrus aurantium essential oils (EOs) compared to 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX) and 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) on multi-species biofilms formed by Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli. The biofilms were grown in acrylic disks immersed in broth, inoculated with microbial suspension (106 cells/mL) and incubated at 37°C / 48 h. After the biofilms were formed, they were exposed for 5 minutes to the solu...

  17. Phenolic compounds from Citrus leaves: antioxidant activity and enzymatic browning inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khettal, Bachra; Kadri, Nabil; Tighilet, Karim; Adjebli, Ahmed; Dahmoune, Farid; Maiza-Benabdeslam, Fadila

    2017-03-01

    Background Phenolic compounds from Citrus are known to be a topic of many studies due to their biological properties including antioxidant activity. Methods Methanolic and aqueous extracts were isolated from Citrus leaves of different species (C. clementina, C. limon, C. hamlin, C. navel, C. aurantifolia, C. aurantium and C. grandis) harvested in Algeria. Results The results showed that aqueous extracts of all species are rich in total phenolic compounds and flavonoids (from 68.23 to 125.28 mg GAE/g DM) and (from 11.99 to 46.25 mg QE/g DM) respectively. The methanolic and aqueous extracts were examined for in vitro antioxidant properties using various antioxidant assays. For aqueous extracts, C. limon showed an important DPPH radical scavenging activity (IC50 35.35 µg/mL), and C. clementina exerted the highest ABTS radical scavenging activity (1,174.43 µM ET/g DM) and a significant ferric reducing potential (30.60 mg BHAE/g DM). For methanolic extracts, C. clementina showed the highest antioxidant activity for all the realized assays (IC50 41.85 µg/mL, 378.63 µM ET/g DM and 13.85 mg BHAE/g DM) for DPPH, ABTS radicals scavenging activities and ferric reducing potential respectively. Antiperoxidase and antipolyphenol oxidase activities of these samples were also evaluated. Conclusions In this investigation, the assessment of antiperoxidase activity proved that the leaves extracts of different species were able to inhibit peroxidase activity. However, this inhibition varied with the species and the source of these enzymes. On the other hand, the aqueous extracts of different species showed moderate inhibition of polyphenol oxidase, while no effect on these enzymes was obtained with methanolic extracts.

  18. Characterization of Bioactive Compounds in Tunisian Bitter Orange (Citrus aurantium L.) Peel and Juice and Determination of Their Antioxidant Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Jabri karoui, Iness; Marzouk, Brahim

    2013-01-01

    Citrus aurantium peel and juice aroma compounds were investigated by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), whereas phenolic compounds analysis was performed by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Limonene was the major volatile compound of bitter orange peel (90.25%) and juice (91.61%). HPLC analysis of bitter orange peel and juice methanolic extracts indicated that phenolic acids constitute their main phenolic class representin...

  19. Pengaruh Variasi Konsentrasi Pektin Kulit Buah Jeruk Bali (Citrus Maxima Merr.) Sebagai Suspending Agent Terhadap Sifat Fisik Suspensi Magnesium Hidroksida

    OpenAIRE

    windriyati, yulias ninik; kurnaningsih, ika; mufrod, mufrod

    2008-01-01

    Suspention is the most effective liquid dosage form for magnesium hydroxide because the compound relatively insoluble in water. Pectin as suspending agent has been used to inhibit sedimentation of suspension. The aim of this research is to know physical and chemical characteristic of pectin from Bali Citrus Peels and the influence of difference concentration of pectin and storage duration to physical characteristic of magnesium hydroxide suspensions. Pectin powder was extracted from Bali Citr...

  20. Citrus tristeza virus-host interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, W. O.; Garnsey, S. M.; Tatineni, S.; Folimonova, S. Y.; Harper, S. J.; Gowda, S.

    2013-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a phloem-limited virus whose natural host range is restricted to citrus and related species. Although the virus has killed millions of trees, almost destroying whole industries, and continually limits production in many citrus growing areas, most isolates are mild or symptomless in most of their host range. There is little understanding of how the virus causes severe disease in some citrus and none in others. Movement and distribution of CTV differs considerably from that of well-studied viruses of herbaceous plants where movement occurs largely through adjacent cells. In contrast, CTV systemically infects plants mainly by long-distance movement with only limited cell-to-cell movement. The virus is transported through sieve elements and occasionally enters an adjacent companion or phloem parenchyma cell where virus replication occurs. In some plants this is followed by cell-to-cell movement into only a small cluster of adjacent cells, while in others there is no cell-to-cell movement. Different proportions of cells adjacent to sieve elements become infected in different plant species. This appears to be related to how well viral gene products interact with specific hosts. CTV has three genes (p33, p18, and p13) that are not necessary for infection of most of its hosts, but are needed in different combinations for infection of certain citrus species. These genes apparently were acquired by the virus to extend its host range. Some specific viral gene products have been implicated in symptom induction. Remarkably, the deletion of these genes from the virus genome can induce large increases in stem pitting (SP) symptoms. The p23 gene, which is a suppressor of RNA silencing and a regulator of viral RNA synthesis, has been shown to be the cause of seedling yellows (SY) symptoms in sour orange. Most isolates of CTV in nature are populations of different strains of CTV. The next frontier of CTV biology is the understanding how the virus

  1. Citrus tristeza virus-host interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, W O; Garnsey, S M; Tatineni, S; Folimonova, S Y; Harper, S J; Gowda, S

    2013-01-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is a phloem-limited virus whose natural host range is restricted to citrus and related species. Although the virus has killed millions of trees, almost destroying whole industries, and continually limits production in many citrus growing areas, most isolates are mild or symptomless in most of their host range. There is little understanding of how the virus causes severe disease in some citrus and none in others. Movement and distribution of CTV differs considerably from that of well-studied viruses of herbaceous plants where movement occurs largely through adjacent cells. In contrast, CTV systemically infects plants mainly by long-distance movement with only limited cell-to-cell movement. The virus is transported through sieve elements and occasionally enters an adjacent companion or phloem parenchyma cell where virus replication occurs. In some plants this is followed by cell-to-cell movement into only a small cluster of adjacent cells, while in others there is no cell-to-cell movement. Different proportions of cells adjacent to sieve elements become infected in different plant species. This appears to be related to how well viral gene products interact with specific hosts. CTV has three genes (p33, p18, and p13) that are not necessary for infection of most of its hosts, but are needed in different combinations for infection of certain citrus species. These genes apparently were acquired by the virus to extend its host range. Some specific viral gene products have been implicated in symptom induction. Remarkably, the deletion of these genes from the virus genome can induce large increases in stem pitting (SP) symptoms. The p23 gene, which is a suppressor of RNA silencing and a regulator of viral RNA synthesis, has been shown to be the cause of seedling yellows (SY) symptoms in sour orange. Most isolates of CTV in nature are populations of different strains of CTV. The next frontier of CTV biology is the understanding how the virus

  2. 7 CFR 93.5 - Fees for citrus product analyses set by cooperative agreement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fees for citrus product analyses set by cooperative... (CONTINUED) COMMODITY LABORATORY TESTING PROGRAMS PROCESSED FRUITS AND VEGETABLES Citrus Juices and Certain Citrus Products § 93.5 Fees for citrus product analyses set by cooperative agreement. The fees for the...

  3. 7 CFR 905.114 - Redistricting of citrus districts and reapportionment of grower members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Redistricting of citrus districts and reapportionment... Regulations § 905.114 Redistricting of citrus districts and reapportionment of grower members. Pursuant to § 905.14, the citrus districts and membership allotted each district shall be as follows: (a) Citrus...

  4. Continuous process for enhanced release and recovery of pectic hydrocolloids and phenolics from citrus biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    During the 2012/2013 harvesting season the Florida citrus processing industry produced 0.55 × 106 metric tons (MT) of dried citrus pellets from citrus processing waste (CPW). The citrus pellets were marketed as a low value animal feed which may sell for $0.22 per kg or less. This biomass also contai...

  5. 7 CFR 457.107 - Florida citrus fruit crop insurance provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... scion Valencia orange. Potential production. The amount, converted to boxes, of citrus fruit that would... of the following: (1) Citrus I—Early and mid-season oranges; (2) Citrus II—Late oranges juice; (3... and Tangerines; (5) Citrus V—Murcott Honey Oranges (also known as Honey Tangerines) and Temple Oranges...

  6. Comparative analysis of juice volatiles in selected mandarins, mandarin relatives and other citrus genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yuan; Bai, Jinhe; Chen, Chunxian; Plotto, Anne; Baldwin, Elizabeth A; Gmitter, Frederick G

    2018-02-01

    Citrus fruit flavor is an important attribute prioritized in variety improvement. The present study compared juice volatiles compositions from 13 selected citrus genotypes, including six mandarins (Citrus reticulata), three sour oranges (Citrus aurantium), one blood orange (Citrus sinensis), one lime (Citrus limonia), one Clementine (Citrus clementina) and one satsuma (Citrus unshiu). Large differences were observed with respect to volatile compositions among the citrus genotypes. 'Goutou' sour orange contained the greatest number of volatile compounds and the largest volatile production level. 'Ponkan' mandarin had the smallest number of volatiles and 'Owari' satsuma yielded the lowest volatile production level. 'Goutou' sour orange and 'Moro' blood orange were clearly distinguished from other citrus genotypes based on the analysis of volatile compositions, even though they were assigned into one single group with two other sour oranges by the molecular marker profiles. The clustering analysis based on the aroma volatile compositions was able to differentiate mandarin varieties and natural sub-groups, and was also supported by the molecular marker study. The gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of citrus juice aroma volatiles can be used as a tool to distinguish citrus genotypes and assist in the assessment of future citrus breeding programs. The aroma volatile profiles of the different citrus genotypes and inter-relationships detected among volatile compounds and among citrus genotypes will provide fundamental information on the development of marker-assisted selection in citrus breeding. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Evaluation of citrus, butternut and sprouting potato as mass rearing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of citrus, butternut and sprouting potato as mass rearing substrates for the oleander mealybug, Paracoccus burnerae (Brain) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) ... The mean number of eggs per female was higher on sprouting potatoes (121.3) than on citrus (68), but declined with an increase in temperature from 22 to ...

  8. Relative population levels of citrus thrips Scirtothrips aurantii on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1989-03-15

    Mar 15, 1989 ... ways, Tate & Murdoch (1987) showed that densities of this pest were consistently lower in natural vegetation than on citrus in both the eastern Cape Province and eastern Transvaal. Immigration of citrus thrips into orchards was therefore considered to be unimportant. The aims of the present study were to ...

  9. Fatty acid metabolism in lambs fed citrus pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, M; Scerra, M; Bognanno, M; Buccioni, A; Cilione, C; Biondi, L; Priolo, A; Luciano, G

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, we have hypothesized that replacing barley with high proportions of dried citrus pulp in a concentrate-based diet for lambs could increase the intake of unsaturated fatty acids and could reduce the rate of the ruminal biohydrogenation of PUFA, with a consequent improvement of the intramuscular fatty acid composition. To test this hypothesis, 26 Comisana lambs were divided into 3 groups and for 56 d were fed a barley-based concentrate diet (CON; 8 lambs) or 2 diets in which barley was replaced with 24% (CIT24; 9 lambs) or 35% (CIT35; 9 lambs) dried citrus pulp. An overall improvement of the fatty acid composition of LM from lambs fed citrus pulp-containing diets was found. The PUFA/SFA ratio was lower (P citrus pulp could have inhibited the ruminal biohydrogenation of PUFA. This is supported by the fact that regardless of the level of inclusion in the diet, citrus pulp increased the proportion of rumenic acid (P citrus pulp in the diets. Furthermore, the SA/(SA + VA) ratio tended to be lower (P = 0.10) in the ruminal fluid from lambs fed the CIT35 diet compared with that of the CON group. In conclusion, our results support the hypothesis that replacing barley with citrus pulp in the diet of growing lambs improves intramuscular fatty acid composition and underline the need for specific studies to clarify the mechanisms by which feeding citrus pulp affects the fatty acid metabolism in ruminants.

  10. New enzymes for hydrolysis and fermentation of citrus waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    The expense involved to dry citrus processing waste into citrus pulp pellets (CPP) for use as a cattle feed continues to increase with rising fuel costs. While there have also been recent increases in the value of CPP, this value fluctuates considerably and does not always cover processing costs. Th...

  11. Ethanol and other products from citrus processing waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greater than 80 percent of citrus produced in Florida is processed for juice production. The bulk of this waste material is dried as citrus pulp and sold as a cattle feed by-product, often at a price lower than the cost of production. While not profitable, this does solve the problem of waste dispos...

  12. An attract-and-kill strategy for Asian citrus psyllid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asian citrus psyllids (ACP) transmit the pathogen responsible for citrus greening disease. Psyllids use color, smell, taste and vibrational cues to identify their host plants and conspecifics. The main goal of this project is to develop an attract-and-kill device strategy that will exploit the psyll...

  13. Characterizing the citrus cultivar Carrizo genome through 454 shotgun sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belknap, William R; Wang, Yi; Huo, Naxin; Wu, Jiajie; Rockhold, David R; Gu, Yong Q; Stover, Ed

    2011-12-01

    The citrus cultivar Carrizo is the single most important rootstock to the US citrus industry and has resistance or tolerance to a number of major citrus diseases, including citrus tristeza virus, foot rot, and Huanglongbing (HLB, citrus greening). A Carrizo genomic sequence database providing approximately 3.5×genome coverage (haploid genome size approximately 367 Mb) was populated through 454 GS FLX shotgun sequencing. Analysis of the repetitive DNA fraction indicated a total interspersed repeat fraction of 36.5%. Assembly and characterization of abundant citrus Ty3/gypsy elements revealed a novel type of element containing open reading frames encoding a viral RNA-silencing suppressor protein (RNA binding protein, rbp) and a plant cytokinin riboside 5′-monophosphate phosphoribohydrolase-related protein (LONELY GUY, log). Similar gypsy elements were identified in the Populus trichocarpa genome. Gene-coding region analysis indicated that 24.4% of the nonrepetitive reads contained genic regions. The depth of genome coverage was sufficient to allow accurate assembly of constituent genes, including a putative phloem-expressed gene. The development of the Carrizo database (http://citrus.pw.usda.gov/) will contribute to characterization of agronomically significant loci and provide a publicly available genomic resource to the citrus research community.

  14. Toxin production by Fusarium solani from declining citrus plants and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The core purpose of this current research was to meticulously survey four tehsils of Sargodha district and to probe the present status of citrus decline in infected citrus orchards. The utmost fungi (39.52%) were secluded from the roots followed by the soil (38.86%). The highest Fusarium sp. followed by Aspergillus, ...

  15. Variation of Citrus cultivars in Egypt assessed by RAPDs, cluster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR-Seham

    2012-11-13

    Nov 13, 2012 ... The four cultivars of sweet common orange and sweet navel orange was linked together in a separate cluster. ... Key words: Abscisic acid, abscission, Citrus, cluster analysis, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) random amplified polymorphic ..... are known to endanger the Citrus industry worldwide. (Hofer, 2007).

  16. Citrus farmers production constraints and attitude to training on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emerging trends and advances in the citrus industry globally necessitates updating farmers knowledge and skill base to cope profitably in the industry. Therefore, this study was designed to assess the disposition of farmers to training on improved techniques of citrus production and also examine production constraints ...

  17. Citrus Production, Constraints and Management Practices in Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    home

    2014-05-16

    May 16, 2014 ... Phytophthora species cause the most serious problem and are economically important soil-borne diseases of citrus (Graham and Timmer, 1994). Previous reports in. Ethiopia indicated high severity of soil-borne diseases caused by Phytophthora species in many citrus orchards. (Seifu, 2003; Sisay, 2007).

  18. Insect pest situation and farmers' cultural practices in citrus orchards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fruit drop caused by fruit piercing insects occurred in 30 to 90 % of sampled trees per farm. Major citrus diseases observed included the citrus tristeza disease, foot rot, brown rot and leaf spot diseases. Farmers' pest/disease management practices were ineffective. Factors that contributed to unsatisfactory control were ...

  19. Developing cryotherapy to eliminate graft-transmissible pathogens in citrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article summarizes research being conducted as part of a project funded by the California Citrus Research Board to develop cryotherapy (freezing buds in liquid nitrogen, and then recovering them) as a viable method for elimination of graft transmissible pathogens from Citrus. There are current...

  20. Utilization of founder lines for improved Citrus biotechnology via RMCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    On October 1st 2011 the CRB chose to fund a unique research project, the development of citrus cultivars specifically for genetic engineering (GE). The objective of this research was to develop GE citrus ‘Founder Lines’ containing DNA sequences that will allow the precise insertion of genes for de...

  1. Water and nitrogen use efficiencies in citrus production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, Wei; Assinck, F.B.T.; Heinen, Marius; Oenema, Oene

    2016-01-01

    Water and nitrogen (N) are two key limiting factors for citrus production. Reported effects of water and N inputs on citrus yield, water use efficiency (WUE) and N use efficiency (NUE) vary greatly, mainly due to differences in cultivars, tree age, climate, soil types, and water and N input

  2. efficacy of rehabilitation methods on citrus canker disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Cultural practices and phytosanitary measures, consisting of removal of inoculum sources, timely application of protective chemical sprays and field sanitation could restore citrus orchards in areas affected by citrus ... chimiques (fongicide du chlorure de cuivre et insecticide pyrinex) était la meilleur option pour la gestion du.

  3. Dissipation and residue of forchlorfenuron in citrus fruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weijun; Jiao, Bining; Su, Xuesu; Zhao, Qiyang; Qin, Dongmei; Wang, Chengqiu

    2013-06-01

    Field trials were carried out in three provinces of China to study the dissipation and residue of forchlorfenuron in citrus fruits. The results had shown that the degradation rate of forchlorfenuron in citrus fruits followed the first-order kinetics equation C = A∙eBt. The half-lives of forchlorfenuron were 15.8-23.0 days, the final residues of forchlorfenuron in pulp were all ≤0.002 mg/kg, and most of the residues were concentrated in the peel. The risk assessment revealed that no significant potential health risk would be induced by forchlorfenuron in citrus fruits. Therefore, it could be safe to apply forchlorfenuron in citrus fruits, and the results of this study could also be regarded as a reference to the setting of maximum residue limit for forchlorfenuron in citrus fruits in China.

  4. Benefits of Ethanolic Extract Paste of Noni (Morinda citrifolia L. Leaves on Oral Mucosa Wound Healing by Examination of Fibroblast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indah Puti Rahmayani Sabirin

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a biological response that occurred following trauma or pathologic condition of the oral mucosa. The wound itself needs proper management so it may heal faster and without complication. One of the indicators of wound healing in oral mucosa is fibroblast cells. In remodelling phase, fibroblast would decrease as they matured into fibrocyte and the collagen fibers has been synthesized. Noni (Morinda citrifolia L. leaf is traditionally used to heal skin wound. The leaves has chemical compounds that may be useful in wound repair process. This experimental research was performed to examine the effect of Indonesian noni  leaves ethanolic extract paste in oral mucosa wound healing by investigating visual wound closure and fibroblast cell count in Wistar rat. Rats were divided into 2 control groups and 4 treatment groups. The paste was formulated in 2.5%, 5%, 10% and 20% concentration, and each of it were applied on oral mucosa wound of treatment group rats. One control groups was given no medication and the other was applied ethanolic extract of noni leaves in 10% gel. The study showed that all paste-treated group has better wound closure (p<0.05 compared to control groups. However, fibroblast cell count did not show any significance among all groups (p=0.143 the cells in paste-treated group in all concentration were lower than control groups.  It may be concluded that topical paste formula of noni leaves ethanolic extract promotes oral mucosa wound healing better than gel formula.

  5. Volatile composition and biological activity of key lime Citrus aurantifolia essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadaro, Federica; Costa, Rosaria; Circosta, Clara; Occhiuto, Francesco

    2012-11-01

    The essential oil of Citrus aurantifolia (Christm) Swingle fruits (limes) was studied for its potential spasmolytic effects in relation to its chemical composition. The essential oil, extracted by hydrodistillation (HD), was analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS. The antispasmodic activity was evaluated on isolated rabbit jejunum, aorta and uterus. The results indicated that the essential oil of C. aurantifolia possesses important spasmolytic properties, which are likely to be due to its major constituents, limonene (58.4%), beta-pinene (15.4%), gamma-terpinene (8.5%), and citral (4.4%).

  6. Radioimmunoassay for the citrus bitter principle, naringin, and related flavonoid-7-O-neohesperidosides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jourdan, P.S.; Weiler, E.W.; Mansell, R.L.

    1982-02-01

    An immunoassay for the citrus bitter principle, naringin, and related flavonoid-7-O-neohesperidosides is reported. The assay detects ca. 2 ng of naringin and can be used to quantify this compound in the parts per billion (ppb) range in crude grapefruit juice and extracts of other plant tissues. The antiserum used is highly reactive with the 2-rhamnosyl-1-glucopyranose at the C-7 position but not with e.g. the isomeric 6-rhamnosyl-1-glucopyranose moiety and can, thus, be used to identify the stereochemistry of this disaccharide moiety at the C-7 position of flavanoids. The assay involves a directly iodinated naringin-(/sup 125/I) as immunotracer.

  7. Transmission of Citrus leprosis virus C by Brevipalpus phoenicis (Geijskes) to Alternative Host Plants Found in Citrus Orchards

    Science.gov (United States)

    The equivalent of US$ 75 million is spent each year in Brazil to control Brevipalpus phoenicis, a mite vector of Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C). In this study we investigated the possibility that hedgerows, windbreaks, and weeds normally found in citrus orchards could host CiLV-C. Mites reared on ...

  8. Antennal response of the Asian citrus psyllid to citrus volatiles and their degradation product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asian citrus psyllid antennae reacted strongly when stimulated with citral and ocimene stimulus tubes that had been aged for 3-5 days. When 20 µl of neat ocimene or citral were aged on filter paper strips in sealed Pasteur pipette stimulus tubes for 6 days on the laboratory bench, voltage changes we...

  9. Homologues of CsLOB1 in citrus function as disease susceptibility genes in citrus canker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junli; Huguet-Tapia, Jose Carlos; Hu, Yang; Jones, Jeffrey; Wang, Nian; Liu, Sanzhen; White, Frank F

    2017-08-01

    The lateral organ boundary domain (LBD) genes encode a group of plant-specific proteins that function as transcription factors in the regulation of plant growth and development. Citrus sinensis lateral organ boundary 1 (CsLOB1) is a member of the LBD family and functions as a disease susceptibility gene in citrus bacterial canker (CBC). Thirty-four LBD members have been identified from the Citrus sinensis genome. We assessed the potential for additional members of LBD genes in citrus to function as surrogates for CsLOB1 in CBC, and compared host gene expression on induction of different LBD genes. Using custom-designed transcription activator-like (TAL) effectors, two members of the same clade as CsLOB1, named CsLOB2 and CsLOB3, were found to be capable of functioning similarly to CsLOB1 in CBC. RNA sequencing and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses revealed a set of cell wall metabolic genes that are associated with CsLOB1, CsLOB2 and CsLOB3 expression and may represent downstream genes involved in CBC. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  10. Citrus leaf blotch virus invades meristematic regions in Nicotiana benthamiana and citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agüero, Jesús; Vives, María Carmen; Velázquez, Karelia; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Juárez, Jose; Navarro, Luis; Moreno, Pedro; Guerri, José

    2013-08-01

    To invade systemically host plants, viruses need to replicate in the infected cells, spread to neighbouring cells through plasmodesmata and move to distal parts of the plant via sieve tubes to start new infection foci. To monitor the infection of Nicotiana benthamiana plants by Citrus leaf blotch virus (CLBV), leaves were agroinoculated with an infectious cDNA clone of the CLBV genomic RNA expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the transcriptional control of a duplicate promoter of the coat protein subgenomic RNA. Fluorescent spots first appeared in agroinfiltrated leaves 11-12 days after infiltration, indicating CLBV replication. Then, after entering the phloem vascular system, CLBV was unloaded in the upper parts of the plant and invaded all tissues, including flower organs and meristems. GFP fluorescence was not visible in citrus plants infected with CLBV-GFP. Therefore, to detect CLBV in meristematic regions, Mexican lime (Citrus aurantifolia) plants were graft inoculated with CLBV, with Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a virus readily eliminated by shoot-tip grafting in vitro, or with both simultaneously. Although CLBV was detected by hybridization and real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 0.2-mm shoot tips in all CLBV-inoculated plants, CTV was not detected. These results explain the difficulty in eliminating CLBV by shoot-tip grafting in vitro. © 2013 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  11. 78 FR 8435 - Importation of Fresh Citrus Fruit From Uruguay, Including Citrus Hybrids and Fortunella

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-06

    ..., and two species of the Citrus- related genus Fortunella (F. japonica Thunb. Swingle and F. margarita... Genus Fortunella (F. japonica (Thunb.) Swingle, F. margarita (Lour.) Swingle), from Uruguay into the..., Fortunella. japonica (Thunb.) Swingle, and F. margarita (Lour.) Swingle, from Uruguay that meet the...

  12. 80 FR 55015 - Importation of Citrus From Peru; Expansion of Citrus-Growing Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-14

    ... Service 7 CFR Part 319 [Docket No. APHIS-2015-0005] RIN 0579-AE09 Importation of Citrus From Peru... entire country of Peru to be imported into the continental United States. Currently, the regulations... Peru, subject to a systems approach. However, based on the findings of a pest list and commodity import...

  13. Morphological, chemical and genetic characterization of Citrus monstruosa, an endemism of Sardinia

    OpenAIRE

    Viglietti, Grazia

    2017-01-01

    The taxonomy and phylogeny of the genus Citrus is rather complicated because of its interspecific sexual reproduction capacities, extended apomictic reproduction and high phenotypic variability. The hybridization might have played an important role in the development of cultivated species of Citrus. In Sardinia the notice of a peculiar citrus named Pompia (Citrus x monstruosa), was observed for the first time in 18th century. This cultivated citrus is limited to a restricted area of the is...

  14. Detection of Citrus leprosis virus C using specific primers and TaqMan probe in one-step real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Nandlal; Wei, G; Govindarajulu, A; Roy, Avijit; Li, Wenbin; Picton, Deric D; Nakhla, M K; Levy, L; Brlansky, R H

    2015-11-01

    Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C), a causal agent of the leprosis disease in citrus, is mostly present in the South and Central America and spreading toward the North America. To enable better diagnosis and inhibit the further spread of this re-emerging virus a quantitative (q) real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay is needed for early detection of CiLV-C when the virus is present in low titer in citrus leprosis samples. Using the genomic sequence of CiLV-C, specific primers and probe were designed and synthesized to amplify a 73 nt amplicon from the movement protein (MP) gene. A standard curve of the 73 nt amplicon MP gene was developed using known 10(10)-10(1) copies of in vitro synthesized RNA transcript to estimate the copy number of RNA transcript in the citrus leprosis samples. The one-step qRT-PCR detection assays for CiLV-C were determined to be 1000 times more sensitive when compared to the one-step conventional reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) CiLV-C detection method. To evaluate the quality of the total RNA extracts, NADH dehydrogenase gene specific primers (nad5) and probe were included in reactions as an internal control. The one-step qRT-PCR specificity was successfully validated by testing for the presence of CiLV-C in the total RNA extracts of the citrus leprosis samples collected from Belize, Costa Rica, Mexico and Panama. Implementation of the one-step qRT-PCR assays for CiLV-C diagnosis should assist regulatory agencies in surveillance activities to monitor the distribution pattern of CiLV-C in countries where it is present and to prevent further dissemination into citrus growing countries where there is no report of CiLV-C presence. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. A genetic system for Citrus Tristeza Virus using the non-natural host Nicotiana benthamiana: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrós, Silvia; Ruiz-Ruiz, Susana; Peña, Leandro; Moreno, Pedro

    2013-01-01

    In nature Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), genus Closterovirus, infects only the phloem cells of species of Citrus and related genera. Finding that the CTV T36 strain replicated in Nicotiana benthamiana (NB) protoplasts and produced normal virions allowed development of the first genetic system based on protoplast transfection with RNA transcribed from a full-genome cDNA clone, a laborious and uncertain system requiring several months for each experiment. We developed a more efficient system based on agroinfiltration of NB leaves with CTV-T36-based binary plasmids, which caused systemic infection in this non-natural host within a few weeks yielding in the upper leaves enough CTV virions to readily infect citrus by slash inoculation. Stem agroinoculation of citrus and NB plants with oncogenic strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens carrying a CTV-T36 binary vector with a GUS marker, induced GUS positive galls in both species. However, while most NB tumors were CTV positive and many plants became systemically infected, no coat protein or viral RNA was detected in citrus tumors, even though CTV cDNA was readily detected by PCR in the same galls. This finding suggests (1) strong silencing or CTV RNA processing in transformed cells impairing infection progress, and (2) the need for using NB as an intermediate host in the genetic system. To maintain CTV-T36 in NB or assay other CTV genotypes in this host, we also tried to graft-transmit the virus from infected to healthy NB, or to mechanically inoculate NB leaves with virion extracts. While these trials were mostly unsuccessful on non-treated NB plants, agroinfiltration with silencing suppressors enabled for the first time infecting NB plants by side-grafting and by mechanical inoculation with virions, indicating that previous failure to infect NB was likely due to virus silencing in early infection steps. Using NB as a CTV host provides new possibilities to study virus-host interactions with a simple and reliable system.

  16. Chemical control of the Asian citrus psyllid and of huanglongbing disease in citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boina, Dhana Raj; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R

    2015-06-01

    By 2014, huanglongbing (HLB), the most destructive disease of citrus, and its insect vector, the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP), Diaphorina citri (Kuwayama), became established in all major citrus-growing regions of the world, including the United States, with the exception of California. At present, application of insecticides is the most widely followed option for reducing ACP populations, while application of antibiotics for suppressing HLB disease/symptoms is being practiced in some citrus-growing regions. Application of insecticides during the dormant winter season, along with cultivation of HLB-free seedlings and early detection and removal of symptomatic and asymptomatic trees, has been very effective in managing ACP. Area-wide management of ACP by application of insecticides at low volume in large areas of citrus cultivation has been shown to be effective in managing HLB and reducing management costs. As insecticide resistance is a major problem in sustainable management of ACP, rotation/alternation of insecticides with different chemistries and modes of action needs to be followed. Besides control of the insect vector, use of antibiotics has temporarily suppressed the symptoms of HLB in diseased trees. Recent efforts to discover and screen existing as well as new compounds for their antibiotic and antimicrobial activities have identified some promising molecules for HLB control. There is an urgent need to find a sustainable solution to the HLB menace through chemical control of ACP populations and within HLB-infected trees through the judicious use of labeled insecticides (existing and novel chemistries) and antibiotics in area-wide management programs with due consideration to the insecticide resistance problem. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. POTENTIAL ENTOMOPATHOGENIC FUNGI TO CONTROL SCALE INSECT PEST ON CITRUS TANGERINE (CITRUS SUHUIENSIS TAN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triwiratno A.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Achiving of food self-sufficiency can be done by using of local potential that is by agribusiness in Indonesia. One potential locally owned citrus agribusiness was the use of entomopathogenic fungi to improve the productivity of citrus. Reports showed decrease in productivity due to infestation of scale insect. The experiment was conducted at the Integrated Laboratory of Indonesian Citrus and Subtropical Fruit Research Institute in October 2013 to October 2014. The study began with a survey for scale insect infestation on citrus crops in high land, medium land and low in dry and rainy seasons. Taken from a collection of entomopathogenic fungi associated with scale insect in the field. Collection of fungi isolated from single conidia and its ability to infect selected scale insect. Entomopathogenic fungi were further tested for the viability and pathogenicity against scale insect. The results showed that the sclae insects attacked citrus were types of L.beckii and A.Aurantii. The highest attack occurred at low land during the dry season by L.beckii with population of 4.2 heads increased to 5.5 individuals per 10 cm in the rainy season. Viability test results showed that the isolates had viability above 50% were SKB4K, SKD1K and SBB3K for 73.6, 61.6 and 53% respectively, which were collected during the dry season. While isolates obtained in the rainy season were SBWD2H and SBWD3BH, each with aviability of 77.3 and 78.3% respectively. Pathogenicity test results showed that there were 6 isolates known to have potential as entomopathogenic fungi for controlling scale insect, namely, SBWB2H, SBWD2H, SBWD3BH, SKD1K, SBWD1K and SBB3K which had pathogenicity over 50% up to 14 days.

  18. Efficacy and uptake of soil-applied imidacloprid in the control of Asian citrus psyllid and a citrus leafminer, two foliar-feeding citrus pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sétamou, M; Rodriguez, D; Saldana, R; Schwarzlose, G; Palrang, D; Nelson, S D

    2010-10-01

    The systemic neonicotinoid insecticide imidacloprid, Admire Pro, was applied to 3- and 4-yr-old nonbearing 'Rio Red' grapefruit, Citrus x paradisi Macfad., trees in 2006 and 2007, respectively, to determine its effects in the control of two major citrus pests, the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae), and a citrus leafminer Phyllocnistis citrella Stainton (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae). Young flush shoots were randomly collected weekly for 13 and 11 wk in 2006 and 2007, respectively, to determine the infestation levels and densities of immature stages of both Asian citrus psyllid and P. citrella. Additional flush shoot samples were collected in 2007 and titers of imidacloprid in leaf tissue were determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Soil application of imidacloprid significantly reduced the infestation levels and densities of both pests on flush shoots, starting from the second week post application. The effects of the neonicotinoid insecticide were similar in both years. Analysis of imidacloprid concentration in leaf tissue showed a gradual increase during the first 3 wk, and titers remained well above 200 ppb for 11 wk postapplication. Significant positive correlations were obtained between imidacloprid titers in leaf tissue and the percentage of control levels achieved for both pests. A high level of suppression of both P. citrella and Asian citrus psyllid populations on citrus trees was associated with imidacloprid titer in leaf tissue >200 ppb, which was reached 2 wk after soil treatment. Although soil application of imidacloprid did not provide rapid knockdown of Asian citrus psyllid and P. citrella populations, it resulted in chronic residues in leaf tissue and long-term suppression of both pests.

  19. Analyses of mitogenome sequences revealed that Asian citrus psyllid (Diaphorina citri) from California was related to those from Florida but different from those in Southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asian citrus psyllid (ACP, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama; Hemiptera: Liviidae) transmits “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” (CLas), an unculturable alpha-proteobacterium associated with citrus Huanglongbing (HLB, yellow shoot disease, also called citrus greening disease). HLB is threatening citrus prod...

  20. In vivo induction of phase II detoxifying enzymes, glutathione transferase and quinone reductase by citrus triterpenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hassan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several cell culture and animal studies demonstrated that citrus bioactive compounds have protective effects against certain types of cancer. Among several classes of citrus bioactive compounds, limonoids were reported to prevent different types of cancer. Furthermore, the structures of citrus limonoids were reported to influence the activity of phase II detoxifying enzymes. The purpose of the study was to evaluate how variations in the structures of citrus limonoids (namely nomilin, deacetyl nomilin, and isoobacunoic acid and a mixture of limonoids would influence phase II enzyme activity in excised tissues from a mouse model. Methods In the current study, defatted sour orange seed powder was extracted with ethyl acetate and subjected to silica gel chromatography. The HPLC, NMR and mass spectra were used to elucidate the purity and structure of compounds. Female A/J mice were treated with three limonoids and a mixture in order to evaluate their effect on phase II enzymes in four different tissues. Assays for glutathione S-transferase and NAD(PH: quinone reductase (QR were used to evaluate induction of phase II enzymatic activity. Results The highest induction of GST against 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB was observed in stomach (whole, 58% by nomilin, followed by 25% isoobacunoic acid and 19% deacetyl nomilin. Deacetyl nomilin in intestine (small as well as liver significantly reduced GST activity against CDNB. Additionally isoobacunoic acid and the limonoid mixture in liver demonstrated a significant reduction of GST activity against CDNB. Nomilin significantly induced GST activity against 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO, intestine (280% and stomach (75% while deacetyl nomilin showed significant induction only in intestine (73%. Induction of GST activity was also observed in intestine (93% and stomach (45% treated with the limonoid mixture. Finally, a significant induction of NAD(PH: quinone reductase (QR activity was

  1. Chemical modification of citrus pectin: Structural, physical and rheologial implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracasso, Aline Francielle; Perussello, Camila Augusto; Carpiné, Danielle; Petkowicz, Carmen Lúcia de Oliveira; Haminiuk, Charles Windson Isidoro

    2018-04-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the physical, structural and rheological modifications caused by the chemical modification process of citrus pectin. Therefore, three commercial citrus pectins with different degree of esterification were chemically modified by sequential alkali and acidic hydrolytic process to produce modified citrus pectins (MCP) with special properties. The molar mass (M w ), degree of esterification (DE), monosaccharide composition, 13 C NMR spectra, homogeneity, morphology (SEM) and rheological behavior of both native and modified citrus pectins (MCP) were investigated. The chemical modification reduced the acid uronic content (up to 28.3%) and molar mass (up to 29.98%), however, showed little influence on the degree of esterification of native pectins. Modified citrus pectins presented higher amounts of neutral monosaccharides, mainly galactose, arabinose and rhamnose, typical of the Ramnogalacturonana-I (RG-I) region. Rheological tests indicated that the native and modified citrus pectins presented pseudoplastic behavior, however, the MCP samples were less viscous, compared to the native ones. Modified samples presented better dissolution in water and less strong gels, with good stability during oscillatory shearing at 25°C. This study aims to better understand the implications that chemical modifications may impose on the structure of citrus pectins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Citrus huanglongbing: a newly relevant disease presents unprecedented challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nian; Trivedi, Pankaj

    2013-07-01

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the oldest citrus diseases and has been known for over a century. HLB is caused by 'Candidatus Liberibacter' spp. that are phloem-limited, fastidious α-proteobacteria and infect hosts in different Kingdoms (i.e., Animalia and Plantae). When compared with well-characterized, cultivatable plant-pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria, the interactions of uncultured insect-vectored plant-pathogenic bacteria, including 'Ca. Liberibacter' spp., with their hosts remain poorly understood. 'Ca. Liberibacter' spp. have been known to cause HLB, which has been rapidly spreading worldwide, resulting in dramatic economic losses. HLB presents an unprecedented challenge to citrus production. In this review, we focus on the most recent research on citrus, 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus', and psyllid interactions, specifically considering the following topics: evolutionary relationships among 'Ca. Liberibacter' spp., genetic diversity, host range, genome analysis, transmission, virulence mechanisms, and the ecological importance of HLB. Currently, no efficient management strategy is available to control HLB, although some promising progress has been made. Further studies are needed to understand citrus, 'Ca. L. asiaticus', and psyllid interactions to design innovative management strategies. Although HLB has been problematic for over a century, we can only win the battle against HLB with a coordinated and deliberate effort by the citrus industry, citrus growers, researchers, legislatures, and governments.

  3. Citrus tristeza virus: a pathogen that changed the course of the citrus industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Pedro; Ambrós, Silvia; Albiach-Martí, Maria R; Guerri, José; Peña, Leandro

    2008-03-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) (genus Closterovirus, family Closteroviridae) is the causal agent of devastating epidemics that changed the course of the citrus industry. Adapted to replicate in phloem cells of a few species within the family Rutaceae and to transmission by a few aphid species, CTV and citrus probably coevolved for centuries at the site of origin of citrus plants. CTV dispersal to other regions and its interaction with new scion varieties and rootstock combinations resulted in three distinct syndromes named tristeza, stem pitting and seedling yellows. The first, inciting decline of varieties propagated on sour orange, has forced the rebuilding of many citrus industries using tristeza-tolerant rootstocks. The second, inducing stunting, stem pitting and low bearing of some varieties, causes economic losses in an increasing number of countries. The third is usually observed by biological indexing, but rarely in the field. CTV polar virions are composed of two capsid proteins and a single-stranded, positive-sense genomic RNA (gRNA) of approximately 20 kb, containing 12 open reading frames (ORFs) and two untranslated regions (UTRs). ORFs 1a and 1b, encoding proteins of the replicase complex, are directly translated from the gRNA, and together with the 5' and 3'UTRs are the only regions required for RNA replication. The remaining ORFs, expressed via 3'-coterminal subgenomic RNAs, encode proteins required for virion assembly and movement (p6, p65, p61, p27 and p25), asymmetrical accumulation of positive and negative strands during RNA replication (p23), or suppression of post-transcriptional gene silencing (p25, p20 and p23), with the role of proteins p33, p18 and p13 as yet unknown. Analysis of genetic variation in CTV isolates revealed (1) conservation of genomes in distant geographical regions, with a limited repertoire of genotypes, (2) uneven distribution of variation along the gRNA, (3) frequent recombination events and (4) different selection pressures

  4. The Asian Citrus Psyllid Genome (Diaphorina citri, Hemiptera)

    OpenAIRE

    Hunter, Wayne B.; Reese, Justin; International Psyllid Genome Consortium, The

    2014-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera), is an important pest of citrus because it vectors bacteria responsible for huanglongbing, which is one of the most serious diseases of citrus worldwide.  The first genome draft of D. citri (DIACI_1.0) was completed in 2011 (ARS, Ft. Pierce, FL), however, gaps in the assembly prompted additional sequencing using the long run PacBio system at the Los Alamos National Lab, NM.  The revised draft genome (DIACI_1.1) was assembled using the new...

  5. Nutritional Potential of Citrus Sinensis and Vitis Vinifera Peels

    OpenAIRE

    Uraku, A. J

    2015-01-01

    The nutritional potential of the peels of Citrus sinensis and Vitis vinifera was assessed by determining proximate and mineral composition. Results indicate carbohydeate content of the peels of Citrus sinensis and Vitis vinifera as 61.07% and 71.77% respectively. Other findings are crude fibre, 13.51% and 4.96%, proten, 3.73% and 11.35%, fats, 10.34% and 1.16%, moisture, 9.78% and 6.52% and ash 1.57% and 4.24%, for the Citrus sinensis and Vitis vinifera respectively. Mineral analysis revealed...

  6. Stability of Citrus tristeza virus protective isolates in field conditions Estabilidade de isolados protetores contra Citrus tristeza virus em condições de campo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Tenório Costa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to monitor the maintenance of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV protective isolates stability in selected clones of 'Pêra' sweet orange (Citrus sinensis, preimmunized or naturally infected by the virus, after successive clonal propagations. The work was carried out in field conditions in the north of Paraná State, Brazil. Coat protein gene (CPG analysis of 33 isolates collected from 16 clones of 'Pêra' sweet orange was performed using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP. Initially, the isolates were characterized by symptoms of stem pitting observed in clones. Then viral genome was extracted and used as template for the amplification of CPG by reverse transcription polimerase chain reaction (RTPCR. RTPCR products electrophoretic profiles were analyzed using the Jaccard coefficient and the UPGMA method. The majority of the clones had weak to moderate stem pitting symptoms and its CTV isolates showed alterations in the SSCP profiles. However, the stability of the protective complex has been maintained, except for isolates from two analised clones. Low genetic variability was observed within the isolates during the studied years.O objetivo deste trabalho foi monitorar a manutenção da estabilidade de isolados protetores contra Citrus tristeza virus (CTV em clones selecionados de laranja 'Pêra' (Citrus sinensis pré-imunizados ou infectados naturalmente pelo vírus, após sucessivas propagações clonais. O trabalho foi realizado em condições de campo, no norte do Estado do Paraná. A análise do gene da capa protéica (GPC de 33 isolados, coletados de 16 clones de laranjeira 'Pêra', foi realizada com o uso da técnica polimorfismo conformacional da fita simples (SSCP. Inicialmente, os isolados foram caracterizados por meio de sintomas de caneluras observados nos clones. Em seguida, o genoma viral foi extraído e utilizado como molde para a amplificação do GCP com uso da transcrição reversa da rea

  7. Bioavailability is improved by enzymatic modification of the citrus flavonoid hesperidin in humans: A randomized, double-blind, crossover trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, I.L.F.; Chee, W.S.S.; Bredsdorff, Lea

    2006-01-01

    Hesperidin is the predominant polyphenol consumed from citrus fruits and juices. However, hesperidin is proposed to have limited bioavailability due to the rutinoside moiety attached to the flavonoid. The aim of this study was to demonstrate in human subjects that the removal of the rhamnose group...... to yield the corresponding flavonoid glucoside (i.e., hesperetin-7-glucoside) will improve the bioavailability of the aglycone hesperetin. Healthy volunteers (n = 16) completed the double-blind, randomized, crossover study. Subjects randomly consumed hesperetin equivalents supplied as orange juice...... that the bioavailability of hesperidin was modulated by enzymatic conversion to hesperetin-7-glucoside, thus changing the absorption site from the colon to the small intestine. This may affect future interventions concerning the health benefits of citrus flavonoids....

  8. Somatic hybridization for citrus rootstock breeding: an effective tool to solve some important issues of the Mediterranean citrus industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambier, Dominique; Benyahia, Hamid; Pensabene-Bellavia, Giovanni; Aka Kaçar, Yildiz; Froelicher, Yann; Belfalah, Zina; Lhou, Beniken; Handaji, Najat; Printz, Bruno; Morillon, Raphael; Yesiloglu, Turgut; Navarro, Luis; Ollitrault, Patrick

    2011-05-01

    The prevalence of sour orange rootstock in the southern and eastern part of the Mediterranean Basin is presently threatened by the spread of Citrus Tristeza Virus (CTV) and its main vector Toxoptera citricida, combined with abiotic constraints such as drought, salinity and alkalinity. The search for alternative CTV-resistant rootstocks that also withstand the other constraints is now considered an urgent priority for a sustainable citrus industry in the area. Complementary progenitors can be found in citrus germplasm to combine the desired traits, particularly between Poncirus and Citrus genera. The production of somatic hybrids allows cumulating all dominant traits irrespective of their heterozygosity level, and would appear to be an effective way to solve the rootstock challenge facing the Mediterranean citrus industry. This paper presents the results obtained during a regional collaborative effort between five countries, to develop new rootstocks by somatic hybridization. New embryogenic callus lines to be used for somatic hybridization have been created. Protoplast fusions have been performed at CIRAD and IVIA laboratories, focusing on intergeneric combinations. Analysis of ploidy level by flow cytometry and molecular markers confirmed the acquisition of new interesting tetraploid somatic hybrids for six combinations. Diploid cybrids with intergeneric (Citrus × Poncirus) nucleus and C. reticulata or C. aurantifolia mitochondria were also identified for four combinations. The agronomical performance of a pre-existing somatic hybrid between Poncirus trifoliata and Citrus reticulata was validated in calcareous soils in Morocco. Somatic hybridization is now integrated into the breeding programs of the five Mediterranean countries.

  9. Field validation of a system for autodissemination of an entomopathogenic fungus, Isaria fumosorosea, to control the Asian citrus psyllid on residential citrus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The citrus industries of California and Texas share a pressing problem with the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae) and huanglongbing (HLB) spreading in residential citrus near commercial groves. Insecticidal treatment of residential trees for the psyllid is problem...

  10. Clean air essential for good citrus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middleton, J.T.

    1958-06-01

    Research studies show that various types of air pollutants seriously hamper citrus production. Yields and fruit quality are often poor. Trees along a highway are smaller and produce fewer fruits than those growing 3 or 4 rows within the orchard. The amount of noxious gases along roadways may contain CO at 40 ppm, acetylene at 0.4 ppm, ethylene at 0.5 ppm, total hydrocarbons at 3.0 ppm, and oxides of nitrogen at 0.6 ppm. Usually a 50% reduction in contaminants appears 10 tree rows away from the road, but clean air may not be found for 100 rows. Sulfur dioxide damages the leaves of a wide variety of plants at concentrations below 1.0 ppm after only a few hours exposure. Ozone causes significant injury to citrus leaves. During periods of aggravated air pollution, ozone may be 20 times natural concentrations and is ten times that of clean air. The effects of atmospheric fluorides upon growth and production in lemon, orange, and grapefruit have been investigated. Results indicate that growth was suppressed and leaves and trunks of trees were smaller than trees grown in clean air.

  11. Fomitiporia mediterranea Infecting Citrus Trees in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Elena

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years a serious disease of citrus (the orange cv. Washington navel, lemon and the common mandarin grafted on sour orange rootstocks has been observed in southern Greek orchards. Affected trees decline, their leaves become yellow and fall early, and shoots and twigs die as the damage expands towards the trunk. Crosssections of the trunks and large branches reveal a light-colored rot in the center, which is surrounded by brown hard necrotic wood. Symptoms start from pruned areas and spread to the rootstock wood, and then resemble esca of grapevine. From the white rotted areas, a fungus was isolated on PDA that formed cream-yellow to light-brown colonies with dense aerial mycelium. Fungal fruit-bodies formed abundantly on the trunks of diseased trees. The fungus was identified as Fomitiporia mediterranea by both traditional and molecular methods. Pathogenicity tests were performed by artificially inoculating orange, mandarin, lemon and sour orange trees with the fungus. Control holes were filled with two PDA plugs. Branches inoculated with the isolates from infected citrus showed wood discoloration that extended up to 20 cm above and 20 cm below the infection hole. The fungus was re-isolated from the discolored parts of the wood. Inoculations with isolates from grapevine and kiwi produced wood discoloration only 3– 4 mm around the holes.

  12. UJI AKTIVITAS ANTIPIRETIK EKSTRAK ETANOL KULIT JERUK MANIS (Citrus x aurantium L TERHADAP TIKUS PUTIH (Rattus novergicus JANTAN GALUR WISTAR YANG DIINDUKSI PEPTON 5%

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Widyasari

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Sweet orange peel (Citrus x aurantium L contains flavonoids that are able to inhibit prostaglandins so they have activity as antipyretic. This study aims to test the antipyretic activity of orange peel (Citrus x aurantium L against Wistar male rats induced by 5% peptone. This research is an experimental research with complete random design. The test animal used was Wistar male white rats as many as 15 tail with 150 - 200 g weight. The test animals were divided into 5 groups: negative control (1% NaCMC suspension, positive control (paracetamol suspension and the test group were orange peel extract (Citrus x aurantium L with concentration of 0.5%, 0.75% and 1%. Temperature measurements were performed before peptone 5%, 1 hour after peptone 5% and 30 min after treatment until 240 min. Data obtained were analyzed using anova test and LSD (Least significant different test. The conclusion of this study is that the extract of sweet orange peel ethanol (Citrus x aurantium L has antipyretic activity in Wistar male white rats and at 1% concentration has activity ability as antipyretic.

  13. Production of Pectinolytic Enzymes by the Yeast Wickerhanomyces anomalus Isolated from Citrus Fruits Peels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María A. Martos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wickerhamomyces anomalus is pectinolytic yeast isolated from citrus fruits peels in the province of Misiones, Argentine. In the present work, enzymes produced by this yeast strain were characterized, and polygalacturonase physicochemical properties were determined in order to evaluate the application of the supernatant in the maceration of potato tissues. W. anomalus was able to produce PG in liquid medium containing glucose and citrus pectin, whose mode of action was mainly of endo type. The supernatant did not exhibit esterase or lyase activity. No others enzymes, capable of hydrolyzing cell wall polymers, such as cellulases and xylanases, were detected. PG showed maximal activity at pH 4.5 and at temperature range between 40°C and 50°C. It was stable in the pH range from 3.0 to 6.0 and up to 50°C at optimum pH. The enzymatic extract macerated potato tissues efficiently. Volume of single cells increased with the agitation speed. The results observed make the enzymatic extract produced by W. anomalus appropriate for future application in food industry, mainly for the production of fruit nectars or mashed of vegetables such as potato or cassava, of regional interest in the province of Misiones, Argentine.

  14. Phenolic content, antioxidant activities and stimulatory roles of citrus fruits on some lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irkin Reyhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities in citrus fruits and their peels were determined, and their stimulatory roles on some lactic acid bacteria were investigated. Phenolic compounds in citrus fruits such as mandarin, lemon, orange and grapefruit were determined either in the juices or in the peel extracts. Total phenolic content was determined in a spectrophotometer at 685 nm using the adapted Folin-Ciocalteu method. Total flavonoid content was measured using LC/MS (liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The effects of the fruit juices and peel extracts on the selected lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus delbrueckii NRRL B5448, Lb. casei NRRL B1922, Lb. acidophilus NRRL B4495 were investigated. The tested lactic acid bacteria were significantly affected by chlorogenic acid, hesperidin, naringin and caffeic acid compared to the control samples (P≤0.05. Antioxidant properties of fruit samples were also measured using the DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl method. The phenolics positively affected the metabolism of bacteria, with the stimulatory effects of the assayed samples being influenced by the phenolic profile.

  15. Bioactive compounds from Mexican lime ( Citrus aurantifolia ) juice induce apoptosis in human pancreatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Jaiprakash R; Chidambara Murthy, K N; Jayaprakasha, G K; Chetti, Mahadev B; Patil, Bhimanagouda S

    2009-11-25

    Lime (Citrus aurantifolia Swingle) is one of the major citrus fruits and widely consumed, but there is limited evidence about its health-promoting properties. Hence, an investigation was conducted to understand the chemopreventive effects of lime juice on pancreatic cancer cells and the possible mechanism for induction of apoptosis using Panc-28 cells. Freeze-dried lime juice was extracted with different solvents, such as chloroform, acetone, MeOH, and MeOH/water (8:2). The chloroform extract showed the highest (85.4 and 90%) radical-scavenging activity by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) methods at 624 microg/mL, whereas the MeOH/water extract showed the lowest (<20%) activity. The active components were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) using a C-18 column as rutin, neohesperidin, hesperidin, and hesperitin. Furthermore, the limonoids identified are limonexic acid, isolimonexic acid, and limonin. All of the extracts of lime juice inhibited Panc-28 cancer cell growth. The MeOH extract exhibited the maximum activity, with an IC50 value of 81.20 microg/mL after 72 h. The inhibition of Panc-28 cells was in the range of 73-89%, at 100 microg/mL at 96 h. The involvement of apoptosis in induction of cytotoxicity was confirmed by expression of Bax, Bcl-2, casapase-3, and p53. The results of the present study clearly indicate that antioxidant activity is proportionate to the content of flavonoids and proliferation inhibition ability is proportionate to the content of both flavonoids and limonoids.

  16. Transcriptional response of Citrus aurantifolia to infection by Citrus tristeza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandía, Mónica; Conesa, Ana; Ancillo, Gema; Gadea, José; Forment, Javier; Pallás, Vicente; Flores, Ricardo; Duran-Vila, Nuria; Moreno, Pedro; Guerri, José

    2007-10-25

    Changes in gene expression of Mexican lime plants in response to infection with a severe (T305) or a mild (T385) isolate of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) were analyzed using a cDNA microarray containing 12,672 probes to 6875 different citrus genes. Statistically significant (P<0.01) expression changes of 334 genes were detected in response to infection with isolate T305, whereas infection with T385 induced no significant change. Induced genes included 145 without significant similarity with known sequences and 189 that were classified in seven functional categories. Genes related with response to stress and defense were the main category and included 28% of the genes induced. Selected transcription changes detected by microarray analysis were confirmed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Changes detected in the transcriptome upon infecting lime with T305 may be associated either with symptom expression, with a strain-specific defense mechanism, or with a general response to stress.

  17. The antimicrobial effects of Citrus limonum and Citrus aurantium essential oils on multi-species biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Sarah Almeida Coelho; Zambrana, Jéssica Rabelo Mina; Iorio, Fernanda Bispo Reis Di; Pereira, Cristiane Aparecida; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Citrus limonum and Citrus aurantium essential oils (EOs) compared to 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX) and 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) on multispecies biofilms formed by Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli. The biofilms were grown in acrylic disks immersed in broth, inoculated with microbial suspension (106 cells/mL) and incubated at 37°C / 48 h. After the biofilms were formed, they were exposed for 5 minutes to the solutions (n = 10): C. aurantium EO, C. limonum EO, 0.2% CHX, 1% NaOCl or sterile saline solution [0.9% sodium chloride NaCl)]. Next, the discs were placed in sterile 0.9% NaCl and sonicated to disperse the biofilms. Tenfold serial dilutions were performed and the aliquots were seeded onto selective agar and incubated at 37°C / 48 h. , the number of colony-forming units per milliliter was counted and analyzed statistically (Tukey test, p ≤ 0.05). C. aurantium EO and NaOCl inhibited the growth of all microorganisms in multi-species biofilms. C. limonum EO promoted a 100% reduction of C. albicans and E. coli, 49.3% of E. faecalis. CHX was less effective against C. albicans and E. coli, yielding a reduction of 68.8% and 86.7%, respectively. However, the reduction of E. faecalis using CHX (81.7%) was greater than that obtained using C. limonum EO. Both Citrus limonum and Citrus aurantium EOs are effective in controlling multi-species biofilms; the microbial reductions achieved by EOs were not only similar to those of NaOCl, but even higher than those achieved by CHX, in some cases.

  18. The antimicrobial effects of Citrus limonum and Citrus aurantium essential oils on multi-species biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Almeida Coelho Oliveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Citrus limonum and Citrus aurantium essential oils (EOs compared to 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX and 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl on multi-species biofilms formed by Candida albicans, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli. The biofilms were grown in acrylic disks immersed in broth, inoculated with microbial suspension (106 cells/mL and incubated at 37°C / 48 h. After the biofilms were formed, they were exposed for 5 minutes to the solutions (n = 10: C. aurantium EO, C. limonum EO, 0.2% CHX, 1% NaOCl or sterile saline solution [0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl]. Next, the discs were placed in sterile 0.9% NaCl and sonicated to disperse the biofilms. Tenfold serial dilutions were performed and the aliquots were seeded onto selective agar and incubated at 37°C / 48 h. Next, the number of colony-forming units per milliliter was counted and analyzed statistically (Tukey test, p ≤ 0.05. C. aurantium EO and NaOCl inhibited the growth of all microorganisms in multi-species biofilms. C. limonum EO promoted a 100% reduction of C. albicans and E. coli, and 49.3% of E. faecalis. CHX was less effective against C. albicans and E. coli, yielding a reduction of 68.8% and 86.7%, respectively. However, the reduction of E. faecalis using CHX (81.7% was greater than that obtained using C. limonum EO. Both Citrus limonum and Citrus aurantium EOs are effective in controlling multi-species biofilms; the microbial reductions achieved by EOs were not only similar to those of NaOCl, but even higher than those achieved by CHX, in some cases.

  19. Physiological effects following administration of Citrus aurantium for 28 days in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Deborah K; George, Nysia I; White, Gene E; Pellicore, Linda S; Abdel-Rahman, Ali; Fabricant, Daniel

    2012-06-15

    Since ephedra-containing dietary supplements were banned from the US market, manufacturers changed their formulations by eliminating ephedra and replacing with other botanicals, including Citrus aurantium, or bitter orange. Bitter orange contains, among other compounds, synephrine, a chemical that is chemically similar to ephedrine. Since ephedrine may have cardiovascular effects, the goal of this study was to investigate the cardiovascular effects of various doses of bitter orange extract and pure synephrine in rats. Female Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed daily by gavage for 28 days with synephrine from two different extracts. One extract contained 6% synephrine, and the other extract contained 95% synephrine. Doses were 10 or 50mg synephrine/kg body weight from each extract. Additionally, caffeine was added to these doses, since many dietary supplements also contain caffeine. Telemetry was utilized to monitor heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature and QT interval in all rats. Synephrine, either as the bitter orange extract or as pure synephrine, increased heart rate and blood pressure. Animals treated with 95% synephrine showed minimal effects on heart rate and blood pressure; more significant effects were observed with the bitter orange extract suggesting that other components in the botanical can alter these physiological parameters. The increases in heart rate and blood pressure were more pronounced when caffeine was added. None of the treatments affected uncorrected QT interval in the absence of caffeine. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Physiological effects following administration of Citrus aurantium for 28 days in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Deborah K., E-mail: deborah.hansen@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, U.S. FDA/NCTR, 3900 NCTR Rd., Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); George, Nysia I. [Division of Personalized Nutrition and Medicine, U.S. FDA/NCTR, 3900 NCTR Rd., Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); White, Gene E. [Toxicological Pathology Associates, 3900 NCTR Rd., Jefferson, AR 72079 (United States); Pellicore, Linda S. [Office of New Drugs, U.S. FDA/Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20903 (United States); Abdel-Rahman, Ali; Fabricant, Daniel [Office of Nutrition, Labeling and Dietary Supplements, U.S. FDA/Center for Food Safety and Nutrition, HFS-810, College Park, MD 20740 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    Background: Since ephedra-containing dietary supplements were banned from the US market, manufacturers changed their formulations by eliminating ephedra and replacing with other botanicals, including Citrus aurantium, or bitter orange. Bitter orange contains, among other compounds, synephrine, a chemical that is chemically similar to ephedrine. Since ephedrine may have cardiovascular effects, the goal of this study was to investigate the cardiovascular effects of various doses of bitter orange extract and pure synephrine in rats. Method: Female Sprague–Dawley rats were dosed daily by gavage for 28 days with synephrine from two different extracts. One extract contained 6% synephrine, and the other extract contained 95% synephrine. Doses were 10 or 50 mg synephrine/kg body weight from each extract. Additionally, caffeine was added to these doses, since many dietary supplements also contain caffeine. Telemetry was utilized to monitor heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature and QT interval in all rats. Results and conclusion: Synephrine, either as the bitter orange extract or as pure synephrine, increased heart rate and blood pressure. Animals treated with 95% synephrine showed minimal effects on heart rate and blood pressure; more significant effects were observed with the bitter orange extract suggesting that other components in the botanical can alter these physiological parameters. The increases in heart rate and blood pressure were more pronounced when caffeine was added. None of the treatments affected uncorrected QT interval in the absence of caffeine.