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Sample records for citric acid concentrations

  1. Determination of low citric acid concentrations in a mixture of weak ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To overcome this, a sodium-saturated cationic ion exchanger was used to exchange these cations with Na+. Following cation exchange, citric acid concentration was determined accurately using the method. Keywords: citric acid measurement, acid titration, mixed weak-acid system, VFA Water SA Vol. 31(4) 2005: 497-502 ...

  2. Effect of citric acid concentration and hydrolysis time on physicochemical properties of sweet potato starches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surendra Babu, Ayenampudi; Parimalavalli, Ramanathan; Rudra, Shalini Gaur

    2015-09-01

    Physicochemical properties of citric acid treated sweet potato starches were investigated in the present study. Sweet potato starch was hydrolyzed using citric acid with different concentrations (1 and 5%) and time periods (1 and 11 h) at 45 °C and was denoted as citric acid treated starch (CTS1 to CTS4) based on their experimental conditions. The recovery yield of acid treated starches was above 85%. The CTS4 sample displayed the highest amylose (around 31%) and water holding capacity its melting temperature was 47.66 °C. The digestibility rate was slightly increased for 78.58% for the CTS3 and CTS4. The gel strength of acid modified starches ranged from 0.27 kg to 1.11 kg. RVA results of acid thinned starches confirmed a low viscosity profile. CTS3 starch illustrated lower enthalpy compared to all other modified starches. All starch samples exhibited a shear-thinning behavior. SEM analysis revealed that the extent of visible degradation was increased at higher hydrolysis time and acid concentration. The CTS3 satisfied the criteria required for starch to act as a fat mimetic. Overall results conveyed that the citric acid treatment of sweet potato starch with 5% acid concentration and 11h period was an ideal condition for the preparation of a fat replacer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Differences in surface roughness of nanohybrid composites immersed in varying concentrations of citric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Kevina Alifen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The surface roughness of restoration is important in predicting the length of time it might remain in the mouth. Conditions within the oral cavity can affect the surface roughness of a restoration. Nanohybrid composite is widely used in dentistry because it can be applied to restore anterior and posterior teeth. Athletes routinely consume isotonic drinks which are acidic and even more erosive than the carbonated variety because they contain a range of acids; the highest content of which being citric acid. Purpose: The aim of the study was to analyze the surface roughness of nanohybrid composite after having been subjected to immersion in varying concentrations of citric acid. Methods: Two isotonic drinks (Pocari Sweat and Mizone were analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC to quantify the respective concentrations of citric acid which they contained. A total of 27 samples of cylindrical nanohybrid composite were prepared before being divided into three groups. In Group 1, samples were immersed in citric acid solution derived from Pocari Sweat. Those of Group 2 were immersed in citric acid solution derived from Mizone; while Group 3, samples were immersed in distilled water as a control. All samples were immersed for 7 days, before their surface roughness was tested by means of a surface roughness tester (Mitutoyo SJ-201. Data was analyzed using a one-way ANOVA test. Results: The results showed that there was no significant difference in surface roughness between Groups 1, 2 and 3 (p=0.985. Conclusion: No difference in surface roughness of nanohybrid composites results from prolonged immersion in varying concentrations of citric acid.

  4. Citric Acid Fermentation by Aspergillus niger on Low Sugar Concentrations and Cotton Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Kiel, Hildegard; Guvrin, Rumia; Henis, Yigal

    1981-01-01

    The possible use of cotton waste as a carbohydrate source of citric acid production by Aspergillus niger was examined. No citric acid was produced when A. niger was grown on cotton waste as a sole carbon source. In two-stage fermentations, however, mycelium obtained from surface cultures in cotton waste medium yielded more citric acid when transferred to sucrose-containing media than when directly inoculated to sucrose-containing media. It is concluded that cotton waste can be used for saving...

  5. Citric acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berovic, Marin; Legisa, Matic

    2007-01-01

    Citric acid is a commodity chemical produced and consumed throughout The World. It is used mainly in the food and beverage industry, primarily as an acidulant. Although it is one of the oldest industrial fermentations, its World production is still in rapid increasing. Global production of citric acid in 2007 was over 1.6 million tones. Biochemistry of citric acid fermentation, various microbial strains, as well as various substrates, technological processes and product recovery are presented. World production and economics aspects of this strategically product of bulk biotechnology are discussed.

  6. Enhanced concentrations of citric acid in spring aerosols collected at the Gosan background site in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jinsang; Kawamura, Kimitaka

    2011-09-01

    In order to investigate water-soluble dicarboxylic acids and related compounds in the aerosol samples under the Asian continent outflow, total suspended particle (TSP) samples ( n = 32) were collected at the Gosan site in Jeju Island over 2-5 days integration during 23 March-1 June 2007 and 16-24 April 2008. The samples were analyzed for water-soluble dicarboxylic acids, ketocarboxylic acids, and α-dicarbonyls using a capillary gas chromatography technique. We found elevated concentrations of atmospheric citric acid (range: 20-320 ng m -3) in the TSP samples during mid- to late April of 2007 and 2008. To specify the sources of citric acid, dicarboxylic acids and related compounds were measured in the pollen sample collected at the Gosan site (Pollen_Gosan), authentic pollen samples from Japanese cedar ( Cryptomeria) (Pollen_cedar) and Japanese cypress ( Chamaecyparis obtusa) (Pollen_cypress), and tangerine fruit produced from Jeju Island. Citric acid (2790 ng in unit mg of pollen mass) was found as most abundant species in the Pollen_Gosan, followed by oxalic acid (2390 ng mg -1). Although citric acid was not detected in the Pollen_cedar and Pollen_cypress as major species, it was found as a dominant species in the tangerine juice while malic acid was detected as major species in the tangerine peel, followed by oxalic and citric acids. Since Japanese cedar trees are planted around tangerine farms to prevent strong winds from the Pacific Ocean, citric acid that may be directly emitted from tangerine is likely adsorbed on pollens emitted from Japanese cedar and then transported to the Gosan site. Much lower malic/citric acid ratios obtained under cloudy condition than clear condition suggest that malic acid may rapidly decompose to lower molecular weight compounds such as oxalic and malonic acids (

  7. Influence of concentration, time and method of application of citric acid and sodium citrate in root conditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Cavassim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to establish the parameters of concentration, time and mode of application of citric acid and sodium citrate in relation to root conditioning. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 495 samples were obtained and equally distributed among 11 groups (5 for testing different concentrations of citric acid, 5 for testing different concentrations of sodium citrate and 1 control group. After laboratorial processing, the samples were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. A previously calibrated and blind examiner evaluated micrographs of the samples. Non-parametric statistical analysis was performed to analyze the data obtained. RESULTS: Brushing 25% citric acid for 3 min, promoted greater exposure of collagen fibers in comparison with the brushing of 1% citric acid for 1 minute and its topical application at 1% for 3 min. Sodium citrate exposed collagen fibers in a few number of samples. CONCLUSION: Despite the lack of statistical significance, better results for collagen exposure were obtained with brushing application of 25% citric acid for 3 min than with other application parameter. Sodium citrate produced a few number of samples with collagen exposure, so it is not indicated for root conditioning.

  8. Influence of concentration, time and method of application of citric acid and sodium citrate in root conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAVASSIM, Rodrigo; LEITE, Fábio Renato Manzolli; ZANDIM, Daniela Leal; DANTAS, Andrea Abi Rached; RACHED, Ricardo Samih Georges Abi; SAMPAIO, José Eduardo Cezar

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to establish the parameters of concentration, time and mode of application of citric acid and sodium citrate in relation to root conditioning. Material and Methods A total of 495 samples were obtained and equally distributed among 11 groups (5 for testing different concentrations of citric acid, 5 for testing different concentrations of sodium citrate and 1 control group). After laboratorial processing, the samples were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. A previously calibrated and blind examiner evaluated micrographs of the samples. Non-parametric statistical analysis was performed to analyze the data obtained. Results Brushing 25% citric acid for 3 min, promoted greater exposure of collagen fibers in comparison with the brushing of 1% citric acid for 1 minute and its topical application at 1% for 3 min. Sodium citrate exposed collagen fibers in a few number of samples. Conclusion Despite the lack of statistical significance, better results for collagen exposure were obtained with brushing application of 25% citric acid for 3 min than with other application parameter. Sodium citrate produced a few number of samples with collagen exposure, so it is not indicated for root conditioning. PMID:22858707

  9. Citric Acid Passivation of Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasensky, David; Reali, John; Larson, Chris; Carl, Chad

    2009-01-01

    Passivation is a process for cleaning and providing corrosion protection for stainless steel. Currently, on Kennedy Space Center (KSC), only parts passivated with nitric acid are acceptable for use. KSC disposes of approximately 125gal of concentrated nitric acid per year, and receives many parts from vendors who must also dispose of used nitric acid. Unfortunately, nitric acid presents health and environmental hazards. As a result, several recent industry studies have examined citric acid as an alternative. Implementing a citric acid-based passivation procedure would improve the health and environmental safety aspects of passivation process. However although there is a lack of published studies that conclusively prove citric acid is a technically sound passivation agent. In 2007, NASA's KSC Materials Advisory Working Group requested the evaluation of citric acid in place of nitric acid for passivation of parts at KSC. United Space Alliance Materials & Processes engineers have developed a three-phase test plan to evaluate citric acid as an alternative to nitric acid on three stainless steels commonly used at KSC: UNS S30400, S41000, and S17400. Phases 1 and 2 will produce an optimized citric acid treatment based on results from atmospheric exposure at NASA's Beach Corrosion Facility. Phase 3 will compare the optimized solution(s) with nitric acid treatments. If the results indicate that citric acid passivates as well or better than nitric acid, NASA intends to approve this method for parts used at the Kennedy Space Center.

  10. Citric acid production patent review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassiadis, Savas; Morgunov, Igor G; Kamzolova, Svetlana V; Finogenova, Tatiana V

    2008-01-01

    Current Review article summarizes the developments in citric acid production technologies in East and West last 100 years. Citric acid is commercially produced by large scale fermentation mostly using selected fungal or yeast strains in aerobe bioreactors and still remains one of the runners in industrial production of biotechnological bulk metabolites obtained by microbial fermentation since about 100 years, reflecting the historical development of modern biotechnology and fermentation process technology in East and West. Citric acid fermentation was first found as a fungal product in cultures of Penicillium glaucum on sugar medium by Wehmer in 1893. Citric acid is an important multifunctional organic acid with a broad range of versatile uses in household and industrial applications that has been produced industrially since the beginning of 20(th) century. There is a great worldwide demand for citric acid consumption due to its low toxicity, mainly being used as acidulant in pharmaceutical and food industries. Global citric acid production has reached 1.4 million tones, increasing annually at 3.5-4.0% in demand and consumption. Citric acid production by fungal submerged fermentation is still dominating, however new perspectives like solid-state processes or continuous yeast processes can be attractive for producers to stand in today's strong competition in industry. Further perspectives aiming in the improvement of citric acid production are the improvement of citric acid producing strains by classical and modern mutagenesis and selection as well as downstream processes. Many inexpensive by-products and residues of the agro-industry (e.g. molasses, glycerin etc.) can be economically utilized as substrates in the production of citric acid, especially in solid-state fermentation, enormously reducing production costs and minimizing environmental problems. Alternatively, continuous processes utilizing yeasts which reach 200-250 g/l citric acid can stand in today

  11. Biotechnological production of citric acid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Max, Belén; Salgado, José Manuel; Rodríguez, Noelia; Cortés, Sandra; Converti, Attilio; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    This work provides a review about the biotechnological production of citric acid starting from the physicochemical properties and industrial applications, mainly in the food and pharmaceutical sectors...

  12. The effect of different concentrations of citric acid on motility patterns of bovine epididymal sperms in Hams F10 milieu

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    K Abdy

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of three concentration of citric acid on motility patterns of bovine epididymal sperms. For this purpose, 50 pairs of bovine testicles were collected immediately after slaughter form urmia abattoir and transferred to the laboratory alongside 5oc ice pack. Epididymal tail sperms were collected with a few incisions in vascular areas and transferred to hams f10 milieu with 10% fetal calf serum and counted after 15 minutes of incubation at 37oc in Co2 incubator. Concentrations of 50 million sperms per ml were proposal and in the normal sperm pH rang of 6.7-7.4, 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 normal concentration of citric acid were added to sperm continuity micro tubes (normal concentration of acid equals 7 mg/ml of bovine serum and at 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 180, 240 and 360 minutes the motility patterns of epididymal sperms were evaluated using the computer assisted sperms analyzing (CASA method. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA using the SPSS 15 software. The results indicated significant differences in various indices of sperm motility patterns (Curvilinear   Velocity, Straight-line Velocity, Average Path Velocity, Mean Angel Degree, Amplitude of Lateral Head Displacement, Beat-Cross Frequency, Linearity, Wobble particularly at 0.3 normal concentration of citric acid compared with the control.

  13. Demineralization of root canal dentine with EDTA and citric acid in different concentrations, pH and application times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr.Sc. Nexhmije Ajeti

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aims of the study are: 1. Determination of the amount of extracted Ca ions from den-tine using 17% and 10% EDTA, at pH 7 and pH 9. 2. Determination of the amount of extracted Ca ions from  den-tine using citric acid 5% and 1%, at pH 7 and pH 9.  Methodology 30 extracted, single rooted, human teeth were tested. Their crowns were sectioned at CEJ using diamond disks. The root canals were manually prepared with K-files #50-60. After each instrument 2.5 ml of 5.25% NaOCl was used and 0.9 NaCl as final irrigation. All teeth were longitudinally sectioned and 8 samples of dentine taken from each sample. EDTA 10% and 17 % and citric acid 1% and 5% in neutral and alkaline pH were used.  Each sample was immersed in acid and then exposure time was evaluated after 1, 5, 10, 15 and 25 min. The release rate of calcium ions from root dentine was evaluated by atomic absorption spectrometer.  Results There were significant differences in the amount of extracted Ca by citric acid 1% and 5% or EDTA 10% and 17% in human teeth.  Conclusions It may be concluded that EDTA is a better chelating agent than citric acid. The decalcifying activity of these solutions is related to the duration of exposure, pH and their concentrations.

  14. Effect of propionic acid on citric acid fermentation in an integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Bao, Jia-Wei; Su, Xian-Feng; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Zeng, Xin; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2016-03-01

    In this study, an integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process was established to solve the problem of wastewater treatment in citric acid production. Citric acid wastewater was treated through anaerobic digestion and then the anaerobic digestion effluent (ADE) was further treated and recycled for the next batch citric acid fermentation. This process could eliminate wastewater discharge and reduce water resource consumption. Propionic acid was found in the ADE and its concentration continually increased in recycling. Effect of propionic acid on citric acid fermentation was investigated, and results indicated that influence of propionic acid on citric acid fermentation was contributed to the undissociated form. Citric acid fermentation was inhibited when the concentration of propionic acid was above 2, 4, and 6 mM in initial pH 4.0, 4.5 and, 5.0, respectively. However, low concentration of propionic acid could promote isomaltase activity which converted more isomaltose to available sugar, thereby increasing citric acid production. High concentration of propionic acid could influence the vitality of cell and prolong the lag phase, causing large amount of glucose still remaining in medium at the end of fermentation and decreasing citric acid production.

  15. Biotechnological production of citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, Belén; Salgado, José Manuel; Rodríguez, Noelia; Cortés, Sandra; Converti, Attilio; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2010-10-01

    This work provides a review about the biotechnological production of citric acid starting from the physicochemical properties and industrial applications, mainly in the food and pharmaceutical sectors. Several factors affecting citric acid fermentation are discussed, including carbon source, nitrogen and phosphate limitations, pH of culture medium, aeration, trace elements and morphology of the fungus. Special attention is paid to the fundamentals of biochemistry and accumulation of citric acid. Technologies employed at industrial scale such as surface or submerged cultures, mainly employing Aspergillus niger, and processes carried out with Yarrowia lipolytica, as well as the technology for recovering the product are also described. Finally, this review summarizes the use of orange peels and other by-products as feedstocks for the bioproduction of citric acid.

  16. Biotechnological production of citric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, Belén; Salgado, José Manuel; Rodríguez, Noelia; Cortés, Sandra; Converti, Attilio; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    This work provides a review about the biotechnological production of citric acid starting from the physicochemical properties and industrial applications, mainly in the food and pharmaceutical sectors. Several factors affecting citric acid fermentation are discussed, including carbon source, nitrogen and phosphate limitations, pH of culture medium, aeration, trace elements and morphology of the fungus. Special attention is paid to the fundamentals of biochemistry and accumulation of citric acid. Technologies employed at industrial scale such as surface or submerged cultures, mainly employing Aspergillus niger, and processes carried out with Yarrowia lipolytica, as well as the technology for recovering the product are also described. Finally, this review summarizes the use of orange peels and other by-products as feedstocks for the bioproduction of citric acid. PMID:24031566

  17. Biotechnological production of citric acid

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Max, Belén; Salgado, José Manuel; Rodríguez, Noelia; Cortés, Sandra; Converti, Attilio; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2010-01-01

    .... Several factors affecting citric acid fermentation are discussed, including carbon source, nitrogen and phosphate limitations, pH of culture medium, aeration, trace elements and morphology of the fungus...

  18. Biotechnological production of citric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Max

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This work provides a review about the biotechnological production of citric acid starting from the physicochemical properties and industrial applications, mainly in the food and pharmaceutical sectors. Several factors affecting citric acid fermentation are discussed, including carbon source, nitrogen and phosphate limitations, pH of culture medium, aeration, trace elements and morphology of the fungus. Special attention is paid to the fundamentals of biochemistry and accumulation of citric acid. Technologies employed at industrial scale such as surface or submerged cultures, mainly employing Aspergillus niger, and processes carried out with Yarrowia lipolytica, as well as the technology for recovering the product are also described. Finally, this review summarizes the use of orange peels and other by-products as feedstocks for the bioproduction of citric acid.

  19. Optimization of Initial pH and Total Sugar Concentration Variables on Citric Acid Production from Pineapple Waste with Aspergillus niger Yeast by Using Response Surface Methodology

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    Widayat Widayat

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Citric acid can be produced from pineapple waste by using fermentation process. This process is done in bubble column reactor with Aspergillus niger yeast. The objective of this research is to find the optimum conditions of initial pH and total sugar concentration. The optimization method used was response surface methodology. This research was carried out at a temperature of 30 oC, spore concentration of 1.23 x 109 spore/ml, total volume 2.0 liter, flow rate of air 58.07 cc/sec and a 5% antifoam concentration. The fermentation process lasted 7 days and the citric acid concentration was analyzed by High Pressure Liquid Cromatography (HPLC method. Statistica 6 software was used for the data treatment. The mathematical model for the optimization citric acid fermentation in bubble column reactor is Y = 54.507 + 2.9851X - 8.987X12 - 2.581X2 - 15.446X22 - 7.989X1X2 The parameter of Y is citric acid yield, X1 is a coding initial pH and X2 is a coding total sugar concentration. The results has given an initial pH optimum 3.61 and total sugar concentration 19,285% w/v with optimum an yield of 55.03 % . Keywords: Bubble column bioreactor, Citric acid fermentation, Initial pH, Total sugar concentration, Response surface methodology

  20. 21 CFR 582.1033 - Citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Citric acid. 582.1033 Section 582.1033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS....1033 Citric acid. (a) Product. Citric acid. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  1. Optimization of Citric Acid Production through Manipulation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... citric acid production from glucose and the cultural conditions were manipulated for optimum citric acid production. Optimization studies improved citric acid yield by 13.34% from 12.81 g/l obtained during the screening test to 14.52 g/l obtained at the end of the optimization studies. Glucose concentration of 15%, pH of 5.5, ...

  2. Microbial production of citric acid

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenberghe, Luciana P. S.; Soccol,Carlos R.; Pandey, Ashok; Lebeault, Jean-Michel

    1999-01-01

    Citric acid is the most important organic acid produced in tonnage and is extensively used in food and pharmaceutical industries. It is produced mainly by submerged fermentation using Aspergillus niger or Candida sp. from different sources of carbohydrates, such as molasses and starch based media. However, other fermentation techniques, e.g. solid state fermentation and surface fermentation, and alternative sources of carbon such as agro-industrial residues have been intensively studied showi...

  3. Effect of acetic acid on citric acid fermentation in an integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Chen, Yang-Qiu; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2014-09-01

    An integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process was proposed to solve the problem of extraction wastewater in citric acid fermentation process. Extraction wastewater was treated by anaerobic digestion and then recycled for the next batch of citric acid fermentation to eliminate wastewater discharge and reduce water resource consumption. Acetic acid as an intermediate product of methane fermentation was present in anaerobic digestion effluent. In this study, the effect of acetic acid on citric acid fermentation was investigated and results showed that lower concentration of acetic acid could promote Aspergillus niger growth and citric acid production. 5-Cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride (CTC) staining was used to quantify the activity of A. niger cells, and the results suggested that when acetic acid concentration was above 8 mM at initial pH 4.5, the morphology of A. niger became uneven and the part of the cells' activity was significantly reduced, thereby resulting in deceasing of citric acid production. Effects of acetic acid on citric acid fermentation, as influenced by initial pH and cell number in inocula, were also examined. The result indicated that inhibition by acetic acid increased as initial pH declined and was rarely influenced by cell number in inocula.

  4. Freezing and glass transitions upon cooling and warming and ice/freeze-concentration-solution morphology of emulsified aqueous citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Anatoli; Molina, Mario J; Tenhu, Heikki

    2016-12-01

    Although freeze-induced phase separation and the ice/FCS (freeze-concentration solution) morphology of aqueous solutions play an important role in fields ranging from life sciences and biotechnology to geophysics and high-altitude ice clouds, their understanding is far from complete. Herein, using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and optical cryo-microscope (OC-M), we have studied the freezing and glass transition behavior and the ice/FCS morphology of emulsified 10-60wt% CA (citric acid) solutions in the temperature region of ∼308and153K. We have obtained a lot of new result which are understandable and unclear. The most essential understandable results are as follows: (i) similar to bulk CA/H2O, emulsified CA/H2O also freezes upon cooling and warming and (ii) the ice/FCS morphology of frozen drops smaller than ∼3-4μm is less ramified than that of frozen bulk solutions. Unclear results, among others, are as follows: (i) in contrast to bulk solutions, which produce one freezing event, emulsified CA/H2O produces two freezing events and (ii) in emulsions, drop concentration is not uniform. Our results demonstrate that DSC thermograms and OC-M images/movies are mutually supplementary and allow us to extract important information which cannot be gained when DSC and OC-M techniques are used alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. 21 CFR 582.6033 - Citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Citric acid. 582.6033 Section 582.6033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... acid. (a) Product. Citric acid. 2 For the purpose of this subpart, no attempt has been made to...

  6. The production and use of citric acid for the removal of potassium from the iron ore concentrate of the Sishen Iron Ore Mine, South Africa

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    Peter J. Williams

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The depletion of the richer iron ore worldwide has made it necessary to process lower quality iron ore. Certain substances, such as potassium, contained within the lower quality iron ore, have a detrimental effect on the smelting process during steel manufacturing. Therefore, international steel-making companies charge penalties when purchasing iron ore concentrates containing high concentrations of potassium. To date, lower quality iron ore has been blended with high quality iron ore in an attempt to alleviate the potassium concentrations in the export iron ore; however, the ratio of low quality iron ore to high quality iron ore is increasing, thereby becoming an escalating problem within the economic functioning of the Sishen Iron Ore Mine. It has, therefore, become necessary to develop an economically viable and environmentally friendly process to reduce the high potassium concentrations contained in the iron ore concentrate of the Sishen Iron Ore Mine. In this study, we compared solid substrate and submerged fermentation using Aspergillus niger for the production of citric acid, which is used for the chemical leaching of potassium from the iron ore concentrate. It was found that submerged fermentation proved to be more economical and efficient, producing a maximum citric acid concentration of 102.3 g/L in 96 h of fermentation. ‘Heap leaching’ simulation experiments were found to be uneconomical, due to the required addition of fungal growth medium every 5 days as a result of growth factor depletion within this time; however, this process removed 17.65% of the potassium from the iron ore concentrate. By contrast, chemical leaching of potassium from the iron ore concentrate proved to be most efficient when using a 1 mol citric acid leaching solution at 60 ºC, removing 23.53% of the potassium contained within the iron ore concentrate. Therefore, the most economical and efficient process for the removal of potassium from the iron

  7. BNL Citric Acid Technology: Pilot Scale Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRANCIS, A J; DODGE,; J, C; GILLOW, J B; FORRESTER, K E

    1999-09-24

    The objective of this project is to remove toxic metals such as lead and cadmium from incinerator ash using the Citric Acid Process developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. In this process toxic metals in bottom ash from the incineration of municipal solid waste were first extracted with citric acid followed by biodegradation of the citric acid-metal extract by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens for metals recovery. The ash contained the following metals: Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, Ti, and Zn. Optimization of the Citric Acid Process parameters which included citric acid molarity, contact time, the impact of mixing aggressiveness during extraction and pretreatment showed lead and cadmium removal from incinerator ash of >90%. Seeding the treated ash with P. fluorescens resulted in the removal of residual citric acid and biostabilization of any leachable lead, thus allowing it to pass EPA?s Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure. Biodegradation of the citric acid extract removed >99% of the lead from the extract as well as other metals such as Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ti, and Zn. Speciation of the bioprecipitated lead by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure at the National Synchrotron Light Source showed that the lead is predominantly associated with the phosphate and carboxyl functional groups in a stable form. Citric acid was completely recovered (>99%) from the extract by sulfide precipitation technique and the extraction efficiency of recovered citric acid is similar to that of the fresh citric acid. Recycling of the citric acid should result in considerable savings in the overall treatment cost. We have shown the potential application of this technology to remove and recover the metal contaminants from incinerator ash as well as from other heavy metal bearing wastes (i.e., electric arc furnace dust from steel industry) or soils. Information developed from this project is being applied to demonstrate the remediation of

  8. Microbial production of citric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana P. S Vandenberghe

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Citric acid is the most important organic acid produced in tonnage and is extensively used in food and pharmaceutical industries. It is produced mainly by submerged fermentation using Aspergillus niger or Candida sp. from different sources of carbohydrates, such as molasses and starch based media. However, other fermentation techniques, e.g. solid state fermentation and surface fermentation, and alternative sources of carbon such as agro-industrial residues have been intensively studied showing great perspective to its production. This paper reviews recent developments on citric acid production by presenting a brief summary of the subject, describing micro-organisms, production techniques, and substrates, etc.O ácido cítrico é o ácido mais produzido em termos de tonagem e é extensivamente utilizado pelas indústrias alimentícia e farmacêutica. É produzido principalmente por fermentação submersa utilizando o fungo Aspergillus niger e leveduras do gênero Candida sp. à partir de diferentes fontes de carbono, como a glicose e meios à base de amido. No entanto, outras técnicas de fermentação, e.g. fermentação no estado sólido e em superfície, e fontes alternativas de carbono tem sido intensamente estudadas mostrando grande perspectivas para o processo. O presente trabalho apresenta um resumo dos últimos avanços sobre a produção do ácido cítrico, descrevendo de maneira sucinta os trabalhos mais recentes, descrevendo microrganismos, técnicas de produção e substratos empregados, etc.

  9. Effect of citric acid on noncovalent interactions in biopolymer jellies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuanyzhbek Musabekov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of citric acid on the formation of gels based on gelatine, melon pulp and sugar has been studied. It is found that the structuring of gelatin the presence of melon pulp is due to hydrogen bonds between the amino acids of gelatin and pectin melon by hydrogen bonds. It is shown that the structuring of gelatin and gelatin – melon pulp depends on the concentration of sugar. The addition of acid in the pectin-gelatin composition reduces the pH, the solubility of pectin and accelerates the formation of jelly. This is due to the fact that in the presence of citric acid reduced the degree of dissociation of galacturonic acid. The intensity of the effect of citric acid on the structure in the presence of melon pulp could be explained by the formation of hydrogen bonds between pectin and citric acid.

  10. Citric Acid Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Pattie L. (Compiler)

    2013-01-01

    The Ground Systems Development and Operations GSDO) Program at NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has the primary objective of modernizing and transforming the launch and range complex at KSC to benefit current and future NASA programs along with other emerging users. Described as the launch support and infrastructure modernization program in the NASA Authorization Act of 2010, the GSDO Program will develop and implement shared infrastructure and process improvements to provide more flexible, affordable, and responsive capabilities to a multi-user community. In support of the GSDO Program, the purpose of this project is to demonstratevalidate citric acid as a passivation agent for stainless steel. Successful completion of this project will result in citric acid being qualified for use as an environmentally preferable alternative to nitric acid for passivation of stainless steel alloys in NASA and DoD applications.

  11. Citric Acid Addition to Controlling Crystallization of Barium Sulphate (BaSO4) in Pipes through Ba2+ Concentration Variation in the Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanto, G.; Fatra, F.; Dera, N. S.; Muryanto, S.; Bayuseno, A. P.

    2017-05-01

    The scale of barium sulphate (BaSO4) is common scale for mineral deposit that found in the offshore oil and gas exploitation. This scale is related with precipitation and grown of mineral deposit on the pipelines surface. Therefore, it results in blockage at the pipe. This paper presents the experimental scaling of barium sulphate in the laminar flow. The barium sulphate solution was prepared by mixing an equimolar solution of barium chloride (BaCl2) and sodium sulphate (Na2SO4). The flow rate is 40 ml/min at temperature of 50 °C. The solutions added by citric acid (C6H8O7) with variation concentration of 0 ppm, 5 ppm, and 10 ppm. The crystallization of barium sulphate was measured by using the conductivity meters. The barite crytals were dried and characterized by using SEM/EDX and XRD. The SEM Results show that the morphology of Barite scale was change in the presence of citric acid. The mineral of barium sulphate was pure barite based on the XRD phase analysis. The presence of citric acid clearly inhibit the crystallization of barium sulphate.

  12. Aconitase and citric acid fermentation by Aspergillus niger.

    OpenAIRE

    Kubicek, C P; Röhr, M

    1985-01-01

    In view of the often-cited theory that citric acid accumulation is caused by an inhibition of aconitase activity, the equilibrium of the reaction of aconitase was investigated by comparing in vivo steady-state concentrations of citrate and isocitrate in Aspergillus niger grown under various citric acid-producing conditions. With the equilibrium catalyzed by the A. niger enzyme in vitro, similar values were obtained. The validity of our in vivo measurements was verified by the addition of the ...

  13. Citric acid production by Candida strains under intracellular nitrogen limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anastassiadis, S; Aivasidis, A; Wandrey, C

    2002-10-01

    A suitable strain and important factors influencing citric acid formation in yeasts were identified. Candida oleophila ATCC 20177 was chosen as the best citric acid producer from several Candida strains. Yields of 50 g/l citric acid were produced in shake flask and 80 g/l in fed-batch fermentations with 1.5 and 3 g/l NH(4)Cl under non-optimized conditions. Ammonium nitrogen was identified as the limiting substrate for citrate formation. Citric acid excretion begins a few hours after exhaustion of nitrogen in the medium. The importance of intracellular nitrogen limitation was clarified by elemental analysis of C. oleophila biomass. The nitrogen content of C. oleophila biomass decreased from 7.45% during the growth phase to 3.96% in the production phase. The biomass contained less carbon and more trace elements in the growth phase compared with the production phase. Relatively high intracellular NH(4)(+) concentration of about 1.2 mg/g biomass (~37.4 mM) was found during the production phase. The low intracellular nitrogen content and increase of intracellular NH(4)(+) concentration, possibly caused by proteolysis following extracellular nitrogen exhaustion, trigger citric acid production. Intracellular nitrogen limitation and the increase in intracellular NH(4)(+) concentration are the most important factors influencing citric acid formation in yeasts.

  14. Submerged citric acid fermentation on orange peel autohydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, Beatriz; Torrado, Ana; Torre, Paolo; Converti, Attilio; Domínguez, José Manuel

    2008-04-09

    The citrus-processing industry generates in the Mediterranean area huge amounts of orange peel as a byproduct from the industrial extraction of citrus juices. To reduce its environmental impact as well as to provide an extra profit, this residue was investigated in this study as an alternative substrate for the fermentative production of citric acid. Orange peel contained 16.9% soluble sugars, 9.21% cellulose, 10.5% hemicellulose, and 42.5% pectin as the most important components. To get solutions rich in soluble and starchy sugars to be used as a carbon source for citric acid fermentation, this raw material was submitted to autohydrolysis, a process that does not make use of any acidic catalyst. Liquors obtained by this process under optimum conditions (temperature of 130 degrees C and a liquid/solid ratio of 8.0 g/g) contained 38.2 g/L free sugars (8.3 g/L sucrose, 13.7 g/L glucose, and 16.2 g/L fructose) and significant amounts of metals, particularly Mg, Ca, Zn, and K. Without additional nutrients, these liquors were employed for citric acid production by Aspergillus niger CECT 2090 (ATCC 9142, NRRL 599). Addition of calcium carbonate enhanced citric acid production because it prevented progressive acidification of the medium. Moreover, the influence of methanol addition on citric acid formation was investigated. Under the best conditions (40 mL of methanol/kg of medium), an effective conversion of sugars into citric acid was ensured (maximum citric acid concentration of 9.2 g/L, volumetric productivity of 0.128 g/(L.h), and yield of product on consumed sugars of 0.53 g/g), hence demonstrating the potential of orange peel wastes as an alternative raw material for citric acid fermentation.

  15. Minimal inhibitory concentrations of undissociated lactic, acetic, citric and propionic acid for Listeria monocytogenes under conditions relevant to cheese

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wemmenhove, Ellen; Valenberg, van Hein J.F.; Zwietering, Marcel H.; Hooijdonk, van Toon C.M.; Wells-Bennik, Marjon H.J.

    2016-01-01

    Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of undissociated lactic acid were determined for six different Listeria monocytogenes strains at 30 °C and in a pH range of 4.2-5.8. Small increments in pH and acid concentrations were used to accurately establish the growth/no growth limits of L.

  16. Cleaner production of citric acid by recycling its extraction wastewater treated with anaerobic digestion and electrodialysis in an integrated citric acid-methane production process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Su, Xian-Feng; Bao, Jia-Wei; Chen, Yang-Qiu; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2015-01-01

    To solve the pollution problem of extraction wastewater in citric acid production, an integrated citric acid-methane production process was proposed. Extraction wastewater was treated through anaerobic digestion and the anaerobic digestion effluent (ADE) was recycled for the next batch of citric acid fermentation, thus eliminating wastewater discharge and reducing water consumption. Excessive Na(+) contained in ADE could significantly inhibit citric acid fermentation in recycling and was removed by electrodialysis in this paper. Electrodialysis performance was improved after pretreatment of ADE with air stripping and activated carbon adsorption to remove precipitable metal ions and pigments. Moreover, the concentrate water was recycled and mixed with feed to improve the water recovery rate above 95% in electrodialysis treatment, while the dilute water was collected for citric acid fermentation. The removal rate of Na(+) in ADE was above 95% and the citric acid production was even higher than that with tap water. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of the temperature and the CO2 concentration on the behaviour of the citric acid as a scale inhibitor of CaCO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, K.; Aponte, H.; Vera, E.

    2017-12-01

    For all Industrial sector is important to extend the useful life of the materials that they use in their process, the scales of CaCO3 are common in situation where fluids are handled with high concentration of ions and besides this temperatures and CO2 concentration dissolved, that scale generates large annual losses because there is a reduction in the process efficiency or corrosion damage under deposit, among other. In order to find new alternatives to this problem, the citric acid was evaluated as scale of calcium carbonate inhibition in critical condition of temperature and concentration of CO2 dissolved. Once the results are obtained it was carried out the statistical evaluation in order to generate an equation that allow to see that behaviour, giving as result, a good efficiency of inhibition to the conditions evaluated the scales of products obtained were characterized through scanning electron microscopy.

  18. Influence of dissolved oxygen concentration on intracellular pH for regulation of Aspergillus niger growth rate during citric acid fermentation in a stirred tank bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Ikram-Ul; Ali, Sikander; Qadeer, M A

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we report the regulation of Aspergillus niger growth rate during citric acid fermentation in a stirred tank bioreactor. For this, the influence of dissolved oxygen concentration in a medium on intracellular pH values and consequently on overall microbial metabolism was emphasized. Intracellular pH of mycelium grown under different concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the medium was determined. Sensitivity of proteins toward proton concentration is well recognized, therefore pH influences on the activities of key regulatory enzymes of Aspergillus niger were determined at pH values similar to those detected in the cells grown under lower dissolved oxygen concentrations. The results have shown significantly reduced specific activities of hexokinase, 6-phosphofructokinase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in more acidic environment, while pyruvate kinase was found to be relatively insensitive towards higher proton concentration. As expected, due to the reduced specific activities of regulatory enzymes under more acidic conditions, overall metabolism should be hindered in the medium with lower dissolved oxygen concentration which was confirmed by detecting the reduced specific growth rates. From the studies, we conclude that dissolved oxygen concentration affects the intracellular pH and thus growth rate of Aspergillus niger during the fermentation process.

  19. Utilization of citric acid in wood bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citric acid (CA) is a weak organic acid. It exists most notably in citrus fruits so that it is named likewise. As a commodity chemical, CA is produced on a large scale by fermentation. In this chapter, we first briefly review the applied research and methods for commercial production of CA. Then we ...

  20. CITRIC ACID PRODUCTION USING FERMENTATION TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    ANKIT KUMAR; OM PRAKASH VERMA

    2007-01-01

    Citric acid, C3H4OH(COOH)3, (Scheele and Wehmer 1897) can be generally manufactured by chemical synthesis which is not much preferred now-a-days because of high costs involved in it and also by fermentation of sugar containing sources in the presence of fungus Aspergillus niger. Citric acid is used in confections and soft drinks ( as a flavouring agent), in metal-cleaning compositions, and in improving the stability of foods and other organic substances by suppressing the deleterious action o...

  1. Citric Acid Production by Aspergillus niger Cultivated on Parkia biglobosa Fruit Pulp

    OpenAIRE

    Auta, Helen Shnada; Abidoye, Khadijat Toyin; Tahir, Hauwa; Ibrahim, Aliyu Dabai; Aransiola, Sesan Abiodun

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the potential of Parkia biglobosa fruit pulp as substrate for citric acid production by Aspergillus niger. Reducing sugar was estimated by 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid and citric acid was estimated spectrophotometrically using pyridine-acetic anhydride methods. The studies revealed that production parameters (pH, inoculum size, substrate concentration, incubation temperature, and fermentation period) had profound effect on the amount of citric acid produced...

  2. Attempts at improving citric acid fermentation by Aspergillus niger in beet-molasses medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adham, Nehad Z

    2002-08-01

    Natural oils with high unsaturated fatty acids content when added at concentrations of 2% and 4% (v/v) to beet molasses (BM) medium caused a considerable increase in citric acid yield from Aspergillus niger. The fermentation capacities were also examined for production of citric acid using BM-oil media under different fermentation conditions. Maximum citric acid yield was achieved in surface culture in the presence of 4% olive oil after 12 days incubation.

  3. 21 CFR 184.1033 - Citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Citric acid. 184.1033 Section 184.1033 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... lemon or pineapple juice; by mycological fermentation using Candida spp., described in §§ 173.160 and...

  4. Citric acid production from whey with sugars and additives by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Citric acid (CA) production by Aspergillus niger ATCC9642 from whey with different concentrations of sucrose, glucose, fructose, galactose riboflavin, tricalcium phosphate and methanol in surface culture process was studied. It was found that whey with 15% (w/v) sucrose with or without 1% methanol was the most ...

  5. Citric Acid Production by Aspergillus niger Cultivated on Parkia biglobosa Fruit Pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auta, Helen Shnada; Abidoye, Khadijat Toyin; Tahir, Hauwa; Ibrahim, Aliyu Dabai; Aransiola, Sesan Abiodun

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the potential of Parkia biglobosa fruit pulp as substrate for citric acid production by Aspergillus niger. Reducing sugar was estimated by 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid and citric acid was estimated spectrophotometrically using pyridine-acetic anhydride methods. The studies revealed that production parameters (pH, inoculum size, substrate concentration, incubation temperature, and fermentation period) had profound effect on the amount of citric acid produced. The maximum yield was obtained at the pH of 2 with citric acid of 1.15 g/L and reducing sugar content of 0.541 mMol(-1), 3% vegetative inoculum size with citric acid yield of 0.53 g/L and reducing sugar content of 8.87 mMol(-1), 2% of the substrate concentration with citric acid yield of 0.83 g/L and reducing sugar content of 9.36 mMol(-1), incubation temperature of 55°C with citric acid yield of 0.62 g/L and reducing sugar content of 8.37 mMol(-1), and fermentation period of 5 days with citric acid yield of 0.61 g/L and reducing sugar content of 3.70 mMol(-1). The results of this study are encouraging and suggest that Parkia biglobosa pulp can be harnessed at low concentration for large scale citric acid production.

  6. Citric acid inhibits development of cataracts, proteinuria and ketosis in streptozotocin (type1) diabetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Ryoji; Nagai, Mime; Shimasaki, Satoko; Baynes, John W.; Fujiwara, Yukio

    2010-01-01

    Although many fruits such as lemon and orange contain citric acid, little is known about beneficial effects of citric acid on health. Here we measured the effect of citric acid on the pathogenesis of diabetic complications in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Although oral administration of citric acid to diabetic rats did not affect blood glucose concentration, it delayed the development of cataracts, inhibited accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) such as Nε-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL) and Nε-(carboxymethyl)lysine (CML) in lens proteins, and protected against albuminuria and ketosis . We also show that incubation of protein with acetol, a metabolite formed from acetone by acetone monooxygenase, generate CEL, suggesting that inhibition of ketosis by citric acid may lead to the decrease in CEL in lens proteins. These results demonstrate that the oral administration of citric acid ameliorates ketosis and protects against the development of diabetic complications in an animal model of type 1 diabetes. PMID:20117096

  7. Aqueous citric acid as a promising cleaning agent of whey evaporators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; P. Johansen, Nikolaj; Garcia, André Castilho

    2017-01-01

    concentration of citric acid was the most effective for all the investigated volumes. From the citric acid solutions, spontaneously supersaturated in calcium citrate tetrahydrate during scale dissolution in the smaller volumes for all citric acid concentrations, calcium citrate tetrahydrate slowly precipitated...... in acceptable purity for technical use. Dissolution efficiency of aqueous solutions of 0.200 mol L−1 nitric acid combined with 0.100, 0.500, and 1.00 mol L−1 citric acid with final volumes of 100, 50, and 25 mL showed synergistic effect especially for the higher concentrations and lower volumes of two acids......Scale in evaporators for lactose production was identified as mainly calcium citrate tetrahydrate with phosphate contaminations. Dissolution of 3.00 g of scale in aqueous solutions of 0.100, 0.500, and 1.00 mol L−1 citric acid with final volumes of 100, 50, and 25 mL was investigated. The highest...

  8. Crosslinking of agarose bioplastic using citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awadhiya, Ankur; Kumar, David; Verma, Vivek

    2016-10-20

    We report chemical crosslinking of agarose bioplastic using citric acid. Crosslinking was confirmed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The effects of crosslinking on the tensile strength, swelling, thermal stability, and degradability of the bioplastic were studied in detail. The tensile strength of the bioplastic films increased from 25.1MPa for control films up to a maximum of 52.7MPa for citric acid crosslinked films. At 37°C, the amount of water absorbed by crosslinked agarose bioplastic was only 11.5% of the amount absorbed by non-crosslinked controls. Thermogravimetric results showed that the crosslinked samples retain greater mass at high temperature (>450°C) than control samples. Moreover, while the crosslinked films were completely degradable, the rate of degradation was lower compared to non-crosslinked controls. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of citric acid on formation of oxides of Cu and Zn in modified ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We report here the influence of citric acid concentration on the formation of sol-gel products in each of Cu and Zn systems by using respective metal nitrate as precursor and citric acid as gelling agent. The synthesized sol-gel products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope.

  10. Synergic effect of Citric Acid and Red Onion skin extract on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antioxidant potentials of citric acid and onion skin extract on the oxidative stability of vegetable oil were examined. Results from the peroxide values showed that citric acid had the best antioxidative potentials at a concentration of 0.2g/100g of vegetable oil. This was followed by the antioxidative potentials of a mixture ...

  11. Optimization of citric acid production by Aspergillus niger

    OpenAIRE

    H.R Samadlouie; Sh Gharanjik

    2015-01-01

    Among the various fungal strains screened for citric acid production, Aspergillus niger is known to produce considerable amounts of citric acid and other organic acids when cultivated in submerge fermentation. In this study, optimization of the medium components was carried out using "one-factor-at-a-time" and response surface methods (RSM). One-factor-at-a-time indicated that the amount of citric acid production was increased along with the increasing of agitation speed (from 150 to 200 rpm)...

  12. Production of Citric Acid by Aspergillus niger Using Pineapple Waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kareem, S. O.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A solid state fermentation was developed for citric acid production from pineapple waste by Aspergillus niger KS-7. The medium was supplemented with different concentration of glucose, sucrose, ammonium nitrate and ammonium phosphate. It was found that pineapple waste with 15% (w/v sucrose and ammonium nitrate (0.25% w/v gave the optimum citric acid secretion (60.61 g/kg in the presence of methanol (2% v/v when fermented for 5 days at 30 °C with the initial moisture content of 65%. The yield was more than 90% based on the amount of fermentable sugar consumed. These results present the use of pineapple peel as a cheap medium for the production of commercially valuable organic acid by A. niger.

  13. CITRIC ACID FERMENTATION OF SUGARS PURIFIED WITH CHELATING RESIN1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Yuichi; Johnson, Marvin J.

    1961-01-01

    Noguchi, Yuichi (University of Wisconsin, Madison), and Marvin J. Johnson. Citric acid fermentation of sugars purified with chelating resin. J. Bacteriol. 82:538–541. 1961.—A new, independently isolated strain of Aspergillus niger capable of giving high yields of citric acid in submerged culture was found to show the same behavior toward iron, zinc, and manganese as a previously studied strain. Citric acid accumulation did not occur in the presence of manganese. Best citric acid production was obtained in the presence of limited amounts of iron and zinc. Use of a chelating ion exchange resin was found to be an excellent method of removing polyvalent metals from sugars, either for analytical purposes or for fermentation. Commercial glucose, after resin treatment, gave citric acid yields of more than 80% when supplemented with iron and zinc. Unpurified glucose was converted to citric acid in good yields by mycelium grown on resin-treated glucose. PMID:14480219

  14. The effect of Aspergillus niger mutagenization on citric acid biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Walisch

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The industrial A. niger strain producing citric acid was mutagenized with the use of new chemical mutagens: free nitroxyl radicals. Strains of higher citric acid production yield were obtained. Citric acid was produced in a shorter time compared to the initial strain. During 6-12 months of storage most of the strains preserved their positive features which proves that mutants with profitable biotechnological properties were obtained. These mutants are used in industrial process.

  15. Effects of Different Fermentation Conditions on Growth and Citric Acid Production Kinetics of two Yarrowia lipolytica Strains

    OpenAIRE

    S. Karasu-Yalcin; Tijen Bozdemir, M.; Yesim Ozbas, Z.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, effects of initial pH, temperature, initial ammonium chloride concentration and initial concentration of various minerals on growth and citric acid production kinetics of two Yarrowia lipolytica strains were investigated in shake flask batch experiments. Specific growth rate and citric acid production rates were correlated with each one of the investigated parameters by using non-linear regression analysis. Maximum citric acid concentration was obtained at initial pH 7.0 and...

  16. A study of partial molar volumes of citric acid and tartaric acid in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Partial molar volumes of citric acid and tartaric acid have been determined in water and binary aqueous mixtures of ethanol (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25% by weight of ethanol) at different temperatures and acid concentrations from the solution density measurements. The data have been evaluated by using Masson equation and ...

  17. Thermodynamic properties of citric acid and the system citric acid-water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruif, C.G. de; Miltenburg, J.C. van; Sprenkels, A.J.J.; Stevens, G.; Graaf, W. de; Wit, H.G.M. de

    1982-01-01

    The binary system citric acid-water has been investigated with static vapour pressure measurements, adiabatic calorimetry, solution calorimetry, solubility measurements and powder X-ray measurements. The data are correlated by thermodynamics and a large part of the phase diagram is given. Molar heat

  18. Effect of different concentrations of acetic, citric, and propionic acid dipping solutions on bacterial contamination of raw chicken skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial contamination of raw, processed poultry may include spoilage bacteria and foodborne pathogens. We evaluated different combinations of organic acid (OA) wash solutions for their ability to reduce bacterial contamination of raw chicken skin and to inhibit growth of spoilage bacteria and path...

  19. Advances in citric acid fermentation by Aspergillus niger: biochemical aspects, membrane transport and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagianni, Maria

    2007-01-01

    Citric acid is regarded as a metabolite of energy metabolism, of which the concentration will rise to appreciable amounts only under conditions of substantive metabolic imbalances. Citric acid fermentation conditions were established during the 1930s and 1940s, when the effects of various medium components were evaluated. The biochemical mechanism by which Aspergillus niger accumulates citric acid has continued to attract interest even though its commercial production by fermentation has been established for decades. Although extensive basic biochemical research has been carried out with A. niger, the understanding of the events relevant for citric acid accumulation is not completely understood. This review is focused on citric acid fermentation by A. niger. Emphasis is given to aspects of fermentation biochemistry, membrane transport in A. niger and modeling of the production process.

  20. Effect of exogenously added rhamnolipids on citric acid production ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The presence of rhamnolipids contributed to a decrease of the oil droplet size, most notably for samples containing sunflower oil and its hydrolization products. The citric acid yield for cultures not supplemented with rhamnolipids was at 82.9 g/l, with a 1:0.04 citric acid to isocitric acid ratio (CA:ICA). The addition of ...

  1. Production of Citric Acid from a New Substrate, Undersized Semolina, by Aspergillus niger

    OpenAIRE

    Emine Alben; Osman Erkmen

    2004-01-01

    The production of citric acid from fermentation medium (mass per volume ratio 0.01 % of undersized semolina) by Aspergillus niger was studied by shake culture method. The effects of initial pH (4.5, 5.5 and 6.5), methanol (volume fraction 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 %) and ammonium nitrate (mass per volume ratio 0.01 %) on the production of citric acid were investigated. Citric acid concentration, biomass concentration and the amount of total carbohydrates (as glucose) were determined during fermentatio...

  2. Enhancement of citric acid production with ram horn hydrolysate by Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbanoglu, Esabi Basaran

    2004-03-01

    The potential use of ram horn hydrolysate (RHH) as a supplement for improvement of citric acid production by Aspergillus niger NRRL 330 was studied. For this purpose, first RHH was produced. Ram horns were hydrolyzed by treating with acid (6 N-H2SO4) and the RHH was obtained. With the addition of RHH to the fermentation medium with a final concentration of 4% (optimal concentration), citric acid value reached a maximum value (94 g/l), which is 52% higher than that of the control experiment. The addition of 4% (v/v) RHH enhanced citric acid accumulation, reduced residual sugar concentration and stimulated mycelial growth. Adding 4% RHH had no adverse effects on A. niger. As a result, RHH was found to be suitable as a valuable supplement for citric acid production in the submerged fermentation.

  3. Citric Acid Production by Aspergillus niger Cultivated on Parkia biglobosa Fruit Pulp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidoye, Khadijat Toyin; Tahir, Hauwa; Ibrahim, Aliyu Dabai; Aransiola, Sesan Abiodun

    2014-01-01

    The study was conducted to investigate the potential of Parkia biglobosa fruit pulp as substrate for citric acid production by Aspergillus niger. Reducing sugar was estimated by 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid and citric acid was estimated spectrophotometrically using pyridine-acetic anhydride methods. The studies revealed that production parameters (pH, inoculum size, substrate concentration, incubation temperature, and fermentation period) had profound effect on the amount of citric acid produced. The maximum yield was obtained at the pH of 2 with citric acid of 1.15 g/L and reducing sugar content of 0.541 mMol−1, 3% vegetative inoculum size with citric acid yield of 0.53 g/L and reducing sugar content of 8.87 mMol−1, 2% of the substrate concentration with citric acid yield of 0.83 g/L and reducing sugar content of 9.36 mMol−1, incubation temperature of 55°C with citric acid yield of 0.62 g/L and reducing sugar content of 8.37 mMol−1, and fermentation period of 5 days with citric acid yield of 0.61 g/L and reducing sugar content of 3.70 mMol−1. The results of this study are encouraging and suggest that Parkia biglobosa pulp can be harnessed at low concentration for large scale citric acid production. PMID:27433535

  4. New Perspectives for Citric Acid Production and Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos R. Soccol

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a great worldwide demand for citric acid consumption due to its low toxicity when compared with other acidulants used mainly in the pharmaceutical and food industries. Other applications of citric acid can be found in detergents and cleaning products, cosmetics and toiletries, and other. Global production has now reached 1.4 million tonnes and there is annual growth of 3.5–4.0 % in demand/consumption of citric acid. As a result of the adverse market conditions, only big producers have survived. Any increase in citric acid productivity would be of potential interest and hence there is an obvious need to consider all possible ways in which this might be achieved. The production by submerged fermentation is still dominating. However, solid-state processes can create new possibilities for producers. Many by-products and residues of the agro-industry can be used in the production of citric acid. A cost reduction in citric acid production can be achieved by using less expensive substrates. The use of agro-industrial residues as support in solid-state fermentation is economically important and minimizes environmental problems. Other perspectives for citric acid production sector are the improvement of citric acid producing strains, which have been carried out by mutagenesis and selection.

  5. Production of Citric Acid from Solid State Fermentation of Sugarcane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aspergillus niger is the leading microorganism of choice for citric acid production. Sugarcane waste was used as substrate under solid state fermentation to comparatively evaluate the citric acid production capacity of Aspergillus niger isolates and the indigenous microflora in the sugarcane waste. Known optimal cultural ...

  6. A kinetic model for citric acid productionfrom apple pomac by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-10-06

    Oct 6, 2008 ... production and Luedeking-Piret-like equation for glucose consumption. The model appeared to ... Key words: Kinetic model, citric acid, Aspergillus niger, Luedeking-Piret equation, apple pomace, growth- associated. .... citric acid by the acetic anhydride and pyridine method of Marier and Boulet (1958).

  7. Application of Box-Behnken Design for Optimum Citric Acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of three factors, temperature, pH and inoculum density on citric acid production was determined using a three variable Box-Behnken design (BBD). The BBD was used to develop a statistical model to describe the production of citric acid and the fermentation conditions were then optimised using RSM. The model ...

  8. Optimising the Effect of Stimulants on Citric Acid Production from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Additives such as low molecular weight alcohols, trace metals, phytate, lipids etc have been reported to stimulate citric acid production. Hence the objective of this study was to investigate the effect of stimulating the metabolic activity of Aspergillus niger for the purpose of improved citric acid production from cocoyam starch.

  9. Citric acid inhibits growth of Helicobacter pylori in vitro: a new strategy for eradication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zazgornik, Jan; Mittermayer, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    About 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori. The association of peptic ulcer disease with Helicobacter pylori is well documented. Therefore eradication is obligatory. However, the high costs of multidrug therapy, the resistance of Helicobacter pylori to antibiotics as well as the sometimes present drug intolerance are limiting factors. The inhibitory effect of 3% hydrogen peroxide, 8.4% sodium bicarbonate, 2% ascorbic acid, citric acid in combination with sodium citrate, 7% and 14% citric acid solutions, respectively, on nine Helicobacter pylori strains were tested in vitro. Citric acid showed a potent inhibitory activity on growth of Helicobacter pylori strains in vitro. This was observed not only when citric acid was applied alone but also if citric acid was given together with low concentration of sodium citrate. Two percent ascorbic acid inhibited three, sodium bicarbonate two and hydrogen peroxide one of the nine tested Helicobacter pylori strains, respectively. Citric acid is a cheap substance present in many fruits and produced by food industry, and it demonstrated powerful inhibitory effect on the growth of Helicobacter pylori strains. On the basis of our findings citric acid should be further evaluated for the eradication of Helicobacter pylori.

  10. Citric acid production in Yarrowia lipolytica SWJ-1b yeast when grown on waste cooking oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Lv, Jinshun; Xu, Jiaxing; Zhang, Tong; Deng, Yuanfang; He, Jianlong

    2015-03-01

    In this study, citric acid was produced from waste cooking oil by Yarrowia lipolytica SWJ-1b. To get the maximal yield of citric acid, the compositions of the medium for citric acid production were optimized, and our results showed that extra nitrogen and magnesium rather than vitamin B1 and phosphate were needed for CA accumulation when using waste cooking oil. The results also indicated that the optimal initial concentration of the waste cooking oil in the medium for citric acid production was 80.0 g/l, and the ideal inoculation size was 1 × 10(7) cells/l of medium. We also reported that during 10-l fermentation, 31.7 g/l of citric acid, 6.5 g/l of isocitric acid, 5.9 g/l of biomass, and 42.1 g/100.0 g cell dry weight of lipid were attained from 80.0 g/l of waste cooking oil within 336 h. At the end of the fermentation, 94.6 % of the waste cooking oil was utilized by the cells of Y. lipolytica SWJ-1b, and the yield of citric acid was 0.4 g/g waste cooking oil, which suggested that waste cooking oil was a suitable carbon resource for citric acid production.

  11. Optimization of the integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process by air stripping and glucoamylase addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Chen, Yang-Qiu; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Wang, Ke; Tang, Lei; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2015-03-01

    To solve the problem of extraction wastewater in citric acid industry, an integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process was proposed. In the integrated process, extraction wastewater was treated by mesophilic anaerobic digestion and then reused to make mash for the next batch of citric acid fermentation. In this study, an Aspergillus niger mutant strain exhibiting resistance to high metal ions concentration was used to eliminate the inhibition of 200 mg/L Na(+) and 300 mg/L K(+) in anaerobic digestion effluent (ADE) and citric acid production increased by 25.0 %. Air stripping was used to remove ammonium, alkalinity, and part of metal ions in ADE before making mash. In consequence, citric acid production was significantly improved but still lower by 6.1 % than the control. Results indicated that metal ions in ADE synergistically inhibited the activity of glucoamylase, thus reducing citric acid production. When 130 U/g glucoamylase was added before fermentation, citric acid production was 141.5 g/L, which was even higher than the control (140.4 g/L). This process could completely eliminate extraction wastewater discharge and reduce water resource consumption.

  12. Optimization of citric acid production by Aspergillus niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.R Samadlouie

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Among the various fungal strains screened for citric acid production, Aspergillus niger is known to produce considerable amounts of citric acid and other organic acids when cultivated in submerge fermentation. In this study, optimization of the medium components was carried out using "one-factor-at-a-time" and response surface methods (RSM. One-factor-at-a-time indicated that the amount of citric acid production was increased along with the increasing of agitation speed (from 150 to 200 rpm, raising the incubation temperature (from 17 to 32 and decreasing pH value (to 2. Moreover, in comparison with the other groups, citric acid production in the treatment containing soy bean powder and minerals revealed a significant increase (up to 25 g/l. The results showed that application of ultrasonic wave during the growth phase could remarkably enhance the production of citric acid. Based on the results of one-factor-at-a-time, sucrose and soy bean powder were the selected additives to test their effect on citric acid production using RSM. The two variables were identified to have significant effects on citric acid production and the maximum citric acid production of 58 g/l was resulted from the combination of 230.87 g/l sucrose and 200.81 g/l soy bean powder. In this study, the significant increase in the production of citric acid in the optimal conditions indicated the using of appropriate statistical methods and also the correct levels of selected variables.

  13. Modelling of the growth-no growth interface of Issatchenkia occidentalis, an olive spoiling yeast, as a function of the culture media, NaCl, citric and sorbic acid concentrations: study of its inactivation in the no growth region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo López, F N; Quintana, M C Durán; Fernández, A Garrido

    2007-06-30

    A global logistic model incorporating a dummy variable for the growth medium (laboratory media or table olives brine) was used for the estimation of the growth-no growth interface of Issatchenkia occidentalis as a function of NaCl, citric and sorbic acid concentrations. The model permitted the deduction of the region where the combination of citric and sorbic acids in laboratory media (above 0.3% and 0.03% wt/vol, respectively) and brine (above 0.1% and 0.03% wt/vol), at 5% NaCl, inhibited the growth of the yeast. Subsequently, the model was validated in laboratory media within the no growth region by a response surface D-optimal design. Inactivation concentrations of sorbic acid produced a progressive loss of viability in I. occidentalis that followed a first order kinetic or downward concave inactivation curves, depending on environmental variables. These curves were properly described by a (primary) model deduced from the Weibull distribution, whose parameters, first decimal reduction time (D(beta)) and shape (beta), were expressed as a function of sorbic acid concentrations (secondary model). At 5% NaCl and within the experimental region checked, an increase of 0.010% and 0.008% sorbic acid reduced D(beta) in 10 h and decrease beta by 10%. Finally, the model was also validated in real "seasoned" table olives packing reporting a complete inactivation of the yeasts' population.

  14. Effect of citric acid and acetic acid on the performance of broilers

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, M. Z.; Khandaker, Z.H; Chowdhury, S D; Islam, K.M.S

    2008-01-01

    An experiment was conducted with commercial broilers to investigate the effects of feeding citric acid, acetic acid and their combination on their performance and to determine the economic competence of using citric acid and acetic acid in broiler rations. A total number of 108 one day old straight run broiler chicks were distributed to four dietary treatments i.e. 0 % citric or acetic acid (A) , 0.5% citric acid (B), 0.5% acetic acid (C) and their combinations 0.5% citric acid and 0.5% aceti...

  15. Influence of Citric Acid on the Pink Color and Characteristics of Sous Vide Processed Chicken Breasts During Chill Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ki-Won

    2015-01-01

    Chicken breast dipped with citric acid (CA) was treated by sous vide processing and stored in a refrigerated state for 0, 3, 6, 9, and 14 d. A non-dipped control group (CON) and three groups dipped in different concentrations of citric acid concentration were analyzed (0.5%, 0.5CIT; 2.0%, 2CIT and 5.0%, 5CIT; w/v). Cooking yield and moisture content increased due to the citric acid. While the redness of the juice and meat in all groups showed significant increase during storage, the redness of the citric acid groups was reduced compared to the control group (pcitric acid-treated samples than in untreated ones, indicating extended shelf life of the cooked chicken breast dipped in citric acid solution. The shear force of the 2CIT and 5CIT groups was significantly lower (pcitric acid concentrations. PMID:26761885

  16. Microbiological Production of Citric and Isocitric Acids from Sunflower Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V. Kamzolova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth of wild type strain Yarrowia lipolytica VKM Y-2373 and its mutant Yarrowia lipolytica N 15 as well the biosynthesis of citric and isocitric acids on sunflower oil were studied. It was indicated that cell growth was associated with the simultaneous utilization of glycerol and free fatty acids produced during oil hydrolysis. The activities of enzymes of glycerol metabolism (glycerol kinase, fatty acid assimilation enzymes of glyoxylate cycle (isocitrate lyase and malate synthase and citric acid cycle were comparatively assayed in Y. lipolytica grown on sunflower oil, glycerol and oleic acid. Glycerol kinase and enzymes of glyoxylate cycle were active during the whole period of cell cultivation on sunflower oil. Citric acid production and a ratio between citric and isocitric acids depended on both the strain used and the medium composition. It was revealed that wild type strain Y. lipolytica VKM Y-2373 produced almost equal amounts of citric and isocitric acids at pH=4.5 and predominantly accumulated isocitric acid at pH=6.0. The mutant Y. lipolytica N 15 produced only citric acid (150 g/L with mass yield (YCA of 1.32 g/g. Biochemical characteristics of mutant strain Y. lipolytica N 15 were discussed.

  17. Production of Citric Acid from a New Substrate, Undersized Semolina, by Aspergillus niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Alben

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The production of citric acid from fermentation medium (mass per volume ratio 0.01 % of undersized semolina by Aspergillus niger was studied by shake culture method. The effects of initial pH (4.5, 5.5 and 6.5, methanol (volume fraction 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 % and ammonium nitrate (mass per volume ratio 0.01 % on the production of citric acid were investigated. Citric acid concentration, biomass concentration and the amount of total carbohydrates (as glucose were determined during fermentation period. About 0.04, 0.0448 and 0.0506 g/L of citric acid was produced in fermentation medium with initial pH=4.5, 5.5 and 6.5, respectively. Citric acid and biomass concentrations were increased with the addition of methanol and ammonium nitrate. The yield of citric acid based on consumed sugar was about 21.9 % in the presence of 3.0 % methanol and 0.01 % ammonium nitrate in fermentation medium with initial pH=6.5.

  18. Fed-batch production of citric acid by Candida lipolytica grown on n-paraffins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crolla, A; Kennedy, K J

    2004-05-13

    This study reports on the effects of fermentor agitation and fed-batch mode of operation on citric acid production from Candida lipolytica using n-paraffin as the carbon source. An optimum range of agitation speeds in the 800-1000 rpm range corresponding to Reynolds numbers of 50000-63000 (based on initial batch conditions) seemed to give the best balance between substrate utilization for biomass growth and citric acid production. Application of multiple fed-batch feedings can be used to extend the batch fermentation and increase final citric acid concentrations and product yield. The three-cycle fed-batch system increased overall citric acid yields to 0.8-1.0 g citricacid/g n-paraffin, approximately a 100% improvement in product yield from those observed in the single cycle fed-batch system and a 200% improvement over normal batch operation. The three-cycle fed-batch mode of operation also increased the final citric acid concentration to 42 g/l from about 12 and 6g/l for single fed-batch cycle and normal batch modes of operation, respectively. Increased citric acid concentrations in three-cycle fed-batch mode was achieved at longer fermentation times.

  19. High-efficient production of citric acid by Aspergillus niger from high concentration of substrate based on the staged-addition glucoamylase strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baoshi; Li, Hua; Zhu, Linghuan; Tan, Fengling; Li, Youran; Zhang, Liang; Ding, Zhongyang; Shi, Guiyang

    2017-06-01

    Citric acid (CA), an important platform-compound, has attracted much attention because of its broad applications and huge market demand. To solve high residual sugar at the fermentation end, we put forwarded strategy of pre-saccharification and then fermentation. Results showed that the residual total sugar decreased by 10.4% and the productivity increased by 4.0% and initially high glucose inhibited cell growth. Furthermore, commercial glucoamylase with high low-pH stability was proposed to staged-add in the fermentation process, which timely compensated enzyme loss, ensuring the glucose supply rate. The fermentation productivity was evidently enhanced by 13.3% with residual total sugar decreasing by 31.3%, simplifying the subsequent product separation and extraction process. Our results confirmed that staged-addition glucoamylase strategy was feasible to effective production of CA.

  20. Effect of citric acid on the acidification of artificial pepsin solution for metacercariae isolation from fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Ki; Pyo, Kyoung-Ho; Hwang, Young-Sang; Chun, Hyang Sook; Park, Ki Hwan; Ko, Seong-Hee; Chai, Jong-Yil; Shin, Eun-Hee

    2013-11-15

    Artificial digestive solution based on pepsin is essential for collecting metacercariae from fish. To promote the enzymatic reactivity of pepsin, the pH of the solution has to be adjusted to pH 1.0-2.0. Hydrochloride (HCl) is usually used for this purpose, but the use of HCl raises safety concerns. The aim of this work was to address the usefulness of citric acid as an alternative for HCl for the acidification of pepsin solution, and to examine its potential to damage metacercariae during in vitro digestion as compared with HCl. Changes in pH after adding 1-9% of citric acid (m/v) to pepsin solution were compared to a 1% HCl (v/v) addition. Digestion of fish muscle was evaluated by measuring released protein concentrations by spectrophotometry. In addition, survival rates of metacercariae in pepsin solution were determined at different citric acid concentrations and were compared that of with 1% HCl. The present study shows that addition of citric acid reduced the pH of pepsin solutions to the required level. Addition of more than 5% of citric acid resulted in the effective digestion of fish muscle over 3h in vitro, and 5% citric acid was less lethal to metacercariae than 1% HCl in pepsin solution. Pepsin solution containing 5% citric acid had digestive capacity superior to pepsin solution containing 1% HCl after 3h incubation with released protein concentrations of 12.0 ng/ml for 5% citric acid and 9.6 ng/ml for 1% HCl. Accordingly, the present study suggests that the addition of 5% citric acid to pepsin solution is a good alternative to 1% HCl in infection studies because citric acid is a stable at room temperature and has a good safety profile. In addition, we suggest that the use of citric acid enables the preparation of commercial digestive solutions for the detection of microorganisms in fish and other vertebrate muscle tissue. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of agitation and aeration on the citric acid production by Yarrowia lipolytica grown on glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rywińska, Anita; Musiał, Izabela; Rymowicz, Waldemar; Zarowska, Barbara; Boruczkowski, Tomasz

    2012-01-01

    The effects of agitation rates from 400 to 900 rpm and aeration rates ranging from 0.18 to 0.6 vvm on biomass and citric acid production on glycerol media by acetate-negative mutants of Yarrowia lipolytica, Wratislavia 1.31 and Wratislavia AWG7, in batch culture were studied. The agitation rates of 800 and 900 rpm (at a constant aeration rate of 0.36 vvm) and aeration rates within the range of 0.24-0.48 vvm (at a constant agitation rate of 800 rpm), which generated dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) higher than 40%, were found the best for citric acid biosynthesis from glycerol. An increase in agitation rate (higher than 800 rpm) and aeration rate (higher than 0.36 vvm) had no impact on DO and citric acid production. The highest citric acid concentration (92.8 g/L) and yield (0.63 g/g) were obtained with Wratislavia 1.31 strain at 0.24 vvm. The highest volumetric citric acid production rate (1.15 g/Lh) and specific citric acid production rate (0.071 g/gh) were reached at 0.48 vvm.

  2. Sodium Picosulfate, Magnesium Oxide, and Anhydrous Citric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium picosulfate, magnesium oxide, and anhydrous citric acid combination powder is used to empty the colon (large ... clear view of the walls of the colon. Sodium picosulfate is in a class of medications called ...

  3. 78 FR 34338 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Preliminary Results of... administrative review of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (citric acid) from... is citric acid and certain citrate salts. The product is currently classified in the Harmonized...

  4. Quality changes and shelf-life extension of ready-to-eat fish patties by adding encapsulated citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou, Ricard; Claret, Anna; Stamatakis, Antonios; Martínez, Brigitte; Guerrero, Luis

    2017-12-01

    Citric acid is commonly used as a flavoring and preservative in food and beverages. The effect of adding citric acid directly or encapsulated (each at 1 and 2 g kg(-1) ) on the quality and shelf-life of ready-to-eat sea bass patties was evaluated during storage at 4 °C in vacuum skin packaging. Microbial growth and total basic volatile nitrogen were maintained at relatively low levels up to 8 weeks of storage. With respect to oxidative stability, the addition of encapsulated citric acid minimized secondary oxidation values more efficiently than its direct addition, regardless of the concentration. This is in agreement with the decreased fishy odor observed in those patties containing encapsulated citric acid. Accordingly, sensory analysis showed that the addition of encapsulated citric acid at 1 g kg(-1) resulted in lower scores in fish aroma compared to that of the control. Sourness is dependent on the amount of citric acid added, regardless of the form (direct or encapsulated). The form of citric acid addition, rather than the amount of citric acid added, caused changes in texture. Therefore, the use of encapsulated citric acid represents a suitable strategy that is of great interest in the seafood industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Biomass pyrolysis liquid to citric acid via 2-step bioconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiguang; Bai, Zhihui; Sun, Hongyan; Yu, Zhisheng; Li, Xingxing; Guo, Yifei; Zhang, Hongxun

    2014-12-31

    The use of fossil carbon sources for fuels and petrochemicals has serious impacts on our environment and is unable to meet the demand in the future. A promising and sustainable alternative is to substitute fossil carbon sources with microbial cell factories converting lignocellulosic biomass into desirable value added products. However, such bioprocesses require tolerance to inhibitory compounds generated during pretreatment of biomass. In this study, the process of sequential two-step bio-conversion of biomass pyrolysis liquid containing levoglucosan (LG) to citric acid without chemical detoxification has been explored, which can greatly improve the utilization efficiency of lignocellulosic biomass. The sequential two-step bio-conversion of corn stover pyrolysis liquid to citric acid has been established. The first step conversion by Phanerochaete chrysosporium (P. chrysosporium) is desirable to decrease the content of other compounds except levoglucosan as a pretreatment for the second conversion. The remaining levoglucosan in solution was further converted into citric acid by Aspergillus niger (A. niger) CBX-209. Thus the conversion of cellulose to citric acid is completed by both pyrolysis and bio-conversion technology. Under experimental conditions, levoglucosan yield is 12% based on the feedstock and the citric acid yield can reach 82.1% based on the levoglucosan content in the pyrolysis liquid (namely 82.1 g of citric acid per 100 g of levoglucosan). The study shows that P. chrysosporium and A. niger have the potential to be used as production platforms for value-added products from pyrolyzed lignocellulosic biomass. Selected P. chrysosporium is able to decrease the content of other compounds except levoglucosan and levoglucosan can be further converted into citric acid in the residual liquids by A. niger. Thus the conversion of cellulose to citric acid is completed by both pyrolysis and bio-conversion technology.

  6. Effect of citric acid on the utilization of olive cake diets for laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed A. Al-Harthi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The study aims at improving the utilization of olive cake (OC containing-diets for laying hens by citric acid supplementation at 0.1 and 0.2%. Olive cake was collected and dried by sunny warm air at an average temperature of 45°C with continuous stirring until completely dried. Then, the OC was included in isonutritive diets at 0, 10 and 20%. Additionally, citric acid was added at 0, 0.1 and 0.2%. This resulted in 3(OC levels×3(citric acid concentrations, producing 9 different treatments. Each treatment was represented by eight replicates of three laying hens each. The diets were fed to laying hens from 40 to 56 weeks of age. Olive cake inclusion up to 20% without citric acid supplementation in the diets of laying hens did not affect laying performance, egg quality or liver function indices, but 10% and 20% OC diets increased feed intake and impaired the feed conversion ratio (FCR compared with the control group. Citric acid added at 0.1% to the diets of laying hens containing 20% OC yielded similar FCR to the unsupplemented control. In addition, citric acid supplementation at 0.1% significantly decreased relative weight of liver compared with the other levels of citric acid, which is obvious in OC-free diet, and it significantly increased relative weight of ovary compared with the control diet, which is obvious in different diets. In conclusion, OC could be used in the laying hens’ diets at 20% when supplemented with 0.1% citric acid without negative effects on laying performance, egg quality and blood metabolites.

  7. Citric acid production by a novel Aspergillus niger isolate: II. Optimization of process parameters through statistical experimental designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfy, Walid A; Ghanem, Khaled M; El-Helow, Ehab R

    2007-12-01

    In this work, sequential optimization strategy, based on statistical designs, was employed to enhance the production of citric acid in submerged culture. For screening of fermentation medium composition significantly influencing citric acid production, the two-level Plackett-Burman design was used. Under our experimental conditions, beet molasses and corn steep liquor were found to be the major factors of the acid production. A near optimum medium formulation was obtained using this method with increased citric acid yield by five-folds. Response surface methodology (RSM) was adopted to acquire the best process conditions. In this respect, the three-level Box-Behnken design was applied. A polynomial model was created to correlate the relationship between the three variables (beet molasses, corn steep liquor and inoculum concentration) and citric acid yield. Estimated optimum composition for the production of citric acid is as follows pretreated beet molasses, 240.1g/l; corn steep liquor, 10.5g/l; and spores concentration, 10(8)spores/ml. The optimum citric acid yield was 87.81% which is 14 times than the basal medium. The five level central composite design was used for outlining the optimum values of the fermentation factors initial pH, aeration rate and temperature on citric acid production. Estimated optimum values for the production of citric acid are as follows initial pH 4.0; aeration rate, 6500ml/min and fermentation temperature, 31.5 degrees C.

  8. Effect of citric acid on setting reaction and tissue response to β-TCP granular cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Naoyuki; Tsuru, Kanji; Mori, Yoshihide; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2017-02-24

    We recently reported that when an acidic calcium phosphate solution is mixed with β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules, the resulting dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) crystals form bridges between the β-TCP granules, creating a set interconnected porous structure in approximately 1 min. Although this self-setting β-TCP granular cement (β-TCPGC) is useful for clinical applications, the short setting time is a key drawback for handling. In this study, the setting time of β-TCPGC was adjusted with the addition of citric acid, which is a known inhibiter of DCPD crystal growth. As the concentration of citric acid in the acidic calcium phosphate solution increased, the amount of DCPD formation in the set β-TCPGC decreased, and the crystal morphology of DCPD became elongated. β-TCPGC prepared with various citric acid concentrations were used as grafting material in rat calvarial bone defects to evaluate bone regeneration in vivo. Four weeks after implantation, no inflammatory reaction and approximately 20% new bone formation were observed, regardless of the presence or absence of citric acid in the liquid phase of β-TCPGC. We concluded, therefore, that citric acid might be a useful retarder of β-TCPGC setting times.

  9. Citric acid production by Yarrowia lipolytica cultivated on olive-mill wastewater-based media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, Seraphim; Galiotou-Panayotou, Maria; Fakas, Stylianos; Komaitis, Michael; Aggelis, George

    2008-05-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica ACA-DC 50109 cultivated on olive-mill wastewater (O.M.W.)-based media, enriched with commercial-industrial glucose, presented an efficient cell growth. Parameters of growth were unaffected by the presence of O.M.Ws in the growth medium. In diluted O.M.Ws enriched with high glucose amounts (initial sugar concentration, 65 g l(-1)), a notable quantity of total citric acid was produced (28.9 g l(-1)). O.M.W.-based media had a noteworthy stimulating effect on the production of citric acid, since both final citric acid concentration and conversion yield of citric acid produced per unit of sugar consumed were higher when compared with the respective parameters obtained from trials without added O.M.W. Adaptation of the strain in O.M.W.-based media favoured the biosynthesis of cellular unsaturated fatty acids (principally of oleic and palmitoleic acids). Additionally, a non-negligible decrease of the phenolic compounds in the growth medium [up to 15% (wt/wt)], a slight decrease of the phyto-toxicity, and a remarkable decolourisation of the O.M.W. were observed. All these results suggest the potentiality of O.M.Ws utilisation in the fermentation process of citric acid production.

  10. Citric acid production by Candida species grown on a soy-based crude glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Thomas P

    2013-01-01

    Citric acid was produced by five species of the yeast Candida after growth on a medium containing soy biodiesel-based crude glycerol. After growth on a medium containing 10 g L(-1) or 60 g L(-1) crude glycerol for 168 hr at 30°C, Candida parapsilosis ATCC 7330 and C. guilliermondii ATCC 9058 produced the highest citric acid levels. On 10 g L(-1) or 60 g L(-1) crude glycerol for 168 hr at 30°C, the citric acid level produced by C. parapsilosis ATCC 7330 was 1.8 g L(-1) or 11.3 g L(-1), respectively, while C. guilliermondii ATCC 9058 produced citric acid concentrations of 3.0 g L(-1) or 10.4 g L(-1), respectively. Biomass production by C. guilliermondii ATCC 9058 on 10 g L(-1) or 60 g L(-1) crude glycerol for 168 hr at 30°C was highest at 1.2 g L(-1) or 6.9 g L(-1), respectively. The citric acid yields observed for C. guilliermondii ATCC 9058 after growth on 10 g L(-1) or 60 g L(-1) crude glycerol (0.35 g g(-1) or 0.21 g g(-1), respectively) were generally higher than for the other Candida species tested. When similar crude glycerol concentrations were present in the culture medium, citric acid yields observed for some of the Candida species utilized in this study were about the same or higher compared to citric acid yields by Yarrowia lipolytica strains. Based on the findings, it appeared that C. guilliermondii ATCC 9058 was the most effective species utilized, with its citric acid production being similar to what has been observed when citric acid-producing strains of Y. lipolytica were grown on crude glycerol under batch conditions that could be of significance to biobased citric acid production.

  11. Citric acid: emerging applications of key biotechnology industrial product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciriminna, Rosaria; Meneguzzo, Francesco; Delisi, Riccardo; Pagliaro, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Owing to new biotechnological production units mostly located in China, global supply of citric acid in the course of the last two decades rose from less than 0.5 to more than 2 million tonnes becoming the single largest chemical obtained via biomass fermentation and the most widely employed organic acid. Critically reviewing selected research achievements and production trends, we identify the reasons for which this polycarboxylic acid will become a key chemical in the emerging bioeconomy.Graphical abstractPalermo's Fabbrica Chimica Italiana Goldenberg today. In 1930 it was Europe's largest citric acid plant (photo courtesy of Aldo Ferrande).

  12. Novel neuroprotective and hepatoprotective effects of citric acid in acute malathion intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M E; Youness, Eman R; Mohammed, Nadia A; Yassen, Noha N; Khadrawy, Yasser A; El-Toukhy, Safinaz Ebrahim; Sleem, Amany A

    2016-12-01

    To study the effect of citric acid given alone or combined with atropine on brain oxidative stress, neuronal injury, liver damage, and DNA damage of peripheral blood lymphocytes induced in the rat by acute malathion exposure. Rats were received intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of malathion 150 mg/kg along with citric acid (200 or 400 mg/kg, orally), atropine (1 mg/kg, i.p.) or citric acid 200 mg/kg + atropine 1 mg/kg and euthanized 4 h later. Malathion resulted in increased lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde) and nitric oxide concentrations accompanied with a decrease in brain reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity, total antioxidant capacity (TAC) and glucose concentrations. Paraoxonase-1, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase activities decreased in brain as well. Liver aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase activities were raised. The comet assay showed increased DNA damage of peripheral blood lymphocytes. Histological damage and increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) were observed in brain and liver. Citric acid resulted in decreased brain lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide. Meanwhile, glutathione, GPx activity, TAC capacity and brain glucose level increased. Brain AChE increased but PON1 and butyrylcholinesterase activities decreased by citric acid. Liver enzymes, the percentage of damaged blood lymphocytes, histopathological alterations and iNOS expression in brain and liver was decreased by citric acid. Meanwhile, rats treated with atropine showed decreased brain MDA, nitrite but increased GPx activity, TAC, AChE and glucose. The drug also decreased DNA damage of peripheral blood lymphocytes, histopathological alterations and iNOS expression in brain and liver. The study demonstrates a beneficial effect for citric acid upon brain oxidative stress, neuronal injury, liver and DNA damage due to acute malathion exposure. Copyright © 2016 Hainan Medical University. Production

  13. Citric acid augmented flashlamp cleaning of corroded steel surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannon, J. H.; Asmus, J. F.

    Due in large part to its environmental acceptability, solutions of citric acid are used to effectively attack and dissolve rust while maintaining the integrity of the base metal. However, the need for high temperatures and solution additives poses constraints. We have recently demonstrated an improved method of rust removal that synergistically employs the high intensity light output of a flashlamp together with a thin layer of citric acid solution. Such a combination will remove rust from steel surfaces as effectively as conventional citric acid cleaning, but at an increased rate. The short, intense burst of radiation in conjunction with the chelating properties of the citric acid acts to explosively remove surface oxide layers. Microscopic surface analysis (scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry) reveals conversion of red hematite to black magnetite during the irradiation process. Subsequent applications of the treatment serve to completely remove the magnetite leaving a clean metal surface. Optical radiation cleaning of steel surfaces offers several advantages: ambient temperature citric acid solutions are used in small quantities, organic surface contaminants are removed in the process, and an increased resistance of the cleaned surface towards flash rusting. Details of the flashcleaning process and examples of treated surfaces will be presented in this paper.

  14. Inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation for enhancing citric acid production by Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Zhang, Jianhua; Cao, Zhanglei; Wang, Yajun; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Depei

    2015-01-16

    The spore germination rate and growth characteristics were compared between the citric acid high-yield strain Aspergillus niger CGMCC 5751 and A. niger ATCC 1015 in media containing antimycin A or DNP. We inferred that differences in citric acid yield might be due to differences in energy metabolism between these strains. To explore the impact of energy metabolism on citric acid production, the changes in intracellular ATP, NADH and NADH/NAD+ were measured at various fermentation stages. In addition, the effects of antimycin A or DNP on energy metabolism and citric acid production was investigated by CGMCC 5751. By comparing the spore germination rate and the extent of growth on PDA plates containing antimycin A or DNP, CGMCC 5751 was shown to be more sensitive to antimycin A than ATCC 1015. The substrate-level phosphorylation of CGMCC 5751 was greater than that of ATCC 1015 on PDA plates with DNP. DNP at tested concentrations had no apparent effect on the growth of CGMCC 5751. There were no apparent effects on the mycelial morphology, the growth of mycelial pellets or the dry cell mass when 0.2 mg L(-1) antimycin A or 0.1 mg L(-1) DNP was added to medium at the 24-h time point. The concentrations of intracellular ATP, NADH and NADH/NAD+ of CGMCC 5751 were notably lower than those of ATCC 1015 at several fermentation stages. Moreover, at 96 h of fermentation, the citric acid production of CGMCC 5751 reached up to 151.67 g L(-1) and 135.78 g L(-1) by adding 0.2 mg L(-1) antimycin A or 0.1 mg L(-1) DNP, respectively, at the 24-h time point of fermentation. Thus, the citric acid production of CGMCC 5751 was increased by 19.89% and 7.32%, respectively. The concentrations of intracellular ATP, NADH and NADH/NAD+ of the citric acid high-yield strain CGMCC 5751 were notably lower than those of ATCC 1015. The excessive ATP has a strong inhibitory effect on citric acid accumulation by A. niger. Increasing NADH oxidation and appropriately reducing the concentration of

  15. Comparison of pretreatment strategies of sugarcane baggase: experimental design for citric acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi-Darani, Kianoush; Zoghi, Alaleh

    2008-10-01

    Solid state fermentation was carried out to compare efficiency of acid, alkaline and urea pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse for production of citric acid using Aspergillus niger ATCC 9142. Plackett-Burman statistical design was used to evaluate significance of variables. Pretreatment of bagasse by urea was known as the most influential treatment to increase citric acid production (137.6g/kg of dry sugarcane bagasse and citric acid yield of 96% based on sugar consumed). Finally, up scaling was achieved to a 20L solid state fermentor in which humidity was constant in gas phase and urea-treated sugarcane bagasse. The produced acid concentration and yield in fermentor was 82.38g/kg of dry substrate and 26.45g/kgday, respectively.

  16. Modeling of the selective pertraction of carboxylic acids obtained by citric fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cascaval Dan

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Facilitated pertraction was applied for the selective separation of citric, maleic and succinic acids from a mixture obtained by citric fermentation. The pertraction equipment included a U-shaped cell containing 1,2-dichloro-ethane as the liquid membrane and Amberlite LA-2 as the carrier. The experimental data indicated that maleic and succinic acids can be initially selectively separated from citric acid, followed by the selectively separation of maleic acid from succinic acid. Using statistical analysis and a second order factorial experiment, two mathematical correlations describing the influence of the main process variables on pertraction selectivity were established. For both extraction systems, the considered variables controlled the extraction process to an extent of 92.9-99.9%, the carrier concentration inside the liquid membrane exhibiting the most important influence.

  17. Novel dry powder inhaler formulation of glucagon with addition of citric acid for enhanced pulmonary delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onoue, Satomi; Yamamoto, Kiyoshi; Kawabata, Yohei; Hirose, Mariko; Mizumoto, Takahiro; Yamada, Shizuo

    2009-12-01

    Glucagon, a gut hormone, is one of the key regulatory elements in glucose homeostasis, and is clinically used for treatment of hypoglycemia and premedication in peroral endoscopy. Dry powder inhaler (DPI) form of glucagon is believed to be a promising new dosage form, and the present study aimed to develop a novel glucagon-DPI using absorption enhancer for improved pharmacological effects. The cytotoxicity of citric and capric acids, the potential absorption enhancers, at 1 and 10 mM was assessed by monitoring extracellular LDH levels in rat alveolar L2 cells, and a concentration- and time-dependent release of LDH was observed in capric acid, but not in citric acid-treated cells. DPI form of glucagon containing citric acid was prepared with a jet mill, and laser diffraction and cascade impactor analyses of the newly developed glucagon-DPI suggested high dispersion and deposition in the respiratory organs with an emitted dose and fine particle fraction of 99.5 and 25%, respectively. Addition of citric acid in glucagon-DPI improved the dissolution behavior, and did not impair the solid-state stability of glucagon-DPI. Intratracheal administration of glucagon-DPI (50 microg-glucagon/kg body weight of rat) containing citric acid led to 2.9-fold more potent hyperglycemic effect in rats, as compared to inhaled glucagon-DPI without citric acid. Based on these physicochemical and pharmacological characterization, the dry powder inhaler of glucagon with addition of citric acid would be of use as an alternative to injection form.

  18. The effect of citric acid and citrate on protoplasmic droplet of bovine epididymal sperms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keivan Abdy

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available AbstractFor evaluation of citric acid and citrate effects on bovine epididymal protoplasmic droplets, fifty bovine testes were collected in the October 2007 till June 2008 from Urmia slaughterhouse and transported to the laboratory in a cool container filled with 5 °C ice pack. Caudal epididymis was incised and sperm cells were put into Petri dishes containing hams f10 media with 10% fetal calf serum (FCS, which were kept in 37 °C, CO2 incubator. Then sperm cells were counted and 50-milion per mL concentration was prepared. After this stage, three dilutions of citric acid (0.1, 0.2, 0.3 N and one dilution of citrate (1N, based on normal osmolarity and normal pH were added to a micro tube containing 25 milion per mL sperm. Then one-step eosin-nigrosin staining in 30-60-120-240-360 minutes was performed and slides were evaluated with 1000-x phase contrast microscope and 200 sperm cells per slide were counted. The results revealed significant difference between blank and citric acid 0.3 N. The proportion of protoplasmic droplet in group consisting of 0.3 N acid citric in 120-240-360 minutes, was significantly lower than that of blank (P < 0.05. There was no significant difference between citrate – blank and citric acid 0.1N-blank groups, but after 240 minutes significant difference was observed between blank & citric acid 0.2 N (P < 0.05. In conclusions citric acid based on dilution and time duration can reduce the proportion of bovine epididymal sperm cytoplasmic droplets.

  19. Corrosion Inhibition of Mild Steel in Citric Acid by Aqueous Extract of Piper Nigrum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Matheswaran

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition efficiency (IE of an aqueous extract of Piper Nigrum L. in controlling corrosion of mild steel at pH 12 has been evaluated by weight loss method in the absence and presence of inhibitor in citric acid medium at different concentration. The result showed that the corrosion inhibition efficiency of these compounds was found to vary with the different concentration at two hour time interval at room temperature. Also, it was found that the corrosion inhibition behaviour of Piper Nigrum L. is greater in 2 N Citric acid than 1 N Citric acid medium. So Piper Nigrum L. can be used has a good inhibitor for preventing mild steel material which is used in many construction purpose.

  20. Citric acid assisted phytoremediation of cadmium by Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsan, Sana; Ali, Shafaqat; Noureen, Shamaila; Mahmood, Khalid; Farid, Mujahid; Ishaque, Wajid; Shakoor, Muhammad Bilal; Rizwan, Muhammad

    2014-08-01

    Phytoextraction is an eco-friendly and cost-effective technique for removal of toxins, especially heavy metals and metalloids from contaminated soils by the roots of high biomass producing plant species with subsequent transport to aerial parts. Lower metal bioavailability often limits the phytoextraction. Organic chelators can help to improve this biological technique by increasing metal solubility. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possibility of improving the phytoextraction of Cd by the application of citric acid. For this purpose, plants were grown in hydroponics under controlled conditions. Results indicated that Cd supply significantly decreased the plant growth, biomass, pigments, photosynthetic characteristics and protein contents which were accompanied by a significant increase in Cd concentration, hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂), electrolyte leakage, malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulation and decrease in antioxidant capacity. The effects were dose dependent with obvious effects at higher Cd concentration. Application of CA significantly enhanced Cd uptake and its accumulation in plant roots, stems and leaves. Citric acid alleviated Cd toxicity by increasing plant biomass and photosynthetic and growth parameters alone and in combination with Cd and by reducing oxidative stress as observed by reduction in MDA and H₂O₂ production and decreased electrolyte leakage induced by Cd stress. Application of CA also enhanced the antioxidant enzymes activity alone and under Cd stress. Thus, the data indicate that exogenous CA application can increase Cd uptake and minimize Cd stress in plants and may be beneficial in accelerating the phytoextraction of Cd through hyper-accumulating plants such as Brassica napus L. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Characterization of wood-based molding bonded with citric acid

    OpenAIRE

    Umemura, Kenji; Ueda, Tomohide; Kawai, Shuichi

    2012-01-01

    The wood-based moldings were fabricated by using only citric acid as an adhesive. The mechanical properties, water resistances, thermal properties and chemical structure were investigated. Wood powder obtained from Acacia mangium was mixed with citric acid under certain weight ratios (0-40 wt%), and each powder mixture was molded using two types of metal molds at 200 °C and 4MPa for 10 min. The modulus of rupture (MOR) and the modulus of elasticity (MOE) values of the wood-based molding conta...

  2. Citric acid as multifunctional agent in blowing films of starch/PBAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Salomão Garcia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Citric acid was used as a compatibilizer in the production of starch and PBAT films plasticized with glycerol and processed by blow extrusion. Films produced were characterized by WVP, mechanical properties, FT-IR-ATR and SEM. WPV ranged from 3.71 to 12.73×10-11 g m-1 s-1 Pa-1, while tensile strength and elongation at break ranged from 1.81 to 7.15 MPa and from 8.61 to 23.63%, respectively. Increasing the citric acid concentration improved WVP and slightly decreased film resistance and elongation. The films micrographs revealed a more homogeneous material with the addition of citric acid. However, the infrared spectra revealed little about cross-linking esterification reaction

  3. Roles of oxygen radicals and elastase in citric acid-induced airway constriction of guinea-pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Y -L; Chiou, W -Y; Lu, F. J.; Chiang, L. Y

    1999-01-01

    Antioxidants attenuate noncholinergic airway constriction. To further investigate the relationship between tachykinin-mediated airway constriction and oxygen radicals, we explored citric acid-induced bronchial constriction in 48 young Hartley strain guinea-pigs, divided into six groups: control; citric acid; hexa(sulphobutyl)fullerenes+citric acid; hexa(sulphobutyl)fullerenes+phosphoramidon+citric acid; dimethylthiourea (DMTU)+citric acid; and DMTU+phosphoramidon+citric acid. Hexa(sulphobutyl...

  4. Citric acid production by selected mutants of Aspergillus niger from cane molasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikram-Ul, Haq; Ali, Sikander; Qadeer, M A; Iqbal, Javed

    2004-06-01

    The present investigation deals with citric acid production by some selected mutant strains of Aspergillus niger from cane molasses in 250 ml Erlenmeyer flasks. For this purpose, a conidial suspension of A. niger GCB-75, which produced 31.1 g/l citric acid from 15% (w/v) molasses sugar, was subjected to UV-induced mutagenesis. Among the 3 variants, GCM-45 was found to be a better producer of citric acid (50.0 +/- 2a) and it was further improved by chemical mutagenesis using N-methyl, N-nitro-N-nitroso-guanidine (MNNG). Out of 3,2-deoxy-D-glucose resistant variants, GCMC-7 was selected as the best mutant, which produced 96.1 +/- 1.5 g/l citric acid 168 h after fermentation of potassium ferrocyanide and H2SO4 pre-treated blackstrap molasses in Vogel's medium. On the basis of kinetic parameters such as volumetric substrate uptake rate (Qs), and specific substrate uptake rate (qs), the volumetric productivity, theoretical yield and specific product formation rate, it was observed that the mutants were faster growing organisms and produced more citric acid. The mutant GCMC-7 has greater commercial potential than the parental strain with regard to citrate synthase activity. The addition of 2.0 x 10(-5) M MgSO4 x 5H2O into the fermentation medium reduced the Fe2+ ion concentration by counter-acting its deleterious effect on mycelial growth. The magnesium ions also induced a loose-pelleted form of growth (0.6 mm, diameter), reduced the biomass concentration (12.5 g/l) and increased the volumetric productivity of citric acid monohydrate (113.6 +/- 5 g/l). Copyright 2003 Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Studies of citric acid metabolism in heart muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meduski, J.W.

    1950-01-01

    1. The pentabromoacetone method for the determination of citric acid was studied; a modification of the procedure of Natelson, Lugovoy and Pincus was used. 2. Two tissue preparations were obtained. The first by washing with water, the second by washing with water and then with 0.5% sodium

  6. Evaluation of Citric Acid Production Potentials of Food Processing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To evaluate citric acid production potentials of food processing wastes. Materials and Methods: Samples of domestic wastes generated from peels of Yam (YP), Cassava (CP), red cocoyam (RCP), white cocoyam (WCP), ripe plantain (RP), unripe plantain (UPP) and garri processing chaff (GPC) were washed, ...

  7. Statistical Optimisation of Fermentation Conditions for Citric Acid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated the optimisation of fermentation conditions during citric acid production via solid state fermentation (SSF) of pineapple peels using Aspergillus niger. A three-variable, three-level Box-Behnken design (BBD) comprising 17 experimental runs was used to develop a statistical model for the fermentation ...

  8. Dynamic Modelling and Simulation of Citric Acid Production from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The modelling of batch production of citric acid from corn starch hydrolysate using Aspergillus niger ATCC 9142 was carried out in this work. A validated mathematical model was developed to describe the process. Four kinetic models, Monod, Haldane, logistic and hyperbolic for simulating the growth of the Aspergillus ...

  9. Effect of dietary citric acid supplementation and partial replacement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Beluga is one of the most important fishes in Caspian Sea. The purpose of this experiment were to evaluate the effect of soybean meal (SBM) as a fishmeal (FM) partial replacement and citric acid (CA) supplement on the calcium (Ca) and phosphorus (P) of muscle, scute and serum of Beluga diets. Three isonitrogenous and ...

  10. Influence of citric acid on SnO2 nanoparticles synthesized by wet chemical processes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sikhwivhilu, LM

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Tin oxide (SnO2) nanoparticles with size range of 19 to 100 nm were successfully synthesized using wet chemical process (i.e. chemical precipitation and sol-gel processes). The results showed that variation of citric acid concentration directly...

  11. Effect of citric acid and microbial phytase on serum enzyme activities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted to study the effect of microbial phytase supplementation and citric acid in broiler chicks fed corn-soybean meal base diets on enzyme activities and some blood parameters of serum and plasma minerals concentration in Ross 308 strain broilers. The data was analysed using a randomized ...

  12. 77 FR 24461 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-24

    ..., which are intermediate products in the production of citric acid, sodium citrate, and potassium citrate... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Final Results of... the preliminary results of the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and...

  13. 76 FR 34044 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... tricalcium citrate tetrahydrate, which are intermediate products in the production of citric acid, sodium... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Final Results of... preliminary results of the first administrative review of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and...

  14. Citric acid production by Aspergillus niger on wet corn distillers grains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, G; West, T P

    2006-09-01

    To determine which citric acid-producing strain of Aspergillus niger utilized wet corn distillers grains most effectively to produce citric acid. Citric acid and biomass production by the fungal strains were analysed on the untreated grains or autoclaved grains using an enzyme assay and a gravimetric method respectively. Fungal citric acid production on the grains was found to occur on the untreated or autoclaved grains. The highest citric acid level on the grains was produced by A. niger ATCC 9142. The autoclaved grains supported less citric acid production by the majority of strains screened. Biomass production by the fungal strains on the untreated or autoclaved grains was quite similar. The highest citric acid yields for A. niger ATCC 9142, ATCC 10577, ATCC 11414, ATCC 12846 and ATCC 26550 were found on the untreated grains. Treatment of the grains had little effect on citric acid yields based on reducing sugars consumed by A. niger ATCC 9029 and ATCC 201122. It is feasible for citric acid-producing strains of A. niger to excrete citric acid on wet corn distillers grains whether the grains are treated or untreated. The most effective citric acid-producing strain of A. niger was ATCC 9142. The study shows that the ethanol processing co-product wet corn distillers grains could be utilized as a substrate for the commercial production of citric acid by A. niger without treatment of the grains.

  15. 78 FR 64914 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-30

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From Canada: Final Results of... of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts from Canada.\\1\\ The review... period of review (POR) is May 1, 2011, through April 30, 2012. \\1\\ See Citric Acid and Certain Citrate...

  16. 78 FR 34648 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts: Preliminary Results of Countervailing Duty Administrative...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts: Preliminary Results of Countervailing... review of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on citric acid and citrate salts from the People's Republic... (202) 482-1503. Scope of the Order The merchandise subject to the order is citric acid and certain...

  17. A mutation of Aspergillus niger for hyper-production of citric acid from corn meal hydrolysate in a bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Liu, Jing; Chen, Ji-hong; Wang, Shu-yang; Lu, Dong; Wu, Qing-hua; Li, Wen-jian

    2014-11-01

    The properties of the screened mutants for hyper-production of citric acid induced by carbon ((12)C(6+)) ion beams and X-ray irradiation were investigated in our current study. Among these mutants, mutant H4002 screened from (12)C(6+) ion irradiation had a higher yield of citric acid production than the parental strain in a 250-ml shaking flash. These expanded submerged experiments in a bioreactor were also carried out for mutant H4002. The results showed that (177.7-196.0) g/L citric acid was accumulated by H4002 through exploiting corn meal hydrolysate (containing initial 200.0-235.7 g/L sugar) with the productivity of (2.96-3.27) g/(L∙h). This was especially true when the initial sugar concentration was 210 g/L, and the best economical citric acid production reached (187.5±0.7) g/L with a productivity of 3.13 g/(L∙h). It was observed that mutant H4002 can utilize low-cost corn meal as a feedstock to efficiently produce citric acid. These results imply that the H4002 strain has the industrial production potentiality for citric acid and offers strong competition for the citric acid industry.

  18. A mutation of Aspergillus niger for hyper-production of citric acid from corn meal hydrolysate in a bioreactor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Liu, Jing; Chen, Ji-hong; Wang, Shu-yang; Lu, Dong; Wu, Qing-hua; Li, Wen-jian

    2014-01-01

    The properties of the screened mutants for hyper-production of citric acid induced by carbon (12C6+) ion beams and X-ray irradiation were investigated in our current study. Among these mutants, mutant H4002 screened from 12C6+ ion irradiation had a higher yield of citric acid production than the parental strain in a 250-ml shaking flash. These expanded submerged experiments in a bioreactor were also carried out for mutant H4002. The results showed that (177.7–196.0) g/L citric acid was accumulated by H4002 through exploiting corn meal hydrolysate (containing initial 200.0–235.7 g/L sugar) with the productivity of (2.96–3.27) g/(L∙h). This was especially true when the initial sugar concentration was 210 g/L, and the best economical citric acid production reached (187.5±0.7) g/L with a productivity of 3.13 g/(L∙h). It was observed that mutant H4002 can utilize low-cost corn meal as a feedstock to efficiently produce citric acid. These results imply that the H4002 strain has the industrial production potentiality for citric acid and offers strong competition for the citric acid industry. PMID:25367793

  19. Leaching of metals from large pieces of printed circuit boards using citric acid and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, Umesh; Su, C; Hocheng, Hong

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, the leaching of metals from large pieces of computer printed circuit boards (CPCBs) was studied. A combination of citric acid (0.5 M) and 1.76 M hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was used to leach the metals from CPCB piece. The influence of system variables such as H2O2 concentration, concentration of citric acid, shaking speed, and temperature on the metal leaching process was investigated. The complete metal leaching was achieved in 4 h from a 4 × 4 cm CPCB piece. The presence of citric acid and H2O2 together in the leaching solution is essential for complete metal leaching. The optimum addition amount of H2O2 was 5.83 %. The citric acid concentration and shaking speed had an insignificant effect on the leaching of metals. The increase in the temperature above 30 °C showed a drastic effect on metal leaching process.

  20. Kinetic modelling of the demineralization of shrimp exoskeleton using citric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alewo Opuada AMEH

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Citric acid was used in the demineralization of shrimp exoskeleton and the kinetics of the demineralization process was studied. Kinetic data was obtained by demineralisation using five acid concentrations (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5M. The obtained kinetic data were fitted to the shrinking core model for fluid particle reactions. The concentration of calcium was found to decrease with time. For all acid concentrations considered, the best predictive mechanism for the demineralization process was determined to be Ash Layer Diffusion Control Mechanism. This was indicated by the high R2 values obtained (0.965 with 150% excess of citric acid.

  1. By-products from the biodiesel chain as a substrate to citric acid production by solid-state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Manuella; Zimmer, Gabriela F; Cremonese, Ezequiel B; de C de S Schneider, Rosana; Corbellini, Valeriano A

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we propose the use of tung cake for the production of organic acids, with an emphasis on citric acid by solid-state fermentation. We evaluated the conditions of production and the by-products from the biodiesel chain as raw materials involved in this bioprocess. First, we standardized the conditions of solid-state fermentation in tung cake with and without residual fat and with different concentrations of glycerine using the fungus Aspergillus niger The solid-state fermentation process was monitored for 7 days considering the biomass growth and pH level. Citric acid production was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Fungal development was better in the crude tung cake, consisting of 20% glycerine. The highest citric acid yield was 350 g kg(-1) of biomass. Therefore, the solid-state fermentation of the tung cake with glycerine led to citric acid production using the Aspergillus niger fungus. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Visualization data on the freezing process of micrometer-scaled aqueous citric acid drops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoli Bogdan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The visualization data (8 movies presented in this article are related to the research article entitled “Freezing and glass transitions upon cooling and warming and ice/freeze-concentration-solution morphology of emulsified aqueous citric acid” (A. Bogdan, M.J. Molina, H. Tenhu, 2016 [1]. The movies recorded in-situ with optical cryo-miscroscopy (OC-M demonstrate for the first time freezing processes that occur during the cooling and subsequent warming of emulsified micrometer-scaled aqueous citric acid (CA drops. The movies are made publicly available to enable critical or extended analyzes.

  3. Effect of Citric Acid on Glycerol Formation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Barley Shochu Mash

    OpenAIRE

    大森, 俊郎; 小川,清; 下田, 雅彦; Toshiro, Omori; KIYOSHI, OGAWA; Masahiko, Shimoda; 三和酒類(株)研究所; Research Laboratory, Sanwa Shurui Co. Ltd.,

    1995-01-01

    Factors influencing the enhancement of glycerol formation by shochu yeast(Saccharomyces cerevisiae)in barley shochu mash (BSM) were investigated. Glycerol formation was influenced in the case of 3% of glucose at the beginning of fermentation. However, the glucose concentration was found not to have an important influence on the glycerol concentration in BSM because it remained at less than 1% during fermentation. The citric acid concentration in BSM of all-koji and mash with a koji ratio of 3...

  4. Hydrophobic starch nanocrystals preparations through crosslinking modification using citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jiang; Tong, Jin; Su, Xingguang; Ren, Lili

    2016-10-01

    Biodegradable starch nanocrystals prepared by an acid treatment process were modified through crosslinking modification using citric acid as reactant by a dry reaction method. The occurrence of crosslinking modification was evaluated by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and swelling degree. X-ray diffraction, wettability tests and contact angle measurements were used to characterize the modified starch nanocrystals. It was found that the crosslinked starch nanocrystals displayed a higher affinity for low polar solvents such as dichloromethane. The surface of starch nanocrystals became more roughness after crosslinking modification with citric acid and the size decreased as revealed by scanning electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering results. XRD analysis showed that the crystalline structure of starch nanocrystals was basically not changed after the crosslinking modification with shorter heating time. The resulting hydrophobic starch nanocrystals are versatile precursors to the development of nanocomposites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Citric acid assisted phytoremediation of copper by Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaheer, Ihsan Elahi; Ali, Shafaqat; Rizwan, Muhammad; Farid, Mujahid; Shakoor, Muhammad Bilal; Gill, Rafaqa Ali; Najeeb, Ullah; Iqbal, Naeem; Ahmad, Rehan

    2015-10-01

    Use of organic acids for promoting heavy metals phytoextraction is gaining worldwide attention. The present study investigated the influence of citric acid (CA) in enhancing copper (Cu) uptake by Brassica napus L. seedlings. 6 Weeks old B. napus seedlings were exposed to different levels of copper (Cu, 0, 50 and 100µM) alone or with CA (2.5mM) in a nutrient medium for 40 days. Exposure to elevated Cu levels (50 and 100µM) significantly reduced the growth, biomass production, chlorophyll content, gas exchange attributes and soluble proteins of B. napus seedlings. In addition, Cu toxicity increased the production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), malondialdehyde (MDA) and electrolyte leakage (EL) in leaf and root tissues of B. napus. Activities of antioxidant enzymes such as guaiacol peroxidase (POD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalases (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) in root and shoot tissues of B. napus were increased in response to lower Cu concentration (50µM) but increased under higher Cu concentration (100µM). Addition of CA into nutrient medium significantly alleviated Cu toxicity effects on B. napus seedlings by improving photosynthetic capacity and ultimately plant growth. Increased activities of antioxidant enzymes in CA-treated plants seems to play a role in capturing of stress-induced reactive oxygen species as was evident from lower level of H2O2, MDA and EL in CA-treated plants. Increasing Cu concentration in the nutrient medium significantly increased Cu concentration in in B. napus tissues. Cu uptake was further increased by CA application. These results suggested that CA might be a useful strategy for increasing phytoextraction of Cu from contaminated soils. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of the association between citric acid and EDTA on root surface etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzolli Leite, Fabio Renato; Nascimento, Gustavo Giacomelli; Manzolli Leite, Elza Regina; Leite, Amauri Antiquera; Cezar Sampaio, Josá Eduardo

    2013-09-01

    This study aims to compare the clot stabilization on root surfaces conditioned with citric acid and ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Scaled root samples (n = 100) were set in fve groups: group I-control group (saline solution); group II (24% EDTA); group III (25% citric acid); group IV (EDTA + citric acid); group V (citric acid + EDTA). Fifty samples were assessed using the root surface modifcation index (RSMI). The other 50 received a blood drop after conditioning. Clot formation was assessed using blood elements adhesion index (BEAI). A blind examiner evaluated photomicrographs. Statistical analysis considered p citric acid (group-IV) reduced clot formation in comparison to citric acid use alone (group-III). Root conditioning with citric acid alone and before EDTA had the best results for smear layer removal and clot stabilization. EDTA inhibited clot stabilization on root surface and must have a residual activity once it has diminished clot adhesion to root even after citric acid conditioning. Thus, EDTA can be used to neutralize citric acid effects on periodontal cells without affecting clot stabilization. Clinical signifcance: To demonstrate that citric acid use on root surfaces previously affected by periodontal disease may favor clot stabilization and may have a benefcial effect on surgical outcomes. Also, EDTA can be used to neutralize citric acid effects on periodontal cells.

  7. Utilization of biodiesel derived-glycerol for 1,3-PD and citric acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrea, Laura; Trif, Monica; Cătoi, Adriana-Florinela; Vodnar, Dan-Cristian

    2017-11-06

    Today, biofuels represent a hot topic in the context of petroleum and adjacent products decrease. As biofuels production increase, so does the production of their major byproduct, namely crude glycerol. The efficient usage of raw glycerol will concur to the biodiesel viability. As an inevitable waste of biodiesel manufacturing, glycerol is potentially an attractive substrate for the production of value-added products by fermentation processes, due to its large amounts, low cost and high degree of reduction. One of the most important usages of glycerol is its bioconversion through microbial fermentation to value-added materials like 1,3-propanediol and citric acid. There is a considerable industrial interest in 1,3-propanediol and citric acid production based on microbial fermentations, as it seems to be in competition with traditional technologies utilized for these products. In the present work, yields and concentrations of 1,3-propanediol and citric acid registered for different isolated strains are also described. Microbial bioconversion of glycerol represents a remarkable choice to add value to the biofuel production chain, allowing the biofuel industry to be more competitive. The current review presents certain ways for the bioconversion of crude glycerol into citric acid and 1,3-propanediol with high yields and concentrations achieved by using isolated microorganisms.

  8. Experimental design data for the biosynthesis of citric acid using Central Composite Design method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kola, Anand Kishore; Mekala, Mallaiah; Goli, Venkat Reddy

    2017-06-01

    In the present investigation, we report that statistical design and optimization of significant variables for the microbial production of citric acid from sucrose in presence of filamentous fungi A. niger NCIM 705. Various combinations of experiments were designed with Central Composite Design (CCD) of Response Surface Methodology (RSM) for the production of citric acid as a function of six variables. The variables are; initial sucrose concentration, initial pH of medium, fermentation temperature, incubation time, stirrer rotational speed, and oxygen flow rate. From experimental data, a statistical model for this process has been developed. The optimum conditions reported in the present article are initial concentration of sucrose of 163.6 g/L, initial pH of medium 5.26, stirrer rotational speed of 247.78 rpm, incubation time of 8.18 days, fermentation temperature of 30.06 °C and flow rate of oxygen of 1.35 lpm. Under optimum conditions the predicted maximum citric acid is 86.42 g/L. The experimental validation carried out under the optimal values and reported citric acid to be 82.0 g/L. The model is able to represent the experimental data and the agreement between the model and experimental data is good.

  9. Experimental design data for the biosynthesis of citric acid using Central Composite Design method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Kishore Kola

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, we report that statistical design and optimization of significant variables for the microbial production of citric acid from sucrose in presence of filamentous fungi A. niger NCIM 705. Various combinations of experiments were designed with Central Composite Design (CCD of Response Surface Methodology (RSM for the production of citric acid as a function of six variables. The variables are; initial sucrose concentration, initial pH of medium, fermentation temperature, incubation time, stirrer rotational speed, and oxygen flow rate. From experimental data, a statistical model for this process has been developed. The optimum conditions reported in the present article are initial concentration of sucrose of 163.6 g/L, initial pH of medium 5.26, stirrer rotational speed of 247.78 rpm, incubation time of 8.18 days, fermentation temperature of 30.06 °C and flow rate of oxygen of 1.35 lpm. Under optimum conditions the predicted maximum citric acid is 86.42 g/L. The experimental validation carried out under the optimal values and reported citric acid to be 82.0 g/L. The model is able to represent the experimental data and the agreement between the model and experimental data is good.

  10. Citric acid compounds of tangerines peel extract (Citrus reticulata) as potential materials teeth whitening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratiwi, F.; Tinata, J. K.; Prakasa, A. W.; Istiqomah; Hartini, E.; Isworo, S.

    2017-04-01

    Peel of citrus fruit (Citrus reticulata) has a variety of possible chemical compounds that may serve as a potential whitening teeth. This research is conducted on a laboratory scale; therefore, it needs to be developed on an application scale. A quasi-experimental was employed in this study. Citric acid extraction was carried out on the type of Sweet Orange (Citrus Aurantium L), Tangerine (Citrus Reticulata Blanco or Citrus Nobilis), Pomelo (Citrus Maxima Merr, Citrus grandis Osbeck), and Lemon (Citrus Limon Linn). Citric acid’s ability test as teeth whitener was performed on premolar teeth with concentrations of 2.5%, 5%, and 10%. The experiments were replicated in 3 times, and teeth whiteness level was measured using Shade Guide VITA Classical. The result of this research showed that citric acid in every kind of orange peel with various concentration has different abilities on whitening teeth. The highest colour level obtained from Tangerine peel’s citric acid concentration of 5%. Orange peel extract has the best teeth whitening abilities tested by the method of Gass Chromatography to know the active ingredients.

  11. [Effects of Citric Acid on Activation and Methylation of Mercury in the Soils of Water-Level-Fluctuating Zone of the Three Gorges.Reservoir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Cai-qing; Liang, Li; You, Rui; Deng, Han; Wang, Ding-yong

    2015-12-01

    To investigate effects of the main component of vegetation root exudates-citric acid on activation and methylation of mercury in the soil of water-level-fluctuating zone (WLFZ) of the Three Gorges Reservoir area, simulation experiments were conducted by extracting and cultivating soil with different concentrations of citric acid. The results showed that after adding citric acid, the total mercury content in leaching solution before reaching peak were higher than that of the control, and increased with the increase of citric acid concentrations. The maximum amount of mercury complexes increased initially and then reached plateaus with the percentage against the total mercury in soil of 1.03%, 1.67%, 1.99%, 2.47%, 2.68%, 2.73% and 2.73% for different citric acid concentrations (0, 1, 2, 4, 5, 6 and 8 mmol · L⁻¹). In addition, concentrations of methylmercury ( MeHg) in soil remained stable in the first 3 hours, and then increased accompanying with the increasing rate rising with the concentration of citric acid ( besides the control group) . This result indicated that citric acid probably could promote the transformation process from inorganic mercury to MeHg in soil. which increased with the concentration of citric acid.

  12. Fate and role of ammonium ions during fermentation of citric acid by Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagianni, Maria; Wayman, Frank; Mattey, Michael

    2005-11-01

    Stoichiometric modeling of the early stages of the citric acid fermentation process by Aspergillus niger revealed that ammonium ions combine with a carbon-containing metabolite inside the cell, in a ratio 1:1, to form a nitrogen compound which is then excreted by the mycelium. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis identified glucosamine as the product of the relationship between glucose and ammonium during the early stages of the citric acid fermentation process. Slightly acidic internal pHs, extremely low ammonium ion concentrations inside the cell, and glucosamine synthesis come into direct contradiction with the earlier theory of the ammonium pool inside the cell, regarded as responsible for inhibition of the enzyme phosphofructokinase. At later fermentation stages, when the mycelium is involved in a process of fragmentation and regrowth, the addition of ammonium sulfate leads to a series of events: the formation and secretion of glucosamine in elevated amounts, the short inhibition of citrate synthesis, growth enhancement, the utilization of glucosamine, and finally, the enhancement of citric acid production rates. Obviously, the enzymatic processes underlining the phenomena need to be reexamined. As a by-product of the citric acid fermentation, glucosamine is reported for the first time here. Suitable process manipulations of the system described in this work could lead to successful glucosamine recovery at the point of its highest yield before degradation by the fungus occurs.

  13. Electrochemical monitoring of citric acid production by Aspergillus niger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutyła-Olesiuk, Anna; Wawrzyniak, Urszula E.; Ciosek, Patrycja; Wróblewski, Wojciech, E-mail: wuwu@ch.pw.edu.pl

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Citric acid fermentation process (production) by Aspergillus niger. • Qualitative/quantitative monitoring of standard culture and culture infected with yeast. • Electronic tongue based on potentiometric and voltammetric sensors. • Evaluation of the progress and the correctness of the fermentation process. • The highest classification abilities of the hybrid electronic tongue. - Abstract: Hybrid electronic tongue was developed for the monitoring of citric acid production by Aspergillus niger. The system based on various potentiometric/voltammetric sensors and appropriate chemometric techniques provided correct qualitative and quantitative classification of the samples collected during standard Aspergillus niger culture and culture infected with yeast. The performance of the proposed approach was compared with the monitoring of the fermentation process carried out using classical methods. The results obtained proved, that the designed hybrid electronic tongue was able to evaluate the progress and correctness of the fermentation process.

  14. 76 FR 4288 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Notice of Extension of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... review of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the... administrative review of citric acid from the PRC within this time limit. Among other things, additional time is...

  15. 77 FR 9891 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Amended Final Results...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China... antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's Republic... Act of 1930, as amended (``the Act''). \\1\\ See Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's...

  16. 76 FR 17835 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... International Trade Administration A-570-937] Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic... order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's Republic of China.... See Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Notice of Extension of...

  17. Citric acid application for denitrification process support in biofilm reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mielcarek, Artur; Rodziewicz, Joanna; Janczukowicz, Wojciech; Dabrowska, Dorota; Ciesielski, Slawomir; Thornton, Arthur; Struk-Sokołowska, Joanna

    2017-03-01

    The study demonstrated that citric acid, as an organic carbon source, can improve denitrification in Anaerobic Sequencing Batch Biofilm Reactor (AnSBBR). The consumption rate of the organic substrate and the denitrification rate were lower during the period of the reactor's acclimatization (cycles 1-60; 71.5 mgCOD L(-1) h(-1) and 17.81 mgN L(-1) h(-1), respectively) than under the steady state conditions (cycles 61-180; 143.8 mgCOD L(-1) h(-1) and 24.38 mgN L(-1) h(-1)). The biomass yield coefficient reached 0.04 ± 0.02 mgTSS· mgCODre(-1) (0.22 ± 0.09 mgTSS mgNre(-1)). Observations revealed the diversified microbiological ecology of the denitrifying bacteria. Citric acid was used mainly by bacteria representing the Trichoccocus genus, which represented above 40% of the sample during the first phase of the process (cycles 1-60). In the second phase (cycles 61-180) the microorganisms the genera that consumed the acetate and formate, as the result of citric acid decomposition were Propionibacterium (5.74%), Agrobacterium (5.23%), Flavobacterium (1.32%), Sphaerotilus (1.35%), Erysipelothrix (1.08%). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of citric acid and EDTA on chromium and nickel uptake and translocation by Datura innoxia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jean, Liliane [Groupe de Recherche Eau Sol Environnement (GRESE), Universite de Limoges 123 avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges (France); Bordas, Francois [Groupe de Recherche Eau Sol Environnement (GRESE), Universite de Limoges 123 avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges (France)], E-mail: francois.bordas@unilim.fr; Gautier-Moussard, Cecile; Vernay, Philippe; Hitmi, Adnane [Laboratoire de Physiologie et Biotechnologies Vegetales, ERTAC EA 3296, Universite Blaise Pascal/IUT d' Auvergne 100 rue de l' Egalite, F-15000 Aurillac (France); Bollinger, Jean-Claude [Groupe de Recherche Eau Sol Environnement (GRESE), Universite de Limoges 123 avenue Albert Thomas, 87060 Limoges (France)

    2008-06-15

    EDTA and citric acid were tested to solubilize metals and enhance their uptake by Datura innoxia, chosen because of its ability to accumulate and tolerate metals. Two application modes were used on an industrial soil contaminated mainly by Cr and Ni. The results showed that citric acid was the most effective at increasing the uptake of Cr and EDTA for Ni. These results are consistent with the effectiveness of both chelants in solubilizing metals from the soil. The translocation factor (TF) of Ni was 1.6- and 6.7-fold higher than the control, respectively, for one and two applications of 1 mmol kg{sup -1} EDTA. After two applications of 5 and 10 mmol kg{sup -1} citric acid, the TF of Cr increased 2- and 3.5-fold relative to the control. Whatever the concentration, the application of EDTA modified the plant physiology significantly. For citric acid this was only observed with the highest dose (10 mmol kg{sup -1}). - Chelant effectiveness in increasing chromium and nickel uptake by Datura innoxia is the result of the increase in translocation versus negative effect on plant physiology.

  19. Establishment and assessment of an integrated citric acid-methane production process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Chen, Yang-Qiu; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Bao, Jia-Wei; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2015-01-01

    To solve the problem of extraction wastewater in citric acid industrial production, an improved integrated citric acid-methane production process was established in this study. Extraction wastewater was treated by anaerobic digestion and then the anaerobic digestion effluent (ADE) was stripped by air to remove ammonia. Followed by solid-liquid separation to remove metal ion precipitation, the supernatant was recycled for the next batch of citric acid fermentation, thus eliminating wastewater discharge and reducing water consumption. 130U/g glucoamylase was added to medium after inoculation and the recycling process performed for 10 batches. Fermentation time decreased by 20% in recycling and the average citric acid production (2nd-10th) was 145.9±3.4g/L, only 2.5% lower than that with tap water (149.6g/L). The average methane production was 292.3±25.1mL/g CODremoved and stable in operation. Excessive Na(+) concentration in ADE was confirmed to be the major challenge for the proposed process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Citric Acid Fuctionalized Magnetic Ferrite Nanoparticles for Photocatalytic Degradation of Azo Dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahto, Triveni Kumar; Roy, Anurag; Sahoo, Banalata; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    In this study different magnetic ferrite nanoparticles (MFe2O4, where M = Fe, Mn, Zn) were synthesized through an aqueous coprecipitation method and then functionalized with citric acid for the degradation of azo dye present in industrial waste water. Here we evaluated the role of citric acid for photocatalytic application. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the catalytic activity in degradation of methyl orange (MO) was evaluated. The rate of MO degradation in different magnetic systems was determined by UV-Vis spectroscopy. The effect of active parameters (pH, initial MO concentration and effect of sunlight) on degradation performance was investigated. For the first time, citric acid chemistry is successfully exploited to develop a photocatalyst that can successfully degrade the dyes. This citric acid functionalized magnetic ferrite nanoparticles are very much effective for photocalytic degradation of dye and also these can be recollected with the help of permanent magnet for successive uses.

  1. EDTA and citric acid mediated phytoextraction of Zn, Cu, Pb and Cd through marigold (Tagetes erecta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinhal, V K; Srivastava, Alok; Singh, V P

    2010-05-01

    Phytoextraction is an emerging cost-effective solution for remediation of contaminated soils which involves the removal of toxins, especially heavy metals and metalloids, by the roots of the plants with subsequent transport to aerial plant organs. The aim of the present investigation is to study the effects of EDTA and citric acid on accumulation potential of marigold (Tagetes erecta) to Zn, Cu, Pb, and Cd and also to evaluate the impacts of these chelators (EDTA and citric acid) in combination with all the four heavy metals on the growth of marigold. The plants were grown in pots and treated with Zn (7.3 mg l(-1)), Cu (7.5 mg I(-1)), Pb (3.7 mg l(-1)) and Cd (0.2 mg l(-1)) alone and in combination with different doses of EDTA i.e., 10, 20 and 30 mg l(-1). All the three doses of EDTA i.e., 10, 20 and 30 mg l(-1) significantly increased the accumulation of Zn, Cu, Pb and Cd by roots, stems and leaves as compared to control treatments. The 30 mg l(-1) concentration of citric acid showed reduced accumulation of these metals by root, stem and leaves as compared to lower doses i.e., 10 and 20 mg l(-1). Among the four heavy metals, Zn accumulated in the great amount (526.34 mg kg(-1) DW) followed by Cu (443.14 mg kg(-1) DW), Pb (393.16 mg kg(-1) DW) and Cd (333.62 mg kg(-1) DW) in leaves with 30 mg l(-1) EDTA treatment. The highest concentration of EDTA and citric acid (30 mg l(-1)) caused significant reduction in growth of marigold in terms of plant height, fresh weight of plant, total chlorophyll, carbohydrate content and protein content. Thus EDTA and citric acid efficiently increased the phytoextractability of marigold which can be used to remediate the soil contaminated with these metals.

  2. Citric acid production from extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers by the genetically engineered yeast Yarrowia lipolytica strain 30 and purification of citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling-Fei; Wang, Zhi-Peng; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2013-11-01

    In this study, citric acid production from extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers by the genetically engineered yeast Yarrowia lipolytica strain 30 was investigated. After the compositions of the extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers for citric acid production were optimized, the results showed that natural components of extract of Jerusalem artichoke tubers without addition of any other components were suitable for citric acid production by the yeast strain. During 10 L fermentation using the extract containing 84.3 g L(-1) total sugars, 68.3 g L(-1) citric acid was produced and the yield of citric acid was 0.91 g g(-1) within 336 h. At the end of the fermentation, 9.2 g L(-1) of residual total sugar and 2.1 g L(-1) of reducing sugar were left in the fermented medium. At the same time, citric acid in the supernatant of the culture was purified. It was found that 67.2 % of the citric acid in the supernatant of the culture was recovered and purity of citric acid in the crystal was 96 %.

  3. Multiple Glass Transitions and Freezing Events of Aqueous Citric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Calorimetric and optical cryo-microscope measurements of 10–64 wt % citric acid (CA) solutions subjected to moderate (3 K/min) and slow (0.5 and 0.1 K/min) cooling/warming rates and also to quenching/moderate warming between 320 and 133 K are presented. Depending on solution concentration and cooling rate, the obtained thermograms show one freezing event and from one to three liquid–glass transitions upon cooling and from one to six liquid–glass and reverse glass–liquid transitions, one or two freezing events, and one melting event upon warming of frozen/glassy CA/H2O. The multiple freezing events and glass transitions pertain to the mother CA/H2O solution itself and two freeze-concentrated solution regions, FCS1 and FCS2, of different concentrations. The FCS1 and FCS2 (or FCS22) are formed during the freezing of CA/H2O upon cooling and/or during the freezing upon warming of partly glassy or entirely glassy mother CA/H2O. The formation of two FCS1 and FCS22 regions during the freezing upon warming to our best knowledge has never been reported before. Using an optical cryo-microscope, we are able to observe the formation of a continuous ice framework (IF) and its morphology and reciprocal distribution of IF/(FCS1 + FCS2). Our results provide a new look at the freezing and glass transition behavior of aqueous solutions and can be used for the optimization of lyophilization and freezing of foods and biopharmaceutical formulations, among many other applications where freezing plays a crucial role. PMID:25482069

  4. Multiple glass transitions and freezing events of aqueous citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdan, Anatoli; Molina, Mario J; Tenhu, Heikki; Loerting, Thomas

    2015-05-14

    Calorimetric and optical cryo-microscope measurements of 10-64 wt % citric acid (CA) solutions subjected to moderate (3 K/min) and slow (0.5 and 0.1 K/min) cooling/warming rates and also to quenching/moderate warming between 320 and 133 K are presented. Depending on solution concentration and cooling rate, the obtained thermograms show one freezing event and from one to three liquid-glass transitions upon cooling and from one to six liquid-glass and reverse glass-liquid transitions, one or two freezing events, and one melting event upon warming of frozen/glassy CA/H2O. The multiple freezing events and glass transitions pertain to the mother CA/H2O solution itself and two freeze-concentrated solution regions, FCS1 and FCS2, of different concentrations. The FCS1 and FCS2 (or FCS22) are formed during the freezing of CA/H2O upon cooling and/or during the freezing upon warming of partly glassy or entirely glassy mother CA/H2O. The formation of two FCS1 and FCS22 regions during the freezing upon warming to our best knowledge has never been reported before. Using an optical cryo-microscope, we are able to observe the formation of a continuous ice framework (IF) and its morphology and reciprocal distribution of IF/(FCS1 + FCS2). Our results provide a new look at the freezing and glass transition behavior of aqueous solutions and can be used for the optimization of lyophilization and freezing of foods and biopharmaceutical formulations, among many other applications where freezing plays a crucial role.

  5. Effects of addition of malic or citric acids on fermentation quality and chemical characteristics of alfalfa silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, W C; Ding, W R; Xu, D M; Ding, L M; Zhang, P; Li, F D; Guo, X S

    2017-11-01

    We studied the effects on alfalfa preservation and chemical composition of the addition of different levels of malic acid and citric acid at ensiling as well as the utilization efficiency of these 2 organic acids after fermentation. Alfalfa was harvested at early bloom stage. After wilting to a dry matter content of approximately 40%, the alfalfa was chopped into 1- to 2-cm pieces for ensiling. Four levels (0, 0.1, 0.5, and 1% of fresh weight) of malic acid or citric acid were applied to chopped alfalfa at ensiling with 4 replicates for each treatment, and the treated alfalfa forages were ensiled for 60 d in vacuum-sealed polyethylene bags (dimensions: 200 mm × 300 mm) packed with 200 to 230 g of fresh alfalfa per mini silo and an initial density of 0.534 g/cm(3). The application of malic or citric acids at ensiling for 60 d led to lower silage pH than was observed in the control silage (0% of malic or citric acids). Application of the 2 organic acids led to higher lactic acid concentration in alfalfa silage than in the control silage except with the application rate of 1% of fresh weight. Silages treated with both organic acids had lower nonprotein nitrogen concentrations than the control silages, and the nonprotein nitrogen concentrations in ensiled forages decreased with the increase in malic or citric acid application rates. The application of the 2 organic acid additives led to lower saturated fatty acid proportions and higher polyunsaturated fatty acid proportions in ensiled alfalfa than in the control silage. The amount of malic and citric acids degraded during ensiling of alfalfa was 1.45 and 0.63 g, respectively. At the application rate of 0.5% of fresh weight, residues of malic acid and citric acid in alfalfa silage were 11.1 and 13.6 g/kg of dry matter. These results indicate that including malic or citric acids at the ensiling of alfalfa effectively improved silage fermentation quality, limited proteolysis, improved fatty acid composition of the

  6. Chemostat study of citric acid production from glycerol by Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rywińska, Anita; Juszczyk, Piotr; Wojtatowicz, Maria; Rymowicz, Waldemar

    2011-03-10

    The aim of the study was to examine how the dilution rate and the chemical composition of the production medium impacts on the synthesis of citric acid by the Yarrowia lipolytica strain Wratislavia AWG7 from glycerol in a chemostat culture. The yeast Y. lipolytica Wratislavia AWG7, an acetate (acet(-)) and morphological (fil(-)) mutant, was cultured in a nitrogen- and phosphorus-limited medium at the dilution rate of 0.009-0.031h(-1) in the chemostat. Under steady-state conditions, the increase in the dilution rate was paralleled by the decrease in citric acid concentration (from 86.5 to 51.2gL(-1)), as well as by the increase in the volumetric rate (from 0.78 to 1.59gL(-1)h(-1)) and specific rate (from 0.05 to 0.18gg(-1)h(-1)) of citric acid production. The yield of the production process varied from 0.59 to 0.67gg(-1). In a 550-h continuous culture of the yeast test, at a dilution rate of 0.01h(-1), in a medium with enhanced concentrations of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus sources, the concentration of citric acid, the concentration of biomass and the volumetric rate of citric acid production were 97.8gL(-1), 22.2gL(-1) and 0.98gL(-1)h(-1), respectively. The yield of the process decreased to 0.49gg(-1). The number of dead cells did not exceed 1% while that of the budding cells accounted for about 20%. Owing to the low content of isocitric acid and polyols, the fermentation process was characterized by a high purity. This study has produced the following finding: the double mutant Y. lipolytica AWG7 is an effective citric acid producer, with the ability to preserve its properties unchanged during the long run of the continuous chemostat process. This is a valued technological feature of such mutants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Coamorphous Loratadine-Citric Acid System with Enhanced Physical Stability and Bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin; Chang, Ruimiao; Zhao, Yanan; Zhang, Jiye; Zhang, Ting; Fu, Qiang; Chang, Chun; Zeng, Aiguo

    2017-02-21

    Coamorphous systems using citric acid as a small molecular excipient were studied for improving physical stability and bioavailability of loratadine, a BCS class II drug with low water solubility and high permeability. Coamorphous loratadine-citric acid systems were prepared by solvent evaporation technique and characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray powder diffraction, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Solid-state analysis proofed that coamorphous loratadine-citric acid system (1:1) was amorphous and homogeneous, had a higher T g over amorphous loratadine, and the intermolecular hydrogen bond interactions between loratadine and citric acid exist. The solubility and dissolution of coamorphous loratadine-citric acid system (1:1) were found to be significantly greater than those of crystalline and amorphous form. The pharmacokinetic study in rats proved that coamorphous loratadine-citric acid system (1:1) could significantly improve absorption and bioavailability of loratadine. Coamorphous loratadine-citric acid system (1:1) showed excellently physical stability over a period of 3 months at 25°C under 0% RH and 25°C under 60% RH conditions. The improved stability of coamorphous loratadine-citric acid system (1:1) could be related to an elevated T g over amorphous form and the intermolecular hydrogen bond interactions between loratadine and citric acid. These studies demonstrate that the developed coamorphous loratadine-citric acid system might be a promising oral formulation for improving solubility and bioavailability of loratadine.

  8. Inulin hydrolysis and citric acid production from inulin using the surface-engineered Yarrowia lipolytica displaying inulinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Yan; Chi, Zhe; Liu, Guang-Lei; Wang, Fang; Madzak, Catherine; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2010-09-01

    The INU1 gene encoding exo-inulinase cloned from Kluyveromyces marxianus CBS 6556 was ligated into the surface display plasmid and expressed in the cells of the marine-derived yeast Yarrowia lipolytica which can produce citric acid. The expressed inulinase was immobilized on the yeast cells. The activity of the immobilized inulinase with 6 x His tag was found to be 22.6 U mg(-1) of cell dry weight after cell growth for 96 h. The optimal pH and temperature of the displayed inulinase were 4.5 and 50 degrees C, respectively and the inulinase was stable in the pH range of 3-8 and in the temperature range of 0-50 degrees C. During the inulin hydrolysis, the optimal inulin concentration was 12.0% and the optimal amount of added inulinase was 181.6 U g(-1) of inulin. Under such conditions, over 77.9% of inulin was hydrolyzed within 10h and the hydrolysate contained main monosaccharides and disaccharides, and minor trisaccharides. During the citric acid production in the flask level, the recombinant yeast could produce 77.9 g L(-1) citric acid and 5.3 g L(-1) iso-citric acid from inulin while 68.9 g L(-1) of citric acid and 4.1 g L(-1) iso-citric acid in the fermented medium were attained within 312 h of the 2-L fermentation, respectively. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Extraction of rare earth elements from a contaminated cropland soil using nitric acid, citric acid, and EDTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hailong; Shuai, Weitao; Wang, Xiaojing; Liu, Yangsheng

    2017-08-01

    Rare earth elements (REEs) contamination to the surrounding soil has increased the concerns of health risk to the local residents. Soil washing was first attempted in our study to remediate REEs-contaminated cropland soil using nitric acid, citric acid, and ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) for soil decontamination and possible recovery of REEs. The extraction time, washing agent concentration, and pH value of the washing solution were optimized. The sequential extraction analysis proposed by Tessier was adopted to study the speciation changes of the REEs before and after soil washing. The extract containing citric acid was dried to obtain solid for the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis. The results revealed that the optimal extraction time was 72 h, and the REEs extraction efficiency increased as the agent concentration increased from 0.01 to 0.1 mol/L. EDTA was efficient to extract REEs over a wide range of pH values, while citric acid was around pH 6.0. Under optimized conditions, the average extraction efficiencies of the major REEs in the contaminated soil were 70.96%, 64.38%, and 62.12% by EDTA, nitric acid, and citric acid, respectively. The sequential extraction analyses revealed that most soil-bounded REEs were mobilized or extracted except for those in the residual fraction. Under a comprehensive consideration of the extraction efficiency and the environmental impact, citric acid was recommended as the most suitable agent for extraction of the REEs from the contaminated cropland soils. The XRF analysis revealed that Mn, Al, Si, Pb, Fe, and REEs were the major elements in the extract indicating a possibile recovery of the REEs.

  10. Effects of tempering (annealing), acid hydrolysis, low-citric acid substitution on chemical and physicochemical properties of starches of four yam (Dioscorea spp.) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falade, Kolawole O; Ayetigbo, Oluwatoyin E

    2017-05-01

    The effects of tempering (annealing), acid hydrolysis and low-citric acid substitution on chemical and physicochemical properties of starches of four Nigerian yam cultivars were investigated. Crude fat and protein contents of the native starches decreased significantly after the modifications, while nitrogen-free extract increased significantly with acid hydrolysis and citric acid substitution. Acid hydrolysis and low-citric acid substitution reduced the least concentration for gel formation of the starches from 4 to 2% w/v, but tempering had no effect. Swelling power of the starches reduced significantly, and water solubility increased significantly at 75 and 85 °C, especially with acid hydrolysis and low-citric acid substitution. However, tempering significantly reduced starch solubility in the four cultivars. Paste clarity of starches of white (29.17%), water (18.90%), yellow (30.90%) and bitter (10.57%) yams reduced significantly with tempering to 14.43, 11.83, 16.93 and 7.27%, but increased significantly with acid hydrolysis to 41.40, 35.37, 28.77 and 32.33%, and low-citric acid substitution to 36.60, 44.17, 50.67 and 14.33%, respectively. Pasting properties such as peak, trough, breakdown, final, and setback viscosities and peak time of native starches reduced significantly with acid hydrolysis and low-citric acid substitution, however, tempering significantly increased their pasting temperature, peak time, setback and final viscosities.

  11. Antagonistic interactions between sodium hypochlorite, chlorhexidine, EDTA, and citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi-Fedele, Giampiero; Doğramaci, Esma J; Guastalli, Andrea R; Steier, Liviu; de Figueiredo, Jose Antonio Poli

    2012-04-01

    Root canal irrigants play a significant role in the elimination of microorganisms, tissue dissolution, and the removal of debris and smear layer. No single solution is able to fulfill these actions completely; therefore, their association is required. The aim of this investigation was to review the antagonistic interactions occurring when sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorhexidine (CHX), EDTA, and citric acid (CA) are used together during endodontic treatment. A search was performed in the electronic database Medline (articles published through 2011; English language; and the following search terms or combinations: "interaction AND root canal irrigant or endodontic irrigant or sodium hypochlorite or chlorhexidine," "sodium hypochlorite AND EDTA or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or citric acid or chelating agent or chlorhexidine," and "chlorhexidine AND EDTA or ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or citric acid or chelating agent") to identify publications that studied unwanted chemical interactions between NaOCl, CHX, and EDTA and CA. The search identified 1,285 publications; 19 fulfilled the inclusion/exclusion criteria of the review. Their research methodology was classified as either in vitro or ex vivo. Antagonistic interactions included the loss of free available chlorine for NaOCl when in contact with chelators, which consequently reduced the tissue dissolution capability and to a lesser extent antimicrobial activities. When CHX and NaOCl are mixed, a precipitate forms that can present detrimental consequences for endodontic treatment, including a risk of discoloration and potential leaching of unidentified chemicals into the periradicular tissues. CHX and EDTA mixtures cause a precipitate, whereas CHX and CA do not exhibit interaction. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fermentative production of high titer citric acid from corn stover feedstock after dry dilute acid pretreatment and biodetoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping-Ping; Meng, Jiao; Bao, Jie

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the citric acid fermentation by a robust strain Aspergillus niger SIIM M288 using corn stover feedstock after dry dilute sulfuric acid pretreatment and biodetoxification. Citric acid at 100.04g/L with the yield of 94.11% was obtained, which are comparable to the starch or sucrose based citric acid fermentation. No free wastewater was generated in the overall process from the pretreatment to citric acid fermentation. Abundant divalent metal ions as well as high titer of potassium, phosphate, and nitrogen were found in corn stover hydrolysate. Further addition of extra nutrients showed no impact on increasing citric acid formation except minimum nitrogen source was required. Various fermentation parameters were tested and only minimum regulation was required during the fermentation. This study provided a biorefining process for citric acid fermentation from lignocellulose feedstock with the maximum citric acid titer and yield. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Effects of sodium chloride, acetic acid and citric acid on the dissolution of aluminum from aluminum cooking utensils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, F; Meshitsuka, S; Funakawa, K; Nose, T

    1990-12-01

    In order to investigate the effects of sodium chloride and organic acids on aluminum elution from cooking utensils made of aluminum, the quantities of aluminum elution were measured in solutions with various concentrations of sodium chloride, acetic acid and citric acid by flameless atomic adsorption spectrophotometry. The increase of the aluminum elution rate from a pudding cup, an aluminum pan and an alumite pan could be clearly distinguished by the coexistence of acetic acid or citric acid and sodium chloride. The elution was low in the presence of sodium chloride at room temperature, but it was distinctly accelerated by heating. Although alumite treatment had the effect of protection against aluminum elution, such elution obviously increased, as shown by the existence of acid and sodium chloride at high temperatures. Aluminum elution rates from surface-untreated cooking utensils made of aluminum were increased by heating by a factor of several thousand.

  14. Model-based design of a pilot-scale simulated moving bed for purification of citric acid from fermentation broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinglan; Peng, Qijun; Arlt, Wolfgang; Minceva, Mirjana

    2009-12-11

    One of the conventional processes used for the recovery of citric acid from its fermentation broth is environmentally harmful and cost intensive. In this work an innovative benign process, which comprises simulated moving bed (SMB) technology and use of a tailor-made tertiary poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) resin as a stationary phase is proposed. This paper focuses on a model-based design of the operation conditions for an existing pilot-scale SMB plant. The SMB unit is modeled on the basis of experimentally determined hydrodynamics, thermodynamics and mass transfer characteristics in a single chromatographic column. Three mathematical models are applied and validated for the prediction of the experimentally attained breakthrough and elution profiles of citric acid and the main impurity component (glucose). The transport dispersive model was selected for the SMB simulation and design studies, since it gives a satisfactory prediction of the elution profiles within acceptable computational time. The equivalent true moving bed (TMB) and SMB models give a good prediction of the experimentally attained SMB separation performances, obtained with a real clarified and concentrated fermentation broth as a feed mixture. The SMB separation requirements are set to at least 99.8% citric acid purity and 90% citric acid recovery in the extract stream. The complete regeneration in sections 1 and 4 is unnecessary. Therefore the net flow rates in all four SMB sections have been considered in the unit design. The influences of the operating conditions (the flow rate in each section, switching time and unit configuration) on the SMB performances were investigated systematically. The resulting SMB design provides 99.8% citric acid purity and 97.2% citric acid recovery in the extract. In addition the citric acid concentration in the extract is a half of its concentration in the pretreated fermentation broth (feed).

  15. Biosynthesis of Citric Acid from Glycerol by Acetate Mutants of Yarrowia lipolytica in Fed-Batch Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Rywińska

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pure and crude glycerol from biodiesel production have been used as substrates for citric acid production by acetate-negative mutants of Yarrowia lipolytica in fed-batch fermentation. Both the final concentration and the yield of the product were the highest when Y. lipolytica Wratislavia AWG7 strain was used in the culture with pure or crude glycerol. With a medium containing 200 g/L of glycerol, production reached a maximum of citric acid of 139 g/L after 120 h. This high yield of the product (up to 0.69 g of citric acid per gram of glycerol consumed was achieved with both pure and crude glycerol. Lower yield of citric acid in the culture with Y. lipolytica Wratislavia K1 strain (about 0.45 g/g resulted from increased erythritol concentrations (up to 40 g/L, accumulated simultaneously with the citric acid. The concentration of isocitric acid, a by-product in this fermentation, was very low, in the range from 2.6 to 4.6 g/L.

  16. Production of citric acid using its extraction wastewater treated by anaerobic digestion and ion exchange in an integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Chen, Yang-Qiu; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2014-08-01

    In order to solve the problem of extraction wastewater pollution in citric acid industry, an integrated citric acid-methane fermentation process is proposed in this study. Extraction wastewater was treated by mesophilic anaerobic digestion and then used to make mash for the next batch of citric acid fermentation. The recycling process was done for seven batches. Citric acid production (82.4 g/L on average) decreased by 34.1 % in the recycling batches (2nd-7th) compared with the first batch. And the residual reducing sugar exceeded 40 g/L on average in the recycling batches. Pigment substances, acetic acid, ammonium, and metal ions in anaerobic digestion effluent (ADE) were considered to be the inhibitors, and their effects on the fermentation were studied. Results indicated that ammonium, Na(+) and K(+) in the ADE significantly inhibited citric acid fermentation. Therefore, the ADE was treated by acidic cation exchange resin prior to reuse to make mash for citric acid fermentation. The recycling process was performed for ten batches, and citric acid productions in the recycling batches were 126.6 g/L on average, increasing by 1.7 % compared with the first batch. This process could eliminate extraction wastewater discharge and reduce water resource consumption.

  17. Detection of exogenous citric acid in fruit juices by stable isotope ratio analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamin, Eric; Martin, Frédérique; Santamaria-Fernandez, Rebeca; Lees, Michèle

    2005-06-29

    A new method has been developed for measuring the D/H ratio of the nonexchangeable sites of citric acid by isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). Pure citric acid is transformed into its calcium salt and subsequently analyzed by pyrolysis-IRMS. The citric acid isolated from authentic fruit juices (citrus, pineapple, and red fruits) systematically shows higher D/H values than its nonfruit counterpart produced by fermentation of various sugar sources. The discrimination obtained with this simplified method is similar to that obtained previously by applying site specific isotopic fractionation-nuclear magnetic resonance (SNIF-NMR) to an ester derivative of citric acid. The combination of carbon 13 and deuterium measurements of extracted citric acid is proposed as a routine method for an optimum detection of exogenous citric acid in all kinds of fruit juices.

  18. Selection of 5-fluorocytosine-resistant mutants from an Aspergillus niger citric acid-producing strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conte Ana Paula de F.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutants of Aspergillus niger N402, induced by UV mutagenesis, were selected and tested for resistance or sensitivity to 5-fluorocytosine. Some mutants showed increased citric acid production, which did not correlate with the intracellular amount of protein or ammonium ion. The resistance to 5-fluorocytosine proved to be a rational approach for isolation of new mutants with improved production of citric acid. The best mutant (FR13 accumulated double the amount of citric acid produced by the parental strain.

  19. Electrochemical monitoring of citric acid production by Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutyła-Olesiuk, Anna; Wawrzyniak, Urszula E; Ciosek, Patrycja; Wróblewski, Wojciech

    2014-05-01

    Hybrid electronic tongue was developed for the monitoring of citric acid production by Aspergillus niger. The system based on various potentiometric/voltammetric sensors and appropriate chemometric techniques provided correct qualitative and quantitative classification of the samples collected during standard Aspergillus niger culture and culture infected with yeast. The performance of the proposed approach was compared with the monitoring of the fermentation process carried out using classical methods. The results obtained proved, that the designed hybrid electronic tongue was able to evaluate the progress and correctness of the fermentation process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The global regulator LaeA controls production of citric acid and endoglucanases in Aspergillus carbonarius

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Tore; Zoglowek, Marta; Lübeck, Mette

    2016-01-01

    investigated the regulatory effect of LaeA on production of citric acid and cellulolytic enzymes in A. carbonarius. Two types of A. carbonarius strains, having laeA knocked out or overexpressed, were constructed and tested in fermentation. The knockout of laeA significantly decreased the production of citric...... acid and endoglucanases, but did not reduce the production of beta-glucosidases or xylanases. The citric acid accumulation was reduced with 74–96 % compared to the wild type. The endoglucanase activity was reduced with 51–78 %. Overexpression of LaeA seemed not to have an effect on citric acid...

  1. Ketogenesis in isolated rat liver mitochondria I. Relationships with the citric acid cycle and with the mitochondrial energy state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopes-Cardozo, M.; Bergh, S.G. van den

    1972-01-01

    1. A method is described to calculate the distribution of acetyl-CoA over the citric acid cycle and ketogenesis during the oxidation of fatty acids in the presence of added malate. 2. Increasing concentrations of added Krebs cycle intermediates lower the rate of ketogenesis both in the low-energy

  2. Citric Acid Cycle Metabolites Predict the Severity of Myocardial Stunning and Mortality in Newborn Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldebrandt, Janus Adler; Støttrup, Nicolaj Brejnholt; Frederiksen, Christian Alcaraz

    2016-01-01

    the presence of myocardial stunning and predicts mortality in acute noninfarct right ventricular heart failure in newborn pigs. This phenomenon occurs independently of the type of inotrope, suggesting that citric acid cycle intermediates represent potential markers of acute noninfarct heart failure.......OBJECTIVES: Myocardial infarction and chronic heart failure induce specific metabolic changes in the neonatal myocardium that are closely correlated to outcome. The aim of this study was to examine the metabolic responses to noninfarct heart failure and inotropic treatments in the newborn heart......, which so far are undetermined. DESIGN: A total of 28 newborn pigs were instrumented with a microdialysis catheter in the right ventricle, and intercellular citric acid cycle intermediates and adenosine metabolite concentrations were determined at 20-minute intervals. Stunning was induced by 10 cycles...

  3. Citric acid-coated gold nanoparticles for visual colorimetric recognition of pesticide dimethoate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dar, Aqib Iqbal; Walia, Shanka; Acharya, Amitabha, E-mail: amitabhachem@gmail.com, E-mail: amitabha@ihbt.res.in [CSIR-Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology, Biotechnology Division (India)

    2016-08-15

    A colorimetric chemo-sensor based on citric acid-coated gold NPs (C-GNP) showed a linear increase in fluorescence intensity with increasing concentration of pesticide dimethoate (DM). The limit of detection was found to be between ~8.25± 0.3 and 20 ± 9.5 ppm. The increase in fluorescence intensity was suggested to have originated from the soft–soft interaction between C-GNPs and DM via sulfur group which is absent in pesticide dicofol (DF). Similar studies with citric acid-coated silver NPs (C-SNPs) did not result any change in the fluorescence intensity. The microscopic studies suggested aggregation of C-GNPs in the presence of DM but not in case of DF.Graphical Abstract.

  4. Statistical optimization of media components to enhance citric acid production from paddy straw using solid state fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. D. Zulkali

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A sequential optimization based on experimental design method was employed to optimize the concentration of media components for improvement of citric acid production from paddy straw by solid state fermentation using Aspergillus niger. The optimization procedure for the media components (NH4NO3, KH2PO4, MgSO4, CuSO4, ZnSO4, FeSO4 and MnSO4 was carried out using the Plaket-Burman Design (PBD for the screening and Central Composite Design (CCD for the optimization. The result obtained from (PBD indicates NH4NO3, KH2PO4 and MgSO4 were the most significant components that affect the citric acid production. The maximum yield obtained by (CCD was 39.5 g citric acid/kg of paddy straw. The statistical analysis showed that the optimum media concentration was 0.03 g/L for NH4NO3, 2.08 g/L for KH2PO4 and 0.015 g/L for MgSO4, which gives the maximum predicted yield of citric acid (51.1 g citric acid/Kg paddy straw.

  5. Application of kaolin to improve citric acid production by a thermophilic Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sikander

    2006-12-01

    Citric acid production by a thermophilic strain of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger IIB-6 in a medium containing blackstrap cane molasses was improved by the addition of kaolin to the fermentation medium. The fermentation was run in a 7.5-l stirred bioreactor (60% working volume). The optimal sugar concentration was found to be 150 g/l. Kaolin (1.0 ml) was added to the fermentation medium to enhance volumetric production. The best results in terms of product formation were observed when 15 parts per million (ppm) kaolin was added 24 h after inoculation. With added kaolin, citric acid production was enhanced 2.34-fold, compared to a control fermentation without added kaolin. The length of incubation to attain this product yield was shortened from 168 to 96 h. The comparison of kinetic parameters showed improved citrate synthase activity of the culture (Y (p/x)=7.046 g/g). When the culture grown at various kaolin concentrations was monitored for Q (p), Q (s), and q (p), there was significant improvement in these variables over the control. Specific production by the culture (q (p)=0.073 g/g cells/h) was improved several fold. The addition of kaolin substantially improved the enthalpy (DeltaH (D)=74.5 kJ/mol) and entropy of activation (DeltaS=-174 J/mol/K) for citric acid production, free energies for transition state formation, and substrate binding for sucrose hydrolysis. The performance of fuzzy logic control of the bioreactor was found to be very promising for an improvement ( approximately 4.2-fold) in the production of citric acid (96.88 g/l), which is of value in commercial applications.

  6. Uranium Leaching from Contaminated Soil Utilizing Rhamnolipid, EDTA, and Citric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Asselin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosurfactants have recently gained attention as “green” agents that can be used to enhance the remediation of heavy metals and some organic matter in contaminated soils. The overall objective of this paper was to investigate rhamnolipid, a microbial produced biosurfactant, and its ability to leach uranium present in contaminated soil from an abandoned mine site. Soil samples were collected from two locations in northern Arizona: Cameron (site of open pit mining and Leupp (control—no mining. The approach taken was to first determine the total uranium content in each soil using a hydrofluoric acid digestion, then comparing the amount of metal removed by rhamnolipid to other chelating agents EDTA and citric acid, and finally determining the amount of soluble metal in the soil matrix using a sequential extraction. Results suggested a complex system for metal removal from soil utilizing rhamnolipid. It was determined that rhamnolipid at a concentration of 150 μM was as effective as EDTA but not as effective as citric acid for the removal of soluble uranium. However, the rhamnolipid was only slightly better at removing uranium from the mining soil compared to a purified water control. Overall, this study demonstrated that rhamnolipid ability to remove uranium from contaminated soil is comparable to EDTA and to a lesser extent citric acid, but, for the soils investigated, it is not significantly better than a simple water wash.

  7. Citric acid facilitated thermal treatment: An innovative method for the remediation of mercury contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Fujun [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Peng, Changsheng [The Key Lab of Marine Environmental Science and Ecology, Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100 (China); Hou, Deyi [Geotechnical and Environmental Research Group, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom); Wu, Bin; Zhang, Qian; Li, Fasheng [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Gu, Qingbao, E-mail: guqb@craes.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Hg content was reduced to <1.5 mg/kg when treated at 400 °C with citric acid. • The treated soil retained most of its original soil physicochemical properties. • Proton provided by citric acid facilitates thermal removal of mercury. • This thermal treatment method is expected to reduce energy input by 35%. - Abstract: Thermal treatment is a promising technology for the remediation of mercury contaminated soils, but it often requires high energy input at heating temperatures above 600 °C, and the treated soil is not suitable for agricultural reuse. The present study developed a novel method for the thermal treatment of mercury contaminated soils with the facilitation of citric acid (CA). A CA/Hg molar ratio of 15 was adopted as the optimum dosage. The mercury concentration in soils was successfully reduced from 134 mg/kg to 1.1 mg/kg when treated at 400 °C for 60 min and the treated soil retained most of its original soil physiochemical properties. During the treatment process, CA was found to provide an acidic environment which enhanced the volatilization of mercury. This method is expected to reduce energy input by 35% comparing to the traditional thermal treatment method, and lead to agricultural soil reuse, thus providing a greener and more sustainable remediation method for treating mercury contaminated soil in future engineering applications.

  8. Influence of glucose and saturated free-fatty acid mixtures on citric acid and lipid production by Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, Seraphim; Galiotou-Panayotou, Maria; Chevalot, Isabelle; Komaitis, Michael; Marc, Ivan; Aggelis, George

    2006-02-01

    In the present report, the effect of glucose and stearin (substrate composed by saturated free-fatty acids) on the production of biomass, reserve lipid, and citric acid by Yarrowia lipolytica ACA-DC 50109 was investigated in nitrogen-limited cultures. Numerical models that were used in order to quantify the kinetic behavior of the above Yarrowia lipolytica strain showed successful simulation, while the optimized parameter values were similar to those experimentally measured and the predictive ability of the models was satisfactory. In nitrogen-limited cultures in which glucose was used as the sole substrate, satisfactory growth and no glucose inhibition occurred, although in some cases the initial concentration of glucose was significantly high (150 g/l). Citric acid production was observed in all trials, which was in some cases notable (final concentration 42.9 g/l, yield 0.56 g per g of sugar consumed). The concentration of unsaturated cellular fatty acids was slightly lower when the quantity of sugar in the medium was elevated. In the cases in which stearin and glucose were used as co-substrates, in spite of the fact that the quantity of cellular lipid inside the yeast cells varied remarkably (from 0.3 to 2.0 g/l-4 to 20% wt/wt), de novo fatty acid biosynthesis was observed. This activity increased when the yeast cells assimilated higher sugar quantities. The citric acid produced was mainly derived from the catabolism of sugar. Nevertheless, citric acid yield on sugar consumed and citrate specific production rate, as evaluated by the numerical model, presented substantially higher values in the fermentation in which no fat was used as glucose co-substrate compared with the cultures with stearin used as co-substrate.

  9. Synergistic antimicrobial activity of caprylic acid in combination with citric acid against both Escherichia coli O157:H7 and indigenous microflora in carrot juice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S A; Rhee, M S

    2015-08-01

    The identification of novel, effective, and non-thermal decontamination methods is imperative for the preservation of unpasteurized and fresh vegetable juices. The aim of this study was to examine the bactericidal effects of caprylic acid + citric acid against the virulent pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 and the endogenous microflora in unpasteurized fresh carrot juice. Carrot juice was treated with either caprylic acid, citric acid, or a combination of caprylic acid + citric acid at mild heating temperature (45 °C or 50 °C). The color of the treated carrot juice as well as microbial survival was examined over time. Combined treatment was more effective than individual treatment in terms of both color and microbial survival. Caprylic acid + citric acid treatment (each at 5.0 mM) at 50 °C for 5 min resulted in 7.46 and 3.07 log CFU/ml reductions in the E. coli O157:H7 and endogenous microflora populations, respectively. By contrast, there was no apparent reduction in either population following individual treatment. A validation assay using a low-density E. coli O157:H7 inoculum (3.31 log CFU/ml) showed that combined treatment with caprylic acid (5.0 mM) + citric acid (2.5 mM) at 50 °C for >5 min or with caprylic acid + citric acid (both at 5.0 mM) at either 45 °C or 50 °C for >5 min completely destroyed the bacteria. Combined treatment also increased the redness of the juice, which is a perceived indication of quality. Taken together, these results indicate that combined treatment with low concentrations of caprylic acid and citric acid, which are of biotic origin, can eliminate microorganisms from unpasteurized carrot juice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Citric acid traps to replace sulphuric acid in the ammonia diffusion of dilute water samples for 15N analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleppi, Patrick; Bucher-Wallin, Inga; Saurer, Matthias; Jäggi, Maya; Landolt, Werner

    2006-01-01

    The analysis of 15N in aqueous samples requires the concentration of dissolved nitrogen (N) into a small volume that can be analysed by mass spectrometry. This is conveniently achieved by the NH3 diffusion technique, where NH4+ is captured on small acidified filters enclosed in PTFE. NO3- can be analysed the same way by reducing it to NH4+ with Devarda's alloy. H2SO4 is commonly used for the acidification of the filters. During combustion, however, this acid leads to the production of SO2 and elemental sulphur, which both have detrimental effects on the mass spectrometer. We propose here to replace H2SO4 with citric acid because it is combusted completely to CO2 and H2O in the elemental analyser before entering the mass spectrometer. Citric acid was found to give comparable results in terms of N recovery and 15N values, both for NH4+ and for NO3- samples. Blank samples revealed that N contamination was slightly lower using citric instead of sulphuric acid as acidifier of the glass filters. NH4+ samples first concentrated over cation-exchange columns were strongly acidic and several methods were tested to raise the pH for the subsequent diffusion. These samples gave incomplete N recoveries, but this problem was independent of the acid used on the filters and of the final pH of the sample. Complete recovery was achieved only by increasing the volume of the eluate from the columns. Citric acid can thus generally be recommended instead of H2SO4 for ammonia diffusion. Copyright 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Optimization of nitrogen for enhanced citric acid productivity by a 2-deoxy D-glucose resistant culture of Aspergillus niger NGd-280.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikram-Ul-Haq; Ali, Sikander; Qadeer, M A; Iqbal, Javed

    2005-03-01

    The present investigation is concerned with the optimization of nitrogen for enhanced citric acid productivity by a 2-deoxy D-glucose resistant culture of Aspergillus niger NGd-280 in a 15 l stirred tank bioreactor. Nutrients, especially nitrogen source have a marked influence on citrate productivity because it is an essential constituent of basal cell proteins. Citric acid has been known to be produced when the nitrogen source was the limiting factor. Ammonium nitrate was employed as a nitrogen source in the present study and batch culture experiments were carried out under various concentrations of ammonium nitrate. Specific growth rate was decreased and the biosynthesis of citric acid was delayed at higher concentrations of ammonium nitrate. Specific citric acid production rate was the highest when intracellular ammonium ion concentration was between 2.0 and 3.0 mmol g(-1) cells. Citrate production was however, stopped when intracellular ammonium ion concentration decreased below 1.0 mmol g(-1) cell.

  12. Dimethylurea/citric acid as a highly efficient deep eutectic solvent for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 126; Issue 3. Dimethylurea/citric acid ... Dimethylurea/citric acid deep eutectic solvent was used as a dual catalyst and a green reaction medium for the efficient synthesis of bis(indolyl)methanes, quinolines and aryl-4, 5-diphenyl-1H-imidazoles. Ease of recovery and ...

  13. Effects of the food additive, citric acid, on kidney cells of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xg; Lv, Qx; Liu, Ym; Deng, W

    2015-01-01

    Citric acid is a food additive that is widely used in the food and drink industry. We investigated the effects of citric acid injection on mouse kidney. Forty healthy mice were divided into four groups of 10 including one control group and three citric acid-treated groups. Low dose, middle dose and high dose groups were given doses of 120, 240 and 480 mg/kg of citric acid, respectively. On day 7, kidney tissues were collected for histological, biochemical and molecular biological examination. We observed shrinkage of glomeruli, widened urinary spaces and capillary congestion, narrowing of the tubule lumen, edema and cytoplasmic vacuolated tubule cells, and appearance of pyknotic nuclei. The relation between histopathological changes and citric acid was dose dependent. Compared to the control, T-SOD and GSH-Px activities in the treated groups decreased with increasing doses of citric acid, NOS activity tended to increase, and H2O2 and MDA contents gradually decreased, but the differences between any treated group and the control were not statistically significant. The apoptosis assay showed a dose-dependent increase of caspase-3 activity after administering citrate that was statistically significant. DNA ladder formation occurred after treatment with any dose of citric acid. We concluded that administration of citric acid may cause renal toxicity in mice.

  14. Bronchoconstriction induced by citric acid inhalation in guinea pigs: role of tachykinins, bradykinin, and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardolo, F L; Rado, V; Fabbri, L M; Sterk, P J; Di Maria, G U; Geppetti, P

    1999-02-01

    Gastroesophageal acid reflux into the airways can trigger asthma attacks. Indeed, citric acid inhalation causes bronchoconstriction in guinea pigs, but the mechanism of this effect has not been fully clarified. We investigated the role of tachykinins, bradykinin, and nitric oxide (NO) on the citric acid- induced bronchoconstriction in anesthetized and artificially ventilated guinea pigs. Citric acid inhalation (2-20 breaths) caused a dose-dependent increase in total pulmonary resistance (RL). RL value obtained after 10 breaths of citric acid inhalation was not significantly different from the value obtained after 20 breaths (p = 0.22). The effect produced by a half-submaximum dose of citric acid (5 breaths) was halved by the bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist HOE 140 (0.1 micromol x kg-1, intravenous) and abolished by the tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist SR 48968 (0.3 micromol x kg-1, intravenous). Bronchoconstriction induced by a submaximum dose of citric acid (10 breaths) was partially reduced by the administration of HOE 140, SR 48968, or the NK1 receptor antagonist CP-99,994 (8 micromol x kg-1, intravenous) alone and completely abolished by the combination of SR 48968 and CP-99,994. Pretreatment with the NO synthase inhibitor, L-NMMA (1 mM, 10 breaths every 5 min for 30 min) increased in an L-arginine-dependent manner the effect of citric acid inhalation on RL. HOE 140 and CP-99,994 markedly reduced the L-NMMA-potentiated bronchoconstriction to inhaled citric acid. We conclude that citric acid-induced bronchoconstriction is caused by tachykinin release from sensory nerves, which, in part, is mediated by endogenously released bradykinin. Simultaneous release of NO by citric acid inhalation counteracts tachykinin-mediated bronchoconstriction. Our study suggests a possible implication of these mechanisms in asthma associated with gastroesophageal acid reflux and a potential therapeutic role of tachykinin and bradykinin antagonists.

  15. Citric Acid-Modified Fenton's Reaction for the Oxidation of Chlorinated Ethylenes in Soil Solution Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seol, Yongkoo; Javandel, Iraj

    2008-03-15

    Fenton's reagent, a solution of hydrogen peroxide and ferrous iron catalyst, is used for an in-situ chemical oxidation of organic contaminants. Sulfuric acid is commonly used to create an acidic condition needed for catalytic oxidation. Fenton's reaction often involves pressure buildup and precipitation of reaction products, which can cause safety hazards and diminish efficiency. We selected citric acid, a food-grade substance, as an acidifying agent to evaluate its efficiencies for organic contaminant removal in Fenton's reaction, and examined the impacts of using citric acid on the unwanted reaction products. A series of batch and column experiments were performed with varying H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations to decompose selected chlorinated ethylenes. Either dissolved iron from soil or iron sulfate salt was added to provide the iron catalyst in the batch tests. Batch experiments revealed that both citric and sulfuric acid systems achieved over 90% contaminant removal rates, and the presence of iron catalyst was essential for effective decontamination. Batch tests with citric acid showed no signs of pressure accumulation and solid precipitations, however the results suggested that an excessive usage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} relative to iron catalysts (Fe{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} < 1/330) would result in lowering the efficiency of contaminant removal by iron chelations in the citric acid system. Column tests confirmed that citric acid could provide suitable acidic conditions to achieve higher than 55% contaminant removal rates.

  16. Effect of Periodic Water Addition on Citric Acid Production in Solid State Fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utpat, Shraddha S.; Kinnige, Pallavi T.; Dhamole, Pradip B.

    2013-09-01

    Water addition is one of the methods used to control the moisture loss in solid state fermentation (SSF). However, none of the studies report the timing of water addition and amount of water to be added in SSF. Therefore, this work was undertaken with an objective to evaluate the performance of periodic water addition on citric acid production in SSF. Experiments were conducted at different moistures (50-80 %) and temperatures (30-40 °C) to simulate the conditions in a fermenter. Citric acid production by Aspergillus niger (ATCC 9029) using sugarcane baggase was chosen as a model system. Based on the moisture profile, citric acid and sugar data, a strategy was designed for periodic addition of water. Water addition at 48, 96, 144 and 192 h enhanced the citric acid production by 62 % whereas water addition at 72, 120, and 168 h increased the citric acid production by just 17 %.

  17. Method for the isolation of citric acid and malic acid in Japanese apricot liqueur for carbon stable isotope analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Fumikazu; Hashiguchi, Tomokazu; Hisatsune, Yuri; Oe, Takaaki; Kawao, Takafumi; Fujii, Tsutomu

    2017-02-15

    A method for detecting the undeclared addition of acidic ingredients is required to control the authenticity of Japanese apricot liqueur. We developed an analytical procedure that minimizes carbon isotope discrimination for measurement of the δ(13)C values of citric and malic acid isolated from Japanese apricot liqueur. Our results demonstrated that freeze-drying is preferable to nitrogen spray-drying, because it does not significantly affect the δ(13)C values of citric acid and results in smaller isotope discrimination for malic acid. Both 0.1% formic acid and 0.2% phosphoric acid are acceptable HPLC mobile phases for the isolation of citric and malic acid, although the δ(13)C values of malic acid exhibited relatively large variation compared with citric acid following isolation using either mobile phase. The developed procedure allows precise δ(13)C measurements of citric and malic acid isolated from Japanese apricot liqueur. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of Food Additive Citric Acid on The Growth of Human Esophageal Carcinoma Cell Line EC109.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoguang; Lv, Qiongxia; Liu, Yumei; Deng, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Today, esophageal cancer (EC) has become one of the most common cancer types in China. Therefore, new drug and therapeutic strategies are urgently needed to improve postoperative survival rate of patients with EC. As a food additive, several lines of evidence have shown that citric acid can be served as glycolysis suppressor to inhibit growth of some tumor cells. However, little is known about the effect of this organic acid on the growth of human esophageal carcinoma cell line, EC109. In this experimental study, cell proliferation rate was determined using MTT assay. Apoptotic morphological changes were evaluated by fluorescent microscopy using Hoechst 33258 staining. Cell apoptosis rate and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) were detected using flow-cytometry. Effect of citric acid on cellular membrane permeability was assessed by measuring lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, using LDH assay kit. Compared to the control group, there was a marked decrease in cells proliferation when the cells were treated with higher citric acid concentrations (800, 1600 μg/ml). Typical apoptotic morphology of EC109 cells was observed upon treatment with citric acid, such as chromatin condensation and appearance of apoptotic body. Cell apoptotic indexes were significantly increased (Pcitric acid at the concentration of 400-1600 μg/ml. Extracellular LDH activity and loss of MMP in all of the treated groups were significantly higher than control (Pcitric acid prevents EC109 cell growth by inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis, which perhaps offers some theoretical guidance for its application in EC treatment.

  19. Lipid and citric acid production by wild yeasts grown in glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Karla Silva Teixeira; Schwan, Rosane Freitas; Dias, Disney Ribeiro

    2014-04-01

    In this study, crude glycerol was used as a carbon source in the cultivation of wild yeasts, aiming for the production of microbial lipids and citric acid. Forty yeasts of different sources were tested concerning their growth in crude and commercial glycerol. Four yeasts (Lidnera saturnus UFLA CES-Y677, Yarrowia lipolytica UFLA CM-Y9.4, Rhodotorula glutinis NCYC 2439, and Cryptococcus curvatus NCYC 476) were then selected owing to their ability to grow in pure (OD600 2.133, 1.633, 2.055, and 2.049, respectively) and crude (OD600 2.354, 1.753, 2.316, and 2.281, respectively) glycerol (10%, 20%, and 30%). Y. lipolytica UFLA CM-Y9.4 was selected for its ability to maintain cell viability in concentrations of 30% of crude glycerol, and high glycerol intake (18.907 g/l). This yeast was submitted to lipid production in 30 g/l of crude glycerol, and therefore obtained 63.4% of microbial lipids. In the fatty acid profile, there was a predominance of stearic (C18:0) and palmitic (C16:0) acids in the concentrations of 87.64% and 74.67%, respectively. We also performed optimization of the parameters for the production of citric acid, which yielded a production of 0.19 g/l of citric acid in optimum conditions (38.4 g/l of crude glycerol, agitation of 184 rpm, and temperature of 30°C). Yarrowia lipolytica UFLA CM-Y9.4 presented good lipid production when in the concentration of 30 g/l of glycerol. These data may be used for production in large quantities for the application of industrial biodiesel.

  20. An investigation into the stability and sterility of citric acid solutions used for cough reflex testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, James R; Wu, Zimei; Lau, Hugo; Suen, Joanna; Wang, Lucy; Pottinger, Sarah; Lee, Elaine; Alazawi, Nawar; Kallesen, Molly; Gargiulo, Derryn A; Swift, Simon; Svirskis, Darren

    2014-10-01

    Citric acid is used in cough reflex testing in clinical and research settings to assess reflexive cough in patients at risk of swallowing disorders. To address a lack of knowledge in this area, this study investigated the stability and sterility of citric acid solutions. Triplicate solutions of citric acid (0.8 M) in isotonic saline were stored at 4 ± 2 °C for up to 28 days and analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbiological sterility of freshly prepared samples and bulk samples previously used for 2 weeks within the hospital was determined using a pour plate technique. Microbial survival in citric acid was determined by inoculating Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, or Candida albicans into citric acid solution and monitoring the number of colony-forming units/mL over 40 min. Citric acid solutions remained stable at 4 °C for 28 days (98.4 ± 1.8 % remained). The freshly prepared and clinical samples tested were sterile. However, viability studies revealed that citric acid solution allows for the survival of C. albicans but not for S. aureus or E. coli. The microbial survival study showed that citric acid kills S. aureus and E. coli but has no marked effect on C. albicans after 40 min. Citric acid samples at 0.8 M remained stable over the 4-week testing period, with viable microbial cells absent from samples tested. However, C. albicans has the ability to survive in citric acid solution if inadvertently introduced in practice. For this reason, in clinical and research practice it is suggested to use single-use aliquots prepared aseptically which can be stored for up to 28 days at 4 °C.

  1. A study of partial molar volumes of citric acid and tartaric acid in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Partial molar volumes; citric acid; tartaric acid; water + ethanol mixture; structure breaker. 1. Introduction ... ity water (sp. cond. ≈ 10–6 ohm–1 cm–1) was used as standard solvent and for making binary aqueous mixtures of ethanol (EtOH). Ethyl alcohol was kept ..... temperatures meaning thereby that solute–solute in-.

  2. 76 FR 33219 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-08

    ... production of a specialized medical grade citric acid, and that it expired at the end of 2008. See GOC... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China... administrative review of the countervailing duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts from the People's...

  3. 77 FR 56188 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Notice of Rescission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-12

    ... citrate tetrahydrate, which are intermediate products in the production of citric acid, sodium citrate... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China... of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on citric acid and certain citrate salts from the People's...

  4. 76 FR 77206 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-12

    ... intermediate products in the production of citric acid, sodium citrate, and potassium citrate. The scope of the... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China...'') has completed its administrative review of the countervailing duty (``CVD'') order on citric acid and...

  5. 77 FR 1455 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-10

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... Department'') published the initiation of the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's Republic of China (``PRC''). See...

  6. 77 FR 22560 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-16

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... Department'') published the initiation of the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's Republic of China (``PRC'').\\1\\ On...

  7. 76 FR 82275 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... countervailing duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts from the People's Republic of China (PRC). See Countervailing Duty Orders and Amendments of Final Affirmative Countervailing Duty Determinations: Citric Acid...

  8. 76 FR 56158 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-12

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... administrative review of the countervailing duty order on citric acid and certain citrate sales from People's Republic of China, covering the period September 19, 2008, through December 31, 2009. See Citric Acid and...

  9. 77 FR 74171 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China...'') published its Preliminary Results of administrative review of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and... Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Post- Preliminary Analysis...

  10. 78 FR 34642 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-10

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China... Department'') is conducting an administrative review of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's Republic of China (``PRC''). The period of review (``POR...

  11. 77 FR 47370 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Intent To Rescind...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-08

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China... countervailing duty (CVD) order on citric acid and certain citrate salts from the People's Republic of China.\\1...). Scope of the Order The scope of the order includes all grades and granulation sizes of citric acid...

  12. 76 FR 47146 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Extension of Time...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China...'') published the initiation of the administrative review of the antidumping duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts (``citric acid'') from the People's Republic of China (``PRC''). See Initiation of...

  13. Effects of citric acid and the siderophore desferrioxamine B (DFO-B) on the mobility of germanium and rare earth elements in soil and uptake in Phalaris arundinacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiche, Oliver; Tischler, Dirk; Fauser, Carla; Lodemann, Jana; Heilmeier, Hermann

    2017-08-03

    Effects of citric acid and desferrioxamine B (DFO-B) on the availability of Ge and selected rare earth elements (REEs) (La, Nd, Gd, Er) to Phalaris arundinacea were investigated. A soil dissolution experiment was conducted to elucidate the effect of citric acid and DFO-B at different concentrations (1 and 10 mmol L-1 citric acid) on the release of Ge and REEs from soil. In a greenhouse, plants of P. arundinacea were cultivated on soil and on sand cultures to investigate the effects of citric acid and DFO-B on the uptake of Ge and REEs by the plants. Addition of 10 mmol L-1 citric acid significantly enhanced desorption of Ge and REEs from soil and uptake into soil-grown plants. Applying DFO-B enhanced the dissolution and the uptake of REEs, while no effect on Ge was observed. In sand cultures, the presence of citric acid and DFO-B significantly decreased the uptake of Ge and REEs, indicating a discrimination of the formed complexes during uptake. This study clearly indicates that citric acid and the microbial siderophore DFO-B may enhance phytoextraction of Ge and REEs due to the formation of soluble complexes that increase the migration of elements in the rhizosphere.

  14. Production of citric and oxalic acids and solubilization of calcium phosphate by Penicillium bilaii.

    OpenAIRE

    Cunningham, J. E.; Kuiack, C

    1992-01-01

    An isolate of Penicillium bilaii previously reported to solubilize mineral phosphates and enhance plant uptake of phosphate was studied. Using agar media with calcium phosphate and the pH indicator alizarin red S, the influence of the medium composition on phosphate solubility and medium acidification was recorded. The major acidic metabolites produced by P. bilaii in a sucrose nitrate liquid medium were found to be oxalic acid and citric acid. Citric acid production was promoted under nitrog...

  15. Phytotoxicity of citric acid and Tween® 80 for potential use as soil amendments in enhanced phytoremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnello, A C; Huguenot, D; van Hullebusch, E D; Esposito, G

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced phytoremediation adding biodegradable amendments like low molecular weight organic acids and surfactants is an interesting area of current research to overcome the limitation that represents low bioavailability of pollutants in soils. However, prior to their use in assisted phytoremediation, it is necessary to test if amendments per se exert any toxic effect to plants and to optimize their application mode. In this context, the present study assessed the effects of citric acid and Tween® 80 (polyethylene glycol sorbitan monooleate) on the development of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) plants, as influenced by their concentration and frequency of application, in order to evaluate the feasibility for their future use in enhanced phytoremediation of multi-contaminated soils. The results showed that citric acid negatively affected plant germination, while it did not have any significant effect on biomass or chlorophyll content. In turn, Tween® 80 did not affect plant germination and showed a trend to increase biomass, as well as it did not have any significant effect on chlorophyll levels. M. sativa appeared to tolerate citric acid and Tween® 80 at the tested concentrations, applied weekly. Consequently, citric acid and Tween® 80 could potentially be utilized to assist phytoremediation of contaminated soils vegetated with M. sativa.

  16. Citric acid effects on brain and liver oxidative stress in lipopolysaccharide-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Salam, Omar M E; Youness, Eman R; Mohammed, Nadia A; Morsy, Safaa M Youssef; Omara, Enayat A; Sleem, Amany A

    2014-05-01

    Citric acid is a weak organic acid found in the greatest amounts in citrus fruits. This study examined the effect of citric acid on endotoxin-induced oxidative stress of the brain and liver. Mice were challenged with a single intraperitoneal dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 200 μg/kg). Citric acid was given orally at 1, 2, or 4 g/kg at time of endotoxin injection and mice were euthanized 4 h later. LPS induced oxidative stress in the brain and liver tissue, resulting in marked increase in lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde [MDA]) and nitrite, while significantly decreasing reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) showed a pronounced increase in brain tissue after endotoxin injection. The administration of citric acid (1-2 g/kg) attenuated LPS-induced elevations in brain MDA, nitrite, TNF-α, GPx, and PON1 activity. In the liver, nitrite was decreased by 1 g/kg citric acid. GPx activity was increased, while PON1 activity was decreased by citric acid. The LPS-induced liver injury, DNA fragmentation, serum transaminase elevations, caspase-3, and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression were attenuated by 1-2 g/kg citric acid. DNA fragmentation, however, increased after 4 g/kg citric acid. Thus in this model of systemic inflammation, citric acid (1-2 g/kg) decreased brain lipid peroxidation and inflammation, liver damage, and DNA fragmentation.

  17. An autopsy case of death due to metabolic acidosis after citric acid ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Tomoya; Usui, Akihito; Matsumura, Takashi; Aramaki, Tomomi; Hosoya, Tadashi; Igari, Yui; Ohuchi, Tsukasa; Hayashizaki, Yoshie; Usui, Kiyotaka; Funayama, Masato

    2015-11-01

    A man in his 40s was found unconscious on a sofa in a communal residence for people with various disabilities. He appeared to have drunk 800 ml of undiluted citric acid from a commercial plastic bottle. The instructions on the label of the beverage specified that the beverage be diluted 20- to 30-fold before consumption. The patient was admitted to an emergency hospital with severe metabolic acidosis (pH, 6.70; HCO3(-), 3.6 mEq/L) and a low ionized calcium level (0.73 mmol/L). Although ionized calcium and catecholamines were continuously administered intravenously to correct the acidosis, the state of acidemia and low blood pressure did not improve, and he died 20 h later. Citric acid concentrations in the patient's serum drawn shortly after treatment in the hospital and from the heart at autopsy were 80.6 mg/ml and 39.8 mg/dl, respectively (normal range: 1.3-2.6 mg/dl). Autopsy revealed black discoloration of the mucosal surface of the esophagus. Microscopically, degenerated epithelium and neutrophilic infiltration in the muscle layer were observed. In daily life, drinking a large amount of concentrated citric acid beverage is rare as a cause of lethal poisoning. However, persons with mental disorders such as dementia may mistakenly drink detergent or concentrated fluids, as in our case. Family members or facility staff in the home or nursing facility must bear in mind that they should not leave such bottles in places where they are easily accessible to mentally handicapped persons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Citric Acid Suppresses the Bitter Taste of Olopatadine Hydrochloride Orally Disintegrating Tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoyama, Mai; Uchida, Shinya; Tanaka, Shimako; Hakamata, Akio; Odagiri, Keiichi; Inui, Naoki; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Namiki, Noriyuki

    2017-01-01

    Orally disintegrating tablets (ODTs) are formulated to disintegrate upon contact with saliva, allowing administration without water. Olopatadine hydrochloride, a second-generation antihistamine, is widely used for treating allergic rhinitis. However, it has a bitter taste; therefore, the development of taste-masked olopatadine ODTs is essential. Some studies have suggested that citric acid could suppress the bitterness of drugs. However, these experiments were performed using solutions, and the taste-masking effect of citric acid on ODTs has not been evaluated using human gustatory sensation tests. Thus, this study evaluated citric acid's taste-masking effect on olopatadine ODTs. Six types of olopatadine ODTs containing 0-10% citric acid were prepared and subjected to gustatory sensation tests that were scored using the visual analog scale. The bitterness and overall palatability of olopatadine ODTs during disintegration in the mouth and after spitting out were evaluated in 11 healthy volunteers (age: 22.8±2.2 years). The hardness of the ODTs was >50 N. Disintegration time and dissolution did not differ among the different ODTs. The results of the gustatory sensation tests suggest that citric acid could suppress the bitterness of olopatadine ODTs in a dose-dependent manner. Olopatadine ODTs with a high content of citric acid (5-10%) showed poorer overall palatability than that of those without citric acid despite the bitterness suppression. ODTs containing 2.5% citric acid, yogurt flavoring, and aspartame were the most suitable formulations since they showed low bitterness and good overall palatability. Thus, citric acid is an effective bitterness-masking option for ODTs.

  19. Inhibitive Protection of Low-Carbon Steel in Citric Acid Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avdeev Yaroslav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An effective mixture has been developed on the basis of the inhibitor IFKhAN-92 and KCNS to protect low-carbon steel in citric acid hot solutions. The proposed mixture inhibits the corrosion of steel in these solutions in a wide range of their concentrations (0.25÷2.0 М and temperatures (20÷95°С. The effective inhibition of the corrosion of steel by the mixture under study is due to the strong retardation of the metal’s both electrode reactions

  20. Preparation of Citric Acid Crosslinked Chitosan/Poly(Vinyl Alcohol Blend Membranes for Creatinine Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retno Ariadi Lusiana

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of membrane using crosslinking reaction between chitosan and citric acid showed that functional group modification increased the number of active carrier groups which lead to better transport capacity of the membrane. In addition, the substitution of the carboxyl group increased creatinine permeation of chitosan membrane. The transport capacity of citric acid crosslinked chitosan membrane for creatinine was found to be 6.3 mg/L. The presence of cyanocobalamin slightly hindered the transport of creatinine although compounds did not able to pass through citric acid crosslinked chitosan/poly(vinyl alcohol blend membrane, as compounds no found in the acceptor phase.

  1. Yarrowialipolytica: A model yeast for citric acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Ema; Charreau, Hernán; Cerrutti, Patricia; Foresti, María Laura

    2017-11-02

    Every year more than 2 million tons of citric acid (CA) are produced around the world for industrial uses. Although initially extracted from citrus, the low profitability of the process and the increasing demand soon stimulated the search for more efficient methods to produce CA. Currently, most world CA demand (99%) is satisfied by fermentations with microorganisms, especially filamentous fungi and yeasts. CA production with yeasts has certain advantages over molds (e.g. higher productivity and easier cultivation), which in the last two decades have triggered a clear increase in publications and patents devoted to the use of yeasts in this field. Yarrowia lipolytica has become a model yeast which proved to be successful in different production systems.Considering the current interest evidenced in the literature, the most significant information on CA production using Y. lipolytica is summarized. The relevance on CA yields of key factors such as strains, media formulation, environmental conditions and production regimes is thoroughly discussed, with particular focus on increasing CA productivity. Besides, the possibility of tuning the mentioned variables to reduce concomitant isocitric acid production -the biggest disadvantage of using yeasts -, is analyzed. Available methods for CA purification/quantification are also discussed. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Bio-synthesis of citric acid from single and co-culture-based fermentation technology using agro-wastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohaib Rafaqat Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Agro-based materials are primarily composed of complex polysaccharides that strengthen microbial growth for the production of industrially relevant value-added products. Therefore, in the present study, solid state fermentation (SSF was carried out using agro-based waste materials (apple pomace, peanut shell and a mixture of both apple pomace and peanut shell with 50:50 ratio as carriers/support for SSF to enhance citric acid production from single and co-culture consortia of Aspergillus ornatus and Alternaria alternata. During initial screening trial it was observed that growth media supplemented with apple pomace under SSF process of co-culture consortia presenting the preeminent 0.46 ± 0.42 mg/mL of citric acid. On partial optimization co-culture showed the maximum citric acid yield (2.644 ± 0.99 mg/mL in the presence of arginine as a nutritional ingredient at 30 °C in an apple pomace based medium at 50% moisture content with pH of 5 and substrate concentration (25 g after 48th of solid state fermentation. In conclusion, a suitable addition of fermentative substrate to the SSF medium increased fungal growth, sugar utilization and citric acid production when used in lower concentrations.

  3. Fate and Role of Ammonium Ions during Fermentation of Citric Acid by Aspergillus niger

    OpenAIRE

    Papagianni, Maria; Wayman, Frank; Mattey, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Stoichiometric modeling of the early stages of the citric acid fermentation process by Aspergillus niger revealed that ammonium ions combine with a carbon-containing metabolite inside the cell, in a ratio 1:1, to form a nitrogen compound which is then excreted by the mycelium. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis identified glucosamine as the product of the relationship between glucose and ammonium during the early stages of the citric acid fermentation process. Slightly acidic int...

  4. 77 FR 72323 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China...) has completed its administrative review of the countervailing duty (CVD) order on citric acid and... 31, 2010. On June 5, 2012, we published the preliminary results of this review.\\1\\ \\1\\ See Citric...

  5. [Antigen retrieval by microwave oven with buffer of citric acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellicer, E M; Sundblad, A

    1994-01-01

    Microwave oven (mwo) is used to stimulate tissue fixation and to retrieve antigens damaged by fixation. Heavy metal salt solutions, water, and citric acid buffer (cab) have been suggested for this purpose. A serie of tumors treated with cab and phosphate-buffered saline (pbs) with mwo were studied immunohistochemically with 24 antibodies. Controls were treated in the same way, except for microwaving. The antibodies were directed against antigens of the following tumors: breast and prostate carcinoma, carcinoid, lymphoma and melanoma. The results showed that cab enhanced the immunoreactivity of the following antigens: estrogen receptors (AMAC), progesterone receptors (Novocastra), HMB45, vimentin, leukocyte common antigen, PCNA, p53, MIB-1 (Ki-67) and prostatic specific antigen. The antigens that did not improve their immunoreactivity, when compared with the control series were: factor VIII, keratin, Leu 22, L26, neuron-specific enolase, CEA, chromogranin, HBME-1, smooth muscle actin and EMA. Microwaving equally improved protein S100 and desmin either with cab or pbs. The only antigen that improved with pbs was actin. The results with B72.3 and NKI/C3 were poor and not reliable. In conclusion microwaving with cab enhances the immunoreactivity of the antibodies mentioned above leading to an increase in sensibility without loosing specificity.

  6. Changes in transcript levels of starch hydrolysis genes and raising citric acid production via carbon ion irradiation mutagenesis of Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei; Li, Wenjian; Chen, Hao; Liu, Jing; Wang, Shuyang; Chen, Jihong

    2017-01-01

    The filamentous ascomycete Aspergillus niger is well known for its ability to accumulate citric acid for the hydrolysis of starchy materials. To improve citric acid productivity, heavy ion beam mutagenesis was utilized to produce mutant A.niger strains with enhanced production of citric acid in this work. It was demonstrated that a mutant HW2 with high concentration of citric acid was isolated after carbon ion irradiation with the energy of 80Mev/μ, which was obvious increase higher than the original strain from liquefied corn starch as a feedstock. More importantly, with the evidence from the expression profiles of key genes and enzyme activity involved in the starch hydrolysis process between original strain and various phenotype mutants, our results confirmed that different transcript levels of key genes involving in starch hydrolysis process between original strain and mutants could be a significant contributor to different citric acid concentration in A.niger, such as, amyR and glaA, which therefore opened a new avenue for constructing genetically engineered A.niger mutants for high-yield citric acid accumulation in the future. As such, this work demonstrated that heavy ion beam mutagenesis presented an efficient alternative strategy to be developed to generate various phenotype microbe species mutants for functional genes research.

  7. Changes in transcript levels of starch hydrolysis genes and raising citric acid production via carbon ion irradiation mutagenesis of Aspergillus niger.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hu

    Full Text Available The filamentous ascomycete Aspergillus niger is well known for its ability to accumulate citric acid for the hydrolysis of starchy materials. To improve citric acid productivity, heavy ion beam mutagenesis was utilized to produce mutant A.niger strains with enhanced production of citric acid in this work. It was demonstrated that a mutant HW2 with high concentration of citric acid was isolated after carbon ion irradiation with the energy of 80Mev/μ, which was obvious increase higher than the original strain from liquefied corn starch as a feedstock. More importantly, with the evidence from the expression profiles of key genes and enzyme activity involved in the starch hydrolysis process between original strain and various phenotype mutants, our results confirmed that different transcript levels of key genes involving in starch hydrolysis process between original strain and mutants could be a significant contributor to different citric acid concentration in A.niger, such as, amyR and glaA, which therefore opened a new avenue for constructing genetically engineered A.niger mutants for high-yield citric acid accumulation in the future. As such, this work demonstrated that heavy ion beam mutagenesis presented an efficient alternative strategy to be developed to generate various phenotype microbe species mutants for functional genes research.

  8. Substrates and oxygen dependent citric acid production by Yarrowia lipolytica: insights through transcriptome and fluxome analyses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wael Sabra; Rajesh Reddy Bommareddy; Garima Maheshwari; Seraphim Papanikolaou; An-Ping Zeng

    2017-01-01

    .... However, to develop a commercial process for the production of citric acid by Y. lipolytica, it is necessary to better understand the primary metabolism and its regulation, especially for growth on mixed substrate...

  9. Citric acid production by Koji fermentation using banana peel as a novel substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, Alagarsamy; Sivakumar, Nallusamy

    2010-07-01

    The growing demand for citric acid and the current need for alternative sources have encouraged biotechnologists to search for novel and economical substrates. Koji fermentation was conducted using the peels of banana (Musa acuminata) as an inexpensive substrate for the production of citric acid using Aspergillus niger. Various crucial parameters that affect citric acid production such as moisture content, temperature, pH, inoculum level and incubation time were quantified. Moisture (70%), 28 degrees C temperature, an initial pH 3, 10(8) spores/ml as inoculum and 72h incubation was found to be suitable for maximum citric acid production by A. niger using banana peel as a substrate. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The global regulator LaeA controls production of citric acid and endoglucanases in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Tore; Zoglowek, Marta; Lübeck, Mette; Frisvad, Jens Christian; Lübeck, Peter Stephensen

    2016-08-01

    The global regulatory protein LaeA is known for regulating the production of many kinds of secondary metabolites in Aspergillus species, as well as sexual and asexual reproduction, and morphology. In Aspergillus carbonarius, it has been shown that LaeA regulates production of ochratoxin. We have investigated the regulatory effect of LaeA on production of citric acid and cellulolytic enzymes in A. carbonarius. Two types of A. carbonarius strains, having laeA knocked out or overexpressed, were constructed and tested in fermentation. The knockout of laeA significantly decreased the production of citric acid and endoglucanases, but did not reduce the production of beta-glucosidases or xylanases. The citric acid accumulation was reduced with 74-96 % compared to the wild type. The endoglucanase activity was reduced with 51-78 %. Overexpression of LaeA seemed not to have an effect on citric acid production or on cellulose or xylanase activity.

  11. Novel neuroprotective and hepatoprorective effects of citric acid in acute malathion intoxication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Omar M.E.Abdel-Salam Eman R.Youness Nadia A.Mohammed Noha N.Yassen Yasser A.Khadrawy Safinaz Ebrahim El-Toukhy Amany A.Sleem

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of citric acid given alone or combined with atropine on brain oxidative stress, neuronal injury, liver damage, and DNA damage of peripheral blood lymphocytes induced in the rat...

  12. Use of Energy Crop (Ricinus communis L.) for Phytoextraction of Heavy Metals Assisted with Citric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui; Chen, Xueping; He, Chiquan; Liang, Xia; Oh, Kokyo; Liu, Xiaoyan; Lei, Yanru

    2015-01-01

    Ricinus communis L. is a bioenergetic crop with high-biomass production and tolerance to cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb), thus, the plant is a candidate crop for phytoremediation. Pot experiments were performed to study the effects of citric acid in enhancing phytoextraction of Cd/Pb by Ricinus communis L. Citric acid increased Cd and Pb contents in plant shoots in all treatments by about 78% and 18-45%, respectively, at the dosage of 10 mM kg(-1) soil without affecting aboveground biomass production. Addition of citric acid reduced CEC, weakened soil adsorption of heavy metals and activated Cd and Pb in soil solutions. The acid-exchangeable fraction (BCR-1) of Pb remained lower than 7% and significantly increased with citric acid amendment. Respective increases in soil evaluation index induces by 14% and 19% under the Cd1Pb50 and Cd1Pb250 treatments upon addition of citric acid resulted in soil quality improvement. Ricinus communis L. has great potential in citric acid-assisted phytoextraction for Cd and Pb remediation.

  13. The impact of harmfulness information on citric acid induced cough and urge-to-cough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssens, Thomas; Brepoels, Sarah; Dupont, Lieven; Van den Bergh, Omer

    2015-04-01

    The cough reflex is an automatic protective reflex, which can be modulated by conscious effort or other forms of top-down control. In this experiment, we investigated whether information about harmfulness of a cough-inducing substance would augment cough reflex sensitivity and associated urge-to-cough. Healthy participants (N = 39) were randomized to receive information that they were to inhale a harmless substance (natural citric acid), or a potentially harmful substance (a potent agro-chemical acid). Using dosimeter-controlled inhalations, the dose of citric acid eliciting at least three coughs (C3) was determined. Next, participants received 4 blocks of randomized presentations of citric acid at the C3 dose, a sub-threshold dose of citric acid and saline control. C3 was reached for 27/39 participants, and C3 thresholds were not influenced by harmfulness information. During repeated citric acid presentations, framing the cough-inducing substance as a potentially harmful chemical resulted in a greater urge-to-cough compared to information framing it as natural citric acid (p < .01). The experimental manipulation did not influence cough frequencies. Our findings show that harmfulness information influences urge-to-cough, corroborating the role of cortical mechanisms in modulating the urge-to-cough and suggesting that cognitive manipulations may contribute to cough treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Improving Properties of Arrowroot Starch (Maranta arundinacea)/PVA Blend Films by Using Citric Acid as Cross-linking Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholichah, Enny; Purwono, Bambang; Nugroho, Pramono

    2017-12-01

    This research studied the effect of PVA as organic polymer and citric acid as crosslinker agent in the arrowroot starch/PVA blend films. The properties of films were investigated by water uptake, water vapor permeability, mechanical properties, thermal stability, spectra of FTIR and XRD patterns. PVA used in this research influenced the film properties at the highest concentration. The cross-linkingsinter or intra molecules of arrowroot and PVA were developed as ester bonds which are formed from the reaction of hydroxyl groups consisting of starch and PVA with citric acid. The ester bond was confirmed by FTIR spectra. The increase of the amount of citric acid affected significantly on physical, chemical and mechanical properties, water uptake, WVP and crystallinity. Water barrier level was reduced by decreasing of water uptake and WVP succeeded significantly with increased crosslinking. Cross-linking impact the thermal stability of the films. The elasticity of the films also increases the production of citric acid as a plasticizer in the making of the films as a food packaging material.

  15. Enhanced solid-state citric acid bio-production using apple pomace waste through surface response methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhillon, G S; Brar, S K; Verma, M; Tyagi, R D

    2011-04-01

      To evaluate the potential of apple pomace (AP) supplemented with rice husk for hyper citric acid production through solid-state fermentation by Aspergillus niger NRRL-567. Optimization of two key parameters, such as moisture content and inducer (ethanol and methanol) concentration was carried out by response surface methodology.   In this study, the effect of two crucial process parameters for solid-state citric acid fermentation by A. niger using AP waste supplemented with rice husk were thoroughly investigated in Erlenmeyer flasks through response surface methodology. Moisture and methanol had significant positive effect on citric acid production by A. niger grown on AP (P citric acid on AP by A. niger (342·41gkg(-1) and 248·42gkg(-1) dry substrate) were obtained with 75% (v/w) moisture along with two inducers [3% (v/w) methanol and 3% (v/w) ethanol] with fermentation efficiency of 93·90% and 66·42%, respectively depending upon the total carbon utilized after 144h of incubation period. With the same optimized parameters, conventional tray fermentation was conducted. The citric acid concentration of 187·96gkg(-1) dry substrate with 3% (v/w) ethanol and 303·34gkg(-1) dry substrate with 3% (v/w) methanol were achieved representing fermentation efficiency of 50·80% and 82·89% in tray fermentation depending upon carbon utilization after 120h of incubation period.   Apple pomace proved to be the promising substrate for the hyper production of citric acid through solid-state tray fermentation, which is an economical technique and does not require any sophisticated instrumentation.   The study established that the utilization of agro-industrial wastes have positive repercussions on the economy and will help to meet the increasing demands of citric acid and moreover will help to alleviate the environmental problems resulting from the disposal of agro-industrial wastes. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied

  16. A novel cleaner production process of citric acid by recycling its treated wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Su, Xian-Feng; Bao, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Hong-Jian; Zeng, Xin; Tang, Lei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jian-Hua; Chen, Xu-Sheng; Mao, Zhong-Gui

    2016-07-01

    In this study, a novel cleaner production process of citric acid was proposed to completely solve the problem of wastewater management in citric acid industry. In the process, wastewater from citric acid fermentation was used to produce methane through anaerobic digestion and then the anaerobic digestion effluent was further treated with air stripping and electrodialysis before recycled as process water for the later citric acid fermentation. This proposed process was performed for 10 batches and the average citric acid production in recycling batches was 142.4±2.1g/L which was comparable to that with tap water (141.6g/L). Anaerobic digestion was also efficient and stable in operation. The average chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal rate was 95.1±1.2% and methane yield approached to 297.7±19.8mL/g TCODremoved. In conclusion, this novel process minimized the wastewater discharge and achieved the cleaner production in citric acid industry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Protonation Equilibria of L-Aspartic, Citric and Succinic Acids in Anionic Micellar Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Srinivasa Rao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS on the protonation equilibria of L-aspartic acid, citric acid and succinic acid has been studied in various concentrations (0.5-2.5% w/v of SLS solution maintaining an ionic strength of 0.16 mol dm-3 at 303 K. The protonation constants have been calculated with the computer program MINIQUAD75 and the best fit models have been calculated based on statistical parameters. The trend of log values of step-wise protonation constants with mole fraction of the medium has been explained based on electrostatic and non-electrostatic forces operating on the protonation equilibria. The effects of errors on the protonation constants have also been presented.

  18. Pd/C Synthesized with Citric Acid: An Efficient Catalyst for Hydrogen Generation from Formic Acid/Sodium Formate

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Zhi-Li; Yan, Jun-Min; Wang, Hong-Li; Ping, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A highly efficient hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate aqueous solution catalyzed by in situ synthesized Pd/C with citric acid has been successfully achieved at room temperature. Interestingly, the presence of citric acid during the formation and growth of the Pd nanoparticles on carbon can drastically enhance the catalytic property of the resulted Pd/C, on which the conversion and turnover frequency for decomposition of formic acid/sodium formate system can reach the highest ...

  19. Substrates and oxygen dependent citric acid production by Yarrowia lipolytica: insights through transcriptome and fluxome analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabra, Wael; Bommareddy, Rajesh Reddy; Maheshwari, Garima; Papanikolaou, Seraphim; Zeng, An-Ping

    2017-05-08

    Unlike the well-studied backer yeast where catabolite repression represents a burden for mixed substrate fermentation, Yarrowia lipolytica, an oleaginous yeast, is recognized for its potential to produce single cell oils and citric acid from different feedstocks. These versatilities of Y. lipolytica with regards to substrate utilization make it an attractive host for biorefinery application. However, to develop a commercial process for the production of citric acid by Y. lipolytica, it is necessary to better understand the primary metabolism and its regulation, especially for growth on mixed substrate. Controlling the dissolved oxygen concentration (pO2) in Y. lipolytica cultures enhanced citric acid production significantly in cultures grown on glucose in mono- or dual substrate fermentations, whereas with glycerol as mono-substrate no significant effect of pO2 was found on citrate production. Growth on mixed substrate with glucose and glycerol revealed a relative preference of glycerol utilization by Y. lipolytica. Under optimized conditions with pO2 control, the citric acid titer on glucose in mono- or in dual substrate cultures was 55 and 50 g/L (with productivity of 0.6 g/L*h in both cultures), respectively, compared to a maximum of 18 g/L (0.2 g/L*h) with glycerol in monosubstrate culture. Additionally, in dual substrate fermentation, glycerol limitation was found to trigger citrate consumption despite the presence of enough glucose in pO2-limited culture. The metabolic behavior of this yeast on different substrates was investigated at transcriptomic and 13C-based fluxomics levels. Upregulation of most of the genes of the pentose phosphate pathway was found in cultures with highest citrate production with glucose in mono- or in dual substrate fermentation with pO2 control. The activation of the glyoxylate cycle in the oxygen limited cultures and the imbalance caused by glycerol limitation might be the reason for the re-consumption of citrate in dual

  20. Formation of formic acid, acetic acid and lactic acid from decomposition of citric acid by coal ash particles at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakui, Hiroyuki; Okitsu, Kenji; Maeda, Yasuaki; Nishimura, Rokuro

    2009-08-30

    It was found for the first time that citric acid was decomposed to formic acid, acetic acid and lactic acid in the presence of coal ash particles at pH 3 at 20 degrees C, while it was not decomposed at more than pH 5. The yield of organic acid at stirring time of 60 min is in the order of formic acid>acetic acid>lactic acid. Since citric acid dissociates to citric anion at more than pH 5, it was suggested that citric anion and negatively charged coal ash particles repelled electrically each other at more than pH 5, resulting in that citric acid could not be adsorbed and not be decomposed on coal ash. Based on the obtained results, the decomposition of citric acid at pH 3 was suggested to be due to catalytic effects of coal ash. Since formic acid and acetic acid can be used as a material of hydrogen fermentation, coal ash could be used as a catalyst to synthesize the important material for hydrogen fermentation from wastewater of citric acid.

  1. Overexpression of a C4-dicarboxylate transporter is the key for rerouting citric acid to C4-dicarboxylic acid production in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Christakou, Eleni; Vang, Jesper; Lübeck, Mette; Lübeck, Peter Stephensen

    2017-03-14

    C4-dicarboxylic acids, including malic acid, fumaric acid and succinic acid, are valuable organic acids that can be produced and secreted by a number of microorganisms. Previous studies on organic acid production by Aspergillus carbonarius, which is capable of producing high amounts of citric acid from varieties carbon sources, have revealed its potential as a fungal cell factory. Earlier attempts to reroute citric acid production into C4-dicarboxylic acids have been with limited success. In this study, a glucose oxidase deficient strain of A. carbonarius was used as the parental strain to overexpress a native C4-dicarboxylate transporter and the gene frd encoding fumarate reductase from Trypanosoma brucei individually and in combination. Impacts of the introduced genetic modifications on organic acid production were investigated in a defined medium and in a hydrolysate of wheat straw containing high concentrations of glucose and xylose. In the defined medium, overexpression of the C4-dicarboxylate transporter alone and in combination with the frd gene significantly increased the production of C4-dicarboxylic acids and reduced the accumulation of citric acid, whereas expression of the frd gene alone did not result in any significant change of organic acid production profile. In the wheat straw hydrolysate after 9 days of cultivation, similar results were obtained as in the defined medium. High amounts of malic acid and succinic acid were produced by the same strains. This study demonstrates that the key to change the citric acid production into production of C4-dicarboxylic acids in A. carbonarius is the C4-dicarboxylate transporter. Furthermore it shows that the C4-dicarboxylic acid production by A. carbonarius can be further increased via metabolic engineering and also shows the potential of A. carbonarius to utilize lignocellulosic biomass as substrates for C4-dicarboxylic acid production.

  2. Gamma irradiation of isocitric and citric acid in aqueous solution: Relevance in prebiotic chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrón-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S.

    2015-07-01

    The radiation chemistry of hydroxy acids like citric and isocitric acids is rather scarce, even though they are crucial compounds in biological systems and for food irradiation. The aim of this work is to study the radiolytic behavior of these acids focused on the interconversion induced by radiation of citric and isocitric acid into other members of the Krebs cycle. The results showed that among the products formed were succinic, malonic, malic and other acids related to metabolic pathways, and these results are correlated with its possible role in chemical evolution processes.

  3. Gamma irradiation of isocitric and citric acid in aqueous solution: Relevance in prebiotic chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negrón-Mendoza, A., E-mail: negron@nucleares.unam.mx; Ramos-Bernal, S. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, UNAM. Cd. Universitaria, A. P. 70-543, 04510 México, D. F. México (Mexico)

    2015-07-23

    The radiation chemistry of hydroxy acids like citric and isocitric acids is rather scarce, even though they are crucial compounds in biological systems and for food irradiation. The aim of this work is to study the radiolytic behavior of these acids focused on the interconversion induced by radiation of citric and isocitric acid into other members of the Krebs cycle. The results showed that among the products formed were succinic, malonic, malic and other acids related to metabolic pathways, and these results are correlated with its possible role in chemical evolution processes.

  4. Comparative analysis of acetic and citric acid on internal milieu of broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Capcarova

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false CS JA X-NONE The aim of the present study was to analyse the effect of two organic acids (acetic and citric acid inclusion on serum parameters and the level of antioxidant status of broiler chickens. Some organic acidifiers reduce the growth of many intestinal bacteria, reduce intestinal colonisation and reduce infectious processes, decrease inflammatory processes at the intestinal mucosa, increase villus height and function of secretion, digestion and absorption of nutrients. Broiler chickens hybrid Ross 308 (n=180 were divided into 3 groups: one control (C and two experimental groups (E1, E2. Experimental animals received acetic and citric acid per os in water in single dose 0.25% for 42 days. After 42 days of feeding blood samples were collected (n=10 in each group. Significant decrease of serum triglycerides in citric acid group when compared with the control group was recorded. Acetic acid administration resulted in increased sodium level. Significant increase of albumin content in both experimental groups and increase of bilirubin content in citric group was recorded. Acids administration had no significant effect on other serum and antioxidant parameters. Acetic and citric acid had no harmful influenced on internal milieu of broiler chickens. The research on the field of organic acid will be worthy of further investigation.

  5. The changes in enzyme activities during citric acid fermentation by Aspergillus niger in solid culture.

    OpenAIRE

    桐村, 光太郎; 熊谷, 和夫; 森貞, 信也; "河邊, 誠一郎"; 宇佐美, 昭次; KOTARO, KIRIMURA; Kazuo, KUMAGAI; SHINYA, MORISADA; Seiichiro", "Kawabe; Shoji, Usami; 住友化学工業株式会社; 岡山理科大学基礎理学科; 早稲田大学理工学部応用化学科; Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University

    1984-01-01

    The changes of enzyme activities during citric acid fermentation in solid culture were studied with a high citric acidproducing strain, Aspergillus niger Yang no. 2,cultivated in synthetic medium containing 2 g/l of gelatin and glass wool as carrier.With fermentation time, the specific activity ratio of fructose-bisphosphate aldolase to glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase increased. Of the TCA cycle enzmes, the specific activities of citrate synthetase and aconitate hydratase remained almost co...

  6. Comparison of sodium acid sulfate to citric acid to inhibit browning of fresh-cut potatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Beth L; Kash, Emily A; Davis-Dentici, Katherine; Bushway, Alfred A

    2011-04-01

    Sodium acid sulfate (SAS) dip treatments were evaluated against a distilled water control and citric acid (CA) to compare its effectiveness in reducing enzymatic browning of raw, French-fry cut potatoes. Two separate studies were conducted with dip concentrations ranging from 0%, 1%, and 3% in experiment 1 to 0%, 2%, and 2.5% in experiment 2 to determine optimal dip concentrations. Russet Burbank potatoes were peeled, sliced, and dipped for 1 min and stored at 3 °C. Color, texture, fry surface pH, and microbiological analyses were conducted on days 0, 7, and 14. The 3% SAS- and CA-treated samples had significantly (p<0.0001) lower pH levels on fry surfaces than all other treatments. Both acidulants had significantly (p≤0.05) lower aerobic plate counts compared to controls in both studies by day 7. However, SAS appeared to be the most effective at the 3% level in maintaining a light fry color up to day 14 and had the highest L-values than all other treatments. The 3% SAS-treated fry slices appeared to have the least change in textural properties over storage time, having a significantly (p=0.0002) higher force value (kg force [kgf]) than the other treatments during experiment 1, without any signs of case-hardening that appeared in the control and CA-treated samples. SAS was just as comparable to CA in reducing surface fry pH and also lowering microbial counts over storage time. According to the results, SAS may be another viable acidulant to be utilized in the fresh-cut fruit and vegetable industry.

  7. Impact of citric acid and calcium ions on acid solubilization of mechanically separated turkey meat: effect on lipid and pigment content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrynets, Y; Omana, D A; Xu, Y; Betti, M

    2011-02-01

    Increased demand for poultry products has resulted in an increased availability of by-products, such as the neck, back, and frame, that can be processed into mechanically separated poultry meat. The major problems with mechanically separated poultry meat are its high lipid content, color instability, and high susceptibility to lipid oxidation. The present work was undertaken to determine the effect of different concentrations of citric acid and calcium ions on protein yield, color characteristics, and lipid removal from protein isolates prepared using an acid-aided extraction process. Six levels of citric acid (0, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 mmol/L) and 2 levels of calcium chloride (0 and 8 mmol/L) were examined. The entire experiment was replicated 3 times, resulting in 36 extractions (3 × 6 × 2). The highest (P pigment was obtained with the addition of 6 or 8 mmol/L of citric acid. Addition of calcium chloride had a negative effect on total pigment content. The study revealed that acid extractions with the addition of citric acid resulted in substantial removal of lipids and pigments from mechanically separated turkey meat, improved stability of the recovered proteins against lipid oxidation, and appreciable protein recovery yields.

  8. Electrodeposited Fe-Co films prepared from a citric-acid-based plating bath

    OpenAIRE

    Yanai, Takeshi; Uto, H; Shimokawa, Takaya; Nakano, Masaki; Fukunaga, Hirotoshi; Suzuki, K.

    2013-01-01

    Electrodeposited Fe-Co films are commonly prepared in a boric-acid-based bath. In this research, we applied citric acid instead of boric acid for the plating of Fe-Co films because boron in the waste bath is restricted by environmental-protection regulations in Japan. We evaluated the effect of citric acid on the magnetic and structural properties of the films. The saturation magnetization of the Fe-Co films slightly increased while the Fe content in the Fe-Co films decreased with increasing ...

  9. Chemical modification of chitosan film via surface grafting of citric acid molecular to promote the biomineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yang, E-mail: liuyang@cczu.edu.cn [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Engineering Research Center of Nano-Geo Materials of Ministry of Education, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Shen, Xin; Zhou, Huan [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China); Wang, Yingjun [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Deng, Linhong, E-mail: dlh@cczu.edu.cn [Institute of Biomedical Engineering and Health Sciences, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164 (China)

    2016-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Chitosan film was modified by surface grafting of citric acid. • The modified film has good hydrophilicity and moisture-retaining capacity. • The citric acid grafting treatment significantly promote the biomineralization. • MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts research confirms the biocompatibility of the film. - Abstract: We develop a novel chitosan–citric acid film (abbreviated as CS–CA) suitable for biomedical applications in this study. In this CS–CA film, the citric acid, which is a harmless organic acid has been extensively investigated as a modifying agent on carbohydrate polymers, was cross-linked by 1-Ethyl-3-(3-dimethyl aminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) onto the surface of chitosan (CS) film. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirms the graft copolymerization of the modified chitosan film (CS–CA). Surface wettability, moisturizing performance, the capacity of mineralization in vitro and biocompatibility of the films were characterized. After modification, this CS–CA film has good hydrophilicity. It is very evident that the citric acid grafting treatment significantly promotes the biomineralization of the chitosan based substrates. Cell experiments show that the MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts can adhere and proliferate well on the surface of CS–CA film. This CS–CA film, which can be prepared in large quantities and at low cost, should have potential application in bone tissue engineering.

  10. Citric acid enhances the phytoextraction of manganese and plant growth by alleviating the ultrastructural damages in Juncus effusus L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najeeb, U.; Xu, L.; Ali, Shafaqat [Institute of Crop Science, College of Agriculture and Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Jilani, Ghulam, E-mail: jilani@uaar.edu.pk [Department of Soil Science, Pir Mehr Ali Shah Arid Agriculture University, Rawalpindi, Punjab 46300 (Pakistan); Gong, H.J. [Institute of Crop Science, College of Agriculture and Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China); Shen, W.Q. [The University of Nottingham at Ningbo, Ningbo 315100 (China); Zhou, W.J., E-mail: wjzhou@zju.edu.cn [Institute of Crop Science, College of Agriculture and Biotechnology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310029 (China)

    2009-10-30

    Chelate-assisted phytoextraction by high biomass producing plant species enhances the removal of heavy metals from polluted environments. In this regard, Juncus effusus a wetland plant has great potential. This study evaluated the effects of elevated levels of manganese (Mn) on the vegetative growth, Mn uptake and antioxidant enzymes in J. effusus. We also studied the role of citric acid and EDTA on improving metal accumulation, plant growth and Mn toxicity stress alleviation. Three-week-old plantlets of J. effusus were subjected to various treatments in the hydroponics as: Mn (50, 100 and 500 {mu}M) alone, Mn (500 {mu}M) + citric acid (5 mM), and Mn (500 {mu}M) + EDTA (5 mM). After 2 weeks of treatment, higher Mn concentrations significantly reduced the plant biomass and height. Both citric acid and EDTA restored the plant height as it was reduced at the highest Mn level. Only the citric acid (but not EDTA) was able to recover the plant biomass weight, which was also obvious from the microscopic visualization of mesophyll cells. There was a concentration dependent increase in Mn uptake in J. effusus plants, and relatively more deposition in roots compared to aerial parts. Although both EDTA and citric acid caused significant increase in Mn accumulation; however, the Mn translocation was enhanced markedly by EDTA. Elevated levels of Mn augmented the oxidative stress, which was evident from changes in the activities of antioxidative enzymes in plant shoots. Raised levels of lipid peroxidation and variable changes in the activities of antioxidant enzymes were recorded under Mn stress. Electron microscopic images revealed several modifications in the plants at cellular and sub-cellular level due to the oxidative damage induced by Mn. Changes in cell shape and size, chloroplast swelling, increased number of plastoglobuli and disruption of thylakoid were noticed. However, these plants showed a high degree of tolerance against Mn toxicity stress, and it removed

  11. Improvement on citric acid production in solid-state fermentation by Aspergillus niger LPB BC mutant using citric pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Cristine; Vandenberghe, Luciana Porto de Souza; Teodoro, Juliana; Pandey, Ashok; Soccol, Carlos Ricardo

    2009-07-01

    Citric acid (CA) production has been conducted through a careful strain selection, physical-chemical optimization and mutation. The aim of this work was to optimize the physical-chemical conditions of CA production by solid-state fermentation (SSF) using the Aspergillus niger LPB BC strain, which was isolated in our laboratory. The parental and mutant strain showed a good production of CA using citric pulp (CP) as a substrate. The physical-chemical parameters were optimized and the best production was reached at 65% moisture, 30 degrees C and pH 5.5. The influence of the addition of commercial and alternative sugars, nitrogen sources, salts, and alcohols was also studied. The best results (445.4 g of CA/kg of CP) were obtained with sugarcane molasses and 4% methanol (v/w). The mutagenesis induction of LPB BC was performed with UV irradiation. Eleven mutant strains were tested in SSF where two mutants showed a higher CA production when compared to the parental strain. A. niger LPB B3 produced 537.6 g of CA/kg of CP on the sixth day of fermentation, while A. niger LPB B6 produced 616.5 g of CA/kg of CP on the fourth day of fermentation, representing a 19.5% and 37% gain, respectively.

  12. [Cough and bronchial obstruction induced by citric acid in smokers, occasional smokers and non-smokers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlastos, F D; Dessanges, J F; Lockhart, A; Prétet, S

    1991-01-01

    We have studied cough and bronchial constriction induced by inhaling citric acid in 15 smokers with baseline airflow obstruction, in 13 occasional smokers and 13 non smokers. The threshold for cough was significantly higher in occasional smokers in relation to smokers and non smokers. Citric acid produced the same degree of bronchial constriction at the same time in smokers and occasional smokers: the maximum fall in forced expired volume (FEV1-VEMS) was recorded five seconds after inhalation of the citric acid (dose threshold) and there was no significant difference between the two groups. In the non smokers, the maximum fall in VEMS was recorded twenty seconds after inhalation of the citric acid and was significantly less in relation to that of the smokers and occasional smokers. In the smokers the degree of smoking could influence the fall of VEMS (% predicted). Cough and bronchial constriction after the inhalation of citric acid are probably related to different physiological mechanisms and are linked to the history of smoking.

  13. Rheological and chemical properties of pectin enriched fractions from different sources extracted with citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierczyńska, Joanna; Cybulska, Justyna; Zdunek, Artur

    2017-01-20

    Yield, properties and functionality of pectins depend on the source material and method of extraction. The objective of this work was to compare pectinolytic enzyme activity in fresh pulp as well as the physicochemical and rheological properties of polysaccharides extracted with citric acid from six new potential sources: fruit materials - peach, blackcurrant, raspberry, strawberry, plum and a vegetable Source: carrot. The uronic acid content of polysaccharides extracted in citric acid depended on pectinolytic enzymes activity in fresh plant tissues and ranged between 16.5 and 37.1%; which are slightly lower values than those of commercial pectins isolated from citrus and apple. The values of examined rheological parameters (viscosity, thixotropic effect, flow behaviour) demonstrated quality and possibility of pectin enriched fraction application as a food texture modifier. Pectin enriched fractions extracted from seasonal fruit and carrot with citric acid showed considerable potential as thickeners and gelling agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Uranium accumulation in Brassica rapa L. and effect of citric acid and humic acids as chelating agents; Acumulacion de uranio en Brassica rapa L. y efecto del acido citrico y acidos humicos como agentes quelantes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez del R, H.; Perez C, G. A.; Davila R, J. I.; Mireles G, F. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98060 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Rodriguez H, G., E-mail: hlopezdelrio@hotmail.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Agronomia, Carretera Zacatecas-Guadalajara Km 15.5, Cieneguillas, Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    Phyto extraction is a technique that makes use of plants for the remediation of soils contaminated with heavy metals. In this study the uranium incorporation in the Brassica rapa L. species was evaluated, in artificially contaminated inert soils with 40 mg U/kg, and the effect of adding of the natural chelating agents citric acid and humic acids in the accumulation of uranium was analyzed. Soil free of organic matter and biologically inert was obtained by controlled calcination s of natural soil. Cultures in the prepared soil consisted of five growth treatments: 1) cultivation without uranium or additives; 2) cultivation in the uranium presence; 3) cultivation with uranium and citric acid (2 g/kg); 4) cultivation with uranium and humic acids (10 g/kg); 5) uranium cultivation and combination of citric and humic acids at the same concentrations. There was no adverse effect on plant growth with the presence of uranium at the given concentration. Regarding the controls, the total biomass in the presence of uranium was slightly higher, while the addition of humic acids significantly stimulated the production of biomass with respect to the citric acid. The combined action of organic acids produced the highest amount of biomass. The efficiency of phyto extraction followed the order Humic acids (301 μg U/g) > Non-assisted (224 μg U/g) >> Citric acid + Humic acids (68 μg U/g) > Citric acid (59 μg U/g). The values of uranium concentration in the total biomass show that the species Brassica rapa L. has the capacity of phyto extraction of uranium in contaminated soils. The addition of humic acids increases the uranium extraction while the addition of citric acid disadvantages it. (Author)

  15. Effects of Citric and Lactic Acid on the Reduction of Deoxynivalenol and Its Derivatives in Feeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Humer

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to mycotoxin-contaminated feeds represents a serious health risk. This has necessitated the need for the establishment of practical methods for mycotoxin decontamination. This study investigated the effects of citric acid (CA and lactic acid (LA on common trichothecene mycotoxins in feeds contaminated with Fusarium mycotoxins. Contaminated feed samples were processed either with 5% CA or 5% LA solutions in a ratio of 1:1.2 (w/v for 5, 24, or 48 h, and analyzed for multiple mycotoxin metabolites using a liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometric method. The analyses showed that treating the feed with CA and LA lowered the concentration of deoxynivalenol (DON, whereby 5% LA lowered the original DON concentration in the contaminated feed samples by half, irrespective of the processing time. Similar lowering effects were observed for the concentrations of 15Ac-DON, 5-hydroxyculmorin, and sambucinol. The concentration of nivalenol was only lowered by the LA treatment. In contrast, CA and LA treatments showed no or only small effects on the concentration of several mycotoxins and their derivatives, including zearalenone, fumonisins, and culmorin. In conclusion, the present results indicate that the use of 5% solutions of LA and CA might reduce the concentration of common trichothecene mycotoxins, especially DON and its derivate 15Ac-DON. However, further research is required to determine the effect on overall toxicity and to identify the underlying mechanisms.

  16. Citric-acid preacidification enhanced electrokinetic remediation for removal of chromium from chromium-residue-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fansheng; Xue, Hao; Wang, Yeyao; Zheng, Binghui; Wang, Juling

    2018-02-01

    Electrokinetic experiments were conducted on chromium-residue-contaminated soils collected from a chemical plant in China. Acidification-electrokinetic remediation technology was proposed in order to solve the problem of removing inefficient with ordinary electrokinetic. The results showed that electrokinetic remediation removal efficiency of chromium from chromium-contaminated soil was significantly enhanced with acidizing pretreatment. The total chromium [Cr(T)] and hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] removal rate of the group acidized by citric acid (0.9 mol/L) for 5 days was increased from 6.23% and 19.01% in the acid-free experiments to 26.97% and 77.66% in the acidification-treated experiments, respectively. In addition, part of chromium with the state of carbonate-combined will be converted into water-soluble state through acidification to improve the removal efficiency. Within the appropriate concentration range, the higher concentration of acid was, the more chromium was released. So the removal efficiency of chromium depended on the acid concentration. The citric acid is also a kind of complexing agent, which produced complexation with Cr that was released by the electrokinetic treatment and then enhanced the removal efficiency. The major speciation of chromium that was removed from soils by acidification-electrokinetics remediation was acid-soluble speciation, revivification speciation and oxidation speciation, which reduced biological availability of chromium.

  17. Enhancing phosphate adsorption capacity of SDS-based magnetite by surface modification of citric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Zhigang [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhang, Chang, E-mail: zhangchang@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zheng, Zuhong [College of Life Science and Technology, Hubei Engineering University, Xiaogan 432000, Hubei Province (China); Hu, Liang; Li, Xuemei; Yang, Zhongzhu; Ma, Chi; Zeng, Guangming [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2017-05-01

    Highlights: • Citric acid (CA) was used to modify the surface structures of SDS-based magnetite. • Dosage of CA, pH values, ion strength, isotherms and dynamics were analyzed. • High CA dissolved anionic SDS and Fe{sup n+} but increased the stability of magnetite. • 0.05 and 0.1 M CA-modified iron oxide removed about 100% phosphorus. • Precipitation of phosphate and Fe {sup n+} was the main removal mechanism. - Abstract: In this study, citric acid (CA) was employed as a low-molecule organic acid to influence the adsorption performance of phosphorus by as-obtained magnetite. The factors including initial phosphate concentrations, dosage of citric acid, pH value, ion strength, contact time and temperature were examined in detail. Results indicated that the dissolution of anion sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) covering on surface of magnetite, a slight decrease of Fe level and a superior structure of magnetite after CA modification occurred. The pH-dependence of phosphate adsorption was impeded and the surface potential of magnetite positively increased at pH > 5.0 when CA was added. Non-linear regression Langmuir-Freundlich model was fitted well in thermodynamics, and the opposite adsorption process as a function of temperatures with or without CA addition was due to the decrease of active energy and active mobility of phosphate ion. Finally, the declining adsorption efficiency with increasing cycles was observed while phosphate removal was approximately finished and had small change with 0.05 and 0.1 M of CA addition. Those improvements of removal efficiency of phosphorus by modified iron oxide were because of the removal of anionic SDS that increased the surface positive charge, and especially the dissolution of element Fe into solution to form precipitate with phosphorus ions. The enhanced stability of magnetite by CA also promoted the high removal efficiency of phosphorus. These implications of CA on phosphate removal can be extended to the field where

  18. Enhanced production of citric acid in Yarrowia lipolytica by Triton X-100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirbagheri, Maryam; Nahvi, Iraj; Emtiazi, Giti; Darvishi, Farshad

    2011-10-01

    Various chemical surfactants could affect permeability of yeast cells. In this study, effects of the surfactant addition upon yeast cells permeability and citric acid (CA) production by Yarrowia lipolytica strains DSM 3286 and M7 were investigated. The addition of Triton X-100 increased 1.4-1.8-fold of the maximum CA quantity achieved for both strains, with final CA concentrations ranging between 75-85 g/l that correspond to CA conversion yields per unit of glucose consumed of ~0.80-0.84 g/g. Scanning electron micrographs of yeast cells showed that the cells treated with Triton X-100 had altered cell structure and were smaller and narrower compared with the non-treated ones. The results showed that Triton X-100 could be used in order to increase the efficiency of CA production by Y. lipolytica strains.

  19. Detection and formation scenario of citric acid, pyruvic acid, and other possible metabolism precursors in carbonaceous meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, George; Reed, Chris; Nguyen, Dang; Carter, Malika; Wang, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Carbonaceous meteorites deliver a variety of organic compounds to Earth that may have played a role in the origin and/or evolution of biochemical pathways. Some apparently ancient and critical metabolic processes require several compounds, some of which are relatively labile such as keto acids. Therefore, a prebiotic setting for any such individual process would have required either a continuous distant source for the entire suite of intact precursor molecules and/or an energetic and compact local synthesis, particularly of the more fragile members. To date, compounds such as pyruvic acid, oxaloacetic acid, citric acid, isocitric acid, and α-ketoglutaric acid (all members of the citric acid cycle) have not been identified in extraterrestrial sources or, as a group, as part of a “one pot” suite of compounds synthesized under plausibly prebiotic conditions. We have identified these compounds and others in carbonaceous meteorites and/or as low temperature (laboratory) reaction products of pyruvic acid. In meteorites, we observe many as part of three newly reported classes of compounds: keto acids (pyruvic acid and homologs), hydroxy tricarboxylic acids (citric acid and homologs), and tricarboxylic acids. Laboratory syntheses using 13C-labeled reactants demonstrate that one compound alone, pyruvic acid, can produce several (nonenzymatic) members of the citric acid cycle including oxaloacetic acid. The isotopic composition of some of the meteoritic keto acids points to interstellar or presolar origins, indicating that such compounds might also exist in other planetary systems. PMID:21825143

  20. Citric Acid Production by the Aspergillus niger Isolated from the Microflora of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Yazdanparast

    1995-08-01

    Full Text Available Citric acid production by A.niger, isolated from the microflora of Iran, has been investigated in liquid and semi-solid states using growth media with different compositions. In 2% media made of Rocheh grape pomace or sabouraud dextrose, the yield of citric acid production was 0.7 g per Kg of the pomace; and the yield decreased by 50% in 2% saghal solian grape pomace medium. However, in 40% (W/W saghal solian semi-solid medium containing 3% methanol, the yield of citric acid production has improved to 80 g per Kg of pomace in stationary mode of production and to 120 g per Kg of pomace in the rolling mode of fermentation.

  1. A Candida guilliermondii lysine hyperproducer capable of elevated citric acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Thomas P

    2016-05-01

    A mutant of the yeast Candida guilliermondii ATCC 9058 exhibiting elevated citric acid production was isolated based upon its ability to overproduce lysine. This method involved the use of a solid medium containing a combination of lysine analogues to identify a mutant that produced a several-fold higher lysine level compared to its parent strain using glucose or glycerol as a carbon source. The mutant strain was also capable of producing more than a fivefold higher citric acid level on glycerol as a carbon source compared to its parent strain. It was concluded that the screening of yeast lysine hyperproducer strains could provide a rapid approach to isolate yeast citric acid hyperproducer strains.

  2. Effects of citric acid esterification on digestibility, structural and physicochemical properties of cassava starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Ji-Qiang; Zhou, Da-Nian; Jin, Zheng-Yu; Xu, Xue-Ming; Chen, Han-Qing

    2015-11-15

    In this study, citric acid was used to react with cassava starch in order to compare the digestibility, structural and physicochemical properties of citrate starch samples. The results indicated that citric acid esterification treatment significantly increased the content of resistant starch (RS) in starch samples. The swelling power and solubility of citrate starch samples were lower than those of native starch. Compared with native starch, a new peak at 1724 cm(-1) was appeared in all citrate starch samples, and crystalline peaks of all starch citrates became much smaller or even disappeared. Differential scanning calorimetry results indicated that the endothermic peak of citrate starches gradually shrank or even disappeared. Moreover, the citrate starch gels exhibited better freeze-thaw stability. These results suggested that citric acid esterification induced structural changes in cassava starch significantly affected its digestibility and it could be a potential method for the preparation of RS with thermal stability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Repeated fed-batch fermentation using biosensor online control for citric acid production by Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Lucie; Grünberg, Mario; Zehnsdorf, Andreas; Aurich, Andreas; Bley, Thomas; Strehlitz, Beate

    2011-05-20

    Biosensor-controlled substrate feeding was used in a citric acid production process with the yeast strain Yarrowia lipolytica H222 with glucose as the carbon source. The application of an online glucose biosensor measurement facilitated the performance of long-time repeated fed-batch process with automated bioprocess control. Ten cycles of repeated fed-batch fermentation were carried out in order to validate both the stability of the microorganism for citric acid production and the robustness of the glucose biosensor in a long-time experiment. In the course of this fermentation with a duration of 553 h, a slight loss of productivity from 1.4 g/(L×h) to 1.1 g/(L×h) and of selectivity for citric acid from 91% to 88% was observed. The glucose biosensor provided 6,227 measurements without any loss of activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Preparation of levoglucosan by pyrolysis of cellulose and its citric acid fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, X L; Zhang, H X; Yang, J Z; Qi, H Y

    2001-08-01

    Levoglucosan (LG), 1,6-anhydro-beta-D-glucopyranose, was produced by pyrolysis of cellulose. A response surface method was used to optimize the reaction parameters: X1, temperature; X2, time required for heating cellulose from room temperature to the designed pyrolysis temperature; and X3, vacuum, and a Box-Behnken design was employed for this purpose. The optimal temperature and time were found to be 388 degrees C and 26.2 min by fixing the vacuum at 1 mm Hg. The levoglucosan prepared was fermented to citric acid by Aspergillus niger CBX-209, which was a mutant derived by gamma-ray mutagenesis of the parent strain CBX-2. The mutant could produce increasing citric acid with increasing LG purity and had a citric acid yield of 87.5% when using purified levoglucosan as the sole carbon source in a 5 day fermentation period.

  5. PbSO4 Leaching in Citric Acid/Sodium Citrate Solution and Subsequent Yielding Lead Citrate via Controlled Crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsheng He

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lead citrate is a key precursor for the green recycling of spent lead acid battery paste in a citric acid/sodium citrate (CA/SC solution. In this study, the main paste component, PbSO4, was leached and crystallized to yield lead citrate. Results showed that the leaching of PbSO4 in citric acid/sodium citrate solution was remarkably enhanced by an increase in temperature from 35 °C to 95 °C and an increase in sodium citrate (SC concentration from 50 to 650 g/L. In comparison, increasing the citric acid/sodium citrate molar ratio inhibited this leaching. Controlled crystallization through cooling the solution or adjusting the pH of the solution can effectively produce lead citrate crystals. The X-ray diffraction patterns of four products obtained in a comparison test were all consistent with Pb3(C6H5O72. However, the scanning electron microscopy analysis suggested that the morphology was distinct from rods to sheets, which were mainly affected by the temperature variation.

  6. Hydrometallurgical process for the recovery of metal values from spent lithium-ion batteries in citric acid media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiangping; Zhou, Tao

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, a hydrometallurgical process has been proposed to recover valuable metals from spent lithium-ion batteries in citric acid media. Leaching efficiencies as high as 97%, 95%, 94%, and 99% of Ni, Co, Mn, and Li were achieved under the optimal leaching experimental conditions of citric acid concentration of 2 mol L(-1), leaching temperature of 80 °C, leaching time of 90 min, liquid-solid ratio of 30 ml g(-1), and 2 vol. % H2O2. For the metals recovery process, nickel and cobalt were selectively precipitated by dimethylglyoxime reagent and ammonium oxalate sequentially. Then manganese was extracted by Na-D2EHPA and the manganese-loaded D2EHPA was stripped with sulfuric acid. The manganese was recovered as MnSO4 in aqueous phase and D2EHPA could be reused after saponification. Finally, lithium was precipitated by 0.5 mol L(-1) sodium phosphate. Under their optimal conditions, the recovery percentages of Ni, Co, Mn, and Li can reach 98%, 97%, 98%, and 89%, respectively. This is a relatively simple route in which all metal values could be effectively leached and recovered in citric acid media. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. Citric acid production and citrate synthase genes in distinct strains of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Citric acid is an important organic acid, multifunctional with a wide array of uses. The objectives of this study were the isolation and selection strains of the genus Aspergillus, investigating the solubilization of phosphate of these isolates, verifying the expression rate of genes involved in the identification of isolates, and ...

  8. Enhancing phosphate adsorption capacity of SDS-based magnetite by surface modification of citric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhigang; Zhang, Chang; Zheng, Zuhong; Hu, Liang; Li, Xuemei; Yang, Zhongzhu; Ma, Chi; Zeng, Guangming

    2017-05-01

    In this study, citric acid (CA) was employed as a low-molecule organic acid to influence the adsorption performance of phosphorus by as-obtained magnetite. The factors including initial phosphate concentrations, dosage of citric acid, pH value, ion strength, contact time and temperature were examined in detail. Results indicated that the dissolution of anion sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) covering on surface of magnetite, a slight decrease of Fe level and a superior structure of magnetite after CA modification occurred. The pH-dependence of phosphate adsorption was impeded and the surface potential of magnetite positively increased at pH > 5.0 when CA was added. Non-linear regression Langmuir-Freundlich model was fitted well in thermodynamics, and the opposite adsorption process as a function of temperatures with or without CA addition was due to the decrease of active energy and active mobility of phosphate ion. Finally, the declining adsorption efficiency with increasing cycles was observed while phosphate removal was approximately finished and had small change with 0.05 and 0.1 M of CA addition. Those improvements of removal efficiency of phosphorus by modified iron oxide were because of the removal of anionic SDS that increased the surface positive charge, and especially the dissolution of element Fe into solution to form precipitate with phosphorus ions. The enhanced stability of magnetite by CA also promoted the high removal efficiency of phosphorus. These implications of CA on phosphate removal can be extended to the field where phosphate pollution is notorious but urgent.

  9. A comparative study on glycerol metabolism to erythritol and citric acid in Yarrowia lipolytica yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewska, Ludwika; Rakicka, Magdalena; Rymowicz, Waldemar; Rywińska, Anita

    2014-09-01

    Citric acid and erythritol biosynthesis from pure and crude glycerol by three acetate-negative mutants of Yarrowia lipolytica yeast was investigated in batch cultures in a wide pH range (3.0-6.5). Citric acid biosynthesis was the most effective at pH 5.0-5.5 in the case of Wratislavia 1.31 and Wratislavia AWG7. With a decreasing pH value, the direction of biosynthesis changed into erythritol synthesis accompanied by low production of citric acid. Pathways of glycerol conversion into erythritol and citric acid were investigated in Wratislavia K1 cells. Enzymatic activity was compared in cultures run at pH 3.0 and 4.5, that is, under conditions promoting the production of erythritol and citric acid, respectively. The effect of pH value (3.0 and 4.5) and NaCl presence on the extracellular production and intracellular accumulation of citric acid and erythritol was compared as well. Low pH and NaCl resulted in diminished activity of glycerol kinase, whereas such conditions stimulated the activity of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The presence of NaCl strongly influenced enzymes activity - the effective erythritol production was correlated with a high activity of transketolase and erythrose reductase. Therefore, presented results confirmed that transketolase and erythrose reductase are involved in the overproduction of erythritol in the cells of Y. lipolytica yeast. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Oxalic acid production by citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger overexpressing the oxaloacetate hydrolase gene oahA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Keiichi; Hattori, Takasumi; Honda, Yuki; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2014-05-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is used worldwide in the industrial production of citric acid. However, under specific cultivation conditions, citric acid-producing strains of A. niger accumulate oxalic acid as a by-product. Oxalic acid is used as a chelator, detergent, or tanning agent. Here, we sought to develop oxalic acid hyperproducers using A. niger as a host. To generate oxalic acid hyperproducers by metabolic engineering, transformants overexpressing the oahA gene, encoding oxaloacetate hydrolase (OAH; EC 3.7.1.1), were constructed in citric acid-producing A. niger WU-2223L as a host. The oxalic acid production capacity of this strain was examined by cultivation of EOAH-1 under conditions appropriate for oxalic acid production with 30 g/l glucose as a carbon source. Under all the cultivation conditions tested, the amount of oxalic acid produced by EOAH-1, a representative oahA-overexpressing transformant, exceeded that produced by A. niger WU-2223L. A. niger WU-2223L and EOAH-1 produced 15.6 and 28.9 g/l oxalic acid, respectively, during the 12-day cultivation period. The yield of oxalic acid for EOAH-1 was 64.2 % of the maximum theoretical yield. Our method for oxalic acid production gave the highest yield of any study reported to date. Therefore, we succeeded in generating oxalic acid hyperproducers by overexpressing a single gene, i.e., oahA, in citric acid-producing A. niger as a host.

  11. Chelating effect of citric acid is negligible for development of enamel erosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadi-Schossig, Parastu; Becker, Klaus; Attin, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Citric acid (CA) is a component in beverages responsible for dental erosion. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of CA with different pH, titratable acid and buffer capacity (ß), and the impact of the chelating effect of CA on development of enamel erosions. In a superfusion model, hydroxy apatite (HAp) dissolution of bovine enamel was measured in four experiments (EXP 1-4) with 27 experimental groups (n = 8 per group). The samples were superfused with different CA variations and respective controls. EXP-1: Dilution series of HCl (pH 2.15-3.02). EXP-2: Dilution series of natural CA (56-1.75 mmol l(-1); pH 2.15-3.02). EXP-3: CA solutions (56 and 14 mmol l(-1), ß: 39.7 and 10.2 mmol l(-1) pH(-1), respectively) with different titratable acidity at equal pH values. EXP-4: CA concentrations (56-1.75 mmol l(-1)) neutralized to pH 7. CA led to higher HAp-dissolution than HCl. With higher pH, the difference in HAp-dissolution rate between the two acids became increasingly smaller. At equal pH, HAp-dissolution was higher for the CA with the higher amount of titratable acid. However, no clear correlation between erosion and titratable acid or ß could be found. Only minimal amounts of HAp were dissolved by neutralized CA compared to CA with natural pH. Under the chosen conditions chelating effects of CA do not have a relevant influence of HAp-dissolution of enamel. Moreover, amount of HAp-dissolution by CA is not attributed to a single factor alone. The interplay between the different parameters of CA seems to be responsible for its erosive potential. The erosive potential of solutions containing citric acid with unknown concentrations could not be predicted using a single parameter alone, and should at best determined in experimental set-ups.

  12. Water-Dispersible Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Obtained from Citric-Acid-Assisted Oxygen Plasma Functionalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jellur Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new and safe method has been developed to functionalize multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs with fewer surface defects, which significantly increases their dispersibility in water. MWCNTs are pretreated in pure ethanol by a supersonic homogenizer. Then, the mixture is dried and soaked in weak citric acid solution. Finally, the MWCNTs in the citric acid solution are treated with radio frequency (13.56 MHz oxygen plasma. As a result, many carboxyl functional groups are attached onto the MWCNT surfaces and stable dispersion of the MWCNTs in water is obtained. The treatment conditions are optimized in this study.

  13. Catalytic role of Cu(II) in the reduction of Cr(VI) by citric acid under an irradiation of simulated solar light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Chen, Cheng; Zhang, Jing; Lan, Yeqing

    2015-05-01

    The catalytic role of Cu(II) in the reduction of Cr(VI) by citric acid with simulated solar light was investigated. The results demonstrated that Cu(II) could significantly accelerate Cr(VI) reduction and the reaction obeyed to pseudo zero-order kinetics with respect to Cr(VI). The removal of Cr(VI) was related to the initial concentrations of Cu(II), citric acid, and the types of organic acids. The optimal removal of Cr(VI) was achieved at pH 4, and the rates of Cu(II) photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) by organic acids were in the order: tartaric acid (two α-OH groups, two -COOH groups)>citric acid (one α-OH group, three -COOH groups)>malic acid (one α-OH group, two -COOH groups)>lactic acid (one α-OH group, one -COOH group)≫succinic acid (two -COOH groups), suggesting that the number of α-OH was the key factor for the reaction, followed by the number of -COOH. The formation of Cu(II)-citric acid complex could generate Cu(I) and radicals through a pathway of metal-ligand-electron transfer, promoting the reduction of Cr(VI). This study is helpful to fully understanding the conversion of Cr(VI) in the existence of both organic acids and Cu(II) with solar light in aquatic environments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Silica Content and Structure from Corncob Ash with Various Acid Treatment (HCl, HBr, and Citric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Ayu Paramita Kusumah Wardhani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a simple method to obtain silica from corncob ash has been investigated using a nonthermal and thermal method. The Nonthermal method was done by various acid treatment with HCl, HBr and citric acid at room temperature. Thermal method was performed for HCl-leached, HBr-leached, and citric acid-leached corncob in the furnace at 750 ºC for 5 hours. Corncob ash was characterized by Energy Dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (EDXRF, Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, X-Ray diffraction (XRD, and Scanning electron microscope-electron dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX. In this study silica content increase after acid treatment (leaching and combustion at high temperatures. The result established that silica is most obtained with HCl treatment that is equal to 79,95% with lower metallic oxide impurity content. The FTIR spectra with different intensity shows silanol group at 1636 – 1641 cm-1, whereas siloxane group at 1037 – 1106 cm-1, 616–797 cm-1, and 459–469 cm-1. X-Ray diffractogram shows silica transition pf amorphous (2θ = 21 - 25º to quartz crystalline (2θ = 26.66º phase. The surface morphology of silica that characterized with SEM-EDX shows amorphous and crystalline silica corresponds to XRD result. The high intensity spectra of Si and O in EDX shows the presence of silica in corncob ash.

  15. Adsorption and desorption dynamics of citric acid anions in soil

    KAUST Repository

    Oburger, E.

    2011-07-26

    The functional role of organic acid anions in soil has been intensively investigated, with special focus on (i) microbial respiration and soil carbon dynamics, (ii) nutrient solubilization or (iii) metal detoxification and reduction of plant metal uptake. Little is known about the interaction dynamics of organic acid anions with the soil matrix and the potential impact of adsorption and desorption processes on the functional significance of these effects. The aim of this study was to characterize experimentally the adsorption and desorption dynamics of organic acid anions in five agricultural soils differing in iron and aluminium oxide contents and using citrate as a model carboxylate. Results showed that both adsorption and desorption processes were fast in all soils, reaching a steady state within approximately 1 hour. However, for a given total soil citrate concentration (ct) the steady state was critically dependent on the starting conditions of the experiment, whether most of the citrate was initially present in solution (cl) or held on the solid phase (cs). Specifically, desorption-led processes resulted in significantly smaller steady-state solution concentrations than adsorption-led processes, indicating that hysteresis occurred. As it is not possible to distinguish between different adsorption and desorption pools in soil experimentally, a new dynamic hysteresis model that relies only on measured soil solution concentrations was developed. The model satisfactorily explained experimental data and was able to predict dynamic adsorption and desorption behaviour. To demonstrate its use, we applied the model to two relevant situations involving exudation and microbial degradation. The study highlighted the complex nature of citrate adsorption and desorption dynamics in soil. We conclude that existing models need to incorporate both temporal and hysteresis components to describe realistically the role and fate of organic acids in soil processes. © 2011 The

  16. Effect of Ginger Extract and Citric Acid on the Tenderness of Duck Breast Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the effect of ginger extract (GE) combined with citric acid on the tenderness of duck breast muscles. Total six marinades were prepared with the combination of citric acid (0 and 0.3 M citric acid) and GE (0, 15, and 30%). Each marinade was sprayed on the surface of duck breasts (15 mL/100 g), and the samples were marinated for 72 h at 4℃. The pH and proteolytic activity of marinades were determined. After 72 h of marination, Warner Bratzler shear force (WBSF), myofibrillar fragmentation index (MFI), pH, cooking loss, moisture content, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and protein solubility were evaluated. There was no significant (p>0.05) difference in moisture content or cooking loss among all samples. However, GE marination resulted in a significant (pcitric acid) and WC (with citric acid) conditions were significantly (pcitric acid may be attributed to various mechanisms such as increased MFI and myofibrillar protein solubility. PMID:26877631

  17. Influence of Citric Acid on the Metal Release of Stainless Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazinanian, N.; Wallinder, I. Odnevall; Hedberg, Y. S. [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Chemical Science and Engineering, Department of Chemistry, Division of Surface and Corrosion Science, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    Knowledge of how metal releases from the stainless steels used in food processing applications and cooking utensils is essential within the framework of human health risk assessment. A new European standard test protocol for testing metal release in food contact materials made from metals and alloys has recently been published by the Council of Europe. The major difference from earlier test protocols is the use of citric acid as the worst-case food simulant. The objectives of this study were to assess the effect of citric acid at acidic, neutral, and alkaline solution pH on the extent of metal release for stainless steel grades AISI 304 and 316, commonly used as food contact materials. Both grades released lower amounts of metals than the specific release limits when they were tested according to test guidelines. The released amounts of metals were assessed by means of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy, and changes in the outermost surface composition were determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results demonstrate that both the pH and the complexation capacity of the solutions affected the extent of metal release from stainless steel and are discussed from a mechanistic perspective. The outermost surface oxide was significantly enriched in chromium upon exposure to citric acid, indicating rapid passivation by the acid. This study elucidates the effect of several possible mechanisms, including complex ion- and ligand-induced metal release, that govern the process of metal release from stainless steel under passive conditions in solutions that contain citric acid.

  18. Improving oxidative stability of olive oil: Incorporation of Spirulina and evaluation of its synergism with citric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Alavi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of different Spirulina concentrations used alone and in combination with citric acid on the oxidative stability of olive oil were assessed. The amounts of primary and secondary oxidation products produced in Spirulina samples were lower than that of the control. The improved oxidative stability indices of Spirulina samples with and without citric acid were in the range of 85.20–94.47% and 258.10–260.21%, respectively. In comparison with the control, Spirulina samples manifested significantly higher carotenoid and chlorophyll contents at the beginning and end of the storage period. The presence of these bioactive compounds results from the presence of Spirulina in the medium and can thus retard the oxidation of olive oil. A higher oxidative stability was reached using BHT in comparison with Spirulina samples. Furthermore, no synergistic action was observed in possible connections between citric acid and Spirulina. In conclusion, Spirulina can enhance oxidative stability and improve the shelf life of olive oil.

  19. 76 FR 2648 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From People's Republic of China: Extension of Time Limit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From People's Republic of China... initiation of administrative review of the countervailing duty order on citric acid and certain citrate salts...

  20. The regulatory effect of citric acid on the co-production of poly(ε-lysine) and poly(L-diaminopropionic acid) in Streptomyces albulus PD-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Xu, Zhaoxian; Xu, Hong; Feng, Xiaohai; Bo, Fangfang

    2014-10-01

    Streptomyces albulus PD-1 can co-produce antimicrobial homo-polymers poly(ε-lysine) (ε-PL) and poly(L-diaminopropionic acid) (PDAP). In this study, a novel feeding strategy of citric acid coupled with glucose-(NH4)2SO4 feeding was employed to S. albulus PD-1. When the pH of the culture broth dropped to 4.0, the feeding solution was added continuously to maintain the concentrations of glucose and citric acid at 10 and 4 g L(-1), respectively. As a result, the final concentration of ε-PL increased from 21.7 to 29.7 g L(-1) and the final concentration of PDAP decreased from 4.8 to 3.2 g L(-1). Assays on intracellular nucleotide levels and key enzyme activities were performed to elucidate the underlying regulation mechanism. The addition of citric acid increased NADH/NAD(+) ratio and decreased intracellular ATP level; meanwhile, the activities of pyruvate kinase, citrate synthase and isocitrate dehydrogenase decreased while aspartate aminotransferase activity increased. Therefore, we deduced that citric acid feeding resulted in metabolic flux redistribution at the node of phosphoenolpyruvate; the metabolic pathway from phosphoenolpyruvate directed into tricarboxylic acid cycle was weakened and thus PDAP production was inhibited. On the other hand, the metabolic pathway from phosphoenolpyruvate directed into oxaloacetate and L-aspartate was enhanced, thereby improving ε-PL production. This fermentation strategy may be potentially useful in ε-PL production because it can effectively inhibit the formation of by-products, such as PDAP.

  1. Photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) by citric and oxalic acids over biogenetic jarosite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhihui; Bai, Shuangyou; Liang, Jianru; Zhou, Lixiang; Lan, Yeqing

    2013-05-01

    In this study, a series of bath experiments were carried out to investigate the photoreduction of Cr(VI) by small molecular weight organic acids (SOAs) over jarosite, a mineral found in acid mine drainage (AMD). The results demonstrated that jarosite or SOAs alone was unable to effectively transform Cr(VI) to Cr(III) even if exposed to an illumination of mimic solar light. However, an addition of jarosite significantly enhanced the reduction of Cr(VI) by SOAs under the same condition. The photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) was strongly influenced by pH, the initial concentrations and the structures of SOAs. Of the tested two SOAs, the reaction rates of photocatalytic reduction of Cr(VI) were in the order of oxalic acid>citric acid. The reaction obeyed to zero-order kinetics with respect to Cr(VI) with excess SOAs. A possible mechanism for photoreduction of Cr(VI) by SOAs over jarosite was proposed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The influence of citric acid, EDTA, and fulvic acid on U(VI) sorption onto kaolinite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barger, Michelle, E-mail: Michelle.l.barger@wmich.edu [Department of Geosciences, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI (United States); Koretsky, Carla M. [Department of Geosciences, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Uranium(VI) sorption onto kaolinite was investigated as a function of pH (3-12), sorbate/sorbent ratio (1 x 10{sup -6}-1 x 10{sup -4} M U(VI) with 2 g/L kaolinite), ionic strength (0.001-0.1 M NaNO{sub 3}), and pCO{sub 2} (0-5%) in the presence or absence of 1 x 10{sup -2}-1 x 10{sup -4} M citric acid, 1 x 10{sup -2}-1 x 10{sup -4} M EDTA, and 10 or 20 mg/L fulvic acid. Control experiments without-solids, containing 1 x 10{sup -6}-1 x 10{sup -4} M U(VI) in 0.01 M NaNO{sub 3} were used to evaluate sorption to the container wall and precipitation of U phases as a function of pH. Control experiments demonstrate significant loss (up to 100%) of U from solution. Although some loss, particularly in 1 x 10{sup -5} and 1 x 10{sup -4} M U experiments, is expected due to precipitation of schoepite, adsorption on the container walls is significant, particularly in 1 x 10{sup -6} M U experiments. In the absence of ligands, U(VI) sorption on kaolinite increases from pH {approx}3 to 7 and decreases from pH {approx}7.5 to 12. Increasing ionic strength from 0.001 to 0.1 M produces only a slight decrease in U(VI) sorption at pH < 7, whereas 10% pCO{sub 2} greatly diminishes U(VI) sorption between pH {approx}5.5 and 11. Addition of fulvic acid produces a small increase in U(VI) sorption at pH < 5; in contrast, between pH 5 and 10 fulvic acid, citric acid, and EDTA all decrease U(VI) sorption. This suggests that fulvic acid enhances U(VI) sorption slightly via formation of ternary ligand bridges at low pH, whereas EDTA and citric acid do not form ternary surface complexes with the U(VI), and that all three ligands, as well as carbonate, form aqueous uranyl complexes that keep U(VI) in solution at higher pH.

  3. The Cardioprotective Effects of Citric Acid and L-Malic Acid on Myocardial Ischemia/Reperfusion Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xilan; Liu, Jianxun; Dong, Wei; Li, Peng; Li, Lei; Lin, Chengren; Zheng, Yongqiu; Hou, Jincai; Li, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Organic acids in Chinese herbs, the long-neglected components, have been reported to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antiplatelet aggregation activities; thus they may have potentially protective effect on ischemic heart disease. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the protective effects of two organic acids, that is, citric acid and L-malic acid, which are the main components of Fructus Choerospondiatis, on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury and the underlying mechanisms. In in vivo rat model of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury, we found that treatments with citric acid and L-malic acid significantly reduced myocardial infarct size, serum levels of TNF-α, and platelet aggregation. In vitro experiments revealed that both citric acid and L-malic acid significantly reduced LDH release, decreased apoptotic rate, downregulated the expression of cleaved caspase-3, and upregulated the expression of phosphorylated Akt in primary neonatal rat cardiomyocytes subjected to hypoxia/reoxygenation injury. These results suggest that both citric acid and L-malic acid have protective effects on myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury; the underlying mechanism may be related to their anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet aggregation and direct cardiomyocyte protective effects. These results also demonstrate that organic acids, besides flavonoids, may also be the major active ingredient of Fructus Choerospondiatis responsible for its cardioprotective effects and should be attached great importance in the therapy of ischemic heart disease. PMID:23737849

  4. Analysis of tellurium thin films electrodeposition from acidic citric bath

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalik, Remigiusz; Kutyła, Dawid [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Non-Ferrous Metals, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Mech, Krzysztof [AGH University of Science and Technology, Academic Centre for Materials and Nanotechnology, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, Krakow (Poland); Żabiński, Piotr, E-mail: rkowalik@agh.edu.pl [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Non-Ferrous Metals, al. A. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Krakow (Poland)

    2016-12-01

    This work presents the description of the electrochemical process of formation thin tellurium layers from citrate acidic solution. The suggested methodology consists in the preparation of stable acidic baths with high content of tellurium, and with the addition of citrate acid. In order to analyse the mechanism of the process of tellurium deposition, the electroanalytical tests were conducted. The tests of cyclic voltammetry and hydrodynamic ones were performed with the use of polycrystalline gold disk electrode. The range of potentials in which deposition of tellurium in direct four-electron process is possible was determined as well as the reduction of deposited Te° to Te{sup 2−} and its re-deposition as a result of the comproportionation reaction. On the basis of the obtained results, the deposition of tellurium was conducted by the potentiostatic method. The influence of a deposition potential and a concentration of TeO{sub 2} in the solution on the rate of tellurium coatings deposition was examined. The presence of tellurium was confirmed by X-ray spectrofluorometry and electron probe microanalysis. In order to determine the phase composition and the morphology, the obtained coatings were analysed with the use of x-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.

  5. Optimization of date syrup for enhancement of the production of citric acid using immobilized cells of Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Yasser S; Alamri, Saad A

    2012-04-01

    Date syrup as an economical source of carbohydrates and immobilized Aspergillus niger J4, which was entrapped in calcium alginate pellets, were employed for enhancing the production of citric acid. Maximum production was achieved by pre-treating date syrup with 1.5% tricalcium phosphate to remove heavy metals. The production of citric acid using a pretreated medium was 38.87% higher than an untreated one that consumed sugar. The appropriate presence of nitrogen, phosphate and magnesium appeared to be important in order for citric acid to accumulate. The production of citric acid and the consumed sugar was higher when using 0.1% ammonium nitrate as the best source of nitrogen. The production of citric acid increased significantly when 0.1 g/l of KH2PO4 was added to the medium of date syrup. The addition of magnesium sulfate at the rate of 0.20 g/l had a stimulating effect on the production of citric acid. Maximum production of citric acid was obtained when calcium chloride was absent. One of the most important benefits of immobilized cells is their ability and stability to produce citric acid under a repeated batch culture. Over four repeated batches, the production of citric acid production was maintained for 24 days when each cycle continued for 144 h. The results obtained in the repeated batch cultivation using date syrup confirmed that date syrup could be used as a medium for the industrial production of citric acid.

  6. Optimization of date syrup for enhancement of the production of citric acid using immobilized cells of Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, Yasser S.; Alamri, Saad A.

    2012-01-01

    Date syrup as an economical source of carbohydrates and immobilized Aspergillus niger J4, which was entrapped in calcium alginate pellets, were employed for enhancing the production of citric acid. Maximum production was achieved by pre-treating date syrup with 1.5% tricalcium phosphate to remove heavy metals. The production of citric acid using a pretreated medium was 38.87% higher than an untreated one that consumed sugar. The appropriate presence of nitrogen, phosphate and magnesium appeared to be important in order for citric acid to accumulate. The production of citric acid and the consumed sugar was higher when using 0.1% ammonium nitrate as the best source of nitrogen. The production of citric acid increased significantly when 0.1 g/l of KH2PO4 was added to the medium of date syrup. The addition of magnesium sulfate at the rate of 0.20 g/l had a stimulating effect on the production of citric acid. Maximum production of citric acid was obtained when calcium chloride was absent. One of the most important benefits of immobilized cells is their ability and stability to produce citric acid under a repeated batch culture. Over four repeated batches, the production of citric acid production was maintained for 24 days when each cycle continued for 144 h. The results obtained in the repeated batch cultivation using date syrup confirmed that date syrup could be used as a medium for the industrial production of citric acid. PMID:23961184

  7. Influence of Citric Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide on Postharvest Quality of Tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa L. ‘Pearl’) Cut Flowers

    OpenAIRE

    Rahimian-Boogar Abdolrahman; Salehi Hassan; Mir Noshin

    2016-01-01

    Quality of cut flowers is an important issue at postharvest as well as an important factor contributing to marketing of and profitability from the tuberose. In this study, the effects of citric acid (CA) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) added to the vase water on postharvest quality of tuberose cut flowers were investigated. CA was applied in concentrations of 50, 100, 200, 400 mg·dm−3 and H2O2 in concentrations of 10, 20, 40 and 80 mg·dm−3 and distilled water as control treatment. Results showed...

  8. Dimethylurea/citric acid as a highly efficient deep eutectic solvent for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    medium for the efficient synthesis of bis(indolyl)methanes, quinolines and aryl-4, 5-diphenyl-1H-imidazoles. Ease of recovery and reusability of DES with high activity makes this method efficient and eco-friendly. Keywords. Deep eutectic; citric acid; dimethylurea; bis(indolyl)methane; quinoline; aryl-4, 5-diphenyl-1H-.

  9. Phenolic Compounds, Phytate, Citric Acid and the In-vitro Iron ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... cowpeas (Vigna unguiculata) and mung beans (Vigna radiata L.) and kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) were analyzed for the polyphenolics and phytates. The total and in vitro accessible iron, and the citric acid were also quantified and their nutritional consequences discussed. Phenolic compounds varied widely in ...

  10. Effect of citric acid on formation of oxides of Cu and Zn in modified ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    gel products ineach of Cu and Zn systems by using respective metal nitrate as precursor and citric acid as gelling agent. Thesynthesized sol-gel products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope(SEM), energy ...

  11. Online analytical investigations on solvent-, temperature- and water vapour-induced phase transformations of citric acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmdach, L.; Ulrich, J. [Martin-Luther-Universitaet Halle-Wittenberg, Zentrum fuer Ingenieurwissenschaft, Verfahrenstechnik/TVT, Halle (Saale) (Germany); Feth, M.P. [Sanofi-Aventis Deutschland GmbH, Chemical and Process Development Frankfurt Chemistry, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    It was demonstrated exemplarily for the crystallization of citric acid that the usage of an ultrasound device as well as Raman spectroscopy enables the inline measurement and the control of phase transitions. The influence of different solvent compositions (water and ethanol-water) on the crystallization of citric acid was investigated. By increasing the ethanol content the transformation point was shifted towards higher temperatures. In addition, a strong impact on the nucleation point as well as on the crystal habit was detected in ethanol-water mixtures. The results lead to the assumption that a citric acid solvate exists, which is, however, highly unstable upon isolation from mother liquor and converts fast into the known anhydrate or monohydrate forms of citric acid. The presence of such a solvate, however, could not be proven during this study. Furthermore, factors such as temperature and humidity which might influence the phase transition of the solid product were analyzed by Hotstage-Raman Spectroscopy and Water Vapor Sorption Gravimetry-Dispersive Raman Spectroscopy. Both, temperature as well as humidity show a strong influence on the behaviour of CAM. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Citric acid production by a novel Aspergillus niger isolate: I. Mutagenesis and cost reduction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfy, Walid A; Ghanem, Khaled M; El-Helow, Ehab R

    2007-12-01

    Ultraviolet-irradiation (UV), ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) and acridine orange (AO) were used to induce citric acid overproduction mutations in Aspergillus niger UMIP 2564. Among 15, eight of the mutant derivatives, were improved with respect to citric acid production from sucrose in batch cultures. Maximum product yield (60.25%) was recorded by W5, a stable UV mutant, with approximately 3.2-fold increase when compared to the parental wild type strain. In terms of the kinetic parameters for batch fermentation processes, the mutation doubled the specific substrate uptake rate and achieved 4.5- and 7.5-fold improvements in citric acid productivity and specific productivity, respectively. For reduction of the fermentation medium cost, corn steep liquor and calcium phosphate pre-treated beet molasses were successfully used as substituents of nitrogen and carbon sources in the growth medium, respectively. These medium substitutions resulted in a W5 citric acid fermentation culture with a product yield of 74.56%.

  13. Properties of polyvinyl alcohol/xylan composite films with citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuaiyang; Ren, Junli; Li, Weiying; Sun, Runcang; Liu, Shijie

    2014-03-15

    Composite films of xylan and polyvinyl alcohol were produced with citric acid as a new plasticizer or a cross-linking agent. The effects of citric acid content and polyvinyl alcohol/xylan weight ratio on the mechanical properties, thermal stability, solubility, degree of swelling and water vapor permeability of the composite films were investigated. The intermolecular interactions and morphology of composite films were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and SEM. The results indicated that polyvinyl alcohol/xylan composite films had good compatibility. With an increase in citric acid content from 10% to 50%, the tensile strength reduced from 35.1 to 11.6 MPa. However, the elongation at break increased sharply from 15.1% to 249.5%. The values of water vapor permeability ranged from 2.35 to 2.95 × 10(-7)g/(mm(2)h). Interactions between xylan and polyvinyl alcohol in the presence of citric acid become stronger, which were caused by hydrogen bond and ester bond formation among the components during film forming. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Analysis of Citric Acid in Beverages: Use of an Indicator Displacement Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umali, Alona P.; Anslyn, Eric V.; Wright, Aaron T.; Blieden, Clifford R.; Smith, Carolyne K.; Tian, Tian; Truong, Jennifer A.; Crumm, Caitlin E.; Garcia, Jorge E.; Lee, Soal; Mosier, Meredith; Nguyen, Chester P.

    2010-01-01

    The use of an indicator displacement assay permits the visualization of binding events between host and guest molecules. An undergraduate laboratory experiment is described to demonstrate the technique in the determination of citric acid content in commercially available beverages such as soda pop and fruit juices. Through the technique, students…

  15. Modification of wheat gluten with citric acid to produce superabsorbent materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat gluten was reacted with citric acid to produce natural superabsorbent materials able to absorb up to 78 times its weight in water. The properties of the modified gluten samples were characterized using Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and water uptak...

  16. Comment on "Analysis of Citric Acid in Beverages: Use of an Indicator Displacement Assay"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konski, Krzysiek; Saw, Jessica; Torriero, Angel A. J.

    2017-01-01

    This letter comments on the paper "Analysis of Citric Acid in Beverages: Use of an Indicator Displacement Assay" ["J. Chem. Educ." 2010, 87 (8), 832-835 (EJ918557)]. Discrepancies in figures and host:indicator complex behavior are discussed and an alternative experimental protocol presented.

  17. Simultaneous Removal of Lindane, Lead and Cadmium from Soils by Rhamnolipids Combined with Citric Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Jinzhong; Meng, Die; Long, Tao; Ying, Rongrong; Ye, Mao; Zhang, Shengtian; Li, Qun; Zhou, Yan; Lin, Yusuo

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the performance of rhamnolipids-citric acid mixed agents in simultaneous desorption of lindane and heavy metals from soils. The capacity of the mixed agents to solubilize lindane, lead and cadmium in aqueous solution was also explored. The results showed that the presence of citric acid greatly enhanced the solubilization of lindane and cadmium by rhamnolipids. A combined effect of the mixed agents on lindane and heavy metals removal from soils was observed. The maximum desorption ratios for lindane, cadmium and lead were 85.4%, 76.4% and 28.1%, respectively, for the mixed agents containing 1% rhamnolipidsand 0.1 mol/L citric acid. The results also suggest that the removal efficiencies of lead and cadmium were strongly related to their speciations in soils, and metals in the exchangeable and carbonate forms were easier to be removed. Our study suggests that the combining use of rhamnolipids and citric acid is a promising alternative to simultaneously remove organochlorine pesticides and heavy metals from soils.

  18. Simultaneous Removal of Lindane, Lead and Cadmium from Soils by Rhamnolipids Combined with Citric Acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinzhong Wan

    Full Text Available This study investigated the performance of rhamnolipids-citric acid mixed agents in simultaneous desorption of lindane and heavy metals from soils. The capacity of the mixed agents to solubilize lindane, lead and cadmium in aqueous solution was also explored. The results showed that the presence of citric acid greatly enhanced the solubilization of lindane and cadmium by rhamnolipids. A combined effect of the mixed agents on lindane and heavy metals removal from soils was observed. The maximum desorption ratios for lindane, cadmium and lead were 85.4%, 76.4% and 28.1%, respectively, for the mixed agents containing 1% rhamnolipidsand 0.1 mol/L citric acid. The results also suggest that the removal efficiencies of lead and cadmium were strongly related to their speciations in soils, and metals in the exchangeable and carbonate forms were easier to be removed. Our study suggests that the combining use of rhamnolipids and citric acid is a promising alternative to simultaneously remove organochlorine pesticides and heavy metals from soils.

  19. 21 CFR 173.280 - Solvent extraction process for citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Solvent extraction process for citric acid. 173.280 Section 173.280 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SECONDARY DIRECT FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Solvents, Lubricants,...

  20. 7 CFR 51.1178 - Maximum anhydrous citric acid permissible for corresponding total soluble solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... corresponding total soluble solids. 51.1178 Section 51.1178 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... Sinensis (l) Osbeck) § 51.1178 Maximum anhydrous citric acid permissible for corresponding total soluble... relation to corresponding total soluble solids in the fruit is set forth in the following Table II together...

  1. Experimental Investigation and Analysis of Mercerized and Citric Acid Surface Treated Bamboo Fiber Reinforced Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Jyotiraman; Baxi, R. N., Dr.

    2017-08-01

    Mercerization or NaOH fiber surface treatment is one of the most popular surface treatment processes to make the natural fibers such as bamboo fibers compatible for use as reinforcing material in composites. But NaOH being a chemical is hazardous and polluting to the nature. This paper explores the possibility of use of naturally derived citric acid for bamboo fiber surface treatment and its comparison with NaOH treated Bamboo Fiber Composites. Untreated, 2.5 wt% NaOH treated and 5 wt% citric acid treated Bamboo Fiber Composites with 5 wt% fiber content were developed by Hand Lay process. Bamboo mats made of bamboo slivers were used as reinforcing material. Mechanical and physical characterization was done to compare the effects of NaOH and citric acid bamboo fiber surface treatment on mechanical and physical properties of Bamboo Fiber Composite. The experiment data reveals that the tensile and flexural strength was found to be highest for citric acid and NaOH treated Bamboo Fiber Composite respectively. Water absorption tendency was found more than the NaOH treated Bamboo Fiber Composites. SEM micrographs used to analyze the morphology of fracture surface of tensile test specimens confirm improvement in fiber-matrix interface bonding due to surface treatment of bamboo fibers.

  2. Deletion of a Chitin Synthase Gene in a Citric Acid Producing Strain of Aspergillus niger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rinker, Torri E.; Baker, Scott E.

    2007-01-29

    Citric acid production by the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger is carried out in a process that causes the organism to drastically alter its morphology. This altered morphology includes hyphal swelling and highly limited polar growth resulting in clumps of swollen cells that eventually aggregate into pellets of approximately 100 microns in diameter. In this pelleted form, A. niger has increased citric acid production as compared to growth in filamentous form. Chitin is a crucial component of the cell wall of filamentous fungi. Alterations in the deposition or production of chitin may have profound effects on the morphology of the organism. In order to study the role of chitin synthesis in pellet formation we have deleted a chitin synthase gene (csmA) in Aspergillus niger strain ATCC 11414 using a PCR based deletion construct. This class of chitin synthases is only found in filamentous fungi and is not present in yeasts. The csmA genes contain a myosin motor domain at the N-terminus and a chitin synthesis domain at the C-terminus. They are believed to contribute to the specialized polar growth observed in filamentous fungi that is lacking in yeasts. The csmA deletion strain (csmAΔ) was subjected to minimal media with and without osmotic stabilizers as well as tested in citric acid production media. Without osmotic stabilizers, the mutant germlings were abnormally swollen, primarily in the subapical regions, and contained large vacuoles. However, this swelling is ultimately not inhibitory to growth as the germlings are able to recover and undergo polar growth. Colony formation was largely unaffected in the absence of osmotic stabilizers. In citric acid production media csmAΔ was observed to have a 2.5 fold increase in citric acid production. The controlled expression of this class of chitin synthases may be useful for improving production of organic acids in filamentous fungi.

  3. The Unusual Acid-Accumulating Behavior during Ripening of Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) is Linked to Changes in Transcription and Enzyme Activity Related to Citric and Malic Acid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Agüero, Mauricio; Tejerina Pardo, Luis; Zamudio, María Sofía; Contreras, Carolina; Undurraga, Pedro; Defilippi, Bruno G

    2016-04-25

    Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill.) is a subtropical fruit characterized by a significant increase in organic acid levels during ripening, making it an interesting model for studying the relationship between acidity and fruit flavor. In this work, we focused on understanding the balance between the concentration of organic acids and the gene expression and activity of enzymes involved in the synthesis and degradation of these metabolites during the development and ripening of cherimoya cv. "Concha Lisa". Our results showed an early accumulation of citric acid and other changes associated with the accumulation of transcripts encoding citrate catabolism enzymes. During ripening, a 2-fold increase in malic acid and a 6-fold increase in citric acid were detected. By comparing the contents of these compounds with gene expression and enzymatic activity levels, we determined that cytoplasmic NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase (cyNAD-MDH) and mitochondrial citrate synthase (mCS) play important regulatory roles in the malic and citric acid biosynthetic pathways.

  4. The citric acid production from raw glycerol by Yarrowia lipolytica yeast and its regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgunov, Igor G; Kamzolova, Svetlana V; Lunina, Julia N

    2013-08-01

    The optimal cultivation conditions ensuring the maximal rate of citric acid (CA) biosynthesis by glycerol-grown mutant Yarrowia lipolytica NG40/UV7 were found to be as follows: growth limitation by inorganic nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus, or sulfur), 28 °C, pH 5.0, dissolved oxygen concentration (pO₂) of 50 % (of air saturation), and pulsed addition of glycerol from 20 to 80 g L⁻¹ depending on the rate of medium titration. Under optimal conditions of fed-batch cultivation, in the medium with pure glycerol, strain Y. lipolytica NG40/UV7 produced 115 g L⁻¹ of CA with the mass yield coefficient of 0.64 g g⁻¹ and isocitric acid (ICA) amounted to 4.6 g L⁻¹; in the medium with raw glycerol, CA production was 112 g L⁻¹ with the mass yield coefficient of 0.90 g g⁻¹ and ICA amounted to 5.3 g L⁻¹. Based on the activities of enzymes involved in the initial stages of raw glycerol assimilation, the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the glyoxylate cycle, the mechanism of increased CA yield from glycerol-containing substrates in Y. lipolytica yeast was explained.

  5. Airway responses to aerosolized methacholine and citric acid in ponies with recurrent airway obstruction (heaves).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, P J; Derksen, F J; Slocombe, R F; Robinson, N E

    1986-03-01

    We measured lung function and airway reactivity in response to methacholine and citric acid administered by aerosol in 2 groups of ponies (principal and control). Principal ponies had a history of heaves, a disease characterized by recurrent airway obstruction. Control ponies had no history of respiratory disease. Both principal and control ponies were paired (principal and control), and measurements were made when principal ponies were in clinical remission (Period A), following barn exposure when principal ponies had acute airway obstruction (Period B), and 1 and 2 wk after they were returned to pasture (Periods C and D). Differences between groups were primarily found at Period B. Barn housing (Period B) decreased dynamic compliance (Cdyn) and increased pulmonary resistance (RL) of principal but not of control ponies. When compared with control ponies at Period B, principal ponies demonstrated airway hyperreactivity. The dose of methacholine required to reduce Cdyn to 65% of baseline (ED65Cdyn) was lower, the change in RL induced by an aerosol of 0.1 mg/ml methacholine (delta RL 0.1) was higher, and the percent change in Cdyn in response to an aerosol of 0.1 mg/ml methacholine (delta %Cdyn 0.1) was larger in principal than in control ponies. A 10-min inhalation of 10% citric acid aerosol did not cause changes in Cdyn in either group of ponies. Control ponies did not increase RL in response to citric acid, whereas at Period B, RL of principal ponies increased following citric acid. We conclude that ponies in clinical remission from heaves are not hyperreactive to aerosols of methacholine or citric acid. Hyperreactivity only exists during acute exacerbations of airway obstruction.

  6. Engineering Yarrowia lipolytica for Enhanced Production of Lipid and Citric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abghari

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Increasing demand for plant oil for food, feed, and fuel production has led to food-fuel competition, higher plant lipid cost, and more need for agricultural land. On the other hand, the growing global production of biodiesel has increased the production of glycerol as a by-product. Efficient utilization of this by-product can reduce biodiesel production costs. We engineered Yarrowia lipolytica (Y. lipolytica at various metabolic levels of lipid biosynthesis, degradation, and regulation for enhanced lipid and citric acid production. We used a one-step double gene knock-in and site-specific gene knock-out strategy. The resulting final strain combines the overexpression of homologous DGA1 and DGA2 in a POX-deleted background, and deletion of the SNF1 lipid regulator. This increased lipid and citric acid production in the strain under nitrogen-limiting conditions (C/N molar ratio of 60. The engineered strain constitutively accumulated lipid at a titer of more than 4.8 g/L with a lipid content of 53% of dry cell weight (DCW. The secreted citric acid reached a yield of 0.75 g/g (up to ~45 g/L from pure glycerol in 3 days of batch fermentation using a 1-L bioreactor. This yeast cell factory was capable of simultaneous lipid accumulation and citric acid secretion. It can be used in fed-batch or continuous bioprocessing for citric acid recovery from the supernatant, along with lipid extraction from the harvested biomass.

  7. Postharvest life of cut gerbera flowers as affected by salicylic acid and citric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Heidarnezhadian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Effect of salicylic acid (SA combined with citric acid (CA on gerbera (Gerbera jamesonii cut flowers was studied. The study was conducted in a factorial arrangement, carried out in a complete randomized design. The factors were SA (0.5,1.5 and 3 mM and CA (1.5 and 3 mM. The effects of treatments on the total chlorophyll content, anthocyanin leakage and malondialdehyde content of cut flowers of gerbera were investigated. The results showed that the vase solution containing 1.5 mM SA significantly increased vase life compared to the control. In addition, the malondialdehyde accumulation reduced in the same solution while membrane stability was improved. Results suggest that SA increases vase life by affecting many of the age-related changes associated with Gerbera petal senescence.

  8. Enhanced citric acid production by a yeast Yarrowia lipolytica over-expressing a pyruvate carboxylase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mei-Juan; Chen, Xi; Wang, Yu-Kuan; Liu, Guang-Lei; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2016-08-01

    In this study, after the expression of a pyruvate carboxylase gene (PYC) cloned from Meyerozyma guilliermondii in a marine-derived yeast Yarrowia lipolytica SWJ-1b, a transformant PG86 obtained had much higher PYC activity than Y. lipolytica SWJ-1b. At the same time, the PYC gene expression and citric acid (CA) production by the transformant PG86 were also greatly enhanced. When glucose concentration in the medium was 60.0 g L(-1), CA concentration formed by the transformant PG86 was 34.02 g L(-1), leading to a CA yield of 0.57 g g(-1) of glucose. During a 10-L fed-batch fermentation, the final concentration of CA was 101.0 ± 1.3 g L(-1), the yield was 0.89 g g(-1) of glucose, the productivity was 0.42 g L(-1) h(-1) and only 5.93 g L(-1) reducing sugar was left in the fermented medium within 240 h of the fed-batch fermentation. HPLC analysis showed that most of the fermentation products were CA.

  9. D-stat culture for studying the metabolic shifts from oxidative metabolism to lipid accumulation and citric acid production in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Estopier, Abril; Guillouet, Stéphane E

    2014-01-20

    Lipid accumulation in oleaginous yeasts is triggered by nutrient imbalance in the culture medium between the carbon source in excess and the nitrogen source in limiting concentration. However Yarrowia lipolytica when cultivated on glucose as the sole carbon source, mainly produces citric acid upon nitrogen limitation over lipid accumulation (only 5-10% triacylglycerol). Therefore for developing bioprocess for the production of triacylglycerol from renewable carbon source as glucose it is of first importance to control this imbalance in order to avoid citric acid production during TAG accumulation. Using D-stat cultivation system, where the N/C was linearly decreased using a constant change rate we were able to identify the N/C ratio inducing TAG accumulation (0.085NmolCmol(-1)) and citric acid (0.021NmolCmol(-1)). We therefore demonstrated that it was possible to accumulate lipids without excretion citric acid as long as the N/C was within this indicated range. Moreover enzyme specific activities measurement during the D-stat indicated that ATP-citrate lyase, malic enzyme and acetyl-coA carboxylase were strongly induced at the onset of lipid accumulation and showed different patterns when citric acid was excreted. Our results give relevant information for future industrial bioprocess development concerning the production of lipids using renewable carbohydrate substrates as an alternative way to produce synthons for fuel or chemical industry. By controlling the N/C over the fermentation process on glucose Y. lipolytica can accumulate lipids without excreting citric acid. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Dendrimers of citric acid and poly (ethylene glycol) as the new drug-delivery agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, H; Adeli, M

    2005-04-01

    Citric acid-polyethylene glycol-citric acid (CPEGC) triblock dendrimers as biocompatible compounds containing G(1), G(2) and G(3) were applied as the drug-delivery systems. Some of the small size molecules and drugs are trapped with the above-synthesized dendrimers. The guest molecules, which are hydrophobic when trapped into the suitable sites of dendrimers, are becoming soluble in aqueous solution. The quantity of trapped molecules and drugs such as 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA), pyridine, mefenamic acid, and diclofenac was measured. The drug/dendrimer complexes remained in room temperature for about 10 months and after this long time they were stable and the drugs were not released. Also, the controlled release of the above-mentioned molecules and drugs in vitro conditions was investigated. The structure definition and controlled release of the molecules and drugs were carried out using different spectroscopy methods.

  11. Application of carbon and hydrogen stable isotope analyses to detect exogenous citric acid in Japanese apricot liqueur.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akamatsu, Fumikazu; Oe, Takaaki; Hashiguchi, Tomokazu; Hisatsune, Yuri; Kawao, Takafumi; Fujii, Tsutomu

    2017-08-01

    Japanese apricot liqueur manufacturers are required to control the quality and authenticity of their liqueur products. Citric acid made from corn is the main acidulant used in commercial liqueurs. In this study, we conducted spiking experiments and carbon and hydrogen stable isotope analyses to detect exogenous citric acid used as an acidulant in Japanese apricot liqueurs. Our results showed that the δ13C values detected exogenous citric acid originating from C4 plants but not from C3 plants. The δ2H values of citric acid decreased as the amount of citric acid added increased, whether the citric acid originated from C3 or C4 plants. Commercial liqueurs with declared added acidulant provided higher δ13C values and lower δ2H values than did authentic liqueurs and commercial liqueurs with no declared added acidulant. Carbon and hydrogen stable isotope analyses are suitable as routine methods for detecting exogenous citric acid in Japanese apricot liqueur. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Response surface optimization of medium components for citric acid production by Aspergillus niger NRRL 567 grown in peat moss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrington, Suzelle; Kim, Jin-Woo

    2008-01-01

    Aspergillus niger NRRL 567 was grown in an inert support material for citric acid production. Optimization of the medium components, including ethanol, methanol, phytate, olive oil and surfactant was carried out using "one-factor-at-a-time" and central composite design (CCD) methods. Optimization using "one-factor-at-a-time" was performed and the supplement of ethanol and methanol between 15 and 30 g/kg dry peat moss (DPM) enhanced citric acid production while higher levels than 30 g/kg DPM had an inhibitory effect on citric acid production at 48 and 72 h of incubation. Based on the results of "one-factor-at-a-time" optimization, phytate, olive oil and methanol were the selected additives to test the effect on citric acid production using CCD. The three variables were identified to have significant effects on citric acid production and the maximum citric acid production of 354.8 g/kg DPM was resulted from the combination of 19 g phytate/kg DPM, 49 g olive oil/kg DPM and 37 g methanol/kg DPM at 120 h. Maximum citric acid production in optimized condition by CCD represented about a 2.7-fold increase compared to that obtained from control before optimization.

  13. Effect of pre-harvest foliar application of citric acid and malic acid on chlorophyll content and post-harvest vase life of Lilium cv. Brunello

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nafiseh eDarandeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Preharvest use of citric acid is a novel method in vase life extension of cut flowers, which is reported on tuberose earlier and confirmed here on lilium. In this research citric acid (0, 0.075, 0.15 percent v/v and malic acid (0, 0.075, 0.15 percent v/v were used together two times during growth period of lilium plants in a randomized factorial design with three replications. The results point out that 0.15% citric acid had increased vase life from 13.1 to 14 days (α=0.05. The interesting finding was the effect of citric acid on bulbil weight, which was decreased from 8.6 gr to 2.9 gr in 0.15% citric acid per cut flower. Malic acid while having no effect on pre-mentioned traits surprisingly increased the chlorophyll content significantly. The interaction effect between citric acid and malic acid on vase life and chlorophyll content proved significant and was evident in results both as antagonistic and synergistic in various traits. In mean comparison of factor-levels, the effect of citric acid on vase-life extension was more prominent increasing it from 11.8 to 14.3 days in treatment with 0.15% citric acid and without malic acid compared to control treatment.

  14. Potential citric acid exposure and toxicity to Hawaiian hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus semotus) associated with Eleutherodactylus frog control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, William C; Witmer, Gary W; Jojola, Susan M; Sin, Hans

    2014-04-01

    We examined potential exposure of Hawaiian hoary bats (Lasiurus cinereus semotus) to citric acid, a minimum risk pesticide registered for control of invasive Eleutherodactylus frog populations. Hoary bats are nocturnal insectivores that roost solitarily in foliage, federally listed as endangered, and are endemic to Hawaii. Oral ingestion during grooming of contaminated fur appears to be the principal route by which these bats might be exposed to citric acid. We made assessments of oral toxicity, citric acid consumption, retention of material on fur, and grooming using big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) as a surrogate species. We evaluated both ground application and aerial application of 16 % solutions of citric acid during frog control operations. Absorbent bat effigies exposed to ground and aerial operational spray applications retained means of 1.54 and 0.02 g, respectively, of dry citric acid, although retention by the effigies was much higher than bat carcasses drenched in citric acid solutions. A high dose delivered orally (2,811 mg/kg) was toxic to the big brown bats and emesis occurred in 1 bat dosed as low as the 759 mg/kg level. No effect was observed with the lower doses examined (≤ 542 mg/kg). Bats sprayed with 5 ml of 16 % (w/w) citric acid solution showed no evidence of intoxication. In field situations, it is unlikely that bats would be sprayed directly or ingest much citric acid retained by fur. Based on our observations, we believe Hawaiian hoary bats to be at very low risk from harmful exposure to a toxic dose of citric acid during frog control operations.

  15. Browning inhibition mechanisms by cysteine, ascorbic acid and citric acid, and identifying PPO-catechol-cysteine reaction products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hussein M; El-Gizawy, Ahmed M; El-Bassiouny, Rawia E I; Saleh, Mahmoud A

    2015-06-01

    The titled compounds were examined as PPO inhibitors and antibrowning agents; their various mechanisms were investigated and discussed. All compounds reduced significantly both the browning process and PPO activity. Browning index gave strong correlation with PPO activity (r(2) = 0.96, n = 19) indicating that the browning process is mainly enzymatic. Ascorbic acid could reduce the formed quinone instantly to the original substrate (catechol) at high concentration (>1.5 %) while at lower concentrations acted as competitive inhibitor (KI = 0.256 ± 0.067 mM). Cysteine, at higher concentrations (≥1.0 %), reacted with the resulted quinone to give a colorless products while at the low concentrations, cysteine worked as competitive inhibitor (KI = 1.113 ± 0.176 mM). Citric acid acted only as PPO non-competitive inhibitor with KI = 2.074 ± 0.363 mM. The products of PPO-catechole-cysteine reaction could be separation and identification by LC-ESI-MS. Results indicated that the product of the enzymatic oxidation of catechol, quinone, undergoes two successive nucleophilic attacks by cysteine thiol group. Cysteine was condensed with the resulted mono and dithiocatechols to form peptide side chains.

  16. Effects of uncoated and citric acid coated cerium oxide nanoparticles, bulk cerium oxide, cerium acetate, and citric acid on tomato plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrios, Ana Cecilia [Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Rico, Cyren M. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Trujillo-Reyes, Jesica [Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Medina-Velo, Illya A. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Peralta-Videa, Jose R. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Environmental Science and Engineering Ph.D. Program, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L., E-mail: jgardea@utep.edu [Department of Chemistry, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Environmental Science and Engineering Ph.D. Program, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 W. University Avenue, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about the physiological and biochemical responses of plants exposed to surface modified nanomaterials. In this study, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants were cultivated for 210 days in potting soil amended with uncoated and citric acid coated cerium oxide nanoparticles (nCeO{sub 2}, CA + nCeO{sub 2}) bulk cerium oxide (bCeO{sub 2}), and cerium acetate (CeAc). Millipore water (MPW), and citric acid (CA) were used as controls. Physiological and biochemical parameters were measured. At 500 mg/kg, both the uncoated and CA + nCeO{sub 2} increased shoot length by ~ 9 and ~ 13%, respectively, while bCeO{sub 2} and CeAc decreased shoot length by ~ 48 and ~ 26%, respectively, compared with MPW (p ≤ 0.05). Total chlorophyll, chlo-a, and chlo-b were significantly increased by CA + nCeO{sub 2} at 250 mg/kg, but reduced by bCeO{sub 2} at 62.5 mg/kg, compared with MPW. At 250 and 500 mg/kg, nCeO{sub 2} increased Ce in roots by 10 and 7 times, compared to CA + nCeO{sub 2}, but none of the treatments affected the Ce concentration in above ground tissues. Neither nCeO{sub 2} nor CA + nCeO{sub 2} affected the homeostasis of nutrient elements in roots, stems, and leaves or catalase and ascorbate peroxidase in leaves. CeAc at 62.5 and 125 mg/kg increased B (81%) and Fe (174%) in roots, while at 250 and 500 mg/kg, increased Ca in stems (84% and 86%, respectively). On the other hand, bCeO{sub 2} at 62.5 increased Zn (152%) but reduced P (80%) in stems. Only nCeO{sub 2} at 62.5 mg/kg produced higher total number of tomatoes, compared with control and the rest of the treatments. The surface coating reduced Ce uptake by roots but did not affect its translocation to the aboveground organs. In addition, there was no clear effect of surface coating on fruit production. To our knowledge, this is the first study comparing the effects of coated and uncoated nCeO{sub 2} on tomato plants. - Highlights: • At 500 mg/kg, coated and bare NPs increased stem length by 13 and 9

  17. Simultaneous production of citric acid and invertase by Yarrowia lipolytica SUC+ transformants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Zbigniew; Walczak, Ewa; Robak, Małgorzata

    2011-07-01

    Simultaneous production of citric acid (CA) and invertase by Yarrowia lipolytica A-101-B56-5 (SUC(+) clone) growing from sucrose, mixture of glucose and fructose, glucose or glycerol was investigated. Among the tested substrates the highest concentration of CA was reached from glycerol (57.15 g/L) with high yield (Y(CA/S)=0.6g/g). When sucrose was used, comparable amount of CA was secreted (45 g/L) with slightly higher yield (Y(CA/S)=0.643 g/g). In all cultures amount of isocitrate (ICA) was below 2% of total citrates. Considering invertase production, the best carbon source appeared to be sucrose (72380 U/L). The highest yield of CA and invertase biosynthesis calculated for 1g of biomass was obtained for cells growing from glycerol (9.9 g/g and 4325 U/g, respectively). Concentrates of extra- and intracellular invertase of the highest activity were obtained from sucrose as substrate (0.5 and 1.8 × 10(6)U/L, respectively). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Gibberellic Acid Production by Different Fermentation Systems Using Citric Pulp as Substrate/Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana de Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gibberellic acid (GA3 is an important phytohormone, a member of gibberellins family, which acts as a promoter and regulator of plant growth. This study aimed to evaluate GA3 production by Fusarium moniliforme LPB03 and Gibberella fujikuroi LPB06 using different techniques of fermentation, solid state fermentation (SSF, submerged fermentation (SmF, and semisolid state fermentation (SSSF, and different types of bioreactors. In all techniques, citric pulp (CP, a subproduct obtained from the extraction of orange juice, was employed as the substrate/support. GA3 production by SSF reached 7.60 g kg−1 and 7.34 g kg−1 in Erlenmeyer flasks and column bioreactors, respectively. For SmF, the highest concentration of GA3 obtained was 236.00 mg L−1 in Erlenmeyer flasks, 273.00 mg L−1 in a 10 L stirred tank reactor (STR, and 203.00 mg L−1 in a 1.5 L bubble column reactor (BCR. SSSF was conducted with a CP suspension. In this case, GA3 concentration reached 331.00 mg L−1 in Erlenmeyer flasks and 208 mg L−1 in a BCR. The choice of the fermentation technique is undoubtedly linked to the characteristics and productivity of each process. The methods studied are inexpensive and were found to produce good proportions of GA3, making them suitable for several applications.

  19. Citric acid production by Aspergillus niger van. Tieghem MTCC 281 using waste apple pomace as a substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Verma, Rachna; Bhalla, T C

    2010-08-01

    A solid state fermentation process was tried for the production of citric acid from apple pomace left after juice extraction using Aspergillus niger van. Tieghem MTCC 281 spores as inoculum (36.8 × 10(4) spores/100 g of pomace). The yield of citric acid was optimized by varying the amount of methanol (1-5% v/w), temperature (25-35°C) and time of incubation (1-7 days) for fermentation process. Optimum yield of citric acid (4.6 g/100 g of pomace) was recorded with 4% (v/w) methanol after 5 days of incubation at 30°C.

  20. Citric Acid Injections: An Accessible and Efficient Method for Controlling Outbreaks of the Crown-of-Thorns Starfish Acanthaster cf. solaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander C. E. Buck

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Outbreaks of the crown-of-thorns starfish (Acanthaster cf. solaris, COTS are one of the primary causes of coral decline in the Indo-Pacific region. Effective methods to control COTS outbreaks may therefore be one of the most direct and immediate ways to reduce coral loss. However, the cost and logistical challenges associated with current control methods have undermined the effectiveness of many control efforts. In this study, we tested the feasibility of using powdered citric acid, which is widely available and low-cost, as an injection chemical for COTS control. We tested what combination of concentration, number of injections, volume, and water type were most efficient at killing COTS. All COTS injected in two or four sites died, irrespectively of the concentration of citric acid used, while single injections failed at reaching 100% mortality. The fastest combination was the injection of 150 g·L−1 citric acid solution in four injection sites (5 mL per site, which killed the starfish in 26.4 ± 4 h. These results suggest that injections of powdered citric acid are an effective, economical, and widely available alternative to current COTS control methods.

  1. Use of acetic and citric acids to control Salmonella Typhimurium in tahini (sesame paste).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nabulsi, Anas A; Olaimat, Amin N; Osaili, Tareq M; Shaker, Reyad R; Zein Elabedeen, Noor; Jaradat, Ziad W; Abushelaibi, Aisha; Holley, Richard A

    2014-09-01

    Since tahini and its products have been linked to Salmonella illness outbreaks and product recalls in recent years, this study assessed the ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to survive or grow in commercial tahini and when hydrated (10% w/v in water), treated with 0.1%-0.5% acetic or citric acids, and stored at 37, 21 and 10 °C for 28 d. S. Typhimurium survived in commercial tahini up to 28 d but was reduced in numbers from 1.7 to 3.3 log10 CFU/ml. However, in the moist or hydrated tahini, significant growth of S. Typhimurium occurred at the tested temperatures. Acetic and citric acids at ≤0.5% reduced S. Typhimurium by 2.7-4.8 log10 CFU/ml and 2.5-3.8 log10 CFU/ml, respectively, in commercial tahini at 28 d. In hydrated tahini the organic acids were more effective. S. Typhimurium cells were not detected in the presence of 0.5% acetic acid after 7 d or with 0.5% citric acid after 21 d at the tested temperatures. The ability of S. Typhimurium to grow or survive in commercial tahini and products containing hydrated tahini may contribute to salmonellosis outbreaks; however, use of acetic and citric acids in ready-to-eat foods prepared from tahini can significantly minimize the risk associated with this pathogen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Application of methanol and sweet potato vine hydrolysate as enhancers of citric acid production by Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Daobing; Shi, Yanke; Wang, Qun; Zhang, Xin; Zhao, Yuhua

    2017-01-01

    Agricultural waste is as an alternative low-cost carbon source or beneficial additives which catch most people's eyes. In addition, methanol and sweet potato vine hydrolysate (SVH) have been reported as the efficient enhancers of fermentation according to some reports. The objective of the present study was to confirm SVH as an efficient additive in CA production and explore the synergistic effects of methanol and SVH in fermentation reactions. The optimal fermentation conditions resulted in a maximum citric acid concentration of 3.729 g/L. The final citric acid concentration under the optimized conditions was increased by 3.6-fold over the original conditions, 0.49-fold over the optimized conditions without methanol, and 1.8-fold over the optimized conditions in the absence of SVH. Kinetic analysis showed that Qp, Yp/s, and Yx/s in the optimized systems were significantly improved compared with those obtained in the absence of methanol or SVH. Further, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that methanol stress promoted the formation of conidiophores, while SVH could neutralize the effect and prolong Aspergillus niger vegetative growth. Cell viability analysis also showed that SVH might eliminate the harmful effects of methanol and enhance cell membrane integrity. SVH was a superior additive for organic acid fermentation, and the combination of methanol and SVH displayed a significant synergistic effect. The research provides a preliminary theoretical basis for SVH practical application in the fermentation industry.

  3. BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES OF CITRIC ACID PRODUCTION BY FERMENTATION FROM SUGAR SUBSTRATES IN CUBA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Pérez Navarro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A proposal for opportunities of citric acid production in Cuba, using sources of sugar substrates such as refined sugar, molasses and whey, by submerged fermentation with Aspergillus niger, where a technology is established from the selected substrate which is provided and the microorganism used. This is a demanding process in terms of investment costs and operation where the best combinations of productivity and cost are achieved with molasses followed by refined sugar and whey. For the selected substrate, the mass and energy balance in each of the steps in the process of obtaining citric acid for different productive capacities of citric acid was made and the minimum economic size of 2.5 t / day was determined. A production capacity of 8 t / day of granulated acid (2 640 t / a, with estimated total investment of $ 9,068,713, NPV = $ 1,401,561, IRR = 27% and DPP = 3 years was selected. The project is resistant to the rising price of raw materials and the cost of electricity and is favored when the process is integrated into a sugar mill cogeneration, while it is sensitive to a reduction in the selling price of the product.

  4. An Experimental Study on Citric Acid Production by Aspergillus niger Using Gelidiella acerosa as a Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Thangavelu; Kalaiselvam, Murugaiyan

    2011-07-01

    Citric acid (CA) is the most important commercial product which is produced by using various sugar substrates in the terrestrial environment. The present study made an attempt to produce citric acid by the fungal strain Aspergillus niger from red seaweed Gelidiella acerosa is the best alternative to sugar substrate in the marine environment. In this study three types of production media were prepared including control (sucrose) by following standard fermentation conditions. The acid production was indicated by the reduction of pH levels. The control medium gave the highest yield of 80 g/l at pH 1.5 and the medium containing crude seaweed powder and other compositions gave the yield of 30 g/l at pH 3.5 whereas the medium containing crude seaweed and 10% sucrose gave the yield of 50 g/l at pH 3.0. When calculating the benefit cost ratio, crude seaweed powder and 10% sucrose yielded 50 g of citric acid at the lower cost of Rs. 35, whereas the other two media gave the yield of 80 and 30 g respectively with the cost of Rs. 77 and 28. In economic point of view, the medium containing seaweed and 10% sucrose showed more benefit with lower cost.

  5. Remediation of soils contaminated with chromium using citric and hydrochloric acids: the role of chromium fractionation in chromium leaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shu-Fen; Huang, Chin-Yuan; Tu, Yao-Ting

    2011-01-01

    Acid washing is a common method for soil remediation, but is not always efficient for chromium-contaminated soil. Both soil particle size and the forms of chromium existing in the soil affect the efficiency of soil washing. Laboratory batch and column dissolution experiments were conducted to determine the efficiencies of citric and hydrochloric acids as agents to extract chromium from soils contaminated with chromium. The effects of soil particle size and chromium fractionation on Cr leaching were also investigated. About 90% of chromium in the studied soil existed either in residual form or bound to iron and manganese oxides, and Cr fraction distributions were similar for all soil particle sizes. Almost all exchangeable and carbonate-bound chromium was removed by washing once with 0.5 M HCl, whereas organic chromium was more effectively removed by washing with citric acid rather than with HCl solution of the same concentration. For chromium fractions that were either bound to Fe-Mn oxides or existed as residual forms, the efficiencies of acid washing were usually 20% or less, except for 0.5 M HCl solution, which had much higher efficiencies. Separation of the soil sample by particle size before the separate washing of the soil fractions had little improvement on the chromium removal.

  6. Citric Acid and Quinine Share Perceived Chemosensory Features Making Oral Discrimination Difficult in C57BL/6J Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treesukosol, Yada; Mathes, Clare M.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence in the literature shows that in rodents, some taste-responsive neurons respond to both quinine and acid stimuli. Also, under certain circumstances, rodents display some degree of difficulty in discriminating quinine and acid stimuli. Here, C57BL/6J mice were trained and tested in a 2-response operant discrimination task. Mice had severe difficulty discriminating citric acid from quinine and 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) with performance slightly, but significantly, above chance. In contrast, mice were able to competently discriminate sucrose from citric acid, NaCl, quinine, and PROP. In another experiment, mice that were conditioned to avoid quinine by pairings with LiCl injections subsequently suppressed licking responses to quinine and citric acid but not to NaCl or sucrose in a brief-access test, relative to NaCl-injected control animals. However, mice that were conditioned to avoid citric acid did not display cross-generalization to quinine. These mice significantly suppressed licking only to citric acid, and to a much lesser extent NaCl, compared with controls. Collectively, the findings from these experiments suggest that in mice, citric acid and quinine share chemosensory features making discrimination difficult but are not perceptually identical. PMID:21421543

  7. Properties and potential medical applications of regenerated casein fibers crosslinked with citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yiqi; Reddy, Narendra

    2012-01-01

    Regenerated protein fibers developed from casein using alkaline solutions and crosslinked with citric acid have good tensile properties and water stability but were cytotoxic. Casein is obtained as a byproduct during skim milk production but has limited industrial applications. In this research, casein was dissolved using alkaline solutions and the effects of fiber formation conditions on the tensile properties was studied before and after crosslinking with citric acid. Crosslinked casein fibers had tensile strength as high as 110 MPa and breaking elongation of 13.6%. The fibers were also stable in 90°C water between pH 3 and 9 but were hydrolyzed at pH 11. Casein was cytotoxic and did not support the attachment and growth of mouse fibroblasts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Facile production of chitin from crab shells using ionic liquid and citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setoguchi, Tatsuya; Kato, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Kazuya; Kadokawa, Jun-ichi

    2012-04-01

    Facile production of chitin from crab shells was performed by direct extraction using an ionic liquid, 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide (AMIMBr), followed by demineralization using citric acid. First, dried crab shells were treated with AMIMBr at elevated temperatures to extract chitin. Supernatants separated by centrifugation were then subjected to a chelating treatment with an aqueous solution of citric acid to achieve demineralization. The precipitated extracts were filtered and dried. The isolated material was subjected to X-ray diffraction, IR, (1)H NMR, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and thermal gravimetric analysis; the results indicated the structure of chitin. On the basis of the IR spectra, the degree of deacetylation in the samples obtained was calculated to be <7%. Furthermore, the protein content was <0.1% and the M(w) values were 0.7-2.2×10(5). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A Biodegradable Thermoset Polymer Made by Esterification of Citric Acid and Glycerol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, Jeffrey M.; Urbanski, Richard; Weinstock, Allison K.; Iwig, David F.; Mathers, Robert T.; von Recum, Horst

    2014-01-01

    A new biomaterial, a degradable thermoset polymer, was made from simple, economical, biocompatable monomers without the need for a catalyst. Glycerol and citric acid, non-toxic and renewable reagents, were crosslinked by a melt polymerization reaction at temperatures from 90-150°C. Consistent with a condensation reaction, water was determined to be the primary byproduct. The amount of crosslinking was controlled by the reaction conditions, including temperature, reaction time, and ratio between glycerol and citric acid. Also, the amount of crosslinking was inversely proportional to the rate of degradation. As a proof-of-principle for drug delivery applications, gentamicin, an antibiotic, was incorporated into the polymer with preliminary evaluations of antimicrobial activity. The polymers incorporating gentamicin had significantly better bacteria clearing of Staphylococcus aureus compared to non-gentamicin gels for up to nine days. PMID:23737239

  10. The citric acid-modified, enzyme-resistant dextrin from potato starch as a potential prebiotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliżewska, Katarzyna

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, enzyme-resistant dextrin, prepared by heating of potato starch in the presence of hydrochloric (0.1% dsb) and citric (0.1% dsb) acid at 130ºC for 3 h (CA-dextrin), was tested as a source of carbon for probiotic lactobacilli and bifidobacteria cultured with intestinal bacteria isolated from feces of three healthy 70-year old volunteers. The dynamics of growth of bacterial monocultures in broth containing citric acid (CA)-modified dextrin were estimated. It was also investigated whether lactobacilli and bifidobacteria cultured with intestinal bacteria in the presence of resistant dextrin would be able to dominate the intestinal isolates. Prebiotic fermentation of resistant dextrin was analyzed using prebiotic index (PI). In co-cultures of intestinal and probiotic bacteria, the environment was found to be dominated by the probiotic strains of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus, which is a beneficial effect.

  11. Decolorization and chemical regeneration of granular activated carbon used in citric acid refining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Sun

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Citric acid fermentation (CAF liquor decolorization by granular activated carbon (GAC was studied and an improved chemical regeneration method of the exhausted GAC by the color of CAF liquor was investigated. The effects of the GAC dosage, time and temperature on the decoloring efficiency (DE % were studied. The DE % of the original GAC was 91 %. The regeneration efficiency (RE % using chemical regents was 104 % of the original GAC. Hot water as cheap reagent was found to be much helpful to the regeneration efficiency. Using oxidant and surfactant in addition to just using NaOH solution can recover 10 % more adsorption capacity of renewed GAC. The adding dosage of oxidant is good at 3 % of exhausted GAC weight; that of surfactant is good at 0.1 %. Comparing with steam regeneration method, high regeneration yield (> 95 % of chemical method was an attractive economic factor. The results of this investigation can be as helpful reference for citric acid manufacturer expanding profits.

  12. Evaluation of environmental impacts of citric acid and glycerol outdoor softwood treatment : case-study

    OpenAIRE

    Essoua Essoua, Gatien Géraud; Blanchet, Pierre; Landry, Véronic; Beauregard,Robert; Ben Amor, Mourad

    2017-01-01

    Over the last few decades, wood modification has been performed to improve wood product technical performance. Using renewable based chemicals for wood modification is an innovative alternative to the non-renewable petrochemicals commonly used. However, it should be kept in mind that having the raw material from renewable sources does not guarantee zero environmental impacts. In this study, the treatment considered uses citric acid and glycerol mixture; two chemical products derived from rene...

  13. Scanning Electron Microscopic Evaluation of Root Canal Irrigation with Saline, Sodium Hypochlorite, and Citric Acid,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-12-01

    endodontic techniques; citric acid for root canal irrigation 4410,ABSTACgmf --,-,m- ,-rms n roc"---’This Study used a scanning electron microscope and a...wall is instrumented during canal preparation and that the smeared layer seems to be found only where endodontic instruments have scraped the surface...between the extremes. It was also decided to use a magnification of 75X to evaluate the superficial debris and 800X to evaluate the smeared layer

  14. Application of statistical experimental designs for the optimization of medium constituents for the production of citric acid from pineapple waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imandi, Sarat Babu; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Somalanka, Subba Rao; Bandaru, Sita Ramalakshmi; Garapati, Hanumantha Rao

    2008-07-01

    Statistical experimental designs were applied for the optimization of medium constituents for citric acid production by Yarrowia lipolytica NCIM 3589 in solid state fermentation (SSF) using pineapple waste as the sole substrate. Using Plackett-Burman design, yeast extract, moisture content of the substrate, KH(2)PO(4) and Na(2)HPO(4) were identified as significant variables which highly influenced citric acid production and these variables were subsequently optimized using a central composite design (CCD). The optimum conditions were found to be yeast extract 0.34 (%w/w), moisture content of the substrate 70.71 (%), KH(2)PO(4) 0.64 (%w/w) and Na(2)HPO(4) 0.69 (%w/w). Citric acid production at these optimum conditions was 202.35 g/kg ds (g citric acid produced/kg of dried pineapple waste as substrate).

  15. Effect of phenolic compounds on the co‐metabolism of citric acid and sugars by Oenococcus oeni from wine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rozès, N; Arola, L; Bordons, A

    2003-01-01

    .... Fifty milligrams per litre or more of phenolic compounds stimulated bacterial growth. Oenococcus oeni seemed to use citric acid and trehalose, if they were present, before glucose and fructose...

  16. Effects of citric Acid and desensitizing agent application on nonfluorosed and fluorosed dentin: an in vitro sem study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Neha, Mahajan; Vandana, Laxman K

    2015-01-01

    .... The purpose of the present study was to compare and evaluate the dentinal tubular changes in fluorosed and nonfluorosed teeth subsequent to the application of citric acid,strontium acetate based sodium fluoride (SAF...

  17. Synergy of a combination of nisin and citric acid against Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingchen; Zhen, Zhen; Wang, Xinyang; Guo, Na

    2017-12-01

    Food-borne diseases caused by pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes, have long attracted attention globally from researchers, food industries, and food safety authorities. Nisin (NS) is the only bacteriocin used worldwide as a generally recognised as safe (GRAS) food preservative, while citric acid (CA) has an unrestricted use in foods since it has GRAS status. In this study, synergistic interactions of NS combined with CA against S. aureus and L. monocytogenes were studied by the chequerboard microdilution method, with fractional inhibitory concentration index values ranging from 0.25 to 0.375 and 0.19 to 0.375, respectively. The positive interactions were verified by time-kill studies in pasteurised milk and disk diffusion assays. The mechanism of the synergistic antibacterial of NS and CA is proposed following SEM analysis and the determination of release of cell constituents. These results suggest that the cell walls and membrane are the probable main targets of this antimicrobial combination. These findings indicated that the combination of NS and CA not only could be used as a new promising naturally sourced food preservative, but may also reduce the problem of bacterial resistance.

  18. Photocatalytic hydrogen production from biomass-derived compounds: a case study of citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaim, Ayad F; Kandiel, Tarek A; Dillert, Ralf; Bahnemann, Detlef W

    2016-11-01

    Highly crystalline anatase TiO2 nanoparticles with high BET surface area have been synthesized by thermal hydrolysis of titanium(IV) bis(ammoniumlactato) dihydroxide aqueous solutions. The photocatalytic H2 production from aqueous citric acid (CA) solutions over Pt-loaded TiO2 has been investigated under different experimental conditions, that is, different CA concentration, temperature, light intensity, and pH of Pt/TiO2 suspension. For comparison, the photocatalytic dehydrogenation of triethanolamine (TEA) has also been investigated. The highest H2 production rates were obtained at pH 3 and 9 for CA and TEA, respectively. This behavior is readily explained by the adsorption characteristic of the employed reagent on the surface of the charged TiO2. The effect of the photocatalyst loading and the light intensity on the H2 production rate showed the same behavior in the case of CA and TEA evincing that these parameters are catalyst dependent. The apparent activation energies have been determined to be 13.5 ± 1.8 and 14.7 ± 1.6 kJ mol(-1) for CA and TEA, respectively, indicating the existence of an activation energy barrier in a photocatalytic process which can be attributed to the desorption of adsorbed products.

  19. Comparative bioavailability studies of citric acid and malonic acid based aspirin effervescent tablets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anju Gauniya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present investigation is aimed at comparing the pharmacokinetic profile (Bioavailability of aspirin in tablet formulations, which were prepared by using different effervescent excipients such as citric acid and malonic acid. Materials and Methods: The relative bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of citric acid based aspirin effervescent tablet (Product A and malonic acid based aspirin effervescent tablet (Product B formulations were evaluated for an in-vitro dissolution study and in-vivo bioavailability study, in 10 normal healthy rabbits. The study utilized a randomized, crossover design with a one-week washout period between doses. Blood samples were collected at 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 24 hours following a 100 mg/kg dose. Plasma samples were assayed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. T max , C max , AUC 0-24 , AUC 0- ∞, MRT, K a, and relative bioavailability were estimated using the traditional pharmacokinetic methods and were compared by using the paired t-test. Result: In the present study, Products A and B showed their T max , C max , AUC 0-24 , AUC 0- ∞, MRT, and K a values as 2.5 h, 2589 ± 54.79 ng/ml, 9623 ± 112.87 ng.h/ml, 9586 ± 126.22 ng.h/ml, 3.6 ± 0.10 h, and 0.3698 ± 0.003 h -1 for Product A and 3.0 h, 2054 ± 55.79 ng/ml, 9637 ± 132.87 ng.h/ml, 9870 ± 129.22 ng.h/ml, 4.76 ± 0.10 h, and 0.3812 ± 0.002 h -1 for Product B, respectively. Conclusion: The results of the paired t-test of pharmacokinetics data showed that there was no significant difference between Products A and B. From both the in vitro dissolution studies and in vivo bioavailability studies it was concluded that products A and B had similar bioavailability.

  20. Comparative bioavailability studies of citric acid and malonic acid based aspirin effervescent tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauniya, Anju; Das, Sanjita; Mallick, Subrata; Basu, S P

    2010-04-01

    The present investigation is aimed at comparing the pharmacokinetic profile (Bioavailability) of aspirin in tablet formulations, which were prepared by using different effervescent excipients such as citric acid and malonic acid. The relative bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of citric acid based aspirin effervescent tablet (Product A) and malonic acid based aspirin effervescent tablet (Product B) formulations were evaluated for an in-vitro dissolution study and in-vivo bioavailability study, in 10 normal healthy rabbits. The study utilized a randomized, crossover design with a one-week washout period between doses. Blood samples were collected at 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12 and 24 hours following a 100 mg/kg dose. Plasma samples were assayed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography. T(max), C(max), AUC(0-24), AUC(0- ∞,) MRT, K(a,) and relative bioavailability were estimated using the traditional pharmacokinetic methods and were compared by using the paired t-test. In the present study, Products A and B showed their T(max), C(max), AUC(0-24), AUC(0- ∞,) MRT, and K(a) values as 2.5 h, 2589 ± 54.79 ng/ml, 9623 ± 112.87 ng.h/ml, 9586 ± 126.22 ng.h/ml, 3.6 ± 0.10 h, and 0.3698 ± 0.003 h (-1) for Product A and 3.0 h, 2054 ± 55.79 ng/ml, 9637 ± 132.87 ng.h/ml, 9870 ± 129.22 ng.h/ml, 4.76 ± 0.10 h, and 0.3812 ± 0.002 h (-1) for Product B, respectively. The results of the paired t-test of pharmacokinetics data showed that there was no significant difference between Products A and B. From both the in vitro dissolution studies and in vivo bioavailability studies it was concluded that products A and B had similar bioavailability.

  1. Structure elucidation and quantification of impurities formed between 6-aminocaproic acid and the excipients citric acid and sorbitol in an oral solution using high-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie V; Cornett, Claus; Nyberg, Nils

    2015-01-01

    and cyclized 6-aminocaproic acid, i.e., caprolactam. No reaction products between d-sorbitol and 6-aminocaproic acid could be observed. 3-Hydroxy-3,4-dicarboxy-butanamide-N-hexanoic acid, dimer and caprolactam were also observed after storage at 20 °C for 3 months. The findings imply that an oral solution of 6......Concentrated solutions containing 6-aminocaproic acid and the excipients citric acid and sorbitol have been studied at temperatures of 50 °C, 60 °C, 70 °C and 80 °C as well as at 20 °C. It has previously been reported that the commonly employed citric acid is a reactive excipient......, and it is therefore important to thoroughly investigate a possible reaction between 6-aminocaproic acid and citric acid. The current study revealed the formation of 3-hydroxy-3,4-dicarboxy-butanamide-N-hexanoic acid between 6-aminocaproic acid and citric acid by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and nuclear...

  2. Cytotoxicity test of 40, 50 and 60% citric acid as dentin conditioner by using MTT assay on culture cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Khoswanto

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Open dentin is always covered by smear layer, therefore before restoration is performed, cavity or tooth which has been prepared should be clean from dirt. The researchers suggested that clean dentin surface would reach effective adhesion between resin and tooth structure, therefore dentin conditioner like citric acid was used to reach the condition. Even though citric acid is not strong acid but it can be very erosive to oral mucous. Several requirements should be fulfilled for dental product such as non toxic, non irritant, biocompatible and should not have negative effect against local, systemic or biological environment. Cytotoxicity test was apart of biomaterial evaluation and needed for standard screening. Purpose: This study was to know the cytotoxicity of 40, 50, 60% citric acid as dentin conditioner using MTT assay. Method: This study is an experimental research using the Post-Test Only Control Group Design. Six samples of each 40, 50 and 60% citric acid for citotoxicity test using MTT assay. The density of optic formazan indicated the number of living cells. All data were statistically analyzed by one way ANOVA. Result: The percentage of living cells in 40, 50 and 60% citric acid were 95.14%, 93.42% and 93.14%. Conclusion: Citric acid is non toxic and safe to be used as dentine conditioner.

  3. Inactivation of Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus by Citric Acid and Sodium Carbonate with Deicers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jang-Kwan; You, Su-Hwa; Kim, Su-Mi; Tark, Dongseob; Lee, Hyang-Sim; Ko, Young-Joon; Seo, Min-Goo; Park, Jong-Hyeon; Kim, Byounghan

    2015-01-01

    Three out of five outbreaks of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) since 2010 in the Republic of Korea have occurred in the winter. At the freezing temperatures, it was impossible to spray disinfectant on the surfaces of vehicles, roads, and farm premises because the disinfectant would be frozen shortly after discharge and the surfaces of the roads or machines would become slippery in cold weather. In this study, we added chemical deicers (ethylene glycol, propylene glycol, sodium chloride, calcium chloride, ethyl alcohol, and commercial windshield washer fluid) to keep disinfectants (0.2% citric acid and 4% sodium carbonate) from freezing, and we tested their virucidal efficacies under simulated cold temperatures in a tube. The 0.2% citric acid could reduce the virus titer 4 logs at −20°C with all the deicers. On the other hand, 4% sodium carbonate showed little virucidal activity at −20°C within 30 min, although it resisted being frozen with the function of the deicers. In conclusion, for the winter season, we may recommend the use of citric acid (>0.2%) diluted in 30% ethyl alcohol or 25% sodium chloride solvent, depending on its purpose. PMID:26319879

  4. Saliva stimulation with glycerine and citric acid does not affect salivary cortisol levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorsson, Camilla; Dahlqvist, Per; Nilsson, Leif; Naredi, Silvana

    2014-08-01

    In critically ill patients with hypotension, who respond poorly to fluids and vasoactive drugs, cortisol insufficiency may be suspected. In serum over 90% of cortisol is protein-bound, thus routine measures of total serum cortisol may yield 'false lows' due to hypoproteinaemia. Thus, the occurrence of cortisol insufficiency could be overestimated in critically ill patients. Salivary cortisol can be used as a surrogate for free serum cortisol, but in critically ill patients saliva production is decreased, and insufficient volume of saliva for analysis is a common problem. The aim of this study was to investigate if a cotton-tipped applicator with glycerine and citric acid could be used for saliva stimulation without affecting salivary cortisol levels. Prospective, observational study. Thirty-six volunteers (six males, 30 females), age 49 ± 9 years, without known oral mucus membrane rupture in the mouth. Forty-two pairs of saliva samples (22 paired morning samples, 20 paired evening samples) were obtained before and after saliva stimulation with glycerine and citric acid. Salivary cortisol was analysed using Spectria Cortisol RIA (Orion Diagnostica, Finland). The paired samples correlated significantly (P citric acid did not significantly influence salivary cortisol levels in healthy volunteers. This indicates that salivary cortisol measurement after saliva stimulation may be a useful complement when evaluating cortisol status in critically ill patients. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The Humidity Dependence of N2O5 Uptake to Citric Acid Aerosol Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzinic, G.; Bartels-Rausch, T.; Tuerler, A.; Ammann, M.

    2013-12-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide is a significant reactive intermediate in the night time chemistry of nitrogen oxides. Depending on atmospheric conditions it can act either as a NO3 radical reservoir or as a major NOx sink by heterogeneous hydrolysis on aerosol surfaces. As such, it can influence tropospheric ozone production and therefore the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. The heterogeneous loss of N2O5 to aerosol particles has remained uncertain, and reconciling lab and field data has demonstrated some gaps in our understanding of the detailed mechanism. We used the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N to study N2O5 uptake kinetics on aerosol particles in an aerosol flow reactor at ambient pressure, temperature and relative humidity. Citric acid, representing strongly oxidized polyfunctional organic compounds in atmospheric aerosols, has been chosen as a proxy due to its well established physical properties. Aerosol uptake measurements were performed with citric acid aerosols in a humidity range of 15-75 % RH, within which the uptake coefficient varies between about 0.001 and about 0.02. Taking into account the well established hygroscopic properties of citric acid, we interpret uptake in terms of disproportionation of N2O5 into nitrate ion and nitronium ion and reaction of the latter with liquid water.

  6. Isolation of lipase and citric acid producing yeasts from agro-industrial wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafakher, Ladan; Mirbagheri, Maryam; Darvishi, Farshad; Nahvi, Iraj; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Hamid; Emtiazi, Giti

    2010-09-30

    Production of agro-industrial waste pollutants has become a major problem for many industries. However, agro-industrial wastes also can provide alternative substrates for industry and their utilization in this manner may help solve pollution problems. The aim of this study was to isolate yeasts from wastewater treatment plants that could be used to remove pollutants such as glycerol, paraffin and crude oil from the agro-industrial wastewater. In this study a total of 300 yeast isolates were obtained from samples of agro-industrial wastes, and two strains (M1 and M2) were investigated for their ability to produce valuable products such as lipase and citric acid. Identification tests showed that these isolates belonged to the species Yarrowia lipolytica. The Y. lipolytica M1 and M2 strains produced maximum levels of lipase (11 and 8.3 U/ml, respectively) on olive oil, and high levels of citric acid (27 and 8 g/l, respectively) on citric acid fermentation medium. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Will mouth wash solutions of water, salt, sodiumbicarbonate or citric acid improve upper gastrointestinal symptoms in chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manley, Karen Joy

    2017-03-01

    Uraemic symptoms including taste changes, nausea and dry retching are common in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Taste buds detect five basic tastes: sweet, salty, sour, umami and bitter. Saliva in CKD usually has increased concentrations of urea, sodium, potassium, phosphate and higher pH levels. Genetic sensitivities to the bitter taste, with the changes in saliva can cause taste changes and impact uraemic symptoms. The aim of this study was to assess if mouth wash solutions of water, salt, sodium bicarbonate or citric acid improves upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in CKD patients. An interventional crossover study with 42 CKD patients (21 men, 21 women) complaining of upper GI symptoms were recruited. Subjects completed a questionnaire to assess symptoms and tested for genetic taste sensitivities. Saliva samples were analysed. Mouth rinse solutions of salt, bicarbonate, citric acid and de-ionised water were trialled in randomized order for patient reaction and symptom improvement. All 42 patients experienced anorexia, 39 (93%) reported taste changes, 27 (48%) nausea and 27 (48%) dry retching. All solutions improved symptoms in some patients. Sodium bicarbonate (P = 0.005) gave the greatest improvement in mouth feel and symptom control compared with the least favoured citric acid solution. Sixty-six percent of patients found sodium bicarbonate beneficial with 40% preference over other solutions. Simple mouthwashes can be used to relieve or eliminate some uraemic symptoms. Rinsing the mouth with a sodium bicarbonate solution cleanses receptors on taste buds and may alter mouth pH thereby reducing some upper GI symptoms that CKD patients can experience. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  8. Pd/C Synthesized with Citric Acid: An Efficient Catalyst for Hydrogen Generation from Formic Acid/Sodium Formate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Li; Yan, Jun-Min; Wang, Hong-Li; Ping, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A highly efficient hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate aqueous solution catalyzed by in situ synthesized Pd/C with citric acid has been successfully achieved at room temperature. Interestingly, the presence of citric acid during the formation and growth of the Pd nanoparticles on carbon can drastically enhance the catalytic property of the resulted Pd/C, on which the conversion and turnover frequency for decomposition of formic acid/sodium formate system can reach the highest values ever reported of 85% within 160 min and 64 mol H2 mol−1 catalyst h−1, respectively, at room temperature. The present simple, low cost, but highly efficient CO-free hydrogen generation system at room temperature is believed to greatly promote the practical application of formic acid system on fuel cells. PMID:22953041

  9. Pd/C Synthesized with Citric Acid: An Efficient Catalyst for Hydrogen Generation from Formic Acid/Sodium Formate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Li; Yan, Jun-Min; Wang, Hong-Li; Ping, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2012-08-01

    A highly efficient hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate aqueous solution catalyzed by in situ synthesized Pd/C with citric acid has been successfully achieved at room temperature. Interestingly, the presence of citric acid during the formation and growth of the Pd nanoparticles on carbon can drastically enhance the catalytic property of the resulted Pd/C, on which the conversion and turnover frequency for decomposition of formic acid/sodium formate system can reach the highest values ever reported of 85% within 160 min and 64 mol H2 mol-1 catalyst h-1, respectively, at room temperature. The present simple, low cost, but highly efficient CO-free hydrogen generation system at room temperature is believed to greatly promote the practical application of formic acid system on fuel cells.

  10. Optimization of date syrup for enhancement of the production of citric acid using immobilized cells of Aspergillus niger

    OpenAIRE

    Mostafa, Yasser S.; Alamri, Saad A.

    2012-01-01

    Date syrup as an economical source of carbohydrates and immobilized Aspergillus niger J4, which was entrapped in calcium alginate pellets, were employed for enhancing the production of citric acid. Maximum production was achieved by pre-treating date syrup with 1.5% tricalcium phosphate to remove heavy metals. The production of citric acid using a pretreated medium was 38.87% higher than an untreated one that consumed sugar. The appropriate presence of nitrogen, phosphate and magnesium appear...

  11. Improvement of production of citric acid from oil palm empty fruit bunches: optimization of media by statistical experimental designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Md Niamul; Alam, Md Zahangir; Muyibi, Suleyman A; Jamal, Parveen; Abdullah-Al-Mamun

    2009-06-01

    A sequential optimization based on statistical design and one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT) method was employed to optimize the media constituents for the improvement of citric acid production from oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) through solid state bioconversion using Aspergillus niger IBO-103MNB. The results obtained from the Plackett-Burman design indicated that the co-substrate (sucrose), stimulator (methanol) and minerals (Zn, Cu, Mn and Mg) were found to be the major factors for further optimization. Based on the OFAT method, the selected medium constituents and inoculum concentration were optimized by the central composite design (CCD) under the response surface methodology (RSM). The statistical analysis showed that the optimum media containing 6.4% (w/w) of sucrose, 9% (v/w) of minerals and 15.5% (v/w) of inoculum gave the maximum production of citric acid (337.94 g/kg of dry EFB). The analysis showed that sucrose (pcitric acid production.

  12. Phosphate recovery through struvite-family crystals precipitated in the presence of citric acid: mineralogical phase and morphology evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perwitasari, D S; Edahwati, L; Sutiyono, S; Muryanto, S; Jamari, J; Bayuseno, A P

    2017-11-01

    Precipitation strategy of struvite-family crystals is presented in this paper to recover phosphate and potassium from a synthetic wastewater in the presence of citric acid at elevated temperature. The crystal-forming solutions were prepared from crystals of MgCl2 and NH4H2PO4 with a molar ratio of 1:1:1 for Mg(+2), [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text], and the citric acid (C6H8O7) was prepared (1.00 and 20.00 ppm) from citric acid crystals. The Rietveld analysis of X-ray powder diffraction pattern confirmed a mixed product of struvite, struvite-(K), and newberyite crystallized at 30°C in the absence of citric acid. In the presence of citric acid at 30° and 40°C, an abundance of struvite and struvite-(K) were observed. A minute impurity of sylvite and potassium peroxide was unexpectedly found in certain precipitates. The crystal solids have irregular flake-shaped morphology, as shown by scanning electron microscopy micrograph. All parameters (citric acid, temperature, pH, Mg/P, and N/P) were deliberately arranged to control struvite-family crystals precipitation.

  13. Comparison of citric acid production by solid-state fermentation in flask, column, tray, and drum bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberghe, Luciana P S; Soccol, Carlos R; Prado, F C; Pandey, Ashok

    2004-01-01

    Studies were conducted to evaluate citric acid production by solid-state fermentation (SSF) using cassava bagasse as substrate employing a fungal culture of Aspergillus niger LPB 21 at laboratory and semipilot scale. Optimization of the process parameters temperature, pH, initial humidity, aeration, and nutritive composition was conducted in flasks and column fermentors. The results showed that thermal treatment of cassava bagasse enhanced fungal fermentation efficacy, resulting in 220 g of citric acid/kg of dry cassava bagasse with only treated cassava bagasse as substrate. The results obtained from the factorial experimental design in a column bioreactor showed that an aeration rate of 60 mL/min (3 mL/[g.min]) and 60% initial humidity were optimum, resulting in 265.7 g/kg of dry cassava bagasse citric acid production. This was almost 1.6 times higher than the quantities produced under unoptimized conditions (167.4 g of citric acid/kg of dry cassava bagasse). The defined parameters were transferred to semipilot scale, which showed high promise for large-scale citric acid production by SSF with cassava bagasse. Respirometry assays were carried out in order to follow indirectly the biomass evolution of the process. Citric acid production reached 220, 309, 263, and 269 g/kg of dry cassava bagasse in Erlenmeyer flasks, column fermentors, a tray bioreactor, and a horizontal drum bioreactor, respectively.

  14. Effect of citric acid on metals mobility in pruning wastes and biosolids compost and metals uptake in Atriplex halimus and Rosmarinus officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia, Y; Eymar, E; Gárate, A; Masaguer, A

    2013-05-01

    To assess metal mobility in pruning waste and biosolids compost (pH 6.9 and total concentration of metals in milligram per kilogram of Cd 1.9, Cu 132, Fe 8,513, Mn 192, Pb 81, and Zn 313), shrubs species Atriplex halimus and Rosmarinus officinalis were transplanted in this substrate and irrigated with citric acid (4 g L(-1), pH 2.9) and nutrient solution daily for 60 days. Citric acid significantly increased the concentrations of soluble Mn and Fe in the nutrient substrate solution measured by suction probes, while other metals did not vary in concentration (Cu and Zn) or were not observed at detectable levels (Cd and Pb). In plants, citric acid significantly increased the concentrations of Cu (2.7 ± 0.1-3.3 ± 0.1 mg kg(-1)), Fe (49.2 ± 5.2-76.8 ± 6.8 mg kg(-1)), and Mn (7.2 ± 1.1-11.4 ± 0.7 mg kg(-1)) in leaves of R. officinalis, whereas the concentration of only Mn (25.4 ± 0.3-42.2 ± 2.9 mg kg(-1)) was increased in A. halimus. Increasing Fe and Mn solubility by citric acid addition indicates the possibility of using it to improve plant nutrition. The mobility of metals in this substrate was influenced for the concentration of the metal, the degree of humification of organic matter and its high Fe content.

  15. Aqueous citric acid as green reaction media for the synthesis of octahydroxanthenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo A. Navarro D.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A simple, convenient and environmentally friendly one-pot procedure for the synthesis of 1,8-dioxo-octahydroxanthenes by the reaction of dimedone and aromatic aldehydes in aqueous citric acid is described. In this green synthetic protocol promoted by the reaction media, the use of any other catalysts and hazardous organic solvents are avoided, making the work up procedure greener and easier. The isolation of the products, obtained in good yields, is readily performed by filtration and crystallization from ethanol when required and the aqueous acidic media can be easily recycled and reused several times without significant loss of catalytic activity.

  16. Geobiochemistry of metabolism: Standard state thermodynamic properties of the citric acid cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canovas, Peter A.; Shock, Everett L.

    2016-12-01

    Integrating microbial metabolism into geochemical modeling allows assessments of energy and mass transfer between the geosphere and the microbial biosphere. Energy and power supplies and demands can be assessed from analytical geochemical data given thermodynamic data for compounds involved in catabolism and anabolism. Results are reported here from a critique of the available standard state thermodynamic data for organic acids and acid anions involved in the citric acid cycle (also known as the tricarboxylic acid cycle or the Krebs cycle). The development of methods for estimating standard state data unavailable from experiments is described, together with methods to predict corresponding values at elevated temperatures and pressures using the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equation of state for aqueous species. Internal consistency is maintained with standard state thermodynamic data for organic and inorganic aqueous species commonly used in geochemical modeling efforts. Standard state data and revised-HKF parameters are used to predict equilibrium dissociation constants for the organic acids in the citric acid cycle, and to assess standard Gibbs energies of reactions for each step in the cycle at elevated temperatures and pressures. The results presented here can be used with analytical data from natural and experimental systems to assess the energy and power demands of microorganisms throughout the habitable ranges of pressure and temperature, and to assess the consequences of abiotic organic compound alteration processes at conditions of subsurface aquifers, sedimentary basins, hydrothermal systems, meteorite parent bodies, and ocean worlds throughout the solar system.

  17. Discovery of a Chemical Modification by Citric Acid in a Recombinant Monoclonal Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant therapeutic monoclonal antibodies exhibit a high degree of heterogeneity that can arise from various post-translational modifications. The formulation for a protein product is to maintain a specific pH and to minimize further modifications. Generally Recognized as Safe (GRAS), citric acid is commonly used for formulation to maintain a pH at a range between 3 and 6 and is generally considered chemically inert. However, as we reported herein, citric acid covalently modified a recombinant monoclonal antibody (IgG1) in a phosphate/citrate-buffered formulation at pH 5.2 and led to the formation of so-called “acidic species” that showed mass increases of 174 and 156 Da, respectively. Peptide mapping revealed that the modification occurred at the N-terminus of the light chain. Three additional antibodies also showed the same modification but displayed different susceptibilities of the N-termini of the light chain, heavy chain, or both. Thus, ostensibly unreactive excipients under certain conditions may increase heterogeneity and acidic species in formulated recombinant monoclonal antibodies. By analogy, other molecules (e.g., succinic acid) with two or more carboxylic acid groups and capable of forming an anhydride may exhibit similar reactivities. Altogether, our findings again reminded us that it is prudent to consider formulations as a potential source for chemical modifications and product heterogeneity. PMID:25136741

  18. The effect of theobromine 200 mg/l topical gel exposure duration against surface enamel hardness resistance from 1% citric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herisa, H. M.; Noerdin, A.; Eriwati, Y. K.

    2017-08-01

    Theobromine can be used to prevent the demineralization of enamel and can stimulate the growth of new enamels. This study analyzes the effect of theobromine’s gel duration exposure on enamel hardness resistance from 1% citric acid. Twenty-eight specimens were divided into three experimental groups; were exposed to theobromine gel 200 mg/l for 16, 48, and 96 minutes; and were then immersed in 1% citric acid. The control group was only immersed in 1% citric acid. Results: A Wilcoxon test showed a significant increase and decrease in enamel microhardness after exposure to theobromine gel and citric acid (p theobromine gel and immersion in citric acid (p theobromine gel 200mg/L increased enamel microhardness but did not contribute to the enamel’s hardness resistance after immersion in 1% citric acid. The duration of theobromine gel application affected enamel microhardness and acid resistance.

  19. Effects of sodium metabisulphite and citric acid on the shelf life of fresh cut sweet potatoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sgroppo, S. C.; Vergara, L. E.; Tenev, M. D.

    2010-07-01

    Minimally processed vegetables are products susceptible to chemical and biological changes, thus becoming highly perishable. During sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas Lam.) processing, some deteriorative reactions occur affecting quality, mainly change of color. The purpose of this research is to avoid or minimize this deterioration, so the effects of application of chemical agents to fresh cut and refrigerated stored sweet potatoes were studied, evaluating the occurrence of major organoleptic, physicochemical and nutritional changes and assessing the sensory acceptability. Tests were done with sweet potato variety Colorada Correntina, which were treated with sodium metabisulphite/citric acid (pH = 2.91), arranged in polystyrene trays film, coated with PVC, and stored at 5 degree centigrade and 10 degree centigrade. Variations on the titratable acidity, pH, total sugars and ascorbic acid were registered and the surface color was evaluated through digital image analysis. The final product acceptability was determined through sensory evaluation and microbiological counts carried out at the beginning and at the end of the assays. During storage, there were slight changes in physicochemical characteristics such as absorbic acid and sugar content and in surface color as well. The microbial counts were lower than the fixed levels established by the Spanish legislature. The sensory attributes were rated as acceptable by consumers. Finally it is possible to assert that sweet potato Colorada Correntina minimally processed and treated with sodium metabisulphite 2%/citric acid can be preserved, packaged and stored at 5 degree centigrade for 14 days. (Author) 34 refs.

  20. Citric acid assisted phytoextraction of chromium by sunflower; morpho-physiological and biochemical alterations in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Mujahid; Ali, Shafaqat; Rizwan, Muhammad; Ali, Qasim; Abbas, Farhat; Bukhari, Syed Asad Hussain; Saeed, Rashid; Wu, Longhua

    2017-11-01

    Soil and water contamination from heavy metals and metalloids is one of the most discussed and burning global issues due to its potential to cause the scarcity of healthy food and safe water. The scientific community is proposing a range of lab and field based physical, chemical and biological solutions to remedy metals and metalloids contaminated soils and water. The present study finds out a possibility of Chromium (Cr) extraction by sunflower from spiked soil under chelating role of citric acid (CA). The sunflower plants were grown under different concentrations of Cr (0, 5, 10 & 20mgkg(-1)) and CA (0, 2.5 & 5mM). Growth, biomass, gas exchange, photosynthesis, electrolyte leakage (EL), reactive oxygen species (ROS; malondialdehyde (MDA), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the activities of antioxidant enzymes such as, superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacole values peroxidase (POD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), catalase (CAT) were measured. The results depicted a clear decline in plant height, root length, leaf area, number of leaves and flowers per plant along with fresh and dry biomass of all parts of plant with increasing concentration of Cr in soil. Similar reduction was observed in chlorophyll a and b, total chlorophyll, carotenoids, soluble protein, gas exchange attributes and SPAD. The increasing concentration of Cr also enhanced the Cr uptake and accumulation in plant roots, stem and leaves along with the production of ROS and EL. The activities of antioxidant enzymes increased with increasing Cr concentration from 0 to 10mg, but decreased at 20mgkg(-1) soil. The CA application significantly alleviated Cr-induced inhibition of plant growth, biomass, photosynthesis, gas exchange, soluble proteins and SPAD value. Presence of CA also enhanced the activities of all antioxidant enzymes and reduced the production of ROS and EL. The chelating potential of CA increased the concentration and accumulation of Cr in plant roots, stem and leaves. It is concluded that the

  1. Effects of chitosan and citric acid on pericarp browning and polyphenol oxidase activity of longan fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wittaya Apai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This research was designed to study the effects of chitosan and citric acid (CA on pericarp browning and polyphenol oxidase (PPO activity of longan fruit. The experiment was conducted by dipping longan fruit in 1.2% (w/v chitosan coating solution containing 1.0% CA (pH 3.3 for 2 min, in 1.0% CA solution (pH 2.6 for 2 min, and in distilled water for 2 min as a control. The treated fruits in each treatment were then packaged in a foam tray, wrapped with 11 μm PVC film and stored at 5°C, 95% RH for 27 days. Pericarp browning, pericarp color, pericarp pH, titratable acidity (TA, weight loss, polyphenol oxidase (PPO activity, and total phenol were monitored during storage. The results revealed that interaction betweenchitosan and CA demonstrated the best treatment in postponement of pericarp browning, which was indicated by the lowest browning index and high L* value, chroma, and hue angle. Based on browning index, the fruits treated with citric acid alone and the control fruits were not acceptable after 20 days, which those treated with both CA and chitosan were still acceptable after 27 days of storage. TA had a correlation with the pericarp pH and browning index. Chitosan mixed with citric acid exhibited a higher efficacy in preventing TA degradation in pericarp and maintaining low pericarp pH, compared to 1.0% CA treatment. In addition, low PPO activity and high total phenol content were found when CA was applied in combination withchitosan during storage.

  2. Citric acid production by Aspergillus niger ATCC 9142 from a treated ethanol fermentation co-product using solid-state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, G; West, T P

    2009-05-01

    To investigate the ability of the citric acid-producing strain Aspergillus niger ATCC 9142 to utilize the ethanol fermentation co-product corn distillers dried grains with solubles for citric acid production following various treatments. The ability of A. niger ATCC 9142 to produce citric acid and biomass on the grains was examined using an enzyme assay and a gravimetric method, respectively. Fungal citric acid production after 240 h was higher on untreated grains than on autoclaved grains or acid-hydrolysed grains. Fungal biomass production was enhanced after autoclaving and acid-hydrolysis of the grains. Phosphate supplementation to the grains slightly stimulated citric acid production while methanol addition decreased its synthesis. Using the phosphate-supplemented grains, the optimal incubation temperature, initial moisture content of the grains and the length of fermentation time for ATCC 9142 citric acid production were determined to be 25 degrees C, 82% and 240 h, respectively. A. niger ATCC 9142 synthesized citric acid on corn distillers dried grains with solubles. The phosphate-treated grains increased citric acid production by the strain. The ethanol fermentation co-product corn distillers dried grains with solubles could be useful commercially as a substrate for A. niger citric acid production.

  3. Monitoring of the fermentation media of citric acid by the trimethylsilyl derivatives of the organic acids formed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassempour, Alireza; Nojavan, Saeed; Talebpour, Zahra; Amiri, Ali Asghar; Najafi, Nahid Mashkouri

    2004-10-20

    In this approach, a derivatization method is described for monitoring of organic acids in fermentation media without any separation step. The aqueous phase of fermentation media was evaporated and heated in a silylation reagent to form trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivatives. The silylated compounds are analyzed by 29Si nuclear magnetic resonance (29Si NMR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). 29Si NMR can qualitatively monitor the components produced in the Krebs cycle. Quantification of these compounds is investigated by using selected ion monitoring mode of mass spectrometry. In this mode, mass to charge (m/z) values of their [M - 15]+ ions, which are 465, 275, 247, 221, 335, 251, and 313 of TMS derivatives of citric, alpha-ketoglutaric, succinic, fumaric, l-malic, oxaloacetic, and palmitic (as an internal standard), acids, respectively, are used. The limit of detection and the linear working range for derivatized citric acid were found to be 0.1 mg L(-1) and 10-3 x 10(4) mg L(-1). The relative standard deviation of the method for five replicates was 2.1%. The average recovery efficiency for citric acid added to culture media was approximately 97.2%. Quantitative results of GC-MS are compared with those obtained by an ultraviolet-visible method. Copyright 2004 American Chemical Society

  4. A Calcium Enterolith in a Patient with Crohn’s Disease and Its In Vitro Dissolubility in Citric Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaya Iwamuro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure and dissolubility of a calcified enterolith and enterolith pieces removed from a 26-year-old Japanese woman with Crohn’s disease were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The enterolith showed a multilayered structure with fatty acid calcium and magnesium phosphate. The amount of calcium, magnesium, and phosphate decreased after they were immersed in a citric acid solution, suggesting a potential contribution of acidic aqueous solution to elute inorganic substances contained in calcified enteroliths. This is the first study to investigate the in vitro dissolubility of calcified enteroliths induced by citric acid solution.

  5. Gene identification and functional analysis of methylcitrate synthase in citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger WU-2223L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Keiichi; Hattori, Takasumi; Honda, Yuki; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2013-01-01

    Methylcitrate synthase (EC 2.3.3.5; MCS) is a key enzyme of the methylcitric acid cycle localized in the mitochondria of eukaryotic cells and related to propionic acid metabolism. In this study, cloning of the gene mcsA encoding MCS and heterologous expression of it in Escherichia coli were performed for functional analysis of the MCS of citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger WU-2223L. Only one copy of mcsA (1,495 bp) exists in the A. niger WU-2223L chromosome. It encodes a 51-kDa polypeptide consisting of 465 amino acids containing mitochondrial targeting signal peptides. Purified recombinant MCS showed not only MCS activity (27.6 U/mg) but also citrate synthase (EC 2.3.3.1; CS) activity (26.8 U/mg). For functional analysis of MCS, mcsA disruptant strain DMCS-1, derived from A. niger WU-2223L, was constructed. Although A. niger WU-2223L showed growth on propionate as sole carbon source, DMCS-1 showed no growth. These results suggest that MCS is an essential enzyme in propionic acid metabolism, and that the methylcitric acid cycle operates functionally in A. niger WU-2223L. To determine whether MCS makes a contribution to citric acid production, citric acid production tests on DMCS-1 were performed. The amount of citric acid produced from glucose consumed by DMCS-1 in citric acid production medium over 12 d of cultivation was on the same level to that by WU-2223L. Thus it was found that MCS made no contribution to citric acid production from glucose in A. niger WU-2223L, although MCS showed CS activity.

  6. Synthesis of New Functionalized Citric Acid-based Dendrimers as Nanocarrier Agents for Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Motamedi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Citric acid-polyethylene glycol-citric acid (CPEGC triblock dendrimers can serve as potential delivery systems. Methods: In this investigation, CPEGC triblock dendrimers were synthesized and then imidazole groups were conjugated onto the surface of the G1, G2 and G3 of the obtained dendrimers. In order to study the type of the interactions between the functionalized dendrimers and a drug molecule, Naproxen which contains acidic groups, was examined as a hydrophobic drug in which the interactions would be of the electrostatic kind between its acidic groups and the lone pair electrons of nitrogen atom in imidazole groups. The quantity of the trapped drug and also the amount of its release were measured with UV spectrometric method in pH 1, 7.4 and 10. The average diameter of the nanocarriers was measured by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS technique Results: The size range of particles was determined to be 16-50 nm for different generations. The rate of the release increased in pH=10 in all generations due to the increase in Naproxen solubility and the hydrolysis of the esteric bonds in the mentioned pH. The results showed that the amount of the trapped drug increased with the increase in the generation of the dendrimer and pH. Conclusion: Based on our findings, we suggest CPEGC triblock dendrimers possess great potential to be used as drug/gene delivery system.

  7. Continuous bio-hydrogen production from citric acid wastewater via facultative anaerobic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Haijun; Shen, Jianquan [Institute of Chemistry, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Zhongguancun, Beijing 100080 (China); Shao, Peng; Yuan, Xing [Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Lu, Tingmao; Wang, Dufu; Xu, Zhinian [Shandong Environment Protection Industry Co. Ltd, Jinan 250014 (China)

    2006-08-15

    In this study, continuous biological hydrogen production using wastewater from citric acid factory as raw materials was investigated. And enrichment cultures from facultative hydrogen-producing anaerobe together with citric acid wastewater were utilized. For finding out the industrialized feasibility of continuous H2 bio-production, the ability of H2-production via facultative anaerobe, optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT) and optimum volume loading rate (VLR) were also studied. The experimental results showed that facultative anaerobic bacteria could yield hydrogen as high as 0.84 mol/H{sub 2}/ mol hexose consumed at the VLR of 38.4 kg COD/m{sup 3} d. Butyric acid was the dominant product among volatile fatty acids (VFAs). An improved upward-flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor with a working volume 50m{sup 3} was used. Continuous hydrogen yield was 0.72 m{sup 3} H{sub 2}/m{sup 3} reactor d under the following conditions: temperature at 35-38{sup o}, initial pH at 6.8-7.2, HRT=12. The study also indicates that the reactor used has a better operational stability and the facultative anaerobe has an excellent adaptive capacity for organic loading rate. Furthermore, the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency exceeded 60% and the total sugar degradation efficiency (TSDE) was close to or over 90%, even up to 96.6% at HRT of 12 h during the experiment. (author)

  8. Citric acid production from orange peel wastes by solid-state fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Torrado

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Valencia orange (Citrus sinensis peel was employed in this work as raw material for the production of citric acid (CA by solid-state fermentation (SSF of Aspergillus niger CECT-2090 (ATCC 9142, NRRL 599 in Erlenmeyer flasks. To investigate the effects of the main operating variables, the inoculum concentration was varied in the range 0.5·10³ to 0.7·10(8 spores/g dry orange peel, the bed loading from 1.0 to 4.8 g of dry orange peel (corresponding to 35-80 % of the total volume, and the moisture content between 50 and 100 % of the maximum water retention capacity (MWRC of the material. Moreover, additional experiments were done adding methanol or water in different proportions and ways. The optimal conditions for CA production revealed to be an inoculum of 0.5·10(6 spores/g dry orange peel, a bed loading of 1.0 g of dry orange peel, and a humidification pattern of 70 % MWRC at the beginning of the incubation with posterior addition of 0.12 mL H2O/g dry orange peel (corresponding to 3.3 % of the MWRC every 12 h starting from 62 h. The addition of methanol was detrimental for the CA production. Under these conditions, the SSF ensured an effective specific production of CA (193 mg CA/g dry orange peel, corresponding to yields of product on total initial and consumed sugars (glucose, fructose and sucrose of 376 and 383 mg CA/g, respectively. These results, which demonstrate the viability of the CA production by SSF from orange peel without addition of other nutrients, could be of interest to possible, future industrial applications.

  9. Citric Acid production from orange peel wastes by solid-state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrado, Ana María; Cortés, Sandra; Manuel Salgado, José; Max, Belén; Rodríguez, Noelia; Bibbins, Belinda P; Converti, Attilio; Manuel Domínguez, José

    2011-01-01

    Valencia orange (Citrus sinensis) peel was employed in this work as raw material for the production of citric acid (CA) by solid-state fermentation (SSF) of Aspergillus niger CECT-2090 (ATCC 9142, NRRL 599) in Erlenmeyer flasks. To investigate the effects of the main operating variables, the inoculum concentration was varied in the range 0.5·10(3) to 0.7·10(8) spores/g dry orange peel, the bed loading from 1.0 to 4.8 g of dry orange peel (corresponding to 35-80 % of the total volume), and the moisture content between 50 and 100 % of the maximum water retention capacity (MWRC) of the material. Moreover, additional experiments were done adding methanol or water in different proportions and ways. The optimal conditions for CA production revealed to be an inoculum of 0.5·10(6) spores/g dry orange peel, a bed loading of 1.0 g of dry orange peel, and a humidification pattern of 70 % MWRC at the beginning of the incubation with posterior addition of 0.12 mL H2O/g dry orange peel (corresponding to 3.3 % of the MWRC) every 12 h starting from 62 h. The addition of methanol was detrimental for the CA production. Under these conditions, the SSF ensured an effective specific production of CA (193 mg CA/g dry orange peel), corresponding to yields of product on total initial and consumed sugars (glucose, fructose and sucrose) of 376 and 383 mg CA/g, respectively. These results, which demonstrate the viability of the CA production by SSF from orange peel without addition of other nutrients, could be of interest to possible, future industrial applications.

  10. NASA and ESA Collaboration on Alternative to Nitric Acid Passivation: Parameter Optimization of Citric Acid Passivation for Stainless Steel Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Headquarters chartered the Technology Evaluation for Environmental Risk Mitigation Principal Center (TEERM) to coordinate agency activities affecting pollution prevention issues identified during system and component acquisition and sustainment processes. The primary objectives of NASA TEERM are to: Reduce or eliminate the use of hazardous materials or hazardous processes at manufacturing, remanufacturing, and sustainment locations. Avoid duplication of effort in actions required to reduce or eliminate hazardous materials through joint center cooperation and technology sharing. Corrosion is an extensive problem that affects the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the European Space Agency (ESA). The damaging effects of corrosion result in steep costs, asset downtime affecting mission readiness, and safety risks to personnel. Consequently, it is vital to reduce corrosion costs and risks in a sustainable manner. NASA and ESA have numerous structures and equipment that are fabricated from stainless steel. The standard practice for protection of stainless steel is a process called passivation. Passivation is defined by The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language as to treat or coat (a metal) in order to reduce the chemical reactivity of its surface. Passivation works by forming a shielding outer (metal oxide) layer that reduces the impact of destructive environmental factors such as air or water. Consequently, this process necessitates a final product that is very clean and free of iron and other contaminants. Typical passivation procedures call for the use of nitric acid; however, there are a number of environmental, worker safety, and operational issues associated with its use. Citric acid is an alternative to nitric acid for the passivation of stainless steels. Citric acid offers a variety of benefits including increased safety for personnel, reduced environmental impact, and

  11. Evidence of a New Role for the High-Osmolarity Glycerol Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in Yeast: Regulating Adaptation to Citric Acid Stress†

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence, Clare L.; Botting, Catherine H.; Antrobus, Robin; Coote, Peter J.

    2004-01-01

    Screening the Saccharomyces cerevisiae disruptome, profiling transcripts, and determining changes in protein expression have identified an important new role for the high-osmolarity glycerol (HOG) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in the regulation of adaptation to citric acid stress. Deletion of HOG1, SSK1, PBS2, PTC2, PTP2, and PTP3 resulted in sensitivity to citric acid. Furthermore, citric acid resulted in the dual phosphorylation, and thus activation, of Hog1p. Despite mino...

  12. The effect of salinity and nitrogen on nutrient distribution, citric acid and vitamin C in hydroponics

    OpenAIRE

    M. Zahedifar; A. M. Ronaghi; MOOSAVI, S.A.A.; S. Safarzadeh Shirazi

    2010-01-01

    The effect of salinity and nitrogen on yield, vitamin C, citric acid and nutrient distribution of tomato in hydroponics culture was investigated. Tomato seeds were first let germinate in yonolit pots with wet coco peat and then their seedlings were transferred to plastic tanks containing 5 liters nutrient solution. Treatments were three levels of salinity (0, 30 and 60 mM as NaCl and CaCl2) and three levels of nitrogen (0, 1.5 and 3% as NH4Cl and NH4H2PO4 and 2:1 w/w). The results showed that...

  13. Development of a certified reference materials for composition of citric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Kulev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a summary of analyzing Technical Regulations of the Customs Union TR TC 029/2012 "Safety Requirements for Food Additives, Flavorings and Technological Processing Aids". Information on certified reference materials (RMs for composition of citric acid is provided. Certified characteristics of the RM are, on the one hand, mass fraction of the base substance and, on the other hand, mass fraction of impurities - toxic elements (lead, arsenic, cadmium, mercury. The first batches of the given RMs are produced, which are registered in the State Register of the approved types of certified reference materials GS010300-2013 and GS010143-2012.

  14. Citric acid treatment of post operative wound infections in HIV/AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagoba, Basavraj; Patil Dawale, Chandrakala; Raju, Reena; Wadher, Bharat; Chidrawar, Shruti; Selkar, Sohan; Suryawanshi, Namdev

    2014-02-01

    The normal cellular immunity is required for normal wound healing. The HIV infection affects wound healing adversely. Wound infections in HIV/AIDS patients are difficult to manage because of compromised immunity. The result is delayed wound healing and increased susceptibility to wound infection. Here we report two cases of HIV positive patients who had developed the post operative wound gape, not responding to the conventional treatment, treated simply by local application of three percent citric acid ointment. Copyright © 2013 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Fabrication of calcium phosphate–calcium sulfate injectable bone substitute using hydroxy-propyl-methyl-cellulose and citric acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thai, Van Viet

    2010-01-01

    In this study, an injectable bone substitute (IBS) consisting of citric acid, chitosan, and hydroxyl propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC) as the liquid phase and tetra calcium phosphate (TTCP), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) and calcium sulfate dehydrate (CSD, CaSO4·2H2O) powders as the solid phase, were fabricated. Two groups were classified based on the percent of citric acid in the liquid phase (20, 40 wt%). In each groups, the HPMC percentage was 0, 2, and 4 wt%. An increase in compressive strength due to changes in morphology was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy images. A good conversion rate of HAp at 20% citric acid was observed in the XRD profiles. In addition, HPMC was not obviously affected by apatite formation. However, both HPMC and citric acid increased the compressive strength of IBS. The maximum compressive strength for IBS was with 40% citric acid and 4% HPMC after 14 days of incubation in 100% humidity at 37°C. PMID:20333539

  16. Removal of heavy metals from polluted soil using the citric acid fermentation broth: a promising washing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongjiao; Gao, Yuntao; Xiong, Huabin

    2017-04-01

    The citric acid fermentation broth was prepared and it was employed to washing remediation of heavy metal-polluted soil. A well-defined washing effect was obtained, the removal percentages using citric acid fermentation broth are that 48.2% for Pb, 30.6% for Cu, 43.7% for Cr, and 58.4% for Cd and higher than that using citric acid solution. The kinetics of heavy metals desorption can be described by the double constant equation and Elovich equation and is a heterogeneous diffusion process. The speciation analysis shows that the citric acid fermentation broth can effectively reduce bioavailability and environmental risk of heavy metals. Spectroscopy characteristics analysis suggests that the washing method has only a small effect on the mineral composition and does not destroy the framework of soil system. Therefore, the citric acid fermentation broth is a promising washing agent and possesses a potential practical application value in the field of remediation of soils with a good washing performance.

  17. Mineralization of citric acid wastewater by photo-electrochemical chlorine oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Hsiang; Shih, Yu-Jen; Huang, Yao-Hui

    2013-05-30

    This work demonstrates a novel chloride photo-electrochemical method for mineralizing citric acid. The electrolytic reactor with a length of 12 cm, a width of 12 cm and a height of 30 cm held 2.5 L of solution, which was involved in the batch reaction. Both anode and cathode were made of titanium coated with RuO2/IrO2. The results revealed that the solution pH dominated the production of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) oxidant in the presence of NaCl as direct current electricity was used. The chloride electrochemical process at pH 5.5 removed 59% of total organic carbon (TOC) in 4 h (NaCl = 200 mM, current = 5 A). UV irradiation (254 nm) in the reactor induced the photo-electrochemical reaction, increasing the TOC removal from 59% to 99.4%. Finally, the reaction pathway for citric acid mineralization was discussed with reference to the detection of intermediates using a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization and functional properties of mango peel pectin extracted by ultrasound assisted citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miaomiao; Huang, Bohui; Fan, Chuanhui; Zhao, Kaili; Hu, Hao; Xu, Xiaoyun; Pan, Siyi; Liu, Fengxia

    2016-10-01

    Pectin was extracted from 'Tainong No. 1' mango peels, using a chelating agent-citric acid as extraction medium by ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and conventional extraction (CE) at temperatures of 20 and 80°C. Chemical structures, rheological and emulsifying properties of mango peel pectins (MPPs) were comparatively studied with laboratory grade citrus pectin (CP). All MPPs exhibited higher protein content (4.74%-5.94%), degree of methoxylation (85.43-88.38%), average molecular weight (Mw, 378.4-2858kDa) than the CP, but lower galacuronic acid content (GalA, 52.21-53.35%). CE or UAE at 80°C resulted in significantly higher pectin yield than those at 20°C, while the extraction time for UAE-80°C (15min) was significantly shorter compared to CE-80°C (2h) with comparable pectin yield. Moreover, MPPs extracted at 80°C were observed with higher GalA and protein content, higher Mw, resulting in higher viscosity, better emulsifying capacity and stability, as compared to those extracted at 20°C and the CP. Therefore, these results suggested that MPPs from 'Tainong No. 1' may become a highly promising pectin with good thickening and emulsifying properties, using ultrasound-assisted citric acid as an efficient and eco-friendly extraction method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Ascorbic acid and citric flavonoids for broilers under heat stress: effects on performance and meat quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JEM Peña

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of increasing doses of ascorbic acid (AA and citric flavonoids (quercetin and rutin on the performance and meat quality characteristics of broilers submitted to cyclic heat stress. Four-hundred one-day-old female Ross 308 were housed in 40 battery cages a in temperature controlled room. Treatments consisted of 0, 250, 500, and 1000 g/ton on of AA + citric flavonoids. Birds were fed ad libitum until 32 day of age. Beginning on day 14 post-hatch until the end of the experiment, in order to simulate cyclic heat stress, the temperature inside the room was increased to 32°C for 5 hours, and decreased until reaching the comfort temperature corresponding to the age of the animals. Birds were slaughtered at 33 days of age, and carcass and commercial cuts yields were determined. Thighs and boneless breast samples were collected and frozen for subsequent analyses of pH, cooking loss, shear force, color, and Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS. Significant differences (p <0.05 were found for feed efficiency from 1 to 7 days of age, with the best values for the birds fed 0 and 250 g/ton on of AA + citric flavonoids. At the end of the experiment, there were no differences in other performance variables, carcass and parts yields, pH, shear force, color and TBARS. The meat of the birds supplemented with 250 g/ton on of product presented the lowest cooking loss.

  20. Metabolomics and Gene Expression Analysis Reveal Down-regulation of the Citric Acid (TCA Cycle in Non-diabetic CKD Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stein Hallan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic kidney disease (CKD is a public health problem with very high prevalence and mortality. Yet, there is a paucity of effective treatment options, partly due to insufficient knowledge of underlying pathophysiology. We combined metabolomics (GCMS with kidney gene expression studies to identify metabolic pathways that are altered in adults with non-diabetic stage 3–4 CKD versus healthy adults. Urinary excretion rate of 27 metabolites and plasma concentration of 33 metabolites differed significantly in CKD patients versus controls (estimate range − 68% to +113%. Pathway analysis revealed that the citric acid cycle was the most significantly affected, with urinary excretion of citrate, cis-aconitate, isocitrate, 2-oxoglutarate and succinate reduced by 40–68%. Reduction of the citric acid cycle metabolites in urine was replicated in an independent cohort. Expression of genes regulating aconitate, isocitrate, 2-oxoglutarate and succinate were significantly reduced in kidney biopsies. We observed increased urine citrate excretion (+74%, p = 0.00009 and plasma 2-oxoglutarate concentrations (+12%, p = 0.002 in CKD patients during treatment with a vitamin-D receptor agonist in a randomized trial. In conclusion, urinary excretion of citric acid cycle metabolites and renal expression of genes regulating these metabolites were reduced in non-diabetic CKD. This supports the emerging view of CKD as a state of mitochondrial dysfunction.

  1. Nutritional quality assessment of tomato fruits after exposure to uncoated and citric acid coated cerium oxide nanoparticles, bulk cerium oxide, cerium acetate and citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Ana Cecilia; Medina-Velo, Illya A; Zuverza-Mena, Nubia; Dominguez, Osvaldo E; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of surface modification on the interaction of nanoparticles (NPs) with plants. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants were cultivated in potting soil amended with bare and citric acid coated nanoceria (nCeO2, nCeO2+CA), cerium acetate (CeAc), bulk cerium oxide (bCeO2) and citric acid (CA) at 0-500 mg kg(-1). Fruits were collected year-round until the harvesting time (210 days). Results showed that nCeO2+CA at 62.5, 250 and 500 mg kg(-1) reduced dry weight by 54, 57, and 64% and total sugar by 84, 78, and 81%. At 62.5, 125, and 500 mg kg(-1) nCeO2+CA decreased reducing sugar by 63, 75, and 52%, respectively and at 125 mg kg(-1) reduced starch by 78%, compared to control. The bCeO2 at 250 and 500 mg kg(-1), increased reducing sugar by 67 and 58%. In addition, when compared to controls, nCeO2 at 500 mg kg(-1) reduced B (28%), Fe (78%), Mn (33%), and Ca (59%). At 125 mg kg(-1) decreased Al by 24%; while nCeO2+CA at 125 and 500 mg kg(-1) increased B by 33%. On the other hand, bCeO2 at 62.5 mg kg(-1) increased Ca (267%), but at 250 mg kg(-1) reduced Cu (52%), Mn (33%), and Mg (58%). Fruit macromolecules were mainly affected by nCeO2+CA, while nutritional elements by nCeO2; however, all Ce treatments altered, in some way, the nutritional quality of tomato fruit. To our knowledge, this is the first study comparing effects of uncoated and coated nanoceria on tomato fruit quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Structure elucidation and quantification of impurities formed between 6-aminocaproic acid and the excipients citric acid and sorbitol in an oral solution using high-resolution mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schou-Pedersen, Anne Marie V; Cornett, Claus; Nyberg, Nils; Østergaard, Jesper; Hansen, Steen Honoré

    2015-03-25

    Concentrated solutions containing 6-aminocaproic acid and the excipients citric acid and sorbitol have been studied at temperatures of 50°C, 60°C, 70°C and 80°C as well as at 20°C. It has previously been reported that the commonly employed citric acid is a reactive excipient, and it is therefore important to thoroughly investigate a possible reaction between 6-aminocaproic acid and citric acid. The current study revealed the formation of 3-hydroxy-3,4-dicarboxy-butanamide-N-hexanoic acid between 6-aminocaproic acid and citric acid by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). Less than 0.03% of 6-aminocaproic acid was converted to 3-hydroxy-3,4-dicarboxy-butanamide-N-hexanoic acid after 30 days of storage at 80°C. Degradation products of 6-aminocaproic acid were also observed after storage at the applied temperatures, e.g., dimer, trimer and cyclized 6-aminocaproic acid, i.e., caprolactam. No reaction products between D-sorbitol and 6-aminocaproic acid could be observed. 3-Hydroxy-3,4-dicarboxy-butanamide-N-hexanoic acid, dimer and caprolactam were also observed after storage at 20°C for 3 months. The findings imply that an oral solution of 6-aminocaproic acid is relatively stable at 20°C at the pH values 4.00 and 5.00 as suggested in the USP for oral formulations. Compliance with the ICH guideline Q3B is expected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Carboxymethylcellulose hydrogel crosslinked with citric acid for biomedical application; Reticulacao de hidrogeis de carboximetilcelulose com acido citrico para aplicacoes biomedicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capanema, Nadia S.V.; Mansur, Alexandra A.P.; Mansur, Herman S., E-mail: nsvnadia@gmail.com [Centro de Nanociencias, Nanotecnologia e Inovacao (CeNano), MG (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Metalurgica e Materiais

    2016-07-01

    The carboxymethylcellulose (CMCel) has been extensively used in order application as flexible polymer membrane. Biopolymers crosslinked have been studied to optimize their performance in biomedical applications. In this work, CMCel films with a degree of substitution (DS = 0.77) were prepared by evaporation of solvent and crosslinked with different concentrations of citric acid (CA). The synthesized CMCel was characterized by Infrared Spectroscopy by Fourier Transform X-ray spectroscopy (FTIR), and morphology assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Morphological analysis performed using the SEM indicated the crosslinked CMCel and not crosslinked with a very smooth and uniform appearance. The FTIR results indicated the modification of existing bands and appearance of a new band 1715 cm{sup -1} suggesting that there has been change in the structure of the crosslinked CMCel. (author)

  4. Modeling and prediction of retardance in citric acid coated ferrofluid using artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Jing-Fung, E-mail: jacklin@cc.feu.edu.tw [Department of Industrial Design, Far East University, Taiwan, ROC (China); Sheu, Jer-Jia [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Southern Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2016-06-01

    Citric acid coated (citrate-stabilized) magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) magnetic nanoparticles have been conducted and applied in the biomedical fields. Using Taguchi-based measured retardances as the training data, an artificial neural network (ANN) model was developed for the prediction of retardance in citric acid (CA) coated ferrofluid (FF). According to the ANN simulation results in the training stage, the correlation coefficient between predicted retardances and measured retardances was found to be as high as 0.9999998. Based on the well-trained ANN model, the predicted retardance at excellent program from Taguchi method showed less error of 2.17% compared with a multiple regression (MR) analysis of statistical significance. Meanwhile, the parameter analysis at excellent program by the ANN model had the guiding significance to find out a possible program for the maximum retardance. It was concluded that the proposed ANN model had high ability for the prediction of retardance in CA coated FF. - Highlights: • The feedforward ANN is applied for modeling of retardance in CA coated FFs. • ANN can predict the retardance at excellent program with acceptable error to MR. • The proposed ANN has high ability for the prediction of retardance.

  5. Response of the periapical tissue of dogs' teeth to the action of citric acid and EDTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Berthold Sperandio

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyze the inflammatory response of dog's periapical tissues to 17% trisodium EDTA salt (pH 8.0 and 1% citric acid (pH 2.0. Saline was used as a control. Six adult dogs were used as the biological model of the study. The experimental units comprised 56 roots of mandibular molars (first and second and premolars (first, second and third. After coronal opening, pulpectomy and root canal instrumentation were performed using the above-mentioned irrigating solutions. After 24 and 48 hours, the animals were euthanized and the teeth and their supporting tissues were removed and histologically processed. The sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and analyzed histopathologically with a light microscope at x100 magnification. The histological analysis focused on the occurrence of acute inflammatory response. The presence of swelling, vasodilatation and inflammatory cells were evaluated and the degree of inflammation was determined for each case. Data were analyzed by Fisher's exact test using the SPSS software with a confidence interval of 95% (p<0.05. 17% EDTA and 1% citric acid caused inflammatory responses in dog's periapical tissues with no significant differences to each other or to saline (control at either the 24-hour (p=0.482 or 48-hour (p=0.377 periods. It may be concluded that the inflammatory response was of mild intensity for the tested substances.

  6. Enhanced biocompatibility and antibacterial property of polyurethane materials modified with citric acid and chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tian-Ming; Wu, Xing-Ze; Qiu, Yun-Ren

    2016-08-01

    Citric acid (CA) and chitosan (CS) were covalently immobilized on polyurethane (PU) materials to improve the biocompatibility and antibacterial property. The polyurethane pre-polymer with isocyanate group was synthesized by one pot method, and then grafted with citric acid, followed by blending with polyethersulfone (PES) to prepare the blend membrane by phase-inversion method so that chitosan can be grafted from the membrane via esterification and acylation reactions eventually. The native and modified membranes were characterized by attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, water contact angle measurement, and tensile strength test. Protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, hemolysis assay, activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, thrombin time, and adsorption of Ca(2+) were executed to evaluate the blood compatibility of the membranes decorated by CA and CS. Particularly, the antibacterial activities on the modified membranes were evaluated based on a vitro antibacterial test. It could be concluded that the modified membrane had good anticoagulant property and antibacterial property.

  7. RESPONSE OF THE PERIAPICAL TISSUE OF DOGS' TEETH TO THE ACTION OF CITRIC ACID AND EDTA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperandio, Cristina Berthold; Silveira, Luiz Fernando Machado; de Araújo, Lenita Aver; Mertos, Josué; Malshe, Ashwin

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the inflammatory response of dog's periapical tissues to 17% trisodium EDTA salt (pH 8.0) and 1% citric acid (pH 2.0). Saline was used as a control. Six adult dogs were used as the biological model of the study. The experimental units comprised 56 roots of mandibular molars (first and second) and premolars (first, second and third). After coronal opening, pulpectomy and root canal instrumentation were performed using the above-mentioned irrigating solutions. After 24 and 48 hours, the animals were euthanized and the teeth and their supporting tissues were removed and histologically processed. The sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and analyzed histopathologically with a light microscope at x100 magnification. The histological analysis focused on the occurrence of acute inflammatory response. The presence of swelling, vasodilatation and inflammatory cells were evaluated and the degree of inflammation was determined for each case. Data were analyzed by Fisher's exact test using the SPSS software with a confidence interval of 95% (p<0.05). 17% EDTA and 1% citric acid caused inflammatory responses in dog's periapical tissues with no significant differences to each other or to saline (control) at either the 24-hour (p=0.482) or 48-hour (p=0.377) periods. It may be concluded that the inflammatory response was of mild intensity for the tested substances. PMID:19089291

  8. Effect of citric acid induced deflocculation on the ultrasonic pretreatment efficiency of dairy waste activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayathri, T; Kavitha, S; Adish Kumar, S; Kaliappan, S; Yeom, Ick Tae; Rajesh Banu, J

    2015-01-01

    In this investigation, the application of citric acid was explored for the removal of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) from waste activated sludge (WAS), followed by ultrasonic pretreatment, which enhanced the subsequent anaerobic biodegradability. EPS was removed with 0.05g/g SS of citric acid. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) solubilization and suspended solids (SS) reduction that occurred for specific energy input of 171.9kJ/kg TS, in deflocculated (EPS removed and ultrasonically pretreated) sludges were found to be 22.70% and 20.28% and was comparatively higher, than the flocculated (with EPS and ultrasonically pretreated). The biogas yield potential of flocculated and deflocculated sludges (specific energy input - 171.9kJ/kgTS) was found to be 0.212L/(gVS) and 0.435L/(gVS), respectively. Accordingly, the deflocculation and ultrasonic pretreatment improved the anaerobic biodegradability efficiently. Thus, this chemo mediated sonic pretreatment is an effective method for enhancing biodegradability and improving clean energy generation from WAS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Preliminary study on preparation of BCNO phosphor particles using citric acid as carbon source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuryadin, Bebeh W.; Pratiwi, Tripuspita; Faryuni, Irfana D.; Iskandar, Ferry, E-mail: ferry@fi.itb.ac.id; Abdullah, Mikrajuddin; Khairurrijal [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Ganesha 10 Bandung, Indonesia 40132 (Indonesia); Ogi, Takashi; Okuyama, Kikuo [Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi Hiroshima, Japan 739-8527 (Japan)

    2015-04-16

    A citric acid was used as a carbon source in the preparation of boron carbon oxy-nitride (BCNO) phosphor particles by a facile process. The preparation process was conducted at relatively low temperature 750 °C and at ambient pressure. The prepared BCNO phosphors showed a high photoluminescence (PL) performance at peak emission wavelength of 470 nm under excitation by a UV light 365 nm. The effects of carbon/boron and nitrogen/boron molar ratios on the PL properties were also investigated. The result showed that the emission spectra with a wavelength peak ranging from 444 nm to 496 nm can be obtained by varying carbon/boron ratios from 0.1 to 0.9. In addition, the observations showed that the BCNO phosphor material has two excitation peaks located at the 365 nm (UV) and 420 nm (blue). Based on these observations, we believe that the citric acid derived BCNO phosphor particles can be a promising inexpensive material for phosphor conversion-based white LED.

  10. Regulation of alternative oxidase at the transcription stage in Aspergillus niger under the conditions of citric acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Takasumi; Kino, Kuniki; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2009-04-01

    The citric acid-producing fungus Aspergillus niger WU-2223L possesses a cyanide-insensitive respiratory pathway catalyzed by alternative oxidase. The regulation of the alternative oxidase under the conditions of citric acid production was determined from the transcription level of the alternative oxidase gene (aox1). PCR and Southern blot analyses revealed that there is only one copy of aox1 on the chromosome of WU-2223L and no homologous gene of aox1. To confirm the regulation stage of alternative oxidase, alternative oxidase activities and aox1 transcription levels were measured under several cultivation conditions, including those for citric acid production. On each cultivation day, the changes in the specific activity of the alternative oxidase were found to be comparable to those in the transcription level of aox1. These results indicate that the activity of the alternative oxidase encoded by aox1 is regulated at the transcription stage under the conditions tested for A. niger WU-2223L.

  11. Interaction of phytase RONOZYME?P(L and citric acid on the utilization of phosphorus by common carp (Cyprinus carpio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Gabaudan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A feeding trial was conducted for 60 days to study the effects of the combination of microbial phytase and citric acidon phosphorus utilization in Cyprinus carpio fingerlings. Four diets designated as diet without phytase or inorganic phosphorussupplementation (T1, with 1.1% MSP (T2, with 0.55% MSP and phytase (T3 and with 0.55% MSP, phytase andcitric acid (T4. Four replicate groups of 20 fish were fed two times daily until satiation. Phosphorus digestibility and retentionwere measured as well as the fish growth performance. It is concluded from the results that the addition of microbial phytaseand citric acid enhances the availability of phosphorus from plant sources, improves bone mineralization, growth and feedefficiency. Combining a low dose of citric acid to the phytase significantly increased the positive effects of the enzyme.

  12. Citric acid enhances the phytoextraction of chromium, plant growth, and photosynthesis by alleviating the oxidative damages in Brassica napus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshan, Sehar; Ali, Shafaqat; Bharwana, Saima Aslam; Rizwan, Muhammad; Farid, Mujahid; Abbas, Farhat; Ibrahim, Muhammad; Mehmood, Muhammad Aamer; Abbasi, Ghulam Hasan

    2015-08-01

    Chromium (Cr) toxicity is widespread in crops grown on Cr-contaminated soils and has become a serious environmental issue which requires affordable strategies for the remediation of such soils. This study was performed to assess the performance of citric acid (CA) through growing Brassica napus in the phytoextraction of Cr from contaminated soil. Different Cr (0, 100, and 500 μM) and citric acid (0, 2.5, and 5.0 mM) treatments were applied alone and in combinations to 4-week-old seedlings of B. napus plants in soil under wire house condition. Plants were harvested after 12 weeks of sowing, and the data was recorded regarding growth characteristics, biomass, photosynthetic pigments, malondialdehyde (MDA), electrolytic leakage (EL), antioxidant enzymes, and Cr uptake and accumulation. The results showed that the plant growth, biomass, chlorophyll contents, and carotenoid as well as soluble protein concentrations significantly decreased under Cr stress alone while these adverse effects were alleviated by application of CA. Cr concentration in roots, stem, and leaves of CA-supplied plant was significantly reduced while total uptake of Cr increased in all plant parts with CA application. Furthermore, in comparison with Cr treatments alone, CA supply reduced the MDA and EL values in both shoots and roots. Moreover, the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), guaiacol peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) in shoots and roots markedly increased by 100 μM Cr exposure, while decreased at 500 μM Cr stress. CA application enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes compared to the same Cr treatment alone. Thus, the data indicate that exogenous CA application can increase Cr uptake and can minimize Cr stress in plants and may be beneficial in accelerating the phytoextraction of Cr through hyper-accumulating plants such as B. napus.

  13. Accelerated anaerobic dechlorination of DDT in slurry with Hydragric Acrisols using citric acid and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cuiying; Xu, Xianghua; Fan, Jianling

    2015-12-01

    The application of electron donor and electron shuttle substances has a vital influence on electron transfer, thus may affect the reductive dechlorination of 1,1,1-trichoro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) in anaerobic reaction systems. To evaluate the roles of citric acid and anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) in accelerating the reductive dechlorination of DDT in Hydragric Acrisols that contain abundant iron oxide, a batch anaerobic incubation experiment was conducted in a slurry system with four treatments of (1) control, (2) citric acid, (3) AQDS, and (4) citric acid+AQDS. Results showed that DDT residues decreased by 78.93%-92.11% of the initial quantities after 20days of incubation, and 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(4-chlorophenyl)-ethane (DDD) was the dominant metabolite. The application of citric acid accelerated DDT dechlorination slightly in the first 8days, while the methanogenesis rate increased quickly, and then the acceleration effect improved after the 8th day while the methanogenesis rate decreased. The amendment by AQDS decreased the Eh value of the reaction system and accelerated microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxides to generate Fe(II), which was an efficient electron donor, thus enhancing the reductive dechlorination rate of DDT. The addition of citric acid+AQDS was most efficient in stimulating DDT dechlorination, but no significant interaction between citric acid and AQDS on DDT dechlorination was observed. The results will be of great significance for developing an efficient in situ remediation strategy for DDT-contaminated sites. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Influence of barley grain particle size and treatment with citric acid on digestibility, ruminal fermentation and microbial protein synthesis in Holstein calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi-Bonchenari, M; Salem, A Z M; López, S

    2017-08-01

    Chemical and physical treatments of barley grain increase ruminally resistant starch and can improve the rumen fermentation pattern. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of chemical (addition of citric acid, CA) and physical (grinding to two different particle sizes, PS) treatment of barley grain on performance, rumen fermentation, microbial protein yield in the rumen and selected blood metabolites in growing calves. In all, 28 male Holstein calves (172±5.1 kg initial BW) were used in a complete randomised design with a factorial arrangement of 2 barley grain particle sizes×2 levels of citric acid. The diets were as follows: (i) small PS (average 1200 µm) barley grain soaked in water (no CA addition); (ii) small PS barley grain soaked in a CA solution (adding 20 g CA/kg barley); (iii) large PS (average 2400 µm) barley grain soaked in water (no citric acid addition) and (iv) large PS barley grain soaked in a citric acid solution (adding 20 g CA/kg barley). Barley grain was then incorporated at 35% in a total mixed ration and fed to the calves for 11 weeks. Feeding small PS barley decreased feed intake (P=0.02) and average daily weight gain (P=0.01). The addition of CA to barley grain did not affect intake but increased weight gain (P0.05). However, the molar proportion of propionate was increased (P=0.03) when barley was more finely ground, and that of acetate was increased (P=0.04) when CA was added to barley grain. The ruminal concentration of ammonia nitrogen was increased (Pcitric acid increased fibre digestibility of total mixed rations, attenuated the decrease in ruminal pH, and improved weight gain and feed efficiency in male Holstein growing calves fed a high-cereal diet (550 g cereal grain/kg diet).

  15. Synthesis of bio-based methacrylic acid by decarboxylation of itaconic acid and citric acid catalyzed by solid transition-metal catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Nôtre, Jérôme; Witte-van Dijk, Susan C M; van Haveren, Jacco; Scott, Elinor L; Sanders, Johan P M

    2014-09-01

    Methacrylic acid, an important monomer for the plastics industry, was obtained in high selectivity (up to 84%) by the decarboxylation of itaconic acid using heterogeneous catalysts based on Pd, Pt and Ru. The reaction takes place in water at 200-250 °C without any external added pressure, conditions significantly milder than those described previously for the same conversion with better yield and selectivity. A comprehensive study of the reaction parameters has been performed, and the isolation of methacrylic acid was achieved in 50% yield. The decarboxylation procedure is also applicable to citric acid, a more widely available bio-based feedstock, and leads to the production of methacrylic acid in one pot in 41% selectivity. Aconitic acid, the intermediate compound in the pathway from citric acid to itaconic acid was also used successfully as a substrate. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Application of poly(aspartic acid-citric acid copolymer compound inhibitor as an effective and environmental agent against calcium phosphate in cooling water systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-ling Zhang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Poly(aspartic acid-citric acid copolymer (PAC is a new product of poly(carboxylic acid scale inhibitor. The study aims to develop a “green” water treatment agent for calcium phosphate scale. The article compares the efficiency of three polymeric antiscalants, poly(aspartic acid-citric acid copolymer (PAC, polymaleic acid (HPMA and a compound inhibitor (PAC-HPMA, for calcium phosphate scale prevention under varying experimental conditions. Inhibitor concentration, calcium concentration, system pH, temperature and experimental time were varied to determine their influences on inhibitor performance by the static scale inhibition method. The copolymer (PAC was characterized by FTIR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR. The compound inhibitor was applied in the actual circulating cooling water system. An atomic force microscope (AFM, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD and a scale formation process analysis were used to explore the scale inhibition mechanism. The results showed that scale inhibition rates of PAC, HPMA and PAC-HPMA against Ca3(PO42 were, respectively, about 23%, 41.5% and 63% when the dosage was 8 mg/L in the experiment. The compound inhibitor showed the better inhibition performance than the above two kinds of monomers. Under the actual working conditions, the inhibition rate of compound inhibitor was close to 100% and completely met the actual application requirements of scale inhibitor in circulating cooling water systems. The main inhibition mechanism was the decomposition-chelation dispersion effect. The compound inhibitor can be used as an efficient “green” scale inhibitor for calcium phosphate.

  17. The effect of EDTA and citric acid on phytoremediation of Cd, Cr, and Ni from soil using Helianthus annuus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgut, Cafer; Katie Pepe, M.; Cutright, Teresa J

    2004-09-01

    The possibility to clean heavy metal contaminated soils with hyperaccumulator plants has shown great potential. One of the most recently studied species used in phytoremediation applications are sunflowers. In this study, two cultivars of Helianthus annuus were used in conjunction with ethylene diamine tetracetic acid (EDTA) and citric acid (CA) as chelators. Two different concentrations of the chelators were studied for enhancing the uptake and translocation of Cd, Cr, and Ni from a silty-clay loam soil. When 1.0 g/kg CA was used, the highest total metal uptake was only 0.65 mg. Increasing the CA concentration posed a severe phytotoxicity to both cultivars as evidenced by stunted growth and diminished uptake rates. Decreasing the CA concentration to 0.1 and 0.3 g/kg yielded results that were not statistically different from the control. EDTA at a concentration of 0.1 g/kg yielded the best results for both cultivars achieving a total metal uptake of {approx}0.73 mg compared to {approx}0.40 mg when EDTA was present at 0.3 g/kg.

  18. The role of citric acid in oral peptide and protein formulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welling, Søren H; Hubálek, František; Jacobsen, Jette

    2014-01-01

    The excipient citric acid (CA) has been reported to improve oral absorption of peptides by different mechanisms. The balance between its related properties of calcium chelation and permeation enhancement compared to a proteolysis inhibition was examined. A predictive model of CA's calcium chelation...... to pH 3. CA was an inferior weak permeation enhancer compared to LCC in both in vitro models using physiological buffers. At pH 4.5 however, degradation of insulin in rat luminal extracts was significantly inhibited in the presence of 10mM CA. The capacity of CA to chelate luminal calcium does...... not occur significantly at the acidic pH values where it effectively inhibits proteolysis, which is its dominant action in oral peptide formulations. On account of insulin's low basal permeability, inclusion of alternative permeation enhancers is likely to be necessary to achieve sufficient oral...

  19. Quantification of uranyl in presence of citric acid; Cuantificacion de uranilo en presencia de acido citrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia G, N.; Barrera D, C.E. [UAEM, Facultad de Quimica, 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ordonez R, E. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: nidgg@yahoo.com.mx

    2007-07-01

    To determine the influence that has the organic matter of the soil on the uranyl sorption on some solids is necessary to have a detection technique and quantification of uranyl that it is reliable and sufficiently quick in the obtaining of results. For that in this work, it intends to carry out the uranyl quantification in presence of citric acid modifying the Fluorescence induced by UV-Vis radiation technique. Since the uranyl ion is very sensitive to the medium that contains it, (speciation, pH, ionic forces, etc.) it was necessary to develop an analysis technique that stands out the fluorescence of uranyl ion avoiding the out one that produce the organic acids. (Author)

  20. Fabrication of a glucose biosensor based on citric acid assisted cobalt ferrite magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Rahul; Titus, Elby; Chandra, Sudeshna; Bardhan, Neel Kanth; Krishna, Rohit; Bahadur, Dhirendra; Gracio, José

    2012-08-01

    A novel and practical glucose biosensor was fabricated with immobilization of Glucose oxidase (GOx) enzyme on the surface of citric acid (CA) assisted cobalt ferrite (CF) magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). This innovative sensor was constructed with glassy carbon electrode which is represented as (GOx)/CA-CF/(GCE). An explicit high negative zeta potential value (-22.4 mV at pH 7.0) was observed on the surface of CA-CF MNPs. Our sensor works on the principle of detection of H2O2 which is produced by the enzymatic oxidation of glucose to gluconic acid. This sensor has tremendous potential for application in glucose biosensing due to the higher sensitivity 2.5 microA/cm2-mM and substantial increment of the anodic peak current from 0.2 microA to 10.5 microA.

  1. Influence of citric acid on the surface texture of glass ionomer restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Dappili Swami Ranga; Kumar, Ramachandran Anil; Venkatesan, Sokkalingam Mothilal; Narayan, Gopal Shankar; Duraivel, Dasarathan; Indra, Rajamani

    2014-09-01

    This study determined the effectiveness of G-coat plus surface protective agent over petroleum jelly on the surface texture of conventional Glass ionomer restorative materials. Three chemically cured conventional glass ionomer restorative materials type II, type IX and ketac molar were evaluated in this study. Sixty specimens were made for each restorative material. They were divided into two groups of thirty specimens each. Of the sixty specimens, thirty were coated with G-coat plus (a nano-filler coating) and the rest with petroleum jelly. Thirty samples of both protective coating agents were randomly divided into six groups of five specimens and conditioned in citric acid solutions of differing pH (pH 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 & 7). Each specimen was kept in citric acid for three hours a day, and the rest of time stored in salivary substitute. This procedure was repeated for 8 days. After conditioning, the surface roughness (Ra, μm) of each specimen was measured using a surface profilometer (Taylor & Habson, UK). Data was analyzed using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's HSD test at a significance level of 0.05. The surface textures of all the tested glass ionomer restorative materials protected with G-coat plus were not significantly affected by acids at low pH. The surface textures of all the tested glass ionomer restorative materials protected with petroleum jelly coating were significantly affected by acids at low pH. The effects of pH on the surface texture of glass ionomer restoratives are material dependent. Among all the materials tested the surface texture of Type II GIC (Group I) revealed marked deterioration when conditioned in solutions of low pH and was statistically significant. Hence, a protective coating either with G-coat plus or with light polymerized low viscosity unfilled resin adhesives is mandatory for all the glass ionomer restorations to increase the wear resistance of the restorative materials.

  2. Effect of EDTA and citric acid on phytoremediation of Cr- B[a]P-co-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chigbo, Chibuike; Batty, Lesley

    2013-12-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals in the environment are a concern, and their removal to acceptable level is required. Phytoremediation, the use of plants to treat contaminated soils, could be an interesting alternative to conventional remediation processes. This work evaluates the role of single and combined applications of chelates to single or mixed Cr + benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P)-contaminated soil. Medicago sativa was grown in contaminated soil and was amended with 0.3 g citric acid, 0.146 g ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), or their combination for 60 days. The result shows that in Cr-contaminated soil, the application of EDTA + citric acid significantly (pcitric acid in Cr-contaminated soil (44 %) or EDTA and EDTA + citric acid in co-contaminated soil increased the removal of Cr from the soil (34 and 54 %, respectively). The dissipation of B[a]P in single B[a]P-contaminated soil was effective even without planting and amendment with chelates, while in co-contaminated soil, it was related to the application of either EDTA or EDTA + citric acid. This suggests that M. sativa with the help of chelates in single or co-contaminated soil can be effective in phytoextraction of Cr and promoting the biodegradation of B[a]P.

  3. Effect of forced aeration on citric acid production by Aspergillus sp. mutants in SSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Cristine; Vandenberghe, Luciana P S; Sturm, Wilerson; Dergint, Dario E A; Spier, Michele Rigon; de Carvalho, Júlio Cesar; Soccol, Carlos R

    2013-12-01

    Citric acid (CA) is one of the most important products of fermentation in the world. A great variety of agro-industrial residues can be used in solid state fermentation. Aspergillus niger parental strain (CCT 7716) and two strains obtained by mutagenesis (CCT 7717 and CCT 7718) were evaluated in Erlenmeyer flasks and glass columns using citric pulp (CP) as substrate/support, sugarcane molasses and methanol. Best results using glass columns (forced aeration) were found in the fourth day of fermentation: 278.4, 294.9 and 261.1 g CA/kg of dry CP with CCT 7716, CCT 7718 and CCT 7717, respectively. In Erlenmeyer flasks (aeration by diffusion) CA reached 410.7, 446.8 and 492.7 g CA/kg of dry CP with CCT 7716, CCT 7718 and CCT 7717, respectively. The aeration by diffusion improved CA production by the three strains. A data acquisition system specially developed for biotechnological processes analysis was used to perform the respirometric parameters measurement.

  4. Optimization of ethanol, citric acid, and α-amylase production from date wastes by strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Aspergillus niger, and Candida guilliermondii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acourene, S; Ammouche, A

    2012-05-01

    The present study deals with submerged ethanol, citric acid, and α-amylase fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae SDB, Aspergillus niger ANSS-B5, and Candida guilliermondii CGL-A10, using date wastes as the basal fermentation medium. The physical and chemical parameters influencing the production of these metabolites were optimized. As for the ethanol production, the optimum yield obtained was 136.00 ± 0.66 g/l under optimum conditions of an incubation period of 72 h, inoculum content of 4% (w/v), sugars concentration of 180.0 g/l, and ammonium phosphate concentration of 1.0 g/l. Concerning citric acid production, the cumulative effect of temperature (30°C), sugars concentration of 150.0 g/l, methanol concentration of 3.0%, initial pH of 3.5, ammonium nitrate concentration of 2.5 g/l, and potassium phosphate concentration of 2.5 g/l during the fermentation process of date wastes syrup did increase the citric acid production to 98.42 ± 1.41 g/l. For the production of α-amylase, the obtained result shows that the presence of starch strongly induces the production of α-amylase with a maximum at 5.0 g/l. Among the various nitrogen sources tested, urea at 5.0 g/l gave the maximum biomass and α-amylase estimated at 5.76 ± 0.56 g/l and 2,304.19 ± 31.08 μmol/l/min, respectively after 72 h incubation at 30°C, with an initial pH of 6.0 and potassium phosphate concentration of 6.0 g/l.

  5. Electron Donor-Acceptor Interaction of 8-Hydroxyquinoline with Citric Acid in Different Solvents: Spectroscopic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demelash Jado

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Charge transfer complex formation between 8-hydroxyquinoline as the electron donor and citric acid as the electron acceptor has been studied spectrophotometrically in ethanol and methanol solvents at room temperature. Absorption band due to charge transfer complex formation was observed near 320 and 325 nm in ethanol and methanol, respectively. The stoichiometric ratio of the complex has been found 3 : 1 by using Job’s and conductometric titration methods. Benesi-Hildebrand equation has been applied to estimate the formation constant and molecular extinction coefficient. It was found that the value of formation constant was larger in ethanol than in methanol. The physical parameters, ionization potential, and standard free energy change of the formed complex were determined and evaluated in the ethanol and methanol solvents.

  6. Properties of baked foams from citric acid modified cassava starch and native cassava starch blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pornsuksomboon, Kanlaya; Holló, Berta Barta; Szécsényi, Katalin Mészáros; Kaewtatip, Kaewta

    2016-01-20

    Starch foams from native cassava starch (NS) and citric acid modified cassava starch (CNS) were prepared using baking processes with blend ratios of 80/20, 60/40, 50/50, 40/60 and 20/80. The density, thickness, morphology, thermal stability and water absorption of the NS, CNS and blended starch foams were determined. The ratio of the two starch components had a significant influence on the density and thickness of the blended starch foams. All blended starch foams showed good water resistance. Moreover, the morphology of the blended starch foam with the NS/CNS ratio of 50/50 showed a more ordered distribution of cell sizes with thicker cell walls than for the NS and CNS foams. The thermal stability of the blended starch foams was somewhat lower than the stability of the NS foam but not to the extent that it affected any potential practical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Modeling Breakthrough Curves of Citric Acid Adsorption onto Anionic Resins in an Aqueous Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohrabali Ghorbanian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Breakthrough curves for citric acid adsorption from aqueous solution onto ion-exchange resin at 20, 35, and 55°C have been investigated. To predict breakthrough curves, three mathematical models have been analyzed based on the values of the least square method parameters, Durbin-Watson test, and mean relative percent error and, finally, appropriate models have been achieved. Models are in good agreement with experimental data based on the results. To examine models reliabilities and accuracy, models have been compared by various breakthrough curve data obtained by other investigators. The results show appropriate agreement and in some cases regression errors have been reduced to less than 1.0 percent.

  8. The effect of root planing and citric acid applications on flap healing in humans. A histologic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashani, H G; Magner, A W; Stahl, S S

    1984-12-01

    Four human teeth and their facial gingival attachment were removed en block 3 months after periodontal flap therapy and citric acid root conditioning and then prepared for histologic evaluation. At the time of periodontal surgery, and prior to citric acid application, the facial root surface was grooved at midline and citric acid was applied only to one-half of each root surface. Tissues were decalcified and histologically prepared as horizontally oriented, step serial sections from the level of the gingival margin to the level of the facial crest. The gingival margins demonstrated reformation of a crevice. The corium at this level showed a mild inflammatory infiltrate. Apical to this level, junctional epithelium adhered to both sides of the root surface and to the central groove. Further apically, supracrestal fiber groups were encountered. No new cementum was noted in these areas. Fiber attachment was present apical to this level. Since no new cementum was seen at this area of attachment, it may represent collagen attachment present prior to periodontal surgery. In the four specimens examined, no differences were seen in the soft tissue closures between the root-planed citric acid-treated root surfaces and root surfaces which received root planing alone.

  9. 76 FR 77772 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-14

    ... of Fair Trade for Imports and Exports, submitted case briefs. RZBC, Yixing Union, and Petitioners... International Trade Administration Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts from the People's Republic of China... Administration, International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. SUMMARY: On June 10, 2011, the...

  10. Effects of ultraviolet irradiation on bonding strength between Co-Cr alloy and citric acid-crosslinked gelatin matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Motoki; Sasaki, Makoto; Katada, Yasuyuki; Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2014-02-01

    Novel techniques for creating a strong bond between polymeric matrices and biometals are required. We immobilized polymeric matrices on the surface of biometal for drug-eluting stents through covalent bond. We performed to improve the bonding strength between a cobalt-chromium alloy and a citric acid-crosslinked gelatin matrix by ultraviolet irradiation on the surface of cobalt-chromium alloy. The ultraviolet irradiation effectively generated hydroxyl groups on the surface of the alloy. The bonding strength between the gelatin matrix and the alloy before ultraviolet irradiation was 0.38 ± 0.02 MPa, whereas it increased to 0.48 ± 0.02 MPa after ultraviolet irradiation. Surface analysis showed that the citric acid derivatives occurred on the surface of the cobalt-chromium alloy through ester bond. Therefore, ester bond formation between the citric acid derivatives active esters and the hydroxyl groups on the cobalt-chromium alloy contributed to the enhanced bonding strength. Ultraviolet irradiation and subsequent immobilization of a gelatin matrix using citric acid derivatives is thus an effective way to functionalize biometal surfaces.

  11. 77 FR 33167 - Citric Acid and Certain Citrate Salts From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Results of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ... High and New Technology Industry Development Project.'' Consistent with the Citric Acid First Review... citrate salts from the PRC and Canada. See CVD Order, 74 FR 25703. On February 14, 2011, the Department... information, and the industry and commerce administrations do not require companies to provide such...

  12. CITRIC-ACID COUGH THRESHOLD AND AIRWAY RESPONSIVENESS IN ASTHMATIC-PATIENTS AND SMOKERS WITH CHRONIC AIR-FLOW OBSTRUCTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    AUFFARTH, B; DEMONCHY, JGR; VANDERMARK, TW; POSTMA, DS; KOETER, GH

    The relation between citric acid cough threshold and airway hyperresponsiveness was investigated in 11 non-smoking patients with allergic asthma (mean FEV1 94% predicted) and 25 non-atopic smokers with chronic airflow obstruction (mean FEV1 65% predicted). Cough threshold was determined on two

  13. The effect of pH on hydrolysis, cross-linking and barrier properties of starch barriers containing citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Erik; Menzel, Carolin; Johansson, Caisa; Andersson, Roger; Koch, Kristine; Järnström, Lars

    2013-11-06

    Citric acid cross-linking of starch for e.g. food packaging applications has been intensely studied during the last decade as a method of producing water-insensitive renewable barrier coatings. We managed to improve a starch formulation containing citric acid as cross-linking agent for industrial paper coating applications by adjusting the pH of the starch solution. The described starch formulations exhibited both cross-linking of starch by citric acid as well as satisfactory barrier properties, e.g. fairly low OTR values at 50% RH that are comparable with EVOH. Furthermore, it has been shown that barrier properties of coated papers with different solution pH were correlated to molecular changes in starch showing both hydrolysis and cross-linking of starch molecules in the presence of citric acid. Hydrolysis was shown to be almost completely hindered at solution pH≥4 at curing temperatures≤105 °C and at pH≥5 at curing temperatures≤150 °C, whereas cross-linking still occurred to some extent at pH≤6.5 and drying temperatures as low as 70 °C. Coated papers showed a minimum in water vapor transmission rate at pH 4 of the starch coating solution, corresponding to the point where hydrolysis was effectively hindered but where a significant degree of cross-linking still occurred. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Citric Acid on MoO3/Al2O3 Catalysts for Sulfur-Resistant Methanation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dajun Meng; Baowei Wang; Wenxia Yu; Weihan Wang; Zhenhua Li; Xinbin Ma

    2017-01-01

    A series of MoO3/Al2O3 catalysts with different amounts (molar ratio of CA/Mo = 0, 1, 1.5, and 2) of citric acid (CA) prepared by simultaneous impregnation were evaluated for sulfur-resistant methanation...

  15. Survival of Listeria innocua in rainbow trout protein recovered by isoelectric solubilization and precipitation with acetic and citric acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, R A; Paker, I; Bane, L; Beamer, S; Jaczynski, J; Matak, K E

    2011-08-01

    During mechanical fish processing, a substantial amount of protein is discarded as by-products. Isoelectric solubilization and precipitation (ISP) is a process that uses extreme pH shifts to solubilize and precipitate protein from by-products to recover previously discarded protein. Typically, strong acids are used for pH reduction, but these acids do not have a pasteurization effect (6 log reduction) on bacterial load; therefore, organic acids were used during ISP processing to test the impact on Listeria innocua concentrations. Headed and gutted rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were inoculated with L. innocua, homogenized, and brought to the target pH with granular citric acid (pH 2.0 and 2.5) or glacial acetic acid (pH 3.0 and 3.5). Proteins were solubilized for 10 min at 4°C, and insoluble components (e.g., skin and insoluble protein) were removed by centrifugation. The remaining solution was pH shifted to the protein isoelectric point (pH 5.5) with sodium hydroxide, and precipitated protein was separated from the water. Microbial cells for each component (proteins, insolubles, and water) were enumerated on modified Oxford agar (MOX) and tryptic soy agar with 6% yeast extract (TSAYE). The sums of the surviving cells from each component were compared with the initial inoculum levels. No significant differences were observed between results obtained from TSAYE and from MOX (P > 0.05). Significant reductions in microbial populations were detected, regardless of pH or acid type (P acid, resulting in a mean reduction of 6.41 log CFU/g in the recovered protein and 5.88 log CFU/g in the combined components. These results demonstrate the antimicrobial potential of organic acids in ISP processing.

  16. Influence of Citric Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide on Postharvest Quality of Tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa L. ‘Pearl’ Cut Flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahimian-Boogar Abdolrahman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Quality of cut flowers is an important issue at postharvest as well as an important factor contributing to marketing of and profitability from the tuberose. In this study, the effects of citric acid (CA and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 added to the vase water on postharvest quality of tuberose cut flowers were investigated. CA was applied in concentrations of 50, 100, 200, 400 mg·dm−3 and H2O2 in concentrations of 10, 20, 40 and 80 mg·dm−3 and distilled water as control treatment. Results showed that both compounds had significant positive effects on solution uptake, wilting and abscission of florets, relative water content, chlorophyll content, and vase life duration. The effects of 100 and 200 mg·dm−3 of CA and 20 and 40 mg·dm−3 of H2O2 proved to be more effective than other treatments. Both compounds increased the vase life of tuberose cut flowers and CA at concentrations 100 and 200 mg dm−3 and H2O2 at concentrations 20 and 40 mg dm−3 doubled this time up to 14-17 days.

  17. The Unusual Acid-Accumulating Behavior during Ripening of Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill. is Linked to Changes in Transcription and Enzyme Activity Related to Citric and Malic Acid Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio González-Agüero

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cherimoya (Annona cherimola Mill. is a subtropical fruit characterized by a significant increase in organic acid levels during ripening, making it an interesting model for studying the relationship between acidity and fruit flavor. In this work, we focused on understanding the balance between the concentration of organic acids and the gene expression and activity of enzymes involved in the synthesis and degradation of these metabolites during the development and ripening of cherimoya cv. “Concha Lisa”. Our results showed an early accumulation of citric acid and other changes associated with the accumulation of transcripts encoding citrate catabolism enzymes. During ripening, a 2-fold increase in malic acid and a 6-fold increase in citric acid were detected. By comparing the contents of these compounds with gene expression and enzymatic activity levels, we determined that cytoplasmic NAD-dependent malate dehydrogenase (cyNAD-MDH and mitochondrial citrate synthase (mCS play important regulatory roles in the malic and citric acid biosynthetic pathways.

  18. Bioremediation of arsenic from water with citric acid cross-linked water hyacinth (E. crassipes) root powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogoi, Pankaj; Adhikari, Pooja; Maji, Tarun K

    2017-08-01

    A green and novel approach was demonstrated for successful remediation of arsenic from contaminated water by citric acid (CA) cross-linked water hyacinth root powder (RP). Different analytical techniques were used to investigate the binding and structural properties of prepared materials. Titanium dioxide played a significant role in the cross-linking process. Incorporation of CA into RP enhanced its integrity, and thus removal efficiency remained unaffected after several cyclic runs. Also the turbidity which formed due to treatment with uncross-linked RP was reduced to below the permissible limit. Effect of the amount of CA, material dose, treatment time, initial ion concentration, and pH were investigated. Use of 10% (w/w) CA was found to be sufficient to bring down the turbidity of the treated water below 2.5 nephelometric turbidity unit (NTU) without hampering the removal capacity/rate. A material dose of 5 g/L removed successfully total inorganic arsenic concentration to below 10 μg/L. The sorption process could be reasonably explained by Langmuir isotherm, and the maximum adsorption capacity was found to be 28 μg of arsenic/g. The material was found to be more efficient at acidic pH (pHZPC = 6.72). The sorption process was governed by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  19. Human tooth enamel dissolution in citric acid as a function of degree of saturation and pH

    CERN Document Server

    Barbour, M E

    2002-01-01

    There is increasing concern among the dental community regarding the damage caused to teeth by the acids in soft drinks. Enamel dissolution in acidic solution can be reduced by addition of calcium and/or phosphate salts to increase the degree of saturation with respect to hydroxyapatite (DS sub H sub A), or by an increase in pH. In soft drinks, however, both of these approaches are associated with a reduced taste quality. The separate effects of each parameter are not known. In the work presented here, enamel dissolution was studied in citric acid solutions with compositions typical of soft drinks. Nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to investigate very early stages of enamel dissolution, with typical exposure times of 30-600 s. Preliminary investigations of the application of SIMS, ESEM and XPS to enamel dissolution studies are also reported. The individual effects of DS sub H sub A , pH and calcium and phosphate concentrations on enamel dissolution have been investigated. It was show...

  20. The opposite roles of agdA and glaA on citric acid production in Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Cao, Zhanglei; Hou, Li; Yin, Liuhua; Wang, Dawei; Gao, Qiang; Wu, Zhenqiang; Wang, Depei

    2016-07-01

    Citric acid is produced by an industrial-scale process of fermentation using Aspergillus niger as a microbial cell factory. However, citric acid production was hindered by the non-fermentable isomaltose and insufficient saccharification ability in A. niger when liquefied corn starch was used as a raw material. In this study, A. niger TNA 101ΔagdA was constructed by deletion of the α-glucosidase-encoding agdA gene in A. niger CGMCC 10142 genome using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. The transformants A. niger OG 1, OG 17, and OG 31 then underwent overexpression of glucoamylase in A. niger TNA 101ΔagdA. The results showed that the α-glucosidase activity of TNA 101ΔagdA was decreased by 62.5 % compared with CGMCC 10142, and isomaltose was almost undetectable in the fermentation broth. The glucoamylase activity of the transformants OG 1 and OG 17 increased by 34.5 and 16.89 % compared with that of TNA 101ΔagdA, respectively. In addition, for the recombinants TNA 101ΔagdA, OG 1 and OG 17, there were no apparent defects in the growth development. Consequently, in comparison with CGMCC 10142, TNA 101ΔagdA and OG 1 decreased the residual reducing sugar by 52.95 and 88.24 %, respectively, and correspondingly increased citric acid production at the end of fermentation by 8.68 and 16.87 %. Citric acid production was further improved by decreasing the non-fermentable residual sugar and increasing utilization rate of corn starch material in A. niger. Besides, the successive saccharification and citric acid fermentation processes were successfully integrated into one step.

  1. Postrigor citric acid enhancement can alter cooked color but not fresh color of dark-cutting beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stackhouse, R J; Apple, J K; Yancey, J W S; Keys, C A; Johnson, T M; Mehall, L N

    2016-04-01

    In 2 experiments, dark-cutting (DC) beef strip loins were used to test the effects of citric acid-enhancement pH on visual and instrumental color of fresh and cooked steaks. In Exp. 1 and 2, each DC (mean pH = 6.57 and 6.65, respectively) and normal-pH, low USDA Choice (CH; mean pH = 5.48 and 5.51, respectively) strip loin was cut into 2 equal-length sections, and DC sections were injected to 111% of raw section weight with pH 3.5 to 5.0 (Exp. 1) or pH 2.0 to 3.5 (Exp. 2) solutions made by mixing citric acid in either 0.05% orthophosphate (PO) solution or tap water (HO) base solutions (Exp. 1) and 0.5% PO or 0.5% tripolyphosphate solution base solutions (Exp. 2). After enhancement, sections were cut into steaks, which were assigned to either 5 d of simulated retail display or cooked to 71°C for cooked color measurement. Postenhancement pH of DC steaks enhanced with pH 3.5 to 5.0 solutions did not ( ≥ 0.180) differ from that of nonenhanced DC steaks (Exp. 1) but linearly decreased ( citric acid enhancement over untreated DC steaks during the first 3 d of display, fresh steak color never ( citric acid enhancement solutions, regardless of base solution, were insufficient to improve the fresh color of DC beef; however, enhancement with pH 2.5 citric acid solutions effectively eliminated the persistent red cooked color typically associated with DC beef comparable with that of normal-pH beef.

  2. Phytoextraction of contaminated urban soils by Panicum virgatum L. enhanced with application of a plant growth regulator (BAP) and citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderholt, Matthew; Vogelien, Dale L; Koether, Marina; Greipsson, Sigurdur

    2017-05-01

    Lead (Pb) contamination in soil represents a threat to human health. Phytoextraction has gained attention as a potential alternative to traditional remediation methods because of lower cost and minimal soil disruption. The North American native switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) was targeted due to its ability to produce high biomass and grow across a variety of ecozones. In this study switchgrass was chemically enhanced with applications of the soil-fungicide benomyl, chelates (EDTA and citric acid), and PGR to optimize phytoextraction of Pb and zinc (Zn) from contaminated urban soils in Atlanta, GA. Exogenous application of two plant hormones was compared in multiple concentrations to determine effects on switchgrass growth: indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and Gibberellic Acid (GA3), and one PGR benzylaminopurine (BAP), The PGR BAP (1.0 μM) was found to generate a 48% increase in biomass compared to Control plants. Chemical application of citric acid, EDTA, benomyl, and BAP were tested separately and in combination in a pot experiment in an environmentally controlled greenhouse to determine the efficacy of phtyoextraction by switchgrass. Soil acidification by citric acid application resulted in highest level of aluminum (Al) and iron (Fe) in plants foliage resulting in severe phytotoxic effects. Total Pb phytoextraction was significantly highest in plants treated with combined chemical application of B + C and B + C + H. Suppression of AMF activities by benomyl application significantly increased concentrations of Al and Fe in roots. Application of benomyl reduced AMF colonization but was also shown to dramatically increase levels of septa fungi infection as compared to Control plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Citric acid production from partly deproteinized whey under non-sterile culture conditions using immobilized cells of lactose-positive and cold-adapted Yarrowia lipolytica B9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Nazli Pinar; Aydogan, Mehmet Nuri; Taskin, Mesut

    2016-08-10

    The present study was performed to produce citric acid (CA) from partly deproteinized cheese whey (DPCW) under non-sterile culture conditions using immobilized cells of the cold-adapted and lactose-positive yeast Yarrowia lipolytica B9. DPCW was prepared using the temperature treatment of 90°C for 15min. Sodium alginate was used as entrapping agent for cell immobilization. Optimum conditions for the maximum CA production (33.3g/L) in non-sterile DPCW medium were the temperature of 20°C, pH 5.5, additional lactose concentration of 20g/L, sodium alginate concentration of 2%, number of 150 beads/100mL and incubation time of 120h. Similarly, maximum citric acid/isocitric acid (CA/ICA) ratio (6.79) could be reached under these optimal conditions. Additional nitrogen and phosphorus sources decreased CA concentration and CA/ICA ratio. Immobilized cells were reused in three continuous reaction cycles without any loss in the maximum CA concentration. The unique combination of low pH and temperature values as well as cell immobilization procedure could prevent undesired microbial contaminants during CA production. This is the first work on CA production by cold-adapted microorganisms under non-sterile culture conditions. Besides, CA production using a lactose-positive strain of the yeast Y. lipolytica was investigated for the first time in the present study. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of pioglitazone, quercetin and hydroxy citric acid on extracellular matrix components in experimentally induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surapaneni Krishna Mohan

    2015-08-01

    Results:The experimental NASH rats treated with pioglitazone showed significant decrease in the levels of hyaluronic acid and significant increase in adiponectin levels when compared to experimentally induced NASH group, but did not show any effect on the levels of leptin. Contrary to these two drugs, viz. pioglitazone and hydroxy citric acid, the group treated with quercetin showedsignificant decrease in the levels of hyaluronic acid and leptin and significant decrease in adiponectin levels compared with that of experimentally induced NASH NASH group, offering maximum protection against NASH. Conclusion: Considering our findings, it could be concluded that quercetin may offer maximum protection against NASH by significantly increasing the levels of adiponectin, when compared to pioglitazone and hydroxy citric acid.

  5. Adsorption and Selective Recovery of Citric Acid with Poly(4-vinylpyridine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Bergh, Matthias; Van de Voorde, Ben; De Vos, Dirk

    2017-10-24

    Citric acid (CA) is an important organic acid that is produced on a large scale by fermentation. Current methods to recover CA from the fermentation broth require large amounts of chemicals and produce considerable amounts of waste, while not all CA can be recovered. The use of adsorbents can increase the degree of product recovery and reduce chemical consumption and waste generation. In this work, poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PVP) is evaluated as an adsorbent for CA recovery. It has a high adsorption capacity (>30 wt %) at low pH and a high selectivity for CA at moderate pH in the presence of sulfate anions, two conditions that are frequently encountered during CA recovery. PVP could be efficiently regenerated after adsorption using simple alcohols like methanol and ethanol. Considering selectivity and regeneration, PVP distinctly outperforms more common adsorbents for organic acids, including commercial strongly and weakly basic anion exchangers. The desirable adsorptive features of PVP for CA can be attributed to the low basicity of the pyridine group. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Stimulatory effect of alcohols (methanol and ethanol) on citric acid productivity by a 2-deoxy D-glucose resistant culture of aspergillus niger GCB-47.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Ikram-Ul; Ali, Sikander; Qadeer, M A; Iqbal, Javed

    2003-02-01

    The present study describes citric acid fermentation by Aspergillus niger GCB-47 in a 15-1 stainless steel stirred fermentor. Among the alcohols tested as stimulating agents, 1.0% (v/v) methanol was found to give maximum amount of anhydrous citric acid (90.02 +/- 2.2 g/l), 24 h after inoculation. This yield of citric acid was 1.96 fold higher than the control. Methanol has a direct effect on mycelial morphology and it promotes pellet formation. It also increases the cell membrane permeability to provoke more citric acid excretion from the mycelial cells. The sugar consumed and % citric acid was 108 +/- 3.8 g/l and 80.39 +/- 4.5%, respectively. The desirable mycelial morphology was in the form of small round pellets having dry cell mass 14.5 +/- 0.8 g/l. Addition of ethanol, however, did not found to enhance citric acid production, significantly. The maximum value of Yp/x (i.e., 5.825 +/- 0.25 g/g) was observed when methanol was used as a stimulating agent. The best results of anhydrous citric acid were observed, 6 days after inoculation when the initial pH of fermentation medium was kept at 6.0.

  7. Effect of pioglitazone, quercetin and hydroxy citric acid on extracellular matrix components in experimentally induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Surapaneni Krishna; Veeraraghavan, Vishnu Priya; Jainu, Mallika

    2015-08-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), is an important component of Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) spectrum, which progresses to the end stage liver disease, if not diagnosed and treated properly. The disproportionate production of pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines secreted from fat contributes to the pathogenesis of NASH. In this study, the comparative effect of pioglitazone, quercetin and hydroxy citric acid on extracellular matrix (ECM) component levels were studied in experimentally induced NASH. The experimental protocol consists of using 48 male Wister rats, which were divided into 8 groups. The levels of hyaluronic acid, leptin and adiponectin were monitored in experimental NASH. The experimental NASH rats treated with pioglitazone showed significant decrease in the levels of hyaluronic acid and significant increase in adiponectin levels when compared to experimentally induced NASH group, but did not show any effect on the levels of leptin. Contrary to these two drugs, viz. pioglitazone and hydroxy citric acid, the group treated with quercetin showed significant decrease in the levels of hyaluronic acid and leptin and significant decrease in adiponectin levels compared with that of experimentally induced NASH NASH group, offering maximum protection against NASH. Considering our findings, it could be concluded that quercetin may offer maximum protection against NASH by significantly increasing the levels of adiponectin, when compared to pioglitazone and hydroxy citric acid.

  8. Human tooth enamel dissolution in citric acid as a function of degree of saturation and pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbour, Michele Emily

    2002-07-01

    There is increasing concern among the dental community regarding the damage caused to teeth by the acids in soft drinks. Enamel dissolution in acidic solution can be reduced by addition of calcium and/or phosphate salts to increase the degree of saturation with respect to hydroxyapatite (DS{sub HA}), or by an increase in pH. In soft drinks, however, both of these approaches are associated with a reduced taste quality. The separate effects of each parameter are not known. In the work presented here, enamel dissolution was studied in citric acid solutions with compositions typical of soft drinks. Nanoindentation and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to investigate very early stages of enamel dissolution, with typical exposure times of 30-600 s. Preliminary investigations of the application of SIMS, ESEM and XPS to enamel dissolution studies are also reported. The individual effects of DS{sub HA}, pH and calcium and phosphate concentrations on enamel dissolution have been investigated. It was shown that there exists a threshold condition defined by calcium and phosphate concentrations and pH, below which there is considerable dissolution and a rapid dependence of dissolution rate on DS{sub HA}, and above which little or no discernible dissolution takes place. This threshold condition corresponds to a considerably undersaturated solution (DS{sub HA} {approx_equal} 0.1). However, contrary to assumptions in many enamel dissolution models in the literature, DS{sub HA} is not sufficient to predict the dissolution rate and the individual calcium and phosphate concentrations are also important. The dependence of enamel dissolution on pH is comparatively minor, with only a small change in dissolution rate for a change in pH. In terms of soft drink modification, it has been shown here that DS{sub HA} adjustment can be used to greatly reduce the rate of enamel dissolution, and that a concurrent change in pH may be superfluous. (author)

  9. Production performance and immune responses of broilers given single step down diet with inclution of citric acid as acidifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamilah .

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A research was conducted to examine the effect of lime and citric acid as acidifier with single step down feeding systems on immune response and production performance of broilers. Treatments applied were P0 (normal diet, P1 (single step down diet, P2 (single step down diet + citric acid 0.8%, P3 (single step down diet + lime acid 0.4% (6.9 ml/100g feed P4, (single step down diet + lime acid 0.8% (13.8 ml/100g feed and P5 (single step down diet + lime acid 1.2% (20.7 ml/100g feed. The parameters measured in this research were immune responses (percentage of bursa fabricius, spleen and heterophile lymphocyte ratio/H-L ratio and production performances (muscle protein mass, feed intake and body weight. Research was assigned in a completely randomized design with 6 treatments and 4 replications (8 birds each. Treatment was given one week until 6 week. The data were subjected to analysis of variance and continued to Duncan test at the level of 5% probability. The results showed that percentage of bursa fabricius were significantly (P < 0.05 different. Treatment P2 (0.13 showed the highest value and significantly different to that of compared to the others P1 (0.08, but the other treatments were the same. Percentages of spleen from treatments P0 and P1 were statistically different as compared to the others. HL ratio was the same among treatments P0, P1 and P3, but it was significantly different from those of treatments P2, P4 and P5. Based on the results of the present study it was concluded that inclusion of citric acid both natural and synthetic forms can improve immune responses and increase muscle protein mass especially due to the inclusion of synthetic citric acid.

  10. High-speed atomic force microscopy of dental enamel dissolution in citric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, Alice; Marks, Will; M Picco, Loren; G Dunton, Peter; Ulcinas, Arturas; E Barbour, Michele; B Jones, Siân; Gimzewski, James; J Miles, Mervyn

    2009-01-01

    High-speed atomic force microscopy (HS AFM) in 'contact' mode was used to image at video rate the surfaces of both calcium hydroxyapatite samples, often used as artificial dental enamel in such experiments, and polished actual bovine dental enamel in both neutral and acidic aqueous environments. The image in each frame of the video of the sample was a few micrometers square, and the high-speed scan window was panned across the sample in real time to examine larger areas. Conventional AFM images of the same regions of the sample were also recorded before and after high-speed imaging. The ability of HS AFM to follow processes occurring in liquid on the timescale of a few seconds was employed to study the dissolution process of both hydroxyapatite and bovine enamel under acidic conditions. Buffered citric acid at pH values between 3.0 and 4.0 was observed to dissolve the surface layers of these samples. The movies recorded showed rapid dissolution of the bovine enamel in particular, which proceeded until the relatively small amount of acid available had been exhausted. A comparison was made with enamel samples that had been treated in fluoride solution (1 h in 300 ppm NaF, pH 7) prior to addition of the acid; the speed of dissolution for these samples was much less than that of the untreated samples. The HS AFM used an in-house designed and constructed high-speed flexure scan stage employing a push-pull piezo actuator arrangement. The HS AFM is able to follow the large changes in height (on the micrometer scale) that occur during the dissolution process.

  11. Effect of citric acid dosage and sintered temperature on the composition, morphology and electrochemical properties of lithium vanadium oxide prepared by a sol-gel method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, C. R.; Su, X. J.; Hou, G. L.; Liu, Z. H.; Yu, F. S.; Bi, S.; Li, H.

    2017-03-01

    A lithium vanadium oxide cathode material was synthesized via sol-gel processing using citric acid as the chelating agent. Different dosage of citric acid and sintered temperature were introduced to investigate their effects on the products composition, morphology and electrochemical properties. The results showed that the V2O3 yield was inhibited and the crystallization of grain was accelerated with the increasing dosage of citric acid. Furthermore, V2O3 was oxidized to LiV3O8 and Li0.3V2O5 with the increase of sintered temperature.

  12. Iron Absorption from Two Milk Formulas Fortified with Iron Sulfate Stabilized with Maltodextrin and Citric Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Maciero, Eugenia; Krasnoff, Gustavo; Cócaro, Nicolas; Gaitan, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Background: Fortification of milk formulas with iron is a strategy widely used, but the absorption of non-heme iron is low. The purpose of this study was to measure the bioavailability of two iron fortified milk formulas designed to cover toddlers’ nutritional needs. These milks were fortified with iron sulfate stabilized with maltodextrin and citric acid. Methods: 15 women (33–47 years old) participated in study. They received on different days, after an overnight fast, 200 mL of Formula A; 200 mL of Formula B; 30 mL of a solution of iron and ascorbic acid as reference dose and 200 mL of full fat cow’s milk fortified with iron as ferrous sulfate. Milk formulas and reference dose were labeled with radioisotopes 59Fe or 55Fe, and the absorption of iron measured by erythrocyte incorporation of radioactive Fe. Results: The geometric mean iron absorption corrected to 40% of the reference dose was 20.6% for Formula A and 20.7% for Formula B, versus 7.5% of iron fortified cow’s milk (p < 0.001). The post hoc Sheffé indeed differences between the milk formulas and the cow’s milk (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Formulas A and B contain highly bioavailable iron, which contributes to covering toddlers’ requirements of this micronutrient. PMID:26529007

  13. Citric acid production from Aspergillus niger MT-4 using hydrolysate extract of the insect Locusta migratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Mesut; Tasar, Gani Erhan; Incekara, Umit

    2013-06-01

    Citric acid (CA) is the most important organic acid used in the food and other industries. Locusta migratoria is an insect species, which has rich nutritional composition (especially protein) and cultivated in some countries. Therefore, the present study investigated the usability of hydrolysate extract of L. migratoria biomass as substrate for the production of CA from Aspergillus niger MT-4. The insect extract (IE) was found to be rich in ash (34.9 g/100 g), protein (35.6 g/100 g) and mineral contents. Yeast extract was found to be the most favorable substrate for biomass production, whereas the maximum production of CA (41.8 g/L) was achieved in the medium containing IE. Besides, uniform pellets with the smallest size (4 mm) were observed in IE medium. It was thought that rich magnesium (6.78 g/100 g) and manganese (1.14 g/100 g) contents of IE increased the production of CA, resulting in the formation of small uniform pellets. This is the first report on the effect of protein-rich insect biomasses on the production of CA. In this regard, L. migratoria biomass was tested for the first time as a CA-production substrate.

  14. Metabolic peculiarities of the citric acid overproduction from glucose in yeasts Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamzolova, Svetlana V; Morgunov, Igor G

    2017-11-01

    Comparative study of 43 natural yeast strains belonging to 20 species for their capability for overproduction of citric acid (CA) from glucose under nitrogen limitation of cell growth was carried out. As a result, natural strain Yarrowia lipolytica VKM Y-2373 was selected. The effect of growth limitation by biogenic macroelements (nitrogen, phosphorus, or sulfur) on the CA production by the selected strain was studied. It was shown that yeasts Y. lipolytica grown under deficiency of nitrogen, phosphorus, or sulfur were able to excrete CA in industrially sufficient amounts (80-85g/L with the product yield (YCA) of 0.70-0.75g/g and the process selectivity of 92.5-95.3%). Based on the obtained data on activities of enzymes involved in the initial stages of glucose oxidation, the cycle of tricarboxylic acids, and the glyoxylate cycle, the conception of the mechanism responsible for the CA overproduction from glucose in Y. lipolytica was formulated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Plant Oils upon Lipase and Citric Acid Production in Yarrowia lipolytica Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farshad Darvishi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonconventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica degrades very efficiently hydrophobic substrates to produce organic acids, single-cell oil, lipases, and so forth. The aim of this study was to investigate the biochemical behavior and simultaneous production of valuable metabolites such as lipase, citric acid (CA, and single-cell protein (SCP by Yarrowia lipolytica DSM 3286 grown on various plant oils as sole carbon source. Among tested plant oils, olive oil proved to be the best medium for lipase and CA production. The Y. lipolytica DSM 3286 produced 34.6 ± 0.1 U/mL of lipase and also CA and SCP as by-product on olive oil medium supplemented with yeast extract. Urea, as organic nitrogen, was the best nitrogen source for CA production. The results of this study suggest that the two biotechnologically valuable products, lipase and CA, could be produced simultaneously by this strain using renewable low-cost substrates such as plant oils in one procedure.

  16. Crystal structures of carbamate kinase from Giardia lamblia bound with citric acid and AMP-PNP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kap Lim

    Full Text Available The parasite Giardia lamblia utilizes the L-arginine dihydrolase pathway to generate ATP from L-arginine. Carbamate kinase (CK catalyzes the last step in this pathway, converting ADP and carbamoyl phosphate to ATP and ammonium carbamate. Because the L-arginine pathway is essential for G. lamblia survival and absent in high eukaryotes including humans, the enzyme is a potential target for drug development. We have determined two crystal structures of G. lamblia CK (glCK with bound ligands. One structure, in complex with a nonhydrolyzable ATP analog, adenosine 5'-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP, was determined at 2.6 Å resolution. The second structure, in complex with citric acid bound in the postulated carbamoyl phosphate binding site, was determined in two slightly different states at 2.1 and 2.4 Å resolution. These structures reveal conformational flexibility of an auxiliary domain (amino acid residues 123-170, which exhibits open or closed conformations or structural disorder, depending on the bound ligand. The structures also reveal a smaller conformational change in a region associated the AMP-PNP adenine binding site. The protein residues involved in binding, together with a model of the transition state, suggest that catalysis follows an in-line, predominantly dissociative, phosphotransfer reaction mechanism, and that closure of the flexible auxiliary domain is required to protect the transition state from bulk solvent.

  17. Citric Acid Metabolism in Resistant Hypertension: Underlying Mechanisms and Metabolic Prediction of Treatment Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Lorenzo, Marta; Martinez, Paula J; Baldan-Martin, Montserrat; Ruiz-Hurtado, Gema; Prado, Jose Carlos; Segura, Julian; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G; Vivanco, Fernando; Ruilope, Luis Miguel; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria

    2017-11-01

    Resistant hypertension (RH) affects 9% to 12% of hypertensive adults. Prolonged exposure to suboptimal blood pressure control results in end-organ damage and cardiovascular risk. Spironolactone is the most effective drug for treatment, but not all patients respond and side effects are not negligible. Little is known on the mechanisms responsible for RH. We aimed to identify metabolic alterations in urine. In addition, a potential capacity of metabolites to predict response to spironolactone was investigated. Urine was collected from 29 patients with RH and from a group of 13 subjects with pseudo-RH. For patients, samples were collected before and after spironolactone administration and were classified in responders (n=19) and nonresponders (n=10). Nuclear magnetic resonance was applied to identify altered metabolites and pathways. Metabolites were confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Citric acid cycle was the pathway most significantly altered (Pcitric acid cycle and deregulation of reactive oxygen species homeostasis control continue its activation after hypertension was developed. A metabolic panel showing alteration before spironolactone treatment and predicting future response of patients is shown. These molecular indicators will contribute optimizing the rate of control of RH patients with spironolactone. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Iron Absorption from Two Milk Formulas Fortified with Iron Sulfate Stabilized with Maltodextrin and Citric Acid

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    Fernando Pizarro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fortification of milk formulas with iron is a strategy widely used, but the absorption of non-heme iron is low. The purpose of this study was to measure the bioavailability of two iron fortified milk formulas designed to cover toddlers´ nutritional needs. These milks were fortified with iron sulfate stabilized with maltodextrin and citric acid. Methods: 15 women (33–47 years old participated in study. They received on different days, after an overnight fast, 200 mL of Formula A; 200 mL of Formula B; 30 mL of a solution of iron and ascorbic acid as reference dose and 200 mL of full fat cow’s milk fortified with iron as ferrous sulfate. Milk formulas and reference dose were labeled with radioisotopes 59Fe or 55Fe, and the absorption of iron measured by erythrocyte incorporation of radioactive Fe. Results: The geometric mean iron absorption corrected to 40% of the reference dose was 20.6% for Formula A and 20.7% for Formula B, versus 7.5% of iron fortified cow’s milk (p < 0.001. The post hoc Sheffé indeed differences between the milk formulas and the cow’s milk (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Formulas A and B contain highly bioavailable iron, which contributes to covering toddlers´ requirements of this micronutrient.

  19. Use of enhanced nisin derivatives in combination with food-grade oils or citric acid to control Cronobacter sakazakii and Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campion, Alicia; Morrissey, Ruth; Field, Des; Cotter, Paul D; Hill, Colin; Ross, R Paul

    2017-08-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii and Escherichia coli O157:H7 are well known food-borne pathogens that can cause severe disease. The identification of new alternatives to heating to control these pathogens in foods, while reducing the impact on organoleptic properties and nutritional value, is highly desirable. In this study, nisin and its bioengineered variants, nisin V and nisin S29A, are used alone, or in combination with plant essential oils (thymol, carvacrol and trans-cinnamaldehyde) or citric acid, with a view to controlling C. sakazakii and E. coli O157:H7 in laboratory-based assays and model food systems. The use of nisin variants (30 μM) with low concentrations of thymol (0.015%), carvacrol (0.03%) and trans-cinnamaldehyde (0.035%) resulted in extended lag phases of growth compared to those for corresponding nisin A-essential oil combinations. Furthermore, nisin variants (60 μM) used in combination with carvacrol (0.03%) significantly reduced viable counts of E. coli O157:H7 (3-log) and C. sakazakii (4-log) compared to nisin A-carvacrol treatment. Importantly, this increased effectiveness translated into food. More specifically, sub-inhibitory concentrations of nisin variants and carvacrol caused complete inactivation of E. coli O157:H7 in apple juice within 3 h at room temperature compared to that of the equivalent nisin A combination. Furthermore, combinations of commercial Nisaplin and the food additive citric acid reduced C. sakazakii numbers markedly in infant formula within the same 3 h period. These results highlight the potential benefits of combining nisin and variants thereof with carvacrol and/or citric acid for the inhibition of Gram negative food-borne pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Citric acid- and Tween(®) 80-assisted phytoremediation of a co-contaminated soil: alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) performance and remediation potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnello, A C; Huguenot, D; van Hullebusch, E D; Esposito, G

    2016-05-01

    A pot experiment was designed to assess the phytoremediation potential of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in a co-contaminated (i.e., heavy metals and petroleum hydrocarbons) soil and the influence of citric acid and Tween(®) 80 (polyethylene glycol sorbitan monooleate), applied individually and combined together, for their possible use in chemically assisted phytoremediation. The results showed that alfalfa plants could tolerate and grow in a co-contaminated soil. Over a 90-day experimental time, shoot and root biomass increased and negligible plant mortality occurred. Heavy metals were uptaken by alfalfa to a limited extent, mostly by plant roots, and their concentration in plant tissues were in the following order: Zn > Cu > Pb. Microbial population (alkane-degrading microorganisms) and activity (lipase enzyme) were enhanced in the presence of alfalfa with rhizosphere effects of 9.1 and 1.5, respectively, after 90 days. Soil amendments did not significantly enhance plant metal concentration or total uptake. In contrast, the combination of citric acid and Tween(®) 80 significantly improved alkane-degrading microorganisms (2.4-fold increase) and lipase activity (5.3-fold increase) in the rhizosphere of amended plants, after 30 days of experiment. This evidence supports a favorable response of alfalfa in terms of tolerance to a co-contaminated soil and improvement of rhizosphere microbial number and activity, additionally enhanced by the joint application of citric acid and Tween(®) 80, which could be promising for future phytoremediation applications.

  1. Quality enhancement in the Japanese sea bass (Lateolabrax japonicas) fillets stored at 4°C by chitosan coating incorporated with citric acid or licorice extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xujian; Chen, Shengjun; Liu, Guangming; Yang, Qiuming

    2014-11-01

    The preserving effects of chitosan, chitosan and citric acid, chitosan and licorice extract on fresh Japanese sea bass fillets stored at 4 °C for 12 days were studied. Results showed that citric acid or licorice extract can enhance the preserving function of chitosan significantly by retarding lipid oxidation and inhibiting microbial growth as reflected in thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and total plate count, respectively. Both total volatile basic nitrogen values and sensory scores indicated chitosan and citric acid or licorice extract can significantly reduce the quality loss and extend the shelf life of Japanese sea bass fish fillets during refrigerated storage. Citric acid or licorice extract with chitosan could thus be applied in the seafood industry to enhance quality of fish fillets as natural preservatives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Overexpression of the NADP+-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase gene (icdA) in citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger WU-2223L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Keiichi; Hattori, Takasumi; Hayashi, Rie; Kirimura, Kohtaro

    2014-01-01

    In the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, NADP(+)-specific isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP(+)-ICDH) catalyzes oxidative decarboxylation of isocitric acid to form α-ketoglutaric acid with NADP(+) as a cofactor. We constructed an NADP(+)-ICDH gene (icdA)-overexpressing strain (OPI-1) using Aspergillus niger WU-2223L as a host and examined the effects of increase in NADP(+)-ICDH activity on citric acid production. Under citric acid-producing conditions with glucose as the carbon source, the amounts of citric acid produced and glucose consumed by OPI-1 for the 12-d cultivation period decreased by 18.7 and 10.5%, respectively, compared with those by WU-2223L. These results indicate that the amount of citric acid produced by A. niger can be altered with the NADP(+)-ICDH activity. Therefore, NADP(+)-ICDH is an important regulator of citric acid production in the TCA cycle of A. niger. Thus, we propose that the icdA gene is a potentially valuable tool for modulating citric acid production by metabolic engineering.

  3. Ultrasound-assisted extraction of pectins from grape pomace using citric acid: a response surface methodology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minjares-Fuentes, R; Femenia, A; Garau, M C; Meza-Velázquez, J A; Simal, S; Rosselló, C

    2014-06-15

    An ultrasound-assisted procedure for the extraction of pectins from grape pomace with citric acid as the extracting agent was established. A Box-Behnken design (BBD) was employed to optimize the extraction temperature (X1: 35-75°C), extraction time (X2: 20-60 min) and pH (X3: 1.0-2.0) to obtain a high yield of pectins with high average molecular weight (MW) and degree of esterification (DE) from grape pomace. Analysis of variance showed that the contribution of a quadratic model was significant for the pectin extraction yield and for pectin MW whereas the DE of pectins was more influenced by a linear model. An optimization study using response surface methodology was performed and 3D response surfaces were plotted from the mathematical model. According to the RSM model, the highest pectin yield (∼32.3%) can be achieved when the UAE process is carried out at 75°C for 60 min using a citric acid solution of pH 2.0. These pectic polysaccharides, composed mainly by galacturonic acid units (ultrasound-assisted extraction could be a good option for the extraction of functional pectins with citric acid from grape pomace at industrial level. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Data of thermal degradation and dynamic mechanical properties of starch–glycerol based films with citric acid as crosslinking agent

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    Paula González Seligra

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Interest in biodegradable edible films as packaging or coating has increased because their beneficial effects on foods. In particular, food products are highly dependents on thermal stability, integrity and transition process temperatures of the packaging. The present work describes a complete data of the thermal degradation and dynamic mechanical properties of starch–glycerol based films with citric acid (CA as crosslinking agent described in the article titled: “Biodegradable and non-retrogradable eco-films based on starch–glycerol with citric acid as crosslinking agent” González Seligra et al. (2016 [1]. Data describes thermogravimetric and dynamical mechanical experiences and provides the figures of weight loss and loss tangent of the films as a function of the temperature.

  5. Data of thermal degradation and dynamic mechanical properties of starch-glycerol based films with citric acid as crosslinking agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Seligra, Paula; Medina Jaramillo, Carolina; Famá, Lucía; Goyanes, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    Interest in biodegradable edible films as packaging or coating has increased because their beneficial effects on foods. In particular, food products are highly dependents on thermal stability, integrity and transition process temperatures of the packaging. The present work describes a complete data of the thermal degradation and dynamic mechanical properties of starch-glycerol based films with citric acid (CA) as crosslinking agent described in the article titled: "Biodegradable and non-retrogradable eco-films based on starch-glycerol with citric acid as crosslinking agent" González Seligra et al. (2016) [1]. Data describes thermogravimetric and dynamical mechanical experiences and provides the figures of weight loss and loss tangent of the films as a function of the temperature.

  6. Shelf life of minimally processed pineapples treated with ascorbic and citric acids

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    Lucimara Rogéria Antoniolli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to determine the shelf life of minimally processed (MP 'Pérola' pineapples treated with ascorbic acid (AA and citric acid (CA based on physical, chemical, sensorial and microbiological attributes. Slices were dipped into drinking water (control or combined solutions of AA:CA (% (1.0:0.5 and 1.0:1.0 with sodium hypochlorite (NaClO 20 mg L-1 for 30 seconds. The samples were conditioned in polyethylene terephtalate packages and stored at 4±1 °C per 13 days. The low peroxidase activity in the slices treated with antioxidant combinations was related to low pH values observed in these samples. The treatments 1.0:0.5 and 1.0:1.0 (AA:CA, % favored maintenance of the initial a* values and avoided the pulp browning. The ascorbic acid increased more than double on the 2nd day in the treated slices. By the 4th day the CO2 values suggested a higher respiratory activity in the slices treated with anti-browning compounds. The antioxidant treatments did not produce detectable residual flavors in the MP pineapple. Regardless of microbiological safety during the 13 days of cold storage, the control slices can be kept by 6 days, afterwards the color and dehydration become strong enough to affect the appearance. On the other hand, MP 'Pérola' pineapples treated with 1.0:0.5 (AA:CA, % and NaClO (20 mg L-1 can be stored for 8 days at 4±1 ºC, which represents the extension of the shelf life in 2 days. After this period the overripe odor starts to develop.

  7. Eco-friendly Rot and Crease Resistance Finishing of Jute Fabric using Citric Acid and Chitosan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, A. K.; Bagchi, A.

    2013-03-01

    Citric acid (CA) along with chitosan was used on bleached jute fabrics to impart anti crease and rot resistance properties in one step. The treatment was carried out by pad-dry-cure method in presence of sodium hypophosphite monohydrate catalyst. Curing at 150° Centigrade for 5 min delivered good crease resistant property (dry crease recovery angle is 244°) and high rot resistance simultaneously by a single treatment, which are durable for five washings with distilled water. Strength retention of jute fabric after 21 days soil burial was found to be 81 % and the loss (%) in strength due to this treatment was 15-18 %. The results showed that chitosan and CA treated-fabric exhibited higher rot resistance (as indicated by soil burial test) when compared to either CA or chitosan by individual treatment. The effect of CA and chitosan combination on the resistance to rotting of jute fabric was found to be synergistic which is higher than the sum of the effects of individual chemicals. CA possibly reacts with hydroxyl groups in cellulose or chitosan to form ester. The CA and chitosan finished fabric has adverse effect on stiffness. Thermal studies showed that final residue left at 500° C was much higher for CA and chitosan treated fabric than untreated jute fabric. FTIR spectroscopy suggested the formation of ester cross-linkage between the jute fibre, CA and chitosan and hence it is understood that this rot resistant finish on jute fabric become durable by this mechanism.

  8. Vibrational Study and Force Field of the Citric Acid Dimer Based on the SQM Methodology

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    Laura Cecilia Bichara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We have carried out a structural and vibrational theoretical study for the citric acid dimer. The Density Functional Theory (DFT method with the B3LYP/6-31G∗ and B3LYP/6-311++G∗∗ methods have been used to study its structure and vibrational properties. Then, in order to get a good assignment of the IR and Raman spectra in solid phase of dimer, the best fit possible between the calculated and recorded frequencies was carry out and the force fields were scaled using the Scaled Quantum Mechanic Force Field (SQMFF methodology. An assignment of the observed spectral features is proposed. A band of medium intensity at 1242 cm−1 together with a group of weak bands, previously not assigned to the monomer, was in this case assigned to the dimer. Furthermore, the analysis of the Natural Bond Orbitals (NBOs and the topological properties of electronic charge density by employing Bader's Atoms in Molecules theory (AIM for the dimer were carried out to study the charge transference interactions of the compound.

  9. The viability of a nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle - Kinetics and thermochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, D.S.

    2007-01-01

    The likelihood of a functioning nonenzymatic reductive citric acid cycle, recently proposed as the precursor to biosynthesis on early Earth, is examined on the basis of the kinetics and thermochemistry of the acetate ??? pyruvate ??? oxaloacetate ??? malate sequence. Using data derived from studies of the Pd-catalyzed phosphinate reduction of carbonyl functions it is shown that the rate of conversion of pyruvate to malate with that system would have been much too slow to have played a role in the early chemistry of life, while naturally occurring reduction systems such as the fayalite-magnetite-quartz and pyrrhotite-pyrite-magnetite mineral assemblages would have provided even slower conversions. It is also shown that the production of pyruvate from acetate is too highly endoergic to be driven by a naturally occurring energy source such as pyrophosphate. It is thus highly doubtful that the cycle can operate at suitable rates without enzymes, and most unlikely that it could have participated in the chemistry leading to life. ?? 2006 Springer Science + Business Media B.V.

  10. Improved model of the retardance in citric acid coated ferrofluids using stepwise regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J. F.; Qiu, X. R.

    2017-06-01

    Citric acid (CA) coated Fe3O4 ferrofluids (FFs) have been conducted for biomedical application. The magneto-optical retardance of CA coated FFs was measured by a Stokes polarimeter. Optimization and multiple regression of retardance in FFs were executed by Taguchi method and Microsoft Excel previously, and the F value of regression model was large enough. However, the model executed by Excel was not systematic. Instead we adopted the stepwise regression to model the retardance of CA coated FFs. From the results of stepwise regression by MATLAB, the developed model had highly predictable ability owing to F of 2.55897e+7 and correlation coefficient of one. The average absolute error of predicted retardances to measured retardances was just 0.0044%. Using the genetic algorithm (GA) in MATLAB, the optimized parametric combination was determined as [4.709 0.12 39.998 70.006] corresponding to the pH of suspension, molar ratio of CA to Fe3O4, CA volume, and coating temperature. The maximum retardance was found as 31.712°, close to that obtained by evolutionary solver in Excel and a relative error of -0.013%. Above all, the stepwise regression method was successfully used to model the retardance of CA coated FFs, and the maximum global retardance was determined by the use of GA.

  11. Effect of citric acid, tetracycline, and doxycycline on instrumented periodontally involved root surfaces: A SEM study

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    Gurparkash Singh Chahal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A surface smear layer consisting of organic and inorganic material is formed on the root surface following mechanical instrumentation and may inhibit the formation of new connective tissue attachment to the root surface. Modification of the tooth surface by root conditioning has resulted in improved connective tissue attachment and has advanced the goal of reconstructive periodontal treatment. Aim: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of citric acid, tetracycline, and doxycycline on the instrumented periodontally involved root surfaces in vitro using a scanning electron microscope. Settings and Design: A total of 45 dentin samples obtained from 15 extracted, scaled, and root planed teeth were divided into three groups. Materials and Methods: The root conditioning agents were applied with cotton pellets using the "Passive burnishing technique" for 5 minutes. The samples were then examined by the scanning electron microscope. Statistical Analysis Used: The statistical analysis was carried out using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, version 15.0 for Windows. For all quantitative variables means and standard deviations were calculated and compared. For more than two groups ANOVA was applied. For multiple comparisons post hoc tests with Bonferroni correction was used. Results: Upon statistical analysis the root conditioning agents used in this study were found to be effective in removing the smear layer, uncovering and widening the dentin tubules and unmasking the dentin collagen matrix. Conclusion: Tetracycline HCl was found to be the best root conditioner among the three agents used.

  12. Olodaterol Attenuates Citric Acid-Induced Cough in Naïve and Ovalbumin-Sensitized and Challenged Guinea Pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wex, Eva; Bouyssou, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Excessive coughing is a common feature of airway diseases. Different G-protein coupled receptors, including β2-adrenergic receptors (β2-AR), have been implicated in the molecular mechanisms underlying the cough reflex. However, the potential antitussive property of β2-AR agonists in patients with respiratory disease is a matter of ongoing debate. The aim of our study was to test the efficacy of the long-acting β2-AR agonist olodaterol with regard to its antitussive property in a pre-clinical model of citric acid-induced cough in guinea pigs and to compare the results to different clinically relevant β2-AR agonists. In our study β2-AR agonists were intratracheally administered, as dry powder, into the lungs of naïve or ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs 15 minutes prior to induction of cough by exposure to citric acid. Cough events were counted over 15 minutes during the citric acid exposure. Olodaterol dose-dependently inhibited the number of cough events in naïve and even more potently and with a greater maximal efficacy in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs (p citric acid-induced cough in naïve and ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs. This is in agreement with pre-clinical and clinical studies showing antitussive efficacy of β2-AR agonists. Indacaterol increased the number of coughs in this model, which concurs with clinical data where a transient cough has been observed after indacaterol inhalation. While the antitussive properties of β2-AR agonists can be explained by their ability to lead to the cAMP-induced hyperpolarization of the neuron membrane thereby inhibiting sensory nerve activation and the cough reflex, the mechanism underlying the pro-tussive property of indacaterol is not known. PMID:25781609

  13. Esthetics in periodontics: covering denuded root surfaces using free gingival grafts without citric acid, Part II: a report on 14 teeth in 10 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, R A

    1989-12-01

    Part I of this series described the history and reviewed various techniques of free gingival graft usage without citric acid. Part II of this series on periodontics describes 10 successful case reports.

  14. Citric acid production by solid-state fermentation on a semi-pilot scale using different percentages of treated cassava bagasse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. C. Prado

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Citric acid is commercailly important product used in several industrial processes. Solid-state fermentation (SSF has become an alternative method for citric acid production using agro-industrial residues such as cassava bagasse (CB. Use of CB as substrate can avoid the environmental problems caused by its disposal in the environment. The aim of this work was to verify the effect of different percentages of gelatinized starch in CB on production of citric acid by SSF in horizontal drum and tray-type bioreactors. Gelatinization was used in order to make the starch structure more susceptible to consumption by the fungus. The best results (26.9 g/100g of dry CB were obtained in horizontal drum bioreactor using 100% gelatinized CB, although the tray-type bioreactor offers advantages and shows promise for large-scale citric acid production in terms of processing costs.

  15. Enhanced adsorption of methylene blue by citric acid modification of biochar derived from water hyacinth (Eichornia crassipes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Liu, Yunguo; Liu, Shaobo; Tan, Xiaofei; Zeng, Guangming; Zeng, Wei; Ding, Yang; Cao, Weicheng; Zheng, Bohong

    2016-12-01

    In this work, a novel potential adsorbent, citric acid (CA)-modified biochar, named as CAWB, was obtained from water hyacinth biomass by slow pyrolysis in a N2 environment at 300 °C. The CA modification focused on enhancing the contaminants adsorption capacity of biochar pyrolyzed at relatively low temperature. Over 90 % of the total methylene blue (MB) could be removed at the first 60 min by CAWB, and the maximum MB adsorption capacity could reach to 395 mg g-1. The physicochemical properties of CAWB was examined by FTIR, XPS, SEM, and BET analysis. The results indicated that the additional carboxyl groups were introduced to the surface of CAWB via the esterification reaction with CA, which played a significant role in the adsorption of MB. Batch adsorption studies showed that the initial MB concentration, solution pH, background ionic strength, and temperature could affect the removal efficiency obviously. The adsorption process could be well described by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm. Thermodynamic analysis revealed that the MB adsorption onto CAWB was an endothermic and spontaneous process. The regeneration study revealed that CAWB still exhibited an excellent regeneration and adsorption performance after multiple cycle adsorptions. The adsorption experiments of actual dye wastewater by CAWB suggested that it had a great potential in environmental application.

  16. Synthesis of highly photoluminescent carbon dots via citric acid and Tris for iron(III) ions sensors and bioimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming; Zhou, Zhulong; Gong, Aihua; Zhang, Yan; Li, Qijun

    2015-10-01

    In this work, high quantum yield and strong photoluminescent carbon quantum dots (C-QDs) are successfully synthesized via a facile and green hydrothermal method using citric acid and Tris as precursors. The as-synthesized C-QDs with a quantum yield (QY) as high as 52% were characterized by UV, FT-IR, TEM, XPS and fluorescence spectroscope. TEM results show that C-QDs are mono-dispersed spherical particles and the diameter distribution of C-QDs is 2.8±1.1 nm. The extraordinary photoluminescent properties and low cytotoxicity of C-QDs were obtained through optical property characterization and cytotoxicity assay. In addition, we found that the as-prepared C-QDs had a high affinity for Fe(3+) ions and the response toward Fe(3+) ions was highly linear (R(2)=0.997) over the concentration range from 2 to 50 μM, which could provide an effective platform for portable detection of Fe(3+) ions. Also, it is demonstrated that the photoluminescent C-QDs display hypotoxicity and are biocompatible for use as biosensors in living cells. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Citric acid enhanced the antioxidant defense system and chromium uptake by Lemna minor L. grown in hydroponics under Cr stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallah-Ud-Din, Rasham; Farid, Mujahid; Saeed, Rashid; Ali, Shafaqat; Rizwan, Muhammad; Tauqeer, Hafiz Muhammad; Bukhari, Syed Asad Hussain

    2017-07-01

    Phytoextraction is a cost-effective and eco-friendly technique for the removal of pollutants, mainly heavy metal(loids) especially from polluted water and metal-contaminated soils. The phytoextraction of heavy metals is, in general, limited due to the low availability of heavy metals in the growth medium. Organic chelators can help to improve the phytoextraction by increasing metal mobility and solubility in the growth medium. The present research was carried out to examine the possibility of citric acid (CA) in improving chromium (Cr) phytoextraction by Lemna minor (duckweed). For this purpose, healthy plants were collected from nearby marsh and grown in hydroponics under controlled conditions. Initial metal contents of both marsh water and plant were measured along with physico-chemical properties of the marsh water. Different concentrations of Cr and CA were applied in the hydroponics in different combinations after defined intervals. Continuous aeration was supplied and pH maintained at 6.5 ± 0.1. Results showed that increasing concentration of Cr significantly decreased the plant biomass, photosynthetic pigments, leaf area, and antioxidant enzyme activities (like catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, peroxidase). Furthermore, Cr stress increased the Cr concentrations, electrolyte leakage, hydrogen peroxide, and malondialdehyde contents in plants. The addition of CA alleviated the Cr-induced toxicity in plants and further enhanced the Cr uptake and its accumulation in L. minor. The addition of CA enhanced the Cr concentration in L. minor by 6.10, 26.5, 20.5, and 20.2% at 0, 10, 100, and 200 μM Cr treatments, respectively, compared to the respective Cr treatments without CA. Overall, the results of the present study showed that CA addition may enhance the Cr accumulation and tolerance in L. minor by enhancing the plant growth and activities of antioxidant enzymes.

  18. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Citric Acid-Treated Wheat Germ Extract in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Yeong Jeong

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, fermentation was the only processing used to improve the functionality of wheat germ. The release of 2,6-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoquinone (DMBQ from hydroquinone glycosides during the fermentation process is considered a marker of quality control. Here, we treated wheat germ extract with citric acid (CWG to release DMBQ and examined the anti-inflammatory activity of this extract using a lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophage model. Treatment of wheat germ with citric acid resulted in detectable release of DMBQ but reduced total phenolic and total flavonoid contents compared with untreated wheat germ extract (UWG. CWG inhibited secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL-6, and IL-12 and the synthesis of cyclooxygenase-2, while UWG only decreased IL-12 production. CWG and UWG induced high levels of anti-inflammatory IL-10 and heme oxygenase-1. CWG specifically inhibited phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and p38 kinase at 15 min after LPS stimulation. Our study showed that citric acid treatment enhanced the anti-inflammatory activity of wheat germ extract.

  19. Citric acid induced promoted dispersion of Pt on the support and enhanced catalytic activities for a Pt-based catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tianqiong; Wang, Jianli; Wang, Suning; Cui, Yajuan; Zhang, Hailong; Yan, Shuang; Yuan, Shandong; Chen, Yaoqiang

    2017-12-01

    Citric acid (CA), as the chelating agent, was introduced to obtain the enhanced Pt dispersion and catalytic activities for the Pt-based catalysts supported on oxygen-storage material. The role and content of CA were investigated systematically. It was found that the citric acid-assisted catalysts showed better Pt dispersion and smaller nanoparticle size of Pt. Thus, the catalyst had lower reduction temperature, preferable thermostability and possessed more oxidation state of Pt species under the oxidation atmosphere. The citric acid-induced fresh catalysts were excellent to convert CO and the corresponding aged ones exhibited higher activities for the elimination of all the target pollutants. Among the aged catalysts, P2-a (the mole ratio of Pt/CA is 2:1) presented the best performance. Particularly, compared with the reference sample (Pc-a), the light-off temperatures (T50) of NO, HC and CO for P2-a decreased by 39 °C, 42 °C and 72 °C, respectively, and the full-conversion temperatures (T90) of NO, HC and CO for P2-a decreased by 44 °C, 44 °C and 48 °C, respectively. Therefore, this work provides a facile and valid method to manufacture advanced catalysts for purification of the vehicle exhaust in the future.

  20. Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Citric Acid-Treated Wheat Germ Extract in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hee-Yeong; Choi, Yong-Seok; Lee, Jae-Kang; Lee, Beom-Joon; Kim, Woo-Ki; Kang, Hee

    2017-07-10

    Until recently, fermentation was the only processing used to improve the functionality of wheat germ. The release of 2,6-dimethoxy-1,4-benzoquinone (DMBQ) from hydroquinone glycosides during the fermentation process is considered a marker of quality control. Here, we treated wheat germ extract with citric acid (CWG) to release DMBQ and examined the anti-inflammatory activity of this extract using a lipopolysaccharide-activated macrophage model. Treatment of wheat germ with citric acid resulted in detectable release of DMBQ but reduced total phenolic and total flavonoid contents compared with untreated wheat germ extract (UWG). CWG inhibited secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-6, and IL-12 and the synthesis of cyclooxygenase-2, while UWG only decreased IL-12 production. CWG and UWG induced high levels of anti-inflammatory IL-10 and heme oxygenase-1. CWG specifically inhibited phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and p38 kinase at 15 min after LPS stimulation. Our study showed that citric acid treatment enhanced the anti-inflammatory activity of wheat germ extract.

  1. The effect of combination of sugar palm fruit, carrageenan, and citric acid on mechanical properties of biodegradable film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinanda, S. A.; Nastabiq, M.; Raharjo, S. H.; Hayati, S. K.; Yaqin, M. A.; Ratnawati

    2017-11-01

    Biodegradable film is a type of plastic material that can be degraded naturally and is usually made of organic material. The material commonly used is polysaccharides. The purpose of this study is to observe the effect of the combination of sugar palm fruit, carrageenan, and citric acid (CA) on the mechanical properties of the biodegradable films, such as tensile strength, elongation and film thickness. The experiment begins with dissolving the sugar palm fruit porridge and carrageenan with ratios of 1:0, 3:1, 2:1, 1:1 in water. The mixture was heated using a heater and magnetic stirrer at 80° C for 10 minutes. Glycerol and citric acid (CA) were added to the solution and stirred for 5 minutes. Each film solution was printed on a modified acrylic and, dried for 18 hours in an oven at 55° C. The formed film layer was then removed from the acrylic mold and inserted in a desiccatorsat 23° C for 1 hour. Then the film analyzed for its tensile strength, elongation using Dynamic Mechanical Thermal Analysis (DMTA), and thickness. The optimum result shown by sugar palm fruit and carrageenan ratio of 1:1 with 1% citric acid (CA).

  2. C-Myc Induced Compensated Cardiac Hypertrophy Increases Free Fatty Acid Utilization for the Citric Acid Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Aaron; Ledee, Dolena; Iwamoto, Kate; Kajimoto, Masaki; O' Kelly-Priddy, Colleen M.; Isern, Nancy G.; Portman, Michael A.

    2013-02-01

    The protooncogene C-Myc (Myc) regulates cardiac hypertrophy. Myc promotes compensated cardiac function, suggesting that the operative mechanisms differ from those leading to heart failure. Myc regulation of substrate metabolism is a reasonable target, as Myc alters metabolism in other tissues. We hypothesize that Myc-induced shifts in substrate utilization signal and promote compensated hypertrophy. We used cardiac specific Myc-inducible C57/BL6 male mice between 4-6 months old that develop hypertrophy with tamoxifen (tam). Isolated working hearts and 13Carbon (13C )-NMR were used to measure function and fractional contributions (Fc) to the citric acid cycle by using perfusate containing 13C-labeled free fatty acids, acetoacetate, lactate, unlabeled glucose and insulin. Studies were performed at pre-hypertrophy (3-days tam, 3dMyc), established hypertrophy (7-days tam, 7dMyc) or vehicle control (cont). Non-transgenic siblings (NTG) received 7-days tam or vehicle to assess drug effect. Hypertrophy was confirmed by echocardiograms and heart weights. Western blots were performed on key metabolic enzymes. Hypertrophy occurred in 7dMyc only. Cardiac function did not differ between groups. Tam alone did not affect substrate contribution in NTG. Substrate utilization was not significantly altered in 3dMyc versus cont. The free fatty acid FC was significantly greater in 7dMyc vs cont with decreased unlabeled Fc, which is predominately exogenous glucose. Free fatty acid flux to the citric acid cycle increased while lactate flux was diminished in 7dMyc compared to cont. Total protein levels of a panel of key metabolic enzymes were unchanged; however total protein O-GlcNAcylation was increased in 7dMyc. Substrate utilization changes did not precede hypertrophy; therefore they are not the primary signal for cardiac growth in this model. Free fatty acid utilization and oxidation increase at established hypertrophy. Understanding the mechanisms whereby this change maintained

  3. The Effect of EDTA and Citric acid on Soil Enzymes Activity, Substrate Induced Respiration and Pb Availability in a Contaminated Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    seyed sajjad hosseini

    2017-03-01

    determined by standard methods after 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of chelates addition. Results and Discussion: The soil texture was loam and the indigenous Pb content was 25.55 mg kg-1. The soil pH was 7.4 and electrical conductivity of saturated extraction measured 2.5 dS m-1. The soil carbonate calcium was 14% and the content of organic carbon and essential nutrients were low. The results showed that EDTA3 and EDTA5 treatments increased Pb availability by 2.17% and 10% compared to control treatment but CA3 and CA5 treatments decreased it by 3.8% and 15.7% respectively. The Pb availability in control and EDTA5 treatments did not change during the incubation time. The available Pb concentration dropped sharply during the incubation time in EDTA3, CA3 and CA5 treatments. The reduction rates in CA3 and CA5 treatments were more than EDTA3 treatment. This may be due to the high stability and low biodegradability of EDTA than biodegradable chelators and low molecular weight organic acids. The results showed that urease and dehydrogenase activities were significantly reduced in EDTA3 and EDTA5 treatments compared to control treatment. Urease and dehydrogenase activities were decreased with the increase of EDTA concentration. Alkaline phosphomonoesterase activity was not affected by the EDTA3 and EDTA5 treatments. In CA3 and CA5 treatments, dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphomonoesterase activities significantly increased with increasing the concentration of citric acid. CA5 treatment showed a prominent effect on urease activity compare to CA3 treatment. The soil enzyme activities increased with incubation time. It seems that reduction in Pb availability causes an increase of soil enzymes activities. Significant negative relationships were found between soil enzymes activities and available Pb concentration (dehydrogenase activity (r=-0.906, P

  4. Citric acid induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis of human immortalized keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT) via caspase- and mitochondrial-dependent signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Tsung-Ho; Chen, Chia-Wei; Hsiao, Yu-Ping; Hung, Sung-Jen; Chung, Jing-Gung; Yang, Jen-Hung

    2013-10-01

    Citric acid is an alpha-hydroxyacid (AHA) widely used in cosmetic dermatology and skincare products. However, there is concern regarding its safety for the skin. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of citric acid on the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. HaCaT cells were treated with citric acid at 2.5-12.5 mM for different time periods. Cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis were investigated by 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI) staining, flow cytometry, western blot and confocal microscopy. Citric acid not only inhibited proliferation of HaCaT cells in a dose-dependent manner, but also induced apoptosis and cell cycle-arrest at the G2/M phase (before 24 h) and S phase (after 24 h). Citric acid increased the level of Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX) and reduced the levels of B-cell lymphoma-2 (BCL-2), B-cell lymphoma-extra large (BCL-XL) and activated caspase-9 and caspase-3, which subsequently induced apoptosis via caspase-dependent and caspase-independent pathways. Citric acid also activated death receptors and increased the levels of caspase-8, activated BH3 interacting-domain death agonist (BID) protein, Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF), and Endonuclease G (EndoG). Therefore, citric acid induces apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway in the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. The study results suggest that citric acid is cytotoxic to HaCaT cells via induction of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest in vitro.

  5. Uptake of 13N-labeled N2O5 to citric acid aerosol particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzinic, Goran; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Birrer, Mario; Türler, Andreas; Ammann, Markus

    2013-04-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide is a significant reactive intermediate in the night time chemistry of nitrogen oxides. Depending on atmospheric conditions it can act either as a NO3 radical reservoir or as a major NOx sink by heterogeneous hydrolysis on aerosol surfaces. As such, it can influence tropospheric ozone production and therefore the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere. Furthermore it's suspected of being a non negligible source of tropospheric Cl, even over continental areas [1,2]. We used the short-lived radioactive tracer 13N delivered by PSI's PROTRAC facility [3] in conjunction with an aerosol flow tube reactor in order to study N2O5 uptake kinetics on aerosol particles. 13NO is mixed with non labeled NO and O3 in a gas reactor where N2O5 is synthesized under dry conditions to prevent hydrolysis on the reactor walls. The resulting N2O5 flow is fed into an aerosol flow tube reactor together with a humidified aerosol flow. By using movable inlets we can vary the length of the aerosol flow tube and thus the reaction time. The gas feed from the reactor is then directed into a narrow parallel plate diffusion denuder system that allows for selective separation of the gaseous species present in the gas phase. Aerosol particles are trapped on a particle filter placed at the end of the denuder system. The activity of 13N labeled species trapped on the denuder plates and in the particle filter can be monitored via scintillation counters. Aerosol uptake measurements were performed with citric acid aerosols in a humidity range of 27-61.5% RH. The results obtained from our measurements have shown that the uptake coefficient increases with humidity from 1.65±0.3x10-3 (~27% RH) to 1.25±0.3x10-2 (45% RH) and 2.00±0.3x10-2 (61.5% RH). Comparison to literature data shows that this is similar to values reported for some polycarboxylic acids (like malonic acid), while being higher than some others [4]. The increase is likely related to the increasing amount of water associated

  6. Similarities and Differences Between “Proactive” and “Passive” Stress-Coping Rats in Responses to Sucrose, NaCl, Citric Acid, and Quinine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    A stress-coping style describes a set of behavioral and physiological measures that characterize an individual’s response to stressful stimuli. It would follow that different stress-coping styles are associated with differential sensitivity for taste stimuli. Animals with stress-coping characteristics better suited to an environment in which new foods are more frequently encountered may show enhanced orosensitivity to cues that signal toxins and/or nutritional value. Here, rats were categorized as “proactive” or “passive” based on results from a defensive burying test. Next, the brief-access taste procedure was used to compare unconditioned licking responses to a concentration array of compounds that humans describe as “sweet” (sucrose), “salty” (NaCl), “sour” (citric acid), and “bitter” (quinine) across the 2 groups. Both groups displayed concentration-dependent lick responses to sucrose, NaCl, citric acid, and quinine. The passive group initiated significantly fewer trials to sucrose than the proactive rats, but the groups did not significantly differ in trial initiation for the other 3 test compounds. Thus, differences in food intake, body weight, and glucose homeostasis between the stress-coping styles are not likely driven by alterations in orosensory responsivity. However, the current findings lend support to the hypothesis that the 2 groups differ in reward-related signaling mechanisms. PMID:24510916

  7. Retrievability of calcium hydroxide intracanal medicament with three calcium chelators, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, citric acid, and chitosan from root canals: An in vitro cone beam computed tomography volumetric analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghu, Ramya; Pradeep, Geethu; Shetty, Ashish; Gautham, P. M.; Puneetha, P. G.; Reddy, T. V. Satyanarayana

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This study compared the amount of aqueous-based and oil-based calcium hydroxide remaining in the canal, after removal with two different chelators 17% EDTA, 20% Citric acid and 0.2% Chitosan in combination with ultrasonic agitation. Methods and Material: Cleaning and shaping of root canals of 28 mandibular premolar was done and canals were filled either with Metapex or Ca(OH)2 mixed with distilled water. Volumetric analysis was performed utilizing cone beam-computed tomography (CBCT) after seven days of incubation. Ca(OH)2 was removed using either 17% EDTA, 20% Citric acid or 0.2% Chitosan in combination with ultrasonic agitation. Statistical analysis used: Volumetric analysis was repeated and percentage difference was calculated and statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U test. Results: All the three chelators failed to remove aqueous-based as well as oil-based Ca(OH)2 completely from the root canal. Aqueous-based Ca(OH)2 was easier to be removed than oil-based Ca(OH)2. 0.2% Chitosan in combination with ultrasonics performed better than 17% EDTA and 20% citric acid in removal of Ca(OH)2. Conclusion: Combination of 0.2% Chitosan and ultrasonic agitation results in lower amount of Ca(OH)2 remnants than 17% EDTA, 20% Citric acid irrespective of type of vehicle present in the mix. PMID:28761249

  8. Determinação simultânea dos ácidos orgânicos tartárico, málico, ascórbico e cítrico em polpas de acerola, açaí e caju e avaliação da estabilidade em sucos de caju Simulataneous determination of tartaric, malic, ascorbic and citric acids in acerola, açai and cashew pulps, and stability evaluation in cashew juices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Scherer

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was determining the main organic acids in pulp and juices, as well as evaluating their stability, after opening the package, by liquid chromatography in a C18 column with isocratic elution and UV detection. In açaí pulp tartaric, malic and citric acids were found. Cashew samples presented all of the organic acids evaluated, besides high concentrations of ascorbic and malic acids. Acerola pulp had the highest ascorbic acid concentration. A small decrease in organic acid content during storage was observed. Malic and citric acids seem to be more stable than tartaric and ascorbic acids.

  9. Enhanced citric acid biosynthesis in Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525 by overexpression of the Escherichia coli citrate synthase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Aditi D; Archana, G; Kumar, G Naresh

    2009-08-01

    Citric acid secretion by fluorescent pseudomonads has a distinct significance in microbial phosphate solubilization. The role of citrate synthase in citric acid biosynthesis and glucose catabolism in pseudomonads was investigated by overexpressing the Escherichia coli citrate synthase (gltA) gene in Pseudomonas fluorescens ATCC 13525. The resultant approximately 2-fold increase in citrate synthase activity in the gltA-overexpressing strain Pf(pAB7) enhanced the intracellular and extracellular citric acid yields during the stationary phase, by about 2- and 26-fold, respectively, as compared to the control, without affecting the growth rate, glucose depletion rate or biomass yield. Decreased glucose consumption was paralleled by increased gluconic acid production due to an increase in glucose dehydrogenase activity. While the extracellular acetic acid yield increased in Pf(pAB7), pyruvic acid secretion decreased, correlating with an increase in pyruvate carboxylase activity and suggesting an increased demand for the anabolic precursor oxaloacetate. Activities of two other key enzymes, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and isocitrate dehydrogenase, remained unaltered, and the contribution of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and isocitrate lyase to glucose catabolism was negligible. Strain Pf(pAB7) demonstrated an enhanced phosphate-solubilizing ability compared to the control. Co-expression of the Synechococcus elongatus PCC 6301 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase and E. coli gltA genes in P. fluorescens ATCC 13525, so as to supplement oxaloacetate for citrate biosynthesis, neither significantly affected citrate biosynthesis nor caused any change in the other physiological and biochemical parameters measured, despite approximately 1.3- and 5-fold increases in citrate synthase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activities, respectively. Thus, our results demonstrate that citrate synthase is rate-limiting in enhancing citrate biosynthesis in P. fluorescens ATCC 13525

  10. Cloning and Characterization of a Pyruvate Carboxylase Gene from Penicillium rubens and Overexpression of the Genein the Yeast Yarrowia lipolytica for Enhanced Citric Acid Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ge-Yi; Lu, Yi; Chi, Zhe; Liu, Guang-Lei; Zhao, Shou-Feng; Jiang, Hong; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a pyruvate carboxylase gene (PYC1) from a marine fungus Penicillium rubens I607 was cloned and characterized. ORF of the gene (accession number: KM397349.1) had 3534 bp encoding 1177 amino acids with a molecular weight of 127.531 kDa and a PI of 6.20. The promoter of the gene was located at -1200 bp and contained a TATAA box, several CAAT boxes and a sequence 5'-SYGGRG-3'. The PYC1 deduced from the gene had no signal peptide, was a homotetramer (α4), and had the four functional domains. After expression of the PYC1 gene from the marine fungus in the marine-derived yeast Yarrowia lipolytica SWJ-1b, the transformant PR32 obtained had much higher specific pyruvate carboxylase activity (0.53 U/mg) than Y. lipolytica SWJ-1b (0.07 U/mg), and the PYC1 gene expression (133.8%) and citric acid production (70.2 g/l) by the transformant PR32 were also greatly enhanced compared to those (100 % and 27.3 g/l) by Y. lipolytica SWJ-1b. When glucose concentration in the medium was 60.0 g/l, citric acid (CA) concentration formed by the transformant PR32 was 36.1 g/l, leading to conversion of 62.1% of glucose into CA. During a 10-l fed-batch fermentation, the final concentration of CA was 111.1 ± 1.3 g/l, the yield was 0.93 g/g, the productivity was 0.46 g/l/h, and only 1.72 g/l reducing sugar was left in the fermented medium within 240 h. HPLC analysis showed that most of the fermentation products were CA. However, minor malic acid and other unknown products also existed in the culture.

  11. Micellar effect on metal-ligand complexes of Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II and Zn(II with citric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nageswara Rao Gollapalli

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemical speciation of citric acid complexes of Co(II, Ni(II, Cu(II and Zn(II was investigated pH-metrically in 0.0-2.5% anionic, cationic and neutral micellar media. The primary alkalimetric data were pruned with SCPHD program. The existence of different binary species was established from modeling studies using the computer program MINIQUAD75. Alkalimetric titrations were carried out in different relative concentrations (M:L:X = 1:2:5, 1:3:5, 1:5:3 of metal (M to citric acid. The selection of best chemical models was based on statistical parameters and residual analysis. The species detected were MLH, ML2, ML2H and ML2H2. The trend in variation of stability constants with change in mole fraction of the medium is explained on the basis of electrostatic and non-electrostatic forces. Distributions of the species with pH at different compositions of micellar media are also presented.

  12. Enhanced effect of HAH on citric acid-chelated Fe(II)-catalyzed percarbonate for trichloroethene degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaori; Brusseau, Mark L; Zang, Xueke; Lu, Shuguang; Zhang, Xiang; Farooq, Usman; Qiu, Zhaofu; Sui, Qian

    2017-11-01

    This work demonstrates the impact of hydroxylamine hydrochloride (HAH) addition on enhancing the degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) by the citric acid (CA)-chelated Fe(II)-catalyzed percarbonate (SPC) system. The results of a series of batch-reactor experiments show that TCE removal with HAH addition was increased from approximately 57 to 79% for a CA concentration of 0.1 mM and from 89 to 99.6% for a 0.5 mM concentration. Free-radical probe tests elucidated the existence of hydroxyl radical (HO(•)) and superoxide anion radical (O2(•-)) in both CA/Fe(II)/SPC and HAH/CA/Fe(II)/SPC systems. However, higher removal rates of radical probe compounds were observed in the HAH/CA/Fe(II)/SPC system, indicating that HAH addition enhanced the generation of both free radicals. In addition, increased contribution of O2(•-) in the HAH/CA/Fe(II)/SPC system compared to the CA/Fe(II)/SPC system was verified by free-radical scavengers tests. Complete TCE dechlorination was confirmed based on the total mass balance of the released Cl(-) species. Lower concentrations of formic acid were produced in the later stages of the reaction for the HAH/CA/Fe(II)/SPC system, suggesting that HAH addition favors complete TCE mineralization. Studies of the impact of selected groundwater matrix constituents indicate that TCE removal in the HAH/CA/Fe(II)/SPC system is slightly affected by initial solution pH, with higher removal rates under acidic and near neutral conditions. Although HCO3(-) was observed to have an adverse impact on TCE removal for the HAH/CA/Fe(II)/SPC system, the addition of HAH reduced its inhibitory effect compared to the CA/Fe(II)/SPC system. Finally, TCE removal in actual groundwater was much significant with the addition of HAH to the CA/Fe(II)/SPC system. The study results indicate that HAH amendment has potential to enhance effective remediation of TCE-contaminated groundwater.

  13. The Citrus transcription factor, CitERF13, regulates citric acid accumulation via a protein-protein interaction with the vacuolar proton pump, CitVHA-c4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shao-jia; Yin, Xue-ren; Xie, Xiu-lan; Allan, Andrew C; Ge, Hang; Shen, Shu-ling; Chen, Kun-song

    2016-02-03

    Organic acids are essential to fruit flavor. The vacuolar H(+) transporting adenosine triphosphatase (V-ATPase) plays an important role in organic acid transport and accumulation. However, less is known of V-ATPase interacting proteins and their relationship with organic acid accumulation. The relationship between V-ATPase and citric acid was investigated, using the citrus tangerine varieties 'Ordinary Ponkan (OPK)' and an early maturing mutant 'Zaoshu Ponkan (ZPK)'. Five V-ATPase genes (CitVHA) were predicted as important to citric acid accumulation. Among the genes, CitVHA-c4 was observed, using a yeast two-hybrid screen, to interact at the protein level with an ethylene response factor, CitERF13. This was verified using bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays. A similar interaction was also observed between Arabidopsis AtERF017 (a CitERF13 homolog) and AtVHA-c4 (a CitVHA-c4 homolog). A synergistic effect on citric acid levels was observed between V-ATPase proteins and interacting ERFs when analyzed using transient over-expression in tobacco and Arabidopsis mutants. Furthermore, the transcript abundance of CitERF13 was concomitant with CitVHA-c4. CitERF13 or AtERF017 over-expression leads to significant citric acid accumulation. This accumulation was abolished in an AtVHA-c4 mutant background. ERF-VHA interactions appear to be involved in citric acid accumulation, which was observed in both citrus and Arabidopsis.

  14. Enhancing aspalathin stability in rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) ready-to-drink iced teas during storage: the role of nano-emulsification and beverage ingredients, citric and ascorbic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, Dalene; Joubert, Elizabeth; Viljoen, Melvi; Manley, Marena

    2012-01-30

    The effects of citric and ascorbic acids on the stability of aspalathin in rooibos (Aspalathus linearis) ready-to-drink (RTD) formulations containing fermented rooibos extract (FR), aspalathin-enriched green rooibos extract (GR) and aspalathin-enriched green rooibos extract ascorbic acid solubilisate (GR-solubilisate) were investigated during storage (12 weeks at 25 °C). Storage of iced tea formulations containing FR and GR extracts reduced their flavonoid content. The aspalathin content of FR iced tea without citric or ascorbic acid was reduced to undetectable levels by week 8 of storage. Addition of citric acid resulted in improved stability of aspalathin, but ascorbic acid did not impart additional stability. Iso-orientin and orientin were less affected than aspalathin, presumably owing to partial conversion of aspalathin to these flavones. Similar results were obtained for GR iced tea formulations. Improved stability of aspalathin was noted in iced tea containing GR-solubilisate with or without citric acid. Lower pH was shown to favour stability, especially for fermented rooibos iced teas. Citric and ascorbic acids contribute to the stability of rooibos flavonoids during storage. Differences in stability between formulations are not due to pH differences but may be related to the matrix. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Metabolism: Part II. The Tricarboxylic Acid (TCA), Citric Acid, or Krebs Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner, George M.

    1986-01-01

    Differentiates the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (or Krebs cycle) from glycolysis, and describes the bridge between the two as being the conversion of pyruvate into acetyl coenzyme A. Discusses the eight steps in the TCA cycle, the results of isotopic labeling experiments, and the net effects of the TCA cycle. (TW)

  16. Phenotypes of gene disruptants in relation to a putative mitochondrial malate-citrate shuttle protein in citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirimura, Kohtaro; Kobayashi, Keiichi; Ueda, Yuka; Hattori, Takasumi

    2016-09-01

    The mitochondrial citrate transport protein (CTP) functions as a malate-citrate shuttle catalyzing the exchange of citrate plus a proton for malate between mitochondria and cytosol across the inner mitochondrial membrane in higher eukaryotic organisms. In this study, for functional analysis, we cloned the gene encoding putative CTP (ctpA) of citric acid-producing Aspergillus niger WU-2223L. The gene ctpA encodes a polypeptide consisting 296 amino acids conserved active residues required for citrate transport function. Only in early-log phase, the ctpA disruptant DCTPA-1 showed growth delay, and the amount of citric acid produced by strain DCTPA-1 was smaller than that by parental strain WU-2223L. These results indicate that the CTPA affects growth and thereby citric acid metabolism of A. niger changes, especially in early-log phase, but not citric acid-producing period. This is the first report showing that disruption of ctpA causes changes of phenotypes in relation to citric acid production in A. niger.

  17. The effect of cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) from rattan biomass as filler and citric acid as co-plasticizer on tensile properties of sago starch biocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, Halimatuddahliana; Harahap, Hamidah; Afandy, Yayang; Fath, M. Thoriq Al

    2017-11-01

    Biocomposite containing cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) from rattan biomass as fillers and citric acid as co-plasticizer. Rattan biomass is a fiber waste from processing industry of rattan which contains 37.6% cellulose. Isolation of alpha cellulose from rattan biomass was prepared by using three stages: delignification, alkalization, and bleaching. It was delignificated with 3.5% HNO3 and NaNO2, precipitated with 17.5% NaOH, bleaching process with 10% H2O2. The preparation of CNC includes acid hydrolysis using 45% H2SO4 and followed by mechanical processes of ultrasonication, centrifugation, and filtration with a dialysis membrane. Biocomposite was prepared using a solution casting method, which includes 1-4 wt % CNC as fillers, 10-40 wt% citric acid as co-plasticizer and 30 wt% glycerol as plasticizer. The results of TGA, SEM and XRD characteristic of CNC show that CNC has low residue mass, rod like and network like shape with crystallinity index 84.46%. Biocomposite characteristic consists of SEM, tensile strength and elongation at break. The resultshows that biocomposites by addition of CNC and citric acid have a smooth surface and homogeneous distribution of fillers. The tensile strength of biocomposites was increased by addition CNC and citric acid. The addition of CNC decreases the elongation at break but by addition of citric acid, the elongation at break was increased.

  18. Preparation and Application of Starch/Polyvinyl Alcohol/Citric Acid Ternary Blend Antimicrobial Functional Food Packaging Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Wu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Ternary blend films were prepared with different ratios of starch/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA/citric acid. The films were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, thermogravimetric analysis, as well as Fourier transform infrared (FTIR analysis. The influence of different ratios of starch/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA/citric acid and different drying times on the performance properties, transparency, tensile strength (TS, water vapor permeability (WVP, water solubility (WS, color difference (ΔE, and antimicrobial activity of the ternary blends films were investigated. The starch/polyvinyl alcohol/citric acid (S/P/C1:1:0, S/P/C3:1:0.08, and S/P/C3:3:0.08 films were all highly transparent. The S/P/C3:3:0.08 had a 54.31 times water-holding capacity of its own weight and its mechanical tensile strength was 46.45 MPa. In addition, its surface had good uniformity and compactness. The S/P/C3:1:0.08 and S/P/C3:3:0.08 showed strong antimicrobial activity to Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli, which were the food-borne pathogenic bacteria used. The freshness test results of fresh figs showed that all of the blends prevented the formation of condensed water on the surface of the film, and the S/P/C3:1:0.08 and S/P/C3:3:0.08 prevented the deterioration of figs during storage. The films can be used as an active food packaging system due to their strong antibacterial effect.

  19. Synthesis of WO{sub 3} nanoparticles by citric acid-assisted precipitation and evaluation of their photocatalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Martínez, D. [Departamento de Ecomateriales y Energía, Facultad de Ingeniería Civil (UANL), Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 66451, San Nicolás de los Garza, N.L. (Mexico); Martínez-de la Cruz, A., E-mail: azael70@yahoo.com.mx [Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 66451, San Nicolás de los Garza, N.L. (Mexico); López-Cuéllar, E. [Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 66451, San Nicolás de los Garza, N.L. (Mexico)

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► WO{sub 3} nanoparticles were synthesized by a simple citric acid-assisted precipitation. ► WO{sub 3} photocatalyst was able to the partial mineralization of rhB, IC and MO. ► WO{sub 3} can be considered as a photocatalyst active under visible light irradiation. -- Abstract: WO{sub 3} nanoparticles were synthesized by citric acid-assisted precipitation method using a 1:1.5 molar ratio of ammonium paratungstate hydrate (H{sub 42}N{sub 10}O{sub 42}W{sub 12}·xH{sub 2}O):citric acid (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 7}). The formation of monoclinic crystal structure of WO{sub 3} at different temperatures was confirmed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The characterization of the samples synthesized was complemented by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Brunauer–Emmitt–Teller surface area (BET) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS). According to the thermal treatment followed during the synthesis of WO{sub 3}, the morphology of the nanoparticles formed was characterized by rectangular and ovoid shapes. The photocatalytic activity of WO{sub 3} obtained under different experimental conditions was evaluated in the degradation of rhodamine B (rhB), indigo carmine (IC), methyl orange (MO), and Congo red (CR) in aqueous solution under UV and UV–vis radiation. The highest photocatalytic activity was observed in the sample obtained by thermal treatment at 700 °C. In general, the sequence of degradation of the organic dyes was: indigo carmine (IC) > rhodamine B (rhB) > methyl orange (MO) > Congo red (CR). The mineralization degree of organic dyes by WO{sub 3} photocatalysts was determined by total organic carbon analysis (TOC) reaching percentages of mineralization of 82% (rhB), 85% (IC), 28% (MO), and 7% (CR) for 96 h of lamp irradiation.

  20. Point mutation of the xylose reductase (XR) gene reduces xylitol accumulation and increases citric acid production in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyda, István; Lübeck, Mette; Ahring, Birgitte K; Lübeck, Peter S

    2014-04-01

    Aspergillus carbonarius accumulates xylitol when it grows on D-xylose. In fungi, D-xylose is reduced to xylitol by the NAD(P)H-dependent xylose reductase (XR). Xylitol is then further oxidized by the NAD(+)-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH). The cofactor impairment between the XR and XDH can lead to the accumulation of xylitol under oxygen-limiting conditions. Most of the XRs are NADPH dependent and contain a conserved Ile-Pro-Lys-Ser motif. The only known naturally occurring NADH-dependent XR (from Candida parapsilosis) carries an arginine residue instead of the lysine in this motif. In order to overcome xylitol accumulation in A. carbonarius a Lys-274 to Arg point mutation was introduced into the XR with the aim of changing the specificity toward NADH. The effect of the genetic engineering was examined in fermentation for citric acid production and xylitol accumulation by using D-xylose as the sole carbon source. Fermentation with the mutant strain showed a 2.8-fold reduction in xylitol accumulation and 4.5-fold increase in citric acid production compared to the wild-type strain. The fact that the mutant strain shows decreased xylitol levels is assumed to be associated with the capability of the mutated XR to use the NADH generated by the XDH, thus preventing the inhibition of XDH by the high levels of NADH and ensuring the flux of xylose through the pathway. This work shows that enhanced production of citric acid can be achieved using xylose as the sole carbon source by reducing accumulation of other by-products, such as xylitol.

  1. Effects of two desensitizing dentifrices on dentinal tubule occlusion with citric acid challenge: Confocal laser scanning microscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneha Anil Rajguru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dentin hypersensitivity results when patent tubules are exposed to pain-inducing external stimuli. Aim: This study aims to compare the effects of two desensitizing dentifrices containing NovaMin and arginine on dentinal tubule occlusion with and without citric acid challenge in vitro using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Materials and Methods: Forty dentin discs were randomly divided into Groups I and II containing twenty specimens each, treated with NovaMin and arginine-containing dentifrices, respectively. Groups I and II were divided into subgroups A and B where IA and IIA underwent CLSM analysis to determine the percentage of tubule occlusion while IB and IIB underwent 0.3% citric acid challenge and CLSM analysis. A novel grading system was devised to categorize tubule occlusion. Results: In Group II, the percentage of occluded tubules was highest for IIA (72.25% ± 10.57% and least for IIB (42.55% ± 8.65% having statistical significance (P < 0.0005. In Group I, the difference between IA (49.9% ± 12.96% and IB (43.15% ± 12.43% was statistically insignificant (P = 0.249. On the comparison between IB and IIB statistically indifferent result was obtained (P = 0.901, whereas the difference between IA and IIA was statistically significant (P < 0.001. The results of grading system were for IA 50% of samples belonged to Grade 2, for IIA 60% - Grade 3, and for IB 70% and for IIB 90% - Grade 2. Conclusion: Dentinal tubule occlusion with arginine-containing dentifrice was significantly higher than NovaMin. However, it could not resist citric acid challenge as effectively as NovaMin. The effects of NovaMin were more sustainable as compared to arginine-containing dentifrice, thus proving to be a better desensitizing agent.

  2. Citric acid production from hydrolysate of pretreated straw cellulose by Yarrowia lipolytica SWJ-1b using batch and fed-batch cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoyan; Lv, Jinshun; Zhang, Tong; Deng, Yuanfang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, crude cellulase produced by Trichoderma reesei Rut-30 was used to hydrolyze pretreated straw. After the compositions of the hydrolysate of pretreated straw were optimized, the study showed that natural components of pretreated straw without addition of any other components such as (NH4)2SO4, KH2PO4, or Mg(2+) were suitable for citric acid production by Yarrowia lipolytica SWJ-1b, and the optimal ventilatory capacity was 10.0 L/min/L medium. Batch and fed-batch production of citric acid from the hydrolysate of pretreated straw by Yarrowia lipolytica SWJ-1b has been investigated. In the batch cultivation, 25.4 g/L and 26.7 g/L citric acid were yields from glucose and hydrolysate of straw cellulose, respectively, while the cultivation time was 120 hr. In the three-cycle fed-batch cultivation, citric acid (CA) production was increased to 42.4 g/L and the cultivation time was extended to 240 hr. However, iso-citric acid (ICA) yield in fed-batch cultivation (4.0 g/L) was similar to that during the batch cultivation (3.9 g/L), and only 1.6 g/L of reducing sugar was left in the medium at the end of fed-batch cultivation, suggesting that most of the added carbon was used in the cultivation.

  3. Citric acid production from glycerol-containing waste of biodiesel industry by Yarrowia lipolytica in batch, repeated batch, and cell recycle regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymowicz, Waldemar; Fatykhova, Alina R; Kamzolova, Svetlana V; Rywińska, Anita; Morgunov, Igor G

    2010-07-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica A-101-1.22 produces high citric acid (112 g l(-1)) with a yield of 0.6 g g(-1) and a productivity of 0.71 g l(-1) h(-1) during batch cultivation in the medium with glycerol-containing waste of biodiesel industry. However, it was observed that the specific citric acid production rate, which was maximal at the beginning of the biosynthesis, gradually decreases in the late production phase and it makes continuation of the process over 100 h pointless. The cell recycle and the repeated batch regimes were performed as ways for prolongation of citric acid synthesis by yeast. Using cell recycle, the active citric acid biosynthesis (96-107 g l(-1)) with a yield of 0.64 g g(-1) and a productivity of 1.42 g l(-1) h(-1) was prolongated up to 300 h. Repeated batch culture remained stable for over 1000 h; the RB variant of 30% feed every 3 days showed the best results: 124.2 g l(-1) citric acid with a yield of 0.77 g g(-1) and a productivity of 0.85 g l(-1) h(-1).

  4. Functional and in vitro gastric digestibility of the whey protein hydrogel loaded with nanostructured lipid carriers and gelled via citric acid-mediated crosslinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Behnaz; Madadlou, Ashkan; Salami, Maryam

    2017-12-15

    Nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) with mean size of 347nm were fabricated and added into a heat-denatured whey protein solution. The subsequent crosslinking of proteins by citric acid or CaCl2 resulted in the formation of cold-set hydrogels. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) proposed formation of more hydrogen bonds in gel due to NLC loading or citric acid-mediated gelation. It was also found based on FITR spectroscopy that citric acid crosslinking disordered whey proteins. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging showed a non-porous and finely meshed microstructure for the crosslinked gels compared to non-crosslinked counterparts. Crosslinking also increased the firmness and water-holding capacity of gels. In pepsin-free fluid, a strong correlation existed between reduction in gel swellability and digestibility over periods up to 60min due to NLC loading and citric acid gelation. However, in peptic fluid, NLC loading and citric acid crosslinking brought about much higher decrease in digestibility than swellability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Citric acid production from glycerol-containing waste of biodiesel industry by Yarrowia lipolytica in batch, repeated batch, and cell recycle regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rymowicz, Waldemar; Rywinska, Anita [Wroclaw Univ. of Environmental and Life Sciences (Poland). Dept. of Biotechnology and Food Microbiology; Fatykhova, Alina R.; Kamzolova, Svetlana V.; Morgunov, Igor G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino (Russian Federation). G.K. Skryabin Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Microorganisms

    2010-07-15

    Yarrowia lipolytica A-101-1.22 produces high citric acid (112 g l{sup -1}) with a yield of 0.6 g g{sup -1} and a productivity of 0.71 g l{sup -1} h{sup -1} during batch cultivation in the medium with glycerol-containing waste of biodiesel industry. However, it was observed that the specific citric acid production rate, which was maximal at the beginning of the biosynthesis, gradually decreases in the late production phase and it makes continuation of the process over 100 h pointless. The cell recycle and the repeated batch regimes were performed as ways for prolongation of citric acid synthesis by yeast. Using cell recycle, the active citric acid biosynthesis (96-107 g l{sup -1}) with a yield of 0.64 g g{sup -1} and a productivity of 1.42 g l{sup -1} h{sup -1} was prolongated up to 300 h. Repeated batch culture remained stable for over 1000 h; the RB variant of 30% feed every 3 days showed the best results: 124.2 g l{sup -1} citric acid with a yield of 0.77 g g{sup -1} and a productivity of 0.85 g l{sup -1} h{sup -1}. (orig.)

  6. Study of apparent molal volume and viscosity of mutual citric acid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... forionic and molecular interactions. The ρ0 and V ϕ 0 f of aq. acids are higher than those of aq. DSP and the viscosity of DSP is higher than that of aq. CA. Examination of ρ0 and V ϕ 0 functions indicates that mutual compositions of CA and DSP counterbalance concentration and temperature effects on pH in bioprocesses ...

  7. Enhancing the reactivity of bimetallic Bi/Fe{sup 0} by citric acid for remediation of polluted water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Jianyu; Lee, Chung-Seop; Kim, Eun-Ju [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Yoon-Young [Department of Environmental Engineering, Kwangwoon University, Seoul 139-701 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Yoon-Seok, E-mail: yschang@postech.ac.kr [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-05

    Highlights: • A novel bismuth modified zero valent iron (Bi/Fe{sup 0}) was synthesized. • The Bi/Fe{sup 0} + CA(citric acid) + O{sub 2} system could produce ·OH and ·O{sub 2}{sup −}. • Some recalcitrant pollutants could be treated by Bi/Fe{sup 0} + CA + O{sub 2} in a short time. • The formation of Fe(III)-citric results in the generation of ·OH and ·O{sub 2}{sup −}. - Abstract: In this study, the environmentally benign citric acid (CA) was utilized to improve the aerobic degradation of 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) over bismuth modified nanoscale zero-valent iron (Bi/Fe{sup 0}). The characterization results revealed the existence of bismuth covering on the Fe{sup 0} surface under zero-valent state. And, the Bi/Fe{sup 0}-CA + O{sub 2} system performed excellent reactivity in degradation of 4-CP due to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was confirmed by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. After 30 min of reaction, 80% of 4-CP was removed using Bi/Fe{sup 0}-CA + O{sub 2} accompanying with high dechlorination rate. The oxidative degradation intermediates were analyzed by HPLC and LC-MS. We found that CA could promote the bismuth-iron system to produce much reactive oxygen species ROS under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions due to its ligand function, which could react with Fe{sup 3+} to form a ligand complex (Fe(III)Cit), accompanying with a considerable production of Fe{sup 2+} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. This study provides a new strategy for generating ROS on nZVI and suggests its application for the mineralization of many recalcitrant pollutants.

  8. Preservation of urine free catecholamines and their free O-methylated metabolites with citric acid as an alternative to hydrochloric acid for LC-MS/MS-based analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitzsch, Mirko; Pelzel, Daniela; Lattke, Peter; Siegert, Gabriele; Eisenhofer, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Measurements of urinary fractionated metadrenalines provide a useful screening test to diagnose phaeochromocytoma. Stability of these compounds and their parent catecholamines during and after urine collection is crucial to ensure accuracy of the measurements. Stabilisation with hydrochloric acid (HCl) can promote deconjugation of sulphate-conjugated metadrenalines, indicating a need for alternative preservatives. Urine samples with an intrinsically acidic or alkaline pH (5.5-6.9 or 7.1-8.7, respectively) were used to assess stability of free catecholamines and their free O-methylated metabolites over 7 days of room temperature storage. Stabilisation with HCl was compared with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid/metabisulphite and monobasic citric acid. Catecholamines and metabolites were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Free catecholamines and their O-methylated metabolites were stable in acidic urine samples over 7 days of room temperature storage, independent of the presence or absence of any stabilisation method. In contrast, free catecholamines, but not the free O-methylated metabolites, showed rapid degradation within 24 h and continuing degradation over 7 days in urine samples with an alkaline pH. Adjustment of alkaline urine samples to a pH of 3-5 with HCl or 4.8-5.4 with citric acid completely blocked degradation of catecholamines. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid/metabisulphite, although reducing the extent of degradation of catecholamines in alkaline urine, was largely ineffectual as a stabiliser. Citric acid is equally effective as HCl for stabilisation of urinary free catecholamines and minimises hazards associated with use of strong inorganic acids while avoiding deconjugation of sulphate-conjugated metabolites during simultaneous LC-MS/MS measurements of free catecholamines and their free O-methylated metabolites.

  9. The mixture of liquid foam soap, ethanol and citric acid as a new fixative-preservative solution in veterinary anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Erkut; Gules, Ozay; Kilimci, Figen Sevil; Kara, Mehmet Erkut; Dilek, Omer Gurkan; Sabanci, Seyyid Said; Tatar, Musa

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates the efficiency of liquid foam soap, ethanol, citric acid and benzalkonium chloride as a fixative-preservative solution (a soap-and ethanol-based fixing solution, or SEFS). In this study, ethanol serves as the fixative and preservative, liquid foam soap as the modifying agent, citric acid as the antioxidant and benzalkonium chloride as the disinfectant. The goat cadavers perfused with SEFS (n=8) were evaluated over a period of one year with respect to hardness, colour and odour using objective methods. Colour and hardness were compared between one fresh cadaver and the SEFS-embalmed cadavers. Histological and microbiological examinations were also performed in tissue samples. Additionally, the cadavers were subjectively evaluated after dissection and palpation. The SEFS provided the effectiveness expected over a 1-year embalming period for the animal cadavers. No bacteria or fungi were isolated except for some non-pathogenic Bacillus species. Visible mould was not present on either cadavers or in the surrounding environment. The cadavers maintained an appearance close to their original anatomical appearance, with muscles having good hardness and elasticity for dissection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Application of natural citric acid sources and their role on arsenic removal from drinking water: a green chemistry approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Santanu; Nath, Bibhash; Sarkar, Simita; Islam, Sk Mijanul; Bundschuh, Jochen; Chatterjee, Debashis; Hidalgo, Manuela

    2013-11-15

    Solar Oxidation and Removal of Arsenic (SORAS) is a low-cost non-hazardous technique for the removal of arsenic (As) from groundwater. In this study, we tested the efficiency of natural citric acid sources extracted from tomato, lemon and lime to promote SORAS for As removal at the household level. The experiment was conducted in the laboratory using both synthetic solutions and natural groundwater samples collected from As-polluted areas in West Bengal. The role of As/Fe molar ratios and citrate doses on As removal efficiency were checked in synthetic samples. The results demonstrate that tomato juice (as citric acid) was more efficient to remove As from both synthetic (percentage of removal: 78-98%) and natural groundwater (90-97%) samples compared to lemon (61-83% and 79-85%, respectively) and lime (39-69% and 63-70%, respectively) juices. The As/Fe molar ratio and the citrate dose showed an 'optimized central tendency' on As removal. Anti-oxidants, e.g. 'hydroxycinnamates', found in tomato, were shown to have a higher capacity to catalyze SORAS photochemical reactions compared to 'flavanones' found in lemon or lime. The application of this method has several advantages, such as eco- and user- friendliness and affordability at the household level compared to other low-cost techniques. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cassava starch coating and citric acid to preserve quality parameters of fresh-cut "Tommy Atkins" mango.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiumarelli, Marcela; Pereira, Leila M; Ferrari, Cristhiane C; Sarantópoulos, Claire I G L; Hubinger, Miriam D

    2010-06-01

    Combination of citric acid dipping (5 g/L) and cassava starch coating (10 g/L), with and without glycerol (10 g/L), was studied to verify the effectiveness of these treatments to inhibit enzymatic browning, to reduce respiration rate, and to preserve quality parameters of "Tommy Atkins" fresh-cut mangoes during storage at 5 degrees C. Color characteristics (L and C), mechanical properties (stress at failure), weight loss, beta-carotene content, sensory acceptance, and microbial growth of fruits were evaluated during 15 d. The respiration rate of fruit subjected to the treatments was also analyzed. Nontreated fresh-cut mango was used as a control sample. Cassava starch edible coatings and citric acid dipping promoted a decrease in respiration rate of mango slices, with values up to 41% lower than the control fruit. This treatment also promoted better preservation of texture and color characteristics of mangoes and delayed carotenoid formation and browning reactions during storage. Moreover, the treated fruit showed great sensory acceptance by consumers throughout the whole storage period. However, the use of glycerol in the coating formulation was not efficient in the maintenance of quality parameters of fresh-cut mangoes, promoting a higher weight loss of samples, impairing fruit texture characteristics, increasing carotenogenesis, and favoring microbial growth during storage.

  12. ORGANIC ACIDS CONCENTRATION IN WINE STOCKS AFTER Saccharomyces cerevisiae FERMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Bayraktar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The biochemical constituents in wine stocks that influence the flavor and quality of wine are investigated in the paper. The tested parameters consist of volume fraction of ethanol, residual sugar, phenolic compounds, tartaric, malic, citric, lactic, acetic acids, titratable acidity and volatile acids. The wine stocks that were received from white and red grape varieties Tairov`s selection were tested. There was a correlation between titratable acidity and volatile acids in the wine stocks from white and red grape varieties. High correlation was also found between lactic and acetic acids, between volatile acids, acetic acid and sugar. It was determined that wine stocks with a high concentration of ethanol originated from those yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in a fermented grape must of high speed of enzyme activity. The taste of wine stocks correlated with the ratio of tartaric to malic acid. Analysis showed significant differences between the varieties of white and red wine stocks in concentrations of organic acids, phenolic compounds, residual sugar, and volume fraction of ethanol. Positive correlation was indicated for both studied groups for volatile acids and acetic acid, tartaric, malic, lactic acids and total sugar. Prospective yeast cultures with high productivity of alcohol (ethanol were selected for winemaking biotechnology.

  13. Efficacy of citric acid denture cleanser on the Candida albicans biofilm formed on poly(methyl methacrylate): effects on residual biofilm and recolonization process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faot, Fernanda; Cavalcanti, Yuri Wanderley; Mendonça e Bertolini, Martinna de; Pinto, Luciana de Rezende; da Silva, Wander José; Cury, Altair Antoninha Del Bel

    2014-06-23

    It is well known that the use of denture cleansers can reduce Candida albicans biofilm accumulation; however, the efficacy of citric acid denture cleansers is uncertain. In addition, the long-term efficacy of this denture cleanser is not well established, and their effect on residual biofilms is unknown. This in vitro study evaluated the efficacy of citric acid denture cleanser treatment on C. albicans biofilm recolonization on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surface. C. albicans biofilms were developed for 72 h on PMMA resin specimens (n = 168), which were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 cleansing treatments (CTs) overnight (8 h). CTs included purified water as a control (CTC) and two experimental groups that used either a 1:5 dilution of citric acid denture cleanser (CT5) or a 1:8 dilution of citric acid denture cleanser (CT8). Residual biofilms adhering to the specimens were collected and quantified at two time points: immediately after CTs (ICT) and after cleaning and residual biofilm recolonization (RT). Residual biofilms were analyzed by quantifying the viable cells (CFU/mL), and biofilm architecture was evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Denture cleanser treatments and evaluation periods were considered study factors. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) test (α = 0.05). Immediately after treatments, citric acid denture cleansing solutions (CT5 and CT8) reduced the number of viable cells as compared with the control (p Citric acid denture cleansers can reduce C. albicans biofilm accumulation and cell viability. However, this CT did not prevent biofilm recolonization.

  14. Lipotoxic Palmitate Impairs the Rate of β-Oxidation and Citric Acid Cycle Flux in Rat Neonatal Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Haffar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Diabetic hearts exhibit intracellular lipid accumulation. This suggests that the degree of fatty acid oxidation (FAO in these hearts is insufficient to handle the elevated lipid uptake. We previously showed that palmitate impaired the rate of FAO in primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Here we were interested in characterizing the site of FAO impairment induced by palmitate since it may shed light on the metabolic dysfunction that leads to lipid accumulation in diabetic hearts. Methods: We measured fatty acid oxidation, acetyl-CoA oxidation, and carnitine palmitoyl transferase (Cpt1b activity. We measured both forward and reverse aconitase activity, as well as NAD+ dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase activity. We also measured reactive oxygen species using the 2', 7'-Dichlorofluorescin Diacetate (DCFDA assay. Finally we used thin layer chromatography to assess diacylglycerol (DAG levels. Results: We found that palmitate significantly impaired mitochondrial β-oxidation as well as citric acid cycle flux, but not Cpt1b activity. Palmitate negatively affected net aconitase activity and isocitrate dehydrogenase activity. The impaired enzyme activities were not due to oxidative stress but may be due to DAG mediated PKC activation. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that palmitate, a highly abundant fatty acid in human diets, causes impaired β-oxidation and citric acid cycle flux in primary neonatal cardiomyocytes. This metabolic defect occurs prior to cell death suggesting that it is a cause, rather than a consequence of palmitate mediated lipotoxicity. This impaired mitochondrial metabolism can have important implications for metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity.

  15. Enhanced citric acid production in aspergillus with inactivated asparagine-linked glycosylation protein 3 (ALG3), and/or increased laeA expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Ziyu; Baker, Scott E.

    2015-12-08

    Provided herein are fungi, such as Aspergillus niger, having a dolichyl-P-Man:Man(5)GlcNAc(2)-PP-dolichyl mannosyltransferase (Alg3) gene genetic inactivation, increased expression of a loss of aflR expression A (Lae), or both. In some examples, such mutants have several phenotypes, including an increased production of citric acid relative to the parental strain. Methods of using the disclosed fungi to make citric acid are also provided, as are compositions and kits including the disclosed fungi.

  16. Citric acid modifies surface properties of commercial CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles reducing their toxicity and cerium uptake in radish (Raphanus sativus) seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trujillo-Reyes, J. [Chemistry Department, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Av., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Vilchis-Nestor, A.R. [Centro Conjunto de Investigación en Química Sustentable UAEM—UNAM, Carretera Toluca—Atlacomulco km 14.5, San Cayetano, CP 50200 Toluca, Estado de México (Mexico); Majumdar, S. [Chemistry Department, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Av., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Av., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Peralta-Videa, J.R. [Chemistry Department, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Av., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Environmental Science and Engineering PhD program, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Av., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Gardea-Torresdey, J.L., E-mail: jgardea@utep.edu [Chemistry Department, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Av., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Environmental Science and Engineering PhD program, The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Ave., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); University of California Center for Environmental Implications of Nanotechnology (UC CEIN), The University of Texas at El Paso, 500 West University Av., El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The citric acid capping significantly reduced the ζ potential values. • As the amount of CA increased, thicker the layer surrounding the CeO{sub 2} NPs. • CeO{sub 2}/CA NPs had better distribution and small particle size than bare CeO{sub 2} NPs. • CeO{sub 2}/CA NPs decrease the Ce uptake by radish seedlings. -- Abstract: Little is known about the mobility, reactivity, and toxicity to plants of coated engineered nanoparticles (ENPs). Surface modification may change the interaction of ENPs with living organisms. This report describes surface changes in commercial CeO{sub 2} NPs coated with citric acid (CA) at molar ratios of 1:2, 1:3, 1:7, and 1:10 CeO{sub 2}:CA, and their effects on radish (Raphanus sativus) seed germination, cerium and nutrients uptake. All CeO{sub 2} NPs and their absorption by radish plants were characterized by TEM, DLS, and ICP-OES. Radish seeds were germinated in pristine and CA coated CeO{sub 2} NPs suspensions at 50 mg/L, 100 mg/L, and 200 mg/L. Deionized water and CA at 100 mg/L were used as controls. Results showed ζ potential values of 21.6 mV and −56 mV for the pristine and CA coated CeO{sub 2} NPs, respectively. TEM images showed denser layers surrounding the CeO{sub 2} NPs at higher CA concentrations, as well as better distribution and smaller particle sizes. None of the treatments affected seed germination. However, at 200 mg/L the CA coated NPs at 1:7 ratio produced significantly (p ≤ 0.05) more root biomass, increased water content and reduced by 94% the Ce uptake, compared to bare NPs. This suggests that CA coating decrease CeO{sub 2} NPs toxicity to plants.

  17. Lanthanum-doped mesostructured strontium titanates synthesized via sol–gel combustion route using citric acid as complexing agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sukpanish, Polthep [Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Center of Excellence on Petrochemical and Materials Technology (PETROMAT), Chulalongkorn University, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Lertpanyapornchai, Boontawee [Program in Petrochemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Yokoi, Toshiyuki [Division of Catalytic Chemistry, Chemical Resources Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Ngamcharussrivichai, Chawalit, E-mail: Chawalit.Ng@chula.ac.th [Department of Chemical Technology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand); Center of Excellence on Petrochemical and Materials Technology (PETROMAT), Chulalongkorn University, Patumwan, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)

    2016-09-15

    In the present work, a series of lanthanum-doped mesostructured strontium titanate (LMST) materials with different La/Sr ratios were synthesized via a sol–gel combustion method in the presence of citric acid as a complexing agent and Pluronic P123 as a templating agent. The effects of the amount of doped La and calcination temperature on the physicochemical properties of the LMSTs were examined using various techniques. Powder X-ray diffraction confirmed the substitution of La{sup 3+} into the SrTiO{sub 3} lattice, generating cubic perovskite La{sub x}Sr{sub 1−x}TiO{sub 3}, for the LMST materials calcined at 600 °C. The purity and crystallinity of the desired perovskite phase were enhanced by citric acid addition. The solubility limit of La{sup 3+} substitution at an La/Sr ratio of 0.43 was determined by structural and morphological studies. Increasing the La doping amount decreased the crystallinity and compositional homogeneity, because an La-rich amorphous phase segregated on the surface, but improved the mesoporosity. N{sub 2} physisorption measurements indicated that the LMSTs had a bimodal pore size distribution, of which the larger one was characterized by the crystallite size of mixed oxides, and the specific surface area of 24.9–37.3 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. The formation of mesopores in the LMST materials synthesized via sol–gel combustion was explained based on a combination of soft- and hard-templating chemistries. - Highlights: • La-doped mesoporous SrTiO{sub 3} (LMST) was prepared first time via sol-gel combustion. • Pluronic P123 triblock copolymer was used as a cheap templating agent. • Citric acid as a complexing agent enhanced the purity and crystallinity of SrTiO{sub 3}. • The textural properties of LMST were improved by increasing the La doping amount. • Mesopore formation was explained by a combined soft- and hard-templating route.

  18. Aerosol Fragmentation Driven by Coupling of Acid-Base and Free-Radical Chemistry in the Heterogeneous Oxidation of Aqueous Citric Acid by OH Radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Matthew J; Wiegel, Aaron A; Wilson, Kevin R; Houle, Frances A

    2017-08-10

    A key uncertainty in the heterogeneous oxidation of carboxylic acids by hydroxyl radicals (OH) in aqueous-phase aerosol is how the free-radical reaction pathways might be altered by acid-base chemistry. In particular, if acid-base reactions occur concurrently with acyloxy radical formation and unimolecular decomposition of alkoxy radicals, there is a possibility that differences in reaction pathways impact the partitioning of organic carbon between the gas and aqueous phases. To examine these questions, a kinetic model is developed for the OH-initiated oxidation of citric acid aerosol at high relative humidity. The reaction scheme, containing both free-radical and acid-base elementary reaction steps with physically validated rate coefficients, accurately predicts the experimentally observed molecular composition, particle size, and average elemental composition of the aerosol upon oxidation. The difference between the two reaction channels centers on the reactivity of carboxylic acid groups. Free-radical reactions mainly add functional groups to the carbon skeleton of neutral citric acid, because carboxylic acid moieties deactivate the unimolecular fragmentation of alkoxy radicals. In contrast, the conjugate carboxylate groups originating from acid-base equilibria activate both acyloxy radical formation and carbon-carbon bond scission of alkoxy radicals, leading to the formation of low molecular weight, highly oxidized products such as oxalic and mesoxalic acid. Subsequent hydration of carbonyl groups in the oxidized products increases the aerosol hygroscopicity and accelerates the substantial water uptake and volume growth that accompany oxidation. These results frame the oxidative lifecycle of atmospheric aerosol: it is governed by feedbacks between reactions that first increase the particle oxidation state, then eventually promote water uptake and acid-base chemistry. When coupled to free-radical reactions, acid-base channels lead to formation of low molecular

  19. Foliar Sprays of Citric Acid and Malic Acid Modify Growth, Flowering, and Root to Shoot Ratio of Gazania (Gazania rigens L.: A Comparative Analysis by ANOVA and Structural Equations Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Talebi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Foliar application of two levels of citric acid and malic acid (100 or 300 mg L−1 was investigated on flower stem height, plant height, flower performance and yield indices (fresh yield, dry yield and root to shoot ratio of Gazania. Distilled water was applied as control treatment. Multivariate analysis revealed that while the experimental treatments had no significant effect on fresh weight and the flower count, the plant dry weight was significantly increased by 300 mg L−1 malic acid. Citric acid at 100 and 300 mg L−1 and 300 mg L−1 malic acid increased the root fresh weight significantly. Both the plant height and peduncle length were significantly increased in all applied levels of citric acid and malic acid. The display time of flowers on the plant increased in all treatments compared to control treatment. The root to shoot ratio was increased significantly in 300 mg L−1 citric acid compared to all other treatments. These findings confirm earlier reports that citric acid and malic acid as environmentally sound chemicals are effective on various aspects of growth and development of crops. Structural equations modeling is used in parallel to ANOVA to conclude the factor effects and the possible path of effects.

  20. Controllable Growth of Bi2MoO6 Nanoplates by Citric Acid Assisted Hydrothermal Process and Their Photocatalytic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bi2MoO6 nanoplates with different sizes have been controllably fabricated by citric acid (CA assisted hydrothermal process. The effects of CA on the morphology of Bi2MoO6 nanoplates have also been investigated. It is found that CA has a critical role in the crystallinity and size of Bi2MoO6 nanoplates. On the basis of XRD analysis and SEM observation of the products, the mechanism for CA assisted hydrothermal synthesis of the Bi2MoO6 nanoplates is discussed. The photocatalytic activity of as-prepared Bi2MoO6 was evaluated by the degradation of RhB dye in water, and the sample prepared when the amount of CA was 2.5mmol exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity.

  1. Inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) hydroxylases by citric acid cycle intermediates: possible links between cell metabolism and stabilization of HIF

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Koivunen, Peppi; Hirsilä, Maija; Remes, Anne M; Hassinen, Ilmo E; Kivirikko, Kari I; Myllyharju, Johanna

    ... (HIF-P4Hs) and one HIF asparaginyl hydroxylase (FIH). We have studied possible links between metabolic pathways and HIF hydroxylases by analyzing the abilities of citric acid cycle intermediates to inhibit purified human HIF-P4Hs and FIH...

  2. [Effect of citric acid stimulation on salivary alpha-amylase, total protein, salivary flow rate and pH value in Pi deficiency children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ze-min; Chen, Long-hui; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Min; Yang, Xiao-rong; Chen, Wei-wen

    2015-02-01

    To compare the effect of citric acid stimulation on salivary alpha-amylase (sAA), total protein (TP), salivary flow rate, and pH value between Pi deficiency (PD) children and healthy children, thereby providing evidence for Pi controlling saliva theory. Twenty PD children were recruited, and 29 healthy children were also recruited at the same time. Saliva samples from all subjects were collected before and after citric acid stimulation. The sAA activity and amount, TP contents, salivary flow rate, and pH value were determined and compared. (1) Citric acid stimulation was able to significantly increase salivary flow rate, pH value, sAA activities, sAA specific activity and sAA amount (including glycosylated and non-glycosylated sAA amount) in healthy children (Pvalue, and glycosylated sAA levels in PD children (P0.05), salivary indices except salivary flow rate and glycosylated sAA levels decreased more in PD children. There was statistical difference in sAA activity ratio, sAA specific activity ratio, and the ratio of glycosylated sAA levels between PD children and healthy children (P<0.05). PD children had decreased response to citric acid stimulation.

  3. Effect of pioglitazone, quercetin, and hydroxy citric acid on vascular endothelial growth factor messenger RNA (VEGF mRNA) expression in experimentally induced nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surapaneni, Krishna Mohan; Vishnu Priya, Veeraraghavan; Mallika, Jainu

    2015-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is associated with various ischemic and inflammatory diseases, and plays an important role in the development of liver fibrosis and hepatocarcinogenesis in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). In this study, the comparative effect of pioglitazone, quercetin, and hydroxy citric acid on VEGF mRNA in experimentally induced NASH was investigated. The experimental protocol consisted of five groups: control, NASH, NASH + pioglitazone, NASH + quercetin, and NASH + hydroxy citric acid. The VEGF mRNA expression was evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT- PCR) analysis for all experimental groups, and the levels of VEGF mRNA were quantitatively measured by densitometry. A higher expression of VEGF mRNA was found in the hepatic cells of rats with experimentally induced NASH compared to the control group. A very mild increase in VEGF mRNA expression was observed in the rats treated with quercetin. In contrast, a mild increase in the expression of VEGF mRNA was observed in the rats treated with pioglitazone and hydroxy citric acid. Quercetin exhibited an effective inhibition of VEGF mRNA expression, while a lower inhibition of the VEGF mRNA level was observed in the hydroxy citric acid- and the pioglitazone-treated rats.

  4. Effects of xylanase and citric acid on the performance, nutrient retention, and characteristics of gastrointestinal tract of broilers fed low-phosphorus wheat-based diets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esmaeilipour, O.; Shivazad, M.; Moravej, H.; Aminzadeh, S.; Rezaian, M.; Krimpen, van M.M.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to study the effects of xylanase and citric acid on the performance, nutrient retention, jejunal viscosity, and size and pH of the gastrointestinal tract of broilers fed a low-P wheat-based diet. The experiment was conducted as a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement with 2 levels

  5. EFFECT OF ACID CONCENTRATION ON CHARACTERS OF SILICA GEL SYNTHESIZED FROM SODIUM SILICATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuryono Nuryono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, synthesis and characterization of silica gel from sodium silicate through sol-gel process using H2SO4, HCl, and citric acid have been investigated. Synthesis was carried out by mixing and stirring  20 mL of H2SO4, HCl or citric acid  at certain concentration with 50 mL of sodium silicate solution (Na2O 0.17 M and SiO2 0.61 M for one hour and let to form gel.  The gel was washed with distillated water, and dried in an oven at 100 oC. Characterization of silica gel was carried out by d