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Sample records for cisplatin

  1. Cisplatin Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dilantin), bumetanide (Bumex), ethacrynic acid (Edecrin), furosemide (Lasix), pyridoxine (Vitamin B-6). Your doctor may need to ... looks like coffee grounds Cisplatin may increase the risk that you will develop other cancers. Talk to ...

  2. Prevention of cisplatin nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayati Fatemeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin has a well-established role in the treatment of broad spectrum of malignancies; however its use is limited because of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity (CIN which can be progressive in more than 50% of cases. The most important risk factors for CIN include higher doses of cisplatin, previous cisplatin chemotherapy, underlying kidney damage and concurrent treatment with other potential nephrotoxin agents, such as aminoglycosides, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, or iodinated contrast media. Different strategies have been offered to diminish or prevent nephrotoxicity of cisplatin. The standard approach for prevention of CIN is the administration of lower doses of cisplatin in combination with full intravenous hydration prior and after cisplatin administration. Cisplatin-induced oxidative stress in the kidney may be prevented by natural antioxidant compounds. The results of this review show that many strategies for prevention of CIN exist, however, attention to the administration of these agent for CIN is necessary.

  3. Cisplatin Induced Nephrotoxicity

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    Seyed Seifollah Beladi Mousavi

    2014-02-01

    The standard approach to prevent cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity is the administration of lower doses of cisplatin in combination with the administration of full intravenous isotonic saline before and after cisplatin administration. Although a number of pharmacologic agents including sodium thiosulfate, N-acetylcysteine, theophylline and glycine have been evaluated for prevention of nephrotoxicity, none have proved to have an established role, thus, additional clinical studies will be required to confirm their probable effects.

  4. Liposomal cisplatin: a new cisplatin formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulos, George P

    2010-09-01

    Over the last three decades, cisplatin has been one of the most effective cytotoxic agents, but its administration has been hindered by its nephrotoxicity, neurotoxicity and myelo toxicity. Recently, liposomal cisplatin, lipoplatin, has been formulated and tested thoroughly in preclinical (in vitro) and phase I, II and III trials, as documented in the literature. Experiments in animals showed that lipoplatin is less toxic than cisplatin and that it produces tumour reduction. The histological examination of treated tumours from mouse xenografts was consistent with apoptosis in the tumour cells in a mechanism similar to that of cisplatin. Lipoplatin infusion in patients and measurements of platinum levels in tumour specimens showed 10-50 times higher levels in tumours and metastases than in the adjacent normal specimens. A phase I-II study using a combination of lipoplatin and gemcitabine in pretreated patients (with disease progression or stable disease) with advanced pancreatic cancer was conducted. No nephrotoxicity was observed. With lipoplatin monotherapy the dose-limiting toxicity was determined to be 350 mg/m and the maximum tolerated dose 300 mg/m; when used in combination with paclitaxel the dose-limiting toxicity for lipoplatin was 250 mg/m and for paclitaxel 175 mg/m, and the maximum tolerated dose was 200 and 175 mg/m, respectively. In two phase II randomized studies comparing the lipoplatin combination versus the cisplatin combination, it was found that the former was statistically significantly less toxic than the latter, whereas the response rate and survival were similar. Up to now, the data on lipoplatin treatment in malignant tumours are quite impressive, because of the negligible toxicity and because it is equal if not superior to cisplatin with regard to response rate. This review aims to chronologically document publications relevant to liposomal cisplatin to date.

  5. Cisplatin triggers platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togna, G I; Togna, A R; Franconi, M; Caprino, L

    2000-09-01

    Clinical observations suggest that anticancer drugs could contribute to the thrombotic complications of malignancy in treated patients. Thrombotic microangiopathy, myocardial infarction, and cerebrovascular thrombotic events have been reported for cisplatin, a drug widely used in the treatment of many solid tumours. The aim of this study is to explore in vitro cisplatin effect on human platelet reactivity in order to define the potentially active role of platelets in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced thrombotic complications. Our results demonstrate that cisplatin increases human platelet reactivity (onset of platelet aggregation wave and thromboxane production) to non-aggregating concentrations of the agonists involving arachidonic acid metabolism. Direct or indirect activation of platelet phospholipase A(2) appears to be implicated. This finding contributes to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of thrombotic complications occurring during cisplatin-based chemotherapy.

  6. Cisplatin induced paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia

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    Waseem Raja

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (CDDP is the first member of a class of platinum-containing anti-cancer drugs that act by binding to and causing cross-linking of deoxyribonucleic acid, which ultimately triggers apoptosis. Cisplatin has a broad-spectrum antineoplastic activity against various types of human tumors. Unfortunately, the optimal usefulness of Cisplatin is limited secondary to its dose related toxicity especially nephrotoxicity. Cisplatin chemotherapy is also associated with cardiotoxic effects that may range from silent arrhythmias to heart failure and even sudden cardiac death. These effects are more pronounced when cisplatin is combined with other cardiotoxic drugs. Here, we report a case of patient of cancer lung who developed paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia following administration of Cisplatin. A brief review of the literature follows.

  7. Cisplatin induced paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Waseem; Mir, M Hussain; Dar, Imtiyaz; Banday, Muzamil Ahmad; Ahmad, Irfan

    2013-10-01

    Cisplatin or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (CDDP) is the first member of a class of platinum-containing anti-cancer drugs that act by binding to and causing cross-linking of deoxyribonucleic acid, which ultimately triggers apoptosis. Cisplatin has a broad-spectrum antineoplastic activity against various types of human tumors. Unfortunately, the optimal usefulness of Cisplatin is limited secondary to its dose related toxicity especially nephrotoxicity. Cisplatin chemotherapy is also associated with cardiotoxic effects that may range from silent arrhythmias to heart failure and even sudden cardiac death. These effects are more pronounced when cisplatin is combined with other cardiotoxic drugs. Here, we report a case of patient of cancer lung who developed paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia following administration of Cisplatin. A brief review of the literature follows.

  8. Haemolytic anaemia after cisplatin treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Levi, J A; Aroney, R S; Dalley, D N

    1981-01-01

    Normochromic or normocytic anaemia is a common side effect of treatment with cisplatin. Two patients treated with cisplatin 100 mg/m2 in combination with vinblastine, bleomycin, and actinomycin D developed haemolytic anaemia. Neither patient had evidence of haemolysis before treatment, and in both cases severe haemolytic anaemia developed after several courses of cisplatin and when the cancer had regressed almost completely. The importance of haemolysis in the development of anaemia after cis...

  9. Cisplatin-Induced Eosinophilic Pneumonia

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    Hideharu Ideguchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 67-year-old man suffering from esophageal cancer was admitted to our hospital complaining of dyspnea and hypoxemia. He had been treated with cisplatin, docetaxel, and fluorouracil combined with radiotherapy. Chest computed tomography revealed bilateral ground-glass opacity, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid showed increased eosinophils. Two episodes of transient eosinophilia in peripheral blood were observed after serial administration of anticancer drugs before the admission, and drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test to cisplatin was positive. Thus cisplatin-induced eosinophilic pneumonia was suspected, and corticosteroid was effectively administered. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of cisplatin-induced eosinophilic pneumonia.

  10. Cisplatin versus cisplatin plus doxorubicin for standard-risk hepatoblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perilongo, G.; Maibach, R.; Shafford, E.; Brugieres, L.; Brock, P.; Morland, B.; de Camargo, B.; Zsiros, J.; Roebuck, D.; Zimmermann, A.; Aronson, D.; Childs, M.; Widing, E.; Laithier, V.; Plaschkes, J.; Pritchard, J.; Scopinaro, M.; Czauderna, P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Preoperative cisplatin alone may be as effective as cisplatin plus doxorubicin in standard-risk hepatoblastoma (a tumor involving three or fewer sectors of the liver that is associated with an alpha-fetoprotein level of >100 ng per milliliter). Methods: Children with standard-risk hepato

  11. Molecular mechanism of cisplatin resistance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used in the treatment of many tumors,particularly in ovarian cancer.GST-π,metallothionein(MT), multidrug resistance associated proteins(MRPs), nucleotide excision repair(NER), mismatch repair(MMR) and oncogenes contribute to drug resistance of cisplatin.

  12. Arterial Emboli Complicating Cisplatin Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Tait, Campbell D.; Rankin, Elaine M

    2012-01-01

    We report three cases of arterial emboli in patients with lung cancer treated with cisplatin chemotherapy. All three patients were managed without surgical intervention but subsequent oncological treatment was complicated by the sequelae of arterial emboli. We discuss the issues surrounding these patients and the importance of identifying patients at risk of arterial embolic phenomena with cisplatin treatment.

  13. Cisplatin versus cisplatin plus doxorubicin for standard-risk hepatoblastoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Perilongo, G.; Maibach, R; Shafford, E.; Brugieres, L; Brock, P; Morland, B.; de Camargo, B; Zsiros, J.; Roebuck, D; Zimmermann, A; Aronson, D.; Childs, M.; Widing, E.; Laithier, V.; Plaschkes, J.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preoperative cisplatin alone may be as effective as cisplatin plus doxorubicin in standard-risk hepatoblastoma (a tumor involving three or fewer sectors of the liver that is associated with an alpha-fetoprotein level of >100 ng per milliliter). METHODS: Children with standard-risk hepatoblastoma who were younger than 16 years of age were eligible for inclusion in the study. After they received one cycle of cisplatin (80 mg per square meter of body-surface area per 24 hours), we...

  14. CISPLATIN I KAMPEN MOD CANCER

    OpenAIRE

    Hasle Rasmussen, Cecilie; Cohen Pedersen, Sarah; Gamsgaard, Christian; Mads Pedersen, Christoffer; Lindberg, Sanne

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the conveying of a teaching material based on the subject of cisplatin, more specifically “Cisplatin as a chemotherapeutic remedy against cancer”. Our paper attempts to analyze the possibility of conveying complex knowledge with regards to e.g. coordination chemistry in an interdisciplinary booklet that incorporates both scientific knowledge of level A chemistry and level B biology, of Danish STX standards. Furthermore, this paper will take into account the governmental ...

  15. Cisplatin-induced hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar coma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komdeur, R.; Derksen, J.; Legdeur, M-C.; Hylkema, B. S.

    2007-01-01

    We present a case of severe hyperglycaemic hyperosmolar derangement after treatment with cisplatin in a patient without previous diabetes mellitus. Limited data are available on this adverse reaction, explaining why impaired glucose handling due to cisplatin is not generally recognised.

  16. Future opportunities in preventing cisplatin induced ototoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H. van den Berg; J.H. Beijnen; A.J.M. Balm; J.H.M. Schellens

    2006-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most commonly used cytotoxic agents. ototoxicity is an important and dose-limiting side-effect of cisplatin therapy. It is believed that cisplatin suppresses the formation of endogenous anti-oxidants that normally prevent the inner ear against reactive oxygen species (ROS). T

  17. Matricaria chamomilla attenuates cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Ragaa H M

    2012-07-01

    Matricaria chamomilla is extensively consumed as a tea or tonic. Despite its widespread use as a home remedy, relatively few trials evaluated its benefits in nephro protection. Hence, this study evaluates the protective role of M. chamomilla in cisplatin nephrotoxicity rat model. The study was conducted on 32 rats divided into four groups. The first group (G1) was injected with saline intra-peritoneally (IP); G2 was injected with 5 mg/kg cisplatin on day 0 of the experiment and repeated four times, with five days free interval. G3 and G4 were injected daily with M. chamomilla (50 mg/kg) IP, starting five days before the experiment (-5 day); in addition, G4 was injected with cisplatin. On day 16, animals were scarified and serum and/or kidney tissue was used to determine: (a) kidney function tests (serum urea, creatinine, gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT), NAG, β-gal), (b) oxidative stress indices (NO, LPO), (c) antioxidant activities (SOD, GSH, total thiols), (d) apoptotic indices (Cathepsin D, DNA fragmentation) and (e) mineral (calcium). M. chamomilla significantly increased the body weight, normalized the kidney functions, improved the apoptotic markers, reduced the oxidative stress markers and corrected the hypo-calcemia that resulted from cisplatin nephrotoxicity. M. chamomilla is a promising nephro-protective compound reducing cisplatin nephrotoxicity most probably by its antioxidant activities and inhibition of gamma glutamyl transferase activity.

  18. Matricaria chamomilla attenuates cisplatin nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragaa H.M. Salama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Matricaria chamomilla is extensively consumed as a tea or tonic. Despite its widespread use as a home remedy, relatively few trials evaluated its benefits in nephro protection. Hence, this study evaluates the protective role of M. chamomilla in cisplatin nephrotoxicity rat model. The study was conducted on 32 rats divided into four groups. The first group (G1 was injected with saline intra-peritoneally (IP; G2 was injected with 5 mg/kg cisplatin on day 0 of the experiment and repeated four times, with five days free interval. G3 and G4 were injected daily with M. chamomilla (50 mg/kg IP, starting five days before the experiment (-5 day; in addition, G4 was injected with cisplatin. On day 16, animals were scarified and serum and/or kidney tissue was used to determine: (a kidney function tests (serum urea, creatinine, gamma glutamyl transferase (GGT, NAG, β-gal, (b oxidative stress indices (NO, LPO, (c antioxidant activities (SOD, GSH, total thiols, (d apoptotic indices (Cathepsin D, DNA fragmentation and (e mineral (calcium. M. chamomilla significantly increased the body weight, normalized the kidney functions, improved the apoptotic markers, reduced the oxidative stress markers and corrected the hypo-calcemia that resulted from cisplatin nephrotoxicity. M. chamomilla is a promising nephro-protective compound reducing cisplatin nephrotoxicity most probably by its antioxidant activities and inhibition of gamma glutamyl transferase activity.

  19. Compound list: cisplatin [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available cisplatin CSP 00132 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/cisplatin....Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/cisplatin...bc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Single/cisplatin.Rat.in_vivo.Kidney.Single.zip ftp://ft...p.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Repeat/cisplatin.Rat.in_vivo.Kidney.Repeat.zip ... ....Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Single.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/cisp

  20. Neuronal involvement in cisplatin neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup-Hansen, A; Helweg-Larsen, Susanne Elisabeth; Schmalbruch, H

    2007-01-01

    Although it is well known that cisplatin causes a sensory neuropathy, the primary site of involvement is not established. The clinical symptoms localized in a stocking-glove distribution may be explained by a length dependent neuronopathy or by a distal axonopathy. To study whether the whole neuron...... of large dorsal root ganglion cells. Motor conduction studies, autonomic function and warm and cold temperature sensation remained unchanged at all doses of cisplatin treatment. The results of these studies are consistent with degeneration of large sensory neurons whereas there was no evidence of distal...

  1. Neuronal involvement in cisplatin neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup-Hansen, A; Helweg-Larsen, Susanne Elisabeth; Schmalbruch, H;

    2007-01-01

    of large dorsal root ganglion cells. Motor conduction studies, autonomic function and warm and cold temperature sensation remained unchanged at all doses of cisplatin treatment. The results of these studies are consistent with degeneration of large sensory neurons whereas there was no evidence of distal......Although it is well known that cisplatin causes a sensory neuropathy, the primary site of involvement is not established. The clinical symptoms localized in a stocking-glove distribution may be explained by a length dependent neuronopathy or by a distal axonopathy. To study whether the whole neuron...

  2. Membrane Transition Temperature Determines Cisplatin Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Raghunathan

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is a classical chemotherapeutic agent used in treating several forms of cancer including head and neck. However, cells develop resistance to the drug in some patients through a range of mechanisms, some of which are poorly understood. Using isolated plasma membrane vesicles as a model system, we present evidence suggesting that cisplatin induced resistance may be due to certain changes in the bio-physical properties of plasma membranes. Giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs isolated from cortical cytoskeleton exhibit a miscibility transition between a single liquid phase at high temperature and two distinct coexisting liquid phases at low temperature. The temperature at which this transition occurs is hypothesized to reflect the magnitude of membrane heterogeneity at physiological temperature. We find that addition of cisplatin to vesicles isolated from cisplatin-sensitive cells result in a lowering of this miscibility transition temperature, whereas in cisplatin-resistant cells such treatment does not affect the transition temperature. To explore if this is a cause or consequence of cisplatin resistance, we tested if addition of cisplatin in combination with agents that modulate GPMV transition temperatures can affect cisplatin sensitivity. We found that cells become more sensitive to cisplatin when isopropanol, an agent that lowers GPMV transition temperature, was combined with cisplatin. Conversely, cells became resistant to cisplatin when added in combination with menthol that raises GPMV transition temperatures. These data suggest that changes in plasma membrane heterogeneity augments or suppresses signaling events initiated in the plasma membranes that can determine response to cisplatin. We postulate that desired perturbations of membrane heterogeneity could provide an effective therapeutic strategy to overcome cisplatin resistance for certain patients.

  3. Methods of reduction of cisplatin nephrotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, E.M. Jr.; Gale, G.R.

    Cisplatin, an agent widely used in the chemotherapy of a variety of human malignancies, is often dose-limited owing to its nephrotoxicity. Some of the approaches under consideration, regarding the reduction of cisplatin nephrotoxicity, include the use of hydration and osmotic diuresis, pharmacological diuretics, chelating agents or agents which otherwise react with cisplatin or reverse cisplatin-induced deoxyribonucleic acid cross-links, and antioxidants to destroy free radicals, especially superoxide radicals, produced by cisplatin. The effects of each of these and other interventions on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity are delineated, along with their proposed mechanisms and effects on therapeutic efficacy. The current status of development of organoplatinum analogs yielding congeners with less nephrotoxicity and greater efficacy is discussed briefly. Finally, a possible role of endogenous and/or exogenous prostaglandins in protecting against or reversing heavy metal nephrotoxicity is suggested.

  4. Mechanisms of cisplatin-induced muscle atrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Hiroyasu, E-mail: sakai@hoshi.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Division of Pharmacy Professional Development and Research, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Sagara, Atsunobu; Arakawa, Kazuhiko; Sugiyama, Ryoto; Hirosaki, Akiko; Takase, Kazuhide; Jo, Ara [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Sato, Ken [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Division of Pharmacy Professional Development and Research, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Chiba, Yoshihiko [Department of Biology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan); Yamazaki, Mitsuaki [Department of Anesthesiology, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences for Research, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama-shi, Toyama 9300194 (Japan); Matoba, Motohiro [Department of Palliative Medicine and Psychooncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 1040045 (Japan); Narita, Minoru, E-mail: narita@hoshi.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacology, Hoshi University, 2-4-41 Ebara, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 1428501 (Japan)

    2014-07-15

    Fatigue is the most common side effect of chemotherapy. However, the mechanisms of “muscle fatigue” induced by anti-cancer drugs are not fully understood. We therefore investigated the muscle-atrophic effect of cisplatin, a platinum-based anti-cancer drug, in mice. C57BL/6J mice were treated with cisplatin (3 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline for 4 consecutive days. On Day 5, hindlimb and quadriceps muscles were isolated from mice. The loss of body weight and food intake under the administration of cisplatin was the same as those in a dietary restriction (DR) group. Under the present conditions, the administration of cisplatin significantly decreased not only the muscle mass of the hindlimb and quadriceps but also the myofiber diameter, compared to those in the DR group. The mRNA expression levels of muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx), muscle RING finger-1 (MuRF1) and forkhead box O3 (FOXO3) were significantly and further increased by cisplatin treated group, compared to DR. Furthermore, the mRNA levels of myostatin and p21 were significantly upregulated by the administration of cisplatin, compared to DR. On the other hand, the phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a, which leads to the blockade of the upregulation of MuRF1 and MAFbx, was significantly and dramatically decreased by cisplatin. These findings suggest that the administration of cisplatin increases atrophic gene expression, and may lead to an imbalance between protein synthesis and protein degradation pathways, which would lead to muscle atrophy. This phenomenon could, at least in part, explain the mechanism of cisplatin-induced muscle fatigue. - Highlights: • Cisplatin decreased mass and myofiber diameter in quadriceps muscle. • The mRNA of MAFbx, MuRF1 and FOXO3 were increased by the cisplatin. • The mRNA of myostatin and p21 were upregulated by cisplatin. • The phosphorylation of Akt and FOXO3a was decreased by cisplatin.

  5. Combining disulfiram and poly(l-glutamic acid)-cisplatin conjugates for combating cisplatin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wantong; Tang, Zhaohui; Shen, Na; Yu, Haiyang; Jia, Yanjie; Zhang, Dawei; Jiang, Jian; He, Chaoliang; Tian, Huayu; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-06-10

    A poly(l-glutamic acid) graft polyethylene glycol-cisplatin complex (PGA-CisPt) performs well in reducing the toxicity of free cisplatin and greatly enhances the accumulation and retention of cisplatin in solid tumors. However, there is a lack of effective treatment options for cisplatin-resistant tumors. A major reason for this is the dense PEG shell, which ensures that the PGA-CisPt maintains a long retention time in the blood that may result in it bypassing the tumor cells or failing to be endocytosed within the tumor microenvironment. Consequently, the cisplatin from PGA-CisPt is released to the extracellular space in the presence of cisplatin-resistant tumor cells and the resistant problem to free cisplatin still valid. Therefore, we devised a strategy to combat the resistance of cisplatin in the tumor microenvironment using nanoparticles-loaded disulfiram (NPs-DSF) as a modulator. In vitro, cisplatin, in combination with DSF, had a synergistic effect and decreased cell survival rate of cisplatin-resistant A549DDP cells. This effect was also observed when combining PGA-CisPt with NPs-DSF. Similarly, in Balb/C nude mice with A549DDP xenografts, NPs-DSF improved PGA-CisPt effectiveness in inhibiting tumor growth while maintaining low toxicity. Our data demonstrate that DSF reduces intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels, inhibits NFκB activity, and modulates the expression of apoptosis-related proteins Bcl-2 and Bax, thereby improves the effectiveness of cisplatin in resistant cell lines. Here, we provide a promising method for overcoming cisplatin resistance in tumors, while maintaining the in vivo benefits of the PGA-CisPt complex.

  6. Duration of cisplatin excretion in breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Karen E; Ryu, Rachel J; Swisher, Elizabeth M; Reed, Eddie; McManus, Terry; Rybeck, Blanche; Petros, William P; Hebert, Mary F

    2013-11-01

    Cisplatin, a platinum-based chemotherapy agent, is commonly used in treating cancers that may affect women of childbearing age, including cervical cancer, triple-negative breast cancer, and pediatric tumors in adolescents. The authors found that platinum was undetectable in breast milk at 66 hours and beyond following a 70-mg dose of intravenous cisplatin. Relative infant dose of platinum was calculated to be between 0.29% and 0.40% of the maternal dose corrected for body weight. This case demonstrates minimal exposure to platinum via breast milk, following a single 70-mg intravenous dose of cisplatin.

  7. Cellular Responses to Cisplatin-Induced DNA Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alakananda Basu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is one of the most effective anticancer agents widely used in the treatment of solid tumors. It is generally considered as a cytotoxic drug which kills cancer cells by damaging DNA and inhibiting DNA synthesis. How cells respond to cisplatin-induced DNA damage plays a critical role in deciding cisplatin sensitivity. Cisplatin-induced DNA damage activates various signaling pathways to prevent or promote cell death. This paper summarizes our current understandings regarding the mechanisms by which cisplatin induces cell death and the bases of cisplatin resistance. We have discussed various steps, including the entry of cisplatin inside cells, DNA repair, drug detoxification, DNA damage response, and regulation of cisplatin-induced apoptosis by protein kinases. An understanding of how various signaling pathways regulate cisplatin-induced cell death should aid in the development of more effective therapeutic strategies for the treatment of cancer.

  8. Suramin protects from cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupre, Tess V; Doll, Mark A; Shah, Parag P; Sharp, Cierra N; Kiefer, Alex; Scherzer, Michael T; Saurabh, Kumar; Saforo, Doug; Siow, Deanna; Casson, Lavona; Arteel, Gavin E; Jenson, Alfred Bennett; Megyesi, Judit; Schnellmann, Rick G; Beverly, Levi J; Siskind, Leah J

    2016-02-01

    Cisplatin, a commonly used cancer chemotherapeutic, has a dose-limiting side effect of nephrotoxicity. Approximately 30% of patients administered cisplatin suffer from kidney injury, and there are limited treatment options for the treatment of cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Suramin, which is Federal Drug Administration-approved for the treatment of trypanosomiasis, improves kidney function after various forms of kidney injury in rodent models. We hypothesized that suramin would attenuate cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Suramin treatment before cisplatin administration reduced cisplatin-induced decreases in kidney function and injury. Furthermore, suramin attenuated cisplatin-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptosis in the kidney cortex. Treatment of mice with suramin 24 h after cisplatin also improved kidney function, suggesting that the mechanism of protection is not by inhibition of tubular cisplatin uptake or its metabolism to nephrotoxic species. If suramin is to be used in the context of cancer, then it cannot prevent cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity of cancer cells. Suramin did not alter the dose-response curve of cisplatin in lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro. In addition, suramin pretreatment of mice harboring lung adenocarcinomas did not alter the initial cytotoxic effects of cisplatin (DNA damage and apoptosis) on tumor cells. These results provide evidence that suramin has potential as a renoprotective agent for the treatment/prevention of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury and justify future long-term preclinical studies using cotreatment of suramin and cisplatin in mouse models of cancer.

  9. Serum thymic factor, FTS, attenuates cisplatin nephrotoxicity by suppressing cisplatin-induced ERK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohda, Yuka; Kawai, Yoshiko; Iwamoto, Noriaki; Matsunaga, Yoshiko; Aiga, Hiromi; Awaya, Akira; Gemba, Munekazu

    2005-11-01

    Serum thymic factor (FTS), a thymic peptide hormone, has been reported to attenuate the bleomycin-induced pulmonary injury and also experimental pancreatitis and diabetes. In the present study, we investigated the effect of FTS on cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II (cisplatin)-induced nephrotoxicity. We have already demonstrated that cephaloridine, a nephrotoxic antibiotic, leads to extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) activation in the rat kidney, which probably contributes to cephaloridine-induced renal dysfunction. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of cisplatin on ERK activation in the rat kidney and also the effect of FTS on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. In vitro treatment of LLC-PK1 cells with FTS significantly ameliorated cisplatin-induced cell injury. Treatment of rats with intravenous cisplatin for 3 days markedly induced renal dysfunction and increased platinum contents in the kidney cortex. An increase in pERK was detected in the nuclear fraction prepared from the rat kidney cortex from days 1 to 3 after injection of cisplatin. FTS suppressed cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction and ERK activation in the kidney. FTS did not influence any Pt contents in the kidney after cisplatin administration. FTS has been shown to enhance the in vivo expression of heat shock protein (HSP) 70 in the kidney cortex. The beneficial role of FTS against cisplatin nephrotoxicity may be mediated in part by HSP70, as suggested by its up-regulation in the kidney cortex treated with FTS alone. Our results suggest that FTS participates in protection from cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by suppressing ERK activation caused by cisplatin.

  10. Membrane Transition Temperature Determines Cisplatin Response

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnan Raghunathan; Aarif Ahsan; Dipankar Ray; Mukesh K. Nyati; Veatch, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a classical chemotherapeutic agent used in treating several forms of cancer including head and neck. However, cells develop resistance to the drug in some patients through a range of mechanisms, some of which are poorly understood. Using isolated plasma membrane vesicles as a model system, we present evidence suggesting that cisplatin induced resistance may be due to certain changes in the bio-physical properties of plasma membranes. Giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) isolate...

  11. Resveratrol attenuates cisplatin renal cortical cytotoxicity by modifying oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentovic, Monica A; Ball, John G; Brown, J Mike; Terneus, Marcus V; McQuade, Elizabeth; Van Meter, Stephanie; Hedrick, Hayden M; Roy, Amy Allison; Williams, Tierra

    2014-03-01

    Cisplatin, a cancer chemotherapy drug, is nephrotoxic. The aim of this study was to investigate whether resveratrol (RES) reduced cisplatin cytotoxicity and oxidative stress. Rat renal cortical slices were pre-incubated 30min with 0 (VEH, ethanol) or 30μg/ml RES followed by 60, 90 or 120min co-incubation with 0, 75, or 150μg/ml cisplatin. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage was unchanged at 60 and 90min by cisplatin. Cisplatin increased (pCisplatin induced oxidative stress prior to LDH leakage as cisplatin depressed glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, increased lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) adducted proteins within 60min. RES failed to reverse glutathione (GSH) depression by cisplatin. In order to eliminated an extracellular interaction between RES and cisplatin, additional studies (RINSE studies) allowed a 30min RES uptake into slices, transfer of slices to buffer lacking RES, followed by 120min cisplatin incubation. RES in the RINSE studies prevented LDH leakage by cisplatin indicating that RES protection was not via a physical interaction with cisplatin in the media. These findings indicate that RES diminished cisplatin in vitro renal toxicity and prevented the development of oxidative stress.

  12. Cisplatin Targeting of Bacterial Ribosomal RNA Hairpins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayani N. P. Dedduwa-Mudalige

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is a clinically important chemotherapeutic agent known to target purine bases in nucleic acids. In addition to major deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA intrastrand cross-links, cisplatin also forms stable adducts with many types of ribonucleic acid (RNA including siRNA, spliceosomal RNAs, tRNA, and rRNA. All of these RNAs play vital roles in the cell, such as catalysis of protein synthesis by rRNA, and therefore serve as potential drug targets. This work focused on platination of two highly conserved RNA hairpins from E. coli ribosomes, namely pseudouridine-modified helix 69 from 23S rRNA and the 790 loop of helix 24 from 16S rRNA. RNase T1 probing, MALDI mass spectrometry, and dimethyl sulfate mapping revealed platination at GpG sites. Chemical probing results also showed platination-induced RNA structural changes. These findings reveal solvent and structural accessibility of sites within bacterial RNA secondary structures that are functionally significant and therefore viable targets for cisplatin as well as other classes of small molecules. Identifying target preferences at the nucleotide level, as well as determining cisplatin-induced RNA conformational changes, is important for the design of more potent drug molecules. Furthermore, the knowledge gained through studies of RNA-targeting by cisplatin is applicable to a broad range of organisms from bacteria to human.

  13. Reversibly PEGylated nanocarrier for cisplatin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanova, Ekaterina; Mitova, Violeta; Shestakova, Pavletta; Kowalczuk, Agnieszka; Momekov, Georgi; Momekova, Denitsa; Marcinkowski, Andrzej; Koseva, Neli

    2013-03-01

    A star-shaped copolymer bearing a shell of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains was designed as a carrier of cisplatin. The proposed strategy was based on synthesis of a PEGylating agent and the incorporation of cisplatin as a reversible linker for PEG modification of the star macromolecules. The attachment of PEG chains to the stars and their release under physiological conditions, as well as the changes in particle size and mobility upon drug loading, was evidenced by diffusion ordered NMR spectroscopy (DOSY). The results demonstrated that PEGylation reduced inter-stars cross-linking and increased the stability of the nanocolloidal solution. The formation of PEG shell resulted in higher drug payload and improved drug release profile of the nanoconjugates. The in vitro bioassay in a panel of human tumor cell lines confirmed that the PEGylated conjugates exhibited superior growth inhibitory activity compared to the cisplatin-loaded nonPEGylated carrier.

  14. Strong adsorption of Al-doped carbon nanotubes toward cisplatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Li, Guo-Qing; Lu, Xiao-Min; Ma, Juan-Juan; Zeng, Peng-Yu; He, Qin-Yu; Wang, Yin-Zhen

    2016-08-01

    The adsorption of cisplatin molecule on Al-doped CNTs is investigated using density functional theory. The obtained results indicate that Al-doped carbon nanotubes can strongly absorb cisplatin. After absorbing cisplatin, the symmetry of CNTs has some changes. We innovatively defined a parameter of symmetry variation which relates to the adsorption. By analyzing the electronic structure, it can be concluded that under the circumstance that cisplatin was absorbed by Al-doped CNTs through aluminum atom of Al-doped CNTs. In conclusion, Al-doped CNTs is a kind of potential delivery carrier with high quality for anticancer drug cisplatin.

  15. Low renal toxicity of lipoplatin compared to cisplatin in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devarajan, Prasad; Tarabishi, Ridwan; Mishra, Jaya; Ma, Qing; Kourvetaris, Andreas; Vougiouka, Maria; Boulikas, Teni

    2004-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most widely used and effective chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of several human malignancies. Although the effectiveness of cisplatin is high, its toxicities justify the demand for improved formulations of this drug. A liposomal formulation of cisplatin, Lipoplatin, was developed in order to reduce the systemic toxicity of cisplatin. Mice and rats injected with cisplatin developed renal insufficiency with clear evidence of tubular damage, but those injected with the same dose of Lipoplatin were almost completely free of kidney injury. The maximum levels of total platinum in rat kidneys after intraperitoneal bolus injection of cisplatin or Lipoplatin at similar doses were similar, but the steady state accumulation of total platinum in the kidney was 5 times higher for cisplatin compared to Lipoplatin. This is proposed as one mechanism to explain the low renal toxicity of Lipoplatin.

  16. Cisplatin-induced anorexia and ghrelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Tomohisa; Yakabi, Koji; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin, a formidable anticancer treatment, is used for several varieties of cancer. There are, however, many cases in which treatment must be abandoned due to a decrease in the patient's quality of life from loss of appetite associated with vomiting and nausea. There is a moderate degree of improvement in prevention of cisplatin-induced nausea and vomiting when serotonin (5-HT) 3 receptor antagonists, neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists, and steroids-either alone or in combination-are administered. The mechanism of action for anorexia, which continues during or after treatment, is, however, still unclear. This anorexia is, similar to the onset of vomiting and nausea, caused by the action of large amounts of 5-HT released as a result of cisplatin administration on tissue 5-HT receptors. Among the 5-HT receptors, the activation of 5-HT2b and 5-HT2c receptors, in particular, seems to play a major role in cisplatin-induced anorexia. Following activation of these two receptors, there is reduced gastric and hypothalamic secretion of the appetite-stimulating hormone ghrelin. There is ample evidence of the usefulness of exogenous ghrelin, synthetic ghrelin agonists, and the endogenous ghrelin signal-enhancer rikkunshito, which are expected to play significant roles in the clinical treatment and prevention of anorexia in future.

  17. Effect of Cisplatin on the Flexibility of Linear DNA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Chao; ZHANG Ling-Yun; HOU Xi-Miao; DOU Shuo-Xing; WANG Peng-Ye

    2011-01-01

    With the aid of an atomic force microscope (AFM), we study the interaction between linear DNA fragment and cisplatin. For different cisplatin concentrations, the AFM used to observe the conformation of DNA has a gradual change. The contour length, the end-to-end distance and the local bend angles of the linear DNA fragment can be accurately measured. The persistence length of DNA interacting with cisplatin is decreased with the increasing cisplatin concentration. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the local bend angles of DNA chains are increased by the binding interaction of cisplatin.%@@ With the aid of an atomic force microscope (AFM), we study the interaction between linear DNA fragment and cisplatin.For different cisplatin concentrations, the AFM used to observe the conformation of DNA has a gradual change.The contour length, the end-to-end distance and the local bend angles of the linear DNA fragment can be accurately measured.The persistence length of DNA interacting with cisplatin is decreased with the increasing cisplatin concentration.Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the local bend angles of DNA chains are increased by the binding interaction of cisplatin.

  18. Protective Effect of Tempol against Cisplatin-Induced Ototoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Cha Kyung; Kim, Jun; Jo, Eu-Ri; Oh, Jeonghyun; Do, Nam Yong; Cho, Sung Il

    2016-11-18

    One of the major adverse effects of cisplatin chemotherapy is hearing loss. Cisplatin-induced ototoxicity hampers treatment because it often necessitates dose reduction, which decreases cisplatin efficacy. This study was performed to investigate the effect of Tempol on cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in an auditory cell line, House Ear Institute-Organ of Corti 1 (HEI-OC1). Cultured HEI-OC1 cells were exposed to 30 μM cisplatin for 24 h with or without a 2 h pre-treatment with Tempol. Cell viability was determined using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and apoptotic cells were identified using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling of nuclei (TUNEL) assay and flow cytometry. The effects of Tempol on cisplatin-induced cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, cleaved caspase, and mitochondrial inducible nitric oxide synthase expression were evaluated using western blot analysis. Levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were measured to assess the effects of Tempol on cisplatin-induced ROS accumulation. Mitochondria were evaluated by confocal microscopy, and the mitochondrial membrane potential was measured to investigate whether Tempol protected against cisplatin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Cisplatin treatment decreased cell viability, and increased apoptotic features and markers, ROS accumulation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Tempol pre-treatment before cisplatin exposure significantly inhibited all these cisplatin-induced effects. These results demonstrate that Tempol inhibits cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in HEI-OC1, and could play a preventive role against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity.

  19. Protective Effect of Tempol against Cisplatin-Induced Ototoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cha Kyung Youn

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the major adverse effects of cisplatin chemotherapy is hearing loss. Cisplatin-induced ototoxicity hampers treatment because it often necessitates dose reduction, which decreases cisplatin efficacy. This study was performed to investigate the effect of Tempol on cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in an auditory cell line, House Ear Institute-Organ of Corti 1 (HEI-OC1. Cultured HEI-OC1 cells were exposed to 30 μM cisplatin for 24 h with or without a 2 h pre-treatment with Tempol. Cell viability was determined using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay and apoptotic cells were identified using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling of nuclei (TUNEL assay and flow cytometry. The effects of Tempol on cisplatin-induced cleaved poly(ADP-ribose polymerase, cleaved caspase, and mitochondrial inducible nitric oxide synthase expression were evaluated using western blot analysis. Levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS were measured to assess the effects of Tempol on cisplatin-induced ROS accumulation. Mitochondria were evaluated by confocal microscopy, and the mitochondrial membrane potential was measured to investigate whether Tempol protected against cisplatin-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. Cisplatin treatment decreased cell viability, and increased apoptotic features and markers, ROS accumulation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. Tempol pre-treatment before cisplatin exposure significantly inhibited all these cisplatin-induced effects. These results demonstrate that Tempol inhibits cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in HEI-OC1, and could play a preventive role against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity.

  20. Decitabine Rescues Cisplatin Resistance in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Viet, Chi T.; Dongmin Dang; Stacy Achdjian; Yi Ye; Katz, Samuel G.; Schmidt, Brian L.

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin resistance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) reduces survival. In this study we hypothesized that methylation of key genes mediates cisplatin resistance. We determined whether a demethylating drug, decitabine, could augment the anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of cisplatin on SCC-25/CP, a cisplatin-resistant tongue SCC cell line. We showed that decitabine treatment restored cisplatin sensitivity in SCC-25/CP and significantly reduced the cisplatin dose require...

  1. Cisplatin-induced peptic ulcers, vagotomy, adrenal and calcium modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, S K; San Antonio, J D; Sokhansanj, A; Miller, C

    1994-04-01

    Cytochemical and autoradiographic studies in Wistar rats [Crl:(WI)BR] show that cisplatin treatment (9 mg/kg) inhibits the release of acetylcholine from the axonal endings of the stomach smooth muscle resulting in bloating of the stomach and ulceration. Cisplatin also induces corticosteroid release from the adrenal gland stimulating peptic ulceration. Vagotomy helps ameliorate the effect but not eliminate it. Calcium supplementation restores normal neuromuscular function to gastric smooth muscle, thereby eliminating the gastro-intestinal toxicity due to cisplatin.

  2. Cisplatin-associated anemia: an erythropoietin deficiency syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Wood, P A; Hrushesky, W J

    1995-01-01

    Cisplatin-based therapy results in a cumulative anemia that is disproportionate to the effects on other blood cells. The severity of this treatment-induced anemia and the resultant transfusion requirement in cancer patients correlate with cisplatin-induced renal tubular dysfunction. Observed/expected serum erythropoietin (EPO) ratios decline with progressive cisplatin therapy and are proportionate to the degree of renal dysfunction. Recovery from anemia and of observed/expected serum EPO rati...

  3. Real-time monitoring of cisplatin-induced cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Alborzinia

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of cisplatin more than 40 years ago and its clinical introduction in the 1970s an enormous amount of research has gone into elucidating the mechanism of action of cisplatin on tumor cells. With a novel cell biosensor chip system allowing continuous monitoring of respiration, glycolysis, and impedance we followed cisplatin treatment of different cancer cell lines in real-time. Our measurements reveal a first effect on respiration, in all cisplatin treated cell lines, followed with a significant delay by interference with glycolysis in HT-29, HCT-116, HepG2, and MCF-7 cells but not in the cisplatin-resistant cell line MDA-MB-231. Most strikingly, cell death started in all cisplatin-sensitive cell lines within 8 to 11 h of treatment, indicating a clear time frame from exposure, first response to cisplatin lesions, to cell fate decision. The time points of most significant changes were selected for more detailed analysis of cisplatin response in the breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Phosphorylation of selected signal transduction mediators connected with cellular proliferation, as well as changes in gene expression, were analyzed in samples obtained directly from sensor chips at the time points when changes in glycolysis and impedance occurred. Our online cell biosensor measurements reveal for the first time the time scale of metabolic response until onset of cell death under cisplatin treatment, which is in good agreement with models of p53-mediated cell fate decision.

  4. Effects of cisplatin on potassium currents in CT26 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Potassium currents were detected in CT26 cells and the currents were reduced by the application of tetraethylammonium (TEA chloride, iberiotoxin, a big conductance calcium-activated potassium channel blocker and barium. The potassium currents were enhanced to 192< by the application of cisplatin (0.5 mM. Moreover, the increase of potassium currents by cisplatin was further inhibited by the application of TEA confirming the action of cisplatin on potassium channels. In addition, relative current induced by cisplatin in CT26 cells was bit larger than in normal IEC-6 cells.

  5. Salvia Officinalis and Cisplatin Effects on Pentylenetetrazole Induced Seizure Threshold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Hadi Khayate-Nouri

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have shown that cisplatin have neuropathic effects and Salvia officinalis (SO could have therapeutic effects on nervous system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of SO hydroalcoholic extract and cisplatin on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ induced seizure in mice. Materials and methods: This is an experimental interventional study. For this purpose first group received normal saline, second group received SO extract, third group received cisplatin, in the fourth group received SO extract plus cisplatin and the subsequent seizure threshold was determined for each group. Results: The results showed that SO extract significantly (p<0.05 increased and in cisplatin group significantly (p<0.05 decreased seizure threshold. Simultaneous uses of cisplatin and SO extract caused to significantly increased seizure threshold (p<0.05 compared with cisplatin group. Conclusion: Considering different types of ingredients in SO extract which have beneficial effects on nervous system, it might be used to reduce cisplatin induced neuropathic effects. It seems that SO extract could be useful in cisplatin-induced seizure but further investigations are needed.

  6. Is Glutathione the Major Cellular Target of Cisplatin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasherman, Yonit; Stürup, Stefan; gibson, dan

    2009-01-01

    Cisplatin is an anticancer drug whose efficacy is limited because tumors develop resistance to the drug. Resistant cells often have elevated levels of cellular glutathione (GSH), believed to be the major cellular target of cisplatin that inactivates the drug by binding to it irreversibly, forming...... [Pt(SG)2] adducts. We show by [1H,15N] HSQC that the half-life of 15N labeled cisplatin in whole cell extracts is 75 min, but no Pt-GSH adducts were observed. When the low molecular mass fraction (cisplatin, binding to GSH was observed probably due to removal...

  7. Comparison of liposomal cisplatin versus cisplatin in non-squamous cell non-small-cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Stathopoulos, G. P.; Antoniou, D.; Dimitroulis, J.; STATHOPOULOS, J.; Marosis, K.; Michalopoulou, P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Liposomal cisplatin was developed to reduce the systemic toxicity of cisplatin, particularly the nephrotoxicity, and it has been used in combination with other agents in pancreatic and head and neck cancers and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Our objective was to compare the effectiveness of lipoplatin combined with paclitaxel versus cisplatin with paclitaxel in advanced non-squamous NSCLC. Methods During 2007–2010, 202 patients with non-squamous NSCLC (stage IIIB and IV) were rec...

  8. Detouring of cisplatin to access mitochondrial genome for overcoming resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrache, Sean; Pathak, Rakesh K; Dhar, Shanta

    2014-07-22

    Chemoresistance of cisplatin therapy is related to extensive repair of cisplatin-modified DNA in the nucleus by the nucleotide excision repair (NER). Delivering cisplatin to the mitochondria to attack mitochondrial genome lacking NER machinery can lead to a rationally designed therapy for metastatic, chemoresistant cancers and might overcome the problems associated with conventional cisplatin treatment. An engineered hydrophobic mitochondria-targeted cisplatin prodrug, Platin-M, was constructed using a strain-promoted alkyne-azide cycloaddition chemistry. Efficient delivery of Platin-M using a biocompatible polymeric nanoparticle (NP) based on biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-block-polyethyleneglycol functionalized with a terminal triphenylphosphonium cation, which has remarkable activity to target mitochondria of cells, resulted in controlled release of cisplatin from Platin-M locally inside the mitochondrial matrix to attack mtDNA and exhibited otherwise-resistant advanced cancer sensitive to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Identification of an optimized targeted-NP formulation with brain-penetrating properties allowed for delivery of Platin-M inside the mitochondria of neuroblastoma cells resulting in ∼17 times more activity than cisplatin. The remarkable activity of Platin-M and its targeted-NP in cisplatin-resistant cells was correlated with the hyperpolarization of mitochondria in these cells and mitochondrial bioenergetics studies in the resistance cells further supported this hypothesis. This unique dual-targeting approach to controlled mitochondrial delivery of cisplatin in the form of a prodrug to attack the mitochondrial genome lacking NER machinery and in vivo distribution of the delivery vehicle in the brain suggested previously undescribed routes for cisplatin-based therapy.

  9. Characterization of sterically stabilized cisplatin liposomes by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg-Shulman, T; Gibson, D; Cohen, R; Abra, R; Barenholz, Y

    2001-02-09

    Extensive scientific efforts are directed towards finding new and improved platinum anticancer agents. A promising approach is the encapsulation of cisplatin in sterically stabilized, long circulating, PEGylated 100 nm liposomes. This liposomal cisplatin (STEALTH cisplatin, formerly known as SPI-77) shows excellent stability in plasma and has a longer circulation time, greater efficacy and lower toxicity than much free cisplatin. However, so far, the physicochemical characterization of STEALTH cisplatin has been limited to size distribution, drug-to-lipid ratio and stability. Information on the physical state of the drug in the liposome aqueous phases and the drug's interaction with the liposome membrane has been lacking. This study was aimed at filling this gap. We report a multinuclear NMR study in which several techniques have been used to assess the physical nature of cisplatin in liposomal formulations and if and to what extent the drug affects the liposome phospholipids. Since NMR detects only the soluble cisplatin in the liposomes and not the insoluble drug, combining NMR and atomic absorption data enables one to determine how much of the encapsulated drug is soluble in the intraliposomal aqueous phase. Our results indicate that almost all of the cisplatin remains intact during the loading process, and that the entire liposomal drug is present in a soluble form in the internal aqueous phase of the liposomes.

  10. Rationally engineered polymeric cisplatin nanoparticles for improved antitumor efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paraskar, Abhimanyu; Soni, Shivani; Basu, Sudipta; Srivats, Shyam; Roy, Rituparna Sinha; Sengupta, Shiladitya [BWH-HST Center for Biomedical Engineering, Harvard Medical School, 65 Landsdowne street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Amarasiriwardena, Chitra J; Lupoli, Nicola, E-mail: ssengupta2@partners.org [Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 65 Landsdowne street, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The use of cisplatin, a first line chemotherapy for most cancers, is dose-limited due to nephrotoxicity. While this toxicity can be addressed through nanotechnology, previous attempts at engineering cisplatin nanoparticles have been limited by the impact on the potency of cisplatin. Here we report the rational engineering of a novel cisplatin nanoparticle by harnessing a novel polyethylene glycol-functionalized poly-isobutylene-maleic acid (PEG-PIMA) copolymer, which can complex with cis-platinum (II) through a monocarboxylato and a coordinate bond. We show that this complex self-assembles into a nanoparticle, and exhibits an IC{sub 50} = 0.77 {+-} 0.11 {mu}M comparable to that of free cisplatin (IC{sub 50} = 0.44 {+-} 0.09 {mu}M). The nanoparticles are internalized into the endolysosomal compartment of cancer cells, and release cisplatin in a pH-dependent manner. Furthermore, the nanoparticles exhibit significantly improved antitumor efficacy in a 4T1 breast cancer model in vivo, with limited nephrotoxicity, which can be explained by preferential biodistribution in the tumor with reduced kidney concentrations. Our results suggest that the PEG-PIMA-cisplatin nanoparticle can emerge as an attractive solution to the challenges in cisplatin chemotherapy.

  11. Efficacy of Neoadjuvant Cisplatin in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szallasi, Zoltan Imre; Eklund, Aron Charles; Li, Qiyuan

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE Cisplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent not used routinely for breast cancer treatment. As a DNA cross-linking agent, cisplatin may be effective treatment for hereditary BRCA1-mutated breast cancers. Because sporadic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) and BRCA1-associated breast cancer...

  12. Mechanism of hyperthermic potentiation of cisplatin action in cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant tumour cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hettinga, JVE; Lemstra, W; Meijer, C; Dam, WA; Uges, DRA; Konings, AWT; DeVries, EGE; Kampinga, HH

    1997-01-01

    In this study, the mechanism(s) by which heat increases cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (cisplatin, cDDP) sensitivity in cDDP-sensitive and -resistant cell lines of murine as well as human origin were investigated. Heating cells at 43 degrees C during cDDP exposure was found to increase drug accumulati

  13. Influence of amifostine on the pharmacokinetics of cisplatin in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korst, A.E.C.; Sterre, M.L.T. van der; Gall, H.E.; Fichtinger-Schepman, A.M.J.; Vermorken, J.B.; Vijgh, W.J.F. van der

    1998-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics of cisplatin was investigated in 13 patients receiving 18 courses of cisplatin alone or in combination with amifostine to investigate the influence of amifostine (WR 2721; Ethyol) on the pharmacokinetics of cisplatin. Cisplatin was administered as a 1-h i.v. infusion, whereas am

  14. Decitabine rescues cisplatin resistance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi T Viet

    Full Text Available Cisplatin resistance in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC reduces survival. In this study we hypothesized that methylation of key genes mediates cisplatin resistance. We determined whether a demethylating drug, decitabine, could augment the anti-proliferative and apoptotic effects of cisplatin on SCC-25/CP, a cisplatin-resistant tongue SCC cell line. We showed that decitabine treatment restored cisplatin sensitivity in SCC-25/CP and significantly reduced the cisplatin dose required to induce apoptosis. We then created a xenograft model with SCC-25/CP and determined that decitabine and cisplatin combination treatment resulted in significantly reduced tumor growth and mechanical allodynia compared to control. To establish a gene classifier we quantified methylation in cancer tissue of cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant HNSCC patients. Cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant patient tumors had distinct methylation profiles. When we quantified methylation and expression of genes in the classifier in HNSCC cells in vitro, we showed that decitabine treatment of cisplatin-resistant HNSCC cells reversed methylation and gene expression toward a cisplatin-sensitive profile. The study provides direct evidence that decitabine restores cisplatin sensitivity in in vitro and in vivo models of HNSCC. Combination treatment of cisplatin and decitabine significantly reduces HNSCC growth and HNSCC pain. Furthermore, gene methylation could be used as a biomarker of cisplatin-resistance.

  15. Quantitation of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II (cisplatin)-DNA-intrastrand adducts in testicular and ovarian cancer patients receiving cisplatin chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, E; Yuspa, S H; Zwelling, L A; Ozols, R F; Poirier, M C

    1986-02-01

    The antitumor activity of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II (cisplatin) is believed to be related to its covalent interaction with DNA where a major DNA binding product is an intrastrand N7-bidentate adduct on adjacent deoxyguanosines. A novel immunoassay was used to quantitate this adduct in buffy coat DNA from testicular and ovarian cancer patients undergoing cisplatin therapy. 44 out of 120 samples taken from 45 cisplatin patients had detectable cisplatin-DNA adducts. No adducts were detected in 18 samples of DNA taken from normal controls, patients on other chemotherapy, or patients before treatment. The quantity of measurable adducts increased as a function of cumulative dose of cisplatin. This was observed both during repeated daily infusion of the drug and over long-term, repeated 21-28 d cycles of administration. These results suggested that adduct removal is slow even though the tissue has a relatively rapid turnover. Patients receiving cisplatin for the first time on 56-d cycles, and those given high doses of cisplatin as a "salvage" regimen, did not accumulate adducts as rapidly as patients on first time chemotherapy on 21- or 28-d cycles. Disease response data, evaluated for 33 cisplatin-treated patients, showed a positive correlation between the formation of DNA adducts and response to drug therapy. However, more data will be required to confirm this relationship. These data show that specific immunological probes can readily be applied to quantitate DNA adducts in patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy.

  16. Efficacy of safranal to cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karafakıoğlu, Yasemin Sunucu; Bozkurt, Mehmet Fatih; Hazman, Ömer; Fıdan, A Fatih

    2017-03-20

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of safranal on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups. The control group received physiological saline; animals in Group 2 received only safranal and in Group 3 received only cisplatin; 5 days of safranal treatment was performed following administration of cisplatin for the animals in Group 4; 5 days of safranal pretreatment was applied to the animals in Group 5 before administration of cisplatin. Cisplatin (7 mg/kg) was intraperitoneally injected as a single dose and safranal (200 mg/kg) was administered by gavage. Biochemical and histopathological methods were utilized for evaluation of the nephrotoxicity. The concentrations of creatinine and urea in plasma and levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) as well as total antioxidant status (TAS) and total oxidant status (TOS) were determined in kidney tissue. Administration of cisplatin to rats induced a marked renal failure, characterized with a significant increase in plasma creatinine and urea concentrations. MDA and TOS levels of rats that received cisplatin alone were not significantly different compared with those of the control group, but GSH and TAS levels in the only cisplatin-administered group were significantly decreased. Safranal administration produced amelioration in biochemical indices of nephrotoxicity in both plasma and kidney tissues when compared with the only cisplatin-administered group, pretreatment with safranal being more effective. As a result, safranal treatment might have a protective effect against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and oxidative stress in rat.

  17. Randomised comparison of cisplatin with cyclophosphamide/cisplatin and with cyclophosphamide/doxorubicin/cisplatin in advanced ovarian cancer. Gruppo Interegionale Cooperativo Oncologico Ginecologia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-15

    565 patients with stage III-IV epithelial ovarian cancer were randomly assigned to receive cisplatin (P), cyclophosphamide and cisplatin (CP), or cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and cisplatin (CAP). Data on 531 patients were analysed. Treatment with CAP resulted in a significantly higher overall (complete and partial) response rate (66 vs 56 vs 49% for CAP, CP, and P, respectively), but the rate of complete surgical response for the three treatment arms was similar (26, 21, and 20%). Size of residual tumour after first surgery and Karnofsky index were the best predictors of complete remission. Survival and disease-free survival were not significantly different in the three arms, although progression-free survival was significantly longer after CAP. However, tumour size, cell type, and Karnofsky index, but not therapy, were independent predictors for survival. Haematological toxicity was highest with CAP. The addition of cyclophosphamide or doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide to cisplatin does not substantially increase the number of potentially curable, advanced ovarian cancer patients.

  18. EPS8 inhibition increases cisplatin sensitivity in lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidija K Gorsic

    Full Text Available Cisplatin, a commonly used chemotherapeutic, is associated with ototoxicity, renal toxicity and neurotoxicity, thus identifying means to increase the therapeutic index of cisplatin may allow for improved outcomes. A SNP (rs4343077 within EPS8, discovered through a genome wide association study of cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs, provided impetus to further study this gene. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the role of EPS8 in cellular susceptibility to cisplatin in cancerous and non-cancerous cells. We used EPS8 RNA interference to determine the effect of decreased EPS8 expression on LCL and A549 lung cancer cell sensitivity to cisplatin. EPS8 knockdown in LCLs resulted in a 7.9% increase in cisplatin-induced survival (P = 1.98 × 10(-7 and an 8.7% decrease in apoptosis (P = 0.004 compared to control. In contrast, reduced EPS8 expression in lung cancer cells resulted in a 20.6% decrease in cisplatin-induced survival (P = 5.08 × 10(-5. We then investigated an EPS8 inhibitor, mithramycin A, as a potential agent to increase the therapeutic index of cisplatin. Mithramycin A decreased EPS8 expression in LCLs resulting in decreased cellular sensitivity to cisplatin as evidenced by lower caspase 3/7 activation following cisplatin treatment (42.7% ± 6.8% relative to control P = 0.0002. In 5 non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC cell lines, mithramycin A also resulted in decreased EPS8 expression. Adding mithramycin to 4 NSCLC cell lines and a bladder cancer cell line, resulted in increased sensitivity to cisplatin that was significantly more pronounced in tumor cell lines than in LCL lines (p<0.0001. An EGFR mutant NSCLC cell line (H1975 showed no significant change in sensitivity to cisplatin with the addition of mithramycin treatment. Therefore, an inhibitor of EPS8, such as mithramycin A, could improve cisplatin treatment by increasing sensitivity of tumor relative to normal cells.

  19. Enhanced antitumor efficacy of cisplatin in combination with HemoHIM in tumor-bearing mice

    OpenAIRE

    Kim Sung-Ho; Jung Uhee; Jo Sung-Kee; Ju Eun-Jin; Park Hae-Ran; Yee Sung-Tae

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Although cisplatin is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents, cisplatin alone does not achieve a satisfactory therapeutic outcome. Also cisplatin accumulation shows toxicity to normal tissues. In this study, we examined the possibility of HemoHIM both to enhance anticancer effect with cisplatin and to reduce the side effects of cisplatin in melanoma-bearing mice. Methods HemoHIM was prepared by adding the ethanol-insoluble fraction to the total water extract of ...

  20. Cisplatin ototoxicity involves cytokines and STAT6 signaling network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Lee, Jeong-Han; Lyu, Ah-Ra; Ji, Hye-Min; Lee, Sang-Heon; Song, Jeho; Park, Sung-Joo; You, Yong-Ouk; Sul, Jeong-Dug; Park, Channy; Chung, Sang-Young; Moon, Sung-Kyun; Lim, David J; So, Hong-Seob; Park, Raekil

    2011-06-01

    We herein investigated the role of the STAT signaling cascade in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cisplatin ototoxicity. A significant hearing impairment caused by cisplatin injection was observed in Balb/c (wild type, WT) and STAT4(-/-), but not in STAT6(-/-) mice. Moreover, the expression levels of the protein and mRNA of pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6, were markedly increased in the serum and cochlea of WT and STAT4(-/-), but not STAT6(-/-) mice. Organotypic culture revealed that the shape of stereocilia bundles and arrays of sensory hair cell layers in the organ of Corti from STAT6(-/-) mice were intact after treatment with cisplatin, whereas those from WT and STAT4(-/-) mice were highly distorted and disarrayed after the treatment. Cisplatin induced the phosphorylation of STAT6 in HEI-OC1 auditory cells, and the knockdown of STAT6 by STAT6-specific siRNA significantly protected HEI-OC1 auditory cells from cisplatin-induced cell death and inhibited pro-inflammatory cytokine production. We further demonstrated that IL-4 and IL-13 induced by cisplatin modulated the phosphorylation of STAT6 by binding with IL-4 receptor alpha and IL-13Rα1. These findings suggest that STAT6 signaling plays a pivotal role in cisplatin-mediated pro-inflammatory cytokine production and ototoxicity.

  1. Cisplatin ototoxicity involves cytokines and STAT6 signaling network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyung-Jin Kim; Jeong-Dug Sul; Channy Park; Sang-Young Chung; Sung-Kyun Moon; David J Lim; Hong-Seob So; Raekil Park; Gi-Su Oh; Jeong-Han Lee; Ah-Ra Lyu; Hye-Min Ji; Sang-Heon Lee; Jeho Song; Sung-Joo Park; Yong-Ouk You

    2011-01-01

    We herein investigated the role of the STAT signaling cascade in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cisplatin ototoxicity. A significant hearing impairment caused by cisplatin injection was observed in Balb/c (wild type,WT) and STAT4-/-,but not in STAT6-/- mice. Moreover,the expression levels of the protein and mRNA of proinflammatory cytokines,including TNF-α,IL-1β,and IL-6,were markedly increased in the serum and cochlea of WT and STAT4+,but not STAT6-/- mice. Organotypic culture revealed that the shape of stereocilia bundles and arrays of sensory hair cell layers in the organ of Corti from STAT6-/- mice were intact after treatment with cisplatin,whereas those from WT and STAT4-/- mice were highly distorted and disarrayed after the treatment. Cisplatin induced the phosphorylation of STAT6 in HEI-OC1 auditory cells,and the knockdown of STAT6 by STAT6-specific siRNA significantly protected HEI-OC1 auditory cells from cisplatin-induced cell death and inhibited pro-inflammatory cytokine production. We further demonstrated that IL-4 and IL-13 induced by cisplatin modulated the phosphorylation of STAT6 by binding with IL-4 receptor alpha and IL-13Rα1. These findings suggest that STAT6 signaling plays a pivotal role in cisplatin-mediated pro-inflammatory cytokine production and ototoxicity.

  2. New Therapeutic Concept of NAD Redox Balance for Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gi-Su Oh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various tumors. In addition to its antitumor activity, cisplatin affects normal cells and may induce adverse effects such as ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and peripheral neuropathy. Various mechanisms such as DNA adduct formation, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses are closely associated with cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity; however, the precise mechanism remains unclear. The cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ has emerged as a key regulator of cellular energy metabolism and homeostasis. Recent studies have demonstrated associations between disturbance in intracellular NAD+ levels and clinical progression of various diseases through the production of reactive oxygen species and inflammation. Furthermore, we demonstrated that reduction of the intracellular NAD+/NADH ratio is critically involved in cisplatin-induced kidney damage through inflammation and oxidative stress and that increase of the cellular NAD+/NADH ratio suppresses cisplatin-induced kidney damage by modulation of potential damage mediators such as oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. In this review, we describe the role of NAD+ metabolism in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and discuss a potential strategy for the prevention or treatment of cisplatin-induced adverse effects with a particular focus on NAD+-dependent cellular pathways.

  3. Pathophysiology of Cisplatin-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Ozkok

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin and other platinum derivatives are the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents to treat solid tumors including ovarian, head and neck, and testicular germ cell tumors. A known complication of cisplatin administration is acute kidney injury (AKI. The nephrotoxic effect of cisplatin is cumulative and dose-dependent and often necessitates dose reduction or withdrawal. Recurrent episodes of AKI may result in chronic kidney disease. The pathophysiology of cisplatin-induced AKI involves proximal tubular injury, oxidative stress, inflammation, and vascular injury in the kidney. There is predominantly acute tubular necrosis and also apoptosis in the proximal tubules. There is activation of multiple proinflammatory cytokines and infiltration of inflammatory cells in the kidney. Inhibition of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α or IL-33 or depletion of CD4+ T cells or mast cells protects against cisplatin-induced AKI. Cisplatin also causes endothelial cell injury. An understanding of the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced AKI is important for the development of adjunctive therapies to prevent AKI, to lessen the need for dose decrease or drug withdrawal, and to lessen patient morbidity and mortality.

  4. Targeted amelioration of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Shaulnie; Smyth, Brendan J; Namin, Arya; Phillips, Grady; Gratton, Michael Anne

    2014-11-01

    This pilot study compared otoprotection provided by trans-tympanic formulations and systemic intraperitoneal administration of L-N-acetylcysteine from cisplatin-induced cochlear oxidative stress. Protection was assessed by measures of hearing loss and cochlear glutathione levels. All groups received an equivalent single dose of L-N-acetylcysteine followed by cisplatin. Cisplatin was administered subcutaneously for 3 days (5.5 mg/kg/day). Two hours prior to day 1 cisplatin, L-N-acetylcysteine was administered either intraperitoneally (250 mg/kg), trans-tympanic as 2% L-N-acetylcysteine in gel, or trans-tympanic as L-N-acetylcysteine-loaded nanocapsules in gel. Hearing was assessed prior to and 3 days after cisplatin followed by microdissection of cochlear tissue. The levels of reduced (GSH) and oxidized (GSSG) glutathione in homogenized tissue supernatants were determined via luminometry. Intraperitoneal L-N-acetylcysteine administration preceding cisplatin resulted in less hearing loss and a higher GSH/GSSG ratio than either trans-tympanic formulation. This suggests that for equivalent doses of L-N-acetylcysteine, systemic rather than targeted cochlear delivery provides increased otoprotection from cisplatin ototoxicity.

  5. Evaluation of nanoparticle delivered cisplatin in beagles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldhaeusser, Brittany; Platt, Simon R.; Marrache, Sean; Kolishetti, Nagesh; Pathak, Rakesh K.; Montgomery, David J.; Reno, Lisa R.; Howerth, Elizabeth; Dhar, Shanta

    2015-08-01

    Intracranial neoplasia is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in both human and veterinary patients, and is difficult to treat with traditional therapeutic methods. Cisplatin is a platinum (Pt)-containing chemotherapeutic agent approved by the Food and Drug Administration; however, substantial limitations exist for its application in canine brain tumor treatment due to the difficulty in crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB), development of resistance, and toxicity. A modified Pt(iv)-prodrug of cisplatin, Platin-M, was recently shown to be deliverable to the brain via a biocompatible mitochondria-targeted lipophilic polymeric nanoparticle (NP) that carries the drug across the BBB and to the mitochondria. NP mediated controlled release of Platin-M and subsequent reduction of this prodrug to cisplatin allowed cross-links to be formed with the mitochondrial DNA, which have no nucleotide excision repair system, forcing the overactive cancer cells to undergo apoptosis. Here, we report in vitro effects of targeted Platin-M NPs (T-Platin-M-NPs) in canine glioma and glioblastoma cell lines with results indicating that this targeted NP formulation is more effective than cisplatin. In both the cell lines, T-Platin-M-NP was significantly more efficacious compared to carboplatin, another Pt-based chemotherapy, which is used in the settings of recurrent high-grade glioblastoma. Mitochondrial stress analysis indicated that T-Platin-M-NP is more effective in disrupting the mitochondrial bioenergetics in both the cell types. A 14-day distribution study in healthy adult beagles using a single intravenous injection at 0.5 mg kg-1 (with respect to Platin-M) of T-Platin-M-NPs showed high levels of Pt accumulation in the brain, with negligible amounts in the other analyzed organs. Safety studies in the beagles monitoring physical, hematological, and serum chemistry evaluations were within the normal limits on days 1, 7, and 14 after injection of either 0.5 mg kg-1 or 2 mg kg

  6. Poly(amido)amine (PAMAM) dendrimer-cisplatin complexes for chemotherapy of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yellepeddi, Venkata Kashyap; Vangara, Kiran Kumar; Palakurthi, Srinath, E-mail: palakurthi@tamhsc.edu [Texas A and M Health Science Center, Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Dendrimer-cisplatin complexes were prepared using PAMAM dendrimers with terminal -NH{sub 2} and -COOH groups as well as biotin-conjugated dendrimers. Preformulation parameters of dendrimer-cisplatin complexes were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Cytotoxicity and mechanism of cytotoxicity of dendrimer-cisplatin complexes was investigated in OVCAR-3, SKOV, A2780 and cisplatin-resistant CP70 human ovarian cancer cell lines. The loading of cisplatin in dendrimers was {approx}11 % (w/w). PAMAM G4 dendrimers with amine surface groups (biotinylated and native) have shown 2.5- to 3.0-fold reduction in IC{sub 50} values in ovarian cancer cells when compared with carboxylate surface dendrimers (p < 0.05). A correlation was observed among cytotoxicity of the complexes, cellular uptake, and platinum-DNA adduct formation. Treatment with dendrimer-cisplatin complexes resulted in a 7.0-fold increase (p < 0.05) in expression of apoptotic genes (Bcl2, Bax, p53) and 13.2- to 27.1-fold increase (p < 0.05) in the activity of caspases 3, 8, and 9 in vitro. Results suggest that PAMAM dendrimers can be used as potential carrier for cisplatin chemotherapy of ovarian cancer.

  7. Paclitaxel plus cisplatin vs. 5-fluorouracil plus cisplatin as first-line treatment for patients with advanced squamous cell esophageal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ying; Ren, Zhonghai; Yuan, Long; Xu, Shuning; Yao, Zhihua; Qiao, Lei; Li, Ke

    2016-01-01

    Paclitaxel plus cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil plus cisplatin treatments are effective strategies for patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. This study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of paclitaxel plus cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil plus cisplatin as first-line chemotherapy for patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. A total of 398 patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma who received chemotherapy were included and divided into 2 gr...

  8. Antitumor activity of Herceptin in combination with STEALTH liposomal cisplatin or nonliposomal cisplatin in a HER2 positive human breast cancer model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbern, G T; Hiller, A J; Musterer, R S; Working, P K; Henderson, I C

    1999-10-01

    Single agent antitumor activity of Herceptin, a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against HER2, has been demonstrated in numerous preclinical and clinical studies. Additionally, combination therapy with Herceptin and chemotherapy (CRx) has demonstrated additive antitumor activity in both preclinical models and early clinical trials. STEALTH (pegylated) liposomal (PL) cisplatin, also known as SPI-077, is currently in clinical trials for a variety of solid tumors. The three studies reported here discuss the antitumor activity of the combination of Herceptin and nonliposomal cisplatin or PL-cisplatin in two xenograft tumor models, initiated from the cell lines, BT474 and MDA453, that overexpress the oncogene, HER2. Herceptin alone had significant antitumor activity in all three experiments (p cisplatin and PL-cisplatin were both effective antitumor agents but, at tolerable dose levels, PL-cisplatin was superior to nonliposomal cisplatin (p cisplatin or PL-cisplatin, was most significant at moderate doses of H (0.5 mg/kg, p cisplatin with Herceptin had statistically similar antitumor activity to that of nonliposomal cisplatin with Herceptin in all experiments. We conclude that combination therapy with PL-cisplatin and Herceptin results in significant antitumor activity with the potential for reducing toxicity in metastatic breast cancer patients.

  9. Cisplatin-DNA adduct formation in patients treated with cisplatin-based chemoradiation: lack of correlation between normal tissues and primary tumor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoebers, F.J.; Pluim, D.; Hart, A.A.M.; Verheij, M.; Balm, A.J.M.; Fons, G.; Rasch, C.R.; Schellens, J.H.M.; Stalpers, L.J.A.; Bartelink, H.; Begg, A.C.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: In this study, the formation of cisplatin-DNA adducts after concurrent cisplatin-radiation and the relationship between adduct-formation in primary tumor tissue and normal tissue were investigated. METHODS: Three intravenous cisplatin-regimens, given concurrently with radiation, were studie

  10. Cisplatin-DNA adduct formation in patients treated with cisplatin-based chemoradiation: lack of correlation between normal tissues and primary tumor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoebers, F.J.P.; Pluim, D.; Hart, A.A.M.; Verheij, M.; Balm, A.J.M.; Fons, G.; Rasch, C.R.N.; Schellens, J.H.M.; Stalpers, L.J.A.; Bartelink, H.; Begg, A.C.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the formation of cisplatin-DNA adducts after concurrent cisplatin-radiation and the relationship between adduct-formation in primary tumor tissue and normal tissue were investigated. Methods: Three intravenous cisplatin-regimens, given concurrently with radiation, were stu

  11. Amelioration of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by statins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh A Maheshwari

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: This finding suggests that simvastatin and rosuvastatin may have a protective effect against cisplatin-induced kidney damage via amelioration of lipid peroxidation as well as due to improvement of renal function, and lipid-lowering effects.

  12. Can pharmacogenetics explain efficacy and safety of cisplatin pharmacotherapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Pablo Cayún Pellizaris

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent times, several investigations have been seeking an explanation for the great variability in both outcome and toxicity in cisplatin-based therapy through pharmacogenetic studies. These studies have focused on the genetic variability of therapeutic targets that could affect cisplatin response and toxicity in diverse type of cancer including lung, gastric, ovarian, testicular and esophageal cancer. In this review, we seek to update the reader in this area of investigation, focusing primarily on DNA reparation enzymes and cisplatin metabolism through Glutathione S-Transferases (GST genes. Current evidence indicates a potential application of pharmacogenetics in therapeutic schemes where cisplatin is the cornerstone of these treatments. Therefore, a collaborative effort is required to study these molecular characteristics in order to generate a genetic panel with clinic utility.

  13. Pericardiocentesis with cisplatin for malignant pericardial effusion and tamponade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takatsugu; Oida; Kenji; Mimatsu; Hiso; Kano; Atsushi; Kawasaki; Youichi; Kuboi; Nobutada; Fukino; Sadao; Amano

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the role and outcome of pericardiocentesis with intrapericardial cisplatin instillation for malignant pericardial effusion resulting from esophageal cancer. METHODS:We retrospectively studied 7 patients who underwent pericardiocentesis with intrapericardial cisplatin instillation for malignant pericardial effusion resulting from esophageal cancer.After pericardiocentesis,we performed catheterization of the pericardial space under ultrasonogram guidance.Malignant etiology of the pericardial f...

  14. The protective effect of theophyline in cisplatin nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Seifollah Beladi Mousavi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is a potent and a major anti-neoplastic drug in the treatment of a broad spectrum of malignancies. However, its clinical use is limited by renal tubular dysfunction that occurs in a significant percent of patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible protective effect of theophyline in the prevention of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. The trial design was prospective, randomized, double-blinded and placebo controlled. Chemotherapeutic patients who received cisplatin at a dosage of at least 50 mg/m 2 alone or in combination with other chemotherapy agent(s were included in the study. There were a total of 76 patients who were randomly divided into two groups. In group 1 (n = 38, placebo was advised; in group 2 (n = 38, patients received 4 mg/kg aminophyline as an intravenous loading dose, followed by theophyline in a dose of 200 mg three times daily orally for four consecutive days. The placebo group had 22 males and 16 females and the theophyline group had 26 males and 12 females. The mean age was 51 ± 17.6 years and the mean dose of cisplatin was 86.71 ± 43.18 mg. The prevalence of cisplatin nephrotoxicity in groups 1 and 2 was 7.9 and 5.3%, respectively, and the difference was not significant (P = 1. In addition, there was no significant association of cisplatin nephrotoxicity with age (P = 0.1, gender (P = 0.64 and mean dose of cisplatin (P = 0.8. These results indicate that prophy-lactic application of aminophyline and theophyline does not have a protective effect against cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

  15. Cisplatin and platinum drugs at the molecular level. (Review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulikas, Teni; Vougiouka, Maria

    2003-01-01

    Over twenty years of intensive work toward improvement of cisplatin, and with hundreds of platinum drugs tested, has resulted in the introduction of the widely used carboplatin and of oxaliplatin used only for a very narrow spectrum of cancers. A number of interesting platinum compounds including the orally administered platinum drug JM216, nedaplatin, the sterically hindered platinum(II) complex ZD0473, the trinuclear platinum complex BBR3464, and the liposomal forms Lipoplatin and SPI-77 are under clinical evaluation. This review summarizes the molecular mechanisms of platinum compounds for DNA damage, DNA repair and induction of apoptosis via activation or modulation of signaling pathways and explores the basis of platinum resistance. Cisplatin, carboplatin, oxaliplatin and most other platinum compounds induce damage to tumors via induction of apoptosis; this is mediated by activation of signal transduction leading to the death receptor mechanisms as well as mitochondrial pathways. Apoptosis is responsible for the characteristic nephrotoxicity, ototoxicity and most other toxicities of the drugs. The major limitation in the clinical applications of cisplatin has been the development of cisplatin resistance by tumors. Mechanisms explaining cisplatin resistance include the reduction in cisplatin accumulation inside cancer cells because of barriers across the cell membrane, the faster repair of cisplatin adducts, the modulation of apoptotic pathways in various cells, the upregulation in transcription factors, the loss of p53 and other protein functions and a higher concentration of glutathione and metallothioneins in some type of tumors. A number of experimental strategies to overcome cisplatin resistance are at the preclinical or clinical level such as introduction of the bax gene, inhibition of the JNK pathway, introduction of a functional p53 gene, treatment of tumors with aldose reductase inhibitors and others. Particularly important are combinations of platinum

  16. Calpain mediated cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in mice*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Chang; Aimei Wang

    2013-01-01

    Ototoxic drug-induced apoptosis of inner ear cel s has been shown to be associated with calpain expression. Cisplatin has severe ototoxicity, and can induce cochlear cel apoptosis. This study assumed that cisplatin activated calpain expression in apoptotic cochlear cel s. A mouse model of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity was established by intraperitoneal injection with cisplatin (2.5, 3.5, 4.5, 5.5 mg/kg). Immunofluorescence staining, image analysis and western blotting were used to detect the expression of calpain 1 and calpain 2 in the mouse cochlea. At the same time, the auditory brainstem response was measured to observe the change in hearing. Results revealed that after intraperitoneal injection with cisplatin for 5 days, the auditory brainstem response threshold shifts increased in mice. Calpain 1 and calpain 2 expression significantly increased in outer hair cel s, the spiral ganglion and stria vascularis. Calpain 2 protein expression markedly increased with an in-creased dose of cisplatin. Results suggested that calpain 1 and calpain 2 mediated cispla-tin-induced ototoxicity in BALB/c mice. During this process, calpain 2 plays a leading role.

  17. Computational metallomics of the anticancer drug cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calandrini, Vania; Rossetti, Giulia; Arnesano, Fabio; Natile, Giovanni; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-12-01

    Cisplatin, cis-diamminedichlorido-platinum(II), is an important therapeutic tool in the struggle against different tumors, yet it is plagued with the emergence of resistance mechanisms after repeated administrations. This hampers greatly its efficacy. Overcoming resistance problems requires first and foremost an integrated and systematic understanding of the structural determinants and molecular recognition processes involving the drug and its cellular targets. Here we review a strategy that we have followed for the last few years, based on the combination of modern tools from computational chemistry with experimental biophysical methods. Using hybrid Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics (QM/MM) simulations, validated by spectroscopic experiments (including NMR, and CD), we have worked out for the first time at atomic level the structural determinants in solution of platinated cellular substrates. These include the copper homeostasis proteins Ctr1, Atox1, and ATP7A. All of these proteins have been suggested to influence the pre-target resistance mechanisms. Furthermore, coupling hybrid QM/MM simulations with classical Molecular Dynamics (MD) and free energy calculations, based on force field parameters refined by the so-called "Force Matching" procedure, we have characterized the structural modifications and the free energy landscape associated with the recognition between platinated DNA and the protein HMGB1, belonging to the chromosomal high-mobility group proteins HMGB that inhibit the repair of platinated DNA. This may alleviate issues relative to on-target resistance process. The elucidation of the mechanisms by which tumors are sensitive or refractory to cisplatin may lead to the discovery of prognostic biomarkers. The approach reviewed here could be straightforwardly extended to other metal-based drugs.

  18. Biodegradable polymeric system for cisplatin delivery: Development, in vitro characterization and investigation of toxicity profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Noor; Khare, Vaibhav; Dubey, Ravindra; Saneja, Ankit [Formulation and Drug Delivery Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine, Jammu (India); Kushwaha, Manoj; Singh, Gurdarshan; Sharma, Neelam; Chandan, Balkrishan [PK-PD-Toxicology Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine, Jammu (India); Gupta, Prem N., E-mail: pngupta10@gmail.com [Formulation and Drug Delivery Division, CSIR-Indian Institute of Integrative Medicine, Jammu (India)

    2014-05-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most potent anticancer agent used in the treatment of various solid tumors, however, its clinical use is limited due to severe adverse effects including nephrotoxicity. In this investigation cisplatin loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles were developed and characterized for various in vitro characteristics including size distribution, zeta potential, drug loading and release profile. PLGA nanoparticles were successfully developed as investigated using scanning electron microscopy and exhibited average particles size and zeta potential as 284.8 nm and − 15.8 mV, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry indicated an absence of any polymer–drug interactions. Cisplatin nanoparticles exhibited in vitro anticancer activity against A549 cells comparable to that of cisplatin solution. The biodistribution study in mice indicated that the kidney cisplatin level was significantly (p < 0.01) lower with cisplatin nanoparticles than cisplatin solution. Following two cycles of cisplatin treatment, a week apart, blood urea nitrogen level was found to be higher in case of cisplatin solution as compared to cisplatin nanoparticles. Further, there was a significant (p < 0.01) increase in plasma creatinine level in case of cisplatin solution as compared to cisplatin nanoparticles. Histopathological examination of kidney from cisplatin nanoparticles treated group revealed no kidney damage, however, a sign of nephrotoxicity was observed in the case of cisplatin solution. The results suggest that PLGA nanoparticle based formulation could be a potential option for cisplatin delivery. - Highlights: • Cisplatin is detected by LCMS following complexation with DDTC. • Nanoparticles showed lower cisplatin accumulation in the kidney. • Nephrotoxicity was evaluated by BUN and creatinine level and by histopathology. • Nanoparticles exhibited lower nephrotoxicity.

  19. Overcoming cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer cells by targeting HIF-1-regulated cancer metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Zhihong; Lu, Yang; Qiu, Songbo; Fan, Zhen

    2016-04-01

    Cisplatin is currently one of the most effective chemotherapeutic drugs used for treating ovarian cancer; however, resistance to cisplatin is common. In this study, we explored an experimental strategy for overcoming cisplatin resistance of human ovarian cancer from the new perspective of cancer cell metabolism. By using two pairs of genetically matched cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell lines, we tested the hypothesis that downregulating hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), which regulates metabolic enzymes involved in glycolysis, is a promising strategy for overcoming cisplatin resistance of human ovarian cancer cells. We found that cisplatin downregulated the level of the regulatable α subunit of HIF-1, HIF-1α, in cisplatin-sensitive ovarian cancer cells through enhancing HIF-1α degradation but did not downregulate HIF-1α in their cisplatin-resistant counterparts. Overexpression of a degradation-resistant HIF-1α (HIF-1α ΔODD) reduced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in cisplatin-sensitive cells, whereas genetic knockdown of HIF-1α or pharmacological promotion of HIF-1α degradation enhanced response to cisplatin in both cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells. We further demonstrated that knockdown of HIF-1α improved the response of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin by redirecting the aerobic glycolysis in the resistant cancer cells toward mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, leading to cell death through overproduction of reactive oxygen species. Our findings suggest that the HIF-1α-regulated cancer metabolism pathway could be a novel target for overcoming cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer.

  20. Ellagic acid prevents cisplatin-induced oxidative stress in liver and heart tissue of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüce, Abdurrauf; Ateşşahin, Ahmet; Ceribaşi, Ali Osman; Aksakal, Mesut

    2007-11-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most active cytotoxic agents in the treatment of cancer. High doses of cisplatin have also been known to produce hepatotoxicity, and several studies suggest that supplemental antioxidants can reduce cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity. The present study was designed to determine the effects on the liver and heart oxidant/antioxidant system and the possible protective effects of ellagic acid on liver and heart toxicity induced by cisplatin. The control group received 0.9% saline; animals in the ellagic acid group received only ellagic acid (10 mg/kg); animals in the cisplatin group received only cisplatin (7 mg/kg); animals in cisplatin + ellagic acid group received ellagic acid for 10 days after cisplatin. The rats were killed at the end of the treatment period. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels, glutathione-peroxidase (GSH-Px) and catalase (CAT) activities were determined in liver and heart tissue. While administration of cisplatin increased the MDA levels in liver and heart tissues, it decreased the GSH, GSH-Px and CAT in these samples when compared to the control group. The administration of ellagic acid to cisplatin-treated rats decreased the MDA levels, and increased GSH, GSH-Px and CAT in these samples. Cisplatin caused marked damages in the histopathological status of liver and heart tissues. These damages were ameliorated by ellagic acid administration. In conclusion, ellagic acid may be used in combination with cisplatin in chemotherapy to improve cisplatin-induced oxidative stress parameters.

  1. Antitumorigenic Evaluation of Thalidomide Alone and in Combination with Cisplatin in DBA2/J Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Marie B. Ruddy

    2002-01-01

    thalidomide failed to inhibit cell proliferation. However, cisplatin treatment with or without thalidomide, significantly inhibited the multiplication of both cell lines in a dose dependent manner. Thalidomide does not appear to be a beneficial adjuvant to cisplatin treatment.

  2. Discovery – Cisplatin and The Treatment of Testicular and Other Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to the discovery of cisplatin in 1965, men with testicular cancer had few medical options. Now, thanks to NCI research, cisplatin and similar chemotherapy drugs are known for curing testicular and other forms of cancer.

  3. Antitumor activity and biodistribution of cisplatin nanocapsules in nude mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts

    OpenAIRE

    Staffhorst, R.W.H.M.; Born, K.; Erkelens, C.A.M.; Hamelers, I.H.L.; Peters, G J; Boven, E.; de Kroon, A.I.P.M.

    2008-01-01

    Cisplatin nanocapsules represent a novel lipid formulation of the anticancer drug cis-diamminedichloridoplatinum(II) (cisplatin), characterized by an unprecedented cisplatin-tolipid molar ratio, and exhibiting strongly increased in-vitro cytotoxicity compared with the free drug. In this study, antitumor efficacy and biodistribution of PEGylated cisplatin nanocapsules were compared with those of the free drug in a mouse tumor model. Nude mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma OVCAR-3 xenografts ...

  4. Origanum majorana Attenuates Nephrotoxicity of Cisplatin Anticancer Drug through Ameliorating Oxidative Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Amel M. Soliman; Shreen Desouky; Mohamed Marzouk; Sayed, Amany A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that cisplatin is an important anticancer drug, its clinical utilization is limited by nephrotoxicity during long term medication. Combined cisplatin chemotherapy with plant extracts can diminish toxicity and enhance the antitumor efficacy of the drug. This study evaluated the effect of Originum majorana ethanolic extract (OMEE) on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Eighteen male rats were divided into three groups as follows: a control group, a group treated with cisplatin (3...

  5. Beneficial Effects of Hesperidin against Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity and Oxidative Stress in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Wafaa R Mohamed; Arafa, El-Shaimaa A.; Basim A. Shehata; Gamal A. El Sherbiny; Abdel Nasser A.M. Elgendy

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin has been frequently used for treatment of wide variety of tumors. The use of cisplatin is associated with severe cytotoxicity such as nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity and spermiotoxicity which radically limits its clinical use. The present study aimed to investigate the possible protective effects of multiple doses of hesperidin against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity induced by single i.p injection of cisplatin (7.5 mg/kg). Hesperidin was given to rats at two different doses (100 an...

  6. Two consecutive days of treatment with liposomal cisplatin in non-small cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Stathopoulos, G. P.; STATHOPOULOS, J.; Dimitroulis, J.

    2012-01-01

    Liposomal cisplatin (Lipoplatin) is a new agent, a cisplatin formulation that has been investigated in a number of studies and compared with cisplatin with respect to toxicity and effectiveness. It has been administered once weekly and in combination with a second agent, once every two weeks. The main outcome of the studies was that lipoplatin has no renal toxicity and is as equally effective as cisplatin. The present study investigated toxicity and effectiveness when lipoplatin is administer...

  7. Antitumor activity and biodistribution of cisplatin nanocapsules in nude mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staffhorst, R.W.H.M.; van der Born, K.; Erkelens, C.A.M.; Hamelers, I.H.L.; Peters, G.J.; Boven, E.; de Kroon, A.I.P.M.

    2008-01-01

    Cisplatin nanocapsules represent a novel lipid formulation of the anticancer drug cis-diamminedichloridoplatinum(II) (cisplatin), characterized by an unprecedented cisplatin-tolipid molar ratio, and exhibiting strongly increased in-vitro cytotoxicity compared with the free drug. In this study, antit

  8. Structural changes of linear DNA molecules induced by cisplatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zhiguo, E-mail: cn.zguoliu@yahoo.com [State Engineering Laboratory of Bio-Resource Eco-Utilization, Harbin 150040 (China); Engineering Research Center of Forest Bio-preparation, Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Key Laboratory of Forest Plant Ecology of Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Liu, Ruisi; Zhou, Zhen; Zu, Yuangang; Xu, Fengjie [State Engineering Laboratory of Bio-Resource Eco-Utilization, Harbin 150040 (China); Engineering Research Center of Forest Bio-preparation, Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China); Key Laboratory of Forest Plant Ecology of Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040 (China)

    2015-02-20

    Interaction between long DNA molecules and activated cisplatin is believed to be crucial to anticancer activity. However, the exact structural changes of long DNA molecules induced by cisplatin are still not very clear. In this study, structural changes of long linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) induced by activated cisplatin have been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The results indicated that long DNA molecules gradually formed network structures, beads-on-string structures and their large aggregates. Electrostatic and coordination interactions were considered as the main driving forces producing these novel structures. An interesting finding in this study is the beads-on-string structures. Moreover, it is worth noting that the beads-on-string structures were linked into the networks, which can be ascribed to the strong DNA–DNA interactions. This study expands our knowledge of the interactions between DNA molecules and cisplatin. - Highlights: • We investigate structural changes of dsDNA and ssDNA induced by cisplatin. • AFM results indicated long dsDNA formed network, beads-on-string and aggregates. • ssDNA can form very similar structures as those of long linear dsDNA. • A possible formation process of theses novel structure is proposed.

  9. Optimizing Liposomal Cisplatin Efficacy through Membrane Composition Manipulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Zisman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The first liposomal formulation of cisplatin to be evaluated clinically was SPI-077. Although the formulation demonstrated enhanced cisplatin tumor accumulation in preclinical models it did not enhance clinical efficacy, possibly due to limited cisplatin release from the formulation localized within the tumor. We have examined a series of liposomal formulations to address the in vivo relationship between cisplatin release rate and formulation efficacy in the P388 murine leukemia model. The base formulation of phosphatidylcholine: phosphatidylglycerol: cholesterol was altered in the C18 and C16 phospholipid content to influence membrane fluidity and thereby impacting drug circulation lifetime and drug retention. Phase transition temperatures (Tm ranged from 42–55°C. The high Tm formulations demonstrated enhanced drug retention properties accompanied by low antitumor activity while the lowest Tm formulations released the drug too rapidly in the plasma, limiting drug delivery to the tumor which also resulted in low antitumor activity. A formulation composed of DSPC : DPPC : DSPG : Chol; (35 : 35 : 20 : 10 with an intermediate drug release rate and a cisplatin plasma half-life of 8.3 hours showed the greatest antitumor activity. This manuscript highlights the critical role that drug release rates play in the design of an optimized drug delivery vehicle.

  10. Optimizing Liposomal Cisplatin Efficacy through Membrane Composition Manipulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zisman, Natalia; Dos Santos, Nancy; Johnstone, Sharon; Tsang, Alan; Bermudes, David; Mayer, Lawrence; Tardi, Paul

    2011-01-01

    The first liposomal formulation of cisplatin to be evaluated clinically was SPI-077. Although the formulation demonstrated enhanced cisplatin tumor accumulation in preclinical models it did not enhance clinical efficacy, possibly due to limited cisplatin release from the formulation localized within the tumor. We have examined a series of liposomal formulations to address the in vivo relationship between cisplatin release rate and formulation efficacy in the P388 murine leukemia model. The base formulation of phosphatidylcholine: phosphatidylglycerol: cholesterol was altered in the C18 and C16 phospholipid content to influence membrane fluidity and thereby impacting drug circulation lifetime and drug retention. Phase transition temperatures (T(m)) ranged from 42-55°C. The high T(m) formulations demonstrated enhanced drug retention properties accompanied by low antitumor activity while the lowest T(m) formulations released the drug too rapidly in the plasma, limiting drug delivery to the tumor which also resulted in low antitumor activity. A formulation composed of DSPC : DPPC : DSPG : Chol; (35 : 35 : 20 : 10) with an intermediate drug release rate and a cisplatin plasma half-life of 8.3 hours showed the greatest antitumor activity. This manuscript highlights the critical role that drug release rates play in the design of an optimized drug delivery vehicle.

  11. [Experimental study of protective effect of solcoseryl on cisplatin nephrotoxicity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, H; Mori, Y

    1992-01-01

    Cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) (cisplatin) is known to possess nephrotoxicity. Recently, it is said that the nephrotoxicity closely correlated with active oxygen. In the present study, an attempt was made to examine, whether or not solcoseryl, antioxidant like scavenger, decreases the nephrotoxicity. Three groups of Sprague-dawley rats were injected cisplatin (3mg/kg) only (C group), cisplatin and 2 times solcoseryl (8mg/kg), (CS2 group), and cisplatin and 5 times solcoseryl (CS5 group). BUN levels in C and CS2 groups were elevated compared to CS5 group. In the light microscopy, 62.5% to 100% in C and CS2 groups revealed massive necrosis in straight part of the proximal tubules, while the damage in CS5 group was only 25%. In the electron microscopy, these findings were similar to the light microscopic observations. Solcoseryl is known to have several antioxidative effects such as inhibition of superoxide producing and hyperperoxidation. It is suggested that these effects of solcoseryl might decrease the nephrotoxicity. Solcoseryl seems to be a useful drug for reducing nephrotoxicity and also it is a safe drug. Therefore, solcoseryl can be used for the prevention of cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

  12. Theoretical study of cisplatin adsorption on silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonetti, S., E-mail: ssimonet@uns.edu.ar [Departamento de Fisica and IFISUR, Universidad Nacional del Sur-CONICET, Av. Alem 1253, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Departamentos de Ciencias Basicas e Ingenieria Mecanica, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, 11 de Abril 461, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Company, A. Diaz; Brizuela, G.; Juan, A. [Departamento de Fisica and IFISUR, Universidad Nacional del Sur-CONICET, Av. Alem 1253, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina)

    2011-11-15

    The adsorption of cisplatin and its complexes, cis-[PtCl(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup +} and cis-[Pt(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup 2+}, on a SiO{sub 2}(1 1 1) hydrated surface has been studied by the Atom Superposition and Electron Delocalization method. The adiabatic energy curves for the adsorption of the drug and its products on the delivery system were considered. The electronic structure and bonding analysis were also performed. The molecule-surface interactions are formed at expenses of the OH surface bonds. The more important interactions are the Cl-H bond for cis-[PtCl{sub 2}(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}] and cis-[PtCl(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup +} adsorptions, and the Pt-O interaction for cis-[Pt(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}]{sup 2+} adsorption. The Cl p orbitals and Pt s, p y d orbitals of the molecule and its complexes, and the s H orbital and, the s and p orbitals of the O atoms of the hydrated surface are the main contribution to the surface bonds.

  13. Epoetin alfa ja namaluva nefrotoksicnosta inducirana so cisplatin kaj staorci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimce Zafirov

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Klinickata efikasnost na cisplatin kako antitumorski lek e nesomnena, no dozno-limitiracki faktor za negova upotreba pretstavuva izrazitata nefrotoksicnost. Najnovite istrazuvawa pokazuvaat deka epoetin alfa moze da ima znacajna uloga ne samo vo terapiski celi za korekcija na razni vidovi na anemii, tuku istiot moze da bide efikasen i kako nevroprotektiv, hepatoprotektiv, kardioprotektiv i osobeno znacajno kako nefroprotektiv kaj nefrotoksicnost inducirana od preparati na baza na platina. Glavna cel na ovaa studija bese da se utvrdi efektot na epoetin alfa vo prevencijata na nefrotoksicnost eksperimentalno inducirana so dolgotrajna administracija na cisplatin vo doza od 2 mg/kg/t.t./nedela vo tek na 8 nedeli, kaj Wistar staorci. Dobienite rezultati od ovaa studija pokazuvaat deka epoetin alfa signifikantno gi ublazuva funkcionalnite bubrezni poremetuvawa inducirani so dolgotrajna administracija na cisplatin, ja podobruva opstata sostojba i go namaluva mortalitetot kaj ispituvanite zivotni.

  14. Radiation-induced cisplatin resistance in two human cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichholtz-Wirth, H.; Stotzer, O. [GSF-Institute of Radiobiology and Cytometry, Neuherberg (Germany); Marx, K. [Medical Clin. III, University, Munich (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    Cisplatin resistance has been induced in human HT-29 and HeLa cells after low-dose fractionated {gamma}-irradiation. The drug resistance is modest and does not confer cross-resistance to irradiation. Alterations that were recently shown to correlate with radiation-induced cisplatin resistance in murine cells are not involved in the resistant HeLa-C3 cells. Scavengers, such as GSH or metallothioneins are unchanged and there is no alteration of the cGMP transduction pathway. Preliminary results in HeLa-C3 cells indicate that resistance is associated with differences of the apoptotic pathway, with enhancement of the p53 suppressor protein after cisplatin treatment but unchanged bcl-2 protein expression. (authors)

  15. Protective effects of pine bark extract against cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ko, Je-Won; Lee,In-Chul; Park, Sung-Hyuk; Moon, Changjong; Kang, Seong-Soo; Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Jong-Choon

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the protective effects of pine bark extract (pycnogenol®, PYC) against cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats. Twenty-four male rats were divided into the following four groups: (1) vehicle control, (2) cisplatin (7.5 mg/kg), (3) cisplatin & PYC 10 (10 mg/kg/day), and (4) cisplatin & PYC 20 (20 mg/kg/day). A single intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin induced hepatotoxicity, as evidenced by an increase in serum aminotransferase and histopathological al...

  16. Cisplatin-induced cardiotoxicity: Mechanisms and cardioprotective strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Awady, El-Sayed E; Moustafa, Yasser M; Abo-Elmatty, Dina M; Radwan, Asmaa

    2011-01-10

    Increased oxidative stress and apoptosis have been implicated in the cardiotoxicity that limits the clinical use of cisplatin as an anti-tumoral drug. Our study was conducted to evaluate the protective potential of acetyl-l-carnitine, DL-α-lipoic acid and silymarin against cisplatin-induced myocardial injury. Eighty male albino rats were divided into eight groups. The first four groups were treated with normal saline, acetyl-l-carnitine (500mg/kg, i.p.), DL-α-lipoic acid (100mg/kg, p.o.) and silymarin (100mg/kg, p.o.) respectively, for 10 successive days. The remaining groups were treated with the same doses of normal saline, acetyl-l-carnitine, DL-α-lipoic acid and silymarin, respectively, for 5 successive days before and after a single dose of cisplatin (10mg/kg, i.p.). Serum activities of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK), creatine kinase isoenzyme MB (CK-MB) and plasma cardiac troponin I (cTnI) concentration were estimated. Malondialdehyde (MDA), reduced glutathione (GSH) contents, superoxide dismutase activity (SOD) and protein content in cardiac tissues were measured. Moreover, integrity of both mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA) was also examined. Cisplatin-treated rats experienced a significant elevation of serum activities of LDH, CK, CK-MB and cTnI plasma concentration. These effects were accompanied by a significant increase in MDA level. On the other hand, a significant decrease in GSH content, SOD activity and total protein content was observed. In addition, both mtDNA and nDNA were heavily damaged. However, acetyl-l-carnitine, DL-α-lipoic acid and silymarin significantly attenuated the cisplatin-evoked disturbances in the above-mentioned parameters. In conclusion, the former drugs were proven to be potential candidates to ameliorate cisplatin-induced cardiotoxicity.

  17. The effect of Thespesia populnea on cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denish Mika

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: To study the effect of Thespesia populnea on Cisplatin induced Nephrotoxicity. Materials and Methods: Experiments were conducted on Male Sprague Dawley Rats (4-6 weeks old weighing 100-120g B.Wt. The drug under study was cisplatin, which is an anticancer drug. Thespesia populnea extract was used to test its ability to alleviate the harmful effects of cisplatin. The animals were divided into three groups: Group I was considered as normal, Group II was given a single dose of cisplatin (6 mg/kg/b.wt., i.p and they constituted the control animals and Group III was treated with cisplatin along with Thespesia populnea (5 mg/kg/b.wt., i.p for 10 consecutive days. Results: Administration of cisplatin resulted in significant (P < 0.05 increase in the levels of serum urea (137 ± 1.6, creatinine (1.69 ± 0.14, ALT (96.18 ± 3.44, AST (80.84 ± 3.34 and bilirubin (4.57 ± 0.08 as compared to normal animals. On the other hand, introduction of Thespesia populnea extract caused a significant (P < 0.05 reduction in the levels of serum markers namely urea (112 ± 2.16, creatinine (0.54 ± 0.004, ALT (76.4 ± 1.45, AST (58.80 ± 1.6 and bilirubin (3.96 ± 0.85. Discussion: Increase in the levels of urea and creatinine in serum as well as ALT, AST and bilirubin is suggestive of both kidney and liver damage. Thespesia populnea extract ameliorated cisplatin induced kidney and liver damage as indicated by reduction in the levels of serum urea, creatinine, AST, ALT and bilirubin. Reduction in the levels of these biochemical markers is an indication of regeneration process. Thus it is concluded that the extract might contain nephroprotective compounds such as flavonoids, alkaloids, etc. which are responsible for alleviating cisplatin induced toxicity.

  18. Preclinical antitumor activity of ethyldeshydroxysparsomycin in combination with cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofs, H P; Wagener, D J; De Valk-Bakker, V; Van Rennes, H; De Vos, D; Doesburg, W H; Ottenheijm, H C; De Grip, W J

    1995-01-01

    The efficacy of cisplatin (CDDP) in combination with the protein synthesis inhibitor ethyldeshydroxysparsomycin (EDSM) has been tested in two tumor models at various schedules. Mice with L1210 leukemia or B16 melanoma were treated with CDDP alone or in combination with EDSM. Against L1210 leukemia, which is sensitive to CDDP, combinations elicited increases in life-span for all treatment schedules compared to those achieved with the corresponding dose of CDDP. Moreover, the combination of EDSM with this platinum compound yielded a cure rate > 80%, compared to cisplatin efficacy is only seen when the tumor is sensitive to CDDP.

  19. Stability, accumulation and cytotoxicity of an albumin-cisplatin adduct

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Charlotte; Tastesen, Hanne Sørup; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2010-01-01

    The accumulation and cytotoxicity of a 10 µmol L¿¹ equimolar human serum albumin-cisplatin adduct (HSA-Pt) was investigated in suspension Ehrlich Ascites Tumor Cells (EATC) and adherent Ehrlich Lettré Ascites Cells (Lettré). HSA-Pt did not induce apoptosis nor was it taken up by the cells to any...... significant amount within 24 h incubation. The accumulation and cytotoxicity of HSA-Pt was compared to 10 µmol L¿¹ cisplatin for which a larger accumulation and cytotoxicity were observed in EATC compared to Lettré. The experiment was performed with cell medium exchange every fourth hour as HSA...

  20. Baicalein and its underlying mechanism as a protector against liver injury induced by cisplatin in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengwei Niu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is widely used for the treatment of a variety of cancers but with a high incidence of hepatotoxicity. Baicalein is originally isolated from the root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi with broad bioactivities. The present study aims to investigate the protective effect of baicalein against cisplatin-induced acute liver injury and the underlying mechanism of this protective effect. Administration of cisplatin (40 mg/kg for 24 h increased the serum alanine and aspartate aminotransferases and alkaline phosphatase levels, while baicalein could reverse all those changes induced by cisplatin. Liver histological analysis further evidenced the protection of baicalein against cisplatin-induced liver injury. Baicalein counteracted the increased liver malondialdehyde (amount induced by cisplatin, while baicalein could further increase the cisplatin-induced elevation of the amount of reduced glutathione in the liver. Further results showed that baicalein reversed the cisplatin-induced decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione-S transferase and glutathione reductase. On the other hand, baicalein alleviated the increase in the serum levels of tumour necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6 induced by cisplatin. Taken together, our results demonstrate that baicalein can inhibit cisplatin-induced hepatic oxidative stress and inflammation, which contributes greatly to the amelioration of cisplatin-induced liver injury.

  1. Reduced ghrelin secretion in the hypothalamus of rats due to cisplatin-induced anorexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakabi, Koji; Sadakane, Chiharu; Noguchi, Masamichi; Ohno, Shino; Ro, Shoki; Chinen, Katsuya; Aoyama, Toru; Sakurada, Tomoya; Takabayashi, Hideaki; Hattori, Tomohisa

    2010-08-01

    Although chemotherapy with cisplatin is a widely used and effective cancer treatment, the undesirable gastrointestinal side effects associated with it, such as nausea, vomiting, and anorexia, markedly decrease patients' quality of life. To elucidate the mechanism underlying chemotherapy-induced anorexia, focusing on the hypothalamic ghrelin secretion-anorexia association, we measured hypothalamic ghrelin secretion in fasted and cisplatin-treated rats. Hypothalamic ghrelin secretion changes after vagotomy or administration of cisplatin. Cisplatin + rikkunshito, a serotonin 2C receptor antagonist or serotonin 3 receptor antagonist, was investigated. The effects of intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of ghrelin or the serotonin 2C receptor antagonist SB242084 on food intake were also evaluated in cisplatin-treated rats. Hypothalamic ghrelin secretion significantly increased in 24-h-fasted rats compared to freely fed rats and was markedly reduced 24 and 48 h after cisplatin treatment in cisplatin-treated rats compared to saline-treated rats, although their plasma ghrelin levels were comparable. In cisplatin-treated rats, icv ghrelin administration reversed the decrease in food intake, vagotomy partially restored hypothalamic ghrelin secretion, and hypothalamic serotonin 2C receptor mRNA expression increased significantly. Administration of rikkunshito (an endogenous ghrelin enhancer) or a serotonin 2C receptor antagonist reversed the decrease in hypothalamic ghrelin secretion and food intake 24 h after cisplatin treatment. Cisplatin-induced anorexia is mediated through reduced hypothalamic ghrelin secretion. Cerebral serotonin 2C receptor activation partially induces decrease in hypothalamic ghrelin secretion, and rikkunshito suppresses cisplatin-induced anorexia by enhancing this secretion.

  2. Protective agent, erdosteine, against cisplatin-induced hepatic oxidant injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, Ahmet; Duru, Mehmet; Ciralik, Harun; Akcan, Ramazan; Sogut, Sadik

    2005-10-01

    Cisplatin, one of the most active cytotoxic agents against cancer, has several toxicities. Hepatotoxicity is one of them occurred during high doses treatment. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of erdosteine against cisplatin-induced liver injury through tissue oxidant/antioxidant parameters and light microscopic evaluation. The rats were randomly divided into three groups: control (n=5), cisplatin (10 mg/kg, n=6) and cisplatin+erdosteine (50 mg/kg/day oral erdosteine, n=8) groups. The rats were sacrificed at the 5th day of cisplatin treatment. The liver tissues were examined with light microscopy and oxidant/antioxidant biochemical parameters. The malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) levels were increased in the cisplatin group in comparison with the control and cisplatin+erdosteine groups (perdosteine groups. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) were higher in cisplatin+erdosteine group than cisplatin group (perdosteine group, a decrease in cytoplasmic changes with the hepatocytes and sinusoidal dilatations around cells of central vein were noticed in as compared to cisplatin group. In the light of microscopic and biochemical results, it was concluded that cisplatin-induced liver damage in high dose and erdosteine prevented this toxic side effect by the way of its antioxidant and radical scavenging effects.

  3. Inhibition of cisplatin-resistance by RNA interference targeting metallothionein using reducible oligo-peptoplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Hwan; Chae, Ji-Won; Kim, Jang Kyoung; Kim, Hyung Jin; Chung, Jee Young; Kim, Yong-Hee

    2015-10-10

    Effective intracellular level of a platinum anti-cancer drug, cisplatin, following repeated injections can be decreased either by the active efflux via ATP pump or by interactions with glutathione and metallothionein. Cisplatin in cytoplasm preferably binds to cysteine-rich proteins such as glutathione and metallothionein (MT). Detoxification of cisplatin by intracellular thiol-containing proteins has been considered to be major hurdles to overcome. The short hairpin RNA targeting MT (shMT) was tested to down-regulate MT and recover cisplatin resistance. A reducible polymer, poly(oligo-d-arginine) (rPOA), formed stable complex with shMT and demonstrated superior transfection efficiency. Efficient transfection of shMT/rPOA oligo-peptoplexes was found to significantly inhibit MT over-expression, resulting in 45% decrease of cell viability compared to the cisplatin alone group. This decrease was mediated by the synergistic effect of shMT/rPOA oligo-peptoplex and cisplatin. Co-administration of shMT/rPOA oligo-peptoplex and cisplatin in in vivo tumor model showed noticeable tumor-suppressing effect by inducing reversal of cisplatin resistance following effective intracellular delivery of shMT by rPOA. Combination therapy through co-administration of shMT/rPOA oligo-peptoplex and cisplatin was found to effectively reverse cisplatin resistance by RNA interference and consequently improve anti-cancer activity of cisplatin.

  4. Depletion of Mitofusin-2 Causes Mitochondrial Damage in Cisplatin-Induced Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobylev, Ilja; Joshi, Abhijeet R; Barham, Mohammed; Neiss, Wolfram F; Lehmann, Helmar C

    2017-01-21

    Sensory neuropathy is a relevant side effect of the antineoplastic agent cisplatin. Mitochondrial damage is assumed to play a critical role in cisplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy, but the pathomechanisms underlying cisplatin-induced mitotoxicity and neurodegeneration are incompletely understood. In an animal model of cisplatin-induced neuropathy, we determined in detail the extent and spatial distribution of mitochondrial damage during cisplatin treatment. Changes in the total number of axonal mitochondria during cisplatin treatment were assessed in intercostal nerves from transgenic mice that express cyan fluorescent protein. Further, we explored the impact of cisplatin on the expression of nuclear encoded molecules of mitochondrial fusion and fission, including mitofusin-2 (MFN2), optic atrophy 1 (OPA1), and dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1). Cisplatin treatment resulted in a loss of total mitochondrial mass in axons and in an abnormal mitochondrial morphology including atypical enlargement, increased vacuolization, and loss of cristae. These changes were observed in distal and proximal nerve segments and were more prominent in axons than in Schwann cells. Transcripts of fusion and fission proteins were reduced in distal nerve segments. Significant reduced expression levels of the fusion protein MFN2 was detected in nerves of cisplatin-exposed animals. In summary, we provide for the first time an evidence that cisplatin alters mitochondrial dynamics in peripheral nerves. Loss of MFN2, previously implicated in the pathogenesis of other neurodegenerative diseases, also contributes to the pathogenesis in cisplatin-induced neuropathy.

  5. Cisplatin induces cytotoxicity through the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and activating transcription factor 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Germain, Carly; Niknejad, Nima; Ma, Laurie; Garbuio, Kyla; Hai, Tsonwin; Dimitroulakos, Jim

    2010-07-01

    The mechanisms underlying the proapoptotic effect of the chemotherapeutic agent, cisplatin, are largely undefined. Understanding the mechanisms regulating cisplatin cytotoxicity may uncover strategies to enhance the efficacy of this important therapeutic agent. This study evaluates the role of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) as a mediator of cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity. Cytotoxic doses of cisplatin and carboplatin treatments consistently induced ATF3 expression in five tumor-derived cell lines. Characterization of this induction revealed a p53, BRCA1, and integrated stress response-independent mechanism, all previously implicated in stress-mediated ATF3 induction. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway involvement in ATF3 induction by cisplatin revealed a MAPK-dependent mechanism. Cisplatin treatment combined with specific inhibitors to each MAPK pathway (c-Jun N-terminal kinase, extracellular signal-regulated kinase, and p38) resulted in decreased ATF3 induction at the protein level. MAPK pathway inhibition led to decreased ATF3 messenger RNA expression and reduced cytotoxic effects of cisplatin as measured by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide cell viability assay. In A549 lung carcinoma cells, targeting ATF3 with specific small hairpin RNA also attenuated the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin. Similarly, ATF3-/- murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) were shown to be less sensitive to cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity compared with ATF3+/+ MEFs. This study identifies cisplatin as a MAPK pathway-dependent inducer of ATF3, whose expression influences cisplatin's cytotoxic effects.

  6. Predictive factors of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patient tolerance to high-dose cisplatin in concurrent chemoradiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Nakano, Kenji; SATO, YASUYOSHI; TOSHIYASU, TAKASHI; SATO, YUKIKO; INAGAKI, LINA; Tomomatsu, Junichi; Sasaki, Toru; SHIMBASHI, WATARU; FUKUSHIMA, HIROFUMI; YONEKAWA, HIROYUKI; Mitani,Hiroki; Kawabata, Kazuyoshi; Takahashi, Shunji

    2015-01-01

    Although high-dose cisplatin is the standard regimen of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), varying levels of patient tolerance towards cisplatin have been reported, and the predictive factors of cisplatin tolerance remain to be elucidated. The present study retrospectively reviewed newly diagnosed HNSCC patients who received CCRT. Cisplatin (80 mg/m2) was administered every 3 weeks. The proportion of high-dose cisplatin-tole...

  7. Structural damage of chicken red blood cells exposed to platinum nanoparticles and cisplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kutwin, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Jaworski, Sławomir;

    2014-01-01

    of platinum nanoparticles (NP-Pt) and cisplatin with blood compartments are important for future applications. This study investigated structural damage, cell membrane deformation and haemolysis of chicken embryo red blood cells (RBC) after treatment with cisplatin and NP-Pt. Cisplatin (4 μg/ml) and NP-Pt (2......Side effects and resistance of cancer cells to cisplatin are major drawbacks to its application, and recently, the possibility of replacing cisplatin with nanocompounds has been considered. Most chemotherapeutic agents are administered intravenously, and comparisons between the interactions......,6 μg/ml), when incubated with chicken embryo RBC, were detrimental to cell structure and induced haemolysis. The level of haemolytic injury was increased after cisplatin and NP-Pt treatments compared to the control group. Treatment with cisplatin caused structural damage to cell membranes...

  8. Role of ellagic acid against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ateşşahín, Ahmet; Ceríbaşi, Ali Osman; Yuce, Abdurrauf; Bulmus, Ozgür; Cikim, Gürkan

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible protective role of antioxidant treatment with ellagic acid on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity using biochemical and histopatological approaches. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups. The control group received 0.9% saline; animals in the ellagic acid group received only ellagic acid (10 mg/kg); animals in the cisplatin group received only cisplatin (7 mg/kg); animals in the cisplatin + ellagic acid group received ellagic acid for 10 days after cisplatin. The effects of ellagic acid on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity were evaluated by plasma creatinine, urea, sodium and calcium concentrations; kidney tissue malondialdehyde, reduced glutathione (GSH), glutathione peroxidase (GSH peroxidase) and catalase activities and histopatological examinations. Administration of cisplatin to rats induced a marked renal failure, characterized by significant increases in plasma creatinine, urea and calcium concentrations. Cisplatin also induced oxidative stress, as indicated by increased kidney tissue concentrations of malondialdehyde, and reduced activities of GSH peroxidase and catalase. Furthermore, treatment with cisplatin caused a marked tubular necrosis, degeneration and desquamation, luminal cast formation, karyomegaly, tubular dilatation, interstitial mononuclear cell infiltration and inter-tubular haemorrhagia. Ellagic acid markedly reduced elevated plasma creatinine, urea and calcium levels and counteracted the deleterious effects of cisplatin on oxidative stress markers. In the same way, ellagic acid ameliorated cisplatin-induced pathological changes including tubular necrosis, degeneration, karyomegaly, tubular dilatation when compared to the cisplatin alone group. These results indicate that the antioxidant ellagic acid might have a protective effect against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and oxidative stress in rat, but not enough to inhibit cisplatin-induced renal dysfunction.

  9. Identification of genes associated with cisplatin resistance in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Ping

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cisplatin is widely used for chemotherapy of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, details of the molecular mechanism responsible for cisplatin resistance are still unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the expression of genes related to cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. Methods A cisplatin-resistant cell line, Tca/cisplatin, was established from a cisplatin-sensitive cell line, Tca8113, which was derived from moderately-differentiated tongue squamous cell carcinoma. Global gene expression in this resistant cell line and its sensitive parent cell line was analyzed using Affymetrix HG-U95Av2 microarrays. Candidate genes involved in DNA repair, the MAP pathway and cell cycle regulation were chosen to validate the microarray analysis results. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis following cisplatin exposure were also investigated. Results Cisplatin resistance in Tca/cisplatin cells was stable for two years in cisplatin-free culture medium. The IC50 for cisplatin in Tca/cisplatin was 6.5-fold higher than that in Tca8113. Microarray analysis identified 38 genes that were up-regulated and 25 that were down-regulated in this cell line. Some were novel candidates, while others are involved in well-characterized mechanisms that could be relevant to cisplatin resistance, such as RECQL for DNA repair and MAP2K6 in the MAP pathway; all the genes were further validated by Real-time PCR. The cell cycle-regulated genes CCND1 and CCND3 were involved in cisplatin resistance; 24-hour exposure to 10 μM cisplatin induced a marked S phase block in Tca/cisplatin cells but not in Tca8113 cells. Conclusion The Tca8113 cell line and its stable drug-resistant variant Tca/cisplatin provided a useful model for identifying candidate genes responsible for the mechanism of cisplatin resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma. Our data provide a useful basis for screening candidate targets for early diagnosis

  10. Role of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Signaling Pathway in Cisplatin-Resistant Lung Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Yunguang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Zheng Siyuan [Department of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Torossian, Artour; Speirs, Christina K.; Schleicher, Stephen; Giacalone, Nicholas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Carbone, David P. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Zhao Zhongming, E-mail: zhongming.zhao@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Lu Bo, E-mail: bo.lu@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: The development of drug-resistant phenotypes has been a major obstacle to cisplatin use in non-small-cell lung cancer. We aimed to identify some of the molecular mechanisms that underlie cisplatin resistance using microarray expression analysis. Methods and Materials: H460 cells were treated with cisplatin. The differences between cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells and parental H460 cells were studied using Western blot, MTS, and clonogenic assays, in vivo tumor implantation, and microarray analysis. The cisplatin-R cells were treated with human recombinant insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein-3 and siRNA targeting IGF-1 receptor. Results: Cisplatin-R cells illustrated greater expression of the markers CD133 and aldehyde dehydrogenase, more rapid in vivo tumor growth, more resistance to cisplatin- and etoposide-induced apoptosis, and greater survival after treatment with cisplatin or radiation than the parental H460 cells. Also, cisplatin-R demonstrated decreased expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 and increased activation of IGF-1 receptor signaling compared with parental H460 cells in the presence of IGF-1. Human recombinant IGF binding protein-3 reversed cisplatin resistance in cisplatin-R cells and targeting of IGF-1 receptor using siRNA resulted in sensitization of cisplatin-R-cells to cisplatin and radiation. Conclusions: The IGF-1 signaling pathway contributes to cisplatin-R to cisplatin and radiation. Thus, this pathway represents a potential target for improved lung cancer response to treatment.

  11. Cisplatin-Associated Ototoxicity: A Review for the Health Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paken, Jessica; Govender, Cyril D.; Pillay, Mershen

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is an effective drug used in the treatment of many cancers, yet its ototoxic potential places cancer patients, exposed to this drug, at risk of hearing loss, thus negatively impacting further on a patient's quality of life. It is paramount for health care practitioners managing such patients to be aware of cisplatin's ototoxic properties and the clinical signs to identify patients at risk of developing hearing loss. English peer-reviewed articles from January 1975 to July 2015 were assessed from PubMed, Science Direct, and Ebscohost. Seventy-nine articles and two books were identified for this review, using MeSH terms and keywords such as “ototoxicity”, “cisplatin”, “hearing loss”, and “ototoxicity monitoring”. This review provides an up-to-date overview of cisplatin-associated ototoxicity, namely, its clinical features, incidence rates, and molecular and cellular mechanisms and risk factors, to health care practitioners managing the patient with cancer, and highlights the need for a team-based approach to complement an audiological monitoring programme to mitigate any further loss in the quality of life of affected patients, as there is currently no otoprotective agent recommended routinely for the prevention of cisplatin-associated ototoxicity. It also sets the platform for effective dialogue towards policy formulation and strengthening of health systems in developing countries. PMID:28115933

  12. DSC Study on Brain Tubulin and the Effect of Cisplatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The thermal property of the polymerization of brain tubulin was studied by a high-sensitivity differential scanning calorimeter. The phenomenon that heat flows increased and decreased consistently and obviously was observed. This phenomenon was called heat flow oscillation. It was probably correlated to the dynamic instability of microtubules. The effect of cisplatin on it was reported, too.

  13. Auditory Brainstem Responses in Children Treated with Cisplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kamali

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: In view of improvement in therapeutic outcome of cancer treatment in children resulting in increased survival rates and the importance of hearing in speech and language development, this research project was intended to assess the effects of cisplatin group on hearing ability in children aged 6 months to 12 years.Methods: In this cross-sectional study, hearing of 10 children on cisplatin group medication for cancer who met the inclusion criteria was examined by recording auditory brainstem responses (ABR using the three stimulants of click and 4 and 8 kHz tone bursts. All children were examined twice: before drug administration and within 72 hours after receiving the last dose. Then the results were compared with each other.Results: There was a significant difference between hearing thresholds before and after drug administration (p<0.05. Right and left ear threshold comparison revealed no significant difference.Conclusion: Ototoxic effects of cisplatin group were confirmed in this study. Insignificant difference observed in comparing right and left ear hearing thresholds could be due to small sample size. auditory brainstem responses test especially with frequency specificity proved to be a useful method in assessing cisplatin ototoxicity.

  14. Pt(IV) complexes as prodrugs for cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yi; Liu, Shu-An; Kerwood, Deborah J; Goodisman, Jerry; Dabrowiak, James C

    2012-02-01

    The antitumor effects of platinum(IV) complexes, considered prodrugs for cisplatin, are believed to be due to biological reduction of Pt(IV) to Pt(II), with the reduction products binding to DNA and other cellular targets. In this work we used pBR322 DNA to capture the products of reduction of oxoplatin, c,t,c-[PtCl(2)(OH)(2)(NH(3))(2)], 3, and a carboxylate-modified analog, c,t,c-[PtCl(2)(OH)(O(2)CCH(2)CH(2)CO(2)H)(NH(3))(2)], 4, by ascorbic acid (AsA) or glutathione (GSH). Since carbonate plays a significant role in the speciation of platinum complexes in solution, we also investigated the effects of carbonate on the reduction/DNA-binding process. In pH 7.4 buffer in the absence of carbonate, both 3 and 4 are reduced by AsA to cisplatin (confirmed using ((195))Pt NMR), which binds to and unwinds closed circular DNA in a manner consistent with the formation of the well-known 1, 2 intrastrand DNA crosslink. However, when GSH is used as the reducing agent for 3 and 4, ((195))Pt NMR shows that cisplatin is not produced in the reaction medium. Although the Pt(II) products bind to closed circular DNA, their effect on the mobility of Form I DNA is different from that produced by cisplatin. When physiological carbonate is present in the reduction medium, ((13))C NMR shows that Pt(II) carbonato complexes form which block or impede platinum binding to DNA. The results of the study vis-à-vis the ability of the Pt(IV) complexes to act as prodrugs for cisplatin are discussed.

  15. Enhancement of Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity by Morphine and Its Attenuation by the Opioid Antagonist Naltrexone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atefeh Aminian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nephrotoxicity is a major side effect of cisplatin, a widely used chemotherapy agent. Morphine and other opioids are also used extensively in different types of cancer for the clinical management of pain associated with local or metastatic neoplastic lesions. In addition to its analgesic effects, morphine has also been reported to possess potential immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties. Herein, we investigated the effects of morphine in a rat model of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Following administration of a single dose of cisplatin (5 mg/kg, animals received intraperitoneal injections of morphine (5 mg/kg/day and/or naltrexone (20 mg/kg/day, an opioid antagonist, for 5 days. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was detected by a significant increase in plasma urea and creatinine levels in addition to alterations in kidney tissue morphology. Levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly increased in the renal tissue in cisplatin group. Moreover, glutathione (GSH concentration and superoxide dismutase activity were significantly reduced in renal tissue in cisplatin group compared with control animals. Treatment with morphine aggravated the deleterious effects of cisplatin at clinical, biochemical and histopathological levels; whereas naltrexone diminished the detrimental effects of morphine in animals receiving morphine and cisplatin. Morphine or naltrexone alone had no effect on the mentioned parameters. Our findings indicate that concomitant treatment with morphine might intensify cisplatin-induced renal damage in rats. These findings suggest that morphine and other opioids should be administered cautiously in patients receiving cisplatin chemotherapy.

  16. Enhancement of Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity by Morphine and Its Attenuation by the Opioid Antagonist Naltrexone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminian, Atefeh; Javadi, Shiva; Rahimian, Reza; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Asadi Amoli, Fahimeh; Moghaddas, Payman; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram

    2016-07-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a major side effect of cisplatin, a widely used chemotherapy agent. Morphine and other opioids are also used extensively in different types of cancer for the clinical management of pain associated with local or metastatic neoplastic lesions. In addition to its analgesic effects, morphine has also been reported to possess potential immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties. Herein, we investigated the effects of morphine in a rat model of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Following administration of a single dose of cisplatin (5 mg/kg), animals received intraperitoneal injections of morphine (5 mg/kg/day) and/or naltrexone (20 mg/kg/day), an opioid antagonist, for 5 days. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was detected by a significant increase in plasma urea and creatinine levels in addition to alterations in kidney tissue morphology. Levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were significantly increased in the renal tissue in cisplatin group. Moreover, glutathione (GSH) concentration and superoxide dismutase activity were significantly reduced in renal tissue in cisplatin group compared with control animals. Treatment with morphine aggravated the deleterious effects of cisplatin at clinical, biochemical and histopathological levels; whereas naltrexone diminished the detrimental effects of morphine in animals receiving morphine and cisplatin. Morphine or naltrexone alone had no effect on the mentioned parameters. Our findings indicate that concomitant treatment with morphine might intensify cisplatin-induced renal damage in rats. These findings suggest that morphine and other opioids should be administered cautiously in patients receiving cisplatin chemotherapy.

  17. Protective effect of metalloporphyrins against cisplatin-induced kidney injury in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Pan

    Full Text Available Oxidative and nitrative stress is a well-known phenomenon in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. The purpose of this work is to study the role of two metalloporphyrins (FeTMPyP and MnTBAP, water soluble complexes, in cisplatin-induced renal damage and their ability to scavenge peroxynitrite. In cisplatin-induced nephropathy study in mice, renal nitrative stress was evident by the increase in protein nitration. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was also evident by the histological damage from the loss of the proximal tubular brush border, blebbing of apical membranes, tubular epithelial cell detachment from the basement membrane, or intra-luminal aggregation of cells and proteins and by the increase in blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine. Cisplatin-induced apoptosis and cell death as shown by Caspase 3 assessments, TUNEL staining and DNA fragmentation Cisplatin-induced nitrative stress, apoptosis and nephrotoxicity were attenuated by both metalloporphyrins. Heme oxygenase (HO-1 also plays a critical role in metalloporphyrin-mediated protection of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. It is evident that nitrative stress plays a critical role in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice. Our data suggest that peroxynitrite is involved, at least in part, in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and protein nitration and cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity can be prevented with the use of metalloporphyrins.

  18. WEE1 inhibition targets cell cycle checkpoints for triple negative breast cancers to overcome cisplatin resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hongping; Shao, Fangyuan; Martin, Scots; Xu, Xiaoling; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2017-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most commonly used therapeutic drugs for cancer therapy, yet prolonged cisplatin treatment frequently results in drug resistance. To enhance therapeutic effect of cisplatin, we conducted a high throughput screening using a kinase library containing 704 kinases against triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. We demonstrated that cisplatin activates ATR, CHK1 and WEE1, which shut down DNA replication and attenuate cisplatin induced-lethality. WEE1 inhibition sensitizes TNBCs and cisplatin resistant cancer cells to cisplatin-induced lethality, because it not only impairs DNA replication checkpoint more profoundly than inhibition of ATR or CHK1, but also defects G2-M cell cycle checkpoint. Finally, we demonstrated that combined cisplatin treatment and WEE1 inhibition synergistically inhibits xenograft cancer growth accompanied by markedly reduced expression of TNBC signature genes. Thus targeting DNA replication and G2-M cell cycle checkpoint simultaneously by cisplatin and WEE1 inhibition is promising for TNBCs treatment, and for overcoming their cisplatin resistance. PMID:28262781

  19. N-acetylcysteine chemoprotection without decreased cisplatin antitumor efficacy in pediatric tumor models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muldoon, Leslie L; Wu, Y Jeffrey; Pagel, Michael A; Neuwelt, Edward A

    2015-02-01

    Decreasing oxidative damage with the antioxidant agent N-acetylcysteine (NAC) can block the side effects of chemotherapy, but may diminish anti-tumor efficacy. We tested the potential for interactions of high dose NAC against a minimally effective cisplatin chemotherapy regimen in rat models of human pediatric cancers. Athymic rats received subcutaneous implantation of human SK-N-AS neuroblastoma cells or intra-cerebellar implantation of human D283-MED medulloblastoma cells. Rats were untreated or treated with cisplatin (3 or 4 mg/kg IV) with or without NAC (1,000 mg/kg IV) 30 min before or 4 h after cisplatin treatment. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and tumor volumes were measured. Cisplatin decreased the growth of SK-N-AS neuroblastoma subcutaneous tumors from 17.7 ± 4.9 to 6.4 ± 2.5 fold over baseline 2 weeks after treatment (P cisplatin efficacy, while 4 h delayed NAC did not significantly affect cisplatin anti-tumor effects (relative tumor volume 6.8 ± 2.0 fold baseline, P cisplatin efficacy (tumor volume 6.8 ± 8.1 mm(3), P = 0.014 versus control). Cisplatin was minimally nephrotoxic in these models. NAC decreased cisplatin-induced elevations in BUN (P < 0.02). NAC chemoprotection did not alter cisplatin therapy, if delayed until 4 h after chemotherapy. These data support a Phase I/II clinical trial of delayed NAC to reduce ototoxicity in children with localized pediatric cancers.

  20. Elemental bioimaging of Cisplatin in Caenorhabditis elegans by LA-ICP-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone, Barbara; Aschner, Michael; Schwerdtle, Tanja; Karst, Uwe; Bornhorst, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (Cisplatin) is one of the most important and frequently used cytostatic drugs for the treatment of various solid tumors. Herein, a laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) method incorporating a fast and simple sample preparation protocol was developed for the elemental mapping of Cisplatin in the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). The method allows imaging of the spatially-resolved elemental distribution of platinum in the whole organism with respect to the anatomic structure in L4 stage worms at a lateral resolution of 5 µm. In addition, a dose- and time-dependent Cisplatin uptake was corroborated quantitatively by a total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (TXRF) method, and the elemental mapping indicated that Cisplatin is located in the intestine and in the head of the worms. Better understanding of the distribution of Cisplatin in this well-established model organism will be instrumental in deciphering Cisplatin toxicity and pharmacokinetics. Since the cytostatic effect of Cisplatin is based on binding the DNA by forming intra- and interstrand crosslinks, the response of poly(ADP-ribose)metabolism enzyme 1 (pme-1) deletion mutants to Cisplatin was also examined. Loss of pme-1, which is the C. elegans ortholog of human poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) led to disturbed DNA damage response. With respect to survival and brood size, pme-1 deletion mutants were more sensitive to Cisplatin as compared to wildtype worms, while Cisplatin uptake was indistinguishable. PMID:25996669

  1. Enhancement of cisplatin cytotoxicity by benzyl isothiocyanate in HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Younghyun; Kim, Yang Jee; Choi, Young Joo; Lee, Joong Won; Lee, Sunyeong; Chung, Hai Won

    2012-07-01

    Cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II) (cisplatin) is one of the most widely used chemotherapeutic drugs, but its effectiveness is limited by tumor cell resistance and the severe side effects it causes. One strategy for overcoming this problem is the concomitant use of natural dietary compounds as therapeutic agents. Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) is a promising chemopreventive agent found in cruciferous vegetables and papaya fruits. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of BITC on cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in human promyelocytic leukemia cells and normal human lymphocytes. The combined treatment of HL-60 cells with BITC followed by cisplatin (BITC/cisplatin) caused a significant decrease in cell viability. BITC also increased apoptotic cell death compared to cisplatin treatment alone. In normal human lymphocytes, BITC did not enhance the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin. Cellular exposure to BITC/cisplatin increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation but decreased the total glutathione (GSH) level in HL-60 cells. Pretreatment of HL-60 cells with N-acetylcysteine or glutathione monoethyl ester effectively decreased BITC/cisplatin-induced cell death. The addition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor PD98059 abolished BITC/cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our results suggest that BITC enhances cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity through the generation of ROS, depletion of GSH, and ERK signaling in HL-60 cells.

  2. WEE1 inhibition targets cell cycle checkpoints for triple negative breast cancers to overcome cisplatin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hongping; Shao, Fangyuan; Martin, Scots; Xu, Xiaoling; Deng, Chu-Xia

    2017-03-06

    Cisplatin is one of the most commonly used therapeutic drugs for cancer therapy, yet prolonged cisplatin treatment frequently results in drug resistance. To enhance therapeutic effect of cisplatin, we conducted a high throughput screening using a kinase library containing 704 kinases against triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. We demonstrated that cisplatin activates ATR, CHK1 and WEE1, which shut down DNA replication and attenuate cisplatin induced-lethality. WEE1 inhibition sensitizes TNBCs and cisplatin resistant cancer cells to cisplatin-induced lethality, because it not only impairs DNA replication checkpoint more profoundly than inhibition of ATR or CHK1, but also defects G2-M cell cycle checkpoint. Finally, we demonstrated that combined cisplatin treatment and WEE1 inhibition synergistically inhibits xenograft cancer growth accompanied by markedly reduced expression of TNBC signature genes. Thus targeting DNA replication and G2-M cell cycle checkpoint simultaneously by cisplatin and WEE1 inhibition is promising for TNBCs treatment, and for overcoming their cisplatin resistance.

  3. Enhanced antitumor efficacy of cisplatin in combination with HemoHIM in tumor-bearing mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sung-Ho

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although cisplatin is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents, cisplatin alone does not achieve a satisfactory therapeutic outcome. Also cisplatin accumulation shows toxicity to normal tissues. In this study, we examined the possibility of HemoHIM both to enhance anticancer effect with cisplatin and to reduce the side effects of cisplatin in melanoma-bearing mice. Methods HemoHIM was prepared by adding the ethanol-insoluble fraction to the total water extract of a mixture of 3 edible herbs, Angelica Radix, Cnidium Rhizoma and Paeonia Radix. Anticancer effects of HemoHIM with cisplatin were evaluated in melanoma-bearing mice. We used a Cr51-release assay to measure the activity of NK/Tc cell and ELISA to evaluate the production of cytokines. Results In melanoma-bearing mice, cisplatin (4 mg/kg B.W. reduced the size and weight of the solid tumors, and HemoHIM supplementation with cisplatin enhanced the decrease of both the tumor size (p in vitro, and did not disturb the effects of cisplatin in vitro. However HemoHIM administration enhanced both NK cell and Tc cell activity in mice. Interestingly, HemoHIM increased the proportion of NK cells in the spleen. In melanoma-bearing mice treated with cisplatin, HemoHIM administration also increased the activity of NK cells and Tc cells and the IL-2 and IFN-γ secretion from splenocytes, which seemed to contribute to the enhanced efficacy of cisplatin by HemoHIM. Also, HemoHIM reduced nephrotoxicity as seen by tubular cell of kidney destruction. Conclusion HemoHIM may be a beneficial supplement during cisplatin chemotherapy for enhancing the anti-tumor efficacy and reducing the toxicity of cisplatin.

  4. EGCG Enhances Cisplatin Sensitivity by Regulating Expression of the Copper and Cisplatin Influx Transporter CTR1 in Ovary Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemin Wang

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is one of the first-line platinum-based chemotherapeutic agents for treatment of many types of cancer, including ovary cancer. CTR1 (copper transporter 1, a transmembrane solute carrier transporter, has previously been shown to increase the cellular uptake and sensitivity of cisplatin. It is hypothesized that increased CTR1 expression would enhance the sensitivity of cancer cells to cisplatin (cDDP. The present study demonstrates for the first time that (--epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG, a major polyphenol from green tea, can enhance CTR1 mRNA and protein expression in ovarian cancer cells and xenograft mice. EGCG inhibits the rapid degradation of CTR1 induced by cDDP. The combination of EGCG and cDDP increases the accumulation of cDDP and DNA-Pt adducts, and subsequently enhances the sensitivity of ovarian cancer SKOV3 and OVCAR3 cells to the chemotherapeutic agent. In the OVCAR3 ovarian cancer xenograft nude mice model, the combination of the lower concentration of cDDP and EGCG strongly repressed the tumor growth and exhibited protective effect on the nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin. Overall, these findings uncover a novel chemotherapy mechanism of EGCG as an adjuvant for the treatment of ovarian cancer.

  5. Is glutathione the major cellular target of cisplatin? A study of the interactions of cisplatin with cancer cell extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasherman, Yonit; Sturup, Stefan; Gibson, Dan

    2009-07-23

    Cisplatin is an anticancer drug whose efficacy is limited because tumors develop resistance to the drug. Resistant cells often have elevated levels of cellular glutathione (GSH), believed to be the major cellular target of cisplatin that inactivates the drug by binding to it irreversibly, forming [Pt(SG)(2)] adducts. We show by [(1)H,(15)N] HSQC that the half-life of (15)N labeled cisplatin in whole cell extracts is approximately 75 min, but no Pt-GSH adducts were observed. When the low molecular mass fraction (cisplatin, binding to GSH was observed probably due to removal of high molecular mass platinophiles. Two-thirds of the Pt adducts formed in whole cell extracts, had a molecular mass >3 kDa. [Pt(SG)(2)] cannot account for more than 20% of the Pt adducts. The concentration of reduced thiols in the high molecular mass fraction of the extracts is six times higher than in the low molecular mass fraction.

  6. Ursolic acid sensitizes cisplatin-resistant HepG2/DDP cells to cisplatin via inhibiting Nrf2/ARE pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu S

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Shouhai Wu,1,2 Tianpeng Zhang,1 Jingsheng Du3 1School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, 2Center for Regenerative and Translational Medicine, 3Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou, Guangdong, People’s Republic of China Background: Combinations of adjuvant sensitizers with anticancer drugs is a promising new strategy to reverse chemoresistance. Ursolic acid (UA is one of the natural pentacyclic triterpene compounds known to have many pharmacological characteristics such as anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. This study investigates whether UA can sensitize hepatocellular carcinoma cells to cisplatin.Materials and methods: Cells were transfected with nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 small interfering RNA and Nrf2 complementary DNA by using Lipofectin 2000. The cytotoxicity of cells was investigated by Cell Counting Kit 8 assay. Cell apoptosis, cell cycle, reactive oxygen species, and mitochondrial membrane potential were detected by flow cytometry fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The protein level of Nrf2, NAD(PH quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1, glutathione S-transferase (GST, and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 was detected by Western blot analysis.Results: The results showed that the reverse index was 2.9- and 9.69-fold by UA of 1.125 µg/mL and 2.25 µg/mL, respectively, for cisplatin to HepG2/DDP cells. UA–cisplatin combination induced cell apoptosis and reactive oxygen species, blocked the cell cycle in G0/G1 phase, and reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential. Mechanistically, UA–cisplatin dramatically decreased the expression of Nrf2 and its downstream genes. The sensibilization of UA–cisplatin combination was diminished in Nrf2 small interfering RNA-transfected HepG2/DDP cells, as well as in Nrf2 complementary DNA-transfected HepG2/DDP cells.Conclusion: The results confirmed the sensibilization of UA on HepG2/DDP cells to

  7. Long-term survival results of a randomized trial comparing gemcitabine/cisplatin and methotrexate/vinblastine/doxorubicin/cisplatin in patients with locally advanced and metastatic bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, J. T.; Maase, Hans von der; Sengeløv, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compare long-term survival in patients with locally advanced       and metastatic transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urothelium treated       with gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) or       methotrexate/vinblastine/doxorubicin/cisplatin (MVAC). PATIENTS AND       METHODS: Efficacy...

  8. Long-term survival results of a randomized trial comparing gemcitabine plus cisplatin, with methotrexate, vinblastine, doxorubicin, plus cisplatin in patients with bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maase, Hans von der; Sengeløv, Lisa; Roberts, James T.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare long-term survival in patients with locally advanced       or metastatic transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urothelium treated       with gemcitabine/cisplatin (GC) or       methotrexate/vinblastine/doxorubicin/cisplatin (MVAC). PATIENTS AND       METHODS: Efficacy data ...

  9. Phase III study comparing cisplatin plus gemcitabine with cisplatin plus pemetrexed in chemotherapy-naive patients with advanced-stage non-small-cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scagliotti, G.V.; Parikh, P.; Pawel, J. von;

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Cisplatin plus gemcitabine is a standard regimen for first-line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Phase II studies of pemetrexed plus platinum compounds have also shown activity in this setting. Patients and Methods This noninferiority, phase III, randomized study...... compared the overall survival between treatment arms using a fixed margin method (hazard ratio [HR] cisplatin 75 mg/m(2) on day 1...... and gemcitabine 1,250 mg/m(2) on days 1 and 8 (n = 863) or cisplatin 75 mg/m(2) and pemetrexed 500 mg/m(2) on day 1 (n = 862) every 3 weeks for up to six cycles. Results Overall survival for cisplatin/pemetrexed was noninferior to cisplatin/ gemcitabine (median survival, 10.3 v 10.3 months, respectively; HR = 0...

  10. Overexpression of long non-coding RNA PVT1 in ovarian cancer cells promotes cisplatin resistance by regulating apoptotic pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Enling; Liu, Zheng; Zhou, Yuxiu; Mi, Ruoran; Wang, Dehua

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Cisplatin is a very effective cancer chemotherapy drug, but cisplatin resistance is a crucial problem of therapy failure. Overexpression of PVT1 has been demonstrated in ovarian cancer. The mRNA level of PVT1 in ovarian cancer tissues of cisplatin-resistant patients and cisplatin-sensitive patients, cisplatin-resistant cells SKOV-3/DDP and A2780/DDP, cisplatin-sensitive cells SKOV-3 and A2780 were determined by qRT-PCR. The influence o...

  11. Disparity in actions of rosiglitazone against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in female Sprague-Dawley rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Parveen; Prashanth, Krishna Shastrula; Gaikwad, Anil Bhanudas; Vij, Mohit; Barua, Chandana C; Bezbaruah, Babul

    2013-11-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most common chemotherapeutic drugs used against various solid, tumours. Despite of its therapeutic benefits, its use in clinical practice is often limited because of dose, related toxicity. The nephrotoxic potential of cisplatin has been ascribed to its accumulation in the, renal tubular cells generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of Bax, increased secretion of, TNFα and activation of certain inflammatory mediators like cytokines. The present investigation was, undertaken with an objective to study the effect of rosiglitazone against cisplatin induced, nephrotoxicity. Pretreatment of rosiglitazone prevents cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity which was, clearly evident from the renal biochemical parameters like reduced BUN, creatinine and TNFα levels, and increased albumin levels, which was also supported by histopathological studies of the kidneys. In contrast, posttreatment of rosiglitazone was not able to protect the renal damage in cisplatin induced, renal toxicity. These results showed the variation of pre & posttreatment effects of rosiglitazone, against the cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity.

  12. Relationship between cisplatin or nedaplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and renal accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Yoshiko; Taniuchi, Saburo; Okahara, Shigeki; Nakamura, Masuhisa; Gemba, Munekazu

    2005-08-01

    Nedaplatin is known to exhibit antitumor activity similar to that of cisplatin. However, concerning side effects, nedaplatin causes renal toxicity less frequently than cisplatin. In this study, we compared the incidence of renal toxicity between cisplatin and nedaplatin by investigating the difference in kidney tissue accumulation. Kidney tissue accumulation of cisplatin administered at 3.75 mg/kg was similar to that of nedaplatin administered at 24 mg/kg. At these doses, the plasma creatinine level and urinary excretion of glucose and N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) similarly increased. There was a correlation between kidney accumulation of cisplatin and nedaplatin and the increases in plasma creatinine level and urinary excretion of NAG. Therefore, our results suggest that nedaplatin less frequently causes renal toxicity in comparison to cisplatin due to lower kidney accumulation.

  13. Electrohydrodynamic encapsulation of cisplatin in poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles for controlled drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parhizkar, Maryam; Reardon, Philip J T; Knowles, Jonathan C; Browning, Richard J; Stride, Eleanor; Barbara, Pedley R; Harker, Anthony H; Edirisinghe, Mohan

    2016-10-01

    Targeted delivery of potent, toxic chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin, is a significant area of research in cancer treatment. In this study, cisplatin was successfully encapsulated with high efficiency (>70%) in poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) polymeric nanoparticles by using electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) where applied voltage and solution flow rate as well as the concentration of cisplatin and polymer were varied to control the size of the particles. Thus, nanoparticles were produced with three different drug:polymer ratios (2.5, 5 and 10wt% cisplatin). It was shown that smaller nanoparticles were produced with 10wt% cisplatin. Furthermore, these demonstrated the best sustained release (smallest burst release). By fitting the experimental data with various kinetic models it was concluded that the release is dependent upon the particle morphology and the drug concentration. Thus, these particles have significant potential for cisplatin delivery with controlled dosage and release period that are crucial chemotherapy parameters.

  14. Neuropeptide Y protects kidney against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by regulating p53-dependent apoptosis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Namoh; Min, Woo-Kie; Park, Min Hee; Lee, Jong Kil; Jin, Hee Kyung; Bae, Jae-Sung

    2016-05-01

    Cisplatin is a platinum-based chemotherapeutic drug for treating various types of cancers. However, the use of cisplatin is limited by its negative effect on normal tissues, particularly nephrotoxicity. Various mechanisms such as DNA adduct formation, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and apoptosis are involved in the adverse effect induced by cisplatin treatment. Several studies have suggested that neuropeptide Y (NPY) is involved in neuroprotection as well as restoration of bone marrow dysfunction from chemotherapy induced nerve injury. However, the role of NPY in chemotherapy- induced nephrotoxicity has not been studied. Here, we show that NPY rescues renal dysfunction by reducing the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins in cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity through Y1 receptor, suggesting that NPY can protect kidney against cisplatin nephrotoxicity as a possible useful agent to prevent and treat cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(5): 288-292].

  15. Preventive Effect of Dihydromyricetin against Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephrotoxicity is a frequent severe side effect of cisplatin chemotherapy, limiting its clinical use despite being one of the most potent chemotherapy drugs. Dihydromyricetin is a highly abundant compound purified from the leaves of Ampelopsis grossedentata. Previous studies have demonstrated the anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects of Dihydromyricetin both in vitro and in vivo, but little is known about the effects of Dihydromyricetin on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and its underlying mechanisms. In the present study, we investigated its potential renoprotective effect and found that Dihydromyricetin ameliorated the renal functional impairment and structural damage caused by cisplatin. Moreover, Dihydromyricetin markedly attenuated cisplatin-induced oxidative stress, as well as protecting against cisplatin-induced inflammation and apoptotic cell death in mouse kidney tissues. These results collectively highlight the potential of DMY as a rational renoprotective agent against cisplatin.

  16. Neuropeptide Y protects kidney against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by regulating p53-dependent apoptosis pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Namoh; Min, Woo-Kie; Park, Min Hee; Lee, Jong Kil; Jin, Hee Kyung; Bae, Jae-sung

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin is a platinum-based chemotherapeutic drug for treating various types of cancers. However, the use of cisplatin is limited by its negative effect on normal tissues, particularly nephrotoxicity. Various mechanisms such as DNA adduct formation, mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and apoptosis are involved in the adverse effect induced by cisplatin treatment. Several studies have suggested that neuropeptide Y (NPY) is involved in neuroprotection as well as restoration of bone marrow dysfunction from chemotherapy induced nerve injury. However, the role of NPY in chemotherapy-induced nephrotoxicity has not been studied. Here, we show that NPY rescues renal dysfunction by reducing the expression of pro-apoptotic proteins in cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity through Y1 receptor, suggesting that NPY can protect kidney against cisplatin nephrotoxicity as a possible useful agent to prevent and treat cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(5): 288-292] PMID:26728272

  17. Carnosic acid attenuates renal injury in an experimental model of rat cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Bidya Dhar; Rentam, Kiran Kumar Reddy; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Kuncha, Madhusudana; Vegi, Ganga Modi Naidu; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2011-12-01

    Nephrotoxicity is one of the serious dose limiting side effects of cisplatin when used in the treatment of various malignant conditions. Accumulating evidence suggests that oxidative stress caused by free radicals and apoptosis of renal cells contributes to the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Present study was aimed to explore the effect of carnosic acid, a potent antioxidant, against cisplatin induced oxidative stress and nephrotoxicity in rats. A single dose of cisplatin (7.5mg/kg) caused marked renal damage, characterized by a significant (PGSH (reduced glutathione) levels and lowered tissue nitrite, SOD (superoxide dismutase), CAT (catalase), GSH-Px (glutathione peroxidase), GR (glutathione reductase) and GST (glutathione S-transferase) levels compared to normal control. Carnosic acid treatment significantly (PGSH-Px, GR and GST compared to cisplatin control. The present study demonstrates that carnosic acid has a protective effect on cisplatin induced experimental nephrotoxicity and is attributed to its potent antioxidant and antiapoptotic properties.

  18. THE EFFECTS OF HSP27 ON THE CYTOTOXICITY OF RAT EMBRYO FIBROBLAST INDUCED BY CISPLATIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To investigate the protective effects of heat shock protein 2700(Hsp27)on cis- platin inducing cytotoxicity in a temperature mutant SV40 large T antigen transformed rat embryo fibroblast (P1-Hsp27). Methods The cytotoxical effects of cisplatin on the proliferation status of P1-Hsp27 cells in the presence or absence of Hsp27 were measured by MTT assay. Results Cisplatin possessed dose-dependent cyto- toxicity on P1-Hsp27 cells. 48h after treatment, about 50% cells were dead in those cells exposed to 200μmol cisplatin. However, no obvious protective effects of Hsp27 on cisplatin induced cytotoxicity could be observed (P>0.05),except in those cells exposed to 500μmol cisplatin 12h after treatment. Conclusion Hsp27 has no obvious protective effects on cisplatin inducing cytotoxicity.

  19. Thalidomide ameliorates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by inhibiting renal inflammation in an experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirshahrokhi, Keyvan; Khalili, Ali-Reza

    2015-04-01

    Cisplatin is a platinum-based chemotherapy drug. However, its chemotherapeutic use is restricted by serious side effects, especially nephrotoxicity. Inflammatory mechanisms have a significant role in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Thalidomide is an immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory agent and is used for the treatment of various inflammatory diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential nephroprotective effect of thalidomide in a mouse model of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Nephrotoxicity was induced in mice by a single injection of cisplatin (15 mg/kg, i.p.) and treated with thalidomide (50 and 100 mg/kg/day, orally) for 4 days, beginning 24 h prior to the cisplatin injection. Renal toxicity induced by cisplatin was demonstrated by increasing plasma levels of creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN). Cisplatin increased the renal production of the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. In addition, kidney levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), and nitric oxide (NO) were increased by cisplatin. Biochemical results showed that thalidomide reduced cisplatin-induced increase in plasma creatinine and BUN. Thalidomide treatment also significantly reduced tissue levels of the proinflammatory cytokines, MDA, MPO, and NO and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Furthermore, histological examination indicated that thalidomide ameliorated renal damage caused by cisplatin. These data suggest that thalidomide attenuates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity possibly by inhibition of inflammatory reactions. Taken together, our findings indicate that thalidomide might be a valuable candidate for the prevention of nephrotoxicity in patients receiving cisplatin.

  20. Identifizierung von chemischen Modulatoren der Cisplatin-induzierten Apoptose in Lungenkrebszellen

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Ziel dieser Doktorarbeit war ein tieferes Verständnis der Cisplatin-induzierten Apoptose. Hierfür wurde der Ablauf Cisplatin-induzierter Apoptose in A549 Zellen charakterisiert. Es konnten u.a. durch den Einsatz des Mikroskopie-basierten Chemikalienscreens neben schon bekannten Signalwegen / Schlüsselproteinen der Apoptose neue Regulatoren identifiziert werden. Speziell die verstärkende oder hemmende Wirkung vieler Medikamente auf die Cisplatin-induzierte Apoptose bedarf weiterer Forschung.

  1. Electrohydrodynamic encapsulation of cisplatin in poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles for controlled drug delivery.

    OpenAIRE

    Parhizkar, M.; Reardon, PJT; Knowles, JC; Browning, RJ; Stride, E.; Pedley, RB; Harker, AH; Edirisinghe, M.

    2016-01-01

    Targeted delivery of potent, toxic chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin, is a significant area of research in cancer treatment. In this study, cisplatin was successfully encapsulated with high efficiency (>70%) in Poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) polymeric nanoparticles by using electrohydrodynamic atomization (EHDA) where applied voltage and solution flow rate as well as the concentration of cisplatin and polymer were varied to control the size of the p...

  2. Intraperitoneal clearance as a potential biomarker of cisplatin after intraperitoneal perioperative chemotherapy: a population pharmacokinetic study

    OpenAIRE

    Royer, B.; Kalbacher, E; Onteniente, S; Jullien, V; Montange, D; Piedoux, S; Thiery-Vuillemin, A; Delroeux, D; Pili-Floury, S.; Guardiola, E; Combe, M.; Muret, P.; Nerich, V; Heyd, B; Chauffert, B

    2011-01-01

    Background: Intraperitoneal (IP) perioperative chemotherapy with cisplatin is an interesting option in ovarian cancer treatment. A combination of cisplatin with IP epinephrine (already shown to improve IP and decrease systemic platinum (Pt) exposure) was evaluated using a population pharmacokinetic analysis. Methods: Data from 55 patients treated with cisplatin-based IP perioperative chemotherapy with (n=26) or without (n=29) epinephrine were analysed using NONMEM. Results: Epinephrine halves...

  3. New potential for enhancing concomitant chemoradiotherapy with FDA approved concentrations of cisplatin via the photoelectric effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altundal, Yucel; Cifter, Gizem; Detappe, Alexandre; Sajo, Erno; Tsiamas, Panagiotis; Zygmanski, Piotr; Berbeco, Ross; Cormack, Robert A; Makrigiorgos, Mike; Ngwa, Wilfred

    2015-02-01

    We predict, for the first time, that by using United States Food and Drug Administration approved concentrations of cisplatin, major radiosensitization may be achieved via photoelectric mechanism during concomitant chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Our analytical calculations estimate that radiotherapy (RT) dose to cancer cells may be enhanced via this mechanism by over 100% during CCRT. The results proffer new potential for significantly enhancing CCRT via an emerging clinical scenario, where the cisplatin is released in-situ from RT biomaterials loaded with cisplatin nanoparticles.

  4. MutS homologue hMSH5: role in cisplatin-induced DNA damage response

    OpenAIRE

    Tompkins Joshua D; Wu Xiling; Her Chengtao

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II), CDDP) and its analogues constitute an important class of anticancer drugs in the treatment of various malignancies; however, its effectiveness is frequently affected by mutations in genes involved in the repair and signaling of cisplatin-induced DNA damage. These observations necessitate a need for a better understanding of the molecular events governing cellular sensitivity to cisplatin. Results Here, we show that hMSH5 mediat...

  5. Gap Junction Enhancer Potentiates Cytotoxicity of Cisplatin in Breast Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Ying; Nguyen, Thu Annelise

    2012-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most widely used anti-cancer drugs due to its ability to damage DNA and induce apoptosis. However, increasing reports of side effects and drug resistance indicate the limitation of cisplatin in cancer therapeutics. Recent studies showed that inhibition of gap junctions diminishes the cytotoxic effect and contributes to drug resistance. Therefore, identification of molecules that counteract gap junctional inhibition without decreasing the anti-cancer effect of cisplatin...

  6. The mechanism of mesna in protection from cisplatin-induced ovarian damage in female rats

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaohuan; Yang, Shu; Lv,Xiangyang; Sun, Haimei; Weng, Jing; Liang, Yuanjing; Zhou, Deshan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Cisplatin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent in the treatment of cancers in clinic; but it often induces adverse effects on ovarian functions such as reduced fertility and premature menopause. Mesna could attenuate the cisplatin-induced ovarian damages; however, the underlying mechanism is still unknown. This study aimed to figure out the underlying mechanism of the protection of mesna for ovaries against cisplatin therapy in cancers. Methods We performed female adult Sprague-D...

  7. Caloric Restriction Is More Efficient than Physical Exercise to Protect from Cisplatin Nephrotoxicity via PPAR-Alpha Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela, Gabriel R.; Wasinski, Frederick; Batista, Rogério O.; Hiyane, Meire I.; Felizardo, Raphael J. F.; Cunha, Flavia; de Almeida, Danilo C.; Malheiros, Denise M. A. C.; Câmara, Niels O. S.; Barros, Carlos C.; Bader, Michael; Araujo, Ronaldo C.

    2017-01-01

    The antineoplastic drug cisplatin promotes renal injury, which limits its use. Protocols that reduce renal cisplatin toxicity will allow higher doses to be used in cisplatin treatment. Here, we compare physical exercise and caloric restriction (CR) as protocols to reduce cisplatin renal injury in mice. Male C57BL/6 were divided into four groups: Control, cisplatin, exercise + cisplatin, and 30% CR + cisplatin. Animals were injected with a single dose of cisplatin (20 mg/kg i.p.) and sacrificed 96 h after injection. Quantitative real time PCR, histological analyses, immunohistochemistry, and biochemical measurements were performed to investigate renal injury, necrosis, apoptosis, and inflammatory mechanisms. Both protocols protected against cisplatin renal injury, but CR was more effective in reducing uraemia and renal necrosis. The CR + Cisplatin group exhibited reduced serum IL-1β and TNF-α levels. No differences were noted in the renal mRNA expression of cytokines. Both interventions reduced apoptosis, but only the CR + Cisplatin group decreased TNFR2 protein expression. PPAR-α was activated in mice after CR. An antagonist of PPAR-α blocked the protective effect of CR. Both interventions attenuated the nephrotoxicity caused by cisplatin injection, but CR + Cisplatin showed a better response by modulating TNFR2. Moreover, part of the CR benefit depends on PPAR-α activation. PMID:28303105

  8. Knockdown of NAPA using short-hairpin RNA sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin: implications to overcome chemoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zchong-Zcho; Chao, Chuck C-K

    2010-09-15

    Cisplatin is a widely used anti-cancer drug which targets DNA in replicating cells. In the present study, we found that NAPA--a protein found in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and implicated in protein trafficking--protects cells against cisplatin. Accordingly, knockdown of NAPA using lentivirus-encoded shRNA (shNAPA) induced ER stress similar to cisplatin treatment in HEK293 cells. A low dose of cisplatin also elicited a mild ER stress response associated with the accumulation of the protective proteins BiP and NAPA. Remarkably, knockdown of NAPA induced apoptosis and enhanced cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity/apoptosis, thereby sensitizing cancer cells to cisplatin. On the other hand, overexpression of NAPA increased resistance to cisplatin by reducing cisplatin-induced ER stress and apoptosis. The modulatory effects of shNAPA required the tumor suppressor p53 since the effects of NAPA knockdown were reduced by the p53 inhibitor PFT-alpha and in H1299 cells which are p53-null. A partial reversal of cisplatin resistance was also observed in cisplatin-resistant HeLa cells following knockdown of NAPA. Our results also indicated that calpain is required for ER-mediated apoptosis. Importantly, combined cisplatin/shNAPA treatment suppressed tumor growth in vivo in xenograph experiments performed in nude mice. Taken together, these observations suggest that NAPA represents a target of cisplatin, and that knockdown of NAPA may improve cisplatin-based cancer therapy.

  9. Antiemetic role of thalidomide in a rat model of cisplatin-induced emesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zheng-xiang; Xu, Jie; Wang, Hong-mei; Ma, Jan; Sun, Xuan; Du, Xiu-ping

    2014-09-01

    The efficacy of thalidomide to attenuate cisplatin-induced emesis was evaluated in a rat model. Four groups were utilized: control group (peritoneal injection and gastric lavage with normal saline), cisplatin group (peritoneal injection of cisplatin at 10 mg/kg and gastric lavage with normal saline), thalidomide group (cisplatin as above and gastric lavage with thalidomide at 10 mg/kg), and granisetron group (positive control for antiemetic effects; cisplatin given as above and gastric lavage done with granisetron at 0.5 mg/kg). The cisplatin-induced kaolin consumption (pica behavior) was used as a model of emesis in patients. The animals' kaolin and food intakes were measured. Further, medulla and gastric tissues were obtained 5 and 33 h after peritoneal injections to quantify the levels of Substance P and Neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R). The cisplatin-induced kaolin consumption was significantly (p thalidomide 72 h after the injection. The levels of Substance P in the medulla and gastric tissue were increased 5 h after the injection in both cisplatin and thalidomide groups, however, returned faster to normal levels in the thalidomide group (p thalidomide, and granisetron group were significantly increased at both 5 and 33 h (p thalidomide attenuates animal equivalent of cisplatin-induced emesis, and this beneficial effect is associated with decreased levels of Substance P levels in the medulla and gastric tissue.

  10. Autophagic flux promotes cisplatin resistance in human ovarian carcinoma cells through ATP-mediated lysosomal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liwei; Xu, Ye; Su, Jing; Yu, Huimei; Kang, Jinsong; Li, Hongyan; Li, Xiaoning; Xie, Qi; Yu, Chunyan; Sun, Liankun; Li, Yang

    2015-11-01

    Lysosomes are involved in promoting resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. However, the mechanisms underlying lysosomal influence of cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer remain incompletely understood. We report that, compared with cisplatin-sensitive SKOV3 cells, autophagy increases in cisplatin-resistant SKOV3/DDP cells treated with cisplatin. Inhibition of early-stage autophagy enhanced cisplatin-mediated cytotoxicity in SKOV3/DDP cells, but autophagy inhibition at a later stage by disturbing autophagosome-lysosome fusion is more effective. Notably, SKOV3/DDP cells contained more lysosomes than cisplatin-sensitive SKOV3 cells. Abundant lysosomes and lysosomal cathepsin D activity were required for continued autolysosomal degradation and maintenance of autophagic flux in SKOV3/DDP cells. Furthermore, SKOV3/DDP cells contain abundant lysosomal ATP required for lysosomal function, and inhibition of lysosomal ATP accumulation impaired lysosomal function and blocked autophagic flux. Therefore, our findings suggest that lysosomes at least partially contribute to cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells through their role in cisplatin-induced autophagic processes, and provide insight into the mechanism of cisplatin resistance in tumors.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide: A novel nephroprotectant against cisplatin-induced renal toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugbartey, George J; Bouma, Hjalmar R; Lobb, Ian; Sener, Alp

    2016-07-01

    Cisplatin is a potent chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various solid-organ cancers. However, a plethora of evidence indicates that nephrotoxicity is a major side effect of cisplatin therapy. While the antineoplastic action of cisplatin is due to formation of cisplatin-DNA cross-links, which damage rapidly dividing cancer cells upon binding to DNA, its nephrotoxic effect results from metabolic conversion of cisplatin into a nephrotoxin and production of reactive oxygen species, causing oxidative stress leading to renal tissue injury and potentially, kidney failure. Despite therapeutic targets in several pre-clinical and clinical studies, there is still incomplete protection against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the third discovered gasotransmitter next to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, has recently been identified in several in vitro and in vivo studies to possess specific antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties that modulate several pathogenic pathways involved in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. The current article reviews the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and displays recent findings in the H2S field that could disrupt such mechanisms to ameliorate cisplatin-induced renal injury.

  12. Effect of metformin against cisplatin induced acute renal injury in rats: a biochemical and histoarchitectural evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Bidya Dhar; Kuncha, Madhusudana; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Sistla, Ramakrishna

    2013-09-01

    Although cisplatin has been a mainstay for cancer therapy, its use is limited mainly because of nephrotoxicity. Accumulating literature suggest the antioxidant and cytoprotective effect of metformin, a first line antidiabetic drug. With this background, we investigated the effect of metformin on the cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity in rats. A single injection of cisplatin (7.5 mg/kg, i.p.) caused marked renal damage, characterized by a significant increase in blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Cr) and abnormal histo-architecture of kidney. These were accompanied by significant elevation of malondialdehyde (MDA), total reactive oxygen species (tROS) and caspase-3 levels and decreased antioxidant levels. Metformin treatment significantly attenuated the increase in malondialdehyde and tROS generation and restores the decrease in both enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants. However metformin treatment did not prevent the cisplatin induced renal injury as there was no significant difference of renal function parameters (BUN and Cr), kidney histopathology as well as caspase-3 activity between cisplatin per se and metformin plus cisplatin treated rats. Histopathology studies revealed that similar glomerular and tubular pathological architecture in both cisplatin per se and cisplatin plus metformin group. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that metformin is not an adjuvant drug to treat nephrotoxicity associated with cisplatin therapy.

  13. The renoprotective activity of hesperetin in cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity in rats: Molecular and biochemical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mukesh; Dahiya, Vicky; Kasala, Eshvendar Reddy; Bodduluru, Lakshmi Narendra; Lahkar, Mangala

    2017-03-14

    Nephrotoxicity remain a major life-threatening complication in cancer patients on cisplatin chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the protective effect and possible cellular mechanism of the hesperetin, a naturally-occurring bioflavonoid against cisplatin-induced renal injury in rats. Hesperetin was administered at a dose of 50mg/kg and 100mg/kg orally for 10days and cisplatin (7.5mg/kg, ip) was administered on the 5th day of experiment. Cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity was evidenced by alteration in the level of markers such as blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, serum albumin and severe histopathological changes in kidney. Cisplatin administration also resulted in significant increase in the tissue oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines. The level of antioxidants enzymes were decreased significantly in the cisplatin administered rats. Hesperetin treatment (50mg/kg and 100mg/kg) normalized the renal function by attenuation of the cisplatin-induced oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, and inflammatory cytokines and histopathological alterations. On the basis of these experimental findings our present study postulate that co-administration of hesperetin with cisplatin chemotherapy may be promising preventive approach to limit the major mortal side effect of cisplatin.

  14. The Mechanism of Cisplatin-induced Apoptosis in HeLa Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youqing Liu; Hui Xing; Xiaobing Han; Xiaoyan Shi; Fengqi Liang; Gang Chen; Ding Ma

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the mechanism of apoptosis induced by cisplatin in vitro in HeLa cells cervical cancer cell line.METHODS The inhibitory effect of cisplatin on HeLa cell growth was analyzed by the MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was measured with flow cytometry and Hoechst 33258 staining following cisplatin treatment. The effect of cisplatin on transcription of HPV E6 was analyzed by RT-PCR and protein expression of E6, P53, p21, Bax and Bcl-2 was studied by Western blots.RESULTS Cisplatin inhibited cellular proliferation in a time and dosedependant manner. The sub-G1 peak by flow cytometry showed a higher apoptotic rate in the experimental group compared to the controls and Hoechst 33258 staining indicated that apoptosis was induced by cisplatin. Results of RT-PCR demonstrated that cisplatin decreased transcription of E6. Western Blots showed that cisplatin decreased protein expression of E6 and increased protein expression of P53, p21 and Bax but had no effect on protein expression of Bcl-2.CONCLUSION Cisplatin induces apoptosis and death of HeLa cells through the suppression of HPV E6 and restoration of p53 function.

  15. The antioxidant and antigenotoxic effects of pycnogenol(®) on rats treated with cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Birsen; Unsal, Meftun; Sekeroglu, Zulal A; Gülbahar, Yavuz

    2011-09-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are implicated in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced toxicity. Pycnogenol® is known for its strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, the possible protective effects of pycnogenol on kidney, bone marrow, and red blood cells in rats treated with cisplatin were investigated. The rats were divided into four groups. Group 1 was the control and groups 2, 3, and 4 were orally treated with pycnogenol (200 mg/kg bw, o.p) for 5 days, treated with cisplatin (7 mg/kg bw, i.p.) on the fifth day and treated with cisplatin plus pycnogenol, respectively. Antioxidative parameters in kidney and red blood cells were measured. Chromosome anomalies in bone marrow and renal histopathology were also investigated. Activities of pro-oxidant enzymes (myeloperoxidase and xanthine oxidase), malondialdehyde, and nitric oxide levels significantly increased but antioxidant enzymes activities decreased in the kidneys and red blood cells after cisplatin treatment. Pycnogenol treatment prior to the administration of cisplatin significantly decreased cisplatin-induced injury, as evidenced by its normalizing these parameters. Chromosomal aberrations decreased and mitotic index frequencies increased in bone marrow treated with cisplatin plus pycnogenol. These findings suggest that pycnogenol may be a useful protective agent against the toxicity associated with cisplatin therapy.

  16. Effect of Camel's Milk on Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Swiss Albino Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M.E. Afifi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Nephrotoxicity is a major complication and a dose limiting factor for cisplatin therapy. Cisplatin mediated nephrotoxicity is remarkably documented by reactive oxygen species. Camel's milk has good nutritive value, antigenotoxic and anticytotoxic effects. The aim of the present study was to assess the protective effect of camel's milk against Cisplatin-induced renal oxidative stress in mice. Approach: Forty mal Swiss albino mice were randomly divided into four groups (n = 10. Group I, control group. Group II was received cisplatin (12 mg kg-1 for 5 alternate days. Group III was received camel's milk (33 mL kg-1 for consecutive 30 days. Group IV was received camel's milk (33 mL kg-1 for consecutive 30 days before administration of Cisplatin. Results: Cisplatin-induced oxidative stress was indicated by increased level of tissue Malondialdehyde (MDA, serum creatinine and urea, decreased the concentration of reduced Glutathione (GSH, Vitamin C (Vit. C and Vitamin E (Vit. E and decreased both activities and gene expression of Superoxid Dismutase (SOD, Catalase (CAT, Glutathione Raductase (GR and Glutathione Peroxidase (GPx. Camel's milk reduced these biochemical changes and counteracted the deleterious effects of cisplatin Conclusion: The present study demonstrated the renoprotective potential of camel's milk against cisplatin-induced oxidative stress and renal dysfunction in mice. Hence, camel's milk has a potential to be used as therapeutic adjuvant in cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

  17. Excitatory Hindbrain-Forebrain Communication Is Required for Cisplatin-Induced Anorexia and Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhadeff, Amber L; Holland, Ruby A; Zheng, Huiyuan; Rinaman, Linda; Grill, Harvey J; De Jonghe, Bart C

    2017-01-11

    Cisplatin chemotherapy is commonly used to treat cancer despite severe energy balance side effects. In rats, cisplatin activates nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) projections to the lateral parabrachial nucleus (lPBN) and calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) projections from the lPBN to the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA). We demonstrated previously that CeA glutamate receptor signaling mediates cisplatin-induced anorexia and body weight loss. Here, we used neuroanatomical tracing, immunofluorescence, and confocal imaging to demonstrate that virtually all NTS→lPBN and lPBN→CeA CGRP projections coexpress vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2), providing evidence that excitatory projections mediate cisplatin-induced energy balance dysregulation. To test whether lPBN→CeA projection neurons are required for cisplatin-induced anorexia and weight loss, we inhibited these neurons chemogenetically using a retrograde Cre-recombinase-expressing canine adenovirus-2 in combination with Cre-dependent inhibitory Designer Receptors Exclusive Activated by Designer Drugs (DREADDs) before cisplatin treatment. Inhibition of lPBN→CeA neurons attenuated cisplatin-induced anorexia and body weight loss significantly. Using a similar approach, we additionally demonstrated that inhibition of NTS→lPBN neurons attenuated cisplatin-induced anorexia and body weight loss significantly. Together, our data support the view that excitatory hindbrain-forebrain projections are necessary for cisplatin's untoward effects on energy intake, elucidating a key neuroanatomical circuit driving pathological anorexia and weight loss that accompanies chemotherapy treatment.

  18. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of cisplatin treatment combined with anaesthetics on EAT cells in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozovic, Gordana; Orsolic, Nada; Knezevic, Fabijan; Horvat Knezevic, Anica; Benkovic, Vesna; Sakic, Katarina; Hrgovic, Zlatko; Bendelja, Kreso; Fassbender, Walter J

    2009-06-01

    In this study, DNA damage in tumour cells, as well as irreversible cell damage leading to apoptosis induced in vivo by the combined application of cisplatin and inhalation anaesthetics, was investigated. The genotoxicity of anaesthetics on Ehrlich ascites tumour (EAT) cells of mice, alone or in combined application with cisplatin, was estimated by using the alkaline comet assay. The percentage of EAT cell apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry. Groups of EAT-bearing mice were (i) treated intraperitoneally with cisplatin, (ii) exposed to repeated anaesthesia with inhalation anaesthetic, and (iii) subjected to combined treatment of exposure to anaesthetics after cisplatin for 3 days. Sevoflurane, halothane and isoflurane caused strong genotoxic effects on tumour cells in vivo. The tested anaesthetics alone showed no direct effect on programmed cell death although sevoflurane and especially halothane decreased the number of living EAT cells in peritoneal cavity lavage. Repeated anaesthesia with isoflurane had stimulatory effects on EAT cell proliferation and inhibited tumour cell apoptosis (6.11%), compared to the control group (10.26%). Cisplatin caused massive apoptosis of EAT cells (41.14%) and decreased the number of living EAT cells in the peritoneal cavity. Combined cisplatin and isoflurane treatment additionally increased EAT cell apoptosis to 51.32%. Combined treatment of mice with cisplatin and all anaesthetics increased the number of living tumour cells in the peritoneal cavity compared to cisplatin treatment of mice alone. These results suggest that the inhalation of anaesthetics may protect tumour cells from the cisplatin-induced genotoxic and cytotoxic effects.

  19. Distribution of platinum in patients treated with cisplatin determined by radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, K.; Rietz, B.; Krarup-Hansen, A.

    1998-01-01

    Cisplatin is used in a successful treatment of testicular cancer and some related conditions, but several toxic effects have been observed. Knowledge about the distribution of platinum in the human body after treatment with massive doses of cisplatin might provide clues to the origin of side...... tissue from 2 male and 2 female patients, treated with different doses of cisplatin. Platinum and gold was determined in all samples. Results for platinum were found to depend not only on the total amount of cisplatin ingested, but also on the time between the last dose and death. Highest concentrations...

  20. Melatonin suppresses cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity via activation of Nrf-2/HO-1 pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilic Ulkan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cisplatin, one of the most effective and potent anticancer drugs, is used in the treatment of a wide variety of both pediatric and adult malignancies. However, the chemotherapeutic use of cisplatin is limited by its serious side-effects such as nephrotoxicity and ototoxicity. Cisplatin chemotherapy induces a reduction in the antioxidant status, leading to a failure of the antioxidant defense against free-radical damage generated by antitumor drugs. Cisplatin-induced oxidative stress in the kidney was partially prevented by antioxidant treatments using superoxide dismutase, glutathione, selenium and flavonoids. Melatonin and its metabolites possess free-radical scavenging activity and it has been shown that they protect against cisplatin toxicity. However, the mechanism of the protective effects of melatonin against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity is still essentially unknown. We therefore designed this study to investigate the underlying mechanism of the protective effect of melatonin against cisplatin-induced renal damage in a rat nephrotoxicity model in vivo. Methods Twenty eight 8-week-old male Wistar rats were divided into four groups of control, melatonin treatment (4 mg/kg b.w i.p. for 10 days, cisplatin treatment (7 mg/kg b.w., i.p. and melatonin and cisplatin combination treatment. Serum urea nitrogen (urea-N and creatinine levels were measured. Histopathological changes were evaluated. In addition, we analyzed the expression levels of HO-1, Nrf2, NF-κB and AP-1 in Western blot analysis. Results Both serum creatinine and urea nitrogen increased significantly following cisplatin administration alone; these values decreased significantly with melatonin co-treatment of cisplatin-treated rats. Histological analysis showed that cisplatin caused damage in the proximal tubular cells in the kidneys of cisplatin-treated rats; these changes were reversed by melatonin co-treatment. Upon Western blot analysis, melatonin

  1. Origanum majorana Attenuates Nephrotoxicity of Cisplatin Anticancer Drug through Ameliorating Oxidative Stress

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    Amel M. Soliman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that cisplatin is an important anticancer drug, its clinical utilization is limited by nephrotoxicity during long term medication. Combined cisplatin chemotherapy with plant extracts can diminish toxicity and enhance the antitumor efficacy of the drug. This study evaluated the effect of Originum majorana ethanolic extract (OMEE on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Eighteen male rats were divided into three groups as follows: a control group, a group treated with cisplatin (3 mg/kg body weight, and a group that received both cisplatin and OMEE (500 mg/kg body weight for 14 days. Cisplatin induced a significant increase in creatinine, urea, uric acid, blood urea nitrogen, malondialdehyde, and nitric oxide levels. However, glutathione, superoxide dismutase, and catalase levels were significantly diminished. Conversely, OMEE significantly modulated the renal and oxidative markers negatively impacted by cisplatin. OMEE significantly reduced the effects of cisplatin-induced changes in renal and oxidative markers, possibly through its free radical scavenging activity. Thus, OMEE may be combined with cisplatin to alleviate nephrotoxicity in cancer chemotherapy.

  2. Gap Junction Enhancer Potentiates Cytotoxicity of Cisplatin in Breast Cancer Cells.

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    Ding, Ying; Nguyen, Thu Annelise

    2012-11-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most widely used anti-cancer drugs due to its ability to damage DNA and induce apoptosis. However, increasing reports of side effects and drug resistance indicate the limitation of cisplatin in cancer therapeutics. Recent studies showed that inhibition of gap junctions diminishes the cytotoxic effect and contributes to drug resistance. Therefore, identification of molecules that counteract gap junctional inhibition without decreasing the anti-cancer effect of cisplatin could be used in combinational treatment, potentiating cisplatin efficacy and preventing resistance. This study investigates the effects of combinational treatment of cisplatin and PQ1, a gap junction enhancer, in T47D breast cancer cells. Our results showed that combinational treatment of PQ1 and cisplatin increased gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) as well as expressions of connexins (Cx26, Cx32 and Cx43), and subsequently decreased cell viability. Ki67, a proliferation marker, was decreased by 75% with combinational treatment. Expressions of pro-apoptotic factors (cleaved caspase-3/-8/-9 and bax) were increased by the combinational treatment with PQ1 and cisplatin; whereas, the pro-survival factor, bcl-2, was decreased by the combinational treatment. Our study demonstrates for the first time that the combinational treatment with gap junction enhancers can counteract cisplatin induced inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication and reduction of connexin expression, thereby increasing the efficacy of cisplatin in cancer cells.

  3. ROLE OF MISMATCH REPAIR PROTEINS IN THE PROCESSING OF CISPLATIN INTERSTRAND CROSS-LINKS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Akshada; Kothandapani, Anbarasi; Zhitkovich, Anatoly; Sobol, Robert W.; Patrick, Steve M.

    2015-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) deficiency gives rise to cisplatin resistance and can lead to poor prognosis in cancers. Various models have been proposed to explain this low level of resistance caused due to loss of MMR proteins. We have shown that MMR proteins are required to maintain cisplatin interstrand cross-links (ICLs) on the DNA leading to increased cellular sensitivity. In our previous studies, we have shown that BER processing of the cisplatin ICLs is mutagenic. Polymerase β (Polβ) can generate mismatches which leads to the activation and the recruitment of mismatch repair proteins. In this paper, we distinguished between the requirement of different downstream MMR proteins for maintaining cisplatin sensitivity. We show that the MutSα (MSH2-MSH6) heterocomplex is required to maintain cisplatin sensitivity, whereas the Mutsβ complex has no effect. These results can be correlated with the increased repair of cisplatin ICLs and ICL induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in the resistant cells. Moreover, we show that MLH1 proficient cells displayed a cisplatin sensitive phenotype when compared with the MLH1 deficient cells and the ATPase activity of MLH1 is essential to mediate this effect. Based on these results, we propose that MutSα as well as the downstream MMR pathway proteins are essential to maintain a cisplatin sensitive phenotype as a consequence of processing Polβ induced mismatches at sites flanking cisplatin ICLs. PMID:26519826

  4. Structural and biochemical changes in mitochondria after cisplatin treatment of Dalton's lymphoma-bearing mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Surya Bali; Rosangkima, Gabriel; Kharbangar, Arpaia

    2010-01-01

    Cisplatin treatment of tumor-bearing mice and analysis of ultrastructural features of mitochondria in the kidney and Dalton's lymphoma cells showed the appearance of more roundish mitochondria with thickened membranes. It also caused the reduction in the number and irregularity in the shape of cristae and formation of vacuoles in the mitochondria. After cisplatin treatment, decreased level of protein, succinate dehydrogenase activity, and increased level of lipid peroxidation were noted in Dalton's lymphoma tumor cells and kidney. Cisplatin-mediated decrease in SDH activity, GSH level and an increase in LPO in the mitochondria of kidney could play an important role to produce nephrotoxicity. However, in DL cells, decrease in cellular GSH could be noteworthy than mt-GSH, along with decrease in SDH activity and increase in LPO in the cisplatin-mediated anticancer activity. These changes could play an important role to produce both the cisplatin-mediated effects i.e. anticancer activity and nephrotoxicity. Cisplatin-induced biochemical and ultrastructural changes in mitochondria after cisplatin treatment should be an important factor in the development of biochemical injury in mitochondria and affecting the overall metabolism in the cells. The findings from the present studies indicate multilevel effect of cisplatin in the cells and do support the earlier view that mitochondria could be a critical target in cisplatin-mediated anticancer activity and toxicity in the hosts.

  5. Increased procoagulant activity of red blood cells in the presence of cisplatin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Cheng-fang; YU Hong-juan; HOU Jin-xiao; ZHOU Jin

    2008-01-01

    Background Cisplatin based chemotherapy is a well recognized risk factor for coagulation disordrs and thrombosis.The pathophysiological mechanisms by which cisplatin promote thrombosis are not well understood.Methods Red blood cells (RBCs) were separated from peripheral blood of patients with breast cancer (n=10) and healthy adults (n=6) and treated with cisplatin. Coagulation time of RBCs was assessed by one step recalcification time and the productions of thrombin, intrinsic and extrinsic factor Xa were measured in the presence or absence of various concentrations of lactadherin. Exposed phosphatidylserine was stained with lactadherin and observed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry.Results Neither fresh RBCs nor RBCs treated without cisplatin had potent procoagulant activity. Cisplatin treatment increased procoagulant activity of RBCs in a cell number- and concentration-dependent manner. Exposed phosphatidylserine was stained with lactadherin and after cisplatin treatment, strong fluorescence was revealed by confocal microscopy. Lactadherin bound RBCs from patients with breast cancer increased from (1.9±0.5)% on control RBCs to (68.0±3.5)% on RBCs treated with 10 pmol/L cisplatin for 24 hours.Conclusions Cisplatin treatment increases procoagulant activity of RBCs, which have a strong association with exposure of phosphatidylserine. The increased procoagulant activity may contribute to the pathogenesis of thrombophilia during cisplatin based chemotherapy in breast cancer patients.

  6. Fabrication and Cytotoxicity of Fucoidan-Cisplatin Nanoparticles for Macrophage and Tumor Cells

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    Pai-An Hwang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Fucoidan, an anionic, sulfated polysaccharide from brown seaweed, is known to exhibit antitumor and immunomodulatory functions. To develop an immune protection and chemotherapeutic agent, fucoidan-cisplatin nanoparticles (FCNPs were designed. FCNPs were prepared by mixing cisplatin with fucoidan solution or fucoidan with cisplatin solution, followed by dialysis to remove trace elements. The nanoparticles, comprising 10 mg of fucoidan and 2 mg of cisplatin, which exhibited the highest cisplatin content and loading efficiency during the production process, were named as Fu100Cis20. The cisplatin content, cisplatin loading efficiency, nanoparticle size, and zeta potential of Fu100Cis20 were 18.9% ± 2.7%, 93.3% ± 7.8%, 181.2 ± 21.0 nm, and −67.4 ± 2.3 mV, respectively. Immune protection assay revealed that Fu100Cis20-treated RAW264.7 cells were protected from the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. Furthermore, antitumor assay indicated that Fu100Cis20-treated HCT-8 cells showed stronger cytotoxicity than those treated with cisplatin alone. These results suggested that fucoidan-based nanoparticles exhibited suitable particle size and high drug encapsulation, and that Fu100Cis20 has potential application in both immunotherapy and chemotherapy.

  7. Cisplatin, vindesine, and bleomycin (DVB) combination chemotherapy for esophageal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, D P; Bains, M; Chapman, R; Golbey, R

    1981-01-01

    Forty-six patients with epidermoid carcinoma of the esophagus have been treated with a three-drug combination of cisplatin, vindesine, and bleomycin. Of the 40 patients currently evaluable for response, 21 have had partial remissions (52%). At least four of these responses were almost complete, with only microscopic disease found on endoscopy or review of the resected specimen. Toxic effects have, in general, been manageable. The major toxic effects included nausea and vomiting, nephrotoxicity, and myelosuppression. There were two drug-related deaths: one due to renal failure and one due to sepsis. The three-drug combination appears to be substantially more effective than either the two-drug combination of cisplatin and bleomycin or vindesine alone. Effects on survival cannot yet be evaluated.

  8. Structural dynamics of cisplatin binding to histidine in a protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon W. M. Tanley

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The platinum anti-cancer agents cisplatin and carboplatin bind to the histidine 15 residue in the model protein hen egg white lysozyme. By using temperatures either side of the protein glass transition state (∼180 K, several platinum binding modes are seen and show that not all these platinum modes are stable. In particular, the mean square displacement vibration amplitudes of the cisplatin and of the histidine to which it is bound are analysed in detail. As well as the multiple platinum peaks, the electron density for the His-15 side chain is weak to absent at 150 K and 200 K, which points to the imidazole ring of the His side chain sampling multiple positions. Most interestingly, the His-15 imidazole becomes more ordered at room temperature.

  9. Structural dynamics of cisplatin binding to histidine in a protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanley, Simon W. M.; Helliwell, John R.

    2014-01-01

    The platinum anti-cancer agents cisplatin and carboplatin bind to the histidine 15 residue in the model protein hen egg white lysozyme. By using temperatures either side of the protein glass transition state (∼180 K), several platinum binding modes are seen and show that not all these platinum modes are stable. In particular, the mean square displacement vibration amplitudes of the cisplatin and of the histidine to which it is bound are analysed in detail. As well as the multiple platinum peaks, the electron density for the His-15 side chain is weak to absent at 150 K and 200 K, which points to the imidazole ring of the His side chain sampling multiple positions. Most interestingly, the His-15 imidazole becomes more ordered at room temperature. PMID:26798779

  10. Tropisetron attenuates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirak, Mohammad Reza; Rahimian, Reza; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud; Abbasi, Ata; Razmi, Ali; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaei; Mousavizadeh, Kazem; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza

    2014-09-05

    Nephrotoxicity is one of the most important complications of cisplatin, a potent chemotherapeutic agent used in the treatment of various malignancies. 5-HT3 antagonists are widely used to counteract chemotherapy-induced emesis and new studies reveal that they poses notable anti-inflammatory properties. In current study, we investigated the effects of 5-HT3 antagonists on cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity in mice. To identify the underlying mechanism of renal protection by tropisetron, we investigated the probable involvement of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR). A single injection of cisplatin (20mg/kg; i.p) induced nephrotoxicity, 5-HT3 antagonists (tropisetron, granisetron and ondansetron,) were given twice daily for 3 day (3mg/kg; i.p). Finally animals were euthanized and blood sample was collected to measure urea and creatinin level. Also kidneys were removed for histopathological examination and biochemical measurements including glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and inflammatory cytokines. Tropisetron decreased the expression of inflammatory molecules including tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and iNOS and improved histopathological damage and renal dysfunction. However other 5-HT3 antagonists, granisetron or ondansetron do not have any elicit effects on biochemical markers and histological damages. Since methyllycaconitine, antagonist of α7nAChR, was unable to reverse the beneficial effect of tropisetron, we concluded that this effect of tropisetron is not mediated by α7nAChR.Our results showed that tropisetron treatment markedly ameliorated the experimental cisplatin induced-nephrotoxicity and this effect might be 5-HT3 receptor and α7nAChR independent.

  11. Pharmacological Protection From Radiation {+-} Cisplatin-Induced Oral Mucositis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotrim, Ana P. [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yoshikawa, Masanobu [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa (Japan); Sunshine, Abraham N.; Zheng Changyu [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Sowers, Anastasia L.; Thetford, Angela D.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B. [Radiation Biology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Baum, Bruce J., E-mail: bbaum@dir.nidcr.nih.gov [Molecular Physiology and Therapeutics Branch, National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To evaluate if two pharmacological agents, Tempol and D-methionine (D-met), are able to prevent oral mucositis in mice after exposure to ionizing radiation {+-} cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Female C3H mice, {approx}8 weeks old, were irradiated with five fractionated doses {+-} cisplatin to induce oral mucositis (lingual ulcers). Just before irradiation and chemotherapy, mice were treated, either alone or in combination, with different doses of Tempol (by intraperitoneal [ip] injection or topically, as an oral gel) and D-met (by gavage). Thereafter, mice were sacrificed and tongues were harvested and stained with a solution of Toluidine Blue. Ulcer size and tongue epithelial thickness were measured. Results: Significant lingual ulcers resulted from 5 Multiplication-Sign 8 Gy radiation fractions, which were enhanced with cisplatin treatment. D-met provided stereospecific partial protection from lingual ulceration after radiation. Tempol, via both routes of administration, provided nearly complete protection from lingual ulceration. D-met plus a suboptimal ip dose of Tempol also provided complete protection. Conclusions: Two fairly simple pharmacological treatments were able to markedly reduce chemoradiation-induced oral mucositis in mice. This proof of concept study suggests that Tempol, alone or in combination with D-met, may be a useful and convenient way to prevent the severe oral mucositis that results from head-and-neck cancer therapy.

  12. Cisplatin-Associated Ototoxicity: A Review for the Health Professional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Paken

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is an effective drug used in the treatment of many cancers, yet its ototoxic potential places cancer patients, exposed to this drug, at risk of hearing loss, thus negatively impacting further on a patient’s quality of life. It is paramount for health care practitioners managing such patients to be aware of cisplatin’s ototoxic properties and the clinical signs to identify patients at risk of developing hearing loss. English peer-reviewed articles from January 1975 to July 2015 were assessed from PubMed, Science Direct, and Ebscohost. Seventy-nine articles and two books were identified for this review, using MeSH terms and keywords such as “ototoxicity”, “cisplatin”, “hearing loss”, and “ototoxicity monitoring”. This review provides an up-to-date overview of cisplatin-associated ototoxicity, namely, its clinical features, incidence rates, and molecular and cellular mechanisms and risk factors, to health care practitioners managing the patient with cancer, and highlights the need for a team-based approach to complement an audiological monitoring programme to mitigate any further loss in the quality of life of affected patients, as there is currently no otoprotective agent recommended routinely for the prevention of cisplatin-associated ototoxicity. It also sets the platform for effective dialogue towards policy formulation and strengthening of health systems in developing countries.

  13. Clinical overview on Lipoplatin: a successful liposomal formulation of cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulikas, Teni

    2009-08-01

    Nanoparticle formulations for packaging existing drugs have been used to treat cancer. Lipoplatin is a liposomal cisplatin encapsulated into liposome nanoparticles of an average diameter of 110 nm. Lipoplatin has substantially reduced the renal toxicity, peripheral neuropathy, ototoxicity, myelotoxicity as well as nausea/vomiting and asthenia of cisplatin in Phase I, II and III clinical studies with enhanced or similar efficacy to cisplatin. During clinical development, 10- to 200-fold higher accumulation of Lipoplatin in solid tumors compared to adjacent normal tissue was found in patients. Targeting of tumor vasculature by Lipoplatin in animals suggested its antiangiogenesis potential and Lipoplatin was proposed to act like a double-sword: as chemotherapy and an antiangiogenesis drug. Lipoplatin has finished successfully one Phase III non-inferiority clinical study as first-line against NSCLC in its combination with paclitaxel showing statistically significant reduction in nephrotoxicity; two more Phase III studies are in progress, one in NSCLC with gemcitabine also showing noninferiority with reduced toxicity and another in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck with 5-fluorouracil. A registrational Phase II/III study against pancreatic cancer is in progress under the orphan drug status granted to Lipoplatin by the European Medicines Agency. Phase II studies are continuing in advanced breast cancer with vinorelbine and gastrointestinal cancers with radiotherapy and 5-fluorouracil. The highlights of the clinical development of Lipoplatin are reviewed.

  14. Cisplatin encapsulated nanoparticle as a therapeutic agent for anticancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eka Putra, Gusti Ngurah Putu; Huang, Leaf; Hsu, Yih-Chih

    2016-03-01

    The knowledge of manipulating size of biomaterials encapsulated drug into nano-scale particles has been researched and developed in treating cancer. Cancer is the second worldwide cause of death, therefore it is critical to treat cancers challenging with therapeutic modality of various mechanisms. Our preliminary investigation has studied cisplatin encapsulated into lipid-based nanoparticle and examined the therapeutic effect on xenografted animal model. We used mice with tumor volume ranging from 195 to 214 mm3 and then few mice were grouped into three groups including: control (PBS), lipid platinum chloride (LPC) nanoparticles and CDDP (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) at dose of 3mg cisplatin /kg body weight. The effect of the treatment was observed for 12 days post-injection. It showed that LPC NPs demonstrated a better therapeutic effect compared to CDDP at same 3mg cisplatin/kg drug dose of tumor size reduction, 96.6% and 11.1% respectively. In addition, mouse body weight loss of LPC, CDDP and PBS treated group are 12.1%, 24.3% and 1.4%. It means that by compared to CDDP group, LPC group demonstrated less side effect as not much reduction of body weight have found. Our findings have shown to be a potential modality to further investigate as a feasible cancer therapy modality.

  15. Dihydroartemisinin potentiates the anticancer effect of cisplatin via mTOR inhibition in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells: involvement of apoptosis and autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xue [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150001 (China); Li, Ling [Department of Brain Cognition Computing Lab, University of Kent, Kent CT2 7NZ (United Kingdom); Jiang, Hong; Jiang, Keping; Jin, Ye [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150001 (China); Zheng, Jianhua, E-mail: zhengjianhua1115@126.com [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • Phosphorylation of mTOR is abnormal activation in SKOV3/DDP ovarian cancer cells. • Downregulation of mTOR by DHA helps to sensitize the SKOV3/DDP cells to chemotherapy. • DHA has the potential of induce autophagy in cancer cells. - Abstract: Dihydroartemisinin (DHA) exhibits anticancer activity in tumor cells but its mechanism of action is unclear. Cisplatin (DDP) is currently the best known chemotherapeutic available for ovarian cancer. However, tumors return de novo with acquired resistance over time. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is an important kinase that regulates cell apoptosis and autophagy, and its dysregulation has been observed in chemoresistant human cancers. Here, we show that compared with control ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3), mTOR phosphorylation was abnormally activated in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells (SKOV3/DDP) following cisplatin monotherapy. Treatment with cisplatin combined with DHA could enhance cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition in SKOV3/DDP cells. This mechanism is at least partially due to DHA deactivation of mTOR kinase and promotion of apoptosis. Although autophagy was also induced by DHA, the reduced cell death was not found by suppressing autophagic flux by Bafilomycin A1 (BAF). Taken together, we conclude that inhibition of cisplatin-induced mTOR activation is one of the main mechanisms by which DHA dramatically promotes its anticancer effect in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells.

  16. Biochemical changes associated with ascorbic acid–cisplatin combination therapeutic efficacy and protective effect on cisplatin-induced toxicity in tumor-bearing mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amenla Longchar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is one of the well-established anticancer drugs being used against a wide spectrum of cancers. However, full therapeutic efficacy of the drug is limited due to development of various toxicities in the host. This study examines the comparative therapeutic effectiveness and toxicities of cisplatin alone and in combination of dietary ascorbic acid (AA in ascites Dalton's lymphoma-bearing mice. The findings show that the combination treatment of mice with ascorbic acid plus cisplatin has much better therapeutic efficacy against murine ascites Dalton's lymphoma (DL in comparison to cisplatin alone and this may involve a decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH, catalase activity and increased lipid peroxidation (LPO in Dalton's lymphoma tumor cells. At the same time, combination treatment indicates a protective role of ascorbic acid against cisplatin-induced tissue toxicities (side effects in the hosts. Cisplatin-induced histopathological changes in liver, kidney and testes were decreased after combination treatment. The analysis of renal function test (RFT, liver function test (LFT and sperm abnormalities also suggest an improvement in these parameters after combination treatment. Therefore, it may be concluded that the increased GSH level, catalase activity and decreased LPO in the tissues, i.e., liver, kidney and testes after combination treatment may be involved in its protective ability against cisplatin-induced tissue toxicities in the host.

  17. Studies of radioactive cisplatin ({sup 191}Pt) for tumour imaging and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Areberg, J

    2000-01-01

    A radioactive variant of the cytostatic agent cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum(II), cisplatin, was synthesised from {sup 191}PtCl{sub 4}. The {sup 191}Pt-cisplatin was found to be a sterile product of high radionuclide, radiochemical and chemical purity. The pharmacokinetics of platinum in tumour tissue and organs at risk of fourteen patients undergoing treatment with cisplatin were studied by exchanging a small fraction of the prescribed amount of cisplatin with {sup 191}Pt-cisplatin. The uptake and retention of platinum were investigated by gamma camera measurements up to ten days after infusion of {sup 191}Pt-cisplatin. Highest concentration of platinum was found in the liver, on average 5.7 {+-} 0.5 {mu}g/g normalised to a given amount of 180 mg cisplatin. Corresponding value for the kidneys was 1.9 {+-} 0.3 {mu}g/g. Uptake of platinum in tumours was visualised in five patients with an average maximum concentration of 4.9 {+-} 1.0 {mu}g/g normalised to a given amount of 180 mg cisplatin. The data from the pharmacokinetic study was used together with data from the literature to estimate the absorbed dose and effective dose to patients receiving radioactive cisplatin. The effective doses were calculated to be 0.10 {+-} 0.02 mSv/MBq, 0.17 {+-} 0.04 mSv/MBq and 0.23 {+-} 0.05 mSv/MBq for {sup 191}Pt-, {sup 193m}Pt-, and {sup 195m}Pt-cisplatin respectively. The combined effect of the radio- and chemotoxicity from {sup 191}Pt-cisplatin was investigated both in vitro and in vivo. A cervical cancer cell line was incubated with cisplatin or {sup 191}Pt-cisplatin with various concentrations and specific activities. It was shown that the surviving fraction was smaller for cells treated with {sup 191}Pt-cisplatin than for cells treated with the same concentration of non-radioactive cisplatin. The surviving fraction decreased with increasing specific activity. Isobologram technique showed that the radio- and chemotoxicity interacted in a supra-additive (synergistic) manner. In

  18. Effect of tunicamycin on cisplatin induced apoptosis of HeLa cells

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    Ye XU

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To investigate the effect of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress in cisplatin-induced apoptosis of human cervical cancer HeLa cells. Methods  HeLa cells were used as the study object which were divided into four groups: TUNI (5mg/L group, cisplatin (6mg/L group, TUNI(5mg/L+cisplatin(6mg/L group, and negative control group (no drug treatment. MTT assay was employed to examine the growth status of the cells. Hoechst staining was used to observe the morphological change in the nucleus. Immunoblotting was used to detect the activation of apoptotic proteins, caspase-3 and caspase-4. Indirect immunofluorescence was used to assess the expression of the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI and phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX. Results  MTT assay showed that the growth inhibition rates were 2.65%±2.71%, 19.60%±4.34%, 44.69%±7.07% and 0% in TUNI group, cisplatin group, TUNI+cisplatin group and control group, respectively (P<0.05. Cisplatin showed a significant inhibitory effect on the growth of HeLa cells, and TUNI enhanced the effect of cisplatin. Statistical significance was found between TUNI+cisplatin group and cisplatin group (P<0.05. Hoechst staining showed that the fluorescence of the nucleus in control group was weak and well-distributed. At 12h after treatment, the nuclei in some HeLa cells in cisplatin group and TUNI+cisplatin group diminished in size, thus showing dense hyperfluorescence, and some of them were broken. The proportion of karyorrhexis cells in TUNI+cisplatin group (44.5%±5.1% was significantly higher than that in cisplatin group (22.7%±3.9%, P<0.05. Immunoblotting showed the expressions of activated caspase-3 and caspase-4 were up-regulated obviously in cisplatin group. Compared to cisplatin group, the expressions of those proteins significantly increased in TUNI+cisplatin group (P<0.05. Indirect immunofluorescence staining showed no PDI expression and weak fluorescence was found in control group. PDI

  19. Combined niclosamide with cisplatin inhibits epithelial-mesenchymal transition and tumor growth in cisplatin-resistant triple-negative breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junjun; Chen, Xiaosong; Ward, Toby; Pegram, Mark; Shen, Kunwei

    2016-07-01

    Women with triple-negative breast cancer have worse prognosis compared to other breast cancer subtypes. Acquired drug resistance remains to be an important reason influencing triple-negative breast cancer treatment efficacy. A prevailing theory postulates that the cancer resistance and recurrence results from a subpopulation of tumor cells with stemness program, which are often insensitive to cytotoxic drugs such as cisplatin. Recent studies suggested that niclosamide, an anti-helminthic drug, has potential therapeutic activities against breast cancer stem cells, which prompts us to determine its roles on eliminating cisplatin-resistant cancer cells. Hence, we established a stable cisplatin-resistant MDA-MB-231 cell line (231-CR) through continuously exposure to increasing concentrations of cisplatin (5-20 μmol/l). Interestingly, 231-CR exhibited properties associated to epithelial-mesenchymal transition with enhanced invasion, preserved proliferation, increased mammosphere formation, and reduced apoptosis compared to naive MDA-MB-231 sensitive cells (231-CS). Importantly, niclosamide or combination with cisplatin inhibited both 231-CS and 231-CR cell proliferation in vitro. In addition, niclosamide reversed the EMT phenotype of 231-CR by downregulation of snail and vimentin. Mechanistically, niclosamide treatment in combination with or without cisplatin significantly inhibited Akt, ERK, and Src signaling pathways. In vivo study showed that niclosamide or combination with cisplatin could repress the growth of xenografts originated from either 231-CS or 231-CR cells, with prominent suppression of Ki67 expression. These findings suggested that niclosamide might serve as a novel therapeutic strategy, either alone or in combination with cisplatin, for triple-negative breast cancer treatment, especially those resistant to cisplatin.

  20. Radiochemotherapy including cisplatin alone versus cisplatin + 5-fluorouracil for locally advanced unresectable stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tribius, Silke; Kilic, Yasemin [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Kronemann, Stefanie [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Schroeder, Ursula [Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery, Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Hakim, Samer [Dept. of Oro-Maxillo-Facial Surgery, Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Schild, Steven E. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Rades, Dirk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany)

    2009-10-15

    Background and purpose: the optimal radiochemotherapy regimen for advanced head-and-neck cancer is still debated. This nonrandomized study compares two cisplatin-based radiochemotherapy regimens in 128 patients with locally advanced unresectable stage IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Patients and methods: concurrent chemotherapy consisted of either two courses cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/d1-5 + 29-33; n = 54) or two courses cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/d1-5 + 29-33) + 5-fluorouracil (5-FU; 600 mg/m{sup 2}/d1-5 + 29-33; n = 74). Results: at least one grade 3 toxicity occurred in 25 of 54 patients (46%) receiving cisplatin alone and in 52 of 74 patients (70%) receiving cisplatin + 5-FU. The latter regimen was particularly associated with increased rates of mucositis (p = 0.027) and acute skin toxicity (p = 0.001). Seven of 54 (13%) and 20 of 74 patients (27%) received only one chemotherapy course due to treatment-related acute toxicity. Late toxicity in terms of xerostomia, neck fibrosis, skin toxicity, and lymphedema was not significantly different. The 2-year locoregional control rates were 67% after cisplatin alone and 52% after cisplatin + 5-FU (p = 0.35). The metastases-free survival rates were 79% and 69%, respectively (p = 0.65), and the overall survival rates 70% and 51%, respectively (p = 0.10). On multivariate analysis, outcome was significantly associated with performance status, T-category, N-category, hemoglobin level prior to radiotherapy, and radiotherapy break > 1 week. Conclusion: two courses of fractionated cisplatin (20 mg/m{sup 2}/day) alone appear preferable, as this regimen resulted in similar outcome and late toxicity as two courses of cisplatin + 5-FU, but in significantly less acute toxicity. (orig.)

  1. Prediction of treatment outcome by cisplatin-DNA adduct formation in patients with stage III/IV head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, treated by concurrent cisplatin-radiation (RADPLAT).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoebers, F.J.; Pluim, D.; Verheij, M.; Balm, A.J.M.; Bartelink, H.; Schellens, J.H.M.; Begg, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to test the predictive value of cisplatin-DNA adduct levels in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) patients treated with cisplatin-radiation. Patients with advanced-stage HNSCC were treated within a randomized trial, investigating the optimal route of cisplatin

  2. DFT study of the molecular and crystal structure and vibrational analysis of cisplatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgieva, I.; Trendafilova, N.; Dodoff, N.; Kovacheva, D.

    2017-04-01

    DFT and periodic-DFT (PAW-PBE method, code VASP) calculations have been performed to study the structural and vibrational characteristics of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cisplatin) at molecular and outside molecular level. To estimate the effect of the intermolecular interactions in crystal on the structural and vibrational properties of cisplatin, three theoretical models are considered in the present study: monomer (isolated molecule), hydrogen bonded dimer and periodic solid state structures. The work focused on the role of the theoretical models for correct modeling and prediction of geometrical and vibrational parameters of cisplatin. It has been found that the elaborate three-dimensional intermolecular hydrogen bonding network in the crystalline cisplatin significantly influences the structural and vibrational pattern of cisplatin and therefore the isolated cisplatin molecule is not the correct computational model regardless of the theoretical level used. To account for the whole intermolecular hydrogen bonding network in direction of both a and c axis and for more reliable calculations of structural and vibrational parameters periodic DFT calculations were carried out in the full crystalline periodic environment with the known lattice parameters for each cisplatin polymorph phase. The model calculations performed both at molecular level and for the periodic structures of alpha and beta cisplatin polymorph forms revealed the decisive role of the extended theoretical model for reliable prediction of the structural and vibrational characteristics of cisplatin. The powder diffraction pattern and the calculated IR and Raman spectra predicted beta polymorph form of our cisplatin sample freshly synthesized for the purposes of the present study using the Dhara's method. The various rotamers realized in the polymorph forms of cisplatin were explained by the low population of the large number of rotamers in solution as well as with the high rotamer

  3. Chronic low vitamin intake potentiates cisplatin-induced intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis in WNIN rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bodiga Vijayalakshmi; Boindala Sesikeran; Putcha Udaykumar; Subramaniam Kalyanasundaram; Manchala Raghunath

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate if cisplatin alters vitamin status and if VR modulates cisplatin induced intestinal apoptosis and oxidative stress in Wistar/NIN (WNIN) male rats.METHODS: Weanling, WNIN male rats (n = 12 per group) received adlibitum for 17 wk: control diet (20%protein) or the same with 50% vitamin restriction. They were then sub-divided into two groups of six rats each and administered cisplatin (2.61 mg/kg bodyweight)once a week for three wk or PBS (vehicle control).Intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) apoptosis was monitored by morphometry, Annexin-V binding, M30 cytodeath assay and DNA fragmentation. Structural and functional integrity of the villus were assessed by villus height /crypt depth ratio and activities of alkaline phosphatase,lys, ala-dipeptidyl amino-peptidase, respectively. To assess the probable mechanism(s) of altered apoptosis,oxidative stress parameters, caspase-3 activity, and expression of Bcl-2 and Bax were determined.RESULTS: Cisplatin per se decreased plasma vitamin levels and they were the lowest in VR animals treated with cisplatin. As expected VR increased only villus apoptosis, whereas cisplatin increased stem cell apoptosis in the crypt. However, cisplatin treatment of VR rats increased apoptosis both in villus and crypt regions and was associated with higher levels of TBARS,protein carbonyls and caspase-3 activity, but lower GSH concentrations. VR induced decrease in Bcl-2 expression was further lowered by cisplatin. Bax expression,unaffected by VR was increased on cisplatin treatment.Mucosal functional integrity was severely compromised in cisplatin treated VR-rats.CONCLUSION: Low intake of vitamins increases the sensitivity of rats to cisplatin and promotes intestinal epithelial cell apoptosis.

  4. Cisplatin Induces Bmi-1 and Enhances the Stem Cell Fraction in Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Nör

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has unveiled a subpopulation of highly tumorigenic, multipotent cells capable of self-renewal in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs. These unique cells, named here cancer stem cells (CSCs, proliferate slowly and might be involved in resistance to conventional chemotherapy. We have shown that CSCs are found in perivascular niches and rely on endothelial cell-secreted factors [particularly interleukin-6 (IL-6] for their survival and self-renewal in HNSCC. Here, we hypothesized that cisplatin enhances the stem cell fraction in HNSCC. To address this hypothesis, we generated xenograft HNSCC tumors with University of Michigan-squamous cell carcinoma 22B (UM-SCC-22B cells and observed that cisplatin treatment increased (P = .0013 the fraction of CSCs [i.e., aldehyde dehydrogenase activity high and cluster of differentiation 44 high (ALDHhighCD44high]. Cisplatin promoted self-renewal and survival of CSCs in vitro, as seen by an increase in the number of orospheres in ultralow attachment plates and induction in B lymphoma Mo-MLV insertion region 1 homolog (Bmi-1 and octamer-binding transcription factor 4 expression. Cisplatin-resistant cells expressed more Bmi-1 than cisplatinsensitive cells. IL-6 potentiated cisplatin-induced orosphere formation generated when primary human HNSCC cells were sorted for ALDHhighCD44high immediately after surgery and plated onto ultralow attachment plates. IL-6-induced signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3 phosphorylation (indicative of stemness was unaffected by treatment with cisplatin in UM-SCC-22B cells, whereas IL-6-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylation (indicative of differentiation processes was partially inhibited by cisplatin. Notably, cisplatin-induced Bmi-1 was inhibited by interleukin-6 receptor blockade in parental and cisplatin-resistant cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that cisplatin enhances the fraction of CSCs

  5. Cisplatin-incorporated nanoparticles of poly(acrylic acid-co-methyl methacrylate copolymer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee KD

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Kyung Dong Lee,1,* Young-Il Jeong,2,* Da Hye Kim,3,4 Gyun-Taek Lim,2 Ki-Choon Choi5 1Department of Oriental Medicine Materials, Dongshin University, Naju, South Korea; 2Department of Polymer Engineering, Chonnam National University, Gwangju, South Korea; 3Faculty of Life and Environmental Science, Shimane University, Matsue, Japan; 4United Graduate School of Agricultural Sciences, Tottori University, Tottori, Japan; 5Grassland and Forages Division, National Institute of Animal Science, Rural Development Administration, Cheonan, South Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Although cisplatin is extensively used in the clinical field, its intrinsic toxicity limits its clinical use. We investigated nanoparticle formations of poly(acrylic acid-co-methyl methacrylate (PAA-MMA incorporating cisplatin and their antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Methods: Cisplatin-incorporated nanoparticles were prepared through the ion-complex formation between acrylic acid and cisplatin. The anticancer activity of cisplatin-incorporated nanoparticles was assessed with CT26 colorectal carcinoma cells. Results: Cisplatin-incorporated nanoparticles have small particle sizes of less than 200 nm with spherical shapes. Drug content was increased according to the increase of the feeding amount of cisplatin and acrylic acid content in the copolymer. The higher acrylic acid content in the copolymer induced increase of particle size and decrease of zeta potential. Cisplatin-incorporated nanoparticles showed a similar growth-inhibitory effect against CT26 tumor cells in vitro. However, cisplatin-incorporated nanoparticles showed improved antitumor activity against an animal tumor xenograft model. Conclusion: We suggest that PAA-MMA nanoparticles incorporating cisplatin are promising carriers for an antitumor drug-delivery system. Keywords: cisplatin, nanoparticle, poly(acrylic acid-co-methyl methacrylate, ion complexes

  6. Novel synthetic protective compound, KR-22335, against cisplatin-induced auditory cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Yoo Seob; Song, Suk Jin; Kang, Sungun; Hwang, Hye Sook; Jung, Young-Sik; Kim, Chul-Ho

    2014-02-01

    Cisplatin [cis-diammine-dichloroplatinum (II)] is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, and one of its most severe side effects is ototoxicity. In the course of developing a new protective agent against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity, we have been interested in a novel synthetic compound, 3-Amino-3-(4-fluoro-phenyl)-1H-quinoline-2,4-dione (KR-22335). We evaluated the effectiveness of KR-22335 as an otoprotective agent against cisplatin-induced toxicity. The otoprotective effect of KR-22335 against cisplatin was tested in vitro in cochlear organs of Corti-derived cell lines, HEI-OC1, and in vivo in a zebrafish (Danio rerio) model. Cisplatin-induced apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and an increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were demonstrated in HEI-OC1 cells. KR-22335 inhibited cisplatin-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial injury in HEI-OC1 cells. KR-22335 inhibited cisplatin-induced activation of JNK, p-38, caspase-3 and PARP in HEI-OC1 cells. Scanning and transmission electron micrographs showed that KR-22335 prevented cisplatin-induced destruction of kinocilium and stereocilia in zebrafish neuromasts. Tissue TUNEL of neuromasts in zebrafish demonstrated that KR-22335 blocked cisplatin-induced TUNEL positive hair cells in neuromasts. The results of this study suggest that KR-22335 may prevent ototoxicity caused by the administration of cisplatin through the inhibition of mitochondrial dysfunction and suppression of ROS generation. KR-22335 may be considered as a potential candidate for protective agents against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity.

  7. Selenium Protects Retinal Cells from Cisplatin-Induced Alterations in Carbohydrate Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akşit, Dilek; Yazıcı, Alper; Akşit, Hasan; Sarı, Esin S.; Yay, Arzu; Yıldız, Onur; Kılıç, Adil; Ermiş, Sıtkı S.; Seyrek, Kamil

    2016-01-01

    Background: Investigate alterations in the expression and localization of carbohydrate units in rat retinal cells exposed to cisplatin toxicity. Aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate putative protective effects of selenium on retinal cells subjected to cisplatin. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: Eighteen healthy Wistar rats were divided into three equal groups: 1. Control, 2. Cisplatin and 3. Cisplatin+selenium groups. After anesthesia, the right eye of each rat was enucleated. Results: Histochemically, retinal cells of control groups reacted with α-2,3-bound sialic acid-specific Maackia amurensis lectin (MAA) strongly, while cisplatin reduced the staining intensity for MAA. However, selenium administration alleviated the reducing effect of cisplatin on the binding sites for MAA in retinal cells. The staining intensity for N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc residues) specific Griffonia simplicifolia-1 (GSL–1) was relatively slight in control animals and cisplatin reduced this slight staining for GSL-1 further. Selenium administration mitigated the reducing effect of cisplatin on the binding sites for GSL-1. A diffuse staining for N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) specific wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) was observed throughout the retina of the control animals. In particular, cells localized in the inner plexiform and photoreceptor layers are reacted strongly with WGA. Compared to the control animals, binding sites for WGA in the retina of rats given cisplatin were remarkably decreased. However, the retinal cells of rats given selenium reacted strongly with WGA. Conclusion: Cisplatin reduces α-2,3-bound sialic acid, GlcNAc and GalNAc residues in certain retinal cells. However, selenium alleviates the reducing effect of cisplatin on carbohydrate residues in retinal cells. PMID:27606141

  8. Selected flavonoids potentiate the toxicity of cisplatin in human lung adenocarcinoma cells: A role for glutathione depletion

    OpenAIRE

    Kachadourian, Remy; LEITNER, VHEATHER M.; Day, Brian J.

    2007-01-01

    Adjuvant therapies that enhance the anti-tumor effects of cisplatin are actively being pursued. Growing evidence supports the involvement of mitochondrial dysfunction in the anti-cancer effect of cis-diammineplatinum(II) dichloride (cisplatin, CDDP). We examined the potential of using selective flavonoids that are effective in depleting tumor cells of glu-tathione (GSH) to potentiate cisplatin-mediated cytotoxicity in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells. We found that cisplatin (40 μM, 48-...

  9. Treatment of Advanced or Recurrent Cervical Cancer with Cisplatin or Cisplatin Containing Regimens: A Cost Effective Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Geisler, Jayanth Swathirajan, Katherine L. Wood, Kelly J. Manahan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trials have demonstrated improvements in survival with adding paclitaxel (P or topotecan (T to cisplatin (C for the treatment of advanced cervical cancer. We sought to evaluate the cost effectiveness of these regimens.Methods: A decision model was developed based on Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG protocols 169 and 179. Arm 1 is 6 cycles of cisplatin. Arm 2 is 6 cycles of CP while arm 3 is 6 cycles of CT. Parameters include overall survival (OS, cost and complications. Sensitivity analyses were performed.Results: The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER for C versus CP is $13,654/quality-adjusted life-year (QALY gained. For CT compared to C, the ICER is $152,327/QALY. When compared simultaneously, CT is dominated. At a willingness to pay (WTP threshold of $50,000/QALY, C is the preferred option but CP is acceptable. Sensitivity analyses suggest that CT would become the preferred option if it was to improve OS to 24 months (compared to 9.4 months.Conclusions: In this model, CP is an acceptable alternative to cisplatin for the treatment of these patients with an increase in cost of only $13,654/QALY. The addition of topotecan did not increase survival enough to justify the increased cost.

  10. ROLE OF ERK1/2 KINASE IN CISPLATIN-INDUCED APOPTOSIS IN HUMAN OVARIAN CARCINOMA CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-qin Wei; Li-hua Sui; Jian-hua Zheng; Guang-mei Zhang; Yan-Lin Kao

    2004-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of extracellular regulated kinase (ERK1/2) pathway in cisplatin-induced apoptosis in human ovarian carcinoma cells.Methods Cisplatin-induced apoptosis were stained with DAPI and was assessed microscopically in human epithelial adenocarcinoma ovarian cell line SKOV3 cells. ERK activation was determined by Western blotting using an anti-phosphoERK antibody to detect ERK activity. The effect of PD98059 on ERK activity induced by cisplatin was detected by MTT assay.Results Marked apoptosis of SKOV3 cells resulted from 48 hours treatment with 20 μg/mL cisplatin. Strong activation of ERK was led to by 15 μg/mL cisplatin. Dose response and time course of cisplatin induced apoptosis in SKOV3 cells.Cisplatin-induced ERK activation occurred at 12 hours and increased to highest induction at 24 hours by Western blotting.The effect of PD 98059 on ERK activity induced by cisplatin at the concentration of 100 μmol/L PD 98059. Statistically significant decreased in cell survival were observed with 100 μmol/L PD 98059 at 15 and 20 μg/mL cisplatin (P< 0.05).Conclusions Cisplatin activates the ERK signaling pathway in ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3. Inhibition of ERK activity enhances sensitivity to cisplatin cytotoxity in ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3. Evaluation of ERK activity could be useful in predicting which ovarian cancer will response most favorably to cisplatin therapy.

  11. Intracellular GSH Alterations and Its Relationship to Level of Resistance following Exposure to Cisplatin in Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Bardia; Nakhjavani, Maryam; Hosseinzadeh, Leila; Amidi, Salimeh; Nikounezhad, Nastaran; H Shirazi, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    One of the major complications in cancer chemotherapy with cisplatin as one of the important medicines in treatment regimens of different cancers is the development of resistance. One of the most described cellular defense mechanisms involved in resistance is glutathione (GSH), thus in this study, the effects of cisplatin on the total intracellular GSH level (GSHi) in some sensitive and resistant variants of human cell lines (hepatocarcinoma HepG2, skin A375, cisplatin sensitive glioblastoma U373MG and cisplatin resistant glioblastoma U373MGCP, cisplatin sensitive ovary A2780S and cisplatin resistant A2780CP cells) were studied. MTT assay was performed to measure cytotoxicity of cisplatin (33.3 µM for 1 hour). Following cisplatin exposure, GSHi (per million cells) was evaluated using a photometrical assay up to 90 minutes. Our results indicate that there are significant differences between GSHi content of A2780CP and U373MGCP cells compared to other cell lines. Moreover, IC50 of cisplatin in different cells seems to have a relation with mean of GSH level in 90 minutes (GSH (mean)90). As a conclusion, it seems that resistance to cisplatin in different cell lines is more related with the diverse patterns of GSHi variations following cisplatin exposure than its original level, and/or its cellular increase or decrease. It is also suggested that GSH (mean)90 may be used as a factor for the prediction of cellular resistance to cisplatin.

  12. Suppression of Poly(rC)-Binding Protein 4 (PCBP4) reduced cisplatin resistance in human maxillary cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yumi; Narita, Norihiko; Nomi, Nozomi; Sugimoto, Chizuru; Takabayashi, Tetsuji; Yamada, Takechiyo; Karaya, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Hideki; Fujieda, Shigeharu

    2015-07-21

    Cisplatin plays an important role in the therapy for human head and neck cancers. However, cancer cells develop cisplatin resistance, leading to difficulty in treatment and poor prognosis. To analyze cisplatin-resistant mechanisms, a cisplatin-resistant cell line, IMC-3CR, was established from the IMC-3 human maxillary cancer cell line. Flow cytometry revealed that, compared with IMC-3 cells, cisplatin more dominantly induced cell cycle G2/M arrest rather than apoptosis in IMC-3CR cells. That fact suggests that IMC-3CR cells avoid cisplatin-induced apoptosis through induction of G2/M arrest, which allows cancer cells to repair damaged DNA and survive. In the present study, we specifically examined Poly(rC)-Binding Protein 4 (PCBP4), which reportedly induces G2/M arrest. Results showed that suppression of PCBP4 by RNAi reduced cisplatin-induced G2/M arrest and enhanced apoptosis in IMC-3CR cells, resulting in the reduction of cisplatin resistance. In contrast, overexpression of PCBP4 in IMC-3 cells induced G2/M arrest after cisplatin treatment and enhanced cisplatin resistance. We revealed that PCBP4 combined with Cdc25A and suppressed the expression of Cdc25A, resulting in G2/M arrest. PCBP4 plays important roles in the induction of cisplatin resistance in human maxillary cancers. PCBP4 is a novel molecular target for the therapy of head and neck cancers, especially cisplatin-resistant cancers.

  13. Collateral sensitivity to cisplatin in KB-8-5-11 drug-resistant cancer cells.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Doherty, Ben

    2014-01-01

    KB-8-5-11 cells are a drug-resistant cervical cell model that overexpresses ABCB1 (P-glycoprotein). KB-8-5-11 has become sensitive to non-ABCB1 substrate cisplatin. Understanding the mechanism of collateral sensitivity to cisplatin may lead to biomarker discovery for platinum sensitivity in patients with cancer.

  14. Syzygium Cumini (L. Seeds Extract Ameliorates Cisplatin Induced Hepatotoxicity in Male Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Maheswari

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of cisplatin, cis-[Pt(II(NH(3(2Cl(2] ([PtCl2(NH32] or CDDP, was a corner stone which triggered the interest in platinum(II-and other metal-containing compounds as potential anticancer drugs. Cisplatin, is one of the most potent chemotherapy drugs widely used for cancer treatment. In our present study, an attempt has been made to study the effect of Cisplatin on biochemical and histopathological parameters and ameliorating effects of the Syzygium cumini (L. aqueous seeds extract or Eugena Jambolana in male wistar rats. Adult male wistar rats were divided into four different groups. Group I Served as vehicle treated normal saline (Control, Group II Rats received single intra-peritoneal (Ip injection of cisplatin (7mg/kg bw, Group III received Syzygium cumini (L. aqueous seeds extract 400mg/kg/bw orally for 7 days beginning one day prior to cisplatin (CP injection. Group IV Rats received alone Syzygium cumini (L. aqueous seeds extract (400mg/kg bw treated. Cisplatin exposure leads to adverse effects on hematological, hepatotoxic parameters including Erythrocytes (RBCs. Cisplatin induction leads to reduction in the levels of Enzymic and Non-Enzymic antioxidants levels. However, on treatment with Syzygium cumini (L. aqueous seeds extract normalized the levels of all the biochemical and hematological parameters. These findings highlight the efficacy of Syzygium cumini (L. aqueous seeds extract as protective effects Cisplatin induced hepatotoxicity.

  15. Telmisartan ameliorates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by inhibiting MAPK mediated inflammation and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Salma; Suchal, Kapil; Gamad, Nanda; Dinda, Amit Kumar; Arya, Dharamvir Singh; Bhatia, Jagriti

    2015-02-05

    Nephrotoxicity is a major adverse effect of the widely used anticancer drug cisplatin. Oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis are implicated in the pathophysiology of cisplatin-induced acute renal injury. Moreover, cisplatin activates many signal transduction pathways involved in cell injury and death, particularly mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. With this background, we aimed to investigate the protective effect of telmisartan, a widely used antihypertensive drug, in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity model in rats. To accomplish this, male albino wistar rats (150-200 g) were divided into 6 groups: Normal, cisplatin-control, telmisartan (2.5, 5 and 10 mg/kg) and telmisartan per se treatment groups. Normal saline or telmisartan was administered orally to rats for 10 days and cisplatin was given on 7th day (8 mg/kg; i.p.) to induce nephrotoxicity. On 10th day, rats were killed and both the kidneys were harvested for biochemical, histopathological and molecular studies. Cisplatin injected rats showed depressed renal function, altered proxidant-antioxidant balance and acute tubular necrosis which was significantly normalized by telmisartan co-treatment. Furthermore, cisplatin administration activated MAPK pathway that caused tubular inflammation and apoptosis in rats. Telmisartan treatment significantly prevented MAPK mediated inflammation and apoptosis. Among the three doses studied telmisartan at 10 mg/kg dose showed maximum nephroprotective effect which could be due to maintenance of cellular redox status and inhibition of MAPK activation.

  16. Apoptosis of HeLa Cells Induced by Cisplatin and Its Mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youqing LIU; Hui XING; Xiaobing HAN; Xiaoyan SHI; Fengqi LIANG; Gang CHENG; Yunping LU; Ding MA

    2008-01-01

    To study the apoptosis induced by cisplatin in cervical cancer cell line HeLa and its mechanism, cell growth inhibition of cisplatin on HeLa cells was analyzed by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was examined by cytometry and Hoechst33258 staining after treatment with cisplatin. The ef- fects of cisplatin on transcription of E6 were analyzed by RT-PCR. The protein expressions of E6, p53, p21, Bax and Bcl-2 were studied by Western blotting. Cisplatin inhibited proliferation in a time- and dose-dependant manner. Cytometically, sub-G1 peak showed higher apoptosis rates in the ex- perimental group than those in the control. Hoechst33258staining exhibited apoptosis induced by cis- platin. RT-PCR revealed that cisplatin decreased transcription of E6. Western blotting showed that cisplatin decreased protein expression of E6 and increased protein expression of p53, p21and Bax. It had no effect on protein expression of Bcl-2. It is concluded that cisplatin can induce apoptosis in HeLa cells by suppressing HPV E6 and thereby restoring the function of p53.

  17. Cisplatin Resistant Spheroids Model Clinically Relevant Survival Mechanisms in Ovarian Tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winyoo Chowanadisai

    Full Text Available The majority of ovarian tumors eventually recur in a drug resistant form. Using cisplatin sensitive and resistant cell lines assembled into 3D spheroids we profiled gene expression and identified candidate mechanisms and biological pathways associated with cisplatin resistance. OVCAR-8 human ovarian carcinoma cells were exposed to sub-lethal concentrations of cisplatin to create a matched cisplatin-resistant cell line, OVCAR-8R. Genome-wide gene expression profiling of sensitive and resistant ovarian cancer spheroids identified 3,331 significantly differentially expressed probesets coding for 3,139 distinct protein-coding genes (Fc >2, FDR < 0.05 (S2 Table. Despite significant expression changes in some transporters including MDR1, cisplatin resistance was not associated with differences in intracellular cisplatin concentration. Cisplatin resistant cells were significantly enriched for a mesenchymal gene expression signature. OVCAR-8R resistance derived gene sets were significantly more biased to patients with shorter survival. From the most differentially expressed genes, we derived a 17-gene expression signature that identifies ovarian cancer patients with shorter overall survival in three independent datasets. We propose that the use of cisplatin resistant cell lines in 3D spheroid models is a viable approach to gain insight into resistance mechanisms relevant to ovarian tumors in patients. Our data support the emerging concept that ovarian cancers can acquire drug resistance through an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

  18. Renal tubular function in patients treated with high-dose cisplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, G; Abildgaard, U; Holstein-Rathlou, N H;

    1988-01-01

    The effect of three cycles of high-dose cisplatin (40 mg/m2 day for 5 days) on renal tubular function was evaluated in 30 patients. A significant impairment of proximal tubular salt and water reabsorption rates was observed, but also distal tubular function seemed to be affected. These changes were...... and water reabsorption during cisplatin administration....

  19. MicroRNA-mRNA functional pairs for cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei Liu; Xin Zhang; Chen-Fei Hu; Qing Xu; Hong-Xia Zhu; Ning-Zhi Xu

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death in women worldwide. Cisplatin is the core of first-line chemotherapy for patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Many patients eventually become resistant to cisplatin, diminishing its therapeutic effect. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have critical functions in diverse biological processes. Using miRNA profiling and polymerase chain reaction validation, we identified a panel of differentially expressed miRNAs and their potential targets in cisplatin-resistant SKOV3/DDP ovarian cancer cells relative to cisplatin-sensitive SKOV3 parental cells. More specifically, our results revealed significant changes in the expression of 13 of 663 miRNAs analyzed, including 11 that were up-regulated and 2 that were down-regulated in SKOV3/DDP cells with or without cisplatin treatment compared with SKOV3 cells with or without cisplatin treatment. miRNA array and mRNA array data were further analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. Bioinformatics analysis suggests that the genes ANKRD17, SMC1A, SUMO1, GTF2H1, and TP73, which are involved in DNA damage signaling pathways, are potential targets of miRNAs in promoting cisplatin resistance. This study highlights candidate miRNA-mRNA interactions that may contribute to cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer.

  20. The protective effect of melanocortins on cisplatin-induced hearing loss

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Francisca Louisa Carolina

    2003-01-01

    Cisplatin is widely used for the treatment of a variety of tumors. Unfortunately, the therapeutic effect of cisplatin is limited because patients can develop a high frequency hearing loss in both ears. Recovery of this hearing loss is observed sporadically. Animal studies have shown that chronic cis

  1. Treatment with docetaxel and cisplatin in advanced adrenocortical carcinoma, a phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urup, Thomas; Pawlak, W Z; Petersen, P M;

    2013-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare disease with a poor response to chemotherapy. Cisplatin is the most widely investigated drug in the treatment of ACC and in vitro studies have indicated activity of taxanes. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of cisplatin...

  2. rmhTNF-αCombined with Cisplatin Inhibits Proliferation of A549 Cell Line In Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Le-min Xia; Yi-yang Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the inhibitory effect of recombinant mutant human tumor necrosis factor-α(rmhTNF-α) in combination with cisplatin on human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549. Methods Human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 was treated with varying concentrations of rmhTNF-α (0.38, 0.75, 1.50, 6.00 and 12.00 IU/ml) or cisplatin (3.91, 7.81, 15.63, 31.25 and 62.50 μg/ml) for 24 hours. Viable cell number was analyzed by using crystal violet staining. The inhibitory rates of A549 cells growth by the two drugs were calculated. For analyzing whether there was a synergistic effect of rmhTNF-α with cisplatin, A549 cells were treated with 0.75 IU/ml rmhTNF-αand increased concentrations of cisplatin. Results rmhTNF-αor cisplatin inhibited the growth of A549 cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. The inhibitory effect of rmhTNF-αcombined with cisplatin was significantly greater than cisplatin alone at the same concentration (all P Conclusion rmhTNF-αcombined with cisplatin might have synergistic inhibitory effect on human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549.

  3. Vibration perception and thermoperception as quantitative measurements in the monitoring of cisplatin induced neurotoxicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Elderson, Arthur; Gerritsen van der Hoop, R.; Haanstra, W.; Neijt, J.P.; Jennekens, F.G.I.

    1989-01-01

    In 20 ovarian cancer patients treated by cisplatin-based chemotherapy quantitative investigations of the vibration and the thermoperception were performed. Following the administration of cisplatin of 300 mg/m2 and more the vibration perception threshold (VPT) was shown to be significantly elevated

  4. Cisplatin-induced ototoxicity : Morphological evidence of spontaneous outer hair cell recovery in albino guinea pigs?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardinaal, RM; de Groot, JCMJ; Huizing, EH; Veldman, JE; Smoorenburg, GF

    2000-01-01

    Cisplatin is frequently used in the treatment of various forms of malignancies. Its therapeutic efficacy, however, is limited by the occurrence of sensorineural hearing loss. Little is known about the course of hearing loss over longer time intervals after cessation of cisplatin administration. Infr

  5. Tumor targeting using polyamidoamine dendrimer-cisplatin nanoparticles functionalized with diglycolamic acid and herceptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesavan, Akila; Ilaiyaraja, P; Sofi Beaula, W; Veena Kumari, Vuttaradhi; Sugin Lal, J; Arunkumar, C; Anjana, G; Srinivas, Satish; Ramesh, Anita; Rayala, Suresh Kumar; Ponraju, D; Venkatraman, Ganesh

    2015-10-01

    Polymer mediated drug delivery system represents a novel promising platform for tumor-targeting with reduced systemic side effects and improved chemotherapeutical efficacy. In this study, we report the preparation and characterization of herceptin targeted, diglycolamic acid (DGA) functionalized polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer as a potent drug carrier for cisplatin. DGA dendrimers carrying cisplatin demonstrated enhanced anticancer activity when targeted with herceptin. In vitro cell line studies with herceptin-DGA-G4-cisplatin in HER-2 +ve and HER-2 -ve human ovarian cancer cell lines showed that these nanoparticles possessed remarkable features such as lower IC50 value, improved S-phase arrest, and enhanced apoptosis due to increased cellular uptake and accumulation than the untargeted DGA-G4-cisplatin and free cisplatin. Furthermore, in vivo results in SCID mice bearing SKOV-3 tumor xenografts, herceptin-DGA-G4-cisplatin, appeared to be more effective in inducing tumor regression as compared to free cisplatin. Collectively, these results indicate that herceptin targeted DGA functionalized PAMAM-cisplatin conjugates serve as better anti-tumor agents than individual therapeutic agents.

  6. Cisplatin and vinorelbine first-line chemotherapy in non-resectable malignant pleural mesothelioma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frank, H.; Palshof, T.; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2008-01-01

    The aim was to evaluate the activity of cisplatin and vinorelbine in previously untreated, inoperable patients having histologically verified malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), normal organ function, and performance status 0-2. Treatment was vinorelbine 25 mg m(-2) i.v. weekly and cisplatin 10...

  7. Effect of creatine and pioglitazone on Hk-2 cell line cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc, Gurkan; Kilinc, Veli; Bedir, Abdulkerim; Ozkaya, Ozan

    2014-08-01

    Cisplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent, which is used in the treatment of various solid organ cancers, and its main dose limiting side effect of cisplatin is nephrotoxicity. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of pioglitazone and creatine on cisplatin nephrotoxicity in vitro. Real-time cell analyzer system (RTCA) was used for real-time and time-dependent analysis of the cellular response of HK-2 cells following incubation with cisplatin and combination with creatine or pioglitazone hydrochloride. First, half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) of cisplatin, creatine and pioglitazone were calculated by RTCA system. Afterwards creatine and pioglitazone was administered with serial dilutions under RTCA system. IC50 dose for cisplatin was 7.69 M × 10(-5) at 24th hour and 3.93 M × 10(-6) at 48th hour. IC50 dose for pioglitazone was 1.61 M × 10(-3) at 24th hour and 2.85 M × 10(-4) at 48th hour. Although cells were treated the dose of 40,225 mM creatine, IC50 dose could not been reached. Neither pioglitazone nor creatine had additional protective effect in any dose. Consequently, beneficial effect of creatine and pioglitazone on cisplatin-induced cell death could not be found. Further studies and clinical trials are needed to evaluate the effect of different doses of these drugs in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

  8. Effect of free creatine therapy on cisplatin-induced renal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genc, Gurkan; Okuyucu, Ali; Meydan, Bilge Can; Yavuz, Oguzhan; Nisbet, Ozlem; Hokelek, Murat; Bedir, Abdulkerim; Ozkaya, Ozan

    2014-08-01

    Abstract Cisplatin is one of the commonly used anticancer drugs and nephrotoxicity limits its use. The aim of this study is to investigate the possible protective effect of creatine supplementation on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups: Group I: Cisplatin (n=20) (7 mg/kg cisplatin intraperitoneal (i.p.) single dose), group II: Cisplatin+creatine monohydrate (n=20) (7 mg/kg cisplatin i.p. single dose and 300 mg/kg creatine p.o. daily for 30 days starting on first day of cisplatin injection), group III: Control group (n=20) (Serum physiologic, 2.5 mL/kg i.p.). Sacrifications were performed at first week and 30th day. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine levels, histopathological evaluation, mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid (mtDNA) common deletion rates, and body weights of rats were evaluated. A significant decrease in body weight, higher values of kidney function tests, histopathological scores, and mtDNA deletion ratios were observed in group I compared to control group at days 7 and 30 (pcreatine significantly reversed kidney functions and pathological findings, this improvement was not sufficient to reach normal control group's results at days 7 and 30. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that creatine administration is a promising adjuvant protective drug for reducing nephrotoxic effect of cisplatin.

  9. Cisplatin-DNA adduct formation in rat spermatozoa and its effect on fetal development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooser, S.T.; Dijk-Knijnenburg, C.M. van; Waalkens-Berendsen, I.D.H.; Smits-van Prooije, A.E.; Snoeij, N.J.; Baan, R.A.; Fichtinger-Schepman, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of males to some genotoxic chemicals causes DNA damage in spermatozoa resulting in embryotoxicity and developmental defects in their offspring. This study demonstrates that cisplatin-DNA adducts could be measured in spermatozoa following treatment with the antineoplastic drug, cisplatin. Th

  10. ABT737 enhances cholangiocarcinoma sensitivity to cisplatin through regulation of mitochondrial dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Zhongqi [Department of Hepatobiliary & Pancreas Surgery, The First Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Yu, Huimei [Department of Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Cui, Ni [Bethune Medical College, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Kong, Xianggui; Liu, Xiaomin; Chang, Yulei [State Key Laboratory of Luminescence and Applications, Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130033 (China); Wu, Yao [Department of Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Sun, Liankun, E-mail: sunlk@jlu.edu.cn [Department of Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China); Wang, Guangyi, E-mail: wgymd@sina.com [Department of Hepatobiliary & Pancreas Surgery, The First Hospital, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130021 (China)

    2015-07-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma responses weakly to cisplatin. Mitochondrial dynamics participate in the response to various stresses, and mainly involve mitophagy and mitochondrial fusion and fission. Bcl-2 family proteins play critical roles in orchestrating mitochondrial dynamics, and are involved in the resistance to cisplatin. Here we reported that ABT737, combined with cisplatin, can promote cholangiocarcinoma cells to undergo apoptosis. We found that the combined treatment decreased the Mcl-1 pro-survival form and increased Bak. Cells undergoing cisplatin treatment showed hyperfused mitochondria, whereas fragmentation was dominant in the mitochondria of cells exposed to the combined treatment, with higher Fis1 levels, decreased Mfn2 and OPA1 levels, increased ratio of Drp1 60 kD to 80 kD form, and more Drp1 located on mitochondria. More p62 aggregates were observed in cells with fragmented mitochondria, and they gradually translocated to mitochondria. Mitophagy was induced by the combined treatment. Knockdown p62 decreased the Drp1 ratio, increased Tom20, and increased cell viability. Our data indicated that mitochondrial dynamics play an important role in the response of cholangiocarcinoma to cisplatin. ABT737 might enhance cholangiocarcinoma sensitivity to cisplatin through regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and the balance within Bcl-2 family proteins. Furthermore, p62 seems to be critical in the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics. - Highlights: • Cholangiocarcinoma may adapt to cisplatin through mitochondrial fusion. • ABT737 sensitizes cholangiocarcinoma to cisplatin by promoting fission and mitophagy. • p62 might participate in the regulation of mitochondrial fission and mitophagy.

  11. DDMC-p53 gene therapy with or without cisplatin and microwave ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohenforst-Schmidt, Wolfgang; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Stopek, Joshua; Vogl, Thomas; Hübner, Frank; Turner, J Francis; Browning, Robert; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Drevelegas, Antonis; Drevelegas, Konstantinos; Darwiche, Kaid; Freitag, Lutz; Rittger, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of death in cancer patients. Severe treatment side effects and late stage of disease at diagnosis continue to be an issue. We investigated whether local treatment using 2-diethylaminoethyl-dextran methyl methacrylate copolymer with p53 (DDMC-p53) with or without cisplatin and/or microwave ablation enhances disease control in BALBC mice. We used a Lewis lung carcinoma cell line to inoculate 140 BALBC mice, which were divided into the following seven groups; control, cisplatin, microwave ablation, DDMC-p53, DDMC-p53 plus cisplatin, DDMC-p53 plus microwave, and DDMC-p53 plus cisplatin plus microwave. Microwave ablation energy was administered at 20 W for 10 minutes. Cisplatin was administered as 1 mL/mg and the DDMC-p53 complex delivered was 0.5 mL. Increased toxicity was observed in the group receiving DDMC-p53 plus cisplatin plus microwave followed by the group receiving DDMC-p53 plus cisplatin. Infection after repeated treatment administration was a major issue. We conclude that a combination of gene therapy using DDMC-p53 with or without cisplatin and microwave is an alternative method for local disease control. However, more experiments are required in a larger model to identify the appropriate dosage profile.

  12. Protective effects of pine bark extract against cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Je-Won; Lee, In-Chul; Park, Sung-Hyuk; Moon, Changjong; Kang, Seong-Soo; Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Jong-Choon

    2014-12-01

    We investigated the protective effects of pine bark extract (pycnogenol®, PYC) against cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats. Twenty-four male rats were divided into the following four groups: (1) vehicle control, (2) cisplatin (7.5 mg/kg), (3) cisplatin & PYC 10 (10 mg/kg/day), and (4) cisplatin & PYC 20 (20 mg/kg/day). A single intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin induced hepatotoxicity, as evidenced by an increase in serum aminotransferase and histopathological alterations, including degeneration/necrosis of hepatocytes, vacuolation, and sinusoidal dilation. In addition, an increase in the malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration and a decrease in the reduced glutathione (GSH) content and catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities were observed in the cisplatin-treated rat hepatic tissues. In contrast, PYC treatment effectively prevented cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity, including the elevation of aminotransferase and histopathological lesions, in a dosedependent manner. Moreover, PYC treatment also induced antioxidant activity by decreasing MDA level and increasing GSH content and SOD and GST activities in liver tissues. These results indicate that PYC has a protective effect against acute hepatotoxicity induced by cisplatin in rats, and that the protective effects of PYC may be due to inhibiting lipid peroxidation and increasing antioxidant activity.

  13. Teratogenic effect of cisplatin in rats and the protective role of sodium selenate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Mohammed S; Morgan, Ashraf M; Mekawy, Mohey M; Zaki, Amr R; Ghazi, Zeinab M

    2016-05-01

    Eighty pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. They were allotted to four equal groups. The first group served as a control without any treatment while the other groups were given cisplatin, sodium selenate, and cisplatin+sodium selenate, respectively. Cisplatin was injected intraperitoneally in a dose of 5mg/kgb wt. on the 12th day of gestation while sodium selenate was administered orally in a dose of 0.5mg/kgb wt throughout gestation. Animals were sacrificed on the 20th day of gestation for fetal examination. Cisplatin produced significant elevation in the percentages of late resorption sites and dead foetuses compared with the control group. The mean foetal and placental weights were significantly reduced. Dwarf foetuses and subcutaneous (s/c) haemorrhage were also recorded in cisplatin-treated group. Visceral abnormalities were revealed in the form of dilated nares, anophthalmia and/or microphthalmia, dilated brain ventricles, hypertrophy of the heart, hypoplasia of the lung, hepatomegaly and dilated renal pelvis. Skeletal examination showed wide open fontanel, incomplete ossification of parietal and interparietal bones, incomplete ossification of sternum, reduction in the number or even complete absence of phalanges, sacral and/or caudal vertebrae. Histopathological examination of placentas in cisplatin-treated group revealed severe pathological alterations. Administration of sodium selenate significantly alleviated the afore-mentioned adverse effects of cisplatin on the fetuses and their placentas so we conclude that sodium selenate as an antioxidant has an effective protective role in cisplatin teratogenic effects.

  14. The Effect of Mirtazapine on Cisplatin-Induced Oxidative Damage and Infertility in Rat Ovaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durdu Altuner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin causes infertility due to ovarian toxicity. The toxicity mechanism is unknown, but evidence suggests oxidative stress. In this study, the effect of mirtazapine on cisplatin-induced infertility and oxidative stress in rats was investigated. 64 female rats were divided into 4 groups of 16. Except for the controls that received physiologic saline only, all were administered with cisplatin (5 mg/kg i.p. and mirtazapine (15 mg/kg p.o. or mirtazapine (30 mg/kg p.o. for 10 days. After this period, six rats from each group were randomly selected, and malondialdehyde (MDA, myeloperoxidase (MPO, nitric oxide (NO, total gluthatione (tGSH, gluthatione peroxidase (GPx, superoxide dismutase (SOD, and 8-hydroxy-2 deoxyguanine (8-OH Gua levels were measured in their ovarian tissues. Reproductive functions of the remaining rats were examined for 6 months. The MDA, MPO, NO groups and 8-OH Gua levels were higher in the cisplatin-treated groups than the controls, which was not observed in the mirtazapine and cisplatin groups. GSH, GPx, and SOD levels were reduced by cisplatin, which was prevented by mirtazapine. Cisplatin caused infertility by 70%. The infertility rates were, respectively, 40% and 10% for the 15 and 30 mg/kg mirtazapine administered groups. In conclusion, oxidative stress induced by cisplatin in the rat ovary tissue causes infertility in the female rats. Mirtazapine reverses this in a dose-dependent manner.

  15. Hesperidin protects testicular and spermatological damages induced by cisplatin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, K; Ciftci, O; Cetin, A; Doğan, H; Başak, N

    2015-09-01

    The clinic usage of cisplatin, an anticancer drug, is limited due to it has many side effects in many systems and organs. In this context, it was aimed to investigate the protective effect of hesperidin, a citrus flavonoid, on testicular and spermatological damages induced by cisplatin in rats. The rats were randomly divided into four groups. The first group was kept as a control. In the second groups, cisplatin was given at the single dose of 7 mg kg(-1) intraperitoneally. In the third group, hesperidin was orally administered at the dose of 50 mg/kg day(-1) for 14 days. In the fourth group, cisplatin and hesperidin were given together at the same doses. Cisplatin treatment caused significant reductions enzymatic (SOD, CAT and GPx) and nonenzymatic (GSH) antioxidants and significant induction level of TBARS. In addition, cisplatin treatment caused decreased sperm motility, epididymal sperm concentration, increased abnormal sperm rate and histopathological damage. In contrast, hesperidin treatment significantly attenuated the harmful effects. In conclusion, this study clearly demonstrated that hesperidin has protective effects on cisplatin-induced reproductive system toxicity depending on its antioxidant properties. Thus, it is thought that hesperidin may be useful against cisplatin toxicity in patients with cancer in terms of reproductive system.

  16. The effect of mirtazapine on cisplatin-induced oxidative damage and infertility in rat ovaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuner, Durdu; Gulaboglu, Mine; Yapca, Omer Erkan; Cetin, Nihal

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin causes infertility due to ovarian toxicity. The toxicity mechanism is unknown, but evidence suggests oxidative stress. In this study, the effect of mirtazapine on cisplatin-induced infertility and oxidative stress in rats was investigated. 64 female rats were divided into 4 groups of 16. Except for the controls that received physiologic saline only, all were administered with cisplatin (5 mg/kg i.p.) and mirtazapine (15 mg/kg p.o.) or mirtazapine (30 mg/kg p.o.) for 10 days. After this period, six rats from each group were randomly selected, and malondialdehyde (MDA), myeloperoxidase (MPO), nitric oxide (NO), total gluthatione (tGSH), gluthatione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and 8-hydroxy-2 deoxyguanine (8-OH Gua) levels were measured in their ovarian tissues. Reproductive functions of the remaining rats were examined for 6 months. The MDA, MPO, NO groups and 8-OH Gua levels were higher in the cisplatin-treated groups than the controls, which was not observed in the mirtazapine and cisplatin groups. GSH, GPx, and SOD levels were reduced by cisplatin, which was prevented by mirtazapine. Cisplatin caused infertility by 70%. The infertility rates were, respectively, 40% and 10% for the 15 and 30 mg/kg mirtazapine administered groups. In conclusion, oxidative stress induced by cisplatin in the rat ovary tissue causes infertility in the female rats. Mirtazapine reverses this in a dose-dependent manner.

  17. Identification of Cisplatin-Regulated Metabolic Pathways in Pluripotent Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stechow, von L.; Ruiz-Aracama, A.; Water, B.; Peijnenburg, A.; Danen, E.; Lommen, A.

    2013-01-01

    The chemotherapeutic compound, cisplatin causes various kinds of DNA lesions but also triggers other pertubations, such as ER and oxidative stress. We and others have shown that treatment of pluripotent stem cells with cisplatin causes a plethora of transcriptional and post-translational alterations

  18. Protective effect of speman on cisplatin-induced testicular and epididymal toxicity in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S B Sainath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Testicular cancer is the most common cancer affecting men of reproductive age. Advances in treatment of the disease, which includes the administration of cisplatin, have brought the 5-year survival rate to over 90%. This high cure rate, coupled with young age of patients, makes elucidation of the impact of the treatment on reproduction become increasingly important. The objective of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of speman, a non-hormonal herbal formulation, on cisplatin-induced suppressed male reproductive health in mice. Male mice were treated with cisplatin or speman alone or in combination and assessed for spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis. Significant decrease in the weights of testes and epididymis was observed in cisplatin treated animals. Injection of cisplatin significantly decreased epididymal sperm count, viable sperms, motile sperms and hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS-tail coiled sperms with a significant reduction in the testicular steroidogenic enzyme activities and serum testosterone levels, whereas co-administration of speman with cisplatin showed a significant improvement in the selected reproductive parameters over cisplatin alone treated mice indicating the beneficial effect of speman to combat cisplatin-induced suppressed reproduction in male mice.

  19. Disruption of the Fanconi anemia-BRCA pathway in cisplatin-sensitive ovarian tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taniguchi, T; Tischkowitz, M; Ameziane, N.; Hodgson, SV; Mathew, C.G.; Joenje, H.; Mok, SC; Andrea, d' AD

    2003-01-01

    Ovarian tumor cells are often genomically unstable and hypersensitive to cisplatin. To understand the molecular basis for this phenotype, we examined the integrity of the Fanconi anemia-BRCA (FANC-BRCA) pathway in those cells. This pathway regulates cisplatin sensitivity and is governed by the coord

  20. Curcumin: A potentially powerful tool to reverse cisplatin-induced toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Ramin; Momtazi, Amir Abbas; Monemi, Alireza; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2017-03-01

    Curcumin is a naturally occurring polyphenol isolated from Curcuma longa that has gained considerable interest over the last decades due to its beneficial effects for human health. Moreover, the usage of cisplatin, a platinum-based chemotherapeutic, is associated with several adverse effects affecting the quality of life of the patients. Also, cisplatin therapy is jeopardized by a great challenge of resistance which reduces the efficacy of this drug. In order to conquer these dark sides of cisplatin therapy, curcumin has been widely used to fight against cisplatin-resistant cancer cells and decrease its unwanted side effects (e.g. ototoxicity, nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity). In this review, we provide a summary of the studies done to show the protective effects of curcumin against cisplatin failure and toxicity.

  1. Decursin Mediated Protection on Cisplatin-induced Nephrotoxicity in SD Rats and BDF1 Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Cheng-zhe; Han Ilhyun; Choung Seyoung

    2012-01-01

    Tisplatin is one of the valuable icancer agents against several types of neoplasm. However, nephrotoxicity is the major adverse effect representing in cisplatin therapy. In this study, the animal tests detecting protective effects of a natural compound, Decursin, on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity were examined by using in vivo model. Pretreatment Decursin 10, 20 and 40 mg · kg^-1 at 48, 24 and 6 h, and administration of a single dose of Cisplatin 5.2 mg · kg^-1. Nephrotoxicity was evaluated by serum BUN and creatinine examination. There was significant difference in body weights, serum BUN and creatinine levels of the normal group. Based on the new understanding of the protective mechanisms of cisplatin-induced nephrotocivity, new strategies can be developed to prevent renal injury or to enhance recovery after cisplatin treatment.

  2. Pharmacogenomics of Cisplatin Sensitivity in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maimon C Rose; Elina Kostyanovskaya; R Stephanie Huang

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin, a platinum-based chemotherapeutic drug, has been used for over 30 years in a wide variety of cancers with varying degrees of success. In particular, cisplatin has been used to treat late stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as the standard of care. However, therapeutic outcomes vary from patient to patient. Considerable efforts have been invested to identify biomark-ers that can be used to predict cisplatin sensitivity in NSCLC. Here we reviewed current evidence for cisplatin sensitivity biomarkers in NSCLC. We focused on several key pathways, including nucleotide excision repair, drug transport and metabolism. Both expression and germline DNA variation were evaluated in these key pathways. Current evidence suggests that cisplatin-based treatment could be improved by the use of these biomarkers.

  3. Nephroprotective effect of Bauhinia variegata (Linn.) whole stem extract against cisplatin-induced nephropathy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, Saumya R; Mishra, Satyaranjan; Sahoo, Sabuj; Panda, Prasana K

    2011-04-01

    The nephroprotective activity of the ethanolic extract of Bauhinia variegata (Linn.) whole stem against cisplatin-induced nephropathy was investigated by an in vivo method in rats. Acute nephrotoxicity was induced by i.p. injection of cisplatin (7 mg/kg of body weight (b.w.)). Administration of ethanol extract at dose levels of 400 and 200 mg/kg (b.w.) to cisplatin-intoxicated rats for 14 days attenuated the biochemical and histological signs of nephrotoxicity of cisplatin in a dose-dependent fashion. Ethanol extract at 400 mg/kg decreased the serum level of creatinine (0.65 ± 0.09; Pvariegata at 400 mg/kg (b.w.) exhibited significant and comparable nephroprotective potential to that of the standard polyherbal drug cystone. The statistically (one-way-ANOVA followed by Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison) processed results suggested the protective action of B. variegate whole stem against cisplatin-induced nephropathy.

  4. Pharmacogenomics of Cisplatin Sensitivity in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maimon C. Rose

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin, a platinum-based chemotherapeutic drug, has been used for over 30 years in a wide variety of cancers with varying degrees of success. In particular, cisplatin has been used to treat late stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC as the standard of care. However, therapeutic outcomes vary from patient to patient. Considerable efforts have been invested to identify biomarkers that can be used to predict cisplatin sensitivity in NSCLC. Here we reviewed current evidence for cisplatin sensitivity biomarkers in NSCLC. We focused on several key pathways, including nucleotide excision repair, drug transport and metabolism. Both expression and germline DNA variation were evaluated in these key pathways. Current evidence suggests that cisplatin-based treatment could be improved by the use of these biomarkers.

  5. A model for prediction of cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity by kidney weight in experimental rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Nematbakhsh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II; CP is used widely as an antitumor drug in clinics, but is accompanied with renal toxicity. Cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity consists of change in kidney weight, histological changes in kidney and increase in serum creatinine (Cr and blood urea nitrogen (BUN. This study was designed to find out a model for prediction of cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity. Materials and Methods: Pathological damage score, kidney weight, BUN, and Cr of 227 rats that were involved in different projects were determined. A total of 187 rats were treated with 7 mg/kg cisplatin and sacrificed 1 week later. Results: There was a good significant correlation between normalized kidney weight and logarithmic scale of BUN and Cr. Relationship between BUN, Cr or normalized kidney weight and pathology damage score was significant. Conclusion: Normalized kidney weight and pathology damage score is a good predictor of renal function in cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity in experimental rats.

  6. The effect of lipocisplatin on cisplatin efficacy and nephrotoxicity in malignant breast cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qun; Tian, Yuantong; Li, Dandi; Sun, Jianfeng; Shi, Donglei; Fang, Lin; Gao, Yong; Liu, Haiyan

    2014-08-01

    A lipid-cisplatin conjugate was synthesized for super-molecular assembly with lipids to form a new generation of liposomal cisplatin formulation, lipocisplatin. In vitro, lipocisplatin has higher efficacy in human ovarian cancer A2780 and human breast cancer MCF-7 with the murine breast cancer cell line 4T1 which is currently an established model for stage IV breast cancer as the most sensitive strain. Moreover, lipocisplatin demonstrated a greater MTD value and relatively longer blood circulation as compared to cisplatin. Lipocisplatin preferentially accumulate drugs to the tumor site, resulting in a better tumor inhibition efficacy. Moreover, lipocisplatin exceeds the size cutoff for kidney clearance, hence it bypasses the nephrotoxicity of cisplatin which is a major curse of one of the most efficient anticancer drugs nowadays in clinic. The results here indicated lipocisplatin may be translated into a new generation of liposomal based cisplatin drug in clinic.

  7. Loss of drug-induced activation of the CD95 apoptotic pathway in a cisplatin-resistant testicular germ cell tumor cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spierings, DCJ; de Vries, EGE; Vellenga, E; de Jong, S

    2003-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are unusually sensitive to cisplatin. In the present study the role of the CD95 death pathway in cisplatin sensitivity of TGCT cells was studied in Tera and its in vitro acquired cisplatin-resistant subclone Tera-CP. Cisplatin induced an increase in CD95 membrane

  8. Post-treatment effects of erythropoietin and nordihydroguaiaretic acid on recovery from cisplatin-induced acute renal failure in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Won; Kwak, Ihm Soo; Lee, Soo Bong; Song, Sang Heon; Seong, Eun Young; Yang, Byeong Yun; Lee, Min Young; Sol, Mee Young

    2009-01-01

    5-lipoxygenase inhibitor and human recombinant erythropoietin might accelerate renal recovery in cisplatin-induced acute renal failure rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into four groups: 1) normal controls; 2) Cisplatin group-cisplatin induced acute renal failure (ARF) plus vehicle treatment; 3) Cisplatin+nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA) group-cisplatin induced ARF plus 5-lipoxygenase inhibitor treatment; 4) Cisplatin+erythropoietin (EPO) group-cisplatin induced ARF plus erythropoietin treatment. On day 10 (after 7 daily injections of NDGA or EPO), urea nitrogen and serum Cr concentrations were significantly lower in the Cisplatin+NDGA and Cisplatin+EPO groups than in the Cisplatin group, and 24 hr urine Cr clearances were significantly higher in the Cisplatin+EPO group than in the Cisplatin group. Semi-quantitative assessments of histological lesions did not produce any significant differences between the three treatment groups. Numbers of PCNA(+) cells were significantly higher in Cisplatin, Cisplatin+NDGA, and Cisplatin+EPO groups than in normal controls. Those PCNA(+) cells were significantly increased in Cisplatin+NDGA group. These results suggest that EPO and also NDGA accelerate renal function recovery by stimulating tubular epithelial cell regeneration.

  9. PTEN overexpression improves cisplatin-resistance of human ovarian cancer cells through upregulating KRT10 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Huijuan; Wang, Ke; Liu, Wenxin; Hao, Quan, E-mail: quan_haotj@126.com

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Overexpression of PTEN enhanced the sensitivity of C13K cells to cisplatin. • KRT10 is a downstream molecule of PTEN involved in the resistance-reversing effect. • Overexpression of KRT10 enhanced the chemosensitivity of C13K cells to cisplatin. - Abstract: Multi-drug resistance (MDR) is a common cause of the failure of chemotherapy in ovarian cancer. PTEN, a tumor suppressor gene, has been demonstrated to be able to reverse cisplatin-resistance in ovarian cancer cell line C13K. However, the downstream molecules of PTEN involved in the resistance-reversing effect have not been completely clarified. Therefore, we screened the downstream molecules of PTEN and studied their interactions in C13K ovarian cancer cells using a 3D culture model. Firstly, we constructed an ovarian cancer cell line stably expressing PTEN, C13K/PTEN. MTT assay showed that overexpression of PTEN enhanced the sensitivity of C13K cells to cisplatin, but not to paclitaxel. Then we examined the differently expressed proteins that interacted with PTEN in C13K/PTEN cells with or without cisplatin treatment by co-immunoprecipitation. KRT10 was identified as a differently expressed protein in cisplatin-treated C13K/PTEN cells. Further study confirmed that cisplatin could induce upregulation of KRT10 mRNA and protein in C13K/PTEN cells and there was a directly interaction between KRT10 and PTEN. Forced expression of KRT10 in C13K cells also enhanced cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition and apoptosis of C13K cells. In addition, KRT10 siRNA blocked cisplatin-induced proliferation inhibition of C13K/PTEN cells. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that KRT10 is a downstream molecule of PTEN which improves cisplatin-resistance of ovarian cancer and forced KRT10 overexpression may also act as a therapeutic method for overcoming MDR in ovarian cancer.

  10. Characterization of mitochondria in cisplatin-resistant human ovarian carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirama, Masanori; Isonishi, Seiji; Yasuda, Makoto; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2006-11-01

    One of the mechanisms of cisplatin cell cytotoxicity is the mitochondria-associated induction of apoptosis. The morphological or functional change of mitochondria in cisplatin-resistant cells has already been reported. Herein we present additional data describing the mitochondrial genomic and functional changes in cisplatin- resistant cells. Cisplatin increased the level of apoptotic cells in cisplatin-sensitive human ovarian carcinoma OV 2008 and C13 cells by 3.90+/-1.01 (SD; N=3) (pmitochondrial downstream event was functioning well in both the C13 cells and in OV 2008 cells. Mitochondrial transmembrane potential (DeltaPsim) determined by flow cytometry using DiOC6-stained cells revealed a significant depolarization of C13 cells as compared to OV 2008 cells. Treatment of these cells with cisplatin or hydrogen peroxide induces complete mitochondrial DNA damage in OV 2008 cells, while only partial DNA-destruction is observed in C13 cells, strongly suggesting that mitochondria are resistant to cisplatin and oxidative stress response. Continuous oxygen consumption of these cells monitored by a multi-channel dissolved oxygen meter is 1.70-fold higher in OV 2008 cells than C13 cells and the oxygen consumption was decreased by 30% in C13 cells, suggesting mitochondrial respiratory malfunction in these cells. The hypothesis generated here is that mitochondrial DNA resistance to cisplatin and oxidative stress response might be one of the main characteristics concerning the lower level of apoptosis induced by cisplatin. However, the mechanism by which the mitochondrial DNA encoded molecule is involved in cisplatin resistance remains to be determined.

  11. Deregulation of let-7e in epithelial ovarian cancer promotes the development of resistance to cisplatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, J; Yang, C; Yang, Q; Ding, H; Jia, J; Guo, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z

    2013-01-01

    Drug resistance remains a major clinical obstacle to successful treatment in ovarian cancer patients, and the evidence of microRNAs involvement in drug resistance has been emerging recently. In this report, we investigated the role of let-7e in the development of cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer. On the cellular level, let-7e expression was significantly reduced in cisplatin-resistant human epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) cell line A2780/CP compared with parental A2780 cell and decreased in a concentration-dependent manner in A2780, SKOV3 and ES2 cells treated with cisplatin. Overexpression of let-7e by transfection of agomir could resensitize A2780/CP and reduce the expression of cisplatin-resistant-related proteins enhancer of zeste 2 (EZH2) and cyclin D1 (CCND1), whereas let-7e inhibitors increased resistance to cisplatin in parental A2780 cells. Quantitative methylation-specific PCR analysis showed hypermethylation of the CpG island adjacent to let-7e in A2780/CP cells, and demethylation treatment with 5-aza-CdR or transfection of pYr-let-7e-shRNA plasmid containing unmethylated let-7e DNA sequence could restore let-7e expression and partly reduce the chemoresistance. In addition, cisplatin combined with let-7e agomirs inhibited the growth of A2780/CP xenograft more effectively than cisplatin alone. Diminished expression of EZH2 and CCND1 and higher cisplatin concentrations in tumor tissue of mice subjected to administration of let-7e agomirs in addition to cisplatin were revealed by immunohistochemistry and atomic absorption spectroscopy, respectively. Taken together, our findings suggest that let-7e may act as a promising therapeutic target for improvement of the sensibility to cisplatin in EOC. PMID:24100610

  12. The impact of erdosteine on cisplatin-induced ototoxicity: a proteomics approach.

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    Waissbluth, Sofia; Garnier, Delphine; Akinpelu, Olubunmi V; Salehi, Pezhman; Daniel, Sam J

    2017-03-01

    Cisplatin is a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent and causes serious side effects, including progressive and irreversible hearing loss. No treatment is currently available for cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. We have previously demonstrated that erdosteine, a potent antioxidant, partially protected the cochlea against cisplatin toxicity in vivo. The aims of this study were to (1) evaluate the protein profiles of the cochlea following cisplatin administration and (2) evaluate the impact of erdosteine on the protein profile using a proteomics-based approach. Thirty Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intraperitoneally with saline (n = 10), cisplatin (n = 10) or with cisplatin and erdosteine (n = 10). The cisplatin dosage was 14 mg/kg and for erdosteine, 500 mg/kg. Following euthanasia, protein lysates were obtained from fresh-frozen cochleae and were processed for mass spectrometry and western blotting. We detected 445 proteins that exhibited a twofold change or greater in the cisplatin group as compared to the control group. Of these, 18 proteins showed a fourfold or greater change in expression associated with cisplatin administration, including ras-related protein Rab-2A, Rab-6A, cd81, ribosomal protein S5, and myelin basic protein, which were downregulated, while Ba1-647 and fibrinogen (alpha chain), amongst others, were upregulated. Co-administration of erdosteine revealed a reversal of these changes in the expression of ras-related protein Rab-2A, ribosomal protein S5, myelin basic protein, and fibrinogen (alpha chain); erdosteine also upregulated glutathione reductase. In this study, we identified various proteins that may play a role in cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. We also observed the changes resulting from co-treatment with an antioxidant.

  13. An Epigenomic Approach to Improving Response to Neoadjuvant Cisplatin Chemotherapy in Bladder Cancer.

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    Xylinas, Evanguelos; Hassler, Melanie R; Zhuang, Dazhong; Krzywinski, Martin; Erdem, Zeynep; Robinson, Brian D; Elemento, Olivier; Clozel, Thomas; Shariat, Shahrokh F

    2016-09-02

    Bladder cancer is among the five most common cancers diagnosed in the Western world and causes significant mortality and morbidity rates in affected patients. Therapeutic options to treat the disease in advanced muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) include cystectomy and chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy is effective in MIBC; however, it has not been widely adopted by the community. One reason is that many patients do not respond to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and no biomarker currently exists to identify these patients. It is also not clear whether a strategy to sensitize chemoresistant patients may exist. We sought to identify cisplatin-resistance patterns in preclinical models of bladder cancer, and test whether treatment with the epigenetic modifier decitabine is able to sensitize cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer cell lines. Using a screening approach in cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer cell lines, we identified dysregulated genes by RNA sequencing (RNAseq) and DNA methylation assays. DNA methylation analysis of tumors from 18 patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy was used to confirm in vitro results. Cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer cells were treated with decitabine to investigate epigenetic sensitization of resistant cell lines. Our results show that HOXA9 promoter methylation status is associated with response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy in bladder cancer cell lines and in metastatic bladder cancer. Bladder cancer cells resistant to cisplatin chemotherapy can be sensitized to cisplatin by the DNA methylation inhibitor decitabine. Our data suggest that HOXA9 promoter methylation could serve as potential predictive biomarker and decitabine might sensitize resistant tumors in patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy.

  14. Downregulation of SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling factor subunits modulates cisplatin cytotoxicity

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    Kothandapani, Anbarasi [Department of Biochemistry and Cancer Biology, University of Toledo-Health Science Campus, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Gopalakrishnan, Kathirvel [Physiological Genomics Laboratory, Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, University of Toledo College of Medicine, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States); Kahali, Bhaskar; Reisman, David [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610 (United States); Patrick, Steve M., E-mail: Stephan.Patrick@utoledo.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Cancer Biology, University of Toledo-Health Science Campus, Toledo, OH 43614 (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Chromatin remodeling complex SWI/SNF plays important roles in many cellular processes including transcription, proliferation, differentiation and DNA repair. In this report, we investigated the role of SWI/SNF catalytic subunits Brg1 and Brm in the cellular response to cisplatin in lung cancer and head/neck cancer cells. Stable knockdown of Brg1 and Brm enhanced cellular sensitivity to cisplatin. Repair kinetics of cisplatin DNA adducts revealed that downregulation of Brg1 and Brm impeded the repair of both intrastrand adducts and interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). Cisplatin ICL-induced DNA double strand break repair was also decreased in Brg1 and Brm depleted cells. Altered checkpoint activation with enhanced apoptosis as well as impaired chromatin relaxation was observed in Brg1 and Brm deficient cells. Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm did not affect the recruitment of DNA damage recognition factor XPC to cisplatin DNA lesions, but affected ERCC1 recruitment, which is involved in the later stages of DNA repair. Based on these results, we propose that SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex modulates cisplatin cytotoxicity by facilitating efficient repair of the cisplatin DNA lesions. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stable knockdown of Brg1 and Brm enhances cellular sensitivity to cisplatin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm impedes the repair of cisplatin intrastrand adducts and interstrand crosslinks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brg1 and Brm deficiency results in impaired chromatin relaxation, altered checkpoint activation as well as enhanced apoptosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of Brg1 and Brm affects recruitment of ERCC1, but not XPC to cisplatin DNA lesions.

  15. Enhancement of cisplatin efficacy by thalidomide in a 9L rat gliosarcoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Susan; Davey, Ross A; Gu, Xiao-Qing; Haywood, Miriam C; McCann, Lauren A; Mather, Laurence E; Boyle, Frances M

    2007-11-01

    With the aim of improving the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme, we investigated the potential of thalidomide to enhance the effectiveness of cisplatin chemotherapy in a rat glioma model. Female F344 rats were implanted with 9L gliosarcoma tumors either intracranially or subcutaneously and treated with 1 mg/kg cisplatin injected i.p. or with 1% thalidomide in the food or with these treatments combined. Cisplatin in combination with thalidomide significantly reduced both the subcutaneous tumor volume at 30 days to 22 +/- 5% (mean +/- SEM, P < 0.001) and the intracranial tumor volume at 18 days to 44 +/- 15% (P < 0.05) of that with cisplatin alone. Thalidomide selectively increased the cisplatin concentration 10-fold in intracranial tumors (P < 0.05) and 2-fold in the subcutaneous tumors (P < 0.05) without increasing its concentration in major organs including brain and kidney. Cisplatin combined with thalidomide caused a significant decrease in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels by 73% in intracranial tumors (P < 0.05) and by 50% in subcutaneous tumors (P < 0.05) and caused the level of active hepatic growth factor (a-HGF) to double in both the subcutaneous and intracranial tumors (P < 0.05), suggesting this treatment altered the vasculature in these tumors. We conclude the increased efficacy of cisplatin in the presence of thalidomide was due to the selective increase in cisplatin concentration within the tumors and speculate that this is the result of thalidomide or the cisplatin/thalidomide combination, selectively altering the tumor vasculature. Based on the selective effects of thalidomide on tumor cisplatin concentrations and the resulting increase in efficacy, thalidomide may also increase the efficacy of other drugs that are presently considered ineffective against glioma.

  16. Effect of Cisplatin on Glomerular Filtration Rate and Effective Renal Plasma Flow

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    Lim, Sang Moo; Hong, Sung Woon; Kim, Young Hyun; Hong, Weon Seon; Song, Jae Kwan; Kim, Young Whan; Lee, Jhin Oh; Kang, Tae Woong [Korea Cancer Canter Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-03-15

    While cisplatin has been widely used in the treatment of a variety of cancers, nephrotoxicity is one of the major problems which frequently limit clinical usefulness of cisplatin. This study has been conducted to investigate nephrotoxicity of cisplatin in terms of changes in glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and effective renal plasma flow (EFPF) measured by the simultaneous use of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPP and {sup 131}I-OIH, before and after administration of cisplatin, in 12 patients with lung cancer and four patients with esophageal cancer. Cisplatin was administrated at total doses of 75-100 mg/m{sup 2} with two hour hydration and diuresis method. GFR determined by the use of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA had a good correlation with 24-hour creatinine clearance rate (r=0.77, p<0.001). GFR and filtration fraction decreased immediately after administration of cisplatin, however, they showed a tendency to be in completely recovered four weeks after administration. ERPF was not changed immediately after and four weeks after administration of cisplatin. GFR before and immediately after administration of cisplatin were analyzed with regard to age, sex, performance status, previous administration of cisplatin and method of administration. None of these factors had any influence on the rate of decrease in GFR except method of administration. Administration of cisplatin as a single dose lowered GFR more compared with that as divided doses. In this study, we have also demonstrated that the simultaneous use of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA and {sup 131}I-OIH was a useful tool for the measurement of GFR and ERPF respectively.

  17. Effect of boldo (Peumus boldus Molina) infusion on lipoperoxidation induced by cisplatin in mice liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, J; Lagos, P; Rivera, P; Zamorano-Ponce, E

    2009-07-01

    Peumus boldus Molina (Monimiaceae), commonly referred to as 'boldo', is used in traditional Chilean medicine to treat hepatic and gastrointestinal diseases. Its leaves are rich in antioxidant compounds, principally alkaloids and flavonoids. This study evaluates the protective effect of a complete boldo leaf infusion on lipoperoxidation (MDA determination at 532 nm) induced by cisplatin in mice liver. To determine if the observed effect can be explained by the action of boldine or catechin, each compound was studied separately. The mice were divided into 8 groups (n = 6): (I) not treated; (II) treated with cisplatin 6 mg/Kg b.w.; (III) treated with boldo leaf infusion 5%; (IV) pretreated with boldo leaf infusion 5% and treated with cisplatin 6 mg/Kg b.w.; (V) treated with boldine 50 mg/Kg b.w.; (VI) pretreated with boldine 50 mg/Kg b.w. and treated with cisplatin 6 mg/kg.b.w.; (VII) treated with catechin; and (VIII) pretreated with catechin 50 mg/Kg b.w. and treated with cisplatin 6 mg/Kg b.w. As expected, the treatment with cisplatin significantly increased (p < 0.01) lipoperoxidation in comparison with the non-treated group. Pretreatment with boldo leaf infusion significantly diminished (p < 0.05) the lipoperoxidation induced by cisplatin with respect to the animals not pretreated with the infusion. The pretreatments with boldine and catechin significantly diminished (p < 0.05) the lipoperoxidation induced by cisplatin with respect to the group treated only with cisplatin. The results suggest that the boldo infusion is acting as a protector with respect to the oxidative hepatic damage caused by cisplatin, and that this protective ability would be due to the presence in the infusion of the natural antioxidants boldine and principally catechin. These findings suggest the potential use of the infusion as a chemoprotector.

  18. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 is essential for cisplatin-induced heat hyperalgesia in mice

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    Carlton Susan M

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cisplatin is primarily used for treatment of ovarian and testicular cancer. Oxaliplatin is the only effective treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer. Both are known to cause dose related, cumulative toxic effects on the peripheral nervous system and thirty to forty percent of cancer patients receiving these agents experience painful peripheral neuropathy. The mechanisms underlying painful platinum-induced neuropathy remain poorly understood. Previous studies have demonstrated important roles for TRPV1, TRPM8, and TRPA1 in inflammation and nerve injury induced pain. Results In this study, using real-time, reverse transcriptase, polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, we analyzed the expression of TRPV1, TRPM8, and TRPA1 induced by cisplatin or oxaliplatin in vitro and in vivo. For in vitro studies, cultured E15 rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons were treated for up to 48 hours with cisplatin or oxaliplatin. For in vivo studies, trigeminal ganglia (TG were isolated from mice treated with platinum drugs for three weeks. We show that cisplatin and oxaliplatin-treated DRG neurons had significantly increased in TRPV1, TRPA1, and TRPM8 mRNA expression. TG neurons from cisplatin treated mice had significant increases in TRPV1 and TRPA1 mRNA expression while oxaliplatin strongly induced only TRPA1. Furthermore, compared to the cisplatin-treated wild-type mice, cisplatin-treated TRPV1-null mice developed mechanical allodynia but did not exhibit enhancement of noxious heat- evoked pain responses. Immunohistochemistry studies showed that cisplatin-treated mice had no change in the proportion of the TRPV1 immunopositive TG neurons. Conclusion These results indicate that TRPV1 and TRPA1 could contribute to the development of thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia following cisplatin-induced painful neuropathy but that TRPV1 has a crucial role in cisplatin-induced thermal hyperalgesia in vivo.

  19. Cisplatin Induces Cytotoxicity through the Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathways ana Activating Transcription Factor 3

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    Carly St. Germain

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying the proapoptotic effect of the chemotherapeutic agent, cisplatin, are largely undefined. Understanding the mechanisms regulating cisplatin cytotoxicity may uncover strategies to enhance the efficacy of this important therapeutic agent. This study evaluates the role of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3 as a mediator of cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity. Cytotoxic doses of cisplatin and carboplatin treatments consistently induced ATF3 expression in five tumor-derived cell lines. Characterization of this induction revealed a p53, BRCA1, and integrated stress response-independent mechanism, all previously implicated in stress-mediated ATF3 induction. Analysis of mitogenactivated protein kinase (MAPK pathway involvement in ATF3 induction by cisplatin revealed a MAPK-dependent mechanism. Cisplatin treatment combined with specific inhibitors to each MAPK pathway (c-Jun N-terminal kinase, extracellularsignal-regulated kinase, and p38 resulted in decreasedATF3 induction at the protein level. MAPK pathway inhibition led to decreased ATF3 messenger RNA expression and reduced cytotoxic effects of cisplatin as measured by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-ylF2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide cell viability assay. In A549 lung carcinoma cells, targeting ATF3 with specific small hairpin RNA also attenuated the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin. Similarly, ATF3-/murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs were shown to be less sensitive to cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity compared with ATF3+/+ MEFs. This study identifies cisplatin as a MAPK pathway-dependent inducer of ATF3, whose expression influences cisplatin’s cytotoxic effects.

  20. An Epigenomic Approach to Improving Response to Neoadjuvant Cisplatin Chemotherapy in Bladder Cancer

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    Evanguelos Xylinas

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer is among the five most common cancers diagnosed in the Western world and causes significant mortality and morbidity rates in affected patients. Therapeutic options to treat the disease in advanced muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC include cystectomy and chemotherapy. Neoadjuvant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy is effective in MIBC; however, it has not been widely adopted by the community. One reason is that many patients do not respond to neoadjuvant chemotherapy, and no biomarker currently exists to identify these patients. It is also not clear whether a strategy to sensitize chemoresistant patients may exist. We sought to identify cisplatin-resistance patterns in preclinical models of bladder cancer, and test whether treatment with the epigenetic modifier decitabine is able to sensitize cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer cell lines. Using a screening approach in cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer cell lines, we identified dysregulated genes by RNA sequencing (RNAseq and DNA methylation assays. DNA methylation analysis of tumors from 18 patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy was used to confirm in vitro results. Cisplatin-resistant bladder cancer cells were treated with decitabine to investigate epigenetic sensitization of resistant cell lines. Our results show that HOXA9 promoter methylation status is associated with response to cisplatin-based chemotherapy in bladder cancer cell lines and in metastatic bladder cancer. Bladder cancer cells resistant to cisplatin chemotherapy can be sensitized to cisplatin by the DNA methylation inhibitor decitabine. Our data suggest that HOXA9 promoter methylation could serve as potential predictive biomarker and decitabine might sensitize resistant tumors in patients receiving cisplatin-based chemotherapy.

  1. Effect of S-1 + cisplatin and gemcitabine + cisplatin on malignant indexes in serum and tumor tissue of advanced NSCLC patients with wild-type EGFR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Can Chen; Qing Fang; Qing-Yuan Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the effect of S-1 + cisplatin and gemcitabine + cisplatin on malignant indexes in serum and tumor tissue of advanced NSCLC patients with wild-type EGFR. Methods: The medical records of 58 advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients with wild-type EGFR were retrospectively analyzed, patients who received S-1 + cisplatin chemotherapy were included in the experimental group, patients who received gemcitabine + cisplatin chemotherapy were included in the control group, and then the levels of tumor markers in serum and the expression levels of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in tumor tissue were determined.Results:After treatment, serum tumor markers CEA, NSE, Cyfra21-1, PCDGF, VEGF and TK1 levels of experimental group were significantly lower than those of control group; Pim-1, LUNX, PFKFB3, PFKFB4 and Ki67 levels in tumor tissue of experimental group were significantly lower than those of control group, and TCF21, PDCD5, ASPP1, ASPP2, p53 and EFEMP1 levels were significantly higher than those of control group. Conclusions: S-1 + cisplatin has better curative effect on advanced NSCLC with wild-type EGFR than gemcitabine + cisplatin, and can more effectively kill cancer cells and regulate the expression of proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes.

  2. The small-molecule TNF-alpha modulator, UTL-5g, reduces side effects induced by cisplatin and enhances the therapeutic effect of cisplatin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, JiaJiu; Chen, Ben; Huang, Wen-Hsin; Lee, An-Rong; Media, Joseph; Valeriote, Frederick A

    2011-01-01

    We investigated a small-molecule modulator of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), UTL-5g (also referred to as GBL-5g), as a potential chemoprotective agent against cisplatin-induced side effects including nephrotoxicity, hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity. Pretreatment of UTL-5g i.p. in BDF1 mice reduced the levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine induced by cisplatin treatment. The levels of both aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT) in these animals were also reduced by UTL-5g. Pretreatment of UTL-5g did not significantly affect the number of white blood cells (WBC) under current experimental conditions, yet it markedly increased blood platelet counts by more than threefold. Therapeutic assessment in SCID mice inoculated with human HCT-15 tumor cells showed that UTL-5g did not attenuate the anti-tumor effect of cisplatin but increased the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin. The LD50 of UTL-5g was determined to be > 2,000 mg/kg by an acute toxicity study. In summary, our studies showed that 1) UTL-5g significantly reduces nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity induced by cisplatin in mice, presumably by lowering the levels of TNF-alpha, 2) UTL-5g markedly increased blood platelet counts in mice and 3) UTL-5g treatment increased the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin against HCT-15 cells inoculated in SCID mice.

  3. Protection against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by recombinant human erythropoietin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcin, Suayib; Müftüoğlu, Sevda; Cetin, Eren; Sarer, Banu; Yildirim, Berna Akkuş; Zeybek, Dilara; Orhan, Bülent

    2003-01-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) is a potent nephrotoxin, and nephrotoxicity is its most important dose-limiting toxicity. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO) in the protection of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and compare its efficacy with the cell-protective agent amifostine. All experiments were conducted on female Wistar albino rats. Animals were randomly assigned to four groups, each including six rats. Group A received only CDDP, group B received CDDP plus rhEPO, group C received CDDP plus amifostine, and group D received only rhEPO. At the end of 7 wk, hemoglobin (Hgb), hematocrite (Htc), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and creatinine (Cr) levels were determined and kidneys of the rats were removed. The weights of the kidneys were measured and sent for histopathological examination. Proximal tubules from four areas of the kidney (outer cortex, inner cortex, the medullary ray, and outer stripe of outer medulla [OSOM]) were evaluated. There were statistically significant differences among the groups in terms of tubular scores, including overall renal tubular score, cortex, inner cortex, OSOM, and medullary ray tubular scores, and Htc levels. Group A rats had the worse tubular scores in all categories when compared to group D rats. When the results of groups B and C were compared, there were no differences in terms of BUN, Cr levels, and tubular scores, but the Htc level was significantly higher in group B. Group B rats had better overall and OSOM tubular scores when compared to group A. Group C also had better overall and OSOM tubular scores compared to group A. The present study showed for the first time that rhEPO plays an important role in the prevention of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and it is as effective as amifostine.

  4. Developing a highly stable PLGA-mPEG nanoparticle loaded with cisplatin for chemotherapy of ovarian cancer.

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    Lihua Cheng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cisplatin is a potent anticancer drug, but its clinical application has been limited due to its undesirable physicochemical characteristics and severe side effects. Better drug formulations for cisplatin are highly desired. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Herein, we have developed a nanoparticle formulation for cisplatin with high encapsulation efficiency and reduced toxicity by using cisplatin-crosslinked carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC core nanoparticles made from poly(lactide-co-glycolide-monomethoxy-poly(polyethylene glycol copolymers (PLGA-mPEG. The nanoparticles have an average diameter of approximately 80 nm measured by transmission electron microscope (TEM. The encapsulation efficiency of cisplatin in the nanoparticles is up to 72%. Meanwhile, we have also observed a controlled release of cisplatin in a sustained manner and dose-dependent treatment efficacy of cisplatin-loaded nanoparticles against IGROV1-CP cells. Moreover, the median lethal dose (LD(50 of the cisplatin-loaded nanoparticles was more than 100 mg/kg by intravenous administration, which was much higher than that of free cisplatin. CONCLUSION: This developed cisplatin-loaded nanoparticle is a promising formulation for the delivery of cisplatin, which will be an effective therapeutic regimen of ovarian cancer without severe side effects and cumulative toxicity.

  5. Metallomics in drug development: characterization of a liposomal cisplatin drug formulation in human plasma by CE-ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tam T T N; Østergaard, Jesper; Stürup, Stefan; Gammelgaard, Bente

    2013-02-01

    A capillary electrophoresis inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry method for separation of free cisplatin from liposome-encapsulated cisplatin and protein-bound cisplatin was developed. A liposomal formulation of cisplatin based on PEGylated liposomes was used as model drug formulation. The effect of human plasma matrix on the analysis of liposome-encapsulated cisplatin and intact cisplatin was studied. The presence of 1 % of dextran and 4 mM of sodium dodecyl sulfate in HEPES buffer was demonstrated to be effective in improving the separation of liposomes and cisplatin bound to proteins in plasma. A detection limit of 41 ng/mL of platinum and a precision of 2.1 % (for 10 μg/mL of cisplatin standard) were obtained. Simultaneous measurements of phosphorous and platinum allows the simultaneous monitoring of the liposomes, liposome-encapsulated cisplatin, free cisplatin and cisplatin bound to plasma constituents in plasma samples. It was demonstrated that this approach is suitable for studies of the stability of liposome formulations as leakage of active drug from the liposomes and subsequent binding to biomolecules in plasma can be monitored. This methodology has not been reported before and will improve characterization of liposomal drugs during drug development and in studies on kinetics.

  6. Non-specific chemical inhibition of the Fanconi anemia pathway sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin

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    Jacquemont Céline

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platinum compounds such as cisplatin and carboplatin are DNA crosslinking agents widely used for cancer chemotherapy. However, the effectiveness of platinum compounds is often tempered by the acquisition of cellular drug resistance. Until now, no pharmacological approach has successfully overcome cisplatin resistance in cancer treatment. Since the Fanconi anemia (FA pathway is a DNA damage response pathway required for cellular resistance to DNA interstrand crosslinking agents, identification of small molecules that inhibit the FA pathway may reveal classes of chemicals that sensitize cancer cells to cisplatin. Results Through a cell-based screening assay of over 16,000 chemicals, we identified 26 small molecules that inhibit ionizing radiation and cisplatin-induced FANCD2 foci formation, a marker of FA pathway activity, in multiple human cell lines. Most of these small molecules also compromised ionizing radiation-induced RAD51 foci formation and homologous recombination repair, indicating that they are not selective toward the regulation of FANCD2. These compounds include known inhibitors of the proteasome, cathepsin B, lysosome, CHK1, HSP90, CDK and PKC, and several uncharacterized chemicals including a novel proteasome inhibitor (Chembridge compound 5929407. Isobologram analyses demonstrated that half of the identified molecules sensitized ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin. Among them, 9 demonstrated increased efficiency toward FA pathway-proficient, cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells. Six small molecules, including bortezomib (proteasome inhibitor, CA-074-Me (cathepsin B inhibitor and 17-AAG (HSP90 inhibitor, synergized with cisplatin specifically in FA-proficient ovarian cancer cells (2008 + FANCF, but not in FA-deficient isogenic cells (2008. In addition, geldanamycin (HSP90 inhibitor and two CHK1 inhibitors (UCN-01 and SB218078 exhibited a significantly stronger synergism with cisplatin in FA

  7. Ondansetron can enhance cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity via inhibition of multiple toxin and extrusion proteins (MATEs)

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    Li, Qing [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan 410078 (China); Guo, Dong [Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan 410078 (China); Dong, Zhongqi [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States); Zhang, Wei [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States); Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Central South University, Hunan 410078 (China); Zhang, Lei; Huang, Shiew-Mei [Office of Clinical Pharmacology, Office of Translational Sciences, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Polli, James E. [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States); Shu, Yan, E-mail: yshu@rx.umaryland.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland at Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2013-11-15

    The nephrotoxicity limits the clinical application of cisplatin. Human organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2) and multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (MATEs) work in concert in the elimination of cationic drugs such as cisplatin from the kidney. We hypothesized that co-administration of ondansetron would have an effect on cisplatin nephrotoxicity by altering the function of cisplatin transporters. The inhibitory potencies of ondansetron on metformin accumulation mediated by OCT2 and MATEs were determined in the stable HEK-293 cells expressing these transporters. The effects of ondansetron on drug disposition in vivo were examined by conducting the pharmacokinetics of metformin, a classical substrate for OCTs and MATEs, in wild-type and Mate1−/− mice. The nephrotoxicity was assessed in the wild-type and Mate1−/− mice received cisplatin with and without ondansetron. Both MATEs, including human MATE1, human MATE2-K, and mouse Mate1, and OCT2 (human and mouse) were subject to ondansetron inhibition, with much greater potencies by ondansetron on MATEs. Ondansetron significantly increased tissue accumulation and pharmacokinetic exposure of metformin in wild-type but not in Mate1−/− mice. Moreover, ondansetron treatment significantly enhanced renal accumulation of cisplatin and cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity which were indicated by increased levels of biochemical and molecular biomarkers and more severe pathohistological changes in mice. Similar increases in nephrotoxicity were caused by genetic deficiency of MATE function in mice. Therefore, the potent inhibition of MATEs by ondansetron enhances the nephrotoxicity associated with cisplatin treatment in mice. Potential nephrotoxic effects of combining the chemotherapeutic cisplatin and the antiemetic 5-hydroxytryptamine-3 (5-HT{sub 3}) receptor antagonists, such as ondansetron, should be investigated in patients. - Highlights: • Nephrotoxicity significantly limits clinical use of the chemotherapeutic

  8. Changes in the Mucus Barrier during Cisplatin-Induced Intestinal Mucositis in Rats

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    Hajime Yamamoto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Gastrointestinal mucositis is a frequent complication of antineoplastic chemotherapy, but the effects of chemotherapy on mucosal defense mechanisms remain poorly understood. We studied the effects of cisplatin on mucin, one of the principal defense factors of the gastrointestinal mucosa, and evaluated the efficacy of two different types of H2-receptor antagonists against cisplatin-induced mucositis. Methods. Cisplatin (6 mg/kg was administered intravenously to rats (day 0. The rats were sacrificed 1, 3, 7, and 11 days after treatment, and their stomach, jejunum, ileum, and colon were removed. Immunoreactivity of the mucosa was compared with the use of anti-mucin monoclonal antibody. To evaluate the efficacy of H2-receptor antagonists, either famotidine (3 mg/kg or lafutidine (30 mg/kg was given orally once daily on days 0, 1, and 2. Histological and biochemical findings were compared among the groups to assess effects on cisplatin-induced injury. Results. Cisplatin significantly altered the immunoreactivity and content of mucin in the small intestinal mucosa, especially in the ileum. Lafutidine protected against cisplatin-induced mucosal injury and attenuated decreased mucin accumulation. Conclusion. Cisplatin appears to alter the mucus barrier function in the intestinal mucosa. Lafutidine might effectively prevent chemotherapy-induced mucositis by activating intestinal mucus cells.

  9. Relationship of intracellular calcium and oxygen radicals to Cisplatin-related renal cell injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Yoshiko; Nakao, Takafumi; Kunimura, Naoshi; Kohda, Yuka; Gemba, Munekazu

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and intracellular calcium in nephrotoxicity related to an antitumor agent, cisplatin. In this study, we employed cultured renal epithelial cells (LLC-PK1). Cisplatin at 500 microM significantly increased the production of ROS 5 h and caused cell injury. This agent significantly increased the intracellular calcium level ([Ca2+]i) in a dose-dependent manner 1 h or more after exposure. DPPD (N,N'-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine), an antioxidant, inhibited a cisplatin-related increase in active oxygen production and cell injury but did not inhibit an early increase in the [Ca2+]i level. An intracellular calcium-chelating compound BAPTA-AM (1,2-bis(O-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetra(acetoxymethyl) ester) inhibited an increase in ROS production and cell injury induced by cisplatin. Furthermore, BAPTA-AM suppressed the rise of [Ca2+]i level in 1 h after exposure; however, an extracellular calcium chelator EGTA and a calcium antagonist nicardipine did not inhibit the rise in [Ca2+]i level in the early phase. An NADPH oxidase inhibitor inhibited a cisplatin-related increase in ROS production and cell disorder. These results suggest that cisplatin-related calcium release from the site of intracellular calcium storage in the early phase causes oxidative stress in renal tubular epithelial cells. Cisplatin may increase the intracellular production of ROS via NADPH oxidase.

  10. The effect of antioxidant on development of fibrosis by cisplatin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Yoshiko; Satoh, Tomohiko; Hibi, Daisuke; Ohno, Yukihiro; Kohda, Yuka; Miura, Katsuyuki; Gemba, Munekazu

    2009-12-01

    Cisplatin causes chronic interstitial disease with fibrosis, but the development mechanism of interstitial fibrosis is not yet understood. We examined the effect of an antioxidant, N,N'-diphenyl-1,4-phenylenediamine (DPPD), on development of interstitial fibrosis induced by cisplatin. Cisplatin increased blood urea nitrogen (BUN), plasma creatinine, and elicited glucosuria and enzymuria at 3 days after administration, but these changes were restored to the normal level after 14 days. Type III collagen increased from 7 days after administration of cisplatin and the expansion of the interstitial fibrosis area became evident at 14 days. Sustained renal fibrosis worsened renal function again at 56 days. Administration of DPPD, which was started at 3 days after cisplatin treatment, significantly inhibited the increase in renal type III collagen contents and the expansion of the interstitial fibrosis area without affecting enzymuria and increased BUN. These results indicate that anti-fibrotic action of DPPD is not secondary due to the inhibition of acute renal injury but is rather a direct effect on renal fibrogenesis. DPPD did not prevent the infiltration of macrophages by cisplatin, suggesting that anti-fibrotic action of DPPD was not mediated by the inhibition of inflammatory cellular influx. It is suggested that reactive oxygen species are involved in cisplatin-induced renal interstitial fibrosis.

  11. Effect of the BRCA1-SIRT1-EGFR axis on cisplatin sensitivity in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da; Wu, Qi-Jun; Bi, Fang-Fang; Chen, Si-Lei; Zhou, Yi-Ming; Zhao, Yue; Yang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that breast cancer 1 (BRCA1), sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) help to modulate cisplatin cytotoxicity. The role of dynamic crosstalk among BRCA1, SIRT1, and EGFR in cisplatin sensitivity remains largely unknown. We found that BRCA1, SIRT1, and EGFR levels were increased in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancers compared with those in cisplatin-sensitive ovarian cancers. Hypomethylation in the BRCA1 promoter was associated with BRCA1 activation, significantly elevated SIRT1 levels, decreased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD)-mediated SIRT1 activity, and decreased EGFR levels. Treatment with 5 and 10 μg/ml cisplatin induced a gradual increase in BRCA1 and SIRT1 levels and a gradual decrease in NAD levels and NAD-mediated SIRT1 activity, whereas EGFR levels were increased or decreased by treatment with 5 or 10 μg/ml cisplatin, respectively. The overexpression of SIRT1 or the enhancement of SIRT1 activity synergistically enhanced the BRCA1-mediated effects on EGFR transcription. In contrast, the knockdown of SIRT1 or the inhibition of SIRT1 activity inhibited the BRCA1-mediated effects on EGFR transcription. BRCA1 regulates EGFR through a BRCA1-mediated balance between SIRT1 expression and activity. Those results improve our understanding of the basic molecular mechanism underlying BRCA1-related cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer.

  12. Use of a passive equilibration methodology to encapsulate cisplatin into preformed thermosensitive liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Janet; Chiu, Gigi N C; Karlsson, Göran; Wasan, Ellen; Ickenstein, Ludger; Edwards, Katarina; Bally, Marcel B

    2008-02-12

    A conventional, cholesterol-containing liposome formulation of cisplatin has demonstrated insignificant activity in clinical trials, due in part, to insufficient release of encapsulated content following localization within solid tumors. For this reason, the development of a triggered release liposome formulation is desirable. In this report, cisplatin was encapsulated into lysolipid-containing thermosensitive liposomes (LTSL) using a novel technique, which relies on the equilibration of cisplatin across the liposomal membrane at temperatures above the gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transition temperature (TC) of the bulk phospholipid. Mild heating and drug loading into LTSL did not induce morphological changes of the liposomes. In vitro data demonstrated that >95% of encapsulated cisplatin was released from LTSL within 5 min following mild heating at 42 degrees C, while liposomes exhibited 70% release of cisplatin at 42 degrees C, and cholesterol-containing liposomes exhibited negligible drug release at 42 degrees C. The pharmacokinetic profiles of LTSL- and TSL-cisplatin indicated that these formulations were rapidly eliminated from circulation (terminal t(1/2) of 1.09 and 2.83 h, respectively). The therapeutic utility of LTSL-cisplatin formulation will be based on strategies where hyperthermia is applied prior to the administration of the liposomal drug-a strategy similar to that used in the clinical assessment of LTSL-doxorubicin formulation.

  13. A Prodrug of Two Approved Drugs, Cisplatin and Chlorambucil, for Chemo War Against Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Rakesh K; Wen, Ru; Kolishetti, Nagesh; Dhar, Shanta

    2017-02-01

    Cancer cells maintain normal mitochondrial glutathione as one of the defense mechanisms to inhibit mitochondrial membrane polarization and hence apoptosis. A combinational therapeutic modality Platin-Cbl, a prodrug of Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved chemotherapeutic agents, cisplatin and chlorambucil (Cbl), was synthesized and characterized to explore the potential of this compound to initiate chemo war on cancer cells using the active drugs, cisplatin and Cbl, when delivered to the cellular power house mitochondrion using a targeted nanoparticle (NP) designed to get associated with this organelle. Platin-Cbl demonstrated significantly high cytotoxic activity across a number of tumor cell lines as well as in a cisplatin resistant cancer cell line compared to cisplatin or its mixture with Cbl suggesting its unique potency in cisplatin resistant tumors. A mitochondria targeted NP formulation of Platin-Cbl allowed for its efficacious mitochondrial delivery. In vitro studies documented high potency of Platin-Cbl NP formulations. Cisplatin resistant cells cells upon treatment with Platin-Cbl were still able to manage energy production to a certain extent via fatty acid pathway; the advantage of using T-Platin-Cbl-NP is that this NP treatment causes impairment of all metabolic pathways in cisplatin resistant cells forcing the cells to undergo efficient apoptosis. This study highlights a combination of several beneficial effects for a cascade of events to overcome resistance associated with single drug therapy.

  14. An Extract of Rhodobacter sphaeroides Reduces Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Mice

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    Wen-Wei Chang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is used as a treatment for various types of solid tumors. Renal injury severely limits the use of cisplatin. Renal cell apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation contribute to cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Previously, we found that an extract of Rhodobacter sphaeroides (Lycogen™ inhibited proinflammatory cytokines and the production of nitric oxide in activated macrophages in a dextran sodium sulfate (DSS-induced colitis model. Here, we evaluated the effect of Lycogen™, a potent anti-inflammatory agent, in mice with cisplatin-induced renal injury. We found that attenuated renal injury correlated with decreased apoptosis due to a reduction in caspase-3 expression in renal cells. Oral administration of Lycogen™ significantly reduced the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β in mice with renal injury. Lycogen™ reduces renal dysfunction in mice with cisplatin-induced renal injury. The protective effects of the treatment included blockage of the cisplatin-induced elevation in serum urea nitrogen and creatinine. Meanwhile, Lycogen™ attenuated body weight loss and significantly prolonged the survival of mice with renal injury. We propose that Lycogen™ exerts anti-inflammatory activities that represent a promising strategy for the treatment of cisplatin-induced renal injury.

  15. Synergistic effect of allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) on cisplatin efficacy in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Xiang; Westover, David; Cao, Felicia; Cao, Shousong; He, Xiang; Kim, Hak-Ryul; Zhang, Yuesheng; Chan, Daniel Cf; Li, Fengzhi

    2015-01-01

    Although in vitro studies have shown that isothiocyanates (ITCs) can synergistically sensitize cancer cells to cisplatin treatment, the underlying mechanisms have not been well defined, and there are no in vivo demonstrations of this synergy. Here, we report the in vitro and in vivo data for the combination of allyl isothiocyanate (AITC), one of the most common naturally occurring ITCs, with cisplatin. Our study revealed that cisplatin and AITC combination synergistically inhibits cancer cell growth and colony formation, and enhances apoptosis in association with the downregulation of antiapoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and survivin. Importantly, the in vivo combination treatment suppresses human tumor growth in animal models without observable increases in toxicity (body weight loss) in comparison with single agent treatment. Furthermore, our data revealed that addition of AITC to cisplatin treatment changes the profile of G2/M arrest (e.g. increase in M phase cell number) and significantly extends the duration of G2/M arrest in comparison with cisplatin treatment alone. To explore the underlying mechanism, we found that AITC treatment rapidly depletes b-tubulin. Combination of AITC and cisplatin inhibits the expression of G2/M checkpoint-relevant proteins including CDC2, cyclin B1 and CDC25. Together, our findings reveal a novel mechanism for AITC enhancing cisplatin efficacy and provides the first in vivo evidence to support ITCs as potential candidates for developing new regimens to overcome platinum resistance.

  16. Soluble guanylate cyclase stimulators increase sensitivity to cisplatin in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Traci R; Takiar, Vinita; Kumar, Bhavna; Kumar, Pawan; Ben-Jonathan, Nira

    2017-03-28

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is an aggressive and often fatal disease. Cisplatin is the most common chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of HNSCC, but intrinsic and acquired resistance are frequent, and severe side effects occur at high doses. The second messenger cyclic GMP (cGMP) is produced by soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). We previously reported that activation of the cGMP signaling cascade caused apoptosis in HNSCC cells, while others found that this pathway enhances cisplatin efficacy in some cell types. Here we found that sGC stimulators reduced HNSCC cell viability synergistically with cisplatin, and enhanced apoptosis by cisplatin. Moreover, the sGC stimulators effectively reduced viability in cells with acquired cisplatin resistance, and were synergistic with cisplatin. The sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272 reduced expression of the survival proteins EGFR and β-catenin, and increased pro-apoptotic Bax, suggesting a potential mechanism for the anti-tumorigenic effects of these drugs. The sGC stimulator Riociguat is FDA-approved to treat pulmonary hypertension, and others are being studied for therapeutic use in several diseases. These drugs could provide valuable addition or alternative to cisplatin in the treatment of HNSCC.

  17. Synergy of Raddeanin A and cisplatin induced therapeutic effect enhancement in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian-Nan, Li; Ye, Yu; Yan-Fei, Zhang; Zhi-Meng, Li; Guang-Zhi, Cai; Ji-Yu, Gong

    2017-02-17

    Cisplatin is a main compound for human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) chemotherapies, but it has certain cytotoxicity during applications. To release that, combining with other drugs are being as a regular plan in clinic. In our present study, we are focusing on one of active monomers extracted from Anemone Raddeana Regel, Raddeanin A (RA), which is on behalf of the same character like cisplatin in the tumor remedies. In order to investigate whether combination usage of RA and cisplatin can be priority to the later drug's effect development and its toxicity reduction in HCC, both of two drugs were treated 24 h or 48 h in QGY-7703 cells for estimating their abilities in tumor cell proliferation inhibition. Results show RA makes synergistic functions with cisplatin after measuring and analyzing their combination index (CI) values. Meanwhile it can strengthen cisplatin's effect by arresting the tumor cells in G0/G1 cycle and further promoting their apoptosis. Interestingly, the molecule signals correlated to tumor cell apoptosis containing both of p53 and bax are simultaneously activated, but bcl-2 and survivin are all depressed in mRNA level. Meanwhile, combining usage with RA can even raise the intracellular productions of reactive oxygen species (ROS). All these consequences reflect RA plays an important role in enhancing the therapeutic effect of cisplatin in HCC. This finding may guide for the drug usage of cisplatin in clinic practice.

  18. Effects of Roselle and Ginger on cisplatin-induced reproductive toxicity in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amr Amin; AlaaEldin A. Hamza

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the protective effects of Hibiscus sabdariffa (Roselle) and Zingiber officinale (Ginger) against cisplatin-induced reproductive toxicity in rats and to study the mechanisms underlying these effects. Methods:which began 21 days before a single cisplatin I.p. Injection (10 mg/kg body weight). Results: Extracts of H. Sabdariffa and Z. Officinale reduced the extent of cisplatin-induced sperm abnormality and enhanced sperm motility. Both extracts restored the control level of malondialdehyde (MDA) (lipid peroxidation marker) in the cisplatin-treated testis.The cisplatin injection induced decline in the levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), reduced glutathione (GSH) and catalase (CAT) were significantly reversed to control levels in groups where cisplatin was preceded by the administration of either H. Sabdariffa or Z. Officinale. Conclusion: Both H. Sabdariffa and Z. Officinale treatment increased the activities of testicular antioxidant enzymes and restored sperm motility of cisplatin-treated rats. The protective effects of tested plants are, therefore, suggested to be mediated by their potent antioxidant activities.

  19. Tangeretin Alleviates Cisplatin-Induced Acute Hepatic Injury in Rats: Targeting MAPKs and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Hany A; Mohamed, Wafaa R; Arab, Hany H; Arafa, El-Shaimaa A

    2016-01-01

    Despite its broad applications, cisplatin affords considerable nephro- and hepatotoxicity through triggering inflammatory and oxidative stress cascades. The aim of the current investigation was to study the possible protective effects of tangeretin on cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity. The impact of tangeretin on cisplatin-evoked hepatic dysfunction and histopathologic changes along with oxidative stress, inflammatory and apoptotic biomarkers were investigated compared to silymarin. Tangeretin pre-treatment significantly improved liver function tests (ALT and AST), inhibited cisplatin-induced lipid profile aberrations (total cholesterol and triglycerides) and diminished histopathologic structural damage in liver tissues. Tangeretin also attenuated cisplatin-induced hepatic inflammatory events as indicated by suppression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and enhancement of interleukin-10 (IL-10). Meanwhile, it lowered malondialdehyde (MDA), nitric oxide (NO) and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF-2) levels with restoration of glutathione (GSH), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Regarding mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, tangeretin attenuated cisplatin-induced increase in phospho-p38, phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK) and phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK1/2) in liver tissues. In addition, tangeretin downregulated Bax expression with augmentation of Bcl-2 promoting liver cell survival. Our results highlight the protective effects of tangeretin against cisplatin-induced acute hepatic injury via the concerted modulation of inflammation, oxidative stress, MAPKs and apoptotic pathways.

  20. Tangeretin Alleviates Cisplatin-Induced Acute Hepatic Injury in Rats: Targeting MAPKs and Apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany A Omar

    Full Text Available Despite its broad applications, cisplatin affords considerable nephro- and hepatotoxicity through triggering inflammatory and oxidative stress cascades. The aim of the current investigation was to study the possible protective effects of tangeretin on cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity. The impact of tangeretin on cisplatin-evoked hepatic dysfunction and histopathologic changes along with oxidative stress, inflammatory and apoptotic biomarkers were investigated compared to silymarin. Tangeretin pre-treatment significantly improved liver function tests (ALT and AST, inhibited cisplatin-induced lipid profile aberrations (total cholesterol and triglycerides and diminished histopathologic structural damage in liver tissues. Tangeretin also attenuated cisplatin-induced hepatic inflammatory events as indicated by suppression of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and enhancement of interleukin-10 (IL-10. Meanwhile, it lowered malondialdehyde (MDA, nitric oxide (NO and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF-2 levels with restoration of glutathione (GSH, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx. Regarding mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway, tangeretin attenuated cisplatin-induced increase in phospho-p38, phospho-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK and phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (p-ERK1/2 in liver tissues. In addition, tangeretin downregulated Bax expression with augmentation of Bcl-2 promoting liver cell survival. Our results highlight the protective effects of tangeretin against cisplatin-induced acute hepatic injury via the concerted modulation of inflammation, oxidative stress, MAPKs and apoptotic pathways.

  1. Low toxicity and anticancer activity of a novel liposomal cisplatin (Lipoplatin) in mouse xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulikas, Teni

    2004-07-01

    Cisplatin has been one of the most widely used and most effective cytotoxic agents in the treatment of malignancies but causes severe adverse reactions including nausea/vomiting, renal toxicity, gastrointestinal toxicity, peripheral neuropathy, asthenia, and ototoxicity. A liposomal formulation of cisplatin, Lipoplatin, was developed in order to reduce the systemic toxicity of cisplatin. A single treatment of rats with 30 mg/kg Lipoplatin resulted in no toxicity whereas 2 or 3 weekly administrations at 30 mg/kg to rats gave neutropenia but no nephrotoxicity. On the contrary, a single injection to rats of 5 mg/kg cisplatin resulted in severe nephrotoxicity. Thus, Lipoplatin is less toxic than cisplatin in rats. Intraperitoneal or intravenous injection of Lipoplatin to SCID (severe combined immunodeficient) mice with subcutaneous breast MCF-7 or prostate LNCaP human tumors resulted in size reduction of the tumors; histological examination of the treated tumors in xenografts was consistent with apoptosis in tumor cells; thus, Lipoplatin appears to exert its cytotoxic effects to tumors in a mechanism similar to that of cisplatin. The preclinical studies reported here set the foundation for the clinical use of Lipoplatin as an exciting new drug with lower toxicity than cisplatin, endowed with proapoptotic properties.

  2. The protective effect of Nigella sativa against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats

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    Sara Hosseinian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The clinical use of cisplatin is highly restricted, because of its nephrotoxicity.In this study the protective effect of Nigella sativa (N. sativa against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was investigated in rats. Materials and Methods: In the current study, the effects of the administration of aqueous-ethanolic extract of N. sativa (100 and 200 mg/kg, BW and vitamin E (100 mg/kg, BW against blood and urine biochemical alterations and kidney function in rats treated with cisplatin were investigated. Cisplatin was injected at a dose of 6 mg/kg, BW, on the sixth day of the experiment. Results: The results indicated significant changes in serum urea and creatinine concentration, urine glucose concentration, and urine output in cisplatin group compared with control group. Serum urea and creatinine concentration in preventive and preventive+treatment vitamin E and preventive+treatment N. sativa (200 mg/kg, BW groups and also serum creatinine concentration in preventive+treatment N. sativa (100 mg/kg, BW group significantly decreased compared with cisplatin group. Urine glucose concentration in preventive and preventive+treatment N. sativa groups and urine output in preventive and preventive+treatment N. sativa (200 mg/kg, BW groups significantly decreased compared with cisplatin group.Osmolarity excretion rate in preventive and preventive+treatment vitamin E and preventive N. sativa groups was significantly higher than control group. Conclusions: The current study suggests that N. sativa extract and vitamin E in a dose- and time-dependent manner improved the serum and urine biochemical parameters and kidney function in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. However, it needs more investigations to determine the mechanism of N. sativa action on cisplatin-induced kidney toxicity.

  3. Renal xenobiotic transporters are differentially expressed in mice following cisplatin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksunes, Lauren M; Augustine, Lisa M; Scheffer, George L; Cherrington, Nathan J; Manautou, José E

    2008-09-04

    The goal of this study was to identify alterations in mRNA and protein expression of various xenobiotic transport proteins in mouse kidney during cisplatin-induced acute renal failure. For this purpose, male C57BL/6J mice received a single dose of cisplatin (18 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle. Four days later, tissues were collected for assessment of plasma BUN, histopathological analysis of renal lesions, and mRNA and Western blot analysis of renal transporters including organic anion and cation transporters (Oat, Oct), organic anion transporting polypeptides (Oatp), multidrug resistance-associated proteins (Mrp), multidrug resistance proteins (Mdr), breast cancer resistance protein (Bcrp) and multidrug and toxin extrusion proteins (Mate). Cisplatin treatment caused necrosis of renal proximal tubules along with elevated plasma BUN and renal kidney injury molecule-1 mRNA expression. Cisplatin-induced renal injury increased mRNA and protein levels of the efflux transporters Mrp2, Mrp4, Mrp5, Mdr1a and Mdr1b. Uptake transporters Oatp2a1 and Oatp2b1 mRNA were also up-regulated following cisplatin. By contrast, expression of Oat1, Oat2, Oct2 and Oatp1a1 mRNA was reduced in cisplatin-treated mice. Expression of several uptake and efflux transporters was unchanged in cisplatin-treated mice. Apical staining of Mrp2 and Mrp4 proteins was enhanced in proximal tubules from cisplatin-treated mice. Collectively, these expression patterns suggest coordinated regulation of uptake and efflux pathways during cisplatin-induced renal injury. Reduced expression of basolateral and apical uptake transporters along with enhanced transcription of export transporters likely represents an adaptation to lower intracellular accumulation of chemicals, prevent their reabsorption and enhance urinary clearance.

  4. Risk factors for cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and potential of magnesium supplementation for renal protection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Kidera

    Full Text Available Nephrotoxicity remains a problem for patients who receive cisplatin chemotherapy. We retrospectively evaluated potential risk factors for cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity as well as the potential impact of intravenous magnesium supplementation on such toxicity.We reviewed clinical data for 401 patients who underwent chemotherapy including a high dose (≥60 mg/m2 of cisplatin in the first-line setting. Nephrotoxicity was defined as an increase in the serum creatinine concentration of at least grade 2 during the first course of cisplatin chemotherapy, as assessed on the basis of National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. The severity of nephrotoxicity was evaluated on the basis of the mean change in the serum creatinine level. Magnesium was administered intravenously to 67 patients (17%.Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was observed in 127 patients (32%. Multivariable analysis revealed that an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2 (risk ratio, 1.876; P = 0.004 and the regular use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs (risk ratio, 1.357; P = 0.047 were significantly associated with an increased risk for cisplatin nephrotoxicity, whereas intravenous magnesium supplementation was associated with a significantly reduced risk for such toxicity (risk ratio, 0.175; P = 0.0004. The development of hypomagnesemia during cisplatin treatment was significantly associated with a greater increase in serum creatinine level (P = 0.0025. Magnesium supplementation therapy was also associated with a significantly reduced severity of renal toxicity (P = 0.012.A relatively poor performance status and the regular use of NSAIDs were significantly associated with cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity, although the latter association was marginal. Our findings also suggest that the ability of magnesium supplementation to protect against the renal toxicity of cisplatin warrants further

  5. p-Methoxyl-diphenyl diselenide protects against cisplatin-induced renal toxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Ethel A; Bortolatto, Cristiani F; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2012-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of p-methoxyl-diphenyl diselenide (OMePhSe)(2) on oxidative stress and renal damage parameters of mice exposed to cisplatin. (OMePhSe)(2) (50 and 100 mg/kg/day) was orally administered to mice for six consecutive days. On the third day after the beginning of (OMePhSe)(2) treatment, the renal toxicity was induced by injecting cisplatin (10 mg/kg intraperitoneal) in mice. (OMePhSe)(2) treatment (50 mg/kg) partially reduced plasma urea and creatinine levels increased by cisplatin. Histopathological examination of kidneys showed that (OMePhSe)(2) ameliorated renal injury caused by cisplatin. (OMePhSe)(2) attenuated the decrease in reduced glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid (AA) levels, the inhibition of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GR) and catalase (CAT) activities caused by cisplatin in kidney. (OMePhSe)(2) treatment partially protected against the inhibition of renal δ-aminolevulinic dehydratase (δ-ALA-D) activity caused by cisplatin. No alteration in renal lipid peroxidation levels was found in cisplatin and/or (OMePhSe)(2) groups. (OMePhSe)(2) was effective against the increase in reactive species (RS) levels caused by the cisplatin exposure. Based on the renoprotective and antioxidant actions of (OMePhSe)(2) we suggest that this organoselenium compound could be considered a feasible candidate to protect against toxicity commonly encountered in cisplatin exposure.

  6. Azadirachta indica Attenuates Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity and Oxidative Stress

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    Ahmed E. Abdel Moneim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of methanolic leaves extract of Azadirachta indica (MLEN, 500 mg/kg bwt on cisplatin- (CP- induced nephrotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats. CP (5 mg/kg bwt was injected intraperitoneally and MLEN was given by gastric gavage for 5 days before or after CP injection. After 5 days of CP injection, CP-induced injury of the renal tissue was evidenced (i as histopathological damage of the renal tissue, (ii as increases in serum uric acid, urea, and creatinine, (iii as increases in malondialdehyde (MDA and nitric oxide (NO, (iv as decreases in the level of glutathione and activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione-S-transferase, and glutathione peroxidase, and (v as increase in the expression of nuclear factor kappa B and apoptosis in kidney tissues. However, the oral administration of MLEN to CP-intoxicated rats for 5 days brought back MDA, NO production, and enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants to near normalcy. Moreover, the histological observations evidenced that neem extract effectively rescues the kidney from CP-mediated oxidative damage. Furthermore, PCR results for caspase-3 and caspase-9 and Bax genes showed downregulation in MLEN treated groups. Therefore, Azadirachta indica can be considered a potential candidate for protection of nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin.

  7. Renoprotective mechanisms of morin in cisplatin-induced kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhengkai; He, Xuexiu; Kou, Jinhua; Wang, Jingjing; Chen, Libin; Yao, Minjun; Zhou, Ershun; Fu, Yunhe; Guo, Changming; Yang, Zhengtao

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we investigated the renoprotective effects of morin on cisplatin-induced kidney injury in mice. Serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were determined according to the corresponding kits. The mRNA levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in kidney tissues were measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). The activities of cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) p65, P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), Bax, p53 and cleaved caspase 3 were evaluated by western blotting. The results showed that the model of cisplatin-induced kidney injury was successfully replicated, and morin significantly attenuated histopathological changes and decreased the levels of TNF-α and IL-1β in the kidneys. In addition, morin attenuated the activation of CYP2E1, phospho-NF-κB p65, phospho-P38 MAPK, Bax, phospho-p53 and cleaved caspase 3 in CP-induced kidney injury. In conclusion, these results indicated that the renoprotective mechanisms of morin may be attributed to the suppression of oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in CP-induced kidney injury.

  8. Gemcitabine and cisplatin in locally advanced and metastatic bladder cancer; 3- or 4-week schedule?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als, Anne Birgitte; Sengeløv, Lisa; Von Der Maase, Hans

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy with gemcitabine and cisplatin (GC) is an active regimen in advanced transitional cell carcinoma (TCC). Traditionally, GC has been administered as a 4-week schedule. However, an alternative 3-week schedule may be more feasible. Long-term survival data for the alternative 3...... intensity for gemcitabine was accordingly lower in the 4 week-schedule. The higher dose intensity of cisplatin in the 3-week schedule, did not lead to increased renal toxicity. In 13 patients with impaired renal function, cisplatin was split into 2 days, which was feasible and efficient. CONCLUSION...

  9. Central Diabetes Insipidus and Cisplatin-Induced Renal Salt Wasting Syndrome: A Challenging Combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortina, Gerard; Hansford, Jordan R; Duke, Trevor

    2016-05-01

    We describe a 2-year-old female with a suprasellar primitive neuroectodermal tumor and central diabetes insipidus (DI) who developed polyuria with natriuresis and subsequent hyponatremia 36 hr after cisplatin administration. The marked urinary losses of sodium in combination with a negative sodium balance led to the diagnosis of cisplatin-induced renal salt wasting syndrome (RSWS). The subsequent clinical management is very challenging. Four weeks later she was discharged from ICU without neurological sequela. The combination of cisplatin-induced RSWS with DI can be confusing and needs careful clinical assessment as inaccurate diagnosis and management can result in increased neurological injury.

  10. DFT study on the adsorption of drug cisplatin onto carbon nanotubes

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    M. S. Badiee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, using quantum mechanics, the interaction of drug cisplatin (CPT with (5, 5 pristine single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT have been studied. All of the calculations have been performed using a hybrid density functional method (B3LYP in solution phases. Three modes of noncovalent and covalent interactions of cisplatin onto pristine SWNT were investigated. Quantum molecular descriptors and frontier orbital analysis in the drug-nanotube systems were studied. It was found that binding of cisplatin with pristine (CPT/NT in solution phase is thermodynamically favorable.

  11. Comment on: A model for prediction of cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity by kidney weight in experimental rats

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    Hamid Nasri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum II, as one of the most applicable and potent anticancer medication, is used in the treatment of a various pediatric and adult malignancies. However, it gives side-effects such as renal toxicity which is dose-dependent, and thus limited its usage. Treatment with cisplatin induces the inflammatory mechanisms, which leads to a reduction in the antioxidant levels, leading to a failure of the antioxidant protection against free-radical damage generated by antitumor drugs. The oxidative stress, induced by cisplatin in the kidney was partially inhibited by antioxidant therapy using selenium, glutathione, flavonoids, and superoxide dismutase.

  12. The Effect of Mirtazapine on Cisplatin-Induced Oxidative Damage and Infertility in Rat Ovaries

    OpenAIRE

    Durdu Altuner; Mine Gulaboglu; Omer Erkan Yapca; Nihal Cetin

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin causes infertility due to ovarian toxicity. The toxicity mechanism is unknown, but evidence suggests oxidative stress. In this study, the effect of mirtazapine on cisplatin-induced infertility and oxidative stress in rats was investigated. 64 female rats were divided into 4 groups of 16. Except for the controls that received physiologic saline only, all were administered with cisplatin (5 mg/kg i.p.) and mirtazapine (15 mg/kg p.o.) or mirtazapine (30 mg/kg p.o.) for 10 days. After t...

  13. Effect of Matricaria chamomilla Hydroalcoholic Extract on Cisplatin-induced Neuropathy in Mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Namvaran Abbas Abad; M.H.Kayate Nouri; A.Gharjanie; F.Tavakoli

    2011-01-01

    AIM: Cisplatin-based chemotherapy is a mainstay for the treatment of solid tumors, especially colorectal, ovarian,testicular, bladder, and lung cancer. Studies have shown that cisplatin could have painful effects on human and animal models. Matricaria chamomilla (MC) has analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of MC hydroalcoholic extract on cisplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy and to compare with morphine in mice. METHODS: Experiments were performed on 60 NMRI male mice weighed 25 g to 30 g which have been divided into 6 groups. The fast group received normal saline;the second group received MC hydroalcoholic extract; the third group received cisplatin; the fourth group received MC hydroalcoholic extract and cisplatin, 96 hours before formalin test; the fifth group received morphine and the sixth group received cisplatin and morphine. The time of injected hind paw biting and licking time were measured in 5-minute interval for an hour. RESULTS: Results showed that formalin induced significant (P<0.05) pain response (the first phase: 0-5 min and the second phase: 15-40 min after injection). Administration of MC extract before formalin injection showed significant (P<0.05) decrease of pain responses in the first and second phase. Administration of cisplatin produced significant (P<0.05) increase in pain response in both phases of formalin test.Injection of MC extract and cisplatin together have shown that MC is able to decrease the second phase of cisplatin-induced pain sig-nificantly (P<0.05). Morphine decreased cisplatin-induced pain in the first and second phase of formalin test significantly(P<0.05).In comparison morphine has analgesic effects in the first phase and MC extract has anti inflammatory effects in the second phase of formalin test significantly (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: MC and cisplatin have analgesic and painful neuropathic respective effects, and MC hydroalcoholic extract is able to

  14. The Effects of Nifedipine on Renal Perfusion Pressure and Kidney During Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats

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    Meral Erdinç

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is one of the most effective cancer chemotherapeutic agent used against various solid tumors. Nephrotoxicity is one of the major dose-limiting side effects of cisplatin. It has been known that different mechanisms as oxidative stress may play an important role in cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity resulted with changes in renal haemodynamics. This study was performed to investigate the effect of nifedipine –one of the dihydropyridine calcium antagonist on changes in renal perfusion pressures and kidneys of rats with cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Male wistar albino rats were divided into 3 groups (n=8:1-Control group(1 ml saline. i.p 2-Cisplatin group (a single dose of cisplatin (5 mg/kg, i.p 3- A single dose of cisplatin (5 mg/kg, i.p + Nifedipine (2 mg/kg/day, i.p for five days. When those pre-treated groups compared with control group, perfusion pressures, serum urea and creatinine levels and tissue MDA levels were found significantly higher in cisplatin group (p<0.001. Histopathological examination showed widespread tubular necrosis and dilatation in cisplatin-treated group versus other groups. In cisplatin + nifedipine pretreated group, perfusion pressures, serum urea and creatinine levels and tissue MDA levels found significantly lower than cisplatin group (p<0. 001 and less tubular dilatation and necrosis was observed. As a result it was demonstrated that Nifedipine has protective effects against cisplatin nephrotoxicity. We suggest that this is partly provided by the beneficial effects of nifedipine on altered renal haemodynamics during cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

  15. Acute effect of cisplatin on renal hemodynamics and tubular function in dog kidneys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, G; Abildgaard, U; Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1986-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the early hemodynamic and tubular effects of cisplatin administration on dogs. To localize the nephrotoxic actions of cisplatin, we have taken advantage of the lithium clearance method. After infusion of 5 mg of cisplatin per kg, an immediate and sign.......56 +/- 0.04 and from 4.76 +/- 0.32 mmol/min to 3.92 +/- 0.23 mmol/min, respectively. The results show that administration of cisplatin causes an acute, mainly proximal tubular impairment in dogs without alterations in renal hemodynamics......./min) and fractional lithium clearance (from 0.31 +/- 0.03 to 0.44 +/- 0.04) was seen. This occurred without measurable changes in glomerular filtration rate and renal blood flow. The calculated fractional as well as absolute rates of proximal reabsorption of sodium decreased significantly from 0.68 +/- 0.03 to 0...

  16. Effect of cisplatin on proximal convoluted and straight segments of the rat kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, G; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Leyssac, P P

    1988-01-01

    The immediate effect of cisplatin on rat proximal tubular function was investigated by two different methods, the lithium clearance method and the occlusion time-transit time method (TT-OT). Within minutes after administration of cisplatin a significant increase in lithium clearance, fractional...... and the late proximal convoluted tubule after cisplatin administration. Concomitantly absolute proximal reabsorption rate was significantly decreased. Intervention by saline loading (2% of body weight) did not prevent the increase in e-TT/OT, but the increase in CLi/Cin was significantly less than...... in the control group. This finding suggests that saline loading protects either the pars recta of the proximal tubule or the juxtamedullary nephrons. Thus, cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in the rat is initiated by an acute mainly proximal tubular impairment including both pars convoluta and pars recta...

  17. Oral erdosteine administration attenuates cisplatin-induced renal tubular damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Zeki; Sogut, Sadik; Odaci, Ersan; Iraz, Mustafa; Ozyurt, Huseyin; Kotuk, Mahir; Akyol, Omer

    2003-02-01

    The effect of oral erdosteine on tissue malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO) levels, and catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities are investigated in the cisplatin model of acute renal failure in rats. A single dose of cisplatin caused kidney damage manifested by kidney histology as well as increases in plasma creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels. Treatment with free radical scavenger erdosteine attenuated increases in plasma creatinine and BUN, and tissue MDA and NO levels, and provided a histologically-proven protection against cisplatin-induced acute renal failure. Erdosteine also reduced depletion in the tissue CAT, GSH-Px, and SOD activities. These results show that erdosteine may be a promising drug for protection against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. However, further studies with different doses of erdosteine are warranted for clarifying the issue.

  18. Cisplatin Tumor Biodistribution and Efficacy after Intratumoral Injection of a Biodegradable Extended Release Implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariella Shikanov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Local delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs has long been recognized as a potential method for reaching high drug doses at the target site while minimizing systemic exposure. Cisplatin is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of various tumors; however, its systemic toxicity remains the primary dose-limiting factor. Here we report that incorporation of cisplatin into a fatty acid-based polymer carrier followed by a local injection into the solid tumor resulted in a successful tumor growth inhibition in heterotopic mouse bladder tumor model in mice. Platinum concentration in the tumor tissue surrounding the injected implant remained above the therapeutic level up to 14 days after the injection, while the plasma levels were several orders of magnitude lower comparing to systemic delivery. The reported delivery system increased the maximum tolerated dose of cisplatin 5 times compared to systemic delivery, thus potentially improving antitumor efficacy of cisplatin in solid tumor model.

  19. Knockdown of Akt Sensitizes Osteosarcoma Cells to Apoptosis Induced by Cisplatin Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changwei Yang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Akt plays an important role in the inhibition of apoptosis induced by chemotherapy and other stimuli. We therefore investigated if knockdown of Akt2 promoted drug-induced apoptosis in cultured osteosarcoma cells in vitro. SAOS-2 cells were transfected with Akt2 siRNA. The sensitivity of the transformed cell line to the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin was assessed. Reduced expression of Akt2 did not directly inhibit the growth rate of the transfected cells; however, it significantly increased their sensitivity to cisplatin. Knockdown of Akt2, together with cisplatin treatment, promoted the expression of p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA. It is possible that the augmentation of cisplatin cytotoxicity may be mediated by PUMA activation. The results of this study suggest that knockdown of Akt2 expression may have therapeutic applications in enhancing the efficacy of chemotherapy in patients with osteosarcoma.

  20. Cofactor metals and antioxidant enzymes in cisplatin-treated rats: effect of antioxidant intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabuncuoglu, Suna; Eken, Ayse; Aydin, Ahmet; Ozgunes, Hilal; Orhan, Hilmi

    2015-10-01

    We explored the association between the activities of antioxidant enzymes and their metallic cofactors in rats treated with cisplatin. The antioxidant effects of aminoguanidine, and a combination of vitamins E and C were investigated. Plasma platin was significantly lower than liver and kidney. Cisplatin treatment caused significant increase in plasma Se-glutathione peroxidase activity. Activities of Se-glutathione peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase, catalase and Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase have been found to be significantly decreased in liver and kidney compared to controls. Zn levels in these organs were diminished upon cisplatin treatment, while levels of Cu were unaffected. Interestingly, levels of iron, the cofactor of catalase, were found to be significantly increased in liver and kidney. Intervention with aminoguanidine or vitamins was generally prevented cisplatin-caused changes in the activity of enzymes and in the tissue levels of cofactor metals. These observations suggest that relation between activities of enzymes and levels of cofactor metals is multifactorial.

  1. Selective Cyclooxygenase-2 Inhibitor Prevents Cisplatin-induced Tumorigenesis in A/J Mice

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    Okada,Toshiaki

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is used to treat lung cancer;however, it is also a known carcinogen. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 inhibitors have been shown to prevent carcinogen-induced experimental tumors. We investigated the effect of a COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, on cisplatin-induced lung tumors. One hundred twenty 4-week-old A/J mice were divided into 6 groups:group 1, no treatment;group 2, low-dose celecoxib (150mg/kg;group 3, high-dose celecoxib (1,500mg/kg;group 4, cisplatin alone;group 5, cisplatin plus low-dose celecoxib;and group 6, cisplatin plus high-dose celecoxib. Mice in groups 4-6 were administered cisplatin (1.62mg/kg, i.p. once a week for 10 weeks between 7 and 16 weeks of age. All mice were sacrificed at week 30. Tumor incidence was 15.8% in group 1, 25% in group 2, 26.3% in group 3, 60% in group 4, 50% in group 5, and 50% in group 6. Tumor multiplicity was 0.2, 0.3, 0.3, 1.3, 1.0, and 0.6 in groups 1-6, respectively. Tumor multiplicity in the cisplatin-treated mice was reduced by celecoxib treatment in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05, group 4 vs. group 6. Celecoxib significantly reduced COX-2 expression in cisplatin-induced tumors (p<0.01, group 4 vs. group 6.

  2. Effect of cisplatin on renal haemodynamics and tubular function in the dog kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, G; Abildgaard, U; Holstein-Rathlou, N H

    1987-01-01

    Administration of cisplatin (5 mg/kg) to dogs results in polyuric renal failure due initially to a proximal tubular functional impairment. 48-72 h after the cisplatin administration the depressed renal function can be attributed to impairment of proximal as well as distal tubular reabsorptive...... capacities associated with increased renal vascular resistance. The polyuria seems to be due to the impaired reabsorption rate in the distal nephron segments....

  3. Inhibitory activity of Bifidobacterium adolescent combined with cisplatin on melanoma in mice and its mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore inhibitory activity of Bifidobacterium adolescent combined with cisplatin on the growth of melanoma(B16)in mice and the underlying mechanism.C57 mice were inoculated with B16 cancer cells to construct mouse model of melanoma and treated with bifidobacterium adolescent combined with cisplatin.Ratios of inhibitory activity on the growth of melanoma(B 16)were calculated.Pathology changes of the tumor were observed by HE staining.B 16 cell cycles were examined on a flow cytometer.Lymphocyte proliferation was measured with MTT assay and the T-cell subset was measured by double marked fluorescence.When bifidobacterium of 1010 cfu/L was injected,the ratio of inhibitory activity on the growth of melanoma(B16)reached 54%,which was similar to that of cisplatin group.The ratio of inhibitory activity reached 74.45% when the mice were treated by bifidobacterium combined with cisplatin,HE staining shows that bifidobacterium inhibited B16 cell proliferation and enhanced the cisplati(n)s killing activity on B16 cells.The results of flow cytometry demonstrated that B16 cell proliferation was arrested at G1 stage after treatment with bifidobacterium.The B16 cell proliferation was arrested at S stage after treatment with cisplatin.The CD4+ percentage increased and the difference was significant compared with the normal group after treatment with bifidobacterium,indicating that T-cell immune activity was enhanced.Treatment with bifidobacterium combined with cisplatin can enhance the inhibitory activity on the growth of melanoma(B16)of cisplatin.The mechanism of the inhibitory activity on B 16 cell proliferation is correlated with the enhanced immune activity in mice.

  4. Modulation of Nrf2/HO-1 by Thymoquinone During Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan ULU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Side effects of cisplatin, such as nephrotoxicity, limit its use in chemotherapeutic regimens and indicate an agent that suppresses its toxicity. Thymoquinone (TQ, the predominant bioactive constituent present in black seed oil (Nigella sativa, has antiinfl ammatory, antioxidant and antitumor effects. We propose a protective mechanism of of TQ on cisplatin-nephrotoxicity in rats that is through modulation of Nrf2-mediated antioxidant induction and reduced inflammation. MATERIAL and METHODS: Twenty-eight male Wistar rats (8 weeks-old were divided into four groups; Control (vehicle; 0.9% saline, 1 ml/kg body wt., p.o., TQ (10 mg/kg body weight/day in drinking water for 5 days, cisplatin (a single injection of 7mg/kg body wt, i.p. and TQ for 5 days in drinking water then a single injection of cisplatin. On day 10, all rats were sacrificed by cervical dislocation, kidneys were removed, and serum urea and creatinine were collected. RESULTS: Serum urea and creatinine levels were significantly higher in cisplatin-treated rats compared with control rats. TQ-treatment significantly decreased serum urea and creatinine levels. Cisplatin-treatment caused significant downregulation of the nuclear NF-E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2, heme oxygenase-1(HO-1 and caused an increase in the levels of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB. Interestingly, TQ supplementation significantly improved the changes associated with cisplatin nephrotoxicity by increasing the levels of Nrf-2 and HO-1 and decreasing the levels of NF-κB. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates the TQ targets NRF2/HO-1 and can be used as a potential agent against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

  5. The TRPM6/EGF pathway is downregulated in a rat model of cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristien J Ledeganck

    Full Text Available Cisplatin-induced hypomagnesemia is described in humans and rats, but the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Recent studies have shown that epidermal growth factor (EGF stimulates Mg(2+ re-absorption in the distal convoluted tubule via the Mg(2+ channel TRPM6. This study investigates the role of TRPM Mg(2+ channels, claudines, and EGF in the Mg(2+ homeostasis in a rat model of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Wistar rats were given 2.5 mg/kg cisplatin per week for 3 weeks and were euthanized 4 or 9 weeks after the first administration. The cisplatin treatment significantly increased the fractional excretion of Mg(2+. Real-time RT-PCR and/or Western blots were performed to assess the renal expression TRPM6, TRPM7, claudin-16, claudin-19, EGF, EGF receptor (EGFR and EGFR-pathway components. The renal mRNA expression of TRPM6 and EGF showed a significant decrease after cisplatin treatment, while the TRPM7, claudin-16 and EGFR expressions remained stable. The claudin-19 mRNA expression was significantly upregulated after cisplatin treatment. Western blotting confirmed the mRNA expression data for the claudins, but an showed upregulation of EGFR only at week 9. The role of the EGFR pathway, involving Pi3-AKT-Rac1, in cisplatin-induced nephropathy, could not be substantiated in further detail. This study shows that cisplatin treatment results in EGF and TRPM6 downregulation in the rat kidney, causing renal Mg(2+ loss. Our results are in line with the hypothesis that EGF influences the renal expression or activation of TRPM6 and plays a significant role in Mg(2+ loss in medication-induced nephropathy.

  6. Downregulation of XPF-ERCC1 enhances cisplatin efficacy in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Sanjeevani; Kothandapani, Anbarasi; Tillison, Kristin; Kalman-Maltese, Vivian; Patrick, Steve M

    2010-07-01

    Bulky cisplatin lesions are repaired primarily by nucleotide excision repair (NER), in which the structure specific endonuclease XPF-ERCC1 is a critical component. It is now known that the XPF-ERCC1 complex has repair functions beyond NER and plays a role in homologous recombination (HR). It has been suggested that expression of ERCC1 correlates with cisplatin drug resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In our study, using NSCLC, ovarian, and breast cancer cells, we show that the XPF-ERCC1 complex is a valid target to increase cisplatin cytotoxicity and efficacy. We targeted XPF-ERCC1 complex by RNA interference and assessed the repair capacity of cisplatin intrastrand and interstrand crosslinks by ELISA and alkaline comet assay, respectively. We also assessed the repair of cisplatin-ICL-induced double-strand breaks (DSBs) by monitoring gamma-H2AX focus formation. Interestingly, XPF protein levels were significantly reduced following ERCC1 downregulation, but the converse was not observed. The transcript levels were unaffected suggesting that XPF protein stability is likely affected. The repair of both types of cisplatin-DNA lesions was decreased with downregulation of XPF, ERCC1 or both XPF-ERCC1. The ICL-induced DSBs persist in the absence of XPF-ERCC1. The suppression of the XPF-ERCC1 complex significantly decreases the cellular viability which correlates well with the decrease in DNA repair capacity. A double knockdown of XPF-ERCC1 displays the greatest level of cellular cytotoxicity when compared with XPF or ERCC1 alone. The difference in cytotoxicity observed is likely due to the level of total protein complex remaining. These data demonstrate that XPF-ERCC1 is a valid target to enhance cisplatin efficacy in cancer cells by affecting cisplatin-DNA repair pathways.

  7. REV3L modulates cisplatin sensitivity of non-small cell lung cancer H1299 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjie; Sheng, Wenjiong; Yu, Chenxiao; Cao, Jianping; Zhou, Jundong; Wu, Jinchang; Zhang, Huojun; Zhang, Shuyu

    2015-09-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 80-85% of all cases of lung cancer. Cisplatin plays a significant role in the management of human lung cancer. Translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) is involved in DNA damage repair. DNA polymerase ζ (Pol ζ) is able to mediate the DNA replication bypass of DNA damage, which is suggested to be involved in chemoresistance. REV3L is the catalytic subunit of Pol ζ. Due to its critical role in translesion DNA synthesis, whether REV3L modulates cisplatin response in NSCLC cells remains unknown. In this study, REV3L overexpression and silencing H1299 cell lines were established. The reports showed that cisplatin induced the expression of REV3L by recruiting Sp1 to its promoter. Similar results were obtained when the ability of the cells to express luciferase from a platinated plasmid was measured. Co-transfection of the reporter with the REV3L overexpression vector or REV3L plus REV7L significantly enhanced the reporter activity. Nuclear condensation and fragmentation of shRNA-REV3L H1299 cells were more pronounced than shRNA-NC H1299 cells after cisplatin exposure, indicating that REV3L overexpression abolished cisplatin-induced DNA damage. Moreover, a forced expression of REV3L conferred the resistance of H1299 cells to cisplatin, whereas the knockdown of REV3L sensitized cisplatin efficacy in H1299 cells. Taken together, we demonstrated that inhibition of REV3L sensitized lung cancer H1299 cells to cisplatin treatment. Thus, REV3L may be a novel target for the chemotherapy of NSCLC.

  8. Cisplatin Tumor Biodistribution and Efficacy after Intratumoral Injection of a Biodegradable Extended Release Implant

    OpenAIRE

    Ariella Shikanov; Sergey Shikanov; Boris Vaisman; Jacob Golenser; Domb, Abraham J.

    2011-01-01

    Local delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs has long been recognized as a potential method for reaching high drug doses at the target site while minimizing systemic exposure. Cisplatin is one of the most effective chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of various tumors; however, its systemic toxicity remains the primary dose-limiting factor. Here we report that incorporation of cisplatin into a fatty acid-based polymer carrier followed by a local injection into the solid tumor resulted in a ...

  9. Gemcitabine Plus Cisplatin for Advanced Biliary Tract Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joon Oh; Oh, Do-Youn; Hsu, Chiun; Chen, Jen-Shi; Chen, Li-Tzong; Orlando, Mauro; Kim, Jong Seok; Lim, Ho Yeong

    2015-07-01

    Evidence suggests that combined gemcitabine-cisplatin chemotherapy extends survival in patients with advanced biliary tract cancer (BTC). We conducted a systematic review in order to collate this evidence and assess whether gemcitabine-cisplatin efficacy is influenced by primary tumor site, disease stage, or geographic region, and whether associated toxicities are related to regimen. MEDLINE (1946-search date), EMBASE (1966-search date), ClinicalTrials. gov (2008-search date), and abstracts from major oncology conferences (2009- search date) were searched (5 Dec 2013) using terms for BTC, gemcitabine, and cisplatin. All study types reporting efficacy (survival, response rates) or safety (toxicities) outcomes of gemcitabine-cisplatin in BTC were eligible for inclusion; efficacy data were extracted from prospective studies only. Evidence retrieved from one meta-analysis (abstract), four randomized controlled trials, 12 nonrandomized prospective studies, and three retrospective studies supported the efficacy and safety of gemcitabine-cisplatin for BTC. Median overall survival ranged from 4.6 to 11.7 months, and response rate ranged from 17.1% to 36.6%. Toxicities were generally acceptable and manageable. Heterogeneity in study designs and data collected prevented formal meta-analysis, however exploratory assessments suggested that efficacy did not vary with primary tumor site (gallbladder vs. others), disease stage (metastatic vs. locally advanced), or geographic origin (Asia vs. other). Incidence of grade 3/4 toxicities was not related to gemcitabine dose or cisplatin frequency. Despite individual variation in study designs, the evidence presented suggests that gemcitabine-cisplatin is effective in patients from a diverse range of countries and with heterogeneous disease characteristics. No substantial differences in toxicity were observed among the different dosing schedules of gemcitabine and cisplatin.

  10. Two cases of cisplatin-induced permanent renal failure following neoadjuvant chemotherapy for esophageal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tomohiko Sasaki; Satoru Motoyama; Atsushi Komatsuda; Hiroyuki Shibata; Yusuke Sato; Kei Yoshino; Akiyuki Wakita; Hajime Saito; Akira Anbai; Mario Jin; Yoshihiro Minamiya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: We experienced two esophageal cancer patients who developed severe acute renal failure after neoadjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorourasil. Presentation of case: After administration of cisplatin, their serum creatinine increased gradually until they required hemodialysis and their renal failure was permanent. In both cases, renal biopsy examination indicated partial recovery of the proximal tubule, but renal function did not recover. After these events, one pati...

  11. ATP sensitizes H460 lung carcinoma cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swennen, Els L R; Ummels, Vanessa; Buss, Irina; Jaehde, Ulrich; Bast, Aalt; Dagnelie, Pieter C

    2010-03-30

    Platinum resistance of cancer cells may evolve due to a decrease in intracellular drug accumulation, decreased cell permeability or by an increased deactivation of the drug by glutathione (GSH). The aim of this study was (1) to investigate the effect of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) on the cytotoxicity of cisplatin in a large cell lung carcinoma cell line (H460), and (2) to examine the potential involvement of increased cisplatin uptake, GSH depletion and pyrimidine starvation by ATP in this effect. H460 cells were harvested and seeded (5% CO(2); 37 degrees C). Subsequently, cells were incubated with medium or ATP followed by an incubation with cisplatin. Cytotoxicity screening was analyzed by the sulforhodamine B (SRB) colorimetric assay, lactate dehydrogenase and caspase-3/7 activity. Pre-incubation for 72h with 0.3 and 3mM ATP strongly enhanced the anti-proliferative potency of cisplatin 2.9- and 7.6-fold, respectively. Moreover, after incubation of H460 cells with 0.3mM ATP the intracellular platinum concentration increased, indicating increased cisplatin uptake by ATP. ATP, despite lowering the LD(50) of cisplatin, did not modulate GSH levels in H460 cells. ATP itself showed a biphasic effect on H460 cell growth: 0.3mM inhibited H460 cell growth via the pyrimidine starvation effect, activation of caspase-3/7 and LDH leakage, while 3mM ATP showed no effect on cell growth. In conclusion, ATP sensitizes the H460 cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. The effect of 0.3mM ATP is not due to GSH depletion but involves increased cisplatin uptake and pyrimidine starvation due to ATP conversion to adenosine followed by cellular uptake.

  12. Nephroprotective effect of gelsemine against cisplatin-induced toxicity is mediated via attenuation of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Zheng, Jing; Zhu, Weiping; Jia, Ning

    2015-03-01

    Cisplatin-induced generation of reactive oxygen species leads to acute nephrotoxicity limiting its use in the treatment of various cancers. Gelsemine, an alkaloid isolated from Gelsemium elegans, is known to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activities. This study was aimed to investigate as to whether gelsemine can serve as a protective agent against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Male Wistar rats were divided into 6 groups, each with 6 rats. Group 1 served as control and received the vehicles (peanut oil for 14 days and 0.9 % saline on day 14 for gelsemine and cisplatin respectively). Group 2 received a single intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin on day 14. Group 3 and 4 were pretreated with two different doses of gelsemine in addition to cisplatin, and group 5 and 6 received only gelsemine. The effects of gelsemine on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity were examined by measuring anti-oxidant enzymes activities, lipid peroxidation, and DNA damage in the kidneys, a well-established model of oxidative damage. Pretreatment of rats with gelsemine caused a significant attenuation of cisplatin-induced DNA and oxidative damages. The blockade of lipid peroxidation and xanthine oxidase activity was accompanied by increased production and/or activity of anti-oxidants, both enzymatic (catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione-S-transferase) and non-enzymatic (GSH). The biomarkers of kidney malfunctioning, creatinine, and blood urea nitrogen were ameliorated. The results of the present study suggest that gelsemine effectively suppressed cisplatin-induced renal injury by improving redox status.

  13. Protective effect of riboflavin on cisplatin induced toxicities: a gender-dependent study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Imrana; Hassan, Iftekhar; Alhazza, Ibrahim M; Chibber, Sandesh

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity exerted by the anticancer drug, cisplatin in vivo is functional to many factors such as dose, duration, gender and age etc. The present study is aimed to investigate if ameliorative potential of riboflavin on cisplatin induced toxicity is gender dependent. Eighty four adult mice from male and female sex were divided into seven groups (n=6) for both sexes. They were treated with riboflavin (2mg/kg), cisplatin (2mg/kg) and their two different combinations (cisplatin at 2mg/kg with 1mg/kg and 2mg/kg of riboflavin) under photoillumination with their respective controls for the combination groups without photoillumination. After treatment, all groups were sacrificed and their kidney, liver and serum were collected for biochemical estimations, comet assay and histopathology. In the present investigation, it was evident from antioxidant and detoxification studies (SOD, CAT, GSH, GST, MDA and carbonyl level) that the female mice exhibited better tolerance towards cisplatin inducted toxicity and the ameliorative effect of riboflavin against cisplatin toxicity was found stronger in their combination groups as compared to the male groups as the activity of all antioxidant enzymes were found better concomitant with lower level of MDA and carbonyl contents in the female combination groups than their male counterparts. Furthermore, single cell gel electrophoresis and histopathological examination confirmed that restoration of normal nuclear and cellular integrity was more prominent in female with respect to the males after treatment in the combination groups in a dose-dependent manner. Hence, this study reveals that cisplatin is more toxic in male mice and the ameliorative effect of riboflavin against cisplatin toxicity is stronger in female mice.

  14. Anticancer activity of liposomal cisplatin in preclinical models of cervical and ovarian cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Casagrande, Naike

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin-based chemotherapy improves survival in cervical and ovarian cancer; however, treatment is associated with tumor resistance and significant toxicity. Lipoplatin (Regulon Inc., Mountain View, California) is a liposomal encapsulated form of cisplatin, developed in an effort to reduce cisplatin‟s systemic toxicity, while simultaneously improving the targeting of drugs to primary tumor and metastasis. Lipoplatin has been successfully administered in several randomized Phase II and II...

  15. Cisplatin selects for stem-like cells in osteosarcoma by activating Notch signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ling; Fan, Zhengfu; Fang, Shuo; Yang, Jian; Gao, Tian; Simões, Bruno M; Eyre, Rachel; Guo, Weichun; Clarke, Robert B

    2016-05-31

    Notch signaling regulates normal stem cells and is also thought to regulate cancer stem cells (CSCs). Recent data indicate that Notch signaling plays a role in the development and progression of osteosarcoma, however the regulation of Notch in chemo-resistant stem-like cells has not yet been fully elucidated. In this study we generated cisplatin-resistant osteosarcoma cells by treating them with sub-lethal dose of cisplatin, sufficient to induce DNA damage responses. Cisplatin-resistant osteosarcoma cells exhibited lower proliferation, enhanced spheroid formation and more mesenchymal characteristics than cisplatin-sensitive cells, were enriched for Stro-1+/CD117+ cells and showed increased expression of stem cell-related genes. A similar effect was observed in vivo, and in addition in vivo tumorigenicity was enhanced during serial transplantation. Using several publicly available datasets, we identified that Notch expression was closely associated with osteosarcoma stem cells and chemotherapy resistance. We confirmed that cisplatin-induced enrichment of osteosarcoma stem cells was mediated through Notch signaling in vitro, and immunohistochemistry showed that cleaved Notch1 (NICD1) positive cells were significantly increased in a relapsed xenograft which had received cisplatin treatment. Furthermore, pretreatment with a γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI) to prevent Notch signalling inhibited cisplatin-enriched osteosarcoma stem cell activity in vitro, including Stro-1+/CD117+ double positive cells and spheroid formation capacity. The Notch inhibitor DAPT also prevented tumor recurrence in resistant xenograft tumors. Overall, our results show that cisplatin induces the enrichment of osteosarcoma stem-like cells through Notch signaling, and targeted inactivation of Notch may be useful for the elimination of CSCs and overcoming drug resistance.

  16. Protective role of apigenin in cisplatin-induced renal injury.

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    He, Xuexiu; Li, Chunmei; Wei, Zhengkai; Wang, Jingjing; Kou, Jinhua; Liu, Weijian; Shi, Mingyu; Yang, Zhengtao; Fu, Yunhe

    2016-10-15

    This study aimed to investigate the effects and molecular mechanisms of the effects of apigenin on cisplatin (CP)-induced kidney injury in mice. Apigenin was intraperitoneally administered for 3 consecutive days before CP treatment. We found that apigenin pretreatment significantly attenuated the damage to the kidneys and decreased the levels of serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) and superoxide dismutase (SOD), which were increased by CP. Apigenin significantly decreased the levels of TNF-α, IL-1β and TGFβ in the kidneys. Additionally, apigenin inhibited the activations of CYP2E1, phospho-NF-κB p65 and phospho-P38 MAPK in CP-induced renal injury. These results suggest that the renoprotective effects of apigenin may be related to the suppressions of oxidative stress and inflammation in CP-induced renal injury in mice.

  17. Plant-Derived Agents for Counteracting Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity

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    Venkataraman, Balaji; Kurdi, Amani; Mahgoub, Eglal; Sadek, Bassem

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin (CSP) is a chemotherapeutic agent commonly used to treat a variety of malignancies. The major setback with CSP treatment is that its clinical efficacy is compromised by its induction of organ toxicity, particular to the kidneys and ears. Despite the significant strides that have been made in understanding the mechanisms underlying CSP-induced renal toxicity, advances in developing renoprotective strategies are still lacking. In addition, the renoprotective approaches described in the literature reveal partial amelioration of CSP-induced renal toxicity, stressing the need to develop potent combinatorial/synergistic agents for the mitigation of renal toxicity. However, the ideal renoprotective adjuvant should not interfere with the anticancer efficacy of CSP. In this review, we have discussed the progress made in utilizing plant-derived agents (phytochemicals) to combat CSP-induced nephrotoxicity in preclinical studies. Furthermore, we have also presented strategies to utilize phytochemicals as prototypes for the development of novel renoprotective agents for counteracting chemotherapy-induced renal damage.

  18. [Schisandrin B protects against nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin in HK-2 cells via Nrf2-ARE activation].

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    Li, Mei; Jin, Jing; Li, Jia; Guan, Cui-Wen; Wang, Wen-Wen; Qiu, Yu-Wen; Huang, Zhi-Ying

    2012-11-01

    This study is to investigate the protection effect of schisandrin B (Sch B) against oxidation stress of HK-2 cells induced by cisplatin and the mechanisms involved. HK-2 cells were cultured and divided into different groups: solvent control group, cisplatin exposure group, positive group, Sch B treatment group. Cell viability and toxicity were evaluated by MTT and LDH assay. GSH level and SOD enzymes activities were also measured. DCFH-DA as fluorescence probe was used to detect ROS level by fluorescence microplate reader. Nrf2 translocation was detected by Western blotting. Real time Q-PCR was used to detect expressions of NQO1, HO-1 and GCLC mRNA level. The results showed that Sch B could significantly inhibit the decline of cell viability induced by cisplatin treatment (P cisplatin and reversed the decrease of GSH level (P cisplatin group (P cisplatin via the activation of Nrf2/ARE signal pathway.

  19. Riboflavin as adjuvant with cisplatin: study in mouse skin cancer model.

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    Salman, Maria; Naseem, Imrana

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin used in treatment of solid tumor induces oxidative stress which leads to hepatotoxicity and nephrotoxicity. New strategies are therefore needed to combat toxicity and optimize its therapeutic potential. Riboflavin (VitaminB2) under photoillumination works as an anti proliferative agent and induces apoptosis. These properties of riboflavin have been exploited to mitigate cisplatin induced toxicities. 9,10-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene /12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate  were used to induce skin tumor in Swiss albino mice. The tumor induced mice were treated with cisplatin, riboflavin as well as their combination under photo illumination. In comparison to tumor control group the cisplatin and riboflavin treated groups showed a compromised level of antioxidant enzymes, functional markers and a higher degree of lipid peroxidation. However these parameters tended towards normal in the combination treated group. The results from histopathology indicate that apoptosis was favored mode of cell death and that necrosis was reduced in combination treated groups. Our findings indicate that combination of cisplatin with riboflavin under photo illumination synergizes its anti cancer activity towards cancer cells and attenuates the cisplatin induced toxicities.

  20. The Role of Thiamine Pyrophosphate in Prevention of Cisplatin Ototoxicity in an Animal Model

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    Ozan Kuduban

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of thiamine pyrophosphate against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in guinea pigs. Materials and Methods. Healthy guinea pigs (n=18 were randomly divided into three groups. Group 1 (n=6 received an intraperitoneal injection of saline solution and cisplatin for 7 days, group 2 (n=6 received an intraperitoneal injection of thiamine pyrophosphate and cisplatin for 7 days, and group 3 (n=6 received only intraperitoneal injection of saline for 7 days. The animals in all groups were sacrificed under anesthesia, and their cochleas were harvested for morphological and biochemical observations. Results. In group 1, receiving only cisplatin, cochlear glutathione concentrations, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase activities significantly decreased (P<0.05 and malondialdehyde concentrations significantly increased (P<0.05 compared to the control group. In group 2, receiving thiamine pyrophosphate and cisplatin, the concentrations of enzymes were near those of the control group. Microscopic examination showed that outer hair cells, spiral ganglion cells, and stria vascularis were preserved in group 2. Conclusion. Systemic administration of thiamine pyrophosphate yielded statistically significant protection to the cochlea of guinea pigs from cisplatin toxicity. Further experimental animal studies are essential to determine the appropriate indications of thiamine pyrophosphate before clinical use.

  1. Determination of Liposomal Cisplatin by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography and Its Application in Pharmacokinetic Studies

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    Toro-Córdova, Alfonso; Ledezma-Gallegos, Fabricio; Mondragon-Fuentes, Laura; Jurado, Rafael; Medina, Luis A.; Pérez-Rojas, Jazmin M.; Garcia-Lopez, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Liposomes have been employed as carriers for antineoplastic drugs to improve delivery. We describe an HPLC–UV method for determining cisplatin levels in liposomal and biological samples, which represents an attractive alternative to the widely used flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. Liposomal cisplatin was extracted from liposomes, plasma and tissue samples by using acetonitrile and separated on a Symmetry C18 column. The mobile phase was a mixture of water, methanol and acetonitrile, and detection was performed at 254 nm. The method was linear in the range of 0.5–10 µg/mL. Using this method, cisplatin concentration was measured in plasma, kidney, liver and tumor at different times post-administration of liposomal cisplatin. This method is proved suitable for measuring the levels of cisplatin encapsulated in a liposomal system, in plasma or tissue samples of experimental animals, after intravenous administration of liposomal cisplatin. Owing to the small plasma volume employed, a complete pharmacokinetic study can be done with a single animal. PMID:27013666

  2. Apoptosis induced by piroxicam plus cisplatin combined treatment is triggered by p21 in mesothelioma.

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    Alfonso Baldi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malignant mesothelioma (MM is a rare, highly aggressive tumor, associated to asbestos exposure. To date no chemotherapy regimen for MM has proven to be definitively curative, and new therapies for MM treatment need to be developed. We have previously shown in vivo that piroxicam/cisplatin combined treatment in MM, specifically acts on cell cycle regulation triggering apoptosis, with survival increase. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We analyzed, at molecular level, the apoptotic increase caused by piroxicam/cisplatin treatment in MM cell lines. By means of genome wide analyses, we analyzed transcriptional gene deregulation both after the single piroxicam or cisplatin and the combined treatment. Here we show that apoptotic increase following combined treatment is mediated by p21, since apoptotic increase in piroxicam/cisplatin combined treatment is abolished upon p21 silencing. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Piroxicam/cisplatin combined treatment determines an apoptosis increase in MM cells, which is dependent on the p21 expression. The results provided suggest that piroxicam/cisplatin combination might be tested in clinical settings in tumor specimens that express p21.

  3. Synergistic effect of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and cisplatin in human cervical carcinoma.

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    Zheng, Xiaodong; Lv, Jieqiang; Shen, Qi; Chen, Yumei; Zhou, Qingfeng; Zhang, Wenwen; Zhu, Xueqiong

    2014-10-01

    We aimed to delineate how pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) affects nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and to determine its antitumor activity alone and in combination with cisplatin in human cervical cancer SiHa cells. The SiHa cells were treated with various concentrations of PDTC and/or cisplatin at various time intervals. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined using a water-soluble tetrazolium salt 8 assay and flow cytometry. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay was used to assess NF-κB activity. Pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (2.5-100 µmol/L) was found to inhibit the growth of SiHa cell lines. Cisplatin (0.01-20.0 μg/mL) and PDTC (2.5-20.0 µmol/L) combined demonstrated additive inhibitive effects on cell growth and increased the level of apoptosis. In addition, PDTC blocked cisplatin-induced activation of NF-κB, leading to enhanced apoptosis and increased chemosensitivity to cisplatin. Taken together, PDTC has significant potential as a chemotherapy agent, alone or in combination with cisplatin.

  4. The Preventive Effect of Oxytocin to Cisplatin-Induced Neurotoxicity: An Experimental Rat Model

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    Tulay Akman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neurotoxicity is a frequent dose-limiting side effect of the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin. This study was conducted to investigate the preventive effect of oxytocin (OT on cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity in rats. Forty-four adult female rats were included in the study. Thirty-six rats were administered intraperitoneally (i.p. single dose cisplatin 10 mg/kg and divided in to 3 groups. The first group (n=12 received saline i.p., whereas the second group (n=12 and the third group (n=12 were injected with 80 µg/kg and 160 µg/kg OT, respectively, for 10 days. The remaining 8 rats served as the control group. Electromyography (EMG studies were recorded and blood samples were collected for the measurement of plasma lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde; MDA, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, and glutathione (GSH levels. EMG findings revealed that compound muscle action potential amplitude was significantly decreased and distal latency was prolonged in the nontreated cisplatin-injected rats compared with the control group (P<0.005. Also, nontreated cisplatin-injected rats showed significantly higher TNF-α and MDA levels and lower GSH level than control group. The administration of OT significantly ameliorated the EMG alterations, suppressed oxidative stress and inflammatory parameters, and increased antioxidative capacity. We suggest that oxytocin may have beneficial effects against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity.

  5. Possible Protective Effect of Sertraline against Cisplatin-Induced Ototoxicity: An Experimental Study

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    Murat Ozturk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective. Cisplatin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent, but its ototoxicity side effect can occur in the majority of patients. Lots of agents were tried to prevent this, but there is not a routine treatment modality yet. The aim of this study was to evaluate the otoprotective effect of sertraline, which is an antidepressant with neuroprotective effects, against cisplatin, in rats. Design. Experimental animal study. Material and Methods. Forty-eight rats were randomly separated in two groups as groups I and II. Group I was identified as the control group and only a single dose of intraperitoneal cisplatin was administered. In group II, in addition to cisplatin, sertraline was administered to the rats through an oral cannula for ten-day period. Distortion product otoacoustic emission measurements were performed at the first day and the 10th day. Results. When the ototoxicity rates after cisplatin in group I and group II in distortion product otoacoustic emission measurements were compared, it was statistically significantly lower in group II in frequencies of 5652, 6165, 6726, 7336, and 7996 Hz (. Conclusion. Sertraline seems to have a protective effect on cisplatin ototoxicity and could be used to prevent the ototoxicity and also to treat the depression that occurred in cancer patients together.

  6. Voluntary exercise prevents cisplatin-induced muscle wasting during chemotherapy in mice.

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    Pernille Hojman

    Full Text Available Loss of muscle mass related to anti-cancer therapy is a major concern in cancer patients, being associated with important clinical endpoints including survival, treatment toxicity and patient-related outcomes. We investigated effects of voluntary exercise during cisplatin treatment on body weight, food intake as well as muscle mass, strength and signalling. Mice were treated weekly with 4 mg/kg cisplatin or saline for 6 weeks, and randomized to voluntary wheel running or not. Cisplatin treatment induced loss of body weight (29.8%, P < 0.001, lean body mass (20.6%, P = 0.001, as well as anorexia, impaired muscle strength (22.5% decrease, P < 0.001 and decreased glucose tolerance. In addition, cisplatin impaired Akt-signalling, induced genes related to protein degradation and inflammation, and reduced muscle glycogen content. Voluntary wheel running during treatment attenuated body weight loss by 50% (P < 0.001, maintained lean body mass (P < 0.001 and muscle strength (P < 0.001, reversed anorexia and impairments in Akt and protein degradation signalling. Cisplatin-induced muscular inflammation was not prevented by voluntary wheel running, nor was glucose tolerance improved. Exercise training may preserve muscle mass in cancer patients receiving cisplatin treatment, potentially improving physical capacity, quality of life and overall survival.

  7. Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidant Mitoquinone Reduces Cisplatin-Induced Ototoxicity in Guinea Pigs.

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    Tate, Alan D; Antonelli, Patrick J; Hannabass, Kyle R; Dirain, Carolyn O

    2017-03-01

    Objective To determine if mitoquinone (MitoQ) attenuates cisplatin-induced hearing loss in guinea pigs. Study Design Prospective and controlled animal study. Setting Academic, tertiary medical center. Subjects and Methods Guinea pigs were injected subcutaneously with either 5 mg/kg MitoQ (n = 9) or normal saline (control, n = 9) for 7 days and 1 hour before receiving a single dose of 10 mg/kg cisplatin. Auditory brainstem response thresholds were measured before MitoQ or saline administration and 3 to 4 days after cisplatin administration. Results Auditory brainstem response threshold shifts after cisplatin treatment were smaller by 28 to 47 dB in guinea pigs injected with MitoQ compared with those in the control group at all tested frequencies (4, 8, 16, and 24 kHz, P = .0002 to .04). Scanning electron microscopy of cochlear hair cells showed less outer hair cell loss and damage in the MitoQ group. Conclusion MitoQ reduced cisplatin-induced hearing loss in guinea pigs. MitoQ appears worthy of further investigation as a means of preventing cisplatin ototoxicity in humans.

  8. Antiemetic and Myeloprotective Effects of Rhus verniciflua Stoke in a Cisplatin-Induced Rat Model

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    Kim, Hyo-Seon; Kim, Hyeong-Geug; Im, Hwi-Jin; Lee, Jin-Seok; Lee, Sung-Bae; Kim, Won-Yong; Lee, Hye-Won; Lee, Sam-Keun; Byun, Chang Kyu

    2017-01-01

    Rhus verniciflua Stoke has been commonly used in traditional medicine to treat gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction diseases. In order to investigate pharmacological properties of Rhus verniciflua Stoke water extract (RVX) on cisplatin-induced amnesia, RVX (0, 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg) was orally administrated for five consecutive days after a single intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin (6 mg/kg) to SD rat. Cisplatin injection significantly increased the kaolin intake (emesis) but reduced the normal diet intake (anorexia) whereas the RVX treatment significantly improved these abnormal diet behaviors at both the acute and delayed phase. The serotonin concentration and the related gene expressions (5-HT3 receptors and SERT) in small intestine tissue were abnormally altered by cisplatin injection, which were significantly attenuated by the RVX treatment. Histological findings of gastrointestinal tracts, as well as the proteins level of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β), revealed the beneficial effect of RVX on cisplatin-induced gastrointestinal inflammation. In addition, RVX significantly improved cisplatin-induced myelosuppression, as evidenced by the observation of leukopenia and by histological examinations in bone marrow. Our findings collectively indicated Rhus verniciflua Stoke improved the resistance of rats to chemotherapy-related adverse effects in the gastrointestinal track and bone marrow.

  9. Hydrogen protects auditory hair cells from cisplatin-induced free radicals.

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    Kikkawa, Yayoi S; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Taniguchi, Mirei; Ito, Juichi

    2014-09-05

    Cisplatin is a widely used chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of various malignancies. However, its maximum dose is often limited by severe ototoxicity. Cisplatin ototoxicity may require the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the inner ear by activating enzymes specific to the cochlea. Molecular hydrogen was recently established as an antioxidant that selectively reduces ROS, and has been reported to protect the central nervous system, liver, kidney and cochlea from oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of molecular hydrogen to protect cochleae against cisplatin. We cultured mouse cochlear explants in medium containing various concentrations of cisplatin and examined the effects of hydrogen gas dissolved directly into the media. Following 48-h incubation, the presence of intact auditory hair cells was assayed by phalloidin staining. Cisplatin caused hair cell loss in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the addition of hydrogen gas significantly increased the numbers of remaining auditory hair cells. Additionally, hydroxyphenyl fluorescein (HPF) staining of the spiral ganglion showed that formation of hydroxyl radicals was successfully reduced in hydrogen-treated cochleae. These data suggest that molecular hydrogen can protect auditory tissues against cisplatin toxicity, thus providing an additional strategy to protect against drug-induced inner ear damage.

  10. Effects of Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol and Cannabidiol on Cisplatin-Induced Neuropathy in Mice.

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    Harris, Hannah M; Sufka, Kenneth J; Gul, Waseem; ElSohly, Mahmoud A

    2016-08-01

    Sativex, a cannabinoid extract with a 1 : 1 ratio of tetrahydocannabinol and cannabidiol, has been shown to alleviate neuropathic pain associated with chemotherapy. This research examined whether tetrahydocannabinol or cannabidiol alone could attenuate or prevent cisplatin-induced tactile allodynia. In experiment 1, mice (C57BL/6) received eight administrations of 2.3 mg/kg cisplatin or saline solution IP every other day to induce tactile allodynia. Mice were then administered vehicle, 100 mg/kg gabapentin, 2 mg/kg tetrahydocannabinol, or 2 mg/kg cannabidiol IP and tested 60 min later on an electronic Von Frey. In experiment 2, prevention studies, cannabidiol (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/kg) or tetrahydocannabinol (0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/kg) was given IP 30 min prior to cisplatin administration (2.3 or 1.0 mg/kg) utilizing a six-dose alternate day protocol. In both studies, tactile responses to the hind paws were quantified in g of force using an electronic Von Frey prior to and after the cisplatin administration protocol. Cisplatin produced a reduction in g of force indicative of neuropathy that was attenuated by gabapentin, tetrahydocannabinol, and cannabidiol but not prevented by either cannabinoid. These data demonstrate that each of the major constituents of Sativex alone can achieve analgesic effects against cisplatin neuropathy.

  11. Mechanism of Cisplatin-Induced Cytotoxicity Is Correlated to Impaired Metabolism Due to Mitochondrial ROS Generation.

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    Yong-Min Choi

    Full Text Available The chemotherapeutic use of cisplatin is limited by its severe side effects. In this study, by conducting different omics data analyses, we demonstrated that cisplatin induces cell death in a proximal tubular cell line by suppressing glycolysis- and tricarboxylic acid (TCA/mitochondria-related genes. Furthermore, analysis of the urine from cisplatin-treated rats revealed the lower expression levels of enzymes involved in glycolysis, TCA cycle, and genes related to mitochondrial stability and confirmed the cisplatin-related metabolic abnormalities. Additionally, an increase in the level of p53, which directly inhibits glycolysis, has been observed. Inhibition of p53 restored glycolysis and significantly reduced the rate of cell death at 24 h and 48 h due to p53 inhibition. The foremost reason of cisplatin-related cytotoxicity has been correlated to the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS that influence multiple pathways. Abnormalities in these pathways resulted in the collapse of mitochondrial energy production, which in turn sensitized the cells to death. The quenching of ROS led to the amelioration of the affected pathways. Considering these observations, it can be concluded that there is a significant correlation between cisplatin and metabolic dysfunctions involving mROS as the major player.

  12. Does Doxycycline work in synergy with cisplatin and oxaliplatin in colorectal cancer?

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    Taanman JanWillem

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, apart from antibacterial properties, doxycycline is reported to have cytotoxic and anti-proliferative actions in various cancers including colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer constitutes one of the most common cancers in the western population. Apart from surgery, chemotherapy plays crucial role in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Cisplatin and oxaliplatin are most commonly used platinum compounds for the cancer chemotherapy. This study has looked for any impact of doxycycline on the cytotoxic effects of platinum compounds in colorectal cancer including its mechanisms of actions. Methods HT 29 colorectal cancer cells were used for this study. These cells were treated with cisplatin and oxaliplatin with or without doxycycline treatment. The caspase 3 gene expression was quantitated by gel electrophoresis and qualitated by real time polymerase chain reactions. The caspase 3 activity was assessed in HT 29 cells with fluorescence kit. Results The results revealed increased caspase 3 gene expressions and activities in HT 29 cells treated with cisplatin, oxaliplatin and doxycycline; however the combination of doxycycline with cisplatin and oxaliplatin did not report increased caspase 3 gene expressions and activity compared to cisplatin and oxaliplatin alone. Conclusion We concluded that doxycycline has role in apoptosis induction in the colorectal cancer. However, it did not show any synergy with platinum compounds in the colorectal cancer cells. This study also pointed towards possible caspase-independent actions of doxycycline with cisplatin and oxaliplatin. However, further work is required to underpin the mechanisms of actions of doxycycline.

  13. A H2S Donor GYY4137 Exacerbates Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Mice

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    Mi Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence demonstrated that hydrogen sulfide (H2S is highly involved in inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis and contributes to the pathogenesis of kidney diseases. However, the role of H2S in cisplatin nephrotoxicity is still debatable. Here we investigated the effect of GYY4137, a novel slow-releasing H2S donor, on cisplatin nephrotoxicity in mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were pretreated with GYY4137 for 72 h prior to cisplatin injection. After cisplatin treatment for 72 h, mice developed obvious renal dysfunction and kidney injury as evidenced by elevated blood urea nitrogen (BUN and histological damage. Consistently, these mice also showed increased proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β in circulation and/or kidney tissues. Meanwhile, circulating thiobarbituric aid-reactive substances (TBARS and renal apoptotic indices including caspase-3, Bak, and Bax were all elevated. However, application of GYY4137 further aggravated renal dysfunction and kidney structural injury in line with promoted inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptotic response following cisplatin treatment. Taken together, our results suggested that GYY4137 exacerbated cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice possibly through promoting inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptotic response.

  14. Amelioration of cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity in Swiss albino mice by Rubia cordifolia extract

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    Joy Jisha

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cisplatin is one of the most effective chemotherapeutics against a wide range of cancers including head, neck, ovarian and lung cancers. But its usefulness is limited by its toxicity to normal tissues, including cells of the kidney proximal tubule. The purpose of the present study is to investigate whether the hydro-alcoholic extract of Rubia cordifolia could decrease the intensity of toxicity in Swiss albino mice. Materials and Methods: Cisplatin at a dose of 12 mg/kg body wt was administered intraperitoneally to Swiss albino mice. Another set of animals was given hydro-alcoholic extract of Rubia cordifolia at different doses along with cisplatin treatment. The antioxidant levels, serum creatinine, serum urea etc. were analyzed. Results: The extract could significantly decrease the cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity as inferred from the tissue antioxidant status in the drug administered animals. Remarkable change was observed in serum creatinine and urea levels. Lipid peroxidation in the kidney and liver tissues was also considerably reduced in Rubia cordifolia extract treated animals. Conclusion: Hydro-alcoholic extracts of Rubia cordifolia are effective in reducing the renal damage caused by the cancer chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin. Since Rubia cordifolia has been in use as an important ingredient in the traditional Ayurvedic system of medicine, it could be safe and beneficial to use this herbal extract as an adjuvant to ameliorate renal damage in patients undergoing cancer chemotherapy with cisplatin.

  15. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy: Add high-frequency audiometry in the regimen

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    R Arora

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Cisplatin-induced ototoxicity shows high interindividual variability and is often accompanied by transient or permanent tinnitus. It is not possible to identify the susceptible individuals before commencement of the treatment. We conducted a prospective, randomized and observational study in a tertiary care centre and evaluated the effects of different doses of cisplatin on hearing. Materials and Methods : Fifty-seven patients scheduled for cisplatin-based chemotherapy were included in the study. All patients were divided into three groups depending on the dose of cisplatin infused in 3 weeks. Results : The subjective hearing loss was found in seven patients, while six patients had tinnitus during the chemotherapy. The hearing loss was sensorineural, dose dependent, symmetrical, bilateral and irreversible. Higher frequencies were first to be affected in cisplatin chemotherapy. Conclusion : As use of high-frequency audiometry is still limited in research work only, we need a strict protocol of adding high-frequency audiometry in the cisplatin-based chemotherapy regimen.

  16. Protective effects of sildenafil citrate administration on cisplatin-induced ovarian damage in rats.

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    Taskin, Mine Islimye; Yay, Arzu; Adali, Ertan; Balcioglu, Esra; Inceboz, Umit

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of sildenafil citrate on cisplatin-induced ovarian toxicity. Thirty-two female rats were divided into four groups. Group 1: saline control; group 2: cisplatin; group 3: sildenafil citrate; and group 4: cisplatin plus sildenafil citrate group. In groups 2 and 4, the rats were injected with 5 mg/kg cisplatin intraperitoneally (i.p.). In groups 3 and 4, the rats were injected with 1.4 mg/kg sildenafil citrate i.p. The ovaries were removed two weeks later in all groups. Histopathologic examination, follicle counting and classification were performed. The expression of anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) was detected immunohistochemically in the ovarian tissues. Sildenafil alleviated cisplatin-induced histopathological changes in the ovarian tissue. Primordial, secondary and tertiary follicles were diminished in group 2 compared with group 1 (p sildenafil citrate preserved primordial follicle count in group 4 compared with group 2, and the difference was statistically significant (p sildenafil citrate is beneficial for protecting the ovaries from cisplatin-induced damage. Sildenafil citrate can be a choice for fertility preservation.

  17. HIF-1α/MDR1 pathway confers chemoresistance to cisplatin in bladder cancer.

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    Sun, Yi; Guan, Zhenfeng; Liang, Liang; Cheng, Yongyi; Zhou, Jiancheng; Li, Jing; Xu, Yonggang

    2016-03-01

    Bladder cancer (BCa) is the 9th most common malignant tumor and the 13th leading cause of death due to cancer. The development of surgery and target drugs bring new challenges for the traditional concept for BCa therapy, and chemotherapy is still the final option for many BCa patients, and cisplatin-containing regimen the most effective one. However, the ubiquitous application of cisplatin-containing regimen in BCa results in the cisplatin-resistance, in addition, the cisplatin‑resistant BCa manifests enhanced malignant behavior, the mechanism of which is unclear. In the present study, we used BCa cell lines to to clarify this point. BCa cell lines T24/J82 were pretreated with cisplatin >3 months to construct stable cisplatin-resistant cell lines (tagged T24(Cis-R) and J82(Cis-R)), which manifested as enhanced capacity of proliferation and malignant behavior in vivo and in vitro, accompanied by cisplatin, and even doxorubicin resistance. The following mechanism dissection revealed that prolonged treatment time of T24/J82 cells led to elevated expression of HIF-1α, which targeted the increased expression of MDR1 on the one hand, and contributed to BCa cell proliferation, migration/invasion on the other hand. Finally, IHC staining of human BCa tissue supported our conclusion that the expression of HIF-1α and MDR1 was higher in chemoresistant tissue vs. chemosensitive tissue. Our results provided a new view of HIF-1α in chemotherapy.

  18. Bucillamine prevents cisplatin-induced ototoxicity through induction of glutathione and antioxidant genes.

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    Kim, Se-Jin; Ho Hur, Joon; Park, Channy; Kim, Hyung-Jin; Oh, Gi-Su; Lee, Joon No; Yoo, Su-Jin; Choe, Seong-Kyu; So, Hong-Seob; Lim, David J; Moon, Sung K; Park, Raekil

    2015-02-20

    Bucillamine is used for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This study investigated the protective effects of bucillamine against cisplatin-induced damage in auditory cells, the organ of Corti from postnatal rats (P2) and adult Balb/C mice. Cisplatin increases the catalytic activity of caspase-3 and caspase-8 proteases and the production of free radicals, which were significantly suppressed by pretreatment with bucillamine. Bucillamine induces the intranuclear translocation of Nrf2 and thereby increases the expression of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS) and glutathione synthetase (GSS), which further induces intracellular antioxidant glutathione (GSH), heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) and superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2). However, knockdown studies of HO-1 and SOD2 suggest that the protective effect of bucillamine against cisplatin is independent of the enzymatic activity of HO-1 and SOD. Furthermore, pretreatment with bucillamine protects sensory hair cells on organ of Corti explants from cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity concomitantly with inhibition of caspase-3 activation. The auditory-brainstem-evoked response of cisplatin-injected mice shows marked increases in hearing threshold shifts, which was markedly suppressed by pretreatment with bucillamine in vivo. Taken together, bucillamine protects sensory hair cells from cisplatin through a scavenging effect on itself, as well as the induction of intracellular GSH.

  19. Science behind cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in humans:A clinical study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Arunkumar PA; Viswanatha GL; Radheshyam N; Mukund H; Belliyappa MS

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relationship between serum electrolyte changes and cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity. Methods: We collected data from 18 patients undergoing cisplatin chemotherapy including serum electrolytes, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and urine potassium, sodium and pH levels before and after the cisplatin chemotherapy. All the patients had cancer and were treated with 40-50 mg/day cisplatin. Renal injury was assessed by measuring serum electrolytes, creatinine, BUN levels and urine potassium, sodium and pH levels.Results:The five cycles of cisplatin based chemotherapy resulted in hypomagnesia (P=0.029), hypocalcaemia (P=0.001*), hypophosphatemia (P=0.003*), hypokalemia (P=0.001*) and increased serum creatinine (P=0.001*) and BUN (P=0.292*) levels. In urine analysis, decrease in potassium (P=0.024*) was found, except potassium there was no significant changes in sodium and urine pH.Conclusions:The present study demonstrates that, acute nephrotoxicity was observed in patients with different types of cancers undergoing cisplatin based chemotherapy due to electrolyte disturbances, when no corrective measures were initiated.

  20. Liver cancer stem cells are selectively enriched by low-dose cisplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence has indicated the importance of cancer stem cells in carcinogenesis. The goal of the present study was to determine the effect of low-dose cisplatin on enriched liver cancer stem cells (LCSCs. Human hepatoblastoma HepG2 cells were treated with concentrations of cisplatin ranging from 1 to 5 μg/mL. Cell survival and proliferation were evaluated using a tetrazolium dye (MTT assay. LCSCs were identified using specific markers, namely aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 (ALDH1 and CD133. The percentage of ALDH1+ or CD133+ cells was examined by flow cytometric analysis. The expression of ALDH1 and/or CD133 in HepG2 cells was determined by immunocytochemical analysis. Low-dose cisplatin treatment significantly decreased cell survival in HepG2 cells after 24 or 72 h. However, the percentage of LCSCs in the surviving cells was greatly increased. The percentage of ALDH1+ or CD133+ cells was increased in a time- and dose-dependent manner after treatment with 1-4 μg/mL cisplatin, whereas 5 μg/mL cisplatin exposure slightly reduced the number of positive cells. These findings indicate that low-dose cisplatin treatment may efficiently enrich the LCSC population in HepG2 cells.

  1. Vitamin B6 metabolism influences the intracellular accumulation of cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Marsili, Sabrina; Vitale, Ilio; Senovilla, Laura; Michels, Judith; Garcia, Pauline; Vacchelli, Erika; Chatelut, Etienne; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2013-02-01

    Vitamin B6 metabolism influences the adaptive response of non-small lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells to distinct, potentially lethal perturbations in homeostasis, encompassing nutrient deprivation, hyperthermia, hypoxia, irradiation as well as the exposure to cytotoxic chemicals, including the DNA-damaging agent cisplatin (CDDP). Thus, the siRNA-mediated downregulation of pyridoxal kinase (PDXK), the enzyme that generates the bioactive form of vitamin B6, protects NSCLC cells (as well as a large collection of human and murine malignant cells of distinct histological derivation) from the cytotoxic effects of CDDP. Accordingly, the administration of pyridoxine, one of the inactive precursors of vitamin B6, exacerbates cisplatin-induced cell death, in vitro and in vivo, but only when PDXK is expressed. Conversely, antioxidants such as non-oxidized glutathione (GSH) are known to protect cancer cells from CDDP toxicity. Pyridoxine increases the amount of CDDP-DNA adducts formed upon the exposure of NSCLC cells to CDDP and aggravates the consequent DNA damage response. On the contrary, in the presence of GSH, NSCLC cells exhibit near-to-undetectable levels of CDDP-DNA adducts and a small fraction of the cell population activates the DNA damage response. We therefore wondered whether vitamin B6 metabolism and GSH might interact with CDDP in a pharmacokinetic fashion. In this short communication, we demonstrate that GSH inhibits the intracellular accumulation of CDDP, while pyridoxine potentiates it in a PDXK-dependent fashion. Importantly, such pharmacokinetic effects do not involve plasma membrane transporters that mediate a prominent fraction of CDDP influx, i.e., solute carrier family 31, member 1 (SLC31A1, best known as copper transporter 1, CTR1) and efflux, i.e., ATPase, Cu ( 2+) transporting, β polypeptide (ATP7B).

  2. 5-Azacytidine prevents cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity and potentiates anticancer activity of cisplatin by involving inhibition of metallothionein, pAKT and DNMT1 expression in chemical induced cancer rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikoo, Kulbhushan; Ali, Idrish Yunus; Gupta, Jeena; Gupta, Chanchal

    2009-12-15

    5-Azactydine inhibits cell growth by direct cytotoxic action as well as by inhibition of DNA methyl transferase enzyme. Inhibitors of DNMT have been reported to potentiate the therapeutic activity of cisplatin in vitro. Dose dependent bone marrow toxicity, neurotoxicity and nephrotoxicity are the major side effects of cisplatin, limiting its use as an effective chemotherapeutic agent. The present study was aimed to reduce the nephrotoxic potential of cisplatin without compensating its potency. To best of our knowledge, this is the first report which shows that the combination of 5-azacytidine with cisplatin leads to remarkable reduction in nephrotoxicity, by involving inhibition of cisplatin induced metallothionein expression. 5-Azacytidine treatment with cisplatin leads to maximum reduction in tumor size in DMH induced colon cancer and tumor volume in DMBA induced breast cancer bearing SD rats. This combination regimen prevents phosphorylation and acetylation of histone H3 which may be involved in inhibition of aberrant gene expression in colon tumors. Further, 5-azacytidine potentiated cisplatin induced antitumor activity by involving decreased expression of pAKT, DNMT1 and an increased expression of p38 in colon tumors. Thus, combination of 5-azactydine with cisplatin attenuates the cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity and potentiates the anti-cancer activity which can have profound clinical implications.

  3. Role of CFTR in oxidative stress and suicidal death of renal cells during cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubera, I; Duranton, C; Melis, N; Cougnon, M; Mograbi, B; Tauc, M

    2013-10-03

    The clinical use of the antineoplastic drug cisplatin is limited by its deleterious nephrotoxic side effect. Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity is associated with an increase in oxidative stress, leading ultimately to renal cell death and irreversible kidney dysfunction. Oxidative stress could be modified by the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR), a Cl(-) channel not only involved in chloride secretion but as well in glutathione (GSH) transport. Thus, we tested whether the inhibition of CFTR could protect against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Using a renal proximal cell line, we show that the specific inhibitor of CFTR, CFTR(inh)-172, prevents cisplatin-induced cell death and apoptosis by modulating the intracellular reactive oxygen species balance and the intracellular GSH concentration. This CFTR(inh)-172-mediated protective effect occurs without affecting cellular cisplatin uptake or the formation of platinum-DNA adducts. The protective effect of CFTR(inh)-172 in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was also investigated in a rat model. Five days after receiving a single cisplatin injection (5 mg/kg), rats exhibited renal failure, as evidenced by the alteration of biochemical and functional parameters. Pretreatment of rats with CFTR(inh)-172 (1 mg/kg) prior to cisplatin injection significantly prevented these deleterious cisplatin-induced nephrotoxic effects. Finally, we demonstrate that CFTR(inh)-172 does not impair cisplatin-induced cell death in the cisplatin-sensitive A549 cancer cell line. In conclusion, the use of a specific inhibitor of CFTR may represent a novel therapeutic approach in the prevention of nephrotoxic side effects during cisplatin treatment without affecting its antitumor efficacy.

  4. Concurrent Chemoradiation with Low-Dose Weekly Cisplatin in Locally Advanced Stage IV Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Myoung Hee; Kang, Jung Hun; Song, Haa-Na; Jeong, Bae Kwon; Chai, Gyu Young; Kang, Kimun; Woo, Seung Hoon; Park, Jung Je; Kim, Jin Pyeong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) with 3-weekly doses of cisplatin is a standard treatment for loco-regionally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). However, treatment with 3-weekly doses of cisplatin is often associated with several adverse events. Therefore, we conducted this retrospective analysis to determine the efficacy and tolerance of CRT with a low weekly dose of cisplatin in stage IV HNSCC patients. Materials and Methods Medical records of patients who were d...

  5. Intracellular GSH Alterations and Its Relationship to Level of Resistance following Exposure to Cisplatin in Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jamali, Bardia; Nakhjavani, Maryam; Hosseinzadeh, Leila; Amidi, Salimeh; Nikounezhad, Nastaran; H. Shirazi, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    One of the major complications in cancer chemotherapy with cisplatin as one of the important medicines in treatment regimens of different cancers is the development of resistance. One of the most described cellular defense mechanisms involved in resistance is glutathione (GSH), thus in this study, the effects of cisplatin on the total intracellular GSH level (GSHi) in some sensitive and resistant variants of human cell lines (hepatocarcinoma HepG2, skin A375, cisplatin sensitive glioblastoma ...

  6. Randomized phase III study comparing paclitaxel/cisplatin/gemcitabine and gemcitabine/cisplatin in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer without prior systemic therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bellmunt, Joaquim; von der Maase, Hans; Mead, Graham M;

    2012-01-01

    The combination of gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) is a standard regimen in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer. A phase I/II study suggested that a three-drug regimen that included paclitaxel had greater antitumor activity and might improve survival.......The combination of gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) is a standard regimen in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer. A phase I/II study suggested that a three-drug regimen that included paclitaxel had greater antitumor activity and might improve survival....

  7. Puerarin attenuates cisplatin-induced rat nephrotoxicity: The involvement of TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xu; Yan, Lei; Zhu, Qing; Shao, Fengmin

    2017-01-01

    Puerarin was a major isoflavonoid derived from the Chinese medical herb radix puerariae (Gegen). In present study effect of puerarin on cisplatin nephrotoxicity was evaluated. Rat model of nephrotoxicity was established by a single intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin (7mg/kg). Puerarin was administrated through caudal vein injection once per day at the dose of 10mg/kg, 30mg/kg and 50mg/kg. Biochemical assays showed that after cisplatin treatment the serum urea and creatinine increased significantly compared with control (Pinduced by cisplatin were significantly attenuated by puerarin treatment in dose-dependent manner, which indicated the renal protective effect of puerarin. Cell culture experiments illustrated that puerarin alone treatment concentration-dependently inhibited COLO205 and HeLa tumor cell growth and dose-dependently promoted the antitumor activity of cisplatin in COLO205 and HeLa tumor cells. The promotion effects might be attributed to suppression of cisplatin-increased NF-κB p65 expression by puerarin. Taken together, findings in this study suggested that puerarin exhibited renal protection against cisplatin nephrotoxicity via inhibiting TLR4/NF-κB signaling, with no inhibition but promotion effect on the antitumor activity of cisplatin. Puerarin might be a promising adjuvant agent for cisplatin chemotherapy. PMID:28182789

  8. Cisplatin as an Anti-Tumor Drug: Cellular Mechanisms of Activity, Drug Resistance and Induced Side Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Florea

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Platinum complexes are clinically used as adjuvant therapy of cancers aiming to induce tumor cell death. Depending on cell type and concentration, cisplatin induces cytotoxicity, e.g., by interference with transcription and/or DNA replication mechanisms. Additionally, cisplatin damages tumors via induction of apoptosis, mediated by the activation of various signal transduction pathways, including calcium signaling, death receptor signaling, and the activation of mitochondrial pathways. Unfortunately, neither cytotoxicity nor apoptosis are exclusively induced in cancer cells, thus, cisplatin might also lead to diverse side-effects such as neuro- and/or renal-toxicity or bone marrow-suppression. Moreover, the binding of cisplatin to proteins and enzymes may modulate its biochemical mechanism of action. While a combination-chemotherapy with cisplatin is a cornerstone for the treatment of multiple cancers, the challenge is that cancer cells could become cisplatin-resistant. Numerous mechanisms of cisplatin resistance were described including changes in cellular uptake, drug efflux, increased detoxification, inhibition of apoptosis and increased DNA repair. To minimize cisplatin resistance, combinatorial therapies were developed and have proven more effective to defeat cancers. Thus, understanding of the biochemical mechanisms triggered by cisplatin in tumor cells may lead to the design of more efficient platinum derivates (or other drugs and might provide new therapeutic strategies and reduce side effects.

  9. Cisplatin as an Anti-Tumor Drug: Cellular Mechanisms of Activity, Drug Resistance and Induced Side Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florea, Ana-Maria [Department of Neuropathology, Heinrich-Heine University, Düsseldorf (Germany); Büsselberg, Dietrich, E-mail: dib2015@qatar-med.cornell.edu [Weil Cornell Medical College in Qatar, Qatar Foundation-Education City, P.O. Box 24144, Doha (Qatar)

    2011-03-15

    Platinum complexes are clinically used as adjuvant therapy of cancers aiming to induce tumor cell death. Depending on cell type and concentration, cisplatin induces cytotoxicity, e.g., by interference with transcription and/or DNA replication mechanisms. Additionally, cisplatin damages tumors via induction of apoptosis, mediated by the activation of various signal transduction pathways, including calcium signaling, death receptor signaling, and the activation of mitochondrial pathways. Unfortunately, neither cytotoxicity nor apoptosis are exclusively induced in cancer cells, thus, cisplatin might also lead to diverse side-effects such as neuro- and/or renal-toxicity or bone marrow-suppression. Moreover, the binding of cisplatin to proteins and enzymes may modulate its biochemical mechanism of action. While a combination-chemotherapy with cisplatin is a cornerstone for the treatment of multiple cancers, the challenge is that cancer cells could become cisplatin-resistant. Numerous mechanisms of cisplatin resistance were described including changes in cellular uptake, drug efflux, increased detoxification, inhibition of apoptosis and increased DNA repair. To minimize cisplatin resistance, combinatorial therapies were developed and have proven more effective to defeat cancers. Thus, understanding of the biochemical mechanisms triggered by cisplatin in tumor cells may lead to the design of more efficient platinum derivates (or other drugs) and might provide new therapeutic strategies and reduce side effects.

  10. The Anti-tumour Agent, Cisplatin, and its Clinically Ineffective Isomer, Transplatin, Produce Unique Gene Expression Profiles in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Galea

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is a DNA-damaging anti-cancer agent that is widely used to treat a range of tumour types. Despite its clinical success, cisplatin treatment is still associated with a number of dose-limiting toxic side effects. The purpose of this study was to clarify the molecular events that are important in the anti-tumour activity of cisplatin, using gene expression profi ling techniques. Currently, our incomplete understanding of this drug’s mechanism of action hinders the development of more efficient and less harmful cisplatin-based chemotherapeutics. In this study the effect of cisplatin on gene expression in human foreskin fibroblasts has been investigated using human 19K oligonucleotide microarrays. In addition its clinically inactive isomer, transplatin, was also tested. Dual-fluor microarray experiments comparing treated and untreated cells were performed in quadruplicate. Cisplatin treatment was shown to significantly up- or down-regulate a consistent subset of genes. Many of these genes responded similarly to treatment with transplatin, the therapeutically inactive isomer of cisplatin. However, a smaller proportion of these transcripts underwent differential expression changes in response to the two isomers. Some of these genes may constitute part of the DNA damage response induced by cisplatin that is critical for its anti-tumour activity. Ultimately, the identification of gene expression responses unique to clinically active compounds, like cisplatin, could thus greatly benefit the design and development of improved chemotherapeutics.

  11. Changes of the cell cycle regulators and cell cycle arrest in cervical cancer cells after cisplatin therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the changes of the cell cycle regulators ATM,Chk2 and p53 and cell cycle arrest in HeLa cells after cisplatin therapy. Methods The proliferation-inhibiting rates of HeLa cells induced by cisplatin of different concentrations were measured by MTT assays. The mRNA and protein expressions of ATM,Chk2 and p53 of HeLa cells with and without cisplatin were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot,respectively. The cell cycle analysis was conducted by flow cytometric analysis. Results Cisplatin...

  12. Comparative efficacy of a single oral dose of ondansetron and of buspirone against cisplatin-induced emesis in cancer patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Alfieri, A. B.; Cubeddu, L. X.

    1995-01-01

    Buspirone, an agonist of the 5-HT1A subtype of serotonin receptors, has shown antiemetic activity in animal models. However, in cancer patients treated with cisplatin, ondansetron, given either i.v. (one 8-mg dose 30 min after cisplatin) or orally (one 16-mg dose at the end of cisplatin infusion) was superior (P < 0.001) to buspirone (60 mg p.o. at the end of cisplatin and 60 mg p.o., 30 min later), in all parameters of antiemetic efficacy. These results are in favour of 5-HT3 receptors, but ...

  13. Nitric oxide- and cisplatin-releasing silica nanoparticles for use against non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munaweera, Imalka; Shi, Yi; Koneru, Bhuvaneswari; Patel, Amit; Dang, Mai H; Di Pasqua, Anthony J; Balkus, Kenneth J

    2015-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and cisplatin releasing wrinkle-structured amine-modified mesoporous silica (AMS) nanoparticles have been developed for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The AMS and NO- and cisplatin-loaded AMS materials were characterized using TEM, BET surface area, FTIR and ICP-MS, and tested in cell culture. The results show that for NSCLC cell lines (i.e., H596 and A549), the toxicity of NO- and cisplatin-loaded silica nanoparticles (NO-Si-DETA-cisplatin-AMS) is significantly higher than that of silica nanoparticles loaded with only cisplatin (Si-DETA-cisplatin-AMS). In contrast, the toxicity of NO-Si-DETA-cisplatin-AMS toward normal lung cell lines is not significantly different from that of Si-DETA-cisplatin-AMS (normal lung fibroblast cells WI-38) or is even lower than that of Si-DETA-cisplatin-AMS (normal lung epithelial cells BEAS-2B). The NO-induced sensitization of tumor cell death demonstrates that NO is a promising enhancer of platinum-based lung cancer therapy.

  14. Curcumin reverses cisplatin resistance in cisplatin-resistant lung caner cells by inhibiting FA/BRCA pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ping; Li, Jian; Jiang, He-Guo; Lan, Ting; Chen, Yong-Chang

    2015-05-01

    Cisplatin (DDP) is the most widely used chemotherapy agent for treatment of malignancies including lung cancer. However, the effectiveness of DDP is often weakened by acquired resistance of tumor cells. DDP kills cancer cells primarily by creating intrastrand and interstrand DNA cross-links, which block DNA replication. The Fanconi anemia (FA)/BRCA pathway is a DNA cross-link damage repair pathway, which regulates cellular resistance to DNA cross-link agents, such as DDP. Some study has shown that natural compound curcumin sensitize human ovarian and breast cancer cells to DDP. However, whether curcumin may reverse resistance to DDP in DDP-resistant lung cancer cells has not been understood. In this study, we showed that curcumin enhanced the proliferation inhibitory effect of DDP and promote DDP-induced apoptosis in A549/DDP cells (DDP-resistant lung adenocarcinoma cells). Moreover, we observed that FA/BRCA pathway DNA damage repair processes, such as DDP-induced FANCD2 monoubiquitination and nuclear foci formation were downregulated in the presence of curcumin, suggesting that curcumin enhanced sensitivity to DDP in A549/DDP cells through the inhibition of FA/BRCA pathway. Furthermore, the calculation of q value and apoptosis analyses revealed that curcumin in combination with DDP could exert a synergistic cytotoxic effect in A549/DDP cells, further demonstrating that curcumin can reverse cisplatin resistance of A549/DDP cells. In conclusion, by suppressing the FA/BRCA pathway DNA repair, curcumin potentiates DDP-induced proliferation inhibitory effect and apoptosis in A549/DDP cell, indicating that curcumin may serve as a chemosensitizer to cross-link-inducing anticancer drugs DDP.

  15. Influence of Berberine on Cisplatin Antineoplastic Effect in A549 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guojun JIANG

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Cisplatin is a standard first-line chemotherapeutic agents for treating advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Unfortunately, the clinical application cisplatin is restricted because it induces serious adverse reaction. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence and probable mechanism of berberine on cisplatin antineoplastic effect on lung cancer A549 cells. Methods The total Cx43 protein amount, localization of Cx43 on cell membrane, and gap junction function were observed after the A549 cells were treated with berberine. The influence of berberine on the antitumor action of cisplatin was detected by standard colony-forming assay. Protein kinase C (PKC protein, which regulates the gap junction, was subsequently determined. Results Berberine did not affect cell survival at concentrations of 0 μM to 10 μM in the A549 cells. The gap junction function between the cells was enhanced through increased Cx43 protein expression and localization of Cx43 on the membrane after berberine treatment. The intercellular dye coupling through gap junction increased when the cells exposed to 0.1 μM, 1 μM, 10 μM berberine [33.3% (P=0.002,3, 67.0% (P<0.001, 160.0% (P<0.001] compared withcontrols. This effect was associated with the PKC activity. The cisplatin-induced inhibition of colony growth was enhanced when berberine was combined with cisplatin. Conclusion Berberine can obviously increase the antitumor effect of cisplatin by enhancing the function of the gap junction possibly in A549 cells.

  16. Neural regulation of the kidney function in rats with cisplatin induced renal failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niamh E Goulding

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Chronic kidney disease (CKD is often associated with a disturbed cardiovascular homeostasis. This investigation explored the role of the renal innervation in mediating deranged baroreflex control of renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA and renal excretory function in cisplatin-induced renal failure.Methods: Rats were either intact or bilaterally renally denervated four days prior to receiving cisplatin (5mg/kg i.p. and entered a chronic metabolic study for 8 days. At day 8, other groups of rats were prepared for acute measurement of RSNA or renal function with either intact or denervated kidneys.Results: Following the cisplatin challenge, creatinine clearance was 50% lower while fractional sodium excretion and renal cortical and medullary TGF-β1 concentrations were 3-4 fold higher in both intact and renally denervated rats compared to control rats. In cisplatin-treated rats, the maximal gain of the high-pressure baroreflex curve was only 20% that of control rats, but not different from that of renally denervated control rats. Volume expansion reduced RSNA by 50% in control and in cisplatin-treated rats but only following bilateral renal denervation. The volume expansion mediated natriuresis/diuresis was absent in the cisplatin-treated rats but was normalised following renal denervation. Conclusions: Cisplatin-induced renal injury impaired renal function and caused a sympatho-excitation with blunting of high and low pressure baroreflex regulation of RSNA, which was dependent on the renal innervation. It is suggested that in man with CKD there is a dysregulation of the neural control of the kidney mediated by its sensory innervation.

  17. The protective effect of erdosteine against ototoxicity induced by cisplatin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalcioglu, M Tayyar; Kizilay, Ahmet; Gulec, Mukaddes; Karatas, Erkan; Iraz, Mustafa; Akyol, Omer; Egri, Mucahit; Ozturan, Orhan

    2005-10-01

    The elimination of cisplatin ototoxicity is an ongoing concern. This experimental study was undertaken to investigate the effect of oral erdosteine in ameliorating cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. Twenty-eight adult female Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into four equal groups. Group A received an oral carrier vehicle of the drug erdosteine with 0.2 ml of 0.9% saline. Group B was administered only erdosteine (per oral 10 mg/kg twice a day) for 6 days. Group C was injected with cisplatin intraperitoneally (i.p.) on day 0 (16 mg/kg body weight), once only. Group D was given erdosteine (per oral 10 mg/kg/day) 1 day before and for 5 days consecutively after cisplatin injection (16 mg/kg, i.p.). Distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) were elicited in different frequency regions, ranging from 1,001 to 6,299 Hz as DPgram and input/output (I/O) functions from the control and experimental animals. All experimental animals were killed under general anesthesia on day 5, following the last otoacoustic emission measurements. Prior to death, blood samples were drawn for measurement of superoxide dismutase, xanthine oxidase (XO), malondialdehyde and nitric oxide. Initial DPgram and I/O function baseline measurements were similar in all groups prior to any drug administration ( P>0.05). On day 5, intra-subject measurement parameters of DPgrams and I/O functions in the cisplatin group showed significant deterioration ( P 0.05). Comparison of the amplitudes of DPgrams and I/O functions between the cisplatin and control groups showed significant changes ( P erdosteine is protective for cochlear function against the disruptive effects of cisplatin as measured by DPOAEs.

  18. Hepatoprotective effect of Ficus religiosa latex on cisplatin induced liver injury in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh C. Yadav

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractFicus religiosa L., Moraceae, is widely planted in the tropics. The chemical constituents of F. religiosa include tannin, saponin gluanol acetate, β-sitosterol, leucoanthocyanidin, and leucoanthocyanin. These are used for the treatment of pain, inflammation, impotence, menstrual disturbances, and urine related problems, and as uterine tonic. The present study aimed to evaluate hepatoprotective effects of F. religiosa latex on cisplatin induced liver injury in Wistar rats. In experimental protocol contained five groups of rats (n = 6. In which, group I (control was administered acacia (2%, w/v of 5 ml/kg throughout the experiment for 16 days. The group II (cisplatin treated was administered single dose of cisplatin (7.5 mg/kg i.p. on 1st day. Group III (extract control was administered 300 mg/kg p.o. of extract for 1stto 10th day. Group IV (Protective was administered extract (300 mg/kg p.o. of F. religiosa latex for 1st to 10th day and administered single dose of cisplatin (7.5 mg/kg i.p. on 11th day and group V (Curative received single dose of cisplatin (7.5 mg/kg i.p. on day 1st, and administered extract (300 mg/kg p.o. from 7th to 16thdays. On the 6th day in cisplatin treated, 10th day in extract control and 16th day in control, protective and curative, blood withdrawn from retro-orbital sinus of rats for biochemical estimation for serum and dissected out the livers for estimation of antioxidant enzymes and histopathological works. The cisplatin-treated group 2 showed a significant increase in serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase and hepatocytes cells degeneration inflammatory infiltrate and necrosis it's were significantly (**p < 0.01 alleviates by protective groups.

  19. Biochemical and histological study of rat liver and kidney injury induced by Cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palipoch, Sarawoot; Punsawad, Chuchard

    2013-09-01

    Cisplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent widely used in treatment of several cancers. It is documented as a major cause of clinical nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of cisplatin-induced liver and kidney injury. Wistar rats were divided into four groups. Group 1 (control) was intraperitoneally (IP) injected with a single dose of 0.85% normal saline. Groups 2, 3 and 4 were IP injected with single doses of cisplatin at 10, 25 and 50 mg/kg body weight (BW), respectively. At 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 h after injection, BW, levels of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, malondialdehyde (MDA), and activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and histology of the liver and kidney were evaluated. Cisplatin caused a reduction in BW of rats in groups 2, 3 and 4 at all post injection intervals. The levels of serum ALT, AST, BUN and creatinine and MDA of the kidney and liver were markedly increased especially at 48 and 72 h, whereas the activity of SOD was decreased after cisplatin injection. Liver sections revealed moderate to severe congestion with dilation of the hepatic artery, portal vein and bile duct and disorganization of hepatic cords at 50 mg/kg of cisplatin. Kidney sections illustrated mild to moderate tubular necrosis at 25 and 50 mg/kg of cisplatin. Therefore, oxidative stress was implicated in the pathogenesis of liver and kidney injury causing biochemical and histological alterations.

  20. Pre-treatment with cardamonin protects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats: Impact on NOX-1, inflammation and apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Naga, Reem N., E-mail: reemelnaga@hotmail.com

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin is an effective anti-cancer drug; however, its clinical use is usually associated with nephrotoxicity as a dose-limiting side effect. Several molecular mechanisms have been found to be involved in this nephrotoxicity such as oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis. The aim of this study was to explore the potential nephroprotective effect of cardamonin, a flavone found in Alpinia plant, in a rat model of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. The possible mechanisms underlying this nephroprotective effect were investigated. Cardamonin was given at two different doses; 10 and 30 mg/kg orally for two weeks, starting one week before giving a single nephrotoxic dose of cisplatin (7 mg/kg). Acute nephrtoxicity was evident by significantly increased blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine levels. Also, cisplatin increased lipid peroxidation and depleted reduced glutathione level and superoxide dismutase. Additionally, cisplatin showed a marked pro-inflammatory response as evidenced by significant increase in tissue levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, NF-kB, iNOS, ICAM-1 and MCP-1. Pre-treatment with cardamonin significantly attenuated the nephrotoxic effects, oxidative stress and inflammation induced by cisplatin, in a dose-dependent manner. Also, cardamonin decreased caspase-3 expression and Bax/Bcl-2 ratio as compared to cisplatin group. Besides, cradamonin reversed cisplatin-induced decrease in EGF. Furthermore, up-regulation of NOX-1 was found to be involved in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and its expression was significantly reduced by cardamonin. Histopathological examination further confirmed the nephroprotective effect of cardamonin. Moreover, pre-treatment with subtoxic concentration of cardamonin has significantly enhanced cisplatin cytotoxic activity in four different human cancer cell lines; hela, hepG2, PC3 and HCT116 cancer cell lines. In conclusion, these findings suggest that cardamonin improves therapeutic index of cisplatin and that NOX-1 is

  1. Protective effect of cysteine and vitamin E, Crocus sativus and Nigella sativa extracts on cisplatin-induced toxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el Daly, E S

    1998-01-01

    Cisplatin [cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum (II)] is a widely used chemotherapeutic drug that is toxic to the kidney. Concurrent administration of cysteine together with vitamin E, Crocus sativus and Nigella sativa reduced the toxicity of cisplatin in rats. When administered i.p. for 5 alternate days with 3 mg/kg cisplatin, cysteine (20 mg/kg) together with vitamin E (2 mg/rat) an extract of Crocus sativus stigmas (50 mg/kg) and Nigella sativa seed (50 mg/kg) significantly reduced blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine levels as well as cisplatin-induced serum total lipids increases. In contrast, the protective agents given together with cisplatin led to an even greater decrease in blood glucose than that seen with cisplatin alone. The serum activities of alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase of cisplatin-treated rats were significantly decreased, whereas the activities of glutathione reductase and isocitrate dehydrogenase were significantly increased. Addition of cysteine and vitamin E, Crocus sativus and Nigella sativa in combination with cisplatin partially prevented many changes in the activities of serum enzymes. In cisplatin-treated rats, the liver activities of isocitrate dehydrogenase and aspartate aminotransferase were significantly increased, whereas much greater changes were found in the kidneys, with increased activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and decreased activities of alkaline phosphatase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, malate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, sorbitol dehydrogenase and gamma-glutamyl transferase, as well as a decreased phosphorylation to oxidation ratio in the mitochondria, indicating reduced adenosine triphosphate production. Also, administration of cysteine and vitamin E, Crocus sativus and Nigella sativa together with cisplatin partially reversed many of the kidney enzymes changes induced by cisplatin

  2. P53 Contributes to Cisplatin Induced Renal Oxidative Damage via Regulating P66shc and MnSOD

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    Yanggang Yuan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cisplatin is widely used to treat malignancies. However, its major limitation is the development of dose-dependent nephrotoxicity. The precise mechanisms of cisplatin-induced kidney damage remain unclear. Previous study demonstrated the central role of mitochondrial ROS (mtROS in the pathogenesis of cisplatin nephrotoxicity. The purpose of this study was to explore the mechanism of mtROS regulation in cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Methods: p53, MnSOD and p66shc were detected at mRNA and protein levels by qPCR and western blot in HK2 cells. mtROS levels were determined by DCFDA and MitoSOX staining. Cell viability and cell apoptosis were accessed by CCK-8 assay, TUNEL assay and flow cytometry, respectivesly. siRNAs were used to knock down p53 and p66shc expression and subsequent changes were observed. In vivo assays using a mouse model of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury were used to validate the in vitro results. Results: In HK2 cells, cisplatin exposure decreased the MnSOD and increased the expression of p53 and p66shc. MnTBAP, a MnSOD mimic, blocked cisplatin-induced the generation of mtROS and cell injury. P66shc and p53 siRNAs rendered renal cells resistant to cisplatin-induced mtROS production and cell death. Furthermore, knockdown of p53 restored MnSOD and inhibiting p66shc. Consistent with these results, we revealed that p53 inhibitor reduced cisplatin-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis by regulating MnSOD and p66shc in the kidney of cisplatin-treated mice. Conclusion: Our study identifies activation of p53 signalling as a potential strategy for reducing the nephrotoxicity associated with cisplatin treatments and, as a result, broadens the therapeutic window of this chemotherapeutic agent.

  3. Protocatechuic aldehyde attenuates cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury by suppressing Nox-mediated oxidative stress and renal inflammation

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    Li Gao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is a classic chemotherapeutic agent widely used to treat different types of cancers including ovarian, head and neck, testicular and uterine cervical carcinomas. However, cisplatin induces acute kidney injury by directly triggering an excessive inflammatory response, oxidative stress and programmed cell death of renal tubular epithelial cells. All of which lead to higher mortality rates in patients. In this study we examined the protective effect of protocatechuic aldehyde (PA in vitro in cisplatin-treated tubular epithelial cells and in vivo in cisplatin nephropathy. PA is a monomer of Traditional Chinese Medicine isolated from the root of S. miltiorrhiza. Results show that PA prevented cisplatin-induced decline of renal function and histological damage, which was confirmed by attenuation of KIM1 in both mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, PA reduced renal inflammation by suppressing oxidative stress and programmed cell death in response to cisplatin, which was further evidenced by in vitro data. Of note, PA suppressed NAPDH oxidases, including Nox2 and Nox4, in a dosage-dependent manner. Moreover, silencing Nox4, but not Nox2, removed the inhibitory effect of PA on cisplatin-induced renal injury, indicating that Nox4 may play a pivotal role in mediating the protective effect of PA in cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury. Collectively, our data indicate that PA largely blocked cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury by suppressing Nox-mediated oxidative stress and renal inflammation without compromising anti-tumor activity of cisplatin. These findings suggest that PA and its derivatives may serve as potential protective agents for cancer patients with cisplatin treatment.

  4. Difference in Expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl Genes in Cisplatin- sensitive and Cisplatin-resistant Human in Ovarian Cancer Cell Lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于利利; 王泽华

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl gene in sensitive (A2780) and drug-resistance (AD6) human ovarian cancer cell lines and explore the molecular mechanism of multidrug resistance, A2780 and AD6 were detected by using DNA gel electrophoresis, flow cytometry and RT-PCR. Our results showed that (1)"DNA ladder" was observed in A2780 and AD6 after cisplatin treatment; (2) after 3.0, 6.0, 9.9 μg/ml of cisplatin treatment, a significant difference was noted in the rate of apoptosis between in A2780 and AD6 (P<0.05); (3) Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl genes were overexpressed in AD6. After cisplatin treatment, the expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl genes was down-regulated in A2780 and AD6. It is concluded that cisplatin could induce the apoptosis of ovarian cancer cells, and the over-expression of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xl genes may contribute to apoptotic inhibition and the development of multidrug-resistance of human ovarian cancer.

  5. Evaluation of the toxicity of tirapazamine plus cisplatin in a mouse tumor model; Untersuchungen zur Toxizitaet von Tirapazamine plus Cisplatin in einem Maus-Tumormodell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, M. [Praxis fuer Strahlentherapie, Weilheim (Germany); Ottenjann, S. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Inst. fuer Experimentelle Onkologie und Therapieforschung, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Kuenzel, G.; Nieder, C.; Molls, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Busch, R. [Inst. fuer Medizinische Statistik und Epidemiologie, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany); Erhardt, W. [Inst. fuer Experimentelle Onkologie und Therapieforschung, Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2006-04-15

    Background and purpose: tirapazamine (TPZ) is an anticancer drug that is selectively activated by the low oxygen environment in solid tumors. Furthermore, TPZ also enhances the tumor cell-killing effect of cisplatin. So far, detailed information on the toxicity of combined treatment is rare. The authors evaluated the toxicity of TPZ in combination with cisplatin in a mouse tumor model. For this purpose, general toxicity was monitored and all inner organs were examined histologically. Material and methods: RIF-1 fibrosarcomas of murine origin growing in the right hindfoot dorsum of C3H mice were used. The animals were treated with 10 x 2 Gy irradiation plus six i.p. injections of 4 mg/kg cisplatin (total dose 24 mg/kg) together with varying doses of TPZ (0-28 mg/kg per injection; total dose 0, 43.2, 86.4, 129.6, 151.2, 172.8 mg/kg). Treatment was applied within 2 weeks (figure 1). Total observation period was up to 35 days. Results: combined treatment with TPZ led to a dose-dependent, significant decrease in motor activity (table 1) and body weight and an increase in mortality (figures 2 and 3, tables 2 and 3). Histological analyses showed areas of necrosis in the heart, liver and kidney and gastric ulcers (table 4). Cisplatin alone produced no severe toxicity. Tumor doubling times were TPZ dose-dependent and comparable with data from the literature (figures 4 and 5, table 3). (orig.)

  6. S-1 plus cisplatin versus fluorouracil plus cisplatin in advanced gastric or gastro-esophageal junction adenocarcinoma patients: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu Hong; Qiu, Miao Zhen; Xu, Jian Ming; Sun, Guo Ping; Lu, Hui Shan; Liu, Yun Peng; Zhong, Mei Zuo; Zhang, He Long; Yu, Shi Ying; Li, Wei; Hu, Xiao Hua; Wang, Jie Jun; Cheng, Ying; Zhou, Jun Tian; Guo, Zeng Qing; Guan, Zhon Gzhen; Xu, Rui Hua

    2015-10-27

    The safety and efficacy of S-1 plus cisplatin in Chinese advanced gastric cancer patients in first line setting is unknown. In this pilot study, patients with advanced gastric or gastro-esophageal junction adenocarcinoma were enrolled and randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive S-1 plus cisplatin (CS group) or 5-FU plus cisplatin (CF group). The primary endpoint was time to progression (TTP). Secondary end points included overall survival (OS) and safety. This study was registered on ClinicalTrials. Gov, number NCT01198392. A total of 236 patients were enrolled. Median TTP was 5.51 months in CS group compared with 4.62 months in CF group [hazard ratio (HR) 1.028, 95% confidential interval (CI) 0.758-1.394, p = 0.859]. Median OS was 10.00 months and 10.46 months in CS and CF groups (HR 1.046, 95%CI 0.709-1.543, p = 0.820), respectively. The most common adverse events in both groups were anemia, leukopenia, neutropenia, nausea, thrombocytopenia, vomiting, anorexia and diarrhea. We find that S-1 plus cisplatin is an effective and tolerable option for advanced gastric or gastro-esophageal junction adenocarcinoma patients in China.

  7. Randomized phase III study comparing paclitaxel-bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP) to standard BEP in intermediate-prognosis germ-cell cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Wit, Ronald; Skoneczna, Iwona; Daugaard, Gedske

    2012-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of four cycles of paclitaxel-bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (T-BEP) to four cycles of bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP) in previously untreated patients with intermediate-prognosis germ-cell cancer (GCC).......To compare the efficacy of four cycles of paclitaxel-bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (T-BEP) to four cycles of bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP) in previously untreated patients with intermediate-prognosis germ-cell cancer (GCC)....

  8. Erythropoietin against cisplatin-induced peripheral neurotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Bulent; Yalcin, Suayib; Nurlu, Gulay; Zeybek, Dilara; Muftuoglu, Sevda

    2004-01-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) is a potent anticancer drug, and neurotoxicity is one of its most important dose-limiting toxicities. In this study we investigated the role of recombinant human erythropoietin (rhuEPO) for protection against CDDP-induced neurotoxicity. All experiments were conducted on female Wistar-albino rats. Animals were randomly assigned to three groups. Group A received only CDDP, group B received CDDP plus rhuEPO, and group C received only rhuEPO. Electroneurography (ENG) was done in the beginning and at the end of 7 wk, then the rats were sacrificed and the sciatic nerve was removed for histopathological examination. The mean initial latency was 2.7438 ms in group A, 2.4875 ms in group B, and 2.62 ms in group C. After 7 wk of treatment, the latency was 2.4938, 2.6313, and 2.3900 ms, respectively. The difference in latencies was not statistically significant. The amplitude of compound muscle action potential (CMAP) was 12.8125 mV, 14.3875 mV, and 14.5600 mV before the treatment and 8.4875, 12.8250, and, 13.0800 mV after treatment, respectively. Amplitude of CMAP was significantly greater in rhuEPO-treated groups (groups B and C) compared to cisplatin only Group A. The mean area of CMAP was 12.2625, 12.3500, and, 12.2800 mV s before the treatment and 5.7125, 10.6463, and 9.1600 mV s after the treatment, respectively. The area of CMAP was significantly larger in rhuEPO-treated groups. In histopathological studies thick, thin, and total number of nerve fibers were 4053, 5050, and 9103, in group A, 5100, 8231, and 13331, in group B, and 5264, 6010, and 11274, in group C respectively. In the microscopic examination active myelinization process was observed in rhuEPO-treated groups. We concluded that at the given dose and schedule CDDP-induced motor neuropathy and rhuEPO prevented this neuropathy by sparing the number of normal nerve fibers and by protecting the amplitude and area of CMAP. We concluded that rhuEPO may also play a role in active myelinization and

  9. A randomized, double-blind, multicentre study comparing daily 2 and 5 mg of tropisetron for the control of nausea and vomiting induced by low-dose cisplatin- or non-cisplatin-containing chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wymenga, ANM; vanderGraaf, WTA; Wils, JA; vanHeukelom, LS; vanderLinden, GHM; DullemondWestland, AC; Nooy, M; vanderHeul, C; deBruijn, KM; deVries, EGE

    1996-01-01

    Background: This study compares efficacy safety and tolerability of 2 and 5 mg tropisetron in prevention of nausea and vomiting induced by low-dose cisplatin- or non-cisplatin-containing chemotherapy. Patients and methods: 152 chemotherapy-naive cancer patients were randomized in a double-blind mann

  10. Metabolomic Profiling of the Effects of Melittin on Cisplatin Resistant and Cisplatin Sensitive Ovarian Cancer Cells Using Mass Spectrometry and Biolog Microarray Technology

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    Sanad Alonezi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS was employed to characterise the metabolic profiles of two human ovarian cancer cell lines A2780 (cisplatin-sensitive and A2780CR (cisplatin-resistant in response to their exposure to melittin, a cytotoxic peptide from bee venom. In addition, the metabolomics data were supported by application of Biolog microarray technology to examine the utilisation of carbon sources by the two cell lines. Data extraction with MZmine 2.14 and database searching were applied to provide metabolite lists. Principal component analysis (PCA gave clear separation between the cisplatin-sensitive and resistant strains and their respective controls. The cisplatin-resistant cells were slightly more sensitive to melittin than the sensitive cells with IC50 values of 4.5 and 6.8 μg/mL respectively, although the latter cell line exhibited the greatest metabolic perturbation upon treatment. The changes induced by melittin in the cisplatin-sensitive cells led mostly to reduced levels of amino acids in the proline/glutamine/arginine pathway, as well as to decreased levels of carnitines, polyamines, adenosine triphosphate (ATP and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+. The effects on energy metabolism were supported by the data from the Biolog assays. The lipid compositions of the two cell lines were quite different with the A2780 cells having higher levels of several ether lipids than the A2780CR cells. Melittin also had some effect on the lipid composition of the cells. Overall, this study suggests that melittin might have some potential as an adjuvant therapy in cancer treatment.

  11. Cytoplasmic p21 is a potential predictor for cisplatin sensitivity in ovarian cancer

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    Liu Ronghua

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background P21(WAF1/Cip1 binds to cyclin-dependent kinase complexes and inhibits their activities. It was originally described as an inhibitor of cancer cell proliferation. However, many recent studies have shown that p21 promotes tumor progression when accumulated in the cell cytoplasm. So far, little is known about the correlation between cytoplasmic p21 and drug resistance. This study was aimed to investigate the role of p21 in the cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer. Methods RT-PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence were used to detect p21 expression and location in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell line C13* and its parental line OV2008. Regulation of cytoplasmic p21 was performed through transfection of p21 siRNA, Akt2 shRNA and Akt2 constitutively active vector in the two cell lines; their effects on cisplatin-induced apoptosis were evaluated by flow cytometry. Tumor tissue sections of clinical samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Results p21 predominantly localizes to the cytoplasm in C13* compared to OV2008. Persistent exposure to low dose cisplatin in OV2008 leads to p21 translocation from nuclear to cytoplasm, while it had not impact on p21 localization in C13*. Knockdown of cytoplasmic p21 by p21 siRNA transfection in C13* notably increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis through activation of caspase 3. Inhibition of p21 translocation into the cytoplasm by transfection of Akt2 shRNA into C13* cells significantly increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis, while induction of p21 translocation into the cytoplasm by transfection of constitutively active Akt2 in OV2008 enhanced the resistance to cisplatin. Immunohistochemical analysis of clinical ovarian tumor tissues demonstrated that cytoplasmic p21 was negatively correlated with the response to cisplatin based treatment. Conclusions Cytoplasmic p21 is a novel biomarker of cisplatin resistance and it may represent a potential therapeutic target for ovarian tumors

  12. Harnessing structure-activity relationship to engineer a cisplatin nanoparticle for enhanced antitumor efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskar, Abhimanyu S; Soni, Shivani; Chin, Kenneth T; Chaudhuri, Padmaparna; Muto, Katherine W; Berkowitz, Julia; Handlogten, Michael W; Alves, Nathan J; Bilgicer, Basar; Dinulescu, Daniela M; Mashelkar, Raghunath A; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2010-07-13

    Cisplatin is a first line chemotherapy for most types of cancer. However, its use is dose-limited due to severe nephrotoxicity. Here we report the rational engineering of a novel nanoplatinate inspired by the mechanisms underlying cisplatin bioactivation. We engineered a novel polymer, glucosamine-functionalized polyisobutylene-maleic acid, where platinum (Pt) can be complexed to the monomeric units using a monocarboxylato and an O --> Pt coordinate bond. We show that at a unique platinum to polymer ratio, this complex self-assembles into a nanoparticle, which releases cisplatin in a pH-dependent manner. The nanoparticles are rapidly internalized into the endolysosomal compartment of cancer cells, and exhibit an IC50 (4.25 +/- 0.16 microM) comparable to that of free cisplatin (3.87 +/- 0.37 microM), and superior to carboplatin (14.75 +/- 0.38 microM). The nanoparticles exhibited significantly improved antitumor efficacy in terms of tumor growth delay in breast and lung cancers and tumor regression in a K-ras(LSL/+)/Pten(fl/fl) ovarian cancer model. Furthermore, the nanoparticle treatment resulted in reduced systemic and nephrotoxicity, validated by decreased biodistribution of platinum to the kidney as quantified using inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy. Given the universal need for a better platinate, we anticipate this coupling of nanotechnology and structure-activity relationship to rationally reengineer cisplatin could have a major impact globally in the clinical treatment of cancer.

  13. Cisplatin or carboplatin in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer: a comprehensive review

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    Andrea Ardizzoni

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin has a pivotal role in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. However, it is associated with a number of serious and unpleasant side effects (nausea-vomiting, myelo-suppression, neuro-toxicity and renal function impairment. To overcome these limitations, most clinicians have turned towards the use of the cisplatin analog carboplatin, which is associated with a lower incidence of toxicity. Although carboplatin and cisplatin have a similar mechanism of action and pre-clinical spectrum of activity, it is still unclear whether they actually have the same clinical efficacy in all types of tumors. While for some tumors, such as ovarian cancer, equivalent efficacy has been convincingly proven, for others, such as germ cell and headneck tumors, there is some evidence that carboplatin is inferior to cisplatin. It has never been convincingly proven that carboplatin and cisplatin have the same efficacy in the treatment of NSCLC. This review provides an update of available evidences about this important scientific question.

  14. Cisplatin-induced acute renal failure is ameliorated by erdosteine in a dose-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyurt, Hüseyin; Yildirim, Zeki; Kotuk, Mahir; Yilmaz, H Ramazan; Yağmurca, Murat; Iraz, Mustafa; Söğüt, Sad; Gergerlioglu, Serdar

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the optimum dosage of erdosteine to ameliorate cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Three different doses of erdosteine at 25, 50 and 75 mg kg(-1) were studied in rats. Intraperitoneal administration of 7 mg kg(-1) cisplatin led to acute renal failure, as indicated by kidney histology and increases in plasma creatinine and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels. At 5 days after cisplatin injection the BUN level was increased significantly from 15.1 +/- 4.3 to 126.7 +/- 152.6 mg dl(-1) and plasma creatinine levels increased from 0.37 +/- 0.005 to 1.68 +/- 1.9 mg dl(-1). When the rats were administered 50 and 75 mg kg(-1) erdosteine 24 h before cisplatin injection that was continued until sacrifice (total of 6 days), the BUN and creatinine levels remained similar to control levels and the grade of histology was similar. Erdosteine at doses of 50 and 75 mg kg(-1) ameliorates cisplatin-induced renal failure. The optimum dose of erdosteine may be 50 mg kg(-1) in this study.

  15. Nephroprotective effect of Bauhinia variegata (linn. whole stem extract against cisplatin-induced nephropathy in rats

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    Saumya R Pani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The nephroprotective activity of the ethanolic extract of Bauhinia variegata (Linn. whole stem against cisplatin-induced nephropathy was investigated by an in vivo method in rats. Acute nephrotoxicity was induced by i.p. injection of cisplatin (7 mg/kg of body weight (b.w.. Administration of ethanol extract at dose levels of 400 and 200 mg/kg (b.w. to cisplatin-intoxicated rats for 14 days attenuated the biochemical and histological signs of nephrotoxicity of cisplatin in a dose-dependent fashion. Ethanol extract at 400 mg/kg decreased the serum level of creatinine (0.65 ± 0.09; P<0.001 and urea (32.86 ± 5.88; P<0.001 associated with a significant increase in body weight (7.16 ± 1.10; P<0.001 and urine volume output (11.95 ± 0.79; P<0.05 as compared to the toxic control group. The ethanol extract of B. variegata at 400 mg/kg (b.w. exhibited significant and comparable nephroprotective potential to that of the standard polyherbal drug cystone. The statistically (one-way-ANOVA followed by Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison processed results suggested the protective action of B. variegate whole stem against cisplatin-induced nephropathy.

  16. Possible role of cysteine-S-conjugate β-lyase in species differences in cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Rieko; Nagata, Saori; Iida, Hiroko; Yamagishi, Norio; Yamashita, Tetsuro; Furuhama, Kazuhisa

    2011-09-01

    To better understand species differences in cisplatin nephrotoxicity, we focused on renal cysteine-S-conjugate β-lyase (C-S lyase), which may play a crucial role in the metabolism of platinum (Pt)-cysteine conjugates. Aminooxyacetic acid hemihydrochloride (AOAA), an inhibitor of C-S lyase, reduced renal injuries due to cisplatin in rats, suggesting involvement of C-S lyase. On day 5 following a bolus cisplatin injection, three species showed in vivo nephrotoxic potentials in the order of rats>mice=rabbits (the highest to lowest), based on body surface. The levels of renal Pt residue at the nephrotoxic dose were in order of rabbits>rats>mice. Meanwhile, the activity of endogenous (basal) mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase (AST), one of the C-S lyases, in the renal cortex of naive animals was rats>mice=rabbits. In a qualitative Western blot analysis, expression of mitochondrial C-S lyase in the kidney was observed at approximately 37kDa in all five species used. In in vitro studies, the cytotoxicity of cisplatin was dependent on the expression level of C-S lyase mRNA in the respective renal cells. These results demonstrate that species differences in cisplatin nephrotoxicity are attributable to an interaction of renal Pt transition with C-S lyase activity.

  17. Protective Effect of Aqueous and Ethanolic Extracts of Portulaca Oleracea Against Cisplatin Induced Nephrotoxicity

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    Gholamreza Karimi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sPortulaca oleracea L. is a herbaceous weed from portulacaceae family. It can be found in many parts of the world. Modern pharmacological studies have demonstrated that P. oleracea have antioxidant effects. The protective effect of aqueous and ethanolic extract of P. oleracea against cisplatin-induced renal toxicity was studied in rats.Materials and MethodsSingle intraperitoneal injection of 4 mg/kg cisplatin was administrated to rats. After 5 days, blood urea nitrogen (BUN and serum creatinine (Scr concentration were determined. Effect of aqueous and ethanolic extracts, before and after cisplatin injection on BUN and Scr, as well as morphological renal damage, was evaluated. ResultsIt was indicated that treatment with aqueous and ethanolic extracts of P. oleracea in the highest dose (0.8 and 2 g/ kg, 6 and 12 hr before cisplatin injection reduced BUN and Scr. Tubular necrotic damage was not observed either. ConclusionResults suggest that P. oleracea extract may protect against cisplatin-induced renal toxicity and might serve as a novel combination agent with cisplan to limit renal injury.

  18. miR-145 sensitizes gallbladder cancer to cisplatin by regulating multidrug resistance associated protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Ming; Zhao, Xiaonan; Wang, Hui; Chen, Wei; Xu, Sunwang; Wang, Wei; Shen, Hui; Huang, Shuai; Wang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    Gallbladder cancer (GBC) is the most common malignancy in biliary tract with poor prognosis. Due to its high chemoresistance, systemic chemotherapies have had limited success in treating GBC patients. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are emerging novel regulators of chemoresistance, which modulate the expression of drug resistance-related genes. In this study, we investigated the association between miR-145 expression and cisplatin sensitivity by both in vivo and in vitro analysis. Quantitative PCR (q-PCR) analysis indicated an increased miR-145 expression in GBC tissues. In addition, studies on GBC cell lines suggested an increased cisplatin efficacy with miR-145 overexpression, whereas decreasing miR-145 expression reduced cisplatin sensitivity. Further, we found that miR-145 accelerated MRP1 mRNA degradation by directly targeting its 3'-UTR and therefore caused increased cisplatin toxicity in GBC cells. Moreover, lower miR-145 and higher MRP1 expression levels predicted poor prognosis in GBC patients who received chemotherapy. Collectively, our findings established a rationale for using miR-145 expression as a biomarker to identify cisplatin-resistant GBC patients and propose that treatment strategies increasing the expression of miR-145 could be a new therapeutic approach for GBC patients.

  19. Combined cisplatin and aurora inhibitor treatment increase neuroblastoma cell death but surviving cells overproduce BDNF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polacchini, Alessio; Albani, Clara; Baj, Gabriele; Colliva, Andrea; Carpinelli, Patrizia; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2016-07-15

    Drug-resistance to chemotherapics in aggressive neuroblastoma (NB) is characterized by enhanced cell survival mediated by TrkB and its ligand, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF); thus reduction in BDNF levels represent a promising strategy to overcome drug-resistance, but how chemotherapics regulate BDNF is unknown. Here, cisplatin treatment in SK-N-BE neuroblastoma upregulated multiple BDNF transcripts, except exons 5 and 8 variants. Cisplatin increased BDNF mRNA and protein, and enhanced translation of a firefly reporter gene flanked by BDNF 5'UTR exons 1, 2c, 4 or 6 and 3'UTR-long. To block BDNF translation we focused on aurora kinases inhibitors which are proposed as new chemotherapeutics. NB cell survival after 24 h treatment was 43% with cisplatin, and 22% by cisplatin+aurora kinase inhibitor PHA-680632, while the aurora kinases inhibitor alone was less effective; however the combined treatment induced a paradoxical increase of BDNF in surviving cells with strong translational activation of exon6-3'UTR-long transcript, while translation of BDNF transcripts 1, 2C and 4 was suppressed. In conclusion, combined cisplatin and aurora kinase inhibitor treatment increases cell death, but induces BDNF overproduction in surviving cells through an aurora kinase-independent mechanism.

  20. The preventive effect of oxytocin to Cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity: an experimental rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, Tulay; Akman, Levent; Erbas, Oytun; Terek, Mustafa Cosan; Taskiran, Dilek; Ozsaran, Aydin

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral neurotoxicity is a frequent dose-limiting side effect of the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin. This study was conducted to investigate the preventive effect of oxytocin (OT) on cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity in rats. Forty-four adult female rats were included in the study. Thirty-six rats were administered intraperitoneally (i.p.) single dose cisplatin 10 mg/kg and divided in to 3 groups. The first group (n=12) received saline i.p., whereas the second group (n=12) and the third group (n=12) were injected with 80 µg/kg and 160 µg/kg OT, respectively, for 10 days. The remaining 8 rats served as the control group. Electromyography (EMG) studies were recorded and blood samples were collected for the measurement of plasma lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde; MDA), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and glutathione (GSH) levels. EMG findings revealed that compound muscle action potential amplitude was significantly decreased and distal latency was prolonged in the nontreated cisplatin-injected rats compared with the control group (Pcisplatin-injected rats showed significantly higher TNF-α and MDA levels and lower GSH level than control group. The administration of OT significantly ameliorated the EMG alterations, suppressed oxidative stress and inflammatory parameters, and increased antioxidative capacity. We suggest that oxytocin may have beneficial effects against cisplatin-induced neurotoxicity.

  1. Cisplatin-induced testicular dysfunction and its amelioration by Launaea taraxacifolia leaf extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adejuwon, S A; Femi-Akinlosotu, O M; Omirinde, J O

    2015-06-01

    This study investigates the ameliorative potential of Launea taraxacifolia (LT) aqueous leaf extract on cisplatin-induced testicular dysfunction in Wistar rats. Thirty rats were randomly divided into six groups (A-F) of 5 rats each: Group A which served as control received water; Group B was intraperitoneally (ip) injected 10 mg kg(-1) body wt cisplatin on day 21; Groups C and D were given 100 and 400 mg of LT via oral administration, respectively, for 21 days while Groups E and F received similar treatment as Groups C and D, respectively, and then exposed to ip administration of 10 mg kg(-1) body weight cisplatin on the 21st day. Exclusively, Cisplatin-exposed Group B rats showed reduced sperm characteristics and increased sperm morphological abnormalities; distorted histological architecture of seminiferous tubules; significantly increased lipid peroxidation (LPO) and decreased activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione (GSH)levels in the testes. These parameters in LT alone treated Groups C and D were not markedly different compared with the control group. The rats with the combined treatment in Groups E and F showed significantly improved sperm parameters, testicular histo-architecture and antioxidant enzymatic activities. Conclusively, aqueous extract of L. taraxacifolia has protective potential against cisplatin damage.

  2. Affecting of aquatic vascular plant Lemna minor by cisplatin revealed by voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supalkova, Veronika; Beklova, Miroslava; Baloun, Jiri; Singer, Christoph; Sures, Bernd; Adam, Vojtech; Huska, Dalibor; Pikula, Jiri; Rauscherova, Libuse; Havel, Ladislav; Zehnalek, Josef; Kizek, Rene

    2008-02-01

    Within the context of application of platinum derivates based effective cytostatics, we can suppose that these risk metals can get into aquatic ecosystems where they can show biologic availability for food chain. In the present work we report on investigation of affecting of duckweed (Lemna minor) by various doses of cisplatin (0, 5, 10, 20, 40, 80 and 160 microM) for 4 days. The toxic influence of cisplatin was evaluated on the basis of growth inhibition expressed as number of leaves, growth rate, and total amount of biomass. The result value of 96hEC50, calculated from growth inhibition with comparison of growth rates, was 6.93 microM. Moreover we aimed on determination of cisplatin content using differential pulse voltammetry. The highest content of cisplatin (320 ng g(-1) of fresh weight) was determined in plants treated by 80 microM at the second day of treatment. Plants protect themselves against heavy metals by means of synthesis of cysteine-rich peptides such as glutathione and phytochelatins. Thus thiol determination in the treated plants by means of Brdicka reaction followed. The marked increase in thiol concentration detected is associated with defence reaction of the plant against stress caused by cisplatin.

  3. Two consecutive days of treatment with liposomal cisplatin in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stathopoulos, G P; Stathopoulos, J; Dimitroulis, J

    2012-11-01

    Liposomal cisplatin (Lipoplatin) is a new agent, a cisplatin formulation that has been investigated in a number of studies and compared with cisplatin with respect to toxicity and effectiveness. It has been administered once weekly and in combination with a second agent, once every two weeks. The main outcome of the studies was that lipoplatin has no renal toxicity and is as equally effective as cisplatin. The present study investigated toxicity and effectiveness when lipoplatin is administered on two consecutive days, repeated every two weeks. Between January 2011 and November 2011, a total of 21 patients with histologically- or cytologically-confirmed non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were enrolled in the study. All but two patients, who had not been pretreated, had received one or two series of chemotherapy and some had undergone radiotherapy. Lipoplatin monotherapy was infused for 8 h the first and second days and repeated every 2 weeks with the aim of administering 6 cycles. The dose per day was 200 mg/m(2). Eight out of 21 (38.10%) patients had a partial response, 9 (42.86%) had stable disease and 4 (19.05%) had progressive disease. Results showed that there was no renal failure toxicity and no other adverse reactions apart from grade 1 myelotoxicity in only 2 patients who had been heavily pretreated, and grade 1 nausea/vomiting in 4 patients. Liposomal cisplatin is an agent with negligible toxicity and reasonably high effectiveness even when administered to pretreated patients with NSCLC.

  4. Nephroprotective effect of vanillic acid against cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity in wistar rats: a biochemical and molecular study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhu, Ganapathy; Nishanthi, Emayavaramban; Sharmila, Ramalingam

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the extensively used anticancer drugs against various cancers. Dosage dependent nephrotoxicity is the major problem in cisplatin chemotherapy. Cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity results in the depletion of renal antioxidant defence system. Our present study is aimed to investigate the nephroprotective effect of vanilic acid to against cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity in male wistar rats. Elevated levels of serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, serum uric acid and reduced antioxidant status were observed as indicatives of nephrotoxicity in cisplatin (7mg/kg bw) alone administered rats. Animals which are pre-treated with vanillic acid (50mg/kg and 100mg/kg) restored the elevated levels of renal function markers and reduced antioxidant status to near normalcy when compared to cisplatin alone treated animals. Cisplatin induced lipid peroxidation was markedly reduced by oral administration of vanillic acid at a high dose. The findings in the present study suggest that vanillic acid is a potential antioxidant that reduce cisplatin nephrotoxicity and can be as a combinatorial regimen in cancer chemotherapy.

  5. Metformin Protects Against Cisplatin-Induced Tubular Cell Apoptosis and Acute Kidney Injury via AMPKα-regulated Autophagy Induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianzhong; Gui, Yuan; Ren, Jiafa; Liu, Xin; Feng, Ye; Zeng, Zhifeng; He, Weichun; Yang, Junwei; Dai, Chunsun

    2016-04-07

    Metformin, one of the most common prescriptions for patients with type 2 diabetes, is reported to protect the kidney from gentamicin-induced nephrotoxicity. However, the role and mechanisms for metformin in preventing cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity remains largely unknown. In this study, a single intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin was employed to induce acute kidney injury (AKI) in CD1 mice. The mice exhibited severe kidney dysfunction and histological damage at day 2 after cisplatin injection. Pretreatment of metformin could markedly attenuate cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury, tubular cell apoptosis and inflammatory cell accumulation in the kidneys. Additionally, pretreatment of metformin could enhance both AMPKα phosphorylation and autophagy induction in the kidneys after cisplatin injection. In cultured NRK-52E cells, a rat kidney tubular cell line, metformin could stimulate AMPKα phosphorylation, induce autophagy and inhibit cisplatin-induced cell apoptosis. Blockade of either AMPKα activation or autophagy induction could largely abolish the protective effect of metformin in cisplatin-induced cell death. Together, this study demonstrated that metformin may protect against cisplatin-induced tubular cell apoptosis and AKI through stimulating AMPKα activation and autophagy induction in the tubular cells.

  6. Dose-dependent effect of 8-day cisplatin administration upon the morphology of the albino guinea pig cochlea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardinaal, RM; de Groot, JCMJ; Huizing, EH; Veldman, JE; Smoorenburg, GF

    2000-01-01

    Numerous studies investigating cisplatin ototoxicity in animals have been performed, but it is difficult to derive a clear dose-effect relation from these studies. The degree of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity depends on a multitude of,factors. Many parameters, such as dose, mode of administration, do

  7. Bee Venom Mitigates Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity by Regulating CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Regulatory T Cells in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunseong Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is used as a potent anticancer drug, but it often causes nephrotoxicity. Bee venom (BV has been used for the treatment of various inflammatory diseases, and its renoprotective action was shown in NZB/W mice. However, little is known about whether BV has beneficial effects on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and how such effects might be mediated. In the present study, the BV-injected group showed a significant increase in the population of Tregs in spleen. Although there was no significant difference in the numbers of Tregs 3 days after cisplatin injection between the BV- and PBS-injected groups, more migration of Tregs into the kidney was observed 6 hours after cisplatin administration in BV group than in PBS group. In addition, BV-injected mice showed reduced levels of serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, renal tissue damage, proinflammatory cytokines, and macrophage infiltration into the kidney 3 days after cisplatin administration. These renoprotective effects were abolished by the depletion of Tregs. The anticancer effect of repeated administrations of cisplatin was not affected by BV injection. These results suggest that BV has protective effects on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice, at least in part, through the regulation of Tregs without a big influence on the antitumor effects of cisplatin.

  8. A comparison of weekly versus 3-weekly cisplatin during adjuvant radiotherapy for high-risk head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosting, Sjoukje F.; Chen, Tom W. W.; Huang, Shao H.; Wang, Lisa; Waldron, John; Gilbert, Ralph; Goldstein, David; Halmos, Gyorgy B.; Witjes, Max J. H.; Gietema, Jourik A.; O'Sullivan, Brian; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Siu, Lillian L.; Hansen, Aaron R.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To compare cumulative cisplatin dose and toxicity between patients who received 3-weekly versus weekly cisplatin during adjuvant radiotherapy for high-risk head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Materials and methods: Consecutive HNSCC patients with involved resection margins and

  9. Enhanced effects of bleomycin on pulmonary function disturbances in patients with decreased renal function due to cisplatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleijfer, S; vanderMark, TW; Mulder, NH; Schraffordt Koops, H.

    1996-01-01

    We examined whether cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity augmented bleomycin-induced pulmonary toxicity in patients with testicular cancer treated with etoposide and cisplatin with (BEP) or without bleomycin (EP). Before and at 3-week intervals during chemotherapy, creatinine clearance and lung function

  10. Sensitization of Cervical Cancer Cells to Cisplatin by Genistein: The Role of NFB and Akt/mTOR Signaling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sahin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer is among the top causes of death from cancer in women. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival; however, cisplatin treatment is associated with toxicity to healthy cells. Genistein has been used as an adjunct to chemotherapy to enhance the activity of chemotherapeutic agents without causing increased toxicity. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of genistein (25 μM on antitumor activity of cisplatin (250 nM on HeLa cervical cancer cells. We have examined the alterations in expression of NF-B, p-mTOR, p-p70S6K1, p-4E-BP1, and p-Akt protein levels in response to treatment. The combination of 25 μM genistein with 250 nM cisplatin resulted in significantly greater growth inhibition (. Genistein enhanced the antitumor activity of cisplatin and reduced the expression of NF-B, p-mTOR, p-p70S6K1, p-4E-BP1, and p-Akt. The results in the present study suggest that genistein could enhance the activity of cisplatin via inhibition of NF-κB and Akt/mTOR pathways. Genistein is a promising nontoxic nutritional agent that may enhance treatment outcome in cervical cancer patients when given concomitantly with cisplatin. Clinical trials of genistein and cisplatin combination are warranted to test this hypothesis.

  11. Pioglitazone protects against cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity in rats and potentiates its anticancer activity against human renal adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Mona F; El Shazly, Shimaa M

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity is a serious problem that limits its use in cancer treatment. The present study aimed to investigate the renal protective capacity of pioglitazone to reduce the cisplatin- induced nephrotoxicity. The underlying suggested mechanism(s) and whether this nephroprotective effect (if any) interferes with the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin on cancer cells were also investigated. Pioglitazone, Bisphenol A diglycidyl ether, BADGE, IP injected (Peroxisome proliferator- activated receptor gamma (PPAR-γ) antagonist), or their combination were administered to rats one hour before cisplatin injection. Moreover, their effects on the cell viability of human renal adenocarcinoma cell models (ACHN) were studied. The obtained results showed that pioglitazone improved the renal function, structural changes, renal malondialdehyde (MDA), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) genes expression in cisplatin injected rats. It increased both renal reduced glutathione (GSH) content and PPAR-γ gene expression. In contrast to the data obtained by prior administration of BADGE. Pioglitazone also potentiated the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin on human renal adenocarcinoma cells and this effect was abolished by BADGE co administration. In conclusion, these results suggested that pioglitazone protected against cisplatin- induced nephrotoxicity through its interaction with PPAR-γ receptors and antioxidant effects. Furthermore, pioglitazone did not interfere but rather potentiated the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin on human renal adenocarcinoma cells.

  12. Protective effects of 6-hydroxy-1-methylindole-3-acetonitrile on cisplatin-induced oxidative nephrotoxicity via Nrf2 inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Ji Hee; Shin, Ji-Sun; Kim, Jong-Bin; Baek, Nam-In; Cho, Young-Wuk; Lee, Yong Sup; Kay, Hee Yeon; Kim, Soo-dong; Lee, Kyung-Tae

    2013-12-01

    We previously demonstrated the ethanol extract of the roots of Brassica rapa protects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by attenuating oxidative stress. Here, we investigated the nephroprotective effects of 6-hydroxy-1-methylindole-3-acetonitrile (6-HMA), which was isolated from the roots of B. rapa, on cisplatin-induced toxicity in renal epithelial LLC-PK1 cells and in rats with acute renal injury. Pretreatment of LLC-PK1 cells with 6-HMA ameliorated cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity caused by oxidative stress, as was demonstrated by reductions in the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) and increased levels of glutathione (GSH). In addition, 6-HMA inhibited cisplatin-induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) expression, possibly due to the suppression of the nuclear translocation and binding activity of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Furthermore, 6-HMA administered rats showed lower levels of blood urea nitrogen (BUN), creatinine, and urinary lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) than cisplatin alone-treated rats in cisplatin-induced renal injury model. Moreover, 6-HMA inhibited the cisplatin-induced formation of MDA and GSH depletion and increased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione reductase (GR). Taken together, these findings indicate 6-HMA is a major active constituent from the roots of B. rapa to have a protective effect against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by attenuating oxidative stress.

  13. The timing of caffeic acid treatment with cisplatin determines sensitization or resistance of ovarian carcinoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sirota

    2017-04-01

    The use of caffeic acid as adjuvant for cisplatin should be carefully examined due to different pharmacokinetic profiles of caffeic acid and cisplatin. Thus, it is questionable if the two agents can reach the tumors at the right time frame in vivo.

  14. Copper chaperone Atox1 interacts with the metal-binding domain of Wilson's disease protein in cisplatin detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgova, Nataliya V; Nokhrin, Sergiy; Yu, Corey H; George, Graham N; Dmitriev, Oleg Y

    2013-08-15

    Human copper transporters ATP7B (Wilson's disease protein) and ATP7A (Menkes' disease protein) have been implicated in tumour resistance to cisplatin, a widely used anticancer drug. Cisplatin binds to the copper-binding sites in the N-terminal domain of ATP7B, and this binding may be an essential step of cisplatin detoxification involving copper ATPases. In the present study, we demonstrate that cisplatin and a related platinum drug carboplatin produce the same adduct following reaction with MBD2 [metal-binding domain (repeat) 2], where platinum is bound to the side chains of the cysteine residues in the CxxC copper-binding motif. This suggests the same mechanism for detoxification of both drugs by ATP7B. Platinum can also be transferred to MBD2 from copper chaperone Atox1, which was shown previously to bind cisplatin. Binding of the free cisplatin and reaction with the cisplatin-loaded Atox1 produce the same protein-bound platinum intermediate. Transfer of platinum along the copper-transport pathways in the cell may serve as a mechanism of drug delivery to its target in the cell nucleus, and explain tumour-cell resistance to cisplatin associated with the overexpression of copper transporters ATP7B and ATP7A.

  15. The Effects of Nimesulide Combined with Cisplatin on Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢丽华; 张珍祥; 徐永健; 张惠兰; 刘剑波

    2004-01-01

    To study the effects of cyclooxygenase 2 selective inhibitor Nimesulide (NIM) combined with Cisplatin (DDP) on human lung cancer and the possible mechanisms, the proliferation and apoptosis of human lung cancer cell line A549 were evaluated by MTT reduction assay and flow cytometry respectively. The inhibitory effect on neoplasia in vivo was tested on nude mice subcutaneously implanted tumor. Our results showed that NIM and DDP could inhibit A549 cell proliferation in a concentration dependent pattern; this action was enhanced when NIM (25 μmol/L) was given in combination with DDP and they worked in a synergistic or additive pattern as DDP concentration ≥ 1 μg/ml. NIM and DDP could induce A549 cells apoptosis and the action was augmented when used in combination (P<0.01). NIM and DDP could inhibit the growth of subcutaneously implan ted tumors on nude mice (P<0.05,P<0.01) and the inhibitory rate of NIM combined with DDP was significantly higher than that of NIM orDDPgroup (P<0.01, P<0.01). It is concluded that combined usc of NIM and DDP has significant synergistic antitumor effects on lung cancer cell line A549 and in animals in vivo. The synergy may be achieved by growth inhibition and apoptosis induction.

  16. Plant-Derived Agents for Counteracting Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreesh Ojha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (CSP is a chemotherapeutic agent commonly used to treat a variety of malignancies. The major setback with CSP treatment is that its clinical efficacy is compromised by its induction of organ toxicity, particular to the kidneys and ears. Despite the significant strides that have been made in understanding the mechanisms underlying CSP-induced renal toxicity, advances in developing renoprotective strategies are still lacking. In addition, the renoprotective approaches described in the literature reveal partial amelioration of CSP-induced renal toxicity, stressing the need to develop potent combinatorial/synergistic agents for the mitigation of renal toxicity. However, the ideal renoprotective adjuvant should not interfere with the anticancer efficacy of CSP. In this review, we have discussed the progress made in utilizing plant-derived agents (phytochemicals to combat CSP-induced nephrotoxicity in preclinical studies. Furthermore, we have also presented strategies to utilize phytochemicals as prototypes for the development of novel renoprotective agents for counteracting chemotherapy-induced renal damage.

  17. Protective effect of CV247 against cisplatin nephrotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Máthé, C; Szénási, G; Sebestény, A; Blázovics, A; Szentmihályi, K; Hamar, P; Albert, M

    2014-08-01

    CV247 (CV), an aqueous mixture of copper (Cu) and manganese (Mn) gluconates, vitamin C and sodium salicylate increased the antitumour effects of cisplatin (CDPP; cis-diamminedichloroplatinum) in vitro. We hypothesized that the antioxidant and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2; prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2) inhibitory components of CV can protect the kidneys from CDPP nephrotoxicity in rats. CDPP (6.5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) slightly elevated serum creatinine (Crea) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) 12 days after treatment. Kidney histology demonstrated extensive tubular epithelial damage and COX-2 immunoreactivity increased 14 days after treatment. A large amount of platinum (Pt) accumulated in the kidney of CDPP-treated rats. Furthermore, CDPP decreased renal iron (Fe), molybdenum (Mo), zinc (Zn), Cu and Mn concentrations and increased plasma Fe and Cu concentrations. CDPP elevated plasma free radical concentration. Treatment with CV alone for 14 days (twice 3 ml/kg/day orally) did not influence these parameters. Chronic CV administration after CDPP reduced renal histological damage and slightly decreased COX-2 immunoreactivity, while failed to prevent the increase in Crea and BUN levels. Blood free radical concentration was reduced, that is, CV improved redox homeostasis. CV restored plasma Fe and renal Fe, Mo and Zn, while decreased Pt and elevated Cu and Mn concentrations in the kidney. Besides the known synergistic antitumour effects with CDPP, CV partially protected the kidneys from CDPP nephrotoxicity probably through its antioxidant effect.

  18. Mechanical Stress Promotes Cisplatin-Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laila Ziko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (CisPt is a commonly used platinum-based chemotherapeutic agent. Its efficacy is limited due to drug resistance and multiple side effects, thereby warranting a new approach to improving the pharmacological effect of CisPt. A newly developed mathematical hypothesis suggested that mechanical loading, when coupled with a chemotherapeutic drug such as CisPt and immune cells, would boost tumor cell death. The current study investigated the aforementioned mathematical hypothesis by exposing human hepatocellular liver carcinoma (HepG2 cells to CisPt, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and mechanical stress individually and in combination. HepG2 cells were also treated with a mixture of CisPt and carnosine with and without mechanical stress to examine one possible mechanism employed by mechanical stress to enhance CisPt effects. Carnosine is a dipeptide that reportedly sequesters platinum-based drugs away from their pharmacological target-site. Mechanical stress was achieved using an orbital shaker that produced 300 rpm with a horizontal circular motion. Our results demonstrated that mechanical stress promoted CisPt-induced death of HepG2 cells (~35% more cell death. Moreover, results showed that CisPt-induced death was compromised when CisPt was left to mix with carnosine 24 hours preceding treatment. Mechanical stress, however, ameliorated cell death (20% more cell death.

  19. Geraniin ameliorates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei; Liu, Yong; He, Pengcheng; Chen, Jiyan; Liu, Shuangxin; Tan, Ning

    2016-08-01

    Geraniin, an active compound isolated from Geranium sibiricum, has been reported to have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effects of geraniin against cisplatin (CP)-induced kidney injury in mice. Geraniin was administrated for three consecutive days following CP (20 mg/kg) injection. The results showed that geraniin inhibited CP-induced kidney histopathologic changes, MDA, inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production in kidney tissues. Geraniin also inhibited CP-induced blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine production. Meanwhile, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) decreased by CP were reversed by the treatment of geraniin. In addition, geraniin significantly inhibited CP-induced NF-κB activation in kidney tissues. Treatment of geraniin dosedependently upregulated the expression of Nrf2 and HO-1. The anticancer effects of CP were not affected by the treatment of geraniin. In conclusion, these results indicated that geraniin protected against CP-induced nephrotoxicity by inhibiting oxidative stress and inflammatory response.

  20. 10-DHGD ameliorates cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elseweidy, Mohamed M; Zaghloul, Mohamed S; Younis, Nahla N

    2016-10-01

    Organs subjected to chronic injuries may develop tissue fibrosis. Several factors contribute to the combat injurious stimuli to repair, heal and alleviate any disturbance. Secretion of chemokines, migration of inflammatory cells to the affected site and activation of fibroblast for production of extracellular matrix (ECM) are examples. Recently, few studies have delt with 10-dehydrogingerdione (10-DHGD), one of the active constituent of ginger extracts that has been published. This constituent proved to be potent antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, cholesterol ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitor, indeed, a hypolipemic agent. It has been selected in the present study as a natural anti-inflammatory agent to combat inflammation, nephrotoxicity and renal fibrosis-induced by cisplatin. Renal fibrosis state demonstrated a significant increase in creatinine, urea, nuclear factor kappa (NF-kB), insulin like growth factor I (IGF-I), fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) along with a significant decrease of hepatocytes growth factor (HGF), renal glutathione (GSH) and in confirm to histopathological examination of kidney tissue. Administration of 10-DHGD orally daily for 4 weeks resulted in a significant improvement of both the biomarkers studied in addition to the histopathological profile of the renal tissues.

  1. Collateral methotrexate resistance in cisplatin-selected murine leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to anticancer drugs is a major cause of failure of many therapeutic protocols. A variety of mechanisms have been proposed to explain this phenomenon. The exact mechanism depends upon the drug of interest as well as the tumor type treated. While studying a cell line selected for its resistance to cisplatin we noted that the cells expressed a >25,000-fold collateral resistance to methotrexate. Given the magnitude of this resistance we elected to investigate this intriguing collateral resistance. From a series of investigations we have identified an alteration in a membrane protein of the resistant cell as compared to the sensitive cells that could be the primary mechanism of resistance. Our studies reviewed here indicate decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of a protein (molecular mass = 66 in the resistant cells, which results in little or no transfer of methotrexate from the medium into the cell. Since this is a relatively novel function for tyrosine phosphorylation, this information may provide insight into possible pharmacological approaches to modify therapeutic regimens by analyzing the status of this protein in tumor samples for a better survival of the cancer patients.

  2. Cisplatin inhibits the formation of a reactive intermediate during copper-catalyzed oxidation of amyloid β peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walke, Gulshan R; Rapole, Srikanth; Kulkarni, Prasad P

    2014-10-06

    Cisplatin was studied for its effect on the copper-catalyzed oxidation of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide. The interaction of cisplatin with Aβ1-16 in the presence of Cu(II) was investigated using cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry. The positive shift in the E1/2 value of Aβ1-16-Cu(II) suggests that the interaction of cisplatin alters the copper-binding properties of Aβ1-16. The mass spectrometry data show complete inhibition of copper-catalyzed decarboxylation/deamination of the Asp1 residue of Aβ1-16, while there is a significant decrease in copper-catalyzed oxidation of Aβ1-16 in the presence of cisplatin. Overall, our results provide a novel mode by which cisplatin inhibits copper-catalyzed oxidation of Aβ. These findings may lead to the design of better platinum complexes to treat oxidative stress in Alzheimer's disease and other related neurological disorders.

  3. Pinpointing differences in cisplatin-induced apoptosis in adherent and non-adherent cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tastesen, Hanne Sørup; Holm, Jacob Bak; Poulsen, Kristian Arild

    2010-01-01

    Platinum compounds are used in the treatment of cancer. We demonstrate that cisplatin-induced (10 µM) apoptosis (caspase-3 activity) is pronounced within 18 hours in non-adherent Ehrlich ascites tumour cells (EATC), whereas there is no increase in caspase-3 activity in the adherent Ehrlich Lettré...... ascites tumour cells (ELA). Loss of KCl and cell shrinkage are hallmarks in apoptosis and has been shown in EATC. However, we find no reduction in cell volume and only a minor loss of K(+) which is accompanied by net uptake of Na(+) following 18 hours cisplatin exposure in ELA. Glutathione and taurine...... have previously been demonstrated to protect cells from apoptosis. We find, however, that increase or decrease in the cellular content of glutathione and taurine has no effect on cisplatin-induced cell death in EATC and ELA. Nevertheless, knock-down of the taurine transporter TauT leads...

  4. Breast cancer cells with acquired antiestrogen resistance are sensitized to cisplatin-induced cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Christina Westmose; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E

    2007-01-01

    for future breast cancer treatment. In this study, we have investigated the effect of the chemotherapeutic compound cisplatin using a panel of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cell lines established from the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. We show that the antiestrogen-resistant cells...... with parental MCF-7 cells. Our data show that Bcl-2 can protect antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells from cisplatin-induced cell death, indicating that the reduced expression of Bcl-2 in the antiestrogen-resistant cells plays a role in sensitizing the cells to cisplatin treatment.......Antiestrogens are currently used for treating breast cancer patients who have estrogen receptor-positive tumors. However, patients with advanced disease will eventually develop resistance to the drugs. Therefore, compounds effective on antiestrogen-resistant tumors will be of great importance...

  5. Seizure following chemotherapy (paclitaxel and cisplatin in a patient of carcinoma cervix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohitashwa Dana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin and paclitaxel both can cause peripheral neurotoxicity as an adverse effect; however, central nervous system neurotoxicity in the form of seizures is rare. We report a case of a 36-year-old female patient of metastatic carcinoma cervix, who developed seizure shortly after cisplatin infusion. Her laboratory investigations were within normal limits. Computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging of the brain did not reveal brain primary metastasis or meningeal carcinomatosis. She had no complaints of fever, no signs and symptoms of infection, and no history of seizure nor was she on any medication predisposing to such an event. Excluding several causes, seizure was thought to be most likely related to the chemotherapy and cisplatin was the more likely agent in view of observed temporal relationship with the adverse event.

  6. Intravenous or oral administration of vinorelbine in adjuvant chemotherapy with cisplatin and vinorelbine for resected NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Steffen Filskov; Carus, Andreas; Meldgaard, Peter

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Cisplatin and vinorelbine given intravenously is a well-established adjuvant chemotherapy regimen after surgery for early-stage NSCLC. Vinorelbine can also be administered orally. However, the efficacy of orally administrated vinorelbine in adjuvant treatment of NSCLC is unknown. We...... assessed the overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) of patients treated with adjuvant i.v. vinorelbine or p.o. vinorelbine, in combination with i.v. cisplatin. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We reviewed two time-separated cohorts of patients referred to the Department of Oncology at Aarhus...... University Hospital (Denmark) from 2005 to 2012 for adjuvant chemotherapy after surgery for NSCLC. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Of the 265 patients included in this study, 126 patients received i.v. and 139 received p.o. vinorelbine/cisplatin. The two groups were comparable with respect to important baseline...

  7. Effects of Cisplatin in Neuroblastoma Rat Cells: Damage to Cellular Organelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santin, Giada; Scietti, Luigi; Veneroni, Paola; Barni, Sergio; Bernocchi, Graziella; Bottone, Maria Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Cisplatin (cisPt) is a chemotherapy agent used as a treatment for several types of cancer. The main cytotoxic effect of cisplatin is generally accepted to be DNA damage. Recently, the mechanism by which cisPt generates the cascade of events involved in the apoptotic process has been demonstrated. In particular it has been shown that some organelles are cisPt target and are involved in cell death. This paper aims to describe the morphological and functional changes of the Golgi apparatus and lysosomes during apoptosis induced in neuronal rat cells (B50) by cisplatin. The results obtained show that the cellular organelles are the target of cisPt, so their damage can induce cell death. PMID:22505928

  8. Review of pemetrexed in combination with cisplatin for the treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjit K Goudar

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Ranjit K GoudarDepartment of Medicine, Division of Hematology, Medical Oncology and Cellular Therapy, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USAAbstract: Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a resistant form of lung cancer, and its incidence continues to rise in Europe and Australia. Until recently, chemotherapy had not been shown to be effective in the treatment of this slowly progressive disease. In 2004, the combination of pemetrexed and cisplatin was shown to induce high response rates in MPM. This article reviews the published literature describing the development and testing of this therapeutic combination in mesothelioma, and examines in detail the key phase III clinical trial that led to the approval of pemetrexed by the US FDA. Ongoing research will further define the role of pemetrexed plus cisplatin in the treatment of MPM.Keywords: malignant pleural mesothelioma, mesothelioma, pemetrexed, cisplatin

  9. Effects of Cisplatin in Neuroblastoma Rat Cells: Damage to Cellular Organelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giada Santin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (cisPt is a chemotherapy agent used as a treatment for several types of cancer. The main cytotoxic effect of cisplatin is generally accepted to be DNA damage. Recently, the mechanism by which cisPt generates the cascade of events involved in the apoptotic process has been demonstrated. In particular it has been shown that some organelles are cisPt target and are involved in cell death. This paper aims to describe the morphological and functional changes of the Golgi apparatus and lysosomes during apoptosis induced in neuronal rat cells (B50 by cisplatin. The results obtained show that the cellular organelles are the target of cisPt, so their damage can induce cell death.

  10. Effects of cisplatin on telomerase activity and telomere length in BEL-7404 human hepatoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Telomerase activity was inhibited in a dose and time-dependent manner with the treatment of cisplatin for 24, 48, or 72 h in a concentration ranged from 0.8 to 50 μM in BEL-7404 human hepatoma cells. There were no changes in expression pattern of three telomerase subunits, its catalytic reverse transcriptase subunit (hTERT), its RNA component (hTR) or the associated protein subunit (TP1), after cisplatin treated for 72 h with indicated concentrations. Mean telomere lengths were decreased by the cisplatin treatment. Cell growth inhibition and cell cycle accumulation in G2/M phase were found to be correlated with telomerase inhibition in the present study, but percentages of cell apoptosis did not change markedly during the process.

  11. Assessment of low-dose cisplatin as a model of nausea and emesis in beagle dogs, potential for repeated administration.

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    Kenward, Hannah; Pelligand, Ludovic; Elliott, Jonathan

    2014-08-01

    Cisplatin is a highly emetogenic cancer chemotherapy agent, which is often used to induce nausea and emesis in animal models. The cytotoxic properties of cisplatin also cause adverse events that negatively impact on animal welfare preventing repeated administration of cisplatin. In this study, we assessed whether a low (subclinical) dose of cisplatin could be utilized as a model of nausea and emesis in the dog while decreasing the severity of adverse events to allow repeated administration. The emetic, nausea-like behavior and potential biomarker response to both the clinical dose (70 mg/m2) and low dose (15 mg/m2) of cisplatin was assessed. Plasma creatinine concentrations and granulocyte counts were used to assess adverse effects on the kidneys and bone marrow, respectively. Nausea-like behavior and emesis was induced by both doses of cisplatin, but the latency to onset was greater in the low-dose group. No significant change in plasma creatinine was detected for either dose groups. Granulocytes were significantly reduced compared with baseline (P = 0.000) following the clinical, but not the low-dose cisplatin group. Tolerability of repeated administration was assessed with 4 administrations of an 18 mg/m2 dose cisplatin. Plasma creatinine did not change significantly. Cumulative effects on the granulocytes occurred, they were significantly decreased (P = 0.03) from baseline at 3 weeks following cisplatin for the 4th administration only. Our results suggest that subclinical doses (15 and 18 mg/m2) of cisplatin induce nausea-like behavior and emesis but have reduced adverse effects compared with the clinical dose allowing for repeated administration in crossover studies.

  12. Chemopreventive Effect of Tadalafil in Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeneye, A A; Benebo, A S

    2016-08-30

    Nephrotoxicity remains a common untoward effect of cisplatin therapy with limited effective chemopreventive options available till date. This study aims to evaluate the possible chemopreventive effect and mechanism(s) of action of 2 mgkg-1 and 5 mgkg-1 of Tadalafil in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxic rats. In this study, twenty-five male Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups (n = 5 rats per group) and daily pretreated with oral doses of distilled water (10 mLkg-1), ascorbic acid (100 mgkg-1), Tadalafil (2 mgkg-1 and 5 mgkg-1) for 7 days before cisplatin (5 mgkg-1, intraperitoneal) was administered. 72 hours post-cisplatin injections, rats were sacrificed humanely and blood samples for serum electrolytes, urea and creatinine and renal tissues for reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and malonialdehyde dehydrogenase (MAD) assays and histopathology were collected. Results showed that cisplatin injection caused significant decreases in the serum sodium (Na+), potassium (K+), bicarbonate (HCO3-), calcium (Ca2+), phosphate (PO42-) and concomitant significant increases in the serum urea and creatinine levels. In addition, there were significant decreases in the renal tissue GSH, SOD, CAT and increased MAD and GSH-Px levels which were corroborated by histopathological features of tubulonephritis. However, these histo-biochemical alterations were significantly attenuated by ascorbic acid and Tadalafil pretreatments. Overall, results of this study showed the chemopreventive potential of Tadalafil against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity which was possibly mediated via antioxidant and anti-lipoperoxidation mechanisms.

  13. Tolerability and toxicity of adjuvant cisplatin and gemcitabine for treating non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Fan; LI Xiao; CHEN Ke-zhong; JIANG Guan-chao; WANG Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background The combination of cisplatin and vinorelbine is an evidence-supported regimen for adjuvant chemotherapy for treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).But this doublet has considerable toxicity and unfavorable tolerability,and results in poor compliance.The cisplatin and gemcitabine regimen is one of the most active and well-tolerated regimens against advanced NSCLC,but its toxicity and tolerability has not been adequately evaluated in the adjuvant setting.Methods From a lung cancer database we retrospectively reviewed NSCLC patients receiving adjuvant chemotherapy of cisplatin (75 mg/m2) and gemcitabine (1250 mg/m2) between January 2005 and December 2011.Postoperative demographics,compliance to adjuvant therapy and toxicity were retrieved from medical records.Results A total of 132 patients met the criteria and were included in the study,96 were male (72.7%) and 36 were female (27.3%).Median age was 60.5 years old,range 29-75 years,and 41.7% of patients were ≥65 years old.Overall,68.2%patients received all four planned cycles,and the cumulative dose delivered for gemcitabine was 8333 mg (83.3% of the planned dose) and cisplatin 248 mg (82.7% of the planned dose).There were no treatment-related deaths.Grade 3/4neutropenia developed in 47 patients (35.6%) and was the predominant hematologic toxicity.Common grade 3/4 nonhematologic toxicities were nausea/vomiting (22.0%),infection (12.3%),and febrile neutropenia (11.4%).Conclusion Cisplatin and gemcitabine are feasible for use in the adjuvant setting with a favorable toxicity profile and superior tolerability compared with published data on cisplatin and vinorelbine.

  14. Identification of cisplatin-regulated metabolic pathways in pluripotent stem cells.

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    Louise von Stechow

    Full Text Available The chemotherapeutic compound, cisplatin causes various kinds of DNA lesions but also triggers other pertubations, such as ER and oxidative stress. We and others have shown that treatment of pluripotent stem cells with cisplatin causes a plethora of transcriptional and post-translational alterations that, to a major extent, point to DNA damage response (DDR signaling. The orchestrated DDR signaling network is important to arrest the cell cycle and repair the lesions or, in case of damage beyond repair, eliminate affected cells. Failure to properly balance the various aspects of the DDR in stem cells contributes to ageing and cancer. Here, we performed metabolic profiling by mass spectrometry of embryonic stem (ES cells treated for different time periods with cisplatin. We then integrated metabolomics with transcriptomics analyses and connected cisplatin-regulated metabolites with regulated metabolic enzymes to identify enriched metabolic pathways. These included nucleotide metabolism, urea cycle and arginine and proline metabolism. Silencing of identified proline metabolic and catabolic enzymes indicated that altered proline metabolism serves as an adaptive, rather than a toxic response. A group of enriched metabolic pathways clustered around the metabolite S-adenosylmethionine, which is a hub for methylation and transsulfuration reactions and polyamine metabolism. Enzymes and metabolites with pro- or anti-oxidant functions were also enriched but enhanced levels of reactive oxygen species were not measured in cisplatin-treated ES cells. Lastly, a number of the differentially regulated metabolic enzymes were identified as target genes of the transcription factor p53, pointing to p53-mediated alterations in metabolism in response to genotoxic stress. Altogether, our findings reveal interconnecting metabolic pathways that are responsive to cisplatin and may serve as signaling modules in the DDR in pluripotent stem cells.

  15. Cisplatin-tethered gold nanospheres for multimodal chemo-radiotherapy of glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setua, Sonali; Ouberai, Myriam; Piccirillo, Sara G.; Watts, Colin; Welland, Mark

    2014-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains the most aggressive and challenging brain tumour to treat. We report the first successful chemo-radiotherapy on patient derived treatment resistant GBM cells using a cisplatin-tethered gold nanosphere. After intracellular uptake, the nanosphere effects DNA damage which initiates caspase-mediated apoptosis in those cells. In the presence of radiation, both gold and platinum of cisplatin, serve as high atomic number radiosensitizers leading to the emission of ionizing photoelectrons and Auger electrons. This resulted in enhanced synergy between cisplatin and radiotherapy mediated cytotoxicity, and photo/Auger electron mediated radiosensitisation leading to complete ablation of the tumour cells in an in vitro model system. This study demonstrates the potential of designed nanoparticles to target aggressive cancers in the patient derived cell lines providing a platform to move towards treatment strategies.Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains the most aggressive and challenging brain tumour to treat. We report the first successful chemo-radiotherapy on patient derived treatment resistant GBM cells using a cisplatin-tethered gold nanosphere. After intracellular uptake, the nanosphere effects DNA damage which initiates caspase-mediated apoptosis in those cells. In the presence of radiation, both gold and platinum of cisplatin, serve as high atomic number radiosensitizers leading to the emission of ionizing photoelectrons and Auger electrons. This resulted in enhanced synergy between cisplatin and radiotherapy mediated cytotoxicity, and photo/Auger electron mediated radiosensitisation leading to complete ablation of the tumour cells in an in vitro model system. This study demonstrates the potential of designed nanoparticles to target aggressive cancers in the patient derived cell lines providing a platform to move towards treatment strategies. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c

  16. Rikkunshito, a traditional Japanese medicine, suppresses cisplatin-induced anorexia in humans

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    Ohno T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Tetsuro Ohno, Mitsuhiro Yanai, Hiroyuki Ando, Yoshitaka Toyomasu, Atsushi Ogawa, Hiroki Morita, Kyoichi Ogata, Erito Mochiki, Takayuki Asao, Hiroyuki KuwanoDepartment of General Surgical Science, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi, JapanBackground: The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Rikkunshito on ghrelin secretion and on cisplatin-induced anorexia in humans.Methods: The study was performed as a crossover design, and ten unresectable or relapsed gastric cancer patients were randomly divided into two groups. Group A (n = 5 was started on Rikkunshito (2.5 g three times daily, orally from the first course of chemotherapy and followed by a second course without Rikkunshito. A treatment with reversed order was performed for Group B (n = 5. All patients received combined chemotherapy with S-1 plus cisplatin. The primary endpoint was the amount of oral intake, and the categories of scales of anorexia, nausea, and vomiting; secondary endpoints included the plasma concentration of acylated ghrelin.Results: In the Rikkunshito-on period, no decrease of the plasma concentration of acylated ghrelin induced by cisplatin was observed. The average oral intake in the Rikkunshito-on period was significantly larger than that in the Rikkunshito-off period, and the grade of anorexia was significantly lower in the Rikkunshito-on period than in the Rikkunshito-off period.Conclusion: Rikkunshito appeared to prevent anorexia induced by cisplatin, resulting in effective prophylactic administration of chemotherapy with cisplatin, and patients could continue their treatments on schedule.Keywords: Rikkunshito, cisplatin, ghrelin, anorexia, stomach cancer

  17. The natural flavonoid apigenin sensitizes human CD44(+) prostate cancer stem cells to cisplatin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Suat; Turkekul, Kader; Serttas, Rıza; Erdogan, Zeynep

    2017-04-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the second most common type of cancer and the fifth leading cause of cancer-related death among men. Development of chemoresistance, tumor relapse and metastasis remain major barriers to effective treatment and all been identified to be associated with cancer stem cells (CSCs). Natural flavonoids such as apigenin have been shown to have the ability to improve the therapeutic efficacy of common chemotherapy agents through CSCs sensitization. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the combination of apigenin with cisplatin on CD44(+) PCa stem cell growth and migration. Platinum-based anti-neoplastic drugs have been used to treat a number of malignancies including PCa. However, acquired resistance and side effects unfortunately have limited cisplatin's use. A CD44(+) subpopulation was isolated from human androgen-independent PC3 PCa cells by using human CD44-PE antibody. IC50 values were determined by MTT test. RT-qPCR, Western blot analyses and image-based cytometer were used to investigate apoptosis, cell cycle and their underlying molecular mechanisms. Cell migration was evaluated by wound healing test. The combination of the IC50 doses of apigenin (15μM) and cisplatin (7.5μM) for 48h significantly enhanced cisplatin's cytotoxic and apoptotic effects through downregulation of Bcl-2, sharpin and survivin; and upregulation of caspase-8, Apaf-1 and p53 mRNA expression. The combined therapy suppressed the phosphorylation of p-PI3K and p-Akt, inhibited the protein expression of NF-κB, and downregulated the cell cycle by upregulating p21, as well as cyclin dependent kinases CDK-2, -4, and -6. Apigenin significantly increased the inhibitory effects of cisplatin on cell migration via downregulation of Snail expression. In conclusion, our study showed the possible therapeutic approach of using apigenin to potentially increase the effects of cisplatin by targeting CSCs subset in prostate cancer.

  18. Enhancing the efficacy of cisplatin in ovarian cancer treatment – could arsenic have a role

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    Helm C William

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ovarian cancer affects more than 200,000 women each year around the world. Most women are not diagnosed until the disease has already metastasized from the ovaries with a resultant poor prognosis. Ovarian cancer is associated with an overall 5 year survival of little more than 50%. The mainstay of front-line therapy is cytoreductive surgery followed by chemotherapy. Traditionally, this has been by the intravenous route only but there is more interest in the delivery of intraperitoneal chemotherapy utilizing the pharmaco-therapeutic advantage of the peritoneal barrier. Despite three large, randomized clinical trials comparing intravenous with intraperitoneal chemotherapy showing improved outcomes for those receiving at least part of their chemotherapy by the intraperitoneal route. Cisplatin has been the most active drug for the treatment of ovarian cancer for the last 4 decades and the prognosis for women with ovarian cancer can be defined by the tumor response to cisplatin. Those whose tumors are innately platinum-resistant at the time of initial treatment have a very poor prognosis. Although the majority of patients with ovarian cancer respond to front-line platinum combination chemotherapy the majority will develop disease that becomes resistant to cisplatin and will ultimately succumb to the disease. Improving the efficacy of cisplatin could have a major impact in the fight against this disease. Arsenite is an exciting agent that not only has inherent single-agent tumoricidal activity against ovarian cancer cell lines but also multiple biochemical interactions that may enhance the cytotoxicity of cisplatin including inhibition of deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA repair. In vitro studies suggest that arsenite may enhance the activity of cisplatin in other cell types. Arsenic trioxide is already used clinically to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia demonstrating its safety profile. Further research in ovarian cancer is warranted to define

  19. The involvement of XPC protein in the cisplatin DNA damaging treatment-mediated cellular response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan WANG; Alan DOMBKOWSKI; Lynn CHUANG; Xiao Xin S XU

    2004-01-01

    Recognition of DNA damage is a critical step for DNA damage-mediated cellular response. XPC is an important DNA damage recognition protein involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER). We have studied the XPC protein in cisplatin DNA damaging treatment-mediated cellular response. Comparison of the microarray data from both normal and XPCdefective human fibroblasts identified 861 XPC-responsive genes in the cisplatin treatment (with minimum fold change≥1.5).The cell cycle and cell proliferation-related genes are the most affected genes by the XPC defect in the treatment. Many other cellular function genes, especially the DNA repair and signal transduction-related genes, were also affected by the XPC defect in the treatment. To validate the microarray data, the transcription levels of some microarray-identified genes were also determined by an RT-PCR based real time PCR assay. The real time PCR results are consistent with the microarray data for most of the tested genes, indicating the reliability of the microarray data. To further validate the microarray data, the cisplatin treatment-mediated caspase-3 activation was also determined. The Western blot hybridization results indicate that the XPC defect greatly attenuates the cisplatin treatment-mediated Caspase-3 activation. We elucidated the role of p53 protein in the XPC protein DNA damage recognition-mediated signaling process. The XPC defect reduces the cisplatin treatment-mediated p53 response. These results suggest that the XPC protein plays an important role in the cisplatin treatment-mediated cellular response. It may also suggest a possible mechanism of cancer cell drug resistance.

  20. Safety assessment and attenuation of cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity by tuberous roots of Boerhaavia diffusa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwasra, Ritu; Kalra, Prerna; Nag, T C; Gupta, Y K; Singh, Surender; Panwar, Anuj

    2016-11-01

    Cisplatin (Cis-diaminedichloroplatinum II) is a chemotherapeutic agent having well documented adverse effect as nephrotoxicity. This study was designed to evaluate the nephroprotective role of Boerhaavia diffusa in cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury. Wistar rats (n = 6) were allocated into six groups constituting normal control, cisplatin-induced, Boerhaavia diffusa root extract in doses 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg and Boerhaavia diffusa per se group, administered orally for a period of ten days. Intraperitoneal injection of cisplatin was administered on day 7, to all groups except normal control and Boerhaavia diffusa per se group. On day 10, cisplatin resulted in substantial nephrotoxicity in Wistar rats with significant (p < 0.001) elevation in serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen, decline in the concentrations of reduced glutathione and superoxide dismutase, elevation in TNF-α level in renal tissues. Boerhaavia diffusa at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight significantly (p < 0.001) ameliorates increased in serum creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, oxidative stress and inflammatory markers. In parallel to this, it also exhibits antiapoptotic activity through the reduction of active caspase-3 expression in kidneys. Findings indicate that Boerhaavia diffusa is effective in mitigating cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and thus, for this the acute and sub-acute toxicity studies conducted to evaluate the safety profile of Boerhaavia diffusa. The no-observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) of tuberous roots of Boerhaavia diffusa root extract was 1000 mg/kg.

  1. Ameliorative effect of Apodytes dimidiata on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, Menon Kunnathully; Lincy, Lawrence; Raghavamenon, Achuthan Chathrattil; Babu, Thekkekara Devassy

    2016-10-01

    Context Nutraceuticals possessing antioxidant potential have been used to alleviate side effects exerted by many chemotherapeutics, including cisplatin. Since Apodytes dimidiata E. Mey. Ex Arn. (Icacinaceae) shows antioxidant potential, it may possess significant chemoprotective effects. Objectives The study investigated whether A. dimidiata could attenuate cisplatin-induced renal damage. Materials and methods Nephrotoxicity was induced by cisplatin (single i.p., 16 mg/kg b wt.) in Wistar rats. Methanolic leaf extract of A. dimidiata (AMF) was administered at a dose of 250 mg/kg b. wt. orally for 5 consecutive days before/after cisplatin administration. Blood and renal parameters were analysed. Total phenolic and flavonoid content in AMF and its NO scavenging effect was determined. Results Significant protective effect of AMF on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was observed in pre-treated animals. The reduction of urea, creatinine and lipid peroxidation was 58.31%, 42.19% and 60%, respectively, and the increase in haemoglobin and leucocyte count was 28.25% and 42.91%, respectively. The increase calculated for GSH, GPx, SOD and catalase was 35.64%, 18.14%, 74.42% and 35.46%, respectively. Tissue architecture of kidney was almost normal in AMF treated animals. The results were comparable to the standard drug, silymarin. AMF contained high level of polyphenols and flavonoids and was found to scavenge NO radicals (IC50 121.8 μg/mL). Discussion and conclusion AMF can effectively counteract cisplatin mediated renal acute toxicity possibly by scavenging reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Accordingly, the study suggests that AMF can ameliorate free radical-induced damage associated with chemotherapeutic drugs.

  2. Neurotrophin-3 transduction attenuates cisplatin spiral ganglion neuron ototoxicity in the cochlea.

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    Bowers, William J; Chen, Xiaowei; Guo, Huang; Frisina, D Robert; Federoff, Howard J; Frisina, Robert D

    2002-07-01

    Ototoxicity is a major dose-limiting side effect of cisplatin chemotherapy for cancer patients. We previously demonstrated in vitro that herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon-mediated delivery of a neurotrophin-3 (NT-3)/myc chimera protects spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in murine cochlear cultures from cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. To extend these findings, a newly constructed amplicon vector (HSVnt-3myc/SV40lac) that expresses the NT-3myc chimera and the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase (lacZ) reporter gene under separate transcriptional control was initially tested in vitro and then was delivered to the cochlea of aged mice that were subsequently treated with cisplatin. Successful transduction with the new amplicon was observed in vitro as determined by its capacity to infect SGNs and to express NT-3myc mRNA and protein. To determine whether amplicon-directed NT-3myc overexpression could abrogate the ototoxicity in vivo, two groups of aged mice (CBA) were inoculated with HSVnt-3myc/SV40lac or control vector, HSVSV40lac, preceding administration of cisplatin. Cochleas inoculated with HSVnt-3myc/SV40lac harbored significantly greater numbers of surviving SGNs and showed lower incidence of cisplatin-induced apoptosis or necrosis than those injected with the control virus. These data demonstrate that HSV amplicon-mediated NT-3 delivery can attenuate the ototoxic actions of cisplatin in the peripheral auditory system of the aged mouse. The potency of NT-3 in SGN neuroprotection suggests that in vivo neurotrophin-based gene therapy is a promising preventative treatment for chemical-induced hearing disorders, and potentially for hearing degeneration due to normal aging.

  3. Long-term results of a randomized trial comparing cisplatin with cisplatin and cyclophosphamide with cisplatin, cyclophosphamide, and adriamycin in advanced ovarian cancer. GICOG (Gruppo Interregionale Cooperativo Oncologico Ginecologia), Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-05-01

    We report the long-term results of a randomized trial comparing cisplatin (P) with cisplatin and cyclophosphamide (CP) with cisplatin, cyclophosphamide, and adriamycin (CAP) in advanced ovarian cancer. Overall, this update confirms previously published data on 529 cases. Median survival times for the three treatments--CAP, CP, and P--are, respectively, 23, 20, and 19 months. The differences among the three arms are still nonsignificant and the estimated percentage survival at 7 years and confidence limits are, respectively, 21.7 (14.9-28.4), 17.0 (11.0-22.9), and 12.2 (6.9-17.4). According to the results of the Cox regression model on prognostic factors, higher grading, a larger residual tumor size, and performance status less than 80 (Karnovsky) all were independently associated with a poorer outcome, while a serous histotype was related to a better prognosis. The other variables (age, stage, center, type of surgery) initially included in the model did not appear to be significantly related to prognosis. The implications of these long-terms results relative to the application of combination chemotherapy with CAP or CP are discussed.

  4. The Role of Epigenetics in Resistance to Cisplatin Chemotherapy in Lung Cancer

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    O' Byrne, Kenneth J.; Barr, Martin P.; Gray, Steven G., E-mail: sgray@stjames.ie [Trinity College Dublin, Department of Clinical Medicine, Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, St James Hospital, James Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland)

    2011-03-17

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer related death in the world. Cisplatin and carboplatin are the most commonly used cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents to treat the disease. These agents, usually combined with drugs such as gemcitabine or pemetrexed, induce objective tumor responses in only 20–30% of patients. Aberrant epigenetic regulation of gene expression is a frequent event in NSCLC. In this article we review the emerging evidence that epigenetics and the cellular machinery involved with this type of regulation may be key elements in the development of cisplatin resistance in NSCLC.

  5. The Protective Effect of mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR in Cisplatin Induced Nephropathy

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    Kultigin Turkmen

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available "nCisplatin, a simple inorganic compound, has been one of the leading antitumor drugs especially for solid tumors for near 30 years. The mechanisms of cisplatin include denaturation of DNA and cell mitochondria, arresting cell cycle in the G2 phase and eventually causing apoptosis, inflammation, necrosis and death in cells. Apoptosis is a process of programmed cell death through cystein proteases named ‘caspases'. Pathways of caspase-mediated apoptosis can classified as ‘mitochondrial' pathway and ‘death receptor' pathway Especially caspase-3 plays a crucial role in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity through the pathways of apoptosis. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates both cell growth and cell cycle progression through the phosphotidyl 3 kinase (PI3K/protein kinase B (Akt signaling pathway. mTOR regulates both cell growth, cell cycle progression and angiogenesis. By targeting mTOR, the immunsuppressant and antiproliferative agent Rapamycin inhibits signals required for cell cycle progression, cell growth, cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Angiogenesis is extremely important in tumor progression and metastasis. Although rapamycin is proapoptotic agent especially in cancers, there is an evidence that rapamycin can also have antiapoptotic properties through pleiotropic function in the regulation of cell death depending on the cell type and activation state as well as downstream targets of antiapoptotic molecules such as p53 and Bcl-2 proteins. Activation of caspase signaling pathways and dysregulation of pro- and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins have been described previously. So there are links between the mTOR and caspase signaling pathways. Despite its effectiveness, the dose of cisplatin that can be administered is limited by its nephrotoxicity such as acute tubuler necrosis (ATN causing acute renal failure (ARF. Several agents have been tested to see whether they could

  6. Influence of mesna on the pharmacokinetics of cisplatin and carboplatin in pediatric cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangarloo, Shahbal B; Gangopadhyay, Suman B; Syme, Rachel M; Wolff, Johannes E A; Glück, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    Mesna, a reactive thiol, often encounters cisplatin and carboplatin in combination protocols involving oxazaphosphorines and platinum drugs. This co-administration might be unfavorable based on the inactivation of platinum drugs by thiol groups in vitro. We investigated whether mesna influences the pharmacokinetics of platinum drugs when co-administered with cisplatin or carboplatin. The pharmacokinetics of platinum drugs were investigated in 18 pediatric patients receiving either cisplatin or carboplatin in a combination with or without mesna. In cisplatin patients, a decrease in the distribution clearance of total platinum was observed when mesna was co-administered (CLd, 2.2 +/- 0.1 mL/min.kg; n = 3), compared to cisplatin without mesna (CLd, 4.8 +/- 1.5 mL/min.kg; n = 5) (p = 0.029, t-test). This might have been caused by an influence of mesna in slowing down the protein binding of cisplatin since a trend (p = 0.057) in prolonged distribution half-life of total platinum was also observed when mesna was present (t(1/2a) 65 +/- 21 min; n = 3) compared to cisplatin without mesna (t(1/2a), 32 +/- 18 min; n = 5). However, the impact of these changes on the area under the concentration time curve (AUC), total clearance (CLt), and volume of distribution (V) for total platinum and ultrafilterable platinum species was hardly noticeable. In carboplatin patients, when mesna was co-administered: AUC (2.5 +/- 0.4 mg.min/mL.400 mg/m2; n = 5) CLt, (6.8 +/- 5.1 mL/min.kg; n = 6), and V (0.7 +/- 0.4 L/kg; n = 6) for ultrafilterable platinum species were not significantly different from when carboplatin were administered without mesna: AUC (2.3 +/- 1.3 mg.min/mL.400 mg/m2; n = 4), CLt (5.8 +/- 4.6 mL/min.kg; n = 5), and V (1.1 +/- 1.1 L/kg; n = 5). Hence, mesna does not significantly influence the pharmacokinetics of cisplatin and carboplatin in pediatric cancer patients.

  7. DDMC-p53 gene therapy with or without cisplatin and microwave ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hohenforst-Schmidt W

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Wolfgang Hohenforst-Schmidt,1 Paul Zarogoulidis,2 Joshua Stopek,3 Thomas Vogl,4 Frank Hübner,1 J Francis Turner,5,6 Robert Browning,7 Konstantinos Zarogoulidis,2 Antonis Drevelegas,8 Konstantinos Drevelegas,8 Kaid Darwiche,9 Lutz Freitag,9 Harald Rittger101II Medical Clinic, Coburg Hospital, University of Wuerzburg, Coburg, Germany; 2Pulmonary Department-Oncology Unit, G Papanikolaou General Hospital, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece; 3Covidien, Jersey City, NJ, USA; 4Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Goethe University of Frankfurt, Frankfurt, Germany; 5Division of Interventional Pulmonology, 6Medical Oncology, Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Western Regional Medical Center, Goodyear, AZ, 7Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Interventional Pulmonology, National Naval Medical Center, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Bethesda, MD, USA; 8Radiology Department, Interbalkan European Medical Center, Thessaloniki, Greece; 9Department of interventional Pneumology, Ruhrlandklinik, University Hospital Essen, University of Essen-Duisburg, Essen, Germany; 10Medical Clinic I, ‘Fuerth Hospital, University of Erlangen, Erlangen, GermanyAbstract: Lung cancer remains the leading cause of death in cancer patients. Severe treatment side effects and late stage of disease at diagnosis continue to be an issue. We investigated whether local treatment using 2-diethylaminoethyl-dextran methyl methacrylate copolymer with p53 (DDMC-p53 with or without cisplatin and/or microwave ablation enhances disease control in BALBC mice. We used a Lewis lung carcinoma cell line to inoculate 140 BALBC mice, which were divided into the following seven groups; control, cisplatin, microwave ablation, DDMC-p53, DDMC-p53 plus cisplatin, DDMC-p53 plus microwave, and DDMC-p53 plus cisplatin plus microwave. Microwave ablation energy was administered at 20 W for 10 minutes. Cisplatin was administered as 1 mL/mg and the DDMC-p53 complex

  8. Micheliolide overcomes KLF4-mediated cisplatin resistance in breast cancer cells by downregulating glutathione

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    Jia Y

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Yongsheng Jia,1,* Chunze Zhang,2,* Liyan Zhou,1,* Huijun Xu,3 Yehui Shi,1 Zhongsheng Tong1 1Department of Breast Oncology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, National Clinical Research Center for Cancer, Key Laboratory of Breast Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Ministry of Education, Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Colorectal Surgery, Tianjin Union Medicine Center, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Oncology, Anhui Provincial Tumor Hospital, Hefei, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Micheliolide (MCL is a promising novel compound with broad-spectrum anticancer activity. However, little is known regarding its action and mechanism in breast cancer. To explore the potential therapeutic application of MCL as a chemosensitivity modulator, this study investigated the effects of MCL on cisplatin sensitivity in breast cancer and the underlying mechanisms. In the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide cytotoxicity assay and a xenograft tumor model, MCL enhanced the cisplatin sensitivity of the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 both in vitro and in vivo. Treatment of MCF-7 cells with low-dose cisplatin (10 µM was sufficient to enrich the proportion of ALDH+ cells and upregulate Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4 expression. The results obtained from knockdown and overexpression experiments demonstrate that KLF4 is both necessary and sufficient to induce a cisplatin resistance phenotype in breast cancer cells. Furthermore, the glutathione (GSH content was elevated in MCF-7 cells after overexpression of KLF4. KLF4-mediated resistance to cisplatin was found to be abrogated by treatment with buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of GSH synthesis. MCL induced GSH depletion and severe cell death in KLF4-overexpressing MCF-7 cells following exposure to cisplatin

  9. Cisplatin-induced testicular toxicity in rats: the protective effect of arjunolic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, Iman O; Abdel-Aziz, Azza; Sarhan, Osama M

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, the effect of arjunolic acid on testicular damage induced by intraperitoneal injection of rats with 7 mg/kg cisplatin was studied. Cisplatin induced a significant reduction in testicular weights, plasma testosterone, and testicular reduced glutathione levels in addition to a significant elevation of testicular malondialdehyde levels and testicular gene expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) when compared with the control group (p testicular injury by attenuating oxidative stress parameters along with downregulation of iNOS, TNF-α, and p38-MAPK testicular expressions.

  10. Complex cisplatin-double strand break (DSB) lesions directly impair cellular non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) independent of downstream damage response (DDR) pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, Catherine R; Turchi, John J

    2012-07-13

    The treatment for advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) often includes platinum-based chemotherapy and IR. Cisplatin and IR combination therapy display schedule and dose-dependent synergy, the mechanism of which is not completely understood. In a series of in vitro and cell culture assays in a NSCLC model, we investigated both the downstream and direct treatment and damage effects of cisplatin on NHEJ catalyzed repair of a DNA DSB. The results demonstrate that extracts prepared from cisplatin-treated cells are fully capable of NHEJ catalyzed repair of a DSB using a non-cisplatin-damaged DNA substrate in vitro. Similarly, using two different host cell reactivation assays, treatment of cells prior to transfection of a linear, undamaged reporter plasmid revealed no reduction in NHEJ compared with untreated cells. In contrast, transfection of a linear GFP-reporter plasmid containing site-specific, cisplatin lesions 6-bp from the termini revealed a significant impairment in DSB repair of the cisplatin-damaged DNA substrates in the absence of cellular treatment with cisplatin. Together, these data demonstrate that impaired NHEJ in combined cisplatin-IR treated cells is likely the result of a direct effect of cisplatin-DNA lesions near a DSB and that the indirect cellular effects of cisplatin treatment are not significant contributors to the synergistic cytotoxicity observed with combination cisplatin-IR treatment.

  11. Enhancement of Cisplatin-Mediated Apoptosis in Ovarian Cancer Cells through Potentiating G2/M Arrest and p21 Upregulation by Combinatorial Epigallocatechin Gallate and Sulforaphane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaping Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Advanced-stage ovarian cancer is characterized by high mortality due to development of resistance to conventional chemotherapy. Novel compounds that can enhance the efficacy of conventional chemotherapy in ovarian cancer may overcome this drug resistance. Consumption of green tea (epigallocatechin gallate, EGCG and cruciferous vegetables (sulforaphane, SFN is inversely associated with occurrence of ovarian cancer and has anticancer effects through targeting multiple molecules in cancer cells. However, the effects of EGCG and SFN combinational treatment on ovarian cancer cells and on efficacy of cisplatin to these cells are unknown. In this study, EGCG or SFN was used to treat both cisplatin-sensitive (A2780 and cisplatin-resistant (A2780/CP20 ovarian cancer cells alone or in combination with cisplatin. We found that EGCG and SFN combinational treatment can reduce cell viability of both ovarian cancer cell lines time- and dose-dependently. Furthermore, EGCG and SFN combinational treatment can enhance cisplatin-induced apoptosis and G2/M phase arrest, thereby enhancing the efficacy of cisplatin on both cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cells. EGCG and SFN combinational treatment upregulated p21 expression induced by cisplatin in cisplatin-sensitive ovarian cancer cells, while p27 expression was not regulated by these treatments. Collectively, these studies provide novel approaches to overcoming cisplatin chemotherapy resistance in ovarian cancer.

  12. Hepatitis B X-interacting protein promotes cisplatin resistance and regulates CD147 via Sp1 in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Wei; Ma, Xiangdong; Yang, Hong; Hua, Wei; Chen, Biliang; Cai, Guoqing

    2017-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is the highest mortality rate of all female reproductive malignancies. Drug resistance is a major cause of treatment failure in malignant tumors. Hepatitis B X-interacting protein acts as an oncoprotein, regulates cell proliferation, and migration in breast cancer. We aimed to investigate the effects and mechanisms of hepatitis B X-interacting protein on resistance to cisplatin in human ovarian cancer cell lines. The mRNA and protein levels of hepatitis B X-interacting protein were detected using RT-PCR and Western blotting in cisplatin-resistant and cisplatin-sensitive tissues, cisplatin-resistant cell lines A2780/CP and SKOV3/CP, and cisplatin-sensitive cell lines A2780 and SKOV3. Cell viability and apoptosis were measured to evaluate cellular sensitivity to cisplatin in A2780/CP cells. Luciferase reporter gene assay was used to determine the relationship between hepatitis B X-interacting protein and CD147. The in vivo function of hepatitis B X-interacting protein on tumor burden was assessed in cisplatin-resistant xenograft models. The results showed that hepatitis B X-interacting protein was highly expressed in ovarian cancer of cisplatin-resistant tissues and cells. Notably, knockdown of hepatitis B X-interacting protein significantly reduced cell viability in A2780/CP compared with cisplatin treatment alone. Hepatitis B X-interacting protein and cisplatin cooperated to induce apoptosis and increase the expression of c-caspase 3 as well as the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. We confirmed that hepatitis B X-interacting protein up-regulated CD147 at the protein expression and transcriptional levels. Moreover, we found that hepatitis B X-interacting protein was able to activate the CD147 promoter through Sp1. In vivo, depletion of hepatitis B X-interacting protein decreased the tumor volume and weight induced by cisplatin. Taken together, these results indicate that hepatitis B X-interacting protein promotes cisplatin resistance and regulated CD147 via Sp1 in

  13. Abrogation of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity by emodin in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Badreldin H; Al-Salam, Suhail; Al Husseini, Isehaq S; Al-Lawati, Intisar; Waly, Mostafa; Yasin, Javed; Fahim, Mohamed; Nemmar, Abderrahim

    2013-04-01

    Nephrotoxicity of the anticancer drug cisplatin (CP) involves the generation of reactive oxygen species in renal cortex, and emodin (a rhubarb anthraquinone) has strong antioxidant and anticancer actions. Therefore, we tested here the possible ameliorative effect of emodin on CP nephrotoxicity in rats. Emodin was given orally (10 mg/kg/day for nine consecutive days), and on day 4, some of the treated rats were also injected intraperitoneally with either saline or CP (6 mg/kg). Five days after CP treatment, rats were killed, and blood and urine samples, and kidneys were collected for the assessment of histopathological renal damage and apoptosis, and for biochemical estimation of creatinine and urea concentrations in plasma and urine, several cytosolic antioxidant enzyme activities in kidneys, and urinalyses. CP significantly increased the concentrations of urea and creatinine, and decreased creatinine clearance. It also significantly reduced cortical glutathione concentration and the activity of superoxide dismutase. CP treatment significantly increased urine volume and N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase activity and significantly decreased osmolarity and protein concentrations. Emodin treatment markedly and significantly mitigated all these effects. Sections from saline- and emodin-treated rats showed apparently normal proximal tubules. However, kidneys of CP-treated rats had a moderate degree of necrosis. This was markedly lessened when CP was given simultaneously with emodin. The concentration of CP in the cortical tissues was not significantly altered by emodin treatment. The results suggested that emodin had ameliorated CP nephrotoxicity in rats. Pending further pharmacological and toxicological studies emodin may be considered a potentially useful nephroprotective agent.

  14. Copper transporter 2 regulates intracellular copper and sensitivity to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Carlos P; Fofana, Mariama; Chan, Jefferson; Chang, Christopher J; Howell, Stephen B

    2014-03-01

    Mammalian cells express two copper (Cu) influx transporters, CTR1 and CTR2. CTR1 serves as an influx transporter for both Cu and cisplatin (cDDP). In mouse embryo fibroblasts, reduction of CTR1 expression renders cells resistant to cDDP whereas reduction of CTR2 makes them hypersensitive both in vitro and in vivo. To investigate the role of CTR2 on intracellular Cu and cDDP sensitivity its expression was molecularly altered in the human epithelial 2008 cancer cell model. Intracellular exchangeable Cu(+) was measured with the fluorescent probe Coppersensor-3 (CS3). The ability of CS3 to report on changes in intracellular Cu(+) was validated by showing that Cu chelators reduced its signal, and that changes in signal accompanied alterations in expression of the major Cu influx transporter CTR1 and the two Cu efflux transporters, ATP7A and ATP7B. Constitutive knock down of CTR2 mRNA by ∼50% reduced steady-state exchangeable Cu by 22-23% and increased the sensitivity of 2008 cells by a factor of 2.6-2.9 in two separate clones. Over-expression of CTR2 increased exchangeable Cu(+) by 150% and rendered the 2008 cells 2.5-fold resistant to cDDP. The results provide evidence that CS3 can quantitatively assess changes in exchangeable Cu(+), and that CTR2 regulates both the level of exchangeable Cu(+) and sensitivity to cDDP in a model of human epithelial cancer. This study introduces CS3 and related sensors as novel tools for probing and assaying Cu-dependent sensitivity to anticancer therapeutics.

  15. Tubular dysfunction after peritonectomy and chemohyperthermic treatment with cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Manna, Gaetano; Virzì, Salvatore; Deraco, Marcello; Capelli, Irene; Accorsi, Alma; Dalmastri, Vittorio; Comai, Giorgia; Bonomi, Serena; Grassi, Antonio; Selva, Saverio; Feliciangeli, Giorgio; Scolari, Maria; Stefoni, Sergio

    2006-01-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis has always been regarded as a contraindication in traditional cancer surgery treatment; however, good results have been reported by using new combined medical-surgical loco-regional techniques. Peritonectomy and chemohyperthermic perfusion with cisplatinum (CIIP) seem to play a central role in obtaining a better survival rate than with the traditional procedures, even though there is a cisplatinum nephrotoxic effect. The aim of this study was to investigate entity and type of renal injury after CIIP. Forty-two patients (12 males and 30 females) with recurrent or primary peritoneal carcinomatosis who underwent peritonectomy and cytoreductive surgery with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy with cisplatin were enrolled. A significant worsening in renal function was observed on the third post-operative day and this condition then persisted for three months. A reduction in estimated-Glomerular Filtration Rate (e-GFR) and an alteration in the albumin:creatinine ratio proved tubular injury. On the third post-operative day after cisplatinum administration, a high toxicity peak was found following platinum free fraction excretion. Proximal tubular injury was confirmed even at the three month analysis. A significant correlation between the total protein reduction rate and the decrease in renal function was established. In relation to that, the platinum free fraction could increase because of a binding protein shortage and the nephrotoxic effect could be enhanced due to platinum accumulation within the post-operative period. This finding suggests that the higher the protein reduction is, the lower the e-GFR determination is at three months.

  16. Monitoring of Tumor Response to Cisplatin Using Optical Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spliethoff, Jarich W.; Evers, Daniel J.; Jaspers, Janneke E.; Hendriks, Benno H.W.; Rottenberg, Sven; Ruers, Theo J.M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Anatomic imaging alone is often inadequate for tuning systemic treatment for individual tumor response. Optically based techniques could potentially contribute to fast and objective response monitoring in personalized cancer therapy. In the present study, we evaluated the feasibility of dual-modality diffuse reflectance spectroscopy–autofluorescence spectroscopy (DRS-AFS) to monitor the effects of systemic treatment in a mouse model for hereditary breast cancer. METHODS: Brca1−/−; p53−/− mammary tumors were grown in 36 mice, half of which were treated with a single dose of cisplatin. Changes in the tumor physiology and morphology were measured for a period of 1 week using dual-modality DRS-AFS. Liver and muscle tissues were also measured to distinguish tumor-specific alterations from systemic changes. Model-based analyses were used to derive different optical parameters like the scattering and absorption coefficients, as well as sources of intrinsic fluorescence. Histopathologic analysis was performed for cross-validation with trends in optically based parameters. RESULTS: Treated tumors showed a significant decrease in Mie-scattering slope and Mie-to-total scattering fraction and an increase in both fat volume fraction and tissue oxygenation after 2 days of follow-up. Additionally, significant tumor-specific changes in the fluorescence spectra were seen. These longitudinal trends were consistent with changes observed in the histopathologic analysis, such as vital tumor content and formation of fibrosis. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that dual-modality DRS-AFS provides quantitative functional information that corresponds well with the degree of pathologic response. DRS-AFS, in conjunction with other imaging modalities, could be used to optimize systemic cancer treatment on the basis of early individual tumor response. PMID:24726234

  17. An investigation of the effect of thiamine pyrophosphate on cisplatin-induced oxidative stress and DNA damage in rat brain tissue compared with thiamine: thiamine and thiamine pyrophosphate effects on cisplatin neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, M I; Cayir, A; Cetin, N; Suleyman, H; Siltelioglu Turan, I; Tan, H

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP) at dosages of 10 and 20 mg/kg on oxidative stress induced in rat brain tissue with cisplatin and compared this with thiamine. Cisplatin neurotoxicity represents one of the main restrictions on the drug being given in effective doses. Oxidative stress is considered responsible for cisplatin toxicity. Our results showed that cisplatin increased the levels of oxidant parameters such as lipid peroxidation (thio barbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS)) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) in brain tissue and suppressed the effects of antioxidants such as total glutathione (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD). TPP, especially at a dosage of 20 mg/kg, significantly reduced TBARS and MPO levels that increase with cisplatin administration compared with the thiamine group, while TPP significantly increases GSH and SOD levels. In addition, the level of 8-Gua (guanine), a product of DNA damage, was 1.7 ± 0.12 8-hydroxyl guanine (8-OH Gua)/105 Gua in brain tissue in the control group receiving cisplatin, compared with 0.97 ± 0.03 8-OH Gua/105 Gua in the thiamine pyrophosphate (20 mg/kg) group and 1.55 ± 0.11 8-OH Gua/105 Gua in the thiamine (20 mg/kg) group. These results show that thiamine pyrophosphate significantly prevents oxidative damage induced by cisplatin in brain tissue, while the protective effect of thiamine is insignificant.

  18. mTOR is a Promising Therapeutic Target Both in Cisplatin-Sensitive and Cisplatin-Resistant Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Ovary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabuchi, Seiji; Kawase, Chiaki; Altomare, Deborah A.; Morishige, Kenichirou; Sawada, Kenjiro; Hayashi, Masami; Tsujimoto, Masahiko; Yamoto, Mareo; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.; Schilder, Russell J.; Ohmichi, Masahide; Testa, Joseph R.; Kimura, Tadashi

    2009-01-01

    Translational Relevance Clear cell carcinoma (CCC) of the ovary is a distinctive subtype of epithelial ovarian cancer associated with a poorer sensitivity to platinum-based chemotherapy and a worse prognosis than the more common serous adenocarcinoma (SAC). To improve survival, the development of new treatment strategies that target CCC more effectively is necessary. Our results show that mTOR is more frequently activated in CCCs than in SACs. Our data have relevance for the design of future clinical studies of first-line treatment for patients with CCC of the ovary. Moreover, the finding of increased expression of phospho-mTOR and greater sensitivity to RAD001 in cisplatin-resistant CCC cells than in cisplatin-sensitive cells suggests a novel treatment option for patients with recurrent disease after cisplatin-based first-line chemotherapy. Purpose mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) plays a central role in cell proliferation and is regarded as a promising target in cancer therapy including for ovarian cancer. This study aims to examine the role of mTOR as a therapeutic target in clear cell carcinoma (CCC) of the ovary which is regarded as aggressive, chemo-resistant histological subtype. Experimental Design Using tissue microarrays of 98 primary ovarian cancers (52 clear cell carcinomas and 46 serous adenocarcinomas), the expression of phospho-mTOR was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Then, the growth-inhibitory effect of mTOR inhibition by RAD001 (everolimus) was examined using 2 pairs of cisplatin-sensitive parental (RMG1 and KOC7C) and cisplatin-resistant human CCC cell lines (RMG1-CR and KOC7C-CR) both in vitro and in vivo. Results Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated mTOR was more frequently activated in CCCs than in serous adenocarcinomas (86.6% vs 50%). Treatment with RAD001 markedly inhibited the growth of both RMG1 and KOC7C cells both in vitro and in vivo. Increased expression of phospho-mTOR was observed in cisplatin-resistant RMG1-CR and KOC7C

  19. Pre-stimulation of the kallikrein system in cisplatin-induced acute renal injury: An approach to renoprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aburto, Andrés [Program of M.Sc., Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile); Barría, Agustín [School of Biochemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile); Cárdenas, Areli [Ph.D. Program, Faculty of Sciences, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile); Carpio, Daniel; Figueroa, Carlos D. [Department of Anatomy, Histology and Pathology, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile); Burgos, Maria E. [Department of Nephrology, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile); Ardiles, Leopoldo, E-mail: leopoldoardiles@gmail.com [Department of Nephrology, Faculty of Medicine, Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia (Chile)

    2014-10-15

    Antineoplastic treatment with cisplatin is frequently complicated by nephrotoxicity. Although oxidative stress may be involved, the pathogenic mechanisms responsible for renal damage have not been completely clarified. In order to investigate the role of the renal kinin system in this condition, a group of rats was submitted to high potassium diet to stimulate the synthesis and excretion of tissue kallikrein 1 (rKLK1) previous to an intraperitoneal injection of 7 mg/kg cisplatin. A significant reduction in lipoperoxidation, evidenced by urinary excretion of malondialdehyde and renal immunostaining of hidroxy-nonenal, was accompanied by a decline in apoptosis. Coincident with these findings we observed a reduction in the expression of renal KIM-1 suggesting that renoprotection may be occurring. Stimulation or indemnity of the renal kinin system deserves to be evaluated as a complementary pharmacological measure to diminish cisplatin nephrotoxicity. - Highlights: • Mechanisms of cisplatin-induced-renal damage have not been completely clarified. • Cisplatin induces oxidative stress and apoptosis. • The renal kallikrein-kinin system is protective in experimental acute renal damage. • Kallikrein stimulation reduces oxidative stress and apoptosis induced by cisplatin. • Protection of the kallikrein-kinin system may reduce cisplatin toxicity.

  20. Low-dose radiation reverses cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells by changing Survivin and Caspase-3 expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Dong; Tao Jiang; Donghai Liang; Xiaoran Liu; Hongsheng Yu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cisplatin (DDP) is the main chemotherapy drug for ovarian cancer. However, ovarian cancer cel s tend to develop cisplatin resistance in the clinical setting. Tumor cel s are sensitive to low-dose radia-tion (LDR). LDR therapy can improve the ef ects of chemotherapy drugs on ovarian cancer, but the underly-ing mechanisms are not clear. In this study, we explored the impact of low-dose radiation on Survivin and Caspase-3 levels in SKOV3/DDP ovarian cancer cel s that are resistant to cisplatin. Methods Cel viability was examined by cel counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, and quantitative PCR was used to detect Caspase-3 and Survivin transcript levels. Flow cytometry was used to detect and quantify apoptotic cel s. Results Cel viability was lower when cel s were treated with LDR and cisplatin than when cel s were treated with conventional radiation and cisplatin, or cisplatin alone (P Conclusion LDR reverses cisplatin resistance in SKOV3/DDP cel s, and may do so by suppressing Survivin expression and increasing Caspase-3 expression.

  1. Cisplatin-induced apoptosis inhibits autophagy, which acts as a pro-survival mechanism in human melanoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Del Bello

    Full Text Available The interplay between a non-lethal autophagic response and apoptotic cell death is still a matter of debate in cancer cell biology. In the present study performed on human melanoma cells, we investigate the role of basal or stimulated autophagy in cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity, as well as the contribution of cisplatin-induced activation of caspases 3/7 and conventional calpains. The results show that, while down-regulating Beclin-1, Atg14 and LC3-II, cisplatin treatment inhibits the basal autophagic response, impairing a physiological pro-survival response. Consistently, exogenously stimulated autophagy, obtained with trehalose or calpains inhibitors (MDL-28170 and calpeptin, protects from cisplatin-induced apoptosis, and such a protection is reverted by inhibiting autophagy with 3-methyladenine or ATG5 silencing. In addition, during trehalose-stimulated autophagy, the cisplatin-induced activation of calpains is abrogated, suggesting the existence of a feedback loop between the autophagic process and calpains. On the whole, our results demonstrate that in human melanoma cells autophagy may function as a beneficial stress response, hindered by cisplatin-induced death mechanisms. In a therapeutic perspective, these findings suggest that the efficacy of cisplatin-based polychemotherapies for melanoma could be potentiated by inhibitors of autophagy.

  2. Cisplatin and quantum dots encapsulated in liposomes as multifunctional nanocarriers for theranostic use in brain and skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Li-Wen [Chang Gung University, Pharmaceutics Laboratory, Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Taiwan (China); Wen, Chih-Jen [Chang Gung University, School of Medicine, Taiwan (China); Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A. [King Saud University, Department of Pharmaceutics, College of Pharmacy (Saudi Arabia); Yen, Tzu-Chen [Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Molecular Imaging Center, Taiwan (China); Fang, Jia-You, E-mail: fajy@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Chang Gung University, Pharmaceutics Laboratory, Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Taiwan (China)

    2012-07-15

    We aimed to develop liposomes for loading both cisplatin and quantum dots (QDs) for both drug delivery and bioimaging. The resultant quantum-dot-liposomes (QDLs) with cisplatin were characterized using dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), encapsulation efficiencies, and fluorescence intensity. QDLs composed of CdSe or CdSe/ZnS QDs represented a size of about 100 nm. The QDLs were prepared at a high QD loading efficiency of nearly 100 %. Most QDs were located within the liposomal bilayers as evidenced by TEM. Slow and sustained cisplatin release from QDLs was achieved. The cellular uptake of QDLs demonstrated effective internalization and significant fluorescence in melanoma cells. The signal derived from QDLs could be observed by different wavelength settings. The cisplatin-containing QDLs revealed higher cytotoxic activity compared to an equal dose of free cisplatin. CdSe/ZnS QDLs were intravenously administered to mice, and the biodistribution was observed with an in vivo imaging system. Significant fluorescence signal and cisplatin accumulation were detected in the brain and skin, as verified by ex vivo imaging and drug distribution. Liposomal inclusion could reduce the reticuloendothelial system uptake of QDs and cisplatin. QDLs evaluated in this study represent a new potential method for theranostic purposes.

  3. NOXA-induced alterations in the Bax/Smac axis enhance sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Lin

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of death from gynecologic malignancy. Deregulation of p53 and/or p73-associated apoptotic pathways contribute to the platinum-based resistance in ovarian cancer. NOXA, a pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein, is identified as a transcription target of p53 and/or p73. In this study, we found that genetic variants of Bcl-2 proteins exist among cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant ovarian cancer cells, and the responses of NOXA and Bax to cisplatin are regulated mainly by p53. We further evaluated the effect of NOXA on cisplatin. NOXA induced apoptosis and sensitized A2780s and SKOV3 cells to cisplatin in vitro and in vivo. The effects were mediated by elevated Bax expression, enhanced caspase activation, release of Cyt C and Smac into the cytosol. Furthermore, gene silencing of Bax or Smac significantly attenuated NOXA and/or cisplatin-induced apoptosis in chemosensitive A2780s cells, whereas overexpression of Bax or addition of Smac-N7 peptide significantly increased NOXA and/or cisplatin-induced apoptosis in chemoresistant SKOV3 cells. To our knowledge, these data suggest a new mechanism by which NOXA chemosensitized ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin by inducing alterations in the Bax/Smac axis. Taken together, our findings show that NOXA is potentially useful as a chemosensitizer in ovarian cancer therapy.

  4. NOXA-induced alterations in the Bax/Smac axis enhance sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chao; Zhao, Xin-yu; Li, Lei; Liu, Huan-yi; Cao, Kang; Wan, Yang; Liu, Xin-yu; Nie, Chun-lai; Liu, Lei; Tong, Ai-ping; Deng, Hong-xin; Li, Jiong; Yuan, Zhu; Wei, Yu-quan

    2012-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of death from gynecologic malignancy. Deregulation of p53 and/or p73-associated apoptotic pathways contribute to the platinum-based resistance in ovarian cancer. NOXA, a pro-apoptotic BH3-only protein, is identified as a transcription target of p53 and/or p73. In this study, we found that genetic variants of Bcl-2 proteins exist among cisplatin-sensitive and -resistant ovarian cancer cells, and the responses of NOXA and Bax to cisplatin are regulated mainly by p53. We further evaluated the effect of NOXA on cisplatin. NOXA induced apoptosis and sensitized A2780s and SKOV3 cells to cisplatin in vitro and in vivo. The effects were mediated by elevated Bax expression, enhanced caspase activation, release of Cyt C and Smac into the cytosol. Furthermore, gene silencing of Bax or Smac significantly attenuated NOXA and/or cisplatin-induced apoptosis in chemosensitive A2780s cells, whereas overexpression of Bax or addition of Smac-N7 peptide significantly increased NOXA and/or cisplatin-induced apoptosis in chemoresistant SKOV3 cells. To our knowledge, these data suggest a new mechanism by which NOXA chemosensitized ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin by inducing alterations in the Bax/Smac axis. Taken together, our findings show that NOXA is potentially useful as a chemosensitizer in ovarian cancer therapy.

  5. Sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] leaf sheath dye protects against cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ademiluyi, Adedayo O; Oboh, Ganiyu; Agbebi, Oluwaseun J; Boligon, Aline A; Athayde, Margareth L

    2014-12-01

    This study sought to determine the protective effect of dietary inclusion of sorghum leaf sheath dye on cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats. Adult male rats were randomly divided into four groups with six animals in each group. Groups I and II were fed a basal diet, while groups III and IV were fed diets containing 0.5% and 1% sorghum leaf sheath dye, respectively, for 20 days before cisplatin administration. Hepatotoxicity was induced by a single dose of cisplatin (7 mg/kg body weight, i.p.), and the experiment was terminated at 3 days after cisplatin injection. The liver and plasma were studied for hepatotoxicity and antioxidant capacity. Cisplatin caused a significant (Pinduced alteration of both plasma and liver antioxidant indices suggests an antioxidant mechanism of action. Hence, this protective effect of Sorghum bicolor leaf sheath dye against cisplatin-induced hepatotoxicity in rats reflects its potential and beneficial role in the prevention of liver damage associated with cisplatin administration.

  6. Abrogation of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats by Berne date extract through ameliorating oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Sayed M. El-Sayed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Our study aimed to investigate the possible protective effect of Berne date extract on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. A single dose of cisplatin (6 mg/kg was given intraperitoneally (i.p to male rats produced significant elevation in serum urea, creatinine and TNF-α levels with significant reduction in serum albumin. It also increased kidney contents of lipid peroxides measured as malondialdehyde (MDA and caspase-3 contents accompanied by a significant decrease in kidney contents of reduced glutathione (GSH as well as enzymatic activities of catalase (CAT and superoxide dismutase (SOD compared to that of the control group. On the other hand, administrations of Berne date extract and vitamin E (a standard reference antioxidant drug given per os (p.o in doses of 300 mg/kg and 1g/kg, respectively for 14 days before cisplatin and 7 consecutive days after cisplatin injection ameliorated the cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity as indicated by the restoration of kidney function and oxidative stress parameters. Furthermore, they reduced the histopathological changes induced by cisplatin. In conclusion, Berne date extract showed protective effect against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity; effects that may be attributed to antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antiapoptotic activities.

  7. Carvedilol alleviates testicular and spermatological damage induced by cisplatin in rats via modulation of oxidative stress and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Ahmed H; Abdelkader, Noha F; Abd El-Raouf, Ola M; Fawzy, Hala M; El-Denshary, Ezz-El-Din S

    2016-12-01

    The clinical application of the anticancer drug cisplatin is limited by its deleterious side effects, including male reproductive toxicity. In this context, the potential protective effect of carvedilol on testicular and spermatological damage induced by cisplatin in male Sprague-Dawley rats was investigated. Carvedilol was orally administered at a dose of 10 mg/kg for 2 weeks, and cisplatin was given as a single intraperitoneal injection of 10 mg/kg on the 12th day to induce toxicity. Cisplatin significantly reduced reproductive organ weight, sperm count and sperm motility, and increased sperm abnormalities and histopathological damage of testicular tissue. In addition, it resulted in a significant decline in serum testosterone as well as levels of testicular enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxides, and reduced glutathione). Moreover, cisplatin remarkably augmented malondialdehyde, nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α, and nuclear factor-kappa B contents in testicular tissue. Conversely, carvedilol administration markedly mitigated cisplatin-induced testicular and spermatological injury as demonstrated by suppression of oxidative/nitrosative and inflammatory burden, amendment of antioxidant defenses, enhancement of steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis, and mitigation of testicular histopathological damage. The current study reveals a promising protective action of carvedilol against cisplatin-induced reproductive toxicity by virtue of its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.

  8. Agents ameliorating or augmenting the nephrotoxicity of cisplatin and other platinum compounds: a review of some recent research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Badreldin H; Al Moundhri, Mansour S

    2006-08-01

    Cisplatin (cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (II)) is an effective agent against various solid tumours. Despite its effectiveness, the dose of cisplatin that can be administered is limited by its nephrotoxicity. Hundreds of platinum compounds (e.g. carboplatin, oxaliplatin, nedaplatin and the liposomal form lipoplatin) have been tested over the last two decades in order to improve the effectiveness and to lessen the toxicity of cisplatin. Several agents have been tested to see whether they could ameliorate or augment the nephrotoxicity of platinum drugs. This review summarizes these studies and the possible mechanisms of actions of these agents. The agents that have been shown to ameliorate experimental cisplatin nephrotoxicity include antioxidants (e.g. melatonin, vitamin E, selenium, and many others), modulators of nitric oxide (e.g. zinc histidine complex), agents interfering with metabolic pathways of cisplatin (e.g. procaine HCL), diuretics (e.g. furosemide and mannitol), and cytoprotective and antiapoptotic agents (e.g. amifostine and erythropoietin). Only few of these agents have been tested in humans. Those agents that have been shown to augment cisplatin nephrotoxicity include nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, spironolactone, gemcitabine and others. Combining these agents with cisplatin should be avoided.

  9. Differences in gene expression profiles and carcinogenesis pathways involved in cisplatin resistance of four types of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Li, Hui; Hou, Shengcai; Hu, Bin; Liu, Jie; Wang, Jun

    2013-08-01

    Cisplatin-based chemotherapy is the standard therapy used for the treatment of several types of cancer. However, its efficacy is largely limited by the acquired drug resistance. To date, little is known about the RNA expression changes in cisplatin-resistant cancers. Identification of the RNAs related to cisplatin resistance may provide specific insight into cancer therapy. In the present study, expression profiling of 7 cancer cell lines was performed using oligonucleotide microarray analysis data obtained from the GEO database. Bioinformatic analyses such as the Gene Ontology (GO) and KEGG pathway were used to identify genes and pathways specifically associated with cisplatin resistance. A signal transduction network was established to identify the core genes in regulating cancer cell cisplatin resistance. A number of genes were differentially expressed in 7 groups of cancer cell lines. They mainly participated in 85 GO terms and 11 pathways in common. All differential gene interactions in the Signal-Net were analyzed. CTNNB1, PLCG2 and SRC were the most significantly altered. With the use of bioinformatics, large amounts of data in microarrays were retrieved and analyzed by means of thorough experimental planning, scientific statistical analysis and collection of complete data on cancer cell cisplatin resistance. In the present study, a novel differential gene expression pattern was constructed and further study will provide new targets for the diagnosis and mechanisms of cancer cisplatin resistance.

  10. Enhancement of tumor cell death by combining cisplatin with an oncolytic adenovirus carrying MDA-7/IL-24

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-mei WU; Kang-jian ZHANG; Xue-tian YUE; Yi-qiang WANG; Yi YANG; Gong-chu LI; Na LI; Yi-gang WANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to creatively implement a novel chemo-gene-virotherapeutic strategy and further strengthen the antitumor effect in cancer cells by the combined use of ZD55-IL-24 and cisplatin. Methods: ZD55-IL-24 is an oncolytic adenovirus that harbors interleukin 24 (IL-24), which has a strong antitumor effect and was identified and evaluated by PCR, RT-PCR, and Western blot analysis. Enhancement of cancer cell death using a combination of ZD55-IL-24 and cisplatin was assessed in several cancer cell lines by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and cytopathic effect (CPE) assay. Apoptosis induction by treatment with ZD55-IL-24 and/or cisplatin was detected in BEL7404 and SMMC7721 by morphological evaluation, apoptotic cell staining, and flow cytometry analysis. In addition, negative effects on normal cells were evaluated in the L-02 cell line using the MTT assay,the CPE assay, morphological evaluation, apoptotic cell staining, and flow cytometry analysis. Results: The combination of ZD55-IL-24 and cisplatin, which is superior to ZD55-IL-24, cisplatin, and ZD55-EGFP, as well as ZD55-EGFP plus cisplatin, resulted in a significantly increased effect. Most importantly, conjugation of ZD55-IL-24 with cisplatin had toxic effects equal to that of cisplatin and did not have overlapping toxicities in normal cells.Conclusions: This study showed that ZD55-IL-24 conjugated with cisplatin exhibited a remarkably increased cytotoxic and apoptosis-inducing effect in cancer cells and significantly reduced the toxicity in normal cells through the use of a reduced dose.

  11. Therapeutic Potential and Molecular Mechanisms of Emblica officinalis Gaertn in countering nephrotoxicity in rats induced by the chemotherapeutic agent cisplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Malik

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Emblica officinalis Gaertn. belonging to family Euphorbiaceae is commonly known as Indian gooseberry or Amla in India. It is used as a ‘rejuvenating herb’ in traditional system of Indian medicine. It has been shown to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects. Thus, on the basis of its biological effects, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the protective effect of the dried fruit extract of the E. Officinalis (EO in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats and also to evaluate the mechanism of its nephroprotection. The study was done on male albino Wistar rats. They were divided into 6 groups (n=6 viz. control, cisplatin-control, cisplatin and EO (150, 300 and 600 mg/kg; p.o. respectively in different groups and EO only (600 mg/kg; p.o. only. EO was administered orally to the rats for a period of 10 days and on the 7th day, a single injection of cisplatin (8 mg/kg; i.p. was administered to the cisplatin-control and EO treatment groups. The rats were sacrificed on the 10th day. Cisplatin-control rats had deranged renal function parameters and the kidney histology confirmed the presence of acute tubular necrosis. Furthermore, there were increased oxidative stress, apoptosis and inflammation along with higher expression of MAPK pathway proteins in the rat kidney from the cisplatin-control group. Contrary to this, EO (600 mg/kg significantly normalized renal function, bolstered antioxidant status and ameliorated histological alterations. The inflammation and apoptosis were markedly lower in comparison to cisplatin-control rats. Furthermore, EO (600 mg/kg inhibited MAPK phosphorylation which was instrumental in preserving renal function and morphology. In conclusion, the results of our study demonstrated that EO attenuated cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats through suppression of MAPK induced inflammation and apoptosis.

  12. Therapeutic Potential and Molecular Mechanisms of Emblica officinalis Gaertn in Countering Nephrotoxicity in Rats Induced by the Chemotherapeutic Agent Cisplatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Salma; Suchal, Kapil; Bhatia, Jagriti; Khan, Sana I.; Vasisth, Swati; Tomar, Ameesha; Goyal, Sameer; Kumar, Rajeev; Arya, Dharamvir S.; Ojha, Shreesh K.

    2016-01-01

    Emblica officinalis Gaertn. belonging to family Euphorbiaceae is commonly known as Indian gooseberry or “Amla” in India. It is used as a ‘rejuvenating herb’ in traditional system of Indian medicine. It has been shown to possess antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects. Thus, on the basis of its biological effects, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the protective effect of the dried fruit extract of the E. Officinalis (EO) in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats and also to evaluate the mechanism of its nephroprotection. The study was done on male albino Wistar rats. They were divided into six groups (n = 6) viz. control, cisplatin-control, cisplatin and EO (150, 300, and 600 mg/kg; p.o. respectively in different groups) and EO only (600 mg/kg; p.o. only). EO was administered orally to the rats for a period of 10 days and on the 7th day, a single injection of cisplatin (8 mg/kg; i.p.) was administered to the cisplatin-control and EO treatment groups. The rats were sacrificed on the 10th day. Cisplatin-control rats had deranged renal function parameters and the kidney histology confirmed the presence of acute tubular necrosis. Furthermore, there were increased oxidative stress, apoptosis and inflammation along with higher expression of MAPK pathway proteins in the rat kidney from the cisplatin-control group. Contrary to this, EO (600 mg/kg) significantly normalized renal function, bolstered antioxidant status and ameliorated histological alterations. The inflammation and apoptosis were markedly lower in comparison to cisplatin-control rats. Furthermore, EO (600 mg/kg) inhibited MAPK phosphorylation which was instrumental in preserving renal function and morphology. In conclusion, the results of our study demonstrated that EO attenuated cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rats through suppression of MAPK induced inflammation and apoptosis. PMID:27752245

  13. The role of mTOR during cisplatin treatment in an in vitro and ex vivo model of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisching, G R; Loos, B; Botha, M H; Engelbrecht, A-M

    2015-09-01

    Cisplatin is used as a cytotoxic agent for the management of cervical cancer. However, the severity of the side-effects limits the use of this drug, particularly at high doses. Resistance to cisplatin is often attributed to a disruption in the normal apoptotic response via aberrant activation of pathways such as the mTOR pathway. Here we assess the role of mTOR and its effect on cell death sensitization and autophagy in response to a low concentration of cisplatin in cervical cancer cells. Additionally we measured the expression profile of mTOR in normal, low- and high-grade squamous intraepithelial (LSIL and HSIL) lesions and cancerous tissue. An in vitro model of cervical cancer was established using HeLa and CaSki cells. mTOR protein expression as well as autophagy-related proteins were evaluated through Western blotting. Inhibition of mTOR was achieved with the use of rapamycin and RNA silencing. A low concentration of cisplatin administered as a single agent induces autophagy, but not apoptosis. Cisplatin cytotoxicity was greatly enhanced in cancer cells when mTOR had been inhibited prior to cisplatin treatment which was likely due to autophagy being increased above cisplatin-induced levels, thereby inducing apoptosis. Cervical tissue samples revealed an increase in mTOR protein expression in LSIL and carcinoma tissue which suggests a change in autophagy control. Our data suggest that utilising a lower dose of cisplatin combined with mTOR inhibition is a viable treatment option and addresses the challenge of cisplatin dose-dependent toxicity, however future studies are required to confirm this in a clinical setting.

  14. Biodegradable microparticles and fiber fabrics for sustained delivery of cisplatin to treat C6 glioma in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jingwei; Tan, Ruo Shan; Wang, Chi-Hwa

    2008-06-15

    The duration of cisplatin release from most of the drug delivery devices seemed to be shorter than 14 days except large microparticles. The objective of this study was to fabricate and characterize cisplatin-loaded PLA microparticles, PLA/PLGA (30/70) composite microparticles, and fibers as formulations for long-term sustained delivery of cisplatin to treat C6 glioma in vitro by electrospray and electrospinning techniques. Cisplatin-loaded biodegradable microparticles with particle size of around 5 microm and fiber fabrics with diameter of 0.5-1.7 microm were obtained using electrospray and electrospinning techniques. Encapsulation efficiency and in vitro release of formulations were measured by ICP-OES. The encapsulation efficiency for different samples of microparticles was approximately from 33% to 72% and the fiber fabrics had encapsulation efficiency greater than 90%. Cisplatin-loaded microparticles showed typical characteristics of cisplatin release profile: a large initial burst followed by a sustained slow release of 35 days. The composite PLA/PLGA (30/70) microparticles could reduce the initial burst release of cisplatin because of their core-shell structures. In contrast, more than 75 days sustained release could be achieved by fiber fabric formulations without large initial burst. MTT assay was used to quantify the cytotoxicity of different formulations against C6 glioma cells. Microparticle formulations had slightly higher cytotoxicity than free drug. In contrast, the cytotoxicity of fiber fabrics formulation was around 4 times higher than of the free drug based on the actual amount of drug released. The microparticle and fiber fabric formulations presented may be promising for the sustained delivery of cisplatin to eliminate the undesired side effects caused by direct injection of cisplatin solution in systemic administration.

  15. Ameliorating effect of DL-α-lipoic acid against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and cardiotoxicity in experimental animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Asmma; Ahmed, Amany A E; Shouman, Samia A; Sharawy, Sabry

    2012-06-01

    Cisplatin is a potent chemotherapeutic agent with a wide range of activities. Nephrotoxicity and cardiotoxicity represent it's major complication upon clinical use. The present study was carried out to evaluate the possible protective effect of DL-α-lipoic acid (LA) against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and cardiotoxicity. Different groups of rats (n = 10) were administered either saline (control), cisplatin (10 mg/kg, i.p.), LA (100 mg/kg, i.p.) or their combination (LA 30 min prior to cisplatin administration). Twenty-four hours later all animals were decapitated and sera were used for estimation of activities of urea (BUN), creatinine (Cr), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and creatine kinase (CK). Homogenates of the kidney and heart were used for estimation of oxidative stress markers (reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and nitric oxide (NO)). Additionally, caspase-3 activities and DNA-fragmentation were investigated in renal tissues. The results showed that cisplatin produced significant elevation in serum activities of LDH, CK, BUN, and Cr and also induced significant elevation in the oxidative stress makers (MDA and NO) accompanied by significant reduction in GSH and SOD in both kidney and heart. The integrity of DNA was heavily damaged and caspase-3 was activated in renal tissues. The results emphasized nephrotoxicty and cardiotoxicity of cisplatin. On the other hand, prior administration of LA significantly attenuated the cisplatin-evoked disturbances in the above mentioned parameters and protected both kidney and heart tissues. The histopathological examination emphasized the obtained results. In conclusion, LA is suggested to be a potential candidate to ameliorate cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity and cardiotoxicity without altering the antitumor efficacy of cisplatin.

  16. The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist pioglitazone protects against cisplatin-induced renal damage in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Cristiano R; Bortolatto, Cristiani F; Wilhelm, Ethel A; Roman, Silvane Souza; Prigol, Marina; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) agonists not only improve metabolic abnormalities of diabetes and consequent diabetic nephropathy, but they also protect against non-diabetic kidney disease in experimental models. Here, we investigated the effect of PPAR-γ agonist pioglitazone against acute renal injury on a cisplatin model in mice. Nephrotoxicity was induced by a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of cisplatin (10 mg kg(-1)). Pioglitazone was administered for six consecutive days in doses of 15 or 30 mg kg(-1)  day(-1), per os (p.o.), starting 3 days before cisplatin injection. Cisplatin treatment to mice induced a marked renal failure, characterized by a significant increase in serum urea and creatinine levels and alterations in renal tissue architecture. Cisplatin exposure induced oxidative stress as indicated by decreased levels of non-enzymatic antioxidant defenses [glutathione (GSH) and ascorbic acid levels] and components of the enzymatic antioxidant defenses [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR) and and glutathione S-transferase(GST) activities)] in renal tissue. Administration of pioglitazone markedly protected against the increase in urea and creatinine levels and histological alterations in kidney induced by cisplatin treatment. Pioglitazone administration ameliorated GSH and ascorbic acid levels decreased by cisplatin exposure in mice. Pioglitazone protected against the inhibition of CAT, SOD, GPx, GR and GST activities induced by cisplatin in the kidneys of mice. These results indicated that pioglitazone has a protective effect against cisplatin-induced renal damage in mice. The protection is mediated by preventing the decline of antioxidant status. The results have implications in use of PPAR-γ agonists in human application for protecting against drugs-induced nephrotoxicity.

  17. Protective Role of Aerobic Exercise Against Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Zeynali; Nematbakhsh; Mojtahedi; Poorshahnazari; Talebi; Pezeshki; Mazaheri; Moslemi

    2015-01-01

    Background Cisplatin (CP) is a chemotherapy drug and nephrotoxicity is considered as its major side effect. Aerobic exercise is well known as an approach to reduce the side effects of many drugs. Objectives This study was designed to determine the protective role of aerobic exercise against CP-induced nephrotoxicity. Materials and Methods Thirty male Wistar rats were randomly divid...

  18. Role of NH3 in the Electron-Induced Reactions of Adsorbed and Solid Cisplatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warneke, Jonas; Rohdenburg, Markus; Zhang, Yucheng; Orzagh, Juraj; Vaz, Alfredo; Utke, Ivo; De Hosson, Jeff Th M.; van Dorp, Willem F.; Swiderek, Petra

    2016-01-01

    The electron-induced decomposition of cisplatin (cis-Pt(NH3)(2)Cl-2) was investigated to reveal if ammine (NH3) ligands have a favorable effect on the purity of deposits produced from metal-containing precursor molecules by focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID). Scanning electron microsco

  19. Sialic acid changes in Dalton's lymphoma-bearing mice after cyclophosphamide and cisplatin treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicol B.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Sialic acid changes in Dalton's lymphoma cells and other tissues of 10-12-week-old Swiss albino mice were investigated in relation to tumour growth in vivo and following cyclophosphamide (ip, 200 mg/kg body weight or cisplatin (ip, 8 mg/kg body weight treatment. Three to four animals of both sexes were used in each experimental group. The sialic acid level of tumour cells (0.88 µmol/g increased with tumour progression (1.44-1.59 µmol/g; P<=0.05 in mice. Sialic acid concentration in other tissues (liver, kidney, testes and brain also increased (~40, 10, 30 and 58%, respectively in the tumour-bearing hosts as compared with that in the respective tissues of normal mice. In vivo cyclophosphamide or cisplatin treatment resulted in an overall decrease of sialic acid contents in the tissues. Cyclophosphamide was more efficient in lowering tissue sialic acid than cisplatin (P<=0.01, ANOVA. It is suggested that sialic acid residues could be an important factor contributing to the manifestation of malignant properties in cancer cells in general and Dalton's lymphoma cells in particular. A significant decrease in the sialic acid content of Dalton's lymphoma cells after cisplatin or cyclophosphamide treatment may bring about specific changes in tumour cells which could be associated with tumour regression.

  20. Paclitaxel, cisplatin and gemcitabine in treatment of carcinomas of unknown primary site, a phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anne Kirstine Hundahl; Pedersen, Karen Damgaard; Gothelf, A.;

    2010-01-01

    Background. The present study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of a combination of paclitaxel, cisplatin and gemcitabine in patients with carcinoma of unknown primary site (CUP). Patients and methods. Patients with CUP, ECOG performance status 0-1 and age between 18 and 65 years...

  1. Increase of intracellular cisplatin levels and radiosensitization by ultrasound in combination with microbubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammertink, Bart H A; Bos, Clemens; van der Wurff-Jacobs, Kim M.; Storm, G; Moonen, Chrit T.; Deckers, Roel

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to enhance drug delivery by using ultrasound in combination with microbubbles (USMB) is extensively studied. So far, these studies have focused on the delivery and efficacy of a single drug, e.g. in chemotherapy. In this study, we investigated the intracellular delivery of cisplatin

  2. Reversal of Jaundice in Two Patients with Inoperable Cholangiocarcinoma Treated with Cisplatin and Gemcitabine Combination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten Criel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Two patients are presented with severe jaundice, due to inoperable cholangiocarcinoma. The chemotherapeutic approach in patients with severe jaundice is discussed. Many schedules of chemotherapy were developed in this tumor type with normal serum bilirubin. We report here the first successful use of cisplatin and gemcitabine combination chemotherapy in these patients. Tolerability was good and liver function tests gradually improved.

  3. Phase I study of the cisplatin analogue 1,1-diamminomethylcyclohexane sulfatoplatinum (TNO-6) (NSC 311056)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, J B; Groth, S; Hansen, S W;

    1985-01-01

    The cisplatin derivative TNO-6 was evaluated for clinical toxicity in a phase I trial. TNO-6 was given daily for 5 days every 3 weeks as a 30-min IV infusion without hydration. In all, 39 patients with advanced cancer were treated at doses of 2.5-9.0 mg/m2. No dose-limiting nephrotoxicity occurred...

  4. The HECTD3 E3 ubiquitin ligase suppresses cisplatin-induced apoptosis via stabilizing MALT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Chen, Xi; Wang, Zehua; Zhao, Dong; Chen, Hui; Chen, Wenlin; Zhou, Zhongmei; Zhang, Junran; Zhang, Jing; Li, Hongmin; Chen, Ceshi

    2013-01-01

    Homologous to the E6-associated protein carboxyl terminus domain containing 3 (HECTD3) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase with unknown functions. Here, we show that HECTD3 confers cancer cell resistance to cisplatin. To understand the molecular mechanisms, we performed a yeast two-hybrid analysis and identified mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue 1 (MALT1) as an HECTD3-interacting protein. HECTD3 promotes MALT1 ubiquitination with nondegradative polyubiquitin chains by direct interacting with the MALT1 through its N-terminal destruction of cyclin domain. HECTD3 does not target MALT1 for degradation but stabilize it. HECTD3 depletion dramatically decreases the levels of MALT1 in MCF7 and HeLa cells treated with cisplatin, which is correlated to an increase in apoptosis. Knockdown of MALT1 likewise increases cisplatin-induced apoptosis in these cancer cells. However, HECTD3 over-expression leads to a decreased cisplatin-induced apoptosis, whereas overexpression of MALT1 partially rescues HECTD3 depletion-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that HECTD3 promotes cell survival through stabilizing MALT1. Our data have important implications in cancer therapy by providing novel molecular targets.

  5. The HECTD3 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Suppresses Cisplatin-Induced Apoptosis via Stabilizing MALT1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Homologous to the E6-associated protein carboxyl terminus domain containing 3 (HECTD3 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase with unknown functions. Here, we show that HECTD3 confers cancer cell resistance to cisplatin. To understand the molecular mechanisms, we performed a yeast two-hybrid analysis and identified mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue 1 (MALT1 as an HECTD3-interacting protein. HECTD3 promotes MALT1 ubiquitination with non-degradative polyubiquitin chains by direct interacting with the MALT1 through its N-terminal destruction of cyclin domain. HECTD3 does not target MALT1 for degradation but stabilize it. HECTD3 depletion dramatically decreases the levels of MALT1 in MCF7 and HeLa cells treated with cisplatin, which is correlated to an increase in apoptosis. Knockdown of MALT1 likewise increases cisplatin-induced apoptosis in these cancer cells. However, HECTD3 overexpression leads to a decreased cisplatin-induced apoptosis, whereas overexpression of MALT1 partially rescues HECTD3 depletion–induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that HECTD3 promotes cell survival through stabilizing MALT1. Our data have important implications in cancer therapy by providing novel molecular targets.

  6. SKA1 regulates the metastasis and cisplatin resistance of non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHEN, LIHUA; YANG, MIN; LIN, QIONGHUA; ZHANG, ZHONGWEI; MIAO, CHANGHONG; ZHU, BIAO

    2016-01-01

    Currently, chemotherapy with platinum-based drugs including cisplatin is the most effective therapy for the treatment of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). However, the efficacy of chemotherapy is limited due to commonly developed drug resistance. Spindle and kinetochore-associated complex subunit 1 (SKA1) is part of a complex essential for stabilizing the attachment of spindle microtubules to kinetochores and for maintaining the metaphase plate during mitosis. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the role of SKA1 in the process of metastasis and drug resistance of NSCLC. We completed a series of experiments to investigate the function of SKA1 in NSCLC metastasis and drug resistance including qRT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blotting, as well as MTT, BrdU, wounded healing, Transwell and gelatin zymography assays. We demonstrated that the expression levels of SKA1 were elevated in NSCLC and were correlated with cancer progression and malignancy. We also reported that SKA1 positively regulated the proliferation and metastatic ability of NSCLC cells. In addition, we determined that SKA1 contributed to cisplatin resistance in NSCLC cells by protecting these cells from cisplatin-induced cell apoptosis. SKA1 also appeared to regulate the ERK1/2 and the Akt-mediated signaling pathways in NSCLC cells. SKA1 is required for metastasis and cisplatin resistance of non-small cell lung cancer. PMID:26985856

  7. Voluntary exercise prevents cisplatin-induced muscle wasting during chemotherapy in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Fjelbye, Jonas; Zerahn, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Loss of muscle mass related to anti-cancer therapy is a major concern in cancer patients, being associated with important clinical endpoints including survival, treatment toxicity and patient-related outcomes. We investigated effects of voluntary exercise during cisplatin treatment on body weight...

  8. Prediction of nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin combination chemotherapy in gastric cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hyung Hwan Moon; Kyung Won Seo; Ki Young Yoon; Yeon Myung Shin; Kyung Hyun Choi; Sang Ho Lee

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the treatment options for nephrotoxicity due to cisplatin combination chemotherapy. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed patients who had received cisplatin combination chemotherapy for gastric cancer between January 2002 and December 2008. We investigated patients who had shown acute renal failure (ARF), and examined their clinical characteristics, laboratory data, use of preventive measures, treatment cycles, the amount of cisplatin administered, recovery period, subsequent treatments, and renal status between the recovered and unrecovered groups. RESULTS: Forty-one of the 552 patients had serum creatinine (SCR) levels greater than 1.5 mg/dL. We found that pre-ARF SCR, ARF SCR, and ARF glomerular filtration rates were significantly associated with renal status post- ARF between the two groups (P = 0.008, 0.026, 0.026, respectively). On the receiver operating characteristic curve of these values, a 1.75 mg/dL ARF SCR value had 87.5% sensitivity and 84.8% specificity (P = 0.011). CONCLUSION: Cessation or reduction of chemotherapy should be considered for patients who have an elevation of SCR levels during cisplatin combination chemotherapy.

  9. Histological Study of Toxic Effects of Cisplatin Single Dose Injection on Rat Kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashhadi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Cisplatin, as an antineoplastic drug widely used for treatment of solid tumors, induces renal toxicity by free radical formation. Objectives The aim of the present study was to identify the histological changes of renal parenchyma after a single dose injection of cisplatin in rat, as an experimental model. Patients and Methods Twenty adult male Sprague Dawley rats, weighting about 210 ± 30 g, were randomly divided into experimental (10 and control (10 groups. The experimental group received a single dose injection of cisplatin intraperitoneally (5 mg/kg. One week after the injection, rats of both groups received deep anesthesia and were scarified. The tissue samples were removed and the prepared sections were stained by H&E and periodic acid–Schiff (PAS methods. The slides were used for both histopathological and morphometric studies. The collected data were analyzed by SPSS. Results Statistical analysis by Mann-Whitney test showed that there was a significant difference in the height of epithelium between the proximal convoluted tubule (PCT and the distal convoluted tubule (DCT of the experimental and control groups (P < 0.001. There was no significant difference in the urinary space diameter between the experimental and control groups. Focal tubular necrosis and vacuolar and eosinophilic degenerations were more prominent in the experimental group. Conclusions It seems that cisplatin can induce many quantitative and qualitative changes in proximal and distal convoluted tubules of nephron in rats.

  10. Radiological study of gastrointestinal motor activity after acute cisplatin in the rat. Temporal relationship with pica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabezos, Pablo Antonio; Vera, Gema; Castillo, Mónica; Fernández-Pujol, Ramón; Martín, María Isabel; Abalo, Raquel

    2008-08-18

    Nausea and vomiting are amongst the most severe dose-limiting side effects of chemotherapy. Emetogenic activity in rats can only be evaluated by indirect markers, such as pica (kaolin intake), or delay in gastric emptying. The aim of this work was to study, by radiological methods, the alterations in gastrointestinal motility induced by acute cisplatin in the rat, and to compare them with the development of pica. Rats received cisplatin (0-6 mg kg(-1)) at day 0. In the pica study, individual food ingestion and kaolin intake were measured each day (from day -3 to day 3). In the radiological study, conscious rats received an intragastric dose of medium contrast 0, 24 or 48 h after cisplatin injection, and serial X-rays were taken 0-24 h after contrast. Cisplatin dose-dependently induced both gastric stasis and stomach distension, showing a strict temporal relationship with the induction of both acute and delayed pica. Radiological methods, which are non-invasive and preserve animals' welfare, are useful to study the effect of emetogenic drugs in the different gastrointestinal regions and might speed up the search for new anti-emetics.

  11. Prometheus' spirit: quality survival in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma after gemcitabine and cisplatin-based chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doval, D C; Pande, S B; Sharma, J B; Pavithran, K; Jena, A; Vaid, A K

    2008-10-01

    In advanced virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) associated with cirrhosis, the average survival is four months. We report a 56-year-old man with a large-volume advanced HCC, in whom gemcitabine and cisplatin-based chemotherapy resulted in near-complete regression, and quality survival of 24 months.

  12. Pistachio supplementation attenuates motor and cognition impairments induced by cisplatin or vincristine in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Golchin

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: We conclude that pistachio in the diet following anticancer drugs such as cisplatin and vincristine might have a protective effect against anticancer drug-induced disruptions in motor and cognitive function. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the exact mechanisms of this protective effect of pistachio.

  13. Adsorptive voltametry to determine platinum levels in plasma from testicular cancer patients treated with cisplatin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gelevert, T; Messerschmidt, J; Meinardi, M.T; Alt, F.; Gietema, Harold; Franke, J.P.; Uges, Donald

    2001-01-01

    Patients cured of metastatic testicular cancer with cisplatin chemotherapy may suffer late adverse effects even after 20 years. The cause of these late adverse effects has not been elucidated yet. One cause might be prolonged tissue retention of platinum in these patients. Therefore, an extremely se

  14. Paeonol, a Major Compound of Moutan Cortex, Attenuates Cisplatin-Induced Nephrotoxicity in Mice

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    Hyojung Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin is an effective chemotherapeutic agent that is used for the treatment of a variety of cancers; however, its nephrotoxicity limits the use of this drug. In the present study, we examined whether paeonol, a major compound of Moutan Cortex, has protective effects on cisplatin-induced acute renal failure in mice. To accomplish this, Balb/c mice (6 to 8 wk of age, weighing 20 to 25 g were administered, Moutan Cortex (300 mg/kg or paeonol (20 mg/kg once a day. At day 4, mice received cisplatin (30, 20, or 10 mg/kg intraperitoneally. The paeonol-treated group showed marked attenuation of serum creatine and blood urea nitrogen levels as well as reduced levels of proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide when compared to the control group. In addition, the paeonol-treated group showed prolonged survival and marked attenuation of renal tissue injury. Taken together, these results demonstrated that paeonol can prevent the renal toxic effects of cisplatin.

  15. Protective Activity of Dendropanax Morbifera Against Cisplatin-Induced Acute Kidney Injury

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    Eun-Sun Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Drug-induced acute kidney injury (AKI has been a severe threat to hospitalized patients, raising the urgent needs to develop strategies to reduce AKI. We investigated the protective activity of Dendropanax morbifera (DP, a medicinal plant which has been widely used to treat infectious and pain diseases, on acute kidney injury (AKI using cisplatin-induced nephropathic models. Methods: Both in vitro renal tubular cells (NRK-52E and in vivo rat models were used to demonstrate the nephroprotective effect of DP. Results: Methanolic extract from DP significantly reduced cisplatin-induced toxicity in renal tubular cells. Through successive liquid extraction, the extract of DP was separated into n-hexane, CHCl3, EtOAc, n-BuOH, and H2O fractions. Among these, the CHCl3 fraction (DPCF was found to be most potent. The protective activity of DPCF was found to be mediated through anti-oxidant, mitochondrial protective, and anti-apoptotic activities. In in vivo rat models of AKI, treatment with DPCF significantly reversed the cisplatin-induced increase in blood urea nitrogen and serum creatinine and histopathologic damage, recovered the level of anti-oxidant enzymes, and inhibited renal apoptosis. Conclusion: We demonstrated that DP extracts decreased cisplatin-induced renal toxicity, indicating its potential to ameliorate drug-associated acute kidney damage.

  16. Reversion by ozone treatment of acute nephrotoxicity induced by cisplatin in rats

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    Ricardo González

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ozone therapy has become a useful treatment for pathological processes, in which the damage mediated by reactive oxygen species is involved. Several lines of evidence suggest that cisplatin-induced acute nephrotoxicity is partially mediated by reactive oxygen species.

  17. Cisplatin-induced DNA-platination in experimental dorsal root ganglia neuronopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, C; de Vries, EGE; Marmiroli, P; Tredici, G; Frattola, L; Cavaletti, G

    1999-01-01

    The mechanism(s) and site(s) of the neurotoxic effect of cisplatin (CDDP) are still not entirely elucidated. A more detailed knowledge of these aspects of CDDP treatment might be useful to obtain a better understanding of the pathogenesis of its peripheral neurotoxicity, which is the dose-limiting s

  18. Role of metallothionein in cisplatin sensitivity of germ-cell tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, C.; Timmer, A.; Vries, E.G.E.de; Groten, J.P.; Knol, A.; Zwart, N.; Dam, W.A.; Sleijfer, D.Th.; Mulder, N.H.

    2000-01-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) is an extremely active drug in the treatment of germ- cell tumours. Earlier, we found an unexpected inverse correlation between the total amount of sulfhydryl groups and CDDP sensitivity in a panel of 3 human germ-cell tumour and 3 colon-carcinoma cell lines. Major components of the

  19. Expression of proteins correlated with the unique cisplatin-sensitivity of testicular cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, Trude; de Jong, Steven; deVries, EGE; Mulder, NH

    1997-01-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) has a curative effect in approximately 80% of patients with testicular cancer, in contrast to the frequent development of resistance in patients with small cell lung cancer and ovarian cancer, and to the natural resistance of colon cancer. At present it is unknown which factors expl

  20. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy changes the incidence of bilateral testicular cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanBasten, JPA; Hoekstra, HJ; vanDriel, MF; Sleijfer, DT; Droste, JHJ; Schraffordt Koops, H.

    1997-01-01

    Background: The introduction of cisplatin-based chemotherapy has remarkably increased the survival of testicular cancer patients. With this success, the concern for a contraIateral testicular tumor has increased. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the risk for contralateral testicular

  1. Proteomics profile changes in cisplatin-treated human ovarian cancer cell strain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhengyu; ZHAO Xia; YANG Jinliang; WEI Yuquan

    2005-01-01

    To compare the alterations in proteomes between cisplatin-treated and -untreated human ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells, and to explore the feasibility of proteomics in research about antitumor mechanisms of agents, SKOV3 cells were exposed to cisplatin (6 μg/mL) for 6 h. Then, the cells were collected and solubilized and global proteins were extracted by lysis buffer; two-dimensional electrophoresis was conducted with the IPG readystrips as carriers; the gels were stained with Coomassie blue and alterations between gels were compared by PDQuest. Eventually, 11 spots with significant differences were selected and excised and the proteins were identified by PMF and MS/MS analysis. The results revealed that exposure to cisplatin could notably increase expressions of some proteins, such as tropomyosin family, actin family, triosephosphate isomerase family, and HSP60, etc.; while expressions of some other proteins decreased, such as enolase family, etc. Those proteins were involved in cellular energy metabolism, transformation, apoptosis and morphologic maintenance, which suggested that alterations of those physiological processes might be involved in anti-tumor mechanism of cisplatin.

  2. Pit-1 inhibits BRCA1 and sensitizes human breast tumors to cisplatin and vitamin D treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seoane, Samuel; Arias, Efigenia; Sigueiro, Rita; Sendon-Lago, Juan; Martinez-Ordoñez, Anxo; Castelao, Esteban; Eiró, Noemí; Garcia-Caballero, Tomás; Macia, Manuel; Lopez-Lopez, Rafael; Maestro, Miguel; Vizoso, Francisco; Mouriño, Antonio; Perez-Fernandez, Roman

    2015-01-01

    The POU class 1 homeobox 1 (POU1F1, also known as Pit-1), pertaining to the Pit-Oct-Unc (POU) family of transcription factors, has been related to tumor growth and metastasis in breast. However, its role in response to breast cancer therapy is unknown. We found that Pit-1 down-regulated DNA-damage and repair genes, and specifically inhibited BRCA1 gene expression, sensitizing breast cancer cells to DNA-damage agents. Administration of 1α, 25-dihydroxy-3-epi-vitamin D3 (3-Epi, an endogenous low calcemic vitamin D metabolite) reduced Pit-1 expression, and synergized with cisplatin, thus, decreasing cell proliferation and apoptosis in vitro, and reducing tumor growth in vivo. In addition, fifteen primary cultures of human breast tumors showed significantly decreased proliferation when treated with 3-Epi+cisplatin, compared to cisplatin alone. This response positively correlated with Pit-1 levels. Our findings demonstrate that high levels of Pit-1 and reduced BRCA1 levels increase breast cancer cell susceptibility to 3-Epi+cisplatin therapy. PMID:25992773

  3. Cisplatin for small cell lung cancer: Associated publications in Science Citation Index Expanded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yuh-Shan; Nakazawa, Kensuke; Sato, Shinya; Tamura, Tomohiro; Kurishima, Koichi; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2013-02-01

    This study was conducted to explore a bibliometric approach to quantitatively assess current research trends in cisplatin-containing chemotherapy for small cell lung cancer (SCLC), using related literature in the Science Citation Index Expanded database from 1992 to 2011. Articles were analyzed by the scientific output and research performances of countries and institutions. The distribution of key words in the article title and author-selected keywords were used to evaluate research trends. It was observed that the number of articles devoted to cisplatin-containing chemotherapy for SCLC did not increase with time. The USA and Japan were the top two countries with the highest number of articles devoted to cisplatin-containing chemotherapy for SCLC. In both countries, the number of articles did not increase with time, and a decreasing trend was identified in the USA over the last 10 years. This study demonstrates trends in cisplatin-containing chemotherapy for SCLC. The clinical application of novel drugs is required for successful SCLC treatment.

  4. Cisplatin resistance by induction of aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C2 in human bladder cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Shirato, Akitomi; KIKUGAWA, TADAHIKO; Miura, Noriyoshi; Tanji, Nozomu; Takemori, Nobuaki; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Yokoyama, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Cisplatin is currently the most effective anti-tumor agent available against bladder cancer. To clarify the mechanism underlying cisplatin resistance in bladder cancer, the present study examined the role of the aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C2 (AKR1C2) protein on chemoresistance using a human bladder cancer cell line. The function of AKR1C2 in chemoresistance was studied using the human HT1376 bladder cancer cell line and the cisplatin-resistant HT1376-CisR subline. AKR1C2 was expresse...

  5. Micro-RNA expression in cisplatin resistant germ cell tumor cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meineke Viktor

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We compared microRNA expression patterns in three cisplatin resistant sublines derived from paternal cisplatin sensitive germ cell tumor cell lines in order to improve our understanding of the mechanisms of cisplatin resistance. Methods Three cisplatin resistant sublines (NTERA-2-R, NCCIT-R, 2102EP-R showing 2.7-11.3-fold increase in drug resistance after intermittent exposure to increasing doses of cisplatin were compared to their parental counterparts, three well established relatively cisplatin sensitive germ cell tumor cell lines (NTERA-2, NCCIT, 2102EP. Cells were cultured and total RNA was isolated from all 6 cell lines in three independent experiments. RNA was converted into cDNA and quantitative RT-PCR was run using 384 well low density arrays covering almost all (738 known microRNA species of human origin. Results Altogether 72 of 738 (9.8% microRNAs appeared differentially expressed between sensitive and resistant cell line pairs (NTERA-2R/NTERA-2 = 43, NCCIT-R/NCCIT = 53, 2102EP-R/2102EP = 15 of which 46.7-95.3% were up-regulated (NTERA-2R/NTERA-2 = 95.3%, NCCIT-R/NCCIT = 62.3%, 2102EP-R/2102EP = 46.7%. The number of genes showing differential expression in more than one of the cell line pairs was 34 between NTERA-2R/NTERA-2 (79% and NCCIT-R/NCCIT (64%, and 3 and 4, respectively, between these two cell lines and 2102EP-R/2102EP (about 27%. Only the has-miR-10b involved in breast cancer invasion and metastasis and has-miR-512-3p appeared to be up-regulated (2-3-fold in all three cell lines. The hsa-miR-371-373 cluster (counteracting cellular senescence and linked with differentiation potency, as well as hsa-miR-520c/-520h (inhibiting the tumor suppressor p21 were 3.9-16.3 fold up-regulated in two of the three cisplatin resistant cell lines. Several new micro-RNA species missing an annotation towards cisplatin resistance could be identified. These were hsa-miR-512-3p/-515/-517/-518/-525 (up to 8.1-fold up

  6. Royal Jelly Modulates Oxidative Stress and Apoptosis in Liver and Kidneys of Rats Treated with Cisplatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Karadeniz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cisplatin (CDDP is one of the most active cytotoxic agents in the treatment of cancer and has adverse side effects such as nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. The present study was designed to determine the effects of royal jelly (RJ against oxidative stress caused by CDDP injury of the kidneys and liver, by measuring tissue biochemical and antioxidant parameters and investigating apoptosis immunohistochemically. Twenty-four Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups, group C: control group received 0.9% saline; group CDDP: injected i.p. with cisplatin (CDDP, 7 mg kg-1 body weight i.p., single dose; group RJ: treated for 15 consecutive days by gavage with RJ (300 mg/kg/day; group RJ + CDDP: treated by gavage with RJ 15 days following a single injection of CDDP. Malondialdehyde (MDA and glutathione (GSH levels, glutathione S-transferase (GST, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, and superoxide dismutase (SOD activities were determined in liver and kidney homogenates, and the liver and kidney were also histologically examined. RJ elicited a significant protective effect towards liver and kidney by decreasing the level of lipid peroxidation (MDA, elevating the level of GSH, and increasing the activities of GST, GSH-Px, and SOD. In the immunohistochemical examinations were observed significantly enhanced apoptotic cell numbers and degenerative changes by cisplatin, but these histological changes were lower in the liver and kidney tissues of RJ + CDDP group. Besides, treatment with RJ lead to an increase in antiapoptotic activity hepatocytes and tubular epithelium. In conclusion, RJ may be used in combination with cisplatin in chemotherapy to improve cisplatin-induced oxidative stress parameters and apoptotic activity.

  7. MDR1 and MDR3 Genes and Drug Resistance to Cisplatin of Ovarian Cancer Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Lirong; XIAO loan; HU Jianli; LI Zhimin; WANG Zehua

    2007-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between MDR1 and MDR3 gene and drug resistance to cisplatin of ovarian cancer cells. Two siRNAs (MDR1, MDR3) which specifically targeted MDR1 and MDR3 genes were transfered into A2780/DDP cells. Then double staining with Annexin- V-FITC/PI was used to detect cell apoptosis by the flow cytometry (FCM). A2780/DDP cell viability was determined by MTT. MDR1 and MDR3 mRNA were assessed by RT-PCR. Caspase-3 protein was detected by Western blotting. Transfection of MDR1 and MDR3 siRNA into A2780/DDP cells failed to reverse the drug-resistance of A2780/DDP cells to cisplatin (P0.05). No significant differ- ence in the apoptosis efficiency was observed between the MDR1 and MDR3 siRNA, pSuppressor- Neo vector transfection cells and untreated cells (P0.05). In the presence of cisplatin of different concentrations, the viability of A2780/DDP cells was not significantly decreased after the transfection. No changes in MDR1 and MDR3 mRNA were found in MDR1 and MDR3 siRNA-transfected A2780/DDP cells. As compared with pSuppressorNeo and untreated groups, no significant difference existed in the expression of MDR1 and MDR3 mRNA (P0.05). The expression of caspase-3 protein in MDR1 and MDR3 siRNA transfected A2780/DDP cells was not significantly increased. It is con- cluded that multidrug resistance induced by cisplatin in ovarian carcinoma cell lines is not due to overexpression of MDR1 and MDR3 gene. The drug resistance of ovarian carcinoma cells to cisplatin is not mediated by P-glycoprotein.

  8. Is intratympanic injection of erdosteine protective against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Issam; El Fata, Fouad

    2012-04-01

    Cisplatin induces ototoxicity in adult and pediatric population. Our aim was (1) to assess the protective effect of intratympanic injections of erdosteine in the prevention of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity and (2) to investigate inner ear protection using a scanning electron microscope. Ears of 20 Hartley guinea pigs were assigned to four subgroups and received an intratympanic injection of: E1-erdosteine 1.125 mg/cc, NS-normal saline, E2-erdosteine 2.25 mg/cc and E4-erdosteine 4.5 mg/cc. After 45 min, an intraperitoneal cisplatin injection of 3 mg/kg was performed and repeated 8 times, once a week to achieve 24 mg/kg. Auditory brainstem responses were recorded before any injection and after 24 mg/kg of cisplatin for the frequencies 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 kHz. Cochleas were analyzed under scanning electron microscope. Average hearing loss in the NS subgroup was 29.8 dB which was lower than E1, E2 and E4 subgroups (40, 43.9, and 51.7 dB, respectively). Difference in the mean threshold increase was statistically significant between NS and the three erdosteine subgroups (P  0.05). However, difference was significant between E1 and E4 (P erdosteine showed a diffuse inflammatory reaction and osteitis of the middle ear. Low or high concentration of intratympanic erdosteine does not offer protection against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity as it causes a considerable inflammatory reaction.

  9. Synergistic effect of cisplatin and synchrotron irradiation on F98 gliomas growing in nude mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricard, Clement; Fernandez, Manuel [Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Requardt, Herwig [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Wion, Didier [Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Vial, Jean-Claude [Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France); Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire de Physique, St Martin d’Hères (France); Segebarth, Christoph; Sanden, Boudewijn van der, E-mail: boudewijn.vandersanden@ujf-grenoble.fr [Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble (France); Université Joseph Fourier, Grenoble (France)

    2013-09-01

    Synchrotron photoactivation therapy of cisplatin relies on a synergistic effect of synchrotron X-rays and platinum and leads to tumor-cell-killing effects and reduction of the tumor blood perfusion. Among brain tumors, glioblastoma multiforme appears as one of the most aggressive forms of cancer with poor prognosis and no curative treatment available. Recently, a new kind of radio-chemotherapy has been developed using synchrotron irradiation for the photoactivation of molecules with high-Z elements such as cisplatin (PAT-Plat). This protocol showed a cure of 33% of rats bearing the F98 glioma but the efficiency of the treatment was only measured in terms of overall survival. Here, characterization of the effects of the PAT-Plat on tumor volume and tumor blood perfusion are proposed. Changes in these parameters may predict the overall survival. Firstly, changes in tumor growth of the F98 glioma implanted in the hindlimb of nude mice after the PAT-Plat treatment and its different modalities have been characterized. Secondly, the effects of the treatment on tumor blood perfusion have been observed by intravital two-photon microscopy. Cisplatin alone had no detectable effect on the tumor volume. A reduction of tumor growth was measured after a 15 Gy synchrotron irradiation, but the whole therapy (15 Gy irradiation + cisplatin) showed the largest decrease in tumor growth, indicating a synergistic effect of both synchrotron irradiation and cisplatin treatment. A high number of unperfused vessels (52%) were observed in the peritumoral area in comparison with untreated controls. In the PAT-Plat protocol the transient tumor growth reduction may be due to synergistic interactions of tumor-cell-killing effects and reduction of the tumor blood perfusion.

  10. Asparagus racemosus ameliorates cisplatin induced toxicities and augments its antileishmanial activity by immunomodulation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachdeva, Heena; Sehgal, Rakesh; Kaur, Sukhbir

    2014-02-01

    Current drugs for the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis are inadequate and their efficacies are also compromised due to suppression of immune function associated during the course of infection. To overcome this problem, efforts are needed to develop therapies with effective immunomodulatory agents where decrease of parasitic burden and simultaneous enhancement of adaptive immunity can be achieved. In this study we have evaluated a new therapeutic approach based on combination of Asparagus racemosus, an immunomodulatory drug, in combination with cisplatin against Leishmania donovani infected BALB/c mice. We demonstrate that A. racemosus (650 mg/kg b.wt./day for 15 days, orally) in combination with cisplatin (5 mg/kg b.wt./day for 5 days, intraperitoneally) enhanced the clearance of parasites as determined by Giemsa-stained liver impression smears. Besides having better killing activity, this combination group achieved increased production of disease resolving Th-1 response (IFN-gamma, IL-2), heightened DTH (delayed type hypersensitivity) response and augmented levels of IgG2a. Moreover, A. racemosus in combination with cisplatin not only provided enhanced protective immune response but also resulted in remarkable improved kidney and liver function tests as manifested by normal levels of SGOT, SGPT, alkaline phosphatase, creatinine and urea in blood plasma with normal histological observations as compared to only cisplatin treated L. donovani infected BALB/c mice. Through this study we have ascertained that A. racemosus in combination with cisplatin in L. donovani infected BALB/c mice boosted as well as restored both cellular and humoral immunity. Thus in view of severe immunosuppression in visceral leishmaniasis, a better and effective strategy for optimum efficacy of future antileishmanial drugs would direct not only killing of parasite by the drug, but also simultaneous generation of immunity against the disease.

  11. Urinary aminopeptidase activities as early and predictive biomarkers of renal dysfunction in cisplatin-treated rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Quesada

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the fluorimetric determination of alanyl- (Ala, glutamyl- (Glu, leucyl-cystinyl- (Cys and aspartyl-aminopeptidase (AspAp urinary enzymatic activities as early and predictive biomarkers of renal dysfunction in cisplatin-treated rats. Male Wistar rats (n = 8 each group received a single subcutaneous injection of either saline or cisplatin 3.5 or 7 mg/kg, and urine samples were taken at 0, 1, 2, 3 and 14 days after treatment. In urine samples we determined Ala, Glu, Cys and AspAp activities, proteinuria, N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG, albumin, and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL. Plasma creatinine, creatinine clearance and renal morphological variables were measured at the end of the experiment. CysAp, NAG and albumin were increased 48 hours after treatment in the cisplatin 3.5 mg/kg treated group. At 24 hours, all urinary aminopeptidase activities and albuminuria were significantly increased in the cisplatin 7 mg/kg treated group. Aminopeptidase urinary activities correlated (p0.259 with plasma creatinine, creatinine clearance and/or kidney weight/body weight ratio at the end of the experiment and they could be considered as predictive biomarkers of renal injury severity. ROC-AUC analysis was made to study their sensitivity and specificity to distinguish between treated and untreated rats at day 1. All aminopeptidase activities showed an AUC>0.633. We conclude that Ala, Cys, Glu and AspAp enzymatic activities are early and predictive urinary biomarkers of the renal dysfunction induced by cisplatin. These determinations can be very useful in the prognostic and diagnostic of renal dysfunction in preclinical research and clinical practice.

  12. Effect of aqueous extract of Rheum ribes on cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousa-Al-Reza Hadjzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study was to examine whether Rheum ribes extract prevents cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Materials and Methods: The animals were divided into three groups: Group A considered as control group, group B were treated with cisplatin (3 mg/kg B.W. for 3 alternative days, and group C further to cisplatin received the aqueous extract of Rheum ribes (150 mg/rat. Results: Blood urea nitrogen (BUN level increased in group B on days 14 and 42 compared to day 0 ( P < 0.001; it was also increased in group B vs. group A on day 14 ( P < 0.001. Rheum ribes extract decreased the serum BUN level on day 14 compared to group B ( P < 0.001. Serum creatinine level in group B had a similar profile as serum BUN level but Rheum ribes had no effect on blood creatinine level. Serum cholesterol level was increased in group B on days 14 and 42 compared to day 0 ( P < 0.001. Also, cholesterol level was significantly increased in group B when compared to group A on day 14 ( P < 0.001. Rheum ribes decreased the blood cholesterol level on day 42 in comparison to group B ( P < 0.001. Serum glucose level was increased in group B on days 14 and 42 vs. day 0 ( P < 0.001. Also, glucose level was significantly increased in group B when compared to group A on day 42 ( P < 0.001. Rheum ribes increased the serum glucose level on days 14 and 42 compared to day 0 ( P < 0.05. Histology of kidneys exposed to cisplatin showed renal injury, but Rheum ribes had no effect on the kidney architecture. Conclusion: Cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity was confirmed in our study. Although Rheum ribes had some effects on biochemical parameters; its effect on renal histology in injured kidney was insignificant.

  13. Radiation response of human lung cancer cells with inherent and acquired resistance to cisplatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twentyman, P.R.; Wright, K.A.; Rhodes, T. (MRC Clinical Oncology and Radiotherapeutics Unit, Cambridge (England))

    1991-02-01

    We have derived sublines of three human lung cancer cell lines with acquired resistance to cisplatin. The cisplatin resistant sublines of NCI-H69 (small cell), COR-L23 (large cell), and MOR (adenocarcinoma) show 5.3 fold, 3.1 fold, and 3.8 fold resistance, respectively, determined in a 6-day MTT assay. Although the parent lines show a wide range of glutathione content per cell, the sublines each show similar values to their corresponding parent line. Radiation response curves have been obtained using a soft agar clonogenic assay. Values obtained for the parent lines (95% CL in parentheses) were: NCI-H69: Do = 0.99 Gy (0.87-1.16), n = 2.9 (1.6-5.2), GSH = 14 ng/10(4) cells; COR-L23: Do = 1.23 Gy (1.05-1.49), n = 1.3 (0.7-2.2), GSH = 47 ng/10(4) cells; MOR: Do = 1.66 Gy (1.48-1.88), n = 3.0 (1.9-4.8), GSH = 86 ng/10(4) cells. The cisplatin resistant variants of NCI-H69 and COR-L23 showed 31% and 63% increases, respectively, in Do compared to their parent lines, whereas no change in radiation response was seen in MOR. In this panel of lines, therefore, although there is a correlation between glutathione content and radiosensitivity of the parent cell lines, acquired resistance to cisplatin is not accompanied by increased glutathione content. However, two of the three cisplatin resistant lines do show a significantly reduced radiosensitivity.

  14. Royal jelly modulates oxidative stress and apoptosis in liver and kidneys of rats treated with cisplatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadeniz, Ali; Simsek, Nejdet; Karakus, Emre; Yildirim, Serap; Kara, Adem; Can, Ismail; Kisa, Fikrullah; Emre, Habib; Turkeli, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) is one of the most active cytotoxic agents in the treatment of cancer and has adverse side effects such as nephrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. The present study was designed to determine the effects of royal jelly (RJ) against oxidative stress caused by CDDP injury of the kidneys and liver, by measuring tissue biochemical and antioxidant parameters and investigating apoptosis immunohistochemically. Twenty-four Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups, group C: control group received 0.9% saline; group CDDP: injected i.p. with cisplatin (CDDP, 7 mg kg(-1) body weight i.p., single dose); group RJ: treated for 15 consecutive days by gavage with RJ (300 mg/kg/day); group RJ + CDDP: treated by gavage with RJ 15 days following a single injection of CDDP. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione (GSH) levels, glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were determined in liver and kidney homogenates, and the liver and kidney were also histologically examined. RJ elicited a significant protective effect towards liver and kidney by decreasing the level of lipid peroxidation (MDA), elevating the level of GSH, and increasing the activities of GST, GSH-Px, and SOD. In the immunohistochemical examinations were observed significantly enhanced apoptotic cell numbers and degenerative changes by cisplatin, but these histological changes were lower in the liver and kidney tissues of RJ + CDDP group. Besides, treatment with RJ lead to an increase in antiapoptotic activity hepatocytes and tubular epithelium. In conclusion, RJ may be used in combination with cisplatin in chemotherapy to improve cisplatin-induced oxidative stress parameters and apoptotic activity.

  15. Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi Decoction, the Water Extract of Chinese Traditional Herbal Medicine, Enhances Cisplatin Cytotoxicity in A549/DDP Cells through Induction of Apoptosis and Autophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most active cytotoxic agents for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treatment. However, the development of cisplatin resistance is common. Bu-Zhong-Yi-Qi decoction (BZYQD), a Chinese traditional herbal medicine, is widely used for the enhancement of antitumor effect in other medications. In this study, we evaluated the effect and drug-resistance reve