WorldWideScience

Sample records for cisnet colorectal cancer

  1. Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rectum are part of the large intestine. Colorectal cancer occurs when tumors form in the lining of ... men and women. The risk of developing colorectal cancer rises after age 50. You're also more ...

  2. Colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Randall W; Cannon, Jamie A; David, Donald S; Early, Dayna S; Ford, James M; Giardiello, Francis M; Halverson, Amy L; Hamilton, Stanley R; Hampel, Heather; Ismail, Mohammad K; Jasperson, Kory; Klapman, Jason B; Lazenby, Audrey J; Lynch, Patrick M; Mayer, Robert J; Ness, Reid M; Provenzale, Dawn; Rao, M Sambasiva; Shike, Moshe; Steinbach, Gideon; Terdiman, Jonathan P; Weinberg, David; Dwyer, Mary; Freedman-Cass, Deborah

    2013-12-01

    Mortality from colorectal cancer can be reduced by early diagnosis and by cancer prevention through polypectomy. These NCCN Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer Screening describe various colorectal screening modalities and recommended screening schedules for patients at average or increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. In addition, the guidelines provide recommendations for the management of patients with high-risk colorectal cancer syndromes, including Lynch syndrome. Screening approaches for Lynch syndrome are also described.

  3. Five Myths about Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... them. Myth: Colorectal cancer is a man’s disease. Truth: Colorectal cancer is almost as common among women as men. ... tested for colorectal cancer because it’s deadly anyway. Truth: Colorectal cancer is often highly treatable. If it’s found and ...

  4. 6 Common Cancers - Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... consisted of treatment with just two drugs, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and leucovorin. A third drug, irinotecan, was approved ... FDA in 1996 for use in combination with 5-FU and leucovorin in treating metastatic colorectal cancer (cancer ...

  5. Colorectal cancers choosing sides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albuquerque, Cristina; Bakker, Elvira R. M.; van Veelen, Wendy; Smits, Ron

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to the majority of sporadic colorectal cancer which predominantly occur in the distal colon, most mismatch repair deficient tumours arise at the proximal side. At present, these regional preferences have not been explained properly. Recently, we have screened colorectal tumours for mutat

  6. Epidemiology of colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Andrew R; Nan, Hongmei

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is currently the third deadliest cancer in the United States and will claim an estimated 49,190 U.S. lives in 2016. The purpose of this review is to summarize our current understanding of this disease, based on nationally published statistics and information presented in peer-reviewed journal articles. Specifically, this review will cover the following topics: descriptive epidemiology (including time and disease trends both in the United States and abroad), risk factors (environmental, genetic, and gene-environment interactions), screening, prevention and control, and treatment. Landmark discoveries in colorectal cancer risk factor research will also be presented. Based on the information reviewed for this report, we suggest that future U.S. public health efforts aim to increase colorectal cancer screening among African American communities, and that future worldwide colorectal cancer epidemiology studies should focus on researching nutrient-gene interactions towards the goal of improving personalized treatment and prevention strategies.

  7. Gallstones and colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Torben; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of gallstone disease in 145 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer was compared with gallstone prevalence in 4,159 subjects randomly selected from a population. The group of patients had a significantly higher prevalence of gallstone disease than the population (odds ratio = 1.......59; 95 percent confidence limits 1.04-2.45), whereas cholecystectomies occurred with equal frequency in the two groups. There was a nonsignificant trend toward more right-sided cancers in patients with gallstones than in patients without. These results, together with available literature, give...... substantial evidence for an association between gallstones and colorectal cancer, an association which is not due to cholecystectomy being a predisposing factor to colorectal cancer. Sporadic findings of an association between cholecystectomy and colorectal cancer can be explained by the above relationship....

  8. Prophylaxis against colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Kronborg, O

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing...... with a well-established register of familial adenomatous polyposis and a recently founded register for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, both with major international relationships. The Danish tradition of epidemiology and clinical trials has also been demonstrated in population screening trials...... for colorectal cancer in average-risk persons as well as high-risk groups with precursors of the disease. The present review places Danish contributions within the prophylaxis of colorectal cancer during the last decade in an international context....

  9. Hereditary colorectal cancer diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov, Louise; Holck, Susanne; Bernstein, Inge

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) subset of tumours can broadly be divided into tumours caused by an underlying mismatch-repair gene mutation, referred to as Lynch syndrome, and those that develop in families with similar patterns of heredity but without disease......-predisposing germline mismatch repair mutations, referred to as familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX). Recognition of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers is central since surveillance programmes effectively reduce morbidity and mortality. The characteristic morphological features linked to Lynch syndrome can aid...... in the identification of this subset, whereas the possibility to use morphological features as an indicator of FCCTX is uncertain.Objective and methodsTo perform a detailed morphological evaluation of HNPCC-associated colorectal cancers and demonstrate significant differences between tumours associated with FCCTX...

  10. Screening for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jin; Efron, Jonathan E

    2011-01-01

    March is national colorectal cancer awareness month. It is estimated that as many as 60% of colorectal cancer deaths could be prevented if all men and women aged 50 years or older were screened routinely. In 2000, Katie Couric's televised colonoscopy led to a 20% increase in screening colonoscopies across America, a stunning rise called the "Katie Couric Effect". This event demonstrated how celebrity endorsement affects health behavior. Currently, discussion is ongoing about the optimal strategy for CRC screening, particularly the costs of screening colonoscopy. The current CRC screening guidelines are summarized in Table 2. Debates over the optimum CRC screening test continue in the face of evidence that 22 million Americans aged 50 to 75 years are not screened for CRC by any modality and 25,000 of those lives may have been saved if they had been screened for CRC. It is clear that improving screening rates and reducing disparities in underscreened communities and population subgroups could further reduce colorectal cancer morbidity and mortality. National Institutes of Health consensus identified the following priority areas to enhance the use and quality of colorectal cancer screening: Eliminate financial barriers to colorectal cancer screening and appropriate follow-up of positive results of colorectal cancer screening. Develop systems to ensure the high quality of colorectal cancer screening programs. Conduct studies to determine the comparative effectiveness of the various colorectal cancer screening methods in usual practice settings. Encouraging population adherence to screening tests and allowing patients to select the tests they prefer may do more good (as long as they choose something) than whatever procedure is chosen by the medical profession as the preferred test.

  11. Prophylaxis against colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Steffen; Kronborg, O

    1996-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing with a w...... for colorectal cancer in average-risk persons as well as high-risk groups with precursors of the disease. The present review places Danish contributions within the prophylaxis of colorectal cancer during the last decade in an international context.......Colorectal cancer is diagnosed in more than 3000 people every year in Denmark, with a population of 5 million, and 2000 die from this disease every year. The aetiology of the disease is complex, but an increasing number of cancers have been related to genetics and Denmark is contributing...... with a well-established register of familial adenomatous polyposis and a recently founded register for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer, both with major international relationships. The Danish tradition of epidemiology and clinical trials has also been demonstrated in population screening trials...

  12. Colorectal Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Past Issues Special Section: Colorectal Cancer Colorectal Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis and Treatment Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Symptoms Check with your healthcare provider if you have ...

  13. [Colorectal cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells, Antoni

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of malignancies showing the greatest benefit from preventive measures, especially screening or secondary prevention. Several screening strategies are available with demonstrated efficacy and efficiency. The most widely used are the faecal occult blood test in countries with population-based screening programmes, and colonoscopy in those conducting opportunistic screening. The present article reviews the most important presentations on colorectal cancer screening at the annual congress of the American Gastroenterological Association held in Washington in 2015, with special emphasis on the medium-term results of faecal occult blood testing strategies and determining factors and on strategies to reduce the development of interval cancer after colonoscopy.

  14. Colorectal cancer screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ramona M McLoughlin; Colm A O'Morain

    2006-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major public health burden worldwide.There is clear-cut evidence that screening will reduce colorectal cancer mortality and the only contentious issue is which screening tool to use.Most evidence points towards screening with fecal occult blood testing.The immunochemical fecal occult blood tests have a higher sensitivity than the guaiac-based tests.In addition,their automation and haemoglobin quantification allows a threshold for colonoscopy to be selected that can be accommodated within individual health care systems.

  15. Screening for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans J; Jakobsen, Karen V; Christensen, Ib J

    2011-01-01

    into improvements of screening for colorectal cancer includes blood-based biological markers, such as proteins, DNA and RNA in combination with various demographically and clinically parameters into a "risk assessment evaluation" (RAE) test. It is assumed that such a test may lead to higher acceptance among......Emerging results indicate that screening improves survival of patients with colorectal cancer. Therefore, screening programs are already implemented or are being considered for implementation in Asia, Europe and North America. At present, a great variety of screening methods are available including...... colono- and sigmoidoscopy, CT- and MR-colonography, capsule endoscopy, DNA and occult blood in feces, and so on. The pros and cons of the various tests, including economic issues, are debated. Although a plethora of evaluated and validated tests even with high specificities and reasonable sensitivities...

  16. Epigenetic changes in colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Jia; Mingzhou Guo

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic changes frequently occur in human colorectal cancer.Genomic global hypomethylation,gene promoter region hypermethylation,histone modifications,and alteration of miRNA patterns are major epigenetic changes in colorectal cancer.Loss of imprinting (LOI) is associated with colorectal neoplasia.Folate deficiency may cause colorectal carcinogenesis by inducing gene-specific hypermethylation and genomic global hypomethylation.HDAC inhibitors and demethylating agents have been approved by the FDA for myelodysplastic syndrome and leukemia treatment.Non-coding RNA is regarded as another kind of epigenetic marker in colorectal cancer.This review is mainly focused on DNA methylation,histone modification,and microRNA changes in colorectal cancer.

  17. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingeholm, Peter; Gögenur, Ismail; Iversen, Lene H

    2016-01-01

    , and other pathological risk factors. DESCRIPTIVE DATA: The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal......-term survivals since it started in 2001 for both patients with colon and rectal cancers.......AIM OF DATABASE: The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. STUDY POPULATION: All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed...

  18. Lysyl oxidase in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T

    2013-11-15

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent form of cancer worldwide and fourth-leading cause of cancer-related mortality, leading to ~600,000 deaths annually, predominantly affecting the developed world. Lysyl oxidase is a secreted, extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme previously suggested to act as a tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. However, emerging evidence has rapidly implicated lysyl oxidase in promoting metastasis of solid tumors and in particular colorectal cancer at multiple stages, affecting tumor cell proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. This emerging research has stimulated significant interest in lysyl oxidase as a strong candidate for developing and deploying inhibitors as functional efficacious cancer therapeutics. In this review, we discuss the rapidly expanding body of knowledge concerning lysyl oxidase in solid tumor progression, highlighting recent advancements in the field of colorectal cancer.

  19. [Colorectal cancer in spouses of colorectal cancer patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumata, T; Shikada, Y; Hasuda, S; Kishihara, F; Suehiro, T; Funahashi, S; Nagamatsu, Y; Iso, Y; Shima, I; Koga, C; Osamura, S; Ueda, M; Furuya, K; Sakino, I

    2000-06-01

    Married couples share home environments and life style for years. In the case of colorectal cancer, an association with insulin resistance was reported. We determined the presence of the insulin-resistance syndrome (IRS, 1 or more of the following: body mass index of > 25 kg/m2, diabetes, or hyperlipidemia) in 84 colorectal cancer patients, of whom 61 patients (73%) had IRS. The incidence of the distal colorectal cancer, which has been declining in the United States, was significantly higher in the IRS group than in the non-IRS group (75.4 vs 52.2%, p = 0.0400). Some mechanisms may promote the progression of mucosal lesions to invasive cancers in the distal colorectum. There were no significant differences with respect to the age (64.6 +/- 9.4 vs 64.3 +/- 11.3 yr, p = 0.8298), height (159 +/- 9 vs 157 +/- 8 cm, p = 0.1375), and body mass index (22.2 +/- 3.6 vs 22.4 +/- 2.7 kg/m2, p = 0.6364) between the patients and their spouses. In 84 couples in whom colorectal cancer develops at least in one may then not illustrate the nursery rhyme: "Jack Sprat could eat no fat, His wife could eat no lean...". The spouses had been married for an average of 38 years, and in 30 spouses who had been followed in a colorectal cancer screening, 5 developed colorectal cancer. To diminish the incidence of colorectal cancer in Japan, we might advise screening colonoscopy to the spouses of colorectal cancer patients, or déjà vu all over again?

  20. Genetic Testing for Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic counseling, and a genetic counselor may recommend genetic testing based on your family health history. When collecting ... find information on colorectal cancer, Lynch syndrome, cancer genetic testing, and genetic counseling services. Colorectal Cancer, Centers for ...

  1. Lysyl oxidase in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Thomas R; Erler, Janine T

    2013-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent form of cancer worldwide and fourth-leading cause of cancer-related mortality, leading to ~600,000 deaths annually, predominantly affecting the developed world. Lysyl oxidase is a secreted, extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme previously suggested...

  2. Colorectal cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Frederico Ferreira Novaes de

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer in the world, and mortality has remained the same for the past 50 years, despite advances in diagnosis and treatment. Because significant numbers of patients present with advanced or incurable stages, patients with pre-malignant lesions (adenomatous polyps that occur as result of genetic inheritance or age should be screened, and patients with long-standing inflammatory bowel disease should undergo surveillance. There are different risk groups for CRC, as well as different screening strategies. It remains to be determined which screening protocol is the most cost-effective for each risk catagory. The objective of screening is to reduce morbidity and mortality in a target population. The purpose of this review is to analyze the results of the published CRC screening studies, with regard to the measured reduction of morbidity and mortality, due to CRC in the studied populations, following various screening procedures. The main screening techniques, used in combination or alone, include fecal occult blood tests, flexible sigmoidoscopy, and colonoscopy. Evidence from the published literature on screening methods for specific risk groups is scanty and frequently does not arise from controlled studies. Nevertheless, data from these studies, combined with recent advances in molecular genetics, certainly lead the way to greater efficacy and lower cost of CRC screening.

  3. Brain metastases from colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vagn-Hansen, Chris Aksel; Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2001-01-01

    Brain metastases from colorectal cancer are rare. The prognosis for patients with even a single resectable brain metastasis is poor. A case of surgically treated cerebral metastasis from a rectal carcinoma is reported. The brain tumour was radically resected. However, cerebral, as well...... as extracerebral, disease recurred 12 months after diagnosis. Surgical removal of colorectal metastatic brain lesions in selected cases results in a longer survival time....

  4. Diagnostic Ultrasound in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARYBackground and purpose Colorectal cancer is a common disease in Denmark with considerable morbidity and mortality. Although survival in recent years has improved, Denmark still has the lowest 5-year survival compared to the other Nordic countries. The treatment of patients depends on local...... the potential to contribute to the staging of colorectal cancer. The purpose of these studies was to determine the usefulness of ultrasound diagnostics in patients with colorectal cancer.The purpose of the TRUS studies was to compare staging of rectal carcinomas using digital rectal exploration...... with the resulting pathological examination in relation to differentiating benign from malignant polyps and determining tumour stage and lymph node status. In this context we also performed an observer comparison using both TRUS and MRI. Consistency of tumour outgrowth of rectal cancer rated by TRUS and MRI...

  5. Familial colorectal cancer type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominguez-Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Da Silva, Sabrina;

    2015-01-01

    Heredity is a major cause of colorectal cancer, but although several rare high-risk syndromes have been linked to disease-predisposing mutations, the genetic mechanisms are undetermined in the majority of families suspected of hereditary cancer. We review the clinical presentation, histopathologic...

  6. Optimisation of colorectal cancer treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, Colette Bernadine Maria-Theresia van den

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Although there have been several improvements in screening, staging, and treatment in the past decades, survival differences remain. For example among certain subgroups of patients, such as elderly patients and patients with comorbiditie

  7. Colorectal Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing colorectal cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  8. Colorectal Cancer Awareness and Screening

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-04-06

    An oncologist (cancer doctor) shares her medical and personal advice for people between the ages of 50 and 75 about getting screened for colorectal cancer.  Created: 4/6/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/6/2017.

  9. Colorectal cancers and chlorinated water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed Mahmoud El-Tawil

    2016-01-01

    Published reports have revealed increased risk of colorectal cancers in people exposed to chlorinated drinking water or chemical derivatives of chlorination. Oestrogen plays a dual positive functions for diminishing the possibilities of such risk by reducing the entrance, and increasing the excretion, of these chemicals. In addition, there are supplementary measures that could be employed in order to reduce this risk further, such as boiling the drinking water, revising the standard concentrations of calcium, magnesium and iron in the public drinking water and prescribing oestrogen in susceptible individuals. Hypo-methylation of genomic DNA could be used as a biological marker for screening for the potential development of colorectal cancers.

  10. Extended resection for locally advanced colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-ping; SONG Xin-ming

    2006-01-01

    @@ Colorectal cancer is a common cause of cancer-related mortality.1 In China, it is one of eight cancers in the cancer control blueprint, which are suggested to have comprehensive treatment.Some patients with colorectal cancer presented no symptoms when they were diagnosed, yet the tumor had already penetrated the intestinal wall and involved adjacent organs. If the tumor is localized at time of diagnosis without distant metastases, it is termed locally advanced colorectal cancer (LACC)regardless of whether there is lymph node metastasis. LACC commonly encountered in clinical practice accounts for 5%-10% of all colorectal cancers.2

  11. Adjuvant therapies for colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The management of colon and rectal cancer has changed dramatically over the last 25 years. The use of adjuvant therapies has become standard practice in locally advanced (stage Ⅲ and selected stage Ⅱ) colorectal cancer. Improved surgical techniques, chemotherapeutics and radiotherapy are resulting in higher cure rates and the development of agents targeting proliferative and angiogenic pathways offer further promise. Here we explore risk factors for local and distant recurrence after resection of colon and rectal cancer, and the role of adjuvant treatments. Discussion will focus on the evidence base for adjuvant therapies utilised in colorectal cancer, and the treatment of sub-groups such as the elderly and stage Ⅱ disease. The role of adjuvant radiotherapy in rectal cancer in reduction of recurrence will be explored and the role and optimal methods for surveillance post-curative resection with or without adjuvant therapy will also be addressed.

  12. Nutrients, foods, and colorectal cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Mingyang; Garrett, Wendy S; Chan, Andrew T

    2015-05-01

    Diet has an important role in the development of colorectal cancer. In the past few decades, findings from extensive epidemiologic and experimental investigations have linked consumption of several foods and nutrients to the risk of colorectal neoplasia. Calcium, fiber, milk, and whole grains have been associated with a lower risk of colorectal cancer, and red meat and processed meat have been associated with an increased risk. There is substantial evidence for the potential chemopreventive effects of vitamin D, folate, fruits, and vegetables. Nutrients and foods also may interact, as a dietary pattern, to influence colorectal cancer risk. Diet likely influences colorectal carcinogenesis through several interacting mechanisms. These include the direct effects on immune responsiveness and inflammation, and the indirect effects of overnutrition and obesity-risk factors for colorectal cancer. Emerging evidence also implicates the gut microbiota as an important effector in the relationship between diet and cancer. Dietary modification therefore has the promise of reducing colorectal cancer incidence.

  13. [Systemic therapy for colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestalozzi, B C; Jäger, D; Knuth, A

    2005-06-01

    Drug treatment of colorectal cancer has made impressive progress during the past 10 years. In addition to the traditional 5-fluorouracil, newer anticancer drugs are available including irinotecan and oxaliplatin. Monoclonal antibodies like bevacizumab and cetuximab have been integrated into modern treatment regimens. Based on randomized clinical trials we can formulate rational treatment strategies as outlined in this article.

  14. Costs of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-04-04

    A health economist talks about studies on figuring out the costs of running a colorectal cancer screening program, and how this can lead to better screening.  Created: 4/4/2017 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 4/4/2017.

  15. Immunotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellebaek, Eva; Andersen, Mads Hald; Svane, Inge Marie

    2012-01-01

    and presents the most interesting strategies investigated so far: cancer vaccination including antigen-defined vaccination and dendritic cell vaccination, chemo-immunotherapy, and adoptive cell transfer. Future treatment options as well as the possibility of combining existing therapies will be discussed along......Although no immunotherapeutic treatment is approved for colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, promising results from clinical trials suggest that several immunotherapeutic strategies may prove efficacious and applicable to this group of patients. This review describes the immunogenicity of CRC...

  16. [New drugs for colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestalozzi, B C; Jäger, D; Knuth, A

    2004-09-01

    Drug treatment of colorectal cancer has made impressive progress during the past 10 years. In addition to fluorouracil new anticancer drugs like irinotecan and oxaliplatin have become available. The activity of fluorouracil was optimized by using schedules of prolonged infusion. Capecitabine is an oral pro-drug of fluorouracil. When colorectal metastases are limited to the liver they should be resected if possible. Sometimes they can be reduced in size by primary chemotherapy (downstaging) and resected later. Very new and exciting are reports with the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab in combination with chemotherapy. Bevacizumab blocks angiogenesis. So far it is available only in the USA.

  17. DECAY ACCELERATING FACTOR AND COLORECTAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高雪芹; 鲁艳芹; 韩金祥

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To review the significance of decay accelerating factor (DAF) in the eolorectal cancer, we searched the data from PubMed and selected the related articles for review. It was found that DAF were expressed in the adenomas and adenocarcinoma of colorectal tissues. The release of DAF in the stool of the patients was also detectable. It increased more significantly in the stool of patients with colorectal cancer than other gastrointestinal cancer. Its detection by ELISA method may render a good test for the noninvasive diagnosis of colorectal cancer. It can be concluded that DAF is expressed extensively in colorectal cancer. And the detection of DAF released in the stool of colorectal cancer patients may be a good noninvasive method for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  18. Deranged Wnt signaling is frequent in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isinger-Ekstrand, Anna; Therkildsen, Christina; Bernstein, Inge;

    2011-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway is frequently deranged in colorectal cancer and is a key target for future preventive and therapeutic approaches. Colorectal cancers associated with the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) syndrome are characterized by wide-spread microsatellite instability...

  19. CISNet Project's Phytoplankton Pigment Monitoring Database for the North Inlet and Ace Basin Estuaries, South Carolina: 1999-2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — EPA/NOAA/NASA CISNet Partnership The Coastal Intensive Site Network (CISNet) was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Oceanic and...

  20. Microbial and viral pathogens in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2011-05-01

    The heterogenetic and sporadic nature of colorectal cancer has led to many epidemiological associations with causes of this disease. As our understanding of the underlying molecular processes in colorectal-cancer develops, the concept of microbial-epithelial interactions as an oncogenic trigger might provide a plausible hypothesis for the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. By contrast with other cancers of the gastrointestinal tract (gastric carcinoma, mucosa-associated lymphoid-tissue lymphoma), a direct causal link between microbial infection (bacteria and viruses) and colorectal carcinoma has not been established. Studies support the involvement of these organisms in oncogenesis, however, in colorectal cancer, clinical data are lacking. Here, we discuss current evidence (both in vitro and clinical studies), and focus on a putative role for bacterial and viral pathogens as a cause of colorectal cancer.

  1. Microbial and viral pathogens in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Collins, Danielle

    2012-02-01

    The heterogenetic and sporadic nature of colorectal cancer has led to many epidemiological associations with causes of this disease. As our understanding of the underlying molecular processes in colorectal-cancer develops, the concept of microbial-epithelial interactions as an oncogenic trigger might provide a plausible hypothesis for the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. By contrast with other cancers of the gastrointestinal tract (gastric carcinoma, mucosa-associated lymphoid-tissue lymphoma), a direct causal link between microbial infection (bacteria and viruses) and colorectal carcinoma has not been established. Studies support the involvement of these organisms in oncogenesis, however, in colorectal cancer, clinical data are lacking. Here, we discuss current evidence (both in vitro and clinical studies), and focus on a putative role for bacterial and viral pathogens as a cause of colorectal cancer.

  2. Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingeholm P

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Peter Ingeholm,1,2 Ismail Gögenur,1,3 Lene H Iversen1,4 1Danish Colorectal Cancer Group Database, Copenhagen, 2Department of Pathology, Herlev University Hospital, Herlev, 3Department of Surgery, Roskilde University Hospital, Roskilde, 4Department of Surgery P, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus C, Denmark Aim of database: The aim of the database, which has existed for registration of all patients with colorectal cancer in Denmark since 2001, is to improve the prognosis for this patient group. Study population: All Danish patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer who are either diagnosed or treated in a surgical department of a public Danish hospital. Main variables: The database comprises an array of surgical, radiological, oncological, and pathological variables. The surgeons record data such as diagnostics performed, including type and results of radiological examinations, lifestyle factors, comorbidity and performance, treatment including the surgical procedure, urgency of surgery, and intra- and postoperative complications within 30 days after surgery. The pathologists record data such as tumor type, number of lymph nodes and metastatic lymph nodes, surgical margin status, and other pathological risk factors. Descriptive data: The database has had >95% completeness in including patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma with >54,000 patients registered so far with approximately one-third rectal cancers and two-third colon cancers and an overrepresentation of men among rectal cancer patients. The stage distribution has been more or less constant until 2014 with a tendency toward a lower rate of stage IV and higher rate of stage I after introduction of the national screening program in 2014. The 30-day mortality rate after elective surgery has been reduced from >7% in 2001–2003 to <2% since 2013. Conclusion: The database is a national population-based clinical database with high patient and data completeness for the perioperative period

  3. Optimizing Outcomes of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.G.S. Meester (Reinier)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractColorectal cancer screening is a leading cause of cancer deaths. Screening for colorectal cancer is implemented in an increasing number of settings, but performance of programs is often suboptimal. In this thesis, advanced modeling, informed by empirical data, was used to identify ar

  4. Red meat and colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuri Faruk Aykan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer in men and the second in women worldwide. More than half of cases occur in more developed countries. The consumption of red meat (beef, pork, lamb, veal, mutton is high in developed countries and accumulated evidence until today demonstrated a convincing association between the intake of red meat and especially processed meat and CRC risk. In this review, meta-analyses of prospective epidemiological studies addressed to this association, observed link of some subtypes of red meat with CRC risk, potential carcinogenic compounds, their mechanisms and actual recommendations of international guidelines are presented.

  5. Molecular Diagnostic Applications in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Huth

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer, a clinically diverse disease, is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Application of novel molecular diagnostic tests, which are summarized in this article, may lead to an improved survival of colorectal cancer patients.  Distinction of these applications is based on the different molecular principles found in colorectal cancer (CRC. Strategies for molecular analysis of single genes (as KRAS or TP53 as well as microarray based techniques are discussed. Moreover, in addition to the fecal occult blood testing (FOBT and colonoscopy some novel assays offer approaches for early detection of colorectal cancer like the multitarget stool DNA test or the blood-based Septin 9 DNA methylation test. Liquid biopsy analysis may also exhibit great diagnostic potential in CRC for monitoring developing resistance to treatment. These new diagnostic tools and the definition of molecular biomarkers in CRC will improve early detection and targeted therapy of colorectal cancer.

  6. Gene expression in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtroder, Karin; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Olesen, Sanne Harder

    2002-01-01

    Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each p...... with a high frequency of loss of heterozygosity. The genes and ESTs presented in this study encode new potential tumor markers as well as potential novel therapeutic targets for prevention or therapy of CRC.......Understanding molecular alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) is needed to define new biomarkers and treatment targets. We used oligonucleotide microarrays to monitor gene expression of about 6,800 known genes and 35,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) on five pools (four to six samples in each...... pool) of total RNA from left-sided sporadic colorectal carcinomas. We compared normal tissue to carcinoma tissue from Dukes' stages A-D (noninvasive to distant metastasis) and identified 908 known genes and 4,155 ESTs that changed remarkably from normal to tumor tissue. Based on intensive filtering 226...

  7. Cancer immunology and colorectal cancer recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, Luca

    2011-06-01

    The recurrence of a cancer - local or distant (metastasis) - is manifested by the persistence of cancer cells in the organism after the ablation of the primary lesion, an ineffective anticancer immune response, and by the activity of biological/immunological factors that can stimulate and sustain its development. This review focuses on colorectal carcinoma and discusses some aspects of cancer immunology regarding cancer development and its recurrence. It is addressed also to the clinician to provide new insights helpful for designing better therapeutic strategies and patient's follow up. Therapeutic approaches used during and after surgical treatments, found capable of modulating immunity (differently affecting disease outcome), will also be described.

  8. Diet and colorectal cancer risk and survival

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkels, R.M.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.; Heine-Bröring, R.C.; Kampman, E.

    2013-01-01

    Unhealthy dietary and other lifestyle factors account for 20–45% of all colorectal cancer cases. Being overweight or obese, having a high intake of red and processed meat and alcohol increase the risk of colorectal cancer, while a high intake of dairy products, fruits and vegetables, foods containin

  9. Indeterminate Pulmonary Nodules at Colorectal Cancer Staging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer A; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of indeterminate pulmonary nodules and specific radiological and clinical characteristics that predict malignancy of these at initial staging chest computed tomography (CT) in patients with colorectal cancer. A considerable number of indeterminate...... pulmonary nodules, which cannot readily be classified as either benign or malignant, are detected at initial staging chest CT in colorectal cancer patients....

  10. Center for Herbal Research on Colorectal Cancer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Research Area: Herbs Program:Centers of Excellence for Research on CAM Description:Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer and the third leading cause of...

  11. Knowledge of colorectal cancer among older persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrich, S P; Weinrich, M C; Boyd, M D; Johnson, E; Frank-Stromborg, M

    1992-10-01

    Cancer screening is a national health priority, especially for colorectal cancer, the second leading cause of death due to cancer in the United States. The researchers measured colorectal cancer knowledge among 211 older Americans. A quasiexperimental pretest-posttest two-by-two factorial design was used to test the effect of knowledge on participation in fecal occult blood screening. The American Cancer Society's colorectal cancer educational slide-tape presentation served as the basis for all of the educational programs. Hemoccult II kits were distributed at no cost to the participants. Descriptive statistics, chi 2, and logistic regressions were used to analyze data. One-half of the participants had incomes below the poverty level. Almost one-half the subjects in the study sample stated that they had not received any information about colorectal cancer within the past year. Caucasians had more knowledge of colorectal cancer than African Americans [F(1, 78) = 7.92, p < 0.01] and persons with higher income had more knowledge than persons with less income [F(2, 76) = 3.01, p = 0.05]. Subjects showed significant increases in colorectal cancer knowledge 6 days after the colorectal cancer education program [t(79) = 2.59, p = 0.01] and this increased knowledge was a predictor of participation in free fecal occult blood screening [chi 2(1, n = 164) = 5.34, p = 0.02].

  12. New registry: National Cancer Patient Registry--Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendy, L; Radzi, M

    2008-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is emerging as one of the commonest cancers in Malaysia. Data on colorectal cancer from the National Cancer Registry is very limited. Comprehensive information on all aspects of colorectal cancer, including demographic details, pathology and treatment outcome are needed as the management of colorectal cancer has evolved rapidly over the years involving several disciplines including gastroenterology, surgery, radiology, pathology and oncology. This registry will be an important source of information that can help the development of guidelines to improve colorectal cancer care relevant to this country. The database will initially recruit all colorectal cancer cases from eight hospitals. The data will be stored on a customized web-based case report form. The database has begun collecting data from 1 October 2007 and will report on its first year findings at the end of 2008.

  13. Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... screening tests have different risks or harms. Screening tests may cause anxiety when you are thinking about or getting ready ... is cancer when there really isn't) can cause anxiety and is usually followed by more tests (such as biopsy ), which also have risks. The ...

  14. Clinical management of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasen, Hans F A; Tomlinson, Ian; Castells, Antoni

    2015-02-01

    Hereditary factors are involved in the development of a substantial proportion of all cases of colorectal cancer. Inherited forms of colorectal cancer are usually subdivided into polyposis syndromes characterized by the development of multiple colorectal polyps and nonpolyposis syndromes characterized by the development of few or no polyps. Timely identification of hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes is vital because patient participation in early detection programmes prevents premature death due to cancer. Polyposis syndromes are fairly easy to recognize, but some patients might have characteristics that overlap with other clinically defined syndromes. Comprehensive analysis of the genes known to be associated with polyposis syndromes helps to establish the final diagnosis in these patients. Recognizing Lynch syndrome is more difficult than other polyposis syndromes owing to the absence of pathognomonic features. Most investigators therefore recommend performing systematic molecular analysis of all newly diagnosed colorectal cancer using immunohistochemical methods. The implementation in clinical practice of new high-throughput methods for molecular analysis might further increase the identification of individuals at risk of hereditary colorectal cancer. This Review describes the clinical management of the various hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes and demonstrates the advantage of using a classification based on the underlying gene defects.

  15. Use of Bevacizumab in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zinser-Sierra, Juan W.; Rodríguez-Ramírez, Saúl; Villalobos-Valencia, Ricardo; Ramírez-Márquez, Marcelino

    2012-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide, and although associated mortality rates in South American countries are generally among the lowest in the world, they are on the rise. The prognosis of patients diagnosed with metastatic colorectal cancer has improved markedly over the last 12 years, increasing from 5 months with best supportive care to almost 2 years with combination chemotherapy plus bevacizumab. New prognostic and predictive biomarkers have been identified to g...

  16. Targeted nanoparticles for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cisterna, Bruno A.; Kamaly, Nazila; Choi, Won Il;

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is highly prevalent worldwide, and despite notable progress in treatment still leads to significant morbidity and mortality. The use of nanoparticles as a drug delivery system has become one of the most promising strategies for cancer therapy. Targeted nanoparticles could...... take advantage of differentially expressed molecules on the surface of tumor cells, providing effective release of cytotoxic drugs. Several efforts have recently reported the use of diverse molecules as ligands on the surface of nanoparticles to interact with the tumor cells, enabling the effective...... delivery of antitumor agents. Here, we present recent advances in targeted nanoparticles against CRC and discuss the promising use of ligands and cellular targets in potential strategies for the treatment of CRCs....

  17. Circadian clock circuitry in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Papa, Gennaro; Piepoli, Ada

    2014-04-21

    Colorectal cancer is the most prevalent among digestive system cancers. Carcinogenesis relies on disrupted control of cellular processes, such as metabolism, proliferation, DNA damage recognition and repair, and apoptosis. Cell, tissue, organ and body physiology is characterized by periodic fluctuations driven by biological clocks operating through the clock gene machinery. Dysfunction of molecular clockworks and cellular oscillators is involved in tumorigenesis, and altered expression of clock genes has been found in cancer patients. Epidemiological studies have shown that circadian disruption, that is, alteration of bodily temporal organization, is a cancer risk factor, and an increased incidence of colorectal neoplastic disease is reported in shift workers. In this review we describe the involvement of the circadian clock circuitry in colorectal carcinogenesis and the therapeutic strategies addressing temporal deregulation in colorectal cancer.

  18. Colorectal cancer, one entity or three

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng-ying LI; Mao-de LAI

    2009-01-01

    Understanding of the mechanism ofcolorectal carcinogenesis has been gaining momentum for some years on account of its high incidence and impact on the lives of individuals affected. Different genetic abnormalities have been found in colorectal cancers from different sites. For example, proximal colon cancer is usually related to the nucleotide instability pathway, as mi-crosatellite instability (MSI). However, distal colon cancer is usually associated with specific chromosomal instability (CIN). The development of cancer at the rectum, though similar to that at the colon, displays its own unique features. These differences might be partially attributed to different embryological development and physiological circumstances. Environmental factors such as diet and alcohol intake also differ in their role in the development of tumors in the three segments, proximal colon, distal colon, and rectum. "Proximal shift" of colon cancer has been known for some time, and survival rates of colorectal cancer are higher when rectal cancers are excluded, both of which emphasize the three different segments of colorectal cancer and their different proper-ties. Meanwhile, colonic and rectal cancers are distinctive therapeutic entities. The concept of three entities of colorectal cancer may be important in designing clinical trails or therapeutic strategies. However, the dispute about the inconsistency of data con-ceming the site-specific mechanism of colorectal carcinoma does exist, and more evidence about molecular events of carcino-genesis and targeted therapy needs to be collected to definitely confirm the conception.

  19. Peptide Vaccine Therapy in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Yu Yang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related deaths and the second most prevalent (after breast cancer in the western world. High metastatic relapse rates and severe side effects associated with the adjuvant treatment have urged oncologists and clinicians to find a novel, less toxic therapeutic strategy. Considering the limited success of the past clinical trials involving peptide vaccine therapy to treat colorectal cancer, it is necessary to revise our knowledge of the immune system and its potential use in tackling cancer. This review presents the efforts of the scientific community in the development of peptide vaccine therapy for colorectal cancer. We review recent clinical trials and the strategies for immunologic monitoring of responses to peptide vaccine therapy. We also discuss the mechanisms underlying the therapy and potential molecular targets in colon cancer.

  20. Continuous quality improvement of colorectal cancer screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mariusz; Madalinski

    2013-01-01

    Quality assurance is a key issue in colorectal cancer screening, because effective screening is able to improve primary prevention of the cancer. The quality measure may be described in terms:how well the screening test tells who truly has a disease (sensitivity) and who truly does not have a disease (specificity). This paper raises concerns about identification of the optimal screening test for colorectal cancer. Colonoscopy vs flexible sigmoidoscopy in colorectal cancer screening has been a source of ongoing debate. A multicentre randomised controlled trial comparing flexible sigmoidoscopy with usual care showed that flexible sigmoidoscopy screening is able to diminish the incidence of distal and proximal colorectal cancer, and also mortality related to the distal colorectal cancer. However, colonoscopy provides a more complete examination and remains the more sensitive exam than flexible sigmoidoscopy. Moreover, colonoscopy with polypectomy significantly reduces colorectal cancer incidence and colorectal cancer-related mortality in the general population. The article considers the relative merits of both methods and stresses an ethical aspect of patient’s involvement in decision-making. Patients should be informed not only about tests tolerability and risk of endoscopy complications, but also that different screening tests for bowel cancer have different strength to exclude colonic cancer and polyps. The authorities calculate effectiveness and costs of the screening tests, but patients may not be interested in statistics regarding flexible sigmoidoscopy screening and from an ethical point of view, they have the right to chose colonoscopy, which is able to exclude a cancer and precancerous lesions in the whole large bowel.

  1. Colorectal cancer: lifestyle and dietary factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Corrêa Lima

    Full Text Available Introduction: Colorectal cancer is the most common tumor in the developed countries, and the number of new cases annualy is aproximately equal for men and women. Several environmental factors can interact in all steps of carcinogenesis. Lately the balance between genetic predisposition and these factors, including nutritional components and lifestyle behaviors, determines individual susceptibility to develop colorectal cancer. The aim of this study is to revise the references about lifestyle include diet, physical exercise, tobacco smoking and use of alcohol, and the risk of colorectal cancer in databases published during 1994-2004. Dietary factors: According to the reports high intake of red meat, and particularly of processed meat and positive energetic balance (high intake of total fat and carbohydrate was associated with a moderate but significant increase in colorectal cancer risk. Convincing preventive factors include increase consumption of a wide variety of fruit and vegetable, particularly, dark-green leafy, cruciferous, a deep-yellow on tones, and fibre. Lifestyle: Physical activity as a means for the primary prevention of colorectal cancer. There is a probable synergic effect among physical inactivity, high energy intake and obesity and incidence of colorectal cancer. A growing body of evidence supports that avoidance overweight and the use of tobacco and alcohol is recommended to prevent colorectal cancer. Conclusion: Current data suggest that lifestyle modification including proper diet such as the ones rich in vegetable and poor in red meat and fat, regular physical activity and maintaining an appropriate body weight and avoiding the use of tobacco and alcohol may lead to reduce colorectal cancer risk.

  2. Atrial fibrillation and survival in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Timothy A

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survival in colorectal cancer may correlate with the degree of systemic inflammatory response to the tumour. Atrial fibrillation may be regarded as an inflammatory complication. We aimed to determine if atrial fibrillation is a prognostic factor in colorectal cancer. Patients and methods A prospective colorectal cancer patient database was cross-referenced with the hospital clinical-coding database to identify patients who had underwent colorectal cancer surgery and were in atrial fibrillation pre- or postoperatively. Results A total of 175 patients underwent surgery for colorectal cancer over a two-year period. Of these, 13 patients had atrial fibrillation pre- or postoperatively. Atrial fibrillation correlated with worse two-year survival (p = 0.04; log-rank test. However, in a Cox regression analysis, atrial fibrillation was not significantly associated with survival. Conclusion The presence or development of atrial fibrillation in patients undergoing surgery for colorectal cancer is associated with worse overall survival, however it was not found to be an independent factor in multivariate analysis.

  3. Gynecologic screening in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijcken, FEM; Mourits, MJE; Kleibeuker, JH; Hollema, H; van der Zee, AGJ

    2003-01-01

    Objective. In hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), women with a mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutation have a cumulative lifetime risk of 25-50% for endometrial cancer and 8-12% for ovarian cancer. Therefore, female members of HNPCC families are offered an annual gynecologic and transvagi

  4. Genetics of Colorectal Cancer (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of colorectal cancer, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about screening for colorectal cancer and research aimed at prevention of this disease. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing and counseling of individuals who may have hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome are also discussed.

  5. Colorectal Cancer - What You Need to Know

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-07-05

    This podcast is based on the July, 2011 CDC Vital Signs report. Colorectal cancer kills about 50,000 men and women every year. Screening can save lives! Screening can find abnormal growths so they can be removed before turning into cancer, and can find the cancer early, when it's easiest to treat. If you're over 50, talk to your doctor about getting screened for colorectal cancer.  Created: 7/5/2011 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/5/2011.

  6. Novel translational strategies in colorectal cancer research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Defining translational research is still a complex task. In oncology, translational research implies using our basic knowledge learnt from in vitro and in vivo experiments to directly improve diagnostic tools and therapeutic approaches in cancer patients. Moreover, the better understanding of human cancer and its use to design more reliable tumor models and more accurate experimental systems also has to be considered a good example of translational research. The identification and characterization of new molecular markers and the discovery of novel targeted therapies are two main goals in colorectal cancer translational research. However, the straightforward translation of basic research findings, specifically into colorectal cancer treatment and vice versa is still underway. In the present paper, a summarized view of some of the new available approaches on colorectal cancer translational research is provided. Pros and cons are discussed for every approach exposed.

  7. CRCHD Launches National Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Screening Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    The NCI CRCHD launches National Screen to Save Colorectal Cancer Outreach and Screening Initiative which aims to increase colorectal cancer screening rates among racially and ethnically diverse and rural communities.

  8. Dietary folate and APC mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, S. de; Engeland, M. van; Lüchtenborg, M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Weijenberg, M.P.

    2006-01-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with colorectal cancer risk and may be involved in colorectal carcinogenesis through increased chromosome instability, gene mutations, and aberrant DNA methylation. Within the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer, we investigated the associations between

  9. Epigenetics and Colorectal Cancer Pathogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardhan, Kankana; Liu, Kebin, E-mail: Kliu@gru.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Medical College of Georgia, and Cancer Center, Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA 30912 (United States)

    2013-06-05

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) develops through a multistage process that results from the progressive accumulation of genetic mutations, and frequently as a result of mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway. However, it has become evident over the past two decades that epigenetic alterations of the chromatin, particularly the chromatin components in the promoter regions of tumor suppressors and oncogenes, play key roles in CRC pathogenesis. Epigenetic regulation is organized at multiple levels, involving primarily DNA methylation and selective histone modifications in cancer cells. Assessment of the CRC epigenome has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and that the average CRC methylome has thousands of abnormally methylated genes. Although relatively less is known about the patterns of specific histone modifications in CRC, selective histone modifications and resultant chromatin conformation have been shown to act, in concert with DNA methylation, to regulate gene expression to mediate CRC pathogenesis. Moreover, it is now clear that not only DNA methylation but also histone modifications are reversible processes. The increased understanding of epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the context of CRC pathogenesis has led to development of epigenetic biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and epigenetic drugs for CRC therapy.

  10. Molecular pathogenesis ofsporadic colorectal cancers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HidetsuguYamagishi; HajimeKuroda; YasuoImai; HideyukiHiraishi

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) results from the progressive accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations that lead to the transformation of normal colonic mucosa to adenocarcinoma. Approximately 75% of CRCs are sporadic and occur in people without genetic predisposition or family history of CRC. During the past two decades, sporadic CRCs were classiifed into three major groups according to frequently altered/mutated genes. These genes have been identiifed by linkage analyses of cancer-prone families and by individual mutation analyses of candidate genes selected on the basis of functional data. In the ifrst half of this review, we describe the genetic pathways of sporadic CRCs and their clinicopathologic features. Recently, large-scale genome analyses have detected many infrequently mutated genes as well as a small number of frequently mutated genes. These infrequently mutated genes are likely described in a lim-ited number of pathways. Gene-oriented models of CRC progression are being replaced by pathway-oriented models. In the second half of this review, we summarize the present knowledge of this research ifeld and discuss its prospects.

  11. CISNet Project’s Water Quality Monitoring Database for North Inlet and ACE Basin Estuaries, South Carolina: 1999-2001.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Baruch Institute for Marine and Coastal Sciences, Univ of South Carolina — EPA/NOAA/NASA CISNet Partnership The Coastal Intensive Site Network (CISNet) was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Oceanic and...

  12. Rak debelega črevesa in danke: Colorectal cancer:

    OpenAIRE

    Potrč, Stojan; Krebs, Bojan

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common malignancy in Europe and also the second most common cause of cancer death. In Slovenia, the incidence of colorectal cancer is high and is still increasing. The survival rate of our patients operated for colorectal cancer is improving and slowly approaches the survival rate of patients operated on the western world. There is still a problem of late diagnosis, usually when the disease is already disseminated. The approach to the treatment of colorect...

  13. [Colorectal cancer (CCR): genetic and molecular alterations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Vázquez, Clara Ibet; Rosales-Reynoso, Mónica Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present a genetic and molecular overview of colorectal carcinogenesis (sporadic and hereditary origin) as a multistage process, where there are a number of molecular mechanisms associated with the development of colorectal cancer and genomic instability that allows the accumulation of mutations in proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, chromosomal instability, and methylation and microsatellite instability, and the involvement of altered expression of microRNAs' prognosis factors.

  14. Tissue Specific Promoters in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. R. Rama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal carcinoma is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. In the most advanced stages, the use of chemotherapy induces a poor response and is usually accompanied by other tissue damage. Significant progress based on suicide gene therapy has demonstrated that it may potentiate the classical cytotoxic effects in colorectal cancer. The inconvenience still rests with the targeting and the specificity efficiency. The main target of gene therapy is to achieve an effective vehicle to hand over therapeutic genes safely into specific cells. One possibility is the use of tumor-specific promoters overexpressed in cancers. They could induce a specific expression of therapeutic genes in a given tumor, increasing their localized activity. Several promoters have been assayed into direct suicide genes to cancer cells. This review discusses the current status of specific tumor-promoters and their great potential in colorectal carcinoma treatment.

  15. Ziv-aflibercept in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel A

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Anuj Patel, Weijing Sun Division of Hematology-Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: The combination of cytotoxic chemotherapy and antiangiogenic agents has become a conventional treatment option for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Ziv-aflibercept is a fusion protein which acts as a decoy receptor for vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF-A, VEGF-B, and placental growth factor (PlGF; it was approved in combination with 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, and irinotecan (FOLFIRI for the treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer that is resistant to or has progressed after an oxaliplatin-containing fluoropyrimidine-based regimen. Herein we review the role of tumor angiogenesis as the rationale for antiangiogenic therapy, the clinical data associated with ziv-aflibercept, and its current role as a treatment option compared to other antiangiogenic agents, such as bevacizumab and regorafenib. Keywords: aflibercept, angiogenesis, colorectal cancer

  16. Updates in colorectal cancer stem cell research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Jie Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the world most common malignant tumors, also is the main disease, which cause tumor-associated death. Surgery and chemotherapy are the most used treatment of CRC. Recent research reported that, cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered as the origin of tumor genesis, development, metastasis and recurrence in theory. At present, it has been proved that, CSCs existed in many tumors including CRC. In this review, we summary the identification of CSCs according to the cell surface markers, and the development of drugs that target colorectal cancer stem cells.

  17. Colorectal Cancer Screening: A Guide to the Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas K Rex

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The two most recent guidelines for colorectal cancer screening are those of the Agency for Healthcare Policy and Research, and the American Cancer Society. The guidelines are similar in many regards and reflect current literature, consensus opinion and compromise between members of multidisciplinary panels. The emphasis of both guidelines is to increase the options available for colorectal cancer screening. Increasing choice should expand the attractiveness of colorectal cancer screening to more patients and physicians, and the development of guidelines should help compel payers to provide reimbursement for colorectal cancer screening. These guidelines are summarized and evaluated as they pertain to colorectal cancer screening.

  18. PIK3CA in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gieri eCathomas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available PIK3CA, the catalytic subunit of PI3K, is mutated in many different tumours, including colorectal cancer. Mutations of PIK3CA have been reported in 10 – 20% of colorectal cancer, about 80% of mutations found in two hot spots in exon 9 and exon 20. In RAS wild-type colorectal cancers, PIK3CA mutations have been associated with a worse clinical outcome and with a negative prediction of a response to targeted therapy by anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies. However, these findings have not been confirmed in all studies and subsequent more detailed analysis has revealed that these effects may be restricted to mutations in Exon 20. Finally, mutations in PIK3CA may be the long sought biomarker for successful adjuvant therapy with aspirin in patients with colorectal cancer. Therefore, PIK3CA mutations appear to be a promising predictive biomarker; however, further data are needed to conclusively define the impact of somatic mutations in the PIK3CA gene for the management of patients with colorectal cancer.

  19. Cruciferous vegetables and colo-rectal cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Lynn, Anthony; Collins, Andrew; Fuller, Zoë; Hillman, Kevin; Ratcliffe, Brian

    2006-01-01

    KEYWORDS - CLASSIFICATION: administration & dosage;Anticarcinogenic Agents;Apoptosis;Brassicaceae;chemically induced;chemistry;Cell Division;Colorectal Neoplasms;drug effects;dietary modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers;Evaluation;Food Handling;Glucosinolates;Glycoside Hydrolases;Humans;Hydrolases;Isothiocyanates;metabolism;methods;pharmacology;prevention & control;Research. Cruciferous vegetables have been studied extensively for their chemoprotective effects. Although they contain ma...

  20. Relationship between intestinal microbiota and colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gokhan; Cipe; Ufuk; Oguz; Idiz; Deniz; Firat; Huseyin; Bektasoglu

    2015-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal tract hosts a complexand vast microbial community with up to 1011-1012 microorganisms colonizing the colon. The gut microbiota has a serious effect on homeostasis and pathogenesis through a number of mechanisms. In recent years, the relationship between the intestinal microbiota and sporadic colorectal cancer has attracted much scientific interest. Mechanisms underlying colonic carcinogenesis include the conversion of procarcinogenic diet-related factors to carcinogens and the stimulation of procarcinogenic signaling pathways in luminal epithelial cells. Understanding each of these mechanisms will facilitate future studies, leading to the development of novel strategies for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of colorectal cancer. In this review, we discuss the relationship between colorectal cancer and the intestinal microbiota.

  1. Mini-invasive surgery for colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Gen Zeng; Zhi-Xiang Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic techniques have been extensively used for the surgical management of colorectal cancer during the last two decades. Accumulating data have demonstrated that laparoscopic colectomy is associated with better short-term outcomes and equivalent oncologic outcomes when compared with open surgery. However, some controversies regarding the oncologic quality of mini-invasive surgery for rectal cancer exist. Meanwhile, some progresses in colorectal surgery, such as robotic technology, single-incision laparoscopic surgery, natural orifice specimen extraction, and natural orifice transluminal endoscopic surgery, have been made in recent years. In this article, we review the published data and mainly focus on the current status and latest advances of mini-invasive surgery for colorectal cancer.

  2. MicroRNA regulation network in colorectal cancer metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiao-Jiao; Zhou; Shu; Zheng; Li-Feng; Sun; Lei; Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide. Metastasis is a major cause of colorectal cancer-related death. Mechanisms of metastasis remain largely obscure. MicroRNA is one of the most important epigenetic regulators by targeting mRNAs posttranscriptionally. Accumulated evidence has supported its significant role in the metastasis of colorectal cancer, including epithelial-mesenchymal transition and angiogenesis. Dissecting microRNAome potentially identifies specific microRNAs as biomarkers of colorectal cancer metastasis. Better understanding of the complex network of microRNAs in colorectal cancer metastasis provide new insights in the biological process of metastasis and in the potential targets for colorectal cancer therapies and for diagnosis of recurrent and metastatic colorectal cancer.

  3. Korean Guidelines for Colorectal Cancer Screening and Polyp Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bo In [The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sung Pil [Yensei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Eun [Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-15

    Colorectal cancer is currently the second most common cancer among Korean males and the fourth most common among females. Since the majority of colorectal cancer case present following the prolonged transformation of adenomas into carcinomas, early detection and removal of colorectal adenomas are vital methods in its prevention. Considering the increasing incidence of colorectal cancer and polyps in Korea, it is very important to establish national guidelines for colorectal cancer screening and polyp detection. The proposed guidelines have been developed by the Korean Multi-Society Task Force using evidence-based methods. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses have been used to form the statements contained in the guidelines. This paper discusses the epidemiology of colorectal cancers and adenomas in Korea as well as optimal methods for screening of colorectal cancer and detection of adenomas including fecal occult blood tests, radiologic tests, and endoscopic examinations.

  4. Oxaliplatin-induced neuropathy in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zedan, Ahmed; Hansen, Torben Frøstrup; Fex Svenningsen, Åsa

    2014-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a chemotherapeutic agent effective against advanced colorectal cancer. Unlike with other platinum-based agents, the main side effect of oxaliplatin is polyneuropathy. Oxaliplatin-induced polyneuropathy (OIPN) has a unique profile, which can be divided into acute and chronic...

  5. Metalloproteinases and their regulators in colorectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagt, M.F.P. van der; Wobbes, T.; Strobbe, L.J.; Sweep, F.C.; Span, P.N.

    2010-01-01

    Metalloproteinases (MPs) such as the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and adamalysins (ADAMs and ADAMTS) are expressed in various stages of colorectal cancer (CRC), and some correlate with survival and prognosis. The MPs are regulated by various factors including EMMPRIN, TIMPs, and RECK. In additio

  6. Why I Got Tested for Colorectal Cancer

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-02-29

    CDC’s Dr. Lisa Richardson explains why she got tested for colorectal cancer when she turned 50 years old. .  Created: 2/29/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 2/29/2016.

  7. Colorectal cancer risk in Crohn's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2008-01-01

    There is recognized increased risk for colorectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, particularly in long-standing and extensive ulcerative colitis. There also appears to be an increased rate of intestinal cancer in Crohn's disease, including both colon and small bowel sites. In Crohn's disease, evidence suggests that detection of colorectal cancer may be delayed with a worse progno sis. Some risk factors for cancer in Crohn's disease include the extent of inflammatory change within the colon and the presence of bypassed or excluded segments, inclu ding rectal "stump" cancer. In addition, the risk for other types of intestinal neoplasms may be increased in Crohn's disease, including lymphoma and carcinoid tumors. Earlier detection of colorectal cancer based on colonoscopy scre ening and surveillance may be achieved but, to date, this has not translated into a positive survival benefit. Moreo ver, newer staining methods and evolving micro-endos copic techniques show promise, but have not significantly altered management. Future research should focus on development of molecular or other bio-markers that might predict future dysplasia or cancer development in Crohn's disease.

  8. Microbiota disbiosis is associated with colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Zhiguang; Guo, Bomin; Gao, Renyuan; Zhu, Qingchao; Qin, Huanlong

    2015-01-01

    The dysbiosis of the human intestinal microbiota is linked to sporadic colorectal carcinoma (CRC). The present study was designed to investigate the gut microbiota distribution features in CRC patients. We performed pyrosequencing based analysis of the 16S rRNA gene V3 region to investigate microbiota of the cancerous tissue and adjacent non-cancerous normal tissue in proximal and distal CRC samples. The results revealed that the microbial structures of the CRC patients and healthy individual...

  9. Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells and Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalano, Veronica [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Gaggianesi, Miriam [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Spina, Valentina; Iovino, Flora [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Dieli, Francesco [Departement of Biopathology and Medicine Biotechnologies, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Stassi, Giorgio, E-mail: giorgio.stassi@unipa.it [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy); Department of Cellular and Molecular Oncology, IRCCS Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Via Salvatore Maugeri, 27100 Pavia, PV (Italy); Todaro, Matilde [Department of Surgical and Oncological Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Liborio Giuffrè 5, 90127 Palermo, PA (Italy)

    2011-04-11

    Nowadays it is reported that, similarly to other solid tumors, colorectal cancer is sustained by a rare subset of cancer stem–like cells (CSCs), which survive conventional anticancer treatments, thanks to efficient mechanisms allowing escape from apoptosis, triggering tumor recurrence. To improve patient outcomes, conventional anticancer therapies have to be replaced with specific approaches targeting CSCs. In this review we provide strong support that BMP4 is an innovative therapeutic approach to prevent colon cancer growth increasing differentiation markers expression and apoptosis. Recent data suggest that in colorectal CSCs, protection from apoptosis is achieved by interleukin-4 (IL-4) autocrine production through upregulation of antiapoptotic mediators, including survivin. Consequently, IL-4 neutralization could deregulate survivin expression and localization inducing chemosensitivity of the colon CSCs pool.

  10. Distinct Gene Expression Signatures in Lynch Syndrome and Familial Colorectal Cancer Type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Veerla, Srinivas;

    2013-01-01

    Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects.......Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects....

  11. Colorectal cancer risk in hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Fábio Guilherme; Figueiredo, Marleny Novaes; Martinez, Carlos Augusto Real

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world, and approximately 5% of them develop in a context of inherited mutations leading to some form of familial colon cancer syndromes. Recognition and characterization of these patients have contributed to elucidate the genetic basis of CRC. Polyposis Syndromes may be categorized by the predominant histological structure found within the polyps. The aim of the present paper is to review the most important clinical features of the Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes, a rare group of genetic disorders formed by the peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenil polyposis syndrome and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome (Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalacaba and Cowden Syndromes). A literature search was performed in order to retrieve the most recent and important papers (articles, reviews, clinical cases and clinical guidelines) regarding the studied subject. We searched for terms such as “hamartomatous polyposis syndromes”, “Peutz-Jeghers syndrome”, “juvenile polyposis syndrome”, “juvenile polyp”, and “PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome” (Cowden syndrome, Bananyan-Riley-Ruvalcaba). The present article reports the wide spectrum of disease severity and extraintestinal manifestations, with a special focus on their potential to develop colorectal and other neoplasia. In the literature, the reported colorectal cancer risk for Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndromes are 39%-68%, 39%-57% and 18%, respectively. A review regarding cancer surveillance recommendations is also presented. PMID:25848489

  12. Treatment of colorectal cancer in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Monica; Millan; Sandra; Merino; Aleidis; Caro; Francesc; Feliu; Jordi; Escuder; Tani; Francesch

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer has a high incidence, and approxi-mately 60% of colorectal cancer patients are older than 70, with this incidence likely increasing in the near future. Elderly patients(> 70-75 years of age) are a very heterogeneous group, ranging from the very fit to the very frail. Traditionally, these patients have often been under-treated and recruited less frequently to clinical trials than younger patients, and thus are underrepresented in publications about cancer treatment. Recent studies suggest that fit elderly patients can be treated in the same way as their younger counterparts, but the treatment of frail patients with comorbidities is still a matter of controversy. Many factors should be taken into account, including fitness for treatment, the wishes of the patient and family, and quality of life. This review will focus on the existing evidence for surgical, oncologic, and palliative treatment in patients over 70 years old with colorectal cancer. Careful patient assessment is necessary in order to individualize treatment approach, and this should rely on a multidisciplinary process. More well-designed controlled trials are needed in this patient population.

  13. Colorectal (Colon) Cancer: What Are the Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Colorectal (Colon) Cancer Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... Risk Assessment Tool (National Cancer Institute) Learning About Colon Cancer Stay Informed Language: English Español (Spanish) File Formats ...

  14. Indeterminate Pulmonary Nodules in Colorectal-Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Jorgensen, Lars N; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer A

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The clinical significance of indeterminate pulmonary nodules (IPN) at staging computed tomography (CT) for colorectal cancer (CRC), and the optimal diagnostic approach, are debated. This study aimed to analyse variability in radiologists' detection of IPN at staging CT for CRC. METHODS......: All patients with CRC referred to our center between 2006 and 2011 were included. Primary staging CT scans were re-evaluated by an experienced thoracic radiologist whose findings were entered into a dedicated database and merged with data from the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group database, the National...... Patient Registry, the Danish Pathology Registry, and the primary CT evaluation. Inter-reader agreement was calculated by Kappa statistics, and associations between variables and malignancy of pulmonary nodules were analyzed with χ (2) and Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon tests. Multivariable logistic regression...

  15. Ranitidine as adjuvant treatment in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Hans Jørgen; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Moesgaard, F;

    2002-01-01

    by oral ranitidine 150 mg or placebo twice daily for 5 years. Adjuvant cytotoxic or radiation therapy was not given. An observer-blinded interim analysis performed after 40 months showed that there was no effect of ranitidine on overall survival, and the study was discontinued in accordance......BACKGROUND: Results from short-term studies of histamine type 2 (H2) receptor antagonists on survival of patients with solid tumours are debatable. In this study the efficacy of the H2-receptor antagonist ranitidine on long-term survival of patients with colorectal cancer was evaluated. METHODS...... curative resection of colorectal cancer and who do not receive perioperative blood transfusion and do not develop postoperative infectious complications....

  16. Six-Year Experience of a Nurse-Led Colorectal Cancer Follow-Up Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objectives. To review the experience of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in a tertiary referral colorectal cancer centre. Methodology. Data from the nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in our unit was prospectively maintained in a colorectal cancer database. Data was analysed from January 1, 2006 until the December 31, 2011. Results. 1125 patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and referred to our unit as a tertiary centre for specialised colorectal can...

  17. Improving colorectal cancer screening: fact and fantasy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dam, Jacques

    2008-02-01

    Premalignant diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, such as Barrett's esophagus, long-standing ulcerative colitis, and adenomatous polyps, have a significantly increased risk for development of adenocarcinoma, most often through an intermediate stage of dysplasia. Adenocarcinoma of the colon is the second most common cancer in the United States. Because patients with colorectal cancer often present with advanced disease, the outcomes are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Effective methods of early detection are essential. As non-polypoid dysplasia is not visible using conventional endoscopy, surveillance of patients with Barrett's esophagus and ulcerative colitis is performed via a system in which multiple random biopsies are obtained at prescribed intervals. Sampling error and missed diagnoses occur frequently and render current screening methods inadequate. Also, the examination of a tissue biopsy is time consuming and costly, and significant intra- and inter-observer variation may occur. The newer methods discussed herein demonstrate the potential to solve these problems by early detection of disease with high sensitivity and specificity. Conventional endoscopy is based on the observation of white light reflected off the tissue surface. Subtle changes in color and shadow reveal structural changes. New developments in optical imaging go beyond white light, exploiting other properties of light. Several promising methods will be discussed at this meeting and shall be briefly discussed below. However, few such imaging modalities have arrived at our clinical practice. Some much more practical methods to improve colorectal cancer screening are currently being evaluated for their clinical impact. These methods seek to overcome limitations other than those of detecting dysplasia not visible under white light endoscopy. The current standard practice of colorectal cancer screening utilizes colonoscopy, an uncomfortable, sometimes difficult medical

  18. APC and chromosome instability in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Cabrera

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is a common disease that can be sporadic or familial. An inactivated adenomatous polyposis coli (APC suppressor gene is found in over 80% of colorectal tumors, this being an early alteration in the development of adenomatous polyps. APC function is not only critical for tumor initiation and progression, and chromosome instability (CIN is another characteristic dependent at least partly on APC mutations.

  19. Metalloproteinases and their regulators in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Jagt, Michel F P; Wobbes, Theo; Strobbe, Luc J A; Sweep, Fred C G J; Span, Paul N

    2010-03-01

    Metalloproteinases (MPs) such as the matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and adamalysins (ADAMs and ADAMTS) are expressed in various stages of colorectal cancer (CRC), and some correlate with survival and prognosis. The MPs are regulated by various factors including EMMPRIN, TIMPs, and RECK. In addition, micro-RNAs are found to be relevant for both MP expression levels and CRC prognostication. Both MPs and their regulators could be potential targets for intervention and therapy in CRC.

  20. Immunotherapy and immunoescape in colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Immunotherapy encompasses a variety of interventions and techniques with the common goal of eliciting tumor cell destructive immune responses. Colorectal carcinoma often presents as metastatic disease that impedes curative surgery. Novel strategies such as active immunization with dendritic cells (DCs), gene transfer of cytokines into tumor cells or administration of immunostimulatory monoclonal antibodies (such as anti-CD137 or anti-CTLA-4) have been assessed in preclinical studies and are at an early clinical development stage. Importantly, there is accumulating evidence that chemotherapy and immunotherapy can be combined in the treatment of some cases with colorectal cancer, with synergistic potentiation as a result of antigens cross-presented by dendritic cells and/or elimination of competitor or suppressive T lymphocyte populations (regulatory T-cells). However, genetic and epigenetic unstable carcinoma cells frequently evolve mechanisms of immunoevasion that are the result of either loss of antigen presentation, or an active expression of immunosuppressive substances. Some of these actively immunosuppressive mechanisms are inducible by cytokines that signify the arrival of an effector immune response. For example, induction of 2, 3 indoleamine dioxygenase (IDO) by IFNy in colorectal carcinoma cells. Combinational and balanced strategies fostering antigen presentation, T-cell costimulation and interference with immune regulatory mechanisms will probably take the stage in translational research in the treatment of colorectal carcinoma.

  1. Expression of angiostatic factors in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Y; Oshika, Y; Fukushima, Y; Tokunaga, T; Hatanaka, H; Kijima, H; Yamazaki, H; Ueyama, Y; Tamaoki, N; Miura, S; Nakamura, M

    1999-12-01

    Angiogenesis plays an important role in growth and proliferation of cancer. Various angiogenic and angiostatic factors regulate angiogenesis. We examined expression of genes encoding various angiostatic factors: thrombospondin 1 (TSP1), thrombospondin 2 (TSP2), brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 1 (BAI1) and angiopoietin 2 (AGP2) in 62 colorectal cancers and 40 samples of extraneoplastic colon mucosa. The expression of the angiostatic factors TSP2 and AGP2 were significantly increased in the cancerous mucosa as compared to these in extraneoplastic mucosa (o2 test; p<0. 0001, and Fisher's exact test; p<0.0001), while the increase in TSP1 expression was not significant. BAI1 expression was slightly decreased in the cancer tissue. These results suggested that specific types of angiostatic factors might have protective roles against cancer cell proliferation via dormancy due to hyponutrition caused by decreased vascularity.

  2. Epigenetics in diagnosis of colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aga Syed Sameer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a third most common epithelial carcinoma. CRC is known to develop from the early precancerous lesion to full blown malignancy via definite phases due to cumulative mutations and aberrant methylation of number of genes. The use of serum biomarkers that is non-invasive to discriminate cancer patients from healthy persons will prove to be an important tool to improve the early diagnosis of CRC. This will serve as the boon to the clinical management of the disease.

  3. Towards a multiscale model of colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ingeborg MM van Leeuwen; Carina M Edwards; Mohammad Ilyas; Helen M Byrne

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the best characterised cancers, with extensive data documenting the sequential gene mutations that underlie its development.Complementary datasets are also being generated describing changes in protein and RNA expression,tumour biology and clinical outcome. Both the quantity and the variety of information are inexorably increasing and there is now an accompanying need to integrate these highly disparate datasets. In this article we aim to explain why we believe that mathematical modelling represents a natural tool or language with which to integrate these data and, in so doing, to provide insight into CRC.

  4. Aspirin Metabolomics in Colorectal Cancer Chemoprevention | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Substantial evidence supports the effectiveness of aspirin for cancer chemoprevention in addition to its well-established role in cardiovascular protection. In recent meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials in humans, daily aspirin use reduced incidence, metastasis and mortality from several common types of cancer, especially colorectal cancer. The mechanism(s) by which aspirin exerts an anticancer benefit is uncertain;numerous effects have been described involving both cyclooxygenase-dependent and -independent pathways. |

  5. [Gastrointestinal surgeons should master the adjuvant therapy of colorectal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jin; Chen, Pengju

    2015-10-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer is one of the main diseases of gastrointestinal surgeons. It is very important to master the adjuvant chemotherapy of colorectal cancer for gastrointestinal surgeons. In recent years, with the development of a number of clinical trials and the appearance of new drugs, fluorouracil combined with oxaliplatin had been established as the standard regimen of adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal cancer. In the current guidelines, stage III( colon cancer is the indication for adjuvant chemotherapy, while stage II( colon cancer should receive adjuvant chemotherapy is uncertain. Unlike colon cancer, adjuvant therapy of rectal cancer is not evidence-based. Especially, the indication and duration of adjuvant chemotherapy for rectal cancer after neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy remain controversial. Adjuvant therapy of colorectal cancer still needs further investigation.

  6. Correlation between expression and differentiation of endocan in colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zuo; Su-Mei Zhang; Ruo-Lei Hu; Hua-Qing Zhu; Qing Zhou; Shu-Yu Gui; Qiang Wu; Yuan Wang

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression frequency of endocan in colorectal cancer and analyze the relationship between endocan expression and clinical parameters and to study the role of endocan in colorectal carcinogenesis.METHODS: Expression of endocan in 72 tumor tissue samples of colorectal cancer as well as in 27 normal mucous membrane tissue samples was analyzed using in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry on tissue microarray, Western blot and reverse-transcript polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).RESULTS: The expression of endocan was higher in normal colon and rectum tissue samples than in cancerous tissue samples (mRNA = 92.6%, protein= 36%), and was lower in colorectal cancer tissuesamples (mRNA = 70.4%, protein = 36.1%). No correlation was found between staining intensity and clinical parameters such as sex, age, tumor size and TNM stage. However, the expression of endocan was positively correlated with the tissue differentiation in colorectal cancer.CONCLUSION: The expression of endocan is down-regulated in colorectal cancer and is positively correlated with the tissue differentiation in colorectal cancer, suggesting that the expression of endocan is associated with development and differentiation of colorectal cancer.

  7. Urinary nucleosides as biological markers for patients with colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Fang Zheng; Jun Yang; Xin-Jie Zhao; Bo Feng; Hong-Wei Kong; Ying-Jie Chen; Shen Lv; Min-Hua Zheng; Guo-Wang Xu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Fourteen urinary nucleosides, primary degradation products of tRNA, were evaluated to know the potential as biological markers for patients with colorectal cancer.METHODS: The concentrations of 14 kinds of urinary nucleosides from 52 patients with colorectal cancer, 10patients with intestinal villous adenoma and 60 healthy adults were determined by column switching high performance liquid chromatography method.RESULTS: The mean levels of 12 kinds of urinary nucleosides (except uridine and guanosine) in the patients with colorectal cancer were significantly higher than those in patients with intestinal villous adenoma or the healthy adults. Using the levels of 14 kinds of urinary nucleosides as the data vectors for principal component analysis, 71% (37/52) patients with colorectal cancer were correctly classified from healthy adults, in which the identification rate was much higher than that of CEA method (29%).Only 10% (1/10) of patients with intestinal villous adenoma were indistinguishable from patients with colorectal cancer. The levels of m1G, Pseu and m1A were positively related with tumor size and Duke's stages of colorectal cancer. When monitoring the changes in urinary nucleoside concentrations of patients with colorectal cancer associated with surgery, it was found that the overall correlations with clinical assessment were 84% (27/32)and 91% (10/11) in response group and progressive group, respectively.CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that urinary nucleosides determined by column switching high performance liquid chromatography method may be useful as biological markers for colorectal cancer.

  8. Workload and surgeon's specialty for outcome after colorectal cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archampong, David; Borowski, David; Wille-Jørgensen, Peer

    2012-01-01

    A large body of research has focused on investigating the effects of healthcare provider volume and specialization on patient outcomes including outcomes of colorectal cancer surgery. However there is conflicting evidence about the role of such healthcare provider characteristics in the management...... of colorectal cancer....

  9. Colorectal cancer screening awareness among physicians in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chatzimichalis Georgios

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data comparison between SEER and EUROCARE database provided evidence that colorectal cancer survival in USA is higher than in European countries. Since adjustment for stage at diagnosis markedly reduces the survival differences, a screening bias was hypothesized. Considering the important role of primary care in screening activities, the purpose of the study was to investigate the colorectal cancer screening awareness among Hellenic physicians. Methods 211 primary care physicians were surveyed by mean of a self-reported prescription-habits questionnaire. Both physicians' colorectal cancer screening behaviors and colorectal cancer screening recommendations during usual check-up visits were analyzed. Results Only 50% of physicians were found to recommend screening for colorectal cancer during usual check-up visits, and only 25% prescribed cost-effective procedures. The percentage of physicians recommending stool occult blood test and sigmoidoscopy was 24% and 4% respectively. Only 48% and 23% of physicians recognized a cancer screening value for stool occult blood test and sigmoidoscopy. Colorectal screening recommendations were statistically lower among physicians aged 30 or less (p = 0.012. No differences were found when gender, level and type of specialization were analyzed, even though specialists in general practice showed a trend for better prescription (p = 0.054. Conclusion Contemporary recommendations for colorectal cancer screening are not followed by implementation in primary care setting. Education on presymptomatic control and screening practice monitoring are required if primary care is to make a major impact on colorectal cancer mortality.

  10. Social inequality in breast, lung and colorectal cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Grethe; Mortensen, Laust Hvas; Andersen, Anne-Marie Nybo;

    2013-01-01

    To examine whether family factors shared by siblings explained the association between education and risk of lung, colorectal and breast cancer.......To examine whether family factors shared by siblings explained the association between education and risk of lung, colorectal and breast cancer....

  11. The Notch pathway in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, Kaitlyn E; George, Dennis C; Fender, Alexander W; Bertrand, Fred E; Sigounas, George

    2016-04-15

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. It is also the third most common cancer diagnosis among men, and the second most common cancer diagnosis among women. Globally, CRC can account for nearly 694,000 annual deaths. It is widely appreciated that CRC is the result of dysregulated cellular pathways that promote an inappropriate stem-cell-like phenotype, apoptotic resistance, unchecked proliferation and metastatic spread. While no single pathway is responsible for all of these attributes, an array of recent studies suggests a pivotal role for abnormal Notch-1 signaling in CRC, in part due to interconnectivity of Notch with other pathways. This review will summarize recent evidence for a role of Notch signaling in CRC, will consider interconnectivity between Notch and other pathways involved in CRC and will discuss the possible utility of targeting Notch as a CRC therapeutic.

  12. Colorectal Cancer & Molecular Mutations and Polymorphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aga Syed Sameer

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity, and is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. The incidence of CRC shows considerable variation among racially or ethnically defined populations in multiracial/ethnic countries. The tumorigenesis of CRC is either because of the chromosomal instability (CIN or microsatellite instability (MIN or involving various proto-oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes and also epigenetic changes in the DNA. In this review I have focused on the mutations and polymorphisms of various important genes of the CIN and MIN pathways which have been implicated in the development of CRC.

  13. Immune cell interplay in colorectal cancer prognosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Samuel; E; Norton; Kirsten; A; Ward-Hartstonge; Edward; S; Taylor; Roslyn; A; Kemp

    2015-01-01

    The immune response to colorectal cancer has proven to be a reliable measure of patient outcome in several studies. However, the complexity of the immune response in this disease is not well understood, par-ticularly the interactions between tumour-associated cells and cells of the innate and adaptive immune system. This review will discuss the relationship betweencancer associated fibroblasts and macrophages, as well as between macrophages and T cells, and demonstrate how each population may support or prevent tumour growth in a different immune environment.

  14. Colorectal cancer prognosis twenty years later

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luis; Bujanda; Cristina; Sarasqueta; Elisabeth; Hijona; Lander; Hijona; Angel; Cosme; Ines; Gil; Jose; Luis; Elorza; Jose; I; Asensio; Santiago; Larburu; José; M; Enríquez-Navascués; Rodrigo; Jover; Francesc; Balaguer; Xavier; Llor; Xavier; Bessa; Montserrat; Andreu; Artemio; Paya; Antoni; Castells; Gastrointestinal; Oncology; Group; of; the; Spanish; Gastroenterological; Association

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate changes in colorectal cancer(CRC) survival over the last 20 years.METHODS:We compared two groups of consecutive CRC patients that were prospectively recruited:Group Ⅰincluded 1990 patients diagnosed between 1980 and 1994.GroupⅡincluded 871 patients diagnosed in 2001.RESULTS:The average follow up time was 21 mo(1-229)for GroupⅠand 50 mo(1-73.4)for GroupⅡ.Overall median survival was significantly longer in Group Ⅱthan in GroupⅠ(73 mo vs 25 mo,P<0.001)and the difference was significant for all ...

  15. Cytogenetic findings in metastases from colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardi, G; Parada, L A; Bomme, L;

    1997-01-01

    Eighteen tumor samples from 11 patients with metastatic colorectal cancer were cytogenetically analyzed after short-term culturing. Of the 13 metastases examined, 11 were from lymph nodes, 1 from the peritoneum and 1 from the lung. In 5 of the 11 patients, matched samples from the primary tumor...... and lymph node metastases were analyzed. Cytogenetic similarities between the primary and secondary lesions were found in all 5 cases, indicating that many of the chromosomal aberrations presumably occurred before disease spreading took place. Compared with the primaries, the metastases appeared to exhibit...

  16. Development of a Federally Funded Demonstration Colorectal Cancer Screening Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Royalty, MS

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality among U.S. adults. In 2004, treatment costs for colorectal cancer were $8.4 billion.There is substantial evidence that colorectal cancer incidence and mortality are reduced with regular screening. The natural history of this disease is also well described: most colorectal cancers develop slowly from preexisting polyps. This slow development provides an opportunity to intervene with screening tests, which can either prevent colorectal cancer through the removal of polyps or detect it at an early stage. However, much less is known about how best to implement an effective colorectal cancer screening program. Screening rates are low, and uninsured persons, low-income persons, and persons who have not visited a physician within a year are least likely to be screened.Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC has 15 years of experience supporting the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program for the underserved population, a similar national program for colorectal cancer is not in place. To explore the feasibility of implementing a national program for the underserved U.S. population and to learn which settings and which program models are most viable and cost-effective, CDC began a 3-year colorectal cancer screening demonstration program in 2005.This article describes briefly this demonstration program and the process CDC used to design it and to select program sites. The multiple-methods evaluation now under way to assess the program’s feasibility and describe key outcomes is also detailed. Evaluation results will be used to inform future activities related to organized screening for colorectal cancer.

  17. Risks of Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... screening tests have different risks or harms. Screening tests may cause anxiety when you are thinking about or getting ready ... is cancer when there really isn't) can cause anxiety and is usually followed by more tests (such as biopsy ), which also have risks. The ...

  18. Dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Saito, Keisuke; Takami, Shinichiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers and a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Although systemic therapy is the standard care for patients with recurrent or metastatic CRC, the prognosis is extremely poor. The optimal sequence of therapy remains unknown. Therefore, alternative strategies, such as immunotherapy, are needed for patients with advanced CRC. This review summarizes evidence from dendritic cell-based cancer immunotherapy strategies that are currently in clinical trials. In addition, we discuss the possibility of antitumor immune responses through immunoinhibitory PD-1/PD-L1 pathway blockade in CRC patients.

  19. Expression of Obesity Hormone Leptin in Human Colorectal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-chun Cong; Xian-wei Dai; Ming-yang Shen; Jun-jiang Wang; Chun-sheng Chen; Hong Zhang; Lei Qiao

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The obesity hormone, leptin, has been found to participate in the development and proliferation of normal and malignant tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of leptin in human colorectal cancer.Methods: Serum leptin levels were measured via ABC-ELLSA in 30 colorectal cancers and 24 normal controls. Leptin concentration in colorectal cancer was analyzed in terms of selected clinicopathological features and some oncogenes.Results: The mean concentration of leptin was significantly higher for colorectal cancers(3.54±1.46 ng/ml) than normal controls(2.27±0.99 ng/ml), no gender difference was observed in this study. Leptin expression in poorly differentiated tumors was obviously lower than those in moderately and well differentiated tumors. There were no statistically significant correlations between leptin and the serum CEA and CA199 in colorectal cancers (P>0.05), and between leptin and the expressions of K-RAS, P53, APC, DCC genes in tumor tissues (P>0.05).Conclusion: Leptin is overexpressed in human colorectal cancer, which is related to the differentiation degrees of the tumor. There is no correlation between leptin expression and chages of oncogenes in colorectal cancers.

  20. Dietary flavonoid intake and risk of stomach and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hae Dong; Kim, Jeongseon

    2013-02-21

    Stomach and colorectal cancers are common cancers and leading causes of cancer deaths. Because the alimentary tract can interact directly with dietary components, stomach and colorectal cancer may be closely related to dietary intake. We systematically searched published literature written in English via PubMed by searching for terms related to stomach and colorectal cancer risk and dietary flavonoids up to June 30, 2012. Twenty-three studies out of 209 identified articles were finally selected for the analysis. Log point effect estimates and the corresponding standard errors were calculated using covariate-adjusted point effect estimates and 95%CIs from the selected studies. Total dietary flavonoid intake was not associated with a reduced risk of colorectal or stomach cancer [odds ratio (OR) (95%CI) = 1.00 (0.90-1.11) and 1.07 (0.70-1.61), respectively]. Among flavonoid subclasses, the intake of flavonols, flavan-3-ols, anthocyanidins, and proanthocyanidins showed a significant inverse association with colorectal cancer risk [OR (95%CI) = 0.71 (0.63-0.81), 0.88 (0.79-0.97), 0.68 (0.56-0.82), and 0.72 (0.61-0.85), respectively]. A significant association was found only between flavonols and stomach cancer risk based on a limited number of selected studies [OR (95%CI) = 0.68 (0.46-0.99)]. In the summary estimates from case-control studies, all flavonoid subclasses except flavones and flavanones were inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk, whereas neither total flavonoids nor any subclasses of flavonoids were associated with colorectal cancer risk in the summary estimates based on the cohort studies. The significant association between flavonoid subclasses and cancer risk might be closely related to bias derived from the case-control design. There was no clear evidence that dietary flavonoids are associated with reduced risk of stomach and colorectal cancer.

  1. KRAS mutation testing in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cong Tan; Xiang Du

    2012-01-01

    The KRAS oncogene is mutated in approximately 35%-45% of colorectal cancers,and KRAS mutational status testing has been highlighted in recent years.The most frequent mutations in this gene,point substitutions in codons 12 and 13,were validated as negative predictors of response to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor antibodies.Therefore,determining the KRAS mutational status of tumor samples has become an essential tool for managing patients with colorectal cancers.Currently,a variety of detection methods have been established to analyze the mutation status in the key regions of the KRAS gene; however,several challenges remain related to standardized and uniform testing,including the selection of tumor samples,tumor sample processing and optimal testing methods.Moreover,new testing strategies,in combination with the mutation analysis of BRAF,PIK3CA and loss of PTEN proposed by many researchers and pathologists,should be promoted.In addition,we recommend that microsatellite instability,a prognostic factor,be added to the abovementioned concomitant analysis.This review provides an overview of KRAS biology and the recent advances in KRAS mutation testing.This review also addresses other aspects of status testing for determining the appropriate treatment and offers insight into the potential drawbacks of mutational testing.

  2. Fecal Molecular Markers for Colorectal Cancer Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rani Kanthan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite multiple screening techniques, including colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, radiological imaging, and fecal occult blood testing, colorectal cancer remains a leading cause of death. As these techniques improve, their sensitivity to detect malignant lesions is increasing; however, detection of precursor lesions remains problematic and has generated a lack of general acceptance for their widespread usage. Early detection by an accurate, noninvasive, cost-effective, simple-to-use screening technique is central to decreasing the incidence and mortality of this disease. Recent advances in the development of molecular markers in faecal specimens are encouraging for its use as a screening tool. Genetic mutations and epigenetic alterations that result from the carcinogenetic process can be detected by coprocytobiology in the colonocytes exfoliated from the lesion into the fecal matter. These markers have shown promising sensitivity and specificity in the detection of both malignant and premalignant lesions and are gaining popularity as a noninvasive technique that is representative of the entire colon. In this paper, we summarize the genetic and epigenetic fecal molecular markers that have been identified as potential targets in the screening of colorectal cancer.

  3. Colorectal cancer risk in hamartomatous polyposissyndromes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fábio Guilherme Campos; Marleny Novaes Figueiredo; Carlos Augusto Real Martinez

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of morbidityand mortality around the world, and approximately 5%of them develop in a context of inherited mutationsleading to some form of familial colon cancer syndromes.Recognition and characterization of thesepatients have contributed to elucidate the genetic basisof CRC. Polyposis Syndromes may be categorized bythe predominant histological structure found within thepolyps. The aim of the present paper is to review themost important clinical features of the HamartomatousPolyposis Syndromes, a rare group of genetic disordersformed by the peutz-Jeghers syndrome, juvenil polyposissyndrome and PTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndrome(Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalacaba and Cowden Syndromes).A literature search was performed in order to retrievethe most recent and important papers (articles,reviews, clinical cases and clinical guidelines) regardingthe studied subject. We searched for terms such as"hamartomatous polyposis syndromes", "Peutz-Jegherssyndrome", "juvenile polyposis syndrome", "juvenilepolyp", and "PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome"(Cowden syndrome, Bananyan-Riley-Ruvalcaba). Thepresent article reports the wide spectrum of diseaseseverity and extraintestinal manifestations, with a specialfocus on their potential to develop colorectal and otherneoplasia. In the literature, the reported colorectalcancer risk for Juvenile Polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers andPTEN Hamartoma Tumor Syndromes are 39%-68%,39%-57% and 18%, respectively. A review regardingcancer surveillance recommendations is also presented.

  4. Probiotics, prebiotics and colorectal cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambalam, Padma; Raman, Maya; Purama, Ravi Kiran; Doble, Mukesh

    2016-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC), the third major cause of mortality among various cancer types in United States, has been increasing in developing countries due to varying diet and dietary habits and occupational hazards. Recent evidences showed that composition of gut microbiota could be associated with the development of CRC and other gut dysbiosis. Modulation of gut microbiota by probiotics and prebiotics, either alone or in combination could positively influence the cross-talk between immune system and microbiota, would be beneficial in preventing inflammation and CRC. In this review, role of probiotics and prebiotics in the prevention of CRC has been discussed. Various epidemiological and experimental studies, specifically gut microbiome research has effectively improved the understanding about the role of probiotics and microbial treatment as anticarcinogenic agents. A few human studies support the beneficial effect of probiotics and prebiotics; hence, comprehensive understanding is urgent to realize the clinical applications of probiotics and prebiotics in CRC prevention.

  5. Pulmonary nodules and metastases in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer (CRC) are subjected to a preoperative thoraco-abdominal CT scan to determine the cancer stage. This staging is of relevance with regard to treatment and prognosis. About 20% of the patients have distant metastatic spread at the time of diagnosis, i.......e. synchronous metastases. Most common are hepatic metastases followed by pulmonary involvement. The optimal staging modality for detecting synchronous pulmonary metastases is debated. It has been argued, that synchronous pulmonary metastases (SPCM) are rare in CRC and that the consequence of detecting SPCM...... is minimal. Furthermore, the current staging practice is complicated by a high number of incidental findings on the thoracic CT, so-called indeterminate pulmonary nodules (IPN). IPN can potentially represent SPCM. The purpose of this thesis was to estimate the prevalence, characteristics and clinical...

  6. Gene expression signatures for colorectal cancer microsatellite status and HNPCC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruhøffer, M; Jensen, J L; Laiho, P;

    2005-01-01

    The majority of microsatellite instable (MSI) colorectal cancers are sporadic, but a subset belongs to the syndrome hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). Microsatellite instability is caused by dysfunction of the mismatch repair (MMR) system that leads to a mutator phenotype, and MSI...... of 101 stage II and III colorectal cancers (34 MSI, 67 microsatellite stable (MSS)) using high-density oligonucleotide microarrays. From these data, we constructed a nine-gene signature capable of separating the mismatch repair proficient and deficient tumours. Subsequently, we demonstrated...

  7. Low Penetrance Alleles in Colorectal Cancer: the arachidonic acid pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L.E. Siezen

    2006-01-01

    textabstractIn summary, we can conclude that we have successfully identified low penetrance alleles in the PPAR., PLA2G2A and ALOX15 genes, conferring differential colorectal adenoma risk, and two such alleles in the PTGS2 gene, one of which is also involved in colorectal cancer risk. These resul

  8. Nuclear legumain activity in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mads H Haugen

    Full Text Available The cysteine protease legumain is involved in several biological and pathological processes, and the protease has been found over-expressed and associated with an invasive and metastatic phenotype in a number of solid tumors. Consequently, legumain has been proposed as a prognostic marker for certain cancers, and a potential therapeutic target. Nevertheless, details on how legumain advances malignant progression along with regulation of its proteolytic activity are unclear. In the present work, legumain expression was examined in colorectal cancer cell lines. Substantial differences in amounts of pro- and active legumain forms, along with distinct intracellular distribution patterns, were observed in HCT116 and SW620 cells and corresponding subcutaneous xenografts. Legumain is thought to be located and processed towards its active form primarily in the endo-lysosomes; however, the subcellular distribution remains largely unexplored. By analyzing subcellular fractions, a proteolytically active form of legumain was found in the nucleus of both cell lines, in addition to the canonical endo-lysosomal residency. In situ analyses of legumain expression and activity confirmed the endo-lysosomal and nuclear localizations in cultured cells and, importantly, also in sections from xenografts and biopsies from colorectal cancer patients. In the HCT116 and SW620 cell lines nuclear legumain was found to make up approximately 13% and 17% of the total legumain, respectively. In similarity with previous studies on nuclear variants of related cysteine proteases, legumain was shown to process histone H3.1. The discovery of nuclear localized legumain launches an entirely novel arena of legumain biology and functions in cancer.

  9. Meta analysis of risk factors for colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kun Chen; Jiong-Liang Qiu; Yang Zhang; Yu-Wan Zhao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the risk factors for colorectal cancer in China.METHODS: A meta-analysis of the risk factors of colorectal cancer was conducted for 14 case-control studies, and reviewed 14 reports within 13 years which included 5034cases and 5205 controls. Dersimonian and Laird random effective models were used to process the results.RESULTS: Meta analysis of the 14 studies demonstrated that proper physical activites and dietary fibers were protective factors (pooled OR<0.8), while fecal mucohemorrhage,chronic diarrhea and polyposis were highly associated with colorectal cancer (all pooled OR>4). The stratified results showed that different OR values of some factors were due to geographic factors or different resourses.CONCLUSION: Risks of colorectal cancer are significantly associated with the histories of intestinal diseases or relative symptoms, high lipid diet, emotional trauma and family history of cancers. The suitable physical activities and dietary fibers are protective factors.

  10. Primary prevention of colorectal cancer: lifestyle, nutrition, exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, María Elena

    2005-01-01

    The past two decades have provided a vast amount of literature related to the primary prevention of colorectal cancer. Large international variation in colorectal cancer incidence and mortality rates and the prominent increases in the incidence of colorectal cancer in groups that migrated from low- to high-incidence areas provided important evidence that lifestyle factors influence the development of this malignancy. Moreover, there is convincing evidence from epidemiological and experimental studies that dietary intake is an important etiological factor in colorectal neoplasia. Although the precise mechanisms have not been clarified, several lifestyle factors are likely to have a major impact on colorectal cancer development. Physical inactivity and to a lesser extent, excess body weight, are consistent risk factors for colon cancer. Exposure to tobacco products early in life is associated with a higher risk of developing colorectal neoplasia. Diet and nutritional factors are also clearly important. Diets high in red and processed meat increase risk. Excess alcohol consumption, probably in combination with a diet low in some micronutrients such as folate and methionine, appear to increase risk. There is also recent evidence supporting a protective effect of calcium and vitamin D in the etiology of colorectal neoplasia. The relationship between intake of dietary fiber and risk of colon cancer has been studied for three decades but the results are still inconclusive. However, some micronutrients or phytochemicals in fiber-rich foods may be important; folic acid is one such micronutrient that has been shown to protect against the development of colorectal neoplasia and is currently being studied in intervention trials of adenoma recurrence. The overwhelming evidence indicates that primary prevention of colon cancer is feasible. Continued focus on primary prevention of colorectal cancer, in combination with efforts aimed at screening and surveillance, will be vital in

  11. Apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target for colorectal cancer treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aman M Abraha; Ezra B Ketema

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of death from cancer among adults. The disease begins as a benign adenomatous polyp, which develops into an advanced adenoma with high-grade dysplasia and then progresses to an invasive cancer. Appropriate apoptotic signaling is fundamentally important to preserve a healthy balance between cell death and cell survival and in maintaining genome integrity. Evasion of apoptotic pathway has been established as a prominent hallmark of several cancers. During colorectal cancer development, the balance between the rates of cell growth and apoptosis that maintains intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis gets progressively disturbed. Evidences are increasingly available to support the hypothesis that failure of apoptosis may be an important factor in the evolution of colorectal cancer and its poor response to chemotherapy and radiation. The other reason for targeting apoptotic pathway in the treatment of cancer is based on the observation that this process is deregulated in cancer cells but not in normal cells. As a result, colorectal cancer therapies designed to stimulate apoptosis in target cells would play a critical role in controlling its development and progression. A better understanding of the apoptotic signaling pathways, and the mechanisms by which cancer cells evade apoptotic death might lead to effective therapeutic strategies to inhibit cancer cell proliferation with minimal toxicity and high responses to chemotherapy. In this review, we analyzed the current understanding and future promises of apoptotic pathways as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer treatment.

  12. Discrepancies between estimated and perceived risk of cancer among individuals with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, K; Nilbert, Mef; Soller, M;

    2007-01-01

    Communicating cancer risk and recommending adequate control programs is central for genetic counseling. Individuals affected by hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) are at about 80% life-time risk of colorectal cancer and for female carriers 40-60% risk of endometrial cancer and 10-1...

  13. Microsatellite instability and MLH1 promoter hypermethylation in colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaron Niv

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is caused by a series of genetic or epigenetic changes, and in the last decade there has been an increased awareness that there are multiple forms of colorectal cancer that develop through different pathways. Microsatellite instability is involved in the genesis of about 15% of sporadic colorectal cancers and most of hereditary nonpolyposis cancers. Tumors with a high frequency of microsatellite instability tend to be diploid, to possess a mucinous histology, and to have a surrounding lymphoid reaction. They are more prevalent in the proximal colon and have a fast pass from polyp to cancer. Nevertheless, they are associated with longer survival than stage-matched tumors with microsatellite stability. Resistance of colorectal cancers with a high frequency of microsatellite instability to 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is well established. Silencing the MLH1 gene expression by its promoter methylation stops the formation of MLH1 protein, and prevents the normal activation of the DMA repair gene. This is an important cause for genomic instability and cell proliferation to the point of colorectal cancer formation. Better knowledge of this process will have a huge impact on colorectal cancer management, prevention, treatment and prognosis.

  14. Microbiota disbiosis is associated with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiguang; Guo, Bomin; Gao, Renyuan; Zhu, Qingchao; Qin, Huanlong

    2015-01-01

    The dysbiosis of the human intestinal microbiota is linked to sporadic colorectal carcinoma (CRC). The present study was designed to investigate the gut microbiota distribution features in CRC patients. We performed pyrosequencing based analysis of the 16S rRNA gene V3 region to investigate microbiota of the cancerous tissue and adjacent non-cancerous normal tissue in proximal and distal CRC samples. The results revealed that the microbial structures of the CRC patients and healthy individuals differed significantly. Firmicutes and Fusobacteria were over-represented whereas Proteobacteria was under-represented in CRC patients. In addition, Lactococcus and Fusobacterium exhibited a relatively higher abundance while Pseudomonas and Escherichia-Shigella was reduced in cancerous tissues compared to adjacent non-cancerous tissues. Meanwhile, the overall microbial structures of proximal and distal colon cancerous tissues were similar; but certain potential pro-oncogenic pathogens were different. These results suggested that the mucosa-associated microbiota is dynamically associated with CRC, which may provide evidences for microbiota-associated diagnostic, prognostic, preventive, and therapeutic strategies for CRC.

  15. Eicosanoid pathway in colorectal cancer: Recent updates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncer, Sinem; Banerjee, Sreeparna

    2015-11-07

    Enzymatic metabolism of the 20C polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) arachidonic acid (AA) occurs via the cyclooxygenase (COX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) pathways, and leads to the production of various bioactive lipids termed eicosanoids. These eicosanoids have a variety of functions, including stimulation of homeostatic responses in the cardiovascular system, induction and resolution of inflammation, and modulation of immune responses against diseases associated with chronic inflammation, such as cancer. Because chronic inflammation is essential for the development of colorectal cancer (CRC), it is not surprising that many eicosanoids are implicated in CRC. Oftentimes, these autacoids work in an antagonistic and highly temporal manner in inflammation; therefore, inhibition of the pro-inflammatory COX-2 or 5-LOX enzymes may subsequently inhibit the formation of their essential products, or shunt substrates from one pathway to another, leading to undesirable side-effects. A better understanding of these different enzymes and their products is essential not only for understanding the importance of eicosanoids, but also for designing more effective drugs that solely target the inflammatory molecules found in both chronic inflammation and cancer. In this review, we have evaluated the cancer promoting and anti-cancer roles of different eicosanoids in CRC, and highlighted the most recent literature which describes how those molecules affect not only tumor tissue, but also the tumor microenvironment. Additionally, we have attempted to delineate the roles that eicosanoids with opposing functions play in neoplastic transformation in CRC through their effects on proliferation, apoptosis, motility, metastasis, and angiogenesis.

  16. Molecular Taxonomy and Tumourigenesis of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, S; Holyoake, D; Maughan, T S

    2016-02-01

    Over the last 5 years there has been a surge in interest in the molecular classification of colorectal cancer. The effect of molecular subtyping on current treatment decisions is limited to avoidance of adjuvant 5-fluorouracil chemotherapy in stage II microsatellite unstable-high disease and avoidance of epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted antibodies in extended RAS mutant tumours. The emergence of specific novel combination therapy for the BRAF-mutant cohort and of the microsatellite unstable-high cohort as a responsive group to immune checkpoint inhibition shows the growing importance of a clinically relevant molecular taxonomy. Clinical trials such as the Medical Research Council FOCUS4 trial using biomarkers to select patients for specific therapies are currently open and testing such approaches. The integration of mutation, gene expression and pathological analyses is refining our understanding of the biological subtypes within colorectal cancer. Sharing of data sets of parallel sequencing and gene expression of thousands of cancers among independent groups has allowed the description of disease subsets and the need for a validated consensus classification has become apparent. This biological understanding of the disease is a key step forward in developing a stratified approach to patient management. The discovery of stratifiers that predict a response to existing and emerging therapies will enable better use of these treatments. Improved scientific understanding of the biological characteristics of poorly responsive subgroups will facilitate the design of novel biologically rational combinations. Novel treatment regimens, including the combination of new drugs with radiation, and the discovery and validation of their associated predictive biomarkers will gradually lead to improved outcomes from therapy.

  17. Towards the human colorectal cancer microbiome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian R Marchesi

    Full Text Available Multiple factors drive the progression from healthy mucosa towards sporadic colorectal carcinomas and accumulating evidence associates intestinal bacteria with disease initiation and progression. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide a first high-resolution map of colonic dysbiosis that is associated with human colorectal cancer (CRC. To this purpose, the microbiomes colonizing colon tumor tissue and adjacent non-malignant mucosa were compared by deep rRNA sequencing. The results revealed striking differences in microbial colonization patterns between these two sites. Although inter-individual colonization in CRC patients was variable, tumors consistently formed a niche for Coriobacteria and other proposed probiotic bacterial species, while potentially pathogenic Enterobacteria were underrepresented in tumor tissue. As the intestinal microbiota is generally stable during adult life, these findings suggest that CRC-associated physiological and metabolic changes recruit tumor-foraging commensal-like bacteria. These microbes thus have an apparent competitive advantage in the tumor microenvironment and thereby seem to replace pathogenic bacteria that may be implicated in CRC etiology. This first glimpse of the CRC microbiome provides an important step towards full understanding of the dynamic interplay between intestinal microbial ecology and sporadic CRC, which may provide important leads towards novel microbiome-related diagnostic tools and therapeutic interventions.

  18. Colorectal Cancer "Methylator Phenotype": Fact or Artifact?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Anacleto

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been proposed that human colorectal tumors can be classified into two groups: one in which methylation is rare, and another with methylation of several loci associated with a "CpG island methylated phenotype (CIMP," characterized by preferential proximal location in the colon, but otherwise poorly defined. There is considerable overlap between this putative methylator phenotype and the well-known mutator phenotype associated with microsatellite instability (MSI. We have examined hypermethylation of the promoter region of five genes (DAPK, MGMT, hMLH1, p16INK4a, and p14ARF in 106 primary colorectal cancers. A graph depicting the frequency of methylated loci in the series of tumors showed a continuous, monotonically decreasing distribution quite different from the previously claimed discontinuity. We observed a significant association between the presence of three or more methylated loci and the proximal location of the tumors. However, if we remove from analysis the tumors with hMLH1 methylation or those with MSI, the significance vanishes, suggesting that the association between multiple methylations and proximal location was indirect due to the correlation with MSI. Thus, our data do not support the independent existence of the so-called methylator phenotype and suggest that it rather may represent a statistical artifact caused by confounding of associations.

  19. Primary prevention of colorectal cancer: are we closer to reality?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Qasim, Asghar

    2012-02-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. An early detection of colorectal cancer determines therapeutic outcomes, while primary prevention remains a challenge. Our aim was to review the dietary, geographical and genetic factors in the causation and their possible role in the primary prevention of colorectal cancer. Data from experimental and clinical studies and population screening programmes were analysed to determine the factors responsible for causation of colorectal cancer. The role of dietary constituents, including the consumption of fat, red meat, fibre content, alcohol consumption, and other lifestyle issues, including obesity, lack of exercise and geographical variations in cancer prevalence were reviewed. The role of genetic and lifestyle factors in causation of colorectal cancer is evident from the experimental, clinical and population-based studies. Dietary factors, including the consumption of fat, fibre, red meat and alcohol, seem to have a significant influence in this regard. The role of micronutrients, vitamins, calcium may be relevant but remain largely unclear. In conclusion, there is ample evidence favouring the role of various dietary and lifestyle factors in the aetiology of colorectal cancer. Modification of these factors is an attractive option, which is likely to help in the primary prevention and reduced disease burden.

  20. Alcohol consumption and distinct molecular pathways to colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongaerts, B.W.C.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Vogel, S. de; Brandt, P.A. van den; Goldbohm, R.A.; Weijenberg, M.P.

    2007-01-01

    High alcohol consumption is related to colorectal cancer (CRC). Our objective was to study associations between alcohol consumption and risk of CRC according to characteristics of aetiological pathways: the chromosomal instability (CIN) and the microsatellite instability (MIN) pathway. We classified

  1. Fecal DNA Screening in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Richter

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common type of cancer diagnosed in Canada, and is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in nonsmokers. Although CRC is considered to be 90% curable if detected early, the majority of patients present with advanced stage III or IV disease. An effective screening test may significantly decrease disease burden. The present paper examines the rationale and potential of fecal DNA testing as an alternative and adjunct to other CRC screening tests. The most efficacious fecal DNA test developed to date has a sensitivity and specificity of 87.5% and 82%, respectively. The approach has a higher positive predictive value than the currently used fecal occult blood test and offers a noninvasive option to patients. It is not reliant on the presence of bleeding, which may be intermittent or altogether absent. The test is now commercially available and is supported by a number of American insurers. Current challenges include cost reduction and demonstration of mortality benefit in a rigorous clinical trial. Despite current challenges, fecal DNA testing is worth pursuing. Both the American Gastroenterological Society and the American Cancer Society maintain that molecular testing is in its infancy but is promising. Fecal DNA testing has the potential to be an exciting addition to the current armament of CRC screening options.

  2. Prognostic and Predictive Roles of KRAS Mutation in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda K. Arrington

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The RAS gene family is among the most studied and best characterized of the known cancer-related genes. Of the three human ras isoforms, KRAS is the most frequently altered gene, with mutations occurring in 17%–25% of all cancers. In particular, approximately 30%–40% of colon cancers harbor a KRAS mutation. KRAS mutations in colon cancers have been associated with poorer survival and increased tumor aggressiveness. Additionally, KRAS mutations in colorectal cancer lead to resistance to select treatment strategies. In this review we examine the history of KRAS, its prognostic value in patients with colorectal cancer, and evidence supporting its predictive value in determining appropriate therapies for patients with colorectal cancer.

  3. Can we accurately report PTEN status in advanced colorectal cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Hocking, Christopher; Hardingham, Jennifer E.; Broadbridge, Vy; Wrin, Joe; Townsend, Amanda R; Tebbutt, Niall; Cooper, John; Ruszkiewicz, Andrew; Lee, Chee; Price, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Loss of phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) function evaluated by loss of PTEN protein expression on immunohistochemistry (IHC) has been reported as both prognostic in metastatic colorectal cancer and predictive of response to anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies although results remain uncertain. Difficulties in the methodological assessment of PTEN are likely to be a major contributor to recent conflicting results. Methods We assessed loss of PTEN function in 51 colorectal cancer ...

  4. Intrahepatic therapy for liver-dominant metastatic colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kerlijne; De; Groote; Hans; Prenen

    2015-01-01

    In patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, the liver is the most common site of metastatic disease. In patients with liver-dominant disease, consideration needs to be given to locoregional treatments such as hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy, transarterial chemoembolisation and selective internal radiation therapy because hepatic metastases are a major cause of liver failure especially in chemorefractory disease. In this review we provide insights on the published literature for locoregional treatment of liver metastases in metastatic colorectal cancer.

  5. [Overview of current modalities of colorectal cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajzrlíková, Ivana Mikoviny; Vítek, Petr

    2016-04-01

    There are one-step and two-steps programs for colorectal cancer screening. The aim of all screening examinations is to detect early stage of the disease in asymptomatic patient. The aim of this article is actual review of current screening modalities such as fecal occult blood test, flexible sigmoideoscopy, colonoscopy, CT colonography, capsule endoscopy, blood-based tests and stool DNA tests. Colonoscopy still remains the gold standard for detection of colorectal neoplasias. In majority of countries worldwide programs for colorectal cancer screening are based on immunochemical fecal occult blood test followed by colonoscopy when positive.

  6. Stool Testing for Colorectal Cancer Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Douglas J; Imperiale, Thomas F

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening has been shown to reduce CRC incidence and mortality and is widely recommended. However, despite the demonstrated benefits of screening and ongoing efforts to improve screening rates, a large percentage of the population remains unscreened. Noninvasive stool based tests offer great opportunity to enhance screening uptake. The evidence supporting the use of both fecal immunochemical testing (FIT) and stool DNA (sDNA) has been growing rapidly and both tests are now commercially available for use. Other stool biomarkers (eg, RNA and protein based) are also actively under study both for use independently and as adjuncts to the currently available tests. This mini review provides current, state of the art knowledge about noninvasive stool based screening. It includes a more detailed examination of those tests currently in use (ie, FIT and sDNA) but also provides an overview of stool testing options under development (ie, protein and RNA).

  7. Diagnostic interval and mortality in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Marie Louise; Frydenberg, Morten; Hamilton, William;

    2012-01-01

    Objective To test the theory of a U-shaped association between time from the first presentation of symptoms in primary care to the diagnosis (the diagnostic interval) and mortality after diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC). Study Design and Setting Three population-based studies in Denmark...... presentation, the association between the length of the diagnostic interval and 5-year mortality rate after the diagnosis of CRC was the same for all three types of data: displaying a U-shaped association with decreasing and subsequently increasing mortality with longer diagnostic intervals. Conclusion Unknown...... confounding and in particular confounding by indication is likely to explain the counterintuitive findings of higher mortality among patients with very short diagnostic intervals, but cannot explain the increasing mortality with longer diagnostic intervals. The results support the theory that longer...

  8. Screening for colorectal cancer: what fits best?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lee, Chun Seng

    2012-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening has been shown to be effective in reducing CRC incidence and mortality. There are currently a number of screening modalities available for implementation into a population-based CRC screening program. Each screening method offers different strengths but also possesses its own limitations as a population-based screening strategy. We review the current evidence base for accepted CRC screening tools and evaluate their merits alongside their challenges in fulfilling their role in the detection of CRC. We also aim to provide an outlook on the demands of a low-risk population-based CRC screening program with a view to providing insight as to which modality would best suit current and future needs.

  9. Combination Effect of Nimotuzumab with Radiation in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hye Kyung; Kim, Mi Sook; Jeong, Jae Hoon [Korea Institute of Radiologicaland Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    To investigate the radiosensitizing effect of the selective epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor nimotuzumab in human colorectal cancer cell lines. Four human colorectal cancer cell lines, HCT-8, LoVo, WiDr, and HCT-116 were treated with nimotuzumab and/or radiation. The effects on cell proliferation, viability, and cell cycle progression were measured by MTT, clonogenic survival assay, flow cytometry, and Western blot. An immunoblot analysis revealed that EGFR phosphorylation was inhibited by nimotuzumab in colorectal cancer cell lines. Under these experimental conditions, pre-treatment with nimotuzumab increased radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cell lines, except for cell line HCT-116. However, cell proliferation or cell cycle progression was not affected by the addition of nimotuzumab, irrespective of irradiation. Nimotuzumab enhanced the radiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells in vitro by inhibiting EGFR-mediated cell survival signaling. This study provided a rationale for the clinical application of the selective EGFR inhibitor, nimotuzumab in combination with radiation in colorectal cancer cells.

  10. Coffee Consumption and the Incidence of Colorectal Cancer in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik J. Groessl

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Higher coffee consumption has been associated with decreased incidence of colorectal cancer. Our objective was to examine the relationship of coffee intake to colorectal cancer incidence in a large observational cohort of postmenopausal US women. Methods. Data were collected for the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study providing a follow-up period of 12.9 years. The mean age of our sample (N=83,778 women was 63.5 years. Daily coffee intake was grouped into 3 categories: None, moderate (>0–<4 cups, and high (4+ cups. Proportional hazards modeling was used to evaluate the relationship between coffee intake and colorectal cancer. Results. There were 1,282 (1.53% new cases of colorectal cancer during follow-up. Compared to nondrinkers, moderate and high coffee drinkers had an increased incidence of colorectal cancer in multivariate analysis (HR 1.15, 1.02–1.29; HR 1.14, 0.93–1.38. Moderate drip brew coffee intake (HR 1.20, 1.05–1.36 and high nondrip brew coffee intake (HR 1.43, 1.01–2.02 were associated with increased odds. Conclusion. Our results suggesting increased incidence of colorectal cancer associated with higher coffee consumption contradict recent meta-analyses but agree with a number of other studies showing that coffee increases risk or has no effect. Brew method results are novel and warrant further research.

  11. Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer and familial colorectal cancer in Central part of Iran, Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Nemati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: There is a lack of data on familial aggregation of colorectal cancer (CRC in Iran. We aimed to deter-mine the frequency of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC and familial colorectal cancer (FCC and to determine the frequency of extracolonic cancers in these families in Isfahan. Methods: We reviewed documents of all patients with a pathologically confirmed diagnosis of CRC admitted to Isfa-han referral hospitals between 1995 and 2006. We also studied our CRC registry at Poursina Hakim Research Institute from 2003 to 2008. We found HNPCC and FCC families based on the Amsterdam II criteria and interviewed them for family history of CRC and extracolonic tumors. The family history was taken at least up to the second-degree relatives. Results: During 1996 to 2008, a total of 2580 CRC cases have been diagnosed. We found 14 HNPCC and 53 FCC families. Mean age of CRC at diagnosis was 48.0 ΁ 14.6 and 49.0 ΁ 13.9 years in the HNPCC and FCC families, re-spectively (p > 0.05. The total numbers of observed extracolonic tumors were 70 (21.6%; mean age = 53.6 ΁ 11.0 years and 157 (13.8%; mean age = 54.8 ΁ 18.0 years in HNPCC and FCC families, respectively (p > 0.05. CRC was respectively found in 52 and 76 members of the HNPCC and FCC families, revealing the frequency of HNPCC and FCC as 2.0% (52/2580 and 2.9% (76/2580, respectively. Conclusions: We found a relative high frequency of HNPCC (2.0% and FCC (2.9% among CRC cases in our socie-ty and high incidence of extracolonic tumors in their families. Further studies focusing on molecular basis in this field and designing a specific screening and national cancer registry program for HNPCC and FCC families should be con-ducted.

  12. Synchronous colorectal and lung cancer:Report of three cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of synchronous colorectal and lung cancer is relatively rare.We report three cases of patients with tumors located in the rectum,ascending colon,the lower lobe of the left lung,and the upper lobe of the right lung.Synchronous curative resection of the two lesions was performed in two patients,whereas colectomy was performed in an elderly patient with a poor lung function.Pathological examination showed the colorectal cancer was a moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma and the lung cancer was a squamous cell carcinoma.Surgical treatment and postoperative adjuvant chemotherapy for the lung cancer were different from those for colorectal cancer with pulmonary metastasis.If possible,radical resection should be performed for each cancer when synchronicity is found.

  13. Aspirin, cyclooxygenase inhibition and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sostres, Carlos; Gargallo, Carla Jerusalen; Lanas, Angel

    2014-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common type of cancer worldwide. Screening measures are far from adequate and not widely available in resource-poor settings. Primary prevention strategies therefore remain necessary to reduce the risk of developing CRC. Increasing evidence from epidemiological studies, randomized clinical trials and basic science supports the effectiveness of aspirin, as well as other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, for chemoprevention of several types of cancer, including CRC. This includes the prevention of adenoma recurrence and reduction of CRC incidence and mortality. The detectable benefit of daily low-dose aspirin (at least 75 mg), as used to prevent cardiovascular disease events, strongly suggests that its antiplatelet action is central to explaining its antitumor efficacy. Daily low-dose aspirin achieves complete and persistent inhibition of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 in platelets (in pre-systemic circulation) while causing a limited and rapidly reversible inhibitory effect on COX-2 and/or COX-1 expressed in nucleated cells. Aspirin has a short half-life in human circulation (about 20 minutes); nucleated cells have the ability to resynthesize acetylated COX isozymes within a few hours, while platelets do not. COX-independent mechanisms of aspirin have been suggested to explain its chemopreventive effects but this concept remains to be demonstrated in vivo at clinical doses.

  14. Microbiota disbiosis is associated with colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguang eGao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The dysbiosis of the human intestinal microbiota is linked to sporadic colorectal carcinoma (CRC. The present study was designed to investigate the gut microbiota distribution features in CRC patients. We performed pyrosequencing based analysis of the 16S rRNA gene V3 region to investigate microbiota of the cancerous tissue and adjacent noncancerous normal tissue in proximal and distal CRC samples. The results revealed that the microbial structures of the CRC patients and healthy individuals differed significantly. Firmicutes and Fusobacteria were over-represented whereas Proteobacteria was under-represented in CRC patients. In addition, Lactococcus and Fusobacterium exhibited a relatively higher abundance while Pseudomonas and Escherichia-Shigella was reduced in cancerous tissues compared to adjacent noncancerous tissues. Meanwhile, the overall microbial structures of proximal and distal colon cancerous tissues were similar; but certain potential pro-oncogenic pathogens were different. These results suggested that the mucosa-associated microbiota is dynamically associated with CRC, which may provide evidences for microbiota-associated diagnostic, prognostic, preventive and therapeutic strategies for CRC.

  15. Aspirin, cyclooxygenase inhibition and colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carlos; Sostres; Carla; Jerusalen; Gargallo; Angel; Lanas

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer(CRC)is the third most common type of cancer worldwide.Screening measures are far from adequate and not widely available in resourcepoor settings.Primary prevention strategies therefore remain necessary to reduce the risk of developing CRC.Increasing evidence from epidemiological studies,randomized clinical trials and basic science supports the effectiveness of aspirin,as well as other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs,for chemoprevention of several types of cancer,including CRC.This includes the prevention of adenoma recurrence and reduction of CRC incidence and mortality.The detectable benefit of daily low-dose aspirin(at least 75 mg),as used to prevent cardiovascular disease events,strongly suggests that its antiplatelet action is central to explaining its antitumor efficacy.Daily low-dose aspirin achieves complete and persistent inhibition of cyclooxygenase(COX)-1 in platelets(in pre-systemic circulation)while causing alimited and rapidly reversible inhibitory effect on COX-2and/or COX-1 expressed in nucleated cells.Aspirin has a short half-life in human circulation(about 20 minutes);nucleated cells have the ability to resynthesize acetylated COX isozymes within a few hours,while platelets do not.COX-independent mechanisms of aspirin have been suggested to explain its chemopreventive effects but this concept remains to be demonstrated in vivo at clinical doses.

  16. Cytokine-Induced Modulation of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mager, Lukas F; Wasmer, Marie-Hélène; Rau, Tilman T; Krebs, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of novel immunomodulatory cancer therapies over the last decade, above all immune checkpoint blockade, has significantly advanced tumor treatment. For colorectal cancer (CRC), a novel scoring system based on the immune cell infiltration in tumors has greatly improved disease prognostic evaluation and guidance to more specific therapy. These findings underline the relevance of tumor immunology in the future handling and therapeutic approach of malignant disease. Inflammation can either promote or suppress CRC pathogenesis and inflammatory mediators, mainly cytokines, critically determine the pro- or anti-tumorigenic signals within the tumor environment. Here, we review the current knowledge on the cytokines known to be critically involved in CRC development and illustrate their mechanisms of action. We also highlight similarities and differences between CRC patients and murine models of CRC and point out cytokines with an ambivalent role for intestinal cancer. We also identify some of the future challenges in the field that should be addressed for the development of more effective immunomodulatory therapies.

  17. New era of colorectal cancer screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maysaa El Zoghbi; Linda C Cummings

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer(CRC) is the 2nd most common cancer in women and 3rd most common cancer in men worldwide. Most CRCs develop from adenomatous polyps arising from glandular epithelium. Tumor growth is initiated by mutation of the tumor suppressor gene APC and involves other genetic mutations in a stepwise process over years. Both hereditary and environmental factors contribute to the development of CRC. Screening has been proven to reduce the incidence of CRC. Screening has also contributed to the decrease in CRC mortality in the United States. However,CRC incidence and/or mortality remain on the rise in some parts of the world(Eastern Europe,Asia,and South America),likely due to factors including westernized diet,lifestyle,and lack of healthcare infrastructure. Multiple screening options are available,ranging from direct radiologic or endoscopic visualization tests that primarily detect premalignant or malignant lesions such as flexible sigmoidoscopy,optical colonoscopy,colon capsule endoscopy,computed tomographic colonography,and double contrast barium enema- to stool based tests which primarily detect cancers,including fecal DNA,fecal immunochemical test,and fecal occult blood test. The availability of some of these tests is limited to areas with high economic resources. This article will discuss CRC epidemiology,pathogenesis,risk factors,and screening modalities with a particular focus on new technologies.

  18. Colorectal cancer through simulation and experiment

    KAUST Repository

    Kershaw, Sophie K.

    2013-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) has formed a canonical example of tumourigenesis ever since its use in Fearon and Vogelstein\\'s linear model of genetic mutation, and continues to generate a huge amount of research interest. Over time, the field has witnessed a transition from solely experimental work to the inclusion of mathematical and computational modelling. The fusion of these disciplines has the potential to provide valuable insights into oncologic processes, but also presents the challenge of uniting many diverse perspectives. Furthermore, the cancer cell phenotype defined by the \\'Hallmarks of Cancer\\' has been extended in recent times and provides an excellent basis for future research. The authors present a timely summary of the literature relating to CRC, addressing the traditional experimental findings, summarising the key mathematical and computational approaches, and emphasising the role of the Hallmarks in current and future developments. The authors conclude with a discussion of interdisciplinary work, outlining areas of experimental interest which would benefit from the insight that theoretical modelling can provide. © The institution of engineering and technology 2013.

  19. Coffee, colon function and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitaglione, Paola; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Pellegrini, Nicoletta

    2012-09-01

    For several years the physiological effects of coffee have been focused on its caffeine content, disregarding the hundreds of bioactive coffee components, such as polyphenols, melanoidins, carbohydrates, diterpenes, etc. These compounds may exert their protection against colorectal cancer (CRC), the third most common cancer worldwide. However, the amount and type of compounds ingested with the beverage may be highly different depending on the variety of coffee used, the roasting degree, the type of brewing method as well as the serving size. In this frame, this paper reviews the mechanisms by which coffee may influence the risk of CRC development focusing on espresso and filtered coffee, as well as on the components that totally or partially reach the colon i.e. polyphenols and dietary fiber, including melanoidins. In particular the effects of coffee on some colon conditions whose deregulation may lead to cancer, namely microbiota composition and lumen reducing environment, were considered. Taken together the discussed studies indicated that, due to their in vivo metabolism and composition, both coffee chlorogenic acids and dietary fiber, including melanoidins, may reduce CRC risk, increasing colon motility and antioxidant status. Further studies should finally assess whether the coffee benefits for colon are driven through a prebiotic effect.

  20. Polymorphic CAG Repeat and Protein Expression of Androgen Receptor Gene in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui; Wang, Guiyu; Song, Yanni; Wang, Feng; Zhu, Bing; Tang, Qingchao; Liu, Zheng; Chen, Yinggang; Zhang, Qian; Muhammad, Shan; Wang, Xishan

    2015-04-01

    Although somatic alterations in CAG repeats in the androgen receptor (AR) gene have been suggested to predispose to colorectal cancer, less is known about AR in colorectal cancer carcinogenesis. Because of lack of relevant analysis on CAG repeat length and AR expression in colorectal cancer, we aimed to investigate the prognostic value of polymorphic CAG and protein expression of the AR gene in patients with colorectal cancer. A case-control study was carried out on 550 patients with colorectal cancer and 540 healthy controls to investigate whether polymorphic CAG within the AR gene is linked to increased risk for colorectal cancer. Polymorphic CAG and AR expression were analyzed to clarify their relationship with clinicopathologic and prognostic factors in patients with colorectal cancer. The study showed that the AR gene in patients with colorectal cancer had a longer CAG repeat sequence than those in the control group, as well as increased risk for colorectal cancer among females (P = 0.013), males (P = 0.002), and total colorectal cancer population (P CAG repeat sequence among males (P CAG repeat sequence and negative AR expression were associated with a short 5-year overall survival (OS) rate in colorectal cancer. Long CAG repeat sequences and the absence of AR expression were closely related to the development of colorectal cancer. Both long CAG and decreased AR expression were correlated with the poor 5-year OS in patients with colorectal cancer.

  1. Colorectal Cancer - What You Need to Know PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-07-05

    This 60 second Public Service Announcement (PSA) is based on the July, 2011 CDC Vital Signs report. Colorectal cancer kills about 50,000 men and women every year. Screening can save lives! Screening can find abnormal growths so they can be removed before turning into cancer, and can find the cancer early, when it's easiest to treat. If you're over 50, talk to your doctor about getting screened for colorectal cancer.  Created: 7/5/2011 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 7/5/2011.

  2. The role of estrogen in the development of colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玲; 王吉凌; 朱圣韬; 史学森

    2015-01-01

    <正>Cancer is a major public health problem in the world.With the progress of medical technology,mean 5-year survival rates of colorectal cancer(CRC)have doubled over the past 40 years[1].However,in 2013,the International Agency for Research on Cancer(IARC)released data on cancer incidence,mortality and prevalence worldwide.The IARC’s online database provides the estimates for 28 types of cancer in 184 countries worldwide.The

  3. Irinotecan in the treatment of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Charles; Mitchell, Edith P; Hoff, Paulo M

    2006-11-01

    Irinotecan, a water-soluble, semisynthetic derivative of camptothecin, is a key component of first- and second-line treatment regimens for metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). In the first-line treatment of metastatic CRC, the results of two prospective, multicenter phase III trials have shown that the combination of irinotecan with bolus or infusional 5-fluorouracil (5FU)/leucovorin (LV) can significantly prolong survival compared with 5FU/LV alone, with a manageable side effects profile. In addition, irinotecan-based regimens, with or without oxaliplatin, may improve resectability of metastases and further increase patient survival. Studies of irinotecan in the first-line setting in combination with newer agents, such as bevacizumab, have shown impressive overall survival. In the second-line setting, irinotecan has demonstrated efficacy superior to that of best supportive care. Initial studies of irinotecan plus bolus 5FU/LV, and the preliminary results from trials of irinotecan plus infusional 5FU/LV in the adjuvant setting, have been disappointing; however, for the largest trial, the Pan-European Trial in Adjuvant Colon Cancer, results with sufficient follow-up are pending. Irinotecan has an acceptable tolerability profile and is not associated with cumulative toxicities in patients with metastatic CRC; regimens containing irinotecan extend treatment duration and improve survival. New regimens and adjunctive therapies are being explored to reduce the incidence of common complications of irinotecan treatment, such as diarrhea and neutropenia.

  4. Prevention of colorectal cancer with vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rheem, Dae S; Baylink, David J; Olafsson, Snorri; Jackson, Christian S; Walter, Michael H

    2010-08-01

    The fact that colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States emphasizes the need for more effective preventive and therapeutic modalities. There is growing evidence that vitamin D may reduce the incidence of CRC. Results of epidemiologic, in vitro, in vivo animal and clinical studies suggest that a low serum vitamin D level may be a serious risk factor for CRC and a high serum vitamin D level may reduce the risk of CRC. On a molecular level, vitamin D suppresses CRC development and growth by affecting cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. Vitamin D insufficiency and CRC are common in the elderly population. Vitamin D insufficiency is simple to screen for and treatable with vitamin D supplementation. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (calcidiol) is the best measure of vitamin D status and should be checked routinely for individuals with risk factors for CRC. Maintaining serum concentrations of calcidiol above 32 ng/ml (80 nmol/l) in individuals whose serum calcidiol level is low may help prevent CRC as well as osteoporosis, fractures, infections, and cardiovascular disease. Daily calcidiol intake of 1000 International Units can increase serum vitamin D to sufficient levels in most elderly persons and, based on available data, may substantially lower the incidence of CRC with minimal risks.

  5. MUC1 and colorectal cancer pathophysiology considerations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaron Niv

    2008-01-01

    Several lines of evidence point towards a biological role of mucin and particularly MUC1 in colorectal cancer.A positive correlation was described between mucin secretion, proliferation, invasiveness, metastasis and bad prognosis. But, the role of MUC1 in cancer progression is still controversial and somewhat confusing. While Hukherjee and colleagues developed MUC1-specific immune therapy in a CRC model, Lillehoj and coinvestigators showed recently that MUC1 inhibits cell proliferation by a β-catenin-dependent mechanism. In carcinoma cells the polarization of MUC1 is lost and the protein is over expressed at high levels over the entire cell surface. A competitive interaction between MUC1 and E-cadherin, through β-catenin binding,disrupts E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell interactions at sites of MUC1 expression. In addition, the complex of MUCl-β-catenin enters the nucleus and activates T-cell factor/leukocyte enhancing factor 1 transcription factors and activates gene expression. This mechanism may be similar to that just described for DCC and UNC5H,which induced apoptosis when not engaged with their ligand netrin, but mediate signals for proliferation,differentiation or migration when ligand bound.

  6. Cruciferous vegetables and colo-rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Anthony; Collins, Andrew; Fuller, Zoë; Hillman, Kevin; Ratcliffe, Brian

    2006-02-01

    Cruciferous vegetables have been studied extensively for their chemoprotective effects. Although they contain many bioactive compounds, the anti-carcinogenic actions of cruciferous vegetables are commonly attributed to their content of glucosinolates. Glucosinolates are relatively biologically inert but can be hydrolysed to a range of bioactive compounds such as isothiocyanates (ITC) and indoles by the plant-based enzyme myrosinase, or less efficiently by the colonic microflora. A number of mechanisms whereby ITC and indoles may protect against colo-rectal cancer have been identified. In experimental animals cruciferous vegetables have been shown to inhibit chemically-induced colon cancer. However, the results of recent epidemiological cohort studies have been inconsistent and this disparity may reflect a lack of sensitivity of such studies. Possible explanations for the failure of epidemiological studies to detect an effect include: assessment of cruciferous vegetable intake by methods that are subject to large measurement errors; the interaction between diet and genotype has not been considered: the effect that post-harvest treatments may have on biological effects of cruciferous vegetables has not been taken into account.

  7. GSTT2 promoter polymorphisms and colorectal cancer risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahn Sun-A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutathione S-transferases are a group of enzymes that participate in detoxification and defense mechanisms against toxic carcinogens and other compounds. These enzymes play an important role in human carcinogenesis. In the present study, we sought to determine whether GSTT2 promoter single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are associated with colorectal cancer risk. Methods A total of 436 colorectal cancer patients and 568 healthy controls were genotyped for three GSTT2 promoter SNPs (-537G>A, -277T>C and -158G>A, using real-time TaqMan assay and direct sequencing. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA was performed to determine the effects of polymorphisms on protein binding to the GSTT2 promoter. Results The -537A allele (-537G/A or A/A was significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk (OR = 1.373, p = 0.025, while the -158A allele (-158G/A or A/A was involved in protection against colorectal cancer (OR = 0.539, p = 0.032. Haplotype 2 (-537A, -277T, -158G was significantly associated with colorectal cancer risk (OR = 1.386, p = 0.021, while haplotype 4 (-537G, -277C, -158A protected against colorectal cancer (OR = 0.539, p = 0.032. EMSA data revealed lower promoter binding activity in the -537A allele than its -537G counterpart. Conclusion Our results collectively suggest that SNPs and haplotypes of the GSTT2 promoter region are associated with colorectal cancer risk in the Korean population.

  8. Role of detection of microsatellite instability in Chinese with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Zhi Liu; Feng Jin; Zhen-Hai Zhang; Shu-Bao Wang

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To detect microsatellite instability (MSI) in patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer or ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer and to provide criteria for screening the kindreds with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer at molecular level.METHODS: MSI was detected in the specimens from 20 cases with HNPCC, 20 cases with ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer and 20 cases with sporadic colorectal cancer by means of polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism.RESULTS: The positive rate of MSI was 85% (17/20) in HNPCC group, 40% (8/20) in ordinary hereditary colorectal cancer group and 10% (2/20) in the sporadic colorectal cancer group respectively. The differences were significant. The mean ages of the three groups were 43.6, 52.2, and 61.8 years respectively, which increased gradually. The incidence of right hemicolon cancer was 64.7%, 37.5%, and 0% respectively, which decreased gradually and had significant difference. The expression ratio of BAT26 and BAT25 was 94.1% respectively, which was highest in the 5 gene sites studied. The incidence of poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma was 70.6% in HNPCC group among high frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H), which was higher than the other two groups, which had 50% and 50% respectively.CONCLUSION: The incidence of MSI-H is higher in HNPCC group. The detection of MSI is simple and economical and has high correlation with the clinicopathologic feature of HNPCC and can be used as a screening method to detect the germ line mutation of the mismatch repair gene.

  9. Breast Cancer Survivorship Care: Targeting a Colorectal Cancer Education Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri G. Homan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer survivors are at risk of developing a second primary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the leading second primary cancers, and it is often preventable. We developed a multi-component educational tool to inform and encourage women breast cancer survivors to engage in CRC screening. To assess the strengths and weakness of the tool and to improve the relevancy to the target audience, we convened four focus groups of women breast cancer survivors in Missouri. We also assessed the potential impact of the tool on the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding CRC and collected information on the barriers to CRC screening through pre- and post-focus groups’ questionnaires. A total of 43 women breast cancer survivors participated and provided very valuable suggestions on design and content to update the tool. Through the process and comparing pre- and post-focus group assessments, a significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors strongly agreed or agreed that CRC is preventable (78.6% vs. 96.9%, p = 0.02 and became aware that they were at a slightly increased risk for CRC (18.6% vs. 51.7%, p = 0.003. The most cited barrier was the complexity of preparation for colonoscopy.

  10. Risk Prediction Model for Colorectal Cancer: National Health Insurance Corporation Study, Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Aesun Shin; Jungnam Joo; Hye-Ryung Yang; Jeongin Bak; Yunjin Park; Jeongseon Kim; Jae Hwan Oh; Byung-Ho Nam

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Incidence and mortality rates of colorectal cancer have been rapidly increasing in Korea during last few decades. Development of risk prediction models for colorectal cancer in Korean men and women is urgently needed to enhance its prevention and early detection. METHODS: Gender specific five-year risk prediction models were developed for overall colorectal cancer, proximal colon cancer, distal colon cancer, colon cancer and rectal cancer. The model was developed using data from a po...

  11. Primary site resection is superior for incurable metastatic colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yusuke; Tanoue; Nobutaka; Tanaka; Yukihiro; Nomura

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate survival in patients treated with FOLFOX followed by primary site resection or palliative surgery for incurable metastatic colorectal cancer. METHODS:Between 2001 and 2009,a total of 98 patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma and non-resectable metastases were diagnosed and treated with the new systemic agent chemotherapy regimen FOLFOX. Primary site resection was carried out in 38 patients, creation of a colostomy or bypass without resection was carried out in 36 patients,and 23 were not...

  12. Nutrigenetics in cancer research--folate metabolism and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2005-11-01

    The B vitamin folate is essential for one-carbon transfer reactions, including those related to the methylation of DNA or other substrates and nucleotide synthesis. Epidemiologic and experimental studies implicate low-folate intakes in elevated risk of colorectal neoplasia and suggest that biologic mechanisms underlying this relation include disturbances in DNA methylation patterns or adverse effects on DNA synthesis and repair. With the completion of the Human Genome Project, a vast amount of data on inherited genetic variability has become available. This genetic information can be used in studies of molecular epidemiology to provide information on multiple aspects of folate metabolism. First, studies linking polymorphisms in folate metabolism to an altered risk of cancer provide evidence for a causal link between this pathway and colorectal carcinogenesis. Second, studies on genetic characteristics can help clarify whether certain individuals may benefit from higher or lower intakes of folate or nutrients relevant to folate metabolism. Third, studies on genetic polymorphisms can generate hypotheses regarding possible biologic mechanisms that connect this pathway to carcinogenesis. Last, genetic variability in folate metabolism may predict survival after a cancer diagnosis, possibly via pharmacogenetic effects. To solve the puzzle of the folate-cancer relation, a transdisciplinary approach is needed that integrates knowledge from epidemiology, clinical studies, experimental nutrition, and mathematical modeling. This review illustrates knowledge that can be gained from molecular epidemiology in the context of nutrigenetics, and the questions that this approach can answer or raise.

  13. 77 FR 11123 - Scientific Information Request on Local Therapies for Unresectable Colorectal Cancer Metastases...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... Therapies for Unresectable Colorectal Cancer Metastases to the Liver AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research... unresectable colorectal cancer metastases to the liver. The EHC Program is dedicated to identifying as many... manufacturers of unresectable colorectal cancer medical devices. Scientific information is being solicited...

  14. Novel Therapies in Development for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Michael S.; Kopetz, Scott

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cause of cancer mortality in the United States. Despite advances in therapy, metastatic CRC remains lethal, and further improvements in therapy are needed. Growing understanding of cancer biology, particularly in growth factor signaling, angiogenesis, and cancer immunology, has translated into many novel therapies under investigation. Patients are increasingly selected for clinical trials rationally on the basis of integral biomarkers. This re...

  15. Inhibition of Embryonic Genes to Control Colorectal Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    stem cells. Cell. 2005;122:947-56. 34. Yeung TM, Gandhi SC, Wilding JL, Muschel R, Bodmer WF. Cancer stem cells from colorectal cancer-derived cell...bracket spanning across shNG-1 and shNp8-1, the P value of each compared to the corresponding shNEG control is the indicated value. Figure 4: LV

  16. Has the new TNM classification for colorectal cancer improved care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagtegaal, I.D.; Quirke, P.; Schmoll, H.J.

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, the Union for International Cancer Control issued the seventh edition of the well-used T (tumor), N (node), and M (metastasis) classification guidelines. There has been a continual refinement of the staging for colorectal cancer since this system for assessing tumor stage was initially adop

  17. Anti-colorectal cancer immunity : control ‘the force’!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Speetjens, Franciscus Maria

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation reports on the relation between the immune system, colorectal cancer and immunotherapy. In the first part, expression of HLA class I and expression of CXCL5 in colocectal cancer was studied. Low expression of HLA class I in rectal tumors was associated with poor survival of rectal

  18. Sulindac treatment in hereditary non-pollyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijcken, Fleur E. M.; Hollema, Harry; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; van der Sluis, Tineke; Ek, Wytske Boersma-van; Kleibeuker, Jan H.

    2007-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, e.g. sulindac have been extensively studied for chemoprevention in familial adenomatous polyposis, but not in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC). We evaluated these effects in HNPCC using surrogate end-points for cancer risk. In a randomised dou

  19. Plant sterol intakes and colorectal cancer risk in the Netherlands : cohort study on diet and cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Normén, A.L.; Brants, H.A.M.; Voorrips, L.E.; Andersson, H.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2001-01-01

    Background: Plant sterols in vegetable foods might prevent colorectal cancer. Objective: The objective was to study plant sterol intakes in relation to colorectal cancer risk in an epidemiologic study. Design: The study was performed within the framework of the Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and C

  20. Validation of colorectal cancer surgery data from administrative data sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xue

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surgery is the primary treatment for colorectal cancer for both curative and palliative intent. Availability of high quality surgery data is essential for assessing many aspects of the quality of colorectal cancer care. The objective of this study was to determine the quality of different administrative data sources in identifying surgery for colorectal cancer with respect to completeness and accuracy. Methods All residents in Alberta, Canada who were diagnosed with invasive colorectal cancer in years 2000-2005 were identified from the Alberta Cancer Registry and included in the study. Surgery data for these patients were obtained from the Cancer Registry (which collects the date of surgery for which the primary tumor was removed and compared to surgery data obtained from two different administrative data sources: Physician Billing and Hospital Inpatient data. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and observed agreement were calculated compared to the Cancer Registry data. Results The Physician Billing data alone or combined with Hospital Inpatient data demonstrated equally high sensitivity (97% for both and observed agreement with the Cancer Registry data (93% for both for identifying surgeries. The Hospital Inpatient data, however, had the highest specificity (80%. The positive predictive value varied by disease stage and across data sources for stage IV (99% for stages I-III and 83-89% for stage IV, the specificity is better for colon cancer surgeries (72-85% than for rectal cancer surgeries (60-73%; validation measures did not vary over time. Conclusion Physician Billing data identify the colorectal cancer surgery more completely than Hospital Inpatient data although both sources have a high level of completeness.

  1. Colorectal cancer diagnosis: Pitfalls and opportunities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pablo; Vega; Fátima; Valentín; Joaquín; Cubiella

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer(CRC) is a major health problem in the Western world. The diagnostic process is a challenge in all health systems for many reasons: There are often no specific symptoms; lower abdominal symptoms are very common and mostly related to nonneoplastic diseases, not CRC; diagnosis of CRC is mainlybased on colonoscopy, an invasive procedure; and the resource for diagnosis is usually scarce. Furthermore, the available predictive models for CRC are based on the evaluation of symptoms, and their diagnostic accuracy is limited. Moreover, diagnosis is a complex process involving a sequence of events related to the patient, the initial consulting physician and the health system. Understanding this process is the first step in identifying avoidable factors and reducing the effects of diagnostic delay on the prognosis of CRC. In this article, we describe the predictive value of symptoms for CRC detection. We summarize the available evidence concerning the diagnostic process, as well as the factors implicated in its delay and the methods proposed to reduce it. We describe the different prioritization criteria and predictive models for CRC detection, specifically addressing the two-week wait referral guideline from the National Institute of Clinical Excellence in terms of efficacy, efficiency and diagnostic accuracy. Finally, we collected information on the usefulness of biomarkers, specifically the faecal immunochemical test, as non-invasive diagnostic tests for CRC detection in symptomatic patients.

  2. Factors Influencing Colorectal Cancer Screening Participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Z. Gimeno García

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is a major health problem worldwide. Although population-based CRC screening is strongly recommended in average-risk population, compliance rates are still far from the desirable rates. High levels of screening uptake are necessary for the success of any screening program. Therefore, the investigation of factors influencing participation is crucial prior to design and launches a population-based organized screening campaign. Several studies have identified screening behaviour factors related to potential participants, providers, or health care system. These influencing factors can also be classified in non-modifiable (i.e., demographic factors, education, health insurance, or income and modifiable factors (i.e., knowledge about CRC and screening, patient and provider attitudes or structural barriers for screening. Modifiable determinants are of great interest as they are plausible targets for interventions. Interventions at different levels (patient, providers or health care system have been tested across the studies with different results. This paper analyzes factors related to CRC screening behaviour and potential interventions designed to improve screening uptake.

  3. Characterizing metabolic changes in human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Michael D; Zhang, Xing; Park, Jeong-Jin; Siems, William F; Gang, David R; Resar, Linda M S; Reeves, Raymond; Hill, Herbert H

    2015-06-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, despite the fact that it is a curable disease when diagnosed early. The development of new screening methods to aid in early diagnosis or identify precursor lesions at risk for progressing to CRC will be vital to improving the survival rate of individuals predisposed to CRC. Metabolomics is an advancing area that has recently seen numerous applications to the field of cancer research. Altered metabolism has been studied for many years as a means to understand and characterize cancer. However, further work is required to establish standard procedures and improve our ability to identify distinct metabolomic profiles that can be used to diagnose CRC or predict disease progression. The present study demonstrates the use of direct infusion traveling wave ion mobility mass spectrometry to distinguish metabolic profiles from CRC samples and matched non-neoplastic epithelium as well as metastatic and primary tumors at different stages of disease (T1-T4). By directly infusing our samples, the analysis time was reduced significantly, thus increasing the speed and efficiency of this method compared to traditional metabolomics platforms. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was used to visualize differences between the metabolic profiles of sample types and to identify the specific m/z features that led to this differentiation. Identification of the distinct m/z features was made using the human metabolome database. We discovered alterations in fatty acid biosynthesis and oxidative, glycolytic, and polyamine pathways that distinguish tumors from non-malignant colonic epithelium as well as various stages of CRC. Although further studies are needed, our results indicate that colonic epithelial cells undergo metabolic reprogramming during their evolution to CRC, and the distinct metabolites could serve as diagnostic tools or potential targets in therapy or primary prevention. Graphical Abstract

  4. Circulating tumor cells in high-risk nonmetastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzaniga, Paola; Gianni, Walter; Raimondi, Cristina; Gradilone, Angela; Lo Russo, Giuseppe; Longo, Flavia; Gandini, Orietta; Tomao, Silverio; Frati, Luigi

    2013-10-01

    The identification of patients at higher risk of recurrence after primary colorectal cancer resection is currently one of the challenges facing medical oncologists. Circulating tumor cell (CTC) may represent a surrogate marker of an early spread of disease in patients without overt metastases. Thirty-seven high-risk stages II-III colorectal cancer patients were evaluated for the presence of CTC. Enumeration of CTCs in 7.5 ml of blood was carried out with the FDA-cleared CellSearch system. CTC count was performed after primary tumor resection and before the start of adjuvant therapy. CTC was detected in 22 % of patients with a significant correlation with regional lymph nodes involvement and stage of disease. No significant correlation was found among the presence of CTC and other clinicopathological parameters. These data suggest that CTCs detection might help in the selection of high-risk stage II colorectal cancer patient candidates for adjuvant chemotherapy.

  5. Therapeutic effect of orally administered microencapsulated oxaliplatin for colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanska, Aleksandra M; Karagiannis, Emmanouil D; Guajardo, Gonzalo; Langer, Robert S; Anderson, Daniel G

    2012-06-01

    Colorectal cancer is a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the United States and other Western countries. Oral delivery of therapeutics remains the most patient accepted form of medication. The development of an oral delivery formulation for local delivery of chemotherapeutics in the gastrointestinal tract can potentially alleviate the adverse side effects including systemic cytotoxicity, as well as focus therapy to the lesions. Here we develop an oral formulation of the chemotherapeutic drug oxaliplatin for the treatment of colorectal cancer. Oxaliplatin was encapsulated in pH sensitive, mucoadhesive chitosan-coated alginate microspheres. The microparticles were formulated to release the chemotherapeutics after passing through the acidic gastric environment thus targeting the intestinal tract. In vivo, these particles substantially reduced the tumor burden in an orthotopic mouse model of colorectal cancer, and reduced mortality.

  6. Two cases of laparoscopic simultaneous resection of colorectal cancer and synchronous liver metastases in elderly patients

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The laparoscopic resection of colorectal cancer and laparoscopic liver surgery are widely considered to be safe. Recently, it has been reported that the simultaneous laparoscopic resection of primary colorectal cancer and liver metastasis is technically feasible and safe when it is performed at experienced centers. However, the feasibility of simultaneous laparoscopic procedures for colorectal cancer and synchronous colorectal liver metastases in elderly patients has not been st...

  7. Epidemiological evidence for vitamin D and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannucci, Edward

    2007-12-01

    Since Garland and Garland formulated the hypothesis that vitamin D may protect against colorectal cancer in 1980, various epidemiological approaches have been undertaken to evaluate this hypothesis. These approaches include studies based on regional solar UVB radiation, plasma- or serum-based studies, dietary studies, and those examining multiple factors that influence vitamin D status. Studies over the past several decades have tended to support that higher levels of vitamin D may decrease risk of colorectal cancer. An important implication is that current recommended dietary intakes such as 200-400 IU/d may be too low to exert appreciable benefits. To substantially reduce risk, higher levels of vitamin D associated with sunshine exposure or considerably higher intakes may be required. Recent studies also suggest a potential benefit of vitamin D on other digestive system cancers. One study suggested that a better vitamin D status at the time of diagnosis and treatment, as indicated by season of diagnosis, may improve survival from colorectal cancer. Darker-skinned individuals who tend to make less vitamin D may be at particularly high risk for digestive system cancer. The strong biological evidence for a protective role of vitamin D supports the epidemiological data. More study is needed to determine the optimal levels and intakes of this vitamin to optimally reduce colorectal cancer risk.

  8. Immunotherapy in colorectal cancer: What have we learned so far?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Castañón, María; Er, Tze-Kiong; Bujanda, Luis; Herreros-Villanueva, Marta

    2016-09-01

    After decades of progress based on chemotherapy and targeted agents, patients with metastatic colorectal cancer still have low long-term survival, with more than 500,000 deaths occurring worldwide every year. Recent results showing clinical evidence of efficacy using immunotherapy in other types of tumors, such as melanoma and lung cancer, have also made this a viable therapy for evaluation in colorectal cancer in clinical trials. The development of cancer immunotherapies is progressing quickly, with a variety of technological approaches. This review summarizes the current status of clinical trials testing immunotherapy in colorectal cancer and discusses what has been learned based on previous results. Immunotherapy strategies, such as various models of vaccines, effector-cell therapy and checkpoint inhibitor antibodies, provide protection against progression for a limited subset of patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer. A better understanding of particular immune cell types and pathways in each patient is still needed. These findings will enable the development of novel biomarkers to select the appropriate subset of patients to be treated with a particular immunotherapy, and the tendencies determined from recent results can guide clinical practice for oncologists in this new therapeutic area and in the design of the next round of clinical trials.

  9. Regulatory T cells in inflammatory bowel diseases and colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gy(o)rgyi Müzes; Béla Molnár; Ferenc Sipos

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are key elements in immunological self-tolerance.The number of Tregs may alter in both peripheral blood and in colonic mucosa during pathological circumstances.The local cellular,microbiological and cytokine milieu affect immunophenotype and function of Tregs.Forkhead box P3+ Tregs function shows altered properties in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs).This alteration of Tregs function can furthermore be observed between Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis,which may have both clinical and therapeutical consequences.Chronic mucosal inflammation may also influence Tregs function,which together with the intestinal bacterial flora seem to have a supporting role in colitis-associated colorectal carcinogenesis.Tregs have a crucial role in the immunoevasion of cancer cells in sporadic colorectal cancer.Furthermore,their number and phenotype correlate dosely with the clinical outcome of the disease,even if their contribution to carcinogenesis has previously been controversial.Despite knowledge of the clinical relationship between IBD and colitis-associated colon cancer,and the growing number of immunological aspects encompassing sporadic colorectal carcinogenesis,the molecular and cellular links amongst Tregs,regulation of the inflammation,and cancer development are still not well understood.In this paper,we aimed to review the current data surrounding the role of Tregs in the pathogenesis of IBD,colitis-associated colon cancer and sporadic colorectal cancer.

  10. Colorectal cancer complicated by perforation. Specific features of surgical tactics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Shchaeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to assess the immediate results of surgical interventions for colorectal cancer complicated by perforation.Materials and methods. The immediate results of surgical treatment were retrospectively analyzed in 56 patients with colorectal cancer complicated by perforated colon cancer, who had been treated at Smolensk surgical hospitals in 2001 to 2013. Patients with diastatic perforation of the colon in the presence of decompensated obturation intestinal obstruction of tumor genesis were not included into this investigation.Results. The immediate results of uni- and multistage surgical interventions were analyzed in relation to the extent of peritonitis and the stage of colon cancer. More satisfactory immediate results were observed after multistage surgical treatment. Following these interventions, a fatal outcome of disseminated peritonitis in the presence of performed colorectal cancer was recorded in 8 (53.3 % cases whereas after symptomatic surgery there were 11 (67.8 % deaths. A fatal outcome was noted in 1 case (7.7 % after multistage surgery.Discussion. The results of surgical treatment in the patients with perforated colorectal cancer are directly related to the degree of peritonitis and the choice of surgical tactics.

  11. Time dependent ethnic convergence in colorectal cancer survival in hawaii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hundahl Scott A

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although colorectal cancer death rates have been declining, this trend is not consistent across all ethnic groups. Biological, environmental, behavioral and socioeconomic explanations exist, but the reason for this discrepancy remains inconclusive. We examined the hypothesis that improved cancer screening across all ethnic groups will reduce ethnic differences in colorectal cancer survival. Methods Through the Hawaii Tumor Registry 16,424 patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer were identified during the years 1960–2000. Cox regression analyses were performed for each of three cohorts stratified by ethnicity (Caucasian, Japanese, Hawaiian, Filipino, and Chinese. The models included stage of diagnosis, year of diagnosis, age, and sex as predictors of survival. Results Mortality rates improved significantly for all ethnic groups. Moreover, with the exception of Hawaiians, rates for all ethnic groups converged over time. Persistently lower survival for Hawaiians appeared linked with more cancer treatment. Conclusion Ethnic disparities in colorectal cancer mortality rates appear primarily the result of differential utilization of health care. If modern screening procedures can be provided equally to all ethnic groups, ethnic outcome differences can be virtually eliminated.

  12. Programmatic screening for colorectal cancer: the COLONPREV study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells, Antoni; Quintero, Enrique

    2015-03-01

    The COLONPREV study is an ongoing multicenter, nationwide, randomized controlled trial aimed at evaluating the efficacy of once-only colonoscopy and biennial fecal immunochemical testing with respect to the reduction of CRC-related mortality at 10 years in average-risk colorectal cancer screening population. Following a pragmatic approach, this study may contribute to establishing the most cost-effective strategy in a programmatic, population-based setting. In this review, we report the results obtained at the first screening round, as well as others achieved in nested evaluations using the COLONPREV dataset with the aim of clarifying some controversial issues on the different strategies of colorectal cancer screening.

  13. Third-line therapy for metastatic colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundgaard, M.G.; Ehrnrooth, E.; Sørensen, Jens Benn

    2008-01-01

    , panitumumab. As a result, third-line treatment is now a necessary step in the optimal treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (MCRC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We conducted a literature review of English language publications on third-line therapy for MCRC from January 2000 to April 2007. Data......OS of 16 months. With irinotecan and 5-FU, mOS around 8 months were reported and with cetuximab combined with irinotecan, the highest mOS was 9.8 months. CONCLUSION: Third-line therapy in advanced colorectal cancer may improve mOS for patients with MCRC. Therefore, randomized studies should be conducted...

  14. Have You Been Tested for Colorectal Cancer? PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-11-05

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the November 2013 CDC Vital Signs report. Colorectal cancer screening saves lives, but only if you get tested. If you’re between 50 and 75, talk with your doctor about which test is best for you. If you have inflammatory bowel disease or a family history of colorectal cancer or polyps, ask your doctor if you should start screening before age 50.  Created: 11/5/2013 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 11/5/2013.

  15. Mutator gene and hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2008-02-05

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  16. Predictive and Prognostic Factors in Colorectal Cancer: A Personalized Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy A. Rockall

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available It is an exciting time for all those engaged in the treatment of colorectal cancer. The advent of new therapies presents the opportunity for a personalized approach to the patient. This approach considers the complex genetic mechanisms involved in tumorigenesis in addition to classical clinicopathological staging. The potential predictive and prognostic biomarkers which have stemmed from the study of the genetic basis of colorectal cancer and therapeutics are discussed with a focus on mismatch repair status, KRAS, BRAF, 18qLOH, CIMP and TGF-β.

  17. Evaluation of complement proteins as screening markers for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Line; Christensen, Ib J; Jensenius, Jens C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Lack of symptoms results in late detection and increased mortality. Inflammation, including complement activation, plays an important role in tumorigenesis. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The concentrations of nine proteins......, M-ficolin and MAp44 in combination discriminate between CRC and patients without cancer. The markers did not have sufficient discriminatory value for CRC detection, but may prove useful for screening when combined with other markers....

  18. Natural Product Shows Effectiveness in Combating Colorectal Cancer | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    An herbal extract used for centuries to prevent heart disease has now been shown to be effective against colorectal cancer when tested in laboratory cell cultures. Scientists from NCI at Frederick found that the natural extract cryptotanshinone (CPT) stops the uncontrolled cell growth characteristic of cancer by interfering with a protein that has been implicated in several cancers, including those of the colon and rectum. The results appear in the journal Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry.

  19. Risk analysis of colorectal cancer incidence by gene expression analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangkuan, Wei-Chuan; Lin, Hung-Che; Chang, Yu-Tien; Jian, Chen-En; Fan, Hueng-Chuen; Chen, Kang-Hua; Liu, Ya-Fang; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Chou, Hsiu-Ling; Yao, Chung-Tay

    2017-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading cancers worldwide. Several studies have performed microarray data analyses for cancer classification and prognostic analyses. Microarray assays also enable the identification of gene signatures for molecular characterization and treatment prediction. Objective Microarray gene expression data from the online Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database were used to to distinguish colorectal cancer from normal colon tissue samples. Methods We collected microarray data from the GEO database to establish colorectal cancer microarray gene expression datasets for a combined analysis. Using the Prediction Analysis for Microarrays (PAM) method and the GSEA MSigDB resource, we analyzed the 14,698 genes that were identified through an examination of their expression values between normal and tumor tissues. Results Ten genes (ABCG2, AQP8, SPIB, CA7, CLDN8, SCNN1B, SLC30A10, CD177, PADI2, and TGFBI) were found to be good indicators of the candidate genes that correlate with CRC. From these selected genes, an average of six significant genes were obtained using the PAM method, with an accuracy rate of 95%. The results demonstrate the potential of utilizing a model with the PAM method for data mining. After a detailed review of the published reports, the results confirmed that the screened candidate genes are good indicators for cancer risk analysis using the PAM method. Conclusions Six genes were selected with 95% accuracy to effectively classify normal and colorectal cancer tissues. We hope that these results will provide the basis for new research projects in clinical practice that aim to rapidly assess colorectal cancer risk using microarray gene expression analysis. PMID:28229027

  20. Perspectives of colorectal cancer risk and screening among Dominicans and Puerto Ricans: stigma and misperceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Roberta E; Diaz, Joseph A; Kim, Ivone

    2009-11-01

    Colorectal cancer is the second most common cancer among Latinos, but a lower percentage of Latinos are screened than Whites and Blacks. Along with recognized economic barriers, differences in knowledge and perceptions might impede colorectal screening among Latinos. We conducted 147 individual, qualitative interviews with Dominicans and Puerto Ricans in the northeastern United States to explore their explanatory models for colorectal cancer and screening barriers. Many participants had not previously heard of colorectal cancer. The most commonly mentioned cause of colorectal cancer was anal sex. Also considered risks were "bad food," digestion leading to constipation, and strained bowel movements. Screening barriers included stigma, misperceptions, embarrassment, and machismo. Progress toward increasing colorectal cancer screening requires normalization of this screening among Latinos. Higher patient familiarity, along with improved physician counseling and referral, might contribute to reducing stigma and other barriers, and to enhancing knowledge and Latino community support of colorectal cancer screening.

  1. Determining the familial risk distribution of colorectal cancer: a data mining approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Rowena; Jenkins, Mark A; Buchanan, Daniel D; Ait Ouakrim, Driss; Giles, Graham G; Casey, Graham; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Le Marchand, Loic; Newcomb, Polly A; Lindor, Noralane M; Hopper, John L; Win, Aung Ko

    2016-04-01

    This study was aimed to characterize the distribution of colorectal cancer risk using family history of cancers by data mining. Family histories for 10,066 colorectal cancer cases recruited to population cancer registries of the Colon Cancer Family Registry were analyzed using a data mining framework. A novel index was developed to quantify familial cancer aggregation. Artificial neural network was used to identify distinct categories of familial risk. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of colorectal cancer were calculated for each category. We identified five major, and 66 minor categories of familial risk for developing colorectal cancer. The distribution the major risk categories were: (1) 7% of families (SIR = 7.11; 95% CI 6.65-7.59) had a strong family history of colorectal cancer; (2) 13% of families (SIR = 2.94; 95% CI 2.78-3.10) had a moderate family history of colorectal cancer; (3) 11% of families (SIR = 1.23; 95% CI 1.12-1.36) had a strong family history of breast cancer and a weak family history of colorectal cancer; (4) 9 % of families (SIR = 1.06; 95 % CI 0.96-1.18) had strong family history of prostate cancer and weak family history of colorectal cancer; and (5) 60% of families (SIR = 0.61; 95% CI 0.57-0.65) had a weak family history of all cancers. There is a wide variation of colorectal cancer risk that can be categorized by family history of cancer, with a strong gradient of colorectal cancer risk between the highest and lowest risk categories. The risk of colorectal cancer for people with the highest risk category of family history (7% of the population) was 12-times that for people in the lowest risk category (60%) of the population. Data mining was proven an effective approach for gaining insight into the underlying cancer aggregation patterns and for categorizing familial risk of colorectal cancer.

  2. DNA aptamers as molecular probes for colorectal cancer study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwame Sefah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding the molecular features of specific tumors can increase our knowledge about the mechanism(s underlying disease development and progression. This is particularly significant for colorectal cancer, which is a heterogeneous complex of diseases developed in a sequential manner through a multistep carcinogenic process. As such, it is likely that tumors with similar characteristics might originate in the same manner and have a similar molecular behavior. Therefore, specific mapping of the molecular features can be potentially useful for both tumor classification and the development of appropriate therapeutic regimens. However, this can only be accomplished by developing high-affinity molecular probes with the ability to recognize specific markers associated with different tumors. Aptamers can most easily meet this challenge based on their target diversity, flexible manipulation and ease of development. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: Using a method known as cell-based Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (cell-SELEX and colorectal cancer cultured cell lines DLD-1 and HCT 116, we selected a panel of target-specific aptamers. Binding studies by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that these aptamers have high affinity and selectivity. Our data further show that these aptamers neither recognize normal colon cells (cultured and fresh, nor do they recognize most other cancer cell lines tested. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The selected aptamers can identify specific biomarkers associated with colorectal cancers. We believe that these probes could be further developed for early disease detection, as well as prognostic markers, of colorectal cancers.

  3. Serum YKL-40 in risk assessment for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Julia S; Christensen, Ib J; Jørgensen, Lars N

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that high serum YKL-40 associates with colorectal cancer in subjects at risk of colorectal cancer. We measured serum YKL-40 in a prospective study of 4,496 Danish subjects [2,064 men, 2,432 women, median age 61 years (range, 18-97)] referred...... to endoscopy due to symptoms or other risk factors for colorectal cancer. Blood samples were collected just before large bowel endoscopy. Serum YKL-40 was determined by ELISA. Serum YKL-40 was higher (P .../L, 25%-75%: 80-206 μg/L) and rectal cancer (104, 72-204 μg/L) compared with subjects with adenoma (84, 53-154 μg/L), other nonmalignant findings (79, 49-138 μg/L), and no findings (62, 41-109 μg/L). Serum YKL-40 independently predicted colorectal cancer [OR, 1.53; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1...

  4. A Comprehensive Study of Extramural Venous Invasion in Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David McClelland

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is a common malignancy and a leading cause of cancer related death. Cancer staging following resection is key to determining any adjuvant therapy in those patients with high risk disease. In colorectal cancer, tumour stage and lymph node stage are the main pathological factors which have been considered to influence outcome. Increasing emphasis is now being placed on other factors, especially the presence of extramural venous invasion (EMVI. It is important to understand the relationship of EMVI with other pathological factors and to confirm that in an individual centre that EMVI is being detected at an appropriate rate and is of prognostic significance. This comprehensive study assesses the reporting and prognostic significance of EMVI in a single centre, using prospectively collected data from histopathology reports of a cohort of 2405 patients who underwent surgery for colorectal cancer over a nine year period. Overall, EMVI was reported in 27.9% of colorectal cancer excision specimens. In tumours (n = 1928 that had not received neoadjuvant therapy, the presence of EMVI varied significantly depending on tumour site (χ2 = 12.03, p<0.005, tumour stage (χ2 = 268.188, p<0.001, lymph node stage (χ2 = 294.368, p<0.001 and Dukes' stage (χ2 = 253.753, p<0.001. Multivariate analysis confirmed EMVI as a significant independent prognostic indicator (p<0.001. In conclusion, the presence of EMVI as an independent prognostic indicator is shown and is related to other pathological and prognostic factors. This study emphasises the requirement for the accurate identification of EMVI in colorectal cancer excision specimens and also understanding the relationship of EMVI with other prognostic factors.

  5. Metastatic colorectal cancer-past, progress and future

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The clinical management of metastatic (stage Ⅳ)colorectal cancer (CRC) is a common challenge faced by surgeons and physicians. The last decade has seen exciting developments in the management of CRC, with significant improvements in prognosis for patients diagnosed with stage Ⅳ disease. Treatment options have expanded from 5-fluorouracil alone to a range of pharmaceutical and interventional therapies,improving survival, and providing a cure in selected cases. Enhanced understanding of the biologic pathways most important in colorectal carcinogenesis has led to a new generation of drugs showing promise in advanced disease. It is hoped that in the near future the treatment paradigm of metastatic CRC will be analogous to that of a chronic illness, rather than a rapidly terminal condition.This overview discusses the epidemiology of advanced CRC and currently available therapeutic options including medical, surgical, ablative and novel modalities in the management of metastatic colorectal cancer.

  6. Activating mutation in MET oncogene in familial colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schildkraut Joellen M

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In developed countries, the lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC is 5%, and it is the second leading cause of death from cancer. The presence of family history is a well established risk factor with 25-35% of CRCs attributable to inherited and/or familial factors. The highly penetrant inherited colon cancer syndromes account for approximately 5%, leaving greater than 20% without clear genetic definition. Familial colorectal cancer has been linked to chromosome 7q31 by multiple affected relative pair studies. The MET proto-oncogene which resides in this chromosomal region is considered a candidate for genetic susceptibility. Methods MET exons were amplified by PCR from germline DNA of 148 affected sibling pairs with colorectal cancer. Amplicons with altered sequence were detected with high-resolution melt-curve analysis using a LightScanner (Idaho Technologies. Samples demonstrating alternative melt curves were sequenced. A TaqMan assay for the specific c.2975C >T change was used to confirm this mutation in a cohort of 299 colorectal cancer cases and to look for allelic amplification in tumors. Results Here we report a germline non-synonymous change in the MET proto-oncogene at amino acid position T992I (also reported as MET p.T1010I in 5.2% of a cohort of sibling pairs affected with CRC. This genetic variant was then confirmed in a second cohort of individuals diagnosed with CRC and having a first degree relative with CRC at prevalence of 4.1%. This mutation has been reported in cancer cells of multiple origins, including 2.5% of colon cancers, and in Conclusions Although the MET p.T992I genetic mutation is commonly found in somatic colorectal cancer tissues, this is the first report also implicating this MET genetic mutation as a germline inherited risk factor for familial colorectal cancer. Future studies on the cancer risks associated with this mutation and the prevalence in different at-risk populations will

  7. Dietary folate and APC mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vogel, Stefan; van Engeland, Manon; Lüchtenborg, Margreet; de Bruïne, Adriaan P; Roemen, Guido M J M; Lentjes, Marjolein H F M; Goldbohm, R Alexandra; van den Brandt, Piet A; de Goeij, Anton F P M; Weijenberg, Matty P

    2006-12-01

    Folate deficiency has been associated with colorectal cancer risk and may be involved in colorectal carcinogenesis through increased chromosome instability, gene mutations, and aberrant DNA methylation. Within the Netherlands Cohort Study on diet and cancer, we investigated the associations between dietary folate intake and colorectal cancer risk with (APC(+)) and without (APC(-)) truncating APC mutations, accounting for hMLH1 expression and K-ras mutations. In total, 528 cases and 4200 subcohort members were available for data analyses of the study cohort (n = 120,852) from a follow-up period between 2.3 and 7.3 y after baseline. Adjusted gender-specific incidence rate ratios (RR) over tertiles of folate intake were calculated in case-cohort analyses for colon and rectal cancer. Although relatively high folate intake was not associated with overall colorectal cancer risk, it reduced the risk of APC(-)colon tumors in men (RR 0.58, 95% CI 0.32-1.05, P(trend) = 0.06 for the highest vs. lowest tertile of folate intake). In contrast, it was positively associated with APC(+) colon tumors in men (highest vs. lowest tertile: RR 2.77, 95% CI 1.29-5.95, P(trend) = 0.008) and was even stronger when the lack of hMLH1 expression and K-ras mutations were excluded (RR 3.99, 95% CI 1.43-11.14, P(trend) = 0.007). Such positive associations were not observed among women; nor was folate intake associated with rectal cancer when APC mutation status was taken into account. Relatively high folate consumption reduced the risk of APC(-) colon tumors, but folate intake was positively associated with APC(+) colon tumors among men. These opposite results may indicate that folate enhances colorectal carcinogenesis through a distinct APC mutated pathway.

  8. Expression of prostasin and its inhibitors during colorectal cancer carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kure Elin H

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical trials where cancer patients were treated with protease inhibitors have suggested that the serine protease, prostasin, may act as a tumour suppressor. Prostasin is proteolytically activated by the serine protease, matriptase, which has a very high oncogenic potential. Prostasin is inhibited by protease nexin-1 (PN-1 and the two isoforms encoded by the mRNA splice variants of hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor-1 (HAI-1, HAI-1A, and HAI-1B. Methods Using quantitative RT-PCR, we have determined the mRNA levels for prostasin and PN-1 in colorectal cancer tissue (n = 116, severe dysplasia (n = 13, mild/moderate dysplasia (n = 93, and in normal tissue from the same individuals. In addition, corresponding tissues were examined from healthy volunteers (n = 23. A part of the cohort was further analysed for the mRNA levels of the two variants of HAI-1, here denoted HAI-1A and HAI-1B. mRNA levels were normalised to β-actin. Immunohistochemical analysis of prostasin and HAI-1 was performed on normal and cancer tissue. Results The mRNA level of prostasin was slightly but significantly decreased in both mild/moderate dysplasia (p PN-1 was more that two-fold elevated in colorectal cancer tissue as compared to healthy individuals (p HAI-1A and HAI-1B mRNAs showed the same patterns of expression. Immunohistochemistry showed that prostasin is located mainly on the apical plasma membrane in normal colorectal tissue. A large variation was found in the degree of polarization of prostasin in colorectal cancer tissue. Conclusion These results show that the mRNA level of PN-1 is significantly elevated in colorectal cancer tissue. Future studies are required to clarify whether down-regulation of prostasin activity via up regulation of PN-1 is causing the malignant progression or if it is a consequence of it.

  9. Internet Use for Prediagnosis Symptom Appraisal by Colorectal Cancer Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Maria D.; Siminoff, Laura A.; Longo, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: This study explored the characteristics of colorectal cancer (CRC) patients who accessed Internet-based health information as part of their symptom appraisal process prior to consulting a health care provider. Method: Newly diagnosed CRC patients who experienced symptoms prior to diagnosis were interviewed. Brief COPE was used to…

  10. Role of chance in familial aggregaton of colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katballe, N.; Bentzen, S.M.; Christensen, M.

    2001-01-01

    A prospective population-based study recorded family trees of 77 colorectal cancer patients younger than 50 years of age. Using mathematical modeling of population age-incidence data, we estimate that 1 (95% confidence limits 0 and 3) of these families is expected to meet the Amsterdam criteria I...

  11. Prognostic and predictive biomarkers in colorectal cancer. Towards precision medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimers, Marlies Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to define prognostic and predictive biomarkers in colorectal cancer for improved risk stratification and treatment benefit in the individual patient, with the introduction of precision medicine in the near future as the ultimate goal. By definition, precision medicine is

  12. Message from Terrence Howard: Screening for Colorectal Cancer PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-04-13

    A message from the actor/musician Terrence Howard about the importance of screening for colorectal cancer.  Created: 4/13/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/13/2010.

  13. Message from Terrence Howard: Screening for Colorectal Cancer PSA (:20)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-04-13

    A message from the actor/musician Terrence Howard about the importance of screening for colorectal cancer.  Created: 4/13/2010 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 4/13/2010.

  14. Experimental study of radioimmunotherapy versus chemotherapy for colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, G.M. de; Bleichrodt, R.P.; Eek, A.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Boerman, O.C.; Hendriks, T.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) has been shown to reduce the incidence of local recurrence of colorectal cancer in an experimental model. The aim of the present study was to investigate the survival benefit of RIT compared with chemotherapy. METHODS: An anastomosis was constructed in male Wag/R

  15. Candidate driver genes in microsatellite-unstable colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alhopuro, Pia; Sammalkorpi, Heli; Niittymaki, Iina; Bistrom, Mia; Raitila, Anniina; Saharinen, Juha; Nousiainen, Kari; Lehtonen, Heli J.; Heliovaara, Elina; Puhakka, Jani; Tuupanen, Sari; Sousa, Sonia; Seruca, Raquel; Ferreira, Ana M.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Jarvinen, Heikki; Ristimaki, Ari; Orntoft, Torben F.; Hautaniemi, Sampsa; Arango, Diego; Karhu, Auli; Aaltonen, Lauri A.

    2012-01-01

    Defects in the mismatch repair system lead to microsatellite instability (MSI), a feature observed in similar to 15% of all colorectal cancers (CRCs). Microsatellite mutations that drive tumourigenesis, typically inactivation of tumour suppressors, are selected for and are frequently detected in MSI

  16. Studies on screening and surveillance for colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.A. Mulder (Sanna)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractColorectal cancer (CRC) is a major public health problem in the Western world. The life-time risk for developing CRC is approximately five percent and increases with age. In The Netherlands, the incidence of CRC is 67.5 per 100 000 in men and 46.7 per 100 000 in women (European Standardi

  17. Cost-effectiveness of colorectal cancer screening - An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Lansdorp-Vogelaar (Iris); A.B. Knudsen (Amy); H. Brenner (Hermann)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThere are several modalities available for a colorectal cancer (CRC) screening program. When determining which CRC screening program to implement, the costs of such programs should be considered in comparison to the health benefits they are expected to provide. Cost-effectiveness analysi

  18. Immunisation of colorectal cancer patients with autologous tumour cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt; Stenholm, A C; Kronborg, O

    1998-01-01

    Patients with colorectal cancer were entered into a clinical phase I trial of immunotherapy with an autologous tumour cell/bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine. We attempted to describe the possible effects and side effects of the immunisation, and further to investigate whether expression...

  19. Refining EGFR-monoclonal antibody treatment in colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krens, Lisanne Laura

    2015-01-01

    The use of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies cetuximab and panitumumab is limited to colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with KRAS wild type tumors and more recently in RAS wild type only. After having become chemotherapy refractory, treatment options are limited for this substanti

  20. Socioeconomic position and participation in colorectal cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, B L; Jørgensen, Torben; Brasso, K

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) screening with faecal occult blood test (FOBT) has the potential to reduce the incidence and mortality of CRC. Screening uptake is known to be inferior in people with low socioeconomic position (SEP) when compared with those with high position; however, the results of most...

  1. Haemostatic alterations in colorectal cancer: perspectives for future treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jakob; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2004-01-01

    The role of the haemostatic system in colorectal cancer (CRC) is reviewed. Correlations between the activation of the haemostatic system and overall survival have been suggested. Experimental studies indicate that the haemostatic system plays a key role in growth, invasion and dissemination of tu...

  2. Changing patterns of recurrent disease in colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossmann, I.; Doornbos, P. M.; Klaase, J. M.; de Bock, G. H.; Wiggers, T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Due to changes in staging, (neo)-adjuvant treatment and surgical techniques for colorectal cancer (CRC), it is expected that the recurrence pattern will change as well. This study aims to report the current incidence of, and time to recurrent disease (RD), further the localization(s) and

  3. Obesity, Aspirin, and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in Carriers of Hereditary Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Movahedi, Mohammad; Bishop, D Timothy; Macrae, Finlay;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: In the general population, increased adiposity is a significant risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC), but whether obesity has similar effects in those with hereditary CRC is uncertain. This prospective study investigated the association between body mass index and cancer risk...... was 25.0 months, and mean follow-up was 55.7 months. RESULTS: During follow-up, 55 of 937 participants developed CRC. For obese participants, CRC risk was 2.41× (95% CI, 1.22 to 4.85) greater than for underweight and normal-weight participants (reference group), and CRC risk increased by 7% for each 1-kg....../m(2) increase in body mass index. The risk of all LS-related cancers in obese people was 1.77× (95% CI, 1.06 to 2.96; P = .03) greater than for the reference group. In subgroup analysis, obesity was associated with 3.72× (95% CI, 1.41 to 9.81) greater CRC risk in patients with LS with MLH1 mutation...

  4. Gliotoxin Inhibits Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junxiong Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of new bioactive compounds from marine natural sources is very important in pharmacological research. Here we developed a Wnt responsive luciferase reporter assay to screen small molecule inhibitors of cancer associated constitutive Wnt signaling pathway. We identified that gliotoxin (GTX and some of its analogues, the secondary metabolites from marine fungus Neosartorya pseufofischeri, acted as inhibitors of the Wnt signaling pathway. In addition, we found that GTX downregulated the β-catenin levels in colorectal cancer cells with inactivating mutations of adenomatous polyposis coli (APC or activating mutations of β-catenin. Furthermore, we demonstrated that GTX induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in multiple colorectal cancer cell lines with mutations of the Wnt signaling pathway. Together, we illustrated a practical approach to identify small-molecule inhibitors of the Wnt signaling pathway and our study indicated that GTX has therapeutic potential for the prevention or treatment of Wnt dependent cancers and other Wnt related diseases.

  5. Risk factors for sporadic colorectal cancer in southern Chinese

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Sheng Wei; Jia-Chun Lu; Lei Wang; Ping Lan; Hong-Jun Zhao; Zhi-Zhong Pan; Jun Huang; Jian-Ping Wang

    2009-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the role of smoking, alcohol drinking, family history of cancer, and body mass index (BMI) in sporadic colorectal cancer in southern Chinese.METHODS:A hospital-based case-control study was conducted from July 2002 to December 2008. There were 706 cases and 723 controls with their sex and age (within 5 years) matched. An unconditional logistic regression model was used to analyze the association between smoking, alcohol drinking, family history of cancer, BMI and sporadic colorectal cancer. RESULTS:No positive association was observed between smoking status and sporadic colorectal cancer risk. Compared with the non alcohol drinkers, the current and former alcohol drinkers had an increased risk of developing sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) (adjusted OR = 8.61 and 95% CI = 6.15-12.05; adjusted OR = 2.30, 95% CI = 1.27-4.17). Moreover, the increased risk of developing sporadic CRC was increased risk of developing sporadic CRC was significant in those with a positive family history of cancer (adjusted OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.12-3.34) and in those with their BMI ≥ 24.0 kg/m2 (adjusted OR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.10-1.75). Stratification analysis showed that the risk of developing both colon and rectal cancers was increased in current alcohol drinkers (adjusted OR = 7.60 and 95% CI = 5.13-11.25; adjusted OR = 7.52 and 95% CI = 5.13-11.01) and in those with their BMI ≥ 24.0 kg/m2 (adjusted OR = 1.38 and 95% CI = 1.04-1.83; adjusted OR = 1.35 and 95% CI = 1.02-1.79). The risk of developing colon cancer, but not rectal cancer, was found in former alcohol drinkers and in those with a positive family history of cancer (adjusted OR = 2.51 and 95% CI = 1.24-5.07; adjusted OR = 1.82 and 95% CI = 1.17-2.82).CONCLUSION:Alcohol drinking, high BMI (≥ 24.0 kg/m2) and positive family history of cancer are the independent risk factors for colorectal cancer in southern Chinese.

  6. Brother of Regulator of Imprinted Sites (BORIS) suppresses apoptosis in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanmei; Fang, Mengdie; Song, Yongfei; Ren, Juan; Fang, Jianfei; Wang, Xiaoju

    2017-01-01

    Identifying oncogenes that promote cancer cell proliferation or survival is critical for treatment of colorectal cancer. The Brother of Regulator of Imprinted Sites (BORIS) is frequently expressed in most types of cancer, but rarely in normal tissues. Aberrantly expressed BORIS relates to colorectal cancer, but its function in colorectal cancer cells remains unclear. In addition, previous studies indicated the significance of cytoplasm-localized BORIS in cancer cells. However, none of them investigated its function. Herein, we investigated the functions of BORIS in cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis and the role of cytoplasm-localized BORIS in colorectal cancer. BORIS expression correlated with colorectal cancer proliferation. BORIS overexpression promoted colorectal cancer cell growth, whereas BORIS knockdown suppressed cell proliferation. Sensitivity of colorectal cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) was inversely correlated with BORIS expression. These data suggest that BORIS functions as an oncogene in colorectal cancer. BORIS silencing induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and apoptosis, whereas BORIS supplementation inhibited apoptosis induced by BORIS short interfering RNA (siRNA), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or 5-FU. Introduction of BORIS-ZFdel showed that cytoplasmic localization of BORIS inhibited apoptosis but not ROS production. Our study highlights the anti-apoptotic function of BORIS in colorectal cancer. PMID:28098226

  7. Relationship Between Microcystin in Drinking Water and Colorectal Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association of microcystin (MC) in drinking water with the incidence of colorectal cancer. Methods The study was designed as a retrospective cohort. Eight townships or towns were randomly selected as the study sites in Haining City of Zhejiang Province, China. 408 cases of colon and rectum carcinomas diagnosed from 1977 to 1996 in the study sites were included, and a survey on types of drinking water of these patients was conducted. Samples of different water sources (well, tap, river and pond) were collected separately and microcystin concentrations were determined by indirect competitive ELISA method. Results The incidence rate of colorectal cancer was significantly higher in population who drank river and pond water than those who drank well and tap water. Compared to well water, the relative risk (RR) for colorectal cancer was 1.88 (tap), 7.94 (river) and 7.70 (pond) respectively. The positive rate (>50 pg/mL) of microcystin in samples of well, tap, river and pond water was 0, 0, 36.23% and 17.14% respectively. The concentration of microcystin in river and pond water was significantly higher than that in well and tap water (P<0.01). Spearman rank correlation analysis showed that in the study sites, the microcystin concentration of river and pond water was positively associated with the incidence of colorectal cancer (rs= 0.881, P<0.01). Conclusions The types of drinking water are positively associated with the incidence of colorectal cancer in the study sites, and this may be related to microcystin contamination of drinking water. Further biological study is needed to support the possible causative role of mycrocystin in carcinogenesis of colon and rectum.

  8. B7-H3 expression in colorectal cancer: associations with clinicopathological parameters and patient outcome

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background We have previously reported overexpression of the immunoregulatory protein B7-H3 in colorectal cancer and that nuclear expression predicted poor outcome in colon cancer patients. The present study was performed to examine the prognostic role of B7-H3 in an independent colorectal cancer cohort. Methods Using tissue microarrays from 731 colorectal cancer patients, tumour B7-H3 expression was ...

  9. Psychological barriers and facilitators of colorectal cancer screening: a French qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgiane Bridou

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the psychological barriers to and facilitators of undergoing the Hemoccult-II® colorectal cancer screening test in France. Sixty-nine French people aged 50 to 74 years were divided into seven qualitative focus groups. Three issues were discussed with participants: knowledge and beliefs about colorectal cancer screening; facilitators of colorectal cancer screening by Hemoccult-II®; barriers to colorectal cancer screening by Hemoccult-II®. All the discussions were led by two psychologists and were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analyzed using qualitative data analysis software. Correspondence factor analyses identified three dimensions for each topic. The main psychological facilitators of colorectal cancer screening were: information about colorectal cancer screening, perceived simplicity of using Hemoccult-II®, and perception of risk. Uncertainty about the reliability of Hemoccult-II®, health anxiety, and embarrassment emerged as the main barriers to colorectal cancer screening. Cross-sectional analyses identified the differences between the views expressed by women and men. Women appeared more embarrassed about Hemoccult-II® and men seemed to be more worried about colorectal cancer. This preliminary study suggests that psychological factors play an important role in colorectal cancer screening by Hemoccult-II®. This finding may help health organizations to conceive better awareness campaigns to promote colorectal cancer screening in order to reduce the related mortality rate by taking into account psychological determinants.

  10. Identification of a biomarker panel for colorectal cancer diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García-Bilbao Amaia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignancies arising in the large bowel cause the second largest number of deaths from cancer in the Western World. Despite progresses made during the last decades, colorectal cancer remains one of the most frequent and deadly neoplasias in the western countries. Methods A genomic study of human colorectal cancer has been carried out on a total of 31 tumoral samples, corresponding to different stages of the disease, and 33 non-tumoral samples. The study was carried out by hybridisation of the tumour samples against a reference pool of non-tumoral samples using Agilent Human 1A 60-mer oligo microarrays. The results obtained were validated by qRT-PCR. In the subsequent bioinformatics analysis, gene networks by means of Bayesian classifiers, variable selection and bootstrap resampling were built. The consensus among all the induced models produced a hierarchy of dependences and, thus, of variables. Results After an exhaustive process of pre-processing to ensure data quality--lost values imputation, probes quality, data smoothing and intraclass variability filtering--the final dataset comprised a total of 8, 104 probes. Next, a supervised classification approach and data analysis was carried out to obtain the most relevant genes. Two of them are directly involved in cancer progression and in particular in colorectal cancer. Finally, a supervised classifier was induced to classify new unseen samples. Conclusions We have developed a tentative model for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer based on a biomarker panel. Our results indicate that the gene profile described herein can discriminate between non-cancerous and cancerous samples with 94.45% accuracy using different supervised classifiers (AUC values in the range of 0.997 and 0.955.

  11. Metabolic syndrome and risk of subsequent colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raluca Pais; Horatiu Silaghi; Alina Cristina Silaghi; Mihai Lucian Rusu; Dan Lucian Dumitrascu

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome and visceral obesity have an increasing prevalence and incidence in the general population. The actual prevalence of the metabolic syndrome is 24% in US population and between 24.6% and 30.9% in Europe. As demonstrated by many clinical trials (NAHANES Ⅲ, INTERHART) the metabolic syndrome is associated with an increased risk of both diabetes and cardiovascular disease. In addition to cardiovascular disease, individual components of the metabolic syndrome have been linked to the development of cancer, particularly to colorectal cancer.Colorectal cancer is an important public health problem; in the year 2000 there was an estimated total of 944 717 incident cases of colorectal cancer diagnosed world-wide. This association is sustained by many epidemiological studies. Recent reports suggest that individuals with metabolic syndrome have a higher risk of colon or rectal cancer. Moreover, the clusters of metabolic syndrome components increase the risk of associated cancer. The physiopathological mechanism that links metabolic syndrome and colorectal cancer is mostly related to abdominal obesity and insulin resistance. Population and experimental studies demonstrated that hyperinsulinemia, elevated C-peptide, elevated body mass index, high levels of insulin growth factor-1, low levels of insulin growth factor binding protein-3, high leptin levels and low adiponectin levels are all involved in carcinogenesis. Understanding the pathological mechanism that links metabolic syndrome and its components to carcinogenesis has a major clinical significance and may have profound health benefits on a number of diseases including cancer, which represents a major cause of mortality and morbidity in our societies.

  12. Analysis of mitochondrial ND1 gene in human colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Akouchekian

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Results showed that a high frequency of somatic alterations of mtDNA occurs during the carcinogenesis and/or the progression of colorectal cancer. Based on the mtDNA mutation pattern observed in this study and other pre-viously studies it is believed that looking for somatic mutations in mtDNA would be one of the diagnostic values in early detection of cancer.

  13. EphB2: a signature of colorectal cancer stem cells to predict relapse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoxue Zhang

    2011-01-01

    @@ Colorectal cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers and is the second leading cause of death from cancer.Currently, the conventional treatment in clinics is surgery combined with chemotherapy or radiation therapy.Although new drugs have been developed, relapse and metastasis occur in nearly half of colorectal cancer patients.

  14. 77 FR 41791 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-16

    ..., Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO) (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of... Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO) (NCI). Type of Information Collection Request: Revision (OMB : 0925... designed to determine if cancer screening for prostate, lung, colorectal, and ovarian cancer can...

  15. Validity of data in the Danish Colorectal Cancer Screening Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomsen MK

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mette Kielsholm Thomsen,1 Sisse Helle Njor,1 Morten Rasmussen,2 Dorte Linnemann,3 Berit Andersen,4 Gunnar Baatrup,5,6 Lennart Jan Friis-Hansen,7 Jens Christian Riis Jørgensen,8 Ellen Margrethe Mikkelsen1 1Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, 2Department of Digestive Diseases K, Bispebjerg Hospital, Copenhagen, 3Department of Pathology, Herlev and Gentofte Hospital, Herlev, 4Department of Public Health Programs, Randers Regional Hospital, Randers, 5Department of Surgery, Odense University Hospital, 6Department of Clinical Science, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, 7Center for Genomic Medicine, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, 8Department of Colorectal Cancer Surgery, Vejle Hospital, Vejle, Denmark Background: In Denmark, a nationwide screening program for colorectal cancer was implemented in March 2014. Along with this, a clinical database for program monitoring and research purposes was established. Objective: The aim of this study was to estimate the agreement and validity of diagnosis and procedure codes in the Danish Colorectal Cancer Screening Database (DCCSD. Methods: All individuals with a positive immunochemical fecal occult blood test (iFOBT result who were invited to screening in the first 3 months since program initiation were identified. From these, a sample of 150 individuals was selected using stratified random sampling by age, gender and region of residence. Data from the DCCSD were compared with data from hospital records, which were used as the reference. Agreement, sensitivity, specificity and positive and negative predictive values were estimated for categories of codes “clean colon”, “colonoscopy performed”, “overall completeness of colonoscopy”, “incomplete colonoscopy”, “polypectomy”, “tumor tissue left behind”, “number of polyps”, “lost polyps”, “risk group of polyps” and “colorectal cancer and polyps/benign tumor

  16. Expression of 5-Lipoxygenase in human colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Labile Togba Soumaoro; Satoru Iida; Hiroyuki Uetake; Megumi Ishiguro; Yoko Takagi; Tetsuro Higuchi; Masamichi Yasuno; Masayuki Enomoto; Kenichi Sugihara

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the 5-lipoxygenases (Loxs) expression level in human colorectal cancer specimens in order to determine its clinicopathologic significance in human tumorigenesis.METHODS: The relative quantity of 5-Lox mRNA in paired 91 colorectal tumor and adjacent normal mucosa samples was determined by real time quantitative PCR. Additionally, the expression of 5-Lox and cyclooxygenase (Cox)-2 proteins was also examined using immunohistochemical staining methods.RESULTS: There was a marked increase in 5-Lox mRNA levels in the tumor compared with paired normal mucosa samples (P < 0.0001). Sixty six (72.5%) tumors showed high 5-Lox mRNA levels. The positivity rate of 5-Lox and Cox-2 protein expression was 68.7% and 79.1%respectively. There was a significant association between tumoral 5-Lox mRNA level and tumor size (Rho = 0.392,P = 0.0002), depth or vessel invasion.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that 5-Lox is up-regulated in colorectal cancer and that inhibition of its expression might be valuable in the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer.

  17. Colorectal cancer incidence rates have decreased in central Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocetti, Emanuele; Buzzoni, Carlotta; Zappa, Marco

    2010-11-01

    We analyzed colorectal cancer incidence data from the Tuscany Cancer Registry, central Italy, for the period 1985-2005. We carried out a trend analysis through a Joinpoint regression analysis, and summarized trends as annual percent change (APC) of the standardized (European standard) rates. Colorectal incidence rates increased until 1996 (APC=+1.4, 95% CI: 0.8-1.9), then decreased significantly (APC=-1.1, 95% CI: -0.8 to -0.4). The change was detected as statistically significant in the age group of 54+ years. Among younger individuals, we observed an increasing incidence until 2003. In the same geographical area, a colorectal screening programme has been active from 1982; it was initially based on guaiac faecal occult blood testing (GFOBT) and on immunological testing (IFOBT) since the mid 1990s. The decline in colorectal cancer incidence since 1996, in the whole population and especially among individuals older than 54 years, may suggest the effect of FOBT screening in terms of precancerous polyps removal.

  18. Potential Protective Effects of Probiotics and Prebiotics Against Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allsopp, Philip; Rowland, Ian

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most frequent cause of cancer related mortality in the world. Approximately 944,000 new cases were diagnosed globally in 2000 and this accounts for 9.2% of all new cancer cases (IARC, 2000). In Western societies namely Europe, North America and Australasia, it is the second most prevalent cancer after lung/breast (Boyle and Langman, 2000). About 363,000 new cases were reported in Europe in 2000 and it affects 6% of men and women by age 75, in almost equal proportion.

  19. Oncogene Mutations in Colorectal Polyps Identified in the Norwegian Colorectal Cancer Prevention (NORCCAP) Screening Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentzen, Jon A.; Grzyb, Krzysztof; De Angelis, Paula M.; Hoff, Geir; Eide, Tor J.; Andresen, Per Arne

    2016-01-01

    Data are limited on oncogene mutation frequencies in polyps from principally asymptomatic participants of population-based colorectal cancer screening studies. In this study, DNA from 204 polyps, 5 mm or larger, were collected from 176 participants of the NORCCAP screening study and analyzed for mutations in KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA including the rarely studied KRAS exons 3 and 4 mutations. KRAS mutations were identified in 23.0% of the lesions and were significantly associated with tubulovillous adenomas and large size. A significantly higher frequency of KRAS mutations in females was associated with mutations in codon 12. The KRAS exon 3 and 4 mutations constituted 23.4% of the KRAS positive lesions, which is a larger proportion compared to previous observations in colorectal cancer. BRAF mutations were identified in 11.3% and were associated with serrated polyps. None of the individuals were diagnosed with de novo or recurrent colorectal cancer during the follow-up time (median 11.2 years). Revealing differences in mutation-spectra according to gender and stages in tumorigenesis might be important for optimal use of oncogenes as therapeutic targets and biomarkers. PMID:27656095

  20. Perceived Stress and Colorectal Cancer Incidence: The Japan Collaborative Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Norimasa; Nishiyama, Takeshi; Sawada, Takayuki; Wang, Chaochen; Lin, Yingsong; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Kikuchi, Shogo

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide, and many risk factors for colorectal cancer have been established. However, it remains uncertain whether psychological stress contributes to the onset of colorectal cancer. Therefore, we conducted a large-scale prospective cohort study to confirm the association between perceived stress and colorectal cancer incidence. We identified 680 cases of colon cancer and 330 cases of rectal cancer during a maximum of 21-year follow-up of 61,563 Japanese men and women. Cox regression analysis adjusted for potential confounders revealed a significant association of perceived stress with rectal cancer incidence but not with colon cancer incidence. This finding is partly consistent with that from only one previous study that addressed an association between perceived stress and the risk of colorectal cancer. However, studies on this topic are sparse and warrant further exploration. PMID:28091607

  1. Six-Year Experience of a Nurse-Led Colorectal Cancer Follow-Up Clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Al Chalabi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives. To review the experience of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in a tertiary referral colorectal cancer centre. Methodology. Data from the nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in our unit was prospectively maintained in a colorectal cancer database. Data was analysed from January 1, 2006 until the December 31, 2011. Results. 1125 patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and referred to our unit as a tertiary centre for specialised colorectal cancer. Nine hundred and four patients had surgical resection of their colorectal cancer. Four hundred and seven patients were referred to the nurse-led colorectal cancer clinic for surveillance. The mean age of the patient cohort was 67 years (range 32–88 and 56% of patients were male. One hundred and seventeen patients were discharged to their general practitioner having been disease free after 5 years of followup. Fifty-four patients were diagnosed with either local or distant recurrence. Conclusion. A nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic is running according to strict follow-up protocols. This type of clinic significantly reduces the number of routine follow-up patients that have to be seen by the colorectal surgical consultant.

  2. Six-year experience of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Chalabi, Hasan; O'Riordan, James M; Richardson, Alex; Flannery, Delia; O'Connor, Katrina; Stuart, Charlotte; Larkin, John; McCormick, Paul; Mehigan, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Aims and Objectives. To review the experience of a nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in a tertiary referral colorectal cancer centre. Methodology. Data from the nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic in our unit was prospectively maintained in a colorectal cancer database. Data was analysed from January 1, 2006 until the December 31, 2011. Results. 1125 patients were diagnosed with colorectal cancer, and referred to our unit as a tertiary centre for specialised colorectal cancer. Nine hundred and four patients had surgical resection of their colorectal cancer. Four hundred and seven patients were referred to the nurse-led colorectal cancer clinic for surveillance. The mean age of the patient cohort was 67 years (range 32-88) and 56% of patients were male. One hundred and seventeen patients were discharged to their general practitioner having been disease free after 5 years of followup. Fifty-four patients were diagnosed with either local or distant recurrence. Conclusion. A nurse-led colorectal cancer follow-up clinic is running according to strict follow-up protocols. This type of clinic significantly reduces the number of routine follow-up patients that have to be seen by the colorectal surgical consultant.

  3. Stage II colorectal cancer: lack of prognostic model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelbaset Buhmeida

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available TO THE EDITOR: Colorectal cancer (CRC is one of the most common malignant tumors worldwide (Gatta et al. 1998 [1], Repetto et al. 2003 [2] with the disease incidence rising along with an advanced age (Wymenga et al. 2001 [3], Franceschi et al. 2001 [4]. The overall mortality from CRC is 60%, which represents the second leading cause of cancer death in western societies. In Finland, the incidence of CRC is 25/100.000, and 20/100.000 among males and females, respectively. Annually, 1.150 new cases are detected among males and 1.200 among women, representing 9.2% and 10% of all cancer cases, respectively (Finnish Cancer Registry, 2005. On the other hand, according to Benghazi Cancer Registry, 2003 [5] the colorectal cancer in eastern part of Libya is the most second frequent cancer after lung cancer in males and breast cancer in females. The average crude incidence rate is 6.4 (male and 5.2 (female cases per 100,000 inhabitants, representing 10.1% of male patients and 9.3% of female patients of all cancer cases.

  4. Seromic profiling of colorectal cancer patients with novel glycopeptide microarray

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Johannes W; Blixt, Ola; Bennett, Eric P

    2011-01-01

    Cancer-associated autoantibodies hold promise as sensitive biomarkers for early detection of cancer. Aberrant post-translational variants of proteins are likely to induce autoantibodies, and changes in O-linked glycosylation represent one of the most important cancer-associated post...... array displaying a comprehensive library of glycopeptides and glycoproteins derived from a panel of human mucins (MUC1, MUC2, MUC4, MUC5AC, MUC6 and MUC7) known to have altered glycosylation and expression in cancer. Seromic profiling of patients with colorectal cancer identified cancer......-associated autoantibodies to a set of aberrant glycopeptides derived from MUC1 and MUC4. The cumulative sensitivity of the array analysis was 79% with a specificity of 92%. The most prevalent of the identified autoantibody targets were validated as authentic cancer immunogens by showing expression of the epitopes in cancer...

  5. Combining chemotherapy and targeted therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer remains one of the major causes of cancer death worldwide. During the past years, the development of new effective treatment options has led to a considerable improvement in the outcome of this disease. The advent of agents such as capecitabine, irinotecan, oxaliplatin, cetuximab and bevacizumab has translated into median survival times in the range of 2 years. Intense efforts have focused on identifying novel agents targeting specific growth factor receptors, critical signal transduction pathways or mediators of angiogenesis. In addition, several clinical trials have suggested that some of these molecularly targeted drugs can be safely and effectively used in combination with conventional chemotherapy. In this article we review various treatment options combining cytotoxic and targeted therapies currently available for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

  6. Collagen mRNA levels changes during colorectal cancer carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Hanne; Anthonsen, Dorit; Lothe, Inger M B;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Invasive growth of epithelial cancers is a complex multi-step process which involves dissolution of the basement membrane. Type IV collagen is a major component in most basement membranes. Type VII collagen is related to anchoring fibrils and is found primarily in the basement membrane....... In addition, corresponding tissue was examined from healthy volunteers (n = 20). mRNA levels were normalized to beta-actin. Immunohistochemical analysis of the distributions of type IV and type VII collagens were performed on normal and affected tissues from colorectal cancer patients. RESULTS: The alpha1(IV......). The level of alpha 6(IV) was 5-fold lower in colorectal cancer tissue as compared to healthy individuals (p collagen was visualized by immunohistochemical staining. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the down-regulation of alpha 6(IV) mRNA coincides...

  7. Tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters in colorectal cancer.

    KAUST Repository

    Cima, Igor

    2016-06-29

    Clusters of tumor cells are often observed in the blood of cancer patients. These structures have been described as malignant entities for more than 50 years, although their comprehensive characterization is lacking. Contrary to current consensus, we demonstrate that a discrete population of circulating cell clusters isolated from the blood of colorectal cancer patients are not cancerous but consist of tumor-derived endothelial cells. These clusters express both epithelial and mesenchymal markers, consistent with previous reports on circulating tumor cell (CTC) phenotyping. However, unlike CTCs, they do not mirror the genetic variations of matched tumors. Transcriptomic analysis of single clusters revealed that these structures exhibit an endothelial phenotype and can be traced back to the tumor endothelium. Further results show that tumor-derived endothelial clusters do not form by coagulation or by outgrowth of single circulating endothelial cells, supporting a direct release of clusters from the tumor vasculature. The isolation and enumeration of these benign clusters distinguished healthy volunteers from treatment-naïve as well as pathological early-stage (≤IIA) colorectal cancer patients with high accuracy, suggesting that tumor-derived circulating endothelial cell clusters could be used as a means of noninvasive screening for colorectal cancer. In contrast to CTCs, tumor-derived endothelial cell clusters may also provide important information about the underlying tumor vasculature at the time of diagnosis, during treatment, and throughout the course of the disease.

  8. Advances and perspectives of colorectal cancer stem cell vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mei; Dou, Jun

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is essentially an environmental and genetic disease featured by uncontrolled cell growth and the capability to invade other parts of the body by forming metastases, which inconvertibly cause great damage to tissues and organs. It has become one of the leading causes of cancer-related mortality in the developed countries such as United States, and approximately 1.2 million new cases are yearly diagnosed worldwide, with the death rate of more than 600,000 annually and incidence rates are increasing in most developing countries. Apart from the generally accepted theory that pathogenesis of colorectal cancer consists of genetic mutation of a certain target cell and diversifications in tumor microenvironment, the colorectal cancer stem cells (CCSCs) theory makes a different explanation, stating that among millions of colon cancer cells there is a specific and scanty cellular population which possess the capability of self-renewal, differentiation and strong oncogenicity, and is tightly responsible for drug resistance and tumor metastasis. Based on these characteristics, CCSCs are becoming a novel target cells both in the clinical and the basic studies, especially the study of CCSCs vaccines due to induced efficient immune response against CCSCs. This review provides an overview of CCSCs and preparation technics and targeting factors related to CCSCs vaccines in detail.

  9. RHOA inactivation enhances Wnt signaling and promotes colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Paulo; Macaya, Irati; Bazzocco, Sarah; Mazzolini, Rocco; Andretta, Elena; Dopeso, Higinio; Mateo-Lozano, Silvia; Bilić, Josipa; Cartón-García, Fernando; Nieto, Rocio; Suárez-López, Lucia; Afonso, Elsa; Landolfi, Stefania; Hernandez-Losa, Javier; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Cajal, Santiago Ramón y; Tabernero, Josep; Tebbutt, Niall C.; Mariadason, John M.; Schwartz, Simo; Arango, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the small GTPase RHOA has strong oncogenic effects in many tumor types, although its role in colorectal cancer remains unclear. Here we show that RHOA inactivation contributes to colorectal cancer progression/metastasis, largely through the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. RhoA inactivation in the murine intestine accelerates the tumorigenic process and in human colon cancer cells leads to the redistribution of β-catenin from the membrane to the nucleus and enhanced Wnt/β-catenin signaling, resulting in increased proliferation, invasion and de-differentiation. In mice, RHOA inactivation contributes to colon cancer metastasis and reduced RHOA levels were observed at metastatic sites compared to primary human colon tumors. Therefore, we have identified a new mechanism of activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and characterized the role of RHOA as a novel tumor suppressor in colorectal cancer. These results constitute a shift from the current paradigm and demonstrate that RHO GTPases can suppress tumor progression and metastasis. PMID:25413277

  10. Molecular markers and targets for colorectal cancer prevention

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Naveena B JANAKIRAM; Chinthalapally V RAO

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent cancer in the world. If detected at an early stage, treatment often might lead to cure. As prevention is better than cure, epidemiological studies reveal that having a healthy diet often protects from pro-moting/developing cancer. An important consideration in evaluating new drugs and devices is determining whether a product can effectively treat a targeted disease. There are quite a number of biomarkers making their way into clinical trials and few are awaiting the preclinical efficacy and safety results to enter into clinical trials. Researchers are facing challenges in modifying trial design and defining the right control population, validating biomarker assays from the bio-logical and analytical perspective and using biomarker data as a guideline for decision making. In spite of following all guidelines, the results are disappointing from many of the large clinical trials. To avoid these disappointments, selection of biomarkers and its target drug needs to be evaluated in appropriate animal models for its toxicities and efficacies. The focus of this review is on the few of the potential molecular targets and their biomarkers in colorectal cancers. Strengths and limitations of biomarkers/surrogate endpoints are also discussed. Various pathways involved in tumor cells and the specific agents to target the altered molecular biomarkerin biomolecular pathwayare elucidated. Importance of emerging new platforms siRNAs and miRNAs technology for colorectal cancer therapeutics is reviewed.

  11. Colorectal cancer in geriatric patients: Endoscopic diagnosis and surgical treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andreas Kirchgatterer; Pius Steiner; Dietmar Hubner; Eva Fritz; Gerhard Aschl; Josef Preisinger; Maximilian Hinterreiter; Bernhard Stadler; Peter Knoflach

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the prevalence of colorectal cancer in geriatric patients undergoing endoscopy and to analyze their outcome.METHODS: All consecutive patients older than 80 years who underwent lower gastrointestinal endoscopy between January 1995 and December 2002 at our institution were included.Patients with endoscopic diagnosis of colorectal cancer were evaluated with respect to indication, localization and stage of cancer, therapeutic consequences, and survival.RESULTS: Colorectal cancer was diagnosed in 88 patients (6% of all endoscopies, 55 women and 33 men, mean age 85.2 years). Frequent indications were lower gastrointestinal bleeding (25%), anemia (24%) or sonographic suspicion of tumor (10%). Localization of cancer was predominantly the sigmoid colon (27%), the rectum (26%), and the ascending colon (20%). Stage Dukes A was rare (1%), but Dukes D was diagnosed in 22% of cases. Curative surgery was performed in 54 patients (61.4%), in the remaining 34 patients (38.6%)surgical treatment was not feasible due to malnutrition and asthenia or cardiopulmonary comorbidity (15 patients), distant metastases (11 patients) or refusal of operation (8 patients).Patients undergoing surgery had a very low in-hospital mortality rate (2%). Operated patients had a one-year and three-year survival rate of 88% and 49%, and the survival rates for nonoperated patients amounted to 46% and 13% respectively.CONCLUSION: Nearly two-thirds of 88 geriatric patients with endoscopic diagnosis of colorectal cancer underwent successful surgery at a very low perioperative mortality rate, resulting in significantly higher survival rates. Hence,the clinical relevance of lower gastrointestinal endoscopy and oncologic surgery in geriatric patients is demonstrated.

  12. Primary and secondary prevention of colorectal cancer in the Czech Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeem, Kateřina; Ševčíková, Jarmila; Kyselý, Zdeněk; Horáková, Dagmar; Vlčková, Jana; Kollárová, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most frequent malignancies in the Czech Republic and worldwide. Also, a high prevalence of overweight and obesity, a high proportion of smokers in the population, and one of the highest per capita alcohol consumption rates are typical for the Czech population. The role of general practitioners in the prevention of colorectal cancer is crucial. In primary prevention, the doctor should emphasise the importance of a healthy lifestyle - a balanced diet rich in fruits and vegetables, maintaining a normal body weight, adequate physical activity, and non-smoking. In secondary prevention, patients should be informed about the possibilities of colorectal cancer screening and the benefits of early detection of the disease. Participation rates of the target population for colorectal cancer screening are low. Steps leading to increased participation in colorectal cancer screening (including postal invitations) play an important role in influencing the mortality of colorectal cancer.

  13. Human FK506 binding protein 65 is associated with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Sanne Harder; Christensen, Lise Lotte; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt;

    2005-01-01

    this gene hFKBP10 together with its encoded protein hFKBP65 as a novel marker associated with colorectal cancer. Analysis of 31 colorectal adenocarcinomas and 14 normal colorectal mucosa by RealTime PCR for hFKBP10 showed a significant up-regulation in tumors, when compared with normal mucosa...

  14. Lgr5 Methylation in Cancer Stem Cell Differentiation and Prognosis-Prediction in Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shasha Su

    Full Text Available Leucine-rich-repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (lgr5 is a candidate marker for colorectal cancer stem cells (CSC. In the current study, we investigated the methylation status within thelgr5 promoter and evaluated its relationship with CSC differentiation, prognosis for colorectal cancer, and its clinicopathological features.The methylation status within Lgr5 promoter was detected with a methylation-specific PCR in six colorectal cancer cell lines as well as 169 primary colorectal tumor tissues. Differentiation of CSC was examined with immunofluorescence and immunocytochemistry. Down-regulation of lgr5 was achieved with gene-specific siRNA. The associations between lgr5 methylation and the clinicopathological features as well as survival of patients were analyzed with statistical methods.The lgr5 promoter was methylated to different degrees for the six colorectal cell lines examined, with complete methylation observed in HCT116 cells in which the lgr5 expression was partially recovered following DAC treatment. The stem-cell sphere formation from HCT116 cells was accompanied by increasing methylation within the lgr5 promoter and decreasing expression of lgr5. Knocking down lgr5 by siRNA also led to stem-cell spheres formation. Among primary colorectal tumors, 40% (67/169 were positive for lgr5 methylation, while none of the normal colon tissues were positive for lgr5 methylation. Furthermore, lgr5 methylation significantly associated with higher tumor grade, and negative distant metastasis (p < 0.05, as well as better prognosis (p = 0.001 in patients with colorectal cancer.Our data suggests that lgr5 methylation, through the regulation of lgr5 expression and colorectal CSC differentiation, may constitute a novel prognostic marker for colorectal cancer patients.

  15. Promoter Methylation Precedes Chromosomal Alterations in Colorectal Cancer Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Derks

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancers are characterized by genetic and epigenetic alterations. This study aimed to explore the timing of promoter methylation and relationship with mutations and chromosomal alterations in colorectal carcinogenesis. Methods: In a series of 47 nonprogressed adenomas, 41 progressed adenomas (malignant polyps, 38 colorectal carcinomas and 18 paired normal tissues, we evaluated promoter methylation status of hMLH1, O6MGMT, APC, p14ARF, p16INK4A, RASSF1A, GATA-4, GATA-5, and CHFR using methylation-specific PCR. Mutation status of TP53, APC and KRAS were studied by p53 immunohistochemistry and sequencing of the APC and KRAS mutation cluster regions. Chromosomal alterations were evaluated by comparative genomic hybridization. Results: Our data demonstrate that nonprogressed adenomas, progressed adenomas and carcinomas show similar frequencies of promoter methylation for the majority of the genes. Normal tissues showed significantly lower frequencies of promoter methylation of APC, p16INK4A, GATA-4, and GATA-5 (P-values: 0.02, 0.02, 1.1×10−5 and 0.008 respectively. P53 immunopositivity and chromosomal abnormalities occur predominantly in carcinomas (P values: 1.1×10−5 and 4.1×10−10. Conclusions: Since promoter methylation was already present in nonprogressed adenomas without chromosomal alterations, we conclude that promoter methylation can be regarded as an early event preceding TP53 mutation and chromosomal abnormalities in colorectal cancer development.

  16. Single-incision laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the effect of single-incisionlaparoscopic colectomy (SILC) for colorectal canceron short-term clinical and oncological outcomes bycomparison with multiport conventional laparoscopiccolectomy (CLC).METHODS: A systematic review was performed usingMEDLINE for the time period of 2008 to December 2014to retrieve all relevant literature. The search terms were"laparoscopy", "single incision", "single port", "singlesite", "SILS", "LESS" and "colorectal cancer". Publicationswere included if they were randomized controlledtrials, case-matched controlled studies, or comparativestudies, in which patients underwent single-incision(SILS or LESS) laparoscopic colorectal surgery. Studieswere excluded if they were non-comparative, or notincluding surgery involving the colon or rectum. A totalof 15 studies with 589 patients who underwent SILC forcolorectal cancer were selected.RESULTS: No significant differences between thegroups were noted in terms of mortality or morbidity.The benefit of the SILC approach included reductionin conversion rate to laparotomy, but there wereno significant differences in other short-term clinicaloutcomes between the groups. Satisfactory oncologicalsurgical quality was also demonstrated for SILC for thetreatment of colorectal cancer with a similar averagelymph node harvest and proximal and distal resectionmargin length as multiport CLC.CONCLUSION: SILC can be performed safely withsimilar short-te

  17. Clues to the pathogenesis of familial colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaltonen, L.A.; Peltomaeki, P.; Pylkkaenen, L.; Chappelle, A. de la (Univ. of Helsinki (Finland)); Leach, F.S.; Powell, S.M.; Jen, J.; Hamilton, S.R.; Petersen, G.M.; Kinzler, K.W.; Vogelstein, B. (Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States) Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Sistonen, P. (Univ. of Helsinki (Finland) Finnish Red Cross Blood Transfusion Service, Helsinki (Finland)); Mecklin, J.P. (Jyvaeskylae Central Hospital (Finland)); Jaervinen, H. (Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland))

    1993-05-07

    A predisposition to colorectal cancer is shown to be linked to markers on chromosome 2 in some families. Molecular features of familial cancers were compared with those of sporadic colon cancers. Neither the familial nor sporadic cancers showed loss of heterozygosity for chromosome 2 markers, and the incidence of mutations in KRAS, P53, and APC was similar in the two groups of tumors. Most of the familial cancers, however, had widespread alterations in short repeated DNA sequences, suggesting that numerous replication errors had occurred during tumor development. Thirteen percent of sporadic cancers had identical abnormalities and these cancers shared biologic properties with the familial cases. These data suggest a mechanism for familial tumorigenesis different from that mediated by classic tumor suppressor genes. 22 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. CT colonography for synchronous colorectal lesions in patients with colorectal cancer: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McArthur, D.R.; Karandikar, S.S. [Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust (Teaching), Department of Surgery, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Mehrzad, H.; Patel, R.; Dadds, J.; Pallan, A.; Roy-Choudhury, S. [Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust (Teaching), Department of Radiology, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-15

    To assess accuracy of CT colonography (CTC) in identifying synchronous lesions in patients with colorectal carcinoma. This study included 174 consecutive patients undergoing CTC as part of staging or primary investigation where a colorectal cancer was diagnosed between 2004 and 2007. Prone unenhanced and portal phase enhanced supine series with air or CO{sub 2} distension were acquired using 4- or 16-slice CT (Toshiba) and read by 2D {+-} 3D formats. Synchronous lesions were classified according to American College of Radiology's (ACR) polyp classification. Segmental gold standard was flexible sigmoidoscopy/colonoscopy within 1 year and/or histology of colonic resection supplemented by follow-up. Nine patients without gold standard were excluded. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were calculated on a per polyp, per patient and per segment basis and discrepancies analysed. Direct comparable data were available for 764/990 colonic segments from 165 patients. Of 41 (C2-C4) synchronous lesions on ''gold standard'', 33 were correctly identified on virtual colonoscopy (VC), overall per polyp sensitivity was 80.5%, with detection rates of 20/24 C3 (83.3%) and 3/3 C4 (100%) with per patient and per segment specificity of 95.4% and 99.2%, respectively. CTC is an accurate technique to assess for significant synchronous lesions in patients with colorectal cancer and is applicable for total pre-operative colonic visualisation. (orig.)

  19. Environmental Factors in an Ontario Community with Disparities in Colorectal Cancer Incidence

    OpenAIRE

    Sritharan, Jeavana; Kamaleswaran, Rishikesan; McFarlan, Ken; Lemonde, Manon; George, Clemon; Sanchez, Otto

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In Ontario, there are significant geographical disparities in colorectal cancer incidence. In particular, the northern region of Timiskaming has the highest incidence of colorectal cancer in Ontario while the southern region of Peel displays the lowest. We aimed to identify non-nutritional modifiable environmental factors in Timiskaming that may be associated with its diverging colorectal cancer incidence rates when compared to Peel. Methods: We performed a systematic review to ide...

  20. Hydrophobic protein in colorectal cancer in relation to tumor stages and grades

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lay-Chin; Yeoh; Chee-Keat; Loh; Boon-Hui; Gooi; Manjit; Singh; Lay-Harn; Gam

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To identify differentially expressed hydrophobic proteins in colorectal cancer. METHODS: Eighteen pairs of colorectal cancerous tissues in addition to tissues from normal mucosa were analysed. Hydrophobic proteins were extracted from the tissues, separated using 2-D gel electrophoresis and analysed using Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Statistical analysis of the proteins was carried out in order to determine the significance of each protein to colorectal cancer (CRC) and als...

  1. Excessive collagen turnover products are released during colorectal cancer progression and elevated in serum from metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Stephanie Nina; Sanz-Pamplona, R.; Pedersen, Susanne Brix

    2016-01-01

    During cancer progression, the homeostasis of the extracellular matrix becomes imbalanced with an excessive collagen remodeling by matrix metalloproteinases. As a consequence, small protein fragments of degraded collagens are released into the circulation. We have investigated the potential...... of protein fragments of collagen type I, III and IV as novel biomarkers for colorectal cancer. Specific fragments of degraded type I, III and IV collagen (C1M, C3M, C4M) and type III collagen formation (Pro-C3) were assessed in serum from colorectal cancer patients, subjects with adenomas and matched healthy...... biomarkers were able to differentiate stage IV metastatic patients from all other stages. Combination of all markers with age and gender in a logistic regression model discriminated between metastatic and non-metastatic patients with an AUROC of 0.80. The data suggest that the levels of these collagen...

  2. Awareness of endometrial cancer risk and compliance with screening in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ketabi, Zohreh; Mosgaard, Berit J; Gerdes, Anne-Marie;

    2012-01-01

    Women with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) have a 40-60% lifetime risk for endometrial cancer. Guidelines in Denmark recommend gynecologic screening for female members of families with HNPCC. We estimated the knowledge of endometrial cancer risk and identified possible predictor...

  3. The gut microbiota, bacterial metabolites and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Petra; Hold, Georgina L; Flint, Harry J

    2014-10-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that the human intestinal microbiota contributes to the aetiology of colorectal cancer (CRC), not only via the pro-carcinogenic activities of specific pathogens but also via the influence of the wider microbial community, particularly its metabolome. Recent data have shown that the short-chain fatty acids acetate, propionate and butyrate function in the suppression of inflammation and cancer, whereas other microbial metabolites, such as secondary bile acids, promote carcinogenesis. In this Review, we discuss the relationship between diet, microbial metabolism and CRC and argue that the cumulative effects of microbial metabolites should be considered in order to better predict and prevent cancer progression.

  4. Recent progress in target therapy in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasetto, Lara Maria; Bortolami, Alberto; Falci, Cristina; Sinigaglia, Giulietta; Monfardini, Silvio

    2006-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are a new class of agents targeting at specific receptors on cancer cells. In addition to having direct cellular effects, antibodies can cany substances, such as radioactive isotopes, toxins and antineoplastic agents, to the targeted cells. Two of them, cetuximab (Erbitux) and bevacizumab (Avastin), seem to have acquired a significant role in the management of patients with radically resected and advanced colorectal carcinoma. Cetuximab plus irinotecan has been approved as second-line therapy in irinotecan-resistant colorectal cancer patients; bevacizumab plus 5FU/LV has resulted in higher response and longer survival than 5FU/LV alone in first line metastatic colorectal cancer; its combination with oxaliplatin has recently doubled results. The superior therapeutic efficacy of these molecular targeting agents over traditional chemotherapy has been shown by the survival benefit achieved by patients with advanced or recurrent cancers. Although the precise molecular mechanism by which these agents produce or enhance an antitumour effect, alone or in combination with anticancer drugs, is unknown, the specific inhibition of target genes critically involved in tumour progression and metastasis is clear. Further studies to determine which patient groups and anticancer drugs are more appropriate for combination therapy with these agents are needed. All the most important data obtained through recent studies are discussed, emphasizing their mechanisms of action, safety profiles and clinical applications.

  5. Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors in colorectal cancer prevention: point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arber, Nadir

    2008-08-01

    The limited success of current treatments for most advanced common malignancies highlights the importance of cancer prevention. Clinical trials on cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitor drugs showed the potential of chemoprevention as a strategy for reducing cancer incidence, although not without associated side effects. The attractiveness of these drugs partly stems from an ability to engage multiple mechanisms of action by their potential to influence multiple components of the carcinogenesis pathway, from initiation to progression. There are two isoforms of the COX enzymes. COX-1 is constitutively expressed in normal tissues and serves as a "housekeeper" of mucosal integrity, whereas COX-2 is an immediate early response gene that is highly inducible by neoplastic and inflammatory stimuli. COX-2 is significantly overexpressed in colorectal neoplasms, making it an attractive therapeutic target. The drug market has been revolutionized by the development of preparations targeted selectively against COX-2, and a proof of concept has been achieved. Chemoprevention of colorectal cancer is already possible with celecoxib, but it is still not the ultimate drug of choice especially because of the cardiovascular risk associated with COX-2 inhibitors. Better patient selection and more effective and safer drugs are needed. Celecoxib is probably best used in a subset of individuals at moderate to high colorectal cancer risk and low risk of cardiovascular disease.

  6. Prognostic significance of detection of microscopic peritoneal disease in colorectal cancer: a systematic review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mohan, Helen M

    2013-06-01

    Free intraperitoneal tumour cells are an independent indicator of poor prognosis, and are encorporated in current staging systems in upper gastrointestinal cancers, but not colorectal cancer. This systematic review aimed to evaluate the role and prognostic significance of positive peritoneal lavage in colorectal cancer.

  7. Determinants of participation in colorectal cancer screening with faecal occult blood testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Euler-Chelpin, My; Brasso, Klaus; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in men and women. Participation rates in faecal occult blood testing (FOBT) screening activities are, however, relatively low. In terms of lowering the colorectal cancer mortality, high participation rates are essential, and therefore...

  8. 76 FR 22108 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ..., Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO) (NCI) SUMMARY: In compliance with the requirement of... Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial (PLCO) (NCI). Type of Information Collection Request: Revision (OMB : 0925... to determine if screening for prostate, lung, colorectal and ovarian cancer can reduce mortality...

  9. The impact of organisational external peer review on colorectal cancer treatment and survival in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilsdonk, M.J.; Dijk, van B.A.C.; Otter, R.; Siesling, S.; Harten, van W.H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Organisational external peer review was introduced in 1994 in the Netherlands to improve multidisciplinary cancer care. We examined the clinical impact of this programme on colorectal cancer care. Methods: Patients with primary colorectal cancer were included from 23 participating hospi

  10. The impact of organisational external peer review on colorectal cancer treatment and survival in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilsdonk, M. J.; van Dijk, B. A. C.; Otter, R.; Siesling, S.; van Harten, W. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Organisational external peer review was introduced in 1994 in the Netherlands to improve multidisciplinary cancer care. We examined the clinical impact of this programme on colorectal cancer care. Methods: Patients with primary colorectal cancer were included from 23 participating hospit

  11. Differential expression of a novel colorectal cancer differentiation-related gene in colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-Guo Li; Jin-Dan Song; Yun-Qing Wang

    2001-01-01

    AIM To investigate SBA2 expression in CRC cell lines snd surgical specimens of CRC and sutologous healthy mucosa. METHODS Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used for relative quantification of SBA2 mRNA levels in 4 human CRC cell lines with different grades of differentiation and 30 clinical samples.Normalization of the results was achieved by simultaneous amplification of β-actin as an internal control. RESULTS In the exponential range of amplification, fairly good linearity demonstrated identical amplification efficiency for SBA2 and β-actin (82%). Markedly lower levels of SBA2 mRNA were detectable in tumors, as compared with the coupled normal counterparts ( P < 0.01 ). SBA2 expression was significantly (0.01 < P <0.05) correlated with the grade of differentiation in CRC,with relatively higher levels in well-differentiated samples and lower in poorly-differentiated cases. Of the 9 cases with lymph nodes affected, 78% (7/9) had reduced SBA2 mRNA expression in contrast to 24% (5/21) in nonmetastasis samples (0.01 < P < 0.05 ). CONCLUSION SBA2 gene might be a promising novel biomarker of cell differentiation in colorectal cancer and its biological features need further studies.

  12. EFFECT OF BODY MASS INDEX ON COLORECTAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张霁; 苏向前; 郑俊全; 顾晋; 宗祥龙; 王怡; 季加孚

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the association between obesity and the risk of colorectal cancer. Methods: 331 patients with rectal cancer and 175 with colon cancer who accepted surgical operation at Beijing Cancer Hospital during 1995 and 2002 were enrolled. Data were collected by reviewing the pathology materials and hospital records. 258 healthy people who accepted health examination at Beijing Cancer Hospital during 2000 and 2002 were also enrolled as control. Data of height, weight and gender at the time of examination were also collected. Obesity was estimated by body mass index (BMI), computed as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared (kg/m2). The degree of obesity was compared between the two groups using BMI(18.5, 24-27.9 and (28 (kg/m2) as the cut-off points for underweight, overweight and obesity. Associations with obesity were estimated by odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). All ORs were adjusted for age and sex. Results: Obesity was significantly prevalent in female patients with rectal cancer. All the patients with colon cancer showed lower level of BMI than control subjects. The ORs for rectal cancer rose with increasing BMI in women. Meanwhile, the ORs for colon cancer dropped with increasing BMI in both men and women. Obesity was an independent risk factor for rectal cancer, but not an independent risk factor for colon cancer. Conclusion: Rectal cancer and colon cancer may have different biological behavior. Obese women have relatively high risk for rectal cancer.

  13. Epidermal growth factor receptor analyses in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Lindebjerg, Jan; Nielsen, Jens Nederby;

    2006-01-01

    equivalent EGFR status (28/34). There was a tendency to higher median protein level (by ELISA) in IHC positive patients compared to IHC negative patients (p=0.086). The median EGFR gene expression level was significantly lower in tumours than in the normal colon with no difference according to IHC status......EGFR immunohistochemistry (IHC) status is not a reliable predictive marker for response to EGFR-targeted therapies. The present study compares the EGFR status at DNA, RNA and protein level. Blood samples, corresponding normal colon and colorectal cancer tissue were collected from 199 colorectal...... cancer (CRC) patients. EGFR status was evaluated by FISH analysis, real-time RT-PCR, ELISA and IHC. A polymorphism in the EGFR promoter was evaluated by PCR analysis. The EGFR levels by different methods were mutually compared. Seventy-eight percent of primary tumours and corresponding lymph nodes had...

  14. Occurrence and survival of synchronous pulmonary metastases in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Krarup, Peter-Martin; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the occurrence of synchronous colorectal cancer metastases (SCCM) confined to the lungs, risk factors for these metastases and their impact on survival. METHODS: In a nationwide cohort study of 26,200 patients data were prospectively entered into the Danish Colorectal...... Cancer Group's (DCCG's) database between May 2001 and December 2011. The recorded data were merged with data from the Danish Pathology Registry and the National Patient Registry. Multivariable logistic- and extended Cox regression analyses were used to adjust for confounding variables. RESULTS: In total...... this association (adjusted OR=1.81 (95% CI: 1.46-2.25, Psurvival compared with non-treated patients, especially when these therapeutic modalities were combined. CONCLUSIONS: The occurrence...

  15. [The usefulness of fecal tests in colorectal cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castells, Antoni

    2014-09-01

    Colorectal cancer is a paradigm of neoplasms that are amenable to preventative measures, especially screening. Currently, to carry this out, there are various strategies that have proven effective and efficient. In countries that have organized population-level screening programs, the most common strategy is fecal occult blood testing. In recent years, new methods have appeared that could constitute viable alternatives in the near future, among which the detection of changes in fecal DNA is emphasized. In this article, we review the most relevant papers on colorectal cancer screening presented at the annual meeting of the American Gastroenterological Association held in Chicago in May 2014, with special emphasis on the medium and long-term performance of strategies to detect occult blood in feces and the first results obtained with fecal DNA testing.

  16. Sulindac Sulfide, but Not Sulindac Sulfone, Inhibits Colorectal Cancer Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher S. Williams

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Sulindac sulfide, a metabolite of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID sulindac sulfoxide, is effective at reducing tumor burden in both familial adenomatous polyposis patients and in animals with colorectal cancer. Another sulindac sulfoxide metabolite, sulindac sulfone, has been reported to have antitumor properties without inhibiting cyclooxygenase activity. Here we report the effect of sulindac sulfone treatment on the growth of colorectal carcinoma cells. We observed that sulindac sulfide or sulfone treatment of HCA-7 cells led to inhibition of prostaglandin E2 production. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited HCA-7 and HCT-116 cell growth in vitro. Sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of either HCA-7 or HCT-116 xenografts, whereas the sulfide derivative inhibited HCA-7 growth in vivo. Both sulindac sulfide and sulfone inhibited colon carcinoma cell growth and prostaglandin production in vitro, but sulindac sulfone had no effect on the growth of colon cancer cell xenografts in nude mice.

  17. Review of Histopathological and Molecular Prognostic Features in Colorectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzouk, Ola; Schofield, John, E-mail: john.schofield@nhs.net [Department of Cellular Pathology, Maidstone Hospital, Hermitage Lane, Maidstone, Kent ME16 9QQ (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-23

    Prediction of prognosis in colorectal cancer is vital for the choice of therapeutic options. Histopathological factors remain paramount in this respect. Factors such as tumor size, histological type and subtype, presence of signet ring morphology and the degree of differentiation as well as the presence of lymphovascular invasion and lymph node involvement are well known factors that influence outcome. Our understanding of these factors has improved in the past few years with factors such as tumor budding, lymphocytic infiltration being recognized as important. Likewise the prognostic significance of resection margins, particularly circumferential margins has been appreciated in the last two decades. A number of molecular and genetic markers such as KRAS, BRAF and microsatellite instability are also important and correlate with histological features in some patients. This review summarizes our current understanding of the main histopathological factors that affect prognosis of colorectal cancer.

  18. Review of Histopathological and Molecular Prognostic Features in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Schofield

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Prediction of prognosis in colorectal cancer is vital for the choice of therapeutic options. Histopathological factors remain paramount in this respect. Factors such as tumor size, histological type and subtype, presence of signet ring morphology and the degree of differentiation as well as the presence of lymphovascular invasion and lymph node involvement are well known factors that influence outcome. Our understanding of these factors has improved in the past few years with factors such as tumor budding, lymphocytic infiltration being recognized as important. Likewise the prognostic significance of resection margins, particularly circumferential margins has been appreciated in the last two decades. A number of molecular and genetic markers such as KRAS, BRAF and microsatellite instability are also important and correlate with histological features in some patients. This review summarizes our current understanding of the main histopathological factors that affect prognosis of colorectal cancer.

  19. Mouse models for the discovery of colorectal cancer driver genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Christopher R; Starr, Timothy K

    2016-01-14

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) constitutes a major public health problem as the third most commonly diagnosed and third most lethal malignancy worldwide. The prevalence and the physical accessibility to colorectal tumors have made CRC an ideal model for the study of tumor genetics. Early research efforts using patient derived CRC samples led to the discovery of several highly penetrant mutations (e.g., APC, KRAS, MMR genes) in both hereditary and sporadic CRC tumors. This knowledge has enabled researchers to develop genetically engineered and chemically induced tumor models of CRC, both of which have had a substantial impact on our understanding of the molecular basis of CRC. Despite these advances, the morbidity and mortality of CRC remains a cause for concern and highlight the need to uncover novel genetic drivers of CRC. This review focuses on mouse models of CRC with particular emphasis on a newly developed cancer gene discovery tool, the Sleeping Beauty transposon-based mutagenesis model of CRC.

  20. Intraoperative ultrasonography in detection of hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael; Kronborg, Ole; Fenger, Claus

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study was designed to compare diagnostic accuracies of measuring liver enzymes, preoperative ultrasonography, surgical examination, and intraoperative ultrasonography for detection of liver metastases from colorectal cancer. METHODS: Blind, prospective comparisons of diagnostic...... examinations mentioned above were performed in 295 consecutive patients with colorectal cancer. An experienced ultrasonologist performed the preoperative examinations, and results were unknown to the other experienced ultrasonologist who performed the intraoperative examinations. The latter, also was unaware...... exploration (54/64) and that of preoperative ultrasonography (45/64). The lowest sensitivity was presented by liver enzymes. Bilobar metastases were detected in 42 of 46 patients by intraoperative ultrasonography but in only 33 patients by the surgeon. Intraoperative ultrasonography demonstrated the highest...

  1. Chemoresistive Gas Sensors for the Detection of Colorectal Cancer Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesare Malagù

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous medical studies show that tumor growth is accompanied by protein changes that may lead to the peroxidation of the cell membrane with consequent emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs by breath or intestinal gases that should be seen as biomarkers for colorectal cancer (CRC. The analysis of VOCs represents a non-invasive and potentially inexpensive preliminary screening technique. An array of chemoresistive gas sensors based on screen-printed metal oxide semiconducting films has been selected to discriminate gases of oncological interest, e.g., 1-iodononane and benzene, widely assumed to be biomarkers of colorectal cancer, from those of interference in the gut, such as methane and nitric oxide.

  2. Heterogenous mismatch-repair status in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joost, Patrick; Veurink, Nynke; Holck, Susanne;

    2014-01-01

    , heterogenous mismatch repair protein staining in order to delineate expression patterns and underlying mechanisms. METHODS: Heterogenous staining patterns that affected at least one of the mismatch repair proteins MLH1, PMS2, MSH2 and MSH6 were identified in 14 colorectal cancers. Based on alternative...... expression patterns macro-dissected and micro-dissected tumor areas were separately analyzed for microsatellite instability and MLH1 promoter methylation. RESULTS: Heterogenous retained/lost mismatch repair protein expression could be classified as intraglandular (within or in-between glandular formations....... CONCLUSIONS: Heterogenous mismatch repair status can be demonstrated in colorectal cancer. Though rare, attention to this phenomenon is recommended since it corresponds to differences in mismatch repair status that are relevant for correct classification. VIRTUAL SLIDES: The virtual slide(s) for this article...

  3. Colorectal cancer and dysplasia in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Timothy L Zisman; David T Rubin

    2008-01-01

    Both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease carry an increased risk of developing colorectal cancer.Established risk factors for cancer among patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) include the younger age at diagnosis,greater extent and duration of disease,increased severity of inflammation,family history of colorectal cancer and coexisting primary sclerosing cholangitis.Recent evidence suggests that current medical therapies and surgical techniques for inflammatory bowel disease may be reducing the incidence of this complication.Nonetheless heightened vigilance and a careful,comprehensive approach to prevent or minimize the complications of invasive cancer are warranted in this unique cohort of patients.Current guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cancer in this high risk population are grounded in the concept of an inflammation-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence.A thorough understanding of the definition and natural history of dysplasia in IBD,as well as the challenges associated with detection and interpretation of dysplasia are fundamental to developing an effective strategy for surveillance and prevention,and understanding the limitations of the current approach to prevention.This article reviews the current consensus guidelines for screening and surveillance of cancer in IBD,as well as presenting the evidence and rationale for chemoprevention of cancer and a discussion of emerging technologies for the detection of dysplasia.

  4. Serum amino acid profiles and their alterations in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichtle, Alexander Benedikt; Nuoffer, Jean-Marc; Ceglarek, Uta; Kase, Julia; Conrad, Tim; Witzigmann, Helmut; Thiery, Joachim; Fiedler, Georg Martin

    2012-08-01

    Mass spectrometry-based serum metabolic profiling is a promising tool to analyse complex cancer associated metabolic alterations, which may broaden our pathophysiological understanding of the disease and may function as a source of new cancer-associated biomarkers. Highly standardized serum samples of patients suffering from colon cancer (n = 59) and controls (n = 58) were collected at the University Hospital Leipzig. We based our investigations on amino acid screening profiles using electrospray tandem-mass spectrometry. Metabolic profiles were evaluated using the Analyst 1.4.2 software. General, comparative and equivalence statistics were performed by R 2.12.2. 11 out of 26 serum amino acid concentrations were significantly different between colorectal cancer patients and healthy controls. We found a model including CEA, glycine, and tyrosine as best discriminating and superior to CEA alone with an AUROC of 0.878 (95% CI 0.815-0.941). Our serum metabolic profiling in colon cancer revealed multiple significant disease-associated alterations in the amino acid profile with promising diagnostic power. Further large-scale studies are necessary to elucidate the potential of our model also to discriminate between cancer and potential differential diagnoses. In conclusion, serum glycine and tyrosine in combination with CEA are superior to CEA for the discrimination between colorectal cancer patients and controls.

  5. Antiproliferative Activity of Triterpene Glycoside Nutrient from Monk Fruit in Colorectal Cancer and Throat Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Can; Dai, Longhai; Liu, Yueping; Rong, Long; Dou, Dequan; Sun, Yuanxia; Ma, Lanqing

    2016-06-13

    Colorectal cancer and throat cancer are the world's most prevalent neoplastic diseases, and a serious threat to human health. Plant triterpene glycosides have demonstrated antitumor activity. In this study, we investigated potential anticancer effects of mogroside IVe, a triterpenoid glycoside from monk fruit, using in vitro and in vivo models of colorectal and laryngeal cancer. The effects of mogroside IVe on the proliferation of colorectal cancer HT29 cells and throat cancer Hep-2 cells were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and the expression levels of p53, phosphorylated ERK1/2, and MMP-9 were analyzed by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that mogroside IVe inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, the proliferation of HT29 and Hep-2 cells in culture and in xenografted mice, which was accompanied by the upregulation of tumor suppressor p53, and downregulation of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9) and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK)1/2. This study revealed the suppressive activity of mogroside IVe towards colorectal and throat cancers and identified the underlying mechanisms, suggesting that mogroside IVe may be potentially used as a biologically-active phytochemical supplement for treating colorectal and throat cancers.

  6. Antiproliferative Activity of Triterpene Glycoside Nutrient from Monk Fruit in Colorectal Cancer and Throat Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can Liu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer and throat cancer are the world’s most prevalent neoplastic diseases, and a serious threat to human health. Plant triterpene glycosides have demonstrated antitumor activity. In this study, we investigated potential anticancer effects of mogroside IVe, a triterpenoid glycoside from monk fruit, using in vitro and in vivo models of colorectal and laryngeal cancer. The effects of mogroside IVe on the proliferation of colorectal cancer HT29 cells and throat cancer Hep-2 cells were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay, and the expression levels of p53, phosphorylated ERK1/2, and MMP-9 were analyzed by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. The results indicated that mogroside IVe inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, the proliferation of HT29 and Hep-2 cells in culture and in xenografted mice, which was accompanied by the upregulation of tumor suppressor p53, and downregulation of matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9 and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2. This study revealed the suppressive activity of mogroside IVe towards colorectal and throat cancers and identified the underlying mechanisms, suggesting that mogroside IVe may be potentially used as a biologically-active phytochemical supplement for treating colorectal and throat cancers.

  7. Second-Line Therapy for Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Guglielmi, Alessandra P.; Sobrero, Alberto F.

    2007-01-01

    The availability of irinotecan and oxaliplatin has dramatically altered both first- and second-line treatment of advanced colorectal cancer (CRC) compared with the era in which the sole treatment option in advanced disease was 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Treatment options and strategies are becoming ever more enriched and complex with the recent availability of biologic agents such as bevacizumab and cetuximab. This article reviews randomized clinical trials assessing second-line treatment after f...

  8. NOTCH Signaling and ATOH1 in Colorectal Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The Notch receptor signaling pathway regulates expression of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor ATOH1 (Math1/Hath1) to determine cell fate in the intestine. In differentiating intestinal stem cells, high levels of Notch activity specify absorptive enterocyte/colonocyte differentiation, whereas high ATOH1 activity specifies secretory (goblet, enteroendocrine, and Paneth) cell differentiation. In colorectal cancer, ATOH1 is a tumor suppressor that is silenced in most tumors, while ...

  9. Advanced imaging of colorectal cancer: From anatomy to molecular imaging

    OpenAIRE

    García-Figueiras, Roberto; Baleato-González, Sandra; Padhani, Anwar R.; Marhuenda, Ana; Luna, Antonio; Alcalá, Lidia; Carballo-Castro, Ana; Álvarez-Castro, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Imaging techniques play a key role in the management of patients with colorectal cancer. The introduction of new advanced anatomical, functional, and molecular imaging techniques may improve the assessment of diagnosis, prognosis, planning therapy, and assessment of response to treatment of these patients. Functional and molecular imaging techniques in clinical practice may allow the assessment of tumour-specific characteristics and tumour heterogeneity. This paper will review recent...

  10. Prognostic Values of microRNAs in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaguang Xi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The functions of non-coding microRNAs (miRNAs in tumorigenesis are just beginning to emerge. Previous studies from our laboratory have identifi ed a number of miRNAs that were deregulated in colon cancer cell lines due to the deletion of the p53 tumor suppressor gene. In this study, the in vivo signifi cance of some of these miRNAs was further evaluated using colorectal clinical samples. Ten miRNAs (hsa-let-7b, hsa-let-7g, hsa-miR-15b, hsa-miR-181b, hsa-miR-191, hsa-miR-200c, hsa-miR-26a, hsa-miR-27a, hsa-miR-30a-5p and hsa-miR-30c were evaluated for their potential prognostic value in colorectal cancer patients. Forty eight snap frozen clinical colorectal samples (24 colorectal cancer and 24 paired normal patient samples with detailed clinical follow-up information were selected . The expression levels of 10 miRNAs were quantified via qRT-PCR analysis. The statistical signifi cance of these markers for disease prognosis was evaluated using a two tailed paired Wilcoxon test. A Kaplan-Meier survival curve was generated followed by performing a Logrank test. Among the ten miRNAs, hsa-miR-15b (p = 0.0278, hsa-miR-181b (p = 0.0002, hsa-miR-191 (p = 0.0264 and hsa-miR-200c (p = 0.0017 were signifi cantly over-expressed in tumors compared to normal colorectal samples. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis indicated that hsa-miR-200c was signifi cantly associated with patient survival (p = 0.0122. The patients (n = 15 with higher hsa-miR-200c expression had a shorter survival time (median survival = 26 months compared to patients (n = 9 with lower expression (median survival = 38 months. Sequencing analysis revealed that hsa-miR-181b (p = 0.0098 and hsa-miR-200c (p = 0.0322 expression were strongly associated with the mutation status of the p53 tumor suppressor gene. Some of these miRNAs may function as oncogenes due to their over-expression in tumors. hsa-miR-200c may be a potential novel prognostic factor in colorectal cancer.

  11. Localization of thymidine phosphorylase in advanced gastric and colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Michiya; Okamoto, Ken; Akimori, Toyokazu; Tochika, Naoshige; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Sugimoto, Takeki; Araki, Keijiro

    2004-01-01

    Thymidine phosphorylase (TP) is known to be more concentrated in human cancer tissues than in adjacent normal tissue based on findings using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry. However, the ultrastructural localization of TP in cancer tissues has not previously been demonstrated. We investigated the localization of TP in gastric cancer and colorectal cancer tissue by ELISA, immunohistochemistry, and immunoelectron microscopy. Between April 1997 and May 2000, we obtained surgically resected specimens from 42, 46, and 36 cases of advanced gastric, colon, and rectal cancer, respectively. ELISA demonstrated that the TP level was higher in cancer tissues than in adjacent normal tissue. Immunohistochemically, cancer cells were positive for the enzyme in some cases. However, in a number of cases immunopositive inflammatory cells were also present in cancerous tissues. At the electron microscope level, TP was diffusely distributed in the cytoplasm of cancer cells and in the mitochondria of the neutrophil in gastric cancer tissue. In rectal cancer tissues, cytoplasmic granules in macrophages in cancer tissues were immunoreactive for the TP. These findings suggest that TP is produced by macrophages and exists in neutrophils and cancer cells.

  12. Problems in screening colorectal cancer in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Davidovic M. Mladen; Milosevic P. Dragoslav; Zdravkovic Sanja; Bojic Bozidar; Djurica Snezana

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore the problems in the screening of colorectal carcinoma in the elderly.METHODS: Three models of colorectal cancer prevention were examined: standard screening, active check-up of suspected cases and summons to have endoscopic checkup for previously diagnosed colorectal polyps. The study was performed among three groups of elderly individuals:Group 1 (167 cases), hospitalized asymptomatic individuals without symptoms in large intestines. Group 2 (612 cases):old individuals at home for the aged, out of which 32 showed symptoms of colon disorders; Group 3 (44 cases): elderly people with diagnosed polyps. As a result of 1788rectosigmoidoscopies, we identified 61 individuals with polyps, out of which 44 patients were over 65 years old.However, only 9 of these 44 individuals agreed to have the endoscopy performed again.RESULTS: One cancer and 13 polyps were detected in Group 1, and two polyps in Group 2. However, it should be noted that only eleven individuals from Group 2 agreed to have the endoscopy. In Group 3, there were no relapses of the polyps among the nine individuals who came back for the endoscopy.CONCLUSION: Poor understanding of the screening procedures is one of the greatest problems in early detection of the cancer in the aged. Paradoxically, the cooperation is better with hospitalized patients, than with "successfully old"persons.

  13. Clinical Aspects of Hypoxia-inducible Factors in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Birgitte Mayland; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt;

    to a standardized scheme. 2. The prognostic value of HIF-1α is investigated by SNP analysis and HIF-1α expression in tissue from 300 patients operated for colorectal cancer and the results is validated in a prospectively population of 200 patients. 3. The predictive value of HIF-1α will be investigated in patients......Clinical Aspects of Hypoxia-inducible Factors in Colorectal Cancer   Birgitte Mayland Havelund1,4 MD, Karen-Lise Garm Spindler1,4 MD, PhD, Flemming Brandt Sørensen2,4 MD, DMSc, Ivan Brandslund3 MD, DMSc, Anders Jakobsen1,4 MD, DMSc. 1Department of Oncology, 2Pathology and 3Biochemistry, Vejle...... Hospital, Vejle, Denmark 4Institute of Regional Health Services Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense Denmark Background Prognostic and predictive markers are needed for individualizing the treatment of colorectal cancer. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is a transcription-inducing factor...

  14. Acetylsalicylic Acid and Eflornithine in Treating Patients at High Risk for Colorectal Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    This phase II trial is studying how well giving acetylsalicylic acid together with eflornithine works in treating patients at high risk for colorectal cancer. Chemoprevention is the use of certain drugs to keep cancer from forming. The use of acetylsalicylic acid and eflornithine may prevent colorectal cancer. |

  15. Psychological distress following fecal occult blood test in colorectal cancer screening--a population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, Klaus; Ladelund, Steen; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the possible psychological side-effect of participating in a colorectal cancer (CRC)-screening program.......To evaluate the possible psychological side-effect of participating in a colorectal cancer (CRC)-screening program....

  16. Characteristics of fatty acid distribution is associated with colorectal cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junjie; Zhang, Lijian; Ye, Xiaoxia; Chen, Liyu; Zhang, Liangtao; Gao, Yihua; Kang, Jing X; Cai, Chun

    2013-05-01

    To investigate tissue fatty acid distribution in relation to the incidence of colorectal cancer prognosis, adjacent normal tissue and cancerous tissue from 35 samples of clinically incident colorectal cancer were obtained. Fatty acids were measured in the colorectal mucosa phospholipid fraction by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Palmitoleic acid and oleic acid were significantly lower in colorectal cancerous tissue, ranging from 20% to 50% less than the adjacent normal tissue. The omega-6 (n-6) fatty acid family members (20:2, 20:3, 20:4 and 22:4) were higher by 1-3 fold in cancerous colorectal tissue. Contrary with the high level of n-6 fatty acids, about a 37% to 87% reduction in EPA and DHA was observed in colorectal cancerous tissue. A higher level of linoleic acid and arachidonic acid was detected in the C cancer stage than in the B cancer stage (pdistribution of colorectal tissue is strongly linked to the incidence of colorectal cancer. This study also provides scientific basis for identifying novel biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer.

  17. Colorectal cancer stem cell and chemoresistant colorectal cancer cell phenotypes and increased sensitivity to Notch pathway inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rui; Wang, Guiyu; Song, Yanni; Tang, Qingchao; You, Qi; Liu, Zheng; Chen, Yinggang; Zhang, Qian; Li, Jiaying; Muhammand, Shan; Wang, Xishan

    2015-08-01

    Colorectal cancer stem cells (Co-CSCs) are a small subpopulation of tumor cells which have been proposed to be tumor-initiating cells in colorectal cancer (CRC) and to be implicated in resistance to standard chemotherapy. Chemoresistance is a common problem in the clinic. However, the interrelation between Co-CSCs and chemoresistant cells has yet to be elucidated. The present study investigated the Co-CSC phenotype in colonospheres and chemoresistant CRC cell lines and aimed to identify targets for therapy. Colonospheres and chemoresistant CRC cells were found to be enriched with the CSC markers CD133 and CD44, and exhibited similar phenotypes. Furthermore, it was found that Notch signaling may simultaneously regulate Co-CSCs and chemoresistant cells and may represent a novel strategy for targeting this pathway in CRC.

  18. An Evolutionary Approach for Identifying Driver Mutations in Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmine Foo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The traditional view of cancer as a genetic disease that can successfully be treated with drugs targeting mutant onco-proteins has motivated whole-genome sequencing efforts in many human cancer types. However, only a subset of mutations found within the genomic landscape of cancer is likely to provide a fitness advantage to the cell. Distinguishing such "driver" mutations from innocuous "passenger" events is critical for prioritizing the validation of candidate mutations in disease-relevant models. We design a novel statistical index, called the Hitchhiking Index, which reflects the probability that any observed candidate gene is a passenger alteration, given the frequency of alterations in a cross-sectional cancer sample set, and apply it to a mutational data set in colorectal cancer. Our methodology is based upon a population dynamics model of mutation accumulation and selection in colorectal tissue prior to cancer initiation as well as during tumorigenesis. This methodology can be used to aid in the prioritization of candidate mutations for functional validation and contributes to the process of drug discovery.

  19. Simultaneous laparoscopic resection of colorectal cancer and synchronous metastatic liver tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Michihiro; Komeda, Koji; Inoue, Yoshihiro; Shimizu, Tetsunosuke; Asakuma, Mitsuhiro; Hirokawa, Fumitoshi; Okuda, Junji; Tanaka, Keitaro; Kondo, Keisaku; Tanigawa, Nobuhiko

    2011-01-01

    Laparoscopic colorectal resection has been applied to advanced colorectal cancer. Synchronous liver metastasis of colorectal cancer would be treated safely and effectively by simultaneous laparoscopic colorectal and hepatic resection. Seven patients with colorectal cancer and synchronous liver metastasis treated by simultaneous laparoscopic resection were analyzed retrospectively. Three patients received a hybrid operation using a small skin incision, 2 patients underwent hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery using a small incision produced for colonic anastomosis, and 2 patients were treated with pure laparoscopic resection. The mean total operation duration was 407 minutes, and mean blood loss was 207 mL. Negative surgical margins were achieved in all cases. Mean postoperative hospital stay was 16.4 days. No recurrence at the surgical margin was observed in the liver. For selected patients with synchronous liver metastasis of colorectal cancer, simultaneous laparoscopic resection is useful for minimizing operative invasiveness while maintaining safety and curability, with satisfying short- and long-term results.

  20. Quality control in colorectal cancer screening: Systematic microbiological investigation of endoscopes used in the NORCCAP (Norwegian Colorectal Cancer Prevention) trial

    OpenAIRE

    Kristiansen Bjørn; Jørgensen Anita; Bretthauer Michael; Hofstad Bjørn; Hoff Geir

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Background Endoscopic colorectal cancer (CRC) screening is currently implemented in many countries. Since endoscopes cannot be sterilised, the transmission of infectious agents through endoscopes has been a matter of concern. We report on a continuous quality control programme in a large-scale randomised controlled trial on flexible sigmoidoscopy screening of an average-risk population. Continuously, throughout a two-year screening period, series of microbiological samples were taken...

  1. Exploring Different Strategies for Efficient Delivery of Colorectal Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Congcong; Ng, Huei Leng Helena; Pan, Weisan; Chen, Hubiao; Zhang, Ge; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Lu, Aiping; Yang, Zhijun

    2015-11-11

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the world. Currently available chemotherapy of CRC usually delivers the drug to both normal as well as cancerous tissues, thus leading to numerous undesirable effects. Much emphasis is being laid on the development of effective drug delivery systems for achieving selective delivery of the active moiety at the anticipated site of action with minimized unwanted side effects. Researchers have employed various techniques (dependent on pH, time, pressure and/or bacteria) for targeting drugs directly to the colonic region. On the other hand, systemic drug delivery strategies to specific molecular targets (such as FGFR, EGFR, CD44, EpCAM, CA IX, PPARγ and COX-2) overexpressed by cancerous cells have also been shown to be effective. This review aims to put forth an overview of drug delivery technologies that have been, and may be developed, for the treatment of CRC.

  2. c-src activating mutation analysis in Chinese patients with colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye-Xiong Tan; Han-Tao Wang; Peng Zhang; Zhong-Hua Yan; Guan-Long Dai; Meng-Chao Wu; Hong-Yang Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the occurrence of cellular src (c-src)activating mutation at codon 531 in colorectal cancer patients from Chinese mainland.METHODS: Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay followed by sequencing and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis were carried out to screen 110 samples of primary colorectal cancer and 20 colorectal liver metastases.RESULTS: Only one sample showed PCR-RFLP-positive results and carried somatic codon 531 mutations. No additional mutation of c-src exon 12 was found.CONCLUSION: c-src codon 531 mutation in colorectal cancer is not the cause of c-src activation.

  3. TGF β1 expression and angiogenesis in colorectal cancer tissue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Xiong; Ling-Ling Gong; Feng Zhang; Ming-Bo Hu; Hong-Yin Yuan

    2002-01-01

    AIM: Transforming growth factor(TGF)β1 is involved in avariety of important cellular functions, including cell growthand differentiation, angiogenesis, immune function andextracellular matrix formation. However, the role of TGF β1as an angiogenic factor in colorectal cancer is still unclear.We investigate the relationship between transforming growthfactor β1 and angiogenesis by analyzing the expression oftransforming growth factor(TGF) β1 in colorectal cancer, aswell as its association with VEGF and MVDMETHODS: The expression of TGF β1 、VEGF, as well as MVDwere detected in 98 colorectal cancer by immunohistochemicalstaining. The relationship between the TGF β1 expression andVEGF expression、MVD was evaluated. To evaluate the effect ofTGF β1 on the angiogenesis of colorectal cancers.RESULTS: Among 98 cases of colorectal cancer, 37 werepositive for TGF β1 (37. 8 %),36 for VEGF(36. 7 %),respectively. The microvessel counts ranged from 19 to 139.8, with a mean of 48.7 (standard deviation, 21. 8). Theexpression of TGF β1 was correlated significantly with thedepth of invasion, stage of disease, lymph nodemetastasis, VEGF expression and MVD. Patients in T3-T4,stage Ⅲ-Ⅳ and with lymph node metastasis had muchhigher expression of TGF β1 than patients in T1-T2, stage Ⅰ -Ⅱ and without lymph node metastasis ( P < 0.05).Thepositive expression rate of VEGF (58.3 %) in the TGF-β1positive group is higher than that in the TGF-β1 negativegroup(41.7 %, P< 0.05). Also, the microvessel count (54+ 18) in TGF-β1 positive group is significantly highar thanthat in TGF-β1 negative group (46 + 15, P < 0.05 ). Themicrovessel count in tumors with both TGF-β1 and VEGFpositive were the highest (58 + 20, 36-140, P < 0. 05 ).Whereas that in tumors with both TGF-β1 and VEGF negativewere the lowest (38+ 16, 19-60, P<0.05).CONCLUSION: TGF β1 might be associated with tumorprogression by madulating the angiogenesis in colorectalcancer and TGF β1 may be used as a

  4. Role of micro-RNA in colorectal cancer screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Montes, José Antonio; Menéndez Sánchez, Pablo

    2014-12-01

    MicroRNAs are involved in carcinogenesis through postranscriptional gene regulatory activity. These molecules are involved in various physiological and pathological functions, such as apoptosis, cell proliferation and differentiation, which indicates their functionality in carcinogenesis as tumour suppressor genes or oncogenes. Several studies have determined the presence of microRNAs in different neoplastic diseases such as colon, prostate, breast, stomach, pancreas, and lung cancer. There are promising data on the usefulness of quantifying microRNAs in different organic fluids and tissues. We have conducted a review of the determinations of microRNAs in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  5. Family Support and Colorectal Cancer Screening among Urban African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittain, Kelly; Taylor, Jacquelyn Y; Loveland-Cherry, Carol; Northouse, Laurel; Caldwell, Cleopatra H

    2012-07-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer death among African Americans. Less than 50% of African Americans have had CRC screening. This study examined the relationships between family support and influence, cultural identity, CRC beliefs, and a screening informed decision among 129 urban African Americans. Family support (p < .01) significantly predicted CRC beliefs and CRC beliefs significantly predicted informed decision (p < .01). Based on study results, practitioners should routinely assess family support and CRC beliefs with African Americans patients. This may improve patient-provider shared decision-making satisfaction and CRC screening adherence among African American patients.

  6. Inadequate preoperative colonic evaluation for synchronous colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Achiam, M P; Burgdorf, S K; Wilhelmsen, M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Synchronous cancers (SC) are well known (2-11%) in patients with colorectal carcinoma (CRC). One study has shown that intraoperative palpation can miss up to 69% of the SC while other studies have shown altered planned surgical procedure due to preoperatively diagnosed......-operation and one patient had pulmonary embolism as a complication to re-operation. CONCLUSIONS: The results show that many patients (78%) never underwent FPCE, but also that many of these patients never had a full postoperative colonic evaluation. SC being overlooked can lead to increased morbidity...... and the possibility of advanced staging of the cancer which is also exemplified in this study....

  7. The Synchronous Prevalence of Colorectal Neoplasms in Patients with Stomach Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang Su; Jung, Woon Tae; Kim, Cha Young; Ha, Chang Yoon; Min, Hyun Ju; Kim, Hyun Jin; Kim, Tae Hyo

    2011-01-01

    Purpose The association between stomach cancer and colorectal cancer is controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the synchronous prevalence of colorectal neoplasms in patients with stomach cancer. Methods A total of 123 patients with stomach cancer (86 male) and 246 consecutive, age- and sex-matched persons without stomach cancer were analyzed from July 2005 to June 2010. All of them underwent colonoscopy within 6 months after undergoing gastroscopy. Results The prevalence of...

  8. Joint effects of colorectal cancer susceptibility loci, circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D and risk of colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda T Hiraki

    Full Text Available Genome wide association studies (GWAS have identified several SNPs associated with colorectal cancer (CRC susceptibility. Vitamin D is also inversely associated with CRC risk.We examined main and joint effects of previously GWAS identified genetic markers of CRC and plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OHD on CRC risk in three prospective cohorts: the Nurses' Health Study (NHS, the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS, and the Physicians' Health Study (PHS. We included 1895 CRC cases and 2806 controls with genomic DNA. We calculated odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for CRC associated with additive genetic risk scores (GRSs comprised of all CRC SNPs and subsets of these SNPs based on proximity to regions of increased vitamin D receptor binding to vitamin D response elements (VDREs, based on published ChiP-seq data. Among a subset of subjects with additional prediagnostic 25(OHD we tested multiplicative interactions between plasma 25(OHD and GRS's. We used fixed effects models to meta-analyze the three cohorts.The per allele multivariate OR was 1.12 (95% CI, 1.06-1.19 for GRS-proximalVDRE; and 1.10 (95% CI, 1.06-1.14 for GRS-nonproxVDRE. The lowest quartile of plasma 25(OHD compared with the highest, had a multivariate OR of 0.63 (95% CI, 0.48-0.82 for CRC. We did not observe any significant interactions between any GRSs and plasma 25(OHD.We did not observe evidence for the modification of genetic susceptibility for CRC according to vitamin D status, or evidence that the effect of common CRC risk alleles differed according to their proximity to putative VDR binding sites.

  9. Quality assurance in the treatment of colorectal cancer: the EURECCA initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breugom, A J; Boelens, P G; van den Broek, C B M; Cervantes, A; Van Cutsem, E; Schmoll, H J; Valentini, V; van de Velde, C J H

    2014-08-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in Europe. Over the past few decades, important advances have been made in screening, staging and treatment of colorectal cancer. However, considerable variation between and within European countries remains, which implies that further improvements are possible. The most important remaining question now is: when are we, health care professionals, delivering the best available care to patients with colon or rectal cancer? Currently, quality assurance is a major issue in colorectal cancer care and quality assurance awareness is developing in almost all disciplines involved in the treatment of colorectal cancer patients. Quality assurance has shown to be effective in clinical trials. For example, standardisation and quality control were introduced in the Dutch TME trial and led to marked improvements of local control and survival in rectal cancer patients. Besides, audit structures can also be very effective in monitoring cancer management and national audits showed to further improve outcome in colorectal cancer patients. To reduce the differences between European countries, an international, multidisciplinary, outcome-based quality improvement programme, European Registration of Cancer Care (EURECCA), has been initiated. In the near future, the EURECCA dataset will perform research on subgroups as elderly patients or patients with comorbidities, which are often excluded from trials. For optimal colorectal cancer care, quality assurance in guideline formation and in multidisciplinary team management is also of great importance. The aim of this review was to create greater awareness and to give an overview of quality assurance in the management of colorectal cancer.

  10. Role of APC and DNA mismatch repair genes in the development of colorectal cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Deodutta

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women in the western hemisphere. According to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 105,500 new cases of colon cancer with 57,100 deaths will occur in the U.S. in 2003, accounting for about 10% of cancer deaths. Among the colon cancer patients, hereditary risk contributes approximately 20%. The main inherited colorectal cancers are the familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP and the hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancers (HNPCC. The FAP and HNPCC are caused due to mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC and DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes. The focus of this review is to summarize the functions of APC and MMR gene products in the development of colorectal cancers.

  11. Prognostic factors in 165 elderly colorectal cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Jun Nan; Hai-Xia Qin; Guang Yang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To analyse the prognostic factors in 165 colorectal patients aged ≥70.METHODS: One hundred and sixty-five elderly patients with colorectal cancer diagnosed by histology were entered into the retrospective study between 1994 and 2001. Patients were given optimal operation alone, chemotherapy after operation, or chemotherapy alone according to tumor stage,histology, physical strength, and co-morbid problems.Survival rate was calculated by Kaplan-Meier method, and compared with meaningful variances by Log-rank method.Prognostic factors were analyzed by Cox regression.RESULTS: The 1,2,3,4,5 year survival rate (all-cause rnortality)was 87.76%, 65.96%, 52.05%, 42.77%, 40.51%,respectively. The mean survival time was 41.89±2.33 months (95% CI: 37.33-46.45 months), and the median survival time was 37 months. Univariate analysis showed that factors such as age, nodal metastasis, treatment method, Duke's stage, gross findings, kind of histology, and degree of differentiation had influences on the survival rate. Multivariate analysis showed that factors such as treatment method,Duke's stage, kind of histology and degree of differentiation were independent prognostic factors.CONCLUSION: This study suggests that the prognosis of elderly colorectal cancer patients is influenced by several factors. Most of elderly patients can endure surgery and/or chemotherapy, and have a long-time survival and good quality of life.

  12. Evaluation of ST13 gene expression in colorectal cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Qing-hua; ZHENG Shu; HU Yue; CHEN Gong-xing; DING Jia-yi

    2005-01-01

    We identified a novel gene ST13 from a subtractive cDNA library of normal intestinal mucosa in 1993, more studies showed that ST13 was a co-chaperone of Hsp70s. Recently we detected the ST13 gene expression in tumor tissue and adjacent normal tissue of the same colorectal cancer patient and investigated ifthe ST13 gene expression might have any prognostic value.Analysis was performed at molecular level by reverse transcfiption-PCR using real-time detection method. We measured two genes simultaneously, ST13 as the target gene and glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase as a reference gene, in primary colorectal tumor specimens and tumor-adjacent normal mucosa specimens from 50 colorectal cancer patients. The expression levels of the ST13 gene were significantly decreased in primary tumors compared with adjacent mucosa (P<0.05). But there were no significant differences in the expression of ST13 as compared with different Dukes' stage, tumor differentiation grade, invasion depth, lymph node metastasis and disease-specific survival.

  13. Targeting metastatic colorectal cancer – present and emerging treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciombor KK

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Kristen K Ciombor,1 Jordan Berlin21Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, OH, USA; 2Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN, USAAbstract: Metastatic colorectal cancer is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the US and around the world. While several novel cytotoxic and biologic therapies have been developed and proven efficacious in the past two decades, their optimal use in terms of patient selection, drug combinations, and regimen sequences has yet to be defined. Recent investigations regarding anti-epidermal growth factor receptor therapies include the comparison of single-agent panitumumab and cetuximab, the benefit of adding cetuximab to chemotherapy in the conversion therapy setting, the comparison of cetuximab and bevacizumab when added to first-line chemotherapy, and predictive biomarkers beyond KRAS exon 2 (codons 12 and 13 mutations. With respect to anti-vascular endothelial growth factor therapies, new data on continuing bevacizumab beyond disease progression on a bevacizumab-containing chemotherapy regimen, the addition of bevacizumab to triplet chemotherapy in the first-line setting, maintenance therapy with bevacizumab plus either capecitabine or erlotinib, the addition of aflibercept to chemotherapy, and regorafenib as monotherapy have emerged. Recent scientific and technologic advances in the field of metastatic colorectal cancer promise to elucidate the biological underpinnings of this disease and its therapies for the goal of improving personalized treatments for patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.Keywords: cetuximab, panitumumab, bevacizumab, aflibercept, regorafenib, biomarker

  14. Survival after adjuvant 5-FU treatment for stage III colon cancer in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cappel, WHDN; Meulenbeld, HJ; Kleibeuker, JH; Nagengast, FM; Menko, FH; Griffioen, G; Cats, A; Morreau, H; Gelderblom, H; Vasen, HFA

    2004-01-01

    In vitro studies suggest that a deficient mismatch repair (MMR) system-reduces 5-Fluorouracil cytotoxicity. Colon cancer (CC) in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is due to a dysfunctioning MMR gene that leads to microsatellite instability (MSI). Clinical studies on the efficacy of 5

  15. Survival after adjuvant 5-FU treatment for stage III colon cancer in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos tot Nederveen Cappel, W.H. de; Meulenbeld, H.J.; Kleibeuker, J.H.; Nagengast, F.M.; Menko, F.H.; Griffioen, G.; Cats, A.; Morreau, H.; Gelderblom, H.; Vasen, H.F.

    2004-01-01

    In vitro studies suggest that a deficient mismatch repair (MMR) system reduces 5-Fluorouracil cytotoxicity. Colon cancer (CC) in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is due to a dysfunctioning MMR gene that leads to microsatellite instability (MSI). Clinical studies on the efficacy of 5

  16. Nanoscale/Molecular analysis of Fecal Colonocytes for Colorectal Cancer Screening | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Existing guidelines recommend colorectal cancer (CRC) screening for all patients over age 50. However, CRC remains the second leading cause of cancer death among Americans largely because colonoscopic screening of all the >100 million Americans over age 50 is unfeasible for both patient-related (non-compliance) and societal (inadequate endoscopic capacity and funding) reasons. |

  17. Loss of heterozygosity: An independent prognostic factor of colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shih-Ching Chang; Jen-Kou Lin; Tzu-Chen Lin; Wen-Yih Liang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Colorectal cancers result from the accumulation of several distinct genetic alterations. This study was to investigate the frequency and prognostic value of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MSI) at 14 genetic loci located near or within regions containing important genes implicated in colorectal tumorigenesis.METHODS: We studied colorectal cancers with corresponding normal mucosae in 207 patients (139 males and 68 females,mean age at the time of tumor resection 66.2±12.4 years,range 22-88 years). There were 37 right-sided colonic tumors, 85 left-sided colonic tumors and 85 rectal tumors.The distribution of tumor staging was stage Ⅰ in 25, stage Ⅱ in 73, stage Ⅲ in 68, and stage Ⅳ in 41. We analyzed the LOH and MSI of HPC1, hMSH2, hMLH1, APC, MET,P53, NH23-H1, DCC, BAT25, BAT26, D17S250, MYCL1 and D8S254 with fluorescent polymerase chain reaction and denatured gel electrophoresis. High-frequency LOH was determined to be greater than three, or more than 50%of the informative marker with LOH. High-frequency MSI (MSI-H) was determined as more than four markers with instability (>30%). Correlations of LOH and MSI with clinical outcomes and pathological features were analyzed and compared.RESULTS: The occurrence of MSI-H was 7.25%, located predominantly in the right colons (7/15) and had a higher frequency of poor differentiation (6/15) and mucin production (7/15). LOH in at least one genetic locus occurred in 78.7% of the tumors and was significantly associated with disease progression. Of the 166 potentially cured patients, 45 developed tumor recurrence within 36 mo of follow-up. Clinicopathological factors affecting 3-year disease-free survival (DFS) were TNM staging, grade of differentiation, preoperative CEA level, and high LOH status. Patients with high LOH tumors had a significantly lower DFS (50%) compared with patients with low LOH tumors (84%). Of the patients developing subsequent tumor recurrence, the number and

  18. Dietary fiber intake and risk of colorectal cancer: A pooled analysis of prospective cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, Y.; Hunter, D.J.; Spiegelman, D.; Bergkvist, L.; Berrino, F.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Buring, J.E.; Colditz, G.A.; Freudenheim, J.L.; Fuchs, C.S.; Giovannucci, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Graham, S.; Harnack, L.; Hartman, A.M.; Jacobs, D.R.; Kato, I.; Krogh, V.; Leitzmann, M.F.; McCullough, M.L.; Miller, A.B.; Pietinen, P.; Rohan, T.E.; Schatzkin, A.; Willett, W.C.; Wolk, A.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A.; Zhang, S.M.; Smith-Warner, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    Context: Inconsistent findings from observational studies have continued the controversy over the effects of dietary fiber on colorectal cancer. Objective: To evaluate the association between dietary fiber intake and risk of colorectal cancer. Design, Setting, and Participants: From 13 prospective c

  19. Clinical findings with implications for genetic testing in families with clustering of colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnen, JT; Vasen, HFA; Khan, PM; Zwinderman, AH; van der Klift, H; Mulder, A; Tops, C; Moller, P; Fodde, R; Menko, F; Taal, B; Nagengast, F; Brunner, H; Kleibeuker, J; Sijmons, R; Griffioen, G; Brocker-Vriends, A; Bakker, E; van Leeuwen-Cornelisse, [No Value; Meijers-Heijboer, A; Lindhout, D; Breuning, M; Post, J; Schaap, C; Apold, J; Heimdal, K; Bertario, L; Bisgaard, ML; Goetz, P

    1998-01-01

    Background Germ-line mutations in DNA mismatch-repair genes (MSH2, MLH1, PIMS1, PMS2, and MSH6) cause susceptibility to hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. We assessed the prevalence of MSH2 and MLH1 mutations in families suspected of having hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer and evalu

  20. Dairy foods, calcium, and colorectal cancer: A pooled analysis of 10 cohort studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cho, E.; Smith-Warner, S.A.; Spiegelman, D.; Beeson, W.L.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Colditz, G.A.; Folsom, A.R.; Fraser, G.E.; Freudenheim, J.L.; Giovannucci, E.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Graham, S.; Miller, A.B.; Pietinen, P.; Potter, J.D.; Rohan, T.E.; Terry, P.; Toniolo, P.; Virtanen, M.J.; Willet, W.C.; Wolk, A.; Wu, K.; Yaun, S.-S.; Zeleniuch-Jacquotte, A.; Hunter, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Studies in animals have suggested that calcium may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer. However, results from epidemiologic studies of intake of calcium or dairy foods and colorectal cancer risk have been inconclusive. Methods: We pooled the primary data from 10 cohort studies in five c

  1. Urine Metabolite Profiling of Human Colorectal Cancer by Capillary Electrophoresis Mass Spectrometry Based on MRB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Lian Chen

    2012-01-01

    (P<0.05. Conclusion. The technique of capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry based on MRB could reveal the significant metabolic alterations during progression of colorectal cancer, and the method is feasible and may be useful for the early diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  2. Gender differences in the trend of colorectal cancer incidence in Singapore, 1968–2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.M.C.M. de Kok (Inge); C.S. Wong (Chia Siong); K.S. Chia (Kee Seng); X. Sim (Xueling); C.S. Tan (Chuen Seng); L.A.L.M. Kiemeney (Bart); H.M. Verkooijen (Helena)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground and aims Over the past decades, incidence trends of colorectal cancer are sharply increased in Singapore. In this population-based study we describe changes in colorectal cancer incidence in Singapore and explore the reasons behind these changes through age-period cohort (APC

  3. Gender differences in the trend of colorectal cancer incidence in Singapore, 1968-2002.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, IM de; Wong, C.S.; Chia, K.S.; Sim, X.; Tan, C.S.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Verkooijen, H.M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Over the past decades, incidence trends of colorectal cancer are sharply increased in Singapore. In this population-based study we describe changes in colorectal cancer incidence in Singapore and explore the reasons behind these changes through age-period cohort (APC) modeling.

  4. Preliminary results of robotic colorectal surgery at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Saad Zaghloul

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the outcomes of robotic colorectal cancer intervention in Egyptian patients. Our preliminary results suggest that robotic-assisted surgery for colorectal cancer can be carried out safely and according to oncological principles.

  5. CALCIUM AND VITAMIN-D - POSSIBLE PROTECTIVE AGENTS AGAINST COLORECTAL-CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KLEIBEUKER, JH; VANDERMEER, R; DEVRIES, EGE

    1995-01-01

    Nutritional factors are important determinants of colorectal cancer risk. Diets high in fat and/or low in fibre are especially recognised to increase risk. Dietary calcium and vitamin D have been suggested to be protective against colorectal cancer. With respect to calcium, its possible effect is th

  6. Dietary flavonol, flavone and catechin intake and risk of colorectal cancer in the Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, C.C.J.M.; Hughes, L.A.E.; Arts, I.C.W.; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Weijenberg, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    Dietary flavonoids are hypothesized to be protective against colorectal cancer, yet findings have been inconsistent. We examined the association of dietary flavonol, flavone and catechin intake with colorectal cancer endpoints within the Netherlands Cohort Study (NLCS). In addition, we explored whet

  7. Plasma Fetuin-A concentration, genetic variation in the AHSG gene and risk of colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nimptsch, Katharina; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Boeing, Heiner;

    2015-01-01

    Fetuin-A, also referred to as α2-Heremans-Schmid glycoprotein (AHSG), is a liver protein known to inhibit insulin actions. Hyperinsulinemia is a possible risk factor for colorectal cancer; however, the role of fetuin-A in the development of colorectal cancer is unclear. We investigated the associ...

  8. Public Awareness of Colorectal Cancer Screening: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Interventions for Increasing Screening Uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno Garcia, Antonio Z.; Hernandez Alvarez Buylla, Noemi; Nicolas-Perez, David; Quintero, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer ranks as one of the most incidental and death malignancies worldwide. Colorectal cancer screening has proven its benefit in terms of incidence and mortality reduction in randomized controlled trials. In fact, it has been recommended by medical organizations either in average-risk or family-risk populations. Success of a screening campaign highly depends on how compliant the target population is. Several factors influence colorectal cancer screening uptake including sociodemographics, provider and healthcare system factors, and psychosocial factors. Awareness of the target population of colorectal cancer and screening is crucial in order to increase screening participation rates. Knowledge about this disease and its prevention has been used across studies as a measurement of public awareness. Some studies found a positive relationship between knowledge about colorectal cancer, risk perception, and attitudes (perceived benefits and barriers against screening) and willingness to participate in a colorectal cancer screening campaign. The mentioned factors are modifiable and therefore susceptible of intervention. In fact, interventional studies focused on average-risk population have tried to increase colorectal cancer screening uptake by improving public knowledge and modifying attitudes. In the present paper, we reviewed the factors impacting adherence to colorectal cancer screening and interventions targeting participants for increasing screening uptake. PMID:24729896

  9. A pooled analysis of the outcome of prospective colonoscopic surveillance for familial colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mesher, David; Dove-Edwin, Isis; Sasieni, Peter;

    2014-01-01

    Surveillance guidelines for the management of familial colorectal cancer (FCC), a dominant family history of colorectal cancer in which the polyposis syndromes and Lynch syndrome have been excluded, are not firmly established. The outcome of colonoscopic surveillance is studied using data from six...

  10. Biological variations in plasma VEGF and VEGFR-1 may compromise their biomarker value in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Mads N.; Brunner, Nils; Christensen, Ib Jarle;

    2010-01-01

    Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) plays a prominent role in tumor angiogenesis and plasma VEGF concentration may carry prognostic information in colorectal cancer. The VEGF receptor 1 (VEGFR-1) is a regulatory receptor which is shredded into plasma of patients with colorectal cancer. For ...

  11. Clinical review: surgical management of locally advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Courtney, D

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent and locally advanced colorectal cancers frequently require en bloc resection of involved organs to achieve negative margins. The aim of this review is to evaluate the most current literature related to the surgical management of locally advanced and recurrent colorectal cancer.

  12. Colorectal cancer risk and dyslipidemia: a case-cohort study nested in an Italian multicentre cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agnoli, C.; Grioni, S.; Sieri, S.; Sacerdote, C.; Vineis, P.; Tumino, R.; Giurdanella, M.C.; Pala, V.; Mattiello, A.; Chiodini, P.; Iacoviello, L.; Curtis, de A.; Cattaneo, L.; Duijnhoven, van F.J.B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dyslipidemia is an established risk factor for many diseases, but its effect on colorectal cancer risk is less clear. We investigated the association of colorectal cancer risk with plasma triglycerides, total, HDL, and LDL cholesterol in four Italian EPIC centers. Methods: We conducted a

  13. Mendelian Randomization Study of Body Mass Index and Colorectal Cancer Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrift, Aaron P.; Gong, Jian; Peters, Ulrike;

    2015-01-01

    the causal association between BMI and colorectal cancer. Methods: We used data from 10,226 colorectal cancer cases and 10,286 controls of European ancestry. The Mendelian randomization analysis used a weighted genetic risk score, derived from 77 genome-wide association study–identified variants associated...

  14. Investigation of the roles of exosomes in colorectal cancer liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Ding, Xiaoling; Nan, Lijuan; Wang, Yiting; Wang, Jing; Yan, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Wei; Sun, Jihong; Zhu, Wei; Ni, Bing; Dong, Suzhen; Yu, Lei

    2015-05-01

    The leading cause of death among cancer patients is tumor metastasis. Tumor-derived exosomes are emerging as mediators of metastasis. In the present study, we demonstrated that exosomes play a pivotal role in the metastatic progression of colorectal cancer. First, a nude mouse model of colorectal cancer liver metastasis was established and characterized. Then, we demonstrated that exosomes from a highly liver metastatic colorectal cancer cell line (HT-29) could significantly increase the metastatic tumor burden and distribution in the mouse liver of Caco-2 colorectal cancer cells, which ordinarily exhibit poor liver metastatic potential. We further investigated the mechanisms by which HT-29-derived-exosomes influence the liver metastasis of colorectal cancer and found that mice treated with HT-29-derived exosomes had a relatively higher level of CXCR4 in the metastatic microenvironment, indicating that exosomes may promote colorectal cancer metastasis by recruiting CXCR4-expressing stromal cells to develop a permissive metastatic microenvironment. Finally, the migration of Caco-2 cells was significantly increased following treatment with HT-29-derived exosomes in vitro, further supporting a role for exosomes in modulating colorectal tumor-derived liver metastasis. The data from the present study may facilitate further translational medicine research into the prevention and treatment of colorectal cancer liver metastasis.

  15. Clinical responses in patients with advanced colorectal cancer to a dendritic cell based vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burgdorf, Stefan K; Fischer, Anders; Myschetzky, Peter S

    2008-01-01

    Patients with disseminated colorectal cancer have a poor prognosis. Preliminary studies have shown encouraging results from vaccines based on dendritic cells. The aim of this phase II study was to evaluate the effect of treating patients with advanced colorectal cancer with a cancer vaccine based...... on dendritic cells pulsed with an allogenic tumor cell lysate. Twenty patients with advanced colorectal cancer were consecutively enrolled. Dendritic cells (DC) were generated from autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells and pulsed with allogenic tumor cell lysate containing high levels of cancer...

  16. Distribution of Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn in primary colorectal cancer and secondary colorectal liver metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ebraheem, A.; Mersov, A.; Gurusamy, K.; Farquharson, M. J.

    2010-07-01

    A microbeam synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (μSRXRF) technique has been used to determine the localization and the relative concentrations of Zn, Cu, Fe and Ca in primary colorectal cancer and secondary colorectal liver metastases. 24 colon and 23 liver samples were examined, all of which were formalin fixed tissues arranged as microarrays of 1.0 mm diameter and 10 μm thickness. The distribution of these metals was compared with light transmission images of adjacent sections that were H and E stained to reveal the location of the cancer cells. Histological details were provided for each sample which enable concentrations of all elements in different tissue types to be compared. In the case of liver, significant differences have been found for all elements when comparing tumour, normal, necrotic, fibrotic, and blood vessel tissues (Kruskal Wallis Test, Pcolon samples (Kruskal Wallis Test, Pcolon tissues. Comparing liver tumour and colon tumour samples, significant differences have been found for all elements (Mann Whitney, Pcolon areas (independent T test, P=0.007 for Zn and Mann Whitney test P<0.0001 for Cu, Fe and Ca). For the blood vessel tissue, the analysis revealed that the difference was only significant for Fe ( P=0.009) from independent T test.

  17. Differential CARM1 expression in prostate and colorectal cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Nguyen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coactivator-associated arginine methyltransferase 1 (CARM1 functions as a transcriptional coactivator of androgen receptor (AR-mediated signaling. Correspondingly, overexpression of CARM1 has been associated with the development of prostate cancer (PCa and its progression to androgen-independent PCa. In our preliminary study, however, the promoting effects of CARM1, with regard to androgen-stimulated AR target gene expression were minimal. These results suggested that the AR target gene expression associated with CARM1 may result primarily from non-hormone dependent activity. The goal of this study was to confirm the pattern of expression of CARM1 in human tumors and determine the mechanism of action in CARM1 overexpressed tumors. Methods Tissue microarray was used to determine the pattern of expression of CARM1 in human cancers by immunohistochemistry. CARM1 expression was also evaluated in prostate and colorectal surgical specimens and the clinical records of all cases were reviewed. In addition, a reporter transcription assay using the prostate-specific antigen (PSA promoter was used to identify the signaling pathways involved in non-hormone-mediated signal activation associated with CARM1. Results The tissue microarray showed that CARM1 was particularly overexpressed in the colorectal cancers while CARM1 expression was not prevalent in the prostate and breast cancers. Further studies using surgical specimens demonstrated that CARM1 was highly overexpressed in 75% of colorectal cancers (49 out of 65 but not in the androgen-independent PCa. In addition, CARM1's coactivating effect on the entire PSA promoter was very limited in both androgen-dependent and androgen-independent PCa cells. These results suggest that there are other factors associated with CARM1 expression in PSA regulation. Indeed, CARM1 significantly regulated both p53 and NF-κB target gene transcription. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that, in

  18. Estimation of Hospital Costs for Colorectal Cancer Care for Nova Scotia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D O'Brien

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC is the second most common invasive cancer in Canada. Estimates of the costs of care allow estimation of the cost effectiveness of screening for premalignant and early disease.

  19. Does Doxycycline work in synergy with cisplatin and oxaliplatin in colorectal cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taanman JanWillem

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, apart from antibacterial properties, doxycycline is reported to have cytotoxic and anti-proliferative actions in various cancers including colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer constitutes one of the most common cancers in the western population. Apart from surgery, chemotherapy plays crucial role in the treatment of colorectal cancer. Cisplatin and oxaliplatin are most commonly used platinum compounds for the cancer chemotherapy. This study has looked for any impact of doxycycline on the cytotoxic effects of platinum compounds in colorectal cancer including its mechanisms of actions. Methods HT 29 colorectal cancer cells were used for this study. These cells were treated with cisplatin and oxaliplatin with or without doxycycline treatment. The caspase 3 gene expression was quantitated by gel electrophoresis and qualitated by real time polymerase chain reactions. The caspase 3 activity was assessed in HT 29 cells with fluorescence kit. Results The results revealed increased caspase 3 gene expressions and activities in HT 29 cells treated with cisplatin, oxaliplatin and doxycycline; however the combination of doxycycline with cisplatin and oxaliplatin did not report increased caspase 3 gene expressions and activity compared to cisplatin and oxaliplatin alone. Conclusion We concluded that doxycycline has role in apoptosis induction in the colorectal cancer. However, it did not show any synergy with platinum compounds in the colorectal cancer cells. This study also pointed towards possible caspase-independent actions of doxycycline with cisplatin and oxaliplatin. However, further work is required to underpin the mechanisms of actions of doxycycline.

  20. Clinical and biological characteristics of colorectal cancer with familial predisposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Bao-ping; ZHANG Ya-li; ZHOU Dian-yuan; GAO Chun-fang; LAI Zhuo-sheng

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the microsatellite instability (MSI), expression of mismatch repair (MMR) gene (hMLH1, hMSH2) and proliferation kinetics in colorectal cancer (CRC) with familial predisposition. Method:Forty-six cases of CRC were studied using silver staining polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) technique, streptavidin-peroxidase (SP) immunohistochemical method and flow cytometry. Results: In CRC patients with familial predisposition, the MSI-positive rate was higher than in sporadic CRC (P<0.05). Familial predisposition and positive MSI were strongly related to early age of cancer onset, the proclivity for proximal colonic cancer, poor differentiated and extracolorectaln malignancies (P<0.01, P<0.05). The incidence of negative expression ofhMLH1 in tumor tissue and hMLH1, hMSH2 in normal colorectal tissues was significantly higher (P<0.05). The negative expression of hMLH1 together with hMSH2 was related with positive MSI (P<0.05).In MSI-positive CRC cells, the proliferation cell nucleus antigen (PCNA) expression, proliferation index and S-phase cells decreased obviously (P<0.01, P<0.05). Conclusion: In CRC with familial predisposition, MSI might be an important contributor. The rate ofhMLH1 and hMSH2 mutation increased in tumor and normal tissue, and the proliferation activity of their cancer cell was lower.

  1. Human papillomavirus detection in paraffin-embedded colorectal cancer tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzi, Elisabetta; Bianchi, Silvia; Frati, Elena R; Amicizia, Daniela; Martinelli, Marianna; Bragazzi, Nicola L; Brisigotti, Maria Pia; Colzani, Daniela; Fasoli, Ester; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Panatto, Donatella; Gasparini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has a well-recognized aetiological role in the development of cervical cancer and other anogenital tumours. Recently, an association between colorectal cancer and HPV infection has been suggested, although this is still controversial. This study aimed at detecting and characterizing HPV infection in 57 paired biopsies from colorectal cancers and adjacent intact tissues using a degenerate PCR approach. All amplified fragments were genotyped by means of sequencing. Overall, HPV prevalence was 12.3 %. In particular, 15.8 % of tumour tissues and 8.8 % of non-cancerous tissue samples were HPV DNA-positive. Of these samples, 85.7 % were genotyped successfully, with 41.7 % of sequences identifying four genotypes of the HR (high oncogenic risk) clade Group 1; the remaining 58.3 % of HPV-genotyped specimens had an unclassified β-HPV. Examining additional cases and analysing whole genomes will help to outline the significance of these findings.

  2. Effect of onion flavonoids on colorectal cancer with hyperlipidemia: an in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Y

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Yongshan He,1,* Heiying Jin,1,* Wei Gong,2,* Chunxia Zhang,1 Acheng Zhou1 1National Center of Colorectal Surgery, Third Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Surgery, Jiangyin Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jiangyin, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objectives: This study aims to find the effect of onion's extraction on the colorectal cancer with hyperlipidemia. Method: We established a hyperlipidemia-subcutaneously heterotopic colorectal cancer orthotopic transplant model and fed mice a high fat diet and performing transplantation. Animal models were treated with capecitabine and/or simvastatin and low-, middle-, high- dose of onion's extraction and both tumor growth rate and blood lipid levels were monitored. Results: We found that colorectal cancer in onion's extraction groups was significantly inhibited, and the effect of high dose of onion's extraction was equivalent to capecitabine. Onion's extraction effectively decreased levels of apoB and TC. Conclusion: Our study established a hyperlipidemia colon tumor model involving subcutaneous colon translocation and orthotopic transplantation, this model was an ideal research model for mutual influence of hyperlipidemia and colorectal cancer. Onion's extraction could inhibit the proliferation of colorectal cancer; the function of the high-dose of onion's extraction was fairly to capecitabine, which provided a new direction in protecting and treating colorectal cancer. Keywords: colorectal cancer, hyperlipidemia, onion flavonoids, capecitabine, simvastatin

  3. Colorectal cancer in Denmark 1943-1997

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lau C; Grønbaek, Morten; Johansen, Christoffer

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: This article reports the incidence rates of colon and rectal cancer in Denmark during 55 years of data registration and estimates the number of cases identified attributable to four modifiable risk factors and potentially preventable. METHODS: On the basis of reports in the nationwide...... rate of rectal cancer was observed for both genders, but the incidence rate among males was higher than that among females. The proportion of cases that could have been prevented if the Danish population had not been exposed to the four known risk factors varied from 0 to 15 percent for each...... of the four risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows that the incidence rate of colon cancer has increased, whereas that of rectal cancer has decreased in Denmark during 55 years of observation. The potentially preventable proportions of incident cases are substantial but not as high as might have been...

  4. Expression of glutaminase is upregulated in colorectal cancer and of clinical significance

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells remodel their metabolic programmes to meet the requirements of rapid proliferation. Glutaminase (GLS1) is a mitochondrial enzyme that converts glutamine to glutamate. Our aim was to investigate, for the first time, GLS1 protein expression in colorectal cancer and to evaluate its clinical significance. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on tissue microarrays containing pairs of cancer and adjacent normal tissues from colorectal cancer patients (n=257). The expression of GL...

  5. Surgery for colorectal cancer in the small town of Komotini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simoglou C

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Christos Simoglou, Eirini Gymnopoulou, Lambros Simoglou, Marina Gymnopoulou, Konstantinia Nikolaou, Dimitrios GymnopoulosSurgical Clinic, Sιsmanogleio General Hospital, Komotini, GreeceBackground: Here we report our experience in treating colon cancer in the 5 years from 200 to 2011. Our surgical clinic treated 49 patients with colorectal cancer, of whom 28 (57.14% were men of mean age 62 years and 21 (42.86% were women of mean age 66 years.Methods: In 15 cases, the cancer was related to the rectum (30.61% and the remaining 34 cases (69.39% were related to the colon. We found synchronous cancer in two patients. One was found in the blank and the upper right while the second was found in the transverse and sigmoid colon. Six of our patients suffered from coexisting biliary lithiasis and underwent simultaneous cholecystectomy, and simultaneous bile duct exploration for common bile duct lithiasis was performed in one of these patients.Results: Twenty-eight of the patients with colon cancer were treated surgically on an emergency basis. There were two postoperative deaths due to septic shock and multiple organ failure. In total, we noted seven complications, all of which involved patients who had undergone emergency surgery. The length of hospital stay was 8–14 days. Four patients with stage IV disease died 2 years after surgery, and the remainder are still alive.Conclusion: We conclude that colon cancer still occurs after the sixth decade, with a male predominance, and is mainly located in the rectum and sigmoid colon. The high rate of ileus in our region indicates inadequate diagnostic access for the residents of our region. However, mortality remains low.Keywords: anastomosis, colorectal cancer, Hartmann, colectomy, sigmoidectomy

  6. Colorectal Carcinoma: A General Overview and Future Perspectives in Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mármol, Inés; Sánchez-de-Diego, Cristina; Pradilla Dieste, Alberto; Cerrada, Elena; Rodriguez Yoldi, María Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer and the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death. Most cases of CRC are detected in Western countries, with its incidence increasing year by year. The probability of suffering from colorectal cancer is about 4%–5% and the risk for developing CRC is associated with personal features or habits such as age, chronic disease history and lifestyle. In this context, the gut microbiota has a relevant role, and dysbiosis situations can induce colonic carcinogenesis through a chronic inflammation mechanism. Some of the bacteria responsible for this multiphase process include Fusobacterium spp, Bacteroides fragilis and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. CRC is caused by mutations that target oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes and genes related to DNA repair mechanisms. Depending on the origin of the mutation, colorectal carcinomas can be classified as sporadic (70%); inherited (5%) and familial (25%). The pathogenic mechanisms leading to this situation can be included in three types, namely chromosomal instability (CIN), microsatellite instability (MSI) and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP). Within these types of CRC, common mutations, chromosomal changes and translocations have been reported to affect important pathways (WNT, MAPK/PI3K, TGF-β, TP53), and mutations; in particular, genes such as c-MYC, KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, PTEN, SMAD2 and SMAD4 can be used as predictive markers for patient outcome. In addition to gene mutations, alterations in ncRNAs, such as lncRNA or miRNA, can also contribute to different steps of the carcinogenesis process and have a predictive value when used as biomarkers. In consequence, different panels of genes and mRNA are being developed to improve prognosis and treatment selection. The choice of first-line treatment in CRC follows a multimodal approach based on tumour-related characteristics and usually comprises surgical resection followed by chemotherapy combined with

  7. Colorectal Carcinoma: A General Overview and Future Perspectives in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Mármol

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer and the fourth most common cause of cancer-related death. Most cases of CRC are detected in Western countries, with its incidence increasing year by year. The probability of suffering from colorectal cancer is about 4%–5% and the risk for developing CRC is associated with personal features or habits such as age, chronic disease history and lifestyle. In this context, the gut microbiota has a relevant role, and dysbiosis situations can induce colonic carcinogenesis through a chronic inflammation mechanism. Some of the bacteria responsible for this multiphase process include Fusobacterium spp, Bacteroides fragilis and enteropathogenic Escherichia coli. CRC is caused by mutations that target oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes and genes related to DNA repair mechanisms. Depending on the origin of the mutation, colorectal carcinomas can be classified as sporadic (70%; inherited (5% and familial (25%. The pathogenic mechanisms leading to this situation can be included in three types, namely chromosomal instability (CIN, microsatellite instability (MSI and CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP. Within these types of CRC, common mutations, chromosomal changes and translocations have been reported to affect important pathways (WNT, MAPK/PI3K, TGF-β, TP53, and mutations; in particular, genes such as c-MYC, KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, PTEN, SMAD2 and SMAD4 can be used as predictive markers for patient outcome. In addition to gene mutations, alterations in ncRNAs, such as lncRNA or miRNA, can also contribute to different steps of the carcinogenesis process and have a predictive value when used as biomarkers. In consequence, different panels of genes and mRNA are being developed to improve prognosis and treatment selection. The choice of first-line treatment in CRC follows a multimodal approach based on tumour-related characteristics and usually comprises surgical resection followed by chemotherapy combined

  8. Zinc finger protein 278, a potential oncogene in human colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoqing Tian; Danfeng Sun; Yanjie Zhang; Shuliang Zhao; Hua Xiong; Jingyuan Fang

    2008-01-01

    Zinc finger protein 278 (ZNF278) is a novel Krueppel Cys2-His2-type zinc finger protein that is ubiquitously distributed in human tissues. Whether ZNF278 is related to the development of colorectal cancer is still unclear. The transcriptional level of ZNF278 was studied in colorectal cancer by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that ZNF278 expression was increased in 53% of colorectal cancer tissues compared to corresponding non-cancerous tissues. The transcriptional down-regulation of ZNF278 was detected in only three (6%) human colorectal cancer tissues compared to corresponding non-cancer tissues. No significant difference was detected in 19 (41%) pairs of samples.However, we failed to find a significant association between the up-regulation of ZNF278 transcription and age, sex, the degree of infiltration, or the tumor size of colorectal cancer.To study the function of ZNF278 in colorectal carcinogenesis,the colon cancer cell line SW1116 was stably transfected with a wild-type ZNF278 plasmid to construct an overexpression system, and was transiently transfected with the small interfering RNA of ZNF278 to construct a ZNF278 knockdown system. Cell proliferation was assessed with 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide dye and a cell counter. The results show that ZNF278 promotes cell growth, and its knockdown suppresses cell proliferation. ZNF278 could be a potential proto-oncogene in colorectal cancer.

  9. Targeting cancer testis antigens for biomarkers and immunotherapy in colorectal cancer: Current status and challenges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anil; Suri; Nirmala; Jagadish; Shikha; Saini; Namita; Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer ranks third among the estimatedcancer cases and cancer related mortalities in United States in 2014. Early detection and efficient therapy remains a significant clinical challenge for this disease. Therefore, there is a need to identify novel tumor asso-ciated molecules to target for biomarker development and immunotherapy. In this regard, cancer testis antigens have emerged as a potential targets for developing novel clinical biomarkers and immunotherapy for various malignancies. These germ cell specific proteins exhibit aberrant expression in cancer cells and contribute in tumorigenesis. Owing to their unique expression profile and immunogenicity in cancer patients, cancer testis antigens are clinically referred as the most promising tumor associated antigens. Several cancer testis antigens have been studied in colorectal cancer but none of them could be used in clinical practice. This review is an attempt to address the promising cancer testis antigens in colorectal cancer and their possible clinical implications as biomarkers and immunotherapeutic targets with particular focus on challenges and future interventions.

  10. Lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status in colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elzbieta Skrzydlewska; Stanislaw Sulkowski; Mariusz Koda; Bogdan Zalewski; Luiza Kanczuga-Koda; Mariola Sulkowska

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can induce carcinogenesis via DNA injury. Both enzymatic and non-enzymatic parameters participate in cell protection against harmful influence of oxidative stress. The aim of the present study was to assess the levels of final lipid peroxidation products like malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE) in primary colorectal cancer. Moreover, we analysed the activity of main antioxidative enzymes, superoxide dismutase (Cu, Zn-SOD),catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and glutathione reductase (GSSRG-R) and the level of nonenzymatic antioxidants (glutathione, vitamins C and E).METHODS: Investigations were conducted in 81 primary colorectal cancers. As a control, the same amount of sample was collected from macroscopically unchanged colon regions of the most distant location to the cancer.Homogenisation of specimens provided 10% homogenates for our evaluations. Activity of antioxidant enzymes and level of glutathione were determined by spectrophotometry.HPLC revealed levels of vitamins C and E and served as a method to detect terminal products of lipid peroxidation in colorectal cancer.RESULTS: Our studies demonstrated a statistically significant increase in the level of lipid peroxidation products (MDA-Adc.muc.-2.65±0.48 nmol/g, Adc. G3-2.15±0.44 nmol/g, clinical Ⅳ stage 4.04±0.47 nmol/g, P<0.001 and 4-HNE-Adc.muc.-0.44±0.07 nmol/g, Adc. G3-0.44±0.10 nmol/g, clinical Ⅳstage 0.52±0.11 nmol/g, P<0.001) as well as increase of Cu,Zn-SOD (Adc.muc.-363±72 U/g, Adc. G3-318±48 U/g,clinical Ⅳ stage 421±58 U/g, P<0.001), GSH-Px (Adc.muc.-2143±623 U/g, Adc. G3-2005±591 U/g, clinical Ⅳ stage 2467±368 U/g, P<0.001) and GSSG-R (Adc. muc.-880±194 U/g,Adc. G3-795±228 U/g, dinical Ⅳ stage 951±243 U/g, P<0.001)in primary tumour comparison with normal colon (MDA1.39±0.15 nmol/g, HNE-0.29±0.03 nmol/g, Cu, Zn-SOD-117±25 U/g, GSH-Px-1723±189 U/g, GSSG-R-625±112 U/g)especially in mucinous and G3

  11. Epidemiologic factors of colorectal cancer in a county hospital in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Leşe

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is the most common digestive cancer. The aim of this study is to determine the colorectal cancer’s frequency relatedto age, gender, personal or family history, and also to blood group of the patients operated in the County Emergency Hospital of BaiaMare, Romania. Material and methods: The records of 512 patients with cancer of the colon, rectal cancer and synchronous colorectal cancerwere studied retrospectively in a period of 15 years, admitted to The Department of Surgery in The County Emergency Hospital of Baia Mare,Romania. Results: Colorectal cancers have been found to be more frequent in women under the age of 50 and in men above this age (p=0.004.In urban environments the right colon cancer (59.62% and rectal cancer (55.87% were more frequently encountered. Tumor location had analmost even distribution: 30% right colon, 35.45% left colon, 34.96% rectal cancer and 0.78% synchronous cancers. The association with personaland family history was statistically insignificant, except asthma which was considered a protective factor (p<0.001 for colorectal cancer.The abidance in blood groups shows proportional distribution with their representation in the population of our country, but family historyof colorectal cancer was found only in O and A groups. Conclusions: The study ascertains the left to right shift of the large bowel cancers, theincreasing of medium age of patients and high incidence of colorectal cancer in women under the age of 50 years. Asthma may be a protectivefactor for colorectal cancer, especially for right colon cancer, and genetic factors are present only in patients with O and A blood groups .

  12. NSAIDs and Cell Proliferation in Colorectal Cancer

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    Raj Ettarh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is common worldwide and accounts for significant morbidity and mortality in patients. Fortunately, epidemiological studies have demonstrated that continuous therapy with NSAIDs offers real promise of chemoprevention and adjunct therapy for colon cancer patients. Tumour growth is the result of complex regulation that determines the balance between cell proliferation and cell death. How NSAIDs affect this balance is important for understanding and improving treatment strategies and drug effectiveness. NSAIDs inhibit proliferation and impair the growth of colon cancer cell lines when tested in culture in vitro and many NSAIDs also prevent tumorigenesis and reduce tumour growth in animal models and in patients, but the relationship to inhibition of tumour cell proliferation is less convincing, principally due to gaps in the available data. High concentrations of NSAIDs are required in vitro to achieve cancer cell inhibition and growth retardation at varying time-points following treatment. However, the results from studies with colon cancer cell xenografts are promising and, together with better comparative data on anti-proliferative NSAID concentrations and doses (for in vitro and in vivo administration, could provide more information to improve our understanding of the relationships between these agents, dose and dosing regimen, and cellular environment.

  13. The impact of new technology on surgery for colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gregory B Makin; David J Breen; John RT Monson

    2001-01-01

    Advances in technology continue at a rapid pace and affect all aspects of life, including surgery. We have reviewed some of these advances and the impact they are having on the investigation and management of colorectal cancer. Modern endoscopes, with magnifying, variable stiffness and Iocalisation capabilities are making the primary investigation of colonic cancer easier and more acceptable for patients. Imaging investigations looking at primary, metastatic and recurrent disease are shifting to digital data sets. which can he stored, reviewed remotely, potentially fused with other modalities and reconstructed as 3 dimensional (3D) images for the purposes of advanced diagnostic interpretation and computer assisted surgery. They include virtual colonoscopy, trans-rectal ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and radioimmunoscintigraphy. Once a colorectal carcinoma is diagnosed, the treatment options available are expanding.Colonic stents are being used to relieve large bowel obstruction, either as a palliative measure or to improve the patient's overall condition before definitive surgery.Transenal endoscopic microsurgery and minimally invasive techniques are being used with similar outcomes and a lower mortality, morbidity and hospital stay than open trans-abdominal surgery. Transanal endoscopic microsurgery allows precise excision of both benign and early malignant lesions in the mid and upper rectum.Survival of patients with inoperable hepatic metastases following radiofrequency ablation is encouraging.Robotics and telemedicine are taking surgery well into the 21st century. Artificial neural networks are being developed to enable us to predict the outcome for individual patients. New technology has a major impact on the way we practice surgery for colorectal cancer.``

  14. Expression of prostasin and its inhibitors during colorectal cancer carcinogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selzer-Plon, J.; Bornholdt, J.; Friis, S.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Clinical trials where cancer patients were treated with protease inhibitors have suggested that the serine protease, prostasin, may act as a tumour suppressor. Prostasin is proteolytically activated by the serine protease, matriptase, which has a very high oncogenic potential. Prostasin...... is inhibited by protease nexin-1 (PN-1) and the two isoforms encoded by the mRNA splice variants of hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor-1 (HAI-1), HAI-1A, and HAI-1B. Methods: Using quantitative RT-PCR, we have determined the mRNA levels for prostasin and PN-1 in colorectal cancer tissue (n = 116...... and HAI-1B. mRNA levels were normalised to beta-actin. Immunohistochemical analysis of prostasin and HAI-1 was performed on normal and cancer tissue. Results: The mRNA level of prostasin was slightly but significantly decreased in both mild/moderate dysplasia (p

  15. Anti-angiogenic agents in metastatic colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major public health concernbeing the third leading cause of cancer mortality inthe United States. The availability of better therapeuticoptions has led to a decline in cancer mortality in thesepatients. Surgical resection should be considered in allstages of the disease. The use of conversion therapyhas made surgery a potentially curative option even inpatients with initially unresectable metastatic disease.In this review we discuss the role of various antiangiogenicagents in patients with metastatic CRC(mCRC). We describe the mechanism of action of theseagents, and the rationale for their use in combinationwith chemotherapy. We also review important clinicalstudies that have evaluated the safety and efficacy ofthese agents in mCRC patients. Despite the discoveryof several promising anti-angiogenic agents, mCRCremains an incurable disease with a median overallsurvival of just over 2 years in patients exposed to allavailable treatment regimens. Further insights intotumor biology and tumor microenvironment may helpimprove outcomes in these patients.

  16. mTOR pathway in colorectal cancer: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francipane, Maria Giovanna; Lagasse, Eric

    2014-01-15

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) has emerged as a potential target for drug development, particularly due to the fact that it plays such a crucial role in cancer biology. In addition, next-generation mTOR inhibitors have become available, marking an exciting new phase in mTOR-based therapy. However, the verdict on their therapeutic effectiveness remains unclear. Here we review phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mTOR signaling as one of the primary mechanisms for sustaining tumor outgrowth and metastasis, recent advances in the development of mTOR inhibitors, and current studies addressing mTOR activation/inhibition in colorectal cancer (CRC). We will also discuss our recent comparative study of different mTOR inhibitors in a population of colon cancer stem cells (CSCs), and current major challenges for achieving individualized drug therapy using kinase inhibitors.

  17. Intestinal inflammation and colorectal cancer: A doubleedged sword?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Angelamaria Rizzo; Francesco Pallone; Giovanni Monteleone; Massimo Claudio Fantini

    2011-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is thought to be the leading cause of many human cancers including colorectal cancer (CRC). Accordingly, epidemiologic and clinical studies indicate that patients affected by ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, the two major forms of inflammatory bowel disease, have an increased risk of developing CRC. In recent years, the role of immune cells and their products have been shown to be pivotal in initiation and progression of colitis-associated CRC. On the other hand, activation of the immune system has been shown to cause dysplastic cell elimination and cancer suppression in other settings. Clinical and experimental data herein reviewed, while confirming chronic inflammation as a risk factor for colon carcinogenesis, do not completely rule out the possibility that under certain conditions the chronic activation of the mucosal immune system might protect from colonic dysplasia.

  18. Colorectal cancer screening: a global overview of existing programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreuders, Eline H; Ruco, Arlinda; Rabeneck, Linda; Schoen, Robert E; Sung, Joseph J Y; Young, Graeme P; Kuipers, Ernst J

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) ranks third among the most commonly diagnosed cancers worldwide, with wide geographical variation in incidence and mortality across the world. Despite proof that screening can decrease CRC incidence and mortality, CRC screening is only offered to a small proportion of the target population worldwide. Throughout the world there are widespread differences in CRC screening implementation status and strategy. Differences can be attributed to geographical variation in CRC incidence, economic resources, healthcare structure and infrastructure to support screening such as the ability to identify the target population at risk and cancer registry availability. This review highlights issues to consider when implementing a CRC screening programme and gives a worldwide overview of CRC burden and the current status of screening programmes, with focus on international differences.

  19. Molecular therapy of colorectal cancer: progress and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Wenhao; Feng, Junlan; Qin, Huanlong; Ma, Yanlei

    2015-02-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the most common types of cancer and leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Although the introduction of cytotoxic drugs such as oxaliplatin, irinotecan and fluorouracil has improved the treatment of advanced CRC, the individual response to chemoradiotherapy varies tremendously from one patient to another. However, recent progress in CRC molecular therapies may provide new insight into the treatment of this disease. Currently, components of the EGFR, VEGF, Wnt and NF-kB pathways are the most important targets for CRC therapy. This review chronicles the development of molecular CRC therapies over the past few decades. We also provide an update on the current progress of research concerning the molecular pathways leading to CRC and discuss the possible implications for CRC therapy.

  20. Prognostic and predictive roles of MIR-383 in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alavieh Fateh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are impressive regulators of gene expression that have a critical role in the pathogenesis of Colorectal Cancer (CRC. With respect to the aberrant expression of microRNA-383 (miR-383 in some types of human malignancy, this prospective study characterized its contribution to CRC tumorigenesis. The real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction was used to examine miR-383 expression levels prospectively in 40 sample pairs of CRC tissues and adjacent noncancerous tissues (>2 cm from cancer tissue. No significant relationship was found between miR-383 expression levels and clinicopathological features. The ability of miR-383 to function as a tumor marker was also examined. Showing significant changes overall, miR-383 expression levels were significantly down regulated in the group of CRC samples compared with matched noncancerous tissue samples. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve also showed ROC area (AROC of 70% for miR-383 with 68% and 75% sensitivity and specificity, respectively. Therefore, miR-383 can be considered as a tumor marker in CRC and help as a potential predictive biomarker in the diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  1. RNAi technology: A Revolutionary tool for the colorectal cancer therapeutics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Lv; Chao Zhang; Jia Hao

    2006-01-01

    With the many changes that have taken place in people's diet and lifestyle, colorectal cancer (CRC) has become a global concern. There were approximately 950000 new cases diagnosed and 500000 deaths recorded worldwide in 2000. It is the second most common type of cancer in the Western world, and it is the third most common type of digestive tumor in China. It is reported that the morbidity of CRC is 4.08/100000 for men and 3.30/100000 for women in China. Despite the rate of improvements in surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the overall five-year survival is around 50%. Therefore, novel treatment need to be developed in order to add to the therapeutic armamentarium.RNA interference (RNAi) is a sequence-specific posttranscriptional gene silencing mechanism, which is triggered by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) and causes degradation of mRNA homologous in sequence to the dsRNA.This new approach has been successfully adopted to inhibit virus replication and tumorigenicity. Recent reports have described DNA vector-based strategies for delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) into mammalian cells, further expanding the utility of RNAi. With the development of the RNAi technology and deeper understanding of this field, a promising new modality of treatment appeared, which can be used in combination with the existing therapies .We reviewed the proceedings on the actualities and advancement of RNAi technology for colorectal cancer therapeutics.

  2. Lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 (LPCAT1) overexpression in human colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansilla, Francisco; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Wang, Shuli; Kruhøffer, Mogens; Lewin, Tal M; Orntoft, Torben F; Coleman, Rosalind A; Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin

    2009-01-01

    The alteration of the choline metabolite profile is a well-established characteristic of cancer cells. In colorectal cancer (CRC), phosphatidylcholine is the most prominent phospholipid. In the present study, we report that lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase 1 (LPCAT1; NM_024830.3), the enzyme that converts lysophosphatidylcholine into phosphatidylcholine, was highly overexpressed in colorectal adenocarcinomas when compared to normal mucosas. Our microarray transcription profiling study showed a significant (p mucosas. Immunohistochemical analysis of colon tumors with a polyclonal antibody to LPCAT1 confirmed the upregulation of the LPCAT1 protein. Overexpression of LPCAT1 in COS7 cells localized the protein to the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria and increased LPCAT1 specific activity 38-fold. In cultured cells, overexpressed LPCAT1 enhanced the incorporation of [(14)C]palmitate into phosphatidylcholine. COS7 cells transfected with LPCAT1 showed no growth rate alteration, in contrast to the colon cancer cell line SW480, which significantly (p < 10(-5)) increased its growth rate by 17%. We conclude that LPCAT1 may contribute to total choline metabolite accumulation via phosphatidylcholine remodeling, thereby altering the CRC lipid profile, a characteristic of malignancy.

  3. Current treatment for liver metastases from colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian-Xin Liu; Wei-Hui Zhang; Hong-Chi Jiang

    2003-01-01

    The liver is the commonest site of distant metastasis ofcolorectal cancer and nearly half of the patients withcolorectal cancer ultimately develop liver involved duringthe course of their diseases. Surgery is the only therapythat offers the possibility of cure for patients with hepaticmetastatic diseases. Five-year survival rates after resectionof all detectable liver metastases can be up to 40 %.Unfortunately, only 25 % of patients with colorectal livermetastases are candidates for liver resection, while the othersare not amenable to surgical resection. Regional therapiessuch as radiofrequency ablation and cryotherapy may beoffered to patients with isolated unresectable metastasesbut no extrahepatic diseases. Hepatic artery catheterchemotherapy and chemoembolization and portal veinembolization are often used for the patients with extensiveliver metastases but without extrahepatic diseases, whichare not suitable for regional ablation. For the patients withmetastatic colorectal cancer beyond the liver, systemicchemotherapy is a more appropriate choice. Immunotherapyis also a good option when other therapies are used incombination to enhance the efficacy. Selective internalradiation therapy is a new radiation method which can beused in patients given other routine therapies Without effects.

  4. Use of microRNAs in directing therapy and evaluating treatment response in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreoli, Silmara Cristiane da Silveira; Gasparini, Nina Jardim [Universidade Católica de Brasília, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Carvalho, Gisele Pereira de [Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Garicochea, Bernardo [Centro de Oncologia Sírio Libanês, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pogue, Robert Edward; Andrade, Rosângela Vieira de [Universidade Católica de Brasília, Brasilia, DF (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide. Survival and prognosis depend on tumor stage upon diagnosis, and in more than 50% of cases, the tumor has already invaded adjacent tissues or metastasis has occurred. Aiming to improve diagnosis, clinical prognosis and treatment of patients with colorectal cancer, several studies have investigated microRNAs as molecular markers of the disease due to their potential regulatory functions on tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes. This review aimed to summarize the main topics related to the use of microRNAs in diagnosis, clinical prognosis and evaluating treatment response in colorectal cancer.

  5. Hypoalbuminemia in colorectal cancer prognosis:Nutritional marker or inflammatory surrogate?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Albumin is the single most abundant protein in thehuman serum. Its roles in physiology and pathologyare diverse. Serum albumin levels have been classicallythought to reflect the nutritional status of patients. Thisconcept has been challenged in the last two decadesas multiple factors, such as inflammation, appearedto affect albumin levels independent of nutrition. Ingeneral,cancer patients have a high prevalence ofhypoalbuminemia. As such, the role of hypoalbuminemiain patients with colorectal cancer has receivedsignificant interest. We reviewed the English literatureon the prognostic value of pretreatment albumin levelsin colorectal cancer. We also consolidated the evidencethat led to the current understanding of hypoalbuminemiaas an inflammatory marker rather than as anutritional one among patients with colorectal cancer.

  6. Clinical and Molecular Characteristics of Post-Colonoscopy Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoffel, Elena M; Erichsen, Rune; Frøslev, Trine;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Colonoscopy provides incomplete protection from colorectal cancer (CRC), but determinants of post-colonoscopy CRC are not well understood. We compared clinical features and molecular characteristics of CRCs diagnosed at different time intervals after a previous colonoscopy....... METHODS: We performed a population-based, cross-sectional study of incident CRC cases in Denmark (2007-2011), categorized as post-colonoscopy or detected during diagnostic colonoscopy (in patients with no prior colonoscopy). We compared prevalence of proximal location and DNA mismatch repair deficiency (d...

  7. Colorectal cancer screening:The role of CT colonography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrea; Laghi; Franco; Iafrate; Marco; Rengo; Cesare; Hassan

    2010-01-01

    Computed tomography colonography(CTC) in colorectal cancer(CRC) screening has two roles:one present and the other potential.The present role is,without any further discussion,the integration into established screening programs as a replacement for barium enema in the case of incomplete colonoscopy.The potential role is the use of CTC as a first-line screening method together with Fecal Occult Blood Test,sigmoidoscopy and colonoscopy.However,despite the fact that CTC has been officially endorsed for CRC scre...

  8. Diabetes mellitus and colorectal cancer – a revealed connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihăiță Pătrășescu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The burden of colorectal cancer (CRC is increasing all over the world. The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is increasing. It is estimated that diabetes affects 387 million people worldwide. It is predicted that 552 million people worldwide will develop diabetes by 2030. A large pool of data indicate that DM increases by 2 fold the risk of CRC. This is the reason to firmly suggest the inclusion of DM in the criteria for CRC screening as an important measure to decrease the mortality of this ailment.

  9. Fruit and vegetable intakes and risk of colorectal cancer and incident and recurrent adenomas in the PLCO cancer screening trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunzmann, Andrew T; Coleman, Helen G; Huang, Wen-Yi; Cantwell, Marie M; Kitahara, Cari M; Berndt, Sonja I

    2016-04-15

    The roles of fruits and vegetables in colorectal cancer development are unclear. Few prospective studies have assessed the association with adenoma, a known precursor to colorectal cancer. Our aim was to evaluate the association between fruit and vegetable intake and colorectal cancer development by evaluating the risk of incident and recurrent colorectal adenoma and colorectal cancer. Study participants were identified from the intervention arm of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian Cancer Screening Trial. Fruit and vegetable intake was measured using a self-reported dietary questionnaire. Total fruit and vegetable intake was not associated with reduced incident or recurrent adenoma risk overall, but a protective association was observed for multiple adenomas (Odds ratio 3rd tertile vs. 1st tertile = 0.61, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.38, 1.00). Higher fruit and vegetable intakes were associated with a borderline reduced risk of colorectal cancer (Hazard ratio (HR) 3rd tertile vs. 1st tertile = 0.82, 95% CI: 0.67, 1.01), which reached significance amongst individuals with high processed meat intakes (HR = 0.74, 95% CI: 0.55, 0.99). Our results suggest that increased fruit and vegetable intake may protect against multiple adenoma development and may reduce the detrimental effects of high processed meat intakes on colorectal cancer risk.

  10. Impact of diabetes on oncologic outcome of colorectal cancer patients: colon vs. rectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Y Jeon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To evaluate the impact of diabetes on outcomes in colorectal cancer patients and to examine whether this association varies by the location of tumor (colon vs. rectum. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study includes 4,131 stage I-III colorectal cancer patients, treated between 1995 and 2007 (12.5% diabetic, 53% colon, 47% rectal in South Korea. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to determine the prognostic influence of DM on survival endpoints. RESULTS: Colorectal cancer patients with DM had significantly worse disease-free survival (DFS [hazard ratio (HR 1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.00-1.37] compared with patients without DM. When considering colon and rectal cancer independently, DM was significantly associated with worse overall survival (OS (HR: 1.46, 95% CI: 1.11-1.92, DFS (HR: 1.45, 95% CI: 1.15-1.84 and recurrence-free survival (RFS (HR: 1.32, 95% CI: 0.98-1.76 in colon cancer patients. No association for OS, DFS or RFS was observed in rectal cancer patients. There was significant interaction of location of tumor (colon vs. rectal cancer with DM on OS (P = 0.009 and DFS (P = 0.007. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that DM negatively impacts survival outcomes of patients with colon cancer but not rectal cancer.

  11. The inositide signaling pathway as a target for treating gastric cancer and colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HongJun eKim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer and colorectal cancer are the leading cause of cancer mortality and have a dismal prognosis. The introduction of biological agents to treat these cancers has resulted in improved outcomes, and combination chemotherapy with targeted agents and conventional chemotherapeutic agents is regarded as standard therapy. Additional newly clarified mechanisms of oncogenesis and resistance to targeted agents require the development of new biologic agents. Aberrantly activation of the inositide signaling pathway by a loss of function PTEN mutation or gain of function mutation/amplification of PIK3CA is an oncogenic mechanism in gastric cancer and colorectal cancer. Clinical trials with biologic agents that target the inositide signaling pathway are being performed to further improve treatment outcomes of patients with advanced gastric cancer and metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC. In this review we summarize the inositide signaling pathway and introduce targeted agents that inhibit abnormal activation of this signaling pathway and clinical trials currently being performed in patients with advanced or metastatic gastric cancer and metastatic CRC using molecular target agents.

  12. N-glycoprotein analysis discovers new up-regulated glycoproteins in colorectal cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicastri, Annalisa; Gaspari, Marco; Sacco, Rosario; Elia, Laura; Gabriele, Caterina; Romano, Roberto; Rizzuto, Antonia; Cuda, Giovanni

    2014-11-07

    Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of death due to cancer worldwide. Therefore, the identification of high-specificity and -sensitivity biomarkers for the early detection of colorectal cancer is urgently needed. Post-translational modifications, such as glycosylation, are known to play an important role in cancer progression. In the present work, we used a quantitative proteomic technique based on (18)O stable isotope labeling to identify differentially expressed N-linked glycoproteins in colorectal cancer tissue samples compared with healthy colorectal tissue from 19 patients undergoing colorectal cancer surgery. We identified 54 up-regulated glycoproteins in colorectal cancer samples, therefore potentially involved in the biological processes of tumorigenesis. In particular, nine of these (PLOD2, DPEP1, SE1L1, CD82, PAR1, PLOD3, S12A2, LAMP3, OLFM4) were found to be up-regulated in the great majority of the cohort, and, interestingly, the association with colorectal cancer of four (PLOD2, S12A2, PLOD3, CD82) has not been hitherto described.

  13. Identification of an epigenetic biomarker panel with high sensitivity and specificity for colorectal cancer and adenomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lind Guro E

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of cancer-specific DNA methylation patterns in epithelial colorectal cells in human feces provides the prospect of a simple, non-invasive screening test for colorectal cancer and its precursor, the adenoma. This study investigates a panel of epigenetic markers for the detection of colorectal cancer and adenomas. Methods Candidate biomarkers were subjected to quantitative methylation analysis in test sets of tissue samples from colorectal cancers, adenomas, and normal colonic mucosa. All findings were verified in independent clinical validation series. A total of 523 human samples were included in the study. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analysis was used to evaluate the performance of the biomarker panel. Results Promoter hypermethylation of the genes CNRIP1, FBN1, INA, MAL, SNCA, and SPG20 was frequent in both colorectal cancers (65-94% and adenomas (35-91%, whereas normal mucosa samples were rarely (0-5% methylated. The combined sensitivity of at least two positives among the six markers was 94% for colorectal cancers and 93% for adenoma samples, with a specificity of 98%. The resulting areas under the ROC curve were 0.984 for cancers and 0.968 for adenomas versus normal mucosa. Conclusions The novel epigenetic marker panel shows very high sensitivity and specificity for both colorectal cancers and adenomas. Our findings suggest this biomarker panel to be highly suitable for early tumor detection.

  14. Genetic variations in SMAD7 are associated with colorectal cancer risk in the colon cancer family registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejuan Jiang

    Full Text Available Recent genome-wide studies identified a risk locus for colorectal cancer at 18q21, which maps to the SMAD7 gene. Our objective was to confirm the association between SMAD7 SNPs and colorectal cancer risk in the multi-center Colon Cancer Family Registry.23 tagging SNPs in the SMAD7 gene were genotyped among 1,592 population-based and 253 clinic-based families. The SNP-colorectal cancer associations were assessed in multivariable conditional logistic regression.Among the population-based families, both SNPs rs12953717 (odds ratio, 1.29; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.49, and rs11874392 (odds ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.70-0.92 were associated with risk of colorectal cancer. These associations were similar among the population- and the clinic-based families, though they were significant only among the former. Marginally significant differences in the SNP-colorectal cancer associations were observed by use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cigarette smoking, body mass index, and history of polyps.SMAD7 SNPs were associated with colorectal cancer risk in the Colon Cancer Family Registry. There was evidence suggesting that the association between rs12953717 and colorectal cancer risk may be modified by factors such as smoking and use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  15. Metformin enhances radiosensitivity via inhibition of DNA repair pathway in colorectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Youn Kyoung; Kim, Mi Sook; Lee, Ji Young; Song, Kyung Hee; Choi, Kyul; Kim, Eun Ho; Ha, Hun Joo [Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-15

    In this study, we provide a scientific rationale for the clinical application of metformin as a radiosensitizer in colorectal cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer in men and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Currently, it is one of the commonest chemoradiotherapy worked better than the radiotherapy or chemotherapy in colorectal cancer. To enhance radiosensitivity of tumor cells for chemoradiotherapy, it is to use potential anticancer agents that act as radiosensitizers. Metformin, one of the most widely used antidiabetic drugs, has recently been associated with potential antitumorigenic effects. Our data shows that metformin combined with radiation enhances the efficacy of radiotherapy and down-regulates DNA repair proteins. Therefore, we provides a scientific rationale for the clinical application of metformin as a radiosensitizer in colorectal cancer.

  16. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and statins in relation to colorectal cancer risk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mazyar Shadman; Polly A Newcomb; John M Hampton; Karen J Wernli; Amy Trentham-Dietz

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association between individual or combined use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or statins and colorectal cancer risk. METHODS: In a population-based case-control study in women, we examined the association between NSAIDs and statin use and the risk of colorectal cancers. We further investigated whether the use of statins modifies the protective effect of NSAIDs. Female cases ( n = 669)of colorectal cancer aged 50-74 years were identified from a statewide registry in Wisconsin during 1999-2001. Community control women ( n = 1375) were randomly selected from lists of licensed drivers and Medicare beneficiaries. Medication use and risk factor information were gathered during a structured telephone interview. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to calculate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). RESULTS: Overall, NSAIDs users had a 30% reduction in risk of colorectal cancer (95% CI: 0.56-0.88). Statin use was not associated with colorectal cancer risk (OR = 1.17, 95% CI: 0.74-1.85), regardless of structural type (lipophilic or hydrophilic), duration of use, or recency. There was no evidence of an interaction between NSAIDs and statins and colorectal cancer risk ( P-interaction = 0.28). CONCLUSION: Although our results confirm the inverse association between NSAIDs use and colorectal cancer risk, they do not support a risk reduction in statin users, or an interaction effect of combined NSAIDs and statin use.

  17. Colorectal cancer screening practices of primary care providers: results of a national survey in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwati, Daud; Harmy, Mohamed Yusoff; Norhayati, Mohd Noor; Amry, Abdul Rahim

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of colorectal cancer has been increasing in many Asian countries including Malaysia during the past few decades. A physician recommendation has been shown to be a major factor that motivates patients to undergo screening. The present study objectives were to describe the practice of colorectal cancer screening by primary care providers in Malaysia and to determine the barriers for not following recommendations. In this cross sectional study involving 132 primary care providers from 44 Primary Care clinics in West Malaysia, self-administered questionnaires which consisted of demographic data, qualification, background on the primary care clinic, practices on colorectal cancer screening and barriers to colorectal cancer screening were distributed. A total of 116 primary care providers responded making a response rate of 87.9%. About 21% recommended faecal occult blood test (FOBT) in more than 50% of their patients who were eligible. The most common barrier was "unavailability of the test". The two most common patient factors are "patient in a hurry" and "poor patient awareness". This study indicates that colorectal cancer preventive activities among primary care providers are still poor in Malaysia. This may be related to the low availability of the test in the primary care setting and poor awareness and understanding of the importance of colorectal cancer screening among patients. More awareness programmes are required for the public. In addition, primary care providers should be kept abreast with the latest recommendations and policy makers need to improve colorectal cancer screening services in health clinics.

  18. Panitumumab: the evidence of its therapeutic potential in metastatic colorectal cancer care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinelli, Erika; Morgillo, Floriana; Troiani, Teresa; Tortora, Giampaolo; Ciardiello, Fortunato

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common malignant disease. Of newly diagnosed patients, 40% have metastatic disease at diagnosis, and approximately 25% of patients with localized disease at diagnosis will ultimately develop metastatic disease. The benefits of systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer over best supportive care have been established. Panitumumab (ABX-EGF) is the first fully human monoclonal antibody developed for use in colorectal cancer that targets the extracellular domains of epidermal growth factor receptor. Aims: The goal of this article is to review the published evidence for the use of panitumumab in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer to define its therapeutic potential. Evidence review: The major evidence of panitumumab activity in colorectal cancer has appeared in meeting report abstracts. One phase II study in monotherapy, one in combination with chemotherapy, and one phase III study have included only patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Clinical potential: To date, in phase II clinical studies panitumumab has demonstrated antitumor activity in advanced, refractory colorectal cancer. As monotherapy it resulted in a 10% response rate with 38% of patients having stable disease, and a 36% response rate with 46% stable disease when combined with chemotherapy. A phase III study indicates a clinically significant advantage of panitumumab as third-line monotherapy over best supportive care. Panitumumab appears to have a good tolerability profile, with no maximum tolerated dose yet defined. PMID:21221177

  19. Role of APC and DNA mismatch repair genes in the development of colorectal cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Roy Deodutta; Narayan Satya

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Colorectal cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women in the western hemisphere. According to the American Cancer Society, an estimated 105,500 new cases of colon cancer with 57,100 deaths will occur in the U.S. in 2003, accounting for about 10% of cancer deaths. Among the colon cancer patients, hereditary risk contributes approximately 20%. The main inherited colorectal cancers are the familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and the hereditary n...

  20. Use of biguanides and the risk of colorectal cancer: a register-based cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapen, Lotte M; Dittrich, Suzanne T A M; de Vries, Frank; Starup-Linde, Jakob; Vestergaard, Peter; Henry, Ronald M A; Stolk, Leo M L; Neef, Cees; Bazelier, Marloes T

    2013-11-01

    Observational studies have shown conflicting results on the potential protecting effect of biguanide use with the risk of colorectal neoplasms. In addition, the cellular mechanism can either support or oppose biguanides influence on colorectal carcinoma. Our objective was to evaluate the association between biguanide use and colorectal carcinoma. A population-based cohort study using healthcare data from the Danish National database (1996-2007), was conducted. Oral antidiabetic drug users (n = 177,281) were matched 1:3 with a population-based reference group. Cox proportional hazard models estimated hazard ratios (HRs) of colorectal carcinoma. Stratification was performed to analyse the risk of colorectal cancer in current biguanide users. Two sub-analyses were performed, to investigate the risk of colorectal cancer associated with discontinuous and prolonged use of biguanides. Instead of a protective effect, we found that current biguanide users had a 1.2-fold increased risk of colorectal cancer (HR = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.08-1.30) as compared with the non-diabetes reference group. Prolonged use was not inversely associated with colorectal cancer either. When studying colorectal risk with biguanides, the underlying T2DM should be taken into account since a 1.3-1.6-fold increased risk was found in oral antidiabetic drug users compared to controls unexposed to diabetic medication. This study could not detect a protective effect of biguanide use with colorectal cancer. Therefore, this study does not support a further investigation of the effectiveness of biguanides to prevent colorectal carcinoma in clinical studies.

  1. The accuracy and completeness for receipt of colorectal cancer care using Veterans Health Administration administrative data

    OpenAIRE

    Sherer, Eric A.; Fisher, Deborah A; Barnd, Jeffrey; Jackson, George L.; Provenzale, Dawn; Haggstrom, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The National Comprehensive Cancer Network and the American Society of Clinical Oncology have established guidelines for the treatment and surveillance of colorectal cancer (CRC), respectively. Considering these guidelines, an accurate and efficient method is needed to measure receipt of care. Methods The accuracy and completeness of Veterans Health Administration (VA) administrative data were assessed by comparing them with data manually abstracted during the Colorectal Cancer Care...

  2. A blended knowledge translation initiative to improve colorectal cancer staging [ISRCTN56824239

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan David P

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A significant gap has been documented between best practice and the actual practice of surgery. Our group identified that colorectal cancer staging in Ontario was suboptimal and subsequently developed a knowledge translation strategy using the principles of social marketing and the influence of expert and local opinion leaders for colorectal cancer. Methods/Design Opinion leaders were identified using the Hiss methodology. Hospitals in Ontario were cluster-randomized to one of two intervention arms. Both groups were exposed to a formal continuing medical education session given by the expert opinion leader for colorectal cancer. In the treatment group the local Opinion Leader for colorectal cancer was detailed by the expert opinion leader for colorectal cancer and received a toolkit. Forty-two centres agreed to have the expert opinion leader for colorectal cancer come and give a formal continuing medical education session that lasted between 50 minutes and 4 hours. No centres refused the intervention. These sessions were generally well attended by most surgeons, pathologists and other health care professionals at each centre. In addition all but one of the local opinion leaders for colorectal cancer met with the expert opinion leader for colorectal cancer for the academic detailing session that lasted between 15 and 30 minutes. Discussion We have enacted a unique study that has attempted to induce practice change among surgeons and pathologists using an adapted social marketing model that utilized the influence of both expert and local opinion leaders for colorectal cancer in a large geographic area with diverse practice settings.

  3. Colorectal cancer surveillance in inflammatory bowel disease: A critical analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Devendra; Desai; Nutan; Desai

    2014-01-01

    Colonoscopic surveillance is advocated in patients with inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) for detection of dys-plasia. There are many issues regarding surveillance in IBD: the risk of colorectal cancer seems to be de-creasing in the majority of recently published studies, necessitating revisions of surveillance strategy; surveil-lance guidelines are not based on concrete evidence; commencement and frequency of surveillance, cost-effectiveness and adherence to surveillance have been issues that are only partly answered. The traditional technique of random biopsy is neither evidence-based nor easy to practice. Therefore, highlighting abnormal areas with newer technology and biopsy from these areas are the way forward. Of the newer technology, digital mucosal enhancement, such as high-definition white light endoscopy and chromoendoscopy(with magnification) have been incorporated in guidelines. Dyeless chromoendoscopy(narrow band imaging) has not yet shown potential, whereas some forms of digital chromoendoscopy(i-Scan more than Fujinon intelligent color enhancement) have shown promise for colonoscopic surveillance in IBD. Other techniquessuch as autofluorescence imaging, endomicroscopy and endocytoscopy need further evidence. Surveillance with genetic markers(tissue, serum or stool) is at an early stage. This article discusses changing epidemiology of colorectal cancer development in IBD and critically evaluates issues regarding colonoscopic surveillance in IBD.

  4. Mismatch repair status and synchronous metastases in colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordholm-Carstensen, Andreas; Krarup, Peter-Martin; Morton, Dion

    2015-01-01

    The causality between the metastatic potential, mismatch repair status (MMR) and survival in colorectal cancer (CRC) is complex. This study aimed to investigate the impact of MMR in CRC on the occurrence of synchronous metastases (SCCM) and survival in patients with SCCM on a national basis....... A nationwide cohort study of 6,692 patients diagnosed with CRC between 2010 and 2012 was conducted. Data were prospectively entered into the Danish Colorectal Cancer Group's database and merged with data from the Danish Pathology Registry and the National Patient Registry. Multivariable and multinomial...... metastases (aOR = 0.69, 95% CI:0.26-1.29, p = 0.436) were unaffected by MMR. MMR in patients with SCCM had no impact on survival (Cox: adjusted Hazard Ratio (aHR) = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.54-1.06, p = 0.101; Proportional excess hazards: aHR = 0.73, 95% CI: 0.50-1.07, p = 0.111) when adjusting for other prognostic...

  5. Therapeutic options for peritoneal metastasis arising from colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabriel Glockzin; Hans J Schlitt; Pompiliu Piso

    2016-01-01

    Peritoneal metastasis is a common sign of advanced tumor stage, tumor progression or tumor recurrence in patients with colorectal cancer. Due to the improvement of systemic chemotherapy, the development of targeted therapy and the introduction of additive treatment options such as cytoreductive surgery(CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy(HIPEC), the therapeutic approach to peritoneal metastatic colorectal cancer(pm CRC) has changed over recent decades, and patient survival has improved. Moreover, in contrast to palliative systemic chemotherapy or best supportive care, the inclusion of CRS and HIPEC as inherent components of a multidisciplinary treatment regimen provides a therapeutic approach with curative intent. Although CRS and HIPEC are increasingly accepted as the standard of care for selected patients and have become part of numerous national and international guidelines, the individual role, optimal timing and ideal sequence of the different systemic, local and surgical treatment options remains a matter of debate. Ongoing and future randomized controlled clinical trials may help clarify the impact of the different components, allow for further improvement of patient selection and support the standar-dization of oncologic treatment regimens for pm CRC. The addition of further therapeutic options such as neo-adjuvant intraperitoneal chemotherapy or pressurized intraperitoneal aerosol chemotherapy, should be investig-ated to optimize therapeutic regimens and further improve the oncological outcome.

  6. EGFR signaling in colorectal cancer: a clinical perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saletti P

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Piercarlo Saletti,1 Francesca Molinari,2 Sara De Dosso,1 Milo Frattini2 1Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, 2Laboratory of Molecular Pathology, Institute of Pathology, Locarno, Switzerland Abstract: Colorectal cancer (CRC remains a formidable health burden worldwide, with up to 50% of patients developing metastases during the course of their disease. This group of CRC patients, characterized by the worst prognosis, has been extensively investigated to improve their life expectancy. Main efforts, focused on the epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR, which plays a pivotal role in CRC pathogenesis, have led to the development and introduction in clinical practice of specific targeted therapies (ie, monoclonal antibodies. Subsequently, the scientific community has tried to identify molecular predictors of the efficacy of such therapies. However, it has become clear that EGFR alterations occurring in CRC are difficult to investigate, and therefore their predictive role is unclear. In contrast, the clinical role of two downstream members (KRAS and NRAS has been clearly demonstrated. Currently, EGFR-targeted therapies can be administered only to patients with wild-type KRAS and NRAS genes. Our review addresses the medical management of metastatic CRC. Specifically, we describe in detail the molecular biology of metastatic CRC, focusing on the EGFR signaling pathway, and we discuss the role of current and emerging related biomarkers and therapies in this field. We also summarize the clinical evidence regarding anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies and examine potential future perspectives. Keywords: colorectal cancer, EGFR, gene mutations, cetuximab, panitumumab

  7. Gambogic acid-loaded biomimetic nanoparticles in colorectal cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhen; Qian, Hanqing; Yang, Mi; Li, Rutian; Hu, Jing; Li, Li; Yu, Lixia; Liu, Baorui; Qian, Xiaoping

    2017-01-01

    Gambogic acid (GA) is expected to be a potential new antitumor drug, but its poor aqueous solubility and inevitable side effects limit its clinical application. Despite these inhe rent defects, various nanocarriers can be used to promote the solubility and tumor targeting of GA, improving antitumor efficiency. In addition, a cell membrane-coated nanoparticle platform that was reported recently, unites the customizability and flexibility of a synthetic copolymer, as well as the functionality and complexity of natural membrane, and is a new synthetic biomimetic nanocarrier with improved stability and biocompatibility. Here, we combined poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) with red blood-cell membrane (RBCm), and evaluated whether GA-loaded RBCm nanoparticles can retain and improve the antitumor efficacy of GA with relatively lower toxicity in colorectal cancer treatment compared with free GA. We also confirmed the stability, biocompatibility, passive targeting, and few side effects of RBCm-GA/PLGA nanoparticles. We expect to provide a new drug carrier in the treatment of colorectal cancer, which has strong clinical application prospects. In addition, the potential antitumor drug GA and other similar drugs could achieve broader clinical applications via this biomimetic nanocarrier.

  8. Colorectal cancer incidence among polypropylene manufacturing workers. An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, R J; Schnatter, A R; Lerman, S E

    1994-06-01

    This study updates an earlier investigation that found a sixfold excess incidence of colorectal cancer among polypropylene workers for the period January 1960 to September 1985. The study cohort comprised 412 male workers with at least 6 months employment and 10 years latency. For the extended follow-up period (October 1985 to May 1992), the standardized incidence ratio (SIR) based on state comparison rates was slightly elevated and not statistically significant (SIR = 1.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.5 to 3.5). A 2.3-fold excess was observed among process workers (95% CI = 0.3 to 8.2), but this was based on only two cases. Risk among process/mechanical workers was greater for short-term workers ( or = 10 years, SIR = 0.7, 95% CI = 0.02 to 4.0). Overall, the update findings do not suggest an occupationally related risk. Possible influences of company-sponsored colorectal cancer screening, the polyolefin unit shutdown, and other factors are discussed.

  9. Multi-class texture analysis in colorectal cancer histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kather, Jakob Nikolas; Weis, Cleo-Aron; Bianconi, Francesco; Melchers, Susanne M.; Schad, Lothar R.; Gaiser, Timo; Marx, Alexander; Zöllner, Frank Gerrit

    2016-06-01

    Automatic recognition of different tissue types in histological images is an essential part in the digital pathology toolbox. Texture analysis is commonly used to address this problem; mainly in the context of estimating the tumour/stroma ratio on histological samples. However, although histological images typically contain more than two tissue types, only few studies have addressed the multi-class problem. For colorectal cancer, one of the most prevalent tumour types, there are in fact no published results on multiclass texture separation. In this paper we present a new dataset of 5,000 histological images of human colorectal cancer including eight different types of tissue. We used this set to assess the classification performance of a wide range of texture descriptors and classifiers. As a result, we found an optimal classification strategy that markedly outperformed traditional methods, improving the state of the art for tumour-stroma separation from 96.9% to 98.6% accuracy and setting a new standard for multiclass tissue separation (87.4% accuracy for eight classes). We make our dataset of histological images publicly available under a Creative Commons license and encourage other researchers to use it as a benchmark for their studies.

  10. PLZF Expression during Colorectal Cancer Development and in Normal Colorectal Mucosa according to Body Size, as Marker of Colorectal Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Mariani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger protein (PLZF is a protein involved in various signaling, growth regulatory, and differentiation pathways, including development/function of some T cells. Here, we aimed at the detection of PLZF during colorectal carcinogenesis, using immunofluorescence, and at the evaluation of the colocalization of PLZF with CD2 and CD56 positive cells (T, γδ, NK, and NKT cells, using confocal-microscopy, along colorectal carcinogenesis, since its earliest stages, that is, dysplastic aberrant crypt foci (ACF. Furthermore, we analyzed PLZF in the normal colonic mucosa (NM according to anthropometric parameters of the subject. NM exhibited strong CD56 fluorescent staining. This infiltration was lost in both ACF and colorectal carcinoma (CRC, while PLZF presence increased from NM to ACF and CRC. Strong association was found between CD56+ colonic mucosa cell infiltration and body mass index. Interestingly, an increased stromal PLZF-reactivity was present in NM of obese subjects. This study shows that overexpression of PLZF and exclusion of NK cells in dysplastic microenvironment are very early events in the stepwise sequence leading to CRC and that lower levels of CD56+ cells in NM, together with increased levels of PLZF+ cells, can be a reflection of colon cancer risk due to obesity.

  11. Risk stratification and detection of new colorectal neoplasms after colorectal cancer screening with faecal occult blood test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Andreas; Milter, Maya Christel; Andersen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Limited data exist on adenoma surveillance as recommended in the European guidelines for quality assurance in colorectal cancer (CRC) screening and diagnosis after faecal occult blood test (FOBT) screening. OBJECTIVE: To assess the European guidelines for adenoma surveillance after CRC...

  12. Screening for urinary tract cancer with urine cytology in Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myrhøj, T; Andersen, M-B; Bernstein, I

    2008-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate if Urine Cytology (UC) is an appropriate screening procedure for detecting urinary tract neoplasia at an early stage in persons at risk in Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer families. METHOD: In the National Danish HNPCC-register persons at risk ...

  13. Discrepancies between estimated and perceived risk of cancer among individuals with hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domanska, K; Nilbert, Mef; Soller, M;

    2007-01-01

    to individual characteristics. A perceived risk of colorectal cancer above 60% was reported by 22/45 individuals, and only one out of five mutation carriers reported a perceived risk > 80%. Female mutation carriers, individuals below age 50, and individuals who received their oncogenetic counseling within 1...

  14. Fruit, vegetables, and colorectal cancer risk : the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duijnhoven, Fraenzel J. B.; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H. Bas; Ferrari, Pietro; Jenab, Mazda; Boshuizen, Hendriek C.; Ros, Martine M.; Casagrande, Corinne; Tjonneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja; Overvad, Kim; Thorlacius-Ussing, Ole; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Boutron-Ruault, Marie-Christine; Morois, Sophie; Kaaks, Rudolf; Linseisen, Jakob; Boeing, Heiner; Noethlings, Ute; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Misirli, Gesthimani; Palli, Domenico; Sieri, Sabina; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Vineis, Paolo; Peeters, Petra H. M.; van Gils, Carla H.; Ocke, Marga C.; Lund, Eiliv; Engeset, Dagrun; Skeie, Guri; Rodriguez Suarez, Laudina; Gonzalez, Carlos A.; Sanchez, Maria-Jose; Dorronsoro, Miren; Navarro, Carmen; Barricarte, Aurelio; Berglund, Goran; Manjer, Jonas; Hallmans, Goran; Palmqvist, Richard; Bingham, Sheila A.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Key, Timothy J.; Allen, Naomi E.; Boffetta, Paolo; Slimani, Nadia; Rinaldi, Sabina; Gallo, Valentina; Norat, Teresa; Riboli, Elio

    2009-01-01

    Background: A high consumption of fruit and vegetables is possibly associated with a decreased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the findings to date are inconsistent. Objective: We examined the relation between self-reported usual consumption of fruit and vegetables and the incidence of CRC

  15. Heterogenous high-level HER-2 amplification in a small subset of colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Andreas H; Burandt, Eike C; Choschzick, Matthias; Simon, Ronald; Yekebas, Emre; Kaifi, Jussuf T; Mirlacher, Martina; Atanackovic, Djordje; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Fiedler, Walter; Terracciano, Luigi; Sauter, Guido; Izbicki, Jakob R

    2010-11-01

    HER-2 is the molecular target for antibody-based treatment of breast cancer (trastuzumab). The potential benefit of anti-HER-2 therapy is currently investigated in several other HER-2 amplified cancers. For example, trastuzumab was recently shown to be effective in HER-2 positive gastric cancer. To address the potential applicability of anti-HER-2 therapy in colorectal cancer, tissue microarray sections and colorectal resection specimens of 1851 colorectal cancers were analyzed for HER-2 overexpression and amplification using FDA approved reagents for immunohistochemistry and fluorescence in situ hybridization. HER-2 amplification was seen in 2.5% and HER-2 overexpression in 2.7% of 1439 interpretable colorectal cancers. Amplification was often high level with HER-2 copies ranging from 4 to 60 per tumor cell and was strongly related to protein overexpression. HER-2 amplification and overexpression were unrelated to histological tumor type, tumor localization, grading, pT, pN, pM or survival. As heterogeneity of drug target expression could represent a major drawback for targeted cancer therapy we next studied HER-2 heterogeneity in selected cases. Extensive evaluation of all available large sections from patients with HER-2 positive colorectal cancer revealed heterogenous findings in 3 of 4 cases. In summary, high-level HER-2 amplification occurs in a small fraction of colorectal cancers. Heterogeneity of amplification may limit the utility of anti- HER-2 therapy in some of these tumors and therefore, adequate clinical trials are needed to further evaluate this approach.

  16. Clinical Implications of Intestinal Stem Cell Markers in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Olsen, Jesper; Linnemann, Dorte

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) still has one of the highest incidence and mortality rate among cancers. Therefore, improved differential diagnostics and personalized treatment are still needed. Several intestinal stem cell markers have been found to be associated with CRC and might have a prognostic...... and predictive significance in CRC patients. This review provides an overview of the intestinal stem cell markers leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (LGR5), B cell–specific Moloney murine leukemia virus insertion site 1 (BMI1), Musashi1 (MSI1), and sex-determining region y-box 9 (SOX9......) and their implications in human CRC. The exact roles of the intestinal stem cell markers in CRC development and progression remain unclear; however, high expression of these stem cell markers have a potential prognostic significance and might be implicated in chemotherapy resistance...

  17. miR-345 in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jakob V; Rossi, Simona; Jensen, Benny V

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have important regulatory functions in cellular processes and have shown promising potential as prognostic markers for disease outcome in patients with cancer. The aim of the present study was to find miRNA expression profiles in whole blood that were prognostic...... for overall survival (OS) in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) treated with cetuximab and irinotecan. METHODS: From 138 patients with mCRC in 3rd line therapy with cetuximab and irinotecan in a prospective phase II study, 738 pretreatment miRNAs were isolated and profiled from whole blood...... to treatment with cetuximab and irinotecan. CONCLUSION: We identified miR-345 in whole blood as a potential biomarker for clinical outcome. MiR-345 was a single prognostic biomarker for both OS and PFS in all patients and also in the non-KRAS mutant population....

  18. Colorectal cancer screening brochure for Latinos: focus group evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperman, Julia L; Efuni, Elizaveta; Villagra, Cristina; DuHamel, Katherine; Jandorf, Lina

    2013-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) can be effectively prevented via screening colonoscopy, yet adherence rates remain low among Latinos. Interventions targeting individual and cultural barriers to screening are needed. We developed an educational brochure to target these barriers faced by a diverse Latino population. The objective was to evaluate the responses of the target population to the culturally and theoretically informed brochure through community member focus groups. Facilitators conducted six focus groups, stratified by gender, language, and prior colonoscopy experience. Topics included: brochure content and layout, cancer knowledge, and CRC screening determinants. Focus groups documented community members' responses to the brochure's overall message and its informational and visual components. Changes to wording, visual aids, and content were suggested to make the brochure culturally more acceptable. Results indicated relevance of the theoretically and culturally guided approach to the development of the brochure leading to refinement of its content and design.

  19. Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Resembling Severe Preeclampsia in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raminder Kaur Khangura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer in women, it is a rare malignancy in pregnancy. Symptoms of CRC such as fatigue, malaise, nausea, vomiting, rectal bleeding, anemia, altered bowel habits, and abdominal mass are often considered typical symptoms of pregnancy. Many cases of CRC are diagnosed in advanced stages due to missed warning signs of CRC, which may be misinterpreted as normal symptoms related to pregnancy. This report reviews 2 cases of CRC diagnosed within a 4-month interval at our institution. Both cases were initially thought to be atypical presentations of preeclampsia. Prenatal history, hospital course, and postpartum course were reviewed for both patients. CRC is often diagnosed at advanced stages in pregnancy. Common physiological symptoms of pregnancy should be scrutinized carefully and worked up appropriately, especially if symptoms remain persistent or increase in intensity or severity.

  20. STAT3: An Anti-Invasive Factor in Colorectal Cancer?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jong, Petrus Rudolf de [Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr. MC 0663, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Mo, Ji-Hun [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Dankook University College of Medicine, 16-5 Anseo-dong, Cheonan, Chungcheongnam-do 330-715 (Korea, Republic of); Harris, Alexandra R.; Lee, Jongdae, E-mail: j142lee@ucsd.edu; Raz, Eyal [Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr. MC 0663, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2014-07-03

    Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) is activated in a majority of cancers, and promotes tumorigenesis and even metastasis through transcriptional activation of its target genes. Recently, we discovered that STAT3 suppresses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and thus metastasis in a mouse model of colorectal cancer (CRC), while it did not affect the overall tumor burden. Furthermore, we found that STAT3 in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) suppresses EMT by regulating stability of an EMT inducer, SNAI-1 (Snail-1). Here, STAT3 functions as an adaptor rather than a transcription factor in the post-translational modification of SNAI-1. In this review, we discuss the unexpected and contradictory role of STAT3 in metastasis of CRC and its clinical implications.

  1. Colorectal cancer carcinogenesis:a review of mechanisms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kanwal Tariq; Kulsoom Ghias

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer in women and the third most common in men globally. CRC arises from one or a combination of chromosomal instability, CpG island methylator phenotype, and microsatellite instability. Genetic instability is usually caused by aneuploidy and loss of heterozygosity. Mutations in the tumor suppressor or cell cycle genes may also lead to cellular transformation. Similarly, epigenetic and/or genetic alterations resulting in impaired cellular pathways, such as DNA repair mechanism, may lead to microsatellite instability and mutator phenotype. Non-coding RNAs, more importantly microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs have also been implicated at various CRC stages. Understanding the specific mechanisms of tumorigenesis and the underlying genetic and epigenetic traits is critical in comprehending the disease phenotype. This paper reviews these mechanisms along with the roles of various non-coding RNAs in CRCs.

  2. Aspirin as a chemoprevention agent for colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lee, Chun Seng

    2012-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of mortality in the western world. It is widely accepted that neoplasms such as colonic polyps are precursors to CRC formation; with the polyp-adenoma-carcinoma sequences well described in medical literature [1, 2]. It has been shown that Aspirin and other non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) have a negative effect on polyp and cancer formation. This review aims to describe some of the mechanism behind the chemoprotective properties of aspirin; COX 2 inhibition, regulation of proliferation and apoptosis and effects on the immune system and also the current evidence that supports its use as a chemoprevention agent against CRC. We will also aim to explore the side effects with the use of aspirin and the pitfalls of using aspirin routinely for primary prophylaxis against CRC.

  3. STAT3: An Anti-Invasive Factor in Colorectal Cancer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrus Rudolf de Jong

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3 is activated in a majority of cancers, and promotes tumorigenesis and even metastasis through transcriptional activation of its target genes. Recently, we discovered that STAT3 suppresses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT and thus metastasis in a mouse model of colorectal cancer (CRC, while it did not affect the overall tumor burden. Furthermore, we found that STAT3 in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC suppresses EMT by regulating stability of an EMT inducer, SNAI-1 (Snail-1. Here, STAT3 functions as an adaptor rather than a transcription factor in the post-translational modification of SNAI-1. In this review, we discuss the unexpected and contradictory role of STAT3 in metastasis of CRC and its clinical implications.

  4. Ultrasound imaging of flow patterns in liver metastases from colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael; Solvig, Jan

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The ability of colour Doppler, power Doppler and echo-enhanced Doppler imaging to detect the blood flow in liver metastases from colorectal cancer was investigated. An evaluation was then made to determine whether the flow pattern could be used as an indication of disease elsewhere....... METHODS: Forty-two patients with hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer were examined, 8 of whom had local recurrence of their colorectal cancer. Seventy-seven liver metastases were evaluated with colour Doppler and power Doppler, and the presence or absence of a Doppler signal in the halo or centre...... detection rate to 98% (P liver...

  5. K-ras oncogene mutations in sporadic colorectal cancer in The Netherlands Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, M.; Goeij, A.F.P.M. de; Weijenberg, M.P.; Roemen, G.M.J.M.; Lentjes, M.H.F.M.; Pachen, M.M.M.; Smits, K.M.; Bruïne, A.P. de; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den

    2003-01-01

    Activation of K-ras oncogene has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis, being mutated in 30-60% of the adenocarcinomas. In this study, 737 incident colorectal cancer (CRC) patients, originating from 120 852 men and women (55-69 years at baseline) participating in the Netherlands Cohort Study

  6. Circulating tumor cells: exploring intratumor heterogeneity of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimondi, Cristina; Nicolazzo, Chiara; Gradilone, Angela; Giannini, Giuseppe; De Falco, Elena; Chimenti, Isotta; Varriale, Elisa; Hauch, Siegfried; Plappert, Linda; Cortesi, Enrico; Gazzaniga, Paola

    2014-05-01

    The hypothesis of the "liquid biopsy" using circulating tumor cells (CTCs) emerged as a minimally invasive alternative to traditional tissue biopsy to determine cancer therapy. Discordance for biomarkers expression between primary tumor tissue and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been widely reported, thus rendering the biological characterization of CTCs an attractive tool for biomarkers assessment and treatment selection. Studies performed in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients using CellSearch, the only FDA-cleared test for CTCs assessment, demonstrated a much lower yield of CTCs in this tumor type compared with breast and prostate cancer, both at baseline and during the course of treatment. Thus, although attractive, the possibility to use CTCs as therapy-related biomarker for colorectal cancer patients is still limited by a number of technical issues mainly due to the low sensitivity of the CellSearch method. In the present study we found a significant discordance between CellSearch and AdnaTest in the detection of CTCs from mCRC patients. We then investigated KRAS pathway activating mutations in CTCs and determined the degree of heterogeneity for KRAS oncogenic mutations between CTCs and tumor tissues. Whether KRAS gene amplification may represent an alternative pathway responsible for KRAS activation was further explored. KRAS gene amplification emerged as a functionally equivalent and mutually exclusive mechanism of KRAS pathway activation in CTCs, possibly related to transcriptional activation. The serial assessment of CTCs may represent an early biomarker of treatment response, able to overcome the intrinsic limit of current molecular biomarkers represented by intratumor heterogeneity.

  7. Human Blood Autoantibodies in the Detection of Colorectal Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ola H Negm

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the second most common malignancy in the western world. Early detection and diagnosis of all cancer types is vital to improved prognosis by enabling early treatment when tumours should be both resectable and curable. Sera from 3 different cohorts; 42 sera (21 CRC and 21 matched controls from New York, USA, 200 sera from Pittsburgh, USA (100 CRC and 100 controls and 20 sera from Dundee, UK (10 CRC and 10 controls were tested against a panel of multiple tumour-associated antigens (TAAs using an optimised multiplex microarray system. TAA specific IgG responses were interpolated against the internal IgG standard curve for each sample. Individual TAA specific responses were examined in each cohort to determine cutoffs for a robust initial scoring method to establish sensitivity and specificity. Sensitivity and specificity of combinations of TAAs provided good discrimination between cancer-positive and normal serum. The overall sensitivity and specificity of the sample sets tested against a panel of 32 TAAs were 61.1% and 80.9% respectively for 6 antigens; p53, AFP, K RAS, Annexin, RAF1 and NY-CO16. Furthermore, the observed sensitivity in Pittsburgh sample set in different clinical stages of CRC; stage I (n = 19, stage II (n = 40, stage III (n = 34 and stage IV (n = 6 was similar (73.6%, 75.0%, 73.5% and 83.3%, respectively, with similar levels of sensitivity for right and left sided CRC. We identified an antigen panel of sufficient sensitivity and specificity for early detection of CRC, based upon serum profiling of autoantibody response using a robust multiplex antigen microarray technology. This opens the possibility of a blood test for screening and detection of early colorectal cancer. However this panel will require further validation studies before they can be proposed for clinical practice.

  8. CT Colonography in the Detection of Colorectal Cancer in Ireland; Economical Considerations and the Potential for Centralisation of Service Provision

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Torreggiani, WC

    2016-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer in Ireland (excluding non melanomatous skin cancer)1.There were roughly 950 women and 1,330 men diagnosed with colorectal cancer annually in Ireland during 2007-20091. By 2020, with our aging population it is estimated that there will be an increase in colorectal cancer of 79 per cent in men and 56 per cent in women1. Colorectal cancer screening by faecal occult blood testing has been shown to reduce CRC mortality. In Europe, colonoscopy is mainly used to investigate faecal occult blood test positive or symptomatic patients, or as a preventive strategy in those with increased CRC risk2

  9. Label-free nanoplasmonic sensing of tumor-associate autoantibodies for early diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Maria; Estevez, M-Carmen; Villar-Vazquez, Roi; Casal, J Ignacio; Lechuga, Laura M

    2016-08-03

    Colorectal cancer is treatable and curable when detected at early stages. However there is a lack of less invasive and more specific screening and diagnosis methods which would facilitate its prompt identification. Blood circulating autoantibodies which are immediately produced by the immune system at tumor appearance have become valuable biomarkers for preclinical diagnosis of cancer. In this work, we present the rapid and label-free detection of colorectal cancer autoantibodies directly in blood serum or plasma using a recently developed nanoplasmonic biosensor. Our nanoplasmonic device offers sensitive and real-time quantification of autoantibodies with excellent selectivity and reproducibility, achieving limits of detection around 1 nM (150-160 ng mL(-1)). A preliminary evaluation of clinical samples of colorectal cancer patients has shown good correlation with ELISA. These results demonstrate the reliability of the nanobiosensor strategy and pave the way towards the achievement of a sensitive diagnostic tool for early detection of colorectal cancer.

  10. Associations between NBS1 Polymorphisms and Colorectal Cancer in Chinese Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-Tao; Zhong, Bao-Yuan; Xu, Hui-Hui; Qiao, Sheng-Yan; Wang, Gui; Huang, Jing; Fan, Hui-Zhen; Zhao, Hong-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    As the central protein of the double strand breaks (DSB)-induced DNA repair pathway, NBS1 participates in detecting the DSBs and plays an essential role in maintaining genomic stability. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in NBS1 gene were commonly tested that associated with the susceptibility to multiple cancers, but the results remained controversial. Thus, we conducted two independent hospital-based case-control studies comprising 1,072 colorectal cancer patients and 1,263 controls to evaluate the association between four NBS1 SNPs and colorectal cancer risk. The result showed that rs2735383C/G polymorphism in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of NBS1 was significantly associated with risk of colorectal cancer using logistic regression (Ptranscriptional activity and expression level. In conclusion, current evidence suggests that the rs2735383C/G polymorphism might contribute to the risk for colorectal cancer.

  11. [Colorectal cancer in the elderly. Surgical treatment, chemotherapy, and contribution from geriatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-López, Pilar; Filipovich Vegas, Elena; Martinez Peromingo, Javier; Jimenez Mola, Sonia

    2017-01-24

    Age is the biggest risk factor for colorectal cancer, with 70% of the cases in patients over 70 years old. For this reason, a review is presented on the surgical treatment and chemotherapy of cancer of colon and rectum in the elderly. A search was performed in PubMed, including words such as elderly, surgery, colorectal cancer, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and oncogeriatrics, and review articles and originals on treatment of colorectal cancer in the elderly were selected. A narrative form was developed from the latest evidence with the results obtained on the treatment of this pathology. Although the treatment of colorectal cancer is standardised, a prior comprehensive geriatric assessment is required in the case of the elderly, before deciding the type of treatment in order to offer these robust elderly-standardised guidelines for the robust elderly and adapt them for use in fragile patients.

  12. Colorectal cancer management in Poland: current improvements and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruszkowski, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most commonly identified malignant neoplasm diagnosed in men (12% of total cancers) and women (11%) in Poland, while CRC mortality is second in men (10.1%) and third in women (11.2%). The main reasons for increasing incidence and mortality are an aging population and an increase in environmental and lifestyle factors which may lead to cancer. In Poland there is a lack of historical (regularly published and accessible) data on cancer morbidity and survival rates. The Oncology Centre published cancer data for the first time in February 2009 the 2006, which, also for the first time, embraced the entire country. Oncology data collection in Poland is based on a network of 16 Regional Cancer Registries reporting to the Polish National Cancer Registry in Warsaw. An additional source of oncology data is the National Health Fund and the Central Statistical Office. The National Cancer Programme (2005) provides funding at ca 780 million euro, which includes amongst others the Early CRC Detection Programme to promote a free screening colonoscopy. Oncology services in Poland are funded almost entirely by public resources--the national budget as sustained by tax revenues (Ministry of Health) and the National Health Fund as sustained by the obligatory public health insurance contribution. Oncology expenditure covered by the national budget (Ministry of Health) and the National Cancer Programme in 2006 amounted to 44.8 million euro and 105.2 million euro, respectively. All these preventive, curative and organizational efforts have significantly improved access to efficient therapies (including radiotherapy) and diagnostic procedures in recent years in Poland, although, clearly, a lot remains to be done.

  13. Surgical treatment of colorectal cancer complicated with acute intestinal obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Schaeva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The main reason for urgent complications of colon cancer is an acute intestinal obstruction (AIO. This is complex pathological condition in 90 % of cases caused by colorectal cancer (CRC.Objective – to evaluate radicality of the performed operations in complicated colorectal cancer in general surgical hospitals. Dependence of the severity of intestinal obstruction by tumor localization, its morphological characteristics, determine dependence of the type of the surgical operation performed on the severity of intestinal obstruction.Materials and methods. We have studied the data on 667 patients with colorectal cancer complicated by acute intestinal obstruction. These patients were treated in the period from 2001 to 2013 in general surgical hospital in the territory of Smolensk and Smolensk region. For the processing of the obtained results we have used software Statistica 6.1. Differences were considered statistically at p ≤ 0.05.Results. All the patients were divided into 3 groups by the expression of intestinal obstruction. Group 1 (n = 279 consisted of patients with the presence of decompensated intestinal obstruction (DIO, group 2 (n = 313 consisted of patients with subcompensated intestinal obstruction (SIO, group 3 (n = 75 included patients with compensated intestinal obstruction (CIO. In case of tumor localization in right halfof the colon we most commonly observed clinical picture of acute development of decompensated intestinal obstruction (p = 0.041. Subcompensated intestinal obstruction prevailed in case of tumor localization in left half of the colon and rectal localization. In general surgical hospitals it is not always possible to speak about radicality of surgical treatment, as in a large number of cases (62.5 % the number of examined lymph nodes was less than 4. When DIO patients are admitted in the clinic, the percentage of singlestage operations is equal to 7.5 % (n = 21. In case of DIO and SIO there was a high

  14. Colorectal cancer mortality and industrial pollution in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Abente Gonzalo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Records kept as a result of the implementation of Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control (IPPC and the European Pollutant Release and Transfer Register (E-PRTR constitute a public inventory of industries, created by the European Commission, which is a valuable resource for monitoring industrial pollution. Our objective is to ascertain whether there might be excess colorectal cancer mortality among populations residing in the vicinity of Spanish industrial installations that are governed by the IPPC Directive and E-PRTR Regulation and report their emissions to air. Methods An ecological study was designed to examine colorectal cancer mortality at a municipal level (8098 Spanish towns, over the period 1997–2006. We conducted an exploratory "near vs. far" analysis to estimate the relative risks (RR of towns situated at a distance of less than 2 km from industrial installations. The analysis was repeated for each of the 24 industrial groups. RR and their 95% credible/confidence intervals (95%CI were estimated on the basis of Poisson regression models, using two types of modelling: a the conditional autoregressive Bayesian model proposed by Besag, York and Mollié, with explanatory variables; and b a mixed regression model. Integrated nested Laplace approximations were used as a Bayesian inference tool. Results Statistically significant RRs were detected in the vicinity of mining industry (RR 1.258; 95%CI 1.082 - 1.463, paper and wood production (RR 1.071; 95%CI 1.007 – 1.140, food and beverage sector (RR 1.069; 95%CI 1.029 - 1.111, metal production and processing installations (RR 1.065; 95% CI 1.011 – 1.123 and ceramics (RR 1.050 ; 95%CI 1.004 – 1.099. Conclusions Given the exploratory nature of this study, it would seem advisable to check in other countries or with other designs, if the proximity of industries that emit pollutants into the air could be an added risk factor for colorectal cancer mortality

  15. Colorectal cancer stem cells : regulation of the phenotype and implications for therapy resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmink, B.L.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis different aspects of cancer stem cells in colorectal cancer are discribed. We focus on the therapy resistance of cancer stem cells and the effect that reactive oxygen species and hypoxia have on the cancer stem cell phenotype. For this purpose a novel culture method to propagate cance

  16. Superoxide-hydrogen peroxide imbalance interferes with colorectal cancer cells viability, proliferation and oxaliplatin response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzolin, Verônica Farina; Cadoná, Francine Carla; Machado, Alencar Kolinski; Berto, Maiquidieli Dal; Barbisan, Fernanda; Dornelles, Eduardo Bortoluzzi; Glanzner, Werner Giehl; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard; Bica, Claudia Giugliano; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica

    2016-04-01

    The role of superoxide dismutase manganese dependent enzyme (SOD2) in colorectal cancer is presently insufficiently understood. Some studies suggest that high SOD2 levels found in cancer tissues are associated with cancer progression. However, thus far, the role of colorectal cancer superoxide-hydrogen peroxide imbalance has not yet been studied. Thus, in order to address this gap in extant literature, we performed an in vitro analysis using HT-29 colorectal cell line exposed to paraquat, which generates high superoxide levels, and porphyrin, a SOD2 mimic molecule. The effect of these drugs on colorectal cancer cell response to oxaliplatin was evaluated. At 0.1 μM concentration, both drugs exhibited cytotoxic and antiproliferative effect on colorectal cancer cells. However, this effect was more pronounced in cells exposed to paraquat. Paraquat also augmented the oxaliplatin cytotoxic and antiproliferative effects by increasing the number of apoptosis events, thus causing the cell cycle arrest in the S and M/G2 phases. The treatments were also able to differentially modulate genes related to apoptosis, cell proliferation and antioxidant enzyme system. However, the effects were highly variable and the results obtained were inconclusive. Nonetheless, our findings support the hypothesis that imbalance caused by increased hydrogen peroxide levels could be beneficial to cancer cell biology. Therefore, the use of therapeutic strategies to decrease hydrogen peroxide levels mainly during oxaliplatin chemotherapy could be clinically important to the outcomes of colorectal cancer treatment.

  17. Evaluation the role of nutritional and individual factors in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Moshfeghi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide including 38% of gastrointestinal cancers. Colorectal cancer is the third type of Iranian men and fourth in women in ranking. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of environmental risk factors in colorectal cancer.Materials and Method: In this case-control study, the authors selected cases from colorectal cancer patients in Arak and controls were selected from Arak hospitals in proportion to the number of cases. Data collected by using a structured questionnaire and based on interviews with patients and their medical records. We used chi-squared and independent t-tests to analyze data. Logistic regression applies to eliminate the effect of possible confounding variables.Results: From all participants 55.7% were male and 90% got married. 33.6% were overweight and/or obese. Mean ± SD of age and BMI was 54.41±14.88 yr and 24.42±4.58, respectively. Regression model showed that fatty food intake, high education and positive family history are the predictor risk factors of colorectal cancer. Conclusion: Due to preventable colorectal cancer and increased global incidence of disease, educational intervention about the importance of disease, methods of screening and diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of patients are necessary

  18. Exploring Different Strategies for Efficient Delivery of Colorectal Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congcong Lin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common cancer and the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the world. Currently available chemotherapy of CRC usually delivers the drug to both normal as well as cancerous tissues, thus leading to numerous undesirable effects. Much emphasis is being laid on the development of effective drug delivery systems for achieving selective delivery of the active moiety at the anticipated site of action with minimized unwanted side effects. Researchers have employed various techniques (dependent on pH, time, pressure and/or bacteria for targeting drugs directly to the colonic region. On the other hand, systemic drug delivery strategies to specific molecular targets (such as FGFR, EGFR, CD44, EpCAM, CA IX, PPARγ and COX-2 overexpressed by cancerous cells have also been shown to be effective. This review aims to put forth an overview of drug delivery technologies that have been, and may be developed, for the treatment of CRC.

  19. Epigenetic Alterations in Colorectal Cancer: Emerging Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okugawa, Yoshinaga; Grady, William M; Goel, Ajay

    2015-10-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. One of the fundamental processes driving the initiation and progression of CRC is the accumulation of a variety of genetic and epigenetic changes in colonic epithelial cells. Over the past decade, major advances have been made in our understanding of cancer epigenetics, particularly regarding aberrant DNA methylation, microRNA (miRNA) and noncoding RNA deregulation, and alterations in histone modification states. Assessment of the colon cancer "epigenome" has revealed that virtually all CRCs have aberrantly methylated genes and altered miRNA expression. The average CRC methylome has hundreds to thousands of abnormally methylated genes and dozens of altered miRNAs. As with gene mutations in the cancer genome, a subset of these epigenetic alterations, called driver events, are presumed to have a functional role in CRC. In addition, the advances in our understanding of epigenetic alterations in CRC have led to these alterations being developed as clinical biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Progress in this field suggests that these epigenetic alterations will be commonly used in the near future to direct the prevention and treatment of CRC.

  20. Multifaceted nature of membrane microdomains in colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kristina A Jahn; Yingying Su; Filip Braet

    2011-01-01

    Membrane microdomains or lipid rafts are known to be highly dynamic and to act as selective signal transduction mediators that facilitate interactions between the cell's external and internal environments. Lipid rafts play an important mediating role in the biology of cancer:they have been found in almost all existing experimental cancer models, including colorectal cancer (CRC),and play key regulatory roles in cell migration, metastasis,cell survival and tumor progression. This paper explores the current state of knowledge in this field by highlighting some of the pioneering and recent lipid raft studies performed on different CRC cell lines and human tissue samples. From this literature review, it becomes clear that membrane microdomains appear to be implicated in all key intracellular signaling pathways for lipid metabolism, drug resistance, cell adhesion, cell death,cell proliferation and many other processes in CRC. All signal transduction pathways seem to originate directly from those peculiar lipid islands, thereby orchestrating the colon cancer cells' state and fate. As confirmed by recent animal and preclinical studies in different CRC models, continuing to unravel the structure and function of lipid rafts - including their associated complex signaling pathways - will likely bring us one step closer to better monitoring and treating of colon cancer patients.

  1. Correlation of IL-8 with induction, progression and metastatic potential of colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression profile of IL-8 in inflammatory and malignant colorectal diseases to evaluate its potential role in the regulation of colorectal cancer (CRC) and the development of colorectal liver metastases (CRLM).METHODS: IL-8 expression was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR (Q-RT-PCR) and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in resected specimens from patients with ulcerative colitis (UC, n = 6)colorectal adenomas (CRA, n = 8), different stages of colorectal cancer (n = 48) as well as synchronous and metachronous CRLM along with their corresponding primary colorectal tumors (n = 16).RESULTS: IL-8 mRNA and protein expression was significantly up-regulated in all pathological colorectal entities investigated compared with the corresponding neighboring tissues. However, in the CRC specimens IL-8 revealed a significantly more pronounced overexpression in relation to the CRA and UC tissues with an average 30-fold IL-8 protein up-regulation in the CRC specimens in comparison to the CRA tissues. Moreover, IL-8 expression revealed a close correlation with tumor grading. Most interestingly, IL-8 up-regulation was most enhanced in synchronous and metachronous CRLM, if compared with the corresponding primary CRC tissues.Herein, an up to 80-fold IL-8 overexpression in individual metachronous metastases compared to normal tumor neighbor tissues was found.CONCLUSION: Our results strongly suggest an association between IL-8 expression, induction and progression of colorectal carcinoma and the development of colorectal liver metastases.

  2. Effects of the combination of blood transfusion and postoperative infectious complications on prognosis after surgery for colorectal cancer. Danish RANX05 Colorectal Cancer Study Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mynster, T; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Moesgaard, F

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The frequency of postoperative infectious complications is significantly increased in patients with colorectal cancer receiving perioperative blood transfusion. It is still debated, however, whether perioperative blood transfusion alters the incidence of disease recurrence or otherwise...... affects the prognosis. METHODS: Patient risk variables, variables related to operation technique, blood transfusion and the development of infectious complications were recorded prospectively in 740 patients undergoing elective resection for primary colorectal cancer. Endpoints were overall survival (n.......13-2.82)), localization of cancer in the rectum and Dukes classification were independent risk factors. CONCLUSION: Blood transfusion per se may not be a risk factor for poor prognosis after colorectal cancer surgery. However, the combination of perioperative blood transfusion and subsequent development of postoperative...

  3. Colonoscopy Surveillance After Colorectal Cancer Resection: Recommendations of the US Multi-Society Task Force on Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahi, Charles J; Boland, C Richard; Dominitz, Jason A; Giardiello, Francis M; Johnson, David A; Kaltenbach, Tonya; Lieberman, David; Levin, Theodore R; Robertson, Douglas J; Rex, Douglas K

    2016-03-01

    The US Multi-Society Task Force has developed updated recommendations to guide health care providers with the surveillance of patients after colorectal cancer (CRC) resection with curative intent. This document is based on a critical review of the literature regarding the role of colonoscopy, flexible sigmoidoscopy, endoscopic ultrasound, fecal testing and CT colonography in this setting. The document addresses the effect of surveillance, with focus on colonoscopy, on patient survival after CRC resection, the appropriate use and timing of colonoscopy for perioperative clearing and for postoperative prevention of metachronous CRC, specific considerations for the detection of local recurrence in the case of rectal cancer, as well as the place of CT colonography and fecal tests in post-CRC surveillance.

  4. Simultaneous resection of colorectal cancer and liver metastases in the right lobe using pure laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Koji; Oki, Eiji; Ikeda, Tetsuo; Saeki, Hiroshi; Ida, Satoshi; Kimura, Yasue; Soejima, Yuuji; Morita, Masaru; Shirabe, Ken; Kusumoto, Tetuya; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2014-08-01

    It is now common to resect colorectal cancer by laparoscopic surgery. Hepatectomy has become a standard treatment for patients with colorectal cancer with resectable liver metastases. The resection of liver tumors can now be done partly by laparoscopic surgery. However, metastatic tumors in the right lobe are often difficult to resect laparoscopically. Furthermore, simultaneous resection of the colorectum and liver may also be difficult. In this study, we evaluated a new method to resect both colorectal cancer and liver metastases in the right lobe by laparoscopic surgery. Two cases are presented that underwent total laparoscopic resection of a right lobe tumor, associated with laparoscopic colorectal resection. The metastatic tumor in the right lobe was first resected in the left hemi-prone position. Then, the colorectal cancer was resected in the lithotomy position. The method for resecting the right lobe liver tumor and colorectal cancer was safe and feasible. The mean duration of surgery was 443.5 min, and the mean blood loss was 158 mL. The postoperative course was uneventful. In selected patients, laparoscopic hepatectomy for right lobe synchronous metastatic tumors can be safely performed simultaneously with colorectal surgery.

  5. Randomised phase III trial of S-1 versus capecitabine in the first-line treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer: SALTO study by the Dutch Colorectal Cancer Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwakman, J J M; Simkens, L H J; van Rooijen, J M; van de Wouw, A J; Ten Tije, A J; Creemers, G J M; Hendriks, M P; Los, M; van Alphen, R J; Polée, M B; Muller, E W; van der Velden, A M T; van Voorthuizen, T; Koopman, M; Mol, L; van Werkhoven, E; Punt, C J A

    2017-04-05

    Hand-foot syndrome (HFS) is a common side effect of capecitabine. S-1 is an oral fluoropyrimidine with comparable efficacy to capecitabine in gastrointestinal cancers but associated with a lower incidence of HFS in Asian patients. This study compares the incidence of HFS between S-1 and capecitabine as first-line treatment in Western metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients.

  6. Epigenetic regulation of miR-21 in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Angelo; Kontos, Christos K; Boni, Themis; Bantounas, Ioannis; Siakouli, Dimitra; Kosmidou, Vivian; Vlassi, Margarita; Spyridakis, Yannis; Tsipras, Iraklis; Zografos, George; Pintzas, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have uncovered several transcription factors that determine biological alterations in tumor cells to execute the invasion-metastasis cascade, including the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We sought to investigate the role of miR-21 in colorectal cancer regulation. For this purpose, miR-21 expression was quantified in a panel of colorectal cancer cell lines and clinical specimens. High expression was found in cell lines with EMT properties and in the vast majority of human tumor specimens. We demonstrate in a cell-specific manner the occupancy of MIR-21 gene promoter by AP-1 and ETS1 transcription factors and, for the first time, the pattern of histone posttranslational modifications necessary for miR-21 overexpression. We also show that Integrin-β4 (ITGβ4), exclusively expressed in polarized epithelial cells, is a novel miR-21 target gene and plays a role in the regulation of EMT, since it is remarkably de-repressed after transient miR-21 silencing and downregulated after miR-21 overexpression. miR-21-dependent change of ITGβ4 expression significantly affects cell migration properties of colon cancer cells. Finally, in a subgroup of tumor specimens, ROC curve analysis performed on quantitative PCR data sets for miR-21, ITGβ4, and PDCD4 shows that the combination of high miR-21 with low ITGβ4 and PDCD4 expression is able to predict presence of metastasis. In conclusion, miR-21 is a key player in oncogenic EMT, its overexpression is controlled by the cooperation of genetic and epigenetic alterations, and its levels, along with ITGβ4 and PDCD4 expression, could be exploited as a prognostic tool for CRC metastasis. PMID:24149370

  7. Expression of survivin and p53 modulates honokiol-induced apoptosis in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ying-Jiun; Lin, Chien-I; Wang, Chia-Lin; Chao, Jui-I

    2014-11-01

    Honokiol is a small biphenolic compound, which exerts antitumor activities; however, the precise mechanism of honokiol-induced apoptosis in the human colorectal cancer cells remains unclear. Here, we show that survivin and p53 display the opposite role on the regulation of honokiol-induced apoptosis in the human colorectal cancer cells. Honokiol induced the cell death and apoptosis in various colorectal cancer cell lines. Moreover, honokiol elicited the extrinsic death receptor pathway of DR5 and caspase 8 and the intrinsic pathway of caspase 9. The common intrinsic and extrinsic downstream targets of activated caspase 3 and PARP protein cleavage were induced by honokiol. Interestingly, honokiol reduced anti-apoptotic survivin protein and gene expression. Transfection with a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-survivin-expressed vector increased the colorectal cancer cell viability and resisted the honokiol-induced apoptosis. Meantime, honokiol increased total p53 and the phosphorylated p53 proteins at Ser15 and Ser46. The p53-wild type colorectal cancer cells were exhibited greater cytotoxicity, apoptosis and survivin reduction than the p53-null cancer cells after treatment with honokiol. Together, these findings demonstrate that the existence of survivin and p53 can modulate the honokiol-induced apoptosis in the human colorectal cancer cells.

  8. Involvement of the CREB5 regulatory network in colorectal cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Lu; Ding, Yanqing

    2014-07-01

    The signal regulatory network involved in colorectal cancer metastasis is complicated and thus the search for key control steps in the network is of great significance for unraveling colorectal cancer metastasis mechanism and finding drug-target site. Previous studies suggested that CREB5 (cAMP responsive element binding protein 5) might play key role in the metastatic signal network of colorectal cancer. Through colorectal cancer expression profile and enriching analysis of the effect of CREB5 gene expression levels on colorectal cancer molecular events, we found that these molecular events are correlated with tumor metastasis. Based on the feature that CREB5 could combine with c-Jun to form heterodimer, together with enriched binding sites for transcription factor AP-1, we identified 16 genes which were up-regulated in the CREB5 high-expression group, contained AP-1 binding sites, and participated in cancer pathway. The molecular network involving these 16 genes, in particular, CSF1R, MMP9, PDGFRB, FIGF and IL6, regulates cell migration. Therefore, CREB5 might accelerate the metastasis of colorectal cancer by regulating these five key genes.

  9. Netrin-1 up-regulation in inflammatory bowel diseases is required for colorectal cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisi, Andrea; Maisse, Carine; Coissieux, Marie-May; Gadot, Nicolas; Lépinasse, Florian; Delloye-Bourgeois, Céline; Delcros, Jean-Guy; Svrcek, Magali; Neufert, Clemens; Fléjou, Jean-François; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Mehlen, Patrick

    2009-10-06

    Chronic inflammation and cancer are intimately associated. This is particularly true for inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), such as ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, which show a major increased risk for colorectal cancer. While the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of IBD has recently improved, the mechanisms that link these chronic inflammatory states to colorectal cancer development are in large part unknown. One of these mechanisms is NF-kappaB pathway activation which in turn may contribute to tumor formation by providing anti-apoptotic survival signals to the epithelial cells. Based on the observation that netrin-1, the anti-apoptotic ligand for the dependence receptors DCC and UNC5H is up-regulated in colonic crypts in response to NF-kappaB, we show here that colorectal cancers from inflammatory bowel diseases patients have selected up-regulation of netrin-1. Moreover, we demonstrate that this inflammation-driven netrin-1 up-regulation is causal for colorectal cancer development as interference with netrin-1 autocrine loop in a mouse model for ulcerative colitis-associated colorectal cancer, while showing no effect on inflammation, inhibits colorectal cancer progression.

  10. Association of Fusobacterium nucleatum with immunity and molecular alterations in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosho, Katsuhiko; Sukawa, Yasutaka; Adachi, Yasushi; Ito, Miki; Mitsuhashi, Kei; Kurihara, Hiroyoshi; Kanno, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Itaru; Ishigami, Keisuke; Igarashi, Hisayoshi; Maruyama, Reo; Imai, Kohzoh; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2016-01-14

    The human intestinal microbiome plays a major role in human health and diseases, including colorectal cancer. Colorectal carcinogenesis represents a heterogeneous process with a differing set of somatic molecular alterations, influenced by diet, environmental and microbial exposures, and host immunity. Fusobacterium species are part of the human oral and intestinal microbiota. Metagenomic analyses have shown an enrichment of Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) in colorectal carcinoma tissue. Using 511 colorectal carcinomas from Japanese patients, we assessed the presence of F. nucleatum. Our results showed that the frequency of F. nucleatum positivity in the Japanese colorectal cancer was 8.6% (44/511), which was lower than that in United States cohort studies (13%). Similar to the United States studies, F. nucleatum positivity in Japanese colorectal cancers was significantly associated with microsatellite instability (MSI)-high status. Regarding the immune response in colorectal cancer, high levels of infiltrating T-cell subsets (i.e., CD3+, CD8+, CD45RO+, and FOXP3+ cells) have been associated with better patient prognosis. There is also evidence to indicate that molecular features of colorectal cancer, especially MSI, influence T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity. Concerning the association between the gut microbiome and immunity, F. nucleatum has been shown to expand myeloid-derived immune cells, which inhibit T-cell proliferation and induce T-cell apoptosis in colorectal cancer. This finding indicates that F. nucleatum possesses immunosuppressive activities by inhibiting human T-cell responses. Certain microRNAs are induced during the macrophage inflammatory response and have the ability to regulate host-cell responses to pathogens. MicroRNA-21 increases the levels of IL-10 and prostaglandin E2, which suppress antitumor T-cell-mediated adaptive immunity through the inhibition of the antigen-presenting capacities of dendritic cells and T-cell proliferation in

  11. Efficacy and safety of oxaliplatin chemotherapy programs as adjuvant treatment in colorectal cancer after surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨莉萍

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the efficacy and safety of 5-fluorouracil and calcium folinatc combined with oxaliplatin(FOLFOX) program with capecitabine regimen combined oxaliplatin(XELOX) program as adjuvant chemotherapy in advanced colorectal cancer after surgery.

  12. Alcohol intake and colorectal cancer: a comparison of approaches for including repeated measures of alcohol consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lau Caspar; Wu, Kana; Grønbaek, Morten;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In numerous studies, alcohol intake has been found to be positively associated with colorectal cancer risk. However, the majority of studies included only one exposure measurement, which may bias the results if long-term intake is relevant.METHODS: We compared different approaches...... for including repeated measures of alcohol intake among 47,432 US men enrolled in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Questionnaires including questions on alcohol intake had been completed in 1986, 1990, 1994, and 1998. The outcome was incident colorectal cancer during follow-up from 1986 to 2002.RESULTS......: During follow-up, 868 members of the cohort experienced colorectal cancer. Baseline, updated, and cumulative average alcohol intakes were positively associated with colorectal cancer, with only minor differences among the approaches. These results support moderately increased risk for intake >30 g...

  13. Effect of maternal and postweaning folic acid supplementation on colorectal cancer risk in the offspring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrauterine and early life exposure to folic acid has significantly increased in North America owing to folic acid fortification, widespread supplemental use and periconceptional folic acid supplementation. The effect of maternal and postweaning folic acid supplementation on colorectal cancer risk ...

  14. Dietary folate, methionine, riboflavin, and vitamin B-6 and risk of sporadic colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, S. de; Dindore, V.; Engeland, M. van; Goldbohm, R.A.; Brandt, P.A. van den; Weijenberg, M.P.

    2008-01-01

    Adequate intake of folate, methionine, riboflavin, and vitamin B-6 may prevent aberrant DNA methylation and thereby protect against colorectal cancer (CRC). However, previous epidemiological studies investigating associations between dietary intakes of these nutrients and CRC have been inconsistent.

  15. P16 METHYLATION OF THE COLORECTAL CANCER AND ASSOCIATION WITH DUKES STAGES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志伟; 易静; 仓辉; 邹鸿志; 郁宝铭; 汤雪明

    2001-01-01

    To explore whether methylation of the CpG island in the promoter of the p16 tumor suppressor gene was associated with clinicopathological characteristics of the colorectal cancer patients. Methods: Methylation- specific PCR (MSP) was used to detect p16 methylation of the colorectal cancer patients. Results: In 58 sporadic colorectal cancer, 43.1% of the tumors had detectable p16 methylation. Dukes' stage was associated with p16 methylation status. Dukes C, D patients (75%) were more likely to contain methylated p16 compared with Dukes A, B patients (13.3%). Conclusion: p16 methylation plays a role in the carcinogenesis of a subset of colorectal cancer. P16 methylation might be considered as a prognostic indicator.

  16. Cetuximab Plus Oxaliplatin May Not Be Effective Primary Treatment for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a randomized phase III trial, the addition of the targeted therapy cetuximab to oxaliplatin and fluoropyrimidine chemotherapy did not prolong survival or time to disease progression of patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

  17. Colonoscopy Reduces Risk of Death from Colorectal Cancer in High-Risk Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long-term results from the National Polyp Study confirm that removing precancerous adenomas not only reduces the risk of colorectal cancer but also reduces the number of deaths from the disease by more than half.

  18. Efficacy and toxicity of adjuvant chemotherapy in elderly patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, C M; Nielsen, D; Dehlendorff, C

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Elderly patients with primary colorectal cancer (CRC) are less frequently treated with adjuvant chemotherapy than younger patients due to concerns regarding toxicity and efficiency. We investigated how age, performance status (PS) and comorbidity influence treatment outcomes. PATIENTS...

  19. The clinical significance of circulating tumor cells in non-metastatic colorectal cancer - A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsson, M; Jess, Per

    2011-01-01

    with metastatic disease, but the prognostic role of CTC in non-metastatic colorectal cancer is less clear. The aim of this review is to examine the possible clinical significance of circulating tumor cells in non-metastatic colorectal cancer (TNM-stage I-III) with the primary focus on detection methods......BACKGROUND: Finding a clinical tool to improve the risk stratification and identifying those colorectal cancer patients with an increased risk of recurrence is of great importance. The presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC) in peripheral blood can be a strong marker of poor prognosis in patients...... and prognosis. METHODS: The PubMed and Cochrane database and reference lists of relevant articles were searched for scientific literature published in English from January 2000 to June 2010. We included studies with non-metastatic colorectal cancer (TNM-stage I-III) and CTC detected pre- and/or post...

  20. Plasma Enterolignan Concentrations and Colorectal Cancer Risk in a Nested Case-Control Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijsten, A.; Hollman, P.C.H.; Boshuizen, H.C.; Buijsman, M.N.C.P.; Veer, van 't P.; Kok, F.J.; Arts, I.C.W.; Bueno-de-Mesquita, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    Enterolignans are biphenolic compounds that possess several biologic activities whereby they may influence carcinogenesis. The authors investigated the association between plasma enterolactone and enterodiol and colorectal cancer risk in a Dutch prospective study. Among more than 35,000 participants

  1. The association between glyceraldehyde-derived advanced glycation end-products and colorectal cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kong, So Yeon; Takeuchi, Masayoshi; Hyogo, Hideyuki; McKeown-Eyssen, Gail; Yamagishi, Sho Ichi; Chayama, Kazuaki; O'Brien, Peter J.; Ferrari, Pietro; Overvad, Kim; Olsen, Anja; Tjønneland, Anne; Boutron-Ruault, Marie Christine; Bastide, Nadia; Carbonnel, Franck; Kühn, Tilman; Kaaks, Rudolf; Boeing, Heiner; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Lagiou, Pagona; Vasilopoulou, Effie; Masala, Giovanna; Pala, Valeria; De Magistris, Maria Santucci; Tumino, Rosario; Naccarati, Alessio; Bueno-De-Mesquita, H. B.; Peeters, Petra H.; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Quiŕos, J. Ramón; Jakszyn, Paula; ͆anchez, María Jos̈e; Dorronsoro, Miren; Gavrila, Diana; Ardanaz, Eva; Rutegård, Martin; Nyström, Hanna; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Khaw, Kay Tee; Bradbury, Kathryn E.; Romieu, Isabelle; Freisling, Heinz; Stavropoulou, Faidra; Gunter, Marc J.; Cross, Amanda J.; Riboli, Elio; Jenab, Mazda; Bruce, W. Robert

    2015-01-01

    Background: A large proportion of colorectal cancers are thought to be associated with unhealthy dietary and lifestyle exposures, particularly energy excess, obesity, hyperinsulinemia, and hyperglycemia. It has been suggested that these processes stimulate the production of toxic reactive carbonyls

  2. Study Shows Aspirin Reduces Colorectal Cancer in Those at High Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findings from the first large clinical trial of its kind indicate that taking high doses of aspirin daily for at least 2 years substantially reduces the risk of colorectal cancer among people at increased risk of the disease.

  3. Early detection of colorectal cancer relapse by infrared spectroscopy in ``normal'' anastomosis tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Ahmad; Sebbag, Gilbert; Argov, Shmuel; Mordechai, Shaul; Sahu, Ranjit K.

    2015-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most aggressive cancers usually occurring in people above the age of 50 years. In the United States, colorectal cancer is the third most diagnosed cancer. The American Cancer Society has estimated 96,830 new cases of colon cancer and 40,000 new cases of rectal cancer in 2014 in the United States. According to the literature, up to 55% of colorectal cancer patients experience a recurrence within five years from the time of surgery. Relapse of colorectal cancer has a deep influence on the quality of patient life. Infrared (IR) spectroscopy has been widely used in medicine. It is a noninvasive, nondestructive technique that can detect changes in cells and tissues that are caused by different disorders, such as cancer. Abnormalities in the colonic crypts, which are not detectable using standard histopathological methods, could be determined using IR spectroscopic methods. The IR measurements were performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded colorectal tissues from eight patients (one control, four local recurrences, three distant recurrences). A total of 128 crypts were measured. Our results showed the possibility of differentiating among control, local, and distant recurrence crypts with more than a 92% success rate using spectra measured from the crypts' middle sites.

  4. Immune escape mechanisms in colorectal cancer pathogenesis and liver metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancione, Massimo; Giordano, Guido; Remo, Andrea; Febbraro, Antonio; Sabatino, Lina; Manfrin, Erminia; Ceccarelli, Michele; Colantuoni, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, growing evidence indicates that the tumor microenvironment (TME) contributes with genomic/epigenomic aberrations of malignant cells to enhance cancer cells survival, invasion, and dissemination. Many factors, produced or de novo synthesized by immune, stromal, or malignant cells, acting in a paracrine and autocrine fashion, remodel TME and the adaptive immune response culminating in metastasis. Taking into account the recent accomplishments in the field of immune oncology and using metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) as a model, we propose that the evasion of the immune surveillance and metastatic spread can be achieved through a number of mechanisms that include (a) intrinsic plasticity and adaptability of immune and malignant cells to paracrine and autocrine stimuli or genotoxic stresses; (b) alteration of positional schemes of myeloid-lineage cells, produced by factors controlling the balance between tumour-suppressing and tumour-promoting activities; (c) acquisition by cancer cells of aberrant immune-phenotypic traits (NT5E/CD73, CD68, and CD163) that enhance the interactions among TME components through the production of immune-suppressive mediators. These properties may represent the driving force of metastatic progression and thus clinically exploitable for cancer prevention and therapy. In this review we summarize results and suggest new hypotheses that favour the growing impact of tumor-infiltrating immune cells on tumour progression, metastasis, and therapy resistance.

  5. Discrimination of serum Raman spectroscopy between normal and colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaozhou; Yang, Tianyue; Yu, Ting; Li, Siqi

    2011-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy of tissues has been widely studied for the diagnosis of various cancers, but biofluids were seldom used as the analyte because of the low concentration. Herein, serum of 30 normal people, 46 colon cancer, and 44 rectum cancer patients were measured Raman spectra and analyzed. The information of Raman peaks (intensity and width) and that of the fluorescence background (baseline function coefficients) were selected as parameters for statistical analysis. Principal component regression (PCR) and partial least square regression (PLSR) were used on the selected parameters separately to see the performance of the parameters. PCR performed better than PLSR in our spectral data. Then linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was used on the principal components (PCs) of the two regression method on the selected parameters, and a diagnostic accuracy of 88% and 83% were obtained. The conclusion is that the selected features can maintain the information of original spectra well and Raman spectroscopy of serum has the potential for the diagnosis of colorectal cancer.

  6. Differences in Colorectal Cancer Outcomes by Race and Insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawk, Rima; Abner, Adrian; Ashford, Alicestine; Brown, Clyde Perry

    2015-12-22

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common cancer among African American women and the third most common cancer for African American men. The mortality rate from CRC is highest among African Americans compared to any other racial or ethnic group. Much of the disparity in mortality is likely due to diagnosis at later stages of the disease, which could result from unequal access to screening. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of race and insurance status on CRC outcomes among CRC patients. Data were drawn from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. Logistic regressions models were used to examine the odds of receiving treatment after adjusting for insurance, race, and other variables. Cox proportional hazard models were used to measure the risk of CRC death after adjusting for sociodemographic and tumor characteristics when associating race and insurance with CRC-related death. Blacks were diagnosed at more advanced stages of disease than whites and had an increased risk of death from both colon and rectal cancers. Lacking insurance was associated with an increase in CRC related-deaths. Findings from this study could help profile and target patients with the greatest disparities in CRC health outcomes.

  7. Differences in Colorectal Cancer Outcomes by Race and Insurance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rima Tawk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the second most common cancer among African American women and the third most common cancer for African American men. The mortality rate from CRC is highest among African Americans compared to any other racial or ethnic group. Much of the disparity in mortality is likely due to diagnosis at later stages of the disease, which could result from unequal access to screening. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of race and insurance status on CRC outcomes among CRC patients. Data were drawn from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. Logistic regressions models were used to examine the odds of receiving treatment after adjusting for insurance, race, and other variables. Cox proportional hazard models were used to measure the risk of CRC death after adjusting for sociodemographic and tumor characteristics when associating race and insurance with CRC-related death. Blacks were diagnosed at more advanced stages of disease than whites and had an increased risk of death from both colon and rectal cancers. Lacking insurance was associated with an increase in CRC related-deaths. Findings from this study could help profile and target patients with the greatest disparities in CRC health outcomes.

  8. Chemometrics of differentially expressed proteins from colorectal cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lay-Chin Yeoh; Saravanan Dharmaraj; Boon-Hui Gooi; Manjit Singh; Lay-Harn Gam

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the usefulness of differentially expressed proteins from colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues for differentiating cancer and normal tissues. METHODS: A Proteomic approach was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins between CRC and normal tissues. The proteins were extracted using Tris buffer and thiourea lysis buffer (TLB) for extraction of aqueous soluble and membrane-associated proteins, respectively. Chemometrics, namely principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), were used to assess the usefulness of these proteins for identifying the cancerous state of tissues. RESULTS: Differentially expressed proteins identified were 37 aqueous soluble proteins in Tris extracts and 24 membrane-associated proteins in TLB extracts. Based on the protein spots intensity on 2D-gel images, PCA by applying an eigenvalue > 1 was successfully used to reduce the number of principal components (PCs) into 12 and seven PCs for Tris and TLB extracts, respectively, and subsequently six PCs, respectively from both the extracts were used for LDA. The LDA classification for Tris extract showed 82.7% of original samples were correctly classified, whereas 82.7% were correctly classified for the cross-validated samples. The LDA for TLB extract showed that 78.8% of original samples and 71.2% of the cross-validated samples were correctly classified. CONCLUSION: The classification of CRC tissues by PCA and LDA provided a promising distinction between normal and cancer types. These methods can possibly be used for identification of potential biomarkers among the differentially expressed proteins identified.

  9. Proteomic indicators of oxidation and hydration state in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey M. Dick

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available New integrative approaches are needed to harness the potential of rapidly growing datasets of protein expression and microbial community composition in colorectal cancer. Chemical and thermodynamic models offer theoretical tools to describe populations of biomacromolecules and their relative potential for formation in different microenvironmental conditions. The average oxidation state of carbon (ZC can be calculated as an elemental ratio from the chemical formulas of proteins, and water demand per residue ( ${\\overline{n}}_{{\\mathrm{H}}_{2}\\mathrm{O}}$ n ¯ H 2 O is computed by writing the overall formation reactions of proteins from basis species. Using results reported in proteomic studies of clinical samples, many datasets exhibit higher mean ZC or ${\\overline{n}}_{{\\mathrm{H}}_{2}\\mathrm{O}}$ n ¯ H 2 O of proteins in carcinoma or adenoma compared to normal tissue. In contrast, average protein compositions in bacterial genomes often have lower ZC for bacteria enriched in fecal samples from cancer patients compared to healthy donors. In thermodynamic calculations, the potential for formation of the cancer-related proteins is energetically favored by changes in the chemical activity of H2O and fugacity of O2 that reflect the compositional differences. The compositional analysis suggests that a systematic change in chemical composition is an essential feature of cancer proteomes, and the thermodynamic descriptions show that the observed proteomic transformations in host tissue could be promoted by relatively high microenvironmental oxidation and hydration states.

  10. Sporadic colorectal cancer: microbial contributors to disease prevention, development and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, Julia L; Housseau, Franck; Sears, Cynthia L

    2016-07-26

    The gut microbiota has been hailed as an accessory organ, with functions critical to the host including dietary metabolic activities and assistance in the development of a proper functioning immune system. However, an aberrant microbiota (dysbiosis) may influence disease processes such as colorectal cancer. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the contributions of the microbiota to prevention, initiation/progression, and treatment of colorectal cancer, with a major focus on biofilms and the antimicrobial and antitumoural immune response.

  11. Is more better than less? Caveats from bevacizumab and cetuximab combination in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camillo Porta

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years, impressing improvements have been made in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer. Following decades of modest achievements, in which it was just a matter of dose and schedule for 5-FU and leucovorin—the only treatment then available—first, the development of irinotecan and oxaliplatin, and then the use of the two biologicals, bevacizumab and cetuximab, have dramatically improved the life expectancy of our colorectal cancer patients...

  12. The role of lysyl oxidase in SRC-dependent proliferation and metastasis of colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Ann-Marie; Cox, Thomas Robert; Bird, Demelza;

    2011-01-01

    Emerging evidence implicates lysyl oxidase (LOX), an extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme, in promoting metastasis of solid tumors. We investigated whether LOX plays an important role in the metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC).......Emerging evidence implicates lysyl oxidase (LOX), an extracellular matrix-modifying enzyme, in promoting metastasis of solid tumors. We investigated whether LOX plays an important role in the metastasis of colorectal cancer (CRC)....

  13. Crafting Appealing Text Messages to Encourage Colorectal Cancer Screening Test Completion: A Qualitative Study

    OpenAIRE

    Weaver, Kathryn E.; Ellis, Shellie D; Denizard-Thompson, Nancy; Kronner, Donna; Miller, David P

    2015-01-01

    Background mHealth interventions that incorporate text messages have great potential to increase receipt of preventive health services such as colorectal cancer screening. However, little is known about older adult perspectives regarding the receipt of text messages from their health care providers. Objective To assess whether older adults would value and access text messages from their physician’s practice regarding colorectal cancer screening. Methods We conducted four focus groups with 26 ...

  14. Glutathione S-transferase M1 null genotype related to poor prognosis of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shushan; Wang, Zengfang; Wang, Zengyan; Duan, Quanhong; Wang, Xiaochen; Li, Jun; Sun, Beicheng

    2016-08-01

    Published studies showed controversial findings about the relationship between glutathione S-transferase M1 (GSTM1) null genotype and clinical outcomes of patients with colorectal cancer. We performed a meta-analysis to quantitatively assess the association between GSTM1 null genotype and prognosis of patients with colorectal cancer. We systematically searched Pubmed, Embase, and Web of Science to identify prospective or retrospective cohort studies assessing the association of GSTM1 null genotype with overall survival (OS) or disease-free survival (DFS) in colorectal cancer. The hazard ratios (HRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CIs) were used to assess the association of GSTM1 null genotype with OS or DFS. Finally, 15 studies from 14 publications with 4326 colorectal cancer patients were included into the meta-analysis. There was no heterogeneity in the meta-analysis relating OS (I (2) = 0 %) and DFS (I (2) = 0 %). Overall, GSTM1 null genotype was significantly associated with poor OS in patients with colorectal cancer (HR = 1.18, 95 % CI 1.07-1.30, P = 0.001). In addition, GSTM1 null genotype was also significantly associated with poor DFS in patients with colorectal cancer (HR = 1.15, 95 % CI 1.03-1.28, P = 0.015). No obvious risk of publication bias was observed. GSTM1 null genotype is significantly associated with poor OS and DFS in patients with colorectal cancer, which suggests that GSTM1 null genotype confers poor effect on the prognosis of colorectal cancer.

  15. Surgical therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer with a potential for cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Terence C; Liauw, Winston; Koong, Heng-Nung; Esquivel, Jesus

    2011-06-01

    Metastatic colorectal cancer has evolved from a paradigm that was previously centered upon the use of systemic chemotherapy to one of multimodality therapy. Hepatectomy, pulmonary metastasectomy, and cytoreductive surgery with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy are surgical procedures that are now routinely performed in specialized institutions treating patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Emerging evidence suggests that in selected patients, these procedures are safe and may be beneficial in contributing to long-term survival.

  16. Panitumumab: the evidence of its therapeutic potential in metastatic colorectal cancer care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Martinelli

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Erika Martinelli1, Floriana Morgillo1, Teresa Troiani1, Giampaolo Tortora2, Fortunato Ciardiello11Cattedra di Oncologia Medica, Dipartimento Medico-Chirurgico di Internistica Clinica e Sperimentale “F. Magrassi e A. Lanzara”, Seconda Università degli Studi di Napoli, Napoli, Italy; 2Dipartimento di Endocrinologia ed Oncologia Molecolare e Clinina, Università di Napoli Federico II, Napoli, ItalyIntroduction: Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common malignant disease. Of newly diagnosed patients, 40% have metastatic disease at diagnosis, and approximately 25% of patients with localized disease at diagnosis will ultimately develop metastatic disease. The benefits of systemic chemotherapy in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer over best supportive care have been established. Panitumumab (ABX-EGF is the first fully human monoclonal antibody developed for use in colorectal cancer that targets the extracellular domains of epidermal growth factor receptor.Aims: The goal of this article is to review the published evidence for the use of panitumumab in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer to define its therapeutic potential.Evidence review: The major evidence of panitumumab activity in colorectal cancer has appeared in meeting report abstracts. One phase II study in monotherapy, one in combination with chemotherapy, and one phase III study have included only patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.Clinical potential: To date, in phase II clinical studies panitumumab has demonstrated antitumor activity in advanced, refractory colorectal cancer. As monotherapy it resulted in a 10% response rate with 38% of patients having stable disease, and a 36% response rate with 46% stable disease when combined with chemotherapy. A phase III study indicates a clinically significant advantage of panitumumab as third-line monotherapy over best supportive care. Panitumumab appears to have a good tolerability profile, with no maximum tolerated

  17. Identification of the DEAD box RNA helicase DDX3 as a therapeutic target in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heerma van Voss, Marise R; Vesuna, Farhad; Trumpi, Kari; Brilliant, Justin; Berlinicke, Cynthia; de Leng, Wendy; Kranenburg, Onno; Offerhaus, G Johan; Bürger, Horst; van der Wall, Elsken; van Diest, Paul J; Raman, Venu

    2015-09-29

    Identifying druggable targets in the Wnt-signaling pathway can optimize colorectal cancer treatment. Recent studies have identified a member of the RNA helicase family DDX3 (DDX3X) as a multilevel activator of Wnt signaling in cells without activating mutations in the Wnt-signaling pathway. In this study, we evaluated whether DDX3 plays a role in the constitutively active Wnt pathway that drives colorectal cancer. We determined DDX3 expression levels in 303 colorectal cancers by immunohistochemistry. 39% of tumors overexpressed DDX3. High cytoplasmic DDX3 expression correlated with nuclear β-catenin expression, a marker of activated Wnt signaling. Functionally, we validated this finding in vitro and found that inhibition of DDX3 with siRNA resulted in reduced TCF4-reporter activity and lowered the mRNA expression levels of downstream TCF4-regulated genes. In addition, DDX3 knockdown in colorectal cancer cell lines reduced proliferation and caused a G1 arrest, supporting a potential oncogenic role of DDX3 in colorectal cancer. RK-33 is a small molecule inhibitor designed to bind to the ATP-binding site of DDX3. Treatment of colorectal cancer cell lines and patient-derived 3D cultures with RK-33 inhibited growth and promoted cell death with IC50 values ranging from 2.5 to 8 μM. The highest RK-33 sensitivity was observed in tumors with wild-type APC-status and a mutation in CTNNB1. Based on these results, we conclude that DDX3 has an oncogenic role in colorectal cancer. Inhibition of DDX3 with the small molecule inhibitor RK-33 causes inhibition of Wnt signaling and may therefore be a promising future treatment strategy for a subset of colorectal cancers.

  18. FGFR4 Role in Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Its Therapeutic Value in Colorectal Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Peláez-García; Rodrigo Barderas; Sofía Torres; Pablo Hernández-Varas; Joaquín Teixidó; Félix Bonilla; Antonio Garcia de Herreros; J Ignacio Casal

    2013-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) is vital in early development and tissue repair. FGFR4 expression levels are very restricted in adult tissues, except in several solid tumors including colorectal cancer, which showed overexpression of FGFR4. Here, FGFR4 mutation analysis discarded the presence of activating mutations, other than Arg(388), in different colorectal cancer cell lines and tumoral samples. Stable shRNA FGFR4-silencing in SW480 and SW48 cell lines resulted in a significan...

  19. Oncological outcome of unresectable lung metastases without extrapulmonary metastases in colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To explore the oncological outcomes of unresectable lung metastases without extrapulmonary metastases in colorectal cancer. METHODS: Patients with unresectable isolated lung metastases from colorectal cancer were prospectively collected in a single institution during a 5-year period. All patients received either the fluorouracil/leucovorin plus oxaliplatin, fluorouracil/leucovorin plus irinotecan or capecitabine plus oxaliplatin regimen as first-line treatment. The resectability after preoperative chem...

  20. Concomitant parenteral nutrition and systemic cytotoxic therapy in a metastatic colorectal cancer patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Popov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathologic nutrients metabolism presents a severe problem in metastatic colorectal cancer patients, especially those with canceromatosis. A hypermetabolism-catabolism syndrome frequently develops in in patients with progressing canceromatosis. This leads to cachexia anorexia syndrome, which significantly impedes available treatment options. Artificial nutrition allows to improve available treatment in such patients. We present a successful case of concomitant parenteral nutrition and systemic cytotoxic therapy in metastatic colorectal cancer patient with peritoneal canceromatosis.

  1. Arctigenin Inhibits Lung Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer by Regulating Cell Viability and Metastatic Phenotypes

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Arctigenin (ARC) has been shown to have an anti-cancer effect in various cell types and tissues. However, there have been no studies concerning metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). In this study, we investigated the anti-metastatic properties of ARC on colorectal metastasis and present a potential candidate drug. ARC induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in CT26 cells through the intrinsic apoptotic pathway via MAPKs signaling. In several metastatic phenotypes, ARC controlled epithelial-mese...

  2. FOXM1 promotes invasion and migration of colorectal cancer cells partially dependent on HSPA5 transactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhiyuan; Feng, Hongbo; Chen, Pinjia; Shi, Xinpeng; Zou, Zhengzhi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, to investigate whether endoplastic reticulum (ER) stress correlated with FOXM1 in colorectal cancer, we analysed the mRNA levels of FOXM1 and ER stress markers HSPA5 and spliced XBP1 by qRT-PCR. FOXM1 mRNA levels were found to positively correlate with HSPA5 in colorectal cancer. However, no significant correlation between FOXM1 and spliced XBP1 mRNA levels was found. Theses results suggested the positive correlation between FOXM1 and HSPA5 in colorectal cancer was not associated with ER stress. Next, we provided evidences that FOXM1 promoted HSPA5 transcription by directly binding to and stimulating HSPA5 promoter. Moreover, a FOXM1-binding site mapped between -1019 and -1012 bp of the proximal HSPA5 promoter was identified. In addition, we found that enhancement of cell migration and invasion by FOXM1 was significantly attenuated by depletion of HSPA5 in colorectal cancer cell. Furthermore, FOXM1 triggered colorectal cancer cell migration and invasion was involved in activities of cell-surface HSPA5. Lastly, our results suggested FOXM1 facilitated the activities and expressions of MMP2 and 9 associated with cell-surface HSPA5 in colorectal cancer cells. Moreover, statistically significant positive correlations between FOXM1 and MMP2 mRNA expression, between HSPA5 and MMP2 were found in colorectal cancer tissue specimens. Together, our results suggested that FOXM1-HSPA5 signaling might be considered as a novel molecular target for designing novel therapeutic regimen to control colorectal cancer metastasis and progression. PMID:27034162

  3. Moving forward in colorectal cancer research, what proteomics has to tell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer and is highly fatal. During the last several years, research has been primarily based on the study of expression profiles using microarray technology. But now, investigators are putting into practice proteomic analyses of cancer tissues and cells to identify new diagnostic or therapeutic biomarkers for this cancer. Because the proteome reflects the state of a cell, tissue or organism more accurately, much is expected from proteomics to yield better tumor markers for disease diagnosis and therapy monitoring. This review summarizes the most relevant applications of proteomics the biomarker discovery for colorectal cancer.

  4. Penetrance of colorectal cancer among MLH1/MSH2 carriers participating in the colorectal cancer familial registry in Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Yun-Hee

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes, responsible for the majority of Lynch Syndrome cancers, have been identified, predominantly MLH1 and MSH2, but the risk associated with these mutations is still not well established. The aim of this study is to provide population-based estimates of the risks of colorectal cancer (CRC by gender and mutation type from the Ontario population. Methods We analyzed 32 families segregating MMR mutations selected from the Ontario Familial Colorectal Cancer Registry and including 199 first-degree and 421 second-degree relatives. The cumulative risks were estimated using a modified segregation-based approach, which allows correction for the ascertainment of the Lynch Syndrome families and permits account to be taken for missing genotype information. Results The risks of developing CRC by age 70 were 60% and 47% among men and women carriers of any MMR mutation, respectively. Among MLH1 mutation carriers, males had significantly higher risks than females at all ages (67% vs. 35% by age 70, p-value = 0.02, while the risks were similar in MSH2 carriers (about 54%. The relative risk associated with MLH1 was almost constant with age (hazard ratio (HR varied between 5.5-5.1 over age 30–70, while the HR for MSH2 decreased with age (from 13.1 at age 30 to 5.4 at age 70. Conclusion This study provides a unique population-based study of CRC risks among MSH2/MLH1 mutation carriers in a Canadian population and can help to better define and understand the patterns of risks among members of Lynch Syndrome families.

  5. Colorectal Cancer Chemoprevention by Mesalazine and Its Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmine Stolfi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD face an increased lifetime risk of developing colorectal cancer (CRC. Independent factors associated with increased risk include long disease duration, extensive colonic involvement, young age at onset of IBD, severity of inflammation, primary sclerosing cholangitis, backwash ileitis, and a family history of CRC, thus emphasising the role of intestinal inflammation as an underlying mechanism. This notion is also supported by the demonstration that the use of certain drugs used to attenuate the ongoing mucosal inflammation, such as mesalazine, seems to associate with a reduced incidence of colitis-associated CRC. In the last decade, work from many laboratories has contributed to delineate the mechanisms by which mesalazine alters CRC cell behaviour. In this paper, we review the available experimental data supporting the ability of mesalazine and its derivatives to interfere with intracellular signals involved in CRC cell growth.

  6. Yttrium-90 Radioembolization of Hepatic Metastases from Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raval eMihir

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Liver metastases from colorectal cancer (CRC result in substantial morbidity and mortality. The primary treatment is systemic chemotherapy, and in selected patients, surgical resection; however, for patients who are not surgical candidates and/or fail systemic chemotherapy, liver-directed therapies are increasingly being utilized. Yttrium-90 (Y-90 microsphere therapy, also known as selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT or radioembolization, has proven to be effective in terms of extending time to progression of disease and also providing survival benefit. This review focuses on the use of Y-90 microsphere therapy in the treatment of liver metastases from CRC, including a comprehensive review of published clinical trials and prospective studies conducted thus far. We review the methodology, outcomes and side effects of Y-90 microsphere therapy for metastatic CRC

  7. Reduced expression of steroid sulfatase in primary colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawłuszko, Agnieszka Anna; Antoniucci, Monica; Horbacka, Karolina; Lianeri, Margarita; Krokowicz, Piotr; Jagodziński, Paweł Piotr

    2013-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is considered an estrogen-dependent malignancy, and intratissue estrogen concentration can be controlled by steroid sulfatase (STS). Little is known about changes in the expression of STS during the development of CRC. Therefore, we analysed the STS mRNA levels in primary colonic adenocarcinoma tissues and adjacent histopathologically unchanged colonic mucosa from patients who underwent radical colon resection (n=90). We found a statistically significant decrease in STS transcript levels in CRC (P=0.0453). Moreover, we found that sodium butyrate (NaBu) significantly upregulated STS transcript levels in DLD-1 and HCT116 CRC cells. Our results suggest that STS expression can be decreased in the process of large intestinal carcinogenesis. Moreover, we observed that NaBu might increase STS expression in CRC cells.

  8. TRIM37 promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition in colorectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Cheng-En; Gan, Jun

    2017-01-01

    There is substantial research on the oncogenic role of tripartite motif containing 37 (TRIM37); however, its importance in colorectal cancer (CRC) remains to be elucidated. The present study used reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry and western blotting to detect the expression level of TRIM37 in CRC. The importance of TRIM37 in cell proliferation, invasion and metastasis of CRC were investigated through overexpressing or knocking-down of TRIM37 in CRC cell lines, to observe its function. The present study revealed that TRIM37 was overexpressed in human CRC tissues. High TRIM37 expression resulted in increased CRC proliferation, migration and invasion. Mechanistically, it was confirmed that TRIM37 enhanced invasion and metastasis of CRC via the epithelial-mesenchymal transition pathway. In conclusion, the present study suggested that TRIM3 may contribute to CRC and act as a potential therapeutic target for CRC treatment. PMID:28098873

  9. Targeted screening for colorectal cancer in high-risk individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Martin C S; Wong, Sunny H; Ng, Siew C; Wu, Justin C Y; Chan, Francis K L; Sung, Joseph J Y

    2015-12-01

    The idea of targeted screening for colorectal cancer based on risk profiles originates from its benefits to improve detection yield and optimize screening efficiency. Clinically, it allows individuals to be more aware of their own risk and make informed decisions on screening choice. From a public health perspective, the implementation of risk stratification strategies may better justify utilization of colonoscopic resources, and facilitate resource-planning in the formulation of population-based screening programmes. There are several at-risk groups who should receive earlier screening, and colonoscopy is more preferred. This review summarizes the currently recommended CRC screening strategies among subjects with different risk factors, and introduces existing risk scoring systems. Additional genetic, epidemiological, and clinical parameters may be needed to enhance their performance to risk-stratify screening participants. Future research studies should refine these scoring systems, and explore the adaptability, feasibility, acceptability, and user-friendliness of their use in clinical practice among different population groups.

  10. Role of robotic surgery in colorectal resections for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, E; Chiappa, A; Ubiali, P; Fiore, B; Corbellini, C; Cossu, M L; Minicozzi, A; Andreoni, B

    2012-09-01

    In recent years, robotic surgery is becoming a valid alternative in colorectal diseases treatment to laparoscopic and traditional open surgery. The most relevant reported technical advantages of the robotic surgery are 3D-view, tremor-filtering, seven degree-free motion and a higher comfortable setting for the surgeon. Both case series and comparative studies available in Literature report only short and mid-term outcomes. These studies are able to demonstrate that robotic surgery is as safe and feasible as laparoscopic surgery regarding perioperative outcomes. Trials with long term follow up are needed to establish the real safety and effectiveness of the robotic surgery especially concerning resections for cancer. The robotic surgery could be considered a promising surgical field. The high costs represent one of the most relevant drawbacks.

  11. Saliva and plasma TIMP-1 in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holten-Andersen, Lars; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Jensen, Siri Beier;

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims. A prospective cross-sectional study was designed to test if total levels of TIMP-1 in saliva and plasma correlated with the diagnosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) in a population with symptoms consistent with this disease. Materials and methods. Stimulated whole saliva and blood...... samples were collected from 161 individuals referred to colonoscopy with symptoms associated with CRC. The results of the examination, as well as previous and/or current other diseases were recorded. In a blinded study, the authors used an in-house TIMP-1 ELISA previously validated for use in saliva...... and plasma to determine total levels of TIMP-1. Results. Fifty-six of the patients (35%) were diagnosed with CRC. Plasma TIMP-1 levels were significantly elevated in CRC patients compared with patients with other, non-malignant diseases and individuals without disease. Significant differences in saliva TIMP...

  12. Colorectal cancer and the KIR genes in the human genome: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koroush Ghanadi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of inflammation-based cancers and is occurred due to growth and spread of cancer cells in colon and/or rectum. Previously genetic association of cell cycle genes, both proto-oncogenes and the tumor suppressors has been proved. But there were few studies about association of immune related genes such as killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs. Thus we intend to perform a meta-analysis to find the association of different genes of KIR and susceptibility to be affected by colorectal cancer. The overall population of the four studies investigated in our meta-analysis was 953 individuals (470 individuals with colorectal cancer and 483 individuals in control groups. After the analyses, we concluded that colorectal cancer is affected by KIR2DS5 and also there were no protecting gene. This result shows the inflammatory basis of this cancer. In other words, in contrast to leukemia and blood cancers, colorectal cancers seem to be affected by hyper activity of natural killer-cells (NKs. Whys and therefore of this paradox, is suggested to be investigated further.

  13. Colorectal cancer and the KIR genes in the human genome: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanadi, Koroush; Shayanrad, Bahareh; Ahmadi, Seyyed Amir Yasin; Shahsavar, Farhad; Eliasy, Hossein

    2016-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of inflammation-based cancers and is occurred due to growth and spread of cancer cells in colon and/or rectum. Previously genetic association of cell cycle genes, both proto-oncogenes and the tumor suppressors has been proved. But there were few studies about association of immune related genes such as killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs). Thus we intend to perform a meta-analysis to find the association of different genes of KIR and susceptibility to be affected by colorectal cancer. The overall population of the four studies investigated in our meta-analysis was 953 individuals (470 individuals with colorectal cancer and 483 individuals in control groups). After the analyses, we concluded that colorectal cancer is affected by KIR2DS5 and also there were no protecting gene. This result shows the inflammatory basis of this cancer. In other words, in contrast to leukemia and blood cancers, colorectal cancers seem to be affected by hyper activity of natural killer-cells (NKs). Whys and therefore of this paradox, is suggested to be investigated further.

  14. Molecular Biomarkers of Colorectal Cancer: A Review of Published Articles From Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geramizadeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Context Colorectal cancer is one of the most common cancers worldwide (the third most common cancer in the world and is especially more common in Western countries; however, its incidence has been increased significantly during the last few years in Eastern countries such as Iran and considered as one of the five common cancers in this country. According to molecular pathways, numerous biomarkers have been identified for colorectal cancers which help patients’ management. Evidence aquisition In this study, we tried to review published articles about the molecular biomarkers of colorectal cancer from Iran. We searched medical databases such as google scholar, Scopus, PubMed, Magiran, SID and Iran Medex for keywords of “colon cancer, KRAS, BRAF, mismatch repair gene, Microsatellite instability, molecular genetics, molecular pathogenesis, biomarker and Iran” to find studies published about colorectal cancers from Iran regarding molecular biomarkers. Conclusion This study showed that molecular biomarkers in colorectal cancer of Iranian patients are not so different from Western population.

  15. Changing patterns of colorectal cancer in China over a period of 20 years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Li; Jin Gu

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether any changes have occurred on the patterns of colorectal cancer in China.METHODS: Data from 21 Chinese articles published from 1980 to 1999, were used to analyze the time trend of colorectal cancer according to the patients' age at diagnosis,sex, the site of the tumor, stage, and the pathology.RESULTS: From 1980s to 1990s, the mean age of the colorectal cancer patients has increased. The percentage of the female patients rose. The distribution of colorectal carcinoma shows a predominance of rectal cancer. However,the proportion of proximal colon cancer (including transverse and ascending colon) increased significantly accompanied by a decline in the percentage of rectal cancer. Similarity in the percentage of distal colon cancer between two decades was revealed. In the 1990s, statistically more Stage B patients were found than those in 1980s. In addition, databases show a significant decrease in the Stage D cases. The proportion of adenocarcinoma increased, but the mucinous adenocarcinoma decreased during two decades.CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that the patternof colorectal cancer in China has been changing. Especially,a proximal shift due to the increasing proportion of ascending and transverse colon cancer has occurred in China.

  16. Hypermethylation of the TPEF/HPP1 Gene in Primary, Metastatic Colorectal Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias P.A. Ebert

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The role of promoter methylation in the process of cancer cell metastasis has not yet been studied. Recently, methylation of the TPEF (transmembrane protein containing epidermal growth factor, follistatin domain gene was reported in human colon, gastric, bladder cancer cells. Using the Methylight assay, TPEF/HPP1 gene methylation was assessed in primary colorectal cancers (n = 47, matched normal colon mucosa, as well as in the liver metastasis of 24 patients with colorectal cancer, compared to the methylation status of the TIMP-3, APC, DAPK, caveolin-2, p16 genes. TPEF was frequently methylated in primary colorectal cancers (36 of 47 compared to the normal colon mucosa (1 of 21 (P < .0001. Interestingly, promoter methylation was significantly more frequent in proximal nonrectal cancers (P < .05. Furthermore, a high degree of methylation of the TPEF gene was also observed in liver metastasis. (19 of 24. In summary, we observed frequent TPEF methylation in primary colorectal cancers, liver metastases, indicating that epigenetic alterations are not only present in the early phases of carcinogenesis, but are also common in metastatic lesions. The high frequency of TPEF methylation in this series of colorectal cancers underscores the importance of epigenetic changes as targets for the development of molecular tests for cancer diagnosis.

  17. Laparoscopy-assisted combined resection for synchronous gastric and colorectal cancer: report of three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Hideo; Okamoto, Yuichi; Ishii, Akiko; Ishizu, Kazuhiro; Kondoh, Yasumasa; Igarashi, Naoki; Ogoshi, Kyoji; Makuuchi, Hiroyasu

    2009-01-01

    In gastric cancer patients, the most common form of synchronous cancer is colorectal cancer. To reduce the invasiveness of the resection, a laparoscopy-assisted combined resection was performed in three patients with synchronous gastric and colorectal cancer. Although all gastric lesions were in the early stages, two colorectal lesions were advanced cases. In all cases, the laparoscopic gastric resection and reconstruction was performed first, followed by the colorectal resection. In the case of right-side colon cancer in addition to gastric cancer, it was relatively easy to perform the combined resection with lymph node dissection sharing the same ports used for the gastrectomy, although we needed an additional port. In one case, in which rectal cancer was present in addition to gastric cancer located in the upper portion of the stomach, a totally laparoscopic proximal gastrectomy was combined with a laparoscopy-assisted low anterior resection, leaving only a lower abdominal minilaparotomy wound. All patients quickly returned to normal activity without remarkable complications, with the exception of a wound infection in one patient. With a mean follow-up of 30.7 months, all patients survived without any sign of recurrence. This procedure represents a feasible option for minimally invasive treatment of synchronous gastric and colorectal cancer.

  18. Dietary fiber and fiber fraction intakes and colorectal cancer risk in Chinese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiao; Fang, Yu-Jing; Pan, Zhi-Zhong; Lu, Min-Shan; Zheng, Mei-Chun; Chen, Yu-Ming; Zhang, Cai-Xia

    2014-01-01

    Few studies have been conducted in Chinese adults to investigate the effect of fiber intake on colorectal cancer risk. The present study aimed to examine the associations of dietary fiber and fiber fraction intakes with colorectal cancer risk in Chinese adults. A total of 613 cases with colorectal cancer were consecutively recruited between July 2010 and October 2012 and frequency matched to 613 controls by age (5-yr interval) and gender. Dietary information was collected through a validated food frequency questionnaire by face-to-face interviews. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) after adjustment for potential confounders. Total dietary fiber and fiber fraction intakes were found to be inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk. Compared with the lowest quartile, the adjusted ORs (95% CIs) for the highest quartile were 0.38 (0.27-0.55) for total dietary fiber, 0.45 (0.32-0.64) for vegetable fiber, and 0.41 (0.28-0.58) for fruit fiber, respectively. In addition, no significant association was found between soy fiber intake and colorectal cancer risk. This study showed that a high intake of dietary fiber, particularly derived from vegetables and fruit, was inversely associated with colorectal cancer risk in Chinese adults.

  19. Mad2 and p53 expression profiles in colorectal cancer and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gang-Qiang Li; Hao Li; Hong-Fu Zhang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of tumor suppressor gene p53 and spindle checkpoint gene Mad2, and to demonstrate their expression difference in colorectal cancer and normal mucosa and to evaluate its clinical significance.METHODS: Westemn blot and immunohistochemistry methods were used to analyze the expression of Mad2 in colorectal cancer and its corresponding normal mucosa. The expression of p53 was detected by immunohistochemistry method in colorectal cancer and its corresponding normal mucosa.RESULTS: Mad2 was significantly overexpressed in colorectal cancer compared with corresponding normal mucosa (P<0.001), and it was not related to the differentiation of adenocarcinoma and other dinical factors (P>0.05).The ratio of Mad2 protein in cancer tissue (C) to that in its normal mucosa tissue (N) was higher than 2, which was more frequently observed in patients with lymph gland metastasis (P<0.05). p53 protein expression was not observed in normal mucosa. The rate of p53 positive expression in adenocarcinomas was 52.6%. There was a significant difference between adenocarcinomas and normal mucosa(P<0.001), which was not related to the differentiation degree of adenocarcinoma and other clinical factors (P>0.05).CONCLUSION: Defect of spindle checkpoint gene Mad2and mutation of p53 gene are involved mainly in colorectal carcinogenesis and C/N>2 is associated with prognosis of colorectal cancer.

  20. Post diagnosis diet quality and colorectal cancer survival in women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa T Fung

    Full Text Available Dietary factors are known to influence colorectal cancer (CRC risk, however, their association with CRC survival is unclear. Therefore, we prospectively examined the association between diet quality scores, dietary patterns and colorectal cancer (CRC survival.1201 women diagnosed with stage I-III CRC between 1986 and 2008, were followed through 2010. Diet was assessed via a food frequency questionnaire administered at least 6 months after diagnosis. We computed the Alternate Healthy Eating Index-2010 (AHEI-2010, alternate Mediterranean Diet score (aMED and Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension score (DASH and derived two dietary patterns, Western (unhealthy and prudent (healthy, by principal component analysis for each woman.During follow-up, we documented 435 deaths, including 162 from CRC. After adjusting for potential confounders, only a higher AHEI-2010 score was significantly associated with lower overall mortality (HR comparing extreme quintiles = 0.71, 95% CI 0.52-0.98, p trend = 0.01 as well as borderline significantly with lower risk of CRC mortality by the trend test (HR Q5 vs Q1 = 0.72, 95% CI = 0.43-1.21, p trend = 0.07. When AHEI-2010 components were examined separately, inverse associations for overall mortality were primarily accounted for by moderate alcohol intake (HR comparing abstainers vs 5-15 g/d = 1.30, 95%CI = 1.05-1.61 and lower intake of sugar sweetened beverages and fruit juices combined (HR for each additional serving = 1.11, 95% CI = 1.01-1.23. No other diet quality score or dietary pattern was associated with overall or CRC-specific mortality.Higher AHEI-2010 score may be associated with lower overall mortality, moderate alcohol consumption and lower consumption of sugar sweetened beverages and juices combined appeared to account for most of the observed associations.

  1. Transcriptome profiling of LGR5 positive colorectal cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Hirsch

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs claims that colorectal carcinomas (CRCs, like normal colorectal epithelium, are organized hierarchically and contain a subpopulation of qualitatively distinct cancer cells. The expression of distinctive surface markers or of certain enzymes is a prerequisite for the isolation and characterization of the CSC population. With respect to CRCs, putative CSCs can be identified by leucine-rich-repeat-containing G-protein-coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5, also known as G-protein-coupled receptor 49, Gpr49. However, the precise function of the intestinal stem cell marker Lgr5 in CRCs remains largely unknown. We silenced LGR5 expression in SW480 CRC cells via lentiviral shRNA constructs. This led to the depletion of a morphologically distinct subpopulation of SW480 CRC cells. Microarray gene expression profiling revealed a down-regulation of NOTCH signaling upon LGR5 silencing that could be confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Furthermore, we induced inflammation-driven colon tumors in Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-Cre-ERT2 mice via administration of azoxymethane and dextrane sodium sulfate. The induced tumors were flow-sorted into fractions of epithelial cells that expressed high or low levels of Lgr5 and were characterized using gene expression profiling. Lgr5 high tumor cells showed higher levels of several stem cell-associated genes and higher Wnt signaling than Lgr5 low tumor cells and Lgr5 high normal stem cells. Here we provide a thorough description of our two gene expression datasets including quality control checks uploaded to Gene Expression Omnibus database (data accession number: GSE46200. The analysis and interpretation of our gene expression data and related results have been published recently by Hirsch and colleagues in Carcinogenesis in 2014.

  2. The Source and Credibility of Colorectal Cancer Information on Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, SoHyun; Oh, Heung-Kwon; Park, Gibeom; Suh, Bongwon; Bae, Woo Kyung; Kim, Jin Won; Yoon, Hyuk; Kim, Duck-Woo; Kang, Sung-Bum

    2016-02-01

    Despite the rapid penetration of social media in modern life, there has been limited research conducted on whether social media serves as a credible source of health information. In this study, we propose to identify colorectal cancer information on Twitter and assess its informational credibility. We collected Twitter messages containing colorectal cancer-related keywords, over a 3-month period. A review of sample tweets yielded content and user categorization schemes. The results of the sample analysis were applied to classify all collected tweets and users, using a machine learning technique. The credibility of the information in the sampled tweets was evaluated. A total of 76,119 tweets were analyzed. Individual users authored the majority of tweets (n = 68,982, 90.6%). They mostly tweeted about news articles/research (n = 16,761, 22.0%) and risk/prevention (n = 14,767, 19.4%). Medical professional users generated only 2.0% of total tweets (n = 1509), and medical institutions rarely tweeted (n = 417, 0.6%). Organizations tended to tweet more about information than did individuals (85.2% vs 63.1%; P Credibility analysis of medically relevant sample tweets revealed that most were medically correct (n = 1763, 84.5%). Among those, more frequently retweeted tweets contained more medically correct information than randomly selected tweets (90.7% vs 83.2%; P information from a large number and variety of users. Coupled with the Internet's potential to increase social support, Twitter may contribute to enhancing public health and empowering users, when used with proper caution.

  3. Perspectives of colorectal cancer screening in Germany 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieg, Andreas; Friedrich, Kilian

    2009-10-15

    Adequate screening methods can decrease colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality. The guaiac test for fecal occult-blood (FOBT) is part of the German CRC Screening Program since 1970 and has evidence level Ia. In randomized multicenter-studies FOBT has an average sensitivity of 24% and decreases CRC mortality up to 30%. Immunological tests for human haemoglobin (iFOBT) show better performance characteristics than guaiac FOBT, with augmented sensitivity and specificity. However, the single tests show wide differences in diagnostic performance and iFOBT is not yet covered by insurance companies although it should replace the guaiac test for CRC screening. Visual colonoscopy, which was introduced to the German National Cancer Screening Program in 2002, is the gold standard for the diagnosis of colorectal neoplasia. From 2003 to 2007 more than 2.8 million examinations have been documented in Germany. The prevalence of adenomas is around 20% and of CRC about 0.7% to 1.0% of the screenings. Seventy percent of the carcinomas detected during screening are in an early stage (UICC I and II). Furthermore, screening colonoscopy is a cost saving procedure with a low complication rate (0.25% overall). Insurance companies save 216€ for each screening colonoscopy mainly by prevention of neoplasia due to polypectomy. In Germany, virtual colonography by computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging still lacks standardization of the hard and software. In experienced centres the sensitivity for CRC and large polyps of CT colonography is comparable to colonoscopy but in meta-analyses the ranking is lower. New technologies like computer-aided colonoscopies with sheath or double balloon techniques are coming up as well as capsule colonoscopy, which sensitivity for large polyps is about 70%. Advised by his physician, the patient can choose his most acceptable examination method from this whole set of screening tools.

  4. A cohort study of the recovery of health and wellbeing following colorectal cancer (CREW study): protocol paper

    OpenAIRE

    Fenlon, Deborah R.; Richardson, Alison; Addington-Hall, Julia M; Smith, Peter; Corner, Jessica L; Winter, Jane; Foster, Claire L.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The number of people surviving colorectal cancer has doubled in recent years. While much of the literature suggests that most people return to near pre-diagnosis status following surgery for colorectal cancer, this literature has largely focused on physical side effects. Longitudinal studies in colorectal cancer have either been small scale or taken a narrow focus on recovery after surgery. There is a need for a comprehensive, long-term study exploring all aspects of healt...

  5. Short-Term Outcomes of Simultaneous Laparoscopic Colectomy and Hepatectomy for Primary Colorectal Cancer With Synchronous Liver Metastases

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Although simultaneous resection of primary colorectal cancer and synchronous liver metastases is reported to be safe and effective, the feasibility of a laparoscopic approach remains controversial. This study evaluated the safety, feasibility, and short-term outcomes of simultaneous laparoscopic surgery for primary colorectal cancer with synchronous liver metastases. From September 2008 to December 2013, 10 patients underwent simultaneous laparoscopic resection of primary colorectal cancer an...

  6. A Panel of Cancer Testis Antigens and Clinical Risk Factors to Predict Metastasis in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramyar Molania

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third common carcinoma with a high rate of mortality worldwide and several studies have investigated some molecular and clinicopathological markers for diagnosis and prognosis of its malignant phenotypes. The aim of this study is to evaluate expression frequency of PAGE4, SCP-1, and SPANXA/D cancer testis antigen (CTA genes as well as some clinical risk markers to predict liver metastasis of colorectal cancer patients. The expression frequency of PAGE4, SCP-1, and SPANXA/D cancer/testis antigen (CTA genes was obtained using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assay in 90 colorectal tumor samples including both negative and positive liver metastasis tumors. Statistical analysis was performed to assess the association of three studied genes and clinical risk factors with CRC liver metastasis. The frequency of PAGE4 and SCP-1 genes expression was significantly higher in the primary tumours with liver metastasis when statistically compared with primary tumors with no liver metastasis (P<0.05. Among all clinical risk factors studied, the lymph node metastasis and the depth of invasion were statistically correlated with liver metastasis of CRC patients. In addition, using multiple logistic regression, we constructed a model based on PAGE4 and lymph node metastasis to predict liver metastasis of CRC.

  7. Association of adherence to lifestyle recommendations and risk of colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Helene; Johnsen, Nina Føns; Christensen, Jane

    2010-01-01

    have been prevented. Results were similar for colon and rectal cancer, but only statistically significant for colon cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Adherence to the recommendations for physical activity, waist circumference, smoking, alcohol intake, and diet may reduce colorectal cancer risk considerably...... on physical activity, waist circumference, smoking, alcohol intake, and diet (dietary fibre, energy percentage from fat, red and processed meat, and fruits and vegetables)) modelled through Cox regression. RESULTS: During a median follow-up of 9.9 years, 678 men and women had colorectal cancer diagnosed......: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: General population of Copenhagen and Aarhus, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: 55 487 men and women aged 50-64 years at baseline (1993-7), not previously diagnosed with cancer. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Risk of colorectal cancer in relation to points achieved in the lifestyle index (based...

  8. Imaging in Colorectal Cancer: Progress and Challenges for the Clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Van Cutsem

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of imaging in colorectal cancer (CRC has significantly evolved over the last twenty years, establishing important roles in surveillance, diagnosis, staging, treatment selection and follow up. The range of modalities has broadened with the development of novel tracer and contrast agents, and the fusion of technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET and computed tomography (CT. Traditionally, the most widely used modality for assessing treatment response in metastasised colon and rectal tumours is CT, combined with use of the RECIST guidelines. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that tumour size does not always adequately correlate with clinical outcomes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a more versatile technique and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-MRI and diffusion-weighted (DW-MRI may be used to evaluate biological and functional effects of treatment. Integrated fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET/CT combines metabolic and anatomical imaging to improve sensitivity and specificity of tumour detection, and a number of studies have demonstrated improved diagnostic accuracy of this modality in a variety of tumour types, including CRC. These developments have enabled the progression of treatment strategies in rectal cancer and improved the detection of hepatic metastatic disease, yet are not without their limitations. These include technical, economical and logistical challenges, along with a lack of robust evidence for standardisation and formal guidance. In order to successfully apply these novel imaging techniques and utilise their benefit to provide truly personalised cancer care, advances need to be clinically realised in a routine and robust manner.

  9. Surgery for rare aneurysm associated with colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei-Hua Lu; Guo-Qing Tao; Wei Shen; Bin Cai; Zhi-Yang Jiang; Jian Sun

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of concomitant aortic aneurysm and colorectal cancer is a rare medical entity, and controversy surrounds its optimal treatment. We report a case of rectal cancer and concomitant aneurysm from the ascending aorta to the common iliac artery. As with DeBakey type Ⅰ aortic dissecting aneurysm, our patient was treated by rectal cancer resection, with preservation of the anus (Dixon operation) under controlled hypotension. Blood pressure was maintained at 80-90/ 50-60 mmHg and the pulse at 70-90 beats/min. The pathological examination of the surgical specimen showed a poorly differentiated T3N0 tumor. The patient had an uneventful recovery without aneurysm rupture, and was discharged from hospital on postoperative day 15 after 3 d adjuvant chemotherapy with oxaliplatin combined with calcium folinate and fluorouracil. The patient was given six courses of adjuvant chemotherapy in 6 mo, without recurrence or metastasis, and the aneurysm was still stable after 2 years follow-up.

  10. Diet and physical activity in the prevention of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Mamta; Shike, Moshe

    2014-12-01

    Diet has been linked to the prevention of colorectal cancer (CRC) and may explain some of the differences in incidence and mortality among various populations. Evidence suggests that a high intake of red and processed meats is associated with an increased risk of CRC. The protective benefits of fiber are unclear, although in some studies fiber is associated with reduced CRC risk. The role of supplements, such as calcium, vitamin D, and folic acid, remains uncertain, and these nutrients cannot be currently recommended for chemoprevention. Obesity and sedentary lifestyle have been associated with an increased risk for colon cancer. Because of the inherent difficulty in studying the effects of specific nutrients, dietary pattern analysis may be a preferable approach to the investigation of the relationship between diet and risk for human diseases. Lifestyle modifications, such as increasing physical activity and consumption of a diet rich in fiber, fruits, vegetables, fish, and poultry and low in red and processed meats, have been advocated for primary prevention of several chronic diseases, and may in fact be beneficial for cancer prevention, particularly CRC.

  11. Tertiary Intratumor Lymphoid Tissue in Colo-Rectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Marchesi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic (or tertiary lymphoid tissue develops at sites of inflammation or infection in non lymphoid organs and is associated with chronic inflammation. In colon mucosa, small lymphoid aggregates are already present in homeostatic conditions, as part of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and play an essential role in the immune response to perturbations of the mucosal microenvironment. Despite the recognized role of inflammation in tumor progression, the presence and biological function of lymphoid tissue in cancer has been poorly investigated. We identified aggregates of lymphocytes resembling tertiary lymphoid tissue in human colorectal cancer specimens; intratumor accumulations of lymphocytes display a high degree of compartmentalization, with B and T cells, mature dendritic cells and a network of CD21+ follicular dendritic cells (FDC. We analyzed the adaptation of colon lymphoid tissue in a murine model of colitis-associated cancer (AOM/DSS. B cell follicle formation increases in the context of the chronic inflammation associated to intestinal neoplasia, in this model. A network of lymphatic and haematic vessels surrounding B cell follicles is present and includes high endothelial venules (HEV. Future task is to determine whether lymphoid tissue contributes to the persistence of the tumor-associated inflammatory reaction, rather than represent a functional immune compartment, potentially participating to the anti tumor response.

  12. Start-Up of the Colorectal Cancer Screening Demonstration Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy DeGroff, MPH

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionIn 2005, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention funded five sites to implement the Colorectal Cancer Screening Demonstration Program (CRCSDP. An evaluation is being conducted that includes a multiple case study. Case study results for the start-up period, the time between initial funding and screening initiation, provide details about the program models and start-up process and reveal important lessons learned.MethodsThe multiple case study includes all five CRCSDP sites, each representing a unique case. Data were collected from August 2005 through September 2006 from documents, observations, and more than 70 interviews with program staff and stakeholders.ResultsSites differed by geographic service area, screening modality selected, and service delivery structure. Program models were influenced by two factors: preexisting infrastructure and the need to adapt programs to fit local service delivery structures. Several sites modeled program components after their National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program. Medical advisory boards convened by all sites provided clinical support for developing program policies and quality assurance plans. Partnerships with comprehensive cancer control programs facilitated access to financial and in-kind resources.ConclusionThe program models developed by the CRCSDP sites offer a range of prototypes. Case study results suggest benefits in employing a multidisciplinary staff team, assembling a medical advisory board, collaborating with local partners, using preexisting resources, designing programs that are easily incorporated into existing service delivery systems, and planning for adequate start-up time.

  13. Tertiary Intratumor Lymphoid Tissue in Colo-Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergomas, Francesca [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Grizzi, Fabio [Laboratory of Molecular Gastroenterology, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Doni, Andrea; Pesce, Samantha [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Laghi, Luigi [Laboratory of Molecular Gastroenterology, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Department of Gastroenterology, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Allavena, Paola [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Mantovani, Alberto [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy); Department of Translational Medicine, University of Milan, Milan 20089 (Italy); Marchesi, Federica, E-mail: federica.marchesi@humanitasresearch.it [Department of Immunology and Inflammation, IRCCS Humanitas Clinical Institute, Via Manzoni 56, 20089 Rozzano, Milan (Italy)

    2011-12-28

    Ectopic (or tertiary) lymphoid tissue develops at sites of inflammation or infection in non lymphoid organs and is associated with chronic inflammation. In colon mucosa, small lymphoid aggregates are already present in homeostatic conditions, as part of the gut-associated lymphoid tissue and play an essential role in the immune response to perturbations of the mucosal microenvironment. Despite the recognized role of inflammation in tumor progression, the presence and biological function of lymphoid tissue in cancer has been poorly investigated. We identified aggregates of lymphocytes resembling tertiary lymphoid tissue in human colorectal cancer specimens; intratumor accumulations of lymphocytes display a high degree of compartmentalization, with B and T cells, mature dendritic cells and a network of CD21{sup +} follicular dendritic cells (FDC). We analyzed the adaptation of colon lymphoid tissue in a murine model of colitis-associated cancer (AOM/DSS). B cell follicle formation increases in the context of the chronic inflammation associated to intestinal neoplasia, in this model. A network of lymphatic and haematic vessels surrounding B cell follicles is present and includes high endothelial venules (HEV). Future task is to determine whether lymphoid tissue contributes to the persistence of the tumor-associated inflammatory reaction, rather than represent a functional immune compartment, potentially participating to the anti tumor response.

  14. The role of aspirin in colorectal cancer chemoprevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Ranger, Gurpreet

    2016-08-01

    Considerable interest has emerged over the last decade regarding the role of aspirin in prevention of colorectal cancer. This disease is one of the commonest cancers in the Western World, therefore, the existence of a simple "everyday" agent, which could have the ability to prevent the disease, represents an invaluable opportunity clinicians may be able to exploit. Evidence from case-control and cohort studies, and recent updates of randomised controlled trials have been very encouraging-indicating benefit from long term use of aspirin at low dose. Possible mechanisms of chemoprevention include inhibition of the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway, or COX-independent mechanisms, for example, the PIK3CA pathway, or therapy-induced senescence of cancer cells. The most serious side effect of prolonged aspirin treatment is haemorrhage, especially from the GI tract. This is likely to be less of a problem with chemoprevention at lower doses. One also needs to consider the impact if aspirin resistance, an increasingly recognised clinical entity.

  15. Hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes: Epidemiological studies on Peutz-Jeghers syndrome & Lynch syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.G.F. van Lier (Margot)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractColorectal cancer (CRC) is the second most common malignancy among women after breast cancer, and the third most common malignancy among men after lung and prostate cancer in the European Union. In the Netherlands, approximately 10000 cases are diagnosed each year. CRC is moreover associ

  16. The risk of brain tumours in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasen, HFA; Sanders, EACM; Taal, BG; Nagengast, FM; Griffioen, G; Menko, FH; Kleibeuker, JH; HouwingDuistermaat, JJ; Khan, PM

    1996-01-01

    Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is known to be associated with several extracolonic cancers, e.g., cancers of the endometrium, stomach, urinary tract, small bowel and ovary. An association between HNPCC and brain tumours has also been reported, although previous risk analysis did

  17. Focusing the Spotlight on the Zebrafish Intestine to Illuminate Mechanisms of Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobert, Viola H; Mouradov, Dmitri; Heath, Joan K

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer, encompassing colon and rectal cancer, arises from the epithelial lining of the large bowel. It is most prevalent in Westernised societies and is increasing in frequency as the world becomes more industrialised. Unfortunately, metastatic colorectal cancer is not cured by chemotherapy and the annual number of deaths caused by colorectal cancer, currently 700,000, is expected to rise. Our understanding of the contribution that genetic mutations make to colorectal cancer, although incomplete, is reasonably well advanced. However, it has only recently become widely appreciated that in addition to the ongoing accumulation of genetic mutations, chronic inflammation also plays a critical role in the initiation and progression of this disease. While a robust and tractable genetic model of colorectal cancer in zebrafish, suitable for pre-clinical studies, is not yet available, the identification of genes required for the rapid proliferation of zebrafish intestinal epithelial cells during development has highlighted a number of essential genes that could be targeted to disable colorectal cancer cells. Moreover, appreciation of the utility of zebrafish to study intestinal inflammation is on the rise. In particular, zebrafish provide unique opportunities to investigate the impact of genetic and environmental factors on the integrity of intestinal epithelial barrier function. With currently available tools, the interplay between epigenetic regulators, intestinal injury, microbiota composition and innate immune cell mobilisation can be analysed in exquisite detail. This provides excellent opportunities to define critical events that could potentially be targeted therapeutically. Further into the future, the use of zebrafish larvae as hosts for xenografts of human colorectal cancer tissue, while still in its infancy, holds great promise that zebrafish could one day provide a practical, preclinical personalized medicine platform for the rapid assessment of the

  18. Approach for mechanism of BH3 domain counterpart BH3I-2′ inducing colorectal cancer cell apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Wan-yu; LIU Yang; ZHANG Zhi-cheng

    2008-01-01

    Objective To discuss mechanism of BH3 domain counterpart BH3I-2' inducing colorectal cancer cell apoptosis. Methods Detected inhibition ratio and apoptosis of colorectal cancer cells HCT-116, which were treated by BH3I-2', with microplate reader and flow cytometry. Results Inhibition ratio of colorectal cancer cells, which were treated by BH3I-2', could reach about 50 %. Ratio of viable apoptotic cell decreased and that of non-viable apoptotie cell increased as time went. Conclusions BH3I-2' can induce colorectal cancer cell apoptosis.

  19. Nutrition support in surgical patients with colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Chen; Bao-Lin Liu; Bin Shang; Ai-Shan Chen; Shi-Qing; Wei Sun; Hong-Zhuan Yin; Jian-Qiao Yin; Qi Su

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To review the application of nutrition support in patientsafter surgery for colorectal cancer, and to propose appropriate nutrition strategies.METHODS: A total of 202 consecutive surgical patients admittedto our hospital with a diagnosis of colon cancer or rectal cancer from January 2010 to July 2010, meeting the requirements of Nutrition Risk Screening 2002,were enrolled in our study. Laboratory tests were performed to analyze the nutrition status of each patient,and the clinical outcome variables, including postoperativecomplications, hospital stay, cost of hospitalization and postoperative outcome, were analyzed.RESULTS: The "non-risk" patients who did not receive postoperative nutrition support had a higher rate of postoperative complications than patients who received postoperative nutrition support (2.40 ± 1.51 vs 1.23 ±0.60, P = 0.000), and had a longer postoperative hospital stay(23.00 ± 15.84 d vs 15.27 ± 5.89 d, P = 0.009).There was higher cost of hospitalization for patients who received preoperative total parenteral nutrition (TPN)than for patients who did not receive preoperative TPN(62 713.50 ± 5070.66 RMB Yuan vs 43178.00 ± 3596.68RMB Yuan, P = 0.014). Applying postoperative enteral nutrition significantly shortened postoperative fasting time(5.16 ± 1.21 d vs 6.40 ± 1.84 d, P = 0.001) and postoperative hospital stay (11.92 ± 4.34 d vs 15.77 ± 6.03 d,P = 0.002). The patients who received postoperative TPN for no less than 7 d had increased serum glucose levels(7.59 ± 3.57 mmol/L vs 6.48 ± 1.32 mmol/L, P = 0.006)and cost of hospitalization (47 724.14 ± 16 945.17 Yuan vs 38 598.73 ± 8349.79 Yuan, P = 0.000). The patients who received postoperative omega-3 fatty acids had ahigher rate of postoperative complications than the patients who did not (1.33 ± 0.64 vs 1.13 ± 0.49, P = 0.041).High level of serum glucose was associated with a high risk of postoperative complications of infection.CONCLUSION: Appropriate and moderate nutritional

  20. Moringa oleifera as an Anti-Cancer Agent against Breast and Colorectal Cancer Cell Lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulrahman Khazim Al-Asmari

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the anti-cancer effect of Moringa oleifera leaves, bark and seed extracts. When tested against MDA-MB-231 and HCT-8 cancer cell lines, the extracts of leaves and bark showed remarkable anti-cancer properties while surprisingly, seed extracts exhibited hardly any such properties. Cell survival was significantly low in both cells lines when treated with leaves and bark extracts. Furthermore, a striking reduction (about 70-90% in colony formation as well as cell motility was observed upon treatment with leaves and bark. Additionally, apoptosis assay performed on these treated breast and colorectal cancer lines showed a remarkable increase in the number of apoptotic cells; with a 7 fold increase in MD-MB-231 to an increase of several fold in colorectal cancer cell lines. However, no significant apoptotic cells were detected upon seeds extract treatment. Moreover, the cell cycle distribution showed a G2/M enrichment (about 2-3 fold indicating that these extracts effectively arrest the cell progression at the G2/M phase. The GC-MS analyses of these extracts revealed numerous known anti-cancer compounds, namely eugenol, isopropyl isothiocynate, D-allose, and hexadeconoic acid ethyl ester, all of which possess long chain hydrocarbons, sugar moiety and an aromatic ring. This suggests that the anti-cancer properties of Moringa oleifera could be attributed to the bioactive compounds present in the extracts from this plant. This is a novel study because no report has yet been cited on the effectiveness of Moringa extracts obtained in the locally grown environment as an anti-cancer agent against breast and colorectal cancers. Our study is the first of its kind to evaluate the anti-malignant properties of Moringa not only in leaves but also in bark. These findings suggest that both the leaf and bark extracts of Moringa collected from the Saudi Arabian region possess anti-cancer activity that can be used to develop new drugs for