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Sample records for cisapride

  1. Use of cisapride with contraindicated drugs in The Netherlands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Bruin, Marie L; Panneman, Martien J M; Leufkens, Hubert G M

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of concomitant use and coprescribing of cisapride with potentially interacting drugs to evaluate the impact of these warnings from 1994 to 1998. DESIGN: Retrospective follow-up study of patients using cisapride. SETTING: Data for this study were obtained...... from the pharmacy database of the Dutch PHARMO record linkage system (n = 834,000). RESULTS: From 1994 to 1998, the prevalence rate of the observed versus expected use of any potentially interacting drug decreased significantly over time (p ... of coprescriptions of potentially interacting drugs among cisapride users increased on average by 13% and 9% per year, respectively. This increase was almost exclusively explained by a large increase in concomitant prescribing of clarithromycin, the most commonly used potentially interacting drug. Decreases...

  2. Effect of cisapride on gastric emptying in dyspeptic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbain, J L; Siegel, J A; Debie, N C; Pauwels, S P

    1988-07-01

    The effect of the new gastrokinetic agent cisapride on gastric emptying was evaluated in 17 dyspeptic patients using the dual radionuclide technique. Eight patients with idiopathic dyspepsia and nine postsurgical dyspeptic patients were studied and compared to a control group. Gastric emptying of solids and liquids was determined after ingestion of a standardized meal using 99mTc-sulfur colloid scrambled eggs as the solid phase and [111In]DTPA-labeled water as the liquid phase. Following a basal study and on a separate occasion, each patient received an intravenous bolus of 10 mg of cisapride after ingestion of the test meal; 10 of the patients were restudied after a two-week period of chronic oral administration of the drug (10 mg four times a day). Baseline gastric emptying of solids was significantly delayed in idiopathic and postsurgical patients; liquid emptying was only delayed in the postsurgical group. Intravenous and oral administration of cisapride significantly shortened gastric emptying in both groups. In all but one patient, the clinical improvement was confirmed by the test. Cisapride appears to be a good alternative to metoclopramide and domperiodone in the treatment of dyspeptic patients. The dual radionuclide technique appears to be a useful physiologic tool for evaluating and predicting the efficacy of a gastric prokinetic therapy in man.

  3. Effect of cisapride on gastric emptying in dyspeptic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbain, J.L.; Siegel, J.A.; Debie, N.C.; Pauwels, S.P.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of the new gastrokinetic agent cisapride on gastric emptying was evaluated in 17 dyspeptic patients using the dual radionuclide technique. Eight patients with idiopathic dyspepsia and nine postsurgical dyspeptic patients were studied and compared to a control group. Gastric emptying of solids and liquids was determined after ingestion of a standardized meal using /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid scrambled eggs as the solid phase and [ 111 In]DTPA-labeled water as the liquid phase. Following a basal study and on a separate occasion, each patient received an intravenous bolus of 10 mg of cisapride after ingestion of the test meal; 10 of the patients were restudied after a two-week period of chronic oral administration of the drug (10 mg four times a day). Baseline gastric emptying of solids was significantly delayed in idiopathic and postsurgical patients; liquid emptying was only delayed in the postsurgical group. Intravenous and oral administration of cisapride significantly shortened gastric emptying in both groups. In all but one patient, the clinical improvement was confirmed by the test. Cisapride appears to be a good alternative to metoclopramide and domperiodone in the treatment of dyspeptic patients. The dual radionuclide technique appears to be a useful physiologic tool for evaluating and predicting the efficacy of a gastric prokinetic therapy in man

  4. Effect of cisapride on gastric emptying in dyspeptic patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbain, J.L.; Siegel, J.A.; Debie, N.C.; Pauwels, S.P.

    1988-07-01

    The effect of the new gastrokinetic agent cisapride on gastric emptying was evaluated in 17 dyspeptic patients using the dual radionuclide technique. Eight patients with idiopathic dyspepsia and nine postsurgical dyspeptic patients were studied and compared to a control group. Gastric emptying of solids and liquids was determined after ingestion of a standardized meal using /sup 99m/Tc-sulfur colloid scrambled eggs as the solid phase and (/sup 111/In)DTPA-labeled water as the liquid phase. Following a basal study and on a separate occasion, each patient received an intravenous bolus of 10 mg of cisapride after ingestion of the test meal; 10 of the patients were restudied after a two-week period of chronic oral administration of the drug (10 mg four times a day). Baseline gastric emptying of solids was significantly delayed in idiopathic and postsurgical patients; liquid emptying was only delayed in the postsurgical group. Intravenous and oral administration of cisapride significantly shortened gastric emptying in both groups. In all but one patient, the clinical improvement was confirmed by the test. Cisapride appears to be a good alternative to metoclopramide and domperiodone in the treatment of dyspeptic patients. The dual radionuclide technique appears to be a useful physiologic tool for evaluating and predicting the efficacy of a gastric prokinetic therapy in man.

  5. Prokinetics prescribing in paediatrics: evidence on cisapride, domperidone, and metoclopramide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mt-Isa, Shahrul; Tomlin, Stephen; Sutcliffe, Alastair; Underwood, Martin; Williamson, Paula; Croft, Nicholas M; Ashby, Deborah

    2015-04-01

    Domperidone and metoclopramide are prokinetics commonly prescribed off-label to infants and younger children in an attempt to treat gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms. Another prokinetic drug, cisapride, was used but withdrawn in 2000 in the United Kingdom because of serious arrhythmic adverse events. Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency issued safety warnings for domperidone in May 2012 and restricted its indications. We report here national primary care prescribing trends and safety signals of these drugs in children. We used data from the General Practice Research Database between 1990 and 2006 for children <18 years. Descriptive statistics and Poisson regressions were performed to characterise prescribing trends. We examined safety signals in nested case-control studies. The proportion of children <2 years old being prescribed one of the medications doubled during the study period. Prescriptions of domperidone increased 10-fold, mainly following the withdrawal of cisapride in 2000. Prescriptions of metoclopramide did not change significantly. Despite the increase in prescriptions of domperidone, no new safety signals were identified. These data showed dramatic changes in prescribing of cisapride and domperidone despite the lack of good-quality supporting evidence. It is possible that these prescribing trends were influenced by published guidelines. Even if produced without robust efficacy and safety evidence, published guidelines can influence clinicians and consequently affect prescribing. Therefore, improving the evidence base on prokinetics to inform future guidelines is vital. The lack of new safety signals during this period would support the development of suitable powered clinical studies.

  6. The effect of a single rectal dose of cisapride on delayed gastric emptying.The effect of a single rectal dose of cisapride on delayed gastric emptying.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brummer, R.J.M.; Schoenmakers, E.A.J.M.; Kemerink, G.J.; Heidendal, G.A.K.; Sanders, D.G.M.; Stockbrügger, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Department of Gastroenterology, University Hospital Maastricht, The Netherlands. BACKGROUND: Cisapride has an established prokinetic effect in patients with delayed gastric emptying. However, rectal administration of the drug might be preferred in patients with either dysphagia or nausea due to

  7. Influence of Cisapride on food-stimulated gastro-oesophageal reflux: A radiological study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelineck, J.; Aksglade, K.; Funch-Jensen, P.; Thommesen, P.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of Cisapride on food-stimulated gastro-oesophageal reflux meachanisms was studied in a double-blind cross-over investigation in 24 consecutive patients selected by endoscopy, 12 with microscopical evidence of gastro-oesophageal reflux and 12 with additional macroscopic oesoghagitis. 63% had food-stimulated gastro-oesophageal reflux, and Cisapride significantly reduced the tendency to gastro-oesophageal reflux and mucosal contact time between gastric content and the oesophageal mucosa in 73% of these patients. It is concluded that Cisapride could be valuable in the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux. (orig.) [de

  8. Effect of cisapride on symptoms and biliary drainage in patients with postcholecystectomy syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farup, P.G.; Tjora, S.; Tholfsen, K.

    1991-01-01

    The study evaluates the effect of 20 mg cisapride twice daily on symptoms and biliary drainage in patients with the postcholecystectomy syndrome. 19 patients, all female, went through a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial with two 4-week treatment periods separated by a 2-week washout period. Symptoms were registered on diary cards. Biliary drainage was studied with dynamic cholescinitigraphy. The down slope of the time-activity curve was used as a measure of the biliary drainage. More symptoms were registered during cisapride therapy than with placebo. This unfavourable effect of cisapride was statistically significant in a subgroup of patients with postcholecystectomy complaints identical to the biliary pain they experienced during injection of contrast at the endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographic examination. Cisapride statistically significantly hastened biliary drainage. The median T 1/2 values were 24 and 28 min after cisapride and placebo, respectively. In conclusion, cisapride promoted biliary drainage in patients with the postcholecystectomy syndrome, but had an unfavourable symptomatic effect in those with bile duct triggered postcholecystectomy complaints. 22 refs., 3 figs

  9. Effects of cisapride on colonic transit in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.J.; Lin, W.Y.; Lan, J.L.; Chen, D.Y.; Chen, Y.H.; Hsieh, T.Y.

    2002-01-01

    Progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS) may involve any portion of the gastrointestinal tract including the colon. Constipation is common in patients with PSS. Cisapride, a benzamide derivative, is a potentially useful agent in the treatment if chronic idiopathic constipation. The effect of cisapride on colonic transit was evaluated in 16 PSS patients by radionuclide colonic transit method. Static images were acquired at regular times, then the geometric center (GC) values were calculated. Each patient received cisapride orally three times a day for a week. The median GC at 4 hours was 0.351 in patients before treatment and 0.775 after treatment. The difference is significant with a p value of 0.026. The median GC at 24 hours was 1.957 in patients before treatment and significantly increased to 2.509 after treatment. The p value was 0.038. Clinically, twelve patients had symptoms of constipation and 8 of them showed improvement of the symptoms after administration of cisapride. The result showed acceleration in colonic transit in response to cisapride. We conclude that cisapride is effective in the treatment of constipation in patients with PSS

  10. Cisapride does not alter gastric volume or pH in patients undergoing ambulatory surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lydon, A

    2012-02-03

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the efficacy of 20 mg cisapride p.o. in reducing residual gastric volume and pH in adult ambulatory surgical patients. METHODS: Using a prospective randomised double-blind controlled design, we administered either 20 mg cisapride p.o. or placebo preoperatively to 64 ASA 1-2 ambulatory surgical patients. Following induction of anesthesia we measured volume and pH of residual gastric contents, using blind aspiration through an orogastric tube. Parametric data were analysed using unpaired, one tail Students\\' t test. Non-parametric data were analysed using Fishers Exact test and Chi square analysis. Statistical significance was accepted at the probability level of < 0.05. RESULTS: Residual gastric volumes were similar in the two groups (19.5 +\\/- 23.8, 23.9 +\\/- 24.4 ml), in the cisapride and placebo groups respectively, P=0.24). Data shown are mean (+\\/- SD). The proportions of patients with a residual gastric volume exceeding 0.4 ml x kg(-1) were similar in the two groups (4 of 28, and 8 of 23 patients in the cisapride and placebo groups respectively, P=0.09). The pH of the residual gastric contents were similar in the cisapride and placebo groups (1.6 +\\/- 0.5, 1.4 +\\/- 0.5, respectively, P=0.26). The proportions of patients with pH < 2.5 was also similar in the cisapride and placebo groups (21 of 25, and 20 of 21 patients respectively, P=0.2). CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative administration of 20 mg cisapride p.o. to patients scheduled for outpatient surgery does not alter either the volume or the pH of gastric contents. Its use in this setting is of no apparent clinical benefit.

  11. [Influence on glycemic control of improved diabetic gastroparesis by long-term cisapride therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, K; Tanabe, S; Mitsuhashi, T; Saigenji, K

    1995-10-01

    To investigate the effect on glycemic control of improving diabetic gastroparesis, we evaluated symptoms (scored), gastric motor functions (solid and liquid gastric emptying studies and electrogastrography), and glycemic control in 11 patients with diabetic gastroparesis (5 men, 6 women, 50.4 +/- 4.5 years old) before and after treatment with cisapride (15 mg/day p.o., 12 weeks). None of the patients had organic abnormalities on gastrointestinal endoscopy. The dysmotility symptom score (maximum: 18) on cisapride significantly improved from 13.1 to 4.0 (p instant noodles labeled with 37 MBq (1 mCi) technetium-99m (both p < 0.05). Liquid gastric emptying, evaluated using a sulfamethizole technique, also improved but not significantly. Electrogastrography revealed no significant changes after treatment, but the postprandial rate of normal frequency waves tended to increase. Glycemic control was assessed based on HbA1C, fructosamine and M value. There were no significant changes in glycemic control after treatment with cisapride. We conclude that long-term administration of cisapride reduced dysmotility symptoms and improved solid and liquid gastric emptying without adversely affecting glycemic control.

  12. Effects of omeprazole and cisapride treatment in Japanese asthmatics with reflux esophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuya Fujimori

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In the United States and Europe, gastroesophageal reflux (GER is receiving attention as a potential cause of bronchial asthma. Few Japanese case reports have described this relationship. Therefore, we investigated the effect of omeprazole and cisapride on pulmonary function tests, blood gases and home peak expiratory flow rates (PEFR in six Japanese outpatients with asthma and proven GER. After 8 weeks of treatment, reflux esophagitis had improved in all patients. However, the parameters of pulmonary function showed no change other than a significant post- treatment increase in home PEFR (4.4-27.7% in three patients. These results suggest that anti-reflux (omeprazole and cisapride treatment will produce small improvements in the PEFR in some Japanese asthmatics with GER.

  13. Impaired transit of chyme in chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction. Correction by cisapride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camilleri, M.; Brown, M.L.; Malagelada, J.R.

    1986-09-01

    Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction is a clinical syndrome whose pathophysiology, objective diagnosis, and treatment are poorly understood. We investigated 8 patients with this syndrome in whom intestinal dysmotility was established manometrically by two or more of the following criteria: abnormal configuration or propagation of interdigestive motor complexes, sustained incoordinate pressure activity, non-propagated bursts of phasic pressure activity, and failure of a solid-liquid meal to induce a fed pattern. To establish the functional impairment and region of the gut primarily affected by the disease, we quantified radio-scintigraphically the gastrointestinal transit of the solid (131I-fiber) and liquid (99 mTc-DTPA) components of a meal. Our techniques allowed us to quantify separately gastric emptying and pylorus-to-cecum transit. Furthermore, we evaluated the effects of a new prokinetic agent, cisapride. Gastric emptying times in pseudoobstruction were not significantly delayed; however, transit times through the small bowel (t1/2) were markedly prolonged (solids, 235 +/- 43 min (mean +/- SEM) vs. 138 +/- 25 controls, p less than 0.05; liquids, 310 +/- 67 vs. 181 +/- 28 controls, p = 0.07). Cisapride was effective in reducing the delayed intestinal transit time to within the normal range (delta solids = -115 +/- 25 min; delta liquids = -146 +/- 71 min; p less than 0.05 for both). These studies suggest that intestinal dysmotility in this group of patients with pseudoobstruction was associated with delayed small bowel transit of radiolabeled solid and liquid components of chyme. Cisapride can restore to normal the delayed transit, indicating that it may potentially correct the impaired propulsive activity in the small bowel of these patients.

  14. Gastric Emptying in Patients with Diabetes: Gastric Emptying Time, Retention Rate and Effect of Cisapride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Byung Chun; Choi, Chung Il; Gwak, Dong Suck; Lee, Jae Tae; Lee, Kyu Bo; Kim, Bo Wan; Chung, Jun Mo

    1992-01-01

    Gastic emptying scan in diabetic patients is widely used to assess the degree of motility disturbance and the symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, bloating, abdominal pain and early gastric fullness which we can't find anatomic lesion by fiberoscopic or barium study. In order to determine the relationship among diabetic gastropathy, neropathy, retinopathy and disease duration, gastric emptying scan using 99m Tc-tin colloid labeled scramble egg in hamburger was performed in 10 healthy male controls and 50 diabetic patients which were subdivided to no neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy and autonomic neuropathy groups according to the degree of diabetic neuropathy and no retinopathy, background retinopathy and proliferative retinopathy groups according to the degree of diabetic retinopathy. After medication of cisapride for 2 weeks, we observed the presence of improvement of gastric motility in diabetics. The results were as following: 1) In controls, gastric emptying time (GET1/2) was 75 ± 13.6 min and 2 hour gastric retension rate(GRR2) was 32 ± 11.1%. 2) In diabetics, GET/2 was prolonged more than 2 hours and GRR2 was 58 ± 23.1%. According to degree of neuropathy, GET1/2 was prolonged more than 2 hours in all three groups and GRR2 was 54± 24.1% in no neuropathy group, 57 ± 24.3% in peripheral neuropathy group and 69 ± 24.6% in autonomic neuropathy group. According to degree of retinopathy, GET1/2 was 110 ± 23.4 min in no retinopathy group and prolonged more than 2 hours in other two groups and GRR2 was 45 ± 21.6% in no retinopathy group, 71 ± 19.7% in background retinopathy group and 73 ± 21.5% in proliferative retinopathy group. 3) After cisapride for 2 weeks, GET1/2 and GRR2 were improved as 90 ± 14.6 min and 40 ± 13.8% (initial GET1/2 and GRR2 were above 2 hours and 61 ± 15.4%). We can conclude from above findings that gastropathy in diabetic neuropathy suggesting main underlying factor in motility disorder. The degree of retinopathy and disease

  15. Gastric Emptying in Patients with Diabetes: Gastric Emptying Time, Retention Rate and Effect of Cisapride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Byung Chun; Choi, Chung Il; Gwak, Dong Suck; Lee, Jae Tae; Lee, Kyu Bo; Kim, Bo Wan; Chung, Jun Mo [Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-07-15

    Gastic emptying scan in diabetic patients is widely used to assess the degree of motility disturbance and the symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, bloating, abdominal pain and early gastric fullness which we can't find anatomic lesion by fiberoscopic or barium study. In order to determine the relationship among diabetic gastropathy, neropathy, retinopathy and disease duration, gastric emptying scan using {sup 99m}Tc-tin colloid labeled scramble egg in hamburger was performed in 10 healthy male controls and 50 diabetic patients which were subdivided to no neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy and autonomic neuropathy groups according to the degree of diabetic neuropathy and no retinopathy, background retinopathy and proliferative retinopathy groups according to the degree of diabetic retinopathy. After medication of cisapride for 2 weeks, we observed the presence of improvement of gastric motility in diabetics. The results were as following: 1) In controls, gastric emptying time (GET1/2) was 75 +- 13.6 min and 2 hour gastric retension rate(GRR2) was 32 +- 11.1%. 2) In diabetics, GET/2 was prolonged more than 2 hours and GRR2 was 58 +- 23.1%. According to degree of neuropathy, GET1/2 was prolonged more than 2 hours in all three groups and GRR2 was 54+- 24.1% in no neuropathy group, 57 +- 24.3% in peripheral neuropathy group and 69 +- 24.6% in autonomic neuropathy group. According to degree of retinopathy, GET1/2 was 110 +- 23.4 min in no retinopathy group and prolonged more than 2 hours in other two groups and GRR2 was 45 +- 21.6% in no retinopathy group, 71 +- 19.7% in background retinopathy group and 73 +- 21.5% in proliferative retinopathy group. 3) After cisapride for 2 weeks, GET1/2 and GRR2 were improved as 90 +- 14.6 min and 40 +- 13.8% (initial GET1/2 and GRR2 were above 2 hours and 61 +- 15.4%). We can conclude from above findings that gastropathy in diabetic neuropathy suggesting main underlying factor in motility disorder. The degree of retinopathy and

  16. Clinical efficacy and safety of cisapride and clebopride in the management of chronic functional dyspepsia: a double-blind, randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbatini, F; Minieri, M; Manzi, G; Piai, G; D'Angelo, V; Mazzacca, G

    1991-01-01

    The clinical efficacy and the safety of chronic oral administration of cisapride, a new gastrointestinal prokinetic agent, (10 mg tid) and clebopride (0.5 mg tid) was assayed in 48 outpatients affected with functional dyspepsia, in a randomized double-blind study. Each of the drugs induced a significant reduction in dyspeptic symptoms after 2 and 4 weeks (p less than 0.001). Two patients, given clebopride, dropped out of the study because of severe side effects during the first week of treatment. Mild adverse reactions were reported in 6 out of 23 cisapride-treated patients and in 10 out of 20 clebopride-treated patients who completed the study. The most common side effect of cisapride was diarrhoea and that of clebopride was drowsiness. Cisapride appears to be as effective as clebopride in reducing dyspeptic symptoms and seems to induce less severe side effects.

  17. Rehabilitating drug-induced long-QT promoters: in-silico design of hERG-neutral cisapride analogues with retained pharmacological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdagi, Serdar; Randall, Trevor; Duff, Henry J; Chamberlin, Adam; Noskov, Sergei Y

    2014-03-08

    The human ether-a-go-go related gene 1 (hERG1), which codes for a potassium ion channel, is a key element in the cardiac delayed rectified potassium current, IKr, and plays an important role in the normal repolarization of the heart's action potential. Many approved drugs have been withdrawn from the market due to their prolongation of the QT interval. Most of these drugs have high potencies for their principal targets and are often irreplaceable, thus "rehabilitation" studies for decreasing their high hERG1 blocking affinities, while keeping them active at the binding sites of their targets, have been proposed to enable these drugs to re-enter the market. In this proof-of-principle study, we focus on cisapride, a gastroprokinetic agent withdrawn from the market due to its high hERG1 blocking affinity. Here we tested an a priori strategy to predict a compound's cardiotoxicity using de novo drug design with molecular docking and Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations to generate a strategy for the rehabilitation of cisapride. We focused on two key receptors, a target interaction with the (adenosine) receptor and an off-target interaction with hERG1 channels. An analysis of the fragment interactions of cisapride at human A2A adenosine receptors and hERG1 central cavities helped us to identify the key chemical groups responsible for the drug activity and hERG1 blockade. A set of cisapride derivatives with reduced cardiotoxicity was then proposed using an in-silico two-tier approach. This set was compared against a large dataset of commercially available cisapride analogs and derivatives. An interaction decomposition of cisapride and cisapride derivatives allowed for the identification of key active scaffolds and functional groups that may be responsible for the unwanted blockade of hERG1.

  18. The involvement of flavin-containing monooxygenase but not CYP3A4 in metabolism of itopride hydrochloride, a gastroprokinetic agent: comparison with cisapride and mosapride citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushiroda, T; Douya, R; Takahara, E; Nagata, O

    2000-10-01

    The goals of the present study were to identify the enzyme responsible for metabolism of itopride hydrochloride (itopride) and to evaluate the likelihood of drug interaction involving itopride. In human liver microsomes, the involvement of flavin-containing monooxygenase in N-oxygenation, the major metabolic pathway of itopride, was indicated by the following results: inhibition by methimazole and thiourea, heat inactivation, and protection against heat inactivation by NADPH. When the effects of ketoconazole on the metabolism of itopride, cisapride, and mosapride citrate (mosapride) were examined using human liver microsomes, ketoconazole strongly inhibited the formation of the primary metabolites of cisapride and mosapride, but not itopride. Other cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 inhibitors, cimetidine, erythromycin, and clarithromycin, also inhibited the metabolism of cisapride and mosapride. In an in vivo study, itopride (30 mg/kg), cisapride (1.5 mg/kg), or mosapride (3 mg/kg) was orally administered to male rats with or without oral pretreatment with ketoconazole (120 mg/kg) twice daily for 2 days. The ketoconazole pretreatment significantly increased the area under the serum concentration curve and the maximum serum concentration of cisapride and mosapride but had no significant effect on the pharmacokinetics of itopride. In addition, itopride did not inhibit five specific CYP-mediated reactions of human liver microsomes. These results suggest that itopride is unlikely to alter the pharmacokinetics of other concomitantly administered drugs.

  19. Noninvasive Assessment of Gastric Emptying by Near-Infrared Fluorescence Reflectance Imaging in Mice: Pharmacological Validation with Tegaserod, Cisapride, and Clonidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Ulrich Gremlich

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Noninvasive near-infrared fluorescence reflectance imaging (FRI is an in vivo technique to assess physiological and molecular processes in the intact organism. Here we describe a method to assess gastric emptying in mice. TentaGel™ beads with covalently bound cyanine dye (Cy5.5 conjugates as fluorescent probe were administered by oral gavage. The amount of intragastric beads/label was derived from the fluorescence signal intensity measured in a region of interest corresponding to the mouse stomach. The FRI signal intensity decreased as a function of time reflecting gastric emptying. In control mice, the gastric half-emptying time was in agreement with literature data. Pharmacological modulation of gastric motility allowed the evaluation of the sensitivity of the FRI-based method. Gastric emptying was either stimulated or inhibited by treatment with the 5-HT4 receptor agonists tegaserod (Zelnorm® and cisapride or the α2-receptor agonist clonidine, respectively. Tegaserod and cisapride dose-dependently accelerated gastric emptying. In contrast, clonidine dose-dependently delayed gastric emptying. In conclusion, FRI using fluorescently labeled beads allows the reliable determination of gastric emptying as well as the assessment of pharmacological interventions. The technique thus offers the potential to characterize molecular targets and pathways involved in physiological regulation and pharmacological modulation of gastric emptying.

  20. Acotiamide hydrochloride (Z-338), a new selective acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, enhances gastric motility without prolonging QT interval in dogs: comparison with cisapride, itopride, and mosapride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Yugo; Tanaka, Takao; Yoshinaga, Koji; Ueki, Shigeru; Hori, Yuko; Eta, Runa; Kawabata, Yoshihiro; Yoshii, Kazuyoshi; Yoshida, Kenji; Matsumura, Toshihiro; Furuta, Shigeru; Takei, Mineo; Tack, Jan; Itoh, Zen

    2011-03-01

    Acotiamide hydrochloride (acotiamide; N-[2-[bis(1-methylethyl) amino]ethyl]-2-[(2-hydroxy-4,5-dimethoxybenzoyl) amino] thiazole-4-carboxamide monohydrochloride trihydrate, Z-338) has been reported to improve meal-related symptoms of functional dyspepsia in clinical studies. Here, we examined the gastroprokinetic effects of acotiamide and its antiacetylcholinesterase activity as a possible mechanism of action in conscious dogs. Acotiamide increased postprandial gastric motor activity in conscious dogs with chronically implanted force transducers and, like itopride, mosapride, and cisapride, exhibited gastroprokinetic activity in these dogs. Furthermore, acotiamide improved clonidine-induced hypomotility and delayed gastric emptying. Acotiamide-enhanced postprandial gastroduodenal motility was suppressed completely by pretreatment with atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist. In in vitro studies, acotiamide enhanced acetylcholine- but not carbachol-induced contractile responses of guinea pig gastric antrum strips. Moreover, like itopride and neostigmine, acotiamide inhibited recombinant human and canine stomach-derived acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity in vitro. The mode of the AChE inhibitory action of acotiamide was selective and reversible. Unlike itopride or mosapride, acotiamide showed no affinity for dopamine D(2) or serotonin 5-HT(4) receptors. With regard to cardiovascular side effects, unlike cisapride, acotiamide did not affect myocardial monophasic action potential duration, QT interval, or corrected QT interval in anesthetized dogs. These results suggest that acotiamide stimulates gastric motility in vivo by inhibiting AChE activity without affecting QT interval. Acotiamide thus represents a beneficial new drug for the treatment of functional dyspepsia involving gastric motility dysfunction, with differences from other prokinetic agents.

  1. Heartburn treatment in primary care: randomised, double blind study for 8 weeks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatlebakk, Jan G; Hyggen, Arild; Madsen, Per H; Walle, Per O; Schulz, Tom; Mowinckel, Petter; Bernklev, Tomm; Berstad, Arnold

    1999-01-01

    Objective To compare the effects and tolerability of omeprazole and cisapride with that of placebo for control of heartburn in primary care patients. Design Randomised, double blind, placebo controlled study. Setting 65 primary care practices in Norway. Participants 483 untreated patients with complaints of heartburn ⩾3 days a week, with at most grade 1 reflux oesophagitis. Interventions Omeprazole 20 mg once daily, cisapride 20 mg twice daily, or placebo for 8 weeks. Main outcome measures Adequate control of heartburn, defined as ⩽1 day of the past 7 days with no more than mild heartburn, after 4 weeks of treatment. Results In the all patients treated analysis, adequate control of heartburn was achieved in 71% of patients taking omeprazole, 22% taking cisapride, and 18% taking placebo after 4 weeks of treatment (omeprazole v cisapride and placebo, Pheartburn whereas cisapride 20 mg twice daily was not significantly more effective than placebo. Key messagesIn primary care patients, heartburn is commonly treated empiricallyMost randomised clinical trials of treatment for heartburn have been conducted in specialist care, and documentation for empirical treatment is limitedOmeprazole was significantly more effective than cisapride or placebo in controlling heartburn and other symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux after 2, 4, and 8 weeks, whereas cisapride did not differ significantly from placeboOmeprazole should be considered as a first choice for empirical treatment of heartburn in primary care PMID:10463897

  2. The evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux in children with chronic respiratory diseases by radionuclide gastroesophageal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Ruifang; Zeng Jihua; Shi Yumin

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in children with chronic respiratory diseases (CRD) by radionuclide gastroesophageal imaging and to investigate the therapeutic effect of Cisapride. Methods: 45 patients were studied with 99 Tc m -DTPA gastroesophageal imaging, and compared the results with those obtained from 8 normal children. The repeated imagings were performed on some of the cases at the end of a three months' Cisapride therapy. Results: 25 (55%) among 45 patients were diagnosed as GER by imaging, while none of 8 normal children. 10 cases with GER received Cisapride therapy for 3 months. At the end of the treatment, the second imaging revealed that GER completely disappeared in 7 of them, and clinical follow-up showed marked improvement of CRD symptoms. Conclusions: The incidence of GER among with CRD children is rather great. Cisapride therapy not only remarkably relieve reflux, but also improve the symptoms of CRD

  3. Systematic review: cardiovascular safety profile of 5-HT4 agonists developed for gastrointestinal disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Tack, J; Camilleri, M; Chang, L; Chey, W D; Galligan, J J; Lacy, B E; Müller-Lissner, S; Quigley, E M M; Schuurkes, J; Maeyer, J H; Stanghellini, V

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The nonselective 5-HT4 receptor agonists, cisapride and tegaserod have been associated with cardiovascular adverse events (AEs). Aim To perform a systematic review of the safety profile, particularly cardiovascular, of 5-HT4 agonists developed for gastrointestinal disorders, and a nonsystematic summary of their pharmacology and clinical efficacy. Methods Articles reporting data on cisapride, clebopride, prucalopride, mosapride, renzapride, tegaserod, TD-5108 (velusetrag) an...

  4. Stimulatory action of itopride hydrochloride on colonic motor activity in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubouchi, Tadashi; Saito, Takaharu; Mizutani, Fujie; Yamauchi, Toshie; Iwanaga, Yuji

    2003-08-01

    We investigated the effects of itopride hydrochloride (itopride, N-[4-[2-(dimethylamino)ethoxy]benzyl]-3,4-dimethoxybenzamide hydrochloride), a gastroprokinetic agent, on the colonic motor activity in vitro and in vivo, in comparison with benzamides, cisapride hydrate (cisapride), and mosapride citrate (mosapride). Itopride stimulated both peristaltic and segmental motility induced by applying intraluminal pressure to the isolated guinea pig colon. Although cisapride and mosapride enhanced the segmental motility, they markedly reduced the peristaltic motility. In conscious dogs with implanted strain gauge force transducers, itopride stimulated contractile activity in the gastrointestinal tract from the stomach to the colon. Cisapride stimulated contractile activity in the gastric antrum, ileum, and ascending colon. Mosapride stimulated contractile activity only in the gastric antrum and ileum. In guinea pigs and rats, itopride accelerated colonic luminal transit. On the other hand, cisapride and mosapride failed to enhance colonic transit. These results demonstrate that itopride has a stimulatory action on colonic peristalsis, propelling colonic luminal contents, different from that of cisapride and mosapride. Therefore, itopride may be a useful drug for the treatment of functional bowel disorders such as functional constipation.

  5. Esófago de Barret en Pediatría: revisión de la literatura a propósito de un caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Tori Tori

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This patient presented at one year of age with a dry and persistent cough prodominantly nocturnal, pneumonia on two occasions, and signs and symptoms compatible with bronchial asthma. Due to the high incidence of gastroesophageal reflux in patients with esophageal atresia , an entity that could be responsible for his symptoms, diagnostic procedures were done to confirm this diagnosis, and treatment was begun with cisapride during one month, but without improvement. It was then that a esophagogastroscopy was performed and Barrett's esophagus was diagnosed. The patient was medicated with cisapride and omeprazole, and two months later a Thal Fundoplication was done. The patient has continued on cisapride and omeprazole with great improvement, being asymptomatic for a period of nine months, and having had only on one occasion a respiratory crisis due to bronchospasm. A repeat esophagogastroscopy has been planned one year after his operation. ( Rev Med Hered 1998; 9: .

  6. 5HT(4) agonists inhibit interferon-gamma-induced MHC class II and B7 costimulatory molecules expression on cultured astrocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeinstra, Esther M.; Wilczak, Nadine; Wilschut, Jan C.; Glazenburg, Lisa; Chesik, Daniel; Kroese, Frans G. M.; De Keyser, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    A failure of tight control of MHC class II expression on astrocytes may play a role in the development of autoimmune responses in multiple sclerosis. The 5-HT4 serotonin receptor agonists cisapride and prucalopride, at concentrations between 10(-10) M and 10(-8) M, reduced interferon-gamma-induced

  7. Effect of different prokinetic agents and a novel enterokinetic agent on postoperative ileus in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winter, B. Y.; Boeckxstaens, G. E.; de Man, J. G.; Moreels, T. G.; Schuurkes, J. A.; Peeters, T. L.; Herman, A. G.; Pelckmans, P. A.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIM: The effects of different prokinetic agents, the motilide erythromycin and the substituted benzamides metoclopramide and cisapride, were investigated in a rat model of postoperative ileus. These effects were compared with that of granisetron, a 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT(3)) receptor

  8. Oral versus intravenous premedication for small bowel biopsy in children: effect on procedure and fluoroscopy times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenhammar, L; Wärngård, O; Lewander, P; Nordvall, M

    1993-01-01

    Oral alimemazine and cisapride, or diazepam and cisapride, or iv midazolam and metoclopramide were given as premedication for small bowel biopsy to three groups of children from a total population of 185 individuals. The biopsy procedures were performed under intermittent fluoroscopy and times for both were recorded. The median biopsy procedure time was significantly shorter in children given iv midazolam and metoclopramide (6 min) compared to those given oral premedication (10 min) (p < 0.001). The median fluoroscopy time was very short in all groups, ranging between 3 and 6 s. It is concluded that iv premedication is superior to oral premedication for small bowel biopsy in children because more effective sedation is obtained.

  9. Departmental of Clinical Investigation: Annual Research Progress Report for Fiscal Year 1992. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    effect of cisapride on the symptoms of unexplained upper abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, anorexia, early satiety, bloating/ distension in patients with...for 30 minutes following eccentric exercise will less the 3 indices of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS): perceived muscular soreness, reduced...post-exercise and the Talag Pain Rating Scale will be used to assess muscular soreness. Progress: No progress report was furnished by the principal

  10. Effect of megestrol acetate and prepulsid on nutritional improvement in patients with head and neck cancers undergoing radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Hui-Chun; Leung, Stephen Wan; Wang, Chong-Jong; Sun, Li-Min; Fang, Fu-Min; Hsu, Jia-Hwa

    1997-01-01

    Background and purpose: Anorexia is a common problem in cancer patients who receive radiotherapy. In this current study, we attempt to determine the effect of megestrol acetate and prepulsid on appetite and nutritional improvement in patients with head and neck cancers undergoing radiotherapy. Materials and Methods: One hundred twenty-nine consecutive patients with head and neck cancers treated between July 1993 and June 1994 were prospectively randomized to receive either megestrol acetate, 40 mg qid (megace group), prepulsid, 5 mg tid (cisapride group), or a placebo treatment (control group) during radiotherapy. Before radiotherapy, body weight (kg), appetite score, performance status, biochemical parameters and hematological parameters were evaluated, and the above-noted clinical and biochemical parameters were assessed and recorded every other week. All patients received 6- 10 MV X-rays or Co-60 γ-ray to head and neck region for a full course of radiotherapy, 61.2-75.6 Gy/7-9 weeks. Results: Forty-eight patients were enrolled in the megace group, 41 patients in the cisapride group, and 40 patients in the control group. At the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th week, as the radiation dose escalated, the megace group had significantly less body weight loss than did the cisapride and control groups (P = 0.045, 0.024, 0.006, 0.003, respectively). The appetite scores of the megace group were significantly higher than those of the cisapride and control groups (P 0.0001). However, there were no statistically significant differences in the change of albumin level among these three groups at the 2nd, 4th, 6th and 8th week (P > 0.05, respectively). Conclusions: Megestrol acetate can significantly decrease the degree of body weight loss, and can prevent the deterioration of appetite in patients with head and neck cancers receiving radiotherapy. However, prepulsid lacks the above-mentioned clinical benefits

  11. Relations between transit time, fermentation products, and hydrogen consuming flora in healthy humans.

    OpenAIRE

    El Oufir, L; Flourié, B; Bruley des Varannes, S; Barry, J L; Cloarec, D; Bornet, F; Galmiche, J P

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: To investigate whether transit time could influence H2 consuming flora and certain indices of colonic bacterial fermentation. METHODS: Eight healthy volunteers (four methane excretors and four non-methane excretors) were studied for three, three week periods during which they received a controlled diet alone (control period), and then the same diet with cisapride or loperamide. At the end of each period, mean transit time (MTT) was estimated, an H2 lactulose breath test was p...

  12. Systematic review: cardiovascular safety profile of 5-HT(4) agonists developed for gastrointestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, J; Camilleri, M; Chang, L; Chey, W D; Galligan, J J; Lacy, B E; Müller-Lissner, S; Quigley, E M M; Schuurkes, J; De Maeyer, J H; Stanghellini, V

    2012-04-01

    The nonselective 5-HT(4) receptor agonists, cisapride and tegaserod have been associated with cardiovascular adverse events (AEs). To perform a systematic review of the safety profile, particularly cardiovascular, of 5-HT(4) agonists developed for gastrointestinal disorders, and a nonsystematic summary of their pharmacology and clinical efficacy. Articles reporting data on cisapride, clebopride, prucalopride, mosapride, renzapride, tegaserod, TD-5108 (velusetrag) and ATI-7505 (naronapride) were identified through a systematic search of the Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase and Toxfile. Abstracts from UEGW 2006-2008 and DDW 2008-2010 were searched for these drug names, and pharmaceutical companies approached to provide unpublished data. Retrieved articles on pharmacokinetics, human pharmacodynamics and clinical data with these 5-HT(4) agonists, are reviewed and summarised nonsystematically. Articles relating to cardiac safety and tolerability of these agents, including any relevant case reports, are reported systematically. Two nonselective 5-HT(4) agonists had reports of cardiovascular AEs: cisapride (QT prolongation) and tegaserod (ischaemia). Interactions with, respectively, the hERG cardiac potassium channel and 5-HT(1) receptor subtypes have been suggested to account for these effects. No cardiovascular safety concerns were reported for the newer, selective 5-HT(4) agonists prucalopride, velusetrag, naronapride, or for nonselective 5-HT(4) agonists with no hERG or 5-HT(1) affinity (renzapride, clebopride, mosapride). 5-HT(4) agonists for GI disorders differ in chemical structure and selectivity for 5-HT(4) receptors. Selectivity for 5-HT(4) over non-5-HT(4) receptors may influence the agent's safety and overall risk-benefit profile. Based on available evidence, highly selective 5-HT(4) agonists may offer improved safety to treat patients with impaired GI motility. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Systematic review: cardiovascular safety profile of 5-HT4 agonists developed for gastrointestinal disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, J; Camilleri, M; Chang, L; Chey, W D; Galligan, J J; Lacy, B E; Müller-Lissner, S; Quigley, E M M; Schuurkes, J; Maeyer, J H; Stanghellini, V

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The nonselective 5-HT4 receptor agonists, cisapride and tegaserod have been associated with cardiovascular adverse events (AEs). Aim To perform a systematic review of the safety profile, particularly cardiovascular, of 5-HT4 agonists developed for gastrointestinal disorders, and a nonsystematic summary of their pharmacology and clinical efficacy. Methods Articles reporting data on cisapride, clebopride, prucalopride, mosapride, renzapride, tegaserod, TD-5108 (velusetrag) and ATI-7505 (naronapride) were identified through a systematic search of the Cochrane Library, Medline, Embase and Toxfile. Abstracts from UEGW 2006–2008 and DDW 2008–2010 were searched for these drug names, and pharmaceutical companies approached to provide unpublished data. Results Retrieved articles on pharmacokinetics, human pharmacodynamics and clinical data with these 5-HT4 agonists, are reviewed and summarised nonsystematically. Articles relating to cardiac safety and tolerability of these agents, including any relevant case reports, are reported systematically. Two nonselective 5-HT4 agonists had reports of cardiovascular AEs: cisapride (QT prolongation) and tegaserod (ischaemia). Interactions with, respectively, the hERG cardiac potassium channel and 5-HT1 receptor subtypes have been suggested to account for these effects. No cardiovascular safety concerns were reported for the newer, selective 5-HT4 agonists prucalopride, velusetrag, naronapride, or for nonselective 5-HT4 agonists with no hERG or 5-HT1 affinity (renzapride, clebopride, mosapride). Conclusions 5-HT4 agonists for GI disorders differ in chemical structure and selectivity for 5-HT4 receptors. Selectivity for 5-HT4 over non-5-HT4 receptors may influence the agent's safety and overall risk–benefit profile. Based on available evidence, highly selective 5-HT4 agonists may offer improved safety to treat patients with impaired GI motility. PMID:22356640

  14. Relationships between transit time in man and in vitro fermentation of dietary fiber by fecal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oufir, L E; Barry, J L; Flourié, B; Cherbut, C; Cloarec, D; Bornet, F; Galmiche, J P

    2000-08-01

    To assess the effects of drug-induced changes in mean transit time (MTT) on the activity of human fecal flora in vitro. The activity of fecal flora was estimated by the ability of a fecal inoculum to ferment a substrate (beet fiber) in vitro in a batch system for 24 h. The inoculum was collected from 8 healthy volunteers studied during three 3-week randomized periods, who received a controlled diet alone (control period) or the same diet with either cisapride or loperamide. Cisapride and loperamide were adjusted in order to halve and double MTT measured during the control period. At the end of each period, the percentage disappearance of the initial added substrate and the concentration and the profile of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), were determined. In the control period, the pH of the inoculum and SCFA concentration were inversely related to MTT (P=0.0001). Individual SCFA production was also significantly related to MTT (P<0.01). Cisapride-reduced transit time was associated with a significant rise in the concentrations of total SCFAs (P<0.05), propionic and butyric acids (P<0.05) and the percentage substrate disappearance (P<0.05). Inverse relations were observed during the loperamide period. Moreover, MTT was inversely related to the percentage substrate disappearance (P<0.001), SCFA production (P<0.001) and butyrate production (P<0.0005). Changes in MTT alter bacterial activity and modify the bacterial pathways affecting the proportion of individual SCFAs. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2000) 54, 603-609

  15. Literature-Related Discovery: Common Factors for Parkinson’s Disease and Crohn’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    cytoplasm of human cells. Synthetic dsRNA Dicer substrates enhance RNAi potency and efficacy. MicroRNAs: genomics, biogenesis, mechanism, and...tetrahydrocannabinol 0.7%, marijuana 0.6%, delta.thc 0.6%, extinct 0.6%, cannabinoid.receptors 0.6%, acid 0.5%, 940 0.5%, cisaprid 0.5%, antagonist 0.4...0.6%, receptor 0.6%, patient 0.6%, endogen 0.5%, tetrahydrocannabinol 0.5%, delta 0.5%, genom 0.4%, kinas 0.4%, factor 0.4%, marijuana 0.4% Single

  16. Relations between transit time, fermentation products, and hydrogen consuming flora in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Oufir, L; Flourié, B; Bruley des Varannes, S; Barry, J L; Cloarec, D; Bornet, F; Galmiche, J P

    1996-06-01

    To investigate whether transit time could influence H2 consuming flora and certain indices of colonic bacterial fermentation. Eight healthy volunteers (four methane excretors and four non-methane excretors) were studied for three, three week periods during which they received a controlled diet alone (control period), and then the same diet with cisapride or loperamide. At the end of each period, mean transit time (MTT) was estimated, an H2 lactulose breath test was performed, and stools were analysed. In the control period, transit time was inversely related to faecal weight, sulphate reducing bacteria counts, concentrations of total short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), propionic and butyric acids, and H2 excreted in breath after lactulose ingestion. Conversely, transit time was positively related to faecal pH and tended to be related to methanogen counts. Methanogenic bacteria counts were inversely related to those of sulphate reducing bacteria and methane excretors had slower MTT and lower sulphate reducing bacteria counts than non-methane excretors. Compared with the control period, MTT was significantly shortened (p < 0.05) by cisapride and prolonged (p < 0.05) by loperamide (73 (11) hours, 47 (5) hours and 147 (12) hours for control, cisapride, and loperamide, respectively, mean (SD)). Cisapride reduced transit time was associated with (a) a significant rise in faecal weight, sulphate reducing bacteria, concentrations of total SCFAs, and propionic and butyric acids and breath H2 as well as (b) a significant fall in faecal pH and breath CH4 excretion, and (c) a non-significant decrease in the counts of methanogenic bacteria. Reverse relations were roughly the same during the loperamide period including a significant rise in the counts of methanogenic bacteria and a significant fall in those of sulphate reducing bacteria. Transit time differences between healthy volunteers are associated with differences in H2 consuming flora and certain indices of colonic

  17. Effect of drug utilization reviews on the quality of in-hospital prescribing: a quasi-experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chabot Isabelle

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drug utilization review (DUR programs are being conducted in Canadian hospitals with the aim of improving the appropriateness of prescriptions. However, there is little evidence of their effectiveness. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of both a retrospective and a concurrent DUR programs on the quality of in-hospital prescribing. Methods We conducted an interrupted time series quasi-experimental study. Using explicit criteria for quality of prescribing, the natural history of cisapride prescription was established retrospectively in three university-affiliated hospitals. A retrospective DUR was implemented in one of the hospitals, a concurrent DUR in another, whereas the third hospital served as a control. An archivist abstracted records of all patients who were prescribed cisapride during the observation period. The effect of DURs relative to the control hospital was determined by comparing estimated regression coefficients from the time series models and by testing the statistical significance using a 2-tailed Student's t test. Results The concurrent DUR program significantly improved the appropriateness of prescriptions for the indication for use whereas the retrospective DUR brought about no significant effect on the quality of prescribing. Conclusion Results suggest a retrospective DUR approach may not be sufficient to improve the quality of prescribing. However, a concurrent DUR strategy, with direct feedback to prescribers seems effective and should be tested in other settings with other drugs.

  18. Gastroprokinetic effect of a new benzamide derivative itopride and its action mechanisms in conscious dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanaga, Y; Miyashita, N; Saito, T; Morikawa, K; Itoh, Z

    1996-06-01

    The novel benzamide derivative itopride was assayed for its effect on gastrointestinal motility in conscious dogs when it was administered intraduodenally (i.d.). Gastrointestinal motility was measured by means of chronically implanted force transducers, and itopride at a dose of 10 mg/kg, i.d. or more increased the gastric contractile force during the digestive state. Intraduodenal cisapride, domperidone and metoclopramide also stimulated gastric motility, and their threshold doses were 1, 3 and 1 mg/kg, respectively. Dopamine infusion (1 mg/kg/hr, i.v.) caused the postprandial gastric motility to disappear, but it was immediately restored by itopride at a dose of 3 mg/kg, i.d. With itopride at 1 and 3 mg/kg, i.d., acetylcholine (0.05 mg/kg/min)-induced contractions were greatly enhanced. In addition to its gastric stimulation, itopride at doses of 10-100 mg/kg, p.o. inhibited apomorphine (0.1 mg/kg, s.c.)-induced vomiting in dogs. In conclusion, intraduodenal itopride stimulates gastric motility through both anti-dopaminergic and anti-acetylcholinesterase actions. Its gastroprokinetic threshold dose was as large as 3-10 times those of cisapride, domperidone and metoclopramide. These findings suggest that itopride is an orally active gastroprokinetic with a moderate anti-emetic action.

  19. Gastrointestinal medications and breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, T M

    1998-09-01

    Medications used to treat gastrointestinal symptoms are increasingly being used as more have been gained nonprescription status. Most of the gastrointestinal medications, such as laxatives, antacids, and antidiarrheal agents, are used short term. Women who breastfeed should be aware of the risks of taking any medications, whether prescription or nonprescription. There is little information describing transfer into breast milk for many of these products. Cimetidine, atropine, cascara, cisapride, loperamide, magnesium sulfate, and senna are the only products identified by the AAP as compatible with breast feeding. Metoclopramide is listed by the AAP as a drug whose effect on nursing infants is unknown but may be of potential concern, although studies published to date have not reported any adverse effects. The safest laxatives and antidiarrheals are those that are not absorbed and should be considered first-line therapy for conditions of constipation or loose stools. Famotidine and nizatidine are excreted into breast milk to a lesser extent than cimetidine or ranitidine and may be the preferred histamine antagonists. Despite the limited data on the use of cisapride in nursing women, it is considered safe by the AAP and may be preferred over metoclopramide for first-line prescription treatment of heartburn. Although most of these agents appear safe in the nursing infant, caretakers should be aware of the potential adverse reactions that may occur in infants whose mothers require these products.

  20. Postoperative ileus: a preventable event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Kathrine; Kehlet, H

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative ileus has traditionally been accepted as a normal response to tissue injury. No data support any beneficial effect of ileus and indeed it may contribute to delayed recovery and prolonged hospital stay. Efforts should, therefore, be made to reduce such ileus. METHODS......: Material was identified from a Medline search of the literature, previous review articles and references cited in original papers. This paper updates knowledge on the pathophysiology and treatment of postoperative ileus. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Pathogenesis mainly involves inhibitory neural reflexes...... only cisapride is proven beneficial; the effect of early enteral feeding remains unclear. However, postoperative ileus may be greatly reduced when all of the above are combined in a multimodal rehabilitation strategy....

  1. Erythromycin antagonizes the deceleration of gastric emptying by glucagon-like peptide 1 and unmasks its insulinotropic effect in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Juris J; Kemmeries, Guido; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-01-01

    . On separate occasions, the prokinetic drugs metoclopramide (10 mg), domperidone (10 mg), cisapride (10 mg, all at -30 min per oral), or erythromycin (200 mg intravenously from -30 to -15 min) were administered in addition to GLP-1. A liquid test meal (50 g sucrose and 8% mixed amino acids in 400 ml......, we aimed to antagonize the deceleration of gastric emptying by GLP-1 to study its effects on insulin secretion after a meal. Nine healthy male volunteers (age 25 +/- 4 years, BMI 25.0 +/- 4.9 kg/m2) were studied with an infusion of GLP-1 (0.8 pmol.kg(-1).min(-1) from -30 to 240 min) or placebo...... technique. Statistical analyses were performed using repeated-measures ANOVA and Duncan's post hoc test. GLP-1 significantly decelerated the velocity of gastric emptying (P drugs used had no effect. Postprandial...

  2. Cholescintigraphy in the evaluation of gastroduodenal reflux in children with gastritis - preliminary report; Cholescyntygrafia w badaniu refluksu dwunastniczo-zoladkowego u dzieci z zapaleniem zoladka - doniesienie wstepne

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lass, P.; Szarszewski, A.; Romanowicz, G.; Mizan, K.; Gumkowska-Kaminska, B.; Slominski, J.M. [Akademia Medyczna, Gdansk (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    We assessed by means of Tc-99m-HEPIDA cholescintigraphy the gastroduodenal reflux in 28 children with endoscopic signs of gastric biliary reflux. Those children were selected from a group of 190 children who underwent endoscopy because of abdominal pain disorders. We found the positive cholescintigraphic test in 67% of children. In 6 control tests after 4-months treatment with cisapride we found the withdrawal of cholescintigraphic signs, which corresponded with the improvement of clinical signs. The authors consider the cholescintigraphic examination useful in evaluation of biliary reflux in children, for the sake of more non-invasive character in comparison to endoscopy and X-ray contrast imaging after catheterizing of duodenum. (author). 9 refs.

  3. Omeprazole for Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease during Pregnancy and Lactation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Marshall

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux is a common complication of pregnancy and lactation. However, the safety of many effective medical therapies, including oral proton pump inhibitors, has not been well defined. The administration of oral omeprazole to a 41-year-old female during the third trimester of pregnancy, after ranitidine and cisapride failed to control her refractory gastroesophageal reflux, is reported. No adverse fetal effects were apparent, and the patient elected to continue omeprazole therapy (20 mg/day while breastfeeding. Peak omeprazole concentrations in breast milk (58 nM, 3 h after ingestion were less than 7% of the peak serum concentration (950 nM at 4 h, indicating minimal secretion. Although omeprazole is a potentially useful therapy for refractory gastroesophageal reflux during pregnancy and lactation, further data are needed to define better its safety and efficacy.

  4. Pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic modelling of drug‐induced QTc interval prolongation in man: prediction from in vitro human ether‐à‐go‐go‐related gene binding and functional inhibition assays and conscious dog studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, V F S; Casarotto, E; Danhof, M

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Functional measures of human ether‐à‐go‐go‐related gene (hERG; Kv11.1) channel inhibition have been prioritized as an in vitro screening tool for candidate molecules. However, it is unclear how these results can be translated to humans. Here, we explore how data on drug binding and functional inhibition in vitro relate to QT prolongation in vivo. Using cisapride, sotalol and moxifloxacin as paradigm compounds, we assessed the relationship between drug concentrations, binding, functional measures and in vivo effects in preclinical species and humans. Experimental Approach Pharmacokinetic–pharmacodynamic modelling was used to characterize the drug effects in hERG functional patch clamp, hERG radio‐labelled dofetilide displacement experiments and QT interval in conscious dogs. Data were analysed in parallel to identify potential correlations between pharmacological activity in vitro and in vivo. Key Results An Emax model could not be used due to large variability in the functional patch clamp assay. Dofetilide displacement revealed that binding curves are unrelated to the in vivo potency estimates for QTc prolongation in dogs and humans. Mean in vitro potency estimates ranged from 99.9 nM for cisapride to 1030 μM for moxifloxacin. Conclusions and Implications The lack of standardized protocols for in vitro assays leads to significant differences in experimental conditions, making the assessment of in vitro–in vivo correlations unreliable. Identification of an accurate safety window during the screening of candidate molecules requires a quantitative framework that disentangles system‐ from drug‐specific properties under physiological conditions, enabling translation of the results to humans. Similar considerations will be relevant for the comprehensive in vitro pro‐arrhythmia assay initiative. PMID:27427789

  5. New in vitro model for proarrhythmia safety screening: IKs inhibition potentiates the QTc prolonging effect of IKr inhibitors in isolated guinea pig hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kui, Péter; Orosz, Szabolcs; Takács, Hedvig; Sarusi, Annamária; Csík, Norbert; Rárosi, Ferenc; Csekő, Csongor; Varró, András; Papp, Julius Gy; Forster, Tamás; Farkas, Attila S; Farkas, András

    2016-01-01

    Preclinical in vivo QT measurement as a proarrhythmia essay is expensive and not reliable enough. The aim of the present study was to develop a sensitive, cost-effective, Langendorff perfused guinea pig heart model for proarrhythmia safety screening. Low concentrations of dofetilide and cisapride (inhibitors of the rapid delayed rectifier potassium current, IKr) were tested alone and co-perfused with HMR-1556 (inhibitor of the slow delayed rectifier potassium current, IKs) in Langendorff perfused guinea pig hearts. The electrocardiographic rate corrected QT (QTc) interval, the Tpeak-Tend interval and the beat-to-beat variability and instability (BVI) of the QT interval were determined in sinus rhythm. Dofetilide and HMR-1556 alone or co-perfused, prolonged the QTc interval by 20±2%, 10±1% and 55±10%, respectively. Similarly, cisapride and HMR-1556 alone or co-perfused, prolonged the QTc interval by 11±3%, 11±4% and 38±6%, respectively. Catecholamine-induced fast heart rate abolished the QTc prolonging effects of the IKr inhibitors, but augmented the QTc prolongation during IKs inhibition. None of the drug perfusions increased significantly the Tpeak-Tend interval and the sinus BVI of the QT interval. IKs inhibition increased the QTc prolonging effect of IKr inhibitors in a super-additive (synergistic) manner, and the QTc interval was superior to other proarrhythmia biomarkers measured in sinus rhythm in isolated guinea pig hearts. The effect of catecholamines on the QTc facilitated differentiation between IKr and IKs inhibitors. Thus, QTc measurement in Langendorff perfused guinea pig hearts with pharmacologically attenuated repolarization reserve and periodic catecholamine perfusion seems to be suitable for preclinical proarrhythmia screening. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Mosapride for gastroesophageal reflux disease in neurologically impaired patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komura, Makoto; Kanamori, Yutaka; Tanaka, Yujiro; Kodaka, Tetsuro; Sugiyama, Masahiko; Terawaki, Kan; Suzuki, Kan; Iwanaka, Tadashi

    2017-03-01

    The prokinetic agent cisapride is effective for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in infants and children, but is no longer used for this purpose because of safety concerns. Therefore, other pharmacological agents need to be investigated for efficacy in GERD treatment. In this study, we examined the effectiveness and safety of mosapride for the treatment of neurologically impaired children and adolescents with GERD. Mosapride (0.3 mg/kg/day) was administered to 11 neurologically impaired patients with GERD (five male; median age, 12.3 years). Esophageal acid exposure was measured using esophageal pH monitoring before and at >5 days after the start of mosapride treatment. The pressure and length of the lower esophageal sphincter were compared before and after mosapride treatment. In the 11 patients, median reflux index (percentage of the total monitoring period during which recorded pH was reflux (range, 0.5-2.1 min/reflux) before and 0.7 min/reflux (range, 0.4-1.2 min/reflux) after treatment with mosapride (P = 0.02). The median number of reflux episodes before (219) and after (122) drug treatment did not differ significantly. The decreased reflux index in neurologically impaired patients with GERD is due to mosapride, therefore mosapride may be a candidate for GERD treatment. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  7. Combination could be another tool for bowel preparation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Jae Seung; Kim, Kyung-Jo

    2016-01-01

    Optimal bowel preparation increases the cecal intubation rate and detection of neoplastic lesions while decreasing the procedural time and procedural-related complications. Although high-volume polyethylene glycol (PEG) solution is the most frequently used preparation for bowel cleansing, patients are often unwilling to take PEG solution due to its large volume, poor palatability, and high incidence of adverse events, such as abdominal bloating and nausea. Other purgatives include osmotic agents (e.g., sodium phosphate, magnesium citrate, and sodium sulfate), stimulant agents (e.g., senna, bisacodyl, and sodium picosulfate), and prokinetic agents (e.g., cisapride, mosapride, and itopride). A combination of PEG with an osmotic, stimulant, or prokinetic agent could effectively reduce the PEG solution volume and increase patients’ adherence. Some such solutions have been found in several published studies to not be inferior to PEG alone in terms of bowel cleansing quality. Although combination methods showed similar efficacy and safety, the value of these studies is limited by shortcomings in study design. New effective and well-tolerated combination preparations are required, in addition to rigorous new validated studies. PMID:26973388

  8. Meta-analysis of the effects of prokinetic agents in patients with functional dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyama, Toru; Yoshihara, Masaharu; Matsuo, Keitaro; Kusunoki, Hiroaki; Kamada, Tomoari; Ito, Masanori; Tanaka, Shinji; Nishi, Nobuo; Chayama, Kazuaki; Haruma, Ken

    2007-03-01

    Functional dyspepsia (FD) is often treated with prokinetic agents; however, the efficacy of prokinetic agents in patients with FD has been questioned recently. The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of the effects of prokinetic agents in patients with FD. Prokinetic agents, including metoclopramide, domperidone, trimebutine, cisapride, itopride and mosapride, used for treatment of FD between 1951 and 2005 were identified. Twenty-seven studies were selected. Difference in the probability of response between the interventional drug and placebo was used as a summary statistic for the treatment effect. Meta-regression analysis was used to detect sources of heterogeneity. In total, 1844 subjects were assigned to an experimental arm, and 1591 subjects were assigned to a placebo arm. Publication bias was ruled out by funnel plot and statistical testing (P = 0.975). In the overall analysis, the summary statistic was 0.295 (95% confidence interval: 0.208-0.382, P < 0.001), indicating that the interventional drug has 30% excess probability of producing a response compared with placebo. The most significant source of heterogeneity was the year of publication (P < 0.001). The data clearly indicate that prokinetic agents are significantly more effective than placebo in the treatment of FD. Although FD is a chronic condition, efficacy was assessed over short periods. Long-term randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm the effect.

  9. Study on interaction of gastrointestinal agents in the presence of cytoprotective drugs. Part III. In vitro study on the adsorption of selected prokinetic drugs on sucralfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimling, Bozena; Pluta, Janusz

    2005-01-01

    Adsorbance of certain prokinetic drugs, regulating the motility of the digestive tract, on a cytoprotective drug--sucralfate was investigated. The evaluation of adsorbance capability was carried out by means of a statistical method in in vitro conditions, taking into account environmental pH, concentration of the investigated drugs as well as the form of sucralfate. Obtained results prove that the analyzed active agents are adsorbed on sucralfate at all the investigated pH ranges and the capability of sucralfate binding depends on its form and environmental pH. The highest binding capability was revealed by samples with pH = 3.6 in the presence of sucralfate in the form of suspension, while the lowest binding capability was observed at pH = 1.5 in the presence of sucralfate in the form of paste. The adsorbance capacity of sucralfate (k) at pH = 3.6 is the highest for cisaprid (k = 8.5) and it is significantly lower for metoclopramide (k = 1.5)

  10. Human engineered heart tissue as a versatile tool in basic research and preclinical toxicology.

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    Sebastian Schaaf

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cell (hESC progenies hold great promise as surrogates for human primary cells, particularly if the latter are not available as in the case of cardiomyocytes. However, high content experimental platforms are lacking that allow the function of hESC-derived cardiomyocytes to be studied under relatively physiological and standardized conditions. Here we describe a simple and robust protocol for the generation of fibrin-based human engineered heart tissue (hEHT in a 24-well format using an unselected population of differentiated human embryonic stem cells containing 30-40% α-actinin-positive cardiac myocytes. Human EHTs started to show coherent contractions 5-10 days after casting, reached regular (mean 0.5 Hz and strong (mean 100 µN contractions for up to 8 weeks. They displayed a dense network of longitudinally oriented, interconnected and cross-striated cardiomyocytes. Spontaneous hEHT contractions were analyzed by automated video-optical recording and showed chronotropic responses to calcium and the β-adrenergic agonist isoprenaline. The proarrhythmic compounds E-4031, quinidine, procainamide, cisapride, and sertindole exerted robust, concentration-dependent and reversible decreases in relaxation velocity and irregular beating at concentrations that recapitulate findings in hERG channel assays. In conclusion this study establishes hEHT as a simple in vitro model for heart research.

  11. QT interval prolongation associated with sibutramine treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison-Woolrych, Mira; Clark, David W J; Hill, Geraldine R; Rees, Mark I; Skinner, Jonathan R

    2006-01-01

    Aims To investigate a possible association of sibutramine with QT interval prolongation. Methods Post-marketing surveillance using prescription event monitoring in the New Zealand Intensive Medicines Monitoring Programme (IMMP) identified a case of QT prolongation and associated cardiac arrest in a patient taking sibutramine for 25 days. This patient was further investigated, including genotyping for long QT syndrome. Other IMMP case reports suggesting arrhythmias associated with sibutramine were assessed and further reports were obtained from the World Health Organisation (WHO) adverse drug reactions database. Results The index case displayed a novel mutation in a cardiac potassium channel subunit gene, KCNQ1, which is likely to prolong cardiac membrane depolarization and increase susceptibility to long QT intervals. Assessment of further IMMP reports identified five additional patients who experienced palpitations associated with syncope or presyncopal symptoms, one of whom had a QTc at the upper limit of normal. Assessment of reports from the WHO database identified three reports of QT prolongation and one fatal case of torsade de pointes in a patient also taking cisapride. Conclusions This case series suggests that sibutramine may be associated with QT prolongation and related dysrhythmias. Further studies are required, but in the meantime we would recommend that sibutramine should be avoided in patients with long QT syndrome and in patients taking other medicines that may prolong the QT interval. PMID:16542208

  12. Acupuncture for functional dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Lei; Zeng, Fang; Liu, Guan J; Ying, Li; Wu, Xi; Liu, Mailan; Liang, Fan-Rong

    2014-10-13

    participants with FD (212 males and 330 females). These studies generally had an unclear risk of bias based on inadequate descriptions of allocation concealment and a high risk of bias based on lack of blinding. None of the studies reported on outcomes of the Functional Digestive Disorder Quality of Life questionnaire (FDDQL), the Satisfaction With Dyspepsia Related Health scale (SODA), the Digestive Health Status Instrument (DHSI), or effective/inefficient rate and symptom recurrence six months from completion of acupuncture treatment.Four RCTs of acupuncture versus medications (cisapride, domperidone, and itopride) were included in the review. No statistically significant difference was noted in the reduction in FD symptom scores and the frequency of FD attack by manual acupuncture, manual-electroacupuncture, or electroacupuncture compared with medications. In three trials of acupuncture versus sham acupuncture, all descriptive or quantitative analysis results implied that acupuncture could improve FD symptom scores and scores on the Neck Disability Index (NDI), the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), the Self-Rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), and the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) more or as significantly as sham acupuncture. With regard to adverse effects, acupuncture was superior to cisapride treatment (one study; all minor events), but no statistically significant difference was reported between acupuncture and sham acupuncture. No adverse effects data were reported in studies examining manual acupuncture versus domperidone, manual-electroacupuncture versus domperidone, or electroacupuncture versus itopride.Nevertheless, all evidence was of low or very low quality. The body of evidence identified cannot yet permit a robust conclusion regarding the efficacy and safety of acupuncture for FD. It remains unknown whether manual acupuncture or electroacupuncture is more effective or safer than other treatments for patients with FD.

  13. Drug-induced acute myocardial infarction: identifying 'prime suspects' from electronic healthcare records-based surveillance system.

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    Preciosa M Coloma

    Full Text Available Drug-related adverse events remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality and impose huge burden on healthcare costs. Routinely collected electronic healthcare data give a good snapshot of how drugs are being used in 'real-world' settings.To describe a strategy that identifies potentially drug-induced acute myocardial infarction (AMI from a large international healthcare data network.Post-marketing safety surveillance was conducted in seven population-based healthcare databases in three countries (Denmark, Italy, and the Netherlands using anonymised demographic, clinical, and prescription/dispensing data representing 21,171,291 individuals with 154,474,063 person-years of follow-up in the period 1996-2010. Primary care physicians' medical records and administrative claims containing reimbursements for filled prescriptions, laboratory tests, and hospitalisations were evaluated using a three-tier triage system of detection, filtering, and substantiation that generated a list of drugs potentially associated with AMI. Outcome of interest was statistically significant increased risk of AMI during drug exposure that has not been previously described in current literature and is biologically plausible.Overall, 163 drugs were identified to be associated with increased risk of AMI during preliminary screening. Of these, 124 drugs were eliminated after adjustment for possible bias and confounding. With subsequent application of criteria for novelty and biological plausibility, association with AMI remained for nine drugs ('prime suspects': azithromycin; erythromycin; roxithromycin; metoclopramide; cisapride; domperidone; betamethasone; fluconazole; and megestrol acetate.Although global health status, co-morbidities, and time-invariant factors were adjusted for, residual confounding cannot be ruled out.A strategy to identify potentially drug-induced AMI from electronic healthcare data has been proposed that takes into account not only statistical

  14. High-throughput cardiac safety evaluation and multi-parameter arrhythmia profiling of cardiomyocytes using microelectrode arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilchrist, Kristin H., E-mail: kgilchrist@rti.org; Lewis, Gregory F.; Gay, Elaine A.; Sellgren, Katelyn L.; Grego, Sonia

    2015-10-15

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) recording extracellular field potentials of human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CM) provide a rich data set for functional assessment of drug response. The aim of this work is the development of a method for a systematic analysis of arrhythmia using MEAs, with emphasis on the development of six parameters accounting for different types of cardiomyocyte signal irregularities. We describe a software approach to carry out such analysis automatically including generation of a heat map that enables quick visualization of arrhythmic liability of compounds. We also implemented signal processing techniques for reliable extraction of the repolarization peak for field potential duration (FPD) measurement even from recordings with low signal to noise ratios. We measured hiPS-CM's on a 48 well MEA system with 5 minute recordings at multiple time points (0.5, 1, 2 and 4 h) after drug exposure. We evaluated concentration responses for seven compounds with a combination of hERG, QT and clinical proarrhythmia properties: Verapamil, Ranolazine, Flecainide, Amiodarone, Ouabain, Cisapride, and Terfenadine. The predictive utility of MEA parameters as surrogates of these clinical effects were examined. The beat rate and FPD results exhibited good correlations with previous MEA studies in stem cell derived cardiomyocytes and clinical data. The six-parameter arrhythmia assessment exhibited excellent predictive agreement with the known arrhythmogenic potential of the tested compounds, and holds promise as a new method to predict arrhythmic liability. - Highlights: • Six parameters describing arrhythmia were defined and measured for known compounds. • Software for efficient parameter extraction from large MEA data sets was developed. • The proposed cellular parameter set is predictive of clinical drug proarrhythmia.

  15. Dyspepsia and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): is there any correlation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simadibrata, Marcellus

    2009-10-01

    Dyspepsia is a syndrome characterized by symptoms and signs of upper gastrointestinal tract and the adjacent organs. It is estimated that 25% of the community have symptoms of dyspepsia syndrome. One-third of patients who visit general physician practices are patients with dyspepsia syndrome; and half of patients who visit gastroenterologists are also patients with dyspepsia syndrome. Dyspepsia syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are very prevalent in the community throughout the world.Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is more and more commonly found in daily medical practice. Until now,the natural history of disease on GERD and dyspepsia is hardly understood, even though many scientists studied both conditions and there are frequently overlapping. In an individual, GERD and dyspepsia may occur simultaneously and therefore they are hardly to be discriminated.The management of GERD is performed in keeping with Indonesia and Asia Pacific consensus, life-style modification and administering the acid suppression agents (Proton pump inhibitor (drug of choice), H2-receptor antagonist, etc),prokinetic agents (Cisapride, domperidone, etc). Life-style modification shall be performed as follows, i.e. sleep with 30-45 degree elevated head or upper chest, do not avoid sour beverages, chocolate, coffee or alcohol, avoid fat and various fried foods, sour food, less stress, stop smoking, small but frequent feeding, etc. There is a correlation between dyspepsia syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease(GERD), particularly between the functional dyspepsia and non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux (NERD). More appropriate definition is necessary to differentiate the dyspepsia syndrome and GERD. Further studies are needed to establish distinct definition and criteria between dyspepsia syndrome and GERD.

  16. Electrophysiological Characteristics of Human iPSC-Derived Cardiomyocytes for the Assessment of Drug-Induced Proarrhythmic Potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Yamamoto

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to (1 characterize basic electrophysiological elements of human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs that correspond to clinical properties such as QT-RR relationship, (2 determine the applicability of QT correction and analysis methods, and (3 determine if and how these in-vitro parameters could be used in risk assessment for adverse drug-induced effects such as Torsades de pointes (TdP. Field potential recordings were obtained from commercially available hiPSC-CMs using multi-electrode array (MEA platform with and without ion channel antagonists in the recording solution. Under control conditions, MEA-measured interspike interval and field potential duration (FPD ranged widely from 1049 to 1635 ms and from 334 to 527 ms, respectively and provided positive linear regression coefficients similar to native QT-RR plots obtained from human electrocardiogram (ECG analyses in the ongoing cardiovascular-based Framingham Heart Study. Similar to minimizing the effect of heart rate on the QT interval, Fridericia's and Bazett's corrections reduced the influence of beat rate on hiPSC-CM FPD. In the presence of E-4031 and cisapride, inhibitors of the rapid delayed rectifier potassium current, hiPSC-CMs showed reverse use-dependent FPD prolongation. Categorical analysis, which is usually applied to clinical QT studies, was applicable to hiPSC-CMs for evaluating torsadogenic risks with FPD and/or corrected FPD. Together, this results of this study links hiPSC-CM electrophysiological endpoints to native ECG endpoints, demonstrates the appropriateness of clinical analytical practices as applied to hiPSC-CMs, and suggests that hiPSC-CMs are a reliable models for assessing the arrhythmogenic potential of drug candidates in human.

  17. Itopride in the treatment of functional dyspepsia in Chinese patients: a prospective, multicentre, post-marketing observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jing; Yuan, Yao-Zong; Holtmann, Gerald

    2011-12-01

    Prokinetic agents are commonly used in the symptomatic treatment of functional dyspepsia (FD). Safety or efficacy issues associated with the use of available prokinetics, such as metoclopramide, domperidone, cisapride and mosapride, mean there is a need for an effective and well tolerated prokinetic agent. Itopride is a novel prokinetic agent with a dual mode of action, good safety profile and documented efficacy in placebo-controlled trials. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness and safety of itopride in the management of FD. This was a prospective, multicentre, post-marketing observational study carried out in private outpatient clinics throughout China. The study included patients with symptomatic FD aged ≥18 years. Patients were prescribed itopride 50 mg three times daily before meals for 4 weeks, after which there was a 2-week follow-up period during which they did not take itopride. Effectiveness and tolerability data obtained from patients who completed 4 weeks of therapy were analysed. The treatment response rate after 4 weeks was measured by patient global assessment; scores at the end of treatment were compared with baseline scores. Response rate based on symptom scoring was also measured after 4 weeks, with an effective treatment being defined as a symptom improvement of ≥50%. In total, 587 patients with FD were enrolled. The mean ± SD difference in the total symptom score before and after the 4-week treatment period was -5.62 ± 3.27, corresponding to a 69.23 ± 26.53% reduction from baseline (p Itopride was an effective and well tolerated drug in the management of FD in this patient population.

  18. The interaction of substituted benzamides with brain benzodiazepine binding sites in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, R W; Lowther, S; Chivers, J; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D; Testa, B

    1988-08-01

    1. The interaction of substituted benzamides with brain benzodiazepine (BDZ) binding sites was examined by their ability to displace [3H]-flunitrazepam ([3H]-FNM) from specific binding sites in bovine cortical membranes in vitro. 2. Clebopride, Delagrange 2674, Delagrange 2335 and BRL 20627 displayed concentration-dependent displacement of [3H]-FNM with IC50 values of 73 nM, 132 nM, 7.7 microM and 5.9 microM, respectively. Other substituted benzamides including metoclopramide, sulpiride, tiapride, sultopride and cisapride were inactive at 10(-5) M. 3. Inhibition by clebopride and Delagrange 2674 of [3H]-FNM binding was apparently competitive and readily reversible. 4. In the presence of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), the ability of diazepam and Delagrange 2674 to displace [3H]-Ro 15-1788 binding was increased 3.6 and 1.6 fold respectively, compared to the absence of GABA, while ethyl beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (beta CCE) and clebopride were less potent in the presence of GABA. 5. Diazepam was 30 fold less potent at displacing [3H]-Ro 15-1788 in membranes that had been photoaffinity labelled with FNM than in control membranes, whereas the potency of beta CCE did not differ. Clebopride and Delagrange 2674 showed a less than two fold loss of potency in photoaffinity labelled membranes. 6. The pattern of binding of clebopride and Delagrange 2674 in these in vitro tests is similar to that found previously with partial agonists or antagonists at BDZ binding sites. 7. Clebopride and Delagrange 2674 inhibited [3H]-FNM binding with similar potency in rat cerebellar and hippocampal membranes, suggesting they have no selectivity for BDZ1 and BDZ2 binding sites. 8. Clebopride and Delagrange 2674 are structurally dissimilar to other BDZ ligands and represent another chemical structure to probe brain BDZ binding sites.

  19. Gastrointestinal dysmotility disorders in critically ill dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, KimMi; Cortes, Yonaira; Eirmann, Laura

    2016-01-01

    To review the human and veterinary literature regarding gastrointestinal (GI) dysmotility disorders in respect to pathogenesis, patient risk factors, and treatment options in critically ill dogs and cats. GI dysmotility is a common sequela of critical illness in people and small animals. The most common GI motility disorders in critically ill people and small animals include esophageal dysmotility, delayed gastric emptying, functional intestinal obstruction (ie, ileus), and colonic motility abnormalities. Medical conditions associated with the highest risk of GI dysmotility include mechanical ventilation, sepsis, shock, trauma, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, and multiple organ failure. The incidence and pathophysiology of GI dysmotility in critically ill small animals is incompletely understood. A presumptive diagnosis of GI dysmotility is often made in high-risk patient populations following detection of persistent regurgitation, vomiting, lack of tolerance of enteral nutrition, abdominal pain, and constipation. Definitive diagnosis is established via radioscintigraphy; however, this diagnostic tool is not readily available and is difficult to perform on small animals. Other diagnostic modalities that have been evaluated include abdominal ultrasonography, radiographic contrast, and tracer studies. Therapy is centered at optimizing GI perfusion, enhancement of GI motility, and early enteral nutrition. Pharmacological interventions are instituted to promote gastric emptying and effective intestinal motility and prevention of complications. Promotility agents, including ranitidine/nizatidine, metoclopramide, erythromycin, and cisapride are the mainstays of therapy in small animals. The development of complications related to GI dysmotility (eg, gastroesophageal reflux and aspiration) have been associated with increased mortality risk. Institution of prophylaxic therapy is recommended in high-risk patients, however, no consensus exists regarding optimal

  20. Evidence-Based Recommendations for Short- and Long-Term Management of Uninvestigated Dyspepsia in Primary Care: An Update of the Canadian Dyspepsia Working Group (CanDys Clinical Management Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander JO Veldhuyzen van Zanten

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is an update to and extension of the previous systematic review on the primary care management of patients with uninvestigated dyspepsia (UD. The original publication of the clinical management tool focused on the initial four- to eight-week assessment of UD. This update is based on new data from systematic reviews and clinical trials relevant to UD. There is now direct clinical evidence supporting a test-and-treat approach in patients with nondominant heartburn dyspepsia symptoms, and head-to-head comparisons show that use of a proton pump inhibitor is superior to the use of H2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs in the initial treatment of Helicobacter pylori-negative dyspepsia patients. Cisapride is no longer available as a treatment option and evidence for other prokinetic agents is lacking. In patients with long-standing heartburn-dominant (ie, gastroesophageal reflux disease and nonheartburn-dominant dyspepsia, a once-in-a-lifetime endoscopy is recommended. Endoscopy should also be considered in patients with new-onset dyspepsia that develops after the age of 50 years. Conventional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, acetylsalicylic acid and cyclooxygenase-2-selective inhibitors can all cause dyspepsia. If their use cannot be discontinued, cotherapy with either a proton pump inhibitor, misoprostol or high-dose H2RAs is recommended, although the evidence is based on ulcer data and not dyspepsia data. In patients with nonheartburn-dominant dyspepsia, noninvasive testing for H pylori should be performed and treatment given if positive. When starting nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for a prolonged course, testing and treatment with H2RAs are advised if patients have a history of previous ulcers or ulcer bleeding.

  1. Translating QT interval prolongation from conscious dogs to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Vincent F S; Smania, Giovanni; Yu, Huixin; Graf, Ramona; Chain, Anne S Y; Danhof, Meindert; Della Pasqua, Oscar

    2017-02-01

    In spite of screening procedures in early drug development, uncertainty remains about the propensity of new chemical entities (NCEs) to prolong the QT/QTc interval. The evaluation of proarrhythmic activity using a comprehensive in vitro proarrhythmia assay does not fully account for pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) differences in vivo. In the present study, we evaluated the correlation between drug-specific parameters describing QT interval prolongation in dogs and in humans. Using estimates of the drug-specific parameter, data on the slopes of the PKPD relationships of nine compounds with varying QT-prolonging effects (cisapride, sotalol, moxifloxacin, carabersat, GSK945237, SB237376 and GSK618334, and two anonymized NCEs) were analysed. Mean slope estimates varied between -0.98 ms μM -1 and 6.1 ms μM -1 in dogs and -10 ms μM -1 and 90 ms μM -1 in humans, indicating a wide range of effects on the QT interval. Linear regression techniques were then applied to characterize the correlation between the parameter estimates across species. For compounds without a mixed ion channel block, a correlation was observed between the drug-specific parameter in dogs and humans (y = -1.709 + 11.6x; R 2  = 0.989). These results show that per unit concentration, the drug effect on the QT interval in humans is 11.6-fold larger than in dogs. Together with information about the expected therapeutic exposure, the evidence of a correlation between the compound-specific parameter in dogs and in humans represents an opportunity for translating preclinical safety data before progression into the clinic. Whereas further investigation is required to establish the generalizability of our findings, this approach can be used with clinical trial simulations to predict the probability of QT prolongation in humans. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. Approaching disturbed sleep in late Parkinson's Disease: first step toward a proposal for a revised UPDRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askenasy, J J

    2001-10-01

    nigrostriatal degeneration and the increased sensitivity of the terminals which alter the normal modulator mechanisms of motor centers in LPD patients. Among the many neurotransmitters of the nigro-striatal pathway one can distinguish two with a major influence on REM and non-REM sleep. REM sleep corresponds to an increased cholinergic receptor activity and a decreased dopaminergic activity. This is the reason why REM sleep deprivation by suppressing cholinergic receptor activity ameliorates LPD motor symptoms. L-Dopa and its agonists by suppressing cholinergic receptors suppress REM sleep. L-Dopa has also an arousal effect on Non-REM sleep, repeatedly awakening the patient and enhancing the fragmentation due to the involuntary movements. (c) Socio-physical assistance. (3) The specific therapy consists of: LFS-Sinemet CR, Tolcapone, Intranasal Desmopressin, Domperidon, Cisapride and neurosurgery; SRBD-CPAP, UPPP, nasal interventions, losing weight; RLS-PLM-Benzodiazepine (Clonazepam), Opioid, Apomorphine infusion; RBD-Clonazepam and dopaminergic agonists; SRH-Clozapine, Risperidone; SRPD-Nortriptyline, Clozapine, Olanzepine; SA-adjustment; EDS-arousing drugs. Each therapeutic approach must be tailored to the individual LPD patient.