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Sample records for cis-regulatory deletion disrupting

  1. Deletion hotspots in AMACR promoter CpG island are cis-regulatory elements controlling the gene expression in the colon.

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    Xiang Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Alpha-methylacyl-coenzyme A racemase (AMACR regulates peroxisomal beta-oxidation of phytol-derived, branched-chain fatty acids from red meat and dairy products -- suspected risk factors for colon carcinoma (CCa. AMACR was first found overexpressed in prostate cancer but not in benign glands and is now an established diagnostic marker for prostate cancer. Aberrant expression of AMACR was recently reported in Cca; however, little is known about how this gene is abnormally activated in cancer. By using a panel of immunostained-laser-capture-microdissected clinical samples comprising the entire colon adenoma-carcinoma sequence, we show that deregulation of AMACR during colon carcinogenesis involves two nonrandom events, resulting in the mutually exclusive existence of double-deletion at CG3 and CG10 and deletion of CG12-16 in a newly identified CpG island within the core promoter of AMACR. The double-deletion at CG3 and CG10 was found to be a somatic lesion. It existed in histologically normal colonic glands and tubular adenomas with low AMACR expression and was absent in villous adenomas and all CCas expressing variable levels of AMACR. In contrast, deletion of CG12-16 was shown to be a constitutional allele with a frequency of 43% in a general population. Its prevalence reached 89% in moderately differentiated CCas strongly expressing AMACR but only existed at 14% in poorly differentiated CCas expressing little or no AMACR. The DNA sequences housing these deletions were found to be putative cis-regulatory elements for Sp1 at CG3 and CG10, and ZNF202 at CG12-16. Chromatin immunoprecipitation, siRNA knockdown, gel shift assay, ectopic expression, and promoter analyses supported the regulation by Sp1 and ZNF202 of AMACR gene expression in an opposite manner. Our findings identified key in vivo events and novel transcription factors responsible for AMACR regulation in CCas and suggested these AMACR deletions may have diagnostic/prognostic value for

  2. Abundant raw material for cis-regulatory evolution in humans

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    Rockman, Matthew V.; Wray, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in gene expression and regulation--due in particular to the evolution of cis-regulatory DNA sequences--may underlie many evolutionary changes in phenotypes, yet little is known about the distribution of such variation in populations. We present in this study the first survey of experimentally validated functional cis-regulatory polymorphism. These data are derived from more than 140 polymorphisms involved in the regulation of 107 genes in Homo sapiens, the eukaryote species with the most available data. We find that functional cis-regulatory variation is widespread in the human genome and that the consequent variation in gene expression is twofold or greater for 63% of the genes surveyed. Transcription factor-DNA interactions are highly polymorphic, and regulatory interactions have been gained and lost within human populations. On average, humans are heterozygous at more functional cis-regulatory sites (>16,000) than at amino acid positions (human phenotypic variation.

  3. The identification of cis-regulatory elements: A review from a machine learning perspective.

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    Li, Yifeng; Chen, Chih-Yu; Kaye, Alice M; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2015-12-01

    The majority of the human genome consists of non-coding regions that have been called junk DNA. However, recent studies have unveiled that these regions contain cis-regulatory elements, such as promoters, enhancers, silencers, insulators, etc. These regulatory elements can play crucial roles in controlling gene expressions in specific cell types, conditions, and developmental stages. Disruption to these regions could contribute to phenotype changes. Precisely identifying regulatory elements is key to deciphering the mechanisms underlying transcriptional regulation. Cis-regulatory events are complex processes that involve chromatin accessibility, transcription factor binding, DNA methylation, histone modifications, and the interactions between them. The development of next-generation sequencing techniques has allowed us to capture these genomic features in depth. Applied analysis of genome sequences for clinical genetics has increased the urgency for detecting these regions. However, the complexity of cis-regulatory events and the deluge of sequencing data require accurate and efficient computational approaches, in particular, machine learning techniques. In this review, we describe machine learning approaches for predicting transcription factor binding sites, enhancers, and promoters, primarily driven by next-generation sequencing data. Data sources are provided in order to facilitate testing of novel methods. The purpose of this review is to attract computational experts and data scientists to advance this field.

  4. The role of cis regulatory evolution in maize domestication.

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    Lemmon, Zachary H; Bukowski, Robert; Sun, Qi; Doebley, John F

    2014-11-01

    Gene expression differences between divergent lineages caused by modification of cis regulatory elements are thought to be important in evolution. We assayed genome-wide cis and trans regulatory differences between maize and its wild progenitor, teosinte, using deep RNA sequencing in F1 hybrid and parent inbred lines for three tissue types (ear, leaf and stem). Pervasive regulatory variation was observed with approximately 70% of ∼17,000 genes showing evidence of regulatory divergence between maize and teosinte. However, many fewer genes (1,079 genes) show consistent cis differences with all sampled maize and teosinte lines. For ∼70% of these 1,079 genes, the cis differences are specific to a single tissue. The number of genes with cis regulatory differences is greatest for ear tissue, which underwent a drastic transformation in form during domestication. As expected from the domestication bottleneck, maize possesses less cis regulatory variation than teosinte with this deficit greatest for genes showing maize-teosinte cis regulatory divergence, suggesting selection on cis regulatory differences during domestication. Consistent with selection on cis regulatory elements, genes with cis effects correlated strongly with genes under positive selection during maize domestication and improvement, while genes with trans regulatory effects did not. We observed a directional bias such that genes with cis differences showed higher expression of the maize allele more often than the teosinte allele, suggesting domestication favored up-regulation of gene expression. Finally, this work documents the cis and trans regulatory changes between maize and teosinte in over 17,000 genes for three tissues.

  5. The role of cis regulatory evolution in maize domestication.

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    Zachary H Lemmon

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression differences between divergent lineages caused by modification of cis regulatory elements are thought to be important in evolution. We assayed genome-wide cis and trans regulatory differences between maize and its wild progenitor, teosinte, using deep RNA sequencing in F1 hybrid and parent inbred lines for three tissue types (ear, leaf and stem. Pervasive regulatory variation was observed with approximately 70% of ∼17,000 genes showing evidence of regulatory divergence between maize and teosinte. However, many fewer genes (1,079 genes show consistent cis differences with all sampled maize and teosinte lines. For ∼70% of these 1,079 genes, the cis differences are specific to a single tissue. The number of genes with cis regulatory differences is greatest for ear tissue, which underwent a drastic transformation in form during domestication. As expected from the domestication bottleneck, maize possesses less cis regulatory variation than teosinte with this deficit greatest for genes showing maize-teosinte cis regulatory divergence, suggesting selection on cis regulatory differences during domestication. Consistent with selection on cis regulatory elements, genes with cis effects correlated strongly with genes under positive selection during maize domestication and improvement, while genes with trans regulatory effects did not. We observed a directional bias such that genes with cis differences showed higher expression of the maize allele more often than the teosinte allele, suggesting domestication favored up-regulation of gene expression. Finally, this work documents the cis and trans regulatory changes between maize and teosinte in over 17,000 genes for three tissues.

  6. The Role of cis Regulatory Evolution in Maize Domestication

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    Lemmon, Zachary H.; Bukowski, Robert; Sun, Qi; Doebley, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression differences between divergent lineages caused by modification of cis regulatory elements are thought to be important in evolution. We assayed genome-wide cis and trans regulatory differences between maize and its wild progenitor, teosinte, using deep RNA sequencing in F1 hybrid and parent inbred lines for three tissue types (ear, leaf and stem). Pervasive regulatory variation was observed with approximately 70% of ∼17,000 genes showing evidence of regulatory divergence between maize and teosinte. However, many fewer genes (1,079 genes) show consistent cis differences with all sampled maize and teosinte lines. For ∼70% of these 1,079 genes, the cis differences are specific to a single tissue. The number of genes with cis regulatory differences is greatest for ear tissue, which underwent a drastic transformation in form during domestication. As expected from the domestication bottleneck, maize possesses less cis regulatory variation than teosinte with this deficit greatest for genes showing maize-teosinte cis regulatory divergence, suggesting selection on cis regulatory differences during domestication. Consistent with selection on cis regulatory elements, genes with cis effects correlated strongly with genes under positive selection during maize domestication and improvement, while genes with trans regulatory effects did not. We observed a directional bias such that genes with cis differences showed higher expression of the maize allele more often than the teosinte allele, suggesting domestication favored up-regulation of gene expression. Finally, this work documents the cis and trans regulatory changes between maize and teosinte in over 17,000 genes for three tissues. PMID:25375861

  7. cis-Regulatory control of the initial neurogenic pattern of onecut gene expression in the sea urchin embryo.

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    Barsi, Julius C; Davidson, Eric H

    2016-01-01

    Specification of the ciliated band (CB) of echinoid embryos executes three spatial functions essential for postgastrular organization. These are establishment of a band about 5 cells wide which delimits and bounds other embryonic territories; definition of a neurogenic domain within this band; and generation within it of arrays of ciliary cells that bear the special long cilia from which the structure derives its name. In Strongylocentrotus purpuratus the spatial coordinates of the future ciliated band are initially and exactly determined by the disposition of a ring of cells that transcriptionally activate the onecut homeodomain regulatory gene, beginning in blastula stage, long before the appearance of the CB per se. Thus the cis-regulatory apparatus that governs onecut expression in the blastula directly reveals the genomic sequence code by which these aspects of the spatial organization of the embryo are initially determined. We screened the entire onecut locus and its flanking region for transcriptionally active cis-regulatory elements, and by means of BAC recombineered deletions identified three separated and required cis-regulatory modules that execute different functions. The operating logic of the crucial spatial control module accounting for the spectacularly precise and beautiful early onecut expression domain depends on spatial repression. Previously predicted oral ectoderm and aboral ectoderm repressors were identified by cis-regulatory mutation as the products of goosecoid and irxa genes respectively, while the pan-ectodermal activator SoxB1 supplies a transcriptional driver function.

  8. CREME: Cis-Regulatory Module Explorer for the Human Genome

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    Loots, G G; Sharan, R; Ovcharenko, I; Ben-Hur, A

    2004-02-11

    The binding of transcription factors to specific regulatory sequence elements is a primary mechanism for controlling gene transcription. Eukaryotic genes are often regulated by several transcription factors, whose binding sites are tightly clustered and form cis-regulatory modules. In this paper we present a web-server, CREME, for identifying and visualizing cis-regulatory modules in the promoter regions of a given set of potentially co-regulated genes. CREME relies on a database of putative transcription factor binding sites that have been annotated across the human genome using a library of position weight matrices and evolutionary conservation with the mouse and rat genomes. A search algorithm is applied to this dataset to identify combinations of transcription factors whose binding sites tend to co-occur in close proximity in the promoter regions of the input gene set. The identified cis-regulatory modules are statistically scored and significant combinations are reported and graphically visualized. Our web-server is available at http://creme.dcode.org/.

  9. Shared Enhancer Activity in the Limbs and Phallus and Functional Divergence of a Limb-Genital cis-Regulatory Element in Snakes.

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    Infante, Carlos R; Mihala, Alexandra G; Park, Sungdae; Wang, Jialiang S; Johnson, Kenji K; Lauderdale, James D; Menke, Douglas B

    2015-10-12

    The amniote phallus and limbs differ dramatically in their morphologies but share patterns of signaling and gene expression in early development. Thus far, the extent to which genital and limb transcriptional networks also share cis-regulatory elements has remained unexplored. We show that many limb enhancers are retained in snake genomes, suggesting that these elements may function in non-limb tissues. Consistent with this, our analysis of cis-regulatory activity in mice and Anolis lizards reveals that patterns of enhancer activity in embryonic limbs and genitalia overlap heavily. In mice, deletion of HLEB, an enhancer of Tbx4, produces defects in hindlimbs and genitalia, establishing the importance of this limb-genital enhancer for development of these different appendages. Further analyses demonstrate that the HLEB of snakes has lost hindlimb enhancer function while retaining genital activity. Our findings identify roles for Tbx4 in genital development and highlight deep similarities in cis-regulatory activity between limbs and genitalia.

  10. Mapping Association between Long-Range Cis-Regulatory Regions and Their Target Genes Using Comparative Genomics

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    Mongin, Emmanuel; Dewar, Ken; Blanchette, Mathieu

    In chordates, long-range cis-regulatory regions are involved in the control of transcription initiation (either as repressors or enhancers). They can be located as far as 1 Mb from the transcription start site of the target gene and can regulate more than one gene. Therefore, proper characterization of functional interactions between long-range cis-regulatory regions and their target genes remains problematic. We present a novel method to predict such interactions based on the analysis of rearrangements between the human and 16 other vertebrate genomes. Our method is based on the assumption that genome rearrangements that would disrupt the functional interaction between a cis-regulatory region and its target gene are likely to be deleterious. Therefore, conservation of synteny through evolution would be an indication of a functional interaction. We use our algorithm to classify a set of 1,406,084 putative associations from the human genome. This genome-wide map of interactions has many potential applications, including the selection of candidate regions prior to in vivo experimental characterization, a better characterization of regulatory regions involved in position effect diseases, and an improved understanding of the mechanisms and importance of long-range regulation.

  11. Deciphering cis-regulatory control in inflammatory cells.

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    Ghisletti, Serena; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2013-01-01

    In innate immune system cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells, deployment of inducible gene expression programmes in response to microbes and danger signals requires highly precise regulatory mechanisms. The inflammatory response has to be tailored based on both the triggering stimulus and its dose, and it has to be unfolded in a kinetically complex manner that suits the different phases of the inflammatory process. Genomic characterization of regulatory elements in this context indicated that transcriptional regulators involved in macrophage specification act as pioneer transcription factors (TFs) that generate regions of open chromatin that enable the recruitment of TFs activated in response to external inputs. Therefore, competence for responses to a specific stimulus is programmed at an early stage of differentiation by factors involved in lineage commitment and maintenance of cell identity, which are responsible for the organization of a cell-type-specific cis-regulatory repertoire. The basic functional and organizational principles that regulate inflammatory gene expression in professional cells of the innate immune system provide general paradigms on the interplay between differentiation and environmental responses. PMID:23650641

  12. Changes in Cis-regulatory Elements during Morphological Evolution

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    Yu-Lee Paul

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available How have animals evolved new body designs (morphological evolution? This requires explanations both for simple morphological changes, such as differences in pigmentation and hair patterns between different Drosophila populations and species, and also for more complex changes, such as differences in the forelimbs of mice and bats, and the necks of amphibians and reptiles. The genetic changes and pathways involved in these evolutionary steps require identification. Many, though not all, of these events occur by changes in cis-regulatory (enhancer elements within developmental genes. Enhancers are modular, each affecting expression in only one or a few tissues. Therefore it is possible to add, remove or alter an enhancer without producing changes in multiple tissues, and thereby avoid widespread (pleiotropic deleterious effects. Ideally, for a given step in morphological evolution it is necessary to identify (i the change in phenotype, (ii the changes in gene expression, (iii the DNA region, enhancer or otherwise, affected, (iv the mutation involved, (v the nature of the transcription or other factors that bind to this site. In practice these data are incomplete for most of the published studies upon morphological evolution. Here, the investigations are categorized according to how far these analyses have proceeded.

  13. Using hexamers to predict cis-regulatory motifs in Drosophila

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    Kibler Dennis

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cis-regulatory modules (CRMs are short stretches of DNA that help regulate gene expression in higher eukaryotes. They have been found up to 1 megabase away from the genes they regulate and can be located upstream, downstream, and even within their target genes. Due to the difficulty of finding CRMs using biological and computational techniques, even well-studied regulatory systems may contain CRMs that have not yet been discovered. Results We present a simple, efficient method (HexDiff based only on hexamer frequencies of known CRMs and non-CRM sequence to predict novel CRMs in regulatory systems. On a data set of 16 gap and pair-rule genes containing 52 known CRMs, predictions made by HexDiff had a higher correlation with the known CRMs than several existing CRM prediction algorithms: Ahab, Cluster Buster, MSCAN, MCAST, and LWF. After combining the results of the different algorithms, 10 putative CRMs were identified and are strong candidates for future study. The hexamers used by HexDiff to distinguish between CRMs and non-CRM sequence were also analyzed and were shown to be enriched in regulatory elements. Conclusion HexDiff provides an efficient and effective means for finding new CRMs based on known CRMs, rather than known binding sites.

  14. Favorable genomic environments for cis-regulatory evolution: A novel theoretical framework.

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    Maeso, Ignacio; Tena, Juan J

    2016-09-01

    Cis-regulatory changes are arguably the primary evolutionary source of animal morphological diversity. With the recent explosion of genome-wide comparisons of the cis-regulatory content in different animal species is now possible to infer general principles underlying enhancer evolution. However, these studies have also revealed numerous discrepancies and paradoxes, suggesting that the mechanistic causes and modes of cis-regulatory evolution are still not well understood and are probably much more complex than generally appreciated. Here, we argue that the mutational mechanisms and genomic regions generating new regulatory activities must comply with the constraints imposed by the molecular properties of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) and the organizational features of long-range chromatin interactions. Accordingly, we propose a new integrative evolutionary framework for cis-regulatory evolution based on two major premises for the origin of novel enhancer activity: (i) an accessible chromatin environment and (ii) compatibility with the 3D structure and interactions of pre-existing CREs. Mechanisms and DNA sequences not fulfilling these premises, will be less likely to have a measurable impact on gene expression and as such, will have a minor contribution to the evolution of gene regulation. Finally, we discuss current comparative cis-regulatory data under the light of this new evolutionary model, and propose that the two most prominent mechanisms for the evolution of cis-regulatory changes are the overprinting of ancestral CREs and the exaptation of transposable elements.

  15. Cis-regulatory Evolution of Chalcone-Synthase Expression in the Genus Arabidopsis

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    de Meaux, J. (Juliette); Pop, A.(National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest, Romania); Mitchell-Olds, T.

    2006-01-01

    The contribution of cis-regulation to adaptive evolutionary change is believed to be essential, yet little is known about the evolutionary rules that govern regulatory sequences. Here, we characterize the short-term evolutionary dynamics of a cis-regulatory region within and among two closely related species, A. lyrata and A. halleri, and compare our findings to A. thaliana. We focused on the cis-regulatory region of chalcone synthase (CHS), a key enzyme involved in the synthesis of plant sec...

  16. Prediction of tissue-specific cis-regulatory modules using Bayesian networks and regression trees

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    Chen Xiaoyu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vertebrates, a large part of gene transcriptional regulation is operated by cis-regulatory modules. These modules are believed to be regulating much of the tissue-specificity of gene expression. Results We develop a Bayesian network approach for identifying cis-regulatory modules likely to regulate tissue-specific expression. The network integrates predicted transcription factor binding site information, transcription factor expression data, and target gene expression data. At its core is a regression tree modeling the effect of combinations of transcription factors bound to a module. A new unsupervised EM-like algorithm is developed to learn the parameters of the network, including the regression tree structure. Conclusion Our approach is shown to accurately identify known human liver and erythroid-specific modules. When applied to the prediction of tissue-specific modules in 10 different tissues, the network predicts a number of important transcription factor combinations whose concerted binding is associated to specific expression.

  17. Computational and molecular dissection of an X-box cis-Regulatory module

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    Warrington, Timothy Burton

    2015-01-01

    Ciliopathies are a class of human diseases marked by dysfunction of the cellular organelle, cilia. While many of the molecular components that make up cilia have been identified and studied, comparatively little is understood about the transcriptional regulation of genes encoding these components. The conserved transcription factor Regulatory Factor X (RFX)/DAF-19, which acts through binding to the cis-regulatory motif known as X-box, has been shown to regulate ciliary genes in many animals f...

  18. cis-Regulatory and Protein Evolution in Orthologous and Duplicate Genes

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    Castillo-Davis, Cristian I.; Hartl, Daniel L.; Achaz, Guillaume

    2004-01-01

    The relationship between protein and regulatory sequence evolution is a central question in molecular evolution. It is currently not known to what extent changes in gene expression are coupled with the evolution of protein coding sequences, or whether these changes differ among orthologs (species homologs) and paralogs (duplicate genes). Here, we develop a method to measure the extent of functionally relevant cis-regulatory sequence change in homologous genes, and validate it using microarray...

  19. Genome-wide de novo prediction of cis-regulatory binding sites in prokaryotes

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    Zhang, Shaoqiang; Xu, Minli; Li, Shan; Su, Zhengchang

    2009-01-01

    Although cis-regulatory binding sites (CRBSs) are at least as important as the coding sequences in a genome, our general understanding of them in most sequenced genomes is very limited due to the lack of efficient and accurate experimental and computational methods for their characterization, which has largely hindered our understanding of many important biological processes. In this article, we describe a novel algorithm for genome-wide de novo prediction of CRBSs with high accuracy. We desi...

  20. Deletion of the secretory vesicle proteins IA-2 and IA-2β disrupts circadian rhythms of cardiovascular and physical activity

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    Kim, Soo Mi; Power, Andrea; Brown, Timothy M.; Constance, Cara M.; Coon, Steven L.; Nishimura, Takuya; Hirai, Hiroki; Cai, Tao; Eisner, Christoph; David R Weaver; Piggins, Hugh D.; Klein, David C.; Schnermann, Jürgen; Notkins, Abner L.

    2009-01-01

    Targeted deletion of IA-2 and IA-2β, major autoantigens in type 1 diabetes and transmembrane secretory vesicle proteins, results in impaired secretion of hormones and neurotransmitters. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of these deletions on daily rhythms in blood pressure, heart rate, core body temperature, and spontaneous physical and neuronal activity. We found that deletion of both IA-2 and IA-2β profoundly disrupts the usual diurnal variation of each of these parameters, wher...

  1. An in vivo cis-regulatory screen at the type 2 diabetes associated TCF7L2 locus identifies multiple tissue-specific enhancers.

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    Daniel Savic

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have repeatedly shown an association between non-coding variants in the TCF7L2 locus and risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D, implicating a role for cis-regulatory variation within this locus in disease etiology. Supporting this hypothesis, we previously localized complex regulatory activity to the TCF7L2 T2D-associated interval using an in vivo bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC enhancer-trapping reporter strategy. To follow-up on this broad initial survey of the TCF7L2 regulatory landscape, we performed a fine-mapping enhancer scan using in vivo mouse transgenic reporter assays. We functionally interrogated approximately 50% of the sequences within the T2D-associated interval, utilizing sequence conservation within this 92-kb interval to determine the regulatory potential of all evolutionary conserved sequences that exhibited conservation to the non-eutherian mammal opossum. Included in this study was a detailed functional interrogation of sequences spanning both protective and risk alleles of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs7903146, which has exhibited allele-specific enhancer function in pancreatic beta cells. Using these assays, we identified nine segments regulating various aspects of the TCF7L2 expression profile and that constitute nearly 70% of the sequences tested. These results highlight the regulatory complexity of this interval and support the notion that a TCF7L2 cis-regulatory disruption leads to T2D predisposition.

  2. Bounded search for de novo identification of degenerate cis-regulatory elements

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    Khetani Radhika S

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification of statistically overrepresented sequences in the upstream regions of coregulated genes should theoretically permit the identification of potential cis-regulatory elements. However, in practice many cis-regulatory elements are highly degenerate, precluding the use of an exhaustive word-counting strategy for their identification. While numerous methods exist for inferring base distributions using a position weight matrix, recent studies suggest that the independence assumptions inherent in the model, as well as the inability to reach a global optimum, limit this approach. Results In this paper, we report PRISM, a degenerate motif finder that leverages the relationship between the statistical significance of a set of binding sites and that of the individual binding sites. PRISM first identifies overrepresented, non-degenerate consensus motifs, then iteratively relaxes each one into a high-scoring degenerate motif. This approach requires no tunable parameters, thereby lending itself to unbiased performance comparisons. We therefore compare PRISM's performance against nine popular motif finders on 28 well-characterized S. cerevisiae regulons. PRISM consistently outperforms all other programs. Finally, we use PRISM to predict the binding sites of uncharacterized regulons. Our results support a proposed mechanism of action for the yeast cell-cycle transcription factor Stb1, whose binding site has not been determined experimentally. Conclusion The relationship between statistical measures of the binding sites and the set as a whole leads to a simple means of identifying the diverse range of cis-regulatory elements to which a protein binds. This approach leverages the advantages of word-counting, in that position dependencies are implicitly accounted for and local optima are more easily avoided. While we sacrifice guaranteed optimality to prevent the exponential blowup of exhaustive search, we prove that the error

  3. Expression-guided in silico evaluation of candidate cis regulatory codes for Drosophila muscle founder cells.

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    Anthony A Philippakis

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available While combinatorial models of transcriptional regulation can be inferred for metazoan systems from a priori biological knowledge, validation requires extensive and time-consuming experimental work. Thus, there is a need for computational methods that can evaluate hypothesized cis regulatory codes before the difficult task of experimental verification is undertaken. We have developed a novel computational framework (termed "CodeFinder" that integrates transcription factor binding site and gene expression information to evaluate whether a hypothesized transcriptional regulatory model (TRM; i.e., a set of co-regulating transcription factors is likely to target a given set of co-expressed genes. Our basic approach is to simultaneously predict cis regulatory modules (CRMs associated with a given gene set and quantify the enrichment for combinatorial subsets of transcription factor binding site motifs comprising the hypothesized TRM within these predicted CRMs. As a model system, we have examined a TRM experimentally demonstrated to drive the expression of two genes in a sub-population of cells in the developing Drosophila mesoderm, the somatic muscle founder cells. This TRM was previously hypothesized to be a general mode of regulation for genes expressed in this cell population. In contrast, the present analyses suggest that a modified form of this cis regulatory code applies to only a subset of founder cell genes, those whose gene expression responds to specific genetic perturbations in a similar manner to the gene on which the original model was based. We have confirmed this hypothesis by experimentally discovering six (out of 12 tested new CRMs driving expression in the embryonic mesoderm, four of which drive expression in founder cells.

  4. Rapid evolution of cis-regulatory sequences via local point mutations

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    Stone, J. R.; Wray, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    Although the evolution of protein-coding sequences within genomes is well understood, the same cannot be said of the cis-regulatory regions that control transcription. Yet, changes in gene expression are likely to constitute an important component of phenotypic evolution. We simulated the evolution of new transcription factor binding sites via local point mutations. The results indicate that new binding sites appear and become fixed within populations on microevolutionary timescales under an assumption of neutral evolution. Even combinations of two new binding sites evolve very quickly. We predict that local point mutations continually generate considerable genetic variation that is capable of altering gene expression.

  5. Identification of a cis-regulatory element by transient analysis of co-ordinately regulated genes

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    Allan Andrew C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors (TFs co-ordinately regulate target genes that are dispersed throughout the genome. This co-ordinate regulation is achieved, in part, through the interaction of transcription factors with conserved cis-regulatory motifs that are in close proximity to the target genes. While much is known about the families of transcription factors that regulate gene expression in plants, there are few well characterised cis-regulatory motifs. In Arabidopsis, over-expression of the MYB transcription factor PAP1 (PRODUCTION OF ANTHOCYANIN PIGMENT 1 leads to transgenic plants with elevated anthocyanin levels due to the co-ordinated up-regulation of genes in the anthocyanin biosynthetic pathway. In addition to the anthocyanin biosynthetic genes, there are a number of un-associated genes that also change in expression level. This may be a direct or indirect consequence of the over-expression of PAP1. Results Oligo array analysis of PAP1 over-expression Arabidopsis plants identified genes co-ordinately up-regulated in response to the elevated expression of this transcription factor. Transient assays on the promoter regions of 33 of these up-regulated genes identified eight promoter fragments that were transactivated by PAP1. Bioinformatic analysis on these promoters revealed a common cis-regulatory motif that we showed is required for PAP1 dependent transactivation. Conclusion Co-ordinated gene regulation by individual transcription factors is a complex collection of both direct and indirect effects. Transient transactivation assays provide a rapid method to identify direct target genes from indirect target genes. Bioinformatic analysis of the promoters of these direct target genes is able to locate motifs that are common to this sub-set of promoters, which is impossible to identify with the larger set of direct and indirect target genes. While this type of analysis does not prove a direct interaction between protein and DNA

  6. Genome-wide de novo prediction of cis-regulatory binding sites in prokaryotes

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    Zhang, Shaoqiang; Xu, Minli; Su, Zhengchang

    2009-01-01

    Although cis-regulatory binding sites (CRBSs) are at least as important as the coding sequences in a genome, our general understanding of them in most sequenced genomes is very limited due to the lack of efficient and accurate experimental and computational methods for their characterization, which has largely hindered our understanding of many important biological processes. In this article, we describe a novel algorithm for genome-wide de novo prediction of CRBSs with high accuracy. We designed our algorithm to circumvent three identified difficulties for CRBS prediction using comparative genomics principles based on a new method for the selection of reference genomes, a new metric for measuring the similarity of CRBSs, and a new graph clustering procedure. When operon structures are correctly predicted, our algorithm can predict 81% of known individual binding sites belonging to 94% of known cis-regulatory motifs in the Escherichia coli K12 genome, while achieving high prediction specificity. Our algorithm has also achieved similar prediction accuracy in the Bacillus subtilis genome, suggesting that it is very robust, and thus can be applied to any other sequenced prokaryotic genome. When compared with the prior state-of-the-art algorithms, our algorithm outperforms them in both prediction sensitivity and specificity. PMID:19383880

  7. Transcription of Mammalian cis-Regulatory Elements Is Restrained by Actively Enforced Early Termination.

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    Austenaa, Liv M I; Barozzi, Iros; Simonatto, Marta; Masella, Silvia; Della Chiara, Giulia; Ghisletti, Serena; Curina, Alessia; de Wit, Elzo; Bouwman, Britta A M; de Pretis, Stefano; Piccolo, Viviana; Termanini, Alberto; Prosperini, Elena; Pelizzola, Mattia; de Laat, Wouter; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2015-11-01

    Upon recruitment to active enhancers and promoters, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) generates short non-coding transcripts of unclear function. The mechanisms that control the length and the amount of ncRNAs generated by cis-regulatory elements are largely unknown. Here, we show that the adaptor protein WDR82 and its associated complexes actively limit such non-coding transcription. WDR82 targets the SET1 H3K4 methyltransferases and the nuclear protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) complexes to the initiating Pol II. WDR82 and PP1 also interact with components of the transcriptional termination and RNA processing machineries. Depletion of WDR82, SET1, or the PP1 subunit required for its nuclear import caused distinct but overlapping transcription termination defects at highly expressed genes and active enhancers and promoters, thus enabling the increased synthesis of unusually long ncRNAs. These data indicate that transcription initiated from cis-regulatory elements is tightly coordinated with termination mechanisms that impose the synthesis of short RNAs. PMID:26593720

  8. Plasticity of the cis-regulatory input function of a gene.

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    Avraham E Mayo

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The transcription rate of a gene is often controlled by several regulators that bind specific sites in the gene's cis-regulatory region. The combined effect of these regulators is described by a cis-regulatory input function. What determines the form of an input function, and how variable is it with respect to mutations? To address this, we employ the well-characterized lac operon of Escherichia coli, which has an elaborate input function, intermediate between Boolean AND-gate and OR-gate logic. We mapped in detail the input function of 12 variants of the lac promoter, each with different point mutations in the regulator binding sites, by means of accurate expression measurements from living cells. We find that even a few mutations can significantly change the input function, resulting in functions that resemble Pure AND gates, OR gates, or single-input switches. Other types of gates were not found. The variant input functions can be described in a unified manner by a mathematical model. The model also lets us predict which functions cannot be reached by point mutations. The input function that we studied thus appears to be plastic, in the sense that many of the mutations do not ruin the regulation completely but rather result in new ways to integrate the inputs.

  9. A primer on regression methods for decoding cis-regulatory logic

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    Das, Debopriya; Pellegrini, Matteo; Gray, Joe W.

    2009-03-03

    The rapidly emerging field of systems biology is helping us to understand the molecular determinants of phenotype on a genomic scale [1]. Cis-regulatory elements are major sequence-based determinants of biological processes in cells and tissues [2]. For instance, during transcriptional regulation, transcription factors (TFs) bind to very specific regions on the promoter DNA [2,3] and recruit the basal transcriptional machinery, which ultimately initiates mRNA transcription (Figure 1A). Learning cis-Regulatory Elements from Omics Data A vast amount of work over the past decade has shown that omics data can be used to learn cis-regulatory logic on a genome-wide scale [4-6]--in particular, by integrating sequence data with mRNA expression profiles. The most popular approach has been to identify over-represented motifs in promoters of genes that are coexpressed [4,7,8]. Though widely used, such an approach can be limiting for a variety of reasons. First, the combinatorial nature of gene regulation is difficult to explicitly model in this framework. Moreover, in many applications of this approach, expression data from multiple conditions are necessary to obtain reliable predictions. This can potentially limit the use of this method to only large data sets [9]. Although these methods can be adapted to analyze mRNA expression data from a pair of biological conditions, such comparisons are often confounded by the fact that primary and secondary response genes are clustered together--whereas only the primary response genes are expected to contain the functional motifs [10]. A set of approaches based on regression has been developed to overcome the above limitations [11-32]. These approaches have their foundations in certain biophysical aspects of gene regulation [26,33-35]. That is, the models are motivated by the expected transcriptional response of genes due to the binding of TFs to their promoters. While such methods have gathered popularity in the computational domain

  10. Lessons from Domestication: Targeting Cis-Regulatory Elements for Crop Improvement.

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    Swinnen, Gwen; Goossens, Alain; Pauwels, Laurens

    2016-06-01

    Domestication of wild plant species has provided us with crops that serve our human nutritional needs. Advanced DNA sequencing has propelled the unveiling of underlying genetic changes associated with domestication. Interestingly, many changes reside in cis-regulatory elements (CREs) that control the expression of an unmodified coding sequence. Sequence variation in CREs can impact gene expression levels, but also developmental timing and tissue specificity of expression. When genes are involved in multiple pathways or active in several organs and developmental stages CRE modifications are favored in contrast to mutations in coding regions, due to the lack of detrimental pleiotropic effects. Therefore, learning from domestication, we propose that CREs are interesting targets for genome editing to create new alleles for plant breeding.

  11. [Identification and mapping of cis-regulatory elements within long genomic sequences].

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    Akopov, S B; Chernov, I P; Vetchinova, A S; Bulanenkova, S S; Nikolaev, L G

    2007-01-01

    The publication of the human and other metazoan genome sequences opened up the possibility for mapping and analysis of genomic regulatory elements. Unfortunately, experimental data on genomic positions of such sequences as enhancers, silencers, insulators, transcription terminators, and replication origins are very limited, especially at the whole genome level. As most genomic regulatory elements (e.g., enhancers) are generally gene-, tissue-, or cell-specific, the prediction of these elements in silico is often ambiguous. Therefore, the development of high-throughput experimental approaches for identification and mapping of genomic functional elements is highly desirable. In this review we discuss novel approaches to high-throughput experimental identification of mammalian genomes cis-regulatory elements which is a necessary step toward the complete genome annotation. PMID:18240562

  12. SMCis: An Effective Algorithm for Discovery of Cis-Regulatory Modules

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    Guo, Haitao; Huo, Hongwei; Yu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) is a challenging problem in computational biology. Limited by the difficulty of using an HMM to model dependent features in transcriptional regulatory sequences (TRSs), the probabilistic modeling methods based on HMMs cannot accurately represent the distance between regulatory elements in TRSs and are cumbersome to model the prevailing dependencies between motifs within CRMs. We propose a probabilistic modeling algorithm called SMCis, which builds a more powerful CRM discovery model based on a hidden semi-Markov model. Our model characterizes the regulatory structure of CRMs and effectively models dependencies between motifs at a higher level of abstraction based on segments rather than nucleotides. Experimental results on three benchmark datasets indicate that our method performs better than the compared algorithms. PMID:27637070

  13. Conservation and evolution of cis-regulatory systems in ascomycete fungi.

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    Audrey P Gasch

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Relatively little is known about the mechanisms through which gene expression regulation evolves. To investigate this, we systematically explored the conservation of regulatory networks in fungi by examining the cis-regulatory elements that govern the expression of coregulated genes. We first identified groups of coregulated Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes enriched for genes with known upstream or downstream cis-regulatory sequences. Reasoning that many of these gene groups are coregulated in related species as well, we performed similar analyses on orthologs of coregulated S. cerevisiae genes in 13 other ascomycete species. We find that many species-specific gene groups are enriched for the same flanking regulatory sequences as those found in the orthologous gene groups fromS. cerevisiae, indicating that those regulatory systems have been conserved in multiple ascomycete species. In addition to these clear cases of regulatory conservation, we find examples of cis-element evolution that suggest multiple modes of regulatory diversification, including alterations in transcription factor-binding specificity, incorporation of new gene targets into an existing regulatory system, and cooption of regulatory systems to control a different set of genes. We investigated one example in greater detail by measuring the in vitro activity of the S. cerevisiae transcription factor Rpn4p and its orthologs from Candida albicans and Neurospora crassa. Our results suggest that the DNA binding specificity of these proteins has coevolved with the sequences found upstream of the Rpn4p target genes and suggest that Rpn4p has a different function in N. crassa.

  14. Brachyury, Foxa2 and the cis-Regulatory Origins of the Notochord.

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    Diana S José-Edwards

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A main challenge of modern biology is to understand how specific constellations of genes are activated to differentiate cells and give rise to distinct tissues. This study focuses on elucidating how gene expression is initiated in the notochord, an axial structure that provides support and patterning signals to embryos of humans and all other chordates. Although numerous notochord genes have been identified, the regulatory DNAs that orchestrate development and propel evolution of this structure by eliciting notochord gene expression remain mostly uncharted, and the information on their configuration and recurrence is still quite fragmentary. Here we used the simple chordate Ciona for a systematic analysis of notochord cis-regulatory modules (CRMs, and investigated their composition, architectural constraints, predictive ability and evolutionary conservation. We found that most Ciona notochord CRMs relied upon variable combinations of binding sites for the transcription factors Brachyury and/or Foxa2, which can act either synergistically or independently from one another. Notably, one of these CRMs contains a Brachyury binding site juxtaposed to an (AC microsatellite, an unusual arrangement also found in Brachyury-bound regulatory regions in mouse. In contrast, different subsets of CRMs relied upon binding sites for transcription factors of widely diverse families. Surprisingly, we found that neither intra-genomic nor interspecific conservation of binding sites were reliably predictive hallmarks of notochord CRMs. We propose that rather than obeying a rigid sequence-based cis-regulatory code, most notochord CRMs are rather unique. Yet, this study uncovered essential elements recurrently used by divergent chordates as basic building blocks for notochord CRMs.

  15. Identification of putative cis-regulatory elements in Cryptosporidium parvum by de novo pattern finding

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    Kissinger Jessica C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cryptosporidium parvum is a unicellular eukaryote in the phylum Apicomplexa. It is an obligate intracellular parasite that causes diarrhea and is a significant AIDS-related pathogen. Cryptosporidium parvum is not amenable to long-term laboratory cultivation or classical molecular genetic analysis. The parasite exhibits a complex life cycle, a broad host range, and fundamental mechanisms of gene regulation remain unknown. We have used data from the recently sequenced genome of this organism to uncover clues about gene regulation in C. parvum. We have applied two pattern finding algorithms MEME and AlignACE to identify conserved, over-represented motifs in the 5' upstream regions of genes in C. parvum. To support our findings, we have established comparative real-time -PCR expression profiles for the groups of genes examined computationally. Results We find that groups of genes that share a function or belong to a common pathway share upstream motifs. Different motifs are conserved upstream of different groups of genes. Comparative real-time PCR studies show co-expression of genes within each group (in sub-sets during the life cycle of the parasite, suggesting co-regulation of these genes may be driven by the use of conserved upstream motifs. Conclusion This is one of the first attempts to characterize cis-regulatory elements in the absence of any previously characterized elements and with very limited expression data (seven genes only. Using de novo pattern finding algorithms, we have identified specific DNA motifs that are conserved upstream of genes belonging to the same metabolic pathway or gene family. We have demonstrated the co-expression of these genes (often in subsets using comparative real-time-PCR experiments thus establishing evidence for these conserved motifs as putative cis-regulatory elements. Given the lack of prior information concerning expression patterns and organization of promoters in C. parvum we

  16. Massively parallel cis-regulatory analysis in the mammalian central nervous system.

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    Shen, Susan Q; Myers, Connie A; Hughes, Andrew E O; Byrne, Leah C; Flannery, John G; Corbo, Joseph C

    2016-02-01

    Cis-regulatory elements (CREs, e.g., promoters and enhancers) regulate gene expression, and variants within CREs can modulate disease risk. Next-generation sequencing has enabled the rapid generation of genomic data that predict the locations of CREs, but a bottleneck lies in functionally interpreting these data. To address this issue, massively parallel reporter assays (MPRAs) have emerged, in which barcoded reporter libraries are introduced into cells, and the resulting barcoded transcripts are quantified by next-generation sequencing. Thus far, MPRAs have been largely restricted to assaying short CREs in a limited repertoire of cultured cell types. Here, we present two advances that extend the biological relevance and applicability of MPRAs. First, we adapt exome capture technology to instead capture candidate CREs, thereby tiling across the targeted regions and markedly increasing the length of CREs that can be readily assayed. Second, we package the library into adeno-associated virus (AAV), thereby allowing delivery to target organs in vivo. As a proof of concept, we introduce a capture library of about 46,000 constructs, corresponding to roughly 3500 DNase I hypersensitive (DHS) sites, into the mouse retina by ex vivo plasmid electroporation and into the mouse cerebral cortex by in vivo AAV injection. We demonstrate tissue-specific cis-regulatory activity of DHSs and provide examples of high-resolution truncation mutation analysis for multiplex parsing of CREs. Our approach should enable massively parallel functional analysis of a wide range of CREs in any organ or species that can be infected by AAV, such as nonhuman primates and human stem cell-derived organoids.

  17. In silico evolution of the hunchback gene indicates redundancy in cis-regulatory organization and spatial gene expression

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    Zagrijchuk, Elizaveta A.; Sabirov, Marat A.; Holloway, David M.; Spirov, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    Biological development depends on the coordinated expression of genes in time and space. Developmental genes have extensive cis-regulatory regions which control their expression. These regions are organized in a modular manner, with different modules controlling expression at different times and locations. Both how modularity evolved and what function it serves are open questions. We present a computational model for the cis-regulation of the hunchback (hb) gene in the fruit fly (Drosophila). We simulate evolution (using an evolutionary computation approach from computer science) to find the optimal cis-regulatory arrangements for fitting experimental hb expression patterns. We find that the cis-regulatory region tends to readily evolve modularity. These cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) do not tend to control single spatial domains, but show a multi-CRM/multi-domain correspondence. We find that the CRM-domain correspondence seen in Drosophila evolves with a high probability in our model, supporting the biological relevance of the approach. The partial redundancy resulting from multi-CRM control may confer some biological robustness against corruption of regulatory sequences. The technique developed on hb could readily be applied to other multi-CRM developmental genes. PMID:24712536

  18. Deletion of an X-inactivation boundary disrupts adjacent gene silencing.

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    Lindsay M Horvath

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In mammalian females, genes on one X are largely silenced by X-chromosome inactivation (XCI, although some "escape" XCI and are expressed from both Xs. Escapees can closely juxtapose X-inactivated genes and provide a tractable model for assessing boundary function at epigenetically regulated loci. To delimit sequences at an XCI boundary, we examined female mouse embryonic stem cells carrying X-linked BAC transgenes derived from an endogenous escape locus. Previously we determined that large BACs carrying escapee Kdm5c and flanking X-inactivated transcripts are properly regulated. Here we identify two lines with truncated BACs that partially and completely delete the distal Kdm5c XCI boundary. This boundary is not required for escape, since despite integrating into regions that are normally X inactivated, transgenic Kdm5c escapes XCI, as determined by RNA FISH and by structurally adopting an active conformation that facilitates long-range preferential association with other escapees. Yet, XCI regulation is disrupted in the transgene fully lacking the distal boundary; integration site genes up to 350 kb downstream of the transgene now inappropriately escape XCI. Altogether, these results reveal two genetically separable XCI regulatory activities at Kdm5c. XCI escape is driven by a dominant element(s retained in the shortest transgene that therefore lies within or upstream of the Kdm5c locus. Additionally, the distal XCI boundary normally plays an essential role in preventing nearby genes from escaping XCI.

  19. Validation of skeletal muscle cis-regulatory module predictions reveals nucleotide composition bias in functional enhancers.

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    Andrew T Kwon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We performed a genome-wide scan for muscle-specific cis-regulatory modules (CRMs using three computational prediction programs. Based on the predictions, 339 candidate CRMs were tested in cell culture with NIH3T3 fibroblasts and C2C12 myoblasts for capacity to direct selective reporter gene expression to differentiated C2C12 myotubes. A subset of 19 CRMs validated as functional in the assay. The rate of predictive success reveals striking limitations of computational regulatory sequence analysis methods for CRM discovery. Motif-based methods performed no better than predictions based only on sequence conservation. Analysis of the properties of the functional sequences relative to inactive sequences identifies nucleotide sequence composition can be an important characteristic to incorporate in future methods for improved predictive specificity. Muscle-related TFBSs predicted within the functional sequences display greater sequence conservation than non-TFBS flanking regions. Comparison with recent MyoD and histone modification ChIP-Seq data supports the validity of the functional regions.

  20. Characterization of Putative cis-Regulatory Elements in Genes Preferentially Expressed in Arabidopsis Male Meiocytes

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    Junhua Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Meiosis is essential for plant reproduction because it is the process during which homologous chromosome pairing, synapsis, and meiotic recombination occur. The meiotic transcriptome is difficult to investigate because of the size of meiocytes and the confines of anther lobes. The recent development of isolation techniques has enabled the characterization of transcriptional profiles in male meiocytes of Arabidopsis. Gene expression in male meiocytes shows unique features. The direct interaction of transcription factors (TFs with DNA regulatory sequences forms the basis for the specificity of transcriptional regulation. Here, we identified putative cis-regulatory elements (CREs associated with male meiocyte-expressed genes using in silico tools. The upstream regions (1 kb of the top 50 genes preferentially expressed in Arabidopsis meiocytes possessed conserved motifs. These motifs are putative binding sites of TFs, some of which share common functions, such as roles in cell division. In combination with cell-type-specific analysis, our findings could be a substantial aid for the identification and experimental verification of the protein-DNA interactions for the specific TFs that drive gene expression in meiocytes.

  1. ChIP-Seq-Annotated Heliconius erato Genome Highlights Patterns of cis-Regulatory Evolution in Lepidoptera.

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    Lewis, James J; van der Burg, Karin R L; Mazo-Vargas, Anyi; Reed, Robert D

    2016-09-13

    Uncovering phylogenetic patterns of cis-regulatory evolution remains a fundamental goal for evolutionary and developmental biology. Here, we characterize the evolution of regulatory loci in butterflies and moths using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) annotation of regulatory elements across three stages of head development. In the process we provide a high-quality, functionally annotated genome assembly for the butterfly, Heliconius erato. Comparing cis-regulatory element conservation across six lepidopteran genomes, we find that regulatory sequences evolve at a pace similar to that of protein-coding regions. We also observe that elements active at multiple developmental stages are markedly more conserved than elements with stage-specific activity. Surprisingly, we also find that stage-specific proximal and distal regulatory elements evolve at nearly identical rates. Our study provides a benchmark for genome-wide patterns of regulatory element evolution in insects, and it shows that developmental timing of activity strongly predicts patterns of regulatory sequence evolution.

  2. Single nucleotide polymorphisms with cis-regulatory effects on long non-coding transcripts in human primary monocytes.

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    Jonas Carlsson Almlöf

    Full Text Available We applied genome-wide allele-specific expression analysis of monocytes from 188 samples. Monocytes were purified from white blood cells of healthy blood donors to detect cis-acting genetic variation that regulates the expression of long non-coding RNAs. We analysed 8929 regions harboring genes for potential long non-coding RNA that were retrieved from data from the ENCODE project. Of these regions, 60% were annotated as intergenic, which implies that they do not overlap with protein-coding genes. Focusing on the intergenic regions, and using stringent analysis of the allele-specific expression data, we detected robust cis-regulatory SNPs in 258 out of 489 informative intergenic regions included in the analysis. The cis-regulatory SNPs that were significantly associated with allele-specific expression of long non-coding RNAs were enriched to enhancer regions marked for active or bivalent, poised chromatin by histone modifications. Out of the lncRNA regions regulated by cis-acting regulatory SNPs, 20% (n = 52 were co-regulated with the closest protein coding gene. We compared the identified cis-regulatory SNPs with those in the catalog of SNPs identified by genome-wide association studies of human diseases and traits. This comparison identified 32 SNPs in loci from genome-wide association studies that displayed a strong association signal with allele-specific expression of non-coding RNAs in monocytes, with p-values ranging from 6.7×10(-7 to 9.5×10(-89. The identified cis-regulatory SNPs are associated with diseases of the immune system, like multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  3. Changes in cis-regulatory elements of a key floral regulator are associated with divergence of inflorescence architectures.

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    Kusters, Elske; Della Pina, Serena; Castel, Rob; Souer, Erik; Koes, Ronald

    2015-08-15

    Higher plant species diverged extensively with regard to the moment (flowering time) and position (inflorescence architecture) at which flowers are formed. This seems largely caused by variation in the expression patterns of conserved genes that specify floral meristem identity (FMI), rather than changes in the encoded proteins. Here, we report a functional comparison of the promoters of homologous FMI genes from Arabidopsis, petunia, tomato and Antirrhinum. Analysis of promoter-reporter constructs in petunia and Arabidopsis, as well as complementation experiments, showed that the divergent expression of leafy (LFY) and the petunia homolog aberrant leaf and flower (ALF) results from alterations in the upstream regulatory network rather than cis-regulatory changes. The divergent expression of unusual floral organs (UFO) from Arabidopsis, and the petunia homolog double top (DOT), however, is caused by the loss or gain of cis-regulatory promoter elements, which respond to trans-acting factors that are expressed in similar patterns in both species. Introduction of pUFO:UFO causes no obvious defects in Arabidopsis, but in petunia it causes the precocious and ectopic formation of flowers. This provides an example of how a change in a cis-regulatory region can account for a change in the plant body plan. PMID:26220938

  4. Changes in cis-regulatory elements of a key floral regulator are associated with divergence of inflorescence architectures.

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    Kusters, Elske; Della Pina, Serena; Castel, Rob; Souer, Erik; Koes, Ronald

    2015-08-15

    Higher plant species diverged extensively with regard to the moment (flowering time) and position (inflorescence architecture) at which flowers are formed. This seems largely caused by variation in the expression patterns of conserved genes that specify floral meristem identity (FMI), rather than changes in the encoded proteins. Here, we report a functional comparison of the promoters of homologous FMI genes from Arabidopsis, petunia, tomato and Antirrhinum. Analysis of promoter-reporter constructs in petunia and Arabidopsis, as well as complementation experiments, showed that the divergent expression of leafy (LFY) and the petunia homolog aberrant leaf and flower (ALF) results from alterations in the upstream regulatory network rather than cis-regulatory changes. The divergent expression of unusual floral organs (UFO) from Arabidopsis, and the petunia homolog double top (DOT), however, is caused by the loss or gain of cis-regulatory promoter elements, which respond to trans-acting factors that are expressed in similar patterns in both species. Introduction of pUFO:UFO causes no obvious defects in Arabidopsis, but in petunia it causes the precocious and ectopic formation of flowers. This provides an example of how a change in a cis-regulatory region can account for a change in the plant body plan.

  5. Bioinformatic analysis of cis-regulatory interactions between progesterone and estrogen receptors in breast cancer

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    Matloob Khushi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin factors interact with each other in a cell and sequence-specific manner in order to regulate transcription and a wealth of publically available datasets exists describing the genomic locations of these interactions. Our recently published BiSA (Binding Sites Analyser database contains transcription factor binding locations and epigenetic modifications collected from published studies and provides tools to analyse stored and imported data. Using BiSA we investigated the overlapping cis-regulatory role of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα and progesterone receptor (PR in the T-47D breast cancer cell line. We found that ERα binding sites overlap with a subset of PR binding sites. To investigate further, we re-analysed raw data to remove any biases introduced by the use of distinct tools in the original publications. We identified 22,152 PR and 18,560 ERα binding sites (<5% false discovery rate with 4,358 overlapping regions among the two datasets. BiSA statistical analysis revealed a non-significant overall overlap correlation between the two factors, suggesting that ERα and PR are not partner factors and do not require each other for binding to occur. However, Monte Carlo simulation by Binary Interval Search (BITS, Relevant Distance, Absolute Distance, Jaccard and Projection tests by Genometricorr revealed a statistically significant spatial correlation of binding regions on chromosome between the two factors. Motif analysis revealed that the shared binding regions were enriched with binding motifs for ERα, PR and a number of other transcription and pioneer factors. Some of these factors are known to co-locate with ERα and PR binding. Therefore spatially close proximity of ERα binding sites with PR binding sites suggests that ERα and PR, in general function independently at the molecular level, but that their activities converge on a specific subset of transcriptional targets.

  6. Recurrent modification of a conserved cis-regulatory element underlies fruit fly pigmentation diversity.

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    William A Rogers

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of morphological traits occurs through the collective action of networks of genes connected at the level of gene expression. As any node in a network may be a target of evolutionary change, the recurrent targeting of the same node would indicate that the path of evolution is biased for the relevant trait and network. Although examples of parallel evolution have implicated recurrent modification of the same gene and cis-regulatory element (CRE, little is known about the mutational and molecular paths of parallel CRE evolution. In Drosophila melanogaster fruit flies, the Bric-à-brac (Bab transcription factors control the development of a suite of sexually dimorphic traits on the posterior abdomen. Female-specific Bab expression is regulated by the dimorphic element, a CRE that possesses direct inputs from body plan (ABD-B and sex-determination (DSX transcription factors. Here, we find that the recurrent evolutionary modification of this CRE underlies both intraspecific and interspecific variation in female pigmentation in the melanogaster species group. By reconstructing the sequence and regulatory activity of the ancestral Drosophila melanogaster dimorphic element, we demonstrate that a handful of mutations were sufficient to create independent CRE alleles with differing activities. Moreover, intraspecific and interspecific dimorphic element evolution proceeded with little to no alterations to the known body plan and sex-determination regulatory linkages. Collectively, our findings represent an example where the paths of evolution appear biased to a specific CRE, and drastic changes in function were accompanied by deep conservation of key regulatory linkages.

  7. Recurrent Modification of a Conserved Cis-Regulatory Element Underlies Fruit Fly Pigmentation Diversity

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    Rogers, William A.; Salomone, Joseph R.; Tacy, David J.; Camino, Eric M.; Davis, Kristen A.; Rebeiz, Mark; Williams, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    The development of morphological traits occurs through the collective action of networks of genes connected at the level of gene expression. As any node in a network may be a target of evolutionary change, the recurrent targeting of the same node would indicate that the path of evolution is biased for the relevant trait and network. Although examples of parallel evolution have implicated recurrent modification of the same gene and cis-regulatory element (CRE), little is known about the mutational and molecular paths of parallel CRE evolution. In Drosophila melanogaster fruit flies, the Bric-à-brac (Bab) transcription factors control the development of a suite of sexually dimorphic traits on the posterior abdomen. Female-specific Bab expression is regulated by the dimorphic element, a CRE that possesses direct inputs from body plan (ABD-B) and sex-determination (DSX) transcription factors. Here, we find that the recurrent evolutionary modification of this CRE underlies both intraspecific and interspecific variation in female pigmentation in the melanogaster species group. By reconstructing the sequence and regulatory activity of the ancestral Drosophila melanogaster dimorphic element, we demonstrate that a handful of mutations were sufficient to create independent CRE alleles with differing activities. Moreover, intraspecific and interspecific dimorphic element evolution proceeded with little to no alterations to the known body plan and sex-determination regulatory linkages. Collectively, our findings represent an example where the paths of evolution appear biased to a specific CRE, and drastic changes in function were accompanied by deep conservation of key regulatory linkages. PMID:24009528

  8. Deciphering Cis-Regulatory Element Mediated Combinatorial Regulation in Rice under Blast Infected Condition.

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    Deb, Arindam; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) present at the promoters facilitate the binding of several transcription factors (TFs), thereby altering the consequent gene expressions. Due to the eminent complexity of the regulatory mechanism, the combinatorics of CRE-mediated transcriptional regulation has been elusive. In this work, we have developed a new methodology that quantifies the co-occurrence tendencies of CREs present in a set of promoter sequences; these co-occurrence scores are filtered in three consecutive steps to test their statistical significance; and the significantly co-occurring CRE pairs are presented as networks. These networks of co-occurring CREs are further transformed to derive higher order of regulatory combinatorics. We have further applied this methodology on the differentially up-regulated gene-sets of rice tissues under fungal (Magnaporthe) infected conditions to demonstrate how it helps to understand the CRE-mediated combinatorial gene regulation. Our analysis includes a wide spectrum of biologically important results. The CRE pairs having a strong tendency to co-occur often exhibit very similar joint distribution patterns at the promoters of rice. We couple the network approach with experimental results of plant gene regulation and defense mechanisms and find evidences of auto and cross regulation among TF families, cross-talk among multiple hormone signaling pathways, similarities and dissimilarities in regulatory combinatorics between different tissues, etc. Our analyses have pointed a highly distributed nature of the combinatorial gene regulation facilitating an efficient alteration in response to fungal attack. All together, our proposed methodology could be an important approach in understanding the combinatorial gene regulation. It can be further applied to unravel the tissue and/or condition specific combinatorial gene regulation in other eukaryotic systems with the availability of annotated genomic sequences and suitable

  9. Identification of High-Impact cis-Regulatory Mutations Using Transcription Factor Specific Random Forest Models.

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    Dmitry Svetlichnyy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer genomes contain vast amounts of somatic mutations, many of which are passenger mutations not involved in oncogenesis. Whereas driver mutations in protein-coding genes can be distinguished from passenger mutations based on their recurrence, non-coding mutations are usually not recurrent at the same position. Therefore, it is still unclear how to identify cis-regulatory driver mutations, particularly when chromatin data from the same patient is not available, thus relying only on sequence and expression information. Here we use machine-learning methods to predict functional regulatory regions using sequence information alone, and compare the predicted activity of the mutated region with the reference sequence. This way we define the Predicted Regulatory Impact of a Mutation in an Enhancer (PRIME. We find that the recently identified driver mutation in the TAL1 enhancer has a high PRIME score, representing a "gain-of-target" for MYB, whereas the highly recurrent TERT promoter mutation has a surprisingly low PRIME score. We trained Random Forest models for 45 cancer-related transcription factors, and used these to score variations in the HeLa genome and somatic mutations across more than five hundred cancer genomes. Each model predicts only a small fraction of non-coding mutations with a potential impact on the function of the encompassing regulatory region. Nevertheless, as these few candidate driver mutations are often linked to gains in chromatin activity and gene expression, they may contribute to the oncogenic program by altering the expression levels of specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes.

  10. Putative cis-regulatory elements in genes highly expressed in rice sperm cells

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    Singh Mohan B

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The male germ line in flowering plants is initiated within developing pollen grains via asymmetric division. The smaller cell then becomes totally encased within a much larger vegetative cell, forming a unique "cell within a cell structure". The generative cell subsequently divides to give rise to two non-motile diminutive sperm cells, which take part in double fertilization and lead to the seed set. Sperm cells are difficult to investigate because of their presence within the confines of the larger vegetative cell. However, recently developed techniques for the isolation of rice sperm cells and the fully annotated rice genome sequence have allowed for the characterization of the transcriptional repertoire of sperm cells. Microarray gene expression data has identified a subset of rice genes that show unique or highly preferential expression in sperm cells. This information has led to the identification of cis-regulatory elements (CREs, which are conserved in sperm-expressed genes and are putatively associated with the control of cell-specific expression. Findings We aimed to identify the CREs associated with rice sperm cell-specific gene expression data using in silico prediction tools. We analyzed 1-kb upstream regions of the top 40 sperm cell co-expressed genes for over-represented conserved and novel motifs. Analysis of upstream regions with the SIGNALSCAN program with the PLACE database, MEME and the Mclip tool helped to find combinatorial sets of known transcriptional factor-binding sites along with two novel motifs putatively associated with the co-expression of sperm cell-specific genes. Conclusions Our data shows the occurrence of novel motifs, which are putative CREs and are likely targets of transcriptional factors regulating sperm cell gene expression. These motifs can be used to design the experimental verification of regulatory elements and the identification of transcriptional factors that regulate sperm cell

  11. Promoter analysis reveals cis-regulatory motifs associated with the expression of the WRKY transcription factor CrWRKY1 in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhirong; Patra, Barunava; Li, Runzhi; Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Yuan, Ling

    2013-12-01

    WRKY transcription factors (TFs) are emerging as an important group of regulators of plant secondary metabolism. However, the cis-regulatory elements associated with their regulation have not been well characterized. We have previously demonstrated that CrWRKY1, a member of subgroup III of the WRKY TF family, regulates biosynthesis of terpenoid indole alkaloids in the ornamental and medicinal plant, Catharanthus roseus. Here, we report the isolation and functional characterization of the CrWRKY1 promoter. In silico analysis of the promoter sequence reveals the presence of several potential TF binding motifs, indicating the involvement of additional TFs in the regulation of the TIA pathway. The CrWRKY1 promoter can drive the expression of a β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene in native (C. roseus protoplasts and transgenic hairy roots) and heterologous (transgenic tobacco seedlings) systems. Analysis of 5'- or 3'-end deletions indicates that the sequence located between positions -140 to -93 bp and -3 to +113 bp, relative to the transcription start site, is critical for promoter activity. Mutation analysis shows that two overlapping as-1 elements and a CT-rich motif contribute significantly to promoter activity. The CrWRKY1 promoter is induced in response to methyl jasmonate (MJ) treatment and the promoter region between -230 and -93 bp contains a putative MJ-responsive element. The CrWRKY1 promoter can potentially be used as a tool to isolate novel TFs involved in the regulation of the TIA pathway. PMID:23979312

  12. Exon-disrupting deletions of NRXN1 in idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S; Weber, Yvonne G; Klitten, Laura L;

    2013-01-01

    Neurexins are neuronal adhesion molecules located in the presynaptic terminal, where they interact with postsynaptic neuroligins to form a transsynaptic complex required for efficient neurotransmission in the brain. Recently, deletions and point mutations of the neurexin 1 (NRXN1) gene have been ...... associated with a broad spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders. This study aimed to investigate if NRXN1 deletions also increase the risk of idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs)....

  13. ChIP-Seq-Annotated Heliconius erato Genome Highlights Patterns of cis-Regulatory Evolution in Lepidoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, James J; van der Burg, Karin R L; Mazo-Vargas, Anyi; Reed, Robert D

    2016-09-13

    Uncovering phylogenetic patterns of cis-regulatory evolution remains a fundamental goal for evolutionary and developmental biology. Here, we characterize the evolution of regulatory loci in butterflies and moths using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) annotation of regulatory elements across three stages of head development. In the process we provide a high-quality, functionally annotated genome assembly for the butterfly, Heliconius erato. Comparing cis-regulatory element conservation across six lepidopteran genomes, we find that regulatory sequences evolve at a pace similar to that of protein-coding regions. We also observe that elements active at multiple developmental stages are markedly more conserved than elements with stage-specific activity. Surprisingly, we also find that stage-specific proximal and distal regulatory elements evolve at nearly identical rates. Our study provides a benchmark for genome-wide patterns of regulatory element evolution in insects, and it shows that developmental timing of activity strongly predicts patterns of regulatory sequence evolution. PMID:27626657

  14. ChIP-Seq-Annotated Heliconius erato Genome Highlights Patterns of cis-Regulatory Evolution in Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J. Lewis

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Uncovering phylogenetic patterns of cis-regulatory evolution remains a fundamental goal for evolutionary and developmental biology. Here, we characterize the evolution of regulatory loci in butterflies and moths using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq annotation of regulatory elements across three stages of head development. In the process we provide a high-quality, functionally annotated genome assembly for the butterfly, Heliconius erato. Comparing cis-regulatory element conservation across six lepidopteran genomes, we find that regulatory sequences evolve at a pace similar to that of protein-coding regions. We also observe that elements active at multiple developmental stages are markedly more conserved than elements with stage-specific activity. Surprisingly, we also find that stage-specific proximal and distal regulatory elements evolve at nearly identical rates. Our study provides a benchmark for genome-wide patterns of regulatory element evolution in insects, and it shows that developmental timing of activity strongly predicts patterns of regulatory sequence evolution.

  15. Mutagenesis of GATA motifs controlling the endoderm regulator elt-2 reveals distinct dominant and secondary cis-regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lawrence; Tracy, Sharon; Rifkin, Scott A

    2016-04-01

    Cis-regulatory elements (CREs) are crucial links in developmental gene regulatory networks, but in many cases, it can be difficult to discern whether similar CREs are functionally equivalent. We found that despite similar conservation and binding capability to upstream activators, different GATA cis-regulatory motifs within the promoter of the C. elegans endoderm regulator elt-2 play distinctive roles in activating and modulating gene expression throughout development. We fused wild-type and mutant versions of the elt-2 promoter to a gfp reporter and inserted these constructs as single copies into the C. elegans genome. We then counted early embryonic gfp transcripts using single-molecule RNA FISH (smFISH) and quantified gut GFP fluorescence. We determined that a single primary dominant GATA motif located 527bp upstream of the elt-2 start codon was necessary for both embryonic activation and later maintenance of transcription, while nearby secondary GATA motifs played largely subtle roles in modulating postembryonic levels of elt-2. Mutation of the primary activating site increased low-level spatiotemporally ectopic stochastic transcription, indicating that this site acts repressively in non-endoderm cells. Our results reveal that CREs with similar GATA factor binding affinities in close proximity can play very divergent context-dependent roles in regulating the expression of a developmentally critical gene in vivo. PMID:26896592

  16. Creation of cis-regulatory elements during sea urchin evolution by co-option and optimization of a repetitive sequence adjacent to the spec2a gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Sandeep; Kiyama, Takae; Villinski, Jeffrey T; Zhang, Ning; Liang, Shuguang; Klein, William H

    2004-09-15

    The creation, preservation, and degeneration of cis-regulatory elements controlling developmental gene expression are fundamental genome-level evolutionary processes about which little is known. Here, we identify critical differences in cis-regulatory elements controlling the expression of the sea urchin aboral ectoderm-specific spec genes. We found multiple copies of a repetitive sequence element termed RSR in genomes of species within the Strongylocentrotidae family, but RSRs were not detected in genomes of species outside Strongylocentrotidae. spec genes in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus are invariably associated with RSRs, and the spec2a RSR functioned as a transcriptional enhancer and displayed greater activity than did spec1 or spec2c RSRs. Single-base pair differences at two cis-regulatory elements within the spec2a RSR increased the binding affinities of four transcription factors, SpCCAAT-binding factor at one element and SpOtx, SpGoosecoid, and SpGATA-E at another. The cis-regulatory elements to which these four factors bound were recent evolutionary acquisitions that acted to either activate or repress transcription, depending on the cell type. These elements were found in the spec2a RSR ortholog in Strongylocentrotus pallidus but not in RSR orthologs of Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis or Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus. Our results indicated that a dynamic pattern of cis-regulatory element evolution exists for spec genes despite their conserved aboral ectoderm expression.

  17. CisMiner: genome-wide in-silico cis-regulatory module prediction by fuzzy itemset mining.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Navarro

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic gene control regions are known to be spread throughout non-coding DNA sequences which may appear distant from the gene promoter. Transcription factors are proteins that coordinately bind to these regions at transcription factor binding sites to regulate gene expression. Several tools allow to detect significant co-occurrences of closely located binding sites (cis-regulatory modules, CRMs. However, these tools present at least one of the following limitations: 1 scope limited to promoter or conserved regions of the genome; 2 do not allow to identify combinations involving more than two motifs; 3 require prior information about target motifs. In this work we present CisMiner, a novel methodology to detect putative CRMs by means of a fuzzy itemset mining approach able to operate at genome-wide scale. CisMiner allows to perform a blind search of CRMs without any prior information about target CRMs nor limitation in the number of motifs. CisMiner tackles the combinatorial complexity of genome-wide cis-regulatory module extraction using a natural representation of motif combinations as itemsets and applying the Top-Down Fuzzy Frequent- Pattern Tree algorithm to identify significant itemsets. Fuzzy technology allows CisMiner to better handle the imprecision and noise inherent to regulatory processes. Results obtained for a set of well-known binding sites in the S. cerevisiae genome show that our method yields highly reliable predictions. Furthermore, CisMiner was also applied to putative in-silico predicted transcription factor binding sites to identify significant combinations in S. cerevisiae and D. melanogaster, proving that our approach can be further applied genome-wide to more complex genomes. CisMiner is freely accesible at: http://genome2.ugr.es/cisminer. CisMiner can be queried for the results presented in this work and can also perform a customized cis-regulatory module prediction on a query set of transcription factor binding

  18. Dysphagia and disrupted cranial nerve development in a mouse model of DiGeorge (22q11 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverly A. Karpinski

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We assessed feeding-related developmental anomalies in the LgDel mouse model of chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS, a common developmental disorder that frequently includes perinatal dysphagia – debilitating feeding, swallowing and nutrition difficulties from birth onward – within its phenotypic spectrum. LgDel pups gain significantly less weight during the first postnatal weeks, and have several signs of respiratory infections due to food aspiration. Most 22q11 genes are expressed in anlagen of craniofacial and brainstem regions critical for feeding and swallowing, and diminished expression in LgDel embryos apparently compromises development of these regions. Palate and jaw anomalies indicate divergent oro-facial morphogenesis. Altered expression and patterning of hindbrain transcriptional regulators, especially those related to retinoic acid (RA signaling, prefigures these disruptions. Subsequently, gene expression, axon growth and sensory ganglion formation in the trigeminal (V, glossopharyngeal (IX or vagus (X cranial nerves (CNs that innervate targets essential for feeding, swallowing and digestion are disrupted. Posterior CN IX and X ganglia anomalies primarily reflect diminished dosage of the 22q11DS candidate gene Tbx1. Genetic modification of RA signaling in LgDel embryos rescues the anterior CN V phenotype and returns expression levels or pattern of RA-sensitive genes to those in wild-type embryos. Thus, diminished 22q11 gene dosage, including but not limited to Tbx1, disrupts oro-facial and CN development by modifying RA-modulated anterior-posterior hindbrain differentiation. These disruptions likely contribute to dysphagia in infants and young children with 22q11DS.

  19. A de novo 1.58 Mb deletion, including MAP2K6 and mapping 1.28 Mb upstream to SOX9, identified in a patient with Pierre Robin sequence and osteopenia with multiple fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyk, Marta; Roeder, Elizabeth; Cheung, Sau Wai; Szafranski, Przemyslaw; Stankiewicz, Paweł

    2015-08-01

    Defects of long-range regulatory elements of dosage-sensitive genes represent an under-recognized mechanism underlying genetic diseases. Haploinsufficiency of SOX9, the gene essential for development of testes and differentiation of chondrocytes, results in campomelic dysplasia, a skeletal malformation syndrome often associated with sex reversal. Chromosomal rearrangements with breakpoints mapping up to 1.6 Mb up- and downstream to SOX9, and disrupting its distant cis-regulatory elements, have been described in patients with milder forms of campomelic dysplasia, Pierre Robin sequence, and sex reversal. We present an ∼1.58 Mb deletion mapping ∼1.28 Mb upstream to SOX9 that encompasses its putative long-range cis-regulatory element(s) and MAP2K6 in a patient with Pierre Robin sequence and osteopenia with multiple fractures. Low bone mass panel testing using massively parallel sequencing of 23 nuclear genes, including COL1A1 and COL1A2 was negative. Based on the previous mouse model of Map2k6, suggesting that Sox9 is likely a downstream target of the p38 MAPK pathway, and our previous chromosome conformation capture-on-chip (4C) data showing potential interactions between SOX9 promoter and MAP2K6, we hypothesize that deletion of MAP2K6 might have affected SOX9 expression and contributed to our patient's phenotype.

  20. LIN7A depletion disrupts cerebral cortex development, contributing to intellectual disability in 12q21-deletion syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayumi Matsumoto

    Full Text Available Interstitial deletion of 12q21 has been reported in four cases, which share several common clinical features, including intellectual disability (ID, low-set ears, and minor cardiac abnormalities. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH analysis using the Agilent Human Genome CGH 180K array was performed with the genomic DNA from a two-year-old Japanese boy with these symptoms, as well as hypoplasia of the corpus callosum. Consequently, a 14 Mb deletion at 12q21.2-q21.33 (nt. 77 203 574-91 264 613 bp, which includes 72 genes, was detected. Of these, we focused on LIN7A, which encodes a scaffold protein that is important for synaptic function, as a possible responsible gene for ID, and we analyzed its role in cerebral cortex development. Western blotting analyses revealed that Lin-7A is expressed on embryonic day (E 13.5, and gradually increases in the mouse brain during the embryonic stage. Biochemical fractionation resulted in the enrichment of Lin-7A in the presynaptic fraction. Suppression of Lin-7A expression by RNAi, using in utero electroporation on E14.5, delayed neuronal migration on postnatal day (P 2, and Lin-7A-deficient neurons remained in the lower zone of the cortical plate and the intermediate zone. In addition, when Lin-7A was silenced in cortical neurons in one hemisphere, axonal growth in the contralateral hemisphere was delayed; development of these neurons was disrupted such that one half did not extend into the contralateral hemisphere after leaving the corpus callosum. Taken together, LIN7A is a candidate gene responsible for 12q21-deletion syndrome, and abnormal neuronal migration and interhemispheric axon development may contribute to ID and corpus callosum hypoplasia, respectively.

  1. Conserved cis-regulatory modules in promoters of genes encoding wheat high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravel, Catherine; Fiquet, Samuel; Boudet, Julie; Dardevet, Mireille; Vincent, Jonathan; Merlino, Marielle; Michard, Robin; Martre, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The concentration and composition of the gliadin and glutenin seed storage proteins (SSPs) in wheat flour are the most important determinants of its end-use value. In cereals, the synthesis of SSPs is predominantly regulated at the transcriptional level by a complex network involving at least five cis-elements in gene promoters. The high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) are encoded by two tightly linked genes located on the long arms of group 1 chromosomes. Here, we sequenced and annotated the HMW-GS gene promoters of 22 electrophoretic wheat alleles to identify putative cis-regulatory motifs. We focused on 24 motifs known to be involved in SSP gene regulation. Most of them were identified in at least one HMW-GS gene promoter sequence. A common regulatory framework was observed in all the HMW-GS gene promoters, as they shared conserved cis-regulatory modules (CCRMs) including all the five motifs known to regulate the transcription of SSP genes. This common regulatory framework comprises a composite box made of the GATA motifs and GCN4-like Motifs (GLMs) and was shown to be functional as the GLMs are able to bind a bZIP transcriptional factor SPA (Storage Protein Activator). In addition to this regulatory framework, each HMW-GS gene promoter had additional motifs organized differently. The promoters of most highly expressed x-type HMW-GS genes contain an additional box predicted to bind R2R3-MYB transcriptional factors. However, the differences in annotation between promoter alleles could not be related to their level of expression. In summary, we identified a common modular organization of HMW-GS gene promoters but the lack of correlation between the cis-motifs of each HMW-GS gene promoter and their level of expression suggests that other cis-elements or other mechanisms regulate HMW-GS gene expression.

  2. Conserved cis-regulatory modules in promoters of genes encoding wheat high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eRAVEL

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The concentration and composition of the gliadin and glutenin seed storage proteins (SSPs in wheat flour are the most important determinants of its end-use value. In cereals, the synthesis of SSPs is predominantly regulated at the transcriptional level by a complex network involving at least five cis-elements in gene promoters. The high-molecular-weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GS are encoded by two tightly linked genes located on the long arms of group 1 chromosomes. Here, we sequenced and annotated the HMW-GS gene promoters of 22 electrophoretic wheat alleles to identify putative cis-regulatory motifs. We focused on 24 motifs known to be involved in SSP gene regulation. Most of them were identified in at least one HMW-GS gene promoter sequence. A common regulatory framework was observed in all the HMW-GS gene promoters, as they shared conserved cis-regulatory modules including all the five motifs known to regulate the transcription of SSP genes. This common regulatory framework comprises a composite box made of the GATA motifs and GCN4-like Motifs (GLMs and was shown to be functional as the GLMs are able to bind a bZIP transcriptional factor SPA (Storage Protein Activator. In addition to this regulatory framework, each HMW-GS gene promoter had additional motifs organized differently. The promoters of most highly expressed x-type HMW-GS genes contain an additional box predicted to bind R2R3-MYB transcriptional factors. However, the differences in annotation between promoter alleles could not be related to their level of expression. In summary, we identified a common modular organization of HMW-GS gene promoters but the lack of correlation between the cis-motifs of each HMW-GS gene promoter and their level of expression suggests that other cis-elements or other mechanisms regulate HMW-GS gene expression.

  3. MotifCombinator: a web-based tool to search for combinations of cis-regulatory motifs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsunoda Tatsuhiko

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A combination of multiple types of transcription factors and cis-regulatory elements is often required for gene expression in eukaryotes, and the combinatorial regulation confers specific gene expression to tissues or environments. To reveal the combinatorial regulation, computational methods are developed that efficiently infer combinations of cis-regulatory motifs that are important for gene expression as measured by DNA microarrays. One promising type of computational method is to utilize regression analysis between expression levels and scores of motifs in input sequences. This type takes full advantage of information on expression levels because it does not require that the expression level of each gene be dichotomized according to whether or not it reaches a certain threshold level. However, there is no web-based tool that employs regression methods to systematically search for motif combinations and that practically handles combinations of more than two or three motifs. Results We here introduced MotifCombinator, an online tool with a user-friendly interface, to systematically search for combinations composed of any number of motifs based on regression methods. The tool utilizes well-known regression methods (the multivariate linear regression, the multivariate adaptive regression spline or MARS, and the multivariate logistic regression method for this purpose, and uses the genetic algorithm to search for combinations composed of any desired number of motifs. The visualization systems in this tool help users to intuitively grasp the process of the combination search, and the backup system allows users to easily stop and restart calculations that are expected to require large computational time. This tool also provides preparatory steps needed for systematic combination search – i.e., selecting single motifs to constitute combinations and cutting out redundant similar motifs based on clustering analysis. Conclusion

  4. Disrupted anatomic networks in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, J Eric; Yi, James; Calkins, Monica E; Ruparel, Kosha; Roalf, David R; Cassidy, Amy; Souders, Margaret C; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; McDonald-McGinn, Donna M; Zackai, Elaine H; Gur, Ruben C; Emanuel, Beverly S; Gur, Raquel E

    2016-01-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is an uncommon genetic disorder with an increased risk of psychosis. Although the neural substrates of psychosis and schizophrenia are not well understood, aberrations in cortical networks represent intriguing potential mechanisms. Investigations of anatomic networks within 22q11DS are sparse. We investigated group differences in anatomic network structure in 48 individuals with 22q11DS and 370 typically developing controls by analyzing covariance patterns in cortical thickness among 68 regions of interest using graph theoretical models. Subjects with 22q11DS had less robust geographic organization relative to the control group, particularly in the occipital and parietal lobes. Multiple global graph theoretical statistics were decreased in 22q11DS. These results are consistent with prior studies demonstrating decreased connectivity in 22q11DS using other neuroimaging methodologies. PMID:27622139

  5. Chromosome aberrations involving 10q22: report of three overlapping interstitial deletions and a balanced translocation disrupting C10orf11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tzschach, Andreas; Bisgaard, Anne-Marie; Kirchhoff, Maria;

    2010-01-01

    and hypotonia. We also report on the results of breakpoint analysis by array painting in a mentally retarded patient with a balanced chromosome translocation 46,XY,t(10;13)(q22;p13)dn. The breakpoint in 10q22 was found to disrupt C10orf11, a brain-expressed gene in the common deleted interval of......Interstitial deletions of chromosome band 10q22 are rare. We report on the characterization of three overlapping de novo 10q22 deletions by high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization in three unrelated patients. Patient 1 had a 7.9 Mb deletion in 10q21.3-q22.2 and suffered from severe...

  6. Mapping cis-Regulatory Domains in the Human Genome UsingMulti-Species Conservation of Synteny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahituv, Nadav; Prabhakar, Shyam; Poulin, Francis; Rubin, EdwardM.; Couronne, Olivier

    2005-06-13

    Our inability to associate distant regulatory elements with the genes that they regulate has largely precluded their examination for sequence alterations contributing to human disease. One major obstacle is the large genomic space surrounding targeted genes in which such elements could potentially reside. In order to delineate gene regulatory boundaries we used whole-genome human-mouse-chicken (HMC) and human-mouse-frog (HMF) multiple alignments to compile conserved blocks of synteny (CBS), under the hypothesis that these blocks have been kept intact throughout evolution at least in part by the requirement of regulatory elements to stay linked to the genes that they regulate. A total of 2,116 and 1,942 CBS>200 kb were assembled for HMC and HMF respectively, encompassing 1.53 and 0.86 Gb of human sequence. To support the existence of complex long-range regulatory domains within these CBS we analyzed the prevalence and distribution of chromosomal aberrations leading to position effects (disruption of a genes regulatory environment), observing a clear bias not only for mapping onto CBS but also for longer CBS size. Our results provide a genome wide data set characterizing the regulatory domains of genes and the conserved regulatory elements within them.

  7. Does positive selection drive transcription factor binding site turnover? A test with Drosophila cis-regulatory modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Z He

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor binding site(s (TFBS gain and loss (i.e., turnover is a well-documented feature of cis-regulatory module (CRM evolution, yet little attention has been paid to the evolutionary force(s driving this turnover process. The predominant view, motivated by its widespread occurrence, emphasizes the importance of compensatory mutation and genetic drift. Positive selection, in contrast, although it has been invoked in specific instances of adaptive gene expression evolution, has not been considered as a general alternative to neutral compensatory evolution. In this study we evaluate the two hypotheses by analyzing patterns of single nucleotide polymorphism in the TFBS of well-characterized CRM in two closely related Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans. An important feature of the analysis is classification of TFBS mutations according to the direction of their predicted effect on binding affinity, which allows gains and losses to be evaluated independently along the two phylogenetic lineages. The observed patterns of polymorphism and divergence are not compatible with neutral evolution for either class of mutations. Instead, multiple lines of evidence are consistent with contributions of positive selection to TFBS gain and loss as well as purifying selection in its maintenance. In discussion, we propose a model to reconcile the finding of selection driving TFBS turnover with constrained CRM function over long evolutionary time.

  8. Conservation of shh cis-regulatory architecture of the coelacanth is consistent with its ancestral phylogenetic position

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    Lang Michael

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The modern coelacanth (Latimeria is the extant taxon of a basal sarcopterygian lineage and sister group to tetrapods. Apart from certain apomorphic traits, its morphology is characterized by a high degree of retention of ancestral vertebrate structures and little morphological change. An insight into the molecular evolution that may explain the unchanged character of Latimeria morphology requires the analysis of the expression patterns of developmental regulator genes and their cis-regulatory modules (CRMs. Results We describe the comparative and functional analysis of the sonic hedgehog (shh genomic region of Latimeria menadoensis. Several putative enhancers in the Latimeria shh locus have been identified by comparisons to sarcopterygian and actinopterygian extant species. Specific sequence conservation with all known actinopterygian enhancer elements has been detected. However, these elements are selectively missing in more recently diverged actinopterygian and sarcopterygian species. The functionality of the putative Latimeria enhancers was confirmed by reporter gene expression analysis in transient transgenic zebrafish and chick embryos. Conclusions Latimeria shh CRMs represent the ancestral set of enhancers that have emerged before the split of lobe-finned and ray-finned fishes. In contrast to lineage-specific losses and differentiations in more derived lineages, Latimeria shh enhancers reveal low levels of sequence diversification. High overall sequence conservation of shh conserved noncoding elements (CNE is consistent with the general trend of high levels of conservation of noncoding DNA in the slowly evolving Latimeria genome.

  9. Comparative epigenomics in distantly related teleost species identifies conserved cis-regulatory nodes active during the vertebrate phylotypic period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tena, Juan J.; González-Aguilera, Cristina; Fernández-Miñán, Ana; Vázquez-Marín, Javier; Parra-Acero, Helena; Cross, Joe W.; Rigby, Peter W.J.; Carvajal, Jaime J.; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Gómez-Skarmeta, José L.; Martínez-Morales, Juan R.

    2014-01-01

    The complex relationship between ontogeny and phylogeny has been the subject of attention and controversy since von Baer’s formulations in the 19th century. The classic concept that embryogenesis progresses from clade general features to species-specific characters has often been revisited. It has become accepted that embryos from a clade show maximum morphological similarity at the so-called phylotypic period (i.e., during mid-embryogenesis). According to the hourglass model, body plan conservation would depend on constrained molecular mechanisms operating at this period. More recently, comparative transcriptomic analyses have provided conclusive evidence that such molecular constraints exist. Examining cis-regulatory architecture during the phylotypic period is essential to understand the evolutionary source of body plan stability. Here we compare transcriptomes and key epigenetic marks (H3K4me3 and H3K27ac) from medaka (Oryzias latipes) and zebrafish (Danio rerio), two distantly related teleosts separated by an evolutionary distance of 115–200 Myr. We show that comparison of transcriptome profiles correlates with anatomical similarities and heterochronies observed at the phylotypic stage. Through comparative epigenomics, we uncover a pool of conserved regulatory regions (≈700), which are active during the vertebrate phylotypic period in both species. Moreover, we show that their neighboring genes encode mainly transcription factors with fundamental roles in tissue specification. We postulate that these regulatory regions, active in both teleost genomes, represent key constrained nodes of the gene networks that sustain the vertebrate body plan. PMID:24709821

  10. ModuleMiner - improved computational detection of cis-regulatory modules: are there different modes of gene regulation in embryonic development and adult tissues?

    OpenAIRE

    Van Loo, Peter; Aerts, Stein; Thienpont, Bernard; De Moor, Bart; Moreau, Yves; Marynen, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We present ModuleMiner, a novel algorithm for computationally detecting cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) in a set of co-expressed genes. ModuleMiner outperforms other methods for CRM detection on benchmark data, and successfully detects CRMs in tissue-specific microarray clusters and in embryonic development gene sets. Interestingly, CRM predictions for differentiated tissues exhibit strong enrichment close to the transcription start site, whereas CRM predictions for embryonic development gene s...

  11. Nutritional control of gene expression in Drosophila larvae via TOR, Myc and a novel cis-regulatory element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grewal Savraj S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nutrient availability is a key determinant of eukaryotic cell growth. In unicellular organisms many signaling and transcriptional networks link nutrient availability to the expression of metabolic genes required for growth. However, less is known about the corresponding mechanisms that operate in metazoans. We used gene expression profiling to explore this issue in developing Drosophila larvae. Results We found that starvation for dietary amino acids (AA's leads to dynamic changes in transcript levels of many metabolic genes. The conserved insulin/PI3K and TOR signaling pathways mediate nutrition-dependent growth in Drosophila and other animals. We found that many AA starvation-responsive transcripts were also altered in TOR mutants. In contrast, although PI3K overexpression induced robust changes in the expression of many metabolic genes, these changes showed limited overlap with the AA starvation expression profile. We did however identify a strong overlap between genes regulated by the transcription factor, Myc, and AA starvation-responsive genes, particularly those involved in ribosome biogenesis, protein synthesis and mitochondrial function. The consensus Myc DNA binding site is enriched in promoters of these AA starvation genes, and we found that Myc overexpression could bypass dietary AA to induce expression of these genes. We also identified another sequence motif (Motif 1 enriched in the promoters of AA starvation-responsive genes. We showed that Motif 1 was both necessary and sufficient to mediate transcriptional responses to dietary AA in larvae. Conclusions Our data suggest that many of the transcriptional effects of amino acids are mediated via signaling through the TOR pathway in Drosophila larvae. We also find that these transcriptional effects are mediated through at least two mechanisms: via the transcription factor Myc, and via the Motif 1 cis-regulatory element. These studies begin to elucidate a nutrient

  12. An arthropod cis-regulatory element functioning in sensory organ precursor development dates back to the Cambrian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simpson Pat

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing number of publications demonstrate conservation of function of cis-regulatory elements without sequence similarity. In invertebrates such functional conservation has only been shown for closely related species. Here we demonstrate the existence of an ancient arthropod regulatory element that functions during the selection of neural precursors. The activity of genes of the achaete-scute (ac-sc family endows cells with neural potential. An essential, conserved characteristic of proneural genes is their ability to restrict their own activity to single or a small number of progenitor cells from their initially broad domains of expression. This is achieved through a process called lateral inhibition. A regulatory element, the sensory organ precursor enhancer (SOPE, is required for this process. First identified in Drosophila, the SOPE contains discrete binding sites for four regulatory factors. The SOPE of the Drosophila asense gene is situated in the 5' UTR. Results Through a manual comparison of consensus binding site sequences we have been able to identify a SOPE in UTR sequences of asense-like genes in species belonging to all four arthropod groups (Crustacea, Myriapoda, Chelicerata and Insecta. The SOPEs of the spider Cupiennius salei and the insect Tribolium castaneum are shown to be functional in transgenic Drosophila. This would place the origin of this regulatory sequence as far back as the last common ancestor of the Arthropoda, that is, in the Cambrian, 550 million years ago. Conclusions The SOPE is not detectable by inter-specific sequence comparison, raising the possibility that other ancient regulatory modules in invertebrates might have escaped detection.

  13. Decoding a signature-based model of transcription cofactor recruitment dictated by cardinal cis-regulatory elements in proximal promoter regions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Benner

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide maps of DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs reveal that most human promoters contain perpetually active cis-regulatory elements between -150 bp and +50 bp (-150/+50 bp relative to the transcription start site (TSS. Transcription factors (TFs recruit cofactors (chromatin remodelers, histone/protein-modifying enzymes, and scaffold proteins to these elements in order to organize the local chromatin structure and coordinate the balance of post-translational modifications nearby, contributing to the overall regulation of transcription. However, the rules of TF-mediated cofactor recruitment to the -150/+50 bp promoter regions remain poorly understood. Here, we provide evidence for a general model in which a series of cis-regulatory elements (here termed 'cardinal' motifs prefer acting individually, rather than in fixed combinations, within the -150/+50 bp regions to recruit TFs that dictate cofactor signatures distinctive of specific promoter subsets. Subsequently, human promoters can be subclassified based on the presence of cardinal elements and their associated cofactor signatures. In this study, furthermore, we have focused on promoters containing the nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1 motif as the cardinal cis-regulatory element and have identified the pervasive association of NRF1 with the cofactor lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1/KDM1A. This signature might be distinctive of promoters regulating nuclear-encoded mitochondrial and other particular genes in at least some cells. Together, we propose that decoding a signature-based, expanded model of control at proximal promoter regions should lead to a better understanding of coordinated regulation of gene transcription.

  14. Targeted deletion of kcne2 impairs ventricular repolarization via disruption of IK,slow1 and Ito,f

    OpenAIRE

    Roepke, Torsten K.; Kontogeorgis, Andrianos; Ovanez, Christopher; Xu, Xianghua; Young, Jeffrey B.; Purtell, Kerry; Goldstein, Peter A.; Christini, David J; Peters, Nicholas S.; Akar, Fadi G.; Gutstein, David E; Lerner, Daniel J.; Abbott, Geoffrey W.

    2008-01-01

    Mutations in human KCNE2, which encodes the MiRP1 potassium channel ancillary subunit, associate with long QT syndrome (LQTS), a defect in ventricular repolarization. The precise cardiac role of MiRP1 remains controversial, in part, because it has marked functional promiscuity in vitro. Here, we disrupted the murine kcne2 gene to define the role of MiRP1 in murine ventricles. kcne2 disruption prolonged ventricular action potential duration (APD), suggestive of reduced repolarization capacity....

  15. ‘In silico expression analysis’, a novel PathoPlant web tool to identify abiotic and biotic stress conditions associated with specific cis-regulatory sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machens, Fabian; Brill, Yuri; Romanov, Artyom; Bülow, Lorenz; Hehl, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Using bioinformatics, putative cis-regulatory sequences can be easily identified using pattern recognition programs on promoters of specific gene sets. The abundance of predicted cis-sequences is a major challenge to associate these sequences with a possible function in gene expression regulation. To identify a possible function of the predicted cis-sequences, a novel web tool designated ‘in silico expression analysis’ was developed that correlates submitted cis-sequences with gene expression data from Arabidopsis thaliana. The web tool identifies the A. thaliana genes harbouring the sequence in a defined promoter region and compares the expression of these genes with microarray data. The result is a hierarchy of abiotic and biotic stress conditions to which these genes are most likely responsive. When testing the performance of the web tool, known cis-regulatory sequences were submitted to the ‘in silico expression analysis’ resulting in the correct identification of the associated stress conditions. When using a recently identified novel elicitor-responsive sequence, a WT-box (CGACTTTT), the ‘in silico expression analysis’ predicts that genes harbouring this sequence in their promoter are most likely Botrytis cinerea induced. Consistent with this prediction, the strongest induction of a reporter gene harbouring this sequence in the promoter is observed with B. cinerea in transgenic A. thaliana. Database URL: http://www.pathoplant.de/expression_analysis.php. PMID:24727366

  16. A cis-regulatory sequence from a short intergenic region gives rise to a strong microbe-associated molecular pattern-responsive synthetic promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmeyer, Mona; Hanko, Erik K R; Roling, Lena; Gonzalez, Lilian; Wehrs, Maren; Hehl, Reinhard

    2016-06-01

    The high gene density in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves only relatively short intergenic regions for potential cis-regulatory sequences. To learn more about the regulation of genes harbouring only very short upstream intergenic regions, this study investigates a recently identified novel microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-responsive cis-sequence located within the 101 bp long intergenic region upstream of the At1g13990 gene. It is shown that the cis-regulatory sequence is sufficient for MAMP-responsive reporter gene activity in the context of its native promoter. The 3' UTR of the upstream gene has a quantitative effect on gene expression. In context of a synthetic promoter, the cis-sequence is shown to achieve a strong increase in reporter gene activity as a monomer, dimer and tetramer. Mutation analysis of the cis-sequence determined the specific nucleotides required for gene expression activation. In transgenic A. thaliana the synthetic promoter harbouring a tetramer of the cis-sequence not only drives strong pathogen-responsive reporter gene expression but also shows a high background activity. The results of this study contribute to our understanding how genes with very short upstream intergenic regions are regulated and how these regions can serve as a source for MAMP-responsive cis-sequences for synthetic promoter design. PMID:26833485

  17. 'In silico expression analysis', a novel PathoPlant web tool to identify abiotic and biotic stress conditions associated with specific cis-regulatory sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolívar, Julio C; Machens, Fabian; Brill, Yuri; Romanov, Artyom; Bülow, Lorenz; Hehl, Reinhard

    2014-01-01

    Using bioinformatics, putative cis-regulatory sequences can be easily identified using pattern recognition programs on promoters of specific gene sets. The abundance of predicted cis-sequences is a major challenge to associate these sequences with a possible function in gene expression regulation. To identify a possible function of the predicted cis-sequences, a novel web tool designated 'in silico expression analysis' was developed that correlates submitted cis-sequences with gene expression data from Arabidopsis thaliana. The web tool identifies the A. thaliana genes harbouring the sequence in a defined promoter region and compares the expression of these genes with microarray data. The result is a hierarchy of abiotic and biotic stress conditions to which these genes are most likely responsive. When testing the performance of the web tool, known cis-regulatory sequences were submitted to the 'in silico expression analysis' resulting in the correct identification of the associated stress conditions. When using a recently identified novel elicitor-responsive sequence, a WT-box (CGACTTTT), the 'in silico expression analysis' predicts that genes harbouring this sequence in their promoter are most likely Botrytis cinerea induced. Consistent with this prediction, the strongest induction of a reporter gene harbouring this sequence in the promoter is observed with B. cinerea in transgenic A. thaliana. DATABASE URL: http://www.pathoplant.de/expression_analysis.php. PMID:24727366

  18. Identification of novel craniofacial regulatory domains located far upstream of SOX9 and disrupted in Pierre Robin sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Christopher T; Attanasio, Catia; Bhatia, Shipra; Benko, Sabina; Ansari, Morad; Tan, Tiong Y; Munnich, Arnold; Pennacchio, Len A; Abadie, Véronique; Temple, I Karen; Goldenberg, Alice; van Heyningen, Veronica; Amiel, Jeanne; FitzPatrick, David; Kleinjan, Dirk A; Visel, Axel; Lyonnet, Stanislas

    2014-08-01

    Mutations in the coding sequence of SOX9 cause campomelic dysplasia (CD), a disorder of skeletal development associated with 46,XY disorders of sex development (DSDs). Translocations, deletions, and duplications within a ∼2 Mb region upstream of SOX9 can recapitulate the CD-DSD phenotype fully or partially, suggesting the existence of an unusually large cis-regulatory control region. Pierre Robin sequence (PRS) is a craniofacial disorder that is frequently an endophenotype of CD and a locus for isolated PRS at ∼1.2-1.5 Mb upstream of SOX9 has been previously reported. The craniofacial regulatory potential within this locus, and within the greater genomic domain surrounding SOX9, remains poorly defined. We report two novel deletions upstream of SOX9 in families with PRS, allowing refinement of the regions harboring candidate craniofacial regulatory elements. In parallel, ChIP-Seq for p300 binding sites in mouse craniofacial tissue led to the identification of several novel craniofacial enhancers at the SOX9 locus, which were validated in transgenic reporter mice and zebrafish. Notably, some of the functionally validated elements fall within the PRS deletions. These studies suggest that multiple noncoding elements contribute to the craniofacial regulation of SOX9 expression, and that their disruption results in PRS.

  19. Cis-regulatory control of the nuclear receptor Coup-TF gene in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamprini G Kalampoki

    Full Text Available Coup-TF, an orphan member of the nuclear receptor super family, has a fundamental role in the development of metazoan embryos. The study of the gene's regulatory circuit in the sea urchin embryo will facilitate the placement of this transcription factor in the well-studied embryonic Gene Regulatory Network (GRN. The Paracentrotus lividus Coup-TF gene (PlCoup-TF is expressed throughout embryonic development preferentially in the oral ectoderm of the gastrula and the ciliary band of the pluteus stage. Two overlapping λ genomic clones, containing three exons and upstream sequences of PlCoup-TF, were isolated from a genomic library. The transcription initiation site was determined and 5' deletions and individual segments of a 1930 bp upstream region were placed ahead of a GFP reporter cassette and injected into fertilized P.lividus eggs. Module a (-532 to -232, was necessary and sufficient to confer ciliary band expression to the reporter. Comparison of P.lividus and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus upstream Coup-TF sequences, revealed considerable conservation, but none within module a. 5' and internal deletions into module a, defined a smaller region that confers ciliary band specific expression. Putative regulatory cis-acting elements (RE1, RE2 and RE3 within module a, were specifically bound by proteins in sea urchin embryonic nuclear extracts. Site-specific mutagenesis of these elements resulted in loss of reporter activity (RE1 or ectopic expression (RE2, RE3. It is proposed that sea urchin transcription factors, which bind these three regulatory sites, are necessary for spatial and quantitative regulation of the PlCoup-TF gene at pluteus stage sea urchin embryos. These findings lead to the future identification of these factors and to the hierarchical positioning of PlCoup-TF within the embryonic GRN.

  20. Preaxial polydactyly/triphalangeal thumb is associated with changed transcription factor-binding affinity in a family with a novel point mutation in the long-range cis-regulatory element ZRS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, Muhammad; Troelsen, Jesper T; Boyd, Mette;

    2010-01-01

    A cis-regulatory sequence also known as zone of polarizing activity (ZPA) regulatory sequence (ZRS) located in intron 5 of LMBR1 is essential for expression of sonic hedgehog (SHH) in the developing posterior limb bud mesenchyme. Even though many point mutations causing preaxial duplication defec...

  1. Distinct cis regulatory elements govern the expression of TAG1 in embryonic sensory ganglia and spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadas, Yoav; Nitzan, Noa; Furley, Andrew J W; Kozlov, Serguei V; Klar, Avihu

    2013-01-01

    Cell fate commitment of spinal progenitor neurons is initiated by long-range, midline-derived, morphogens that regulate an array of transcription factors that, in turn, act sequentially or in parallel to control neuronal differentiation. Included among these are transcription factors that regulate the expression of receptors for guidance cues, thereby determining axonal trajectories. The Ig/FNIII superfamily molecules TAG1/Axonin1/CNTN2 (TAG1) and Neurofascin (Nfasc) are co-expressed in numerous neuronal cell types in the CNS and PNS - for example motor, DRG and interneurons - both promote neurite outgrowth and both are required for the architecture and function of nodes of Ranvier. The genes encoding TAG1 and Nfasc are adjacent in the genome, an arrangement which is evolutionarily conserved. To study the transcriptional network that governs TAG1 and Nfasc expression in spinal motor and commissural neurons, we set out to identify cis elements that regulate their expression. Two evolutionarily conserved DNA modules, one located between the Nfasc and TAG1 genes and the second directly 5' to the first exon and encompassing the first intron of TAG1, were identified that direct complementary expression to the CNS and PNS, respectively, of the embryonic hindbrain and spinal cord. Sequential deletions and point mutations of the CNS enhancer element revealed a 130bp element containing three conserved E-boxes required for motor neuron expression. In combination, these two elements appear to recapitulate a major part of the pattern of TAG1 expression in the embryonic nervous system.

  2. Distinct cis regulatory elements govern the expression of TAG1 in embryonic sensory ganglia and spinal cord.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoav Hadas

    Full Text Available Cell fate commitment of spinal progenitor neurons is initiated by long-range, midline-derived, morphogens that regulate an array of transcription factors that, in turn, act sequentially or in parallel to control neuronal differentiation. Included among these are transcription factors that regulate the expression of receptors for guidance cues, thereby determining axonal trajectories. The Ig/FNIII superfamily molecules TAG1/Axonin1/CNTN2 (TAG1 and Neurofascin (Nfasc are co-expressed in numerous neuronal cell types in the CNS and PNS - for example motor, DRG and interneurons - both promote neurite outgrowth and both are required for the architecture and function of nodes of Ranvier. The genes encoding TAG1 and Nfasc are adjacent in the genome, an arrangement which is evolutionarily conserved. To study the transcriptional network that governs TAG1 and Nfasc expression in spinal motor and commissural neurons, we set out to identify cis elements that regulate their expression. Two evolutionarily conserved DNA modules, one located between the Nfasc and TAG1 genes and the second directly 5' to the first exon and encompassing the first intron of TAG1, were identified that direct complementary expression to the CNS and PNS, respectively, of the embryonic hindbrain and spinal cord. Sequential deletions and point mutations of the CNS enhancer element revealed a 130bp element containing three conserved E-boxes required for motor neuron expression. In combination, these two elements appear to recapitulate a major part of the pattern of TAG1 expression in the embryonic nervous system.

  3. In planta analysis of a cis-regulatory cytokinin response motif in Arabidopsis and identification of a novel enhancer sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramireddy, Eswarayya; Brenner, Wolfram G; Pfeifer, Andreas; Heyl, Alexander; Schmülling, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    The phytohormone cytokinin plays a key role in regulating plant growth and development, and is involved in numerous physiological responses to environmental changes. The type-B response regulators, which regulate the transcription of cytokinin response genes, are a part of the cytokinin signaling system. Arabidopsis thaliana encodes 11 type-B response regulators (type-B ARRs), and some of them were shown to bind in vitro to the core cytokinin response motif (CRM) 5'-(A/G)GAT(T/C)-3' or, in the case of ARR1, to an extended motif (ECRM), 5'-AAGAT(T/C)TT-3'. Here we obtained in planta proof for the functionality of the latter motif. Promoter deletion analysis of the primary cytokinin response gene ARR6 showed that a combination of two extended motifs within the promoter is required to mediate the full transcriptional activation by ARR1 and other type-B ARRs. CRMs were found to be over-represented in the vicinity of ECRMs in the promoters of cytokinin-regulated genes, suggesting their functional relevance. Moreover, an evolutionarily conserved 27 bp long T-rich region between -220 and -193 bp was identified and shown to be required for the full activation by type-B ARRs and the response to cytokinin. This novel enhancer is not bound by the DNA-binding domain of ARR1, indicating that additional proteins might be involved in mediating the transcriptional cytokinin response. Furthermore, genome-wide expression profiling identified genes, among them ARR16, whose induction by cytokinin depends on both ARR1 and other specific type-B ARRs. This together with the ECRM/CRM sequence clustering indicates cooperative action of different type-B ARRs for the activation of particular target genes. PMID:23620480

  4. Cis-Regulatory Elements Determine Germline Specificity and Expression Level of an Isopentenyltransferase Gene in Sperm Cells of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinghua; Yuan, Tong; Duan, Xiaomeng; Wei, Xiaoping; Shi, Tao; Li, Jia; Russell, Scott D; Gou, Xiaoping

    2016-03-01

    Flowering plant sperm cells transcribe a divergent and complex complement of genes. To examine promoter function, we chose an isopentenyltransferase gene known as PzIPT1. This gene is highly selectively transcribed in one sperm cell morphotype of Plumbago zeylanica, which preferentially fuses with the central cell during fertilization and is thus a founding cell of the primary endosperm. In transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), PzIPT1 promoter displays activity in both sperm cells and upon progressive promoter truncation from the 5'-end results in a progressive decrease in reporter production, consistent with occurrence of multiple enhancer sites. Cytokinin-dependent protein binding motifs are identified in the promoter sequence, which respond with stimulation by cytokinin. Expression of PzIPT1 promoter in sperm cells confers specificity independently of previously reported Germline Restrictive Silencer Factor binding sequence. Instead, a cis-acting regulatory region consisting of two duplicated 6-bp Male Gamete Selective Activation (MGSA) motifs occurs near the site of transcription initiation. Disruption of this sequence-specific site inactivates expression of a GFP reporter gene in sperm cells. Multiple copies of the MGSA motif fused with the minimal CaMV35S promoter elements confer reporter gene expression in sperm cells. Similar duplicated MGSA motifs are also identified from promoter sequences of sperm cell-expressed genes in Arabidopsis, suggesting selective activation is possibly a common mechanism for regulation of gene expression in sperm cells of flowering plants. PMID:26739233

  5. Integrative modeling of eQTLs and cis-regulatory elements suggests mechanisms underlying cell type specificity of eQTLs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D Brown

    Full Text Available Genetic variants in cis-regulatory elements or trans-acting regulators frequently influence the quantity and spatiotemporal distribution of gene transcription. Recent interest in expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL mapping has paralleled the adoption of genome-wide association studies (GWAS for the analysis of complex traits and disease in humans. Under the hypothesis that many GWAS associations tag non-coding SNPs with small effects, and that these SNPs exert phenotypic control by modifying gene expression, it has become common to interpret GWAS associations using eQTL data. To fully exploit the mechanistic interpretability of eQTL-GWAS comparisons, an improved understanding of the genetic architecture and causal mechanisms of cell type specificity of eQTLs is required. We address this need by performing an eQTL analysis in three parts: first we identified eQTLs from eleven studies on seven cell types; then we integrated eQTL data with cis-regulatory element (CRE data from the ENCODE project; finally we built a set of classifiers to predict the cell type specificity of eQTLs. The cell type specificity of eQTLs is associated with eQTL SNP overlap with hundreds of cell type specific CRE classes, including enhancer, promoter, and repressive chromatin marks, regions of open chromatin, and many classes of DNA binding proteins. These associations provide insight into the molecular mechanisms generating the cell type specificity of eQTLs and the mode of regulation of corresponding eQTLs. Using a random forest classifier with cell specific CRE-SNP overlap as features, we demonstrate the feasibility of predicting the cell type specificity of eQTLs. We then demonstrate that CREs from a trait-associated cell type can be used to annotate GWAS associations in the absence of eQTL data for that cell type. We anticipate that such integrative, predictive modeling of cell specificity will improve our ability to understand the mechanistic basis of human

  6. PP2C-like Promoter and Its Deletion Variants Are Induced by ABA but Not by MeJA and SA in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalothia, Purva; Sangwan, Chetna; Alok, Anshu; Mehrotra, Sandhya; Mehrotra, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression is mediated through interaction between cis regulatory elements and its cognate transcription factors. Cis regulatory elements are defined as non-coding DNA sequences that provide the binding sites for transcription factors and are clustered in the upstream region of genes. ACGT cis regulatory element is one of the important cis regulatory elements found to be involved in diverse biological processes like auxin response, salicylic acid (SA) response, UV light response, ABA response and jasmonic acid (JA) response. We identified through in silico analysis that the upstream region of protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) gene has a distinct genetic architecture of ACGT elements. In the present study, the activation of the full length promoter and its deletion constructs like 900 base pair, 500 base pair, 400 base pair and NRM (Nathji Rajesh Mehrotra) were examined by stable transformation in Arabidopsis thaliana using β-glucuronidase as the reporter gene. Evaluation of deletion constructs of PP2C-like promoter was carried out in the presence of phytohormones like abscisic acid (ABA), SA and JA. Our result indicated that the full length and 900 base pair promoter-reporter constructs of PP2C-like promoter was induced in response to ABA but not to methyl jasmonate and SA. PMID:27200023

  7. Maps of cis-Regulatory Nodes in Megabase Long Genome Segments are an Inevitable Intermediate Step Toward Whole Genome Functional Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Lev G; Akopov, Sergey B; Chernov, Igor P; Sverdlov, Eugene D

    2007-04-01

    The availability of complete human and other metazoan genome sequences has greatly facilitated positioning and analysis of various genomic functional elements, with initial emphasis on coding sequences. However, complete functional maps of sequenced eukaryotic genomes should include also positions of all non-coding regulatory elements. Unfortunately, experimental data on genomic positions of a multitude of regulatory sequences, such as enhancers, silencers, insulators, transcription terminators, and replication origins are very limited, especially at the whole genome level. Since most genomic regulatory elements (e.g. enhancers) are generally gene-, tissue-, or cell-specific, the prediction of these elements by computational methods is difficult and often ambiguous. Therefore, the development of high-throughput experimental approaches for identifying and mapping genomic functional elements is highly desirable. At the same time, the creation of whole-genome map of hundreds of thousands of regulatory elements in several hundreds of tissue/cell types is presently far beyond our capabilities. A possible alternative for the whole genome approach is to concentrate efforts on individual genomic segments and then to integrate the data obtained into a whole genome functional map. Moreover, the maps of polygenic fragments with functional cis-regulatory elements would provide valuable data on complex regulatory systems, including their variability and evolution. Here, we reviewed experimental approaches to the realization of these ideas, including our own developments of experimental techniques for selection of cis-acting functionally active DNA fragments from large (megabase-sized) segments of mammalian genomes. PMID:18660850

  8. Maps of cis-Regulatory Nodes in Megabase Long Genome Segments are an Inevitable Intermediate Step Toward Whole Genome Functional Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, Lev G; Akopov, Sergey B; Chernov, Igor P; Sverdlov, Eugene D

    2007-01-01

    The availability of complete human and other metazoan genome sequences has greatly facilitated positioning and analysis of various genomic functional elements, with initial emphasis on coding sequences. However, complete functional maps of sequenced eukaryotic genomes should include also positions of all non-coding regulatory elements. Unfortunately, experimental data on genomic positions of a multitude of regulatory sequences, such as enhancers, silencers, insulators, transcription terminators, and replication origins are very limited, especially at the whole genome level. Since most genomic regulatory elements (e.g. enhancers) are generally gene-, tissue-, or cell-specific, the prediction of these elements by computational methods is difficult and often ambiguous. Therefore, the development of high-throughput experimental approaches for identifying and mapping genomic functional elements is highly desirable. At the same time, the creation of whole-genome map of hundreds of thousands of regulatory elements in several hundreds of tissue/cell types is presently far beyond our capabilities. A possible alternative for the whole genome approach is to concentrate efforts on individual genomic segments and then to integrate the data obtained into a whole genome functional map. Moreover, the maps of polygenic fragments with functional cis-regulatory elements would provide valuable data on complex regulatory systems, including their variability and evolution. Here, we reviewed experimental approaches to the realization of these ideas, including our own developments of experimental techniques for selection of cis-acting functionally active DNA fragments from large (megabase-sized) segments of mammalian genomes. PMID:18660850

  9. A Hox Transcription Factor Collective Binds a Highly Conserved Distal-less cis-Regulatory Module to Generate Robust Transcriptional Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Juli D; Zandvakili, Arya; Gebelein, Brian

    2016-04-01

    cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) generate precise expression patterns by integrating numerous transcription factors (TFs). Surprisingly, CRMs that control essential gene patterns can differ greatly in conservation, suggesting distinct constraints on TF binding sites. Here, we show that a highly conserved Distal-less regulatory element (DCRE) that controls gene expression in leg precursor cells recruits multiple Hox, Extradenticle (Exd) and Homothorax (Hth) complexes to mediate dual outputs: thoracic activation and abdominal repression. Using reporter assays, we found that abdominal repression is particularly robust, as neither individual binding site mutations nor a DNA binding deficient Hth protein abolished cooperative DNA binding and in vivo repression. Moreover, a re-engineered DCRE containing a distinct configuration of Hox, Exd, and Hth sites also mediated abdominal Hox repression. However, the re-engineered DCRE failed to perform additional segment-specific functions such as thoracic activation. These findings are consistent with two emerging concepts in gene regulation: First, the abdominal Hox/Exd/Hth factors utilize protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions to form repression complexes on flexible combinations of sites, consistent with the TF collective model of CRM organization. Second, the conserved DCRE mediates multiple cell-type specific outputs, consistent with recent findings that pleiotropic CRMs are associated with conserved TF binding and added evolutionary constraints. PMID:27058369

  10. Combining computational prediction of cis-regulatory elements with a new enhancer assay to efficiently label neuronal structures in the medaka fish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Mongin

    Full Text Available The developing vertebrate nervous system contains a remarkable array of neural cells organized into complex, evolutionarily conserved structures. The labeling of living cells in these structures is key for the understanding of brain development and function, yet the generation of stable lines expressing reporter genes in specific spatio-temporal patterns remains a limiting step. In this study we present a fast and reliable pipeline to efficiently generate a set of stable lines expressing a reporter gene in multiple neuronal structures in the developing nervous system in medaka. The pipeline combines both the accurate computational genome-wide prediction of neuronal specific cis-regulatory modules (CRMs and a newly developed experimental setup to rapidly obtain transgenic lines in a cost-effective and highly reproducible manner. 95% of the CRMs tested in our experimental setup show enhancer activity in various and numerous neuronal structures belonging to all major brain subdivisions. This pipeline represents a significant step towards the dissection of embryonic neuronal development in vertebrates.

  11. PlantPAN: Plant promoter analysis navigator, for identifying combinatorial cis-regulatory elements with distance constraint in plant gene groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Hsien-Da

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The elucidation of transcriptional regulation in plant genes is important area of research for plant scientists, following the mapping of various plant genomes, such as A. thaliana, O. sativa and Z. mays. A variety of bioinformatic servers or databases of plant promoters have been established, although most have been focused only on annotating transcription factor binding sites in a single gene and have neglected some important regulatory elements (tandem repeats and CpG/CpNpG islands in promoter regions. Additionally, the combinatorial interaction of transcription factors (TFs is important in regulating the gene group that is associated with the same expression pattern. Therefore, a tool for detecting the co-regulation of transcription factors in a group of gene promoters is required. Results This study develops a database-assisted system, PlantPAN (Plant Promoter Analysis Navigator, for recognizing combinatorial cis-regulatory elements with a distance constraint in sets of plant genes. The system collects the plant transcription factor binding profiles from PLACE, TRANSFAC (public release 7.0, AGRIS, and JASPER databases and allows users to input a group of gene IDs or promoter sequences, enabling the co-occurrence of combinatorial transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs within a defined distance (20 bp to 200 bp to be identified. Furthermore, the new resource enables other regulatory features in a plant promoter, such as CpG/CpNpG islands and tandem repeats, to be displayed. The regulatory elements in the conserved regions of the promoters across homologous genes are detected and presented. Conclusion In addition to providing a user-friendly input/output interface, PlantPAN has numerous advantages in the analysis of a plant promoter. Several case studies have established the effectiveness of PlantPAN. This novel analytical resource is now freely available at http://PlantPAN.mbc.nctu.edu.tw.

  12. A universal algorithm for genome-wide in silicio identification of biologically significant gene promoter putative cis-regulatory-elements; identification of new elements for reactive oxygen species and sucrose signaling in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Matt; Kleczkowski, Leszek A; Karpinski, Stanislaw

    2006-02-01

    Short motifs of many cis-regulatory elements (CREs) can be found in the promoters of most Arabidopsis genes, and this raises the question of how their presence can confer specific regulation. We developed a universal algorithm to test the biological significance of CREs by first identifying every Arabidopsis gene with a CRE and then statistically correlating the presence or absence of the element with the gene expression profile on multiple DNA microarrays. This algorithm was successfully verified for previously characterized abscisic acid, ethylene, sucrose and drought responsive CREs in Arabidopsis, showing that the presence of these elements indeed correlates with treatment-specific gene induction. Later, we used standard motif sampling methods to identify 128 putative motifs induced by excess light, reactive oxygen species and sucrose. Our algorithm was able to filter 20 out of 128 novel CREs which significantly correlated with gene induction by either heat, reactive oxygen species and/or sucrose. The position, orientation and sequence specificity of CREs was tested in silicio by analyzing the expression of genes with naturally occurring sequence variations. In three novel CREs the forward orientation correlated with sucrose induction and the reverse orientation with sucrose suppression. The functionality of the predicted novel CREs was experimentally confirmed using Arabidopsis cell-suspension cultures transformed with short promoter fragments or artificial promoters fused with the GUS reporter gene. Our genome-wide analysis opens up new possibilities for in silicio verification of the biological significance of newly discovered CREs, and allows for subsequent selection of such CREs for experimental studies.

  13. Conserved cis-regulatory elements for DNA-binding-with-one-finger and homeo-domain-leucine-zipper transcription factors regulate companion cell-specific expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana SUCROSE TRANSPORTER 2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneidereit, Alexander; Imlau, Astrid; Sauer, Norbert

    2008-09-01

    The transition from young carbon-importing sink leaves of higher plants to mature carbon-exporting source leaves is paralleled by a complete reversal of phloem function. While sink-leaf phloem mediates the influx of reduced carbon from older source leaves and the release of this imported carbon to the sink-leaf mesophyll, source-leaf phloem catalyzes the uptake of photoassimilates into companion cells (CCs) and sieve elements (SEs) and the net carbon export from the leaf. Phloem loading in source leaves with sucrose, the main or exclusive transport form for fixed carbon in most higher plants, is catalyzed by plasma membrane-localized sucrose transporters. Consistent with the described physiological switch from sink to source, the promoter of the Arabidopsis AtSUC2 gene is active only in source-leaf CCs of Arabidopsis or of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). For the identification of regulatory elements involved in this companion cell-specific and source-specific gene expression, we performed detailed analyses of the AtSUC2 promoter by truncation and mutagenesis. A 126-bp promoter fragment was identified, which seems to contain these fragments and which drives AtSUC2-typical expression when combined with a 35S minimal promoter. Within this fragment, linker-scanning analyses revealed two cis-regulatory elements that were further characterized as putative binding sites for transcription factors of the DNA-binding-with-one-finger or the homeo-domain-leucine-zipper families. Similar or identical binding sites are found in other genes and in different plant species, suggesting an ancient regulatory mechanism for this important physiological switch. PMID:18551303

  14. Gene expression profiling of cultured human NF1 heterozygous (NF1+/-) melanocytes reveals downregulation of a transcriptional cis-regulatory network mediating activation of the melanocyte-specific dopachrome tautomerase (DCT) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucneau, Joachim; De Schepper, Sofie; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Van Hummelen, Paul; Naeyaert, Jean-Marie; Lambert, Jo

    2005-08-01

    One of the major primary features of the neurocutaneous genetic disorder Neurofibromatosis type 1 are the hyperpigmentary café-au-lait macules where disregulation of melanocyte biology is supposed to play a key etiopathogenic role. To gain better insight into the possible role of the tumor suppressor gene NF1, a transcriptomic microarray analysis was performed on human NF1 heterozygous (NF1+/-) melanocytes of a Neurofibromatosis type 1 patient and NF1 wild type (NF1+/+) melanocytes of a healthy control patient, both cultured from normally pigmented skin and hyperpigmented lesional café-au-lait skin. From the magnitude of gene effects, we found that gene expression was affected most strongly by genotype and less so by lesional type. A total of 137 genes had a significant twofold or more up- (72) or downregulated (65) expression in NF1+/- melanocytes compared with NF1+/+ melanocytes. Melanocytes cultured from hyperpigmented café-au-lait skin showed 37 upregulated genes whereas only 14 were downregulated compared with normal skin melanocytes. In addition, significant genotype xlesional type interactions were observed for 465 genes. Differentially expressed genes were mainly involved in regulating cell proliferation and cell adhesion. A high number of transcription factor genes, among which a specific subset important in melanocyte lineage development, were downregulated in the cis-regulatory network governing the activation of the melanocyte-specific dopachrome tautomerase (DCT) gene. Although the results presented have been obtained with a restricted number of patients (one NF1 patient and one control) and using cDNA microarrays that may limit their interpretation, the data nevertheless addresses for the first time the effect of a heterozygous NF1 gene on the expression of the human melanocyte transcriptome and has generated several interesting candidate genes helpful in elucidating the etiopathology of café-au-lait macules in NF1 patients.

  15. Identification of a novel functional deletion variant in the 5'-UTR of the DJ-1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warnich Louise

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DJ-1 forms part of the neuronal cellular defence mechanism against oxidative insults, due to its ability to undergo self-oxidation. Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of central nervous system damage in different neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease (PD. Various mutations in the DJ-1 (PARK7 gene have been shown to cause the autosomal recessive form of PD. In the present study South African PD patients were screened for mutations in DJ-1 and we aimed to investigate the functional significance of a novel 16 bp deletion variant identified in one patient. Methods The possible effect of the deletion on promoter activity was investigated using a Dual-Luciferase Reporter assay. The DJ-1 5'-UTR region containing the sequence flanking the 16 bp deletion was cloned into a pGL4.10-Basic luciferase-reporter vector and transfected into HEK293 and BE(2-M17 neuroblastoma cells. Promoter activity under hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress conditions was also investigated. Computational (in silico cis-regulatory analysis of DJ-1 promoter sequence was performed using the transcription factor-binding site database, TRANSFAC via the PATCH™ and rVISTA platforms. Results A novel 16 bp deletion variant (g.-6_+10del was identified in DJ-1 which spans the transcription start site and is situated 93 bp 3' from a Sp1 site. The deletion caused a reduction in luciferase activity of approximately 47% in HEK293 cells and 60% in BE(2-M17 cells compared to the wild-type (P Conclusion This is the first report of a functional DJ-1 promoter variant, which has the potential to influence transcript stability or translation efficiency. Further work is necessary to determine the extent to which the g.-6_+10del variant affects the normal function of the DJ-1 promoter and whether this variant confers a risk for PD.

  16. Family Disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spread the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care ... Life Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Family Disruptions Page Content Article Body No matter how ...

  17. Sustainable Disruptions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Silje Alberthe Kamille; Kjær, Lykke Bloch

    2016-01-01

    Since 2012 the Sustainable Disruptions (SD) project at the Laboratory for Sustainability at Design School Kolding (DK) has developed and tested a set of design thinking tools, specifically targeting the barriers to economically, socially, and environmentally sustainable business development...

  18. Disrupted Disclosure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krause Hansen, Hans; Uldam, Julie

    appearances become challenged through disruptive disclosures in mediaenvironments characterized by multiple levels of visibility, with companies both observing andbeing observed by civil society groups that criticize them; (c) why and how the mobilization aroundtransparency and ensuing practices...

  19. 3p deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Anupam; Khetarpal, S

    2013-08-01

    3p deletion is a rare cytogenetic finding. Here we describe a 3 months old male with congenital malformations. His karyotype revealed 3p deletion 46,XY,del(3)(p25-pter). The child had flexion deformity of wrist and elbow which has never been reported before. PMID:24036645

  20. Partial deletion 11q

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael; Tommerup, N; Sørensen, F B;

    1995-01-01

    We describe the cytogenetic findings and the dysmorphic features in a stillborn girl with a large de novo terminal deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. The karyotype was 46,XX,del(11)(q21qter). By reviewing previous reports of deletion 11q, we found that cleft lip and palate are most...

  1. Schizophrenia and chromosomal deletions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindsay, E.A.; Baldini, A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Morris, M. A. [Univ. of Geneva School of Medicine, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-01

    Recent genetic linkage analysis studies have suggested the presence of a schizophrenia locus on the chromosomal region 22q11-q13. Schizophrenia has also been frequently observed in patients affected with velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS), a disorder frequently associated with deletions within 22q11.1. It has been hypothesized that psychosis in VCFS may be due to deletion of the catechol-o-methyl transferase gene. Prompted by these observations, we screened for 22q11 deletions in a population of 100 schizophrenics selected from the Maryland Epidemiological Sample. Our results show that there are schizophrenic patients carrying a deletion of 22q11.1 and a mild VCFS phenotype that might remain unrecognized. These findings should encourage a search for a schizophrenia-susceptibility gene within the deleted region and alert those in clinical practice to the possible presence of a mild VCFS phenotype associated with schizophrenia. 9 refs.

  2. Disrupting Business

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Geoff; Bazzichelli, Tatiana

    Disruptive Business explores some of the interconnections between art, activism and the business concept of disruptive innovation. With a backdrop of the crisis of financial capitalism, austerity cuts in the cultural sphere, the idea is to focus on potential art strategies in relation to a broken...... economy. In a perverse way, we ask whether this presents new opportunities for cultural producers to achieve more autonomy over their production process. If it is indeed possible, or desirable, what alternative business models emerge? The book is concerned broadly with business as material for reinvention...

  3. TAD disruption as oncogenic driver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valton, Anne-Laure; Dekker, Job

    2016-02-01

    Topologically Associating Domains (TADs) are conserved during evolution and play roles in guiding and constraining long-range regulation of gene expression. Disruption of TAD boundaries results in aberrant gene expression by exposing genes to inappropriate regulatory elements. Recent studies have shown that TAD disruption is often found in cancer cells and contributes to oncogenesis through two mechanisms. One mechanism locally disrupts domains by deleting or mutating a TAD boundary leading to fusion of the two adjacent TADs. The other mechanism involves genomic rearrangements that break up TADs and creates new ones without directly affecting TAD boundaries. Understanding the mechanisms by which TADs form and control long-range chromatin interactions will therefore not only provide insights into the mechanism of gene regulation in general, but will also reveal how genomic rearrangements and mutations in cancer genomes can lead to misregulation of oncogenes and tumor suppressors. PMID:27111891

  4. Patterns of cis regulatory variation in diverse human populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara E Stranger

    Full Text Available The genetic basis of gene expression variation has long been studied with the aim to understand the landscape of regulatory variants, but also more recently to assist in the interpretation and elucidation of disease signals. To date, many studies have looked in specific tissues and population-based samples, but there has been limited assessment of the degree of inter-population variability in regulatory variation. We analyzed genome-wide gene expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines from a total of 726 individuals from 8 global populations from the HapMap3 project and correlated gene expression levels with HapMap3 SNPs located in cis to the genes. We describe the influence of ancestry on gene expression levels within and between these diverse human populations and uncover a non-negligible impact on global patterns of gene expression. We further dissect the specific functional pathways differentiated between populations. We also identify 5,691 expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs after controlling for both non-genetic factors and population admixture and observe that half of the cis-eQTLs are replicated in one or more of the populations. We highlight patterns of eQTL-sharing between populations, which are partially determined by population genetic relatedness, and discover significant sharing of eQTL effects between Asians, European-admixed, and African subpopulations. Specifically, we observe that both the effect size and the direction of effect for eQTLs are highly conserved across populations. We observe an increasing proximity of eQTLs toward the transcription start site as sharing of eQTLs among populations increases, highlighting that variants close to TSS have stronger effects and therefore are more likely to be detected across a wider panel of populations. Together these results offer a unique picture and resource of the degree of differentiation among human populations in functional regulatory variation and provide an estimate for the transferability of complex trait variants across populations.

  5. Deciphering cis-regulatory control in inflammatory cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ghisletti, Serena; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2013-01-01

    In innate immune system cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells, deployment of inducible gene expression programmes in response to microbes and danger signals requires highly precise regulatory mechanisms. The inflammatory response has to be tailored based on both the triggering stimulus and its dose, and it has to be unfolded in a kinetically complex manner that suits the different phases of the inflammatory process. Genomic characterization of regulatory elements in this context indi...

  6. Computational methods to dissect cis-regulatory transcriptional networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vibha Rani

    2007-12-01

    The formation of diverse cell types from an invariant set of genes is governed by biochemical and molecular processes that regulate gene activity. A complete understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of gene expression is the major function of genomics. Computational genomics is a rapidly emerging area for deciphering the regulation of metazoan genes as well as interpreting the results of high-throughput screening. The integration of computer science with biology has expedited molecular modelling and processing of large-scale data inputs such as microarrays, analysis of genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes. Many bioinformaticians have developed various algorithms for predicting transcriptional regulatory mechanisms from the sequence, gene expression and interaction data. This review contains compiled information of various computational methods adopted to dissect gene expression pathways.

  7. Edit Distance with Block Deletions

    OpenAIRE

    Dana Shapira; Storer, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Several variants of the edit distance problem with block deletions are considered. Polynomial time optimal algorithms are presented for the edit distance with block deletions allowing character insertions and character moves, but without block moves. We show that the edit distance with block moves and block deletions is NP-complete (Nondeterministic Polynomial time problems in which any given solution to such problem can be verified in polynomial time, and any NP problem can be converted into...

  8. Deletion analysis of spinal muscular atrophy in southern Indian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swaminathan Bhairavi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a genetically heterogeneous disease with paresis and muscle atrophy due to loss of anterior horn cell function. The survival of motor neuron gene (SMN and neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP play a primary role. Both the gene homologues exist as inverted duplications on Chromosome 5q. The telomeric/functional (SMN1 and the centromeric (SMN2 copies differ from each other in eight nucleotides. The C→T transition (at Codon 280 within Exon 7 of SMN2 causes disruption of an exonic splicing enhancer (ESE and/or creates an exonic splicing silencer (ESS leading to abnormal splicing and a truncated protein. Objective: To determine the molecular genetics of SMN1 and NAIP genes in SMA from southern India. Materials and Methods: In the present study, 37 patients from the neuromuscular disorders clinic of National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences were assayed for the deletions in the SMN1 and NAIP genes using PCR-RFLP methods. Results: Among the SMA Type I patients, 43% showed deletions of SMN1 and NAIP. In patients Type II SMA, 57% showed deletions of the SMN1 exons. Conclusion: Thus, deletions were found to occur in 47.8% of the Type I and II patients. Lower sensitivity of gene deletion study in clinically suspected SMA needs further study as clinical diagnosis of SMA is not gold standard. However, the results do correlate with other studies conducted in India.

  9. ATLAS DQ2 DELETION SERVICE

    CERN Document Server

    Oleynik, D; The ATLAS collaboration; Garonne, V; Campana, S

    2012-01-01

    ATLAS DQ2 Deletion service is a sub system of the ATLAS Distributed Data Management (DDM) project DQ2. DDM DQ2 responsible for the replication, access and bookkeeping of ATLAS data across more than 130 distributed grid sites. It also enforces data management policies decided on by the collaboration and defined in the ATLAS computing model. Responsibility of ATLAS DQ2 Deletion service is serving deletion requests on the grid by interacting with grid middleware and the DQ2 catalogues. Furthermore, it also takes care of retry strategies, check-pointing transactions, load management and fault tolerance. In this talk special attention is paid to the technical details, which are used to achieve the high performance of service, accomplished without overloading either site storage, catalogues or other DQ2 components. Also specialty of database backend implementation will be described. Special section will be devote to the deletion monitoring service that allows operators a detailed view of the working system.

  10. ATLAS DQ2 Deletion Service

    CERN Document Server

    OLEYNIK, D; The ATLAS collaboration; GARONNE, V; CAMPANA, S

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Data Management project DQ2 is responsible for the replication, access and bookkeeping of ATLAS data across more than 100 distributed grid sites. It also enforces data management policies decided on by the collaboration and defined in the ATLAS computing model. The DQ2 deletion service is one of the most important DDM services. This distributed service interacts with 3rd party grid middleware and the DQ2 catalogs to serve data deletion requests on the grid. Furthermore, it also takes care of retry strategies, check-pointing transactions, load management and fault tolerance. In this paper special attention is paid to the technical details which are used to achieve the high performance of service (peaking at more than 4 millions files deleted per day), accomplished without overloading either site storage, catalogs or other DQ2 components. Special attention is also paid to the deletion monitoring service that allows operators a detailed view of the working system.

  11. Disruption of MBD5 contributes to a spectrum of psychopathology and neurodevelopmental abnormalities

    OpenAIRE

    Hodge, Jennelle C.; Mitchell, Elyse; Pillalamarri, Vamsee; Toler, Tomi L.; Bartel, Frank; Hutton M Kearney; Zou, Ying S; Tan, Wen-Hann; Hanscom, Carrie; Kirmani, Salman; Hanson, Rae R.; Skinner, Steven A.; Rogers, Curtis; Everman, David B.; Boyd, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Microdeletions of chromosomal region 2q23.1 that disrupt MBD5 contribute to a spectrum of neurodevelopmental phenotypes, however the impact of this locus in human psychopathology has not been described. To characterize the structural variation landscape of MBD5 disruptions and the associated psychopathology, 22 individuals with genomic disruption of MBD5 (translocation, point mutation, and deletion) were identified through whole-genome sequencing or cytogenomic microarray at 11 molecular diag...

  12. Effects of crp deletion in Salmonella enterica serotype Gallinarum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubino Salvatore

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonella enterica serotype Gallinarum (S. Gallinarum remains an important pathogen of poultry, especially in developing countries. There is a need to develop effective and safe vaccines. In the current study, the effect of crp deletion was investigated with respect to virulence and biochemical properties and the possible use of a deletion mutant as vaccine candidate was preliminarily tested. Methods Mutants were constructed in S. Gallinarum by P22 transduction from Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium with deletion of the crp gene. The effect was characterized by measuring biochemical properties and by testing of invasion in a chicken loop model and by challenge of six-day-old chickens. Further, birds were immunized with the deleted strain and challenged with the wild type isolate. Results The crp deletions caused complete attenuation of S. Gallinarum. This was shown by ileal loop experiments not to be due to significantly reduced invasion. Strains with such deletions may have vaccine potential, since oral inoculatoin with S. Gallinarum Δcrp completely protected against challenge with the same dose of wild type S. Gallinarum ten days post immunization. Interestingly, the mutations did not cause the same biochemical and growth changes to the two biotypes of S. Gallinarum. All biochemical effects but not virulence could be complemented by providing an intact crp-gene from S. Typhimurium on the plasmid pSD110. Conclusion Transduction of a Tn10 disrupted crp gene from S. Typhimurium caused attenuation in S. Gallinarum and mutated strains are possible candidates for live vaccines against fowl typhoid.

  13. Oncolytic Replication of E1b-Deleted Adenoviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Hsin Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Various viruses have been studied and developed for oncolytic virotherapies. In virotherapy, a relatively small amount of viruses used in an intratumoral injection preferentially replicate in and lyse cancer cells, leading to the release of amplified viral particles that spread the infection to the surrounding tumor cells and reduce the tumor mass. Adenoviruses (Ads are most commonly used for oncolytic virotherapy due to their infection efficacy, high titer production, safety, easy genetic modification, and well-studied replication characteristics. Ads with deletion of E1b55K preferentially replicate in and destroy cancer cells and have been used in multiple clinical trials. H101, one of the E1b55K-deleted Ads, has been used for the treatment of late-stage cancers as the first approved virotherapy agent. However, the mechanism of selective replication of E1b-deleted Ads in cancer cells is still not well characterized. This review will focus on three potential molecular mechanisms of oncolytic replication of E1b55K-deleted Ads. These mechanisms are based upon the functions of the viral E1B55K protein that are associated with p53 inhibition, late viralmRNAexport, and cell cycle disruption.

  14. ATLAS DQ2 Deletion Service

    CERN Document Server

    OLEYNIK, D; The ATLAS collaboration; GARONNE, V; CAMPANA, S

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Data Management project DQ2 is responsible for the replication, access and bookkeeping of ATLAS data across more than 100 distributed grid sites. It also enforces data management policies decided on by the collaboration and defined in the ATLAS computing model. The DQ2 Deletion Service is one of the most important DDM services. This distributed service interacts with 3rd party grid middleware and the DQ2 catalogues to serve data deletion requests on the grid. Furthermore, it also takes care of retry strategies, check-pointing transactions, load management and fault tolerance. In this paper special attention is paid to the technical details which are used to achieve the high performance of service, accomplished without overloading either site storage, catalogues or other DQ2 components. Special attention is also paid to the deletion monitoring service that allows operators a detailed view of the working system.

  15. Alcohol disrupts sleep homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Mahesh M; Sharma, Rishi; Sahota, Pradeep

    2015-06-01

    Alcohol is a potent somnogen and one of the most commonly used "over the counter" sleep aids. In healthy non-alcoholics, acute alcohol decreases sleep latency, consolidates and increases the quality (delta power) and quantity of NREM sleep during the first half of the night. However, sleep is disrupted during the second half. Alcoholics, both during drinking periods and during abstinences, suffer from a multitude of sleep disruptions manifested by profound insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and altered sleep architecture. Furthermore, subjective and objective indicators of sleep disturbances are predictors of relapse. Finally, within the USA, it is estimated that societal costs of alcohol-related sleep disorders exceeds $18 billion. Thus, although alcohol-associated sleep problems have significant economic and clinical consequences, very little is known about how and where alcohol acts to affect sleep. In this review, we have described our attempts to unravel the mechanism of alcohol-induced sleep disruptions. We have conducted a series of experiments using two different species, rats and mice, as animal models. We performed microdialysis, immunohistochemical, pharmacological, sleep deprivation and lesion studies which suggest that the sleep-promoting effects of alcohol may be mediated via alcohol's action on the mediators of sleep homeostasis: adenosine (AD) and the wake-promoting cholinergic neurons of the basal forebrain (BF). Alcohol, via its action on AD uptake, increases extracellular AD resulting in the inhibition of BF wake-promoting neurons. Since binge alcohol consumption is a highly prevalent pattern of alcohol consumption and disrupts sleep, we examined the effects of binge drinking on sleep-wakefulness. Our results suggest that disrupted sleep homeostasis may be the primary cause of sleep disruption observed following binge drinking. Finally, we have also shown that sleep disruptions observed during acute withdrawal, are caused due to impaired

  16. Disrupting Vestibular Activity Disrupts Body Ownership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Adria E N; Harris, Laurence R

    2015-01-01

    People are more sensitive at detecting asynchrony between a self-generated movement and visual feedback concerning that movement when the movement is viewed from a first-person perspective. We call this the 'self-advantage' and interpret it as an objective measure of self. Here we ask if disruption of the vestibular system in healthy individuals affects the self-advantage. Participants performed finger movements while viewing their hand in a first-person ('self') or third-person ('other') perspective and indicated which of two periods (one with minimum delay and the other with an added delay of 33-264 ms) was delayed. Their sensitivity to the delay was calculated from the psychometric functions obtained. During the testing, disruptive galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) was applied in five-minute blocks interleaved with five minutes of no stimulation for a total of 40 min. We confirmed the self-advantage under no stimulation (31 ms). In the presence of disruptive GVS this advantage disappeared and there was no longer a difference in performance between perspectives. The threshold delay for the 'other' perspective was not affected by the GVS. These results suggest that an intact vestibular signal is required to distinguish 'self' from 'other' and to maintain a sense of body ownership. PMID:26595957

  17. Endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Karen

    . To improve knowledge on possible influences of endocrine disrupters on female reproductive system, the effects of EDCs on genital malformations in females and the development of mammary glands were studied in the present project. AIMS: The aims for the studies on male and female mammary gland development......BACKGROUND: Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) may contribute to reproductive changes in boys in the Western world, however, less is known about influence of EDCs in women. The incidence of precocious breast development is increasing in USA and Europe and mammary gland development has been...... suggested as particularly sensitive to endocrine disruption. Mammary gland examination in toxicological studies may be useful for improving knowledge on possible influences of EDCs on human mammary glands and also be useful for detection of endocrine disrupting effects of chemicals as part of safety testing...

  18. Search and Disrupt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    This paper analyzes how external search is affected by strategic interest alignment among knowledge sources. I focus on misalignment arising from the heterogeneous effects of disruptive technologies by analyzing the influence of incumbents on 2,855 non-incumbents? external knowledge search efforts....... The efforts most likely to solve innovation problems obtained funding from the European Commission?s 7th Framework Program (2007-2013). The results show that involving incumbents improves search in complementary technologies, while demoting it when strategic interests are misaligned in disruptive technologies....... However, incumbent sources engaged in capability reconfiguration to accommodate disruption improve search efforts in disruptive technologies. The paper concludes that the value of external sources is contingent on more than their knowledge. Specifically, interdependence of sources in search gives rise...

  19. 76 FR 22680 - Procurement List; Deletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-22

    ... INFORMATION: Deletions On 2/25/2011 (76 FR 10571), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Deletions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Deletions from the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  20. Deletion of ameloblastin exon 6 is associated with amelogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulter, James A; Murillo, Gina; Brookes, Steven J; Smith, Claire E L; Parry, David A; Silva, Sandra; Kirkham, Jennifer; Inglehearn, Chris F; Mighell, Alan J

    2014-10-15

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) describes a heterogeneous group of inherited dental enamel defects reflecting failure of normal amelogenesis. Ameloblastin (AMBN) is the second most abundant enamel matrix protein expressed during amelogenesis. The pivotal role of AMBN in amelogenesis has been confirmed experimentally using mouse models. However, no AMBN mutations have been associated with human AI. Using autozygosity mapping and exome sequencing, we identified genomic deletion of AMBN exon 6 in a second cousin consanguineous family with three of the six children having hypoplastic AI. The genomic deletion corresponds to an in-frame deletion of 79 amino acids, shortening the protein from 447 to 368 residues. Exfoliated primary teeth (unmatched to genotype) were available from family members. The most severely affected had thin, aprismatic enamel (similar to that reported in mice homozygous for Ambn lacking exons 5 and 6). Other teeth exhibited thicker but largely aprismatic enamel. One tooth had apparently normal enamel. It has been suggested that AMBN may function in bone development. No clinically obvious bone or other co-segregating health problems were identified in the family investigated. This study confirms for the first time that AMBN mutations cause non-syndromic human AI and that mouse models with disrupted Ambn function are valid.

  1. Polypeptone induces dramatic cell lysis in ura4 deletion mutants of fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzy Matsuo

    Full Text Available Polypeptone is widely excluded from Schizosaccharomyces pombe growth medium. However, the reasons why polypeptone should be avoided have not been documented. Polypeptone dramatically induced cell lysis in the ura4 deletion mutant when cells approached the stationary growth phase, and this phenotype was suppressed by supplementation of uracil. To determine the specificity of this cell lysis phenotype, we created deletion mutants of other genes involved in de novo biosynthesis of uridine monophosphate (ura1, ura2, ura3, and ura5. Cell lysis was not observed in these gene deletion mutants. In addition, concomitant disruption of ura1, ura2, ura3, or ura5 in the ura4 deletion mutant suppressed cell lysis, indicating that cell lysis induced by polypeptone is specific to the ura4 deletion mutant. Furthermore, cell lysis was also suppressed when the gene involved in coenzyme Q biosynthesis was deleted. This is likely because Ura3 requires coenzyme Q for its activity. The ura4 deletion mutant was sensitive to zymolyase, which mainly degrades (1,3-beta-D glucan, when grown in the presence of polypeptone, and cell lysis was suppressed by the osmotic stabiliser, sorbitol. Finally, the induction of cell lysis in the ura4 deletion mutant was due to the accumulation of orotidine-5-monophosphate. Cell wall integrity was dramatically impaired in the ura4 deletion mutant when grown in the presence of polypeptone. Because ura4 is widely used as a selection marker in S. pombe, caution needs to be taken when evaluating phenotypes of ura4 mutants.

  2. A persistent mitochondrial deletion reduces fitness and sperm performance in heteroplasmic populations of C. elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Kara

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations are of increasing interest due to their involvement in aging, disease, fertility, and their role in the evolution of the mitochondrial genome. The presence of reactive oxygen species and the near lack of repair mechanisms cause mtDNA to mutate at a faster rate than nuclear DNA, and mtDNA deletions are not uncommon in the tissues of individuals, although germ-line mtDNA is largely lesion-free. Large-scale deletions in mtDNA may disrupt multiple genes, and curiously, some large-scale deletions persist over many generations in a heteroplasmic state. Here we examine the phenotypic effects of one such deletion, uaDf5, in Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans. Our study investigates the phenotypic effects of this 3 kbp deletion. Results The proportion of uaDf5 chromosomes in worms was highly heritable, although uaDf5 content varied from worm to worm and within tissues of individual worms. We also found an impact of the uaDf5 deletion on metabolism. The deletion significantly reduced egg laying rate, defecation rate, and lifespan. Examination of sperm bearing the uaDf5 deletion revealed that sperm crawled more slowly, both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion Worms harboring uaDf5 are at a selective disadvantage compared to worms with wild-type mtDNA. These effects should lead to the rapid extinction of the deleted chromosome, but it persists indefinitely. We discuss both the implications of this phenomenon and the possible causes of a shortened lifespan for uaDf5 mutant worms.

  3. The disruption management model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlister, James

    2011-10-01

    Within all organisations, business continuity disruptions present a set of dilemmas that managers may not have dealt with before in their normal daily duties. The disruption management model provides a simple but effective management tool to enable crisis management teams to stay focused on recovery in the midst of a business continuity incident. The model has four chronological primary headlines, which steer the team through a quick-time crisis decision-making process. The procedure facilitates timely, systematic, rationalised and justified decisions, which can withstand post-event scrutiny. The disruption management model has been thoroughly tested within an emergency services environment and is proven to significantly support clear and concise decision making in a business continuity context. PMID:22130341

  4. Changing circumstances, disrupting habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Wendy; Witt, Melissa Guerrero; Tam, Leona

    2005-06-01

    The present research investigated the mechanisms guiding habitual behavior, specifically, the stimulus cues that trigger habit performance. When usual contexts for performance change, habits cannot be cued by recurring stimuli, and performance should be disrupted. Thus, the exercising, newspaper reading, and TV watching habits of students transferring to a new university were found to survive the transfer only when aspects of the performance context did not change (e.g., participants continued to read the paper with others). In some cases, the disruption in habits also placed behavior under intentional control so that participants acted on their current intentions. Changes in circumstances also affected the favorability of intentions, but changes in intentions alone could not explain the disruption of habits. Furthermore, regardless of whether contexts changed, nonhabitual behavior was guided by intentions. PMID:15982113

  5. Emerging and Disruptive Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Several emerging or disruptive technologies can be identified that might, at some point in the future, displace established laboratory medicine technologies and practices. These include increased automation in the form of robots, 3-D printing, technology convergence (e.g., plug-in glucose meters for smart phones), new point-of-care technologies (e.g., contact lenses with sensors, digital and wireless enabled pregnancy tests) and testing locations (e.g., Retail Health Clinics, new at-home testing formats), new types of specimens (e.g., cell free DNA), big biology/data (e.g., million genome projects), and new regulations (e.g., for laboratory developed tests). In addition, there are many emerging technologies (e.g., planar arrays, mass spectrometry) that might find even broader application in the future and therefore also disrupt current practice. One interesting source of disruptive technology may prove to be the Qualcomm Tricorder XPrize, currently in its final stages. PMID:27683538

  6. The disruption management model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlister, James

    2011-10-01

    Within all organisations, business continuity disruptions present a set of dilemmas that managers may not have dealt with before in their normal daily duties. The disruption management model provides a simple but effective management tool to enable crisis management teams to stay focused on recovery in the midst of a business continuity incident. The model has four chronological primary headlines, which steer the team through a quick-time crisis decision-making process. The procedure facilitates timely, systematic, rationalised and justified decisions, which can withstand post-event scrutiny. The disruption management model has been thoroughly tested within an emergency services environment and is proven to significantly support clear and concise decision making in a business continuity context.

  7. Sustainable Disruption Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaaben, Bo Valdemar

    The world we live in is globalized. Goods are seldom made in the place where they are used or consumed, and we do increasingly travel to other countries for either business or pleasure. In our everyday lives we rely on well-functioning global transportations systems to continue the standard......, such as e.g. technical problems or congestions are also typical causes of delays. Returning a transportation system to its original plan of operation is referred to as Disruption Management. Disruptions are, however, not the only cause of concern to the transportation industry. Fuel is becoming...... when managing recovery from disruptions. The underlying work of this thesis is carried out as an industrial PhD project in co-operation with the company Jeppesen, which have the airline industry as its primary area of business and the maritime industry as its secondary area. For this reason the thesis...

  8. Search and Disrupt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    Extant research on external knowledge search and open innovation assumes that collaborators are aligned in their strategic interests towards solving innovation problems. However, disruptive innovation is known to threaten the competitive advantage of incumbent firms, thereby creating a potential...... conflict of interest between these firms and their collaborators. This paper explores the extent to which strategic interests influence joint problem solving in both complementary and disruptive technologies by analyzing the effects of incumbent collaboration. The analysis disentangles inability...... and strategic intent to find that non-incumbents experience suppression of problem solving likelihood within disruptive technologies when incumbent collaborators are not strategically committed. The paper contributes to extant theory by showing the influence of firms’ underlying strategic interests...

  9. Interruptions disrupt reading comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroughi, Cyrus K; Werner, Nicole E; Barragán, Daniela; Boehm-Davis, Deborah A

    2015-06-01

    Previous research suggests that being interrupted while reading a text does not disrupt the later recognition or recall of information from that text. This research is used as support for Ericsson and Kintsch's (1995) long-term working memory (LT-WM) theory, which posits that disruptions while reading (e.g., interruptions) do not impair subsequent text comprehension. However, to fully comprehend a text, individuals may need to do more than recognize or recall information that has been presented in the text at a later time. Reading comprehension often requires individuals to connect and synthesize information across a text (e.g., successfully identifying complex topics such as themes and tones) and not just make a familiarity-based decision (i.e., recognition). The goal for this study was to determine whether interruptions while reading disrupt reading comprehension when the questions assessing comprehension require participants to connect and synthesize information across the passage. In Experiment 1, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension. In Experiment 2, interruptions disrupted reading comprehension but not recognition of information from the text. In Experiment 3, the addition of a 15-s time-out prior to the interruption successfully removed these negative effects. These data suggest that the time it takes to process the information needed to successfully comprehend text when reading is greater than that required for recognition. Any interference (e.g., an interruption) that occurs during the comprehension process may disrupt reading comprehension. This evidence supports the need for transient activation of information in working memory for successful text comprehension and does not support LT-WM theory. PMID:25867225

  10. Heme oxygenase-1 deletion affects stress erythropoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-An Cao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Homeostatic erythropoiesis leads to the formation of mature red blood cells under non-stress conditions, and the production of new erythrocytes occurs as the need arises. In response to environmental stimuli, such as bone marrow transplantation, myelosuppression, or anemia, erythroid progenitors proliferate rapidly in a process referred to as stress erythropoiesis. We have previously demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 deficiency leads to disrupted stress hematopoiesis. Here, we describe the specific effects of HO-1 deficiency on stress erythropoiesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a transplant model to induce stress conditions. In irradiated recipients that received hmox(+/- or hmox(+/+ bone marrow cells, we evaluated (i the erythrocyte parameters in the peripheral blood; (ii the staining intensity of CD71-, Ter119-, and CD49d-specific surface markers during erythroblast differentiation; (iii the patterns of histological iron staining; and (iv the number of Mac-1(+-cells expressing TNF-α. In the spleens of mice that received hmox(+/- cells, we show (i decreases in the proerythroblast, basophilic, and polychromatophilic erythroblast populations; (ii increases in the insoluble iron levels and decreases in the soluble iron levels; (iii increased numbers of Mac-1(+-cells expressing TNF-α; and (iv decreased levels of CD49d expression in the basophilic and polychromatophilic erythroblast populations. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: As reflected by effects on secreted and cell surface proteins, HO-1 deletion likely affects stress erythropoiesis through the retention of erythroblasts in the erythroblastic islands of the spleen. Thus, HO-1 may serve as a therapeutic target for controlling erythropoiesis, and the dysregulation of HO-1 may be a predisposing condition for hematologic diseases.

  11. Disruptive Co-Creation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butler, Ivan; Christensen, David

    set up to foster innovative partnerships between civil society organizations, businesses and academia with the objective of supporting disruptive business model innovation in co-creation processes across these sectors. This paper delves into state-of-the-art concerning literature pertinent...

  12. Potential Novel Mechanism for Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome: Deletion of a Distant Region Containing Regulatory Elements of PITX2

    OpenAIRE

    Volkmann, Bethany A.; Zinkevich, Natalya S.; Mustonen, Aki; Schilter, Kala F.; Bosenko, Dmitry V.; Reis, Linda M.; Broeckel, Ulrich; Link, Brian A.; Semina, Elena V.

    2011-01-01

    The authors describe an identification of conserved PITX2 enhancers located within a gene desert upstream of the gene and a deletion of this upstream region in a patient with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome with no disruption of the PTIX2 coding region. The data suggest a new mechanism of Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome.

  13. Deletion 22q13.3 syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Phelan Mary C

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The deletion 22q13.3 syndrome (deletion 22q13 syndrome or Phelan-McDermid syndrome) is a chromosome microdeletion syndrome characterized by neonatal hypotonia, global developmental delay, normal to accelerated growth, absent to severely delayed speech, and minor dysmorphic features. The deletion occurs with equal frequency in males and females and has been reported in mosaic and non-mosaic forms. Due to lack of clinical recognition and often insufficient laboratory testing, the syndr...

  14. Gene Deletion by Synthesis in Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinsil; Kim, Dong-Uk; Hoe, Kwang-Lae

    2017-01-01

    Targeted gene deletion is a useful tool for understanding the function of a gene and its protein product. We have developed an efficient and robust gene deletion approach in yeast that employs oligonucleotide-based gene synthesis. This approach requires a deletion cassette composed of three modules: a central 1397-bp KanMX4 selection marker module and two 366-bp gene-specific flanking modules. The invariable KanMX4 module can be used in combination with different pairs of flanking modules targeting different genes. The two flanking modules consist of both sequences unique to each cassette (chromosomal homologous regions and barcodes) and those common to all deletion constructs (artificial linkers and restriction enzyme sites). Oligonucleotides for each module and junction regions are designed using the BatchBlock2Oligo program and are synthesized on a 96-well basis. The oligonucleotides are ligated into a single deletion cassette by ligase chain reaction, which is then amplified through two rounds of nested PCR to obtain sufficient quantities for yeast transformation. After removal of the artificial linkers, the deletion cassettes are transformed into wild-type diploid fission yeast SP286 cells. Verification of correct clone and gene deletion is achieved by performing check PCR and tetrad analysis. This method with proven effectiveness, as evidenced by a high success rate of gene deletion, can be potentially applicable to create systematic gene deletion libraries in a variety of yeast species. PMID:27671940

  15. An analysis of substitution, deletion and insertion mutations in cancer genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iengar, Prathima

    2012-08-01

    Cancer-associated mutations in cancer genes constitute a diverse set of mutations associated with the disease. To gain insight into features of the set, substitution, deletion and insertion mutations were analysed at the nucleotide level, from the COSMIC database. The most frequent substitutions were c → t, g → a, g → t, and the most frequent codon changes were to termination codons. Deletions more than insertions, FS (frameshift) indels more than I-F (in-frame) ones, and single-nucleotide indels, were frequent. FS indels cause loss of significant fractions of proteins. The 5'-cut in FS deletions, and 5'-ligation in FS insertions, often occur between pairs of identical bases. Interestingly, the cut-site and 3'-ligation in insertions, and 3'-cut and join-pair in deletions, were each found to be the same significantly often (p Proto-oncogenes undergo fewer, less-disruptive mutations, in selected protein regions, to activate a single allele. Finally, catalogues, in ranked order, of genes mutated in each cancer, and cancers in which each gene is mutated, were created. The study highlights the nucleotide level preferences and disruptive nature of cancer mutations.

  16. Endocrine disrupting compounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, I B; Christensen, P; Dantzer, V;

    2001-01-01

    With the growing concern that environmental chemicals might impair human and animal fertility, it is important to investigate the possible influence of these substances on sexual differentiation and genital development of mammals. Many of these substances are suspected to interfere with endocrine...... processes, and exposure during critical periods of prenatal development might affect reproductive performance over several generations. Alkylphenols and their metabolites are lipophilic substances exerting apparent estrogenic action in in vitro and in vivo testing systems. With the widespread industrial use...... or embryo models for the evaluation of possible consequences of human exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds is discussed. Furthermore, possible consequences of exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds for the embryo transfer industry are addressed....

  17. Celibacy and Family Disruption

    OpenAIRE

    Emaletdinov B. M.

    2013-01-01

    Causes for celibacy, divorces and successful marriage are discussed in the article. Absence of true love and inability to build and keep it are the main reasons for family disruption. Amorousness, immature love and various forms of false or flawed love substitute the true feeling. It is caused by increased women’s independence, loss of mutual understanding and trust (due to infidelity or jealousy), incompatibility of characters or values. Celibacy is often conditioned by physical disability, ...

  18. Search and Disrupt

    OpenAIRE

    Ørding Olsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes how external search is affected by strategic interest alignment among knowledge sources. I focus on misalignment arising from the heterogeneous effects of disruptive technologies by analyzing the influence of incumbents on 2,855 non-incumbents? external knowledge search efforts. The efforts most likely to solve innovation problems obtained funding from the European Commission?s 7th Framework Program (2007-2013). The results show that involving incumbents improv...

  19. Schematically disruptive game design

    OpenAIRE

    Howell, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Many games focus their resources at satiating player ‘needs’, and meeting perceived expectations that players have of how games should behave and of what constitutes enjoyable, gratifying gameplay. This paper outlines an alternate position on game design – one which focuses on disrupting these expectations, on designing games that players cannot succeed in simply by relying on their pre-acquired gameplay experiences. A critique of current game design trends is offered, and possible future out...

  20. 1p36 deletion syndrome: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan VK

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Valerie K Jordan,1 Hitisha P Zaveri,2 Daryl A Scott1,2 1Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 2Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA Abstract: Deletions of chromosome 1p36 affect approximately 1 in 5,000 newborns and are the most common terminal deletions in humans. Medical problems commonly caused by terminal deletions of 1p36 include developmental delay, intellectual disability, seizures, vision problems, hearing loss, short stature, distinctive facial features, brain anomalies, orofacial clefting, congenital heart defects, cardiomyopathy, and renal anomalies. Although 1p36 deletion syndrome is considered clinically recognizable, there is significant phenotypic variation among affected individuals. This variation is due, at least in part, to the genetic heterogeneity seen in 1p36 deletions which include terminal and interstitial deletions of varying lengths located throughout the 30 Mb of DNA that comprise chromosome 1p36. Array-based copy number variant analysis can easily identify genomic regions of 1p36 that are deleted in an affected individual. However, predicting the phenotype of an individual based solely on the location and extent of their 1p36 deletion remains a challenge since most of the genes that contribute to 1p36-related phenotypes have yet to be identified. In addition, haploinsufficiency of more than one gene may contribute to some phenotypes. In this article, we review recent successes in the effort to map and identify the genes and genomic regions that contribute to specific 1p36-related phenotypes. In particular, we highlight evidence implicating MMP23B, GABRD, SKI, PRDM16, KCNAB2, RERE, UBE4B, CASZ1, PDPN, SPEN, ECE1, HSPG2, and LUZP1 in various 1p36 deletion phenotypes. Keywords: chromosome 1p36, chromosome deletion, 1p36 deletion syndrome, monosomy 1p36

  1. The chromosome 9q subtelomere deletion syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stewart, D.R.; Kleefstra, T.

    2007-01-01

    The chromosome 9q subtelomere deletion syndrome (9qSTDS) is among the first and most common clinically recognizable syndromes to arise from widespread testing by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) of subtelomere deletions. There are about 50 reported cases worldwide. Affected individuals invar

  2. 13Q DELETIONS IN LYMPHOID MALIGNANCIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HERMANSON, M; GRANDER, D; MERUP, M; WU, XS; HEYMAN, M; RASOOL, O; JULIUSSON, G; GAHRTON, G; DETLOFSSON, R; NIKIFOROVA, N; BUYS, C; SODERHALL, S; YANKOVSKY, N; ZABAROVSKY, E; EINHORN, S

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that a candidate tumor suppressor gene resides telomeric of the RB1 gene at 13q14, a region that is commonly deleted in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL). In this study, we have evaluated the frequency and minimal region of overlap for 13q deletions in malig

  3. 78 FR 56679 - Procurement List; Deletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... 8/2/2013 (78 FR 46927-46928), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Deletions AGENCY: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Deletions from the Procurement List. SUMMARY:...

  4. Seven gene deletions in seven days

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingemann Jensen, Sheila; Lennen, Rebecca; Herrgard, Markus;

    2015-01-01

    enables growth at 37 °C, thereby facilitating removal of integrated antibiotic cassettes and deletion of additional genes in the same day. Phosphorothioated primers were demonstrated to enable simultaneous deletions during one round of electroporation. Utilizing these methods, we constructed strains...

  5. Selective neuronal PTEN deletion: can we take the brakes off of growth without losing control?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin A Gutilla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The limited ability for injured adult axons to regenerate is a major cause for limited functional recovery after injury to the nervous system, motivating numerous efforts to uncover mechanisms capable of enhancing regeneration potential. One promising strategy involves deletion or knockdown of the phosphatase and tensin (PTEN gene. Conditional genetic deletion of PTEN before, immediately following, or several months after spinal cord injury enables neurons of the corticospinal tract (CST to regenerate their axons across the lesion, which is accompanied by enhanced recovery of skilled voluntary motor functions mediated by the CST. Although conditional genetic deletion or knockdown ofPTEN in neurons enables axon regeneration, PTEN is a well-known tumor suppressor and mutations of the PTEN gene disrupt brain development leading to neurological abnormalities including macrocephaly, seizures, and early mortality. The long-term consequences of manipulating PTEN in the adult nervous system, as would be done for therapeutic intervention after injury, are only now being explored. Here, we summarize evidence indicating that long-term deletion of PTEN in mature neurons does not cause evident pathology; indeed, cortical neurons that have lived without PTEN for over 1 year appear robust and healthy. Studies to date provide only a first look at potential negative consequences of PTEN deletion or knockdown, but the absence of any detectable neuropathology supports guarded optimism that interventions to enable axon regeneration after injury are achievable.

  6. Abnormal auditory and language pathways in children with 16p11.2 deletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey I. Berman

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Copy number variations at chromosome 16p11.2 contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD. This study seeks to improve our understanding of the biological basis of behavioral phenotypes common in ASD, in particular the prominent and prevalent disruption of spoken language seen in children with the 16p11.2 BP4–BP5 deletion. We examined the auditory and language white matter pathways with diffusion MRI in a cohort of 36 pediatric deletion carriers and 45 age-matched controls. Diffusion MR tractography of the auditory radiations and the arcuate fasciculus was performed to generate tract specific measures of white matter microstructure. In both tracts, deletion carriers exhibited significantly higher diffusivity than that of controls. Cross-sectional diffusion parameters in these tracts changed with age with no group difference in the rate of maturation. Within deletion carriers, the left-hemisphere arcuate fasciculus mean and radial diffusivities were significantly negatively correlated with clinical language ability, but not non-verbal cognitive ability. Diffusion metrics in the right-hemisphere arcuate fasciculus were not predictive of language ability. These results provide insight into the link between the 16p11.2 deletion, abnormal auditory and language pathway structures, and the specific behavioral deficits that may contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders such as ASD.

  7. Deletions in the fifth alpha helix of HIV-1 matrix block virus release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The matrix (MA) protein of HIV-1 is the N-terminal component of the Gag structural protein and is critical for the early and late stages of viral replication. MA contains five α-helices (α1–α5). Deletions in the N-terminus of α5 as small as three amino acids impaired virus release. Electron microscopy of one deletion mutant (MA∆96-120) showed that its particles were tethered to the surface of cells by membranous stalks. Immunoblots indicated all mutants were processed completely, but mutants with large deletions had alternative processing intermediates. Consistent with the EM data, MA∆96-120 retained membrane association and multimerization capability. Co-expression of this mutant inhibited wild type particle release. Alanine scanning mutation in this region did not affect virus release, although the progeny virions were poorly infectious. Combined, these data demonstrate that structural ablation of the α5 of MA inhibits virus release. - Highlights: • Deletions were identified in the C-terminus of matrix that block virus release. • These deletion mutants still multimerized and associated with membranes. • TEM showed the mutant particles were tethered to the cell surface. • Amino acid mutagenesis of the region did not affect release. • The data suggests that disruption of matrix structure blocks virus release

  8. Disruption - Access cards service

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    We would like to inform you that between 10 November and 15 December 2014, the access cards service in Building 55 will be disrupted, as the GS Department has decided to improve the facilities for users of this building. During the work, you will find the registration, biometric registration and dosimeter exchange services on the second floor of Building 55 and the vehicle sticker service on the ground floor along with the access cards service. We thank you for your understanding and apologise for any inconvenience caused.

  9. Celibacy and Family Disruption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emaletdinov B. M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Causes for celibacy, divorces and successful marriage are discussed in the article. Absence of true love and inability to build and keep it are the main reasons for family disruption. Amorousness, immature love and various forms of false or flawed love substitute the true feeling. It is caused by increased women’s independence, loss of mutual understanding and trust (due to infidelity or jealousy, incompatibility of characters or values. Celibacy is often conditioned by physical disability, revaluation of freedom and independence, huge requirements to partners, consumer attitude to life, infertility, alcohol and drug abuse, abnormalities in personality and sexuality.

  10. Relativistic tidal disruption events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levan A.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In March 2011 Swift detected an extremely luminous and long-lived outburst from the nucleus of an otherwise quiescent, low luminosity (LMC-like galaxy. Named Swift J1644+57, its combination of high-energy luminosity (1048 ergs s−1 at peak, rapid X-ray variability (factors of >100 on timescales of 100 seconds and luminous, rising radio emission suggested that we were witnessing the birth of a moderately relativistic jet (Γ ∼ 2 − 5, created when a star is tidally disrupted by the supermassive black hole in the centre of the galaxy. A second event, Swift J2058+0516, detected two months later, with broadly similar properties lends further weight to this interpretation. Taken together this suggests that a fraction of tidal disruption events do indeed create relativistic outflows, demonstrates their detectability, and also implies that low mass galaxies can host massive black holes. Here, I briefly outline the observational properties of these relativistic tidal flares observed last year, and their evolution over the first year since their discovery.

  11. Disruptions in the TFTR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a successful reactor, it will be useful to predict the occurrence of disruptions and to understand disruption effects including how a plasma disrupts onto the wall and how reproducibly it does so. Studies of disruptions on TFTR at both high-βpol and high-density have shown that, in both types, a fast growing m/n=1/1 mode plays an important role. In highdensity disruptions, a newly observed fast m/n = 1/1 mode occurs early in the thermal decay phase. For the first time in TFTR q-profile measurements just prior to disruptions have been made. Experimental studies of heat deposition patterns on the first wall of TFTR due to disruptions have provided information on MHD phenomena prior to or during the disruption, how the energy is released to the wall, and the reproducibility of the heat loads from disruptions. This information is important in the design of future devices such as ITER. Several new processes of runaway electron generation are theoretically suggested and their application to TFTR and ITER is considered, together with a preliminary assessment of x-ray data from runaways generated during disruptions

  12. Disruptive camouflage impairs object recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Richard J. Webster; Hassall, Christopher; Herdman, Chris M.; Godin, Jean-Guy J.; Sherratt, Thomas N.

    2013-01-01

    Whether hiding from predators, or avoiding battlefield casualties, camouflage is widely employed to prevent detection. Disruptive coloration is a seemingly well-known camouflage mechanism proposed to function by breaking up an object's salient features (for example their characteristic outline), rendering objects more difficult to recognize. However, while a wide range of animals are thought to evade detection using disruptive patterns, there is no direct experimental evidence that disruptive...

  13. Deletion of Atoh1 disrupts Sonic Hedgehog signaling in the developing cerebellum and prevents medulloblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Flora, Adriano; Klisch, Tiemo J.; Schuster, Gabriele; Zoghbi, Huda Y.

    2009-01-01

    Granule neuron precursors (GNPs) are the most actively proliferating cells in the post-natal nervous system and mutations in pathways controlling their cell cycle can result in medulloblastoma. The transcription factor Atoh1 has been suspected to contribute to GNP proliferation, but its role in normal and neoplastic post-natal cerebellar development remains unexplored. We show that Atoh1 regulates the signal transduction pathway of Sonic Hedgehog, an extracellular factor that is essential for...

  14. Finding cis-regulatory modules in Drosophila using phylogenetic hidden Markov models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Wendy S W; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    MOTIVATION: Finding the regulatory modules for transcription factors binding is an important step in elucidating the complex molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of gene expression. There are numerous methods available for solving this problem, however, very few of them take advantage of th...

  15. Evaluation of phylogenetic footprint discovery for predicting bacterial cis-regulatory elements and revealing their evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Helden Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The detection of conserved motifs in promoters of orthologous genes (phylogenetic footprints has become a common strategy to predict cis-acting regulatory elements. Several software tools are routinely used to raise hypotheses about regulation. However, these tools are generally used as black boxes, with default parameters. A systematic evaluation of optimal parameters for a footprint discovery strategy can bring a sizeable improvement to the predictions. Results We evaluate the performances of a footprint discovery approach based on the detection of over-represented spaced motifs. This method is particularly suitable for (but not restricted to Bacteria, since such motifs are typically bound by factors containing a Helix-Turn-Helix domain. We evaluated footprint discovery in 368 Escherichia coli K12 genes with annotated sites, under 40 different combinations of parameters (taxonomical level, background model, organism-specific filtering, operon inference. Motifs are assessed both at the levels of correctness and significance. We further report a detailed analysis of 181 bacterial orthologs of the LexA repressor. Distinct motifs are detected at various taxonomical levels, including the 7 previously characterized taxon-specific motifs. In addition, we highlight a significantly stronger conservation of half-motifs in Actinobacteria, relative to Firmicutes, suggesting an intermediate state in specificity switching between the two Gram-positive phyla, and thereby revealing the on-going evolution of LexA auto-regulation. Conclusion The footprint discovery method proposed here shows excellent results with E. coli and can readily be extended to predict cis-acting regulatory signals and propose testable hypotheses in bacterial genomes for which nothing is known about regulation.

  16. FootprintDB: Analysis of Plant Cis-Regulatory Elements, Transcription Factors, and Binding Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Moreira, Bruno; Sebastian, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    FootprintDB is a database and search engine that compiles regulatory sequences from open access libraries of curated DNA cis-elements and motifs, and their associated transcription factors (TFs). It systematically annotates the binding interfaces of the TFs by exploiting protein-DNA complexes deposited in the Protein Data Bank. Each entry in footprintDB is thus a DNA motif linked to the protein sequence of the TF(s) known to recognize it, and in most cases, the set of predicted interface residues involved in specific recognition. This chapter explains step-by-step how to search for DNA motifs and protein sequences in footprintDB and how to focus the search to a particular organism. Two real-world examples are shown where this software was used to analyze transcriptional regulation in plants. Results are described with the aim of guiding users on their interpretation, and special attention is given to the choices users might face when performing similar analyses. PMID:27557773

  17. Extensive conservation of ancient microsynteny across metazoans due to cis-regulatory constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Irimia, Manuel; Tena, Juan J.; Alexis, Maria S.; Fernandez-Miñan, Ana; Maeso, Ignacio; Bogdanović, Ozren; de la Calle-Mustienes, Elisa; Roy, Scott W; Gómez-Skarmeta, José L.; Fraser, Hunter B.

    2012-01-01

    The order of genes in eukaryotic genomes has generally been assumed to be neutral, since gene order is largely scrambled over evolutionary time. Only a handful of exceptional examples are known, typically involving deeply conserved clusters of tandemly duplicated genes (e.g., Hox genes and histones). Here we report the first systematic survey of microsynteny conservation across metazoans, utilizing 17 genome sequences. We identified nearly 600 pairs of unrelated genes that have remained tight...

  18. Evolving New Skeletal Traits by cis-Regulatory Changes in Bone Morphogenetic Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indjeian, Vahan B; Kingman, Garrett A; Jones, Felicity C; Guenther, Catherine A; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Myers, Richard M; Kingsley, David M

    2016-01-14

    Changes in bone size and shape are defining features of many vertebrates. Here we use genetic crosses and comparative genomics to identify specific regulatory DNA alterations controlling skeletal evolution. Armor bone-size differences in sticklebacks map to a major effect locus overlapping BMP family member GDF6. Freshwater fish express more GDF6 due in part to a transposon insertion, and transgenic overexpression of GDF6 phenocopies evolutionary changes in armor-plate size. The human GDF6 locus also has undergone distinctive regulatory evolution, including complete loss of an enhancer that is otherwise highly conserved between chimps and other mammals. Functional tests show that the ancestral enhancer drives expression in hindlimbs but not forelimbs, in locations that have been specifically modified during the human transition to bipedalism. Both gain and loss of regulatory elements can localize BMP changes to specific anatomical locations, providing a flexible regulatory basis for evolving species-specific changes in skeletal form. PMID:26774823

  19. Cis-regulatory mechanisms of left/right asymmetric neuron-subtype specification in C. elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Etchberger, John F.; Eileen B Flowers; Poole, Richard J.; Bashllari, Enkelejda; Hobert, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    Anatomically and functionally defined neuron types are sometimes further classified into individual subtypes based on unique functional or molecular properties. To better understand how developmental programs controlling neuron type specification are mechanistically linked to programs controlling neuronal subtype specification, we have analyzed a neuronal subtype specification program that occurs across the left/right axis in the nervous system of the nematode C. elegans. A terminal selector ...

  20. Identification and Characterization of a cis-Regulatory Element for Zygotic Gene Expression in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaji, Takashi; Lopez, David; Pellegrini, Matteo; Umen, James

    2016-01-01

    Upon fertilization Chlamydomonas reinhardtii zygotes undergo a program of differentiation into a diploid zygospore that is accompanied by transcription of hundreds of zygote-specific genes. We identified a distinct sequence motif we term a zygotic response element (ZYRE) that is highly enriched in promoter regions of C reinhardtii early zygotic genes. A luciferase reporter assay was used to show that native ZYRE motifs within the promoter of zygotic gene ZYS3 or intron of zygotic gene DMT4 are necessary for zygotic induction. A synthetic luciferase reporter with a minimal promoter was used to show that ZYRE motifs introduced upstream are sufficient to confer zygotic upregulation, and that ZYRE-controlled zygotic transcription is dependent on the homeodomain transcription factor GSP1. We predict that ZYRE motifs will correspond to binding sites for the homeodomain proteins GSP1-GSM1 that heterodimerize and activate zygotic gene expression in early zygotes. PMID:27172209

  1. Dissection of transcriptional and cis-regulatory control of differentiation in human pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaferia, Giuseppe R; Balestrieri, Chiara; Prosperini, Elena; Nicoli, Paola; Spaggiari, Paola; Zerbi, Alessandro; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2016-03-15

    The histological grade of carcinomas describes the ability of tumor cells to organize in differentiated epithelial structures and has prognostic and therapeutic impact. Here, we show that differential usage of the genomic repertoire of transcriptional enhancers leads to grade-specific gene expression programs in human pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). By integrating gene expression profiling, epigenomic footprinting, and loss-of-function experiments in PDAC cell lines of different grade, we identified the repertoires of enhancers specific to high- and low-grade PDACs and the cognate set of transcription factors acting to maintain their activity. Among the candidate regulators of PDAC differentiation, KLF5 was selectively expressed in pre-neoplastic lesions and low-grade primary PDACs and cell lines, where it maintained the acetylation of grade-specific enhancers, the expression of epithelial genes such as keratins and mucins, and the ability to organize glandular epithelia in xenografts. The identification of the transcription factors controlling differentiation in PDACs will help clarify the molecular bases of its heterogeneity and progression. PMID:26769127

  2. Cis-regulatory programs in the development and evolution of vertebrate paired appendages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, Andrew R; Shubin, Neil H

    2016-09-01

    Differential gene expression is the core of development, mediating the genetic changes necessary for determining cell identity. The regulation of gene activity by cis-acting elements (e.g., enhancers) is a crucial mechanism for determining differential gene activity by precise control of gene expression in embryonic space and time. Modifications to regulatory regions can have profound impacts on phenotype, and therefore developmental and evolutionary biologists have increasingly focused on elucidating the transcriptional control of genes that build and pattern body plans. Here, we trace the evolutionary history of transcriptional control of three loci key to vertebrate appendage development (Fgf8, Shh, and HoxD/A). Within and across these regulatory modules, we find both complex and flexible regulation in contrast with more fixed enhancers that appear unchanged over vast timescales of vertebrate evolution. The transcriptional control of vertebrate appendage development was likely already incredibly complex in the common ancestor of fish, implying that subtle changes to regulatory networks were more likely responsible for alterations in phenotype rather than the de novo addition of whole regulatory domains. Finally, we discuss the dangers of relying on inter-species transgenesis when testing enhancer function, and call for more controlled regulatory swap experiments when inferring the evolutionary history of enhancer elements. PMID:26783722

  3. Network discovery pipeline elucidates conserved time-of-day-specific cis-regulatory modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd P Michael

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Correct daily phasing of transcription confers an adaptive advantage to almost all organisms, including higher plants. In this study, we describe a hypothesis-driven network discovery pipeline that identifies biologically relevant patterns in genome-scale data. To demonstrate its utility, we analyzed a comprehensive matrix of time courses interrogating the nuclear transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana plants grown under different thermocycles, photocycles, and circadian conditions. We show that 89% of Arabidopsis transcripts cycle in at least one condition and that most genes have peak expression at a particular time of day, which shifts depending on the environment. Thermocycles alone can drive at least half of all transcripts critical for synchronizing internal processes such as cell cycle and protein synthesis. We identified at least three distinct transcription modules controlling phase-specific expression, including a new midnight specific module, PBX/TBX/SBX. We validated the network discovery pipeline, as well as the midnight specific module, by demonstrating that the PBX element was sufficient to drive diurnal and circadian condition-dependent expression. Moreover, we show that the three transcription modules are conserved across Arabidopsis, poplar, and rice. These results confirm the complex interplay between thermocycles, photocycles, and the circadian clock on the daily transcription program, and provide a comprehensive view of the conserved genomic targets for a transcriptional network key to successful adaptation.

  4. Characterization of "cis"-regulatory elements ("c"RE) associated with mammary gland function

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Bos taurus genome assembly has propelled dairy science into a new era; still, most of the information encoded in the genome has not yet been decoded. The human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project has spearheaded the identification and annotation of functional genomic elements in the hu...

  5. RAR/RXR binding dynamics distinguish pluripotency from differentiation associated cis-regulatory elements

    OpenAIRE

    Chatagnon, Amandine; Veber, Philippe; Morin, Valérie; Bedo, Justin; Triqueneaux, Gérard; Sémon, Marie; Laudet, Vincent; D'Alché-Buc, Florence; Benoit, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    In mouse embryonic cells, ligand-activated retinoic acid receptors (RARs) play a key role in inhibiting pluripotency-maintaining genes and activating some major actors of cell differentiation. To investigate the mechanism underlying this dual regulation, we performed joint RAR/RXR ChIP-seq and mRNA-seq time series during the first 48 h of the RA-induced Primitive Endoderm (PrE) differentiation process in F9 embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells. We show here that this dual regulation is associated w...

  6. RAR/RXR binding dynamics distinguish pluripotency from differentiation associated cis-regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatagnon, Amandine; Veber, Philippe; Morin, Valérie; Bedo, Justin; Triqueneaux, Gérard; Sémon, Marie; Laudet, Vincent; d'Alché-Buc, Florence; Benoit, Gérard

    2015-05-26

    In mouse embryonic cells, ligand-activated retinoic acid receptors (RARs) play a key role in inhibiting pluripotency-maintaining genes and activating some major actors of cell differentiation. To investigate the mechanism underlying this dual regulation, we performed joint RAR/RXR ChIP-seq and mRNA-seq time series during the first 48 h of the RA-induced Primitive Endoderm (PrE) differentiation process in F9 embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells. We show here that this dual regulation is associated with RAR/RXR genomic redistribution during the differentiation process. In-depth analysis of RAR/RXR binding sites occupancy dynamics and composition show that in undifferentiated cells, RAR/RXR interact with genomic regions characterized by binding of pluripotency-associated factors and high prevalence of the non-canonical DR0-containing RA response element. By contrast, in differentiated cells, RAR/RXR bound regions are enriched in functional Sox17 binding sites and are characterized with a higher frequency of the canonical DR5 motif. Our data offer an unprecedentedly detailed view on the action of RA in triggering pluripotent cell differentiation and demonstrate that RAR/RXR action is mediated via two different sets of regulatory regions tightly associated with cell differentiation status. PMID:25897113

  7. Repartnering after First Union Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zheng; Schimmele, Christoph M.

    2005-01-01

    Using data from the 1995 General Social Survey (N= 2,639), this study examines two competing repartnering choices made by Canadians after first union disruption: marriage or cohabitation. About 42% of women and 54% of men form a second union 5 years after union disruption, with cohabitation being the most prevalent choice. The timing of second…

  8. Disrupting Ethnography through Rhizoanalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Masny

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article interrogates principles of ethnography in education proposed by Mills and Morton: raw tellings, analytic pattern, vignette and empathy. This article adopts a position that is uncomfortable, unconventional and interesting. It involves a deterritorialization/ rupture of ethnography in education in order to reterritorialize a different concept: rhizoanalysis, a way to position theory and data that is multilayered, complex and messy. Rhizoanalysis, the main focus of this article is not a method. It is an approach to research conditioned by a reality in which Deleuze and Guattari disrupt representation, interpretation and subjectivity. In this article, Multiple Literacies Theory, a theoretical and practical framework, becomes a lens to examine a rhizomatic study of a Korean family recently arrived to Australia and attending English as a second language classes. Observations and interviews recorded the daily lives of the family. The vignettes were selected by reading data intensively and immanently through a process of palpation, an innovative approach to educational research. Rhizoanalysis proposes to abandon the given and invent different ways of thinking about and doing research and what might happen when reading data differently, intensively and immanently, through Multiple Literacies Theory. Rhizoanalysis, a game-changer in the way research can be conducted, affords a different lens to tackle issues in education through research.

  9. Gene deletion analysis of a Chinese boy with Xp21 contiguous gene deletion syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    麻宏伟; 姜俊; 王岳平; 王志超; 陈丽英; 松尾雅文

    2004-01-01

    @@ Xp21 contiguous gene deletion syndrome, sometimes called complex glycerol kinase deficiency, is associated with variable size Xp21 deletions that usually include the glycerol kinase gene and span multiple Xp21 disease gene loci in the region. The order of the potentially affected loci are as follows:

  10. Molecular basis and consequences of a deletion in the amelogenin gene, analyzed by capture PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagerstroem-Fermer, M.; Pettersson, U.; Landegren, U. (Univ. of Uppsala (Sweden))

    1993-07-01

    A mutation that disrupts the gene for one of the major proteins in tooth enamel has been investigated. The mutation is located in the amelogenin gene and causes X-linked amelogenesis imperfecta, characterized by defective mineralization of tooth enamel. The authors have isolated the breakpoints of a 5-kb deletion in the amelogenin gene on the basis of nucleotide sequence information located upstream of the lesion, using a technique termed capture PCR. The deletion removes five of the seven exons, spanning from the second intron to the last exon. Only the first two codons for the mature protein remain, consistent with the relatively severe phenotype of affected individuals in the present family. The mutation appears to have arisen as an illegitimate recombination event since of 11 nucleotide positions immediately surrounding the two breakpoints, 9 are identical. 17 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Tidal disruption event demographics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, C. S.

    2016-09-01

    We survey the properties of stars destroyed in tidal disruption events (TDEs) as a function of black hole (BH) mass, stellar mass and evolutionary state, star formation history and redshift. For M_{BH} ≲ 10^7 M_{⊙}, the typical TDE is due to a M* ˜ 0.3 M⊙ M-dwarf, although the mass function is relatively flat for M_{ast } ≲ M_{⊙}. The contribution from older main-sequence stars and sub-giants is small but not negligible. From MBH ≃ 107.5-108.5 M⊙, the balance rapidly shifts to higher mass stars and a larger contribution from evolved stars, and is ultimately dominated by evolved stars at higher BH masses. The star formation history has little effect until the rates are dominated by evolved stars. TDE rates should decline very rapidly towards higher redshifts. The volumetric rate of TDEs is very high because the BH mass function diverges for low masses. However, any emission mechanism which is largely Eddington-limited for low BH masses suppresses this divergence in any observed sample and leads to TDE samples dominated by MBH ≃ 106.0-107.5 M⊙ BHs with roughly Eddington peak accretion rates. The typical fall-back time is relatively long, with 16 per cent having tfb plausible if tfb has any relation to the transient rise time. For almost any BH mass function, systematic searches for fainter, faster time-scale TDEs in smaller galaxies, and longer time-scale TDEs in more massive galaxies are likely to be rewarded.

  12. When Disruptive Approaches Meet Disruptive Technologies: Learning at a Distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Chere Campbell

    2000-01-01

    Reviews research on constructivism in learning and selection of learning strategies. Suggests linking constructivism with instructional technologies for continuing medical education in order to "disrupt" reactive, habitual ways of learning and encourage active engagement. (SK)

  13. Endocrine Effects of Circadian Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrosian, Tracy A; Fonken, Laura K; Nelson, Randy J

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythms, provoked by artificial lighting at night, inconsistent sleep-wake schedules, and transmeridian air travel, is increasingly prevalent in modern society. Desynchrony of biological rhythms from environmental light cycles has dramatic consequences for human health. In particular, disrupting homeostatic oscillations in endocrine tissues and the hormones that these tissues regulate can have cascading effects on physiology and behavior. Accumulating evidence suggests that chronic disruption of circadian organization of endocrine function may lead to metabolic, reproductive, sleep, and mood disorders. This review discusses circadian control of endocrine systems and the consequences of distorting rhythmicity of these systems. PMID:26208951

  14. Neurotoxicity of Thyroid Disrupting Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyroid hormones playa critical role in the normal development ofthe mammalian brain. Thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs) are environmental contaminants that alter the structure or function ofthe thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormone (TH) homeost...

  15. Vortex disruption by magnetohydrodynamic feedback

    CERN Document Server

    Mak, Julian; Hughes, D W

    2016-01-01

    In an electrically conducting fluid, vortices stretch out a weak, large-scale magnetic field to form strong current sheets on their edges. Associated with these current sheets are magnetic stresses, which are subsequently released through reconnection, leading to vortex disruption, and possibly even destruction. This disruption phenomenon is investigated here in the context of two-dimensional, homogeneous, incompressible magnetohydrodynamics. We derive a simple order of magnitude estimate for the magnetic stresses --- and thus the degree of disruption --- that depends on the strength of the background magnetic field (measured by the parameter $M$, a ratio between the Alfv\\'en speed and a typical flow speed) and on the magnetic diffusivity (measured by the magnetic Reynolds number $\\mbox{Rm}$). The resulting estimate suggests that significant disruption occurs when $M^{2}\\mbox{Rm} = O(1)$. To test our prediction, we analyse direct numerical simulations of vortices generated by the breakup of unstable shear flo...

  16. 77 FR 68737 - Procurement List, Proposed Deletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE FROM... Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Deletions from the Procurement... Must Be Received On or Before: 12/17/2012. ADDRESSES: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are...

  17. 78 FR 65618 - Procurement List; Proposed Deletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE FROM... Purchase From People Who Are Blind or Severely Disabled. ACTION: Proposed Deletions from the Procurement... Received on or Before: 12/2/2013. ADDRESSES: Committee for Purchase From People Who Are Blind or...

  18. Union-Find with Constant Time Deletions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alstrup, Stephen; Thorup, Mikkel; Gørtz, Inge Li;

    2014-01-01

    operations performed, and α_M/N_(n) is a functional inverse of Ackermann’s function. They left open the question whether delete operations can be implemented more efficiently than find operations, for example, in o(log n) worst-case time. We resolve this open problem by presenting a relatively simple...

  19. Familial deletion 18p syndrome: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lemyre Emmanuelle

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletion 18p is a frequent deletion syndrome characterized by dysmorphic features, growth deficiencies, and mental retardation with a poorer verbal performance. Until now, five families have been described with limited clinical description. We report transmission of deletion 18p from a mother to her two daughters and review the previous cases. Case presentation The proband is 12 years old and has short stature, dysmorphic features and moderate mental retardation. Her sister is 9 years old and also has short stature and similar dysmorphic features. Her cognitive performance is within the borderline to mild mental retardation range. The mother also presents short stature. Psychological evaluation showed moderate mental retardation. Chromosome analysis from the sisters and their mother revealed the same chromosomal deletion: 46, XX, del(18(p11.2. Previous familial cases were consistent regarding the transmission of mental retardation. Our family differs in this regard with variable cognitive impairment and does not display poorer verbal than non-verbal abilities. An exclusive maternal transmission is observed throughout those families. Women with del(18p are fertile and seem to have a normal miscarriage rate. Conclusion Genetic counseling for these patients should take into account a greater range of cognitive outcome than previously reported.

  20. Deletion of GPIHBP1 causing severe chylomicronemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios, Jonathan J; Shastry, Savitha; Jasso, Juan; Hauser, Natalie; Garg, Abhimanyu; Bensadoun, André; Cohen, Jonathan C; Hobbs, Helen H

    2012-05-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) is a hydrolase that cleaves circulating triglycerides to release fatty acids to the surrounding tissues. The enzyme is synthesized in parenchymal cells and is transported to its site of action on the capillary endothelium by glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored high-density lipoprotein-binding protein 1 (GPIHBP1). Inactivating mutations in LPL; in its cofactor, apolipoprotein (Apo) C2; or in GPIHBP1 cause severe hypertriglyceridemia. Here we describe an individual with complete deficiency of GPIHBP1. The proband was an Asian Indian boy who had severe chylomicronemia at 2 months of age. Array-based copy-number analysis of his genomic DNA revealed homozygosity for a 17.5-kb deletion that included GPIHBP1. A 44-year-old aunt with a history of hypertriglyceridemia and pancreatitis was also homozygous for the deletion. A bolus of intravenously administered heparin caused a rapid increase in circulating LPL and decreased plasma triglyceride levels in control individuals but not in two GPIHBP1-deficient patients. Thus, short-term treatment with heparin failed to attenuate the hypertriglyceridemia in patients with GPIHBP1 deficiency. The increasing resolution of copy number microarrays and their widespread adoption for routine cytogenetic analysis is likely to reveal a greater role for submicroscopic deletions in Mendelian conditions. We describe the first neonate with complete GPIHBP1 deficiency due to homozygosity for a deletion of GPIHBP1. PMID:22008945

  1. Grin1 receptor deletion within CRF neurons enhances fear memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgette Gafford

    Full Text Available Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF dysregulation is implicated in mood and anxiety disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. CRF is expressed in areas engaged in fear and anxiety processing including the central amygdala (CeA. Complicating our ability to study the contribution of CRF-containing neurons to fear and anxiety behavior is the wide variety of cell types in which CRF is expressed. To manipulate specific subpopulations of CRF containing neurons, our lab has developed a mouse with a Cre recombinase gene driven by a CRF promoter (CRFp3.0Cre (Martin et al., 2010. In these studies, mice that have the gene that encodes NR1 (Grin1 flanked by loxP sites (floxed were crossed with our previously developed CRFp3.0Cre mouse to selectively disrupt Grin1 within CRF containing neurons (Cre+/fGrin1+. We find that disruption of Grin1 in CRF neurons did not affect baseline levels of anxiety, locomotion, pain sensitivity or exploration of a novel object. However, baseline expression of Grin1 was decreased in Cre+/fGrin1+ mice as measured by RTPCR. Cre+/fGrin1+ mice showed enhanced auditory fear acquisition and retention without showing any significant effect on fear extinction. We measured Gria1, the gene that encodes AMPAR1 and the CREB activator Creb1 in the amygdala of Cre+/fGrin1+ mice after fear conditioning. Both Gria1 and Creb1 were enhanced in the amygdala after training. To determine if the Grin1-expressing CRF neurons within the CeA are responsible for the enhancement of fear memory in adults, we infused a lentivirus with Cre driven by a CRF promoter (LV pCRF-Cre/fGrin1+ into the CeA of floxed Grin1 mice. Cre driven deletion of Grin1 specifically within CRF expressing cells in the CeA also resulted in enhanced fear memory acquisition and retention. Altogether, these findings suggest that selective disruption of Grin1 within CeA CRF neurons strongly enhances fear memory.

  2. Insertion and deletion processes in recent human history.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Sjödin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although insertions and deletions (indels account for a sizable portion of genetic changes within and among species, they have received little attention because they are difficult to type, are alignment dependent and their underlying mutational process is poorly understood. A fundamental question in this respect is whether insertions and deletions are governed by similar or different processes and, if so, what these differences are. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We use published resequencing data from Seattle SNPs and NIEHS human polymorphism databases to construct a genomewide data set of short polymorphic insertions and deletions in the human genome (n = 6228. We contrast these patterns of polymorphism with insertions and deletions fixed in the same regions since the divergence of human and chimpanzee (n = 10,546. The macaque genome is used to resolve all indels into insertions and deletions. We find that the ratio of deletions to insertions is greater within humans than between human and chimpanzee. Deletions segregate at lower frequency in humans, providing evidence for deletions being under stronger purifying selection than insertions. The insertion and deletion rates correlate with several genomic features and we find evidence that both insertions and deletions are associated with point mutations. Finally, we find no evidence for a direct effect of the local recombination rate on the insertion and deletion rate. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data strongly suggest that deletions are more deleterious than insertions but that insertions and deletions are otherwise generally governed by the same genomic factors.

  3. Disruptive event analysis: volcanism and igneous intrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three basic topics are addressed for the disruptive event analysis: first, the range of disruptive consequences of a radioactive waste repository by volcanic activity; second, the possible reduction of the risk of disruption by volcanic activity through selective siting of a repository; and third, the quantification of the probability of repository disruption by volcanic activity

  4. Fetal ventriculomegaly due to familial submicroscopic terminal 6q deletions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wadt, Karin; Jensen, Lisa Neerup; Bjerglund, Lise;

    2012-01-01

    Submicroscopic terminal 6q deletions are rare. We report on two familial submicroscopic terminal 6q deletions ascertained because of prenatally detected isolated ventriculomegaly and further delineate the variable prenatal and postnatal phenotype. We review published cases of......Submicroscopic terminal 6q deletions are rare. We report on two familial submicroscopic terminal 6q deletions ascertained because of prenatally detected isolated ventriculomegaly and further delineate the variable prenatal and postnatal phenotype. We review published cases of...

  5. Comparative studies of genome-wide maps of nucleosomes between deletion mutants of elp3 and hos2 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Matsumoto

    Full Text Available In order to elucidate the influence of histone acetylation upon nucleosomal DNA length and nucleosome position, we compared nucleosome maps of the following three yeast strains; strain BY4741 (control, the elp3 (one of histone acetyltransferase genes deletion mutant, and the hos2 (one of histone deactylase genes deletion mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We sequenced mononucleosomal DNA fragments after treatment with micrococcal nuclease. After mapping the DNA fragments to the genome, we identified the nucleosome positions. We showed that the distributions of the nucleosomal DNA lengths of the control and the hos2 disruptant were similar. On the other hand, the distribution of the nucleosomal DNA lengths of the elp3 disruptant shifted toward shorter than that of the control. It strongly suggests that inhibition of Elp3-induced histone acetylation causes the nucleosomal DNA length reduction. Next, we compared the profiles of nucleosome mapping numbers in gene promoter regions between the control and the disruptant. We detected 24 genes with low conservation level of nucleosome positions in promoters between the control and the elp3 disruptant as well as between the control and the hos2 disruptant. It indicates that both Elp3-induced acetylation and Hos2-induced deacetylation influence the nucleosome positions in the promoters of those 24 genes. Interestingly, in 19 of the 24 genes, the profiles of nucleosome mapping numbers were similar between the two disruptants.

  6. Orbital deletion procedure and its applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    莫亦荣; 林梦海; 吴玮; 张乾二

    1999-01-01

    The orbital deletion procedure is introduced, which is suited to quantitatively investigating the electronic delocalization effiect in earboeations and boranes. While the routine, ab initio molecular orbital methods can generate wavefunetions for real systems where all electrons are delocalized, the present orbital deletion procedure can generate wavefunctions for hypothetical reference molecules where electronic delocalization effect is deactivated. The latter wavefunetion normlly corresponds In the most stable resonance structure in terms of the resonance theory. By comparing and analyzing the delocalized and the localized wavefunetions, one can obtain a quantitative and instinct pieture to show how electronic deloealizalion inside a molecule affects the molecular structure, energy as well as other physical properties. Two examples are detailedly discussed. The first is related to the hypercoujugation of alkyl groups in carbocations and a comparison of the order of stability of carbocations is made, T

  7. An environment-mediated quantum deleter

    CERN Document Server

    Srikanth, R; Banerjee, Subhashish

    2006-01-01

    Environment-induced decoherence presents a great challenge to realizing a quantum computer. We point out the somewhat surprising fact that decoherence can be useful, indeed necessary, for practical quantum computation, in particular, for the effective erasure of quantum memory in order to initialize the state of the quantum computer. The essential point behind the deleter is that the environment, by means of a dissipative interaction, furnishes a contractive map towards a pure state. We present a specific example of an amplitude damping channel provided by a two-level system's interaction with its environment in the weak Born-Markov approximation. This is contrasted with a purely dephasing, non-dissipative channel provided by a two-level system's interaction with its environment by means of a quantum nondemolition interaction. We point out that currently used state preparation techniques, for example using optical pumping, essentially perform as quantum deleters.

  8. Rac1 deletion causes thymic atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunziker, Lukas; Benitah, Salvador Aznar; Aznar Benitah, Salvador; Braun, Kristin M; Jensen, Kim; McNulty, Katrina; Butler, Colin; Potton, Elspeth; Nye, Emma; Boyd, Richard; Laurent, Geoff; Glogauer, Michael; Wright, Nick A; Watt, Fiona M; Janes, Sam M

    2011-04-29

    The thymic stroma supports T lymphocyte development and consists of an epithelium maintained by thymic epithelial progenitors. The molecular pathways that govern epithelial homeostasis are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that deletion of Rac1 in Keratin 5/Keratin 14 expressing embryonic and adult thymic epithelial cells leads to loss of the thymic epithelial compartment. Rac1 deletion led to an increase in c-Myc expression and a generalized increase in apoptosis associated with a decrease in thymic epithelial proliferation. Our results suggest Rac1 maintains the epithelial population, and equilibrium between Rac1 and c-Myc may control proliferation, apoptosis and maturation of the thymic epithelial compartment. Understanding thymic epithelial maintenance is a step toward the dual goals of in vitro thymic epithelial cell culture and T cell differentiation, and the clinical repair of thymic damage from graft-versus-host-disease, chemotherapy or irradiation.

  9. Rac1 deletion causes thymic atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Hunziker

    Full Text Available The thymic stroma supports T lymphocyte development and consists of an epithelium maintained by thymic epithelial progenitors. The molecular pathways that govern epithelial homeostasis are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that deletion of Rac1 in Keratin 5/Keratin 14 expressing embryonic and adult thymic epithelial cells leads to loss of the thymic epithelial compartment. Rac1 deletion led to an increase in c-Myc expression and a generalized increase in apoptosis associated with a decrease in thymic epithelial proliferation. Our results suggest Rac1 maintains the epithelial population, and equilibrium between Rac1 and c-Myc may control proliferation, apoptosis and maturation of the thymic epithelial compartment. Understanding thymic epithelial maintenance is a step toward the dual goals of in vitro thymic epithelial cell culture and T cell differentiation, and the clinical repair of thymic damage from graft-versus-host-disease, chemotherapy or irradiation.

  10. Secure Deletion of Data from SSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akli Fundo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The deletion of data from storage is an important component on data security. The deletion of entire disc or special files is well-known on hard drives, but this is quite different on SSDs, because they have a different architecture inside, and the main problem is if they serve the same methods like hard drives for data deletion or erasing. The built-in operations are used to do this on SSDs. The purpose of this review is to analyses some methods which are proposed to erase data form SSDs and their results too, to see which of them offers the best choice. In general we will see that the techniques of erasing data from entire disc from hard drives can be used also on SSDs, but there’s a problem with bugs. On the other hand, we cannot use the same techniques of erasing a file from hard drives and SSDs. To make this possible, there are required changes in FTL layer, which is responsible for mapping between logic addresses and physical addresses.

  11. Deletion of Dystrophin In-Frame Exon 5 Leads to a Severe Phenotype: Guidance for Exon Skipping Strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Yon Charles Toh

    Full Text Available Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy severity depends upon the nature and location of the DMD gene lesion and generally correlates with the dystrophin open reading frame. However, there are striking exceptions where an in-frame genomic deletion leads to severe pathology or protein-truncating mutations (nonsense or frame-shifting indels manifest as mild disease. Exceptions to the dystrophin reading frame rule are usually resolved after molecular diagnosis on muscle RNA. We report a moderate/severe Becker muscular dystrophy patient with an in-frame genomic deletion of DMD exon 5. This mutation has been reported by others as resulting in Duchenne or Intermediate muscular dystrophy, and the loss of this in-frame exon in one patient led to multiple splicing events, including omission of exon 6, that disrupts the open reading frame and is consistent with a severe phenotype. The patient described has a deletion of dystrophin exon 5 that does not compromise recognition of exon 6, and although the deletion does not disrupt the reading frame, his clinical presentation is more severe than would be expected for classical Becker muscular dystrophy. We suggest that the dystrophin isoform lacking the actin-binding sequence encoded by exon 5 is compromised, reflected by the phenotype resulting from induction of this dystrophin isoform in mouse muscle in vivo. Hence, exon skipping to address DMD-causing mutations within DMD exon 5 may not yield an isoform that confers marked clinical benefit. Additional studies will be required to determine whether multi-exon skipping strategies could yield more functional dystrophin isoforms, since some BMD patients with larger in-frame deletions in this region have been reported with mild phenotypes.

  12. Deletion of Dystrophin In-Frame Exon 5 Leads to a Severe Phenotype: Guidance for Exon Skipping Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toh, Zhi Yon Charles; Thandar Aung-Htut, May; Pinniger, Gavin; Adams, Abbie M; Krishnaswarmy, Sudarsan; Wong, Brenda L; Fletcher, Sue; Wilton, Steve D

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy severity depends upon the nature and location of the DMD gene lesion and generally correlates with the dystrophin open reading frame. However, there are striking exceptions where an in-frame genomic deletion leads to severe pathology or protein-truncating mutations (nonsense or frame-shifting indels) manifest as mild disease. Exceptions to the dystrophin reading frame rule are usually resolved after molecular diagnosis on muscle RNA. We report a moderate/severe Becker muscular dystrophy patient with an in-frame genomic deletion of DMD exon 5. This mutation has been reported by others as resulting in Duchenne or Intermediate muscular dystrophy, and the loss of this in-frame exon in one patient led to multiple splicing events, including omission of exon 6, that disrupts the open reading frame and is consistent with a severe phenotype. The patient described has a deletion of dystrophin exon 5 that does not compromise recognition of exon 6, and although the deletion does not disrupt the reading frame, his clinical presentation is more severe than would be expected for classical Becker muscular dystrophy. We suggest that the dystrophin isoform lacking the actin-binding sequence encoded by exon 5 is compromised, reflected by the phenotype resulting from induction of this dystrophin isoform in mouse muscle in vivo. Hence, exon skipping to address DMD-causing mutations within DMD exon 5 may not yield an isoform that confers marked clinical benefit. Additional studies will be required to determine whether multi-exon skipping strategies could yield more functional dystrophin isoforms, since some BMD patients with larger in-frame deletions in this region have been reported with mild phenotypes. PMID:26745801

  13. Disruptive Innovation in Healthcare & Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2014-01-01

    will pay. Disruptive Innovation in context of the author’s body of work in healthcare and rehabilitation relates to how development of a cloud-based converged infrastructure resource, similar to that conceived in a national (Danish) study titled Humanics, can act as an accessible data and knowledge...

  14. Disruption of MBD5 contributes to a spectrum of psychopathology and neurodevelopmental abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, J C; Mitchell, E; Pillalamarri, V; Toler, T L; Bartel, F; Kearney, H M; Zou, Y S; Tan, W H; Hanscom, C; Kirmani, S; Hanson, R R; Skinner, S A; Rogers, R C; Everman, D B; Boyd, E; Tapp, C; Mullegama, S V; Keelean-Fuller, D; Powell, C M; Elsea, S H; Morton, C C; Gusella, J F; DuPont, B; Chaubey, A; Lin, A E; Talkowski, M E

    2014-03-01

    Microdeletions of chromosomal region 2q23.1 that disrupt MBD5 (methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 5) contribute to a spectrum of neurodevelopmental phenotypes; however, the impact of this locus on human psychopathology has not been fully explored. To characterize the structural variation landscape of MBD5 disruptions and the associated human psychopathology, 22 individuals with genomic disruption of MBD5 (translocation, point mutation and deletion) were identified through whole-genome sequencing or cytogenomic microarray at 11 molecular diagnostic centers. The genomic impact ranged from a single base pair to 5.4 Mb. Parents were available for 11 cases, all of which confirmed that the rearrangement arose de novo. Phenotypes were largely indistinguishable between patients with full-segment 2q23.1 deletions and those with intragenic MBD5 rearrangements, including alterations confined entirely to the 5'-untranslated region, confirming the critical impact of non-coding sequence at this locus. We identified heterogeneous, multisystem pathogenic effects of MBD5 disruption and characterized the associated spectrum of psychopathology, including the novel finding of anxiety and bipolar disorder in multiple patients. Importantly, one of the unique features of the oldest known patient was behavioral regression. Analyses also revealed phenotypes that distinguish MBD5 disruptions from seven well-established syndromes with significant diagnostic overlap. This study demonstrates that haploinsufficiency of MBD5 causes diverse phenotypes, yields insight into the spectrum of resulting neurodevelopmental and behavioral psychopathology and provides clinical context for interpretation of MBD5 structural variations. Empirical evidence also indicates that disruption of non-coding MBD5 regulatory regions is sufficient for clinical manifestation, highlighting the limitations of exon-focused assessments. These results suggest an ongoing perturbation of neurological function throughout the

  15. FLCN intragenic deletions in Chinese familial primary spontaneous pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yibing; Zhu, Chengchu; Zou, Wei; Ma, Dehua; Min, Haiyan; Chen, Baofu; Ye, Minhua; Pan, Yanqing; Cao, Lei; Wan, Yueming; Zhang, Wenwen; Meng, Lulu; Mei, Yuna; Yang, Chi; Chen, Shilin; Gao, Qian; Yi, Long

    2015-05-01

    Primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) is a significant clinical problem, affecting tens of thousands patients annually. Germline mutations in the FLCN gene have been implicated in etiology of familial PSP (FPSP). Most of the currently identified FLCN mutations are small indels or point mutations that detected by Sanger sequencing. The aim of this study was to determine large FLCN deletions in PSP families that having no FLCN sequence-mutations. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) assays and breakpoint analyses were used to detect and characterize the deletions. Three heterozygous FLCN intragenic deletions were identified in nine unrelated Chinese families including the exons 1-3 deletion in two families, the exons 9-14 deletion in five families and the exon 14 deletion in two families. All deletion breakpoints are located in Alu repeats. A 5.5 Mb disease haplotype shared in the five families with exons 9-14 deletion may date the appearance of this deletion back to approximately 16 generations ago. Evidences for founder effects of the other two deletions were also observed. This report documents the first identification of founder mutations in FLCN, as well as expands mutation spectrum of the gene. Our findings strengthen the view that MLPA analysis for intragenic deletions/duplications, as an important genetic testing complementary to DNA sequencing, should be used for clinical molecular diagnosis in FPSP.

  16. Automatic Airway Deletion in Pulmonary Segmentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ping; ZHUANG Tian-ge

    2005-01-01

    A method of removing the airway from pulmonary segmentation image was proposed. This method firstly segments the image into several separate regions based on the optimum threshold and morphological operator,and then each region is labeled and noted with its mean grayscale. Therefore, most of the non-lung regions can be removed according to the tissue's Hounsfield units (HU) and the imaging modality. Finally, the airway region is recognized and deleted automatically through using the priori information of its HU and size. This proposed method is tested using several clinical images, yielding satisfying results.

  17. A high-throughput gene disruption methodology for the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium robertsii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Xu

    Full Text Available Systematic gene disruption is a direct way to interrogate a fungal genome to functionally characterize the full suite of genes involved in various biological processes. Metarhizium robertsii is extraordinarily versatile, and it is a pathogen of arthropods, a saprophyte and a beneficial colonizer of rhizospheres. Thus, M. robertsii can be used as a representative to simultaneously study several major lifestyles that are not shared by the "model" fungi Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Neurospora crassa; a systematic genetic analysis of M. robertsii will benefit studies in other fungi. In order to systematically disrupt genes in M. robertsii, we developed a high-throughput gene disruption methodology, which includes two technologies. One is the modified OSCAR-based, high-throughput construction of gene disruption plasmids. This technology involves two donor plasmids (pA-Bar-OSCAR with the herbicide resistance genes Bar and pA-Sur-OSCAR with another herbicide resistance gene Sur and a recipient binary plasmid pPK2-OSCAR-GFP that was produced by replacing the Bar cassette in pPK2-bar-GFP with a ccdB cassette and recombination recognition sites. Using this technology, a gene disruption plasmid can be constructed in one cloning step in two days. The other is a highly efficient gene disruption technology based on homologous recombination using a Ku70 deletion mutant (ΔMrKu70 as the recipient strain. The deletion of MrKu70, a gene encoding a key component involved in nonhomologous end-joining DNA repair in fungi, dramatically increases the gene disruption efficiency. The frequency of disrupting the conidiation-associated gene Cag8 in ΔMrKu70 was 93% compared to 7% in the wild-type strain. Since ΔMrKu70 is not different from the wild-type strain in development, pathogenicity and tolerance to various abiotic stresses, it can be used as a recipient strain for a systematic gene disruption project to characterize the whole suite of genes involved in the

  18. Disrupting the habit of interviewing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Honan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper contributes to the growing domain of ‘post-qualitative’ research and experiments with a new (representational form to move away from traditional and clichéd descriptions of research methods. In this paper, I want to interrogate the category of interview, and the habit of interviewing, to disrupt the clichés, so as to allow thinking of different ways of writing/speaking/representing the interactions between researcher and researched that will breathe new life into qualitative inquiries. I will attempt to flatten and shred, destabilise and disrupt our common-sense ideas about interview, including those held most sacred to the qualitative community, that of anonymity and confidentiality, as well as the privilege of the ‘transcript’ in re-presenting interview data.

  19. Optimal Disruption of Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jin-Hua

    2016-01-01

    The collection of all the strongly connected components in a directed graph, among each cluster of which any node has a path to another node, is a typical example of the intertwining structure and dynamics in complex networks, as its relative size indicates network cohesion and it also composes of all the feedback cycles in the network. Here we consider finding an optimal strategy with minimal effort in removal arcs (for example, deactivation of directed interactions) to fragment all the strongly connected components into tree structure with no effect from feedback mechanism. We map the optimal network disruption problem to the minimal feedback arc set problem, a non-deterministically polynomial hard combinatorial optimization problem in graph theory. We solve the problem with statistical physical methods from spin glass theory, resulting in a simple numerical method to extract sub-optimal disruption arc sets with significantly better results than a local heuristic method and a simulated annealing method both...

  20. Disruptive technologies in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Flavin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the role of “disruptive” innovative technologies in higher education. In this country and elsewhere, Higher Education Institutions (HEIs have invested significant sums in learning technologies, with Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs being more or less universal, but these technologies have not been universally adopted and used by students and staff. Instead, other technologies not owned or controlled by HEIs are widely used to support learning and teaching. According to Christensen's theory of Disruptive Innovation, these disruptive technologies are not designed explicitly to support learning and teaching in higher education, but have educational potential. This study uses Activity Theory and Expansive Learning to analyse data regarding the impact of disruptive technologies. The data were obtained through a questionnaire survey about awareness and use of technologies, and through observation and interviews, exploring participants’ actual practice. The survey answers tended to endorse Disruptive Innovation theory, with participants establishing meanings for technologies through their use of them, rather than in keeping with a designer's intentions. Observation revealed that learners use a narrow range of technologies to support learning, but with a tendency to use resources other than those supplied by their HEIs. Interviews showed that participants use simple and convenient technologies to support their learning and teaching. This study identifies a contradiction between learning technologies made available by HEIs, and technologies used in practice. There is no evidence to suggest that a wide range of technologies is being used to support learning and teaching. Instead, a small range of technologies is being used for a wide range of tasks. Students and lecturers are not dependent on their HEIs to support learning and teaching. Instead, they self-select technologies, with use weighted towards established brands. The

  1. Secure Deletion on Log-structured File Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Reardon, Joel; Capkun, Srdjan; Basin, David

    2011-01-01

    We address the problem of secure data deletion on log-structured file systems. We focus on the YAFFS file system, widely used on Android smartphones. We show that these systems provide no temporal guarantees on data deletion and that deleted data still persists for nearly 44 hours with average phone use and indefinitely if the phone is not used after the deletion. Furthermore, we show that file overwriting and encryption, methods commonly used for secure deletion on block-structured file systems, do not ensure data deletion in log-structured file systems. We propose three mechanisms for secure deletion on log-structured file systems. Purging is a user-level mechanism that guarantees secure deletion at the cost of negligible device wear. Ballooning is a user-level mechanism that runs continuously and gives probabilistic improvements to secure deletion. Zero overwriting is a kernel-level mechanism that guarantees immediate secure deletion without device wear. We implement these mechanisms on Nexus One smartphon...

  2. Detection of mitochondrial DNA deletion by a modified PCR method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪振诚; 王学敏; 缪明永; 章卫平; 焦炳华; 倪庆桂

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To develop a simple and efficient method for detecting small populations of mitochondrial DNA deletion. Methods: Peripheral blood cell DNA was obtained from a victim who was accidently exposed to a 60Co radiation source 11 years ago. Using the DNA as template, PCR was performed to generate multiple products including true deletions and artifacts. The full length product was recovered and used as template of secondary PCR. The suspicious deletion product of mtDNA could be confirmed if it was only yielded by first PCR. Using either original primers or their nested primers, the suspicious deletion product was amplified and authenticated as true deletion product. The template was recovered and determined to be a deletion by sequencing directly. Results: A new mtDNA deletion, spanning 889 bp from nt11688 to nt12576, was detected in the peripheral blood cells of the victim. Conclusion: The new PCR-based method is more efficient in detecting small populations of mtDNA deletion than other routine methods. MtDNA deletion is found in the victim, suggesting there is relationship between the deletion and phenotypes of the disease.

  3. HOW TO IDENTIFY DISRUPTIVE NEW BUSINESSES

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth Robles

    2015-01-01

    In almost any industry, the most dramatic stories of growth and success were launched from a platform of disruptive innovation (Christensen et al., 2002). The probability of creating a successful, new growth business is 10 times greater if the innovators pursue a disruptive strategy rather than a sustaining one. Genuinely disruptive innovations are the ones that result in the creation of entirely new markets and business models. Few companies have introduced these innovations. Disruptive inno...

  4. Thyroid effects of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Malene; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla; Main, Katharina M

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, many studies of thyroid-disrupting effects of environmental chemicals have been published. Of special concern is the exposure of pregnant women and infants, as thyroid disruption of the developing organism may have deleterious effects on neurological outcome. Chemicals may exert...... thyroid-disrupting effects, and there is emerging evidence that also phthalates, bisphenol A, brominated flame retardants and perfluorinated chemicals may have thyroid disrupting properties....

  5. Turbulence and disruptions in Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the first part of this thesis, the possible explanation of the electron abnormal thermal conductivity with electromagnetic drift modes rather than simply electrostatic is discussed. A variational form is established in non collisional conditions; linear modes principal possibilities are reviewed, then quasilinear theory is used to calculate the transport phenomenon associated to each mode. They are compared to experimental results. Electron abnormal thermal conductibility is not better explained by electromagnetic modes than by electrostatic modes. In the second part, disruptions are examined; experimental manifestations are briefly recalled. Existing interpretations of these phenomenons are reviewed, which are based on magnetic islands non-linear evolution. A detailed analytical study of the case l=1, m=1 is made. Other disruptions are studied; it is shown that the disruptive process is indissociable from sudden apparition of small scale magnetic turbulence. The possibility of such a turbulence is studied. Its predictable effects are compared to experiment. Such a turbulence, is assumed to exist permanently in an attenuated form, which could justify the electronic transport anomalies in quiescent state

  6. Engineering analysis of TFTR disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, J.G.; Rothe, K.E.; Bronner, G.

    1984-09-01

    This report covers an engineering approach quantifying the currents, forces, and times, as well as plasma position, for the worst-case disruption based on engineerign circuit assumptions for the plasma. As the plasma moves toward the wall during the current-decay phase of disruption, the wall currents affect the rate of movement and, hence, the decay time. The calculated structure-induced currents differ considerably from those calculated using a presently available criterion, which specifies that the plasma remains stationary in the center of the torus while decaying in 10 ms. This report outlines the method and basis for the engineering calculation used to determine the current and forces as a function of the circuit characteristics. It provides specific calculations for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) with variations in parameters such as the thermal decay time, the torus resistance, and plasma temperature during the current decay. The study reviews possible ways to reduce the disruption damage of TFTR by reducing the magnitude of the plasma external field energy that is absorbed by the plasma during the current decay.

  7. Pharmacological disruption of maladaptive memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jane R; Torregrossa, Mary M

    2015-01-01

    Many psychiatric disorders are characterized by intrusive, distracting, and disturbing memories that either perpetuate the illness or hinder successful treatment. For example, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) involves such strong reemergence of memories associated with a traumatic event that the individual feels like the event is happening again. Furthermore, drug addiction is characterized by compulsive use and repeated relapse that is often driven by internal memories of drug use and/or by exposure to external stimuli that were associated with drug use. Therefore, identifying pharmacological methods to weaken the strength of maladaptive memories is a major goal of research efforts aimed at finding new treatments for these disorders. The primary mechanism by which memories could be pharmacologically disrupted or altered is through manipulation of memory reconsolidation. Reconsolidation occurs when an established memory is remembered or reactivated, reentering a labile state before again being consolidated into long-term memory storage. Memories are subject to disruption during this labile state. In this chapter we will discuss the preclinical and clinical studies identifying potential pharmacological methods for disrupting the integrity of maladaptive memory to treat mental illness. PMID:25977090

  8. The disruptive instability in Tokamak plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salzedas, F.J.B.

    2001-01-01

    Studies performed in RTP (Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project) of the most violent and dangerous instability in tokamak plasmas, the major disruption, are presented. A particular class of disruptions is analyzed, namely the density limit disruption, which occur in high density plasmas. The radiative te

  9. Disruptive innovation as an entrepreneurial process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y. Chandra; S.-J.S. Yang

    2008-01-01

    Research on conditions and causal mechanisms that influence disruptive innovation has been relatively unexplored in the extant research in disruptive innovation. By re-conceptualizing disruptive innovation as an entrepreneurial process at product, firm and industry levels, this paper draws on emergi

  10. Deletion of ultraconserved elements yields viable mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahituv, Nadav; Zhu, Yiwen; Visel, Axel; Holt, Amy; Afzal, Veena; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2007-07-15

    Ultraconserved elements have been suggested to retainextended perfect sequence identity between the human, mouse, and ratgenomes due to essential functional properties. To investigate thenecessities of these elements in vivo, we removed four non-codingultraconserved elements (ranging in length from 222 to 731 base pairs)from the mouse genome. To maximize the likelihood of observing aphenotype, we chose to delete elements that function as enhancers in amouse transgenic assay and that are near genes that exhibit markedphenotypes both when completely inactivated in the mouse as well as whentheir expression is altered due to other genomic modifications.Remarkably, all four resulting lines of mice lacking these ultraconservedelements were viable and fertile, and failed to reveal any criticalabnormalities when assayed for a variety of phenotypes including growth,longevity, pathology and metabolism. In addition more targeted screens,informed by the abnormalities observed in mice where genes in proximityto the investigated elements had been altered, also failed to revealnotable abnormalities. These results, while not inclusive of all thepossible phenotypic impact of the deleted sequences, indicate thatextreme sequence constraint does not necessarily reflect crucialfunctions required for viability.

  11. Rare human diseases: 9p deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galagan V.O.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective of the study was to review the anamnesis, pheno - and genotype in patients with rare chromosome disorders such as 9p deletion syndrome. Genetic methods of investigation (clinical and genealogical, cytogenetic, FISH- method, paraclinical and instrumental methods of examination were used. Karyotyping was performed by the G-method of differential staining of chromosomes. Only three cases of pathology were diagnosed in the Medical Genetics Center over the last 10 years. By anamnesis data nobody in the probands’ families had bad habits, was exposed to occupational hazards, took part in the elimination of the Chernobyl accident or lived in contaminated areas. Clinical signs of diseases have not been identified in probands’ parents. All probands had trigonocephaly, bilateral epicanthal folds, ocular hypertelorism, downslanting palpebral fissures, long philtrum, flat face and nasal bridge, low set ears with malformed auricles. Two patients of three ones had exophthalmos, contracture of the second and third fingers, abnormal external genitalia. In all three cases there was monosomy of chromosome 9 of critical segment p 24. Normal karyotypes were seen in all parents, so there were three cases of new mutations of 9p deletion syndrome. Retardation of physical, psycho-spech, mental development in proband with or without congenital anomalies requires medical genetic counseling in a specialized institution. Cases of reproductive loss in anamnesis require cytogenetic investigation of fetal membranes and amniotic fluid.

  12. Are there ethnic differences in deletions in the dystrophin gene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, M.; Verma, I.C. [All India Inst. of Medical Sciences, New Delhi (India)

    1997-01-20

    We studied 160 cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) drawn from all parts of India, using multiplex PCR of 27 exons. Of these, 103 (64.4%) showed intragenic deletions. Most (69.7%) of the deletions involved exons 45-51. The phenotype of cases with deletion of single exons did not differ significantly from those with deletion of multiple exons. The distribution of deletions in studies from different countries was variable, but this was accounted for either by the small number of cases studied, or by fewer exons analyzed. It is concluded that there is likely to be no ethnic difference with respect to deletions in the DMD gene. 38 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. A 3 Mb deletion in 14q12 causes severe mental retardation, mild facial dysmorphisms and Rett-like features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Filomena Tiziana; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Caselli, Rossella; Katzaki, Eleni; Sampieri, Katia; Meloni, Ilaria; Ariani, Francesca; Longo, Ilaria; Maggio, Angela; Balestri, Paolo; Grosso, Salvatore; Farnetani, Maria Angela; Berardi, Rosario; Mari, Francesca; Renieri, Alessandra

    2008-08-01

    The present report describes a 7-year-old girl with a de novo 3 Mb interstitial deletion of chromosome 14q12, identified by oligo array-CGH. The region is gene poor and contains only five genes two of them, FOXG1B and PRKD1 being deleted also in a previously reported case with a very similar phenotype. Both patients present prominent metopic suture, epicanthic folds, bulbous nasal tip, tented upper lip, everted lower lip and large ears and a clinical course like Rett syndrome, including normal perinatal period, postnatal microcephaly, seizures, and severe mental retardation. FOXG1B (forkhead box G1B) is a very intriguing candidate gene since it is known to promote neuronal progenitor proliferation and to suppress premature neurogenesis and its disruption is reported in a patient with postnatal microcephaly, corpus callosum agenesis, seizures, and severe mental retardation.

  14. Genetic deletion of the desmosomal component desmoplakin promotes tumor microinvasion in a mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew G H Chun

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We used the RIP1-Tag2 (RT2 mouse model of islet cell carcinogenesis to profile the transcriptome of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PNET that were either non-invasive or highly invasive, seeking to identify pro- and anti-invasive molecules. Expression of multiple components of desmosomes, structures that help maintain cellular adhesion, was significantly reduced in invasive carcinomas. Genetic deletion of one of these desmosomal components, desmoplakin, resulted in increased local tumor invasion without affecting tumor growth parameters in RT2 PNETs. Expression of cadherin 1, a component of the adherens junction adhesion complex, was maintained in these tumors despite the genetic deletion of desmoplakin. Our results demonstrate that loss of desmoplakin expression and resultant disruption of desmosomal adhesion can promote increased local tumor invasion independent of adherens junction status.

  15. Analysis of partial AZFc deletions in Malaysian infertile male subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeamar, Hussein Ali; Ramachandran, Vasudevan; Ismail, Patimah; Nadkarni, Prashan; Fawzi, Nora

    2013-04-01

    Complete deletions in the AZF (a, b, and c) sub-regions of the Y-chromosome have been shown to contribute to unexplained male infertility. However, the role of partial AZFc deletions in male infertility remains to be verified. Three types of partial AZFc deletions have been identified. They are gr/gr, b1/b3, and b2/b3 deletions. A recent meta-analysis showed that ethnic and geographical factors might contribute to the association of partial AZFc deletions with male infertility. This study analyzed the association of partial AZFc deletions in Malaysian infertile males. Fifty two oligozoospermic infertile males and 63 fertile controls were recruited to this study. Screening for partial AZFc deletions was done using the two sequence-tagged sites approach (SY1291 and SY1191) which were analyzed using both the conventional PCR gel-electrophoresis and the high resolution melt, HRM method. Gr/gr deletions were found in 11.53% of the cases and 9.52% of the controls (p = 0.725). A B2/b3 deletion was found in one of the cases (p = 0.269). No B1/b3 deletions were identified in this study. The results of HRM analysis were consistent with those obtained using the conventional PCR gel-electrophoresis method. The HRM analysis was highly repeatable (95% limit of agreement was -0.0879 to 0.0871 for SY1191 melting temperature readings). In conclusion, our study showed that partial AZFc deletions were not associated with male infertility in Malaysian subjects. HRM analysis was a reliable, repeatable, fast, cost-effective, and semi-automated method which can be used for screening of partial AZFc deletions. PMID:23231020

  16. A deletion map of the WAGR region on chromosome 11.

    OpenAIRE

    Gessler, M; Thomas, G H; Couillin, P; Junien, C; McGillivray, B C; Hayden, M; Jaschek, G.; Bruns, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    The WAGR (Wilms tumor, aniridia, genitourinary anomalies, and mental retardation) region has been assigned to chromosome 11p13 on the basis of overlapping constitutional deletions found in affected individuals. We have utilized 31 DNA probes which map to the WAGR deletion region, together with six reference loci and 13 WAGR-related deletions, to subdivide this area into 16 intervals. Specific intervals have been correlated with phenotypic features, leading to the identification of individual ...

  17. Feasibility of establishing deletion of the late cornified envelope genes LCE3B and LCE3C as a susceptibility factor for psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Safia; Hassan, Iffat; Majid, Sabhiya; Bhat, Yasmeen Jabeen; Farooq, Rabia

    2016-01-01

    Background: Psoriasis is a chronic hyperproliferative inflammatory disease of the skin, genetic predisposition to which is well-established. The late cornified envelope genes LCE3B and LCE3C are involved in maintaining the integrity of skin barrier especially following skin barrier disruption. The deletion of these genes would lead to an impaired epidermal response following damage to the skin barrier thus predisposing to psoriatic lesions. This study aimed to evaluate the common deletion of late cornified envelope genes (LCE 3B/3C) in psoriasis patients of Kashmiri ethnic population of North India. Materials and Methods: It was a hospital-based, case-control study which included 100 psoriasis cases and an equal number of controls. Blood samples were obtained, and DNA was extracted from all the samples by a kit-based method. To determine the LCE3C_LCE3B-del genotype, a three-primer polymerase chain reaction assay was performed. Results: The genotype for the common LCE3C_LCE3B deletion in 100 psoriasis patients and 100 controls was determined. Among the cases, 17 cases were homozygous for insertion genotype (I/I), 40 cases were heterozygous for insertion/deletion genotype (I/D) and 43 cases were homozygous for deletion genotype (D/D), compared to controls where 20 cases were homozygous for insertion genotype (I/I), 45 cases were heterozygous for insertion/deletion genotype (I/D), and 35 cases were homozygous for deletion genotype (D/D). The del/del frequency was higher among psoriatic patients compared to controls (43% vs. 35%) although the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.507). Conclusion: We hereby infer that LCE3C_LCE3B deletion does not appear to be associated with the risk of psoriasis in our population. PMID:27376048

  18. On fixed-parameter algorithms for Split Vertex Deletion

    OpenAIRE

    CYGAN, Marek; Pilipczuk, Marcin

    2012-01-01

    In the Split Vertex Deletion problem, given a graph G and an integer k, we ask whether one can delete k vertices from the graph G to obtain a split graph (i.e., a graph, whose vertex set can be partitioned into two sets: one inducing a clique and the second one inducing an independent set). In this paper we study fixed-parameter algorithms for Split Vertex Deletion parameterized by k: we show that, up to a factor quasipolynomial in k and polynomial in n, the Split Vertex Deletion problem can ...

  19. A Domesticated piggyBac Transposase Plays Key Roles in Heterochromatin Dynamics and DNA Cleavage during Programmed DNA Deletion in Tetrahymena thermophila

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng CY; Vogt A; Mochizuki K.; Yao MC

    2010-01-01

    Transposons comprise large fractions of eukaryotic genomes and provide genetic reservoirs for the evolution of new cellular functions. We identified TPB2, a homolog of the piggyBac transposase gene that is required for programmed DNA deletion in Tetrahymena. TPB2 was expressed exclusively during the time of DNA excision, and its encoded protein Tpb2p was localized in DNA elimination heterochromatin structures. Notably, silencing of TPB2 by RNAi disrupts the final assembly of these heterochrom...

  20. Disruptive Innovation in Numerical Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltz, Jacob I. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-06

    We propose the research and development of a high-fidelity hydrodynamic algorithm for tetrahedral meshes that will lead to a disruptive innovation in the numerical modeling of Laboratory problems. Our proposed innovation has the potential to reduce turnaround time by orders of magnitude relative to Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) codes; reduce simulation setup costs by millions of dollars per year; and effectively leverage Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) and future Exascale computing hardware. If successful, this work will lead to a dramatic leap forward in the Laboratory's quest for a predictive simulation capability.

  1. Zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) gene deletion reduces spinal cord white matter damage and motor deficits in a murine MOG-induced multiple sclerosis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bo Young; Kim, In Yeol; Kim, Jin Hee; Kho, A Ra; Lee, Song Hee; Lee, Bo Eun; Sohn, Min; Koh, Jae-Young; Suh, Sang Won

    2016-10-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the role of zinc transporter 3 (ZnT3) on multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a disease model of multiple sclerosis, was induced by immunization with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG35-55) in female mice. Three weeks after the initial immunization, demyelination, immune cell infiltration and blood brain barrier (BBB) disruption in the spinal cord were analyzed. Clinical signs of EAE first appeared on day 11 and reached a peak level on day 19 after the initial immunization. ZnT3 gene deletion profoundly reduced the daily clinical score of EAE. The ZnT3 gene deletion-mediated inhibition of the clinical course of EAE was accompanied by suppression of inflammation and demyelination in the spinal cord. The motor deficit accompanying neuropathological changes associated with EAE were mild in ZnT3 gene deletion mice. This reduction in motor deficit was accompanied by coincident reductions in demyelination and infiltration of encephalitogenic immune cells including CD4+ T cells, CD8+ T cells, CD20+ B cells and F4/80+ microglia in the spinal cord. These results demonstrate that ZnT3 gene deletion inhibits the clinical features and neuropathological changes associated with EAE. ZnT3 gene deletion also remarkably inhibited formation of EAE-associated aberrant synaptic zinc patches, matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) activation and BBB disruption. Therefore, amelioration of EAE-induced clinical and neuropathological changes by ZnT3 gene deletion suggests that vesicular zinc may be involved in several steps of MS pathogenesis. PMID:27370228

  2. Beta-cell specific deletion of Dicer1 leads to defective insulin secretion and diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalis, Martins; Bolmeson, Caroline; Esguerra, Jonathan L.S.;

    2011-01-01

    -blown diabetes mellitus in adulthood that recapitulated the natural history of the spontaneous disease in mice. Reduced insulin gene expression and concomitant reduced insulin secretion preceded the hyperglycaemic state and diabetes development. Immunohistochemical, flow cytometric and ultrastructural analyses...... revealed altered islet morphology, marked decreased ß-cell mass, reduced numbers of granules within the ß-cells and reduced granule docking in adult RIP-Cre Dicer1(¿/¿) mice. ß-cell specific Dicer1 deletion did not appear to disrupt fetal and neonatal ß-cell development as 2-week old RIP-Cre Dicer1...... and diabetes development....

  3. Disruptive innovation for social change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Clayton M; Baumann, Heiner; Ruggles, Rudy; Sadtler, Thomas M

    2006-12-01

    Countries, organizations, and individuals around the globe spend aggressively to solve social problems, but these efforts often fail to deliver. Misdirected investment is the primary reason for that failure. Most of the money earmarked for social initiatives goes to organizations that are structured to support specific groups of recipients, often with sophisticated solutions. Such organizations rarely reach the broader populations that could be served by simpler alternatives. There is, however, an effective way to get to those underserved populations. The authors call it "catalytic innovation." Based on Clayton Christensen's disruptive-innovation model, catalytic innovations challenge organizational incumbents by offering simpler, good-enough solutions aimed at underserved groups. Unlike disruptive innovations, though, catalytic innovations are focused on creating social change. Catalytic innovators are defined by five distinct qualities. First, they create social change through scaling and replication. Second, they meet a need that is either overserved (that is, the existing solution is more complex than necessary for many people) or not served at all. Third, the products and services they offer are simpler and cheaper than alternatives, but recipients view them as good enough. Fourth, they bring in resources in ways that initially seem unattractive to incumbents. And fifth, they are often ignored, put down, or even encouraged by existing organizations, which don't see the catalytic innovators' solutions as viable. As the authors show through examples in health care, education, and economic development, both nonprofit and for-profit groups are finding ways to create catalytic innovation that drives social change.

  4. Kcne2 deletion causes early-onset nonalcoholic fatty liver disease via iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Min; Nguyen, Dara; Anand, Marie; Kant, Ritu; Köhncke, Clemens; Lisewski, Ulrike; Roepke, Torsten K; Hu, Zhaoyang; Abbott, Geoffrey W

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an increasing health problem worldwide, with genetic, epigenetic, and environmental components. Here, we describe the first example of NAFLD caused by genetic disruption of a mammalian potassium channel subunit. Mice with germline deletion of the KCNE2 potassium channel β subunit exhibited NAFLD as early as postnatal day 7. Using mouse genetics, histology, liver damage assays and transcriptomics we discovered that iron deficiency arising from KCNE2-dependent achlorhydria is a major factor in early-onset NAFLD in Kcne2(─/─) mice, while two other KCNE2-dependent defects did not initiate NAFLD. The findings uncover a novel genetic basis for NAFLD and an unexpected potential factor in human KCNE2-associated cardiovascular pathologies, including atherosclerosis. PMID:26984260

  5. Mitochondrial DNA deletions in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatar, Arzu; Tasdemir, Sener; Sahin, Ibrahim; Bozoglu, Ceyda; Erdem, Haktan Bagis; Yoruk, Ozgur; Tatar, Abdulgani

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the 4977 and 7400 bp deletions of mitochondrial DNA in patients with chronic suppurative otitis media and to indicate the possible association of mitochondrial DNA deletions with chronic suppurative otitis media. Thirty-six patients with chronic suppurative otitis media were randomly selected to assess the mitochondrial DNA deletions. Tympanomastoidectomy was applied for the treatment of chronic suppurative otitis media, and the curettage materials including middle ear tissues were collected. The 4977 and 7400 bp deletion regions and two control regions of mitochondrial DNA were assessed by using the four pair primers. DNA was extracted from middle ear tissues and peripheral blood samples of the patients, and then polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) were performed. PCR products were separated in 2 % agarose gel. Seventeen of 36 patients had the heterozygote 4977 bp deletion in the middle ear tissue but not in peripheral blood. There wasn't any patient who had the 7400 bp deletion in mtDNA of their middle ear tissue or peripheral blood tissue. The patients with the 4977 bp deletion had a longer duration of chronic suppurative otitis media and a higher level of hearing loss than the others (p media and the reactive oxygen species can cause the mitochondrial DNA deletions and this may be a predisposing factor to sensorineural hearing loss in chronic suppurative otitis media. An antioxidant drug as a scavenger agent may be used in long-term chronic suppurative otitis media.

  6. 44 CFR 5.27 - Deletion of identifying details.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Deletion of identifying details. 5.27 Section 5.27 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY..., FEMA may delete identifying details when making available or publishing an opinion, statement of...

  7. Recurrence and Variability of Germline EPCAM Deletions in Lynch Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, Roland P.; Vissers, Lisenka E. L. M.; Venkatachalam, Ramprasath; Bodmer, Danielle; Hoenselaar, Eveline; Goossens, Monique; Haufe, Aline; Kamping, Eveline; Niessen, Renee C.; Hogervorst, Frans B. L.; Gille, Johan J. P.; Redeker, Bert; Tops, Carli M. J.; van Gijn, Marielle E.; van den Ouweland, Ans M. W.; Rahner, Nils; Steinke, Verena; Kahl, Philip; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Morak, Monika; Kloor, Matthias; Stemmler, Susanne; Betz, Beate; Hutter, Pierre; Bunyan, David J.; Syngal, Sapna; Culver, Julie O.; Graham, Tracy; Chan, Tsun L.; Nagtegaal, Iris D.; van Krieken, J. Han J. M.; Schackert, Hans K.; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; van Kessel, Ad Geurts; Ligtenberg, Marjolijn J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we identified 3' end deletions in the EPCAM gene as a novel cause of Lynch syndrome. These truncating EPCAM deletions cause allele-specific epigenetic silencing of the neighboring DNA mismatch repair gene MSH2 in tissues expressing EPCAM. Here we screened a cohort of unexplained Lynch-like

  8. Linguistic and Psychomotor Development in Children with Chromosome 14 Deletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampini, Laura; D'Odorico, Laura; Zanchi, Paola; Zollino, Marcella; Neri, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The present study focussed on a specific type of rare genetic condition: chromosome 14 deletions. Children with this genetic condition often show developmental delays and brain and neurological problems, although the type and severity of symptoms varies depending on the size and location of the deleted genetic material. The specific aim of the…

  9. Mitochondrial Citrate Transporter-dependent Metabolic Signature in the 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Eleonora; Tassone, Flora; Wong, Sarah; Angkustsiri, Kathleen; Simon, Tony J; Song, Gyu; Giulivi, Cecilia

    2015-09-18

    The congenital disorder 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22qDS), characterized by a hemizygous deletion of 1.5-3 Mb on chromosome 22 at locus 11.2, is the most common microdeletion disorder (estimated prevalence of 1 in 4000) and the second risk factor for schizophrenia. Nine of ∼30 genes involved in 22qDS have the potential of disrupting mitochondrial metabolism (COMT, UFD1L, DGCR8, MRPL40, PRODH, SLC25A1, TXNRD2, T10, and ZDHHC8). Deficits in bioenergetics during early postnatal brain development could set the basis for a disrupted neuronal metabolism or synaptic signaling, partly explaining the higher incidence in developmental and behavioral deficits in these individuals. Here, we investigated whether mitochondrial outcomes and metabolites from 22qDS children segregated with the altered dosage of one or several of these mitochondrial genes contributing to 22qDS etiology and/or morbidity. Plasma metabolomics, lymphocytic mitochondrial outcomes, and epigenetics (histone H3 Lys-4 trimethylation and 5-methylcytosine) were evaluated in samples from 11 22qDS children and 13 age- and sex-matched neurotypically developing controls. Metabolite differences between 22qDS children and controls reflected a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis (higher lactate/pyruvate ratios) accompanied by an increase in reductive carboxylation of α-ketoglutarate (increased concentrations of 2-hydroxyglutaric acid, cholesterol, and fatty acids). Altered metabolism in 22qDS reflected a critical role for the haploinsufficiency of the mitochondrial citrate transporter SLC25A1, further enhanced by HIF-1α, MYC, and metabolite controls. This comprehensive profiling served to clarify the biochemistry of this disease underlying its broad, complex phenotype. PMID:26221035

  10. Molecular mimicry and clonal deletion: A fresh look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Noel R

    2015-06-21

    In this article, I trace the historic background of clonal deletion and molecular mimicry, two major pillars underlying our present understanding of autoimmunity and autoimmune disease. Clonal deletion originated as a critical element of the clonal selection theory of antibody formation in order to explain tolerance of self. If we did have complete clonal deletion, there would be major voids, the infamous "black holes", in our immune repertoire. For comprehensive, protective adaptive immunity, full deletion is necessarily a rare event. Molecular mimicry, the sharing of epitopes among self and non-self antigens, is extraordinary common and provides the evidence that complete deletion of self-reactive clones is rare. If molecular mimicry were not common, protective adaptive immunity could not be all-encompassing. By taking a fresh look at these two processes together we can envision their evolutionary basis and understand the need for regulatory devices to prevent molecular mimicry from progressing to autoimmune disease. PMID:25172771

  11. Current concepts in neuroendocrine disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Olea, Martha; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Orlando, Edward F; Ottinger, Mary Ann; Rosenfeld, Cheryl S; Wolstenholme, Jennifer T; Trudeau, Vance L

    2014-07-01

    In the last few years, it has become clear that a wide variety of environmental contaminants have specific effects on neuroendocrine systems in fish, amphibians, birds and mammals. While it is beyond the scope of this review to provide a comprehensive examination of all of these neuroendocrine disruptors, we will focus on select representative examples. Organochlorine pesticides bioaccumulate in neuroendocrine areas of the brain that directly regulate GnRH neurons, thereby altering the expression of genes downstream of GnRH signaling. Organochlorine pesticides can also agonize or antagonize hormone receptors, adversely affecting crosstalk between neurotransmitter systems. The impacts of polychlorinated biphenyls are varied and in many cases subtle. This is particularly true for neuroedocrine and behavioral effects of exposure. These effects impact sexual differentiation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and other neuroendocrine systems regulating the thyroid, metabolic, and stress axes and their physiological responses. Weakly estrogenic and anti-androgenic pollutants such as bisphenol A, phthalates, phytochemicals, and the fungicide vinclozolin can lead to severe and widespread neuroendocrine disruptions in discrete brain regions, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and hypothalamus, resulting in behavioral changes in a wide range of species. Behavioral features that have been shown to be affected by one or more these chemicals include cognitive deficits, heightened anxiety or anxiety-like, sociosexual, locomotor, and appetitive behaviors. Neuroactive pharmaceuticals are now widely detected in aquatic environments and water supplies through the release of wastewater treatment plant effluents. The antidepressant fluoxetine is one such pharmaceutical neuroendocrine disruptor. Fluoxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor that can affect multiple neuroendocrine pathways and behavioral circuits, including disruptive effects on reproduction and

  12. Deletion of the App-Runx1 region in mice models human partial monosomy 21

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Arbogast

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Partial monosomy 21 (PM21 is a rare chromosomal abnormality that is characterized by the loss of a variable segment along human chromosome 21 (Hsa21. The clinical phenotypes of this loss are heterogeneous and range from mild alterations to lethal consequences, depending on the affected region of Hsa21. The most common features include intellectual disabilities, craniofacial dysmorphology, short stature, and muscular and cardiac defects. As a complement to human genetic approaches, our team has developed new monosomic mouse models that carry deletions on Hsa21 syntenic regions in order to identify the dosage-sensitive genes that are responsible for the symptoms. We focus here on the Ms5Yah mouse model, in which a 7.7-Mb region has been deleted from the App to Runx1 genes. Ms5Yah mice display high postnatal lethality, with a few surviving individuals showing growth retardation, motor coordination deficits, and spatial learning and memory impairments. Further studies confirmed a gene dosage effect in the Ms5Yah hippocampus, and pinpointed disruptions of pathways related to cell adhesion (involving App, Cntnap5b, Lgals3bp, Mag, Mcam, Npnt, Pcdhb2, Pcdhb3, Pcdhb4, Pcdhb6, Pcdhb7, Pcdhb8, Pcdhb16 and Vwf. Our PM21 mouse model is the first to display morphological abnormalities and behavioural phenotypes similar to those found in affected humans, and it therefore demonstrates the major contribution that the App-Runx1 region has in the pathophysiology of PM21.

  13. Generation of stable mutants and targeted gene deletion strains in Cryptococcus neoformans through electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaorong; Chacko, Nadia; Wang, Linqi; Pavuluri, Yashwant

    2015-04-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is the etiologic agent of cryptococcal meningitis that causes more than half a million deaths worldwide each year. This capsulated basidiomycetous yeast also serves as a model for micropathogenic studies. The ability to make stable mutants, either via ectopic integration or homologous recombination, has been accomplished using biolistic transformation. This technical advance has greatly facilitated the research on the basic biology and pathogenic mechanisms of this pathogen in the past two decades. However, biolistic transformation is costly, and its reproducibility varies widely. Here we found that stable ectopic integration or targeted gene deletion via homologous replacement could be accomplished through electroporative transformation. The stability of the transformants obtained through electroporation and the frequency of homologous replacement is highly dependent on the selective marker. A frequency of homologous recombination among the stable transformants obtained by electroporation is comparable to those obtained by biolistic transformation (∼10%) when dominant drug selection markers are used, which is much higher than what has been previously reported for electroporation when auxotrophic markers were used (0.001% to 0.1%). Furthermore, disruption of the KU80 gene or generation of gene deletion constructs using the split marker strategy, two approaches known to increase homologous replacement among transformants obtained through biolistic transformation, also increase the frequency of homologous replacement among transformants obtained through electroporation. Therefore, electroporation provides a low cost alternative for mutagenesis in Cryptococcus.

  14. Ku80-deleted cells are defective at base excision repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Han [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, The Institute of Biotechnology, The Department of Molecular Medicine, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Tumor Suppression Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid 28029 (Spain); Marple, Teresa [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, The Institute of Biotechnology, The Department of Molecular Medicine, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Hasty, Paul, E-mail: hastye@uthscsa.edu [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, The Institute of Biotechnology, The Department of Molecular Medicine, 15355 Lambda Drive, San Antonio, TX 78245-3207 (United States); Tumor Suppression Group, Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO), Madrid 28029 (Spain)

    2013-05-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Ku80-deleted cells are hypersensitive to ROS and alkylating agents. • Cells deleted for Ku80, but not Ku70 or Lig4, have reduced BER capacity. • OGG1 rescues hypersensitivity to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and paraquat in Ku80-mutant cells. • Cells deleted for Ku80, but not Lig4, are defective at repairing AP sites. • Cells deleted for Ku80, but not Lig4 or Brca2 exon 27, exhibit increased PAR. - Abstract: Ku80 forms a heterodimer with Ku70, called Ku, that repairs DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. As a consequence of deleting NHEJ, Ku80-mutant cells are hypersensitive to agents that cause DNA DSBs like ionizing radiation. Here we show that Ku80 deletion also decreased resistance to ROS and alkylating agents that typically cause base lesions and single-strand breaks (SSBs). This is unusual since base excision repair (BER), not NHEJ, typically repairs these types of lesions. However, we show that deletion of another NHEJ protein, DNA ligase IV (Lig4), did not cause hypersensitivity to these agents. In addition, the ROS and alkylating agents did not induce γ-H2AX foci that are diagnostic of DSBs. Furthermore, deletion of Ku80, but not Lig4 or Ku70, reduced BER capacity. Ku80 deletion also impaired BER at the initial lesion recognition/strand scission step; thus, involvement of a DSB is unlikely. Therefore, our data suggests that Ku80 deletion impairs BER via a mechanism that does not repair DSBs.

  15. Protective effect of taurine on the light-induced disruption of isolated frog rod outer segments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isolated frog rod outer segments (ROS) incubated in a Krebs-bicarbonate medium, and illuminated for 2 h, show a profound alteration in their structure. This is characterized by distention of discs, vesiculation, and a marked swelling. The light-induced ROS disruption requires the presence of bicarbonate and sodium chloride. Replacement of bicarbonate by TRIS or HEPES protects ROS structure. Also, substitution of sodium chloride by sucrose or choline chloride maintains unaltered the ROS structure. Deletion of calcium, magnesium, or phosphate does not modify the effect produced by illumination. An increased accumulation of labeled bicarbonate and tritiated water is observed in illuminated ROS, as compared with controls in the dark. The presence of taurine, GABA, or glycine, at concentrations of 5-25 mM, effectively counteracts the light-induced ROS disruption. Taurine (25 mM) reduces labeled bicarbonate and tritiated water levels to those observed in the dark incubated ROS

  16. Multistage Logistic Network Optimization under Disruption Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Rusman, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Getting over disruptions risk has been a challenging issue for many companies under the globalization that will link to potential external source such as demand uncertainties, natural disasters, and terrorist attacks. The disruption is an unexpected event that disturbs normal flows of products and materials within a supply chain. The disruption at one members of supply chain will propagate the offers and finally affect significant impacts on the entire chain. If we look back...

  17. Disrupted Sleep: From Molecules to Cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Someren, E.J.W.; Cirelli, C.; Dijk, D.-J.; Van Cauter, E; Schwartz, Sophie; Chee, M. W. L.

    2015-01-01

    Although the functions of sleep remain to be fully elucidated, it is clear that there are far-reaching effects of its disruption, whether by curtailment for a single night, by a few hours each night over a long period, or by disruption in sleep continuity. Epidemiological and experimental studies of these different forms of sleep disruption show deranged physiology from subcellular levels to complex affective behavior. In keeping with the multifaceted influence of sleep on health and well-bei...

  18. Disrupted Sleep: From Molecules to Cognition

    OpenAIRE

    Van Someren, Eus J. W.; Cirelli, Chiara; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Van Cauter, Eve; Schwartz, Sophie; Chee, Michael W. L.

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Although the functions of sleep remain to be fully elucidated, it is clear that there are far-reaching effects of its disruption, whether by curtailment for a single night, by a few hours each night over a long period, or by disruption in sleep continuity. Epidemiological and experimental studies of these different forms of sleep disruption show deranged physiology from subcellular levels to complex affective behavior. In keeping with the multifaceted influence of sleep on health ...

  19. Disruption management in passenger railway transportation.

    OpenAIRE

    Jespersen-Groth, J.; Potthoff, Daniel; Clausen, J.; Huisman, Dennis; Kroon, Leo; Maróti, Gábor; Nielsen, M.N.

    2007-01-01

    textabstractThis paper deals with disruption management in passenger railway transportation. In the disruption management process, many actors belonging to different organizations play a role. In this paper we therefore describe the process itself and the roles of the different actors. Furthermore, we discuss the three main subproblems in railway disruption management: timetable adjustment, and rolling stock and crew re-scheduling. Next to a general description of these problems, we give an o...

  20. Towards a Framework of Digital Platform Disruption

    OpenAIRE

    Kazan, Erol; Tan, Chee-Wee; Lim, Eric T. K.

    2014-01-01

    Digital platforms are disruptive information technology (IT) artifacts that erode conventional business logic associated with traditional market structures. This paper presents a framework for examining the disruptive potential of digital platforms whereby we postulate that the strategic interplay of governance regimes and platform layers is deterministic of whether disruptive derivatives are permitted to flourish. This framework has been employed in a comparative case study betwe...

  1. Catastrophic disruption experiments: Recent results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, G.; Ryan, E. V.; Nakamura, A. M.; Giblin, I.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the progress in the field of catastrophic disruption experiments over the past 4 years, since the publication of the review paper by Fujiwara et al. (1989). We describe the development of new techniques to produce shattering impacts relevant to the study of the collisional evolution of the asteroids, and summarize the results from numerous experiments which have been performed to date, using a variety of materials for both the impactor and the targets. Some of these, such as ice-on-ice, loose aggregates and pressurized targets, are quite new and have provided novel and exciting results. Some of the gaps existing previously in the data on fragment ejection-angle distributions, as well as translational and rotational velocity fields (including fine fragments) have been filled, and these new results will be surveyed.

  2. Disrupting Entanglement of Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Leichenauer, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    We study entanglement in thermofield double states of strongly coupled CFTs by analyzing two-sided Reissner-Nordstrom solutions in AdS. The central object of study is the mutual information between a pair of regions, one on each asymptotic boundary of the black hole. For large regions the mutual information is positive and for small ones it vanishes; we compute the critical length scale, which goes to infinity for extremal black holes, of the transition. We also generalize the butterfly effect of Shenker and Stanford to a wide class of charged black holes, showing that mutual information is disrupted upon perturbing the system and waiting for a time of order $\\log E/\\delta E$ in units of the temperature. We conjecture that the parametric form of this timescale is universal.

  3. Fungal ABC transporter deletion and localization analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Andriy; Weber, Stefan S; Nijland, Jeroen G; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Driessen, Arnold J M

    2012-01-01

    Fungal cells are highly complex as their metabolism is compartmentalized harboring various types of subcellular organelles that are bordered by one or more membranes. Knowledge about the intracellular localization of transporter proteins is often required for the understanding of their biological function. Among different approaches available, the localization analysis based on the expression of GFP fusions is commonly used as a relatively fast and cost-efficient method that allows visualization of proteins of interest in both live and fixed cells. In addition, inactivation of transporter genes is an important tool to resolve their specific function. Here we provide a detailed protocol for the deletion and localization analysis of ABC transporters in the filamentous fungus Penicillium chrysogenum. It includes construction of expression plasmids, their transformation into fungal strains, cultivation of transformants, microscopy analysis, as well as additional protocols on staining of fungal cells with organelle-specific dyes like Hoechst 33342, MitoTracker DeepRed, and FM4-64. PMID:22183644

  4. Genetic deletion of fibroblast growth factor 14 recapitulates phenotypic alterations underlying cognitive impairment associated with schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshammari, T K; Alshammari, M A; Nenov, M N; Hoxha, E; Cambiaghi, M; Marcinno, A; James, T F; Singh, P; Labate, D; Li, J; Meltzer, H Y; Sacchetti, B; Tempia, F; Laezza, F

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive processing is highly dependent on the functional integrity of gamma-amino-butyric acid (GABA) interneurons in the brain. These cells regulate excitability and synaptic plasticity of principal neurons balancing the excitatory/inhibitory tone of cortical networks. Reduced function of parvalbumin (PV) interneurons and disruption of GABAergic synapses in the cortical circuitry result in desynchronized network activity associated with cognitive impairment across many psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. However, the mechanisms underlying these complex phenotypes are still poorly understood. Here we show that in animal models, genetic deletion of fibroblast growth factor 14 (Fgf14), a regulator of neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission, leads to loss of PV interneurons in the CA1 hippocampal region, a critical area for cognitive function. Strikingly, this cellular phenotype associates with decreased expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) and vesicular GABA transporter (VGAT) and also coincides with disrupted CA1 inhibitory circuitry, reduced in vivo gamma frequency oscillations and impaired working memory. Bioinformatics analysis of schizophrenia transcriptomics revealed functional co-clustering of FGF14 and genes enriched within the GABAergic pathway along with correlatively decreased expression of FGF14, PVALB, GAD67 and VGAT in the disease context. These results indicate that Fgf14−/− mice recapitulate salient molecular, cellular, functional and behavioral features associated with human cognitive impairment, and FGF14 loss of function might be associated with the biology of complex brain disorders such as schizophrenia. PMID:27163207

  5. Ectrodactyly and proximal/intermediate interstitial deletion 7q

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McElveen, C.; Carvajal, M.V.; Moscatello, D. [Louisiana State Univ. Medical Center, New Orleans, LA (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-13

    We report on an individual with severe mental retardation, seizures, microcephaly, unusual face, scoliosis, and cleft feet and cleft right hand. The chromosomal study showed a proximal interstitial deletion 7q (q11.23q22). From our review of the literature, 11 patients have been reported with ectrodactyly (split hand/split foot malformation) and proximal/intermediate interstitial deletions or rearrangements of 7q. The critical segment for ectrodactyly seems to be located between 7q21.2 and 7q22.1. This malformation is present in 41% of the patients whose deletion involves the critical segment. 37 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Survey of disruption causes at JET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, P. C.; Johnson, M. F.; Alper, B.; Buratti, P.; Hender, T. C.; Koslowski, H. R.; Riccardo, V.

    2011-01-01

    A survey has been carried out into the causes of all 2309 disruptions over the last decade of JET operations. The aim of this survey was to obtain a complete picture of all possible disruption causes, in order to devise better strategies to prevent or mitigate their impact. The analysis allows the e

  7. Rurality and Patterns of Social Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Kenneth P.

    1984-01-01

    Argues that structural cleavages provoke social disruptions where opportunities are conducive. Thus, combinations of rurality with particular structural cleavages predict specific disruption patterns. Data from northeastern United States indicate that rurality, combined with other population characteristics (provocation, ascriptive inequality,…

  8. Network Formation under the Threat of Disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoyer, B.

    2013-01-01

    The studies in this thesis are focused on the impact the presence of a network disruptor has on network formation models. In particular, we build two theoretical models to study the effect of network disruption on network formation and test the effect network disruption has on equilibrium selection

  9. RCSD1-ABL1 Translocation Associated with IKZF1 Gene Deletion in B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shawana Kamran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The RCSD1 gene has recently been identified as a novel gene fusion partner of the ABL1 gene in cases of B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL. The RCSD1 gene is located at 1q23 and ABL1 is located at 9q34, so that the RCSD1-ABL1 fusion typically arises through a rare reciprocal translocation t(1;9(q23;q34. Only a small number of RCSD1-ABL1 positive cases of B-ALL have been described in the literature, and the full spectrum of clinical, morphological, immunophenotypic, and molecular features associated with this genetic abnormality has not been defined. We describe extensive genetic characterization of a case of B-ALL with RCSD1-ABL1 fusion, by using conventional cytogenetic analysis, Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization (FISH studies, and Chromosomal Microarray Analysis (CMA. The use of CMA resulted in detection of an approximately 70 kb deletion at 7p12.2, which caused a disruption of the IKZF1 gene. Deletions and mutations of IKZF1 are recurring abnormalities in B-ALL and are associated with a poor prognosis. Our findings highlight the association of the deletion of IKZF1 gene with the t(1;9(q24;q34 and illustrate the importance of comprehensive cytogenetic and molecular evaluation for accurate prediction of prognosis in patients with B-cell ALL.

  10. Cardiomyocyte-specific deletion of leptin receptors causes lethal heart failure in Cre-recombinase-mediated cardiotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Michael E; Smith, Grant; Hall, John E; Stec, David E

    2012-12-15

    Although disruption of leptin signaling is associated with obesity as well as cardiac lipid accumulation and dysfunction, it has been difficult to separate the direct effects of leptin on the heart from those associated with the effects of leptin on body weight and fat mass. Using Cre-loxP recombinase technology, we developed tamoxifen-inducible, cardiomyocyte-specific leptin receptor-deficient mice to assess the role of leptin in regulating cardiac function. Cre recombinase activation in the heart resulted in transient reduction in left ventricular systolic function which recovered to normal levels by day 10. However, when cardiomyocyte leptin receptors were deleted in the setting of Cre recombinase-induced left ventricular dysfunction, irreversible lethal heart failure was observed in less than 10 days in all mice. Heart failure after leptin receptor deletion was associated with marked decreases of cardiac mitochondrial ATP, phosphorylated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and AMP-activated kinase (pAMPK). Our results demonstrate that specific deletion of cardiomyocyte leptin receptors, in the presence of increased Cre recombinase expression, causes lethal heart failure associated with decreased cardiac energy production. These observations indicate that leptin plays an important role in regulating cardiac function in the setting of cardiac stress caused by Cre-recombinase expression, likely through actions on cardiomyocyte energy metabolism.

  11. Deletion of PTEN produces autism-like behavioral deficits and alterations in synaptic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Joaquin N; Smith, Gregory D; Arbuckle, Erin P; White, Jessika; Holley, Andrew J; Floruta, Crina M; Ahmed, Nowrin; Gomez, Maribel C; Okonkwo, Obi

    2014-01-01

    Many genes have been implicated in the underlying cause of autism but each gene accounts for only a small fraction of those diagnosed with autism. There is increasing evidence that activity-dependent changes in neuronal signaling could act as a convergent mechanism for many of the changes in synaptic proteins. One candidate signaling pathway that may have a critical role in autism is the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. A major regulator of this pathway is the negative repressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). In the current study we examined the behavioral and molecular consequences in mice with neuron subset-specific deletion of PTEN. The knockout (KO) mice showed deficits in social chamber and social partition test. KO mice demonstrated alterations in repetitive behavior, as measured in the marble burying test and hole-board test. They showed no changes in ultrasonic vocalizations emitted on postnatal day 10 or 12 compared to wildtype (WT) mice. They exhibited less anxiety in the elevated-plus maze test and were more active in the open field test compared to WT mice. In addition to the behavioral alterations, KO mice had elevation of phosphorylated AKT, phosphorylated S6, and an increase in S6K. KO mice had a decrease in mGluR but an increase in total and phosphorylated fragile X mental retardation protein. The disruptions in intracellular signaling may be why the KO mice had a decrease in the dendritic potassium channel Kv4.2 and a decrease in the synaptic scaffolding proteins PSD-95 and SAP102. These findings demonstrate that deletion of PTEN results in long-term alterations in social behavior, repetitive behavior, activity, and anxiety. In addition, deletion of PTEN significantly alters mGluR signaling and many synaptic proteins in the hippocampus. Our data demonstrates that deletion of PTEN can result in many of the behavioral features of autism and may provide insights into the regulation of intracellular signaling on synaptic proteins.

  12. Disruption of the endothelin A receptor in the nephron causes mild fluid volume expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Deborah

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelin, via endothelin A receptors (ETA, exerts multiple pathologic effects that contribute to disease pathogenesis throughout the body. ETA antagonists ameliorate many experimental diseases and have been extensively utilized in clinical trials. The utility of ETA blockers has been greatly limited, however, by fluid retention, sometimes leading to heart failure or death. To begin to examine this issue, the effect of genetic disruption of ETA in the nephron on blood pressure and salt handling was determined. Methods Mice were generated with doxycycline-inducible nephron-specific ETA deletion using Pax8-rtTA and LC-1 transgenes on the background of homozygous loxP-flanked ETA alleles. Arterial pressure, Na metabolism and measures of body fluid volume status (hematocrit and impedance plethysmography were assessed. Results Absence of nephron ETA did not alter arterial pressure whether mice were ingesting a normal or high Na diet. Nephron ETA disruption did not detectably affect 24 hr Na excretion or urine volume regardless of Na intake. However, mice with nephron ETA knockout that were fed a high Na diet had mild fluid retention as evidenced by an increase in body weight and a fall in hematocrit. Conclusions Genetic deletion of nephron ETA causes very modest fluid retention that does not alter arterial pressure. Nephron ETA, under normal conditions, likely do not play a major role in regulation of Na excretion or systemic hemodynamics.

  13. 78 FR 63967 - Procurement List; Proposed Addition and Deletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ...: Social Vocational Services, Inc.--Deleted, San Jose, CA Contracting Activity: DEPT OF THE ARMY, W40M NATL... Sustainment Systems, Natick, MA NPA: ReadyOne Industries (ROI), Inc., El Paso, TX Contracting Activity:...

  14. Characterization of a lymphoblastoid line deleted for lambda immunoglobulin genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hough, C.A., White, B.N., Holden, J.A. [Queen`s Univ., Ontario (Canada)

    1995-04-01

    While characterizing the cat eye syndrome (CES) supernumerary chromosome for the presence of {lambda} immunoglobulin gene region sequences, a lymphoblastoid cell line from one CES patient was identified in which there was selection of cells deleted from some IGLC and IGLV genes. Two distinct deletions, one on each chromosome 22, were identified, presumably arising from independent somatic recombination events occurring during B-lymphocyte differentiation. The extent of the deleted regions was determined using probes from the various IGLV subgroups and they each covered at least 82 kilobases. The precise definition of the deletions was not possible because of conservation of some restriction sites in the IGLV region. The cell line was used to map putative IGLV genes within the recombinant phage {lambda}V{lambda}135 to the distal part of the IGLV gene region. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  15. The contribution of cis-regulatory elements to head-to-head gene pairs’ co-expression pattern

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Transcription regulation is one of the most critical pipelines in biological process,in which cis-elements play the role as gene expression regulators.We attempt to deduce the principles underlying the co-expression of "head-to-head" gene pairs by analyzing activities or behaviors of the shared cis-elements.A network component analysis was performed to estimate the impact of cis-elements on gene promoters and their activities under different conditions.Our discoveries reveal how biological system uses those regulatory elements to control the expression pattern of "head-to-head" gene pairs and the whole transcription regulation system.

  16. Identification of Predictive Cis-Regulatory Elements Using a Discriminative Objective Function and a Dynamic Search Space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Karnik

    Full Text Available The generation of genomic binding or accessibility data from massively parallel sequencing technologies such as ChIP-seq and DNase-seq continues to accelerate. Yet state-of-the-art computational approaches for the identification of DNA binding motifs often yield motifs of weak predictive power. Here we present a novel computational algorithm called MotifSpec, designed to find predictive motifs, in contrast to over-represented sequence elements. The key distinguishing feature of this algorithm is that it uses a dynamic search space and a learned threshold to find discriminative motifs in combination with the modeling of motifs using a full PWM (position weight matrix rather than k-mer words or regular expressions. We demonstrate that our approach finds motifs corresponding to known binding specificities in several mammalian ChIP-seq datasets, and that our PWMs classify the ChIP-seq signals with accuracy comparable to, or marginally better than motifs from the best existing algorithms. In other datasets, our algorithm identifies novel motifs where other methods fail. Finally, we apply this algorithm to detect motifs from expression datasets in C. elegans using a dynamic expression similarity metric rather than fixed expression clusters, and find novel predictive motifs.

  17. Cis-regulatory control of the nodal gene, initiator of the sea urchin oral ectoderm gene network

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Jongmin; Su, Yi-Hsien; Lee, Pei Yun; Robertson, Anthony J; Coffman, James A.; Davidson, Eric H.

    2007-01-01

    Expression of the nodal gene initiates the gene regulatory network which establishes the transcriptional specification of the oral ectoderm in the sea urchin embryo. This gene encodes a TGFβ ligand, and in Strongylocentrotus purpuratus its transcription is activated in the presumptive oral ectoderm at about the 30-cell stage. Thereafter Nodal signaling occurs among all cells of the oral ectoderm territory, and nodal expression is required for expression of oral ectoderm regulatory genes. The ...

  18. Tissue-specific expression of the human alpha 1-antitrypsin gene is controlled by multiple cis-regulatory elements.

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, R F; Li, Y.; Sifers, R N; Wang, H.; Hardick, C; Tsai, S. Y.; Woo, S L

    1987-01-01

    Human alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) is expressed in the liver, and a 318 bp fragment immediately flanking the CAP site of the gene was found to be sufficient to drive the expression of a reporter gene (CAT) specifically in hepatoma cells. The enhancing activity however, was orientation-dependent. The DNA fragment was separated into a distal region and a proximal region. A "core enhancer" sequence GTGGTTTC is present within the distal region and is capable of activity enhancement in both orientati...

  19. Tissue-specific expression of the human alpha 1-antitrypsin gene is controlled by multiple cis-regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, R F; Li, Y; Sifers, R N; Wang, H; Hardick, C; Tsai, S Y; Woo, S L

    1987-10-26

    Human alpha 1-antitrypsin (AAT) is expressed in the liver, and a 318 bp fragment immediately flanking the CAP site of the gene was found to be sufficient to drive the expression of a reporter gene (CAT) specifically in hepatoma cells. The enhancing activity however, was orientation-dependent. The DNA fragment was separated into a distal region and a proximal region. A "core enhancer" sequence GTGGTTTC is present within the distal region and is capable of activity enhancement in both orientations when complemented by the proximal region in the sense orientation. The results strongly suggest that there are multiple cis-acting elements in the human AAT gene that confer cell specificity for its expression. Nuclear proteins prepared from the hepatoma cells bound specifically to the proximal region in a band-shifting assay that was resistant to competition by the globin promoter DNA. Foot-printing analysis showed a protected domain within the proximal region that contains a nearly perfect palindromic sequence TGGTTAATATTCACCA, which may be important in the regulation of AAT expression in the liver. PMID:2823229

  20. Properties of non-coding DNA and identification of putative cis-regulatory elements in Theileria parva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Xiang

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasites in the genus Theileria cause lymphoproliferative diseases in cattle, resulting in enormous socio-economic losses. The availability of the genome sequences and annotation for T. parva and T. annulata has facilitated the study of parasite biology and their relationship with host cell transformation and tropism. However, the mechanism of transcriptional regulation in this genus, which may be key to understanding fundamental aspects of its parasitology, remains poorly understood. In this study, we analyze the evolution of non-coding sequences in the Theileria genome and identify conserved sequence elements that may be involved in gene regulation of these parasitic species. Results Intergenic regions and introns in Theileria are short, and their length distributions are considerably right-skewed. Intergenic regions flanked by genes in 5'-5' orientation tend to be longer and slightly more AT-rich than those flanked by two stop codons; intergenic regions flanked by genes in 3'-5' orientation have intermediate values of length and AT composition. Intron position is negatively correlated with intron length, and positively correlated with GC content. Using stringent criteria, we identified a set of high-quality orthologous non-coding sequences between T. parva and T. annulata, and determined the distribution of selective constraints across regions, which are shown to be higher close to translation start sites. A positive correlation between constraint and length in both intergenic regions and introns suggests a tight control over length expansion of non-coding regions. Genome-wide searches for functional elements revealed several conserved motifs in intergenic regions of Theileria genomes. Two such motifs are preferentially located within the first 60 base pairs upstream of transcription start sites in T. parva, are preferentially associated with specific protein functional categories, and have significant similarity to know regulatory motifs in other species. These results suggest that these two motifs are likely to represent transcription factor binding sites in Theileria. Conclusion Theileria genomes are highly compact, with selection seemingly favoring short introns and intergenic regions. Three over-represented sequence motifs were independently identified in intergenic regions of both Theileria species, and the evidence suggests that at least two of them play a role in transcriptional control in T. parva. These are prime candidates for experimental validation of transcription factor binding sites in this single-celled eukaryotic parasite. Sequences similar to two of these Theileria motifs are conserved in Plasmodium hinting at the possibility of common regulatory machinery across the phylum Apicomplexa.

  1. Identification of Predictive Cis-Regulatory Elements Using a Discriminative Objective Function and a Dynamic Search Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnik, Rahul; Beer, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    The generation of genomic binding or accessibility data from massively parallel sequencing technologies such as ChIP-seq and DNase-seq continues to accelerate. Yet state-of-the-art computational approaches for the identification of DNA binding motifs often yield motifs of weak predictive power. Here we present a novel computational algorithm called MotifSpec, designed to find predictive motifs, in contrast to over-represented sequence elements. The key distinguishing feature of this algorithm is that it uses a dynamic search space and a learned threshold to find discriminative motifs in combination with the modeling of motifs using a full PWM (position weight matrix) rather than k-mer words or regular expressions. We demonstrate that our approach finds motifs corresponding to known binding specificities in several mammalian ChIP-seq datasets, and that our PWMs classify the ChIP-seq signals with accuracy comparable to, or marginally better than motifs from the best existing algorithms. In other datasets, our algorithm identifies novel motifs where other methods fail. Finally, we apply this algorithm to detect motifs from expression datasets in C. elegans using a dynamic expression similarity metric rather than fixed expression clusters, and find novel predictive motifs.

  2. Changes in cis-regulatory elements of a key floral regulator are associated with divergence of inflorescence architectures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Kusters; S. Della Pina; R. Castel; E. Souer; R. Koes

    2015-01-01

    Higher plant species diverged extensively with regard to the moment (flowering time) and position (inflorescence architecture) at which flowers are formed. This seems largely caused by variation in the expression patterns of conserved genes that specify floral meristem identity (FMI), rather than ch

  3. The meta-epigenomic structure of purified human stem cell populations is defined at cis-regulatory sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong Mei; Golden, Aaron; Mar, Jessica C.; Einstein, Francine H.; Greally, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism and significance of epigenetic variability in the same cell type between healthy individuals are not clear. Here, we purify human CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from different individuals and find that there is increased variability of DNA methylation at loci with properties of promoters and enhancers. The variability is especially enriched at candidate enhancers near genes transitioning between silent and expressed states, and encoding proteins with leukocyte differentiation properties. Our findings of increased variability at loci with intermediate DNA methylation values, at candidate “poised” enhancers, and at genes involved in HSPC lineage commitment suggest that CD34+ cell subtype heterogeneity between individuals is a major mechanism for the variability observed. Epigenomic studies performed on cell populations, even when purified, are testing collections of epigenomes, or meta-epigenomes. Our findings show that meta-epigenomic approaches to data analysis can provide insights into cell subpopulation structure. PMID:25327398

  4. A cis-regulatory antisense RNA represses translation in Vibrio cholerae through extensive complementarity and proximity to the target locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Howard; Replogle, John Michael; Vather, Naomi; Tsao-Wu, Maya; Mistry, Ronak; Liu, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    As with all facultative pathogens, Vibrio cholerae must optimize its cellular processes to adapt to different environments with varying carbon sources and to environmental stresses. More specifically, in order to metabolize mannitol, V. cholerae must regulate the synthesis of MtlA, a mannitol transporter protein produced exclusively in the presence of mannitol. We previously showed that a cis-acting small RNA (sRNA) expressed by V. cholerae, MtlS, appears to post-transcriptionally downregulate the expression of mtlA and is produced in the absence of mannitol. We hypothesized that since it is complementary to the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of mtlA mRNA, MtlS may affect synthesis of MtlA by forming an mtlA-MtlS complex that blocks translation of the mRNA through occlusion of its ribosome binding site. To test this hypothesis, we used in vitro translation assays in order to examine the role MtlS plays in mtlA regulation and found that MtlS is sufficient to suppress translation of transcripts harboring the 5' UTR of mtlA. However, in a cellular context, the 5' UTR of mtlA is not sufficient for targeted repression by endogenous MtlS; additional segments from the coding region of mtlA play a role in the ability of the sRNA to regulate translation of mtlA mRNA. Additionally, proximity of transcription sites between the sRNA and mRNA significantly affects the efficacy of MtlS.

  5. Changes in cis-regulatory elements of a key floral regulator are associated with divergence of inflorescence architectures

    OpenAIRE

    Kusters, E.; Pina, Della, S.; Castel, R; Souer, E.; Koes, R

    2015-01-01

    Higher plant species diverged extensively with regard to the moment (flowering time) and position (inflorescence architecture) at which flowers are formed. This seems largely caused by variation in the expression patterns of conserved genes that specify floral meristem identity (FMI), rather than changes in the encoded proteins. Here, we report a functional comparison of the promoters of homologous FMI genes from Arabidopsis, petunia, tomato and Antirrhinum. Analysis of promoter-reporter cons...

  6. A Survey of 6,300 Genomic Fragments for cis-Regulatory Activity in the Imaginal Discs of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Jory

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Over 6,000 fragments from the genome of Drosophila melanogaster were analyzed for their ability to drive expression of GAL4 reporter genes in the third-instar larval imaginal discs. About 1,200 reporter genes drove expression in the eye, antenna, leg, wing, haltere, or genital imaginal discs. The patterns ranged from large regions to individual cells. About 75% of the active fragments drove expression in multiple discs; 20% were expressed in ventral, but not dorsal, discs (legs, genital, and antenna, whereas ∼23% were expressed in dorsal but not ventral discs (wing, haltere, and eye. Several patterns, for example, within the leg chordotonal organ, appeared a surprisingly large number of times. Unbiased searches for DNA sequence motifs suggest candidate transcription factors that may regulate enhancers with shared activities. Together, these expression patterns provide a valuable resource to the community and offer a broad overview of how transcriptional regulatory information is distributed in the Drosophila genome.

  7. Cis-regulatory element-based genome-wide identification of DREB1/CBF targets in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huan Zhao; Weizhong Liu; Yong Hu; Xianglin Liu; Yikun He

    2008-01-01

    Microarray analysis is used to identify transcriptional targets.However,the direct targets of transcription factors cannot be distin guished from indirect ones;further,genes with low-expression levels cannot be identified by this method.In the present study,we exploi the cis-element dehydration-responsive element(DRE)that is known to be responsible for the transcription of DRE binding factor](DREB1)targets in the promoter region of all Arabidopsis genes.Putative targets whose promoters contain the elements were verified by both microarray and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR)analysis.Five new DREB 1/CBF direct targets were identified.Compared with traditional microarray analysis,our method is convenient and cost-effective for identifying the downstream targets of transcription factors.

  8. Recurrent deletions of IKZF1 in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    de Rooij, Jasmijn D.E.; Beuling, Eva; Marry M van den Heuvel-Eibrink; Obulkasim, Askar; Baruchel, André; Trka, Jan; Reinhardt, Dirk; Sonneveld, Edwin; Gibson, Brenda E.S.; Pieters, Rob; Zimmermann, Martin; Zwaan, C. Michel; Fornerod, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    IKAROS family zinc finger 1/IKZF1 is a transcription factor important in lymphoid differentiation, and a known tumor suppressor in acute lymphoid leukemia. Recent studies suggest that IKZF1 is also involved in myeloid differentiation. To investigate whether IKZF1 deletions also play a role in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia, we screened a panel of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia samples for deletions of the IKZF1 locus using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and for mutations...

  9. Construction of Deletion-knockout Mutant Fowlpox Virus (FWPV)

    OpenAIRE

    Laidlaw, Stephen M.; Skinner, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The construction of deletion-knockout poxviruses is a useful approach to determining the function of specific virus genes. This protocol is an adaptation of the transient dominant knockout selection protocol published by Falkner and Moss (1990) for use with vaccinia virus. The protocol makes use of the dominant selectable marker Escherichia coli guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (gpt) gene (Mulligan and Berg, 1981), under the control of an early/late poxvirus promoter. The deletion viruses th...

  10. Bilateral hand amyotrophy with PMP-22 gene deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochard, A; Guennoc, A M; Praline, J; Malinge, M C; de Toffol, B; Corcia, P

    2007-01-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) phenotypes are heterogeneous. We report the case of a 52-year-old woman without medical history, who complained of bilateral hand weakness suggestive first of a motor neuron disorder. The presence of a diffuse predominant distal demyelinating neuropathy suggested a deletion of PMP-22 gene, which was confirmed by genetic analysis. This case report underlines a novel phenotype related to the deletion of PMP-22 gene.

  11. Insertion and Deletion Processes in Recent Human History

    OpenAIRE

    Per Sjödin; Thomas Bataillon; Schierup, Mikkel H.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although insertions and deletions (indels) account for a sizable portion of genetic changes within and among species, they have received little attention because they are difficult to type, are alignment dependent and their underlying mutational process is poorly understood. A fundamental question in this respect is whether insertions and deletions are governed by similar or different processes and, if so, what these differences are. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We use publishe...

  12. Fast detection of deletion breakpoints using quantitative PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulshara Abildinova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The routine detection of large and medium copy number variants (CNVs is well established. Hemizygotic deletions or duplications in the large Duchenne muscular dystrophy DMD gene responsible for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are routinely identified using multiple ligation probe amplification and array-based comparative genomic hybridization. These methods only map deleted or duplicated exons, without providing the exact location of breakpoints. Commonly used methods for the detection of CNV breakpoints include long-range PCR and primer walking, their success being limited by the deletion size, GC content and presence of DNA repeats. Here, we present a strategy for detecting the breakpoints of medium and large CNVs regardless of their size. The hemizygous deletion of exons 45-50 in the DMD gene and the large autosomal heterozygous PARK2 deletion were used to demonstrate the workflow that relies on real-time quantitative PCR to narrow down the deletion region and Sanger sequencing for breakpoint confirmation. The strategy is fast, reliable and cost-efficient, making it amenable to widespread use in genetic laboratories.

  13. Fast detection of deletion breakpoints using quantitative PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abildinova, Gulshara; Abdrakhmanova, Zhanara; Tuchinsky, Helena; Nesher, Elimelech; Pinhasov, Albert; Raskin, Leon

    2016-06-16

    The routine detection of large and medium copy number variants (CNVs) is well established. Hemizygotic deletions or duplications in the large Duchenne muscular dystrophy DMD gene responsible for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are routinely identified using multiple ligation probe amplification and array-based comparative genomic hybridization. These methods only map deleted or duplicated exons, without providing the exact location of breakpoints. Commonly used methods for the detection of CNV breakpoints include long-range PCR and primer walking, their success being limited by the deletion size, GC content and presence of DNA repeats. Here, we present a strategy for detecting the breakpoints of medium and large CNVs regardless of their size. The hemizygous deletion of exons 45-50 in the DMD gene and the large autosomal heterozygous PARK2 deletion were used to demonstrate the workflow that relies on real-time quantitative PCR to narrow down the deletion region and Sanger sequencing for breakpoint confirmation. The strategy is fast, reliable and cost-efficient, making it amenable to widespread use in genetic laboratories. PMID:27333265

  14. Exon Deletions of Parkin Gene in Patients with Parkinson Disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王涛; 梁直厚; 孙圣刚; 曹学兵; 彭海; 刘红进; 童萼塘

    2004-01-01

    Summary: Mutations in the parkin gene have recently been identified in familial and isolated patients with early-onset Parkinson disease (PD) and that subregions between exon 2 and 4 of the parkin gene are hot spots of deletive mutations. To study the distribution of deletions in the parkin gene among variant subset patients with PD in China, and to explore the role of parkin gene in the pathogenesis of PD, 63 patients were divided into early onset and later onset groups. Exons 1-12 were amplified by PCR, templated by the genomic DNA of patients, and then the deletion distribution detected by agarose electrophoresis. Four patients were found to be carrier of exon deletions in 63 patients with PD. The location of the deletion was on exon 2 (1 case), exon 3 (2 cases) and exon 4 (1 case). All patients were belong to the group of early onset PD. The results showed that parkin gene deletion on exon 2, exon 3 and exon 4 found in Chinese population contributes partly to early onset PD.

  15. Erosion products in disruption simulation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safronov, V.; Arkhipov, N.; Bakhtin, V.; Barsuk, V.; Kurkin, S.; Mironova, E.; Toporkov, D.; Vasenin, S.; Zhitlukhin, A. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research, Troisk, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Arkhipov, I. [Inst. of Physical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation); Werle, H.; Wuerz, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    Erosion of divertor materials under tokamak disruption event presents a serious problem of ITER technology. Erosion restricts the divertor lifetime and leads to production of redeposited layers of the material retaining large amount of tritium, which is a major safety issue for future fusion reactor. Since ITER disruptive heatloads are not achievable in existing tokamaks, material erosion is studied in special simulation experiments. Till now the simulation experiments have focused mainly on investigation of shielding effect and measurement of erosion rate. In the present work the properties of eroded and redeposited graphite are studied under condition typical for hard ITER disruption. (author)

  16. Disruptive School Peers and Student Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jannie H. G.; Krægpøth, Morten Visby; Skyt Nielsen, Helena;

    This paper estimates how peers’ achievement gains are affected by the presence of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children in the school-cohort. We exploit that some children move between schools and thus generate variation in peer composition in the receiving schoolcohort. We...... identify three groups of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children from detailed Danish register data: children with divorced parents, children with parents convicted of crime, and children with a psychiatric diagnosis. We find that adding potentially disruptive children lowers the academic...... achievement of peers by about 1.5-2 percent of a standard deviation....

  17. Disruptive School Peers and Student Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jannie H. Grøne; Krægpøth, Morten; Nielsen, Helena Skyt;

    This paper estimates how peers’ achievement gains are affected by the presence of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children in the school-cohort. We exploit that some children move between schools and thus generate variation in peer composition in the receiving school-cohort. We...... identify three groups of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children from detailed Danish register data: children with divorced parents, children with parents convicted of crime, and children with a psychiatric diagnosis. We find that adding potentially disruptive children lowers the academic...... achievement of peers by about 1.7-2.3 percent of a standard deviation....

  18. Disruptive School Peers and Student Outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Jannie H. G.; Krægpøth, Morten; Nielsen, Helena Skyt;

    2015-01-01

    This paper estimates how peers’ achievement gains are affected by the presence of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children in the school-cohort. We exploit that some children move between schools and thus generate variation in peer composition in the receiving school-cohort. We...... identify three groups of potentially disruptive and emotionally sensitive children from detailed Danish register data: children with divorced parents, children with parents convicted of crime, and children with a psychiatric diagnosis. We find that adding potentially disruptive children lowers the academic...... achievement of peers by about 1.7–2.3% of a standard deviation....

  19. OF SYSTEMS THAT HAVE DISRUPTABLE CONSTRAINS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernov Yuriy Tikhonovich

    2012-07-01

    Formulas of equivalent static loads, with the help of which the systems are analyzed when constraints are disrupted, are generated. No inertial force is to be derived to obtain equivalent static loads. This is important in view of their application in dynamic analyses . Analysis of the static system in the event of disrupted constraints is based on the equations derived by the authors. The result of the analysis represents an inverse linear relation of static loading and relative stiffness of the system with disrupted constraints. This means that the lower the stiffness of the system, the higher the static loading.

  20. Disruption Management in Passenger Railway Transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Julie Jespersen; Potthoff, Daniel; Clausen, Jens;

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with disruption management in passenger railway transportation. In the disruption management process, many actors belonging to different organizations play a role. In this paper we therefore describe the process itself and the roles of the different actors. Furthermore, we discuss...... the three main subproblems in railway disruption management: timetable adjustment, and rolling stock and crew re-scheduling. Next to a general description of these problems, we give an overview of the existing literature and we present some details of the specific situations at DSB S-tog and NS...

  1. DISRUPTIVE BEHAVIOUR AMONGST DOCTORS, MYTH OR REALITY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avtar Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Disruptive behavior in a medical setting is defined as objectionable or offensive interpersonal behavior that leads to disruption of professional activities in the workplace. 1 It has been observed that majority of doctors do not show disruptive behavior in their day today conduct and only few doctors are identified for their disruptive behavior . Special commi ttee on professional conduct and ethics defines disruptive behavior in physicians as aberrant behavior manifested through personal interaction with physicians , hospital personnel , health care professionals , patients , family members or others which interferes with patient care or could reasonably be expected to interfere with the process of delivering quality care. 2 Common forms of disruptive behaviors generally seen amongst young doctors are use of abusive language , yelling or shouting at patients , colleagues and subordinate staff , showing in disciplined behavior and at times indulging in physical abuse. 3 - 4 STUDY DESIGN : Study was conducted at a tertiary care hospital where 614 health care professionals participated which included 108 doctors 432 nurs ing staff and 74 paramedical staff METHOD : Data collection was done by semi structured pretested questionnaire and was entered in Microsoft Excel and analyzed for frequency and percentages . RESULTS : 64 % doctor , 66% nursing staff and 50% of the paramedicals answered that they have seen doctors showing disruptive behavior at one time or the other . Not all the doctors show disruptive behavior but this type of aberrant behavior is seen mainly in2 - 3 percent of doctors only. While answering to the que stion as to the type of disruptive behavior , 57% health care professionals reported that commonest form of disruptive behavior noticed by them amongst doctors was yelling or shouting on junior staff , patients and colleagues . 47% answered that doctors with disruptive behavior do not follow laid down orders or

  2. Partial deletion of the sulfate transporter SLC13A1 is associated with an osteochondrodysplasia in the Miniature Poodle breed.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W Neff

    Full Text Available A crippling dwarfism was first described in the Miniature Poodle in Great Britain in 1956. Here, we resolve the genetic basis of this recessively inherited disorder. A case-control analysis (8:8 of genotype data from 173 k SNPs revealed a single associated locus on CFA14 (P(raw <10(-8. All affected dogs were homozygous for an ancestral haplotype consistent with a founder effect and an identical-by-descent mutation. Systematic failure of nine, nearly contiguous SNPs, was observed solely in affected dogs, suggesting a deletion was the causal mutation. A 130-kb deletion was confirmed both by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH analysis and by cloning the physical breakpoints. The mutation was perfectly associated in all cases and obligate heterozygotes. The deletion ablated all but the first exon of SLC13A1, a sodium/sulfate symporter responsible for regulating serum levels of inorganic sulfate. Our results corroborate earlier findings from an Slc13a1 mouse knockout, which resulted in hyposulfatemia and syndromic defects. Interestingly, the metabolic disorder in Miniature Poodles appears to share more clinical signs with a spectrum of human disorders caused by SLC26A2 than with the mouse Slc13a1 model. SLC26A2 is the primary sodium-independent sulfate transporter in cartilage and bone and is important for the sulfation of proteoglycans such as aggregan. We propose that disruption of SLC13A1 in the dog similarly causes undersulfation of proteoglycans in the extracellular matrix (ECM, which impacts the conversion of cartilage to bone. A co-dominant DNA test of the deletion was developed to enable breeders to avoid producing affected dogs and to selectively eliminate the mutation from the gene pool.

  3. Disruptions, Disruptivity, and Safer Operating Windows in the High-β Spherical Torus NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhardt, S P; Diallo, A; Gates, D; LeBlanc, B P; Menard, J E; Mueller, D; Sabbagh, S A; Soukhanovskii, V; Tritz, K

    2012-09-27

    This paper discusses disruption rates, disruption causes, and disruptivity statistics in the high- βN National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, et al. Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. While the overall disruption rate is rather high, configurations with high βN , moderate q*, strong boundary shaping, sufficient rotation, and broad pressure and current profiles are found to have the lowest disruptivity; active n=1 control further reduces the disruptivity. The disruptivity increases rapidly for q*<2.7, which is substantially above the ideal MHD current limit. In quiescent conditions, qmin >1.25 is generally acceptable for avoiding the onset of core rotating n=1 kink/tearing modes; when EPM and ELM disturbances are present, the required qmin for avoiding those modes is raised to ~1.5. The current ramp and early flat-top phase of the discharges are prone to n=1 core rotating modes locking to the wall, leading to a disruption. Small changes to the discharge fueling during this phase can often mitigate the rotation damping associated with these modes and eliminate the disruption. The largest stored energy disruptions are those that occur at high current when a plasma current rampdown is initiated incorrectly.

  4. Thyroid disrupting chemicals: Mechanisms and mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental contaminants are known to act as thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs). Broadly defined, TDCs are xenobiotics that alter the structure or function of the thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormone (TH) homeostasis, or change circulating o...

  5. Glaciological parameters of disruptive event analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following disruptive events caused by ice sheets are considered: continental glaciation, erosion, loading and subsidence, deep ground water recharge, flood erosion, isostatic rebound rates, melting, and periodicity of ice ages

  6. Double tidal disruptions in galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Mandel, Ilya

    2015-01-01

    A star on a nearly radial trajectory approaching a massive black hole (MBH) gets tidally disrupted if it comes sufficiently close to the MBH. Here we explore what happens to binary stars whose centers of mass approach the MBH on nearly radial orbits. The interaction with the MBH often leads to both stars being disrupted in sequence. We argue that such events could produce light curves that are substantially different from those of the single disruptions, with possible features such as two local maxima. Tidal forces from the MBH can also lead the binary components to collide; these merger products can form highly magnetized stars, whose subsequent tidal disruption may enable prompt jet formation.

  7. Passive runaway electron suppression in tokamak disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Runaway electrons created in disruptions pose a serious problem for tokamaks with large current. It would be desirable to have a runaway electron suppression method which is passive, i.e., a method that does not rely on an uncertain disruption prediction system. One option is to let the large electric field inherent in the disruption drive helical currents in the wall. This would create ergodic regions in the plasma and increase the runaway losses. Whether these regions appear at a suitable time and place to affect the formation of the runaway beam depends on disruption parameters, such as electron temperature and density. We find that it is difficult to ergodize the central plasma before a beam of runaway current has formed. However, the ergodic outer region will make the Ohmic current profile contract, which can lead to instabilities that yield large runaway electron losses

  8. Shell Galaxies, Dynamical Friction, and Dwarf Disruption

    CERN Document Server

    Ebrova, Ivana; Canalizo, Gabriela; Bennert, Nicola; Jilkova, Lucie

    2009-01-01

    Using N-body simulations of shell galaxies created in nearly radial minor mergers, we investigate the error of collision dating, resulting from the neglect of dynamical friction and of gradual disruption of the cannibalized dwarf.

  9. Towards a Framework of Digital Platform Disruption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazan, Erol; Tan, Chee-Wee; Lim, Eric T. K.

    2014-01-01

    Digital platforms are disruptive information technology (IT) artifacts that erode conventional business logic associated with traditional market structures. This paper presents a framework for examining the disruptive potential of digital platforms whereby we postulate that the strategic interplay...... of governance regimes and platform layers is deterministic of whether disruptive derivatives are permitted to flourish. This framework has been employed in a comparative case study between centralized (i.e., PayPal) and decentralized (i.e., Coinkite) digital payment platforms to illustrate its applicability...... and yield propositions on the nature and impact of digital platform disruptions. Preliminary findings indicate that centralized digital platforms attempt to create unique configurals to obtain monopolistic power by tightly coupling platform layers, which are difficult to replicate. Conversely, decentralized...

  10. Disruptive Innovation in Chinese and Indian Businesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    markets, has made these emerging economies fertile ground for developing and applying disruptive innovations. A novel mix of key attributes distinctive from those of established technologies or business models, disruptive innovations are typically inferior, yet affordable and "good-enough" products...... or services, which originate in lower-end market segments, but later move up to compete with those provided by incumbent firms. This book sheds new light on disruptive innovations both from and for the bottom of the pyramid in China and India, from the point of view of local entrepreneurs and international...... firms seeking to operate their businesses there. It covers both the theoretical and practical implications of disruptive innovation using conceptual frameworks alongside detailed case studies, whilst also providing a comparison of conditions and strategic options in India and China. Further, unlike...

  11. Report on Criteria for Endocrine Disrupters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbech, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the Danish Centre on Endocrine Disrupters as a project contracted by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency. The Danish Centre on Endocrine Disrupters is an interdisciplinary scientific network without walls. The main purpose of the Centre is to build and gather...... new knowledge on endocrine disrupters with the focus on providing information requested for the preventive work of the regulatory authorities. The Centre is financed by the Ministry of the Environment and the scientific work programme is followed by an international scientific advisory board....... The overall aim of this project is to provide a science based proposal for criteria for endocrine disrupters. The terms of reference for the project specify elements to be included and/or addressed when developing the criteria (Annex 1). Also, several international reports and papers dealing with assessment...

  12. 75 FR 30306 - Responding To Disruptive Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    ... performance of official duties by Government employees.'' The sole enforcement mechanism provided by paragraph... opposes the use of punishment in the management of disruptive patients. Instead, it reflects the view...

  13. The Relative Ineffectiveness of Criminal Network Disruption

    OpenAIRE

    Duijn, P.A.C.; Kashirin, V.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Researchers, policymakers and law enforcement agencies across the globe struggle to find effective strategies to control criminal networks. The effectiveness of disruption strategies is known to depend on both network topology and network resilience. However, as these criminal networks operate in secrecy, data-driven knowledge concerning the effectiveness of different criminal network disruption strategies is very limited. By combining computational modeling and social network analysis with u...

  14. Anastomotic disruption after large bowel resection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad U NasirKhan; Farshad Abir; Walter Longo; Robert Kozol

    2006-01-01

    Anastomotic disruption is a feared and serious complication of colon surgery. Decades of research have identified factors favoring successful healing of anastomoses as well as risk factors for anastomotic disruption. However, some factors, such as the role of mechanical bowel preparation, remain controversial.Despite proper caution and excellent surgical technique,some anastomotic leaks are inevitable. The rapid identification of anastomotic leaks and the timely treatment in these cases are paramount.

  15. BUSINESS MODEL PATTERNS FOR DISRUPTIVE TECHNOLOGIES

    OpenAIRE

    BENJAMIN AMSHOFF; CHRISTIAN DÜLME; JULIAN ECHTERFELD; JÜRGEN GAUSEMEIER

    2015-01-01

    Companies nowadays face a myriad of business opportunities as a direct consequence of manifold disruptive technology developments. As a basic characteristic, disruptive technologies lead to a severe shift in value-creation networks giving rise to new market segments. One of the key challenges is to anticipate the business logics within these nascent and formerly unknown markets. Business model patterns promise to tackle this challenge. They can be interpreted as proven business model elements...

  16. On asymmetric collisions with large disruption parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collisions between a weak electron bunch and a strong positron bunch are studied within a flat model. Electrons are tracked through the transverse space charge field of the positron bunch, and it is shown that positrons in a storage ring may remain stable after asymmetric collisions with a weak electron bunch in spite of large values of the electron disruption parameter. The plasma oscillations that affect collisions with large disruption parameters may be suppressed by properly matching the electrons. 8 refs., 5 figs

  17. Sleep and circadian rhythm disruption in schizophrenia†

    OpenAIRE

    Wulff, Katharina; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Middleton, Benita; Foster, Russell G.; Joyce, Eileen M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Sleep disturbances comparable with insomnia occur in up to 80% of people with schizophrenia, but very little is known about the contribution of circadian coordination to these prevalent disruptions. Aims A systematic exploration of circadian time patterns in individuals with schizophrenia with recurrent sleep disruption. Method We examined the relationship between sleep-wake activity, recorded actigraphically over 6 weeks, along with ambient light exposure and simultaneous circadia...

  18. Airline Disruption Management - Perspectives, Experiences and Outlook

    OpenAIRE

    Kohl, Niklas; Larsen, Allan; Larsen, Jesper; Ross, Alex; Tiourine, Sergey

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade, airlines have become more concerned with developing an optimal flight schedule, with very little slack left to accommodate for any form of variation from the optimal solution. During operation the planned schedules often have to be revised due to disruptions caused by for example severe weather, technical problems and crew sickness. Thus, the field of Airline Disruption Management has emerged within the past few years. The increased focus on cutting cost at the major air...

  19. Anastomotic disruption after large bowel resection

    OpenAIRE

    NasirKhan, Mohammad U; Abir, Farshad; Longo, Walter; Kozol, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Anastomotic disruption is a feared and serious complication of colon surgery. Decades of research have identified factors favoring successful healing of anastomoses as well as risk factors for anastomotic disruption. However, some factors, such as the role of mechanical bowel preparation, remain controversial. Despite proper caution and excellent surgical technique, some anastomotic leaks are inevitable. The rapid identification of anastomotic leaks and the timely treatment in these cases are...

  20. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING EFFECTS OF BUTYLPARABEN: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Pallabi Goswami; J.C Kalita

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, there has been an increasing concern in the field of endocrine disruption over the presence of various endocrine disrupting chemicals in Pharmaceuticals and Personal care products (PPCPs). This concern has also been as PPCPs are most widely used and had led to introduction of thousands of new and complex chemicals that enter the environment in large quantities. The effect of the chemicals has not only been restricted to human who are exposed directly to the chemicals or the a...

  1. Disruption Management in Passenger Railway Transportation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen-Groth, Julie; Potthoff, Daniel; Clausen, Jens;

    This paper deals with disruption management in passenger railway transportation. In the disruption management process, many actors belonging to different organizations play a role. In this paper we therefore describe the process itself and the roles of the different actors. Furthermore, we discus...... for related problems in the airline world are discussed as well. Finally, we address the integration of the re-scheduling processes of the timetable, and the resources rolling stock and crew....

  2. Similarity of DMD gene deletion and duplication in the Chinese patients compared to global populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Ming

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA deletion and duplication were determined as the major mutation underlying Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD. Method Applying multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA, we have analyzed 179 unrelated DMD/BMD subjects from northern China. Results Seventy-three percent of the subjects were found having a deletion (66.25% or duplication (6.25%. Exons 51–52 were detected as the most common fragment deleted in single-exon deletion, and the region of exons 45–50 was the most common exons deleted in multi-exon deletions. About 90% of DMD/BMD cases carry a small size deletion that involves 10 exons or less, 26.67% of which carry a single-exon deletion. Most of the smaller deletions resulted in an out-of-frame mutation. The most common exons deleted were determined to be between exon 48 and exon 52, with exon 50 was the model allele. Verifying single-exon deletion, one sample with a deletion of exon 53 that was initially observed from MLPA showed that there was a single base deletion that abolished the ligation site in MLPA. Confirmation of single-exon deletion is recommended to exclude single base deletion or mutation at the MLPA ligation site. Conclusion The frequency of deletion and duplication in northern China is similar to global ethnic populations.

  3. Mechanistic evaluation of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taxvig, Camilla

    BACKGROUND: This PhD project is part of the research area concerning effects of endocrine disrupters at the National Food Institute at DTU in Denmark. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have proved to be important for improper development of the male reproductive organs and subsequent for the ...... metabolising system using liver S9 mixtures or hepatic rat microsomes could be a convenient method for the incorporation of metabolic aspects into in vitro testing for endocrine disrupting effects.......BACKGROUND: This PhD project is part of the research area concerning effects of endocrine disrupters at the National Food Institute at DTU in Denmark. Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have proved to be important for improper development of the male reproductive organs and subsequent......, to be able to detect effects and predict mixture effects. In addition, a new hypothesis have emerge concerning a potential role of exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals, and the development of obesity and obesity related diseases. AIM: This PhD project aimed to gain more information regarding...

  4. Airline Disruption Management - Perspectives, Experiences and Outlook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohl, Niklas; Larsen, Allan; Larsen, Jesper;

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade, airlines have become more concerned with developing an optimal flight schedule, with very little slack left to accommodate for any form of variation from the optimal solution. During operation the planned schedules often have to be revised due to disruptions caused by for ex......Over the past decade, airlines have become more concerned with developing an optimal flight schedule, with very little slack left to accommodate for any form of variation from the optimal solution. During operation the planned schedules often have to be revised due to disruptions caused...... by for example severe weather, technical problems and crew sickness. Thus, the field of Airline Disruption Management has emerged within the past few years. The increased focus on cutting cost at the major airlines has intensified the interest in the development of new and cost e cient methods to handle airline...... disruptions. The purpose of this paper is twofold. In the first part it o ers an introduction to airline disruption management, provides the readers with a description of the planning processes and delivers a detailed overview of the numerous aspects of airline disruption management. In the second part we...

  5. Airline Disruption Management - Perspectives, Experiences and Outlook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohl, Niklas; Larsen, Allan; Larsen, Jesper;

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade, airlines have become more concerned with developing an optimal flight schedule, with very little slack left to accommodate for any form of variation from the optimal solution. During operation the planned schedules often have to be revised due to disruptions caused by for ex......Over the past decade, airlines have become more concerned with developing an optimal flight schedule, with very little slack left to accommodate for any form of variation from the optimal solution. During operation the planned schedules often have to be revised due to disruptions caused...... by for example severe weather, technical problems and crew sickness. Thus, the field of Airline Disruption Management has emerged within the past few years. The increased focus on cutting cost at the major airlines has intensified the interest in the development of new and cost efficient methods to handle...... airline disruptions. The purpose of this paper is twofold. In the first part it offers an introduction to airline disruption management provides the readers with a description of the planning processes and delivers a detailed overview of the numerous aspects of airline disruption management. In the second...

  6. Functional Genomics Using the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Deletion Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nislow, Corey; Wong, Lai Hong; Lee, Amy Huei-Yi; Giaever, Guri

    2016-01-01

    Constructed by a consortium of 16 laboratories, the Saccharomyces genome-wide deletion collections have, for the past decade, provided a powerful, rapid, and inexpensive approach for functional profiling of the yeast genome. Loss-of-function deletion mutants were systematically created using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based gene deletion strategy to generate a start-to-stop codon replacement of each open reading frame by homologous recombination. Each strain carries two molecular barcodes that serve as unique strain identifiers, enabling their growth to be analyzed in parallel and the fitness contribution of each gene to be quantitatively assessed by hybridization to high-density oligonucleotide arrays or through the use of next-generation sequencing technologies. Functional profiling of the deletion collections, using either strain-by-strain or parallel assays, provides an unbiased approach to systematically survey the yeast genome. The Saccharomyces yeast deletion collections have proved immensely powerful in contributing to the understanding of gene function, including functional relationships between genes and genetic pathways in response to diverse genetic and environmental perturbations. PMID:27587784

  7. Functional Profiling Using the Saccharomyces Genome Deletion Project Collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nislow, Corey; Wong, Lai Hong; Lee, Amy Huei-Yi; Giaever, Guri

    2016-01-01

    The ability to measure and quantify the fitness of an entire organism requires considerably more complex approaches than simply using traditional "omic" methods that examine, for example, the abundance of RNA transcripts, proteins, or metabolites. The yeast deletion collections represent the only systematic, comprehensive set of null alleles for any organism in which such fitness measurements can be assayed. Generated by the Saccharomyces Genome Deletion Project, these collections allow the systematic and parallel analysis of gene functions using any measurable phenotype. The unique 20-bp molecular barcodes engineered into the genome of each deletion strain facilitate the massively parallel analysis of individual fitness. Here, we present functional genomic protocols for use with the yeast deletion collections. We describe how to maintain, propagate, and store the deletion collections and how to perform growth fitness assays on single and parallel screening platforms. Phenotypic fitness analyses of the yeast mutants, described in brief here, provide important insights into biological functions, mechanisms of drug action, and response to environmental stresses. It is important to bear in mind that the specific assays described in this protocol represent some of the many ways in which these collections can be assayed, and in this description particular attention is paid to maximizing throughput using growth as the phenotypic measure. PMID:27587776

  8. Deletion 2q37 syndrome: Cognitive-behavioral trajectories and autistic features related to breakpoint and deletion size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisch, Gene S; Falk, Rena E; Carey, John C; Imitola, Jaime; Sederberg, Maria; Caravalho, Karen S; South, Sarah

    2016-09-01

    Subtelomeric deletions have been reported in ∼2.5% of individuals with developmental disabilities. Subtelomeric deletion 2q37 has been detected in many individuals diagnosed with intellectual disabilities (ID) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Previously, genotype-phenotype correspondences were examined for their relationship to breakpoints 37.1, 37.2, or 37.3. Our purpose was to ascertain whether there were phenotypic differences at these breakpoints, elucidate the cognitive-behavioral phenotype in del2q37, and examine the genotype-phenotype association in the deletion with respect to cognitive-behavioral profiles and ASD. We administered a comprehensive cognitive-behavioral battery to nine children diagnosed with del 2q37, ages 3.9-17.75 years. ID for five tested with the Stanford-Binet (4th Edition) (SBFE) ranged from severe to mild [IQ Range: 36-59]. Adaptive behavior scores from the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS) were much below adequate levels (DQ Range: floor value ["19"] to 55). Autism scores from the Child Autism Rating Scale (CARS) ranged from 22 [non-autistic] to 56 [extremely autistic]; 5/8 [63%] children received scores on the autism spectrum. Participants with the largest deletions, 10.1 and 9.5 Mb, attained the highest IQ and DQ scores while those with the smallest deletions, 7.9 and 6.6 Mb, made the lowest IQ and DQ scores. No association between deletion breakpoint and phenotype were found. Assessment of the various deleted regions suggested histone deacetylase 4 gene (HDAC4) was a likely candidate gene for ASD in our sample. However, two earlier reports found no association between HDAC4 haploinsufficiency and ASD. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Characterization of cryptic rearrangements, deletion, complex variants of PML, RARA in acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratibha Kadam Amare

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL is characterized by a reciprocal translocation t(15;17(q22;q21 leading to the disruption of Promyelocytic leukemia (PML and Retionic Acid Receptor Alpha (RARA followed by reciprocal PML-RARA fusion in 90% of the cases. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH has overcome the hurdles of unavailability of abnormal and/or lack of metaphase cells, and detection of cryptic, submicroscopic rearrangements. In the present study, besides diagnostic approach we sought to analyze these cases for identification and characterization of cryptic rearrangements, deletion variants and unknown RARA translocation variants by application of D-FISH and RARA break-apart probe strategy on interphase and metaphase cells in a large series of 200 cases of APL. Forty cases (20% had atypical PML-RARA and/or RARA variants. D-FISH with PML/RARA probe helped identification of RARA insertion to PML. By application of D-FISH on metaphase cells, we documented that translocation of 15 to 17 leads to 17q deletion which results in loss of reciprocal fusion and/or residual RARA on der(17. Among the complex variants of t(15;17, PML-RARA fusion followed by residual RARA insertion closed to PML-RARA on der(15 was unique and unusual. FISH with break-apart RARA probe on metaphase cells was found to be a very efficient strategy to detect unknown RARA variant translocations like t(11;17(q23;q21, t(11;17(q13;q21 and t(2;17(p21;q21. These findings proved that D-FISH and break-apart probe strategy has potential to detect primary as well as secondary additional aberrations of PML, RARA and other additional loci. The long-term clinical follow-up is essential to evaluate the clinical importance of these findings.

  10. Disruption of PHO13 improves ethanol production via the xylose isomerase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamba, Takahiro; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-03-01

    Xylose is the second most abundant sugar in lignocellulosic materials and can be converted to ethanol by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains expressing heterologous genes involved in xylose assimilation pathways. Recent research demonstrated that disruption of the alkaline phosphatase gene, PHO13, enhances ethanol production from xylose by a strain expressing the xylose reductase (XR) and xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH) genes; however, the yield of ethanol is poor. In this study, PHO13 was disrupted in a recombinant strain harboring multiple copies of the xylose isomerase (XI) gene derived from Orpinomyces sp., coupled with overexpression of the endogenous xylulokinase (XK) gene and disruption of GRE3, which encodes aldose reductase. The resulting YΔGP/XK/XI strain consumed 2.08 g/L/h of xylose and produced 0.88 g/L/h of volumetric ethanol, for an 86.8 % theoretical ethanol yield, and only YΔGP/XK/XI demonstrated increase in cell concentration. Transcriptome analysis indicated that expression of genes involved in the pentose phosphate pathway (GND1, SOL3, TAL1, RKI1, and TKL1) and TCA cycle and respiratory chain (NDE1, ACO1, ACO2, SDH2, IDH1, IDH2, ATP7, ATP19, SDH4, SDH3, CMC2, and ATP15) was upregulated in the YΔGP/XK/XI strain. And the expression levels of 125 cell cycle genes were changed by deletion of PHO13. PMID:26769491

  11. Mechanical algal disruption for efficient biodiesel extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehbiel, Joel David

    Biodiesel from algae provides several benefits over current biodiesel feedstocks, but the energy requirements of processing algae into a useable fuel are currently so high as to be prohibitive. One route to improving this is via disruption of the cells prior to lipid extraction, which can significantly increase energy recovery. Unfortunately, several obvious disruption techniques require more energy than can be gained. This dissertation examines the use of microbubbles to improve mechanical disruption of algal cells using experimental, theoretical, and computational methods. New laboratory experiments show that effective ultrasonic disruption of algae is achieved by adding microbubbles to an algal solution. The configuration studied flows the solution through a tube and insonifies a small section with a high-pressure ultrasound wave. Previous biomedical research has shown effective cell membrane damage on animal cells with similar methods, but the present research is the first to extend such study to algal cells. Results indicate that disruption increases with peak negative pressure between 1.90 and 3.07 MPa and with microbubble concentration up to 12.5 x 107 bubbles/ml. Energy estimates of this process suggest that it requires only one-fourth the currently most-efficient laboratory-scale disruption process. Estimates of the radius near each bubble that causes disruption (i.e. the disruption radius) suggest that it increases with peak negative pressure and is near 9--20 microm for all cases tested. It is anticipated that these procedures can be designed for better efficiency and efficacy, which will be facilitated by identifying the root mechanisms of the bubble-induced disruption. We therefore examine whether bubble expansion alone creates sufficient cell deformation for cell rupture. The spherically-symmetric Marmottant model for bubble dynamics allows estimation of the flow regime under experimental conditions. Bubble expansion is modeled as a point source of

  12. Reliable communication over non-binary insertion/deletion channels

    CERN Document Server

    Yazdani, Raman

    2012-01-01

    We consider the problem of reliable communication over non-binary insertion/deletion channels where symbols are randomly deleted from or inserted in the transmitted sequence and all symbols are corrupted by additive white Gaussian noise. To this end, we utilize the inherent redundancy achievable in non-binary symbol sets by first expanding the symbol set and then allocating part of the bits associated with each symbol to watermark symbols. The watermark sequence, known at the receiver, is then used by a forward-backward algorithm to provide soft information for an outer code which decodes the transmitted sequence. Through numerical results and discussions, we evaluate the performance of the proposed solution and show that it leads to significant system ability to detect and correct insertions/deletions. We also provide estimates of the maximum achievable information rates of the system, compare them with the available bounds, and construct practical codes capable of approaching these limits.

  13. A local-world node deleting evolving network model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu Yuying [Department of Mathematics, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Sun Jitao [Department of Mathematics, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)], E-mail: sunjt@sh163.net

    2008-06-16

    A new type network growth rule which comprises node addition with the concept of local-world connectivity and node deleting is studied. A series of theoretical analysis and numerical simulation to the LWD network are conducted in this Letter. Firstly, the degree distribution p(k) of this network changes no longer pure scale free but truncates by an exponential tail and the truncation in p(k) increases as p{sub a} decreases. Secondly, the connectivity is tighter, as the local-world size M increases. Thirdly, the average path length L increases and the clustering coefficient decreases as generally node deleting increases. Finally, trends up when the local-world size M increases, so as to k{sub max}. Hence, the expanding local-world can compensate the infection of the node deleting.

  14. Dissecting the phenotypes of Dravet syndrome by gene deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Moran; Han, Sung; Tai, Chao; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Hunker, Avery; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2015-08-01

    Neurological and psychiatric syndromes often have multiple disease traits, yet it is unknown how such multi-faceted deficits arise from single mutations. Haploinsufficiency of the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.1 causes Dravet syndrome, an intractable childhood-onset epilepsy with hyperactivity, cognitive deficit, autistic-like behaviours, and premature death. Deletion of Nav1.1 channels selectively impairs excitability of GABAergic interneurons. We studied mice having selective deletion of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons. In brain slices, these deletions cause increased threshold for action potential generation, impaired action potential firing in trains, and reduced amplification of postsynaptic potentials in those interneurons. Selective deletion of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons increases susceptibility to thermally-induced seizures, which are strikingly prolonged when Nav1.1 is deleted in both interneuron types. Mice with global haploinsufficiency of Nav1.1 display autistic-like behaviours, hyperactivity and cognitive impairment. Haploinsufficiency of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin-expressing interneurons causes autistic-like behaviours, but not hyperactivity, whereas haploinsufficiency in somatostatin-expressing interneurons causes hyperactivity without autistic-like behaviours. Heterozygous deletion in both interneuron types is required to impair long-term spatial memory in context-dependent fear conditioning, without affecting short-term spatial learning or memory. Thus, the multi-faceted phenotypes of Dravet syndrome can be genetically dissected, revealing synergy in causing epilepsy, premature death and deficits in long-term spatial memory, but interneuron-specific effects on hyperactivity and autistic-like behaviours. These results show that multiple disease traits can arise from similar functional deficits in specific interneuron types. PMID:26017580

  15. Ku80-Deleted Cells are Defective at Base Excision Repair

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Han; Marple, Teresa; Hasty, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Ku80 forms a heterodimer with Ku70, called Ku, that repairs DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via the nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway. As a consequence of deleting NHEJ, Ku80-mutant cells are hypersensitive to agents that cause DNA DSBs like ionizing radiation. Here we show that Ku80 deletion also decreased resistance to ROS and alkylating agents that typically cause base lesions and single-strand breaks (SSBs). This is unusual since base excision repair (BER), not NHEJ, typically repa...

  16. Binding numbers of fractional k-deleted graphs

    OpenAIRE

    KOTANI, Keiko

    2010-01-01

    Let k be an integer with $k \\ge 2$. We show that if G be a graph such that $|G| > 4k+1 -4\\sqrt {k-1}$ and $bind(G)> {(2k-1)(n-1) \\over k(n-2)},$ then G is a fractional k-deleted graph. We also show that in the case where k is even, if G be a graph such that $|G| > 4k+1 -4\\sqrt {k}$ and $bind(G)> {(2k-1)(n-1) \\over k(n-2)+1},$ then G is a fractional k-deleted graph.

  17. Functional analysis of hepatitis B virus pre-s deletion variants associated with hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chih-Ming

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Naturally occurring pre-S deletion mutants have been identified in hepatitis B carriers and shown to be associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. The phenotypes of these pre-S deletion genomes remain unclear, and they were investigated in this study. Methods The pre-S deletion genomes: (1 pre-S1 deletion, (2 deletion spanning pre-S1 and pre-S2, (3 pre-S2 N-terminal deletion, and (4 pre-S2 internal deletion were constructed and analyzed by transfection into Huh-7 cells. Results Functional analyses reveal that these mutants were divided into two groups: S promoter deletion and non-S promoter deletion variants. Compared with the wild-type genome, S promoter deletion variants led to an inverse ratio of pre-S1 mRNA and pre-S2/S mRNA, and intracellular accumulation of surface proteins. An interesting finding is that a small amount of L proteins was detected in the medium from S promoter deletion variant-transfected cells. Non-S promoter deletion variants conversely displayed a wild-type like mRNA and protein pattern. The secretion of surface proteins from non-S promoter deletion variants was inhibited less than from S promoter deletion variant. Immunofluorescence analysis showed mutant surface proteins colocalized with ER and exhibited an atypical distribution: granular staining pattern in the S-promoter deletion variants and perinuclear staining pattern in the non-S promoter deletion variants. Conclusion This study shows that these pre-S deletion genomes exhibit two different phenotypes in mRNA transcription, surface protein expression and secretion. This diversity seems to result from the deletion of S promoter rather than result from the deletion of pre-S1 or pre-S2.

  18. A Genome-Wide Transcription An alysis Reveals a Close Correlation of Promoter INDEL Polymorphism and Heterotic Gene Expression in Rice Hybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-Yong Zhang; Li-Geng Ma; Xing Wang Deng; Hang He; Liang-Bi Chen; Lei Li; Man-Zhong Liang; Xiang-Feng Wang; Xi-Gang Liu; Guang-Ming He; Run-Sheng Chen

    2008-01-01

    Heterosis,or hybrid vigor,refers to the phenomenon in which hybrid progeny of two inbred varieties exhibits enhanced growth or agronomic performance.Although a century-long history of research has generated several hypotheses regarding the genetic basis of heterosis,the molecular mechanisms underlying heterosis and heterotic gene expression remain elusive.Here,we report a genome-wide gene expression analysis of two heterotic crosses in rice,taking advantage of its fully sequenced genomes.Approximately 7-9%of the genes were differentially expressed in the seedling shoots from two sets of heterotic crosses,including many transcription factor genes,and exhibited multiple modes of gene action.Comparison of the putative promoter regions of the ortholog genes between inbred parents revealed extensive sequence variation,particularly smallinsertions/deletions(INDELs),many of which result in the formation/disruption of putative cis-regulatory elements.Together,these results suggest that a combinatoriaI interplay between expression of transcription factors and polymorphic promoter cis-regulatory elements in the hybrids is one plausible molecular mechanism underlying heterotic gene action and thus heterosis in rice.

  19. Disruptive Intelligence : How to gather Information to deal with disruptive innovations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriens, D.J.; Solberg Søilen, K.

    2014-01-01

    Disruptive innovations are innovations that have the capacity to transform a whole business into one with products that are more accessible and affordable (cf. Christensen et al. 2009). As Christensen et al. argue no business is immune to such disruptive innovations. If these authors are right, it m

  20. Mechanical algal disruption for efficient biodiesel extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krehbiel, Joel David

    Biodiesel from algae provides several benefits over current biodiesel feedstocks, but the energy requirements of processing algae into a useable fuel are currently so high as to be prohibitive. One route to improving this is via disruption of the cells prior to lipid extraction, which can significantly increase energy recovery. Unfortunately, several obvious disruption techniques require more energy than can be gained. This dissertation examines the use of microbubbles to improve mechanical disruption of algal cells using experimental, theoretical, and computational methods. New laboratory experiments show that effective ultrasonic disruption of algae is achieved by adding microbubbles to an algal solution. The configuration studied flows the solution through a tube and insonifies a small section with a high-pressure ultrasound wave. Previous biomedical research has shown effective cell membrane damage on animal cells with similar methods, but the present research is the first to extend such study to algal cells. Results indicate that disruption increases with peak negative pressure between 1.90 and 3.07 MPa and with microbubble concentration up to 12.5 x 107 bubbles/ml. Energy estimates of this process suggest that it requires only one-fourth the currently most-efficient laboratory-scale disruption process. Estimates of the radius near each bubble that causes disruption (i.e. the disruption radius) suggest that it increases with peak negative pressure and is near 9--20 microm for all cases tested. It is anticipated that these procedures can be designed for better efficiency and efficacy, which will be facilitated by identifying the root mechanisms of the bubble-induced disruption. We therefore examine whether bubble expansion alone creates sufficient cell deformation for cell rupture. The spherically-symmetric Marmottant model for bubble dynamics allows estimation of the flow regime under experimental conditions. Bubble expansion is modeled as a point source of

  1. Disc formation from stellar tidal disruptions

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnerot, Clément; Lodato, Giuseppe; Price, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    The potential of tidal disruption of stars to probe otherwise quiescent supermassive black holes cannot be exploited, if their dynamics is not fully understood. So far, the observational appearance of these events has been commonly derived from analytical extrapolations of the debris dynamical properties just after the stellar disruption. In this paper, we perform hydrodynamical simulations of stars in highly eccentric orbits, that follow the stellar debris after disruption and investigate their ultimate fate. We demonstrate that gas debris circularize on an orbital timescale because relativistic apsidal precession causes the stream to self-cross. The higher the eccentricity and/or the deeper the encounter, the faster is the circularization. If the internal energy deposited by shocks during stream self-interaction is readily radiated, the gas forms a narrow ring at the circularization radius. It will then proceed to accrete viscously at a super-Eddington rate, puffing up under radiation pressure. If instead c...

  2. Mermaid syndrome with amniotic band disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Managoli, Sanjeev; Chaturvedi, Pushpa; Vilhekar, Krishna Y; Iyenger, Janaki

    2003-01-01

    An association of Amniotic Band Disruption Sequence and Mermaid Syndrome in a newborn having multiple congenital anomalies is being reported. The newborn had aberrant string like tissues attached to the amputed fingers and toes. Adhesions of amniotic bands had disrupted the fetal parts especially anteriorly in the midline, causing multiple anomalies. Apart from these features of Amniotic Band Disruption Sequence, the newborn had complete fusion of the lower limbs by cutaneous tissue, a characteristic of Mermaid Syndrome (Sirenomelia). Associated malformations were anal stenosis, rectal atresia, small horseshoe kidney, hypoplastic urinary bladder and a bicomuate uterus. The single umbilical artery had a high origin, arising directly from the aorta just distal to the celiac axis, which is unique to sirenomelia. Theories put forward regarding the etiopathogenesis of both the conditions are discussed. PMID:12619964

  3. Disruption, beamstrahlung, and beamstrahlung pair creation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, P.

    1988-12-01

    The two major effects from the interaction of e/sup /minus//e/sup +/ beams---beamstrahlung and disruption---are reviewed, with emphasis on flat beam collisions. For the disruption effects we discuss the luminosity enhancement factor, the maximum and rms disruption angles, and the ''kink instability''. All the results are obtained from computer simulations, and scaling laws based on these are deduced whenever possible. For the beamstrahlung effects, we concentrate only on the final electron energy spectrum and the deflection angle associated with low energy particles. In addition to the generic studies on the beam-beam effects, we also list the relevant beam-beam parameters obtained from simulations on two sample designs: the TLC and the ILC. As an addendum, the newly discovered phenomenon of coherent beamstrahlung pair creation, together with the incoherent process, are discussed. 18 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) gene modification in transgenic animals: functional consequences of selected exon and regulatory region deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Shelley; Zhang, Limin; Marquez, Michael; de la Torre, Brian; Long, Jeffery M; Bucht, Goran; Taylor, Palmer

    2005-12-15

    AChE is an alternatively spliced gene. Exons 2, 3 and 4 are invariantly spliced, and this sequence is responsible for catalytic function. The 3' alternatively spliced exons, 5 and 6, are responsible for AChE disposition in tissue [J. Massoulie, The origin of the molecular diversity and functional anchoring of cholinesterases. Neurosignals 11 (3) (2002) 130-143; Y. Li, S. Camp, P. Taylor, Tissue-specific expression and alternative mRNA processing of the mammalian acetylcholinesterase gene. J. Biol. Chem. 268 (8) (1993) 5790-5797]. The splice to exon 5 produces the GPI anchored form of AChE found in the hematopoietic system, whereas the splice to exon 6 produces a sequence that binds to the structural subunits PRiMA and ColQ, producing AChE expression in brain and muscle. A third alternative RNA species is present that is not spliced at the 3' end; the intron 3' of exon 4 is used as coding sequence and produces the read-through, unanchored form of AChE. In order to further understand the role of alternative splicing in the expression of the AChE gene, we have used homologous recombination in stem cells to produce gene specific deletions in mice. Alternatively and together exon 5 and exon 6 were deleted. A cassette containing the neomycin gene flanked by loxP sites was used to replace the exon(s) of interest. Tissue analysis of mice with exon 5 deleted and the neomycin cassette retained showed very low levels of AChE expression, far less than would have been anticipated. Only the read-through species of the enzyme was produced; clearly the inclusion of the selection cassette disrupted splicing of exon 4 to exon 6. The selection cassette was then deleted in exon 5, exon 6 and exons 5 + 6 deleted mice by breeding to Ella-cre transgenic mice. AChE expression in serum, brain and muscle has been analyzed. Another AChE gene targeted mouse strain involving a region in the first intron, found to be critical for AChE expression in muscle cells [S. Camp, L. Zhang, M. Marquez, B

  5. Adipose-specific deletion of TFAM increases mitochondrial oxidation and protects mice against obesity and insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernochet, Cecile; Mourier, Arnaud; Bezy, Olivier;

    2012-01-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in adipose tissue, but the role for adipose tissue mitochondria in the development of these disorders is currently unknown. To understand the impact of adipose tissue mitochondria on whole-body metabolism, we have generated...... a mouse model with disruption of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) specifically in fat. F-TFKO adipose tissue exhibit decreased mtDNA copy number, altered levels of proteins of the electron transport chain, and perturbed mitochondrial function with decreased complex I activity and greater...... oxygen consumption and uncoupling. As a result, F-TFKO mice exhibit higher energy expenditure and are protected from age- and diet-induced obesity, insulin resistance, and hepatosteatosis, despite a greater food intake. Thus, TFAM deletion in the adipose tissue increases mitochondrial oxidation that has...

  6. Tidal disruption of stars by SMBHs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komossa, S.

    2016-06-01

    The tidal disruption and subsequent accretion of stars by supermassive black holes produces spectacular flares in the X-ray sky. First found with ROSAT, ongoing and upcoming sky surveys will find these events in the 1000s. In X-rays, tidal disruption events (TDEs) provide us with powerful new probes of accretion physics under extreme conditions, of the formation of disk winds, of relativistic effects near the SMBH, and of the presence of supermassive binary black holes. This talk reviews the status of observations, and discusses future prospects. XMM-Newton will continue to play an important role in identifying new events and carry out spectroscopic follow-ups.

  7. Abundance Anomalies In Tidal Disruption Events

    OpenAIRE

    Kochanek, C. S.

    2015-01-01

    The ~10% of tidal disruption events (TDEs) due to stars more massive than the Sun should show abundance anomalies due to stellar evolution in helium, carbon and nitrogen, but not oxygen. Helium is always enhanced, but only by up to ~25% on average because it becomes inaccessible once it is sequestered in the high density core as the star leaves the main sequence. However, portions of the debris associated with the disrupted core of a main sequence star can be enhanced in helium by factors of ...

  8. Manufacturing doubt about endocrine disrupter science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergman, Åke; Becher, Georg; Blumberg, Bruce;

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed response to the critique of "State of the Science of Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals 2012" (UNEP/WHO, 2013) by financial stakeholders, authored by Lamb et al. (2014). Lamb et al.'s claim that UNEP/WHO (2013) does not provide a balanced perspective on endocrine disruption......) report is not particularly erudite and that their critique is not intended to be convincing to the scientific community, but to confuse the scientific data. Consequently, it promotes misinterpretation of the UNEP/WHO (2013) report by non-specialists, bureaucrats, politicians and other decision makers...

  9. Engineering aspects of disruption current decay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engineering features associated with the configuration of a tokamak can affect the amount of energy that produces melting and damage to the limiters or internal wall surfaces as the result of a major disruption. During the current decay period of a major thermal disruption, the energy that can damage a wall or limiter comes from the external magnetic field. By providing a good conducting torus near the plasma and increasing the plasma circuit resistance, this magnetic energy (transferred by way of the plasma circuit) can be minimized. This report addresses engineering design features to reduce the energy deposited on the inner torus surface that produces melting of the structures

  10. Disruptive Innovation by Emerging Multinational Latecomers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Peter Ping

    on disruptive innovation (DI) and the bottom of the pyramid (BOP) provides a great opportunity to shed light on the key issue. To take advantage of this “missed” opportunity, I integrate the two reframed constructs of DI and BOP and also develop a typology of four ideal-typical innovations toward a theory...... of latecomer innovation as a special DI by EMNE at BOP to provide insights into the mechanisms underlying the trajectories of catching up and leapfrogging. Built upon latecomer innovation, EMNEs at BOP can emerge as the most disruptive challengers to the MNE incumbents at TOP. The implications of reframed...

  11. 77 FR 22288 - Procurement List; Additions and Deletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-13

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 2/17/2012 (77 FR 9631), the Committee for Purchase From People Who Are..., Office of Acquisitions, Alexandria, VA. Deletions On 2/17/2012 (77 FR 9631), the Committee for Purchase... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office COMMITTEE FOR PURCHASE...

  12. Behavioral Phenotype in the 9q Subtelomeric Deletion Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, W.M.A.; Kleefstra, T.; Egger, J.I.M.

    2010-01-01

    The 9q Subtelomeric Deletion Syndrome (9qSTDS) is clinically characterized by mental retardation, childhood hypotonia, and facial dysmorphisms. Haploinsufficiency of the EHMT1 gene has been demonstrated to be responsible for its core phenotype. In a significant number of patients behavioral abnormal

  13. Distinct effects of tafazzin deletion in differentiated and undifferentiated mitochondria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Acehan; Z. Khuchua; R.H. Houtkooper; A. Malhotra; J. Kaufman; F.M. Vaz; M. Ren; H.A. Rockman; D.L. Stokes; M. Schlame

    2009-01-01

    Tafazzin is a conserved mitochondrial protein that is required to maintain normal content and composition of cardiolipin. We used electron tomography to investigate the effect of tafazzin deletion on mitochondrial structure and found that cellular differentiation plays a crucial role in the manifest

  14. Frequency of heterozygous TET2 deletions in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Tripodi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Joseph Tripodi1, Ronald Hoffman1, Vesna Najfeld2, Rona Weinberg31The Myeloproliferative Disorders Program, Tisch Cancer Institute, Department of Medicine and 2Department of Medicine and Pathology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, 3The Myeloproliferative Disorders Program, Cellular Therapy Laboratory, The New York Blood Center, New York, NY, USAAbstract: The Philadelphia chromosome (Ph-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs, including polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and primary myelofibrosis, are a group of clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders with overlapping clinical and cytogenetic features and a variable tendency to evolve into acute leukemia. These diseases not only share overlapping chromosomal abnormalities but also a number of acquired somatic mutations. Recently, mutations in a putative tumor suppressor gene, ten-eleven translocation 2 (TET2 on chromosome 4q24 have been identified in 12% of patients with MPN. Additionally 4q24 chromosomal rearrangements in MPN, including TET2 deletions, have also been observed using conventional cytogenetics. The goal of this study was to investigate the frequency of genomic TET2 rearrangements in MPN using fluorescence in situ hybridization as a more sensitive method for screening and identifying genomic deletions. Among 146 MPN patients, we identified two patients (1.4% who showed a common 4q24 deletion, including TET2. Our observations also indicated that the frequency of TET2 deletion is increased in patients with an abnormal karyotype (5%.Keywords: TET2, myeloproliferative neoplasms, fluorescence in situ hybridization, cytogenetics

  15. Efficient Generation of Unmarked Deletions in Legionella pneumophila▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Bryan, Andrew; Harada, Kaoru; Michele S Swanson

    2011-01-01

    Unmarked gene deletions facilitate studies of Legionella pneumophila multicomponent processes, such as motility and exonuclease activity. For this purpose, FRT-flanked alleles constructed in Escherichia coli using λ-Red recombinase were transferred to L. pneumophila by natural transformation. Resistance cassettes were then efficiently excised using the Flp site-specific recombinase encoded on a plasmid that is readily lost.

  16. 76 FR 14942 - Procurement List; Additions and Deletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ..., XRAW7M8 USPFO Activity IA ARNG, Johnston, IA. ] Deletions On 1/21/2011 (76 FR 3879-3880), the Committee... constructed and will be under the control and military management of the 2D Engineer Battalion when it... replace absent military food service personnel. The Contracting Officer stated that the military...

  17. Expanding Our Understanding of mtDNA Deletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Martin; Vincent, Amy E; Turnbull, Doug M

    2016-07-12

    Clonal expansion of mtDNA deletions compromises mitochondrial function in human disease and aging, but how deleterious mtDNA genomes propagate has remained unclear. In this issue (Gitschlag et al., 2016) and in a recent Nature publication, C. elegans studies implicate the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)) and offer mechanistic insights into this process. PMID:27411002

  18. 76 FR 21336 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions and Deletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    ..., W6QK RDECOM CONTR CTR NATICK, MA. Coverage: C-List for 100% of the requirement of the U.S Army, as... SERVICES ADMINISTRATION, NEW YORK, NY. Slacks, Woman's, Navy--Tropical Blue NSN: 8410-01-377-9373. NPAs... PEOPLE WHO ARE BLIND OR SEVERELY DISABLED Procurement List; Proposed Additions and Deletions...

  19. 78 FR 20620 - Procurement List; Additions to and Deletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ...-00-NIB-0004--Mouse, Optical Sensor, Black and Grey, Ergonomic shaped NPA: L.C. Industries for the... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Additions On 2/1/2013 (78 FR 7412-7413) and 2/8/2013 (78 FR 9386-9387), the Committee... SERVICE, GSA/PBS/R03 SOUTH SERVICE CENTER, PHILADELPHIA, PA Deletions On 3/23/2012 (77 FR 17035),...

  20. Genetics Home Reference: 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Seattle, Washington Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center Disease InfoSearch: 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome Emory University School of Medicine Genetics Education Materials for School Success (GEMSS) MalaCards: chromosome 22q11. ...

  1. Disruption of TGF-β signaling in smooth muscle cell prevents flow-induced vascular remodeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Fu [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China); Chambon, Pierre [Institut de Génétique et de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire (CNRS UMR7104, INSERM U596, ULP, Collége de France) and Institut Clinique de la Souris, ILLKIRCH, Strasbourg (France); Tellides, George [Department of Surgery, Interdepartmental Program in Vascular Biology and Therapeutics, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Kong, Wei [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Basic Medical College of Peking University, Beijing (China); Zhang, Xiaoming, E-mail: rmygxgwk@163.com [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China); Li, Wei [Department of Vascular Surgery, Peking University People’s Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • TGF-β signaling in SMC contributes to the flow-induced vascular remodeling. • Disruption of TGF-β signaling in SMC can prevent this process. • Targeting SM-specific Tgfbr2 could be a novel therapeutic strategy for vascular remodeling. - Abstract: Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling has been prominently implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular remodeling, especially the initiation and progression of flow-induced vascular remodeling. Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are the principal resident cells in arterial wall and are critical for arterial remodeling. However, the role of TGF-β signaling in SMC for flow-induced vascular remodeling remains unknown. Therefore, the goal of our study was to determine the effect of TGF-β pathway in SMC for vascular remodeling, by using a genetical smooth muscle-specific (SM-specific) TGF-β type II receptor (Tgfbr2) deletion mice model. Mice deficient in the expression of Tgfbr2 (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup f/f}) and their corresponding wild-type background mice (MyhCre.Tgfbr2{sup WT/WT}) underwent partial ligation of left common carotid artery for 1, 2, or 4 weeks. Then the carotid arteries were harvested and indicated that the disruption of Tgfbr2 in SMC provided prominent inhibition of vascular remodeling. And the thickening of carotid media, proliferation of SMC, infiltration of macrophage, and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) were all significantly attenuated in Tgfbr2 disruption mice. Our study demonstrated, for the first time, that the TGF-β signaling in SMC plays an essential role in flow-induced vascular remodeling and disruption can prevent this process.

  2. Whole-Retina Reduced Electrophysiological Activity in Mice Bearing Retina-Specific Deletion of Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake Bedore

    Full Text Available Despite rigorous characterization of the role of acetylcholine in retinal development, long-term effects of its absence as a neurotransmitter are unknown. One of the unanswered questions is how acetylcholine contributes to the functional capacity of mature retinal circuits. The current study investigates the effects of disrupting cholinergic signalling in mice, through deletion of vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT in the developing retina, pigmented epithelium, optic nerve and optic stalk, on electrophysiology and structure of the mature retina.A combination of electroretinography, optical coherence tomography imaging and histological evaluation assessed retinal integrity in mice bearing retina- targeted (embryonic day 12.5 deletion of VAChT (VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox and littermate controls at 5 and 12 months of age. VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox mice did not show any gross changes in nuclear layer cellularity or synaptic layer thickness. However, VAChTSix3-Cre-flox/flox mice showed reduced electrophysiological response of the retina to light stimulus under scotopic conditions at 5 and 12 months of age, including reduced a-wave, b-wave, and oscillatory potential (OP amplitudes and decreased OP peak power and total energy. Reduced a-wave amplitude was proportional to the reduction in b-wave amplitude and not associated with altered a-wave 10%-90% rise time or inner and outer segment thicknesses.This study used a novel genetic model in the first examination of function and structure of the mature mouse retina with disruption of cholinergic signalling. Reduced amplitude across the electroretinogram wave form does not suggest dysfunction in specific retinal cell types and could reflect underlying changes in the retinal and/or extraretinal microenvironment. Our findings suggest that release of acetylcholine by VAChT is essential for the normal electrophysiological response of the mature mouse retina.

  3. Deletion affecting band 7q36 not associated with holoprosencephaly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahim, S.A.D.; Krivchenia, E.; Mohamed, A.N. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Although the appearance of 7q36 aberrations have been postulated to be responsible for holoprosencephaly (HPE), the presence of a de novo 7q36 deletion in fetus without HPE has not been reported. We report the first case of a fetus with 7q36 deletion but lacking HPE. Ultrasound examination of a 25-year-old G3P1 Caucasian female showed small head circumference with microcephaly at 28 weeks. Decreased amniotic fluid volume, bilateral renal dilatation and abnormal facial features were also noted. Chromosome analysis after cordocentesis showed an abnormal female karyotype with a deletion involving the chromosome band 7q36, 46,XX,del(7)(q36). Chromosome studies on the biological parents were normal. In view of the chromosome finding and after extensive counseling, the couple elected to terminate the pregnancy. The chromosome findings were confirmed by fetal blood chromosome analysis at termination. Post-mortem examination confirmed dysmorphic features including a depressed nasal bridge and large flat ears with no lobules, but no cleft lip or palate was noted. Internal abnormalities included a bicuspid pulmonary valve and abnormally located lungs. The brain weighed 190g (249 {plus_minus} 64g expected) and had symmetric cerebral hemispheres without evidence of HPE or other gross or microscopic malformation, except focal cerebellar cortical dysplasia. In summary, our patient showed a deletion of the same chromosomal band implicated in HPE but lacked HPE. This finding indicates that 7q36 deletion may be seen in the absence of HPE and suggests that other genetic mechanisms may be responsible for HPE in this setting.

  4. Rare copy number deletions predict individual variation in intelligence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald A Yeo

    Full Text Available Phenotypic variation in human intellectual functioning shows substantial heritability, as demonstrated by a long history of behavior genetic studies. Many recent molecular genetic studies have attempted to uncover specific genetic variations responsible for this heritability, but identified effects capture little variance and have proven difficult to replicate. The present study, motivated an interest in "mutation load" emerging from evolutionary perspectives, examined the importance of the number of rare (or infrequent copy number variations (CNVs, and the total number of base pairs included in such deletions, for psychometric intelligence. Genetic data was collected using the Illumina 1MDuoBeadChip Array from a sample of 202 adult individuals with alcohol dependence, and a subset of these (N = 77 had been administered the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI. After removing CNV outliers, the impact of rare genetic deletions on psychometric intelligence was investigated in 74 individuals. The total length of the rare deletions significantly and negatively predicted intelligence (r = -.30, p = .01. As prior studies have indicated greater heritability in individuals with relatively higher parental socioeconomic status (SES, we also examined the impact of ethnicity (Anglo/White vs. Other, as a proxy measure of SES; these groups did not differ on any genetic variable. This categorical variable significantly moderated the effect of length of deletions on intelligence, with larger effects being noted in the Anglo/White group. Overall, these results suggest that rare deletions (between 5% and 1% population frequency or less adversely affect intellectual functioning, and that pleotropic effects might partly account for the association of intelligence with health and mental health status. Significant limitations of this research, including issues of generalizability and CNV measurement, are discussed.

  5. Evolution of the Insertion-Deletion Mutation Rate Across the Tree of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Way; Ackerman, Matthew S; Dillon, Marcus M; Platt, Thomas G; Fuqua, Clay; Cooper, Vaughn S; Lynch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mutations are the ultimate source of variation used for evolutionary adaptation, while also being predominantly deleterious and a source of genetic disorders. Understanding the rate of insertion-deletion mutations (indels) is essential to understanding evolutionary processes, especially in coding regions, where such mutations can disrupt production of essential proteins. Using direct estimates of indel rates from 14 phylogenetically diverse eukaryotic and bacterial species, along with measures of standing variation in such species, we obtain results that imply an inverse relationship of mutation rate and effective population size. These results, which corroborate earlier observations on the base-substitution mutation rate, appear most compatible with the hypothesis that natural selection reduces mutation rates per effective genome to the point at which the power of random genetic drift (approximated by the inverse of effective population size) becomes overwhelming. Given the substantial differences in DNA metabolism pathways that give rise to these two types of mutations, this consistency of results raises the possibility that refinement of other molecular and cellular traits may be inversely related to species-specific levels of random genetic drift. PMID:27317782

  6. The impact of gene duplication, insertion, deletion, lateral gene transfer and sequencing error on orthology inference: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalquen, Daniel A; Altenhoff, Adrian M; Gonnet, Gaston H; Dessimoz, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    The identification of orthologous genes, a prerequisite for numerous analyses in comparative and functional genomics, is commonly performed computationally from protein sequences. Several previous studies have compared the accuracy of orthology inference methods, but simulated data has not typically been considered in cross-method assessment studies. Yet, while dependent on model assumptions, simulation-based benchmarking offers unique advantages: contrary to empirical data, all aspects of simulated data are known with certainty. Furthermore, the flexibility of simulation makes it possible to investigate performance factors in isolation of one another.Here, we use simulated data to dissect the performance of six methods for orthology inference available as standalone software packages (Inparanoid, OMA, OrthoInspector, OrthoMCL, QuartetS, SPIMAP) as well as two generic approaches (bidirectional best hit and reciprocal smallest distance). We investigate the impact of various evolutionary forces (gene duplication, insertion, deletion, and lateral gene transfer) and technological artefacts (ambiguous sequences) on orthology inference. We show that while gene duplication/loss and insertion/deletion are well handled by most methods (albeit for different trade-offs of precision and recall), lateral gene transfer disrupts all methods. As for ambiguous sequences, which might result from poor sequencing, assembly, or genome annotation, we show that they affect alignment score-based orthology methods more strongly than their distance-based counterparts.

  7. Altered Actions of Memantine and NMDA-Induced Currents in a New Grid2-Deleted Mouse Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayako Kumagai

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Memantine is a non-competitive antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor, and is an approved drug for the treatment of moderate-to-severe Alzheimer’s disease. We identified a mouse strain with a naturally occurring mutation and an ataxic phenotype that presents with severe leg cramps. To investigate the phenotypes of these mutant mice, we screened several phenotype-modulating drugs and found that memantine (10 mg/kg disrupted the sense of balance in the mutants. Moreover, the mutant mice showed an attenuated optokinetic response (OKR and impaired OKR learning, which was also observed in wild-type mice treated with memantine. Microsatellite analyses indicated that the Grid2 gene-deletion is responsible for these phenotypes. Patch-clamp analysis showed a relatively small change in NMDA-dependent current in cultured granule cells from Grid2 gene-deleted mice, suggesting that GRID2 is important for correct NMDA receptor function. In general, NMDA receptors are activated after the activation of non-NMDA receptors, such as AMPA receptors, and AMPA receptor dysregulation also occurs in Grid2 mutant mice. Indeed, the AMPA treatment enhanced memantine susceptibility in wild-type mice, which was indicated by balance sense and OKR impairments. The present study explores a new role for GRID2 and highlights the adverse effects of memantine in different genetic backgrounds.

  8. A deletion mutation in bovine SLC4A2 is associated with osteopetrosis in Red Angus cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beever Jonathan E

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteopetrosis is a skeletal disorder of humans and animals characterized by the formation of overly dense bones, resulting from a deficiency in the number and/or function of bone-resorbing osteoclast cells. In cattle, osteopetrosis can either be induced during gestation by viral infection of the dam, or inherited as a recessive defect. Genetically affected calves are typically aborted late in gestation, display skull deformities and exhibit a marked reduction of osteoclasts. Although mutations in several genes are associated with osteopetrosis in humans and mice, the genetic basis of the cattle disorder was previously unknown. Results We have conducted a whole-genome association analysis to identify the mutation responsible for inherited osteopetrosis in Red Angus cattle. Analysis of >54,000 SNP genotypes for each of seven affected calves and nine control animals localized the defective gene to the telomeric end of bovine chromosome 4 (BTA4. Homozygosity analysis refined the interval to a 3.4-Mb region containing the SLC4A2 gene, encoding an anion exchanger protein necessary for proper osteoclast function. Examination of SLC4A2 from normal and affected animals revealed a ~2.8-kb deletion mutation in affected calves that encompasses exon 2 and nearly half of exon 3, predicted to prevent normal protein function. Analysis of RNA from a proven heterozygous individual confirmed the presence of transcripts lacking exons 2 and 3, in addition to normal transcripts. Genotyping of additional animals demonstrated complete concordance of the homozygous deletion genotype with the osteopetrosis phenotype. Histological examination of affected tissues revealed scarce, morphologically abnormal osteoclasts displaying evidence of apoptosis. Conclusions These results indicate that a deletion mutation within bovine SLC4A2 is associated with osteopetrosis in Red Angus cattle. Loss of SLC4A2 function appears to induce premature cell death, and

  9. Phenotype microarray analysis of Escherichia coli K-12 mutants with deletions of all two-component systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lu; Lei, Xiang-He; Bochner, Barry R; Wanner, Barry L

    2003-08-01

    Two-component systems are the most common mechanism of transmembrane signal transduction in bacteria. A typical system consists of a histidine kinase and a partner response regulator. The histidine kinase senses an environmental signal, which it transmits to its partner response regulator via a series of autophosphorylation, phosphotransfer, and dephosphorylation reactions. Much work has been done on particular systems, including several systems with regulatory roles in cellular physiology, communication, development, and, in the case of bacterial pathogens, the expression of genes important for virulence. We used two methods to investigate two-component regulatory systems in Escherichia coli K-12. First, we systematically constructed mutants with deletions of all two-component systems by using a now-standard technique of gene disruption (K. A. Datsenko and B. L. Wanner, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 97:6640-6645, 2000). We then analyzed these deletion mutants with a new technology called Phenotype MicroArrays, which permits assays of nearly 2,000 growth phenotypes simultaneously. In this study we tested 100 mutants, including mutants with individual deletions of all two-component systems and several related genes, including creBC-regulated genes (cbrA and cbrBC), phoBR-regulated genes (phoA, phoH, phnCDEFGHIJKLMNOP, psiE, and ugpBAECQ), csgD, luxS, and rpoS. The results of this battery of nearly 200,000 tests provided a wealth of new information concerning many of these systems. Of 37 different two-component mutants, 22 showed altered phenotypes. Many phenotypes were expected, and several new phenotypes were also revealed. The results are discussed in terms of the biological roles and other information concerning these systems, including DNA microarray data for a large number of the same mutants. Other mutational effects are also discussed. PMID:12897016

  10. Conditional deletion of epithelial IKKβ impairs alveolar formation through apoptosis and decreased VEGF expression during early mouse lung morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Changgong

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alveolar septation marks the beginning of the transition from the saccular to alveolar stage of lung development. Inflammation can disrupt this process and permanently impair alveolar formation resulting in alveolar hypoplasia as seen in bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm newborns. NF-κB is a transcription factor central to multiple inflammatory and developmental pathways including dorsal-ventral patterning in fruit flies; limb, mammary and submandibular gland development in mice; and branching morphogenesis in chick lungs. We have previously shown that epithelial overexpression of NF-κB accelerates lung maturity using transgenic mice. The purpose of this study was to test our hypothesis that targeted deletion of NF-κB signaling in lung epithelium would impair alveolar formation. Methods We generated double transgenic mice with lung epithelium-specific deletion of IKKβ, a known activating kinase upstream of NF-κB, using a cre-loxP transgenic recombination strategy. Lungs of resulting progeny were analyzed at embryonic and early postnatal stages to determine specific effects on lung histology, and mRNA and protein expression of relevant lung morphoreulatory genes. Lastly, results measuring expression of the angiogenic factor, VEGF, were confirmed in vitro using a siRNA-knockdown strategy in cultured mouse lung epithelial cells. Results Our results showed that IKKβ deletion in the lung epithelium transiently decreased alveolar type I and type II cells and myofibroblasts and delayed alveolar formation. These effects were mediated through increased alveolar type II cell apoptosis and decreased epithelial VEGF expression. Conclusions These results suggest that epithelial NF-κB plays a critical role in early alveolar development possibly through regulation of VEGF.

  11. THYROID HORMONE DISRUPTION: FROM KINETICS TO DYNAMICS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A wide range of chemicals with diverse structures act as thyroid disrupting chemicals (TDCs). Broadly defined, TDCs are chemicals that alter the structure or function of the thyroid gland, alter regulatory enzymes associated with thyroid hormones (THs), or change circulating or t...

  12. The Relative Ineffectiveness of Criminal Network Disruption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A.C. Duijn; V. Kashirin; P.M.A. Sloot

    2014-01-01

    Researchers, policymakers and law enforcement agencies across the globe struggle to find effective strategies to control criminal networks. The effectiveness of disruption strategies is known to depend on both network topology and network resilience. However, as these criminal networks operate in se

  13. The relative ineffectiveness of criminal network disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijn, Paul A C; Kashirin, Victor; Sloot, Peter M A

    2014-01-01

    Researchers, policymakers and law enforcement agencies across the globe struggle to find effective strategies to control criminal networks. The effectiveness of disruption strategies is known to depend on both network topology and network resilience. However, as these criminal networks operate in secrecy, data-driven knowledge concerning the effectiveness of different criminal network disruption strategies is very limited. By combining computational modeling and social network analysis with unique criminal network intelligence data from the Dutch Police, we discovered, in contrast to common belief, that criminal networks might even become 'stronger', after targeted attacks. On the other hand increased efficiency within criminal networks decreases its internal security, thus offering opportunities for law enforcement agencies to target these networks more deliberately. Our results emphasize the importance of criminal network interventions at an early stage, before the network gets a chance to (re-)organize to maximum resilience. In the end disruption strategies force criminal networks to become more exposed, which causes successful network disruption to become a long-term effort. PMID:24577374

  14. Collisional and Rotational Disruption of Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kevin J.; Michel, Patrick; Richardson, Derek C.

    2011-02-01

    Asteroids are leftover pieces from the era of planet formation that help us understand conditions in the early Solar System. Unlike larger planetary bodies that were subject to global thermal modification during and subsequent to their formation, these small bodies have kept at least some unmodified primordial material from the solar nebula. However, the structural properties of asteroids have been modified considerably since their formation. Thus, we can find among them a great variety of physical configurations and dynamical histories. In fact, with only a few possible exceptions, all asteroids have been modified or completely disrupted many times during the age of the Solar System. This picture is supported by data from space mission encounters with asteroids that show much diversity of shape, bulk density, surface morphology, and other features. Moreover, the gravitational attraction of these bodies is so small that some physical processes occur in a manner far removed from our common experience on Earth. Thus, each visit to a small body has generated as many questions as it has answered. In this review we discuss the current state of research into asteroid disruption processes, focusing on collisional and rotational mechanisms. We find that recent advances in modeling catastrophic disruption by collisions have provided important insights into asteroid internal structures and a deeper understanding of asteroid families. Rotational disruption, by tidal encounters or thermal effects, is responsible for altering many smaller asteroids, and is at the origin of many binary asteroids and oddly shaped bodies.

  15. Empathy in Boys with Disruptive Behavior Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wied, Minet; Goudena, Paul P.; Matthys, Walter

    2005-01-01

    Background: The present study examined empathy in 8- to 12-year-old clinically referred boys with disruptive behavior disorders (DBD) (n = 25) and age-matched normal controls (n = 24). Method: Situational empathy was assessed by children's emotional and cognitive responses to six empathy-inducing vignettes (displaying sadness, anger or happiness).…

  16. The Relative Ineffectiveness of Criminal Network Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijn, Paul A. C.; Kashirin, Victor; Sloot, Peter M. A.

    2014-02-01

    Researchers, policymakers and law enforcement agencies across the globe struggle to find effective strategies to control criminal networks. The effectiveness of disruption strategies is known to depend on both network topology and network resilience. However, as these criminal networks operate in secrecy, data-driven knowledge concerning the effectiveness of different criminal network disruption strategies is very limited. By combining computational modeling and social network analysis with unique criminal network intelligence data from the Dutch Police, we discovered, in contrast to common belief, that criminal networks might even become `stronger', after targeted attacks. On the other hand increased efficiency within criminal networks decreases its internal security, thus offering opportunities for law enforcement agencies to target these networks more deliberately. Our results emphasize the importance of criminal network interventions at an early stage, before the network gets a chance to (re-)organize to maximum resilience. In the end disruption strategies force criminal networks to become more exposed, which causes successful network disruption to become a long-term effort.

  17. Five disruptive technology directions for 5G

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boccardi, Federico; W. Heath Jr., Robert; Lozano, Angel;

    2014-01-01

    New research directions will lead to fundamental changes in the design of future fifth generation (5G) cellular networks. This article describes five technologies that could lead to both architectural and component disruptive design changes: device-centric architectures, millimeter wave, massive...

  18. Traffic disruption route Einstein near building 170

    CERN Multimedia

    A Lopez - TS/CE

    2005-01-01

    The TS/CE Group informs you that, for the duration of the work at Building 170, there may be some disruption to traffic on route Einstein in the vicinity of Building 170. The work is due to take place from the 14th to 18th February. For more information, please contact 165029. A. Lopez TS/CE

  19. The disruptive effect of Think Aloud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janni; Yssing, Carsten

    2004-01-01

    Think Aloud (TA), we ask the question: what happens when users are required to verbalise their visual perceptions and interactions? We argue that TA may have a disruptive effect, suggesting that other techniques be considered. With a theoretical distinction between focal and subsidiary awareness...

  20. Heavy Metals Acting as Endocrine Disrupters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Georgescu

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Last years researches focused on several natural and synthetic compounds that may interfere with the major functionsof the endocrine system and were termed endocrine disrupters. Endocrine disrupters are defined as chemicalsubstances with either agonist or antagonist endocrine effects in human and animals. These effects may be achievedby interferences with the biosynthesis or activity of several endogenous hormones. Recently, it was demonstratedthat heavy metals such as cadmium (Cd, arsen (As, mercury (Hg, nickel (Ni, lead (Pb and zinc (Zn may exhibitendocrine-disrupting activity in animal experiments. Emerging evidence of the intimate mechanisms of action ofthese heavy metals is accumulating. It was revealed, for example, that the Zn atom from the Zn fingers of theestrogen receptor can be replaced by several heavy metal molecules such as copper, cobalt, Ni and Cd. By replacingthe Zn atom with Ni or copper, binding of the estrogen receptor to the DNA hormone responsive elements in the cellnucleus is prevented. In both males and females, low-level exposure to Cd interferes with the biological effects ofsteroid hormones in reproductive organs. Arsen has the property to bind to the glucocorticoid receptor thusdisturbing glucocorticoids biological effects. With regard to Hg, this may induce alterations in male and femalefertility, may affect the function of the hypothalamo-pituitary-thyroid axis or the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis,and disrupt biosynthesis of steroid hormones.

  1. Analysis of recent fuel-disruption experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent USDOE-sponsored DEH, FGR, and TREAT F series fuel-disruption experiments are analyzed with existing analytical models. The experiments are interpreted and the results used to evaluate the models. Calculations are presented using the FRAS3 fission-gas-behavior code and the DiMelfi-Deitrich fuel-response model

  2. Hot Super Earths: disrupted young jupiters?

    CERN Document Server

    Nayakshin, Sergei

    2011-01-01

    Recent {\\em Kepler} observations revealed an unexpected abundance of "hot" Earth-size to Neptune-size planets in the inner $0.02-0.2$ AU from their parent stars. We propose that these smaller planets are the remnants of massive giant planets that migrated inward quicker than they could contract. We show that such disruptions naturally occur in the framework of the Tidal Downsizing hypothesis for planet formation. We find that the characteristic planet-star separation at which such "hot disruptions" occur is $R \\approx 0.03-0.2$ AU. This result is independent of the planet's embryo mass but is dependent on the accretion rate in the disc. At high accretion rates, $\\dot M \\simgt 10^{-6}\\msun$ yr$^{-1}$, the embryo is unable to contract quickly enough and is disrupted. At late times, when the accretion rate drops to $\\dot M \\simlt 10^{-8} \\msun$ yr$^{-1}$, the embryos migrate sufficiently slow to not be disrupted. These "late arrivals" may explain the well known population of hot jupiters. If type I migration reg...

  3. Analysis of recent fuel-disruption experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, J.M.; Kraft, T.E.; DiMelfi, R.J.; Fenske, G.R.; Gruber, E.E.

    1982-01-01

    Recent USDOE-sponsored DEH, FGR, and TREAT F series fuel-disruption experiments are analyzed with existing analytical models. The experiments are interpreted and the results used to evaluate the models. Calculations are presented using the FRAS3 fission-gas-behavior code and the DiMelfi-Deitrich fuel-response model.

  4. Disruption of Vitamin D and Calcium Signaling in Keratinocytes Predisposes to Skin Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikle, Daniel D.; Jiang, Yan; Nguyen, Thai; Oda, Yuko; Tu, Chia-ling

    2016-01-01

    1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH)2D), the active metabolite of vitamin D, and calcium regulate epidermal differentiation. 1,25(OH)2D exerts its effects through the vitamin D receptor (VDR), a transcription factor in the nuclear hormone receptor family, whereas calcium acts through the calcium sensing receptor (Casr), a membrane bound member of the G protein coupled receptor family. We have developed mouse models in which the Vdr and Casr have been deleted in the epidermis (epidVdr−∕− and epidCasr−∕−). Both genotypes show abnormalities in calcium induced epidermal differentiation in vivo and in vitro, associated with altered hedgehog (HH) and β–catenin signaling that when abnormally expressed lead to basal cell carcinomas (BCC) and trichofolliculomas, respectively. The Vdr−∕− mice are susceptible to tumor formation following UVB or chemical carcinogen exposure. More recently we found that the keratinocytes from these mice over express long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) oncogenes such as H19 and under express lncRNA tumor suppressors such as lincRNA-21. Spontaneous tumors have not been observed in either the epidVdr−∕− or epidCasr−∕−. But in mice with epidermal specific deletion of both Vdr and Casr (epidVdr−∕−/epidCasr−∕− [DKO]) tumor formation occurs spontaneously when the DKO mice are placed on a low calcium diet. These results demonstrate important interactions between vitamin D and calcium signaling through their respective receptors that lead to cancer when these signals are disrupted. The roles of the β–catenin, hedgehog, and lncRNA pathways in predisposing the epidermis to tumor formation when vitamin D and calcium signaling are disrupted will be discussed. PMID:27462278

  5. Disruption of a cystine transporter downregulates expression of genes involved in sulfur regulation and cellular respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpkins, Jessica A; Rickel, Kirby E; Madeo, Marianna; Ahlers, Bethany A; Carlisle, Gabriel B; Nelson, Heidi J; Cardillo, Andrew L; Weber, Emily A; Vitiello, Peter F; Pearce, David A; Vitiello, Seasson P

    2016-01-01

    Cystine and cysteine are important molecules for pathways such as redox signaling and regulation, and thus identifying cellular deficits upon deletion of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cystine transporter Ers1p allows for a further understanding of cystine homeostasis. Previous complementation studies using the human ortholog suggest yeast Ers1p is a cystine transporter. Human CTNS encodes the protein Cystinosin, a cystine transporter that is embedded in the lysosomal membrane and facilitates the export of cystine from the lysosome. When CTNS is mutated, cystine transport is disrupted, leading to cystine accumulation, the diagnostic hallmark of the lysosomal storage disorder cystinosis. Here, we provide biochemical evidence for Ers1p-dependent cystine transport. However, the accumulation of intracellular cystine is not observed when the ERS1 gene is deleted from ers1-Δ yeast, supporting the existence of modifier genes that provide a mechanism in ers1-Δ yeast that prevents or corrects cystine accumulation. Upon comparison of the transcriptomes of isogenic ERS1+ and ers1-Δ strains of S. cerevisiae by DNA microarray followed by targeted qPCR, sixteen genes were identified as being differentially expressed between the two genotypes. Genes that encode proteins functioning in sulfur regulation, cellular respiration, and general transport were enriched in our screen, demonstrating pleiotropic effects of ers1-Δ. These results give insight into yeast cystine regulation and the multiple, seemingly distal, pathways that involve proper cystine recycling. PMID:27142334

  6. Characteristics of dr1790 disruptant and its functional analysis in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jianhui; Wang, Hu; Xu, Xin; Wang, Liangyan; Tian, Bing; Hua, Yuejin

    2015-06-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans (DR) is an extremophile that is well known for its resistance to radiation, oxidants and desiccation. The gene dr1790 of D. radiodurans was predicted to encode a yellow-related protein. The primary objective of the present study was to characterize the biological function of the DR1790 protein, which is a member of the ancient yellow/major royal jelly (MRJ) protein family, in prokaryotes. Fluorescence labeling demonstrated that the yellow-related protein encoded by dr1790 is a membrane protein. The deletion of the dr1790 gene decreased the cell growth rate and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and radiation and increased the membrane permeability of D. radiodurans. Transcript profiling by microarray and RT-PCR analyses of the dr1790 deletion mutant suggested that some genes that are involved in protein secretion and transport were strongly suppressed, while other genes that are involved in protein quality control, such as chaperones and proteases, were induced. In addition, the expression of genes with predicted functions that are involved in antioxidant systems, electron transport, and energy metabolism was significantly altered through the disruption of dr1790. Moreover, the results of proteomic analyses using 2-DE and MS also demonstrated that DR1790 contributed to D. radiodurans survival. Taken together, these results indicate that the DR1790 protein from the ancient yellow protein family plays a pleiotropic role in the survival of prokaryotic cells and contributes to the extraordinary resistance of D. radiodurans against oxidative and radiation stresses.

  7. Characteristics of dr1790 disruptant and its functional analysis in Deinococcus radiodurans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhui Cheng

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Deinococcus radiodurans (DR is an extremophile that is well known for its resistance to radiation, oxidants and desiccation. The gene dr1790 of D. radiodurans was predicted to encode a yellow-related protein. The primary objective of the present study was to characterize the biological function of the DR1790 protein, which is a member of the ancient yellow/major royal jelly (MRJ protein family, in prokaryotes. Fluorescence labeling demonstrated that the yellow-related protein encoded by dr1790 is a membrane protein. The deletion of the dr1790 gene decreased the cell growth rate and sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and radiation and increased the membrane permeability of D. radiodurans. Transcript profiling by microarray and RT-PCR analyses of the dr1790 deletion mutant suggested that some genes that are involved in protein secretion and transport were strongly suppressed, while other genes that are involved in protein quality control, such as chaperones and proteases, were induced. In addition, the expression of genes with predicted functions that are involved in antioxidant systems, electron transport, and energy metabolism was significantly altered through the disruption of dr1790. Moreover, the results of proteomic analyses using 2-DE and MS also demonstrated that DR1790 contributed to D. radiodurans survival. Taken together, these results indicate that the DR1790 protein from the ancient yellow protein family plays a pleiotropic role in the survival of prokaryotic cells and contributes to the extraordinary resistance of D. radiodurans against oxidative and radiation stresses.

  8. Loss of Usp9x disrupts cortical architecture, hippocampal development and TGFβ-mediated axonogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane Stegeman

    Full Text Available The deubiquitylating enzyme Usp9x is highly expressed in the developing mouse brain, and increased Usp9x expression enhances the self-renewal of neural progenitors in vitro. USP9X is a candidate gene for human neurodevelopmental disorders, including lissencephaly, epilepsy and X-linked intellectual disability. To determine if Usp9x is critical to mammalian brain development we conditionally deleted the gene from neural progenitors, and their subsequent progeny. Mating Usp9x(loxP/loxP mice with mice expressing Cre recombinase from the Nestin promoter deleted Usp9x throughout the entire brain, and resulted in early postnatal lethality. Although the overall brain architecture was intact, loss of Usp9x disrupted the cellular organization of the ventricular and sub-ventricular zones, and cortical plate. Usp9x absence also led to dramatic reductions in axonal length, in vivo and in vitro, which could in part be explained by a failure in Tgf-β signaling. Deletion of Usp9x from the dorsal telencephalon only, by mating with Emx1-cre mice, was compatible with survival to adulthood but resulted in reduction or loss of the corpus callosum, a dramatic decrease in hippocampal size, and disorganization of the hippocampal CA3 region. This latter phenotypic aspect resembled that observed in Doublecortin knock-out mice, which is an Usp9x interacting protein. This study establishes that Usp9x is critical for several aspects of CNS development, and suggests that its regulation of Tgf-β signaling extends to neurons.

  9. Disruptive behavior in school. Wired up - the relationship between disruptive behavior and new technology.

    OpenAIRE

    Solberg, Stine

    2014-01-01

    Background: The thesis is part of the research project Disruptive behavior in school, led by professor Liv Duesund at the Department of Special Needs Education, University of Oslo. Professor Duesund is the supervisor of the thesis. It is a cooperation project between University of Oslo and University of California, Berkeley and compares the educational cultures of Norway an the United States (Duesund, 2013). The focus is on disruptive behavior, and in what ways behavior can vary in the two ...

  10. Screening for clinically significant non-deletional alpha thalassaemia mutations by pyrosequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Haywood, Anna; Dreau, Helene; Timbs, Adele; Schuh, Anna; Old, John; Henderson, Shirley

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Non-deletional ?+-thalassaemia is associated with a higher degree of morbidity and mortality than deletional forms of ?+-thalassaemia. Screening for the common deletional forms of ?-thalassaemia by Gap-PCR is widely practiced; however, the detection of non-deletional ?-thalassaemia mutations is technically more labour-intensive and expensive, as it requires DNA sequencing. In addition, the presence of four very closely homologous alpha globin genes and the frequent co-exis...

  11. Sequence homology at the breakpoint and clinical phenotype of mitochondrial DNA deletion syndromes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekim Sadikovic

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA deletions are a common cause of mitochondrial disorders. Large mtDNA deletions can lead to a broad spectrum of clinical features with different age of onset, ranging from mild mitochondrial myopathies (MM, progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO, and Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS, to severe Pearson syndrome. The aim of this study is to investigate the molecular signatures surrounding the deletion breakpoints and their association with the clinical phenotype and age at onset. MtDNA deletions in 67 patients were characterized using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH followed by PCR-sequencing of the deletion junctions. Sequence homology including both perfect and imperfect short repeats flanking the deletion regions were analyzed and correlated with clinical features and patients' age group. In all age groups, there was a significant increase in sequence homology flanking the deletion compared to mtDNA background. The youngest patient group (<6 years old showed a diffused pattern of deletion distribution in size and locations, with a significantly lower sequence homology flanking the deletion, and the highest percentage of deletion mutant heteroplasmy. The older age groups showed rather discrete pattern of deletions with 44% of all patients over 6 years old carrying the most common 5 kb mtDNA deletion, which was found mostly in muscle specimens (22/41. Only 15% (3/20 of the young patients (<6 years old carry the 5 kb common deletion, which is usually present in blood rather than muscle. This group of patients predominantly (16 out of 17 exhibit multisystem disorder and/or Pearson syndrome, while older patients had predominantly neuromuscular manifestations including KSS, PEO, and MM. In conclusion, sequence homology at the deletion flanking regions is a consistent feature of mtDNA deletions. Decreased levels of sequence homology and increased levels of deletion mutant heteroplasmy appear to correlate with earlier

  12. Longitudinal association between marital disruption and child BMI and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkes, Jeremy

    2012-08-01

    This research examines whether family disruptions (i.e., divorces and separation) contribute to children's weight problems. The sample consists of 7,299 observations for 2,333 children, aged 5-14, over the 1986-2006 period, from a US representative sample from the Child and Young Adult Survey accompanying the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY). The study uses individual-fixed-effects models in a longitudinal framework to compare children's BMI and weight problems before and after a disruption. Furthermore, besides doing a before-after comparison for children, the study also estimates the effects at various periods relative to the disruption in order to examine whether children are affected before the disruption and whether any effects change as time passes from the disruption, as some effects may be temporary or slow to develop. Despite having a larger sample than the previous studies, the results provide no evidence that, on average, children's BMI and BMI percentile scores (measured with continuous outcomes) are affected before the disruption, after the disruption, and as time passes from the disruption, relative to a baseline period a few years before the disruption. However, children experiencing a family disruption do have an increased risk of obesity (having a BMI percentile score of 95 or higher) in the two years leading up to the disruption as well as after the disruption, and as time passes from the disruption. PMID:22484366

  13. Copy Number Variation Screen Identifies a Rare De Novo Deletion at Chromosome 15q13.1-13.3 in a Child with Language Impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry A Pettigrew

    Full Text Available A significant proportion of children (up to 7% in the UK present with pronounced language difficulties that cannot be explained by obvious causes like other neurological and medical conditions. A substantial genetic component is predicted to underlie such language problems. Copy number variants (CNVs have been implicated in neurodevelopmental and psychiatric conditions, such as autism and schizophrenia, but it is not fully established to what extent they might contribute to language disorders. We conducted a CNV screen in a longitudinal cohort of young children with language-related difficulties (n = 85, focusing on single events at candidate loci. We detected a de novo deletion on chromosome 15q13.1-13.3. The adjacent 15q11-13.1 locus is disrupted in Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes, while disruptions across the breakpoints (BP1-BP6 have previously been implicated in different neurodevelopmental phenotypes including autism, intellectual disability (ID, seizures and developmental delay (DD. This is the first report of a deletion at BP3-BP5 being linked to a deficit confined to language impairment, in the absence of ID, expanding the range of phenotypes that implicate the chromosome 15q13 locus.

  14. Mitochondrial DNA deletion mutations in adult mouse cardiac side population cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lushaj, Entela B., E-mail: lushaj@surgery.wisc.edu [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Lozonschi, Lucian; Barnes, Maria; Anstadt, Emily; Kohmoto, Takushi [Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53792 (United States)

    2012-06-01

    We investigated the presence and potential role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion mutations in adult cardiac stem cells. Cardiac side population (SP) cells were isolated from 12-week-old mice. Standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to screen for the presence of mtDNA deletion mutations in (a) freshly isolated SP cells and (b) SP cells cultured to passage 10. When present, the abundance of mtDNA deletion mutation was analyzed in single cell colonies. The effect of different levels of deletion mutations on SP cell growth and differentiation was determined. MtDNA deletion mutations were found in both freshly isolated and cultured cells from 12-week-old mice. While there was no significant difference in the number of single cell colonies with mtDNA deletion mutations from any of the groups mentioned above, the abundance of mtDNA deletion mutations was significantly higher in the cultured cells, as determined by quantitative PCR. Within a single clonal cell population, the detectable mtDNA deletion mutations were the same in all cells and unique when compared to deletions of other colonies. We also found that cells harboring high levels of mtDNA deletion mutations (i.e. where deleted mtDNA comprised more than 60% of total mtDNA) had slower proliferation rates and decreased differentiation capacities. Screening cultured adult stem cells for mtDNA deletion mutations as a routine assessment will benefit the biomedical application of adult stem cells.

  15. Common Deletion (CD) in mitochondrial DNA of irradiated rat heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Raquel Gomes; Ferreira-Machado, Samara C.; Almeida, Carlos E.V. de, E-mail: raquelgsiqueira@gmail.com [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcanatara Gomes. Lab. de Ciencias Radiologicas; Silva, Dayse A. da; Carvalho, Elizeu F. de [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcanatara Gomes. Lab. de Diagnosticos por DNA; Melo, Luiz D.B. de [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho. Lab. de Parasitologia Molecular

    2014-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to map the common deletion (CD) area in mtDNA and investigate the levels of this deletion in irradiated heart. The assays were developed in male Wistar rats that were irradiated with three different single doses (5, 10 or 15 Gy) delivered directly to the heart and the analyses were performed at various times post-irradiation (3, 15 or 120 days). The CDs area were sequenced and the CD quantified by real-time PCR. Our study demonstrated that the CD levels progressively decreased from the 3rd until the 15th day after irradiation, and then increased thereafter. Additionally, it was observed that the levels of CD are modulated differently according to the different categories of doses (moderate and high). This study demonstrated an immediate response to ionizing radiation, measured by the presence of mutations in the CD area and a decrease in the CD levels. (author)

  16. Optimizing Gateway™ technology (Invitrogen) to construct Rhizobium leguminosarum deletion mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Lanza Lucio, Monica; Alborno, Marcelo; Rey Navarro, Luis; Imperial Ródenas, Juan

    2010-01-01

    The study of the role of different genes in Rhizobium leguminosarum requires the generation of mutants by homologous recombination. In this communication we describe a novel approach to obtain deletion mutants of genes in Rhizobium using Gateway TM Cloning technology (Invitrogen) and a new vector (pK18-attR), both conjugative and Rhizobium specific, that carries the recombination tails of Gateway system. This tool is a new alternative to the classic approach based on cloning using rest...

  17. Research Progress on Pseudorabies Gene-deleted Vaccine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Sheng-zao; CHEN Huang-chun; XIONG Fu

    2002-01-01

    Pseudorabies is caused by pseudorabies virus (PrV), which is a member of family Herpesviridae, subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae and is the agent of acute infectious disease in many domestic and wild animals. Swine was the natural host and reservior of PRV, which inflicts major economic loss in pig industries world wide. Immunization with safe, effective vaccine is main measurements to prevent the disease.In this assay, research progress on PRV gene-deleted vaccine used extensively today was discussed.

  18. Delete-free Reachability Analysis for Temporal and Hierarchical Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Bit-Monnot, Arthur; Smith, David E.; Do, Minh

    2016-01-01

    Reachability analysis is a crucial part of the heuristic computation for many state of the art classical and temporal planners. In this paper, we study the difficulty that arises in assessing the reachability of actions in planning problems containing sets of interdependent actions, notably including problems with required concurrency as well as hierarchical planning problems. In temporal planners, this complication has been addressed by augmenting a delete-free relaxation with additional rel...

  19. Multidrug Resistance of a Porin Deletion Mutant of Mycobacterium smegmatis

    OpenAIRE

    Stephan, Joachim; Mailaender, Claudia; Etienne, Gilles; Daffé, Mamadou; Niederweis, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Mycobacteria contain an outer membrane of unusually low permeability which contributes to their intrinsic resistance to many agents. It is assumed that small and hydrophilic antibiotics cross the outer membrane via porins, whereas hydrophobic antibiotics may diffuse through the membrane directly. A mutant of Mycobacterium smegmatis lacking the major porin MspA was used to examine the role of the porin pathway in antibiotic sensitivity. Deletion of the mspA gene caused high-level resistance of...

  20. 78 FR 71582 - Procurement List; Proposed Additions and Deletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ...-583-9479--SS NSN: 8415-01-583-9480--SR NSN: 8415-01-583-9483--SL NSN: 8415-01-583-9485--MS NSN: 8415...: 8415-01-584-1640--SS NSN: 8415-01-584-1641--SR NSN: 8415-01-584-1642--SL NSN: 8415-01-584-1643--MS NSN... for deletion from the Procurement List: Products Stamp Pad Ink NSN: 7510-01-316-7516--Refill...

  1. Molecular basis of human growth hormone gene deletions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossover sites resulting from unequal recombination within the human growth hormone (GH) gene cluster that cause GH1 gene deletions and isolated GH deficiency type 1A were localized in nine patients. In eight unrelated subjects homozygous for 6.7-kilobase (kb) deletions, the breakpoints are within two blocks of highly homologous DNA sequences that lie 5' and 3' to the GH1 gene. In seven of these eight cases, the breakpoints map within a 1,250-base-pair (bp) region composed of 300-bp Alu sequences of 86% homology and flanking non-Alu sequences that are 600 and 300 bp in length and are of 96% and 88% homology, respectively. In the eighth patient, the breakpoints are 5' to these Alu repeats and are most likely within a 700-bp-region of 96% homologous DNA sequences. In the ninth patient homozygous for a 7.6-kb deletion, the breakpoints are contained with a 29-bp perfect repeat lying 5' to GH1 and the human chorionic somatomammotropin pseudogene (CSHP1). Together, these results indicate that the presence of highly homologous DNA sequences flanking GH1 predispose to recurrent unequal recombinational events presumably through chromosomal misalignment

  2. Disruption of cytoplasmic microtubules by ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation of cultured human skin fibroblasts causes the disassembly of their microtubules. Using indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, we have now investigated whether damage to the microtubule precursor pool may contribute to the disruption of microtubules. Exposure to polychromatic UV radiation inhibits the reassembly of microtubules during cellular recovery from cold treatment. In addition, the ability of taxol to promote microtubule polymerization and bundling is inhibited in UV-irradiated cells. However, UV irradiation of taxol-pretreated cells or in situ detergent-extracted microtubules fails to disrupt the microtubule network. These data suggest that damage to dimeric tubulin, or another soluble factor(s) required for polymerization, contributes to the disassembly of microtubules in UV-irradiated human skin fibroblasts

  3. The hexagon hypothesis: Six disruptive scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtles, Jim

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to bring a simple but effective and comprehensive approach to the development, delivery and monitoring of business continuity solutions. To ensure that the arguments and principles apply across the board, the paper sticks to basic underlying concepts rather than sophisticated interpretations. First, the paper explores what exactly people are defending themselves against. Secondly, the paper looks at how defences should be set up. Disruptive events tend to unfold in phases, each of which invites a particular style of protection, ranging from risk management through to business continuity to insurance cover. Their impact upon any business operation will fall into one of six basic scenarios. The hexagon hypothesis suggests that everyone should be prepared to deal with each of these six disruptive scenarios and it provides them with a useful benchmark for business continuity. PMID:26420396

  4. Endocrine disrupters. The case of estrogen xenobiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Olea Serrano

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Interest of the scientific community in chemical substances able to alter the hormone balance –endocrine disrupters- has grown with increasing evidence of the consequences for animal populations of exposure to these substances. As has occurred on previous occasions, observational data on animal populations have been sufficiently suggestive to cause concerns among clinicians that similar effects may be produced in human populations. Although data on the effects on populations of animals are more easily generated than those on individuals, clinical observations on human individuals alongside the few existing epidemiological studies have shown a certain parallelism. Indeed, in vitro and in vivo models have been able to designate many chemical compounds as hormonal mimics, including both natural and human-produced compounds to which there are exposure risks. The present work reviews the conceptual premises of endocrine disruption and the development of the use of this term.

  5. Analysis of the functional consequences of targeted exon deletion in COL7A1 reveals prospects for dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornert, Olivier; Kühl, Tobias; Bremer, Jeroen; van den Akker, Peter C; Pasmooij, Anna Mg; Nyström, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Genetically evoked deficiency of collagen VII causes dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (DEB)-a debilitating disease characterized by chronic skin fragility and progressive fibrosis. Removal of exons carrying frame-disrupting mutations can reinstate protein expression in genetic diseases. The therapeutic potential of this approach is critically dependent on gene, protein, and disease intrinsic factors. Naturally occurring exon skipping in COL7A1, translating collagen VII, suggests that skipping of exons containing disease-causing mutations may be feasible for the treatment of DEB. However, despite a primarily in-frame arrangement of exons in the COL7A1 gene, no general conclusion of the aptitude of exon skipping for DEB can be drawn, since regulation of collagen VII functionality is complex involving folding, intra- and intermolecular interactions. To directly address this, we deleted two conceptually important exons located at both ends of COL7A1, exon 13, containing recurrent mutations, and exon 105, predicted to impact folding. The resulting recombinantly expressed proteins showed conserved functionality in biochemical and in vitro assays. Injected into DEB mice, the proteins promoted skin stability. By demonstrating functionality of internally deleted collagen VII variants, our study provides support of targeted exon deletion or skipping as a potential therapy to treat a large number of individuals with DEB. PMID:27157667

  6. Cloning and disruption of Ustilago maydis genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Fotheringham, S.; Holloman, W K

    1989-01-01

    We have demonstrated that genes from Ustilago maydis can be cloned by direct complementation of mutants through the use of genomic libraries made in a high-frequency transformation vector. We isolated a gene involved in amino acid biosynthesis as an illustrative example and showed that integrative and one-step disruption methods can be used to create null mutations in the chromosomal copy of the gene by homologous recombination. The results of this investigation make it clear that one-step ge...

  7. The Impact of Disruptive Innovations in Orthopaedics

    OpenAIRE

    Hansen, Erik; Bozic, Kevin J.

    2009-01-01

    The US healthcare system is currently facing daunting demographic and economic challenges. Because musculoskeletal disorders and disease represent a substantial and growing portion of this healthcare burden, novel approaches will be needed to continue to provide high-quality, affordable, and accessible orthopaedic care to our population. The concept of “disruptive innovations,” which has been studied and popularized by Harvard Business School Professor Clayton Christensen, may offer a potenti...

  8. Disruption strategies for online child pornography networks

    OpenAIRE

    Joffres, Kilauea

    2012-01-01

    The advent of the Internet has allowed for the creation of online child pornography networks, in which websites link to one another and facilitate access to child pornographic materials. This project seeks to use social network analysis tools to identify effective disruption strategies against online child pornography networks. For this purpose, four networks of child exploitation material were extracted using a specially designed web-crawler. These networks were then submitted to three diffe...

  9. Mechanical properties and disruption of dental biofilms

    OpenAIRE

    Rmaile, Amir

    2013-01-01

    A literature review of dental plaque biofilms formation, progression and detachment mechanisms is presented in this thesis. Various strategies that have been employed to reduce or eliminate dental biofilms are discussed. The focus of the thesis was on the mechanical properties and disruption of dental biofilms, especially from hard-to-access areas of the oral cavity, such as the interproximal (IP) sites between the teeth. Various methods to measure mechanical properties of dental biofilms wer...

  10. Language adapts to signal disruption in interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Macuch Silva, V.; Roberts, S

    2016-01-01

    Linguistic traits are often seen as reflecting cognitive biases and constraints (e.g. Christiansen & Chater, 2008). However, language must also adapt to properties of the channel through which communication between individuals occurs. Perhaps the most basic aspect of any communication channel is noise. Communicative signals can be blocked, degraded or distorted by other sources in the environment. This poses a fundamental problem for communication. On average, channel disruption accompanies p...

  11. Will disruptive innovations cure health care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, C M; Bohmer, R; Kenagy, J

    2000-01-01

    It's no secret that health care delivery is convoluted, expensive, and often deeply dissatisfying to consumers. But what is less obvious is that a way out of this crisis exists. Simpler alternatives to expensive care are already here--everything from $5 eyeglasses that people can use to correct their own vision to angioplasty instead of open-heart surgery. Just as the PC replaced the mainframe and the telephone replaced the telegraph operator, disruptive innovations are changing the landscape of health care. Nurse practitioners, general practitioners, and even patients can do things in less-expensive, decentralized settings that could once be performed only by expensive specialists in centralized, inconvenient locations. But established institutions--teaching hospitals, medical schools, insurance companies, and managed care facilities--are fighting these innovations tooth and nail. Instead of embracing change, they're turning the thumbscrews on their old processes--laying off workers, delaying payments, merging, and adding layers of overhead workers. Not only is this at the root of consumer dissatisfaction with the present system, it sows the seeds of its own destruction. The history of disruptive innovations tells us that incumbent institutions will be replaced with ones whose business models are appropriate to the new technologies and markets. Instead of working to preserve the existing systems, regulators, physicians, and pharmaceutical companies need to ask how they can enable more disruptive innovations to emerge. If the natural process of disruption is allowed to proceed, the result will be higher quality, lower cost, more convenient health care for everyone. PMID:11143147

  12. Disruption of vitamin A metabolism by dioxin

    OpenAIRE

    Högberg, Pi

    2003-01-01

    Vitamin A (retinoids) is a nutrient that plays a central role in development and remains essential for cell growth and differentiation throughout life. Dioxins are polychlorinated organic pollutants known to negatively affect the storage and body clearance of retinoids. This work aimed at studying mechanisms and consequences of dioxin-induced retinoid disruption in vivo. As model compound we used 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and as model species adult male S...

  13. Robust scheduling and disruption recovery for airlines

    OpenAIRE

    Eggenberg, Niklaus; Salani, Matteo

    2009-01-01

    Airline planning include complex and structured operations that must be planned in advance in order to exploit the available resources, provide a reliable and competitive service and forecast system's performances. Decisions regarding operations are based on data which is frequently due to uncertainty. Moreover, unpredicted events may disrupt the current schedule and force managers to take reactive decisions to recover to an operational state. On the other hand, proactive decisions, i.e. deci...

  14. Influence of Dynamic Capabilities in Creating Disruptive Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Čiutienė, R; Thattakath, E

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the influence of Dynamic Capabilities in creating Disruptive Innovation. For doing so the concepts of Dynamic Capabilities and Disruptive Innovation are reviewed. The criteria of an innovation named Disruptive Innovation are obtained by comparative study between the various innovation types. To demonstrate the role of Dynamic Capabilities in creating Disruptive Innovation, the Innovation Lifecycle is demonstrated with respect to Dynamic Capabilities. Th...

  15. Fungal tools for the degradation of endocrine disrupting compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Kabiersch, Grit

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting compounds are synthetic or natural compounds that mimic the action of hormones and thus disrupt or alter functions of the endocrine system usually through direct interactions with nuclear receptors. The main objective of this work was to develop strategies of how to degrade endocrine disrupting compounds and how to monitor the removal of the endocrine disrupting effect with focus on the estrogenic compound bisphenol A and on the virilizing compound tributyltin. Bisph...

  16. Fortum, how an incumbent should deal with a disruptive innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Noteboom, Arno

    2014-01-01

    Solar PV as a disruptive innovation is changing the established energy industry. It forces energy incumbents to compete on a new market, and on new features. This research sets out to investigate how Fortum should be dealing with this disruptive innovation. This study is conducted in two parts, first it is analysed what the effects are of solar PV being labelled disruptive. This determines whether Fortum should at all be participating in this new disruptive market. The second part analyse...

  17. Influence of Dynamic Capabilities in Creating Disruptive Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Čiutienė, R; Thattakath, E

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate the influence of Dynamic Capabilities in creating Disruptive Innovation. For doing so the concepts of Dynamic Capabilities and Disruptive Innovation are reviewed. The criteria of an innovation named Disruptive Innovation are obtained by comparative study between the various innovation types. To demonstrate the role of Dynamic Capabilities in creating Disruptive Innovation, the Innovation Lifecycle is demonstrated with respect to Dynamic Capabilities. Th...

  18. Extensor Mechanism Disruption in Knee Dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Malley, Michael; Reardon, Patrick; Pareek, Ayoosh; Krych, Aaron; Levy, Bruce A; Stuart, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    Disruption of the knee extensor mechanism is a challenging injury with no clear consensus on optimal treatment. Although rare in the setting of knee dislocations, these injuries should not be overlooked. Acute, complete rupture of either the quadriceps or patellar tendon necessitates primary repair with or without augmentation. Surgical management may also be required in the setting of a partial tear if a significant extensor lag is present or nonoperative treatment has failed. Tendon augmentation is used during primary repair if the native tissue is inadequate or after a failed primary repair. The purpose of this study is to evaluate extensor mechanism disruption incidence, injury patterns, associated injuries, and surgical options, including a novel tendon augmentation technique. This procedure consists of primary patellar or quadriceps tendon repair with semitendinosus autograft augmentation utilizing a distal or proximal patellar socket. Advantages of repair with tendon augmentation include accelerated rehabilitation, decreased risk of patellar fracture from transverse or longitudinal bone tunnels, and less hardware complications. We recommend consideration of this technique for selected cases of acute extensor mechanism disruption in the setting of tibiofemoral dislocation. PMID:26636488

  19. Risk Evaluation of Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gioiosa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We review here our studies on early exposure to low doses of the estrogenic endocrine-disrupting chemical bisphenol A (BPA on behavior and metabolism in CD-1 mice. Mice were exposed in utero from gestation day (GD 11 to delivery (prenatal exposure or via maternal milk from birth to postnatal day 7 (postnatal exposure to 10 µg/kg body weight/d of BPA or no BPA (controls. Bisphenol A exposure resulted in long-term disruption of sexually dimorphic behaviors. Females exposed to BPA pre- and postnatally showed increased anxiety and behavioral profiles similar to control males. We also evaluated metabolic effects in prenatally exposed adult male offspring of dams fed (from GD 9 to 18 with BPA at doses ranging from 5 to 50 000 µg/kg/d. The males showed an age-related significant change in a number of metabolic indexes ranging from food intake to glucose regulation at BPA doses below the no observed adverse effect level (5000 µg/kg/d. Consistent with prior findings, low but not high BPA doses produced significant effects for many outcomes. These findings provide further evidence of the potential risks that developmental exposure to low doses of the endocrine disrupter BPA may pose to human health, with fetuses and infants being highly vulnerable.

  20. Physician disruptive behaviors: Five year progress report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstein, Alan H

    2015-11-16

    Disruptive behaviors in health care can have a significant adverse effect on staff interactions that can negatively impact staff satisfaction, staff performance, and patient outcomes of care. As referenced in a previously published article, the Obstetrics and Gynecology specialty is one of the service areas where these behaviors occur more frequently. Despite growing evidence of the ill effects of these types of behaviors many organizations are still having a difficult time in addressing these issues in an effective manner. Gaining a better understanding of the nature, causes, and impact of these behaviors is crucial to finding the right remedies for solution. Nobody intentionally starts the day planning to be disruptive, it's just that things get in the way. A combination of deep seated factors related to age and gender preferences, culture and ethnicity, life experiences, and other events that help shape values, attitudes and personalities, and more external factors related to training, environmental pressures, stress and burnout, and other personal issues all contribute to the mix. Given the complexities of today's health care environment, each person needs to recognize the importance of being held accountable for appropriate actions and behaviors that affect work relationships and care coordination that impact patient care. Early recognition, early intervention, and taking a pro-active supportive approach to improve individual behaviors will result in better relationships, less disruption, more satisfaction, and better outcomes of care. PMID:26601095

  1. Molecular Characterization of Heterologous HIV-1gp120 Gene Expression Disruption in Mycobacterium bovis BCG Host Strain: A Critical Issue for Engineering Mycobacterial Based-Vaccine Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG as a live vector of recombinant bacterial vaccine is a promising system to be used. In this study, we evaluate the disrupted expression of heterologous HIV-1gp120 gene in BCG Pasteur host strain using replicative vectors pMV261 and pJH222. pJH222 carries a lysine complementing gene in BCG lysine auxotrophs. The HIV-1 gp120 gene expression was regulated by BCG hsp60 promoter (in plasmid pMV261 and Mycobacteria spp. α-antigen promoter (in plasmid pJH222. Among 14 rBCG:HIV-1gp120 (pMV261 colonies screened, 12 showed a partial deletion and two showed a complete deletion. However, deletion was not observed in all 10 rBCG:HIV-1gp120 (pJH222 colonies screened. In this study, we demonstrated that E. coli/Mycobacterial expression vectors bearing a weak promoter and lysine complementing gene in a recombinant lysine auxotroph of BCG could prevent genetic rearrangements and disruption of HIV 1gp120 gene expression, a key issue for engineering Mycobacterial based vaccine vectors.

  2. Disruptions of topological chromatin domains cause pathogenic rewiring of gene-enhancer interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupiáñez, Darío G; Kraft, Katerina; Heinrich, Verena; Krawitz, Peter; Brancati, Francesco; Klopocki, Eva; Horn, Denise; Kayserili, Hülya; Opitz, John M; Laxova, Renata; Santos-Simarro, Fernando; Gilbert-Dussardier, Brigitte; Wittler, Lars; Borschiwer, Marina; Haas, Stefan A; Osterwalder, Marco; Franke, Martin; Timmermann, Bernd; Hecht, Jochen; Spielmann, Malte; Visel, Axel; Mundlos, Stefan

    2015-05-21

    Mammalian genomes are organized into megabase-scale topologically associated domains (TADs). We demonstrate that disruption of TADs can rewire long-range regulatory architecture and result in pathogenic phenotypes. We show that distinct human limb malformations are caused by deletions, inversions, or duplications altering the structure of the TAD-spanning WNT6/IHH/EPHA4/PAX3 locus. Using CRISPR/Cas genome editing, we generated mice with corresponding rearrangements. Both in mouse limb tissue and patient-derived fibroblasts, disease-relevant structural changes cause ectopic interactions between promoters and non-coding DNA, and a cluster of limb enhancers normally associated with Epha4 is misplaced relative to TAD boundaries and drives ectopic limb expression of another gene in the locus. This rewiring occurred only if the variant disrupted a CTCF-associated boundary domain. Our results demonstrate the functional importance of TADs for orchestrating gene expression via genome architecture and indicate criteria for predicting the pathogenicity of human structural variants, particularly in non-coding regions of the human genome. PMID:25959774

  3. Disruptive Behaviour of Students in Primary Education and Emotional Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esturgo-Deu, M. Estrella; Sala-Roca, Josefina

    2010-01-01

    This study analyses the relation between disruptive behaviours and the emotional abilities of children in primary education. To do this, disruptive behaviour and emotional abilities were evaluated in 1422 pupils aged between 6 and 12 years of age at 11 education centres using EQIjv. No relation was found between disruptive behaviours and age, but…

  4. The Impact of Marital Conflict and Disruption on Children's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseknecht, Sharon K.; Hango, Darcy W.

    2006-01-01

    This article investigates the effect of inconsistency between parental marital conflict and disruption on children's health. Inconsistent situations arise when minimal marital conflict precedes disruption or when marital conflict is high but there is no disruption. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, two alternative…

  5. Novel features of 3q29 deletion syndrome: Results from the 3q29 registry

    OpenAIRE

    Glassford, Megan R.; Jill A. Rosenfeld; Freedman, Alexa A.; Michael E Zwick; ,; Mulle, Jennifer G.

    2016-01-01

    3q29 deletion syndrome is caused by a recurrent, typically de novo heterozygous 1.6 Mb deletion, but because incidence of the deletion is rare (1 in 30,000 births) the phenotype is not well described. To characterize the range of phenotypic manifestations associated with 3q29 deletion syndrome, we have developed an online registry (3q29deletion.org) for ascertainment of study subjects and phenotypic data collection via Internet‐based survey instruments. We report here on data collected during...

  6. In vitro deletions in the partition locus of plasmid pSC101.

    OpenAIRE

    Kalla, S R; Gustafsson, P

    1984-01-01

    Deletion mutants in the 375-base-pair EcoRI-AvaI fragment carrying the partition locus of plasmid pSC101 were formed by the combined action of exonuclease III and nuclease S1. Six deletion mutants were isolated, and the endpoints of the deletions were sequenced. One of the deletions extended 69 base pairs from the EcoRI site without impairing plasmid stability. The other five deletions caused the plasmid to be unstable and extended 199 to 251 base pairs from the EcoRI site.

  7. Interstitial deletion 5p accompanied by dicentric ring formation of the deleted segment resulting in trisomy 5p13-cen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuffenhauer, S.; Daumer-Haas, C.; Murken, J. [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen (Germany)] [and others

    1996-10-02

    Karyotypes with an interstitial deletion and a marker chromosome formed from the deleted segment are rare. We identified such a rearrangement in a newborn infant, who presented with macrocephaly, asymmetric square skull, minor facial anomalies, omphalocele, inguinal hernias, hypospadias, and club feet. The karyotype 46,XY,del(5)(pter{r_arrow}p13::cen{r_arrow}qter)/47,XY,+dicr(5)(:p13{r_arrow}cen::p13{r_arrow}cen),del(5)(pter{r_arrow}p13::cen{r_arrow}qter) was identified by banding studies and FISH analysis in the peripheral lymphocytes. One breakpoint on the del(5) maps distal to GDNF, and FISH analysis using an {alpha}-satellite probe suggests that the proximal breakpoint maps within the centromere. The dicentric r(5) consists of two copies of the segment deleted in the del(5), resulting in trisomy of proximal 5p (5p13-cen). The phenotype of the propositus is compared with other trisomy 5p cases and possible mechanisms for the generation of this unique chromosomal rearrangement are discussed. 27 refs., 3 figs.

  8. Characterization of genetic deletions in Becker muscular dystrophy using monoclonal antibodies against a deletion-prone region of dystrophin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanh, L.T.; Man, Nguyen Thi; Morris, G.E. [Wales Institute, Clwyd (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-08-28

    We have produced a new panel of 20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against a region of the dystrophin protein corresponding to a deletion-prone region of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene (exons 45-50). We show that immunohistochemistry or Western blotting with these {open_quotes}exon-specific{close_quotes} mAbs can provide a valuable addition to Southern blotting or PCR methods for the accurate identification of genetic deletions in Becker muscular dystrophy patients. The antibodies were mapped to the following exons: exon 45 (2 mAbs), exon 46 (6), exon 47 (1), exons 47/48 (4), exons 48-50 (6), and exon 50 (1). PCR amplification of single exons or groups of exons was used both to produce specific dystrophin immunogens and to map the mAbs obtained. PCR-mediated mutagenesis was also used to identify regions of dystrophin important for mAb binding. Because the mAbs can be used to characterize the dystrophin produced by individual muscle fibres, they will also be useful for studying {open_quotes}revertant{close_quotes} fibres in Duchenne muscle and for monitoring the results of myoblast therapy trials in MD patients with deletions in this region of the dystrophin gene. 27 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Deletion breakpoint mapping on chromosome 9p21 in breast cancer cell line MCF-7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-ping XIE

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To map the deletion breakpoint of chromosome 9p21 in breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Methods  The deletion of chromosome 9p21 was checked by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA in MCF-7. Subsequently, the deletion breakpoint was amplified by long range PCR and the deletion region was narrowed by primer walking. Finally, the deletion position was confirmed by sequencing. Results  The deletion was found starting within the MTAP gene and ending within CDKN2A gene by MLPA. Based on long range PCR and primer walking, the deletion was confirmed to cover the region from chr9:21819532 to chr9:21989622 by sequencing, with a deletion size of 170kb, starting within the intron 4 of MTAP and ending within the intron 1 near exon 1β of CDKN2A. Conclusions  Long range PCR is an efficient way to detect deletion breakpoints. In MCF-7, the deletion has been confirmed to be 170kb, starting within the MTAP gene and ending within the CDKN2A gene. The significance of the deletion warrants further research.

  10. DNA-based detection of chromosome deletion and amplification: diagnostic and mechanistic significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a few of the many possible examples in which application of a molecular cytogenetic approach can ultimately lead to a new, important understanding about the statics and dynamics of human chromosome structure. In the case of retinoblastoma, cytological observations of deletions and linkage analysis have positioned the retinoblastoma locus to bank 13q14. This locus is grossly deleted in some spontaneous tumors. It is still necessary to locate more precisely and characterize the nature of the retinoblastoma locus, as well as the basis for the heterogeneity in deletions removing one copy of this locus. One is left with the possibility that those deletions that may be observed cytologically reflect but the tip of the iceberg of deletions; detection of others may require molecular probes. A related question is the nature of the DNA sequences at the deletion boundaries and the role they play in promoting these deletions

  11. Deletion of chromosomal region 13q14.3 in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavé, H; Avet-Loiseau, H; Devaux, I; Rondeau, G; Boutard, P; Lebrun, E; Méchinaud, F; Vilmer, E; Grandchamp, B

    2001-03-01

    Deletion of the 13q14 chromosomal region is frequent in B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) and is believed to inactivate a tumor supressor gene (TSG) next to RB1. We studied microsatellite markers spanning the 13q14 chromosomal region in 138 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Allelic loss was demonstrated in six cases (4.3%). Deletion did not include RB1 in two cases. In five patients, the deleted region overlapped that described in B-CLL. A sixth patient harbored a smaller deletion, slightly more telomeric than minimal deleted regions reported in B-CLL. Apparent differences in the delineation of the minimal deleted region could be due to the fact that the putative TSG is a very large gene, with some deletions affecting only a part of it. Our present findings suggest that at least some of its exons lie within a region of less than 100 kb more telomeric that previously thought.

  12. Molecular cytogenetic detection of chromosome 15 deletions in patients with Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadwick, D.E.; Weksberg, R.; Shuman, C. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are clinically distinct genetic disorders involving alterations of chromosome 15q11-q13. Approximately 75% of individuals with PWS and AS have deletions within 15q11-q13 by molecular analysis. We have evaluated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the clinical laboratory detection of del(15)(q11q13) using the cosmid probes D15S11 and GABRB3 (ONCOR, Gaithersburg, NY). 4/4 PWS and 1/1 AS patients previously identified as having cytogenetic deletions were deleted for both probes. In a prospectively ascertained series of 54 patient samples referred to rule out either PWS or AS, 8 were deleted for D15S11 and GABRB3. In addition, an atypical deletion patient with PWS was also identified who was found to be deleted for GABRB3 but not D15S11. The SNRPN locus was also deleted in this patient. Only 4 of the 9 patient samples having molecular cytogenetic deletions were clearly deleted by high resolution banding (HRB) analysis. The microscopic and submicroscopic deletions have been confirmed by dinucleotide (CA) repeat analysis. Microsatellite polymorphism analysis was also used to demonstrate that five non-deletion patients in this series had biparental inheritance of chromosome 15, including region q11-q13. Deletions were not detected by either HRB, FISH or microsatellite polymorphism analysis in samples obtained from parents of the deletion patients. Methylation studies of chromosome 15q11-q13 are in progress for this series of PWS and AS families. FISH analysis of chromosome 15q11-q13 in patients with PWS and AS is a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for deletion detection.

  13. A New Criterion for Disruption Prediction on HL-2A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Qing-Wei; JI Xiao-Quan; DING Xuan-Tong; HL-2A team; ZHOU Hang-Yu; FENG Bei-Bin; LIU Yi; PAN Yu-Dong; LI Wei; DUAN Xu-Ru; CHEN Wei; CUI Zheng-Ying

    2006-01-01

    @@ A new criterion has been proposed to predict the major disruptions caused by tearing mode instabilities. According to the HL-2A experimental results, the statistical analyses are employed to investigate the relationships between MHD activities and the plasma disruptions. Two kinds of the tearing mode activities can finally cause the disruption on HL-2A operations. By introducing a new parameter, i.e. an integral of poloidal magnetic field over time, as the criterion of disruption precursor, almost all of the disruptions can be predicted.

  14. Novel CIC point mutations and an exon-spanning, homozygous deletion identified in oligodendroglial tumors by a comprehensive genomic approach including transcriptome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Eisenreich

    Full Text Available Oligodendroglial tumors form a distinct subgroup of gliomas, characterized by a better response to treatment and prolonged overall survival. Most oligodendrogliomas and also some oligoastrocytomas are characterized by a unique and typical unbalanced translocation, der(1,19, resulting in a 1p/19q co-deletion. Candidate tumor suppressor genes targeted by these losses, CIC on 19q13.2 and FUBP1 on 1p31.1, were only recently discovered. We analyzed 17 oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas by applying a comprehensive approach consisting of RNA expression analysis, DNA sequencing of CIC, FUBP1, IDH1/2, and array CGH. We confirmed three different genetic subtypes in our samples: i the "oligodendroglial" subtype with 1p/19q co-deletion in twelve out of 17 tumors; ii the "astrocytic" subtype in three tumors; iii the "other" subtype in two tumors. All twelve tumors with the 1p/19q co-deletion carried the most common IDH1 R132H mutation. In seven of these tumors, we found protein-disrupting point mutations in the remaining allele of CIC, four of which are novel. One of these tumors also had a deleterious mutation in FUBP1. Only by integrating RNA expression and array CGH data, were we able to discover an exon-spanning homozygous microdeletion within the remaining allele of CIC in an additional tumor with 1p/19q co-deletion. Therefore we propose that the mutation rate might be underestimated when looking at sequence variants alone. In conclusion, the high frequency and the spectrum of CIC mutations in our 1p/19q-codeleted tumor cohort support the hypothesis that CIC acts as a tumor suppressor in these tumors, whereas FUBP1 might play only a minor role.

  15. Differential splicing of human androgen receptor pre-mRNA in X-linked reifenstein syndrome, because of a deletion involving a putative branch site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ris-Stalpers, C.; Verleun-Mooijman, M.C.T.; Blaeij, T.J.P. de; Brinkmann, A.O.; Degenhart, H.J.; Trapman, J. (Erasmus Univ., Rotterdam (Netherlands))

    1994-04-01

    The analysis of the androgen receptor (AR) gene, mRNA, and protein in a subject with X-linked Reifenstein syndrome (partial androgen insensitivity) is reported. The presence of two mature AR transcripts in genital skin fibroblasts of the patient is established, and, by reverse transcriptase-PCR and RNase transcription analysis, the wild-type transcript and a transcript in which exon 3 sequences are absent without disruption of the translational reading frame are identified. Sequencing and hybridization analysis show a deletion of >6 kb in intron 2 of the human AR gene, starting 18 bp upstream of exon 3. The deletion includes the putative branch-point sequence (BPS) but not the acceptor splice site on the intron 2/exon 3 boundary. The deletion of the putative intron 2 BPS results in 90% inhibition of wild-type splicing. The mutant transcript encodes an AR protein lacking the second zinc finger of the DNA-binding domain. Western/immunoblotting analysis is used to show that the mutant AR protein is expressed in genital skin fibroblasts of the patient. The residual 10% wild-type transcript can be the result of the use of a cryptic BPS located 63 bp upstream of the intron 2/exon 3 boundary of the mutant AR gene. The mutated AR protein has no transcription-activating potential and does not influence the transactivating properties of the wild-type AR, as tested in cotransfection studies. It is concluded that the partial androgen-insensitivity syndrome of this patient is the consequence of the limited amount of wild-type AR protein expressed in androgen target cells, resulting from the deletion of the intron 2 putative BPS. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Deletion involving D15S113 in a mother and son without Angelman syndrome: Refinement of the Angelman syndrome critical deletion region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelis, R.C.; Skinner, S.A.; Lethco, B.A. [Greenwood Genetic Center, SC (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-02

    Deletions of 15q11-q13 typically result in Angelman syndrome when inherited from the mother and Prader-Willi syndrome when inherited from the father. The critical deletion region for Angelman syndrome has recently been restricted by a report of an Angelman syndrome patient with a deletion spanning less than 200 kb around the D15S113 locus. We report here on a mother and son with a deletion of chromosome 15 that includes the D15S113 locus. The son has mild to moderate mental retardation and minor anomalies, while the mother has a borderline intellectual deficit and slightly downslanting palpebral fissures. Neither patient has the seizures, excessive laughter and hand clapping, ataxia or the facial anomalies which are characteristic of Angelman syndrome. The proximal boundary of the deletion in our patients lies between the D15S10 and The D15S113 loci. Our patients do not have Angelman syndrome, despite the deletion of the D15S113 marker. This suggests that the Angelman syndrome critical deletion region is now defined as the overlap between the deletion found in the previously reported Angelman syndrome patient and the region that is intact in our patients. 28 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Tidal disruption events from supermassive black hole binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Coughlin, Eric R; Nixon, Chris; Begelman, Mitchell C

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the pre-disruption gravitational dynamics and post-disruption hydrodynamics of the tidal disruption of stars by supermassive black hole (SMBH) binaries. We focus on binaries with relatively low mass primaries ($10^6M_{\\odot}$), moderate mass ratios, and separations with reasonably long gravitational wave inspiral times (tens of Myr). First, we generate a large ensemble (between 1 and 10 million) of restricted three-body integrations to quantify the statistical properties of tidal disruptions by circular SMBH binaries of initially-unbound stars. Compared to the reference case of a disruption by a single SMBH, the binary potential induces significant variance into the specific energy and angular momentum of the star at the point of disruption. Second, we use Newtonian numerical hydrodynamics to study the detailed evolution of the fallback debris from 120 disruptions randomly selected from the three-body ensemble (excluding only the most deeply penetrating encounters). We find that the overall mor...

  18. Abundance anomalies in tidal disruption events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, C. S.

    2016-05-01

    The ˜10 per cent of tidal disruption events (TDEs) due to stars more massive than M* ≳ M⊙ should show abundance anomalies due to stellar evolution in helium, carbon and nitrogen, but not oxygen. Helium is always enhanced, but only by up to ˜25 per cent on average because it becomes inaccessible once it is sequestered in the high-density core as the star leaves the main sequence. However, portions of the debris associated with the disrupted core of a main-sequence star can be enhanced in helium by factors of 2-3 for debris at a common orbital period. These helium abundance variations may be a contributor to the observed diversity of hydrogen and helium line strengths in TDEs. A still more striking anomaly is the rapid enhancement of nitrogen and the depletion of carbon due to the CNO cycle - stars with M* ≳ M⊙ quickly show an increase in their average N/C ratio by factors of 3-10. Because low-mass stars evolve slowly and high-mass stars are rare, TDEs showing high N/C will almost all be due to ˜1-2 M⊙ stars disrupted on the main sequence. Like helium, portions of the debris will show still larger changes in C and N, and the anomalies decline as the star leaves the main sequence. The enhanced [N/C] abundance ratio of these TDEs provides the first natural explanation for the rare, nitrogen-rich quasars and may also explain the strong nitrogen emission seen in ultraviolet spectra of ASASSN-14li.

  19. Laser Microbial Killing and Biofilm Disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krespi, Yosef P.; Kizhner, Victor

    2009-06-01

    Objectives: To analyze the ability of NIR lasers to reduce bacterial load and demonstrate the capability of fiber-based Q-switched Nd:YAG laser disrupting biofilm. Study Design: NIR diode laser was tested in vitro and in vivo using pathogenic microorganisms (S. aureus, S. pneumoniae, P. aeruginosa). In addition biofilms were grown from clinical Pseudomonas isolates and placed in culture plates, screws, tympanostomy tubes and PET sutures. Methods: In the animal experiments acute rhinosinusitis model was created by packing the rabbit nose with bacteria soaked solution. The nasal pack was removed in two days and nose was exposed to laser irradiation. A 940 nm diode laser with fiber diffuser was used. Nasal cultures were obtained before and after the laser treatments. Animals were sacrificed fifteen days following laser treatment and bacteriologic/histologic results analyzed. Q-switched Nd:YAG laser generated shockwave pulses were delivered on biofilm using special probes over culture plates, screws, tubes, and PET sutures for the biofilm experiments. Results: Average of two log bacteria reduction was achieved with NIR laser compared to controls. Histologic studies demonstrated preservation of tissue integrity without significant damage to mucosa. Biofilms were imaged before, during and after treatment using a confocal microscope. During laser-generated shockwave application, biofilm was initially seen to oscillate and eventually break off. Large and small pieces of biofilm were totally and instantly removed from the surface to which they were attached in seconds. Conclusions: Significant bacterial reduction was achieved with NIR laser therapy in this experimental in vitro and animal study. In addition we disrupted Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms using Q-switched Nd:YAG laser and special probes generating plasma and shockwave. This new and innovative method of bacteria killing and biofilm disruption without injuring host tissue may have clinical application in the

  20. Disruption of Four Kinesin Genes in Dictyostelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soga Ikko

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kinesin and dynein are the two families of microtubule-based motors that drive much of the intracellular movements in eukaryotic cells. Using a gene knockout strategy, we address here the individual function(s of four of the 13 kinesin proteins in Dictyostelium. The goal of our ongoing project is to establish a minimal motility proteome for this basal eukaryote, enabling us to contrast motor functions here with the often far more elaborate motor families in the metazoans. Results We performed individual disruptions of the kinesin genes, kif4, kif8, kif10, and kif11. None of the motors encoded by these genes are essential for development or viability of Dictyostelium. Removal of Kif4 (kinesin-7; CENP-E family significantly impairs the rate of cell growth and, when combined with a previously characterized dynein inhibition, results in dramatic defects in mitotic spindle assembly. Kif8 (kinesin-4; chromokinesin family and Kif10 (kinesin-8; Kip3 family appear to cooperate with dynein to organize the interphase radial microtubule array. Conclusion The results reported here extend the number of kinesin gene disruptions in Dictyostelium, to now total 10, among the 13 isoforms. None of these motors, individually, are required for short-term viability. In contrast, homologs of at least six of the 10 kinesins are considered essential in humans. Our work underscores the functional redundancy of motor isoforms in basal organisms while highlighting motor specificity in more complex metazoans. Since motor disruption in Dictyostelium can readily be combined with other motility insults and stresses, this organism offers an excellent system to investigate functional interactions among the kinesin motor family.

  1. Pheromone disruption of Argentine ant trail integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckling, D.M.; Peck, R.W.; Manning, L.M.; Stringer, L.D.; Cappadonna, J.; El-Sayed, A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Disruption of Argentine ant trail following and reduced ability to forage (measured by bait location success) was achieved after presentation of an oversupply of trail pheromone, (Z)-9-hexadecenal. Experiments tested single pheromone point sources and dispersion of a formulation in small field plots. Ant walking behavior was recorded and digitized by using video tracking, before and after presentation of trail pheromone. Ants showed changes in three parameters within seconds of treatment: (1) Ants on trails normally showed a unimodal frequency distribution of walking track angles, but this pattern disappeared after presentation of the trail pheromone; (2) ants showed initial high trail integrity on a range of untreated substrates from painted walls to wooden or concrete floors, but this was significantly reduced following presentation of a point source of pheromone; (3) the number of ants in the pheromone-treated area increased over time, as recruitment apparently exceeded departures. To test trail disruption in small outdoor plots, the trail pheromone was formulated with carnuba wax-coated quartz laboratory sand (1 g quartz sand/0.2 g wax/1 mg pheromone). The pheromone formulation, with a half-life of 30 h, was applied by rotary spreader at four rates (0, 2.5, 7.5, and 25 mg pheromone/m2) to 1- and 4-m2 plots in Volcanoes National Park, Hawaii. Ant counts at bait cards in treated plots were significantly reduced compared to controls on the day of treatment, and there was a significant reduction in ant foraging for 2 days. These results show that trail pheromone disruption of Argentine ants is possible, but a much more durable formulation is needed before nest-level impacts can be expected. ?? 2008 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  2. Criteria for endocrine disrupters: report from the Danish centre on Endocrine Disrupters (CEHOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbech, Henrik; Bjerregaard, Poul; Hass, Ulla;

    The aim of this session is to give a presentation of the report (both ENV and HH) on criteria carried out by the Danish Centre on Endocrine Disrupters (CEHOS) as a project contracted by the Danish Environmental Protection Agency. CEHOS is an interdisciplinary scientific network without walls...... and the main purpose of the Centre is to build and gather new knowledge on endocrine disrupters (EDs) with focus on information needed for the preventive work of the regulatory authorities. The aim of the report was to propose scientific criteria for the identification of ED substances of concern for human...

  3. Coherent photon-photon processes in disruptive and non-disruptive relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using an impact parameter formulation, differential probability distributions and cross sections for the production of lepton pairs via the photon-photon mechanism are calculated for relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The characteristic features of lepton pair production in disruptive as well as in non-disruptive A-A collisions are studied. Cross sections can be large, the very low k perpendicularto -values of the pairs will help to distinguish these pairs from the ones originating from other sources like Drell-Yan or thermal production. (orig.)

  4. 5q14.3 deletion neurocutaneous syndrome: Contiguous gene syndrome caused by simultaneous deletion of RASA1 and MEF2C: A progressive disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilari, Rita; Agosta, Guillermo; Bacino, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    We report the case of a young girl who was presented with complex clinical symptoms caused by the deletion of contiguous genes: RASA1 and MEF2C, located on chromosome 5q14.3. Specifically, the diagnosis of her skin disorder and vascular malformations involving central nervous system is consistent with a RASopathy. The child's neurological manifestations are observed in most patients suffering from 5q14.3 by deletion or mutation of the MEF2C gene. A review of the literature allowed us to conclude that the contiguous deletion of genes RASA1 and MEF2C fulfills the criteria for the diagnosis of a Neurocutaneous syndrome as proposed by Carr et al. [2011]. We also assessed the penetrance of RASA1 and clinical manifestations of MEF2C according to the type of deletion. This child described presents the complete symptomatology of both deleted genes. We would also like to highlight the progression of the disorder.

  5. Traumatic ureteropelvic disruption in the child

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traumatic disruption of the ureter from the renal pelvis is a rare injury because the ureteropelvic junction is situated deep in the retroperitoneum and is thus protected by the spine and paraspinal muscles. The mechanism for this injury is thought to be the stretching of the proximal ureter by sudden extreme hyperextension of the trunk. As a non-fatal injury, this occurs only in the child because of the greater elasticity and mobility of the young skeleton. At The Children's Hospital we have seen 3 cases of avulsion of the ureter from the pelvis following blunt trauma. (orig.)

  6. Amphibians as model to study endocrine disrupters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloas, Werner; Lutz, Ilka

    2006-10-13

    Environmental compounds can interfere with endocrine systems of wildlife and humans. These so-called endocrine disrupters (ED) are known to affect reproductive biology and thyroid system. The classical model species for these endocrine systems are amphibians and therefore they can serve as sentinels for detection of the modes of action (MOAs) of ED. Recently, amphibians are being reviewed as suitable models to assess (anti)estrogenic and (anti)androgenic MOAs influencing reproductive biology as well as (anti)thyroidal MOAs interfering with the thyroid system. The development of targeted bioassays in combination with adequate chemical analyses is the prerequisite for a concise risk assessment of ED.

  7. Multimedia data mining and analytics disruptive innovation

    CERN Document Server

    Baughman, Aaron; Pan, Jia-Yu; Petrushin, Valery A

    2015-01-01

    This authoritative text/reference provides fresh insights into the cutting edge of multimedia data mining, reflecting how the research focus has shifted towards networked social communities, mobile devices and sensors. Presenting a detailed exploration into the progression of the field, the book describes how the history of multimedia data processing can be viewed as a sequence of disruptive innovations. Across the chapters, the discussion covers the practical frameworks, libraries, and open source software that enable the development of ground-breaking research into practical applications.

  8. Radial aplasia and chromosome 22q11 deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digilio, M C; Giannotti, A; Marino, B; Guadagni, A M; Orzalesi, M; Dallapiccola, B

    1997-01-01

    We report on a neonate with deletion 22q11 (del22q11) presenting with facial dysmorphism, ocular coloboma, congenital heart defect, urogenital malformations, and unilateral radial aplasia. This malformation complex includes features frequently occurring in velocardiofacial syndrome as well as findings described in the CHARGE and VACTERL associations. To our knowledge, the present case is the first report of radial aplasia in del22q11. This observation further supports and extends the clinical variability of del22q11. Images PMID:9391893

  9. Targeted deletions of cyclooxygenase-2 and atherogenesis in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hui, Yiqun; Ricciotti, Emanuela; Crichton, Irene;

    2010-01-01

    -2 in macrophages and T cells (TCs) to atherogenesis. METHODS AND RESULTS: Deletion of macrophage-COX-2 (Mac-COX-2KOs) was attained with LysMCre mice and completely suppressed lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophage prostaglandin (PG) formation and lipopolysaccharide-evoked systemic PG biosynthesis...... by approximately 30%. Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated COX-2 expression was suppressed in polymorphonuclear leukocytes isolated from MacKOs, but PG formation was not even detected in polymorphonuclear leukocyte supernatants from control mice. Atherogenesis was attenuated when MacKOs were crossed into hyperlipidemic...

  10. Genetic deletion of caspase-2 accelerates MMTV/c-neu-driven mammary carcinogenesis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, M J; McCormick, L; Janke, L; Howard, A; Bouchier-Hayes, L; Green, D R

    2013-09-01

    Despite being the most evolutionarily conserved of the mammalian caspases, little is understood about the cellular function of caspase-2 in normal tissues or what role caspase-2 may have in the progression of human disease. It has been reported that deletion of the caspase-2 gene (Casp2), accelerates Eμ-myc lymphomagenesis in mice, and thus caspase-2 may act as a tumor suppressor in hematological malignancies. Here, we sought to extend these findings to epithelial cancers by examining the potential role of caspase-2 as a tumor suppressor in the mouse mammary carcinogenesis model; MMTV/c-neu. The rate of tumor acquisition was significantly higher in multiparous Casp2(-/-)/MMTV mice compared with Casp2(+/+)/MMTV and Casp2(+/-)/MMTV mice. Cells from Casp2(-/-)/MMTV tumors were often multinucleated and displayed bizarre mitoses and karyomegaly, while cells from Casp2(+/+)/MMTV and Casp2(+/-)/MMTV tumors never displayed this phenotype. Tumors from Casp2(-/-)/MMTV animals had a significantly higher mitotic index than tumors from Casp2(+/+)/MMTV and Casp2(+/-)/MMTV animals. Cell cycle analysis of Casp2(-/-) E1A/Ras-transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) also indicated a higher proliferative rate in the absence of caspase-2. In vitro assays further illustrated that MEF had increased genomic instability in the absence of caspase-2. This appears to be due to disruption of the p53 pathway because we observed a concomitant decrease in the induction of the p53 target genes, Pidd, p21 and Mdm2. Thus caspase-2 may function as a tumor suppressor, in part, through regulation of cell division and genomic stability.

  11. Deletion of autophagy inducer RB1CC1 results in degeneration of the retinal pigment epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jingyu; Jia, Lin; Khan, Naheed; Lin, Chengmao; Mitter, Sayak K; Boulton, Michael E; Dunaief, Joshua L; Klionsky, Daniel J; Guan, Jun-Lin; Thompson, Debra A; Zacks, David N

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy regulates cellular homeostasis and response to environmental stress. Within the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) of the eye, the level of autophagy can change with both age and disease. The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between reduced autophagy and age-related degeneration of the RPE. The gene encoding RB1CC1/FIP200 (RB1-inducible coiled-coil 1), a protein essential for induction of autophagy, was selectively knocked out in the RPE by crossing Best1-Cre mice with mice in which the Rb1cc1 gene was flanked with Lox-P sites (Rb1cc1(flox/flox)). Ex vivo and in vivo analyses, including western blot, immunohistochemistry, transmission electron microscopy, fundus photography, optical coherence tomography, fluorescein angiography, and electroretinography were performed to assess the structure and function of the retina as a function of age. Deletion of Rb1cc1 resulted in multiple autophagy defects within the RPE including decreased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, accumulation of autophagy-targeted precursors, and increased numbers of mitochondria. Age-dependent degeneration of the RPE occurred, with formation of atrophic patches, subretinal migration of activated microglial cells, subRPE deposition of inflammatory and oxidatively damaged proteins, subretinal drusenoid deposits, and occasional foci of choroidal neovascularization. There was secondary loss of photoreceptors overlying the degenerated RPE and reduction in the electroretinogram. These observations are consistent with a critical role of autophagy in the maintenance of normal homeostasis in the aging RPE, and indicate that disruption of autophagy leads to retinal phenotypes associated with age-related degeneration.

  12. Novel large-range mitochondrial DNA deletions and fatal multisystemic disorder with prominent hepatopathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, Marzia; Rizza, Teresa; Verrigni, Daniela [Unit of Molecular Medicine for Neuromuscular and Neurodegenerative Diseases, ' Bambino Gesu' Children' s Hospital, Rome (Italy); Martinelli, Diego [Division of Metabolism, ' Bambino Gesu' Children' s Hospital, Rome (Italy); Tozzi, Giulia; Torraco, Alessandra; Piemonte, Fiorella [Unit of Molecular Medicine for Neuromuscular and Neurodegenerative Diseases, ' Bambino Gesu' Children' s Hospital, Rome (Italy); Dionisi-Vici, Carlo [Division of Metabolism, ' Bambino Gesu' Children' s Hospital, Rome (Italy); Nobili, Valerio [Gastroenterology and Liver Unit, ' Bambino Gesu' Children' s Hospital, Rome (Italy); Francalanci, Paola; Boldrini, Renata; Callea, Francesco [Dept. Pathology, ' Bambino Gesu' Children' s Hospital, Rome (Italy); Santorelli, Filippo Maria [UOC Neurogenetica e Malattie Neuromuscolari, Fondazione Stella Maris, Pisa (Italy); Bertini, Enrico [Unit of Molecular Medicine for Neuromuscular and Neurodegenerative Diseases, ' Bambino Gesu' Children' s Hospital, Rome (Italy); and others

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expanded array of mtDNA deletions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pearson syndrome with prominent hepatopathy associated with single mtDNA deletions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Detection of deletions in fibroblasts and blood avoids muscle and liver biopsy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Look for mtDNA deletions before to study nuclear genes related to mtDNA depletion. -- Abstract: Hepatic involvement in mitochondrial cytopathies rarely manifests in adulthood, but is a common feature in children. Multiple OXPHOS enzyme defects in children with liver involvement are often associated with dramatically reduced amounts of mtDNA. We investigated two novel large scale deletions in two infants with a multisystem disorder and prominent hepatopathy. Amount of mtDNA deletions and protein content were measured in different post-mortem tissues. The highest levels of deleted mtDNA were in liver, kidney, pancreas of both patients. Moreover, mtDNA deletions were detected in cultured skin fibroblasts in both patients and in blood of one during life. Biochemical analysis showed impairment of mainly complex I enzyme activity. Patients manifesting multisystem disorders in childhood may harbour rare mtDNA deletions in multiple tissues. For these patients, less invasive blood specimens or cultured fibroblasts can be used for molecular diagnosis. Our data further expand the array of deletions in the mitochondrial genomes in association with liver failure. Thus analysis of mtDNA should be considered in the diagnosis of childhood-onset hepatopathies.

  13. Geometric figure-ground cues override standard depth from accretion-deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanrikulu, Ömer Daglar; Froyen, Vicky; Feldman, Jacob; Singh, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Accretion-deletion is widely considered a decisive cue to surface depth ordering, with the accreting or deleting surface interpreted as behind an adjoining surface. However, Froyen, Feldman, and Singh (2013) have shown that when accretion-deletion occurs on both sides of a contour, accreting-deleting regions can also be perceived as in front and as self-occluding due to rotation in three dimensions. In this study we ask whether geometric figure-ground cues can override the traditional "depth from accretion-deletion" interpretation even when accretion-deletion takes place only on one side of a contour. We used two tasks: a relative-depth task (front/back), and a motion-classification task (translation/rotation). We conducted two experiments, in which texture in only one set of alternating regions was moving; the other set was static. Contrary to the traditional interpretation of accretion-deletion, the moving convex and symmetric regions were perceived as figural and rotating in three dimensions in roughly half of the trials. In the second experiment, giving different motion directions to the moving regions (thereby weakening motion-based grouping) further weakened the traditional accretion-deletion interpretation. Our results show that the standard "depth from accretion-deletion" interpretation is overridden by static geometric cues to figure-ground. Overall, the results demonstrate a rich interaction between accretion-deletion, figure-ground, and structure from motion that is not captured by existing models of depth from motion.

  14. Abundance Anomalies In Tidal Disruption Events

    CERN Document Server

    Kochanek, C S

    2015-01-01

    The ~10% of tidal disruption events (TDEs) due to stars more massive than the Sun should show abundance anomalies due to stellar evolution in helium, carbon and nitrogen, but not oxygen. Helium is always enhanced, but only by up to ~25% on average because it becomes inaccessible once it is sequestered in the high density core as the star leaves the main sequence. However, portions of the debris associated with the disrupted core of a main sequence star can be enhanced in helium by factors of 2-3 for debris at a common orbital period. These helium abundance variations may be a contributor to the observed diversity of hydrogen and helium line strengths in TDEs. A still more striking anomaly is the rapid enhancement of nitrogen and the depletion of carbon due to the CNO cycle -- stars more massive than the Sun quickly show an increase in their average N/C ratio by factors of 3-10. Because low mass stars evolve slowly and high mass stars are rare, TDEs showing high N/C will almost all be due to 1-2Msun stars disr...

  15. Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder: current insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baweja R

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Raman Baweja, Susan D Mayes, Usman Hameed, James G Waxmonsky Department of Psychiatry, Penn State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA, USA Abstract: Disruptive mood dysregulation disorder (DMDD was introduced as a new diagnostic entity under the category of depressive disorders in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5. It was included in DSM-5 primarily to address concerns about the misdiagnosis and consequent overtreatment of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents. DMDD does provide a home for a large percentage of referred children with severe persistent irritability that did not fit well into any DSM, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV diagnostic category. However, it has been a controversial addition to the DSM-5 due to lack of published validity studies, leading to questions about its validity as a distinct disorder. In this article, the authors discuss the diagnostic criteria, assessment, epidemiology, criticism of the diagnosis, and pathophysiology, as well as treatment and future directions for DMDD. They also review the literature on severe mood dysregulation, as described by the National Institute of Mental Health, as the scientific support for DMDD is based primarily on studies of severe mood dysregulation. Keywords: disruptive mood dysregulation disorder, persistent irritability, temper outbursts 

  16. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Sanchez

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this analysis report is to evaluate and document the inclusion or exclusion of the disruptive events features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). A screening decision, either ''Included'' or ''Excluded,'' is given for each FEP, along with the technical basis for screening decisions. This information is required by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) at 10 CFR 63.114 (d), (e), and (f) [DIRS 156605]. The FEPs addressed in this report deal with both seismic and igneous disruptive events, such as fault displacements through the repository and an igneous intrusion into the repository. For included FEPs, this analysis summarizes the implementation of the FEP in TSPA-LA (i.e., how the FEP is included). For excluded FEPs, this analysis provides the technical basis for exclusion from TSPA-LA (i.e., why the FEP is excluded). Previous versions of this report were developed to support the total system performance assessments (TSPA) for various prior repository designs. This revision addresses the repository design for the license application (LA).

  17. Angelman syndrome: Validation of molecular cytogenetic analysis of chromosome 15q11-q13 for deletion detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, L.; Knoll, J.H.M. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-03-13

    In a series of 18 individuals comprising parents of Angelman syndrome (AS) patients and AS patients with large deletions, microdeletions, and no deletions, we utilized fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with genomic phage clones for loci D15S63 and GABRB3 for deletion detection of chromosome 15q11-q13. Utilization of probes at these loci allows detection of common large deletions and permits discrimination of less common small deletions. In all individuals the molecular cytogenetic data were concordant with the DNA deletion analyses. FISH provides an accurate method of deletion detection for chromosome 15q11-q13. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Dystrophin in frameshift deletion patients with Becker Muscular Dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangopadhyay, S.B.; Ray, P.N.; Worton, R.G.; Sherratt, T.G.; Heckmatt, J.Z.; Dubowitz, V.; Strong, P.N.; Miller, G. (Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States)); Shokeir, M. (Univ. Hospital, Saskatchewan (Canada))

    1992-09-01

    In a previous study the authors identified 14 cases with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) or its milder variant, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD), with a deletion of exons 3-7, a deletion that would be expected to shift the translational reading frame of the mRNA and give a severe phenotype. They have examined dystrophin and its mRNA from muscle biopsies of seven cases with either mild or intermediate phenotypes. In all cases they detected slightly lower-molecular-weight dystrophin in 12%-15% abundance relative to the normal. By sequencing amplified mRNA they have found that exon 2 is spliced to exon 8, a splice that produces a frameshifted mRNA, and have found no evidence for alternate splicing that might be involved in restoration of dystrophin mRNA reading frame in the patients with a mild phenotype. Other transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms such as cryptic promoter, ribosomal frameshifting, and reinitiation are suggested that might play some role in restoring the reading frame. 34 refs., 5 figs. 1 tab.

  19. Disruptive Conduct: The Impact of Disruptive Technologies on Social Relations in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flavin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Higher education institutions (HEIs) have invested significantly in digital technologies for learning and teaching. However, technologies provided by HEIs have not been universally successful in terms of adoption and usage. Meanwhile, both students and lecturers use disruptive technologies to support learning and teaching. This article examines…

  20. Disrupting Law School: How Disruptive Innovation Will Revolutionize the Legal World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistone, Michele R.; Horn, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Facing dramatic declines in enrollment, revenue, and student quality at the same time that their cost structure continues to rise and public support has waned, law schools are in crisis. A key driver of the crisis is shrinking employment opportunities for recent graduates, which stem in part from the disruption of the traditional business model…

  1. Deletion of P399{sub E}401 in NADPH cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase results in partial mixed oxidase deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flueck, Christa E., E-mail: christa.flueck@dkf.unibe.ch [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, University Children' s Hospital, Bern (Switzerland); Mallet, Delphine [Service d' Endocrinologie Moleculaire et Maladies Rares, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Bron (France); Hofer, Gaby [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, University Children' s Hospital, Bern (Switzerland); Samara-Boustani, Dinane [Hopital Necker-Enfants malades, Paris (France); Leger, Juliane [Hopital Robert Debre, Paris (France); Polak, Michel [Hopital Necker-Enfants malades, Paris (France); Morel, Yves [Service d' Endocrinologie Moleculaire et Maladies Rares, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Bron (France); Pandey, Amit V., E-mail: amit@pandeylab.org [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, University Children' s Hospital, Bern (Switzerland)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Mutations in human POR cause congenital adrenal hyperplasia. {yields} We are reporting a novel 3 amino acid deletion mutation in POR P399{sub E}401del. {yields} POR mutation P399{sub E}401del decreased P450 activities by 60-85%. {yields} Impairment of steroid metabolism may be caused by multiple hits. {yields} Severity of aromatase inhibition is related to degree of in utero virilization. -- Abstract: P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is the electron donor for all microsomal P450s including steroidogenic enzymes CYP17A1, CYP19A1 and CYP21A2. We found a novel POR mutation P399{sub E}401del in two unrelated Turkish patients with 46,XX disorder of sexual development. Recombinant POR proteins were produced in yeast and tested for their ability to support steroid metabolizing P450 activities. In comparison to wild-type POR, the P399{sub E}401del protein was found to decrease catalytic efficiency of 21-hydroxylation of progesterone by 68%, 17{alpha}-hydroxylation of progesterone by 76%, 17,20-lyase action on 17OH-pregnenolone by 69%, aromatization of androstenedione by 85% and cytochrome c reduction activity by 80%. Protein structure analysis of the three amino acid deletion P399{sub E}401 revealed reduced stability and flexibility of the mutant. In conclusion, P399{sub E}401del is a novel mutation in POR that provides valuable genotype-phenotype and structure-function correlation for mutations in a different region of POR compared to previous studies. Characterization of P399{sub E}401del provides further insight into specificity of different P450s for interaction with POR as well as nature of metabolic disruptions caused by more pronounced effect on specific P450s like CYP17A1 and aromatase.

  2. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein {beta} deletion increases mitochondrial function and protects mice from LXR-induced hepatic steatosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, Shaikh M., E-mail: rmizanoor@hotmail.com [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Choudhury, Mahua; Janssen, Rachel C.; Baquero, Karalee C. [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Miyazaki, Makoto [Division of Renal Diseases and Hypertension, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Friedman, Jacob E. [Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LXR agonist activation increases liver TG accumulation by increasing lipogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C/EBP{beta}{sup -/-} mouse prevents LXR activation-mediated induction of hepatic lipogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C/EBP{beta} deletion increases mitochondrial transport chain function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Beneficial effects of LXR activation on liver cholesterol metabolism did not change. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer C/EBP{beta} inhibition might have important therapeutic potential. -- Abstract: Drugs designed specifically to activate liver X receptors (LXRs) have beneficial effects on lowering cholesterol metabolism and inflammation but unfortunately lead to severe hepatic steatosis. The transcription factor CCAAT/enhancer binding protein beta (C/EBP{beta}) is an important regulator of liver gene expression but little is known about its involvement in LXR-based steatosis and cholesterol metabolism. The present study investigated the role of C/EBP{beta} expression in LXR agonist (T0901317)-mediated alteration of hepatic triglyceride (TG) and lipogenesis in mice. C/EBP{beta} deletion in mice prevented LXR agonist-mediated induction of lipogenic gene expression in liver in conjunction with significant reduction of liver TG accumulation. Surprisingly, C/EBP{beta}{sup -/-} mice showed a major increase in liver mitochondrial electron chain function compared to WT mice. Furthermore, LXR activation in C/EBP{beta}{sup -/-} mice increased the expression of liver ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG1, a gene implicated in cholesterol efflux and reducing blood levels of total and LDL-cholesterol. Together, these findings establish a central role for C/EBP{beta} in the LXR-mediated steatosis and mitochondrial function, without impairing the influence of LXR activation on lowering LDL and increasing HDL-cholesterol. Inactivation of C/EBP{beta} might therefore be an important therapeutic strategy to prevent LXR

  3. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA: Common double deletion in the N-Acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase gene (GALNS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, Toshinori; Tomatsu, Shunji; Fukuda, Seiji [Gifu Univ. School of Medicine, Gifu (Japan)] [and others

    1995-04-10

    Mucopolysaccharidosis IVA (MPS IVA) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfatase (GALNS). We found two separate deletions of nearly 8.0 and 6.0 kb in the GALNS gene, including some exons. There are Alu repetitive elements near the breakpoints of the 8.0-kb deletion, and this deletion resulted from an Alu-Alu recombination. The other 6.0-kb deletion involved illegitimate recombinational events between incomplete short direct repeats of 8 bp at deletion breakpoints. The same rearrangement has been observed in a heteroallelic state in four unrelated patients. This is the first documentation of a common double deletion a gene that is not a member of a gene cluster. 39 refs., 5 figs.

  4. STUDY OF DELETION OF P16 GENE IN THE PROGRESSION OF BRAIN ASTROCYTOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhai Guang; Yuan Xianhou

    1998-01-01

    Objective:To study the relationship between deletion of P16 gene and occurrence and progression of astrocytomas. Methods: The techniques of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunohistochemistry were used to detect the deletion of exon2 of P16 gene and expression of P16 gene in 52 cases of Brain astrocytoma.Results: The deletion rate of exon2 of P16 gene in the tumors analyzed was 34.6%. Most of them with deletion of exon2 of p16 gene were high grade astrocytomas (grade Ⅲ 42%, grade Ⅳ 50%). 61.5% of the tumors were absent from expression of p16 and the deletion rate of p16 protein increased with the grade of astrocytoma (X2=10.83, P<0.005). Conclusion: Deletion of p16 gene and protein may correlate with the malignant progression of astrocytoma.

  5. Deletion mapping indicates that MTS1 is the target of frequent deletions at chromosome 9p21 in paediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidal-Giroux, C; Gérard, B; Cavé, H; Duval, M; Rohrlich, P; Elion, J; Vilmer, E; Grandchamp, B

    1996-02-01

    Recent reports have indicated a high frequency of deletions of MTS1 (CDKN2, p16ink4, CDKI4) in acute lymphoblastic leukaemias (ALLs). This gene is located at chromosome 9p21 and encodes an inhibitor of cyclin D-dependent kinases. In contrast with the observations in some other malignancies, no inactivation of MTS1 by intragenic mutation was demonstrated in leukaemias. A contribution of MTS1 alterations to leukaemogenesis therefore remains questionable. In order to test for the implication of MTS1 as a tumour suppressor gene in paediatric ALLs we have explored the 9p21 chromosomal region of 46 children with this disease. The copy number of the MTS1 gene in blasts from the patients was determined using a quantitative PCR assay enabling us to precisely detect mono- and bi-allelic deletions. Rearrangements of the gene were sought by Southern blot analysis. The extent of the deletions was studied using microsatellite markers spanning the 9p21 chromosomal region. Point mutations were sought in exon 1 and exon 2 of the MTS1 gene in patients with a mono-allelic deletion in addition, exon 2 of MTS1, which contains two-thirds of the coding region, was sequenced in all patients who had no deletion of the gene. Altogether, our data are consistent with the view that MTS1 is the target of 9p21 deletions. Either one or two alleles of the gene were deleted in 36% of non-selected children with B-lineage ALL and both alleles were deleted in all seven patients we studied with T-lineage ALL. The absence of any point mutation implies that the major mechanism of inactivation of MTS1 in ALLs is deletional.

  6. A Chinese familial growth hormone deficiency with a deletion of 7.1 kb of DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    He, Y A; Chen, S S; Wang, Y. X; Lin, X. Y.; D. F. Wang

    1990-01-01

    Using restriction endonuclease analysis and a human growth hormone cDNA probe, we have found a Chinese family with a human growth hormone gene deletion. Two affected sibs are homozygous for a deletion of approximately 7.1 kb of DNA, which contains the normal human growth hormone gene. The patients' parents and grandmothers are heterozygous for the deleted gene. Their grandfathers are normal and homozygous for the hGH-N gene. All of them have normal stature.

  7. The rates and patterns of deletions in the human factor IX gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketterling, R.P.; Vielhaber, E.L.; Lind, T.J.; Thorland, E.C.; Sommer S.S. (Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States))

    1994-02-01

    Deletions are commonly observed in genes with either segments of highly homologous sequences or excessive gene length. However, in the factor IX gene and in most genes, deletions (of [ge]21 bp) are uncommon. The authors have analyzed DNA from 290 families with hemophilia B (203 independent mutations) and have found 12 deletions >20 bp. Eleven of these are >2 kb (range >3-163 kb), and one is 1.1 kb. The junctions of the four deletions that are completely contained within the factor IX gene have been determined. A novel mutation occurred in patient HB128: the data suggest that a 26.8-kb deletion occurred between two segments of alternating purines and pyrimidines and that a 2.3-kb sense strand segment derived from the deleted region was inserted. For a sample of 203 independent mutations, the authors estimate the [open quotes]baseline[close quotes] rates of deletional mutation per base pair per generation as a function of size. The rate for large (>2 kb)I deletions is exceedingly low. For every mutational event in which a given base is at the junction of a large deletion, there are an estimated 58 microdeletions (<20 bp) and 985 single-base substitutions at that base. Analysis of the nine reported deletion junctions in the factor IX gene literature reveals that (i) five are associated with inversion, orphan sequences, or sense strand insertions; (ii) four are simple deletions that display an excess of short direct repeats at their junctions; (iii) there is no dramatic clustering of junctions within the gene; and (iv) with the exception of alternating purines and pyrimidines, deletion junctions are not preferentially associated with repetitive DNA. 58 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. SIMULATING THE SUPPLY DISRUPTION FOR THE COORDINATED SUPPLY CHAIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    There are many disruptive accidents in the supply chain operations system and achieving the coordination of supply chain is main objective for supply chain research. While disruptive accidents have increasingly influenced the coordinated operation of the supply chain, existing research literature on the supply chain coordination is setting in a stationary environment. The answer for how the disruptive accidents affect the coordinated supply chain is given in this paper. Based on the benchmark supply chain which is coordinated by the negative incentive mechanism, we study the impacts of supply disruption on the supply chain system by using simulation approach in which two different distribution function of random variable are used to express the supply disruption. Comparison between these two simulation results and possible coordination mechanism under the supply disruption are proposed. From the perspective of supply chain risk management, we provide the inspiration for the manager.

  9. Fish and wildlife species as sentinels of environmental endocrine disruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, S.R.; Matter, J.M.; Rattner, B.A.; Guiney, P.D.; Kendall, Ronald J.; Dickerson, Richard L.; Giesy, John P.; Suk, William P.

    1998-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the history and criteria for use of captive and free-ranging fish and wildlife (amphibians, reptiles, birds, and mammals) species as sentinels of potential environmental endocrine disruption. Biochemical, behavioral, physiological, immunological, genetic, reproductive, developmental, and ecological correlates of endocrine disruption in these sentinels are presented and reviewed. In addition, data needs to promote better use of sentinel species in the assessment of endocrine disruption are discussed.

  10. Research progress of the endocrine disrupting activities of polychlorinated biphenyls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Jingming; QIN Zhanfen; CONG Lin; XU Xiaobai

    2004-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are global persistent organic pollutants. Almost all commercial PCBs mixtures, single PCB congener, and their metabolites possess endocrine disrupting activities. They can disrupt the estrogen/androgen system, thyroid hormone system and other endocrine systems by interfering with the synthesis, transport, storage, metabolism, and feedback regulation of hormones. The newest data related to the endocrine disrupting activities of PCBs and their mechanisms are reviewed and the research perspectives are also discussed.

  11. Universal versus tailored solutions for alleviating disruptive behavior in hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Berman-Kishony, Talia; Shvarts, Shifra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Disruptive behavior among hospital staff can negatively affect quality of care. Motivated by a standard on disruptive behavior issued by The Joint Commission (LD 3.10), as well as the desire to improve patient care, minimize liability, and improve staff retention, hospitals are setting policies to prevent and resolve disruptive behaviors. However, it is unknown whether uniform conflict management tools are equally effective among different hospital settings. Methods: We surveyed r...

  12. Environmental endocrine disruption: an effects assessment and analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Crisp, T M; Clegg, E D; Cooper, R. L.; Wood, W. P.; D. G. Anderson; Baetcke, K. P.; Hoffmann, J L; Morrow, M S; Rodier, D J; Schaeffer, J E; Touart, L W; Zeeman, M G; Patel, Y. M.

    1998-01-01

    This report is an overview of the current state of the science relative to environmental endocrine disruption in humans, laboratory testing, and wildlife species. Background information is presented on the field of endocrinology, the nature of hormones, and potential sites for endocrine disruption, with specific examples of chemicals affecting these sites. An attempt is made to present objectively the issue of endocrine disruption, consider working hypotheses, offer opposing viewpoints, analy...

  13. Frequency of the mtDNA 9-bp deletion in Chinese ethnic groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚永刚; 袁志刚; 周曾娣; 耿排力; 李庆伟; 张亚平

    2001-01-01

    The 9-bp deletion in the COIl/tRNALys intergenic region (region V) of human mitochondrial DNA was screened in 1521 Chinese from 16 ethnic groups and 9 Han geographic groups. The highest frequency was found in populations of Miao (32.4%) and Bouyei (30.8%) from Guizhou Province, whereas no deletion was found in Kazak population in Xinjiang. In the populations of Wa and Lahu from Yunnan Province, Uygur and Mongolian from Xinjiang,the deletion frequency was relatively low ( ≤ 4 % ), while in the remaining 18 groups, the frequency was moderate (6 % ~ 24% ). Except those Hans in Xinjiang, Guizhou and that reported in Taiwan, the deletion frequency in the Han geo graphic groups did not show a substantial difference. However, the deletion frequency in some ethnic groups from the same geographic region or with similar ethnohistory did not show similarity. A general decrease tendency in the deletion frequency was found from south to north and from coastal to inland. The frequency of the 9-bp deletion was approximate ly 17.20% in all Chinese we studied and reported elsewhere. Additionally, 4 individuals were found to carry the tripli cation of 9-bp segment in region V; one individual had X. II type of 9-bp deletion; and no other length polymorphisms were detected in this region in 27 randomly selected individuals with or without the deletion.

  14. Induction of Mitochondrial DNA Deletion by Ionizing Radiation in Human Lung Fibroblast IMR-90 Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Hyeon Soo; Jung, U Hee; Park, Hae Ran; Jo, Sung Kee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion is a well-known marker for oxidative stress and aging and also contributes to their unfavorable effects in cultured cells and animal tissues. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of ionizing radiation (IR) on mtDNA deletion and the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in this process in human lung fibroblast (IMR-90) cells. Young IMR-90 cells at population doubling (PD) 39 were irradiated with {sup 137}Cs -rays and the intracellular ROS level was determined by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) and mtDNA common deletion (4977bp) was detected by nested PCR. Old cells at PD 55 and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated young cells were compared as the positive control. IR increased the intracellular ROS level and mtDNA 4977 bp deletion in IMR-90 cells dose-dependently. The increases of ROS level and mtDNA deletion were also observed in old cells and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated young cells. To confirm the increased ROS level is essential for mtDNA deletion in irradiated cells, the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) on IRinduced ROS and mtDNA deletion were examined. 5 mM NAC significantly attenuated the IR-induced ROS increase and mtDNA deletion. These results suggest that IR induces the mtDNA deletion and this process is mediated by ROS in IMR-90 cells.

  15. One-dimensional Array Grammars and P Systems with Array Insertion and Deletion Rules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolf Freund

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider the (one-dimensional array counterpart of contextual as well as insertion and deletion string grammars and consider the operations of array insertion and deletion in array grammars. First we show that the emptiness problem for P systems with (one-dimensional insertion rules is undecidable. Then we show computational completeness of P systems using (one-dimensional array insertion and deletion rules even of norm one only. The main result of the paper exhibits computational completeness of one-dimensional array grammars using array insertion and deletion rules of norm at most two.

  16. Association between the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele and late onset of schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, H.B.; Timm, S.; Wang, A.G.;

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The 32-bp deletion allele in chemokine receptor CCR5 has been associated with several immune-mediated diseases and might be implicated in schizophrenia as well. METHOD: The authors genotyped DNA samples from 268 schizophrenia patients and 323 healthy subjects. Age at first admission...... of the deletion allele in the latter subgroup of patients. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele is a susceptibility factor for schizophrenia with late onset. Alternatively, the CCR5 32-bp deletion allele may act as a modifier by delaying the onset of schizophrenia without...

  17. Cognitive and structural neuroimaging characteristics of schizophrenia patients with large, rare copy number deletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth Martin, Andrew; Robinson, Gail; Reutens, David; Mowry, Bryan

    2014-12-30

    Large (>500 Kb), rare (frequency <1%) deletions are associated with risk for schizophrenia. The aim of the study was to characterise patients with these deletions using measures of cognition, grey-matter volume and white-matter integrity. Patients with schizophrenia and large, rare deletions (SZ-del) (n=17) were assessed on a test of intelligence, the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI), and compared with age- and sex-matched schizophrenia patients without large, rare deletions (SZ-nodel) (n=65), and healthy controls (HCs) (n=50). Regional grey-matter differences were investigated using voxel-based morphometry (SZ-del=9; SZ-nodel=26; HC=19). White-matter integrity was assessed using fractional anisotropy (SZ-del=9; SZ-nodel=24; HC=15). Compared with schizophrenia patients without large, rare deletions, those with large, rare deletions had lower IQ; greater grey-matter volume in clusters with peaks in the left and right cerebellum, left hippocampus, and right rectal gyrus; and increased white-matter anisotropy in the body and genu of the corpus callosum. Compared with healthy controls, patients with large, rare deletions had reduced grey matter volume in the right calcarine gyrus. In sum, patients with large, rare deletions had structural profiles intermediate to those observed in healthy controls and schizophrenia patients without large, rare deletions, but had greater impairment in intelligence. PMID:25453991

  18. Disruption of zinc homeostasis in Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, J. D.; Crafford, A. M.; Markesbery, W. R.; Lovell, M. A.

    2002-04-01

    The basic hypothesis being tested is that, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the delicate balance of brain Zn is disrupted and may play a role in the pathogenesis of neuron degeneration. Micro-PIXE measurements reveal a significant elevation of Zn in senile plaques (SP) in AD brain compared with adjacent neuropil and a significant increase in AD neuropil compared to control neuropil. The observation of elevated Zn in SP is of interest because the amyloid precursor protein contains a Zn binding site that may prevent normal cleavage leading to the generation of a toxic fragment of beta amyloid, the constituent of SP. The potential of using laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry as a complimentary microprobe technique is also presented.

  19. Assessment of CRBR core disruptive accident energetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of an independent assessment of core disruptive accident energetics for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor are presented in this document. This assessment was performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission under the direction of the CRBR Program Office within the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. It considered in detail the accident behavior for three accident initiators that are representative of three different classes of events; unprotected loss of flow, unprotected reactivity insertion, and protected loss of heat sink. The primary system's energetics accommodation capability was realistically, yet conservatively, determined in terms of core events. This accommodation capability was found to be equivalent to an isentropic work potential for expansion to one atmosphere of 2550 MJ or a ramp rate of about 200 $/s applied to a classical two-phase disassembly

  20. Collisional and Rotational Disruption of Asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Walsh, Kevin J; Richardson, Derek C

    2009-01-01

    Asteroids are leftover pieces from the era of planet formation that help us understand conditions in the early Solar System. Unlike larger planetary bodies that were subject to global thermal modification during and subsequent to their formation, these small bodies have kept at least some unmodified primordial material from the solar nebula. However, the structural properties of asteroids have been modified considerably since their formation. Thus, we can find among them a great variety of physical configurations and dynamical histories. In fact, with only a few possible exceptions, all asteroids have been modified or completely disrupted many times during the age of the Solar System. This picture is supported by data from space mission encounters with asteroids that show much diversity of shape, bulk density, surface morphology, and other features. Moreover, the gravitational attraction of these bodies is so small that some physical processes occur in a manner far removed from our common experience on Earth....

  1. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary purpose of this analysis is to evaluate seismic- and igneous-related features, events, and processes (FEPs). These FEPs represent areas of natural system processes that have the potential to produce disruptive events (DE) that could impact repository performance and are related to the geologic processes of tectonism, structural deformation, seismicity, and igneous activity. Collectively, they are referred to as the DE FEPs. This evaluation determines which of the DE FEPs are excluded from modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). The evaluation is based on the data and results presented in supporting analysis reports, model reports, technical information, or corroborative documents that are cited in the individual FEP discussions in Section 6.2 of this analysis report

  2. Disruption of zinc homeostasis in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic hypothesis being tested is that, in Alzheimer's disease (AD), the delicate balance of brain Zn is disrupted and may play a role in the pathogenesis of neuron degeneration. Micro-PIXE measurements reveal a significant elevation of Zn in senile plaques (SP) in AD brain compared with adjacent neuropil and a significant increase in AD neuropil compared to control neuropil. The observation of elevated Zn in SP is of interest because the amyloid precursor protein contains a Zn binding site that may prevent normal cleavage leading to the generation of a toxic fragment of beta amyloid, the constituent of SP. The potential of using laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry as a complimentary microprobe technique is also presented

  3. Disrupting neuronal transmission: Mechanism of DBS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satomi eChiken

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Applying high-frequency stimulation to deep brain rain structure, known as deep brain stimulation (DBS, has now been recognized an effective therapeutic option for a wide range of neurological and psychiatric disorders. DBS targeting the basal ganglia thalamo-cortical loop, especially the internal segment of the globus pallidus, subthalamic nucleus and thalamus, has been widely employed as a successful surgical therapy for movement disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease, dystonia and tremor. However, the neurophysiological mechanism underling the action of DBS remains unclear and is still under debate: does DBS inhibit or excite local neuronal elements? In this review, we will examine this question and propose the alternative interpretation: DBS dissociates inputs and outputs, resulting in disruption of abnormal signal transmission.

  4. Features, Events, and Processes: Disruptive Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. King

    2004-03-31

    The primary purpose of this analysis is to evaluate seismic- and igneous-related features, events, and processes (FEPs). These FEPs represent areas of natural system processes that have the potential to produce disruptive events (DE) that could impact repository performance and are related to the geologic processes of tectonism, structural deformation, seismicity, and igneous activity. Collectively, they are referred to as the DE FEPs. This evaluation determines which of the DE FEPs are excluded from modeling used to support the total system performance assessment for license application (TSPA-LA). The evaluation is based on the data and results presented in supporting analysis reports, model reports, technical information, or corroborative documents that are cited in the individual FEP discussions in Section 6.2 of this analysis report.

  5. Assessment of CRBR core disruptive accident energetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theofanous, T.G.; Bell, C.R.

    1984-03-01

    The results of an independent assessment of core disruptive accident energetics for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor are presented in this document. This assessment was performed for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission under the direction of the CRBR Program Office within the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation. It considered in detail the accident behavior for three accident initiators that are representative of three different classes of events; unprotected loss of flow, unprotected reactivity insertion, and protected loss of heat sink. The primary system's energetics accommodation capability was realistically, yet conservatively, determined in terms of core events. This accommodation capability was found to be equivalent to an isentropic work potential for expansion to one atmosphere of 2550 MJ or a ramp rate of about 200 $/s applied to a classical two-phase disassembly.

  6. Endocrine disrupter - estradiol - in Chesapeake Bay tributaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorabawila, Nelum [University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD 21853 (United States); Gupta, Gian [University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD 21853 (United States)]. E-mail: gcgupta@umes.edu

    2005-04-11

    Exogenous chemicals that interfere with natural hormonal functions are considered endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Estradiol (17{beta}-estradiol or E2) is the most potent of all xenoestrogens. Induction of vitellogenin (VTG) production in male fish occurs at E2 concentrations as low as 1 ng l{sup -1}. E2 reaches aquatic systems mainly through sewage and animal waste disposal. Surface water samples from ponds, rivers (Wicomico, Manokin and Pocomoke), sewage treatment plants (STPs), and coastal bays (Assawoman, Monie, Chincoteague, and Tangier Sound - Chesapeake Bay) on the Eastern Shore of Maryland were analyzed for E2 using enzyme linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA). E2 concentrations in river waters varied between 1.9 and 6.0 ng l{sup -1}. Highest E2 concentrations in river waters were observed immediately downstream of STPs. E2 concentrations in all the coastal bays tested were 2.3-3.2 ng l{sup -1}.

  7. How to Spot a Disrupted Galactic Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    Many satellites dwarf galaxies and globular clusters are thought to be orbiting our galaxy, but detecting them can be a tricky business. In particular, satellites can be disrupted by the galactic potential and spread out into streams, making them so diffuse that were unable to spot them in photometric observations.In a recent study, a team of scientists led by John Vickers (Chinese Academy of Sciences) has cleverly worked around this difficulty by searching for groups of stars that have clustered velocities and metallicities differing from the background field.Searching Through StarsRadial velocity and metallicity of LAMOST stars near the physical location of Lamost 1. Circles are stars within 1.5 of the target location, small dots are stars within 5. [Vickers et al. 2016]The team trawled the Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fibre Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST) catalog, which contains spectroscopic information for 2.5 million stars. Vickers and collaborators first hunted for stars that shared an approximate physical location and had similar velocities (because the stars of a satellite will maintain similar velocities even after the satellite is disrupted). Next, they discarded any of these clumps that didnt also share a similar metallicity.Vickers and collaborators then compared the resulting set of 21 candidate streams to catalogs of known globular clusters, open clusters, and nearby galaxies. Three of the candidate clumps, clustered in a 3 area on the sky, do not correspond to any known objects. The authors postulate that these are all part of a disrupted satellite, which they dub Lamost 1.Characterizing a Former ClusterFitting the spectroscopic data for the member stars, the authors are able to estimate a number of characteristics of Lamost 1, with the best fit implying an age of 11 Gyr, a total mass of about 20,000 solar masses, and a distance from us of about 8,500 light-years.Based on the stellar motions, the authors believe that the clump is on an eccentric

  8. Paradoxical expression of INK4c in proliferative multiple myeloma tumors: bi-allelic deletion vs increased expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanamura Ichiro

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A high proliferative capacity of tumor cells usually is associated with shortened patient survival. Disruption of the RB pathway, which is critically involved in regulating the G1 to S cell cycle transition, is a frequent target of oncogenic events that are thought to contribute to increased proliferation during tumor progression. Previously, we determined that p18INK4c, an essential gene for normal plasma cell differentiation, was bi-allelically deleted in five of sixteen multiple myeloma (MM cell lines. The present study was undertaken to investigate a possible role of p18INK4c in increased proliferation of myeloma tumors as they progress. Results Thirteen of 40 (33% human myeloma cell lines do not express normal p18INK4c, with bi-allelic deletion of p18 in twelve, and expression of a mutated p18 fragment in one. Bi-allelic deletion of p18, which appears to be a late progression event, has a prevalence of about 2% in 261 multiple myeloma (MM tumors, but the prevalence is 6 to10% in the 50 tumors with a high expression-based proliferation index. Paradoxically, 24 of 40 (60% MM cell lines, and 30 of 50 (60% MM tumors with a high proliferation index express an increased level of p18 RNA compared to normal bone marrow plasma cells, whereas this occurs in only five of the 151 (3% MM tumors with a low proliferation index. Tumor progression is often accompanied by increased p18 expression and an increased proliferation index. Retroviral-mediated expression of exogenous p18 results in marked growth inhibition in three MM cell lines that express little or no endogenous p18, but has no effect in another MM cell line that already expresses a high level of p18. Conclusion Paradoxically, although loss of p18 appears to contribute to increased proliferation of nearly 10% of MM tumors, most MM cell lines and proliferative MM tumors have increased expression of p18. Apart from a small fraction of cell lines and tumors that have inactivated

  9. A bright year for tidal disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Brian D.; Stone, Nicholas C.

    2016-09-01

    When a star is tidally disrupted by a supermassive black hole (SMBH), roughly half of its mass falls back to the SMBH at super-Eddington rates. As this gas is tenuously gravitationally bound and unable to cool radiatively, only a small fraction fin ≪ 1 may accrete, with the majority instead becoming unbound in an outflow of velocity ˜104 km s-1. The outflow spreads laterally as it expands to large radii, encasing the SMBH and blocking the inner disc's EUV/X-ray radiation, which becomes trapped in a radiation-dominated nebula. Ionizing nebular radiation heats the inner edge of the ejecta, converting the emission to optical/near-UV wavelengths where photons more readily escape due to the lower opacity. This can explain the unexpectedly low and temporally constant effective temperatures of optically discovered tidal disruption event (TDE) flares. For high-mass SMBHs, M• ≳ 107 M⊙, the ejecta can become fully ionized at an earlier stage, or for a wider range of viewing angles, producing a TDE flare accompanied by thermal X-ray emission. The peak optical luminosity is suppressed as the result of adiabatic losses in the inner disc wind when M• ≪ 107 M⊙, possibly contributing to the unexpected dearth of optical TDEs in galaxies with low-mass SMBHs. In the classical picture, where fin ≈ 1, TDEs de-spin supermassive SMBHs and cap their maximum spins well below theoretical accretion physics limits. This cap is relaxed in our model, and existing Fe Kα spin measurements provide preliminary evidence that fin < 1.

  10. Exploring the relationship between retrieval disruption from collaboration and recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Sarah J; Rajaram, Suparna

    2011-07-01

    When people recall together in a collaborative group they recall less than their potential. This phenomenon of collaborative inhibition is explained in terms of retrieval disruption. However, collaborative recall also re-exposes individuals to items recalled by others that they themselves might otherwise have forgotten. This re-exposure produces post-collaborative benefits in individual recall. The current study examined whether reduced retrieval disruption during group recall is related not only to less collaborative inhibition, but also to greater post-collaborative recall benefits. To test this we devised a paradigm to calculate the extent to which each individual experienced retrieval disruption during group recall. We also included two types of collaborative groups, one of which was expected to experience greater retrieval disruption than the other. Results suggest that the relationship between retrieval disruption and recall performance depends on the level at which retrieval disruption is measured. When retrieval disruption was assessed at the individual level, then minimising retrieval disruption was associated with higher recall (i.e., less collaborative inhibition and greater post-collaborative individual recall). However, when retrieval disruption was assessed at the group level there was no relationship with recall. Furthermore, the findings from this design suggest a role of cross-cueing in modulating group recall levels.

  11. DISRUPTION MANAGEMENT FOR SUPPLY CHAIN COORDINATION WITH EXPONENTIAL DEMAND FUNCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The coordination problem of a supply chain comprising one supplier and one retailer under market demand disruption is studied in this article. A novel exponential demand function is adopted, and the penalty cost is introduced explicitly to capture the deviation production cost caused by the market demand disruption. The optimal strategies are obtained for different disruption scale under the centralized mode. For the decentralized mode, it is proved that the supply chain can be fully coordinated by adjusting the price discount policy appropriately when disruption occurs. Furthermore, the authors point out that similar results can be established for more general demand functions that represent different market circumstances if certain assumptions are satisfied.

  12. Disruptions in ITER and strategies for their control and mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehnen, M., E-mail: michael.lehnen@iter.org [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Aleynikova, K.; Aleynikov, P.B.; Campbell, D.J. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Drewelow, P. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Greifswald branch, EURATOM Ass., D-17491 Greifswald (Germany); Eidietis, N.W. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Gasparyan, Yu. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Kashirskoe sh. 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Granetz, R.S. [MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Gribov, Y. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Hartmann, N. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Energy and Climate Research—Plasma Physics, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Hollmann, E.M. [University of California-San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Izzo, V.A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Jachmich, S. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM/KMS, Association EURATOM – Belgian State, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Kim, S.-H.; Kočan, M. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Koslowski, H.R. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Institute of Energy and Climate Research—Plasma Physics, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Kovalenko, D. [SRC RF TRINITI, ul. Pushkovykh, vladenie 12, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Kruezi, U. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-08-15

    The thermal and electromagnetic loads related to disruptions in ITER are substantial and require careful design of tokamak components to ensure they reach the projected lifetime and to ensure that safety relevant components fulfil their function for the worst foreseen scenarios. The disruption load specifications are the basis for the design process of components like the full-W divertor, the blanket modules and the vacuum vessel and will set the boundary conditions for ITER operations. This paper will give a brief overview on the disruption loads and mitigation strategies for ITER and will discuss the physics basis which is continuously refined through the current disruption R&D programs.

  13. Effect of aquaporin-q deletion on pleural fluid transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANGJin-Jun; HONGQun-Ying; 等

    2003-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the role of aquaporin-1(AQP1)and sodium channel on pleural fluid transport.METHODS:Wild-type and AQP1 null mice were used in this study.After the mice were briefly anesthetized,0.25mL of hyperosmolar or isosmolar solution(containing terbutaline,amiloride or saline only)was infused into the pleural space.Then mice were sacrificed at scheduled times for measurement of pleural fluid osmolality or volume,RESULTS:After instillation of hyperosmolar fluid into the pleural space,the osmolality of pleural fluid in wild-type mice was higher than that in AQP1 null mice killed at the same time(1,2,5min).There was no difference in the isosmolar clearance between the wild-type and AQP1 null mice after injection of 0.25mL isosmolar fluid into the pleural space.Terbutaline increased the osmotic and isosmolar fluid transport across pleura,but these effects were not influenced by AQP1 dfeletion.In contrast,amiloride reduced osmotic and isosmolar pleural fluid transport and these effects were not influenced by AQP1 deletion.CONCLUSION;AQP1 water channels facilitated osmotic fluid transport across the pleural surface,However,AQP1 did not play an important role in pleural isosmolar fluid clearance.Sodium channel may play a role in osmotic and isosmolar pleural fluid transport.The effects of sodium channel on fluid transport across pleural space were not influenced by aquaporin-1 deletion.

  14. Deletion of 7q33-q35 in a Patient with Intellectual Disability and Dysmorphic Features: Further Characterization of 7q Interstitial Deletion Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Dilzell

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report concerns a 16-year-old girl with a 9.92 Mb, heterozygous interstitial chromosome deletion at 7q33-q35, identified using array comparative genomic hybridization. The patient has dysmorphic facial features, intellectual disability, recurrent infections, self-injurious behavior, obesity, and recent onset of hemihypertrophy. This patient has overlapping features with previously reported individuals who have similar deletions spanning the 7q32-q36 region. It has been difficult to describe an interstitial 7q deletion syndrome due to variations in the sizes and regions in the few patients reported in the literature. This case contributes to the further characterization of an interstitial distal 7q deletion syndrome.

  15. Disruption calling: Strategic implications of disruptive innovations on the Canadian telecommunications industry

    OpenAIRE

    Mendoza, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Disruptive forces are impacting the telecommunications industry. In the near-term, these innovations will spur competition from alternative network providers seeking to provide equivalent services at a lower cost and a lower price. Medium term threats include service, content and application providers that seek to relegate telecom firms to being “pipe providers”. Longer term implications come from the fact that service and content providers will begin to reach through the network an...

  16. Decreased C3 Activation by the devR Gene-Disrupted Mycobacterium tuberculosis Strain in Comparison to the Wild-Type Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Narayan Rao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the complement component C3 is an important step in the complement cascade, contributing to inflammatory mechanisms. Considerable research on gene-disrupted mycobacterial strains using animal models of tuberculosis infection has reported the roles of some of the mycobacterial genes during tuberculosis infection. The aim of the present study was to assess the pattern of complement activation by the devR gene-disrupted Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv strain and compare with that by its wild-type strain. In vitro complement activation at the level of C3 by the gene-disrupted strain, its complemented strain, and wild-type strain was performed using solid-phase ELISA. It was observed that the ability of devR gene-disrupted M. tuberculosis H37Rv to activate C3 was significantly reduced in comparison to its wild-type strain (P<0.05. In addition, C3 activation by the complemented devR mutant strain was almost similar to that of the wild strain, which indicated that the reduced ability to activate C3 could potentially be due to the deletion of devR gene. These findings indicate that the gene devR probably aids in complement activation and contributes to the inflammatory processes during tuberculosis infection.

  17. Prenatal Diagnosis of Cystic Hygroma related to a Deletion of 16q24.1 with Haploinsufficiency of FOXF1 and FOXC2 Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Garabedian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the prenatal diagnosis of cystic hygroma that was subsequently identified to have haploinsufficiency of the FOXF1 and FOXC2 genes via array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH. Deletion o f these genes has previously neither been associated with cystic hygroma nor prenatally diagnosed. The FOX gene cluster is involved in cardiopulmonary development. This case expands the phenotypic spectrum o f abnormalities of the FOXF1 and FOXC2 genes, as it seems within the spectrum of function that disruption of the FOX gene cluster would lead to include abnormalities of prenatal onset. Identification of this association would not be possible with conventional karyotype or targeted aCGH. This case highlights the power of whole genomic aCGH to further delineate the etiology of birth defects.

  18. Third case of 8q23.3-q24.13 deletion in a patient with Langer-Giedion syndrome phenotype without TRPS1 gene deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereza, Nina; Severinski, Srećko; Ostojić, Saša; Volk, Marija; Maver, Aleš; Dekanić, Kristina Baraba; Kapović, Miljenko; Peterlin, Borut

    2012-03-01

    Langer-Giedion syndrome (LGS) is a contiguous gene syndrome caused by a hemizygous deletion on chromosome 8q23.3-q24.11 involving TRPS1 and EXT1 genes. We report on a girl with LGS phenotype and a 7.5 Mb interstitial deletion at chromosome 8q23.3-q24.13. Array-comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH) revealed a deletion encompassing only the EXT1 and not the TRPS1 gene. Even though the deletion of TRPS1 and EXT1 genes is responsible for craniofacial and skeletal features of LGS, there have been previous reports of patients with LGS phenotype and 8q24 deletions leaving the TRPS1 gene intact. To our knowledge, this is the third such case. Our patient differs from previously reported LGS patients without TRPS1 gene deletion in that she has the typical LGS facial dysmorphism and skeletal abnormalities. However, the girl is of normal height and has only a mild developmental delay. Additionally, she has dyslalia and premature adrenarche classified as Tanner stage 3 premature pubarche which have not yet been described as features of LGS. We examine the molecular breakpoints and phenotypes of our patient and previously reported cases.

  19. Third case of 8q23.3-q24.13 deletion in a patient with Langer-Giedion syndrome phenotype without TRPS1 gene deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereza, Nina; Severinski, Srećko; Ostojić, Saša; Volk, Marija; Maver, Aleš; Dekanić, Kristina Baraba; Kapović, Miljenko; Peterlin, Borut

    2012-03-01

    Langer-Giedion syndrome (LGS) is a contiguous gene syndrome caused by a hemizygous deletion on chromosome 8q23.3-q24.11 involving TRPS1 and EXT1 genes. We report on a girl with LGS phenotype and a 7.5 Mb interstitial deletion at chromosome 8q23.3-q24.13. Array-comparative genomic hybridization (a-CGH) revealed a deletion encompassing only the EXT1 and not the TRPS1 gene. Even though the deletion of TRPS1 and EXT1 genes is responsible for craniofacial and skeletal features of LGS, there have been previous reports of patients with LGS phenotype and 8q24 deletions leaving the TRPS1 gene intact. To our knowledge, this is the third such case. Our patient differs from previously reported LGS patients without TRPS1 gene deletion in that she has the typical LGS facial dysmorphism and skeletal abnormalities. However, the girl is of normal height and has only a mild developmental delay. Additionally, she has dyslalia and premature adrenarche classified as Tanner stage 3 premature pubarche which have not yet been described as features of LGS. We examine the molecular breakpoints and phenotypes of our patient and previously reported cases. PMID:22315192

  20. A Preferred Home for Disrupted Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-07-01

    Observed burps from the shredding of stars by supermassive black holes suggest that this behavior is more common in an unusual type of galaxy. A new study has examined NGC 3156, an example from this galaxy type, to better understand what causes this preference.Stellar BetrayalAn artists illustration of a tidal disruption event, in which a star is sent on a plunging orbit near a supermassive black hole and is subsequently torn apart by the black holes tidal forces. [NASA/CXC/M.Weiss]Tidal disruption events (TDEs) are events where a star plunges too close to a supermassive black hole and is torn apart by the black holes tidal forces. Weve observed roughly a dozen of these violent events in the last five years, and we expect to finds hundreds to thousands more with future surveys.TDEs are triggered when a star is sent on a plunging orbit close to a supermassive black hole. But what sends the star into harms way? One possible culprit is a dynamical mechanism known as two-body relaxation. In this process, stars orbiting a black hole undergo individual starstar interactions that, with a close enough encounter, can send them on plunging orbits.Choosing an Unusual HostOne puzzle with TDEs is that they tend to be preferentially found in rather unusual galaxies: galaxies that recently exhibited a lot of star formation but are now quiescent. In particular, several of the TDEs have been discovered in what are known as E+A galaxies, a rare subtype of elliptical galaxy that has recently undergone a major starburst.Since this subtype makes up only ~0.1% of all galaxies, its surprising that weve found so many TDEs in E+A galaxies so far. So why the preference?In an effort to answer this question, two scientists, Nicholas Stone (Einstein Fellow at Columbia University) and Sjoert van Velzen (Hubble Fellow at Johns Hopkins University), have teamed up to examine a nearby E+A galaxy, NGC 3156.Tidal disruption rates as a function of central supermassive-black-hole mass. The blue curve

  1. Plasma-material interaction under simulated disruption conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkhipov, N.I. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Bakhtin, V.P. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Safronov, V.M. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Toporkov, D.A. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Vasenin, S.G. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Wurz, H. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, INR (Germany); Zhitlukhin, A.M. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    Sudden evaporation of divertor plate surface under high heat load during tokamak plasma disruption instantaneously produces a vapor shield. The cloud of vaporized material prevents the divertor plates from the bulk of incoming energy flux and thus reduces the further material erosion. Dynamics and effectiveness of the vapor shield are studied experimentally at the 2MK-200 facility under simulated disruption conditions. (orig.).

  2. Prenatal Smoking Exposure, Low Birth Weight, and Disruptive Behavior Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigg, Joel T.; Breslau, Naomi

    2007-01-01

    Background: Prenatal problems are among theorized etiologies for child disruptive behavior problems. A key question concerns whether etiological contributors are shared across the broad range of disruptive psychopathology or are partially or largely distinct. Method: We examined prenatal smoking exposure and low birth weight as risk factors for…

  3. ENDOCRINE-DISRUPTING CONTAMINANTS AND REPRODUCTION IN VERTEBRATE WILDLIFE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fields of toxicology, endocrinology, and reproductive physiology recently have combined resources to study the effects of endocrine-disrupting contaminants (EDCs) in wildlife populations. EDCs include a wide variety of chemicals that are only related by the ability to disrupt...

  4. Teachers' Perceptions of Disruptive Behaviour in Schools: A Psychological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Poppy; Schlösser, Annette; Scarr, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation into school teachers' perceptions of disruptive behaviour from a psychological perspective. The inter-disciplinary nature of this research bridges the understanding between educational and psychological perspectives on disruptive behaviour. This article discusses evidence that for the most troubled pupils,…

  5. Noncontingent peer attention as treatment for disruptive classroom behavior.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, K. M.; Drew, H A; Weber, N L

    2000-01-01

    A functional analysis isolated peer attention as the primary maintaining variable for disruptive behavior displayed by a student with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Using a brief reversal design, noncontingent reinforcement was then shown to reduce disruptive behavior relative to the peer attention condition. Implications for assessing behavior disorders in mainstream school settings are discussed.

  6. Testicular dysgenesis syndrome: possible role of endocrine disrupters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Katrine; Asklund, Camilla; Skakkebaek, Niels E;

    2006-01-01

    and molecular studies, all suggestive of an interrelation between the different symptoms. The aetiology of TDS is suspected to be related to genetic and/or environmental factors, including endocrine disrupters. Few human studies have found associations/correlations between endocrine disrupters, including...

  7. Disruption management of the vehicle routing problem with vehicle breakdown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mu, Q; Fu, Z; Lysgaard, Jens;

    2011-01-01

    This paper introduces a new class of problem, the disrupted vehicle routing problem (VRP), which deals with the disruptions that occur at the execution stage of a VRP plan. The paper then focuses on one type of such problem, in which a vehicle breaks down during the delivery and a new routing...

  8. ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING EFFECTS OF BUTYLPARABEN: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallabi Goswami

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been an increasing concern in the field of endocrine disruption over the presence of various endocrine disrupting chemicals in Pharmaceuticals and Personal care products (PPCPs. This concern has also been as PPCPs are most widely used and had led to introduction of thousands of new and complex chemicals that enter the environment in large quantities. The effect of the chemicals has not only been restricted to human who are exposed directly to the chemicals or the animals which gets exposed to the chemicals through wide variety of veterinary drugs, but also the aquatic organisms and other form of Wildlife which are non target and indirectly gets exposed to the chemicals through individual human activity. Parabens includes a group of compound of which methylparaben, butylparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben are most widely used as preservatives in various PPCPs. Recent concern over the use of parabens has been drawn by the scientific community as these chemicals are reported to exert a weak estrogenic activity, with butylparaben showing the most potent activity among methyl-, ethyl- and propyl esters in in vitro recombinant yeast assay and in in vivo uterotrophic assay. Human exposure to butylparaben which occur mainly through inhalation, ingestion, or eye or skin contact, from intake of foods or drugs or use of cosmetics and personal care products where butylparaben is mainly used as a preservative. Effects of butylparaben are studied in various animal model systems like rodents to determine the possible effects in human which showed various effects which include defects in male reproductive system like increase in weight of epididymis, also change in serum testosterone level and a significant increase in uterine weight in ovariectomized and immature rats. Other effects include irritation to the respiratory tract, allergic skin reactions, atrophy of lymphoid tissue in the spleen, thymus, and lymph nodes and multifocal

  9. Increased mitochondrial DNA deletions in substantia nigra dopamine neurons of the aged rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Gemma M; Dayas, Christopher V; Smith, Doug W

    2014-01-01

    The dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra (SN), which constitute the origin of the nigrostriatal system, are vulnerable to age-related degenerative processes. For example, in humans there is a relatively small age-related loss of neurons but a marked decline of the dopaminergic phenotype associated with impaired voluntary motor control. However, the mechanisms responsible for the dysfunction and degeneration of SN dopamine neurons remain poorly understood. One potential contributor is mitochondrial dysfunction, resulting from an increased abundance of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations such as deletions. Human studies have identified relatively high levels of mtDNA deletions in these cells in both aging and Parkinson's disease (>35%), with a higher abundance of deletions (>60%) in individual neurons with mitochondrial dysfunction. However, it is unknown whether similar mtDNA mutations occur in other species such as the rat. In the present study, we quantified mtDNA deletion abundance in laser microdissected SN dopaminergic neurons from young and old F344 rats. Our results indicate that mtDNA deletions accumulated with age, with approximately 20% more mtDNA deletions in SN dopaminergic neurons from old compared to young animals. Thus, while rat SN dopaminergic neurons do accumulate mtDNA deletions with aging, this does not reflect the deletion burden in humans, and other mechanisms may be operating to compensate for age-related mtDNA damage in the rat SN dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25612740

  10. Deletion in sigB in Bacillus cereus affects spore properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Y.P.; Hornstra, L.M.; Atmadja, R.D.; Schaik, van W.; Vos, de W.M.; Abee, T.

    2005-01-01

    In Bacillus cereus and other gram-positive bacteria the alternative sigma factor ¿B is an important regulator of the stress response. Deletion of the sigB gene generally leads to a stress-sensitive phenotype of vegetative cells. In this study, we describe the effect of the deletion of the sigB gene

  11. Multiple Patterns of FHIT Gene Homozygous Deletion in Egyptian Breast Cancer Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fragile histidine triad (FHIT) gene encodes a putative tumour suppressor protein. Loss of Fhit protein in cancer is attributed to different genetic alterations that affect the FHIT gene structure. In this study, we investigated the pattern of homozygous deletion that target the FHIT gene exons 3 to 9 genomic structure in Egyptian breast cancer patients. We have found that 65% (40 out of 62) of the cases exhibited homozygous deletion in at least one FHIT exon. The incidence of homozygous deletion was not associated with patients clinico pathological parameters including patients age, tumour grade, tumour type, and lymph node involvement. Using correlation analysis, we have observed a strong correlation between homozygous deletions of exon 3 and exon 4 (P<0.0001). Deletions in exon 5 were positively correlated with deletions in exon 7 (P<0.0001), Exon 8 (P<0.027), and exon 9 (P=0.04). Additionally, a strong correlation was observed between exons 8 and exon 9 (P<0.0001).We conclude that FHIT gene exons are homozygously deleted at high frequency in Egyptian women population diagnosed with breast cancer. Three different patterns of homozygous deletion were observed in this population indicating different mechanisms of targeting FHIT gene genomic structure.

  12. 10 CFR 9.19 - Segregation of exempt information and deletion of identifying details.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Segregation of exempt information and deletion of identifying details. 9.19 Section 9.19 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION PUBLIC RECORDS Freedom of Information Act Regulations § 9.19 Segregation of exempt information and deletion of identifying details....

  13. A new alpha(0)-thalassemia deletion found in a Dutch family (--(AW)).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Phylipsen, M.; Vogelaar, I.P.; Schaap, R.A.; Arkesteijn, S.G.; Boxma, G.L.; Helden, W.C. van; Wildschut, I.C.; Bruin-Roest, A.C. de; Giordano, P.C.; Harteveld, C.L.

    2010-01-01

    Alpha-thalassemia is an inherited hemoglobin disorder characterized by a microcytic hypochromic anemia caused by a quantitative reduction of the alpha-globin chain. The majority of the alpha-thalassemias is caused by deletions in the alpha-globin gene cluster. A deletion in the alpha-globin gene clu

  14. Rapid deletion plasmid construction methods for protoplast and Agrobacterium based fungal transformation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Increasing availability of genomic data and sophistication of analytical methodology in fungi has elevated the need for functional genomics tools in these organisms. Gene deletion is a critical tool for functional analysis. The targeted deletion of genes requires both a suitable method for the trans...

  15. Detection of Homozygous Deletions and Mutations in the CDKN2A Gene in Hydatidiform Moles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wang; Shuying Wu; Ying Gu; Yan Zhu; Xiaowei Zhang

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate homozygous deletions and mutations in the CDKN2A gene (p16INK4a and p14ARF gene) in hydatidiform moles.METHODS A total of 38 hydatidiform mole samples and 30 villi samples were examined for homozygous deletions in the CDKN2A gene by PCR and for mutations by DHPLC.RESULTS I) Among 38 hydatidiform mole samples,homozygous deletions in the p16INK4a exon 1 were identified in 5 cases (13.2%), while no homozygous deletions were found in the p16INK4a exon 1 of 30 early-pregnancy samples. The rates of those deletions in hydatidiform compared to early-pregnancy villi samples was statistically significant (P = 0.036). Ii) No homozygous deletions in the p14ARF exon 1 or p16INK4a exon 2 were found in any of the hydatidiform moles or early-preganancy samples, iii)In all hydatidiform moles and early-pregnancy villi samples, no mutations were detected by DHPLC.CONCLUSION We suggest there may be a close correlation between homozygous deletions in the CDKN2A gene and occurrence of hydatidiform moles variation in the CDKN2A gene is mainly caused by homozygous deletions, while mutations may be not a major cause.

  16. The smt-0 mutation which abolishes mating-type switching in fission yeast is a deletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Styrkársdóttir, U; Egel, R; Nielsen, O;

    1993-01-01

    Mating-type switching in the fission yeast, S. pombe, is initiated by a DNA double-strand break (DSB) between the mat1 cassette and the H1 homology box. The mat1-cis-acting mutant, smt-0, abolishes mating-type switching and is shown here to be a 263-bp deletion. This deletion starts in the middle...

  17. L1CAM whole gene deletion in a child with L1 syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidsey, Brandalyn A; Baldwin, Erin E; Toydemir, Reha; Ahles, Lauren; Hanson, Heather; Stevenson, David A

    2014-06-01

    L1 syndrome is a group of overlapping, X-linked disorders caused by mutations in L1CAM. Clinical phenotypes within L1 syndrome include X-linked hydrocephalus with stenosis of the aqueduct of sylvius (HSAS); mental retardation, adducted thumbs, shuffling gait, and aphasia (MASA) syndrome; spastic paraplegia type 1; and agenesis of the corpus callosum. Over 200 mutations in L1CAM have been reported; however, only a few large gene deletions have been observed. We report on a 4-month-old male with a de novo whole gene deletion of L1CAM presenting with congenital hydrocephalus, aqueductal stenosis, and adducted thumbs. Initial failure of L1CAM gene sequencing suggested the possibility of a whole gene deletion of L1CAM. Further investigation through chromosome microarray analysis showed a 62Kb deletion encompassing the first exon of the PDZD4 gene and the entire L1CAM gene. Investigations into genotype-phenotype correlations have suggested that mutations leading to truncated or absent L1 protein cause more severe forms of L1 syndrome. Based on the presentation of the proband and other reported patients with whole gene deletions, we provide further evidence that L1CAM whole gene deletions result in L1 syndrome with a severe phenotype, deletions of PDZD4 do not cause additional manifestations, and that X-linked nephrogenic diabetes insipidus reported in a subset of patients with large L1CAM deletions results from the loss of AVPR2. PMID:24668863

  18. How To Recover Delete photos from iPhone 5/4S/4

    OpenAIRE

    James, MR

    2015-01-01

    Lost photos from iPhone can be recovered with the iPhone photo recovery, which provides three ways to recover deleted photos from iPhone recover photos from iphone directly restore photos from iTunes backup recover photos from iCloud backup http://www.smart-iphone-recovery.com/how-to-recover-deleted-photos-from-iphone.html

  19. Yod Deletion in Fiji English: Phonological Shibboleth or L2 English?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tent, Jan

    2001-01-01

    Discusses one pronunciation feature shared by the vast majority of speakers of English in Fiji: the deletion of yod in non-primary stressed /Cju/ syllables. Considers variation in yod pronunciation according to ethnicity, age, gender, and education and examines whether yod deletion is a phonological shibboleth of Fiji English or merely a feature…

  20. Deletion of the vaccinia virus gene A46R, encoding for an inhibitor of TLR signalling, is an effective approach to enhance the immunogenicity in mice of the HIV/AIDS vaccine candidate NYVAC-C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Perdiguero

    Full Text Available Viruses have developed strategies to counteract signalling through Toll-like receptors (TLRs that are involved in the detection of viruses and induction of proinflammatory cytokines and IFNs. Vaccinia virus (VACV encodes A46 protein which disrupts TLR signalling by interfering with TLR: adaptor interactions. Since the innate immune response to viruses is critical to induce protective immunity, we studied whether deletion of A46R gene in a NYVAC vector expressing HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens (NYVAC-C improves immune responses against HIV-1 antigens. This question was examined in human macrophages and in mice infected with a single A46R deletion mutant of the vaccine candidate NYVAC-C (NYVAC-C-ΔA46R. The viral gene A46R is not required for virus replication in primary chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF cells and its deletion in NYVAC-C markedly increases TNF, IL-6 and IL-8 secretion by human macrophages. Analysis of the immune responses elicited in BALB/c mice after DNA prime/NYVAC boost immunization shows that deletion of A46R improves the magnitude of the HIV-1-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell immune responses during adaptive and memory phases, maintains the functional profile observed with the parental NYVAC-C and enhances anti-gp120 humoral response during the memory phase. These findings establish the immunological role of VACV A46R on innate immune responses of macrophages in vitro and antigen-specific T and B cell immune responses in vivo and suggest that deletion of viral inhibitors of TLR signalling is a useful approach for the improvement of poxvirus-based vaccine candidates.