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Sample records for cirripedia rhizocephala sacculinidae

  1. Sympatric three-species infection by Sacculina parasites (Cirripedia: Rhizocephala: Sacculinidae) of an intertidal grapsoid crab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsuchida, Kohei; Lützen, Jørgen; Nishida, Mutsumi

    2006-01-01

    Parasitization by sacculinids (Cirripedia: Rhizocephala: Sacculinidae) induces severe modifications in morphology, behavior, and reproduction of their host crabs. To understand the mechanisms involved, it is important to have comprehensive information on their association. However, such information...

  2. The colleteric glands in Sacculinidae (Crustacea, Cirripedia, Rhizocephala): an ultrastructural study of ovisac secretion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, Sven

    2002-01-01

    Ovisac secretion by the paired colleteric glands of Sacculina carcini and Heterosaccus dollfusi (Rhizocephala, Sacculinida) was documented and studied at the ultrastructural level. Preparatory to oviposition, the epithelium of each colleteric gland secretes one branched, elastic, transparent ovisac.

  3. Anatomy of virgin and mature externae of Loxothylacus texanus, parasitic on the dark blue crab Callinectes rathbunae (Crustacea: Cirripedia: Rhizocephala: Sacculinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Fernando; Bortolini, José Luis; Høeg, Jens T

    2010-02-01

    Rhizocephalan parasites are dioecious organisms, in that one or several dwarf males are implanted into the external part of the female parasite soon after it emerges from the interior of the host animal. The structure of the female externa and its resident males is crucial for understanding both the reproductive biology and the taxonomy of these specialized parasites. We use scanning electron microscopy and histological methods to study the anatomy of juvenile and the mature externae of the rhizocephalan barnacle Loxothylacus texanus parasitizing the blue crab Callinectes rathbunae. We put emphasis on the implantation of males and the histology of the female reproductive organs. In the virgin externae, male cyprids attach around a cuticular hood covering the mantle aperture, which is partially blocked by a plug of cuticle so only trichogon larvae, not cyprids, can access the mantle cavity. This resembles the situation known from Sacculina carcini. The mature externa is characterized by a visceral mass that contains the ovary, paired colleteric glands, a single male receptacle, but paired receptacle ducts. The proximal attachment of the visceral mass is located at some distance from the basal stalk, as is characteristic for the genus Loxothylacus. The internal anatomy of the mature externa of L. texanus is in most features similar to that seen in other species of the Sacculinidae, which comprises the majority of rhizocephalan species. However, the single receptacle creates a situation where the two implanted males cannot be kept separate as in most other rhizocephalans, but pass through spermatogenesis in a common chamber. This may have unknown effects on the reproductive biology such as male-male competition.

  4. Phylogeny and evolution of life history strategies of the Parasitic Barnacles (Crustacea, Cirripedia, Rhizocephala)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenner, Henrik; Hebsgaard, Martin Bay

    2006-01-01

    The barnacles (Crustacea, Cirripedia) consist of three well-defined orders: the conventional filter-feeding barnacles (Thoracica), the burrowing barnacles (Acrothoracica), and the parasitic barnacles (Rhizocephala). Thoracica and Acrothoracica feed by catching food particles from the surrounding ...... crustaceans (Anomura), which includes hermit crabs and squat lobsters....

  5. Efectos del rizocéfalo Loxothylacus armatus (Cirripedia: Rhizocephala en el cangrejo Paraxanthus barbiger (Decapoda: Brachyura en Chile Effects of the rhizocephalan Loxothylacus armatus (Cirripedia: Rhizocephala on the crab Paraxanthus barbiger (Decapoda: Brachyura in Chile

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    MARIO GEORGE-NASCIMENTO

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Diversas asociaciones biológicas de amplia distribución y alta especificidad en el ambiente marino han pasado casi desapercibidas para los estudiosos en Chile. Aquí se describe cuantitativamente la infección por Loxothylacus armatus Boschma 1949 (Cirripedia: Rhizocephala en el cangrejo Paraxanthus barbiger (Poeppig 1836 (Decapoda: Brachyura y se evalúa si el parásito produce efectos semejantes a los descritos para asociaciones similares. Para ello, 513 ejemplares del cangrejo fueron recolectados manualmente desde el submareal somero, entre septiembre y octubre de 2003, en Lenga, Octava Región de Chile. La prevalencia de rizocéfalos alcanzó valores máximos cercanos al 60 % en hospedadores de pequeño tamaño corporal, provocando castración, inhibiendo el desarrollo gonadal de las hembras y modificando el tamaño de los caracteres sexuales secundarios en ambos sexos, lo que sugiere que impone una gran demanda sobre su hospedador. Estos resultados muestran una gran similitud con otros estudios que involucran a rizocéfalos, y podrían, al incorporar a las simbiosis en el estudio de las comunidades bentónicas en Chile, conducir a que se reinterprete, por ejemplo, la abundancia y patrones de reproducción de P. barbiger, una especie de depredador prominente de esas comunidades bentónicasIn the marine realm, several biological associations are distributed worldwide and are highly specific, but remain poorly studied in Chile. Here, we describe quantitatively the infection by the barnacle Loxothylacus armatus Boschma 1949 (Cirripedia: Rhizocephala in the crab Paraxanthus barbiger (Poeppig 1836 (Decapoda: Brachyura, and assess if the parasite effects are similar to rhizocephalan-decapod associations elsewhere. To do this, 513 crabs were collected by hand while scuba diving between September and October, 2003 in the shallow subtidal zone of Lenga (37° S, Chile. Maximum prevalence reached ca. 60 % in small body size hosts, producing total

  6. Cypris metamorphosis, injection and earliest internal development of theRrizocephalan Loxothylacus panopaei (Gissler). Crustacea: Cirripedia: Rhizocephala: Sacculinidae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenner, H

    2001-01-01

    , and the succeeding developmental stages up to the stage of the earliest primordium reported from the literature. The anlage of the ovary is traced back to the free-swimming cypris stage and it is implied that the mesoderm and ectoderm of the endoparasite are already differentiated in the cyprid....

  7. Sacculina nectocarcini, a new species of rhizocephalan, a new species of rhizocephalan(Cirripedia: Rhizocephala) parasitising the red rock crabNectocarcinus integrifrons (Decapoda: Brachyura: Portunidae)(Decapoda: Brachyura: Portunidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurney, Robert H.; Rybakov, Alexey V.; Høeg, Jens Thorvald

    2006-01-01

    The parasitic barnacles, Rhizocephala, are a little known group within Australia with only seven described species from a coastline stretching approximately 59763 km. This study describes a new species of Rhizocephala, Sacculina nectocarcini. The description is based on a unique combination...

  8. Sacculina nectocarcini, a new species of rhizocephalan, a new species of rhizocephalan(Cirripedia: Rhizocephala) parasitising the red rock crabNectocarcinus integrifrons (Decapoda: Brachyura: Portunidae)(Decapoda: Brachyura: Portunidae)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurney, Robert H.; Rybakov, Alexey V.; Høeg, Jens Thorvald;

    2006-01-01

    The parasitic barnacles, Rhizocephala, are a little known group within Australia with only seven described species from a coastline stretching approximately 59763 km. This study describes a new species of Rhizocephala, Sacculina nectocarcini. The description is based on a unique combination...

  9. Why Williamson's (2014) theory of Hybridogenesis fails to explain the evolution of the Rhizocephala

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenner, Henrik; Lytzen, Jørgen Gjerom

    2015-01-01

    Alle biologiske, ultrastrukturelle og molekylære data understøtter konlusionen at subordernerne Cirripedia, Rhizocephala og Thoracica er nært beslægtede. Williamsons spekulationer, nemlig at den såkaldte hybridogenesis kan forklare hvo ledes Rhizocepahlerne har udviklet sig, hviler på et selektiv...

  10. The described species of the family Sacculinidae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschma, H.

    1955-01-01

    I. INTRODUCTION AND KEYS OF GENERA AND SPECIES The present paper contains the data concerning the synonymy and the figures of the Sacculinidae, compiled from the various publications dealing with species of the family, to bring the scattered data together in a general survey. The keys contain all th

  11. Rhizocephala of Curaçao

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschma, H.

    1925-01-01

    The authors who have studied the Rhizocephala have a quite different opinion as to the limits of the species, especially those of the genus Sacculina. On the one side KOSSMANN (1874) and GIARD (1887, 1888) are convinced that every specimen of Sacculina found on a certain crab has to be separated spe

  12. A Study of the Morphology and Biology of Thompsonia littoralis (Crustacea: Cirripedia: Rhizocephala)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lützen, Jørgen; Jespersen, Åse

    1992-01-01

    the stalk. Spermatogonia are presumably injected by male cyprids into the female externa and develop into sperm within one or more vesicular spermatogenic bodies in its mantle. The eggs are laid through a single oviduct into the mantle cavity where they become fertilized and develop into cyprids...

  13. Notes on Japanese Rhizocephala, with description of two new species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschma, H.

    1935-01-01

    The following notes are based upon material of parasites on two Crustaceans from Japan, viz., Pachygrapsus crassipes Randall and Petrolisthes japonicus de Haan 1). Each of these two species may be infested by two different species of Rhizocephala: on Pachygrapsus crassipes occur the parasites Saccul

  14. Rhizocephala from New Guinea : I. Sacculina carinata Kossmann and Loxothylacus kossmanni nov. spec.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschma, H.

    1955-01-01

    In the collections brought together by Dr. L. D. Brongersma, Dr. L. B. Holthuis, and Dr. M. Boeseman, during their voyage to New Guinea and adjacent islands 1), there are a number of crabs and hermit crabs bearing Rhizocephalan parasites. Some of the Sacculinidae of this collection are dealt with in

  15. First Record on Larval Development of the Cirripedian Parasite Loxothylacus texanus (Cirripedia-Rhizocephala Under Laboratory Conditions in Mxico

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    J. Franco-Lopez

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Crabs with mature parasites were put on individual aquariums of 20 L of capacity and with an initial salinity of 10. Salinity was gradually increased 1 until it reached a point in which parasites expeled their eggs or larvae. Larvae at different developmental stages obtained from each sample were preserved in 70 and ethanol to be studied afterwards. From 20 crabs employed, only 14 of them produced eggs and other 6 died after a few days at the aquariums. The mature externas expelled from 8000 to 160000 clustered eggs. After 24 h from the beginning of cellular division, larvae hatch. This larvae are called nauplius 1. This stage lasted 24 h, after which all larvae entered an excitation period, where they rapidly moved, to then pass a new molt process resulting in a new larval stage, nauplius 2. Elevating salinity a unity, externas started to expel eggs, nauplis larvae 1 hatched from them, but they only survived less than 24 h. As salinity increased, nauplius larvae lived longer, even to realized a molt. At a 15 salinity, larvae reached cypris stage with no problem, but with a salinity higher than 25, larvae died after a few hours of hatching. We can conclude that: the rhizocephalan Loxothylacus texanus has two nauplius stages, the nauplius and cypris larvae presented similar morphological characteristics to related species of rhizocephalans and a salinity interval from 15 to 20 report the same result.

  16. Synchronism of naupliar development of Sacculina carcini Thompson, 1836 (Pancrustacea, Rhizocephala) revealed by precise monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trédez, Fabien; Rabet, Nicolas; Bellec, Laure; Audebert, Fabienne

    2017-01-01

    Sacculina carcini is member of a highly-specialized group of parasitic cirripeds (Rhizocephala) that use crabs ( Carcinus maenas) as hosts to carry out the reproductive phase of their life cycle. We describe the naupliar development of S. carcini Thompson, 1836 from a very precise monitoring of three different broods from three specimens. Nauplii were sampled every 4 h, from the release of the larvae until the cypris stage. Larval development, from naupliar instar 1 to the cypris stage, lasts 108 h at 18 °C. A rigorous sampling allowed us to describe an additional intermediate naupliar instar, not described previously. Naupliar instars are renumbered from 1 to 5. Nauplius 1 (N1) larvae hatch in the interna; N2 are released from the interna and last between 12 and 16 h; N3 appear between 12 and 16 h after release; N4 appear between 28 and 32 h; and N5 appear between 44 and 48 h. The cypris stage appears between 108 and 112 h. The redescribed morphologies allowed us to identify new characters. Antennular setation discriminates naupliar instars 3, 4 and 5. Telson and furca morphologies discriminate all naupliar instars. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the speed of larval development is similar within a single brood and between broods from different specimens, suggesting synchronization of larval development. From precise monitoring of broods every 4 h, we demonstrate that the life cycle of S. carcini includes five instars of naupliar larvae instead of four. The morphological characters of the larvae discriminate these naupliar instars and allow the identification of S. carcini from other Rhizocephala species. S. carcini larvae develop synchronously. Consequently, they might be an informative model to study larval development in crustaceans.

  17. Cypris Larvae in Polysaccus Mediterraneus and Mycetomorpha Vancouverensis: Their Importance in Analyzing the Phylogeny and Sexual Evolution of Parasitic Barnacles (Crustacea: Cirripedia: Rhizocephala)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Rybakov, AV

    2007-01-01

    We used SEM to investigate the cypris larvae in two species of parasitic barnacles, Polysaccus mediterraneus (Polysaccidae) from the eastern Mediterranean and Mycetomorpha vancouverensis (Mycetomorphidae) from the northern Pacific. Both species belong to the rhizocephalan suborder Akentrogonida a...

  18. Phylogenetic relationships of Darwin's "Mr. Arthrobalanus": The burrowing barnacles (Cirripedia: Acrothoracica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiu-Chin; Kobasov, Gregory A; Chan, Benny K K

    2016-07-01

    The barnacles of the superorder Acrothoracica are small, burrowing, epibiotic, and dioecious (large female with dwarf male) crustaceans largely found in the carbonate sediments and skeletons of marine invertebrates. The acrothoracicans represent the Cirripedia with the most plesiomorphic characters and have prominently featured in phylogenetic speculations concerning these crustaceans. Traditionally, Acrothoracica was divided into two main orders, Pygophora and Apygophora. The Apygophora had uniramus cirri and no anus. The Pygophora had biramus terminal cirri and an anus and was further divided into two families, Lithoglyptidae and Cryptophialidae. Kolbasov (2009) revised the superorder Acrothoracica on the basis of morphological examinations of females, dwarf males, and cyprids and rearranged the acrothoracican species into two new orders, Lithoglyptida and Cryptophialida. The present study is the first attempt to reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships of acrothoracican barnacles by sequencing two mitochondrial (cytochrome C oxidase I and 16S ribosomal DNA) and two nuclear (18S ribosomal DNA and histone H3) markers of 8 of the 11 genera comprising 23 acrothoracican species. All monophylies of the eight acrothoracican genera sampled in this study were strongly supported. The deep interfamilial relationship constructed is consistent with the recent morphological phylogenetic relationship proposed by Kolbasov, Newman, and Høeg (Kolbasov, 2009) that Cryptophialidae (order Cryptophialida) is the sister group to all other acrothoracicans (order Lithoglyptida). According to an ancestral character state reconstruction analysis, the posterior lobes of females; armament of opercular bars, attachment stalk, lateral projections of the body, and aperture slits in dwarf males; and habitat use appear to have phylogenetic importance.

  19. Epibionts and parasites on crustaceans (Copepoda, Cladocera, Cirripedia larvae inhabiting the Gulf of Gdańsk (Baltic Sea in very large numbers* This work was supported in part by grant No. BW/1320-5-0183-3 from the University of Gdańsk.

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    Luiza Bielecka

    2014-06-01

    Infestation by epibionts and parasites was not restricted to calanoid copepods: it was also detected in non-negligible numbers on other crustaceans, namely, Harpacticoida, Cladocera (Bosmina sp. and Cirripedia larvae (nauplii in the Gulf of Gdańsk.

  20. Epibionts and parasites on crustaceans (Copepoda, Cladocera, Cirripedia larvae inhabiting the Gulf of Gdańsk (Baltic Sea in very large numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Bielecka

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of epizoic filter-feeding Protozoa (Vorticella and Zoothamnium and parasitic Protozoa (Ellobiopsis on Calanoida was noticed in the Gulf of Gdańsk in 1998, 1999 and 2006. The relatively high (4-16% of all calanoids level of infestation varied depending on the type of infestation (0.1-13% of the population of particular taxa. The dominant copepods – Acartia spp., Temora longicornis and Centropages hamatus - were attacked the most frequently (from 10.5% to 54% of all infested calanoids. Epibiosis and parasitism were observed on all copepod developmental stages (adults, juveniles and nauplii. Epibionts and parasites were located on different parts of the body, but mainly on the prosome. Infestation by epibionts and parasites was not restricted to calanoid copepods: it was also detected in non-negligible numbers on other crustaceans, namely, Harpacticoida, Cladocera (Bosmina sp. and Cirripedia larvae (nauplii in the Gulf of Gdańsk.

  1. The Cirripedia of Trinidad

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bacon, Peter R.

    1976-01-01

    The cirripede fauna of the island of Trinidad has been little investigated. SOUTHWARD (1962) recorded five species collected in north-west Trinidad for experimental studies; he listed Chthamalus fragilis Darwin on mangroves, Balanus amphitrite var. on mangroves and harbour piles, B. tintinnabulum Li

  2. The Species of the genus Sacculina (Crustacea Rhizocephala)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschma, H.

    1937-01-01

    The genus Sacculina was founded by Thompson (1836), who described the species Sacculina carcini, the parasite of the shore crab. A second species, Sacculina inflata, was described by Leuckart (1859). Anderson (1862) gave a description of a third species, Sacculina triangularis, and published importa

  3. Studies on some ecological aspects of Balanus amphitrite (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, D.V.

    been made by several researchers in view of addressing antifouling issues. The larval rearing experiments indicated that larvae in the field experience a nutritional stress. However this stress did not translate proportionately to the well-fed larvae...

  4. Records of Australian Fouling Organisms: Sessile Barnacles (Crustacea, Cirripedia),

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    Dr. W.A. Newman) Laboratorio de Ensayo de Materiales e Investigaciones Tecnologicas (LEMIT), Argentina. (Attention: Dr. V. Rascio) Dept. of Zoology...AD-A105 265 MATERIALS RESEARCH LABS ASCOT VALE (AUSTRALIA) FIG B/1 RECORDS OF AUSTRALIAN FOULING ORGANISMS: SESSILE BARNACLES (CRU--ETC(U) APR 81 J A...SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ORGANISATION MATERIALS RESEARCH LABORATORIES MELBOURNE, VICTORIA REPORT . MRL-R-809 RECORDS OF AUSTRALIAN FOULING ORGANISMS: SESSILE

  5. Sacculina beauforti and Loxothylacus ihlei, two Rhizocephala of the Crab Scylla serata (Forsk.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschma, H.

    1949-01-01

    With great pleasure I dedicate the two new species described below to the two Amsterdam zoologists Prof. L. F. DE BEAUFORT and Prof. J. E. W. IHLE, who with their important researches in various branches of zoology both have so largely contributed to the progress of this science. The two species des

  6. Notes on a Sacculina carpiliae Guérin-Ganivet (Crustacea Rhizocephala)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschma, H.

    1949-01-01

    Certain Rhizocephalan parasites of the crabs Xanthias lamarcki (H. M. E.), Lybia tesselata (Latr.), and Glyptoxanthus vermiculatus (Lam.) mutually so closely correspond in all their characters that undoubtedly they belong to the same species. When the characters of this species are defined it appear

  7. Rhizocephala from New Guinea : IV. Notes on Parasites of various Crabs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschma, H.

    1955-01-01

    The parasites dealt with in the present paper were brought together by Dr. L. D. Brongersma, Dr. L. B. Holthuis, and Dr. M. Boeseman during their recent voyage to New Guinea1). One of the specimens had to remain unidentified on account of lack of distinct characters; the other parasites proved to be

  8. Exploration and metamorphosis in Balanus amphitrite Darwin (Cirripedia ; Thoracica) cyprids: significance of sugars and adult extract

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; Anil, A.C.; Raghukumar, S.

    promotion of Balanus amphitrite. The barnacle cyprid, while exploring some surfaces, leaves behind 'footprints' of temporary adhesive. In the absence of AE, sugar-treated cyprids did not deposit footprints. Concurrently, the sugar-treated cyprids deposited...

  9. Physiological responses to hypoxia and anoxia in Balanus amphitrite (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, D.V.; Prakash, S.

    collected at different tidal levels was observed. Enzyme activity increased with increase in the duration of tidal exposure, suggesting a capability to adapt to stress in different niches. Nauplii showed antioxidant defense (increased enzyme activity) under...

  10. Biodiversity and Biogeography of Chthamalid Barnacles from the North-Eastern Pacific (Crustacea Cirripedia.

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    Benny K K Chan

    Full Text Available The biogeography and ecology of the species of Chthamalus present on the west coast of America are described, using data from 51 localities from Alaska to Panama, together with their zonation on the shore with respect to that of other barnacles. The species present were C. dalli, Pilsbry 1916, C. fissus, Darwin, 1854, C. anisopoma Pilsbry 1916 and four species in the C. panamensis complex. The latter are C. panamensis Pilsbry, 1916, C. hedgecocki, Pitombo & Burton, 2007, C. alani nom. nov. (formerly C. southwardorum Pitombo & Burton, 2007 and C. newmani sp. nov.. These four species were initially separated by enzyme electrophoresis. They could only be partially separated by DNA bar coding but may be separated using morphological characters.

  11. Molecular phylogeny and character evolution of the chthamaloid barnacles (Cirripedia:Thoracica)

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    Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Crandall, Keith A.;

    2012-01-01

    of the Chthamaloidea has been debated since Darwin's seminal monographs. Theories of morphological and ontogenetic evolution suggest that the group could have evolved multiple times from pedunculated relatives and that shell plate number diminished gradually (8¿6¿4) from an ancestral state with eight wall plates......The Chthamaloidea (Balanomorpha) present the most plesiomorphic characters in shell plates and cirri, mouthparts, and oral cone within the acorn barnacles (Thoracica: Sessilia). Due to their importance in understanding both the origin and diversification of the Balanomorpha, the evolution...... surrounded by whorls of small imbricating plates; but this hypothesis has never been subjected to a rigorous phylogenetic test. Here we used multilocus sequence data and extensive taxon sampling to build a comprehensive phylogeny of the Chthamaloidea as a basis for understanding their morphological evolution...

  12. Growth and molting in epizoic pedunculate barnacles genus Octolasmis (Crustacea: Thecostraca: Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomsterberg, Mikkel; Glenner, Henrik; Høeg, Jens T

    2004-01-01

    plates, with large areas of general cuticle in between. The external integument grows by means of a system of narrow growth zones, one encircling the peduncle and a Y-shaped system on either side of the capitulum. Growth is by a regular series of molts, but shedding of old cuticle and production of new...... layers is entirely restricted to the growth zones. Just prior to ecdysis, the new cuticle lies in a highly folded fashion beneath the old cuticle that is about to be shed. At ecdysis, the old cuticle breaks along the margins of the growth zones and the resulting scars remain as a system of "ecdysial...

  13. Influence of temperature on the starvation threshold of nauplii of barnacle Balanus amphitrite (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, D.V.; Anil, A.C.

    An evaluation of starvation threshold of the newly hatched Balanus amphitrite nauplii (instar, II) has been made at three different temperatures (5, 15 and 25°C). Earlier studies on starvation in crustacean larvae demonstrated Point of No Return...

  14. Reproduction in Balanus amphitrite Darwin (Cirripedia: Thoracica); influence of temperature and food concentration

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, D.V.; Anil, A.C.; Venkat, K.

    obligatory cross-fertilizing hermaphrodite, self-fertilization was observed. The rise in temperature from 20 to 30°C resulted in a longer interbreeding interval (6 to 7 days, 200 Artemia ind-1 day-1; 11 to 13 days, 50 Artemia ind-1 day-1). Computed carbon...

  15. Biodiversity and Biogeography of Chthamalid Barnacles from the North-Eastern Pacific (Crustacea Cirripedia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Benny K K; Chen, H-N; Dando, P R; Southward, A J; Southward, E C

    2016-01-01

    The biogeography and ecology of the species of Chthamalus present on the west coast of America are described, using data from 51 localities from Alaska to Panama, together with their zonation on the shore with respect to that of other barnacles. The species present were C. dalli, Pilsbry 1916, C. fissus, Darwin, 1854, C. anisopoma Pilsbry 1916 and four species in the C. panamensis complex. The latter are C. panamensis Pilsbry, 1916, C. hedgecocki, Pitombo & Burton, 2007, C. alani nom. nov. (formerly C. southwardorum Pitombo & Burton, 2007) and C. newmani sp. nov.). These four species were initially separated by enzyme electrophoresis. They could only be partially separated by DNA bar coding but may be separated using morphological characters.

  16. Scanning electron microscopy of acrothoracican cypris larvae (Crustacea, Thecostraca, Cirripedia, Acrothoracica, Lithoglyptidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolbasov, Gregory A.; Høeg, Jens T.; Elfimov, Alexei S.

    1999-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to provide a full morphological description of cypris morphology in the acrothoracican species Lithoglyptes milis and L. habei (Lithoglyptidae). Special attention was given to lattice organs, antennules, thorax, thoracopods, abdomen, and furcal rami. Cypris larv

  17. Significance of biofilm proteins in modulating cyprid metamorphosis of Balanus amphitrite (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.; KrishnaKumar, S.

    amphitrite, whereas monospecies biofilms did not. The treatment of biofilms with protease resulted in a decline in metamorphosis, except in B. brevis, where although metamorphosis was negated initially, it increased with the protease concentration...

  18. Studies on some cues regulating metamorphosis of the larvae of Balanus amphitrite (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, L.

    to carry out the assays. Rittschof et al. (1984) have described these methods in detail. 14 2.2.3 Treatment with sugars The cyprids were immersed in seawater containing different concentrations (10-8, 10-7, 10-5 or 10-3M) of D-glucose, D-galactose or D... introduced into wells of 24-well plates coated with AE and to non-coated multiwells (Corning-430262) along with 2 ml of autoclaved, filtered seawater at 35? (Maki et al. 1990). The above treatments were repeated employing a single cyprid (single cyprid...

  19. Morfología del aparato reproductor del picoroco Austromegabalanus psittacus (Molina, 1782 (Cirripedia, Balanidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Contreras

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Descripción morfológica de las estructuras reproductivas de Austromegabalanus psittacus en dos periodos de maduración sexual. Se determinó que es un organismo hermafrodita que transfiere sus espermatozoides mediante un órgano intromitente o pene. El aparato reproductor masculino consta de testículos organizados en acinos que se distribuyen arboriformemente, dos conductos deferentes que se unen en la base del pene para formar el conducto eyaculador. El aparato reproductor femenino consiste principalmente en un ovario sacular que rodea al resto del cuerpo y se encuentra adherido a través de musculatura a la base de las placas operculares. Se organiza internamente en sacos acinares elongados que contienen ovogonias y ovocitos previtelogénicos adheridos a su pared y vitelogénicos y maduros libres dentro del lumen. Se observaron diferencias notorias en los ovarios entre los organismos recolectados en septiembre y octubre. En septiembre presentaron coloración amarillenta y en su interior se encontraron dos estructuras compactas denominadas lamelas ovígeras en cuyo interior se observaron ovocitos fecundados, embriones en diferentes estados de desarrollo y nauplius libres en la cavidad corporal; en octubre los ovarios son gruesos, blanquecinos y con gran cantidad de fluido lechoso en su interior.

  20. Morfología del aparato reproductor del picoroco Austromegabalanus psittacus (Molina, 1782) (Cirripedia, Balanidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Catalina Contreras; Nicolás Luna; Enrique Dupré

    2015-01-01

    Descripción morfológica de las estructuras reproductivas de Austromegabalanus psittacus en dos periodos de maduración sexual. Se determinó que es un organismo hermafrodita que transfiere sus espermatozoides mediante un órgano intromitente o pene. El aparato reproductor masculino consta de testículos organizados en acinos que se distribuyen arboriformemente, dos conductos deferentes que se unen en la base del pene para formar el conducto eyaculador. El aparato reproductor femenino consiste pri...

  1. Cypris morphology in the barnacles Ibla and Paralepas (Crustacea: Cirripedia Thoracica) implications for cirripede evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Jens T; Achituv, Yair; Chan, Benny K K;

    2009-01-01

    terminally on the fourth antennular segment is a similarity with the Acrothoracica. The attachment disc is angled rather than facing distally and is encircled by a low cuticular velum. The thoracopods have two-segmented endopods and exopods as in the Thoracica, but the number, shape, and position...

  2. Immunocytochemical studies on the naupliar nervous system of Balanus improvisus (Crustacea, Cirripedia, Thecostraca)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semmler, Henrike; Wanninger, Andreas; Høeg, Jens T;

    2008-01-01

    neurons in the protocerebrum, along the circumoesophageal connectives and in the mandibular ganglion stain only for serotonin. Due to the almost complete absence of comparable data on the neuroanatomy of early (naupliar) stages in other Crustacea, we include immunocytochemical data on the larvae...

  3. Influence of bacterial exopolymers, conspecific adult extract and salinity on the cyprid metamorphosis of Balanus amphitrite (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Khandeparker, R.

    the metamorphosis rate. The interaction between these two variables, however, did not change in any combination, irrespective of the bacterial strain used. The Pseudomonas epm promoted metamorphosis at 15 ppt, but was inhibitory at 45 ppt. The Acinetobacter epm...

  4. Notes on the ultrastructure of the setae on the fourth antennulary segment of the Balanus amphitrite cyprid (Crustacea : Cirripedia : Thoracica)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lagersson, Niklas; Garm, Anders Lydik; Høeg, Jens Thorvald

    2003-01-01

    This study presents electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) observations on the putative settlement receptors of the fourth antennulary segments. The TEM data from all nine setae are from the outer dendritic segment. Eight of them have morphological characteristics, indicating bimodal sensory properties w...

  5. Larval development and metamorphosis in Balanus amphitrite Darwin (Cirripedia; Thoracica): Significance of food concentration, temperature and nucleic acids

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Desai, D.V.; Khandeparker, L.

    . Increase in rearing temperature and food concentration positively influenced the size of the larvae. Food concentration influenced the DNA of 3 and 4 naupliar instars and temperature influenced the DNA of 4 and 5 instar nauplii. The RNA content of 4...

  6. Comparison of nutritional status of field and laboratory reared Balanus amphitrite Darwin (Cirripedia: Thoracica) larvae and implication of starvation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, D.V.; Anil, A.C.

    amphitrite. The larvae were also field-reared using micro-enclosures. Laboratory-reared larvae were larger in size than the field-reared larvae. An increase in size, DNA content and instar index of the starved II instar larvae was observed indicating...

  7. Some biological consequences of environmental change: a study using barnacles (Cirripedia: Balanomorpha) and gum trees (Angiospermae: Myrtaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckeridge, John S

    2010-06-01

    Uniformitarianism permits understanding of the past on the basis of the present, and modeling the future through consideration of the fossil record. The present paper addresses the impact environmental (climatic) change has had on acorn barnacles and eucalyptus trees. Acorn barnacles (Balanomorpha) are first recorded after the K/T mass-extinction event. In the Paleogene, rapid radiation resulted in their occupying most marine environments. That balanomorphs survived both the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum and the Pleistocene glaciation is testament to their ability to adapt to opportunities; they are known from the littoral (Chamaesipho) to depths of 3600 m (Tetrachaelasma) and within this from diverse substrates: rock, wood and miscellaneous flotsam, plus in symbiosis or commensalism with most larger marine organisms. Darwin's (1854) view of the late Tertiary as the age of barnacles is reflected in their diversity, distribution and biomass. Barnacles are contrasted with the Australian Myrtaceae: plants ranging from woody shrubs to tall trees. The most significant is Eucalyptus sensu lato, which typifies Australia's flora, and is characterized by aromatic leaves that produce eucalyptol. Eucalyptus has evolved strategies that result in its domination of Australian open woodlands: these include production of highly flammable eucalyptol oil (with a flashpoint of 49 °C) and an unprecedented ability to regenerate following forest fires. Gum trees and barnacles first appear in the Paleogene, their earliest records are Australasian, and they both demonstrate extraordinary resilience when environmental conditions are optimal.

  8. Antennulary sensory organs in cyprids of Octolasmis and Lepas (Crustacea: Thecostraca: Cirripedia: Thoracica): a scanning electron microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomsterberg, Mikkel; Høeg, Jens T; Jeffries, William B;

    2004-01-01

    Cypris larvae of the pedunculate barnacles Octolasmis angulata (Poecilasmatidae), Lepas australis, L. pectinata, and Dosima fascicularis (Lepadidae) were studied with scanning electron microscopy, focusing on the sensory setae and the attachment disc on the antennules. The antennules of O. angulata...

  9. The impact of food type, temperature and starvation on larval development of Balanus amphitrite Darwin (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, D.V.; Anil, A.C.

    The impact of diatom food species (Chaetoceros calcitrans and Skeletonema costatum), temperature and starvation on the larval development of Balanus amphitrite was evaluated. Starvation threshold levels for different ages of larvae (0- to 5-day...

  10. The whale barnacle Cryptolepas rhachianecti (Cirripedia: Coronulidae), a phoront of the grey whale Eschrichtius robustus (Cetacea: Eschrichtiidae), from a sandy beach in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosselaers, Mark; Collareta, Alberto

    2016-08-22

    An isolated compartment of a whale barnacle is herein described from Recent beach deposits in Zoutelande (Walcheren, The Netherlands). This specimen is identified as belonging to the extant coronulid species Cryptolepas rhachianecti, currently known as an epizoic symbiont of the grey whale Eschrichtius robustus. This find represents the first occurrence of C. rhachianecti outside the North Pacific, and the first one as a (sub)fossil. In view of the fact that E. robustus, which is currently confined to the North Pacific, is known as a subfossil from the northeastern Atlantic between late Late Pleistocene (c. 45,000 years ago) and historical (c. 1700 AD) times, we propose a similar (late Quaternary) age for the isolated compartment. The find indicates that the extinct late Quaternary northeastern Atlantic population of E. robustus was infected by Cryptolepas rhachianecti. Our find is, therefore, compatible with the hypothesis of an ancient grey whale migration route running between the subtropical/temperate waters of the northeast Atlantic (or Mediterranean Basin), and the cold waters of the Baltic Sea (or southern Arctic Ocean), through the southern North Sea. Finally, we discuss the systematic placement of the fossil barnacle species Cryptolepas murata and propose the possibility of its removal from the genus Cryptolepas pending further investigations.

  11. Influence of elevated temperature, pCO2, and nutrients on larva-biofilm interaction: Elucidation with acorn barnacle, Balanus amphitrite Darwin (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baragi, Lalita V.; Anil, Arga Chandrashekar

    2017-02-01

    Selection of optimal habitat by larvae of sessile organism is influenced by cues offered by the biofilm. Ocean warming and acidification are likely to enforce changes in the biofilm community and inturn influence the settlement process. Hence, we evaluated the influence of biofilm (multispecies and unialgal) and diet-mediated changes on the settlement of Balanus amphitrite cyprids (presettlement non-feeding larval stage) under different combinations of temperature (28, 30, 32 and 34 °C), pCO2 (400, 750 and 1500 μatm) and nutrient (unenriched and f/2 enriched). Nutrient enrichment enhanced the diatom and bacterial abundance at ambient temperature (30 °C) and pCO2 (400 μatm), which inturn increased larval settlement. Elevated pCO2 (750 and 1500 μatm) had no direct effect but a variable cascading effect on the settlement via biofilm-mediated changes was observed, depending on the type of biofilm. In contrast, elevated temperature (32 and 34 °C), either individually or in combination with elevated pCO2 had direct negative effect on settlement. However, biofilm-mediated changes compensated this negative effect. The larval settlement was also influenced by changes in the larval diet. Under elevated temperature and pCO2, cyprids raised with a feed (Chaetoceros calcitrans) from ambient temperature and pCO2 were of poor quality (lower RNA:DNA ratio, lower protein synthetic capacity) and yielded lower settlement. However, cyprids raised with a feed from elevated temperature and pCO2 were of better quality (higher RNA:DNA ratio, higher protein synthetic capacity) and yielded higher settlement. Overall, the observations from the present study provide insights into the significance of biotic interactions on the coastal biofouling communities under future climatic scenario and emphasise the need for future experiments on these aspects.

  12. Southern hemisphere deep-water stylasterid corals including a new species, Errinalabrosa sp. n. (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa, Stylasteridae), with notes on some symbiotic scalpellids (Cirripedia, Thoracica, Scalpellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, Daniela; Cairns, Stephen D; Puce, Stefania; Newman, William A

    2015-01-01

    A number of stylasterid corals are known to act as host species and create refuges for a variety of mobile and sessile organisms, which enhances their habitat complexity. These include annelids, anthozoans, cirripeds, copepods, cyanobacteria, echinoderms, gastropods, hydroids and sponges. Here we report the first evidence of a diverse association between stylasterids and scalpellid pedunculate barnacles and describe a new stylasterid species, Errinalabrosa, from the Tristan da Cunha Archipelago. Overall, five stylasterid species are found to host eight scalpellid barnacles from several biogeographic regions in the southern hemisphere (Southern Ocean, temperate South America and the southern Indo-Pacific realms). There is an apparent lack of specificity in this kind of association and different grades of reaction to the symbiosis have been observed in the coral. These records suggest that the association between pedunculate barnacles and hard stylasterid corals has a wide distribution among different biogeographic realms and that it is relatively rare and confined largely to deep water.

  13. Crustacean parasites associated with hermit crabs from the western Mediterranean Sea, with first documentation of egg predation by the burrowing barnacle Trypetesa lampas (Cirripedia: Acrothoracica: Trypetesidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jason D; Gallardo, Alejandra; Murphy, Angela E

    2011-03-01

    Parasitic isopods (family Bopyridae) and burrowing barnacles (family Trypetesidae) infesting hermit crabs were investigated from shallow subtidal collections made along the southeastern coast of Spain in 2009. A total of 713 specimens of Clibanarius erythropus (Latreille, 1818) and 82 Calcinus tubularis (L., 1767) were examined. Gastropod shells and worm tubes inhabited by hermit crabs were collected by hand while snorkeling and were cracked to determine host species, size, sex and presence of eggs. Two species of bopyrid isopods were found on C. erythropus: the branchial parasite Bopyrissa fraiseii (Carayon, 1943) and the abdominal parasite Parathelges cardonae Codreanu and Codreanu in Codreanu, 1968. Among all C. erythropus examined, Bopyrissa fraiseii was found on 0.6% of hermit crabs and P. cardonae was found on 0.3%. A redescription of P. cardonae is provided and the species is documented with light and scanning electron microscopy for the first time. No Calcinus tubularis harbored parasitic isopods, but one specimen was parasitized by an unidentified rhizocephalan barnacle of the genus Septosaccus (1.2%). The burrowing barnacle Trypetesa lampas (Hancock, 1849) was found associated with both hermit crab species and evidence of predation on host eggs by this barnacle is shown for the first time. Trypetesa lampas was found in 4.2% of the shells collected. The present study expands our knowledge of the parasite fauna of hermit crabs from the Mediterranean Sea and indicates that additional research is needed to determine the impact of trypetesid egg predators on hermit crab populations.

  14. Antifouling effect of bioactive compounds from marine sponge Acanthella elongata and different species of bacterial film on larval attachment of Balanus amphitrite (cirripedia, crustacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viswambaran Ganapiriya

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The antifouling activity of bioactive compounds from marine sponge Acanthella elongata (Dendy and five species of bacterial biofilm were studied. Larvae of Balanus amphitrite (Cyprids and nauplii were used to monitor the settlement inhibition and the extent to which inhibition was due to toxicity. The crude extract and partially purified fractions of A.elongata showed significant inhibition over the settlement individually, and with the interaction of bacterial species. No bacterial film stimulated the barnacle settlement. The high but variable levels of antifouling activity in combination with less amount of toxicity showed the potential of these metabolites in environmentally-friendly antifouling preparations.

  15. Interactive effect of elevated pCO2 and temperature on the larval development of an inter-tidal organism, Balanus amphitrite Darwin (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Baragi, L.V.; Anil, A.C.

    selected based on present day pCO2 (~400 µatm) and predicted concentration for the year 2100 (~750 µatm) (Stocker et al., 2013). Four treatments were used in this study: (1) Control treatment - ambient temperature (~30 °C) and ambient pCO2 (~400 µatm); (2...) Elevated pCO2 treatment - ambient temperature (~30 °C) and elevated pCO2 (~750 µatm); (3) Elevated temperature treatment - elevated temperature (~34 °C) and ambient pCO2 (~400 µatm); and (4) Synergistic treatment - elevated temperature (~34 °C...

  16. Coliform accumulation in Amphibalanus amphitrite (Darwin, 1854 (Cirripedia and its use as an organic pollution bioindicator in the estuarine area of Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CMR Farrapeira

    Full Text Available Samples of water and barnacles Amphibalanus amphitrite were collected from Recife, Brazil, to assess if it accumulates total (TC and thermotolerant coliforms (TTC related with sewage pollution. The Most Probable Number (MPN values and the standard procedures for examination of shellfish were used. Comparatively with the water samples, the highest coliform values came from the barnacles, with TC values ranging from 2.4 × 10(6 MPN.g-1, and TTC ranging from > 2.4 × 10³ to 2.9 × 10(5 MPN.g-1. Barnacles accumulate the TC Ewingella americana, and the TTC Escherichia coli, Enterobacter gergoviae, Enterobacter aerogenes, and Enterobacter sakazakii. The results provided an indication of the level of organic contamination at the sampling locations and that this species could be a good organic pollution bioindicator.

  17. Three-dimensional computer-aided reconstruction of FMRFamide immunopositive neuron distribution in the ventral ganglion of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite (Cirripedia, Crustacea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Gallus

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available We have implemented a simple program to solve three of the problems related to 3D reconstruction (3D-Rec of soft tissues: alignment of sections, distortions, and estimation of the spatial position of elements of interest inside the tissues. As a model, we chose the distribution of FMRFamide-like immunopositive neurons in the ventral ganglion of the barnacle Balanus amphitrite collected during different seasonal periods. Images of immunostained sections were acquired by means of a CCDcamera- equipped microscope and a PC and the reference points were taken inside the sections. The FMRFamide-like immunopositive neurons detected in the barnacle ventral ganglion were grouped into four different classes according to size, shape and staining intensity. More numerous FMRFamide- like immunopositive neurons were detected in the autumn-collected barnacle than in the summer counterpart. The two 3D reconstructions obtained from transverse and longitudinal ventral ganglion sections were efficaciously compared after 90° rotation of one of them. Comparison of these two 3D-Rec suggests the presence of at least two groups of FMRFamide-like immunopositive neurons that are seasonally-related and probably involved in reproduction.

  18. Southern hemisphere deep-water stylasterid corals including a new species, Errina labrosa sp. n. (Cnidaria, Hydrozoa, Stylasteridae, with notes on some symbiotic scalpellids (Cirripedia, Thoracica, Scalpellidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Pica

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of stylasterid corals are known to act as host species and create refuges for a variety of mobile and sessile organisms, which enhances their habitat complexity. These include annelids, anthozoans, cirripeds, copepods, cyanobacteria, echinoderms, gastropods, hydroids and sponges. Here we report the first evidence of a diverse association between stylasterids and scalpellid pedunculate barnacles and describe a new stylasterid species, Errina labrosa, from the Tristan da Cunha Archipelago. Overall, five stylasterid species are found to host eight scalpellid barnacles from several biogeographic regions in the southern hemisphere (Southern Ocean, temperate South America and the southern Indo-Pacific realms. There is an apparent lack of specificity in this kind of association and different grades of reaction to the symbiosis have been observed in the coral. These records suggest that the association between pedunculate barnacles and hard stylasterid corals has a wide distribution among different biogeographic realms and that it is relatively rare and confined largely to deep water.

  19. Preliminary results on the anatomy of the larval musculature of Balanus improvisus (Darwin, 1854) (Crustacea: Cirripedia: Thecostraca) using phalloidin staining in combination with confocal laserscanning microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Semmler, Henrike; Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Scholtz, Gerhard;

    2006-01-01

    The anatomy of the larval muscular systems in Balanus improvisus (Darwin, 1854) was investigated by using phalloidin staining to visualize filamentous F-actin in combination with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). The larval musculature contains an anterior muscle complex associated with ...

  20. Notes on some Indopacific species of the genus Sacculina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschma, H.

    1953-01-01

    For many years the species problem in the Sacculinidae has been a matter of controversies. Kossmann's (1872) paper was of fundamental importance, because in his descriptions of a great number of new species, chiefly from the Philippine Islands, he derived the specific characters from the anatomical

  1. Darwin taxonomist: Barnacles and shell burrowing barnacles Darwin taxónomo: cirrípedos y cirrípedos perforadores de conchas

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This bibliographic review revisits circumstances in which the wharf, shell burrowing barnacle, Cryptophialus minutus, was first collected by Charles Darwin in southern Chile, in 1836. Further, explores how its collection marked Darwin's taxonomical interest in Cirripedia. A short review analyzes the initial number of extant species of Cirripedia, as described by Darwin and the present situation, with emphasis on recent collections of C. minutus in the southern tip of South America.Esta revisi...

  2. Remarkable convergent evolution in specialized parasitic Thecostraca (Crustacea)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Crandall, Keith A

    2009-01-01

    the metamorphosis found in the Facetotecta and Rhizocephala suggests a common evolutionary origin, but until now no comprehensive study has looked at the basic evolution of these thecostracan groups. Results To this end, we collected DNA sequences from three nuclear genes [18S rRNA (2,305), 28S rRNA (2...

  3. The monophyletic origin of a remarkable sexual system in akentrogonid rhizocephalan parasites:A molecular and larval structural study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glenner, Henrik; Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Stenderup, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    We use sequences from the nuclear ribosomal genes, 18S and 28S to analyze the phylogeny of the Rhizocephala Akentrogonida including two species, Clistosaccus paguri and Chthamalophilus delagei, that are critical for understanding rhizocephalan evolution but have not previously been part of a mole...

  4. Anatomy of virgin and mature externae of Loxothylacus texanus, parasitic on the dark blue crab Callinectes rathbunae (Crustacea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alvarez, Fernando; Bortolini, José Luis; Høeg, Jens Thorvald

    2010-01-01

    the reproductive biology and the taxonomy of these specialized parasites. We use scanning electron microscopy and histological methods to study the anatomy of juvenile and the mature externae of the rhizocephalan barnacle Loxothylacus texanus parasitizing the blue crab Callinectes rathbunae. We put emphasis......, as is characteristic for the genus Loxothylacus. The internal anatomy of the mature externa of L. texanus is in most features similar to that seen in other species of the Sacculinidae, which comprises the majority of rhizocephalan species. However, the single receptacle creates a situation where the two implanted...

  5. Barnacles and their significance in biofouling

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Anil, A.C.; Desai, D.V.; Khandeparker, L.; Gaonkar, C.A.

    on the known living species and two on fossil species, summarily titled Monographs of the sub-class Cirripedia (Darwin 1851a,b; Darwin 1854a,b). He became the world’s foremost barnacle expert. Barnacles have relatively recent evolutionary radiation...

  6. Darwin taxonomist: Barnacles and shell burrowing barnacles Darwin taxónomo: cirrípedos y cirrípedos perforadores de conchas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUAN CARLOS CASTILLA

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This bibliographic review revisits circumstances in which the wharf, shell burrowing barnacle, Cryptophialus minutus, was first collected by Charles Darwin in southern Chile, in 1836. Further, explores how its collection marked Darwin's taxonomical interest in Cirripedia. A short review analyzes the initial number of extant species of Cirripedia, as described by Darwin and the present situation, with emphasis on recent collections of C. minutus in the southern tip of South America.Esta revisión bibliográfica describe las circunstancias en el que el cirrípedo enano, Crypophialus minutus, perforador de conchas, fue recolectado por Charles Darwin en el sur de Chile, en 1836. Además, cómo esta recolección marcó el interés taxonómico de Darwin en Cirripedia. Se presenta una revisión resumida sobre el número inicial de especies vivas de Cirripedia, como fueron descritas por Darwin, y la situación actual, con énfasis en recolecciones recientes de C. minutus en el cono sur de Suramérica.

  7. When similar beginnings lead to different ends: Constraints and diversity i cirripede larval development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Møller, Ole Sten

    2006-01-01

    the larvae hatch as cyprids. The cypris larvae are very similar among the ingroups of the Cirripedia, but interesting variations occur in structures used for substrate location and attachment. The cyprid is specialized to both swim through the water and actively explore the substratum by walking...

  8. Deep phylogeny and character evolution in thecostraca (Crustacea: Maxillopoda)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Høeg, Jens Thorvald; Crandall, Keith A.

    2012-01-01

    The thecostracans include the Facetotecta, Ascothoracida, and Cirripedia and show great diversity in both morphology and biology. This makes them ideal models for studying evolutionary adaptations of the larval and adult body-plan, lifestyle, and reproduction. Surprisingly, despite all the work p...

  9. Contribution to the feeding ecology of the banded puffer fish Colomesus psittacus (Tetraodontidae in north Brazilian mangrove creeks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Krumme

    Full Text Available Stomach contents were examined from 102 banded puffer, Colomesus psittacus (Tetraodontidae, caught from intertidal mangrove creeks at diurnal neap tides between June and September, 1997 (early dry season near Bragança (north Brazil. The study found that C. psittacus were specialized predators of Cirripedia (Balanus spp. and Brachyuran crabs (Uca spp., Pachygrapsus gracilis (mean: 58 and 38% by dry weight, respectively, emphasizing a short food chain in the mangrove system. Cirripedia and Brachyura dominated the diet in all size classes, however, the prey spectrum narrowed with fish size. The mean daily consumption of Cirripedia and Brachyura was 6.2% body weight of C. psittacus. On average C. psittacus consumed 100.3 g.ha-1.d-1 of Cirripedia and 178.7 g.ha-1.d-1 of Brachyura (wet weight. The predation on Brachyuran crabs - a significant driver of fluxes of organic matter and energy in the system - provides C. psittacus with an important ecological function in the mangrove food web. A plant-animal interaction is proposed where C. psittacus exerts a mutually beneficial cleaning function on the Aufwuchs (Cirripedia and associated epibiota of Rhizophora mangle stilt roots. Our results and those of other studies suggest that C. psittacus encounter optimum foraging conditions in the mangrove at high inundations at daylight (spring tide-day whereas darkness and low inundations are linked to poor foraging conditions (neap tide-night. The C. psittacus resource could be used as an alternative income in the region in terms of i sustainable catch and filet processing for exports to East Asia, ii developing certified aquaculture methods for breeding puffers for the aquarium trade.

  10. The selective advantage of host feminization: a case study of the green crab Carcinus maenas and the parasitic barnacle Sacculina carcini

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Tommy; Nielsen, Anders Isberg; Stig-Jørgensen, Anders Isak

    2012-01-01

    Male crabs infected by parasitic barnacles (Rhizocephala) are known to be morphologically feminized. Here, we investigate morphological chances in green crabs, Carcinus maenas, induced by the parasitic barnacle Sacculina carcini. Infected males acquire a broader, longer and segmented abdomen......, fringed with marginal setae. Copulatory appendages and pereopods are reduced in length, and the chelae become smaller. The feminization show great individual variation. Males with scars from lost externae, the parasites reproductive organ situated under the abdomen, are less modified than males carrying...... an externa, and the feminization is more pronounced in smaller than in larger males. No super-feminization is evident in female crabs that remain morphologically unaffected by infection. The protective value of a parasitically induced enlargement of the male abdomen may constitute an adaptation...

  11. Diet of Ctenogobius shufeldti (Jordan and Eigenmann, 1887 (Teleostei, Gobiidae in Guaratuba Bay, subtropical west Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Zanlorenzi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The diet composition of the American freshwater goby, Ctenogobius shufeldti, was investigated in an estuarine area and two of its tributaries. 397 individuals, total length from 21 to 70mm, were sampled over a period of 12 months and their stomach contents were analysed by the Frequency of Occurrence and Number of Points methods. According to the Alimentary Index, diet was constituted mainly by Ostracoda (IA=50.51 and Tanaidacea (IA=40.85, and secondarily by Gastropoda (IA=1.21, Amphipoda (IA=0.10, Isopoda (IA=0.01, Cirripedia (IA=0.01, Decapoda larvae (IA=0.01, Insecta (IA=0.01, Chlorophyta (IA=2.15 and Rodophyta (IA=0.15 filamentous algae, and plants (IA=4.99. Diversity of diet was higher in rivers than in the Bay. Except for Decapoda larvae, items found in the two rivers were the same. In the Bay, Amphipoda and Cirripedia were not found. Previous to this research, the filamentous algae Chlorophyta and Rodophyta had not been noted in the diet of this species in estuaries close to Guaratuba. In view of this, and regarding the possible roles played by cryptobenthic fish species in aquatic communities (Depczynski and Bellwood, 2003, it is concluded that C. shufeldti takes part in trophic dynamics feeding on benthic organisms as well as on algae, a behaviour that can result from both marine and continental influences existing in the region.

  12. Phylogenetic position of the pentastomida and [pan]crustacean relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavrov, Dennis V.; Brown, Wesley M.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2004-01-31

    Pentastomids are a small group of vermiform animals with unique morphology and parasitic lifestyle. They are generally recognized as being related to the Arthropoda, however the nature of this relationship is controversial. We have determined the complete sequence of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the pentastomid Armillifer armillatus and complete, or nearly complete, mtDNA sequences from representatives of four previously unsampled groups of Crustacea: Remipedia (Speleonectes tulumensis), Cephalocarida (Hutchinsoniella macracantha), Cirripedia (Pollicipes polymerus), and Branchiura (Argulus americanus). Analyses of the mtDNA gene arrangements and sequences determined in this study indicate unambiguously that pentastomids are a group of modified crustaceans likely related to branchiurans. In addition, gene arrangement comparisons strongly support an unforeseen assemblage of pentastomids with maxillopod and cephalocarid crustaceans, to the exclusion of remipedes, branchiopods, malacos tracans and insects.

  13. Phylogenetic position of the Pentastomida and (pan)crustacean relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, Dennis V.; Brown, Wesley M.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2004-01-01

    Pentastomids are a small group of vermiform animals with unique morphology and parasitic lifestyle. They are generally recognized as being related to the Arthropoda; however, the nature of this relationship is controversial. We have determined the complete sequence of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of the pentastomid Armillifer armillatus and complete or nearly complete mtDNA sequences from representatives of four previously unsampled groups of Crustacea: Remipedia (Speleonectes tulumensis), Cephalocarida (Hutchinsoniella macracantha), Cirripedia (Pollicipes polymerus) and Branchiura (Argulus americanus). Analyses of the mtDNA gene arrangements and sequences determined in this study indicate unambiguously that pentastomids are a group of modified crustaceans probably related to branchiurans. In addition, gene arrangement comparisons strongly support an unforeseen assemblage of pentastomids with maxillopod and cephalocarid crustaceans, to the exclusion of remipedes, branchiopods, malacostracans and hexapods. PMID:15129965

  14. The tempo and mode of barnacle evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pérez-Losada, Marcos; Harp, Margaret; Høeg, Jens T

    2008-01-01

    (outgroup) species representing almost all the Thoracica families to assess the tempo and mode of barnacle evolution. Using phylogenetic methods of maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian inference and 14 fossil calibrations, we found that: (1) Iblomorpha form a monophyletic group; (2......) pedunculated barnacles without shell plates (Heteralepadomorpha) are not ancestral, but have evolved, at least twice, from plated forms; (3) the ontogenetic pattern with 5-->6-->8-->12+ plates does not reflect Thoracica shell evolution; (4) the traditional asymmetric barnacles (Verrucidae) and the Balanomorpha......) the Thoracica suborders evolved since the Early Carboniferous (340mya) with the final radiation of the Sessilia in the Upper Jurassic (147mya). These results, therefore, reject many of the underlying hypotheses about character evolution in the Cirripedia Thoracica, stimulate a variety of new thoughts...

  15. Vertical and horizontal distribution of zooplankton and polar cod in southern Baffin Bay (66-71°N) in September 2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellerup, Sanne; Dünweber, Michael; Møller, Eva Friis;

    2015-01-01

    Zooplankton are the link connecting primary producers to higher trophic levels, and knowing their distribution and community is important for predicting the distribution of predator species, like fish, seabirds, and marine mammals. However, data from open Arctic oceans are still scarce. In autumn...... fishes in the upper 500 m of southern Baffin Bay in September 2009. The zooplankton community was dominated by copepods (55 % of abundance in the upper 500 m), primarily of the genus Calanus. Other important zooplankton taxa included Limacina helicina, Chaetognatha, and Cirripedia nauplii....... On the Greenland Shelf, most Calanus were late copepodite stages and most were found at the depths of >200 m, suggesting they were in diapause. On the Canadian Shelf, there were relatively more Calanus in the near-surface layers, which were probably still actively feeding and which were available to visual...

  16. Further observations on zooplankton of the Potengi Estuary (Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil with special reference to the larvae of Brachyura (Crustacea, Decapoda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Sankarankutty

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with data on zooplankton collected from the estuary of Potengi, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil covering a period of one year from October 1992 to October 1993. Three fixed stations within the estuary located at varying distances from the mouth of the river were sampled. Sampling was done monthly when the tide was lowest. Analysis of the samples has shown clear pattern of seasonal variations in abundance of the dominant zooplankton components which are composed of Copepoda, Appendicularia, larvae of Brachyura, larvae of Cirripedia and Chaetognalha. A detailed study of the larvae of Brachyura was also attempted which showed that seven species can be identified in the samples, of which those of Aratus pisonii (H. Milne Edwards and Cardisoma guanhumi Latreille have already been described. Other five species are designated here numerically and description of various stages present in the samples are given.

  17. Invasion and Morphological Variation of the Non- Indigenous BarnacleChthamalus challengeri(Hoek, 1883) in Yangshan Port and its Surrounding Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yan; XUE Junzeng; LIN Junda; WU Huixian

    2015-01-01

    Invasive species generally possess unique characteristics that allow them to survive the invasion process in order to es-tablish and spread in new habitats. Successful invaders must resist both physical and physiological stresses associated with the changing environment. A common littoral barnacle,Chthamalus challengeri Hoek, 1883 (Crustacea, Cirripedia), which is native to Japan, South Korea and northern China, has become established in the high-littoral zone adjacent to Yangshan Port, Shanghai, China. A comparison of the morphology ofChthamlus species from Zhoushan archipelago with previous description indicates the occur-rence of C. challengeri.The new immigrant becomes a dominant species in certain high-intertidal habitats of the adjacent area to of Yangshan Port.C. challengeri was found in part of sampling sites in Zhoushan in 2010; however, it dispersed to all the eleven sam-pling sites in 2012. Densities ofC.challengerihad increased over 10 times in the last 2 years, with the highest mean value reaching 39533±6243ind.m-2 in the new habitat. The specific ratios of both operculum area (Sa) to base area (SA) and average height of pa-rietal plates (H) to length of base (L) revealed thatC. Challengeri displays morphological changes to resist stronger currents in the new habitats for invasion.

  18. Key to marine arthropod larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Fornshell

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The scope of this key is restricted to the larvae of marine arthropods. The key is based solely on their morphology, patterns of body segmentation, numbers of appendages, and mode of locomotion. An effort has been made to treat all traditionally named larval forms, both planktonic and benthic. It is intended that this key be useful for a researcher working with archived museum specimens and therefore, does not include habitat information as a identifying trait, even though this information is usually available in the archived records. Within the phylum Arthropoda there are two sub-phyla and eleven classes having larval stages in the marineenvironment. Where feasible the original names of the various larval types have been used. Because this nomenclature is less commonly used today compared to the past, the more recent taxonomic affinities are included in parentheses after the original larval name. The key includes the following thirty-four larvae: Branchhiopoda nauplii; Cephalocarida nauplii; Mystacocarida nauplii; trilobite larva; protonymphon; hexapod larvae; Remipedia nauplii; nauplius - Y larvae; Cirripedia nauplii; Ascothoracida nauplii; Ostracoda nauplii; Euphausiacea nauplii; Penaeidea nauplii; Cyclopoida nauplii; Calanoida nauplii; Harpacticoida nauplii;Polyarthra nauplii; cypris larva; eryonecius larva; cypris-Y larva; elapthocaris larvae; mysis larvae; lucifer zoea; acetes zoea; acanthosoma larva; phyllosoma; antizoea larva; anomuran zoea; brachyuran zoea; calyptopis larvae; furcilia larva; crytopia larva; puerulus larva; alima larva.

  19. Effects of human trampling on a rocky shore fauna on the Sao Paulo coast, southeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, M N; Rosso, S

    2009-11-01

    Increased tourist activity in coastal regions demands management strategies to reduce impacts on rocky shores. The highly populated coastal areas in southeastern Brazil are an example of degradation caused by development of industry and tourism. Among different shore impacts, trampling has been intensively studied, and may represent a significant source of stress for intertidal fauna. A randomised blocks design was applied to experimentally study the effects of two different trampling intensities on richness, diversity, density and biomass of the rocky shore fauna of Obuseiro beach, Guarujá, southeastern Brazil. Blocks were distributed in two portions of the intertidal zone, dominated respectively by Chthamalus bisinuatus (Cirripedia) and Isognomon bicolor (Bivalvia). Blocks were trampled over three months, simulating the vacation period in Brazil and were monitored for the following nine months. Results indicate that Chthamalus bisinuatus is vulnerable to trampling impacts. Richness, diversity and turn-over index tended to be higher in trampled plots four months after trampling ceased. In general, results agree with previous trampling studies, suggesting that even low intensities of trampling may cause some impact on intertidal communities. Management strategies should include isolation of sensitive areas, construction of boardwalks, visitor education and monitoring programmes. In Brazil, additional data obtained from experimental studies are necessary in order to achieve a better understanding of trampling impacts on rocky shore communities.

  20. Ship hull fouling in the port of Recife, Pernambuco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Maria Rocha Farrapeira

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Ports of big coastal cities are exposed to exotic species as a consequence of shipping traffic. As the Port of Recife receives an annual average of 491 ships from other regions of Brazil and from all over the world, this work was aimed at knowing which marine animals were passively transported on such vessels hulls, in order to map and monitor new bioinvasions in the area. Thus, 32 vessels of several origins were investigated between November 2005 and March 2006, samples were taken and the macrofauna identified. Sixty species of associated animals were identified, consisting of 28 sessile species, particularly the Cirripedia Balanomorpha and Lepadomorpha as dominants, 8 sedentary animals, namely Mytillidae and Dreissenidae and 23 free-living species, particularly, Caprellidae, Gammaridae, Tanaidacea, Turbellaria, Nemertea and Polychaeta. The first occurrence of Conchoderma virgatum was recorded with exact location for the Brazilian littoral, and Conchoderma auritum, Amphibalanus subalbidus and Haliplanella lineata were recorded for the first time at the littoral of Pernambuco State. The invasion pathway was confirmed for Amphibalanus reticulatus and Mytilopsis leucophaeta, invader species of the estuarine area of Recife's city. Megabalanus coccopoma was considered as a risk invader species for the region.Regiões portuárias das grandes cidades litorâneas estão sujeitas à recepção de espécies exóticas como conseqüência da movimentação dos navios. Como o Porto do Recife recebe uma média anual de 491 atracações de navios, provenientes de várias regiões do Brasil e do mundo, objetivou-se conhecer quais animais marinhos eram transportados passivamente nos cascos das embarcações para mapear e monitorar novas invasões biológicas na área. Assim, foram investigados 32 barcos de diversas origens, nos meses de novembro de 2005 a março de 2006, tendo a macrofauna sido amostrada e identificada. Foram encontradas 60 espécies de animais

  1. Macroepizoísmo em Libinia ferreirae (Crustacea, Brachyura, Majidae Macroepizoites on Libinia ferreirae (Crustacea, Brachyura, Majidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa C. Winter

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Um estudo de distribuição dos macroepizóicos foi realizado numa população do caranguejo-aranha Libinia ferreirae Brito Capello, 1871 proveniente do litoral dos estados do Paraná e de Santa Catarina. O material biológico foi obtido junto aos pescadores, e faz parte do rejeito de pesca. Os caranguejos foram mensurados e os macroepizóicos identificados e contados. Os seguintes macroepizóicos sésseis foram registrados: Calliactis tricolor (Lesueur, 1817 (Cnidaria; Actiniaria (Cnidaria; Arca sp. (Mollusca; Ostreidae (Mollusca; Acanthodesia tenuis (Desor, 1848 (Bryozoa; Cirripedia e duas espécies tubícolas de Gammaridea (Crustacea. Além destes organismos ocorreram dois tubos desabitados e quatro animais vágeis. A anêmona C. tricolor foi a espécie mais abundante e freqüente, sendo, provavelmente, utilizada como mecanismo de camuflagem pelo caranguejo. O macroepizoísmo em L. ferreirae está relacionado com a idade ou tamanho do caranguejo, tendo maior incidência naqueles mais velhos ou de maior porte. Entretanto, a densidade dos macroepizóicos por caranguejo se mantém em torno de três. Não há relação entre o macroepizoísmo e o sexo do hospedeiro; somente fêmeas ovígeras utilizam desse recurso mais freqüentemente do que as não-ovígeras. Devido à maior área de fixação, os macroepizóicos colonizam principalmente a carapaça do caranguejo, enquanto nos pereiópodos há predominância de Bryozoa.A study of the distribution of the macroepizoites was carried out on a population of the spider crab Libinia ferreirae Brito Capello, 1871 from the Southern Brazilian coast. Crabs were obtained from shrimps and fishes by-catch. They were measured, and their macroepizoites were identified and counted. The following sessile macroepizoites were registered: Calliactis tricolor (Lesueur, 1817 (Cnidaria; Actiniaria (Cnidaria; Arca sp. (Mollusca; Ostreidae (Mollusca; Acanthodesia tenuis (Desor, 1848 (Bryozoa; Cirripedia and two species

  2. Mesozooplankton community development at elevated CO2 concentrations: results from a mesocosm experiment in an Arctic fjord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Niehoff

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The increasing CO2 concentration in the atmosphere caused by burning fossil fuels leads to increasing pCO2 and decreasing pH in the world ocean. These changes may have severe consequences for marine biota, especially in cold-water ecosystems due to higher solubility of CO2. However, studies on the response of mesozooplankton communities to elevated CO2 are still lacking. In order to test whether abundance and taxonomic composition change with pCO2, we have sampled nine mesocosms, which were deployed in Kongsfjorden, an Arctic fjord at Svalbard, and were adjusted to eight CO2 concentrations, initially ranging from 185 μatm to 1420 μatm. Vertical net hauls were taken weekly over about one month with an Apstein net (55 μm mesh size in all mesocosms and the surrounding fjord. In addition, sediment trap samples, taken every second day in the mesocosms, were analysed to account for losses due to vertical migration and mortality. The taxonomic analysis revealed that meroplanktonic larvae (Cirripedia, Polychaeta, Bivalvia, Gastropoda, and Decapoda dominated in the mesocosms while copepods (Calanus spp., Oithona similis, Acartia longiremis and Microsetella norvegica were found in lower abundances. In the fjord copepods prevailed for most of our study. With time, abundance and taxonomic composition developed similarly in all mesocosms and the pCO2 had no significant effect on the overall community structure. Also, we did not find significant relationships between the pCO2 level and the abundance of single taxa. Changes in heterogeneous communities are, however, difficult to detect, and the exposure to elevated pCO2 was relatively short. We therefore suggest that future mesocosm experiments should be run for longer periods.

  3. Seasonal and interannual variation in mesozooplankton community structure off Tongyeong, southeastern coast of Korea, from 2011 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Garam; Kang, Hyung-Ku; Myoung, Jung-Goo

    2017-02-01

    Mesozooplankton community structure and environmental factors were monitored monthly at a fixed station off Tongyeong, southeastern coast of Korea, from 2011 to 2014 to better understand the variability of the mesozooplankton community in relation to changes in the marine environment. Total mesozooplankton density varied from 747 to 8,945 inds. m-3 with peaks in summer. The surface water temperature (r = 0.338, p < 0.05) and chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) concentration (r = 0.505, p < 0.001) were parts of the factors that may have induced the mesozooplankton peaks in summer. Copepods accounted for 71% of total mesozooplankton. Total copepod density, particularly cyclopoid copepods, increased during the study period. Cumulative sum plots and anomalies of the cyclopoid copepod density revealed a change of the cyclopoid density from negative to positive in June 2013. A positive relationship between cyclopoid copepods and the Chl-a concentration (r = 0.327, p < 0.05) appeared to be one of the reasons for the increase in cyclopoids. Dominant mesozooplankton species such as Paracalanus parvus s.l., Oikopleura spp., Evadne tergestina, Cirripedia larvae, Corycaeus affinis, Calanus sinicus, and Oithona similis accounted for 60% of total mesozooplankton density. Based on cluster analysis of the mesozooplankton community by year, the seasonal distinction among groups was different in 2014 compared to other years. P. parvus s.l. and its copepodites contributed most in all groups in all four years. Our results suggest that the high Chl-a concentration since 2013 may have caused the changes in mesozooplankton community structure in the study area.

  4. Diatoms and Other Epibionts Associated with Olive Ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea) Sea Turtles from the Pacific Coast of Costa Rica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majewska, Roksana; Santoro, Mario; Bolaños, Federico; Chaves, Gerardo; De Stefano, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Although the sea turtles have long been familiar and even iconic to marine biologists, many aspects of their ecology remain unaddressed. The present study is the first of the epizoic diatom community covering the olive ridley turtle's (Lepidochelys olivacea) carapace and the first describing diatoms living on sea turtles in general, with the primary objective of providing detailed information on turtle epibiotic associations. Samples of turtle carapace including the associated diatom biofilm and epizoic macro-fauna were collected from Ostional beach (9° 59´ 23.7´´ N 85° 41´ 52.6´´ W), Costa Rica, during the arribada event in October 2013. A complex diatom community was present in every sample. In total, 11 macro-faunal and 21 diatom taxa were recorded. Amongst diatoms, the most numerous were erect (Achnanthes spp., Tripterion spp.) and motile (Haslea sp., Navicula spp., Nitzschia spp., Proschkinia sp.) forms, followed by adnate Amphora spp., while the most common macro-faunal species was Stomatolepas elegans (Cirripedia). Diatom densities ranged from 8179 ± 750 to 27685 ± 4885 cells mm-2. Epizoic microalgae were either partly immersed or entirely encapsulated within an exopolymeric coat. The relatively low diatom species number, stable species composition and low inter-sample dissimilarities (14.4% on average) may indicate a mutualistic relationship between the epibiont and the basibiont. Dispersal of sea turtle diatoms is probably highly restricted and similar studies will help to understand both diatom diversity, evolution and biogeography, and sea turtle ecology and foraging strategies.

  5. A review on the mechanism of attachment and metamorphosis in barnacle cyprids%藤壶金星幼虫附着变态机制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    饶小珍; 林岗; 许友勤

    2013-01-01

    藤壶属节肢动物门(Arthropoda)甲壳亚门(Crustacea)蔓足下纲(Cirripedia)围胸总目(Thoracica),具备特殊的形态结构、生活史和种群生态特征,是最主要的海洋污损生物.其幼虫阶段通常经历6期无节幼体和1期不摄食的金星幼虫,从浮游的金星幼虫附着变态成固着的稚体是藤壶生活史中的一个关键环节.外界化学和生物因子中成体提取物、水溶性信息素、足迹、神经递质、激素、生物膜等均影响藤壶金星幼虫的附着变态;内在因子即金星幼虫的生理状态(能量储量和年龄)决定了其对外界因子的反应程度.概括了近年来藤壶附着变态生理机制和分子机制研究的进展,可为深入了解藤壶金星幼虫附着变态机制提供参考,也为开发新型、高效、环保的防污剂提供理论指导.

  6. Diatoms and Other Epibionts Associated with Olive Ridley (Lepidochelys olivacea Sea Turtles from the Pacific Coast of Costa Rica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roksana Majewska

    Full Text Available Although the sea turtles have long been familiar and even iconic to marine biologists, many aspects of their ecology remain unaddressed. The present study is the first of the epizoic diatom community covering the olive ridley turtle's (Lepidochelys olivacea carapace and the first describing diatoms living on sea turtles in general, with the primary objective of providing detailed information on turtle epibiotic associations. Samples of turtle carapace including the associated diatom biofilm and epizoic macro-fauna were collected from Ostional beach (9° 59´ 23.7´´ N 85° 41´ 52.6´´ W, Costa Rica, during the arribada event in October 2013. A complex diatom community was present in every sample. In total, 11 macro-faunal and 21 diatom taxa were recorded. Amongst diatoms, the most numerous were erect (Achnanthes spp., Tripterion spp. and motile (Haslea sp., Navicula spp., Nitzschia spp., Proschkinia sp. forms, followed by adnate Amphora spp., while the most common macro-faunal species was Stomatolepas elegans (Cirripedia. Diatom densities ranged from 8179 ± 750 to 27685 ± 4885 cells mm-2. Epizoic microalgae were either partly immersed or entirely encapsulated within an exopolymeric coat. The relatively low diatom species number, stable species composition and low inter-sample dissimilarities (14.4% on average may indicate a mutualistic relationship between the epibiont and the basibiont. Dispersal of sea turtle diatoms is probably highly restricted and similar studies will help to understand both diatom diversity, evolution and biogeography, and sea turtle ecology and foraging strategies.

  7. Predators on rocky shores in the northern Atlantic: Can the results of local experiments be generalized on a geographical scale?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingólfsson, Agnar

    2009-07-01

    Experimental manipulations of invertebrate prey and predators on rocky shores have been done by many authors. In the northern Atlantic the predators involved are usually the green crab Carcinus maenas and/or the dogwhelk Nucella lapillus, and the prey species studied are acorn barnacles (balanid Cirripedia), mussels ( Mytilus spp.) and winkles ( Littorina spp.). Usually the predators are found to have a regulating "top-down" effect on the prey species. In Iceland the acorn barnacle Semibalanus balanoides, the blue mussel Mytilus edulis and the flat periwinkle Littorina obtusata (including to some extent Littorina mariae) are found on rocky shores all around Iceland in what would seem to be near-optimal physical conditions. The predators Carcinus maenas and Nucella lapillus, on the other hand, are relatively southern species that do not thrive on the colder coasts of Iceland. Thus general surveys of different coasts of Iceland would seem to offer opportunities to see whether the results of local experiments can be discerned on a geographical scale (hundreds of km). The roughly 4900 km of the rocky coastline in Iceland was in this study subdivided into four regions, I-IV, according to the commonness or presence of the two predators. With the hope of reducing compounding factors the surveys were confined to sheltered or semi-sheltered fucoid shores, which were further divided into Ascophyllum (more sheltered) and Fucus vesiculosus (less sheltered) shores. Estuaries or other low-salinity environments were avoided. The study was based on 761 stations distributed around the rocky coastline on these two types of shores. The results for barnacles and mussels, being generally more abundant in regions were predators were scarce or absent, and being less common in Ascophyllum than F. vesiculosus shores in contrast to the predatory dogwelks, were in large measure in accord with predictions from experiments indicating "top-down" regulation. The results for the periwinkles

  8. Biodiversity of the Deep-Sea Benthic Fauna in the Sangihe-Talaud Region, Indonesia: Observations from the INDEX-SATAL 2010 Expedition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, S.; Munro, C.; Nganro, N.; Tunnicliffe, V.; Wirasantosa, S.; Sibert, E.; Hammond, S. R.; Bors, E.; Butterfield, D.; Holden, J. F.; Baker, E. T.; Sherrin, J.; Makarim, S.; Troa, R.; Shank, T. M.

    2010-12-01

    The benthic ecosystems found in the deep-sea promontories of Sangihe Talaud region were explored, between June and August 2010, using the ROV Little Hercules aboard the NOAA ship Okeanos Explorer. The Sangihe-Talaud region is part of the Coral Triangle (CT) an area known for harboring the most biodiverse shallow-water coral reefs in the world. Notwithstanding the significant research efforts that have been undertaken to catalog and protect the biodiversity of the CT prior this expedition, virtually nothing was known about the life inhabiting the deep sea. The high-resolution imagery obtained from the 27 ROV dives revealed remarkably high abundances and diversity of animal species, many of which appear to be novel. On hard bottom substrates, cold-water corals were the dominant sessile macrofauna, in terms of biomass, followed by glass sponges (Hexactinellida) and sea lilies (Crinoidea). The coral taxa observed in this area represent six large orders of cnidarians: antipatharians (black corals), scleractinians (stony corals), zoanthideans (gold corals), alcyonaceans (octocorals), pennatulaceans (sea pens), and anthoathecates (hydrocorals). Most sessile species, independently of their size class or taxonomic affiliation, harbor a wide variety of associated fauna. Brittle stars (Ophiuroidea), squat lobsters (Galatheoidea), shrimp (Caridea), amphipods (Amphipoda), anemones (Actinaria), zanthideans, barnacles (Cirripedia), hydroids (Hydrozoa) and worms (Polychaeta) are the animal groups most commonly found forming these associations. In contrast, soft bottom habitats were dominated by stalked sponges, sea pens, sea cucumbers (Holothuroidea) and brittle stars. Other conspicuous fauna include fish, hermit crabs (Paguridae), urchins (Echinoidea) and octopuses (Cephalopoda). The abundance of habitats generated by the high number of geological and biological features and depth ranges present in the deep coral triangle (e.g., ridges, seamounts, island margins, plains, and rock

  9. Prospecção hidrobiológica da Baía de Sepetiba Color and transparence of waters of Sepetiba Bay, in Rio de Janeiro State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lejeune P. H. de Oliveira

    1971-01-01

    Full Text Available Côr das águas de Sepetiba; as pròpriamente marítimas, pela Escala de Forel e as outras côres aparentes totais feitas por comparação com escalas de SÉGUY e com o Dicionário de Côres de MAERZ & PAUL, 1950. Côr Forel nº6 mostrava no litoral cirrípedes como a Tetraclita squamosa, nas rochas; Águas com a cianofícea planctônica Trichodesmium erythraeum tinham côr de "fôlha de bananeira" ou alpine green. O verde esmeralda mais intenso no local 7, com plancto maciço da diatomácea Coscinodiscus; a parte central da Baía com 150 [quilometros quadrados], cheia de larvas de camarão Penaeus schmidti, águas de cõr de ferrugem nas superfícies das águas; os estuários côr caramelo, isabellinus e bistre. Êste levantamento preliminar serve para comparações futuras, pois a Baía de Sepetiba ainda não é poluída. Futuramente haverá um pôrto de minérios com 3.000.000 de toneladas anuais, cais do pôrto, siderúrgicas e outras indústrias que a poluirão. Várias cõres de águas poluídas da Baía de Guanabara, como águas negras, águas côr de asfalto e outras escurecidas não foram encontradas em Sepetiba. Também não foram encntradas "águas vermelhas" com plancto predominante de dinoflagelados do que já vimos na Baía de Guanabara seguidos de mortandadas de peixes. A fig. 3 mostra as curvas de transparência, e a relação entre côr e transparência é dada para as côres totais aparentes. Foi marcado o coeficiente de extinção da luz K, pelo cálculo a partir do Disco de Secchi. Havendo poluições todos êsses dados que apresentamos deverão ser alterados.The apparent total color of sea by comparison with samples tested by "MAERZ & PAUL: A Dictionary of Colors, 1950". We find green colors of Forel Scale: Forel n. 5 in waters with Pheophyceae, Sargassum, and Rhodophyceae; Forel n. 6 waters in stones with the Cirripedia, the barnacle Tetraclita squamosa; the alpine green in waters with Trichodesmium exuthraeum. Emerald