WorldWideScience

Sample records for circumnuclear x-ray emission

  1. X-ray emission spectroscopy. X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despujols, J.

    1992-01-01

    Principles of X-ray emission spectrometry are first recalled, then wave-length dispersive and energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer are described. They are essentially designed for qualitative and quantitative analysis of elements (Z>10). Sample preparation, calibration, corrections, interferences, accuracy are reviewed. Examples of use in different industries are given. (71 refs.)

  2. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Solar flares; X-ray detectors; X-ray line emission and continuum; break energy; microflares. Abstract. Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS), the first space-borne solar astronomy experiment of India was designed to improve our current understanding of X-ray emission from the Sun in general and solar flares in ...

  3. High-Resolution X-ray Emission and X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, F.M.F. de

    2000-01-01

    In this review, high-resolution X-ray emission and X-ray absorption spectroscopy will be discussed. The focus is on the 3d transition-metal systems. To understand high-resolution X-ray emission and reso-nant X-ray emission, it is first necessary to spend some time discussing the X-ray absorption

  4. Proton induced X-ray emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Rashiduzzman

    1976-09-01

    The developments in proton induced X-ray emission analysis are reviewed. Techniques for analyzing thick and thin samples of different origin are described. Discussions on the application of proton induced X-ray emission analysis in different fields, comparison of the sensitivity of this method with other analytical techniques, its limitations and possible improvements are presented

  5. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS), the first space-borne solar astronomy experiment of India was designed to improve our current understanding of X-ray emission from the Sun in general and solar flares in particular. SOXS mission is composed of two solid state detectors, viz., Si and CZT semiconductors ...

  6. Metrology and X-rays emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chancel, C.; Schirmann, D.

    1993-01-01

    This scientific journal explains different technologies used to study X-rays emissions hot dense plasmas created by laser at the Dam center of Limeil-Valenton (CEL-V) or created by nuclear fire in the Pacific

  7. Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Keizo

    2003-01-01

    The principle of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis and its medical application are described. Accelerated charged particles induce X-ray emission from the irradiated target atom due to the ionization of its inner orbital electron. Elemental analyses can be done by the characteristic X-rays, which differing from element to element. Particles such as protons are accelerated usually by the cyclotron or Van de Graaff accelerator. Emitted X-rays are measured by Si(Li) semiconductor detector which gives X-ray spectra of the target element atoms. PIXE analysis, highly sensitive to heavy elements, metals, P, S, K and Cl, is used for characterization of blood for aging and diseases and of rat tissues under normal and cancerous conditions. Micro-PIXE camera is a recent fruit, which gives the image of the distribution of intracellular elements by scanning with <1 μm particle beam. The micro-beam is produced by the static electric type accelerator, micro-slit system and quadrupolar magnets. Examples of the image of bovine endothelial cells (K, S, P and Br) and of Br kinetics given as Br-deoxyuridine are presented. The molecular imaging will be further developed from micro- to nano-PIXE. (N.I.)

  8. X-ray emission from white dwarfs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strittmatter, P. A.; Brecher, K.; Burbidge, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    It is suggested that both the 250-eV background radiation and the recently observed variations in the optical emission from certain white dwarfs may be due to thermal bremsstrahlung from hot coronae surrounding such stars. The X-ray flux from the variable white dwarfs is predicted and in the most favorable case, R548, is sufficiently large to allow an observational test of the model. The possibility that the variations observed in strong X-ray sources are due to pulsations in the coronae surrounding degenerate stars, rather than in stars themselves, is also discussed. For the white dwarfs, both pulsation and rotation of the central star are found to be adequate sources of coronal energy, with pulsation being subject to relatively easy observational test. The energy requirements for the strong X-ray sources are briefly discussed.

  9. X-ray emission from hot plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Satio; Kato, Takako.

    1979-01-01

    X-ray emission from hot plasmas is discussed with a critical review of different theories. The results given in the present paper are complementary to those given by Kato in the sense that the present paper is introductory to the paper by Kato. The contents of the present paper are; 1. Introduction 2. Ionization and Recombination Rate Coefficients 3. Relative Abundances of Ions 4. Intensity and Spectra of Radiation 5. Comparison with Earlier Results 6. Emission and Absorption Lines (author)

  10. Particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, D.D.

    1991-08-01

    The accelerator based ion beam technique of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) is discussed in some detail. This report pulls together all major reviews and references over the last ten years and reports on PIXE in vacuum and using external beams. The advantages, limitations, costs and types of studies that may be undertaken using an accelerator based ion beam technique such as PIXE, are also discussed. 25 refs., 7 tabs., 40 figs

  11. X-Ray Emission Properties of Supernova Remnants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vink, J.; Alsabti, A.W.; Murdin, P.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray emission from supernova remnants can be broadly divided into thermal X-ray emission from the shock-heated plasmas and in nonthermal (synchrotron) emission caused by very high-energy (10–100 TeV) electrons moving in the magnetic fields of the hot plasmas. The thermal X-ray emission of young

  12. Modeling X-Ray Emission around Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Michael E.; Bregman, Joel N.

    2014-04-01

    Extended X-ray emission can be studied by spatial surface brightness measurements or by spectral analysis, but the two methods can disagree at low intensity levels. Here we present an improved method for spatial analysis that can be extended to include spectral information simultaneously. We construct a model for the entire image in a given energy band and generate a likelihood function to compare the model to the data. A critical goal is disentangling vignetted and unvignetted backgrounds through their different spatial distributions. Employing either maximum likelihood or Markov Chain Monte Carlo, we can derive probability distributions for the source and background parameters together, or we can fit and subtract the background, leaving the description of the source non-parametric. We calibrate this method against a variety of simulated images, and apply it to Chandra observations of the hot gaseous halo around the elliptical galaxy NGC 720. We follow the emission below a tenth of the background and infer a hot gas mass within 35 kpc of 4-5 × 109 M ⊙, with some indication that the profile continues to at least 50 kpc and that it steepens. We derive stronger constraints on the surface brightness profile than previous studies that employed the spectral method, and we show that the density profiles inferred from these studies are in conflict with the observed surface brightness profile. Contrary to a previous claim, we find that the X-ray halo does not contain the full complement of missing baryons within the virial radius.

  13. Repeated pulsed x-ray emission equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terauchi, Hikaru; Iida, Satoshi

    1982-01-01

    X-ray diffraction technique has been applied to determine the spatial positions of atoms which compose a material, and it is needless to say that the technique is a fundamental means regardless of the fields of research. However, the application of X-ray diffraction to the research on physical properties has been so far limited to know the spatial positions of atoms or molecules under thermal equilibrium condition. The addition of time element to the conventional technique, that is, the analysis of material structure including the time-varying processes under non-equilibrium conditions, is considered to approach the elucidation of the essence of materials. The authors call this dynamic structural analysis. The authors have planned to analyze X-ray diffraction intensity which has the resolution of about 10 -8 s in the real time which is conjugate with energy. However, present pulsed X-ray sources are not suitable for diffraction experiment because the pulse width is too long or X-ray wavelength is too short. Accordingly, the authors have made for trial a pulsed X-ray source for diffraction experiment. Its specifications are: diode voltage (X-ray tube voltage) from 200 to 300 kV, diode current from 2 to 5 kA, pulse width of about 30ns, maximum repetition frequency 10 pps, and X-ray focus size of 2 mm diameter. One of the features of this source is the repeated generation of pulsed X-ray. This is the first trial in the world, and is indispensable to the dynamic structural analysis described above. The quality of the emitted X-ray is also written. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  14. Chemical effects in x-ray emission spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, N.G.

    1982-01-01

    The chemical bond influence in X-ray emission spectra of hafnium, iodine, iron, sulphur, aluminium and magnesium is detected. The position of one X-ray emission line is determined by three methods: parabolic profile; Gaussian distribution and extra-heavy maximum. (author)

  15. X-Ray Emission from Compact Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cominsky, L

    2004-03-23

    This paper presents a review of the physical parameters of neutron stars and black holes that have been derived from X-ray observations. I then explain how these physical parameters can be used to learn about the extreme conditions occurring in regions of strong gravity, and present some recent evidence for relativistic effects seen in these systems. A glossary of commonly used terms and a short tutorial on the names of X-ray sources are also included.

  16. Radio and X-ray emission from supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asvarova, A.I.; Novruzova, H.I.; Ahmedova, S.I.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper it was studied the statistical correlation between radio and X-ray emissions from shell-type supernova remnants (SNR). The primary aim of this study is to test the model of radio emission of shell-type SNRs presented by one of the authors. Based on this model of radio emission, by using the Monte Carlo techniques we have simulated statistical relations radio - X-ray luminosities (not surface brightnesses) which then were compared with the observations. X-ray emission is assumed to be thermal. To have a uniform statistical material it was used observational data on the SNRs in Magellanic Clouds

  17. Soft x ray emission from Alexandrite laser-matter-interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhalter, P. G.; Harter, D. J.; Gabl, E. F.; Bado, P.; Newman, D. A.

    1993-07-01

    X-ray spectroscopy was used to quantify the plasma generated by a focused, Alexandrite laser as a potential alternative source in proximity lithography. An x-ray emission efficiency of 2 - 11% was determined by analysis of spectral data (10 - 14 A) from transition-metal targets.

  18. X-ray Emission Characteristics of Flares Associated with CMEs ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We present the study of 20 solar flares observed by “Solar. X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS)” mission during November 2003 to December. 2006 and found associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) seen by. LASCO/SOHO mission. In this investigation, X-ray emission characteris- tics of solar flares and their ...

  19. X-ray and extreme ultraviolet emission from comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, C. M.; Cravens, T. E.; Dennerl, K.

    The discovery of high energy X-ray emission in 1996 from C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake) has created a surprising new class of X-ray emitting objects. The original discovery (Lisse et al., 1996) and subsequent detection of X-rays from 17 other comets (Table 1) have shown that the very soft (E < 1 keV) emission is due to an interaction between the solar wind and the comet's atmosphere, and that X-ray emission is a fundamental property of comets. Theoretical and observational work has demonstrated that charge exchange collisions of highly charged solar wind ions with cometary neutral species is the best explanation for the emission. Now a rapidly changing and expanding field, the study of cometary X-ray emission appears to be able to lead us to a better understanding of a number of physical phenomena: the nature of the cometary coma, other sources of X-ray emission in the solar system, the structure of the solar wind in the heliosphere, and the source of the local soft X-ray background.

  20. X-ray emission from high temperature plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, W. L.

    1974-01-01

    X-rays from a 25-hJ plasma focus apparatus were observed with pinhole cameras. The cameras consist of 0.4 mm diameter pinholes in 2 cm thick lead housing enclosing an X-ray intensifying screen at the image plane. Pictures recorded through thin aluminum foils or plastic sheets for X-ray energies sub gamma smaller than 15 keV show distributed X-ray emissions from the focussed plasma and from the anode surface. However, when thick absorbers are used, radial filamentary structure in the X-ray emission from the anode surface is revealed. Occasionally larger structures are observed in addition to the filaments. Possible mechanisms for the filamentary structure are discussed.

  1. X-ray Emission from the Guitar Nebula

    OpenAIRE

    Romani, Roger W.; Cordes, James M.; Yadigaroglu, I. -A.

    1997-01-01

    We have detected weak soft X-ray emission from the Pulsar Wind Nebula trailing the high velocity star PSR 2224+65 (the `Guitar Nebula'). This X-ray flux gives evidence of \\gamma~10^7 eV particles in the pulsar wind and constrains the properties of the post-shock flow. The X-ray emission is most easily understood if the shocked pulsar wind is partly confined in the nebula and if magnetic fields in this zone can grow to near equipartition values.

  2. X-Ray Emission from the Guitar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Roger W.; Cordes, James M.; Yadigaroglu, I.-A.

    1997-01-01

    We have detected weak soft X-ray emission from the pulsar wind nebula trailing the high-velocity star PSR 2224+65 (the "Guitar Nebula"). This X-ray flux gives evidence of gamma approximately 10(exp 7) eV particles in the pulsar wind and constrains the properties of the postshock flow. The X-ray emission is most easily understood if the shocked pulsar wind is partly confined in the nebula and if magnetic fields in this zone can grow to near-equipartition values.

  3. The very soft X-ray emission of X-ray-faint early-type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, S.; Fabbiano, G.

    1994-01-01

    A recent reanaylsis of Einstein data, and new ROSAT observations, have revealed the presence of at least two components in the X-ray spectra of X-ray faint early-type galaxies: a relatively hard component (kT greater than 1.5 keV), and a very soft component (kT approximately 0.2-0.3 keV). In this paper we address the problem of the nature of the very soft component and whether it can be due to a hot interstellar medium (ISM), or is most likely originated by the collective emission of very soft stellar sources. To this purpose, hydrodynamical evolutionary sequences for the secular behavior of gas flows in ellipticals have been performed, varying the Type Ia supernovae rate of explosion, and the dark matter amount and distribution. The results are compared with the observational X-ray data: the average Einstein spectrum for six X-ray faint early-type galaxies (among which are NGC 4365 and NGC 4697), and the spectrum obtained by the ROSAT pointed observation of NGC 4365. The very soft component could be entirely explained with a hot ISM only in galaxies such as NGC 4697, i.e., when the depth of the potential well-on which the average ISM temperature strongly depends-is quite shallow; in NGC 4365 a diffuse hot ISM would have a temperature larger than that of the very soft component, because of the deeper potential well. So, in NGC 4365 the softest contribution to the X-ray emission comes certainly from stellar sources. As stellar soft X-ray emitters, we consider late-type stellar coronae, supersoft sources such as those discovered by ROSAT in the Magellanic Clouds and M31, and RS CVn systems. All these candidates can be substantial contributors to the very soft emission, though none of them, taken separately, plausibly accounts entirely for its properties. We finally present a model for the X-ray emission of NGC 4365, to reproduce in detail the results of the ROSAT pointed observation, including the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) spectrum and radial

  4. Stimulated X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy in Transition Metal Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Thomas; Weninger, Clemens; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Zhu, Diling; Mercadier, Laurent; Majety, Vinay P.; Marinelli, Agostino; Lutman, Alberto; Guetg, Marc W.; Decker, Franz-Josef; Boutet, Sébastien; Aquila, Andy; Koglin, Jason; Koralek, Jake; DePonte, Daniel P.; Kern, Jan; Fuller, Franklin D.; Pastor, Ernest; Fransson, Thomas; Zhang, Yu; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Rohringer, Nina; Bergmann, Uwe

    2018-03-01

    We report the observation and analysis of the gain curve of amplified K α x-ray emission from solutions of Mn(II) and Mn(VII) complexes using an x-ray free electron laser to create the 1 s core-hole population inversion. We find spectra at amplification levels extending over 4 orders of magnitude until saturation. We observe bandwidths below the Mn 1 s core-hole lifetime broadening in the onset of the stimulated emission. In the exponential amplification regime the resolution corrected spectral width of ˜1.7 eV FWHM is constant over 3 orders of magnitude, pointing to the buildup of transform limited pulses of ˜1 fs duration. Driving the amplification into saturation leads to broadening and a shift of the line. Importantly, the chemical sensitivity of the stimulated x-ray emission to the Mn oxidation state is preserved at power densities of ˜1020 W /cm2 for the incoming x-ray pulses. Differences in signal sensitivity and spectral information compared to conventional (spontaneous) x-ray emission spectroscopy are discussed. Our findings build a baseline for nonlinear x-ray spectroscopy for a wide range of transition metal complexes in inorganic chemistry, catalysis, and materials science.

  5. Enhanced X-ray Emission from Early Universe Analog Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorby, Matthew; Kaaret, Philip; Prestwich, Andrea H.; Mirabel, I. Felix; Feng, Hua

    2016-04-01

    X-rays from binaries containing compact objects may have played an important role in heating the early Universe. Here we discuss our findings from X-ray studies of blue compact dwarf galaxies (BCDs), Lyman break analogs (LBAs), and Green Pea galaxies (GP), all of which are considered local analogs to high redshift galaxies. We find enhanced X-ray emission per unit star-formation rate which strongly correlates with decreasing metallicity. We find evidence for the existence of a L_X-SFR-Metallicity plane for star-forming galaxies. The exact properties of X-ray emission in the early Universe affects the timing and morphology of reionization, both being observable properties of current and future radio observations of the redshifted 21cm signal from neutral hydrogen.

  6. Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Keith W.

    1999-09-01

    Elemental analysis using emission of characteristic x rays is a well-established scientific method. The success of this analytical method is highly dependent on the properties of the source used to produce the x rays. X-ray tubes have long existed as a principal excitation source, but electron and proton beams have also been employed extensively. The development of the synchrotron radiation x-ray source that has taken place during the past 40 years has had a major impact on the general field of x-ray analysis. Even tier 40 years, science of x-ray analysis with synchrotron x-ray beams is by no means mature. Improvements being made to existing synchrotron facilities and the design and construction of new facilities promise to accelerate the development of the general scientific use of synchrotron x-ray sources for at least the next ten years. The effective use of the synchrotron source technology depends heavily on the use of high-performance computers for analysis and theoretical interpretation of the experimental data. Fortunately, computer technology has advanced at least as rapidly as the x-ray technology during the past 40 years and should continue to do so during the next decade. The combination of these technologies should bring about dramatic advances in many fields where synchrotron x-ray science is applied. It is interesting also to compare the growth and rate of acceptance of this particular research endeavor to the rates for other technological endeavors. Griibler [1997] cataloged the time required for introduction, diffusion,and acceptance of technological, economic, and social change and found mean values of 40 to 50 years. The introduction of the synchrotron source depends on both technical and non-technical factors, and the time scale at which this seems to be occurring is quite compatible with what is seen for other major innovations such as the railroad or the telegraph. It will be interesting to see how long the present rate of technological change

  7. Observations of EUV and X-ray Emission from Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, C.

    The unexpected discovery of x-ray emission from Comet Hyakutake in March 1996 (Lisse et al. 1996) produced a number of questions about the physical mechanism producing the radiation. The original detection and subsequent observations have shown that the very soft (best fit thermal bremsstrahlung model kT0.2 keV) emission is due to an interaction between the solar wind and the comet's atmosphere. Using the results from the more than 15 comets detected to date in x-rays, I report here on the latest results on cometary x-ray emission, including new results from Chandra, and show that charge exchange between highly ionized minor ions in the solar wind and neutral gases in the cometary coma is the most likely operative mechanism. I then use this result to study a number of problems of astrophysical interest: the nature of the cometary coma, other possible sources of x-ray emission in the solar system, the structure of the solar wind in the heliosphere, and the source of the local x-ray background.

  8. Structure of the Circumnuclear Region of Seyfert 2 Galaxies Revealed by RXTE Hard X-Ray Observations of NGC 4945

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madejski, G.; Zycki, P.; Done, C.; Valinia, A.; Blanco, P.; Rothschild, R.; Turek, B.

    2000-01-01

    NGC 4945 is one of the brightest Se.yfert galaxies on the sky at 100 keV, but is completely absorbed below 10 keV, implying an optical depth of the absorber to electron scattering of a few; its absorption column is probably the largest which still allows a direct view of the nucleus at hard X-ray energies. Our observations of it with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) satellite confirm the large absorption, which for a simple phenomenological fit using an absorber with Solar abundances implies a column of 4.5(sup 0.4, sub -0.4) x 10(exp 24) /sq cm. Using a a more realistic scenario (requiring Monte Carlo modeling of the scattering), we infer the optical depth to Thomson scattering of approximately 2.4. If such a scattering medium were to subtend a large solid angle from the nucleus, it should smear out any intrinsic hard X-ray variability on time scales shorter than the light travel time through it. The rapid (with a time scale of approximately a day) hard X-ray variability of NGC 4945 we observed with the RXTE implies that the bulk of the extreme absorption in this object does not originate in a parsec-size, geometrically thick molecular torus. Limits on the amount of scattered flux require that the optically thick material on parsec scales must be rather geometrically thin, subtending a half-angle < 10 deg. This is only marginally consistent with the recent determinations of the obscuring column in hard X-rays, where only a quarter of Seyfert 2s have columns which are optically thick, and presents a problem in accounting for the Cosmic X-ray Background primarily with AGN possessing the geometry as that inferred by us. The small solid angle of the obscuring material, together with the black hole mass (of approximately 1.4 x 10(exp 6) solar mass) from megamaser measurements. allows a robust determination of the source luminosity, which in turn implies that the source radiates at approximately 10% of the Eddington limit.

  9. Quantitative x-ray emission from a DPF device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhalter, P. G.; Mehlman, G.; Newman, D. A.; Krishnan, M.; Prasad, R. R.

    1992-10-01

    The x-ray emission was measured from a Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) device. The high density plasma is generated by an electrical discharge in rarefied-neon gas between electrodes in a Mather-type plasma focus configuration. A curved-crystal x-ray spectrograph, a pinhole camera, and an active-filtered photodiode were the diagnostics viewing the axial output of the pinched-plasma region. The x-ray pinhole images indicate a pinched volume roughly 8 mm in length with a nearly circular cross section of about 300 μm in diameter. The digitized spectral traces were computer processed to obtain absolute x-ray line intensities. The neon plasma yielded 10-15 J of K-shell radiation into 4π with the hydrogenlike and heliumlike alpha lines totaling 55%-65% of the total spectral emission. The x-ray emission of the DPF device was studied as a function of discharge current and anode diameter.

  10. X-Ray and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy of Dim X-Ray Point Sources Constituting the Galactic Ridge X-Ray Emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumiko Morihana

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of X-ray and Near-Infrared observations of the Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE. We extracted 2,002 X-ray point sources in the Chandra Bulge Field (l =0°.113, b = 1°.424 down to ~10-14.8 ergscm-2s-1 in 2-8 keV band with the longest observation (900 ks of the GRXE. Based on X-ray brightness and hardness, we classied the X-ray point sources into three groups: A (hard, B (soft and broad spectrum, and C (soft and peaked spectrum. In order to know populations of the X-ray point sources, we carried out NIR imaging and spectroscopy observation. We identied 11% of X-ray point sources with NIR and extracted NIR spectra for some of them. Based on X-ray and NIR properties, we concluded that non-thermal sources in the group A are mostly active galactic nuclei and the thermal sources are mostly white dwarf binaries such as cataclysmic variables (CVs and Pre-CVs. We concluded that the group B and C sources are X-ray active stars in flare and quiescence, respectively.

  11. Tracking of azobenzene isomerization by X-ray emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, H

    2014-09-11

    Cis-trans isomerizations are among the fundamental processes in photochemistry. In azobenzene or its derivatives this dynamics is, due to its reversibility, one of the reactions widely used in photostimulation of molecular motors or in molecular electronics. Though intensively investigated in the optical regime, no detailed study exists in the X-ray regime so far. Because the X-ray emission spectroscopy echoes the electronic structure sensitive to the geometry, this theoretical report based on the density functional theory and its time-dependent version presents different nitrogen K-edge X-ray emission spectra for cis and trans isomers with close interrelation to their electron configuration. Considering the spectrum along the isomerization path, these structural signatures can be utilized to probe the isomerization dynamics in the excited molecule. The scheme can further be generalized to the element specific photoreactions.

  12. Resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy in Dy compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Okada, Kozo; Kotani, Akio.

    1994-01-01

    The excitation spectrum of the L 3 -M 5 X-ray emission of Dy compounds in the pre-edge region of Dy L 3 X-ray absorption near edge structure (L 3 -XANES) is theoretically investigated based upon the coherent second order optical formula with multiplet coupling effects. The spectral broadening of the excitation spectrum is determined by the M 5 core hole lifetime, being free from the L 3 core hole lifetime. The fine pre-edge structure of the L 3 edge due to the 2p→4f quadrupole transition can be seen in the excitation spectrum, while this structure is invisible in the conventional XANES, in agreement with the recent experimental results. We clarify the conditions for the excitation spectrum to be regarded as the absorption spectrum with a smaller width. The resonant X-ray emission spectra for various incident photon energies around the L 3 edge are also calculated. (author)

  13. Diffuse X-Ray Emission in the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Our understanding of the diffuse X-ray emission from the Milky Way has evolved. extensively with time from when it was first observed in the 1960's, and its origin is still the subject of debate as much now as ever. This presentation will provide an overview of that evolution, the various emission components, emission mechanisms, an assessment of the current state of the field, and implications for eROSITA.

  14. Observational Trends of Cometary X-ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, C. M.

    2001-05-01

    The unexpected discovery of x-ray emission from Comet Hyakutake in March 1996 (Lisse et al. 1996) has produced a number of questions about the physical mechanism producing the radiation. The original detection and subsequent observations (Dennerl et al. 1997, Mumma et al. 1997, Krasnopolsky et al. 1998, Owens et al. 1998, Lisse et al. 1999, Lisse et a. 2001, Dennerl et al. 2001) have shown that the very soft (best fit thermal bremsstrahlung model kT = 0.23 keV) emission is due to an interaction between the solar wind and the comet's atmosphere. Using the results from the more than 15 comets detected to date in x-rays, we report on the latest results on cometary x-ray emission. Our emphasis will be on understanding the physical mechanism producing the emission, and using this to determine the nature of the cometary coma and solar wind flux. As-observed morphologies, spectra, and light curves will be discussed. We also report on the status of current cometary observations using the new powerful x-ray observatories Chandra and XMM. This work has been graciously supported by grants from the NASA Planetary Astronomy and Astrophysical Data Programs.

  15. Screening in resonant X-ray emission of molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ågren, Hans; Luo, Yi; Gelmukhanov, Faris

    1996-01-01

    We explore the effects of screening in resonant X-ray emission from molecules by means of unconstrained multi-configurational self-consistent field optimizations of each state involved in the resonant and nonresonant X-ray processes. It is found that, although screening can produce shifts...... in transition energies of a few eV, its effect on the transition intensities is relatively minor. Using results from the investigated molecules, we find that the screening is quite dependent on the type of molecule - saturated versus unsaturated - and on the core site, but depends little on the particular core...

  16. Applications of particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akselsson, K. R.

    1978-01-01

    In Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) analysis samples are bombarded by protons or α-particles of a few MeV/u. The induced characteristic x-rays are detected with a x-ray detector e.g. a Si(Li)-detector. The energies of the x-ray peaks are characteristic for the elements in the samples and the intensities of the x-ray transitions are proportional to the abundances of the elements. The research area which first attracted those of us working with PIXE was the study of sources, transport and deposition of airborne particulates. Sources, transport, wet deposition, other applications where PIXE is already known to be competitive are trace elemental analysis of water below the ppb-level and analyses requiring a space resolution of 1-10μ. However, there is still much to do for physicists in developing the full potential of low-energy accelerators as analytical tools in multidisciplinary teams. (JIW)

  17. Mechanisms of x-ray emission from peeling adhesive tape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, E.; Horvat, J.; Lewis, R. A.

    2010-09-01

    It has previously been reported that x-rays are emitted when adhesive tape is peeled in a vacuum but no account of the dependence of the x-ray emission on the pressure of the environment has been given to date. In this paper we present detailed experimental data on the number and angular distribution of x-ray photons as a function of pressure. We find that x-rays are emitted for pressures between p0=10-3 and p1=10-2 mBar, with ˜106 counts/(cm2 s) recorded by a 256×256 pixel2 silicon array sensor placed 35 mm from the tape. The main role of the tape is found to be the build-up of an acceleration potential sufficient to produce x-rays by bremsstrahlung of free electrons in a low-pressure gas. The source of the free electrons is the gas. Our model shows that the production rate of uncompensated tape charge and absorption of positive ions from the gas define p1. The angular distribution of the radiation shows a pressure-independent 20° wide peak in the direction perpendicular to electron motion. Ordinary bremsstrahlung cannot describe this peak.

  18. A laboratory-based hard x-ray monochromator for high-resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy and x-ray absorption near edge structure measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidler, G T; Mortensen, D R; Remesnik, A J; Pacold, J I; Ball, N A; Barry, N; Styczinski, M; Hoidn, O R

    2014-11-01

    We report the development of a laboratory-based Rowland-circle monochromator that incorporates a low power x-ray (bremsstrahlung) tube source, a spherically bent crystal analyzer, and an energy-resolving solid-state detector. This relatively inexpensive, introductory level instrument achieves 1-eV energy resolution for photon energies of ∼5 keV to ∼10 keV while also demonstrating a net efficiency previously seen only in laboratory monochromators having much coarser energy resolution. Despite the use of only a compact, air-cooled 10 W x-ray tube, we find count rates for nonresonant x-ray emission spectroscopy comparable to those achieved at monochromatized spectroscopy beamlines at synchrotron light sources. For x-ray absorption near edge structure, the monochromatized flux is small (due to the use of a low-powered x-ray generator) but still useful for routine transmission-mode studies of concentrated samples. These results indicate that upgrading to a standard commercial high-power line-focused x-ray tube or rotating anode x-ray generator would result in monochromatized fluxes of order 10(6)-10(7) photons/s with no loss in energy resolution. This work establishes core technical capabilities for a rejuvenation of laboratory-based hard x-ray spectroscopies that could have special relevance for contemporary research on catalytic or electrical energy storage systems using transition-metal, lanthanide, or noble-metal active species.

  19. X-ray emission lines from photoionized plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liedahl, D.A.

    1992-11-01

    Plasma emission codes have become a standard tool for the analysis of spectroscopic data from cosmic X-ray sources. However, the assumption of collisional equilibrium, typically invoked in these codes, renders them inapplicable to many important astrophysical situations, particularly those involving X-ray photoionized nebulae, which are likely to exist in the circumsource environments of compact X-ray sources. X-ray line production in a photoionized plasma is primarily the result of radiative cascades following recombination. Through the development of atomic models of several highly-charged ions, this work extends the range of applicability of discrete spectral models to plasmas dominated by recombination. Assuming that ambient plasma conditions lie in the temperature range 10 5 --10 6 K and the density range 10 11 --10 16 cm -3 , X-ray line spectra are calculated over the wavelength range 5--45 angstrom using the HULLAC atomic physics package. Most of the work focuses on the Fe L-shell ions. Line ratios of the form (3s-2p)/(3d-2p) are shown to characterize the principal mode of line excitation, thereby providing a simple signature of photoionization. At electron densities exceeding 10 12 cm -3 , metastable state populations in the ground configurations approach their LTE value, resulting in the enrichment of the Fe L-shell recombination spectrum and a set of density-sensitive X-ray line ratios. Radiative recombination continua and emission lines produced selectively by Δn = 0 dielectronic recombination are shown to provide two classes of temperature diagnostics. Because of the extreme overionization, the recombination continua are expected to be narrow (ΔE/E much-lt 1), with ΔE = kT. Dielectronic recombination selectively drives radiative transitions that originate on states with vacancies in the 2s subshell, states that are inaccessible under pure RR population kinetics

  20. Optical/Infrared Polarised Emission in X-ray Binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Russell

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, evidence for synchrotron emission in both black-hole (BH and neutron star X-ray binaries has been mounting, from optical/infrared spectral, polarimetric, and fast timing signatures. The synchrotron emission of jets can be highly linearly polarised, depending on the configuration of the magnetic field (B-field. Optical and infrared (OIR polarimetric observations of X-ray binaries are presented in this brief review. The OIR polarimetric signature of relativistic jets is detected at levels of ∼1–10%, similarly to for active galactic nuclei (AGN cores. This reveals that the magnetic geometry in the compact jets may be similar for supermassive and stellar-mass BHs. The B-fields near the jet base in most of these systems appear to be turbulent, variable and on average, aligned with the jet axis, although there are some exceptions. These measurements probe the physical conditions in the accretion (outflow and demonstrate a new way of connecting inflow and outflow, using both rapid timing and polarisation. Variations in polarisation could be due to rapid changes of the ordering of the B-field in the emitting region, or in one case, flares from individual ejections or collisions between ejecta. It is predicted that in some cases, variable levels of X-ray polarisation from synchrotron emission originating in jets will be detected from accreting galactic BHs with upcoming spaceborne X-ray polarimeters.

  1. The X-ray emission spectrum of gaseous acetylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brammer, R.; Rubensson, J.E.; Wassdahl, N.; Nordgren, J.

    1987-01-01

    The X-ray emission spectrum of acetylene in the gas phase has been recorded using a 10 m grazing incidence spectrometer. Analysis of the spectrum is made based on calculations of total energies, potential curves and Franck-Condon vibrational intensities. Four emission bands are seen with the 1 π u band exhibiting vibrational structure. Analysis of the vibrations gives the CIs ionization energy. High energy satellite structure is observed and interpreted. (orig.)

  2. Spontaneous emission effects in optically pumped x-ray FEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smetanin, I.V.; Grigor`ev, S.V. [P.N. Lebedev Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    An effect of spontaneous emission in both quantum and classical regimes of the optically pumped X-ray free electron laser (FEL) in investigated. The quantum properties of an FEL are determined by the ratio of the separation {h_bar} between the absorption and emission lines (i.e. the quanta emitted) and their effective width {Delta}{epsilon} {eta}={h_bar}/{Delta}{epsilon}. In the conventional classical regime {eta} {much_lt} 1 an electron emits and absorbes a great number of shortwavelength photons over the interaction region, the gain in FEL being the result of these competitive processes. In the quantum limit {eta} {much_gt} 1 the emission and absorption lines are completely separated and thus the FEL becomes a two-level quantum oscillator with a completely inverted active medium. Spontaneous emission causes the electron to leave the range of energies where resonant interaction with the laser field occurs, thus effectively reducing the number of particles that take part in generating the induced X-ray signal. This effect is found to be crucial for lasing in optically pumped X-ray FEL. The characteristic relaxation times are calculated for both classical and quantum FEL regimes. It is shown that spontaneous emission results in FEL electron beam threshold current, which is of rather high value. An optimal range of pumping laser intensities is determined.

  3. Quantifying the Exospheric Component of Soft X-ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Kip; Collier, Michael R.; Snowden, Steven L.; Robertson, Ina; Hansen, Kenneth; Cravens, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    High charge state heavy ions in the solar wind exchange charge with ambient neutral gas. This process creates a product ion in an excited state. During the radiative cascade process, EUV and X-ray photons are emitted with energies in the range of about 100 eV to 1 keV. Because the terrestrial exospheric density at the nominal magnetopause location is relatively high, approx. 10 cu cm, solar wind charge exchange, or SWCX, can be observed by Earth-orbiting soft X-ray instruments such as the ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counters (PSPC). In this presentation, we will compare simulated and observed soft Xray emission during an event on August 18-19, 1991 and discuss the role of exospheric SWCX emission for this and other events.

  4. X-ray Emission Lines in Cataclysmic Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, E. M.; Singh, K. P.; Rana, V.; Girish, V.; Barrett, P. E.

    2005-12-01

    We describe a complete spectroscopic archival study of the emission lines from cataclysmic variables as observed by the Chandra X-ray Observatory using the High Energy Transmission Grating. G-, R-, and the H/He-like ratios are used to infer temperatures and densities for the emitting plasmas. The G-ratio for Si XIII indicates a minimum electron temperature of 106 K for the observed CVs. The Fe XVII 17.10/17.05 {Å} and 17.10/16.77 {Å} line ratios for all of the CVs imply densities greater than 1014 cm-3 or photoexcitation. The R ratios imply values from 1011 to 1014-15 cm-3. We do not convincingly detect any radiation recombination features. Implications for the physics of CV accretion processes are briefly discussed. The research of EMS was partially supported by contract NAS-39073 from NASA to SAO for the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  5. Colliding Stellar Winds Structure and X-ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittard, J. M.; Dawson, B.

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the structure and X-ray emission from the colliding stellar winds in massive star binaries. We find that the opening angle of the contact discontinuity (CD) is overestimated by several formulae in the literature at very small values of the wind momentum ratio, η. We find also that the shocks in the primary (dominant) and secondary winds flare by ≈20° compared to the CD, and that the entire secondary wind is shocked when η ≲ 0.02. Analytical expressions for the opening angles of the shocks, and the fraction of each wind that is shocked, are provided. We find that the X-ray luminosity Lx∝η, and that the spectrum softens slightly as η decreases.

  6. Chandra ACIS Observations of Jovian X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garmire, Gordon; Elsner, Ronald; Feigelson, Eric; Ford, Peter; Gladstone, G. Randall; Hurley, Kevin; Metzger, Albert; Waite, J. Hunter, Jr.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    On November 25 and 26, 1999, the Chandra X-ray spacecraft conducted a set of four 19,000 sec observations of Jupiter. The ACIS-S instrument configuration was used for its good low energy efficiency and spatial resolution. An anomalous response was obtained which was subsequently attributed to strong jovian infrared radiation penetrating the detector and piling up spurious events across the entire X-ray range. However, the pre-observation establishment of an offsetting bias field has allowed the recovery of data from that portion of Jupiter's disc which remained within the elevated portion of the bias field during the observation. This ranges from fewer than 3000 sec to the entire observing time for about 10% of the planet. Auroral emission is seen near both poles in each observation. The northern aurora ia overall more intense than the southern, consistent with prior Einstein and ROSAT Observatory results. The southern aurora shows more modulation with Jupiter's rotation than the northern. Spatial resolution has been improved by at least a factor of two over prior measurements but convincing evidence of structure has not been seen. Lower latitude emission, first observed by ROSAT, is confirmed with flux levels averaging more than a factor of five below peak auroral values. Pronounced variation in the observed emission has occurred over the observing period. The spectral response extends from 0.24 keV, below which noise dominates, to about 1.2 keV. For all four observations the spectrum is clearly enhanced between 0.45 and 0.85 keV. This is apparently unequivocal evidence that Jupiter's X-ray emission is the result of oxygen and perhaps sulfur ions precipitating into the planet's atmosphere, where they undergo charge exchange interactions. The identification of specific transitions lines in the spectrum is among the ongoing efforts. A bremsstrahlung component has not yet been identified.

  7. Utilization of synchrotron radiation in analytical chemistry. Soft X-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuji

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron soft X-ray spectroscopy includes three major types of spectroscopy such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). This paper takes up XAS and XES of soft X-rays, and briefly describes the principle. XAS is roughly classified into XANES (X-ray absorption near-edge structure) and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure), and XANES is mainly used in the analysis based on XAS of soft X-rays. As the examples of the latest soft X-ray analyses, the following are introduced: (1) bandgap of boron implantation diamond and the local structure of boron, (2) catalytic sites in solid fuel cell carbon electrode, and (3) soft X-ray analysis under atmospheric pressure. (A.O.)

  8. THE SOFT X-RAY AND NARROW-LINE EMISSION OF Mrk 573 ON KILOPARSEC SCALES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Martin, O.; Acosta-Pulido, J. A.; Garcia, A. M. Perez; Ramos Almeida, C.

    2010-01-01

    We present a study of the circumnuclear region of the nearby Seyfert galaxy Mrk 573 using Chandra, XMM-Newton, and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data. We have studied the morphology of the soft (<2 keV) X-rays comparing it with the [O III] and Hα HST images. The soft X-ray emission is resolved into a complex extended region. The X-ray morphology shows a biconical region extending up to 12 arcsec (4 kpc) in projection from the nucleus. A strong correlation between the X-rays and the highly ionized gas seen in the [O III]λ5007 A image is reported. Moreover, we have studied the line intensities detected with the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) and used them to fit the low-resolution EPIC/XMM-Newton and ACIS/Chandra spectra. The RGS/XMM-Newton spectrum is dominated by emission lines of C VI, O VII, O VIII, Fe XVII, and Ne IX, among other highly ionized species. A good fit is obtained using these emission lines found in the RGS/XMM-Newton spectrum as a template for Chandra spectra of the nucleus and extended emission, coincident with the cone-like structures seen in the [O III]/Hα map. The photoionization model Cloudy provides a reasonable fit for both the nuclear region and the cone-like structures showing that the dominant excitation mechanism is photoionization. For the nucleus the emission is modeled using two phases: a high ionization [log (U) = 1.23] and a low ionization [log (U) = 0.13]. For the high-ionization phase the transmitted and reflected components are in a 1:2 ratio, whereas for the low ionization the reflected component dominates. For the extended emission, we successfully reproduced the emission with two phases. The first phase shows a higher ionization parameter for the northwest (log (U) = 0.9) than for the southeast cone (log (U) = 0.3). Moreover, this phase is transmission dominated for the southeast cone and reflection dominated for the northwest cone. The second phase shows a low-ionization parameter (log (U) = -3) and is

  9. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares Rajmal Jain, Malini Aggarwal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    standing of X-ray emission from the Sun in general and solar flares in ... X-ray emission. On the other hand, the poor spectral resolution of X-ray detectors put a constraint to measuring precisely the break energy point between thermal ... noted that the 14 August 2004 flare is rising in the beginning as a slow heating of the.

  10. Studies of soft x-ray emission during solar flares

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anandaram, M.N.

    1973-01-01

    Solar flare soft x-ray emission from 0.5 A to 8.5 A was observed during 1967-68 by Bragg crystal (LiF and EDDT) spectrometers aboard the OSO-4 satellite and also by NRL broad-band ionization detectors aboard the OGO-4 satellite. In this work, instrumental parameters for the LiF crystal spectrometer based on experimental values have been determined and used in the data analysis. The total continuum emission in the 0.5 to 3 A and the 1 to 8 A broad band segments has been determined from OGO-4 data for 21 flares. In doing this, a simple and approximate method of converting the total emission based on the gray body approximation (in which the OGO-4 data are reported) to one based on the thermal continuum spectrum has been developed. (author)

  11. Characterizing X-Ray and Radio Emission in the Black Hole X-Ray Binary V404 Cygni During Quiescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Vikram; Loh, Alan; Corbel, Stephane; Tomsick, John A.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Walton, Dominic J.; Barret, Didier; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present results from multi-wavelength simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the black hole X-ray binary V404 Cyg in quiescence. Our coverage with NuSTAR provides the very first opportunity to study the X-ray spectrum of V404 Cyg at energies above 10 keV. The unabsorbed broadband (0.3-30 keV) quiescent luminosity of the source is 8.9 x 10(exp 32) erg per sec for a distance of 2.4 kpc. The source shows clear variability on short timescales (an hour to a couple of hours) in the radio, soft X-ray, and hard X-ray bands in the form of multiple flares. The broadband X-ray spectra obtained from XMM-Newton and NuSTAR can be characterized with a power-law model having a photon index of gamma = 2.12 +/- 0.07 (90% confidence errors); however, residuals at high energies indicate spectral curvature significant at a 3 sigma confidence level with the e-folding energy of the cutoff as 20(sub -7)(sup +20) keV. Such curvature can be explained using synchrotron emission from the base of a jet outflow. Radio observations using the VLA reveal that the spectral index evolves on very fast timescales (as short as 10 minutes), switching between optically thick and thin synchrotron emission, possibly due to instabilities in the compact jet or stochastic instabilities in the accretion rate. We explore different scenarios to explain this very fast variability.

  12. Scaling of x-ray emission and ion velocity in laser produced Cu ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    has been studied. The x-ray emissions were monitored with the help of high quantum efficiency x-ray silicon photo diodes and vacuum photo diodes, all covered with aluminium filters of different thickness. The x-ray intensity vs the laser intensity has a scaling factor of (1.2–1.92). The relative x-ray conversion efficiency ...

  13. Discovery of Hard Nonthermal Pulsed X-Ray Emission from the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 1E 1841-045

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, L.; Hermsen, W.; Méndez, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    We report the discovery of nonthermal pulsed X-ray/soft gamma-ray emission up to ~150 keV from the anomalous 11.8 s X-ray pulsar AXP 1E 1841-045 located near the center of supernova remnant Kes 73 using Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) Proportional Counter Array and High Energy X-Ray Timing

  14. Potpourri of proton induced x-ray emission analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangelson, N.F.; Nielson, K.K.; Eatough, D.J.; Hansen, L.D.

    1974-01-01

    A proton-induced x-ray emission analysis (PIXE) system using 2-MeV protons was developed. Measurements are being made in connection with several research projects. A study is being conducted to provide ecological baseline information in the region of the Navajo and the proposed Kaiparowits coal-fired electric generating stations. Trace-element measurements in this study are reported on air-particulate samples, small rodent tissues, soils, and plants. In another study air particulates collected near a source of SO 2 are extracted from the collection filter with an HCl solution and sulfate and sulfite ions are determined by calorimetric methods. The extraction solution is also analyzed by PIXE to determine the elemental composition. The latter information is necessary for an understanding of possible interferences with the calorimetric method and also indicates the heavy metals emitted by the source. Studies on human autopsy tissues, archeological artifacts, and in regular graduate and undergraduate laboratory classes are mentioned briefly

  15. Soft X-ray emission studies of biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurmaev, E.Z. E-mail: kurmaev@ifmlrs.uran.ru; Werner, J.P.; Moewes, A.; Chiuzbaian, S.; Bach, M.; Ching, W.-Y.; Motozaki, W.; Otsuka, T.; Matsuya, S.; Endo, K.; Neumann, M

    2004-07-01

    Soft X-ray fluorescence measurements are used to characterize three groups of biomaterials: Vitamin B{sub 12} and derivatives, antioxidants (aspirin and paracetamol), and human teeth. We show that the chemical bonding in Vitamin B{sub 12} is characterized by the strong Co-C bond and the relatively weak Co-N bond. The Co-C bond in cyanocobalamin is found to be stronger than that of methylcobalamin leading to their different biological activity. The chemical bonding of paracetamol and aspirin is characterized by the formation of oxygen lone-pair {pi}-orbitals, which can neutralize free radicals and therefore be related to antioxidant activity of these compounds. Carbon K{alpha} emission spectra of a caries lesion suggest that the CaCO{sub 3} like phase exists in sound enamel and that a selective loss of carbonate occurs during the early stages of a caries attack.

  16. X-Ray Emission from the Jets of XTE J1550-564

    OpenAIRE

    Kaaret, P.; Corbel, S.; Tomsick, J.A.; Fender, R.P.; Miller, J.M.; Orosz, J.A.; Tzioumis, A.K.; Wijnands, R.A.D.

    2003-01-01

    We report on X-ray observations of the the large-scale jets recently discovered in the radio and detected in X-rays from the black hole candidate X-ray transient and microquasar XTE J1550-564. On 11 March 2002, X-ray emission was detected 23 arcsec to the West of the black hole candidate and was extended along the jet axis with a full width at half maximum of 1.2 arcsec and a full width at 10% of maximum intensity of 5 arcsec. The morphology of the X-ray emission matched well to that of the r...

  17. Extended hard-X-ray emission in the inner few parsecs of the Galaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perez, Kerstin; Hailey, Charles J.; Bauer, Franz E.

    2015-01-01

    of objects emitting soft X-rays (less than 10 kiloelectronvolts) within the surrounding hundreds of parsecs, as well as the population responsible for unresolved X-ray emission extending along the Galactic plane, is dominated by accreting white dwarf systems. Observations of diffuse hard-X-ray (more than 10...... range. This emission is more sharply peaked towards the Galactic Centre than is the surface brightness of the soft-X-ray population. This could indicate a significantly more massive population of accreting white dwarfs, large populations of low-mass X-ray binaries or millisecond pulsars, or particle...

  18. X-ray absorption and emission studies of diamond nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Buuren, T.; Willey, T.; Raty, J.Y.; Galli, G.; Terminello, L.J.; Bostedt, C.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: A new family of carbon nanopaticles produced in detonations, are found to have a core of diamond with a coating fullerene- like carbon. X-ray diffraction and TEM show that the nanodiamond powder is crystalline and approximately 4 nm in diameter. These nano-sized diamonds do not display the characteristic property of other group IV nanoparticles: a strong widening of the energy gap between the conduction and valence bands owing to quantum-confinement effects. For nano-sized diamond with a size distribution of 4 nm, there is no shift of the band energies relative to bulk diamond. Although the C1s core exciton feature clearly observed in the K-edge absorption edge of bulk diamond is shifted and broadening due to increased overlap of the excited electron with the core holein the small particle. Also the depth of the second gap in the nanodiamond spectra is shallower than that of bulk diamond. A feature at lower energy in the X-ray absorption spectra that is not present in the bulk samples is consistent with a fullerene like surface reconstruction. By exposing the diamond nanoparticles to an Argon /Oxygen plasma then annealing in a UHV environment we have obtained a hydrogen free surface. The nanodiamonds processed in this manner show an increase fullerene type contribution in the carbon x-ray absorption pre-edge. High spatial resolution EELS measurements of the empty states of a single nanodiamond particle acquired with a ld emission TEM also show the core of the particle is bulk diamond like where as the surface has a fullerene like structure. Standard density-functional calculations on clusters in which the diamond surface bonds are terminated with hydrogen atoms, show that the bandgap begins to increase above the bulk value only for clusters smaller than 1 nm. Surface hydrogen atoms are found to be about as close as they do in molecular hydrogen and can escape as H 2 , forcing the respective carbon atoms to rearrange. A series of such rearrangements can

  19. Plasma Emission Profile Recreation using Soft X-Ray Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, J. W.; Mauel, M. E.; Levesque, J. P.

    2015-11-01

    With sufficient views from multiple diode arrays, soft X-ray tomography is an invaluable plasma diagnostic because it is a non-perturbing method to reconstruct the emission within the interior of the plasma. In preparation for the installation of new SXR arrays in HBT-EP, we compute high-resolution tomographic reconstructions of discharges having kink-like structures that rotate nearly rigidly. By assuming a uniform angular mapping from the kink mode rotation, Δϕ ~ ωΔ t, a temporal sequence from a single 16-diode fan array represents as many as 16 x 100 independent views. We follow the procedure described by Wang and Granetz and use Bessel basis functions to take the inverse Radon transform. This transform is fit to our data using a least-squares method to estimate the internal SXR emissivity as a sum of polar functions. By varying different parameters of the transformation, we optimize the quality of our recreation of the emission profile and quantify how the reconstruction changes with the azimuthal order of the transform. Supported by U.S. DOE Grant DE-FG02-86ER53222.

  20. Variability of X-ray emission from OB stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collura, A.; Sciortino, S.; Serio, S.; Vaiana, G. S.; Harnden, F.R. JR.; Osservatorio Astronomico, Palermo, Italy; Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA)

    1989-01-01

    The variability in soft X-ray emission of 12 OB stars is studied. Two different methods of analysis, one more suitable for detecting short-term variations, the other aimed at detecting long time-scale variations, are applied to all stars in the sample. The long-term variability analysis shows that Cyg-OB2 8A Zeta Pup and Delta Ori exhibit significant count rate variations between different data sections. Similar variations are marginally detected in 15 Mon; the count rate variations for the other eight stars are consistent with statistical fluctuations. The light curve of Cyg-OB2 8A suggests the existence of two different emission levels. The short-term variability analysis detects marginal variability in Tau Sco with an effective amplitude of about 30 percent and a time scale of about 50 s. The upper limits to the effective short-term variability amplitude for all other sample stars are in the 10-30 percent range. 30 refs

  1. X-ray emission from National Ignition Facility indirect drive targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, A.T.; Managan, R.A.; Tobin, M.T.; Peterson, P.F.

    1996-01-01

    We have performed a series of 1-D numerical simulations of the x-ray emission from National Ignition Facility (NIF) targets. Results are presented in terms of total x-ray energy, pulse length, and spectrum. Scaling of x-ray emissions is presented for variations in both target yield and hohlraum thickness. Experiments conducted on the Nova facility provide some validation of the computational tools and methods

  2. EVIDENCE OF BULK ACCELERATION OF THE GRB X-RAY FLARE EMISSION REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang, Bing, E-mail: uhm@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2016-06-10

    Applying our recently developed generalized version of the high-latitude emission theory to the observations of X-ray flares in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), here we present clear observational evidence that the X-ray flare emission region is undergoing rapid bulk acceleration as the photons are emitted. We show that both the observed X-ray flare light curves and the photon index evolution curves can be simultaneously reproduced within a simple physical model invoking synchrotron radiation in an accelerating emission region far from the GRB central engine. Such an acceleration process demands an additional energy dissipation source other than kinetic energy, which points toward a significant Poynting flux in the emission region of X-ray flares. As the X-ray flares are believed to share a similar physical mechanism as the GRB prompt emission, our finding here hints that the GRB prompt emission jets may also carry a significant Poynting flux in their emitting region.

  3. Production of Loop-Top Hard X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, James A.; Seaquist, Valerie

    2003-01-01

    The main goal of this work has been to understand the particle acceleration mechanism (or mechanisms) in impulsive solar flares, using hard X-ray observations of high spatial and spectral resolution. Several new observations, including the observations by YOHKOH that reveal emission from both footpoints and loop tops, have suggested to us that a model employing stochastic acceleration is the most likely candidate for explaining energetic particles in a majority (if not all) of impulsive flares. In this model, most of the flare energy is initially converted into plasma waves and turbulence, which in turn can accelerate particles from thermal to relativistic energies on sub-second timescales. This research has provided important tools for the interpretation of the high spectral and spatial resolution observations obtained from the Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) . In the course of our research, we have focused on two different (but possibly related) stochastic acceleration models: (1) a model that employs high-frequency whistler turbulence and concentrates on the energetic electrons, and (2) a model that employs low frequency MHD waves, and is able to accelerate both the ambient electrons and ions.

  4. Soft x-ray emission studies of several aluminum alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, K.L.; Zhang, C.H.; Callcott, T.A.; Arakawa, E.T.; Ederer, D.L.; Biancaniello, F.; Curelaru, I.

    1986-01-01

    During the first few months of operation of our soft x-ray spectrometer at the NSLS, we have measured the L emission spectrum for three classes of aluminum alloys: dilute aluminum-magnesium alloys to extend the Al-Mg system to the impurity limit; a 50-50 alloy of aluminum-lithium to characterize the band structure of bulk samples of this potential battery electrolite; and the icosahedral and normal Al-Mn alloys to see if the two phases had measurably different density of states which have been predicted. All spectra shown are produced when core holes generated by energetic electrons or photons are filled by radiative transitions from conduction band states. Dipole selection rules govern the transitions. Thus, K spectra provide a measure of the p-symmetic partial density of states (DOS) near the atom. Similarly, L spectra produced by transitions to p-core holes map the s and d symmetric DOS in the vicinity of the atom with the core hole

  5. Soft x-ray emission studies of several aluminum alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsang, K.L.; Zhang, C.H.; Callcott, T.A.; Arakawa, E.T.; Ederer, D.L.; Biancaniello, F.; Curelaru, I.

    1986-09-23

    During the first few months of operation of our soft x-ray spectrometer at the NSLS, we have measured the L emission spectrum for three classes of aluminum alloys: dilute aluminum-magnesium alloys to extend the Al-Mg system to the impurity limit; a 50-50 alloy of aluminum-lithium to characterize the band structure of bulk samples of this potential battery electrolite; and the icosahedral and normal Al-Mn alloys to see if the two phases had measurably different density of states which have been predicted. All spectra shown are produced when core holes generated by energetic electrons or photons are filled by radiative transitions from conduction band states. Dipole selection rules govern the transitions. Thus, K spectra provide a measure of the p-symmetic partial density of states (DOS) near the atom. Similarly, L spectra produced by transitions to p-core holes map the s and d symmetric DOS in the vicinity of the atom with the core hole.

  6. A comparative study of the ionic keV X-ray line emission from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    inner-shell line emission and ionic line emission [1]. The inner-shell X-ray line radiation is produced by the hot electrons generated during the interaction of the ultrashort, ultrain- tense laser pulses with the target [2]. The hot electrons penetrate into the cold target material to produce the characteristic X-ray line radiation (K-α, ...

  7. Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-06

    Feb 6, 2014 ... Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma, produced by laser pulses of 45 fs duration, focussed up to an intensity of ∼1018 W cm-2, is carried out. The plasma conditions prevalent during the emission of X-ray spectrum were identified by comparing the experimental spectra with the ...

  8. X-ray and Far-Ultraviolet emission from comets : Relevant charge exchange processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewits, D; McCullough, RW; Tielens, AGGM; Hoekstra, R

    2004-01-01

    The surprising detection of strong X-ray and Far-Ultraviolet (FUV) emission from comets is the direct result of charge exchange reactions of multiply-charged solar wind ions with the neutral coma of the comet. A future diagnostics use of spectral features in cometary X-ray and FUV emission is

  9. Trends in grazing emission x-ray analysis techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grieken, R. van; Tsuji, K.; Injuk, J.

    2000-01-01

    In grazing-emission x-ray fluorescence (GEXRF) spectrometry, XRF is made surface-sensitive, not by grazing incidence of the exciting radiation as in total reflection XRF (TXRF), but by detecting only that part of fluorescence radiation that is emitted at grazing angles above a polished sample carrier or above a flat wafer. In case of GEXRF, and contrary to TXRF, wavelength-dispersive (WD) detection can be used. Applications are, in principle, similar to those of (variable angle) TXRF. At the laboratory scale, only prototype instruments are available, and the GEXRF unit can be an accessory to a commercial WD-XRF instrument. The detection limits of GEXRF are in the higher pg range, corresponding to a concentration of between 0.4-3 μg/l, if a sample volume of 100 μl is examined. Because of the WD detection, GEXRF also lends itself for the analysis of low-Z elements, from Z > 5; this is an advantage over conventional TXRF (but similar to TXRF using a thin-window energy-dispersive detector). Since the GEXRF prototype is a sequential rather than a simultaneous instrument, the analysis time is long when many elements have to be determined. Moreover, because the soft characteristic radiation is more strongly absorbed in its longer path through the matrix than in TXRF, the linear response for trace analysis using GEXRF is limited; this was proven by calculating the fluorescence intensities as a function of layer thickness and composition. The specimens are very limited in thickness. The sample preparation procedure for liquid or other samples to be analyzed with the GEXRF unit is thus very problematic. Results for water samples, bio-materials and pigment and aerosol samples have indeed shown that the quantitative nature of GEXRF for trace analysis is poor. The most promising features of GEXRF are in the field of surface and thin-layer analysis. Trace contaminations on silicon wafers can be determined and depth profiling can characterize stratified near-surface layers. But

  10. X-RAY EMISSION FROM MAGNETIC MASSIVE STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazé, Yaël; Petit, Véronique; Rinbrand, Melanie; Owocki, Stan; Cohen, David; Ud-Doula, Asif; Wade, Gregg A.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetically confined winds of early-type stars are expected to be sources of bright and hard X-rays. To clarify the systematics of the observed X-ray properties, we have analyzed a large series of Chandra and XMM-Newton observations, corresponding to all available exposures of known massive magnetic stars (over 100 exposures covering ∼60% of stars compiled in the catalog of Petit et al.). We show that the X-ray luminosity is strongly correlated with the stellar wind mass-loss rate, with a power-law form that is slightly steeper than linear for the majority of the less luminous, lower- M-dot B stars and flattens for the more luminous, higher- M-dot O stars. As the winds are radiatively driven, these scalings can be equivalently written as relations with the bolometric luminosity. The observed X-ray luminosities, and their trend with mass-loss rates, are well reproduced by new MHD models, although a few overluminous stars (mostly rapidly rotating objects) exist. No relation is found between other X-ray properties (plasma temperature, absorption) and stellar or magnetic parameters, contrary to expectations (e.g., higher temperature for stronger mass-loss rate). This suggests that the main driver for the plasma properties is different from the main determinant of the X-ray luminosity. Finally, variations of the X-ray hardnesses and luminosities, in phase with the stellar rotation period, are detected for some objects and they suggest that some temperature stratification exists in massive stars' magnetospheres

  11. Chandra X-ray Observations of Jovian Low-latitude Emissions: Morphological, Temporal, and Spectral Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Anil; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gladstone, G. Randall; Cravens, Thomas E.; Waiate J. Hunter, Jr.; Branduardi-Raymont, Graziella; Ford, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Chandra observed X-rays from Jupiter during 24-26 February 2003 for about 40 hours with the ACIS-S and HRC-I instruments. The analysis of Jovian low-latitude "disk" Xray emissions are presented and compared with the high-latitude "auroral" emissions. We report the first Chandra ACIS-S measured X-ray spectrum (0.3-2 keV) of Jupiter's low-latitude disk The disk X-ray emission is harder and extends to higher energies than the auroral spectrum. The temporal variation in the Jovian disk X-rays is on an average consistent with those in the solar X-rays observed by GOES, and TIMED/SSE. Contrary to the auroral X-rays, the disk emissions are uniformly distributed over Jupiter; no indication of longitudinal dependence or correlation with surface magneh field strength is visible. Also, unlike the approx. 40 +/- 20 min periodic oscillations seen in the auroral X-ray emissions, the disk emissions do not show any periodic oscillations. The disk spectrum seems to be consistent with resonant and fluorescent scattering of solar X-rays by the Jovian upper atmosphere. Jupiter's disk is found to be about 50% dimmer in soft X-rays in February 2003 compared that in December 2000, which is consistent with the decrease in solar activity. No evidence of lightning-induced X-rays is seen in the Chandra X-ray data. The Jovian disk spectra observed with Chandra-ACIS is stronger than that observed with XMM-Newton two months later during April 28-29, 2003. The XMM-Newton Xray image of Jupiter shows evidence of limb darkening on the anti-sunward side as seen from Earth, as well as an asymmetry with respect to the subsolar point: suggesting a solar driven process.

  12. X-ray emission from stainless steel foils irradiated by femtosecond petawatt laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhimova, M. A.; Faenov, A. Ya; Pikuz, T. A.; Skobelev, I. Yu; Pikuz, S. A.; Nishiuchi, M.; Sakaki, H.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Sagisaka, S.; Dover, N. P.; Kondo, Ko; Ogura, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Kiriyama, H.; Esirkepov, T.; Bulanov, S. V.; Andreev, A.; Kando, M.; Zhidkov, A.; Nishitani, K.; Miyahara, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Kodama, R.; Kondo, K.

    2018-01-01

    We report about nonlinear growth of x-ray emission intensity emitted from plasma generated by femtosecond petawatt laser pulses irradiating stainless steel foils. X-ray emission intensity increases as ∼ I 4.5 with laser intensity I on a target. High spectrally resolved x-ray emission from front and rear surfaces of 5 μm thickness stainless steel targets were obtained at the wavelength range 1.7–2.1 Å, for the first time in experiments at femtosecond petawatt laser facility J-KAREN-P. Total intensity of front x-ray spectra three times dominates to rear side spectra for maximum laser intensity I ≈ 3.2×1021 W/cm2. Growth of x-ray emission is mostly determined by contribution of bremsstrahlung radiation that allowed estimating bulk electron plasma temperature for various magnitude of laser intensity on target.

  13. The 300 Kpc Long X-Ray Jet in PKS 1127-145, Z=1.18 Quasar: Constraining X-Ray Emission Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemiginowska, Aneta; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Stawarz, Lukasz; /Heidelberg Observ. /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Cheung, C.C.; /KIPAC,; Harris, D.E.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Sikora, Marek; /Warsaw, Copernicus Astron. Ctr.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Bechtold,; /Arizona U., Astron. Dept. - Steward Observ.

    2006-11-20

    We present a {approx} 100 ksec Chandra X-ray observation and new VLA radio data of the large scale, 300 kpc long X-ray jet in PKS 1127-145, a radio loud quasar at redshift z=1.18. With this deep X-ray observation we now clearly discern the complex X-ray jet morphology and see substructure within the knots. The X-ray and radio jet intensity profiles are seen to be strikingly different with the radio emission peaking strongly at the two outer knots while the X-ray emission is strongest in the inner jet region. The jet X-ray surface brightness gradually decreases by an order of magnitude going out from the core. The new X-ray data contain sufficient counts to do spectral analysis of the key jet features. The X-ray energy index of the inner jet is relatively flat with {alpha}{sub x} = 0.66 {+-} 0.15 and steep in the outer jet with {alpha}{sub x} = 1.0 {+-} 0.2. We discuss the constraints implied by the new data on the X-ray emission models and conclude that ''one-zone'' models fail and at least a two component model is needed to explain the jet's broad-band emission. We propose that the X-ray emission originates in the jet proper while the bulk of the radio emission comes from a surrounding jet sheath. We also consider intermittent jet activity as a possible cause of the observed jet morphology.

  14. X-ray emission from open star clusters with Spectrum-Rontgen-Gamma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, K.P.; Ojha, D.K.; Schnopper, H.W.

    1998-01-01

    The study of X-ray emission from co-evolving populations of stars in open dusters is extremely important for understanding the dynamo activity among the stars. With this objective, we propose to observe a number of open clusters in the X-ray and UV bands using SPECTRUM-Rontgen-Gamma. The high...... throughput of SPECTRUM-Rontgen-Gamma will help detect main sequence stars like Sun in middle-aged and old clusters. We will study the relationships between various parameters - age, rotation, abundance, UBV colors, X-ray luminosity, coronal temperature etc. X-ray spectra of younger and brighter populations...

  15. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM YOUNG SUNS IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oskinova, L. M.; Hainich, R.; Sun, W.; Chen, Y.; Evans, C. J.; Hénault-Brunet, V.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A.; Gallagher, J. S. III; Guerrero, M. A.; Güdel, M.; Silich, S.; Nazé, Y.; Reyes-Iturbide, J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of extended X-ray emission within the young star cluster NGC 602a in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) based on observations obtained with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. X-ray emission is detected from the cluster core area with the highest stellar density and from a dusty ridge surrounding the H II region. We use a census of massive stars in the cluster to demonstrate that a cluster wind or wind-blown bubble is unlikely to provide a significant contribution to the X-ray emission detected from the central area of the cluster. We therefore suggest that X-ray emission at the cluster core originates from an ensemble of low- and solar-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars, each of which would be too weak in X-rays to be detected individually. We attribute the X-ray emission from the dusty ridge to the embedded tight cluster of the newborn stars known in this area from infrared studies. Assuming that the levels of X-ray activity in young stars in the low-metallicity environment of NGC 602a are comparable to their Galactic counterparts, then the detected spatial distribution, spectral properties, and level of X-ray emission are largely consistent with those expected from low- and solar-mass PMS stars and young stellar objects (YSOs). This is the first discovery of X-ray emission attributable to PMS stars and YSOs in the SMC, which suggests that the accretion and dynamo processes in young, low-mass objects in the SMC resemble those in the Galaxy.

  16. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM YOUNG SUNS IN THE SMALL MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oskinova, L. M.; Hainich, R. [Institute for Physics and Astronomy, University Potsdam, D-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Sun, W.; Chen, Y. [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 Jiangsu (China); Evans, C. J. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Henault-Brunet, V. [Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA), Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Gallagher, J. S. III [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 5534 Sterling, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Guerrero, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, IAA-CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Guedel, M. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Tuerkenschanzstrasse 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Silich, S. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica Optica y Electronica, AP 51, 72000 Puebla (Mexico); Naze, Y. [GAPHE, Departement AGO, Universite de Liege, Allee du 6 Aout 17, Bat. B5C, B-4000 Liege (Belgium); Reyes-Iturbide, J. [LATO-DCET/Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Rodovia Jorge Amado, km 16, 45662-000 Ilheus, BA (Brazil)

    2013-03-01

    We report the discovery of extended X-ray emission within the young star cluster NGC 602a in the Wing of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) based on observations obtained with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. X-ray emission is detected from the cluster core area with the highest stellar density and from a dusty ridge surrounding the H II region. We use a census of massive stars in the cluster to demonstrate that a cluster wind or wind-blown bubble is unlikely to provide a significant contribution to the X-ray emission detected from the central area of the cluster. We therefore suggest that X-ray emission at the cluster core originates from an ensemble of low- and solar-mass pre-main-sequence (PMS) stars, each of which would be too weak in X-rays to be detected individually. We attribute the X-ray emission from the dusty ridge to the embedded tight cluster of the newborn stars known in this area from infrared studies. Assuming that the levels of X-ray activity in young stars in the low-metallicity environment of NGC 602a are comparable to their Galactic counterparts, then the detected spatial distribution, spectral properties, and level of X-ray emission are largely consistent with those expected from low- and solar-mass PMS stars and young stellar objects (YSOs). This is the first discovery of X-ray emission attributable to PMS stars and YSOs in the SMC, which suggests that the accretion and dynamo processes in young, low-mass objects in the SMC resemble those in the Galaxy.

  17. A PILOT DEEP SURVEY FOR X-RAY EMISSION FROM fuvAGB STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahai, R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, MS 183-900, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Sanz-Forcada, J.; Sánchez Contreras, C. [Astrobiology Center (CSIC-INTA), ESAC campus, E-28691 Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid (Spain); Stute, M. [Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, Auf der Morgenstelle 10, D-72076, Tübingen (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    We report the results of a pilot survey for X-ray emission from a newly discovered class of AGB stars with far-ultraviolet excesses (fuvAGB stars) using XMM-Newton and Chandra. We detected X-ray emission in three of six fuvAGB stars observed—the X-ray fluxes are found to vary in a stochastic or quasi-periodic manner on roughly hour-long timescales, and simultaneous UV observations using the Optical Monitor on XMM for these sources show similar variations in the UV flux. These data, together with previous studies, show that X-ray emission is found only in fuvAGB stars. From modeling the spectra, we find that the observed X-ray luminosities are ∼(0.002–0.2) L{sub ⊙} and the X-ray-emitting plasma temperatures are ∼(35–160) × 10{sup 6} K. The high X-ray temperatures argue against the emission arising in stellar coronae, or directly in an accretion shock, unless it occurs on a WD companion. However, none of the detected objects is a known WD-symbiotic star, suggesting that if WD companions are present, they are relatively cool (<20,000 K). In addition, the high X-ray luminosities specifically argue against emission originating in the coronae of main-sequence companions. We discuss several models for the X-ray emission and its variability and find that the most likely scenario for the origin of the X-ray (and FUV) emission involves accretion activity around a companion star, with confinement by strong magnetic fields associated with the companion and/or an accretion disk around it.

  18. Resonant soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, J.-H.; Augustsson, A.; Englund, C.-J.; Nordgren, J.

    2004-01-01

    We present now a possible way to carry out soft-x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy of liquids. The liquid cell has a window to attain compatibility with UHV conditions of the spectrometer and beamline. The synchrotron radiation enters the liquid cell through a 100nm-thick silicon nitride window and the emitted x-rays exit through the same window. This allows in particular liquid solid interfaces to be studied. Such a liquid cell has been used to study the electronic structure of a variety of systems ranging from water solutions of inorganic salts and inertial drugs to nano materials and actinide compounds in their wet conditions

  19. X-ray emission from supernova remnants with particular reference to the Cygnus Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gronenschild, E.H.B.M.

    1979-01-01

    Observational or theoretical results related to the study of supernova remnants (SNRs) are described. Some background information is given by reviewing the present status of our knowledge of supernovae and supernova remnants, both from theory and observations. Also the distribution of all known radio, optical, and X-ray SNRs in the Galaxy is shown and a comparison is made. The X-ray observations of the well-known X-ray SNR the Cygnus Loop are discussed in detail and the discovery of a new X-ray emitting SNR W44 is described. Other radio sources are investigated, and the observed X-ray emission of SNRs are analysed using thermal spectra like exponential or bremsstrahlung spectra. The X-ray line spectrum that emerges from SNRs is described in detail. (Auth.)

  20. X-ray Emission and Absorption Studies of Silicides in Relation to their Electronic Structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijs, P.J.W.; Wiech, G.; Zahorowski, W.; Speier, W.; Goedkoop, J.B.; Czyzyk, Marek; Acker, J.F. van; Leuken, E. van; Groot, R.A. de; Laan, G. van der; Sarma, D.D.; Kumar, L.; Buschow, K.H.J.; Fuggle, J.C.

    1990-01-01

    The valence bands and conduction bands of about 30 transition metal silicides (of which we concentrate on 4 here) have been investigated by measurements of Si X-ray emission bandsspectra, X-ray absorption spectra near the Si K (1s) edge, photoemission spectra, and Bremsstrahlung Isochromat spectra.

  1. Volume effect of laser produced plasma on X-ray emissions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    been observed that x-ray emissions from ns duration plasma show a volume effect similar to sub- ... geometrical effect leading to x-ray enhancement for ns plasmas. ... 1–5 Joules. A plano convex lens, with /5.8 was used to focus the laser beam on to a massive slab target of oxygen free copper. These targets were well ...

  2. X-ray spectra from magnetar candidates - III. Fitting SGR/AXP soft X-ray emission with non-relativistic Monte Carlo models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zane, S.; Rea, N.; Turolla, R.; Nobili, L.

    2009-01-01

    Within the magnetar scenario, the ‘twisted magnetosphere’ model appears very promising in explaining the persistent X-ray emission from soft gamma repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs). In the first two papers of the series, we have presented a 3D Monte Carlo code for solving radiation

  3. X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Lamberti, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    During the last two decades, remarkable and often spectacular progress has been made in the methodological and instrumental aspects of x–ray absorption and emission spectroscopy. This progress includes considerable technological improvements in the design and production of detectors especially with the development and expansion of large-scale synchrotron reactors All this has resulted in improved analytical performance and new applications, as well as in the perspective of a dramatic enhancement in the potential of x–ray based analysis techniques for the near future. This comprehensive two-volume treatise features articles that explain the phenomena and describe examples of X–ray absorption and emission applications in several fields, including chemistry, biochemistry, catalysis, amorphous and liquid systems, synchrotron radiation, and surface phenomena. Contributors explain the underlying theory, how to set up X–ray absorption experiments, and how to analyze the details of the resulting spectra. X-R...

  4. X-Ray Emission of Cataclysmic Variables Observed by Integral

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gális, R.; Eckert, D.; Paltani, S.; Münz, F.; Kocka, Matúš

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 18, 3-4 (2009), s. 321-326 ISSN 1392-0049 Grant - others:ESA(XE) ESA-PECS project No. 98023; VEGA(SK) 2/0078/10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : binaries starss * cataclysmic * X-rays Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.032, year: 2009

  5. STELLAR WIND INDUCED SOFT X-RAY EMISSION FROM CLOSE-IN EXOPLANETS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kislyakova, K. G.; Lammer, H. [Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz (Austria); Fossati, L. [Argelander-Institut für Astronomie der Universität Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Johnstone, C. P. [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Holmström, M. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Kiruna (Sweden); Zaitsev, V. V., E-mail: kristina.kislyakova@oeaw.ac.at [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2015-01-30

    In this Letter, we estimate the X-ray emission from close-in exoplanets. We show that the Solar/Stellar Wind Charge Exchange Mechanism (SWCX), which produces soft X-ray emission, is very effective for hot Jupiters. In this mechanism, X-ray photons are emitted as a result of the charge exchange between heavy ions in the solar wind and the atmospheric neutral particles. In the solar system, comets produce X-rays mostly through the SWCX mechanism, but it has also been shown to operate in the heliosphere, in the terrestrial magnetosheath, and on Mars, Venus, and the Moon. Since the number of emitted photons is proportional to the solar wind mass flux, this mechanism is not very effective for the solar system giants. Here we present a simple estimate of the X-ray emission intensity that can be produced by close-in extrasolar giant planets due to charge exchange with the heavy ions of the stellar wind. Using the example of HD 209458b, we show that this mechanism alone can be responsible for an X-ray emission of ≈10{sup 22} erg s{sup –1}, which is 10{sup 6} times stronger than the emission from the Jovian aurora. We discuss also the possibility of observing the predicted soft X-ray flux of hot Jupiters and show that despite high emission intensities they are unobservable with current facilities.

  6. Projectile charge changing correlated with K-x-ray emission in O5+ + He and Ar collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkafrawy, T.; Tanis, J. A.

    2012-11-01

    Projectile and target K-x-ray emission associated with projectile charge changing was investigated for 12-30 MeV O5+ + He and Ar collisions. Negligible projectile x-ray emission was observed in coincidence with projectile electron capture or loss, while target x-ray emission correlated to projectile charge changing was seen. Differential cross sections were measured for correlated and uncorrelated x-ray emission.

  7. Influence of the voltage-time derivative in X-ray emission from laboratory sparks

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Víctor; Montanyà, Joan

    2010-10-01

    X-rays produced by laboratory sparks in air at atmospheric pressure for rod-rod and rod-plane configurations were observed. A total of 510 sparks were applied for both polarities. The paper shows the effects of the voltage rise time and the peak voltage in the generation of X-rays. It is found here that shorter rise times and high peak voltages tend to produce more X-rays emissions with higher energies than longer front waveforms or lower peak voltages. In a similar way, higher voltage variations produce more energetic emissions. This finding suggests that the variation of the electric field before the breakdown can play a fundamental role in the X-ray production. The results are similar with the observations of X-rays produced in natural lightning where detections have been associated to leader steps before the return stroke.

  8. News on the X-ray emission from hot subdwarf stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palombara, Nicola La; Mereghetti, Sandro

    2017-12-01

    In latest years, the high sensitivity of the instruments on-board the XMM-Newton and Chandra satellites allowed us to explore the properties of the X-ray emission from hot subdwarf stars. The small but growing sample of X-ray detected hot subdwarfs includes binary systems, in which the X-ray emission is due to wind accretion onto a compact companion (white dwarf or neutron star), as well as isolated sdO stars, in which X-rays are probably due to shock instabilities in the wind. X-ray observations of these low-mass stars provide information which can be useful for our understanding of the weak winds of this type of stars and can lead to the discovery of particularly interesting binary systems. Here we report the most recent results we have recently obtained in this research area.

  9. X-Ray Emission from Ultraviolet Luminous Galaxies and Lyman Break Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornschemeier, Ann; Ptak, A. F.; Salim, S.; Heckman, T. P.; Overzier, R.; Mallery, R.; Rich, M.; Strickland, D.; Grimes, J.

    2009-01-01

    We present results from an XMM mini-survey of GALEX-selected Ultraviolet-Luminous Galaxies (UVLGs) that appear to include an interesting subset that are analogs to the distant (3Break Galaxies (LBGs). The 2-10 kev X-ray emission of LBGs appear to be broadly similar to that of galaxies in the local Universe, possibly indicating similarity in the production of accreting binaries over large evolutionary timescales in the Universe. We have detected luminous X-ray emission from one UVLG that permits basic X-ray spectroscopic analysis, and have direct X-ray constraints on a total of 6 UVLGs. We find evidence for likely large scatter in the assumed X-ray/star-formation rate relation for LBGs.

  10. Characterizing X-Ray and Radio Emission in the Black Hole X-Ray Binary V404 Cygni During Quiescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rana, Vikram; Loh, Alan; Corbel, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    We present results from multi-wavelength simultaneous X-ray and radio observations of the black hole X-ray binary V404 Cyg in quiescence. Our coverage with NuSTAR provides the very first opportunity to study the X-ray spectrum of V404 Cyg at energies above 10 keV. The unabsorbed broadband (0...

  11. Nonlinear QED effects in X-ray emission of pulsars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakeri, Soroush [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haghighat, Mansour [Department of Physics, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71946-84795 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Xue, She-Sheng, E-mail: Soroush.Shakeri@ph.iut.ac.ir, E-mail: m.haghighat@shirazu.ac.ir, E-mail: xue@icra.it [ICRANet, Piazzale della Repubblica 10, 65122, Pescara (Italy)

    2017-10-01

    In the presence of strong magnetic fields near pulsars, the QED vacuum becomes a birefringent medium due to nonlinear QED interactions. Here, we explore the impact of the effective photon-photon interaction on the polarization evolution of photons propagating through the magnetized QED vacuum of a pulsar. We solve the quantum Boltzmann equation within the framework of the Euler-Heisenberg Lagrangian to find the evolution of the Stokes parameters. We find that linearly polarized X-ray photons propagating outward in the magnetosphere of a rotating neutron star can acquire high values for the circular polarization parameter. Meanwhile, it is shown that the polarization characteristics of photons besides photon energy depend strongly on parameters of the pulsars such as magnetic field strength, inclination angle and rotational period. Our results are clear predictions of QED vacuum polarization effects in the near vicinity of magnetic stars which can be tested with the upcoming X-ray polarimetric observations.

  12. AGN X-Ray emission and black holes (Kelly+, 2008)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, B. C.; Bechtold, J.; Trump, J. R.

    2009-01-01

    In this analysis we combine 169 RQQs from Kelly et al. (2007ApJ...665.1489K) with 149 RQQs from the main SDSS sample of Strateva et al. (2005, Cat. J/AJ/130/387) to create a sample of 318 RQQs. Out of these 318 sources, 276 (86.8%) are detected in the X-ray. (1 data file)....

  13. A SEARCH FOR X-RAY EMISSION FROM COLLIDING MAGNETOSPHERES IN YOUNG ECCENTRIC STELLAR BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Getman, Konstantin V.; Broos, Patrick S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kóspál, Ágnes [Konkoly Observatory, Research Center for Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 67, 1525 Budapest (Hungary); Salter, Demerese M. [Department of Astronomy and Laboratory for Millimeter-Wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Garmire, Gordon P. [Huntingdon Institute for X-ray Astronomy, LLC, 10677 Franks Road, Huntingdon, PA 16652 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Among young binary stars whose magnetospheres are expected to collide, only two systems have been observed near periastron in the X-ray band: the low-mass DQ Tau and the older and more massive HD 152404. Both exhibit elevated levels of X-ray emission at periastron. Our goal is to determine whether colliding magnetospheres in young high-eccentricity binaries commonly produce elevated average levels of X-ray activity. This work is based on Chandra snapshots of multiple periastron and non-periastron passages in four nearby young eccentric binaries (Parenago 523, RX J1622.7-2325 Nw, UZ Tau E, and HD 152404). We find that for the merged sample of all four binaries the current X-ray data show an increasing average X-ray flux near periastron (at a ∼2.5-sigma level). Further comparison of these data with the X-ray properties of hundreds of young stars in the Orion Nebula Cluster, produced by the Chandra Orion Ultradeep Project (COUP), indicates that the X-ray emission from the merged sample of our binaries cannot be explained within the framework of the COUP-like X-ray activity. However, due to the inhomogeneities of the merged binary sample and the relatively low statistical significance of the detected flux increase, these findings are regarded as tentative only. More data are needed to prove that the flux increase is real and is related to the processes of colliding magnetospheres.

  14. Alpha Particle Induced X-ray Emission in the Classroom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, Jorge A.; Borunda, Mario F.; Morales, Jaime

    2003-01-01

    We report on an experimental demonstration in an introductory modern physics course to elucidate the X-ray line spectra, and how they arise from transitions of electrons to inner shells. We seek to determine the effect of limited use of an interactive component as a supplement to a traditional lecture, and how it would improve the student achievement. In this preliminary study the students were exposed to traditional lectures on X-ray production and Bohr's model, they then were given a homework on the abc of X-ray spectra, after which they were given a pre-test on the materials, followed by an in-class demonstration, and a final post-exam. The gain, as measured from pre- to post-exams appears to remark the differences in how students approached the subject before and after the use of the demonstration. This initial study shows the validity of in-class demonstrations as teaching tools and opens a wide new area of research in modern physics teaching

  15. Modeling X-ray Emission of Galactic Winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomesh, Teague; Gould Zweibel, Ellen; Bustard, Chad

    2017-06-01

    Despite galaxies being the main players on the cosmological scene, and our living inside of one, the processes of evolution which create these structures are still a mystery. Galactic winds are an important component of galaxy evolution and the mechanisms which drive these outflows have yet to be explained. We have incorporated x-ray production into a preexisting model of galactic outflows in order to generate predictions of x-ray luminosity to test current wind theories against observations. Specifically, the model is a representation of thermally driven winds. First, we incorporated the equations for x-ray luminosity into the wind model and tested its effects over a wide range of parameter space. We then created models to match the parameters of several cool galactic outflows previously studied. Finally, we searched the relevant literature for observations of these galaxies that we could use to compare with our predicted luminosities. Our models consistently predicted luminosities within a factor of two of the observed values. This led to the conclusion that if the hot and cool gas are coupled then thermal energy may play a role in the driving of these winds. Unraveling this mystery will be key to understanding galactic outflows and galactic evolution overall.

  16. Characterization of nuclear physics targets using Rutherford backscattering and particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubehn, T.; Wozniak, G.J.; Phair, L.; Moretto, L.G.; Yu, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    Rutherford backscattering and particle induced X-ray emission have been utilized to precisely characterize targets used in nuclear fission experiments. The method allows for a fast and non-destructive determination of target thickness, homogeneity and element composition. (orig.)

  17. Laboratory simulation of charge exchange-produced X-ray emission from comets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiersdorfer, P; Boyce, K R; Brown, G V; Chen, H; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; May, M; Olson, R E; Porter, F S; Stahle, C K; Tillotson, W A

    2003-06-06

    In laboratory experiments using the engineering spare microcalorimeter detector from the ASTRO-E satellite mission, we recorded the x-ray emission of highly charged ions of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen, which simulates charge exchange reactions between heavy ions in the solar wind and neutral gases in cometary comae. The spectra are complex and do not readily match predictions. We developed a charge exchange emission model that successfully reproduces the soft x-ray spectrum of comet Linear C/1999 S4, observed with the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

  18. CHANDRA DETECTION OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM ULTRACOMPACT DWARF GALAXIES AND EXTENDED STAR CLUSTERS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Meicun; Li, Zhiyuan

    2016-01-01

    We have conducted a systematic study of X-ray emission from ultracompact dwarf (UCD) galaxies and extended star clusters (ESCs), based on archival Chandra observations. Among a sample of 511 UCDs and ESCs complied from the literature, 17 X-ray counterparts with 0.5–8 keV luminosities above ∼5 × 10 36 erg s −1 are identified, which are distributed in eight early-type host galaxies. To facilitate comparison, we also identify X-ray counterparts of 360 globular clusters (GCs) distributed in four of the eight galaxies. The X-ray properties of the UCDs and ESCs are found to be broadly similar to those of the GCs. The incidence rate of X-ray-detected UCDs and ESCs, 3.3% ± 0.8%, while lower than that of the X-ray-detected GCs (7.0% ± 0.4%), is substantially higher than expected from the field populations of external galaxies. A stacking analysis of the individually undetected UCDs/ESCs further reveals significant X-ray signals, which corresponds to an equivalent 0.5–8 keV luminosity of ∼4 × 10 35 erg s −1 per source. Taken together, these provide strong evidence that the X-ray emission from UCDs and ESCs is dominated by low-mass X-ray binaries having formed from stellar dynamical interactions, consistent with the stellar populations in these dense systems being predominantly old. For the most massive UCDs, there remains the possibility that a putative central massive black hole gives rise to the observed X-ray emission

  19. Brightening X-Ray Emission from GW170817/GRB 170817A: Further Evidence for an Outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, John J.; Nynka, Melania; Haggard, Daryl; Kalogera, Vicky; Evans, Phil

    2018-01-01

    The origin of the X-ray emission from neutron star coalescence GW170817/GRB 170817A is a key diagnostic of the unsettled post-merger narrative, and different scenarios predict distinct evolution in its X-ray light curve. Due to its sky proximity to the Sun, sensitive X-ray monitoring of GW170817/GRB 170817A has not been possible since a previous detection at 16 days post-burst. We present new, deep Chandra observations of GW170817/GRB 170817A at 109 days post-burst, immediately after Sun constraints were lifted. The X-ray emission has brightened from a 0.3–8.0 keV flux of 3.6× {10}-15 erg s‑1 cm‑2 at 16 days to 15.8 × {10}-15 erg s‑1 cm‑2 at 109 days, at a rate similar to the radio observations. This confirms that the X-ray and radio emission have a common origin. We show that the X-ray light curve is consistent with models of outflow afterglows, in which the outflow can be a cocoon shocked by the jet, dynamical ejecta from the merger, or an off-axis structured jet. Further deep X-ray monitoring can place powerful constraints on the physical parameters of these models, by both timing the passing of a synchrotron cooling break through the X-ray band and detecting the associated steepening of the X-ray photon index. Finally, the X-ray brightening strengthens the argument that simple off-axis top-hat jet models are not consistent with the latest observations of GW170817/GRB 170817A.

  20. Emission Line Spectra in the Soft X-ray Region 20 - 75 Angstroms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepson, J. K.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Chen, H.; Behar, E.; Kahn, S. M.

    2002-01-01

    As part of a project to complete a comprehensive catalogue of astrophysically relevant emission lines in support of new-generation X-ray observatories using the Lawrence Livermore electron beam ion traps EBIT-I and EDIT-II, emission lines of argon and sulfur in the soft X-ray and extreme ultraviolet region were studied. Observations of Ar IX through Ar XVI and S VII through S XIV between 20 and 75 Angstrom are presented to illustrate our work.

  1. Investigation on non-equilibrium x-ray emission spectra from laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei Wenbing; Chang Tieqiang; Zhang Jun

    1995-01-01

    A statistical method for the ion configuration probability distribution in non-LTE plasmas based on the average-ion model is described. In this method, the ion configuration probabilities are obtained from the average level population probabilities of the ions according to the binomial distribution. The non-equilibrium ion configuration distribution and X-ray spectra emitted from Au plasmas produced by 1.06 μm laser are studied. The calculated X-ray emission spectra are in the same energy band range as the experimental results. We discuss the non-equilibrium characteristics of X-ray emission, and show that the contributions of the multiply excited ions to X-ray emission are important

  2. Non-thermal Hard X-Ray Emission from Coma and Several Abell Clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, C

    2004-01-01

    We report results of hard X-Ray observations of the clusters Coma, Abell 496, Abell754, Abell 1060, Abell 1367, Abell2256 and Abell3558 using RXTE data from the NASA HEASARC public archive. Specifically we searched for clusters with hard x-ray emission that can be fitted by a power law because this would indicate that the cluster is a source of non-thermal emission. We are assuming the emission mechanism proposed by Vahk Petrosian where the inter cluster space contains clouds of relativistic electrons that by themselves create a magnetic field and emit radio synchrotron radiation. These relativistic electrons Inverse-Compton scatter Microwave Background photons up to hard x-ray energies. The clusters that were found to be sources of non-thermal hard x-rays are Coma, Abell496, Abell754 and Abell 1060

  3. Exotic x-ray emission from dense plasmas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rosmej, F.B.; Dachicourt, R.; Deschaud, B.; Khaghani, D.; Dozières, M.; Šmíd, Michal; Renner, Oldřich

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 22 (2015), s. 224005 ISSN 0953-4075 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED1.1.00/02.0061 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Grant - others:ELI Beamlines(XE) CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0061; AVČR(CZ) M100101208 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : hollow ions * x-ray spectroscopy * atomic physics Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.833, year: 2015

  4. The X-ray emission properties of millisecond pulsars

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, W.; Trümper, J.

    1998-01-01

    Until now X-radiation from nine millisecond pulsars has been detected. In the present paper we summarize the observations and show the results of a re-analysis of archival ROSAT data. In addition we present the results of recent observations of PSR J0437-4715 with the ROSAT PSPC and HRI detectors. We show that the pulsed fraction is independent of energy in the range 0.1-2.4 keV. The pulse width as measured at X-ray energies is comparable with that observed in the radio domain. An upper limit...

  5. Radio and X-ray emission from newly born remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvati, M.

    1983-01-01

    Radio and X-ray observations of SN 1979c and SN 1980k offer a unique opportunity of monitoring the transition from supernovae to remnants. By means of the two-frequency radio light curves, the hypothesis that these objects are surrounded by circumstellar matter, originated in a presupernova wind, is tested, and the relevant parameters are derived. Then the absorption-corrected light curves are used to test the various proposed models. SN 1980k appears to be powered by a canonical shock, while SN 1979c is a good plerion candidate. An optical pulsar could still be detected at its location. (Auth.)

  6. X-ray emission in collisions of highly charged I, Pr, Ho, and Bi ions with a W surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, H.; Tona, M.; Ohtani, S.; Sun, J.; Nakamura, N.; Yamada, C.; Yoshiyasu, N.; Sakurai, M.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray emission yields, which are defined as the total number of emitted x-ray photons per incident ion, and dissipated fractions of potential energies through x-ray emission have been measured for slow highly charged ions of I, Pr, Ho, and Bi colliding with a W surface. A larger amount of potential energy was consumed for the x-ray emission with increasing the atomic number and the charge state. The present measurements show that x-ray emission is one of the main decay channels of hollow atoms produced in collisions of very highly charged ions of heavy elements

  7. AN XMM-NEWTON SURVEY OF THE SOFT X-RAY BACKGROUND. III. THE GALACTIC HALO X-RAY EMISSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henley, David B.; Shelton, Robin L.

    2013-01-01

    We present measurements of the Galactic halo's X-ray emission for 110 XMM-Newton sight lines selected to minimize contamination from solar wind charge exchange emission. We detect emission from few million degree gas on ∼4/5 of our sight lines. The temperature is fairly uniform (median = 2.22 × 10 6 K, interquartile range = 0.63 × 10 6 K), while the emission measure and intrinsic 0.5-2.0 keV surface brightness vary by over an order of magnitude (∼(0.4-7) × 10 –3 cm –6 pc and ∼(0.5-7) × 10 –12 erg cm –2 s –1 deg –2 , respectively, with median detections of 1.9 × 10 –3 cm –6 pc and 1.5 × 10 –12 erg cm –2 s –1 deg –2 , respectively). The high-latitude sky contains a patchy distribution of few million degree gas. This gas exhibits a general increase in emission measure toward the inner Galaxy in the southern Galactic hemisphere. However, there is no tendency for our observed emission measures to decrease with increasing Galactic latitude, contrary to what is expected for a disk-like halo morphology. The measured temperatures, brightnesses, and spatial distributions of the gas can be used to place constraints on models for the dominant heating sources of the halo. We provide some discussion of such heating sources, but defer comparisons between the observations and detailed models to a later paper

  8. Ultra fast atomic process in X-ray emission by inner-shell ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moribayashi, Kengo; Sasaki, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Neyagawa, Osaka (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment; Tajima, T.

    1998-03-01

    An ultra-fast atomic process together with X-ray emission by inner-shell ionization using high intensity (10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}) short pulse (20fs) X-ray is studied. A new class of experiment is proposed and a useful pumping source is suggested. In this method, it is found that the gain value of X-ray laser amounts to larger than 1000(1/cm) with use of the density of 10{sup 22}/cm{sup 3} of carbon atom. Electron impact ionization effect and initial density effect as well as intensity of pumping source effect are also discussed. (author)

  9. Time correlation between plasma behaviour and soft x-ray emission in a plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Katsumi; Tagaya, Yutaka; Shimoda, Katsuji; Okabe, Yushiro; Yamamoto, Toshikazu

    1986-01-01

    Soft X-rays emitted from a plasma focus are investigated experimentally. In contrast to single-pulsive burst of neutron, hard X-rays, ion- and electron beams, the soft X-rays are observed from the collapse phase to the decay phase of the plasma column, and have typically three successive peaks in its signal. Each peak corresponds to the maximum compression, the disruption and the decay phase of plasma column. It is revealed that the first and the second peaks are radiated by plasma itself, whereas the third peak is caused by emission from the inner electrode face. (author)

  10. Hard x-ray emission spectroscopy: a powerful tool for the characterization of magnetic semiconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Rovezzi, Mauro; Glatzel, Pieter

    2013-01-01

    This review aims to introduce the x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) techniques to the materials scientist working with magnetic semiconductors (e.g. semiconductors doped with 3d transition metals) for applications in the field of spin-electronics. We focus our attention on the hard part of the x-ray spectrum (above 3 keV) in order to demonstrate a powerful element- and orbital-selective characterization tool in the study of bulk electronic struct...

  11. Proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis at Lucas Heights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, D.; Duerden, P.

    1979-02-01

    The state of the proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) work at Lucas Heights is reported together with a full description of the experimental arrangement and its use for analysis of trace elements (Z >or= 14). The fundamentals of PIXE are examined in detail with a view to understanding not only the background continuum but also the X-ray production mechanisms. Quantitative predictions for the number of X-rays detected after proton bombardment of the target have been made and these compare well with experiments

  12. K-x-ray emission in MeV/u O^5+ on Ar collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkafrawy, T.; Tanis, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    K-X-ray emission has been investigated for 1.5 and 2 MeV/u O^5+ on Ar collisions. Emission lines resulting from O-Kα, Ar-Kα and Ar-Kβ transitions have been observed. This work was done at Western Michigan University using the tandem Van de Graaff. For oxygen, the observed x rays may be attributed to K-shell excitation and in the case of Ar to excitation or ionization. The K-x-ray production cross sections have been determined taking into account the detector solid angle and detection efficiency, and are compared with related measurements from other investigators. Coincidence measurements are planned to investigate in detail the K-x-ray production mechanisms.

  13. A carbon nanotube field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Sigen; Calderon, Xiomara; Peng Rui; Schreiber, Eric C.; Zhou, Otto; Chang, Sha

    2011-01-01

    The authors report a carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission multipixel x-ray array source for microradiotherapy for cancer research. The developed multipixel x-ray array source has 50 individually controllable pixels and it has several distinct advantages over other irradiation source including high-temporal resolution (millisecond level), the ability to electronically shape the form, and intensity distribution of the radiation fields. The x-ray array was generated by a CNT cathode array (5x10) chip with electron field emission. A dose rate on the order of >1.2 Gy/min per x-ray pixel beam is achieved at the center of the irradiated volume. The measured dose rate is in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation result.

  14. THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SHOCKED STELLAR WIND OF PULSAR GAMMA-RAY BINARIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabalza, V.; Paredes, J. M. [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos (ICC), Universitat de Barcelona (IEEC-UB), Marti i Franques 1, E08028 Barcelona (Spain); Bosch-Ramon, V., E-mail: vzabalza@am.ub.es [Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 31 Fitzwilliam Place, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2011-12-10

    Gamma-ray-loud X-ray binaries are binary systems that show non-thermal broadband emission from radio to gamma rays. If the system comprises a massive star and a young non-accreting pulsar, their winds will collide producing broadband non-thermal emission, most likely originated in the shocked pulsar wind. Thermal X-ray emission is expected from the shocked stellar wind, but until now it has neither been detected nor studied in the context of gamma-ray binaries. We present a semi-analytic model of the thermal X-ray emission from the shocked stellar wind in pulsar gamma-ray binaries, and find that the thermal X-ray emission increases monotonically with the pulsar spin-down luminosity, reaching luminosities of the order of 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}. The lack of thermal features in the X-ray spectrum of gamma-ray binaries can then be used to constrain the properties of the pulsar and stellar winds. By fitting the observed X-ray spectra of gamma-ray binaries with a source model composed of an absorbed non-thermal power law and the computed thermal X-ray emission, we are able to derive upper limits on the spin-down luminosity of the putative pulsar. We applied this method to LS 5039, the only gamma-ray binary with a radial, powerful wind, and obtain an upper limit on the pulsar spin-down luminosity of {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1}. Given the energetic constraints from its high-energy gamma-ray emission, a non-thermal to spin-down luminosity ratio very close to unity may be required.

  15. Elemental analysis of coal by proton-induced x-ray emission analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronch, S.M.; Ehmann, W.D.; Laumer, H.W.; Gabbard, F.

    1976-01-01

    Proton-induced x-ray emission was used to determine elemental concentrations in solid coal samples. The coal samples were irradiated with 2.5 to 5.5 MeV protons. Concentrations were determined from characteristic x-ray yields taking into account matrix absorption. The precision is shown by replicate analysis and the accuracy by comparison with results obtained by other laboratories using different techniques

  16. X-Ray Emission from Active Galactic Nuclei with Intermediate-Mass Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewangan, G. C.; Mathur, S.; Griffiths, R. E.; Rao, A. R.

    2008-12-01

    We present a systematic X-ray study of eight active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with intermediate-mass black holes (MBH ~ 8-95 × 104 M⊙) based on 12 XMM-Newton observations. The sample includes the two prototype AGNs in this class—NGC 4395 and POX 52 and six other AGNs discovered with the Sloan Digitized Sky Survey. These AGNs show some of the strongest X-ray variability, with the normalized excess variances being the largest and the power density break timescales being the shortest observed among radio-quiet AGNs. The excess-variance-luminosity correlation appears to depend on both the BH mass and the Eddington luminosity ratio. The break timescale-black hole mass relations for AGN with IMBHs are consistent with that observed for massive AGNs. We find that the FWHM of the Hβ/Hα line is uncorrelated with the BH mass, but shows strong anticorrelation with the Eddington luminosity ratio. Four AGNs show clear evidence for soft X-ray excess emission (kTin ~ 150-200 eV). X-ray spectra of three other AGNs are consistent with the presence of the soft excess emission. NGC 4395 with lowest L/LEdd lacks the soft excess emission. Evidently small black mass is not the primary driver of strong soft X-ray excess emission from AGNs. The X-ray spectral properties and optical-to-X-ray spectral energy distributions of these AGNs are similar to those of Seyfert 1 galaxies. The observed X-ray/UV properties of AGNs with IMBHs are consistent with these AGNs being low-mass extensions of more massive AGNs, those with high Eddington luminosity ratio looking more like narrow-line Seyfert 1 s and those with low L/LEdd looking more like broad-line Seyfert 1 galaxies.

  17. Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-06

    Feb 6, 2014 ... tron temperature. A power law fit to the electron temperature showed a scaling of I0.47 with laser intensity. Keywords. X-ray spectroscopy; K-shell spectra; plasma diagnostics; ionic line radiation. PACS Nos 52.70.La; 52.70.–m; 52.50.Jm. 1. Introduction. Spectral analysis of the K-shell X-ray emission of ...

  18. Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-06

    Feb 6, 2014 ... X-ray spectroscopy; K-shell spectra; plasma diagnostics; ionic line radiation. PACS Nos 52.70.La; 52.70.–m; 52.50.Jm. 1. Introduction. Spectral analysis of the K-shell X-ray emission of plasma produced by intense laser pulses is often used to derive diagnostic information [1] of electron temperature, density, ...

  19. Discovery of a Time Lag between the Soft X-Ray and Radio Emission of the Tidal Disruption Flare ASASSN-14li: Evidence for Linear Disk–Jet Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasham, Dheeraj R.; van Velzen, Sjoert

    2018-03-01

    The tidal disruption of a star by a supermassive black hole can result in transient radio emission. The electrons producing these synchrotron radio flares could either be accelerated inside a relativistic jet or externally by shocks resulting from an outflow interacting with the circumnuclear medium. Until now, evidence for the internal emission mechanism has been lacking; nearly all tidal disruption flare studies have adopted the external shock model to explain the observed properties of radio flares. Here we report a result that presents a challenge to external emission models: we discovered a cross-correlation between the soft X-ray (0.3–1 keV) and 16 GHz radio flux of the tidal disruption flare ASASSN-14li. Variability features in the X-ray light curve appear again in the radio light curve, but after a time lag of {12}-5+6 days. This demonstrates that the soft X-ray-emitting accretion disk regulates the radio emission. This coupling appears to be inconsistent with all previous external emission models for this source but is naturally explained if the radio emission originates from a freely expanding jet. We show that emission internal to an adiabatically expanding jet can also reproduce the observed evolution of the radio spectral energy distribution. Furthermore, both the correlation between X-ray and radio luminosity as well as our radio spectral modeling imply an approximately linear coupling between the accretion rate and jet power.

  20. Extended hard-X-ray emission in the inner few parsecs of the Galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Kerstin; Hailey, Charles J; Bauer, Franz E; Krivonos, Roman A; Mori, Kaya; Baganoff, Frederick K; Barrière, Nicolas M; Boggs, Steven E; Christensen, Finn E; Craig, William W; Grefenstette, Brian W; Grindlay, Jonathan E; Harrison, Fiona A; Hong, Jaesub; Madsen, Kristin K; Nynka, Melania; Stern, Daniel; Tomsick, John A; Wik, Daniel R; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, William W; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2015-04-30

    The Galactic Centre hosts a puzzling stellar population in its inner few parsecs, with a high abundance of surprisingly young, relatively massive stars bound within the deep potential well of the central supermassive black hole, Sagittarius A* (ref. 1). Previous studies suggest that the population of objects emitting soft X-rays (less than 10 kiloelectronvolts) within the surrounding hundreds of parsecs, as well as the population responsible for unresolved X-ray emission extending along the Galactic plane, is dominated by accreting white dwarf systems. Observations of diffuse hard-X-ray (more than 10 kiloelectronvolts) emission in the inner 10 parsecs, however, have been hampered by the limited spatial resolution of previous instruments. Here we report the presence of a distinct hard-X-ray component within the central 4 × 8 parsecs, as revealed by subarcminute-resolution images in the 20-40 kiloelectronvolt range. This emission is more sharply peaked towards the Galactic Centre than is the surface brightness of the soft-X-ray population. This could indicate a significantly more massive population of accreting white dwarfs, large populations of low-mass X-ray binaries or millisecond pulsars, or particle outflows interacting with the surrounding radiation field, dense molecular material or magnetic fields. However, all these interpretations pose significant challenges to our understanding of stellar evolution, binary formation, and cosmic-ray production in the Galactic Centre.

  1. X-ray Emission Properties of Intermediate-Mass, Pre-Main-Sequence Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povich, Matthew S.; Binder, Breanna; Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S.

    2017-08-01

    Intermediate-mass (2-8 M⊙) main-sequence stars with A to mid-B spectral types occupy an X-ray "desert" of weak intrinsic emission between low- and high-mass stars. Lacking the wind-shock driven emission of massive, O and early B stars or the convectively-driven magnetic reconnection flaring activity of later-type stars, X-ray detections of (non-peculiar) main-sequence AB stars are typically ascribed to the presence of unresolved, lower-mass binary companions. There is mounting evidence, however, that intermediate-mass, pre-main sequence stars (IMPS) with GK spectral types produce intrinsic X-ray emission that rapidly decays with time following the development of a radiative zone as IMPS approach the ZAMS as AB stars. This suggests that X-ray emission from IMPS may be a more luminous analog of the well-studied coronal X-ray emission from lower-mass, T Tauri stars. Statistical studies of young IMPS have been hampered by their scarcety in nearby, unobscured star-forming regions. We present the first results from a spectral-fitting study to measure absorption-corrected X-ray luminosities and plasma temperatures for hundreds of candidate X-ray emitting IMPS found in the MYStIX and MAGiX surveys of massive Galactic star forming regions. Candidate IMPS are placed on the HR diagram via a novel infrared spectral energy distribution modeling technique designed for highly-obscured, young massive star-forming regions. The rapid decay of X-ray emission from these objects has the potential to provide an independent chronometer to constrain star formation rates, and may produce an age-dependent bias in the relationship between the stellar X-ray luminosity function and mass function in distant (>2 kpc) regions observed with relatively shallow X-ray observations.This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under grant CAREER-1454334 and by NASA through Chandra Award 18200040.

  2. X-Rays from NGC 3256: High-Energy Emission in Starburst Galaxies and Their Contribution to the Cosmic X-Ray Background

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, Edward C.; Lehnert, Matthew D.; Helfand, David J.

    1999-01-01

    The infrared-luminous galaxy NGC 3256 is a classic example of a merger-induced nuclear starburst system. We find here that it is the most X-ray-luminous star-forming galaxy yet detected (L 0.5-10keV =1.6x10 42 ergs s-1). Long-slit optical spectroscopy and a deep, high-resolution ROSAT X-ray image show that the starburst is driving a ''superwind'' which accounts for ∼20% of the observed soft X-ray emission. Analysis of X-ray spectral data from ASCA indicates this gas has a characteristic temperature of kT≅0.3 keV. Our model for the broadband X-ray emission of NGC 3256 contains two additional components: a warm thermal plasma (kT≅0.8 keV) associated with the central starburst, and a hard power-law component with an energy index of α X ≅0.7. We discuss the energy budget for the two thermal plasmas and find that the input of mechanical energy from the starburst is more than sufficient to sustain the observed level of emission. We also examine possible origins for the power-law component, concluding that neither a buried AGN nor the expected population of high-mass X-ray binaries can account for this emission. Inverse Compton scattering, involving the galaxy's copious flux of infrared photons and the relativistic electrons produced by supernovae, is likely to make a substantial contribution to the hard X-ray flux. Such a model is consistent with the observed radio and IR fluxes and the radio and X-ray spectral indices. We explore the role of X-ray-luminous starbursts in the production of the cosmic X-ray background radiation. The number counts and spectral index distribution of the faint radio source population, thought to be dominated by star-forming galaxies, suggest that a significant fraction of the hard X-ray background could arise from starbursts at moderate redshift. (c) (c) 1999. The American Astronomical Society

  3. Microwave and X-Ray emission during a isentropic expansion and its application to solar bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piazza, L.R.

    1983-01-01

    The gyro-synchrotron emission in microwaves and the free-free emission in X-rays of a plasma enclosed in a cylinder coincident with a magnetic force tube were calculated for an isentropic self-similar expansion, with plane and cylindrical symmetries. This expansion model was applied to a region of the low solar corona, and the results were compared to the emission observed in some simple solar events of low intensity. The calculations show satisfactory coincidence with the events in X-rays for energies around 10 29 ergs. The solar events analyzed in microwaves, which are not the same that were studied in X-rays, in general do not fit the theoretical results. The origin of the discrepancy is probably the formulation of the processes of emission applied to the expansion. (Author) [pt

  4. Hard X-ray Emission from the M87 AGN Detected with NuSTAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ka-Wah; Nemmen, Rodrigo; Irwin, Jimmy; Lin, Dacheng

    2018-01-01

    M87 hosts a 3–6 billion solar mass black hole with a remarkable relativistic jet that has been regularly monitored in radio to TeV bands. However, hard X-ray emission above 10keV expected to primarily come from the jet or the accretion flow had never been detected from its unresolved X-ray core. We report NuSTAR detection up to 40 keV from the the central regions of M87. Together with simultaneous Chandra observations, we have constrained the dominant hard X-ray emission to be from its unresolved X-ray core, presumably in its quiescent state. The core spectrum is well fitted by a power-law. The measured flux density at 40keV is consistent with a jet origin, although emission from the advection-dominated accretion flow cannot be completely ruled out. The detected hard X-ray emission is significantly lower than that predicted by synchrotron self-Compton models introduced to explain emission above a GeV.

  5. Lifetime-vibrational interference effects in resonantly excited x-ray emission spectra of CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skytt, P.; Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The parity selection rule for resonant X-ray emission as demonstrated for O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} can be seen as an effect of interference between coherently excited degenerate localized core states. One system where the core state degeneracy is not exact but somewhat lifted was previously studied at ALS, namely the resonant X-ray emission of amino-substituted benzene (aniline). It was shown that the X-ray fluorescence spectrum resulting from excitation of the C1s at the site of the {open_quotes}aminocarbon{close_quotes} could be described in a picture separating the excitation and the emission processes, whereas the spectrum corresponding to the quasi-degenerate carbons could not. Thus, in this case it was necessary to take interference effects between the quasi-degenerate intermediate core excited states into account in order to obtain agreement between calculations and experiment. The different vibrational levels of core excited states in molecules have energy splittings which are of the same order of magnitude as the natural lifetime broadening of core excitations in the soft X-ray range. Therefore, lifetime-vibrational interference effects are likely to appear and influence the band shapes in resonant X-ray emission spectra. Lifetime-vibrational interference has been studied in non-resonant X-ray emission, and in Auger spectra. In this report the authors discuss results of selectively excited soft X-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules, where they focus on lifetime-interference effects appearing in the band shapes.

  6. X-ray emission from relativistically moving electron density cusps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kando, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Nakamura, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Kotaki, H.; Kawase, K.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Fukuda, Y.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Daito, I.; Kameshima, T.; Mori, M.; Koga, J. K.; Daido, H.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T.; Ma, J.; Chen, L.-M.; Ragozin, E. N.

    2012-01-01

    We report on novel methods to generate ultra-short, coherent, X-rays using a laserplasma interaction. Nonlinear interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma creates stable, specific structures such as electron cusps. For example, wake waves excited in an underdense plasma by an intense, short-pulse laser become dense and propagate along with the laser pulse. This is called a relativistic flying mirror. The flying mirror can reflect a counter-propagating laser pulse and directly convert it into high-frequency radiation, with a frequency multiplication factor of ∼ 4γ 2 and pulse shortening with the same factor. After the proof-of-principle experiments, we observed that the photon number generated in the flying mirror is close to the theoretical estimate. We present the details of the experiment in which a 9 TW laser pulse focused into a He gas jet generated the Flying Mirror, which partly reflected a 1 TW pulse, giving up to ∼ 10 10 photons, 60 nJ (1.4×10 12 photons/sr) in the XUV spectral region (12.8-22 nm).

  7. X-ray emission from relativistically moving electron density cusps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kando, M.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Nakamura, T.; Hayashi, Y.; Kotaki, H.; Kawase, K.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Fukuda, Y.; Kiriyama, H.; Okada, H.; Daito, I.; Kameshima, T.; Mori, M.; Koga, J. K.; Daido, H.; Faenov, A. Ya.; Pikuz, T.; Ma, J.; Chen, L.-M.; Ragozin, E. N. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Osaka University (Japan); Joint Institute for High Temperature of the Russian Academy of Science, Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); P. N. Lebedev Physical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky prospekt 53, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Japan Atomic Energy Agency and Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries (Japan); Ludwig-Maximilians-University (Germany); and others

    2012-07-11

    We report on novel methods to generate ultra-short, coherent, X-rays using a laserplasma interaction. Nonlinear interaction of intense laser pulses with plasma creates stable, specific structures such as electron cusps. For example, wake waves excited in an underdense plasma by an intense, short-pulse laser become dense and propagate along with the laser pulse. This is called a relativistic flying mirror. The flying mirror can reflect a counter-propagating laser pulse and directly convert it into high-frequency radiation, with a frequency multiplication factor of {approx} 4{gamma}{sup 2} and pulse shortening with the same factor. After the proof-of-principle experiments, we observed that the photon number generated in the flying mirror is close to the theoretical estimate. We present the details of the experiment in which a 9 TW laser pulse focused into a He gas jet generated the Flying Mirror, which partly reflected a 1 TW pulse, giving up to {approx} 10{sup 10} photons, 60 nJ (1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} photons/sr) in the XUV spectral region (12.8-22 nm).

  8. Probing Transient Valence Orbital Changes with Picosecond Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    March, Anne Marie; Assefa, Tadesse A.; Boemer, Christina

    2017-01-01

    it a powerful technique for molecular studies in a wide variety of environments. A picosecond-time-resolved measurement of the complete Is X-ray emission spectrum captures the transient photoinduced changes and includes the weak valence-to-core (vtc) emission lines that correspond to transitions from occupied......We probe the dynamics of valence electrons in photoexcited [Fe(terpy)2]2+ in solution to gain deeper insight into the Fe ligand bond changes. We use hard X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), which combines element specificity and high penetration with sensitivity to orbital structure, making...

  9. Magnetar-like X-Ray Bursts Suppress Pulsar Radio Emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archibald, R. F.; Lyutikov, M.; Kaspi, V. M.; Tendulkar, S. P. [Department of Physics and McGill Space Institute, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Burgay, M.; Possenti, A. [INAF–Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, Via della Scienza 5, I-09047 Selargius (Italy); Esposito, P.; Rea, N. [Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Israel, G. [INAF–Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone, Roma (Italy); Kerr, M. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Sarkissian, J. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Parkes Observatory, P.O. Box 276, Parkes, NSW 2870 (Australia); Scholz, P., E-mail: archibald@astro.utoronto.ca [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics, Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 248, Penticton, BC V2A 6J9 (Canada)

    2017-11-10

    Rotation-powered pulsars and magnetars are two different observational manifestations of neutron stars: rotation-powered pulsars are rapidly spinning objects that are mostly observed as pulsating radio sources, while magnetars, neutron stars with the highest known magnetic fields, often emit short-duration X-ray bursts. Here, we report simultaneous observations of the high-magnetic-field radio pulsar PSR J1119−6127 at X-ray, with XMM-Newton and NuSTAR , and at radio energies with the Parkes radio telescope, during a period of magnetar-like bursts. The rotationally powered radio emission shuts off coincident with the occurrence of multiple X-ray bursts and recovers on a timescale of ∼70 s. These observations of related radio and X-ray phenomena further solidify the connection between radio pulsars and magnetars and suggest that the pair plasma produced in bursts can disrupt the acceleration mechanism of radio-emitting particles.

  10. Study of X-ray emission from plasma focus device using vacuum photodiode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, N.; Borthakur, T. K.; Neog, N. K.

    2013-10-01

    A newly fabricated vacuum photodiode (VPD) is used to measure time resolved X-ray emission and electron temperature from plasma focus device operated in hydrogen medium. The VPD signals are compared with the PIN diode signal and observed to be of similar in nature. The acquired signals from VPD are deduced to measure electron temperature and X-ray radiated power for four different anode tips (cylindrical, diverging, oval and converging). The electron temperatures are found to be 0.64, 1.5, 0.60 and 0.55 keV for cylindrical, diverging, oval and converging anode tips respectively in hydrogen plasma. The X-ray radiated powers are observed to be varying with respect to the shape of the anode tips and it is found highest in case of converging tip and lowest for the diverging one. Results indicate that VPD could efficiently be employed as an X-ray diagnostics in plasma focus device.

  11. Study of X-ray emission from plasma focus device using vacuum photodiode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukdar, N.; Borthakur, T.K., E-mail: tkborthakur@yahoo.co.uk; Neog, N.K.

    2013-10-21

    A newly fabricated vacuum photodiode (VPD) is used to measure time resolved X-ray emission and electron temperature from plasma focus device operated in hydrogen medium. The VPD signals are compared with the PIN diode signal and observed to be of similar in nature. The acquired signals from VPD are deduced to measure electron temperature and X-ray radiated power for four different anode tips (cylindrical, diverging, oval and converging). The electron temperatures are found to be 0.64, 1.5, 0.60 and 0.55 keV for cylindrical, diverging, oval and converging anode tips respectively in hydrogen plasma. The X-ray radiated powers are observed to be varying with respect to the shape of the anode tips and it is found highest in case of converging tip and lowest for the diverging one. Results indicate that VPD could efficiently be employed as an X-ray diagnostics in plasma focus device.

  12. Specific features of thermocouple calorimeter application for measurements of pulsed X-ray emission from plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavrilov, V. V.; Fasakhov, I. K.

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that the accuracy of time-integrated measurements of pulsed X-ray emission from hot plasma with calibrated thermocouple calorimeters is mainly determined by two factors. The first and the most important factor is heating of the filter by the absorbed X-rays; as a result, the calorimeter measures the thermal radiation of the filter, which causes appreciable distortion of the temporal profile and amplitude of the recorded signal. The second factor is the dependence of the effective depth of X-ray absorption in the dielectric that covers the entrance window of the calorimeter on the energy of X-ray photons, i.e., on the recorded radiation spectrum. The results of model calculations of the calorimeter signal are compared with the experimental data.

  13. LIGO/Virgo GW170817: Chandra X-ray Emission Continues to Rise 156 Days Post-Merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggard, Daryl; Nynka, Melania; Ruan, John J.; Evans, Phil; Kalogera, Vicky

    2018-01-01

    We have obtained new X-ray observations of GW170817 via Chandra Director's Discretionary Time (PI: Wilkes, Program Number 19408607). The X-ray counterpart to GW170817/GRB170817A/SSS17a continues to be detected and the X-ray emission continues to brighten approximately 156 days after the neutron star merger.

  14. Time Variabilities of Solar Wind Ion Fluxes and of X-ray and EUV Emissions from Comet Hyakutake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, M.; Cravens, T.; Lisse, C.; Ipavich, F.; von Steiger, R.; Shah, P.; Armstrong, T.

    1999-01-01

    Observations of X-ray and extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emissions from comet C/Hyakutake 1996 B2 made by the Rontgen X-ray satellite (ROSAT) and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) revealed a total X-ray luminosity of about 500 MW.

  15. On the origin of pulsing X-ray emission of AE Aqr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Globina, V. I.; Ikhsanov, N. R.

    2017-12-01

    The cataclysmic variable AE Aquarii is a low-mass close binary system containing a red dwarf and a 33 s rotation period magnetic white dwarf which operates as a rotation-powered pulsar. The 33 s pulsations are detected in the optical, UV and X-rays. The 16.5 s harmonic is also present in the optical and UV. This pulsing emission comes from two hot spots (T p ∼ 26000 K) located in the regions of magnetic poles on the white dwarf surface. The nature of the X-ray pulsations of AE Aqr is still under discussion. No 16.5 s harmonic in X-ray is observed and the luminosity of the pulsing component in X-rays is significantly smaller than the luminosity of the pulsing component in the optical and UV. We suggest that the source of pulsing X-ray emission is also located in the magnetic pole region at the surface of the white dwarf and can be associated with a hot spot (T ∼ 106 ‑ 107 K). This spot is heated by the backflowing charged particles. However, the source of particles responsible for the heating the X-ray spot differs from the source of particles responsible for the heating the area emitting in the optical an UV.

  16. A Non-thermal Pulsed X-Ray Emission of AR Scorpii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, J.; Hu, C.-P.; Lin, L. C. C.; Tam, P. H. T.; Pal, P. S.; Hui, C. Y.; Kong, A. K. H.; Cheng, K. S.

    2018-02-01

    We report the analysis result of UV/X-ray emission from AR Scorpii, which is an intermediate polar (IP) composed of a magnetic white dwarf and an M-type star, with the XMM-Newton data. The X-ray/UV emission clearly shows a large variation over the orbit, and their intensity maximum (or minimum) is located at the superior conjunction (or inferior conjunction) of the M star orbit. The hardness ratio of the X-ray emission shows a small variation over the orbital phase and shows no indication of the absorption by an accretion column. These properties are naturally explained by the emission from the M star surface rather than that from the accretion column on the white dwarf’s (WD) star, which is similar to usual IPs. Additionally, the observed X-ray emission also modulates with the WD’s spin with a pulse fraction of ∼14%. The peak position is aligned in the optical/UV/X-ray band. This supports the hypothesis that the electrons in AR Scorpii are accelerated to a relativistic speed and emit non-thermal photons via the synchrotron radiation. In the X-ray bands, evidence of the power-law spectrum is found in the pulsed component, although the observed emission is dominated by the optically thin thermal plasma emissions with several different temperatures. It is considered that the magnetic dissipation/reconnection process on the M star surface heats up the plasma to a temperature of several keV and also accelerates the electrons to the relativistic speed. The relativistic electrons are trapped in the WD’s closed magnetic field lines by the magnetic mirror effect. In this model, the observed pulsed component is explained by the emissions from the first magnetic mirror point.

  17. X-ray Emission from Solar Flares Rajmal Jain, Malini Aggarwal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    X-ray Emission from Solar Flares. 137. Figure 8. The differential emission measure (DEM) as a function of temperature measured in the 14 August 2004 and 27 July 2005 flares observed by Si detector of SOXS mission. Figure 9. Variation of broken power-law index below (γ1 – top panel) and above (γ2 – bottom panel) ...

  18. Modelling of X-ray emission supernova remnants observed by the European satellite XMM-Newton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassam-Chenai, G.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis deals with the X-ray emission of supernova remnants (SNRs) observed by the European satellite XMM-Newton. In SNRs, the matter heated to millions of degrees shines brightly in X-rays. This emission depends on the hydrodynamical evolution of the SNR, on the chemical composition of the ejected matter and on the ambient medium. Moreover, the blast-wave is considered to be the prime site of the production and the acceleration of cosmic-rays in our Galaxy. XMM-Newton is one of the first to allow the investigation of these different aspects thanks to its spatially-resolved spectroscopy and its very good sensitivity. l first studied Kepler's SNR (SN 1604) whose X-ray emission is dominated by the ejecta. Its observation has allowed to obtain information on the nucleosynthesis products, on their spatial distribution and on the temperature structure in the shocked ejecta. This gives strong constraints on the physics of the explosion and on the progenitor's type. l have shown also that the X-ray emission at the shock is likely to be non-thermal. Then, l studied the SNR G347.3-0.5 whose X-ray emission is entirely due to the synchrotron radiation of relativistic (TeV) electrons accelerated at the shock. From five pointing, l made a full mapping of the X-ray emission characteristics (brightness, absorption and spectral index) at small scale. Combined to radio observations, these results have indicated a clear interaction between the SNR and molecular clouds located at 1 kpc and not at 6 kpc as previously estimated. Lastly, in the framework of a self-similar hydrodynamical model coupled with non-linear particle acceleration, l have obtained the synchrotron emission profile in SNRs, including the adiabatic and radiative losses of the accelerated electrons. (author) [fr

  19. Two-photon-induced x-ray emission in neon atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yuping; Wang Chuankui; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Gel'mukhanov, Faris; Carniato, Stephane; Simon, Marc; Taieeb, Richard

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the resonant x-ray emission from a neon atom induced by the two-photon population of a double-core-hole excited state. Two qualitatively different schemes of this process are studied: The first one involves an off-resonant intermediate single-core-hole state; the second scheme passes through a resonant core-ionized intermediate state. The numerical simulations of the resonant x-ray emission performed for different peak intensities and pulse durations show significant population of the double-core-hole final states. Therefore, rather strong two-photon absorption-induced x-ray emission is predicted for both studied schemes. Thus, high counting rates in experimental measurements are expected.

  20. GIANT CORONAL LOOPS DOMINATE THE QUIESCENT X-RAY EMISSION IN RAPIDLY ROTATING M STARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, O.; Yadav, R.; Garraffo, C.; Saar, S. H.; Wolk, S. J.; Kashyap, V. L.; Drake, J. J.; Pillitteri, I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Observations indicate that magnetic fields in rapidly rotating stars are very strong, on both small and large scales. What is the nature of the resulting corona? Here we seek to shed some light on this question. We use the results of an anelastic dynamo simulation of a rapidly rotating fully convective M star to drive a physics-based model for the stellar corona. We find that due to the several kilo Gauss large-scale magnetic fields at high latitudes, the corona, and its X-ray emission are dominated by star-size large hot loops, while the smaller, underlying colder loops are not visible much in the X-ray. Based on this result, we propose that, in rapidly rotating stars, emission from such coronal structures dominates the quiescent, cooler but saturated X-ray emission.

  1. New Chandra observations of the jet in 3C273. 1. Softer X-ray than radio spectra and the X-ray emission mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jester, Sebastian; /Fermilab; Harris, D.E.; /Smithsonian Astrophys. Observ.; Marshall, H.L.; /MIT, MKI; Meisenheimer, K.; /Heidelberg, Max Planck Inst. Astron.

    2006-05-01

    The jet in 3C273 is a high-power quasar jet with radio, optical and X-ray emission whose size and brightness allow a detailed study of the emission processes acting in it. We present deep Chandra observations of this jet and analyze the spectral properties of the jet emission from radio through X-rays. We find that the X-ray spectra are significantly softer than the radio spectra in all regions of the bright part of the jet except for the first bright ''knot A'', ruling out a model in which the X-ray emission from the entire jet arises from beamed inverse-Compton scattering of cosmic microwave background photons in a single-zone jet flow. Within two-zone jet models, we find that a synchrotron origin for the jet's X-rays requires fewer additional assumptions than an inverse-Compton model, especially if velocity shear leads to efficient particle acceleration in jet flows.

  2. Simultaneous emissions of X-rays and microwaves from long laboratory sparks and downward lightning leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanya, J.; Oscar, V. D. V.; Tapia, F. F.

    2017-12-01

    Since the discovery of the Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes more than 20 years ago, investigations on high energy emissions from natural lightning and high voltage laboratory sparks gained significant interest. X-ray emissions from lightning as well from high voltage laboratory sparks have in common the role played by negative leaders/streamers. On the other hand, negative leaders are well known to produce much more VHF and microwave radiation than positive leaders. Moreover, in previous works, microwave emissions from lightning leaders have been attributed to Bremsstrahlung process. The object of this work is to investigate if X-rays and RF microwave emissions share the same origin. We present simultaneous measurements of X-rays and microwaves in high voltage sparks and natural lightning. The instrumentation consists on a NaI(Tl) and LaBr3 scintillation detectors and two different receivers. One is fix tuned at 2.4 GHz with a bandwidth of 5.5 MHz. The second can be tuned at any frequency up to 18 GHz with different selectable bandwidths of 10 MHz, 40 MHz and 100 MHz. In the laboratory, results have shown that all the sparks presented microwave radiation before the breakdown of the gap, either X-rays were detected or not. In the cases where X-rays were identified, microwave emissions peaked at the same time (in the microsecond scale). We found that the power amplitudes of the microwave emissions are related to the applied voltage to the gap. In the same configuration, those cases where X-rays were detected microwave emissions presented higher power levels. The results suggest that in some part of the discharge electrons are very fast accelerated allowing, in some cases, to reach enought energy to produce X-rays. In the field, we have found similar results. On 13th of June of 2015 a bipolar cloud-to-ground flash struck 200 m close to the Eagle Nest instrumented tower (Spanish Pyrenees, 2536 m ASL). The flash presented four strokes and, in all of them, microwave

  3. X-Ray Emission from the Wolf-Rayet Bubble S 308

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toala, J. A.; Guerrero, M. A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A.; Arthur, S. J.; Smith, R. C.; Snowden, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    The Wolf-Rayet (WR) bubble S 308 around the WR star HD 50896 is one of the only two WR bubbles known to possess X-ray emission. We present XMM-Newton observations of three fields of this WR bubble that, in conjunction with an existing observation of its Northwest quadrant (Chu et al. 2003), map most of the nebula. The X-ray emission from S 308 displays a limb-brightened morphology, with a 22' in size central cavity and a shell thickness of approx. 8'. This X-ray shell is confined by the optical shell of ionized material. The spectrum is dominated by the He-like triplets of N VI at approx.0.43 keV and O VII at approx.0.5 keV, and declines towards high energies, with a faint tail up to 1 keV. This spectrum can be described by a two-temperature optically thin plasma emission model (T1 approx.1.1 x 10(exp 6) K, T2 approx.13 x 10(exp 6) K), with a total X-ray luminosity approx.3 x 10(exp 33) erg/s at the assumed distance of 1.8 kpc. Qualitative comparison of the X-ray morphology of S 308 with the results of numerical simulations of wind-blown WR bubbles suggests a progenitor mass of 40 Stellar mass and an age in the WR phase approx.20,000 yrs. The X-ray luminosity predicted by simulatioms including the effects of heat conduction is in agreement with the observations, however, the simulated X-ray spectrum indicates generally hotter gas than is derived from the observations. We suggest that non-equilibrium ionization (NEI) may provide an explanation for this discrepancy.

  4. X-ray emissions from centimeter-long streamer corona discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, C. L.; Millan, R. M.; McGaw, D. G.; Yu, C. T.; Putter, A. S.; Labelle, J. W.; Dwyer, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    In this work we provide extensive evidence that runaway electron acceleration and subsequent bremsstrahlung X-ray emission are a common feature in electrical discharges of negative polarity. They can be easily detected at voltages as low as 100 kV, indicating that all negative lightning could potentially produce runaway electrons. We show that centimeter-long streamer corona discharges produce bursts of X-ray radiation that are emitted by a source that is highly compact in space and time. Therefore, the emitted X-ray photons arrive together at the detector and pile up. Median burst energies vary between 33-96% of the total 100 keV available electrostatic energy that an electron can acquire in the gap. We present detailed statistical analysis of 5000+ discharges, showing that X-rays are observed in as many as 60% of the triggers, depending on the configuration. X-ray detection is more frequent when: the streamer corona discharge is not followed by a spark, the detector is oriented perpendicular to the gap, and a thicker anode is used. We show that for an 8-cm-long gap, X-rays are produced when runaway electrons hit the anode, and that the runaway electron acceleration is not correlated with streamer collisions, as inferred in meter-long discharges. The described experiment is a promising way for measuring the runaway electron distribution very close to the source and its dependence on the applied voltage.

  5. X-ray astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacconi, R.; Gursky, H.

    1974-01-01

    This text contains ten chapters and three appendices. Following an introduction, chapters two through five deal with observational techniques, mechanisms for the production of x rays in a cosmic setting, the x-ray sky and solar x-ray emission. Chapters six through ten include compact x-ray sources, supernova remnants, the interstellar medium, extragalactic x-ray sources and the cosmic x-ray background. Interactions of x rays with matter, units and conversion factors and a catalog of x-ray sources comprise the three appendices. (U.S.)

  6. X-ray absorption spectra and emission spectra of plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Yonglun; Yang Li; Wang Minsheng; Li Jiaming

    2002-01-01

    The author reports a theoretical method to calculate the resolved absorption spectra and emission spectra (optically thin) of hot dense plasmas. Due to its fully relativistic treatment incorporated with the quantum defect theory, it calculates the absorption spectra and emission spectra for single element or multi-element plasmas with little computational efforts. The calculated absorption spectra of LTE gold plasmas agree well with the experimental ones. It also calculates the optical thin emission spectra of LTE gold plasmas, which is helpful to diagnose the plasmas of relevant ICF plasmas. It can also provide the relevant parameters such as population density of various ionic stages, precise radiative properties for ICF studies

  7. Effect of anode shape on pinch structure and X-ray emission of plasma focus device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, N.; Neog, N. K.; Borthkur, T. K.

    The effect of anode shapes on pinch structure and X-ray emission of plasma focus device operated with cylindrical, diverging, oval and converging anode tips is reported. The pinch structure in the radial compression phase has been investigated by employing a triple pinhole camera. It has been observed that pinch structure as well as the X-ray emission of PF device strongly depends upon anode tip designs. For the first time the studies were carried out in two new shapes of anode tips that is the oval and the divergent one. It has been observed that the oval and diverging anode tips are more conducive for the formation of instabilities and hotspot generation. The studies of X-ray emission were also carried out by employing three channels of a p-i-n diode X-ray spectrometer in entire anode designs to corroborate the results of a triple pinhole camera. Additionally, the effective hard X-ray photon energy was also estimated by the radiography method for all the anode tip designs, which indirectly provide a qualitative idea of the generation of induced accelerating field in the pinched column during compression.

  8. MODELING THE THERMAL DIFFUSE SOFT AND HARD X-RAY EMISSION IN M17

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velazquez, P. F.; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, A.; Esquivel, A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ap. 70-543, 04510 D.F. (Mexico); Rosado, M. [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ap. 70-248, 04510 D.F. (Mexico); Reyes-Iturbide, J., E-mail: pablo@nucleares.unam.mx, E-mail: ary@nucleares.unam.mx, E-mail: esquivel@nucleares.unam.mx, E-mail: margarit@astro.unam.mx [LATO-DCET/Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz, Rodovia Jorge Amado, km 16, 45662-000 Ilheus, BA (Brazil)

    2013-04-10

    We present numerical models of very young wind driven superbubbles. The parameters chosen for the simulations correspond to the particular case of the M17 nebula, but are appropriate for any young superbubble in which the wind sources have not completely dispersed their parental cloud. From the simulations, we computed the diffuse emission in the soft ([0.5-1.5] keV) and hard ([1.5-5] keV) X-ray bands. The total luminosity in our simulations agrees with the observations of Hyodo et al., about two orders of magnitude below the prediction of the standard model of Weaver et al.. The difference with respect to the standard (adiabatic) model is the inclusion of radiative cooling, which is still important in such young bubbles. We show that for this type of object the diffuse hard X-ray luminosity is significant compared to that of soft X-rays, contributing as much as 10% of the total luminosity, in contrast with more evolved bubbles where the hard X-ray emission is indeed negligible, being at least four orders of magnitude lower than the soft X-ray emission.

  9. X-ray Emission from the Radio Jet in 3C 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, D. E.; Hjorth, J.; Sadun, A. C.

    1999-01-01

    spectrum and we calculate some of the physical parameters for thermal bremsstrahlung and synchrotron self-Compton models. We conclude that no simple model is consistent with the data but if the knot contains small regions with flat spectra, these could produce the observed X-rays (via synchrotron emission......We report the discovery of X-ray emission from a radio knot at a projected distance of 25" from the nucleus of the Seyfert galaxy, 3C 120. The data were obtained with the ROSAT High Resolution Imager (HRI). Optical upper limits for the knot preclude a simple power law extension of the radio...

  10. X-ray emission spectroscopic determination of iron in a polyurethane encapsulant curing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, J.M.; Kling, E.N.

    1979-01-01

    Presented is a procedure for determining the iron content in a polyurethane encapsulant curing agent by x-ray emission spectroscopy. Standards were prepared by adding ferric acetyl acetonate to a curing agent of identical composition to that being analyzed, but containing no iron. Results show that x-ray emission spectroscopy is feasible for determination of iron in the 30 to 50 ppM range. This range could probably be extended by the preparation of additional standards. Precision of the method is approximately 1.2 ppM at the 99 percent confidence level

  11. An X-Ray Reprocessing Model of Disk Thermal Emission in Type 1 Seyfert Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, James; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Using a geometry consisting of a hot central Comptonizing plasma surrounded by a thin accretion disk, we model the optical through hard X-ray spectral energy distributions of the type 1 Seyfert. galaxies NGC 3516 and NGC 7469. As in the model proposed by Poutanen, Krolik, and Ryde for the X-ray binary Cygnus X-1 and later applied to Seyfert galaxies by Zdziarski, Lubifiski, and Smith, feedback between the radiation reprocessed by the disk and the thermal Comptonization emission from the hot central plasma plays a pivotal role in determining the X-ray spectrum, and as we show, the optical and ultraviolet spectra as well. Seemingly uncorrelated optical/UV and X-ray light curves, similar to those which have been observed from these objects can, in principle, be explained by variations in the size, shape, and temperature of the Comptonizing plasma. Furthermore, by positing a disk mass accretion rate which satisfies a condition for global energy balance between the thermal Comptonization luminosity and the power available from accretion, one can predict the spectral properties of the heretofore poorly measured hard X-ray continuum above approximately 50 keV in type 1 Seyfert galaxies. Conversely, forthcoming measurements of the hard X-ray continuum by more sensitive hard X-ray and soft gamma-ray telescopes, such as those aboard the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) in conjunction with simultaneous optical, UV, and soft X-ray monitoring, will allow the mass accretion rates to be directly constrained for these sources in the context of this model.

  12. WEAK HARD X-RAY EMISSION FROM TWO BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS OBSERVED WITH NuSTAR: COMPTON-THICK ABSORPTION OR INTRINSIC X-RAY WEAKNESS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Alexander, D. M.; Hickox, R. [Department of Physics, Durham University, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Harrison, F. A.; Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Madsen, K. K. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Bauer, F. E. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Casilla 306, Santiago 22 (Chile); Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, F. E. [DTU Space-National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Elektrovej 327, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Comastri, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Fabian, A. C. [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Farrah, D. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Fiore, F. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio Catone (Italy); Hailey, C. J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Matt, G. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Universita degli Studi Roma Tre, via della Vasca Navale 84, I-00146 Roma (Italy); Ogle, P. [IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); and others

    2013-08-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain Almost-Equal-To 400-600 hard X-ray ({approx}> 10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons are not significantly absorbed (N{sub H} {approx}< 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain the column densities for both to be N{sub H} Almost-Equal-To 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2} if the weak hard X-ray emission is caused by obscuration from the shielding gas. We discuss a few possibilities for how PG 1004+130 could have Compton-thick shielding gas without strong Fe K{alpha} line emission; dilution from jet-linked X-ray emission is one likely explanation. We also discuss the intrinsic X-ray weakness scenario based on a coronal-quenching model relevant to the shielding gas and disk wind of BAL quasars. Motivated by our NuSTAR results, we perform a Chandra stacking analysis with the Large Bright Quasar Survey BAL quasar sample and place statistical constraints upon the fraction of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars; this fraction is likely 17%-40%.

  13. NuSTAR Hard X-ray Survey of the Galactic Center Region. I. Hard X-ray Morphology and Spectroscopy of the Diffuse Emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mori, Kaya; Hailey, Charles J.; Krivonos, Roman

    2015-01-01

    self-consistently determined their intrinsic column density (similar to 10(23) cm(-2)), primary X-ray spectra (power-laws with Gamma similar to 2) and set a lower limit of the X-ray luminosity of Sgr A* flare illuminating the Sgr A clouds to L-X >= 10(38) erg s(-1). Above similar to 20 keV, hard X......We present the first sub-arcminute images of the Galactic Center above 10 keV, obtained with NuSTAR. NuSTAR resolves the hard X-ray source IGR J17456-2901 into non-thermal X-ray filaments, molecular clouds, point sources, and a previously unknown central component of hard X-ray emission (CHXE). Nu......STAR detects four non-thermal X-ray filaments, extending the detection of their power-law spectra with Gamma similar to 1.3-2.3 up to similar to 50 keV. A morphological and spectral study of the filaments suggests that their origin may be heterogeneous, where previous studies suggested a common origin in young...

  14. X-ray Emission From Eta Carinae near Periastron in 2009 I: A Two State Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Corcoran, Michael F.; Russell, Christopher; Pollock, Andrew M. T.; Gull, Theodore R.; Teodoro, Mairan; Madura, Thomas I.; Damineli, Augusto; Pittard, Julian M.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray emission from the supermassive binary system Eta Carinae declines sharply around periastron. This X-ray minimum has two distinct phases the lowest flux phase in the first 3 weeks and a brighter phase thereafter. In 2009, the Chandra X-ray Observatory monitored the first phase five times and found the lowest observed flux at 1.91012 ergs/sq cm/s (38 keV). The spectral shape changed such that the hard band above 4 keV dropped quickly at the beginning and the soft band flux gradually decreased to its lowest observed value in 2 weeks. The hard band spectrum had begun to recover by that time. This spectral variation suggests that the shocked gas producing the hottest X-ray gas near the apex of the wind-wind collision (WWC) is blocked behind the dense inner wind of the primary star, which later occults slightly cooler gas down-stream. Shocked gas previously produced by the system at earlier orbital phases is suggested to produce the faint residual X-ray emission seen when the emission near the apex is completely blocked by the primary wind. The brighter phase is probably caused by the re-appearance of the WWC plasma, whose emissivity significantly declined during the occultation. We interpret this to mean that the X-ray minimum is produced by a hybrid mechanism of an occultation and a decline in emissivity of the WWC shock. We constrain timings of superior conjunction and periastron based on these results.

  15. Capture and loss correlated to x-ray emission in O^5+ on Ar collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkafrawy, T.; Kayani, A.; Tanis, J. A.

    2010-03-01

    K x rays emitted from projectile and target atoms correlated to projectile capture and loss charge states were investigated for 18 and 25 MeV O^5+ on Ar collisions. Single capture coincidences are of interest as they translate to a target electron transferred to the projectile ion causing excitation followed by x-ray emission. Such a process is the signature for resonant charge transfer and excitation followed by x-ray emission (RTEX). We plan to cover the energy range for such RTEX cross sections. Heavy targets like Ar are not commonly used so we seek to test RTE theory for such targets. It is also planned to run for O^7+ to increase the capture probability. We are planning to measure single loss coincidences as well so we can study projectile ionization associated with projectile and target K-x-ray emission. In the case of Li-like O, K emission correlated with O^6+ can be obtained by K-shell ionization accompanied by 2s -> 2p (or higher) excitation followed by a 2p ->1s decay, or the same emission line can be obtained from K-shell excitation to 2p (or higher) accompanied by ionization of the 2s electron. On the other hand, Ar K emission can be obtained by K-shell ionization followed by 2p ->1s or 3p ->1s decay, or possibly by K-shell excitation to 3d or higher levels.

  16. Design of a novel transmission-grating spectrometer for soft X-ray emission studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsui, Takaki [Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan) and Graduate School for Advanced Studies, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan)]. E-mail: hatsui@ims.ac.jp; Setoyama, Hiroyuki [Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Shigemasa, Eiji [Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Graduate School for Advanced Studies, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Kosugi, Nobuhiro [Institute for Molecular Science, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan); Graduate School for Advanced Studies, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan)

    2005-06-15

    The design of a transmission-grating spectrometer for high-resolution soft X-ray emission studies has been proposed. It is different from conventional types of soft X-ray emission spectrometers; that is, the spectrometer has a Wolter type I mirror, a free-standing transmission grating, and a back-illuminated CCD. A high collection angle up to 1.5 x 10{sup -3} sr is achieved by utilizing the Wolter mirror as a prefocusing system. The CCD is mounted at 1400 mm downstream of the grating on a Rowland torus mount. Diffracted X-rays are detected by the CCD in the normal incidence geometry, resulting in high detection efficiency. The energy resolution is limited by the figure errors of the optical elements and the spatial resolution of the detector. The ray-tracing results confirm that the aberrations do not practically degrade the energy resolution.

  17. Obtaining attosecond x-ray pulses using a self-amplified spontaneous emission free electron laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Zholents

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a technique for the generation of a solitary attosecond x-ray pulse in a free-electron laser (FEL, via a process of self-amplified spontaneous emission. In this method, electrons experience an energy modulation upon interacting with laser pulses having a duration of a few cycles within single-period wiggler magnets. Two consecutive modulation sections, followed by compression in a dispersive section, are used to obtain a single, subfemtosecond spike in the electron peak current. This region of the electron beam experiences an enhanced growth rate for FEL amplification. After propagation through a long undulator, this current spike emits a ∼250   attosecond x-ray pulse whose intensity dominates the x-ray emission from the rest of the electron bunch.

  18. A powerful flare from Sgr A* confirms the synchrotron nature of the X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, G.; George, E.; Scaringi, S.; Zhang, S.; Jin, C.; Dexter, J.; Terrier, R.; Clavel, M.; Degenaar, N.; Eisenhauer, F.; Genzel, R.; Gillessen, S.; Goldwurm, A.; Habibi, M.; Haggard, D.; Hailey, C.; Harrison, F.; Merloni, A.; Mori, K.; Nandra, K.; Ott, T.; Pfuhl, O.; Plewa, P. M.; Waisberg, I.

    2017-06-01

    We present the first fully simultaneous fits to the near-infrared (NIR) and X-ray spectral slope (and its evolution) during a very bright flare from Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole at the Milky Way's centre. Our study arises from ambitious multiwavelength monitoring campaigns with XMM-Newton, NuSTAR and SINFONI. The average multiwavelength spectrum is well reproduced by a broken power law with ΓNIR = 1.7 ± 0.1 and ΓX = 2.27 ± 0.12. The difference in spectral slopes (ΔΓ = 0.57 ± 0.09) strongly supports synchrotron emission with a cooling break. The flare starts first in the NIR with a flat and bright NIR spectrum, while X-ray radiation is detected only after about 103 s, when a very steep X-ray spectrum (ΔΓ = 1.8 ± 0.4) is observed. These measurements are consistent with synchrotron emission with a cooling break and they suggest that the high-energy cut-off in the electron distribution (γmax) induces an initial cut-off in the optical-UV band that evolves slowly into the X-ray band. The temporal and spectral evolution observed in all bright X-ray flares are also in line with a slow evolution of γmax. We also observe hints for a variation of the cooling break that might be induced by an evolution of the magnetic field (from B ˜ 30 ± 8 G to B ˜ 4.8 ± 1.7 G at the X-ray peak). Such drop of the magnetic field at the flare peak would be expected if the acceleration mechanism is tapping energy from the magnetic field, such as in magnetic reconnection. We conclude that synchrotron emission with a cooling break is a viable process for Sgr A*'s flaring emission.

  19. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Hard X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy on a Tabletop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miaja-Avila

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Experimental tools capable of monitoring both atomic and electronic structure on ultrafast (femtosecond to picosecond time scales are needed for investigating photophysical processes fundamental to light harvesting, photocatalysis, energy and data storage, and optical display technologies. Time-resolved hard x-ray (>3  keV spectroscopies have proven valuable for these measurements due to their elemental specificity and sensitivity to geometric and electronic structures. Here, we present the first tabletop apparatus capable of performing time-resolved x-ray emission spectroscopy. The time resolution of the apparatus is better than 6 ps. By combining a compact laser-driven plasma source with a highly efficient array of microcalorimeter x-ray detectors, we are able to observe photoinduced spin changes in an archetypal polypyridyl iron complex [Fe(2,2^{′}-bipyridine_{3}]^{2+} and accurately measure the lifetime of the quintet spin state. Our results demonstrate that ultrafast hard x-ray emission spectroscopy is no longer confined to large facilities and now can be performed in conventional laboratories with 10 times better time resolution than at synchrotrons. Our results are enabled, in part, by a 100- to 1000-fold increase in x-ray collection efficiency compared to current techniques.

  20. The Sun's X-ray Emission During the Recent Solar Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Mirek; Gburek, Szymon; Siarkowski, Marek; Kuzin, Sergey; Farnik, Frantisek; Reale, Fabio; Phillips, Kenneth J. H.

    2010-02-01

    The Sun recently underwent a period of a remarkable lack of major activity such as large flares and sunspots, without equal since the advent of the space age a half century ago. A widely used measure of solar activity is the amount of solar soft X-ray emission, but until recently this has been below the threshold of the X-ray-monitoring Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). There is thus an urgent need for more sensitive instrumentation to record solar X-ray emission in this range. Anticipating this need, a highly sensitive spectrophotometer called Solar Photometer in X-rays (SphinX) was included in the solar telescope/spectrometer TESIS instrument package on the third spacecraft in Russia's Complex Orbital Observations Near-Earth of Activity of the Sun (CORONAS-PHOTON) program, launched 30 January 2009 into a near-polar orbit. SphinX measures X-rays in a band similar to the GOES longer-wavelength channel.

  1. X-ray continuum and iron K emission line from the radio galaxy 3C 390.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, M.; Makishima, K.; Kohmura, Y.; Tashiro, M.; Ohashi, T.; Barr, P.; Hayashida, K.; Palumbo, G. G. C.; Trinchieri, G.; Elvis, M.

    1994-01-01

    X-ray properties of the radio galaxy 3C 390.3 were investigated using the European X-ray Observatory Satellite (EXOSAT) and Ginga satellites. Long-term, large-amplitude X-ray intensity changes were detected over a period extending from 1984 through 1991, and high-quality X-ray spectra were obtained especially with Ginga. The X-ray continuum spectra were described with power-law model with photon slope in the range 1.5-1.8, and the slope flattened as the 2-20 keV luminosity decreased by 40%. There was a first detection of the iron emission line from this source at the 90% confidence level. An upper limit was derived on the thermal X-ray component. X-ray emission mechanisms and possible origins of the long-term variation are discussed.

  2. X-ray emission in heavy-ion collisions. Progress report, April 1, 1979-March 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.L.

    1980-04-01

    Recent research in the cyclotron institute and department of chemistry at Texas A and M University on the x-ray emission in heavy-ion collisions is described. Areas covered include: spectra of Ka x-rays from 64 MeV sulfur ions traveling in solids; foil-excited Ka x-ray transitions in few-electron sulfur ions; high-resolution study of the target thickness dependence of x-ray emission from 65 MeV sulfur ions; dynamic screening of highly stripped sulfur ions in solids; Mg Ka x-ray satellites excited by ion bombardment, multiplet structure and dependence on projectile and chemical environment; angular distributions of beam and target Ka x-rays; chemical effects on K x-ray satellites of fluorine compounds; and a non-linear least-squares peak-fitting program employing Voight functions

  3. 2p3d Resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy of cobalt compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schooneveld, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    This manuscript demonstrates that 2p3d resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) yields unique information on the chemically relevant valence electrons of transition metal atoms or ions. Experimental data on cobalt compounds and several theories were used hand-in-hand. In chapter 1 2p3d RXES was

  4. The transport of trace elements during hemodialysis measured with proton induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vis, R.D.; Bos, A.J.J.; Verheul, H.

    1979-01-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) is used to follow the behaviour of some trace elements in blood during the treatment of uremic patients with artificial kidney. Of course, this behaviour is dependent on the concentrations of these elements in the water used for the treatment. (author)

  5. Field emission behavior of carbon nanotube yarn for micro-resolution X-ray tube cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Jae Won; Mo, Chan Bin; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Ryu, Seongwoo; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) has excellent electrical and thermal conductivity and high aspect ratio for X-ray tube cathode. However, CNT field emission cathode has been shown unstable field emission and short life time due to field evaporation by high current density and detachment by electrostatic force. An alternative approach in this direction is the introduction of CNT yarn, which is a one dimensional assembly of individual carbon nanotubes bonded by the Van der Waals force. Because CNT yarn is composed with many CNTs, CNT yarns are expected to increase current density and life time for X-ray tube applications. In this research, CNT yarn was fabricated by spinning of a super-aligned CNT forest and was characterized for application to an X-ray tube cathode. CNT yarn showed a high field emission current density and a long lifetime of over 450 hours. Applying the CNT yarn field emitter to the X-ray tube cathode, it was possible to obtain micro-scale resolution images. The relationship between the field emission properties and the microstructure evolution was investigated and the unraveling effect of the CNT yarn was discussed.

  6. Proton-induced X-ray emission analysis of Jordanian cigarettes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallak, A.B.

    1981-01-01

    Proton-induced X-ray emission spectroscopy was applied to determine the concentration of 11 elements in cigaretta tobacco of four brands commercially made in Jordan, and one foreign brand. The results are expressed in absolute amount per cigarette. Cigarette wrapping paper and cigarette smoke were also anlayzed. The significance of some of the elements found in the samples are discussed. (author)

  7. Proton induced X-ray emission analysis of trace elements in human blood serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheek, D.B.; Hay, H.J.; Newton, C.S.

    1979-01-01

    Proton induced x-ray emission has been used for quantitative analyses of trace elements in blood serum samples. This work is part of a survey concerned with Zn, Cu, Fe, Cr, Mn and Se in Australian Aboriginal people not receiving optimal diet. Special attention is being directed to Cr because of the high incidence of diabetes mellitus in these people

  8. A comparative study of the ionic keV X-ray line emission from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 277–288. A comparative study of the ionic keV X-ray line emission from plasma produced by the femtosecond, picosecond and nanosecond duration laser pulses. V ARORA. ∗. , P A NAIK, B S RAO and P D GUPTA. Laser Plasma Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013, India.

  9. The application of proton induced X-ray emission in criminalistics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhenyuan; Xie Shuxian

    1993-01-01

    The determination method of trace elements in high pure gold by proton induced X-ray emission is reported. The target preparation, design of physical experiment, data proceeding and the analysis of gold samples by the internal standard of single-standard are discussed. Using this determination method, the identification of a sample of high pure gold is performed

  10. Detections of hard X-ray emissions from bright early-type galaxies with ASCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushita, K.; Makishima, K.; Awaki, H.; Canizares, C. R.; Fabian, A. C.; Fukazawa, Y.; Loewenstein, M.; Matsumoto, H.; Mihara, T.; Mushotzky, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    Five bright elliptical galaxies in the Virgo Cluster, NGC 4365, NGC 4374 (M84), NGC 4406 (M86), NGC 4472 (M49), and NGC 4636, were observed with ASCA. In addition to the extended thermal X-ray emission of temperature kT approximately 1 keV, harder X-rays with color temperature kT greater than or equal to 2 keV were detected from all of them. The 2-10 keV luminosities of this hard component for the five galaxies, integrated within 5 min, are distributed within a relatively narrow range of (1-4) x 10(exp 40) ergs/s. The hard X-ray component is primarily attributed to the integrated emission from discrete X-ray sources. In NGC 4406 and NGC 4374 the data indicate that the hard component is contributed additionally by foreground/background emission from the hot intracluster medium (ICM) of the Virgo Cluster. The hard component of NGC 4472 seems also contributed by the Virgo ICM emission, but in this case there is evidence that the ICM brightness is locally enhanced within approximately 10 min of NGC 4472.

  11. Optimization of soft x-ray line emission from laser-produced carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Optimization of soft x-ray line emission from laser-produced carbon plasma with laser intensity. A CHOWDHURY, R A JOSHI, G P GUPTA*, P A NAIK and P D GUPTA. Laser Plasma Division, Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013, India. £Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, ...

  12. Cometary X-ray Emission: the View After the First Chandra Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, C. M.

    2002-01-01

    The unexpected discovery of x-ray emission from Comet Hyakutake in March 1996 (Lisse et al. 1996) has produced a number of questions about the physical mechanism producing the radiation. The original detection and subsequent observations (Dennerl et al. 1997, Mumma et al. 1997, Krasnopolsky et al. 1998, Owens et al. 1998, Lisse et al. 1999) have shown that the very soft (best fit thermal bremsstrahlung model kT ~ 0.2 keV) emission is due to an interaction between the solar wind and the comet's atmosphere. Using the results from the 15 comets detected to date in x-rays, we report on the latest results on cometary x-ray emission, including new results from Chandra and XMM. As-observed morphologies, spectra, and light curves will be discussed. Our emphasis will be on understanding the physical mechanism producing the emission, and using this to determine the nature of the cometary coma, the structure of the solar wind in the heliosphere, and the source of the local soft x-ray background. This work has been graciously supported by grants from the NASA Planetary Astronomy and Astrophysical Data Programs.

  13. The Relationship Between Solar Radio and Hard X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S. M.; Benz, A. O.; Christe, S.; Farnik, F.; Kundu, M. R.; Mann, G.; Ning, Z.; Raulin, J.-P.; Silva-Valio, A. V. R.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; hide

    2011-01-01

    This review discusses the complementary relationship between radio and hard Xray observations of the Sun using primarily results from the era of the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager satellite. A primary focus of joint radio and hard X-ray studies of solar flares uses observations of nonthermal gyrosynchrotron emission at radio wavelengths and bremsstrahlung hard X-rays to study the properties of electrons accelerated in the main flare site, since it is well established that these two emissions show very similar temporal behavior. A quantitative prescription is given for comparing the electron energy distributions derived separately from the two wavelength ranges: this is an important application with the potential for measuring the magnetic field strength in the flaring region, and reveals significant differences between the electrons in different energy ranges. Examples of the use of simultaneous data from the two wavelength ranges to derive physical conditions are then discussed, including the case of microflares, and the comparison of images at radio and hard X-ray wavelengths is presented. There have been puzzling results obtained from observations of solar flares at millimeter and submillimeter wavelengths, and the comparison of these results with corresponding hard X-ray data is presented. Finally, the review discusses the association of hard X-ray releases with radio emission at decimeter and meter wavelengths, which is dominated by plasma emission (at lower frequencies) and electron cyclotron maser emission (at higher frequencies), both coherent emission mechanisms that require small numbers of energetic electrons. These comparisons show broad general associations but detailed correspondence remains more elusive.

  14. Soft X-ray emission from the radio pulsar PSR 0656 + 14

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, F. A.; Middleditch, J.; Hjellming, R. M.; Mason, K. O.

    1989-01-01

    A radio source with a flux density of a few mJy was found in the error region of the soft X-ray source E0656 + 14, and identified as the radio pulsar PSR 0656 + 14. The radio source has a steep, nonthermal spectrum and a high degree of linear (62 percent) and circular (19 percent) polarization. The X-ray spectrum of the pulsar is among the softest sources observed with the Einstein Observatory. The X-ray data taken with the Einstein imaging proportional counter (IPC) permit a range of blackbody temperatures of 3-6 x 10 to the 5th K, and an equivalent column density of hydrogen smaller than 4 x 10 to the 20th/sq cm. If the assumption is made that the X-ray flux is thermal radiation from surface of the neutron star, then the pulsar must be at a distance smaller than 550 pc, consistent with the low dispersion measure of PSR 0656 + 14. The X-ray timing data suggest that the X-ray emission is modulated at the pulsar's 0.385-s spin period with an amplitude of 18 percent + or - 6 percent, and that there is a 0.0002 probability that this is spurious. It was noted that PSR 0656 + 14 is close to the geometric center of a 20-deg diameter soft X-ray emitting ring called the Gemini-Monoceros enhancement. The close distance of the pulsar, together with its relatively young age of 1.1 x 10 to the 5th yr, makes it possible that the ring is a supernova remnant from the explosion of the pulsar's progenitor. A radio source extending over a region 1.2 to 3.3 arcmin south of the pulsar is a candidate for association with the pulsar.

  15. X-ray emission in slow highly charged ion-surface collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, H; Abe, T; Fujita, Y; Sun, J; Takahashi, S; Tona, M; Yoshiyasu, N; Nakamura, N; Sakurai, M; Yamada, C; Ohtani, S

    2007-01-01

    X-rays emitted in the collisions of highly charged ions with a surface have been measured to investigate dissipation schemes of their potential energies. While 8.1% of the potential energy was dissipated in the collisions of He-like I ions with a W surface, 29.1% has been dissipated in the case of He-like Bi ions. The x-ray emissions play significant roles in the dissipation of the potential energies in the interaction of highly charged heavy ions with the surface

  16. ROSAT PSPC spectra of X-ray selected narrow emission line galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenero, E. Romero; Carrera, F. J.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Mittaz, J. P. D.; McHardy, I. M.; Jones, L. R.

    1996-01-01

    The Rosat Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) spectra of a sample of 35 X-ray selected Narrow Emission Line Galaxies (NELGs) are presented. Of these 35 objects, 16 are from the Rosat International X-ray Optical Survey (RIXOS) and the remaining 19 were discovered during the optical identification of Rosat U.K. deep survey sources. A power law model with low energy absorption set at the Galactic value is found to be a good fit for all sources. The results indicate that the spectral slope of NELGs is flatter than that of active galactic nuclei.

  17. The hard X-ray emission spectra from accretion columns in intermediate polars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Insu; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1994-01-01

    We consider the hard (greater than 2 keV) X-ray emission from accretion columns in an intermediate polar system, GK Per, using a simple settling solution. The rate of photon emission per logarithmic energy interval can be fitted with a power law, E(exp -gamma), with gamma approximately 2.0, in agreement with observations. This index is only weakly dependent on the mass accretion rate, dot-M, for dot-M in the range of a few times 10(exp 16-18) g/s. The peak energy of the photon spectra (after photoelectric absorption) is expected to be E(sub p) approximately (5 keV) gamma(exp -1/3) (N(sub H)/10(exp 23)/sq cm)(exp 1/3) where N(sub H) is the hydrogen column density along the line of sight. The observed spectra of GK Per and possibly of V1223 Sgr suggest N(sub H) approximately 10(exp 23)/sq cm. This large N(sub H) may be due to partially ionized preshock column material. Alternatively, we also consider absorption by the cool outer parts of an accretion disk. In this case the photoelectric absorption depth in the disk is a sensitive function of inclination. For GK Per the required inclination is approximately 83 deg. For mass accretion rates larger than a critical rate of approximately 10(exp 18) g/s, X-ray emission from the column accretion is significantly affected by radiation drag. Although the mass accretion rate increases dramatically during outbursts, the observed hard (greater than 2 keV) X-ray luminosity will not rise proportionately. The slope and peak energy of the outburst spectra are only weakly affected. We conclude that the observed X-ray spectra can be explained by this simple analytic solution and that the production of hard X-rays from the accretion shock at the magnetic poles in the intermediate polars is in general agreement with the observations. However, since the X-ray emission and absorption depend on the mass accretion rate in a complicated manner, observed hard X-ray luminosities (greater than 2 keV) are not a good indicator of the mass

  18. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Muramatsu, Yasuji

    2009-01-01

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and mo...

  19. Trace element analysis in liquids by proton induced x-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deconninck, G.

    Proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE) from liquid has been developed for quantitative and simultaneous analysis of trace elements. Liquid drops and trickles are bombarded at atmospheric pressure, x-rays are detected in a non dispersive Si(Li) solid state detector. Absolute determinations are made by comparison with standard solutions. Detection limits in a 5 minutes run are in the ppm range for a single drop (0.05 ml). The application of this technique to the determination of trace elements in biological liquids is investigated (Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, in plant extracts, haemocyanine, albumins...). (author)

  20. X-ray fluorescence analysis and optical emission spectrometry of an roman mirror from Tomis, Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belc, M.; Bogoi, M.; Ionescu, D.; Guita, D.; Caiteanu, S.; Caiteanu, D.

    2000-01-01

    The miscellaneous population of Roman Empire, their diverse cultural tradition, their ability to assimilate the roman civilization spirits, had determined a permanent reassessment superimposed upon the roman contribution. Analysis was undertaken using optical emission spectrometry and non-destructive X-ray fluorescence. X-ray fluorescence analysis is a well-established method and is often used in archaeometry and other work dealing with valuable objects pertaining to the history of art and civilization. Roman mirror analysed has been found not to be made of speculum (a high tin bronze). (authors)

  1. The Spectacular Radio-Near-IR-X-Ray Jet of 3C 111: the X-Ray Emission Mechanism and Jet Kinematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clautice, Devon; Perlman, Eric S.; Georganopoulos, Markos; Lister, Matthew L.; Tombesi, Francesco; Cara, Mihai; Marshall, Herman L.; Hogan, Brandon M.; Kazanas, Demos

    2016-01-01

    Relativistic jets are the most energetic manifestation of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) phenomenon. AGN jets are observed from the radio through gamma-rays and carry copious amounts of matter and energy from the subparsec central regions out to the kiloparsec and often megaparsec scale galaxy and cluster environs. While most spatially resolved jets are seen in the radio, an increasing number have been discovered to emit in the optical/near- IR and/or X-ray bands. Here we discuss a spectacular example of this class, the 3C 111 jet, housed in one of the nearest, double-lobed FR II radio galaxies known. We discuss new, deep Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations that reveal both near-IR and X-ray emission from several components of the 3C 111 jet, as well as both the northern and southern hotspots. Important differences are seen between the morphologies in the radio, X-ray, and near-IR bands. The long (over 100 kpc on each side), straight nature of this jet makes it an excellent prototype for future, deep observations, as it is one of the longest such features seen in the radio, near-IR/optical, and X-ray bands. Several independent lines of evidence, including the X-ray and broadband spectral shape as well as the implied velocity of the approaching hotspot, lead us to strongly disfavor the EC/CMB model and instead favor a two-component synchrotron model to explain the observed X-ray emission for several jet components. Future observations with NuSTAR, HST, and Chandra will allow us to further constrain the emission mechanisms.

  2. Iron emission lines from extended x-ray jets in SS 433: reheating of atomic nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliari, Simone; Fender, Rob; Méndez, Mariano

    2002-09-06

    Powerful relativistic jets are among the most ubiquitous and energetic observational consequences of accretion around supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei and neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes in x-ray binary (XRB) systems. But despite more than three decades of study, the structure and composition of these jets remain unknown. Here we present spatially resolved x-ray spectroscopy of arc second-scale x-ray jets from XRB SS 433 analyzed with the Chandra advanced charge-coupled device imaging spectrometer. These observations reveal evidence for a hot continuum and Doppler-shifted iron emission lines from spatially resolved regions. Apparently, in situ reheating of the baryonic component of the jets takes place in a flow that moves with relativistic bulk velocity even more than 100 days after launch from the binary core.

  3. X-RAY EMISSION FROM SUPERNOVAE IN DENSE CIRCUMSTELLAR MATTER ENVIRONMENTS: A SEARCH FOR COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ofek, E. O.; Gal-Yam, A.; Yaron, O.; Arcavi, I.; Fox, D.; Cenko, S. B.; Filippenko, A. V.; Bloom, J. S.; Sullivan, M.; Gnat, O.; Frail, D. A.; Horesh, A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Corsi, A.; Quimby, R. M.; Gehrels, N.; Nugent, P. E.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Bildsten, L.; Poznanski, D.

    2013-01-01

    The optical light curve of some supernovae (SNe) may be powered by the outward diffusion of the energy deposited by the explosion shock (the so-called shock breakout) in optically thick (τ ∼> 30) circumstellar matter (CSM). Recently, it was shown that the radiation-mediated and radiation-dominated shock in an optically thick wind must transform into a collisionless shock and can produce hard X-rays. The X-rays are expected to peak at late times, relative to maximum visible light. Here we report on a search, using Swift/XRT and Chandra, for X-ray emission from 28 SNe that belong to classes whose progenitors are suspected to be embedded in dense CSM. Our sample includes 19 Type IIn SNe, one Type Ibn SN, and eight hydrogen-poor superluminous SNe (SLSN-I such as SN 2005ap). Two SNe (SN 2006jc and SN 2010jl) have X-ray properties that are roughly consistent with the expectation for X-rays from a collisionless shock in optically thick CSM. However, the X-ray emission from SN 2006jc can also be explained as originating in an optically thin region. Thus, we propose that the optical light curve of SN 2010jl is powered by shock breakout in CSM. We suggest that two other events (SN 2010al and SN 2011ht) were too X-ray bright during the SN maximum optical light to be explained by the shock-breakout model. We conclude that the light curves of some, but not all, SNe IIn/Ibn are powered by shock breakout in CSM. For the rest of the SNe in our sample, including all of the SLSN-I events, our X-ray limits are not deep enough and were typically obtained too early (i.e., near the SN maximum light) for definitive conclusions about their nature. Late-time X-ray observations are required in order to further test whether these SNe are indeed embedded in dense CSM. We review the conditions required for a shock breakout in a wind profile. We argue that the timescale, relative to maximum light, for the SN to peak in X-rays is a probe of the column density and the density profile above the

  4. Soft x ray emission spectra from laser-irradiated high-Z targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlman, G.; Burkhalter, P. G.; Newman, D. A.; Ripin, B. H.

    1990-06-01

    X ray data were acquired from mass-limited targets with the Pharos III laser system. Targets, mounted at the tip of thin glass stalks, were microscopic pieces of single or multiple high-Z element composition. The laser irradiance was 4 x 10(exp 14) W/sq cm with about 300J of focused 1.05 microns wavelength laser beam. A convex KAP crystal spectrograph was used for its capability to collect high resolution spectra in the 4 to 20 A soft x ray region. The recorded spectral film densities were microdensitometered and converted by computer-processing to absolute continuum and emission line intensities. The spectral features were identified with the aid of ab-initio atomic structure calculations. The continuum background was evaluated as a source of pseudo-continua for absorption studies of soft x rays.

  5. CORRELATION OF HARD X-RAY AND WHITE LIGHT EMISSION IN SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhar, Matej; Krucker, Säm; Battaglia, Marina; Kleint, Lucia; Casadei, Diego [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland, Bahnhofstrasse 6, 5210 Windisch (Switzerland); Oliveros, Juan Carlos Martinez; Hudson, Hugh S. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A statistical study of the correlation between hard X-ray and white light emission in solar flares is performed in order to search for a link between flare-accelerated electrons and white light formation. We analyze 43 flares spanning GOES classes M and X using observations from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. We calculate X-ray fluxes at 30 keV and white light fluxes at 6173 Å summed over the hard X-ray flare ribbons with an integration time of 45 s around the peak hard-X ray time. We find a good correlation between hard X-ray fluxes and excess white light fluxes, with a highest correlation coefficient of 0.68 for photons with energy of 30 keV. Assuming the thick target model, a similar correlation is found between the deposited power by flare-accelerated electrons and the white light fluxes. The correlation coefficient is found to be largest for energy deposition by electrons above ∼50 keV. At higher electron energies the correlation decreases gradually while a rapid decrease is seen if the energy provided by low-energy electrons is added. This suggests that flare-accelerated electrons of energy ∼50 keV are the main source for white light production.

  6. Current sheath curvature correlation with the neon soft x-ray emission from plasma focus device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, T; Lin, X; Chandra, K A; Tan, T L; Springham, S V; Patran, A; Lee, P; Lee, S; Rawat, R S

    2005-01-01

    The insulator sleeve length is one of the major parameters that can severely affect the neon soft x-ray yield from a plasma focus. The effect of the insulation sleeve length on various characteristic timings of plasma focus discharges and hence the soft x-ray emission characteristics has been investigated using a resistive divider. The pinhole images and laser shadowgraphy are used to explain the observed variation in the average soft x-ray yield (measured using a diode x-ray spectrometer) with variation of the insulator sleeve length. We have found that for a neon filled plasma focus device the change in insulator sleeve length changes the current sheath curvature angle and thus the length of the focused plasma column. The optimized current sheath curvature angle is found to be between 39 0 and 41 0 , at the specific axial position of 6.2-9.3 cm from the cathode support plate, for our 3.3 kJ plasma focus device. A strong dependence of the neon soft x-ray yield on the current sheath curvature angle has thus been reported

  7. Modeling of the EUV and X-Ray Emission Spectra Induced by the Solar Winds Ions in the Heliosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharchenko, Vasili

    2005-01-01

    We have carried out investigation of the EUV and X-ray emission spectra induced in interaction between the Solar Wind (SW) and interstellar neutral gas. The spectra of most important SW ions have been computed for the charge-exchange mechanism of X-ray emission using new accurate spectroscopic data from recent laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations. Total spectra have been constructed as a sum of spectra induced in the charge-exchange collisions by individual O(exp q+), C(exp q+), N(exp q+), Ne(exp q+), Mg (exp q+) and Fe(exp q+) ions. Calculations have been performed for X-ray emission from the heliospheric hydrogen and helium gas. X-ray maps of the heliosphere have been computed. The power density of X-ray sources in the heliospheric ecliptic plane is shown for the H gas and for the He gas. Distances from the Sun (0,0) are given in AU. The helium cone is clear seen in the X-ray map of the charge-exchange emission induced by the solar wind. X-ray emission spectra detected by the Chandra X-ray telescope from the "dark" side of Moon has been identified as a X-ray background emission induced by the solar wind from the geocorona. Spectra and intensities of this charge-exchange X-rays have been compared with the heliospheric component of the X-ray background. Observations and modeling of the SW spectra induced from the geocorona indicate a strong presence of emission lines of highly charged oxygen ions. Anisotropy in distribution of heliospheric X-rays has been predicted and calculated for the regions of the fast and slow solar winds.

  8. Characterization of metallic nanoparticles by high-resolution X-ray absorption and X-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuehn, Timna-Josua

    2012-03-15

    In almost all areas of technology, metallic nanoparticles are of interest due to their special thermal, electronic, magnetic and optical properties. Their special properties are mainly due to their small size which implies the relevance of quantum effects as well as the significance of the surface: For 2 nm nanoparticles, the surface-to-volume ratio is already 1:1. However, the identification of surface-to-volume interactions - that are responsible for the new properties - is a difficult task due to the small size that inhibits a lot of 'standard' techniques to be applicable. Here X-ray absorption/emission spectroscopy (XAS/XES) is a favorable tool for the characterization of nanoparticles, independent on size, degree of crystallinity and shape/condition of the surface. Using XAS, a tempered nanosized Co{sub 3}Pt/C catalyst have been investigated. Its outstanding oxygen-reduction reaction (ORR) properties in a fuel cell could be related to a lowered Pt 5d-band center connected to a tightened Pt-Pt bonding distance, leading to a weakening of the oxygen adsorption strength so that the ORR may proceed faster. One drawback remains, however, as the properties found by (standard) XAS are summed up for different chemical environments of the chosen element. Thus, no distinction can be made between, e.g., the pure metal in a nanoparticles' interior and the ligated metal in the outer shells or surface. Here, high-resolution fluorescence-detected XAS (HRFD-XAS) provides additional opportunities as, due to its chemical sensitivity, it leads to site-selective XAS. For a system of 6 nm sized Co nanoparticles, build up of a metallic core surrounded by a protecting shell, that resulted from the 'smooth oxidation' process, this technique of site-selective XAS was proven to be applicable. For the first time, the interior and outer shell of a metallic nanoparticle could be characterized separately. In particular, the Co-hcp phase could be determined for the

  9. DETECTION OF DIFFUSE X-RAY EMISSION FROM PLANETARY NEBULAE WITH NEBULAR O VI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, N.; Guerrero, M. A. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, IAA-CSIC, c/ Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Jacob, R.; Schoenberner, D.; Steffen, M., E-mail: nieves@iaa.es [Leibniz-Institut fuer Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany)

    2013-04-10

    The presence of O VI ions can be indicative of plasma temperatures of a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} K that are expected in heat conduction layers between the hot shocked stellar wind gas at several 10{sup 6} K and the cooler (10{sup 4} K) nebular gas of planetary nebulae (PNe). We have used FUSE observations of PNe to search for nebular O VI emission or absorption as a diagnostic of the conduction layer to ensure the presence of hot interior gas. Three PNe showing nebular O VI, namely IC 418, NGC 2392, and NGC 6826, have been selected for Chandra observations and diffuse X-ray emission is indeed detected in each of these PNe. Among the three, NGC 2392 has peculiarly high diffuse X-ray luminosity and plasma temperature compared with those expected from its stellar wind's mechanical luminosity and terminal velocity. The limited effects of heat conduction on the plasma temperature of a hot bubble at the low terminal velocity of the stellar wind of NGC 2392 may partially account for its high plasma temperature, but the high X-ray luminosity needs to be powered by processes other than the observed stellar wind, probably the presence of an unseen binary companion of the central star of the PN (CSPN) of NGC 2392. We have compiled relevant information on the X-ray, stellar, and nebular properties of PNe with a bubble morphology and found that the expectations of bubble models including heat conduction compare favorably with the present X-ray observations of hot bubbles around H-rich CSPNe, but have notable discrepancies for those around H-poor [WR] CSPNe. We note that PNe with more massive central stars can produce hotter plasma and higher X-ray surface brightness inside central hot bubbles.

  10. THE ORIGIN OF THE PUZZLING HARD X-RAY EMISSION OF γ CASSIOPEIAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motch, Christian [Observatoire Astronomique, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l’Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Oliveira, Raimundo Lopes de [Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Departamento de Física, Av. Marechal Rondon s/n, 49100-000 São Cristóvão, SE (Brazil); Smith, Myron A., E-mail: christian.motch@unistra.fr [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2015-06-20

    Massive B and Be stars produce X-rays from shocks in high-velocity winds with temperatures of a few million degrees and maximum X-ray luminosities of ≈10{sup 31} erg s{sup −1}. Surprisingly, a sub-group of early Be stars exhibits ≥20 times hotter X-ray temperatures and ≥10 times higher X-ray luminosities than normal. This group of Be stars, dubbed γ-Cas analogs, contains about 10 known objects. The origin of this bizarre behavior has been extensively debated in the past decades. Two mechanisms have been put forward: accretion of circumstellar disk matter onto an orbiting white dwarf, or magnetic field interaction between the star and the circumstellar disk. We show here that the X-ray and optical emissions of the prototype of the class, γ-Cas, are very well correlated on year timescales with no significant time delay. Since the expected migration time from internal disk regions that emit most of the optical flux to the orbit of the companion star is several years, the simultaneity of the high energy and optical flux variations indicates that X-ray emission arises from close to the star. The systematic lack of magnetic field detection reported in recent spectro-polarimetric surveys of Be stars is consistent with the absence of strong magnetic wind braking in these fast spinning stars but place strong constraints on the possible origin of the magnetic field. We propose that in γ-Cas, the magnetic field emerges from equatorially condensed subsurface convecting layers, the thickness of which steeply increases with rotation rate, and that γ-Cas and its analogs are the most massive and closest to critical rotation Be stars.

  11. X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE WOLF-RAYET BUBBLE S 308

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toalá, J. A.; Guerrero, M. A.; Chu, Y.-H.; Gruendl, R. A.; Arthur, S. J.; Smith, R. C.; Snowden, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    The Wolf-Rayet (WR) bubble S 308 around the WR star HD 50896 is one of the only two WR bubbles known to possess X-ray emission. We present XMM-Newton observations of three fields of this WR bubble that, in conjunction with an existing observation of its northwest quadrant, map most of the nebula. The X-ray emission from S 308 displays a limb-brightened morphology, with a central cavity ∼22' in size and a shell thickness of ∼8'. This X-ray shell is confined by the optical shell of ionized material. The spectrum is dominated by the He-like triplets of N VI at 0.43 keV and O VII at 0.57 keV, and declines toward high energies, with a faint tail up to 1 keV. This spectrum can be described by a two-temperature optically thin plasma emission model (T 1 ∼ 1.1 × 10 6 K, T 2 ∼ 13 × 10 6 K), with a total X-ray luminosity ∼2 × 10 33 erg s –1 at the assumed distance of 1.5 kpc.

  12. Synchrotron radiation based micro X-ray fluorescence analysis of the calibration samples used in surface sensitive total reflection and grazing emission X-ray fluorescence techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubala-Kukuś, A.; Banaś, D.; Pajek, M.; Szlachetko, J.; Jagodziński, P.; Susini, J.; Salomé, M.

    2013-12-01

    Total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF) and grazing emission X-ray fluorescence (GEXRF) are surface sensitive techniques and can be used for detailed surface studies of different materials, including ultra-low concentration contamination or the lateral and depth distributions of elements. The calibration procedure typically used involves placing a micro-droplet (˜μl) of the standard solution onto a silicon wafer (or quartz backing). After evaporation of the solvent, the residual amount of elements is used as a reference standard. Knowledge of the distribution of residue material on the substrate surface is crucial for precise quantification. In the present work the investigation of the lateral distribution of elements in the multielemental calibrating samples, containing the 23 most commonly studied elements, by using the synchrotron radiation based micro X-ray fluorescence is presented. The goal of this project was the study of a uniformity of the elemental distributions and determination of the residual elements morphology depending on the temperature of the drying process. The X-ray images were compared with optical and SEM images. Paper presents in details the experimental setup, sample preparation procedures, measurements and results. In the analysis of the X-ray images of the sample dried in high temperature the censoring approach was applied improving the quality of statistical analysis. The information on the elements distribution in the calibrating samples can be useful for developing more accurate calibration procedures applied in quantitative analysis of surface sensitive TXRF and GEXRF techniques.

  13. INTRAGROUP AND GALAXY-LINKED DIFFUSE X-RAY EMISSION IN HICKSON COMPACT GROUPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Hornschemeier, Ann E. [Laboratory for X-ray Astrophysics, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mulchaey, John S. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Brandt, William N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Garmire, Gordon P.; Gronwall, Caryl; Konstantopoulos, Iraklis S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Johnson, Kelsey E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 3813, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Zabludoff, Ann I., E-mail: tdesjar@uwo.ca [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 95721 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Isolated compact groups (CGs) of galaxies present a range of dynamical states, group velocity dispersions, and galaxy morphologies with which to study galaxy evolution, particularly the properties of gas both within the galaxies and in the intragroup medium. As part of a large, multiwavelength examination of CGs, we present an archival study of diffuse X-ray emission in a subset of nine Hickson compact groups (HCGs) observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. We find that seven of the groups in our sample exhibit detectable diffuse emission. However, unlike large-scale emission in galaxy clusters, the diffuse features in the majority of the detected groups are linked to the individual galaxies, in the form of both plumes and halos likely as a result of vigourous star formation or activity in the galaxy nucleus, as well as in emission from tidal features. Unlike previous studies from earlier X-ray missions, HCGs 31, 42, 59, and 92 are found to be consistent with the L{sub X} -T relationship from clusters within the errors, while HCGs 16 and 31 are consistent with the cluster L{sub X} -{sigma} relation, though this is likely coincidental given that the hot gas in these two systems is largely due to star formation. We find that L{sub X} increases with decreasing group H I to dynamical-mass ratio with tentative evidence for a dependence in X-ray luminosity on H I morphology whereby systems with intragroup H I indicative of strong interactions are considerably more X-ray luminous than passively evolving groups. We also find a gap in the L{sub X} of groups as a function of the total group specific star formation rate. Our findings suggest that the hot gas in these groups is not in hydrostatic equilibrium and these systems are not low-mass analogs of rich groups or clusters, with the possible exception of HCG 62.

  14. Analysis of the electronic structure of human hemoglobin from soft X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soldatov, A.V.; Kravtsova, A.N.; Fedorovich, E.N.; Ankudinov, A.; Moewes, A.; Kurmaev, E.Z.

    2005-01-01

    We present X-ray emission spectra (XES) of human hemoglobin excited near the iron L 2,3 threshold and the nitrogen and carbon K-edges. The experiment is compared with our calculations of the corresponding spectra and gives good agreement. We find that the Fe L 3 emission is affected by the nearest nitrogen atoms located in the heme plane around the central iron atom. The distribution of the partial electronic densities of states of hemoglobin is determined

  15. Exploring the Diffuse X-ray Emission of Supernova Remnant Kesteven 69 with XMM-Newton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Ae Seo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the X-ray emission from the shock-heated plasma of the Galactic supernova remnant Kesteven 69 with XMM-Newton. Assuming the plasma is at collisional ionization equilibrium, a plasma temperature and a column absorption are found to be kT ~ 0.62 keV and NH ~ 2.85 ×1022 cm-2 respectively by imaging spectroscopy. Together with the deduced emission measure, we place constraints on its Sedov parameters.

  16. An optimised set-up for total reflection particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kan, J.A. van; Vis, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    MeV proton beams at small angles of incidence (0-35 mrad) are used to analyse trace elements on flat surfaces such as Si wafers or quartz substrates. In these experiments, the particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) signal is used in a new optimized set-up. This set-up is constructed in such a way that the X-ray detector can reach very large solid angles, larger than 1 sr. Use of these large detector solid angles, combined with the reduction of bremsstrahlung background, affords limits of detection (LOD) of the order of 10 10 at cm -2 using total reflection particle induced X-ray emission (TPIXE). The LODs from earlier TPIXE measurements in a non-optimized set-up are used to estimate LODs in the new TPIXE set-up. Si wafers with low surface concentrations of V, Ni, Cu and Ag are used as standards to calibrate the LODs found with this set-up. The metal concentrations are determined by total reflection X-ray fluorescence (TXRF). The TPIXE measurements are compared with TXRF measurements on the same wafers. (Author)

  17. Resonant Compton Upscattering Models of Magnetar Hard X-ray Emission and Polarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baring, Matthew G.; Wadiasingh, Zorawar; Gonthier, Peter L.; Kust Harding, Alice

    2017-08-01

    Non-thermal quiescent X-ray emission extending between 10 keV and around 150 keV has been seen in about 10 magnetars by RXTE, INTEGRAL, Suzaku and Fermi-GBM. For inner magnetospheric models of such hard X-ray signals, resonant Compton upscattering is anticipated to be the most efficient process for generating the continuum radiation. This is because the scattering becomes resonant at the cyclotron frequency, and the effective cross section exceeds the classical Thomson value by over two orders of magnitude. We present angle-dependent hard X-ray upscattering model spectra for uncooled monoenergetic relativistic electrons injected in inner regions of pulsar magnetospheres. These spectra are integrated over closed field lines and obtained for different observing perspectives. The spectral cut-off energies are critically dependent on the observer viewing angles and electron Lorentz factor. We find that electrons with energies less than around 15 MeV will emit most of their radiation below 250 keV, consistent with the observed turnovers in magnetar hard X-ray tails. Moreover, electrons of higher energy still emit most of the radiation below around 1 MeV, except for quasi-equatorial emission locales for select pulses phases. In such cases, attenuation mechanisms such as pair creation will be prolific, thereby making it difficult to observe signals extending into the Fermi-LAT band. Our spectral computations use new state-of-the-art, spin-dependent formalism for the QED Compton scattering cross section in strong magnetic fields. The emission exhibits strong polarization above around 30 keV that is anticipated to be dependent on pulse phase, thereby defining science agendas for future hard X-ray polarimeters.

  18. Deka-keV X-ray emission associated with the onset of radio noise storms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crosby, N.; Vilmer, N.; Lund, Niels

    1996-01-01

    observed at the onset of noise storms, either as a fully developed flare or, more often, as a soft X-ray brightening without conspicuous Her signature. In order to investigate to what extent electrons energized in the active region contribute to the noise-storm emission in the overlying coronal structures......Radio noise storms show that suprathermal electrons (a few tens of keV) are present in the vicinity of active regions during several hours or even a few days. Where and how these electrons are energized is not yet well known. A flare-like sudden energy release in the active region is in general...... from an isothermal fit to the GOES fluxes. Although the electron population producing the deka-keV X-ray emission would be energetic enough to power the simultaneous radio noise storm, the much longer duration of the radio emission requires time-extended particle acceleration. The acceleration probably...

  19. Resonant x-ray emission from gas-phase TiCl{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hague, C.F.; Tronc, M. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); De Groot, F. [Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) has proved to be a powerful tool for studying the electronic structure of condensed matter. Over the past few years it has been used mainly for studying the valence bands of solids and condensed molecules. Very recently the advent of high brightness photon beams provided by third generation synchrotron radiation source undulators, associated with efficient x-ray emission spectrometers has made it possible to perform experiments on free diatomic molecular systems. RXE spectra of free molecules are of prime importance to gain insight into their electronic structure and bonding as they reflect the symmetry of orbitals engaged in the two-electron, two-step process with the l = 0, {+-}2 parity-conserving selection rule, and are free from solid state effects which can introduce difficulties in the interpretation. They provide information (more so than XAS) on the core excited states, and, when performed at fixed incident photon energy as a function of the emitted photon energy, on the electronic excitation (charge transfer, multiplet states). Moreover the anisotropy of the angular distribution of resonant x-ray emission affects the relative intensity of the emission peaks and provides information concerning the symmetries of final states. This is a preliminary report on what are the first RXE spectra of a 3d transition metal complex in the gas phase. The experiment concerns the Ti 3d {yields}2p emission spectrum of TiCl{sub 4} over the 450 to 470 eV region.

  20. Line X-ray emission from Al targets irradiated by high-intensity, variable-length laser pulses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Limpouch, J.; Renner, Oldřich; Krouský, Eduard; Uschmann, I.; Förster, E.; Kalashnikov, M. P.; Nickles, P. V.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 20, - (2002), s. 43-49 ISSN 0263-0346 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/01/0755 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : laser-produced plasma * line X-ray emission * X-ray sources * X-ray spectroscopy Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 0.487, year: 2002

  1. Measurements of fast electron beams and soft X-ray emission from plasma-focus experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surała Władysław

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper reports results of the recent experimental studies of pulsed electron beams and soft X-rays in plasma-focus (PF experiments carried out within a modified PF-360U facility at the NCBJ, Poland. Particular attention was focused on time-resolved measurements of the fast electron beams by means of two different magnetic analyzers, which could record electrons of energy ranging from about 41 keV to about 715 keV in several (6 or 8 measuring channels. For discharges performed with the pure deuterium filling, many strong electron signals were recorded in all the measuring channels. Those signals were well correlated with the first hard X-ray pulse detected by an external scintillation neutron-counter. In some of the analyzer channels, electron spikes (lasting about dozens of nanoseconds and appearing in different instants after the current peculiarity (so-called current dip were also recorded. For several discharges, fast ion beams, which were emitted along the z-axis and recorded with nuclear track detectors, were also investigated. Those measurements confirmed a multibeam character of the ion emission. The time-integrated soft X-ray images, which were taken side-on by means of a pinhole camera and sensitive X-ray films, showed the appearance of some filamentary structures and so-called hot spots. The application of small amounts of admixtures of different heavy noble gases, i.e. of argon (4.8% volumetric, krypton (1.6% volumetric, or xenon (0.8% volumetric, decreased intensity of the recorded electron beams, but increased intensity of the soft X-ray emission and showed more distinct and numerous hot spots. The recorded electron spikes have been explained as signals produced by quasi-mono-energetic microbeams emitted from tiny sources (probably plasma diodes, which can be formed near the observed hot spots.

  2. Study of X-ray emission in aluminium z-pinches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosch, R.

    1999-01-01

    Previous experiments, at 0.1. TX level, have shown that stability and x-ray emission of fast Z-pinches, could be strongly increased by imploding an aluminium vapor jet onto a very thin coaxial wire. We present here first results of an aluminium Z-pinch, using a similar liner, but at mega-ampere level. The pinch is driven by AMBIORIX high-power facility, a 2 TW, 0.5 Ω, 2 MA, 50 ns pulse-line generator. We study the effect of an aluminium wire and its diameter (20-50 μm) on the implosion dynamics, on x-ray yield on MHD stability of the column at stagnation. Analysis of A1 jet on A1 wire shots demonstrates that x-ray yield due to emission processes in the H- and He- like ionization stages (i.e. the K-shell) is significantly enhanced, relative to that of A1 jet only ones. The wire also leads to better symmetry of the implosion, and to better reproducibility of shots. X-ray signals exhibit two similar pulses, 10 ns in width, 15 ns spaced. To discern spectral origin of both pulses, experiments are realized with stainless steel wire (25 μm in diameter). Results show that liner and wire radial simultaneously and contribute to both pulses. Analysis of a typical A1 jet on A1 wire shot, using detailed collisional-radiative equilibrium (CRE) model is also given in this thesis. View o the pinch at stagnation as a cola-dense core surrounded by a hot-low density corona reproduces all features of the X-ray data. (author)

  3. Proton-Induced X-Ray Emission Analysis of Crematorium Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Salina; Nadareski, Benjamin; Yoskowitz, Joshua; Labrake, Scott; Vineyard, Michael

    2014-09-01

    There has been considerable debate in recent years about possible mercury emissions from crematoria due to amalgam tooth restorations. We have performed a proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of aerosol and soil samples taken near the Vale Cemetery Crematorium in Schenectady, NY, to address this concern. The aerosol samples were collected on the roof of the crematorium using a nine-stage, cascade impactor that separates the particulate matter by aerodynamic diameter and deposits it onto thin Kapton foils. The soil samples were collected at several different distances from the crematorium and compressed into pellets with a hydraulic press. The Kapton foils containing the aerosol samples and the soil pellets were bombarded with 2.2-MeV protons from the 1.1-MV tandem Pelletron accelerator in the Union College Ion-Beam Analysis Laboratory. We measured significant concentrations of sulfur, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, and iron, but essentially no mercury in the aerosol samples. The lower limit of detection for airborne mercury in this experiment was approximately 0.2 ng / m3. The PIXE analysis of the soil samples showed the presence of elements commonly found in soil (Si, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe), but no trace of mercury. There has been considerable debate in recent years about possible mercury emissions from crematoria due to amalgam tooth restorations. We have performed a proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis of aerosol and soil samples taken near the Vale Cemetery Crematorium in Schenectady, NY, to address this concern. The aerosol samples were collected on the roof of the crematorium using a nine-stage, cascade impactor that separates the particulate matter by aerodynamic diameter and deposits it onto thin Kapton foils. The soil samples were collected at several different distances from the crematorium and compressed into pellets with a hydraulic press. The Kapton foils containing the aerosol samples and the soil pellets were bombarded with 2.2-Me

  4. Hard X-Ray Emission from Partially Occulted Solar Flares: RHESSI Observations in Two Solar Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Effenberger, Frederic; Costa, Fatima Rubio da; Petrosian, Vahé [Department of Physics and KIPAC, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Oka, Mitsuo; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Krucker, Säm [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Liu, Wei [Bay Area Environmental Research Institute, 625 2nd Street, Suite 209, Petaluma, CA 94952 (United States); Glesener, Lindsay, E-mail: feffen@stanford.edu, E-mail: frubio@stanford.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Flares close to the solar limb, where the footpoints are occulted, can reveal the spectrum and structure of the coronal looptop source in X-rays. We aim at studying the properties of the corresponding energetic electrons near their acceleration site, without footpoint contamination. To this end, a statistical study of partially occulted flares observed with Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager is presented here, covering a large part of solar cycles 23 and 24. We perform detailed spectra, imaging, and light curve analyses for 116 flares and include contextual observations from SDO and STEREO when available, providing further insights into flare emission that were previously not accessible. We find that most spectra are fitted well with a thermal component plus a broken power-law, non-thermal component. A thin-target kappa distribution model gives satisfactory fits after the addition of a thermal component. X-ray imaging reveals small spatial separation between the thermal and non-thermal components, except for a few flares with a richer coronal source structure. A comprehensive light curve analysis shows a very good correlation between the derivative of the soft X-ray flux (from GOES ) and the hard X-rays for a substantial number of flares, indicative of the Neupert effect. The results confirm that non-thermal particles are accelerated in the corona and estimated timescales support the validity of a thin-target scenario with similar magnitudes of thermal and non-thermal energy fluxes.

  5. Diffuse X-ray emission from the superbubbles N70 and N185 in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes-Iturbide, J.; Rodríguez-González, A.; Velázquez, P. F.; Rosado, M.; Sánchez-Cruces, M.; Ambrocio-Cruz, P.

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the diffuse X-ray emission from superbubbles (SBs) N70 (DEM L301) and N185 (DEM L25) located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, based on data from the XMM-Newton Satellite. We obtained spectra and images of these objects in the soft X-ray energy band. These X-ray spectra were fitted by a thermal plasma model, with temperatures of 2.6×10 6 K and 2.3×10 6 K, for N70 and N185, respectively. For N70, images show that X-ray emission comes from the inner regions of the SB when we compare the distribution of the X-ray and the optical emission, while for N185, the X-ray emission is partially confined by the optical shell. We suggest that the observed X-ray emission is caused by shock-heated gas, inside of the optical shells. We also obtained X-ray luminosities which exceed the values predicted by the standard analytical model. This fact shows that, in addition to the winds of the interior stars, it is necessary to consider another ingredient in the description, such as a supernova explosion, as has been proposed in previous numerical models.

  6. Diffuse X-ray emission from the superbubbles N70 and N185 in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes-Iturbide, J.; Rodríguez-González, A.; Velázquez, P. F. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70–543, D.F. México (Mexico); Rosado, M.; Sánchez-Cruces, M. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70–264, C.P. 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico); Ambrocio-Cruz, P. [Instituto de Ciencias Básicas e Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de Hidalgo, Ciudad Universitaria, Km 4.5 Carretera Pachuca-Tulancingo, Col. Carboneras, C.P. 42184, Mineral de la Reforma, Hgo. (Mexico)

    2014-11-01

    We present a study of the diffuse X-ray emission from superbubbles (SBs) N70 (DEM L301) and N185 (DEM L25) located in the Large Magellanic Cloud, based on data from the XMM-Newton Satellite. We obtained spectra and images of these objects in the soft X-ray energy band. These X-ray spectra were fitted by a thermal plasma model, with temperatures of 2.6×10{sup 6} K and 2.3×10{sup 6} K, for N70 and N185, respectively. For N70, images show that X-ray emission comes from the inner regions of the SB when we compare the distribution of the X-ray and the optical emission, while for N185, the X-ray emission is partially confined by the optical shell. We suggest that the observed X-ray emission is caused by shock-heated gas, inside of the optical shells. We also obtained X-ray luminosities which exceed the values predicted by the standard analytical model. This fact shows that, in addition to the winds of the interior stars, it is necessary to consider another ingredient in the description, such as a supernova explosion, as has been proposed in previous numerical models.

  7. X-ray Emission Spectrum of Liquid Ethanol: Origin of Split Peaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Osamu; Ljungberg, Mathias P; Pettersson, Lars G M

    2017-12-14

    The X-ray emission spectrum of liquid ethanol was calculated using density functional theory and a semiclassical approximation to the Kramers-Heisenberg formula including core-hole-induced dynamics. Our spectrum agrees well with the experimental spectrum. We found that the intensity ratio between the two peaks at 526 and 527 eV assigned as 10a' and 3a″ depends not only on the hydrogen bonding network around the target molecule but also on the intramolecular conformation. This effect is absent in liquid methanol and demonstrates the high sensitivity of X-ray emission to molecular structure. The dependence of spectral features on hydrogen-bonding as well as on dynamical effects following core excitation are also discussed.

  8. Particle induced X-ray emission for quantitative trace-element analysis using the Eindhoven cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivits, H.

    1980-01-01

    Development of a multi-elemental trace analysis technique using PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission), was started almost five years ago at the Eindhoven University of Technology, in the Cyclotron Applications Group of the Physics Department. The aim of the work presented is to improve the quantitative aspects of trace-element analysis with PIXE, as well as versatility, speed and simplicity. (Auth.)

  9. Calibration of K-x-ray-emission rates in the decay of 49V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchinson, J.M.R.; Mullen, P.A.

    1983-01-01

    49 V K-x-ray point sources with an average energy of 4.55-keV have been standardized for emission rate by two methods, namely by 2π-proportional counting and by comparison with a calibrated 55 Fe point source. The two results agree to within 1%. The half-life of 49 V has been measured to be 338 +- 5 days. (author)

  10. Measurements of laser generated soft X-ray emission from irradiated gold foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J. S.; Keiter, P. A.; Klein, S. R.; Drake, R. P.; Shvarts, D. [University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward St., Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Frank, Y.; Raicher, E.; Fraenkel, M. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne (Israel)

    2016-11-15

    Soft x-ray emission from laser irradiated gold foils was measured at the Omega-60 laser system using the Dante photodiode array. The foils were heated with 2 kJ, 6 ns laser pulses and foil thicknesses were varied between 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 μm. Initial Dante analysis indicates peak emission temperatures of roughly 100 eV and 80 eV for the 0.5 μm and 1.0 μm thick foils, respectively, with little measurable emission from the 2.0 μm foils.

  11. Analytical utility of the M series x-ray emission lines applied to uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, A.G.

    1976-01-01

    Secondary emission x-ray analysis for actinide elements has usually meant utilizing the L series x-ray lines. The major disadvantage of these x-ray lines is that they fall in the region of high level Bremsstrahlung radiation, producing a high background and, subsequently, larger error and high detection limits. The utilization of the M series x-ray lines of actinide elements with wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometers greatly minimizes these problems. Calibration curves for uranium, neptunium, plutonium, and americium were prepared by the ''coprex'' method, and the analytical characteristics of the L and M series compared. The Mα and β x-ray lines, under optimum conditions, are several times more sensitive than their L series counterparts. With the greater sensitivity in addition to the lower background, peak to background ratios for M lines up to 40 times greater than those for L lines were obtained. Detection limits can be lowered from about 0.7 μg using the Lα 1 line to 0.05 μg when M x-ray lines are used. The relative advantages and disadvantages of utilizing the L and M series x-ray lines for secondary emission x-ray analysis are discussed

  12. Differential emission measure analysis of hot-flare plasma from solar-maximum mission X-ray data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrijver, J.; Jakimiec, J.; Sylwester, J.; Lemen, J.R.; Mewe, R.; Bentley, R.D.; Fludra, A.; Sylwester, B.

    1984-01-01

    We have investigated differential emission measure (DEM) distribution of hot flare plasma (T>10 MK) using SMM X-ray data from Bent Crystal Spectrometer (BCS) and Hard X-ray Imaging Spectrometer (HXIS). We have found that the analysis provide a very sensitive test of consistency of observational data

  13. Recent measurements of soft X-ray emission from the DPF-1000U facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surała Władysław

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Soft X-ray imaging is a very useful diagnostic technique in plasma-focus (PF experiments. This paper reports results of four experimental sessions which were carried out at the DPF-1000U plasma-focus facility in 2013 and 2014. Over 200 discharges were performed at various experimental conditions. Measurements were taken using two X-ray pinhole cameras with a line of sight perpendicular to the z-axis, at different azimuthal angles (about 20° and 200°, and looking towards the centre of the PF-pinch column. They were equipped with diaphragms 1000 μm or 200–300 μm in diameter and coated with filters of 500 μm Al foil and 10 μm Be foil, respectively. Data on the neutron emission were collected with silver activation counters. For time-resolved measurements the use was made of four PIN diodes equipped with various filters and oriented towards the centre of the PF-column, in the direction perpendicular to the electrode axis. The recorded X-ray images revealed that when the additional gas-puff system is activated during the discharge, the stability of the discharge is improved. The data collected in these experiments confirmed the appearance of a filamentary fine structure in the PF discharges. In the past years the formation of such filaments was observed in many Z-pinch type experiments. Some of the recorded X-ray images have also revealed the appearance of the so-called hot-spots, i.e. small plasma regions of a very intense X-ray emission. Such a phenomenon was observed before in many PF experiments, e.g. in the MAJA-PF device, but it has not been investigated so far in a large facility such as the DPF-1000U. The time-resolved measurements provided the evidence of a time lapse between the X-ray emission from plasma regions located at different distance from the anode surface. The formation of distinct ‘hot-spots’ in different instants of the DPF-1000U discharge was also observed.

  14. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE FIRST Be/BLACK HOLE SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munar-Adrover, P.; Paredes, J. M.; Ribó, M. [Departament d' Astronomia i Meteorologia, Institut de Ciències del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, IEEC-UB, Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Iwasawa, K. [ICREA, Institut de Ciències del Cosmos, Universitat de Barcelona, IEEC-UB, Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Zabalza, V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Casares, J. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2014-05-10

    MWC 656 (=HD 215227) was recently discovered to be the first binary system composed of a Be star and a black hole (BH). We observed it with XMM-Newton, and detected a faint X-ray source compatible with the position of the optical star, thus proving it to be the first Be/BH X-ray binary. The spectrum analysis requires a model fit with two components, a blackbody plus a power law, with k{sub B}T=0.07{sub −0.03}{sup +0.04} keV and a photon index Γ = 1.0 ± 0.8, respectively. The non-thermal component dominates above ≅0.8 keV. The obtained total flux is F(0.3-5.5 keV)=(4.6{sub −1.1}{sup +1.3})×10{sup −14} erg cm{sup –2} s{sup –1}. At a distance of 2.6 ± 0.6 kpc the total flux translates into a luminosity L {sub X} = (3.7 ± 1.7) × 10{sup 31} erg s{sup –1}. Considering the estimated range of BH masses to be 3.8-6.9 M {sub ☉}, this luminosity represents (6.7 ± 4.4) × 10{sup –8} L {sub Edd}, which is typical of stellar-mass BHs in quiescence. We discuss the origin of the two spectral components: the thermal component is associated with the hot wind of the Be star, whereas the power-law component is associated with emission from the vicinity of the BH. We also find that the position of MWC 656 in the radio versus X-ray luminosity diagram may be consistent with the radio/X-ray correlation observed in BH low-mass X-ray binaries. This suggests that this correlation might also be valid for BH high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) with X-ray luminosities down to ∼10{sup –8} L {sub Edd}. MWC 656 will allow the accretion processes and the accretion/ejection coupling at very low luminosities for BH HMXBs to be studied.

  15. Non-thermal x-ray emission from wire array z-pinches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ampleford, David [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hansen, Stephanie B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jennings, Christopher Ashley [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Webb, Timothy Jay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Harper-Slaboszewicz, V. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Loisel, Guillaume Pascal [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flanagan, Timothy McGuire [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bell, Kate Suzanne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Brent M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); McPherson, Leroy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rochau, Gregory A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Chittenden, Jeremy P. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Sherlock, Mark [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Appelbe, Brian [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Giuliani, John [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Washington, DC (United States); Ouart, Nicholas [Naval Research Lab. (NRL), Washington, DC (United States); Seely, John [Artep Inc., Ellicott City, MD (United States)

    2015-12-01

    We report on experiments demonstrating the transition from thermally-dominated K-shell line emission to non-thermal, hot-electron-driven inner-shell emission for z pinch plasmas on the Z machine. While x-ray yields from thermal K-shell emission decrease rapidly with increasing atomic number Z, we find that non-thermal emission persists with favorable Z scaling, dominating over thermal emission for Z=42 and higher (hn ≥ 17keV). Initial experiments with Mo (Z=42) and Ag (Z=47) have produced kJ-level emission in the 17-keV and 22-keV Kα lines respectively. We will discuss the electron beam properties that could excite these non - thermal lines. We also report on experiments that have attempted to control non - thermal K - shell line emission by modifying the wire array or load hardware setup.

  16. Dynamics of the Upper Atmosphere X-ray Emission during the 23rd Solar Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugacheva, Galina; Gusev, Anatoly; Martin, Inácio M.; Spjeldvik, Walther

    Long-term observations with the RPS-1instrument on the CORONAS-F satellite (July 2001 to December 2005) permitted the evaluation of the low energy 3.0-31.5 keV X-ray emission flux radiated by the upper nocturnal atmosphere. This emission mostly results from the bremsstrahlung radiation from magnetospheric electrons. The entire nocturnal atmosphere emits energy in the range of 3 to 5 keV, especially in the southern hemisphere, over the Pacific and Indian ocean areas. In the northern hemisphere, the brightest emission from the atmo-sphere is observed at high latitudes in the region of Earth's radiation belt (ERB). In lower northern latitudes, the X-ray emission intensity is rather weak especially during the summer, and on 5-8 keV maps there are regions where there are no discernible emissions. At energies higher than 8 keV, only areas over the South-Atlantic magnetic anomaly and ERB at high latitudes are distinctly observed. This emission is produced by X-rays arising from interactions of ERB particles, descending to the altitude of 500 km in their bounce motion with the am-bient atmospheric matter, and by direct ERB particles passing through the lateral walls and entrance window of the detector (electrons with energies higher than 100 keV and protons with energies higher than 3 MeV). In order to determine the source mechanisms of soft X-rays in the energy range 3 to 8 keV from regions in the ERB, we studied the relationship between the seasonal variation of the X-ray atmospheric radiation and phases of the solar activity cycle. The global monthly, six-monthly, and yearly-averaged X-ray flux distributions were statistically determined for the five-year duration of the CORONAS-F mission. From these distributions, it is possible to infer about the influence of the phase of the solar activity and seasonal effects on the fluxes with energy in the range of 3 to 8 keV. Analysis of these data revealed important regularities in the behavior of this emission. We noted that

  17. Role of screening and angular distributions in resonant soft-x-ray emission of CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skytt, P.; Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    In the present work the authors focus on two particular properties of resonant X-ray emission, namely core hole screening of the excited electron, and anisotropy caused by the polarization of the exciting synchrotron radiation. The screening of the core hole by the excited electron causes energy shifts and intensity variations in resonant spectra compared to the non-resonant case. The linear polarization of the synchrotron radiation and the dipole nature of the absorption process create a preferential alignment selection of the randomly oriented molecules in the case of resonant excitation, producing an anisotropy in the angular distribution of the emitted X-rays. The authors have chosen CO for this study because this molecule has previously served as a showcase for non-resonant X-ray emission, mapping the valence electronic structure differently according to the local selection rules. With the present work they take interest in how this characteristic feature of the spectroscopy is represented in the resonant case.

  18. Scorpius X-1 - Origin of the radio and hard X-ray emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaty, R.; Cheng, C. C.; Tsuruta, S.

    1974-01-01

    The consequences of models for the central radio source and the hard X-ray emitting region in Sco X-1 are examined. The radio emission could result from noncoherent synchrotron radiation, and the X-rays may be produced by bremsstrahlung. It is shown that both these mechanisms require a mass outflow from Sci X-1. The radio source is located at about 30 million km from the center of the star, and its linear dimensions do not exceed 300 million km. The magnetic field in the radio source is on the order of 1 gauss. If the hard X-rays are produced by thermal bremsstrahlung, their source is located between 10,000 and 50,000 km from the center of the star, the temperature is 2 billion K, and the emission measure is 2 times 10 to the 56th power per cu cm. This hot plasma loses energy inward by conduction and outward by supersonic expansion. The rates of energy loss for both of these processes are about 10 to the 36th ergs per sec, comparable to the total luminosity of Sco X-1.

  19. SCO X-1: Origin of the radio and hard X-ray emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaty, R.; Cheng, C. C.; Tsuruta, S.

    1973-01-01

    The consequences of models for the central radio source and the hard X-ray ( 30 keV) emitting region in Sco X-1 are examined. It was found that the radio emission could result from noncoherent synchrotron radiation and that the X-rays may be produced by bremsstrahlung. It is shown that both mechanisms require a mass outflow from Sco X-1. The radio source is located at r approximately 3x10 to the 12th power cm from the center of the star, and its linear dimensions do not exceed 3x10 to the 13th power cm. The magnetic field in the radio source is on the order of 1 gauss. If the hard X-rays are produced by thermal bremsstrahlung, their source is located at 10 to the 9th power approximately r approximately 5x10 to the 9th power cm, the temperature is 2x10 to the 9th power K, and the emission measure is 2x10 to the 56th power/cu cm. This hot plasma loses energy inward by conduction and outward by supersonic expansion. The rates of energy loss for both processes are about 10 to the 36th power erg/s, comparable to the total luminosity of Sco X-1.

  20. Proton-induced x-ray emission analysis of deep-sea ferromanganese nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, S.J.; Oona, H.; Perron, S.J.; Fernando, Q.; Lee, J.J.H.; Zeitlin, H.

    1980-01-01

    Seven samples of deep-sea ferromanganese nodules from the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans were analyzed by proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). The concentrations of Na, Mg, Al, Si, K, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Rb, Sr, Mo, Ba, Tl and Pb in the nodules were determined, and the accuracy of the determinations was verified independently by flame atomic absorption and emission techniques. Thin sample targets on Nuclepore filter disks backed with Kapton were used with 1-MeV protons for the low-energy region (0 to 8 keV) and 2-MeV protons and a 0.004-in. al filter for the high-energy region (5 to 35 keV) of the X-ray spectrum. X-ray yield data were obtained for elements from Na to U (11 < Z < 92), with standards of 99.999% purity and the thin target technqiue. Five different NBS standard reference materials (orchard leaves, pine needles, bovine liver, coal, and coal fly ash) were analyzed by this method to determine the precision and accuracy that could be achieved under the operating conditions of the PIXE system. 4 figures, 6 tables

  1. Multielement proton-induced x-ray emission analysis of Bangladeshi tobacco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadi, D.A.; Ali, M.; Biswas, S.K.; Islam, M.M.; Khan, A.H.

    1984-01-01

    The concentration of 12 different elements in cigarette tobacco of different brands, commercially made in Bangladesh, was determined using the proton particle-induced x-ray emission (proton PIXE) method. In all the present experiments, proton beams of 2.0 MeV (on the target in air) and about 30 nA current were used for characteristic x-ray excitation. The concentration of the elements (K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb and Sr) was determined by comparison with a calibration obtained from the NBS orchard leaf standard SRM 1571. The results have been compared with available data on some foreign brands of tobacco and the probable reasons for the difference in the contents of some of the elements found in the Bangladeshi brands are discussed. (author)

  2. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Iihara, Junji; Takebe, Toshihiko; Denlinger, Jonathan D.

    2008-03-29

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and molecular orbital calculations confirm that boron atoms in CVD-B-diamond substitute for carbon atoms in the diamond lattice to form covalent B-C bonds, while boron atoms in HPT-B-diamond react with the impurity nitrogen atoms to form hexagonal boron nitride. This suggests that the high purity diamond without nitrogen impurities is necessary to synthesize p-type B-diamond semiconductors.

  3. Resolving the hard X-ray emission of GX 5-1 with INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paizis, A.; Ebisawa, K.; Tikkanen, T.

    2005-01-01

    contamination from the nearby black hole candidate GRS 1758-258 above 20 keV. During our observations, GX 5-1 was mostly found in the horizontal and normal branch of its hardness intensity diagram. A clear hard X-ray emission is observed above similar to 30 keV which exceeds the exponential cut-off spectrum......We present the study of one year of INTEGRAL data on the neutron star low mass X-ray binary GX 5-1. Thanks to the excellent angular resolution and sensitivity of INTEGRAL, we are able to obtain a high quality spectrum of GX 5-1 from similar to 5keV to similar to 100 keV, for the first time without...

  4. [Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) for analysis of trace elements in biological materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Y

    1996-01-01

    Outline of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and its application to biomedical samples are described. Charged particles from cyclotron or van de Graaff generator bombards analytical samples and semiconductor detector measures energy and intensity of induced characteristic x-ray. Simultaneous determination for 22Na to 92U is possible by PIXE. 100 nA of 3 MeV protons bombards biomedical samples and detection limits for almost all trace essential elements are sub microgram/g. Only 1 mg of biomedical sample is necessary for determination of trace elements and no chemical procedure is necessary for preparation of analytical sample. PIXE is powerful tool for determination of essential elements and applied for diagnosis for several diseases.

  5. Massive stars, x-ray ridge, and galactic 26Al gamma-ray line emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montmerle, T.

    1986-07-01

    Massive stars interact with their parent molecular cloud by means of their ionizing flux and strong winds, thereby creating giant, hollow HII regions. To account for the observed structure of these HII regions, it appears necessary that all the wind energy be dissipated. Dorland and Montmerle have recently proposed a new dissipation mechanism, in the process, diffuse hard X-rays are emitted. If the observed galactic X-ray ''ridge'' results from this process on a galactic scale, it can be accounted for by the interaction of ∼3000 Wolf-Rayet stars (mostly within a ∼6.5 kpc ring) with their surrounding interstellar gas. This result is essentially consistent with the suggestion by Prantzos and Casse that the galactic 26 Al γ-ray line emission originates in Wolf-Rayet stars

  6. Standardization of proton-induced x-ray emission technique for analysis of thick samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shad; Zeb, Johar; Ahad, Abdul; Ahmad, Ishfaq; Haneef, M.; Akbar, Jehan

    2015-09-01

    This paper describes the standardization of the proton-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) technique for finding the elemental composition of thick samples. For the standardization, three different samples of standard reference materials (SRMs) were analyzed using this technique and the data were compared with the already known data of these certified SRMs. These samples were selected in order to cover the maximum range of elements in the periodic table. Each sample was irradiated for three different values of collected beam charges at three different times. A proton beam of 2.57 MeV obtained using 5UDH-II Pelletron accelerator was used for excitation of x-rays from the sample. The acquired experimental data were analyzed using the GUPIXWIN software. The results show that the SRM data and the data obtained using the PIXE technique are in good agreement.

  7. A review of molecular effects in gas-phase KL X-ray emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillemin, Renaud; Carniato, Stéphane; Journel, Loïc [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Stolte, Wayne C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154-4003 (United States); Marchenko, Tatiana; Khoury, Lara El; Kawerk, Elie; Piancastelli, Maria Novella [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Hudson, Amanda C.; Lindle, Dennis W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154-4003 (United States); Simon, Marc, E-mail: marc.simon@upmc.fr [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matière et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2013-06-15

    The unique capabilities of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) to provide a deep insight into molecular dynamics following core excitation are reviewed here. Characteristic features of molecular X-ray emission are experimentally observed and theoretically interpreted. Some of our most significant results on molecular dynamics following deep core excitation are presented. In particular, we provide several examples of nuclear dynamics on the femtosecond or subfemtosecond time scale; line-narrowing effects related to the quenching of vibrational structure due to parallelism of intermediate and final state curves; anomalous line dispersion across a resonance, which is due to core-hole lifetime effects; spin–orbit-state populations derived from polarized RIXS experiments. We also show how to connect the RIXS results to the general chemical properties of the investigated systems.

  8. Anatomy of the AGN in NGC 5548. IX. Photoionized emission features in the soft X-ray spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Junjie; Kaastra, J. S.; Mehdipour, M.; Gu, Liyi; Costantini, E.; Kriss, G. A.; Bianchi, S.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Behar, E.; Di Gesu, L.; Ponti, G.; Petrucci, P.-O.; Ebrero, J.

    2018-04-01

    The X-ray narrow emission line region (NELR) of the archetypal Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 has been interpreted as a single-phase photoionized plasma that is absorbed by some of the warm absorber components. This scenario requires those overlaying warm absorber components to have larger distance (to the central engine) than the X-ray NELR, which is not fully consistent with the distance estimates found in the literature. Therefore, we reanalyze the high-resolution spectra obtained in 2013-2014 with the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) aboard XMM-Newton to provide an alternative interpretation of the X-ray narrow emission features. We find that the X-ray narrow emission features in NGC 5548 can be described by a two-phase photoionized plasma with different ionization parameters (logξ = 1.3 and 0.1) and kinematics (vout = -50 and -400 km s-1), and no further absorption by the warm absorber components. The X-ray and optical NELR might be the same multi-phase photoionized plasma. Both X-ray and optical NELR have comparable distances, asymmetric line profiles, and the underlying photoionized plasma is turbulent and compact in size. The X-ray NELR is not the counterpart of the UV/X-ray absorber outside the line of sight because their distances and kinematics are not consistent. In addition, X-ray broad emission features that we find in the spectrum can be accounted for by a third photoionized emission component. The RGS spectrum obtained in 2016 is analyzed as well, where the luminosity of most prominent emission lines (the O VII forbidden line and O VIII Lyα line) are the same (at a 1σ confidence level) as in 2013-2014.

  9. EMISSION LINES BETWEEN 1 AND 2 keV IN COMETARY X-RAY SPECTRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, Ian; Christian, Damian J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States); Bodewits, Dennis [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Dennerl, Konrad [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, D-85741 Garching Germany (Germany); Lisse, Carey M. [Planetary Exploration Group, Space Department, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Rd, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Wolk, Scott J., E-mail: ian.ewing.794@my.csun.edu, E-mail: daman.christian@csun.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-01-20

    We present the detection of new cometary X-ray emission lines in the 1.0-2.0 keV range using a sample of comets observed with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory and ACIS spectrometer. We have selected five comets from the Chandra sample with good signal-to-noise spectra. The surveyed comets are C/1999 S4 (LINEAR), C/1999 T1 (McNaught-Hartley), 153P/2002 (Ikeya-Zhang), 2P/2003 (Encke), and C/2008 8P (Tuttle). We modeled the spectra with an extended version of our solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) emission model. Above 1 keV, we find Ikeya-Zhang to have strong emission lines at 1340 and 1850 eV which we identify as being created by SWCX lines of Mg XI and Si XIII, respectively, and weaker emission lines at 1470, 1600, and 1950 eV formed by SWCX of Mg XII, Mg XI, and Si XIV, respectively. The Mg XI and XII and Si XIII and XIV lines are detected at a significant level for the other comets in our sample (LS4, MH, Encke, 8P), and these lines promise additional diagnostics to be included in SWCX models. The silicon lines in the 1700-2000 eV range are detected for all comets, but with the rising background and decreasing cometary emission, we caution that these detections need further confirmation with higher resolution instruments.

  10. X-ray emission from a nanosecond-pulse discharge in an inhomogeneous electric field at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Cheng; Shao Tao; Ren Chengyan; Zhang Dongdong; Tarasenko, Victor; Kostyrya, Igor D.; Ma Hao; Yan Ping

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes experimental studies of the dependence of the X-ray intensity on the anode material in nanosecond high-voltage discharges. The discharges were generated by two nanosecond-pulse generators in atmospheric air with a highly inhomogeneous electric field by a tube-plate gap. The output pulse of the first generator (repetitive pulse generator) has a rise time of about 15 ns and a full width at half maximum of 30–40 ns. The output of the second generator (single pulse generator) has a rise time of about 0.3 ns and a full width at half maximum of 1 ns. The electrical characteristics and the X-ray emission of nanosecond-pulse discharge in atmospheric air are studied by the measurement of voltage-current waveforms, discharge images, X-ray count and dose. Our experimental results showed that the anode material rarely affects electrical characteristics, but it can significantly affect the X-ray density. Comparing the density of X-rays, it was shown that the highest x-rays density occurred in the diffuse discharge in repetitive pulse mode, then the spark discharge with a small air gap, and then the corona discharge with a large air gap, in which the X-ray density was the lowest. Therefore, it could be confirmed that the bremsstrahlung at the anode contributes to the X-ray emission from nanosecond-pulse discharges.

  11. Application of proton-induced X-ray emission method to determination of lead content in blood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slominska, D.; Jarczyk, L.; Rokita, E.; Strzalkowski, A.; Losiowski, A.; Macheta, A.; Sych, M.; Moszkowicz, S.

    1979-01-01

    The proton induced X-ray emission method is applied for determination of lead content in the blood of the people exposed to contact with ethyline vapours and people working in lead-zinc works. (author)

  12. Discovery of the double Doppler-shifted emission-line systems in the X-ray spectrum of SS 433

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, Taro; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Aoki, Takashi; Doty, John; Matsuoka, Masaru; Mitsuda, Kazuhisa; Nagase, Fumiaki; Ricker, George; White, Nick E.

    1994-01-01

    We have used the CCD X-ray spectrometers on ASCA and resolved the X-ray emission line from the jet of SS 433 both into Doppler-shifted components with two distinct velocities, and into emission from different ionization states of iron, i.e., Fe XXV and Fe XXVI. This is the first direct detection of the two Doppler shifted beams in the X-ray spectra of SS 433 and allows the radial velocity of the jet along the line of sight to be determined with an accuracy comparable to the optical spectroscopy. We also found pairs of emission lines from other atomic species, such as ionized silicon and sulfur, with the Doppler shifts consistent with each other. This confirms the origin of the X-ray emission in the high temperature plasma in the jets.

  13. Low Altitude Solar Magnetic Reconnection, Type III Solar Radio Bursts, and X-ray Emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, I H; Lobzin, V V; Donea, A; Tingay, S J; McCauley, P I; Oberoi, D; Duffin, R T; Reiner, M J; Hurley-Walker, N; Kudryavtseva, N A; Melrose, D B; Harding, J C; Bernardi, G; Bowman, J D; Cappallo, R J; Corey, B E; Deshpande, A; Emrich, D; Goeke, R; Hazelton, B J; Johnston-Hollitt, M; Kaplan, D L; Kasper, J C; Kratzenberg, E; Lonsdale, C J; Lynch, M J; McWhirter, S R; Mitchell, D A; Morales, M F; Morgan, E; Ord, S M; Prabu, T; Roshi, A; Shankar, N Udaya; Srivani, K S; Subrahmanyan, R; Wayth, R B; Waterson, M; Webster, R L; Whitney, A R; Williams, A; Williams, C L

    2018-01-26

    Type III solar radio bursts are the Sun's most intense and frequent nonthermal radio emissions. They involve two critical problems in astrophysics, plasma physics, and space physics: how collective processes produce nonthermal radiation and how magnetic reconnection occurs and changes magnetic energy into kinetic energy. Here magnetic reconnection events are identified definitively in Solar Dynamics Observatory UV-EUV data, with strong upward and downward pairs of jets, current sheets, and cusp-like geometries on top of time-varying magnetic loops, and strong outflows along pairs of open magnetic field lines. Type III bursts imaged by the Murchison Widefield Array and detected by the Learmonth radiospectrograph and STEREO B spacecraft are demonstrated to be in very good temporal and spatial coincidence with specific reconnection events and with bursts of X-rays detected by the RHESSI spacecraft. The reconnection sites are low, near heights of 5-10 Mm. These images and event timings provide the long-desired direct evidence that semi-relativistic electrons energized in magnetic reconnection regions produce type III radio bursts. Not all the observed reconnection events produce X-ray events or coronal or interplanetary type III bursts; thus different special conditions exist for electrons leaving reconnection regions to produce observable radio, EUV, UV, and X-ray bursts.

  14. The Relation Between Magnetic Fields and X-ray Emission for Solar Microflares and Active Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichenko, A. S.; Bogachev, S. A.

    2017-09-01

    We present the result of a comparison between magnetic field parameters and the intensity of X-ray emission for solar microflares with Geosynchronous Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) classes from A0.02 to B5.1. For our study, we used the monochromatic MgXII Imaging Spectroheliometer (MISH), the Full-disk EUV Telescope (FET), and the Solar PHotometer in X-rays (SphinX) instruments onboard the Complex Orbital Observations Near-Earth of Activity of the Sun-Photon CORONAS- Photon spacecraft because of their high sensitivity in soft X-rays. The peak flare flux (PFF) for solar microflares was found to depend on the strength of the magnetic field and on the total unsigned magnetic flux as a power-law function. In the spectral range 2.8 - 36.6 Å, which shows very little increase related to microflares, the power-law index of the relation between the X-ray flux and magnetic flux for active regions is 1.48 ±0.86, which is close to the value obtained previously by Pevtsov et al. ( Astrophys. J. 598, 1387, 2003) for different types of solar and stellar objects. In the spectral range 1 - 8 Å, the power-law indices for PFF(B) and PFF(Φ) for microflares are 3.87 ±2.16 and 3 ±1.6, respectively. We also make suggestions on the heating mechanisms in active regions and microflares under the assumption of loops with constant pressure and heating using the Rosner-Tucker-Vaiana scaling laws.

  15. Swift/BAT Detects Increase in Hard X-ray Emission from the Ultra-compact X-ray Binary 4U 1543-624

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlam, Renee; Miller, Jon M.; Miller-Jones, James; Reynolds, Mark

    2017-08-01

    The Swift/BAT detected an increase in hard X-ray emission (15-50 keV) coming from the ultra-compact X-ray binary 4U 1543-624 around 2017 August 9. The MAXI daily monitoring also shows a gradual increase in 2.0-20.0 keV X-ray intensity as of 2017 August 19. Swift/XRT ToO monitoring of the source was triggered and shows an increase in unabsorbed flux to 1.06E-9 ergs/cm2/s in the 0.3-10.0 keV energy band as of 2017 August 26. ATCA performed ToO observations for approximately 4 hours in the 5.5 GHz and 9.0 GHz bands while the antennas were in the 1.5A array configuration from 11:25-16:09 UTC on 2017 August 23. The source was not detected in either band.

  16. Discovery of radio emission from the symbiotic X-ray binary system GX 1+4

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Eijnden, J.; Degenaar, N.; Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Wijnands, R.; Miller, J. M.; King, A. L.; Rupen, M. P.

    2018-02-01

    We report the discovery of radio emission from the accreting X-ray pulsar and symbiotic X-ray binary GX 1+4 with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array. This is the first radio detection of such a system, wherein a strongly magnetized neutron star accretes from the stellar wind of an M-type giant companion. We measure a 9 GHz radio flux density of 105.3 ± 7.3 μJy, but cannot place meaningful constraints on the spectral index due to a limited frequency range. We consider several emission mechanisms that could be responsible for the observed radio source. We conclude that the observed properties are consistent with shocks in the interaction of the accretion flow with the magnetosphere, a synchrotron-emitting jet, or a propeller-driven outflow. The stellar wind from the companion is unlikely to be the origin of the radio emission. If the detected radio emission originates from a jet, it would show that strong magnetic fields (≥1012 G) do not necessarily suppress jet formation.

  17. A compact dispersive refocusing Rowland circle X-ray emission spectrometer for laboratory, synchrotron, and XFEL applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, William M.; Hoidn, Oliver R.; Ditter, Alexander S.; Seidler, Gerald T.; Kas, Joshua; Stein, Jennifer L.; Cossairt, Brandi M.; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Guo, Jinghua; Ye, Yifan; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine

    2017-07-01

    X-ray emission spectroscopy is emerging as an important complement to x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, providing a characterization of the occupied electronic density of states local to the species of interest. Here, we present details of the design and performance of a compact x-ray emission spectrometer that uses a dispersive refocusing Rowland (DRR) circle geometry to achieve excellent performance for the 2-2.5 keV range, i.e., especially for the K-edge emission from sulfur and phosphorous. The DRR approach allows high energy resolution even for unfocused x-ray sources. This property enables high count rates in laboratory studies, approaching those of insertion-device beamlines at third-generation synchrotrons, despite use of only a low-powered, conventional x-ray tube. The spectrometer, whose overall scale is set by use of a 10-cm diameter Rowland circle and a new small-pixel complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor x-ray camera, is easily portable to synchrotron or x-ray free electron laser beamlines. Photometrics from measurements at the Advanced Light Source show excellent overall instrumental efficiency. In addition, the compact size of this instrument lends itself to future multiplexing to gain large factors in net collection efficiency or its implementation in controlled gas gloveboxes either in the lab or in an endstation.

  18. Modeling Flare Hard X-ray Emission from Electrons in Contracting Magnetic Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidoni, Silvina E.; Allred, Joel C.; Alaoui, Meriem; Holman, Gordon D.; DeVore, C. Richard; Karpen, Judith T.

    2016-05-01

    The mechanism that accelerates particles to the energies required to produce the observed impulsive hard X-ray emission in solar flares is not well understood. It is generally accepted that this emission is produced by a non-thermal beam of electrons that collides with the ambient ions as the beam propagates from the top of a flare loop to its footpoints. Most current models that investigate this transport assume an injected beam with an initial energy spectrum inferred from observed hard X-ray spectra, usually a power law with a low-energy cutoff. In our previous work (Guidoni et al. 2016), we proposed an analytical method to estimate particle energy gain in contracting, large-scale, 2.5-dimensional magnetic islands, based on a kinetic model by Drake et al. (2010). We applied this method to sunward-moving islands formed high in the corona during fast reconnection in a simulated eruptive flare. The overarching purpose of the present work is to test this proposed acceleration model by estimating the hard X-ray flux resulting from its predicted accelerated-particle distribution functions. To do so, we have coupled our model to a unified computational framework that simulates the propagation of an injected beam as it deposits energy and momentum along its way (Allred et al. 2015). This framework includes the effects of radiative transfer and return currents, necessary to estimate flare emission that can be compared directly to observations. We will present preliminary results of the coupling between these models.

  19. ORIGIN OF THE GALACTIC DIFFUSE X-RAY EMISSION: IRON K-SHELL LINE DIAGNOSTICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobukawa, Masayoshi [Department of Teacher Training and School Education, Nara University of Education, Takabatake-cho, Nara, 630-8528 (Japan); Uchiyama, Hideki [Faculty of Education, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka, 422-8529 (Japan); Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Koyama, Katsuji [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, 606-8502 (Japan); Yamauchi, Shigeo, E-mail: nobukawa@nara-edu.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Nara Women’s University, Kitauoyanishimachi, Nara, 630-8506 (Japan)

    2016-12-20

    This paper reports detailed K-shell line profiles of iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) of the Galactic Center X-ray Emission (GCXE), Galactic Bulge X-ray Emission (GBXE), Galactic Ridge X-ray Emission (GRXE), magnetic Cataclysmic Variables (mCVs), non-magnetic Cataclysmic Variables (non-mCVs), and coronally Active Binaries (ABs). For the study of the origin of the GCXE, GBXE, and GRXE, the spectral analysis is focused on equivalent widths of the Fe i-K α , Fe xxv-He α , and Fe xxvi-Ly α  lines. The global spectrum of the GBXE is reproduced by a combination of the mCVs, non-mCVs, and ABs spectra. On the other hand, the GRXE spectrum shows significant data excesses at the Fe i-K α and Fe xxv-He α  line energies. This means that additional components other than mCVs, non-mCVs, and ABs are required, which have symbiotic phenomena of cold gas and very high-temperature plasma. The GCXE spectrum shows larger excesses than those found in the GRXE spectrum at all the K-shell lines of iron and nickel. Among them the largest ones are the Fe i-K α , Fe xxv-He α , Fe xxvi-Ly α , and Fe xxvi-Ly β  lines. Together with the fact that the scale heights of the Fe i-K α , Fe xxv-He α , and Fe xxvi-Ly α lines are similar to that of the central molecular zone (CMZ), the excess components would be related to high-energy activity in the extreme envelopment of the CMZ.

  20. 0.5 to 6 MeV Ar ion induced X-ray emission in view to analytical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenorio Castilleros, M.D.

    1979-01-01

    A study of the X-ray emission induced by 0.5 to 6 MeV Ar ions has been realized in view of multielemental analytical applications. The historical development of the use of heavy ion induced X-ray emission in analysis and the theoretical background of inner-shell ionization in heavy ion-atom collisions are described. The emission of non characteristic X-rays and the effects related to the penetration of heavy ions in matter are also related. The experimental part contains a description of the experimental devices and of the X-ray spectra fitting method. Thick target yields as a function of the target Z and the Ar ion energy are reported. The analytical possibilities are examined and an application to the analysis of Si and Cl in cadmium telluride crystals is given [fr

  1. Measurement of anisotropic soft X-ray emission during radio-frequency current drive in the JFT-2M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawashima, Hisato; Matoba, Tohru; Hoshino, Katsumichi; Kawakami, Tomohide; Yamamoto, Takumi; Hasegawa, Mitsuru; Fuchs, Gerhard; Uesugi, Yoshihiko.

    1994-01-01

    A new vertical soft X-ray pulse height analyzer (PHA) system and a tangential PHA system were used to measure the anisotropy of soft X-ray emission during lower-hybrid current drive (LHCD) and also during current drive by the combination of LHCD and electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in the JFT-2M tokamak. The strong soft X-ray emission was measured in the parallel forward direction during LHCD. When ECRH was applied during LHCD, the perpendicular emission was enhanced. The high-energy electron velocity distribution was evaluated by comparing the measured and calculated X-ray spectra. The distribution form was consistent with the theoretical prediction based on the electron Landau damping of lower-hybrid waves and the electron cyclotron damping of electron cyclotron waves for reasonable energy ranges. (author)

  2. Ultrafast Core-Hole-Induced Dynamics in Water Probed by X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odelius, Michael; Nordlund, Dennis; Pettersson, Lars G.M.; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Fuchs, Oliver; Weinhardt, Lothar; Maier, Florian; Umbach, Eberhard; Heske, Clemens; Zubavichus, Yan; Grunze, Michael; Denlinger, Jonathan D.; Nilsson, Anders

    2005-01-01

    The isotope effect and excitation-energy dependence have been measured in the oxygen K-edge x-ray emission spectrum (XES). The use of XES to monitor core decay processes provides information about molecular dynamics (MD) on an ultrafast time scale through the O1s lifetime of a few femtoseconds. Different nuclear masses give rise to differences in the dynamics and the observed isotope effect in XES is direct evidence of the importance of such processes. MD simulations show that even the excitation-energy dependence in the XES is mainly related to differences in core-excited-state dynamics

  3. Deka-keV X-ray emission associated with the onset of radio noise storms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crosby, N.; Vilmer, N.; Lund, Niels

    1996-01-01

    Radio noise storms show that suprathermal electrons (a few tens of keV) are present in the vicinity of active regions during several hours or even a few days. Where and how these electrons are energized is not yet well known. A flare-like sudden energy release in the active region is in general...... observed at the onset of noise storms, either as a fully developed flare or, more often, as a soft X-ray brightening without conspicuous Her signature. In order to investigate to what extent electrons energized in the active region contribute to the noise-storm emission in the overlying coronal structures...

  4. Electronic structure of human hemoglobin: ultrasoft X-ray emission study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soldatov, A.V.; Kravtsova, A.N.; Fedorovich, E.N.; Kurmaev, E.Z.; Moewes, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The iron L 2,3 and carbon, nitrogen and oxygen Kα X-ray emission spectra (XES) of human hemoglobin have been recorded at the soft X-ray spectroscopy endstation on Undulator Beam line 8.0 at Advanced Light Source (ALS) located at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The theoretical calculations of Fe L 3 -XES have been performed using ab initio code FEFF8.2. The calculations have been carried out for the structure of hemoglobin presented in PDB (entry 3HHB) as well as for the molecule with symmetrical heme plane. It was found that the Fe L 3 emission spectrum calculated for the ideal molecule agrees slightly better with the experiment as compared with those calculated for the real molecule. Thus, one can use the structure of the ideal molecule for theoretical Fe L 3 -XES simulations. The theoretical analysis has shown that the fist peak of experimental Fe L 3 - emission spectrum is enhanced by the nearest nitrogen atoms lying in heme plane around the central iron atom. The theoretical C K- and N K-XES spectra of hemoglobin have been calculated. A good agreement between theoretical and experimental spectra has been obtained. The distribution of the partial electronic densities of states in the valence and conduction bands of hemoglobin has been determined

  5. First light - II. Emission line extinction, population III stars, and X-ray binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Kirk S. S.; Wise, John H.; Aykutalp, Aycin; O'Shea, Brian W.; Norman, Michael L.; Xu, Hao

    2018-02-01

    We produce synthetic spectra and observations for metal-free stellar populations and high-mass X-ray binaries in the Renaissance Simulations at a redshift of 15. We extend our methodology from the first paper in the series by modelling the production and extinction of emission lines throughout a dusty and metal-enriched interstellar and circum-galactic media extracted from the simulation, using a Monte Carlo calculation. To capture the impact of high-energy photons, we include all frequencies from hard X-ray to far-infrared with enough frequency resolution to discern line emission and absorption profiles. The most common lines in our sample in order of their rate of occurrence are Ly α, the C IV λλ1548, 1551 doublet, H α, and the Ca II λλλ8498, 8542, 8662 triplet. The best scenario for a direct observation of a metal-free stellar population is a merger between two Population III Galaxies. In mergers between metal-enriched and metal-free stellar populations, some characteristics may be inferred indirectly. Single Population III galaxies are too dim to be observed photometrically at z = 15. Ly α emission is discernible by JWST as an increase in J200w - J277w colour off the intrinsic stellar tracks. Observations of metal-free stars will be difficult, though not impossible, with the next generation of space telescopes.

  6. Millimeter and X-Ray Emission from the 5 July 2012 Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsap, Y. T.; Smirnova, V. V.; Motorina, G. G.; Morgachev, A. S.; Kuznetsov, S. A.; Nagnibeda, V. G.; Ryzhov, V. S.

    2018-03-01

    The 5 July 2012 solar flare SOL2012-07-05T11:44 (11:39 - 11:49 UT) with an increasing millimeter spectrum between 93 and 140 GHz is considered. We use space and ground-based observations in X-ray, extreme ultraviolet, microwave, and millimeter wave ranges obtained with the Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, Radio Solar Telescope Network, and Bauman Moscow State Technical University millimeter radio telescope RT-7.5. The main parameters of thermal and accelerated electrons were determined through X-ray spectral fitting assuming the homogeneous thermal source and thick-target model. From the data of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly/SDO and differential-emission-measure calculations it is shown that the thermal coronal plasma gives a negligible contribution to the millimeter flare emission. Model calculations suggest that the observed increase of millimeter spectral flux with frequency is determined by gyrosynchrotron emission of high-energy (≳ 300 keV) electrons in the chromosphere. The consequences of the results are discussed in the light of the flare-energy-release mechanisms.

  7. High resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy: An advanced tool for actinide research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitova, T.; Brendebach, B.; Dardenne, K.; Denecke, M. A.; Lebid, A.; Löble, M.; Rothe, J.; Batuk, O. N.; Hormes, J.; Liu, D.; Breher, F.; Geckeis, H.

    2010-03-01

    High resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy (HRXES) is becoming increasingly important for our understanding of electronic and coordination structures. The combination of such information with development of quantum theoretical tools will advance our capability for predicting reactivity and physical behavior especially of 5f elements. HRXES can be used to remove lifetime broadening by registering the partial fluorescence yield emitted by the sample (i.e., recording a windowed signal from the energy dispersed fluorescence emission while varying incident photon energy), thereby yielding highly resolved X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra. Such spectra often display resonant features not observed in conventional XAFS. The spectrometer set-up can also be used for a wide range of other experiments, for example, resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS), where bulk electron configuration information in solids, liquids and gases is obtained. Valence-selective XAFS studies, where the local structure of a selected element's valence state present in a mixture of valence states can be obtained, as well as site-selective XAFS studies, where the coordination structure of a metal bound to selected elements can be differentiated from that of all the other ligating atoms. A HRXES spectrometer has been constructed and is presently being commissioned for use at the INE-Beamline for actinide research at the synchrotron source ANKA at FZK. We present the spectrometer's compact, modular design, optimized for attaining a wide range of energies, and first test measurement results. Examples from HRXES studies of lanthanides, actinides counter parts, are also shown.

  8. The Presence of Dust and Ice Scattering in X-Ray Emissions from Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snios, Bradford; Lichtman, Jack; Kharchenko, Vasili

    2018-01-01

    X-ray emissions from cometary atmospheres were modeled from first principles using the charge-exchange interaction with solar wind ions as well as coherent scattering of solar X-rays from dust and ice grains. Scattering cross-sections were interpolated over the 1 nm–1 cm grain radius range using approximations based on the optically thin or thick nature of grains with different sizes. The theoretical emission model was compared to Chandra observations of Comets ISON and Ikeya–Zhang due to their high signal-to-noise ratios and clearly defined spectral features. Comparing the observed intensities to the model showed that the charge-exchange mechanism accurately reproduced the emission spectra below 1 keV, while dust and ice scattering was negligible. Examining the 1–2 keV range found dust and ice scattering emissions to agree well with observations, while charge-exchange contributions were insignificant. Spectral features between the scattering model and observations also trended similarly over the 1–2 keV range. The dust and ice density within the cometary atmosphere n was varied with respect to grain size a as the function n(a)\\propto {a}-α , with Ikeya–Zhang requiring α =2.5 and ISON requiring α =2.2 to best fit the observed spectral intensities. These grain size dependencies agreed with independent observations and simulations of such systems. The overall findings demonstrate evidence of significant scattering emissions present above 1 keV in the analyzed cometary emission spectra and that the dust/ice density dependence on grain radius a may vary significantly between comets.

  9. The application of proton induced x-ray emission to the element analysis of thick obsidian samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duerden, P.; Cohen, D.; Clayton, E.

    1979-11-01

    The proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique has been applied to the analysis of element concentrations in obsidian source samples. No target preparation other than washing and the selection of a flat surface was undertaken. Thick target yields have been calculated and element concentrations derived from the detected X-ray spectra; concentrations are given for K, Ca, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, Ga, As, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Ta, and Pb. A pinhole filter is described which enables a single measurement of about 5 minutes' duration to give element concentration data over an X-ray energy range 3-20 keV

  10. Soft x-ray emission characteristics from laser produced plasmas using a double stream gas-puff nozzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masayuki; Yamagami, Susumu; Mima, Kunioki [Osaka Univ., Institute of Laser Engineering, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Daido, Hiroyuki; Oketa, Takatsugu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Kizu, Kyoto (Japan). Kansai Research Establishment; Fiedorowicz, Henrky; Bartnik, Andrzej [Military University of Technology, Institute of Optoelectronics, Kaliskiego, Warsaw (Poland); Nakayama, Takeyoshi [Kinki Univ., School of Science and Engineering, Osaka (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    We characterize a laser produced double-stream gas puff plasma for soft x-ray generation. The double-stream nozzle gas puff target could suppress sideway gas expansion by surrounding the gas from the outer nozzle. Therefore, the x-ray emission from a double nozzle Xe gas-puff target irradiated by a nano-second laser pulse is as strong as that using a solid target. In addition the x-ray source size is smaller than ordinary gas puff plasma. (author)

  11. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Mosher, D.; De Groot, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays in 5-MA Saturn discharges is reported. The timing of multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra (1 to 10 keV) agree with 2D radiation-hydrocode simulations. Nonthermal x-ray emission (10 to 100 keV) correlates with pinch spots distributed along the z-axis. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum, yield, and pinch-spot emission with those of 0.8-MA, single- exploded-wire discharges on Gamble-II suggest a common nonthermal- production mechanism. Nonthermal x-ray yields are lower than expected from current scaling of Gamble II results, suggesting that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single-wire geometries for nonthermal x-ray production. The instabilities, azimuthal asymmetries, and inferred multiple implosions that accompany the implosion geometry lead to larger, more irregular pinch spots, a likely reason for reduced nonthermal efficiency. A model for nonthermal-electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly- collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas combined with 1D hydrocode simulations of Saturn compact loads predicts weak nonthermal x-ray emission

  12. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Mosher, D.; De Groot, J.S.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays in 5-MA Saturn discharges is reported. The timing of multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra (1 to 10 keV) agree with 2D radiation-hydrocode simulations. Nonthermal x-ray emission (10 to 100 keV) correlates with pinch spots distributed along the z-axis. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum, yield, and pinch-spot emission with those of 0.8-MA, single-exploded-wire discharges on Gamble-II suggest a common nonthermal-production mechanism. Nonthermal x-ray yields are lower than expected from current scaling of Gamble II results, suggesting that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single-wire geometries for nonthermal x-ray production. The instabilities, azimuthal asymmetries, and inferred multiple implosions that accompany the implosion geometry lead to larger, more irregular pinch spots, a likely reason for reduced nonthermal efficiency. A model for nonthermal-electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas combined with 1D hydrocode simulations of Saturn compact loads predicts weak nonthermal x-ray emission. (author). 3 figs., 10 refs

  13. Absolute Soft X-ray Emission Measurements at the Nike Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J.; Atkin, R.; Boyer, C.; Colombant, D.; Feldman, U.; Fielding, D.; Gardner, J.; Holland, G.; Klapisch, M.; Mostovych, A. N.; Obenscain, S.; Seely, J. F.

    2002-11-01

    Recent experiments at the Nike laser facility have demonstrated that, when a low intensity prepulse ( 2main laser intensity) is used to heat a thin Au or Pd coating on a planar CH target, the growth of non-uniformities due to laser imprint can be reduced from the growth observed for an uncoated CH target. The absolute radiation intensity in the soft x-ray region (0.1-1 keV) has a important role in the energy balance for layered targets. There is an ongoing effort to characterize the soft x-ray emission using an absolutely calibrated transmission grating spectrometer and filtered diode modules. Measurements of the angular distribution of the emission from unlayered solid targets (Au, Pd, CH) have recently been made using an array of moveable filtered diode modules. The data from the angular distribution studies will be presented. A new absolutely calibrated, time-resolving transmission grating spectrometer has been installed at the Nike. The new version has improved spectral resolution, selectable transmission filters, and the potential for simultaneous temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution. Preliminary data from the new spectrometer will be presented and future experiments will be briefly discussed. *Work was supported by DoE

  14. Package for Interactive Analysis of Line Emission (Analysis of UV-X-Ray High-Resolution Emission Spectra)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Paul (Technical Monitor); Kashyap, Vinay

    2004-01-01

    The Package for Interactive Analysis of Line Emission (PINTofALE) is a suite of IDL routines designed to carry out spectroscopic analysis of high-resolution X-ray spectra. The current version is 1.5, and will shortly be upgraded to v2. A detailed description of the package, together with detailed documentation, example walk-throughs, science threads, and downloadable tar files, are available on-line.

  15. A vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube field-emission electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kim, Jae-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2013-01-01

    We report on a fully vacuum-sealed compact x-ray tube based on focused carbon nanotube (CNT) field-emission electrons for various radiography applications. The specially designed two-step brazing process enabled us to accomplish a good vacuum level for the stable and reliable operation of the x-ray tube without any active vacuum pump. Also, the integrated focusing electrodes in the field-emission electron gun focused electron beams from the CNT emitters onto the anode target effectively, giving a small focal spot of around 0.3 mm with a large current of above 50 mA. The active-current control through the cathode electrode of the x-ray tube led a fast digital modulation of x-ray dose with a low voltage of below 5 V. The fabricated compact x-ray tube showed a stable and reliable operation, indicating good maintenance of a vacuum level of below 5 × 10 −6 Torr and the possibility of field-emission x-ray tubes in a stand-alone device without an active pumping system. (paper)

  16. High-resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy with transition-edge sensors: present performance and future potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uhlig, J.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Swetz, D. S.; Jaye, C.; Fischer, D. A.; Reintsema, C. D.; Bennett, D. A.; Vale, L. R.; Mandal, U.; O' Neil, G. C.; Miaja-Avila, L.; Joe, Y. I.; El Nahhas, A.; Fullagar, W.; Parnefjord Gustafsson, F.; Sundström, V.; Kurunthu, D.; Hilton, G. C.; Schmidt, D. R.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-04-21

    X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is a powerful element-selective tool to analyze the oxidation states of atoms in complex compounds, determine their electronic configuration, and identify unknown compounds in challenging environments. Until now the low efficiency of wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometer technology has limited the use of XES, especially in combination with weaker laboratory X-ray sources. More efficient energy-dispersive detectors have either insufficient energy resolution because of the statistical limits described by Fano or too low counting rates to be of practical use. This paper updates an approach to high-resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy that uses a microcalorimeter detector array of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs). TES arrays are discussed and compared with conventional methods, and shown under which circumstances they are superior. It is also shown that a TES array can be integrated into a table-top time-resolved X-ray source and a soft X-ray synchrotron beamline to perform emission spectroscopy with good chemical sensitivity over a very wide range of energies.

  17. Spectral evolution of soft x-ray emission from optically thin, high electron temperature platinum plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Hara

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The soft x-ray spectra of heavy element plasmas are frequently dominated by unresolved transition array (UTA emission. We describe the spectral evolution of an intense UTA under optically thin conditions in platinum plasmas. The UTA was observed to have a peak wavelength around 4.6 nm at line-of-sight averaged electron temperatures less than 1.4 keV at electron densities of (2.5–7.5 × 1013 cm−3. The UTA spectral structure was due to emission from 4d–4f transitions in highly charged ions with average charge states of q = 20–40. A numerical simulation successfully reproduced the observed spectral behavior.

  18. Spectral evolution of soft x-ray emission from optically thin, high electron temperature platinum plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Hayato; Li, Bowen; Dunne, Padraig; O'Sullivan, Gerry; Sasaki, Akira; Suzuki, Chihiro; Tamura, Naoki; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Kato, Daiji; Murakami, Izumi; Higashiguchi, Takeshi; LHD Experiment Group

    2017-08-01

    The soft x-ray spectra of heavy element plasmas are frequently dominated by unresolved transition array (UTA) emission. We describe the spectral evolution of an intense UTA under optically thin conditions in platinum plasmas. The UTA was observed to have a peak wavelength around 4.6 nm at line-of-sight averaged electron temperatures less than 1.4 keV at electron densities of (2.5-7.5) × 1013 cm-3. The UTA spectral structure was due to emission from 4d-4f transitions in highly charged ions with average charge states of q = 20-40. A numerical simulation successfully reproduced the observed spectral behavior.

  19. Kossel interferences of proton-induced X-ray emission lines in periodic multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Meiyi; Le Guen, Karine; André, Jean-Michel [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75231 Paris cedex 05 (France); CNRS UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75231 Paris cedex 05 (France); Ilakovac, Vita [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75231 Paris cedex 05 (France); CNRS UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matière et Rayonnement, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, F-75231 Paris cedex 05 (France); Université de Cergy-Pontoise, F-95031 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Vickridge, Ian [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, boîte courrier 840, F-75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); CNRS UMR 7588, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, boîte courrier 840, F-75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Schmaus, Didier [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, boîte courrier 840, F-75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); CNRS UMR 7588, Institut des NanoSciences de Paris, 4 place Jussieu, boîte courrier 840, F-75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Université Paris Diderot-P7, F-75205 Paris cedex 13 (France); and others

    2016-11-01

    The Kossel interferences generated by characteristic X-ray lines produced inside a periodic multilayer have been observed upon proton irradiation, by submitting a Cr/B{sub 4}C/Sc multilayer stack to 2 MeV protons and observing the intensity of the Sc and Cr Kα characteristic emissions as a function of the detection angle. When this angle is close to the Bragg angle corresponding to the emission wavelength and period of the multilayer, an oscillation of the measured intensity is detected. The results are in good agreement with a model based on the reciprocity theorem. The combination of the Kossel measurements and their simulation, will be a useful tool to obtain a good description of the multilayer stack and thus to study nanometer-thick layers and their interfaces.

  20. EBIS-A facility for the studies of X-ray emission from solids bombarded by highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banaś, D., E-mail: d.banas@ujk.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Jabłoński, Ł. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Jagodziński, P. [Department of Physics, Kielce University of Technology, 25-314 Kielce (Poland); Kubala-Kukuś, A.; Sobota, D.; Pajek, M. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland)

    2015-07-01

    We report here on the progress in the X-ray spectroscopy program at the EBIS-A facility installed recently at the Institute of Physics of Jan Kochanowski University in Kielce. In this facility the beams of low-energy highly charged ions (HCI) produced by the Dresden EBIS-A ion source, after extraction and charge-state separation in the double focusing magnet, are directed to the experimental UHV chamber equipped with a 5-axis universal sample manipulator. The X-rays emitted in interaction of the highly charged ions with solids can be measured by an energy dispersive X-ray silicon drift detector (SDD) and/or a wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (WDS) mounted at the experimental chamber. The surface nanostructures formed by an impact of HCI will be studied by the grazing emission X-ray fluorescence (GEXRF) technique and using a multiprobe surface analysis system based on the X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS) coupled to the UHV chamber of the EBIS-A facility. In this paper a brief description of the facility, X-ray instrumentation and the surface analysis system is given and the first results are presented.

  1. Subnanosecond X-ray apparatus with flexible cable radiator probe based on small-size explosive emission vacuum diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, S N; Mesyats, G A; Shpak, V G

    2011-01-01

    Subnanosecond X-ray apparatus with a miniature radiator tube, which was connected to a source of high-voltage pulses through a commercial thin flexible radio-frequency coaxial cable (PK50, production of Russia), rated at 50 Ohm and having a length of 1 m, was created. Miniature explosive emission vacuum diodes were used as the picosecond X-ray emitter. The main advantages of the new subnanosecond X-ray apparatus with a flexible cable radiator probe, in comparison with a conventional one, include a small size and a lightweight (from 10 to 32 kg in our performance), as well as the possibility to bring the small-size X-ray tube by means of a long and thin flexible supply cable immediately to an object, which is hard to reach with available X-ray apparatus. The developed X-ray apparatus may find application in medicine for close-focus intracavitary roentgenotherapy, and also in industry for X-ray non-destructive inspection of small diameter lengthy intricate hollow parts.

  2. Soft x-ray emission from postpulse expanding laser-produced plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, J. L.; Feldman, U.; Mostovych, A. N.; Seely, J. F.; Colombant, D.; Holland, G.

    2003-12-01

    A diagnostic spectrometer has been developed at the Naval Research Laboratory to measure the time resolved absolute intensity of radiation emitted from targets irradiated by the Nike laser. The spectrometer consists of a dispersive transmission grating of 2500 lines/mm or 5000 lines/mm and a detection system consisting of an absolutely calibrated Si photodiode array and a charge coupled device camera. In this article, this spectrometer was used to study the spatial distribution of soft x-ray radiation from low Z elements (primarily carbon) that lasted tens of nanoseconds after the main laser illumination was over. We recorded soft x-ray emission as a function of the target material and target orientation with respect to the incoming laser beam and the spectrometer line of sight. While a number of spectral features have been identified in the data, the instrument's combined temporal and spatial resolution allowed observation of the plasma expansion from CH targets for up to ˜25 ns after the cessation of the main laser pulse. The inferred plasma expansion velocities are slightly higher than those previously reported.

  3. X-Ray, EUV, UV and Optical Emissivities of Astrophysical Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, John C.; West, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This grant primarily covered the development of the thermal X-ray emission model code called APEC, which is meant to replace the Raymond and Smith (1977) code. The new code contains far more spectral lines and a great deal of updated atomic data. The code is now available (http://hea-www.harvard.edu/APEC), though new atomic data is still being added, particularly at longer wavelengths. While initial development of the code was funded by this grant, current work is carried on by N. Brickhouse, R. Smith and D. Liedahl under separate funding. Over the last five years, the grant has provided salary support for N. Brickhouse, R. Smith, a summer student (L. McAllister), an SAO predoctoral fellow (A. Vasquez), and visits by T. Kallman, D. Liedahl, P. Ghavamian, J.M. Laming, J. Li, P. Okeke, and M. Martos. In addition to the code development, the grant supported investigations into X-ray and UV spectral diagnostics as applied to shock waves in the ISM, accreting black holes and white dwarfs, and stellar coronae. Many of these efforts are continuing. Closely related work on the shock waves and coronal mass ejections in the solar corona has grown out of the efforts supported by the grant.

  4. Accretion dynamics and polarized x-ray emission of magnetized neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arons, J.

    1991-01-01

    The basic ideas of accretion onto magnetized neutron stars are outlined. These are applied to a simple model of the structure of the plasma mound sitting at the magnetic poles of such as star, in which upward diffusion of photons is balanced by their downward advection. This steady flow model of the plasma's dynamical state is used to compute the emission of polarized X-rays from the optically thick, birefringent medium. The linear polarization of the continuum radiation emerging from the quasi-static mound is found to be as much as 40% at some rotation phases, but is insensitive to the geometry of the accretion flow. The role of the accretion shock, whose detailed polarimetric and spectral characteristics have yet to be calculated, is emphasized as the final determinant of the properties of the emerging X-rays. Some results describing the fully time dependent dynamics of the flow are also presented. In particular, steady flow onto a neutron star is shown to exhibit formation of ''photon bubbles,'' regions of greatly reduced plasma density filled with radiation which form and rise on millisecond time scales. The possible role of these complex structures in the flow for the formation of the emergent spectrum is briefly outlined

  5. Pulse-periodic generation of supershort avalanche electron beams and X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Erofeev, M. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2014-05-01

    Pulse-periodic generation of supershort avalanche electron beams (SAEBs) and X-ray emission in nitrogen, as well as the transition from a single-pulse mode to a pulse-periodic mode with a high repetition frequency, was studied experimentally. It is shown that, in the pulse-periodic mode, the full width at halfmaximum of the SAEB is larger and the decrease rate of the gap voltage is lower than those in the single-pulse mode. It is found that, when the front duration of the voltage pulse at a nitrogen pressure of 90 Torr decreases from 2.5 to 0.3 ns, the X-ray exposure dose in the pulse-periodic mode increases by more than one order of magnitude and the number of SAEB electrons also increases. It is shown that, in the pulse-periodic mode of a diffuse discharge, gas heating in the discharge gap results in a severalfold increase in the SAEB amplitude (the number of electrons in the beam). At a generator voltage of 25 kV, nitrogen pressure of 90 Torr, and pulse repetition frequency of 3.5 kHz, a runaway electron beam was detected behind the anode foil.

  6. Applications of X-ray emission to elemental analysis of foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flocchini, R.G.; Lagunas-Solar, M.C.; Perley, B.P.

    1996-01-01

    Trace element analysis via X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) and Proton-Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) techniques were applied to several samples of fresh and processed foods. Thin samples of fresh fruits and vegetables, processed dry foods, and spices were included in these analyses. The results indicate that XRF and/or PIXE analysis is applicable to these types of samples but require special and simple modifications in sample preparation techniques, and the inclusion of new matrix type corrections for data analysis. However, the non-destructive nature, reproducibility, efficiency and high sensitivity that characterize these multi-element analytical procedures can provide new potential methods for detecting trace elements in foods and in many agricultural commodities. Toxic metals such as Hg, Pb, and As were detected in some foods. In addition, other essential or neutral trace elements such as Na, K, Mg, Ca, Cu, Cr, V, Zn, Mo, Fe, Mn, Ni, Se, Cl, S, and P were also detected. These and other elements can be analyzed rapidly and with high sensitivity for applications in process control and for certification of food quality. Developing these techniques and procedures specifically for food and for various agricultural products may provide new analytical options and help mitigate the expected impact of forthcoming regulations intended to establish limits and tolerance levels for micro toxicants and other essential nutrients in foods and agricultural products. (author)

  7. X-ray powder diffractometry of emissions from the cement industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, P. P.; Khan, A. R.; Davin, M. T.

    X-ray powder diffractometry has been found capable of identifying and distinguishing limestone and cement particles, the two important emissions of the cement industry. The limestone shows strong reflections principally at 1.87,1.91,2.09,2.28,2.49,3.03 and 3.83 Å from its main constituent, calcite, whereas cement shows reflections at 1.76, 2.18, 2.60, 2.64, a doublet at 2.73-2.77 and 3.02 Å from its main phases, the di-, and tri-calcium silicates. X-ray diffraction analysis of airborne particles collected on glass fibre filters in the vicinity of cement factories in Karachi, Pakistan and Ravena, New York State, revealed limestone but no cement particles. This observation was consistent with our earlier inference drawn from chemical and statistical methods for Karachi's ambient aerosols. The method can complement the selective leaching technique suggested earlier by us for source identification. On the basis of model calculations, a methodology has been worked out that would make the present technique adaptable to plant conditions.

  8. Compression between ion and hard x-ray emissions from nitrogen and argon in Mather type plasma focus device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Paghe

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, some characteristics of a Mather type Plasma Focus (PF device such as a discharge current, pinch time, ion flux and hard x-ray intensity has been investigated simultaneously in argon and nitrogen gases separately for various operating gas pressures and charging voltages of capacitor bank. It was observed that pinch phenomena was energy and pressure dependent in current sheath as well as ion and hard x-ray emission intensity. Optimum pressure with maximum ion flux and the most intense hard x-ray showed a nearly linear dependence on the charging voltage of the device. Maximum ion flux was estimated in the order of 1018 ions per steradian in both gases. Hard x-ray emission was registered a little after discharge current and Faraday cup (FC signals. Also, optimum pressure for maximum ion flux was not the same as the pressure for intense hard x-rays. Hard x-ray intensity reached its peak at higher pressures

  9. Elemental and mineralogical study of earth-based pigments using particle induced X-ray emission and X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, P.; Lynch, P. A.; Laird, J. S.; Casey, H. M.; Goodall, L. J.; Ryan, C. G.; Sloggett, R. J.

    2010-07-01

    Artwork and precious artefacts demand non-destructive analytical methodologies for art authentication, attribution and provenance assessment. However, structural and chemical characterisation represents a challenging problem with existing analytical techniques. A recent authentication case based on an Australian Aboriginal artwork, indicate there is substantial benefit in the ability of particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE), coupled with dynamic analysis (DA) to characterise pigments through trace element analysis. However, this information alone is insufficient for characterising the mineralogical residence of trace elements. For this reason a combined methodology based on PIXE and X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been performed to explore the benefits of a more comprehensive data set. Many Aboriginal paintings and artefacts are predominantly earth pigment based. This makes these cultural heritage materials an ideal case study for testing the above combined methodological approach on earth-based pigments. Samples of synthetic and naturally occurring earth-based pigments were obtained from a range of sources, which include Indigenous communities within Australia's Kimberley region. PIXE analyses using a 3 MeV focussed proton beam at the CSIRO nuclear microprobe, as well as laboratory-based XRD was carried out on the above samples. Elemental signature spectra as well as mineralogical data were used to assess issues regarding synthetic and naturally occurring earth pigments with the ultimate aim of establishing provenance.

  10. Correlated X-ray/UV/optical emission and short-term variability in a Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4593

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Main; Naik, Sachindra

    2018-03-01

    We present a detailed multifrequency analysis of an intense monitoring programme of Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4593 over a duration of nearly for a month with Swift observatory. We used 185 pointings to study the variability in six ultraviolet/optical and two soft (0.3-1.5 keV) and hard X-ray (1.5-10 keV) bands. The amplitude of the observed variability is found to decrease from high energy to low energy (X-ray to optical) bands. Count-count plots of ultraviolet/optical bands with hard X-rays clearly suggest the presence of a mixture of two major components: (i) highly variable component such as hard X-ray emission, and (ii) slowly varying disc-like component. The variations observed in the ultraviolet/optical emission are strongly correlated with the hard X-ray band. Cross-correlation analysis provides the lags for the longer wavelengths compared to the hard X-rays. Such lags clearly suggest that the changes in the ultraviolet/optical bands follow the variations in the hard X-ray band. This implies that the observed variation in longer wavelengths is due to X-ray reprocessing. Though, the measured lag spectrum (lag versus wavelength) is well described by λ4/3 as expected from the standard disc model, the observed lags are found to be longer than the predicted values from standard disc model. This implies that the actual size of the disc of NGC 4593 is larger than the estimated size of standard thin disc as reported in active galactic nuclei such as NGC 5548 and Fairall 9.

  11. DISCOVERY OF X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE GALACTIC SUPERNOVA REMNANT G32.8-0.1 WITH SUZAKU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamba, Aya; Sawada, Makoto [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University 5-10-1 Fuchinobe Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5258 (Japan); Terada, Yukikatsu [Department of Physics, Science, Saitama University, Sakura, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Hewitt, John; Petre, Robert; Angelini, Lorella [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Safi-Harb, Samar [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Zhou, Ping [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Bocchino, Fabrizio [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134, Palermo (Italy)

    2016-02-10

    We present the first dedicated X-ray study of the supernova remnant (SNR) G32.8−0.1 (Kes 78) with Suzaku. X-ray emission from the whole SNR shell has been detected for the first time. The X-ray morphology is well correlated with the emission from the radio shell, while anti-correlated with the molecular cloud found in the SNR field. The X-ray spectrum shows not only conventional low-temperature (kT ∼ 0.6 keV) thermal emission in a non-equilibrium ionization state, but also a very high-temperature (kT ∼ 3.4 keV) component with a very low ionization timescale (∼2.7 × 10{sup 9} cm{sup −3} s), or a hard nonthermal component with a photon index Γ ∼ 2.3. The average density of the low-temperature plasma is rather low, of the order of 10{sup −3}–10{sup −2} cm{sup −3}, implying that this SNR is expanding into a low-density cavity. We discuss the X-ray emission of the SNR, also detected in TeV with H.E.S.S., together with multi-wavelength studies of the remnant and other gamma-ray emitting SNRs, such as W28 and RCW 86. Analysis of a time-variable source, 2XMM J185114.3−000004, found in the northern part of the SNR, is also reported for the first time. Rapid time variability and a heavily absorbed hard-X-ray spectrum suggest that this source could be a new supergiant fast X-ray transient.

  12. Discovery of X-Ray Emission from the Galactic Supernova Remnant G32.8-0.1 with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamba, Aya; Terada, Yukikatsu; Hewitt, John; Petre, Robert; Angelini, Lorella; Safi-Harb, Samar; Zhou, Ping; Bocchino, Fabrizio; Sawada, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    We present the first dedicated X-ray study of the supernova remnant (SNR) G32.8-0.1 (Kes 78) with Suzaku. X-ray emission from the whole SNR shell has been detected for the first time. The X-ray morphology is well correlated with the emission from the radio shell, while anti-correlated with the molecular cloud found in the SNR field. The X-ray spectrum shows not only conventional low-temperature (kT approximately 0.6 kiloelectronvolts) thermal emission in a nonequilibrium ionization state, but also a very high-temperature (approximately 3.4 kiloelectronvolts) component with a very low ionization timescale (approximately 2.7 times 10 (sup 9) per cubic centimeter per second), or a hard nonthermal component with a photon index Gamma approximately equal to 2.3. The average density of the low-temperature plasma is rather low, of the order of 10 (sup -3) - 10 (sup -2) per cubic centimeter, implying that this SNR is expanding into a low-density cavity. We discuss the X-ray emission of the SNR, also detected in teraelectronvolts with H.E.S.S. (High Energy Stereoscopic System), together with multi-wavelength studies of the remnant and other gamma-ray emitting SNRs, such as W28 and RCW 86. Analysis of a time-variable source, 2XMM J185114.3-000004, found in the northern part of the SNR, is also reported for the first time. Rapid time variability and a heavily absorbed hard-X-ray spectrum suggest that this source could be a new supergiant fast X-ray transient.

  13. Detection of halogenated flame retardants in polyurethane foam by particle induced X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maley, Adam M.; Falk, Kyle A.; Hoover, Luke; Earlywine, Elly B.; Seymour, Michael D.; DeYoung, Paul A.; Blum, Arlene; Stapleton, Heather M.; Peaslee, Graham F.

    2015-09-01

    A novel application of particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) has been developed to detect the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardant chemicals in polyurethane foams. Traditional Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) methods for the detection and identification of halogenated flame retardants in foams require extensive sample preparation and data acquisition time. The elemental analysis of the halogens in polyurethane foam performed by PIXE offers the opportunity to identify the presence of halogenated flame retardants in a fraction of the time and sample preparation cost. Through comparative GC-MS and PIXE analysis of 215 foam samples, excellent agreement between the two methods was obtained. These results suggest that PIXE could be an ideal rapid screening method for the presence of chlorinated and brominated flame retardants in polyurethane foams.

  14. Trace element determination in tomato puree using particle induced X-ray emission and Rutherford backscattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero-Davila, E.; Miranda, J.

    2004-01-01

    Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) were used to determine the concentrations of trace elements in samples of 12 tomato puree brands sold in the Mexican market. While RBS offered information about the main elements present in the matrix, PIXE gave results on trace elements. As a whole, data for 17 elements (C, N, O, Na, Mg, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, and Zn) were obtained. To evaluate the results, a comparison with brands from USA, Japan, Colombia, and Chile was carried out, using tomato purees produced following the domestic technology recipe. Additionally, the results were considered in the light of the Codex Alimentarius and the Mexican standard. It was found that all of the brands fall within the limits established by these standards, being of the same order of magnitude as the foreign brands. (author)

  15. Power-law X-ray and gamma-ray emission from relativistic thermal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdziarski, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    A common characteristic of cosmic sources is power-law X-ray emission. Extragalactic sources of this type include compact components of active galactic nuclei (AGN). The present study is concerned with a theoretical model of such sources, taking into account the assumption that the power-law spectra are produced by repeated Compton scatterings of soft photons by relativistic thermal electrons. This is one of several possible physical mechanisms leading to the formation of a power-law spectrum. Attention is given to the Comptonization of soft photon sources, the rates of pair processes, the solution of the pair equilibrium equation, and the constraints on a soft photon source and an energy source. It is concluded that the compactness parameters L/R of most of the cosmic sources observed to date lie below the maximum luminosity curves considered.

  16. Hard X-ray PhotoEmission Spectroscopy of strongly correlated systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panaccione, Giancarlo; Offi, Francesco; Sacchi, Maurizio; Torelli, Piero

    2008-06-01

    Hard X-ray PhotoEmission Spectroscopy (HAXPES) is a new tool for the study of bulk electronic properties of solids using synchrotron radiation. We review recent achievements of HAXPES, with particular reference to the VOLPE project, showing that high energy resolution and bulk sensitivity can be obtained at kinetic energies of 6-8 keV. We present also the results of recent studies on strongly correlated materials, such as vanadium sesquioxide and bilayered manganites, revealing the presence of different screening properties in the bulk with respect to the surface. We discuss the relevant experimental features of the metal-insulator transition in these materials. To cite this article: G. Panaccione et al., C. R. Physique 9 (2008).

  17. Application of proton-induced X-ray emission technique to gunshot residue analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, P.; Panigrahi, N.; Rao, M.S.; Varier, K.M.; Sen, S.; Mehta, G.K.

    1982-04-01

    The proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique was applied to the identification and analysis of gunshot residues. Studies were made of the type of bullet and bullet hole identification, firearm discharge element profiles, the effect of various target backings, and hand swabbings. The discussion of the results reviews the sensitivity of the PIXE technique, its nondestructive nature, and its role in determining the distance from the gun to the victim and identifying the type of bullet used and whether a wound was made by a bullet or not. The high sensitivity of the PIXE technique, which is able to analyze samples as small as 0.1 to 1 ng, and its usefulness for detecting a variety of elements should make it particularly useful in firearms residue investigations.

  18. Sample preparation techniques in trace element analysis by X-ray emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valkovic, V.

    1983-11-01

    The report, written under a research contract with the IAEA, contains a detailed presentation of the most difficult problem encountered in the trace element analysis by methods of the X-ray emission spectroscopy, namely the sample preparation techniques. The following items are covered. Sampling - with specific consideration of aerosols, water, soil, biological materials, petroleum and its products, storage of samples and their handling. Pretreatment of samples - preconcentration, ashing, solvent extraction, ion exchange and electrodeposition. Sample preparations for PIXE - analysis - backings, target uniformity and homogeneity, effects of irradiation, internal standards and specific examples of preparation (aqueous, biological, blood serum and solid samples). Sample preparations for radioactive sources or tube excitation - with specific examples (water, liquid and solid samples, soil, geological, plants and tissue samples). Finally, the problem of standards and reference materials, as well as that of interlaboratory comparisons, is discussed

  19. Core-hole-induced dynamical effects in the x-ray emission spectrum of liquid methanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungberg, M P; Zhovtobriukh, I; Takahashi, O; Pettersson, L G M

    2017-04-07

    We compute the x-ray emission spectrum of liquid methanol, with the dynamical effects that result from the creation of the core hole included in a semiclassical way. Our method closely reproduces a fully quantum mechanical description of the dynamical effects for relevant one-dimensional models of the hydrogen-bonded methanol molecules. For the liquid, we find excellent agreement with the experimental spectrum, including the large isotope effect in the first split peak. The dynamical effects depend sensitively on the initial structure in terms of the local hydrogen-bonding (H-bonding) character: non-donor molecules contribute mainly to the high-energy peak while molecules with a strong donating H-bond contribute to the peak at lower energy. The spectrum thus reflects the initial structure mediated by the dynamical effects that are, however, seen to be crucial in order to reproduce the intensity distribution of the recently measured spectrum.

  20. Electronic structure, charge distribution and X-ray emission spectra of V3Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisimov, V.I.; Gubanov, V.A.; Ivanovskii, A.L.; Kurmaev, E.Z.; Weber, J.; Lacroix, R.

    1979-01-01

    Cluster calculations of the electronic structure and charge distribution in V 3 Si have been performed using two different molecular orbital methods: a semiempirical LCAO and the MS Xα model. The results are compared with X-ray emission spectra and band structure calculations. An analysis of the calculated electronic distribution reveals a charge transfer from Si-atoms to V-atoms, the additional charge on a V-atom being 0.6e (LCAO) and 0.4e (MS Xα method). The results are in good agreement with experiment, which indicates that the cluster approach is adequate for the description of charge distributions and spectra characteristics of the A-15 compounds. (author)

  1. Silicon X-ray line emission from solar flares and active regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkinson, J.H.; Wolff, R.S.; Kestenbaum, H.L.; Ku, W.H.-M.; Lemen, J.R.; Long, K.S.; Novick, R.; Suozzo, R.J.; Weisskopf, M.C.

    1978-01-01

    New observations of solar flare and active region X-ray spectra obtained with the Columbia University instrument on OSO-8 are presented and discussed. The high sensitivity of the graphite crystal panel has allowed both line and continuum spectra to be observed with moderate spectral resolution. Observations with higher spectral resolution have been made with a panel of pentaerythritol crystals. Twenty-nine lines between 1.5 and 7.0 A have been resolved and identified, including several dielectronic recombination satellite lines to Si XIV and Si XIII lines which have been observed for the first time. It has been found that thermal continuum models specified by single values of temperature and emission measure have fitted that data adequately, there being good agreement with the values of these parameters derived from line intensity ratios. (Auth.)

  2. L23 soft-x-ray emission and absorption spectra of Na

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callcott, T.A.; Arakawa, E.T.; Ederer, D.L.

    1978-01-01

    The L 23 soft-x-ray emission (SXE) and soft-x-ray absorption (SXA) edges have been measured. The SXE edges were measured at temperatures between 85 and 380 K, and analyzed to obtain edge positions and widths. The widths increased from GAMMA/sub SXE/ = 100 meV at 85 K to 150 meV at 320 K and to 180 meV above the melting point at 380 K. Both SXE and SXA edges were measured at 100 K with the same spectrometer, and the data were analyzed to obtain values of the edge widths (GAMMA/sub SXE/ = 100 meV and GAMMA/sub SXA/ = 64 meV), of the many-body peaking parameter (α/sub SXE/ = 0.15 and α/sub SXA/ = 0.24), of the gap between the edges (E/sub g/ = 74 meV), and of the excess width of the emission edge [(ΔGAMMA) 2 = GAMMA 2 /sub SXE/ - GAMMA 2 /sub SXA/ = 5900 (meV) 2 ]. The values of E/sub g/ and (ΔGAMMA) 2 were used in the partial-lattice-relaxation theory of Almbladh to obtain a value of the core-hole lifetime broadening (GAMMA/sub 2p/ = 10 meV). We conclude that structure in the transition density of states, many-body effects, and lattice relaxation all have important effects on the edge structure, and suggest that rounding of the SXE edge by partial relaxation accounts for the smaller peaking parameter obtained from the SXE data as compared to the SXA data

  3. On the properties of synchrotron-like X-ray emission from laser wakefield accelerated electron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuffey, C.; Schumaker, W.; Matsuoka, T.; Chvykov, V.; Dollar, F.; Kalintchenko, G.; Kneip, S.; Najmudin, Z.; Mangles, S. P. D.; Vargas, M.; Yanovsky, V.; Maksimchuk, A.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Krushelnick, K.

    2018-04-01

    The electric and magnetic fields responsible for electron acceleration in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator (LWFA) also cause electrons to radiate x-ray photons. Such x-ray pulses have several desirable properties including short duration and being well collimated with tunable high energy. We measure the scaling of this x-ray source experimentally up to laser powers greater than 100 TW. An increase in laser power allows electron trapping at a lower density as well as with an increased trapped charge. These effects resulted in an x-ray fluence that was measured to increase non-linearly with laser power. The fluence of x-rays was also compared with that produced from K-α emission resulting from a solid target interaction for the same energy laser pulse. The flux was shown to be comparable, but the LWFA x-rays had a significantly smaller source size. This indicates that such a source may be useful as a backlighter for probing high energy density plasmas with ultrafast temporal resolution.

  4. X-RAY EMISSION FROM J1446–4701, J1311–3430, AND OTHER BLACK WIDOW PULSARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arumugasamy, Prakash; Pavlov, George G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Garmire, Gordon P., E-mail: pxa151@ucs.psu.edu [Huntingdon Institute for X-ray Astronomy, LLC, 10677 Franks Road, Huntingdon, PA 16652 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    We present the results of detailed X-ray analysis of two black-widow pulsars (BWPs), J1446–4701 and J1311–3430. PSR J1446–4701 is a BWP with orbital parameters near the median values of the sample of known BWPs. Its X-ray emission that was detected by XMM-Newton is well characterized by a soft power-law (PL) spectrum (photon index Γ ≈ 3), and it shows no significant orbital modulations. In view of a lack of radio eclipses and an optical non-detection, the system most likely has a low orbital inclination. PSR J1311–3430 is an extreme BWP with a very compact orbit and the lowest minimum mass companion. Our Chandra data confirm the hard Γ ≈ 1.3 emission seen in previous observations. Through phase-restricted spectral analysis, we found a hint (∼2.6σ) of spectral hardening around pulsar inferior conjunction. We also provide a uniform analysis of the 12 BWPs observed with Chandra and compare their X-ray properties. Pulsars with soft, Γ > 2.5 emission seem to have lower than average X-ray and γ-ray luminosities. We do not, however, see any other prominent correlation between the pulsar’s X-ray emission characteristics and any of its other properties. The contribution of the intra-binary shock to the total X-ray emission, if any, is not discernible in this sample of pulsars with shallow observations.

  5. Relation between X-Ray and γ-Ray Emissions for Fermi Blazars ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Using γ-ray band data detected by Fermi Large Area Tele- scope (LAT) and X-ray band data for 78 blazars, we find a medium cor- relation between X-ray and γ-ray fluxes in the average state. A medium anticorrelation is also found between X-ray (1 KeV) mean spectral index αx and γ-ray mean spectral index αγ for ...

  6. Solar Wind Charge Exchange and Local Hot Bubble X-Ray Emission with the DXL Sounding Rocket Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, M.; Collier, M. R.; Cravens, T.; Koutroumpa, D.; Kuntz, K. D.; Lepri, S.; McCammon, D.; Porter, F. S.; Prasai, K.; Robertson, I.; hide

    2012-01-01

    The Diffuse X-ray emission from the Local Galaxy (DXL) sounding rocket is a NASA approved mission with a scheduled first launch in December 2012. Its goal is to identify and separate the X-ray emission of the SWCX from that of the Local Hot Bubble (LHB) to improve our understanding of both. To separate the SWCX contribution from the LHB. DXL will use the SWCX signature due to the helium focusing cone at 1=185 deg, b=-18 deg, DXL uses large area propostionai counters, with an area of 1.000 sq cm and grasp of about 10 sq cm sr both in the 1/4 and 3/4 keY bands. Thanks to the large grasp, DXL will achieve in a 5 minule flight what cannot be achieved by current and future X-ray satellites.

  7. X-ray Emission Spectroscopy to Study Ligand Valence Orbitals in Mn Coordination Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smolentsev, Grigory; Soldatov, Alexander V; Messinger, Johannes; Merz, Kathrin; Weyhermuller, Thomas; Bergmann, Uwe; Pushkar, Yulia; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Glatzel, Pieter

    2009-03-02

    We discuss a spectroscopic method to determine the character of chemical bonding and for the identification of metal ligands in coordination and bioinorganic chemistry. It is based on the analysis of satellite lines in X-ray emission spectra that arise from transitions between valence orbitals and the metal ion 1s level (valence-to-core XES). The spectra, in connection with calculations based on density functional theory (DFT), provide information that is complementary to other spectroscopic techniques, in particular X-ray absorption (XANES and EXAFS). The spectral shape is sensitive to protonation of ligands and allows ligands, which differ only slightly in atomic number (e.g., C, N, O...), to be distinguished. A theoretical discussion of the main spectral features is presented in terms of molecular orbitals for a series of Mn model systems: [Mn(H2O)6]2+, [Mn(H2O)5OH]+, [Mn(H2O)5NH2]+, and [Mn(H2O)5NH3]2+. An application of the method, with comparison between theory and experiment, is presented for the solvated Mn2+ ion in water and three Mn coordination complexes, namely [LMn(acac)N3]BPh4, [LMn(B2O3Ph2)(ClO4)], and [LMn(acac)N]BPh4, where L represents 1,4,7-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane, acac stands for the 2,4-pentanedionate anion, and B2O3Ph2 represents the 1,3-diphenyl-1,3-dibora-2-oxapropane-1,3-diolato dianion.

  8. HARD X-RAY EMISSION DURING FLARES AND PHOTOSPHERIC FIELD CHANGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burtseva, O.; Petrie, G. J. D.; Pevtsov, A. A.; Martínez-Oliveros, J. C.

    2015-01-01

    We study the correlation between abrupt permanent changes of magnetic field during X-class flares observed by the Global Oscillation Network Group and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager instruments, and the hard X-ray (HXR) emission observed by RHESSI, to relate the photospheric field changes to the coronal restructuring and investigate the origin of the field changes. We find that spatially the early RHESSI emission corresponds well to locations of the strong field changes. The field changes occur predominantly in the regions of strong magnetic field near the polarity inversion line (PIL). The later RHESSI emission does not correspond to significant field changes as the flare footpoints are moving away from the PIL. Most of the field changes start before or around the start time of the detectable HXR signal, and they end at about the same time or later than the detectable HXR flare emission. Some of the field changes propagate with speed close to that of the HXR footpoint at a later phase of the flare. The propagation of the field changes often takes place after the strongest peak in the HXR signal when the footpoints start moving away from the PIL, i.e., the field changes follow the same trajectory as the HXR footpoint, but at an earlier time. Thus, the field changes and HXR emission are spatio-temporally related but not co-spatial nor simultaneous. We also find that in the strongest X-class flares the amplitudes of the field changes peak a few minutes earlier than the peak of the HXR signal. We briefly discuss this observed time delay in terms of the formation of current sheets during eruptions

  9. X-ray and UV correlation in the quiescent emission of Cen X-4, evidence of accretion and reprocessing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardini F.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We conducted the first long-term (60 days, multiwavelength (optical, ultraviolet, and X-ray simultaneous monitoring of Cen X-4 with daily Swift observations, with the goal of understanding variability in the low mass X-ray binary Cen X-4 during quiescence. We found Cen X-4 to be highly variable in all energy bands on timescales from days to months, with the strongest quiescent variability a factor of 22 drop in the X-ray count rate in only 4 days. The X-ray, UV and optical (V band emission are correlated on timescales down to less than 110 s. The shape of the correlation is a power law with index γ about 0.2–0.6. The X-ray spectrum is well fitted by a hydrogen NS atmosphere (kT = 59 − 80 eV and a power law (with spectral index Γ = 1.4 − 2.0, with the spectral shape remaining constant as the flux varies. Both components vary in tandem, with each responsible for about 50% of the total X-ray flux, implying that they are physically linked. We conclude that the X-rays are likely generated by matter accreting down to the NS surface. Moreover, based on the short timescale of the correlation, we also unambiguously demonstrate that the UV emission can not be due to either thermal emission from the stream impact point, or a standard optically thick, geometrically thin disc. The spectral energy distribution shows a small UV emitting region, too hot to arise from the accretion disk, that we identified as a hot spot on the companion star. Therefore, the UV emission is most likely produced by reprocessing from the companion star, indeed the vertical size of the disc is small and can only reprocess a marginal fraction of the X-ray emission. We also found the accretion disc in quiescence to likely be UV faint, with a minimal contribution to the whole UV flux.

  10. Scaling of x-ray emission and ion velocity in laser produced Cu ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The x-ray intensity vs the laser intensity has a scaling factor of (1.2–1.92). The relative x-ray conversion efficiency follows an empirical relationship which is in close agreement with the one reported by Babonneau et al. The ion velocities were monitored using Langmuir probes placed at different angles and radial distances ...

  11. Surface roughness-aided hard X-ray emission from carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A clear enhancement in the low to moderately high-energy. X-rays has been noticed. In this report, we present a highly efficient, low-debris hard X-ray source based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) irradiated by intense, femtosecond laser. In the process we also demonstrate the critical role of surface roughness ...

  12. Surface roughness-aided hard X-ray emission from carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Efficient low debris hard X-ray source based on multiwalled carbon nan- otubes (MWNT) irradiated by intense, femtosecond laser over an intensity range of 1015–. 1017 W cm−2 µm2 is reported. The MWNT targets yield two orders of magnitude higher. X-rays (indicating significant enhancement of laser coupling) ...

  13. Optimization of soft x-ray line emission from laser-produced carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The x-ray conversion efficiencies can be increased using short wavelength lasers whereas the desired x-ray spectral component can be maximized by creating a plasma that is populated predominantly with the relevant ions, that is, by optimizing the laser intensity. In this paper we optimize the laser intensity for maximum ...

  14. The Properties of the Galactic Hot Gaseous Halo from X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunyang; Bregman, Joel N.

    2018-01-01

    The extended hot X-ray emitting gaseous halo of the Milky Way has an optical depth ∼1 for the dominant emission lines of O VII and O VIII, which are used to infer the halo properties. To improve on halo gas properties, we treat optical depth effects with a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model, which leads to slightly steeper density profiles (β ~ 0.5) than if optical depths effects were ignored. For the preferred model where the halo is rotating on cylinders at 180 km s-1, independent fits to both lines lead to identical results, where the core radius is 2.5 kpc and the turbulent component of the Doppler-b parameter is 100–120 km s-1 the turbulent pressure is 20% of the thermal pressure. The fit is improved when emission from a disk is included, with a radial scale length of 3 kpc (assumed) and a fitted vertical scale height of approximately 1.3 kpc. The disk component is a minor mass constituent and has low optical depth, except at low latitudes. The gaseous mass is 3–4×1010 M⊙ within 250 kpc, similar to our previous determinations and significantly lower than the mass of the missing baryons, which is 1.7× 10^11 M⊙.

  15. Ultrafast emission from colloidal nanocrystals under pulsed X-ray excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Turtos, R.M.; Polovitsyn, A.; Christodoulou, S.; Salomoni, M.; Auffray, E.; Moreels, I.; Lecoq, P.; Grim, J.Q.

    2016-01-01

    Fast timing has emerged as a critical requirement for radiation detection in medical and high energy physics, motivating the search for scintillator materials with high light yield and fast time response. However, light emission rates from conventional scintillation mechanisms fundamentally limit the achievable time resolution, which is presently at least one order of magnitude slower than required for next-generation detectors. One solution to this challenge is to generate an intense prompt signal in response to ionizing radiation. In this paper, we present colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) as promising prompt photon sources. We investigate two classes of NCs: two-dimensional CdSe nanoplatelets (NPLs) and spherical CdSe/CdS core/giant shell quantum dots (GS QDs). We demonstrate that the emission rates of these NCs under pulsed X-ray excitation are much faster than traditional mechanisms in bulk scintillators, i.e. 5d-4f transitions. CdSe NPLs have a sub-100 ps effective decay time of 77 ps and CdSe/...

  16. X-RAY EMISSION FROM THE SUPER-EARTH HOST GJ 1214

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalitha, S.; Singh, K. P. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Poppenhaeger, K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M. [Hamburger Sternwarte, Universität Hamburg, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-07-20

    Stellar activity can produce large amounts of high-energy radiation, which is absorbed by the planetary atmosphere leading to irradiation-driven mass loss. We present the detection and an investigation of high-energy emission in a transiting super-Earth host system, GJ 1214, based on XMM-Newton observations. We derive an X-ray luminosity of L{sub X} = 7.4 × 10{sup 25} erg s{sup –1} and a corresponding activity level of log (L{sub X} /L {sub bol}) ∼ –5.3. Further, we determine a coronal temperature of about ∼3.5 MK, which is typical for coronal emission of moderately active low-mass stars. We estimate that GJ 1214 b evaporates at a rate of 1.3× 10{sup 10} g s{sup –1} and has lost a total of ≈2-5.6 M {sub ⊕}.

  17. Relativistic iron emission lines in neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries as probes of neutron star radii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cackett, E.M.; Miller, J.M.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Grindlay, J.E.; Homan, J.; van der Klis, M.; Miller, M.C.; Strohmayer, T.E.; Wijnands, R.

    2008-01-01

    Using Suzaku observations of three neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries ( Ser X-1, 4U 1820-30, and GX 349+2) we have found broad, asymmetric, relativistic Fe K emission lines in all three objects. These Fe K lines can be well fit by a model for lines from a relativistic accretion disk ("diskline''),

  18. Multiwavelength Photometric Imaging of X-Ray and EUV Emission from Comet P/Tempel-Tuttle 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, Carey M.

    2004-01-01

    The unexpected discovery of x-ray emission from Comet Hyakutake in March 1996 (Lisse et ai. 1996) has produced a number of questions about the physical mechanism producing the radiation. The original detection and subsequent observations (Dennerl et ai. 1997, Mumma et al. 1997, Krasnopolsky et al. 1998, Owens et al. 1998. Lisse et al. 1999) have shown that the very soft (best fit thermal bremsstrahlung model kT approx. 0.2 keV) emission is due to an interaction between the solar wind and the comet's atmosphere. Using the results fiom the 15 comets detected to date in x-rays, we report on the latest results on cometary x-ray emission, including new results from Chandra and XMM. As-observed morphologies, spectra, and light curves will be discussed. Our emphasis will be on understanding the physical mechanism producing the emission, and using this to determine the nature of the cometary coma, the structure of the solar wind in the heliosphere, and the source of the local soft x-ray background. This work has been graciously supported by grants from the NASA Planetary Astronomy and Astrophysical Data Programs.

  19. X-Ray Emission Spectrometer Design with Single-Shot Pump-Probe and Resonant Excitation Capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spoth, Katherine; /SUNY, Buffalo /SLAC

    2012-08-28

    Core-level spectroscopy in the soft X-ray regime is a powerful tool for the study of chemical bonding processes. The ultrafast, ultrabright X-ray pulses generated by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) allow these reactions to be studied in greater detail than ever before. In this study, we investigated a conceptual design of a spectrometer for the LCLS with imaging in the non-dispersive direction. This would allow single-shot collection of X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) measurements with varying laser pump X-ray probe delay or a variation of incoming X-ray energy over the illuminated area of the sample. Ray-tracing simulations were used to demonstrate how the components of the spectrometer affect its performance, allowing a determination of the optimal final design. These simulations showed that the spectrometer's non-dispersive focusing is extremely sensitive to the size of the sample footprint; the spectrometer is not able to image a footprint width larger than one millimeter with the required resolution. This is compatible with a single shot scheme that maps out the laser pump X-ray probe delay in the non-dispersive direction as well as resonant XES applications at normal incidence. However, the current capabilities of the Soft X-Ray (SXR) beamline at the LCLS do not produce the required energy range in a small enough sample footprint, hindering the single shot resonant XES application at SXR for chemical dynamics studies at surfaces. If an upgraded or future beamline at LCLS is developed with lower monochromator energy dispersion the width can be made small enough at the required energy range to be imaged by this spectrometer design.

  20. STEADY X-RAY SYNCHROTRON EMISSION IN THE NORTHEASTERN LIMB OF SN 1006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuda, Satoru; Petre, Robert; Mori, Koji; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Long, Knox S.; Winkler, P. Frank; Tsunemi, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    We investigate time variations and detailed spatial structures of X-ray synchrotron emission in the northeastern limb of SN 1006, using two Chandra observations taken in 2000 and 2008. We extract spectra from a number of small (∼10'') regions. After taking account of proper motion and isolating the synchrotron from the thermal emission, we study time variations in the synchrotron emission in the small regions. We find that there are no regions showing strong flux variations. Our analysis shows an apparent flux decline in the overall synchrotron flux of ∼4% at high energies, but we suspect that this is mostly a calibration effect, and that flux is actually constant to ∼1%. This is much less than the variation found in other remnants where it was used to infer magnetic-field strengths up to 1 mG. We attribute the lack of variability to the smoothness of the synchrotron morphology, in contrast to the small-scale knots found to be variable in other remnants. The smoothness is to be expected for a Type Ia remnant encountering uniform material. Finally, we find a spatial correlation between the flux and the cutoff frequency in synchrotron emission. The simplest interpretation is that the cutoff frequency depends on the magnetic-field strength. This would require that the maximum energy of accelerated electrons is not limited by synchrotron losses, but by some other effect. Alternatively, the rate of particle injection and acceleration may vary due to some effect not yet accounted for, such as a dependence on shock obliquity.

  1. Madelung's potentials structure of X-ray emission spectra, and reactivity of alkali metal metavanadates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirsanov, V.V.; Fotiev, A.A.; Tskhaj, V.A.; Cherkashenko, V.M. (AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Khimii)

    1983-07-01

    Madelung constants of ionic sublattices, describing the dependence of Madelung potentials on ionic charges in crystallographically non-equivalent V, O and M positions, were calculated for metavanadates MVO/sub 3/ (M=Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs). Semiempirical interpretation of the fine structure and shifts of intensity maximums of X-ray VKsub(..beta..''..beta..sup(5))- and VLsub(..cap alpha..)-emission spectra and X-ray spectral assessment of the degree of chemical bond ionicity in metavanadate oxy-vanadium sublattice are given. The reactivity of these compounds during their interaction with vanadium pentoxide and the activity of different ions in this process were considered.

  2. Atomic imaging by x-ray-fluorescence holography and electron-emission holography: A comparative theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Len, P.M.; Thevuthasan, S.; Fadley, C.S.; Kaduwela, A.P.; Van Hove, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    We consider from a theoretical viewpoint the direct imaging of atoms at and near the surfaces of solids by both x-ray-fluorescence holography (XFH) and electron-emission holography (EEH). The more ideal nature of x-ray scattering makes XFH images superior to those in single-energy EEH. The overlap of real and twin features for pairs of atoms at ±a can cause their XFH or EEH atomic images to cancel for certain combinations of wave vector and |a|. The relative merits of XFH and EEH for structure studies are considered

  3. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of liquids and lithium batterymaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustsson, Andreas [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    2004-01-01

    Lithium ion insertion into electrode materials is commonly used in rechargeable battery technology. The insertion implies changes in both the crystal structure and the electronic structure of the electrode material. Side-reactions may occur on the surface of the electrode which is exposed to the electrolyte and form a solid electrolyte interface (SEI). The understanding of these processes is of great importance for improving battery performance. The chemical and physical properties of water and alcohols are complicated by the presence of strong hydrogen bonding. Various experimental techniques have been used to study geometrical structures and different models have been proposed to view the details of how these liquids are geometrically organized by hydrogen bonding. However, very little is known about the electronic structure of these liquids, mainly due to the lack of suitable experimental tools. In this thesis examples of studies of lithium battery electrodes and liquid systems using soft x-ray emission spectroscopy will be presented. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation has been used to accomplish selective excitation, in terms of energy and polarization. The electronic structure of graphite electrodes has been studied, before and after lithium intercalation. Changes in the electronic structure upon lithiation due to transfer of electrons into the graphite π-bands have been observed. Transfer of electrons in to the 3d states of transition metal oxides upon lithiation have been studied, through low energy excitations as dd- and charge transfer-excitations. A SEI was detected on cycled graphite electrodes. By the use of selective excitation different carbon sites were probed in the SEI. The local electronic structure of water, methanol and mixtures of the two have been examined using a special liquid cell, to separate the liquid from the vacuum in the experimental chamber. Results from the study of liquid water showed a strong influence on the 3a1 molecular

  4. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of liquids and lithium battery materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augustsson, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Lithium ion insertion into electrode materials is commonly used in rechargeable battery technology. The insertion implies changes in both the crystal structure and the electronic structure of the electrode material. Side-reactions may occur on the surface of the electrode which is exposed to the electrolyte and form a solid electrolyte interface (SEI). The understanding of these processes is of great importance for improving battery performance. The chemical and physical properties of water and alcohols are complicated by the presence of strong hydrogen bonding. Various experimental techniques have been used to study geometrical structures and different models have been proposed to view the details of how these liquids are geometrically organized by hydrogen bonding. However, very little is known about the electronic structure of these liquids, mainly due to the lack of suitable experimental tools. In this thesis examples of studies of lithium battery electrodes and liquid systems using soft x-ray emission spectroscopy will be presented. Monochromatized synchrotron radiation has been used to accomplish selective excitation, in terms of energy and polarization. The electronic structure of graphite electrodes has been studied, before and after lithium intercalation. Changes in the electronic structure upon lithiation due to transfer of electrons into the graphite π-bands have been observed. Transfer of electrons in to the 3d states of transition metal oxides upon lithiation have been studied, through low energy excitations as dd- and charge transfer-excitations. A SEI was detected on cycled graphite electrodes. By the use of selective excitation different carbon sites were probed in the SEI. The local electronic structure of water, methanol and mixtures of the two have been examined using a special liquid cell, to separate the liquid from the vacuum in the experimental chamber. Results from the study of liquid water showed a strong influence on the 3a1 molecular

  5. Revisiting Weak Emission-line Quasars with a Simple Approach to Deduce their Nature and the Tracers of X-ray Weakness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Qingling

    2018-01-01

    We present an X-ray and multi-wavelength study of 17 “bridge” weak emission-line quasars (WLQs) and 16 “extreme” WLQs naturally divided by their C IV rest equivalent widths (REWs), which constitute our clean WLQ sample together. New Chandra 3.1-4.8 ks observations were obtained for 14 objects while the other 19 have archival X-ray observations. 4 of the 17 bridge WLQs appear to be X-ray weak, while 9 of the 16 extreme WLQs appear to be X-ray weak. The X-ray weak fraction in the bridge sample (23.5%) is lower than in the extreme sample(56.3%), indicating the fraction of X-ray weak objects along with rising C IV REWs.X-ray stacking analysis is performed for the X-ray weak WLQs in the clean sample. We measured a relatively hard (Γeff=1.37) effective power-law photon index for a stack of the X-ray weak subsample, suggesting X-ray absorption due to shielding material inside the broad emission-line region (BELR). We proposed a geometrically and optically thick inner accretion disk as the natural shield, which could also explain the behavior of the X-ray weak fraction along with C IV REW.Futhermore, we ran Peto-Prentice tests to assess if the distributions of optical-UV spectral properties are different between X-ray weak WLQs and X-ray normal WLQs. We also examined correlations between △αOX and optical-UV spectral properties. The C IV REW, C IV blueshift, C IV FWHM, REWs of the Si IV, λ1900, Fe II, and Mg II emission features, and the relative SDSS color △(g - i) are examined in our study. △(g - i) turned out to be the most effective tracer of X-ray weakness.

  6. Note: study of extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray emission of metal targets produced by laser-plasma-interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantouvalou, I; Jung, R; Tuemmler, J; Legall, H; Bidu, T; Stiel, H; Malzer, W; Kanngiesser, B; Sandner, W

    2011-06-01

    Different metal targets were investigated as possible source material for tailored laser-produced plasma-sources. In the wavelength range from 1 to 20 nm, x-ray spectra were collected with a calibrated spectrometer with a resolution of λ/Δλ = 150 at 1 nm up to λ/Δλ = 1100 at 15 nm. Intense line emission features of highly ionized species as well as continuum-like spectra from unresolved transitions are presented. With this knowledge, the optimal target material can be identified for the envisioned application of the source in x-ray spectrometry on the high energy side of the spectra at about 1 keV. This energy is aimed for because 1 keV-radiation is ideally suited for L-shell x-ray spectroscopy with nm-depth resolution. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  7. Development of a PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) analysis device using an extracted proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saidi, A.

    1989-01-01

    The experimental device described allows the extention of the PIXE (Particle Induced X-ray Emission) method to the analysis, by means of proton beams, of solid or liquid samples, which can not be analyzed under vacuum conditions. The homogeneity of the surfaces to be analysed and elements (in the atmosphere) which absorb X-rays must be taken into account. Liquid samples do not need special care. The results show that: at high energies, the extracted beam sensibility is of the same order of magnitude as those obtained under vacuum; at low energies, the performance under vacuum conditions is better. The particles energy losses, at the exit membrane and in the outer atmosphere, decrease the X-rays production efficiency [fr

  8. Extended analysis of satellite structures in particle induced X-ray emission spectra using molecular orbital calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uda, U.

    Methods for estimating intensity distributions of X-ray satellite spectra induced by accelerated ions with energies of a few McVlamu are reviewed, where the orbitals responsible for X-ray emission are written in the molecular frame, not in the atomic frame. The ionization cross section is written here in the frame of the direct Coulomb interaction and the shake process. The following two factors are taken into account: (1) changes in the number of orbital electrons due to molecular orbital formation and (2) deviation of the number of electric charges on the projectile ion from the nuclear charge Z. Here the semiclassical approximation (SCA) has been used to calculate the Coulomb interaction between the projectile ion and the orbital electrons. In order to estimate the intensity of X-rays emitted from multiply ionized states changes in the fluorescence yield from the yield of isolated atoms caused by resonant orbital rearrangement (ROR), were also taken into account. Furthermore the energy loss of the projectile ions and absorption of emitted X-rays in the material were taken into account. The agreement between the calculated and the observed X-ray satellite intensities is satisfactory when we use all the correction terms mentioned above.

  9. Theoretical estimation of proton induced X-ray emission yield of the trace elements present in the lung and breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manjunatha, H.C.; Sowmya, N.

    2013-01-01

    X-rays may be produced following the excitation of target atoms induced by an energetic incident ion beam of protons. Proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis has been used for many years for the determination of elemental composition of materials using X-rays. Recent interest in the proton induced X-ray emission cross section has arisen due to their importance in the rapidly expanding field of PIXE analysis. One of the steps in the analysis is to fit the measured X-ray spectrum with theoretical spectrum. The theoretical cross section and yields are essential for the evaluation of spectrum. We have theoretically evaluated the PIXE cross sections for trace elements in the lung and breast cancer tissues such as Cl, K, Ca,Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Br, Rb, P, S, Sr, Hg and Pb. The estimated cross section is used in the evaluation of Proton induced X-ray emission spectrum for the given trace elements.We have also evaluated the Proton induced X-ray emission yields in the thin and thick target of the given trace elements. The evaluated Proton induced X-ray emission cross-section, spectrum and yields are graphically represented. Some of these values are also tabulated. Proton induced X-ray emission cross sections and a yield for the given trace elements varies with the energy. PIXE yield depends on a real density and does not on thickness of the target. (author)

  10. Development of particle induced X-ray emission facility at cyclotron laboratory and its prospective applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puri, N.K. [Department of Applied Physics, Delhi Technological Universily (Formerly Delhi College of Engineering, DCE), Delhi (India); Garg, M.L. [Department of Bio-Physics, Panjab Universily, Chandigarh (India); Govil, I.M. [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh (India)

    2013-07-01

    Full text: We are presenting here a description of modifications in the Variable Energy Cyclotron (VEC) Chandigarh along with the installation of Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) setup. The installation of new main magnet power supply of 400A/125V out put with 10 ppm stability (model 853 M/S Danfysik, Denmark) and a new stabilized solid state power supply for RF oscillator gave the beam characteristics substantially good enough for PIXE work. A new chamber [1] was designed to cater for Proton Induced Gamma Emission (PIGE) and Rutherford Back Scattering (RBS) analysis along with PIXE measurements. The HPGe X-ray detector, the Ge(Li) -ray detector and a Silicon Surface Barrier (SSB) detector could be mounted simultaneously in the chamber. A Turbo-Molecular vacuum pump was provided to produce a clean vacuum of the order of 10{sup -7} torr in PIXE chamber. A remotely controlled stepper motor could move the 12/24-position target holder. Beam size optimization along with the minimization of background was done with the help of graphite collimators, thus making the setup suitable for practical applications. We attempted to address some of the limitations using PIXE facility of Institute of Physics (IOP), India [2] and incorporated modifications (e.g. chamber design, sample holder etc.) in our set-up. Preliminary experiments for the PIXE analysis of aerosol samples, gunshot residues samples and bone samples were presented. The aerosol samples were collected using aerosol sampling kit which involves Millipore diaphragmatic vacuum pump and Sequential Filter Unit (SFU) with coarse pored Nucleo pore polycarbonate filter in such a manner that the particles passing through the 8m pore size filter were collected on the 0.4m pore size filter. Two different pistols viz. 7.65mm Indian made and 7.63mm Germany made were used to fire at a filter paper target with card board and cotton wool backing from a distance of 3 feet. Two sheets of Whatman filter paper were used to form the

  11. Design and characterization of a spatially distributed multibeam field emission x-ray source for stationary digital breast tomosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Xin; Rajaram, Ramya; Calderon-Colon, Xiomara; Yang Guang; Phan, Tuyen; Lalush, David S.; Lu Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2009-01-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a limited angle computed tomography technique that can distinguish tumors from its overlying breast tissues and has potentials for detection of cancers at a smaller size and earlier stage. Current prototype DBT scanners are based on the regular full-field digital mammography systems and require partial isocentric motion of an x-ray tube over certain angular range to record the projection views. This prolongs the scanning time and, in turn, degrades the imaging quality due to motion blur. To mitigate the above limitations, the concept of a stationary DBT (s-DBT) scanner has been recently proposed based on the newly developed spatially distributed multibeam field emission x-ray (MBFEX) source technique using the carbon nanotube. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the performance of the 25-beam MBFEX source array that has been designed and fabricated for the s-DBT system. The s-DBT system records all the projection images by electronically activating the multiple x-ray beams from different viewing angles without any mechanical motion. The configuration of the MBFEX source is close to the published values from the Siemens Mammomat system. The key issues including the x-ray flux, focal spot size, spatial resolution, scanning time, beam-to-beam consistency, and reliability are evaluated using the standard procedures. In this article, the authors describe the design and performance of a distributed x-ray source array specifically designed for the s-DBT system. They evaluate the emission current, current variation, lifetime, and focal spot sizes of the source array. An emission current of up to 18 mA was obtained at 0.5x0.3 mm effective focal spot size. The experimentally measured focal spot sizes are comparable to that of a typical commercial mammography tube without motion blurring. Trade-off between the system spatial resolution, x-ray flux, and scanning time are also discussed. Projection images of a breast phantom were

  12. Modeling Gamma-Ray Emission From the High-Mass X-Ray Binary LS 5039

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stan Owocki

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A few high-mass X-ray binaries–consisting of an OB star plus compact companion– have been observed by Fermi and ground-based Cerenkov telescopes like High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS to be sources of very high energy (VHE; up to 30 TeV γ-rays. This paper focuses on the prominent γ-ray source, LS 5039, which consists of a massive O6.5V star in a 3.9-day-period, mildly elliptical (e ≈ 0.24 orbit with its companion, assumed here to be an unmagnetized compact object (e.g., black hole. Using three dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of the Bondi-Hoyle accretion of the O-star wind onto the companion, we find that the orbital phase variation of the accretion follows very closely the simple Bondi-Hoyle-Lyttleton (BHL rate for the local radius and wind speed. Moreover, a simple model, wherein intrinsic emission of γ-rays is assumed to track this accretion rate, reproduces quite well Fermi observations of the phase variation of γ-rays in the energy range 0.1-10 GeV. However for the VHE (0.1-30 TeV radiation observed by the HESS Cerenkov telescope, it is important to account also for photon-photon interactions between the γ-rays and the stellar optical/UV radiation, which effectively attenuates much of the strong emission near periastron. When this is included, we find that this simple BHL accretion model also quite naturally fits the HESS light curve, thus making it a strong alternative to the pulsar-wind-shock models commonly invoked to explain such VHE γ-ray emission in massive-star binaries.

  13. DETECTION OF HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA-RAY EMISSION DURING THE X-RAY FLARING ACTIVITY IN GRB 100728A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdo, A. A.; Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Bechtol, K.; Berenji, B.; Blandford, R. D.; Borgland, A. W.; Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Bouvier, A.; Brigida, M.

    2011-01-01

    We present the simultaneous Swift and Fermi observations of the bright GRB 100728A and its afterglow. The early X-ray emission is dominated by a vigorous flaring activity continuing until 1 ks after the burst. In the same time interval, high-energy emission is significantly detected by the Fermi/Large Area Telescope. Marginal evidence of GeV emission is observed up to later times. We discuss the broadband properties of this burst within both the internal and external shock scenarios, with a particular emphasis on the relation between X-ray flares, the GeV emission, and a continued long-duration central engine activity as their power source.

  14. Applications of particle induced X-ray emission analysis to ambient aerosol studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lannefors, H.

    1982-01-01

    The characteristics of Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) analysis in conjunction with different ambient aerosol samplers have been studied. Correction factors have been calculated for homogeneous and inhomogeneous rural and urban aerosol samples. The Nuclepore two stage filter sampler provided the most useful combination of the resolution and particle size fractionation in urban, rural and remote environments. The PIXE-analysis technique in combination with different samplers was employed in aerosol composition studies in rural and remote environments. Particular emphasis was laid on studies of aerosol long range transport. Based on air mass trajectory analysis and aerosol composition measurements the foreign contribution in southern Sweden was estimated to be 70 - 80% for S and Pb but only 30 - 50% for V and Ni. The spatial and temporal extension of a long range transport episode was studied using high time resolution continuous filter samplers in a network in southern Sweden. The variation in the concentration levels of sulphur agreed well with changes in the air mass history. Arctic summer elemental concentration levels as measured during the Swedish YMER-80 icebreaker expedition were typically one order of magnitude lower than Arctic winter levels. The combination of chemical information, optical properties and size distribution data supports the hypothesis of long range transport of air pollution into the Arctic especially during the winter. This takes place during the winter season because the Polar front is further south making conditions for long range transport up to the Arctic more favourable. (Auth.)

  15. Comparing Compositions of Modern Cast Bronze Sculptures: Optical Emission Spectroscopy Versus x-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, M. L.; Dunand, D. C.

    2015-07-01

    Bulk elemental compositions of 74 modern cast bronze sculptures from the collection at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Rodin Museum (Philadelphia, PA) were determined using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and a handheld x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer. The elemental compositions of the cast sculptures as measured previously by ICP-OES and presently by XRF are compared: A good match is found between the two methods for the base metal (Cu) and the two majority alloying elements (Zn and Sn). For both ICP-OES and XRF data, when the Zn composition is plotted versus the Sn composition, three discernable clusters are found that are related to the artist, foundry, casting date, and casting method; they consist of (A) high-zinc brass, (B) low-zinc, low-tin brass, and (C) low-zinc, tin bronze. Thus, our study confirms that the relatively fast, nondestructive XRF spectrometry can be used effectively over slower and invasive, but more accurate, ICP-OES to help determine a sculpture's artist, foundry, date of creation, date of casting, and casting method.

  16. Implications of the radio and X-ray emission that followed GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakar, Ehud; Piran, Tsvi

    2018-04-01

    The radio and X-rays that followed GW170817 increased gradually over ˜ 100 days, resembling the radio flare predicted to arise from the interaction of a binary neutron star merger outflow with the ISM (Nakar & Piran 2011). Considering a blast wave moving with a Lorentz factor Γ, we show that an off-axis observer, namely an observer at θobs > 1/Γ, sees a light curve rising faster than Fν∝t3. Therefore, the observed rise, Fν∝ t0.78, implies that at all times we have seen an on-axis emission. Namely, the emitting matter was within θobs motivated one, proposed so far, is the interaction of a relativistic jet with the ejecta and the resulting cocoon. The jet could have been choked or successful. In the latter case, it has produced a short GRB pointing elsewhere (this successful jet-cocoon system is sometimes called a "structured jet"). Although circumstantial evidence disfavors a successful jet, the jet fate cannot be decisively determined from current observations. The light curve alone may not be sufficient to resolve this question, since both chocked and successful jets can lead to a gradual rise to a peak, followed by a decay. Therefore, the recent turnover of the light curve does not necessitate a successful jet.

  17. Particle induced X-ray emission-computed tomography analysis of an adsorbent for extraction chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Takahiro; Yokoyama, Akihito; Kitamura, Akane; Ohkubo, Takeru; Ishii, Yasuyuki [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Watanuki-machi 1233, 370-1292 Takasaki (Japan); Takahatake, Yoko; Watanabe, Sou; Koma, Yoshikazu [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Muramatsu 4-33, 319-1194 Tokai-mura (Japan); Kada, Wataru [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Gunma University, Tenjin-machi 1-5-1, 376-8515 Kiryu (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Nd, which simulates minor actinides (MAs), was used for investigating residual minor actinides produced during the extraction chromatography separation of spent fuel from fast neutron reactors. A cross-sectional distribution of Nd in a minute globular adsorbent having diameter less than 50 μm was obtained using particle induced X-ray emission-computed tomography with a 3-MeV proton microbeam. The measurement area was 150 × 150 μm{sup 2} corresponding to 128 × 128 imaging pixels in projection images with 9° resolution, image reconstruction was carried out by a modified ML-EM (maximum likelihood expectation maximization) method. As a result, the cross-sectional distribution of Nd in the adsorbent was successfully obtained, and it was first revealed that Nd existed both in the central region and on the outer surface even after an elution. This implies that the internal structure of the adsorbent must be modified for improving of the recovery of MAs.

  18. The X-ray stable emission in MCG-6-30-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammoun, E.; Papadakis, I.

    2017-10-01

    The flux-flux plot (FFP) method is a model-independent way that allows to extract the variable and stable components from the X-ray spectra of AGNs showing strong variability. We applied this method to the simultaneous XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations of MCG-6-30-15, in the 0.3-40 keV range. The constant component, in the 4-40 keV energy range, is consistent a neutral reflection from distant material ( D > 1.56 × 10^{4} R_{g}) revealing an iron K line in the 6-7 keV band and a Compton hump peaking at ˜ 20 keV. It contributes to ˜ 20% of the total emission, on average. The variable component is consistent with a power-law spectrum with a constant photon index (Γ ˜ 2) varying only in normalization without any hint of a relativistic ionized reflection. The FFPs below 3 keV show a clear evidence of a variable warm absorber with the possibility of having a stable component at these low energies.

  19. X-ray emission from a high-atomic-number z-pinch plasma created from compact wire arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Nash, T.J.; Marder, B.M.

    1996-03-01

    Thermal and nonthermal x-ray emission from the implosion of compact tungsten wire arrays, driven by 5 MA from the Saturn accelerator, are measured and compared with LLNL Radiation-Hydro-Code (RHC) and SNL Hydro-Code (HC) numerical models. Multiple implosions, due to sequential compressions and expansions of the plasma, are inferred from the measured multiple x-radiation bursts. Timing of the multiple implosions and the thermal x-ray spectra measured between 1 and 10 keV are consistent with the RHC simulations. The magnitude of the nonthermal x-ray emission measured from 10 to 100 keV ranges from 0.02 to 0.08% of the total energy radiated and is correlated with bright-spot emission along the z-axis, as observed in earlier Gamble-11 single exploding-wire experiments. The similarities of the measured nonthermal spectrum and bright-spot emission with those measured at 0.8 MA on Gamble-II suggest a common production mechanism for this process. A model of electron acceleration across magnetic fields in highly-collisional, high-atomic-number plasmas is developed, which shows the existence of a critical electric field, E c , below which strong nonthermal electron creation (and the associated nonthermal x rays) do not occur. HC simulations show that significant nonthermal electrons are not expected in this experiment (as observed) because the calculated electric fields are at least one to two orders-of-magnitude below E c . These negative nonthermal results are confirmed by RHC simulations using a nonthermal model based on a Fokker-Plank analysis. Lastly, the lower production efficiency and the larger, more irregular pinch spots formed in this experiment relative to those measured on Gamble II suggest that implosion geometries are not as efficient as single exploding-wire geometries for warm x-ray production

  20. The EVE plus RHESSI DEM for Solar Flares, and Implications for Residual Non-Thermal X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTiernan, James; Caspi, Amir; Warren, Harry

    2016-05-01

    Solar flare spectra are typically dominated by thermal emission in the soft X-ray energy range. The low energy extent of non-thermal emission can only be loosely quantified using currently available X-ray data. To address this issue, we combine observations from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) with X-ray data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) to calculate the Differential Emission Measure (DEM) for solar flares. This improvement over the isothermal approximation helps to resolve the ambiguity in the range where the thermal and non-thermal components may have similar photon fluxes. This "crossover" range can extend up to 30 keV.Previous work (Caspi et.al. 2014ApJ...788L..31C) concentrated on obtaining DEM models that fit both instruments' observations well. For this current project we are interested in breaks and cutoffs in the "residual" non-thermal spectrum; i.e., the RHESSI spectrum that is left over after the DEM has accounted for the bulk of the soft X-ray emission. As in our earlier work, thermal emission is modeled using a DEM that is parametrized as multiple gaussians in temperature. Non-thermal emission is modeled as a photon spectrum obtained using a thin-target emission model ('thin2' from the SolarSoft Xray IDL package). Spectra for both instruments are fit simultaneously in a self-consistent manner.For this study, we have examined the DEM and non-thermal resuidual emission for a sample of relatively large (GOES M class and above) solar flares observed from 2011 to 2014. The results for the DEM and non-thermal parameters found using the combined EVE-RHESSI data are compared with those found using only RHESSI data.

  1. Imaging of high-energy x-ray emission from cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, T; Izumi, N; Tommasini, R; Bradley, D K; Bell, P; Cerjan, C J; Dixit, S; Döppner, T; Jones, O; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G; Landen, O L; LePape, S; Mackinnon, A J; Park, H-S; Patel, P K; Prasad, R R; Ralph, J; Regan, S P; Smalyuk, V A; Springer, P T; Suter, L; Town, R P J; Weber, S V; Glenzer, S H

    2012-10-01

    Accurately assessing and optimizing the implosion performance of inertial confinement fusion capsules is a crucial step to achieving ignition on the NIF. We have applied differential filtering (matched Ross filter pairs) to provide broadband time-integrated absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered implosions. This diagnostic measures the temperature- and density-sensitive bremsstrahlung emission and provides estimates of hot spot mass, mix mass, and pressure.

  2. Spin-polarized x-ray emission of 3d transition-metal ions : A comparison via K alpha and K beta detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Xin; deGroot, F.M.F.; Cramer, SP

    1997-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that spin-polarized x-ray-excitation spectra can be obtained using K alpha emission as well as K beta lines. A spin-polarized analysis of K alpha x-ray emission and the excitation spectra by K alpha detection on a Ni compound is reported. A systematic analysis of the

  3. Characteristic x-ray emission from undermines plasmas irradiated by ultra-intense lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann, Christoph [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2012-05-05

    Between FY09 and FY11 we have conducted more than a dozen three-week experimental campaigns at high-power laser facilities around the world to investigate laser-channeling through x-ray and optical imaging and the conversion from laser-energy to xrays. We have performed simultaneous two-wavelength x-ray imaging (K-alpha and He-alpha) to distinguish the hot-plasma region (hot-spot) from the laser-produced electrons (K-alpha). In addition, we have initiated a new collaboration with SNL and have performed first shots on the 100 TW beamlet chamber to commission a fast x-ray streak camera to be used to investigate the temporal evolution of our K-alpha sources. We also collaborated on campaigns at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK) and the LANL Trident laser to employ laser produced x-ray sources for Thomson scattering off dense matter.

  4. Volume effect of laser produced plasma on X-ray emissions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A polished copper tip attached to a simple BNC connector was used as Langmuir probes. The probe is kept at a ... 300 ps duration. Two sets of x-ray data taken with 15 J and 11 J constant energy shots clearly shows that two lateral maxima appear in the x-ray signal plotted against the target position relative to the best focus ...

  5. Femtosecond X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy on zno nanoparticles in solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Penfold, Thomas J.; Szlachetko, Jakub; Gawelda, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    We have performed femtosecond X-ray spectroscopy measurements after UV photoexcitation of a colloidal solution of ZnO nanoparticles. The results indicate sub-ps hole trapping at oxygen vacancies with shallowly-trapped electrons in the conduction band.......We have performed femtosecond X-ray spectroscopy measurements after UV photoexcitation of a colloidal solution of ZnO nanoparticles. The results indicate sub-ps hole trapping at oxygen vacancies with shallowly-trapped electrons in the conduction band....

  6. Normal incidence X-ray telescope power spectra of X-ray emission from solar active regions. I - Observations. II - Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Daniel O.; Martens, Petrus C. H.; Golub, Leon

    1993-01-01

    Fourier analysis is applied to very high resolution image of coronal active regions obtained by the Normal Incidence X-Ray Telescope is used to find a broad isotropic power-law spectrum of the spatial distribution of soft X-ray intensities. Magnetic structures of all sizes are present down to the resolution limit of the instrument. Power spectra for the X-ray intensities of a sample of topologically different active regions are found which fall off with increasing wavenumber as 1/k-cubed. A model is presented that relates the basic features of coronal magnetic fluctuations to the subphotospheric hydrodynamic turbulence that generates them. The model is used to find a theoretical power spectrum for the X-ray intensity which falls off with increasing wavenumber as 1/k-cubed. The implications of a turbulent regime in active regions are discussed.

  7. The effects of stellar dynamics on the X-ray emission of flat early-type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, Andrea; Ciotti, Luca; Pellegrini, Silvia

    2014-03-01

    Past observational and numerical studies indicated that the hot gaseous haloes of early-type galaxies may be sensitive to the stellar kinematics. With high-resolution ZEUS 2D hydrosimulations, we study the hot gas evolution in flat early-type galaxies of fixed (stellar plus dark) mass distribution, but with variable amounts of azimuthal velocity dispersion and rotational support, including the possibility of a (counter) rotating inner disc. The hot gas is fed by stellar mass-losses, and heated by supernova explosions and thermalization of stellar motions. The simulations provide γth, the ratio between the heating due to the relative velocity between the stellar streaming and the interstellar medium bulk flow, and the heating attainable by complete thermalization of the stellar streaming. We find that (1) X-ray emission-weighted temperatures and luminosities match observed values and are larger in fully velocity dispersion supported systems; X-ray isophotes are boxy where rotation is significant; (2) γth ≃ 0.1-0.2 for isotropic rotators and (3) γth ≃ 1 for systems with an inner (counter) rotating disc. The lower X-ray luminosities of isotropic rotators are not explained just by their low γth but by a complicated flow structure and evolution, consequence of the angular momentum stored at large radii. Rotation is therefore important to explain the lower average X-ray emission and temperature observed in flat and more rotationally supported galaxies.

  8. NuSTAR detection of high-energy X-ray emission and rapid variability from sagittarius A* flares

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrière, Nicolas M.; Tomsick, John A.; Baganoff, Frederick K.

    2014-01-01

    Sagittarius A* harbors the supermassive black hole that lies at the dynamical center of our Galaxy. Sagittarius A* spends most of its time in a low luminosity emission state but flares frequently in the infrared and X-ray, increasing up to a few hundred fold in brightness for up to a few hours...... at a time. The physical processes giving rise to the X-ray flares are uncertain. Here we report the detection with the NuSTAR observatory in Summer and Fall 2012 of four low to medium amplitude X-ray flares to energies up to 79 keV. For the first time, we clearly see that the power-law spectrum...... of the two brightest flares (∼55 times quiescence in the 2-10 keV band) are compared to simple physical models in an attempt to identify the main X-ray emission mechanism, but the data do not allow us to significantly discriminate between them. However, we confirm the previous finding that the parameters...

  9. Thermal components in the early X-ray afterglows of GRBs: likely cocoon emission and constraints on the progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valan, Vlasta; Larsson, Josefin; Ahlgren, Björn

    2018-02-01

    The early X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are usually well described by absorbed power laws. However, in some cases, additional thermal components have been identified. The origin of this emission is debated, with proposed explanations including supernova shock breakout, emission from a cocoon surrounding the jet, as well as emission from the jet itself. A larger sample of detections is needed in order to place constraints on these different models. Here, we present a time-resolved spectral analysis of 74 GRBs observed by Swift X-ray Telescope in a search for thermal components. We report six detections in our sample, and also confirm an additional three cases that were previously reported in the literature. The majority of these bursts have a narrow range of blackbody radii around ˜2 × 1012 cm, despite having a large range of luminosities (Lpeak ˜ 1047-1051 erg s-1). This points to an origin connected to the progenitor stars, and we suggest that emission from a cocoon breaking out from a thick wind may explain the observations. For two of the bursts in the sample, an explanation in terms of late prompt emission from the jet is instead more likely. We also find that these thermal components are preferentially detected when the X-ray luminosity is low, which suggests that they may be hidden by bright afterglows in the majority of GRBs.

  10. CHANDRA CHARACTERIZATION OF X-RAY EMISSION IN THE YOUNG F-STAR BINARY SYSTEM HD 113766

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisse, C. M. [Planetary Exploration Branch, Space Exploration Sector, Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Road, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Christian, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University Northridge, 18111 Nordhoff Street, Northridge, CA 91330 (United States); Wolk, S. J. [Chandra X-ray Center, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Günther, H. M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, NE83-569, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Chen, C. H. [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Grady, C. A., E-mail: carey.lisse@jhuapl.edu, E-mail: damian.christian@csun.edu, E-mail: swolk@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: hgunther@mit.edu, E-mail: cchen@stsci.edu, E-mail: carol.a.grady@nasa.gov [Eureka Scientific and Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 667, NASA-GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Using Chandra , we have obtained imaging X-ray spectroscopy of the 10–16 Myr old F-star binary HD 113766. We individually resolve the 1.″4 separation binary components for the first time in the X-ray and find a total 0.3–2.0 keV luminosity of 2.2 × 10{sup 29} erg s{sup −1}, consistent with previous RASS estimates. We find emission from the easternmost, infrared-bright, dusty member HD 113766A to be only ∼10% that of the western, infrared-faint member HD 113766B. There is no evidence for a 3rd late-type stellar or substellar member of HD 113766 with L {sub x} > 6 × 10{sup 25} erg s{sup −1} within 2′ of the binary pair. The ratio of the two stars’ X-ray luminosity is consistent with their assignments as F2V and F6V by Pecaut et al. The emission is soft for both stars, kT {sub Apec} = 0.30–0.50 keV, suggesting X-rays produced by stellar rotation and/or convection in young dynamos, but not accretion or outflow shocks, which we rule out. A possible 2.8 ± 0.15 (2 σ ) hr modulation in the HD 113766B X-ray emission is seen, but at very low confidence and of unknown provenance. Stellar wind drag models corresponding to L {sub x} ∼ 2 × 10{sup 29} erg s{sup −1} argue for a 1 mm dust particle lifetime around HD 113766B of only ∼90,0000 years, suggesting that dust around HD 113766B is quickly removed, whereas 1 mm sized dust around HD 113766A can survive for >1.5 × 10{sup 6} years. At 10{sup 28}–10{sup 29} erg s{sup −1} X-ray luminosity, astrobiologically important effects, like dust warming and X-ray photolytic organic synthesis, are likely for any circumstellar material in the HD 113766 systems.

  11. Detailed EXOSAT and optical observations of the intermediate polar 3A0729+103: discovery of two medium energy X-ray emission regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHardy, I.M.; Pye, J.P.; Fairall, A.P.; Menzies, J.W.

    1987-01-01

    EXOSAT observations of the intermediate polar cataclysmic variable 3A0729+103 reveal a strong orbital modulation, with the 2-4KeV X-rays being significantly more modulated than the 4-6keV X-rays, indicative of photoelectric absorption. The 913 second modulation which is very prominent in the optical light curve, is weakly detected in the medium-energy X-ray light curve, confirming that it represents the white dwarf spin period. These observations are well explained by a combination of two sources of medium-energy X-ray emission. The presence of two emission regions is also clearly seen in the optical spectroscopy, particularly in the intensity of the He II4686 line which has two peaks during the orbit. The authors identify the two optical emission regions with the two X-ray emission regions. (author)

  12. Charge exchange laboratory studies relevant to solar-wind-induced cometary and planetary X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eissa, Farhat

    The discovery of cometary X-ray emission for the first time in 1996, from comet Hyukatake using the Röntgen satellite (ROSAT) [Lisse, C. M. et al., 1996] was a highly surprising event. Since then, X-ray and extreme ultra violet (X-EUV) emission has been observed from a number of comets [Lisse, C. M. et al., 2001]. The production of such radiation is strongly believed to be the result of the charge exchange collisions of the minor heavy highly charged solar wind (SW) ions with cometary neutrals. This study reports the first state-selective He- like X-ray spectra resulting from single-electron capture (SEC) in charge exchange collisions of O 7+ and Ne 9+ with He and CO targets at a collision velocity of 800 km/s. The ions and velocity are typical of solar wind ions while the molecular and atomic targets are typical of cometary (CO) and interstellar (He) neutrals. The spectra have been obtained by means of simultaneous cold-target recoil ion momentum spectroscopic (COLTRIMS) and X-ray spectroscopic measurements that involved the triple-coincident detection of X- rays, scattered projectile, and target recoil ions. The spectra test the ability of theories to account for the relative population of triplet and singlet states in He-like product ions following SEC. The O 7+ +He spectra are compared with theoretical spectra based on quantal molecular-orbital close- coupling (QMOCC) and multi-channel Landau-Zener (MCLZ) calculations. In addition, all spectra have been used to extract angular momentum distributions based on the traditional 3:1 triplet-to-singlet ratio assumption for the populated states. The QMOCC and MCLZ calculations and the experimental results, however, suggest significant departures from this assumption. The extracted l - distributions are state-of-the-art at this time for modeling purposes due to the high differentiation power of the experimental procedure.

  13. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  14. Comparison study of positron emission tomography, X-ray CT and MRI in Parkinsonism with dementia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Junichi; Peppard, R.; Calne, D.B.

    1989-01-01

    Brain atrophy and local cerebral metabolic rate of glucose (LCMR-glc) in Parkinson's disease with dementia and Parkinsonism-dementia complex (PDC) were studied using positron emission tomography (PET) with F-18-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose, X-ray CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The group of Parkinson's disease with dementia (n=7) had a significantly decreased LCMR-glc in all regions when compared with the age-matched normal group. In the group of Parkinson's disease without dementia (n=6), LCMR-glc was also significantly lower than the control group, although it was higher than the group with associated dementia. Some of the normal aged persons had cortical atrophy. There was no correlation between LCMR-glc and cortical atrophy. Six Guamnian patients had PDC associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and four patients had it without ALS. LCMR-glc did not differ in the two groups. It was, however, significantly lower than that in 5 Guamanian and 10 Caucasian normal persons. The group of PDC had a noticeable cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation, regardless of the presence or absence of ALS. There was correlation between decrease of LCMR-glc and cortical atrophy of the frontal, parietal and temporal lobes. Parkinson's disease and PDC were different from Alzheimer's disease in which a decreased LCMR-glc has been reported to be usually confined to the cerebral cortex. Cortical atrophy and ventricular dilatation were depicted on MRI and CT in the PDC group, but did not in the group of Parkinson's disease. PET was useful in the functional examination and both MRI and CT were useful in the anatomical examination of these diseases. (Namekawa, K)

  15. Analysis of memory consolidation and evocation in rats by proton induced X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobim, P. F. C.; dos Santos, C. E. I.; Maurmann, N.; Reolon, G. K.; Debastiani, R.; Pedroso, T. R.; Carvalho, L. M.; Dias, J. F.

    2014-08-01

    It is well known that trace elements such as Mg, Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn have a key role in synapse plasticity and learning. Learning process is conventionally divided in three distinct and complementary stages: memory acquisition, consolidation and evocation. Consolidation is the stabilization of the synaptic trace formed by acquisition, while evocation is the recall of this trace. Ion-based techniques capable of providing information concerning the elemental composition of organic tissues may be helpful to improve our understanding on memory consolidation and evocation processes. In particular, the Particle-Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique can be used to analyze different biological tissues with good accuracy. In this work we explore the versatility of PIXE to measure the elemental concentrations in rat brain tissues in order to establish any possible correlation between them and the memory consolidation and evocation processes. To this end, six groups of middle-age male Wistar rats were trained and tested in a step-down Inhibitory Avoidance conditioning. After the behavior tests, the animals were decapitated in accordance with the legal procedures and their brains were removed and dissected for the PIXE analyses. The results demonstrated that there are differences in the elemental concentration among the groups and such variations may be associated with their availability to the learning processes (by memory consolidation and evocation). Moreover, the control groups circumvent the possibility that a non-specific event involved in learning tasks cause such variations. Our results suggest that PIXE may be a useful tool to investigate memory consolidation and evocation in animal models.

  16. Characteristics of X-Ray Emission from the PFRC-2 Capacitively Coupled Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Richard; Pearcy, Jacob; Jandovitz, Peter; Swanson, Charles; Matteucci, Jackson; Cohen, Samuel; PFRC Team

    2015-11-01

    It is uncertain what causes keV X-rays emitted from the central-cell region of a cool (bulk Te ~ 4 eV), tenuous (ne ~1010 cm-3), 5 cm diameter, weakly ionized hydrogen plasma column generated in a tandem high-mirror-ratio mirror machine (PFRC-2 device) by a low-power, external, capacitively-coupled RF (27 MHz) antenna. We explored whether the energetic electrons responsible for the X-rays exist only in the central cell (ER) or also in the asymmetric mirror regions at opposite ends of the machine, as well as how the spectra compare if they do exist in both regions. To address this, we have designed, built, calibrated, installed and operated an X-ray detector system to view the PFRC-2 region near the RF antenna in one end cell (MC). We observe somewhat different X-ray spectra emanating from the two regions. The system comprises two Amptek XR-100CR detectors with moveable slits that scan across the plasma column. Further control of radial resolution (to 0.4 cm) is afforded by changing the detector-to-slit distance. Calibrations were performed with an 55Fe source. These data are being used to understand the source of the fast electrons that create the X-rays in the MC and in the ER. This work is supported by the US DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 and the Princeton Environmental Institute.

  17. X-ray emission regimes and rotation sequences in M 35 . An updated model of stellar activity evolution on the main sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondoin, P.

    2013-08-01

    Context. Late-type stars in young open clusters show two kinds of dependence of their X-ray emission on rotation. They also tend to group into two main sub-populations that lie on narrow sequences in diagrams where their rotation periods are plotted against their (B - V) colour indices. A correlation between these two regimes of X-ray emission and the rotation sequences has been recently observed in the M 34 open cluster. Sun-like M 34 stars also show a drop of their X-ray to bolometric luminosity ratio by about one order of magnitude at a Rossby number of about 0.3. Aims: The present study looks for similar connections between X-ray activity and rotation in an other open cluster. The aim is to consolidate a model of X-ray activity evolution on the main sequence and to provide observational constraints on dynamo processes in the interiors of late-type stars. Methods: The paper compares XMM-Newton measurements of X-ray stellar emission in M 35 with X-ray luminosity distributions derived from rotation period measurements assuming either an X-ray regime transition at a critical Rossby number or a correlation between X-ray emission regimes and rotation sequences. Results: This second hypothesis could account for the low number of M 35 stars detected in X-rays. A model of X-ray activity evolution is proposed based on the correlation. One major output is that the transition from saturated to non-saturated X-ray emission occurs at Rossby numbers between about 0.13 and 0.4 for each star depending on its mass and initial period of rotation on the ZAMS. This prediction agrees with observations of stellar X-ray emission in M 34. It explains the large range of X-ray luminosities observed among Sun-like stars in young open clusters. Conclusions: I conclude that the correlation between X-ray emission regimes and rotation sequences could be a fundamental property of the early evolution of stellar magnetic activity on the main sequence. I argue that the angular momentum

  18. Experimental and theoretical correlations between vanadium K-edge X-ray absorption and Kβ emission spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Julian A; Wandzilak, Aleksandra; Maganas, Dimitrios; Wurster, Nicole I C; Hugenbruch, Stefan; Kowalska, Joanna K; Pollock, Christopher J; Lima, Frederico A; Finkelstein, Kenneth D; DeBeer, Serena

    2016-09-01

    A series of vanadium compounds was studied by K-edge X-ray absorption (XAS) and K[Formula: see text] X-ray emission spectroscopies (XES). Qualitative trends within the datasets, as well as comparisons between the XAS and XES data, illustrate the information content of both methods. The complementary nature of the chemical insight highlights the success of this dual-technique approach in characterizing both the structural and electronic properties of vanadium sites. In particular, and in contrast to XAS or extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), we demonstrate that valence-to-core XES is capable of differentiating between ligating atoms with the same identity but different bonding character. Finally, density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations enable a more detailed, quantitative interpretation of the data. We also establish correction factors for the computational protocols through calibration to experiment. These hard X-ray methods can probe vanadium ions in any oxidation or spin state, and can readily be applied to sample environments ranging from solid-phase catalysts to biological samples in frozen solution. Thus, the combined XAS and XES approach, coupled with DFT calculations, provides a robust tool for the study of vanadium atoms in bioinorganic chemistry.

  19. Discrepancies between soft x-ray emissivity contours and magnetic flux surfaces in Alcator C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borras, M.C.; Granetz, R.S.

    1996-01-01

    The soft x-ray diagnostic system of Alcator C-Mod, equipped with 152 detectors distributed in four arrays, is used to obtain iso-emissivity surfaces. These surfaces have been characterized by giving their elongation and relative shift from the centre of the tokamak as functions of plasma radius. Flux surfaces, provided by magnetic diagnostics, have also been described with elongation and shift. Results from the comparison of the two sets of geometric parameters obtained from magnetic and x-ray diagnostics are presented. We find that, whereas the shifts obtained from these two diagnostic methods are always in good agreement, the corresponding elongation curves show different patterns. An agreement between elongations better than 2% is only found in a range of about 2 cm in minor radius. On the other hand, the elongations can differ by 10% towards the plasma edge and the plasma centre. Error bars for the x-ray diagnostic are obtained by propagating the effect of ± 1% random errors at the detector signals, and can amount to ± 1-2% of the estimated values near the edge and the centre of the plasma. The estimated uncertainties in the determination of elongation from magnetic flux surfaces are of the order of 4%. A series of tests and simulations performed to verify the accuracy of the X-ray diagnostic system is presented. The discrepancies found could imply the existence of asymmetries in impurity concentration. (Author)

  20. Catching a glimpse of the X-ray emission from galaxies in the early Universe by studying nearby low-metallicity galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu-Zych, Antara; Hornschemeier, Ann; Lehmer, Bret; Ptak, Andrew; Yukita, Mihoko

    2015-09-01

    Deep studies of X-ray emission from galaxies, such as the Chandra Deep Field-South 4 Ms (soon to be 7Ms) survey, have allowed us to peer back in history at X-ray binary formation and evolution over cosmic timescales. X-ray stacking observations of z=1-4 star-forming galaxies reveal that the metallicity evolution of the Universe drives the evolution of the 2-10 keV X-ray luminosity per star formation rate (SFR), which is dominated by high mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs). By finding local (z=0.02-0.2), rare, analogs of these high redshift galaxies, we have found further evidence that the X-ray emission per SFR is elevated compared to typical local star-forming galaxies and this appears to be due to the lower metallicities of these galaxies. Theoretically, metal poor stars produce weaker stellar winds, which results in higher numbers of more massive binaries and therefore leads to higher X-ray luminosities in metal poor populations. Since galaxies in the early universe (and their binaries) formed in a more pristine universe, with few metals, the analogs that we have been studying have cosmological significance. X-ray emission from X-ray binaries and hot gas within galaxies at these early epochs is expected to be important for heating and reionization of the Universe. We will present our current results on the study of HMXB populations in nearby metal-poor starbursts. These primordial analog galaxies represent a challenge for current X-ray facilities, but with modest exposures with Athena, we will obtain high-resolution X-ray spectra permitting detailed study of their properties. We use simulations of the X-ray spectra from these galaxies with Athena to explore the potential capability for measuring column densities (n_H) and metallicities, as well as line shifts to detect outflows that may ultimately enrich the intergalactic medium (IGM).

  1. X-ray Lβ215 emission spectrum of Ru in Ru(NH3)6Cl3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, R.C.C.; Barth, J.; LaVilla, R.E.; Nordling, C.

    1984-07-01

    One of the broader applications of synchrotron radiation has been to EXAFS studies for material structure determination, i.e., for an analysis of x-ray absorption over an extended energy region beyond a core ionization limit. Studies of the near edge structure (XANES) give a different type of information, characteristic of the local symmetry and electronic configuration of the absorbing atom. This type of information is reflected also in the x-ray emission spectra, in particular for transitions involving the valence levels. Examination of the near edge absorption or the emission spectrum does not require an instrument capable of scanning a wide energy range with high counting statistics, as does EXAFS; the needs are rather for good resolution and a reliable calibration of the energy scale. Some of the problems of near edge spectra were particularly evident in our investigation of Ru-Lβ 2 15 emission from Ru(NH 3 ) 6 Cl 3 . The Ru-Lβ 2 15 emission was measured with a laboratory Rowland circle x-ray spectrometer with a curved quartz (1010) crystal (radius = 22 inches) in a fixed position appropriate to the energy range, and a position sensitive detector which can be positioned along the Rowland circle. The Ru spectrum was excited mainly by Sn-L/sub α/ primary radiation from a Sn anode in a demountable x-ray tube operating at 13 kV and 120 mA. The resolution of the instrument in this region is 1.5 eV. An accurate calibration of the energy scale was conveniently obtained by measuring a reference x-ray emission line in the same instrumental configuration. In the present case the Pd-L/sub α/ emission line at 2838 eV was used to establish the energy scale. The energy dispersion of the instrument was determined from the Cl-K/sub β/ emission spectrum of CH 3 Cl between 2810 eV and 2830 eV and Pd-Lα 1 2 and extrapolated to the energy region of the recorded emission spectrum. 6 references, 1 figure

  2. Theoretically predicted soft x-ray emission and absorption spectra of graphitic-structured BC2N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Yasuji

    Theoretical B K, C K and N K x-ray emission/absorption spectra of three possible graphitic-structured BC2N clusters are predicted based on the B2p-, C2p-, and N2p- density-of-states (DOS) calculated by discrete variational (DV)-X[alpha] molecular orbital calculations. Several prominent differences in DOS spectral features among BC2Ns, h-BN, and graphite are confirmed from comparison of calculated B2p-, C2p-, and N2p-DOS spectra. These variations in the spectra allow BC2N structures to be positively identified by high-resolution x-ray emission/absorption spectroscopy in the B K, C K, and N K regions.

  3. Material analysis with the aid of particle induced X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadler, E.

    1984-12-01

    Material analysis are discussed on the basis of PIXE and Rutherford scattering spectroscopy. Various problems including cross-section changes, energy changes, count rate and deadtime, background, escape peaks and perturbations and overlap are discussed in relation to PIXE, while the influence of the energy loss of the projectile, the mass of the projectile, the cinematic factor, projectile energy, the scattering angle and the solid angle are discussed in terms of Rutherford scattering spectroscopy. X-ray production theory and x-ray detectors are also briefly discussed. The effect of elastically scattered protons on the energy resolution of the x-ray detector is discussed. The application of PIXE and Rutherford scattering spectroscopy to the analysis of air particle samples, and to the determination of the efficiency of the filters used for the collection of air-particle samples is also discussed

  4. Hard X-ray Emission along the Z Track in GX 17+2 GQ Ding∗ & CP ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the hard X-ray emission flux and the radio flux are highest on the HB, then fade away along the Z track on their HIDs, and, finally, become lowest on the flaring branch. (FB) (Penninx et al. 1988; Di Salvo et al. 2000, 2002; Lin et al. 2009; Ding et al. 2003, 2011; Migliari et al. 2007; Fender et al. 2007). It is noted that in the past ...

  5. Magnetic linear dichroism in x-ray emission spectroscopy: Yb in Yb3 Fe5 O12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, F.M.F. de; Krisch, M.H.; Sette, F.; Vogel, J.

    2000-01-01

    A magnetic linear dichroism MLD effect of up to 5% has been observed in the 2p 1/2 4d x-ray emission spectrum of Yb in Yb 3 Fe 5 O 12 . The spectral shape is well reproduced with an atomic multiplet calculation of the 4d to 2p decay. It is shown that the details of the spectral shapes are

  6. On Calibrations Using the Crab Nebula and Models of the Nebular X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisskopf, M. C.; Guainazzi, M.; Jahoda, K.; Shaposhnikov, N.; O'Dell, S. L.; Zavlin, V. E.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Elsner, R. F.

    2010-04-01

    Motivated by a paper of Kirsch et al. on possible use of the Crab Nebula as a standard candle for calibrating X-ray response functions, we examine consequences of intrinsic departures from a single (absorbed) power law upon such calibrations. We limit our analyses to three more modern X-ray instruments—the ROSAT/PSPC, the RXTE/Proportional Counter Array, and the XMM-Newton/EPIC-pn (burst mode). The results indicate a need to refine two of the three response functions studied. We are also able to distinguish between two current theoretical models for the system spectrum.

  7. Soft x-ray emission from the Lupus Loop and SN 1006 supernova remnants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, P.F. Jr.; Hearn, D.R.; Richardson, J.A.; Behnken, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    X-ray maps of the Lupus region have been obtained in a raster scan observation from SAS 3. These show the Lupus Loop to be a faint, extended source of soft x-rays with a temperature about 2.5 x 10 6 K. The most prominent feature of the region is the A.D. 1006 supernova remnant, which is unexpectedly bright at 0.2--1.0 keV. One speculative interpretation of the low-energy flux from SN 1006 is as blackbody radiation from a hot neutron star

  8. Dust extinction and X-ray emission from the starburst galaxy NGC 1482

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagshette, N. D.; Pandge, M. B.; Pandey, S. K.; Patil, M. K.

    2012-07-01

    We present the results based on multiwavelength imaging observations of the prominent dust lane starburst galaxy NGC 1482 aimed to investigate the extinction properties of dust existing in the extreme environment. (B-V) colour-index map derived for the starburst galaxy NGC 1482 confirms two prominent dust lanes running along its optical major axis and are found to extend up to ˜11 kpc. In addition to the main lanes, several filamentary structures of dust originating from the central starburst are also evident. Though, the dust is surrounded by exotic environment, the average extinction curve derived for this target galaxy is compatible with the Galactic curve, with RV = 3.05, and imply that the dust grains responsible for the optical extinction in the target galaxy are not really different than the canonical grains in the Milky Way. Our estimate of total dust content of NGC 1482 assuming screening effect of dust is ˜2.7 × 105 M⊙, and provide lower limit due to the fact that our method is not sensitive to the intermix component of dust. Comparison of the observed dust in the galaxy with that supplied by the SNe to the ISM, imply that this supply is not sufficient to account for the observed dust and hence point towards the origin of dust in this galaxy through a merger like event. Our multiband imaging analysis reveals a qualitative physical correspondence between the morphologies of the dust and Hα emission lines as well as diffuse X-ray emission in this galaxy. Spatially resolved spectral analysis of the hot gas along outflows exhibit a gradient in the temperature. Similar gradient was also noticed in the measured values of metallicity, indicating that the gas in the halo is not yet enriched. High resolution, 2-8 keV Chandra image reveals a pair of point sources in the nuclear region with their luminosities equal to 2.27 × 1039 erg s-1 and 9.34 × 1039 erg s-1, and are in excess of the Eddington-limit of 1.5 M⊙ accreting source. Spectral analysis of these

  9. Radio emission in clusters and connection to X-ray emission

    OpenAIRE

    Feretti, Luigina

    2007-01-01

    The most spectacular aspect of cluster radio emission is represented by the large-scale diffuse radio sources, which cannot be obviously associated with any individual galaxy. These sources demonstrate the existence of relativistic particles and magnetic fields in the cluster volume, thus indicating the presence of non-thermal processes in the hot intracluster medium. The knowledge of the properties of these sources has increased significantly in recent years, owing to sensitive radio images ...

  10. High-energy-resolution grazing emission X-ray fluorescence applied to the characterization of thin Al films on Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayser, Y., E-mail: yves.kayser@psi.ch [Department of Physics, University of Fribourg, 1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Szlachetko, J. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen-PSI (Switzerland); Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Banaś, D. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Cao, W. [Department of Physics, University of Fribourg, 1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Department of Physics, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Dousse, J.-Cl.; Hoszowska, J. [Department of Physics, University of Fribourg, 1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Kubala-Kukuś, A.; Pajek, M. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland)

    2013-10-01

    The grazing emission X-ray fluorescence (GEXRF) technique was applied to the analysis of different Al films, with nominal thicknesses in the range of 1 nm to 150 nm, on Si wafers. In GEXRF the sample volume from which the fluorescence intensity is detected is restricted to a near-surface region whose thickness can be tuned by varying the observation angle. This is possible because of the refraction of the fluorescence X-rays and the quite long emission paths within the probed sample. By recording the X-ray fluorescence signal for different shallow emission angles, defined relatively to the flat, smooth sample surface, the deposited Al surface layers of the different samples could be well characterized in terms of layer thickness, layer density, oxidation and surface roughness. The advantages offered by synchrotron radiation and the employed wavelength-dispersive detection setup were profited from. The GEXRF results retrieved were confirmed by complementary measurements. The experimental setup, the principles and advantages of GEXRF and the analysis of the recorded angular intensity profiles will be discussed in details. - Highlights: • GEXRF was applied to the quantitative characterization of Al-layered Si wafers. • The principles and applications of GEXRF and GIXRF are reviewed. • The advantages of a high-energy-resolution setup were taken advantage of. • The layer thicknesses, density, oxidation and roughness were reconstructed. • The results were validated by XANES, micro-XRF and SEM.

  11. Radial profiles of hard X-ray emission during steady state current drive in the TRIAM-1M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Takabatake, Y.; Jotaki, E.; Moriyama, S.; Nagao, A.; Nakamura, K.; Hiraki, N.; Itoh, S.

    1990-01-01

    The hard X-ray emission from the TRIAM-1M tokamak plasma during steady state lower hybrid current drive with a discharge duration of a few minutes was measured with sodium iodide scintillation spectrometers. The radial profiles of the X-ray emission were also measured and indicate that, in the low density regime (n e =(1-3)x10 12 cm -3 ), the current carrying high energy electrons are mainly in the inner region of the plasma column and their radial profile remains unchanged during current drive. On the other hand, high density discharges (n e =(3-6)x10 12 cm -3 ) are always accompanied by an abrupt drop of the plasma current, and the X-ray emission profile changes from peaked to broad. This change can be attributed to the conditions of wave accessibility. As the electron density increases, the accessibility of the plasma to lower hybrid waves with low values of the parallel wave number n parallel is significantly reduced and high energy electrons resonating with the waves are produced at the plasma periphery. Interaction of these electrons with the limiters causes an increase of the electron density in this region; waves with low n parallel then become completely excluded from the inner part of the plasma column. This interpretation is supported by measurements of the density profile and impurity radiation, and has been confirmed in an investigation of discharges with additional gas puffing. (author). 17 refs, 21 figs

  12. Transition Metal Nanoparticle Oxidation in a Chemically Non-Homogenous Environment Revealed by 2p3d Resonant X-ray Emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schooneveld, M.M.; Suljoti, E.; Campos-Cuerva, C.; Gosselink, R.W.; van der Eerden, A.M.J.; Schlappa, J.; Zhou, K.J.; Monney, C.; Schmitt, T.; de Groot, F.M.F.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is often employed in fields such as catalysis to determine whether transition-metal nanoparticles are oxidized. Here we show 2p3/2 XAS and 2p3d resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) data of oleate-coated cobalt nanoparticles with average diameters of 4.0,

  13. X-Ray Jet Emission from the Black Hole X-Ray Binary XTE J1550-564 with Chandra in 2000

    OpenAIRE

    Tomsick, J.A.; Corbel, S.; Fender, R.P.; Miller, J.M.; Orosz, J.A.; Tzioumis, T.; Wijnands, R.A.D.; Kaaret, P.

    2003-01-01

    We have discovered an X-ray jet due to material ejected from the black hole X-ray transient XTE J1550-564. The discovery was first reported by Corbel et al. (Science, 298, 196 and astro-ph/0210224), and here, we present an analysis of the three Chandra observations made between 2000 June and 2000 September. For these observations, a source is present that moves in an eastward direction away from the point source associated with the compact object. The separation between the new source and the...

  14. A tetrahedron beam computed tomography benchtop system with a multiple pixel field emission x-ray tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaochao; Kim, Joshua; Laganis, Philip; Schulze, Derek; Liang, Yongguang; Zhang, Tiezhi

    2011-10-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT) using a carbon nanotube (CNT) multiple pixel field emission x-ray (MPFEX) tube. A multiple pixel x-ray source facilitates the creation of novel x-ray imaging modalities. In a previous publication, the authors proposed a Tetrahedron Beam Computed Tomography (TBCT) imaging system which comprises a linear source array and a linear detector array that are orthogonal to each other. TBCT is expected to reduce scatter compared with Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) and to have better detector performance. Therefore, it may produce improved image quality for image guided radiotherapy. In this study, a TBCT benchtop system has been developed with an MPFEX tube. The tube has 75 CNT cold cathodes, which generate 75 x-ray focal spots on an elongated anode, and has 4 mm pixel spacing. An in-house-developed, 5-row CT detector array using silicon photodiodes and CdWO(4) scintillators was employed in the system. Hardware and software were developed for tube control and detector data acquisition. The raw data were preprocessed for beam hardening and detector response linearity and were reconstructed with an FDK-based image reconstruction algorithm. The focal spots were measured at about 1 × 2 mm(2) using a star phantom. Each cathode generates around 3 mA cathode current with 2190 V gate voltage. The benchtop system is able to perform TBCT scans with a prolonged scanning time. Images of a commercial CT phantom were successfully acquired. A prototype system was developed, and preliminary phantom images were successfully acquired. MPFEX is a promising x-ray source for TBCT. Further improvement of tube output is needed in order for it to be used in clinical TBCT systems.

  15. Quantitative reconstruction of PIXE-tomography data for thin samples using GUPIX X-ray emission yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michelet, C., E-mail: michelet@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Barberet, Ph., E-mail: barberet@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Devès, G., E-mail: deves@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Bouguelmouna, B., E-mail: bbouguel@gmail.com [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Bourret, S., E-mail: bourret@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Delville, M.-H., E-mail: delville@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr [Institut de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Bordeaux (ICMCB, UPR9048) CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, 87 avenue du Dr. A. Schweitzer, Pessac F-33608 (France); Le Trequesser, Q., E-mail: letreque@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Institut de Chimie de la Matière Condensée de Bordeaux (ICMCB, UPR9048) CNRS, Université de Bordeaux, 87 avenue du Dr. A. Schweitzer, Pessac F-33608 (France); Gordillo, N., E-mail: nuri.gordillo@gmail.com [Univ. Bordeaux, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); CNRS, IN2P3, CENBG, UMR 5797, F-33170 Gradignan (France); Beasley, D.G., E-mail: d.beasley@ucl.ac.uk [Center of Medical Imaging Computing (CMIC), Department of Medical Physics & Bioengineering, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); and others

    2015-04-01

    We present here a new development of the TomoRebuild software package, to perform quantitative Particle Induced X-ray Emission Tomography (PIXET) reconstruction. X-ray yields are obtained from the GUPIX code. The GUPIX data base is available for protons up to 5 MeV and also in the 20–100 MeV energy range, deuterons up to 6 MeV, {sup 3}He and alphas up to 12 MeV. In this version, X-ray yields are calculated for thin samples, i.e. without simulating X-ray attenuation. PIXET data reconstruction is kept as long as possible independent from Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy Tomography (STIMT). In this way, the local mass distribution (in g/cm{sup 3}) of each X-ray emitting element is reconstructed in all voxels of the analyzed volume, only from PIXET data, without the need of associated STIMT data. Only the very last step of data analysis requires STIMT data, in order to normalize PIXET data to obtain concentration distributions, in terms of normalized mass fractions (in μg/g). For this, a noise correction procedure has been designed in ImageJ. Moreover sinogram or image misalignment can be corrected, as well as the difference in beam size between the two experiments. The main features of the TomoRebuild code, user friendly design and modular C++ implementation, were kept. The software package is portable and can run on Windows and Linux operating systems. An optional user-friendly graphic interface was designed in Java, as a plugin for the ImageJ graphic software package. Reconstruction examples are presented from biological specimens of Caenorhabditis elegans – a small nematode constituting a reference model for biology studies. The reconstruction results are compared between the different codes TomoRebuild, DISRA and JPIXET, and different reconstruction methods: Filtered BackProjection (FBP) and Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM)

  16. H2 emission and CO absorption in Centaurus A : Evidence for a circumnuclear molecular disk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Israel, F.P.; Dishoeck, van E.F.; Baas, F.; Koornneef, J.; Black, J.H.; Graauw, de Th.

    1990-01-01

    Emission and absorption lines of H2 and CO in nuclei of several galaxies with strong NIR emission, including Centaurus A (NGC 5128), were studied at the La Silla observatory to obtain constraints on the physical parameters of molecular material close to the nucleus of the NGC 5128 galaxy. Results

  17. Detailed ADM-based Modeling of Shock Retreat and X-ray Emission of τ Sco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, C. L.; Petit, V.; Cohen, D. H.; Townsend, R. H.; Wade, G. A.

    2018-01-01

    Leveraging the improvement of spectropolarimeters over the past few decades, surveys have found that about 10% of OB-type stars host strong (˜ kG) and mostly dipolar surface magnetic fields. One B-type star, τ Sco, has a more complex surface magnetic field than the general population of OB stars. Interestingly, its X-ray luminosity is an order of magnitude higher than predicted from analytical models of magnetized winds. Previous studies of τ Sco's magnetosphere have predicted that the region of closed field loops should be located close to the stellar surface. However, the lack of X-ray variability and the location of the shock-heated plasma measured from forbidden-to-intercombination X-ray line ratios suggest that the hot plasma, and hence the closed magnetic loops, extend considerably farther from the stellar surface, implying a significantly lower mass loss rate than initially assumed. We present an adaptation of the Analytic Dynamical Magnetosphere model, describing the magnetic confinement of the stellar wind, for an arbitrary field loop configuration. This model is used to predict the shock-heated plasma temperatures for individual field loops, which are then compared to high resolution grating spectra from the Chandra X-ray Observatory. This comparison shows that larger closed magnetic loops are needed.

  18. Hard X-ray Emission along the Z Track in GX 17+ 2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    -ray Timing Experiment (HEXTE) on board Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer for Z source GX 17+2, we investigate the evolution of its PCA spectra and HEXTE spectra along a `Z' track on its hardness-intensity diagram. A hard ...

  19. A powerful flare from Sgr A* confirms the synchrotron nature of the X-ray emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponti, G.; George, E.; Scaringi, S.; Zhang, S.; Jin, C.; Dexter, J.; Terrier, R.; Clavel, M.; Degenaar, N.; Eisenhauer, F.; Genzel, R.; Gillessen, S.; Goldwurm, A.; Habibi, M.; Haggard, D.; Hailey, C.; Harrison, F.; Merloni, A.; Mori, K.; Nandra, K.; Ott, T.; Pfuhl, O.; Plewa, P.M.; Waisberg, I.

    2017-01-01

    We present the first fully simultaneous fits to the near-infrared (NIR) and X-ray spectral slope (and its evolution) during a very bright flare from Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole at the Milky Way's centre. Our study arises from ambitious multiwavelength monitoring campaigns with XMM-Newton,

  20. Investigation of x-ray emission induced by hot electrons in dense Cu plasmas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmíd, Michal; Renner, Oldřich; Rosmej, F.B.; Khaghani, D.

    T161, May (2014), s. 1-3 ISSN 0031-8949 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100101208 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : dense plasma focus * X-ray and gamma-ray measurements * particle beam interactions in plasmas * plasma production and heating by laser beams Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 1.126, year: 2014

  1. Iron Emission Lines from Extended X-ray Jets in SS 433: Reheating of Atomic Nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Migliari, Simone; Fender, Rob; Méndez, Mariano

    2002-01-01

    Powerful relativistic jets are among the most ubiquitous and energetic observational consequences of accretion around supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei and neutron stars and stellar-mass black holes in x-ray binary (XRB) systems. But despite more than three decades of study, the

  2. The Relationship Between Solar Radio and Hard X-ray Emission

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    White, S.M.; Benz, A. O.; Christe, S.; Fárník, František; Kundu, M.R.; Mann, G.; Ning, Z.; Raulin, J.-P.; Silva-Valio, A.V.R.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Vilmer, N.; Warmuth, A.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 159, 1-4 (2011), s. 225-261 ISSN 0038-6308 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Sun * radio radiation * X-rays Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.611, year: 2011

  3. Evidence for Intermediate Polars as the Origin of the Galactic Center Hard X-ray Emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hailey, Charles J.; Mori, Kaya; Perez, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    estimated white dwarf mass. Observations of the inner 10 pc can be accounted for by IPs with 〈MWD〉≈0.9M⊙, consistent with that of the CV population in general and the X-ray observed field IPs in particular. The lower mass derived by Chandra and XMM-Newton appears to be an artifact of narrow energy...

  4. Observation of enhanced soft x-ray emission using nitrogen clusters ionized by intense, femtosecond laser

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mocek, Tomáš; Park, J. J.; Kim, Ch. M.; Kim, H. T.; Lee, D. G.; Hong, K. H.; Nam, Ch. H.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 5 (2003), s. 3105-3107 ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A100 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010921 Keywords : clusters * femtosecond laser s * x-ray spectroscopy Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Laser s Impact factor: 2.171, year: 2003

  5. The X-ray emission of the WR+O binary WR 79

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosset, E.; Sana, H.; Rauw, G.; Nazé, Y.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of our multiwavelength study of the open cluster NGC6231, we observed the colliding-wind WR+O binary WR79 at six different epochs with the XMM-Newton observatory. These pointings offer the possibility to study the X-ray spectrum of WR79 and its possible variability. Our results are

  6. Surface roughness-aided hard X-ray emission from carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MWNT) irradiated by intense, femtosecond laser over an intensity range of 1015 –1017 W cm−2 2 is reported. The MWNT targets yield two orders of magnitude higher X-rays (indicating significant enhancement of laser coupling) and three ...

  7. Weak hard X-ray emission from two broad absorption line quasars observed with NuSTAR: Compton-thick absorption or intrinsic X-ray weakness?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.

    2013-01-01

    likely explanation. We also discuss the intrinsic X-ray weakness scenario based on a coronal-quenching model relevant to the shielding gas and disk wind of BAL quasars. Motivated by our NuSTAR results, we perform a Chandra stacking analysis with the Large Bright Quasar Survey BAL quasar sample and place...

  8. Role of local absorption on the X-ray emission from MHD accretion shocks in classical T Tauri stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Accretion processes onto classical T Tauri stars (CTTSs are believed to generate shocks at the stellar surface due to the impact of supersonic downflowing plasma. Although current models of accretion streams provide a plausible global picture of this process, several aspects are still unclear. For example, the observed X-ray luminosity in accretion shocks is, in general, well below the predicted value. A possible explanation discussed in the literature is in terms of significant absorption of the emission due to the thick surrounding medium. Here we consider a 2D MHD model describing an accretion stream propagating through the atmosphere of a CTTS and impacting onto its chromosphere. The model includes all the relevant physics, namely the gravity, the thermal conduction, and the radiative cooling, and a realistic description of the unperturbed stellar atmosphere (from the chromosphere to the corona. From the model results, we synthesize the X-ray emission emerging from the hot slab produced by the accretion shock, exploring different configurations and strengths of the stellar magnetic field. The synthesis includes the local absorption by the thick surrounding medium and the Doppler shift of lines due to the component of plasma velocity along the line-of-sight. We explore the effects of absorption on the emerging X-ray spectrum, considering different inclinations of the accretion stream with respect to the observer. Finally we compare our results with the observations.

  9. Electronic structure of multiferroic BiFeO3 by resonant soft-x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Tohru; Higuchi, T.; Liu, Y.-S.; Yao, P.; Glans, P.-A.; Guo, Jinghua; Chang, C.; Wu, Z.; Sakamoto, W.; Itoh, N.; Shimura, T.; Yogo, T.; Hattori, T.

    2008-07-11

    The electronic structure of multiferroic BiFeO{sub 3} has been studied using soft-X-ray emission spectroscopy. The fluorescence spectra exhibit that the valence band is mainly composed of O 2p state hybridized with Fe 3d state. The band gap corresponding to the energy separation between the top of the O 2p valence band and the bottom of the Fe 3d conduction band is 1.3 eV. The soft-X-ray Raman scattering reflects the features due to charge transfer transition from O 2p valence band to Fe 3d conduction band. These findings are similar to the result of electronic structure calculation by density functional theory within the local spin-density approximation that included the effect of Coulomb repulsion between localized d states.

  10. Hard X-Ray Emission from Sh 2-104: A NuSTAR Search for Gamma-Ray Counterparts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotthelf, E. V.; Mori, K.; Aliu, E.

    2016-01-01

    We present NuSTAR hard X-ray observations of Sh 2–104, a compact H ii region containing several young massive stellar clusters (YMSCs). We have detected distinct hard X-ray sources coincident with localized VERITAS TeV emission recently resolved from the giant gamma-ray complex MGRO J2019...... with extragalactic objects. The combined XMM-Newton and NuSTAR spectrum of 3XMM J201744.7+365045 is well-fit to an absorbed power-law model with cm−2 and a photon index . Based on possible long-term flux variation and the lack of detected pulsations (≤43% modulation), this object is likely a background active...

  11. THE CHANDRA SURVEY OF EXTRAGALACTIC SOURCES IN THE 3CR CATALOG: X-RAY EMISSION FROM NUCLEI, JETS, AND HOTSPOTS IN THE CHANDRA ARCHIVAL OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Torino, via Pietro Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy); Harris, D. E.; Paggi, A.; Wilkes, B. J.; Kuraszkiewicz, J. [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Liuzzo, E.; Orienti, M.; Paladino, R. [Istituto di Radioastronomia, INAF, via Gobetti 101, I-40129, Bologna (Italy); Tremblay, G. R. [Yale Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Physics Department, Yale University, P.O. Box 208120, New Haven, CT 06520-8120 (United States); Baum, S. A.; O’Dea, C. P. [University of Manitoba, Dept of Physics and Astronomy, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    As part of our program to build a complete radio and X-ray database of all Third Cambridge catalog extragalactic radio sources, we present an analysis of 93 sources for which Chandra archival data are available. Most of these sources have already been published. Here we provide a uniform re-analysis and present nuclear X-ray fluxes and X-ray emission associated with radio jet knots and hotspots using both publicly available radio images and new radio images that have been constructed from data available in the Very Large Array archive. For about 1/3 of the sources in the selected sample, a comparison between the Chandra and radio observations was not reported in the literature: we find X-ray detections of 2 new radio jet knots and 17 hotspots. We also report the X-ray detection of extended emission from the intergalactic medium for 15 galaxy clusters.

  12. Non-Quiescent X-ray Emission from Neutron Stars and Black Holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tournear, Derek M

    2003-08-18

    X-ray astronomy began with the detection of the persistent source Scorpius X-1. Shortly afterwards, sources were detected that were variable. Centaurus X-2, was determined to be an X-ray transient, having a quiescent state, and a state that was much brighter. As X-ray astronomy progressed, classifications of transient sources developed. One class of sources, believed to be neutron stars, undergo extreme luminosity transitions lasting a few seconds. These outbursts are believed to be thermonuclear explosions occurring on the surface of neutron stars (type I X-ray bursts). Other sources undergo luminosity changes that cannot be explained by thermonuclear burning and last for days to months. These sources are soft X-ray transients (SXTs) and are believed to be the result of instabilities in the accretion of matter onto either a neutron star or black hole. Type I X-ray bursts provide a tool for probing the surfaces of neutron stars. Requiring a surface for the burning has led authors to use the presence of X-ray bursts to rule out the existence of a black hole (where an event horizon exists not a surface) for systems which exhibit type I X-ray bursts. Distinguishing between neutron stars and black holes has been a problem for decades. Narayan and Heyl have developed a theoretical framework to convert suitable upper limits on type I X-ray bursts from accreting black hole candidates (BHCs) into evidence for an event horizon. We survey 2101.2 ks of data from the USA X-ray timing experiment and 5142 ks of data from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) experiment to obtain the first formal constraint of this type. 1122 ks of neutron star data yield a population averaged mean burst rate of 1.7 {+-} 0.4 x 10{sup -5} bursts s{sup -1}, while 6081 ks of BHC data yield a 95% confidence level upper limit of 4.9 x 10{sup -7} bursts s{sup -1}. Applying the framework of Narayan and Heyl we calculate regions of luminosity where the neutron stars are expected to burst and the BHCs

  13. Projectile X-ray emission in relativistic ion-atom collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salem, Shadi Mohammad Ibrahim

    2010-03-16

    This work reports on the study of the projectile X-ray emission in relativistic ion-atom collisions. Excitation of K-shell in He-like uranium ions, electron capture into H-like uranium ions and Simultaneous ionization and excitation of initially He-like uranium ions have been studied using the experimental storage ring at GSI. For the K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1} and K{sub {alpha}}{sub 2} transitions originating from the excitation of the He-like uranium ions, no alignment was observed. In contrast, the Ly{sub {alpha}}{sub 1} radiation from the simultaneous ionization-excitation process of the He-like uranium ions shows a clear alignment. The experimental value leads to the inclusion of a magnetic term in the interaction potential. The capture process of target electrons into the highly-charged heavy ions was studied using H-like uranium ions at an incident energy of 220 MeV/u, impinging on N{sub 2} gas-target. It was shown that, the strongly aligned electrons captured in 2p{sub 3/2} level couple with the available 1s{sub 1/2} electron which shows no initial directional preference. The magnetic sub-state population of the 2p{sub 3/2} electron is redistributed according to the coupling rules to the magnetic sub-states of the relevant two-electron states. This leads to the large anisotropy in the corresponding individual ground state transitions contributing to the K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1} emission. From the K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1}/K{sub {alpha}}{sub 2} ratio, the current results show that the incoherent addition of the E1 and M2 transition components yield to an almost isotropic emission of the total K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1}. In contrast to the radiative electron capture, the experimental results for the K-shell single excitation of He-like uranium ions indicate that only the {sup 1}P{sub 1} level contributes to the K{sub {alpha}}{sub 1} transition. For this case, the anisotropy parameter {beta}{sub 20} was found to be -0.20{+-}0.03. This work also reports on the study of a two

  14. Modeling the Magnetospheric X-ray Emission from Solar Wind Charge Exchange with Verification from XMM-Newton Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-26

    Earth (i.e., hydrogen) to a heavy , high charge state, ion in the solarwind. The electron can be captured in an excited state and transition to lower... heavy ions , Geophys Res. Lett., 24, 105–109, doi:10.1029/96GL03780. Cravens, T. E. (2000), Heliospheric X-ray emission associated with charge transfer...quantifying charge exchange from other ions with emission lines around the 1 4 keV band have also been performed, though the lack of cross-sectional

  15. Signature of externally introduced laser fields in X-ray emission of multicharged ions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Renner, Oldřich; Sauvan, P.; Dalimier, E.; Riconda, C.; Rosmej, F.B.; Weber, S.; Nicolai, P.; Peyrusse, O.; Uschmann, I.; Höfer, S.; Loetzsch, R.; Förster, E.; Oks, E.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 3 (2009), s. 139-146 ISSN 1574-1818 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/06/0801 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 506350 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laser-produced plasma * x-ray spectroscopy * atomic processes in plasmas * PIC and fluid simulations * plasma diagnostics Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  16. Velocity gradient induced line splitting in x-ray emission accompanying plasma-wall interaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmíd, Michal; Renner, Oldřich; Liska, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 125, Aug (2013), s. 38-44 ISSN 0022-4073 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/0814; GA ČR GAP205/11/0571 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser-produced plasmas * x-ray spectroscopy * plasma-wall interaction * spectral line profiles * Doppler shift * ion velocity gradients Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.288, year: 2013

  17. Charge exchange signatures in x-ray line emission accompanying plasma-wall interaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Renner, Oldřich; Dalimier, E.; Liska, R.; Oks, E.; Šmíd, Michal

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 397, č. 1 (2012), s. 1-6 ISSN 1742-6588 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/0814; GA ČR GAP208/10/2302; GA AV ČR IAAX00100903 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : laser-produced plasma * particle jets generation * plasma-wall interaction * x-ray spectroscopy * charge exchange Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  18. Analysis of ancient Egyptian finds of metal artefacts by alpha-induced x-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mommsen, H.; Bauer, K.G.; Fazly, Q.; Mayer-Kuckuk, T.; Schurkes, P.

    1982-05-01

    The application of the particle-induced X-ray fluorescence method for the determination of the quantitative composition of objects is described. This is a non-destructive method of analysis, is accurate and highly sensitive. The method is particularly attractive for the examination of valuable archeological finds. The results of the analyses of various Egyptian metal artefacts carried out with the method are presented and discussed

  19. Thermal disc emission from a rotating black hole: X-ray polarization signatures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dovčiak, Michal; Muleri, F.; Goosmann, René; Karas, Vladimír; Matt, G.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 391, č. 1 (2008), s. 32-38 ISSN 0035-8711 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/07/0052; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06014 Grant - others:ESA(XE) ESA-PECS project No. 98040 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : polarization * relativity * instrumentation: polarimeters * X-rays: binaries Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 5.185, year: 2008

  20. The X-ray view of the quasar MR 2251-178 and its host cluster: Variability, absorption, and intracluster gas emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komossa, S.

    2001-03-01

    MR 2251-178 was the first quasar initially discovered in X-rays, and the first one found to host a warm absorber. The quasar turned out to be an outstanding object in many respects. It has a high ratio of X-ray/optical luminosity, is surrounded by the largest quasar emission-line nebula known, and is located in the outskirts of a cluster of galaxies. Here, we present results from an analysis of the X-ray spectral, temporal, and spatial properties of this source and its environment based on deep ROSAT observations. Remarkably, we do not detect any excess X-ray cold absorption expected to originate from the giant gas nebula surrounding MR 2251-178. This excludes the presence of a huge HI envelope around the quasar. The X-ray spectrum of MR 2251-178 is best fit by a warm-absorbed powerlaw with an ionization parameter log U = 0.5 and a column density log N_w = 22.6 which, however, cannot be the same material as the giant optical emission line nebula. The mean (0.1-2.4) keV X-ray luminosity amounts to 1045 erg/s. A spatial analysis shows that the bulk of the X-ray emission from the quasar is consistent with a point source, as expected in view of the powerlaw-shaped X-ray spectrum and the rapid X-ray variability we detect. In addition, extended emission appears at weak emission levels, including a bridge between the quasar and the cD galaxy of the cluster. The X-ray emission from the intra-cluster medium is weak or absent. We derive an upper limit on the X-ray luminosity of L_x <= 1.6 1042 erg/s, weaker than other clusters of comparable richness. None of the other member galaxies of the cluster to which MR 2251-178 belongs, are detected in X-rays. However, east of the quasar there is a significant excess of X-ray sources, several of them without optical counterparts on the UK Schmidt plates.

  1. An Experimental Benchmark for Improved Simulation of Absolute Soft X-Ray Emission from Polystyrene Targets Irradiated With the Nike Laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weaver, J. L; Busquet, M; Colombant, D. G; Mostovych, A. N; Feldman, U; Klapisch, M; Seely, J. F; Brown, C; Holland, G

    2005-01-01

    Absolutely calibrated, time-resolved spectral intensity measurements of soft x-ray emission from laser-irradiated polystyrene targets are compared to radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that include...

  2. Correlation between Soft X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectra of the Nitrogen Atoms within Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikawa, Yuka; Tokushima, Takashi; Takahashi, Osamu; Hoke, Hiroshi; Takamuku, Toshiyuki

    2016-08-04

    Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been performed on the N K-edge of two imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([C2mim][TFSA]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([C2mim][Br]), to clarify the electronic structures of the ILs. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has also been applied to the ILs by excitation at various X-ray energies according to the XAS spectra. It was possible to fully associate the XAS peaks with the XES peaks. Additionally, both XAS and XES spectra of the ILs were well reproduced by the theoretical spectra for a single-molecule model on [C2mim](+) and [TFSA](-) using density functional theory. The assignments for the XAS and XES peaks of the ILs were accomplished from both experimental and theoretical approaches. The theoretical XAS and XES spectra of [C2mim](+) and [TFSA](-) did not significantly depend on the conformations of the ions. The reproducibility of the theoretical spectra for the single-molecule model suggested that the interactions between the cations and anions are very weak in the ILs, thus scarcely influencing the electronic structures of the nitrogen atoms.

  3. X-ray Emission Cross Sections following Charge Exchange by Multiply-Charged Ions of Astrophysical Interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otranto, Sebastian; Olson, Ronald; Beiersdorfer, Peter

    2006-05-01

    State selective nl-electron capture cross sections calculated using the classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) model are presented for highly charged ions with Z = 6-10 colliding with atoms and molecules. The energy dependence of the l-level populations is investigated. The calculated cross sections are compared with measurements made by Greenwood et al [1], using O^8+ and Ne^10+ on various targets at 3 keV/amu, and with recent x-ray emission cross sections measured with the EBIT machine at LLNL using O^8+ and Ne^9+,10+ on different targets at 10 eV/amu. We use the calculated cross sections to present an ab initio determination of the soft x-ray spectrum of comet C/Linear 1999 S4 that was observed on the Chandra X-ray Observatory [2]. [1] J. B. Greenwood, I. D. Williams, S. J. Smith and A. Chutjian, Phys. Rev. A 63, 062707 (2001). [2] C. M. Lisse, D. J. Christian, K. Dennerl, K. J. Meech, R. Petre, H. A. Weaver and S. J. Wolk, Science 292, 1343 (2001).

  4. Radiation by energetic electrons accelerated by wave-particle interaction: a plausible mechanism for x-ray emission from the Venus mantle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bingham

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper it is argued that recently observed x-ray emission from non-magnetic planets (Dennerl et al., 2002 can be explained as a combination of bremsstrahlung and line K-shell radiation produced by the interaction of energetic electrons with the neutral atmosphere. Numerical simulations show that the modified two stream instability can generate energetic 100 eV electrons that are observed and these electrons can produce x-ray emission.

  5. Local moments and electronic correlations in Fe-based Heusler alloys: Kα x-ray emission spectra measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svyazhin, Artem, E-mail: svyazhin@imp.uran.ru [M.N. Mikheev Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences – Ural Division, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kurmaev, Ernst; Shreder, Elena; Shamin, Sergey [M.N. Mikheev Institute of Metal Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences – Ural Division, 620990 Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Sahle, Christoph J. [ESRF – The European Synchrotron, CS40220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2016-09-15

    Heusler alloys are a property-rich class of materials, intensively investigated today from both theoretical and real-world application points of view. In this paper, we attempt to shed light on the role of electronic correlations in the Fe{sub 2}MeAl group (where Me represents all 3d elements from Ti to Ni) of Heusler alloys. For this purpose, we have investigated the local moments of iron by means of the x-ray emission spectroscopy technique. To obtain numerical values of local moments, the Kα-FWHM method has been employed for the first time. In every compound of the group, the presence of a local moment on the Fe atom was detected. As has been revealed, the values of these moments are temperature-independent, pointing to an insufficiency of a pure itinerant approach to magnetism in these alloys. We also comprehensively compare the usage of Kβ main lines and Kα spectra as tools for the probing of local moments and point out the significant advantages of the latter. - Highlights: • Local spin moments of iron in Fe{sub 2}MeAl (Me = Ti … Ni) Heusler alloys were investigated by means of x-ray emission spectroscopy. • Independence of the local moments from temperature confirms their localized nature. • A local moment value of iron in Fe{sub 2}MeAl raises with the atomic number of element Me. • The applicability of the Kα x-ray emission line for extracting local moment values of 3d elements was established.

  6. Local moments and electronic correlations in Fe-based Heusler alloys: Kα x-ray emission spectra measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svyazhin, Artem; Kurmaev, Ernst; Shreder, Elena; Shamin, Sergey; Sahle, Christoph J.

    2016-01-01

    Heusler alloys are a property-rich class of materials, intensively investigated today from both theoretical and real-world application points of view. In this paper, we attempt to shed light on the role of electronic correlations in the Fe 2 MeAl group (where Me represents all 3d elements from Ti to Ni) of Heusler alloys. For this purpose, we have investigated the local moments of iron by means of the x-ray emission spectroscopy technique. To obtain numerical values of local moments, the Kα-FWHM method has been employed for the first time. In every compound of the group, the presence of a local moment on the Fe atom was detected. As has been revealed, the values of these moments are temperature-independent, pointing to an insufficiency of a pure itinerant approach to magnetism in these alloys. We also comprehensively compare the usage of Kβ main lines and Kα spectra as tools for the probing of local moments and point out the significant advantages of the latter. - Highlights: • Local spin moments of iron in Fe 2 MeAl (Me = Ti … Ni) Heusler alloys were investigated by means of x-ray emission spectroscopy. • Independence of the local moments from temperature confirms their localized nature. • A local moment value of iron in Fe 2 MeAl raises with the atomic number of element Me. • The applicability of the Kα x-ray emission line for extracting local moment values of 3d elements was established.

  7. Is low-energy-ion bombardment generated X-ray emission a secondary mutational source to ion-beam-induced genetic mutation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thongkumkoon, P.; Prakrajang, K.; Thopan, P.; Yaopromsiri, C.; Suwannakachorn, D.; Yu, L.D.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Detected X-ray emission from metal, plastic and biological samples. ► Characteristic X-ray emission was detected from metal but not from non-metals. ► Low-energy ion bombarded bacteria held in different sample holders. ► Bacteria held in metal holder had higher mutation rate than in plastic holder. ► Ion-beam-induced X-ray from biological sample is not a basic mutation source. -- Abstract: Low-energy ion beam biotechnology has achieved tremendous successes in inducing crop mutation and gene transfer. However, mechanisms involved in the related processes are not yet well understood. In ion-beam-induced mutation, ion-bombardment-produced X-ray has been proposed to be one of the secondary mutation sources, but the speculation has not yet been experimentally tested. We carried out this investigation to test whether the low-energy ion-beam-produced X-ray was a source of ion-beam-induced mutation. In the investigation, X-ray emission from 29-keV nitrogen- or argon- ion beam bombarded bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells held in a metal or plastic sample holder was in situ detected using a highly sensitive X-ray detector. The ion beam bombarded bacterial cells held in different material holders were observed for mutation induction. The results led to a conclusion that secondary X-ray emitted from ion-beam-bombarded biological living materials themselves was not a, or at least a negligible, mutational source, but the ion-beam-induced X-ray emission from the metal that made the sample holder could be a source of mutation

  8. Is low-energy-ion bombardment generated X-ray emission a secondary mutational source to ion-beam-induced genetic mutation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thongkumkoon, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Prakrajang, K. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Faculty of Science, Maejo University, Chiang Mai 50290 (Thailand); Thopan, P.; Yaopromsiri, C. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Suwannakachorn, D. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@fnrf.science.cmu.ac.th [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: ► Detected X-ray emission from metal, plastic and biological samples. ► Characteristic X-ray emission was detected from metal but not from non-metals. ► Low-energy ion bombarded bacteria held in different sample holders. ► Bacteria held in metal holder had higher mutation rate than in plastic holder. ► Ion-beam-induced X-ray from biological sample is not a basic mutation source. -- Abstract: Low-energy ion beam biotechnology has achieved tremendous successes in inducing crop mutation and gene transfer. However, mechanisms involved in the related processes are not yet well understood. In ion-beam-induced mutation, ion-bombardment-produced X-ray has been proposed to be one of the secondary mutation sources, but the speculation has not yet been experimentally tested. We carried out this investigation to test whether the low-energy ion-beam-produced X-ray was a source of ion-beam-induced mutation. In the investigation, X-ray emission from 29-keV nitrogen- or argon- ion beam bombarded bacterial Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells held in a metal or plastic sample holder was in situ detected using a highly sensitive X-ray detector. The ion beam bombarded bacterial cells held in different material holders were observed for mutation induction. The results led to a conclusion that secondary X-ray emitted from ion-beam-bombarded biological living materials themselves was not a, or at least a negligible, mutational source, but the ion-beam-induced X-ray emission from the metal that made the sample holder could be a source of mutation.

  9. Design and characterization of a multi-beam micro-CT scanner based on carbon nanotube field emission x-ray technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Rui

    In this dissertation, I will present the results for my Ph.D. research for the past five years. My project mainly focuses on advanced imaging applications with a multi-beam x-ray source array based on carbon nanotube field emission technology. In the past few years, research in carbon nanotubes gradually changed from the raw material science to its application. Field emission x-ray application is one of the hottest research areas for carbon nanotube. Compared to traditional thermionic x-ray sources, the carbon nanotube field emission x-ray source has some natural advantages over traditional thermionic x-ray sources such as instantaneous x-ray generation, programmability and miniaturization. For the past few years, the research and development of carbon nanotube field emission x-ray has shifted from single x-ray beam applications to spatially distributed multi-beam x-ray sources. Previously in Zhou group, we have already built a gated micro-CT system with single beam micro-focus x-ray tube for higher spatial and temporal resolution as required in live animal imaging and a multi-beam tomosynthesis system targeting for faster and more stable breast imaging. Now my project mainly focused on the design, characterization and optimization of a multi-beam micro-CT imaging system. With the increase of gantry rotation speed approaching the mechanical limit, it is getting more and more difficult to further speed up the CT scanning. My new system promises a potential solution for the problem, and it serves as a great test platform for truly stationary micro-CT geometry. The potential capabilities it showed during the characterization and imaging measurements was promising. The dissertation is composed of five chapters. In Chapter 1, I will generally review the physics principles of x-ray generation and interaction with matter. Then the discovery of carbon nanotube and its great potential to serve as an excellent field emission electron source will be introduced in the second

  10. Radiological protection problems associated with parasitic X-ray emission from electronic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amlinger, G.; Anger, K.; Billaudelle, H.; Ehlers, J.; Fendt, H.W.; Festag, J.G.; Haug, R.; Herrmann, K.H.; Klein, H.; Kossel, F.; Krebs, A.; Lauterbach, U.; Leibssle, H. Fa.; Lustig, H.; Maushart, R.; Milde, K.G.; Peter, F.; Ritter, J.; Riecke, W.D.; Rosenbaum, O.; Schiekel, M. Fa.; Schleich, F.; Schmidt, Th.; Speyer, K.; Teschke, L.; Tzschaschel, R.; Wagner, H.; Wehner, G.; Wendel, W.; Zehender, E.; Aiginoer, H.; Zakovsky, J.; Blom, G.; De backer, J.; Delhove, J.; Hublet, P.; Lejeune, P.; Misslin, A.; Nuyts, R.; Popovitch, I.; Hjardemaal, O.; Oehlenschlaeger, N.; Gonzalez Del Campo, R.; Becker, S.; Elder, R.L.; Matthews, J.D.; Sheldon, J.L.; Viitaniemi, T.J.; Aouizerate, H.; Aymeric, H.; Barthe, J.; Bermann, F.; Berthaud, Madeleine; Blanc, D.; Bory, P.; Bourrieau, J.; Bouville, A.; Bovagne, H.; Bresson, G.; Casanovas, J.; Cassanhiol, E.; Cassanhiol, E.; Chambragne, J.; Chanteur, J.; Choquet, R.; Cluchet, J.; Commanay, L.; Commanay, P.; Cros, J.L.; Dana, M.; Danna, J.; Decossas, J.L.; Delpla, M.; Destame, D.; Dieval, M.; Drouet, J.; Dubec, A.; Galy, J.; Garnier, A.; Gouerne, R.; Gras, M.; Grob, R.; Guelfucci, J.P.; Guevenoux, J.; Guichardiere, R.; Hamard, J.; Hardy, J.; Haym, J.P.; Hionette, J.; Jacob, G.; Lavie, J.M.; Levy, L.; Logre, P.; Manquene, J.; Martin, H.; Mathieu, J.; Odievre, Monique; Oustrin, J.; Palluel, P.; Patau, J.P.; Penotet, H.; Perrot, A.; Petel, M.; Peyrelavigne, A.; Peyrelavigne, Monique; Provincial, M.; Raedersdorff, J.; Renard, Cl.; Roche, L.; Roche, R.; Schaeffer, R.; Soubiran, J.; Soudain, G.; Stern, J.C.; Terrissol, M.; Tixier, M.; Vialettes, H.; Wauquier, J.M.; Casbolt, P.N.; Ciuciura, A.; Goodhew, E.G.; Jones, I.S.; O'riordan, M.C.; Speight, D.L.; Ward, P.R.; Williams, K.F.; Biro, T.; Vago, G.; Rosental, N.; Argiero, L.; Belli, M.; Boggio, M.; Carfi, N.; Garretti, S.; Loppa, A.; Parisi, A.; Susanna, A.; Ogawa, I.; Koren, K.; Aten, J.B.Th.; Barendsen, G.W.; Den Boer, A.M.; De Pijper, M.A.; Hekman, H.; Julius, H.W.; Strackee, L.; Van daatselaar, G.; Lorentzon, L.; Hadzi-Pealo, M.; Jeremio, M.; Stevanovio, Marija; Oosterkamp, W.J.; Shalmon, E.; Doyen, Diana; Goetschalkx, J.; Puel, R.

    1971-03-01

    During the past few decades there has been an increase in the production of many types of electronic devices such as rectifying tubes, thyratrons, klystrons, magnetrons, etc., containing elements capable of emitting undesirable X-radiation. These components are not only found in equipment used in industry and research laboratories, but also in devices of a more domestic nature, such as colour television sets, usually low in energy, this radiation may nevertheless constitute a health hazard for many users of such devices and may affect not only workers but even the population as a whole. The Commission of the European Communities (Euratom) felt it was desirable to review the state of the art with regard to problems of radiological protection arising in the manufacture, repair and use of such electronic equipment and to seek suitable technical and administrative solutions. In conjunction with the Centre Physique Atomique et Nucleaire of the Paul Sabatier University, the Commission held an International Symposium in Toulouse on 3-6 November 1970, which was attended by manufacturers of electronic equipment, officials of technical inspection bodies and representatives of public health and occupational safety authorities. The following items were discussed: classification and identification of sources of parasitic X-rays, methods of measuring soft X-rays, biological aspects of exposure to soft X-rays, performance standards and methods for testing and inspecting electronic equipment. The Symposium was followed attentively by 180 delegates from 21 countries and international organizations, and was concluded by a round table discussion at which the chairmen of the different sessions, assisted by experts, drew conclusions from their sessions and from the discussions, pointing up the problems which needed most urgently to be studied. This document contains the texts, in their original versions, of the papers presented at the meetings, together with the minutes of the

  11. Trace metal content in aspirin and women's cosmetics via proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hichwa, B.P.; Pun, D.D.; Wang, D.

    1981-01-01

    A multielemental analysis to determine the trace metal content of generic and name-brand aspirins and name-brand lipsticks was done via proton induced x-ray (PIXE) measurements. The Hope College PIXE system is described as well as the target preparation methods. The trace metal content of twelve brands of aspirin and aspirin substitutes and fourteen brands of lipstick are reported. Detection limits for most elements are in the range of 100 parts per billion (ppb) to 10 parts per million

  12. The variable hard x-ray emission of NGC 4945 as observed by NUSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puccetti, Simonetta; Comastri, Andrea; Fiore, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    We present a broadband (~0.5-79 keV) spectral and temporal analysis of multiple NuSTAR observations combined with archival Suzaku and Chandra data of NGC 4945, the brightest extragalactic source at 100 keV. We observe hard X-ray (>10 keV) flux and spectral variability, with flux variations of a f...... of a factor of two on timescales of 20 ks. A variable primary continuum dominates the high-energy spectrum (>10 keV) in all states, while the reflected/scattered flux that dominates at E...

  13. Soft X-ray emission of a fast-capillary-discharge device

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schmidt, Jiří; Koláček, Karel; Štraus, Jaroslav; Prukner, Václav; Frolov, Oleksandr; Boháček, Vladislav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 2 (2005), s. 105-109 ISSN 1051-9998. [International Conference on High- Power Particle Beams, BEAMS /15th./. St. Petersburg, 18.7.2004-23.7.2004] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK2043105; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/03/0711 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : pre-pulse plasma * capillary discharge * soft X-ray laser Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.271, year: 2005

  14. Infrared emission from four Be stars optical counterparts of galactic X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persi, P.; Ferrari-Toniolo, M.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary results of our infrared observations from 2.3 up to 10 and 20 microns of the Be-X-ray stars X Per, γ Cas and HDE 245770, indicate the presence of an ionized circumstellar disk with an electron density law of the type nsub(e) proportional to rsup(-3.5). X Per and γ Cas show besides, variable infrared excess at 10μ suggesting variability in the stellar wind. LS I+65 0 010 presents an anomalous infrared energy distribution for a Be star. (Auth.)

  15. A theoretical study on the selective oxygen K-edge soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of liquid acetic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Naohiro; Kanai, Seiji; Tokushima, Takashi; Horikawa, Yuka; Takahashi, Osamu

    2015-11-01

    We have performed theoretical calculations to reproduce the site-selective X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) spectra of liquid acetic acid at the oxygen K-edge (OCdbnd O,1s and OOH,1s). Structure sampling of an acetic acid cluster model was performed from the ab initio molecular dynamics trajectory. Relative XES intensities for the core-hole excited state dynamics simulations were calculated using density functional theory. We found that the theoretical XES spectra reproduced well the experimental spectra and that these calculations gave us electronic and molecular structure information about liquid acetic acid.

  16. Chemical state analysis of Cl Kα and Kβ1,3 X-ray emission lines using polychromatic WDXRF spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kainth, Harpreet Singh; Upmanyu, Arun; Sharma, Hitesh; Singh, Tejbir; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2018-02-01

    With the support of research projects focusing on sampling and data analysing of different varieties of chemical compounds, wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) technique is commonly used in many research laboratories throughout the world wide to determine the elemental composition of various unknown samples. In the present study, first time we have employed polychromatic S8 TIGER WDXRF spectrometer to study the chemical state analysis in Cl Kα and Kβ1,3 X-ray emission lines. A Voigt function is used to determine the central peak position of the K shell emission lines in all samples. From the present measurements, it is seen that both positive and negative shifts have been observed in Cl Kα (2.622 keV) and Kβ1,3 (2.817 keV) emission peaks. It has been also seen that the effective charge, relative line-width and relative intensity ratio I(Kβ1,3/Kα) are found proportional with the chemical shift. Furthermore, a parabolic relation is also established between them.

  17. A redetermination of the X-ray spectrum of SN 1006 and excess diffuse emission from the Lupus region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Katsuji; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Becker, R.H.; Hughes, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    X-ray from SN 1006 and from the adjacent Lupus region were separately observed with the Tenma gas scintillation proportional counters. The spectrum of the local excess emission from the Lupus region can be consistently fitted with either a thin thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum with a temperature of 7.5 ± 2.6 keV or a power-law spectrum with a photon index of 2.1 ± 0.1. The x-ray emission from SN 1006, after subtraction of this local excess, has a spectrum which can be described as a power-law spectrum with a photon index of 3.3 ± 0.1 or a thin thermal bremsstrahlung spectrum with a temperature of 1.9 ± 0.1 keV which is much softer than the previously reported spectrum. No significant iron line emission was observed in the SN 1006 spectrum. The 90 % upper limit for the equivalent width of the iron line was reduced to 400 eV. The observed spectrum can also be interpreted in terms of a nonequilibrium ionization model of about 2-keV electron temperature. (author)

  18. Characterization of the Electronic Structure of Silicon Nanoparticles Using X-ray Absorption and Emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaverka, April Susan Montoya [Univ.of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Resolving open questions regarding transport in nanostructures can have a huge impact on a broad range of future technologies such as light harvesting for energy. Silicon has potential to be used in many of these applications. Understanding how the band edges of nanostructures move as a function of size, surface termination and assembly is of fundamental importance in understanding the transport properties of these materials. In this thesis work I have investigated the change in the electronic structure of silicon nanoparticle assemblies as the surface termination is changed. Nanoparticles are synthesized using a thermal evaporation technique and sizes are determined using atomic force microscopy (AFM). By passivating the particles with molecules containing alcohol groups we are able to modify the size dependent band edge shifts. Both the valence and conduction bands are measured using synchrotron based x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) techniques. Particles synthesized via recrystallization of amorphous silicon/SiO2 multilayers of thicknesses below 10 nm are also investigated using the synchrotron techniques. These samples also show quantum confinement effects but the electronic structure is different from those synthesized via evaporation methods. The total bandgap is determined for all samples measured. The origins of these differences in the electronic structures are discussed.

  19. Development of multilayer optics for X-ray broadband spectrometry of plasma emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emprin, Benoit

    2014-01-01

    Within the framework of the research on inertial confinement fusion, the 'Commissariat a l'energie atomique et aux energies alternatives' has studied and implemented an absolute calibrated time-Resolved broadband soft x-Ray spectrometer, called 'Diagnostic de Mesure du rayonnement X'. This diagnostic, composed of 20 measurement channels, measures the emitted radiant power from a laser created plasma in the range from 50 eV to 20 keV. We have developed additional measurement channels to obtain redundancy and an improvement in measurement accuracy. The principle of these new channels is based on an original concept to obtain spectral bounded flat-Responses. Two channels have been developed for the 2 - 4 keV and 4 - 6 keV spectral ranges, using aperiodic multilayer mirrors made at the 'Laboratoire Charles Fabry' with Cr/Sc and Ni/W/SiC/W layers respectively. These mirrors were characterized at synchrotron radiation facilities and integrated into the spectrometer. The two new channels were used during laser-Plasma experimental campaigns at the OMEGA laser facility in Rochester (USA). This allowed us to determine directly the radiant power with only one measurement within a certain spectral band, and with a better precision when compared with using standard channels. The results, in good agreement with the standard measurement channels, allowed us to validate the use of aperiodic multilayer mirrors for X-Ray broadband spectrometry. (author) [fr

  20. A physical interpretation of the jet-like X-ray emission from supernova remnant W49B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miceli, M.; Miceli, M.; Decourchelle, A.; Ballet, J.; Miceli, M.; Bocchino, F.; Hughes, J.; Hwang, U.; Hwang, U.; Petre, R.

    2008-01-01

    In the framework of the study of supernova remnants and their complex interaction with the interstellar medium and the circumstellar material, we focus on the galactic supernova remnant W49B. Its morphology exhibits an X-ray bright elongated nebula, terminated on its eastern end by a sharp perpendicular structure aligned with the radio shell. The X-ray spectrum of W49B is characterized by strong K emission lines from Si, S, Ar, Ca, and Fe. There is a variation of the temperature in the remnant with the highest temperature found in the eastern side and the lowest one in the western side. The analysis of the recent observations of W49B indicates that the remnant may be the result of an asymmetric bipolar explosion where the ejecta are collimated along a jet-like structure and the eastern jet is hotter and more Fe-rich than the western one. Another possible scenario associates the X-ray emission with a spherical explosion where parts of the ejecta are interacting with a dense belt of ambient material. To overcome this ambiguity we present new results of the analysis of an XMM-Newton observation and we perform estimates of the mass and energy of the remnant. We conclude that the scenario of an anisotropic jet-like explosion explains quite naturally our observation results, but the association of W49B with a hyper-nova and a gamma-ray burst, although still possible, is not directly supported by any evidence. (authors)

  1. Performances of a bent-crystal spectrometer adapted to resonant x-ray emission measurements on gas-phase samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Journel, Loiec; El Khoury, Lara; Marin, Thierry; Guillemin, Renaud; Carniato, Stephane; Avila, Antoine; Delaunay, Renaud; Hague, Coryn F.; Simon, Marc [Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matiere et Rayonnement, UPMC University of Paris 06, UMR 7614, F-75005 Paris (France) and Laboratoire de Chimie Physique-Matiere et Rayonnement, CNRS, UMR 7614, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2009-09-15

    We describe a bent-crystal spectrometer adapted to measure x-ray emission resulting from core-level excitation of gas-phase molecules in the 0.8-8 keV energy range. The spectrometer is based on the Johann principle, and uses a microfocused photon beam to provide high-resolution (resolving power of {approx}7500). A gas cell was designed to hold a high-pressure (300 mbar) sample of gas while maintaining a high vacuum (10{sup -9} mbar) in the chamber. The cell was designed to optimize the counting rate (2000 cts/s at the maximum of the Cl K{alpha} emission line), while minimizing self-absorption. Example of the K{alpha} emission lines of CH{sub 3}Cl molecules is presented to illustrate the capabilities of this new instrument.

  2. The Determination of Composite Elements in Zircaloy-2 by X-Ray Fluorescence and Emission Spectrometry Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dian Anggraini; Rosika Kriswarini; Yusuf N

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of composing elements in zircaloy-2 has been done by Emission Spectrometry method and X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF). The aim of the analysis is to verify conformity between composing elements in zircaloy-2 and the material certificate. Spectrometry Emission method has higher sensitivity in element determination of a material than that of XRF method, so can be estimated that emission spectrometry method has higher accuracy than that of XRF method. The result of qualitative analysis by Emission Spectrometry indicate that the composing elements in zircaloy-2 were Sn, Cr and Ni. However, the qualitative analysis result by XRF method indicated that the composing elements in zircaloy 2 were Sn, Cr, Ni and Fe. Fe element can not be analysed by Emission Spectrometry method because Emission Spectrometer did not equipped with Fe detector. The quantitative analysis result of the composing elements in the material with both methods showed that Sn, Cr and Ni concentration of zircaloy 2 existed in concentration ranges of the material certificate. Result of statistical test (F and t-test) of analysis result of both methods can be used for analyzing composing elements in zircaloy 2. Emission Spectrometry method was more sensitive and accurate for determining Cr and Ni element in zircaloy 2 than that of emission Spectrometry method but both methods had same accuracy. The precision of measurement of Sn, Cr and Ni element using XRF method was better than that of Emission spectrometry method. (author)

  3. DXL: A Sounding Rocket Mission for the Study of Solar Wind Charge Exchange and Local Hot Bubble X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeazzi, M.; Prasai, K.; Uprety, Y.; Chiao, M.; Collier, M. R.; Koutroumpa, D.; Porter, F. S.; Snowden, S.; Cravens, T.; Robertson, I.; hide

    2011-01-01

    The Diffuse X-rays from the Local galaxy (DXL) mission is an approved sounding rocket project with a first launch scheduled around December 2012. Its goal is to identify and separate the X-ray emission generated by solar wind charge exchange from that of the local hot bubble to improve our understanding of both. With 1,000 square centimeters proportional counters and grasp of about 10 square centimeters sr both in the 1/4 and 3/4 keV bands, DXL will achieve in a 5-minute flight what cannot be achieved by current and future X-ray satellites.

  4. Angular dependence of L x-ray emission in high-Z atoms bombarded by 18-60 MeV fluorine ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ajay; Agnihotri, A. N.; Misra, D.; Kasthurirangan, S.; Sarkadi, L.; Tribedi, L. C.

    2012-11-01

    The L x-ray intensities of 79Au, 82Pb and 83Bi have been measured in collisions with 18-60 MeV fluorine ions in an angular range 20°-75°. The Ll x-ray intensity, normalized to the intensity of other L x-ray lines in the same spectrum, shows an anisotropic emission pattern and the degree of anisotropy depends on the impact energy of the projectile. The alignment parameter values for the L3 subshell, deduced from the measured anisotropy parameter for the Ll line, have been compared with the theoretical ones.

  5. The Soft-X-Ray Emission of Ark 120. XMM-Newton, NuSTAR, and the Importance of Taking the Broad View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, G.; Marinucci, A.; Guainazzi, M.; Brenneman, L. W.; Elvis, M.; Lohfink, A.; Arevalo, P.; Boggs, S. E.; Cappi, M.; Stern, D.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present simultaneous XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations of the 'bare' Seyfert 1 galaxy, Ark 120, a system in which ionized absorption is absent. The NuSTAR hard-X-ray spectral coverage allows us to constrain different models for the excess soft-X-ray emission. Among phenomenological models, a cutoff power law best explains the soft-X-ray emission. This model likely corresponds to Comptonization of the accretion disc seed UV photons by a population of warm electrons: using Comptonization models, a temperature of approximately 0.3 kiloelectronvolts and an optical depth of approximately 13 are found. If the UV-to-X-ray OPTXAGNF model is applied, the UV fluxes from the XMM-Newton Optical Monitor suggest an intermediate black hole spin. Contrary to several other sources observed by NuSTAR, no high-energy cutoff is detected with a lower limit of 190 kiloelectronvolts.

  6. The soft-X-ray emission of Ark 120. XMM-Newton, NuSTAR, and the importance of taking the broad view

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matt, G.; Marinucci, A.; Guainazzi, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present simultaneous XMM-Newton and NuSTAR observations of the 'bare' Seyfert 1 galaxy, Ark 120, a system in which ionized absorption is absent. The NuSTAR hard-X-ray spectral coverage allows us to constrain different models for the excess soft-X-ray emission. Among phenomenological models......, a cutoff power law best explains the soft-X-ray emission. This model likely corresponds to Comptonization of the accretion disc seed UV photons by a population of warm electrons: using Comptonization models, a temperature of similar to 0.3 keV and an optical depth of similar to 13 are found. If the UV......-to-X-ray optxagnf model is applied, the UV fluxes from the XMM-Newton Optical Monitor suggest an intermediate black hole spin. Contrary to several other sources observed by NuSTAR, no high-energy cutoff is detected with a lower limit of 190 keV....

  7. Effect of beryllium filter purity on x-ray emission measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarry, M. B.; Franz, P.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Goetz, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    Beryllium foils of the purity grade typically specified for use as filters in soft x-ray (SXR) diagnostics may contain sufficient heavy element impurities to distort the energy transmission response of the filter. Electron microprobe analysis of the foils used in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) SXR tomography diagnostic revealed an impurity content of ˜0.3% fractional abundance by weight, comprised primarily of iron, zirconium, chromium, and nickel. These impurities lower the peak filter transmission in the energy range of the detector and alter the shape of the transmission curve. As a result, foil impurities introduce errors in any general measurement where radiation is being filtered. For example, neglecting the effect of impurities on filter transmission leads to large systematic errors (50%) in the electron temperature measured using the SXR double-filter technique on MST.

  8. Effect of beryllium filter purity on x-ray emission measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGarry, M B; Hartog, D J Den; Goetz, J A; Franz, P

    2014-01-01

    Beryllium foils of the purity grade typically specified for use as filters in soft x-ray (SXR) diagnostics may contain sufficient heavy element impurities to distort the energy transmission response of the filter. Electron microprobe analysis of the foils used in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) SXR tomography diagnostic revealed an impurity content of ∼0.3% fractional abundance by weight, comprised primarily of iron, zirconium, chromium, and nickel. These impurities lower the peak filter transmission in the energy range of the detector and alter the shape of the transmission curve. As a result, foil impurities introduce errors in any general measurement where radiation is being filtered. For example, neglecting the effect of impurities on filter transmission leads to large systematic errors (50%) in the electron temperature measured using the SXR double-filter technique on MST. (paper)

  9. Statistics associated with an elemental analysis system of particles induced by X-ray emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romo K, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    In the quantitative elemental analysis by X-ray techniques one has to use data spectra which present fluctuations of statistical nature both from the energy and from the number of counts accumulated. While processing the results for the obtainment of a quantitative result, a detailed knowledge of the associated statistics distributions is needed. In this work, l) the statistics associated with the system photon's counting as well as 2) the distribution of the results as a function of the energy are analyzed. The first one is important for the definition of the expected values and uncertainties and for the spectra simulation (Mukoyama, 1975). The second one is fundamental for the determination of the contribution for each spectral line. (M.R.) [es

  10. Time-dependent search for neutrino emission from X-ray binaries with the ANTARES telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, A.; André, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Avgitas, T.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bormuth, R.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Celli, S.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coleiro, A.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Di Palma, I.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; El Bojaddaini, I.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Felis, I.; Fusco, L. A.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geißelsöder, S.; Geyer, K.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Glotin, H.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; Illuminati, G.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Jongen, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lachaud, C.; Lahmann, R.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Loucatos, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Mathieu, A.; Melis, K.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Mueller, C.; Nezri, E.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Roensch, K.; Saldaña, M.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schnabel, J.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Turpin, D.; Tönnis, C.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vivolo, D.; Wagner, S.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2017-04-01

    ANTARES is currently the largest neutrino telescope operating in the Northern Hemisphere, aiming at the detection of high-energy neutrinos from astrophysical sources. Neutrino telescopes constantly monitor at least one complete hemisphere of the sky, and are thus well-suited to detect neutrinos produced in transient astrophysical sources. A time-dependent search has been applied to a list of 33 X-ray binaries undergoing high flaring activities in satellite data (RXTE/ASM, MAXI and Swift/BAT) and during hardness transition states in the 2008-2012 period. The background originating from interactions of charged cosmic rays in the Earth's atmosphere is drastically reduced by requiring a directional and temporal coincidence with astrophysical phenomena. The results of this search are presented together with comparisons between the neutrino flux upper limits and the neutrino flux predictions from astrophysical models. The neutrino flux upper limits resulting from this search limit the jet parameter space for some astrophysical models.

  11. Soft x-ray absorption and emission spectra and the electronic structure of some exotic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ederer, D.L.; Canfield, L.R.; Callcott, T.A.; Tsang, K.L.; Zhang, C.H.; Arakawa, E.T.

    1988-01-01

    The technique of soft x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SXE) is complimentary to that of photoemission spectroscopy (PES). SXE probes the local partial density of states (PDOS), selects dipole allowed symmetries, and is not necessarily surface sensitive. PES on the other hand, averages over the DOS and can be used to measure the dispersion of the energy bands. PES is also very surface sensitive. We present measurements on the high T/sub c/ superconductors, the quasicrystalline phase of AlMn, and the LiAl intermetallic alloy. These measurements provide insight for theoretical modeling. In the case of the high T/sub c/ compound and the intermetallic compound the measurements are in good agreement with the theory. However, for the quasicrystals the measurements provide new insights to challenge theory. 13 refs., 3 figs

  12. Direct Detection of Oxygen Ligation to the Mn4Ca Cluster of Photosystem II by X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pushkar, Yulia; Long, Xi; Glatzel, Pieter; Brudvig, Gary W.; Dismukes, G. Charles; Collins, Terrence J.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe

    2009-06-16

    Ligands play critical roles during the catalytic reactions in metalloproteins through bond formation/breaking, protonation/deprotonation, and electron/spin delocalization. While there are well-defined element-specific spectroscopic handles, such as X-ray spectroscopy and EPR, to follow the chemistry of metal catalytic sites in a large protein matrix, directly probing particular ligand atoms like C, N, and O is challenging due to their abundance in the protein. FTIR/Raman and ligand-sensitive EPR techniques such as ENDOR and ESEEM have been applied to study metal-ligand interactions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can also indirectly probe the ligand environment; its element-specificity allows us to focus only on the catalytic metal site, and EXAFS and XANES provide metal-ligand distances, coordination numbers, and symmetry of ligand environments. However, the information is limited, since one cannot distinguish among ligand elements with similar atomic number (i.e. C, N. and O). As an alternative and a more direct method to probe the specific metal-ligand chemistry in the protein matrix, we investigated the application of X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). Using this technique we have identified the oxo-bridging ligands of the Mn{sub 4}Ca complex of photosystem II (PS II), a multisubunit membrane protein, that catalyzes the water oxidizing reaction. The catalytic mechanism has been studied intensively by Mn XAS. The fundamental question of this reaction, however, is how the water molecules are ligated to the Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster and how the O-O bond formation occurs before the evolution of O{sub 2}. This implies that it is necessary to follow the chemistry of the oxygen ligands in order to understand the mechanism.

  13. X-RAY EMISSION FROM STRONGLY ASYMMETRIC CIRCUMSTELLAR MATERIAL IN THE REMNANT OF KEPLER'S SUPERNOVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkey, Mary T.; Reynolds, Stephen P.; Borkowski, Kazimierz J.; Blondin, John M., E-mail: reynolds@ncsu.edu [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh NC 27695-8202 (United States)

    2013-02-10

    Kepler's supernova remnant resulted from a thermonuclear explosion, but is interacting with circumstellar material (CSM) lost from the progenitor system. We describe a statistical technique for isolating X-ray emission due to CSM from that due to shocked ejecta. Shocked CSM coincides well in position with 24 {mu}m emission seen by Spitzer. We find most CSM to be distributed along the bright north rim, but substantial concentrations are also found projected against the center of the remnant, roughly along a diameter with position angle {approx}100 Degree-Sign . We interpret this as evidence for a disk distribution of CSM before the supernova, with the line of sight to the observer roughly in the disk plane. We present two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of this scenario in qualitative agreement with the observed CSM morphology. Our observations require Kepler to have originated in a close binary system with an asymptotic giant branch star companion.

  14. The inner radio structure of Centaurus A - Clues to the origin of the jet X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, J. O.; Feigelson, E. D.; Schreier, E. J.

    1983-01-01

    VLA observations at 1.4 and 4.9 GHz of the jet and inner lobes of the nearby radio galaxy Centaurus A have been used to construct maps of total intensity and polarization at resolutions of 31 x 10 and 3.6 x 1.1 arcsec. Surface brightness and pressure distributions in the jet, combined with the apparent X-ray emission from the ISM of NGC 5128, indicate that it is thermally confined. A comparison of the radio structure and the optical galaxy shows that the jet in Cen A emerges nearly along the major axis of the elliptical stellar component that is parallel to the angular momentum vector of the dust lane. The outer radio structure bends toward the galaxy minor axis. Evidence is found for a common synchrotron radiation origin of the full spectrum jet emission.

  15. A contribution to the characterisation of natural and industrial crystalline emissions using electron beam and X-ray techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, F.N.

    1980-01-01

    In this work the composition of dusts of different origin is studied based on the assumption that natural and industrial emissions sources may possibly be differentiated by the emission of characteristic minerals and compounds. Only if some of these compounds or certain groups of compounds can be associated with a distinct emission source, such compounds may be considered as guiding compounds or guiding minerals. In this case the emission sources should be identified unambiguously even over large distances. In the air pollution studies performed in the past, the emphasis has been laid mainly on gases like SO 2 , CO, CO 2 , NOsub(x), and HF, without paying much attention to the crystalline and amorphous components, which are present simultaneously. This study is restricted to the dust-like component of natural and industrial emission sources to get more information on its composition. In part these emissions are less dangerous in the compound state, as for example fluorine in the mica type mineral muskovite (KAl 2 [(OH,F) 2 AlSi 3 O 10 ]. As a working hypothesis it has been assumed that based on a series of investigations these compounds can be identified using electron miscroscopy and electron diffraction. In the presence of larger quantities of emission materials also X-ray techniques as Debye-Scherrer- or gonio methods can be applied. Reliable results can only be obtained by an investigation covering a broad area of industrial production. (orig./RW) [de

  16. Skull x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - head; X-ray - skull; Skull radiography; Head x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  17. Neck x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - neck; Cervical spine x-ray; Lateral neck x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored so that the lowest amount of radiation is used to produce the image. Pregnant women and ...

  18. Characterization of continuous and pulsed emission modes of a hybrid micro focus x-ray source for medical imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghani, Muhammad U.; Wong, Molly D.; Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Di; Zheng, Bin [Center for Biomedical Engineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Rong, John X. [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Wu, Xizeng [Department of Radiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35249 (United States); Liu, Hong, E-mail: liu@ou.edu [Center for Biomedical Engineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively characterize a micro focus x-ray tube that can operate in both continuous and pulsed emission modes. The micro focus x-ray source (Model L9181-06, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan) has a varying focal spot size ranging from 16 µm to 50 µm as the source output power changes from 10 to 39 W. We measured the source output, beam quality, focal spot sizes, kV accuracy, spectra shapes and spatial resolution. Source output was measured using an ionization chamber for various tube voltages (kVs) with varying current (µA) and distances. The beam quality was measured in terms of half value layer (HVL), kV accuracy was measured with a non-invasive kV meter, and the spectra was measured using a compact integrated spectrometer system. The focal spot sizes were measured using a slit method with a CCD detector with a pixel pitch of 22 µm. The spatial resolution was quantitatively measured using the slit method with a CMOS flat panel detector with a 50 µm pixel pitch, and compared to the qualitative results obtained by imaging a contrast bar pattern. The focal spot sizes in the vertical direction were smaller than that of the horizontal direction, the impact of which was visible when comparing the spatial resolution values. Our analyses revealed that both emission modes yield comparable imaging performances in terms of beam quality, spectra shape and spatial resolution effects. There were no significantly large differences, thus providing the motivation for future studies to design and develop stable and robust cone beam imaging systems for various diagnostic applications. - Highlights: • A micro focus x-ray source that operates in both continuous and pulse emission modes was quantitatively characterized. • The source output, beam quality, focal spot measurements, kV accuracy, spectra analyses and spatial resolution were measured. • Our analyses revealed that both emission modes yield comparable imaging performances in terms of beam

  19. Lα1 satellites in X-ray emission spectra of higher - Z elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poonia, S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The X-ray satellite spectra arising due to 2p 3/2 -1 3x -1 - 3x -1 3d -1 (x ≡ s, p, d) transition array, in elements with Z 74 to 92, have been calculated. While the energies of various transitions of the array have been determined by using available Hartree-Fock-Slater data on 1s -1 - 2p -1 3x -1 and 2p 3/2 -1 - 3x -1 , 3x' -1 Auger transition energies and their relative intensities have been estimated by considering cross - sections of singly ionized 2x -1 (x ≡ s, p) states and then of subsequent Coster-Kronig and shake off processes. The calculated spectra have been compared with the measured satellite energies in Lα1 spectra. Their intense peaks have been identified as the observed satellite lines. The one to one correspondence between the peaks in calculated spectra and the satellites in measured spectra has been established on the basis of the agreement between the separations in the peak energies and those in the measured satellite energies. It has been established that three satellites observed in the Lα 1 region of the X-ray spectra of various elements and named α', α ix and α x in order of increasing energy are mainly emitted by 2p 3/2 -1 3d -1 - 3d -2 transitions. It is observed that the satellite α' in all these spectra can be assigned to the superposition of 3 F 4 - 3 F 4 transition and that this must be most intense one out of all these satellites, contributing in order of decreasing intensity. The line α ix , has been assigned to mainly the 1 F 3 - 1 G 4 , 1 P 1 - 1 D 2 and 1 F 3 - 1 D 2 transitions. Finally, the satellite α x , reported in the spectra of elements with Z = 74-92, has been associated with the transition 3 D 3 - 3 F 4 . The possible contributions of other transitions of the 2p 3/2 -1 3x -1 - 3x -1 3d -1 (x ≡ s, p, d) array having appreciable intensities, have also been discussed

  20. X-ray emission from z pinches at 107 A: Current scaling, gap closure, and shot-to-shot fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stygar, W.A.; Ives, H.C.; Fehl, D.L.; Cuneo, M.E.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Bailey, J.E.; Bennett, G.R.; Bliss, D.E.; Chandler, G.A.; Leeper, R.J.; Matzen, M.K.; McDaniel, D.H.; McGurn, J.S.; McKenney, J.L.; Mix, L.P.; Muron, D.J.; Porter, J.L.; Ramirez, J.J.; Ruggles, L.E.; Seamen, J.F.

    2004-01-01

    a single pinch would have on the shot-success probability of the double-pinch inertial-confinement-fusion driver proposed by Hammer et al. [Phys. Plasmas 6, 2129 (1999)]. We find that on a given shot, the probability that two independent pinches would radiate the same peak power to within a factor of 1±α (where 0≤α 1/2 )%=8.5% fluctuation in P r would provide adequate symmetry on 44% of the shots. We propose that three-dimensional radiative-magnetohydrodynamic simulations be performed to quantify the sensitivity of the x-ray emission to various initial conditions, and to determine whether an imploding z pinch is a spatiotemporal chaotic system

  1. Study of the gamma emission from the 31-year isomer of 178Hf induced by X-ray irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, C.B.; Davanloo, F.; Iosif, M.C.

    1999-01-01

    A sample containing 6.3x10 14 nuclei of the 16 + isomer of 178 Hf having a half-life of 31 years and excitation energy of 2.446 MeV was irradiated with x-ray pulses derived from a device operated at 15mA to produce Bremsstrahlung radiation with an end point energy set to be 90 keV. Gamma-spectra of the isomeric target were taken with a Ge-detector. Intensity of the 325.5 keV (6 + →4 + transition in the ground state band of 178 Hf was found to increase by about 2%. Such an accelerated decay of the 178 Hf isomer is consistent with an integrated cross section of 3x10 -23 cm 2 ·keV if the resonant absorption takes place within the energy ranges corresponding to the maxima of the x-ray flux, either near 20 keV, or at the K emission lines of W

  2. Effects of chemical combination on x-ray Kα and Kβ1,3 emission spectra of Co

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baydas, E; Oez, E

    2010-01-01

    Chemical shift, differences of full width at half maximum (ΔFWHM) and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of Kα and Kβ 1,3 x-ray emission lines were measured for the following Co compounds: Co, CoO, Co 2 O 3 , CoSO 4 .7H 2 O, Co(NO 3 ) 2 .6H 2 O, CoCr 2 O 4 , Co(ClO 4 ) 2 .6H 2 O, Co(C 2 H 3 O 2 ), CoCl 2 .6H 2 O, CoCl 2 , CoF 2 , CoF 2 .4H 2 O and CoF 3 . The measurements were performed with wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (WDXRF). It was found that the calculated results for Co compounds are strongly correlated with the oxidation state. At the same time, chemical shift for F compounds is generally more than that for Cl compounds. Larger chemical shifts and FWHM were also found for Kβ 1,3 lines than Kα ones. It should be noted that the magnitude of chemical shifts increases with the increasing number of ligand atoms.

  3. Evidence for quiescent synchrotron emission in the black hole X-ray transient Swift J1357.2–0933

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahbaz T.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We present high time-resolution optical and infrared observations of the edge-on black hole X-ray transient Swift J1357.2-0933. Our data taken in 2012 shows the system to be at its pre-outburst magnitude and so the system is in quiescence. In contrast to other X-ray transients, the quiescent light curves of Swift J1357.2-0933 do not show the secondary star’s ellipsoidal modulation. The optical and infrared light curves is dominated by variability with an optical fractional rms of about 20 per cent, much larger than what is observed in other systems. The quiescent ultraviolet to mid-IR spectral energy distribution in quiescence is dominated by a nonthermal component with a power–law index of −1.4, (the broad-band rms SED has a similar index which arises from optically thin synchrotron emission from a jet; the lack of a peak in the spectral energy distribution rules out advection-dominated models (based on [19].

  4. X-ray emission in heavy-ion collisions. Progress report, March 1, 1982-March 1, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.L.

    1983-03-01

    A major project involving the study of electron transfer in fluorine compounds following multiple K-plus L-shell ionization by 5.5 MeV He, 22 MeV C, 48 MeV Mg, and 80 MeV Ar ions was completed. This comprehensive investigation, which began three years ago, uncovered a resonant electron transfer mechanism, provided the first quantitative estimates of electron transfer rates, and revealed the importance of fast electron transfer to n greater than or equal to 3 states in solid compounds. Considerable progress was made in delineating the effects of solid state environment on x-ray emission from highly stripped projectile ions. A surprising result in this project area was the discovery of lines associated with states involving n = 3 electrons in 48 MeV Mg projectile x-ray spectra obtained with thick carbon targets. Work was completed on a study of the alignment of foil-excited H- and He-like states in 65 MeV sulfur ions. These measurements are being extended to Magnesium ions with the intention of searching for surface and tilted foil effects. The report contains a summary of the research activities supported by this contract during the 1981 to 1982 contract year

  5. Molecular-orbital studies via satellite-free x-ray fluorescence: Cl K absorption and K--valence-level emission spectra of chlorofluoromethanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perera, R.C.C.; Cowan, P.L.; Lindle, D.W.; LaVilla, R.E.; Jach, T.; Deslattes, R.D.

    1991-01-01

    X-ray absorption and emission measurements in the vicinity of the chlorine K edge of the three chlorofluoromethanes have been made using monochromatic synchrotron radiation as the source of excitation. By selectively tuning the incident radiation to just above the Cl 1s single-electron ionization threshold for each molecule, less complex x-ray-emission spectra are obtained. This reduction in complexity is attributed to the elimination of multielectron transitions in the Cl K shell, which commonly produce satellite features in x-ray emission. The resulting ''satellite-free'' x-ray-emission spectra exhibit peaks due only to electrons in valence molecular orbitals filling a single Cl 1s vacancy. These simplified emission spectra and the associated x-ray absorption spectra are modeled using straightforward procedures and compared with semiempirical ground-state molecular-orbital calculations. Good agreement is observed between the present experimental and theoretical results for valence-orbital energies and those obtained from ultraviolet photoemission, and between relative radiative yields determined both experimentally and theoretically in this work

  6. First hard X-ray detection of the non-thermal emission around the Arches cluster: morphology and spectral studies with NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krivonos, Roman A.; Tomsick, John A.; Bauer, Franz E.

    2014-01-01

    and spectrum. The spatial distribution of the hard X-ray emission is found to be consistent with the broad region around the cluster where the 6.4 keV line is observed. The interpretation of the hard X-ray emission within the context of the X-ray reflection model puts a strong constraint on the luminosity......The Arches cluster is a young, densely packed massive star cluster in our Galaxy that shows a high level of star formation activity. The nature of the extended non-thermal X-ray emission around the cluster remains unclear. The observed bright Fe Ku line emission at 6.4 keV from material...... that is neutral or in a low ionization state can be produced either by X-ray photoionization or by cosmic-ray particle bombardment or both. In this paper, we report on the first detection of the extended emission around the Arches cluster above 10 keV with the NuSTAR mission, and present results on its morphology...

  7. An X-Ray computed tomography/positron emission tomography system designed specifically for breast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, John M; Yang, Kai; Burkett, George W; Packard, Nathan J; Huang, Shih-ying; Bowen, Spencer; Badawi, Ramsey D; Lindfors, Karen K

    2010-02-01

    Mammography has served the population of women who are at-risk for breast cancer well over the past 30 years. While mammography has undergone a number of changes as digital detector technology has advanced, other modalities such as computed tomography have experienced technological sophistication over this same time frame as well. The advent of large field of view flat panel detector systems enable the development of breast CT and several other niche CT applications, which rely on cone beam geometry. The breast, it turns out, is well suited to cone beam CT imaging because the lack of bones reduces artifacts, and the natural tapering of the breast anteriorly reduces the x-ray path lengths through the breast at large cone angle, reducing cone beam artifacts as well. We are in the process of designing a third prototype system which will enable the use of breast CT for image guided interventional procedures. This system will have several copies fabricated so that several breast CT scanners can be used in a multi-institutional clinical trial to better understand the role that this technology can bring to breast imaging.

  8. Nonthermal x-ray emission from a tungsten z-pinch at 5 MA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Nash, T.J.; Marder, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    The generation of intense bursts of warm x rays with power in the 1-TW regime are of interest for the study of in-depth nuclear radiation effects. Results from high-atomic-number single-wire experiments carried out at 0.8 MA on Gamble II in the 1970s showed 0.25% efficient production of nonthermal, bremsstrahlung-like lines and continuum in the 5- to 100-keV regime. This high efficiency in combination with suggested Z 2 and I 2 scaling of the nonthermal radiation motivated the present experiment to measure and model the radiation from the z pinch formed from compact high-Z wire arrays at high current. In the experiment, tungsten wire arrays of length 20 mm on a mounting radius of 2 mm were imploded over the mass range 1 to 16 mg on the Saturn accelerator operating with a peak discharge current of 5 MA. As in the Gamble-II experiments, bright spots were observed to form at ∼1-mm intervals along the z axis at the time of a first implosion and to be the source of the hard radiation measured. Maximum radiation occurred for masses less than or approximately equal to 4 mg. The experiment was simulated using the LASNEX and TIP numerical codes with a nonthermal model. The timing of the multiple implosions, owing to compression and expansion of the resulting plasma are observed to be in agreement with predictions from both codes and analytic modeling

  9. Measurement of the Hard X-ray emission spectrum from MST

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, R.; den Hartog, D. J.; Forest, C. B.; Tabora, J.; Peysson, Y.; Delpech, L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2000-10-01

    Diagnosing the radial profile of fast electrons in the RFP can contribute to the understanding of fast electron production and transport, and for diagnosing RF power deposition profiles during upcoming experiments using lower hybrid and electron Bernstein waves. Initial measurements using a single channel Cadmium-Telluride (CdTe) X-ray detector (8kEv->200keV) have shown substantial emmission between 10 and 40 keV in standard and improved confinement plasmas. The measured spectra will be compared to predictions from CQL3D, a Fokker-Planck code that computes the electron distribution function in the presence of an inductive electric field and rf power. Data from the detectors are digitized directly rather than using electronic pulse height discrimination and counting. This allows for: a) better energy resolution b) dynamic time resolution c) better pile-up detection d) windowed time binning triggered on discrete plasma events. Binning data triggered upon similar plasma events such as sawteeth allows us to build up fast time resolution energy spectra over these events. Spatial resolution will be achieved in a new 16 channel system currently under design. This work has been funded by the DOE.

  10. Time-dependent search for neutrino emission from X-ray binaries with the ANTARES telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, A. [GRPHE—Université de Haute Alsace—Institut universitaire de technologie de Colmar, 34 rue du Grillenbreit, BP 50568, Colmar, 68008 France (France); André, M. [Technical University of Catalonia, Laboratory of Applied Bioacoustics, Rambla Exposició, Vilanova i la Geltrú, Barcelona, 08800 Spain (Spain); Anton, G. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, Erlangen, 91058 Germany (Germany); Ardid, M. [Institut d' Investigació per a la Gestió Integrada de les Zones Costaneres (IGIC), Universitat Politècnica de València, C/ Paranimf 1, Gandia, 46730 Spain (Spain); Aubert, J.-J. [Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM UMR 7346, Marseille, 13288 France (France); Avgitas, T.; Baret, B. [APC, Université Paris Diderot, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA/IRFU, Observatoire de Paris, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, 75205 France (France); Barrios-Martí, J., E-mail: antares.spokesperson@in2p3.fr [IFIC—Instituto de Física Corpuscular (CSIC—Universitat de València), c/ Catedrático José Beltrán, 2, Paterna, Valencia, E-46980 Spain (Spain); and others

    2017-04-01

    ANTARES is currently the largest neutrino telescope operating in the Northern Hemisphere, aiming at the detection of high-energy neutrinos from astrophysical sources. Neutrino telescopes constantly monitor at least one complete hemisphere of the sky, and are thus well-suited to detect neutrinos produced in transient astrophysical sources. A time-dependent search has been applied to a list of 33 X-ray binaries undergoing high flaring activities in satellite data (RXTE/ASM, MAXI and Swift/BAT) and during hardness transition states in the 2008–2012 period. The background originating from interactions of charged cosmic rays in the Earth's atmosphere is drastically reduced by requiring a directional and temporal coincidence with astrophysical phenomena. The results of this search are presented together with comparisons between the neutrino flux upper limits and the neutrino flux predictions from astrophysical models. The neutrino flux upper limits resulting from this search limit the jet parameter space for some astrophysical models.

  11. Analysis of hard X-ray emission from selected very high energy {gamma}-ray sources observed with INTEGRAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Agnes Irene Dorothee

    2009-11-13

    A few years ago, the era of very high energy {gamma}-ray astronomy started, when the latest generation of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT) like H.E.S.S. began to operate and to resolve the sources of TeV emission. Identifications via multi-wavelength studies reveal that the detected sources are supernova remnants and active galactic nuclei, but also pulsar wind nebulae and a few binaries. One widely discussed open question is, how these sources are able to accelerate particles to such high energies. The understanding of the underlying particle distribution, the acceleration processes taking place, and the knowledge of the radiation processes which produce the observed emission, is, therefore, of crucial interest. Observations in the hard X-ray domain can be a key to get information on these particle distributions and processes. Important for this thesis are the TeV and the hard X-ray range. The two instruments, H.E.S.S. and INTEGRAL, whose data were used, are, therefore, described in detail. The main part of this thesis is focused on the X-ray binary system LS 5039/RX J1826.2-1450. It was observed in several energy ranges. The nature of the compact object is still not known, and it was proposed either to be a microquasar system or a non-accreting pulsar system. The observed TeV emission is modulated with the orbital cycle. Several explanations for this variability have been discussed in recent years. The observations with INTEGRAL presented in this thesis have provided new information to solve this question. Therefore, a search for a detection in the hard X-ray range and for its orbital dependence was worthwhile. Since LS 5039 is a faint source and the sky region where it is located is crowded, a very careful, non-standard handling of the INTEGRAL data was necessary, and a cross-checking with other analysis methods was essential to provide reliable results. We found that LS 5039 is emitting in the hard X-ray energy range. A flux rate and an upper

  12. Analysis of hard X-ray emission from selected very high energy γ-ray sources observed with INTEGRAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, Agnes Irene Dorothee

    2009-01-01

    A few years ago, the era of very high energy γ-ray astronomy started, when the latest generation of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes (IACT) like H.E.S.S. began to operate and to resolve the sources of TeV emission. Identifications via multi-wavelength studies reveal that the detected sources are supernova remnants and active galactic nuclei, but also pulsar wind nebulae and a few binaries. One widely discussed open question is, how these sources are able to accelerate particles to such high energies. The understanding of the underlying particle distribution, the acceleration processes taking place, and the knowledge of the radiation processes which produce the observed emission, is, therefore, of crucial interest. Observations in the hard X-ray domain can be a key to get information on these particle distributions and processes. Important for this thesis are the TeV and the hard X-ray range. The two instruments, H.E.S.S. and INTEGRAL, whose data were used, are, therefore, described in detail. The main part of this thesis is focused on the X-ray binary system LS 5039/RX J1826.2-1450. It was observed in several energy ranges. The nature of the compact object is still not known, and it was proposed either to be a microquasar system or a non-accreting pulsar system. The observed TeV emission is modulated with the orbital cycle. Several explanations for this variability have been discussed in recent years. The observations with INTEGRAL presented in this thesis have provided new information to solve this question. Therefore, a search for a detection in the hard X-ray range and for its orbital dependence was worthwhile. Since LS 5039 is a faint source and the sky region where it is located is crowded, a very careful, non-standard handling of the INTEGRAL data was necessary, and a cross-checking with other analysis methods was essential to provide reliable results. We found that LS 5039 is emitting in the hard X-ray energy range. A flux rate and an upper flux

  13. Relationship between x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy and the local H-bond environment in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhovtobriukh, Iurii; Besley, Nicholas A.; Fransson, Thomas; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G. M.

    2018-04-01

    The connection between specific features in the water X-ray absorption spectrum and X-ray emission spectrum (XES) and the local H-bond coordination is studied based on structures obtained from path-integral molecular dynamics simulations using either the opt-PBE-vdW density functional or the MB-pol force field. Computing the XES spectrum using all molecules in a snapshot results in only one peak in the lone-pair (1b1) region, while the experiment shows two peaks separated by 0.8-0.9 eV. Different H-bond configurations were classified based on the local structure index (LSI) and a geometrical H-bond cone criterion. We find that tetrahedrally coordinated molecules characterized by high LSI values and two strong donated and two strong accepted H-bonds contribute to the low energy 1b1 emission peak and to the post-edge region in absorption. Molecules with the asymmetric H-bond environment with one strong accepted H-bond and one strong donated H-bond and low LSI values give rise to the high energy 1b1 peak in the emission spectrum and mainly contribute to the pre-edge and main-edge in the absorption spectrum. The 1b1 peak splitting can be increased to 0.62 eV by imposing constraints on the H-bond length, i.e., for very tetrahedral structures short H-bonds (less than 2.68 Å) and for very asymmetric structures elongated H-bonds (longer than 2.8 Å). Such structures are present, but underrepresented, in the simulations which give more of an average of the two extremes.

  14. Relationship between x-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy and the local H-bond environment in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhovtobriukh, Iurii; Besley, Nicholas A; Fransson, Thomas; Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G M

    2018-04-14

    The connection between specific features in the water X-ray absorption spectrum and X-ray emission spectrum (XES) and the local H-bond coordination is studied based on structures obtained from path-integral molecular dynamics simulations using either the opt-PBE-vdW density functional or the MB-pol force field. Computing the XES spectrum using all molecules in a snapshot results in only one peak in the lone-pair (1b 1 ) region, while the experiment shows two peaks separated by 0.8-0.9 eV. Different H-bond configurations were classified based on the local structure index (LSI) and a geometrical H-bond cone criterion. We find that tetrahedrally coordinated molecules characterized by high LSI values and two strong donated and two strong accepted H-bonds contribute to the low energy 1b 1 emission peak and to the post-edge region in absorption. Molecules with the asymmetric H-bond environment with one strong accepted H-bond and one strong donated H-bond and low LSI values give rise to the high energy 1b 1 peak in the emission spectrum and mainly contribute to the pre-edge and main-edge in the absorption spectrum. The 1b 1 peak splitting can be increased to 0.62 eV by imposing constraints on the H-bond length, i.e., for very tetrahedral structures short H-bonds (less than 2.68 Å) and for very asymmetric structures elongated H-bonds (longer than 2.8 Å). Such structures are present, but underrepresented, in the simulations which give more of an average of the two extremes.

  15. The circumburst environment of a FRED GRB: study of the prompt emission and X-ray/optical afterglow of GRB 051111

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidorzi, C.; Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Mundell, C. G.; Rol, E.; Bode, M. F.; Carter, D.; La Parola, V.; Melandri, A.; Monfardini, A.; Mottram, C. J.; O'Brien, P. T.; Page, K. L.; Sakamoto, T.; Smith, R. J.; Steele, I. A.; Tanvir, N. R.

    2007-02-01

    Aims:We report a multi-wavelength analysis of the prompt emission and early afterglow of GRB 051111 and discuss its properties in the context of current fireball models. Methods: The detection of GRB 051111 by the Burst Alert Telescope on-board Swift triggered early BVRi' observations with the 2-m robotic Faulkes Telescope North in Hawaii, as well as X-ray observations with the Swift X-Ray Telescope. Results: The prompt γ-ray emission shows a classical FRED profile. The optical afterglow light curves are fitted with a broken power law, with α_1=0.35 to α_2=1.35 and a break time around 12 min after the GRB. Although contemporaneous X-ray observations were not taken, a power law connection between the γ-ray tail of the FRED temporal profile and the late XRT flux decay is feasible. Alternatively, if the X-ray afterglow tracks the optical decay, this would represent one of the first GRBs for which the canonical steep-shallow-normal decay typical of early X-ray afterglows has been monitored optically. We present a detailed analysis of the intrinsic extinction, elemental abundances and spectral energy distribution. From the absorption measured in the low X-ray band we find possible evidence for an overabundance of some α elements such as oxygen, [O/Zn] = 0.7 ± 0.3, or, alternatively, for a significant presence of molecular gas. The IR-to-X-ray Spectral Energy Distribution measured at 80 min after the burst is consistent with the cooling break lying between the optical and X-ray bands. Extensive modelling of the intrinsic extinction suggests dust with big grains or grey extinction profiles. The early optical break is due either to an energy injection episode or, less probably, to a stratified wind environment for the circumburst medium.

  16. X-ray tube target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    A target with an improved heat emissive surface for use in a rotating anode type x-ray tube is described. The target consists of a body having a first surface portion made of x-ray emissive material and a second surface portion made of a heat emissive material comprising at least one of hafnium boride, hafnium oxide, hafnium nitride, hafnium silicide, and hafnium aluminide. (U.K.)

  17. The Evolution of Normal Galaxy X-Ray Emission Through Cosmic History: Constraints from the 6 MS Chandra Deep Field-South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmer, B. D.; Basu-Zych, A. R.; Mineo, S.; Brandt, W. N.; Eurfrasio, R. T.; Fragos, T.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Lou, B.; Xue, Y. Q.; Bauer, F. E.; hide

    2016-01-01

    We present measurements of the evolution of normal-galaxy X-ray emission from z (is) approx. 0-7 using local galaxies and galaxy samples in the approx. 6 Ms Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) survey. The majority of the CDF-S galaxies are observed at rest-frame energies above 2 keV, where the emission is expected to be dominated by X-ray binary (XRB) populations; however, hot gas is expected to provide small contributions to the observed-frame (is) less than 1 keV emission at z (is) less than 1. We show that a single scaling relation between X-ray luminosity (L(sub x)) and star-formation rate (SFR) literature, is insufficient for characterizing the average X-ray emission at all redshifts. We establish that scaling relations involving not only SFR, but also stellar mass and redshift, provide significantly improved characterizations of the average X-ray emission from normal galaxy populations at z (is) approx. 0-7. We further provide the first empirical constraints on the redshift evolution of X-ray emission from both low-mass XRB (LMXB) and high-mass XRB (HMXB) populations and their scalings with stellar mass and SFR, respectively. We find L2 -10 keV(LMXB)/stellar mass alpha (1+z)(sub 2-3) and L2 -10 keV(HMXB)/SFR alpha (1+z), and show that these relations are consistent with XRB population-synthesis model predictions, which attribute the increase in LMXB and HMXB scaling relations with redshift as being due to declining host galaxy stellar ages and metallicities, respectively. We discuss how emission from XRBs could provide an important source of heating to the intergalactic medium in the early universe, exceeding that of active galactic nuclei.

  18. Soft x-ray Planetary Imager

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The project is to prototype a soft X-ray Imager for planetary applications that has the sensitivity to observe solar system sources of soft  X-ray emission. A strong...

  19. Electron energy-loss and soft X-ray emission spectroscopy of electronic structure of MgB4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yohei; Saito, Taiki; Tsuchiya, Kohei; Terauchi, Masami; Saito, Hiroki; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2017-09-01

    The electronic structure of MgB4, with the characteristic crystal structure comprising one-dimensional pentagonal B6 cluster chain, was investigated using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and soft X-ray emission spectroscopy based on transmission electron microscopy. The dielectric function and density of state of unoccupied and occupied states were clarified experimentally for the first time. Although theoretical calculations has predicted MgB4 to be a semiconductor, the electron energy-loss spectrum in this study show a plasmon peak at 0.4 eV, which might be due to carrier electrons. Theoretical calculations suggested that the electronic states near the Fermi energy are localized along the one dimensional B6 cluster chain. Therefore, one-dimensional electric conductivity is expected.

  20. X-ray fluorescence spectrometric and optical emission spectographic analysis of thoria in thoriated copper metal powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandola, L.C.; Khanna, P.P.

    1984-01-01

    Two methods, one using the X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometric technique and another using optical emission spectrographic (OES) technique are described for the determination of thoria in the concentration range 0.5-10% in thoriated copper metal powder. The precision of XRF method is superior to OES method but when sample quantity is very small, the OES method is useful. For XRF method, 500 mg sample is mixed with boric acid binding material and converted to a tablet for analysis. For OES method, only 200 mg sample is needed which is glued to the flat ends of two graphite electrodes for excitation by AC arc. The precision obtained in XRF is better than +-1% and in OES it is +-23%. (author)

  1. Benchmark results and theoretical treatments for valence-to-core x-ray emission spectroscopy in transition metal compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortensen, D. R.; Seidler, G. T.; Kas, Joshua J.; Govind, Niranjan; Schwartz, Craig P.; Pemmaraju, Sri; Prendergast, David G.

    2017-09-01

    We report measurement of the valence-to-core (VTC) region of the K-shell x-ray emission spectra from several Zn and Fe inorganic compounds, and their critical comparison with several existing theoretical treatments. We find generally good agreement between the respective theories and experiment, and in particular find an important admixture of dipole and quadrupole character for Zn materials that is much weaker in Fe-based systems. These results on materials whose simple crystal structures should not, a prior, pose deep challenges to theory, will prove useful in guiding the further development of DFT and time-dependent DFT methods for VTC-XES predictions and their comparison to experiment.

  2. Proton Induced X-Rays Emission (PIXE) and Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) applied in the environmental sample analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, Ion V.; Iordan, M.; Stihi, C.; Bancuta, A.; Dima, G.; Busuioc, G.; Ciupina, V.; Belc, M.; Badica, T.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work is to determine the elemental composition of tree leaves using Proton-Induced X-Rays Emission (PIXE) and Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS) methods. By PIXE Spectrometry we identified and determined the concentration of S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu Zn, As, Br, Sr and by AAS method the concentration of elements: Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Se, Cd. Pb was identified in only 2 samples from 29. For tree leave samples collected at a large distance to the polluting source the Sr concentration decreased and the Mg, Ca, Se, Zn and Fe concentrations increased. Also, we can observe a small affinity of these leaves for the environmental Pb which was detected for two samples at a small distance to polluting source. (authors)

  3. Density functional theory calculations of the non-resonant and resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy of carbon fullerenes and nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson-Heine, Magnus W. D.; George, Michael W.; Besley, Nicholas A.

    2018-03-01

    The non-resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy of fullerenes and carbon nanotubes is studied with density functional theory in conjunction with short-range corrected functionals. For C60 and C70 the X-ray emission spectra are insensitive to modest structural changes, and absorption onto the fullerene cage has the greatest effect with a broader less structured band observed with the high energy π band reduced in intensity. For carbon nanotubes the X-ray emission spectra are shown to be weakly dependent on the length and chirality of the nanotube. However, some variation with the diameter of the tube is observed in both resonant and non-resonant spectra.

  4. Characterization of Continuous and Pulsed Emission modes of a Hybrid Micro Focus X-ray Source for Medical Imaging Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, Muhammad U; Wong, Molly D; Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Di; Zheng, Bin; Rong, John X; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2017-05-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively characterize a micro focus x-ray tube that can operate in both continuous and pulsed emission modes. The micro focus x-ray source (Model L9181-06, Hamamatsu Photonics, Japan) has a varying focal spot size ranging from 16-50 μm as the source output power changes from 10-39 W. We measured the source output, beam quality, focal spot sizes, kV accuracy, spectra shapes and spatial resolution. Source output was measured using an ionization chamber for various tube voltages (kVs) with varying current (μA) and distances. The beam quality was measured in terms of half value layer (HVL), kV accuracy was measured with a non-invasive kV meter, and the spectra was measured using a compact integrated spectrometer system. The focal spot sizes were measured using a slit method with a CCD detector with a pixel pitch of 22 μm. The spatial resolution was quantitatively measured using the slit method with a CMOS flat panel detector with a 50 μm pixel pitch, and compared to the qualitative results obtained by imaging a contrast bar pattern. The focal spot sizes in the vertical direction were smaller than that of the horizontal direction, the impact of which was visible when comparing the spatial resolution values. Our analyses revealed that both emission modes yield comparable imaging performances in terms of beam quality, spectra shape and spatial resolution effects. There were no significantly large differences, thus providing the motivation for future studies to design and develop stable and robust cone beam imaging systems for various diagnostic applications.

  5. X-ray-emission studies of chemical bonding in transition-metal silicides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijs, P.J.W.; Leuken, H. van; Groot, R.A. de; Fuggle, J.C.; Reiter, S.; Wiech, G.; Buschow, K.H.J.

    1991-01-01

    We present Si L2,3 emission-band spectra of a series of 3d and 4d transition-metal (TM) silicides, together wtih Si K emission-band spectra of four 3d TM disilicides. The data are compared with augmented-spherical-wave density-of-states (DOS) calculations, and good agreement is found. The trends we

  6. Spectral analysis of K-shell X-ray emission of magnesium plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-02-06

    Feb 6, 2014 ... ... line emission occurs from the plasma region having sub-critical density, whereas K- emission arises from the bulk solid heated to a temperature of 10 eV by the impact of hot electrons. K- line from Be-like ions was used to estimate the hot electron temperature. A power law fit to the electron temperature ...

  7. Investigation of the amorphous to crystalline phase transition of chemical solution deposited Pb(Zr30Ti70)O3 thin films by soft x-ray absorption and soft x-ray emission spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneller, T.; Schneller, T.; Kohlstedt, H.; Petraru, A.; Waser, R.; Guo, J.; Denlinger, J.; Learmonth, T.; Glans, Per-Andres; Smith, K. E.

    2008-08-01

    Chemical solution deposited (CSD) complex oxide thin films attract considerable interest in various emerging fields as for example, fuel cells, ferroelectric random access memories or coated conductors. In the present paper the results of soft-x-ray spectroscopy between 100 eV and 500 eV on the amorphous to crystalline phase transition of ferroelectric PbZr{sub 0.3}Ti{sub 0.7}O{sub 3} (PZT) thin films are presented. Five CSD samples derived from the same wafer coated with a PZT film pyrolyzed at 350 C were heat treated at different temperatures between 400 C and 700 C. At first the sample were morphologically and electrically characterized. Subsequently the soft-x-ray absorption and emission experiments were performed at the undulator beamline 8.0 of the Advanced Light Source of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Soft-x-ray absorption spectra were acquired for the Ti L{sub 2,3-}, O K-, and C K-edge thresholds by using simultaneously the total electron yield (TEY) and total fluorescence yield (TFY) detection methods. For two samples, annealed at 400 C and 700 C, respectively, the resonant inelastic soft-x-ray spectroscopy (RIXS) was applied for various excitation energies near the Ti L-, O K-edges. We observed clear evidence of a rutile phase at untypically low temperatures. This rutile phase transforms into the perovskite phase upon increasing annealing temperature. These results are discussed in the framework of current microscopic models of the PZT (111) texture selection.

  8. Lifetime-broadening-suppressed X-ray absorption spectrum of β-YbAlB4 deduced from Yb 3d → 2p resonant X-ray emission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Naomi; Mizumaki, Masaichiro; Kanai, Noriko; Hayashi, Hisashi; Matsuda, Yasuhiro H.; Kuga, Kentaro; Nakatsuji, Satoru; Watanabe, Shinji

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the Yb 3d → 2p (Yb Lα 1,2 ) resonant X-ray emission spectrum of β-YbAlB 4 was acquired using excitation energies around the Yb L 3 -edge, at 2 K. Subsequently, the lifetime-broadening-suppressed (LBS) X-ray absorption structure (XAS) spectrum was obtained using the SIM-RIXS program. This spectrum was found to exhibit clearly resolved pre-edge and shoulder structures. Resonant Lα 1 emission spectra were well reproduced from LBS-XAS profiles over wide ranges of excitation and emission energies. In contrast, noticeable discrepancies appeared between the experimental and simulated Lα 2 emission spectra, suggesting an effect resulting from M 4 M 5 O 1 Coster-Kronig transitions. LBS-XAS, in conjunction with partial fluorescence yield (PFY) XAS and transmission XAS, determined a value for the Yb valence (v) in β-YbAlB 4 of 2.76 ± 0.08 at 2 K. Despite this relatively large uncertainty in v, each method provided a consistent variation in valence (δv) as the temperature was raised from 2 to 280 K: 0.060 ± 0.004 (LBS-XAS), 0.061 ± 0.005 (PFY-XAS) and 0.058 ± 0.007 (transmission XAS). The smaller δv associated with LBS-XAS demonstrates the greater precision of this method. (author)

  9. Investigation of line X-ray emission spectrum production of X-pinch superdense plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magunov, A.I.; Skobelev, I.Yu.; Faenov, A.Ya.; Pikuz, S.A.; Romanova, V.M.; Shelkovenko, T.A.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical investigations were performed to study the formation of the line emission spectrum of aluminium X-pinch. The emission spectra were recorded with a help of a focusing spatial resolution spectrograph which utilize a spherically bended mica crystal. The characteristics of emission spectra, intensity and form of spectral lines caused by the transitions from high-excitation levels of He-like ion Al 12 and transition of 3p-1s of H-like Al 13 are used to determine the X-pinch plasma parameters at different stages of X-pinch evolution. 32 refs., 4 figs

  10. Charge Exchange X-Ray Emission due to Highly Charged Ion Collisions with H, He, and H2: Line Ratios for Heliospheric and Interstellar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumbee, R. S.; Mullen, P. D.; Lyons, D.; Shelton, R. L.; Fogle, M.; Schultz, D. R.; Stancil, P. C.

    2018-01-01

    The fundamental collisional process of charge exchange (CX) has been established as a primary source of X-ray emission from the heliosphere, planetary exospheres, and supernova remnants. In this process, X-ray emission results from the capture of an electron by a highly charged ion from a neutral atom or molecule, to form a highly excited, high-charge state ion. As the captured electron cascades down to the lowest energy level, photons are emitted, including X-rays. To provide reliable CX-induced X-ray spectral models to realistically simulate these environments, line ratios and spectra are computed using theoretical CX cross sections obtained with the multi-channel Landau-Zener, atomic-orbital close-coupling, molecular-orbital close-coupling, and classical trajectory Monte Carlo methods for various collisional velocities relevant to astrophysics. X-ray spectra were computed for collisions of bare and H-like C to Al ions with H, He, and H2 with results compared to available experimental data. Using these line ratios, XSPEC models of CX emission in the northeast rim of the Cygnus Loop supernova remnant and the heliosphere are shown as examples with ion velocity dependence.

  11. Contribution to the study of X-ray emission induced by accelerated bromine and krypton ions and possibilities of analytical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tenorio Castilleros, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    In view of analytical applications the X-ray emission induced by 3 to 85 MeV Br and Kr ions has been studied. Thick target yields have been measured and ionization cross section for K and L shells have been calculated. The X-ray emission rates and energy shifts have also been determined. The results are discussed in the frame of the actually existing models for inner shell ionization in atomic collisions. As a practical application azteque ceramics have been analyzed. The possibilities and the difficulties of the technic are emphasized [fr

  12. Optimization of soft x-ray line emission from laser-produced carbon ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Absolute measurement for He- resonance (1s2 10-1s2p 11, at 40.2 Å) line emission from a laser-produced carbon plasma has been studied as a function of laser intensity. The optimum laser intensity is found to be ≈ 1.3 × 1012 W/cm2 for the maximum emission of 3.2 × 1013 photons sr-1 pulse-1. Since this line lies in ...

  13. Depth profiles of Al impurities implanted in Si wafers determined by means of the high-resolution grazing emission X-ray fluorescence technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayser, Y., E-mail: yves.kayser@unifr.c [Department of Physics, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Banas, D. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Cao, W.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Hoszowska, J. [Department of Physics, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Jagodzinski, P. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Kavcic, M. [J. Stefan Institute, SI-1000, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kubala-Kukus, A. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Nowak, S. [Department of Physics, University of Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Pajek, M. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); Szlachetko, J. [Institute of Physics, Jan Kochanowski University, 25-406 Kielce (Poland); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), F-38043 Grenoble (France)

    2010-06-15

    The synchrotron radiation based high-resolution grazing emission X-ray fluorescence (GEXRF) technique was used to extract the distribution of Al ions implanted with a dose of 10{sup 16} atoms/cm{sup 2} in Si wafers with energies ranging between 1 and 100 keV. The depth distributions of the implanted ions were deduced from the measured angular profiles of the Al-K{alpha} X-ray fluorescence line with nanometer-scale precision. The experimental results were compared to theoretical predictions of the depth distributions resulting from ion implantation. A good agreement between experiment and theory was found which proved that the presented high-resolution grazing emission X-ray fluorescence technique is well suited to perform depth profiling measurements of impurities located within the extinction depth, provided the overall shape of the distribution can be assumed a priori.

  14. Observation of a Short Period Quasi-periodic Pulsation in Solar X-Ray, Microwave, and EUV Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Cho, Kyung-Suk [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI), Daejeon, 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Nakariakov, Valery M., E-mail: pankaj@kasi.re.kr [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Warwick, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-10

    This paper presents the multiwavelength analysis of a 13 s quasi-periodic pulsation (QPP) observed in hard X-ray (12–300 keV) and microwave (4.9–34 GHz) emissions during a C-class flare that occurred on 2015 September 21. Atmospheric Image Assembly (AIA) 304 and 171 Å images show an emerging loop/flux tube (L1) moving radially outward, which interacts with the preexisting structures within the active region (AR). The QPP was observed during the expansion of and rising motion of L1. The Nobeyama Radioheliograph microwave images in 17/34 GHz channels reveal a single radio source that was co-spatial with a neighboring loop (L2). In addition, using AIA 304 Å images, we detected intensity oscillations in the legs of L2 with a period of about 26 s. A similar oscillation period was observed in the GOES soft X-ray flux derivative. This oscillation period seems to increase with time. We suggest that the observed QPP is most likely generated by the interaction between L2 and L3 observed in the AIA hot channels (131 and 94 Å). The merging speed of loops L2 and L3 was ∼35 km s{sup −1}. L1 was destroyed possibly by its interaction with preexisting structures in the AR, and produced a cool jet with the speed of ∼106–118 km s{sup −1} associated with a narrow CME (∼770 km s{sup −1}). Another mechanism of the QPP in terms of a sausage oscillation of the loop (L2) is also possible.

  15. Search for X-Ray Emission Associated with the Shapley Supercluster with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Gupta, Anjali; Yamasaki, Noriko Y.; Takei, Yoh; Ohashi, Takaya; Sato, Kosuke; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Henry, J. Patrick; Kelley, Richard L.

    2012-01-01

    Suzaku performed observations of 3 regions in and around the Shapley supercluster: a region located between A3558 and A3556, at approx 0.9 times the virial radii of both clusters, and two other regions at 1 deg and 4 away from the first pointing. The 4 deg -otfset observation was used to evaluate the Galactic foreground emission. We did not detect significant redshifted Oxygen emission lines (O VII and O VIII) in the spectra of all three pointings, after subtracting the contribution of foreground and background emission. An upper limit for the redshifted O VIII Ka line intensity of the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM) is 1.5 x 10(exp -7) photons / s / sq cm / sq arcmin, which corresponds to an overdensity of approx 380 (Z/0.1 Solar Z)(exp -1/2)(L/3 Mpc)(exp -1/2), assuming T = 3 x 10(exp 6) K. We found excess continuum emission in the 1 deg-offset and on-filament regions, represented by thermal models with kT approximates 1 keV and approximates 2 keV, respectively. The redshifts of both 0 and that of the supercluster (0.048) are consistent with the observed spectra. The approx 1 keV emission can be also fitted with Ne-rich Galactic (zero redshift) thin thermal emission. Radial intensity profile of 2 keV component suggests contribution from A3558 and A3556, but with significant steepening of the intensity slope in the outer region of A3558. Finally, we summarized the previous Suzaku search for the WHIM and discussed the feasibility of constraining the WHIM. An overdensity of 5 x 10 (exp 6) K with the Suzaku XIS. The non detection with Suzaku suggests that typical line-of-sight average overdensity is < 400.

  16. EXTENDED X-RAY EMISSION IN THE VICINITY OF THE MICROQUASAR LS 5039: PULSAR WIND NEBULA?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durant, Martin; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Pavlov, George G.; Chang, Chulhoon; Garmire, Gordon P.

    2011-01-01

    LS 5039 is a high-mass binary with a period of 4 days, containing a compact object and an O-star, one of the few high-mass binaries detected in γ-rays. Our Chandra Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer observation of LS 5039 provided a high-significance (∼10σ) detection of extended emission clearly visible for up to 1' from the point source. The spectrum of this emission can be described by an absorbed power-law model with photon index Γ = 1.9 ± 0.3, somewhat softer than the point-source spectrum Γ = 1.44 ± 0.07, with the same absorption, N H = (6.4 ± 0.6) x 10 21 cm -2 . The observed 0.5-8 keV flux of the extended emission is ≅ 8.8 x 10 -14 erg s -1 cm -2 or 5% of the point-source flux; the latter is a factor of ∼2 lower than the lowest flux detected so far. Fainter extended emission with comparable flux and a softer (Γ ∼ 3) spectrum is detected at even greater radii (up to 2'). Two possible interpretations of the extended emission are a dust scattering halo and a synchrotron nebula powered by energetic particles escaping the binary. We discuss both of these scenarios and favor the nebula interpretation, although some dust contribution is possible. We have also found transient sources located within a narrow stripe south of LS 5039. We discuss the likelihood of these sources to be related to LS 5039.

  17. X-Ray Emission from an Asymmetric Blast Wave and a Massive White Dwarf in the Gamma Ray Emitting Nova V407 CYG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Thomas; Donato, Davide; Mukai, Koji; Sokoloski, Jennifer; Chomiuk, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Classical nova events in symbiotic stars, although rare, offer a unique opportunity to probe the interaction between ejecta and a dense environment in stellar explosions. In this work, we use X-ray data obtained with Swift and Suzaku during the recent classical nova outburst in V407 Cyg to explore such an interaction. We find evidence of both equilibrium and non-equilibrium ionization plasmas at the time of peak X-ray brightness, indicating a strong asymmetry in the density of the emitting region. Comparing a simple model to the data, we find that the X-ray evolution is broadly consistent with nova ejecta driving a forward shock into the dense wind of the Mira companion. We detect a highly absorbed soft X-ray component in the spectrum during the first 50 days of the outburst that is consistent with supersoft emission from the nuclear burning white dwarf. The high temperature and short turn off time of this emission component, in addition to the observed breaks in the optical and UV lightcurves, indicate that the white dwarf in the binary is extremely massive. Finally, we explore the connections between the X-ray and GeV-ray evolution, and propose that the gamma ray turn-off is due to the stalling of the forward shock as the ejecta reach the red giant surface.

  18. Miniature x-ray point source for alignment and calibration of x-ray optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, R.H.; Boyle, M.J.; Glaros, S.S.

    1977-01-01

    A miniature x-ray point source of high brightness similar to that of Rovinsky, et al. is described. One version of the x-ray source is used to align the x-ray optics on the Argus and Shiva laser systems. A second version is used to determine the spatial and spectral transmission functions of the x-ray optics. The spatial and spectral characteristics of the x-ray emission from the x-ray point source are described. The physical constraints including size, intensity and thermal limitations, and useful lifetime are discussed. The alignment and calibration techniques for various x-ray optics and detector combinations are described

  19. Analyzing x-ray emissions from meter-scale negative discharges in ambient air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kochkin, Pavlo; Köhn, Christoph; Ebert, Ute

    2016-01-01

    streamers of opposite polarity launches the electrons, that they are further accelerated in the discharge field and then lose their energy, e.g., by photon emission through Bremsstrahlung. We model electron and photon dynamics in space and energy with a Monte Carlo model. Also the detector response...... and attenuation curves. The nanosecond duration of the bursts as well as their energy spectrum is consistent with model calculations....

  20. Long-term variability in the X-ray emission of RX J0720.4-3125

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, C.P.; Vink, J.; Méndez, R.M.; Verbunt, F.

    2004-01-01

    We detect a gradual, long-term change in the shape of the X-ray spectrum of the isolated neutron star RX J0720.4-3125, such that the spectrum of the source can no longer be described as a blackbody spectrum. The change is accompanied by an energy-dependent change in the pulse profile. If the X-ray

  1. Cosmic x ray physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccammon, Dan; Cox, D. P.; Kraushaar, W. L.; Sanders, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    The annual progress report on Cosmic X Ray Physics for the period 1 Jan. to 31 Dec. 1990 is presented. Topics studied include: soft x ray background, new sounding rocket payload: x ray calorimeter, and theoretical studies.

  2. X-Ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enema. What you can expect During the X-ray X-rays are performed at doctors' offices, dentists' offices, ... as those using a contrast medium. Your child's X-ray Restraints or other techniques may be used to ...

  3. Chest x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest radiography; Serial chest x-ray; X-ray - chest ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  4. Abdominal x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdominal film; X-ray - abdomen; Flat plate; KUB x-ray ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  5. Development of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray emission spectrometers for transmission electron microscopes--an introduction of valence electron spectroscopy for transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terauchi, Masami; Koike, Masato; Fukushima, Kurio; Kimura, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Two types of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray spectrometers, a high-dispersion type and a conventional one, for transmission electron microscopes were constructed. Those spectrometers were used to study the electronic states of valence electrons (bonding electrons). Both spectrometers extended the acceptable energy regions to higher than 2000 eV. The best energy resolution of 0.08 eV was obtained for an Al L-emission spectrum by using the high-dispersion type spectrometer. By using the spectrometer, C K-emission of carbon allotropes, Cu L-emission of Cu(1-x)Zn(x) alloys and Pt M-emission spectra were presented. The FWHM value of 12 eV was obtained for the Pt Malpha-emission peak. The performance of the conventional one was also presented for ZnS and a section specimen of a multilayer device. W-M and Si-K emissions were clearly resolved. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has an advantage for obtaining spectra from a single crystalline specimen with a defined crystal setting. As an example of anisotropic soft X-ray emission, C K-emission spectra of single crystalline graphite with different crystal settings were presented. From the spectra, density of states of pi- and sigma-bondings were separately derived. These results demonstrated a method to analyse the electronic states of valence electrons of materials in the nanometre scale based on TEM.

  6. Study of microstress state of P91 steel using complementary mechanical Barkhausen, magnetoacoustic emission, and X-ray diffraction techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Augustyniak, Bolesław, E-mail: bolek@mif.pg.gda.pl; Piotrowski, Leszek; Maciakowski, Paweł; Chmielewski, Marek [Faculty of Applied Physics and Mathematics, Gdansk University of Technology, 80-233 Gdansk (Poland); Lech-Grega, Marzena; Żelechowski, Janusz [The Institute of Non-Ferrous Metals, 32-050 Skawina (Poland)

    2014-05-07

    The paper deals with assessment of microstress state of martensite P91 steel using three complementary techniques: mechanical Barkhausen emission, magnetoacoustic emission (MAE), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) profile analysis. Magnetic coercivity Hc and microstructure were investigated with inductive magnetometry and magnetic force microscopy (MFM), respectively. Internal stress level of P91 steel was modified by heat treatment. Steel samples were austenitized, quenched, and then tempered at three temperatures (720 °C, 750 °C, and 780 °C) during increasing time (from 15 min up to 240 min). The microstrain level ε{sub i} was evaluated using Williamson–Hall method. It was revealed that during tempering microstrain systematically decreases from ε{sub i} = 2.5 × 10{sup −3} for as quenched state down to ε{sub i} = 0.3 × 10{sup −3} for well tempered samples. Both mechanical hardness (Vicker's HV) and magnetic hardness (coercivity) decrease almost linearly with decreasing microstrain while the MAE and MBE intensities strongly increase. Tempering leads to evident shift of the MeBN intensity maximum recorded for the first load towards lower applied strain values and to increase of MAE intensity. This indicates that the microstress state deduced by magnetic techniques is correlated with microstrains evaluated with XRD technique.

  7. A Suzaku Search for Nonthermal Emission at Hard X-Ray Energies in the Coma Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Caballero, et al. (Mexico City: Univ. Nacional Autónoma de México), 3, 869 Eckert, D., Produit , N., Paltani, S., Neronov, A., & Courvoisier, T. J...energies and completely dominated by thermal emission, allows Coma’s thermal and nonthermal properties to be simultaneously de - termined. The XMM and HXD... contrast to finding an actual power-law signature in the data, is instead compensating for a slight excess at high 10 10 5 10 4 10 3 0.01 0.1 1 10 C ou nt

  8. A Suzaku Study of Ejecta Structure and Origin of Hard X-ray Emission in the Supernova Remnant G156.2+5.7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Hiroyuki; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Katsuda, Satoru; Mori, Koji; Petre, Robert; Yamaguchi, Hiroya

    2012-01-01

    We report an X-ray study of the evolved Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G1S6.2+S.7 based on six pointing observations with Suzaku. The remnant's large extent (100' in diameter) allows us to investigate its radial structure in the northwestern and eastern directions from the apparent center. The X-ray spectra. were well fit with a two-component non-equilibrium ionization model representing the swept-up interstellar medium (ISM) and the metal-rich ejecta. We found prominent central concentrations of Si, S and Fe from the ejecta component; the lighter elements of O, Ne and Mg were distributed more uniformly. The temperature of the ISM component suggests a slow shock (610-960 km/s), hence the remnant's age is estimated to be 7,000-15,000 yr, assuming its distance to be approx. 1.1 kpc. G1S6.2+5.7 has also been thought to emit hard, non-thermal X-rays, despite being considerably older than any other such remnant. In response to a recent discovery of a background cluster of galaxies (2XMM J045637.2+522411), we carefully excluded its contribution, and reexamined the origin of the hard X-ray emission. We found that the residual hard X-ray emission is consistent with the expected level of the cosmic X-ray background. Thus, no robust evidence for the non-thermal emission was obtained from G156.2+5.7. These results are consistent with the picture of an evolved SNR.

  9. Early Soft X-Ray to UV Emission from Double Neutron Star Mergers: Implications from the Long-term Observations of GW170817

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiang-Yu; Huang, Zhi-Qiu

    2018-01-01

    Recent long-term radio follow-up observations of GW170817 reveal a simple power-law rising light curve, with a slope of {t}0.78, up to 93 days after the merger. The latest X-ray detection at 109 days is also consistent with such a temporal slope. Such a shallow rise behavior requires a mildly relativistic outflow with a steep velocity gradient profile, so that slower material with larger energy catches up with the decelerating ejecta and re-energizes it. It has been suggested that this mildly relativistic outflow may represent a cocoon of material. We suggest that the velocity gradient profile may form during the stage that the cocoon is breaking out of the merger ejecta, resulting from shock propagation down a density gradient. The cooling of the hot relativistic cocoon material immediately after it breaks out should have produced soft X-ray to UV radiation at tens of seconds to hours after the merger. The soft X-ray emission has a luminosity of {L}{{X}}∼ {10}45 {erg} {{{s}}}-1 over a period of tens of seconds for a merger event like GW170817. The UV emission shows a rise initially and peaks at about a few hours with a luminosity of {L}{UV}∼ {10}42 {erg} {{{s}}}-1. The soft X-ray transients could be detected by future wide-angle X-ray detectors, such as the Chinese mission Einstein Probe. This soft X-ray/UV emission would serve as one of the earliest electromagnetic counterparts of gravitation waves from double neutron star mergers and could provide the earliest localization of the sources.

  10. Simultaneous optical/X-ray study of GS 1354-64 (=BW Cir) during hard outburst: evidence for optical cyclo-synchrotron emission from the hot accretion flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahari, Mayukh; Gandhi, Poshak; Charles, Philip A.; Kotze, Marissa M.; Altamirano, Diego; Misra, Ranjeev

    2017-07-01

    We present results from simultaneous optical [South African Large Telescope (SALT)] and X-ray (Swift and INTEGRAL) observations of GS 1354-64/BW Cir during the 2015 hard state outburst. During the rising phase, optical/X-ray time series shows a strong anti-correlation with X-ray photons lagging optical. Optical and X-ray power spectra show quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) at a frequency of ˜18 mHz with a confidence level of at least 99 per cent. Simultaneous fitting of Swift/XRT and INTEGRAL spectra in the range 0.5-1000.0 keV shows non-thermal, power-law-dominated (>90 per cent) spectra with a hard power-law index of 1.48 ± 0.03, inner disc temperature of 0.12 ± 0.01 keV and an inner disc radius of ˜3000 km. All evidence is consistent with cyclo-synchrotron radiation in a non-thermal, hot electron cloud extending to ˜100 Schwarzschild radii being a major physical process for the origin of optical photons. At outburst peak about one month later, when the X-ray flux rises and the optical drops, the apparent features in the optical/X-ray correlation vanish and the optical auto correlation widens. Although ˜0.19 Hz QPO is observed from the X-ray power spectra, the optical variability is dominated by the broad-band noise, and the inner disc temperature increases. These results support a change in the dominant optical emission source between outburst rise and peak, consistent with a weakening of hot flow as the disc moves in.

  11. Tracing the Mass-Dependent Star Formation History of Late-Type Galaxies using X-ray Emission: Results from the CHANDRA Deep Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmer, B.D; Brandt, W.N.; Schneider, D.P.; Steffen, A.T.; Alexander, D.M.; Bell, E.F.; Hornschemeier, A.E.; McIntosh, D.H.; Bauer, F.E.; Gilli, R.; hide

    2008-01-01

    We report on the X-ray evolution over the last approx.9 Gyr of cosmic history (i.e., since z = 1.4) of late-type galaxy populations in the Chandra Deep Field-North and Extended Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-N and E-CDF-S. respectively; jointly CDFs) survey fields. Our late-type galaxy sample consists of 2568 galaxies. which were identified using rest-frame optical colors and HST morphologies. We utilized X-ray stacking analyses to investigate the X-ray emission from these galaxies, emphasizing the contributions from normal galaxies that are not dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Over this redshift range, we find significant increases (factors of approx. 5-10) in the X-ray-to-optical mean luminosity ratio (L(sub x)/L(sub B)) and the X-ray-to-stellar-mass mean ratio (L(sub x)/M(sub *)) for galaxy populations selected by L(sub B) and M(sub *), respectively. When analyzing galaxy samples selected via SFR, we find that the mean X-ray-to-SFR ratio (L(sub x)/SFR) is consistent with being constant over the entire redshift range for galaxies with SFR = 1-100 Solar Mass/yr, thus demonstrating that X-ray emission can be used as a robust indicator of star-formation activity out to z approx. 1.4. We find that the star-formation activity (as traced by X-ray luminosity) per unit stellar mass in a given redshift bin increases with decreasing stellar mass over the redshift range z = 0.2-1, which is consistent with previous studies of how star-formation activity depends on stellar mass. Finally, we extend our X-ray analyses to Lyman break galaxies at z approx. 3 and estimate that L(sub x)/L(sub B) at z approx. 3 is similar to its value at z = 1.4.

  12. Confronting X-Ray Emission Models with theHighest-Redshift Kiloparsec-Scale Jets: The z = 3.89 Jet in Quasar 1745+624

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, C.C.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Stawarz, L.; /Heidelberg Observ.; Siemiginowska, A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2006-06-28

    A newly identified kiloparsec-scale X-ray jet in the high-redshift z=3.89 quasar 1745+624 is studied with multi-frequency Very Large Array, Hubble Space Telescope, and Chandra X-ray imaging data. This is only the third large-scale X-ray jet beyond z > 3 known and is further distinguished as being the most luminous relativistic jet observed at any redshift, exceeding 10{sup 45} erg/s in both the radio and X-ray bands. Apart from the jet's extreme redshift, luminosity, and high inferred equipartition magnetic field (in comparison to local analogues), its basic properties such as X-ray/radio morphology and radio polarization are similar to lower-redshift examples. Its resolved linear structure and the convex broad-band spectral energy distributions of three distinct knots are also a common feature among known powerful X-ray jets at lower-redshift. Relativistically beamed inverse Compton and ''non-standard'' synchrotron models have been considered to account for such excess X-ray emission in other jets; both models are applicable to this high-redshift example but with differing requirements for the underlying jet physical properties, such as velocity, energetics, and electron acceleration processes. One potentially very important distinguishing characteristic between the two models is their strongly diverging predictions for the X-ray/radio emission with increasing redshift. This is considered, though with the limited sample of three z > 3 jets it is apparent that future studies targeted at very high-redshift jets are required for further elucidation of this issue. Finally, from the broad-band jet emission we estimate the jet kinetic power to be no less than 10{sup 46} erg/s, which is about 10% of the Eddington luminosity corresponding to this galaxy's central supermassive black hole mass M{sub BH} {approx}> 10{sup 9} M{sub {circle_dot}} estimated here via the virial relation. The optical luminosity of the quasar core is about ten times

  13. Sensitivity of Inferred Electron Temperature from X-ray Emission of NIF Cryogenic DT Implosions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klem, Michael [Univ. of Dallas, Irving, TX (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory seeks to achieve thermonuclear ignition through inertial confinement fusion. The accurate assessment of the performance of each implosion experiment is a crucial step. Here we report on work to derive a reliable electron temperature for the cryogenic deuteriumtritium implosions completed on the NIF using the xray signal from the Ross filter diagnostic. These Xrays are dominated by bremsstrahlung emission. By fitting the xray signal measured through each of the individual Ross filters, the source bremsstrahlung spectrum can be inferred, and an electron temperature of the implosion hot spot inferred. Currently, each filter is weighted equally in this analysis. We present work quantifying the errors with such a technique and the results from investigating the contribution of each filter to the overall accuracy of the temperature inference. Using this research, we also compare the inferred electron temperature against other measured implosion quantities to develop a more complete understanding of the hotspot physics.

  14. The Optical/UV Excess of X-Ray-dim Isolated Neutron Stars. I. Bremsstrahlung Emission from a Strangeon Star Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Weiyang; Lu, Jiguang; Men, Yunpeng; Xu, Renxin [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Tong, Hao [Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Ge, Mingyu [Key Laboratory for Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Li, Zhaosheng, E-mail: r.x.xu@pku.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Xiangtan University, Xiangtan 411105 (China)

    2017-03-01

    X-ray-dim isolated neutron stars (XDINSs) are characterized by Planckian spectra in X-ray bands, but show optical/ultraviolet (UV) excesses: the factors by which the measured photometry exceeds those extrapolated from X-ray spectra. To solve this problem, a radiative model of bremsstrahlung emission from a plasma atmosphere is established in the regime of a strangeon star. A strangeon star atmosphere could simply be regarded as the upper layer of a normal neutron star. This plasma atmosphere, formed and maintained by the interstellar-medium-accreted matter due to the so-called strangeness barrier, is supposed to be of two temperatures. All seven XDINS spectra could be well fitted by the radiative model, from optical/UV to X-ray bands. The fitted radiation radii of XDINSs are from 7 to 13 km, while the modeled electron temperatures are between 50 and 250 eV, except RX J0806.4–4123, with a radiation radius of ∼3.5 km, indicating that this source could be a low-mass strangeon star candidate. This strangeon star model could further be tested by soft X-ray polarimetry, such as the Lightweight Asymmetry and Magnetism Probe, which is expected to be operational on China’s space station around 2020.

  15. Picosecond x-ray streak camera studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasyanov, Yu.S.; Malyutin, A.A.; Richardson, M.C.; Chevokin, V.K.

    1975-01-01

    Some initial results of direct measurement of picosecond x-ray emission from laser-produced plasmas are presented. A PIM-UMI 93 image converter tube, incorporating an x-ray sensitive photocathode, linear deflection, and three stages of image amplification was used to analyse the x-ray radiation emanating from plasmas produced from solid Ti targets by single high-intensity picosecond laser pulses. From such plasmas, the x-ray emission typically persisted for times of 60psec. However, it is shown that this detection system should be capable of resolving x-ray phenomena of much shorter duration. (author)

  16. Soft x-ray emission from clusters of galaxies and related phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Mittaz, Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Since the discovery of the cluster soft excess (CSE) over eight years ago, its properties and origin have been the subject of debate With the recent launch of new missions such as XMM-Newton and FUSE, we are beginning to answer some of the complex issues regarding the phenomenon This conference proceedings is an attempt to bring together the latest research results and covers both observational and theoretical work on the CSE and related topics One of the main topics is the possible relationship between the CSE and the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM), which is believed to harbor 50% of the baryons in the near Universe New data from both XMM-Newton and FUSE have indicated a possible causal link between the WHIM and CSE Evidence is based on the apparent detection of O VII emission lines in the soft excess spectrum of the outskirts of several clusters, as well as reports of absorption lines at local and higher redshifts (seen in the spectra of distant sources) as signature of the WHIM However, while there h...

  17. Multiwavelength observations of Active Galactic Nuclei from the radio to the hard X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuchert, Tobias

    2017-07-01

    Active Galaxies form a peculiar type of galaxies. Their cores, the so-called "Active Galactic Nuclei" (AGN), are the most persistent luminous objects in the universe. Accretion of several solar masses per year onto black holes of Millions to Billions of solar masses drive the immense energy output of these systems, which can exceed that of the entire galaxy. The compact energy source, however, only measures about one over a Billion times that of the entire galaxy. Subject of my thesis are observations of the two main channels of energy release of selected AGN systems, both of which are encompassed by profound and yet unanswered questions. These channels are on the one hand the pronounced X-ray emission of the hot and compact accreting environment in close vicinity of the black hole, and on the other hand the radio synchrotron emission of magnetically collimated jets that are fed by portions of the accreted matter. These jets also function as effective accelerators and drive the injected matter deep into the intergalactic medium. As the circumnuclear environment of AGN is too compact to be spatially resolved in the X-rays, I show how X-ray spectroscopy can be used to: (1) understand the effects of strong gravity to trace the geometry and physics of the X-ray source and (2) more consistently quantify matter that surrounds and dynamically absorbs our direct line of sight towards the X-ray source. Second, I unveil the valuable information contained in the polarized radio light being emitted from magnetized jet outflows. In contrast to the X-ray emitting region, I am able to spatially resolve the inner parts of the jet of a prominent galaxy with help of the Very Long Baseline Array, a large network of radio telescopes. The resulting polarization maps turn out to be exceptionally promising in answering fundamental questions related to jet physics.

  18. Discovery of 6.4 keV line and soft X-ray emissions from G323.7-1.0 with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saji, Shigetaka; Matsumoto, Hironori; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Nobukawa, Kumiko K.; Uchiyama, Hideki; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Koyama, Katsuji

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, the Suzaku X-ray data of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) candidate G323.7-1.0 are analyzed to search for X-ray emissions. Spatially extended enhancements in the 6.4 keV line and in soft X-rays are found inside or on the radio shell. The soft X-ray enhancement would be the hottest part of the shell-like X-ray emission along the radio shell. The 6.4 keV line enhancement is detected at a significance level of 4.1 σ. The lower limit of the equivalent width (EW) is 1.2 keV. The energy centroid of the 6.4 keV line is 6.40 ± 0.04 keV, indicating that the iron is less ionized than the Ne-like state. If the 6.4 keV line originates from ionizing non-equilibrium thermal plasma, presence of iron-rich ejecta in a low-ionization state is required, which is disfavored by the relatively old age of the SNR. The 6.4 keV line enhancement would be due to K-shell ionization of iron atoms in a dense interstellar medium by high-energy particles. Since there is no irradiating X-ray source, the origin of the 6.4 keV line enhancement is not likely the photoionization. The large EW can only be explained by K-shell ionization due to cosmic-ray protons with an energy of ˜10 MeV, which might be generated by the shock acceleration in G323.7-1.0.

  19. Radio emission from the X-ray pulsar Her X-1: a jet launched by a strong magnetic field neutron star?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Eijnden, J.; Degenaar, N.; Russell, T. D.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Wijnands, R.; Miller, J. M.; King, A. L.; Rupen, M. P.

    2018-01-01

    Her X-1 is an accreting neutron star (NS) in an intermediate-mass X-ray binary. Like low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs), it accretes via Roche lobe overflow, but similar to many high-mass X-ray binaries containing a NS; Her X-1 has a strong magnetic field and slow spin. Here, we present the discovery of radio emission from Her X-1 with the Very Large Array. During the radio observation, the central X-ray source was partially obscured by a warped disc. We measure a radio flux density of 38.7 ± 4.8 μJy at 9 GHz but cannot constrain the spectral shape. We discuss possible origins of the radio emission, and conclude that coherent emission, a stellar wind, shocks and a propeller outflow are all unlikely explanations. A jet, as seen in LMXBs, is consistent with the observed radio properties. We consider the implications of the presence of a jet in Her X-1 on jet formation mechanisms and on the launching of jets by NSs with strong magnetic fields.

  20. A CHANDRA PERSPECTIVE ON GALAXY-WIDE X-RAY BINARY EMISSION AND ITS CORRELATION WITH STAR FORMATION RATE AND STELLAR MASS: NEW RESULTS FROM LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmer, B. D.; Jenkins, L. P.; Alexander, D. M.; Goulding, A. D.; Roberts, T. P.; Bauer, F. E.; Brandt, W. N.; Ptak, A.

    2010-01-01

    We present new Chandra observations that complete a sample of seventeen (17) luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) with D H ∼ 20 cm -2 . The LIRGs in our sample have total infrared (8-1000 μm) luminosities in the range of L IR ∼ (1-8) x 10 11 L sun . The high-resolution imaging and X-ray spectral information from our Chandra observations allow us to measure separately X-ray contributions from active galactic nuclei and normal galaxy processes (e.g., X-ray binaries and hot gas). We utilized total infrared plus UV luminosities to estimate star formation rates (SFRs) and K-band luminosities and optical colors to estimate stellar masses (M * ) for the sample. Under the assumption that the galaxy-wide 2-10 keV luminosity (L gal HX ) traces the combined emission from high-mass X-ray binaries (HMXBs) and low-mass X-ray binaries, and that the power output from these components is linearly correlated with SFR and M * , respectively, we constrain the relation L gal HX = αM * + βSFR. To achieve this, we construct a Chandra-based data set composed of our new LIRG sample combined with additional samples of less actively star-forming normal galaxies and more powerful LIRGs and ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) from the literature. Using these data, we measure best-fit values of α = (9.05 ± 0.37) x 10 28 erg s -1 M -1 sun and β = (1.62 ± 0.22) x 10 39 erg s -1 (M sun yr -1 ) -1 . This scaling provides a more physically meaningful estimate of L gal HX , with ∼0.1-0.2 dex less scatter, than a direct linear scaling with SFR. Our results suggest that HMXBs dominate the galaxy-wide X-ray emission for galaxies with SFR/M * ∼>5.9 x 10 -11 yr -1 , a factor of ∼2.9 times lower than previous estimates. We find that several of the most powerful LIRGs and ULIRGs, with SFR/M * ∼> 10 -9 yr -1 , appear to be X-ray underluminous with respect to our best-fit relation. We argue that these galaxies are likely to contain X-ray binaries residing in compact star-forming regions

  1. Strong soft X-ray emission from a double-stream gas puff target irradiated with a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Rakowski, R.; Szczurek, M. [Military Univ. of Technology, Warsaw (Poland). Inst. of Optoelectronics; Daido, H.; Suzuki, M.; Yamagami, S.; Choi, I.W.; Tang, H.J. [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering

    2001-07-01

    Soft X-ray emission from a new double-stream gas puff target irradiated with a nanosecond, high-power Nd:YAG laser pulse has been studied. The target was formed by pulsed injection of gas into a hollow gas stream made from helium by using a double-nozzle setup. Strong X-ray emissions near 10 nm from the double-stream krypton/helium, near 11 nm from the xenon/helium, and at 13 nm from the oxygen/helium targets were observed. The emission from the double-stream gas puff target was several times higher as compared to the ordinary gas puff targets, and comparable to the emission from the solid targets irradiated in the same conditions. (orig.)

  2. The Medical Case for a Positron Emission Tomography and X-ray Computed Tomography Combined Service in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bulushi, Naima K; Bailey, Dale; Mariani, Giuliano

    2013-11-01

    The value of a positron emission tomography and X-ray computed tomography (PET/CT) combined service in terms of diagnostic accuracy, cost-effectiveness and impact on clinical decision-making is well-documented in the literature. Its role in the management of patients presenting with cancer is shifting from early staging and restaging to the early assessment of the treatment response. Currently, the application of PET/CT has extended to non-oncological specialties-mainly neurology, cardiology and rheumatology. A further emerging application for PET/CT is the imaging of infection/inflammation. This article illustrates some of the PET/CT applications in both oncological and non-oncological disorders. In view of the absence of this modality in Oman, this article aims to increase the awareness of the importance of these imaging modalities and their significant impact on diagnosis and management in both oncological and non-oncological specialties for patients of all age groups as well as the decision-makers.

  3. Trace metal analysis in sea grasses from Mexican Caribbean Coast by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solis, C.; Issac O, K.; Martinez, A.; Lavoisier, E.; Martinez, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    The growing urban and tourist activity in the Mexican Caribbean coasts has resulted in an increase of chemical substances, metals in particular, discharged to the coastal waters. In order to reach an adequate management and conservation of these marine ecosystems it is necessary to perform an inventory of the actual conditions that reflect the vulnerability and the level of damage. Sea-grasses are considered good biological indicators of heavy metal contamination in marine systems. The goal of this preliminary work is to evaluate the concentrations of trace metals such as Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, and Pb in Thalassia testudinum, a very common sea-grass in the Mexican Caribbean Sea. Samples were collected from several locations in the coasts of the Yucatan Peninsula: Holbox, Blanquizal and Punta Allen, areas virtually uninfluenced by anthropogenic activities. Trace elements in different part plants were determined by particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE). This is a very suitable technique since it offers a fast, accurate and multi-element analysis. Also, the analysis by PIXE can be performed directly on powdered leaves without a laborious sample preparation. The trace metal concentration determined in sea-grasses growing in Caribbean generally fall in the range of the lowest valuables reported for sea grasses from the Gulf of Mexico. The results indicate that the studied areas do not present contamination by heavy metals. (Author)

  4. Hydrodemetallation and Hydrodesulfurization Spent Catalysts Elemental Analysis: Comparison of Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence and Atomic Emission Spectrometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoux, Laetitia; Gourhand, Sébastien; Hébrant, Marc; Schneider, Michel; Diliberto, Sébastien; Meux, Eric

    2017-08-01

    Petroleum industries continuously consume catalysts on very large scales. The recycling of spent catalysts is thus of major economic and environmental importance and its first step consists of the characterization of the valuable metal content. Wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) analysis is compared with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) for the analysis of five samples of spent hydrodesulphurization (HDS) and hydrodemetallization (HDM) catalysts. The elements are considered for their economic interest (Co, Ni, Mo, and V) or for the problems that can arise when they are present in the sample in significant quantities (Al, As, P, Fe). First, the systematic comparison of the analysis of known synthetic samples was performed. The originality here is that the samples were first beaded with lithium tetraborate (Li 2 B 4 O 7 ) for WDXRF analysis and then dissolved in hot HCl 6M for ICP-AES measurements. With this processing, we were able to clearly identify the origin of analytical problems when they arose. Second, the semi-quantitative protocol of WDXRF is compared with the quantitative procedure. Finally, the analysis of the spent catalysts is presented and the information gained by the systematic comparison of ICP-AES and WDXRF is shared. The interest of the simultaneous determination by the two techniques when such complicated heterogeneous matrices are involved is clearly demonstrated.

  5. PIXE in 1980: Summary of the second international conference on particle induced x-ray emission and its analytical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akselsson, K.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Second International Conference on Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) and its analytical applications was held in Lund, Sweden, June 9-12, 1980. About a hundred papers were presented, including seven invited talks (PIXE and particle scattering, microbeam analysis, applications to aerosols and biological samples). The main impression left by the conference was that both the PIXE method and its applications are in a phase of fast development. Considerable effort has successfully been devoted to optimizing the basic PIXE technique. Also the great advantage of simultaneously getting information about lighter elements and sample mass was reported to have been successfully employed in routine analyses. PIXE, which was initially considered to be a method mainly for thin samples, has also been shown to be competitive for a variety of thick samples. Data from aerosol studies was presented. With the PIXE-method, it is feasible to perform series of measurements over a long period of time, many samples in parallel and/or samples from sites of poor accessibility. However, the advantages of PIXE may be further exploited in aerosol investigations and some promising lines of sampler development were reported. Sample preparation techniques are crucial for applications to biological samples and several laboratories are engaged in such developmental work. However, it was also evident that PIXE is already giving significant contributions to research in biology and medicine

  6. Hard-X-ray emission lines from the decay of 44Ti in the remnant of supernova 1987A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenev, S A; Lutovinov, A A; Tsygankov, S S; Winkler, C

    2012-10-18

    It is assumed that the radioactive decay of (44)Ti powers the infrared, optical and ultraviolet emission of supernova remnants after the complete decay of (56)Co and (57)Co (the isotopes that dominated the energy balance during the first three to four years after the explosion) until the beginning of active interaction of the ejecta with the surrounding matter. Simulations show that the initial mass of (44)Ti synthesized in core-collapse supernovae is (0.02-2.5) × 10(-4) solar masses (M circled dot). Hard X-rays and γ-rays from the decay of this (44)Ti have been unambiguously observed from Cassiopeia A only, leading to the suggestion that values of the initial mass of (44)Ti near the upper bound of the predictions occur only in exceptional cases. For the remnant of supernova 1987A, an upper limit to the initial mass of (44)Ti of supernova 1987A in the narrow band containing two direct-escape lines of (44)Ti at 67.9 and 78.4 keV. The measured line fluxes imply that this decay provided sufficient energy to power the remnant at late times. We estimate that the initial mass of (44)Ti was (3.1 ± 0.8) × 10(-4), which is near the upper bound of theoretical predictions.

  7. The trace element analysis of ancient Indian coins using proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE) technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PURI, N.K.; HAJIVALIEI, M.; BEDI, S.C.; SINGH, N.; GOVIL, I.M.; GARG, M.L.; HANDA, D.K.; GOVIL, K.L.; ROUT, B.; VIJAYAN, V.

    2004-01-01

    Elemental analysis of ancient Indian coins viz. thirty-three punched marked coins (6 th century B.C.), fifty-nine coins belonging to Kusanas (78-250 A.D) and twenty-five coins belonging to medieval period (11 th -14 th century A.D), from India have been analysed using Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) technique. The elements namely S, Ca, Fe, Ag, Cu, Ni and Pb were detected in most of the punch-marked coins while elements namely S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, As and Zn were detected in most of the Kusanas coins and the S, Ca, Fe, Cu, Ag, Sn, Pb were detected in 11 th -14 th century A.D. coins. Based on the elemental analysis different hypotheses put forward in the earlier literature were examined. This is the first attempt where reasonable number of ancient coins belonging to different periods were analysed by modern non destructive multi-elemental technique such as PIXE and has put the importance of the elemental analysis of ancient Indian coins in the proper perspective

  8. Combination of thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) for elemental analysis of solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garten, R.P.H.; Frankfurt Univ.; Schneeweis, G.; Steinbrech, B.; Koenig, K.H.; Groeneveld, K.O.

    1982-01-01

    Proton Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) analysis is realtively widely used in the analysis of water and metal ion preconcentration preparations from water samples. In this field the efficiency of PIXE is strongly enhanced by taking advantage of the Thin-layer Chromatography (TLC) as a separation step prior the PIXE. Spectral interferences from multielement samples are overcome by the TLC group-separation following chemical aspects. The potentials of the locally resolved and scanned PIXE analysis are employed gaining specific advantages in multielement analysis. The benefits of the combined TLC-PIXE technique are exemplified on some metal chelates of the 8th auxiliary group. A quantitative determination procedure is established for the simultaneous analysis of auxiliary group elements of absolute amounts within the nanogramme-range by calibration using series of graduated dilution and by correction for the dependence of the PIXE-signal intensity on the chromatographic migration length. The additional effort concerning the preseparation by TLC prior to PIXE is negligible. (orig.)

  9. SUZAKU OBSERVATION OF STRONG FLUORESCENT IRON LINE EMISSION FROM THE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT V1647 ORI DURING ITS NEW X-RAY OUTBURST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamaguchi, Kenji; Grosso, Nicolas; Kastner, Joel H.; Richmond, Michael; Weintraub, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The Suzaku X-ray satellite observed the young stellar object (YSO) V1647 Ori on 2008 October 8 during the new mass accretion outburst reported in 2008 August. During the 87 ks observation with a net exposure of 40 ks, V1647 Ori showed a high level of X-ray emission with a gradual decrease in flux by a factor of 5 and then displayed an abrupt flux increase by an order of magnitude. Such enhanced X-ray variability was also seen in XMM-Newton observations in 2004 and 2005 during the 2003-2005 outburst, but has rarely been observed for other YSOs. The spectrum clearly displays emission from Helium-like iron, which is a signature of hot plasma (kT ∼ 5 keV). It also shows a fluorescent iron Kα line with a remarkably large equivalent width (EW) of ∼600 eV. Such a large EW suggests that a part of the incident X-ray emission that irradiates the circumstellar material and/or the stellar surface is hidden from our line of sight. XMM-Newton spectra during the 2003-2005 outburst did not show a strong fluorescent iron Kα line, so that the structure of the circumstellar gas very close to the stellar core that absorbs and re-emits X-ray emission from the central object may have changed in between 2005 and 2008. This phenomenon may be related to changes in the infrared morphology of McNeil's nebula between 2004 and 2008.

  10. Producing x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallozzi, P.J.; Epstein, H.M.; Jung, R.G.; Applebaum, D.C.; Fairand, B.P.; Gallagher, W.J.

    1977-01-01

    A method of producing x-rays by directing radiant energy from a laser onto a target is described. Conversion efficiency of at least about 3 percent is obtained by providing the radiant energy in a low-power precursor pulse of approximately uniform effective intensity focused onto the surface of the target for about 1 to 30 nanoseconds so as to generate an expanding unconfined coronal plasma having less than normal solid density throughout and comprising a low-density (underdense) region wherein the plasma frequency is less than the laser radiation frequency and a higher-density (overdense) region wherein the plasma frequency is greater than the laser radiation frequency and, about 1 to 30 nanoseconds after the precursor pulse strikes the target, a higher-power main pulse focused onto the plasma for about 10 -3 to 30 nanoseconds and having such power density and total energy that the radiant energy is absorbed in the underdense region and conducted into the overdense region to heat it and thus to produce x-rays therefrom with the plasma remaining substantially below normal solid density and thus facilitating the substantial emission of x-rays in the form of spectral lines arising from nonequilibrium ionization states

  11. Chest X-Ray

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about chest radiography also known as chest x-rays. Chest x-rays are the most commonly performed x-ray exams and use a very small dose of ... of the inside of the chest. A chest x-ray is used to evaluate the lungs, heart and ...

  12. X-ray sky

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruen, M.; Koubsky, P.

    1977-01-01

    The history is described of the discoveries of X-ray sources in the sky. The individual X-ray detectors are described in more detail, i.e., gas counters, scintillation detectors, semiconductor detectors, and the principles of X-ray spectrometry and of radiation collimation aimed at increased resolution are discussed. Currently, over 200 celestial X-ray sources are known. Some were identified as nebulae, in some pulsations were found or the source was identified as a binary star. X-ray bursts of novae were also observed. The X-ray radiation is briefly mentioned of spherical star clusters and of extragalactic X-ray sources. (Oy)

  13. UNDERSTANDING THE UNUSUAL X-RAY EMISSION PROPERTIES OF THE MASSIVE, CLOSE BINARY WR 20a: A HIGH ENERGY WINDOW INTO THE STELLAR WIND INITIATION REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, Gabriela; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Strickler, Rachel, E-mail: gmontes@ucsc.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2013-11-10

    The problem of explaining the X-ray emission properties of the massive, close binary WR 20a is discussed. Located near the cluster core of Westerlund 2, WR 20a is composed of two nearly identical Wolf-Rayet stars of 82 and 83 solar masses orbiting with a period of only 3.7 days. Although Chandra observations were taken during the secondary optical eclipse, the X-ray light curve shows no signs of a flux decrement. In fact, WR 20a appears slightly more X-ray luminous and softer during the optical eclipse, opposite to what has been observed in other binary systems. To aid in our interpretation of the data, we compare with the results of hydrodynamical simulations using the adaptive mesh refinement code Mezcal which includes radiative cooling and a radiative acceleration force term. It is shown that the X-ray emission can be successfully explained in models where the wind-wind collision interface in this system occurs while the outflowing material is still being accelerated. Consequently, WR 20a serves as a critical test-case for how radiatively driven stellar winds are initiated and how they interact. Our models not only procure a robust description of current Chandra data, which cover the orbital phases between 0.3 and 0.6, but also provide detailed predictions over the entire orbit.

  14. Understanding the Unusual X-Ray Emission Properties of the Massive, Close Binary WR 20a: A High Energy Window into the Stellar Wind Initiation Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Gabriela; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; De Colle, Fabio; Strickler, Rachel

    2013-11-01

    The problem of explaining the X-ray emission properties of the massive, close binary WR 20a is discussed. Located near the cluster core of Westerlund 2, WR 20a is composed of two nearly identical Wolf-Rayet stars of 82 and 83 solar masses orbiting with a period of only 3.7 days. Although Chandra observations were taken during the secondary optical eclipse, the X-ray light curve shows no signs of a flux decrement. In fact, WR 20a appears slightly more X-ray luminous and softer during the optical eclipse, opposite to what has been observed in other binary systems. To aid in our interpretation of the data, we compare with the results of hydrodynamical simulations using the adaptive mesh refinement code Mezcal which includes radiative cooling and a radiative acceleration force term. It is shown that the X-ray emission can be successfully explained in models where the wind-wind collision interface in this system occurs while the outflowing material is still being accelerated. Consequently, WR 20a serves as a critical test-case for how radiatively driven stellar winds are initiated and how they interact. Our models not only procure a robust description of current Chandra data, which cover the orbital phases between 0.3 and 0.6, but also provide detailed predictions over the entire orbit.

  15. The Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin C. Weisskopf

    Full Text Available The Imaging X-ray Polarimetry Explorer (IXPE expands observation space by simultaneously adding polarization to the array of X-ray source properties currently measured (energy, time, and location. IXPE will thus open new dimensions for understanding how X-ray emission is produced in astrophysical objects, especially in systems under extreme physical conditions. Keywords: X-ray astronomy, X-ray polarimetry, X-ray imaging

  16. Laboratory Measurements Of Charge-exchange Produced X-ray Emission From K-shell Transitions In Hydrogenic And Helium-like Fe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gregory V.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Boyce, K. R.; Chen, H.; Gu, M. F.; Kelley, R. L.; Kilbourne, C. A.; Porter, F. S.; Thorn, D.; Wargelin, B.

    2006-09-01

    We have used a microcalorimeter and solid state detectors to measure x-ray emission produced by charge exchange reactions between bare and hydrogenic Fe colliding with neutral helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen gas. We show the measured spectral signature produced by different neutral donors and compare our results to theory where available. We also compare our results to measurements of the Fe K line emission from the Galactic Center measured by the XIS on the Suzaku x-ray observatory. This comparison shows that charge exchange recombination between highly charged ions (either cosmic rays or thermal ions) and neutral gas is probably not the dominant source of diffuse line emission in the Galactic Center. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48, and is also supported by NASA APRA grants to LLNL, GSFC, Harvard-Smithsonian CfA, and Stanford University.

  17. XMM-Newton Detection of Hard X-Ray Emission in the Nitrogen-Type Wolf-Rayet Star WR 110

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Stephen L.; Zhekov, Svetozar A.; Güdel, Manuel; Schmutz, Werner

    2002-06-01

    We have used the excellent sensitivity of XMM-Newton to obtain the first high-quality X-ray spectrum of a Wolf-Rayet (W-R) star that is not known to be a member of a binary system. Our target, the nitrogen-type star WR 110 (HD 165688), was also observed and detected with the Very Large Array at four different frequencies. The radio flux density increases with frequency according to a power law Sν~ν+0.64+/-0.10, in very good agreement with the behavior expected for free-free wind emission. The radio data give an ionized mass-loss rate M=4.9×10-5 Msolar yr-1 for an assumed spherical constant-velocity wind. The undispersed CCD X-ray spectra reveal strong emission lines from He-like ions of Mg, Si, and S. The emission measure distribution shows a dominant contribution from cool plasma with a characteristic temperature kTcool~0.5 keV (~6 MK). Little or no excess absorption of this cool component above the value expected from the visual extinction is present. We conclude that the bulk of the cool plasma detected by XMM-Newton lies at hundreds of stellar radii or more if the wind is approximately spherical and homogeneous, but it could lie closer to the star if the wind is clumped. If the cool plasma is due to instability-driven wind shocks, then typical shock velocities are vs~340-550 km s-1 and the average filling factor of X-ray-emitting gas in the wind is no larger than f~10-6. A surprising result is the unambiguous detection of a hard X-ray component that is clearly seen in the hard-band images and the spectra. This hard component accounts for about half of the observed flux and can be acceptably fitted by a hot, optically thin thermal plasma or a power-law model. If the emission is thermal, then a temperature kThot>=3 keV is derived. Such high temperatures are not predicted by current instability-driven wind shock models, and a different mechanism is thus required to explain the hard X-rays. We examine several possible mechanisms and show that the hard emission

  18. The Multi-Instrument (EVE-RHESSI) DEM for Solar Flares, and Implications for Residual Non-Thermal Soft X-Ray Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTiernan, James M.; Caspi, Amir; Warren, Harry

    2015-04-01

    In the soft X-ray energy range, solar flare spectra are typically dominated by thermal emission. The low energy extent of non-thermal emission can only be loosely quantified using currently available X-ray data. To address this issue, we combine observations from the EUV Variability Experiment (EVE) on-board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) with X-ray data from the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The improvement over the isothermal approximation is intended to resolve the ambiguity in the range where the thermal and non-thermal components may have similar photon fluxes. This "crossover" range can extend up to 30 keV for medium to large solar flares.Previous work (Caspi et.al. 2014ApJ...788L..31C) has concentrated on obtaining DEM models that fit both instruments' observations well. Now we are interested in any breaks and cutoffs in the "residual" non-thermal spectrum; i.e., the RHESSI spectrum that is left over after the DEM has accounted for the bulk of the soft X-ray emission. Thermal emission is again modeled using a DEM that is parametrized as multiple gaussians in temperature; the non-thermal emission is modeled as a photon spectrum obtained using a thin-target emission model ('thin2' from the SolarSoft Xray IDL package). Spectra for both instruments are fit simultaneously in a self-consistent manner. The results for non-thermal parameters then are compared with those found using RHESSI data alone, with isothermal and double-thermal models.

  19. Monte-Carlo simulations of secondary electron emission from CsI, induced by 1-10 keV X-rays and electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akkerman, A.; Gibrekhterman, A.; Breskin, A.; Chechik, R.

    1992-05-01

    A model for electron transport and emission in CsI is proposed. It is based on theoretically calculated microscopic cross-sections for electron interaction with the nuclear and the electronic components of the solid. A Monte Carlo program based on this model was developed to simulate secondary electron emission induced by X-rays and electrons in the energy range of 1 to 10 keV. The calculated secondary emission yields agree with existing experimental data. The model provides all necessary characteristics for the design of radiation detectors based on secondary electron emission. It can be expanded to higher incident energies and other alkali halides. (author)

  20. Miniature x-ray source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebes, James E.; Bell, Perry M.; Robinson, Ronald B.

    2000-01-01

    A miniature x-ray source utilizing a hot filament cathode. The source has a millimeter scale size and is capable of producing broad spectrum x-ray emission over a wide range of x-ray energies. The miniature source consists of a compact vacuum tube assembly containing the hot filament cathode, an anode, a high voltage feedthru for delivering high voltage to the cathode, a getter for maintaining high vacuum, a connector for initial vacuum pump down and crimp-off, and a high voltage connection for attaching a compact high voltage cable to the high voltage feedthru. At least a portion of the vacuum tube wall is fabricated from highly x-ray transparent materials, such as sapphire, diamond, or boron nitride.