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Sample records for circulatory disease risk

  1. Radiation and risk of circulatory diseases in the German uranium miners cohort study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Objectives: Little and inconsistent evidence is available on the relation between the exposure to ionizing radiation at lo w doses and circulatory diseases. While among the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki a clear linear increase in risk for stroke and heart diseases with increasing exposure to external radiation has been demonstrated, most other studies that investigated effects of circulatory diseases and radiation found no such relation (Mc Gale and Darby 2005). The aim of the present analysis is to evaluate the risk of circulatory diseases and radiation within the German uranium miners cohort study. Methods: The cohort includes 59,001 men who were employed for at least 6 months between 1946 and 1989 at the former Wismut uranium company in Eastern Germany. Exposure to radon and its progeny in Working Level Months (W.L.M.), long-lived radionuclides in kBq h/m3 and external gamma radiation in mSv was estimated by using a detailed job -exposure matrix. For 95% of the cohort members the vital status has been ascertained from the date of entry to 31 December 1998. 16,598 cohort members were deceased within this time period. For 88% of them, causes of death were identified from several sources and coded by I.C.D. 10. Poisson regression techniques applying linear models were used to estimate the excess relative risk (E.R.R.) for circulatory diseases per unit of cumulative exposure to radiation after adjusting for attained age and calendar period. Background rates were estimated internally. Smoking or other potential confounding factors were not considered, since no information was available. Results: The total number of person-years under observation was 1,801,630 with a mean duration of follow-up of 30 years. In this period a total of 5,417 circulatory diseases deaths (I.C.D. 10 'I') including 3,719 heart diseases (I.C.D. 10 'I00-I52')and 1,297 strokes (I.C.D. 'I60-69') occurred. 90% of the cohort members (n=50

  2. Radiation and risk of circulatory diseases in the German uranium miners cohort study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuzer, M.; Kreisheimer, M.; Kandel, M.; Tschense, A.; Grosche, B. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Objectives: Little and inconsistent evidence is available on the relation between the exposure to ionizing radiation at lo w doses and circulatory diseases. While among the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki a clear linear increase in risk for stroke and heart diseases with increasing exposure to external radiation has been demonstrated, most other studies that investigated effects of circulatory diseases and radiation found no such relation (Mc Gale and Darby 2005). The aim of the present analysis is to evaluate the risk of circulatory diseases and radiation within the German uranium miners cohort study. Methods: The cohort includes 59,001 men who were employed for at least 6 months between 1946 and 1989 at the former Wismut uranium company in Eastern Germany. Exposure to radon and its progeny in Working Level Months (W.L.M.), long-lived radionuclides in kBq h/m3 and external gamma radiation in mSv was estimated by using a detailed job -exposure matrix. For 95% of the cohort members the vital status has been ascertained from the date of entry to 31 December 1998. 16,598 cohort members were deceased within this time period. For 88% of them, causes of death were identified from several sources and coded by I.C.D. 10. Poisson regression techniques applying linear models were used to estimate the excess relative risk (E.R.R.) for circulatory diseases per unit of cumulative exposure to radiation after adjusting for attained age and calendar period. Background rates were estimated internally. Smoking or other potential confounding factors were not considered, since no information was available. Results: The total number of person-years under observation was 1,801,630 with a mean duration of follow-up of 30 years. In this period a total of 5,417 circulatory diseases deaths (I.C.D. 10 'I') including 3,719 heart diseases (I.C.D. 10 'I00-I52')and 1,297 strokes (I.C.D. 'I60-69') occurred. 90% of the

  3. Sensitivity Analysis of Median Lifetime on Radiation Risks Estimates for Cancer and Circulatory Disease amongst Never-Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Lori J.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation risks are estimated in a competing risk formalism where age or time after exposure estimates of increased risks for cancer and circulatory diseases are folded with a probability to survive to a given age. The survival function, also called the life-table, changes with calendar year, gender, smoking status and other demographic variables. An outstanding problem in risk estimation is the method of risk transfer between exposed populations and a second population where risks are to be estimated. Approaches used to transfer risks are based on: 1) Multiplicative risk transfer models -proportional to background disease rates. 2) Additive risk transfer model -risks independent of background rates. In addition, a Mixture model is often considered where the multiplicative and additive transfer assumptions are given weighted contributions. We studied the influence of the survival probability on the risk of exposure induced cancer and circulatory disease morbidity and mortality in the Multiplicative transfer model and the Mixture model. Risks for never-smokers (NS) compared to the average U.S. population are estimated to be reduced between 30% and 60% dependent on model assumptions. Lung cancer is the major contributor to the reduction for NS, with additional contributions from circulatory diseases and cancers of the stomach, liver, bladder, oral cavity, esophagus, colon, a portion of the solid cancer remainder, and leukemia. Greater improvements in risk estimates for NS s are possible, and would be dependent on improved understanding of risk transfer models, and elucidating the role of space radiation on the various stages of disease formation (e.g. initiation, promotion, and progression).

  4. Skipping Breakfast and Risk of Mortality from Cancer, Circulatory Diseases and All Causes: Findings from the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Yae; Onishi, Kazunari; Hosoda, Takenobu; Amano, Hiroki; Otani, Shinji; Kurozawa, Youichi; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Background Breakfast eating habits are a dietary pattern marker and appear to be a useful predictor of a healthy lifestyle. Many studies have reported the unhealthy effects of skipping breakfast. However, there are few studies on the association between skipping breakfast and mortality. In the present study, we examined the association between skipping breakfast and mortality from cancer, circulatory diseases and all causes using data from a large-scale cohort study, the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study (JACC) Study. Methods A cohort study of 34,128 men and 49,282 women aged 40–79 years was conducted, to explore the association between lifestyle and cancer in Japan. Participants completed a baseline survey during 1988 to 1990 and were followed until the end of 2009. We classified participants into two groups according to dietary habits with respect to eating or skipping breakfast and carried out intergroup comparisons of lifestyle. Multivariate analysis was performed using the Cox proportional hazard regression model. Results There were 5,768 deaths from cancer and 5,133 cases of death owing to circulatory diseases and 17,112 cases for all causes of mortality during the median 19.4 years follow-up. Skipping breakfast was related to unhealthy lifestyle habits. After adjusting for confounding factors, skipping breakfast significantly increased the risk of mortality from circulatory diseases [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.42] and all causes (HR = 1.43) in men and all causes mortality (HR = 1.34) in women. Conclusion Our findings showed that skipping breakfast is associated with increasing risk of mortality from circulatory diseases and all causes among men and all causes mortality among women in Japan. PMID:27046951

  5. Dose-response relationship analysis for cancer and circulatory system disease mortality risks among uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relation between lung cancer risk and radon exposure has been clearly established, especially from the studies on uranium miner cohorts. But the association between radon exposure and extrapulmonary cancers and non-cancer diseases remains not well known. Moreover, the health risks associated with the other mining-related ionizing radiation exposures are still under consideration. The aim of this thesis is to contribute to the estimation of the radio-induced health risks at low-doses through the analysis of the kidney cancer and Circulatory System Disease (CSD) mortality risks among uranium miners. Kidney cancer mortality risk analyses were performed from the French cohort of uranium miners (n=5086; follow-up period: 1946-2007), the post-55 cohort (n=3,377; follow-up period: 1957-2007) and the German cohort of the Wismut (n=58,986; follow-up period: 1946-2003) which included 24, 11 and 174 deaths from kidney cancer, respectively. The exposures to radon and its short-lived progeny (expressed in Working Level Month WLM), to uranium ore dust (kBqh.m-3) and to external gamma rays (mSv) were estimated for each miners and the equivalent kidney dose was calculated. The dose-response relation was refined considering two responses: the instantaneous risk of kidney cancer mortality (corresponding to the classical analysis, Cause specific Hazard Ratio (CSHR) estimated with the Cox model) and its occurrence probability during the followup (Sub-distribution Hazard Ratio (SHR) estimated with the Fine and Gray model). An excess of kidney cancer mortality was observed only in the French cohort (SMR = 1.62 CI95%[1.04; 2.41]). In the Wismut cohort, a decrease of the kidney cancer mortality was observed (0.89 [0.78; 0.99]). For these three cohorts, the occupational radiological exposures (or the equivalent kidney dose) were significantly associated neither with the risk of kidney cancer mortality (e.g. CSHRWismut-radon/100 WLM=1.023 [0.993; 1.053]), nor with its occurrence

  6. Radiation exposure and circulatory disease risk: Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivor data, 1950-2003

    OpenAIRE

    Shimizu, Yukiko; Kodama, Kazunori; Nishi, Nobuo; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Suyama, Akihiko; Soda, Midori; Grant, Eric J; Sugiyama, Hiromi; Sakata, Ritsu; Moriwaki, Hiroko; Hayashi, Mikiko; Konda, Manami; Shore, Roy E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the degree to which ionising radiation confers risk of mortality from heart disease and stroke. Design Prospective cohort study with more than 50 years of follow-up. Setting Atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Participants 86 611 Life Span Study cohort members with individually estimated radiation doses from 0 to >3 Gy (86% received

  7. Skipping Breakfast and Risk of Mortality from Cancer, Circulatory Diseases and All Causes: Findings from the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Yokoyama, Yae; Onishi, Kazunari; Hosoda, Takenobu; Amano, Hiroki; Otani, Shinji; KUROZAWA, Youichi; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2016-01-01

    Background Breakfast eating habits are a dietary pattern marker and appear to be a useful predictor of a healthy lifestyle. Many studies have reported the unhealthy effects of skipping breakfast. However, there are few studies on the association between skipping breakfast and mortality. In the present study, we examined the association between skipping breakfast and mortality from cancer, circulatory diseases and all causes using data from a large-scale cohort study, the Japan Collaborative C...

  8. Space Radiation Cancer, Circulatory Disease and CNS Risks for Near Earth Asteroid and Mars Missions: Uncertainty Estimates for Never-Smokers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Chappell, Lori J.; Wang, Minli; Kim, Myung-Hee

    2011-01-01

    The uncertainties in estimating the health risks from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) are a major limitation to the length of space missions and the evaluation of potential risk mitigation approaches. NASA limits astronaut exposures to a 3% risk of exposure induced cancer death (REID), and protects against uncertainties in risks projections using an assessment of 95% confidence intervals after propagating the error from all model factors (environment and organ exposure, risk coefficients, dose-rate modifiers, and quality factors). Because there are potentially significant late mortality risks from diseases of the circulatory system and central nervous system (CNS) which are less well defined than cancer risks, the cancer REID limit is not necessarily conservative. In this report, we discuss estimates of lifetime risks from space radiation and new estimates of model uncertainties are described. The key updates to the NASA risk projection model are: 1) Revised values for low LET risk coefficients for tissue specific cancer incidence, with incidence rates transported to an average U.S. population to estimate the probability of Risk of Exposure Induced Cancer (REIC) and REID. 2) An analysis of smoking attributable cancer risks for never-smokers that shows significantly reduced lung cancer risk as well as overall cancer risks from radiation compared to risk estimated for the average U.S. population. 3) Derivation of track structure based quality functions depends on particle fluence, charge number, Z and kinetic energy, E. 4) The assignment of a smaller maximum in quality function for leukemia than for solid cancers. 5) The use of the ICRP tissue weights is shown to over-estimate cancer risks from SPEs by a factor of 2 or more. Summing cancer risks for each tissue is recommended as a more accurate approach to estimate SPE cancer risks. 6) Additional considerations on circulatory and CNS disease risks. Our analysis shows that an individual s

  9. Current discussions of DDREF, cataracts, circulatory diseases and dose limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although more than a century of radiation research has provided a lot of insight into radiation risk, there are still fields that need clarification. This is particularly true for the low dose range, meaning doses up to ∼100 mSv. One can detect biological effects in that dose range, but it is unclear whether these biological effects like mutations or chromosomal aberrations translate into health effects like cancer, cataracts or circulatory diseases. Thus, for radiation protection purposes, assumptions have to made that must be reappraised on the basis of new findings from time to time. Affected by new insights are currently the DDREF (dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor), cataracts and circulatory diseases. If the new findings are very convincing, dose limits have to be changed at short notice. If there are only weak indications, stability of the radiation protection system is more important than changing limits all the time. (authors)

  10. Analysis of Dose Response for Circulatory Disease After Radiotherapy for Benign Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, Mark P., E-mail: mark.little@nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Kleinerman, Ruth A. [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Mabuchi, Kiyohiko [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Executive Plaza South, Rockville, Maryland (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To assess the shape of the dose-response for various circulatory disease endpoints, and modifiers by age and time since exposure. Methods and Materials: This was an analysis of the US peptic ulcer data testing for heterogeneity of radiogenic risk by circulatory disease endpoint (ischemic heart, cerebrovascular, other circulatory disease). Results: There were significant excess risks for all circulatory disease, with an excess relative risk Gy{sup -1} of 0.082 (95% CI 0.031-0.140), and ischemic heart disease, with an excess relative risk Gy{sup -1} of 0.102 (95% CI 0.039-0.174) (both p = 0.01), and indications of excess risk for stroke. There were no statistically significant (p > 0.2) differences between risks by endpoint, and few indications of curvature in the dose-response. There were significant (p < 0.001) modifications of relative risk by time since exposure, the magnitude of which did not vary between endpoints (p > 0.2). Risk modifications were similar if analysis was restricted to patients receiving radiation, although the relative risks were slightly larger and the risk of stroke failed to be significant. The slopes of the dose-response were generally consistent with those observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in occupationally and medically exposed groups. Conclusions: There were excess risks for a variety of circulatory diseases in this dataset, with significant modification of risk by time since exposure. The consistency of the dose-response slopes with those observed in radiotherapeutically treated groups at much higher dose, as well as in lower dose-exposed cohorts such as the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and nuclear workers, implies that there may be little sparing effect of fractionation of dose or low-dose-rate exposure.

  11. Circulatory disease mortality in a Canadian occupational cohort with low dose exposure to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation, such as those received during radiotherapy, leads to increased risk of circulatory diseases.. Emerging evidence of excess risks of circulatory diseases after exposure to doses well below those considered previously as safe warrants epidemiological studies of populations exposed to low levels of ionizing radiation. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the risk of circulatory disease mortality in a Canadian cohort of 337,397 individuals (169,256 men and 168,141 women) occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation and included in the National Dose Registry (NDR) of Canada. The cohort consists of employees at nuclear power stations (nuclear workers), medical, dental and industrial workers. Mean whole body radiation dose was 8.6 mSv for men and 1.2 mSv for women. During the study period (1951-1995) 3,533 deaths from circulatory diseases (3,018 among men and 515 among women) have been identified. The circulatory disease mortality in the cohort was significantly lower than in the Canadian population at large. The cohort showed a significant dose response both in men and in women. Estimates of circulatory disease mortality risk in the NDR cohort are higher than those of most other occupational cohorts and higher than in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors studies. The major limitation of the study is the absence of information on non-radiation lifestyle-related risk factors for circulatory diseases. Lack of adjustment for these factors or for socio-economic status requires caution in interpretation of the study findings. It was estimated that dose errors related to recording doses below the dosimeter detection limit as zero is unlikely to result in an overestimation of risk by more than 15-20%. (author)

  12. Risk factors and outcomes in transfusion-associated circulatory overload

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, EL; Kwaan, N; Looney, MR; Gajic, O; Hubmayr, RD; Gropper, MA; Koenigsberg, M; Wilson, G.; Matthay, M; Bacchetti, P.; Toy, P

    2013-01-01

    Background: Transfusion-associated circulatory overload is characterized by new respiratory distress and hydrostatic pulmonary edema within 6 hours after blood transfusion, but its risk factors and outcomes are poorly characterized. Methods: Using a case control design, we enrolled 83 patients with severe transfusion-associated circulatory overload identified by active surveillance for hypoxemia and 163 transfused controls at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and Mayo Clinic ...

  13. Burden of Circulatory System Diseases and Ignored Barriers ofKnowledge Translation

    OpenAIRE

    Hamed-Basir Ghafouri; Shahzad Saravani; Farhad Shokraneh

    2012-01-01

    Circulatory system disease raise third highest disability-adjusted life years among Iranians and ischemic cardiac diseases are main causes for such burden. Despite available evidences on risk factors of the disease, no effective intervention was implemented to control and prevent the disease. This paper non-systematically reviews available literature on the problem, solutions, and barriers of implementation of knowledge translation in Iran. It seems that there are ignored factors such as cult...

  14. Burden of Circulatory System Diseases and Ignored Barriers of Knowledge Translation

    OpenAIRE

    Ghafouri, Hamed-Basir; Saravani, Shahzad; Shokraneh, Farhad

    2012-01-01

    Circulatory system disease raise third highest disability-adjusted life years among Iranians and ischemic cardiac diseases are main causes for such burden. Despite available evidences on risk factors of the disease, no effective intervention was implemented to control and prevent the disease. This paper non-systematically reviews available literature on the problem, solutions, and barriers of implementation of knowledge translation in Iran. It seems that there are ignored factors such as cult...

  15. A Review of Non-Cancer Effects, Especially Circulatory and Ocular Diseases1

    OpenAIRE

    Little, Mark P.

    2013-01-01

    There is a well-established association between high doses (> 5 Gy) of ionizing radiation exposure and damage to the heart and coronary arteries, although only recently have studies with high quality individual dosimetry been conducted that would enable quantification of this risk adjusting for concomitant chemotherapy. The association between lower dose exposures and late occurring circulatory disease has only recently begun to emerge in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in various occu...

  16. Burden of Circulatory System Diseases and Ignored Barriers ofKnowledge Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed-Basir Ghafouri

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Circulatory system disease raise third highest disability-adjusted life years among Iranians and ischemic cardiac diseases are main causes for such burden. Despite available evidences on risk factors of the disease, no effective intervention was implemented to control and prevent the disease. This paper non-systematically reviews available literature on the problem, solutions, and barriers of implementation of knowledge translation in Iran. It seems that there are ignored factors such as cultural and motivational issues in knowledge translation interventions but there are hopes for implementation of started projects and preparation of students as next generation of knowledge transferors.

  17. Sizable variations in circulatory disease mortality by region and country of birth in six European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafnsson, Snorri B; Bhopal, Raj S; Agyemang, Charles;

    2013-01-01

    . RESULTS: South Asians in Denmark, England and Wales and France experienced excess circulatory disease mortality (MRRs 1.37-1.91). Similar results were seen for Eastern Europeans in these countries as well as in Sweden (MRRs 1.05-1.51), for those of Middle Eastern origin in Denmark (MRR = 1.49) and France......BACKGROUND: Circulatory disease mortality inequalities by country of birth (COB) have been demonstrated for some EU countries but pan-European analyses are lacking. We examine inequalities in circulatory mortality by geographical region/COB for six EU countries. METHODS: We obtained national death...... sizes. The pattern for IHD mortality was similar to that for circulatory disease mortality. Two- to three-fold excess cerebrovascular disease mortality was found for several foreign-born groups compared with the local-born populations in some countries. CONCLUSIONS: Circulatory disease mortality varies...

  18. Sizable variations in circulatory disease mortality by region and country of birth in six European countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rafnsson, S.B.; Bhopal, R.S.; Agyemang, C.; Fagot-Campagna, A.; Harding, S.; Hammar, N.; Hedlund, E.; Juel, K.; Primatesta, P.; Rosato, M.; Rey, G.; Wild, S.H.; Mackenbach, J.P.; Stirbu, I.; Kunst, A.E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Circulatory disease mortality inequalities by country of birth (COB) have been demonstrated for some EU countries but pan-European analyses are lacking. We examine inequalities in circulatory mortality by geographical region/COB for six EU countries. Methods: We obtained national death a

  19. Trends in death from circulatory diseases in Brazil between 1979 and 1996

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the trends in mortality due to circulatory diseases in men and women aged > or = 30 years in Brazil from 1979 to 1996. METHODS: We analyzed population count data obtained from the IBGE Foundation and mortality data obtained from the System of Information on Mortality of the DATASUS of the Ministry of Health. RESULTS: Circulatory diseases, ischemic heart disease, and cerebrovascular disease were the major causes of death in men and women in Brazil. The standardized age c...

  20. Association of physical inactivity with circulatory disease events and hospital treatment costs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davey RC

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Rachel C Davey,1 Thomas Cochrane1,21Centre for Research and Action in Public Health, University of Canberra, ACT, Australia; 2Centre for Sport and Exercise Research, Staffordshire University, Stoke on Trent, United KingdomPurpose: Epidemiological studies of chronic disorders need to consider more responsive outcomes, particularly those that manifest themselves across a defined population over a shorter time period, to improve our ability to detect the causes of and intervene in the global epidemics of today. We explore the use of hospital episode statistics as a candidate for this role and estimate the strength of the association of circulatory disease-related events with physical inactivity, considered here as an undesirable health behavior.Settings, patients, and methods: The primary research was set in a mid-sized city in central England. Aggregation was at output area level (comprising ~300 residents; 51 of which were included. A random sample of 761 adults was selected to obtain estimates of the mean level of physical activity within each area. Circulatory disease hospital events were recorded and aggregated by output area over a 2-year period. Hierarchical linear modeling was used to establish the strength of the association between area-level physical activity and circulatory disease events. Sex, age, and reporting quarter were included as additional individual-level explanatory variables.Results: Areas reporting greater activity were less likely (event rate ratio = 0.855; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.78–0.94 to have a circulatory disease event, as were females (0.593; 95% CI: 0.47–0.75. Areas with older residents (1.578; 95% CI: 1.5–1.66 and later reporting quarters (1.095; 95% CI: 1.04–1.15 were more likely to report circulatory disease events.Conclusion: This study supports the use of hospital episode statistics as an outcome measure in the epidemiology of circulatory disease and reaffirms the potential importance of

  1. Association of Plasma Circulatory Markers, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and High Sensitive C-Reactive Protein in Coronary Artery Disease Patients of India

    OpenAIRE

    Jagdish Prasad; Rakesh Sarkar; Pragya Srivastava; Hem Chandra Jha; Aruna Singh Mittal

    2009-01-01

    Plasma inflammatory markers have been shown to be predictors for cardiovascular risk, however, there is no study where the levels of plasma circulatory markers have been evaluated in coronary artery disease patients (CAD pts) positive for C. pneumoniae IgA and high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) which may help in better understanding of disease pathogenesis. A total of 192 patients and 192 controls attending the Cardiology Outpatient Department of Safdarjung Hospital were enrolled. The ...

  2. Mortality due to diseases of the circulatory system among the elderly population in Brazilian Amazon: temporal and spatial analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Karine Vila Real Nunes; Sandra Mara Alves da Silva Neves; Eliane Ignotti

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Circulatory Diseases (CD) are the major cause of death among the elderly population in Brazilian Amazon. OBJECTIVE: to analyze standardized mortality rates of diseases of the circulatory system (DCS), according to the main causes of death among the elderly, in microregions of the Brazilian Amazon, in the period of 1998 - 2007. METHODS: ecological study of mortality rates distribution standardized by CD and corrected by deaths from poorly defined causes among the elderly (> 65 ye...

  3. Life expectancy and death by diseases of the circulatory system in patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Hällgren, Jonas; Westman, Jeanette; Ösby, Urban; Alinaghizadeh, Hassan; Gissler, Mika; Nordentoft, Merete

    2013-01-01

    mortality and death by diseases of the circulatory system has seen a decline in all the Nordic countries, but a recent paper indicates that women and men in Denmark, Finland, and Sweden, who had been hospitalised for a psychotic disorder, had a two to three-fold increased risk of dying from a cardiovascular...... disease. The aim of this study was to compare the mortality by diseases of the circulatory system among patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia in the three Nordic countries Denmark, Sweden, and Finland. Furthermore, the aim was to examine and compare life expectancy among these patients. Cause......Excess mortality from diseases and medical conditions (natural death) in persons with psychiatric disorders has been extensively reported. Even in the Nordic countries with well-developed welfare systems, register based studies find evidence of an excess mortality. In recent years, cardiac...

  4. Infectious and inflammatory disorders of the circulatory system as risk factors for stroke in Saudi children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective was to report on the role of infectious and inflammatory disorders as risk factors for stroke in a prospective and retrospective cohort of Saudi children. Children, who presented with stroke, were evaluated at the Division of Pediatric Neurology or admitted to King Khalid University Hospital, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the periods July 1992 to February 2001 (retrospective study) and February 2001 to March 2003 (prospective study). Investigations for suspected cases included haemostatic assays, microbiological and serological tests. Neuroimaging included cranial CT, MRI magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), magnetic resonance venography (MRV) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) brain scan. Of the 104 Saudi children with stroke, seen during the combined study periods of 10 years and 7 months, infectious and inflammatory disorders of the circulatory systems were identified risk factors in 18 (17.3%). Five children had stroke following acute bacterial meningitis at ages ranging between 5-21 months. The causative organism was identified in 3 of them and consisted of Haemophilus influenza (in a 5-months-old girl), Streptococcus pneumonia (in a 21-months-old girl complicated by subdural empyema and sinovenous thrombosis), and Staphylococcus aureus in a 6-months-old boy who had an underlying chronic granulomatous disease. Unspecified meningitis/meningoencephalitis affected 4 patients, whereas 3 children had an underlying congenital infection as a cause for their stroke. Two of the latter 3 children were diagnosed to have congenital toxoplasmosis, and the third had congenital rubella syndrome. Two girls had stroke following septicemia at ages of one and 2 months. Neurobrucellosis caused stroke in 2 boys at the ages of 4 1/2 and 4 years. In both patients, neuroimaging revealed lacunar and other infects involving mainly the deep cerebral nuclei, secondary to occlusion of small penetrating end

  5. NASA Models of Space Radiation Induced Cancer, Circulatory Disease, and Central Nervous System Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Chappell, Lori J.; Kim, Myung-Hee Y.

    2013-01-01

    The risks of late effects from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) are potentially a limitation to long-term space travel. The late effects of highest concern have significant lethality including cancer, effects to the central nervous system (CNS), and circulatory diseases (CD). For cancer and CD the use of age and gender specific models with uncertainty assessments based on human epidemiology data for low LET radiation combined with relative biological effectiveness factors (RBEs) and dose- and dose-rate reduction effectiveness factors (DDREF) to extrapolate these results to space radiation exposures is considered the current "state-of-the-art". The revised NASA Space Risk Model (NSRM-2014) is based on recent radio-epidemiology data for cancer and CD, however a key feature of the NSRM-2014 is the formulation of particle fluence and track structure based radiation quality factors for solid cancer and leukemia risk estimates, which are distinct from the ICRP quality factors, and shown to lead to smaller uncertainties in risk estimates. Many persons exposed to radiation on earth as well as astronauts are life-time never-smokers, which is estimated to significantly modify radiation cancer and CD risk estimates. A key feature of the NASA radiation protection model is the classification of radiation workers by smoking history in setting dose limits. Possible qualitative differences between GCR and low LET radiation increase uncertainties and are not included in previous risk estimates. Two important qualitative differences are emerging from research studies. The first is the increased lethality of tumors observed in animal models compared to low LET radiation or background tumors. The second are Non- Targeted Effects (NTE), which include bystander effects and genomic instability, which has been observed in cell and animal models of cancer risks. NTE's could lead to significant changes in RBE and DDREF estimates for GCR particles, and the potential

  6. The role of perfusion lung scanning and diffusion capacity for early diagnosis of micro circulatory disturbances in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and the frequent inflammatory exacerbations with development of respiratory failure lead to changes in the micro circulatory and an increased risk of lung thrombotic and thromboembolic complication. The aim of the study was to establish the possibility of the perfusion lung scanning and diffusion capacity for early diagnosis of pulmonary micro circulatory disturbances in COPD with mild and moderate respiratory failure. 59 COPD patients were investigated. The data presented significant segmental disorders. Only in 5 (8.47%) of them the perfusion lung scintigrams were normal. In 23 of the patients, single-breath diffusing capacity (DICO) and its two components: membranous component (Dm) and capillary blood component (Vc) were determined. DICO was lower especially Vc the mean sign of micro circulatory disorders. A relationship between the degree of hypoxaemia and the changes found in the perfusion scintigraphy was found. Changes in the pulmonary lung scanning and in the diffusion capacity in COPD with mild respiratory failure seem to be an early diagnostic test. The early anticoagulant and desaggregant prevention may decrease the risk of thrombotic complications in the development of the disease. (authors)

  7. Second-hand Smoke, Cotinine Levels, and Risk of Circulatory Mortality in a Large Cohort Study of Never-Smokers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gallo, Valentina; Neasham, David; Airoldi, Luisa; Ferrari, Pietro; Jenab, Mazda; Boffetta, Paolo; Overvad, Kim; Tjonneland, Anne; Clavel-Chapelon, Francoise; Boeing, Heiner; Pala, Valeria; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Tumino, Rosario; Arriola, Larraitz; Lund, Eiliv; Bueno-De-Mesquita, Bas; Peeters, Petra H.; Melander, Olle; Hallmans, Goran; Riboli, Elio; Saracci, Rodolfo; Vineis, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Background: Exposure to second-hand smoke has been shown to be associated with increased cardiovascular mortality in several, but not all, epidemiologic studies. Our aim was to investigate the risk of circulatory death associated with exposure to second-hand smoke in never-smokers in a very large pr

  8. Mock circulatory system for the evaluation of left ventricular assist devices, endoluminal prostheses, and vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, Daniel; Fonseca, Jeison; Andrade, Aron; Biscegli, José Francisco; Manrique, Ricardo; Guerrino, Domingos; Prakasan, Akash Kuzhiparambil; Ortiz, Jaime Pinto; Lucchi, Julio Cesar

    2008-06-01

    A new digital computer mock circulatory system has been developed in order to replicate the physiologic and pathophysiologic characteristics of the human cardiovascular system. The computer performs the acquisition of pressure, flow, and temperature in an open loop system. A computer program has been developed in Labview programming environment to evaluate all these physical parameters. The acquisition system was composed of pressure, flow, and temperature sensors and also signal conditioning modules. In this study, some results of flow, cardiac frequencies, pressures, and temperature were evaluated according to physiologic ventricular states. The results were compared with literature data. In further works, performance investigations will be conducted on a ventricular assist device and endoprosthesis. Also, this device should allow for evaluation of several kinds of vascular diseases. PMID:18422796

  9. The main issues and the ways of improvement of health care for patients with diseases of the circulatory system

    OpenAIRE

    Sazanova G.Yu.

    2014-01-01

    Regulations and publications on the provision of quality health care for patients with diseases of the circulatory system of the native scientists have been studied. The majority of the issues concerns the disorganization of health care standards: the uneven distribution of diagnostic resources mostly in the hospitals and preventive health care organizations. The proposed ways to improve the patient care have been analyzed.

  10. Influence of Aerobic Exercise on Stress Response and Circulatory Function in Patients with High Risk of Cardiovas-cular Diseases after Intensive Military Trainings%有氧运动对心血管病高危因素新兵高强度军事训练后机体循环功能与应激反应的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹏; 韩国华; 蒋希; 马兴杰; 董岸莺; 乔昆

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察有氧运动对存在心血管病高危因素新兵高强度军事训练后机体循环功能与应激反应的影响。方法选取某部存在心血管病高危因素的新入伍战士40名,在常规体能锻炼基础上增加有氧运动,为期2个月,于有氧锻炼开始前和结束后行10 km 跑步运动应激测试,记录受试者运动应激前30 min 及后10 min 心率、收缩压、心率血压乘积的变化,以及血超敏 C 反应蛋白(hs-CRP)、心肌型肌酸激酶同工酶(CK-MB)和氨基末端脑钠肽前体(NT-proBNP)浓度的变化。结果受试者两次运动应激后心率、收缩压、心率血压乘积及血 hs-CRP、NT-proBNP 浓度均升高(P <0.01);第2次运动应激后心率、心率血压乘积及血 hs-CRP、NT-proBNP 浓度升高幅度低于首次运动应激后(P <0.05或 P <0.01)。结论高强度军事训练可增加心血管病高危人群的应激反应并影响其循环功能,合理的体能锻炼联合有氧运动有助于减少急性心血管病事件甚至心源性猝死的发生。%Objective To observe the influences of aerobic exercise on stress response and circulatory function in the patients with high risk of cardiovascular diseases after intensive military training. Methods A comprehensive method was used including questionnaire survey, physical examination and 12-lead electrocardiogram. The population with cardiovascular high-risk (n = 40) was intervened by aerobic exercise for 2 months. The changes of HR, blood pressure, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), creatinekinase-MB ( CK-MB) and amino-terminal pro-B-type brain natriuretic peptide ( NT-proBNP) were compared between the two groups before and after a 10 km run. Results There was no significant difference in rate-pressure product and biological indexes among two groups before the exercise. After the exercise,rate-pressure product, hs-CRR, and NT-proBNP increased and there was statistical difference between the two

  11. Initial circulatory response to active standing in Parkinson's disease without typical orthostatic hypotension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Delgado

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available While the circulatory response to orthostatic stress has been already evaluated in Parkinson's disease patients without typical orthostatic hypotension (PD-TOH, there is an initial response to the upright position which is uniquely associated with active standing (AS. We sought to assess this response and to compare it to that seen in young healthy controls (YHC. Method In 10 PD-TOH patients (8 males, 60±7 years, Hoehn and Yahr ≤3 the changes in systolic blood pressure (SBP and heart rate that occur in the first 30 seconds (sec of standing were examined. Both parameters were non-invasively and continuously monitored using the volume-clamp method by Peñáz and the Physiocal criteria by Wesseling. The choice of sample points was prompted by the results of previous studies. These sample points were compared to those of 10 YHC (8 males, 32±8 years. Results The main finding of the present investigation was an increased time between the AS onset and SBP overshoot in PD-TOH group (24±4 vs. 19±3 sec; p<0.05. Conclusion This delay might reflect a prolonged latency in the baroreflex-mediated vascular resistance response, but more studies are needed to confirm this preliminary hypothesis.

  12. Development of a Deprivation Index and its relation to premature mortality due to diseases of the circulatory system in Hungary, 1998-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhász, Attila; Nagy, Csilla; Páldy, Anna; Beale, Linda

    2010-05-01

    An association between health and socio-economic status is well known. Based on international and national studies, the aims of this study were to develop a multi-dimensional index at the municipality level, to provide information about socio-economic deprivation in Hungary and to investigate the association between socio-economic status and the spatial distribution of premature mortality due to diseases of the circulatory system. Seven municipality level socio-economic indicators were used from the National Information System of Spatial Development (income, low qualification, unemployment, one-parent families, large families, density of housing and car ownership). After normalisation and standardisation, indicator weights were evaluated using factor analysis. A risk analysis study was conducted using the Rapid Inquiry Facility software to evaluate the association between deprivation and the spatial distribution of premature mortality due to diseases of the circulatory system for the years 1998-2004. Areas of significantly high deprivation were identified in the northeastern, eastern and southwestern parts of Hungary. A statistically significant association was found between premature cardiovascular mortality and deprivation status in both genders. The Deprivation Index is the first composite index at the municipality level in Hungary and includes key factors that affect socio-economic status. The identified association highlighted the fact that inequalities in socio-economic status may reflect the spatial distribution of health status in a population. The results can be used to inform prevention strategies and help plan local health promotion programs aimed at reducing health inequalities. PMID:20199838

  13. Determinants of exercise peak arterial blood pressure, circulatory power, and exercise cardiac power in a population based sample of Finnish male and female aged 30 to 47 years: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hulkkonen, Janne; Aatola, Heikki; Pälve, Kristiina; Lehtimäki, Terho; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Viikari, Jorma SA; Raitakari, Olli T.; Kähönen, Mika

    2014-01-01

    Background Novel parameters derived from peak maximal oxygen uptake (VO2) and exercise arterial blood pressure, such as peak circulatory power (CP) and exercise cardiac power (ECP), can be used in the risk assessment of cardiovascular disease and stroke. However, the determinants of these factors are poorly characterized in the general population. Methods We assessed peak arterial blood pressure, CP and ECP with standardized cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) on 281 female and 257 male part...

  14. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000106.htm Heart disease - risk factors To use the sharing features on ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. Changing ...

  15. Life Expectancy and Death by Diseases of the Circulatory System in Patients with Bipolar Disorder or Schizophrenia in the Nordic Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Laursen, Thomas Munk; Wahlbeck, Kristian; Hällgren, Jonas; Westman, Jeanette; Ösby, Urban; Alinaghizadeh, Hassan; Gissler, Mika; Nordentoft, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Objective Excess mortality from diseases and medical conditions (natural death) in persons with psychiatric disorders has been extensively reported. Even in the Nordic countries with well-developed welfare systems, register based studies find evidence of an excess mortality. In recent years, cardiac mortality and death by diseases of the circulatory system has seen a decline in all the Nordic countries, but a recent paper indicates that women and men in Denmark, Finland, and Sweden, who had b...

  16. 21 CFR 101.83 - Health claims: plant sterol/stanol esters and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of coronary heart disease (CHD). 101.83 Section 101.83 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION.... (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and circulatory system. Coronary heart disease... lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels are associated with increased risk of developing coronary heart...

  17. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk factors. ...

  18. Favorable Circulatory System Outcomes as Adjuvant Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) Treatment for Cerebrovascular Diseases in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Chiu, Hsienhsueh Elley; Hong, Yu-Chiang; Chang, Ku-chou; Shih, Chun-Chuan; Hung, Jen-wen; Liu, Chia-Wei; Tan, Teng-Yeow; Huang, Chih-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background This study searches the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) used in a previous project, aiming for reconstructing possible cerebrovascular disease-related groups (DRG),and estimating the costs between cerebrovascular disease and related diseases. Methods and Materials We conducted a nationwide retrospective cohort study in stroke inpatients, we examined the overall costs in 3 municipalities in Taiwan, by evaluating the possible costs of the expecting diagno...

  19. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hearts® WISEWOMAN Program Other Chronic Disease Topics Diabetes Nutrition Obesity Physical Activity Stroke Heart Disease Risk Factors Recommend ... Hearts® WISEWOMAN Program Other Chronic Disease Topics Diabetes Nutrition Obesity Physical Activity Stroke File Formats Help: How do ...

  20. Non-invasive evaluation for pulmonary circulatory impairment during exercise in patients with chronic lung disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy was performed at rest and during exercise on sixteen patients with chronic lung disease to evaluate the secondary pulmonary hypertension during exercise with non-invasive technique. An inverse significant correlation was found between thallium activity ratio (TAR) of left ventricle plus ventricular septum to right ventricle and both of pulmonary vascular resistance and right to left ventricular work index ratio during exercise. The patients were divided into three groups according to mean pulmonary arterial pressure (P-barPA) at rest and during exercise: the first group consisted of six patients with pulmonary hypertension during exercise (P-barPA: below 25 mmHg at rest and above 30 mmHg during exercise), the second group consisted of four patients with pulmonary hypertension at rest (P-barPA above 25 mmHg at rest), and the third group consisted of six patients without pulmonary hypertension (P-barPA below 25 mmHg at rest, below 30 mmHg during exercise). In the first group, TAR during exercise was lowered than at rest in four patients, and in the second group TAR during exercise was lowered than at rest in all, while in the third group TAR during exercise was increased than at rest in five patients. These results suggest that thallium-201 myocardial scintigraphy can reflect pulmonary hemodynamics during exercise in patients with chronic lung disease and it is of great use to predict the patients with pulmonary hypertension during exercise. (author)

  1. Epidemiology and Risk Factors of Cerebral Ischemia and Ischemic Heart Diseases: Similarities and Differences

    OpenAIRE

    Soler, Ernest Palomeras; Ruiz, Virgina Casado

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia and ischemic heart diseases, common entities nowadays, are the main manifestation of circulatory diseases. Cardiovascular diseases, followed by stroke, represent the leading cause of mortality worldwide. Both entities share risk factors, pathophisiology and etiologic aspects by means of a main common mechanism, atherosclerosis. However, each entity has its own particularities. Ischemic stroke shows a variety of pathogenic mechanisms not present in ischemic heart disease. An ...

  2. Clinical application of radionuclear diagnostic method to select treatments for circulatory diseases and its evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (EDG) PET and its diagnostic significance were investigated and myocardial viability was assessed for coronary revascularization in the patients with ischemic cardial disease. Time-course changes in 18F-FDG PET image were monitored in 15 patients with acute cardiac infarction to decide the test timing for assessment of viability. In acute phase of infarction, it was found difficult to evaluate the viability of cardiac muscles based on the amount of 18F-FDG accumulated in the muscles under fasting conditions. Since 18F-FDG is also accumulated in the normal cardiac muscles under glucose loading conditions, the ratio of radioactivity in the region of infarction to that in the normal region (I/N) was used for the evaluation. The viability of cardiac muscles in the acute phase could be assessed with I/N ratio as a parameter. Next, efficacies of 13N-ammonia PET at resting state and 18F-FDG PET under glucose loading were investigated in inveterate cardiac infarction. When compared with 13N-ammonia accumulation, a greater accumulation of 18F-FDG was observed in the patient with inferior myocardial infarction, suggesting the presence of viable muscles. Thus, cardio-motility was improved by CABG on the right coronal artery. Then, motion of a regional wall was evaluated by Bull's eye method. Significant differences in blood flow-metabolism mismatch on Bull's eye map were found between the viability (+) group and the viability (-) group. These results suggest that Bull's eye technique is very useful method for evaluation of regional wall motion and also, imaging under glucose loading conditions is superior to that under fasting ones. (M.N.)

  3. Risk of cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gejl, Michael; Starup-Linde, Jakob; Thomsen, Jan Lykke Scheel;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Type 2 diabetes (DM) increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. We investigated the effects of antidiabetic drugs on the composite endpoint (CE) of ischemic heart disease, heart failure or stroke in DM patients. METHODS: We conducted a nested case-control study. Cases were DM patients who......% CI: 16.88-24.12), neuropathy (OR=1.39, 95% CI: 1.05-1.85) and peripheral artery disease (OR=1.31, 95% CI: 1.02-1.69) increased the risk of CE. Biguanides (OR=0.62 95% CI; 0.54-0.71) and liraglutide (OR=0.48 95% CI; 0.38-0.62) significantly decreased the risk of CE as did statin treatment (OR=0.63, 95...

  4. Heart Disease: Know Your Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Stroke This information in Spanish ( en español ) Heart disease: Know your risk Are you at risk for ... risk factors Return to top More information on Heart disease and stroke prevention Read more from womenshealth.gov ...

  5. Is vitamin B12 deficiency a risk factor for cardiovascular disease in vegetarians?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Roman

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this paper is to describe the role of vitamin B12 deficiency in cardiovascular disease development among vegetarians. Vegetarians have a high prevalence of vitamin B12 deficiency. Deficiency of this vitamin is associated with a variety of atherogenic processes that are mainly, but not exclusively, due to vitamin B12 deficiency-induced hyperhomocysteinemia. Each 5-μmol/L increase above 10 μmol/L of serum homocysteine is associated with a 20% increased risk of circulatory health problems. Mean homocysteine concentration >10 μmol/L among vegetarians was reported in 32 of 34 reports. Macrocytosis associated with vitamin B12 deficiency is also associated with fatal and non-fatal coronary disease, myocardial infarction, stroke, and other circulatory health problems. Compared with non-vegetarians, vegetarians have an improved profile of the traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors, including serum lipids, blood pressure, serum glucose concentration, and weight status. However, not all studies that assessed cardiovascular disease incidence among vegetarians reported a protective effect. Among studies that did show a lower prevalence of circulatory health problems, the effect was not as pronounced as expected, which may be a result of poor vitamin B12 status due to a vegetarian diet. Vitamin B12 deficiency may negate the cardiovascular disease prevention benefits of vegetarian diets. In order to further reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, vegetarians should be advised to use vitamin B12 supplements. PMID:25998928

  6. What's My Lyme Disease Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? What's My Lyme Disease Risk? KidsHealth > For Teens > What's My Lyme Disease Risk? Print A A A Text Size What's ... la enfermedad de Lyme? Is the thought of Lyme disease making you feel you'd be safer in ...

  7. Mathematical circulatory system model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, William D. (Inventor); Stevens, Scott A. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system and method of modeling a circulatory system including a regulatory mechanism parameter. In one embodiment, a regulatory mechanism parameter in a lumped parameter model is represented as a logistic function. In another embodiment, the circulatory system model includes a compliant vessel, the model having a parameter representing a change in pressure due to contraction of smooth muscles of a wall of the vessel.

  8. Animals: Disease Risks for People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Knowledge Base Browse AVMA Policies Browse by Animal/Species Browse by Topic Browse by Discipline Resources ... Your Veterinarian Pet Care Currently selected Emergency Care Animal Welfare Veterinary Careers Public Health Disease Risks for ...

  9. What Are Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Coronary Heart Disease Risk Factors? Coronary heart disease risk factors are ... high blood pressure, overweight and obesity, and others. Heart Disease Risk Factors 09/30/2011 This video—presented ...

  10. Heart Disease Risk Factors You Can Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease: Know your risk Heart Health and Stroke Heart disease risk factors you can control Did you know? ... overall health. Return to top More information on Heart disease risk factors you can control Read more from ...

  11. Cheese and cardiovascular disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjerpsted, Julie Bousgaard; Tholstrup, Tine

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently, the effect of dairy products on cardiovascular risk is a topic with much debate and conflicting results. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of the existing literature regarding the effect of cheese intake and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Studies included...

  12. Genetic risks for cardiovascular diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Zafarmand, M. H.

    2008-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD), which involves the heart, brain, and peripheral circulation, is a major health problem world-wide. The development of atherosclerosis is a complex process, and several established risk factors are involved. Nevertheless, these established risk factors do not fully explain the occurrence of CVD and further insight is required in factors such as genetic determinants that may identify individuals at risk. In this thesis we worked on the genetic basis...

  13. Mechanical Circulatory Assist Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Sang B.; Magovern, George J.; Christlieb, Ignacio Y.; Kao, Race L.

    1987-01-01

    Cardiogenic shock occurs in about 10% of the 1.5 million patients who suffer myocardial infarction and in approximately 1% of the 200,000 patients who undergo open-heart surgery each year. The ventricular assist device decreases the workload of the failing ventricles and increases the blood flow through the coronary system. Recovery of failing myocardium after mechanical circulatory assistance has been well documented; however, the mechanisms that contribute to the recovery of a failing heart...

  14. Clinical application of nuclear medical diagnostic method for adaptation deciion of treatment for circulatory disease and evaluation of its efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, Yoshio; Hayashida, Kohei; Fukuchi, Kazuki [National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    In this study, the conditions of patients to which cerebral revascularization through anastomosis of internal and external carotid arteries is applicable were investigated. In the first part, classification of the degree of cerebrovascular disease was attempted using positron emission tomography (PET) and in the second, cerebral blood circulation was evaluated using cerebral SPECT to consider in respect of advisability of the revascularization surgery. Since cerebral ischemia tends to be induced by enhancement of cerebral oxygen uptake, cerebral revascularization was thought to be restricted to the patients with cerebrovascular disease in stage 2. So, cerebral blood flow, cerebral blood volume and cerebral oxygen metabolism were compared among the patients in stage 1 and stage 2, and the normal control. The blood flow was decreased with the severity of disease and lowest in the patients of stage 2. There were significant differences in the oxygen metabolism and blood volume between the patient stage 1 and the control. The cerebral blood flow in patient in stage 2 was decreased to a level below the self-control range, leading to an increase in the cerebral oxygen uptake. Therefore, it was concluded that the severity of cerebrovascular disease could be estimated with cerebrocirculation index and vasodilation ability determined by cerebral SPECT. Patients of which cerebral blood flow is decreased by more than 28.0% can be regarded as the patient in stage 2. When cerebral blood volume determined by IMP-ARG method and PET method and was compared, underestimation was 34.5% for plane phantom and 11% for cranial pseudo phantom. Further classification would be made on the basis of vascular response under the conditions of Diamox loading and it was concluded that cases of which decrease in cerebral blood flow is 10% or less were applicable to cerebral revascularization. (M.N.)

  15. Chagas disease risk in Texas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahotra Sarkar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, remains a serious public health concern in many areas of Latin America, including México. It is also endemic in Texas with an autochthonous canine cycle, abundant vectors (Triatoma species in many counties, and established domestic and peridomestic cycles which make competent reservoirs available throughout the state. Yet, Chagas disease is not reportable in Texas, blood donor screening is not mandatory, and the serological profiles of human and canine populations remain unknown. The purpose of this analysis was to provide a formal risk assessment, including risk maps, which recommends the removal of these lacunae. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The spatial relative risk of the establishment of autochthonous Chagas disease cycles in Texas was assessed using a five-stage analysis. 1. Ecological risk for Chagas disease was established at a fine spatial resolution using a maximum entropy algorithm that takes as input occurrence points of vectors and environmental layers. The analysis was restricted to triatomine vector species for which new data were generated through field collection and through collation of post-1960 museum records in both México and the United States with sufficiently low georeferenced error to be admissible given the spatial resolution of the analysis (1 arc-minute. The new data extended the distribution of vector species to 10 new Texas counties. The models predicted that Triatoma gerstaeckeri has a large region of contiguous suitable habitat in the southern United States and México, T. lecticularia has a diffuse suitable habitat distribution along both coasts of the same region, and T. sanguisuga has a disjoint suitable habitat distribution along the coasts of the United States. The ecological risk is highest in south Texas. 2. Incidence-based relative risk was computed at the county level using the Bayesian Besag-York-Mollié model and post-1960 T. cruzi incidence data. This

  16. Right ventricular performance and central circulatory hemodynamics during upright exercise in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A combined hemodynamic and radionuclide approach was used to evaluate right ventricular performance during upright exercise in 12 male patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. To assess the influence of intrathoracic pressure on hemodynamic parameters, pleural pressure was measured using an esophageal balloon. Mean age was 58.5 +/- 6.7 yr (+/- SD), and all had dyspnea on physical exertion. For the group, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was 1.04 +/- 0.40 L and arterial oxygen-tension (PaO2) was 77 +/- 11 mmHg. During steady-state, upright exercise on the bicycle ergometer at 58% of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 max): (1) mean pulmonary artery pressure (Ppa) and pulmonary vascular resistance index (PVRI) increased significantly; (2) right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) failed to augment appropriately (less than 5% increase); and (3) right ventricular end-diastolic volume index (RVEDVI) increased significantly, whereas right ventricular end-systolic volume index (RVESVI) did not change. A diminished pulmonary vascular bed, the change in PaO2, and possibly increased alveolar pressure appeared to contribute to the increased load placed on the right ventricle. Both RVEDVI and RVESVI were significantly correlated with Ppa at rest and during exercise. In 2 of the 12 patients, stroke volume index and left ventricular end-diastolic volume index showed minimal change with exercise. VO2max was correlated with the FEV1 (r . 0.75; p . 0.01) as well as resting (r . -0.60; p . 0.02) and exercise (r . -0.61; p . 0.02) PVRI. These results suggest that exercise performance may be limited by right ventricular dysfunction in addition to respiratory impairment in some patients with chronic airway disease

  17. The influence of the winter North Atlantic Oscillation index on hospital admissions through diseases of the circulatory system in Lisbon, Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almendra, Ricardo; Santana, Paula; Vasconcelos, João; Silva, Giovani; Gonçalves, Fábio; Ambrizzi, Tércio

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyze the relationship between North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), meteorological variables, air pollutants, and hospital admissions due to diseases of circulatory systems in Lisbon (Portugal) during winter months (2003-2012). This paper is one of the few studies analyzing the impact of NAO on health through its influence on thermal stress and air pollution and is the first to be conducted in Lisbon. This study uses meteorological data (synthetized into a thermal comfort index), air pollutant metrics, and the NAO index (all clustered in 10-day cycles to overcome daily variability of the NAO index). The relationship between morbidity, thermal comfort index, NAO index, and air pollutants was explored through several linear models adjusted to seasonality through a periodic function. The possible indirect effect between the NAO index and hospital admissions was tested, assuming that NAO (independent variable) is affecting hospital admissions (outcome variable) through thermal discomfort and/or pollution levels (tested as individual mediators). This test was conducted through causal mediation analysis and adjusted for seasonal variation. The results from this study suggest a possible indirect relationship between NAO index and hospital admissions. Although NAO is not significantly associated with hospital admissions, it is significantly associated with CO, PM2.5, NO, and SO2 levels, which in turn increase the probability of hospitalization. The discomfort index (built with temperature and relative humidity) is significantly associated with hospital admissions, but its variability is not explained by the NAO index. This study highlights the impacts of the atmospheric circulation patterns on health. Furthermore, understanding the influence of the atmospheric circulation patterns can support the improvement of the existing contingency plans.

  18. Other Possible Heart Disease Risk Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your risk Heart Health and Stroke Other possible heart disease risk factors Related information Depression fact sheet Stress ... Return to top More information on Other possible heart disease risk factors Read more from womenshealth.gov Heart ...

  19. Circulatory Syndrome: An Evolution of the Metabolic Syndrome Concept!

    OpenAIRE

    Khoshdel, Ali Reza; Carney, Shane L; Gillies, Alastair

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome has been a useful, though controversial construct in clinical practice as well as a valuable model in order to understand the interactions of diverse cardiovascular risk factors. However the increasing importance of the circulatory system in particular the endothelium , in both connecting and controlling organ function has underlined the limitations of the metabolic syndrome definition. The proposed “Circulatory Syndrome” is an attempt to refine the metabolic syndrome c...

  20. Effect of prone sleeping on circulatory control in infants

    OpenAIRE

    Chong, A; N. Murphy; MATTHEWS, T

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The mechanism of death in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) remains unclear. Progressive bradycardia is the pre-eminent terminal event, suggesting that circulatory failure might be a crucial factor. Vasomotor tone regulates the circulatory system by controlling blood volume distribution while maintaining venous return and blood pressure.
AIM—To examine whether prone sleeping, the most consistently identified risk factor for SIDS, has a measurable influence on...

  1. Automated diagnostic system of pathological states of the circulatory system

    OpenAIRE

    Книшов, Генадій Васильович; Настенко, Євген Арнольдович; Носовець, Олена Костянтинівна; Береговий, Олександр Анатолієвич; Шаповалова, Валентина Вікторівна; Плахтій, Артур Миколайович

    2014-01-01

    The results of developing an automated system of diagnosing pathological conditions of a human blood circulatory system have been presented. The system is based on the results of researching functional bonds between arterial blood pressure measurements and cardiac rate frequency in health and disease. Nomographic charts and percentage diagrams, reflecting the type of relation depending on a blood circulatory condition, have been used. The system development has been carried out by means of th...

  2. Pulmonary Hypertension in the Era of Mechanical Circulatory Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Yamini; Cooper, Lauren B; Parikh, Kishan S; Felker, G Michael; Milano, Carmelo A; Rogers, Joseph G; Hernandez, Adrian F; Patel, Chetan B

    2016-01-01

    Left heart disease (LHD) represents the most common cause of pulmonary hypertension (PH), and is associated with worse prognosis compared with LHD without PH. In addition, PH due to LHD may prevent patients from receiving heart transplantation, because of risk of perioperative right ventricular failure. Current literature lacks comprehensive descriptions and management strategies of PH due to LHD. In this review, we summarize the literature that is available to highlight the definition, pathogenesis, and prognosis of PH due to LHD. Furthermore, we discuss the use of mechanical circulatory support (MCS) in this population. Finally, we provide recommendations regarding the management and reassessment of PH due to LHD in the specific context of MCS. PMID:27442856

  3. Total cardiovascular disease risk assessment: a review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooney, Marie Therese

    2011-09-01

    The high risk strategy for the prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD) requires an assessment of an individual\\'s total CVD risk so that the most intensive risk factor management can be directed towards those at highest risk. Here we review developments in the assessment and estimation of total CVD risk.

  4. Genetic risk profiles for coronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tikkanen, Emmi

    2013-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is a major burden for public health worldwide. Several factors are known to be associated with the disease risk, including high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and blood pressure. The established risk factors do not, however, fully predict an individual s risk for the disease. In recent years, new candidate risk factors, including genetic markers, have been extensively studied. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have mapped over 40 genetic...

  5. The abdominal circulatory pump.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Aliverti

    Full Text Available Blood in the splanchnic vasculature can be transferred to the extremities. We quantified such blood shifts in normal subjects by measuring trunk volume by optoelectronic plethysmography, simultaneously with changes in body volume by whole body plethysmography during contractions of the diaphragm and abdominal muscles. Trunk volume changes with blood shifts, but body volume does not so that the blood volume shifted between trunk and extremities (Vbs is the difference between changes in trunk and body volume. This is so because both trunk and body volume change identically with breathing and gas expansion or compression. During tidal breathing Vbs was 50-75 ml with an ejection fraction of 4-6% and an output of 750-1500 ml/min. Step increases in abdominal pressure resulted in rapid emptying presumably from the liver with a time constant of 0.61+/-0.1SE sec. followed by slower flow from non-hepatic viscera. The filling time constant was 0.57+/-0.09SE sec. Splanchnic emptying shifted up to 650 ml blood. With emptying, the increased hepatic vein flow increases the blood pressure at its entry into the inferior vena cava (IVC and abolishes the pressure gradient producing flow between the femoral vein and the IVC inducing blood pooling in the legs. The findings are important for exercise because the larger the Vbs the greater the perfusion of locomotor muscles. During asystolic cardiac arrest we calculate that appropriate timing of abdominal compression could produce an output of 6 L/min. so that the abdominal circulatory pump might act as an auxiliary heart.

  6. About Alzheimer's Disease: Risk Factors and Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alzheimer's Project Act (NAPA) About ADEAR About Alzheimer's Disease: Risk Factors and Prevention We can’t control some risk factors for ... Preventing Alzheimer’s Disease: What Do We Know? Alzheimer's Disease: Unraveling the Mystery ... Factors and Prevention News Summit sets the path ahead for Alzheimer's ...

  7. Introduction to circulatory and respiratory system modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, Gianfranco; Darowski, Marek; Golczewski, Tomasz; Gorczynska, Krystyna; Kozarski, Maciej

    2010-01-01

    This chapter is focused on circulatory and respiratory system modeling. It includes a brief history of circulatory and respiratory system modeling development and a short description of the state of art. In the chapter also basic classification of mechanical circulatory and respiratory assistance is presented. The last part of the chapter deals with innovative approaches to modeling of both circulatory and respiratory system which concern hybrid models and virtual organs. Hybrid modeling cons...

  8. Fungal Diseases: Ringworm Risk & Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Candidiasis Oropharyngeal / Esophageal Candidiasis Genital / vulvovaginal candidiasis Invasive candidiasis Definition Symptoms Risk & Prevention Sources Diagnosis Treatment Statistics Healthcare Professionals ...

  9. 38 CFR 4.62 - Circulatory disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR RATING DISABILITIES Disability Ratings The Musculoskeletal System § 4.62 Circulatory disturbances. The circulatory disturbances, especially of the lower extremity following injury in the popliteal... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Circulatory...

  10. Mortality of men caused by neoplasms; Mortality of women caused by neoplasms; Mortality of men caused by diseases of circulatory system; Mortality of women caused by diseases of circulatory system; Mortality of men caused by diseases of respiratory system; Mortality of women caused by diseases of respiratory system; Mortality of men caused by diseases of digestive system; Mortality of women caused by diseases of digestive system; Mortality of men caused by external causes; Mortality of women caused by external causes; 1 : 3 000 000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Health condition of population was processed pursuing the data of the Statistical Office of the Slovak Republic and the Health for All international database (WHO, 1999). The analysis of causes of mortality of Slovak's population shows that: · two types of diseases are decisive: diseases of circulatory system and neoplasms, which cause death of almost four fifths of Slovak's population; · other diseases (diseases of respiratory and digestive systems, external causes - accidents, homicides, suicides, poisonings, etc.) cause death only to about a fifth of population. The occurrence of neoplastic diseases in the EU countries is slightly declining, the Czech Republic experienced even dramatic decrease, in contrary, an alarming increase of these diseases characterises Hungary. Slovakia compared to the rest of Europe is the second most threatened country following Hungary where almost 200 (in Slovakia it is about 160) out of 100,000 inhabitants in age below 64 years prematurely die annually from malign neoplasms. Even Ukrainians (150) are better off. About 2.5-fold less people die from cancer in Finland, Sweden or Norway compared to Slovakia. The low mean life expectancy of population of Slovakia is also reduced because of unfavourable health condition of the Roma ethnicity. (author)

  11. Risk of cardiovascular disease in inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nynne; Nyboe; Andersen; Tine; Jess

    2014-01-01

    Abundant scientific evidence supporting an association between inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) and venous thromboembolic events, caused by an IBD related hypercoagulability, is acknowledged and thromboprophylactic treatment strategies are now implemented in the management of IBD patients. In contrary, the risk of arterial thromboembolic disease, as ischemic heart disease, cerebrovascular events, and mesenteric ischemia in patients with IBD remains uncertain and the magnitude of a potentially increased risk is continuously debated, with ambiguous risk estimates among studies. The evident role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis forms the basis of a biological plausible link; the chronic systemic inflammation in IBD patients increases the risk of atherosclerosis and thereby the risk of thrombotic events. Further, studies have shown that the burden of traditional risk factors for atherosclerosis, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and dyslipidemia is lower in IBD populations, thus further strengthen the role of non-traditional risk factors, as chronic inflammation in the linking of the two disease entities. Likewise, mortality from cardiovascular disease in IBD remains questioned. The aim of the current review is to give an up-date on the existing evidence of the possible association between IBD and cardiovascular disease and to discuss traditional and non-traditional risk factors.

  12. Peripheral biomarkers of stroke: Focus on circulatory microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayan, Murali; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2016-10-01

    Stroke is the second leading cause of death in the world. Stroke occurs when blood flow stops, and that stoppage results in reduced oxygen supply to neurons in the brain. The occurrence of stroke increases with age, but anyone at any age can suffer from stroke. Recent research has implicated multiple cellular changes in stroke patients, including oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammatory responses, and changes in mRNA and proteins. Recent research has also revealed that stroke is associated with modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Stroke can be controlled by modifiable risk factors, including diet, cardiovascular, hypertension, smoking, diabetes, obesity, metabolic syndrome, depression and traumatic brain injury. Stroke is the major risk factor for vascular dementia (VaD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). The purpose of this article is to review the latest developments in research efforts directed at identifying 1) latest developments in identifying biomarkers in peripheral and central nervous system tissues, 2) changes in microRNAs (miRNAs) in patients with stroke, 3) miRNA profile and function in animal brain, and 4) protein biomarkers in ischemic stroke. This article also reviews research investigating circulatory miRNAs as peripheral biomarkers of stroke. PMID:27503360

  13. Judging risk for multiple diseases: the role of disease worry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senay, Ibrahim; Hensley-Alford, Sharon; Kaphingst, Kimberly A

    2013-04-01

    Risk perceptions and disease worry of 1,959 healthy adults were measured in a telephone-based survey. In the model for each of eight health conditions, people's perceived risk was related to their worry for that condition (p worry for the other seven conditions (p people were worried about a certain condition, the more their worry about the other seven conditions increased their risk perception for that condition (p < .0001). The results are important for preventing biased risk perceptions in multiple-disease contexts. PMID:22843634

  14. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Jette Brommann; Sværke, Claus; Thomsen, Reimar Wernich; Lange, Peter; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the risk of cancer in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including which cancer sites are most affected. We examined the short- and long-term risk of lung and extrapulmonary cancer in a nationwide cohort of COPD patients.......Little is known about the risk of cancer in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), including which cancer sites are most affected. We examined the short- and long-term risk of lung and extrapulmonary cancer in a nationwide cohort of COPD patients....

  15. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Espanol Image Library Campaign Materials The Healthy Heart Handbook for Women Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease ... on how to choose and cook low-fat foods, get more physical activity, and achieve a healthy ...

  16. Dental disease and risk of coronary heart disease and mortality.

    OpenAIRE

    DeStefano, F.; Anda, R F; Kahn, H. S.; Williamson, D F; Russell, C. M.

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate a reported association between dental disease and risk of coronary heart disease. SETTING--National sample of American adults who participated in a health examination survey in the early 1970s. DESIGN--Prospective cohort study in which participants underwent a standard dental examination at baseline and were followed up to 1987. Proportional hazards analysis was used to estimate relative risks adjusted for several covariates. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Incidence of morta...

  17. Detecting Risk Factor of Diseases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zvárová, Jana

    1995-01-01

    Roč. 15, 1/2 (1995), s. 203-212. ISSN 0208-5216. [Seminar on Statistics and Clinical Practice. Warsaw, 20.06.1994-23.06.1994] Keywords : risk factors * genetics * association * epidemilogy * measures of association * screening * genetics

  18. Single and combined effects of air pollutants on circulatory and respiratory system-related mortality in Belgrade, Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojić, Svetlana Stanišić; Stanišić, Nemanja; Stojić, Andreja; Šoštarić, Andrej

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association between short- and long-term exposure to particulate matter (PM10), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and soot and mortality attributed to circulatory and respiratory diseases in Belgrade area (Serbia). The analyzed data set comprised results of regular pollutant monitoring and corresponding administrative records on frequency of daily mortality in the period 2009-2014. Nonlinear exposure-response dependencies and delayed effects of temperature were examined by means of distributed lag nonlinear models. The air pollutant loadings and circulatory system-related death rates in Belgrade area are among the highest in Europe. Data demonstrated that excess risk of death with short-term exposure to elevated concentrations of PM10, SO2, and soot was not significant, whereas marked effect size estimates for exposure over 90 d preceding mortality were found. The influence of chronic exposure was shown to be greater for respiratory than circulatory system-related mortality. When stratified by age and gender, higher risk was noted for male individuals below the age of 65 years. PMID:26699658

  19. Erectile function and risk of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiang; Chen, Honglei; Schwarzschild, Michael A; Glasser, Dale B; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Rimm, Eric B; Ascherio, Alberto

    2007-12-15

    Erectile dysfunction is common among individuals with Parkinson's disease, but it is unknown whether it precedes the onset of the classic features of Parkinson's disease. To address this question, the authors examined whether erectile dysfunction was associated with Parkinson's disease risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Analyses included 32,616 men free of Parkinson's disease at baseline in 1986 who in 2000 completed a retrospective questionnaire with questions on erectile dysfunction in different time periods. Relative risks were computed using Cox proportional hazards models adjusting for age, smoking, caffeine intake, history of diabetes, and other covariates. Among men who reported their erectile function before 1986, 200 were diagnosed with Parkinson's disease during 1986-2002. Men with erectile dysfunction before 1986 were 3.8 times more likely to develop Parkinson's disease during the follow-up than were those with very good erectile function (relative risk = 3.8, 95% confidence interval: 2.4, 6.0; p disease were 2.7, 3.7, and 4.0 (95% confidence interval: 1.4, 11.1; p = 0.008) for participants with first onset of erectile dysfunction (before 1986) at 60 or more, 50-59, and less than 50 years of age, respectively, relative to those without erectile dysfunction. In conclusion, in this retrospective analysis in a large cohort of men, the authors observed that erectile dysfunction was associated with a higher risk of developing Parkinson's disease. PMID:17875583

  20. Serum triglycerides and risk of cardiovascular disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boullart, I.; Graaf, J. de; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.

    2012-01-01

    Dyslipidemia, especially elevated serum levels of cholesterol, is causally related to cardiovascular disease. The specific role of triglycerides has long been controversial. In this article we discuss the role of serum triglycerides in relation to the risk of cardiovascular disease. First, the (path

  1. Reducing Climate-Sensitive Disease Risks

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2014-01-01

    Disease risks to humans, animals, and plants are determined by interconnected environmental variables that affect incidence, transmission, and outbreak. Climate change affects many of the environmental variables that lead to disease. Regardless of the species involved, the impacts can ultimately affect the health, livelihood, and economic security of humans. The objective of this World Ban...

  2. Alzheimer's Disease: Genes, pathogenesis and risk prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Sleegers, Kristel; Duijn, Cock

    2001-01-01

    textabstractWith the aging of western society the contribution to morbidity of diseases of the elderly, such as dementia, will increase exponentially. Thorough preventative and curative strategies are needed to constrain the increasing prevalence of these disabling diseases. Better understanding of the pathogenesis of disease will enable development of therapy, prevention and the identification of high-risk groups in the population. Here, we review the genetic epidemiology of Alzheimer's dise...

  3. Education and the risk for Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Letenneur, L; Launer, L J; Andersen, K;

    2000-01-01

    The hypothesis that a low educational level increases the risk for Alzheimer's disease remains controversial. The authors studied the association of years of schooling with the risk for incident dementia and Alzheimer's disease by using pooled data from four European population-based follow......-up studies. Dementia cases were identified in a two-stage procedure that included a detailed diagnostic assessment of screen-positive subjects. Dementia and Alzheimer's disease were diagnosed by using international research criteria. Educational level was categorized by years of schooling as low ( or =12). Relative risks (95% confidence intervals) were estimated by using Poisson regression, adjusting for age, sex, study center, smoking status, and self-reported myocardial infarction and stroke. There were 493 (328) incident cases of dementia (Alzheimer's disease) and 28...

  4. Relation between awareness of circulatory disorders and smoking in a general population health examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Völzke Henry

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about proportions of smokers who maintain smoking after they are aware of a circulatory disorder. The goal was to analyze the extent to which the number of circulatory disorders may be related to being a current smoker. Methods Cross-sectional survey study with a probability sample of residents in Germany investigated in health examination centers. Questionnaire data of 3,778 ever smoking participants aged 18 – 79 were used, questions included whether the respondent had ever had hypertension, myocardial infarction, other coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke, other cerebrovascular disease, peripheral vascular disease, and venous thrombosis. Logistic regression was calculated for circulatory disorders and their number with current smoking as the dependent variable, and odds ratios (OR are presented adjusted for physician contact, inpatient treatment, smoking cessation counseling, heavy smoking, exercise, overweight and obesity, school education, sex and age. Results Among ever smokers who had 1 circulatory disorder, 52.1 % were current smokers and among those who reported that they had 3 or more circulatory disorders 28.0 % were current smokers at the time of the interview. The adjusted odds of being a current smoker were lower for individuals who had ever smoked in life and had 2 or more central circulatory disorders, such as myocardial infarction, heart failure or stroke, than for ever smokers without central circulatory disorder (2 or more disorders: adjusted OR 0.6, 95 % confidence interval, CI, 0.4 to 0.8. Conclusion Among those with central circulatory disorders, there is a substantial portion of individuals who smoke despite their disease. The data suggest that only a portion of smokers among the general population seems to be discouraged from smoking by circulatory disorders or its accompanying cognitive or emotional processes.

  5. Mechanical circulatory treatment of advanced heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løgstrup, Brian B; Vase, Henrik; Gjedsted, Jakob;

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. When patients cease to respond adequately to optimal medical therapy mechanical circulatory support has been promising. The advent of mechanical circulatory support devices has allowed significant improvements in...... patient survival and quality of life for those with advanced or end-stage heart failure. We provide a general overview of current mechanical circulatory support devices encompassing options for both short- and long-term ventricular support....

  6. Association of sulfur dioxide exposure with circulatory system deaths in a medium-sized city in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.T. Amancio

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available There is a demonstrable association between exposure to air pollutants and deaths due to cardiovascular diseases. The objective of this study was to estimate the effects of exposure to sulfur dioxide on mortality due to circulatory diseases in individuals 50 years of age or older residing in São José dos Campos, SP. This was a time-series ecological study for the years 2003 to 2007 using information on deaths due to circulatory disease obtained from Datasus reports. Data on daily levels of pollutants, particulate matter, sulfur dioxide (SO2, ozone, temperature, and humidity were obtained from the São Paulo State Environmental Agency. Moving average models for 2 to 7 days were calculated by Poisson regression using the R software. Exposure to SO2 was analyzed using a unipollutant, bipollutant or multipollutant model adjusted for mean temperature and humidity. The relative risks with 95%CI were obtained and the percent decrease in risk was calculated. There were 1928 deaths with a daily mean (± SD of 1.05 ± 1.03 (range: 0-6. Exposure to SO2 was significantly associated with mortality due to circulatory disease: RR = 1.04 (95%CI = 1.01 to 1.06 in the 7-day moving average, after adjusting for ozone. There was an 8.5% decrease in risk in the multipollutant model, proportional to a decrease of SO2 concentrations. The results of this study suggest that residents of medium-sized Brazilian cities with characteristics similar to those of São José dos Campos probably have health problems due to exposure to air pollutants.

  7. Association of sulfur dioxide exposure with circulatory system deaths in a medium-sized city in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amancio, C.T. [Departamento de Medicina, Universidade de Taubaté, Taubaté, SP (Brazil); Nascimento, L.F.C. [Departamento de Medicina, Universidade de Taubaté, Taubaté, SP (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Ambientais, Universidade de Taubaté, Taubaté, SP (Brazil)

    2012-08-17

    There is a demonstrable association between exposure to air pollutants and deaths due to cardiovascular diseases. The objective of this study was to estimate the effects of exposure to sulfur dioxide on mortality due to circulatory diseases in individuals 50 years of age or older residing in São José dos Campos, SP. This was a time-series ecological study for the years 2003 to 2007 using information on deaths due to circulatory disease obtained from Datasus reports. Data on daily levels of pollutants, particulate matter, sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), ozone, temperature, and humidity were obtained from the São Paulo State Environmental Agency. Moving average models for 2 to 7 days were calculated by Poisson regression using the R software. Exposure to SO{sub 2} was analyzed using a unipollutant, bipollutant or multipollutant model adjusted for mean temperature and humidity. The relative risks with 95%CI were obtained and the percent decrease in risk was calculated. There were 1928 deaths with a daily mean (± SD) of 1.05 ± 1.03 (range: 0-6). Exposure to SO{sub 2} was significantly associated with mortality due to circulatory disease: RR = 1.04 (95%CI = 1.01 to 1.06) in the 7-day moving average, after adjusting for ozone. There was an 8.5% decrease in risk in the multipollutant model, proportional to a decrease of SO{sub 2} concentrations. The results of this study suggest that residents of medium-sized Brazilian cities with characteristics similar to those of São José dos Campos probably have health problems due to exposure to air pollutants.

  8. Association of sulfur dioxide exposure with circulatory system deaths in a medium-sized city in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a demonstrable association between exposure to air pollutants and deaths due to cardiovascular diseases. The objective of this study was to estimate the effects of exposure to sulfur dioxide on mortality due to circulatory diseases in individuals 50 years of age or older residing in São José dos Campos, SP. This was a time-series ecological study for the years 2003 to 2007 using information on deaths due to circulatory disease obtained from Datasus reports. Data on daily levels of pollutants, particulate matter, sulfur dioxide (SO2), ozone, temperature, and humidity were obtained from the São Paulo State Environmental Agency. Moving average models for 2 to 7 days were calculated by Poisson regression using the R software. Exposure to SO2 was analyzed using a unipollutant, bipollutant or multipollutant model adjusted for mean temperature and humidity. The relative risks with 95%CI were obtained and the percent decrease in risk was calculated. There were 1928 deaths with a daily mean (± SD) of 1.05 ± 1.03 (range: 0-6). Exposure to SO2 was significantly associated with mortality due to circulatory disease: RR = 1.04 (95%CI = 1.01 to 1.06) in the 7-day moving average, after adjusting for ozone. There was an 8.5% decrease in risk in the multipollutant model, proportional to a decrease of SO2 concentrations. The results of this study suggest that residents of medium-sized Brazilian cities with characteristics similar to those of São José dos Campos probably have health problems due to exposure to air pollutants

  9. Alcoholic Cirrhosis Increases Risk for Autoimmune Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Lisbet; Vilstrup, Hendrik; Deleuran, Bent;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Alcoholic cirrhosis is associated with hyperactivation and dysregulation of the immune system. In addition to its ability to increase risk for infections, it also may increase the risk for autoimmune diseases. We studied the incidence of autoimmune diseases among patients with...... alcohol-associated cirrhosis vs controls in Denmark. METHODS: We collected data from nationwide health care registries to identify and follow up all citizens of Denmark diagnosed with alcoholic cirrhosis from 1977 through 2010. Each patient was matched with 5 random individuals from the population...... diagnosed with alcoholic cirrhosis, 532 developed an autoimmune disease, yielding an overall increased adjusted incidence rate ratio (aIRR) of 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24-1.50). The strongest associations were with Addison's disease (aIRR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.04-5.85), inflammatory bowel disease (a...

  10. An Overview of NASA's Risk of Cardiovascular Disease from Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Zarana S.; Huff, Janice L.; Simonsen, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    The association between high doses of radiation exposure and cardiovascular damage is well established. Patients that have undergone radiotherapy for primary cancers of the head and neck and mediastinal regions have shown increased risk of heart and vascular damage and long-term development of radiation-induced heart disease [1]. In addition, recent meta-analyses of epidemiological data from atomic bomb survivors and nuclear industry workers has also shown that acute and chronic radiation exposures is strongly correlated with an increased risk of circulatory disease at doses above 0.5 Sv [2]. However, these analyses are confounded for lower doses by lifestyle factors, such as drinking, smoking, and obesity. The types of radiation found in the space environment are significantly more damaging than those found on Earth and include galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), solar particle events (SPEs), and trapped protons and electrons. In addition to the low-LET data, only a few studies have examined the effects of heavy ion radiation on atherosclerosis, and at lower, space-relevant doses, the association between exposure and cardiovascular pathology is more varied and unclear. Understanding the qualitative differences in biological responses produced by GCR compared to Earth-based radiation is a major focus of space radiation research and is imperative for accurate risk assessment for long duration space missions. Other knowledge gaps for the risk of radiation-induced cardiovascular disease include the existence of a dose threshold, low dose rate effects, and potential synergies with other spaceflight stressors. The Space Radiation Program Element within NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) is managing the research and risk mitigation strategies for these knowledge gaps. In this presentation, we will review the evidence and present an overview of the HRP Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and Other Degenerative Tissue Effects from Radiation Exposure.

  11. Diet and risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Vibeke; Olsen, Anja; Carbonnel, Franck;

    2012-01-01

    European cohorts, mainly including middle-aged adults, suggest that a diet high in protein from meat and fish is associated with a higher risk of inflammatory bowel disease. Intake of the n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid linoleic acid may confer risk of ulcerative colitis, whereas n-3 polyunsaturated fatty...... dioxide and aluminium silicate). Conclusions: A diet high in protein, particular animal protein, may be associated with increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease and relapses. N-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids may predispose to ulcerative colitis whilst n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid may protect. These...... results should be confirmed in other countries and in younger subjects before dietary counselling is recommended in high risk subjects....

  12. Infectious Disease Risk Associated with Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Duane L.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation opens with views of the shuttle in various stages of preparation for launch, a few moments after launch prior to external fuel tank separation, a few pictures of the earth,and several pictures of astronomical interest. The presentation reviews the factors effecting the risks of infectious disease during space flight, such as the crew, water, food, air, surfaces and payloads and the factors that increase disease risk, the factors affecting the risk of infectious disease during spaceflight, and the environmental factors affecting immunity, such as stress. One factor in space infectious disease is latent viral reactivation, such as herpes. There are comparisons of the incidence of viral reactivation in space, and in other analogous situations (such as bed rest, or isolation). There is discussion of shingles, and the pain and results of treatment. There is a further discussion of the changes in microbial pathogen characteristics, using salmonella as an example of the increased virulence of microbes during spaceflight. A factor involved in the risk of infectious disease is stress.

  13. Judging Risk for Multiple Diseases: The Role of Disease Worry

    OpenAIRE

    Senay, Ibrahim; Alford, Sharon Hensley; Kaphingst, Kimberly A.

    2012-01-01

    Risk perceptions and disease worry of 1,959 healthy adults were measured in a telephone-based survey. In the model for each of eight health conditions, people’s perceived risk was related to their worry for that condition (p < .0001) and their worry for the other seven conditions (p < .001). There was also an interaction indicating that the less people were worried about a certain condition, the more their worry about the other seven conditions increased their risk perception for that conditi...

  14. Colorectal cancer risk in Crohn's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh James Freeman

    2008-01-01

    There is recognized increased risk for colorectal cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, particularly in long-standing and extensive ulcerative colitis. There also appears to be an increased rate of intestinal cancer in Crohn's disease, including both colon and small bowel sites. In Crohn's disease, evidence suggests that detection of colorectal cancer may be delayed with a worse progno sis. Some risk factors for cancer in Crohn's disease include the extent of inflammatory change within the colon and the presence of bypassed or excluded segments, inclu ding rectal "stump" cancer. In addition, the risk for other types of intestinal neoplasms may be increased in Crohn's disease, including lymphoma and carcinoid tumors. Earlier detection of colorectal cancer based on colonoscopy scre ening and surveillance may be achieved but, to date, this has not translated into a positive survival benefit. Moreo ver, newer staining methods and evolving micro-endos copic techniques show promise, but have not significantly altered management. Future research should focus on development of molecular or other bio-markers that might predict future dysplasia or cancer development in Crohn's disease.

  15. Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease: High Blood Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Major Risk Factors for Heart Disease High Blood Cholesterol High blood cholesterol is another major risk factor for heart disease ... can do something about. The higher your blood cholesterol level, the greater your risk for developing heart ...

  16. RICKETTSIAL DISEASES: RISK FOR INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen L. Richards

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Penyakit Rickettsia bersifat endemik hampir di seluruh bagian dunia, dan begitu juga di Indonesia. Termasuk dalam penyakit-penyakit rickettsia adalah tifus epidemik, tifus murine, "scrub typhus," dan "spotted fever." Tifus epidemik, yang ditularkan kepada manusia melalui tuma pada tubuh manusia, dan dapat menyebabkan sakit berat dan kematian.   Tifus murine (tifus endemik, bersumber pada pinjal hewan, merupakan penyakit yang mirip tifus epidemik, tetapi dengan gejala-gejala yang lebih ringan dan jarang menyebabkan kematian. "Scrub typhus", merupakan penyakit yang dapat ringan sampai berat dan dapat membahayakan hidup, ditularkan kepada manusia melalui gigitan tungau yang belum dewasa yang dikenal sebagai "chigger". "Spotted fever: (demam yang disertai dengan bintik-bentik pada kulit, disebabkan karena terinfeksi oleh salah satu dari berbagai spesies rickettsia dari kelompok "spotted fever", dan ditularkan kepada manusia oleh pejamu (hospes vertebrata melalui gigitan caplak (tick yang terinfeksi. Penyakit yang disebabkan oleh organisma yang menyerupai rickettsia (rickettsia-like organism adalah: "Q fever", yaitu penyakit yang akut atau kronis yang diduga ditularkan secara alamiah akibat terhirup oleh partikel udara yang terinfeksi Coxiella burnetti sejenis bakteri yang sangat resisten terhadap upaya menonaktifkannya secara kimiawi dan fisik. Bartonellosis atau penyakit Carrion, ditemukan pada daerah dengan ketinggian sedang di Andes, Amerika Selatan. Penyakit ini ditularkan oleh lalat pasir (sand flies. "Trench fever", mirip dengan tifus epidemik, ditularkan kepada manusia oleh tuma; penyakit ini sembuh sendiri. Penyakit garutan kucing (Cat-scratch disease, disebabkan oleh infeksi Bartonella henselae di tempat gigitan atau garutan kucing rumah yang merupakan hospes. Demam sennetsu, merupakan penyakit yang dapat sembuh sendiri dan hanya ditemukan di Jepang dan Malaysia. Pengobatan dengan tetrasiklin atau kloramfenikol untuk penyakit Rickettsia

  17. Who Is at Risk for Coronary Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on Twitter. Who Is at Risk for Coronary Heart Disease? In the United States, coronary heart disease (CHD) ... type of fat. Other Risks Related to Coronary Heart Disease Other conditions and factors also may contribute to ...

  18. Combined television viewing and computer use and mortality from all-causes and diseases of the circulatory system among adults in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Ford Earl S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Watching television and using a computer are increasingly common sedentary behaviors. Whether or not prolonged screen time increases the risk for mortality remains uncertain. Methods Mortality for 7,350 adults aged ≥ 20 years who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey during 1999-2002 and were followed through 2006 was examined. Participants were asked a single question about the amount of time they spent watching television or videos or using...

  19. Education and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordahl, Helene; Rod, Naja Hulvej; Frederiksen, Birgitte Lidegaard;

    2013-01-01

    Educational-related gradients in coronary heart disease (CHD) and mediation by behavioral risk factors are plausible given previous research; however this has not been comprehensively addressed in absolute measures. Questionnaire data on health behavior of 69,513 participants, 52 % women, from...

  20. Lifestyle factors and risk of cardiovascular diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoevenaar-Blom, M.P.

    2013-01-01

     Background Evidence is accumulating that lifestyle factors influence the incidence of fatal and non-fatal cardiovascular diseases (CVD). A healthy diet, being physically active, moderate alcohol consumption and not smoking are associated with a lower CVD risk. In addition to

  1. Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Force Recommendations Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults The ... Recommendation | 1 Screening for Peripheral Artery Disease and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment with Ankle Brachial Index in Adults Potential ...

  2. Familial risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier Møller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke; Wohlfarht, Jan;

    2015-01-01

    . METHODS: The study encompassed the entire Danish population during 1977-2011 (N=8,295,773; 200 million person-years). From national registries, we obtained information on diagnosis date of IBD (N=45,780) and family ties. Using Poisson regression, we estimated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) of IBD in......OBJECTIVES: Estimates of familial risk of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC) are needed for counseling of patients and could be used to target future prevention. We aimed to provide comprehensive population-based estimates of familial risk of IBD...... pronounced in relatives of CD cases. IRRs increased with two or more IBD-affected relatives and were modified by age, with the highest family-related IRR observed in early life. CONCLUSIONS: The risk of IBD is significantly increased in first -, second-, and third-degree relatives of IBD-affected cases, with...

  3. Periodontal Disease as a Risk Factor for Ischemic Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdorreza Dorafshan

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coronary artery disease is recognized as one of the three major causes of mortality around the world. The role of inflammation in producing coronary artery disease has been established in previous studies. Since periodontitis, which is highly prevalent, is considered as a cause of inflammation, its influence on producing coronary artery disease was investigated in the present study considering its four main indices. Methods: In this case-control study, 60 patients with angiographically proven coronary artery disease were selected as case group After matching for some baseline characteristics including educational level, age, sex, and some established risk factors for coronary artery disease, 60 healthy individuals were selected as control group from a population in whom coronary artery disease had been angiographically ruled out. Then, the existence of periodontitis was compared with statistical methods in these two groups, considering four different dental indices.Results: The mean plaque index (PI was 57.82±2.92% in cases vs. 35.73±2.53% in controls (p4mm was 35.14±3.89% and 15.48±2.79% in cases and controls, respectively (P0.05. Therefore, except for the number of lost teeth, there was a statistically significant difference between these two groups. For an evaluation of independent variables, multiple logistic regression analysis was used. Odds ratio was 1.02 for attachment loss and 2.2 for BOP. Conclusion: Periodontitis may be counted as a risk factor for coronary artery disease and it is essential to study the effects of control and management of these diseases as primary and secondary prevention for coronary artery disease in future studies.

  4. Head injury and risk for Parkinson disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenborg, Line; Rugbjerg, Kathrine; Lee, Pei-Chen;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the association between head injuries throughout life and the risk for Parkinson disease (PD) in an interview-based case-control study. METHODS: We identified 1,705 patients diagnosed with PD at 10 neurologic centers in Denmark in 1996-2009 and verified their diagnoses in...... medical records. Patients were matched to 1,785 controls randomly selected from the Danish Central Population Register on sex and year of birth. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. RESULTS: We observed no association between any head.......31; 95% CI 0.88, 1.95) and risk for PD. Application of a lag time of 10 years between head injury and first cardinal symptom resulted in similar risk estimates. CONCLUSIONS: The results do not support the hypothesis that head injury increases the risk for PD....

  5. Antioxidant vitamins and coronary heart disease risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knekt, Paul; Ritz, John; Pereira, Mark A;

    2004-01-01

    intake had a lower CHD incidence. Compared with subjects who did not take supplemental vitamin C, those who took >700 mg supplemental vitamin C/d had a relative risk of CHD incidence of 0.75 (0.60, 0.93; P for trend risk......BACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have suggested a lower risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) at higher intakes of fruit, vegetables, and whole grain. Whether this association is due to antioxidant vitamins or some other factors remains unclear. OBJECTIVE: We studied the relation between the intake...... of antioxidant vitamins and CHD risk. DESIGN: A cohort study pooling 9 prospective studies that included information on intakes of vitamin E, carotenoids, and vitamin C and that met specific criteria was carried out. During a 10-y follow-up, 4647 major incident CHD events occurred in 293 172 subjects who were...

  6. Separation of craniopagus Siamese twins using cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, D E; Reitz, B A; Carson, B S; Long, D M; Dufresne, C R; Vander Kolk, C A; Maxwell, L G; Tilghman, D M; Nichols, D G; Wetzel, R C

    1989-11-01

    Occipitally joined craniopagus Siamese twins were separated with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest. The 7-month-old infants shared a large sagittal venous sinus that precluded conventional neurosurgical approach because of risk of exsanguination and air embolism. After craniotomy and preliminary exposure of the sinus, each twin underwent sternotomy and total cardiopulmonary bypass with deep hypothermia. Hypothermic circulatory arrest allowed safe division and subsequent reconstruction of the sinus remnants. Several unusual problems were encountered, including transfusion of a large blood volume from one extracorporeal circuit to the other through the common venous sinus, deleterious warming of the exposed brain during circulatory arrest, and thrombosis of both pump oxygenators. Both infants survived, although recovery was complicated in each by neurologic injury, cranial wound infection, and hydrocephalus. This case demonstrates the valuable supportive role of cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermic circulatory arrest in the management of complex surgical problems of otherwise inoperable patients. PMID:2682024

  7. Risk of cardiovascular disease following radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Excess radiation-induced cardiac mortalities have been reported among radiotherapy patients. Many case reports describe the occurrence of atherosclerosis following radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease and breast cancer. Some case reports describe the cerebral infarction following radiotherapy to neck region, and of peripheral vascular disease of the lower extremities following radiotherapy to the pelvic region. The association of atomic bomb radiation and cardiovascular disease has been examined recently by incidence studies and prevalence studies of various endpoints of atherosclerosis; all endpoints indicated an increase of cardiovascular disease in the exposed group. It is almost certain that the cardiovascular disease is higher among atomic bomb survivors. However, since a heavy exposure of 10-40 Gy is delivered in radiotherapy and the bomb survivors were exposed to radiation at high dose and dose-rate, the question is whether the results can be extrapolated to individuals exposed to lower levels of radiation. Some recent epidemiological studies on occupationally exposed workers and population living near Chernobyl have provided the evidence for cardiovascular disease being a significant late effect at relatively low doses of radiation. However, the issue of non-cancer mortality from radiation is complicated by lack of adequate information on doses, and many other confounding factors (e.g., smoking habits or socio-economic status). This presentation will evaluate possible radiobiological mechanisms for radiation-induced cardiovascular disease, and will address its relevance to radiation protection management at low doses and what the impact might be on future radiation risk assessments. (authors)

  8. Environmental risk factors for inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molodecky, Natalie A; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2010-05-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with significant morbidity. The etiology of IBD has been extensively studied during the last several decades; however, causative factors in disease pathology are not yet fully understood. IBD is thought to result from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors that influence the normal intestinal commensal flora to trigger an inappropriate mucosal immune response. Although many IBD susceptibility genes have been discovered, similar advances in defining environmental risk factors have lagged. A number of environmental risk factors have been explored, including smoking, appendectomy, oral contraceptives, diet, breastfeeding, infections/ vaccinations, antibiotics, and childhood hygiene. However, most of these factors have demonstrated inconsistent findings, thus making additional studies necessary to better understand the etiology of IBD. PMID:20567592

  9. Chronic Granulomatous Disease as a Risk Factor for Autoimmune Disease

    OpenAIRE

    De Ravin, Suk See; Naumann, Nora; Cowen, Edward W.; Friend, Julia; Hilligoss, Dianne; Marquesen, Martha; Balow, James E.; Karyl S. Barron; Turner, Maria L.; Gallin, John I.; Malech, Harry L.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is characterized by recurrent infections and granuloma formation. In addition, we have observed a number of diverse autoimmune conditions in our CGD population, suggesting that patients with CGD are at an elevated risk for development of autoimmune (AI) disorders. In this report, we describe antiphospholipid syndrome (aPL), recurrent pericardial effusion, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), IgA nephropathy, cutaneous lupus erythematosus, and autoimmune pul...

  10. College Students' Perceived Disease Risk versus Actual Prevalence Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew Lee; Dickerson, Justin B.; Sosa, Erica T.; McKyer, E. Lisako J.; Ory, Marcia G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare college students' perceived disease risk with disease prevalence rates. Methods: Data were analyzed from 625 college students collected with an Internet-based survey. Paired t-tests were used to separately compare participants' perceived 10-year and lifetime disease risk for 4 diseases: heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and…

  11. Nutrition and the risk of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Nan; Yu, Jin-Tai; Tan, Lin; Wang, Ying-Li; Sun, Lei; Tan, Lan

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that accounts for the major cause of dementia, and the increasing worldwide prevalence of AD is a major public health concern. Increasing epidemiological studies suggest that diet and nutrition might be important modifiable risk factors for AD. Dietary supplementation of antioxidants, B vitamins, polyphenols, and polyunsaturated fatty acids are beneficial to AD, and consumptions of fish, fruits, vegetables, coffee, and light-to-moderate alcohol reduce the risk of AD. However, many of the results from randomized controlled trials are contradictory to that of epidemiological studies. Dietary patterns summarizing an overall diet are gaining momentum in recent years. Adherence to a healthy diet, the Japanese diet, and the Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower risk of AD. This paper will focus on the evidence linking many nutrients, foods, and dietary patterns to AD. PMID:23865055

  12. Space radiation and cardiovascular disease risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boerma, Marjan; Nelson, Gregory A; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Mao, Xiao-Wen; Koturbash, Igor; Hauer-Jensen, Martin

    2015-12-26

    Future long-distance space missions will be associated with significant exposures to ionizing radiation, and the health risks of these radiation exposures during manned missions need to be assessed. Recent Earth-based epidemiological studies in survivors of atomic bombs and after occupational and medical low dose radiation exposures have indicated that the cardiovascular system may be more sensitive to ionizing radiation than was previously thought. This has raised the concern of a cardiovascular disease risk from exposure to space radiation during long-distance space travel. Ground-based studies with animal and cell culture models play an important role in estimating health risks from space radiation exposure. Charged particle space radiation has dense ionization characteristics and may induce unique biological responses, appropriate simulation of the space radiation environment and careful consideration of the choice of the experimental model are critical. Recent studies have addressed cardiovascular effects of space radiation using such models and provided first results that aid in estimating cardiovascular disease risk, and several other studies are ongoing. Moreover, astronauts could potentially be administered pharmacological countermeasures against adverse effects of space radiation, and research is focused on the development of such compounds. Because the cardiovascular response to space radiation has not yet been clearly defined, the identification of potential pharmacological countermeasures against cardiovascular effects is still in its infancy. PMID:26730293

  13. Measurement science in the circulatory system

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Casey M; Baker-Groberg, Sandra M.; Cianchetti, Flor A.; Glynn, Jeremy J.; Healy, Laura D.; Lam, Wai Yan; Nelson, Jonathan W.; Parrish, Diana C.; Phillips, Kevin G.; Scott-Drechsel, Devon E.; Tagge, Ian J.; Zelaya, Jaime E.; Hinds, Monica T.; McCarty, Owen J.T.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of the cellular and molecular constituents of the circulatory system are regulated by the biophysical properties of the heart, vasculature and blood cells and proteins. In this review, we discuss measurement techniques that have been developed to characterize the physical and mechanical parameters of the circulatory system across length scales ranging from the tissue scale (centimeter) to the molecular scale (nanometer) and time scales of years to milliseconds. We compare the uti...

  14. [Organ donation after circulatory death].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, J; Kalisvaart, M; van der Hoeven, M; Epker, J; de Haan, J; IJzermans, J N M; Grüne, F

    2016-02-01

    Approximately 17 million inhabitants live in the Netherlands. The number of potential organ donors in 1999 was the lowest in Europe with only 10 donors per million inhabitants. Medical associations, public health services, health insurance companies and the government had to find common solutions in order to improve organ allocation, logistics of donations and to increase the number of transplantations. After a prolonged debate on medical ethical issues of organ transplantation, all participants were able to agree on socio-medico-legal regulations for organ donation and transplantation. In addition to improving the procedure for organ donation after brain death (DBD) the most important step was the introduction of organ donation after circulatory death (DCD). Measures such as the introduction of a national organ donor database, improved information to the public, further education on intensive care units (ICU), guidelines for end of life care on the ICU, establishment of transplantation coordinators on site, introduction of autonomous explantation teams and strict procedures on the course of organ donations, answered many practical issues about logistics and responsibilities for DBD and DCD. In 2014 the number of postmortem organ donations rose to 16.4 per million inhabitants. Meanwhile, up to 60 % of organ donations in the Netherlands originate from a DCD procedure compared to approximately 10 % in the USA. This overview article discusses the developments and processes of deceased donation in the Netherlands after 15 years of experience with DCD. PMID:26810404

  15. Disease Risks of Childhood Obesity in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN-PING LI; XIAO-GUANG YANG; FENG-YING ZHAI; JIAN-HUA PIAO; WEN-HUA ZHAO; JIAN ZHANG; GUAN-SHENG MA

    2005-01-01

    .3% obese boys and all obese girls had metabolic syndrome, while only15.5% normal weight boys and 18.8% normal weight girls had metabolic syndrome. Four risk factors for metabolic syndrome were found in 8.3% obese boys while none in normal weight boys and girls. The prevalence of MetS among normal weight,overweight, and obesity groups was 1.5%, 18.3%, and 38.1% respectively. Conclusion The cardiovascular disease (CVD)risk factors are clustered in obese Chinese children. Our observations strongly suggest that efforts should be made to prevent the onset of overweight and its associated diseases during early childhood.

  16. Heart Disease Risk Factors | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk factors. Risk factors also increase the chance that existing CHD ... CHD, talk with your doctor or healthcare provider. Risk Factors You Can Control Smoking —Smoking is the most ...

  17. Pregnancy and the risk of autoimmune disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Khashan, Ali S

    2012-01-31

    Autoimmune diseases (AID) predominantly affect women of reproductive age. While basic molecular studies have implicated persisting fetal cells in the mother in some AID, supportive epidemiological evidence is limited. We investigated the effect of vaginal delivery, caesarean section (CS) and induced abortion on the risk of subsequent maternal AID. Using the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS) we identified women who were born between 1960 and 1992. We performed data linkage between the CRS other Danish national registers to identify women who had a pregnancy and those who developed AID. Women were categorised into 4 groups; nulligravida (control group), women who had 1st child by vaginal delivery, whose 1st delivery was by CS and who had abortions. Log-linear Poisson regression with person-years was used for data analysis adjusting for several potential confounders. There were 1,035,639 women aged >14 years and 25,570 developed AID: 43.4% nulligravida, 44.3% had their first pregnancy delivered vaginally, 7.6% CS and 4.1% abortions. The risk of AID was significantly higher in the 1st year after vaginal delivery (RR = 1.1[1.0, 1.2]) and CS (RR = 1.3[1.1, 1.5]) but significantly lower in the 1st year following abortion (RR = 0.7[0.6, 0.9]). These results suggest an association between pregnancy and the risk of subsequent maternal AID. Increased risks of AID after CS may be explained by amplified fetal cell traffic at delivery, while decreased risks after abortion may be due to the transfer of more primitive fetal stem cells. The increased risk of AID in the first year after delivery may also be related to greater testing during pregnancy.

  18. Pregnancy and the risk of autoimmune disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali S Khashan

    Full Text Available Autoimmune diseases (AID predominantly affect women of reproductive age. While basic molecular studies have implicated persisting fetal cells in the mother in some AID, supportive epidemiological evidence is limited. We investigated the effect of vaginal delivery, caesarean section (CS and induced abortion on the risk of subsequent maternal AID. Using the Danish Civil Registration System (CRS we identified women who were born between 1960 and 1992. We performed data linkage between the CRS other Danish national registers to identify women who had a pregnancy and those who developed AID. Women were categorised into 4 groups; nulligravida (control group, women who had 1st child by vaginal delivery, whose 1st delivery was by CS and who had abortions. Log-linear Poisson regression with person-years was used for data analysis adjusting for several potential confounders. There were 1,035,639 women aged >14 years and 25,570 developed AID: 43.4% nulligravida, 44.3% had their first pregnancy delivered vaginally, 7.6% CS and 4.1% abortions. The risk of AID was significantly higher in the 1st year after vaginal delivery (RR = 1.1[1.0, 1.2] and CS (RR = 1.3[1.1, 1.5] but significantly lower in the 1st year following abortion (RR = 0.7[0.6, 0.9]. These results suggest an association between pregnancy and the risk of subsequent maternal AID. Increased risks of AID after CS may be explained by amplified fetal cell traffic at delivery, while decreased risks after abortion may be due to the transfer of more primitive fetal stem cells. The increased risk of AID in the first year after delivery may also be related to greater testing during pregnancy.

  19. Lifestyle Decreases Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Slavíček, Jaroslav; Kittnar, Otomar; Fraser, Gary E.; Medová, Eva; Konečná, Jana; Žižka, Robert; Dohnalová, Alena; Novák, Vladimír

    2008-01-01

    The morbidity and mortality of the cardiovascular diseases is high in the developed countries. The lifestyle changes are capable to decrease it by 50%. The aim of the present study was to measure the parameters of some risk factors before and after a one-week NEW START rehabilitative retreat. 1,349 volunteers, 320 men, 1,029 woman, mean age 51±14.5 (SD) years participated in 30 rehabilitative retreats from 1999–2006 in the Czech Republic, using a low-fat, low-energy, lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet...

  20. Familial risk of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier Møller, Frederik; Andersen, Vibeke; Jess, Tine;

    2014-01-01

    Background The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) – ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease (CD) - are caused by complex gene-environment interactions. This study provides updated familial aggregation patterns in a large population-based Danish IBD cohort. Methods: Our cohort study was based on...... the entire Danish population during 1977-2011 (n=8,295,773). Through a unique personal identification number assigned to each Danish citizen, sex, date and location of birth, identity of parents, and information on vital status and emigration were available. This information was used to establish...... kinship in the entire population. Individuals receiving at least 2 diagnoses of IBD during the time period (n=45,780) were identified using the Danish National Registry of Patients. Risk of IBD in family members to individuals with IBD was assessed by Poisson regression analysis. Results: The overall...

  1. Lifestyle decreases risk factors for cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavícek, Jaroslav; Kittnar, Otomar; Fraser, Gary E; Medová, Eva; Konecná, Jana; Zizka, Robert; Dohnalová, Alena; Novák, Vladimir

    2008-12-01

    The morbidity and mortality of cardiovascular diseases is high in the developed countries. The lifestyle changes are capable to decrease it by 50%. The aim of the present study was to measure the parameters of some risk factors before and after a one-week NEW START rehabilitative retreat. 1349 volunteers, 320 men, 1029 woman, mean age 51 +/- 14.5 (SD) years participated in 30 rehabilitative retreats from 1999-2006 in the Czech Republic, using a low-fat, low-energy, lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet and exercise, in a stress-free environment. Body weight, height, BMI, blood pressure, heart rate, serum cholesterol and blood glucose were measured. Body weight decreased in 1223 measured persons from 71.2 +/- 14.38 (SD) to 70.6 +/- 14.02 kg (placto-ovo vegetarians and Seventh-day Adventists than in controls who never observed the diet and avail the lifestyle programs. The parameters were nonsignificantly changed one year after finishing the retreat in the sample of 68 persons showing the positive effect of retreats. Our results showed, that the intake of a low-fat, low-energy diet, over the course of one week in a stress-free environment, had positive impact on the risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:19256282

  2. Ionizing radiation and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoel, David G

    2006-09-01

    For more than 15 years the A-bomb survivor studies have shown increased noncancer mortality due to radiation exposures. The most prominent cause of this increase is circulatory disease mortality. Although the estimated relative risk is less than for solid cancers (1.2 versus 1.6 per Sv), there are measurable increases in cardiovascular disease mortality at doses greater than 0.5 Sv. The evidence for circulatory diseases in mortality studies of occupational cohorts exposed to external radiation is less compelling. It is generally accepted that atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the arteries and a risk factor for myocardial infarction. Immunological markers for inflammatory disease have been shown to be dose related in A-bomb survivors. Evidence from animal studies reveals increased cardiovascular mortality and arterial endothelial damage from both neutron and, to a lesser extent, gamma exposures. PMID:17119211

  3. [THE CHARACTERISTIC OF SOMATOTYPE AND FUNCTIONAL STATE OF CIRCULATORY SYSTEM OF STUDENT YOUTH OF THE NORTHEAST OF RUSSIA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeieva, A V; Klimova, T M; Mikhailova, A E; Zakharova, R N; Vinokurova, S P; Timofeiev, L F

    2015-01-01

    The article considers results of single-step study in random sampling of female students of the M.K. Ammosov north-east federal university (n=456). The study was carried out to investigate somatotype and functional state of circulatory system. The standard technique was applied to measure height, body mass, chest circumference, level of arterial pressure and rate of heart beats. The type of somatotype was established using Pignet index. The tone of vegetative system was determined using Kérdö index. The adaptation potential of circulatory system was determined using functional changes index. The results of study established that in 61% of examined female students the type of constitution corresponds to normosthenic one. The percentage of persons with asthenic and hypersthenic type of constitution amounted to 27% and 12% correspondingly. The signs of increasing oftone ofsympathetic nervous system are observed in 89% of girls. The functional condition of circulatory system is evaluated as "tension of adaptation mechanisms" that is apparently related to period of adaptation to new conditions. The prolonged preservation of such states results in exhaustion offunctional resources of organism and can promote development of diseases. In conditions of impacting of unfavorable ecological factors the deconditionning disorders can significantly contribute to health disturbances and decreasing of life quality. To preserve youth's health during period of education the comprehensive strategy is to be implemented such components as dynamic monitoring of health, organization of adequate diet, explanation of necessity of observance of sleep and rest pattern, development of conditions for active aerobic physical exertion and activities on correction of risk factors of development of diseases are to be included. PMID:26987173

  4. Vascular disease and stroke risk in atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Lane, Deirdre A;

    2012-01-01

    Vascular disease (including myocardial infarction and peripheral artery disease) has been proposed as a less well-validated risk factor for stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. We investigated whether vascular disease is an independent risk factor of stroke/thromboembolism in atrial fibri...

  5. One risk assessment tool for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, and chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Alssema (Marjan); R.S. Newson (Rachel); S.J.L. Bakker (Stephan); C.D. Stehouwer (Coen); M.W. Heymans (Martijn); M.G.A.A.M. Nijpels (Giel); H.L. Hillege (Hans); A. Hofman (Albert); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); R.T. Gansevoort; J.M. Dekker (Jacqueline)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractOBJECTIVE - Individuals at high risk for chronic cardiometabolic disease (cardiovascular disease [CVD], type 2 diabetes, and chronic kidney disease [CKD]) share many risk factors and would benefit from early intervention. We developed a nonlaboratory-based risk-assessment tool for identi

  6. One Risk Assessment Tool for Cardiovascular Disease, Type 2 Diabetes, and Chronic Kidney Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alssema, Marjan; Newson, Rachel S.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; Stehouwer, Coen D. A.; Heymans, Martijn W.; Nijpels, Giel; Hillege, Hans L.; Hofman, Albert; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Dekker, Jacqueline M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE-Individuals at high risk for chronic cardiometabolic disease (cardiovascular disease [CVD], type 2 diabetes, and chronic kidney disease [CKDD]) share many risk factors and would benefit from early intervention. We developed a nonlaboratory-based risk-assessment tool for identification of p

  7. [Cardiovascular risk in polycystic kidney disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lorenzo, Adelaide; Stallone, Giovanni; Infante, Barbara; Grandaliano, Giuseppe; Schena, Francesco Paolo

    2015-09-01

    Hypertension is common and occurs in the majority of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) patients prior to loss of kidney function. Hypertension relates to progressive kidney enlargement, and is a significant independent risk factor for progression to end-stage renal disease. The pathogenesis of hypertension in ADPKD is complex and depends on many factors that influence each other. High expression of PKD1 and PKD2 genes is present in the cilia of tubular epithelial cells, in endothelial cells and in vascular smooth muscle cells. Decreased or absent polycystin-1 or -2 expression is associated with abnormal vascular structure and function. PKD1/PKD2 deficiency results in reduced nitric oxide levels, altered endothelial response to shear stress with attenuation in vascular relaxation. Activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system occurs in ADPKD due to decreased nitric oxide production as well as bilateral cyst expansion and intra-renal ischemia. With increasing cyst size, further activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system occurs, blood pressure increases and a vicious cycle ensues with enhanced cyst growth and hypertension ultimately leading to end-stage renal disease. Inhibition of the angiotensin-aldosterone system is possible with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and seems to be the first-line treatment for hypertension in these subjects. As suggested by the HALT-PKD study, an aggressive blood pressure control is safe and recommended and is associated with preservation of kidney function and a reduction in total kidney volume over time. A collaborative multidisciplinary approach between nephrologists and cardiologists is necessary for the monitoring of kidney and heart complications. PMID:26418387

  8. Patients with psoriasis have an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlehoff, Ole; Gislason, Gunnar; Lindhardsen, Jesper; Skov, Lone; Hansen, Peter Riis

    2012-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic immunoinflammatory disease that affects 2-3% of the population and shares pathophysiologic mechanisms and risk factors with cardiovascular diseases. Studies have suggested psoriasis as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and Danish guidelines on...... cardiovascular risk factor modification in patients with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis have recently been published. We provide a short review of the current evidence and the Danish guidelines....

  9. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Patients Are at Increased Risk of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kantsø, Bjørn; Simonsen, Jacob; Hoffmann, Steen;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Crohn's disease (CD), and ulcerative colitis (UC) are chronic diseases characterized by an inappropriate immune response, which may also increase the risk of infections. We investigated the risk of invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) before and after...

  10. Evaluation of Newer Risk Markers for Coronary Heart Disease Risk Classification A Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kavousi, Maryam; Elias-Smale, Suzette; Rutten, Joost H. W.; Leening, Maarten J. G.; Vliegenthart, Rozemarijn; Verwoert, Germaine C.; Krestin, Gabriel P.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; de Maat, Moniek P. M.; Leebeek, Frank W. G.; Mattace-Raso, Francesco U. S.; Lindemans, Jan; Hofman, Albert; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; van der Lugt, Aad; van den Meiracker, Anton H.; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Whether newer risk markers for coronary heart disease (CHD) improve CHD risk prediction remains unclear. Objective: To assess whether newer risk markers for CHD risk prediction and stratification improve Framingham risk score (FRS) predictions. Design: Prospective population-based study.

  11. Dietary intake of antioxidants and risk of Alzheimer disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Engelhart (Marianne); M.I. Geerlings (Miriam); A. Ruitenberg (Annemieke); J.C. van Swieten; J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); A. Hofman (Albert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractCONTEXT: Laboratory findings have suggested that oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Therefore, the risk of Alzheimer disease might be reduced by intake of antioxidants that counteract the detrimental effects of oxidative stress. OB

  12. Representations of the Human Circulatory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Manjon, Asuncion; Angon, Yolanda Postigo

    2009-01-01

    There is no agreement about the robustness of intuitive representations of the circulatory system and their susceptibility to change by instruction. In this paper, we analyse to what extent students with varying degrees of biology instruction and different ages (High School Health Science and Social Science students and first and final year…

  13. Challenges for risk management related to emerging animal diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Aaltonen, Taina

    2010-01-01

    The uncertainties related to climate change and its effects on the spreading of animal diseases causes the most difficulties for the risk management. Preparedness and contingency planning for serious animal diseases in EU has mainly focused on conventional animal diseases, like foot- and-mouth-disease, classical swine fever and avian influenza.

  14. A Rational Risk Policy for Regulating Plant Diseases and Pests

    OpenAIRE

    Narrod, Clare A.; Glauber, Joseph W.

    2001-01-01

    Diseases and pests pose risks to U.S. agriculture and forests, but regulations and quarantines to control these risks are costly. The U.S. Department of Agriculture issues rules to control these risks based on economic analyses that do not take adequate account of links between risks and policy outcomes. A benefit-cost analysis that fully incorporates both the risk of a disease outbreak and the effect of regulations and quarantines on such risk can yield quite different conclusions. We apply ...

  15. Risk Factors of Periodontal Disease: Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef A. AlJehani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. This paper aims to review the evidence on the potential roles of modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors associated with periodontal disease. Data. Original articles that reported on the risk factors for periodontal disease were included. Sources. MEDLINE (1980 to Jan 2014, PubMed (using medical subject headings, and Google Scholar were searched using the following terms in different combinations: “periodontal disease,” “periodontitis,” “risk factors,” and “causal.” This was supplemented by hand-searching in peer-reviewed journals and cross-referenced with the articles accessed. Conclusions. It is important to understand the etiological factors and the pathogenesis of periodontal disease to recognize and appreciate the associated risk factors. As periodontal disease is multifactorial, effective disease management requires a clear understanding of all the associated risk factors.

  16. Von Willebrand factor in patients on mechanical circulatory support – a double-edged sword between bleeding and thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarski, Jacek; Pacholewicz, Jerzy; Zakliczynski, Michal; Gasior, Mariusz; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical circulatory support (MCS) is an umbrella term describing the various technologies used in both short- and long-term management of patients with either end-stage chronic heart failure (HF) or acute HF. Most often, MCS has emerged as a bridge to transplantation, but more recently it is also used as a destination therapy. Mechanical circulatory support includes left ventricular assist device (LVAD) or bi-ventricular assist device (Bi-VAD). Currently, 2- to 3-year survival in carefully selected patients is much better than with medical therapy. However, MCS therapy is hampered by sometimes life-threatening complications including bleeding and device thrombosis. Von Willebrand factor (vWF) has two major functions in haemostasis. First, it plays a crucial role in platelet-subendothelium adhesion and platelet-platelet interactions (aggregation). Second, it is the carrier of factor VIII (FVIII) in plasma. Von Willebrand factor prolongs FVIII half-time by protecting it from proteolytic degradation. It delivers FVIII to the site of vascular injury thus enhancing haemostatic process. On one hand, high plasma levels of vWF have been associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. On the other, defects or deficiencies of vWF underlie the inherited von Willebrand disease or acquired von Willebrand syndrome. Here we review the pathophysiology of thrombosis and bleeding associated with vWF. PMID:26702279

  17. Genetically elevated bilirubin and risk of ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Stefan; Frikke-Schmidt, R; Nordestgaard, B G;

    2013-01-01

    Elevated plasma levels of bilirubin, an endogenous antioxidant, have been associated with reduced risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI). Whether this is a causal relationship remains unclear.......Elevated plasma levels of bilirubin, an endogenous antioxidant, have been associated with reduced risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI). Whether this is a causal relationship remains unclear....

  18. Quantifying cardiovascular disease risk factors in patients with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, I M; Skaaby, T; Ellervik, C;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In a previous meta-analysis on categorical data we found an association between psoriasis and cardiovascular disease and associated risk factors. OBJECTIVES: To quantify the level of cardiovascular disease risk factors in order to provide additional data for the clinical management...

  19. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and risk of gallstone disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Stefan; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Benn, Marianne;

    2013-01-01

    Drugs which reduce plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) may protect against gallstone disease. Whether plasma levels of LDL-C per se predict risk of gallstone disease remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that elevated LDL-C is a causal risk factor for symptomatic gallstone...

  20. A novel risk score to predict cardiovascular disease risk in national populations (Globorisk)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajifathalian, Kaveh; Ueda, Peter; Lu, Yuan;

    2015-01-01

    , diabetes, and total cholesterol, and allowed the effects of sex and age on cardiovascular disease to vary between cohorts or countries. We developed risk equations for fatal cardiovascular disease and for fatal plus non-fatal cardiovascular disease. We validated the risk equations internally and also using...... regions (China, Czech Republic, Denmark, England, Iran, Japan, Malawi, Mexico, South Korea, Spain, and USA). FINDINGS: The risk score discriminated well in internal and external validations, with C statistics generally 70% or more. At any age and risk factor level, the estimated 10 year fatal....... Conversely, the proportion of people at high risk of fatal cardiovascular disease was largest in China and Mexico. In China, 33% of men and 28% of women had a 10-year risk of fatal cardiovascular disease of 10% or more, whereas in Mexico, the prevalence of this high risk was 16% for men and 11% for women...

  1. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and risk of infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This review article focuses on the risk of infections in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Throughout the years there have been a number of studies describing the risk of pulmonary infections in patients with COPD, whereas only few studies have focused on the risk of inf...

  2. The Impact of Personalized Risk Feedback on Mexican Americans' Perceived Risk for Heart Disease and Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovick, Shelly R.; Wilkinson, Anna V.; Ashida, Sato; de Heer, Hendrik D.; Koehly, Laura M.

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about the effect of personalized risk information on risk perceptions over time, particularly among ethnically diverse subpopulations. The present study examines Mexican American's (MAs) risk perceptions for heart disease and diabetes at baseline and following receipt of risk feedback based on family health history. Participants…

  3. Assessment of Cardiovascular Disease Risk in South Asian Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Monira Hussain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although South Asian populations have high cardiovascular disease (CVD burden in the world, their patterns of individual CVD risk factors have not been fully studied. None of the available algorithms/scores to assess CVD risk have originated from these populations. To explore the relevance of CVD risk scores for these populations, literature search and qualitative synthesis of available evidence were performed. South Asians usually have higher levels of both “classical” and nontraditional CVD risk factors and experience these at a younger age. There are marked variations in risk profiles between South Asian populations. More than 100 risk algorithms are currently available, with varying risk factors. However, no available algorithm has included all important risk factors that underlie CVD in these populations. The future challenge is either to appropriately calibrate current risk algorithms or ideally to develop new risk algorithms that include variables that provide an accurate estimate of CVD risk.

  4. Cardiovascular risk and hippocampal thickness in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donix, Markus; Scharf, Maria; Marschner, Kira; Werner, Annett; Sauer, Cathrin; Gerner, Antje; Nees, Josef A; Meyer, Shirin; Donix, Katharina L; Von Kummer, Rüdiger; Holthoff, Vjera A

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors influence onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Among cognitively healthy people, changes in brain structure and function associated with high blood pressure, diabetes, or other vascular risks suggest differential regional susceptibility to neuronal damage. In patients with Alzheimer's disease, hippocampal and medial temporal lobe atrophy indicate early neuronal loss preferentially in key areas for learning and memory. We wanted to investigate whether this regional cortical thinning would be modulated by cardiovascular risk factors. We utilized high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and a cortical unfolding technique to determine the cortical thickness of medial temporal subregions in 30 patients with Alzheimer's disease. Cardiovascular risk was assessed using a sex-specific multivariable risk score. Greater cardiovascular risk was associated with cortical thinning in the hippocampus CA2/3/dentate gyrus area but not other hippocampal and medial temporal subregions. APOE genotype, a family history of Alzheimer's disease, and age did not influence cortical thickness. Alzheimer's disease-related atrophy could mask the influence of genetic risk factors or age on regional cortical thickness in medial temporal lobe regions, whereas the impact of vascular risk factors remains detectable. This highlights the importance of cardiovascular disease prevention and treatment in patients with Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24228185

  5. Cardiovascular Risk and Hippocampal Thickness in Alzheimer’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Donix

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular risk factors influence onset and progression of Alzheimer’s disease. Among cognitively healthy people, changes in brain structure and function associated with high blood pressure, diabetes, or other vascular risks suggest differential regional susceptibility to neuronal damage. In patients with Alzheimer’s disease, hippocampal and medial temporal lobe atrophy indicate early neuronal loss preferentially in key areas for learning and memory. We wanted to investigate whether this regional cortical thinning would be modulated by cardiovascular risk factors. We utilized high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and a cortical unfolding technique to determine the cortical thickness of medial temporal subregions in 30 patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Cardiovascular risk was assessed using a sex-specific multivariable risk score. Greater cardiovascular risk was associated with cortical thinning in the hippocampus CA2/3/dentate gyrus area but not other hippocampal and medial temporal subregions. APOE genotype, a family history of Alzheimer’s disease, and age did not influence cortical thickness. Alzheimer’s disease-related atrophy could mask the influence of genetic risk factors or age on regional cortical thickness in medial temporal lobe regions, whereas the impact of vascular risk factors remains detectable. This highlights the importance of cardiovascular disease prevention and treatment in patients with Alzheimer’s disease.

  6. Dietary intake of antioxidants and risk of Alzheimer disease

    OpenAIRE

    Engelhart, Marianne; Geerlings, Miriam; Ruitenberg, Annemieke; van Swieten, J C; Witteman, Jacqueline; Breteler, Monique; Hofman, Albert

    2002-01-01

    textabstractCONTEXT: Laboratory findings have suggested that oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Therefore, the risk of Alzheimer disease might be reduced by intake of antioxidants that counteract the detrimental effects of oxidative stress. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether dietary intake of antioxidants is related to risk of Alzheimer disease. DESIGN AND SETTING: The Rotterdam Study, a population-based, prospective cohort study conducted in the Netherland...

  7. Influenza Vaccination Reduces Dementia Risk in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Ju-Chi; Hsu, Yi-Ping; Kao, Pai-Feng; Hao, Wen-Rui; Liu, Shing-Hwa; Lin, Chao-Feng; Sung, Li-Chin; Wu, Szu-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Taiwan has the highest prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) worldwide. CKD, a manifestation of vascular diseases, is associated with a high risk of dementia. Here, we estimated the association between influenza vaccination and dementia risk in patients with CKD. Data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan were used in this study. The study cohort included all patients diagnosed with CKD (according to International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revisio...

  8. Risk factors of cerebrovascular diseases and their intervention and management

    OpenAIRE

    En XU; Hai-xia WEN

    2015-01-01

    Cerebrovascular diseases are important causes of clinical death and disability because of high prevalence and morbidity and easy to recurrence. A number of risk factors have involved in the progress of cerebrovascular diseases, which include uncontrolled and controlled risk factors. The former refers to old age, gender, low birth weight, race/ethnicity, genetic factors, etc. The latter includes hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation and other cardiac diseases, dyslipidemia...

  9. Risk Factors for Chronic Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Materials Webinars Tips & Stories Links & Resources Learn About Chronic Kidney Disease Kidney Glossary Ask Our Expert Toll-Free Helpline: ... Questions What You Can Do Download all the chronic kidney disease information presented here. Preview Our CKD Booklets Stage ...

  10. Multi-scale simulation of circulatory system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi-scale/multi-physical functions of human whole body circulatory systems can be simulated for their overall quantitative evaluation by integrated models of blood vessel geometry, substrate, mechanics, transport and physiology, and of which field is currently called physiome. The author has been developing such a simulation ultimately aiming at personalized medicare, and this paper describes its procedure and applications in vascular re-construction by medical images, in model constructions of the circulatory 0-dimensional hemodynamics and of autonomic nervous systems, in blood flow dynamics and function in the left ventricle, and in hemodynamic analysis of aorta. Physics of blood flow, the vascular modeling based on images like those of MRI and CT, and the bio-dynamic model for multi-scale calculation including actual examinations of simulated blood flow dynamics are described for the procedure and application. The simulation described will contribute to the medicare concerning clinical diagnosis, surgery prediction and new drug development. (S.I)

  11. SPATIAL DYNAMICS OF LAND COVER AND INFECTIOUS DISEASE RISK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate changes may allow for vector-transmitted tropical diseases to spread into temperate areas. Areas of low ecological diversity are at higher risk of infectious disease transmission due to decreased zooprophylaxis, the diversion of disease carrying insects from humans to...

  12. Pathophysiological roles of peroxynitrite in circulatory shock

    OpenAIRE

    Szabó, Csaba; Módis, Katalin

    2010-01-01

    Peroxynitrite is a reactive oxidant produced from nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide, which reacts with proteins, lipids and DNA and promotes cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory responses. Here we overview the role of peroxynitrite in various forms of circulatory shock. Immunohistochemical and biochemical evidence demonstrate the production of peroxynitrite in various experimental models of endotoxic and hemorrhagic shock, both in rodents and in large animals. In addition, biological markers of pero...

  13. Hierarchical study of Guyton Circulatory Model

    OpenAIRE

    Assar, Rodrigo; Soueidan, Hayssam; Sherman, David James

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an initial study of the Guyton Circulatory Model using BioRica. This model consists of 18 connected modules, each of which caracterise a separate physiological subsystem. We have focused the present analysis in the Renin- Angiotensin-Aldosterone System (RAAS). The use of BioRica allowed us to build an hierarchical model for this system by means of directly mapping modules to BioRica nodes. The results of each node were validated by comparison with published results.

  14. Risk prediction—Homocysteine in Coronary Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Harish, Rao B; Govindaraju, V.; C N Manjunath

    2007-01-01

    Majority of patients who experience a Coronary Heart disease event have one or more of the conventional risk factors for atherosclerosis and so do many people who have not yet experienced such an event. Thus predictive models based on conventional risk factors have lower than the desired accuracy, providing a stimulus to search for new factors to predict accurately the risk of CHD. In this regard newer risk factors like homocysteine, Lp(a), insulin resistances are the important ones and are c...

  15. Hypersensitivity to Ticks and Lyme Disease Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Georgine; Wikel, Stephen K; Spielman, Andrew; Telford, Sam R.; McKay, Kathleen; Krause, Peter J.; ,

    2005-01-01

    Although residents of Lyme disease–endemic regions describe frequent exposure to ticks, Lyme disease develops in relatively few. To determine whether people who experience cutaneous hypersensitivity against tick bite have fewer episodes of Lyme disease than those who do not, we examined several factors that might restrict the incidence of Lyme disease among residents of Block Island, Rhode Island. Of 1,498 study participants, 27% (95% confidence interval [CI] 23%–31%) reported >1 tick bites, ...

  16. Risk factors of cardiovascular disease among children with chronic kidney disease in Gaza strip

    OpenAIRE

    Muhaisen, Rafat M.; Sharif, Fadel A.; Yassin, Maged M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly recognized as a global public health problem. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of mortality in patients with mild-to-moderate CKD and end-stage renal disease. There is accumulating evidence that the increase in CVD burden is present in CKD patients prior to dialysis, due both to conventional risk factors and kidney-specific disease. Detection and initiation of treatment for CVD risk factors at early stages of CKD should be ...

  17. Association of sulfur dioxide exposure with circulatory system deaths in a medium-sized city in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    C.T. Amancio; Nascimento, L.F.C.

    2012-01-01

    There is a demonstrable association between exposure to air pollutants and deaths due to cardiovascular diseases. The objective of this study was to estimate the effects of exposure to sulfur dioxide on mortality due to circulatory diseases in individuals 50 years of age or older residing in São José dos Campos, SP. This was a time-series ecological study for the years 2003 to 2007 using information on deaths due to circulatory disease obtained from Datasus reports. Data on daily levels of po...

  18. Risk of bleeding related to antithrombotic treatment in cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke; Olesen, Jonas B; Charlot, Mette;

    2012-01-01

    Antithrombotic therapy is a cornerstone of treatment in patients with cardiovascular disease with bleeding being the most feared complication. This review describes the risk of bleeding related to different combinations of antithrombotic drugs used for cardiovascular disease: acute coronary...... syndrome (ACS), atrial fibrillation (AF), cerebrovascular (CVD) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Different risk assessment schemes and bleeding definitions are compared. The HAS-BLED risk score is recommended in patients with AF and in ACS patients with AF. In patients with ACS with or without...

  19. Management of Cardiovascular Risk in Patients with Chronic Inflammatory Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardsen, Jesper; Kristensen, Søren Lund; Ahlehoff, Ole

    2016-01-01

    An increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been observed in a range of chronic inflammatory diseases (CID), including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriasis, inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD), and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The increased risk of CVDs and reduced life expectancy in...... gained considerable interest in recent years. We briefly summarize the current level of evidence of the association between CIDs and CVD and cardiovascular risk management recommendations. Perspectives of ongoing and planned trials are discussed in consideration of potential ways to improve primary and...

  20. Erectile Function and Risk of Parkinson’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Xiang; Chen, Honglei; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Glasser, Dale B; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Rimm, Eric B; Ascherio, Alberto

    2007-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction is common among individuals with Parkinson’s disease, but it is unknown whether it precedes the onset of the classic features of Parkinson’s disease. To address this question, the authors examined whether erectile dysfunction was associated with Parkinson’s disease risk in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. Analyses included 32,616 men free of Parkinson’s disease at baseline in 1986 who in 2000 completed a retrospective questionnaire with questions on erectile dysf...

  1. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Older People with Intellectual Disabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, Channa

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Chapter 1 General introduction There is an increasing group of older people with intellectual disability in The Netherlands, reaching almost the same life expectancy as the general population. Age-related diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, cancer and dementia are now the most encountered diseases and causes of death in older people with intellectual disabilities. Although cardiovascular disease is a major risk for older people with intellectual disabilities...

  2. Insulin Resistance and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in Postmenopausal Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, Michelle D; Hedlin, Haley; Stefanick, Marcia L;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insulin resistance is associated with diabetes mellitus, but it is uncertain whether it improves cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk prediction beyond traditional cardiovascular risk factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: We identified 15,288 women from the Women's Health Initiative Biomarkers....../HDL-C, or impaired fasting glucose (serum glucose ≥110 mg/dL) to traditional risk factors in separate Cox multivariable analyses and assessed risk discrimination and reclassification. The study end point was major CVD events (nonfatal and fatal coronary heart disease and ischemic stroke) within 10 years, which...

  3. Thigh circumference and risk of heart disease and premature death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heitmann, Berit L; Frederiksen, Peder

    2009-01-01

    of follow-up for total death. RESULTS: A small thigh circumference was associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular and coronary heart diseases and total mortality in both men and women. A threshold effect for thigh circumference was evident, with greatly increased risk of premature death...... circumference seems to be associated with an increased risk of developing heart disease or premature death. The adverse effects of small thighs might be related to too little muscle mass in the region. The measure of thigh circumference might be a relevant anthropometric measure to help general practitioners in...... early identification of individuals at an increased risk of premature morbidity and mortality....

  4. Causal beliefs and perceptions of risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease, The Netherlands, 2007

    OpenAIRE

    Claassen, E.A.M.; Henneman, L.; Nijpels, G; Dekker, J.M.; Marteau, T.; Timmermans, D R M

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Understanding people's perceptions of disease risk and how these perceptions compare with actual risk models may improve the effectiveness of risk communication. This study examined perceived disease risk and causal beliefs for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD), the relationship between self-reported risk factors and perceived disease risk, and the influence of causal beliefs on perceived disease risk in people at increased risk. Methods The sample (n = 255) consis...

  5. Danish GPs' perception of disease risk and benefit of prevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nexøe, Jørgen; Gyrd-Hansen, Dorte; Kragstrup, Jakob;

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Uncertainty and risk are central issues in relation to health and health care services. Healthy individuals do not necessarily fall ill, despite the presence of risk factors. It has been documented that doctors, health service administrators and patients are more inclined to choose in...... to take into account all available measures of risk reductions.......BACKGROUND: Uncertainty and risk are central issues in relation to health and health care services. Healthy individuals do not necessarily fall ill, despite the presence of risk factors. It has been documented that doctors, health service administrators and patients are more inclined to choose...... interventions against risk factors when information about the effects is presented in terms of relative risk reductions rather than absolute risk reductions. OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to gain better insight into how GPs perceive risk of disease, and how this perception is influenced by the way...

  6. Use of Chronic Kidney Disease to Enhance Prediction of Cardiovascular Risk in Those at Medium Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Chia, Yook Chin; Lim, Hooi Min; Ching, Siew Mooi

    2015-01-01

    Based on global cardiovascular (CV) risk assessment for example using the Framingham risk score, it is recommended that those with high risk should be treated and those with low risk should not be treated. The recommendation for those of medium risk is less clear and uncertain. We aimed to determine whether factoring in chronic kidney disease (CKD) will improve CV risk prediction in those with medium risk. This is a 10-year retrospective cohort study of 905 subjects in a primary care clinic s...

  7. Cardiovascular Disease in CKD in Children: Update on Risk Factors, Risk Assessment, and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Amy C.; Mitsnefes, Mark M.

    2009-01-01

    In young adults with onset of chronic kidney disease in childhood, cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death. The likely reason for increased cardiovascular disease in these patients is high prevalence of traditional and uremia-related cardiovascular disease risk factors during childhood chronic kidney disease. Early markers of cardiomyopathy, such as left ventricular hypertrophy and left ventricular dysfunction and early markers of atherosclerosis, such as increased carotid ar...

  8. Hepatitis C virus infection and risk of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Torsten; Lebech, Anne-Mette; Kjaer, Andreas; Weis, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Several chronic infections have been associated with cardiovascular diseases, including Chlamydia pneumoniae, human immunodeficiency virus and viral hepatitis. This review evaluates the literature on the association between chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the risk of coronary artery...

  9. Behavioral Risk Factor Data: Heart Disease & Stroke Prevention

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2011 to present. BRFSS is a continuous, state-based surveillance system that collects information about modifiable risk factors for chronic diseases and other...

  10. Pregnancy loss and later risk of atherosclerotic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm; Andersen, Elisabeth Anne Wreford; Wohlfahrt, Jan;

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy losses and atherosclerotic disease may be etiologically linked through underlying pathology. We examined whether miscarriage and stillbirth increase later risk of myocardial infarction, cerebral infarction, and renovascular hypertension....

  11. Risk of Hodgkin's disease and other cancers after infectious mononucleosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjalgrim, H; Askling, J; Sørensen, P;

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infectious mononucleosis, which is caused by the Epstein-Barr virus, has been associated with an increased risk for Hodgkin's disease. Little is known, however, about how infectious mononucleosis affects long-term risk of Hodgkin's disease, how this risk varies with age at infectious...... mononucleosis diagnosis, or how the risk for Hodgkin's disease varies in different age groups. In addition, the general cancer profile among patients who have had infectious mononucleosis has been sparsely studied. METHODS: Population-based cohorts of infectious mononucleosis patients in Denmark and Sweden were...... statistical tests including the trend tests were two-sided. RESULTS: A total of 1381 cancers were observed during 689 619 person-years of follow-up among 38 562 infectious mononucleosis patients (SIR = 1. 03; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.98-1.09). Apart from Hodgkin's disease (SIR = 2.55; 95% CI = 1...

  12. Risk factors of cerebrovascular diseases and their intervention and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    En XU

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebrovascular diseases are important causes of clinical death and disability because of high prevalence and morbidity and easy to recurrence. A number of risk factors have involved in the progress of cerebrovascular diseases, which include uncontrolled and controlled risk factors. The former refers to old age, gender, low birth weight, race/ethnicity, genetic factors, etc. The latter includes hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atrial fibrillation and other cardiac diseases, dyslipidemia, asymptomatic carotid stenosis, obesity, smoking, unhealthy lifestyle, alcoholism, metabolic syndrome, hyperhomocysteinemia, etc. Meanwhile, hypertension is the most important one in the above-mentioned risk factors. It would effectively reduce or postpone the onset of cerebrovascular diseases through proper intervention and management on those risk factors. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.01.006

  13. Organ donation after circulatory death: the forgotten donor?

    OpenAIRE

    Rady, Mohamed Y; Verheijde, Joseph L; McGregor, Joan

    2006-01-01

    Donation after circulatory death (DCD) can be performed on neurologically intact donors who do not fulfill neurologic or brain death criteria before circulatory arrest. This commentary focuses on the most controversial donor-related issues anticipated from mandatory implementation of DCD for imminent or cardiac death in hospitals across the USA. We conducted a nonstructured review of selected publications and websites for data extraction and synthesis. The recommended 5 min of circulatory arr...

  14. Cardiovascular Risk and Hippocampal Thickness in Alzheimer’s Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Markus Donix; Maria Scharf; Kira Marschner; Annett Werner; Cathrin Sauer; Antje Gerner; Nees, Josef A.; Shirin Meyer; Donix, Katharina L.; Rüdiger Von Kummer; Holthoff, Vjera A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular risk factors influence onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Among cognitively healthy people, changes in brain structure and function associated with high blood pressure, diabetes, or other vascular risks suggest differential regional susceptibility to neuronal damage. In patients with Alzheimer's disease, hippocampal and medial temporal lobe atrophy indicate early neuronal loss preferentially in key areas for learning and memory. We wanted to investigate whether this ...

  15. Autoimmune diseases and severe infections as risk factors for schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benros, Michael E; Nielsen, Philip R; Nordentoft, Merete;

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have been associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia. It has been suggested that brain-reactive autoantibodies are part of the mechanisms behind this association. Furthermore, an increased permeability of the blood-brain barrier has been observed during periods of...... infection and inflammation. The authors therefore investigated whether autoimmune diseases combined with exposures to severe infections may increase the risk of schizophrenia...

  16. Lost in Translation: Epidemiology, Risk, and Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Ganguli, Mary; Kukull, Walter A.

    2010-01-01

    There is increasing emphasis on interdisciplinary “translation” in biomedical research.1 A major push towards prevention of Alzheimer's Disease is spawning translational research 2 that should span basic, clinical, and population investigations. Epidemiological studies, which address our understanding of risk and protective factors for disease at the population level, are contributing less than they could to translational research. In part, this is because the key concept of risk is being “lo...

  17. ICD-11 and SNOMED CT Common Ontology: circulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Jean-Marie; Schulz, Stefan; Rector, Alan; Spackman, Kent; Millar, Jane; Campbell, James; Ustün, Bedirhan; Chute, Christopher G; Solbrig, Harold; Della Mea, Vincenzo; Persson, Kristina Brand

    2014-01-01

    The improvement of semantic interoperability between data in electronic health records and aggregated data for health statistics requires efforts to carefully align the two domain terminologies ICD and SNOMED CT. Both represent a new generation of ontology-based terminologies and classifications. The proposed alignment of these two systems and, in consequence, the validity of their cross-utilisation, requires a specific resource, named Common Ontology. We present the ICD-11 SNOMED CT Common Ontology building process including: a) the principles proposed for aligning the two systems with the help of a common model of meaning, b) the design of this common ontology, and c) preliminary results of the application to the diseases of the circulatory system. PMID:25160347

  18. Environmental Risk Factors for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Molodecky, Natalie A; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and is associated with significant morbidity. The etiology of IBD has been extensively studied during the last several decades; however, causative factors in disease pathology are not yet fully understood. IBD is thought to result from the interaction between genetic and environmental factors that influence the normal intestinal commensal flora to trigger an inappropriate mucosal immune res...

  19. [The stakes of force perseverance training and muscle structure training in rehabilitation. Recommendations of the German Federation for Prevention and Rehabilitation of Heart-Circulatory Diseases e.v].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjarnason-Wehrens, B; Mayer-Berger, W; Meister, E R; Baum, K; Hambrecht, R; Gielen, S

    2004-05-01

    While aerobic endurance training has been a substantial part of international recommendations for cardiac rehabilitation during the last 30 years, there is still a rather reserved attitude of the medical community to resistance exercise in this field. Careful recommendations for resistance exercise in cardiac patients was only published a few years ago. It has been taken for granted that strength exercise elicits a substantial increase in blood pressure and thus imposes, especially in cardiac patients, a risk of potentially fatal cardiovascular complications. Results of the latest studies show that the existing recommended overcaution is not justified. Strength exercise can indeed result in extreme increases of blood pressure, but this is not the case for all loads of this kind. The actual blood pressure response to strength exercise depends on the isometric component, the exercise intensity (load or resistance used), muscle mass activated, the number of repetitions in the set and/or the duration of the contraction as well as involvement of Valsalva maneuver. Intra arterially performed blood pressure measurements during resistance exercise in patients with heart disease showed that strength training carried out at low intensities (40-60% of MVC) and with high numbers of repetitions (15-20) only evokes a moderate increase of blood pressure comparable with blood pressure measures induced by moderate endurance training. If used properly and performed accurately, individually dosed, medically supervised and controlled through experienced sport therapists, a dynamic resistance exercise is-at least for a certain group of patients-not associated with higher risks than an aerobic endurance training and can in addition to endurance training improve muscle force and endurance, have a positive influence on cardiovascular function, metabolism, cardiovascular risk factors as well as psychosocial well-being and overall quality of life. However, with respect to currently

  20. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Emerging Adults in College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abshire, Demetrius Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to examine factors associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among emerging adults in college aged 18-25 years. CVD risks that develop during this period often persist into adulthood making it an ideal time to target CVD prevention. The specific aims of this dissertation were to 1) explore perceptions…

  1. Risk stratification of patients suspected of coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Møller; Voss, Mette; Hansen, Vibeke B;

    2012-01-01

    To compare the performance of five risk models (Diamond-Forrester, the updated Diamond-Forrester, Morise, Duke, and a new model designated COronary Risk SCORE (CORSCORE) in predicting significant coronary artery disease (CAD) in patients with chest pain suggestive of stable angina pectoris....

  2. [New populations at increased cardiovascular risk: Cardiovascular disease in dermatological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godoy-Gijón, Elena; Meseguer-Yebra, Carmen; Palacio-Aller, Lucía; Godoy-Rocati, Diego Vicente; Lahoz-Rallo, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    The increased cardiovascular risk in some dermatological diseases has been demonstrated in recent decades. Diseases such as psoriasis and systemic lupus erythematosus are currently included in the guidelines for prevention of cardiovascular disease. Other diseases such as androgenic alopecia, polycystic ovary syndrome, hidradenitis suppurativa or lichen planus have numerous studies that point to an increased risk, however, they have not been included in these guidelines. In this article we review the evidence supporting this association, in order to alert the clinician to the need for greater control in cardiovascular risk factors in these patients. PMID:26383179

  3. Patients’ experiences managing cardiovascular disease and risk factors in prison

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Emily H.; Wang, Emily A.; Curry, Leslie A.; Chen, Peggy G.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite greater risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in patients with a history of incarceration, little is known about how prisons manage CVD risk factors (CVD-RF) to mitigate this risk. Methods We conducted in-depth interviews with individuals with CVD-RF who had been recently released from prison (n = 26). These individuals were recruited through community flyers and a primary care clinic in Connecticut. Using a grounded theory approach and the constant comparative met...

  4. Cardiovascular disease risk in adults with spastic bilateral cerebral palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Slot, Wilma; Roebroeck, Marij; Nieuwenhuijsen, Channah; Bergen, Michael; Stam, Henk; Burdorf, Alex; Berg-Emons, Rita

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To explore: (i) cardiovascular disease risk factors and the 10-year clustered risk of a fatal cardiovascular event in adults with spastic bilateral cerebral palsy; and (ii) relationships between the 10-year risk and body fat, aerobic fitness and physical activity. Design: Cross-sectional study. Subjects: Forty-three adults with spastic bilateral cerebral palsy without severe cognitive impairment (mean age 36.6 years (standard deviation 6); 27 men). Methods: Biological a...

  5. Risk of Importing Zoonotic Diseases through Wildlife Trade, United States

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlin, Boris I; Schloegel, Lisa M.; Daszak, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The United States is the world’s largest wildlife importer, and imported wild animals represent a potential source of zoonotic pathogens. Using data on mammals imported during 2000–2005, we assessed their potential to host 27 selected risk zoonoses and created a risk assessment that could inform policy making for wildlife importation and zoonotic disease surveillance. A total of 246,772 mammals in 190 genera (68 families) were imported. The most widespread agents of risk zoonoses were rabies ...

  6. Job strain as a risk factor for coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Nyberg, Solja T; Batty, G David;

    2012-01-01

    Published work assessing psychosocial stress (job strain) as a risk factor for coronary heart disease is inconsistent and subject to publication bias and reverse causation bias. We analysed the relation between job strain and coronary heart disease with a meta-analysis of published and unpublished...

  7. Effect of biodiversity changes in disease risk: exploring disease emergence in a plant-virus system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Israel Pagán

    Full Text Available The effect of biodiversity on the ability of parasites to infect their host and cause disease (i.e. disease risk is a major question in pathology, which is central to understand the emergence of infectious diseases, and to develop strategies for their management. Two hypotheses, which can be considered as extremes of a continuum, relate biodiversity to disease risk: One states that biodiversity is positively correlated with disease risk (Amplification Effect, and the second predicts a negative correlation between biodiversity and disease risk (Dilution Effect. Which of them applies better to different host-parasite systems is still a source of debate, due to limited experimental or empirical data. This is especially the case for viral diseases of plants. To address this subject, we have monitored for three years the prevalence of several viruses, and virus-associated symptoms, in populations of wild pepper (chiltepin under different levels of human management. For each population, we also measured the habitat species diversity, host plant genetic diversity and host plant density. Results indicate that disease and infection risk increased with the level of human management, which was associated with decreased species diversity and host genetic diversity, and with increased host plant density. Importantly, species diversity of the habitat was the primary predictor of disease risk for wild chiltepin populations. This changed in managed populations where host genetic diversity was the primary predictor. Host density was generally a poorer predictor of disease and infection risk. These results support the dilution effect hypothesis, and underline the relevance of different ecological factors in determining disease/infection risk in host plant populations under different levels of anthropic influence. These results are relevant for managing plant diseases and for establishing conservation policies for endangered plant species.

  8. Risk factors in familial forms of celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, Hugh James

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease has been reported in up to 2% of some European populations. A similar risk has been identified in the America and Australia where immigration of Europeans has occurred. Moreover, an increasing number of celiac disease patients are being identified in many Asian countries, including China and India. Finally, celiac disease has also been detected in Asian immigrants and their descendants to other countries, such as Canada. Within these so-called “general” celiac populations, howe...

  9. Risk factors in familial forms of celiac disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hugh; James; Freeman

    2010-01-01

    Celiac disease has been reported in up to 2% of some European populations. A similar risk has been identified in the America and Australia where immigration of Eu-ropeans has occurred. Moreover, an increasing number of celiac disease patients are being identified in many Asian countries, including China and India. Finally, celiac disease has also been detected in Asian immigrants and their descendants to other countries, such as Canada. Within these so-called "general" celiac populations, however, there are...

  10. Incidence, Risk and Prognosis of Parkinson Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M.L. de Lau (Lonneke)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractParkinson disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, and is clinically characterized by resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia and postural imbalance. These typical motor symptoms result from a selective degeneration of dopamine-producing neurons in the subs

  11. Constipation and risk of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Henderson, Victor W; Borghammer, Per;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine long-term associations between constipation and Parkinson's disease (PD) in men and women, we conducted a population-based cohort study using prospectively collected registry data on hospital contacts for constipation and PD, stratified by follow-up time and sex. METHODS: We...

  12. Reproductive factors and Parkinson's disease risk in Danish women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greene, N; Lassen, C F; Rugbjerg, K;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Parkinson's disease is more common in men than women by a ratio of about 1.5:1 and yet there is no consensus to date as to whether female reproductive factors including hormone use affect Parkinson's disease risk. Our objective was to examine the relationship between...... and fertile life length, age at menopause or post-menopausal hormone treatment was found. CONCLUSIONS: Reproductive factors related to women's early- to mid-reproductive lives appear to be predictive of subsequent Parkinson's disease risk whereas factors occurring later in life seem less important....

  13. Credit scores, cardiovascular disease risk, and human capital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israel, Salomon; Caspi, Avshalom; Belsky, Daniel W; Harrington, HonaLee; Hogan, Sean; Houts, Renate; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Sanders, Seth; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E

    2014-12-01

    Credit scores are the most widely used instruments to assess whether or not a person is a financial risk. Credit scoring has been so successful that it has expanded beyond lending and into our everyday lives, even to inform how insurers evaluate our health. The pervasive application of credit scoring has outpaced knowledge about why credit scores are such useful indicators of individual behavior. Here we test if the same factors that lead to poor credit scores also lead to poor health. Following the Dunedin (New Zealand) Longitudinal Study cohort of 1,037 study members, we examined the association between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and the underlying factors that account for this association. We find that credit scores are negatively correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Variation in household income was not sufficient to account for this association. Rather, individual differences in human capital factors—educational attainment, cognitive ability, and self-control—predicted both credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and accounted for ∼45% of the correlation between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk. Tracing human capital factors back to their childhood antecedents revealed that the characteristic attitudes, behaviors, and competencies children develop in their first decade of life account for a significant portion (∼22%) of the link between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk at midlife. We discuss the implications of these findings for policy debates about data privacy, financial literacy, and early childhood interventions. PMID:25404329

  14. Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Using Framingham Risk Score in Korean Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Jin-Young; Park, Wan

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer survivors. The aim of this study was to investigate the modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors and 10-year probability of the disease based on the Framingham risk score in cancer survivors, compared with the general population. Methods A total of 1,225 cancer survivors and 5,196 non-cancer controls who participated in the 2007–2013 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were enrolled. We assessed modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors including smoking, body mass index, physical inactivity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and elevated blood glucose level. The 10-year probability of cardiovascular disease was determined by applying the Framingham cardiovascular disease risk equation among cancer survivors and non-cancer controls, ranging from 30 to 74 years old who had no overt cardiovascular diseases. Results The proportion of subjects who had higher fasting glucose levels, hemoglobin A1c levels, systolic blood pressure, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and those who had lower high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels was significantly higher in the cancer survivors than in the non-cancer controls. The average 10-year probability of cardiovascular disease among the cancer survivors was higher than that in the non-cancer controls in both men and women. The average 10-year probability of cardiovascular disease in relation to the cancer type was significantly higher in patients with hepatic, colon, lung, breast, and gastric cancer. Conclusion Cancer survivors have a higher cardiovascular disease risk and 10-year probability of cardiovascular disease than non-cancer controls. Control of cardiovascular disease risk factors and implementation of a well-defined cardiovascular disease prevention program are needed for treating cancer survivors. PMID:27468342

  15. Postmenopausal Estrogen Therapy and Risk of Gallstone Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Maja Hellfritzsch; Erichsen, Rune; Frøslev, Trine;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Female gender and increasing age are key risk factors for gallstone disease; therefore, postmenopausal women are at high risk. Estrogen increases cholesterol saturation of bile and may further increase gallstone risk, but population-based evidence is sparse. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was...... to examine the association between postmenopausal estrogen therapy and risk of gallstone disease and the impact of duration of treatment and use of opposing progestin. STUDY DESIGN: We conducted a population-based case-control study. Cases were postmenopausal women (defined as aged ≥45 years) with...... gallstone disease identified in the period 1996-2010. For each case, we selected ten population controls matched to cases by age and sex. We defined exposure as any use of estrogen (opposed and unopposed by progestin). Cases/controls were categorized as current estrogen users if their last prescription was...

  16. Should Global Burden of Disease Estimates Include Depression as a Risk Factor for Coronary Heart Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baxter Amanda J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study estimates the premature mortality and disability of all major diseases and injuries. In addition it aims to quantify the risk that diseases and other factors play in the aetiology of disease and injuries. Mental disorders and coronary heart disease are both significant public health issues due to their high prevalence and considerable contribution to global disease burden. For the first time the Global Burden of Disease Study will aim to assess mental disorders as risk factors for coronary heart disease. We show here that current evidence satisfies established criteria for considering depression as an independent risk factor in development of coronary heart disease. A dose response relationship appears to exist and plausible biological pathways have been proposed. However, a number of challenges exist when conducting a rigorous assessment of the literature including heterogeneity issues, definition and measurement of depression and coronary heart disease, publication bias and residual confounding. Therefore, despite some limitations in the available data, it is now appropriate to consider major depression as a risk factor for coronary heart disease in the new Global Burden of Disease Study.

  17. Use of Chronic Kidney Disease to Enhance Prediction of Cardiovascular Risk in Those at Medium Risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yook Chin Chia

    Full Text Available Based on global cardiovascular (CV risk assessment for example using the Framingham risk score, it is recommended that those with high risk should be treated and those with low risk should not be treated. The recommendation for those of medium risk is less clear and uncertain. We aimed to determine whether factoring in chronic kidney disease (CKD will improve CV risk prediction in those with medium risk. This is a 10-year retrospective cohort study of 905 subjects in a primary care clinic setting. Baseline CV risk profile and serum creatinine in 1998 were captured from patients record. Framingham general cardiovascular disease risk score (FRS for each patient was computed. All cardiovascular disease (CVD events from 1998-2007 were captured. Overall, patients with CKD had higher FRS risk score (25.9% vs 20%, p = 0.001 and more CVD events (22.3% vs 11.9%, p = 0.002 over a 10-year period compared to patients without CKD. In patients with medium CV risk, there was no significant difference in the FRS score among those with and without CKD (14.4% vs 14.6%, p = 0.84 However, in this same medium risk group, patients with CKD had more CV events compared to those without CKD (26.7% vs 6.6%, p = 0.005. This is in contrast to patients in the low and high risk group where there was no difference in CVD events whether these patients had or did not have CKD. There were more CV events in the Framingham medium risk group when they also had CKD compared those in the same risk group without CKD. Hence factoring in CKD for those with medium risk helps to further stratify and identify those who are actually at greater risk, when treatment may be more likely to be indicated.

  18. Use of Chronic Kidney Disease to Enhance Prediction of Cardiovascular Risk in Those at Medium Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Yook Chin; Lim, Hooi Min; Ching, Siew Mooi

    2015-01-01

    Based on global cardiovascular (CV) risk assessment for example using the Framingham risk score, it is recommended that those with high risk should be treated and those with low risk should not be treated. The recommendation for those of medium risk is less clear and uncertain. We aimed to determine whether factoring in chronic kidney disease (CKD) will improve CV risk prediction in those with medium risk. This is a 10-year retrospective cohort study of 905 subjects in a primary care clinic setting. Baseline CV risk profile and serum creatinine in 1998 were captured from patients record. Framingham general cardiovascular disease risk score (FRS) for each patient was computed. All cardiovascular disease (CVD) events from 1998-2007 were captured. Overall, patients with CKD had higher FRS risk score (25.9% vs 20%, p = 0.001) and more CVD events (22.3% vs 11.9%, p = 0.002) over a 10-year period compared to patients without CKD. In patients with medium CV risk, there was no significant difference in the FRS score among those with and without CKD (14.4% vs 14.6%, p = 0.84) However, in this same medium risk group, patients with CKD had more CV events compared to those without CKD (26.7% vs 6.6%, p = 0.005). This is in contrast to patients in the low and high risk group where there was no difference in CVD events whether these patients had or did not have CKD. There were more CV events in the Framingham medium risk group when they also had CKD compared those in the same risk group without CKD. Hence factoring in CKD for those with medium risk helps to further stratify and identify those who are actually at greater risk, when treatment may be more likely to be indicated. PMID:26496190

  19. Framingham risk score with cardiovascular events in chronic kidney disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Chia Chen

    Full Text Available The Framingham Risk Score (FRS was developed to predict coronary heart disease in various populations, and it tended to under-estimate the risk in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients. Our objectives were to determine whether FRS was associated with cardiovascular events, and to evaluate the role of new risk markers and echocardiographic parameters when they were added to a FRS model. This study enrolled 439 CKD patients. The FRS is used to identify individuals categorically as "low" (4.7 cm, left ventricular hypertrophy or left ventricular ejection fraction<50% to the FRS model significantly improves the predictive values for cardiovascular events. In CKD patients, "high" risk categorized by FRS predicts cardiovascular events. Novel biomarkers and echocardiographic parameters provide additional predictive values for cardiovascular events. Future study is needed to assess whether risk assessment enhanced by using these biomarkers and echocardiographic parameters might contribute to more effective prediction and better care for patients.

  20. Risk based surveillance for vector borne diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Rene

    and new exotic diseases like Usutu and West Nile Virus may lead to outbreaks in the region. In the worst case the combined effect of climate change and globalization may potentially lead to European outbreaks of important zoonotic mosquito borne infections like Rift Valley Fever in cattle and Japanese...... Encephalitis in swine. Being able to model the impact of climate and environmental change on the transmission intensity of vector borne diseases is potentially a powerful tool to both monitor and prevent outbreaks in a cost effective way. The recent unexpected outbreaks of bluetongue and Schmallenberg virus...... is the direct result of climate change. The potential for virus transmission by biting midges was here modeled monthly for the Baltic See Region and the rest of Europe. The results showed that Baltic See Region has a lower transmission potential than most other areas in Europe. And the model identified...

  1. Incidence, Risk and Prognosis of Parkinson Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, Lonneke

    2006-01-01

    textabstractParkinson disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, and is clinically characterized by resting tremor, rigidity, bradykinesia and postural imbalance. These typical motor symptoms result from a selective degeneration of dopamine-producing neurons in the substantia nigra in the brain stem. Despite intensive research in the last decades, the pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for this process are still not completely understood and therapies for PD are as ye...

  2. Risk of primary biliary cirrhosis in patients with coeliac disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Thulstrup, Ane Marie; Blomqvist, P;

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several case reports, but only a few studies, have examined the coexistence of coeliac disease and primary biliary cirrhosis. AIM: To estimate the risk of primary biliary cirrhosis in two national cohorts of patients with coeliac disease in Denmark and Sweden. METHODS: Through record...... linkage all Danish patients hospitalised with coeliac disease were followed for possible occurrence of primary biliary cirrhosis from 1 January 1977 until 31 December 1992. All patients hospitalised with coeliac disease in Sweden from 1987 to 1996 were also followed in a separate analysis. RESULTS: A...... total of 896 patients with coeliac disease were identified in Denmark with a median follow up period of 9.1 years for a total of 8040 person-years at risk. Two cases of primary biliary cirrhosis were observed where 0.07 were expected, giving a standardised incidence ratio of 27.6 (95% confidence...

  3. Predicting disease risk using bootstrap ranking and classification algorithms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohad Manor

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS are widely used to search for genetic loci that underlie human disease. Another goal is to predict disease risk for different individuals given their genetic sequence. Such predictions could either be used as a "black box" in order to promote changes in life-style and screening for early diagnosis, or as a model that can be studied to better understand the mechanism of the disease. Current methods for risk prediction typically rank single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs by the p-value of their association with the disease, and use the top-associated SNPs as input to a classification algorithm. However, the predictive power of such methods is relatively poor. To improve the predictive power, we devised BootRank, which uses bootstrapping in order to obtain a robust prioritization of SNPs for use in predictive models. We show that BootRank improves the ability to predict disease risk of unseen individuals in the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium (WTCCC data and results in a more robust set of SNPs and a larger number of enriched pathways being associated with the different diseases. Finally, we show that combining BootRank with seven different classification algorithms improves performance compared to previous studies that used the WTCCC data. Notably, diseases for which BootRank results in the largest improvements were recently shown to have more heritability than previously thought, likely due to contributions from variants with low minimum allele frequency (MAF, suggesting that BootRank can be beneficial in cases where SNPs affecting the disease are poorly tagged or have low MAF. Overall, our results show that improving disease risk prediction from genotypic information may be a tangible goal, with potential implications for personalized disease screening and treatment.

  4. Autoimmune disease and risk for Parkinson disease A population-based case-control study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rugbjerg, K.; Friis, S.; Ritz, B.;

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Inflammatory mediators are increased in autoimmune diseases and may activate microglia and might cause an inflammatory state and degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the brain. Thus, we evaluated whether having an autoimmune disease increases the risk for developing Parkinson disease...... among inhabitants of Denmark who were alive at the date of the patient's diagnosis. The main exposure measure was a hospital diagnosis of 1 of 32 selected autoimmune diseases recorded 5 or more years before the index date in the files of the Danish Hospital Register. Results: We observed no overall...... association between a diagnosis of autoimmune disease and risk for subsequent PD (odds ratio 0.96, 95% confidence interval 0.85-1.08). In a subgroup of patients with autoimmune diseases with systemic involvement, primarily rheumatoid arthritis, we saw a decrease in risk for PD of 30%. Conclusions: Our results...

  5. Homocysteine as risk factor for coronary artery disease in pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakistani people belong to an ethnic group which has the highest rate of coronary artery disease. There are a number of risk factors for developing the coronary artery disease (CAD). Homocysteine, a sulphur containing amino acid, has been reported to be an independent risk factor for CAD. The present study was done to find out the role of hyperhomocysteinemia in the development of coronary artery disease in Pakistan. Materials and Methods: A cross sectional study was carried out. There were 40 angiographically diagnosed male patients of coronary artery disease between 30 - 40 years of age taken as cases and 40 age, sex and socioeconomically matched healthy subjects with normal carotid doppler study taken as controls. Fasting venous blood from cases and controls was taken in E.D.T.A vacationers. Plasma was analyzed for homo-cysteine level by enzyme immunoassay method. Results: Mean plasma concentration of homocysteine in coronary artery disease patients i.e. cases was 13.5 +- 6.8 mu mol/L and was higher than the mean for controls (10.76 +- 2.27 mu mol/L) to a significant extent. Conclusion: Hyperhomocysteinemia through inter-play with the classical cardiovascular risk factors may be aggravating the risk of coronary artery disease in Pakistani people. (author)

  6. Analysis of genetics and risk factors of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panpalli Ates, M; Karaman, Y; Guntekin, S; Ergun, M A

    2016-06-14

    Alzheimer's Disease is the leading neurodegenerative cause of dementia. The pathogenesis is not clearly understood yet, is believed to be the complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. Consequently vascular risk factors and Apolipoprotein E genotyping are increasingly gaining importance. This study aimed at assessing the relationships between Alzheimer's Disease and Apolipoprotein E phenotype and vascular risk factors. Patients diagnosed with "possible Alzheimer's Disease" in the Gazi University, Department of Neurology, were included in the study and age-matched volunteer patients who attended the polyclinic were included as a control group. In this study, the risk factors including low education level, smoking, hyperlipidemia, higher serum total cholesterol levels, and hyperhomocysteinemia were found to be statistically significantly more common in the Alzheimer's Disease group in comparison to the Control Group, while all Apolipoprotein E ε4/ε4 genotypes were found in the Alzheimer's Disease group. The presence of the Apolipoprotein E ε4 allele is believed to increase vascular risk factors as well as to affect Alzheimer's Disease directly. The biological indicators which are used in identifying the patients' genes will be probably used in the treatment plan of the patients in the future. PMID:27026590

  7. Risk for travel-associated legionnaires' disease, Europe, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauté, Julien; Zucs, Phillip; de Jong, Birgitta

    2012-11-01

    Legionnaires' disease is underreported in Europe; notification rates differ substantially among countries. Approximately 20% of reported cases are travel-associated. To assess the risk for travel-associated Legionnaires' disease (TALD) associated with travel patterns in European countries, we retrieved TALD surveillance data for 2009 from the European Surveillance System, and tourism denominator data from the Statistical Office of the European Union. Risk (number cases reported/number nights spent) was calculated by travel country. In 2009, the network reported 607 cases among European travelers, possibly associated with 825 accommodation sites in European Union countries. The overall risk associated with travel abroad was 0.3 cases/million nights. We observed an increasing trend in risk from northwestern to southeastern Europe; Greece had the highest risk (1.7). Our findings underscore the need for countries with high TALD risks to improve prevention and control of legionellosis; and for countries with high TALD risks, but low notification rates of Legionnaires' disease to improve diagnostics and reporting. PMID:23092591

  8. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and risk of infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Peter

    2009-01-01

    bacteria causing acute exacerbations. Also lung infections like pneumonia, lung abscess and empyema are more often seen in patients with COPD than in healthy subjects. With regard to extrapulmonary infections, it seems that COPD patients are not at higher risk of infection compared with subjects without......This review article focuses on the risk of infections in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Throughout the years there have been a number of studies describing the risk of pulmonary infections in patients with COPD, whereas only few studies have focused on the risk of...... infection outside the lungs. With increasing severity of COPD the risk of respiratory tract infection also increases. The impairment of the innate immune system is most likely responsible for both the colonization of respiratory tract with bacteria and for an increased risk of infection with new strains of...

  9. Risk prediction and risk reduction in patients with manifest arterial disease

    OpenAIRE

    Goessens, B.M.B.

    2006-01-01

    Risicovoorspelling en risicoverlaging bij patienten met manifest vaatlijden Engelstalig abstract The number of patients with clinical manifest arterial disease is increasing because of the aging of the population. Patients with manifest arterial disease have an increased risk of a new vascular event in the same or different arterial bed. Medical treatment of vascular risk factors (hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes mellitus) and lifestyle changes (healthy diets, exercise, quit smoking) ca...

  10. Assessment of Cardiovascular Disease Risk by using Framingham Risk Equation amongst the Residents of Ahmedabad City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonal Parikh, Manish Patel, Hemant Tiwari, D V Bala, Bhavin Joshi

    2013-01-01

    Results: The median 10-year probability of CHD was 2.9% (5.6% for men and 1.8% for women. One third (33.4% population above 30 years had CVD risk 20% or more. Males had significantly higher CVD risk as compared to females (20% of males & 4.5% of female had high CVD risk. Cardiovascular disease risk was also person with inadequate sleep & in executives. Conclusion- Higher risk in males & unskilled worker was mainly due to tobacco addiction while in executives it was mainly due to diabetes & obesity.

  11. A Coupled Biventricular Finite Element and Lumped Parameter Circulatory System Model of Heart Failure

    OpenAIRE

    Wenk, Jonathan F.; Ge, Liang; Zhang, Zhihong; Soleimani, Mehrdad; Potter, D Dean; Wallace, Arthur W.; Ratcliffe, Mark B.; Guccione, Julius M.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical modeling of the cardiovascular system is becoming an important tool for assessing the influence of heart disease and treatment therapies. In the current study we present an approach for modeling the interaction between the heart and circulatory system. This was accomplished by creating animal specific biventricular finite element models, which characterize the mechanical response of the heart, and coupling them to a lumped parameter model that represents the systemic and pulmonic ci...

  12. A coupled biventricular finite element and lumped-parameter circulatory system model of heart failure

    OpenAIRE

    Wenk, JF; Ge, L.; Zhang, Z.; Soleimani, M.; Potter, DD; Wallace, AW; Tseng, E; Ratcliffe, MB; Guccione, JM

    2012-01-01

    Numerical modelling of the cardiovascular system is becoming an important tool for assessing the influence of heart disease and treatment therapies. In the current study, we present an approach for modelling the interaction between the heart and the circulatory system. This was accomplished by creating animal-specific biventricular finite element (FE) models, which characterise the mechanical response of the heart, and by coupling them to a lumped-parameter model that represents the systemic ...

  13. Pathophysiology of cerebral circulatory disorders in idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -score images, revealed a reduction or disappearance of the hypoperfusion site in 19 of 31 (61.3%) cases, either no-change or a shift of the hypoperfusion site in 12 of 31 (38.7%) cases, and a correlation between the pattern of cortical blood flow reduction on ARG method and the pattern of cerebral cortex hypoperfusion on 3D-SSP Z-score images after surgery. Cerebral circulatory disorders in iNPH manifest as either of two pathophysiological conditions: the ''circulatory disorder of the cerebral cortical region'' and the ''circulatory disorder of the thalamus-basal ganglia region.'' Various patterns develop according to the disease stage. (author)

  14. Increased risk of intestinal cancer in Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jess, Tine; Gamborg, Michael; Matzen, Peter;

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The risk of intestinal malignancy in Crohn's disease (CD) remains uncertain since risk estimates vary worldwide. The global CD population is growing and there is a demand for better knowledge of prognosis of this disease. Hence, the aim of the present study was to conduct a meta-analysis...... of population-based data on intestinal cancer risk in CD. METHODS: The MEDLINE search engine and abstracts from international conferences were searched for the relevant literature by use of explicit search criteria. All papers fulfilling the strict inclusion criteria were scrutinized for data on...... population size, time of follow-up, and observed to expected cancer rates. STATA meta-analysis software was used to perform overall pooled risk estimates (standardized incidence ratio (SIR), observed/expected) and meta-regression analyses of the influence of specific variables on SIR. RESULTS: Six papers...

  15. Disease management mitigates risk of pathogen transmission from maricultured salmonids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Simon R. M.; Bruno, David W.; Madsen, Lone;

    2015-01-01

    increased risk of exposure to neighbouring farms is inversely related to distance from and directly related to biomass at the source of infection. Epidemiological techniques integrating data from oceanography, diagnostics and pathogen shedding rates and viability contribute to improved understanding of...... management thresholds. For wild populations, risk of pathogen spillback is estimated from farm-based epidemiological data; however, validation, particularly for ISAV and SAV, is required using direct surveillance....... pathogen transmission pathways among farms and permit the designation of areas of risk associated with sources of infection. Occupation of an area of risk may increase the likelihood of exposure, infection and disease among susceptible fish. Disease mitigation in mariculture occurs at 2 scales: area...

  16. Increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest in obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warnier, Miriam Jacoba; Blom, Marieke Tabo; Bardai, Abdennasser;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to determine whether (1) patients with obstructive pulmonary disease (OPD) have an increased risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) due to ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation (VT/VF), and (2) the SCA risk is mediated by cardiovascular risk-profile and/or respiratory drug use....... METHODS: A community-based case-control study was performed, with 1310 cases of SCA of the ARREST study and 5793 age, sex and SCA-date matched non-SCA controls from the PHARMO database. Only incident SCA cases, age older than 40 years, that resulted from unequivocal cardiac causes...... with electrocardiographic documentation of VT/VF were included. Conditional logistic regression analysis was used to assess the association between SCA and OPD. Pre-specified subgroup analyses were performed regarding age, sex, cardiovascular risk-profile, disease severity, and current use of respiratory drugs. RESULTS...

  17. Pregnancy and the risk of autoimmune disease: An exploration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-01-31

    Fetal microchimerism is the study of persisting fetal cells in the mother years after pregnancy and the purported implications for her health and longevity. Due to the association between pregnancy and autoimmune disease (AID), and the preponderance of these diseases in women, laboratory studies have for years attempted to link microchimeric fetal cells with the onset of AID after pregnancy. This new study gave us the opportunity to examine for the first time if this theory could be proven clinically in a large cohort of women. By examining whether different types of delivery affected the onset of AID, we also aimed to indirectly relate this finding to fetal microchimerism. The results did suggest an association between pregnancy and the risk of subsequent maternal AID, with increased risks noted after caesarean section (CS) and decreased risks after abortion. This is the first epidemiological study on the risk of AID following pregnancy.

  18. Risk factors and risk index of cardiac events in pregnant women with heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hua; HUANG Tao-tao; LIN Jian-hua

    2012-01-01

    Background Pregnant women with heart disease are at high risk.Studies of risk factors of these patients are of great significance to improve maternal and fetal outcomes.In this paper,we try to discuss the main risk factors of cardiac events in pregnant women with heart disease and to establish a risk assessment system.Methods A retrospective analysis was carried out for pregnancies in 1741 women with heart disease who delivered in Shanghai Obstetrical Cardiology Intensive Care Center between January 1993 and September 2010.A Logistic regression model was used to identify independent risk factors of cardiac events and calculate the risk index in pregnant women with heart disease.Results The composition of heart disease in pregnant women was arrhythmia (n=662,38.00%),congenital heart disease (CHD; n=529,30.40%),cardiomyopathy (n=327,18.80%),rheumatic heart disease (RHD; n=151,8.70%),and cardiopathy induced by pre-eclampsia (n=53,3.00%).Main cardiac events were heart failure (n=110,6.32%),symptomatic arrhythmia needing medication (n=43,2.47%),cardiac arrest (n=2,0.11%),syncope (n=3,0.17%),and maternal death (n=10,0.57%).Six independent risk factors to predict cardiac events in pregnant women with heart disease were cardiac events before pregnancy (heart failure,severe arrhythmia,cardiac shock,etc.,P=0.000),New York Heart Association (NYHA) class >ll (P=0.000),oxygen saturation <90% (P=0.018),pulmonary artery hypertention (PAH)>50 mmHg (P=0.025),cyanotic heart disease without surgical correction (P=0.015),and reduced left ventricular systolic function (ejection fraction <40%,P=0.003).Every risk factor was calculated as 1 score.The incidence of cardiac events in patients with scores 0,1,2,3,and ≥4 was 2.10%,31.61%,61.25%,68.97%,and 100.00% respectively.Conclusions Pregnancy with heart disease could lead to undesirable pregnancy outcomes.The risk of cardiac events in pregnant women with heart disease could be assessed by risk

  19. Sacrococcygeal pilonidal disease: analysis of previously proposed risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Harlak

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Sacrococcygeal pilonidal disease is a source of one of the most common surgical problems among young adults. While male gender, obesity, occupations requiring sitting, deep natal clefts, excessive body hair, poor body hygiene and excessive sweating are described as the main risk factors for this disease, most of these need to be verified with a clinical trial. The present study aimed to evaluate the value and effect of these factors on pilonidal disease. METHOD: Previously proposed main risk factors were evaluated in a prospective case control study that included 587 patients with pilonidal disease and 2,780 healthy control patients. RESULTS: Stiffness of body hair, number of baths and time spent seated per day were the three most predictive risk factors. Adjusted odds ratios were 9.23, 6.33 and 4.03, respectively (p<0.001. With an adjusted odds ratio of 1.3 (p<.001, body mass index was another risk factor. Family history was not statistically different between the groups and there was no specific occupation associated with the disease. CONCLUSIONS: Hairy people who sit down for more than six hours a day and those who take a bath two or less times per week are at a 219-fold increased risk for sacrococcygeal pilonidal disease than those without these risk factors. For people with a great deal of hair, there is a greater need for them to clean their intergluteal sulcus. People who engage in work that requires sitting in a seat for long periods of time should choose more comfortable seats and should also try to stand whenever possible.

  20. Predicting disease risks from highly imbalanced data using random forest

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty Sounak; Khalilia Mohammed; Popescu Mihail

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background We present a method utilizing Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) dataset for predicting disease risk of individuals based on their medical diagnosis history. The presented methodology may be incorporated in a variety of applications such as risk management, tailored health communication and decision support systems in healthcare. Methods We employed the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) data, which is publicly available through Healthcare Cost and Utilization Pro...

  1. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and the Relationship of Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evrim Çakır

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a common endocrine disorder affecting at least 5-10% of women of reproductive age. PCOS is characterized by hyperandrogenism, menstrual disturbance, anovulation, infertility and obesity and, also associated with increased number of cardiovascular risk factors and early atherosclerosis. Hyperinsulinemia is a frequent finding in PCOS patients and has cause-and-effect relationship with low-grade chronic inflammation and increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Turk Jem 2013; 17: 33-7

  2. Is Procidentia a Distinct Disease? Comparison of Risk Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Serdar Aydin

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Total prolapse%u2014in other words, procidentia%u2014refers to the complete eversion of the total length of the vagina. Age, pregnancy, delivery, previous pelvic surgery, and conditions that increase intra-abdominal pressure, such as chronic pulmonary disease, constipation, and obesity are risk factors for pelvic organ prolapse. This study aims to assess the incidence of anterior, posterior, apical, and total prolapse and to determine differences in the risk factors for different vaginal...

  3. Association between Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases and the Risk of Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Kang Lu; Hao-Kuang Wang; Chih-Ching Yeh; Chih-Yuan Huang; Pi-Shan Sung; Liang-Chao Wang; Chih-Hsin Muo; Fung-Chang Sung; Han-Jung Chen; Ying-Chun Li; Li-Ching Chang; Kuen-Jer Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Aim. Autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARD) are characterized by systemic inflammation and may affect multiple organs and cause vascular events such as ischemic stroke and acute myocardial infarction. However, the association between ARD and increased risk of dementia is uncertain. This is a retrospective cohort study to investigate and compare the risk of dementia between patients clinically diagnosed with ARD and non-ARD patients during a 5-year follow-up period. Methods. Data were obtained fr...

  4. Trans fatty acids – A risk factor for cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Mohammad Perwaiz

    2014-01-01

    Trans fatty acids (TFA) are produced either by hydrogenation of unsaturated oils or by biohydrogenation in the stomach of ruminant animals. Vanaspati ghee and margarine have high contents of TFA. A number of studies have shown an association of TFA consumption and increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This increased risk is because TFA increase the ratio of LDL cholesterol to HDL cholesterol. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and World Health Organization have ...

  5. Racial/ethnic residential segregation and cardiovascular disease risk

    OpenAIRE

    Kershaw, Kiarri N.; Albrecht, Sandra S.

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of research has examined whether racial/ethnic residential segregation contributes to health disparities, but recent findings in the literature, particularly with respect to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, have not been summarized. This review provides an overview of findings from studies of racial/ethnic residential segregation of non-Hispanic blacks and Hispanics with CVD risk published between January 2011 and July 2014. The majority of studies of black segregation showed...

  6. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and the Relationship of Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Evrim Çakır; Erman Çakal; Mustafa Özbek; Mustafa Şahin; Tuncay Delibaşı

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder affecting at least 5-10% of women of reproductive age. PCOS is characterized by hyperandrogenism, menstrual disturbance, anovulation, infertility and obesity and, also associated with increased number of cardiovascular risk factors and early atherosclerosis. Hyperinsulinemia is a frequent finding in PCOS patients and has cause-and-effect relationship with low-grade chronic inflammation and increased risk of cardiovascular disease...

  7. Genetic Risk Assessment of Periodontal Disease in Healthy Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Carinci, F.; A. Palmieri; Girardi, A; Cura, F; Scapoli, L; D. Lauritano

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: About 30% of the general population manifests periodontal disease (PD). Patients with parents with a compromised periodontal condition may need prosthetic or implantology treatment (PIT), therefore those patients are at increased risk of developing PD during or after dental treatment. Hence the use of a genetic test for identify those most at risk of PD and submit them to very closely oral hygiene protocols, is mandatory. PIT of these patients must be done safely having previous...

  8. Major life events and risk of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Naja Hulvej; Hansen, Johnni; Schernhammer, Eva;

    2010-01-01

    major life events are risk factors for Parkinson's disease. Between 1986 and 2006, we identified 13,695 patients with a (PD) primary diagnosis of PD in the Danish National Hospital Register. Each case was frequency matched by age and gender to five population controls. Information on major life events...... experienced life events was unexpected but might suggest a general "risk avoidance behavior" in Parkinson's patients....

  9. Risk factors for small bowel cancer in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashner, B A

    1992-08-01

    Suspected risk factors for adenocarcinoma of the small bowel in Crohn's disease include surgically excluded small bowel loops, chronic fistulous disease, and male sex. Review of all seven University of Chicago cases failed to confirm any suspected risk factor. A case-control study was performed to identify possible alternatives. Each case was matched to four randomly selected controls from an inflammatory bowel disease registry matched for year of birth, sex, and confirmed small bowel Crohn's disease. Three factors were significantly associated with the development of cancer: (1) Four cancers developed in the jejunum, and jejunal Crohn's disease was associated with the development of cancer [odds ratio (OR) 8.0, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.6-39.3]. (2) There was an association between the development of cancer and occupations known to be associated with an increased colorectal cancer risk (OR 20.3, CI 2.7-150.5). Three cases (a chemist with exposure to halogenated aromatic compounds and aliphatic amines, a pipefitter with exposure to asbestos, and a machinist with exposures to cutting oils, solvents, and abrasives) and one of 28 controls (a fireman with multiple hazardous exposures) had an occupational risk factor. (3) Among medications taken for at least six months, only 6-mercaptopurine use was associated with cancer (OR 10.8, CI 1.1-108.7). In conclusion, proximal small bowel disease, 6-mercaptopurine use, and hazardous occupations are associated with cancer of the small bowel in patients with Crohn's disease and can be added to the list of suspected risk factors. PMID:1499440

  10. Estimating the risk of cardio vascular diseases among pakistani diabetics using uk pds risk engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of risk estimation of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) is helpful for clinician to identifying high risk populations for their effective treatment. Latest studies recommended only initiating cardio-protective treatment in diabetic patients based on personalized CHD risk estimates so as to reduce undue harm from overly aggressive risk factor modification. The United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UK PDS) Risk Engine is a widely used tool to assess the risk of Cardio Vascular diseases (CVD) in diabetics. The literature search so far did not reveal any study of risk assessment among Pakistani Diabetics. Methods: This descriptive study is based on the data of 470 type-2 diabetics seen in Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Services Institute of Medical Sciences, Lahore during 2011. The data of these 470 patients was analyzed through UKPDS Risk Engine. CHD risk was calculated. Results: The 10 years risk of CHD, fatal CHD, stroke and fatal stroke was 9.4%, 4.4%, 1.7% and 0.2% respectively. Conclusions: The present study show a lower risk of CVD occurring among Pakistani diabetics as compared to studies from western countries. (author)

  11. Allergen-specific immunotherapy and risk of autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Madsen, Flemming; Skaaby, Tea

    2012-01-01

    After 100 years of experience with allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), an issue that is still unresolved is whether SIT can act as a trigger of, or as a risk factor for, autoimmune disease. We searched the literature for evidence on this topic.......After 100 years of experience with allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), an issue that is still unresolved is whether SIT can act as a trigger of, or as a risk factor for, autoimmune disease. We searched the literature for evidence on this topic....

  12. Risk factors for lung diseases after renal transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ventsislava P Pencheva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lung diseases are one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality after renal transplantation. The aim of the study is to define the risk factors for infectious and noninfectious pulmonary complications in kidney transplant patients. Materials and Methods: We prospectively studied 267 patients after renal transplantation. The kidney recipients were followed-up for the development of pulmonary complications for a period of 7 years. Different noninvasive and invasive diagnostic tests were used in cases suspected of lung disease. Results: The risk factors associated with the development of pulmonary complications were diabetes mellitus (odds ratio [OR] = 4.60; P = 0.001, arterial hypertension (OR = 1.95; P = 0.015, living related donor (OR = 2.69; P = 0.004, therapy for acute graft rejection (OR = 2.06; P = 0.038, immunosuppressive regimens that includes mycophenolate (OR = 2.40; P = 0.011, azathioprine (OR = 2.25; P = 0.023, and tacrolimus (OR = 1.83; P = 0.041. The only factor associated with the lower risk of complications was a positive serology test for Cytomegalovirus of the recipient before transplantation (OR = 0.1412; P = 0.001. Conclusion: The risk factors can be used to identify patients at increased risk for posttransplant lung diseases. Monitoring of higher-risk patients allow timely diagnosis and early adequate treatment and can reduce the morbidity and mortality after renal transplantation.

  13. General epistatic models of the risk of complex diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yun S; Wang, Fulton; Slatkin, Montgomery

    2010-12-01

    The range of possible gene interactions in a multilocus model of a complex inherited disease is studied by exploring genotype-specific risks subject to the constraint that the allele frequencies and marginal risks are known. We quantify the effect of gene interactions by defining the interaction ratio, CR=KR/KRI, where KR is the recurrence risk to relatives with relationship R for the true model and KRI is the recurrence risk to relatives for a multiplicative model with the same marginal risks. We use a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) procedure to sample from the space of possible models. We find that the average of CR increases with the number of loci for both low frequency (p=0.03) and higher frequency (p=0.25) causative alleles. Furthermore, the probability that CR>1 is nearly 1. Similar results are obtained when more weight is given to risk models that are closer to the comparable multiplicative model. These results imply that, in general, gene interactions will result in greater heritability of a complex inherited disease than is expected on the basis of a multiplicative model of interactions and hence may provide a partial explanation for the problem of missing heritability of complex diseases. PMID:20855570

  14. Vitamin D and the risk of dementia and Alzheimer disease

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas J Littlejohns; Henley, William E.; Lang, Iain A.; Annweiler, Cedric; Beauchet, Olivier; Chaves, Paulo H. M.; Fried, Linda; Kestenbaum, Bryan R.; Kuller, Lewis H.; Langa, Kenneth M.; Lopez, Oscar L.; Kos, Katarina; Soni, Maya; Llewellyn, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether low vitamin D concentrations are associated with an increased risk of incident all-cause dementia and Alzheimer disease. Methods: One thousand six hundred fifty-eight elderly ambulatory adults free from dementia, cardiovascular disease, and stroke who participated in the US population–based Cardiovascular Health Study between 1992–1993 and 1999 were included. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass...

  15. Markers of Inflammation and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeem Sarwar; Thompson, Alexander J.; Emanuele Di Angelantonio

    2009-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of global mortality, with coronary heart disease (CHD) its major manifestation. Although inflammation, the body’s response to noxious stimuli, is implicated in several stages of CHD development, the relevance of circulating levels of markers of inflammation to CHD risk remains uncertain. This review summarizes available epidemiological evidence for four emerging inflammatory markers implicated in CHD (fibrinogen, C-reactive protein, lipoprotein-asso...

  16. Risk based culling for highly infectious diseases of livestock

    OpenAIRE

    te Beest Dennis E; Hagenaars Thomas J; Stegeman J; Koopmans Marion PG; van Boven Michiel

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The control of highly infectious diseases of livestock such as classical swine fever, foot-and-mouth disease, and avian influenza is fraught with ethical, economic, and public health dilemmas. Attempts to control outbreaks of these pathogens rely on massive culling of infected farms, and farms deemed to be at risk of infection. Conventional approaches usually involve the preventive culling of all farms within a certain radius of an infected farm. Here we propose a novel culling strat...

  17. Age, APOE and sex: Triad of risk of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Brandalyn C; Thompson, Paul M; Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    2016-06-01

    Age, apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE) and chromosomal sex are well-established risk factors for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD; AD). Over 60% of persons with AD harbor at least one APOE-ε4 allele. The sex-based prevalence of AD is well documented with over 60% of persons with AD being female. Evidence indicates that the APOE-ε4 risk for AD is greater in women than men, which is particularly evident in heterozygous women carrying one APOE-ε4 allele. Paradoxically, men homozygous for APOE-ε4 are reported to be at greater risk for mild cognitive impairment and AD. Herein, we discuss the complex interplay between the three greatest risk factors for Alzheimer's disease, age, APOE-ε4 genotype and chromosomal sex. We propose that the convergence of these three risk factors, and specifically the bioenergetic aging perimenopause to menopause transition unique to the female, creates a risk profile for AD unique to the female. Further, we discuss the specific risk of the APOE-ε4 positive male which appears to emerge early in the aging process. Evidence for impact of the triad of AD risk factors is most evident in the temporal trajectory of AD progression and burden of pathology in relation to APOE genotype, age and sex. Collectively, the data indicate complex interactions between age, APOE genotype and gender that belies a one size fits all approach and argues for a precision medicine approach that integrates across the three main risk factors for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26969397

  18. Evaluation of the Families SHARE workbook: an educational tool outlining disease risk and healthy guidelines to reduce risk of heart disease, diabetes, breast cancer and colorectal cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Koehly, Laura M.; Morris, Bronwyn A.; Skapinsky, Kaley; Goergen, Andrea; Ludden, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Background Common diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer are etiologically complex with multiple risk factors (e.g., environment, genetic, lifestyle). These risk factors tend to cluster in families, making families an important social context for intervention and lifestyle-focused disease prevention. The Families Sharing Health Assessment and Risk Evaluation (SHARE) workbook was designed as an educational tool outlining family health history based risk of heart disease, type 2 d...

  19. Common polygenic variation enhances risk prediction for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escott-Price, Valentina; Sims, Rebecca; Bannister, Christian; Harold, Denise; Vronskaya, Maria; Majounie, Elisa; Badarinarayan, Nandini; Morgan, Kevin; Passmore, Peter; Holmes, Clive; Powell, John; Brayne, Carol; Gill, Michael; Mead, Simon; Goate, Alison; Cruchaga, Carlos; Lambert, Jean-Charles; van Duijn, Cornelia; Maier, Wolfgang; Ramirez, Alfredo; Holmans, Peter; Jones, Lesley; Hardy, John; Seshadri, Sudha; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Amouyel, Philippe; Williams, Julie

    2015-12-01

    The identification of subjects at high risk for Alzheimer's disease is important for prognosis and early intervention. We investigated the polygenic architecture of Alzheimer's disease and the accuracy of Alzheimer's disease prediction models, including and excluding the polygenic component in the model. This study used genotype data from the powerful dataset comprising 17 008 cases and 37 154 controls obtained from the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project (IGAP). Polygenic score analysis tested whether the alleles identified to associate with disease in one sample set were significantly enriched in the cases relative to the controls in an independent sample. The disease prediction accuracy was investigated in a subset of the IGAP data, a sample of 3049 cases and 1554 controls (for whom APOE genotype data were available) by means of sensitivity, specificity, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) and positive and negative predictive values. We observed significant evidence for a polygenic component enriched in Alzheimer's disease (P = 4.9 × 10(-26)). This enrichment remained significant after APOE and other genome-wide associated regions were excluded (P = 3.4 × 10(-19)). The best prediction accuracy AUC = 78.2% (95% confidence interval 77-80%) was achieved by a logistic regression model with APOE, the polygenic score, sex and age as predictors. In conclusion, Alzheimer's disease has a significant polygenic component, which has predictive utility for Alzheimer's disease risk and could be a valuable research tool complementing experimental designs, including preventative clinical trials, stem cell selection and high/low risk clinical studies. In modelling a range of sample disease prevalences, we found that polygenic scores almost doubles case prediction from chance with increased prediction at polygenic extremes. PMID:26490334

  20. The relationship of vitamin D status to risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaaby, Tea

    2015-02-01

    Vitamin D is essential for bone mineralisation, but a growing body of evidence points at a broader role; vitamin D deficiency has been found to be associated with mortality and several diseases ranging from cardiovascular disease to autoimmune diseases and liver diseases. The evidence is, however, inconclusive and the possible pathways remain unresolved. The aims of the thesis were to investigate the association of vitamin D status to 5-year changes in cardiovascular risk factors such as blood pressure, lipid profile, the metabolic syndrome and urine albumin creatinine ratio (UACR); the association of a known genetic determinant of vitamin D status to cardiovascular risk factors; the association of vitamin D status to the incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and all-cause mortality; and the association of vitamin D status to cause-specific mortality. Data from the 3 population-based studies Monica10 (n = 2,656, 1993-94), Inter99 (n = 6,794, 1999-2001) and Health2006 (n = 3,471, 2006-2008) conducted at the Research Centre for Prevention and Health were used. The studies included questionnaires, physical examinations, and blood tests. Vitamin D status was measured at baseline. Participants were genotyped for the most frequent filaggrin mutations. Registry-based diagnoses and causes of death were obtained from The Danish National Patient Register and the Danish Registry of Causes of Death, respectively. Linear, logistic, Cox and instrumental variable regressions were used to model the associations between vitamin D status and cardiovascular risk factors, disease and mortality. With a 10 year mean follow-up time, we found a significant association between vitamin D status and all-cause mortality with a HR=0.95 (p = 0.005) per 10 nmol/l higher vitamin D level. We found no association between vitamin D status and incidence of ischaemic heart disease or stroke (HR = 1.01, p = 0.442 and HR = 1.00, p = 0.920, respectively). We found a baseline level of vitamin D that

  1. Longterm results of liver transplantation from donation after circulatory death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, Joris J; Detry, Olivier; Putter, Hein; Rogiers, Xavier; Porte, Robert J; van Hoek, Bart; Pirenne, Jacques; Metselaar, Herold J; Lerut, Jan P; Ysebaert, Dirk K; Lucidi, Valerio; Troisi, Roberto I; Samuel, Undine; den Dulk, A Claire; Ringers, Jan; Braat, Andries E

    2016-08-01

    Donation after circulatory death (DCD) liver transplantation (LT) may imply a risk for decreased graft survival, caused by posttransplantation complications such as primary nonfunction or ischemic-type biliary lesions. However, similar survival rates for DCD and donation after brain death (DBD) LT have been reported. The objective of this study is to determine the longterm outcome of DCD LT in the Eurotransplant region corrected for the Eurotransplant donor risk index (ET-DRI). Transplants performed in Belgium and the Netherlands (January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2007) in adult recipients were included. Graft failure was defined as either the date of recipient death or retransplantation whichever occurred first (death-uncensored graft survival). Mean follow-up was 7.2 years. In total, 126 DCD and 1264 DBD LTs were performed. Kaplan-Meier survival analyses showed different graft survival for DBD and DCD at 1 year (77.7% versus 74.8%, respectively; P = 0.71), 5 years (65.6% versus 54.4%, respectively; P = 0.02), and 10 years (47.3% versus 44.2%, respectively; P = 0.55; log-rank P = 0.038). Although there was an overall significant difference, the survival curves almost reach each other after 10 years, which is most likely caused by other risk factors being less in DCD livers. Patient survival was not significantly different (P = 0.59). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed a hazard ratio of 1.7 (P end of circulation until aortic cold perfusion, over 25 minutes was associated with a lower graft survival in univariate analysis of all DCD transplants (P = 0.002). In conclusion, DCD LT has an increased risk for diminished graft survival compared to DBD. There was no significant difference in patient survival. DCD allografts with a first WIT > 25 minutes have an increased risk for a decrease in graft survival. Liver Transplantation 22 1107-1114 2016 AASLD. PMID:27028896

  2. Effect of particulate matter, atmospheric gases, temperature, and humidity on respiratory and circulatory diseases’ trends in Lisbon, Portugal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freitas, M.C.; Pacheco, A.M.G.; Verburg, T.G.; Wolterbeek, H.T.

    2009-01-01

    This study addresses the significant effects of both well-known contaminants (particles, gases) and less-studied variables (temperature, humidity) on serious, if relatively common, respiratory and circulatory diseases. The area of study is Lisbon, Portugal, and time series of health outcome (daily a

  3. A risk factor for female fertility and pregnancy: celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stazi, A V; Mantovani, A

    2000-12-01

    Celiac disease is a genetically-based intolerance to gluten. In the past, celiac disease has been considered a rare disease of infancy characterized by chronic diarrhea and delayed growth. Besides the overt enteropathy, there are many other forms which appear later in life; target organs are not limited to the gut, but include liver, thyroid, skin and reproductive tract. It is now recognized that celiac disease is a relatively frequent disorder; the overall prevalence is at least 1:300 in Western Europe. Celiac disease may impair the reproductive life of affected women, eliciting delayed puberty, infertility, amenorrhea and precocious menopause. Clinical and epidemiological studies show that female patients with celiac disease are at higher risk of spontaneous abortions, low birth weight of the newborn and reduced duration of lactation. No adequate studies are available on the rate of birth defects in the progeny of affected women; however, celiac disease induces malabsorption and deficiency of factors essential for organogenesis, e.g. iron, folic acid and vitamin K. The overall evidence suggests that celiac disease patients can be a group particularly susceptible to reproductive toxicants; however, the pathogenesis of celiac disease-related reproductive disorders still awaits clarification. At present, like the other pathologies associated with celiac disease, the possible prevention or treatment of reproductive effects can only be achieved through a life-long maintenance of a gluten-free diet. PMID:11228068

  4. Parity, breastfeeding and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Sanne Ae; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Wood, Angela M;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: There is uncertainty about the direction and magnitude of the associations between parity, breastfeeding and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). We examined the separate and combined associations of parity and breastfeeding practices with the incidence of CHD later in life among...

  5. Hereditary hemochromatosis and risk of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellervik, Christina; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Grande, Peer;

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We tested the hypothesis that the hereditary hemochromatosis genotypes C282Y/C282Y, C282Y/H63D, or C282Y/wild-type are risk factors for ischemic heart disease (IHD) and myocardial infarction (MI). METHODS AND RESULTS: We performed a prospective study of 9178 individuals from the Danish...

  6. Ankylosing spondylitis and risk of ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Essers, Ivette; Stolwijk, Carmen; Boonen, Annelies;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the incidence and risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI), including the role of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID), in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) compared with population controls. METHODS: All patients with...

  7. Inflammatory cytokines and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaptoge, Stephen; Seshasai, Sreenivasa Rao Kondapally; Gao, Pei;

    2014-01-01

    Because low-grade inflammation may play a role in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD), and pro-inflammatory cytokines govern inflammatory cascades, this study aimed to assess the associations of several pro-inflammatory cytokines and CHD risk in a new prospective study, including meta...

  8. Kidney Stones and the Risk for Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Rule, Andrew D.; Bergstralh, Eric J.; Melton, L. Joseph; Li, Xujian; Amy L. Weaver; Lieske, John C.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: Kidney stones lead to chronic kidney disease (CKD) in people with rare hereditary disorders (e.g., primary hyperoxaluria, cystinuria), but it is unknown whether kidney stones are an important risk factor for CKD in the general population.

  9. Teachers' Risk Perception and Needs in Addressing Infectious Disease Outbreak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Emmy M. Y.; Cheng, May M. H.; Lo, S.K.

    2010-01-01

    The outbreak of the Influenza A (H1N1) virus has led to numerous precautionary school closures in several countries. No research is available on the school teachers' perceptions as a health protective resource in controlling communicable disease outbreaks. The purposes of this study were to examine the risk perception, the perceived understanding…

  10. Allergen-specific immunotherapy and risk of autoimmune disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linneberg, Allan; Madsen, Flemming; Skaaby, Tea

    2012-01-01

    After 100 years of experience with allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT), an issue that is still unresolved is whether SIT can act as a trigger of, or as a risk factor for, autoimmune disease. We searched the literature for evidence on this topic....

  11. RISK FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE IN PRISON POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Soares de OliveiraI

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to make a reflection about the risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease in the prison population, as well as the performance of the health care team in these spaces. It is a reflective approach, literature that included e-journal articles, published in the year 2003 to 2011, indexed at LILACS, Scielo, MEDLINE, and available in full. Textbooks were also consulted and ordinances of Ministry of health and Justice of Brazil. Used the descriptors "risk factors," "cardiovascular disease" and "Prisoners". It was noted that the current situation of overcrowding in prisons is, with unhealthy environment, which imposes risks the health of prisoners. The living habits, such as use of alcohol and drugs (cocaine, marijuana, tranquillizers and tobacco, increases the risk for cardiovascular disease. In addition, the authors emphasize, a priori, the low level of schooling of the detainees. The performance of the health care team must be based on educational practices for promoting and monitoring the health, with multidisciplinary support. Further studies need to be done in order to investigate the incidence of cardiovascular diseases, as well as evidence of the effectiveness of health care for this population.

  12. Does Poor Sleep Raise Risk for Alzheimer's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About ADEAR Does poor sleep raise risk for Alzheimer’s disease? February 29, 2016 Studies confirm what many ... prevent Alzheimer’s. Which comes first, poor sleep or Alzheimer’s? The chicken-and-egg question is whether Alzheimer’s- ...

  13. Urinary and plasma magnesium and risk of ischemic heart disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joosten, Michel M.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; van der Harst, Pim; Geleijnse, Johanna M.; Feskens, Edith J. M.; Navis, Gerjan; Bakker, Stephan J. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Previous studies on dietary magnesium and risk of ischemic heart disease (IHD) have yielded inconsistent results, in part because of a lack of direct measures of actual magnesium uptake. Urinary excretion of magnesium, an indicator of dietary magnesium uptake, might provide more consiste

  14. Dietary fat and risk of coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Marianne U; Overvad, Kim; Dyerberg, Jørn;

    2004-01-01

    In a 16-year follow-up study (ending in 1998) of 3,686 Danish men and women aged 30-71 years at recruitment, the association between energy intake from dietary fat and the risk of coronary heart disease was evaluated while assessing the possible modifying role of gender and age. In the models use...

  15. Dietary Risk Factors and Their Modification in Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Robert W.

    1988-01-01

    Provides an overview of dietary risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including diet sodium intake for hypertension and dietary fat and cholesterol for hypercholesterolemia, exacerbation of these conditions by obesity, and intervention strategies for their modification. Describes clinical strategies for modifying diet: education, skills…

  16. COPD stage and risk of hospitalization for infectious disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benfield, Thomas; Lange, Peter; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Respiratory tract infections are a frequent complication of COPD, but little is known about the incidence, association, and risk of infectious diseases related to impaired lung function. METHODS: Participants in the Copenhagen City Heart Study had lung function measured at baseline......, and were followed for up to 25 years. All hospitalizations due to any infection were identified through registry linkage. Impaired lung function was defined according to the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) staging system. MAIN RESULTS: A total of 3,333 infectious disease......, or other infectious diseases. CONCLUSIONS: The presence of obstructive lung disease is a significant predictor of IDH caused by respiratory tract infections, but not of hospitalizations due to infections outside the respiratory system....

  17. Arterial hypertension, microalbuminuria, and risk of ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J S; Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Strandgaard, S;

    2000-01-01

    , diabetes mellitus, and renal or urinary tract disease. Untreated arterial hypertension or borderline hypertension was present in 204 subjects, who were followed until 1993 by the National Hospital and Death Certificate Registers with respect to development of ischemic heart disease. During 1978 person...... hypertensive subjects. In 1983 and 1984, blood pressure, urinary albumin/creatinine concentration ratio, plasma total and HDL cholesterol levels, body mass index, and smoking status were obtained in a population-based sample of 2085 subjects, aged 30 to 60 years, who were free from ischemic heart disease......-years, 18 (9%) of the hypertensive subjects developed ischemic heart disease. Microalbuminuria, defined as a urinary albumin/creatinine ratio above the upper decile (1.07 mg/mmol), was the strongest predictor of ischemic heart disease, with an unadjusted relative risk of 4.2 (95% CI 1.5 to 11.9, P=0...

  18. Risk of ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease among offspring of patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orholm, Marianne; Fonager, Kirsten; Sørensen, Henrik Toft

    1999-01-01

    ) and Crohn's disease (CD) among first-degree relatives of patients with these diseases. To give more precise risk estimates we conducted a nationwide study using population-based data from the Danish National Registry of Patients (NRP). METHODS: All patients from the entire Danish population (5......OBJECTIVE: The incidence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) varies among and within countries, but several studies have indicated that genetic factors may play an important role in the etiology of IBD. A Danish regional study has observed an almost 10-fold increased risk for ulcerative colitis (UC...

  19. Predicting disease risks from highly imbalanced data using random forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakraborty Sounak

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present a method utilizing Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP dataset for predicting disease risk of individuals based on their medical diagnosis history. The presented methodology may be incorporated in a variety of applications such as risk management, tailored health communication and decision support systems in healthcare. Methods We employed the National Inpatient Sample (NIS data, which is publicly available through Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP, to train random forest classifiers for disease prediction. Since the HCUP data is highly imbalanced, we employed an ensemble learning approach based on repeated random sub-sampling. This technique divides the training data into multiple sub-samples, while ensuring that each sub-sample is fully balanced. We compared the performance of support vector machine (SVM, bagging, boosting and RF to predict the risk of eight chronic diseases. Results We predicted eight disease categories. Overall, the RF ensemble learning method outperformed SVM, bagging and boosting in terms of the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve (AUC. In addition, RF has the advantage of computing the importance of each variable in the classification process. Conclusions In combining repeated random sub-sampling with RF, we were able to overcome the class imbalance problem and achieve promising results. Using the national HCUP data set, we predicted eight disease categories with an average AUC of 88.79%.

  20. Major lipids, apolipoproteins, and risk of vascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Collaboration, Emerging Risk Factors; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Sarwar, Nadeem;

    2009-01-01

    initial vascular disease from 68 long-term prospective studies, mostly in Europe and North America. During 2.79 million person-years of follow-up, there were 8857 nonfatal myocardial infarctions, 3928 coronary heart disease [CHD] deaths, 2534 ischemic strokes, 513 hemorrhagic strokes, and 2536......CONTEXT: Associations of major lipids and apolipoproteins with the risk of vascular disease have not been reliably quantified. OBJECTIVE: To assess major lipids and apolipoproteins in vascular risk. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Individual records were supplied on 302,430 people without...... mg/dL directly measured low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). Within-study regression analyses were adjusted for within-person variation and combined using meta-analysis. RESULTS: The rates of CHD per 1000 person-years in the bottom and top thirds of baseline lipid distributions, respectively...

  1. Epidemiology, classification, and modifiable risk factors of peripheral arterial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas W Shammas

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Nicolas W ShammasMidwest Cardiovascular Research Foundation, Cardiovascular Medicine, PC, Davenport, IA, USAAbstract: Peripheral arterial disease (PAD is part of a global vascular problem of diffuse atherosclerosis. PAD patients die mostly of cardiac and cerebrovascular-related events and much less frequently due to obstructive disease of the lower extremities. Aggressive risk factors modification is needed to reduce cardiac mortality in PAD patients. These include smoking cessation, reduction of blood pressure to current guidelines, aggressive low density lipoprotein lowering, losing weight, controlling diabetes and the use of oral antiplatelet drugs such as aspirin or clopidogrel. In addition to quitting smoking and exercise, cilostazol and statins have been shown to reduce claudication in patients with PAD. Patients with critical rest limb ischemia or severe progressive claudication need to be treated with revascularization to minimize the chance of limb loss, reduce symptoms, and improve quality of life.Keywords: peripheral arterial disease, epidemiology, risk factors, classification

  2. Risk factors for congenital heart diseases in Alexandria, Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A matched case control study has been conducted in the children's hospitals in Alexandria, Egypt, during 2 years-period, aiming at investigating the risk factors for the occurrence of congenital heart diseases. Our results showed that the significant risk factors for developing any type of congenital heart disease and ventricular septal defects were: older paternal age at birth, positive consanguinity, positive family history, female sex hormones, irradiation, hazardous maternal occupation, diabetes mellitus and suburban or rural residence. However, some environmental/teratogenic factors were not implicated in the etiology of atrial septal defects or pulmonary stenosis. These findings strongly suggest that environmental factors vary according to the specific type of congenital heart disease. This study emphasizes on the need to instruct the public about the importance of pre-marital counselling and the deleterious effects of various teratogens in the environment

  3. Peripheral artery disease is a coronary heart disease risk equivalent among both men and women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subherwal, Sumeet; Patel, Manesh R; Kober, Lars;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) has been proposed as a 'coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent'. We aimed to examine whether PAD confers similar risk for mortality as incident myocardial infarction (MI) and whether risk differs by gender. METHODS: Using nationwide Danish.......62-1.80, respectively), and composite of death, MI, and ischaemic stroke, 95% CI HR, 1.38, 95% CI 1.36-1.42; and HR 1.68, 95% CI 1.61-1.75, respectively). The greater long-term risks of PAD were seen for both women and men. CONCLUSIONS: Both women and men with incident PAD have greater long-term risks of total and...

  4. Tendência da mortalidade por doenças do aparelho circulatório no Brasil: 1950 a 2000 Tendencia de la mortalidad por enfermedades del aparato circulatorio en Brasil: 1950 a 2000 Mortality trends due to circulatory system diseases in Brazil: 1950 to 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduarda Ângela Pessoa Cesse

    2009-11-01

    . Realizamos análisis de tendencia linear de las razones de mortalidad estandarizadas para EAC en las capitales brasileñas que presentaron series completas de mortalidad, considerando los años censales del período de estudio (1950 a 2000. RESULTADOS: Si bien las EAC representan proporcionalmente la primera causa de óbito en la población brasileña, y mostraron un crecimiento proporcional en el período de análisis de este estudio, el riesgo de óbito, representado por las razones de mortalidad estandarizadas, está en disminución, particularmente a partir de la década del ´80. Se destacan las ciudades de Fortaleza, Salvador, Belo Horizonte, Río de Janeiro y São Paulo, que presentan razones de mortalidad estandarizadas elevadas, aunque en disminución (p BACKGROUND: The circulatory system diseases (CAD, one of the most important current health problems, have started to show a declining trend in mortality in several countries, although they are still proportionally the number one regarding the statistics of morbimortality. OBJECTIVE: To analyze the mortality trend due to CAD in Brazilian capital cities, during the period of 1950 to 2000. METHODS: Temporal series study, of Standardized Mortality Ratios by CAD. We used secondary data on death from the statistical annual reports from IBGE (the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics and from the Mortality Information System. We carried out a linear trend analysis of the Standardized Mortality Ratios due to CAD in the Brazilian capital cities that presented complete mortality series, considering the census years during the study period (1950 to 2000. RESULTS: Although proportionally the CAD represent the main cause of death in the Brazilian population, as well as presenting a proportional increase during the period of analysis of this study, the risk of death, represented by the Standardized Mortality Ratios, have been decreasing, particularly from the eighties onward. It is noteworthy the fact that Fortaleza

  5. Body mass index and risk of autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harpsøe, Maria C; Basit, Saima; Andersson, Mikael;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A possible aetiological link between obesity and certain autoimmune diseases (ADs) has been suggested. We investigated the associations between body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) and 43 ADs. METHODS: 75,008 women participating in the Danish National Birth Cohort were followed during a median......-up, 2430 women (3.2%) developed a total of 2607 new-onset ADs. Risk of any autoimmune disease was increased in obese women (HR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.46) compared with normal weight women (18.5-≤25 kg/m2). Obese women (BMI≥30 kg/m2) were at increased risk of sarcoidosis (HR 3.59; 95% CI, 2.31 to 5.......57) and type 1 diabetes mellitus (HR 2.67; 95% CI, 1.71 to 4.17). Risk of dermatitis herpetiformis increased by 14% (95% CI, 1% to 30%) per BMI unit. Conversely, risk of celiac disease and Raynaud's phenomenon decreased by 7% (95% CI, 1% to 13%) and 12% (95% CI, 4% to 19%) per BMI unit, respectively...

  6. Primary care patients' recognition of their own risk for cardiovascular disease: implications for risk communication in practice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijden, T.T. van der; Bos, L.B.; Loon, MS Koelewijn-van

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Guidelines on primary prevention of cardiovascular disease emphasize identifying high-risk patients for intensive risk-reducing management. These guidelines recommend the identification of individuals with high risk using risk score sheets or risk tables. Patients' misperceptions

  7. Gender differences in genetic risk profiles for cardiovascular disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaisa Silander

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular disease (CVD incidence, complications and burden differ markedly between women and men. Although there is variation in the distribution of lifestyle factors between the genders, they do not fully explain the differences in CVD incidence and suggest the existence of gender-specific genetic risk factors. We aimed to estimate whether the genetic risk profiles of coronary heart disease (CHD, ischemic stroke and the composite end-point of CVD differ between the genders. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied in two Finnish population cohorts, using the case-cohort design the association between common variation in 46 candidate genes and CHD, ischemic stroke, CVD, and CVD-related quantitative risk factors. We analyzed men and women jointly and also conducted genotype-gender interaction analysis. Several allelic variants conferred disease risk for men and women jointly, including rs1801020 in coagulation factor XII (HR = 1.31 (1.08-1.60 for CVD, uncorrected p = 0.006 multiplicative model. Variant rs11673407 in the fucosyltransferase 3 gene was strongly associated with waist/hip ratio (uncorrected p = 0.00005 in joint analysis. In interaction analysis we found statistical evidence of variant-gender interaction conferring risk of CHD and CVD: rs3742264 in the carboxypeptidase B2 gene, p(interaction = 0.009 for CHD, and rs2774279 in the upstream stimulatory factor 1 gene, p(interaction = 0.007 for CHD and CVD, showed strong association in women but not in men, while rs2069840 in interleukin 6 gene, p(interaction = 0.004 for CVD, showed strong association in men but not in women (uncorrected p-values. Also, two variants in the selenoprotein S gene conferred risk for ischemic stroke in women, p(interaction = 0.003 and 0.007. Importantly, we identified a larger number of gender-specific effects for women than for men. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A false discovery rate analysis suggests that we may expect half of the reported

  8. Work Stress as a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivimäki, Mika; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2015-09-01

    The role of psychosocial work stress as a risk factor for chronic disease has been the subject of considerable debate. Many researchers argue in support of a causal connection while others remain skeptical and have argued that the effect on specific health conditions is either negligible or confounded. This review of evidence from over 600,000 men and women from 27 cohort studies in Europe, the USA and Japan suggests that work stressors, such as job strain and long working hours, are associated with a moderately elevated risk of incident coronary heart disease and stroke. The excess risk for exposed individuals is 10-40 % compared with those free of such stressors. Differences between men and women, younger versus older employees and workers from different socioeconomic backgrounds appear to be small, indicating that the association is robust. Meta-analyses of a wider range of health outcomes show additionally an association between work stress and type 2 diabetes, though not with common cancers or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, suggesting outcome specificity. Few studies have addressed whether mitigation of work stressors would reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. In view of the limited interventional evidence on benefits, harms and cost-effectiveness, definitive recommendations have not been made (e.g. by the US Preventive Services Taskforce) for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease via workplace stress reduction. Nevertheless, governments are already launching healthy workplace campaigns, and preventing excessive work stress is a legal obligation in several countries. Promoting awareness of the link between stress and health among both employers and workers is an important component of workplace health promotion. PMID:26238744

  9. Visible aging signs as risk markers for ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Association of common aging signs (i.e., male pattern baldness, hair graying, and facial wrinkles) as well as other age-related appearance factors (i.e., arcus corneae, xanthelasmata, and earlobe crease) with increased risk of ischemic heart disease was initially described in anecdotal reports from...... clinicians observing trends in the physical appearance of patients with ischemic heart disease. Following these early observations numerous epidemiological studies have reported these associations. Since the prevalences of both visible aging signs and ischemic heart disease have a strong correlation with......, and are mostly speculative. As a consequence of inconsistent findings and lack of mechanistic explanations for the observed associations with ischemic heart disease, consensus on the clinical importance of these visible aging signs has been lacking. The aim of this review is for each of the visible...

  10. Job Strain and the Risk of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkilä, Katriina; Madsen, Ida E H; Nyberg, Solja T;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Many clinicians, patients and patient advocacy groups believe stress to have a causal role in inflammatory bowel diseases, such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. However, this is not corroborated by clear epidemiological research evidence. We investigated the associa.......48). There was negligible heterogeneity among the study-specific associations. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that job strain, an indicator of work-related stress, is not a major risk factor for Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis.......-Work Consortium. Work-related psychosocial stress was operationalised as job strain (a combination of high demands and low control at work) and was self-reported at baseline. Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis were ascertained from national hospitalisation and drug reimbursement registers. The associations...

  11. Diarrhoeal diseases in rural Malaysia: risk factors in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lye, M S

    1984-04-01

    A survey was conducted in six selected rural villages to obtain baseline data on socioeconomic status, nutrition, environmental sanitation and behavioural aspects in relation to diarrhoeal diseases, using a standard questionnaire. Subsequent to this, children 0-4 years of age were followed weekly for six months for diarrhoeal disease. Eleven variables representing socioeconomic status, nutritional status, housing condition, environmental sanitation, mother's knowledge and beliefs were investigated using stepwise logistic regression to determine significant predictors of diarrhoeal disease. Children who were below two years of age, living in conditions of poor sanitation and poor quality water supply, whose houses were prone to flooding and who had mothers whose sanitary habits were not influenced by their religious beliefs, were at significantly greater risk of diarrhoeal disease. PMID:6497315

  12. Instability conditions for circulatory and gyroscopic conservative systems

    CERN Document Server

    Birtea, Petre; Comanescu, Dan

    2011-01-01

    We give a method which generates sufficient conditions for instability of equilibria for circulatory and gyroscopic conservative systems. The method is based on the Gramians of a set of vectors whose coordinates are powers of the roots of the characteristic polynomial for the studied systems. New instability results are obtained for general circulatory and gyroscopic conservative systems. We also apply this method for studying the instability of motion for a charged particle in a stationary electromagnetic field.

  13. Numerical models: realization and applications. Circulatory system models

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, Gianfranco; Lazzari, Claudio,; Zielinski, Krzysztof; Fresiello, Libera; Palko, Krzysztof Jakub

    2010-01-01

    This chapter illustrates the basic structure, the organization and some examples of digital computer circulatory models applications. A special attention is given to the realization of graphical user interfaces and to choice of software platforms. Mechanical circulatory assistance is treated giving two examples where it is represented with two different approaches: representing the physical device or its functional aspects. The parallel LVAD assistance is simulated modeling the pneumatic vent...

  14. Role and applications of circulatory models in cardiovascular pathophysiology.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, Gianfranco; Kozarski, Maciej; Lazzari, Claudio,; Gorczynska, Krystyna; Palko, Jakub K.; K Zielinski; Di Molfetta, Arianna; Darowski, Marek

    2009-01-01

    Circulatory models are relevant for research, education and prosthetic devices/components testing. Independently of its structure that can be numerical, physical or hybrid, the models can be used in different areas of cardiovascular pathophysiology. However, the models are often used to reproduce specific circulatory conditions instead of being used as "systemic" tools. That is to say, the models are used to evaluate the global effects of external disturbances such as pathologies, therapies, ...

  15. The Risk of Colorectal Neoplasia in Patients with Gallbladder Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung Noh; Lee, Tae Yoon; Yun, Sung-Cheol

    2015-09-01

    Cholecystectomy is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, but little is known about the relationship between gallbladder disease and colorectal adenoma. Gallbladder polyps and colorectal neoplasia (CRN) share several risk factors such as obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome, which might account for their association. In this study, we investigated whether asymptomatic patients with gallbladder disease are at increased risk of CRN and identified the factors to their association. The study population consisted of 4,626 consecutive, asymptomatic individuals drawn from a prospective health check-up cohort who underwent both ultrasonography and colonoscopy screening. The prevalence of CRNs in patients with gallbladder polyps or gallstones was significantly higher than that in the control group (32.1% vs. 26.8%; P = 0.032, 35.8% vs. 26.9%; P = 0.020). A multivariate regression analysis showed that gallbladder polyps were an independent risk factor for CRN [adjusted odds ratio (OR): 1.29; 95% confidence interval (CI); 1.03-1.62] whereas gallstones were not (adjusted OR: 1.14; 95% CI: 0.79-1.63). The adjusted OR for the risk of CRN was 1.12 for gallbladder polyps CRN increased with increasing polyp size (P trend = 0.022). Our results suggest that colorectal neoplasia is significantly related to gallbladder polyps, especially those ≥ 5 mm. PMID:26339169

  16. Circadian misalignment increases cardiovascular disease risk factors in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher J; Purvis, Taylor E; Hu, Kun; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2016-03-01

    Shift work is a risk factor for hypertension, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease. This increased risk cannot be fully explained by classic risk factors. One of the key features of shift workers is that their behavioral and environmental cycles are typically misaligned relative to their endogenous circadian system. However, there is little information on the impact of acute circadian misalignment on cardiovascular disease risk in humans. Here we show-by using two 8-d laboratory protocols-that short-term circadian misalignment (12-h inverted behavioral and environmental cycles for three days) adversely affects cardiovascular risk factors in healthy adults. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by 3.0 mmHg and 1.5 mmHg, respectively. These results were primarily explained by an increase in blood pressure during sleep opportunities (SBP, +5.6 mmHg; DBP, +1.9 mmHg) and, to a lesser extent, by raised blood pressure during wake periods (SBP, +1.6 mmHg; DBP, +1.4 mmHg). Circadian misalignment decreased wake cardiac vagal modulation by 8-15%, as determined by heart rate variability analysis, and decreased 24-h urinary epinephrine excretion rate by 7%, without a significant effect on 24-h urinary norepinephrine excretion rate. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h serum interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, resistin, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels by 3-29%. We demonstrate that circadian misalignment per se increases blood pressure and inflammatory markers. Our findings may help explain why shift work increases hypertension, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:26858430

  17. [Adipokines: adiponectin, leptin, resistin and coronary heart disease risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopff, Barbara; Jegier, Anna

    2005-01-01

    Visceral obesity is among the known risk factors of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. As long as adipose tissue was considered only an inert store of excess energy, accumulated in triglycerides, explanation of the mechanisms causing increased cardiovascular risk in obesity was difficult. Finding that the adipose tissue is an active endocrine organ and that the adipokines secreted in it influence several metabolic processes, allowed better understanding of this correlation. Several disturbances in secretion, function and balance of adipokines occur in the course of obesity. Changes of adiponectin, leptin and resistin concentrations are among the reasons of accelerated atherosclerosis occurring in the visceral adiposity. Adiponectin concentrations are decreased in visceral adiposity. Adiponectin is adipokine possessing antiatherogenic properties. It's effects exerted though the specific receptors in skeletal muscles and liver include decreased insulin resistance and improved plasma lipid profile. Acting directly in the vessel wall adiponectin prevents development of atheromatic lesions by inhibiting production of adhesive molecules and formation of foam cells. It has been found that decreased adiponectin concentrations are connected not only with increased coronary risk but also with progression of atherosclerosis in coronary vessels. Moreover it was found that adiponectin plasma concentration is significantly decreased in acute coronary incidences. Leptin regulates energy metabolism and balance. The concentrations of this adipokine are increased in obesity and correlate with insulin resistance. Hiperleptinemia has been also recognized as cardiovascular diseases risk factor. Resistin is considered to be a substance increasing insulin resistance, however the exact mechanisms are not known. Resistin plasma concentrations are increased in obese subjects and correlate with the inflammatory state that underlies the initiation and progression of atherosclerotic

  18. [Socioeconomic class as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Ch; Ackermann-Liebrich, U

    2005-09-01

    It's been known for a long time, that certain diseases are more frequent in lower socioeconomic classes. But knowledge about the nature of this association, its main risk factors and how to improve health outcomes in lower social groups is still limited. Social class has been defined by different indicators by e.g. occupation and job position or the highest school qualification achieved. For international comparisons different classifications such as "The Registrar General's Social Class Classification " or the "International Standard Classification of Education" have been used. Several European Studies show a higher prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular risk factors including smoking, obesity, physical inactivity, hypertension and hypercholesterolemia in lower socioeconomic classes. But this studies also show that all socioeconomic groups have access to medical services. The Data from the Swiss Health Survey show the distribution of cardiovascular risk factors and diseases by three levels of education: Behaviouralfactors such as smoking, obesity and physical inactivity are more commonly present in the lower socioeconomic groups. People with a lower educational level visit their GP more often, whereas people with a higher level of educational consult specialists more frequently. Medical services are often used to check of blood pressure, blood sugar and cholesterol. An indication of state of health may be shown by medication and treatment for cardiovascular disease which is more prevalent in lower socioeconomic groups. The present discussion of explanations of the poorer state of health in lower socioeconomic groups goes beyond the classical risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Studies have shown that after the correction for risk factors a correlation remains between social class and state of health. It is believed, that psychosocial factors such as self-esteem, control in the workplace or coping-strategies play an additional important role

  19. The CIHR Circulatory and Respiratory Health Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm King

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR was officially established on June 7, 2000. Among the 13 institutes that were created, the Institute for Circulatory and Respiratory Health (C&R or CnR, which brings together researchers in the fields of heart, stroke, lung and blood research, has become the principal outlet for respiratory research in this country. Although this large, combined institute was not the first choice of our society or of the respiratory research community at large, we must respect this choice within the context of the new direction for Canadian health research and help to make it work. Over this past summer, the process of recruiting the scientific directors and advisory board members for each CIHR institute has proceeded at a rapid pace. As we go to press, the decisions on the appointment of the 13 inaugural scientific directors are being made. In addition, over the next few weeks, the institute advisory boards will be appointed. The CIHR Governing Council has the ultimate responsibility for these appointments. The Council represents a very broad cross-section of the health research community in Canada; all of us on the Council sincerely wish to see the very best team of directors and board members selected to fulfill these roles.

  20. CT screening of vertebrarterial circulatory disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Shigeru; Toyoda, Keiko; Moriyama, Hiroshi [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-09-01

    The frequency of MR angiography (MRA) used to diagnose vertebrobasiliar insufficiency appears high. Findings of abnormality by MRA show cases with maldescription of hemivertebral artery. In such cases, it is unclear whether these are due to anaplasia of the vertebral artery or to the existence of morbid constriction, thus requiring confirmation by a vertebral arteriography (VAG). We observe the vascular morphology of vertebral artery by Computed tomography (CT) scanning for screening circulatory disorders. In photography and CT scan reading, the region was severally photographed between foramen magnum and aortic arch by plain CT and contrast CT at a slice of 5 mm. The constrictive region of the vertebral artery was estimated by comparing plain and contrast CT. Subjects were 34 clinical cases of vascular maldescription in the vertebrobasilar artery, nearly no blood vessel description, or blood vessel winding or inclination. We determined the constrictive morbid state of the vertebral or subclavian artery and cervical vertebra deformity. In findings of maldescription by MRA, it was suggested that discrimination is feasible to a certain degree, whether the vertebral artery has a morbid constrictive region or due to anaplasia. Our results suggest that screening by CT scanning may be more efficient than that by MRA. (author)

  1. Risk Estimate of Diseases in Scale-Free Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-Jie; XU Xin-Jian

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the effect of risk estimate on the spread of diseases by the standard susceptible-infected-susceptible (SIS) model. The perception of the risk of being infected is explained as cutting off links among individuals, either healthy or infected. We study this simple dynamics on scaie-free networks by analytical methods and computer simulations. We obtain the self-consistency form for the infection prevalence in steady states. For a given transmission rate, there exists a linear relationship between the reciprocal of the density of infected nodes and the estimate parameter. We confirm all the results by sufficient numerical simulations.

  2. Fluoride: a risk factor for inflammatory bowel disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Follin-Arbelet, Benoit; Moum, Bjørn

    2016-09-01

    Although the association between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and oral hygiene has been noticed before, there has been little research on prolonged fluoride exposure as a possible risk factor. In the presented cases, exposure to fluoride seems indirectly associated with higher incidence of IBD. Fluoride toxicology and epidemiology documents frequent unspecific chronic gastrointestinal symptoms and intestinal inflammation. Efflux genes that confer resistance to environmental fluoride may select for IBD associated gut microbiota and therefore be involved in the pathogenesis. Together these multidisciplinary results argue for further investigation on the hypothesis of fluoride as a risk factor for IBD. PMID:27199224

  3. Aging populations, chronic diseases, gender and the risk of disability

    OpenAIRE

    Bould, Sally; Casaca, Sara Falcão

    2011-01-01

    The current discussion in the EU of the increase in life expectancy as it relates to pension reform misses a big part of the picture. The increase in life expectancy in Europe, as in the US, is accompanied by an increasing risk of disability in the later years. The time between the onset of a chronic disease and death has increased dramatically in the last half century. It has also created a situation where older workers risk being limited in the kind of paid work they can do and the very old...

  4. Donation after cardio-circulatory death liver transplantation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hieu Le Dinh; Arnaud de Roover; Abdour Kaba; Séverine Lauwick; Jean Joris; Jean Delwaide; Pierre Honoré

    2012-01-01

    The renewed interest in donation after cardio-circulatory death (DCD) started in the 1990s following the limited success of the transplant community to expand the donation after brain-death (DBD) organ supply and following the request of potential DCD families.Since then,DCD organ procurement and transplantation activities have rapidly expanded,particularly for nonvital organs,like kidneys.In liver transplantation (LT),DCD donors are a valuable organ source that helps to decrease the mortality rate on the waiting lists and to increase the availability of organs for transplantation despite a higher risk of early graft dysfunction,more frequent vascular and ischemia-type biliary lesions,higher rates of re-listing and re-transplantation and lower graft survival,which are obviously due to the inevitable warm ischemia occurring during the declaration of death and organ retrieval process.Experimental strategies intervening in both donors and recipients at different phases of the transplantation process have focused on the attenuation of ischemia-reperfusion injury and already gained encouraging results,and some of them have found their way from pre-clinical success into clinical reality.The future of DCD-LT is promising.Concerted efforts should concentrate on the identification of suitable donors (probably Maastricht category Ⅲ DCD donors),better donor and recipient matching (high risk donors to low risk recipients),use of advanced organ preservation techniques (oxygenated hypothermic machine perfusion,normothermic machine perfusion,venous systemic oxygen persufflation),and pharmacological modulation (probably a multi-factorial biologic modulation strategy) so that DCD liver allografts could be safely utilized and attain equivalent results as DBD-LT.

  5. Multifactorial diseases and risk estimations: special reference of mutation component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetic effects of radiation in man have been tractable such aspects as genes, chromosomes, genomes, individuals and populations. In spite of enormous interest from an academic view point on the mechanism studies, it is rather a little study on incidence or prevalence of genetic diseases as hereditary effects when human population in general have been exposed by radiation. Such studies are valuable for radiation protection as well as radiation public health. In this review, I have attempted to reconcile some fragments evidences to derive an important conclusion: the hereditary effects of radiation could not be detected from examination of disease incidence (or prevalence) for the genetic risk. (J.P.N.)

  6. Obesity and the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthew J. Sorrentino

    2006-01-01

    @@ The increasing prevalence of obesity worldwide has many experts concerned about the worsening health of a large proportion of the population. It is well recognized that obesity is associated with a higher mortality, an increased risk of hypertension and hyperlipidemia, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, osteoarthritis, gall bladder disease and possibly some cancers. Currently it is estimated that over two thirds of adults in the United States are overweight and nearly one third are clinically obese.1 Of special concern is the rapid increase in obesity among children. Other countries both developed and developing are experiencing similar trends.

  7. Contemporary mechanical circulatory support therapy for postcardiotomy shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuhara, Shinichi; Takeda, Koji; Garan, Arthur Reshad; Kurlansky, Paul; Hastie, Jonathan; Naka, Yoshifumi; Takayama, Hiroo

    2016-04-01

    Significant progress has been made in the use of mechanical circulatory support (MCS), particularly in the clinical success in durable left ventricular assist device. Short-term MCS has also advanced in the form of venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, external centrifugal VADs as well as percutaneous VADs. Postcardiotomy shock (PCS) is a rare clinical entity associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. It is characterized by heart failure that either results in an inability to wean from cardiopulmonary bypass or that occurs in the immediate postoperative period, accounting for the most common indication for MCS. The reported in-hospital mortality of the PCS patients remains high, consistently over 50 %, despite ongoing refinements of MCS technology. The optimization of selection criteria and the prompt institution of MCS are likely the keys to improving this persistently high mortality rate. Unfortunately, the lack of a clear definition for PCS in the literature limits scientific analyses and comparison of the existing evidence. To establish the treatment strategy and appropriately manage this challenging disease, substantial and fundamental effort by the cardiovascular society is imperative. PMID:26874519

  8. Multi-locus genetic risk score predicts risk for Crohn’s disease in Slovenian population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupančič, Katarina; Skok, Kristijan; Repnik, Katja; Weersma, Rinse K; Potočnik, Uroš; Skok, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To develop a risk model for Crohn’s disease (CD) based on homogeneous population. METHODS: In our study were included 160 CD patients and 209 healthy individuals from Slovenia. The association study was performed for 112 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We generated genetic risk scores (GRS) based on the number of risk alleles using weighted additive model. Discriminatory accuracy was measured by area under ROC curve (AUC). For risk evaluation, we divided individuals according to positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR) of a test, with LR > 5 for high risk group and LR 5.54) showed significantly increased odds of developing CD (OR = 26.65, 95%CI: 11.25-63.15) compared to the individuals with the lowest risk (GRS < 4.57) which is a considerably greater risk captured than in one SNP with the highest effect size (OR = 3.24). When more than 33 SNPs were included in GRS, discriminatory ability was not improved significantly; AUC of all 74 SNPs was 0.76. CONCLUSION: The authors proved the possibility of building accurate genetic risk score based on 33 risk variants on Slovenian CD patients which may serve as a screening tool in the targeted population. PMID:27076762

  9. Risk Factors for Peripheral Arterial Disease among Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jing; Mohler, Emile R.; Xie, Dawei; Shlipak, Michael G.; Townsend, Raymond R.; Appel, Lawrence J; Raj, Dominic S.; Ojo, Akinlolu O.; Schreiber, Martin J.; Strauss, Louise F.; Zhang, Xiaoming; Wang, Xin; He, Jiang; Hamm, L. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk of developing peripheral arterial disease (PAD). We examined the cross-sectional association between novel risk factors and prevalent PAD among patients with CKD. A total of 3,758 patients with an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) of 20-70 mL/min/1.73 m2 who participated in the chronic renal insufficiency cohort (CRIC) study were included in the current analysis. PAD was defined as an ankle-brachial index

  10. A genetic risk score combining ten psoriasis risk loci improves disease prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoyan Chen

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated skin disease affecting 2-3% of Caucasians. Recent genetic association studies have identified multiple psoriasis risk loci; however, most of these loci contribute only modestly to disease risk. In this study, we investigated whether a genetic risk score (GRS combining multiple loci could improve psoriasis prediction. Two approaches were used: a simple risk alleles count (cGRS and a weighted (wGRS approach. Ten psoriasis risk SNPs were genotyped in 2815 case-control samples and 858 family samples. We found that the total number of risk alleles in the cases was significantly higher than in controls, mean 13.16 (SD 1.7 versus 12.09 (SD 1.8, p = 4.577×10(-40. The wGRS captured considerably more risk than any SNP considered alone, with a psoriasis OR for high-low wGRS quartiles of 10.55 (95% CI 7.63-14.57, p = 2.010×10(-65. To compare the discriminatory ability of the GRS models, receiver operating characteristic curves were used to calculate the area under the curve (AUC. The AUC for wGRS was significantly greater than for cGRS (72.0% versus 66.5%, p = 2.13×10(-8. Additionally, the AUC for HLA-C alone (rs10484554 was equivalent to the AUC for all nine other risk loci combined (66.2% versus 63.8%, p = 0.18, highlighting the dominance of HLA-C as a risk locus. Logistic regression revealed that the wGRS was significantly associated with two subphenotypes of psoriasis, age of onset (p = 4.91×10(-6 and family history (p = 0.020. Using a liability threshold model, we estimated that the 10 risk loci account for only 11.6% of the genetic variance in psoriasis. In summary, we found that a GRS combining 10 psoriasis risk loci captured significantly more risk than any individual SNP and was associated with early onset of disease and a positive family history. Notably, only a small fraction of psoriasis heritability is captured by the common risk variants identified to date.

  11. Risk Factors of Non-Communicable Diseases and Metabolic Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Esmailnasab, N; G. Moradi; A Delaveri

    2012-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome is a common nmetabolic ndisorder, which leads to early Cardio Vascular Disease and diabetes type II. The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its risk factors in Kurdistan, Iran. Method: The data was extracted from provincial section of Iranian national non-communicable surveillance survey conducted in 2005. The study was a population-based survey with multi-stage cluster sampling method. Adult Treatment Panel-III measures ...

  12. Affluence and the Worldwide Distribution of Cardiovascular Disease Risks

    OpenAIRE

    Ezzati, Majid; Vander Hoorn, Stephen; Lawes, Carlene M.M.; Leach, Rachel; James, W.Philip T.; Alan D Lopez; Rodgers, Anthony; Christopher J L Murray

    2005-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases and their nutritional risk factors—including overweight and obesity, elevated blood pressure, and cholesterol—are among the leading causes of global mortality and morbidity, and have been predicted to rise with economic development. Methods and Findings We examined age-standardized mean population levels of body mass index (BMI), systolic blood pressure, and total cholesterol in relation to national income, food share of household expenditure, and urbanizati...

  13. Socioeconomic disparities in risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Wielgosz, A T; Spasoff, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Despite a general decline in mortality rates in recent decades, these rates are substantially higher among lower socioeconomic groups. To determine target groups for preventive health promotion programs, the prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease by socioeconomic group in Canadian adults aged 20 to 69 years was examined through comparison of estimates from the 1978-79 Canada Health Survey, the 1981 Canada Fitness Survey and the labour force smoking surveys of 1975 and 1983. Lev...

  14. A comparative risk assessment of burden of disease and injury attributable to 67 risk factors and risk factor clusters in 21 regions, 1990-2010: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, S.S.; Vos, T.; Flaxman, A.D.; Danaei, G.; Shibuya, K.; Adair-Rohani, H.; Amann, M.; Anderson, H.R.; Andrews, K.G.; Aryee, M.; Atkinson, C.; Bacchus, L.J.; Bahalim, A.N.; Balakrishnan, K.; Balmes, J.; Barker-Collo, S.; Baxter, A.; Bell, M.L.; Blore, J.D.; Blyth, F.; Bonner, C.; Borges, G.; Bourne, R.; Boussinesq, M.; Brauer, M.; Brooks, P.; Bruce, N.G.; Brunekreef, B.; Bryan-Hancock, C.; Bucello, C.; Buchbinder, R.; Bull, F.; Burnett, R.T.; Byers, T.E.; Calabria, B.; Carapetis, J.; Carnahan, E.; Chafe, Z.; Charlson, F.; Chen, H.; Chen, J.S.; Cheng, A.T.; Child, J.C.; Cohen, A.; Colson, K.E.; Cowie, B.C.; Darby, S.; Darling, S.; Davis, A.; Degenhardt, L.; Dentener, F.; Des Jarlais, D.C.; Devries, K.; Dherani, M.; Ding, E.L.; Dorsey, E.R.; Driscoll, T.; Edmond, K.; Ali, S.E.; Engell, R.E.; Erwin, P.J.; Fahimi, S.; Falder, G.; Farzadfar, F.; Ferrari, A.; Finucane, M.M.; Flaxman, S.; Fowkes, F.G.R.; Freedman, G.; Freeman, M.K.; Gakidou, E.; Ghosh, S.; Giovannucci, E.; Gmel, G.; Graham, K.; Grainger, R.; Grant, B.; Gunnell, D.; Gutierrez, H.R.; Hall, W.; Hoek, H.W.; Hogan, A.; Hosgood, H.D.; Hoy, D.; Hu, H.; Hubbell, B.J.; Hutchings, S.J.; Ibeanusi, S.E.; Jacklyn, G.L.; Jasrasaria, R.; Jonas, J.B.; Kan, H.; Kanis, J.A.; Kassebaum, N.; Kawakami, N.; Khang, Y-H.; Khatibzadeh, S.; Khoo, J-P.; de Kok, C.; Laden, F.; Lalloo, R.; Lan, Q.; Lathlean, T.; Leasher, J.L.; Leigh, J.; Li, Y.; Lin, J.K.; Lipshultz, S.E.; London, S.; Lozano, R.; Lu, Y.; Mak, J.; Malekzadeh, R.; Mallinger, L.; Marcenes, W.; March, L.; Marks, R.; Martin, R.; McGale, P.; McGrath, J.; Mehta, S.; Mensah, G.A.; Merriman, T.R.; Micha, R.; Michaud, C.; Mishra, V.; Hanafiah, K.M.; Mokdad, A.A.; Morawska, L.; Mozaffarian, D.; Murphy, T.; Naghavi, M.; Neal, B.; Nelson, P.K.; Nolla, J.M.; Norman, R.; Olives, C.; Omer, S. B; Orchard, J.; Osborne, R.; Ostro, B.; Page, A.; Pandey, K.D.; Parry, C.D.H.; Passmore, E.; Patra, J.; Pearce, N.; Pelizzari, P.M.; Petzold, M.; Phillips, M.R.; Pope, D.; Pope, C.A.; Powles, J.; Rao, M.; Razavi, H.; Rehfuess, E.A.; Rehm, J.T.; Ritz, B.; Rivara, F.P.; Roberts, T.; Robinson, C.; Rodriguez-Portales, J.A.; Romieu, I.; Room, R.; Rosenfeld, L.C.; Roy, A.; Rushton, L.; Salomon, J.A.; Sampson, U.; Sanchez-Riera, L.; Sanman, E.; Sapkota, A.; Seedat, S.; Shi, P.; Shield, K.; Shivakoti, R.; Singh, G.M.; Sleet, D.A.; Smith, E.; Smith, K.R.; Stapelberg, N.J.C.; Steenland, K.; Stöckl, H.; Stovner, L.J.; Straif, K.; Straney, L.; Thurston, G.D.; Tran, J.H.; van Dingenen, R.; van Donkelaar, A.; Veerman, J.L.; Vijayakumar, L.; Weintraub, R.; Weissman, M.M.; White, R.A.; Whiteford, H.; Wiersma, S.T.; Wilkinson, J.D.; Williams, H.C.; Williams, W.; Wilson, N.; Woolf, A.D.; Yip, P.; Zielinski, J.M.; Lopez, A.D.; Murray, C.J.L.; Ezzati, M.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Quantification of the disease burden caused by different risks informs prevention by providing an account of health loss different to that provided by a disease-by-disease analysis. No complete revision of global disease burden caused by risk factors has been done since a comparative risk

  15. Polygenic risk of Parkinson disease is correlated with disease age at onset

    OpenAIRE

    Escott-Price, V; International, Parkinson s. Disease Genomics Consortium; Nalls, M.A.; Morris, H R; Lubbe, S; Brice, A.; Gasser, T.; Heutink, P; Wood, N W; Hardy, J.; Singleton, A.B.; Williams, N.M.; IPDGC, consortium members

    2015-01-01

    Objective We have investigated the polygenic architecture of Parkinson disease (PD) and have also explored the potential relationship between an individual's polygenic risk score and their disease age at onset. Methods This study used genotypic data from 4,294 cases and 10,340 controls obtained from the meta‐analysis of PD genome‐wide association studies. Polygenic score analysis was performed as previously described by the International Schizophrenia Consortium, testing whether the polygenic...

  16. Chagas heart disease: pathophysiologic mechanisms, prognostic factors and risk stratification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anis Rassi Jr

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Chagas heart disease (CHD results from infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi and is the leading cause of infectious myocarditis worldwide. It poses a substantial public health burden due to high morbidity and mortality. CHD is also the most serious and frequent manifestation of chronic Chagas disease and appears in 20-40% of infected individuals between 10-30 years after the original acute infection. In recent decades, numerous clinical and experimental investigations have shown that a low-grade but incessant parasitism, along with an accompanying immunological response [either parasite-driven (most likely or autoimmune-mediated], plays an important role in producing myocardial damage in CHD. At the same time, primary neuronal damage and microvascular dysfunction have been described as ancillary pathogenic mechanisms. Conduction system disturbances, atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, congestive heart failure, systemic and pulmonary thromboembolism and sudden cardiac death are the most common clinical manifestations of chronic Chagas cardiomyopathy. Management of CHD aims to relieve symptoms, identify markers of unfavourable prognosis and treat those individuals at increased risk of disease progression or death. This article reviews the pathophysiology of myocardial damage, discusses the value of current risk stratification models and proposes an algorithm to guide mortality risk assessment and therapeutic decision-making in patients with CHD.

  17. Alzheimer’s disease: Risk factors and therapeutic targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxman Pokhrel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD, a neurodegenerative disorder, has been determined as an outcome of genetic as well as behavioral conditions. The complete understanding of its generation and progress is yet to be understood. However, there has been a significant progress in the diagnosis and identification of the associated risk factors of AD. Several of the risk factors were found connected with cholesterol. Scientists are mainly focusing on the reduction of amyloid β and stabilization of tau protein towards the development of its drugs. To modulate amyloid β, the key components of cholesterol metabolism have been attractive targets and the enzymes involved in the phosphorylation of tau have been tried to stabilize tau protein. This review article briefly highlights the symptoms, risk factors, and drug targets of AD.

  18. Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in an Aging HIV Population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin-Iguacel, R; Llibre, J M; Friis-Moller, N

    2015-01-01

    With more effective and widespread antiretroviral treatment, the overall incidence of AIDS- or HIV-related death has decreased dramatically. Consequently, as patients are aging, cardiovascular disease (CVD) has emerged as an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the HIV population. The...... incidence of CVD overall in HIV is relatively low, but it is approximately 1.5-2-fold higher than that seen in age-matched HIV-uninfected individuals. Multiple factors are believed to explain this excess in risk such as overrepresentation of traditional cardiovascular risk factors (particularly smoking......), toxicities associated with cumulative exposure to some antiretroviral agents, together with persistent chronic inflammation, and immune activation associated with HIV infection. Tools are available to calculate an individual's predicted risk of CVD and should be incorporated in the regular follow-up of HIV...

  19. Risk based culling for highly infectious diseases of livestock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    te Beest Dennis E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The control of highly infectious diseases of livestock such as classical swine fever, foot-and-mouth disease, and avian influenza is fraught with ethical, economic, and public health dilemmas. Attempts to control outbreaks of these pathogens rely on massive culling of infected farms, and farms deemed to be at risk of infection. Conventional approaches usually involve the preventive culling of all farms within a certain radius of an infected farm. Here we propose a novel culling strategy that is based on the idea that farms that have the highest expected number of secondary infections should be culled first. We show that, in comparison with conventional approaches (ring culling, our new method of risk based culling can reduce the total number of farms that need to be culled, the number of culled infected farms (and thus the expected number of human infections in case of a zoonosis, and the duration of the epidemic. Our novel risk based culling strategy requires three pieces of information, viz. the location of all farms in the area at risk, the moments when infected farms are detected, and an estimate of the distance-dependent probability of transmission.

  20. Risk factors for osteoporosis in inflammatory bowel disease patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Carla; Andrade; Lima; Andre; Castro; Lyra; Raquel; Rocha; Genoile; Oliveira; Santana

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease(IBD) patients exhibit higher risk for bone loss than the general population. The chronic inflammation causes a reduction in bone mineral density(BMD), which leads to osteopenia and osteoporosis. This article reviewed each risk factor for osteoporosis in IBD patients. Inflammation is one of the factors that contribute to osteoporosis in IBD patients, and the main system that is involved in bone loss is likely RANK/RANKL/osteoprotegerin. Smoking is a risk factor for bone loss and fractures, and many mechanisms have been proposed to explain this loss. Body composition also interferes in bone metabolism and increasing muscle mass may positively affect BMD. IBD patients frequently use corticosteroids, which stimulates osteoclastogenesis. IBD patients are also associated with vitamin D deficiency, which contributes to bone loss. However, infliximab therapy is associated with improvements in bone metabolism, but it is not clear whether the effects are because of inflammation improvement or infliximab use. Ulcerative colitis patients with proctocolectomy and ileal pouches and Crohn’s disease patients with ostomy are also at risk for bone loss, and these patients should be closely monitored.

  1. The Framingham Risk Function Underestimated Absolute Coronary Heart Disease Risk in Czech Men

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Reissigová, Jindra; Zvárová, Jana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 1 (2007), s. 43-49. ISSN 0026-1270 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : external validation * Framingham risk function * coronary heart disease Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 1.451, year: 2007

  2. Relationship between Sarcopenic Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease Risk as Estimated by the Framingham Risk Score

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeong-Hyeon; Cho, Jung Jin; Park, Yong Soon

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the association between sarcopenic obesity and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in Korean adults (n=3,320; ≥40 yr) who participated in the 5th Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2010. The appendicular skeletal muscle mass divided by body weight was calculated for each participant; participants with values

  3. Novel risk factors for cardiovascular disease in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya-Amaya, Jenny; Sarmiento-Monroy, Juan Camilo; Mantilla, Ruben-Dario; Pineda-Tamayo, Ricardo; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana; Anaya, Juan-Manuel

    2013-07-01

    Since cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most common cause of mortality in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we aimed to determine factors associated with such a complication in a large series of Colombian patients. This was a cross-sectional analytical study in which 800 consecutive Colombian patients with RA were assessed for variables associated with CVD. Furthermore, a systematic literature review was performed to address the state of the art about non-traditional risk factors for CVD in RA. The preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses guidelines were followed in data extraction, analysis, and reporting of articles selected. Hypercholesterolemia, type 2 diabetes mellitus, abnormal body mass index, abdominal obesity, and current smoking were all traditional risk factors significantly associated with CVD in Colombians. As non-traditional risk factors, familial autoimmunity, more than 10 years of duration of the disease, patients working on household duties, use of systemic steroids, and low education level were associated with CVD in the studied population. Out of a total of 9,812 articles identified in PubMed and Scopus databases, 140 fulfilled the eligibility criteria and were included. Through this systematic review, several factors and outcomes related to CVD were confirmed and identified. These were categorized into genetics, RA-related, and others. Traditional risk factors do not completely explain the high rates of CVD in patients with RA; thus, novel risk factors related to autoimmunity are now recognized predicting the presence of CVD as strong as traditional risk factors. Our results may assist health professionals and policymakers in making decisions about CVD in patients with RA. PMID:23584985

  4. Increased Risk of Osteoporosis in Patients With Peptic Ulcer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chieh-Hsin; Tung, Yi-Ching; Chai, Chee-Yin; Lu, Ying-Yi; Su, Yu-Feng; Tsai, Tai-Hsin; Kuo, Keng-Liang; Lin, Chih-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate osteoporosis risk in patients with peptic ulcer disease (PUD) using a nationwide population-based dataset. This Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) analysis included 27,132 patients aged 18 years and older who had been diagnosed with PUD (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] codes 531–534) during 1996 to 2010. The control group consisted of 27,132 randomly selected (age- and gender)-matched patients without PUD. The association between PUD and the risk of developing osteoporosis was estimated using a Cox proportional hazard regression model. During the follow-up period, osteoporosis was diagnosed in 2538 (9.35 %) patients in the PUD group and in 2259 (8.33 %) participants in the non-PUD group. After adjusting for covariates, osteoporosis risk was 1.85 times greater in the PUD group compared to the non-PUD group (13.99 vs 5.80 per 1000 person-years, respectively). Osteoporosis developed 1 year after PUD diagnosis. The 1-year follow-up period exhibited the highest significance between the 2 groups (hazard ratio [HR] = 63.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 28.19–142.74, P < 0.001). Osteoporosis risk was significantly higher in PUD patients with proton-pump-inhibitors (PPIs) use (HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.03–1.34) compared to PUD patients without PPIs use. This study revealed a significant association between PUD and subsequent risk of osteoporosis. Therefore, PUD patients, especially those treated with PPIs, should be evaluated for subsequent risk of osteoporosis to minimize the occurrence of adverse events. PMID:27100415

  5. DETERMINING CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE RISK IN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL CHILDREN:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate E. Reed

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available At least 50% of children have one or more cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factor. We aimed to 1 determine the prevalence of CVD risk factors in a sample of Canadian children, and 2 create a Healthy Heart Score that could be used in a school setting, to identify children with a greater number and severity of CVD risk factors. Children (n = 242, 122M, 120F, aged 9-11 years were assessed for cardiovascular fitness, physical activity, systolic/diastolic blood pressure, and body mass index (BMI. Biological values were converted to age and sex specific percentiles and allocated a score. Healthy Heart Scores could range between 5 and 18, with lower scores suggesting a healthier cardiovascular profile. Seventy-seven children volunteered for blood samples in order to assess the relationship between the Healthy Heart Score and (total cholesterol (TC, high and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL, LDL and triglycerides (TG. Fifty eight percent of children had elevated scores for at least 1 risk factor. The group mean Healthy Heart Score was 8 (2.2. The mean score was significantly higher in boys (9 (2.2 compared with girls (8 (2.1, p < 0.01. A high score was significantly associated with a low serum HDL, a high TC:HDL and a high TG concentration. Our results support other studies showing a high prevalence of CVD risk factors in children. Our method of allocation of risk score, according to percentile, allows for creation of an age and sex specific CVD risk profile in children, which takes into account the severity of the elevated risk factor

  6. Formulations of hormone therapy and risk of Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, Jessica I.; Ton, Thanh G.N.; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Longstreth, W.T.; Franklin, Gary M.; Swanson, Phillip D.; Smith-Weller, Terri; Racette, Brad A.; Checkoway, Harvey

    2014-01-01

    Background Hormone therapy (HT) is a class of medications widely prescribed to women in the Western world. Evidence from animal models and in vitro studies suggests that estrogen may protect against nigrostriatal system injury and increase dopamine synthesis, metabolism, and transport. Existing epidemiologic research indicates a possible reduced risk of Parkinson disease (PD) associated with HT use. The objective of this study was to evaluate PD risk associated with specific HT formulations. Methods Neurologist confirmed cases and age-matched controls were identified from Group Health Cooperative (GHC) of Washington state. Final analysis included 137 female cases and 227 controls. HT use was ascertained from the GHC pharmacy database, further classified as conjugated estrogens, esterified estrogens, and progestin. Results Ever use of HT formulation demonstrated a suggested elevated risk with esterified estrogen use (OR, 3.1; 95% CI, 1.0–9.8), and no risk associated with conjugated estrogen use (OR, 0.6; 95% CI, 0.6–1.3). Restricting this analysis to prescriptions that included progestin further elevated the risk associated with esterified estrogen use (OR, 6.9; 95% CI, 2.1–22.9); again, no risk was associated with conjugated estrogen use (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 0.6–5.0). Conclusions The findings from this study suggest an increase in PD risk associated with esterified estrogen use combined with progestin, and no risk associated with conjugated estrogen with progestin. These findings could have important implications for choice of HT in clinical practice. PMID:25255692

  7. Risk behaviors for sexually transmitted diseases among crack users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Alves Guimarães

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractObjectives: to investigate the prevalence and risk behaviors by means of reporting of sexually transmitted diseases among crack users.Method: cross-sectional study carried out with 588 crack users in a referral care unit for the treatment of chemical dependency. Data were collected by means of face-to-face interview and analyzed using Stata statistical software, version 8.0.Results: of the total participants, 154 (26.2%; 95% CI: 22.8-29.9 reported antecedents of sexually transmitted diseases. Ages between 25 and 30 years (RP: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.0-4.0 and over 30 years (RP: 3.8; 95% CI: 2.1-6.8, alcohol consumption (RP: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.1-3.3, antecedents of prostitution (RP: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.3-2.9 and sexual intercourse with person living with human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS (RP: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.8-4.2 were independently associated with reporting of sexually transmitted diseases.Conclusion: the results of this study suggest high risk and vulnerability of crack users for sexually transmitted diseases.

  8. Risk behaviors for sexually transmitted diseases among crack users 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Rafael Alves; da Silva, Leandro Nascimento; França, Divânia Dias da Silva; Del-Rios, Nativa Helena Alves; Carneiro, Megmar Aparecida dos Santos; Teles, Sheila Araujo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: to investigate the prevalence and risk behaviors by means of reporting of sexually transmitted diseases among crack users. Method: cross-sectional study carried out with 588 crack users in a referral care unit for the treatment of chemical dependency. Data were collected by means of face-to-face interview and analyzed using Stata statistical software, version 8.0. Results: of the total participants, 154 (26.2%; 95% CI: 22.8-29.9) reported antecedents of sexually transmitted diseases. Ages between 25 and 30 years (RP: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.0-4.0) and over 30 years (RP: 3.8; 95% CI: 2.1-6.8), alcohol consumption (RP: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.1-3.3), antecedents of prostitution (RP: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.3-2.9) and sexual intercourse with person living with human immunodeficiency virus/AIDS (RP: 2.7; 95% CI: 1.8-4.2) were independently associated with reporting of sexually transmitted diseases. Conclusion: the results of this study suggest high risk and vulnerability of crack users for sexually transmitted diseases. PMID:26444164

  9. [Celiac disease. Risk factors for women in reproductive age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stazi, A V; Mantovani, A

    2000-05-01

    In the past coeliac disease, or intolerance to gluten, has been considered a rare disease in infancy, whose most important signs were chronic diarrhea with malabsorption and reduced growth. However, besides this classical form, there are a number of other clinical and subclinical forms which may appear even in the adult life and without any overt intestinal sign. The alterations may affect, e.g., the liver, thyroid, skin and the female and male reproductive system. The overall prevalence of the different forms of coeliac disease in Western Europe is at least 1:300. The aim of the present paper is to describe and evaluate the effects of coeliac disease on female reproduction. Such effects include delayed menarche, amenorrhea, infertility and early menopause. Epidemiological studies show that besides reduced fertility, affected women are at higher risk of reproductive problems such as pregnancy loss, low birthweight of offspring and reduced duration of breastfeeding. There are no adequate studies to evidentiate a possible increase of birth defects; nevertheless, coeliac disease induces malabsorption, with deficiencies of nutritional factors essential to prenatal development such as iron, folic acid and vitamin K. The mechanisms underlying the reproductive alterations are still awaiting clarification; however, an interaction among specific nutritional deficiencies, endocrine imbalances and immune disturbances is suspected. As for the other effects associated to the coeliac disease, the possible prevention or treatment of the reproductive effects is only the lifelong maintenance of a gluten-free diet. PMID:11048475

  10. Adolescent BMI Trajectory and Risk of Diabetes versus Coronary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirosh, Amir; Shai, Iris; Afek, Arnon; Dubnov-Raz, Gal; Ayalon, Nir; Gordon, Barak; Derazne, Estela; Tzur, Dorit; Shamis, Ari; Vinker, Shlomo; Rudich, Assaf

    2016-01-01

    currently considered to be normal — constitutes a substantial risk factor for obesity-related disorders in midlife. Although the risk of diabetes is mainly associated with increased BMI close to the time of diagnosis, the risk of coronary heart disease is associated with an elevated BMI both in adolescence and in adulthood, supporting the hypothesis that the processes causing incident coronary heart disease, particularly atherosclerosis, are more gradual than those resulting in incident diabetes. (Funded by the Chaim Sheba Medical Center and the Israel Defense Forces Medical Corps.) PMID:21470009

  11. The Risk of Peripheral Arterial Disease after Parathyroidectomy in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsuan-Ju; Li, Tsai-Chung; Hsu, Chih-Cheng; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The changes of the risk of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in patients with end-stage renal disease after parathyroidectomy are scant. Methods We used a nationwide health insurance claims database to select all dialysis-dependent patients with end-stage renal disease aged 18 years and older for the study population in 2000 to 2006. Of the patients with end-stage renal disease, we selected 947 patients who had undergone parathyroidectomy as the parathyroidectomy group and frequency matched 3746 patients with end-stage renal disease by sex, age, years since the disease diagnosis, and the year of index date as the non-parathyroidectomy group. We used a multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis with the use of a robust sandwich covariance matrix estimate, accounting for the intra-cluster dependence of hospitals or clinics, to measure the risk of peripheral arterial disease for the parathyroidectomy group compared with the non-parathyroidectomy group after adjusting for sex, age, premium-based income, urbanization, and comorbidity. Results The mean post-op follow-up periods were 5.08 and 4.52 years for the parathyroidectomy and non-parathyroidectomy groups, respectively; the incidence density rate of PAD in the PTX group was 12.26 per 1000 person-years, significantly lower than the data in the non-PTX group (24.09 per 1000 person-years, adjusted HR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.46–0.94). Conclusion Parathyroidectomy is associated with reduced risk of peripheral arterial disease in patients with end-stage renal disease complicated with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:27284924

  12. Prevalence and risk factors of atrial fibrillation in hospitalized patients with chronic kidney disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王骄

    2013-01-01

    Objective Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained tachyarrhythmia in the general population.AF and Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) share several common risk factors.We investigated the association between chronic kidney disease and risk of atrial fibrillation

  13. Historical Perspective and Risk of Multiple Neglected Tropical Diseases in Coastal Tanzania: Compositional and Contextual Determinants of Disease Risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Ato Armah

    Full Text Available In the past decade, research on neglected tropical diseases (NTDs has intensified in response to the need to enhance community participation in health delivery, establish monitoring and surveillance systems, and integrate existing disease-specific treatment programs to control overlapping NTD burdens and detrimental effects. In this paper, we evaluated the geographical distribution of NTDs in coastal Tanzania.We also assessed the collective (compositional and contextual factors that currently determine risks to multiple NTDs using a cross sectional survey of 1253 individuals in coastal Tanzania. The results show that the effect size in decreasing order of magnitude for non-binary predictors of NTD risks is as follows: NTD comorbidities > poverty > educational attainment > self-reported household quality of life > ethnicity. The multivariate analysis explained 95% of the variance in the relationship between NTD risks and the theoretically-relevant covariates. Compositional (biosocial and sociocultural factors explained more variance at the neighbourhood level than at the regional level, whereas contextual factors, such as access to health services and household quality, in districts explained a large proportion of variance at the regional level but individually had modest statistical significance, demonstrating the complex interactions between compositional and contextual factors in generating NTD risks.NTD risks were inequitably distributed over geographic space, which has several important policy implications. First, it suggests that localities of high burden of NTDs are likely to diminish within statistical averages at higher (regional or national levels. Second, it indicates that curative or preventive interventions will become more efficient provided they can be focused on the localities, particularly as populations in these localities are likely to be burdened by several NTDs simultaneously, further increasing the imperative of multi-disease

  14. Androgenetic alopecia and risk of coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lata Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Androgenetic alopecia (AGA or male pattern baldness (MPB has been found to be associated with the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD. The well-known risk factors are family history of CAD, hypertension, increased body mass index (BMI, central obesity, hyperglycemia, and dyslipidemia. The newer risk factors are serum lipoprotein-a (SL-a, serum homocysteine (SH, and serum adiponectin (SA. Aim : Identifying individuals at risk of CAD at an early age might help in preventing CAD and save life. Hence, a comparative study of CAD risk factors was planned in 100 males of AGA between the age of 25 and 40 years with equal number of age- and sex-matched controls. Materials and Methods : Patients of AGA grade II or more of Hamilton and Norwood (HN Scale and controls were examined clinically and advised blood test. The reports were available for fasting blood sugar (FBS, serum total serum cholesterol (SC in 64 cases, 64 controls; lipoproteins (high, low, very low density, HDL, LDL, VLDL, serum triglycerides (ST in 63 cases, 63 controls; SL-a in 63 cases, 74 controls; SH in 56 cases, 74 controls; and SA in 62 cases, 74 controls. Results : In these cases family history (FH of AGA and CAD was significantly high. The blood pressure (BP was also found to be significantly high in the cases. The difference of mean serum HDL, LDL, VLDL, ST, SH, and SL-a in cases and controls were statistically significant and with increasing grade of AGA, the risk factors also increased. Conclusion : Patients with AGA appear to be at an increased risk of developing CAD, therefore, clinical evaluation of cases with AGA of grade II and above may be of help in preventing CAD in future.

  15. Major life events and the risk of ischaemic heart disease: does accumulation increase the risk?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ingelise; Diderichsen, Finn; Kornerup, Henriette; Prescott, Eva; Rod, Naja Hulvej

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stress is a consequence of different types of external demands, most of which have been shown to be associated with increased risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD), but whether accumulation of stressors over a life-course results in additional risk of IHD remains unknown. This study...... investigates the impact of major life events (MLE) in childhood, adulthood and at work, singly and accumulated, on incident IHD in men and women and examines vital exhaustion (VE) and use of tranquillizers as potential mediators. Material and methods The study includes 8738 participants, 57% women, from the......, there were no associations between MLE and incidence of IHD. However, being placed in care during childhood was associated with a higher risk of IHD among women [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.36; 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.97-1.89], but a lower risk of IHD among men (HR¿=¿0.72; 95% CI 0.51-1.03). MLE...

  16. Plasma urate concentration and risk of coronary heart disease:a Mendelian randomisation analysis

    OpenAIRE

    White, Jon; Sofat, Reecha; Hemani, Gibran; Shah, Tina; Engmann, Jorgen; Dale, Caroline; Shah, Sonia; Kruger, Felix A.; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Swerdlow, Daniel I.; Palmer, Tom; McLachlan, Stela; Langenberg, Claudia; Zabaneh, Delilah; Lovering, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Increased circulating plasma urate concentration is associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, but the extent of any causative effect of urate on risk of coronary heart disease is still unclear. In this study, we aimed to clarify any causal role of urate on coronary heart disease risk using Mendelian randomisation analysis. Methods We first did a fixed-effects meta-analysis of the observational association of plasma urate and risk of coronary heart disease...

  17. Relation of anthropometric variables to coronary artery disease risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virendra C Patil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Anthropometric variables and their relation to conventional coronary artery disease (CAD risk factors in railway employees have been inadequately studied in India. This cross-sectional survey was carried out in the Solapur division of the Central railway in the year 2004, to assess the anthropometric variables in railway employees and their relation to conventional CAD risk factors. Materials and Methods: A total of 995 railway employees, with 872 males and 123 females participated in this cross-sectional study. All subjects underwent anthropometric measurements, fasting lipid profile, and blood sugar level. Various anthropometric indices were calculated for body mass index (BMI, waist circumference (WC, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR, waist-to-height ratio (WHtR, and abdominal volume index (AVI. Statistical analysis was done by EPI Info 6 statistical software. Results: Compared to all other obesity indices, WHtR was most prevalent in both genders. High WHtR was present in 699 (80.16% males and 103 (83.73% females. Age ≥45 years, high systolic BP, high diastolic BP, low HDL, high triglyceride, and diabetes mellitus were positively correlated with high BMI, high WC, high WHR, high WHtR, and high AVI. High BMI, high WC, high WHR, high WHtR, and high AVI were negatively associated with physical inactivity. Conclusions: Over all, anthropometric variables in both genders were significantly deranged in subjects with coronary risk factors. Compared to all other anthropometric variables, WHtR was statistically significantly associated with a majority of coronary artery risk factors. Hence we recommend inclusion of WHtR as a parameter of obesity to predict coronary artery disease risk factor along with WC, WHR, and BMI in epidemiologic studies.

  18. Perinatal and early life risk factors for inflammatory bowel disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen E Roberts; Clare J Wotton; John G Williams; Myfanwy Griffith; Michael J Goldacre

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate associations between perinatal risk factors and subsequent inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children and young adults.METHODS: Record linked abstracts of birth registrations,maternity, day case and inpatient admissions in a defined population of southern England. Investigation of 20 perinatal factors relating to the maternity or the birth: maternal age, Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC) in the mother, maternal social class, marital status, smoking in pregnancy, ABO blood group and rhesus status, pre-eclampsia, parity, the infant's presentation at birth, caesarean delivery, forceps delivery, sex, number of babies delivered, gestational age, birthweight, head circumference, breastfeeding and Apgar scores at one and five minutes.RESULTS: Maternity records were present for 180 children who subsequently developed IBD. Univariate analysis showed increased risks of CD among children of mothers with CD (P = 0.011, based on two cases of CD in both mother and child) and children of mothers who smoked during pregnancy. Multivariate analysis confirmed increased risks of CD among children of mothers who smoked (odds ratio = 2.04, 95% CI =1.06-3.92) and for older mothers aged 35+ years (4.81,2.32-9.98). Multivariate analysis showed that there were no significant associations between CD and 17 other perinatal risk factors investigated. It also showed that, for UC, there were no significant associations with the perinatal factors studied.CONCLUSION: This study shows an association between CD in mother and child; and elevated risks of CD in children of older mothers and of mothers who smoked.

  19. 77 FR 9842 - Health Claim; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-21

    ...; Phytosterols and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notification... phytosterols and risk of coronary heart disease (CHD), in a manner that is consistent with FDA's February 14... use of a health claim regarding reduced risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) for...

  20. Deep brain stimulation for psychiatric diseases: what are the risks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Christian; Fontaine, Denys

    2015-05-01

    Despite the application of deep brain stimulation (DBS) as an efficient treatment modality for psychiatric disorders, such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (GTS), and treatment refractory major depression (TRD), few patients are operated or included in clinical trials, often for fear of the potential risks of an approach deemed too dangerous. To assess the surgical risks, we conducted an analysis of publications on DBS for psychiatric disorders. A PubMed search was conducted on reports on DBS for OCD, GTS, and TRD. Forty-nine articles were included. Only reports on complications related to DBS were selected and analyzed. Two hundred seventy-two patients with a mean follow-up of 22 months were included in our analysis. Surgical mortality was nil. The overall mortality was 1.1 %: two suicides were unrelated to DBS and one death was reported to be unlikely due to DBS. The majority of complications were transient and related to stimulation. Long-term morbidity occurred in 16.5 % of cases. Three patients had permanent neurological complications due to intracerebral hemorrhage (2.2 %). Complications reported in DBS for psychiatric diseases appear to be similar to those reported for DBS in movement disorders. But class I evidence is lacking. Our analysis was based mainly on small non-randomized studies. A significant number of patients (approximately 150 patients) who were treated with DBS for psychiatric diseases had to be excluded from our analysis as no data on complications was available. The exact prevalence of complications of DBS in psychiatric diseases could not be established. DBS for psychiatric diseases is promising, but remains an experimental technique in need of further evaluation. A close surveillance of patients undergoing DBS for psychiatric diseases is mandatory. PMID:25795265

  1. Natural disturbance reduces disease risk in endangered rainforest frog populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roznik, Elizabeth A; Sapsford, Sarah J; Pike, David A; Schwarzkopf, Lin; Alford, Ross A

    2015-01-01

    Natural disturbances can drive disease dynamics in animal populations by altering the microclimates experienced by hosts and their pathogens. Many pathogens are highly sensitive to temperature and moisture, and therefore small changes in habitat structure can alter the microclimate in ways that increase or decrease infection prevalence and intensity in host populations. Here we show that a reduction of rainforest canopy cover caused by a severe tropical cyclone decreased the risk of endangered rainforest frogs (Litoria rheocola) becoming infected by a fungal pathogen (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis). Reductions in canopy cover increased the temperatures and rates of evaporative water loss in frog microhabitats, which reduced B. dendrobatidis infection risk in frogs by an average of 11-28% in cyclone-damaged areas, relative to unaffected areas. Natural disturbances to the rainforest canopy can therefore provide an immediate benefit to frogs by altering the microclimate in ways that reduce infection risk. This could increase host survival and reduce the probability of epidemic disease outbreaks. For amphibian populations under immediate threat from this pathogen, targeted manipulation of canopy cover could increase the availability of warmer, drier microclimates and therefore tip the balance from host extinction to coexistence. PMID:26294048

  2. Cardiovascular diseases and risk factors among Chinese immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zhizhong; Zhao, Dong

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and major CVD risk factors, including diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity and smoking among Chinese immigrants by a systematic review of studies from various countries. PubMed and the China National Knowledge Infrastructure databases were searched for studies of the prevalence of major CVDs and risk factors, and of CVD mortality among Chinese immigrants. The search identified 386 papers, 16 of which met the inclusion criteria for this review. In mainland China, there is a pattern of high stroke prevalence but low coronary heart disease (CHD) prevalence. Among Chinese immigrants, there is a much lower prevalence and mortality of stroke, but a higher prevalence and mortality of CHD, even though these are lower than the rates in immigrants of other ethnicities in the host country. The prevalence of CVD risk factors is also markedly different in immigrants. Compared with mainland Chinese, Chinese immigrants have a higher prevalence of diabetes and hypertension, higher serum cholesterol, poorer dietary patterns, and higher prevalence of obesity and smoking. Thus, the epidemiological pattern of CVD among Chinese immigrants changes compared with resident mainland Chinese. The less healthy environmental factor after immigration may be a major trigger in the adverse CVD status of Chinese immigrants. It is important for policy-makers to pay more attention to specific minority immigrant groups, and to implement more effective preventive measures to improve the health of immigrant populations. PMID:26350421

  3. ROLE OF VARIOUS RISK FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranay Wal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Coronary Artery Disease (CAD is the leading cause of cardiovascular mortality world wide. Increasing rate of CAD mortality and projected rise in CAD mortality for 2020 in the developing world necessitates immediate prevention and control measures. Cardiovascular disease (CVD is generally due to reduced blood flow to the heart, brain or body caused by atheroma or thrombosis. It is increasingly common after the age of 60, but rare below the age of 30. Plaques (plates of fatty atheroma build up in different arteries during adult life. These can eventually cause narrowing of the arteries, or trigger a local thrombosis (blood clot which completely blocks the blood flow. Despite scientific evidence that evidence based drug therapy reduce mortality in patients with established CAD, these therapies continue to be underutilized in patients receiving conventional care. It is essential to identify and manage risk factors for coronary artery diseases and to implement unique and creative approaches to stimulate better adherence to practice guidelines, to improve the quality of care given to patients with CAD. Reduction of SBP, DBP, heart rate, and body fat%, total cholesterol, triglycerides and LDL after regular yogic practices is beneficial for cardiac and hypertensive patients. Emphasis focusing on conventional risk factors, lifestyle modifications, smoking cessation, reduction of central obesity through dietary modification and exercise, can be proved to be the key interventions for preventing CAD.

  4. Electromagnetic fields: risk assessment and occupational diseases in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Every year about 8000 occupational diseases are accepted in Italy by I.N.A.I.L., the Italian Workers' Compensation Authority. The occupational diseases are caused by different agents (chemical, biological, physical) but only a very little percentage resulted to be caused by non ionizing radiations. In this paper the Authors report an analysis of occupational diseases caused by non ionising radiations denounced to I.N.A.I.L. and compensated. It is discussed the Italian situation in light of the controversial studies related to the link between exposure and health effects. Because of the uncertainty about an E.M.F. - health link, the main effort is to determine the probability and seriousness of E.M.F. hazard and to realize an accurate risk assessment at workplace, which is one of the main objectives pursued by I.N.A.I.L. Technical Advisory Department for Risk Assessment and Prevention. Moreover, in this paper it is also reported the state of advancement of Italian legislation on health protection against non ionizing radiations at workplace in view of the new European Directive (2004/40/C.E.). (authors)

  5. Mate preference and disease risk in Zootermopsis angusticollis (Isoptera: Termopsidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengaus, Rebeca B; James, Lady-Thelma; Hartke, Tamara R; Brent, Colin S

    2011-12-01

    Termites face significant and chronic intranidal selection pressures from parasites and pathogens that colonize their nests. They also encounter microbes outside their nest while foraging and during dispersal of winged primary reproductives to establish new colonies. The latter run the additional risk of becoming infected by a mating partner. Indeed, death of reproductives because of disease is a major cause of incipient colony failure and may favor prescreening prospective mates for signs of illness. To determine the role of disease on mate preference in termites, female primary reproductives of the Pacific dampwood termite Zootermopsis angusticollis (Hagen) simultaneously were presented with reproductive males that were either healthy or exhibiting a progression of symptoms associated with infection by the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae (Metchnikoff Sorokin). We compared duration and frequency of female visits to healthy and infected males. In addition, we determined the physiological consequences for females exposed to fungal conidia, either directly or indirectly through their mate. Females showed no preference for healthy rather than infected males. Moreover, only directly-exposed females experienced negative physiological effects, having a reduced chance of survival, gaining less weight, developing fewer functional ovarioles, and producing significantly fewer vitellogenic oocytes than controls. Although there are important fitness-related costs of direct exposure, the lack of mate selection based on disease risk suggests that more imminent ecological pressures (e.g., predators, desiccation) override the need for a careful and time-consuming assessment of a potential mate's health. PMID:22217773

  6. Electromagnetic fields: risk assessment and occupational diseases in Italy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filosa, L.; Frusteri, L. [Risk Assessment and Prevention, Technical Advisory Dept., Italian Workers Compensation Authority, Rome (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Every year about 8000 occupational diseases are accepted in Italy by I.N.A.I.L., the Italian Workers' Compensation Authority. The occupational diseases are caused by different agents (chemical, biological, physical) but only a very little percentage resulted to be caused by non ionizing radiations. In this paper the Authors report an analysis of occupational diseases caused by non ionising radiations denounced to I.N.A.I.L. and compensated. It is discussed the Italian situation in light of the controversial studies related to the link between exposure and health effects. Because of the uncertainty about an E.M.F. - health link, the main effort is to determine the probability and seriousness of E.M.F. hazard and to realize an accurate risk assessment at workplace, which is one of the main objectives pursued by I.N.A.I.L. Technical Advisory Department for Risk Assessment and Prevention. Moreover, in this paper it is also reported the state of advancement of Italian legislation on health protection against non ionizing radiations at workplace in view of the new European Directive (2004/40/C.E.). (authors)

  7. Risk of Lyme disease development after a tick bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladenović Jovan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Despite numerous research of Lyme disease (LD, there are still many concerns about environmental of infectious agent of LD, as well as its prophylaxis, diagnosis and treatment. The aim of this work was to determine the risk of LD in relation to the way of removing ticks and duration of tick attachment. Methods. In the period from 2000 to 2007 a prospective study was conducted including persons with tick bite referred to the Institute of Epidemiology, Military Medical Academy, and followed for the occurrence of early Lyme disease up to six months after a tick bite. Epidemiological questionnaire was used to collect relevant information about the place and time of tick bites, the way of a removing tick, duration of tick attachment, remnants of a tick left in the skin (parts of the mouth device and the signs of clinical manifestations of LD. Duration of tick attachment was determined on the basis of size of engorged tick and epidemiological data. Removed ticks were determined by the key of Pomerancev. Professional removing of attached tick was considered to be removing of tick with mechanical means by healthcare personnel. Fisher's exact test, Chi squares test and calculation of the relative risk (RR were used for data analysis. Results. Of 3 126 patients with tick bite, clinical manifestations of LD were demonstrated in 19 (0.61%. In the group of subjects (n = 829 in which a tick was not removed professionally there were 17 (2.05% cases with LD, while in the group of respondents (n=2 297 in who a tick was removed professionally there were 2 (0.09% cases with LD after tick bite (RR, 23.55; p < 0.0001. The disease was most frequent in the group of respondents with incompletely and unprofessionally removed ticks (2.46%. In the groups of patients with unprofessionally but completely removed ticks LD occurred in 0.89%, while in the group of subjects with a tick removed by an expert, but incompletely in 0.78% cases. The disease occurred

  8. Long-term trends in cardiovascular disease mortality and association with respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, A J

    2016-03-01

    The recent decline in cardiovascular disease mortality in Western countries has been linked with changes in life style and treatment. This study considers periods of decline before effective medical interventions or knowledge about risk factors. Trends in annual age-standardized death rates from cerebrovascular disease, heart disease and circulatory disease, and all cardiovascular disease are reviewed for three phases, 1881-1916, 1920-1939, and 1940-2000. There was a consistent decline in the cerebrovascular disease death rate between 1891 and 2000, apart from brief increases after the two world wars. The heart disease and circulatory disease death rate was declining between 1891 and 1910 before cigarette smoking became prevalent. The early peak in cardiovascular mortality in 1891 coincided with an influenza pandemic and a peak in the death rate from bronchitis, pneumonia and influenza. There is also correspondence between short-term fluctuations in the death rates from these respiratory diseases and cardiovascular disease. This evidence of ecological association is consistent with the findings of many studies that seasonal influenza can trigger acute myocardial infarction and episodes of respiratory infection are followed by increased risk of cardiovascular events. Vaccination studies could provide more definitive evidence of the role in cardiovascular disease and mortality of influenza, other viruses, and common bacterial agents of respiratory infection. PMID:26243537

  9. Crohn's disease and risk of fracture: does thyroid disease play a role?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nakechand Pooran; Pankaj Singh; Simmy Bank

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To assess the role of thyroid disease as a risk for fractures in Crohn's patients.METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted from 1998 to 2000. The study group consisted of 210 patients with Crohn's disease. A group of 206 patients without inflammatory bowel disease served as controls. Primary outcome was thyroid disorder. Secondary outcomes included use of steroids, immunosuppressive medications, surgery and incidence of fracture.RESULTS: The prevalence of hyperthyroidism was similar in both groups. However, the prevalence of hypothyroidism was lower in Crohn's patients (3.8 % vs 8.2 %, P=0.05).Within the Crohn's group, the use of immunosuppressive agents (0 % vs11 %), steroid usage (12.5 % vs37 %), small bowel surgery (12.5 % vs 28 %) and large bowel surgery (12.5 % vs27 %) were lower in the hypothyroid subset as compared to the euthyroid subset. Seven (3.4 %) Crohn'spatients suffered fracture, all of whom were euthyroid.CONCLUSION: Thyroid disorder was not found to be associated with Crohn's disease and was not found to increase the risk for fractures. Therefore, screening for thyroid disease is not a necessary component in the management of Crohn's disease.

  10. Risk factors for alcoholic liver disease in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Lan Lu; Jin-Yan Luo; Ming Tao; Yan Gen; Ping Zhao; Hong-Li Zhao; Xiao-Dong Zhang; Nei Dong

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To examine the association of daily alcohol intake,types of alcoholic beverage consumed, drinking patterns and obesity with alcoholic liver disease in China.METHODS: By random cluster sampling and a 3-year follow-up study, 1 270 alcohol drinkers were recruited from different occupations in the urban and suburban areas of Xi'an City. They were examined by specialists and inquired for information on: Medical history and family medical history, alcohol intake, types of alcoholic beverage consumed, drinking patterns by detailed dietary questionnaires. Routine blood tests and ultrasonography were done.RESULTS: Multivariate analysis showed that: (1) The risk threshold for developing alcoholic liver disease was ingestion of more than 20 g alcohol per day, keeping on drinking for over 5 years in men. The highest OR was at the daily alcohol consumption ≥160 g, the occurrence rate of ALD amounted to 18.7% (P<0.01). No ALD occurred when ingestion of alcohol was less than 20 g per day. (2) 87.9% of all drank only at mealtimes. The cumulative risk of developing ALD was significantly higher in those individuals who regularly drank alcohol without food than in those who drank only at mealtimes, especially for those who regularly drank hard liquors only and multiple drinks (P<0.05). (3) The alcohol consumption in those with BMI ≥25 was lower than in those with BMI <25, but the risk increased to 11.5%, significantly higher than that of general population, 6.5% (P<0.01). (4)Abstinence and weight reduction could benefit the liver function recovery.CONCLUSION: In the Chinese population the ethanol risk threshold for developing ALD is 20 g per day, and this risk increases with increased daily intake. Drinking 20 g of ethanol per day and for less than 5 years are safe from ALD. Drinking alcohol outside mealtimes and drinking hard liquors only and multiple different alcohol beverages both increase the risk of developing ALD. Obesity also increases the risk. Abstinence

  11. Association between Autoimmune Rheumatic Diseases and the Risk of Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Lu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARD are characterized by systemic inflammation and may affect multiple organs and cause vascular events such as ischemic stroke and acute myocardial infarction. However, the association between ARD and increased risk of dementia is uncertain. This is a retrospective cohort study to investigate and compare the risk of dementia between patients clinically diagnosed with ARD and non-ARD patients during a 5-year follow-up period. Methods. Data were obtained from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 (LHID2000. We included 1221 patients receiving ambulatory or hospitalization care and 6105 non-ARD patients; patients were matched by sex, age, and the year of index use of health care. Each patient was studied for 5 years to identify the subsequent manifestation of dementia. The data obtained were analyzed by Cox proportional hazard regression. Results. During the 5-year follow-up period, 30 ARD (2.48% and 141 non-ARD patients (2.31% developed dementia. During the 5-year follow-up period, there were no significant differences in the risks of any type of dementia (adjusted hazard ratio (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.79–1.76 in the ARD group after adjusting for demographics and comorbidities. Conclusions. Within the 5-year period, patients with and without ARD were found to have similar risks of developing dementia.

  12. Emerging Risk Biomarkers in Cardiovascular Diseases and Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Kant Upadhyay

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Present review article highlights various cardiovascular risk prediction biomarkers by incorporating both traditional risk factors to be used as diagnostic markers and recent technologically generated diagnostic and therapeutic markers. This paper explains traditional biomarkers such as lipid profile, glucose, and hormone level and physiological biomarkers based on measurement of levels of important biomolecules such as serum ferritin, triglyceride to HDLp (high density lipoproteins ratio, lipophorin-cholesterol ratio, lipid-lipophorin ratio, LDL cholesterol level, HDLp and apolipoprotein levels, lipophorins and LTPs ratio, sphingolipids, Omega-3 Index, and ST2 level. In addition, immunohistochemical, oxidative stress, inflammatory, anatomical, imaging, genetic, and therapeutic biomarkers have been explained in detail with their investigational specifications. Many of these biomarkers, alone or in combination, can play important role in prediction of risks, its types, and status of morbidity. As emerging risks are found to be affiliated with minor and microlevel factors and its diagnosis at an earlier stage could find CVD, hence, there is an urgent need of new more authentic, appropriate, and reliable diagnostic and therapeutic markers to confirm disease well in time to start the clinical aid to the patients. Present review aims to discuss new emerging biomarkers that could facilitate more authentic and fast diagnosis of CVDs, HF (heart failures, and various lipid abnormalities and disorders in the future.

  13. Emerging risk biomarkers in cardiovascular diseases and disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Ravi Kant

    2015-01-01

    Present review article highlights various cardiovascular risk prediction biomarkers by incorporating both traditional risk factors to be used as diagnostic markers and recent technologically generated diagnostic and therapeutic markers. This paper explains traditional biomarkers such as lipid profile, glucose, and hormone level and physiological biomarkers based on measurement of levels of important biomolecules such as serum ferritin, triglyceride to HDLp (high density lipoproteins) ratio, lipophorin-cholesterol ratio, lipid-lipophorin ratio, LDL cholesterol level, HDLp and apolipoprotein levels, lipophorins and LTPs ratio, sphingolipids, Omega-3 Index, and ST2 level. In addition, immunohistochemical, oxidative stress, inflammatory, anatomical, imaging, genetic, and therapeutic biomarkers have been explained in detail with their investigational specifications. Many of these biomarkers, alone or in combination, can play important role in prediction of risks, its types, and status of morbidity. As emerging risks are found to be affiliated with minor and microlevel factors and its diagnosis at an earlier stage could find CVD, hence, there is an urgent need of new more authentic, appropriate, and reliable diagnostic and therapeutic markers to confirm disease well in time to start the clinical aid to the patients. Present review aims to discuss new emerging biomarkers that could facilitate more authentic and fast diagnosis of CVDs, HF (heart failures), and various lipid abnormalities and disorders in the future. PMID:25949827

  14. CARDIOVASCULAR RISK FACTORS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. D. Bazdyrev

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to detect previously undiagnosed arterial hypertension in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD as a risk factor for cardiovascular mortality.Materials and methods. 43 patients with stage I–II of COPD and the absence of clinical signs of cardiovascular diseases were examined. Spirometry, body plethysmography and diffusing lung capacity (DLCO were included in the respiratory system assessment. The cardiovascular system was assessed with echocardiography and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM.Results. Despite the absence of obvious signs of cardiovascular lesions (an increase of office blood pressure, intracardiac hemodynamic changes, the following cardiovascular risk factors were identified: age (58.2 ± 2.0 years, male gender, smoking, hypercholesterolemia and dyslipidemia (total cholesterol 5.9 ± 0.9 mmol / l, low density lipoproteins 3.8 ± 0.5 mmol / l, triglycerides 1.8 ± 0.2 mmol / l. Correlation analysis has revealed the relation between several respiratory parameters and the severity of dyspnea and quality of life in patients with COPD, as well as its relation with lipid levels.Conclusion. The patients with COPD have a large number of risk factors for CVD. According to ABPM data, arterial hypertension was verified in 18 (41.9 % of 43 patients with COPD at normal level of office blood pressure; moreover, 51.2 % of patients demonstrated low reduction of blood pressure during the night-time that nowadays, is considered to be a predictor of cardiovascular disease and sudden death.

  15. Work Stress as a Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kivimäki, Mika; Kawachi, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    The role of psychosocial work stress as a risk factor for chronic disease has been the subject of considerable debate. Many researchers argue in support of a causal connection while others remain skeptical and have argued that the effect on specific health conditions is either negligible or confounded. This review of evidence from over 600,000 men and women from 27 cohort studies in Europe, the USA and Japan suggests that work stressors, such as job strain and long working hours, are associat...

  16. Lifestyle, family history, and risk of idiopathic Parkinson disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kenborg, Line; Lassen, Christina F; Ritz, Beate;

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between Parkinson disease (PD) and smoking has been examined in several studies, but little is known about smoking in conjunction with other behaviors and a family history of PD. Using unconditional logistic regression analysis, we studied individual and joint associations of these.......60 (95% confidence interval: 1.15, 2.23). In conclusion, duration of smoking seems to be more important than intensity in the relationship between smoking and idiopathic PD. The finding of lower risk estimates for smoking in combination with caffeine or alcohol requires further confirmation....

  17. Albuminuria: Prevalence, associated risk factors and relationship with cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Fang; Yang, Wenying; Weng, Jianping; Jia, Weiping; Ji, Linong; Xiao, Jianzhong; Shan, Zhongyan; Liu, Jie; Tian, Haoming; Ji, Qiuhe; Zhu, Dalong; Ge, Jiapu; Lin, Lixiang; Chen, Li; Guo, Xiaohui

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims/Introduction To investigate the prevalence and associated risk factors of microalbuminuria, and to explore the relationship between albuminuria and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Materials and Methods A nationally representative sample of 38,203 Chinese participants was categorized by different levels of urinary albumin‐to‐creatinine ratio (ACR; 0 –10 mg/g, 10 –20 mg/g, 20 –30 mg/g, 30 –300 mg/g). The prevalence of albuminuria was compared by using a single urinary ACR cut‐off po...

  18. Relation between diet composition and coronary heart disease risk factors.

    OpenAIRE

    Porrini, M.; Simonetti, P.; Testolin, G; C. Roggi; Laddomada, M S; Tenconi, M T

    1991-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to evaluate dietary intakes and their correlation to some risk factors for coronary heart disease. DESIGN--The study was a population based survey with random sample selection stratified by age and sex. PARTICIPANTS--352 adults living in a small town in Northern Italy took part in the study. Response rate was 46% among females and 48% among males. Refusal to take part was mainly due to the large number of tests involved. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS--Diets were h...

  19. [How to reduce the risk of Legionnaires' disease?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonne, Anne; Astagneau, Pascal

    2005-11-30

    Legionella pneumophila is a microorganism present in water and able to develop pneumoniae through inhalation of contaminated aerosols. Legionnaires'disease is rare (1000 cases per year in France) concerning particularly people with risk factors, but potentially with severe prognosis (lethality 15-20%). The diagnosis was recently facilitated by the introduction of urinary antigen test. Hospital is the most frequent place where L. pneumophila were acquired; however the proportion of nosocomial cases is decreasing since 2001. The associated mortality is higher for hospital acquired cases than for community acquired cases. Several official guidelines were written about prevention of legionnaires' disease. Primary prevention is essentially based on control and maintaining of water-distribution system. Secondary prevention should be a prompt response to identification of a case in order to find the source of Legionella and to protect immunocompromised persons. PMID:16419902

  20. Pediatric nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lucia Pacifico; Valerio Nobili; Caterina Anania; Paola Verdecchia; Claudio Chiesa

    2011-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a range of liver histology severity and outcomes in the absence of chronic alcohol use. The mildest form is simple steatosis in which triglycerides accumulate within hepatocytes. A more advanced form of NAFLD, nonalcoholic steatohepatitis, includes inflammation and liver cell injury, progressive to cryptogenic cirrhosis. NAFLD has become the most common cause of chronic liver disease in children and adolescents. The recent rise in the prevalence rates of overweight and obesity likely explains the NAFLD epidemic worldwide. NAFLD is strongly associated with abdominal obesity, type 2 diabetes, and dyslipidemia, and most patients have evidence of insulin resistance. Thus, NAFLD shares many features of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), a highly atherogenic condition, and this has stimulated interest in the possible role of NAFLD in the development of atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence suggests that NAFLD is associated with a significantly greater overall mortality than in the general population, as well as with increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), independently of classical atherosclerotic risk factors. Yet, several studies including the pediatric population have reported independent associations between NAFLD and impaired flow-mediated vasodilatation and increased carotid artery intimal medial thickness-two reliable markers of subclinical atherosclerosis-after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and MetS. Therefore, the rising prevalence of obesity-related MetS and NAFLD in childhood may lead to a parallel increase in adverse cardiovascular outcomes. In children, the cardiovascular system remains plastic and damage-reversible if early and appropriate interventions are established effectively. Therapeutic goals for NAFLD should address nutrition, physical activity, and avoidance of smoking to prevent not only end-stage liver disease but also CVD.

  1. Metabolic syndrome as a risk factor for gallstone disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nahum Méndez-Sánchez; Norberto C. Chavez-Tapia; Daniel Motola-Kuba; Karla Sanchez-Lara; Guadalupe Ponciano-Rodríguez; Héctor Baptista; Martha H. Ramos; Misael Uribe

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To establish an association between the presence of metabolic syndrome and the development of gallstone disease.METHOIDS: We carried out a cross-sectional study in a check-up unit in a university hospital in Mexico City. We enrolled 245 subjects, comprising 65 subjects with gallstones (36 women, 29 men) and 180 controls (79women and 101 men without gallstones). Body mass index, waist circumference, blood pressure, plasma insulin, and serum lipids and lipoproteins levels were measured. Insulin resistance was calculated by homeostasis model assessment. Unconditional logistic regressionanalysis (univariate and multivariate) was used to calculate the risk of gallstone disease associated with the presence of at least three of the criteria (Adult Treatment Panel Ⅲ). Analyses were adjusted for age and sex.RESULTS: Among 245 subjects, metabolic syndrome was present in 40% of gallstone disease subjects, compared with 17.2% of the controls, adjusted by age and gender (odds ratio (OR) = 2.79; 95%CI, 1.46-5.33; P = 0.002),a dose-dependent effect was observed with each component of metabolic syndrome (OR = 2.36, 95%CI, 0.72-7.71;P = 0.16 with one component and OR = 5.54, 95%CI,1.35-22.74; P = 0.02 with four components of metabolic syndrome). Homeostasis model assessment was significantly associated with gallstone disease (adjusted OR = 2.25;95%CI, 1.08-4.69; P = 0.03).CONCLUSION: We conclude that as for cardiovascular disease and diabetes mellitus, gallstone disease appears to be strongly associated with metabolic syndrome.

  2. Iron: Protector or Risk Factor for Cardiovascular Disease? Still Controversial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio García-Rodríguez

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Iron is the second most abundant metal in the Earth’s crust. Despite being present in trace amounts, it is an essential trace element for the human body, although it can also be toxic due to oxidative stress generation by the Fenton reaction, causing organic biomolecule oxidation. This process is the basis of numerous pathologies, including cardiovascular diseases (CVD. The relationship between iron and cardiovascular disease was proposed in 1981 by Jerome Sullivan. Since then, numerous epidemiological studies have been conducted to test this hypothesis. The aim of this review is to present the main findings of the chief epidemiological studies published during the last 32 years, since Sullivan formulated his iron hypothesis, suggesting that this element might act as a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We have analyzed 55 studies, of which 27 supported the iron hypothesis, 20 found no evidence to support it and eight were contrary to the iron hypothesis. Our results suggest that there is not a high level of evidence which supports the hypothesis that the iron may be associated with CVD. Despite the large number of studies published to date, the role of iron in cardiovascular disease still generates a fair amount of debate, due to a marked disparity in results.

  3. Ageism as a Risk Factor for Chronic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Julie Ober

    2016-08-01

    Ageism is one of the most socially condoned and institutionalized forms of prejudice in the United States. Older adults are discriminated against in employment, health care, and other domains. Exposure to unfavorable stereotypes adversely affects the attitudes, cognitions, and behavior of older adults. Recurrent experiences with negative stereotypes combined with discrimination may make ageism a chronic stressor in the lives of older adults. The way stress influences physical health is gaining increasing support. The weathering hypothesis (Geronimus, A. T. (1992) The weathering hypothesis and the health of African-American women and infants: Evidence and speculations. Ethnicity and Disease, 2, 207-221) posits that the cumulative effects of chronic objective and subjective stressors and high-effort coping cause deterioration of the body, premature aging, and associated health problems such as chronic diseases. Researchers have found empirical support for the weathering hypothesis as well as its theorized contribution to racial and ethnic health disparities. Although ageism is not experienced over the entire life course, as racism typically is, repeated exposure to chronic stressors associated with age stereotypes and discrimination may increase the risk of chronic disease, mortality, and other adverse health outcomes. I conclude with implications for practice in the helping professions and recommendations for future research. Ageism warrants greater recognition, social condemnation, and scientific study as a possible social determinant of chronic disease. PMID:25618315

  4. Chronic Pancreatitis Correlates With Increased Risk of Cerebrovascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Tuck-Siu; Liao, Kuan-Fu; Lin, Chi-Ming; Lin, Cheng-Li; Chen, Wen-Chi; Lai, Shih-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to explore whether there is a relationship between chronic pancreatitis and cerebrovascular disease in Taiwan. Using the claims data of the Taiwan National Health Insurance Program, we identified 16,672 subjects aged 20 to 84 years with a new diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis from 2000 to 2010 as the chronic pancreatitis group. We randomly selected 65,877 subjects aged 20 to 84 years without chronic pancreatitis as the nonchronic pancreatitis group. Both groups were matched by sex, age, comorbidities, and the index year of diagnosing chronic pancreatitis. The incidence of cerebrovascular disease at the end of 2011 was measured. The multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to measure the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for cerebrovascular disease risk associated with chronic pancreatitis and other comorbidities. The overall incidence of cerebrovascular disease was 1.24-fold greater in the chronic pancreatitis group than that in the nonchronic pancreatitis group (14.2 vs. 11.5 per 1000 person-years, 95% CI = 1.19–1.30). After controlling for confounding factors, the adjusted HR of cerebrovascular disease was 1.27 (95% CI = 1.19–1.36) for the chronic pancreatitis group as compared with the nonchronic pancreatitis group. Woman (adjusted HR = 1.41, 95% CI = 1.31–1.51), age (every 1 year, HR = 1.04, 95% CI = 1.04–1.05), atrial fibrillation (adjusted HR = 1.23, 95% CI = 1.02–1.48), chronic kidney disease (adjusted HR = 1.48, 95% CI = 1.31–1.67), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (adjusted HR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.16–1.40), diabetes mellitus (adjusted HR = 1.82, 95% CI = 1.72–1.92), hypertension (adjusted HR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.56–1.76), and peripheral atherosclerosis (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI = 1.06–1.51) were other factors significantly associated with cerebrovascular disease. Chronic pancreatitis is

  5. Risk factors for cerebrovascular disease mortality among the elderly in Beijing: a competing risk analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Tang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To examine the associations of combined lifestyle factors and physical conditions with cerebrovascular diseases (CBVD mortality, after accounting for competing risk events, including death from cardiovascular diseases, cancers and other diseases. METHODS: Data on 2010 subjects aged over 55 years were finally analyzed using competing risk models. All the subjects were interviewed by the Beijing Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA, in China, between 1 January 1992 and 30 August 2009. RESULTS: Elderly females were at a lower risk of death from CBVD than elderly males (HR = 0.639, 95% CI = 0.457-0.895. Increasing age (HR = 1.543, 95% CI = 1.013-2.349, poor self-rated health (HR = 1.652, 95% CI = 1.198-2.277, hypertension (HR = 2.201, 95% CI = 1.524-3.178 and overweight (HR = 1.473, 95% CI = 1.013-2.142 or obesity (HR = 1.711, 95% CI = 1.1754-2.490 was associated with higher CBVD mortality risk. Normal cognition function (HR = 0.650, 95% CI = 0.434-0.973 and living in urban (HR = 0.456, 95% CI = 0.286-0.727 was associated with lower CBVD mortality risk. Gray's test also confirmed the cumulative incidence (CIF of CBVD was lower in the 'married' group than those without spouse, and the mortality was lowest in the 'nutrition sufficient' group among the 'frequent consumption of meat group' and the 'medial type group' (P value<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: CBVD mortality was associated with gender, age, blood pressure, residence, BMI, cognitive function, nutrition and the result of self-rated health assessment in the elderly in Beijing, China.

  6. Strategies for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Claudio

    2015-06-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is frequently accompanied by multimorbidities in affected patients. Even though the majority of these comorbidities are also related to advanced age and cigarette smoke, also COPD itself has significant impact on insurgence, or worsening of these conditions. As a consequence, COPD is regarded as a complex disease with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary involvement. According to current guidelines for the management of COPD patients, the comprehensive treatment of this condition should target respiratory symptoms as well as comorbidities. Cardiovascular disease is one of the most frequent comorbidities in COPD patients and there are several strategies for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease in COPD patients. These include smoking cessation, pharmacologic prevention of cardiovascular disease, and the treatment of COPD. Beta-blockers for the prevention of cardiovascular disease have been traditionally limited in COPD patients, albeit current evidence supporting their efficacy and safety in these patients. With regard to COPD medications, corticosteroids are generally not recommended, except for exacerbations, while long-acting beta2-agonists have demonstrated an acceptable profile of cardiovascular safety. Long-acting anticholinergic bronchodilators, in particular tiotropium in the mist inhaler formulation, have been associated with an increased risk of major cardiovascular events and mortality. Data on this issue remain, however, controversial. Glycopyrronium, a recently introduced anticholinergic, demonstrated. a rapid and sustained relief of respiratory symptoms with a favorable safety profile and no increase in cardiovascular risk, in monotherapy and in combination with a long-acting beta2-agonist in a comprehensive trial program indicating a valid option for COPD patients with CV comorbidities. PMID:25655487

  7. An Integrated Simulation Tool for Modeling the Human Circulatory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asami, Ken'ichi; Kitamura, Tadashi

    This paper presents an integrated simulation of the circulatory system in physiological movement. The large circulatory system model includes principal organs and functional units in modules in which comprehensive physiological changes such as nerve reflexes, temperature regulation, acid/base balance, O2/CO2 balance, and exercise are simulated. A beat-by-beat heart model, in which the corresponding electrical circuit problems are solved by a numerical analytic method, enables calculation of pulsatile blood flow to the major organs. The integration of different perspectives on physiological changes makes this simulation model applicable for the microscopic evaluation of blood flow under various conditions in the human body.

  8. Can oral infection be a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingar Olsen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is a scourge of longevity that will drain enormous resources from public health budgets in the future. Currently, there is no diagnostic biomarker and/or treatment for this most common form of dementia in humans. AD can be of early familial-onset or sporadic with a late-onset. Apart from the two main hallmarks, amyloid-beta and neurofibrillary tangles, inflammation is a characteristic feature of AD neuropathology. Inflammation may be caused by a local central nervous system insult and/or by peripheral infections. Numerous microorganisms are suspected in AD brains ranging from bacteria (mainly oral and non-oral Treponema species, viruses (herpes simplex type I, and yeasts (Candida species. A causal relationship between periodontal pathogens and non-oral Treponema species of bacteria has been proposed via the amyloid-beta and inflammatory links. Periodontitis constitutes a peripheral oral infection that can provide the brain with intact bacteria and virulence factors and inflammatory mediators due to daily, transient bacteremias. If and when genetic risk factors meet environmental risk factors in the brain, disease is expressed, in which neurocognition may be impacted, leading to the development of dementia. To achieve the goal of finding a diagnostic biomarker and possible prophylactic treatment for AD, there is an initial need to solve the etiological puzzle contributing to its pathogenesis. This review therefore addresses oral infection as the plausible etiology of late-onset AD (LOAD.

  9. Myelodysplastic syndrome. A blood disease of high risk to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) is reviewed on its classification, diagnosis, therapy, prognosis, patho-physiology, causes and relation to radiation, mainly from radiation biology aspect. MDL is a cryptogenic, progressive and refractory blood disease with abnormal morphology and dysfunction of cells of bone marrow and peripheral blood and often results in leukemia. Epidemiology shows that radiation is a potent cause of MDL as well as chemotherapy to malignant diseases and that in Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors, leukemia risk is linearly correlated with their exposed dose. In Hiroshima survivors, the excessive relative risk of MDL per Sv (ERR1Sv) is preliminarily reported to be as high as 13 and MDL patients is reportedly increasing in Chernobyl. T-lymphocytes from MDL patients are found more sensitive to X-ray in the micronucleus assay. However, direct causal gene(s) are obscure now. Cause and pathology of MDL are expected solved by future elucidation of gene expression concerned with radiation response and DNA repair, and of subsequent change of functional protein products. (K.H.)

  10. Isotretinoin exposure and risk of inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashtak, Shadi; Khaleghi, Shahryar; Pittelkow, Mark R; Larson, Joseph J; Lahr, Brian D; Murray, Joseph A

    2014-12-01

    IMPORTANCE Isotretinoin is the standard treatment for refractory severe nodulocystic acne.A true association between prior isotretinoin use and development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is uncertain. Addressing the reality of this association is important in decision making for both the clinician and the patient when isotretinoin treatment is indicated.OBJECTIVE To assess the risk of IBD mainly in patients with acne with and without isotretinoin exposure.DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS In this retrospective, single-center study, the electronic medical records of patients who were primarily seeking acne treatment were reviewed for isotretinoin exposure. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes were used to search for IBD diagnosis. participants included 1078 patients from 1995 to 2011,with isotretinoin referenced in their medical records, and who had ongoing local medical care defined as having had a serum sample collected between 2006 to 2011 for any reason while an Olmsted County, Minnesota, resident at the time of serum sample collection.EXPOSURES The exposed group included the patients with confirmed prior isotretinoin exposure (n = 576), and the nonexposed group were defined as patients who never received isotretinoin or received it after the diagnosis of IBD (n = 502).MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Risk of IBD among isotretinoin-exposed vs non exposed patients.RESULTS Both groups were comparable by race, prior systemic antibiotic use, and systemic tetracycline use. Inflammatory bowel disease developed less frequently in the isotretinoin-exposed group vs the nonexposed group (0.9%vs 2.6%; P = .03; unadjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.33; 95%CI, 0.12-0.93; P = .04). The negative association between isotretinoin exposure and IBD remained after adjusting for sex (OR, 0.28; 95%CI, 0.10-0.80;P = .02) and for sex and non acne indication (OR, 0.28; 95%CI, 0.10-0.79; P = .02).CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Our study did not show an increased risk

  11. Risk indicators in coronary cardiac disease and occlusive disease of the peripheral arteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 160 patients with clinically confirmed coronary heart diseases, angiograms of the coronary vessels, the left ventricle, the abdominal aorta, the pelvic and femoral arteries and the supra-aortic vessels were taken. At the same time the incidence of the risk indicators overweight, hypercholesterinaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, hyperuricaemia, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and cigarette smoking was established and compared with the angiograms. Hypercholesterinaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, diabetes mellitus and hypertension are found to be in a clearly positive correlation with the frequency and severity of coronary and peripheral vascular diseases. For hyperuricaemia and overweight a relation to the frequency and severity of peripheral but not coronary vascular stenoses is outlined. Cigarette smoking, again, proves to be a clear risk indicator. (orig./MG)

  12. Early cardiovascular risk markers and cardiac function in children with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Tranæus Lindblad, Ylva

    2016-01-01

    Children with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk of premature death, foremost due to cardiovascular disease (CVD). The cardiovascular (CV) morbidity starts early in the disease process and renal transplanted children (CKD-T) are also at risk. Aims: The overall aim of this thesis was to study CV morbidity and potential risk factors in pediatric CKD and CKD-T patients. The prevalence of various known biomarkers associated with increased risk of CVD was assessed ...

  13. Obesity and cardiometabolic disease risk factors among USadolescents with disabilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sarah E Messiah; Denise C Vidot; Gabriel Somarriba; Kanathy Haney; Semra Aytur; Ruby A Natale; Jeffrey P Brosco; Kristopher L Arheart

    2015-01-01

    AIM To generate prevalence estimates of weightstatus and cardiometabolic disease risk factors amongadolescents with and without disabilities.METHODS: Analysis of the 1999-2010 National Healthand Nutrition Examination Survey data was conductedamong 12-18 years old with (n = 256) and withoutdisabilities (n = 5020). Mean values of waist circumference,fasting glucose, high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol,triglycerides, systolic and diastolic blood pressure andmetabolic syndrome (MetS, ≥ 3 risk factors present) wereexamined by the following standardized body mass index(BMI) categories for those with and without disabilities;overweight (BMI ≥ 85th - 〈 95th percentile for age andsex), obesity (BMI ≥ 95th percentile) and severe obesity(BMI ≥35 kg/m2). Linear regression models were fit witheach cardiometabolic disease risk factor independently ascontinuous outcomes to show relationships with disabilitystatus.RESULTS: Adolescents with disabilities were significantly more likely to be overweight (49.3%), obese (27.6%)and severely obese (12%) vs their peers withoutdisabilities (33.1%, 17.5% and 3.6%, respectively, P≤ 0.01 for all). A higher proportion of overweight,obese and severely obese children with disabilities hadabnormal SBP, fasting lipids and glucose as well asMetS (18.9% of overweight, 32.3% of obese, 55% ofseverely obese) vs their peers without disabilities (9.7%,16.8%, 36.3%, respectively). US adolescents withdisabilities are over three times as likely to have MetS(OR = 3.45, 95%CI: 1.08-10.99, P = 0.03) vs theirpeers with no disabilities.CONCLUSION: Results show that adolescents withdisabilities are disproportionately affected by obesityand poor cardiometabolic health vs their peers withno disabilities. Health care professionals shouldmonitor the cardiometabolic health of adolescents withdisabilities.

  14. Cervical removal at hysterectomy for benign disease. Risks and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasson, H M

    1993-10-01

    An assessment of the risks and benefits of total and subtotal hysterectomy for benign disease was performed using the published literature, including a MEDLINE search, on all studies dealing with hysterectomy and related topics from 1946 to 1992. The shift from subtotal to total hysterectomy occurred before cytologic screening was accepted. Currently, SIL is diagnosed by cytology, evaluated by colposcopy and treated preferentially with cone biopsy. Prophylactic removal of the cervix does not eliminate the risk of cancer: it may shift the risk to the vaginal epithelium. The cervix has a role in sexual arousal and orgasm, probably due to stimulation of the Frankenhauser uterovaginal plexus. Bladder and bowel dysfunction following total hysterectomy may be related to loss of nerve ganglia closely associated with the cervix. Increased operative and postoperative morbidity, vaginal shortening, vault prolapse, abnormal cuff granulations and oviductal prolapse are other disadvantages of total hysterectomy. The cervix is not a useless organ and should not be removed during hysterectomy without a proper indication. PMID:8263867

  15. Risk of diarrheal disease in Ecuadorian day-care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sempértegui, F; Estrellá, B; Egas, J; Carrión, P; Yerovi, L; Díaz, S; Lascano, M; Aranha, R; Ortiz, W; Zabala, A

    1995-07-01

    To determine the risk for diarrheal disease (DD) in day-care centers (DCC) for children residing in a poor urban slum area of Quito, Ecuador, compared with that for children from the same environment but cared for in their own residential home (RH), a prospective age-, sex- and locale-controlled study of DD was conducted, including 115 children in DCC and 115 in RH, ages 12 to 42 months. The overall incidence of DD was 46/1000 child weeks. Diarrhea was more common in DCC than in RH (relative risk (RR), 1.75; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.38 to 2.22; P vegetables was associated with a higher risk of DD in DCC than in RH (RR = 4.08, CI 2.93 to 5.67, P Aeromonas (RR = 10.47, CI 1.35 to 81.05, P Aeromonas isolates were resistant to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7567291

  16. Binge drinking, drinking frequency, and risk of ischaemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov-Ettrup, Lise; Eliasen, Marie; Ekholm, Ola;

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Light-to-moderate alcohol drinking is associated with a decreased risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD). However, drinking heavily and in binges has been suggested to increase IHD risk. This complexity makes the issue of binge drinking within the light-to-moderate alcohol range an...... important area for further investigation. METHODS: This population-based cohort study included 26,786 men and women who participated in the Danish National Cohort Study in 1994, 2000, and 2005. Binge drinking (defined >5 drinks/day) and risk of IHD and all-cause mortality was investigated among light...... during a mean follow up of 6.9 years. Among male light-to-moderate drinkers reporting occasional binge drinking, the hazard ratio (HR) of IHD was 0.81 (95% CI 0.61-1.08) compared to male light-to-moderate drinkers reporting no binge drinking. Corresponding HR for women was 0.97 (95% CI 0.54-1.76). For...

  17. Modifiable Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Indigenous Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam A. Lucero

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To identify modifiable cardio-metabolic and lifestyle risk factors among indigenous populations from Australia (Aboriginal Australians/Torres Strait Islanders, New Zealand (Māori, and the United States (American Indians and Alaska Natives that contribute to cardiovascular disease (CVD. Methods. National health surveys were identified where available. Electronic databases identified sources for filling missing data. The most relevant data were identified, organized, and synthesized. Results. Compared to their non-indigenous counterparts, indigenous populations exhibit lower life expectancies and a greater prevalence of CVD. All indigenous populations have higher rates of obesity and diabetes, hypertension is greater for Māori and Aboriginal Australians, and high cholesterol is greater only among American Indians/Alaska Natives. In turn, all indigenous groups exhibit higher rates of smoking and dangerous alcohol behaviour as well as consuming less fruits and vegetables. Aboriginal Australians and American Indians/Alaska Natives also exhibit greater rates of sedentary behaviour. Conclusion. Indigenous groups from Australia, New Zealand, and the United States have a lower life expectancy then their respective non-indigenous counterparts. A higher prevalence of CVD is a major driving force behind this discrepancy. A cluster of modifiable cardio-metabolic risk factors precede CVD, which, in turn, is linked to modifiable lifestyle risk factors.

  18. Do Cardiometabolic Risk Factors Relative Risks Differ for the Occurrence of Ischemic Heart Disease and Stroke?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalami Harandi, Samaneh; Sarrafzadegan, Nizal; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Talaei, Mohammad; Dianatkhah, Mino; Oveisgharan, Shahram; Pourmoghaddas, Ali; Salehi, Asma; Sedighifard, Zohre

    2016-01-01

    Background: The effects of the risk factors of ischemic heart disease (IHD) and stroke on the occurrence of these diseases differ between different populations. Objectives: To study the difference in the effects of different cardiovascular (CVD) risk factors on the incidence of IHD and stroke in an Iranian adult population. Patients and Methods: The Isfahan Cohort Study (ICS) is a longitudinal study that followed up 6323 subjects older than 35 years with no history of CVD since 2001. Of the original sample, only 5431 participants were contacted and followed up until 2011. The end points were the occurrence of IHD (defined as fatal and non-fatal myocardial infarction, unstable angina, and sudden cardiac death) and stroke. After 10 years of follow-up, 564 new cases of IHD and 141 new cases of stroke were detected. The relative risks (RRs) of cardiometabolic risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia, high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level, current smoking, obesity, high waist-to-hip ratio, family history of CVD, and metabolic syndrome were compared between IHD and stroke patients. The ratio of relative risks (RRR) was calculated for comparing two RRs and estimated adjusted RRR was calculated by using generalized linear regression with a log link and binomial distribution. Results: The RRs of the occurrence of IHD and stroke in diabetic patients were 1.94 and 3.26, respectively, and the difference was statistically different (P = 0.016). The RR of high LDL-C was significantly higher for IHD than for stroke (P = 0.045), while all the other risk factors showed similar RRs for IHD and stroke, with no significant difference in their RRR, including hypertension. Diabetes and hypertension had the highest RRs for IHD, followed by diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and hypertension for stroke. Conclusions: The effect of diabetes mellitus on stroke was more

  19. Risk factors for alloimmunization by patients with sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Murao

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Blood transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD is limited by the development of alloantibodies to erythrocytes. In the present study, the frequency and risk factors for alloimmunization were determined. Transfusion records and medical charts of 828 SCD patients who had been transfused and followed at the Belo Horizonte Blood Center, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil, were retrospectively reviewed. Alloimmunization frequency was 9.9% (95% CI: 7.9 to 11.9% and 125 alloantibodies were detected, 79% of which belonged to the Rhesus and Kell systems. Female patients developed alloimmunization more frequently (P = 0.03. The median age of the alloimmunized group was 23.3 years, compared to 14.6 years for the non-alloimmunized group (P < 0.0001. Multivariate analyses were applied to the data for 608 hemoglobin (Hb SS or SC patients whose number of transfusions was recorded accurately. Number of transfusions (P = 0.00006, older age (P = 0.056 and Hb SC (P = 0.02 showed independent statistical associations with alloimmunization. Hb SC patients older than 14 years faced a 2.8-fold higher (95% CI: 1.3 to 6.0 risk of alloimmunization than Hb SS patients. Female Hb SC patients had the highest risk of developing alloantibodies. In patients younger than 14 years, only the number of transfusions was significant. We conclude that an increased risk of alloimmunization was associated with older patients with Hb SC, specially females, even after adjustments were made for the number of transfusions received, the most significant variable.

  20. The European Registry for Patients with Mechanical Circulatory Support (EUROMACS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de By, Theo M M H; Mohacsi, Paul; Gummert, Jan; Bushnaq, Hasan; Krabatsch, Thomas; Gustafsson, Finn; Leprince, Pascal; Martinelli, Luigi; Meyns, Bart; Morshuis, Michiel; Netuka, Ivan; Potapov, Evgenij; Zittermann, Armin; Delmo Walter, Eva Maria; Hetzer, Roland

    2015-01-01

    other founding international members. It aims to promote scientific research to improve care of end-stage heart failure patients with ventricular assist device or a total artificial heart as long-term mechanical circulatory support. Likewise, the organization aims to provide and maintain a registry of...

  1. Organ donation after circulatory death: the forgotten donor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rady, Mohamed Y; Verheijde, Joseph L; McGregor, Joan

    2006-01-01

    Donation after circulatory death (DCD) can be performed on neurologically intact donors who do not fulfill neurologic or brain death criteria before circulatory arrest. This commentary focuses on the most controversial donor-related issues anticipated from mandatory implementation of DCD for imminent or cardiac death in hospitals across the USA. We conducted a nonstructured review of selected publications and websites for data extraction and synthesis. The recommended 5 min of circulatory arrest does not universally fulfill the dead donor rule when applied to otherwise neurologically intact donors. Scientific evidence from extracorporeal perfusion in circulatory arrest suggests that the procurement process itself can be the event causing irreversibility in DCD. Legislative abandonment of the dead donor rule to permit the recovery of transplantable organs is necessary in the absence of an adequate scientific foundation for DCD practice. The designation of organ procurement organizations or affiliates to obtain organ donation consent introduces self-serving bias and conflicts of interest that interfere with true informed consent. It is important that donors and their families are not denied a 'good death', and the impact of DCD on quality of end-of-life care has not been satisfactorily addressed to achieve this. PMID:17020597

  2. Biological evaluation of mechanical circulatory support systems in calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakhorst, G; VanDerMeer, J; Kik, C; Mihaylov, D; Havlik, P; Trinkl, J; Monties, [No Value

    1996-01-01

    Data from animal experiments with mechanical circulatory support systems (MCSS) performed in Groningen and Marseille over the past years were used to obtain normal values of hematological, coagulation, rheological and blood chemistry parameters in calves. These parameters were divided between two gr

  3. Postcardiotomy Mechanical Circulatory Support in Two Infants with Williams’ Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Contrafouris, Constantinos A.; Chatzis, Andrew C.; Kanakis, Meletios A.; Prodromos A. Azariadis; Mitropoulos, Fotios A

    2014-01-01

    Supravalvar aortic stenosis (SVAS) in patients with Williams' syndrome is often accompanied by coronary, pulmonary, and even myocardial lesions and therefore associated with increased perioperative morbidity and mortality. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides reliable short-term mechanical circulatory support to patients, especially young, in acute postoperative cardiac failure when conventional means are ineffective. The incorporation of centrifugal pumps in these systems has ...

  4. Cigarette use and cardiovascular risk in chronic kidney disease: an unappreciated modifiable lifestyle risk factor.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stack, Austin G

    2012-01-31

    Tobacco use is a major modifiable cardiovascular risk factor in the general population and contributes to excess cardiovascular risk. Emerging evidence from large-scale observational studies suggests that continued tobacco use is also an independent cardiovascular risk factor among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The benefits of smoking cessation programs on improving the heath status of patients and reducing mortality are unequivocal in the general population. Despite this, there has been little effort in pursuing tobacco cessation programs in dialysis cohorts or those with lesser degrees of kidney impairment. Most of our attention to date has focused on the development of "kidney-specific" interventions that reduce rates of renal disease progression and improve dialysis outcomes. The purpose of this current review is to describe the epidemiology of tobacco use among patients with CKD, draw attention to its negative impact on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and finally highlight potential strategies for successful intervention. We hope that this study heightens the importance of tobacco use in CKD, stimulates renewed interest in the barriers and challenges that exist in achieving smoking cessation, and endorses the efficacy of intervention strategies and the immeasurable benefits of quitting on cardiovascular and noncardiovascular outcomes.

  5. Cardiovascular disease risk in young women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Guleria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a common disorder in women of reproductive age group. Insulin resistance and the consequent hyperinsulinemia seem to be the central pathophysiological mechanism that links PCOS to its associated metabolic derangements. Women with PCOS exhibit a number of risk factors for coronary artery disease. We studied risk of CVD using two surrogate markers, carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD. Aims and objectives: To study cardiovascular disease risk in young women (18-35 years age with PCOS using CIMT and FMD. Materials and Methods: Sixty women with PCOS (age: 23.8 ± 4.5 years; body mass index [BMI]: 23.5 ± 4.2 kg/m 2 were compared with 30 age- and BMI-matched healthy controls (age: 26.3 ± 5.4 years; BMI: 22.6 ± 3.8 kg/m 2 . Diagnosis of PCOS was made using the Rotterdam criteria. Fasting blood sample was analyzed for glucose, insulin, lipid profile, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP, high molecular weight adiponectin (HMWADP, and interleukin 6 (IL6. CIMT and FMD were performed. Results: PCOS patients had a higher waist to hip ratio (W/H [0.86 ± .07 vs. 0.80 ± .05] and free testosterone index (FTI [6.6 ± 6.5 vs. 2.0 ± 1.0] in comparison to controls. There was no difference in the two groups in lipid profile parameters and HOMA IR. CIMT was significantly higher (0.59 ± .1 mm vs. 0.50 ± .05 mm, P value <.001 and FMD lower (10.3 ± 3.9% vs. 15.2 ± 5.5%, P value < .001 in cases when compared to controls. FMD negatively correlated with W/H ratio (r: -0.257 and hsCRP (r: -0.347, while IMT showed positive correlation with IL6 (r: 0.325 and hsCRP (r: 0.303 and a negative correlation with high-density lipoprotein (HDL [r: -0.224], all P values < .05. Conclusions: Patients with PCOS have evidence for increased CVD risk as shown by endothelial dysfunction manifested by increased CIMT and a lower FMD.

  6. Disease activity as a risk factor for myocardial infarction in rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Radovits, B.J.; Popa-Diaconu, D.A.; Popa, C.; Eijsbouts, A.M.M.; Laan, R.F.J.M.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Fransen, J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are at greater risk of developing coronary heart disease than the general population. Systemic inflammation may contribute to this risk. This study investigated whether the level of disease activity is associated with the risk of developing myocardi

  7. C-reactive protein, genetically elevated levels and risk of ischemic heart and cerebrovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, Jeppe; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2009-01-01

    We tested whether genetically elevated levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) cause increased risk of ischemic heart disease and ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Levels of CRP >3mg/L, compared with levels <1mg/L, associated with a 1.6- and 1.3-fold increased risk of ischemic heart disease and ischemic...

  8. Notification of occupational disease and the risk of work disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolstad, Henrik A; Christensen, Michael V; Jensen, Lone Donbæk;

    2012-01-01

    , occupational, and social characteristics that predict poorer vocational prognosis. Analyses that adjusted for these differences showed an increased risk of work disability following notification for patients who were working when notified at baseline (HR (adj)1.46, 95% CI 1.17-1.82). No effect was seen for...... of 564 patients were notified of an occupational disease when they were examined at baseline and 1740 patients were not. We obtained weekly information on sick payment, unemployment payment, disability pension, rehabilitation benefit, and other social benefits during the two years of follow-up from a...... national register. Using Cox regression models, we analyzed notification and adjusted hazard ratios (HR (adj)) of work disability (defined as >12 weeks of social benefits during the first or second year of follow-up). RESULTS: Prior to notification, notified patients had higher levels of clinical...

  9. Risk Factors for Death from Invasive Pneumococcal Disease, Europe, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Joana Gomes; Hruba, Frantiska; Lopalco, Pier Luigi; Pastore-Celentano, Lucia; Gauci, Andrew J. Amato

    2015-01-01

    We studied the possible association between patient age and sex, clinical presentation, Streptococcus pneumoniae serotype, antimicrobial resistance, and death in invasive pneumococcal disease cases reported by 17 European countries during 2010. The study sample comprised 2,921 patients, of whom 56.8% were men and 38.2% were >65 years of age. Meningitis occurred in 18.5% of cases. Death was reported in 264 (9.0%) cases. Older age, meningitis, and nonsusceptibility to penicillin were significantly associated with death. Non–pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) serotypes among children 65 years of age, risk did not differ by serotype. These findings highlight differences in case-fatality rates between serotypes and age; thus, continued epidemiologic surveillance across all ages is crucial to monitor the long-term effects of PCVs. PMID:25693604

  10. Risk factors for peripheral arterial disease among patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Mohler, Emile R; Xie, Dawei; Shlipak, Michael G; Townsend, Raymond R; Appel, Lawrence J; Raj, Dominic S; Ojo, Akinlolu O; Schreiber, Martin J; Strauss, Louise F; Zhang, Xiaoming; Wang, Xin; He, Jiang; Hamm, L Lee

    2012-07-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk for developing peripheral arterial disease (PAD). The aim of this study was to examine the cross-sectional association between novel risk factors and prevalent PAD in patients with CKD. A total of 3,758 patients with estimated glomerular filtration rates of 20 to 70 ml/min/1.73 m(2) who participated in the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) study were included in the present analysis. PAD was defined as an ankle-brachial index arm or leg revascularization. After adjustment for age, gender, race, cigarette smoking, physical activity, history of hypertension and diabetes, pulse pressure, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and CRIC clinical sites, several novel risk factors were significantly associated with PAD. For example, odds ratios for a 1-SD higher level of risk factors were 1.18 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08 to 1.29) for log-transformed high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, 1.18 (95% CI 1.08 to 1.29) for white blood cell count, 1.15 (95% CI 1.05 to 1.25) for fibrinogen, 1.13 (95% CI 1.03 to 1.24) for uric acid, 1.14 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.26) for glycosylated hemoglobin, 1.11 (95% CI 1.00 to 1.23) for log-transformed homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, and 1.35 (95% CI 1.18 to 1.55) for cystatin C. In conclusion, these data indicate that inflammation, prothrombotic state, oxidative stress, insulin resistance, and cystatin C were associated with an increased prevalence of PAD in patients with CKD. Further studies are warranted to examine the causal effect of these risk factors on PAD in patients with CKD. PMID:22465315

  11. Genetic risk factors for Parkinson’s disease in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Koliada

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the genetic risk factors for Parkinson’s disease (PD such as polymorphisms in genes CYP1A1, GSTM1 and APOE. A total number of 516 people were examined. 300 persons were in the control group (mean age 67,0 ± 0,4 years; 200 males and 100 females and 216 persons were patients with PD (mean age 65,0 ± 0,7 years, 116 males and 100 females. Whole blood samples collected from each person were genotyped using PCR-RFLP. Amplification and restriction results were assessed by conducting vertical agarose gel electrophoresis. The study analyzed marker с.2452C>A in the CYP1A1 gene. In the control group, allele C frequency was 0.79, and allele A frequency – 0.21. Genotype frequencies were: CC – 0.61, AC – 0.36, AA – 0.03. In the group of patients alleles C and A frequencies were 0.64 and 0.36 correspondingly. Genotype frequencies were: CC – 0.35, AC – 0.58, AA – 0.07. There was a significant difference between both groups in allele A frequency. It is considered that 0/0 genotype for the GSTM1 gene is a risk factor for PD. In the controls, +/+ and 0/0 genotypes frequencies were 0.67 and 0.33 correspondingly. In the group of patients +/+ genotype frequency was 0.55 and 0/0 genotype frequency – 0.45. The difference was statistically significant. In the control group genotype frequencies for the АРОЕ gene were 0.715 (Е3/Е3, 0.077 (Е3/Е4, 0.009 (Е4/Е4, 0.167 (Е2/Е3, 0.031 (Е2/Е4 and 0.000 (Е2/Е2. In the group of patients with PD they were 0.634 (Е3/Е3, 0.148 (Е3/Е4, 0.032 (Е4/Е4, 0.157 (Е2/Е3, 0.023 (Е2/Е4 and 0.000 (Е2/Е2. Е3/Е4 genotype frequency was significantly higher in the group of patients with PD than in the control group. Pathogenic allele с.2452C>A of the CYP1A1 gene is associated with increased risk of PD (OR = 1.72. 0/0 genotype carriers have higher risk to develop PD (OR = 1.72. Allele έ4 of the АРОЕ gene may be associated with increased risk of PD. Risk of the disease is

  12. Disease activity and cancer risk in inflammatory bowel disease associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Harry Sokol; Jacques Cosnes; Olivier Chazouilleres; Laurent Beaugerie; Emmanuel Tiret; Raoul Poupon; Philippe Seksik

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the phenotype of inflammatory bowel disease associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC-IBD).METHODS: Data from 75 PSC-]BD patients evaluated in our tertiary center between 1963 and 2006 were collected and compared to 150 IBD patients without PSC, matched for sex, birth date, IBD diagnosis date and initial disease location regarding ileal, different colonic segments, and rectum, respectively.RESULTS: While PSC-IBD patients received more 5-aminosalicylates (8.7 years/patient vs 2.9 years/patient, P<0.001), they required less immunosuppressors (24% vs 46% at 10 years; P<0.001) and less intestinal resection (10% vs 44% at 10 years, P<0.001). The 25-year cumulative rate of colectomy was 25.1% in PSC-IBD and 37.3% in controls (P=0.004). The 25-year cumulative rate of colorectal cancer was 23.4% in PSC-IBD vs 0% in controls (P=0.002). PSC was the only independent risk factor for the development of colorectal cancer (OR=10.8; 95%CI, 3.7-31.3). Overall survival rate without liver transplantation was reduced in PSC-IBD patients (67% vs 91% in controls at 25 years, P=0.001).CONCLUSION: This study confirms that patients with PSC-IBD have a particular disease phenotype independent of the initial disease location. Although their disease is less active and they use more 5-aminosalicylates, they present a higher risk of colorectal cancer.

  13. Comparison of Calipers for Matching on the Disease Risk Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, John G; Gagne, Joshua J

    2016-05-15

    Previous studies have compared calipers for propensity score (PS) matching, but none have considered calipers for matching on the disease risk score (DRS). We used Medicare claims data to perform 3 cohort studies of medication initiators: a study of raloxifene versus alendronate in 1-year nonvertebral fracture risk, a study of cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors versus nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory medications in 6-month gastrointestinal bleeding, and a study of simvastatin + ezetimibe versus simvastatin alone in 6-month cardiovascular outcomes. The study periods for each cohort were 1998 through 2005, 1999 through 2002, and 2004 through 2005, respectively. In each cohort, we calculated 1) a DRS, 2) a prognostic PS which included the DRS as the independent variable in a PS model, and 3) the PS for each patient. We then nearest-neighbor matched on each score in a variable ratio and a fixed ratio within 8 calipers based on the standard deviation of the logit and the natural score scale. When variable ratio matching on the DRS, a caliper of 0.05 on the natural scale performed poorly when the outcome was rare. The prognostic PS did not appear to offer any consistent practical benefits over matching on the DRS directly. In general, logit-based calipers or calipers smaller than 0.05 on the natural scale performed well when DRS matching in all examples. PMID:27037270

  14. Cardiovascular Diseases and Mental Disorders: Bidirectional Risk Factors?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Vollenweider

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases (CVD, their well-established risk factors (CVRF and mental disorders are common and co-occur more frequently than would be expected by chance. However, potential causal mechanisms underlying their association still need to be elucidated. Several non-mutually exclusive hypotheses have been suggested to explain this association: a mental disorders could increase vulnerability to CVD through poor health behaviour including smoking, unbalanced diet, sedentary lifestyle or the side effects of psychotropic drugs; b CVD or their treatment could favour the development of mental disorders; or c mental disorders and CVD/CVRF could share risk factors such as common metabolic processes or common genes. Disentangling some of these mechanisms will require studying the temporal relationship of the appearance of CVD and mental disorders.Herein we review the existing epidemiological evidence of an association between these two types of disorders, and describe several mechanisms potentially involved. We will briefly describe the CoLaus/PsyCoLaus study cohort, a population-based in Lausanne, Switzerland designed to address some of these questions.

  15. RISK FACTORS FOR SEVERE HAND, FOOT AND MOUTH DISEASE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owatanapanich, Somchai; Wutthanarungsan, Rochana; Jaksupa, Wipaporn; Thisyakorn, Usa

    2015-05-01

    We studied risk factors associated with severe hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) caused by enteroviruses among patients aged less than 15 years admitted to King Narai Hospital, Lopburi, Thailand during 2011-2013. Cases were divided into either mild or severe. Severe cases were those with encephalitis, meningitis, myocarditis, pneumonia, pulmonary edema or respiratory failure. Risk factors for severe infection were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. One hundred eighteen patients met the case definition of HFMD. Of these, 95 (80.5%) were classified as mild cases, and 23 (19.5%) as severe cases; there were 5 deaths (4.2%). Of the 23 severe cases, 9 were infected with coxsackievirus A16 (CA16), 8 with enterovirus 71 (EV71) and 4 with both EV71 and CA16. The most common presentations among the severe caseswere: seizures (74%), pneumonia (39%), encephalitis (39%), and meningitis (13%). The clinical manifestations significantly related to severe HFMD on univariate analysis were highest body temperature 39.00C, duration of fever 23 days, absence of skin lesions, diarrhea, dyspnea, seizures and hyperglycemia. The clinical manifestations significantly related to severe HFMD on both univariate and multivariate analyses were age less than 1 year, absence of oral lesions and drowsiness/lethargy. Clinicians should be aware of these factors. Early recognition of severe cases is important to increase the rates of successful outcomes and reduce mortality. PMID:26521518

  16. Risk Factors for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Yakışan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the rural part of our country the use of traditional biomass was common and as a result of this, women who light the fire and bake bread and cook meals as well as children around them are exposed to the smoke that come out . The aim of this study was to to determine possible risk factors and associated conditions of COPD in women. The study was prospective and case-controlled. Fifty-two female patients with COPD followed up in Akdeniz University Hospital Department of Respiratory Medicine were included in this study. All cases were enrolled between December 2000 and October 2003. Fifty-four female non COPD subjects were chosen as the control group. These control subjects who did not have lung diseases were randomly selected in different outpatient clinics in the same hospital. Age, place of residence, comorbid conditions, cigarette smoking (active and passive, occupational exposure, air pollution, socio-economic status, education level, passive smoking in childhood, the fuel used for heating, cooking and baking bread and its duration were questioned. Results from this study suggest that exposure to cooking smoke, low education level, living in rural area, baking bread at home were associated risk factors with COPD among women.

  17. The association between chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular disease risk factors in atomic bomb survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sera, Nobuko; Hida, Ayumi; Imaizumi, Misa; Nakashima, Eiji; Akahoshi, Masazumi

    2013-01-01

    Atomic bomb (A-bomb) radiation is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) and metabolic CVD risk factors. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is also known to be a risk factor for CVD and little is known whether CKD is associated with A-bomb radiation. To examine whether CKD is associated with CVD risk factors or with A-bomb radiation in A-bomb survivors, we classified renal dysfunction in 1,040 A-bomb survivors who were examined in 2004-2007 as normal [n = 121; estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) ≥ 90 ml/min/1.73 m(2)]; mild (n = 686; eGFR 60-89 ml/min/1.73 m(2)); moderate (n = 217; eGFR 30-59 ml/min/1.73 m(2)); or severe (n = 16; eGFR bomb radiation. Hypertension [odds ratio (OR), 1.57; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.12-2.20, P = 0.009]; DM (OR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.23-2.61, P = 0.002); hyperlipidemia (OR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.12-2.14, P = 0.008); and MetS (OR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.32-2.63, P bomb survivors. PMID:23148507

  18. Periodontal disease and risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a meta-analysis of observational studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Tao Zeng

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many epidemiological studies have found a positive association between periodontal disease (PD and risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, but this association is varied and even contradictory among studies. We performed a meta-analysis to ascertain the relationship between PD and COPD. METHODS: PubMed and Embase database were searched up to January 10, 2012, for relevant observational studies on the association between PD and risk of COPD. Data from the studies selected were extracted and analyzed independently by two authors. The meta-analysis was performed using the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software. RESULTS: Fourteen observational studies (one nested case-control, eight case-control, and five cross-sectional involving 3,988 COPD patients were yielded. Based on random-effects meta-analysis, a significant association between PD and COPD was identified (odds ratio = 2.08, 95% confidence interval = 1.48-2.91; P<0.001, with sensitivity analysis showing that the result was robust. Subgroups analyses according to study design, ethnicity, assessment of PD/COPD, and adjusted/unadjusted odds ratios also revealed a significant association. Publication bias was detected. CONCLUSIONS: Based on current evidence, PD is a significant and independent risk factor of COPD. However, whether a causal relationships exists remains unclear. Morever, we suggest performing randomized controlled trails to explore whether periodontal interventions are beneficial in regulating COPD pathogenesis and progression.

  19. Value of multiple risk factors in predicting coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: This study sought to assess the relationship between correlative comprehension risk factors and coronary arterial disease and to build up a simple mathematical model to evaluate the extension of coronary artery lesion in patients with stable angina. Methods: A total of 1024 patients with chest pain who underwent coronary angiography were divided into CAD group(n=625)and control group(n=399) based on at least one significant coronary artery narrowing more than 50% in diameter. Independent risk factors for CAD were evaluated and multivariate logistic regression model and receiver-operating characteristic(ROC) curves were used to estimate the independent influence factor for CAD and built up a simple formula for clinical use. Results: Multivariate regression analysis revealed that UACR > 7.25 μg/mg(OR=3.6; 95% CI 2.6-4.9; P20 mmol/L(OR=3.2; 95% CI 2.3-4.4; P2(OR=2.3; 95% CI 1.4-3.8; P 2.6 mmol/L (OR 2.141; 95% CI 1.586-2.890; P 7.25 μg/mg + 1.158 x hsCRP > 20 mmol/L + 0.891 GFR 2 + 0.831 x LVEF 2.6 mmol/L + 0.676 x smoking history + 0.594 x male + 0.459 x diabetes + 0.425 x hypertension). Area under the curve was 0.811 (P < 0.01), and the optimal probability value for predicting severe stage of CAD was 0.977 (sensitivity 49.0%, specificity 92.7% ). Conclusions: Risk factors including renal insufficiency were the main predictors for CAD. The logistic regression model is the non-invasive method of choice for predicting the extension of coronary artery lesion in patients with stable agiana. (authors)

  20. Natural Disasters, Corpses and the Risk of Infectious Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JM Conly

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent occurrence of the category 4 Hurricane Katrina devastated the United States? Gulf Coast. The hurricane caused widespread destruction and flooding, and left hundreds of thousands of people homeless. The mounting death toll was reported at almost 300 deaths as of September 8, 2005 (1,2. The unfolding events and high death toll have left an unusual situation in which there are many decomposing corpses either lying on the streets or floating in the flood waters. The presence of these corpses in open settings, such as in public places and in the water that has inundated much of the city of New Orleans, naturally raises concerns about the occurrence of infectious disease epidemics (3. In the aftermath of large natural disasters, instinctive uncertainties arise among workers and the general population with respect to the appropriate handling and disposal of dead bodies and human remains. Given the recent occurrence of Hurricane Katrina as a large natural disaster and the unprecedented setting of the numerous corpses requiring disposal, it was considered timely to review the infectious disease risks associated with the handling of dead bodies.

  1. Risk factors of cardiovascular diseases in rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T V Popkova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular complications (CVC including myocardial infarction (MI, sudden death and stroke (ST are the main cause of premature mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Chronic inflammation plays the key role in the development of CVC in RA. Objective. To analyze prevalence of cardiovascular diseases (CVD, significance of traditional risk factors (Rf, DMARDs and RA features in the development of clinical and subclinical signs of atherosclerosis (AT. To compare results with data of QUEST-RA. Material and methods. Traditional Rf and CVD frequency in RA pts were assessed with a questionnaire. Coronary heart disease, MI and ST were diagnosed according to medical documents. Subclinical signs of atherosclerosis were evaluated with carotid artery sonography. Results. Traditional CVD Rf were evaluated in 563 pts (496 female, 93 male aged 54 (44-54 years with disease duration 72 (24-144 months. Clinical signs of AT were revealed in5,6%, subclinical – in 11% of RA pts. Hyperlipidemia was present in 82%, increase of intima-media thickness – in 51%, family strain of CVD – in 44%, hypertension – in 38% of pts with RA. Traditional Rf, extra-articular features of RA, CVC and early AT signs weremore frequent in men than in women (p<0,005. Thickness of intima-media complex in 11men exceed that in women (p<0,005. RA pts were divided into two groups (I – with CVD and II – without CVD to assess relationship between traditional Rf and CVC. Frequency of traditional Rf (hypertension and increased intima-media thickness in group I was higher than in group II. Relative risk of their development was 4,78 and 2,09 respectively (p<0,05. 38% of RA pts had extra-articular features of RA (OR=2,02; p=0,04. Thickness of intima-media complex correlated with duration of treatment with hydroxichloroquine and sulfasalazine (r=0,34; p=0,0002 and r=0,28; p=0,008 respectively. CVC were not associated with administration of other DMARDs.

  2. All about Your Risk for Prediabetes, Type 2 Diabetes, and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... being more active. Astudy of people at high risk for type 2 diabetes found that people could lower their ... inactive If you develop prediabetes, you’re at risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease. But you can ...

  3. Oral hygiene status of individuals with cardiovascular diseases and associated risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    Divya Shetty; Mahima Dua; Kiran Kumar; Raghu Dhanpal; Madhusudan Astekar; Devi Charan Shetty

    2012-01-01

    Dentist and oral health screening may be the latest weapon in identifying persons at risk of cardiovascular disease. Oral infections, specifically periodontitis, may confer independent risks for different systemic conditions. The risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases also suggest that the relationship between periodontal disease and diabetes works in both ways. The aim of this study was to support and strengthen the association and relationship between oral hygiene status of in...

  4. Climate change and infectious disease risk management: a localised health security perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic risks in relation to climate change are not fully understood and to a large extent have to be regarded as unpredictable. It is therefore important to focus attention on human vulnerability and coping for which more certain influences on disease risk can be assessed. Despite commonplace environmental conditions for infectious diseases around the world, only some people are affected. This is because the larger proportions of disease risks are regularly a function of human socio-econo...

  5. Weak Prediction Power of the Framingham Risk Score for Coronary Artery Disease in Nonagenarians

    OpenAIRE

    Josef Yayan

    2014-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease (CAD) is caused by an acute myocardial infarction and is still feared as a life-threatening heart disease worldwide. In order to identify patients at high risk for CAD, previous studies have proposed various risk assessment scores for the prevention of CAD. The most commonly used risk assessment score for CAD worldwide is the Framingham Risk Score (FRS). The FRS is used for middle-aged people; hence, its appropriateness has not been demonstrated to predict t...

  6. Olive oil intake and risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality in the PREDIMED Study

    OpenAIRE

    Guasch-Ferre, M. (Marta); Hu, F.B.; Martinez-Gonzalez, M. A.; Fito, M. (Montserrat); Bullo, M. (Mónica); Estruch, R.; Ros, E.; D. Corella; Recondo, J. (Javier); Gomez-Gracia, E. (Enrique); Fiol, M; Lapetra, J.; L. Serra-Majem; Muñoz, M. A.; Pinto, X. (Xavier)

    2014-01-01

    Background It is unknown whether individuals at high cardiovascular risk sustain a benefit in cardiovascular disease from increased olive oil consumption. The aim was to assess the association between total olive oil intake, its varieties (extra virgin and common olive oil) and the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality in a Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular risk. Methods We included 7,216 men and women at high cardiovascular risk, aged 55 to 80 years, from the PREvención ...

  7. Olive oil intake and risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality in the PREDIMED Study

    OpenAIRE

    Guasch-Ferré, Marta; Hu, Frank B; Martínez-González, Miguel A; Fitó, Montserrat; Bulló, Mònica; Estruch, Ramon; Ros, Emilio; Corella, Dolores; Recondo, Javier; Gómez-Gracia, Enrique; Fiol, Miquel; Lapetra, José; Serra-Majem, Lluís; Muñoz, Miguel A.; Pintó, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Background: It is unknown whether individuals at high cardiovascular risk sustain a benefit in cardiovascular disease from increased olive oil consumption. The aim was to assess the association between total olive oil intake, its varieties (extra virgin and common olive oil) and the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality in a Mediterranean population at high cardiovascular risk. Methods: We included 7,216 men and women at high cardiovascular risk, aged 55 to 80 years, from the PREvenció...

  8. 21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. 101.75 Section 101.75 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... risk of coronary heart disease. (a) Relationship between dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease. (1) Cardiovascular disease means diseases of the heart and...

  9. Circulatory response to hyperthermia during acute normovolaemic haemodilution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, Anita; Fahim, M.

    Cats anaesthetized with a mixture of chloralose and urethane were exposed to heat stress in two groups. In the first group (n=10) of control animals, the effect of heat stress on haemodynamic variables was recorded at control haematocrit (HCT) of 42.0+/-1.0%. In a second group, the effect of heat stress was studied after induction of acute normovolaemic haemodilution (HCT of 13.0+/-1.0%). Haemodilution was induced to a maximum of 60% replacement of blood with dextran (mol.wt. 150000). Heat stress was induced by surface heating and core body temperature was raised from 37° C to 42° C. The effect of heat stress and haemodilution on various haemodynamic variables, viz. left ventricular pressure (LVP), left ventricular contractility (LVdP/dtmax), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), arterial blood pressure (ABP), right atrial pressure (RAP), and arterial blood PO2, PCO2 and pH was examined. Haemodilution produced significant (P0.05) changes in ABP, RAP, LVdP/dtmax and total peripherial resistance (TPR). Hyperthermia caused a significant fall (P<0.05) in TPR. However, the percentage fall in TPR was higher in the control group. On exposure to heat stress, there were significant (P<0.05I increases in HR and CO in both the groups; however, HR and CO values were significantly (P<0.05) higher in the haemodiluted group compared to the control. The latter findings could be due either to the higher basal values of these variables with the fall in HCT or to inefficient cardiovascular regulatory mechanisms. The lack of efficient regulatory control under such severe stress conditions makes the cardiovascular system of anaemic animals more vulnerable to heat stress. In conclusion, the results of the present study showed deleterious effects of heat stress in both the groups. The higher values of HR and CO in the haemodiluted group may be responsible for circulatory failure at low HCT values, indicating a higher risk in the haemodiluted group as compared to the control group.

  10. Prevalence and Risk Factors of CKD in Chinese Patients with Periodontal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kejin Liu; Qinghua Liu; Wei Chen; Mengjun Liang; Wei Luo; Xianfeng Wu; Yiping Ruan; Jie Wang; Ricong Xu; Xiaojiang Zhan; Jianwen Yu; Jiaqing Tan; Xiuqing Dong; Jincai Zhang; Xueqing Yu

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Periodontal disease is common among adults and is associated with an increasing risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD). We aimed to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of CKD in patients with periodontal disease in China. METHODS: In the current cross-sectional study, patients with periodontal disease were included from Guangdong Provincial Stomatological Hospital between March 2011 and August 2011. CKD was defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR)

  11. The Peripheral Arterial disease study (PERART/ARTPER): prevalence and risk factors in the general population

    OpenAIRE

    Vicheto Marisa; Sorribes Marta; Toran Pere; Pera Guillem; Baena-Díez José; Forés Rosa; Alzamora María; Reina María; Sancho Amparo; Albaladejo Carlos; Llussà Judith

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The early diagnosis of atherosclerotic disease is essential for developing preventive strategies in populations at high risk and acting when the disease is still asymptomatic. A low ankle-arm index is a good marker of vascular events and may be diminished without presenting symptomatology (silent peripheral arterial disease). The aim of the study is to know the prevalence and associated risk factors of peripheral arterial disease in the general population. Methods We perfo...

  12. p-Cresol and Cardiovascular Risk in Mild-to-Moderate Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Meijers, Björn K.I.; Claes, Kathleen; Bammens, Bert; De Loor, Henriette; Viaene, Liesbeth; Verbeke, Kristin; Kuypers, Dirk; Vanrenterghem, Yves; Evenepoel, Pieter

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives: Cardiovascular disease is highly prevalent in chronic kidney disease. Traditional risk factors are insufficient to explain the high cardiovascular disease prevalence. Free p-cresol serum concentrations, mainly circulating as its derivative p-cresyl sulfate, are associated with cardiovascular disease in hemodialysis patients. It is not known if p-cresol is associated with cardiovascular disease in patients with chronic kidney disease not yet on dialysis.

  13. Impact of heat waves on nonaccidental deaths in Jinan, China, and associated risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Shouqin; Han, Jing; Zhou, Lin; Liu, Yueling; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Ji; Zhang, Ying

    2016-01-01

    An ecological study and a case-crossover analysis were conducted to evaluate the impact of heat waves on nonaccidental deaths, and to identify contributing factors of population vulnerability to heat-related deaths in Jinan, China. Daily death data and meteorological data were collected for summer months (June to August) of 2012-2013. Excess mortality was calculated and multivariate linear regression models were used to assess the increased risk of heat waves on deaths. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were performed to estimate the odd ratios (ORs) of risk factors and their 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Overall, heat waves were related to 24.88 % excess deaths of total nonaccidental deaths and 31.33 % excess deaths of circulatory diseases, with an OR of 16.07 (95 % CI 8.80-23.33) for total nonaccidental deaths and 12.46 (95 % CI 7.39-17.53) for deaths of circulatory diseases. The case-crossover analysis indicated that older people were more likely to die during heat waves (OR = 1.233, 95 % CI 1.076-1.413) and more deaths occurred outside a hospital during heat waves (OR = 1.142, 95 % CI 1.006-1.296). In conclusion, heat waves have caused excess deaths and significantly increased the risk of circulatory deaths. The risk factors identified in our study have implications for public health interventions to reduce heat-related mortality during extreme heat events.

  14. Risks and benefits of combining immunosuppressives and biological agents in inflammatory bowel disease: is the synergy worth the risk?

    OpenAIRE

    Hanauer, Stephen B.

    2007-01-01

    Since the introduction of infliximab to treat Crohn's disease, combination therapy with immunosuppressants has reduced immunogenicity, without impacting efficacy. The availability of novel anti‐TNF agents and potential combined toxicities question the risk/benefit of combination therapies.

  15. Physical inactivity: the "Cinderella" risk factor for noncommunicable disease prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Fiona C; Bauman, Adrian E

    2011-08-01

    There is strong evidence demonstrating the direct and indirect pathways by which physical activity prevents many of the major noncommunicable diseases (NCD) responsible for premature death and disability. Physical inactivity was identified as the 4th leading risk factor for the prevention of NCD, preceded only by tobacco use, hypertension, and high blood glucose levels, and accounting for more than 3 million preventable deaths globally in 2010. Physical inactivity is a global public health priority but, in most countries, this has not yet resulted in widespread recognition nor specific physical activity-related policy action at the necessary scale. Instead, physical inactivity could be described as the Cinderella of NCD risk factors, defined as "poverty of policy attention and resourcing proportionate to its importance." The pressing question is "Why is this so?" The authors identify and discuss 8 possible explanations and the need for more effective communication on the importance of physical activity in the NCD prevention context. Although not all of the issues identified will be relevant for any 1 country, it is likely that at different times and in different combinations these 8 problems continue to delay national-level progress on addressing physical inactivity in many countries. The authors confirm that there is sufficient evidence to act, and that much better use of well-planned, coherent communication strategies are needed in most countries and at the international level. Significant opportunities exist. The Toronto Charter on Physical Activity and the Seven Investments that Work are 2 useful tools to support increased advocacy on physical activity within and beyond the context of the crucial 2011 UN High-Level Meeting on NCDs. PMID:21916710

  16. Prevalence of Selected Chronic, Noncommunicable Disease Risk Factors in Jordan: Results of the 2007 Jordan Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Nsour, Mohannad; Zindah, Meyasser; Belbeisi, Adel; Hadaddin, Raja; Brown, David W.; Walke, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are the leading cause of illness and death in Jordan. Since 2002, the Jordan Ministry of Health, in cooperation with the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, established the Jordan Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey to collect information on many of the behaviors and conditions related to NCDs. The objectives of this study were to describe the prevalence of selected NCD risk factors and the relations...

  17. Solid fuel smoke exposure and risk of obstructive airways disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qorbani, Mostafa; Yunesian, Masud

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether there is an association between Obstructive Airways Disease (OAD) and indoor exposure to baking home-made bread smoke (BHBS) in ground oven at home. In this hospital-based case-control study, 83 patients with OAD (cases) were compared with 72 patients without any known pulmonary diseases from the surgical ward (controls) who were frequently matched with cases on age. The interview was performed using the modified questionnaire recommended by the "American Thoracic Society". The questionnaire comprised of demographic information, occupational history, cigarette smoking and indoor exposure to BHBS in ground oven at home. The exposure to BHBS was considered both as a dichotomous and quantitative variable (number of years being exposed to smoke) and the population attributable fraction (PAF) was estimated due to BHBS exposure. The percentage of indoor exposure to BHBS was measured as 51.8% and 30.6% in the cases and the controls, respectively. The average years of exposure to BHBS was 20.46 years (SD: 11.60) for the cases and 15.38 years (SD: 13.20) for the controls. The univariate analysis comparing the cases and the controls showed that exposure to BHBS (as a binary variable) and occupational exposure to dust was significantly associated with OAD. In the multivariate model, only exposure to BHBS was associated with OAD (OR=2.22, 95%CI = 1.14-4.35). Duration of exposure to BHBS (as a quantitative variable) was significantly associated with OAD in the univariate model. In the multivariate model, only the duration of exposure to BHBS (years) showed a significant association with OAD (OR=1.04, 95% CI=1.01-1.08). Population attributable risk due to BHBS exposure was equal to 28.5%. PMID:23369551

  18. Solid Fuel Smoke Exposure and Risk of Obstructive Airways Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masud Yunesian

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to investigate whether there is an association between Obstructive Airways Disease (OAD and indoor exposure to baking home-made bread smoke (BHBS in ground oven at home. In this hospital-based case–control study, 83 patients with OAD (caseswere compared with 72 patients without any known pulmonary diseases from the surgical ward (controls who were frequently matched with cases on age. The interview wasperformed using the modified questionnaire recommended by the "American Thoracic Society". The questionnaire comprised of demographic information, occupational history,cigarette smoking and indoor exposure to BHBS in ground oven at home. The exposure toBHBS was considered both as a dichotomous and quantitative variable (number of years being exposed to smoke and the population attributable fraction (PAF was estimated due to BHBS exposure. The percentage of indoor exposure to BHBS was measured as 51.8% and30.6% in the cases and the controls, respectively. The average years of exposure to BHBS was 20.46 years (SD: 11.60 for the cases and 15.38 years (SD: 13.20 for the controls. The univariate analysis comparing the cases and the controls showed that exposure to BHBS (as a binary variable and occupational exposure to dust was significantly associated with OAD. In the multivariate model, only exposure to BHBS was associated with OAD (OR=2.22, 95%CI= 1.14-4.35. Duration of exposure to BHBS (as a quantitative variable was significantly associated with OAD in the univariate model. In the multivariate model, only the duration of exposure to BHBS (years showed a significant association with OAD (OR=1.04, 95% CI=1.01-1.08. Population attributable risk due to BHBS exposure was equal to 28.5%.

  19. Solid fuel smoke exposure and risk of obstructive airways disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qorbani Mostafa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was designed to investigate whether there is an association between Obstructive Airways Disease (OAD and indoor exposure to baking home-made bread smoke (BHBS in ground oven at home. In this hospital-based case–control study, 83 patients with OAD (cases were compared with 72 patients without any known pulmonary diseases from the surgical ward (controls who were frequently matched with cases on age. The interview was performed using the modified questionnaire recommended by the "American Thoracic Society". The questionnaire comprised of demographic information, occupational history, cigarette smoking and indoor exposure to BHBS in ground oven at home. The exposure to BHBS was considered both as a dichotomous and quantitative variable (number of years being exposed to smoke and the population attributable fraction (PAF was estimated due to BHBS exposure. The percentage of indoor exposure to BHBS was measured as 51.8% and 30.6% in the cases and the controls, respectively. The average years of exposure to BHBS was 20.46 years (SD: 11.60 for the cases and 15.38 years (SD: 13.20 for the controls. The univariate analysis comparing the cases and the controls showed that exposure to BHBS (as a binary variable and occupational exposure to dust was significantly associated with OAD. In the multivariate model, only exposure to BHBS was associated with OAD (OR=2.22, 95%CI = 1.14-4.35. Duration of exposure to BHBS (as a quantitative variable was significantly associated with OAD in the univariate model. In the multivariate model, only the duration of exposure to BHBS (years showed a significant association with OAD (OR=1.04, 95% CI=1.01-1.08. Population attributable risk due to BHBS exposure was equal to 28.5%.

  20. Space Radiation Heart Disease Risk Estimates for Lunar and Mars Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Chappell, Lori; Kim, Myung-Hee

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Space Radiation Program performs research on the risks of late effects from space radiation for cancer, neurological disorders, cataracts, and heart disease. For mortality risks, an aggregate over all risks should be considered as well as projection of the life loss per radiation induced death. We report on a triple detriment life-table approach to combine cancer and heart disease risks. Epidemiology results show extensive heterogeneity between populations for distinct components of the overall heart disease risks including hypertension, ischaemic heart disease, stroke, and cerebrovascular diseases. We report on an update to our previous heart disease estimates for Heart disease (ICD9 390-429) and Stroke (ICD9 430-438), and other sub-groups using recent meta-analysis results for various exposed radiation cohorts to low LET radiation. Results for multiplicative and additive risk transfer models are considered using baseline rates for US males and female. Uncertainty analysis indicated heart mortality risks as low as zero, assuming a threshold dose for deterministic effects, and projections approaching one-third of the overall cancer risk. Medan life-loss per death estimates were significantly less than that of solid cancer and leukemias. Critical research questions to improve risks estimates for heart disease are distinctions in mechanisms at high doses (>2 Gy) and low to moderate doses (<2 Gy), and data and basic understanding of radiation doserate and quality effects, and individual sensitivity.

  1. Addressing Consent Issues in Donation After Circulatory Determination of Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overby, Kim J; Weinstein, Michael S; Fiester, Autumn

    2015-01-01

    Given the widening gap between the number of individuals on transplant waiting lists and the availability of donated organs, as well as the recent plateau in donations based on neurological criteria (i.e., brain death), there has been a growing interest in expanding donation after circulatory determination of death. While the prevalence of this form of organ donation continues to increase, many thorny ethical issues remain, often creating moral distress in both clinicians and families. In this article, we address one of these issues, namely, the challenges surrounding patient and surrogate informed consent for donation after circulatory determination of death. First we discuss several general concerns regarding consent related to this form of organ donation, and then we address additional issues that are unique to three different patient categories: adult patients with medical decision-making capacity or potential capacity, adult patients who lack capacity, and pediatric patients. PMID:26225503

  2. Cardiovascular disease risk factors in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novaković Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Clinical, epidemiological and biochemical studies strongly support the concept that the non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is a hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome. Insulin resistance is a common factor connecting obesity, diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia with fatty liver and the progression of hepatic disease to steatohepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Since identification of cardiovascular risk factors is the first step in their prevention, the aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of some risk factors in patients with fatty liver. Material and Methods. The study included 130 patients who met metabolic syndrome criteria; their demographic and anthropometric characteristics were analyzed and some clinical characteristics were determined, such as smoking habit, arterial pressure and alcohol intake. Routine biochemical analyses were carried out by a standard laboratory procedure. Hepatic steatosis was detected by the abdominal ultrasound. Modified criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III were used to describe the metabolic syndrome. Results. The study group consisted of 72 subjects (55.38%, who had been found by ultrasound to have fatty liver, whereas the control group included 58 respondents (44.62% without pathological ultrasound findings. Differences in the number of fatty liver were highly statistically significant between the groups. The values of body mass index (33.56±6.05 vs 30.56±4.23 kg/m2; p = 0.001, glucose (6.23±0.95 vs 5.76±0.88 mmol/l; p<0.01 and cholesterol (6.66±1.30 vs 6.23±0.95; p <0.05 were significantly higher in the patients with fatty liver than in those without fatty liver. Conclusion. Our results indicate that the patients from the study group had a high percentage of cardiovascular risk factors.

  3. Singular divergence instability thresholds of kinematically constrained circulatory systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Static instability or divergence threshold of both potential and circulatory systems with kinematic constraints depends singularly on the constraints' coefficients. Particularly, the critical buckling load of the kinematically constrained Ziegler's pendulum as a function of two coefficients of the constraint is given by the Plücker conoid of degree n=2. This simple mechanical model exhibits a structural instability similar to that responsible for the Velikhov–Chandrasekhar paradox in the theory of magnetorotational instability.

  4. Antibiotics can ameliorate circulatory complications of liver cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bjørn Stæhr; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2011-01-01

    Livercirrhosis can be complicated by a hyperdynamic circulatory syndrome. This is due to translocation of bacteria and bacterial product (bacterial DNA and endotoxins), which stimulate the splanchnic nitric oxide synthase and leads to splanchnic vasodilatation and haemodynamic derangement. This...... review focuses on how broad spectrum antibiotics can ameliorate the haemodynamic consequences of bacterial translocation. It is possible that the use of broad spectrum antibiotics in the future may be used to prevent other complications of liver cirrhosis than spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and...

  5. Parallel left ventricular assistance tests on the hybrid circulatory model.

    OpenAIRE

    Kozarski, Maciej; Ferrari, Gianfranco; Zielinski, Krzysztof; Gorczynska, Krystyna; Palko, Krzysztof Jakub; Darowski, Marek

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Evaluation of new control and measurement methods worked out for heart assist devices and artificial hearts need new laboratory tools making experiments more accurate, repeatable, easier and less time consuming. The proper answer to this demand seems to be a hybrid hydro-numerical model HHNM of the circulatory system. Its performance illustrates the exemplary laboratory application when the physical left ventricle assist device is connected in parallel to the numerical left ventri...

  6. Assessing the risk of Legionnaires' disease: the inhalation exposure model and the estimated risk in residential bathrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Kenichi; Uchiyama, Iwao; Okumura, Jiro

    2013-02-01

    Legionella are widely found in the built environment. Patients with Legionnaires' disease have been increasing in Japan; however, health risks from Legionella bacteria in the environment are not appropriately assessed. We performed a quantitative health risk assessment modeled on residential bathrooms in the Adachi outbreak area and estimated risk levels. The estimated risks in the Adachi outbreak approximately corresponded to the risk levels exponentially extrapolated into lower levels on the basis of infection and mortality rates calculated from actual outbreaks, suggesting that the model of Legionnaires' disease in residential bathrooms was adequate to predict disease risk for the evaluated outbreaks. Based on this model, the infection and mortality risk levels per year in 10 CFU/100 ml (100 CFU/L) of the Japanese water quality guideline value were approximately 10(-2) and 10(-5), respectively. However, acceptable risk levels of infection and mortality from Legionnaires' disease should be adjusted to approximately 10(-4) and 10(-7), respectively, per year. Therefore, a reference value of 0.1 CFU/100 ml (1 CFU/L) as a water quality guideline for Legionella bacteria is recommended. This value is occasionally less than the actual detection limit. Legionella levels in water system should be maintained as low as reasonably achievable (<1 CFU/L). PMID:23195792

  7. Using Nontraditional Risk Factors in Coronary Heart Disease Risk Assessment : US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calonge, Ned; Petitti, Diana B.; DeWitt, Thomas G.; Gregory, Kimberly D.; Harris, Russell; Isham, George; LeFevre, Michael L.; Loveland-Cherry, Carol; Marion, Lucy N.; Moyer, Virginia A.; Ockene, Judith K.; Sawaya, George F.; Siu, Albert L.; Teutsch, Steven M.; Yawn, Barbara P.

    2009-01-01

    Description: New recommendation from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) on the use of nontraditional, or novel, risk factors in assessing the coronary heart disease (CHD) risk of asymptomatic persons. Methods: Systematic reviews were conducted of literature since 1996 on 9 proposed non

  8. Hypothesis: Metalloproteinase Inhibitors Decrease Risks of Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizotte-Waniewski, Michelle; Brew, Keith; Hennekens, Charles H

    2016-07-01

    The hypothesis that matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors reduce risks of cardiovascular disease in humans is plausible, unproven, and difficult to test, due, in part, to differences in specificity and route of administration. Endogenous tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) are tight-binding, protein inhibitors that function in vivo and can be engineered to enhance specificity for desired targets. Nonetheless, TIMPs have been difficult to test, in part, because their secondary functions, including cell growth promotion and angiogenesis, raise concerns about side effects and they cannot be delivered orally. In contrast, doxycycline and other chemically modified tetracyclines are broad-spectrum, reversible MMP inhibitors with lower affinity but can be taken orally and have US Food and Drug Administration approval. The completed phase 2 randomized trials in humans of MMP inhibitors have methodologic limitations but generally show no significant benefits with adverse effects. At present, the principal research challenge is to achieve a better understanding of the complexities of biological functions of MMPs and subsequently to conduct large-scale phase 3 trials. PMID:26703451

  9. Effects of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Communication for Patients With Type 2 Diabetes on Risk Perception in a Randomized Controlled Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Welschen, Laura M. C.; Bot, Sandra D M; Kostense, Piet J.; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Timmermans, Daniëlle R.M.; van der Weijden, Trudy; Nijpels, Giel

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) underestimate their risk of developing severe complications, and they do not always understand the risk communication by their caregivers. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of an intervention focused on the communication of the absolute 10-year risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with T2DM. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A randomized controlled trial was performed in T2DM patients newly referred to...

  10. Towards a Fast Dynamic Model of the Human Circulatory System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Carolyn; Green, Melissa; Boris, Jay; Oran, Elaine

    2011-11-01

    We describe a model for systems-level transport in the human circulatory system that is based on a set of equations for a one-dimensional unsteady elastic pipe flow circuit. The system is collapsed from three spatial dimensions and time to one spatial dimension and time by assuming axisymmetric vessel geometry and a parabolic velocity profile across the cylindrical vessels. To drive the fluid, the contractions of a beating heart are modeled as periodic area changes of the elastic vessels. Two different models are compared, both including and neglecting fluid acceleration. Time-resolved distributions of pressure, velocity and area compare reasonably well with reference data. Increasing the rigidity of the vasculature is found to increase peak arterial pressures on the order of ten percent, and including a distributed vascular contraction to model distributed skeletal muscle contractions monotonically increases time-averaged blood flow in the veins, consistent with human physiological response. The circulatory system model presented here simulates the circulatory system on the order of one hundred times faster than real-time; that is, we can compute thousands of heartbeats per minute of CPU time.

  11. Prediction of coronary heart disease : a comparison between the Copenhagen risk score and the Framingham risk score applied to a Dutch population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, CL; Bilo, HJG; Thomsen, TF; Groenier, KH; Meyboom-De Jong, B

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the estimation of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk by the Framingham risk score (FRS) and the Copenhagen risk score (CRS) using Dutch population data. Design. Comparison of CHD risk estimates from FRS and CRS. CHD risk-estimations for each separate risk factor. Setting. Urk,

  12. Risk of ischemic heart disease in women after radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darby, Sarah C.; Ewertz, Marianne; McGale, Paul;

    2013-01-01

    Radiotherapy for breast cancer often involves some incidental exposure of the heart to ionizing radiation. The effect of this exposure on the subsequent risk of ischemic heart disease is uncertain.......Radiotherapy for breast cancer often involves some incidental exposure of the heart to ionizing radiation. The effect of this exposure on the subsequent risk of ischemic heart disease is uncertain....

  13. Pelvic inflammatory disease and risk of invasive ovarian cancer and ovarian borderline tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christina B; Faber, Mette T; Jensen, Allan;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the potential association between a history of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer or ovarian borderline tumors.......The aim of the study was to examine the potential association between a history of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer or ovarian borderline tumors....

  14. Chemotherapy, radiotherapy and combined modality for Hodgkin's disease, with emphasis on second cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franklin, J G; Paus, M D; Pluetschow, A;

    2005-01-01

    Second malignancies (SM) are a major late effect of treatment for Hodgkin's disease (HD). Reliable comparisons of SM risk between alternative treatment strategies are lacking.......Second malignancies (SM) are a major late effect of treatment for Hodgkin's disease (HD). Reliable comparisons of SM risk between alternative treatment strategies are lacking....

  15. Family history of premature death and risk of early onset cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm; Carstensen, Lisbeth; Oyen, Nina; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob; Christiansen, Michael; McKenna, William J; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Melbye, Mads; Boyd, Heather A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a family history of premature death, cardiovascular death in particular, on the risk of early cardiovascular disease.......The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a family history of premature death, cardiovascular death in particular, on the risk of early cardiovascular disease....

  16. The association between early menopause and risk of ischaemic heart disease: Influence of Hormone Therapy?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkkegaard, E; Andersen, Zorana Jovanovic; Heitmann, B L; Keiding, N; Ottesen, B; Pedersen, A T

    2006-01-01

    Randomised clinical trials find no protection against development of ischaemic heart disease by use of Hormone Therapy (HT) after the age of 50 years. Observational studies suggest that early menopause is a risk factor for ischaemic heart disease. Yet, a clinical very relevant question is whether...... HT reduces this risk associated with early menopause....

  17. Outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases: Risk perception and behaviour of the general public

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Bults (Marloes)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This thesis focuses on risk perception and behaviour of the public during the outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases. It consists of studies on Influenza A (H1N1), Q fever and Lyme disease. These studies were conducted among both the general public and specific risk

  18. [C-reactive protein and risk of ischaemic vascular and cerebrovascular disease--secondary publication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zacho, J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Jensen, J.S.; Grande, P.; Sillesen, H.; Nordestgaard, B.G.

    2009-01-01

    Elevated levels of C reactive protein (CRP) are associated with increased risk of ischaemic vascular disease. We tested whether this is a causal association. CRP > 3 vs < 1 mg/l were associated with an increased risk of ischaemic heart- and cerebrovascular disease of 1.6 and 1.3, respectively. Four...

  19. Alcohol consumption and risk of peripheral arterial disease : the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, R.; Geleijnse, J.M.; Hofman, A.; Meijer, W.T.; Rooij, van F.J.A.; Grobbee, D.E.; Witteman, J.C.M.

    2002-01-01

    Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Data on alcohol consumption and atherosclerosis are scarce. To determine the association between alcohol consumption and risk of peripheral arterial disease, the authors carried out a cross-sectional study (199

  20. Alcohol consumption and risk of peripheral arterial disease - The Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, R; Geleijnse, JM; Hofman, A; Meijer, WT; van Rooij, FJA; Grobbee, DE; Witteman, JCM

    2002-01-01

    Moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Data on alcohol consumption and atherosclerosis are scarce. To determine the association between alcohol consumption and risk of peripheral arterial disease, the authors carried out a cross-sectional study (199

  1. A Survey of Dutch Expert Opinion on Climatic Drivers of Infectious Disease Risk in Western Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Mia Akin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is considered to be a significant influence for infectious disease risk in Western Europe. Climatic and non-climatic developments act together resulting in current and future infectious disease risk. This study uses a survey to explore Dutch expert perspectives on climate change induced infectious disease risk. The results show that the experts consider temperature change, precipitation change, humidity change, and climate change induced habitat change to be relatively important for water-related infectious disease risk, vector-borne disease risk excluding zoonoses, and the risk of zoonoses. The climatic drivers are seen as relatively less important for food-related infectious disease risk. The experts rate many non-climatic drivers to be highly important for infectious disease risk. Comparatively, the majority of the non-climatic drivers assessed are seen as more important than climate change drivers. The degree of uncertainty in the future development of climatic drivers is viewed as moderate to high, and for non-climatic drivers mostly as moderate. An analysis of subsamples based on professional backgrounds reveals differences in experts’ opinions for e.g., socio-cultural drivers, and similarities. Diversity and consensus amongst expert perspectives on climate change and infectious diseases can have implications for policy. Further research to uncover and compare prevailing perspectives is necessary.

  2. Oral hygiene status of individuals with cardiovascular diseases and associated risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Shetty

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dentist and oral health screening may be the latest weapon in identifying persons at risk of cardiovascular disease. Oral infections, specifically periodontitis, may confer independent risks for different systemic conditions. The risk factors associated with cardiovascular diseases also suggest that the relationship between periodontal disease and diabetes works in both ways. The aim of this study was to support and strengthen the association and relationship between oral hygiene status of individuals with cardiovascular diseases and its associated risk factors. A simple random sampling was carried out in 200 inhabitants of Western Utter Pradesh, India. An oral health visit and examination was made for an equal number of males and females of different age groups with cardiovascular diseases. Evaluation of the oral status was made by means of an oral hygiene index, community periodontal index of treatment needs and loss of attachment. Evaluation of oral status in patients with cardiovascular diseases and in the control group has shown a statistically significant low level of oral health in patients with cardiovascular diseases as compared to control. Prevalence of systemic diseases in different age groups significantly correlated with the prevalence of severe periodontal diseases. Treating gum disease may reduce the risk of heart disease and improve health outcomes for patients with periodontal disease and vascular heart problems.

  3. Knowledge of heart disease risk factors among workers in a Nigerian University: A call for concern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeseye Abiodun Akintunde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cardiovascular disease is the commonest cause of mortality worldwide. Many risk factors predate the development of cardiovascular diseases. Adequate knowledge of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases is the first step towards effective preventive strategies to combat the cardiovascular diseases burden in any population. This study aims to determine the knowledge of workers in a Nigerian University on risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 206 academic and non-academic staff of Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria using the Heart Disease Fact Questionnaire (HDFQ. Demographic data were taken. The lipid profile and random blood sugar were taken. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 17.0. Results: The mean age of the study participants was 45.3 ΁ 7.9 years. There were 96 males (46.6%. The mean HDFQ score was 48.6%. Only 41 (19.9% of participants were assessed to have good knowledge of heart disease risk factors. Majority, 101 (49.0% had poor knowledge while 64 (31.2% had fair knowledge of heart disease risk factors. There was no significant difference between prevalence of CV risk factors between those with good or fair or low level of knowledge. Most participants did not have a good level of knowledge about risk factors, prevention, treatment and association with diabetes as it relates to heart diseases. Conclusion: Knowledge of heart disease risk factors is low among University workers in Nigeria. Effective education on heart disease risk factors and appropriate preventive strategies are indeed important to reduce cardiovascular disease burden in Nigerian University communities.

  4. Ranking of psychosocial and traditional risk factors by importance for coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schnohr, Peter; Marott, Jacob L; Kristensen, Tage S.;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To rank psychosocial and traditional risk factors by importance for coronary heart disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: The Copenhagen City Heart Study is a prospective cardiovascular population study randomly selected in 1976. The third examination was carried out from 1991 to 1994, and 8882 men...... was one of the most important risk factors for coronary heart disease, our findings emphasize the importance of including psychosocial factors in risk prediction scores....... and women free of cardiovascular diseases were included in this study. Events were assessed until April 2013. Forward selection, population attributable fraction, and gradient boosting machine were used for determining ranks. The importance of vital exhaustion for risk prediction was investigated by C...

  5. Utilizing Dental Electronic Health Records Data to Predict Risk for Periodontal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyvalikakath, Thankam P; Padman, Rema; Vyawahare, Karnali; Darade, Pratiksha; Paranjape, Rhucha

    2015-01-01

    Periodontal disease is a major cause for tooth loss and adversely affects individuals' oral health and quality of life. Research shows its potential association with systemic diseases like diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and social habits such as smoking. This study explores mining potential risk factors from dental electronic health records to predict and display patients' contextualized risk for periodontal disease. We retrieved relevant risk factors from structured and unstructured data on 2,370 patients who underwent comprehensive oral examinations at the Indiana University School of Dentistry, Indianapolis, IN, USA. Predicting overall risk and displaying relationships between risk factors and their influence on the patient's oral and general health can be a powerful educational and disease management tool for patients and clinicians at the point of care. PMID:26262380

  6. Girls’ Diets Affect Puberty,Later Disease Risk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢钦虢

    2000-01-01

    本刊上期刊登了吴春拂选注的一篇文章,题目是:Dieting May HarmGirl’s IQs。该文标题中的Dieting的意思是“节食”,节食,会降低女孩的智商;而本文标题中的Diets却是“饮食”的意思。本文的主题句就亮出一个或多或少与前文相左的意见: Young girls who consume diets rich in animal protein and fat may be eatingtheir way to an early puberty(青春期)and possibly increasing their risk for chronicdisease later in life. 女孩如果多吃富含动物蛋白质和动物脂肪的食物将过早进入青春期,并可能日后患上慢性疾病的风险。 根据专家的意见,女孩的“健康饮食”应该是:to reduce intakes of saturated(饱和的)fat and red meat and excess calories and to increase fruit/vegetable intakesin children. 如此饮食,其收效是:result in lower breast cancer rates,along with otherhealth benefits. 也许读者不会料到,如此饮食同样存在着“负面作用”:but the risk ofosteoporosis,and perhaps of other diseases,might increase. 两文并读,或者就单读此文,读者朋友就会深感左右为难,无所适从。 其实,深入一步想,这些意见并不矛盾,世界上许多事情都应该一分为二地去看,去思考。

  7. Excess coronary artery disease risk in South Asian immigrants: Can dysfunctional high-density lipoprotein explain increased risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Dodani

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Sunita DodaniMedical College of Georgia, Augusta, GA, USABackground: Coronary artery disease (CAD is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States (US, and South Asian immigrants (SAIs have a higher risk of CAD compared to Caucasians. Traditional risk factors may not completely explain high risk, and some of the unknown risk factors need to be explored. This short review is mainly focused on the possible role of dysfunctional high-density lipoprotein (HDL in causing CAD and presents an overview of available literature on dysfunctional HDL.Discussion: The conventional risk factors, insulin resistance parameters, and metabolic syndrome, although important in predicting CAD risk, may not sufficiently predict risk in SAIs. HDL has antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and antithrombotic properties that contribute to its function as an antiatherogenic agent. Recent Caucasian studies have shown HDL is not only ineffective as an antioxidant but, paradoxically, appears to be prooxidant, and has been found to be associated with CAD. Several causes have been hypothesized for HDL to become dysfunctional, including Apo lipoprotein A-I (Apo A-I polymorphisms. New risk factors and markers like dysfunctional HDL and genetic polymorphisms may be associated with CAD.Conclusions: More research is required in SAIs to explore associations with CAD and to enhance early detection and prevention of CAD in this high risk group.Keywords: South Asian immigrants, coronary heart disease, cardiovascular risk, high-density lipoprotein

  8. Serum homocysteine as a risk factor for coronary heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    atherothrombotic disease without their traditional risk factors. (author)

  9. Risk factors for respiratory syncytial virus hospitalisation in children with heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kim; Stensballe, LG; Fisker, Niels;

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the risk and risk factors for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalisation and determinants of the severity of RSV disease in children with heart disease. METHODS: By using a database on RSV tests in Denmark all children with RSV diagnosed with heart disease in Denmark...... hospitalisation predictors of the need for respiratory support (supplemental oxygen, nasal continuous positive airway pressure or mechanical ventilation) were young age (relative risk (RR) 0.47, 95% CI 0.32 to 0.67 per additional year of age) and cardiac decompensation (RR 1.81, 95% CI 1.02 to 3.......23). The incidence rate of RSV hospitalisation among children with any heart disease aged 0-23 months was 5.65 per 100 child-years. CONCLUSION: In children with heart disease risk factors for RSV admission are Down syndrome, cardiomyopathy and haemodynamically significant heart disease. Young age and cardiac...

  10. Promotor polymorphisms in leukotriene C4 synthase and risk of ischemic cerebrovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freiberg, J.J.; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A.; Sillesen, H.; Jensen, Gorm Boje; Nordestgaard, Børge; Freiberg, Jacob J; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne; Sillesen, Henrik; Jensen, Gorm B; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cysteinyl leukotrienes are involved in inflammation and possibly in early carotid atherosclerosis. We tested the hypothesis that the -444 A/C and -1072 G/A polymorphisms of the leukotriene C(4) synthase associate with risk of ischemic cerebrovascular disease. METHODS AND RESULTS: We...... atherosclerosis, or with levels of platelets and coagulation factors. CONCLUSIONS: Leukotriene C(4) synthase -1072 AA genotype predict increased risk, whereas -444 CC genotype predict decreased risk of ischemic cerebrovascular disease....

  11. Fine-mapping in the MHC region accounts for 18% additional genetic risk for celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Pulit, Sara L.; Trynka, Gosia; Hunt, Karen A.; Romanos, Jihane; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; van Heel, David A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Bakker, Paul I.W.

    2015-01-01

    Although dietary gluten is the trigger, celiac disease risk is strongly influenced by genetic variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region. We fine-mapped the MHC association signal to identify additional risk factors independent of the HLA-DQ alleles and observed five novel associations that account for 18% of the genetic risk. Together with the 57 known non-MHC loci, genetic variation can now explain up to 48% of celiac disease heritability. PMID:25894500

  12. Fine-mapping in the MHC region accounts for 18% additional genetic risk for celiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Pulit, Sara L.; Trynka, Gosia; Hunt, Karen A.; Romanos, Jihane; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Van Heel, David A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Paul I W de Bakker

    2015-01-01

    Although dietary gluten is the trigger, celiac disease risk is strongly influenced by genetic variation in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region. We fine-mapped the MHC association signal to identify additional risk factors independent of the HLA-DQ alleles and observed five novel associations that account for 18% of the genetic risk. Together with the 57 known non-MHC loci, genetic variation can now explain up to 48% of celiac disease heritability.

  13. Improving coeliac disease risk prediction by testing non-HLA variants additional to HLA variants

    OpenAIRE

    Romanos, Jihane; Rosen, Anna; Kumar, Vinod; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Szperl, Agata; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; van Diemen, Cleo C.; Kanninga, Roan; Jankipersadsing, Soesma A; Steck, Andrea; Eisenbarth, Georges; Van Heel, David A.; Cukrowska, Bozena; Bruno, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Background The majority of coeliac disease (CD) patients are not being properly diagnosed and therefore remain untreated, leading to a greater risk of developing CD-associated complications. The major genetic risk heterodimer, HLA-DQ2 and DQ8, is already used clinically to help exclude disease. However, approximately 40% of the population carry these alleles and the majority never develop CD. Objective We explored whether CD risk prediction can be improved by adding non-HLA-susceptible varian...

  14. Improving coeliac disease risk prediction by testing non-HLA variants additional to HLA variants

    OpenAIRE

    Romanos, Jihane; Rosén, Anna; Kumar, Vinod; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Szperl, Agata; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; van Diemen, Cleo C.; Kanninga, Roan; Jankipersadsing, Soesma A; Steck, Andrea; Eisenbarth, Georges; Van Heel, David A.; Cukrowska, Bozena; Bruno, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    Background: The majority of coeliac disease (CD) patients are not being properly diagnosed and therefore remain untreated, leading to a greater risk of developing CD-associated complications. The major genetic risk heterodimer, HLA-DQ2 and DQ8, is already used clinically to help exclude disease. However, approximately 40% of the population carry these alleles and the majority never develop CD. Objective: We explored whether CD risk prediction can be improved by adding non-HLA-susceptible vari...

  15. Population-Based Risk Assessment of APOL1 on Renal Disease

    OpenAIRE

    David J. Friedman; Kozlitina, Julia; Genovese, Giulio; Jog, Prachi; Pollak, Martin R.

    2011-01-01

    Case-control studies suggest that African Americans with genetic variants in both copies of APOL1 have increased risk for hypertension-attributable ESRD and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Here, we tested these risk variants in the Dallas Heart Study to ascertain the prevalence of APOL1-associated renal disease in a large population-based study and to estimate the contribution of APOL1 risk variants to disparities in renal disease. We determined the genotype of 1825 African Americans and ...

  16. Are certain life style habits associated with lower Alzheimer disease risk?

    OpenAIRE

    Arab, Lana; Sabbagh, Marwan N.

    2010-01-01

    As the number of patients with Alzheimer disease is expected to grow, finding ways to prevent and lower the risk of Alzheimer disease becomes a crucial matter. Risk factors for developing AD have been identified including health conditions, dietary habits, genetics and heredity, gender, education, age, and lifestyle. Interventions targeted at some of these risk factors may offer opportunities for development of an optimal preventive strategy. Life style habits which include dietary habits and...

  17. Audit of Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors among Supported Adults with Intellectual Disability Attending an Ageing Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Robyn A.; Schluter, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor profile for older adults with intellectual disability (ID). As many CVD risk factors are treatable by lifestyle changes, confirmation of the risk factor profile for older adults with ID could substantially impact upon preventive health practices for this group. Method:…

  18. Application of cardiovascular disease risk prediction models and the relevance of novel biomarkers to risk stratification in Asian Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kanjilal

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available S Kanjilal1, VS Rao1, M Mukherjee1, BK Natesha1, KS Renuka1, K Sibi1, SS Iyengar1, Vijay V Kakkar1,21Tata Proteomics and Coagulation Department, Thrombosis Research Institute, Bangalore, Narayana Hrudayalaya Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka, India; 2Thrombosis Research Institute, London, UKAbstract: The increasing pressure on health resources has led to the emergence of risk assessment as an essential tool in the management of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Concern exists regarding the validity of their generalization to all populations. Existing risk scoring models do not incorporate emerging ‘novel’ risk factors. In this context, the aim of the study was to examine the relevance of British, European, and Framingham predictive CVD risk scores to the asymptomatic high risk Indian population. Blood samples drawn from the participants were analyzed for various ‘traditional’ and ‘novel’ biomarkers, and their CVD risk factor profiling was also done. The Framingham model defined only 5% of the study cohort to be at high risk, which appears to be an underestimation of CVD risk in this genetically predisposed population. These subjects at high risk had significantly elevated levels of lipid, pro-inflammatory, pro-thrombotic, and serological markers. It is more relevant to develop risk predictive scores for application to the Indian population. This study substantiates the argument that alternative approaches to risk stratification are required in order to make them more adaptable and applicable to different populations with varying risk factor and disease patterns.Keywords: atherosclerosis, risk factors, risk score, Framingham, plasma biomarkers

  19. Application of cardiovascular disease risk prediction models and the relevance of novel biomarkers to risk stratification in Asian Indians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kanjilal

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available S Kanjilal1, VS Rao1, M Mukherjee1, BK Natesha1, KS Renuka1, K Sibi1, SS Iyengar1, Vijay V Kakkar1,21Tata Proteomics and Coagulation Department, Thrombosis Research Institute, Bangalore, Narayana Hrudayalaya Hospital, Bangalore, Karnataka, India; 2Thrombosis Research Institute, London, UKAbstract: The increasing pressure on health resources has led to the emergence of risk assessment as an essential tool in the management of cardiovascular disease (CVD. Concern exists regarding the validity of their generalization to all populations. Existing risk scoring models do not incorporate emerging ‘novel’ risk factors. In this context, the aim of the study was to examine the relevance of British, European, and Framingham predictive CVD risk scores to the asymptomatic high risk Indian population. Blood samples drawn from the participants were analyzed for various ‘traditional’ and ‘novel’ biomarkers, and their CVD risk factor profiling was also done. The Framingham model defined only 5% of the study cohort to be at high risk, which appears to be an underestimation of CVD risk in this genetically predisposed population. These subjects at high risk had significantly elevated levels of lipid, pro-inflammatory, pro-thrombotic, and serological markers. It is more relevant to develop risk predictive scores for application to the Indian population. This study substantiates the argument that alternative approaches to risk stratification are required in order to make them more adaptable and applicable to different populations with varying risk factor and disease patterns.Keywords: atherosclerosis, risk factors, risk score, Framingham, plasma biomarkers

  20. Homocysteine in cerebrovascular disease: An independent risk factor for subcortical vascular encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Bertsch, Thomas; Mielke, Orell; Höly, Sabine; Zimmer, Wilma; Casarin, Wendy; Aufenanger, Johannes; Walter, Silke; Muehlhauser, Frank; Kuehl, Sandra; Ragoschke, Andreas; Fassbender, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    Hyperhomocysteinemia is a risk factor for obstructive large-vessel disease. Here, we studied plasma concentrations of homocysteine and vitamins in patients suffering from subcortical vascular encephalopathy (SVE), a cerebral small-vessel disease leading to dementia. These results were compared to the homocysteine and vitamin plasma concentrations from patients with cerebral large vessel disease and healthy control subjects. Plasma concentrations of homocysteine, vascular risk factors and vita...

  1. Widespread non-additive and interaction effects within HLA loci modulate the risk of autoimmune diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lenz, Tobias L.; Deutsch, Aaron J.; Han, Buhm; Hu, Xinli; Okada, Yukinori; Eyre, Stephen; Knapp, Michael; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Abecasis, Gonçalo; Becker, Jessica; Boeckxstaens, Guy; Chen, Wei-Min; Franke, Andre; Gladman, Dafna D

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genes confer substantial risk for autoimmune diseases on a log-additive scale. Here we speculated that differences in autoantigen-binding repertoires between a heterozygote's two expressed HLA variants might result in additional non-additive risk effects. We tested the non-additive disease contributions of classical HLA alleles in patients and matched controls for five common autoimmune diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (ncases = 5,337), type 1 diabetes (T1D; ncases...

  2. The risk of falling into poverty after developing heart disease: a survival analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Callander, Emily J.; Schofield, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    Background Those with a low income are known to have a higher risk of developing heart disease. However, the inverse relationship – falling into income poverty after developing heart disease has not been explored with longitudinal data. This paper aims to determine if those with heart disease have an elevated risk of falling into poverty. Methods Survival analysis was conducted using the longitudinal Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia survey, between the years 2007 and 2012. Th...

  3. Forecasting the Future Risk of Barmah Forest Virus Disease under Climate Change Scenarios in Queensland, Australia

    OpenAIRE

    Naish, Suchithra; Mengersen, Kerrie; Hu, Wenbiao; Tong, Shilu

    2013-01-01

    Background Mosquito-borne diseases are climate sensitive and there has been increasing concern over the impact of climate change on future disease risk. This paper projected the potential future risk of Barmah Forest virus (BFV) disease under climate change scenarios in Queensland, Australia. Methods/Principal Findings We obtained data on notified BFV cases, climate (maximum and minimum temperature and rainfall), socio-economic and tidal conditions for current period 2000–2008 for coastal reg...

  4. MULTIPLE LOGISTIC REGRESSION MODEL TO PREDICT RISK FACTORS OF ORAL HEALTH DISEASES

    OpenAIRE

    Parameshwar V Pandit; Javali, Shivalingappa B.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analysis the dependence of oral health diseases i.e. dental caries and periodontal disease on considering the number of risk factors through the applications of logistic regression model. Method: The cross sectional study involves a systematic random sample of 1760 permanent dentition aged between 18-40 years in Dharwad, Karnataka, India. Dharwad is situated in North Karnataka. The mean age was 34.26±7.28. The risk factors of dental caries and periodontal disease were established ...

  5. Inherited prion disease with 4-octapeptide repeat insertion: disease requires the interaction of multiple genetic risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaski, Diego N; Pennington, Catherine; Beck, Jon; Poulter, Mark; Uphill, James; Bishop, Matthew T; Linehan, Jaqueline M; O'Malley, Catherine; Wadsworth, Jonathan D F; Joiner, Susan; Knight, Richard S G; Ironside, James W; Brandner, Sebastian; Collinge, John; Mead, Simon

    2011-06-01

    Genetic factors are implicated in the aetiology of sporadic late-onset neurodegenerative diseases. Whether these genetic variants are predominantly common or rare, and how multiple genetic factors interact with each other to cause disease is poorly understood. Inherited prion diseases are highly heterogeneous and may be clinically mistaken for sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease because of a negative family history. Here we report our investigation of patients from the UK with four extra octapeptide repeats, which suggest that the risk of clinical disease is increased by a combination of the mutation and a susceptibility haplotype on the wild-type chromosome. The predominant clinical syndrome is a progressive cortical dementia with pyramidal signs, myoclonus and cerebellar abnormalities that closely resemble sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Autopsy shows perpendicular deposits of prion protein in the molecular layer of the cerebellum. Identity testing, PRNP microsatellite haplotyping and genealogical work confirm no cryptic close family relationships and suggests multiple progenitor disease haplotypes. All patients were homozygous for methionine at polymorphic codon 129. In addition, at a single nucleotide polymorphism upstream of PRNP thought to confer susceptibility to sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (rs1029273), all patients were homozygous for the risk allele (combined P=5.9×10(-5)). The haplotype identified may also be a risk factor in other partially penetrant inherited prion diseases although it does not modify age of onset. Blood expression of PRNP in healthy individuals was modestly higher in carriers of the risk haplotype. These findings may provide a precedent for understanding apparently sporadic neurodegenerative diseases caused by rare high-risk mutations. PMID:21616973

  6. Diabetes and the risk of developing Parkinson's disease in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schernhammer, Eva; Hansen, Johnni; Rugbjerg, Kathrine;

    2011-01-01

    Insulin contributes to normal brain function. Previous studies have suggested associations between midlife diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease. Using Danish population registers, we investigated whether a history of diabetes or the use of antidiabetes drugs was ...

  7. [Musculoskeletal pathology in occupational risks and common degenerative disease: reflections on the intensity and duration of the risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamini, Roberta; Astengo, Rossana

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, in Italy the reports of mnusculoskeletal diseases increase as confirmed in the last INAIL (national insurance for occupational diseases and injuries) annual report. The Emilia-Ronmagna is one of the region with the highest number of reports: 15.9% of the total in 2012. The decree no. 81/08 has partially simplified the medico-legal activities related to musculoskeletal diseases; however, the medico-legal physicians have still to deal with some issues such as risk assessment quality, economic crisis, and specific work environments (e.g. agriculture and many handicraft activities). Tire risk factors of musculoskeletal diseases and their assessments are quite well studied. The latency period of these diseases needs to be investigated, since it could be a relevant aspect for legal medical judgment, insurance protection and prevention. Based on literature data and INAIL experience, authors propose some considerations useful for a scientific debate. PMID:25558730

  8. Risk Factors for non-communicable diseases in Mozambique.

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Patrícia Diogo Padrão Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) are the main cause of mortality worldwide, having accounted for two thirds of all deaths in 2010. In Mozambique, although communicable diseases are the most important contributors for the morbidity and mortality burden, NCD are becoming more frequent, being estimated to have accounted for one fifth of all deaths in 2010. Worldwide, the most common NCD cardiovascular (CV) diseases, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases and diabetes share four main lifestyle ris...

  9. Residential Distance to High-voltage Power Lines and Risk of Neurodegenerative Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frei, Patrizia; Poulsen, Aslak Harbo; Mezei, Gabor;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible association between residential distance to high-voltage power lines and neurodegenerative diseases, especially Alzheimer's disease. A Swiss study previously found increased risk of Alzheimer's disease for people living within 50 m of a power...... line. A register-based case-control study including all patients diagnosed with neurodegenerative diseases during the years 1994-2010 was conducted among the entire adult population of Denmark. Using conditional logistic regression models, hazard ratios for ever living close to a power line in the time...... period 5-20 years before diagnosis were computed. The risks for developing dementia, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and motor neuron disease were not increased in persons living within close vicinity of a power line. The risk of Alzheimer's disease was not increased for ever living within 50 m...

  10. TOWARDS LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES FOR REDUCING LYME DISEASE RISK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incidence of Lyme disease in the United States continues to grow. Low-density development is also increasing in endemic regions, raising questions about the relationship between development pattern and disease. This study sought to model Lyme disease incidence rate using quanti...

  11. Cattle trade and the risk of importing animal diseases into the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterbosch, T.J.; Dopfer, D.D.V.

    2005-01-01

    This study examines the risk of importing animal diseases into the Netherlands through livestock trade. It presents projections of Dutch cattle imports until 2010, and applies quantitative epidemiology to estimate the related probabilities of importing three animal diseases (foot and mouth disease,

  12. Family history of vascular disease and the risk of cardiovascular events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijmans, M.

    2015-01-01

    A positive family history of cardiovascular disease is an established risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease. In clinical practice, this evident relation between the presence of cardiovascular disease in families and first cardiovascular events has resulted in family history being

  13. Vector-borne diseases: the basic reproduction number R0 and risk maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartemink, N.A.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis deals with the derivation of the basic reproduction number (R0) for vector-borne diseases, in the context of studying the effect of climate change on the risk of emergence diseases. Vector-borne diseases are transmitted from an infected individual to another individual by vectors, usuall

  14. Independent and competing disease risks: Implications for host Populations in variable environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jolles, A.E.; Etienne, R.S.

    2006-01-01

    Disease models usually assume disease to act independently of other mortality- and morbidity-causing factors. Alternatively, disease may function as a competing risk factor, for example, killing already moribund hosts. Using tuberculosis (TB) in African buffalo as a model system, we explore conseque

  15. Independent and competing disease risks : Implications for host Populations in variable environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jolles, AE; Etienne, RS; Olff, H; Jolles, Anna E.; DeAngelis, Donald L.; Michalakis, Yannis

    2006-01-01

    Disease models usually assume disease to act independently of other mortality- and morbidity-causing factors. Alternatively, disease may function as a competing risk factor, for example, killing already moribund hosts. Using tuberculosis (TB) in African buffalo as a model system, we explore conseque

  16. Coronary artery disease risk assessment from unstructured electronic health records using text mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnagaddala, Jitendra; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Ray, Pradeep; Kumar, Manish; Chang, Nai-Wen; Dai, Hong-Jie

    2015-12-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) often leads to myocardial infarction, which may be fatal. Risk factors can be used to predict CAD, which may subsequently lead to prevention or early intervention. Patient data such as co-morbidities, medication history, social history and family history are required to determine the risk factors for a disease. However, risk factor data are usually embedded in unstructured clinical narratives if the data is not collected specifically for risk assessment purposes. Clinical text mining can be used to extract data related to risk factors from unstructured clinical notes. This study presents methods to extract Framingham risk factors from unstructured electronic health records using clinical text mining and to calculate 10-year coronary artery disease risk scores in a cohort of diabetic patients. We developed a rule-based system to extract risk factors: age, gender, total cholesterol, HDL-C, blood pressure, diabetes history and smoking history. The results showed that the output from the text mining system was reliable, but there was a significant amount of missing data to calculate the Framingham risk score. A systematic approach for understanding missing data was followed by implementation of imputation strategies. An analysis of the 10-year Framingham risk scores for coronary artery disease in this cohort has shown that the majority of the diabetic patients are at moderate risk of CAD. PMID:26319542

  17. Predicting Disease Risk, Identifying Stakeholders, and Informing Control Strategies: A Case Study of Anthrax in Montana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Lillian R; Blackburn, Jason K

    2016-06-01

    Infectious diseases that affect wildlife and livestock are challenging to manage and can lead to large-scale die-offs, economic losses, and threats to human health. The management of infectious diseases in wildlife and livestock is made easier with knowledge of disease risk across space and identifying stakeholders associated with high-risk landscapes. This study focuses on anthrax, caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis, risk to wildlife and livestock in Montana. There is a history of anthrax in Montana, but the spatial extent of disease risk and subsequent wildlife species at risk are not known. Our objective was to predict the potential geographic distribution of anthrax risk across Montana, identify wildlife species at risk and their distributions, and define stakeholders. We used an ecological niche model to predict the potential distribution of anthrax risk. We overlaid susceptible wildlife species distributions and land ownership delineations on our risk map. We found that there was an extensive region across Montana predicted as potential anthrax risk. These potentially risky landscapes overlapped the ranges of all 6 ungulate species considered in the analysis and livestock grazing allotments, and this overlap was on public and private land for all species. Our findings suggest that there is the potential for a multi-species anthrax outbreak on multiple landscapes across Montana. Our potential anthrax risk map can be used to prioritize landscapes for surveillance and for implementing livestock vaccination programs. PMID:27169560

  18. von Hippel-Lindau protein regulates transition from fetal to adult circulatory system in retina

    OpenAIRE

    Kurihara, Toshihide; Kubota, Yoshiaki; Ozawa, Yoko; Takubo, Keiyo; Noda, Kousuke; Simon, M. Celeste; Johnson, Randall S; Suematsu, Makoto; Tsubota, Kazuo; Ishida, Susumu; Goda, Nobuhito; Suda, Toshio; Okano, Hideyuki

    2010-01-01

    In the early neonatal stage, the fetal circulatory system undergoes dramatic transition to the adult circulatory system. Normally, embryonic connecting vessels such as ductus arteriosus and the foramen ovale close and regress. In the neonatal retina, hyaloid vessels maintaining blood flow in the embryonic retina regress, and retinal vessels take over to form adult-type circulatory system. This process is regulated by the programmed cell death switch mediated by macrophages via Wnt and Angiopo...

  19. Disease-modifying therapies and infectious risks in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelmann, Alexander; Loebermann, Micha; Reisinger, Emil C; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Zettl, Uwe K

    2016-04-01

    Immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive treatments for multiple sclerosis (MS) are associated with an increased risk of infection, which makes treatment of this condition challenging in daily clinical practice. Use of the expanding range of available drugs to treat MS requires extensive knowledge of treatment-associated infections, risk-minimizing strategies and approaches to monitoring and treatment of such adverse events. An interdisciplinary approach to evaluate the infectious events associated with available MS treatments has become increasingly relevant. In addition, individual stratification of treatment-related infectious risks is necessary when choosing therapies for patients with MS, as well as during and after therapy. Determination of the individual risk of infection following serial administration of different immunotherapies is also crucial. Here, we review the modes of action of the available MS drugs, and relate this information to the current knowledge of drug-specific infectious risks and risk-minimizing strategies. PMID:26943779

  20. Durable mechanical circulatory support in advanced heart failure: a critical care cardiology perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lala, Anuradha; Mehra, Mandeep R

    2013-11-01

    Though cardiac transplantation for advanced heart disease patients remains definitive therapy for patients with advanced heart failure, it is challenged by inadequate donor supply, causing durable mechanical circulatory support (MCS) to slowly become a new primary standard. Selecting appropriate patients for MCS involves meeting a number of prespecifications as is required in evaluation for cardiac transplant candidacy. As technology evolves to bring forth more durable smaller devices, selection criteria for appropriate MCS recipients will likely expand to encompass a broader, less sick population. The "Holy Grail" for MCS will be a focus on clinical recovery and explantation of devices rather than the currently more narrowly defined indications of bridge to transplantation or lifetime device therapy. PMID:24188222

  1. Cardiovascular disease risk models and longitudinal changes in cognition: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie L Harrison

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease and its risk factors have consistently been associated with poor cognitive function and incident dementia. Whether cardiovascular disease prediction models, developed to predict an individual's risk of future cardiovascular disease or stroke, are also informative for predicting risk of cognitive decline and dementia is not known.The objective of this systematic review was to compare cohort studies examining the association between cardiovascular disease risk models and longitudinal changes in cognitive function or risk of incident cognitive impairment or dementia.Medline, PsychINFO, and Embase were searched from inception to March 28, 2014. From 3,413 records initially screened, 21 were included.The association between numerous different cardiovascular disease risk models and cognitive outcomes has been tested, including Framingham and non-Framingham risk models. Five studies examined dementia as an outcome; fourteen studies examined cognitive decline or incident cognitive impairment as an outcome; and two studies examined both dementia and cognitive changes as outcomes. In all studies, higher cardiovascular disease risk scores were associated with cognitive changes or risk of dementia. Only four studies reported model prognostic performance indices, such as Area Under the Curve (AUC, for predicting incident dementia or cognitive impairment and these studies all examined non-Framingham Risk models (AUC range: 0.74 to 0.78.Cardiovascular risk prediction models are associated with cognitive changes over time and risk of dementia. Such models are easily obtainable in clinical and research settings and may be useful for identifying individuals at high risk of future cognitive decline and dementia.

  2. Social and Behavioral Risk Marker Clustering Associated with Biological Risk Factors for Coronary Heart Disease: NHANES 2001–2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. Everage

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Social and behavioral risk markers (e.g., physical activity, diet, smoking, and socioeconomic position cluster; however, little is known whether clustering is associated with coronary heart disease (CHD risk. Objectives were to determine if sociobehavioral clustering is associated with biological CHD risk factors (total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, and diabetes and whether associations are independent of individual clustering components. Methods. Participants included 4,305 males and 4,673 females aged ≥20 years from NHANES 2001–2004. Sociobehavioral Risk Marker Index (SRI included a summary score of physical activity, fruit/vegetable consumption, smoking, and educational attainment. Regression analyses evaluated associations of SRI with aforementioned biological CHD risk factors. Receiver operator curve analyses assessed independent predictive ability of SRI. Results. Healthful clustering (SRI = 0 was associated with improved biological CHD risk factor levels in 5 of 6 risk factors in females and 2 of 6 risk factors in males. Adding SRI to models containing age, race, and individual SRI components did not improve C-statistics. Conclusions. Findings suggest that healthful sociobehavioral risk marker clustering is associated with favorable CHD risk factor levels, particularly in females. These findings should inform social ecological interventions that consider health impacts of addressing social and behavioral risk factors.

  3. Prediction of Cardiovascular Disease Risk among Low-Income Urban Dwellers in Metropolitan Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Tin Tin Su; Mohammadreza Amiri; Farizah Mohd Hairi; Nithiah Thangiah; Awang Bulgiba; Hazreen Abdul Majid

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to predict the ten-year cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk among low-income urban dwellers of metropolitan Malaysia. Participants were selected from a cross-sectional survey conducted in Kuala Lumpur. To assess the 10-year CVD risk, we employed the Framingham risk scoring (FRS) models. Significant determinants of the ten-year CVD risk were identified using General Linear Model (GLM). Altogether 882 adults (≥30 years old with no CVD history) were randomly selected. The classic FRS mode...

  4. Risk Classification in Animal Disease Prevention: Who Benefits from Differentiated Policy?

    OpenAIRE

    Niemi, Jarkko K.; Lyytikainen, Tapani; Sahlstrom, Leena; Virtanen, Terhi; Lehtonen, Heikki

    2009-01-01

    Risk classification of livestock farms can help stakeholders design and implement risk management measures according to the possessed risk. Our goal is to examine how differently pig farms may contribute to the societal costs of an animal disease outbreak, how valuable this information is to different stakeholders, and how it can be used to target risk management measures. We show that the costs of an outbreak starting from a certain farm can be quantified for the entire sector using bio-econ...

  5. Patients with psoriasis have insufficient knowledge of their risk of atherothrombotic disease and metabolic syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skiveren, J; Philipsen, P; Therming, Gitte

    2015-01-01

    atherothrombotic disease and metabolic syndrome, and to assess the importance of the kind of treatment received and of membership of a patients' association. METHODS: In total, 218 patients with psoriasis (mean age 45.5 years, range 18-83), who were being treated with methotrexate or biological drugs responded to...... a questionnaire. RESULTS: Patients were well informed about their skin disease, but were less well informed about their risk of atherothrombotic disease/metabolic syndrome (visual analogue scale values of 6.91 and 5.15, respectively). Patients' knowledge of the disease was reflected by 74.......2-99.1% correct answers (CA). The risk of arthritis elicited 88% CA and of depression 41.7% CA, while the risk of atherothrombotic disease and metabolic syndrome produced only 11.9-15.3% CA. Patients treated with biological drugs had a significantly stronger sense of being more well informed about the risk of...

  6. Management of High Blood Pressure in Those without Overt Cardiovascular Disease Utilising Absolute Risk Scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R. Nelson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing blood pressure has a continuum of adverse risk for cardiovascular events. Traditionally this single measure was used to determine who to treat and how vigorously. However, estimating absolute risk rather than measurement of a single risk factor such as blood pressure is a superior method to identify who is most at risk of having an adverse cardiovascular event such as stroke or myocardial infarction, and therefore who would most likely benefit from therapeutic intervention. Cardiovascular disease (CVD risk calculators must be used to estimate absolute risk in those without overt CVD as physician estimation is unreliable. Incorporation into usual practice and limitations of the strategy are discussed.

  7. Sociodemographic differences in myocardial infarction risk perceptions among people with coronary heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalto, Anna-Mari; Weinman, John; French, David P;

    2007-01-01

    This study examines sociodemographic differences in myocardial infarction (MI) risk perceptions among people with coronary heart disease (CHD) (N = 3130). Two variables for comparative risk perceptions were computed: (1) own risk compared to that of an average person; and (2) own risk compared to...... that of an average person with CHD. Comparative optimism in MI risk perceptions was common, particularly among men and those with higher education. CHD severity and psychosocial resources mediated these sociodemographic differences. These results suggest challenges for secondary prevention in CHD......, particularly regarding psychosocial interventions for communicating risk information and supporting lifestyle adjustments....

  8. Forecasting the future risk of Barmah Forest virus disease under climate change scenarios in Queensland, Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suchithra Naish

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mosquito-borne diseases are climate sensitive and there has been increasing concern over the impact of climate change on future disease risk. This paper projected the potential future risk of Barmah Forest virus (BFV disease under climate change scenarios in Queensland, Australia. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We obtained data on notified BFV cases, climate (maximum and minimum temperature and rainfall, socio-economic and tidal conditions for current period 2000-2008 for coastal regions in Queensland. Grid-data on future climate projections for 2025, 2050 and 2100 were also obtained. Logistic regression models were built to forecast the otential risk of BFV disease distribution under existing climatic, socio-economic and tidal conditions. The model was applied to estimate the potential geographic distribution of BFV outbreaks under climate change scenarios. The predictive model had good model accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Maps on potential risk of future BFV disease indicated that disease would vary significantly across coastal regions in Queensland by 2100 due to marked differences in future rainfall and temperature projections. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the results of this study demonstrate that the future risk of BFV disease would vary across coastal regions in Queensland. These results may be helpful for public health decision making towards developing effective risk management strategies for BFV disease control and prevention programs in Queensland.

  9. Risk of Infections in Patients with Chronic Diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mor, Anil; Thomsen, Reimar W.

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an update on the risk of several important community-acquired infections seen in patients with diabetes: respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and bacteremia. Respiratory tract infections: Recent epidemiological evidence shows a modest (1.25 to 1.75-fold) risk...... tuberculosis. Limited data is available for diabetes and influenza, yet both influenza and pneumococcal vaccination is recommended in patients with diabetes. Urinary tract infections: The risk of asymptomatic bacteriuria and cystitis is 1.5 to 2 times increased in diabetes patients, while their risk of...... bacteremia. Conclusions: Increased infection surveillance and unmeasured confounding factors among diabetic patients may contribute to the observed increased infection risk, yet outcomes following infection are similar or worse in diabetes patients. In conclusion, there is epidemiological evidence that...

  10. Circulatory abnormalities in cirrhosis with focus on neurohumoral aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    1997-01-01

    resistance are decreased. A peripheral arterial vasodilatation may be of pathogenic importance to the low systemic vascular resistance as it directly correlates to the degree of central hypovolemia. It may therefore be an important element in the development of the low arterial blood pressure and......-angiotensin-aldosterone system, and elevated circulating vasopressin, endothelin-1 may also be implicated in the hemodynamic counter-regulation in cirrhosis. Recent research has focused on the assertion that the hemodynamic and neurohumoral abnormalities in cirrhosis are part of a general circulatory dysfunction influencing the...

  11. Bleeding following deep hypothermia and circulatory arrest in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossad, Emad B; Machado, Sandra; Apostolakis, John

    2007-03-01

    Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) is a technique of extracorporeal circulation commonly used in children with complex congenital heart defects undergoing surgical repairs. The use of profound cooling (20 degrees C) and complete cessation of circulation allow adequate exposure and correction of these complex lesions, with enhanced cerebral protection. However, the profound physiologic state of DHCA results in significant derangement of the coagulation system and a high incidence of postoperative bleeding. This review examines the impact of DHCA on bleeding and transfusion requirements in children and the pathophysiology of DHCA-induced platelet dysfunction. It also focuses on possible pharmacologic interventions to decrease bleeding following DHCA in children. PMID:17484172

  12. Postcardiotomy Mechanical Circulatory Support in Two Infants with Williams' Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contrafouris, Constantinos A.; Chatzis, Andrew C.; Kanakis, Meletios A.; Azariadis, Prodromos A.; Mitropoulos, Fotios A.

    2014-01-01

    Supravalvar aortic stenosis (SVAS) in patients with Williams' syndrome is often accompanied by coronary, pulmonary, and even myocardial lesions and therefore associated with increased perioperative morbidity and mortality. Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) provides reliable short-term mechanical circulatory support to patients, especially young, in acute postoperative cardiac failure when conventional means are ineffective. The incorporation of centrifugal pumps in these systems has made their use more efficient and less traumatic. We describe our experience of using the Levitronix CentriMag pump in two patients with Williams' syndrome who underwent surgical correction of supravalvular aortic stenosis. PMID:24741444

  13. The risk of atherosclerosis in patients with chronic kidney disease

    OpenAIRE

    Olechnowicz-Tietz, Sylwia; Gluba, Anna; Paradowska, Anna; Banach, Maciej; Rysz, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is becoming a serious health problem; the number of people with impaired renal function is rapidly rising, especially in industrialized countries. A major complication of CKD is cardiovascular disease. Accelerated atherosclerosis has been observed in early stages of renal dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the degree of renal insufficiency and both the prevalence and intensity of coronary artery disease (asses...

  14. Environmental factors and risk of developing paediatric inflammatory bowel disease - A population based study 2007-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Christian; Paerregaard, Anders; Munkholm, Pia;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: To identify environmental risk factors for developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: To identify environmental risk factors for developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in children...

  15. The Addition of Vascular Calcification Scores to Traditional Risk Factors Improves Cardiovascular Risk Assessment in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Liabeuf, Sophie; Desjardins, Lucie; Diouf, Momar; Temmar, Mohamed; Renard, Cédric; Choukroun, Gabriel; Massy, Ziad A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although a variety of non-invasive methods for measuring cardiovascular (CV) risk (such as carotid intima media thickness, pulse wave velocity (PWV), coronary artery and aortic calcification scores (measured either by CT scan or X-ray) and the ankle brachial index (ABI)) have been evaluated separately in chronic kidney disease (CKD) cohorts, few studies have evaluated these methods simultaneously. Here, we looked at whether the addition of non-invasive methods to traditional risk f...

  16. Socioeconomic inequalities in coronary heart disease risk in older age: contribution of established and novel coronary risk factors

    OpenAIRE

    RAMSAY, S E; Morris, R. W.; Whincup, P. H.; Papacosta, O.; Rumley, A; Lennon, L; Lowe, G.; Wannamethee, S.G.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Evidence on socioeconomic inequalities in coronary heart disease (CHD) and their pathways in the elderly is limited. Little is also known about the contributions that novel coronary risk factors (particularly inflammatory/hemostatic markers) make to socioeconomic inequalities in CHD. Objectives: To examine the extent of socioeconomic inequalities in CHD in older age, and the contributions (relative and absolute) of established and novel coronary risk factors. Methods: A population...

  17. Gamma-Glutamyltransferase: A Predictive Biomarker of Cellular Antioxidant Inadequacy and Disease Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Gerald Koenig; Stephanie Seneff

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) is a well-established serum marker for alcohol-related liver disease. However, GGT’s predictive utility applies well beyond liver disease: elevated GGT is linked to increased risk to a multitude of diseases and conditions, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and all-cause mortality. The literature from multiple population groups worldwide consistently shows strong predictive power for GGT, even across different gender and ethn...

  18. Evaluation of European coeliac disease risk variants in a north Indian population

    OpenAIRE

    Senapati, Sabyasachi; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Sood, Ajit; Midha, Vandana; Szperl, Agata; Romanos, Jihane; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Franke, Lude; Alonso, Santos; Thelma, B. K.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia

    2014-01-01

    Studies in European populations have contributed to a better understanding of the genetics of complex diseases, for example, in coeliac disease (CeD), studies of over 23 000 European samples have reported association to the HLA locus and another 39 loci. However, these associations have not been evaluated in detail in other ethnicities. We sought to better understand how disease-associated loci that have been mapped in Europeans translate to a disease risk for a population with a different et...

  19. Prospective Cohort Study of Type 2 Diabetes and the Risk of Parkinson's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Ashley; Logroscino, Giancarlo; Driver, Jane A.; Buring, Julie Elizabeth; Gaziano, John Michael; Kurth, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the association between type 2 diabetes and newly reported Parkinson's disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Our study included 21,841 participants in the Physicians’ Health Study, a cohort of U.S. male physicians. Diabetes and Parkinson's disease were self-reported via questionnaire. We used time-varying Cox regression to calculate adjusted relative risk (RR) for Parkinson's disease. RESULTS—Over 23 years, 556 individuals with Parkinson's disease were identified. Subject...

  20. Cardiovascular disease and hypertension in sub-Saharan Africa: burden, risk and interventions

    OpenAIRE

    Cappuccio, Francesco Paolo; Miller, Michelle Avril

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease, including stroke, heart failure and kidney disease, has been common in sub-Saharan Africa for many years, and rapid urbanization is causing an upsurge of ischaemic heart disease and metabolic disorders. At least two-thirds of cardiovascular deaths now occur in low- and middle-income countries, bringing a double burden of disease to poor and developing world economies. High blood pressure (or hypertension) is by far the commonest underlying risk factor for cardiovascula...

  1. Inflammation-associated risk factors for Alzheimer s disease and dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksson, Ulrika K.

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer s disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia worldwide and a highly debilitating, and deadly, disease. For the majority of AD cases, the cause of the disease is not known. Chronic inflammation has been implicated in AD pathology. The overall objective of this thesis was to study indices of altered peripheral inflammation as risk factors for dementia in general and Alzheimer s disease in particular. The four studies included in this thesis are observational epide...

  2. Predicting Spatial Distribution of Infection Risk of Airborne Transmission Diseases in a Hospital Ward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qian, Hua; Li, Yuguo; Nielsen, Peter V.; Huang, Xinghuang

    2007-01-01

    This study attempt to integrate the Wells-Riley equation and computational fluid dynamics for analyzing the risk of airborne transmission diseases in a building. The new method can predict the spatial distribution of the infection risk of the airborne transmission diseases in a large hospital ward......, while the Wells-Riley equation alone can only predict the overall infection risk in the whole building assuming a uniform distribution of the droplet nuclei concentration. This new method is applied to analyze the transmission risk in the well documented 8A ward SARS outbreak in a Hong Kong hospital in...

  3. Risk of solid cancer, cardiovascular disease, anaphylaxis, osteoporosis and fractures in patients with systemic mastocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broesby-Olsen, Sigurd; Farkas, Dóra Körmendiné; Vestergaard, Hanne;

    2016-01-01

    In patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM), several aspects of morbidity remain poorly understood. We assessed the risk of solid cancers, cardiovascular disease, anaphylaxis, osteoporosis, and fractures in SM patients. Using Danish medical registries, we conducted a nationwide population.......2 (95% CI 0.9-1.6) and the 10-year AR was 5.9% (95% CI 3.9-8.4). SM patients are at increased risk of solid cancers - especially melanoma and NMSC-and cardiovascular disease. The risk of anaphylaxis and osteoporosis is clearly increased in SM, though absolute risk was low in this population-based study...

  4. Awareness of risk factors among persons at risk for lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and sleep apnea: A Canadian population-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Walker, Shannon L; Saltman, David L.; Rosemary Colucci; Lesli Martin

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess awareness among persons at risk for lung cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and sleep apnea regarding symptoms and risk factors of the disease, and their attitudes regarding the disease and toward those who are affected.METHODS: A quantitative hybrid telephone and Internet survey of a representative population of Canadian adults at risk for at least one of the three diseases was conducted. To measure the awareness and attitudes of First Nations, Inuit an...

  5. Risk and economic consequences of contagious animal disease introduction.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, H.S.

    1998-01-01

    IntroductionWithin the European Union, epidemics of contagious animal diseases such as Classical Swine Fever (CSF) and Foot-and-Mouth Disease (FMD) are to be eradicated according to strict EU- prescriptions including stamping-out of infected herds, establishment of control and surve

  6. Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors in Older People with Intellectual Disabilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.F. de Winter (Channa)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Chapter 1 General introduction There is an increasing group of older people with intellectual disability in The Netherlands, reaching almost the same life expectancy as the general population. Age-related diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, cancer and dementia are

  7. The Impact of Dietary and Metabolic Risk Factors on Cardiovascular Diseases and Type 2 Diabetes Mortality in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira Otto, Marcia C.; Afshin, Ashkan; Micha, Renata; Khatibzadeh, Shahab; Fahimi, Saman; Singh, Gitanjali; Danaei, Goodarz; Sichieri, Rosely; Carlos A. Monteiro; Maria L C Louzada; Ezzati, Majid; Mozaffarian, Dariush

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trends in food availability and metabolic risk factors in Brazil suggest a shift toward unhealthy dietary patterns and increased cardiometabolic disease risk, yet little is known about the impact of dietary and metabolic risk factors on cardiometabolic mortality in Brazil. Methods: Based on data from Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study, we used comparative risk assessment to estimate the burden of 11 dietary and 4 metabolic risk factors on mortality due to cardiovascular diseases...

  8. The Impact of Dietary and Metabolic Risk Factors on Cardiovascular Diseases and Type 2 Diabetes Mortality in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira Otto, Marcia C.; Ashkan Afshin; Renata Micha; Shahab Khatibzadeh; Saman Fahimi; Gitanjali Singh; Goodarz Danaei; Rosely Sichieri; Carlos A. Monteiro; Maria L C Louzada; Majid Ezzati; Dariush Mozaffarian

    2016-01-01

    Background Trends in food availability and metabolic risk factors in Brazil suggest a shift toward unhealthy dietary patterns and increased cardiometabolic disease risk, yet little is known about the impact of dietary and metabolic risk factors on cardiometabolic mortality in Brazil. Methods Based on data from Global Burden of Disease (GBD) Study, we used comparative risk assessment to estimate the burden of 11 dietary and 4 metabolic risk factors on mortality due to cardiovascular diseases a...

  9. Cardiovascular disease risk score prediction models for women and its applicability to Asians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goh LGH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Louise GH Goh,1 Satvinder S Dhaliwal,1 Timothy A Welborn,2 Peter L Thompson,2–4 Bruce R Maycock,1 Deborah A Kerr,1 Andy H Lee,1 Dean Bertolatti,1 Karin M Clark,1 Rakhshanda Naheed,1 Ranil Coorey,1 Phillip R Della5 1School of Public Health, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia; 2Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Perth, WA, Australia; 3School of Population Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia; 4Harry Perkins Institute for Medical Research, Perth, WA, Australia; 5School of Nursing and Midwifery, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia Purpose: Although elevated cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors are associated with a higher risk of developing heart conditions across all ethnic groups, variations exist between groups in the distribution and association of risk factors, and also risk levels. This study assessed the 10-year predicted risk in a multiethnic cohort of women and compared the differences in risk between Asian and Caucasian women. Methods: Information on demographics, medical conditions and treatment, smoking behavior, dietary behavior, and exercise patterns were collected. Physical measurements were also taken. The 10-year risk was calculated using the Framingham model, SCORE (Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation risk chart for low risk and high risk regions, the general CVD, and simplified general CVD risk score models in 4,354 females aged 20–69 years with no heart disease, diabetes, or stroke at baseline from the third Australian Risk Factor Prevalence Study. Country of birth was used as a surrogate for ethnicity. Nonparametric statistics were used to compare risk levels between ethnic groups. Results: Asian women generally had lower risk of CVD when compared to Caucasian women. The 10-year predicted risk was, however, similar between Asian and Australian women, for some models. These findings were

  10. Gluten Introduction and the Risk of Coeliac Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szajewska, Hania; Shamir, Raanan; Mearin, Luisa;

    2016-01-01

    carrying at least one of the CD risk alleles. Because genetic risk alleles are generally not known in an infant at the time of solid food introduction, the following recommendations apply to all infants, although they are derived from studying families with first-degree relatives with CD. Although breast-feeding...... should be promoted for its other well-established health benefits, neither any breast-feeding nor breast-feeding during gluten introduction has been shown to reduce the risk of CD. Gluten may be introduced into the infant's diet anytime between 4 and 12 completed months of age. In children at high risk......BACKGROUND: The European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition recommended in 2008, based on observational data, to avoid both early (<4 months) and late (≥7 months) introduction of gluten and to introduce gluten while the infant is still being breast-fed. New evidence...

  11. Allelic Spectra of Risk SNPs Are Different for Environment/Lifestyle Dependent versus Independent Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan P Gorlov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have generated sufficient data to assess the role of selection in shaping allelic diversity of disease-associated SNPs. Negative selection against disease risk variants is expected to reduce their frequencies making them overrepresented in the group of minor (<50% alleles. Indeed, we found that the overall proportion of risk alleles was higher among alleles with frequency <50% (minor alleles compared to that in the group of major alleles. We hypothesized that negative selection may have different effects on environment (or lifestyle-dependent versus environment (or lifestyle-independent diseases. We used an environment/lifestyle index (ELI to assess influence of environmental/lifestyle factors on disease etiology. ELI was defined as the number of publications mentioning "environment" or "lifestyle" AND disease per 1,000 disease-mentioning publications. We found that the frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with strong environmental/lifestyle components follow the distribution expected under a selectively neutral model, while frequency distributions of the risk alleles for the diseases with weak environmental/lifestyle influences is shifted to the lower values indicating effects of negative selection. We hypothesized that previously selectively neutral variants become risk alleles when environment changes. The hypothesis of ancestrally neutral, currently disadvantageous risk-associated alleles predicts that the distribution of risk alleles for the environment/lifestyle dependent diseases will follow a neutral model since natural selection has not had enough time to influence allele frequencies. The results of our analysis suggest that prediction of SNP functionality based on the level of evolutionary conservation may not be useful for SNPs associated with environment/lifestyle dependent diseases.

  12. Emerging Risk Biomarkers in Cardiovascular Diseases and Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Ravi Kant Upadhyay

    2015-01-01

    Present review article highlights various cardiovascular risk prediction biomarkers by incorporating both traditional risk factors to be used as diagnostic markers and recent technologically generated diagnostic and therapeutic markers. This paper explains traditional biomarkers such as lipid profile, glucose, and hormone level and physiological biomarkers based on measurement of levels of important biomolecules such as serum ferritin, triglyceride to HDLp (high density lipoproteins) ratio, l...

  13. Understanding variation in disease risk: the elusive concept of frailty

    OpenAIRE

    Aalen, Odd O.; Valberg, Morten; Grotmol, Tom; Tretli, Steinar

    2014-01-01

    The concept of frailty plays a major role in the statistical field of survival analysis. Frailty variation refers to differences in risk between individuals which go beyond known or measured risk factors. In other words, frailty variation is unobserved heterogeneity. Although understanding frailty is of interest in its own right, the literature on survival analysis has demonstrated that existence of frailty variation can lead to surprising artefacts in statistical estimation that are importan...

  14. Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease: Risk Factors for Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Factor, Stephanie H.; Levine, Orin S.; Schwartz, Benjamin; Lee H Harrison; Farley, Monica M.; McGeer, Allison; Schuchat, Anne

    2003-01-01

    We conducted a case-control study to identify risk factors for invasive group A streptococcal (GAS) infections, which can be fatal. Case-patients were identified when Streptoccus pyogenes was isolated from a normally sterile site and control subjects (two or more) were identified and matched to case-patients by using sequential-digit telephone dialing. All participants were noninstitutionalized surveillance area residents, >18 years of age. Conditional logistic regression identified the risk ...

  15. Absolute coronary risk analyser--a tool for managing coronary heart disease risk.

    OpenAIRE

    Mitrabasu P; Shahapurkar J; Sreekumar T; Vyawahare M; Sarma C

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to develop a coronary risk analyser which can calculate authentically the absolute coronary risk of an individual for coronary risk management. METHODS AND RESULTS: After extensive literature survey was done to derive the most appropriate method to calculate the absolute coronary risk. Joint British recommendations derived from Framingham′s heart study were adopted for its supreme sensitivity and specificity. A windows based software is deve...

  16. How safe is safe enough? Radiation risk for a human mission to Mars.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis A Cucinotta

    Full Text Available Astronauts on a mission to Mars would be exposed for up to 3 years to galactic cosmic rays (GCR--made up of high-energy protons and high charge (Z and energy (E (HZE nuclei. GCR exposure rate increases about three times as spacecraft venture out of Earth orbit into deep space where protection of the Earth's magnetosphere and solid body are lost. NASA's radiation standard limits astronaut exposures to a 3% risk of exposure induced death (REID at the upper 95% confidence interval (CI of the risk estimate. Fatal cancer risk has been considered the dominant risk for GCR, however recent epidemiological analysis of radiation risks for circulatory diseases allow for predictions of REID for circulatory diseases to be included with cancer risk predictions for space missions. Using NASA's models of risks and uncertainties, we predicted that central estimates for radiation induced mortality and morbidity could exceed 5% and 10% with upper 95% CI near 10% and 20%, respectively for a Mars mission. Additional risks to the central nervous system (CNS and qualitative differences in the biological effects of GCR compared to terrestrial radiation may significantly increase these estimates, and will require new knowledge to evaluate.

  17. Ethical controversies in organ donation after circulatory death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The persistent mismatch between the supply of and need for transplantable organs has led to efforts to increase the supply, including controlled donation after circulatory death (DCD). Controlled DCD involves organ recovery after the planned withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment and the declaration of death according to the cardiorespiratory criteria. Two central ethical issues in DCD are when organ recovery can begin and how to manage conflicts of interests. The "dead donor rule" should be maintained, and donors in cases of DCD should only be declared dead after the permanent cessation of circulatory function. Permanence is generally established by a 2- to 5-minute waiting period. Given ongoing controversy over whether the cessation must also be irreversible, physicians should not be required to participate in DCD. Because the preparation for organ recovery in DCD begins before the declaration of death, there are potential conflicts between the donor's and recipient's interests. These conflicts can be managed in a variety of ways, including informed consent and separating the various participants' roles. For example, informed consent should be sought for premortem interventions to improve organ viability, and organ procurement organization personnel and members of the transplant team should not be involved in the discontinuation of life-sustaining treatment or the declaration of death. It is also important to emphasize that potential donors in cases of DCD should receive integrated interdisciplinary palliative care, including sedation and analgesia. PMID:23629612

  18. Computational Hemodynamic Simulation of Human Circulatory System under Altered Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim. Chang Sung; Kiris, Cetin; Kwak, Dochan

    2003-01-01

    A computational hemodynamics approach is presented to simulate the blood flow through the human circulatory system under altered gravity conditions. Numerical techniques relevant to hemodynamics issues are introduced to non-Newtonian modeling for flow characteristics governed by red blood cells, distensible wall motion due to the heart pulse, and capillary bed modeling for outflow boundary conditions. Gravitational body force terms are added to the Navier-Stokes equations to study the effects of gravity on internal flows. Six-type gravity benchmark problems are originally presented to provide the fundamental understanding of gravitational effects on the human circulatory system. For code validation, computed results are compared with steady and unsteady experimental data for non-Newtonian flows in a carotid bifurcation model and a curved circular tube, respectively. This computational approach is then applied to the blood circulation in the human brain as a target problem. A three-dimensional, idealized Circle of Willis configuration is developed with minor arteries truncated based on anatomical data. Demonstrated is not only the mechanism of the collateral circulation but also the effects of gravity on the distensible wall motion and resultant flow patterns.

  19. Connectivity of the American agricultural landscape: Assessing the national risk of crop pest and disease spread

    OpenAIRE

    Margosian, M.L.; Garrett, Karen A.; J.M.S. Hutchinson; With, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a new approach for national evaluation of disease and pest risk based on networks of crop plant availability. We are in the process of generalizing this analysis for other countries.

  20. Mercury exposure and risk of cardiovascular disease in two U.S. cohorts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mozaffarian, Dariush; Shi, Peilin; Morris, J Steven; Spiegelman, Donna; Grandjean, Philippe; Siscovick, David S; Willett, Walter C; Rimm, Eric B

    2011-01-01

    Exposure to methylmercury from fish consumption has been linked to a potentially increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but evidence from prior studies is equivocal. Beneficial effects of the ingestion of fish and selenium may also modify such effects....