WorldWideScience

Sample records for circulation thermohaline au

  1. Thermohaline circulation in the Gulf of California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, N. A.

    1988-05-01

    The Gulf of California, a narrow, semienclosed sea, is the only evaporative basin of the Pacific Ocean. As a result of evaporative forcing, salinities in the gulf are 1 to 2 ‰ higher than in the adjacent Pacific at the same latitude. This paper examines the thermohaline structure of the gulf and the means by which thermohaline exchange between the Pacific and the gulf occurs, over time scales of months to years. In addition to evaporative forcing, air-sea heat fluxes and momentum fluxes are important to thermohaline circulation in the gulf. From observations presented here, it appears that the gulf gains heat from the atmosphere on an annual average, unlike the Mediterranean and Red seas, which have comparable evaporative forcing. As a result, outflow from the gulf tends to be less dense than inflow from the Pacific. Winds over the gulf change direction with season, blowing northward in summer and southward in winter. This same seasonal pattern appears in near-surface transports averaged across the gulf. The thermohaline circulation, then, consists of outflow mostly between about 50 m and 250 m, inflow mostly between 250 m and 500 m, and a surface layer in which the direction of transport changes with seasonal changes in the large-scale winds. Using hydrographic observations from a section across the central gulf, total transport in or out of the northern gulf is estimated to be 0.9 Sv, heat gain from the atmosphere is estimated to be 20 to 50 W m-2, and evaporation is estimated to be 0.95 m yr-1. These estimates are annual averages, based on cruises from several years. Seasonal variations in thermohaline structure in the gulf are also examined and found to dominate the variance in temperature and density in the top 500 m of the water column. Salinity has little seasonal variability but does exhibit more horizontal variablility than temperature or density. Major year-to-year variations in thermohaline structure may be attributable to El Niño-Southern Oscillation

  2. The South China Sea Thermohaline Structure and Circulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chu, Peter C; Ma, Binbing; Chen, Yuchun

    2002-01-01

    ...), consisting of 116,019 temperature and 9,617 salinity profiles, during 1968-1984 to investigate the temporal and spatial variabilities of South China Sea thermohaline structures and circulation...

  3. Detecting Holocene changes in thermohaline circulation

    OpenAIRE

    Keigwin, L. D.; Boyle, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Throughout the last glacial cycle, reorganizations of deep ocean water masses were coincident with rapid millennial-scale changes in climate. Climate changes have been less severe during the present interglacial, but evidence for concurrent deep ocean circulation change is ambiguous.

  4. The stability of the thermohaline circulation in a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiller, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); Mikolajewicz, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany); Voss, R. [Deutsches Klimarechenzentrum (DKRZ), Hamburg (Germany)

    1996-02-01

    The stability of the Atlantic thermohaline circulation against meltwater input is investigated in a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model. The meltwater input to the Labrador Sea is increased linearly for 250 years to a maximum input of 0.625 Sv and then reduced again to 0 (both instantaneously and slowly decreasing over 250 years). The resulting freshening forces a shutdown of the formation of North Atlantic deepwater and a subsequent reversal of the thermohaline circulation of the Atlantic, filling the deep Atlantic with Antarctic bottom water. The change in the overturning pattern causes a drastic reduction of the Atlantic northward heat transport, resulting in a strong cooling with maximum amplitude over the northern North Atlantic and a southward shift of the sea-ice margin in the Atlantic. Due to the increased meridional temperature gradient, the Atlantic intertropical convergence zone is displaced southward and the westerlies in the northern hemisphere gain strength. We identify four main feedbacks affecting the stability of the thermohaline circulation: the change in the overturning circulation of the Atlantic leads to longer residence times of the surface waters in high northern latitudes, which allows them to accumulate more precipitation and runoff from the continents, which results in an increased stability in the North Atlantic.

  5. A Three-Box Model of Thermohaline Circulation under the Energy Constraint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yang; Guan Yu-Ping; Liang Chu-Jin; Chen Da-Ke

    2011-01-01

    The driving mechanism of thermohaline circulation is still a controversial topic in physical oceanography. Classic theory is based on Stommel's two-box model under buoyancy constraint. Recently, Guan and Huang proposed a new viewpoint in the framework of energy constraint with a two-box model. We extend it to a three-box model, including the effect of wind-driven circulation. Using this simple model, we further study how ocean mixing impacts on thermohaline circulation under the energy constraint. (geophysics, astronomy, and astrophysics)

  6. Hydrology of surface waters and thermohaline circulation during the last glacial period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, L.

    1996-01-01

    Sedimentological studies on oceanic cores from the north Atlantic have revealed, over the last glacial period, abrupt climatic changes with a periodicity of several thousand years which contrasts strongly with the glacial-interglacial periodicity (several tens of thousand years). These periods of abrupt climate changes correspond to massive icebergs discharges into the north Atlantic. The aim of this work was to study the evolution of the thermohaline circulation in relation to these episodic iceberg discharges which punctuated the last 60 ka. To reconstruct the oceanic circulation in the past, we have analysed oxygen and carbon stable isotopes on benthic foraminifera from north Atlantic deep-sea cores. First of all, the higher temporal resolution of sedimentary records has enabled us to establish a precise chrono-stratigraphy for the different cores. Then, we have shown the close linkage between surface water hydrology and deep circulation, giving evidence of the sensibility of thermohaline circulation to melt water input in the north Atlantic ocean. Indeed, changes in deep circulation are synchronous from those identified in surface waters and are recorded on a period which lasted ∼ 1500 years. Deep circulation reconstructions, before and during a typical iceberg discharge reveal several modes of circulation linked to different convection sites at the high latitudes of the Atlantic basin. Moreover, the study of the last glacial period gives the opportunity to differentiate circulation changes due to the external forcing (variations of the orbital parameters) and those linked to a more local forcing (icebergs discharges). 105 refs., 50 figs., 14 tabs., 4 appends

  7. Thermohaline circulation: a missing equation and its climate-change implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Hsien-Wang

    2018-01-01

    We formulate a box model of coupled ocean-atmosphere to examine the differential fields interactive with the thermohaline circulation (THC) and their response to global warming. We discern a robust convective bound on the atmospheric heat transport, which would divide the climate regime into warm and cold branches; but unlike the saline mode of previous box models, the cold state, if allowed, has the same-signed—though weaker—density contrast and THC as the present climate, which may explain its emergence from coupled general circulation models. We underscore the nondeterminacy of the THC due to random eddy shedding and apply the fluctuation theorem to constrain the shedding rate, thus closing the problem. The derivation reveals an ocean propelled toward the maximum entropy production (MEP) on millennial timescale (termed "MEP-adjustment"), the long timescale arising from the compounding effect of microscopic fluctuations in the shedding rate and their slight probability bias. Global warming may induce hysteresis between the two branches, like that seen in GCMs, but the cold transition is far more sensitive to the moistening than the heating effects as the latter would be countered by the hydrological feedback. The uni- or bi-modality of the current state—hence whether the THC may recover after the cold transition—depends on the global-mean convective flux and may not be easily assessed due to its observed uncertainty.

  8. Impacts of Wind Stress Changes on the Global Heat Transport, Baroclinic Instability, and the Thermohaline Circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeferson Prietsch Machado

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The wind stress is a measure of momentum transfer due to the relative motion between the atmosphere and the ocean. This study aims to investigate the anomalous pattern of atmospheric and oceanic circulations due to 50% increase in the wind stress over the equatorial region and the Southern Ocean. In this paper we use a coupled climate model of intermediate complexity (SPEEDO. The results show that the intensification of equatorial wind stress causes a decrease in sea surface temperature in the tropical region due to increased upwelling and evaporative cooling. On the other hand, the intensification of wind stress over the Southern Ocean induces a regional increase in the air and sea surface temperatures which in turn leads to a reduction in Antarctic sea ice thickness. This occurs in association with changes in the global thermohaline circulation strengthening the rate of Antarctic Bottom Water formation and a weakening of the North Atlantic Deep Water. Moreover, changes in the Southern Hemisphere thermal gradient lead to modified atmospheric and oceanic heat transports reducing the storm tracks and baroclinic activity.

  9. Thermohaline structure and circulation in the upper layers of the southern Bay of Bengal during BOBMEX-Pilot (October-November 1998)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshBabu, V.; Murty, V.S.N.; Rao, L.V.G.; Prabhu, C.V.; Tilvi, V.

    Hydrographic data collected on board ORV Sagar Kanya in the southern Bay of Bengal during the BOBMEX-Pilot programme (October -- November 1998) have been used to describe the thermohaline structure and circulation in the upper 200m water column...

  10. The Arctic Ocean as a dead end for floating plastics in the North Atlantic branch of the Thermohaline Circulation

    KAUST Repository

    Cózar, Andrés

    2017-04-20

    The subtropical ocean gyres are recognized as great marine accummulation zones of floating plastic debris; however, the possibility of plastic accumulation at polar latitudes has been overlooked because of the lack of nearby pollution sources. In the present study, the Arctic Ocean was extensively sampled for floating plastic debris from the Tara Oceans circumpolar expedition. Although plastic debris was scarce or absent in most of the Arctic waters, it reached high concentrations (hundreds of thousands of pieces per square kilometer) in the northernmost and easternmost areas of the Greenland and Barents seas. The fragmentation and typology of the plastic suggested an abundant presence of aged debris that originated from distant sources. This hypothesis was corroborated by the relatively high ratios of marine surface plastic to local pollution sources. Surface circulation models and field data showed that the poleward branch of the Thermohaline Circulation transfers floating debris from the North Atlantic to the Greenland and Barents seas, which would be a dead end for this plastic conveyor belt. Given the limited surface transport of the plastic that accumulated here and the mechanisms acting for the downward transport, the seafloor beneath this Arctic sector is hypothesized as an important sink of plastic debris.

  11. Global Ocean Circulation in Thermohaline Coordinates and Small-scale and Mesoscale mixing: An Inverse Estimate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groeskamp, S.; Zika, J. D.; McDougall, T. J.; Sloyan, B.

    2016-02-01

    I will present results of a new inverse technique that infers small-scale turbulent diffusivities and mesoscale eddy diffusivities from an ocean climatology of Salinity (S) and Temperature (T) in combination with surface freshwater and heat fluxes.First, the ocean circulation is represented in (S,T) coordinates, by the diathermohaline streamfunction. Framing the ocean circulation in (S,T) coordinates, isolates the component of the circulation that is directly related to water-mass transformation.Because water-mass transformation is directly related to fluxes of salt and heat, this framework allows for the formulation of an inverse method in which the diathermohaline streamfunction is balanced with known air-sea forcing and unknown mixing. When applying this inverse method to observations, we obtain observationally based estimates for both the streamfunction and the mixing. The results reveal new information about the component of the global ocean circulation due to water-mass transformation and its relation to surface freshwater and heat fluxes and small-scale and mesoscale mixing. The results provide global constraints on spatially varying patterns of diffusivities, in order to obtain a realistic overturning circulation. We find that mesoscale isopycnal mixing is much smaller than expected. These results are important for our understanding of the relation between global ocean circulation and mixing and may lead to improved parameterisations in numerical ocean models.

  12. Thermohaline forcing of eastern boundary currents: With application to the circulation off the west coast of Australia

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mc; Shetye, S.R.; Kundu, P.K.

    The linear, viscid, continuously stratified model of McCreary (1981) is extended to allow for thermohaline forcing by a specified, longitudinally independent, surface density field @ips@@. When the ocean is unbounded and @ips@@ is steady...

  13. Detecting the Spectrum of the Atlantic's Thermo-haline Circulation: Deconvolved Climate Proxies Show How Polar Climates Communicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reischmann, Elizabeth; Yang, Xiao; Rial, José

    2014-05-01

    Deconvolution is widely used in a wide variety of scientific fields, including its significant use in seismology, as a tool to recover real input from a system's impulse response and output. Our research uses spectral division deconvolution in the context of studying the impulse response of the possible relationship between the nonlinear climates of the Polar Regions by using select δ18O ice cores from both poles. This is feasible in spite of the fact that the records may be the result of nonlinear processes because the two polar climates are synchronized for the period studied, forming a Hilbert transform pair. In order to perform this analysis, the age models of three Greenland and four Antarctica records have been matched using a Monte Carlo method with the methane-matched pair GRIP and BYRD as a basis of calculations. For all of the twelve resulting pairs, various deconvolutions schemes (Weiner, Damped Least Squares, Tikhonov, Truncated Singular Value Decomposition) give consistent, quasi-periodic, impulse responses of the system. Multitaper analysis then demonstrates strong, millennia scale, quasi-periodic oscillations in these system responses with a range of 2,500 to 1,000 years. However, these results are directionally dependent, with the transfer function from north to south differing from that of south north. High amplitude power peaks at 5,000 to 1,7000 years characterize the former, while the latter contains peaks at 2,500 to 1,700 years. These predominant periodicities are also found in the data, some of which have been identified as solar forcing, but others of which may indicate internal oscillations of the climate system (1.6-1.4ky). The approximately 1,500 year period transfer function, which does not have a corresponding solar forcing, may indicate one of these internal periodicities of the system, perhaps even indicating the long-term presence of the Deep Water circulation, also known as the thermo-haline circulation (THC). Simplified models of

  14. Conceptual model for millennial climate variability: a possible combined solar-thermohaline circulation origin for the {proportional_to}1,500-year cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dima, Mihai [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany); University of Bucharest, Department of Atmospheric Physics, Faculty of Physics, P.O. Box 11440, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Lohmann, Gerrit [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany)

    2009-02-15

    Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events are the most pronounced climatic changes over the last 120,000 years. Although many of their properties were derived from climate reconstructions, the associated physical mechanisms are not yet fully understood. These events are paced by a {proportional_to}1,500-year periodicity whose origin remains unclear. In a conceptual model approach, we show that this millennial variability can originate from rectification of an external (solar) forcing, and suggest that the thermohaline circulation, through a threshold response, could be the rectifier. We argue that internal threshold response of the thermohaline circulation (THC) to solar forcing is more likely to produce the observed DO cycles than amplification of weak direct {proportional_to}1,500-year forcing of unknown origin, by THC. One consequence of our concept is that the millennial variability is viewed as a derived mode without physical processes on its characteristic time scale. Rather, the mode results from the linear representation in the Fourier space of nonlinearly transformed fundamental modes. (orig.)

  15. Thermohaline circulation in the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIB) during austral summer and winter periods of 1997

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshBabu, V.; Suryanarayana, A.; Murty, V.S.N.

    circulation. The dynamic topography field at 500 m relative to 2000 db surface in the central part of CIB, representing the abyssal circulation, was generally characterized by a southwestward weak flow around 10 degrees S flanked by cyclonic and anti...

  16. Simulated changes in vegetation distribution, land carbon storage, and atmospheric CO{sub 2} in response to a collapse of the North Atlantic thermohaline circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, Peter [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany); Joos, Fortunat [University of Bern (Switzerland). Climate and Environmental Physics Institute; Gerber, Stefan [University of Bern (Switzerland). Climate and Environmental Physics Institute; Princeton University, NJ (United States); Knutti, Reto [University of Bern (Switzerland). Climate and Environmental Physics Institute; National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2005-12-01

    It is investigated how abrupt changes in the North Atlantic (NA) thermohaline circulation (THC) affect the terrestrial carbon cycle. The Lund-Potsdam-Jena Dynamic Global Vegetation Model is forced with climate perturbations from glacial freshwater experiments with the ECBILT-CLIO ocean-atmosphere-sea ice model. A reorganisation of the marine carbon cycle is not addressed. Modelled NA THC collapses and recovers after about a millennium in response to prescribed freshwater forcing. The initial cooling of several Kelvin over Eurasia causes a reduction of extant boreal and temperate forests and a decrease in carbon storage in high northern latitudes, whereas improved growing conditions and slower soil decomposition rates lead to enhanced storage in mid-latitudes. The magnitude and evolution of global terrestrial carbon storage in response to abrupt THC changes depends sensitively on the initial climate conditions. These were varied using results from time slice simulations with the Hadley Centre model HadSM3 for different periods over the past 21 kyr. Changes in terrestrial storage vary between -67 and +50 PgC for the range of experiments with different initial conditions. Simulated peak-to-peak differences in atmospheric CO{sub 2} are 6 and 13 ppmv for glacial and late Holocene conditions. Simulated changes in {delta}{sup 13}C are between 0.15 and 0.25 permille. These simulated carbon storage anomalies during a NA THC collapse depend on their magnitude on the CO{sub 2} fertilisation feedback mechanism. The CO{sub 2} changes simulated for glacial conditions are compatible with available evidence from marine studies and the ice core CO{sub 2} record. The latter shows multi-millennial CO{sub 2} variations of up to 20 ppmv broadly in parallel with the Antarctic warm events A1 to A4 in the South and cooling in the North. (orig.)

  17. 21,000 years of Ethiopian African monsoon variability recorded in sediments of the western Nile deep-sea fan: impact of the Nile freshwater inflow for the Mediterranean thermo-haline circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revel, Marie; Colin, Christophe; Bernasconi, Stephano; Combourieu-Nebout, Nathalie; Ducassou, Emmanuelle; Rolland, Yann; Bosch, Delphine

    2014-05-01

    The Nile delta sedimentation constitutes a continuous high resolution (1.6 mm/year) record of Ethiopian African monsoon regime intensity. Multiproxy analyses performed on core MS27PT recovered in hemipelagic Nile sediment margin (Blue/White Nile River suspended matter frequency fluctuations during the last 21 cal. ka BP. The radiogenic Sr and Nd isotopes, clay mineralogy, bulk elemental composition and palynological analyses reveal large changes in source components, oscillating between a dominant aeolian Saharan contribution during the LGM and the Late Holocene (~4 to 2 cal. ka BP), a dominant Blue/Atbara Nile River contribution during the early Holocene (15 to 8.4 cal. ka BP) and a probable White Nile River contribution during the Middle Holocene (8.4 to 4 cal. ka BP). The following main features are highlighted: 1. The rapid shift from the LGM arid conditions to the African Humid Period (AHP) started at about 15 cal. ka BP. AHP extends until 8.4 cal. ka BP, and we suggest that the Ethiopian African Monsoon maximum between 12 and 8 cal. ka BP is responsible for a larger Blue/Atbara Nile sediment load and freshwater input into the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. 2. The transition between the AHP and the arid Late Holocene is gradual and occurs in two main phases between 8.4 and 6.5 cal. ka BP and 6.5 to 3.2 cal. ka BP. We suggest that the main rain belt shifted southward from 8.4 to ~4 cal. ka BP and was responsible for progressively reduced sediment load and freshwater input into the eastern Mediterranean Sea. 3. The aridification along the Nile catchments occurred from ~4 to 2 cal. ka BP. A dry period, which culminates at 3.2 cal. ka BP, and seems to coincide with a re-establishment of increased oceanic primary productivity in the western Mediterranean Sea. We postulate that the decrease in thermo-haline water Mediterranean circulation could be part of a response to huge volumes of fresh-water delivered principally by the Nile River from 12 to 8.4 cal. ka BP in the

  18. Picoplankton distribution influenced by thermohaline circulation in the southern Adriatic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šilović, Tina; Mihanović, Hrvoje; Batistić, Mirna; Radić, Iris Dupčić; Hrustić, Enis; Najdek, Mirjana

    2018-03-01

    In this study, we focus on the interactive dynamics between physico-chemical processes and picoplankton distribution in order to advance our current understanding of the roles of various parameters in regulating picoplankton community structure in highly dynamic marine system such as the South Adriatic Sea. The research was carried out between October 2011 and September 2012 along the transect in the northern part of the South Adriatic Pit. The deep water convection occurred in the southern Adriatic during February 2012, with vertical mixing reaching the depth of 500 m. The picoplankton community was highly affected by this mixing event, whilst its compartments each responded differently. During deep water convection low nucleic acid heterotrophic bacteria (LNA HB) and Synechococcus had their lowest abundances (4 × 105 cell ml-1 and 8 × 102 cell ml-1, respectively), picoeucaryotes had their highest abundances (104 cell ml-1), while Prochlorococcus was absent from the area, most likely due to intense cooling and vertical mixing. In March 2012 Eastern Adriatic Current (EAC) brought warm and saline water with more nutrients, which resulted in the proliferation of high nucleic acid heterotrophic bacteria (HNA HB), having maximal abundance (4 × 105 cell ml-1). The re-establishment of Levantine Intermediate Water (LIW) intrusion after the deep water convection resulted in the re-appearance of Prochlorococcus and maximal abundances of Synechococcus (4 × 104 cell ml-1) in May 2012. The distribution of picoheterotrophs was mainly explained by the season, while the distribution of picophytoplankton was explained by the depth. Aside from nutrients, salinity was an important parameter, affecting particularly Prochlorococcus. The re-appearance of Prochlorococcus in the southern Adriatic during the period of LIW intrusion, together with their correlation with salinity, indicates their potential association with LIW. The relationship between Prochloroccocus distribution and physico-chemical environmental parameters provides an important insight into the ecological roles and niche preferences of this group.

  19. Thermohaline circulation and water characteristics around Mauritius group of islands

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, Y.V.B.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Rao, D.P.; Sastry, J

    stream_size 5 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Indian_J_Mar_Sci_19_196.pdf.txt stream_source_info Indian_J_Mar_Sci_19_196.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  20. The dynamics of İzmir Bay under the effects of wind and thermohaline forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayın, Erdem; Eronat, Canan

    2018-04-01

    The dominant circulation pattern of İzmir Bay on the Aegean Sea coast of Turkey is studied taking into consideration the influence of wind and thermohaline forces. İzmir Bay is discussed by subdividing the bay into outer, middle and inner areas. Wind is the most important driving force in the İzmir coastal area. There are also thermohaline forces due to the existence of water types of different physical properties in the bay. In contrast to the two-layer stratification during summer, a homogeneous water column exists in winter. The free surface version of the Princeton model (Killworth's 3-D general circulation model) is applied, with the input data obtained through the measurements made by the research vessel K. Piri Reis. As a result of the simulations with artificial wind, the strong consistent wind generates circulation patterns independent of the seasonal stratification in the bay. Wind-driven circulation causes cyclonic or anticyclonic movements in the middle bay where the distinct İzmir Bay Water (IBW) forms. Cyclonic movement takes place under the influence of southerly and westerly winds. On the other hand, northerly and easterly winds cause an anticyclonic movement in the middle bay. The outer and inner bay also have the wind-driven recirculation patterns expected.

  1. Thermohaline staircases in the Amundsen Basin: Possible disruption by shear and mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, John D.; Fer, Ilker; Morison, James H.

    2017-10-01

    As part of the 2013 and 2014 North Pole Environmental Observatories (NPEO) in the Amundsen Basin of the Arctic Ocean, two similar temperature microstructure experiments were performed with different results. In 2013, vertical fluxes were through a thermohaline staircase, and in 2014, the thermohaline staircase was largely absent. Here we investigate the reasons for this difference. The 2013 data set was characterized by an extensive thermohaline staircase, indicative of the diffusive convective type of double diffusion (DC), from 120 to 250 m depths. The staircase was absent above 200 m in 2014, even though analysis of density ratio, Rρ, still shows high susceptibility to DDC. In the depth range of interest, survey-averaged Rρ = 3.8 in 2013 and Rρ = 3.6 in 2014, indicating that the temperature-salinity structure in the pycnocline was not the cause of the lack of a staircase in 2014. We propose that exceptionally weak turbulent mixing, even for the typically quiescent Arctic Ocean, allowed formation of the staircase in 2013. Average thermal diffusivity, KT, between 50 and 120 m is elevated in 2014, 2 × 10-5 m2 s-1, compared to 2013, 1 × 10-6 m2 s-1. However, vertical Atlantic Water (AW) DC heat fluxes in 2013 are remarkably consistent with turbulent heat fluxes in 2014. Similar data sets collected in 2007 and 2008 both resemble 2014, showing consistently higher mixing values compared to 2013. The suppression of turbulence during NPEO 2013 resulted from increased near-surface stratification, possibly caused by a different large-scale circulation pattern that year.

  2. Impact of interocean exchange on the Atlantic overturning circulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijer, W.

    2000-01-01

    The awareness that human activity could change climate has greatly raised public and scientific interest in climate. One issue of present-day climate research is the stability of the thermohaline circulation. This overturning circulation, popularly known as the `conveyor belt', redistributes

  3. Mediterranean Thermohaline Response to Large-Scale Winter Atmospheric Forcing in a High-Resolution Ocean Model Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusinato, Eleonora; Zanchettin, Davide; Sannino, Gianmaria; Rubino, Angelo

    2018-04-01

    Large-scale circulation anomalies over the North Atlantic and Euro-Mediterranean regions described by dominant climate modes, such as the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO), the East Atlantic pattern (EA), the East Atlantic/Western Russian (EAWR) and the Mediterranean Oscillation Index (MOI), significantly affect interannual-to-decadal climatic and hydroclimatic variability in the Euro-Mediterranean region. However, whereas previous studies assessed the impact of such climate modes on air-sea heat and freshwater fluxes in the Mediterranean Sea, the propagation of these atmospheric forcing signals from the surface toward the interior and the abyss of the Mediterranean Sea remains unexplored. Here, we use a high-resolution ocean model simulation covering the 1979-2013 period to investigate spatial patterns and time scales of the Mediterranean thermohaline response to winter forcing from NAO, EA, EAWR and MOI. We find that these modes significantly imprint on the thermohaline properties in key areas of the Mediterranean Sea through a variety of mechanisms. Typically, density anomalies induced by all modes remain confined in the upper 600 m depth and remain significant for up to 18-24 months. One of the clearest propagation signals refers to the EA in the Adriatic and northern Ionian seas: There, negative EA anomalies are associated to an extensive positive density response, with anomalies that sink to the bottom of the South Adriatic Pit within a 2-year time. Other strong responses are the thermally driven responses to the EA in the Gulf of Lions and to the EAWR in the Aegean Sea. MOI and EAWR forcing of thermohaline properties in the Eastern Mediterranean sub-basins seems to be determined by reinforcement processes linked to the persistency of these modes in multiannual anomalous states. Our study also suggests that NAO, EA, EAWR and MOI could critically interfere with internal, deep and abyssal ocean dynamics and variability in the Mediterranean Sea.

  4. Short-time scale coupling between thermohaline and meteorological forcing in the Ría de Pontevedra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula C. Pardo

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Two cruises were performed in May-June and October-November 1997 in the Ría de Pontevedra under strong downwelling conditions. Temperature and salinity data were recorded in short sampling periods to describe the changes in thermohaline property distribution in a short time scale. In order to obtain the residual fluxes in the Ría, a bi-dimensional non-stationary salt and thermal-energy weight averaged box-model was applied. Outputs from this kinematic model were compared with Upwelling Index, river flow and density gradient, resulting in a good multiple correlation, which proves the strong coupling between thermohaline properties and meteorological variability. Ekman forcing affects the whole area but mainly controls the dynamics of outer zones. The intensity of its effect on the circulation pattern within the Ría depends on the grade of stratification of the water bodies. River flow is more relevant in inner parts. According to estimated spatially averaged velocities, water residence time is lower than two weeks in outer parts of the Ría, and decreases toward the inner zones.

  5. Via Lyon: Parcours de romans et mutations éditoriales au XVIe siècle. Partie II. La circulation des textes entre Lyon et Paris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaëlle Burg

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available La première partie du dossier Via Lyon (Carte Romanze 2/2 [2014] analysait le rôle de carrefour économique et culturel de la ville de Lyon dans la constitution d’une identité éditoriale des romans publiés en France au XVIe siècle. L’étude de ces «parcours de romans» conduit à replacer, en cette seconde partie du dossier, la notion d’«étape lyonnaise» dans la dynamique qui anime les deux principaux centres d’imprimerie français de la Renaissance. L’étude des pérégrinations éditoriales, de Paris à Lyon et de Lyon à Paris, de Lancelot du Lac (G. Burg, de Valentin et Orson (M. Colombo Timelli et de Méliadus chevalier de la Croix (A. Réach-Ngô met ainsi au jour les diverses formes de circulation, d’adaptation et de réappropriation que les ateliers parisiens et lyonnais confèrent aux œuvres romanesques qui passent sous leurs presses tout au long du siècle. The first part of the file Via Lyon (Carte Romanze 2/2 [2014] analyzed the role of economic and cultural crossroad of Lyon city in the constitution of an editorial identity of novels published in France in the sixteenth century. The study of these «novels’ route» leads to situate the concept of «Lyon step» in the dynamics which animates the two major French printing centers of the Renaissance. The editorial peregrinations, from Paris to Lyon and from Lyon to Paris, of three french novels, Lancelot du Lac (G. Burg, Valentin and Orson (M. Colombo Timelli and Méliadus chevalier de la Croix (A. Réach-Ngô, shows the various forms of circulation, adaptation and reappropriation that various Parisian and Lyon workshops give to novels they print throughout the century. 

  6. Transport and Thermohaline Structure in the Western Tropical North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonau, Martha Coakley

    Transport and thermohaline structure of water masses and their respective variability are observed and modeled in the western tropical North Pacific using autonomous underwater gliders, Argo climatology and a numerical ocean state estimate. The North Equatorial Current (NEC) advects subtropical and subpolar water masses into the region that are transported equatorward by the Mindanao Current (MC). Continuous glider observations of these two currents from June 2009 to December 2013 provide absolute geostrophic velocity, water mass structure, and transport. The observations are compared to Argo climatology (Roemmich and Gilson, 2009), wind and precipitation to assess forcing, and annual and interannual variability. Observations are assimilated into a regional ocean state estimate (1/6°) to examine regional transport variability and its relationship to the El Nino-Southern Oscillation phenomena (ENSO). The NEC, described in Chapter 1, is observed along 134.3°E, from 8.5°N to 16.5°N. NEC thermocline transport is relatively constant, with a variable subthermocline transport that is distinguished by countercurrents centered at 9.6°N and 13.1°N. Correlation between thermocline and subthermocline transport is strong. Isopycnals with subducted water masses, the North Pacific Tropical Water and North Pacific Intermediate Water, have the greatest fine-scale thermohaline variance. The NEC advects water masses into the MC, described in Chapter 2, that flows equatorward along the coast of Mindanao. Gliders observed the MC at a mean latitude of 8.5°N. The Mindanao Undercurrent (MUC) persists in the subthermocline offshore of the MC, with a net poleward transport of intermediate water typical of South Pacific origin. The variable subthermocline transport in the MC/MUC has an inverse linear relationship with the Nino 3.4 index and strongly impacts total transport variability. For each the MC and NEC, surface salinity and thermocline depth have a strong relationship with ENSO

  7. Observed thermohaline structure and cooling of Kochi backwaters and adjoining southeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Mehra, P.; Prabhudesai, R.G.; Sivadas, T.K.; Balachandran, K.K.; Vijaykumar, K.; Revichandran, C.; Agarvadekar, Y.; Francis, R.; Martin, G.D.

    and salinity. The southernmost location was the most sensitive, and the easternmost location the least sensitive to meteorological changes. Thermohaline stratification was greater at the mouth region during monsoon, where a cap of (approx 4 m) low-saline water...

  8. Sensitivity experiments with an adaptation model of circulation of western tropical Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bahulayan, N.; Shaji, C.; Rao, A.D.; Dube, S.K.

    circulation at 10 m depth is controlled by both wind stress and sea surface topography. Circulation at 50 m depth is mainly controlled by thermohaline forcing and sea surface topography. The current speed in the western tropical Indian Ocean is of the order...

  9. Recent increases in Arctic freshwater flux affects Labrador Sea convection and Atlantic overturning circulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Qian; Dixon, Timothy H.; Myers, Paul G.; Bonin, Jennifer; Chambers, Don; Van Den Broeke, M. R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073765643

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is an important component of ocean thermohaline circulation. Melting of Greenland's ice sheet is freshening the North Atlantic; however, whether the augmented freshwater flux is disrupting the AMOC is unclear. Dense Labrador Sea Water (LSW),

  10. INFLUENCE OF THERMOHALINE CONVECTION ON DIFFUSION-INDUCED IRON ACCUMULATION IN A STARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theado, S.; Vauclair, S.; Alecian, G.; LeBlanc, F.

    2009-01-01

    Atomic diffusion may lead to heavy-element accumulation inside stars in certain specific layers. Iron accumulation in the Z-bump opacity region has been invoked by several authors to quantitatively account for abundance anomalies observed in some stars, or to account for stellar oscillations through the induced κ-mechanism. These authors, however, never took into account the fact that such an accumulation creates an inverse μ-gradient, unstable for thermohaline convection. Here, we present results for A-F stars, where abundance variations are computed with and without this process. We show that iron accumulation is still present when thermohaline convection is taken into account, but much reduced compared to when this physical process is neglected. The consequences of thermohaline convection for A-type stars as well as for other types of stars are presented.

  11. Decadal-scale thermohaline variability in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Hutchinson, K

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available . This AGEM has improved accuracy compared to traditional climatologies and other proxy methods. The AGEM for the Atlantic Southern Ocean offers an ideal technique to investigate the thermohaline variability over the past two decades in a key region for water...

  12. Chaotic thermohaline convection in low-porosity hydrothermal systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoofs, Stan; Spera, Frank J.; Hansen, Ulrich

    1999-01-01

    Fluids circulate through the Earth's crust perhaps down to depths as great as 5^15 km, based on oxygen isotope systematics of exhumed metamorphic terrains, geothermal fields, mesozonal batholithic rocks and analysis of obducted ophiolites. Hydrothermal flows are driven by both thermal and chemical

  13. Solving large linear systems in an implicit thermohaline ocean model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Niet, Arie Christiaan

    2007-01-01

    The climate on earth is largely determined by the global ocean circulation. Hence it is important to predict how the flow will react to perturbation by for example melting icecaps. To answer questions about the stability of the global ocean flow, a computer model has been developed that is able to

  14. Spatial and temporal variability of thermohaline properties in the Bay of Koper (northern Adriatic Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soczka Mandac, Rok; Žagar, Dušan; Faganeli, Jadran

    2013-04-01

    In this study influence of fresh water discharge on the spatial and temporal variability of thermohaline (TH) conditions is explored for the Bay of Koper (Bay). The Bay is subject to different driving agents: wind stress (bora, sirocco), tidal and seiches effect, buoyancy fluxes, general circulation of the Adriatic Sea and discharge of the Rizana and Badaševica rivers. These rivers have torrential characteristics that are hard to forecast in relation to meteorological events (precipitation). Therefore, during episodic events the spatial and temporal variability of TH properties in the Bay is difficult to determine [1]. Measurements of temperature, salinity and turbidity were conducted monthly on 35 sampling points in the period: June 2011 - December 2012. The data were processed and spatial interpolated with an objective analysis method. Furthermore, empirical orthogonal function analysis (EOF) [2] was applied to investigate spatial and temporal TH variations. Strong horizontal and vertical stratification was observed in the beginning of June 2011 due to high fresh water discharge of the Rizana (31 m3/s) and Badaševica (2 m3/s) rivers. The horizontal gradient (ΔT = 6°C) was noticed near the mouth of the Rizana river. Similar pattern was identified for salinity field on the boundary of the front where the gradient was ΔS = 20 PSU. Vertical temperature gradient was ΔT = 4°C while salinity gradient was ΔS = 18 PSU in the subsurface layer at depth of 3 m. Spatial analysis of the first principal component (86% of the total variance) shows uniform temperature distribution in the surface layer (1m) during the studied period. Furthermore, temporal variability of temperature shows seasonal variation with a minimum in February and maximum in August. This confirms that episodic events have a negligible effect on spatial and temporal variation of temperature in the subsurface layer. Further analysis will include application of EOF on the salinity, density and total

  15. Observation of Au + AuAu + Au + ρ0 and Au + AuAu* + Au* + ρ0 with STAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, K.

    2002-01-01

    First observation of the reactions Au + AuAu + Au + ρ 0 and Au + AuAu* + Au* + ρ 0 with the STAR detector are reported. The ρ are produced at small perpendicular momentum, as expected if they couple coherently to both nuclei. Models of vector meson production and the correlation with nuclear breakup are discussed, as well as a fundamental test of quantum mechanics that is possible with the system. (author)

  16. An Oceanic General Circulation Model (OGCM) investigation of the Red Sea circulation, 1. Exchange between the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofianos, Sarantis S.; Johns, William E.

    2002-11-01

    The mechanisms involved in the seasonal exchange between the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean are studied using an Oceanic General Circulation Model (OGCM), namely the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model (MICOM). The model reproduces the basic characteristics of the seasonal circulation observed in the area of the strait of Bab el Mandeb. There is good agreement between model results and available observations on the strength of the exchange and the characteristics of the water masses involved, as well as the seasonal flow pattern. During winter, this flow consists of a typical inverse estuarine circulation, while during summer, the surface flow reverses, there is an intermediate inflow of relatively cold and fresh water, and the hypersaline outflow at the bottom of the strait is significantly reduced. Additional experiments with different atmospheric forcing (seasonal winds, seasonal thermohaline air-sea fluxes, or combinations) were performed in order to assess the role of the atmospheric forcing fields in the exchange flow at Bab el Mandeb. The results of both the wind- and thermohaline-driven experiments exhibit a strong seasonality at the area of the strait, which is in phase with the observations. However, it is the combination of both the seasonal pattern of the wind stress and the seasonal thermohaline forcing that can reproduce the observed seasonal variability at the strait. The importance of the seasonal cycle of the thermohaline forcing on the exchange flow pattern is also emphasized by these results. In the experiment where the thermohaline forcing is represented by its annual mean, the strength of the exchange is reduced almost by half.

  17. Contributions of hydroclimate variability and associated North-African riverine fluxes to eastern-Mediterranean sapropel formation and related seawater circulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Jiawang

    2017-01-01

    The Mediterranean Sea is a semi-enclosed basin surrounded by catchment areas characterized by different climate regimes, as it lies at the interface between the African tropical and European temperate zones. Moreover, the Mediterranean has a dynamic thermohaline circulation, making it particularly

  18. Circulation, échange et production de poteries dans les Andes Centrales au deuxième millénaire AV. J.C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Sont présentés tout d’abord les quatre types céramiques définis pour la séquence Pirwa de Piruru (1600/1500 - 800/600 av. J.C.. Puis, après quelques réflexions méthodologiques à propos de la détermination de groupes céramiques pertinents, particulièrement durant le Formatif Initial, Piruru Pirwa est replacé dans le contexte culturel de la cordillère centre-andine, des changements significatifs étant constatés entre les phases Pirwa II et III. Les analyses céramologiques montrent que trois types sont importés et que le quatrième résulte d’une production locale. Les variations dans l’organisation globale de l’habitat Pirwa II et Pirwa III permettent de proposer l’hypothèse que l’activité céramique, c’est-à-dire la production de vaisselles, pourrait, dans l’exemple de Piruru, dépendre de la sédentarité. Circulación, intercambio y producción de cerámica en los Andes Centrales durante el segundo milenio a. C. En primer lugar, se presentan los cuatro tipos cerámicos definidos para la secuencia Pirwa de Piruru (1600/1500 - 800/600 a.C.. Luego, después de unas reflexiones metodológicas acerca de la determinación de grupos cerámicos pertinentes, especialmente durante el período Formativo Inicial, se sitúa Piruru Pirwa en el contexto cultural de la sierra central, notando cambios significativos entre las fases Pirwa II y Pirwa III. Los análisis ceramológicos muestran que tres tipos son importados, y que el cuarto es resultado de una producción local. Tomando en cuenta las variaciones en la organización general del asentamiento Pirwa II y Pirwa III, se plantea la hipótesis que la actividad cerámica, es decir la producción alfarera, en Piruru, podría vincularse al sedentarismo. Circulation, exchange and production of wares in the Central Highlands of Peru during the secund millenium B.C. In this paper, four ceramic types are defined and described for the Piruru Pirwa sequence (1600/1500 - 800/600 a C, and

  19. Increases to Inferred Rates of Planetesimal Accretion due to Thermohaline Mixing in Metal-accreting White Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Evan B.; Bildsten, Lars

    2018-06-01

    Many isolated, old white dwarfs (WDs) show surprising evidence of metals in their photospheres. Given that the timescale for gravitational sedimentation is astronomically short, this is taken as evidence for ongoing accretion, likely of tidally disrupted planetesimals. The rate of such accretion, {\\dot{M}}acc}, is important to constrain, and most modeling of this process relies on assuming an equilibrium between diffusive sedimentation and metal accretion supplied to the WD’s surface convective envelope. Building on the earlier work of Deal and collaborators, we show that high {\\dot{M}}acc} models with only diffusive sedimentation are unstable to thermohaline mixing and that models that account for the enhanced mixing from the active thermohaline instability require larger accretion rates, sometimes reaching {\\dot{M}}acc}≈ {10}13 {{g}} {{{s}}}-1 to explain observed calcium abundances. We present results from a grid of MESA models that include both diffusion and thermohaline mixing. These results demonstrate that both mechanisms are essential for understanding metal pollution across the range of polluted WDs with hydrogen atmospheres. Another consequence of active thermohaline mixing is that the observed metal abundance ratios are identical to accreted material.

  20. East Sea Spatial and Temporal Variability of Thermohaline Structure and Circulation Identified From Observational (T, S) Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    47. Global Planet Change, 92, 162– 178. IHS Jane’s 360, 2015: China, Russia conduct large-scale joint naval exercise. Accessed 10 December 2015...moisture fluxes . Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres (1984– 2012), 113. Tada, R., T. Irino, and I. Koizumi, 1999: Land‐ocean linkages over

  1. The Arctic Ocean as a dead end for floating plastics in the North Atlantic branch of the Thermohaline Circulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cózar, Andrés; Martí, Elisa; Duarte, Carlos M; García-de-Lomas, Juan; van Sebille, Erik|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831921; Ballatore, Thomas J; Eguíluz, Victor M; González-Gordillo, J Ignacio; Pedrotti, Maria L; Echevarría, Fidel; Troublè, Romain; Irigoien, Xabier

    The subtropical ocean gyres are recognized as great marine accummulation zones of floating plastic debris; however, the possibility of plastic accumulation at polar latitudes has been overlooked because of the lack of nearby pollution sources. In the present study, the Arctic Ocean was extensively

  2. The Arctic Ocean as a dead end for floating plastics in the North Atlantic branch of the Thermohaline Circulation

    KAUST Repository

    Có zar, André s; Martí , Elisa; Duarte, Carlos M.; Garcí a-de-Lomas, Juan; van Sebille, Erik; Ballatore, Thomas J.; Eguí luz, V. M.; Gonzá lez-Gordillo, J. Ignacio; Pedrotti, Maria L.; Echevarrí a, Fidel; Troublè , Romain; Irigoien, Xabier

    2017-01-01

    The subtropical ocean gyres are recognized as great marine accummulation zones of floating plastic debris; however, the possibility of plastic accumulation at polar latitudes has been overlooked because of the lack of nearby pollution sources

  3. Storm-induced water dynamics and thermohaline structure at the tidewater Flade Isblink Glacier outlet to the Wandel Sea (NE Greenland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillov, Sergei; Dmitrenko, Igor; Rysgaard, Søren; Babb, David; Toudal Pedersen, Leif; Ehn, Jens; Bendtsen, Jørgen; Barber, David

    2017-11-01

    In April 2015, an ice-tethered conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) profiler and a down-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) were deployed from the landfast ice near the tidewater glacier terminus of the Flade Isblink Glacier in the Wandel Sea, NE Greenland. The 3-week time series showed that water dynamics and the thermohaline structure were modified considerably during a storm event on 22-24 April, when northerly winds exceeded 15 m s-1. The storm initiated downwelling-like water dynamics characterized by on-shore water transport in the surface (0-40 m) layer and compensating offshore flow at intermediate depths. After the storm, currents reversed in both layers, and the relaxation phase of downwelling lasted ˜ 4 days. Although current velocities did not exceed 5 cm s-1, the enhanced circulation during the storm caused cold turbid intrusions at 75-95 m depth, which are likely attributable to subglacial water from the Flade Isblink Ice Cap. It was also found that the semidiurnal periodicities in the temperature and salinity time series were associated with the lunar semidiurnal tidal flow. The vertical structure of tidal currents corresponded to the first baroclinic mode of the internal tide with a velocity minimum at ˜ 40 m. The tidal ellipses rotate in opposite directions above and below this depth and cause a divergence of tidal flow, which was observed to induce semidiurnal internal waves of about 3 m height at the front of the glacier terminus. Our findings provide evidence that shelf-basin interaction and tidal forcing can potentially modify coastal Wandel Sea waters even though they are isolated from the atmosphere by landfast sea ice almost year-round. The northerly storms over the continental slope cause an enhanced circulation facilitating a release of cold and turbid subglacial water to the shelf. The tidal flow may contribute to the removal of such water from the glacial terminus.

  4. Origin and climatic impact of a thermo-haline changes in next centuries in the IPSL-CM4 coupled model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swingedouw, D.

    2006-11-01

    The thermo-haline circulation (THC) strongly influences the climate of the North Atlantic. The warming caused by the release of anthropic CO 2 risks to affect this oceanic circulation and then the climate. In this thesis we point to evaluate this risk and to understand the climatic impact of the THC in the future thanks to the tri-dimensional ocean-atmosphere-sea-ice-land IPSL-CM4 coupled model. In a first part we have done a survey of the principal theories and knowledge concerning the THC. We have then validated the pertinence of IPSL-CM4 to lead our study. The role of the salt has appeared primordial for the dynamics of the THC. Then, we have evaluated the sensitivity of the THC to the global fresh water forcing of the ocean. Different sensitivities of the convection sites of the North Atlantic, related to salinity transport process, have been revealed in IPSL-CM4. We have then analysed some scenario simulations for next centuries. It has appeared a significant diminution of the THC in those simulations, which is strongly magnified if the melting of Greenland is taken in account. The analysis of several scenarios taking into account or not this glacier melting has permitted to isolate in an original manner the role played by THC feedbacks. Last, the effect of the THC on the climate has been quantified in IPSL-CM4. It appears to be more slight that the global warming, even locally on Europe. The explanation of the mechanisms at the origin of the influence of the THC on climate has also been clarified. The impact of the THC on the oceanic carbon uptake in the ocean has been lastly evaluated, and appears to be very small on 140 years. This study thus gives a clear vision of the role of the THC on the climate and its possible future. (author)

  5. Mode Water Formation via Cabbeling and Submesoscale Lateral Mixing at a Strained Thermohaline Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, L. N.; Shakespeare, C. J.

    2014-12-01

    Mode waters play an important role in interannual climate variability through the temporary storage of heat and carbon in the ocean. The mechanisms explaining their formation are not well understood but appear to be shaped by the dynamics of the ocean fronts that mark their poleward extent. We explore a mode water formation mechanism that has a clear connection to fronts and involves cabbeling. Cabbeling refers to the process by which two water masses of equal density but different temperature and salinity are combined to create a new, denser water mass, as a result of nonlinearities in the equation of state for seawater. The work is motivated in part by recent observations of an extremely sharp, density-compensated front at the north wall of the Gulf Stream, the boundary between the subtropical and subpolar gyres. Here, the inter-gyre salinity/temperature difference is compressed into a span of a few kilometers, making the flow susceptible to cabbeling. The sharpness of the front is caused by frontogenetic strain, which is presumably balanced by submesoscale lateral mixing processes. We study this balance with a simple analytical model of a thermohaline front forced by uniform strain and derive a scaling for the amount of water mass transformation resulting from the ensuing cabbeling. The theory suggests that this mechanism could be responsible for persistent, hence significant, mode water formation. As such, it represents a submesoscale process that impacts the ocean on basin scales that should be resolved or parameterized in realistic numerical simulations.

  6. Loire and Gironde turbid plumes: Characterization and influence on thermohaline properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costoya, X.; Fernández-Nóvoa, D.; deCastro, M.; Gómez-Gesteira, M.

    2017-12-01

    Knowledge and predictability of turbid river plumes is of great importance because they modulate the properties of the seawater adjacent to river mouths. The Loire and Gironde Rivers form the most important plumes in the Bay of Biscay, as they provide > 75% of total runoff. The development of the turbid plume under the influence of its main drivers was analyzed using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer satellite data from the period 2003-2015. River discharge was found to be the main driver, followed by wind, which also had an important effect in modulating the turbid plume during periods of high river discharge. Seaward and upwelling favorable winds enhanced the dispersion of plumes on seawater, whereas landward and downwelling favorable winds limited mixing with the adjacent ocean water. The maximum extension of the turbid plume was reached under landward winds. In addition, the spatio-temporal evolution of the East Atlantic pattern and the North Atlantic Oscillation was observed to affect the dynamics of plumes: positive values of both indices favored a greater extension of the plume. Thermohaline properties differed inside and outside the area affected by both rivers. In particular, these rivers maintain winter stratification inside the turbid plume, which results in a different warming ratio when compared with the adjacent ocean.

  7. Increased thermohaline stratification as a possible cause for an ocean anoxic event in the Cretaceous period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbacher, J; Huber, B T; Norris, R D; Markey, M

    2001-01-18

    Ocean anoxic events were periods of high carbon burial that led to drawdown of atmospheric carbon dioxide, lowering of bottom-water oxygen concentrations and, in many cases, significant biological extinction. Most ocean anoxic events are thought to be caused by high productivity and export of carbon from surface waters which is then preserved in organic-rich sediments, known as black shales. But the factors that triggered some of these events remain uncertain. Here we present stable isotope data from a mid-Cretaceous ocean anoxic event that occurred 112 Myr ago, and that point to increased thermohaline stratification as the probable cause. Ocean anoxic event 1b is associated with an increase in surface-water temperatures and runoff that led to decreased bottom-water formation and elevated carbon burial in the restricted basins of the western Tethys and North Atlantic. This event is in many ways similar to that which led to the more recent Plio-Pleistocene Mediterranean sapropels, but the greater geographical extent and longer duration (approximately 46 kyr) of ocean anoxic event 1b suggest that processes leading to such ocean anoxic events in the North Atlantic and western Tethys were able to act over a much larger region, and sequester far more carbon, than any of the Quaternary sapropels.

  8. Viscosity effects and anthropogenic impact on thermohaline flow in the Schleswig-Holstein region (Germany)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magri, F.; Bayer, U. [GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (Germany)

    2008-10-23

    Coupled fluid flow, heat and mass transport (i.e. thermohaline flow) simulations have been carried out in order to study the interactions between shallow and deep brine flow in an aquifer system which includes a salt dome close to the surface. Particular attention has been given to the role of young processes (i.e., faults, Quaternary channels, and shallow salt structures) in affecting groundwater flow at basin scale. The results show that beside topography-driven flow, different convective regimes play a role for extensive solute exchange between shallow and deep aquifers. Particularly, heavy brines sink from the shallow salt dome crest into deeper aquifers. Furthermore, the young basin features strongly control discharge and recharge processes. At this state, the issues to be solved are the role of a transition zone along the salt flank, the effects of variable fluid viscosity in affecting the system dynamics and the impact of anthropogenic activities such as pumping stations on brine migration and heat transport. So far, viscosity effects are well described for rising hot plumes, while their influence on sinking brines are not studied yet. With regard to anthropogenic impact, pumping groundwater in saline environment can provide severe problems. For instance, brines up-coning can disturb wells and pollute the freshwater resources. Although the presented studies focus on the Schleswig-Holstein region (Germany), the results are of great interest for many sedimentary basins in which the described features are commonly encountered. Investigations concerning the potential impact of anthropogenic activities on the dynamics of deep and shallow groundwater processes will provide additional knowledge concerning key factors controlling the formation and evolution of saline waters within basins. At the same time, this research has an important practical use for water resource management. (orig.)

  9. Storm-induced water dynamics and thermohaline structure at the tidewater Flade Isblink Glacier outlet to the Wandel Sea (NE Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kirillov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In April 2015, an ice-tethered conductivity–temperature–depth (CTD profiler and a down-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP were deployed from the landfast ice near the tidewater glacier terminus of the Flade Isblink Glacier in the Wandel Sea, NE Greenland. The 3-week time series showed that water dynamics and the thermohaline structure were modified considerably during a storm event on 22–24 April, when northerly winds exceeded 15 m s−1. The storm initiated downwelling-like water dynamics characterized by on-shore water transport in the surface (0–40 m layer and compensating offshore flow at intermediate depths. After the storm, currents reversed in both layers, and the relaxation phase of downwelling lasted ∼ 4 days. Although current velocities did not exceed 5 cm s−1, the enhanced circulation during the storm caused cold turbid intrusions at 75–95 m depth, which are likely attributable to subglacial water from the Flade Isblink Ice Cap. It was also found that the semidiurnal periodicities in the temperature and salinity time series were associated with the lunar semidiurnal tidal flow. The vertical structure of tidal currents corresponded to the first baroclinic mode of the internal tide with a velocity minimum at ∼ 40 m. The tidal ellipses rotate in opposite directions above and below this depth and cause a divergence of tidal flow, which was observed to induce semidiurnal internal waves of about 3 m height at the front of the glacier terminus. Our findings provide evidence that shelf–basin interaction and tidal forcing can potentially modify coastal Wandel Sea waters even though they are isolated from the atmosphere by landfast sea ice almost year-round. The northerly storms over the continental slope cause an enhanced circulation facilitating a release of cold and turbid subglacial water to the shelf. The tidal flow may contribute to the removal of such water from the glacial terminus.

  10. Potential links between surging ice sheets, circulation changes and the Dansgaard Oeschger cycles in the Irminger Sea, 60-18 kyr.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Krefeld-Alfane, S.; Sarntheim, M.; Erlenkeuser, S.; Grootes, P.; Jung, S.J.A.; Nadeau, M.J.; Pflaumann, U.; Voelker, A.

    2000-01-01

    Surface and deepwater paleoclimate records in Irminger Sea core SO82-5 (59°N, 31°W) and Icelandic Sea core PS2644 (68°N, 22°W) exhibit large fluctuations in thermohaline circulation (THC) from 60 to 18 calendar kyr B.P., with a dominant periodicity of 1460 years from 46 to 22 calendar kyr B.P.,

  11. Fritz Schott's Contributions to the Understanding of the Ocean Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visbeck, M.

    2009-04-01

    The ocean circulation and its central significance for global climate lay at the heart of Fritz's research. In the context of hard-won data from his more than 30 research cruises to key regions of the Atlantic and Indian oceans, he made fundamental contributions to our understanding of the wind-driven and thermohaline ocean circulation. His insights and explorations of circulation and dynamics of the tropical Indian and Atlantic Oceans have led the field and provided a large part of the basis for planning large, international experiments. Fritz's work is also distinguished by his making exceptional use of modeling results, increasingly as the models have improved. His research has provided a much clearer correspondence between the observed ocean-structure and dynamical theory-noting both theoretical successes and limitations. Besides his general interest in the physical oceanography of the World Oceans, most of his research was devoted to the dynamics of tropical oceans with its intense and highly variable current systems. Concerning the Indian Ocean, Fritz's investigated the response of the Somali Current system to the variable monsoon winds in the early 1980's, obtaining high-quality, hydrographic surveys and the first long term direct measurement of ocean currents from moored arrays. His analyses and interpretations provided a synthesis of the complex circulations there. In the tropical Atlantic Ocean Fritz research focused on the western boundary circulation with important contributions to the understanding of the North Brazil Current retroflection, and the variability of the shallow and deep western boundary currents. Trying to solve the fundamental question ‘what is the role of the tropical ocean for climate variability', Fritz initiated large multinational research programs under the umbrella of the World Climate Research Projects WOCE (World Ocean Circulation Experiment) and CLIVAR (Climate Variability and Predictability). Fritz was the initiator and

  12. Central Au on Au collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alard, J.P.; Amouroux, V. [Labo de Phys. Corp., IN2P3-CRNS, Univ. Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Fd. (France); Basrak, Z. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia)] [and others; FOPI-Collaboration

    1995-02-06

    In nucleus-nucleus collisions the initial relative kinetic energy of target and projectile is available for internal excitation of the interacting system; it is however still not well established to what extent local equilibrium and thermalisation occur. Local equilibrium is of interest to derive, within the formalism of transport equations and of the equation of state, (EOS), general properties of compressed and excited nuclear matter. Such approach describes in relatively simple terms the complex many body interactions occuring within extended baryonic and hadronic (or quark) matter. For a basic microscopic understanding it is highly desirable to investigate the elementary in-medium interactions in relation to the free elementary processes. Excitation function measurements of central collisions between the heaviest available nuclei (like Au on Au), supply the best ground for such studies: the highest degree of thermalisation and compression is expected for such reactions. The consideration presented here of energy thermalisation and of an expanding system clusterizing at freeze-out in a situation close to the liquid gas phase transition can be of interest to astrophysics as well as to the quark gluon plasma deconfinement studied in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the higher energy regime of CERN and Brookhaven. (orig.).

  13. Post-Glacial Development of Western North Atlantic - Labrador Sea Oceanographic Circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheldon, Christina

    2015-01-01

    The subpolar North Atlantic Ocean – Labrador Sea region is an important site for both oceanographic and atmospheric circulation. The convergence of ocean currents causes downwelling of cold, saline water in the subpolar gyre, helping to drive the world-wide thermohaline circulation system. The main......, the subpolar gyre weakened, which carried less Gulf Stream-derived water to the western North Atlantic Ocean via the West Greenland Current and the Slopewater Current, south of Newfoundland. Changes in the subpolar gyre circulation had developed to be analogous to the modern climate by approximately 2 cal kyr...... surface currents involved in the gyre are the south-flowing, cold and relatively fresh Labrador Current and the north-flowing, warm and relatively saline Gulf Stream. The oceanic front between these two major currents moves north and south, dependent on the relative strengths of the currents, impacting...

  14. Profile and bottle data collected on the RV Melville (cruise Vancouver 06) from the Agulhas-South Atlantic Thermohaline Transport Experiment (ASTTEX) in the Atlantic Ocean from 20030102 to 20030115 (NODC Accession 0074001)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Introduction: The Agulhas-South Atlantic Thermohaline Experiment (ASTTEX) examined the fluxes of heat, salt and mass entering the South Atlantic ocean via the...

  15. Bottom water circulation in Cascadia Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hautala, Susan L.; Paul Johnson, H.; Hammond, Douglas E.

    2009-10-01

    A combination of beta spiral and minimum length inverse methods, along with a compilation of historical and recent high-resolution CTD data, are used to produce a quantitative estimate of the subthermocline circulation in Cascadia Basin. Flow in the North Pacific Deep Water, from 900-1900 m, is characterized by a basin-scale anticyclonic gyre. Below 2000 m, two water masses are present within the basin interior, distinguished by different potential temperature-salinity lines. These water masses, referred to as Cascadia Basin Bottom Water (CBBW) and Cascadia Basin Deep Water (CBDW), are separated by a transition zone at about 2400 m depth. Below the depth where it freely communicates with the broader North Pacific, Cascadia Basin is renewed by northward flow through deep gaps in the Blanco Fracture Zone that feeds the lower limb of a vertical circulation cell within the CBBW. Lower CBBW gradually warms and returns to the south at lighter density. Isopycnal layer renewal times, based on combined lateral and diapycnal advective fluxes, increase upwards from the bottom. The densest layer, existing in the southeast quadrant of the basin below ˜2850 m, has an advective flushing time of 0.6 years. The total volume flushing time for the entire CBBW is 2.4 years, corresponding to an average water parcel residence time of 4.7 years. Geothermal heating at the Cascadia Basin seafloor produces a characteristic bottom-intensified temperature anomaly and plays an important role in the conversion of cold bottom water to lighter density within the CBBW. Although covering only about 0.05% of the global seafloor, the combined effects of bottom heat flux and diapycnal mixing within Cascadia Basin provide about 2-3% of the total required global input to the upward branch of the global thermohaline circulation.

  16. Thermohaline front’ off the east coast of India and its generating mechanism

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    HareeshKumar, P.V.; Mathew, B.; RameshKumar, M.R.; Rao, A.R.; Jagadeesh, P.S.V.; Radhakrishnan, K.G.; Shyni, T.N.

    in the Bay of Bengal after the monsoon, as a result of intense coastal circulation and stirring by eddies. Key words: Bay of Bengal, Ocean front, East India Coastal Current, ElNino-Dipole year, Anti- cyclonic eddy, Thermal inversion Corresponding..., the temperature profiles show thermal inversion up to ~1.5oC (1.3oC in December) near the coast (17.94oN, 83.83oE) and 1.3oC (0.3oC in December) farther offshore (17.29oN, 84.42oE). The inversion is noticed up to a maximum depth of 55m farther offshore...

  17. La libre circulation des personnes au sein de l’espace de la C.E.M.A.C : entre mythes et réalités Free movement of people within the Central Africa Economic and Monetary Community : between myths and reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serge Loungou

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available La question de la libre circulation des personnes est une des pierres d’achoppement entre les Etats membres de la Communauté Economique et Monétaire de l’Afrique Centrale (C.E.M.A.C. Cette mésentente est liée à une multitude de raisons, dont certaines participent de constructions imaginaires développées en particulier au Gabon et en Guinée équatoriale. Trois grands mythes sous-tendent le refus manifeste de ces deux Etats d’appliquer le principe communautaire de la libre circulation des personnes ; il s’agit des mythes de l’invasion démographique, de la spoliation économique et de la perversion sociale associée à la délinquance d’origine étrangère. Fortement ancrées dans les consciences nationales, ces représentations s’expriment à travers des politiques migratoires et des pratiques frontalières particulièrement discriminatoires à l’égard des ressortissants de la sous-région.The issue of free movement of people is one of the stumbling blocks between the Members of the Central Africa Economic and Monetary Community (C.A.E.M.C. This disagreement is related to many reasons, some of which are part of imaginary constructions developed especially in Gabon and Equatorial Guinea. Three great myths are underlying the apparent reluctance of these two states to apply the principles of free movement of people: the myth of demographic invasion and the myths of economic and social perversion associated with the crime of foreign origin. Deeply rooted in the national consciousness, these representations are expressed through migration policies and border practices which are particularly discriminatory against nationals of the sub region.

  18. The influence of orography on modern ocean circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffre, Pierre; Ladant, Jean-Baptiste; Donnadieu, Yannick; Sepulchre, Pierre; Goddéris, Yves

    2018-02-01

    The effects of orography on climate are investigated with a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (IPSL-CM5). Results are compared with previous investigations in order to dig out robust consequences of the lack of orography on the global scale. Emphasis is made on the thermohaline circulation whose sensitivity to orography has only been subject to a very limited number of studies using coupled models. The removal of the entire orography switches the Meridional Overturning Circulation from the Atlantic to the Pacific, following freshwater transfers from the latter to the former that reverse the salinity gradient between these oceans. This is in part due to the increased freshwater export from the Pacific to the Atlantic through North America in the absence of the Rocky Mountains and the consecutive decreased evaporation in the North Atlantic once the Atlantic MOC weakens, which cools the northern high-latitudes. In addition and unlike previous model studies, we find that tropical freshwater transfers are a major driver of this switch. More precisely, the collapse of the Asian summer monsoon, associated with westward freshwater transfer across Africa, is critical to the freshening of the Atlantic and the increased salt content in the Pacific. Specifically, precipitations are increasing over the Congo catchment area and induce a strong increase in runoff discharging into the tropical Atlantic. In addition, the removal of the Andes shifts the area of strong precipitation toward the Amazonian catchment area and results in a larger runoff discharging into the Tropical Atlantic.

  19. Recent increases in Arctic freshwater flux affects Labrador Sea convection and Atlantic overturning circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Dixon, Timothy H.; Myers, Paul G.; Bonin, Jennifer; Chambers, Don; van den Broeke, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is an important component of ocean thermohaline circulation. Melting of Greenland's ice sheet is freshening the North Atlantic; however, whether the augmented freshwater flux is disrupting the AMOC is unclear. Dense Labrador Sea Water (LSW), formed by winter cooling of saline North Atlantic water and subsequent convection, is a key component of the deep southward return flow of the AMOC. Although LSW formation recently decreased, it also reached historically high values in the mid-1990s, making the connection to the freshwater flux unclear. Here we derive a new estimate of the recent freshwater flux from Greenland using updated GRACE satellite data, present new flux estimates for heat and salt from the North Atlantic into the Labrador Sea and explain recent variations in LSW formation. We suggest that changes in LSW can be directly linked to recent freshening, and suggest a possible link to AMOC weakening.

  20. Ultra-relativistic Au+Au and d+Au collisions:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Hauer, M.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wenger, E.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    In this talk I will review PHOBOS data on charged particle multiplicities, obtained in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at RHIC. The general features of the Au+Au pseudorapidity distributions results will be discussed and compared to those of /line{p}p collisions. The total charged particle multiplicity, scaled by the number of participant pairs, is observed to be about 40% higher in Au+Au collisions than in /line{p}p and d+Au systems, but, surprisingly at the same level of e+e- collisions. Limiting fragmentation scaling is seen to be obeyed in Au+Au collisions.

  1. Mise au point

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    31 mai 2013 ... traités au service de chirurgie maxillo-faciale et chirurgie plastique de l'hôpital ... qui est la fracture simple isolée du corps, on a inclut ce type de fracture ... sion latérale au niveau de la queue du sourcil. La voie vestibulaire ...

  2. Au pair trajectories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher

    2015-01-01

    pair-sending families in the Philippines, this dissertation examines the long-term trajectories of these young Filipinas. It shows how the au pairs’ local and transnational family relations develop over time and greatly influence their life trajectories. A focal point of the study is how au pairs...... that Filipina au pairs see their stay abroad as an avenue of personal development and social recognition, I examine how the au pairs re-position themselves within their families at home through migration, and how they navigate between the often conflicting expectations of participation in the sociality......Since 2000, thousands of young Filipino migrants have come to Denmark as au pairs. Officially, they are there to “broaden their cultural horizons” by living temporarily with a Danish host family, but they also conduct domestic labor in exchange for food and money, which allows them to send...

  3. Investigating the Interannual Variability of the Circulation and Water Mass Formation in the Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofianos, S. S.; Papadopoulos, V. P.; Denaxa, D.; Abualnaja, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The interannual variability of the circulation and water mass formation in the Red Sea is investigated with the use of a numerical model and the combination of satellite and in-situ observations. The response of Red Sea to the large-scale variability of atmospheric forcing is studied through a 30-years simulation experiment, using MICOM model. The modeling results demonstrate significant trends and variability that are mainly located in the central and northern parts of the basin. On the other hand, the exchange pattern between the Red Sea and the Indian Ocean at the strait of Bab el Mandeb presents very weak interannual variability. The results verify the regularity of the water mass formation processes in the northern Red Sea but also show significant variability of the circulation and thermohaline conditions in the areas of formation. Enhanced water mass formation conditions are observed during specific years of the simulation (approximately five years apart). Analysis of recent warm and cold events in the northernmost part of the basin, based on a combination of atmospheric reanalysis results and oceanic satellite and in-situ observations, shows the importance of the cyclonic gyre that is prevailing in this part of the basin. This gyre can effectively influence the sea surface temperature (SST) and intensify or mitigate the winter effect of the atmospheric forcing. Upwelling induced by persistent periods of the gyre functioning drops the SST over the northernmost part of the Red Sea and can produce colder than normal winter SST even without extreme atmospheric forcing. These mechanisms are crucial for the formation of intermediate and deep water masses in the Red Sea and the strength of the subsequent thermohaline cells.

  4. About the seasonal variability of the Alboran Sea circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Yáñez, M.; Plaza, F.; García-Lafuente, J.; Sarhan, T.; Vargas, J. M.; Vélez-Belchi, P.

    2002-07-01

    Data from a mooring line deployed midway between the Alboran Island and Cape Tres Forcas are used to study the time variability of the Alboran Sea from May 1997 to May 1998. The upper layer salinity and zonal velocity present annual and semiannual cycles characterised by a minimum in spring and autumn and a maximum in summer and winter. Temperature has the opposite behaviour to that of salinity indicating changes in the presence of the Atlantic water within the Alboran Passage. A large set of SST images is used to study these cycles. The decrease of salinity and velocity in our mooring location in spring and autumn seems to be related to the eastward drifting of the Western Alboran Gyre (WAG). The increase of salinity and velocity is caused by the Atlantic current flowing south of the Alboran Island and its associated thermohaline front. Conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD) data from two cruises along the 3°W are coherent with current meters and SST interpretations. During the period analysed, summer months are characterised by the stability of the two-gyre system, while in winter, the circulation is characterised by a coastal jet flowing close to the African shore. We use sea level differences across the Strait of Gibraltar for studying the variability of the Atlantic inflow. We discuss the changes in the Alboran Sea circulation and its relation with the variability of the inertial radius of the Atlantic inflow. Though our results are speculative, we find a possible relation between the disappearance of the two-gyre system and a reversal of the circulation in Gibraltar. Longer time series are needed to conclude, but comparison with previous works makes us think that the seasonal cycle described from May 1997 to May 1998 could be the most likely one for the Alboran Sea upper layer.

  5. Thermohaline structure and water masses in the north of Antarctic Peninsula from data collected in situ by southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilana E. K. C. Wainer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Western Antarctic Peninsula is rapidly warming and exhibits high indices of biodiversity concentrated mostly along its continental shelf. This region has great importance due to the the mixing caused by the interaction of waters from Weddell Sea (MW, Bransfield Strait (EB and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (CCA transmits thermohaline characteristics and nutrients of different sites and finally connects with all the world’s oceans. However, studies focusing on the temporal variability of the region’s oceanographic conditions that finally determine the water mass formation are sparse due to the logistical difficulties of conducting oceanographic surveys and traditional monitoring during the winter. For this study, variations of the thermohaline structure and water masses in the vicinity and below the sea ice in the North of the Antarctic Peninsula (AP and Scotia Sea (SS were recorded between February and November 2008 by two female southern elephant seals (SES, Mirounga leonina tagged with Conductivity–Temperature–Depth/Satellite-Relay Data Logger (CTD–SRDL. One thousand three hundred and thirty vertical profiles of temperature and salinity were collected by seals which were tagged by the MEOP-BR Project team at the Elephant Island, South Shetlands. These profiles, together with spread state diagrams allowed the identification of water masses and their variances in the ocean’s vertical structure. Among the set of identified water masses we cite: Antarctic Surface Water (AASW, Winter Water (WW, Warm Deep Water (WDW, Modified Warm Deep Water (MWDW, Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW, Upper Circumpolar Deep Water (UCDW, Lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCDW and Ice Shelf Water (ISW. Our results show that the oceanic vertical structure undergoes changes that cannot be traditionally monitored, particularly during the Austral winter and that SES are important and modern oceanographic data collection platforms allowing for the improvement of our

  6. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...... with particle size. We find that the fraction of low-coordinated Au atoms scales approximately with the catalytic activity, suggesting that atoms on the corners and edges of Au nanoparticles are the active sites. This effect is explained using density functional calculations....

  7. Microwave circulator design

    CERN Document Server

    Linkhart, Douglas K

    2014-01-01

    Circulator design has advanced significantly since the first edition of this book was published 25 years ago. The objective of this second edition is to present theory, information, and design procedures that will enable microwave engineers and technicians to design and build circulators successfully. This resource contains a discussion of the various units used in the circulator design computations, as well as covers the theory of operation. This book presents numerous applications, giving microwave engineers new ideas about how to solve problems using circulators. Design examples are provided, which demonstrate how to apply the information to real-world design tasks.

  8. Magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au and Fe-Au alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohno, S.; Shimakura, H. [Niigata University of Pharmacy and Applied Life Sciences, Higashijima, Akiha-ku, Niigata 956-8603 (Japan); Tahara, S. [Faculty of Science, University of the Ryukyus, Nishihara-cho, Okinawa 903-0213 (Japan); Okada, T. [Niigata College of Technology, Kamishin’eicho, Nishi-ku, Niigata 950-2076 (Japan)

    2015-08-17

    The magnetic susceptibility of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, Fe-Au and Cu-Au alloys was investigated as a function of temperature and composition. Liquid Cr{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.5 ≤ c and Mn{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.3≤c obeyed the Curie-Weiss law with regard to their dependence of χ on temperature. The magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Fe-Au alloys also exhibited Curie-Weiss behavior with a reasonable value for the effective number of Bohr magneton. On the Au-rich side, the composition dependence of χ for liquid TM-Au (TM=Cr, Mn, Fe) alloys increased rapidly with increasing TM content, respectively. Additionally, the composition dependences of χ for liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, and Fe-Au alloys had maxima at compositions of 50 at% Cr, 70 at% Mn, and 85 at% Fe, respectively. We compared the composition dependences of χ{sub 3d} due to 3d electrons for liquid binary TM-M (M=Au, Al, Si, Sb), and investigated the relationship between χ{sub 3d} and E{sub F} in liquid binary TM-M alloys at a composition of 50 at% TM.

  9. Modelling of circulation and dispersion of radioactive pollutants in the Japan sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cetina, M.; Rajar, R.; Povinec, P.

    2000-01-01

    A large amount of radioactive waste was deposited in the Japan Sea, at a depth of about 3 000 m by the former Soviet Union. Research was carried out to determine to what extent the surface waters could be contaminated by possible leakage from the dumped containers. A three-dimensional, non-linear, baro-clinic model was used to determine the circulation and pollutant dispersion. The computations were carried out in the diagnostic mode, taking into account data on winter and summer temperature and salinity distribution. Thermohaline forcing due to strong temperatures and salinity gradients is the main forcing factor influencing the bottom circulation. Wind forcing and the inflow/outflow surface currents were also taken into account. The simulated velocity fields show relatively good agreement with observed surface currents and with some measurements of bottom currents. The simulated hydrodynamic field is in visibly closer agreement with the observed surface circulation when topographic stress is taken into account. After the release of radionuclides at the sea bottom, the first very small contamination would reach the surface layers after 3 years. The maximum concentrations of about 10 -3 Bq m -3 would be attained after 30 years. But everywhere the predicted radionuclide concentrations would be about two orders of magnitude smaller than the background values, caused by global fallout from nuclear weapons tests. Therefore, it will be impossible to determine the effect of leakage of wastes from the dumping sites over the present background levels. (authors)

  10. Circulation pump mounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalicky, A.

    1976-01-01

    The suspension is described of nuclear reactor circulating pumps enabling their dilatation with a minimum reverse force consisting of spacing rods supported with one end in the anchor joints and provided with springs and screw joints engaging the circulating pump shoes. The spacing rods are equipped with side vibration dampers anchored in the shaft side wall and on the body of the circulating pump drive body. The negative reverse force F of the spacing rods is given by the relation F=Q/l.y, where Q is the weight of the circulating pump, l is the spatial distance between the shoe joints and anchor joints, and y is the deflection of the circulating pump vertical axis from the mean equilibrium position. The described suspension is advantageous in that that the reverse force for the deflection from the mean equilibrium position is minimal, dynamic behaviour is better, and construction costs are lower compared to suspension design used so far. (J.B.)

  11. Le CRDI au Ghana

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    pour prévenir le paludisme, des études ayant démontré que leur utilisation pouvait réduire considérablement la mortalité infantile. Les chercheurs ont également suggéré aux gouvernements différents moyens pour inciter les gens à acheter les moustiquaires et à les utiliser correctement. Les TI au service de la démocratie.

  12. Mise au point

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    et traité à temps, le risque de complications et de morbidité peut être écarté. Les auteurs rapportent 2 cas de kystes de la vallécule. La tomodensitométrie a confirmé la présence d'une formation kystique prenant origine au niveau de la val- lécule. Une laryngoscopie directe a été faite pour les 2 patients sous anesthésie ...

  13. Circulation and hydrological characteristics of the North Aegean Sea: a contribution from real-time buoy measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. NITTIS

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the POSEIDON Project, a network of open sea oceanographic buoys equipped with meteorological and oceanographic sensors has been operational in the Aegean Sea since 1998. The analysis of upper-ocean physical data (currents at 3m, temperature and salinity at 3-40m depths collected during the last 2 years from the stations of the North Aegean basin indicates a strong temporal variability of flow field and hydrological characteristics in both synoptic and seasonal time scales. The northern part of the basin is mainly influenced by the Black Sea Water outflow and the mesoscale variability of the corresponding thermohaline fronts, while the southern stations are influenced by the general circulation of the Aegean Sea with strong modulations caused by the seasonally varying atmospheric forcing.

  14. Seasonal overturning circulation in the Red Sea: 2. Winter circulation

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Fengchao; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Pratt, Lawrence J.; Bower, Amy S.; Kö hl, Armin; Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh; Rivas, David

    2014-01-01

    The shallow winter overturning circulation in the Red Sea is studied using a 50 year high-resolution MITgcm (MIT general circulation model) simulation with realistic atmospheric forcing. The overturning circulation for a typical year, represented

  15. Dynamics of the Water Circulations in the Southern South China Sea and Its Seasonal Transports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryabor, Farshid; Ooi, See Hai; Samah, Azizan Abu; Akbari, Abolghasem

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional Regional Ocean Modeling System is used to study the seasonal water circulations and transports of the Southern South China Sea. The simulated seasonal water circulations and estimated transports show consistency with observations, e.g., satellite altimeter data set and re-analysis data of the Simple Ocean Data Assimilation. It is found that the seasonal water circulations are mainly driven by the monsoonal wind stress and influenced by the water outflow/inflow and associated currents of the entire South China Sea. The intrusion of the strong current along the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia and the eddies at different depths in all seasons are due to the conservation of the potential vorticity as the depth increases. Results show that the water circulation patterns in the northern part of the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia are generally dominated by the geostrophic currents while those in the southern areas are due solely to the wind stress because of negligible Coriolis force there. This study clearly shows that individual surface freshwater flux (evaporation minus precipitation) controls the sea salinity balance in the Southern South China Sea thermohaline circulations. Analysis of climatological data from a high resolution Regional Ocean Modeling System reveals that the complex bathymetry is important not only for water exchange through the Southern South China Sea but also in regulating various transports across the main passages in the Southern South China Sea, namely the Sunda Shelf and the Strait of Malacca. Apart from the above, in comparision with the dynamics of the Sunda Shelf, the Strait of Malacca reflects an equally significant role in the annual transports into the Andaman Sea.

  16. Mise au point

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tomie est replacé et fixé par des fils d'acier, krönlein lais- sait ce fragment pédiculé au fascia temporalis afin d'évi- ter la dépression de la fosse temporale due à la désinser- tion du muscle temporal [20] ; dans notre série, après reconstitution du cadre, le muscle temporal est suturé à son point d'insertion. pour les tumeurs ...

  17. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was flat and rough reference surfaces. Our micro/nanofabrication process is a scalable approach based on cost-efficient self-organization and provides potential for further developing functional surfaces to study the behavior of microbes on nanoscale topographies.We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all

  18. Au pairs on Facebook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher

    2016-01-01

    Ethnographers are increasingly making use of Facebook to acquire access and general acquaintance with their field of study. However, little has been written on how Facebook is used methodologically in research that does not have social media sites as the main focus of interest. This article argues...... the au pairs resist and embrace such dominant representations, and on how such representations are ascribed different meanings in the transnational social fields of which the migrant are a part. The article is based on ethnographic fieldwork conducted between 2010 and 2014 in Denmark, the Philippines...

  19. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-02-07

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was flat and rough reference surfaces. Our micro/nanofabrication process is a scalable approach based on cost-efficient self-organization and provides potential for further developing functional surfaces to study the behavior of microbes on nanoscale topographies.

  20. Early concepts and charts of ocean circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, R. G.; Stramma, L.; Kortum, G.

    in the 1860s and 1870s (i.e. Lightning; Porcupine; Challenger; Gazelle; Vøringen), as well as mounting evidence for the existence of a deep and global thermohaline circulation (Carpenter; Prestwich). The dynamical method for calculating geostrophic flow in the atmosphere (Guldberg and Mohn) and a precursor to our present formulation for quantizing surface wind stress (Zöppritz) were introduced in the 1870s. On a regional scale for the Norwegian Sea, the dynamical method was applied to marine measurements made at depth to yield a three-dimensional view of flow patterns (Mohn). Further insight into the deep circulation came slowly, but with ever increasing numbers of observations being made at and near the surface, the upper-layer circulation in non-polar latitudes was approximately described by the late 1880s (Krümmel).

  1. Cluster-to-cluster transformation among Au6, Au8 and Au11 nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiuqing; Fu, Junhong; Lin, Xinzhang; Fu, Xuemei; Yan, Jinghui; Wu, Ren'an; Liu, Chao; Huang, Jiahui

    2018-05-22

    We present the cluster-to-cluster transformations among three gold nanoclusters, [Au6(dppp)4]2+ (Au6), [Au8(dppp)4Cl2]2+ (Au8) and [Au11(dppp)5]3+ (Au11). The conversion process follows a rule that states that the transformation of a small cluster to a large cluster is achieved through an oxidation process with an oxidizing agent (H2O2) or with heating, while the conversion of a large cluster to a small one occurs through a reduction process with a reducing agent (NaBH4). All the reactions were monitored using UV-Vis spectroscopy and ESI-MS. This work may provide an alternative approach to the synthesis of novel gold nanoclusters and a further understanding of the structural transformation relationship of gold nanoclusters.

  2. Charged particle density distributions in Au + Au collisions at ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Charged particle pseudorapidity distributions have been measured in Au + Au collisions using the BRAHMS detector at RHIC. The results are presented as a function of the collision centrality and the center of mass energy. They are compared to the predictions of different parton scattering models and the important role of ...

  3. Geothermal heating, diapycnal mixing and the abyssal circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Emile-Geay

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The dynamical role of geothermal heating in abyssal circulation is reconsidered using three independent arguments. First, we show that a uniform geothermal heat flux close to the observed average (86.4 mW m−2 supplies as much heat to near-bottom water as a diapycnal mixing rate of ~10−4 m2 s−1 – the canonical value thought to be responsible for the magnitude of the present-day abyssal circulation. This parity raises the possibility that geothermal heating could have a dynamical impact of the same order. Second, we estimate the magnitude of geothermally-induced circulation with the density-binning method (Walin, 1982, applied to the observed thermohaline structure of Levitus (1998. The method also allows to investigate the effect of realistic spatial variations of the flux obtained from heatflow measurements and classical theories of lithospheric cooling. It is found that a uniform heatflow forces a transformation of ~6 Sv at σ4=45.90, which is of the same order as current best estimates of AABW circulation. This transformation can be thought of as the geothermal circulation in the absence of mixing and is very similar for a realistic heatflow, albeit shifted towards slightly lighter density classes. Third, we use a general ocean circulation model in global configuration to perform three sets of experiments: (1 a thermally homogenous abyssal ocean with and without uniform geothermal heating; (2 a more stratified abyssal ocean subject to (i no geothermal heating, (ii a constant heat flux of 86.4 mW m−2, (iii a realistic, spatially varying heat flux of identical global average; (3 experiments (i and (iii with enhanced vertical mixing at depth. Geothermal heating and diapycnal mixing are found to interact non-linearly through the density field, with geothermal heating eroding the deep stratification supporting a downward diffusive flux, while diapycnal mixing acts to map

  4. Modelling the water mass circulation in the Aegean Sea. Part I: wind stresses, thermal and haline fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Valioulis

    1994-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to develop a computer model capable of simulating the water mass circulation in the Aegean Sea. There is historical, phenomenological and recent experimental evidence of important hydrographical features whose causes have been variably identified as the highly complex bathymetry, the extreme seasonal variations in temperature, the considerable fresh water fluxes, and the large gradients in salinity or temperature across neighbouring water masses (Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean. In the approach taken here, physical processes are introduced into the model one by one. This method reveals the parameters responsible for permanent and seasonal features of the Aegean Sea circulation. In the first part of the work reported herein, wind-induced circulation appears to be seasonally invariant. This yearly pattern is overcome by the inclusion of baroclinicity in the model in the form of surface thermohaline fluxes. The model shows an intricate pattern of sub-basin gyres and locally strong currents, permanent or seasonal, in accord with the experimental evidence.

  5. Modelling the water mass circulation in the Aegean Sea. Part I: wind stresses, thermal and haline fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Valioulis

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to develop a computer model capable of simulating the water mass circulation in the Aegean Sea. There is historical, phenomenological and recent experimental evidence of important hydrographical features whose causes have been variably identified as the highly complex bathymetry, the extreme seasonal variations in temperature, the considerable fresh water fluxes, and the large gradients in salinity or temperature across neighbouring water masses (Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean. In the approach taken here, physical processes are introduced into the model one by one. This method reveals the parameters responsible for permanent and seasonal features of the Aegean Sea circulation. In the first part of the work reported herein, wind-induced circulation appears to be seasonally invariant. This yearly pattern is overcome by the inclusion of baroclinicity in the model in the form of surface thermohaline fluxes. The model shows an intricate pattern of sub-basin gyres and locally strong currents, permanent or seasonal, in accord with the experimental evidence.

  6. Arctic circulation regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proshutinsky, Andrey; Dukhovskoy, Dmitry; Timmermans, Mary-Louise; Krishfield, Richard; Bamber, Jonathan L

    2015-10-13

    Between 1948 and 1996, mean annual environmental parameters in the Arctic experienced a well-pronounced decadal variability with two basic circulation patterns: cyclonic and anticyclonic alternating at 5 to 7 year intervals. During cyclonic regimes, low sea-level atmospheric pressure (SLP) dominated over the Arctic Ocean driving sea ice and the upper ocean counterclockwise; the Arctic atmosphere was relatively warm and humid, and freshwater flux from the Arctic Ocean towards the subarctic seas was intensified. By contrast, during anticylonic circulation regimes, high SLP dominated driving sea ice and the upper ocean clockwise. Meanwhile, the atmosphere was cold and dry and the freshwater flux from the Arctic to the subarctic seas was reduced. Since 1997, however, the Arctic system has been under the influence of an anticyclonic circulation regime (17 years) with a set of environmental parameters that are atypical for this regime. We discuss a hypothesis explaining the causes and mechanisms regulating the intensity and duration of Arctic circulation regimes, and speculate how changes in freshwater fluxes from the Arctic Ocean and Greenland impact environmental conditions and interrupt their decadal variability. © 2015 The Authors.

  7. Multifragmentation in Au + Au collisions studied with AMD-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Akira [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1998-07-01

    AMD-V is an optimum model for calculation of multifragmentation in Au + Au collisions. AMD-V consider anti-symmetry of incident nucleus, target nucleus and fragments, furthermore, it treat the quantum effect to exist many channels in the intermediate and final state. 150 and 250 MeV/nucleon incident energy were used in the experiments. The data of multifragment atom in {sup 197}Au + {sup 197}Au collisions was reproduced by AMD-V calculation using Gognny force, corresponding to the imcompressibility of nuclear substance K = 228 MeV and its mean field depend on momentum. When other interaction (SKG 2 force, corresponding to K = 373 KeV) was used an mean field does not depend on momentum, the calculation results could not reproduce the experimental values, because nucleus and deuteron were estimated too large and {alpha}-particle and intermediate fragments estimated too small. (S.Y.)

  8. Transverse expansion in 197 Au + 197 Au collisions at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Y.; Liu, F.; Liu, K.; Schweda, K.; Xu, N.

    2003-01-01

    Using the RQMD model, transverse momentum distributions and particle ratios are studied for 197 Au + 197 Au collisions at √s NN = 200 GeV. In particular, they present results on the mean transverse momentum of charged pions, charged kaons, protons and anti-protons and compare with experimental measurements. They discuss an approach to study early partonic collectivity in high energy nuclear collisions

  9. Electrochemical Recovery of Gold from Waste Electric and Electronic Equipment Using Circulating Particulate Bed Reactor (CPBE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravinder, T.; Ali, U. F. M.; Ridwan, F. M.; Ibrahim, N.; Azmi, N. H.

    2017-06-01

    The utilization of electrochemical process recovery involving low reactant concentrations of metal requires electrodes with high mass transport rates and specific surface areas. This is essential to increase cross-sectional current densities whilst optimizing the capital and operating costs. Experimental results demonstrated that Circulating Particulate Bed Reactor (CPBE) is suitable for the recovery of low concentrations of gold from aqueous chloride solution containing {{AuCl}}4- and {{AuCl}}2- of less than 0.5 mol m-3(< 102 g m-3). Elemental gold was successfully obtained on 0.5-1 mm gr particles in an electrochemical reactor incorporating a cation- permeable membrane and operated in bath recycle mode. Depletion to concentration < 5 × 10-3 mol m-3 (< 1 g m-3) appeared to be mass transport controlled at an applied potential of +0.20 V (SCE), specific electrical energy consumption (SEEC) of ca. 800-1300 kWh h (tonne Au)-1 for cell voltages (U) of 2.0-3.0 V, and fractional current efficiencies of ca. 0.95. However, atomic absorption and UV spectrophotometry established that as the ([{{AuCl}}4-+[{{AuCl}}2-]) concentration decayed, the [{{AuCl}}4-]:[{{AuCl}}2-] molar ratio changed. A multi-step mechanism for reduction of {{AuCl}}4- ions explained this behavior in terms of changing overpotentials for {{AuCl}}4- and {{AuCl}}2- reduction as total dissolved gold concentration decreased. In addition, SEM images confirmed that adherent and coherent Au deposits were achieved with CPBE for Au deposition under mass transport control at 0.20 V (SCE).

  10. Face au risque

    CERN Document Server

    Grosse, Christian; November, Valérie

    2007-01-01

    Ce volume collectif sur le risque inaugure la collection L'ÉQUINOXE. Ancré dans l'histoire pour mesurer les continuités et les ruptures, il illustre la manière dont les sciences humaines évaluent et mesurent les enjeux collectifs du risque sur les plans politiques, scientifiques, énergétiques, juridiques et éthiques. Puisse-t-il nourrir la réflexion sur la culture et la prévention du risque. Ses formes épidémiques, écologiques, sociales, terroristes et militaires nourrissent les peurs actuelles, structurent les projets sécuritaires et constituent - sans doute - les défis majeurs à notre modernité. Dans la foulée de la richesse scientifique d'Equinoxe, L'ÉQUINOXE hérite de son esprit en prenant à son tour le pari de contribuer - non sans risque - à enrichir en Suisse romande et ailleurs le champ éditorial des sciences humaines dont notre société a besoin pour forger ses repères. Après Face au risque suivra cet automne Du sens des Lumières. (MICHEL PORRET Professeur Ordinaire à la F...

  11. Controlled humidity gas circulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruner, S.M.

    1981-01-01

    A programmable circulator capable of regulating the humidity of a gas stream over a wide range of humidity is described. An optical dew-point hygrometer is used as a feedback element to control the addition or removal of water vapor. Typical regulation of the gas is to a dew-point temperature of +- 0.2 0 C and to an accuracy limited by the dew-point hygrometer

  12. Fluid circulation control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benard, Henri; Henocque, Jean.

    1982-01-01

    Horizontal fluid circulation control device, of the type having a pivoting flap. This device is intended for being fitted in the pipes of hydraulic installation, particularly in a bleed and venting system of a nuclear power station shifting radioactive or contaminated liquids. The characteristic of this device is the cut-out at the top of the flap to allow the air contained in the pipes to flow freely [fr

  13. Changes in ocean circulation in the South-east Atlantic Ocean during the Pliocene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, B. F.; McClymont, E.; Felder, S.; Leng, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Southeast Atlantic Ocean is an important ocean gateway because major oceanic systems interact with each other in a relatively small geographic area. These include the Benguela Current, Antarctic Circumpolar Current, and the input of warm and saline waters from the Indian Ocean via the Agulhas leakage. However, there remain questions about circulation change in this region during the Pliocene, including whether there was more or less Agulhas Leakage, which may have implications for the strength of the global thermohaline circulation. ODP Site 1087 (31°28'S, 15°19'E, 1374m water depth) is located outside the Benguela upwelling region and is affected by Agulhas leakage in the modern ocean. Sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) are thus sensitive to the influence of Agulhas Leakage at this site. Our approach is to apply several organic geochemistry proxies and foraminiferal analyses to reconstruct the Pliocene history of ODP 1087, including the UK37' index (SSTs), pigments (primary productivity) and planktonic foraminifera (water mass changes). SSTs during the Pliocene range from 17 to 22.5 °C (mean SSTs at 21 °C), and show variability on orbital and suborbital time scales. Our results indicate that the Benguela upwelling system had intensified and/or shifted south during the Pliocene. We find no evidence of Agulhas leakage, meaning that either Agulhas Leakage was severely reduced or displaced during the mid-Pliocene. Potential causes of the observed signals include changes to the local wind field and/or changes in the temperature of intermediate waters which upwell in the Benguela system. Pronounced cooling is observed during cold stages in the Pliocene, aligned with the M2 and KM2 events. These results may indicate that changes to the extent of the Antarctic ice sheet had impact on circulation in the south east Atlantic during the Pliocene via displacement of the Antarctic Circumpolar Currents.

  14. L’apprentissage au cern

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    pour les professions d’électronicien(ne) et de laborantin(e) en physique L’apprentissage au CERN est régi par les lois, règlements et contrats en vigueur dans le canton de Genève. En cas de réussite à l’examen de fin d’apprentissage, les apprentis obtiennent le Certificat fédéral de capacité suisse (CFC). 6 places au total sont ouvertes au recrutement pour les deux professions. L’apprentissage dure 4 ans. Minima requis pour faire acte de candidature : avoir au moins 15 ans et moins de 21 ans à la date de début de l’apprentissage ; avoir terminé la scolarité obligatoire, au minimum 9e du Cycle d’orientation genevois (3e en France) ; être ressortissant d’un pays membre du CERN (Allemagne, Autriche, Belgique, Bulgarie, Danemark, Espagne, Finlande, France, Grèce, Hongrie, Italie, Norvège, Pays-Bas, Pologne, Portugal, Royaume-Uni, République tchèque, République slovaque , Suède, Suisse) ; pour les résidents en Suisse : être ressortissant su...

  15. Transverse velocity scaling in 197Au+197Au fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukasik, J.; Hudan, S.; Lavaud, F.

    2002-07-01

    Invariant transverse-velocity spectra of intermediate-mass fragments were measured with the 4π multi-detector system INDRA for collisions of 197 Au on 197 Au at incident energies between 40 and 150 MeV per nucleon. Their scaling properties as a function of incident energy and atomic number Z are used to distinguish and characterize the emissions in (i) peripheral collisions at the projectile and target rapidities, and in (ii) central and (iii) peripheral collisions near mid-rapidity. The importance of dynamical effects is evident in all three cases and their origin is discussed. (orig.)

  16. Flow in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belt Tonjes, Marguerite; the PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2004-08-01

    The study of flow can provide information on the initial state dynamics and the degree of equilibration attained in heavy-ion collisions. This contribution presents results for both elliptic and directed flow as determined from data recorded by the PHOBOS experiment in Au+Au runs at RHIC at \\sqrt{sNN} = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. The PHOBOS detector provides a unique coverage in pseudorapidity for measuring flow at RHIC. The systematic dependence of flow on pseudorapidity, transverse momentum, centrality and energy is discussed.

  17. Radiology of liver circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermine, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    This book proposes that careful evaluation of the arterioportogram is the cornerstone in assessing portal flow obstruction, being the most consistent of all observations including liver histology, portal venous pressure, size and number of portosystemic collaterals, and wedged hepatic venous pressure. Very brief chapters cover normal hepatic circulation and angiographic methods. Contrast volumes and flow rates for celiac, hepatic, and superior mesenteric injection are given, with the timing for venous phase radiographs. In the main body of the text, portal obstruction is divided very simply into presinusoidal (all proximal causes) and postsinusoidal (all distal causes, including Budd-Chiari). Changes are discussed regarding the splenic artery and spleen; hepatic artery and its branches; portal flow rate and direction; and arterioportal shunting and portosystemic collateral circulation in minimal, moderate, severe, and very severe portal obstruction and in recognizable entities such as prehepatic portal and hepatic venous obstructions. The major emphasis in this section is the recognition and understanding of flow changes by which level and severity of obstruction are assessed (not simply the anatomy of portosystemic collateral venous flow). Excellent final chapters discuss the question of portal hypertension without obstruction, and the contribution of arterioportography to the treatment of portal hypertension, again with an emphasis on hemodynamics before and after shunt surgery. There is a fascinating final chapter on segmental intrahepatic obstruction without portal hypertension that explains much of the unusual contrast enhancement sometimes seen in CT scanning of hepatic mass lesions

  18. Circulation of Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitani, P.

    2016-01-01

    Since the dawn of man, contemplation of the stars has been a primary impulse in human beings, who proliferated their knowledge of the stars all over the world. Aristotle sees this as the product of primeval and perennial “wonder” which gives rise to what we call science, philosophy, and poetry. Astronomy, astrology, and star art (painting, architecture, literature, and music) go hand in hand through millennia in all cultures of the planet (and all use catasterisms to explain certain phenomena). Some of these developments are independent of each other, i.e., they take place in one culture independently of others. Some, on the other hand, are the product of the “circulation of stars.” There are two ways of looking at this. One seeks out forms, the other concentrates on the passing of specific lore from one area to another through time. The former relies on archetypes (for instance, with catasterism), the latter constitutes a historical process. In this paper I present some of the surprising ways in which the circulation of stars has occurred—from East to West, from East to the Far East, and from West to East, at times simultaneously.

  19. Chiral magnetic effect search in p+Au, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jie

    2018-01-01

    Metastable domains of fluctuating topological charges can change the chirality of quarks and induce local parity violation in quantum chromodynamics. This can lead to observable charge separation along the direction of the strong magnetic field produced by spectator protons in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, a phenomenon called the chiral magnetic effect (CME). A major background source for CME measurements using the charge-dependent azimuthal correlator (Δϒ) is the intrinsic particle correlations (such as resonance decays) coupled with the azimuthal elliptical anisotropy (v2). In heavy-ion collisions, the magnetic field direction and event plane angle are correlated, thus the CME and the v2-induced background are entangled. In this report, we present two studies from STAR to shed further lights on the background issue. (1) The Δϒ should be all background in small system p+Au and d+Au collisions, because the event plane angles are dominated by geometry fluctuations uncorrelated to the magnetic field direction. However, significant Δϒ is observed, comparable to the peripheral Au+Au data, suggesting a background dominance in the latter, and likely also in the mid-central Au+Au collisions where the multiplicity and v2 scaled correlator is similar. (2) A new approach is devised to study Δϒ as a function of the particle pair invariant mass (minv) to identify the resonance backgrounds and hence to extract the possible CME signal. Signal is consistent with zero within uncertainties at high minv. Signal at low minv, extracted from a two-component model assuming smooth mass dependence, is consistent with zero within uncertainties.

  20. Filipino au pairs on the move

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher

    2016-01-01

    Most Filipina au pairs in Denmark send remittances back home, and for many, au pairing forms part of longer-term migration trajectories. This article explores how Filipina au pairs try to carve out a future for themselves abroad. It shows that they navigate within tight webs of financial interdep......Most Filipina au pairs in Denmark send remittances back home, and for many, au pairing forms part of longer-term migration trajectories. This article explores how Filipina au pairs try to carve out a future for themselves abroad. It shows that they navigate within tight webs of financial...

  1. Level lifetimes of Au52+ in Au plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Bo; Zhu Zhiyan; Jiang Gang; Zhu Zhenghe

    2003-01-01

    Based on the extended relativistic multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock theory, the level lifetimes, level widths and wavelengths of Au 52+ have been calculated using the General-purpose Relativistic Atomic Structure Program. The wavelengths obtained are in good agreement with the experimental data available. The relationship between the level lifetimes and the level widths satisfies the Heisenberg uncertainty principle

  2. Circulation Systems Past and Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurice J. Freedman

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available A review of the development of circulation systems shows two areas of change. The librarian's perception of circulation control has shifted from a broad service orientation to a narrow record-keeping approach and recently back again. The technological development of circulation sys-tems has evolved from manual systems to the online systems of today. The trade-offs and deficiencies of earlier systems in relation to the comprehensive services made possible by the online computer are detailed.

  3. The ocean circulation inverse problem

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wunsch, C

    1996-01-01

    .... This book addresses the problem of inferring the state of the ocean circulation, understanding it dynamically, and even forecasting it through a quantitative combination of theory and observation...

  4. La course au logement social

    OpenAIRE

    Bourgeois, Marine

    2013-01-01

    Ce billet a été publié dans le cadre de l'opération Têtes Chercheuses, qui permet à des étudiants ou chercheurs de grandes écoles, d'universités ou de centres de recherche partenaires de promouvoir des projets innovants en les rendant accessibles, et ainsi participer au débat public.

  5. Variation in the Norwegian gyre and its links to the termohaline circulation (THC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarson, B. E.; Linderholm, H. W.; Wilson, R.; Rydval, M.

    2017-12-01

    Summer temperature patterns in Scandinavia are partly governed by variations in the North Atlantic drift (being part of the Gulf Stream) causing northern Europe to be warmer than similar latitudes. Observation show that northwestern European climate is strongly link to sea surface temperature (SST) and the ocean circulation (the Norwegian gyre, NG) in the Norwegian Sea. On decadal- multidecadal time scales, there is also positive association with the sub-tropical gyre, but also a weaker (and negative) connection to the sub Polar gyre (SPG) which is linked to the thermohaline circulation (THC). The negative correlations occur only during the April-June and July-September (JAS) seasons, when the ocean mixed layer is shallow in the North Atlantic. A network of Maximum Latewood Density (MXD) tree-ring chronologies from 7 sites in Northern Scandinavia, 1 in central Scotland and 1 in Labrador was used to identifying SST influences on local to regional summer temperatures patterns during 1901-20XX. The sites represent tree growth strongly correlated with mean JAS temperatures (Fennoscandia r > 0.7, Scotland r > 0.6, Labrador r > 0.5). Both the Scotland and Labrador chronologies correlates only with SST from adjacent coastal areas. The Fennoscandian chronologies showed strong and temporally consistent correlations with SST across the NG (r > 0.5), but also positive correlations of the same magnitude across the sub-tropical gyre. In addition, a negative, but weaker, correlation was found over the SPG domain. Climate models (PMIP5) were not able to reproduce the correlation patterns evident in both observations and tree-ring data. The tripolar correlation pattern suggests that North Atlantic SST influences summer temperature variability in Northern Fennoscandia, illustrating the potential for using tree-rings to reconstruct the THC and the heat transport towards the North Atlantic region and atmosphere- ocean interaction back in time.

  6. Millennial-scale interaction between ice sheets and ocean circulation during marine isotope stage 100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masao eOhno

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Waxing/waning of the ice sheets and the associated change in thermohaline circulation have played an important role in global climate change since major continental ice sheets appeared in the northern hemisphere about 2.75 million years ago. In the earliest glacial stages, however, establishment of the linkage between ice sheet development and ocean circulation remain largely unclear. Here we show new high-resolution records of marine isotope stage 100 recovered from deep-sea sediments on the Gardar Drift, in the subpolar North Atlantic. Results of a wide range of analyses clearly reveal the influence of millennial-scale variability in iceberg discharge on ocean surface condition and bottom current variability in the subpolar North Atlantic during marine isotope stage 100. We identified eight events of ice-rafted debris, which occurred mostly with decreases in sea surface temperature and in current components indicating North Atlantic Deep Water. These decreases are interpreted by weakened deep water formation linked to iceberg discharge, similarly to observations from the last glacial period. Dolomite fraction of the ice-rafted events in early MIS 100 like the last glacial Heinrich events suggests massive collapse of the Laurentide ice sheet in North America. At the same time, our early glacial data suggest differences from the last glacial period: absence of 1470-year periodicity in the interactions between ice sheets and ocean, and northerly shift of the ice-rafted debris belt. Our high-resolution data largely improve the picture of ice-sheet/ocean interactions on millennial time scales in the early glacial period after major Northern Hemisphere glaciation.

  7. Circulation and oxygen cycling in the Mediterranean Sea: Sensitivity to future climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powley, Helen R.; Krom, Michael D.; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2016-11-01

    Climate change is expected to increase temperatures and decrease precipitation in the Mediterranean Sea (MS) basin, causing substantial changes in the thermohaline circulation (THC) of both the Western Mediterranean Sea (WMS) and Eastern Mediterranean Sea (EMS). The exact nature of future circulation changes remains highly uncertain, however, with forecasts varying from a weakening to a strengthening of the THC. Here we assess the sensitivity of dissolved oxygen (O2) distributions in the WMS and EMS to THC changes using a mass balance model, which represents the exchanges of O2 between surface, intermediate, and deep water reservoirs, and through the Straits of Sicily and Gibraltar. Perturbations spanning the ranges in O2 solubility, aerobic respiration kinetics, and THC changes projected for the year 2100 are imposed to the O2 model. In all scenarios tested, the entire MS remains fully oxygenated after 100 years; depending on the THC regime, average deep water O2 concentrations fall in the ranges 151-205 and 160-219 µM in the WMS and EMS, respectively. On longer timescales (>1000 years), the scenario with the largest (>74%) decline in deep water formation rate leads to deep water hypoxia in the EMS but, even then, the WMS deep water remains oxygenated. In addition, a weakening of THC may result in a negative feedback on O2 consumption as supply of labile dissolved organic carbon to deep water decreases. Thus, it appears unlikely that climate-driven changes in THC will cause severe O2 depletion of the deep water masses of the MS in the foreseeable future.

  8. A semi-diagnostic calculation of climatic circulation in the western Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shaji, C.; Bahulayan, N.; Dube, S.K.; Rao, A.D.

    . The model involves the sea surface topography function used as the integral function, and is driven with the wind stress at surface and thermohaline forcing at different levels. A steady state solution is obtained within 40 days of model integration...

  9. Indian Ocean circulation changes over the Middle Pleistocene Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, B.; Auer, G.; De Vleeschouwer, D.; Christensen, B. A.; Stolfi, C.; Reuning, L.; Martinez-Garcia, A.; Haug, G. H.; Bogus, K.

    2017-12-01

    The Mid-Pleistocene Transition (MPT; 1.4 - 0.4 Ma) represents a climatic shift towards climate cycles at a quasi-100-kyr frequency. Although, several high-resolution records covering the MPT from globally distributed archives exist, there is only sparse evidence on changes in heat exchange between the Pacific and Indian Oceans, which represents a crucial part of the global thermohaline circulation (THC). Deciphering the influence of this heat exchange via the Indonesian Throughflow (ITF) is an important step in understanding the causes of the MPT. The Leeuwin Current off Western Australia is directly influenced by the ITF and can therefore be used to reconstruct ITF variability during the MPT. Today, the Leeuwin Current is the only southward flowing eastern boundary current in the southern hemisphere. The onset of the current is unknown but is proposed to have occurred 1 Ma and was likely related to significant changes in ITF dynamics during the MPT We present the first continuous reconstruction of changes in the Leeuwin Current during the MPT using data from IODP Expedition 356 Site U1460. The site is located at 29°S in the path of the current. High sedimentation rates ( 30 cm/ka) at Site U1460 provide the opportunity for high-resolution reconstruction of the MPT. We reconstruct paleoenvironmental variability by combining XRF, organic geochemistry, ICP-MS and XRD data with shipboard data, to reconstruct Leeuwin Current and ITF variability. Initial analyses show clear indications that upwelling off Western Australia intensified during the MPT, indicated by increased primary productivity related to increased nutrient levels, from 900-600 ka. Our results also suggest that the west Australian current (WAC) strengthened during this time supplying cool eutrophic waters from the high southern latitutes to the site. This intensification of the WAC may have had major implications for the Indian Ocean current system, but also the THC at large. This seems to be coupled with

  10. Some recent results in Au+Au collisions at AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z.

    1996-01-01

    Many interesting results have been obtained for Au + Au reactions at AGS. The basic information about the reaction dynamics comes from the hadronic distribution. and this article reviews the recent progress of these distributions in details. The proton rapidity distribution shows significantly increased stopping compared to lighter systems, implying the formation of a state of high baryon density. Unlike reactions at this energy induced by lighter heavy ions, at low m t - m 0 the proton invariant spectra deviate from a single exponential shape and become fear,. while pion spectra are found to rise in this region, with the π - spectra rising faster than the π + spectra. The inverse slope parameter increases faster for particles of larger mass as the number of participants in the reaction increases, an indication of increased effect of radial expansion in central collision. Anti-proton Needs have been measured recently, and unfortunately a comparison among current results from different experiments indicates discrepancy

  11. Sino-Danish Brain Circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelsen, Rasmus Gjedssø; Du, Xiangyun; Søndergaard, Morten Karnøe

    2014-01-01

    China is faced with urgent needs to develop an economically and environmentally sustainable economy based on innovation and knowledge. Brain circulation and research and business investments from the outside are central for this development. Sino-American brain circulation and research...... and investment by overseas researchers and entrepreneurs are well described. In that case, the US is the center of global R&D and S&T. However, the brain circulation and research and investments between a small open Scandinavian economy, such as Denmark, and the huge developing economy of China are not well...... understood. In this case, Denmark is very highly developed, but a satellite in the global R&D and S&T system. With time and the growth of China as a R&D and S&T power house, both Denmark and China will benefit from brain circulation between them. Such brain circulation is likely to play a key role in flows...

  12. Nuclear spin of 185Au and hyperfine structure of 188Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekstroem, C.; Ingelman, S.; Wannberg, G.

    1977-03-01

    The nuclear spin of 185 Au, I = 5/2, and the hyperfine separation of 188 Au, Δγ = +- 2992(30) MHz, have been measured with the atomic-beam magnetic resonance method. The spin of 185 Au indicates a deformed nuclear shape in the ground state. The small magnetic moment of 188 Au is close in value to those of the heavier I = 1 gold isotopes 190 192 194 Au, being located in a typical transition region. (Auth.)

  13. Natural Circulation with Boiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mathisen, R P

    1967-09-15

    A number of parameters with dominant influence on the power level at hydrodynamic instability in natural circulation, two-phase flow, have been studied experimentally. The geometrical dependent quantities were: the system driving head, the boiling channel and riser dimensions, the single-phase as well as the two phase flow restrictions. The parameters influencing the liquid properties were the system pressure and the test section inlet subcooling. The threshold of instability was determined by plotting the noise characteristics in the mass flow records against power. The flow responses to artificially obtained power disturbances at instability conditions were also measured in order to study the nature of hydrodynamic instability. The results presented give a review over relatively wide ranges of the main parameters, mainly concerning the coolant performance in both single and parallel boiling channel flow. With regard to the power limits the experimental results verified that the single boiling channel performance was intimately related to that of the parallel channels. In the latter case the additional inter-channel factors with attenuating effects were studied. Some optimum values of the parameters were observed.

  14. L’apprentissage au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    En 1961, sur la base du constat que l’évolution du marché du travail nécessitait un besoin croissant de personnel qualifié, le 1er accord entre la République et canton de Genève et le CERN fut signé. Cet accord avait notamment pour objet la formation professionnelle de jeunes électroniciens et techniciens de laboratoires en physique. Le CERN, acteur local économique d’importance, soulignait par cet accord sa volonté de participer au développement économique et social local. Le 1er apprenti arriva au CERN en 1965. En 1971, le centre d’apprentissage fut créé ; il accueille aujourd’hui plus d’une vingtaine d’apprentis au total, à raison d’environ six nouveaux apprentis chaque année. Cet apprentissage est dédié aux jeunes âgés e...

  15. How Does Amino Acid Ligand Modulate Au Core Structure and Characteristics in Peptide Coated Au Nanocluster?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Li, Xu; Zhao, Hongkang; Zhao, Lina

    2018-03-01

    The atomic structures and the corresponding physicochemical properties of peptide coated Au nanoclusters determine their distinctive biological targeting applications. To learn the modulation of amino acid ligand on the atomic structure and electronic characteristics of coated Au core is the fundamental knowledge for peptide coated Au nanocluster design and construction. Based on our recent coated Au nanocluster configuration study (Nanoscale, 2016, 8, 11454), we built the typically simplified Au13(Cys-Au-Cys) system to more clearly learn the basic modulation information of amino acid ligand on Au core by the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. There are two isomers as ligand adjacent bonding (Iso1) and diagonal bonding (Iso2) to Au13 cores. The geometry optimizations indicate the adjacent bonding Iso1 is more stable than Iso2. More important, the Au13 core of Iso1 distorts much more significantly than that of Iso2 by Cys-Au-Cys bonding through the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) analysis, which modulate their electronic characteristics in different ways. In addition, the frontier molecular orbital results of Au13(Cys-Au-Cys) isomers confirm that the Au cores mainly determine the blue shifts of Au13(Cys-Au-Cys) systems versus the original Au13 core in their UV-visible absorption spectrum studies. The configuration of Au13 core performs deformation under Cys-Au-Cys ligand modulation to reach new stability with distinct atomic structure and electronic properties, which could be the theory basis for peptide coated AuNCs design and construction.

  16. Fabricating a Homogeneously Alloyed AuAg Shell on Au Nanorods to Achieve Strong, Stable, and Tunable Surface Plasmon Resonances

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2015-08-13

    Colloidal metal nanocrystals with strong, stable, and tunable localized surface plasmon resonances (SPRs) can be useful in a corrosive environment for many applications including field-enhanced spectroscopies, plasmon-mediated catalysis, etc. Here, a new synthetic strategy is reported that enables the epitaxial growth of a homogeneously alloyed AuAg shell on Au nanorod seeds, circumventing the phase segregation of Au and Ag encountered in conventional synthesis. The resulting core–shell structured bimetallic nanorods (AuNR@AuAg) have well-mixed Au and Ag atoms in their shell without discernible domains. This degree of mixing allows AuNR@AuAg to combine the high stability of Au with the superior plasmonic activity of Ag, thus outperforming seemingly similar nanostructures with monometallic shells (e.g., Ag-coated Au NRs (AuNR@Ag) and Au-coated Au NRs (AuNR@Au)). AuNR@AuAg is comparable to AuNR@Ag in plasmonic activity, but that it is markedly more stable toward oxidative treatment. Specifically, AuNR@AuAg and AuNR@Ag exhibit similarly strong signals in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy that are some 30-fold higher than that of AuNR@Au. When incubated with a H2O2 solution (0.5 m), the plasmonic activity of AuNR@Ag immediately and severely decayed, whereas AuNR@AuAg retained its activity intact. Moreover, the longitudinal SPR frequency of AuNR@AuAg can be tuned throughout the red wavelengths (≈620–690 nm) by controlling the thickness of the AuAg alloy shell. The synthetic strategy is versatile to fabricate AuAg alloyed shells on different shaped Au, with prospects for new possibilities in the synthesis and application of plasmonic nanocrystals.

  17. Seasonal overturning circulation in the Red Sea: 2. Winter circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Fengchao; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Pratt, Larry J.; Bower, Amy S.; Köhl, Armin; Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh; Rivas, David

    2014-04-01

    The shallow winter overturning circulation in the Red Sea is studied using a 50 year high-resolution MITgcm (MIT general circulation model) simulation with realistic atmospheric forcing. The overturning circulation for a typical year, represented by 1980, and the climatological mean are analyzed using model output to delineate the three-dimensional structure and to investigate the underlying dynamical mechanisms. The horizontal model circulation in the winter of 1980 is dominated by energetic eddies. The climatological model mean results suggest that the surface inflow intensifies in a western boundary current in the southern Red Sea that switches to an eastern boundary current north of 24°N. The overturning is accomplished through a cyclonic recirculation and a cross-basin overturning circulation in the northern Red Sea, with major sinking occurring along a narrow band of width about 20 km along the eastern boundary and weaker upwelling along the western boundary. The northward pressure gradient force, strong vertical mixing, and horizontal mixing near the boundary are the essential dynamical components in the model's winter overturning circulation. The simulated water exchange is not hydraulically controlled in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb; instead, the exchange is limited by bottom and lateral boundary friction and, to a lesser extent, by interfacial friction due to the vertical viscosity at the interface between the inflow and the outflow.

  18. Transport characteristics in Au/pentacene/Au diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Toshiaki; Naka, Akiyoshi; Hiroki, Masanobu; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Someya, Takao; Fujiwara, Akira

    2018-03-01

    We have used scanning and transmission electron microscopes (SEM and TEM) to study the structure of a pentacene thin film grown on a Au layer with and shown that it consists of randomly oriented amorphous pentacene clusters. We have also investigated the transport properties of amorphous pentacene in a metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) diode structure and shown that the current is logarithmically proportional to the square root of the applied voltage, which indicates that transport occurs as the result of hopping between localized sites randomly distributed in space and energy.

  19. High-p$_{T}$ Tomography of d+Au and Au+Au at SPS, RHIC, and LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Vitev, I; Vitev, Ivan; Gyulassy, Miklos

    2002-01-01

    The interplay of nuclear effects on the p_T > 2 GeV inclusive hadron spectra in d+Au and Au+Au reactions at root(s) = 17, 200, 5500 GeV is compared to leading order perturbative QCD calculations for elementary p+p (p-bar+p) collisions. The competition between nuclear shadowing, Cronin effect, and jet energy loss due to medium-induced gluon radiation is predicted to lead to a striking energy dependence of the nuclear suppression/enhancement pattern in A+A reactions. We show that future d+Au data can used to disentangle the initial and final state effects.

  20. Configuration dependent deformation in 183Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, P.; Kumar, A.; Govil, I.M.; Mukherjee, G.; Singh, R.P.; Muralithar, S.; Bhowmik, R.K.

    1998-01-01

    The lifetime measurements in 183 Au nucleus were carried in order to probe the deformation properties of the band built on the i 3/2 and h 9/2 configurations. The nucleus of 183 Au was populated using a reaction 28 Si( 159 Tb,4n) 183 Au at a beam energy of 140 MeV. Lifetime measurements were carried out using Recoil Distance Measurements (RDM) method

  1. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Montipora Corals in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Montipora in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  2. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Porites in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Porites in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  3. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Leptoseris Corals in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Leptoseris in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  4. Predicted Habitat Suitability for Leptoseris in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for Leptoseris in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to create this...

  5. Predicted Habitat Suitability for All Mesophotic Corals in the Au'au Channel Region

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This raster denotes predicted habitat suitability for all mesophotic corals in the Au'au Channel region. Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) modeling software was used to...

  6. Synthesis of nir-sensitive Au-Au{sub 2}S nanocolloids for drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, L.; Chow, G.M

    2003-01-15

    Near IR (NIR) sensitive Au-Au{sub 2}S nanocolloids were prepared by mixing HAuCl{sub 4} and Na{sub 2}S in aqueous solutions. An anti-tumor drug, cis-platin, was adsorbed onto Au-Au{sub 2}S nanoparticle surface via the 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) layers. The results show that the degree of adsorption of cis-platin onto Au-Au{sub 2}S nanoparticles was controlled by the solution pH value, and the drug release was sensitive to near-infrared irradiation. The cis-platin-loaded Au-Au{sub 2}S nanocolloids can be potentially applied as NIR activated drug delivery carrier.

  7. Stability analysis on natural circulation boiling water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metz, Peter

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of the study is a stability analysis of the simplified boiling water reactor concept. A fluid dynamics code, DYNOS, was developed and successfully validated against FRIGG and DESIRE data and a stability benchmark on the Ringhals 1 forced circulation BWR. Three simplified desings were considered in the analysis: The SWRIOOO by Siemens and the SBWR and ESBWR from the General Electric Co. For all three design operational characteristics, i.e. power versus flow rate maps, were calculated. The effects which different geometric and operational parameters, such as the riser height, inlet subcooling etc., have on the characteristics have been investigated. Dynamic simulations on the three simplified design revealed the geysering and the natural circulation oscillations modes only. They were, however, only encountered at pressure below 0.6 MPa. Stability maps for all tree simplified BWRs were calculated and plotted. The study concluded that a fast pressurisation of the reactor vessel is necessary to eliminate the possibility of geysering or natural circulation oscillations mode instability. (au) 26 tabs., 88 ills.

  8. Stability analysis on natural circulation boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, Peter

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of the study is a stability analysis of the simplified boiling water reactor concept. A fluid dynamics code, DYNOS, was developed and successfully validated against FRIGG and DESIRE data and a stability benchmark on the Ringhals 1 forced circulation BWR. Three simplified desings were considered in the analysis: The SWRIOOO by Siemens and the SBWR and ESBWR from the General Electric Co. For all three design operational characteristics, i.e. power versus flow rate maps, were calculated. The effects which different geometric and operational parameters, such as the riser height, inlet subcooling etc., have on the characteristics have been investigated. Dynamic simulations on the three simplified design revealed the geysering and the natural circulation oscillations modes only. They were, however, only encountered at pressure below 0.6 MPa. Stability maps for all tree simplified BWRs were calculated and plotted. The study concluded that a fast pressurisation of the reactor vessel is necessary to eliminate the possibility of geysering or natural circulation oscillations mode instability. (au)

  9. Successful synthesis and thermal stability of immiscible metal Au-Rh, Au-Ir andAu-Ir-Rh nanoalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubin, Yury; Plyusnin, Pavel; Sharafutdinov, Marat; Makotchenko, Evgenia; Korenev, Sergey

    2017-05-01

    We successfully prepared face-centred cubic nanoalloys in systems of Au-Ir, Au-Rh and Au-Ir-Rh, with large bulk miscibility gaps, in one-run reactions under thermal decomposition of specially synthesised single-source precursors, namely, [AuEn2][Ir(NO2)6], [AuEn2][Ir(NO2)6] х [Rh(NO2)6]1-х and [AuEn2][Rh(NO2)6]. The precursors employed contain all desired metals ‘mixed’ at the atomic level, thus providing significant advantages for obtaining alloys. The observations using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy show that the nanoalloy structures are composed of well-dispersed aggregates of crystalline domains with a mean size of 5 ± 3 nm. Еnergy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray powder diffraction (XRD) measurements confirm the formation of AuIr, AuRh, AuIr0.75Rh0.25, AuIr0.50Rh0.50 and AuIr0.25Rh0.75 metastable solid solutions. In situ high-temperature synchrotron XRD (HTXRD) was used to study the formation mechanism of nanoalloys. The observed transformations are described by the ‘conversion chemistry’ mechanism characterised by the primary development of particles comprising atoms of only one type, followed by a chemical reaction resulting in the final formation of a nanoalloy. The obtained metastable nanoalloys exhibit essential thermal stability. Exposure to 180 °C for 30 h does not cause any dealloying process.

  10. Seasonal overturning circulation in the Red Sea: 2. Winter circulation

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Fengchao

    2014-04-01

    The shallow winter overturning circulation in the Red Sea is studied using a 50 year high-resolution MITgcm (MIT general circulation model) simulation with realistic atmospheric forcing. The overturning circulation for a typical year, represented by 1980, and the climatological mean are analyzed using model output to delineate the three-dimensional structure and to investigate the underlying dynamical mechanisms. The horizontal model circulation in the winter of 1980 is dominated by energetic eddies. The climatological model mean results suggest that the surface inflow intensifies in a western boundary current in the southern Red Sea that switches to an eastern boundary current north of 24N. The overturning is accomplished through a cyclonic recirculation and a cross-basin overturning circulation in the northern Red Sea, with major sinking occurring along a narrow band of width about 20 km along the eastern boundary and weaker upwelling along the western boundary. The northward pressure gradient force, strong vertical mixing, and horizontal mixing near the boundary are the essential dynamical components in the model\\'s winter overturning circulation. The simulated water exchange is not hydraulically controlled in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb; instead, the exchange is limited by bottom and lateral boundary friction and, to a lesser extent, by interfacial friction due to the vertical viscosity at the interface between the inflow and the outflow. Key Points Sinking occurs in a narrow boundary layer along the eastern boundary Surface western boundary current switches into an eastern boundary current Water exchange in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb is not hydraulically controlled © 2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  11. The Electronic Properties and L3 XANES of Au and Nano-Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yiu, Y.M.; Zhang, P.; Sham, T.K.

    2004-01-01

    The electronic properties of Au crystal and nano Au have been investigated by theory and experiment. Molecularly capped nano-Au was synthesized using the two-phase method. Au nano-particles have been characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). They retain the fcc crystal structure. Their sizes have been determined to be in a range from 5.5 nm to 1.7 nm. The L3 X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) of nano-Au and Au foil have been recorded using synchrotron radiation, and examined by theoretical calculation based on the first principles. Both theory and experiment show that the nano-Au particles have essentially all the Au L3 XANES features of bulk Au in the near edge region with less pronounced resonance peaks. It is also shown that nano Au exhibits lower 4f binding energy than bulk Au in good agreement with quantum confined Au systems reported previously.

  12. The Invertibility, Explicit Determinants, and Inverses of Circulant and Left Circulant and g-Circulant Matrices Involving Any Continuous Fibonacci and Lucas Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaolin Jiang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulant matrices play an important role in solving delay differential equations. In this paper, circulant type matrices including the circulant and left circulant and g-circulant matrices with any continuous Fibonacci and Lucas numbers are considered. Firstly, the invertibility of the circulant matrix is discussed and the explicit determinant and the inverse matrices by constructing the transformation matrices are presented. Furthermore, the invertibility of the left circulant and g-circulant matrices is also studied. We obtain the explicit determinants and the inverse matrices of the left circulant and g-circulant matrices by utilizing the relationship between left circulant, g-circulant matrices and circulant matrix, respectively.

  13. La difficile émergence d’un territoire lagunaire protégé au Portugal : la Ria Formosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Bertrand

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Les eaux lagunaires sont au cœur de stratégies territoriales plus ou moins compatibles avec une maîtrise d’ensemble de l’hydrosystème sous-tendue par des objectifs de conservation. Le contrôle de la circulation des eaux et des activités à l’intérieur de la lagune est une alternative, au moins provisoire, à une gestion intégrée du littoral.

  14. Reconstruct the past thermocline circulation in the Atlantic: calcification depths and Mg/Ca-temperature calibrations for 6 deep-dwelling planktonic foraminifera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleroux, C.; deMenocal, P.; Arbuszewski, J.; Linsley, B.

    2012-04-01

    The subtropical cells are shallow meridional overturning circulations driven by the atmospheric circulation and the deep thermohaline circulation. They connect the mid-latitude and the tropic, release latten heat to the atmosphere and impact climate on decadal to longer time scale. The upper water column temperature and salinity structures of the ocean reflect this circulation. We present proxies to study these past structures. We performed stable oxygen isotope (δ18O) and trace element ratio measurements on one surface-dwelling (G. ruber)1 and six deep-dwelling planktonic foraminifera species (N. dutertrei, G. inflata, G. tumida, G. truncatulinoides, G. hirsuta and G. crassaformis) on 66 coretops spanning from 35°N to 20°S along the Mid-Atlantic ridge. Comparison between measured δ18O and predicted δ18O (using water column temperature and seawater δ18O), shows that N. dutertrei, G. tumida, G. hirsuta and G. crassaformis keep the same apparent calcification depth along the transect (respectively: 125m, 150m, 700m and 800m). Calcification at two depth levels was also tested. For the six deep-dwelling species, we establish Mg/Ca-temperature calibrations with both atlas temperature at the calcification depth and isotopic temperature. We present Mg/Ca-temperature equations for species previously very poorly calibrated. The δ18O and temperature (Mg/Ca derived) on the six planktonic foraminifera species faithfully reproduce the modern water column structure of the upper 800 m depth, establishing promising proxies for past subsurface reconstruction. 1 Arbuszewski, J. J., P. B. deMenocal, A. Kaplan, and C. E. Farmer (2010), On the fidelity of shell-derived δ18Oseawater estimates, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 300(3-4), 185-196.

  15. L’olivier au Maroc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Mouhtadi Issam

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available L’olivier est une culture traditionnelle sur le pourtour de la Méditerranée. Il est donc naturel de trouver cet arbre au Maroc où il est présent depuis des siècles. Cultivé surtout traditionnellement jusqu’à ses dernières années, il fait l’objet maintenant d’un plan de valorisation très ambitieux pour non seulement garder le Royaume à son niveau actuel (2e producteur mondial pour l’olive de conserve et 6e pour l’huile d’olive mais pour conquérir de nouveaux marchés au niveau mondial et profiter ainsi de l’engouement que connaît cette huile reconnue pour ses bienfaits. Le plan national « Maroc Vert » permet ainsi, grâce à des subventions conséquentes, non seulement de renouveler les vergers existant avec la variété traditionnelle picholine du Maroc, mais également la plantation de nouvelles variétés en super-intensif dans le but d’industrialiser au maximum de nouveaux vergers. Il en est de même pour la transformation des olives en huile de bonne qualité avec la mise en place d’unités de trituration modernes qui doivent supplanter à terme la multitude de « maâsra » et réduire ainsi l’impact environnemental dû aux margines. L’olive ne sera plus dans l’avenir que représentée par son huile et ses formes comestibles, mais les résidus de son extraction seront valorisés soit sous forme de combustible élaboré pour le grignon, soit sous forme d’une base de chimie verte pour les sous-produits du raffinage. D’autres applications sont actuellement à l’étude, car le Maroc à compris, comme tous les autres grands pays producteurs, que l’olive était un nouveau gisement de richesses.

  16. Proper Sizing of Circulation Pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tommerup, Henrik M.; Nørgaard, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes the preliminary results from field tests of replacing various types of old pumps used for circulating water in heating systems in single- and double-family houses with new types of pumps. The tests were carried out in Denmark for the Danish Electricity Savings Trust, but the r......The paper describes the preliminary results from field tests of replacing various types of old pumps used for circulating water in heating systems in single- and double-family houses with new types of pumps. The tests were carried out in Denmark for the Danish Electricity Savings Trust...

  17. Travailler avec Windows 7 au CERN (FR)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    Vue d'ensemble des nouveaux concepts et des changements dans l'interface utilisateur survenus dans Windows 7 depuis les versions antérieures de Windows (XP ou Vista). La mise à disposition de Windows 7 au CERN et son intégration dans l’infrastructure de Windows au CERN seront présentées.

  18. Becoming independent through au pair migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalgas, Karina Märcher

    2015-01-01

    . This article argues that, despite this critique, au pairing does play an important formative role for young Filipinas because it opens up for experiences abroad that enable them to be recognised as independent adults in Philippine society. Rather than autonomy, however, au pairs define their independence...

  19. Study of Au+Au relativistic collisions with the Fopi-Phase I detector; Etude des collisions relativistes Au+Au avec le detecteur Fopi-Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupieux, P

    1995-01-01

    Au+Au relativistic collisions, in a 100-1000 MeV energy domain per nucleon, are described. Experiments have been carried out with the SIS accelerator at GSI/Darmstadt. Data are analysed with the FOPI-phase I detector. These data are compared with IQMD model (Isospin Quantum Molecular Dynamics) Predictions. (S.G). 80 refs., 77 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. English for au pairs the au pair's guide to learning English

    CERN Document Server

    Curtis, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    English for Au Pairs has interlinked stories about a group of au pairs new to England. Marta, an 18-year-old from Poland arrives in the UK to work as an au pair. Throughout her year-long stay she has many different experiences - some bad, some good - but with the support of her host family she finds new friends and improves her English. English for Au Pairs offers insight into the joys and difficulties of being an au pair while at the same time reinforcing English language learning through grammar explanations and exercises.

  1. Les dessins animés au Chili : syntaxe, circulation et consommation

    OpenAIRE

    Del Villar Muñoz , Rafael

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the research is to describe cognitive diegetic operating modes in cartoons transmitted in open access television in Chile, as well as their traffic conditions (supply) and consumption during 2000. The analysis draws correlations between the scheduler’s description of the programming, the audience (statistical description), and the cognitive worlds and proposed diegetic protocols (qualitative analysis). Such description will allow us to detect that Japanese cartoons are the most pop...

  2. Energie nominale atteinte au SPS

    CERN Multimedia

    * Le 9 juillet les premiers essais du système d'extraction ont permis de réaliser l'extraction rapide sur un tour de la quasi-totalité du faisceau circulant qui a été envoyé sur une décharge externe. Des difficultés entre les dipôles et les quadrupô/es principaux ont été surmontées et, le 15 juillet, plus de 4 x lu'2 protons par impulsion étaient accélérés à 200 GeV.

  3. Seasonal evolution of cholorophyll-a and cyanobacteria (Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus on the northeast continental shelf of the Gulf of Cádiz: relation to thermohaline and nutrients fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleonora Anfuso

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal evolution of nutrients, chlorophyll-a (chl-a and cyanobacteria (Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus on the northeast continental shelf of the Gulf of Cádiz was observed during four cruises in summer and autumn 2006 and winter and spring 2007. Samples were collected to determine the distribution of chl-a and cyanobacteria abundance and to analyse their coupling with thermohaline and chemical properties in the gulf region. Surface nutrient distributions showed clear seasonal variability. Maximum levels were recorded for the entire study region during winter due to winter mixing and the strong influence of the Guadalquivir River and Bay of Cádiz outflow. Maximum chl-a levels were reached during spring for the entire region and for the entire water column. Minimum values of chl-a were observed during summer, under prevailing oligotrophic conditions, and winter when in spite of relatively high nutrient concentrations, phytoplankton growth was probably light-limited. The distribution of both cyanobacteria populations also varied seasonally in association with the oceanographic conditions. Prochlorococcus maximum cell abundance was observed at the sea surface during the four cruises, except in the northern region during summer. However, Synechococcus showed a maximum concentration at the sea surface in autumn and winter and at the subsurface chlorophyll maximum in autumn and spring.

  4. Theoretical prediction of the noble gas complexes HeAuF and NeAuF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Ab initio calculations were carried out to investigate the structures and the stability of the noble gas complexes HeAuF and NeAuF through MP2 and CCSD(T) methods.The HeAuF was predicted to have a linear structure with weak He-Au covalent bonding,the distance of which is closer to the covalent limit in comparison with the corresponding van der Waals limit.The dissociation energy with respect to He + AuF was found to be 24 and 26 kJ·mol-1 at the CCSD(T)/basis set B and B’ levels,respectively.However,similar calculations for NeAuF indicate that NeAuF is not a stable species.

  5. Au, Ag and Au:Ag colloidal nanoparticles synthesized by pulsed laser ablation as SERS substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vinod

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemically pure colloidal suspensions of gold and silver nanoparticles were synthesized using pulsed laser ablation. The dependence of laser fluence on the surface plasmon characteristics of the nanoparticles was investigated. Au:Ag colloidal suspensions were prepared by mixing highly monodisperse Au and Ag nanocolloids. The plasmon band of these mixtures was found to be highly sensitive to Au:Ag concentration ratio and wavelength of the laser beam used in the ablation process. The Au:Ag mixture consists of almost spherical shaped nanostructures with a tendency to join with adjacent ones. The surface enhanced Raman scattering activity of the Au, Ag and Au:Ag colloidal suspensions was tested using crystal violet as probe molecules. Enhancement in Raman signal obtained with Au:Ag substrates was found to be promising and strongly depends on its plasmon characteristics.

  6. Ocean circulation in the southern Benguela region from the Pliocene to the Pleistocene: tracking Agulhas leakage into the SE Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrick, Benjamin; McClymont, Erin; Felder, Sojna; Leng, Melanie

    2013-04-01

    The transition from the warmth of the middle Pliocene to the large amplitude, 100 kyr glacial-interglacial cycles of the late Pleistocene provides a way to understand the forcings and impacts of regional and global climate change. Here, we investigate changes in ocean circulation over the period from 3.5 Ma to present using a marine sediment core, ODP Site 1087 (31o28'S, 15o19'E, 1374m water depth). ODP 1087 is located in the South-east Atlantic Ocean, outside the Benguela upwelling region. Its location allows investigation of the history of the heat and salt transfer to the Atlantic Ocean from the Indian Ocean ("Agulhas leakage"), which plays an important part in the global thermohaline circulation. It is not known how this transfer reacted to generally warmer global temperatures during the mid-Pliocene, nor to the transition to a globally cooler climate in the early Pleistocene. Our approach is to apply several organic geochemistry proxies and foraminiferal analyses to reconstruct the history of ODP 1087. These include the U37K' index to reconstruct sea surface temperatures, pigment analysis for understanding productivity changes, and foraminifera assemblage analysis to detect the presence of different water masses at the site. We have identified changes in SSTs and biological productivity that we argue to reflect shifts in the position of the Benguela upwelling cells, and a changing influence of Agulhas leakage. Our new data reveal a different organization in the Southeast Atlantic. It shows that during the Pliocene ODP 1087 was dominated by Benguela upwelling which had shifted south. We find no evidence for Agulhas leakage during the mid Pliocene, which could mean that Agulhas Leakage was severely reduced during the mid Pliocene. The implications of these results for understanding Plio-Pleistocene climate changes will be explored here.

  7. VanderLaan Circulant Type Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyan Pan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulant matrices have become a satisfactory tools in control methods for modern complex systems. In the paper, VanderLaan circulant type matrices are presented, which include VanderLaan circulant, left circulant, and g-circulant matrices. The nonsingularity of these special matrices is discussed by the surprising properties of VanderLaan numbers. The exact determinants of VanderLaan circulant type matrices are given by structuring transformation matrices, determinants of well-known tridiagonal matrices, and tridiagonal-like matrices. The explicit inverse matrices of these special matrices are obtained by structuring transformation matrices, inverses of known tridiagonal matrices, and quasi-tridiagonal matrices. Three kinds of norms and lower bound for the spread of VanderLaan circulant and left circulant matrix are given separately. And we gain the spectral norm of VanderLaan g-circulant matrix.

  8. Controlled Synthesis of Au@AgAu Yolk-Shell Cuboctahedra with Well-Defined Facets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londono-Calderon, Alejandra; Bahena, Daniel; Yacaman, Miguel J

    2016-08-02

    The synthesis of Au@AgAu yolk-shell cuboctahedra nanoparticles formed by galvanic replacement in a seed-mediated method is described. Initially, single-crystal Au seeds are used for the formation of Au@Ag core-shell nanocubes, which serve as the template material for the deposition of an external Au layer. The well-controlled synthesis yields the formation of cuboctahedra nanoparticles with smooth inner and outer Au/Ag surfaces. The deposition/oxidation process is described to understand the formation of cuboctahedra and octahedra nanoparticles. The Au core maintains the initial morphology of the seed and remains static at the center of the yolk-shell because of residual Ag. Structural analysis of the shell indicates intrinsic stacking faults (SFs) near the surface. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) compositional analysis show an Au-Ag nonordered alloy forming the shell. The three-dimensional structure of the nanoparticles presented open facets on the [111] as observed by electron tomography SIRT reconstruction over a stack of high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) images. The geometrical model was validated by analyzing the direction of streaks in coherent nanobeam diffraction (NBD). The catalytic activity was evaluated using a model reaction based on the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NTP) by NaBH4 in the presence of Au@AgAu yolk-shell nanoparticles.

  9. AU-EU “Strategic Partnership”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodt, Annemarie Peen; Okeke, Jide

    2013-01-01

    This article appraises strategic partnership between the African Union (AU) and European Union (EU). It examines the context and nature of AU and EU security relations and explores the conditions under which partnership has a positive impact in this regard. This includes an evaluation...... of convergence between the two organizations and its effect or lack thereof on African security. The article concludes that events leading up to and initiatives following the 2007 Joint Africa–European Union Strategy have produced a degree of AU and EU convergence, which has had limited impact on the efficacy...... of the African security regime, the level of which remains mediocre at best....

  10. Synthesis of ultrathin face-centered-cubic Au@Pt and Au@Pd core-shell nanoplates from hexagonal-close-packed Au square sheets

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Zhanxi

    2015-03-17

    The synthesis of ultrathin face-centered-cubic (fcc) Au@Pt rhombic nanoplates is reported through the epitaxial growth of Pt on hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) Au square sheets (AuSSs). The Pt-layer growth results in a hcp-to-fcc phase transformation of the AuSSs under ambient conditions. Interestingly, the obtained fcc Au@Pt rhombic nanoplates demonstrate a unique (101)f orientation with the same atomic arrangement extending from the Au core to the Pt shell. Importantly, this method can be extended to the epitaxial growth of Pd on hcp AuSSs, resulting in the unprecedented formation of fcc Au@Pd rhombic nanoplates with (101)f orientation. Additionally, a small amount of fcc (100)f-oriented Au@Pt and Au@Pd square nanoplates are obtained with the Au@Pt and Au@Pd rhombic nanoplates, respectively. We believe that these findings will shed new light on the synthesis of novel noble bimetallic nanostructures. Phase change: Ultrathin Au@Pt and Au@Pd core-shell nanoplates were prepared from Au square sheets. A phase transformation from hexagonal close-packed (hcp) to face-centered cubic (fcc) is observed upon coating the hcp Au square sheets with Pt or Pd under ambient conditions. The prepared fcc Au@Pt and Au@Pd rhombic nanoplates demonstrate unique (101)f orientation (picture shows a typical fcc Au@Pt rhombic nanoplate). © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Et pourquoi pas au CERN ?

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Télétravail ou travail à distance, aménagement des horaires de travail et autres évolutions favorables à un meilleur équilibre vie privée et vie professionnelle sont adoptés par nombre d’entreprises et d’organisations !   Rendu possible grâce au développement de nouvelles technologies dont Internet, le travail à distance séduit de plus en plus de personnels, ainsi que de plus en plus de sociétés qui y trouvent des avantages en matière de gestion de l’espace, de sécurité (moins de trajets domicile-entreprise), de développement durable (moins de pollution), de motivation et de bien-être de leurs personnels. Les horaires aménagés, voire les « core-hours1 », sont également des pratiques de plus e...

  12. Journalism as Cultures of Circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    The universe of journalism has always consisted of interspersed texts, meanings and practices. Yet, much journalism research has often isolated either texts and/or contexts and as such assumed relations between professional practices, informed (rational) readers and (conceived) core texts...... of journalism. It is, however, more important than ever to shift attention away from texts to the processes through which they are circulated. This is partly because the many cultural forms of journalism (textual, institutional, technological, material, behavioural and imagined) are undergoing significant......, likes, comments, searches, journalist roles, writing and reading positions and identities etc. Such forms will be traced within the mediation of a specific event with the overall aim of beginning a theorization of the landscape of journalism as highly interrelated cultures of circulation....

  13. Radioisotopic evaluation of portal circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maliska, C.; Rosenthal, D.

    1986-01-01

    The use of a radio-tracer of portal circulation through the intestine, should prevent cruel punctures in the portal-vein or spleen as it is usually the case with traditional methods in the study of portal-system. The absorption of I-131 and Tc-99m, previously cheked in rabbits presented similar results in dogs. The time of circulation between terminal large-intestine and the liver (t-RF) was determined by external counting at hepatic level by recording radioactivity variation-time. In healthy animals the t-RF was from 20to 60 seconds, with average time of 42 seconds. In 2 animals with partial binding of portal-vein the t-RF went up to 110 and 120 seconds. (Author) [pt

  14. Ocean circulation generated magnetic signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manoj, C.; Kuvshinov, A.; Maus, S.

    2006-01-01

    Conducting ocean water, as it flows through the Earth's magnetic field, generates secondary electric and magnetic fields. An assessment of the ocean-generated magnetic fields and their detectability may be of importance for geomagnetism and oceanography. Motivated by the clear identification...... of ocean tidal signatures in the CHAMP magnetic field data we estimate the ocean magnetic signals of steady flow using a global 3-D EM numerical solution. The required velocity data are from the ECCO ocean circulation experiment and alternatively from the OCCAM model for higher resolution. We assume...... of the magnetic field, as compared to the ECCO simulation. Besides the expected signatures of the global circulation patterns, we find significant seasonal variability of ocean magnetic signals in the Indian and Western Pacific Oceans. Compared to seasonal variation, interannual variations produce weaker signals....

  15. Influence of Corynebacterium parvum on the phagocytosis of /sup 198/Au colloids in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergoc, R.M.; Bianchin, A.M.; Caro, R.A.; Ihlo, J.E.; Rivera, E.S. (Buenos Aires Univ. Nacional (Argentina). Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica)

    1982-07-01

    The kinetics of the phagocytosis of gelatin-protected /sup 198/Au colloids in Wistar rats treated with Corynebacterium Parvum (CBP), was studied in order to explain its mechanism of immunomodulation. A previously developed extracorporeal blood circulation technique was used. The changes in the rate of phagocytosis, v, after the administration of CBP, for a dose of the /sup 198/Au colloid smaller or higher than the substratum constant, were studied. In the first case, no significant changes of v were observed; in the second case, significant increases of v were determined, which reached a maximum 6 days after the CBP administration. The kinetic analysis of the obtained data indicates that the action of CBP is exerted on the stage of the entrance of the colloidal particle into the reticuloendothelial cell.

  16. Influence of Corynebacterium parvum on the phagocytosis of 198Au colloids in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergoc, R.M.; Bianchin, A.M.; Caro, R.A.; Ihlo, J.E.; Rivera, E.S.

    1982-01-01

    The kinetics of the phagocytosis of gelatin-protected 198 Au colloids in Wistar rats treated with Corynebacterium Parvum (CBP), was studied in order to explain its mechanism of immunomodulation. A previously developed extracorporeal blood circulation technique was used. The changes in the rate of phagocytosis, v, after the administration of CBP, for a dose of the 198 Au colloid smaller or higher than the substratum constant, were studied. In the first case, no significant changes of v were observed; in the second case, significant increases of v were determined, which reached a maximum 6 days after the CBP administration. The kinetic analysis of the obtained data indicates that the action of CBP is exerted on the stage of the entrance of the colloidal particle into the reticuloendothelial cell. (author) [es

  17. Local structure of disordered Au-Cu and Au-Ag alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frenkel, A. I.; Machavariani, V. Sh.; Rubshtein, A.; Rosenberg, Yu.; Voronel, A.; Stern, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    X-ray-absorption fine structure (XAFS) and x-ray-diffraction (XRD) measurements of disordered alloys Au x Cu 1-x and Au 0.5 Ag 0.5 prepared by melt spinning were performed. In the Au 0.5 Ag 0.5 alloy, no significant local deviations of the atoms from the average fcc lattice were detected while in Au x Cu 1-x alloys, significant deviations of atoms from the average fcc lattice were found. Mean-square vibrations of the Cu-Cu distances revealed by the XAFS in Au x Cu 1-x alloys indicate the weakening of contact between Cu atoms in the dilute limit. Our computer simulation for Au x Cu 1-x clusters of 10 5 atoms reproduces the main features of both the XAFS and XRD data

  18. Charged hadron transverse momentum distributions in Au+Au collisions at S=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Christof; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    We present transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. The evolution of the spectra for transverse momenta p_T from 0.25 to 5GeV/c is studied as a function of collision centrality over a range from 65 to 344 participating nucleons. We find a significant change of the spectral shape between proton-antiproton and peripheral Au+Au collisions. Comparing peripheral to central Au+Au collisions, we find that the yields at the highest p_T exhibit approximate scaling with the number of participating nucleons, rather than scaling with the number of binary collisions.

  19. Low Radioactivities Center. Report presented to the Scientific Committee, July 19, 1994; Centre des Faibles Radioactivites. Rapport presente au Comite Scientifique, 19 juillet 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-07-01

    This document is the annual report of the Low Radioactivities Center for the year 1994. The Center is a joint CEA-CNRS laboratory devoted to biogeochemical, climate and Earth science studies. It has developed refined methods for the measurement of small amounts of stable and radioactive isotopes (lead, thorium, cesium, radium, radon, polonium, potassium, argon, beryllium, carbon, oxygen, helium..), in particular isotope dating methods such as K/Ar and C14 methods. The research activities are regrouped in four topics: the study and modelling of great biogeochemical cycles (troposphere physico-chemistry, carbon cycle, mass transfers between atmosphere, ocean and sediments); the evolution of climate (thermohaline circulation and heat transfers); the interactions between the internal activity of the Earth and the Earth`s surface (magnetic field instabilities, oceanic volcanism, geodynamics of orogenic domains, active volcanism); the outstanding events of the Earth`s history (Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary, cosmic phenomena, Quaternary evolution of the fossil man and of its environment). A complete list of the laboratory publications is given in the appendix together with a listing of the other activities (teaching, external collaborations, oceanic campaigns, seminars..). (J.S.). 659 refs., 39 figs., 1 tab., 3 photos., 4 appends.

  20. Observations of Local Seychelles Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Observations of Local Seychelles Circulation Geno...goal for the proposed work is to develop predictive capabilities for physical oceanography for the Seychelles region in support of locally relevant...observations in the Seychelles region that will lead to long-term data collection efforts. In collaboration with local partnerships, we will carry out

  1. Circulating nucleic acids and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anker, Philippe; Stroun, Maurice

    2012-06-01

    J.B. Lamarck in 1809 was the first to present a theory of evolution. He proposed it was due to the adaptation of species to environmental changes, this adaptation being acquired by the offspring. In 1868, Darwin suggested that cells excrete gemmules, which circulate through the body and reach the gonads where they are transmitted to the next generation. His main argument came from graft hybrids. In the fifties and sixties, Russian geneticists, rejecting neo-Darwinism, said that acquired characteristics were the basis of evolution. The main experiments on which they based their theory were the transmission of hereditary characteristics by a special technique of grafting between two varieties of plants. We repeated this kind of experiment and also succeeded in obtaining hereditary modifications of the pupil plants that acquired some characteristics of the mentor variety. Rather than adopting the views of the Russian scientists, we suggested that DNA was circulating between the mentor and pupil plants. Hirata's group have shown recently, by using molecular techniques such as cloning, RFLP PCR and sequencing some genes of their graft hybrids of pepper plants, that transfer of informative molecules from the mentor to the pupil plant does exist. Nucleic acids are actively released by cells; they circulate in the body. They can transform oncogenically or trigger antibody response but the only genetic transformation showing that DNA can go from the soma to the germen comes from graft hybrids. This suggests that circulating nucleic acids, in this case DNA, like Darwin's gemmules, play a role in the mechanism of evolution.

  2. 3D movies for teaching seafloor bathymetry, plate tectonics, and ocean circulation in large undergraduate classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, C. D.; Lisiecki, L. E.; Gebbie, G.; Hamann, B.; Kellogg, L. H.; Kreylos, O.; Kronenberger, M.; Spero, H. J.; Streletz, G. J.; Weber, C.

    2015-12-01

    Geologic problems and datasets are often 3D or 4D in nature, yet projected onto a 2D surface such as a piece of paper or a projection screen. Reducing the dimensionality of data forces the reader to "fill in" that collapsed dimension in their minds, creating a cognitive challenge for the reader, especially new learners. Scientists and students can visualize and manipulate 3D datasets using the virtual reality software developed for the immersive, real-time interactive 3D environment at the KeckCAVES at UC Davis. The 3DVisualizer software (Billen et al., 2008) can also operate on a desktop machine to produce interactive 3D maps of earthquake epicenter locations and 3D bathymetric maps of the seafloor. With 3D projections of seafloor bathymetry and ocean circulation proxy datasets in a virtual reality environment, we can create visualizations of carbon isotope (δ13C) records for academic research and to aid in demonstrating thermohaline circulation in the classroom. Additionally, 3D visualization of seafloor bathymetry allows students to see features of seafloor most people cannot observe first-hand. To enhance lessons on mid-ocean ridges and ocean basin genesis, we have created movies of seafloor bathymetry for a large-enrollment undergraduate-level class, Introduction to Oceanography. In the past four quarters, students have enjoyed watching 3D movies, and in the fall quarter (2015), we will assess how well 3D movies enhance learning. The class will be split into two groups, one who learns about the Mid-Atlantic Ridge from diagrams and lecture, and the other who learns with a supplemental 3D visualization. Both groups will be asked "what does the seafloor look like?" before and after the Mid-Atlantic Ridge lesson. Then the whole class will watch the 3D movie and respond to an additional question, "did the 3D visualization enhance your understanding of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge?" with the opportunity to further elaborate on the effectiveness of the visualization.

  3. Improvement of Classification of Enterprise Circulating Funds

    OpenAIRE

    Rohanova Hanna O.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the article lies in revelation of possibilities of increase of efficiency of managing enterprise circulating funds by means of improvement of their classification features. Having analysed approaches of many economists to classification of enterprise circulating funds, systemised and supplementing them, the article offers grouping classification features of enterprise circulating funds. In the result of the study the article offers an expanded classification of circulating funds, ...

  4. Hall Effect Gyrators and Circulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Giovanni; DiVincenzo, David P.

    2014-04-01

    The electronic circulator and its close relative the gyrator are invaluable tools for noise management and signal routing in the current generation of low-temperature microwave systems for the implementation of new quantum technologies. The current implementation of these devices using the Faraday effect is satisfactory but requires a bulky structure whose physical dimension is close to the microwave wavelength employed. The Hall effect is an alternative nonreciprocal effect that can also be used to produce desired device functionality. We review earlier efforts to use an Ohmically contacted four-terminal Hall bar, explaining why this approach leads to unacceptably high device loss. We find that capacitive coupling to such a Hall conductor has much greater promise for achieving good circulator and gyrator functionality. We formulate a classical Ohm-Hall analysis for calculating the properties of such a device, and show how this classical theory simplifies remarkably in the limiting case of the Hall angle approaching 90°. In this limit, we find that either a four-terminal or a three-terminal capacitive device can give excellent circulator behavior, with device dimensions far smaller than the ac wavelength. An experiment is proposed to achieve GHz-band gyration in millimeter (and smaller) scale structures employing either semiconductor heterostructure or graphene Hall conductors. An inductively coupled scheme for realizing a Hall gyrator is also analyzed.

  5. Comparative efficiencies of photothermal destruction of malignant cells using antibody-coated silica-Au nanoshells, hollow Au/Ag nanospheres and Au nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Fong-Yu; Chen, Chen-Tai; Yeh, Chen-Sheng, E-mail: csyeh@mail.ncku.edu.t [Department of Chemistry, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2009-10-21

    Three Au-based nanomaterials (silica-Au nanoshells, hollow Au/Ag nanospheres and Au nanorods) were evaluated for their comparative photothermal efficiencies at killing three types of malignant cells (A549 lung cancer cells, HeLa cervix cancer cells and TCC bladder cancer cells) using a CW NIR laser. Photodestructive efficiency was evaluated as a function of the number of nanoparticles required to destroy the cancer cells under 808 nm laser wavelength at fixed laser power. Of the three nanomaterials, silica/Au nanoshells needed the minimum number of particles to produce effective photodestruction, whereas Au nanorods needed the largest number of particles. Together with the calculated photothermal conversion efficiency, the photothermal efficiency rankings are silica-Au nanoshells > hollow Au/Ag nanospheres > Au nanorods. Additionally, we found that HeLa cells seem to present better heat tolerance than the other two cancer cell lines.

  6. Intense fluorescence of Au 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Chongqi; Harbich, Wolfgang; Sementa, Luca; Ghiringhelli, Luca; Apra, Edoardo; Stener, Mauro; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Brune, Harald

    2017-08-21

    Ligand-protected Au clusters are non-bleaching fluorescence markers in bio- and medical applications. We show that their fluorescence is an intrinsic property of the Au cluster itself. We find a very intense and sharp fluorescence peak located at λ =739.2 nm (1.68 eV) for Au20 clusters in a Ne matrix held at 6 K. The fluorescence reflects the HOMO-LUMO diabatic bandgap of the cluster. The cluster shows a very rich absorption fine structure reminiscent of well defined molecule-like quantum levels. These levels are resolved since Au20 has only one stable isomer (tetrahedral), therefore our sample is mono-disperse in cluster size and conformation. Density-functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations clarify the nature of optical absorptionand predict both main absorption peaks and intrinsic fluorescence in good agreement with experiment.

  7. Interplanetary shock phenomena beyond 1 AU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    Attention is given to spatial dependences exhibited by spacecraft measurements obtained between 1 and 30 AU, together with temporal variations occurring between solar activity cycle maxima and minima. At 1-3 AU radial distances, shocks develop in association with the corotating solar wind streams characterizing solar minimum and accelerate solar wind evolution with distance while heating the solar wind and generating waves and turbulence. At solar maximum, shocks are observed more frequently at 1 AU but still in association with transient solar events; acceleration leading to energetic storm particles is observed both within and beyond 1 AU. The superimposed effect of large numbers of intense shocks may be responsible for the solar cycle modulation of galactic cosmic rays. 77 references

  8. Amélioration de la nutrition au Cambodge au moyen de l ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Amélioration de la nutrition au Cambodge au moyen de l'aquaculture et des jardins potagers domestiques (FCRSAI). Si l'on produit au Cambodge suffisamment de riz pour nourrir la population, la sous-alimentation maternelle et infantile y demeure quand même élevée en raison de la faible diversification des cultures et du ...

  9. Encoders for block-circulant LDPC codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divsalar, Dariush (Inventor); Abbasfar, Aliazam (Inventor); Jones, Christopher R. (Inventor); Dolinar, Samuel J. (Inventor); Thorpe, Jeremy C. (Inventor); Andrews, Kenneth S. (Inventor); Yao, Kung (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Methods and apparatus to encode message input symbols in accordance with an accumulate-repeat-accumulate code with repetition three or four are disclosed. Block circulant matrices are used. A first method and apparatus make use of the block-circulant structure of the parity check matrix. A second method and apparatus use block-circulant generator matrices.

  10. Proton channeling in Au at low energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdes, J.E.; Vargas, P.

    1996-01-01

    The electronic energy loss for low velocity protons channeled in the direction single crystal Au is calculated. The spatial distribution of valence electronic density in Au is calculated using Tight Binding Linear Muffin Tin Method. The proton trajectories are determined by numerical integration of the classical motion equation, and the energy loss is evaluated using the calculated valence electronic density in the friction term. The results allow to describe qualitatively the non linear behavior of energy loss with ion velocity observed experimentally. (author)

  11. Unravelling Thiol’s Role in Directing Asymmetric Growth of Au Nanorod–Au Nanoparticle Dimers

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2015-12-15

    Asymmetric nanocrystals have practical significance in nanotechnologies but present fundamental synthetic challenges. Thiol ligands have proven effective in breaking the symmetric growth of metallic nanocrystals but their exact roles in the synthesis remain elusive. Here, we synthesized an unprecedented Au nanorod-Au nanoparticle (AuNR-AuNP) dimer structure with the assistance of a thiol ligand. On the basis of our experimental observations, we unraveled for the first time that the thiol could cause an inhomogeneous distribution of surface strains on the seed crystals as well as a modulated reduction rate of metal precursors, which jointly induced the asymmetric growth of monometallic dimers. © 2015 American Chemical Society.

  12. Apprentissages techniques : L'apprentissage au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    APPRENTISSAGES TECHNIQUES GESTION ET DEVELOPPEMENT DU PERSONNEL HR/PMD L'APPRENTISSAGE AU CERN pour les professions d'électronicien(ne) et de laborantin(e) en physique L'apprentissage au CERN est régi par les lois, règlements et contrats en vigueur dans le Canton de Genève. En cas de réussite à l'examen de fin d'apprentissage, les apprentis obtiennent le Certificat Fédéral de Capacité Suisse (CFC). 7 places au total sont ouvertes au recrutement pour les deux professions. L'apprentissage dure 4 ans. Minima requis pour faire acte de candidature : • avoir au moins 15 ans et moins de 21 ans à la date de début de l'apprentissage • avoir terminé la scolarité obligatoire, au minimum 9ème du Cycle d'orientation genevois (3ème en France) • être ressortissant d'un pays membre du CERN (Allemagne, Autriche, Belgiqu...

  13. Evidence of final-state suppression of high-p{_ T} hadrons in Au + Au collisions using d + Au measurements at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harrington, A. S.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lee, J. W.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wysłouch, B.; Zhang, J.

    Transverse momentum spectra of charged hadrons with pT 2 GeV/c). In contrast, the d + Au nuclear modification factor exhibits no suppression of the high-pT yields. These measurements suggest a large energy loss of the high-pT particles in the highly interacting medium created in the central Au + Au collisions. The lack of suppression in d + Au collisions suggests that it is unlikely that initial state effects can explain the suppression in the central Au + Au collisions. PACS: 25.75.-q

  14. 100-MeV proton beam intensity measurement by Au activation analysis using {sup 197}Au(p, pn){sup 196}Au and {sup 197}Au(p, p3n){sup 194}Au reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokhtari Oranj, Leila [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Nam-Suk; Oh, Joo-Hee [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hee-Seock, E-mail: lee@postech.ac.kr [Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, POSTECH, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The proton beam intensity of a 100-MeV proton linac at the Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) was measured by an Au activation analysis using {sup 197}Au(p, pn){sup 196}Au and {sup 197}Au(p, p3n){sup 194}Au reactions to determine the accuracy and precision of beam intensity measurement using Gafchromic film dosimetry method. The target, irradiated by 100-MeV protons, was arranged in a stack consisting of Au, Al foils and Pb plates. The yields of produced radio-nuclei in Au foils were obtained by gamma-ray spectroscopy. The FLUKA code was employed to calculate the energy spectrum of protons onto the front surface of Au foils located at three different depth points of the target and also to investigate the condition of incident beam on the target. A good agreement was found between the beam intensity measurements using the activation analysis method at three different depth points of the target. An excellent agreement was also observed between the beam intensity measurements using the Au activation analysis method and the dosimetry method using Gafchromic film.

  15. Effect of Au Precursor and Support on the Catalytic Activity of the Nano-Au-Catalysts for Propane Complete Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshid M. Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic activity of nano-Au-catalyst(s for the complete propane oxidation was investigated. The results showed that the nature of both Au precursor and support strongly influences catalytic activity of the Au-catalyst(s for the propane oxidation. Oxidation state, size, and dispersion of Au nanoparticles in the Au-catalysts, surface area, crystallinity, phase structure, and redox property of the support are the key aspects for the complete propane oxidation. Among the studied Au-catalysts, the AuHAuCl4-Ce catalyst is found to be the most active catalyst.

  16. Toward hybrid Au nanorods @ M (Au, Ag, Pd and Pt) core-shell heterostructures for ultrasensitive SERS probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xiaobin; Gao, Guanhui; Kang, Shendong; Lei, Yanhua; Pan, Zhengyin; Shibayama, Tamaki; Cai, Lintao

    2017-06-01

    Being able to precisely control the morphologies of noble metallic nanostructures is of essential significance for promoting the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect. Herein, we demonstrate an overgrowth strategy for synthesizing Au @ M (M = Au, Ag, Pd, Pt) core-shell heterogeneous nanocrystals with an orientated structural evolution and highly improved properties by using Au nanorods as seeds. With the same reaction condition system applied, we obtain four well-designed heterostructures with diverse shapes, including Au concave nanocuboids (Au CNs), Au @ Ag crystalizing face central cube nanopeanuts, Au @ Pd porous nanocuboids and Au @ Pt nanotrepangs. Subsequently, the exact overgrowth mechanism of the above heterostructural building blocks is further analysed via the systematic optimiziation of a series of fabrications. Remarkably, the well-defined Au CNs and Au @ Ag nanopeanuts both exhibit highly promoted SERS activity. We expect to be able to supply a facile strategy for the fabrication of multimetallic heterogeneous nanostructures, exploring the high SERS effect and catalytic activities.

  17. INDRA at GSI; INDRA au GSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bougault, R.; Bocage, F.; Durand, D.; Lopez, O.; Steckmeyer, J.C.; Tamain, B.; Vient, E. [Lab. de Physique Corpusculaire, Caen Univ., 14 (France); Collaboration INDRA: IPN-Orsay, DAPNIA-Saclay, SUBATECH-Nantes, IPN- Lyon, GANIL-Caen

    1997-12-31

    In connection to the decision of installing the INDRA detector by the SIS synchrocyclotron at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany) the report presents the tasks taken into account by the LPC-Caen. These refer to the detector displacement and (mechanical) installation at GSI, the tests before beam (i.e. electronics acquisition software, detectors, etc.) as well as the data acquisition and processing. The physical pro-arguments mention the possibility of disposing of heavy ion beams in a range from 50 MeV to several GeV/nucleon so extending the study of multifragmentation done at GANIL between 30 and 90 MeV/nucleon. More specific, the scientific program of INDRA at GSI inserts studies between those done at around Fermi energy, were the reaction mechanisms are of type of deep inelastic scattering/incomplete fusion, and the studies in the relativistic energy domain where the individual properties of nucleons and transparency of nuclear matter implies mechanisms of the participant-spectator type (fire-ball creation). Also mentioned as fields of extensive studies are: the multifragmentation and its fundamental relation with the nuclear matter equation of state, the role of reaction dynamics in the appearance of collective effects of the radial flow type and its relations with the nuclear compressibility and phase transitions and the thermodynamics of nuclear matter. It appeared that the heavy systems Xe + Sn and Au + Au are the best compromise for the different topics to be approached. The bombarding energies extend from 50 to 150 MeV/nucleon. The report ends with the table giving for six heavy systems (Xe + Sn, Au + Au, C + Au, Ar + Au and P + Au) the required bombarding energies 15 refs.

  18. Diarrhea caused by circulating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Elisabeth; Kump, Patrizia; Krejs, Guenter J

    2012-09-01

    Circulating agents cause intestinal secretion or changes in motility with decreased intestinal transit time, resulting in secretory-type diarrhea. Secretory diarrhea as opposed to osmotic diarrhea is characterized by large-volume, watery stools, often more than 1 L per day; by persistence of diarrhea when patients fast; and by the fact that on analysis of stool-water, measured osmolarity is identical to that calculated from the electrolytes present. Although sodium plays the main role in water and electrolyte absorption, chloride is the major ion involved in secretion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Vasculitis of the mesenteric circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Matthew J; Warrington, Kenneth J

    2017-02-01

    Vasculitis of the mesenteric circulation is an uncommon but life-threatening manifestation of systemic vasculitis. Initial symptoms are frequently non-specific and therefore patients often present to primary care physicians and gastroenterologists with abdominal pain or gastrointestinal bleeding. Given the severity of the conditions associated with mesenteric vasculitis, it is imperative to appropriately diagnose and initiate treatment of suspected cases. This review will focus on diseases commonly associated with vasculitis of the mesenteric vessels. Imaging characteristics and clinical features assisting in diagnosis as well as initial approaches to treatment are emphasized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Autonomic Regulation of Splanchnic Circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen A Fraser

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of the autonomic nervous system in circulatory regulation of the splanchnic organs (stomach, small intestine, colon, liver, pancreas and spleen is reviewed. In general, the sympathetic nervous system is primarily involved in vasoconstriction, while the parasympathetic contributes to vasodilation. Vasoconstriction in the splanchnic circulation appears to be mediated by alpha-2 receptors and vasodilation by activation of primary afferent nerves with subsequent release of vasodilatory peptides, or by stimulation of beta-adrenergic receptors. As well, an important function of the autonomic nervous system is to provide a mechanism by which splanchnic vascular reserve can be mobilized during stress to maintain overall cardiovascular homeostasis.

  1. Hydrodynamic characteristics in the Levantine Basin in autumn 2016 - The CINEL experiment (CIrculation and water mass properties in the North-Eastern Levantine)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Elena; Poulain, Pierre-Marie; Gerin, Riccardo; Hayes, Dan; Gildor, Hezi; Kokkini, Zoi

    2017-04-01

    During the CINEL experiment, currents and thermohaline properties of the water masses in the eastern areas of the Levantine Basin (Mediterranean Sea) were monitored with mobile autonomous systems in October-December 2016. Two gliders were operated together with satellite-tracked drifters and Argo floats to study the complex circulation features governing the dynamics near the coast and in the open sea. Strong mesoscale and sub-basin scale eddies were detected and were crossed several times by the gliders during the experiment. The physical and biogeochemical parameters were sampled, showing peculiar characteristics in some of the mesoscale features and a probable interaction with a persistent coastal current off Israel. The in-situ observations were interpreted in concert with the distribution of tracers (sea surface temperature, chlorophyll) and altimetry data obtained from satellites. Numerical simulations with a high resolution model in which deep profiles of temperature and salinity from gliders were assimilated, were used in near-real time to fine tune the observational array and to help with the interpretation of the local dynamics.

  2. Au Kenya, des oiseaux nuisent à une culture adaptée au climat ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    23 août 2013 ... Selon Evans Kituyi, spécialiste de programme principal au Centre de ... principal au Gadam Sorghum Production and Marketing Project. Si les graines occupent une place de premier plan dans l'alimentation des oiseaux, ...

  3. The extraction characteristic of Au-Ag from Au concentrate by thiourea solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bongju; Cho, Kanghee; On, Hyunsung; Choi, Nagchoul; Park, Cheonyoung

    2013-04-01

    The cyanidation process has been used commercially for the past 100 years, there are ores that are not amenable to treatment by cyanide. Interest in alternative lixiviants, such as thiourea, halogens, thiosulfate and malononitrile, has been revived as a result of a major increase in gold price, which has stimulated new developments in extraction technology, combined with environmental concern. The Au extraction process using the thiourea solvent has many advantages over the cyanidation process, including higher leaching rates, faster extraction time and less than toxicity. The purpose of this study was investigated to the extraction characteristic of Au-Ag from two different Au concentrate (sulfuric acid washing and roasting) under various experiment conditions (thiourea concentration, pH of solvent, temperature) by thiourea solvent. The result of extraction experiment showed that the Au-Ag extraction was a fast extraction process, reaching equilibrium (maximum extraction rate) within 30 min. The Au-Ag extraction rate was higher in the roasted concentrate than in the sulfuric acid washing. The higher the Au-Ag extraction rate (Au - 70.87%, Ag - 98.12%) from roasted concentrate was found when the more concentration of thiourea increased, pH decreased and extraction temperature increased. This study informs extraction method basic knowledge when thiourea was a possibility to eco-/economic resources of Au-Ag utilization studies including the hydrometallurgy.

  4. Search for hyperheavy toroidal nuclear structures formed in Au + Au collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sochocka, A.; Planeta, R.; Starypan, Z.; Benisz, A.; Hachaj, P.; Nicolis, N.G.

    2008-01-01

    We study the feasibility of an experimental observation of toroidal breakup configurations in Au+Au collisions using the CHIMERA multidetector system. BUU simulations indicate that the threshold energy for toroidal configuration is around 23 MeV/nucleon. The simulations of decay process using the ETNA code indicate the sensitivity of some observables to different studied break-up geometries. (author)

  5. Au/ZnO nanoarchitectures with Au as both supporter and antenna of visible-light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Tianyu; Chen, Wei; Hua, Yuxiang; Liu, Xiaoheng, E-mail: xhliu@mail.njust.edu.cn

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • An inversed Au/ZnO nanostructure was fabricated with ZnO loaded onto Au. • The Au/ZnO nanocomposites showed enhanced properties in visible-light photocatalysis. • The SPR effect of Au was considered important for visible-light photocatalysis. - Abstract: In this paper, we fabricate Au/ZnO nanostructure with smaller ZnO nanoparticles loaded onto bigger gold nanoparticles via combining seed-mediated method and sol-gel method. The obtained Au/ZnO nanocomposites exhibit excellent properties in photocatalysis process like methyl orange (MO) degradation and oxidative conversion of methanol into formaldehyde under visible light irradiation. The enhanced properties were ascribed to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect of Au nanoparticles, which could contribute to the separation of photo-excited electrons and holes and facilitate the process of absorbing visible light. This paper contributes to the emergence of multi-functional nanocomposites with possible applications in visible-light driven photocatalysts and makes the Au/ZnO photocatalyst an exceptional choice for practical applications such as environmental purification of organic pollutants in aqueous solution and the synthesis of fine chemicals and intermediates.

  6. Identified particles in Au+Au collisions at S=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phobos Collaboration; Wosiek, Barbara; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    The yields of identified particles have been measured at RHIC for Au+Au collisions at S=200 GeV using the PHOBOS spectrometer. The ratios of antiparticle to particle yields near mid-rapidity are presented. The first measurements of the invariant yields of charged pions, kaons and protons at very low transverse momenta are also shown.

  7. Au/ZnO nanoarchitectures with Au as both supporter and antenna of visible-light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Tianyu; Chen, Wei; Hua, Yuxiang; Liu, Xiaoheng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • An inversed Au/ZnO nanostructure was fabricated with ZnO loaded onto Au. • The Au/ZnO nanocomposites showed enhanced properties in visible-light photocatalysis. • The SPR effect of Au was considered important for visible-light photocatalysis. - Abstract: In this paper, we fabricate Au/ZnO nanostructure with smaller ZnO nanoparticles loaded onto bigger gold nanoparticles via combining seed-mediated method and sol-gel method. The obtained Au/ZnO nanocomposites exhibit excellent properties in photocatalysis process like methyl orange (MO) degradation and oxidative conversion of methanol into formaldehyde under visible light irradiation. The enhanced properties were ascribed to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect of Au nanoparticles, which could contribute to the separation of photo-excited electrons and holes and facilitate the process of absorbing visible light. This paper contributes to the emergence of multi-functional nanocomposites with possible applications in visible-light driven photocatalysts and makes the Au/ZnO photocatalyst an exceptional choice for practical applications such as environmental purification of organic pollutants in aqueous solution and the synthesis of fine chemicals and intermediates.

  8. Influence of Au Nanoparticle Shape on Au@Cu2O Heterostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis of metal-semiconductor heterostructures may allow the combination of function of the corresponding components and/or the enhanced performance resulting from the interactions between all the components. In this paper, Au@Cu2O core-shell heterostructures are prepared by a seed-growth method, using different-shaped Au nanocrystals as the seeds such as nanorods, octahedra, decahedra, dots, and nanocubes. The results revealed that the final structure of Au@Cu2O was greatly influenced by the shape of the seeds used. Exposure of Cu2O{111} and Cu2O{001} favored when the overgrowth happened on Au{111} and Au{001} surface, respectively. The size of the product can also be tuned by the amount of the seeds. The results reported here provide a thinking clue to modulate the shape and size of core-shell nanocrystals, which is useful in developing new materials with desired performance.

  9. Intestinal circulation during inhalation anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tverskoy, M.; Gelman, S.; Fowler, K.C.; Bradley, E.L.

    1985-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the influence of inhalational agents on the intestinal circulation in an isolated loop preparation. Sixty dogs were studied, using three intestinal segments from each dog. Selected intestinal segments were pumped with aortic blood at a constant pressure of 100 mmHg. A mixture of 86 Rb and 9-microns spheres labeled with 141 Ce was injected into the arterial cannula supplying the intestinal loop, while mesenteric venous blood was collected for activity counting. A very strong and significant correlation was found between rubidium clearance and microsphere entrapment (r = 0.97, P less than 0.0001). Nitrous oxide anesthesia was accompanied by a higher vascular resistance (VR), lower flow (F), rubidium clearance (Cl-Rb), and microspheres entrapment (Cl-Sph) than pentobarbital anesthesia, indicating that the vascular bed in the intestinal segment was constricted and flow (total and nutritive) decreased. Halothane, enflurane, and isoflurane anesthesia were accompanied by a much lower arteriovenous oxygen content difference (AVDO 2 ) and oxygen uptake than pentobarbital or nitrous oxide. Compared with pentobarbital, enflurane anesthesia was not accompanied by marked differences in VR, F, Cl-Rb, and Cl-Sph; halothane at 2 MAC decreased VR and increased F and Cl-Rb while isoflurane increased VR and decreased F. alpha-Adrenoceptor blockade with phentolamine (1 mg . kg-1) abolished isoflurane-induced vasoconstriction, suggesting that the increase in VR was mediated via circulating catecholamines

  10. Roadmap for cardiovascular circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Christopher P.; Suresh, Vinod; Mithraratne, Kumar; Muller, Alexandre; Ho, Harvey; Ladd, David; Hellevik, Leif R.; Omholt, Stig W.; Chase, J. Geoffrey; Müller, Lucas O.; Watanabe, Sansuke M.; Blanco, Pablo J.; de Bono, Bernard; Hunter, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Computational models of many aspects of the mammalian cardiovascular circulation have been developed. Indeed, along with orthopaedics, this area of physiology is one that has attracted much interest from engineers, presumably because the equations governing blood flow in the vascular system are well understood and can be solved with well‐established numerical techniques. Unfortunately, there have been only a few attempts to create a comprehensive public domain resource for cardiovascular researchers. In this paper we propose a roadmap for developing an open source cardiovascular circulation model. The model should be registered to the musculo‐skeletal system. The computational infrastructure for the cardiovascular model should provide for near real‐time computation of blood flow and pressure in all parts of the body. The model should deal with vascular beds in all tissues, and the computational infrastructure for the model should provide links into CellML models of cell function and tissue function. In this work we review the literature associated with 1D blood flow modelling in the cardiovascular system, discuss model encoding standards, software and a model repository. We then describe the coordinate systems used to define the vascular geometry, derive the equations and discuss the implementation of these coupled equations in the open source computational software OpenCMISS. Finally, some preliminary results are presented and plans outlined for the next steps in the development of the model, the computational software and the graphical user interface for accessing the model. PMID:27506597

  11. Cerebral perfusion studies using Au-195: Investigations into their clinical usefulness and comparisons with the xenon-133 inhalation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draws, J.

    1989-01-01

    Au-195m cerebral perfusion studies in the diagnosis of blood supply disorders of the brain have only recently leaped into currency. Au-195m is not capable of diffusing. This particular property permits first-pass times of vascular transfer to be determined for cerebral tissues that correlate with the degree of cerebral circulation. In the study described here, attempts were made to shed more light on the clinical usefulness of the method. For this purpose, the record sheets of two cohorts of patients were analysed on a retrospective basis. 1. In 23 patients, where the cerebrovascular disorders were strictly confined to the cerebral hemispheres, the blood supply of the brain was examined on the basis of both Au-195m cerebral perfusion studies and the xenon-133 inhalation method. In the evaluation of the findings based on the Au-195m study the investigator was blinded to the neurological manifestations of the disease and the results from other studies. In 82% of the patients the perfusion mapping using Au-195m was consistent with the clinical symptoms. 2. In a second group of patients, the probable results of the Au-195m perfusion study were forecasted on the basis of the medical history, clinical symptoms and preliminary diagnosis and subsequently compared to those actually obtained. Expected and actual results were found to be in agreement for 88% of cases. The results provided evidence of the suitability of Au-195m cerebral perfusion studies to examine the blood suply of the brain. In view of the fact that the examinations and measurements are relatively uncomplicated, this newly developed method is most likely to be used on a broader basis in the future. (orig./MG) [de

  12. Synthesis of ultrathin face-centered-cubic Au@Pt and Au@Pd core-shell nanoplates from hexagonal-close-packed Au square sheets

    KAUST Repository

    Fan, Zhanxi; Zhu, Yihan; Huang, Xiao; Han, Yu; Wang, Qingxiao; Liu, Qing; Huang, Ying; Gan, Chee Lip; Zhang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    @Pd rhombic nanoplates, respectively. We believe that these findings will shed new light on the synthesis of novel noble bimetallic nanostructures. Phase change: Ultrathin Au@Pt and Au@Pd core-shell nanoplates were prepared from Au square sheets. A phase

  13. Excitation functions for 197Au (d, p)198Au, 197Au(d, 2n)197mHg, 197Au(d, 2n)197Hg and 197Au(d, p2n)196Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Xianguan; Peng Xiufeng; He Fuqing

    1987-01-01

    By using activation method and stack-foil technique, the excitation functions for d + 197 Au reaction in 6.6-13.1 MeV energy range are measured. The measured values are compared with previous results and theoretical calculations

  14. Synthesis and characterization in AuCu–Si nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novelo, T.E.; Amézaga-Madrid, P.; Maldonado, R.D.; Oliva, A.I.; Alonzo-Medina, G.M.

    2015-01-01

    Au/Cu bilayers with different Au:Cu concentrations (25:75, 50:50 and 75:25 at.%) were deposited on Si(100) substrates by thermal evaporation. The thicknesses of all Au/Cu bilayers were 150 nm. The alloys were prepared by thermal diffusion into a vacuum oven with argon atmosphere at 690 K during 1 h. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed different phases of AuCu and CuSi alloys in the samples after annealing process. CuSi alloys were mainly obtained for 25:75 at.% samples, meanwhile the AuCuII phase dominates for samples prepared with 50:50 at.%. Additionally, the Au:Cu alloys with 75:25 at.%, produce Au 2 Cu 3 and Au 3 Cu phases. The formed alloys were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to study the morphology and the elemental concentration of the formed alloys. - Highlights: • AuCu/Si alloy thin films were prepared by thermal diffusion. • Alloys prepared with 50 at.% of Au produce the AuCuII phase. • Alloys prepared with 75 at.% of Au produce Au 3 Cu and Au 2 Cu 3 phases. • All alloys present diffusion of Si and Cu through the CuSi alloy formation

  15. Au nanoparticles films used in biological sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosales Perez, M; Delgado Macuil, R; Rojas Lopez, M; Gayou, V L; Sanchez Ramirez, J F

    2009-01-01

    Lactobacillus para paracasei are used commonly as functional food and probiotic substances. In this work Au nanoparticles self-assembled films were used for Lactobacillus para paracasei determination at five different concentrations. Functionalized substrates were immersed in a colloidal solution for one and a half hour at room temperature and dried at room temperature during four hours. After that, drops of Lactobacillus para paracasei in aqueous solution were put into the Au nanoparticles film and let dry at room temperature for another two hours. Infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflectance sampling mode was used to observe generation peaks due to substrate silanization, enhancement of Si-O band intensity due to the Au colloids added to silanized substrate and also to observe the enhancement of Lactobacillus para paracasei infrared intensity of the characteristic frequencies at 1650, 1534 and 1450 cm -1 due to surface enhancement infrared absorption.

  16. Au nanoparticles films used in biological sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosales Perez, M; Delgado Macuil, R; Rojas Lopez, M; Gayou, V L [Centro de Investigacion en BiotecnologIa Aplicada del IPN, Tepetitla Tlaxcala Mexico C.P. 90700 (Mexico); Sanchez Ramirez, J F, E-mail: mrosalespe@ipn.m [CICATA Legaria Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    Lactobacillus para paracasei are used commonly as functional food and probiotic substances. In this work Au nanoparticles self-assembled films were used for Lactobacillus para paracasei determination at five different concentrations. Functionalized substrates were immersed in a colloidal solution for one and a half hour at room temperature and dried at room temperature during four hours. After that, drops of Lactobacillus para paracasei in aqueous solution were put into the Au nanoparticles film and let dry at room temperature for another two hours. Infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflectance sampling mode was used to observe generation peaks due to substrate silanization, enhancement of Si-O band intensity due to the Au colloids added to silanized substrate and also to observe the enhancement of Lactobacillus para paracasei infrared intensity of the characteristic frequencies at 1650, 1534 and 1450 cm{sup -1} due to surface enhancement infrared absorption.

  17. Au nanorice assemble electrolytically into mesostars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Rizia; Neumann, Oara; Mirin, Nikolay; Wang, Hui; Halas, Naomi J

    2009-02-24

    Star-shaped mesotructures are formed when an aqueous suspension of Au nanorice particles, which consist of prolate hematite cores and a thin Au shell, is subjected to an electric current. The nanorice particles assemble to form hyperbranched micrometer-scale mesostars. To our knowledge, this is the first reported observation of nanoparticle assembly into larger ordered structures under the influence of an electrochemical process (H(2)O electrolysis). The assembly is accompanied by significant modifications in the morphology, dimensions, chemical composition, crystallographic structure, and optical properties of the constituent nanoparticles.

  18. Uranus atmospheric dynamics and circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Michael; Beebe, Reta F.; Conrath, Barney J.; Hinson, David P.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.

    1991-01-01

    The observations, models, and theories relevant to the atmospheric dynamics and meteorology of Uranus are discussed. The available models for the large-scale heat transport and atmospheric dynamics as well as diagnostic interpretations of the Voyager data are reviewed. Some pertinent ideas and questions regarding the global circulation balance are considered, partly in comparison with other planetary atmospheres. The available data indicate atmospheric rotation at midlatitudes nearly 200 m/s faster than that of the planetary magnetic field. Analysis of the dynamical deformation of the shape and size of isobaric surfaces measured by the Voyager radio-occultation experiment suggests a subrotating equator at comparable altitudes. Infrared temperature retrievals above the cloud deck indicate a smaller equator-to-pole contrast than expected for purely radiative-convective equilibrium, but show local variations implying a latitudinally correlated decrease with altitude in the cloud-tracked wind.

  19. Improvement of Classification of Enterprise Circulating Funds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohanova Hanna O.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the article lies in revelation of possibilities of increase of efficiency of managing enterprise circulating funds by means of improvement of their classification features. Having analysed approaches of many economists to classification of enterprise circulating funds, systemised and supplementing them, the article offers grouping classification features of enterprise circulating funds. In the result of the study the article offers an expanded classification of circulating funds, which clearly shows the role of circulating funds in managing enterprise finance and economy in general. The article supplements and groups classification features of enterprise circulating funds by: the organisation level, functioning character, sources of formation and their cost, and level of management efficiency. The article shows that the provided grouping of classification features of circulating funds allows exerting all-sided and purposeful influence upon indicators of efficiency of circulating funds functioning and facilitates their rational management in general. The prospect of further studies in this direction is identification of the level of attraction of loan resources by production enterprises for financing circulating funds.

  20. NPP Krsko natural circulation performance evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segon, Velimir; Bajs, Tomislav; Frogheri, Monica

    1999-01-01

    The present document deals with an evaluation of the natural circulation performance of the Krsko nuclear power plant. Two calculation have been performed using the NPP Krsko nodalization (both similar to the LOBI A2-77 natural circulation experiment) - the first with the present steam generators at NPP Krsko (Westinghouse, 18% plugged), the second with the future steam generators (Siemens, 0% plugged). The results were evaluated using the natural circulation flow map derived in /1/, and were compared to evaluate the influence of the new steam generators on the natural circulation performance. (author)

  1. A blood circulation model for reference man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, R.W.; Eckerman, K.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Williams, L.R. [Indiana Univ., South Bend, IN (United States). Div. of Liberal Arts and Sciences

    1996-12-31

    A dynamic blood circulation model that predicts the movement and gradual dispersion of a bolus of material in the circulation after its intravenous injection into an adult human. The main purpose of the model is improve the dosimetry of internally deposited radionuclides that decay in the circulation to a significant extent. The model partitions the blood volume into 24 separate organs or tissues, right heart chamber, left heart chamber, pulmonary circulation, arterial outflow to the aorta and large arteries, and venous return via the large veins. Model results were compared to data obtained from injection of carbon 11 labeled carbon monoxide or rubidium 86.

  2. A blood circulation model for reference man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leggett, R.W.; Eckerman, K.F.; Williams, L.R.

    1996-01-01

    A dynamic blood circulation model that predicts the movement and gradual dispersion of a bolus of material in the circulation after its intravenous injection into an adult human. The main purpose of the model is improve the dosimetry of internally deposited radionuclides that decay in the circulation to a significant extent. The model partitions the blood volume into 24 separate organs or tissues, right heart chamber, left heart chamber, pulmonary circulation, arterial outflow to the aorta and large arteries, and venous return via the large veins. Model results were compared to data obtained from injection of carbon 11 labeled carbon monoxide or rubidium 86

  3. Basic natural circulation characteristics of SBWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuran, S.; Soekmen, C. N.

    2001-01-01

    Natural circulation is an important passive heat removal mechanism for both existing and next generation light water reactors. Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) is one of the advanced light water reactors that rely on natural circulation for normal as well as emergency core cooling. In this study, basic natural circulation characteristics of this reactor are examined on a flow loop that simulates the operation of SBWR. On this model, effect of system operating parameters on the steady state natural circulation characteristics inside the loop is studied via solving the transcendental equation for loop flow rate

  4. Influence of Au Nanoparticle Shape on Au@Cu2O Heterostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jie; Lu, Na; Chen, Wei; Kong, Lina; Yang, Yun; Ma, Dekun; Huang, Shaoming

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis of metal-semiconductor heterostructures may allow the combination of function of the corresponding components and/or the enhanced performance resulting from the interactions between all the components. In this paper, Au@Cu2O core-shell heterostructures are prepared by a seed-growth method, using different-shaped Au nanocrystals as the seeds such as nanorods, octahedra, decahedra, dots, and nanocubes. The results revealed that the final structure of Au@Cu2O was greatly influenced by ...

  5. Surface chemistry of 2-butanol and furfural on Cu, Au and Cu/Au single crystals

    OpenAIRE

    Megginson, Rory

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the adsorption of 2-butanol and furfural was investigated on Au (111), Cu (111) and Cu/Au (111) surfaces. It was hoped that by studying how these species adsorbed on these surfaces , insight would be provided into the roles of Cu and Au in the “hydrogen free” hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol. This is a valuable process as currently furfuryl alcohol is derived from crude oil but it is possible to derive furfural from corn husk making it a greener process...

  6. Impact of restriction of the Atlantic-Mediterranean gateway on the Mediterranean Outflow Water and eastern Atlantic circulation during the Messinian

    Science.gov (United States)

    PéRez-Asensio, J. N.; Aguirre, J.; Schmiedl, G.; Civis, J.

    2012-09-01

    Messinian foraminiferal stable oxygen and carbon isotopes of the Montemayor-1 core (Guadalquivir Basin, SW Spain) have been investigated. This record is exceptional to study the Mediterranean Outflow Water (MOW) impact on the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and global climate during the Messinian because the core is near the Guadalhorce Corridor, the last Betic gateway to be closed during the early Messinian. Our results allow dating accurately its closure at 6.18 Ma. Constant benthicδ18O values, high difference between benthic and planktonic δ18O, and low sedimentation rates before 6.18 Ma indicate the presence of a two-layer water column, with bottom winnowing due to an enhanced Mediterranean outflow current. The enhanced contribution of dense MOW to the North Atlantic Ocean likely fostered the formation of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). After 6.18 Ma, benthicδ18O values parallel that of the global glacioeustatic curve, the difference between benthic and planktonic δ18O is low, and sedimentation rates considerably increased. This indicates a good vertical mixing of the water column, interruption of the MOW, and a dominant glacioeustatic control on the isotopic signatures. According to the role of MOW in the modern Atlantic thermohaline circulation, the reduction of the MOW after the closure of the Guadalhorce Corridor might have resulted in a decreased NADW formation rate between 6.0 and 5.5 Ma weakening the AMOC and promoting northern hemisphere cooling. After the Gibraltar Strait opening, the restoration of the MOW and related salt export from the Mediterranean could have promoted an enhanced NADW formation.

  7. (DEEE) au Sénégal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    utilisateurs professionnels ont moins de 40 ans; 65,9% des réparateurs sont âgés au plus de 36 ans. Les acteurs de sexe ..... conséquences négatives des DEEE sur la santé ..... Chine où un réseau de coopération entre les institutions ...

  8. 370 emplois auraient ete supprimes au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit-Godet, S

    2002-01-01

    "La FTMH demande un plan social pour les salaries des sous-traitants.  Environ 370 postes ont ete supprimes au CERN ces douze derniers mois.» Alain Perrat, secretaire de la FTMH, tire la sonnette d'alarme" (1 page).

  9. Surface structure of AU3Cu(001)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckstein, G.A.; Maupai, S.; Dakkouri, A.S.

    1999-01-01

    The surface morphology, composition, and structure of Au3Cu(001) as determined by scanning tunneling microscopy and surface x-ray diffraction are presented. Atomic resolution STM images reveal distinctive geometric features. The analysis of the surface x-ray diffraction data provides clear evidence...... for the surface structure. [S0163-1829(99)04535-X]....

  10. Nanoporous Au: an unsupported pure gold catalyst?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittstock, A; Neumann, B; Schaefer, A; Dumbuya, K; Kuebel, C; Biener, M; Zielasek, V; Steinrueck, H; Gottfried, M; Biener, J; Hamza, A; B?umer, M

    2008-09-04

    The unique properties of gold especially in low temperature CO oxidation have been ascribed to a combination of various effects. In particular, particle sizes below a few nm and specific particle-support interactions have been shown to play important roles. On the contrary, recent reports revealed that monolithic nanoporous gold (npAu) prepared by leaching a less noble metal, such as Ag, out of the corresponding alloy can also exhibit remarkably high catalytic activity for CO oxidation, even though no support is present. Therefore, it was claimed to be a pure and unsupported gold catalyst. We investigated npAu with respect to its morphology, surface composition and catalytic properties. In particular, we studied the reaction kinetics for low temperature CO oxidation in detail taking mass transport limitation due to the porous structure of the material into account. Our results reveal that Ag, even if removed almost completely from the bulk, segregates to the surface resulting in surface concentrations of up to 10 at%. Our data suggest that this Ag plays a significant role in activation of molecular oxygen. Therefore, npAu should be considered as a bimetallic catalyst rather than a pure Au catalyst.

  11. HYPERTENSION AU COURS DE LA GROSSESSE: Aspects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hypertension soit une prévalence de 8,2%. Cette pathologie survient dans notre .... consultations prénatales ou le post-partum. Sur le plan clinique, la ... des patientes étaient au terme de leur grossesse alors que 22.11%, avaient un âge ...

  12. A reagentless amperometric immunosensor based on nano-au and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-01

    Aug 1, 2011 ... which was then mixed with AU nanoparticles (nano-Au) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) ..... Kaminishi D, Ozaki H, Ohno Y, Maehashi K, Inoue K, Matsumoto K, Seri ... nanoparticle doped chitosan film. Anal.

  13. Molecules on vicinal Au surfaces studied by scanning tunnelling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, J; Neel, N; Jensen, H; Berndt, R; Rurali, R; Lorente, N

    2006-01-01

    Using low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy and spectroscopy we investigated the adsorption characteristics of 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic-dianhydride and fullerenes on Au(788), Au(433), and Au(778). On Au(788) and Au(778), 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic-dianhydride exhibits three coexisting superstructures, which do not reflect the periodicity of the hosting substrate. The adsorption on Au(433) leads to the formation of molecule chains along the step edges after annealing the sample. Fullerene molecules on Au(788) arrange in a mesh of islands, which extends over several hundreds of nanometres with an extraordinarily high periodicity. A combination of fullerene adsorption and annealing leads to facetting of Au(433) and the formation of extraordinarily long fullerene stripes

  14. Three-particle correlations from parton cascades in Au+Au collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, G.L.; Ma, Y.G.; Zhang, S.; Cai, X.Z.; Chen, J.H.; He, Z.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Long, J.L.; Shen, W.Q.; Shi, X.H.; Zhong, C.; Zuo, J.X.

    2007-01-01

    We present a study of three-particle correlations among a trigger particle and two associated particles in Au+Au collisions at s NN =200 GeV using a multi-phase transport model (AMPT) with both partonic and hadronic interactions. We found that three-particle correlation densities in different angular directions with respect to the triggered particle ('center', 'cone', 'deflected', 'near' and 'near-away') increase with the number of participants. The ratio of 'deflected' to 'cone' density approaches to 1.0 with the increasing of number of participants, which indicates that partonic Mach-like shock waves can be produced by strong parton cascades in central Au+Au collisions

  15. pH-Induced transformation of ligated Au25 to brighter Au23 nanoclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszkielewicz, Magdalena; Olesiak-Banska, Joanna; Comby-Zerbino, Clothilde; Bertorelle, Franck; Dagany, Xavier; Bansal, Ashu K; Sajjad, Muhammad T; Samuel, Ifor D W; Sanader, Zeljka; Rozycka, Miroslawa; Wojtas, Magdalena; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Bonacic-Koutecky, Vlasta; Antoine, Rodolphe; Ozyhar, Andrzej; Samoc, Marek

    2018-05-01

    Thiolate-protected gold nanoclusters have recently attracted considerable attention due to their size-dependent luminescence characterized by a long lifetime and large Stokes shift. However, the optimization of nanocluster properties such as the luminescence quantum yield is still a challenge. We report here the transformation of Au25Capt18 (Capt labels captopril) nanoclusters occurring at low pH and yielding a product with a much increased luminescence quantum yield which we have identified as Au23Capt17. We applied a simple method of treatment with HCl to accomplish this transformation and we characterized the absorption and emission of the newly created ligated nanoclusters as well as their morphology. Based on DFT calculations we show which Au nanocluster size transformations can lead to highly luminescent species such as Au23Capt17.

  16. Circulation and salt intrusion in the Piaçaguera Channel, Santos (SP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Bruner de Miranda

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of thermohaline properties and currents sampled at an anchor station in the Piaçaguera Channel (Santos Estuary in the austral winter was made in terms of tidal (neap and spring tidal cycles and non-tidal conditions, with the objective to characterize the stratification, circulation and salt transport due to the fortnightly tidal modulation. Classical methods of observational data analysis of hourly and nearly synoptic observations and analytical simulations of nearly steady-state salinity and longitudinal velocity profiles were used. During the neap tidal cycle the flood (v0 velocities varied in the range of -0.20 m/s to 0.30 m/s associated with a small salinity variation from surface to bottom (26.4 psu to 30.7 psu. In the spring tidal cycle the velocities increased and varied in the range of -0.40 m/s to 0.45 m/s, but the salinity stratification remained almost unaltered. The steady-state salinity and velocity profiles simulated with an analytical model presented good agreement (Skill near 1.0, in comparison with the observational profiles. During the transitional fortnightly tidal modulation period there was no changes in the channel classification (type 2a - partially mixed and weakly stratified, because the potential energy rate was to low to enhance the halocline erosion. These results, associated with the high water column vertical stability (RiL >20 and the low estuarine Richardson number (RiE=1.6, lead to the conclusions: i the driving mechanism for the estuary circulation and mixing was mainly balanced by the fresh water discharge and the tidal forcing associated with the baroclinic component of the gradient pressure force; ii there was no changes in the thermohaline and circulation characteristics due to the forthnigtly tidal modulation; and iii the nearly steady-state of the vertical salinity and velocity profiles were well simulated with a theoretical classical analytical model.A análise de dados termohalinos e correntes

  17. Natural circulation in reactor coolant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    Reactor coolant system (RCS) natural circulation in a PWR is the buoyancy-driven coolant circulation between the core and the upper-plenum region (in-vessel circulation) with or without a countercurrent flow in the hot leg piping between the vessel and steam generators (ex-vessel circulation). This kind of multidimensional bouyancy-driven flow circulation serves as a means of transferring the heat from the core to the structures in the upper plenum, hot legs, and possibly steam generators. As a result, the RCS piping and other pressure boundaries may be heated to high temperatures at which the structural integrity is challenged. RCS natural circulation is likely to occur during the core uncovery period of the TMLB' accident in a PWR when the vessel upper plenum and hot leg are already drained and filled with steam and possibly other gaseous species. RCS natural circulation is being studied for the Surry plant during the TMLB' accident in which station blackout coincides with the loss of auxiliary feedwater and no operator actions. The effects of the multidimensional RCS natural circulation during the TMLB' accident are discussed

  18. Circulating follistatin in relation to energy metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Schiøler; Plomgaard, Peter

    2016-01-01

    a relation to energy metabolism. In this narrative review, we attempt to reconcile the existing findings on circulating follistatin with the novel concept that circulating follistatin is a liver-derived molecule regulated by the glucagon-to-insulin ratio. The picture emerging is that conditions associated...

  19. Synthesis and characterization of Au incorporated Alq3 nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Bilal; Ahmad, Sultan; Parwaz, M.; Rahul, Khan, Zishan H.

    2018-05-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of pure and Au incorporated Alq3 nanowires. These nanowires are synthesized using thermal vapor transport method. The luminescence intensity of Au incorporated Alq3 nanowires are recorded to be higher than that of pure Alq3 nanowires, which is found to increase with the increase in Au concentration. Fluorescence quenching is also observed when Au concentration is increased beyond the certain limit.

  20. Energy dependence of collective flow of neutrons and charged particles in 197Au+197Au collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaich, T.; Freiesleben, H.; Holzmann, R.; Keller, J.G.; Prokopowicz, W.; Schuetter, C.; Wajda, E.; Zude, E.

    1994-01-01

    Our contribution focusses on one particular aspect of collective flow of nuclear matter: the so-called ''squeeze-out'', i.e. the preferential emission of mid-rapidity particles perpendicular to the reaction plane. The data were taken for the system 197 Au + 197 Au at 400, 600 and 800 MeV/u. We cover two topics, the comparison of neutrons and protons, and the bombarding energy dependence of the neutrons' squeeze-out. (orig.)

  1. Appui au réseautage et au renforcement des télécentres ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    En Afrique de l'Ouest francophone, les télécentres luttent pour atteindre la viabilité financière tout en demeurant au diapason des collectivités, une situation qui tient au fait qu'ils ont accès à un moins grand nombre de ressources en ligne et à une communauté d'utilisateurs plus restreinte que les télécentres anglophones.

  2. Strangeness production in Au+Au collisions at the AGS: recent results from E917

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, W.-C.; Back, B.B.; Betts, R.R.; Britt, H.C.; Chang, W.C.; Gillitzer, A.; Henning, W.F.; Hofman, D.J.; Holzman, B.; Nanal, V.; Wuosmaa, A.H.

    1999-01-01

    Strangeness production in Au+Au collisions has been measured via the yields of K + , K - at 6, 8 AGeV and of bar Λ at 10.8 AGeV beam kinetic energy in experiment E917. By varying the collision centrally and beam energy, a systematic search for indications of new phenomena and in-medium effects under high baryon density is undertaken

  3. Pondération de la base juridique du droit au logement au Zimbabwe ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    13 déc. 2016 ... La criminalité et la pauvreté au Ghana urbain. La manière dont la criminalité et la pauvreté interagissent a été étudiée et débattue dans la littérature de recherche occidentale, mais on sait pe. Voir davantageLa criminalité et la pauvreté au Ghana urbain ...

  4. Flow and bose-einstein correlations in Au-Au collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phobos Collaboration; Manly, Steven; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyinski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    Argonne flow and Bose-Einstein correlations have been measured in Au-Au collisions at S=130 and 200 GeV using the PHOBOS detector at RHIC. The systematic dependencies of the flow signal on the transverse momentum, pseudorapidity, and centrality of the collision, as well as the beam energy are shown. In addition, results of a 3-dimensional analysis of two-pion correlations in the 200 GeV data are presented.

  5. The effect of Au amount on size uniformity of self-assembled Au nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S-H; Wang, D-C; Chen, G-Y; Chen, K-Y [Graduate School of Engineering Science and Technology, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Taiwan (China)

    2008-03-15

    The self-assembled fabrication of nanostructure, a dreaming approach in the area of fabrication engineering, is the ultimate goal of this research. A finding was proved through previous research that the size of the self-assembled gold nanoparticles could be controlled with the mole ratio between AuCl{sub 4}{sup -} and thiol. In this study, the moles of Au were fixed, only the moles of thiol were adjusted. Five different mole ratios of Au/S with their effect on size uniformity were investigated. The mole ratios were 1:1/16, 1:1/8, 1:1, 1:8, 1:16, respectively. The size distributions of the gold nanoparticles were analyzed by Mac-View analysis software. HR-TEM was used to derive images of self-assembled gold nanoparticles. The result reached was also the higher the mole ratio between AuCl{sub 4}{sup -} and thiol the bigger the self-assembled gold nanoparticles. Under the condition of moles of Au fixed, the most homogeneous nanoparticles in size distribution derived with the mole ratio of 1:1/8 between AuCl{sub 4}{sup -} and thiol. The obtained nanoparticles could be used, for example, in uniform surface nanofabrication, leading to the fabrication of ordered array of quantum dots.

  6. A reagentless amperometric immunosensor based on nano-au and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, carboxyl-ferrocene (Fc-COOH) was explored to label alphafetoprotein antibody (anti-AFP), which was then mixed with AU nanoparticles (nano-Au) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) dispersed by chitosan (CS) to form the nano-Au/MWCNTs/anti-AFP-Fc chitosan composite. After that, the composite ...

  7. Viscoelastic nature of Au nanoparticle–PDMS nanocomposite gels

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A stable gel of Au nanoparticles in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) nanocomposite is prepared by employing the curing agent of PDMS elastomer as a reducing agent for the formation of Au nanoparticles by an in-situ process. The viscoelastic nature of these gels is very sensitive to the Au nanoparticle loading and the ...

  8. The point-defect of carbon nanotubes anchoring Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Y. A.; Cui, Y. H.; Li, X. N.

    2010-01-01

    The understanding of the interaction between Au and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is very important since Au/CNTs composites have wide applications in many fields. In this study, we investigated the dispersion of Au nanoparticles on the CNTs by transmission electron microscopy and the bonding mechanism...

  9. Preparation and use of 195m Au-containing liquid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panek, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    A 195m Au-containing liquid is prepared by adsorbing 195m-Hg on an adsorption agent and then eluting the daughter radioisotope 195m-Au. A radioisotope generator and the adsorption agent to be used in preparation of 195m Au-containing liquids are also claimed

  10. Anomolous, intensity dependent losses in Au(32+) beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Ahrens, L.; Calvani, H.

    1997-01-01

    The AGS Booster is a rapid cycling proton and heavy ion synchrotron. Anomolous, intensity dependent losses in Au(32+) beams have been observed in the AGS Booster. No collective signal is expected, or observed, but increasing the number of injected ions decreases the beam lifetime. The loss rates for Au(32+) are compared with those for Au(15+)

  11. φ meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at √sNN=200 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Gronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravstov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.

    2004-01-01

    We report the STAR measurement of ψ meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at √s NN = 200 GeV. Using the event mixing technique, the ψ spectra and yields are obtained at midrapidity for five centrality bins in Au+Au collisions and for non-singly-diffractive p+p collisions. It is found that the ψ transverse momentum distributions from Au+Au collisions are better fitted with a single-exponential while the p+p spectrum is better described by a double-exponential distribution. The measured nuclear modification factors indicate that ψ production in central Au+Au collisions is suppressed relative to peripheral collisions when scaled by the number of binary collisions ( bin >). The systematics of T > versus centrality and the constant ψ/K - ratio versus beam species, centrality, and collision energy rule out kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for ψ production

  12. Jet-Hadron Correlations in √sNN =200 GeV p +p and Central Au +Au Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L., Jr.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Azimuthal angular correlations of charged hadrons with respect to the axis of a reconstructed (trigger) jet in Au +Au and p +p collisions at √sNN =200 GeV in STAR are presented. The trigger jet population in Au +Au collisions is biased toward jets that have not interacted with the medium, allowing easier matching of jet energies between Au +Au and p +p collisions while enhancing medium effects on the recoil jet. The associated hadron yield of the recoil jet is significantly suppressed at high transverse momentum (pTassoc) and enhanced at low pTassoc in 0%-20% central Au +Au collisions compared to p +p collisions, which is indicative of medium-induced parton energy loss in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  13. Charged hadron transverse momentum distributions in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Lee, J. W.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2004-01-01

    We present transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV. The spectra were measured for transverse momenta pT from 0.25 to 4.5 GeV/c in a pseudorapidity range of 0.2<η<1.4. The evolution of the spectra is studied as a function of collision centrality, from 65 to 344 participating nucleons. The results are compared to data from proton-antiproton collisions and Au+Au collisions at lower RHIC energies. We find a significant change of the spectral shape between proton-antiproton and semi-peripheral Au+Au collisions. Comparing semi-peripheral to central Au+Au collisions, we find that the yields at high pT exhibit approximate scaling with the number of participating nucleons, rather than scaling with the number of binary collisions.

  14. Moderator circulation in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fath, H.E.S.; Hussein, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    A two-dimensional computer code that is capable of predicting the moderator flow and temperature distribution inside CANDU calandria is presented. The code uses a new approach to simulate the calandria tube matrix by blocking the cells containing the tubes in the finite difference mesh. A jet momentum-dominant flow pattern is predicted in the nonisothermal case, and the effect of the buoyancy force, resulting from nuclear heating, is found to enhance the speed of circulation. Hot spots are located in low-velocity areas at the top of the calandria and below the inlet jet level between the fuel channels. A parametric study is carried out to investigate the effect of moderator inlet velocity,moderator inlet nozzle location, and geometric scaling. The results indicate that decreasing the moderator inlet velocity has no significant influence on the general features of the flow pattern (i.e., momentum dominant); however, too many high-temperature hot spots appear within the fuel channels

  15. Numerical Modeling of Ocean Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert N.

    2007-01-01

    The modelling of ocean circulation is important not only for its own sake, but also in terms of the prediction of weather patterns and the effects of climate change. This book introduces the basic computational techniques necessary for all models of the ocean and atmosphere, and the conditions they must satisfy. It describes the workings of ocean models, the problems that must be solved in their construction, and how to evaluate computational results. Major emphasis is placed on examining ocean models critically, and determining what they do well and what they do poorly. Numerical analysis is introduced as needed, and exercises are included to illustrate major points. Developed from notes for a course taught in physical oceanography at the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University, this book is ideal for graduate students of oceanography, geophysics, climatology and atmospheric science, and researchers in oceanography and atmospheric science. Features examples and critical examination of ocean modelling and results Demonstrates the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches Includes exercises to illustrate major points and supplement mathematical and physical details

  16. Circulating microparticles: square the circle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The present review summarizes current knowledge about microparticles (MPs) and provides a systematic overview of last 20 years of research on circulating MPs, with particular focus on their clinical relevance. Results MPs are a heterogeneous population of cell-derived vesicles, with sizes ranging between 50 and 1000 nm. MPs are capable of transferring peptides, proteins, lipid components, microRNA, mRNA, and DNA from one cell to another without direct cell-to-cell contact. Growing evidence suggests that MPs present in peripheral blood and body fluids contribute to the development and progression of cancer, and are of pathophysiological relevance for autoimmune, inflammatory, infectious, cardiovascular, hematological, and other diseases. MPs have large diagnostic potential as biomarkers; however, due to current technological limitations in purification of MPs and an absence of standardized methods of MP detection, challenges remain in validating the potential of MPs as a non-invasive and early diagnostic platform. Conclusions Improvements in the effective deciphering of MP molecular signatures will be critical not only for diagnostics, but also for the evaluation of treatment regimens and predicting disease outcomes. PMID:23607880

  17. Vertical mixing by Langmuir circulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWilliams, James C.; Sullivan, Peter P.

    2001-01-01

    Wind and surface wave frequently induce Langmuir circulations (LC) in the upper ocean, and the LC contribute to mixing materials down from the surface. In this paper we analyze large-eddy simulation (LES) cases based on surface-wave-averaged, dynamical equations and show that the effect of the LC is a great increase in the vertical mixing efficiency for both material properties and momentum. We provide new confirmation that the previously proposed K-profile parameterization (KPP) model accurately characterizes the turbulent transport in a weakly convective, wind-driven boundary layer with stable interior stratification. We also propose a modest generalization of KPP for the regime of weakly convective Langmuir turbulence. This makes the KPP turbulent flux profiles match those in the LES case with LC present fairly well, especially so for material properties being transported downwards from the ocean surface. However, some open issues remain about how well the present LES and KPP formulations represent Langmuir turbulence, in part because wave-breaking effects are not yet included. (Author)

  18. Circulation et fonction de la médisance en campagne électorale [Electoral campaigning and malicious rumours: The circulation and function of gossips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aldina Marques

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available En politique il est parfois difficile de faire la distinction entre la vie privée et la vie publique des politiciens. Les campagnesélectorales favorisent cette indistinction et, parfois, le ouï-dire, les rumeurs, la médisance, en définitive, font partie du débat publique ou de l’ambiance électorale vécue. Essayant d’établir la distinction entre ce qui est public et ce qui est privé en politique, je me propose d’analyser la circulation des rumeurs encampagne électorale au Portugal, particulièrement les supports de circulation, les formes verbales qu’elles assument et le rôle communicationnel qu’elles y jouent.In politics, it is sometimes difficult to distinguish between the private and the public spheres of politicians. Electoral campaignsfavour this indistinction and, occasionally, rumours, gossips and detraction, in short, are part of the public debate and electoral environment. In this paper, it is intended to point out the features and ways of circulation of a gossip in the course of a campaign for legislative elections in Portugal.

  19. Analysis of the intermediate stage in the heavy ion interactions of 208Pb+197Au and 197Au+197Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasir, Tabassum; Khan, E.U.; Baluch, J.J.; Qureshi, I.E.; Sajid, M.; Shahzad, M.I.

    2008-01-01

    Two different projectiles 208 Pb and 197 Au at the same energy (11.67MeV/u) have been bombarded on 197 Au target to study heavy ion interactions using mica as a passive detector. In this paper we present results on the study of energy damping and time scale of the existence of di-nuclear composite system in the intermediate reaction step. The plots of Q-values as well as reaction cross sections in various angular bins of scattering angles suggest that K.E. damping was complete and dynamic equilibrium was established between the first and second reaction steps. The time scale of this duration was also determined

  20. 46 CFR 56.50-45 - Circulating pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... APPURTENANCES Design Requirements Pertaining to Specific Systems § 56.50-45 Circulating pumps. (a) A main circulating pump and emergency means for circulating water through the main condenser shall be provided. The... circulating pump and the condenser. (b) Independent sea suctions shall be provided for the main circulating...

  1. Hollow Au@Pd and Au@Pt core-shell nanoparticles as electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Hyon Min; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Sougrat, Rachid; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Khashab, Niveen M.

    2012-01-01

    that individual metals may not catalyze. Here, preparation of hollow Au@Pd and Au@Pt core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) and their use as electrocatalysts are reported. Galvanic displacement with Ag NPs is used to obtain hollow NPs, and higher reduction potential of Au

  2. Seed-mediated growth and manipulation of Au nanorods via size-controlled synthesis of Au seeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Juncheng; Duggan, Jennifer N.; Morgan, Joshua; Roberts, Christopher B.

    2012-01-01

    Seed-mediated growth of gold (Au) nanorods with highly controllable length, width, and aspect ratio was accomplished via carefully size-controlled synthesis of the original Au seeds. A slow dynamic growth of Au nanoparticle seeds was observed after reduction of the Au salt (i.e., hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (III) hydrate) by sodium borohydride (NaBH 4 ) in the presence of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). As such, the size of the Au nanoparticle seeds can therefore be manipulated through control over the duration of the reaction period (i.e., aging times of 2, 8, 48, 72, and 144 h were used in this study). These differently sized Au nanoparticles were subsequently used as seeds for the growth of Au nanorods, where the additions of Au salt, CTAB, AgNO 3 , and ascorbic acid were employed. Smaller Au nanoparticle seeds obtained via short growth/aging time resulted in Au nanorods with higher aspect ratio and thus longer longitudinal surface plasmon wavelength (LSPW). The larger Au nanoparticle seeds obtained via longer growth/aging time resulted in Au nanorods with lower aspect ratio and shorter LSPW.

  3. Di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV Au + Au and d + Au collisions at STAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, W.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, R.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Wu; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, N.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The STAR Collaboration presents for the first time two-dimensional di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV central Au + Au and minimum-bias d + Au collisions to explore hadronization mechanisms in the quark gluon plasma. The enhancement of the jet-like yield for leading pions in Au + Au data with respect to the d + Au reference and the absence of such an enhancement for leading non-pions (protons and kaons) are discussed within the context of a quark recombination scenario. The correlated yield at large angles, specifically in the ridge region, is found to be significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. The consistencies of the constituent quark scaling, azimuthal harmonic model and a mini-jet modification model description of the data are tested, providing further constraints on hadronization.

  4. Di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV Au+Au and d+Au collisions at STAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Adamczyk

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The STAR Collaboration presents for the first time two-dimensional di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV central Au+Au and minimum-bias d+Au collisions to explore hadronization mechanisms in the quark gluon plasma. The enhancement of the jet-like yield for leading pions in Au+Au data with respect to the d+Au reference and the absence of such an enhancement for leading non-pions (protons and kaons are discussed within the context of a quark recombination scenario. The correlated yield at large angles, specifically in the ridge region, is found to be significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. The consistencies of the constituent quark scaling, azimuthal harmonic model and a mini-jet modification model description of the data are tested, providing further constraints on hadronization.

  5. Di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV Au + Au and d + Au collisions at STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, JK; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, MM; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, EC; Averichev, GS; Bai, X; Bairathi, V; Banerjee, A; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, AK; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, LC; Bordyuzhin, IG; Bouchet, J; Brandenburg, D; Brandin, AV; Bunzarov, I; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, JM; Cebra, D; Cervantes, MC; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, X; Chen, JH; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, HJ; Das, S; De Silva, LC; Debbe, RR; Dedovich, TG; Deng, J; Derevschikov, AA; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, JL; Draper, JE; Du, CM; Dunkelberger, LE; Dunlop, JC; Efimov, LG; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, CE; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, CA; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, DS; Guo, Y; Gupta, S; Gupta, A; Guryn, W; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, JW; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, GW; Hofman, DJ; Horvat, S; Huang, T; Huang, B; Huang, HZ; Huang, X; Huck, P

    2015-10-23

    The STAR Collaboration presents for the first time two-dimensional di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV central Au + Au and minimum-bias d + Au collisions to explore hadronization mechanisms in the quark gluon plasma. The enhancement of the jet-like yield for leading pions in Au + Au data with respect to the d + Au reference and the absence of such an enhancement for leading non-pions (protons and kaons) are discussed within the context of a quark recombination scenario. The correlated yield at large angles, specifically in the ridge region, is found to be significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. The consistencies of the constituent quark scaling, azimuthal harmonic model and a mini-jet modification model description of the data are tested, providing further constraints on hadronization.

  6. First results on d+Au collisions from PHOBOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harrington, A. S.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lee, J. W.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Noell, A.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Teng, R.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.; Zhang, J.

    2004-02-01

    We have measured transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in d+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV, in the range 0.25 < pT < 6.0 GeV/c. With increasing collision centrality, the yield at high transverse momenta increases more rapidly than the overall particle density, leading to a strong modification of the spectral shape. This change in spectral shape is qualitatively different from observations in Au+Au collisions at the same energy. The results provide important information for discriminating between different models for the suppression of high-pT hadrons observed in Au+Au collisions.

  7. 229 Age au premier vêlage et intervalle entre vêlages de quatre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Madjina TELLAH

    ... Polytechnique de Bobo-Dioulasso (UPB), 01 BP 1091 Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso ..... rapportés au Niger et au Tchad [4], au Cameroun chez les zébus Goudali [8], au ... [9], au Sénégal chez le zébu Gobra [10], au Bénin chez les vaches ...

  8. Development of CO2 circulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, J.

    1988-01-01

    The development of the basic machine types we have supplied has not been without problems. The Windscale AGR (the prototype AGR) was a small 1.2 MW vertically up circulator with an inlet temperature of 237 deg. C (459 deg. F). Oil leakage problems occurred and were cured in the works test facility and the machine went into service with no other problems. The Horizontal 5 MW machines for Hinkley/Hunterston were not so fortunate with vibration problems, interface corrosion problems (effecting the whole reactor) and material dimensional stability problems. Oil ingress problems did not show up in test work but were later reported from site. These reports were initially exagerated due to the measuring techniques which took the operators some time to resolve. In the vertical 5 MW machines for Hartlepool and Heysham 1 there are two interesting factors, firstly a spar failure and secondly shaft axial stability. Many of the problems were due to modifications at site or our inability to model all aspects of site installation from which lessons for the future can be learned. The latest stations Torness and Heysham II incorporate these lessons. The machines have been designed with so much margin that during the resolution of the reactor control rod gag problems the machines were run continuously at 20% overload (6.3 MW). From an initial accident case of 350 deg. C inlet temperature, this increased to 458 deg. C and now stands at 585 deg. C. No modifications to the impeller were required. The site experience to date is good with no operational problems reported. (author). 4 figs

  9. [Hyp-Au-Sn9(Hyp)3-Au-Sn9(Hyp)3-Au-Hyp]-: the longest intermetalloid chain compound of tin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Mareike; Schrenk, Claudio; Block, Theresa; Pöttgen, Rainer; Schnepf, Andreas

    2017-10-12

    The reaction of the metalloid tin cluster [Sn 10 (Hyp) 4 ] 2- with (Ph 3 P)Au-SHyp (Hyp = Si(SiMe 3 ) 3 ) gave an intermetalloid cluster [Au 3 Sn 18 (Hyp) 8 ] - 1, which is the longest intermetalloid chain compound of tin to date. 1 shows a structural resemblance to binary AuSn phases, which is expected for intermetalloid clusters.

  10. SpaceX Dragon Air Circulation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Brenda; Piatrovich, Siarhei; Prina, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    The Dragon capsule is a reusable vehicle being developed by Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) that will provide commercial cargo transportation to the International Space Station (ISS). Dragon is designed to be a habitable module while it is berthed to ISS. As such, the Dragon Environmental Control System (ECS) consists of pressure control and pressure equalization, air sampling, fire detection, illumination, and an air circulation system. The air circulation system prevents pockets of stagnant air in Dragon that can be hazardous to the ISS crew. In addition, through the inter-module duct, the air circulation system provides fresh air from ISS into Dragon. To utilize the maximum volume of Dragon for cargo packaging, the Dragon ECS air circulation system is designed around cargo rack optimization. At the same time, the air circulation system is designed to meet the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) inter-module and intra-module ventilation requirements and acoustic requirements. A flight like configuration of the Dragon capsule including the air circulation system was recently assembled for testing to assess the design for inter-module and intra-module ventilation and acoustics. The testing included the Dragon capsule, and flight configuration in the pressure section with cargo racks, lockers, all of the air circulation components, and acoustic treatment. The air circulation test was also used to verify the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of the Dragon capsule. The CFD model included the same Dragon internal geometry that was assembled for the test. This paper will describe the Dragon air circulation system design which has been verified by testing the system and with CFD analysis.

  11. Modes of North Atlantic Decadal Variability in the ECHAM1/LSG Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere General Circulation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorita, Eduardo; Frankignoul, Claude

    1997-02-01

    The climate variability in the North Atlantic sector is investigated in a 325-yr integration of the ECHAM1/ LSG coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model. At the interannual timescale, the coupled model behaves realistically and sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies arise as a response of the oceanic surface layer to the stochastic forcing by the atmosphere, with the heat exchanges both generating and damping the SST anomalies. In the ocean interior, the temperature spectra are red up to a period of about 20 years, and substantial decadal fluctuations are found in the upper kilometer or so of the water column. Using extended empirical orthogonal function analysis, two distinct quasi-oscillatory modes of ocean-atmosphere variability are identified, with dominant periods of about 20 and 10 years, respectively. The oceanic changes in both modes reflect the direct forcing by the atmosphere through anomalous air-sea fluxes and Ekman pumping, which after some delay affects the intensity of the subtropical and subpolar gyres. The SST is also strongly modulated by the gyre currents. In the thermocline, the temperature and salinity fluctuations are in phase, as if caused by thermocline displacements, and they have no apparent connection with the thermohaline circulation. The 20-yr mode is the most energetic one; it is easily seen in the thermocline and can be found in SST data, but it is not detected in the atmosphere alone. As there is no evidence of positive ocean-atmosphere feedback, the 20-yr mode primarily reflects the passive response of the ocean to atmospheric fluctuations, which may be in part associated with climate anomalies appearing a few years earlier in the North Pacific. The 10-yr mode is more surface trapped in the ocean. Although the mode is most easily seen in the temperature variations of the upper few hundred meters of the ocean, it is also detected in the atmosphere alone and thus appears to be a coupled ocean-atmosphere mode. In both modes

  12. Au Based Nanocomposites Towards Plasmonic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panniello, A.; Curri, M. L.; Placido, T.; Reboud, V.; Kehagias, N.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.; Mecerreyes, D.; Agostiano, A.; Striccoli, M.

    2010-06-01

    Incorporation of nano-sized metals in polymers can transfer their unique features to the host matrix, providing nanocomposite materials with improved optical, electric, magnetic and mechanical properties. In this work, colloidal Au nanorods have been incorporated into PMMA based random co-polymer, properly functionalized with amino groups and the optical and morphological properties of the resulting nanocomposite have been investigated by spectroscopic and AFM measurements. Au nanorods have demonstrated to preserve the plasmon absorption and to retain morphological features upon the incorporation, thus making the final metal modified polymer composite exploitable for the fabrication of plasmonic devices. The prepared nanocomposites have been then patterned by Nano Imprint Lithography technique in order to demonstrate the viability of the materials towards optical applications.

  13. Photoswitchable Faraday effect in EuS-Au nanosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawashima, Akira; Nakanishi, Takayuki; Kitagawa, Yuichi; Fushimi, Koji; Hasegawa, Yasuchika [Division of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, North-13 West-8, Kita-ku, 060-8628, Sapporo (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    Effective photoswitchable europium sulfide nanocrystals with gold nanoparticles using dithiol (DDT: 1,10-decanedithiol) joint molecules, EuS-Au nanosystems, are demonstrated. The TEM image indicates the formation of EuS-Au nanosystems composed of cube-shaped EuS nanocrystals and spherical Au nanoparticles. Under visible-light irradiation, a drastic change of absorption band of EuS-Au nanosystems at around 600 nm was observed. The Faraday effects of EuS-Au nanosystems were estimated using magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) measurements. The effective change of the MCD spectra of EuS-Au nanosystems under visible-light irradiation was successfully observed at around 670 nm for the first time. The effective reversible changes in MCD spectra with the alternative irradiation cycles of visible light (>440 nm) and dark are also presented. The decrease rate of rotation angle at 670 nm of EuS-Au nanosystems is larger than that of absorbance. These results indicate that the effective change of MCD spectra of EuS-Au nanosystems would be dominated not only by a drastic change of absorption band related to enhanced LSPR of Au nanoparticles but also by specific interaction between EuS and Au in nanosystem under irradiation. Illustration of photoswitch and TEM image of EuS-Au nanosystems. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Near-infrared-responsive, superparamagnetic Au@Co nanochains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varadee Vittur

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This manuscript describes a new type of nanomaterial, namely superparamagnetic Au@Co nanochains with optical extinctions in the near infrared (NIR. The Au@Co nanochains were synthesized via a one-pot galvanic replacement route involving a redox-transmetalation process in aqueous medium, where Au salt was reduced to form Au shells on Co seed templates, affording hollow Au@Co nanochains. The Au shells serve not only as a protective coating for the Co nanochain cores, but also to give rise to the optical properties of these unique nanostructures. Importantly, these bifunctional, magneto-optical Au@Co nanochains combine the advantages of nanophotonics (extinction at ca. 900 nm and nanomagnetism (superparamagnetism and provide a potentially useful new nanoarchitecture for biomedical or catalytic applications that can benefit from both activation by light and manipulation using an external magnetic field.

  15. Mechanical properties and grindability of experimental Ti-Au alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masatoshi; Kikuchi, Masafumi; Okuno, Osamu

    2004-06-01

    Experimental Ti-Au alloys (5, 10, 20 and 40 mass% Au) were made. Mechanical properties and grindability of the castings of the Ti-Au alloys were examined. As the concentration of gold increased to 20%, the yield strength and the tensile strength of the Ti-Au alloys became higher without markedly deteriorating their ductility. This higher strength can be explained by the solid-solution strengthening of the a titanium. The Ti-40%Au alloy became brittle because the intermetallic compound Ti3Au precipitated intensively near the grain boundaries. There was no significant difference in the grinding rate and grinding ratio among all the Ti-Au alloys and the pure titanium at any speed.

  16. Synthesis of Pd-Au bimetallic nanocrystals via controlled overgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Byungkwon; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Yu, Taekyung; Wang, Jinguo; Kim, Moon J; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Rycenga, Matthew; Xia, Younan

    2010-03-03

    This paper describes the synthesis of Pd-Au bimetallic nanocrystals with controlled morphologies via a one-step seeded-growth method. Two different reducing agents, namely, L-ascorbic acid and citric acid, were utilized for the reduction of HAuCl(4) in an aqueous solution to control the overgrowth of Au on cubic Pd seeds. When L-ascorbic acid was used as the reducing agent, conformal overgrowth of Au on the Pd nanocubes led to the formation of Pd-Au nanocrystals with a core-shell structure. On the contrary, localized overgrowth of Au was observed when citric acid was used as the reducing agent, producing Pd-Au bimetallic dimers. Through this morphological control, we were able to tune the localized surface plasmon resonance peaks of Pd-Au bimetallic nanostructures in the visible region.

  17. Electrosynthesis and characterization of polypyrrole/Au nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Wei [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Li, C.M. [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)]. E-mail: ecmli@ntu.edu.sg; Chen Peng [School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Sun, C.Q. [School of Electric and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2006-11-12

    Polypyrrole films containing gold nanoparticles (PPy/Au) were electrosynthesized on a glassy carbon electrode. This was done by applying a constant current of 1.43 mA cm{sup -2} in solutions containing colloidal Au particles and pyrrole monomer. A chloroaurate medium with a citrate/tannic acid reducing/protection agent was employed for generating the Au colloids. The PPy/Au films were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Raman spectroscopy. Also, electrochemical behaviors of the PPy/Au films were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and AC impedance measurements. Experimental results demonstrate that PPy/Au has greater conductivity and better stability than PPy. The effect of incorporated Au nanoparticles in PPy matrix was studied and the mechanism was suggested.

  18. Synthesis of SERS active Au nanowires in different noncoordinating solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou Xiaomiao; Zhang Xiaoling, E-mail: zhangxl@bit.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Cluster Science of Ministry of Education, Beijing Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, School of Science (China); Fang Yan, E-mail: fangyan@mail.cnu.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory for Nano-Photonics and Nano-Structure (NPNS), Capital Normal University (China); Chen Shutang; Li Na; Zhou Qi [Key Laboratory of Cluster Science of Ministry of Education, Beijing Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, School of Science (China)

    2011-06-15

    Au nanowires with length up to micrometers were synthesized through a simple and one-pot solution growth method. HAuCl{sub 4} was reduced in a micellar structure formed by 1-octadecylamine and oleic acid in hexane, heptane, toluene and chloroform, respectively. As the non-polarity of noncoordinating solvents can affect the nucleation and growth rates of Au nanostructures, Au nanowires with different diameters could be obtained by changing the noncoordinating solvents in the synthetic process. The influences of the solvents on the morphology of Au nanowires were systematically studied. When using hexane as reaction solvent, the product turned to be high portion of Au nanowires with more uniform size than the others. Furthermore, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrum of 2-thionaphthol was obtained on the Au nanowire-modified substrate, indicating that the as-synthesized Au nanowires have potential for highly sensitive optical detection application.

  19. Au-nanoparticles grafted on plasma treated PE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svorcik, V.; Chaloupka, A.; Rezanka, P.; Slepicka, P.; Kolska, Z.; Kasalkova, N.; Hubacek, T.; Siegel, J.

    2010-01-01

    Polyethylene (PE) surface was treated with Ar plasma. Activated surface was grafted from methanol solution of 1,2-ethanedithiol. Then the sample was immersed into freshly prepared colloid solution of Au-nanoparticles. Finally Au layer was sputtered on the samples. Properties of the modified PE were studied using various methods: AFM, EPR, RBS and nanoindentation. It was shown that the plasma treatment results in degradation of polymer chain (AFM) and creation of free radicals by EPR. After grafting with dithiol, the concentration of free radicals declines. The presence of Au and S in the surface layer after the coating with Au-nanoparticles was proved by RBS. Plasma treatment changes PE surface morphology and increases surface roughness, too. Another significant change in surface morphology and roughness was observed after deposition of Au-nanoparticles. Nanoindentation measurements show that the grafting with Au-nanoparticles increases adhesion of subsequently sputtered Au layer.

  20. Highly Stable [C60AuC60]+/- Dumbbells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulart, Marcelo; Kuhn, Martin; Martini, Paul; Chen, Lei; Hagelberg, Frank; Kaiser, Alexander; Scheier, Paul; Ellis, Andrew M

    2018-05-17

    Ionic complexes between gold and C 60 have been observed for the first time. Cations and anions of the type [Au(C 60 ) 2 ] +/- are shown to have particular stability. Calculations suggest that these ions adopt a C 60 -Au-C 60 sandwich-like (dumbbell) structure, which is reminiscent of [XAuX] +/- ions previously observed for much smaller ligands. The [Au(C 60 ) 2 ] +/- ions can be regarded as Au(I) complexes, regardless of whether the net charge is positive or negative, but in both cases, the charge transfer between the Au and C 60 is incomplete, most likely because of a covalent contribution to the Au-C 60 binding. The C 60 -Au-C 60 dumbbell structure represents a new architecture in fullerene chemistry that might be replicable in synthetic nanostructures.

  1. Circulating microRNAs in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamam, Rimi; Hamam, Dana; Alsaleh, Khalid A.

    2017-01-01

    Effective management of breast cancer depends on early diagnosis and proper monitoring of patients' response to therapy. However, these goals are difficult to achieve because of the lack of sensitive and specific biomarkers for early detection and for disease monitoring. Accumulating evidence...... in the past several years has highlighted the potential use of peripheral blood circulating nucleic acids such as DNA, mRNA and micro (mi)RNA in breast cancer diagnosis, prognosis and for monitoring response to anticancer therapy. Among these, circulating miRNA is increasingly recognized as a promising...... circulating miRNAs as diagnostic, prognostic or predictive biomarkers in breast cancer management....

  2. Solvent extraction of Au(III) for preparation of a carrier-free multitracer and an Au tracer from an Au target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weginwar, R.G.; Kobayashi, Y.; Ambe, S.; Liu, B.; Enomoto, S.; Ambe, F.

    1996-01-01

    Separation of Au(III) and various carrier-free radionuclides by solvent extraction was investigated using an Au target irradiated by an energetic heavy-ion beam. Percentage extraction of Au(III) and coextraction of the radionuclides were determined with varying parameters such as kinds of solvent, molarity of HCl or pH, and Au concentration. Under the conditions where Au(III) was effectively extracted, namely extraction with ethyl acetate or isobutyl methyl ketone from 3 mol*dm -3 HCl, carrier-free radionuclides of many elements were found to be more or less coextracted. Coextraction of radionuclides of some elements was found to increase with an increase in the concentration of Au(III). This finding is ascribed to the formation of strong association of the complex of these elements with chloroauric acid. In order to avoid serious loss of these elements by the extraction, lowering of the Au(III) concentration or the use of a masking agent such as sodium citrate is necessary. Gold(III) was shown to be effectively back extracted with a 0.1 mol*dm -3 aqueous solution of 2-amino-2-hydroxymethyl-1,3-propanediol. Thus, a radiochemical procedure has been established for preparing a carrier-free multitracer and an Au tracer with carrier form from an Au target irradiated with a heavy-ion beam. Both tracers are now used individually for chemical and biological experiments. (author). 22 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Characterization of Ir/Au pixel TES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunieda, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Zen, N.; Damayanthi, R.M.T.; Mori, F.; Fujita, K.; Nakazawa, M.; Fukuda, D.; Ohkubo, M.

    2006-01-01

    Signal shapes and noise characteristics of an asymmetrical ten-pixel Ir/Au-TES have been studied. The asymmetric design may be effective to realize an imaging spectrometer. Distinct two exponential decays observed for X-ray events are consistent with a two-step R-T curve. A theoretical thermal model for noise in multi-pixel devices reasonably explains the experimental data

  4. Le CRDI au Brésil

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Les recherches subventionnées par le CRDI au Brésil ont permis d'éclairer les débats sur nombre de questions, dont la démocratie, la croissance économique, la santé, les services sociaux, l'innovation, la foresterie et l'eau. Pendant la dictature militaire, qui a pris fin en 1985, le CRDI s'est employé à assurer la survie de la ...

  5. La cardiomyopathie dilatee au centre hospitalier Universitaire ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    But : Afin d'améliorer la prise en charge, d'éviter l'évolution rapide vers une insuffisance cardiaque réfractaire au traitement, nous avons entrepris cette étude en milieu hospitalier. Méthode : il s'est agi d'une étude rétrospective et descriptive dans le service de cardiologie du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Tokoin de Lomé.

  6. Decay of 184Hg to 184Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nettles, W.G.; Beraud, R.; Cole, J.D.; Hamilton, J.H.; Ramayya, A.V.; Spejewski, E.H.; Sastry, K.S.R.

    1977-01-01

    Levels in 184 Au were investigated by e--γ--t and γ--γ--t coincidence techniques. A level scheme with eight definite and two tentative levels is presented; gamma branching ratios are shown. The state at 156 keV was found to have a lifetime of 36 +- 6 ns; for four of the next five levels, T 1 / 2 was less than 2 ns. 2 figures

  7. Optimizing the planar structure of (1 1 1) Au/Co/Au trilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumah, D P; Cebollada, A; Clavero, C; Garcia-MartIn, J M; Skuza, J R; Lukaszew, R A; Clarke, R

    2007-01-01

    Au/Co/Au trilayers are interesting for a range of applications which exploit their unusual optical and electronic transport behaviour in a magnetic field. Here we present a comprehensive structural and morphological study of a series of trilayers with 0-7 nm Co layer thickness fabricated on glass by ultrahigh vacuum vapour deposition. We use a combination of in situ electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy and x-ray scattering to determine the optimum deposition conditions for highly textured, flat and continuous layered structures. The 16 nm Au-on-glass buffer layer, deposited at ambient temperature, is found to develop a smooth (1 1 1) texture on annealing at 350 deg. C for 10 min. Subsequent growth of the Co layer at 150 deg. C produces a (1 1 1) textured film with lateral grain size of ∼150 nm in the 7 nm-thick Co layer. A simultaneous in-plane and out-of-plane Co lattice expansion is observed for the thinnest Co layers, converging to bulk values for the thickest films. The roughness of the Co layer is similar to that of the Au buffer layer, indicative of conformal growth. The 6 nm Au capping layer smoothens the trilayer surface, resulting in a surface roughness independent of the Co layer thickness

  8. Magnetic properties and microstructure study of high coercivity Au/FePt/Au trilayer thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.K.; Yuan, F.T.; Liao, W.M.; Hsu, C.W.; Horng, Lance

    2006-01-01

    High-coercivity Au(60 nm)/FePt(δ nm)/Au(60 nm) trilayer samples were prepared by sputtering at room temperature, followed by post annealing at different temperatures. For the sample with δ=60 nm, L1 ordering transformation occurs at 500 deg. C. Coercivity (H c ) is increased with the annealing temperature in the studied range 400-800 deg. C. The H c value of the trilayer films is also varied with thickness of FePt intermediate layer (δ), from 27 kOe for δ=60 nm to a maximum value of 33.5 kOe for δ=20 nm. X-ray diffraction data indicate that the diffusion of Au atoms into the FePt L1 lattice is negligible even after a high-temperature (800 deg. C) annealing process. Furthermore, ordering parameter is almost unchanged as δ is reduced from 60 to 15 nm. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) photos indicate that small FePt Ll particles are dispersed amid the large-grained Au. We believe that the high coercivity of the trilayer sample is attributed to the small and uniform grain sizes of the highly ordered FePt particles which have perfect phase separation with Au matrix

  9. Au 38 (SPh) 24 : Au 38 Protected with Aromatic Thiolate Ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rambukwella, Milan; Burrage, Shayna; Neubrander, Marie; Baseggio, Oscar; Aprà, Edoardo; Stener, Mauro; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Dass, Amala

    2017-03-21

    Au38(SR)24 is one of the most extensively investigated gold nanomolecules along with Au25(SR)18 and Au144(SR)60. However, so far it has only been prepared using aliphatic-like ligands, where R = –SC6H13, -SC12H25 and –SCH2CH2Ph. Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24 when reacted with HSPh undergoes core-size conversion to Au36(SPh)24, and existing literature suggest that Au38(SPh)24 cannot be synthesized. Here, contrary to prevailing knowledge, we demonstrate that Au38(SPh)24 can be prepared if the ligand exchanged conditions are optimized, without any formation of Au36(SPh)24. Conclusive evidence is presented in the form of MALDI-MS, ESI-MS characterization, and optical spectra of Au38(SPh)24 in a solid glass form showing distinct differences from that of Au38(S-aliphatic)24. Theoretical analysis confirms experimental assignment of the optical spectrum and shows that the stability of Au38(SPh)24 is comparable to that of its aliphatic analogues, but results from different physical origins, with a significant component of ligand-ligand attractive interactions.

  10. Seawater circulating system in an aquaculture laboratory

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chatterji, A.; Ingole, B.S.; Parulekar, A.H.

    The note gives an account, for the first time in India, of an Aquaculture Laboratory with open type seawater circulating system developed at the National Institute of Oceanography, Goa, India. Besides describing the details of the system...

  11. EOP MIT General Circulation Model (MITgcm)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data contains a regional implementation of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm) at a 1-km spatial resolution for the...

  12. Seasonal Overturning Circulation in the Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, F.; Hoteit, I.; Koehl, A.

    2010-12-01

    The Red Sea exhibits a distinct seasonal overturning circulation. In winter, a typical two-layer exchange structure, with a fresher inflow from the Gulf of Aden on top of an outflow from the Red Sea, is established. In summer months (June to September) this circulation pattern is changed to a three-layer structure: a surface outflow from the Red Sea on top of a subsurface intrusion of the Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water and a weakened deep outflow. This seasonal variability is studied using a general circulation model, MITgcm, with 6 hourly NCEP atmospheric forcing. The model is able to reproduce the observed seasonal variability very well. The forcing mechanisms of the seasonal variability related to seasonal surface wind stress and buoyancy flux, and water mass transformation processes associated with the seasonal overturning circulation are analyzed and presented.

  13. Blocking device especially for circulating pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susil, J.; Vychodil, V.; Lorenc, P.

    1976-01-01

    The claim of the invention is a blocking device which blocks reverse flow occurring after the shutdown of circulating pumps, namely in the operation of nuclear power plants or in pumps with a high delivery head. (F.M.)

  14. Estuarine turbidity, flushing, salinity, and circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    The effects of estuarine turbidity, flushing, salinity, and circulation on the ecology of the Chesapeake Bay are discussed. The sources of fresh water, the variations in salinity, and the circulation patterns created by temperature and salinity changes are analyzed. The application of remote sensors for long term observation of water temperatures is described. The sources of sediment and the biological effects resulting from increased sediments and siltation are identified.

  15. [Circulating tumor cells: cornerstone of personalized medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafii, A; Vidal, F; Rathat, G; Alix-Panabières, C

    2014-11-01

    Cancer treatment has evolved toward personalized medicine. It is mandatory for clinicians to ascertain tumor biological features in order to optimize patients' treatment. Identification and characterization of circulating tumor cells demonstrated a prognostic value in many solid tumors. Here, we describe the main technologies for identification and characterization of circulating tumor cells and their clinical application in gynecologic and breast cancers. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Themes on circulation in the third world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, M; Prothero, R M

    1983-01-01

    "This article focuses upon circulation, or reciprocal flows of people, with specific reference to Third World societies." Aspects considered include attempts to standardize terminology and to formulate typologies of population movement; the development of explanatory models of circulation and modernization, social networks, family welfare, and capitalism; and "the transfer of methods and concepts to societies and populations different from those from which they initially evolved and in which they were first tested." excerpt

  17. Search for toroidal and bubble nuclei formed in the Au + Au reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planeta, R.; Brzychczyk, J.; Majka, Z.; Blicharska, J.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Zipper, W.; Schmidt, K.; Kowalski, S.; Cibor, J.; Hachaj, P.; Nicolis, N.

    2003-01-01

    In this contribution we present the feasibility study for the experimental observation of toroidal and bubble nuclei. This search is based on data collected by the CHIMERA collaboration for the Au + Au reaction at 15 MeV/nucleon. The beam time needed to achieve this goal is calculated for events with at least 5 heavy fragments. We found that the fraction of such events among the accumulated data is equal to 8*10 -4 . Assuming the Au beam intensity is 0.03 pnA and target thickness equals 0.3 mg/cm 2 we estimated that 450 hours of beam time is needed to record 10 6 multifragment events. Present status of the Monte-Carlo simulation predictions is shortly discussed. (A.C.)

  18. Search for toroidal and bubble nuclei formed in the Au + Au reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Planeta, R.; Brzychczyk, J.; Majka, Z. [M.Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagellonian University, Krakow (Poland); Blicharska, J.; Grzeszczuk, A.; Zipper, W.; Schmidt, K.; Kowalski, S. [Silesian University, Institute of Physics, Katowice (Poland); Cibor, J. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Hachaj, P. [Cracow Univ. of Technology, Krakow (Poland); Nicolis, N. [Ioannina Univ. (Greece)

    2003-07-01

    In this contribution we present the feasibility study for the experimental observation of toroidal and bubble nuclei. This search is based on data collected by the CHIMERA collaboration for the Au + Au reaction at 15 MeV/nucleon. The beam time needed to achieve this goal is calculated for events with at least 5 heavy fragments. We found that the fraction of such events among the accumulated data is equal to 8*10{sup -4}. Assuming the Au beam intensity is 0.03 pnA and target thickness equals 0.3 mg/cm{sup 2} we estimated that 450 hours of beam time is needed to record 10{sup 6} multifragment events. Present status of the Monte-Carlo simulation predictions is shortly discussed. (A.C.)

  19. Photoluminescence from Au nanoparticles embedded in Au:oxide composite films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hongbo; Wen, Weijia; Wong, George K.

    2006-12-01

    Au:oxide composite multilayer films with Au nanoparticles sandwiched by oxide layers (such as SiO2, ZnO, and TiO2) were prepared in a magnetron sputtering system. Their photoluminescence (PL) spectra were investigated by employing a micro-Raman system in which an Argon laser with a wavelength of 514 nm was used as the pumping light. Distinct PL peaks located at a wavelength range between 590 and 680 nm were observed in most of our samples, with Au particle size varying from several to hundreds of nanometers. It was found that the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in these composites exerted a strong influence on the position of the PL peaks but had little effect on the PL intensity.

  20. Photoluminescence from Au nanoparticles embedded in Au:oxide composite films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Hongbo; Wen Weijia; Wong, George K. L.

    2006-01-01

    Au:oxide composite multilayer films with Au nanoparticles sandwiched by oxide layers (such as SiO 2 , ZnO, and TiO 2 ) were prepared in a magnetron sputtering system. Their photoluminescence (PL) spectra were investigated by employing a micro-Raman system in which an Argon laser with a wavelength of 514 nm was used as the pumping light. Distinct PL peaks located at a wavelength range between 590 and 680 nm were observed in most of our samples, with Au particle size varying from several to hundreds of nanometers. It was found that the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in these composites exerted a strong influence on the position of the PL peaks but had little effect on the PL intensity

  1. Charge transport through O-deficient Au-MgO-Au junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, M. M.; Eckern, Ulrich; Rungger, Ivan; Schuster, Cosima; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2009-01-01

    Metal-oxide heterostructures have been attracting considerable attention in recent years due to various technological applications. We present results of electronic structure and transport calculations for the Au-MgO-Au (metal-insulator-metal) heterostructure based on density-functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green’s functions method. The dependence of the conductance of the heterostructure on the thickness of the MgO interlayer and the interface spacing is studied. In addition, we address the effects of O vacancies. We observe deviations from an exponentially suppressed conductance with growing interlayer thickness caused by Au-O chemical bonds. Electronic states tracing back to O vacancies can increase the conductance. Furthermore, this effect can be enhanced by enlarging the interface spacing as the vacancy induced Mg states are shifted toward the Fermi energy.

  2. Charge transport through O-deficient Au-MgO-Au junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Fadlallah, M. M.

    2009-12-29

    Metal-oxide heterostructures have been attracting considerable attention in recent years due to various technological applications. We present results of electronic structure and transport calculations for the Au-MgO-Au (metal-insulator-metal) heterostructure based on density-functional theory and the nonequilibrium Green’s functions method. The dependence of the conductance of the heterostructure on the thickness of the MgO interlayer and the interface spacing is studied. In addition, we address the effects of O vacancies. We observe deviations from an exponentially suppressed conductance with growing interlayer thickness caused by Au-O chemical bonds. Electronic states tracing back to O vacancies can increase the conductance. Furthermore, this effect can be enhanced by enlarging the interface spacing as the vacancy induced Mg states are shifted toward the Fermi energy.

  3. Surgical myocardial revascularization without extracorporeal circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salomón Soriano Ordinola Rojas

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the immediate postoperative period of patients undergoing myocardial revascularization without extracorporeal circulation with different types of grafts. METHODS: One hundred and twelve patients, 89 (79.5% of whom were males, were revascularized without extracorporeal circulation. Their ages ranged from 39 to 85 years. The criteria for indicating myocardial revascularization without extracorporeal circulation were as follows: revascularized coronary artery caliber > 1.5 mm, lack of intramyocardial trajectory on coronary angiography, noncalcified coronary arteries, and tolerance of the heart to the different rotation maneuvers. RESULTS: Myocardial revascularization without extracorporeal circulation was performed in 112 patients. Three were converted to extracorporeal circulation, which required a longer hospital stay but did not impact mortality. During the procedure, the following events were observed: atrial fibrillation in 10 patients, ventricular fibrillation in 4, total transient atrioventricular block in 2, ventricular extrasystoles in 58, use of a device to retrieve red blood cells in 53, blood transfusion in 8, and arterial hypotension in 89 patients. Coronary angiography was performed in 20 patients on the seventh postoperative day when the grafts were patent. CONCLUSION: Myocardial revascularization without extracorporeal circulation is a reproducible technique that is an alternative for treating ischemic heart disease.

  4. Evidence of significant covalent bonding in Au(CN)(2)(-).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Bin; Wang, Yi-Lei; Yang, Jie; Xing, Xiao-Peng; Li, Jun; Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2009-11-18

    The Au(CN)(2)(-) ion is the most stable Au compound known for centuries, yet a detailed understanding of its chemical bonding is still lacking. Here we report direct experimental evidence of significant covalent bonding character in the Au-C bonds in Au(CN)(2)(-) using photoelectron spectroscopy and comparisons with its lighter congeners, Ag(CN)(2)(-) and Cu(CN)(2)(-). Vibrational progressions in the Au-C stretching mode were observed for all detachment transitions for Au(CN)(2)(-), in contrast to the atomic-like transitions for Cu(CN)(2)(-), revealing the Au-C covalent bonding character. In addition, rich electronic structural information was obtained for Au(CN)(2)(-) by employing 118 nm detachment photons. Density functional theory and high-level ab initio calculations were carried out to understand the photoelectron spectra and obtain insight into the nature of the chemical bonding in the M(CN)(2)(-) complexes. Significant covalent character in the Au-C bonding due to the strong relativistic effects was revealed in Au(CN)(2)(-), consistent with its high stability.

  5. Production of φ mesons in Au-Au collisions at the AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Back, B. B.; Betts, R. R.; Chang, J.; Gillitzer, A.; Henning, W. F.; Hofman, D. J.; Nanal, V.; Seto, R.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Xiang, H.

    1999-01-01

    The first measurements of φ meson production in Au-Au collisions at AGS energies are presented via the decay to K + K - . A measurement of the centrality dependence of the yield shows an increase similar to that seen for the K - with a spectral shape consistent with a relativistic Breit-Wigner distribution within the statistical errors of the present data set. Future analysis using the full data set with 4 times the statistics will allow a more accurate determination of the yields, slopes and spectral shapes

  6. Elliptic Flow in Au+Au Collisions at √sNN = 130 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, K. H.; Adams, N.; Adler, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Allgower, C.; Amsbaugh, J.; Anderson, M.; Anderssen, E.; Arnesen, H.; Arnold, L.; Averichev, G. S.; Baldwin, A.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Beddo, M.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellwied, R.; Bennett, S.; Bercovitz, J.; Berger, J.; Betts, W.; Bichsel, H.; Bieser, F.; Bland, L. C.; Bloomer, M.; Blyth, C. O.; Boehm, J.; Bonner, B. E.; Bonnet, D.; Bossingham, R.; Botlo, M.; Boucham, A.; Bouillo, N.; Bouvier, S.; Bradley, K.; Brady, F. P.; Braithwaite, E. S.; Braithwaite, W.; Brandin, A.; Brown, R. L.; Brugalette, G.; Byrd, C.; Caines, H.; Calderón de La Barca Sánchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carr, L.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Caylor, B.; Cebra, D.; Chatopadhyay, S.; Chen, M. L.; Chen, W.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S. P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Chrin, J.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J. P.; Conin, L.; Consiglio, C.; Cormier, T. M.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Danilov, V. I.; Dayton, D.; Demello, M.; Deng, W. S.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Dialinas, M.; Diaz, H.; Deyoung, P. A.; Didenko, L.; Dimassimo, D.; Dioguardi, J.; Dominik, W.; Drancourt, C.; Draper, J. E.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Eggert, T.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Etkin, A.; Fachini, P.; Feliciano, C.; Ferenc, D.; Ferguson, M. I.; Fessler, H.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Flores, I.; Foley, K. J.; Fritz, D.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gazdzicki, M.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Gojak, C.; Grabski, J.; Grachov, O.; Grau, M.; Greiner, D.; Greiner, L.; Grigoriev, V.; Grosnick, D.; Gross, J.; Guilloux, G.; Gushin, E.; Hall, J.; Hallman, T. J.; Hardtke, D.; Harper, G.; Harris, J. W.; He, P.; Heffner, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hill, D.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horsley, M.; Howe, M.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Hümmler, H.; Hunt, W.; Hunter, J.; Igo, G. J.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu. I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jacobson, S.; Jared, R.; Jensen, P.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kenney, V. P.; Khodinov, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S. R.; Klyachko, A.; Koehler, G.; Konstantinov, A. S.; Kormilitsyne, V.; Kotchenda, L.; Kotov, I.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krupien, T.; Kuczewski, P.; Kuhn, C.; Kunde, G. J.; Kunz, C. L.; Kutuev, R. Kh.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lakehal-Ayat, L.; Lamas-Valverde, J.; Lamont, M. A.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C. P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lebedev, A.; Lecompte, T.; Leonhardt, W. J.; Leontiev, V. M.; Leszczynski, P.; Levine, M. J.; Li, Q.; Li, Q.; Li, Z.; Liaw, C.-J.; Lin, J.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, H.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Locurto, G.; Long, H.; Longacre, R. S.; Lopez-Noriega, M.; Lopiano, D.; Love, W. A.; Lutz, J. R.; Lynn, D.; Madansky, L.; Maier, R.; Majka, R.; Maliszewski, A.; Margetis, S.; Marks, K.; Marstaller, R.; Martin, L.; Marx, J.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; Matyushevski, E. A.; McParland, C.; McShane, T. S.; Meier, J.; Melnick, Yu.; Meschanin, A.; Middlekamp, P.; Mikhalin, N.; Miller, B.; Milosevich, Z.; Minaev, N. G.; Minor, B.; Mitchell, J.; Mogavero, E.; Moiseenko, V. A.; Moltz, D.; Moore, C. F.; Morozov, V.; Morse, R.; de Moura, M. M.; Munhoz, M. G.; Mutchler, G. S.; Nelson, J. M.; Nevski, P.; Ngo, T.; Nguyen, M.; Nguyen, T.; Nikitin, V. A.; Nogach, L. V.; Noggle, T.; Norman, B.; Nurushev, S. B.; Nussbaum, T.; Nystrand, J.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Olchanski, K.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Ososkov, G. A.; Ott, G.; Padrazo, D.; Paic, G.; Pandey, S. U.; Panebratsev, Y.; Panitkin, S. Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Pentia, M.; Perevotchikov, V.; Peryt, W.; Petrov, V. A.; Pinganaud, W.; Pirogov, S.; Platner, E.; Pluta, J.; Polk, I.; Porile, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Puskar-Pasewicz, J.; Rai, G.; Rasson, J.; Ravel, O.; Ray, R. L.; Razin, S. V.; Reichhold, D.; Reid, J.; Renfordt, R. E.; Retiere, F.; Ridiger, A.; Riso, J.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Roehrich, D.; Rogachevski, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, C.; Russ, D.; Rykov, V.; Sakrejda, I.; Sanchez, R.; Sandler, Z.; Sandweiss, J.; Sappenfield, P.; Saulys, A. C.; Savin, I.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Scheblien, J.; Scheetz, R.; Schlueter, R.; Schmitz, N.; Schroeder, L. S.; Schulz, M.; Schüttauf, A.; Sedlmeir, J.; Seger, J.; Seliverstov, D.; Seyboth, J.; Seyboth, P.; Seymour, R.; Shakaliev, E. I.; Shestermanov, K. E.; Shi, Y.; Shimanskii, S. S.; Shuman, D.; Shvetcov, V. S.; Skoro, G.; Smirnov, N.; Smykov, L. P.; Snellings, R.; Solberg, K.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stephenson, E. J.; Stock, R.; Stolpovsky, A.; Stone, N.; Stone, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Stroebele, H.; Struck, C.; Suaide, A. A.; Sugarbaker, E.; Suire, C.; Symons, T. J.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarchini, A.; Tarzian, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Tikhomirov, V.; Szanto de Toledo, A.; Tonse, S.; Trainor, T.; Trentalange, S.; Tokarev, M.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trofimov, V.; Tsai, O.; Turner, K.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Vakula, I.; van Buren, G.; Vandermolen, A. M.; Vanyashin, A.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vigdor, S. E.; Visser, G.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vu, C.; Wang, F.; Ward, H.; Weerasundara, D.; Weidenbach, R.; Wells, R.; Wells, R.; Wenaus, T.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitfield, J. P.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Willson, R.; Wilson, K.; Wirth, J.; Wisdom, J.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wolf, J.; Wood, L.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Yakutin, A. E.; Yamamoto, E.; Yang, J.; Yepes, P.; Yokosawa, A.; Yurevich, V. I.; Zanevski, Y. V.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhu, J.; Zimmerman, D.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zubarev, A. N.

    2001-01-01

    Elliptic flow from nuclear collisions is a hadronic observable sensitive to the early stages of system evolution. We report first results on elliptic flow of charged particles at midrapidity in Au+Au collisions at sNN = 130 GeV using the STAR Time Projection Chamber at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The elliptic flow signal, v2, averaged over transverse momentum, reaches values of about 6% for relatively peripheral collisions and decreases for the more central collisions. This can be interpreted as the observation of a higher degree of thermalization than at lower collision energies. Pseudorapidity and transverse momentum dependence of elliptic flow are also presented.

  7. Narrowing of the balance function with centrality in Au + Au collisions at √sNN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, J.; Alder, C.; Ahammed, Z.; Allgower, C.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Averichev, G.S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Caines, H.; Calderonde la Barca Sanchez, M.; Cardenas, A.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Corral, M.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Draper, J.E.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.I.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; Kuznetsov, A.A.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Landgraf, J.M.; Lange, S.; Lansdell, C.P.; Lasiuk, B.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Leontiev, V.M.; LeVine, M.J.; Li, Q.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, F.; Liu, L.; Liu, Z.; Liu, Q.J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W.J.; Long, H.

    2003-01-01

    The balance function is a new observable based on the principle that charge is locally conserved when particles are pair produced. Balance functions have been measured for charged particle pairs and identified charged pion pairs in Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 130 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider using STAR. Balance functions for peripheral collisions have widths consistent with model predictions based on a superposition of nucleon-nucleon scattering. Widths in central collisions are smaller, consistent with trends predicted by models incorporating late hadronization

  8. Proton channeling in Au at low energies; Canalizacion de protones en Au a bajas energias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdes, J E; Vargas, P [Chile Univ., Santiago (Chile). Dept. de Fisica

    1997-12-31

    The electronic energy loss for low velocity protons channeled in the <100> direction single crystal Au is calculated. The spatial distribution of valence electronic density in Au is calculated using Tight Binding Linear Muffin Tin Method. The proton trajectories are determined by numerical integration of the classical motion equation, and the energy loss is evaluated using the calculated valence electronic density in the friction term. The results allow to describe qualitatively the non linear behavior of energy loss with ion velocity observed experimentally. (author). 14 refs., 4 figs.

  9. D and $^{3}He$ production in $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130 GeV Au + Au collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, C; Allgower, C; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J T; Barannikova, O Yu; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bichsel, H; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Boucham, A; Brandin, A B; Cadman, R V; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca-Sanchez, M; Cardenas, A; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, M L; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; De Mello, M; Deng, W S; Derevshchikov, A A; Didenko, L; Draper, J E; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Finch, E; Fisyak, Yu; Flierl, D; Foley, Kenneth J; Fu, J; Gagunashvili, N D; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F J M; Ghazikhanian, V; Grabski, J; Grachov, O A; Greiner, D E; Grigoriev, V; Guedon, M; Guschin, E; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heffner, M; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Hümmler, H; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Ivanshin, Yu I; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kisiel, A; Klay, J L; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A A; Konstantinov, A S; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Krämer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krüger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A V; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R K; Kuznetsov, A A; Lakehal-Ayat, L; Lamas-Valverde, J; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lebedev, A; LeCompte, T J; Lednicky, R; Leontiev, V M; Le Vine, M J; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lo Curto, G; Long, H; Longacre, R S; López-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Lynn, D; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnik, Yu M; Meshchanin, A P; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mitchell, J; Moiseenko, V A; Moltz, D; Moore, C F; Morozov, V; De Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Mutchler, G S; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, Grazyna Janina; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Oson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Panebratsev, Yu A; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevozchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Platner, E D; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potrebenikova, E V; Prindle, D J; Pruneau, C A; Radomski, S; Rai, G; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D M; Reid, J G; Retière, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, C; Russ, D; Rykov, V L; Sakrejda, I; Sandweiss, J; Saulys, A C; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schröder, L S; Schüttauf, A; Schweda, K; Seger, J E; Seliverstov, D M; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shestermanov, K E; Shimansky, S S; Shvetcov, V S; Skoro, G P; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stephenson, E J; Stock, Reinhard; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M N; Stringfellow, B C; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E R; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Turner, K; Ullrich, T S; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; Van der Molen, A; Vanyashin, A V; Vasilevski, I M; Vasilev, A N; Vigdor, S E; Voloshin, S A; Wang, F; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Wenaus, T J; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yokosawa, A; Yurevich, V I; Zanevsky, Yu V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zoulkarneev, R; Zubarev, A N; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.87.262301

    2001-01-01

    The first measurements of light antinucleus production in Au + Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider are reported. The observed production rates for d and /sup 3/He are much larger than in lower energy nucleus-nucleus collisions. A coalescence model analysis of the yields indicates that there is little or no increase in the antinucleon freeze-out volume compared to collisions at CERN SPS energy. These analyses also indicate that the 3He freeze-out volume is smaller than the d freeze-out volume. (22 refs).

  10. Light Fragment Production and Power Law Behavior in Au + Au Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.; Albergo, S.; Bieser, F.; Brady, F.P.; Caccia, Z.; Cebra, D.A.; Chacon, A.D.; Chance, J.L.; Choi, Y.; Costa, S.; Elliott, J.B.; Gilkes, M.L.; Hauger, J.A.; Hirsch, A.S.; Hjort, E.L.; Insolia, A.; Justice, M.; Keane, D.; Kintner, J.; Lisa, M.A.; Matis, H.S.; McMahan, M.; McParland, C.; Olson, D.L.; Partlan, M.D.; Porile, N.T.; Potenza, R.; Rai, G.; Rasmussen, J.; Ritter, H.G.; Romanski, J.; Romero, J.L.; Russo, G.V.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Scott, A.; Shao, Y.; Srivastava, B.K.; Symons, T.J.M.; Tincknell, M.L.; Tuve, C.; Warren, P.G.; Weerasundara, D.; Wieman, H.H.; Wolf, K.L.

    1995-01-01

    Using charged-particle-exclusive measurements of Au+Au collisions in the LBL Bevalac's EOS time projection chamber, we investigate momentum-space densities of fragments up to 4 He as a function of fragment transverse momentum, azimuth relative to the reaction plane, rapidity, multiplicity, and beam energy. Most features of these densities above a transverse momentum threshold are consistent with momentum-space coalescence, and, in particular, the increase in sideward flow with fragment mass is generally well described by a momentum-space power law

  11. Energy Dependence of Particle Multiplicities in Central Au+Au Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Corbo, J.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Henderson, C.; Hicks, D.; Hofman, D.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Rafelski, M.; Rbeiz, M.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2002-01-01

    We present the first measurement of the pseudorapidity density of primary charged particles in Au+Au collisions at (sNN) = 200 GeV. For the 6% most central collisions, we obtain dNch/dη\\|\\|η\\|<1 = 650+/-35(syst). Compared to collisions at (sNN) = 130 GeV, the highest energy studied previously, an increase by a factor of 1.14+/-0.05 at 90% confidence level, is found. The energy dependence of the pseudorapidity density is discussed in comparison with data from proton-induced collisions and theoretical predictions.

  12. CHARGED PARTICLE MULTIPLICITIES IN ULTRA-RELATIVISTIC AU+AU AND CU+CU COLLISIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, B. B.; Alver, B.; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Chetluru, V.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harnarine, I.; Hauer, M.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, W.; Lin, W. T.; Loizides, C.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Reed, C.; Richardson, E.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Szostak, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; Vannieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Walters, P.; Wenger, E.; Willhelm, D.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wyngaardt, S.; Wyslouch, B.

    The PHOBOS collaboration has carried out a systematic study of charged particle multiplicities in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A unique feature of the PHOBOS detector is its ability to measure charged particles over a very wide angular range from 0.5° to 179.5° corresponding to |η| <5.4. The general features of the charged particle multiplicity distributions as a function of pseudo-rapidity, collision energy and centrality, as well as system size, are discussed.

  13. Fermi surfaces properties of AuAl2, AuGa2, and AuIn2 with the CaF2-type cubic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, K.; Kakihana, M.; Suzuki, F.; Yara, T.; Hedo, M.; Nakama, T.; Ōnuki, Y.; Harima, H.

    2018-05-01

    We grew high-quality single crystals of AuAl2, AuGa2, and AuIn2 with the fluorite (CaF2)-type cubic structure and determined the Fermi surface properties by the de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) experiments using full-potential LAPW bad calculations. The Fermi surface and optical properties for three compounds were once studied from an interest of colors because AuAl2 has a striking bright reddish-purple color, whereas AuGa2 and AuIn2 are, respectively, neutral and bluish. The detected dHvA frequencies in the present study are found to be in a wide range of (0.1-13)×107 Oe. The main dHvA branches for three compounds are in excellent agreement with the theoretical ones, but some dHvA branches with small dHvA frequencies are slightly deviated from the theoretical ones, especially in AuGa2 and AuIn2.

  14. Azimuthal di-hadron correlations in d plus Au and Au plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV measured at the STAR detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D.R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M.J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielčík, Jaroslav; Bielčíková, Jana; Biritz, B.; Bland, L.C.; Bonner, B.E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A.V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M.C.D.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M.C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, Petr; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Chen, J.Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K.E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R.F.; Codrington, M.J.M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A.D.; De Silva, L.C.; Debbe, R.R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Derevschikov, A.A.; de Souza, R.D.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J.L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J.C.; Mazumdar, M.R.D.; Efimov, L.G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R.G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangaharan, D.R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y.N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.X.; Harris, J.W.; Hays-Wehle, J.P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Hofman, D.J.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, B.; Huang, H.Z.; Humanic, T.J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C.L.; Jones, P.G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitán, Jan; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D.P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S.R.; Knospe, A.G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kushpil, Vasilij; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Landgraf, J.M.; LaPointe, S. (ed.); Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednický, Richard; Lee, Ch.; Lee, J.H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M.J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.M.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W.J.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Lu, Y.; Luo, X.; Ma, G.L.; Ma, Y.G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O.I.; Mangotra, L.K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H.S.; Matulenko, Yu.A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T.S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N.G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M.K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M.M.; Morozov, B.; Morozov, D.A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B.K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J.M.; Netrakanti, P.K.; Ng, M.J.; Nogach, L.V.; Nurushev, S.B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E.W.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B.S.; Pal, S.K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Yu.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S.C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M.A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A.M.; Potukuchi, B.V.K.S.; Powell, C.B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N.K.; Pujahari, P.R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R.L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H.G.; Roberts, J.B.; Rogachevskiy, O.V.; Romero, J.L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T.R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S.S.; Sichtermann, E.P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R.N.; Skoby, M.J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H.M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T.D.S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J.R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M.C.; Subba, N.L.; Šumbera, Michal; Sun, X.M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D.N.; Symons, T.J.M.; de Toledo, A. S.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A.H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L.H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J.H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A.R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlustý, David; Tokarev, M. V.; Trainor, T.A.; Tram, V.N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O.D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D.G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J.A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G.M.S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S.A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Westfall, G.D.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S.W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.F.; Xie, W.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q.H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, J.B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W.M.; Zhang, X.P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zhou, W.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y.H.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 2 (2010), 024912/1-024912/14 ISSN 0556-2813 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : AU+AU COLLISIONS * RADIATION * PLASMA Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 3.416, year: 2010

  15. Balance functions from Au+Au, d+Au, and p+p collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barnby, L. S.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D.R.; Bellwied, R.; Betancourt, M.J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielčík, Jaroslav; Bielčíková, Jana; Biritz, B.; Bland, L.C.; Bonner, B.E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A.V.; Bridgeman, A.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Sanchez, M.C.D.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M.C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, Petr; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Chen, J.Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K.E.; Christie, W.; Chung, P.; Clarke, R.F.; Codrington, M.J.M.; Corliss, R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Leyva, A.D.; De Silva, L.C.; Debbe, R.R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Derevschikov, A.A.; de Souza, R.D.; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J.L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J.C.; Mazumdar, M.R.D.; Efimov, L.G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Fersch, R.G.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangaharan, D.R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y.N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.X.; Harris, J.W.; Hays-Wehle, J.P.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Hofman, D.J.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, B.; Huang, H.Z.; Humanic, T.J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C.L.; Jones, P.G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitán, Jan; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Kikola, D.P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S.R.; Knospe, A.G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Koroleva, L.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kushpil, Vasilij; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M.A.C.; Landgraf, J.M.; LaPointe, S. (ed.); Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednický, Richard; Lee, Ch.; Lee, J.H.; Leight, W.; LeVine, M.J.; Li, C.; Li, L.; Li, N.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.M.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S.J.; Lisa, M.A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W.J.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Lu, Y.; Luo, X.; Ma, G.L.; Ma, Y.G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O.I.; Mangotra, L.K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H.S.; Matulenko, Yu.A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T.S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N.G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitrovski, M.K.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M.M.; Morozov, B.; Morozov, D.A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B.K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J.M.; Netrakanti, P.K.; Ng, M.J.; Nogach, L.V.; Nurushev, S.B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E.W.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B.S.; Pal, S.K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Yu.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S.C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M.A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A.M.; Potukuchi, B.V.K.S.; Powell, C.B.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N.K.; Pujahari, P.R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R.L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ritter, H.G.; Roberts, J.B.; Rogachevskiy, O.V.; Romero, J.L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R.P.; Schmitz, N.; Schuster, T.R.; Seele, J.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S.S.; Sichtermann, E.P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R.N.; Skoby, M.J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H.M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T.D.S.; Staszak, D.; Stevens, J.R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M.C.; Subba, N.L.; Šumbera, Michal; Sun, X.M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D.N.; Symons, T.J.M.; de Toledo, A. S.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A.H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L.H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J.H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A.R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlustý, David; Tokarev, M. V.; Trainor, T.A.; Tram, V.N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O.D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D.G.; Van Buren, G.; van Leeuwen, M.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vanfossen, J.A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G.M.S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S.A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Westfall, G.D.; Whitten, C.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S.W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.F.; Xie, W.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q.H.; Xu, W.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Xue, L.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, J.B.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W.M.; Zhang, X.P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zhou, W.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y.H.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 2 (2010), 024905/1-024905/16 ISSN 0556-2813 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505; CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : HEAVY-ION COLLISIONS * AU-AU COLLISIONS * TIME PROJECTION CHAMBER Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 3.416, year: 2010

  16. Electron diffraction on amorphous and crystalline AuAl2 , AuGa2 and AuIn2 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohorquez, A.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental (in situ) measurements of electron diffraction and resistivity of amorphous and crystalline AuAl 2 , AuGa 2 and AuIn 2 thin films were performed. Thin films were produced by quench condensation. Interference and atomic distribution functions were analyzed assuming the same short range order for the three systems in the amorphous phase. The experimental results do not agree with this assumption, giving evidence that the short range order is not the same for the three amorphous systems. Further discussion of interference and atomic distribution functions shows a more evident tendency in amorphous AuIn 2 where short order of AuIn 2 and In can be inferred. (Author)

  17. Preferential Au precipitation at deformation-induced defects in Fe–Au and Fe–Au–B–N alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S., E-mail: S.Zhang-1@tudelft.nl [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Langelaan, G. [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Brouwer, J.C.; Sloof, W.G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Brück, E. [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); Zwaag, S. van der [Novel Aerospace Materials Group, Faculty of Aerospace Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands); Dijk, N.H. van [Fundamental Aspects of Materials and Energy, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-01-25

    Highlights: • Fe–Au–B–N forms a good model alloy system for self healing of deformation damage. • Solute Au atoms exclusively precipitate at grain boundaries, cracks and cavities. • XPS indicates a strong tendency for Au segregation on free surfaces at 550 °C. • Interstitial B and N form hexagonal BN on free surfaces at 550 °C. • Selective Au precipitation at open volume defects can cause autonomous repair. -- Abstract: The influence of deformation-induced defects on the isothermal precipitation of Au was studied in high-purity Fe–Au and Fe–Au–B–N alloys. Preferential Au precipitation upon annealing at 550 °C is observed at local plastic indentations. In fractured Fe–Au–B–N, solute Au atoms were found to heterogeneously precipitate at grain boundaries and local micro-cracks. This is supported by in-situ creep tests that showed a strong tendency for Au precipitation at cracks and cavities also formed during creep loading at 550 °C. Complementary X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy experiments indicate a strong tendency of Au, B and N segregation onto free surface during aging. The observed site-specific precipitation of Au holds interesting opportunities for defect healing in steels subjected to creep deformation.

  18. Hypoxia, leukocytes, and the pulmonary circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenmark, Kurt R; Davie, Neil J; Reeves, John T; Frid, Maria G

    2005-02-01

    Data are rapidly accumulating in support of the idea that circulating monocytes and/or mononuclear fibrocytes are recruited to the pulmonary circulation of chronically hypoxic animals and that these cells play an important role in the pulmonary hypertensive process. Hypoxic induction of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, stromal cell-derived factor-1, vascular endothelial growth factor-A, endothelin-1, and tumor growth factor-beta(1) in pulmonary vessel wall cells, either directly or indirectly via signals from hypoxic lung epithelial cells, may be a critical first step in the recruitment of circulating leukocytes to the pulmonary circulation. In addition, hypoxic stress appears to induce release of increased numbers of monocytic progenitor cells from the bone marrow, and these cells may have upregulated expression of receptors for the chemokines produced by the lung circulation, which thus facilitates their specific recruitment to the pulmonary site. Once present, macrophages/fibrocytes may exert paracrine effects on resident pulmonary vessel wall cells stimulating proliferation, phenotypic modulation, and migration of resident fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells. They may also contribute directly to the remodeling process through increased production of collagen and/or differentiation into myofibroblasts. In addition, they could play a critical role in initiating and/or supporting neovascularization of the pulmonary artery vasa vasorum. The expanded vasa network may then act as a conduit for further delivery of circulating mononuclear cells to the pulmonary arterial wall, creating a feedforward loop of pathological remodeling. Future studies will need to determine the mechanisms that selectively induce leukocyte/fibrocyte recruitment to the lung circulation under hypoxic conditions, their direct role in the remodeling process via production of extracellular matrix and/or differentiation into myofibroblasts, their impact on the phenotype of resident smooth muscle

  19. Conductive Au nanowires regulated by silk fibroin nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Bo-Ju; Lu, Qiang

    2014-03-01

    Conductive Au-biopolymer composites have promising applications in tissue engineering such as nerve tissue regeneration. In this study, silk fibroin nanofibers were formed in aqueous solution by regulating silk self-assembly process and then used as template for Au nanowire fabrication. We performed the synthesis of Au seeds by repeating the seeding cycles for several times in order to increase the density of Au seeds on the nanofibers. After electroless plating, densely decorated Au seeds grew into irregularly shaped particles following silk nanofiber to fill the gaps between particles and finally form uniform continuous nanowires. The conductive property of the Au-silk fibroin nanowires was studied with current-voltage ( I-V) measurement. A typical ohmic behavior was observed, which highlighted their potential applications in nerve tissue regeneration.

  20. Structure of eutectic alloys of Au with Si and Ge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, S. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1, Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan)], E-mail: takeda@rc.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Fujii, H. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1, Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kawakita, Y. [Faculty of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1, Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Tahara, S.; Nakashima, S. [Graduate School of Sciences, Kyushu University, 4-2-1, Ropponmatsu, Fukuoka 810-8560 (Japan); Kohara, S.; Itou, M. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Koto Sayo-cho, Sayo Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2008-03-06

    Au-Si and Au-Ge alloy systems have a deep eutectic point in the Au-rich concentration region where the melting point falls down to 633 K. In order to investigate the liquid structure in relation to the glass-forming tendency of these alloys, high-energy X-ray diffraction measurements have been carried out at the eutectic composition and at compositions with excess amounts of Au or IVb element. The nearest neighbor correlations in the eutectic liquids are intense and sharp in the pair distribution function and exhibit a rather small temperature dependence in comparison with those alloys of other than the eutectic composition. Structural models for these liquid alloys are proposed with the aid of reverse Monte Carlo simulation. The reproduced atomic arrangements around the eutectic region exhibit a substitutional-type structure where the dense random packing of Au atoms is preserved and Si or Ge atoms occupy the Au-sites at random.

  1. Que faisons-nous au CERN ?

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    Le CERN a pour vocation la science pure, l'étude des questions les plus fondamentales de la nature:Qu'est-ce que la matière ?D'ou vient-elle ? Comment s'agglomère-t-elle en formes complexes comme les étoiles, les planètes et les êtres humains ? Au CERN, les collisions de particules servent à sonder le coeur de la matière et les chercheurs du Laboratoire étudient ces millions de collisions de particules afin de trouver des réponses à ces questions.

  2. Les frameworks au coeur des applications web

    OpenAIRE

    Moro, Arielle; Daehne, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Depuis quelques années, Internet est vraiment entré dans les mœurs : tant dans les entreprises qu’au sein de chaque foyer. En effet, Internet permet de communiquer à travers le monde en quelques secondes, de vendre toute sorte de produits en déployant des solutions e-commerce facilement et bien d’autres choses. Internet est donc un véritable vecteur de communication, de commerce et à présent, avec le Web 2.0, un vrai berceau d’informations (tant des informations personnelles que des informati...

  3. Quantum interference effects in nanostructured Au

    CERN Document Server

    Pratumpong, P; Evans, S D; Johnson, S; Howson, M A

    2002-01-01

    We present results on the magnetoresistance and temperature dependence of the resistivity for nanostructured Au produced by chemical means. The magnetoresistance was typical of highly disordered metals exhibiting quantum interference effects. We fitted the data and were able to determine the spin-orbit scattering relaxation time to be 10 sup - sup 1 sup 2 s and we found the inelastic scattering time at 10 K to be 10 sup - sup 1 sup 1 s. The inelastic scattering rate varied as T sup 3 between 4 and 20 K, which is typical for electron-phonon scattering in disordered metals.

  4. Reconfigurable c-Si/Au hybrid nanoantenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebykin, A. V.; Zalogina, A. S.; Zuev, D. A.; Makarov, S. V.

    2017-09-01

    We have performed numerical optimization of hybrid c-Si/Au nanoantenna's geometry to improve efficiency of NV-centers radiation. We have shown that Purcell factor at the wavelength 635 nm can be as much as 4550 for point light emitter placed in the gap between gold spherical nanoparticle and truncated silicon nanocone. We have demonstrated that electric field enhancement can reach a value of 12.9 at the wavelength of NV-center pumping, 532 nm. Our results can be useful for the development of more efficient sources of single photons based on NV-centers in nanodiamonds.

  5. Le CRDI au Népal

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Au cours des années 1980 et 1990, les recherches menées dans le domaine de la phytosélection ont donné lieu à l'amélio- ration du rendement de céréales telles que le mil et l'orge. Par la suite, d'autres activités de recherche ont rendu les agriculteurs mieux en mesure de préserver la diversité génétique de leurs cultures ...

  6. Dialogue avec les groupes islamistes au Moyen-Orient | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Par exemple, les groupes islamistes en Égypte, en Jordanie, au Koweït, au Maroc et au Yémen rejettent la violence politique, appuient la primauté du droit et acceptent le pluralisme politique. Il n'en demeure pas moins que certaines politiques des groupes islamistes, même les plus modérés, continuent à poser problème ...

  7. Electrochemical Properties of Alkanethiol Monolayers Adsorbed on Nanoporous Au Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Yeon Yi; Seo, Bora; Kim, Jong Won

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the electrochemical properties of alkanethiol monolayers adsorbed on NPG surfaces by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and the results are compared to those on flat Au surfaces. The reductive desorption of alkanethiols on NPG surfaces is observed in more negative potential regions than that on flat Au surfaces due the stronger S-Au interaction on NPG surfaces. While the electron transfer through alkanethiol monolayers on flat Au surfaces occurs via a tunneling process through the monolayer films, the redox species can permeate through the monolayers on NPG surfaces to transfer the electrons to the Au surfaces. The results presented here will help to elucidate the intrinsic electrochemical properties of alkanethiol monolayers adsorbed on curved Au surfaces, particularly on the surface of AuNPs. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of thiolate molecules on Au surfaces have been the subject of intensive research for the last few decades due to their unique physical and chemical properties. The well-organized surface structures of thiolate SAMs with various end-group functionalities can be further utilized for many applications in biology and nanotechnology. In addition to the practical applications, SAMs of thiolate molecules on Au surfaces also provide unique opportunities to address fundamental issues in surface chemistry such as self-organized surface structures, electron transfer behaviors, and moleculesubstrate interactions. Although there have been numerous reports on the fundamental physical and chemical properties of thiolate SAMs on Au surfaces, most of them were investigated on flat Au surfaces, typically on well-defined Au(111) surfaces

  8. First principles study of pentacene on Au(111)

    OpenAIRE

    Stokbro, Kurt; Smidstrup, Søren

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the atomic and electronic structure of a single layer of pentacene on the Au(111) surface using density functional theory. To find the candidate structures we strain match the pentacene crystal geometry with the Au(111) surface, in this way we find pentacene overlayer structures with a low strain. We show that the geometries obtained with this approach has lower energy than previous proposed surface geometries of pentacene on Au(111). We also show that the geometry and workfunc...

  9. Energy level alignment in Au/pentacene/PTCDA trilayer stacks

    OpenAIRE

    Sehati, P.; Braun, S.; Fahlman, M.

    2013-01-01

    Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy is used to investigate the energy level alignment and molecular orientation at the interfaces in Au/pentacene/PTCDA trilayer stacks. We deduced a standing orientation for pentacene grown on Au while we conclude a flat lying geometry for PTCDA grown onto pentacene. We propose that the rough surface of polycrystalline Au induces the standing geometry in pentacene. It is further shown that in situ deposition of PTCDA on pentacene can influence the orientati...

  10. Experimental evidence for electron localization on Au upon photo-activation of Au/anatase catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carneiro, J.T.; Carneiro, Joana T.; Savenije, Tom J.; Mul, Guido

    2009-01-01

    Time resolved microwave conductivity (TRMC) measurements show that the presence of Au on anatase Hombikat UV100 significantly reduces the lifetime of mobile electrons formed by photo-excitation of this photocatalyst at 300 nm, providing evidence for the widely acclaimed electron localization effect

  11. Magnetic holes in the solar wind between 0.3 AU and 17 AU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sperveslage

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic holes (MHs are depressions of the magnetic field magnitude. Turner et al. (1977 identified the first MHs in the solar wind and determined an occurrence rate of 1.5 MHs/d. Winterhalter et al. (1994 developed an automatic identification criterion to search for MHs in Ulysses data in the solar wind between 1 AU and 5.4 AU. We adopt their criterion to expand the search to the heliocentric distances down to 0.3 AU using data from Helios 1 and 2 and up to 17 AU using data from Voyager 2. We relate our observations to two theoretical approaches which describe the so-called linear MHs in which the magnetic vector varies in magnitude rather than direction. Therefore we focus on such linear MHs with a directional change less than 10º. With our observations of about 850 MHs we present the following results: Approximately 30% of all the identified MHs are linear. The maximum angle between the initial magnetic field vector and any vector inside the MH is 20º in average and shows a weak relation to the depth of the MHs. The angle between the initial magnetic field and the minimum variance direction of those structures is large and very probably close to 90º. The MHs are placed in a high β environment even though the average solar wind shows a smaller β. The widths decrease from about 50 proton inertial length in a region between 0.3 AU and 0.4 AU heliocentric distance to about 15 proton inertial length at distances larger than 10 AU. This quantity is correlated with the β of the MH environments with respect to the heliocentric distance. There is a clear preference for the occurrence of depressions instead of compressions. We discuss these results with regard to the main theories of MHs, the mirror instability and the alternative soliton approach. Although our observational results are more consistent with the soliton theory we favour a combination of both. MHs might be the remnants of initial mirror mode structures which can be described as

  12. Temperature, salinity, conductivity, and other measurements collected in the Northern Ocean as part of the Arctic Experiment in 1994 (NODC Accession 0002728)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Investigation of thermohaline circulation in Nordic Seas, hydrography and pathways of Atlantic water summer Arctic experiments

  13. Circulating water pumps for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Hiroshi; Ohmori, Tsuneaki

    1979-01-01

    Shortly, the nuclear power station with unit power output of 1100 MW will begin the operation, and the circulating water pumps manufactured recently are those of 2.4 to 4 m bore, 840 to 2170 m 3 /min discharge and 2100 to 5100 kW driving power. The circulating water pumps are one of important auxiliary machines, because if they fail, power generation capacity lowers immediately. Enormous quantity of cooling water is required to cool condensers, therefore in Japan, sea water is usually used. As siphon is formed in circulating water pipes, the total head of the pumps is not very high. The discharge of the pumps is determined so as to keep the temperature rise of discharged water lower than 7 deg. C. The quantity of cooling water for nuclear power generation is about 50% more as compared with thermal power generation because of the difference in steam conditions. The total head of the pumps is normally from 8 to 15 m. The circulating water pumps rarely stop after they started the operation, therefore it is economical to determine the motor power so that it can withstand 10% overload for a short period, instead of large power. At present, vertical shaft, oblique flow circulating water pumps are usually employed. Recently, movable blade pumps are adopted. The installation, construction and materials of the pumps and the problems are described. (Kako, I.)

  14. Cascade of circulations in fluid turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory L

    2006-12-01

    Kelvin's theorem on conservation of circulations is an essential ingredient of Taylor's theory of turbulent energy dissipation by the process of vortex-line stretching. In previous work, we have proposed a nonlinear mechanism for the breakdown of Kelvin's theorem in ideal turbulence at infinite Reynolds number. We develop here a detailed physical theory of this cascade of circulations. Our analysis is based upon an effective equation for large-scale coarse-grained velocity, which contains a turbulent-induced vortex force that can violate Kelvin's theorem. We show that singularities of sufficient strength, which are observed to exist in turbulent flow, can lead to nonvanishing dissipation of circulation for an arbitrarily small coarse-graining length in the effective equations. This result is an analog for circulation of Onsager's theorem on energy dissipation for singular Euler solutions. The physical mechanism of the breakdown of Kelvin's theorem is diffusion of lines of large-scale vorticity out of the advected loop. This phenomenon can be viewed as a classical analog of the Josephson-Anderson phase-slip phenomenon in superfluids due to quantized vortex lines. We show that the circulation cascade is local in scale and use this locality to develop concrete expressions for the turbulent vortex force by a multiscale gradient expansion. We discuss implications for Taylor's theory of turbulent dissipation and we point out some related cascade phenomena, in particular for magnetic flux in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

  15. Structural and optical studies of Au doped titanium oxide films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, E.; Franco, N.; Barradas, N.P.; Nunes, B.; Lopes, J.; Cavaleiro, A.; Torrell, M.; Cunha, L.; Vaz, F.

    2012-01-01

    Thin films of TiO 2 were doped with Au by ion implantation and in situ during the deposition. The films were grown by reactive magnetron sputtering and deposited in silicon and glass substrates at a temperature around 150 °C. The undoped films were implanted with Au fluences in the range of 5 × 10 15 Au/cm 2 –1 × 10 17 Au/cm 2 with a energy of 150 keV. At a fluence of 5 × 10 16 Au/cm 2 the formation of Au nanoclusters in the films is observed during the implantation at room temperature. The clustering process starts to occur during the implantation where XRD estimates the presence of 3–5 nm precipitates. After annealing in a reducing atmosphere, the small precipitates coalesce into larger ones following an Ostwald ripening mechanism. In situ XRD studies reveal that Au atoms start to coalesce at 350 °C, reaching the precipitates dimensions larger than 40 nm at 600 °C. Annealing above 700 °C promotes drastic changes in the Au profile of in situ doped films with the formation of two Au rich regions at the interface and surface respectively. The optical properties reveal the presence of a broad band centered at 550 nm related to the plasmon resonance of gold particles visible in AFM maps.

  16. Structural and optical studies of Au doped titanium oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, E., E-mail: ealves@itn.pt [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear (ITN), 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Gama Pinto, 21649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Franco, N.; Barradas, N.P. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear (ITN), 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Centro de Fisica Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Gama Pinto, 21649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Nunes, B. [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear (ITN), 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Lopes, J. [Instituto Superior de Engenharia de Lisboa (Portugal); Cavaleiro, A. [SEC-CEMUC - Universidade de Coimbra, Dept. Eng. Mecanica, Polo II, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Torrell, M.; Cunha, L.; Vaz, F. [Centro de Fisica, Universidade do Minho, 4800-058 Guimaraes (Portugal)

    2012-02-01

    Thin films of TiO{sub 2} were doped with Au by ion implantation and in situ during the deposition. The films were grown by reactive magnetron sputtering and deposited in silicon and glass substrates at a temperature around 150 Degree-Sign C. The undoped films were implanted with Au fluences in the range of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} Au/cm{sup 2}-1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} Au/cm{sup 2} with a energy of 150 keV. At a fluence of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} Au/cm{sup 2} the formation of Au nanoclusters in the films is observed during the implantation at room temperature. The clustering process starts to occur during the implantation where XRD estimates the presence of 3-5 nm precipitates. After annealing in a reducing atmosphere, the small precipitates coalesce into larger ones following an Ostwald ripening mechanism. In situ XRD studies reveal that Au atoms start to coalesce at 350 Degree-Sign C, reaching the precipitates dimensions larger than 40 nm at 600 Degree-Sign C. Annealing above 700 Degree-Sign C promotes drastic changes in the Au profile of in situ doped films with the formation of two Au rich regions at the interface and surface respectively. The optical properties reveal the presence of a broad band centered at 550 nm related to the plasmon resonance of gold particles visible in AFM maps.

  17. Carbon monoxide oxidation on bimetallic Ru/Au(111 surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROLF-JÜRGEN BEHM

    2001-02-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical deposition of Ru on Au(111 was performed in 0.5 M H2SO4+10-4 M RuCl3 . The obtained bimetallic Ru/Au(111 surfaces were character-ised by cyclic voltammetry and in situ STM in 0.5 MH2SO4. The Ru deposit consists of nanoscale islands, which merge with increasing coverage. Two different types of bimetallic Ru/Au(111 surfaces with respect to the distribution of Ru islands over the Au(111 substrate surface were obtained. When the deposition was performed at potentials more positive than the range of Au(111 reconstruction, homogeneous nucleation occured resulting in a random distribution of Ru islands. When the deposition was performed on reconstructed Au(111 at low overpotentials, selective nucleation occured resulting in the replication of the Au(111 reconstruction. Only at higher deposition overpotentials, can multilayer deposits be formed, which exhibit a very rough surface morphology. The electrocatalytic activity of such structurally well defined Ru/Au(111 bimetallic surfaces was studied towards CO oxidation with the Ru coverage ranging from submonolayer to several monolayer. COstripping commences at about 0.2 Vand occurs over a broad potential range. The observed influence of the Ru structure on the CO stripping voltammetry is explained by local variations in the COadsorption energy, caused by differences in the local Ru structure and by effects induced by the Au(111 substrate.

  18. Au(111) and Pt(111) surface phase behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandy, A.R.; Mochrie, S.G.J.; Zehner, D.M.

    1993-01-01

    We describe our recent X-ray scattering studies of the structure and phases of the clean Au(111) and Pt(111) surfaces. Below 0.65 of their respective bulk melting temperatures, the Au(111) surface has a well-ordered chevron reconstruction and the Pt(111) surface is unreconstructed. Above these te......We describe our recent X-ray scattering studies of the structure and phases of the clean Au(111) and Pt(111) surfaces. Below 0.65 of their respective bulk melting temperatures, the Au(111) surface has a well-ordered chevron reconstruction and the Pt(111) surface is unreconstructed. Above...

  19. Circulation as Assessment: Collection Development Policies Evaluated in Terms of Circulation at a Small Academic Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkins, Debbi

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the use of academic library circulation statistics to assess whether user needs are being met and describes a study at Stetson University that investigated collection development practices by comparing circulation statistics for books selected by faculty in support of departmental curricula with those of librarian selections. (Author/LRW)

  20. Observation of D0 Meson Nuclear Modifications in Au +Au Collisions at √sNN =200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D0) production via the hadronic decay channel (D0→K-+π+) in Au +Au collisions at √sNN =200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, Nbin, from p +p to central Au +Au collisions. The D0 meson yields in central Au +Au collisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by Nbin, for transverse momenta pT>3 GeV /c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate pT is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions and coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.

  1. Approche historiographique des pratiques sportives au Cameroun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biwole M. Claude Emmanuel Abolo

    2016-01-01

    En 50 ans d'indépendance, le sport camerounais a beaucoup évolué. De 11 en 1970, les fédérations sportives sont passées à plus de 40 aujourd'hui et les titres, trophées et médailles ne se comptent plus depuis lors. Le Cameroun est devenu progressivement une nation où le sport compte et où l'exploit sportif n'est plus méprisé, rejeté, voire vilipendé. Hier assimilés à des brutes épaisses, les sportifs sont aujourd'hui admirés et adulés. Finie l'image négative de marginaux qui leur collait au corps : finis les sous-entendus ridicules où ils étaient classés au bas de l'échelle sociale, juste bons pour bander les muscles et réaliser des performances. C'est cela la plus grande victoire du sport camerounais en 50 ans d'existence. Il a réussi à faire l'unanimité et les performances des sportifs devenues pour toute la nation un modèle, une référence et un réel motif de fierté.

  2. Apprentissage administratif : L'apprentissage au CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    APPRENTISSAGE ADMINISTRATIF FORMATION ET DEVELOPPEMENT HR/PMD/RCC L'APPRENTISSAGE AU CERN pour les professions d'employé(e) de commerce et d'assistant(e) en information documentaire L'apprentissage au CERN est régi par les lois, règlements et contrats en vigueur dans le Canton de Genève. En cas de réussite à l'examen de fin d'apprentissage, les apprentis obtiennent le Certificat Fédéral de Capacité Suisse (CFC). 1 place est offerte pour la formation d'employé(e) de commerce 2 places sont offertes pour la formation d'assistant(e) en information documentaire L'apprentissage dure 3 ans. Minima requis pour faire acte de candidature : • avoir terminé la scolarité obligatoire • être ressortissant d'un pays membre du CERN (Allemagne, Autriche, Belgique, Bulgarie, Danemark, Espagne,Finlande, France, Grèce, Hongrie, Italie, Norvège...

  3. Microstructural evolution of Au/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite films: The influence of Au concentration and thermal annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, J., E-mail: joelborges@fisica.uminho.pt [Instituto Pedro Nunes, Laboratório de Ensaios, Desgaste e Materiais, Rua Pedro Nunes, 3030-199 Coimbra (Portugal); SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Centro/Departamento de Física, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Kubart, T.; Kumar, S.; Leifer, K. [Solid-State Electronics, Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, Uppsala SE-751 21 (Sweden); Rodrigues, M.S. [Instituto Pedro Nunes, Laboratório de Ensaios, Desgaste e Materiais, Rua Pedro Nunes, 3030-199 Coimbra (Portugal); Centro/Departamento de Física, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Duarte, N.; Martins, B.; Dias, J.P. [Instituto Pedro Nunes, Laboratório de Ensaios, Desgaste e Materiais, Rua Pedro Nunes, 3030-199 Coimbra (Portugal); Cavaleiro, A. [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Vaz, F. [SEG-CEMUC, Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Centro/Departamento de Física, Universidade do Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal)

    2015-04-01

    Nanocomposite thin films consisting of a dielectric matrix, such as titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}), with embedded gold (Au) nanoparticles were prepared and will be analysed and discussed in detail in the present work. The evolution of morphological and structural features was studied for a wide range of Au concentrations and for annealing treatments in air, for temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 °C. Major findings revealed that for low Au atomic concentrations (at.%), there are only traces of clustering, and just for relatively high annealing temperatures, T ≥ 500 °C. Furthermore, the number of Au nanoparticles is extremely low, even for the highest annealing temperature, T = 800 °C. It is noteworthy that the TiO{sub 2} matrix also crystallizes in the anatase phase for annealing temperatures above 300 °C. For intermediate Au contents (5 at.% ≤ C{sub Au} ≤ 15 at.%), the formation of gold nanoclusters was much more evident, beginning at lower annealing temperatures (T ≥ 200 °C) with sizes ranging from 2 to 25 nm as the temperature increased. A change in the matrix crystallization from anatase to rutile was also observed in this intermediate range of compositions. For the highest Au concentrations (> 20 at.%), the films tended to form relatively larger clusters, with sizes above 20 nm (for T ≥ 400 °C). It is demonstrated that the structural and morphological characteristics of the films are strongly affected by the annealing temperature, as well as by the particular amounts, size and distribution of the Au nanoparticles dispersed in the TiO{sub 2} matrix. - Highlights: • Au:TiO{sub 2} films were produced by magnetron sputtering and post-deposition annealing. • The Au concentration in the films increases with the Au pellet area. • Annealing induced microstructural changes in the films. • The nanoparticle size evolution with temperature depends on the Au concentration.

  4. Hollow Au@Pd and Au@Pt core-shell nanoparticles as electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Hyon Min

    2012-09-27

    Hybrid alloys among gold, palladium and platinum become a new category of catalysts primarily due to their enhanced catalytic effects. Enhancement means not only their effectiveness, but also their uniqueness as catalysts for the reactions that individual metals may not catalyze. Here, preparation of hollow Au@Pd and Au@Pt core-shell nanoparticles (NPs) and their use as electrocatalysts are reported. Galvanic displacement with Ag NPs is used to obtain hollow NPs, and higher reduction potential of Au compared to Ag, Pd, and Pt helps to produce hollow Au cores first, followed by Pd or Pt shell growth. Continuous and highly crystalline shell growth was observed in Au@Pd core-shell NPs, but the sporadic and porous-like structure was observed in Au@Pt core-shell NPs. Along with hollow core-shell NPs, hollow porous Pt and hollow Au NPs are also prepared from Ag seed NPs. Twin boundaries which are typically observed in large size (>20 nm) Au NPs were not observed in hollow Au NPs. This absence is believed to be due to the role of the hollows, which significantly reduce the strain energy of edges where the two lattice planes meet. In ethanol oxidation reactions in alkaline medium, hollow Au@Pd core-shell NPs show highest current density in forward scan. Hollow Au@Pt core-shell NPs maintain better catalytic activities than metallic Pt, which is thought to be due to the better crystallinity of Pt shells as well as the alloy effect of Au cores. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  5. An SFG and DFG investigation of polycrystalline Au, Au-Cu and Au-Ag-Cu electrodes in contact with aqueous solutions containing KCN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bozzini, Benedetto; Busson, Bertrand; De Gaudenzi, Gian Pietro; Mele, Claudio; Tadjeddine, Abderrahmane

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the behaviour of polycrystalline Au, Au-Cu (Cu 25%) and Au-Ag-Cu (Ag 10%, Cu 15%) electrodes in contact with neutral aqueous solutions of KCN has been studied as a function of potential by means of in situ sum frequency generation (SFG) and difference frequency generation (DFG) spectroscopies. The potential-dependent spectra have been analysed quantitatively with a model for the second-order non-linear susceptibility accounting for vibrational and electronic effects. The potential-dependence of the CN - stretching band position and of the free-electron contribution to the real part of the non-resonant component of the second-order susceptibility have been accounted for. Spectroelectrochemical results were complemented by cyclic voltammetric measurements. The chief stress in this work has been placed on systematising and quantifying the interaction between the vibrational and electronic structures of the electrodic interfaces studied. The effects of adsorbates on the electronic structure of the adsorbing electrode, as a function of electrode alloy composition and applied potential are particularly critical for the understanding of Au-alloy electrochemistry in the presence of cyanide and cyanocomplexes. The systematic comparison of SFG and DFG spectra measured under the same electrochemical conditions for Au, Au-Cu and Au-Ag-Cu electrodes discloses a rich phenomenology related to the electronic structure of the interface

  6. An SFG and DFG investigation of polycrystalline Au, Au-Cu and Au-Ag-Cu electrodes in contact with aqueous solutions containing KCN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozzini, Benedetto [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Universita di Lecce, v. Monteroni, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)]. E-mail: benedetto.bozzini@unile.it; Busson, Bertrand [CLIO-LCP, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); De Gaudenzi, Gian Pietro [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Universita di Lecce, v. Monteroni, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Mele, Claudio [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Universita di Lecce, v. Monteroni, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Tadjeddine, Abderrahmane [UDIL-CNRS, Bat. 201, Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, BP 34, 91898 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2007-01-16

    In this paper, the behaviour of polycrystalline Au, Au-Cu (Cu 25%) and Au-Ag-Cu (Ag 10%, Cu 15%) electrodes in contact with neutral aqueous solutions of KCN has been studied as a function of potential by means of in situ sum frequency generation (SFG) and difference frequency generation (DFG) spectroscopies. The potential-dependent spectra have been analysed quantitatively with a model for the second-order non-linear susceptibility accounting for vibrational and electronic effects. The potential-dependence of the CN{sup -} stretching band position and of the free-electron contribution to the real part of the non-resonant component of the second-order susceptibility have been accounted for. Spectroelectrochemical results were complemented by cyclic voltammetric measurements. The chief stress in this work has been placed on systematising and quantifying the interaction between the vibrational and electronic structures of the electrodic interfaces studied. The effects of adsorbates on the electronic structure of the adsorbing electrode, as a function of electrode alloy composition and applied potential are particularly critical for the understanding of Au-alloy electrochemistry in the presence of cyanide and cyanocomplexes. The systematic comparison of SFG and DFG spectra measured under the same electrochemical conditions for Au, Au-Cu and Au-Ag-Cu electrodes discloses a rich phenomenology related to the electronic structure of the interface.

  7. Experimental study of the natural circulation phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabundjian, Gaiane; Andrade, Delvonei Alves de; Umbehaun, Pedro E.; Torres, Walmir M.; Castro, Alfredo Jose Alvim de; Belchior Junior, Antonio; Rocha, Ricardo Takeshi Vieira da; Damy, Osvaldo Luiz de Almeida; Torres, Eduardo

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to study the natural circulation in experimental loops and extend the results to nuclear facilities. New generation of compact nuclear power plants use the natural circulation as cooling and residual heat removal systems in case of accidents or shutdown. Lately the interest in this phenomenon, by scientific community, has increased. The experimental loop, described in this paper, was assembled at Escola Politecnica - USP at the Chemical Engineering Department. It is the goal to generate information to help with the understanding of the one and two phase natural circulation phenomena. Some experiments were performed with different levels of heat power and different flow of the cooling water at the secondary circuit. The data generated from these experiments are going to be used to validate some computational thermal hydraulic codes. Experimental results for one and two phase regimes are presented as well as the proposed model to simulate the flow regimes with the RELAP5 code. (author)

  8. Systems engineering requirements impacting MHTGR circulator design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, H.W.; Baccaglini, G.M.; Potter, R.C.; Shenoy, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    At the initiation of the MHTGR program, an important task involved translating the plant users' requirements into design conditions. This was particularly true in the case of the heat transport and shutdown cooling systems since these embody many components. This paper addresses the two helium circulators in these systems. An integrated approach is being used in the development of design and design documentation for the MHTGR plant. It is an organized and systematic development of plant functions and requirements, determined by top-down design, performance, and cost trade-off studies and analyses, to define the overall plant systems, subsystems, components, and human actions. These studies, that led to the identification of the major design parameters for the two circulators, are discussed in this paper. This includes the performance information, steady state and transient data, and the various interface requirements. The design of the circulators used in the MHTGR is presented. (author). 1 ref., 17 figs

  9. Circulating microRNAs in breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamam, Rimi; Hamam, Dana; Alsaleh, Khalid A

    2017-01-01

    Effective management of breast cancer depends on early diagnosis and proper monitoring of patients' response to therapy. However, these goals are difficult to achieve because of the lack of sensitive and specific biomarkers for early detection and for disease monitoring. Accumulating evidence in ...... circulating miRNAs as diagnostic, prognostic or predictive biomarkers in breast cancer management.......Effective management of breast cancer depends on early diagnosis and proper monitoring of patients' response to therapy. However, these goals are difficult to achieve because of the lack of sensitive and specific biomarkers for early detection and for disease monitoring. Accumulating evidence...... in the past several years has highlighted the potential use of peripheral blood circulating nucleic acids such as DNA, mRNA and micro (mi)RNA in breast cancer diagnosis, prognosis and for monitoring response to anticancer therapy. Among these, circulating miRNA is increasingly recognized as a promising...

  10. Adjustable speed drives improve circulating water system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dent, R.A.; Dicic, Z.

    1994-01-01

    This paper illustrates the integration of electrical and mechanical engineering requirements to produce a solution to past problems and future operating demands. The application of adjustable speed drives in the modifications of the circulating water system at Indian Point No. 3 Nuclear Power Plant provided increased operating flexibility, efficiency and avoided otherwise costly renovations to the plant electrical systems. Rectification of the original inadequate design of the circulating water system, in addition to maximizing plant efficiency consistent with environmental considerations, formed the basis for this modification. This entailed replacement of all six circulating water pumps and motors and physical modifications to the intake system. This paper details the methodology used in this engineering task. The new system was installed successfully and has been operating reliably and economically for the past eight years

  11. Natural circulation in a scaled PWR integral test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiang, R.L.; Jeuck, P.R. III

    1987-01-01

    Natural circulation is an important mechanism for cooling a nuclear power plant under abnormal operating conditions. To study natural circulation, we modeled a type of pressurized water reactor (PWR) that incorporates once-through steam generators. We conducted tests of single-phase natural circulations, two-phase natural circulations, and a boiler condenser mode. Because of complex geometry, the natural circulations observed in this facility exhibit some phenomena not commonly seen in a simple thermosyphon loop

  12. Experimental study of natural circulation circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemos, Wanderley F.; Su, Jian, E-mail: wlemos@lasme.coppe.ufrj.br, E-mail: sujian@lasme.coppe.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (LASME/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Simulacao e Metodos Numericos; Faccini, Jose L.H., E-mail: faccini@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (LTE/IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Termo-Hidraulica Experimental

    2011-07-01

    This work presents an experimental study about fluid flows behavior in natural circulation, under conditions of single-phase flow. The experiment was performed through experimental thermal-hydraulic circuit built at IEN. This test equipment has performance similar to passive system of residual heat removal present in Advanced Pressurized Water Reactors (APWR). This experimental study aims to observing and analyzing the natural circulation phenomenon, using this experimental circuit that was dimensioned and built based on concepts of similarity and scale. This philosophy allows the analysis of natural circulation behavior in single-phase flow conditions proportionally to the functioning real conditions of a nuclear reactor. The experiment was performed through procedures to initialization of hydraulic feeding of primary and secondary circuits and electrical energizing of resistors installed inside heater. Power controller has availability to adjust values of electrical power to feeding resistors, in order to portray several conditions of energy decay of nuclear reactor in a steady state. Data acquisition system allows the measurement and monitoring of the evolution of the temperature in various points through thermocouples installed in strategic points along hydraulic circuit. The behavior of the natural circulation phenomenon was monitored by graphical interface on computer screen, showing the temperature evolutions of measuring points and results stored in digital spreadsheets. The results stored in digital spreadsheets allowed the getting of data to graphic construction and discussion about natural circulation phenomenon. Finally, the calculus of Reynolds number allowed the establishment for a correlation of friction in function of geometric scales of length, heights and cross section of tubing, considering a natural circulation flow throughout in the region of hot leg. (author)

  13. Fort St. Vrain circulator operating experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brey, H. L.

    1988-08-15

    Fort St. Vrain, on the system of Public Service Company of Colorado, is the only high-temperature gas-cooled power reactor in the United States. Four helium circulators are utilized in this plant to transfer heat from the reactor to the steam generators. These unique machines have a single stage axial flow helium compressor driven by a single stage steam turbine. A single stage water driven (pelton wheel) turbine is the back-up drive utilizing either feed water, condensate, or fire water as the driving fluid. Developmental testing of the circulators was accomplished prior to installation into Fort St. Vrain. A combined machine operating history of approximately 250,000 hours has shown these machines to be of conservative design and proven mechanical integrity. However, many problems have been encountered in operating the complex auxiliaries which are necessary for successful circulator and plant operation. It has been 15 years since initial installation of the circulators occurred at Fort St. Vrain. During this time, a number of significant issues had to be resolved dealing specifically with machine performance. These events include cavitation damage of the pelton wheels during the initial plant hot functional testing, cracks in the water turbine buckets and cervic coupling, static shutdown seal bellows failure, and, most recently, degradation of components within the steam drive assembly. Unreliable operation particularly with the circulator auxiliaries has been a focus of attention by Public Service Company of Colorado. Actions to replace or significantly modify the existing circulators and their auxiliaries are currently awaiting decisions concerning the long-term future of the Fort St. Vrain plant. (author). 10 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs.

  14. Experimental study of natural circulation circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemos, Wanderley F.; Su, Jian; Faccini, Jose L.H.

    2011-01-01

    This work presents an experimental study about fluid flows behavior in natural circulation, under conditions of single-phase flow. The experiment was performed through experimental thermal-hydraulic circuit built at IEN. This test equipment has performance similar to passive system of residual heat removal present in Advanced Pressurized Water Reactors (APWR). This experimental study aims to observing and analyzing the natural circulation phenomenon, using this experimental circuit that was dimensioned and built based on concepts of similarity and scale. This philosophy allows the analysis of natural circulation behavior in single-phase flow conditions proportionally to the functioning real conditions of a nuclear reactor. The experiment was performed through procedures to initialization of hydraulic feeding of primary and secondary circuits and electrical energizing of resistors installed inside heater. Power controller has availability to adjust values of electrical power to feeding resistors, in order to portray several conditions of energy decay of nuclear reactor in a steady state. Data acquisition system allows the measurement and monitoring of the evolution of the temperature in various points through thermocouples installed in strategic points along hydraulic circuit. The behavior of the natural circulation phenomenon was monitored by graphical interface on computer screen, showing the temperature evolutions of measuring points and results stored in digital spreadsheets. The results stored in digital spreadsheets allowed the getting of data to graphic construction and discussion about natural circulation phenomenon. Finally, the calculus of Reynolds number allowed the establishment for a correlation of friction in function of geometric scales of length, heights and cross section of tubing, considering a natural circulation flow throughout in the region of hot leg. (author)

  15. Fort St. Vrain circulator operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brey, H.L.

    1988-01-01

    Fort St. Vrain, on the system of Public Service Company of Colorado, is the only high-temperature gas-cooled power reactor in the United States. Four helium circulators are utilized in this plant to transfer heat from the reactor to the steam generators. These unique machines have a single stage axial flow helium compressor driven by a single stage steam turbine. A single stage water driven (pelton wheel) turbine is the back-up drive utilizing either feed water, condensate, or fire water as the driving fluid. Developmental testing of the circulators was accomplished prior to installation into Fort St. Vrain. A combined machine operating history of approximately 250,000 hours has shown these machines to be of conservative design and proven mechanical integrity. However, many problems have been encountered in operating the complex auxiliaries which are necessary for successful circulator and plant operation. It has been 15 years since initial installation of the circulators occurred at Fort St. Vrain. During this time, a number of significant issues had to be resolved dealing specifically with machine performance. These events include cavitation damage of the pelton wheels during the initial plant hot functional testing, cracks in the water turbine buckets and cervic coupling, static shutdown seal bellows failure, and, most recently, degradation of components within the steam drive assembly. Unreliable operation particularly with the circulator auxiliaries has been a focus of attention by Public Service Company of Colorado. Actions to replace or significantly modify the existing circulators and their auxiliaries are currently awaiting decisions concerning the long-term future of the Fort St. Vrain plant. (author). 10 refs, 7 figs, 2 tabs

  16. Controlled synthesis of PbS-Au nanostar-nanoparticle heterodimers and cap-like Au nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nana; Li, Lianshan; Huang, Teng; Qi, Limin

    2010-11-01

    Uniform PbS-Au nanostar-nanoparticle heterodimers consisting of one Au nanoparticle grown on one horn of a well-defined six-horn PbS nanostar were prepared using the PbS nanostars as growth substrates for the selective deposition of Au nanoparticles. The size of the Au nanoparticles on the horns of the PbS nanostars could be readily adjusted by changing the PbS concentration for the deposition of Au nanoparticles. An optimum cetyltrimethylammonium bromide concentration and temperature were essential for the selective deposition of uniform Au nanoparticles on single horns of the PbS nanostars. Unusual PbS-Au nanoframe-nanoparticle heterodimers were obtained by etching the PbS-Au nanostar-nanoparticle heterodimers with oxalic acid while novel cap-like Au nanoparticles were obtained by etching with hydrochloric acid. The obtained heterodimeric nanostructures and cap-like nanoparticles are promising candidates for anisotropic nanoscale building blocks for the controllable assembly of useful, complex architectures.

  17. Au/SiO2 nanocomposite film substrates with a high number density of Au nanoparticles for molecular conductance measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae-Gun; Koyama, Emiko; Kikkawa, Yoshihiro; Kirihara, Kazuhiro; Naitoh, Yasuhisa; Kim, Deok-Soo; Tokuhisa, Hideo; Kanesato, Masatoshi; Koshizaki, Naoto

    2007-01-01

    Au/SiO 2 nanocomposite films consisting of an extremely high number density of Au nanoparticles dispersed in a SiO 2 matrix a few nanometres thick were deposited by a co-sputtering method, and employed for molecular conductance measurement by immobilizing and bridging conjugated biphenyl molecules on dispersed Au nanoparticles. The number density of Au nanoparticles in the insulating SiO 2 matrix was approximately 14 000 μm 2 , and the average interparticle distance from their neighbours was about 8 nm. The current increased considerably up to the range of nanoamperes after the immobilization of the conjugated biphenyl molecules, 10 5 times larger than without molecules before immobilization. Although the Au nanoparticles can be connected to only 30% of all combinations of neighbouring Au nanoparticles by biphenyl molecules 2.4 nm long from the topological analysis, the biphenyl molecules can bridge most of the Au nanoparticles, and their bridging continuity is over 100 nm in length. Thus the measured current is suggested to come from the continuously bridged molecules between the Au nanoparticles. Furthermore the I-V data of the whole Au/SiO 2 nanocomposite film immobilized with conjugated molecules are confirmed to be in a reasonable range in comparison with the scanning tunnelling spectroscopy data of similar conjugated molecules

  18. Strange baryon resonance production in sqrt s NN=200 GeV p+p and Au+Au collisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Bai, Y; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Bhardwaj, S; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Blyth, S-L; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Bravar, A; Burton, T P; Bystersky, M; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Castillo, J; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; de Moura, M M; Dedovich, T G; DePhillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Djawotho, P; Dogra, S M; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Edwards, W R; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gaillard, L; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Gorbunov, Y G; Gos, H; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, N; Gutierrez, T D; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; He, W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Hepplemann, S; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Horner, M J; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E W; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jia, F; Jiang, H; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kim, B C; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Kislov, E M; Klein, S R; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kowalik, K L; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; LaPointe, S; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lehocka, S; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lin, X; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, G L; Ma, J G; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Millane, J; Miller, M L; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D K; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reinnarth, J; Relyea, D; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarsour, M; Sazhin, P S; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Seyboth, P; Shabetai, A; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shen, W Q; Shimanskiy, S S; Sichtermann, E; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stadnik, A; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Sumbera, M; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Swanger, M; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Buren, G Van; van der Kolk, N; van Leeuwen, M; Molen, A M Vander; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I M; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W T; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wetzler, A; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Z; Yepes, P; Yoo, I-K; Yurevich, V I; Zhan, W; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zubarev, A N; Zuo, J X

    2006-09-29

    We report the measurements of Sigma(1385) and Lambda(1520) production in p+p and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[s{NN}]=200 GeV from the STAR Collaboration. The yields and the p(T) spectra are presented and discussed in terms of chemical and thermal freeze-out conditions and compared to model predictions. Thermal and microscopic models do not adequately describe the yields of all the resonances produced in central Au+Au collisions. Our results indicate that there may be a time span between chemical and thermal freeze-out during which elastic hadronic interactions occur.

  19. Correlated Production of Protons and Antiprotons in Au + Au Collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Correlations between p and (anti p) at transverse momenta typical of enhanced baryon production in Au + Au collisions are reported. The PHENIX experiment has measured same and opposite sign baryon pairs in Au + Au collisions at √(ovr S NN ) = 200 GeV. Correlated production of proton and (anti p) with the trigger particle from the range 2.5 T T T range rises with increasing centrality, except for the most central collisions, where baryons show a significantly smaller number of associated mesons. These data are consistent with a picture in which hard scattered partons produce correlated p and (anti p) in the p T region of the baryon excess.

  20. Parton interactions and two particle transverse momentum correlations in Au + Au collisions at √SNN=130 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qingjun; Guo Liqun; Piao Xingliang

    2006-01-01

    Partonic effects on two-particle transverse momentum correlations are studied for Au + Au collisions at √S NN =130 GeV in the Monte Carlo model, AMPT. This study demonstrates that in these collisions partonic interactions contribute significantly to the correlations. Additionally, model calculations are compared with data of the two-particle transverse momentum correlations measured by the STAR Collaboration at RHIC, and it is found that AMPT with string melting can well reproduce the measured centrality dependence of the two-particle transverse momentum correlations in Au + Au collisions at √S NN =130 GeV. (authors)

  1. Alloying Au surface with Pd reduces the intrinsic activity in catalyzing CO oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Qian, Kun; Luo, Liangfeng; Jiang, Zhiquan; Huang, Weixin

    2016-01-01

    were evaluated. The formation of Au-Pd alloy particles was identified. The Au-Pd alloy particles exhibit enhanced dispersions on SiO2 than Au particles. Charge transfer from Pd to Au within Au-Pd alloy particles. Isolated Pd atoms dominate the surface

  2. Quenching phenomena in natural circulation loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umekawa, Hisashi; Ozawa, Mamoru; Ishida, Naoki

    1995-01-01

    Quenching phenomena has been investigated experimentally using circulation loop of liquid nitrogen. During the quenching under natural circulation, the heat transfer mode changes from film boiling to nucleate boiling, and at the same time flux changes with time depending on the vapor generation rate and related two-phase flow characteristics. Moreover, density wave oscillations occur under a certain operating condition, which is closely related to the dynamic behavior of the cooling curve. The experimental results indicates that the occurrence of the density wave oscillation induces the deterioration of effective cooling of the heat surface in the film and the transition boiling regions, which results in the decrease in the quenching velocity

  3. Labour circulation and the urban labour process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standing, G

    1986-01-01

    The author investigates aspects of labor circulation, which he defines as "temporary movement between geographical areas for work or in search of work....[He attempts to determine] what roles have been played by labour circulation in the development of urban-industrial labour forces in the transition to industrial capitalism." Factors considered include the exploitation and oppression of labor migrants; the industrial-urban labor reserve; urban socioeconomic stratification and discrimination by age, sex, or race; the division of labor; and policy options. excerpt

  4. An elementary model of money circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovskii, Vladimir N.; Schinckus, Christophe

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigates money circulation for a system, consisting of a production system, the government, a central bank, commercial banks and many customers of the commercial banks. A set of equations for the system is written; the theory determines the main features of interaction between production and money circulation. Investigation of the equations in a steady-state situation reveals some relationship among output of the production system and monetary variables. The relation of quantity theory of money is confirmed, whereas a new concept of the efficiency of the system is introduced.

  5. Engineering Judgment and Natural Circulation Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreri, J.C.; Ferreri, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    The analysis performed to establish the validity of computer code results in the particular field of natural circulation flow stability calculations is presented in the light of usual engineering practice. The effects of discretization and closure correlations are discussed and some hints to avoid undesired mistakes in the evaluations performed are given. Additionally, the results are presented for an experiment relevant to the way in which a (small) number of skilled, nuclear safety analysts and researchers react when facing the solution of a natural circulation problem. These results may be also framed in the concept of Engineering Judgment and are potentially useful for Knowledge Management activities.

  6. First circulating beam in the AA

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    On 3 July 1980, two years after project authorization, beam circulated for the first time in the AA. It was a 3.56 GeV/c proton test beam. We see an expecting crowd, minutes before the happy event. The persons are too numerous to name them all, but the 3 most prominent ones are at the centre (left to right): Roy Billinge (Joint AA Project Leader, with his hand on the control box), Eifionydd Jones (white shirt), Simon van der Meer (spiritus rector and Joint AA Project Leader). The first antiprotons were injected, made to circulate and cooled soon after, on 14 July 1980.

  7. Quenching phenomena in natural circulation loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umekawa, Hisashi; Ozawa, Mamoru [Kansai Univ., Osaka (Japan); Ishida, Naoki [Daihatsu Motor Company, Osaka (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Quenching phenomena has been investigated experimentally using circulation loop of liquid nitrogen. During the quenching under natural circulation, the heat transfer mode changes from film boiling to nucleate boiling, and at the same time flux changes with time depending on the vapor generation rate and related two-phase flow characteristics. Moreover, density wave oscillations occur under a certain operating condition, which is closely related to the dynamic behavior of the cooling curve. The experimental results indicates that the occurrence of the density wave oscillation induces the deterioration of effective cooling of the heat surface in the film and the transition boiling regions, which results in the decrease in the quenching velocity.

  8. Resonance production and exotic clusters in Au+Au, d+Au and p+p collisions at √(s) = 200 AGeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besliu, Calin; Jipa, Alexandru; Lungescu, Andrea; Zgura, Sorin

    2004-01-01

    The resonance production in Au+Au, d+Au and p+p collisions at √(s) = 200 AGeV are presented. The resonances are used as a sensitive tool to examine the collision dynamics in the hadronic medium through their decay and regeneration. The modification of resonance mass, width, and shape due to phase space and dynamical effects are also discussed. The measurement of resonances provides an important tool for studying the dynamics in relativistic heavy-ion collisions by probing the time evolution of the source from chemical to kinetic freeze-out and the hadronic interactions at later stages

  9. Growth and structure of Co/Au magnetic thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsot, N.

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the growth and the crystallographic structure of magnetic ultra thin cobalt/gold films (Co/Au), in order to investigate the correlations between their magnetic and structural properties. Room temperature (R.T.) Co growth on Au (111) proceeds in three stages. Up to 2 Co monolayers (ML), a bilayer island growth mode is observed. Between 2 and 5 ML, coalescence of the islands occurs, covering the substrate surface and a Co/Au mixing is observed resulting from the de-construction of the Herringbone reconstruction. Finally, beyond 5 ML, the CoAu mixing is buried and the Co growth continues in a 3-D growth. Annealing studies at 600 K on this system show a smoothing effect of the Co film, and at the same time, segregation of Au atoms. The quality of the Co/Au interface (sharpness) is not enhanced by the annealing. The local order was studied by SEXAFS and the long range order by GIXRD showing that the Co film has a hexagonal close packed structure, with an easy magnetization axis perpendicular to the surface. From a local order point of view, the Co grows with an incoherent epitaxy and keeps its own bulk parameters. The GIXRD analysis shows a residual strain in the Co film of 4%. The difference observed between the local order analysis and the long range order results is explained in terms of the low dimensions of the diffracting domains. The evolution of film strains, as a function of the Co coverage, shows a marked deviation from the elastic strain theory. Modification of the strain field in the Co film as a function of the Au coverage is studied by GIXRD analysis. The Au growth study, at R.T., shows no evidence of a Au/Co mixing in the case of the Au/Co interface. The Au overlayer adopts a twinned face centred cubic structure on the rough Co film surface. (author)

  10. Epitaxial growth of zigzag PtAu alloy surface on Au nano-pentagrams with enhanced Pt utilization and electrocatalytic performance toward ethanol oxidation reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Cheng; Gao, Xiaohui; Zhuang, Zhihua; Cheng, Chunfeng; Zheng, Fuqin; Li, Xiaokun; Chen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • PtAu nanoalloy surface is heteroepitaxially grown on the pre-synthesized Au nano-pentagrams. • The PtAu/Au nano-pentagrams exhibit excellent electrocatalytic activity for ethanol oxidation. • The charge transfer resistance of PtAu/Au is lower than that of commercial Pt/C. • The durability and anti-poisoning ability of PtAu/Au is much better than those of commercial Pt/C - Abstract: Improving Pt utilization is of fundamental importance for many significant processes in energy conversion, which is strongly dependent on the surface structure of used catalysts. Based on the traditional Pt-on-Au system which has been proved to be an ideal nanostructure for improving the catalytic activity and stability of Pt, and the recent follow-up studies on this system, we introduce here a new strategy for fabricating Pt surface with high-index facets over the Pt-on-Au system. To achieve this goal, we elaborately designed and fabricated a unique zigzag PtAu alloy nanosurface on Au nano-pentagrams (PtAu/Au NPs) through epitaxial growth of Pt along the high-index facets on the pre-synthesized Au nano-pentagrams. Owing to the surface electronic interaction between Au and Pt and the exposed high-index facets from the unique morphology of zigzag PtAu alloy nanosurface, the as-prepared PtAu/Au NPs exhibited excellent electrocatalytic performance toward ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) in alkaline condition. The specific activity (8.3 mA cm"−"2) and mass activity (4.4 A mg"−"1) obtained from PtAu/Au NPs are about 5.2 and 5.5 times, respectively, higher than those from commercial Pt/C for EOR.

  11. CO oxidation on Alsbnd Au nano-composite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, C.; Majumder, C.

    2018-03-01

    Using first principles method we report the CO oxidation behaviour of Alsbnd Au nano-composites in three different size ranges: Al6Au8, Al13Au42 and a periodic slab of Alsbnd Au(1 1 1) surface. The clusters prefer enclosed structures with alternating arrangement of Al and Au atoms, maximising Auδ-sbnd Alδ+ bonds. Charge distribution analysis suggests the charge transfer from Al to Au atoms, corroborated by the red shift in the density of states spectrum. Further, CO oxidation on these nano-composite systems was investigated through both Eley - Rideal and Langmuir Hinshelwood mechanism. While, these clusters interact with O2 non-dissociatively with an elongation of the Osbnd O bond, further interaction with CO led to formation of CO2 spontaneously. On contrary, the CO2 evolution by co-adsorption of O2 and CO molecules has a transition state barrier. On the basis of the results it is inferred that nano-composite material of Alsbnd Au shows significant promise toward effective oxidative catalysis.

  12. Magnetic order of Au nanoparticle with clean surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Ryuju; Ishikawa, Soichiro; Sato, Hiroyuki; Sato, Tetsuya, E-mail: satoh@appi.keio.ac.jp

    2015-11-01

    Au nanoparticles, which are kept in vacuum after the preparation by gas evaporation method, show ferromagnetism even in 1.7 nm in diameter. The intrinsic magnetism is examined by detecting the disappearance of spontaneous magnetization in Au bulk prepared by heating the nanoparticles without exposure to the air. The temperature dependence of spontaneous magnetization is not monotonic and the increase in magnetization is observed after Au nanoparticles are exposed to the air. The magnetic behavior can be interpreted by the ferrimagnetic-like core–shell structure with shell thickness of 0.16±0.01 nm and magnetic moment of (1.5±0.1)×10{sup −2} μ{sub B}/Au atom, respectively. - Highlights: • Au nanoparticles with clean surface were prepared by the gas evaporation method. • The spontaneous magnetization was observed in Au nanoparticles. • Temperature dependent spontaneous magnetization of smaller Au particles was not monotonic. • The magnetic behavior was interpreted by the ferrimagnetic-like core–shell model. • The shell thickness and the magnetic moment per Au atom were estimated.

  13. Alternating voltage-induced electrochemical synthesis of colloidal Au nanoicosahedra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCann, Kevin; Cloud, Jacqueline E.; Yang, Yongan, E-mail: yonyang@mines.edu [Colorado School of Mines, Department of Chemistry and Geochemistry (United States)

    2013-11-15

    A simple method of alternating voltage-induced electrochemical synthesis has been developed to synthesize highly dispersed colloidal Au nanoicosahedra of 14 ± 3 nm in size. This simple and effective method uses a common transformer to apply a zero-offset alternating voltage to a pair of identical Au electrodes that are immersed in an electrolyte solution containing ligands. The obtained Au nanoicosahedra in this work are among the smallest Au icosahedra synthesized in aqueous solutions. A series of experimental conditions have been studied, such as voltage, the electrolyte identity and concentration, stabilizer identity and concentration, and reaction temperature. The mechanistic study indicates that Au nanoicosahedra are produced on electrode surfaces through an intermediate state of AuO{sub x}. The kinetic rate constant of these Au icosahedra in catalyzing the reduction of 4-nitrophenol with sodium borohydride is found much larger than the literature values of similar Au nanocrystals. In addition, the synthesis of Au–Pd-alloyed NCs has also been attempted.Graphical Abstract.

  14. The Type II supernovae 2006V and 2006au

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taddia, F.; Stritzinger, M. D.; Sollerman, J.

    2012-01-01

    curve evolution similar to that of SN 1987A. At the earliest epochs, SN 2006au also displays an initial dip which we interpret as the signature of the adiabatic cooling phase that ensues shock break-out. SNe 2006V and 2006au are both found to be bluer, hotter and brighter than SN 1987A. Spectra of SNe...

  15. Lessons learned from AU PSO-missions in Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandrup, Thomas

    The paper deals with the lessons learned from AU's PSO since 2002, and what that entails for the design of future PSO.......The paper deals with the lessons learned from AU's PSO since 2002, and what that entails for the design of future PSO....

  16. Synthesis and stability of monolayer-protected Au38 clusters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toikkanen, O.; Ruiz, V.; Rönnholm, G.; Kalkkinen, N.; Liljeroth, P.W.; Quinn, B.M.

    2008-01-01

    A synthesis strategy to obtain monodisperse hexanethiolate-protected Au38 clusters based on their resistance to etching upon exposure to a hyperexcess of thiol is reported. The reduction time in the standard Brust−Schiffrin two-phase synthesis was optimized such that Au38 were the only clusters that

  17. Gouvernance et gestion des ressources communes au Vietnam ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Gouvernance et gestion des ressources communes au Vietnam. La subvention permettra au Collège d'agriculture et de foresterie de l'Université de Huê de se pencher sur des questions reliées à la gestion des ressources communes et à la pauvreté dans ... New funding opportunity for gender equality and climate change.

  18. Growth and structure of Co/Au magnetic thin films; Croissance et structure des couches minces magnetiques Co/Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsot, N

    1999-01-14

    We have studied the growth and the crystallographic structure of magnetic ultra thin cobalt/gold films (Co/Au), in order to investigate the correlations between their magnetic and structural properties. Room temperature (R.T.) Co growth on Au (111) proceeds in three stages. Up to 2 Co monolayers (ML), a bilayer island growth mode is observed. Between 2 and 5 ML, coalescence of the islands occurs, covering the substrate surface and a Co/Au mixing is observed resulting from the de-construction of the Herringbone reconstruction. Finally, beyond 5 ML, the CoAu mixing is buried and the Co growth continues in a 3-D growth. Annealing studies at 600 K on this system show a smoothing effect of the Co film, and at the same time, segregation of Au atoms. The quality of the Co/Au interface (sharpness) is not enhanced by the annealing. The local order was studied by SEXAFS and the long range order by GIXRD showing that the Co film has a hexagonal close packed structure, with an easy magnetization axis perpendicular to the surface. From a local order point of view, the Co grows with an incoherent epitaxy and keeps its own bulk parameters. The GIXRD analysis shows a residual strain in the Co film of 4%. The difference observed between the local order analysis and the long range order results is explained in terms of the low dimensions of the diffracting domains. The evolution of film strains, as a function of the Co coverage, shows a marked deviation from the elastic strain theory. Modification of the strain field in the Co film as a function of the Au coverage is studied by GIXRD analysis. The Au growth study, at R.T., shows no evidence of a Au/Co mixing in the case of the Au/Co interface. The Au overlayer adopts a twinned face centred cubic structure on the rough Co film surface. (author)

  19. Synthesis and crystal structure of a new Cu3Au-type ternary phase in the Au-In-Pd system: distribution of atoms over crystallographic positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptashkina, Evgeniya A; Kabanova, Elizaveta G; Tursina, Anna I; Yatsenko, Alexandr V; Kuznetsov, Victor N

    2018-03-01

    A new Cu 3 Au-type ternary phase (τ phase) is found in the AuPd-rich part of the Au-In-Pd system. It has a broad homogeneity range based on extensive (Pd,Au) and (In,Au) replacement, with the composition varying between Au 17.7 In 25.3 Pd 57.0 and Au 50.8 In 16.2 Pd 33.0 . The occupancies of the crystallographic positions were studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction for three samples of different composition. The sites with m-3m symmetry are occupied by atoms with a smaller scattering power than the atoms located on 4/mmm sites. Two extreme structure models were refined. Within the first, the occupation type changes from (Au,In,Pd) 3 (Pd,In) to (Au,Pd) 3 (In,Pd,Au) with an increase in the Au gross content. For the second model, the occupation type (Au,In,Pd) 3 (Pd,Au) remains essentially unchanged for all Au concentrations. Although the diffraction data do not allow the choice of one of these models, the latter model, where Au substitutes In on 4/mmm sites, seems to be preferable, since it agrees with the fact that the homogeneity range of the τ phase is inclined to the Au corner and provides the same occupation type for all the studied samples of different compositions.

  20. Evidence from d+Au measurements for final-state suppression of high-p(T) hadrons in Au+Au collisions at RHIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhaskar, P; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Castro, M; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, B; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Ganti, M S; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Gaudichet, L; Germain, M; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grigoriev, V; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guedon, M; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gushin, E; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaneta, M; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konstantinov, A S; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lansdell, C P; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Leontiev, V M; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Messer, M; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nevski, P; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pandey, S U; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Rykov, V; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seliverstov, D; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tikhomirov, V; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Trivedi, M D; Trofimov, V; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; VanderMolen, A M; Vasiliev, A N; Vasiliev, M; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yakutin, A E; Yamamoto, E; Yang, J; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Zanevski, Y V; Zborovský, I; Zhang, H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2003-08-15

    We report measurements of single-particle inclusive spectra and two-particle azimuthal distributions of charged hadrons at high transverse momentum (high p(T)) in minimum bias and central d+Au collisions at sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV. The inclusive yield is enhanced in d+Au collisions relative to binary-scaled p+p collisions, while the two-particle azimuthal distributions are very similar to those observed in p+p collisions. These results demonstrate that the strong suppression of the inclusive yield and back-to-back correlations at high p(T) previously observed in central Au+Au collisions are due to final-state interactions with the dense medium generated in such collisions.

  1. Interface stress in Au/Ni multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweitz, K.O.; Böttiger, J.; Chevallier, J.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of intermixing on the apparent interface stress is studied in -textured dc-magnetron sputtered Au/Ni multilayers by use of two methods commonly used for determining interface stress. The method using profilometry and in-plane x-ray diffraction does not take intermixing...... into account and yields an apparent interface stress of -8.46 +/- 0.99 J m(-2). However, observed discrepancies between model calculations and measured high-angle x-ray diffractograms indicate intermixing, and by use of the profilometry and sin(2) psi method the real interface stress value of -2.69 +/- 0.43 J...... m(-2) is found. This method also reveals a significant and systematic change of the stress-free lattice parameter of both constituents as a function of modulation period which is shown to account for the difference between the two findings. The method using in-plane diffraction is thus shown...

  2. La Physique au LHC - Partie I

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    Le LHC devrait permettre l'observation du boson de Higgs et pouvoir lever le voile sur l'un des scénarios de nouvelle physique présentés dans la cours précédent. Ce cours détaillera les perspectives de physique au LHC (découvertes possibles et mesures de précision) ainsi que les méthodes et difficultés expérimentales. L'accent sera mis sur les problèmes liés à la brisure de la symétrie electrofaible. Les possibilités de développement futur à plus haute luminosité et/ou énergie seront également discutées.

  3. Development of Ir/Au-TES microcalorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunieda, Yuichi; Fukuda, Daiji; Ohno, Masashi; Nakazawa, Masaharu; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Ataka, Manabu; Ohkubo, Masataka; Hirayama, Fuminori

    2004-01-01

    We are developing X-ray microcalorimeters using transition edge sensors (TES) for high resolution x-ray spectroscopy. Microcalorimeters are thermal detectors which measure the energy of an incident x-ray photon using a TES thermometer operated at a sharp transition edge between normal and superconducting states. TES microcalorimeters can achieve faster response than conventional microcalorimeters by keeping the operating point of TES in the transition region through the use of strong negative electrothermal feedback (ETF). We developed a bilayer TES where a normal metal Au was deposited on a superconductor Ir in order to improve the thermal conductivity of the Ir-TES. We investigated resistance-temperature characteristics. As a result, it showed a very sharp transition within 1 mK at the temperature of 110 mK. The energy resolution of 9.4 eV (FWHM) was achieved for a 5899 eV Mn K al line. (author)

  4. and Au nanoparticles for SERS applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazio Enza

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphological and optical properties of noble metal nanoparticles prepared by picosecond laser generated plasmas in water were investigated. First, the ablation efficiency was maximized searching the optimal focusing conditions. The nanoparticle size, measured by Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy, strongly depends on the laser fluence, keeping fixed the other deposition parameters such as the target to scanner objective distance and laser repetition frequency. STEM images indicate narrow gradients of NP sizes. Hence the optimization of ablation parameters favours a fine tuning of nanoparticles. UV-Visible spectroscopy helped to determine the appropriate laser wavelength to resonantly excite the localized surface plasmon to carry out Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS measurements. The SERS activity of Ag and Au substrates, obtained spraying the colloids synthesized in water, was tested using crystal violet as a probe molecule. The good SERS performance, observed at excitation wavelength 785 nm, is attributed to aggregation phenomena of nanoparticles sprayed on the support.

  5. Jounin Nicolas, Chantier interdit au public

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Nuytens

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Le travail de Nicolas Jounin s’appuie sur des enquêtes de terrain réalisées dans la première moitié des années 2000, en France, dans le monde du bâtiment, sur des chantiers et autour de ceux-ci. Il paraît pour la première fois en 2008 et se présente comme un récit d’observations participantes (tandis que l’auteur aura usé d’autres techniques de recherche au cours de sa thèse de doctorat. Cette option de publier essentiellement une version dynamique du terrain, qui se retrouve dans six des hu...

  6. Bed system performance in helium circulation mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yean Jin; Jung, Kwang Jin; Ahn, Do Hee; Chung, Hong Suk [UST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Hee Suk [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Sei Hun [NFRI, Deajeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    As a part of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Project, We have conducted an experiment for storing hydrogen to depleted uranium and zirconium cobalt. The helium blanket effect has been observed in experiments using metal hydrides. The collapse of the hydrogen isotopes are accompanied by the decay heat and helium-3. Helium-3 dramatically reduces the hydrogen isotope storage capacity by surrounding the metal. This phenomenon is called a helium blanket effect. In addition the authors are working on the recovery and removal techniques of helium-3. In this paper, we discuss the equipment used to test the helium blanket effect and the results of a helium circulation experiment. The helium-3 produced surrounds the storage material surface and thus disturbs the reaction of the storage material and the hydrogen isotope. Even if the amount of helium-3 is small, the storage capacity of the SDS bed significantly drops. This phenomenon is the helium blanket effect. To resolve this phenomenon, a circulating loop was introduced. Using a circulating system, helium can be separated from the storage material. We made a helium loop that includes a ZrCo bed. Then using a metal bellows pump, we tested the helium circulation.

  7. Periodontitis and increase in circulating oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Tomofuji

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS are products of normal cellular metabolism. However, excessive production of ROS oxidizes DNA, lipids and proteins, inducing tissue damage. Studies have shown that periodontitis induces excessive ROS production in periodontal tissue. When periodontitis develops, ROS produced in the periodontal lesion diffuse into the blood stream, resulting in the oxidation of blood molecules (circulating oxidative stress. Such oxidation may be detrimental to systemic health. For instance, previous animal studies suggested that experimental periodontitis induces oxidative damage of the liver and descending aorta by increasing circulating oxidative stress. In addition, it has been revealed that clinical parameters in chronic periodontitis patients showed a significant improvement 2 months after periodontal treatment, which was accompanied by a significant reduction of reactive oxygen metabolites in plasma. Improvement of periodontitis by periodontal treatment could reduce the occurrence of circulating oxidative stress. Furthermore, recent studies indicate that the increase in circulating oxidative stress following diabetes mellitus and inappropriate nutrition damages periodontal tissues. In such cases, therapeutic approaches to systemic oxidative stress might be necessary to improve periodontal health.

  8. Natural circulation under severe accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pafford, D.J.; Hanson, D.J.; Tung, V.X.; Chmielewski, S.V.

    1992-01-01

    Research is being conducted to better understand natural circulation phenomena in mixtures of steam and noncondensibles and its influence on the temperature of the vessel internals and the hot leg, pressurizer surge line, and steam generator tubes. The temperature of these structures is important because their failure prior to reactor vessel lower head failure could reduce the likelihood of containment failure as a result of direct containment heating. Computer code calculations (MELPROG, SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3) predict high fluid temperatures in the upper plenum resulting from in-vessel natural circulation. Using a simple model for the guide tube phenomena, high upper plenum temperatures are shown to be consistent with the relatively low temperatures that were deduced metallurgically from leadscrews removed from the TMI-2 upper plenum. Evaluation of the capabilities of the RELAP5/MOD3 computer code to predict natural circulation behavior was also performed. The code was used to model the Westinghouse natural circulation experimental facility. Comparisons between code calculations and results from experiments show good agreement

  9. Opportunities in CARICOM Migration : Brain Circulation, Diasporic ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Opportunities in CARICOM Migration : Brain Circulation, Diasporic Tourism, and Investment. Between 1965 and 2000, about 12% of the Caribbean labour force moved to Canada and other developed countries, making the Caribbean the largest per capita source of emigrants in the world. Remittances from these emigrants ...

  10. Oceanic Circulation. A Programmed Unit of Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marine Maritime Academy, Castine.

    This booklet contains a programmed lesson on oceanic circulation. It is designed to allow students to progress through the subject at their own speed. Since it is written in linear format, it is suggested that students proceed through the program from "frame" to succeeding "frame." Instructions for students on how to use the booklet are included.…

  11. 3D Visualization of Global Ocean Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, V. G.; Sharma, R.; Zhang, E.; Schmittner, A.; Jenny, B.

    2015-12-01

    Advanced 3D visualization techniques are seldom used to explore the dynamic behavior of ocean circulation. Streamlines are an effective method for visualization of flow, and they can be designed to clearly show the dynamic behavior of a fluidic system. We employ vector field editing and extraction software to examine the topology of velocity vector fields generated by a 3D global circulation model coupled to a one-layer atmosphere model simulating preindustrial and last glacial maximum (LGM) conditions. This results in a streamline-based visualization along multiple density isosurfaces on which we visualize points of vertical exchange and the distribution of properties such as temperature and biogeochemical tracers. Previous work involving this model examined the change in the energetics driving overturning circulation and mixing between simulations of LGM and preindustrial conditions. This visualization elucidates the relationship between locations of vertical exchange and mixing, as well as demonstrates the effects of circulation and mixing on the distribution of tracers such as carbon isotopes.

  12. Efficient Circulation of Railway Rolling Stock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alfieri, A.; Groot, R.; Kroon, L.G.; Schrijver, A.

    2006-01-01

    Railway rolling stock (locomotives, carriages, and train units) is one of the most significant cost sources for operatorsof passenger trains, both public and private. Rolling stock costsare due to material acquisition, power supply, and material maintenance. The efficient circulation of rolling

  13. Efficient Circulation of Railway Rolling Stock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Alfieri (Arianna); R. Groot (Rutger); L.G. Kroon (Leo); A. Schrijver (Lex)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractRailway rolling stock (locomotives, carriages, and train units) is one of the most significant cost sources for operatorsof passenger trains, both public and private. Rolling stock costsare due to material acquisition, power supply, and material maintenance. The efficient circulation of

  14. Neutron scattering study of Ce3Au3Sb4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasaya, Mitsuo; Katoh, Kenichi; Kohgi, Masahumi; Osakabe, Toyotaka

    1993-01-01

    Rare-earth compounds with an Y 3 Au 3 Sb 4 -type crystal structure are semiconductors or semi-metals. Among them, Ce 3 Au 3 Sb 4 is a semiconductor with an activation energy of about 640 K and shows no magnetic order down to 1.5 K. The magnetic part of the specific heat for Ce 3 Au 3 Sb 4 obtained by subtracting the value for La 3 Au 3 Sb 4 from the total specific heat of Ce 3 Au 3 Sb 4 shows a broad peak at around 10 K, the origin of which is well explained by the crystalline-field splitting determined by neutron scattering. (author)

  15. Sputtering of Au induced by single Xe ion impacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birtcher, R. C.; Donnelly, S. E.

    1999-01-01

    Sputtering of Au thin films has been determined for Xe ions with energies between 50 and 600 keV. In-situ transmission electron microscopy was used to observe sputtered Au during deposition on a carbon foil near the specimen. Total reflection and transmission sputtering yields for a 62 nm thick Au thin film were determined by ex-situ measurement of the total amount of Au on the carbon foils. In situ observations show that individual Xe ions eject Au nanoparticles as large as 7 nm in diameter with an average diameter of approximately 3 nm. Particle emission correlates with crater formation due to single ion impacts. Nanoparticle emission contributes significantly to the total sputtering yield for Xe ions in this energy range in either reflection or transmission geometry

  16. Les circulants entre métropoles européennes à l’épreuve de leurs mobilités. Une lecture temporelle, spatiale et sociale de la pénibilité Circulating between European cities: A temporal, spatial and social reading of arduous mobility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Giroud

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cet article interroge les circulations d’individus entre Lisbonne et quatre autres métropoles européennes (Berlin, Bruxelles, Londres, Paris sous l’angle de la pénibilité. L’approche proposée articule trois dimensions, à savoir la construction des pratiques de circulation entre métropoles à l’échelle biographique, le fonctionnement familial induit par la circulation et l’expérience des lieux fréquentés au quotidien dans chacune des métropoles. La prise en compte de ces trois dimensions permet de caractériser les circulants en termes de situations de mobilité à travers lesquelles est envisagée la pénibilité. Les situations de mobilité bien vécues semblent traduire un relatif équilibre dans les modes de vie associés aux circulations. L’article met cependant en évidence une série de facteurs qui peuvent contribuer à fragiliser, ou à nuancer ces situations : la lassitude, l’absence d’espace d’identification et de projet, la gestion de l’absence du circulant au sein de la famille, la modification du rapport à des lieux de ressourcement, la limitation des pratiques dans les lieux de la circulation. Au total, il n’existe pas de segmentation claire entre ces situations de mobilité du point de vue de la pénibilité. Des situations de mobilité très diverses peuvent être vécues de manière différente. La pénibilité dépend finalement d’une combinaison de facteurs qui, pris isolément, n’ont pas d’effet mécanique.This article examines the circulation of people between Lisbon and four other European cities (Berlin, Brussels, London, Paris in terms of the difficulties that it can cause. The proposed approach articulates three dimensions, namely the construction of practices of circulation between cities at a biographical scale, the way families deal with the circulation of one or more of its members, and the daily experience of places frequented in each of the cities. Taking into account these

  17. Azimuthal Anisotropy in U +U and Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Li, Z. M.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, G. L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B. J.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2 } and v2{4 }, for charged hadrons from U +U collisions at √{sNN }=193 GeV and Au +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV . Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2 } on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U +U collisions. We also show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.

  18. Transverse energy measurement in Au + Au collisions by the STAR experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, R.

    2011-01-01

    Transverse energy (E T ) has been measured with both of its components, namely hadronic (E T had ) and electromagnetic (E T em ) in a common phase space at mid-rapidity for 62.4 GeV Au+Au collisions by the STAR experiment. E T production with centrality and √S NN is studied with similar measurements from SPS to RHIC and is compared with a final state gluon saturation model (EKRT). The most striking feature is the observation of a nearly constant value of E T /N ch ∼ 0.8 GeV from AGS, SPS to RHIC. The initial energy density estimated by the boost-invariant Bjorken hydrodynamic model, is well above the critical density for a deconfined matter of quarks and gluons predicted by lattice QCD calculations. (author)

  19. Spin-polarized ballistic conduction through correlated Au-NiMnSb-Au heterostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Morari, C.

    2017-11-20

    We examine the ballistic conduction through Au-NiMnSb-Au heterostructures consisting of up to four units of the half-metallic NiMnSb in the scattering region, using density functional theory (DFT) methods. For a single NiMnSb unit the transmission function displays a spin polarization of around 50% in a window of 1eV centered around the Fermi level. By increasing the number of layers, an almost complete spin polarization of the transmission is obtained in this energy range. Supplementing the DFT calculations with local electronic interactions, of Hubbard-type on the Mn sites, leads to a hybridization between the interface and many-body states. The significant reduction of the spin polarization seen in the density of states is not apparent in the spin polarization of the conduction electron transmission, which suggests that the hybridized interface and many-body induced states are localized.

  20. Deep sub-threshold ϕ production in Au+Au collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Arnold, O.; Behnke, C.; Belounnas, A.; Belyaev, A.; Berger-Chen, J. C.; Biernat, J.; Blanco, A.; Blume, C.; Böhmer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Chernenko, S.; Chlad, L.; Deveaux, C.; Dreyer, J.; Dybczak, A.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O.; Filip, P.; Fonte, P.; Franco, C.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Golubeva, M.; Greifenhagen, R.; Guber, F.; Gumberidze, M.; Harabasz, S.; Heinz, T.; Hennino, T.; Hlavac, S.; Höhne, C.; Holzmann, R.; Ierusalimov, A.; Ivashkin, A.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Kardan, B.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Korcyl, G.; Kornakov, G.; Kotte, R.; Kühn, W.; Kugler, A.; Kunz, T.; Kurepin, A.; Kurilkin, A.; Kurilkin, P.; Ladygin, V.; Lalik, R.; Lapidus, K.; Lebedev, A.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Mahmoud, T.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Maurus, S.; Metag, V.; Michel, J.; Mihaylov, D. M.; Morozov, S.; Müntz, C.; Münzer, R.; Naumann, L.; Nowakowski, K. N.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Petukhov, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramos, S.; Ramstein, B.; Reshetin, A.; Rodriguez-Ramos, P.; Rosier, P.; Rost, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Scheib, T.; Schuldes, H.; Schwab, E.; Scozzi, F.; Seck, F.; Sellheim, P.; Siebenson, J.; Silva, L.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Strzempek, P.; Sturm, C.; Svoboda, O.; Szala, M.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Tsertos, H.; Usenko, E.; Wagner, V.; Wendisch, C.; Wiebusch, M. G.; Wirth, J.; Zanevsky, Y.; Zumbruch, P.; Hades Collaboration

    2018-03-01

    We present data on charged kaons (K±) and ϕ mesons in Au(1.23A GeV)+Au collisions. It is the first simultaneous measurement of K- and ϕ mesons in central heavy-ion collisions below a kinetic beam energy of 10A GeV. The ϕ /K- multiplicity ratio is found to be surprisingly high with a value of 0.52 ± 0.16 and shows no dependence on the centrality of the collision. Consequently, the different slopes of the K+ and K- transverse-mass spectra can be explained solely by feed-down, which substantially softens the spectra of K- mesons. Hence, in contrast to the commonly adapted argumentation in literature, the different slopes do not necessarily imply diverging freeze-out temperatures of K+ and K- mesons caused by different couplings to baryons.

  1. Azimuthal anisotropy in Au+Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Akhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bharadwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bhatia, V.S.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopdhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; De Moura, M.M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Foley, K.J.; Fomenko, K.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.

    2004-01-01

    The results from the STAR Collaboration on directed flow (v 1 ), elliptic flow (v 2 ), and the fourth harmonic (v 4 ) in the anisotropic azimuthal distribution of particles from Au+Au collisions at √s NN = 200 GeV are summarized and compared with results from other experiments and theoretical models. Results for identified particles are presented and fit with a Blast Wave model. For v 2 , scaling with the number of constituent quarks and parton coalescence is discussed. For v 4 , scaling with v 22 and quark coalescence predictions for higher harmonic flow is discussed. The different anisotropic flow analysis methods are compared and nonflow effects are extracted from the data. For v 2 , scaling with the number of constituent quarks and parton coalescence are discussed. For v 2 2 and quark coalescence are discussed

  2. Diffractive J/{psi} production in ultra-peripheral Au-Au collisions at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, S.N. [Brookhaven National Lab., Dept. of Physics, Upton, NY (United States)

    2005-07-01

    During the 2004 Au-Au run with {radical}(S{sub NN}) = 200 GeV at RHIC, the PHENIX collaboration commissioned a trigger for J/{psi} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} and the high mass di-lepton continuum. The PHENIX experiment has excellent capability for identifying electrons since it includes a high resolution electromagnetic calorimeter array and ring imaging Cerenkov counters. The main features expected from photo-produced di-leptons are small net transverse momentum of the pair and low multiplicity of produced tracks (both characteristic of diffusive processes). Adequate event selection and a thorough extraction of the J/{psi} signal has led to a J/{psi} photoproduction cross-section of (48 {+-} 14 (stat) {+-} 16 (syst)) {mu}b.

  3. Centrality determination in Au-Au collisions at 1.23 AGeV with HADES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuschke, Maximilian [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Goethe-Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany); Collaboration: HADES-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    An important characterization of events in heavy-ion physics is the centrality. It classifies events by considering the collision's cross section relative to the total cross section of the system. This characteristics is needed for many analyses, as it provides indirect information about the initial geometrical reaction properties. As the production rate of particles is a function of the deposited energy, which itself depends on the centrality, quantities based on measured multiplicities allow to draw conclusions about the centrality of a collision. Estimators used to determine the centrality for Au-Au collisions at 1.23 AGeV recorded with HADES include the charged particle multiplicity and hit multiplicities measured with various detectors, such as the TOF/RPC or forward wall. Calibration methods accounting for variations in the acceptance of the detectors are introduced and verified by comparison with the theoretical expectations, as obtained by calculations with the Glauber-Model.

  4. Prominent transverse flow of clusters in stopped Au(150AMeV)+Au reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffin, J.P.; Kuhn, C.; Roy, C.; Cerruti, C.; Crochet, P.; Fintz, P.; Guillaume, G.; Houari, A.; Jundt, F.; Rami, F.; Tizniti, L.; Wagner, P.; Konopka, J.; Stoecker, H.

    1995-01-01

    Stopped Au(150AMeV)+Au collisions have been measured with the FOPI-Detector at GSI by imposing an upper limit on the ratio of the global longitudinal momentum to the collected charge within an event. The ejectiles, in particular those with Z>3, have a rapidity close to mid-rapidity and exhibit angular distributions in the centre-of-mass strongly peaking around 90 thus suggesting an enhancement of the flow in the transverse direction. Fits to the data and comparisons with QMD calculations indicate an averaged collective velocity in the transverse direction equal to 0.12c. Significance of the determined velocity and temperature values is discussed. ((orig.))

  5. Investigation of Au/Au(100) film growth with energetic deposition by kinetic Monte Carlo simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qingyu; Ma Tengcai; Pan Zhengying; Tang Jiayong

    2000-01-01

    The Au/Au(100) epitaxial growth with energetic deposition was simulated by using kinetic Monte Carlo method. The influences of energetic atoms on morphology and atomistic processes in the early stage of film growth were investigated. The reentrant layer-by-layer growth was observed in the temperature range of 450 K to 100 K. The authors found the energetic atoms can promote the nucleation and island growth in the early stages of film growth and enhance the smoothness of film surface at temperatures of film growth in 3-dimensional mode and in quasi-two-dimensional mode. The atomistic mechanism that promotes the nucleation and island growth and enhances the smoothness of film surface is discussed

  6. On Productions of Net-Baryons in Central Au-Au Collisions at RHIC Energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Hui Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The transverse momentum and rapidity distributions of net-baryons (baryons minus antibaryons produced in central gold-gold (Au-Au collisions at 62.4 and 200 GeV are analyzed in the framework of a multisource thermal model. Each source in the model is described by the Tsallis statistics to extract the effective temperature and entropy index from the transverse momentum distribution. The two parameters are used as input to describe the rapidity distribution and to extract the rapidity shift and contribution ratio. Then, the four types of parameters are used to structure some scatter plots of the considered particles in some three-dimensional (3D spaces at the stage of kinetic freeze-out, which are expected to show different characteristics for different particles and processes. The related methodology can be used in the analyses of particle production and event holography, which are useful for us to better understand the interacting mechanisms.

  7. Au Kenya, des oiseaux nuisent à une culture adaptée au climat ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    23 août 2013 ... KITUI, Kenya (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Le gadam, une variété de sorgho à croissance rapide résistante à la sécheresse, a été introduit au Kenya comme solution d'adaptation aux changements climatiques. Or, il se trouve que le gadam comporte un inconvénient imprévu : les oiseaux sauvages ...

  8. Autopistas: AU-1 25 de Mayo y AU-6 Perito Moreno

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial, Equipo

    1981-02-01

    Full Text Available Highways AU-1 and AU-6, approximately 17 km. long, were constructed for the purpose of solving the serious traffic problems in Buenos Aires, a city of nine million inhabitants and an evergrowing number of cars. A computer program was created for the design based on the geometric shape of the highway and the position of the supports. Using this, all elements composing the structure were calculated and the framework was sized. This programme made it possible to complete a stretch of 150 metres per week. The very rapid construction was carried out through self-supporting arches made of metallic beams held in place by brackets. The brackets were fitted in specially designed grooves in the major supports of the highway.

    Las autopistas AU-1 y AU-6, con una longitud aproximada de 17 km, se realizaron con objeto de resolver el grave problema de infraestructura vial del Municipio de Buenos Aires, ciudad de nueve millones de habitantes y con un parque de vehículos en rápido crecimiento. Para el proyecto se creó un programa de ordenador con el que, partiendo de la definición geométrica de la autopista y de la posición de las pilas, se calculan todos los elementos que componen la estructura y se dimensionan las armaduras. Este programa permitió proyectar un tramo (150 m por semana. La construcción, a un ritmo muy rápido, se llevó a cabo mediante cimbras autoportantes compuestas por vigas metálicas apoyadas sobre ménsulas, las cuales a su vez apoyan en unos nichos dejados en las pilas.

  9. Devenir De l'azote de L'engrais enrichi au n applique au tournesol ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L'utilisation de I' azote de I' engrais par la culture de toumesol a ete appreciee par Ia determination du coefficient d'utilisation apparent (CUA) estime par Ia methode de difference et du coefficient d'utilisation reel (CUR) estime par Ia methode isotopique. 80 kg N ha-1 a 4.87% d'atomes en exces de 15N ont ete appliques au ...

  10. Observations of the summer Red Sea circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofianos, Sarantis S.; Johns, William E.

    2007-06-01

    Aiming at exploring and understanding the summer circulation in the Red Sea, a cruise was conducted in the basin during the summer of 2001 involving hydrographic, meteorological, and direct current observations. The most prominent feature, characteristic of the summer circulation and exchange with the Indian Ocean, is a temperature, salinity, and oxygen minimum located around a depth of 75 m at the southern end of the basin, associated with Gulf of Aden Intermediate Water inflowing from the Gulf of Aden during the summer season as an intruding subsurface layer. Stirring and mixing with ambient waters lead to marked increases in temperature (from 16.5 to almost 33°C) and salinity (from 35.7 to more than 38 psu) in this layer by the time it reaches midbasin. The observed circulation presents a very vigorous pattern with strong variability and intense features that extend the width of the basin. A permanent cyclone, detected in the northern Red Sea, verifies previous observations and modeling studies, while in the central sector of the basin a series of very strong anticyclones were observed with maximum velocities exceeding 1 m/s. The three-layer flow pattern, representative of the summer exchange between the Red Sea and the Gulf of Aden, is observed in the strait of Bab el Mandeb. In the southern part of the basin the layer flow is characterized by strong banking of the inflows and outflows against the coasts. Both surface and intermediate water masses involved in the summer Red Sea circulation present prominent spatial variability in their characteristics, indicating that the eddy field and mixing processes play an important role in the summer Red Sea circulation.

  11. Decontamination of CAGR gas circulator components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, L.N.; Hooper, A.J.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the development and full-scale trial of two methods for removal of radioactive contamination on the surfaces of CAGR gas circulator components. The two methods described are a particle impact cleaning (PIC) decontamination technique and an electrochemical technique, 'electro-swabbing', which is based on the principle of decontamination by electro-polishing. In developing these techniques it was necessary to take account of the physical and chemical nature of the surface deposits on the gas circulator components; these were shown to consist of magnetite-type oxide and carbonaceous material. In order to follow the progress of the decontamination it was also necessary to develop a surface sampling technique which was effective and precise under these conditions; an electrochemical technique, employing similar principles to the electro-swabbing process, was developed for this purpose. The full-scale trial of the PIC decontamination technique was carried out on an inlet guide vane (IGV) assembly, this having been identified as the component from the gas circulator which contributes most to the radiation dose accumulated during routine circulator maintenance. The technique was shown to be practically viable and some 99% of the radioactive contamination was readily removed from the treated surfaces with only negligible surface damage being caused. The full-scale trial of the electro-swabbing decontamination technique was carried out on a gas circulator impeller. High decontamination factors were again achieved with ≥ 99% of the radioactive contamination being removed from the treated surfaces. The technique has practical limitations in terms of handling and treatment of waste-arisings. However, the use of specially-designed swabbing electrodes may allow the treatment of constricted geometries inaccessible to techniques such as PIC. The technique is also highly suitable for the treatment of soft-finish materials and of components fabricated from a

  12. Measurements of mass-dependent azimuthal anisotropy in central p + Au, d + Au, and 3He + Au collisions at √{sN N}=200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Alfred, M.; Andrieux, V.; Apadula, N.; Asano, H.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bagoly, A.; Bai, M.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bathe, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Blau, D. S.; Boer, M.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Bumazhnov, V.; Campbell, S.; Canoa Roman, V.; Cervantes, R.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Chujo, T.; Citron, Z.; Connors, M.; Cronin, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Dixit, D.; Do, J. H.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Fadem, B.; Fan, W.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukuda, Y.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Goto, Y.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hill, J. C.; Hill, K.; Hodges, A.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Imai, K.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Jezghani, M.; Ji, Z.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Jorjadze, V.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kanda, S.; Kang, J. H.; Kapukchyan, D.; Karthas, S.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, M.; Kim, M. H.; Kimelman, B.; Kincses, D.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Komkov, B.; Kotov, D.; Kudo, S.; Kurgyis, B.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Lacey, R.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Leitch, M. J.; Leung, Y. H.; Lewis, N. A.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Liu, M. X.; Loggins, V.-R.; Lökös, S.; Lovasz, K.; Lynch, D.; Majoros, T.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Masuda, H.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Metzger, W. J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Mihalik, D. E.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mitsuka, G.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Morrow, S. I.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagai, K.; Nagashima, K.; Nagashima, T.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nyanin, A. S.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ottino, G. J.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, M.; Peng, J.-C.; Peng, W.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perezlara, C. E.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Phipps, M.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Pun, A.; Purschke, M. L.; Radzevich, P. V.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richford, D.; Rinn, T.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Runchey, J.; Safonov, A. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, K.; Sato, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seidl, R.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shioya, T.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skoby, M. J.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Stepanov, M.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takeda, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tarnai, G.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Ueda, Y.; Ujvari, B.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vazquez-Carson, S.; Velkovska, J.; Virius, M.; Vrba, V.; Vukman, N.; Wang, X. R.; Wang, Z.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; White, A. S.; Wong, C. P.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xu, C.; Xu, Q.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yamamoto, H.; Yanovich, A.; Yin, P.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zharko, S.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2018-06-01

    We present measurements of the transverse-momentum dependence of elliptic flow v2 for identified pions and (anti)protons at midrapidity (|η |<0.35 ), in 0%-5% central p +Au and 3He+Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV. When taken together with previously published measurements in d +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV, the results cover a broad range of small-collision-system multiplicities and intrinsic initial geometries. We observe a clear mass-dependent splitting of v2(pT) in d +Au and 3He+Au collisions, just as in large nucleus-nucleus (A +A ) collisions, and a smaller splitting in p +Au collisions. Both hydrodynamic and transport model calculations successfully describe the data at low pT (<1.5 GeV /c ), but fail to describe various features at higher pT. In all systems, the v2 values follow an approximate quark-number scaling as a function of the hadron transverse kinetic energy per constituent quark (K ET/nq ), which was also seen previously in A +A collisions.

  13. Cross section of the 197Au(n,2n196Au reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalamara A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The 197Au(n,2n196Au reaction cross section has been measured at two energies, namely at 17.1 MeV and 20.9 MeV, by means of the activation technique, relative to the 27Al(n,α24Na reference reaction cross section. Quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams were produced at the 5.5 MV Tandem T11/25 accelerator laboratory of NCSR “Demokritos”, by means of the 3H(d,n4He reaction, implementing a new Ti-tritiated target of ∼ 400 GBq activity. The induced γ-ray activity at the targets and reference foils has been measured with HPGe detectors. The cross section for the population of the second isomeric (12− state m2 of 196Au was independently determined. Auxiliary Monte Carlo simulations were performed using the MCNP code. The present results are in agreement with previous experimental data and with theoretical calculations of the measured reaction cross sections, which were carried out with the use of the EMPIRE code.

  14. Stream dynamics between 1 AU and 2 AU: a detailed comparison of observations and theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burlaga, L.; Pizzo, V.; Lazarus, A.; Gazis, P.

    1984-04-01

    A radial alignment of three solar wind stream structures observed by IMP-7 and -8 (at 1.0 AU) and Voyager 1 and 2 (in the range 1.4 to 1.8 AU) in late 1977 is presented. It is demonstrated that several important aspects of the observed dynamical evolution can be both qualitatively and quantitatively described with a single-fluid 2-D MHD numerical model of quasi-steady corotating flow, including accurate prediction of: (1) the formation of a corotating shock pair at 1.75 AU in the case of a simple, quasi-steady stream; (2) the coalescence of the thermodynamic and magnetic structures associated with the compression regions of two neighboring, interacting, corotating streams; and (3) the dynamical destruction of a small (i.e., low velocity-amplitude, short spatial-scale) stream by its overtaking of a slower moving, high-density region associated with a preceding transient flow. The evolution of these flow systems is discussed in terms of the concepts of filtering and entrainment

  15. Promotion of Phenol Photodecomposition over TiO2 Using Au, Pd, and AuPd Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, Ren; Tiruvalam, Ramchandra; He, Qian

    2012-01-01

    Noble metal nanoparticles (Au, Pd, AuPd alloys) with a narrow size distribution supported on nanocrystalline TiO2 (M/TiO2) have been synthesized via a sol-immobilization route. The effect of metal identity and size on the photocatalytic performance of M/TiO2 has been systematically investigated u...

  16. Two particle correlations at mid-rapidity in Si+A and Au+Au from E859/E866

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, M.D.

    1997-01-01

    Two particle correlation measurements for Si-A and Au- Au collisions from Brookhaven E859 and E866 are discussed. These measurements allow us, with some interpretation, to deduce the size of the participant region in a heavy ion collision. We show that various source parameterizations yield consistent results and we explore the dependence of the apparent source size on the pion yield

  17. {phi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN}=200 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Gronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravstov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

    2004-06-01

    We report the STAR measurement of {psi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Using the event mixing technique, the {psi} spectra and yields are obtained at midrapidity for five centrality bins in Au+Au collisions and for non-singly-diffractive p+p collisions. It is found that the {psi} transverse momentum distributions from Au+Au collisions are better fitted with a single-exponential while the p+p spectrum is better described by a double-exponential distribution. The measured nuclear modification factors indicate that {psi} production in central Au+Au collisions is suppressed relative to peripheral collisions when scaled by the number of binary collisions (). The systematics of versus centrality and the constant {psi}/K{sup -} ratio versus beam species, centrality, and collision energy rule out kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {psi} production.

  18. Direct virtual photon production in Au plus Au collisions at root s(NN)=200 GeV STAR Collaboration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adamczyk, L.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, Jana; Chaloupka, P.; Federič, Pavol; Federičová, P.; Harlenderová, A.; Kocmánek, Martin; Kvapil, J.; Lidrych, J.; Rusňák, Jan; Rusňáková, O.; Šaur, Miroslav; Šimko, Miroslav; Šumbera, Michal; Trzeciak, B. A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 770, JUL (2017), s. 451-458 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG15001; GA MŠk LM2015054 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : STAR collaboration * transverse mementum * Au Au collisions Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 4.807, year: 2016

  19. Gold surfaces and nanoparticles are protected by Au(0)-thiyl species and are destroyed when Au(I)-thiolates form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimers, Jeffrey R.; Ford, Michael J.; Halder, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    that it is the noble character of gold and nanoparticle surfaces that destabilizes Au(I)-thiolates. Bonding results from large van der Waals forces, influenced by covalent bonding induced through s-d hybridization and charge polarization effects that perturbatively mix in some Au(I)-thiolate character. A simple method...

  20. Measurements of higher order flow harmonics in Au + Au collisions at √ sNN=200 GeV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adare, A.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Mikeš, P.; Růžička, Pavel; Tomášek, Lukáš; Vrba, Václav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 25 (2011), "252301-1"-"252301-7" ISSN 0031-9007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : PHENIX detector * Au + Au collisions * nuclear collisions * flow harmonics Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 7.370, year: 2011

  1. Charged particle multiplicity fluctuations in Au + Au collisions at √sNN = 200 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Krzysztof; the PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J. L.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2004-08-01

    This paper presents the first PHOBOS results on charged particle multiplicity fluctuations measured for Au+Au collisions at the highest RHIC energy within a wide pseudorapidity range of |η| < 3. The dependence on collision geometry is removed in the analysis by using the normalized difference between the number of particles in separate η bins. We compare our data to HIJING model predictions.

  2. Charged particle multiplicity fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200\\, {\\rm GeV}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Krzysztof; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J. L.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wyslouch, B.

    2004-08-01

    This paper presents the first PHOBOS results on charged particle multiplicity fluctuations measured for Au+Au collisions at the highest RHIC energy within a wide pseudorapidity range of |eegr| < 3. The dependence on collision geometry is removed in the analysis by using the normalized difference between the number of particles in separate eegr bins. We compare our data to HIJING model predictions.

  3. Au@AuPt nanoparticles embedded in B-doped graphene: A superior electrocatalyst for determination of rutin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xianlan; Yang, Guangming; Feng, Shaoping; Shi, Ling; Huang, Zhaolong [School of Science, Honghe University (China); Key Laboratory of Natural Pharamaceutical & Chemical Biology of Yunnan Province Mengzi, Yunnan 661100 (China); Pan, Haibo [Fujian Key Lab of Medical Instrument & Pharmaceutical Technology, Yishan Campus, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Liu, Wei, E-mail: liuwei4728@126.com [School of Science, Honghe University (China); Key Laboratory of Natural Pharamaceutical & Chemical Biology of Yunnan Province Mengzi, Yunnan 661100 (China)

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • The formation of B-doped graphene (BG) with high content of a total B species use hydrothermal method with B{sub 2}O{sub 3} as reducing agent and boron source. • BG was exfoliated into monolayer nanosheet impregnated by Au@AuPt NPs because B atom creates a net positive charge to facilitate NPs adsorption. • The dispersed carboxyl units of BG can form hydrogen bonding with the phenolic hydroxyl groups of rutin, making more rutin participate in reaction. • Au@AuPt NPs can form charge accumulation or valence change on prominent part of the surface, improving the catalytic effect to rutin. • More electroactive sites were generated by doping B atoms into graphene structures, which act as multidimensional electron transport pathways. - Abstract: A hydrothermal approach was used to prepare B-doped graphene with B{sub 2}O{sub 3} as reductant and boron source. Results reveal that the boron atoms have been successfully embedded into graphene with a high content of a total B species (2.85 at.%). Then, B-doped graphene was exfoliated further into monolayer nanosheet by impregnating Au@AuPt core-shell nanoparticles (Au@AuPt NPs) because boron atom creates a net positive charge, which facilitates Au@AuPt NPs adsorption to form Au@AuPt NPs/B-doped graphene hybrid nanocatalysts. After that, the Au@AuPt NPs/B-doped hybrid suspension was dropped on glassy carbon electrode for sensing rutin. In this way, the dispersed carboxyl units of B-doped graphene can form hydrogen bonding with the phenolic hydroxyl groups of rutin, making rutin enrich easily on modified electrode surface to enhance the electrochemical response. At the same time, its electrochemical mechanism on the modified electrode was elucidated using cyclic voltammetry. It was found that its electrochemical behavior on modified electrode surface was a surface-controlled quasi-reversible process, and the charge transfer coefficient (α) and electron transfer number (n) were 0.296 and 2, respectively

  4. Ordered arrays of Au catalysts by FIB assisted heterogeneous dewetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkouider, A; Ronda, A; David, T; Favre, L; Abbarchi, M; Naffouti, M; Osmond, J; Delobbe, A; Sudraud, P; Berbezier, I

    2015-12-18

    Synthesizing Au0.8Si0.2 nanocatalysts that are homogeneous in size and have controlled position is becoming a challenging and crucial prequisite for the fabrication of ordered semiconductor nanowires. In this study, Au0.8Si0.2 nanocatalysts are synthesized via dewetting of Au layers on Si(111) during thermal annealing in an ultra-high vacuum. In the first part of the paper, the mechanism of homogeneous dewetting is analyzed as a function of the Au-deposited thickness (h Au). We distinguish three different dewetting regimes: (I) for a low thickness ([Formula: see text]), a submonolyer coverage of Au is stabilized and there is no dewetting. (II) For an intermediate thickness ([Formula: see text]), there is both dewetting and Au0.8Si0.2 phase formation. The size and density of the Au0.8Si0.2 clusters are directly related to h Au. When cooling down to room temperature, the clusters decompose and reject the Si at the Au/Si substrate interface. (III) For a large thickness ([Formula: see text]), only dewetting takes place, without forming AuSi clusters. In this regime, the dewetting is kinetically controlled by the self-diffusion of Au (activation energy ∼0.43 eV) without evidence of an Si-alloying effect. As a practical consequence, when relying solely on the homogeneous dewetting of Au/Si(111) to form the Au0.8Si0.2 catalysts (without a supply of Si atoms from vapor), regime II should be used to obtain good size and density control. In the second part of the paper, a process for ordering the catalysts using focused ion beam-(FIB) assisted dewetting (heterogeneous dewetting) is developed. We show that no matter what the FIB milling conditions and the Au nominal thickness are, dewetting is promoted by ion beam irradiation and is accompanied by the formation of Au0.8Si0.2 droplets. The droplets preferentially form on the patterned areas, while in similar annealing conditions, they do not form on the unpatterned areas. This behavior is attributed to the larger Au

  5. In-situ STM study of phosphate adsorption on Cu(111), Au(111) and Cu/Au(111) electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlaup, Christian; Horch, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of Cu(111), Au(111) and Cu-covered Au(111) electrodes with a neutral phosphate buffer solution has been studied by means of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and in situ electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (EC-STM). Under low potential conditions, both the Cu(111) and the Au(111......) surface appear apparently adsorbate free, indicated by the presence of a (4×4) structure and the herringbone surface reconstruction, respectively. Upon potential increase, phosphate anions adsorb on both surfaces and for Cu(111) the formation of a (√3×√3)R30° structure is found, whereas on Au(111) a "(√3......×√7)" structure is formed. For a Cu-submonolayer on Au(111), coadsorption of phosphate anions leads to the formation of a (2×2) vacancy structure within an assumed pseudomorphic structure of the Cu-submonolayer with the phosphate anions occupying the vacancies. When desorbing the phosphate anions at low...

  6. High-temperature stability of Au/Pd/Cu and Au/Pd(P)/Cu surface finishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C. E.; Hsieh, W. Z.; Lee, P. T.; Huang, Y. H.; Kuo, T. T.

    2018-03-01

    Thermal reliability of Au/Pd/Cu and Au/Pd(4-6 wt.% P)/Cu trilayers in the isothermal annealing at 180 °C were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The pure Pd film possessed a nanocrystalline structure with numerous grain boundaries, thereby facilitating the interdiffusion between Au and Cu. Out-diffusion of Cu through Pd and Au grain boundaries yielded a significant amount of Cu oxides (CuO and Cu2O) over the Au surface and gave rise to void formation in the Cu film. By contrast, the Pd(P) film was amorphous and served as a good diffusion barrier against Cu diffusion. The results of this study indicated that amorphous Pd(P) possessed better oxidation resistance and thermal reliability than crystalline Pd.

  7. Uptake of Au(III) Ions by Aluminum Hydroxide and Their Spontaneous Reduction to Elemental Gold (Au(0)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama; Matsukado; Uchida; Motomura; Watanabe; Izawa

    2001-01-01

    The behavior of AuCl(4)(-) ions during the formation of aluminum hydroxide at pH 6 was examined. With an increase in NaCl concentration, the content of gold taken up by aluminum hydroxide decreased, suggesting that chloro-hydroxy complexes of Au(III) ion were taken up due to the formation of Al-O-Au bonds. It was found unexpectedly that the Au(III) ions taken up were spontaneously reduced to elemental gold without addition of a specific reducing reagent and then colloidal gold particles were formed. The mechanisms for the uptake of Au(III) ions by aluminum hydroxide and for their spontaneous reduction are discussed. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  8. Experimental investigation on natural circulation and air-injection enhanced circulation in a simple loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter Ambrosini; Nicola Forgione; Francesco Oriolo; Filippo Pellacani; Mariano Tarantino; Claudio Struckmann

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Natural circulation represents an interesting phenomenon because of both the complex aspects characterising it and for the widespread application in industry. On the other hand, injection of a gas into a rising branch of a loop represents a means to establish or to enhance a circulation flow, as it occurs in the so-called 'air-lift' loops. Both natural circulation and gas-injection enhanced circulation are presently considered for cooling Accelerator Driven System (ADS) reactors. These are subcritical reactors in which the fission reaction chain is maintained by the injection of neutrons obtained by spallation reactions in a target through a high energy proton beam generated in an external accelerator. The capability of such reactors to be used as incinerators of long lived fission products makes them particularly interesting in the light of the closure of the nuclear fuel cycle. Some of the fluids proposed as coolants for these reactors are liquid metals, with main interest for lead and lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE). Experimental activities are being performed in support to the design of the reactor prototype by different organisations. The university of Pisa, in addition to provide cooperation in these large scale activities performed with LBE has set up a specific experimental program aimed at studying the fundamental mechanisms involved in natural circulation and gas-injection enhanced circulation. The adopted experimental facility consists in a simple loop, having a rectangular lay-out (roughly, 4 m tall and 1 m wide), equipped with a 5 kW, 1 m tall heater, a 2 m long pipe-in-pipe heat exchanger, an air injection device and a separator. The fluid adopted in the tests performed up to now is water, though studies for evaluating the feasibility of the adoption of different fluids have been undertaken. Experimental data reported in previous publications concerning this research were related to a relatively high range of gas

  9. Money circulation and debt circulation: A restatement of quantity theory of money

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Xiaoyun; Xiong, Wanting; Chen, Liujun; Chen, Jiawei; Wang, Yougui; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2018-01-01

    Both money and debt are products of credit creation of banks. Money is always circulating among traders by facilitating commodity transactions. In contrast, debt is created by borrowing and annihilated by repayment as it is matured. However, when this creation- annihilation process is mediated by banks which are constrained by a credit capacity, there exists continuous transfer of debt among debtors, which can be defined as debt circulation. This paper presents a multi-agent model in which in...

  10. Enhanced middle-infrared light transmission through Au/SiO(x)N(y)/Au aperture arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Gongli; Yao, Xiang; Ji, Xinming; Zhou, Jia; Bao, Zongming; Huang, Yiping

    2011-12-01

    The enhanced middle-infrared light transmission through Au/SiO(x)N(y)/Au aperture arrays by changing the refractive index and the thickness of a dielectric layer was studied experimentally. The results indicated that the transmission spectra was highly dependent on the refractive index and the thickness of SiO(x)N(y). We found that the transmission peaks redshifted regularly along with the refractive index from 1.6 to 1.8, owing to the role of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) coupling in the Au/SiO(x)N(y)/Au cascaded metallic structure. Simultaneously, a higher transmission efficiency and narrower transmission peak was obtained in Au/SiO2.1N0.3/Au cascaded metallic structure with small refractive index (1.6) than in Au/SiO0.6N1/Au cascaded metallic structure with large refractive index (1.8). When the thickness of SiO(x)N(y) changes from 0.2 to 0.4 microm, the shape of transmission spectra exhibits a large change. It was found that a higher transmission efficiency and narrower transmission peak was obtained in Au/SiO(x)N(y)/Au cascaded metallic structure with a thin dielectric film (0.2 microm), with the increase of SiO(x)N(y) film's thickness, the transmission peak gradually widened and disappeared finally. This effect is useful in applications of biochemical sensing and tunable integrated plasmonic devices in the middle-infrared region.

  11. SORPTION OF Au(III BY Saccharomyces cerevisiae BIOMASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaria Amaria

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Au(III sorption by S. cerevisiae biomass extracted from beer waste industry was investigated. Experimentally, the sorption was conducted in batch method. This research involved five steps: 1 identification the functional groups present in the S. cerevisiae biomass by infrared spectroscopic technique, 2 determination of optimum pH, 3 determination of the sorption capacity and energy, 4 determination of the sorption type by conducting desorption of sorbed Au(III using specific eluents having different desorption capacity such as H2O (van der Waals, KNO3 (ion exchange, HNO3 (hydrogen bond, and tiourea (coordination bond, 5 determination of effective eluents in Au(III desorption by partial desorption of sorbed Au(III using thiourea, NaCN and KI. The remaining Au(III concentrations in filtrate were analyzed using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. The results showed that: 1 Functional groups of S. cerevisiae biomass that involved in the sorption processes were hydroxyl (-OH, carboxylate (-COO- and amine (-NH2, 2 maximum sorption was occurred at pH 4, equal to 98.19% of total sorption, 3 The sorption capacity of biomass was 133.33 mg/g (6.7682E-04 mol/g and was involved sorption energy 23.03 kJ mol-1, 4 Sorption type was dominated by coordination bond, 5 NaCN was effective eluent to strip Au(III close to 100%.   Keywords: sorption, desorption, S. cerevisiae biomass, Au(III

  12. Ge-Au eutectic bonding of Ge (100) single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowlton, W.B.; Beeman, J.W.; Emes, J.H.; Loretto, D.; Itoh, K.M.; Haller, E.E.

    1993-01-01

    The author present preliminary results on the eutectic bonding between two (100) Ge single crystal surfaces using thin films of Au ranging from 900 angstrom/surface to 300 angstrom/surface and Pd (10% the thickness of Au). Following bonding, plan view optical microscopy (OM) of the cleaved interface of samples with Au thicknesses ≤ 500 angstrom/surface show a eutectic morphology more conducive to phonon transmission through the bond interface. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) cross sectional interface studies of a 300 angstrom/surface Au sample show epitaxial growth of Ge. In sections of the bond, lattice continuity of the Ge is apparent through the interface. TEM studies also reveal heteroepitaxial growth of Au with a Au-Ge lattice mismatch of less than 2%. Eutectic bonds with 200 angstrom/surface Au have been attained with characterization pending. An optical polishing technique for Ge has been optimized to insure intimate contact between the Ge surfaces prior to bonding. Interferometry analysis of the optically polished Ge surface shows that surface height fluctuations lie within ±150 angstrom across an interval of lmm. Characterization of phonon transmission through the interface is discussed with respect to low temperature detection of ballistic phonons

  13. Theoretical studies of acrolein hydrogenation on Au20 nanoparticle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Chen, Zhao-Xu; He, Xiang; Kang, Guo-Jun

    2010-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles play a key role in catalytic processes. We investigated the kinetics of stepwise hydrogenation of acrolein on Au20 cluster model and compared with that on Au(110) surface. The rate-limiting step barrier of CC reduction is about 0.5 eV higher than that of CO hydrogenation on Au(110) surface. On Au20 nanoparticle, however, the energy barrier of the rate-determining step for CC hydrogenation turns out to be slightly lower than the value for the CO reduction. The selectivity difference on the two substrate models are attributed to different adsorption modes of acrolein: via the CC on Au20, compared to through both CC and CO on Au(110). The preference switch implies that the predicted selectivity of competitive hydrogenation depends on substrate model sensitively, and particles with more low-coordinated Au atoms than flat surfaces are favorable for CC hydrogenation, which is in agreement with experimental result.

  14. Stabilizing ultrasmall Au clusters for enhanced photoredox catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Bo; Lu, Kang-Qiang; Tang, Zichao; Chen, Hao Ming; Xu, Yi-Jun

    2018-04-18

    Recently, loading ligand-protected gold (Au) clusters as visible light photosensitizers onto various supports for photoredox catalysis has attracted considerable attention. However, the efficient control of long-term photostability of Au clusters on the metal-support interface remains challenging. Herein, we report a simple and efficient method for enhancing the photostability of glutathione-protected Au clusters (Au GSH clusters) loaded on the surface of SiO 2 sphere by utilizing multifunctional branched poly-ethylenimine (BPEI) as a surface charge modifying, reducing and stabilizing agent. The sequential coating of thickness controlled TiO 2 shells can further significantly improve the photocatalytic efficiency, while such structurally designed core-shell SiO 2 -Au GSH clusters-BPEI@TiO 2 composites maintain high photostability during longtime light illumination conditions. This joint strategy via interfacial modification and composition engineering provides a facile guideline for stabilizing ultrasmall Au clusters and rational design of Au clusters-based composites with improved activity toward targeting applications in photoredox catalysis.

  15. The new version of the Institute of Numerical Mathematics Sigma Ocean Model (INMSOM) for simulation of Global Ocean circulation and its variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, Anatoly; Fomin, Vladimir; Diansky, Nikolay; Korshenko, Evgeniya

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we present the improved version of the ocean general circulation sigma-model developed in the Institute of Numerical Mathematics of the Russian Academy of Sciences (INM RAS). The previous version referred to as INMOM (Institute of Numerical Mathematics Ocean Model) is used as the oceanic component of the IPCC climate system model INMCM (Institute of Numerical Mathematics Climate Model (Volodin et al 2010,2013). Besides, INMOM as the only sigma-model was used for simulations according to CORE-II scenario (Danabasoglu et al. 2014,2016; Downes et al. 2015; Farneti et al. 2015). In general, INMOM results are comparable to ones of other OGCMs and were used for investigation of climatic variations in the North Atlantic (Gusev and Diansky 2014). However, detailed analysis of some CORE-II INMOM results revealed some disadvantages of the INMOM leading to considerable errors in reproducing some ocean characteristics. So, the mass transport in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) was overestimated. As well, there were noticeable errors in reproducing thermohaline structure of the ocean. After analysing the previous results, the new version of the OGCM was developed. It was decided to entitle is INMSOM (Institute of Numerical Mathematics Sigma Ocean Model). The new title allows one to distingwish the new model, first, from its older version, and second, from another z-model developed in the INM RAS and referred to as INMIO (Institute of Numerical Mathematics and Institute of Oceanology ocean model) (Ushakov et al. 2016). There were numerous modifications in the model, some of them are as follows. 1) Formulation of the ocean circulation problem in terms of full free surface with taking into account water amount variation. 2) Using tensor form of lateral viscosity operator invariant to rotation. 3) Using isopycnal diffusion including Gent-McWilliams mixing. 4) Using atmospheric forcing computation according to NCAR methodology (Large and Yeager 2009). 5

  16. Extreme interplanetary rotational discontinuities at 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepping, R. P.; Wu, C.-C.

    2005-11-01

    This study is concerned with the identification and description of a special subset of four Wind interplanetary rotational discontinuities (from an earlier study of 134 directional discontinuities by Lepping et al. (2003)) with some "extreme" characteristics, in the sense that every case has (1) an almost planar current sheet surface, (2) a very large discontinuity angle (ω), (3) at least moderately strong normal field components (>0.8 nT), and (4) the overall set has a very broad range of transition layer thicknesses, with one being as thick as 50 RE and another at the other extreme being 1.6 RE, most being much thicker than are usually studied. Each example has a well-determined surface normal (n) according to minimum variance analysis and corroborated via time delay checking of the discontinuity with observations at IMP 8 by employing the local surface planarity. From the variance analyses, most of these cases had unusually large ratios of intermediate-to-minimum eigenvalues (λI/λmin), being on average 32 for three cases (with a fourth being much larger), indicating compact current sheet transition zones, another (the fifth) extreme property. For many years there has been a controversy as to the relative distribution of rotational (RDs) to tangential discontinuities (TDs) in the solar wind at 1 AU (and elsewhere, such as between the Sun and Earth), even to the point where some authors have suggested that RDs with large ∣Bn∣s are probably not generated or, if generated, are unstable and therefore very rare. Some of this disagreement apparently has been due to the different selection criteria used, e.g., some allowed eigenvalue ratios (λI/λmin) to be almost an order of magnitude lower than 32 in estimating n, usually introducing unacceptable error in n and therefore also in ∣Bn∣. However, we suggest that RDs may not be so rare at 1 AU, but good quality cases (where ∣Bn∣ confidently exceeds the error in ∣Bn∣) appear to be uncommon, and further

  17. Modelling the Seasonal Overturning Circulation in the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Fengchao; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Pratt, Larry; Bower, Amy; Koehl, Armin; Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh

    2015-01-01

    The overturning circulation in the Red Sea exhibits a distinct seasonally reversing pattern and is studied using 50-year, high-resolution MIT general circulation model simulations. The seasonal water exchange in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb

  18. Silent Circulation of Ross River Virus in French Polynesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maite Aubry

    2015-08-01

    Discussion: Our results support the existence of autochthonous RRV transmission and suggest that this pathogen has silently circulated in French Polynesia. These findings raise the question of possible undetected circulation of RRV in other Pacific Island Countries and Territories.

  19. Circulating dendritic cells in pediatric patients with nephrotic syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EL-HAKIM

    nephrotic syndrome, circulating DCs were measured by flowcytometry. Results: Circulating DC count ... parents or caregivers of each child before enrollment in the study. ..... role in initiating the primary immune response. On the basis of the ...

  20. Distinct proteome pathology of circulating microparticles in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Ole; Nielsen, Christoffer Tandrup; Tanassi, Julia T

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is poorly understood but has been linked to defective clearance of subcellular particulate material from the circulation. This study investigates the origin, formation, and specificity of circulating microparticles (MPs) in patients...

  1. Circulation induced by diffused aeration in a shallow lake

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-01-01

    Jan 1, 2017 ... Lastly, a simple returning flow model was proposed to describe the circulation flow patterns ... method to describe the circulation patterns induced by the bub- ... 160 holes of 1 mm, which was designed to promote high mix-.

  2. Uptake and degradation of circulating proteins by the liver.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buys, Carolus Henricus Cornelis Maria

    1976-01-01

    Circulating proteins, like all proteins in a living animal, are subject to continual replacement or turnover. This process implies both synthesis and degradation, This thesis deals with the degradative part of turnover of circulating proteins. ... Summary

  3. Anti-cyclonic circulation driven by the estuarine circulation in a gulf type ROFI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, T.; Sanford, L. P.; Nakatsuji, K.; Sugiyama, Y.

    1997-08-01

    Baroclinic residual circulation processes are examined in gulf type Regions Of Freshwater Influence (ROFIs), which have large rivers discharging into a rounded head wider than the Rossby internal deformation radius. Theoretical and observational investigations concentrate on Ise Bay, Japan, with supporting data from Osaka Bay and Tokyo Bay. Simplified analytical solutions are derived to describe the primary features of the circulation. Three dimensional residual current data collected using moored current meters and shipboard acoustic doppler current profilers (ADCPs), satellite imagery and density structure data observed using STDs, are presented for comparison to the theoretical predictions. There are three key points to understanding the resulting circulation in gulf type ROFIs. First, there are likely to be three distinct water masses: the river plume, a brackish upper layer, and a higher salinity lower layer. Second, baroclinic processes in gulf type ROFIs are influenced by the Earth's rotation at first order. Residual currents are quasi-geostrophic and potential vorticity is approximately conserved. Third, the combined effects of a classical longitudinal estuarine circulation and the Earth's rotation are both necessary to produce the resulting circulation. Anti-cyclonic vorticity is generated in the upper layer by the horizontal divergence associated with upward entrainment, which is part of the estuarine circulation. The interaction between anti-cyclonic vorticity and horizontal divergence results in two regions of qualitatively different circulation, with gyre-like circulation near the bay head and uniformly seaward anti-cyclonicly sheared flow further towards the mouth. The stagnation point separating the two regions is closer to (further away from) the bay head for stronger (weaker) horizontal divergence, respectively. The vorticity and spin-up time of this circulation are-(ƒ-ω 1)/2 and h/2w 0, respectively, where ƒ is the Coriolis parameter, ω 1 is

  4. Producing superfluid circulation states using phase imprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Avinash; Dubessy, Romain; Badr, Thomas; De Rossi, Camilla; de Goër de Herve, Mathieu; Longchambon, Laurent; Perrin, Hélène

    2018-04-01

    We propose a method to prepare states of given quantized circulation in annular Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) confined in a ring trap using the method of phase imprinting without relying on a two-photon angular momentum transfer. The desired phase profile is imprinted on the atomic wave function using a short light pulse with a tailored intensity pattern generated with a spatial light modulator. We demonstrate the realization of "helicoidal" intensity profiles suitable for this purpose. Due to the diffraction limit, the theoretical steplike intensity profile is not achievable in practice. We investigate the effect of imprinting an intensity profile smoothed by a finite optical resolution onto the annular BEC with a numerical simulation of the time-dependent Gross-Pitaevskii equation. This allows us to optimize the intensity pattern for a given target circulation to compensate for the limited resolution.

  5. Natural circulation in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastos, J.L.F.; Loureiro, L.V.; Rocha, R.T.V. da; Umbehaun, P.E.

    1992-01-01

    Several analytical modelling have been done for steady-state and slow transients conditions, besides more sophisticated studies considering two and three dimensional effects in a very simple geometry. Under severe accident conditions for PWR a code to analyse natural circulation has been developed by Westinghouse. This paper discusses the problem of natural circulation in a complex geometry similar to that of nuclear power plants. A first experiment has been done at the integral test facility of 'Co-ordination of Special Projects-Ministry of Naval Affairs' (Coordenadoria para Projetos Especiais -Ministerio da Marinha, COPESP) for several flux conditions. The results obtained were compared with numerical simulations for the steady-state regime. 09 refs, 05 figs, 01 tab. (B.C.A.)

  6. Circulation policies in health science libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, C; Coker, N C

    1970-10-01

    There is general agreement that library policies have considerable influence on the use of libraries. Medical school (health science) libraries of this country were surveyed as to their policies in respect to whether faculty and student use were regulated by a single policy, circulation regulations, hours library was accessible to users, accessibility of reserve material, interlibrary loan, policy on overdue material, and exit control. THE LIBRARIES WERE THEN DIVIDED INTO THREE GROUPS, HIGH, MIDDLE, AND LOW ACCORDING TO THE FOLLOWING CHARACTERISTICS: size of student body, size of faculty, size of holdings, size of library staff, annual budget, and annual circulation. Our findings would indicate that schools falling in a high category based upon these criteria tend to be more restrictive in their policies and to have different regulations for faculty and students than do schools in the low category.These findings warrant further study.

  7. Circulating elastin peptides, role in vascular pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, L; Labat-Robert, J

    2014-12-01

    The atherosclerotic process starts with the degradation of elastic fibers. Their presence was demonstrated in the circulation as well as several of their biological properties elucidated. We described years ago a procedure to obtain large elastin peptides by organo-alkaline hydrolysis, κ-elastin. This method enabled also the preparation of specific antibodies used to determine elastin peptides, as well as anti-elastin antibodies in body fluids and tissue extracts. Elastin peptides were determined in a large number of human blood samples. Studies were carried out to explore their pharmacological properties. Similar recent studies by other laboratories confirmed our findings and arose new interest in circulating elastin peptides for their biological activities. This recent trend justified the publication of a review of the biological and pathological activities of elastin peptides demonstrated during our previous studies, subject of this article. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Natural circulation in simulated LMFBR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, A.E.; Carbajo, J.J.; Lloyd, D.B.; Montgomery, B.H.; Rose, S.D.; Wantland, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    Natural circulation experiments have been performed using simulated liquid metal fast breeder reactor fuel assemblies in the Thermal-Hydraulic Out-of-Reactor Safety (THORS) facility, an engineering-scale sodium loop. Objective of these tests has been to provide experimental data under conditions that might be encountered during a partial or total loss of the shutdown heat removal system (SHRS) in a reactor. The experiments have included single- and two-phase tests under quasi-steady and transient conditions, at both nominal and non-nominal system conditions. Results from these test indicate that the potential for reactor damage during degraded SHRS operation is extremely slight, and that natural circulation can be a major contributor to safe operation of the system in both single- and two-phase flow during such operation

  9. Genetic architecture of circulating lipid levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirkan, Ayşe; Amin, Najaf; Isaacs, Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Serum concentrations of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), triglycerides (TGs) and total cholesterol (TC) are important heritable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Although genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of circulating lipid...... the ENGAGE Consortium GWAS on serum lipids, were applied to predict lipid levels in an independent population-based study, the Rotterdam Study-II (RS-II). We additionally tested for evidence of a shared genetic basis for different lipid phenotypes. Finally, the polygenic score approach was used to identify...... an alternative genome-wide significance threshold before pathway analysis and those results were compared with those based on the classical genome-wide significance threshold. Our study provides evidence suggesting that many loci influencing circulating lipid levels remain undiscovered. Cross-prediction models...

  10. Exercise increases circulating GDF15 in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleinert, Maximilian; Clemmensen, Christoffer; Sjøberg, Kim Anker

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) is a stress-sensitive circulating factor that regulates systemic energy balance. Since exercise is a transient physiological stress that has pleiotropic effects on whole-body energy metabolism, we herein explored the effect of exercise on a......) circulating GDF15 levels and b) GDF15 release from skeletal muscle in humans. METHODS: Seven healthy males either rested or exercised at 67% of their VO2max for 1 h and blood was sampled from the femoral artery and femoral vein before, during, and after exercise. Plasma GDF15 concentrations were determined...... in these samples. RESULTS: Plasma GDF15 levels increased 34% with exercise (p exercise. There was no difference between the arterial and venous GDF15 concentration before, during, and after exercise. During...

  11. On-Chip Microwave Quantum Hall Circulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Mahoney

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulators are nonreciprocal circuit elements that are integral to technologies including radar systems, microwave communication transceivers, and the readout of quantum information devices. Their nonreciprocity arises from the interference of microwaves over the centimeter scale of the signal wavelength, in the presence of bulky magnetic media that breaks time-reversal symmetry. Here, we realize a completely passive on-chip microwave circulator with size 1/1000th the wavelength by exploiting the chiral, “slow-light” response of a two-dimensional electron gas in the quantum Hall regime. For an integrated GaAs device with 330  μm diameter and about 1-GHz center frequency, a nonreciprocity of 25 dB is observed over a 50-MHz bandwidth. Furthermore, the nonreciprocity can be dynamically tuned by varying the voltage at the port, an aspect that may enable reconfigurable passive routing of microwave signals on chip.

  12. Bone Marrow Scans with Colloidal {sup 198}Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Sung Soo; Whang, Kee Suk [Kyungpook National University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1973-03-15

    The bone marrow scans with colloidal {sup 198}Au were performed on 33 cases with hematologically normal patients and patients with various blood dyscrasia. Bone marrow aspirations were done at iliac crest in all cases but one. A correlation between the scan findings and an erythroid cellularity was evaluated. The following results were obtained. 1) Out of 33 cases, 23 (about 70%) showed a correlation between {sup 198}Au marrow uptakes on the scans and the erythroid cellularity. 2) The diseases in which no correlation existed between {sup 198}Au uptake and erythroid cellularity were aplastic anemia, acute leukemia and chronic myelogenous leukemia.

  13. Facile synthesis of Ag nanocubes and Au nanocages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrabalak, Sara E; Au, Leslie; Li, Xingde; Xia, Younan

    2007-01-01

    This protocol describes a method for the synthesis of Ag nanocubes and their subsequent conversion into Au nanocages via the galvanic replacement reaction. The Ag nanocubes are prepared by a rapid (reaction time nanocubes. With this method, Ag nanocubes can be prepared and isolated for use within approximately 3 h. The Ag nanocubes can then serve as sacrificial templates for the preparation of Au nanocages, with a method for their preparation also described herein. The procedure for Au nanocage preparation and isolation requires approximately 5 h.

  14. Epitaxial CdSe-Au nanocrystal heterostructures by thermal annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figuerola, Albert; van Huis, Marijn; Zanella, Marco; Genovese, Alessandro; Marras, Sergio; Falqui, Andrea; Zandbergen, Henny W; Cingolani, Roberto; Manna, Liberato

    2010-08-11

    The thermal evolution of a collection of heterogeneous CdSe-Au nanosystems (Au-decorated CdSe nanorods, networks, vertical assemblies) prepared by wet-chemical approaches was monitored in situ in the transmission electron microscope. In contrast to interfaces that are formed during kinetically controlled wet chemical synthesis, heating under vacuum conditions results in distinct and well-defined CdSe/Au interfaces, located at the CdSe polar surfaces. The high quality of these interfaces should make the heterostructures more suitable for use in nanoscale electronic devices.

  15. Correlates of Circulating 25-Hydroxyvitamin D

    OpenAIRE

    McCullough, Marjorie L.; Weinstein, Stephanie J.; Freedman, D. Michal; Helzlsouer, Kathy; Flanders, W. Dana; Koenig, Karen; Kolonel, Laurence; Laden, Francine; Le Marchand, Loic; Purdue, Mark; Snyder, Kirk; Stevens, Victoria L.; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael; Virtamo, Jarmo; Yang, Gong

    2010-01-01

    Low vitamin D status is common globally and is associated with multiple disease outcomes. Understanding the correlates of vitamin D status will help guide clinical practice, research, and interpretation of studies. Correlates of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentrations measured in a single laboratory were examined in 4,723 cancer-free men and women from 10 cohorts participating in the Cohort Consortium Vitamin D Pooling Project of Rarer Cancers, which covers a worldwide geogra...

  16. Circulating fluidized bed boilers design and operations

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Prabir

    1991-01-01

    This book provides practicing engineers and students with insight into the design and operation of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) boilers. Through a combination of theoretical concepts and practical experience, this book gives the reader a basic understanding of the many aspects of this subject.Important environmental considerations, including solid waste disposal and predicted emissions, are addressed individually in separate chapters. This book places an emphasis on combustion, hydrodynamics, heat transfer, and material issues, and illustrates these concepts with numerous examples of pres

  17. Music Circulation and Transmission in Tbilisi, Georgia

    OpenAIRE

    Sebald, Brigita

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation, based upon two years research in Tbilisi, Georgia, questions how popular music travels from the performer to the audience and how it circulates among audience members. After the disintegration of the Soviet Union in the early 1990s, the state-run music industry collapsed, taking the infrastructure for music distribution with it. In the years since, a music industry has not been rebuilt due to uncertain economic realities and a shaky political situation. Because of this, per...

  18. Periodontitis and increase in circulating oxidative stress

    OpenAIRE

    Takaaki Tomofuji; Koichiro Irie; Toshihiro Sanbe; Tetsuji Azuma; Daisuke Ekuni; Naofumi Tamaki; Tatsuo Yamamoto; Manabu Morita

    2009-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are products of normal cellular metabolism. However, excessive production of ROS oxidizes DNA, lipids and proteins, inducing tissue damage. Studies have shown that periodontitis induces excessive ROS production in periodontal tissue. When periodontitis develops, ROS produced in the periodontal lesion diffuse into the blood stream, resulting in the oxidation of blood molecules (circulating oxidative stress). Such oxidation may be detrimental to systemic health. Fo...

  19. Engineering Judgment and Natural Circulation Calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreri, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    The analysis performed to establish the validity of computer code results in the particular field of natural circulation flow stability calculations is presented in the light of usual engineering practice. The effects of discretization and closure correlations are discussed and some hints to avoid undesired mistakes in the evaluations performed are given. Additionally, the results are presented for an experiment relevant to the way in which a (small) number of skilled, nuclear safety analysts...

  20. Nitric oxide : An ally in extracorporeal circulation?

    OpenAIRE

    Melki, Vilyam

    2016-01-01

    Many complications associated with heart surgery are due to the negative effects of extracorporeal circulation (ECC). Some of these complications may be attributed to ECC-induced activation of inflammation and coagulation pathways. The inflammatory reaction may be caused by the interaction of blood components with air and the artificial surfaces of the ECC, from substances produced due to ischaemia-reperfusion injury of the heart and lungs, and from increased release of endotoxin from ischemi...

  1. The creation and circulation of public geographies

    OpenAIRE

    Kitchin, Rob; Linehan, Denis; O'Callaghan, Cian; Lawton, Philip

    2013-01-01

    In response to the commentaries, we discuss further how social media disrupts and remakes the creation and circulation of geographical knowledges and potentially reconfigures the moral economy of the social sciences. In particular, we examine questions of what is meant by public geography, the publics which such geographies serve, alternative and complementary approaches to social media, the politics of authorship within collective blogs, the politics and mechanisms of knowledge c...

  2. NUCLA Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    The objective of this DOE Cooperative Agreement is to conduct a cost-shared clean coal technology project to demonstrate the feasibility of circulating fluidized bed combustion technology and to evaluate economic, environmental, and operational benefits of CFB steam generators on a utility scale. At the conclusion of the Phase 2 program, testing related to satisfying these objectives was completed. Data analysis and reporting are scheduled for completion by October 1991. (VC)

  3. First circulating beam in the AA

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    On 3 July 1980, two years after project authorization, beam circulated for the first time in the AA. It was a 3.5 GeV/c proton test beam. We see an expecting crowd, minutes before the happy event. The persons are to numerous to name them all. Heribert Koziol, apparently asleep, is answering the call from an impatient director. See also 8007094.

  4. Circulating procoagulant microparticles in cancer patients

    OpenAIRE

    Thaler, Johannes; Ay, Cihan; Weinstabl, Harald; Dunkler, Daniela; Simanek, Ralph; Vormittag, Rainer; Freyssinet, Jean-Marie; Zielinski, Christoph; Pabinger, Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Accumulating evidence indicates that microparticles (MPs) are important mediators of the interaction between cancer and the hemostatic system. We conducted a large prospective cohort study to determine whether the number of circulating procoagulant MPs is elevated in cancer patients and whether the elevated MP levels are predictive of occurrence of venous thrombembolism (VTE). We analyzed plasma samples of 728 cancer patients from the ongoing prospective observational Vien...

  5. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Au-based monolayer derivatives in honeycomb structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapoor, Pooja, E-mail: pupooja16@gmail.com; Sharma, Munish; Ahluwalia, P. K. [Physics Department, Himachal Pradesh University, Shimla, Himachal Pradesh, India 171005 (India); Kumar, Ashok [Centre for Physical Sciences, School of Basic and Applied Sciences, Central University of Punjab, Bathinda, India, 151001 (India)

    2016-05-23

    We present electronic properties of atomic layer of Au, Au{sub 2}-N, Au{sub 2}-O and Au{sub 2}-F in graphene-like structure within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). The lattice constant of derived monolayers are found to be higher than the pristine Au monolayer. Au monolayer is metallic in nature with quantum ballistic conductance calculated as 4G{sub 0}. Similarly, Au{sub 2}-N and Au{sub 2}-F monolayers show 4G{sub 0} and 2G{sub 0} quantum conductance respectively while semiconducting nature with calculated band gap of 0.28 eV has been observed for Au{sub 2}-O monolayer. Most interestingly, half metalicity has been predicted for Au{sub 2}-N and Au{sub 2}-F monolayers. Our findings may have importance for the application of these monolayers in nanoelectronic and spintronics.

  6. Circulation in a Short Cylindrical Couette System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akira Kageyama; Hantao Ji; Jeremy Goodman

    2003-07-08

    In preparation for an experimental study of magnetorotational instability (MRI) in liquid metal, we explore Couette flows having height comparable to the gap between cylinders, centrifugally stable rotation, and high Reynolds number. Experiments in water are compared with numerical simulations. The flow is very different from that of an ideal, infinitely long Couette system. Simulations show that endcaps co-rotating with the outer cylinder drive a strong poloidal circulation that redistributes angular momentum. Predicted toroidal flow profiles agree well with experimental measurements. Spin-down times scale with Reynolds number as expected for laminar Ekman circulation; extrapolation from two-dimensional simulations at Re less than or equal to 3200 agrees remarkably well with experiment at Re approximately equal to 106. This suggests that turbulence does not dominate the effective viscosity. Further detailed numerical studies reveal a strong radially inward flow near both endcaps. After turning vertically along the inner cylinder, these flows converge at the midplane and depart the boundary in a radial jet. To minimize this circulation in the MRI experiment, endcaps consisting of multiple, differentially rotating rings are proposed. Simulations predict that an adequate approximation to the ideal Couette profile can be obtained with a few rings.

  7. Circulation in a Short Cylindrical Couette System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akira Kageyama; Hantao Ji; Jeremy Goodman

    2003-01-01

    In preparation for an experimental study of magnetorotational instability (MRI) in liquid metal, we explore Couette flows having height comparable to the gap between cylinders, centrifugally stable rotation, and high Reynolds number. Experiments in water are compared with numerical simulations. The flow is very different from that of an ideal, infinitely long Couette system. Simulations show that endcaps co-rotating with the outer cylinder drive a strong poloidal circulation that redistributes angular momentum. Predicted toroidal flow profiles agree well with experimental measurements. Spin-down times scale with Reynolds number as expected for laminar Ekman circulation; extrapolation from two-dimensional simulations at Re less than or equal to 3200 agrees remarkably well with experiment at Re approximately equal to 106. This suggests that turbulence does not dominate the effective viscosity. Further detailed numerical studies reveal a strong radially inward flow near both endcaps. After turning vertically along the inner cylinder, these flows converge at the midplane and depart the boundary in a radial jet. To minimize this circulation in the MRI experiment, endcaps consisting of multiple, differentially rotating rings are proposed. Simulations predict that an adequate approximation to the ideal Couette profile can be obtained with a few rings

  8. When Prostate Cancer Circulates in the Bloodstream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Vlaeminck-Guillem

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Management of patients with prostate cancer is currently based on imperfect clinical, biological, radiological and pathological evaluation. Prostate cancer aggressiveness, including metastatic potential, remains difficult to accurately estimate. In an attempt to better adapt therapeutics to an individual (personalized medicine, reliable evaluation of the intrinsic molecular biology of the tumor is warranted, and particularly for all tumor sites (primary tumors and secondary sites at any time of the disease progression. As a consequence of their natural tendency to grow (passive invasion or as a consequence of an active blood vessel invasion by metastase-initiating cells, tumors shed various materials into the bloodstream. Major efforts have been recently made to develop powerful and accurate methods able to detect, quantify and/or analyze all these circulating tumor materials: circulating tumors cells, disseminating tumor cells, extracellular vesicles (including exosomes, nucleic acids, etc. The aim of this review is to summarize current knowledge about these circulating tumor materials and their applications in translational research.

  9. Exercise increases circulating GDF15 in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Kleinert

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15 is a stress-sensitive circulating factor that regulates systemic energy balance. Since exercise is a transient physiological stress that has pleiotropic effects on whole-body energy metabolism, we herein explored the effect of exercise on a circulating GDF15 levels and b GDF15 release from skeletal muscle in humans. Methods: Seven healthy males either rested or exercised at 67% of their VO2max for 1 h and blood was sampled from the femoral artery and femoral vein before, during, and after exercise. Plasma GDF15 concentrations were determined in these samples. Results: Plasma GDF15 levels increased 34% with exercise (p < 0.001 and further increased to 64% above resting values at 120 min (p < 0.001 after the cessation of exercise. There was no difference between the arterial and venous GDF15 concentration before, during, and after exercise. During a resting control trial, GDF15 levels measured in the same subjects were unaltered. Conclusions: Vigorous submaximal exercise increases circulating GDF15 levels in humans, but skeletal muscle tissue does not appear to be the source. Keywords: Skeletal muscle, Growth differentiation factor 15, Recovery, Physical activity

  10. Diagnosis of boundary-layer circulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beare, Robert J; Cullen, Michael J P

    2013-05-28

    Diagnoses of circulations in the vertical plane provide valuable insights into aspects of the dynamics of the climate system. Dynamical theories based on geostrophic balance have proved useful in deriving diagnostic equations for these circulations. For example, semi-geostrophic theory gives rise to the Sawyer-Eliassen equation (SEE) that predicts, among other things, circulations around mid-latitude fronts. A limitation of the SEE is the absence of a realistic boundary layer. However, the coupling provided by the boundary layer between the atmosphere and the surface is fundamental to the climate system. Here, we use a theory based on Ekman momentum balance to derive an SEE that includes a boundary layer (SEEBL). We consider a case study of a baroclinic low-level jet. The SEEBL solution shows significant benefits over Ekman pumping, including accommodating a boundary-layer depth that varies in space and structure, which accounts for buoyancy and momentum advection. The diagnosed low-level jet is stronger than that determined by Ekman balance. This is due to the inclusion of momentum advection. Momentum advection provides an additional mechanism for enhancement of the low-level jet that is distinct from inertial oscillations.

  11. The dynamics of the coronary collateral circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimarino, Marco; D'Andreamatteo, Mariangela; Waksman, Ron; Epstein, Stephen E; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2014-04-01

    Coronary collaterals are present at birth, with wide interindividual variation in their functional capacity. These vessels protect jeopardized myocardium, and the number of collaterals and the extent of their coverage are associated with improved survival in patients with coronary heart disease. The collateral circulation is not a permanent set of structures, but undergoes dynamic changes with important consequences for cardioprotection. If a severe atherosclerotic lesion develops in an artery supplying tissue downstream of a total occlusion through collateral blood flow, pressure gradients across the collateral bed change. The result is that some of the collateral flow previously supplying the perfusion territory of the totally occluded artery is redirected to the perfusion territory of the donor artery, thus producing a 'collateral steal'. The collateral circulation can regress once antegrade flow in the main dependent artery is re-established, as occurs following the recanalization of a chronic total occlusion. The clinical benefits of coronary revascularization must be cautiously weighed against the risk of reducing the protective support derived from coronary collaterals. Consequently, pharmacological, gene-based, and cell-based therapeutic attempts have been made to enhance collateral function. Although such approaches have so far yielded no, or modest, beneficial results, the rapidly accruing data on coronary collateral circulation will hopefully lead to new effective therapeutic strategies.

  12. Circulation of a triaxial, charged ellipsoidal droplet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graber, J.L.; Rosensteel, G.

    2002-01-01

    The Kelvin circulation, which is the Casimir invariant of the general collective motion gcm(3) Lie algebra, is determined for a rapidly rotating triaxial nucleus in the classical domain. The potential energy is approximated by the sum of Coulomb repulsion and attractive surface energy terms, and the kinetic energy is adopted from the Riemann ellipsoidal model. An accurate approximation valid for both small and large deformations is reported for the potential energy. The Riemann ellipsoid theory allows for collective rotation in the continuum from rigid body motion to irrotational flow; the rigidity parametrizes this kinematical continuum. Analytic formulas are derived for the circulation, angular momentum, and energy as functions of the axis lengths, fissility, and rigidity. In particular, the bifurcation point to Jacobi triaxial shapes from noncollective oblate spheroids is given by a simple analytic formula. For a given fissility, the bifurcation point depends sensitive- ly on the rigidity. The Kelvin circulation remains approximately constant for triaxial ellipsoids as the angular momentum increases. This implies that gcm(3) is an approximate partial dynamical symmetry for rapidly rotating triaxial nuclei

  13. Colloidal Au and Au-alloy catalysts for direct borohydride fuel cells: Electrocatalysis and fuel cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwan, Mohammed H.; Macdonald, Charles L. B.; Northwood, Derek O.; Gyenge, Elod L.

    Supported colloidal Au and Au-alloys (Au-Pt and Au-Pd, 1:1 atomic ratio) on Vulcan XC-72 (with 20 wt% metal load) were prepared by the Bönneman method. The electrocatalytic activity of the colloidal metals with respect to borohydride electro-oxidation for fuel cell applications was investigated by voltammetry on static and rotating electrodes, chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and fuel cell experiments. The fundamental electrochemical techniques showed that alloying Au, a metal that leads to the maximum eight-electron oxidation of BH 4 -, with Pd or Pt, well-known catalysts of dehydrogenation reactions, improved the electrode kinetics of BH 4 - oxidation. Fuel cell experiments corroborated the kinetic studies. Using 5 mg cm -2 colloidal metal load on the anode, it was found that Au-Pt was the most active catalyst giving a cell voltage of 0.47 V at 100 mA cm -2 and 333 K, while under identical conditions the cell voltage using colloidal Au was 0.17 V.

  14. Colloidal Au and Au-alloy catalysts for direct borohydride fuel cells: Electrocatalysis and fuel cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwan, Mohammed H.; Northwood, Derek O. [Department of Mechanical, Auto and Materials Engineering, University of Windsor, Windsor (Canada N9B 3P4); Macdonald, Charles L.B. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Windsor, Windsor (Canada N9B 3P4); Gyenge, Elod L. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada V6T 1Z4)

    2006-07-14

    Supported colloidal Au and Au-alloys (Au-Pt and Au-Pd, 1:1 atomic ratio) on Vulcan XC-72 (with 20wt% metal load) were prepared by the Bonneman method. The electrocatalytic activity of the colloidal metals with respect to borohydride electro-oxidation for fuel cell applications was investigated by voltammetry on static and rotating electrodes, chronoamperometry, chronopotentiometry and fuel cell experiments. The fundamental electrochemical techniques showed that alloying Au, a metal that leads to the maximum eight-electron oxidation of BH{sub 4}{sup -}, with Pd or Pt, well-known catalysts of dehydrogenation reactions, improved the electrode kinetics of BH{sub 4}{sup -} oxidation. Fuel cell experiments corroborated the kinetic studies. Using 5mgcm{sup -2} colloidal metal load on the anode, it was found that Au-Pt was the most active catalyst giving a cell voltage of 0.47V at 100mAcm{sup -2} and 333K, while under identical conditions the cell voltage using colloidal Au was 0.17V. (author)

  15. Chemical and electrical characteristics of annealed Ni/Au and Ni/Ir/Au contacts on AlGaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngoepe, P.N.M., E-mail: phuti.ngoepe@up.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa); Meyer, W.E.; Auret, F.D.; Omotoso, E.; Diale, M. [Department of Physics, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X20, Hatfield 0028 (South Africa); Swart, H.C.; Duvenhage, M.M.; Coetsee, E. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P.O. Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300 (South Africa)

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of Ni/Au and Ni/Ir/Au metal contacts deposited on AlGaN was investigated at different annealing temperatures. The samples were studied with electrical and chemical composition techniques. I–V characteristics of the Schottky diodes were optimum after 500 and 600 °C annealing for Ni/Au and Ni/Ir/Au based diodes, respectively. The depth profiles of the contacts were measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time of flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy. These chemical composition techniques were used to examine the evolution of the metal contacts in order to verify the influence the metals have on the electrical properties of the diodes. The insertion of Ir as a diffusion barrier between Ni and Au effected the electrical properties, improving the stability of the contacts at high temperatures. Gold diffused into the AlGaN film, degrading the electrical properties of the Ni/Au diode. At 500 °C, the insertion of Ir, however, prevented the in-diffusion of Au into the AlGaN substrate.

  16. Formation of germline chimera Gaok chicken used circulation primordial germ cells (circulation PGCs fresh and thawed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostaman T

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Formation of germline chimeras by transfer of chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs is one of the effective techniques for preservation and regeneration of genetic resources in chickens. This study attempted to form germline chimeras of Gaok chicken buy purifying circulated PGCs of donor embryo before it is transferred to the recipient (White Leghorn chickens=WL and studied the ability of recipient embryo on survival in incubators, and hatchability. This study used 200 fertile eggs of Gaok and 90 fertile WL breed all of the eggs was incubated at 380C and 60% humidity in a portable incubator. PGCs-circulation of the blood collected Gaok embryos at stage 14-16 were taken from the dorsal aorta, and then purified by centrifugation method using nycodenz. PGCs-circulation results further purification frozen in liquid nitrogen before being transferred to the recipient embryo. The results showed that for the development of embryos transferred to the fresh circulation of PGCs-circulation as many as 25 cells can survive up to day 14, while one of the transferred of 50 and 100 cells into recipient embryos was hatched (10%. On the contrari recipient embryos that are transferred to the frozen PGCs-circulation the embryos development was shorter, and only survived until day 10th (treatment 25 cells, day 14th (treatment of 50 cells and day 17th (treatment of 100 cells. It is concluded that the amount of PGCs-circulation embryos transferred to the recipient is one factor that influence the success of the development germline chimeras.

  17. Evaluation of the Olympus AU-510 analyser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farré, C; Velasco, J; Ramón, F

    1991-01-01

    The selective multitest Olympus AU-510 analyser was evaluated according to the recommendations of the Comision de Instrumentacion de la Sociedad Española de Quimica Clinica and the European Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards. The evaluation was carried out in two stages: an examination of the analytical units and then an evaluation in routine work conditions. The operational characteristics of the system were also studied.THE FIRST STAGE INCLUDED A PHOTOMETRIC STUDY: dependent on the absorbance, the inaccuracy varies between +0.5% to -0.6% at 405 nm and from -5.6% to 10.6% at 340 nm; the imprecision ranges between -0.22% and 0.56% at 405 nm and between 0.09% and 2.74% at 340 nm. Linearity was acceptable, apart from a very low absorbance for NADH at 340 nm; and the imprecision of the serum sample pipetter was satisfactory.TWELVE SERUM ANALYTES WERE STUDIED UNDER ROUTINE CONDITIONS: glucose, urea urate, cholesterol, triglycerides, total bilirubin, creatinine, phosphate, iron, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and gamma-glutamyl transferase.The within-run imprecision (CV%) ranged from 0.67% for phosphate to 2.89% for iron and the between-run imprecision from 0.97% for total bilirubin to 7.06% for iron. There was no carryover in a study of the serum sample pipetter. Carry-over studies with the reagent and sample pipetters shows some cross contamination in the iron assay.

  18. Adsorptive behavior of dimethylglyoxime on Au(111).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jandee; Kim, Sechul; Rhee, Choong Kyun

    2011-12-06

    Dimethylglyoxime (DMG) adsorbed on Au(111) was investigated using electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). STM experiments revealed three different structures of adsorbed DMG at open circuit potential (~0.07 V versus Ag/AgCl): (2√3×2√3)R30°-α, (2√3×4√3)R30°-β, and (2√3×4√3)R30°-γ. The coverage of adsorbed DMG obtained using XPS was 0.33. A combination of structural and quantitative information identified the adsorbed DMG as an anionic tetramer, held together by intermolecular hydrogen bonding and arrayed in three ordered patterns. Domains of adsorbed DMG underwent phase transitions between the observed structures, most likely due to the influence of the STM tip. However, a significant correlation between the observed structures and the imaging conditions was not found. The ordered layers existed only at open circuit potential as evidenced by their disappearance when the potential was shifted to 0.2 or -0.15 V. The ordered layers were also removed by immersion in a solution of Ni(2+), implying that the adsorbed DMG was converted to a soluble dimer complex with the Ni(2+) ion. This particular observation is discussed in terms of the rigidity of the organic network. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  19. De l’individu postcommuniste au citoyen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Krasteva

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available L’article analyse le paradoxe de la conception communiste du citoyen engagé : au niveau idéologique, citoyenneté et engagement sont intrinsèquement liés, au niveau politique ils sont souvent radicalement dissociés. Le citoyen communiste est plus engagé que citoyen. La citoyenneté était dépourvue de plusieurs de ses attributs : de la jouissance de la loi qui établit « l’égalité arithmétique » et minorise les maîtres ; de la citoyenneté active – civile et politique – pour ne jouir que la protection sociale ; de la participation au profit de l’appartenance. L’individu communiste était engagé, non pas parce qu’il l’avait choisi dans la liberté, mais parce qu’il n’avait pas la liberté de se désengager. L’article compare l’engagement communiste et postcommuniste en analysant le second au croisement de l’individualité et de la citoyenneté et en distinguant trois formes de désengagement – contestataire, « bonapartiste » et individualiste et trois formes d’engagement – mimétique, héroïque, civique.From the postcommunist individual to the citizenThe article analysis the paradox of the communist conception of the engaged citizen: at ideological level, citizenship and participation are closely linked; at political level, they are radically dissociated. The communist citizen is more engaged than citizen. The citizenship is deprived of several of its attributes: of the law which establishes "the arithmetic equality" and minimises the masters; of the active citizenship, civic and political, enjoying just the social one; of the participation for emphasizing on the belonging. The communist individual is engaged not because he has chosen freely to be such, but because he had not the freedom to disengage him/herself. The article compares the communist and the post communist participation analysing the latter at the intersection of individuality and citizenship and distinguishing three forms

  20. 19 CFR 207.63 - Circulation of draft questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Circulation of draft questionnaires. 207.63... SUBSIDIZED EXPORTS TO THE UNITED STATES Five-Year Reviews § 207.63 Circulation of draft questionnaires. (a) The Director shall circulate draft questionnaires to the parties for comment in each full review. (b...

  1. Characteristics of the Current Sales and Circulation System in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    our reporter

    2001-01-01

    <正> 5 Former circulation enterprises finding new market position Those large-sized auto circulation enterprises, which used to lead the circulation system, have been suffering the twist and turns from the new system oriented by automakers. Their market shares shapely fell down and have emerged into chaos. Parts of them that are powerful enough have established new sales companies controlled by the jointly

  2. Exact Inverse Matrices of Fermat and Mersenne Circulant Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanpeng Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The well known circulant matrices are applied to solve networked systems. In this paper, circulant and left circulant matrices with the Fermat and Mersenne numbers are considered. The nonsingularity of these special matrices is discussed. Meanwhile, the exact determinants and inverse matrices of these special matrices are presented.

  3. Appraisal of circulation routine duties in academic libraries | Hassan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of brown charging system, book reservation, keeping of reserved collection, circulation of reserved books, treatment of overdue, lost of books on loan and library statistics among other as duties perform in circulation department of libraries. Keywords: Library Service, Circulation Duties, Challenges, Academic Libraries ...

  4. A simple approach for facile synthesis of Ag, anisotropic Au and bimetallic (Ag/Au) nanoparticles using cruciferous vegetable extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, Jasmine; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Kapoor, Sudhir

    2012-01-01

    We present a simple and straightforward approach for the synthesis and stabilization of relatively monodisperse Ag, Au and bimetallic (Ag/Au) nanoparticles by using cruciferous vegetable (green/red) extracts by simply adjusting the pH environment in the aqueous medium. The vegetable extracts act both as reducing and capping agents. The monometallic and bimetallic nanoparticles of Ag and Au so obtained were characterized by UV–visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is shown that red cabbage extract can be used for the preparation of anisotropic Au nanoparticles. The formation of Au anisotropic nanoparticles was found to depend on a number of environmental factors, such as the pH of the reaction medium, reaction time, and initial reactant concentrations. Additionally, it is shown that these extract-stabilized Au and Ag nanoparticles can be used as a seed for preparation of bimetallic Au/Ag nanoparticles. For bimetallic alloy nanoparticles the absorption peak was observed between the two maxima of the corresponding metallic particles. The surface plasmon absorption maxima for bimetallic nanoparticles changed linearly with increasing Au mole ratio content in various alloy compositions. It has been shown that the formation of hollow Au spheres depends on the experimental conditions. - Graphical abstract: TEM image of gold nanoparticles at pH 3.27 formed by red cabbage extract. Highlights: ► First report on the reactivity of the extracts toward metal ions using a spectrophotometric technique. ► Red cabbage extract has better reducing properties than green cabbage extract. ► Red cabbage extract can reduce metal ions at any pH. ► Reduction of metal ions can have important consequences in the study of soil chemistry.

  5. A simple approach for facile synthesis of Ag, anisotropic Au and bimetallic (Ag/Au) nanoparticles using cruciferous vegetable extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, Jasmine; Mukherjee, Tulsi; Kapoor, Sudhir, E-mail: sudhirk@barc.gov.in

    2012-10-01

    We present a simple and straightforward approach for the synthesis and stabilization of relatively monodisperse Ag, Au and bimetallic (Ag/Au) nanoparticles by using cruciferous vegetable (green/red) extracts by simply adjusting the pH environment in the aqueous medium. The vegetable extracts act both as reducing and capping agents. The monometallic and bimetallic nanoparticles of Ag and Au so obtained were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It is shown that red cabbage extract can be used for the preparation of anisotropic Au nanoparticles. The formation of Au anisotropic nanoparticles was found to depend on a number of environmental factors, such as the pH of the reaction medium, reaction time, and initial reactant concentrations. Additionally, it is shown that these extract-stabilized Au and Ag nanoparticles can be used as a seed for preparation of bimetallic Au/Ag nanoparticles. For bimetallic alloy nanoparticles the absorption peak was observed between the two maxima of the corresponding metallic particles. The surface plasmon absorption maxima for bimetallic nanoparticles changed linearly with increasing Au mole ratio content in various alloy compositions. It has been shown that the formation of hollow Au spheres depends on the experimental conditions. - Graphical abstract: TEM image of gold nanoparticles at pH 3.27 formed by red cabbage extract. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer First report on the reactivity of the extracts toward metal ions using a spectrophotometric technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Red cabbage extract has better reducing properties than green cabbage extract. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Red cabbage extract can reduce metal ions at any pH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduction of metal ions can have important consequences in the study of soil chemistry.

  6. THREE-DIMENSIONAL ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION OF WARM AND HOT JUPITERS: EFFECTS OF ORBITAL DISTANCE, ROTATION PERIOD, AND NONSYNCHRONOUS ROTATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Showman, Adam P. [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 University Blvd., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Lewis, Nikole K. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J., E-mail: showman@lpl.arizona.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

    2015-03-10

    Efforts to characterize extrasolar giant planet (EGP) atmospheres have so far emphasized planets within 0.05 AU of their stars. Despite this focus, known EGPs populate a continuum of orbital separations from canonical hot Jupiter values (0.03–0.05 AU) out to 1 AU and beyond. Unlike typical hot Jupiters, these more distant EGPs will not generally be synchronously rotating. In anticipation of observations of this population, we here present three-dimensional atmospheric circulation models exploring the dynamics that emerge over a broad range of rotation rates and incident stellar fluxes appropriate for warm and hot Jupiters. We find that the circulation resides in one of two basic regimes. On typical hot Jupiters, the strong day–night heating contrast leads to a broad, fast superrotating (eastward) equatorial jet and large day–night temperature differences. At faster rotation rates and lower incident fluxes, however, the day–night heating gradient becomes less important, and baroclinic instabilities emerge as a dominant player, leading to eastward jets in the midlatitudes, minimal temperature variations in longitude, and, often, weak winds at the equator. Our most rapidly rotating and least irradiated models exhibit similarities to Jupiter and Saturn, illuminating the dynamical continuum between hot Jupiters and the weakly irradiated giant planets of our own solar system. We present infrared (IR) light curves and spectra of these models, which depend significantly on incident flux and rotation rate. This provides a way to identify the regime transition in future observations. In some cases, IR light curves can provide constraints on the rotation rate of nonsynchronously rotating planets.

  7. THREE-DIMENSIONAL ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION OF WARM AND HOT JUPITERS: EFFECTS OF ORBITAL DISTANCE, ROTATION PERIOD, AND NONSYNCHRONOUS ROTATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Showman, Adam P.; Lewis, Nikole K.; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to characterize extrasolar giant planet (EGP) atmospheres have so far emphasized planets within 0.05 AU of their stars. Despite this focus, known EGPs populate a continuum of orbital separations from canonical hot Jupiter values (0.03–0.05 AU) out to 1 AU and beyond. Unlike typical hot Jupiters, these more distant EGPs will not generally be synchronously rotating. In anticipation of observations of this population, we here present three-dimensional atmospheric circulation models exploring the dynamics that emerge over a broad range of rotation rates and incident stellar fluxes appropriate for warm and hot Jupiters. We find that the circulation resides in one of two basic regimes. On typical hot Jupiters, the strong day–night heating contrast leads to a broad, fast superrotating (eastward) equatorial jet and large day–night temperature differences. At faster rotation rates and lower incident fluxes, however, the day–night heating gradient becomes less important, and baroclinic instabilities emerge as a dominant player, leading to eastward jets in the midlatitudes, minimal temperature variations in longitude, and, often, weak winds at the equator. Our most rapidly rotating and least irradiated models exhibit similarities to Jupiter and Saturn, illuminating the dynamical continuum between hot Jupiters and the weakly irradiated giant planets of our own solar system. We present infrared (IR) light curves and spectra of these models, which depend significantly on incident flux and rotation rate. This provides a way to identify the regime transition in future observations. In some cases, IR light curves can provide constraints on the rotation rate of nonsynchronously rotating planets

  8. Au cœur des services : les larmes au travail

    OpenAIRE

    Soares, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Nous avons cru pendant longtemps qu’il était possible de laisser nos émotions à la porte des organisations. Cela simplifie excessivement la complexité et l’hétérogénéité du travail et, par conséquent, on finit par sous-estimer les effets du travail sur la santé. Notre objectif est de comprendre une forme particulière de l’expression des émotions des travailleuses et travailleurs : les larmes au travail. Pour comprendre cette question, nous utilisons une approche qualitative avec les travaille...

  9. Size exclusion chromatography for semipreparative scale separation of Au38(SR)24 and Au40(SR)24 and larger clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoppe, Stefan; Boudon, Julien; Dolamic, Igor; Dass, Amala; Bürgi, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) on a semipreparative scale (10 mg and more) was used to size-select ultrasmall gold nanoclusters (<2 nm) from polydisperse mixtures. In particular, the ubiquitous byproducts of the etching process toward Au(38)(SR)(24) (SR, thiolate) clusters were separated and gained in high monodispersity (based on mass spectrometry). The isolated fractions were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, MALDI mass spectrometry, HPLC, and electron microscopy. Most notably, the separation of Au(38)(SR)(24) and Au(40)(SR)(24) clusters is demonstrated.

  10. Coexistence of multiple conformations in cysteamine monolayers on Au(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Bilic, A; Reimers, JR

    2005-01-01

    The structural organization, catalytic function, and electronic properties of cysteamine monolayers on Au(111) have been addressed comprehensively by voltammetry, in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) in anaerobic environment, and a priori molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and STM image si...

  11. PHENIX results on jets in d + Au

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanks, J. Ali

    2016-12-15

    We present recently published results [A. Adare, et al., (arXiv:1509.04657)] on fully reconstructed R=0.3 anti-k{sub t} jets measured in p+p and d+Au collisions at 200 GeV center-of-mass energy. The jet yields for four centrality classes along with the p+p reference are presented, as well as both the minimum bias R{sub dAu} and centrality dependent R{sub dAu} and R{sub CP}. We find that while the minimum bias R{sub dA} is consistent with unity, providing a strong constraint on models including cold-nuclear-matter effects or energy loss in small systems, the centrality dependent R{sub dAu} show a striking variation which presents a challenge to models attempting to describe the interplay between soft and hard processes in these systems.

  12. Ordered Au Nanodisk and Nanohole Arrays: Fabrication and Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Yue Bing; Juluri, Bala Krishna; Kiraly, Brian; Huang, Tony Jun

    2010-01-01

    We have utilized nanosphere lithography (NSL) to fabricate ordered Au nanodisk and nanohole arrays on substrates and have studied the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the arrays. Through these investigations, we demonstrate that the angle- dependent behavior of the LSPR in the Au nanodisk arrays enables real-time observation of exciton-plasmon couplings. In addition, we show that the NSL-fabricated Au nanohole arrays can be applied as templates for patterning micro-/nanoparticles under capillary force. The unique structural and plasmonic characteristics of the Au nanodisk and nano- hole arrays, as well as the low-cost and high-throughput NSL-based nanofabrication technique, render these arrays excellent platforms for numerous engineering applications. © 2010 by ASME.

  13. Synthesis of polyanthranilic acid–Au nanocomposites by emulsion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    PANA–Au nanocomposites are characterized by SEM, equipped with EDS, TGA, FT–IR, XRD and electrochemical techniques. XRD of ... Polyanthranilic acid; nanocomposite; in situ polymerization; emulsion polymerization; nano- particles. 1.

  14. Adaptation dans les zones cruciales au regard des changements ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ) vise à accroître la résilience des populations pauvres dans trois « zones cruciales » au regard des changements climatiques : les bassins hydrographiques, les deltas et les régions semi-arides.

  15. Prolonged reorganization of thiol-capped Au nanoparticles layered structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarathi Kundu

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged reorganization behaviour of mono-, di-, tri- and multi-layer films of Au nanoparticles prepared by Langmuir-Blodgett method on hydrophobic Si(001 substrates have been studied by using X-ray scattering techniques. Out-of-plane study shows that although at the initial stage the reorganization occurs through the compaction of the films keeping the layered structure unchanged but finally all layered structures modify to monolayer structure. Due to this reorganization the Au density increases within the nanometer thick films. In-plane study shows that inside the reorganized films Au nanoparticles are distributed randomly and the particle size modifies as the metallic core of Au nanoparticles coalesces.

  16. Contribution de la tomographie par coherence optique au diagnostic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Contribution de la tomographie par coherence optique au diagnostic de la neuropathie optique toxique. C.O.A. Abouki, S Alamou, C.R.A. Assavedo, L Odoulami-Yehouessi, I Sounouvou, S Hounnou-Tchabi ...

  17. Catalytically favorable surface patterns in Pt-Au nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental demonstrations of novel PtAu nanoparticles with highly enhanced catalytic properties, we present a systematic theoretical study that explores principal catalytic indicators as a function of the particle size

  18. Fabrication of Pt/Au concentric spheres from triblock copolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Haeng-Deog; Park, Soojin; Russell, Thomas P

    2010-02-23

    Dispersion of an aqueous H(2)PtCl(6) solution into a trifluorotoluene (TFT) solution of a polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-P2VP-b-PEO) triblock copolymer produced an emulsion-induced hollow micelle (EIHM), comprising a water nanodroplet stabilized by PEO, H(2)PtCl(6)/P2VP, and PS, sequentially. The following addition of an aqueous LiAuCl(4) solution into the dispersion led to a coordination of LiAuCl(4) and PEO. The resulting spherical EIHM structure was transformed to a hollow cylindrical micelle by the fusion of spherical EIHM with the addition of methanol. This structural transition was reversible by the alternative addition of methanol and TFT. Oxygen plasma was used to generate Pt/Au concentric spheres and hollow cylindrical Pt/Au nano-objects.

  19. Exotic high activity surface patterns in PtAu nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2013-01-01

    of the truncated octahedron cluster motif. Exotic surface patterns are obtained particularly for Pt-rich compositions, where Pt atoms are being surrounded by Au atoms. These surface arrangements boost the catalytic activity by creating a large number of active

  20. Distributions of charged hadrons associated with high transverse momentum particles in pp and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[sNN]=200 GeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J; Adler, C; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Amonett, J; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Badyal, S K; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baudot, J; Bekele, S; Belaga, V V; Bellwied, R; Berger, J; Bezverkhny, B I; Bhardwaj, S; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Billmeier, A; Bland, L C; Blyth, C O; Bonner, B E; Botje, M; Boucham, A; Brandin, A; Bravar, A; Cadman, R V; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Carroll, J; Castillo, J; Cebra, D; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, Y; Chernenko, S P; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Coffin, J P; Cormier, T M; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Das, S; Derevschikov, A A; Didenko, L; Dietel, T; Dong, W J; Dong, X; Draper, J E; Du, F; Dubey, A K; Dunin, V B; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Majumdar, M R; Eckardt, V; Efimov, L G; Emelianov, V; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Fachini, P; Faine, V; Faivre, J; Fatemi, R; Filimonov, K; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flierl, D; Foley, K J; Fu, J; Gagliardi, C A; Gagunashvili, N; Gans, J; Ganti, M S; Gaudichet, L; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gonzalez, J E; Grachov, O; Grebenyuk, O; Gronstal, S; Grosnick, D; Guertin, S M; Gupta, A; Gutierrez, T D; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Hardtke, D; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Henry, T W; Heppelmann, S; Herston, T; Hippolyte, B; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffmann, G W; Horsley, M; Huang, H Z; Huang, S L; Hughes, E; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Ishihara, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Janik, M; Jiang, H; Johnson, I; Jones, P G; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kaplan, M; Keane, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klay, J; Klein, S R; Klyachko, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchenda, L; Kovalenko, A D; Kramer, M; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Kuhn, C; Kulikov, A I; Kumar, A; Kunde, G J; Kunz, C L; Kutuev, R Kh; Kuznetsov, A A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Lange, S; Lasiuk, B; Laue, F; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednický, R; Levine, M J; Li, C; Li, Q; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Liu, Q J; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Long, H; Longacre, R S; Lopez-Noriega, M; Love, W A; Ludlam, T; Lynn, D; Ma, J; Ma, Y G; Magestro, D; Mahajan, S; Mangotra, L K; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Martin, L; Marx, J; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McClain, C J; McShane, T S; Meissner, F; Melnick, Yu; Meschanin, A; Miller, M L; Milosevich, Z; Minaev, N G; Mironov, C; Mischke, A; Mishra, D; Mitchell, J; Mohanty, B; Molnar, L; Moore, C F; Mora-Corral, M J; Morozov, D A; Morozov, V; de Moura, M M; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nayak, S K; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Nikitin, V A; Nogach, L V; Norman, B; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okorokov, V; Oldenburg, M; Olson, D; Paic, G; Pal, S K; Panebratsev, Y; Panitkin, S Y; Pavlinov, A I; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Petrov, V A; Phatak, S C; Picha, R; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Porile, N; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Potekhin, M; Potrebenikova, E; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Putschke, J; Rai, G; Rakness, G; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ravel, O; Ray, R L; Razin, S V; Reichhold, D; Reid, J G; Renault, G; Retiere, F; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevski, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L J; Sahoo, R; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Savin, I; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Schroeder, L S; Schweda, K; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Shao, W; Sharma, M; Shestermanov, K E; Shimanskii, S S; Singaraju, R N; Simon, F; Skoro, G; Smirnov, N; Snellings, R; Sood, G; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Speltz, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stock, R; Stolpovsky, A; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Struck, C; Suaide, A A P; Sugarbaker, E; Suire, C; Sumbera, M; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Szarwas, P; Tai, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Timoshenko, S; Tokarev, M; Tonjes, M B; Trainor, T A; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; Vandermolen, A M; Varma, R; Vasilevski, I; Vasiliev, A N; Vernet, R; Vigdor, S E; Viyogi, Y P; Voloshin, S A; Vznuzdaev, M; Waggoner, W; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Z M; Ward, H; Watson, J W; Webb, J C; Wells, R; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Willson, R; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wood, J; Wu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Z; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, E; Yepes, P; Yurevich, V I; Yuting, B; Zanevski, Y V; Zhang, H; Zhang, W M; Zhang, Z P; Zhaomin, Z P; Zizong, Z P; Zołnierczuk, P A; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, J; Zubarev, A N

    2005-10-07

    Charged hadrons in [EQUATION: SEE TEXT] associated with particles of [EQUATION: SEE TEXT] are reconstructed in pp and Au+Au collisions at sqrt[sNN]=200 GeV. The associated multiplicity and p magnitude sum are found to increase from pp to central Au+Au collisions. The associated p distributions, while similar in shape on the nearside, are significantly softened on the awayside in central Au+Au relative to pp and not much harder than that of inclusive hadrons. The results, consistent with jet quenching, suggest that the awayside fragments approach equilibration with the medium traversed.

  1. Seasonal overturning circulation in the Red Sea: 1. Model validation and summer circulation

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Fengchao

    2014-04-01

    The overturning circulation in the Red Sea exhibits a distinct seasonally reversing pattern and is studied using high-resolution MIT general circulation model simulations. In the first part of this study, the vertical and horizontal structure of the summer overturning circulation and its dynamical mechanisms are presented from the model results. The seasonal water exchange in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb is successfully simulated, and the structures of the intruding subsurface Gulf of Aden intermediate water are in good agreement with summer observations in 2011. The model results suggest that the summer overturning circulation is driven by the combined effect of the shoaling of the thermocline in the Gulf of Aden resulting from remote winds in the Arabian Sea and an upward surface slope from the Red Sea to the Gulf of Aden set up by local surface winds in the Red Sea. In addition, during late summer two processes associated, respectively, with latitudinally differential heating and increased salinity in the southern Red Sea act together to cause the reversal of the contrast of the vertical density structure and the cessation of the summer overturning circulation. Dynamically, the subsurface northward pressure gradient force is mainly balanced by vertical viscosity resulting from the vertical shear and boundary friction in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb. Unlike some previous studies, the three-layer summer exchange flows in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb do not appear to be hydraulically controlled.

  2. Seasonal overturning circulation in the Red Sea: 1. Model validation and summer circulation

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Fengchao; Hoteit, Ibrahim; Pratt, Larry J.; Bower, Amy S.; Zhai, Ping; Kö hl, Armin; Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh

    2014-01-01

    The overturning circulation in the Red Sea exhibits a distinct seasonally reversing pattern and is studied using high-resolution MIT general circulation model simulations. In the first part of this study, the vertical and horizontal structure of the summer overturning circulation and its dynamical mechanisms are presented from the model results. The seasonal water exchange in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb is successfully simulated, and the structures of the intruding subsurface Gulf of Aden intermediate water are in good agreement with summer observations in 2011. The model results suggest that the summer overturning circulation is driven by the combined effect of the shoaling of the thermocline in the Gulf of Aden resulting from remote winds in the Arabian Sea and an upward surface slope from the Red Sea to the Gulf of Aden set up by local surface winds in the Red Sea. In addition, during late summer two processes associated, respectively, with latitudinally differential heating and increased salinity in the southern Red Sea act together to cause the reversal of the contrast of the vertical density structure and the cessation of the summer overturning circulation. Dynamically, the subsurface northward pressure gradient force is mainly balanced by vertical viscosity resulting from the vertical shear and boundary friction in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb. Unlike some previous studies, the three-layer summer exchange flows in the Strait of Bab el Mandeb do not appear to be hydraulically controlled.

  3. Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor cost estimate for a circulator test facility (modified HTGR circulator test facility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-10-01

    This is a conceptual design cost estimate for a Helium Circulator Test Facility to be located at the General Atomic Company, San Diego, California. The circulator, drive motors, controllers, thermal barrier, and circulator service module installation costs are part of the construction cost included

  4. Explicit Determinants of the RFPrLrR Circulant and RLPrFrL Circulant Matrices Involving Some Famous Numbers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulant matrices may play a crucial role in solving various differential equations. In this paper, the techniques used herein are based on the inverse factorization of polynomial. We give the explicit determinants of the RFPrLrR circulant matrices and RLPrFrL circulant matrices involving Fibonacci, Lucas, Pell, and Pell-Lucas number, respectively.

  5. Programmation religieuse au Moyen-Orient : analyse du contenu de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Depuis dix ans, la télévision contribue beaucoup au façonnement des attitudes au Moyen-Orient. Dans un contexte de gouvernements autoritaires, d'instabilité politique, de guerre et d'interventions militaires étrangères récurrentes, la télévision a permis la diffusion d'opinions et de points de vue qui, autrement, auraient ...

  6. Surface alloying in Sn/Au(111) at elevated temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadhukhan, Pampa; Singh, Vipin Kumar; Rai, Abhishek; Bhattacharya, Kuntala; Barman, Sudipta Roy

    2018-04-01

    On the basis of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, we show that when Sn is deposited on Au(111) single crystal surface at a substrate temperature TS=373 K, surface alloying occurs with the formation of AuSn phase. The evolution of the surface structure and the surface morphology has been studied by low energy electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy, respectively as a function of Sn coverage and substrate temperatures.

  7. Low-temperature Au/a-Si wafer bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Errong; Xiong, Bin; Wang, Yuelin

    2011-01-01

    The Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–Au/Ti/a-Si/SiO 2 /Si bonding structure, which can also be used for the bonding of non-silicon material, was investigated for the first time in this paper. The bond quality test showed that the bond yield, bond repeatability and average shear strength are higher for this bonding structure. The interfacial microstructure analysis indicated that the Au-induced crystallization of the amorphous silicon process leads to big Si grains extending across the bond interface and Au filling the other regions of the bond interface, which result into a strong and void-free bond interface. In addition, the Au-induced crystallization reaction leads to a change in the IR images of the bond interface. Therefore, the IR microscope can be used to evaluate and compare the different bond strengths qualitatively. Furthermore, in order to verify the superiority of the bonding structure, the Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–a-Si/SiO 2 /Si (i.e. no Ti/Au layer on the a-Si surface) and Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–Au/Ti/SiO 2 /Si bonding structures (i.e. Au thermocompression bonding) were also investigated. For the Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–a-Si/SiO 2 /Si bonding structure, the poor bond quality is due to the native oxide layer on the a-Si surface, and for the Si/SiO 2 /Ti/Au–Au/Ti/SiO 2 /Si bonding structure, the poor bond quality is caused by the wafer surface roughness which prevents intimate contact and limits the interdiffusion at the bond interface.

  8. Diastereoselective Au-Catalyzed Allene Cycloisomerizations to Highly Substituted Cyclopentenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Ryan D; Phelps, Alicia M; Raimbach, William A T; Schomaker, Jennifer M

    2017-07-07

    Site- and regiocontrolled Au-catalyzed allene carbocyclizations furnish highly substituted cyclopentenes in >1:1 dr. Significant substitution on the substrate is tolerated, with potential to install five contiguous stereocenters after alkene functionalization. Major challenges include identifying a Au/Cu catalyst that controls both the relative rates of allene epimerization/cyclization and the facial selectivity in addition of a metal enolate to the allene. Experiments to achieve stereodivergent cyclizations and transform key cyclopentenes into useful synthetic building blocks are described.

  9. Soutien institutionnel au Centre for Population and Environmental ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Le Centre for Population and Environmental Development (CPED), établi au Nigeria, est un organisme indépendant à but non lucratif qui a été constitué officiellement en 1998. Il se consacre à la recherche-action sur la réduction de la pauvreté et le développement durable au Nigeria en général et dans la région du delta ...

  10. Preparation of Au cone for fast ignition target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Kai; Zhou Lan; Zhang Lin; Wan Xiaobo; Xiao Jiang

    2005-01-01

    Cone-shell target is typically used for the fast ignition experiments of inertial confinement fusion. In order to fabricate cone-shell target the Au cones with different angles were produced by electroplating and precise machining. The Au electroplating process was introduced in the paper, and the dependence of coating quality on the parameters, such as composition, temperature, pH of electroplating bath, current density and tip effect, were discussed. (author)

  11. Relance de l'aquaculture au Sri Lanka

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    cas de risque et de mettre au point des systèmes de dépuration (c'est-à-dire de purification au moyen d'eau de mer stérilisée). Un élément primordial du projet de recherche consiste à protéger la population contre les contaminants (aussi bien naturels que d'origine anthropique). Pour que les collectivités puissent exploiter ...

  12. Synthesis of Au38(SCH2CH2Ph)24, Au36(SPh-tBu)24, and Au30(S-tBu)18 Nanomolecules from a Common Precursor Mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambukwella, Milan; Dass, Amala

    2017-10-17

    Phenylethanethiol protected nanomolecules such as Au 25 , Au 38 , and Au 144 are widely studied by a broad range of scientists in the community, owing primarily to the availability of simple synthetic protocols. However, synthetic methods are not available for other ligands, such as aromatic thiol and bulky ligands, impeding progress. Here we report the facile synthesis of three distinct nanomolecules, Au 38 (SCH 2 CH 2 Ph) 24 , Au 36 (SPh-tBu) 24 , and Au 30 (S-tBu) 18 , exclusively, starting from a common Au n (glutathione) m (where n and m are number of gold atoms and glutathiolate ligands) starting material upon reaction with HSCH 2 CH 2 Ph, HSPh-tBu, and HStBu, respectively. The systematic synthetic approach involves two steps: (i) synthesis of kinetically controlled Au n (glutathione) m crude nanocluster mixture with 1:4 gold to thiol molar ratio and (ii) thermochemical treatment of the purified nanocluster mixture with excess thiols to obtain thermodynamically stable nanomolecules. Thermochemical reactions with physicochemically different ligands formed highly monodispersed, exclusively three different core-size nanomolecules, suggesting a ligand induced core-size conversion and structural transformation. The purpose of this work is to make available a facile and simple synthetic method for the preparation of Au 38 (SCH 2 CH 2 Ph) 24 , Au 36 (SPh-tBu) 24 , and Au 30 (S-tBu) 18 , to nonspecialists and the broader scientific community. The central idea of simple synthetic method was demonstrated with other ligand systems such as cyclopentanethiol (HSC 5 H 9 ), cyclohexanethiol(HSC 6 H 11 ), para-methylbenzenethiol(pMBT), 1-pentanethiol(HSC 5 H 11 ), 1-hexanethiol(HSC 6 H 13 ), where Au 36 (SC 5 H 9 ) 24 , Au 36 (SC 6 H 11 ) 24 , Au 36 (pMBT) 24 , Au 38 (SC 5 H 11 ) 24 , and Au 38 (SC 6 H 13 ) 24 were obtained, respectively.

  13. Au70S20(PPh3)12: an intermediate sized metalloid gold cluster stabilized by the Au4S4 ring motif and Au-PPh3 groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzler, Sebastian; Schrenk, Claudio; Frojd, Andrew R; Häkkinen, Hannu; Clayborne, Andre Z; Schnepf, Andreas

    2018-01-02

    Reducing (Ph 3 P)AuSC(SiMe 3 ) 3 with l-Selectride® gives the medium-sized metalloid gold cluster Au 70 S 20 (PPh 3 ) 12 . Computational studies show that the phosphine bound Au-atoms not only stabilize the electronic structure of Au 70 S 20 (PPh 3 ) 12 , but also behave as electron acceptors leading to auride-like gold atoms on the exterior.

  14. Modification of Au surfaces using new ferrocene derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Ortiz, Tanya L.; Malave-Leon, Maria; Rivera-Claudio, Mirna; Castillo-Ramirez, Jorge; Cabrera-Martinez, Carlos R.; Brito-Gomez, Rosa; Tremont, Rolando J.

    2008-01-01

    Gold surfaces have been modified by self-assembled techniques. Here the adsorption time of diasteroisomers (1R, 3S)-1-ferrocenyl-3-methyl-4,4-diphenyl-2,5-dioxacyclopentane and (1S, 3S)-1-ferrocenyl-3-methyl-4,4-diphenyl-2,5-dioxacyclopentane (, 3a and 3b) at a Au surface in ethanol solution was controlled. This study was followed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. The method used for the surface modification was the control of exposure time of a Au surface in the modifier/ethanol solution. It was demonstrated by EIS and XPS that the Au surface was modified with mixture of compounds 3a + 3b, avoiding the electron transference in the interface. It was also observed that the organometallic molecule indeed had been adsorbed on the Au surface. In addition, evidence seems to conclude that the molecule-Au interaction is through the electrons of cyclopentadienyl moiety, where the oxygen atoms are near the air-molecule interface and the iron atom is near the Au surface. This type of interaction of the ferrocene derivatives with gold surfaces has not been reported by any other author

  15. Biosupported Bimetallic Pd Au Nanocatalysts for Dechlorination of Environmental Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Corte, S.; Fitts, J.; Hennebel, T.; Sabbe, T.; Bliznuk, V.; Verschuere, S.; van der Lelie, D.; Verstraete, W.; Boon, N.

    2011-08-30

    Biologically produced monometallic palladium nanoparticles (bio-Pd) have been shown to catalyze the dehalogenation of environmental contaminants, but fail to efficiently catalyze the degradation of other important recalcitrant halogenated compounds. This study represents the first report of biologically produced bimetallic Pd/Au nanoparticle catalysts. The obtained catalysts were tested for the dechlorination of diclofenac and trichloroethylene. When aqueous bivalent Pd(II) and trivalent Au(III) ions were both added to concentrations of 50 mg L{sup -1} and reduced simultaneously by Shewanella oneidensis in the presence of H{sub 2}, the resulting cell-associated bimetallic nanoparticles (bio-Pd/Au) were able to dehalogenate 78% of the initially added diclofenac after 24 h; in comparison, no dehalogenation was observed using monometallic bio-Pd or bio-Au. Other catalyst-synthesis strategies did not show improved dehalogenation of TCE and diclofenac compared with bio-Pd. Synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction, (scanning) transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy indicated that the simultaneous reduction of Pd and Au supported on cells of S. oneidensis resulted in the formation of a unique bimetallic crystalline structure. This study demonstrates that the catalytic activity and functionality of possibly environmentally more benign biosupported Pd-catalysts can be improved by coprecipitation with Au.

  16. Controlled electrodeposition of Au monolayer film on ionic liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Qiang; Pang, Liuqing; Li, Man; Zhang, Yunxia; Ren, Xianpei [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, National Ministry of Education, Shaanxi Engineering Lab for Advanced Energy Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Liu, Shengzhong Frank, E-mail: szliu@dicp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, National Ministry of Education, Shaanxi Engineering Lab for Advanced Energy Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Dalian National Laboratory for Clean Energy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • We fabricate Au monolayer film on Ionic liquid substrate using an electrochemical deposition technique. • Au monolayer film was deposited on a “soft substrate” for the first time. • Au monolayer film can contribute extra Raman enhancement. - Abstract: Gold (Au) nanoparticles have been attractive for centuries for their vibrant appearance enhanced by their interaction with sunlight. Nowadays, there have been tremendous research efforts to develop them for high-tech applications including therapeutic agents, sensors, organic photovoltaics, medical applications, electronics and catalysis. However, there remains to be a challenge to fabricate a monolayer Au coating with complete coverage in controlled fashion. Here we present a facile method to deposit a uniform Au monolayer (ML) film on the [BMIM][PF{sub 6}] ionic liquid substrate using an electrochemical deposition process. It demonstrates that it is feasible to prepare a solid phase coating on the liquid-based substrate. Moreover, the thickness of the monolayer coating can be controlled to a layer-by-layer accuracy.

  17. Study of Pd-Au/MWCNTs formic acid electrooxidation catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikolajczuk, Anna; Borodzinski, Andrzej; Kedzierzawski, Piotr; Lesiak, Beata [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warszawa (Poland); Stobinski, Leszek [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warszawa (Poland); Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, ul. Woloska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Koever, Laszlo; Toth, Jozsef [Institute of Nuclear Research, Hungarian Academy of Sciences (ATOMKI), P. O. Box 51, 4001 Debrecen (Hungary); Lin, Hong-Ming [Department of Materials Engineering, Tatung University, 40, Chungshan N. Rd., 3rd Sec, 104, Taipei (China)

    2010-12-15

    The Pd-Au multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) supported catalyst exhibits higher power density in direct formic acid fuel cell (DFAFC) than similar Pd/MWCNTs catalyst. The Pd-Au/MWCNTs catalyst also exhibits higher activity and is more stable in electrooxidation reaction of formic acid during cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements. After preparation by polyol method, the catalyst was subjected to two type of treatments: (I) annealing at 250 C in 100% of Ar, (II) reducing in 5% of H{sub 2} in Ar atmosphere at 200 C. It was observed that the catalyst after treatment I was completely inactive, whereas after treatment II exhibited high activity. In order to explain this effect the catalysts were characterized by electron spectroscopy methods. The higher initial catalytic activity of Pd-Au/MWCNTs catalyst than Pd/MWCNTs catalyst in reaction of formic acid electrooxidation was attributed to electronic effect of gold in Pd-Au solution, and larger content of small Au nanoparticles of 1 nm size. The catalytic inactivity of Pd-Au/MWCNTs catalysts annealed in argon is attributed to carbon amorphous overlayer covering of Pd oxide shell on the metallic nanoparticles. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Spin Polarization and Quantum Spins in Au Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hsien Li

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study focuses on investigating the magnetic properties and the critical particle size for developing sizable spontaneous magnetic moment of bare Au nanoparticles. Seven sets of bare Au nanoparticle assemblies, with diameters from 3.5 to 17.5 nm, were fabricated with the gas condensation method. Line profiles of the X-ray diffraction peaks were used to determine the mean particle diameters and size distributions of the nanoparticle assemblies. The magnetization curves M(Ha reveal Langevin field profiles. Magnetic hysteresis was clearly revealed in the low field regime even at 300 K. Contributions to the magnetization from different size particles in the nanoparticle assemblies were considered when analyzing the M(Ha curves. The results show that the maximum particle moment will appear in 2.4 nm Au particles. A similar result of the maximum saturation magnetization appearing in 2.3 nm Au particles is also concluded through analysis of the dependency of the saturation magnetization MP on particle size. The MP(d curve departs significantly from the 1/d dependence, but can be described by a log-normal function. Magnetization can be barely detected for Au particles larger than 27 nm. Magnetic field induced Zeeman magnetization from the quantum confined Kubo gap opening appears in Au nanoparticles smaller than 9.5 nm in diameter.

  19. Novel condensation of Au-centered trigonal prisms in rare-earth-metal-rich tellurides: Er7Au2Te2 and Lu7Au2Te2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shalabh; Corbett, John D

    2010-07-14

    A new monoclinic structure occurs for Er(7)Au(2)Te(2) according to X-ray diffraction analysis of single crystals grown at 1200 degrees C: C2/m, Z = 4, a = 17.8310(9) A, b = 3.9819(5) A, c = 16.9089(9) A, beta = 104.361(4) degrees. The isostructural Lu(7)Au(2)Te(2) also exists according to X-ray powder pattern means, a = 17.536(4) A, b = 3.9719(4) A, c = 16.695(2) A, beta = 104.33(1) degrees. The structure contains zigzag chains of condensed, Au-centered tricapped trigonal prisms (TCTP) of Er along c that also share basal faces along b to generate puckered sheets. Further bi-face-capping Er atoms between these generate the three dimensional network along a, with tellurium in cavities outlined by augmented trigonal prismatic Er polyhedra. Bonding analysis via LMTO-DFT methods reveal very significant Er-Au bonding interactions, as quantified by their energy-weighted Hamilton overlap populations (-ICOHP), approximately 49% of the total for all interactions. These and similar Er-Te contributions sharply contrast with the small Er-Er population, only approximately 14% of the total in spite of the high proportion of Er-Er contacts. The strong polar bonding of Er to the electronegative Au and Te leaves Er relatively oxidized, with many of its 5d states falling above the Fermi level and empty. The contradiction with customary representations of structures that highlight rare-earth metal clusters is manifest. The large Er-Au Hamilton overlap population is in accord with the strong bonding between early and late transition metals first noted by Brewer in 1973. The relationship of this structure to the more distorted orthorhombic (Imm2) structure type of neighboring Dy(7)Ir(2)Te(2) is considered.

  20. Alloying Au surface with Pd reduces the intrinsic activity in catalyzing CO oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Qian, Kun

    2016-03-30

    © 2016. Various Au-Pd/SiO2 catalysts with a fixed Au loading but different Au:Pd molar ratios were prepared via deposition-precipitation method followed by H2 reduction. The structures were characterized and the catalytic activities in CO oxidation were evaluated. The formation of Au-Pd alloy particles was identified. The Au-Pd alloy particles exhibit enhanced dispersions on SiO2 than Au particles. Charge transfer from Pd to Au within Au-Pd alloy particles. Isolated Pd atoms dominate the surface of Au-Pd alloy particles with large Au:Pd molar ratios while contiguous Pd atoms dominate the surface of Au-Pd alloy particles with small Au:Pd molar ratios. Few synergetic effect of Au-Pd alloy occurs on catalyzing CO oxidation under employed reaction conditions. Alloying Au with Pd reduces the intrinsic activity in catalyzing CO oxidation, and contiguous Pd atoms on the Au-Pd alloy particles are capable of catalyzing CO oxidation while isolated Pd atoms are not. These results advance the fundamental understandings of Au-Pd alloy surfaces in catalyzing CO oxidation.