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Sample records for circuit-measuring collaborative learning

  1. The Design of Circuit-Measuring Collaborative Learning System with Embedded Broker

    CERN Document Server

    Kao, Fu-Chien; Huang, Ting-Hao

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the academic community has been giving much attention to Cooperative Learning System, a group learning method combined with pedagogy and social psychology. It allows group members to gain knowledge through collaborations and interactions. Nowadays, most Internet cooperative learning systems are designed to provide students mainly with a convenient online environment to study theoretical courses but rarely with an online environment to operate practical instruments. Hence, this paper designed a 3D online cooperative learning system for operating virtual instruments with circuit-measuring function. By integrating with Virtual Reality, Remote Control Parameter Transmission and embedded system techniques, this system gives learners not only a cooperative learning environment via networking to jointly operate the 3D virtual instruments (for example, multi-meters, power supplies and oscilloscopes) but also the functions of instant messages and 3D puzzles to interact with one another. Therefore, learners c...

  2. Collaborations in Open Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Howard

    2015-01-01

    This thesis researches automated services for professionals aiming at starting collaborative learning projects in open learning environments, such as MOOCs. It investigates the theoretical backgrounds of team formation for collaborative learning. Based on the outcomes, a model is developed describin

  3. Mobile Collaborative Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Bye, Gunhild Griff

    2008-01-01

    Mobile technology is a well-known part of life for the most children and adults in Norway today. Over the last several years, a lot of research has been done to improve this technology and it seems like a mobile collaborative learning system can be an important tool for learning in the future. By using ubiquitous computing and context-aware computing, the technologies are integrated into the environment and enable the user to move around and learn in a natural environment. This leads to many ...

  4. Accounting Experiences in Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmond, Tracie; Tiggeman, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    This paper discusses incorporating collaborative learning into accounting classes as a response to the Accounting Education Change Commission's call to install a more active student learner in the classroom. Collaborative learning requires the students to interact with each other and with the material within the classroom setting. It is a…

  5. Children's Views of Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnard, Sandra; Sharp, John

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative learning is a widely used and popular strategy in many primary schools. In this article, the authors review the nature and purpose of collaborative learning and present a summary of how one small group of Year 5/6 children view its effectiveness. (Contains 3 tables.)

  6. Judgments of Learning in Collaborative Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helsdingen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Helsdingen, A. S. (2010, March). Judgments of Learning in Collaborative Learning Environments. Poster presented at the 1st International Air Transport and Operations Symposium (ATOS 2010), Delft, The Netherlands: Delft University of Technology.

  7. Messy Collaboration: Learning from a Learning Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Bob; Walker, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Messy collaboration refers to complexity, unpredictability and management dilemmas when educators work together. Such messiness was evident in a Hong Kong English Learning Study, a structured cyclical process in which teachers and researcher-participants from a teacher education institution work collaboratively on effective student learning. This…

  8. Wikis and Collaborative Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Binbin; Niiya, Melissa; Warschauer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    While collaborative learning and collaborative writing can be of great value to student learning, the implementation of a technology-supported collaborative learning environment is a challenge. With their built-in features for supporting collaborative writing and social communication, wikis are a promising platform for collaborative learning;…

  9. Knowledge Convergence and Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Heisawn; Chi, Michelene T. H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper operationalized the notion of knowledge convergence and assessed quantitatively how much knowledge convergence occurred during collaborative learning. Knowledge convergence was defined as an increase in common knowledge where common knowledge referred to the knowledge that all collaborating partners had. Twenty pairs of college students…

  10. Systems Support for Collaborative Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Allison, Collin; Ruddle, Alan; Michaelson, Rosa

    2002-01-01

    One of the distinguishing features of novel network based learning environments is their capability to support group work and collaboration. TAGS, the Tutor and Groups Support Scheme, is an inter-disciplinary, inter-institutional project, which brings together software systems builders, subject-specialists and educational content developers. Collaborative Learning is central to the pedagogical goals of TAGS, and this has lead to the concept of groups being used as a fundamental organising pri...

  11. Performative Tools and Collaborative Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Minder, Bettina; Lassen, Astrid Heidemann

    The use of performative tools can support collaborative learning across knowledge domains (i.e. science and practice), because they create new spaces for dialog. However, so far innovation literature provides little answers to the important discussion of how to describe the effects and requirements...... of performative tools used in transdisciplinary events for collaborative learning. The results of this single case study add to extant knowledge- and learning literature by providing the reader with a rich description of characteristics and learning functions of performative tools in transdisciplinary events...... and a description of how they interrelate with the specific setting of such an event. Furthermore, they complement previous findings by relating performative tools to collaborative learning for knowledge intensive ideas....

  12. Learning Music from Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, R. Keith

    2008-01-01

    I draw on two traditions of research: the social psychology of collaborative groups, and the ethnographic study of improvisational performance. I outline a general model of group creativity derived from these traditions. I show how the model can be used to better understand musical competence and performance, and I provide recommendations for how…

  13. Assessment of (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strijbos, J. -W.

    2011-01-01

    Within the (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning (CS)CL research community, there has been an extensive dialogue on theories and perspectives on learning from collaboration, approaches to scaffold (script) the collaborative process, and most recently research methodology. In contrast, the issue of assessment of collaborative learning has…

  14. Project Learning and Virtual Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fibiger, Bo; Nielsen, Janni; Sorensen, Elsebeth;

    2005-01-01

    This paper will introduce a master program in ICT and Learning (MIL) and present some of the experiences we have gained so far. MIL is a result of a collaborative initiative taken by five Danish universities, and it is an accredited part-time 2-year master program. It is unique in the sense...... that it builds on the pedagogical framework of project pedagogy and is based on online collaboration.The paper will describe MIL, the universities involved, the administrative organization, and the profile of the students. We will discuss the pedagogical framework and the project collaboration in relation...

  15. Globally Collaborative Experiential Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi UTSUMI

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The Global University System (GUS [Utsumi, et al, 2003] is a worldwide initiative to create advanced telecommunications infrastructure for access to educational resources across national and cultural boundaries for global peace. GUS aims to create a worldwide consortium of universities to provide the underdeveloped world with access to 21st Century education via broadband Internet technologies. The aim is to achieve “education and healthcare for all,” anywhere, anytime and at any pace. The GUS works in the major regions of the globe with partnerships of higher education and healthcare institutions. Learners in these regions will be able to take their courses from member institutions around the world to receive a GUS degree. These learners and their professors from partner institutions will also form a global forum for exchange of ideas and information and for conducting collaborative research and development with emerging global GRID computer network technology. Globally Collaborative Environmental Peace Gaming (GCEPG project [Utsumi, 2003] with a globally distributed computer simulation system, focusing on the issue of environment and sustainable development in developing countries, is to train would-be decision-makers in crisis management, conflict resolution, and negotiation techniques basing on “facts and figures.” The GUS will supply game players from around the world.

  16. Managing the Collaborative Learning Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, June G.

    2002-01-01

    The feature story in this issue, "Managing the Collaborative Learning Environment," focuses on the growing emphasis on teamwork in the workplace. It discusses how the concept of empowering employees in the workplace is evolving and the benefits--faster decision making, lower costs and absenteeism, higher productivity and quality, and increased…

  17. Introverts and Collaborative Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    george jacobs

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available I was interested in reviewing Susan Cain’s (2013 “Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking” for two reasons. First, as an introvert I wanted to learn more about myself. Second, I wanted to explore Cain and others’ criticism that group activities in the workplace and in education are unfair to introverts. This book review contains two parts. The first part elaborates the general concept of introversion, borrowing heavily from the impressive amount of research and practical experience presented in Cain (2013. The second part addresses the criticism that teachers who use Cooperative Learning (CL are being unfair to their introvert students.   Saya tertarik untuk menelaah buku karya Susan Cain yang berjudul “Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking” karena dua alasan : pertama, sebagai seorang introvert saya ingin tahu lebih lanjut tentang diri saya; kedua, kritik tentang kegiatan kelompok dalam tempat kerja dan di tempat sekolah yang tidak fair bagi orang pendiam (introvert. Telaah buku ini berisi dua bagian. Bagian pertama mengelaborasi konsep umum tentang introversi, dengan mengacu ke sejumlah penelitian dan pengalaman praktis oleh Cain (2013. Bagian kedua, menelaah kritik tentang guru-guru yang menggunakan teknik “Cooperative Learning (CL” itu tidak adil bagi siswa-siswa yang bersifat introvert atau pendiam.

  18. Collaborative Lea(r)ning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jacob S.

    , the strategies of companies, and the work of managers. Alliances are both a cause and an effect of intensive competition. Collaboration can help firms to lower costs and risks, to expand markets, to develop new products and to learn or create new knowledge. One of the challenges is building capability...... to establishing a joint improvement and learning culture with these organisations. Simply, if companies want to create new capabilities and improve their competitiveness, they must combine their knowledge and skills in a unique way, and create improvement and learning links to enable personal and information......The inter-organisational collaboration perspective is not new. Phoenician merchants have used this perspective while setting up joint ventures to limit their risks in overseas trading. What is new are the ways in which efficiency alliances are interacting and changing the terms of competition...

  19. Mobile Learning: location, collaboration and scaffolding inquiry

    OpenAIRE

    Scanlon, Eileen

    2014-01-01

    Critiques of mobile learning pedagogy are concerned with whether such approaches are technology led. This chapter discusses how the particular features of mobile learning can be harnessed to provide new learning opportunities in relation to collaboration, inquiry and location-based learning. Technology supported inquiry learning is a situation rich with possibilities for collaboration. In particular, mobile learning offers new possibilities for scaffolding collaboration together with its othe...

  20. Ontology development for computersupported collaborative learning scripts

    OpenAIRE

    Papakonstantinou, Aliki; Demetriadis, Stavros; Bassiliades, Nick

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an ongoing effort to develop an ontology for Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) Scripts. Our work merges the field of collaborative learning with the field of semantic web and provides a framework for the formalization of collaboration scripts using the OWL language. Collaboration scripts are didactic scenarios that prescribe learners' interactions in collaborative settings. A script comprises a number of phases and each phase specifies the activity that lear...

  1. Assessment of (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijbos, Jan-Willem

    2011-01-01

    Within the (Computer-Supported) Collaborative Learning (CS) CL research community, there has been an extensive dialogue on theories and perspectives on learning from collaboration, approaches to scaffold (script) the collaborative process, and most recently research methodology. In contrast, the iss

  2. Accountability for Project-Based Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Abu-Hussain; Essawi, Mohammad; Tilchin, Oleg

    2014-01-01

    One perspective model for the creation of the learning environment and engendering students' thinking development is the Project-Based Collaborative Learning (PBCL) model. This model organizes learning by collaborative performance of various projects. In this paper we describe an approach to enhancing the PBCL model through the creation of…

  3. Using Web Tools, Collaborating, and Learning Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Karen L.; Cifuentes, Lauren

    2001-01-01

    Describes a case study of a graduate class that investigated how students learn and collaborate in a Web-based course designed according to the current social-constructivist conception of learning. Discusses independent and collaborative activities; how student learn to use technology; communication; student preferences; learner differences;…

  4. Methodological challenges for collaborative learning research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strijbos, Jan-Willem; Fischer, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Research on collaborative learning, both face-to-face and computer-supported, has thrived in the past 10 years. The studies range from outcome-oriented (individual and group learning) to process-oriented (impact of interaction on learning processes, motivation and organisation of collaboration) to m

  5. Learning Multidisciplinary Collaboration with Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Thomas Duus

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the design of a game-based learning process for developing communication in public organisations. The game-design presented here emphasises those parts of public organisations that tend to employ multidisciplinary teams for solving wicked problems. As such teams employ...... Professional was designed. Its purpose was to a) provide team members with a shared language for discussing work related problems in regard to communication. To facilitate an understanding on the collaboration across professions, and to provide a space for dialogue about professional cooperation, Public...... members from different, professional backgrounds, the game Public Professional sought to develop new understandings among team members and across professions. The purpose of this game was to facilitate an understanding among team members and across professions, a game-based learning process named Public...

  6. Interaction Forms in Successful Collaborative Learning in Virtual Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuopala, Essi; Hyvönen, Pirkko; Järvelä, Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Despite the numerous studies on social interaction in collaborative learning, little is known about interaction forms in successful computer-supported collaborative learning situations. The purpose of this study was to explore and understand student interaction in successful collaborative learning during a university course which was mediated by…

  7. A collaborative learning approach and its evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Ishitani, Lucila; Guimarães, Silvio J. F.; Bruegger, Gisele

    2006-01-01

    The use of new technologies does not mean that the applied education model is modern. New technologies can be used in a way that follows the traditional education model, with all its deficiencies. The collaborative education model involves students in reflection, participation, and construction of their knowledge, or to collaboratively learn. This article aims to present mechanisms to stimulate collaborative learning, in present education, through the aid of virtual learning environments.

  8. Supportive Learning: Linear Learning and Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bih Ni; Abdullah, Sopiah; Kiu, Su Na

    2016-01-01

    This is a conceptual paper which is trying to look at the educational technology is not limited to high technology. However, electronic educational technology, also known as e-learning, has become an important part of today's society, which consists of a wide variety of approaches to digitization, components and methods of delivery. In the…

  9. Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration and Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deana D. Pennington

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Complex environmental problem solving depends on cross-disciplinary collaboration among scientists. Collaborative research must be preceded by an exploratory phase of collective thinking that creates shared conceptual frameworks. Collective thinking, in a cross-disciplinary setting, depends on the facility with which collaborators are able to learn and understand each others' perspectives. This paper applies three perspectives on learning to the problem of enabling cross-disciplinary collaboration: Maslow's hierarchy of needs, constructivism, and organizational learning. Application of learning frameworks to collaboration provides insights regarding receptive environments for collaboration, and processes that facilitate cross-disciplinary interactions. These environments and interactions need time to develop and require a long phase of idea generation preceding any focused research effort. The findings highlight that collaboration is itself a complex system of people, scientific theory, and tools that must be intentionally managed. Effective management of the system requires leaders who are facilitators and are capable of orchestrating effective environments and interactions.

  10. Students experiences with collaborative learning in asynchronous computer-supported collaborative learning environments.

    OpenAIRE

    Dewiyanti, Silvia; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Jochems, Wim; Broers, Nick

    2008-01-01

    Dewiyanti, S., Brand-Gruwel, S., Jochems, W., & Broers, N. (2007). Students experiences with collaborative learning in asynchronous computer-supported collaborative learning environments. Computers in Human Behavior, 23, 496-514.

  11. National Wind Distance Learning Collaborative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. James B. Beddow

    2013-03-29

    Executive Summary The energy development assumptions identified in the Department of Energy's position paper, 20% Wind Energy by 2030, projected an exploding demand for wind energy-related workforce development. These primary assumptions drove a secondary set of assumptions that early stage wind industry workforce development and training paradigms would need to undergo significant change if the workforce needs were to be met. The current training practice and culture within the wind industry is driven by a relatively small number of experts with deep field experience and knowledge. The current training methodology is dominated by face-to-face, classroom based, instructor present training. Given these assumptions and learning paradigms, the purpose of the National Wind Distance Learning Collaborative was to determine the feasibility of developing online learning strategies and products focused on training wind technicians. The initial project scope centered on (1) identifying resources that would be needed for development of subject matter and course design/delivery strategies for industry-based (non-academic) training, and (2) development of an appropriate Learning Management System (LMS). As the project unfolded, the initial scope was expanded to include development of learning products and the addition of an academic-based training partner. The core partners included two training entities, industry-based Airstreams Renewables and academic-based Lake Area Technical Institute. A third partner, Vision Video Interactive, Inc. provided technology-based learning platforms (hardware and software). The revised scope yielded an expanded set of results beyond the initial expectation. Eight learning modules were developed for the industry-based Electrical Safety course. These modules were subsequently redesigned and repurposed for test application in an academic setting. Software and hardware developments during the project's timeframe enabled redesign providing

  12. The classroom group work for collaborative learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雪珍

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the issues in the field of collaborative learning,and put its sDess on the c|agsroom group work for collaborative learning.The way to deal with group work and teacher's role in the process will also be discussed.

  13. The classroom group work for collaborative learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王雪珍

    2009-01-01

    This paper addresses the issues in the field of collaborative learning,and put its stress on the classroom group work for collaborative learning.The way to deal with group work and teacher's role in the process will also be discussed.

  14. Different Futures of Adaptive Collaborative Learning Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummel, Nikol; Walker, Erin; Aleven, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    In this position paper we contrast a Dystopian view of the future of adaptive collaborative learning support (ACLS) with a Utopian scenario that--due to better-designed technology, grounded in research--avoids the pitfalls of the Dystopian version and paints a positive picture of the practice of computer-supported collaborative learning 25 years…

  15. Learning during a Collaborative Final Exam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlstrom, Orjan

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative testing has been suggested to serve as a good learning activity, for example, compared to individual testing. The aim of the present study was to measure learning at different levels of knowledge during a collaborative final exam in a course in basic methods and statistical procedures. Results on pre- and post-tests taken…

  16. Collaborative Inquiry Learning: Models, Tools, and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Thorsten; Urhahne, Detlef; Schanze, Sascha; Ploetzner, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Collaborative inquiry learning is one of the most challenging and exciting ventures for today's schools. It aims at bringing a new and promising culture of teaching and learning into the classroom where students in groups engage in self-regulated learning activities supported by the teacher. It is expected that this way of learning fosters…

  17. Collaborative Learning and Dialogue: Democratic Learning in Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Joseph; Hyslop-Margison, Emery

    2006-01-01

    Building on the framework of Peters and Armstrong's (1998) three Types of Teaching/Learning, this article explores the use of dialogue to foster a collaborative and democratic learning experience. There are three conditions under which dialogue can be facilitated as a part of the collaborative learning experience: (a) intent, (b) a dialogical…

  18. Collaborative Learning in the Cloud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchner, Kathrin; Razmerita, Liana

    2015-01-01

    This present study aims to investigate how students perceive collaboration and identifies associated technologies used to collaborate. In particular we aim to address the following research questions: What are the factors that impact satisfaction with collaboration? How do these factors differ in...

  19. Collaborative Inquiry Learning: Models, Tools, and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Thorsten; Urhahne, Detlef; Schanze, Sascha; Ploetzner, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Collaborative inquiry learning is one of the most challenging and exciting ventures for today?s schools. It aims at bringing a new and promising culture of teaching and learning into the classroom where students in groups engage in self-regulated learning activities supported by the teacher. It is expected that this way of learning fosters students? motivation and interest in science, that they learn to perform steps of inquiry similar to scientists and that they gain know...

  20. Learning during a collaborative final exam

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlström, Örjan

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative testing has been suggested to serve as a good learning activity, for example, compared to individual testing. The aim of the present study was to measure learning at different levels of knowledge during a collaborative final exam in a course in basic methods and statistical procedures. Results on pre- and post-tests taken individually (N = 30) before and after the collaborative part of the final exam confirmed learning effects at the uni- and multi-structural levels, as well as ...

  1. Developing Instructional Leadership through Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Claire Johnson; McKnight, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    Collaborative learning teams have emerged as an effective tool for teachers to steadily and continuously improve their instruction. Evidence also suggests that a learning teams model can affect school leadership as well. We explored the impact of learning teams on leadership roles of principals and teachers in secondary schools and found that…

  2. Social Media, Collaboration and Social Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondahl, Margrethe; Razmerita, Liana

    2014-01-01

    Social media has created new possibilities for digitally native students to engage, interact and collaborate in learning tasks that foster learning processes and the overall learning experience. Using both qualitative and quantitative data, this article discusses experiences and challenges of using...

  3. Cultivating collaborative improvement: an action learning approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middel, Rick; McNichols, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    The process of implementing collaborative initiatives across disparate members of supply networks is fraught with difficulties. One approach designed to tackle the difficulties of organisational change and interorganisational improvement in practice is 'action learning'. This paper examines the expe

  4. Teacher learning in collaborative curriculum design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, Bregje de; Voogt, J.; Westbroek, H.; Handelzalts, A.; Walraven, A.; McKenney, S.; Pieters, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Interconnected Model of Professional Growth (Clarke & Hollingsworth, 2002) was used to identify processes of teacher learning during the collaborative design of curriculum materials in the context of curriculum innovation. Nine published studies from six different countries about teachers’ colla

  5. Teacher learning in collaborative curriculum design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, Joke; Westbroek, Hanna; Handelzalts, Adam; Walraven, Amber; McKenney, Susan; Pieters, Jules; De Vries, Bregje

    2011-01-01

    Voogt, J., Westbroek, H., Handelzalts, A., Walraven, A., McKenney, S., Pieters, J., & De Vries, B. (2011). Teacher learning in collaborative curriculum design. Teaching and Teacher Education, 27(8), 1235-1244.

  6. Mixed artefacts as mediators for collaborative learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ellen Tove; Davidsen, Jacob; Konnerup, Ulla

    2012-01-01

    -through-construction as part of the Problem Based Learning pedagogy, and to increase students‘ awareness of the role of embodied interaction in learning. Simultaneously the Lab facilitates design of prototypes and exploration of use situations within the fields of Human-Computer Interaction, Computer Supported Cooperative......eLearningLab at Aalborg University conduct teaching and research in the intersection between Human Computer Interaction (technology), Information architecture (organization) and learning and development (human action). Inspired by the lay out of workshops spaces at architecture schools, eLearning...... Work and Computer Supported Collaborative Learning. This paper presents the ideas behind the eLearning Lab‘s DesignLab....

  7. Lessons Learned from the Collaborative Writing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhavsar, Victoria; Ahn, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    We reflect on how to implement the instrumental aspect of collaborative writing in such a way that the developmental aspect of collaborative writing is maximally fostered, based on conditions necessary for socially constructed learning. We discuss four instrumental strategies that bolster mutual ownership of the writing and protect the social…

  8. Teacher learning in collaborative curriculum design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, J.; Westbroek, H.B.; Handelzalts, A.; Walraven, A.; McKenney, S.; Pieters, J.M.; Vries, de B.

    2011-01-01

    Hollingsworth, 2002) was used to identify processes of teacher learning during the collaborative design of curriculum materials in the context of curriculum innovation. Nine published studies from six different countries about teachers’ collaborative curriculum design were analyzed to identify the l

  9. Teacher Learning in Collaborative Curriculum Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voogt, J.; Westbroek, H.; Handelzalts, A.; Walraven, A.; McKenney, S.; Pieters, J.; de Vries, B.

    2011-01-01

    The Interconnected Model of Professional Growth (Clarke & Hollingsworth, 2002) was used to identify processes of teacher learning during the collaborative design of curriculum materials in the context of curriculum innovation. Nine published studies from six different countries about teachers' collaborative curriculum design were analyzed to…

  10. Teaching & Learning Across Collaborative Digital contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    This paper addresses the challenge of teaching and learning in a blended, collaborative Digital Context. It reports on a case study in which the promotion of learners empowerment and meta-learning are key objectives. The findings of the case study suggest the presence of a promising potential in ...... in a marriage between theory-led designs, digital technology, and dialogic collaborative knowledge building for cultivating and enhancing student empowerment....

  11. Use of an Interculturally Enriched Collaboration Script in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning in Higher Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popov, V.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Kuznetsov, A.N.; Mulder, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this exploratory study, the authors introduced an interculturally enriched collaboration script (IECS) for working in culturally diverse groups within a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environment and then assessed student online collaborative behaviour, learning performance and

  12. Collaborative Leadership Learning; Developing Facilitation Skills for Collaborative Learning in Leadership Learning Groups.

    OpenAIRE

    James, Kim; Mann, Jasbir; Creasy, Jane

    2003-01-01

    many organisations working for example, with less hierarchical structures, with cross- organisational partners, or in professional environments. Leadership at all levels must be supported by leaders in top executive positions who develop their own capabilities both as leaders and in their role of leading the learning of leadership throughout their organisations. Their ideas of their role in leading learning will be shaped by their own leadership development experiences. Collaborative learning...

  13. Collaborative Learning in Music Education: A Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, David W.

    2001-01-01

    States that collaborative learning has been absent from the field of music education. Presents a literature review on collaborative learning, focusing on issues such as the issue of student achievement and the difference between cooperative and collaborative learning. Explores research on collaborative learning in music education. Includes…

  14. Collaborative Learning Framework in Business Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir GRIGORE

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a solution based on collaboration with experts and practitioner from university and ERP companies involved in process learning by training and learning by working. The solution uses CPI test to establish proper team for framework modules: Real-Time Chat Room, Discussion Forum, E-mail Support and Learning through Training. We define novice, practitioner and expert competence level based on CORONET train methodology. ERP companies have own roles for mentoring services to knowledge workers and evaluate the performance of learning process with teachers’ cooperation in learning by teaching and learning by working module.

  15. Application Protocol Design for Collaborative Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joung-Souk Sung

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This presentation will describe the effort to construct an effective educational support environment and to develop meaningful educational applications, This system is a framework supporting interactive collaboration which enables both teachers and students to interact in real-time from remote sites. The purpose of this collaboration is to bring interactive multimedia learning in real-time. In order to induce collaborative learning, this paperproposes protocol design process that shares knowledge awareness information for learning environments. The protocol helps learner to mediate and recognize collaborators in the shared knowledge space. We are developing an open-ended collaborative learning supportsystem, which is called prototype system for protocol design, and facilities to share individual knowledge and to learn through collaboration. This system architecture can be viewed asdivided in four logical parts: the infrastructure, the service functions, the advanced service functions and the application. The session management is creates/destroys the sessions and performs the functions controlling the QOS by detaching the network load. Session manager include: session control, floor control, media instance control, packet interpreter, event interpreter, media server instance, media interface, network interface private applicationinterface and media server control.

  16. Developing Reading Comprehension through Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Drummond, Sylvia; Mazón, Nancy; Littleton, Karen; Vélez, Maricela

    2014-01-01

    The present study explores the development and promotion of reading comprehension in primary school students, in the context of the implementation of an educational programme called "Learning Together" (LT). The programme, which centred on collaborative learning activities, was designed to promote oral and written communication in…

  17. Learning to Collaborate by Collaborating: A Face-to-Face Collaborative Activity for Measuring and Learning Basics about Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortez, C.; Nussbaum, M.; Woywood, G.; Aravena, R.

    2009-01-01

    In today's fast-changing business environment, teams have emerged as a requirement for business success. However, in schools and universities, students are usually not taught teamwork skills. In this paper, we introduce learning to collaborate by collaborating, a process that enables collaboration and teamwork skills to be taught and measured…

  18. Architecture for Collaborative Learning Activities in Hybrid Learning Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Ibáñez, María Blanca; Maroto, David; García Rueda, José Jesús; Leony, Derick; Delgado Kloos, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    3D virtual worlds are recognized as collaborative learning environments. However, the underlying technology is not sufficiently mature and the virtual worlds look cartoonish, unlinked to reality. Thus, it is important to enrich them with elements from the real world to enhance student engagement in learning activities. Our approach is to build learning environments where participants can either be in the real world or in its mirror world while sharing the same hybrid space in a collaborative ...

  19. On the conditions for generative collaboration: learning through collaborative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontecorvo, Clotilde

    2007-06-01

    Drawing on autobiographical recollections, I propose to see collaborative research as a learning experience. I assume a sociocultural psychological approach to the social understanding and interpretation of different scientific research practices. I examine the modalities of collaboration in my first experience of managing an important national research project on Italian families' dinner table conversations, and in a larger collaborative research endeavor concerning the everyday life of middle-class Italian, Swedish and US families from a comparative view (the Sloan project). On the basis of these experiences, I highlight some of the difficulties met by two other projects presented in this special issue, the DUNES project (Tartas and Muller Mirza, this issue) and the Transition project (Markova and Plichtova, this issue). I conclude by suggesting a provisional criterion for generativity in collaborative research. I suggest that generativity occurs when the more expert and academically oldest ones become conscious that they are learning something new from the group and from some other, independently from age and experience.

  20. ICT & Collaborative LearningCollaborative Learning between Kansai University & University of Hawaii~

    OpenAIRE

    KIMURA, Bert Y.; KIMURA, Mary E. O.; HO, Curtis; Kubota, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    Kansai University students majoring in educational technology are provided opportunities to increase their teamwork skills and intercultural competencies through authentic learning, group work and collaborative projects, including a collaborative video project with University of Hawaii graduate students. These experiences are integrated into the ICT For Learning class taught each fall semester in the Faculty of Informatics.

  1. Learning commons evolution and collaborative essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Schader, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    This book examines successfully planned and implemented learning commons at several different academic institutions around the world. These case studies provide a methodology for effective planning, implementation and assessment. Practical information is provided on how to collaborate with campus stakeholders, estimate budgeting and staffing and determine the equipment, hardware and software needs. Also provided are memoranda of understandings (MOUs), planning checklists and assessment tools. This book reflects a unifying focus on both the evolution of learning commons to learning spaces and t

  2. Collaborative Supervised Learning for Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Rebbapragada, Umaa; Lane, Terran

    2011-01-01

    Collaboration methods for distributed machine-learning algorithms involve the specification of communication protocols for the learners, which can query other learners and/or broadcast their findings preemptively. Each learner incorporates information from its neighbors into its own training set, and they are thereby able to bootstrap each other to higher performance. Each learner resides at a different node in the sensor network and makes observations (collects data) independently of the other learners. After being seeded with an initial labeled training set, each learner proceeds to learn in an iterative fashion. New data is collected and classified. The learner can then either broadcast its most confident classifications for use by other learners, or can query neighbors for their classifications of its least confident items. As such, collaborative learning combines elements of both passive (broadcast) and active (query) learning. It also uses ideas from ensemble learning to combine the multiple responses to a given query into a single useful label. This approach has been evaluated against current non-collaborative alternatives, including training a single classifier and deploying it at all nodes with no further learning possible, and permitting learners to learn from their own most confident judgments, absent interaction with their neighbors. On several data sets, it has been consistently found that active collaboration is the best strategy for a distributed learner network. The main advantages include the ability for learning to take place autonomously by collaboration rather than by requiring intervention from an oracle (usually human), and also the ability to learn in a distributed environment, permitting decisions to be made in situ and to yield faster response time.

  3. Social Innovation and Collaborative Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Linda Lundgaard; Hulgård, Lars

    2014-01-01

    offspring for academic learning and teaching is of a hybrid character – performed through bricolage – and that this presumably in the coming years will foster a differentiation when (more) universities capture this development. From a learning and skills perspective, social enterprises and social......In this chapter we explore the roots and inspirations as well as the innovative pedagogy, learning and study programmes in social innovation and social entrepreneurship at Roskilde University in Denmark. We further outline the contribution of academic capacity building nationally and...... internationally in the area of social entrepreneurship and social innovation. We sketch out six inspirational traditions that influence learning and teaching in social innovation and social entrepreneurship: 1/ features and concepts of classic entrepreneurship teaching, 2/ critical pedagogy of the oppressed and...

  4. Social Innovation and Collaborative Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Linda Lundgaard; Hulgård, Lars

    2014-01-01

    entrepreneurship are of particular interest, since teaching and learning set out to comprise theoretical, empirical and practical dimensions. At the Centre for Social Entrepreneurship (CSE) we are engaged in processes of reformulating the ‘old position’ of the reform university, where students were first of all...... and internationally in the area of social entrepreneurship and social innovation. We sketch out six inspirational traditions that influence learning and teaching in social innovation and social entrepreneurship: 1/ features and concepts of classic entrepreneurship teaching, 2/ critical pedagogy of the oppressed...... that the offspring for academic learning and teaching is of a hybrid character – performed through bricolage – and that this presumably in the coming years will foster a differentiation when (more) universities capture this development. From a learning and skills perspective, social enterprises and social...

  5. Seven Affordances of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning: How to Support Collaborative Learning? How Can Technologies Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Heisawn; Hmelo-Silver, Cindy E.

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes 7 core affordances of technology for collaborative learning based on theories of collaborative learning and CSCL (Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning) practices. Technology affords learner opportunities to (1) engage in a joint task, (2) communicate, (3) share resources, (4) engage in productive collaborative learning…

  6. Collaborative Inquiry Learning: Models, tools, and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Thorsten; Urhahne, Detlef; Schanze, Sascha; Ploetzner, Rolf

    2010-02-01

    Collaborative inquiry learning is one of the most challenging and exciting ventures for today's schools. It aims at bringing a new and promising culture of teaching and learning into the classroom where students in groups engage in self-regulated learning activities supported by the teacher. It is expected that this way of learning fosters students' motivation and interest in science, that they learn to perform steps of inquiry similar to scientists and that they gain knowledge on scientific processes. Starting from general pedagogical reflections and science standards, the article reviews some prominent models of inquiry learning. This comparison results in a set of inquiry processes being the basis for cooperation in the scientific network NetCoIL. Inquiry learning is conceived in several ways with emphasis on different processes. For an illustration of the spectrum, some main conceptions of inquiry and their focuses are described. In the next step, the article describes exemplary computer tools and environments from within and outside the NetCoIL network that were designed to support processes of collaborative inquiry learning. These tools are analysed by describing their functionalities as well as effects on student learning known from the literature. The article closes with challenges for further developments elaborated by the NetCoIL network.

  7. Learning through collaboration: video game wikis

    OpenAIRE

    Barr, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    The wiki, wherein community-spirited players meticulously document their gaming experiences for the benefit of others, from simple guides to complex theories and strategies, has become the de facto online reference medium for video game players. This study sought to examine how players learn from one another about the systems that underpin their favourite games and how they engaged with social media – wikis, in particular – to facilitate this collaborative learning. It is argued that in coll...

  8. On the Task-based Collaborative Learning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曲囡囡; 马卓

    2008-01-01

    <正>Task-based language teaching(TBLT) has been a prevalent teaching practice in the TEFL field in the recent years and its momentum for striving to be the legitimate one has never ceased. The present study tries to provide a theoretical foundation for its application in the communicative learning approach of English as the second language(ESL),namely the collaborative learning mode.

  9. Collaborative reinforcement learning of autonomic behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Dowling, Jim; CUNNINGHAM, RAYMOND; Curran, Eoin; Cahill, Vinny

    2004-01-01

    peer-reviewed This paper introduces Collaborative Reinforcement Learning (CRL), a coordination model for solving system-wide optimisation problems in distributed systems where there is no support for global state. In CRL the autonomic properties of a distributed system emerge from the coordination of individual agents solving discrete optimisation problems using Reinforcement Learning. In the context of an ad hoc routing protocol, we show how system-wide optimisation in CRL can be used t...

  10. Fostering Interdisciplinary Collaboration to Improve Student Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Ronald A. Styron Jr.; Jennifer L. Styron

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the impact on student learning of those enrolled in courses where instructors participated in collegial coaching and peer mentoring. A nonequivalent group design methodology was employed along with an analysis of variance to analyze data. Findings indicated higher mastery levels of student learning outcomes, higher levels of perceived critical thinking and collaboration by students, statistical significance in critical thinking constructs, higher level...

  11. Online Collaborative Learning and Communication Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havard, Byron; Du, Jianxia; Xu, Jianzhong

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the dynamics of online collaborative learning and communication media regarding team projects. Media richness and social presence theories are well-accepted rational theories that explain media choices and media behaviors, and serve as the theoretical framework. Quantitative and qualitative data collection…

  12. Wiki Based Collaborative Learning in Interuniversity Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzlinger, Elisabeth; Herzog, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    In business education advanced collaboration skills and media literacy are important for surviving in a globalized business where virtual communication between enterprises is part of the day-by-day business. To transform these global working situations into higher education, a learning scenario between two universities in Germany and Austria was…

  13. Multimodal representations in collaborative history learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prangsma, M.E.

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation focuses on the question: How does making and connecting different types of multimodal representations affect the collaborative learning process and the acquisition of a chronological frame of reference in 12 to 14-year olds in pre vocational education? A chronological frame of refe

  14. Automating Expertise in Collaborative Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVoie, Noelle; Streeter, Lynn; Lochbaum, Karen; Wroblewski, David; Boyce, Lisa; Krupnick, Charles; Psotka, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a set of tools for improving online collaborative learning including an automated expert that monitors and moderates discussions, and additional tools to evaluate contributions, semantically search all posted comments, access a library of hundreds of digital books and provide reports to instructors. The technology behind these…

  15. Technology in Support of Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resta, Paul; Laferriere, Therese

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the research conducted in the last 20 years on the application of technology in support of collaborative learning in higher education. The review focuses primarily on studies that use Internet-based technologies and social interaction analysis. The review provides six sets of observations/recommendations regarding methodology,…

  16. Are Online Learners Frustrated with Collaborative Learning Experiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capdeferro, Neus; Romero, Margarida

    2012-01-01

    Online education increasingly puts emphasis on collaborative learning methods. Despite the pedagogical advantages of collaborative learning, online learners can perceive collaborative learning activities as frustrating experiences. The purpose of this study was to characterize the feelings of frustration as a negative emotion among online learners…

  17. A Path to Collaborative Strategic Learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nancy M. Carlson

    2003-10-01

    Collaborative learning is critical for the future of any organization and must align with the strategic organizational processes that result in products valued by others. To discover these processes, proposal preparation is explored using topic-oriented ethnography, grounded theory, and an innovative addition to qualitative interviewing, called metainquiry. Using interview data from editors, graphic artists, text processors, scientists, engineers, and technical managers, substantive theory emerges. The research discovers the five essential processes of owning, visioning, reviewing, producing, and contributing needed for organizational strategic learning to occur. The dimensions of these processes are made explicit and can be used to gauge the health of any organization. The substantive theory also provides insight into the ability of collaborative learning to evolve, flourish, and adapt to the strategic advantage of the organization. Lastly, actionable goals with ten essential elements emerge that link owning, visioning, reviewing, producing, and contributing as a path for all organizations to follow to promote collaborative learning communities and enhance their competitive advantage.

  18. When Collaborative Learning Meets Nature: Collaborative Learning as a Meaningful Learning Tool in the Ecology Inquiry Based Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenszayn, Ronit; Assaraf, Orit Ben-Zvi

    2011-01-01

    This research suggests utilizing collaborative learning among high school students for better performance on ecology inquiry-based projects. A case study of nine 12th grade students who participated in collaborative learning sessions in the open field and in class is examined. The results show that the students concentrated on discussing the…

  19. Enhancing Collaborative Learning through Group Intelligence Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yin Leng; Macaulay, Linda A.

    Employers increasingly demand not only academic excellence from graduates but also excellent interpersonal skills and the ability to work collaboratively in teams. This paper discusses the role of Group Intelligence software in helping to develop these higher order skills in the context of an enquiry based learning (EBL) project. The software supports teams in generating ideas, categorizing, prioritizing, voting and multi-criteria decision making and automatically generates a report of each team session. Students worked in a Group Intelligence lab designed to support both face to face and computer-mediated communication and employers provided feedback at two key points in the year long team project. Evaluation of the effectiveness of Group Intelligence software in collaborative learning was based on five key concepts of creativity, participation, productivity, engagement and understanding.

  20. Fostering Interdisciplinary Collaboration to Improve Student Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald A. Styron Jr.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the impact on student learning of those enrolled in courses where instructors participated in collegial coaching and peer mentoring. A nonequivalent group design methodology was employed along with an analysis of variance to analyze data. Findings indicated higher mastery levels of student learning outcomes, higher levels of perceived critical thinking and collaboration by students, statistical significance in critical thinking constructs, higher levels of persistence, and more A's and B's and fewer D's and F's in courses where faculty members were mentored as compared to courses where faculty members were not.

  1. Collaborative multiagent reinforcement learning by payoff propagation

    OpenAIRE

    Kok, Jelle R.; Vlassis, Nikos

    2006-01-01

    In this article we describe a set of scalable techniques for learning the behavior of a group of agents in a collaborative multiagent setting. As a basis we use the framework of coordination graphs of Guestrin, Koller, and Parr (2002a) which exploits the dependencies between agents to decompose the global payoff function into a sum of local terms. First, we deal with the single-state case and describe a payoff propagation algorithm that computes the individual actions that approximately maxim...

  2. Implementing Collaborative Learning Methods in the Political Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative learning is one, among other, active learning methods, widely acclaimed in higher education. Consequently, instructors in fields that lack pedagogical training often implement new learning methods such as collaborative learning on the basis of trial and error. Moreover, even though the benefits in academic circles are broadly touted,…

  3. Structured collaboration versus individual learning in solving physics problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harskamp, Egbert; Ding, Ning

    2006-01-01

    The research issue in this study is how to structure collaborative learning so that it improves solving physics problems more than individual learning. Structured collaborative learning has been compared with individual learning environments with Schoenfeld's problem-solving episodes. Students took

  4. Collaborative learning in multi-user virtual environments

    OpenAIRE

    Ibáñez, María Blanca; García Rueda, José Jesús; Maroto, David; Delgado Kloos, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Multi-user virtual environments (MUVEs) have captured the attention and interest of educators as remote collaborative learning environments due to their immersion, interaction and communication capabilities. However, productive learning interactions cannot be considered a given and careful consideration of the design of learning activities and organizational support must be provided to foster collaboration. In this paper, a model to support collaborative learning in MUVEs is presented. This m...

  5. The Effects of a Creative Commons Approach on Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-Chung; Tao, Shu-Yuan; Chen, Wei-Hung; Chen, Sherry Y.; Liu, Baw-Jhiune

    2013-01-01

    Social media on the World Wide Web, such as Wiki, are increasingly applied to support collaborative learning for students to conduct a project together. However, recent studies indicated that students, learning in the collaborative project, may not actively contribute to the collaborative work and are involved only in a limited level of positive…

  6. Supporting Awareness for Augmenting Participation in Collaborative Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Hiroaki; Yano, Yoneo

    This paper describes Coconuts (Concurrent Collaborative Learning Environment Supported by Awareness), a proposed module of Sharlok (Sharing, Linking and Looking-for Knowledge), an open-ended and collaborative learning environment that integrates a knowledge building tool with a collaborative interface tool. Coconuts was developed in order to…

  7. Incorporating learning styles in a computer-supported collaborative learning model

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Shuangyan; Joy, Mike; Griffiths, Nathan

    2008-01-01

    Collaborative learning enables individual learners to combine their own expertise, experience and ability to accomplish a mutual learning goal. The grouping of learners, and learning from social interactions with peer-learners, are two basic characteristics of collaborative learning. For individual learners to benefit from collaborative learning, individual learners with different characteristics must be grouped together. In this paper, we propose a computer-supported collaborative learning m...

  8. Collaborative learning situated in the university context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María de los Ángeles MARTÍNEZ RUIZ

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Effective strategies in teacher education can be based on conceptual change and social constructivism models. From this framework theory, we assume that, in order to improve the succession of the different progressive stages of teachers'conceptual development, social and collaborative strategies are more adequate than individual methodologies. The main aim of this research is to analyze the use of particular and appropiate strategies in a constructivist and collaborative teacher education context. The case-study carried out proves that conceptual change is more effective when it is implemented synergistically with strategies directed towards group autonomy and group-regulation of learning rhythms and goals. The results demostrate the benefits derived from the use of strategies that propitiate the sharing and comparing practice among prospective teachers, especially, if they are, as usual, at heterogenous levels of teaching expertise.

  9. Using Agents in Web-Based Constructivist Collaborative Learning System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘莹; 林福宗; 王雪

    2004-01-01

    Web-based learning systems are one of the most interesting topics in the area of the application of computers to education. Collaborative learning, as an important principle in constructivist learning theory, is an important instruction mode for open and distance learning systems. Through collaborative learning, students can greatly improve their creativity, exploration capability, and social cooperation. This paper used an agent-based coordination mechanism to respond to the requirements of an efficient and motivating learning process. This coordination mechanism is based on a Web-based constructivist collaborative learning system, in which students can learn in groups and interact with each other by several kinds of communication modes to achieve their learning objectives efficiently and actively. In this learning system, artificial agents represent an active part in the collaborative learning process; they can partially replace human instructors during the multi-mode interaction of the students.

  10. Collaborative learning of clinical skills in health professions education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolsgaard, Martin G; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan M; Ringsted, Charlotte V

    2016-01-01

    above. Collaborative learning of clinical skills leads to improvements in self-efficacy, confidence and performance when task processing is observable or communicable. However, the effects of collaborative learning of clinical skills may decrease over time as benefits in terms of shared cognition....... Training efficiency may therefore be improved if the outcomes of collaborative learning of clinical skills are superior or equivalent to those attained through individual learning. HOW: According to a social interaction perspective, collaborative learning of clinical skills mediates its effects through...

  11. When Collaborative Learning Meets Nature: Collaborative Learning as a Meaningful Learning Tool in the Ecology Inquiry Based Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenszayn, Ronit; Ben-Zvi Assaraf, Orit

    2011-01-01

    This research suggests utilizing collaborative learning among high school students for better performance on ecology inquiry-based projects. A case study of nine 12th grade students who participated in collaborative learning sessions in the open field and in class is examined. The results show that the students concentrated on discussing the methods of measurement and observation in the open field, rather than the known methods from class or from the laboratory. Another major part of their discussions concentrated on knowledge construction. Knowledge construction occurred between students with same or similar learning abilities. The role of the teacher in these discussions was crucial: she had to deal with and dispel misconceptions; and she had to bridge the gap between low-ability and high-ability students, for enabling meaningful learning to occur. The article ends with a number of recommendations for using collaborative learning as a tool for achieving meaningful learning in high school ecology inquiry-based projects.

  12. Theoretical and Pedagogical Perspectives on Orchestrating Creativity and Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamalainen, Raija; Vahasantanen, Katja

    2011-01-01

    The role of teacher is increasingly related to designing and arranging collaborative learning situations in which fruitful and creative group work may occur. This thematic review presents recent studies on creativity and collaborative learning from the perspective of the teacher as conductor of learning processes. The precondition for the design…

  13. Supporting Teachers to Design and Use Mobile Collaborative Learning Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfisi-Schottman, Iza; George, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Mobile Collaborative Learning Games combine all the ingredients necessary to attract students' attention and engage them in learning activities. However, designing a coherent scenario that combines mobility, game mechanics and collaborative learning is quite a challenge. In this article, we take the first step by proposing several game patterns…

  14. Predicting Student Performance in a Collaborative Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Jennifer K.; Aleven, Vincent; Rummel, Nikol

    2015-01-01

    Student models for adaptive systems may not model collaborative learning optimally. Past research has either focused on modeling individual learning or for collaboration, has focused on group dynamics or group processes without predicting learning. In the current paper, we adjust the Additive Factors Model (AFM), a standard logistic regression…

  15. Collaborative Tasks in Wiki-Based Environment in EFL Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Bin; Wang, Dongshuo; Xing, Minjie

    2016-01-01

    Wikis provide users with opportunities to post and edit messages to collaborate in the language learning process. Many studies have offered findings to show positive impact of Wiki-based language learning for learners. This paper explores the effect of collaborative task in error correction for English as a Foreign Language learning in an online…

  16. Collaborative E-Learning Using Semantic Course Blog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lai-Chen; Yeh, Ching-Long

    2008-01-01

    Collaborative e-learning delivers many enhancements to e-learning technology; it enables students to collaborate with each other and improves their learning efficiency. Semantic blog combines semantic Web and blog technology that users can import, export, view, navigate, and query the blog. We developed a semantic course blog for collaborative…

  17. Collaborative learning in teaching information management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natho, N.; Knipping, L.; Pfeiffer, O.; Schröder, C.; Zorn, E.; Jeschke, S.

    2010-08-01

    In this paper, we present the course called 'New Media in Education and Research', which employs a blended learning approach. This course is a part of a new bachelor's programme 'Natural Sciences in the Information Society' that is in place in TU Berlin. The main goal of this course is to provide the students with the appropriate information technology literacy that they will need during their studies and beyond. A more specific goal of the course is to train the students to collaborate in small groups. Tablet PCs with OneNote installed on it act as agents to communicate some of the technological aspects as well as soft skills in a blended learning scenario. We discuss the pedagogical and technological backgrounds of the course and we present the implementation of the course. We conclude with a review of our results and an outlook to future work.

  18. Improving together: collaborative learning in science communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller-Reeve, Mathew

    2015-04-01

    Most scientists today recognise that science communication is an important part of the scientific process. Despite this recognition, science writing and communication are generally taught outside the normal academic schedule. If universities offer such courses, they are generally short-term and intensive. On the positive side, such courses rarely fail to motivate. At no fault of their own, the problem with such courses lies in their ephemeral nature. The participants rarely complete a science communication course with an immediate and pressing need to apply these skills. And so the skills fade. We believe that this stalls real progress in the improvement of science communication across the board. Continuity is one of the keys to success! Whilst we wait for the academic system to truly integrate science communication, we can test and develop other approaches. We suggest a new approach that aims to motivate scientists to continue nurturing their communication skills. This approach adopts a collaborative learning framework where scientists form writing groups that meet regularly at different institutes around the world. The members of the groups learn, discuss and improve together. The participants produce short posts, which are published online. In this way, the participants learn and cement basic writing skills. These skills are transferrable, and can be applied to scientific articles as well as other science communication media. In this presentation we reflect on an ongoing project, which applies a collaborative learning framework to help young and early career scientists improve their writing skills. We see that this type of project could be extended to other media such as podcasts, or video shorts.

  19. Enhancing collaborative learning by means of collaborative serious games:providing requirements to collaborative serious games' design

    OpenAIRE

    Parzhetskaya, L. (Lyana)

    2014-01-01

    The current study is a theoretical overview which aim is to define collaborative serious games, identify the problems arising in using and implementation of these games in learning and education and search of ways of improvement of the collaborative process by means of providing the requirements to collaborative serious games’ design. The study makes connections among the following concepts: collaboration, gaming and technology and shows how they can be combined into a one study in order to i...

  20. Evaluation of Intelligent Grouping Based on Learners' Collaboration Competence Level in Online Collaborative Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muuro, Maina Elizaphan; Oboko, Robert; Wagacha, Waiganjo Peter

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we explore the impact of an intelligent grouping algorithm based on learners' collaborative competency when compared with (a) instructor based Grade Point Average (GPA) method level and (b) random method, on group outcomes and group collaboration problems in an online collaborative learning environment. An intelligent grouping…

  1. Analysis and Assessment of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conversations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trausan-Matu, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Trausan-Matu, S. (2008). Analysis and Assessment of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Conversations. Workshop presentation at the symposium Learning networks for professional. November, 14, 2008, Heerlen, Nederland: Open Universiteit Nederland.

  2. A Collaborative Virtual Environment for Situated Learning of Car Driving

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miao, Yongwu; Pinkwart, Niels; Hoppe, Ulrich

    2007-01-01

    Miao, Y., Pinkwart, N., and Hoppe, H.U. (2006). "A Collaborative Virtual Environment for Situated Learning of Car Driving". International Journal on Advanced Technology for Learning (ATL), 3(4), 233-240.

  3. Scripting intercultural computer-supported collaborative learning in higher education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popov, V.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL), specifically in an intercultural learning environment, creates both challenges and benefits. Among the challenges are the coordination of different attitudes, styles of communication, and patterns of behaving. Among the benefits are t

  4. Distributed Leadership Collaboration Factors to Support Idea Generation In Computer-Supported Collaborative e-Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Niki Lambropoulos; Aneesha Bakharia; Alain Gourdin

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to identify, discuss and analyze students’ collaboration factors related to distributed leadership (DL), which correlates with interaction quality evident in idea generation. Scripting computer-supported collaborative e-learning (CSCeL) activities based on DL can scaffold students’ interactions that support collaboration and promote idea generation. Furthermore, the associated tools can facilitate collaboration via scripting and shed light on students’ interactions and dialogi...

  5. Improving Virtual Collaborative Learning through Canonical Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Peter; Lehr, Christian; Gersch, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Virtual collaboration continues to gain in significance and is attracting attention also as virtual collaborative learning (VCL) in education. This paper addresses aspects of VCL that we identified as critical in a series of courses named "Net Economy": (1) technical infrastructure, (2) motivation and collaboration, and (3) assessment…

  6. Coordinated Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning: Awareness and Awareness Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Jeroen; Bodemer, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, research on awareness during online collaboration focused on topics such as the effects of spatial information about group members' activities on the collaborative process. When the concept of awareness was introduced to computer-supported collaborative learning, this focus shifted to cognitive group awareness (e.g., information…

  7. Coordinated computer-supported collaborative learning: Awareness and awareness tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, J.J.H.M.; Bodermer, D.

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, research on awareness during online collaboration focused on topics such as the effects of spatial information about group members’ activities on the collaborative process. When the concept of awareness was introduced to computer-supported collaborative learning, this focus shifted to

  8. Accessible collaborative learning using mobile devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike Wald

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes accessible collaborative learning using mobile devices with mobile enhancements to Synote, the freely available, award winning, open source, web based application that makes web hosted recordings easier to access, search, manage, and exploit for all learners, teachers and other users. Notes taken live during lectures using Twitter on any mobile device can be automatically uploaded into Synote and synchronised with a recording of the lecture. Syntalk, a mobile speech recognition application enables synchronized live verbal contributions from the class to also be captured on Synote through captions. Synote Mobile has been developed as an accessible cross device and cross browser HTML5 version of Synote. Synote Discussion supports commenting on Synote’s Synmark notes stored as discussions in its own database and published as Linked data so they are available for Synote or other systems to use.

  9. Doing Outcomes-Based Collaborative Teaching and Learning in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schalkwyk, Gertina J.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter focuses on applying the concepts of outcomes-based collaborative teaching and learning in an Asian context and with students coming from a Confucian heritage culture and explores examples of how to implement effective collaborative teaching and learning in an Asian higher education setting.

  10. Learn More, Stress Less: Exploring the Benefits of Collaborative Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Andri; Artino, Anthony R., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Many classroom instructors use collaborative learning activities to promote student learning, raise academic achievement, and support cognitive engagement. We conducted a collaborative assessment in a small undergraduate educational psychology course (N = 31) and used survey methodology to explore student perceptions. Taken together, our…

  11. E-Collaboration Technologies in Teaching/Learning Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zascerinska, Jelena; Ahrens, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    A proper use of e-collaboration technologies in the teaching/learning process is provided by varied cooperative networks, which penetrate teachers' and students' activity more thoroughly with the availability of broadband services. However, the successful use of e-collaboration technologies in teaching/learning activity within a multicultural…

  12. Competence development of synchronously coaced trainee teachers in collaborative learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooreman, Ralph W.; Kommers, Piet A.M.; Jochems, Wim M.G.

    2007-01-01

    The need to make trainee teachers more prepared to coach collaborative learning effectively is increasing, as collaborative learning is becoming more important. One complication in this training process is that it is hard for the teacher trainer to hear and understand the students’ utterances and th

  13. Learning by Doing, Discussing and Questioning: A Collaborative Writing Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Michele M.

    Although benefits and problems in collaborative learning, as well as techniques for facilitating it, have been extensively discussed in recent publications on composition teaching, few detailed descriptions of actual classroom uses of collaborative learning have been published. In an innovative one-term writing course, taught at the Chinese…

  14. Rethinking Learner Support: The Challenge of Collaborative Online Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, Mary

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of computer-mediated communication in open and distance learning focuses on how learner support of online-intensive and interactive forms of learning and teaching are conceptualized. Topics include virtual learning environments; collaborative learning; interpersonal response; identity; interaction; time and duration; institutional…

  15. Collaborative Learning Through Formative Peer Review With Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Eaton, Carrie Diaz; Wade, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a collaboration between a mathematician and a compositionist who developed a sequence of collaborative writing assignments for calculus. This sequence of developmentally-appropriate assignments presents peer review as a collaborative process that promotes reflection, deepens understanding, and improves exposition. First, we distinguish writing-to-learn from writing-in-the-disciplines. Then, we review collaborative writing pedagogies and explain best practices for teaching...

  16. Has research on collaborative learning technologies addressed massiveness?

    OpenAIRE

    Manathunga, Kalpani; Hern??ndez Leo, Davinia

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing interest in understanding to what extent innovative educational technologies can be used to support massive courses. Collaboration is one of the main desired elements in massive learning actions involving large communities of participants. Accumulated research in collaborative learning technologies has proposed and evaluated multiple models and implementation tools that engage learners in knowledge-intensive social interactions fostering fruitful learning. Howev...

  17. Mobile Collaborative Informal Learning Design: Study of collaborative effectiveness using Activity Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasnain Zafar Baloch

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Smart Mobile Devices (SMD are there for many years but using them as learning tools started to emerge as new research area. The trend to merge collaborative learning methodology by using mobile devices in informal context is important for implementation of Learner Centric Learning (LCL. Survey and numerous studies show that more than 95% of students in colleges are users of these smart mobile devices in developed world. Developing counties are also catching up and we can see this percentage is almost same in university level in these countries. Students are using SMDs for learning in some form. Higher education Institutions also try to embark their E-learning to Mobile learning (ML. The aim of this paper is to do propose operational framework for designing Mobile Collaborative Informal learning activities using SMDs. Show results of experimental and case study done to study the Mobile Collaborative Informal learning using Activity Theory (AT. Core Components of framework are Mobile Learning Activities/Objects, Wireless/Mobile Smart devices, Collaborative knowledge and Collaborative learning. The research mention here is its infancy stage.

  18. The influence of learning in collaborative improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jacob S.; Boer, Harry; Gertsen, Frank

    2008-01-01

    learning environment (willing and able to learn) creates operational, relational and learning outcomes - a self-reinforcing process. A weak learning environment (some willingness but limited ability to learn) creates operational outcomes but is sensitive to 'accidents' and thus at risk of actually...... producing negative relational and learning outcomes. A 'blocked learning' environment (no willingness to learn) may create good operational outcomes, but will not produce learning and relational outcomes. Consequently, it is doubtful if such situations are sustainable....

  19. Structured Collaboration versus Individual Learning in Solving Physics Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harskamp, Egbert; Ding, Ning

    2006-11-01

    The research issue in this study is how to structure collaborative learning so that it improves solving physics problems more than individual learning. Structured collaborative learning has been compared with individual learning environments with Schoenfeld’s problem-solving episodes. Students took a pre-test and a post-test and had the opportunity to solve six physics problems. Ninety-nine students from a secondary school in Shanghai participated in the study. Students who learnt to solve problems in collaboration and students who learnt to solve problems individually with hints improved their problem-solving skills compared with those who learnt to solve the problems individually without hints. However, it was hard to discern an extra effect for students working collaboratively with hints—although we observed these students working in a more structured way than those in the other groups. We discuss ways to further investigate effective collaborative processes for solving physics problems.

  20. Exploring the Influences of Elementary School Students' Learning Motivation on Web-Based Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin-Fei, Huang; Chia-Ju, Liu

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the influences of students' learning motivation on Web-based collaborative learning. This study conducted learning materials of Web pages about science and collaborative learning, a motivation questionnaire and interviews were used for data collection. Eighty Grade 5 students and a science teacher were…

  1. Collaborative Language Learning for Professional Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Joy Mesh

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable support for educational development using new technologies in higher education depends on having a basic roadmap that links current demands for developmental support to a plan for ways in which longer term needs will be recognized and met. The growing demand for lifelong learning of a second language is evident within the workplace where new technologies offer flexible solutions. In order to meet the special needs of working adults, the University of Siena Language Center (CLA has developed a multiple-level series of blended English courses from beginner to intermediate level for both university technical-administrative personnel and the hospital staff of the Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Senese (AOUS. The pedagogical approach takes into consideration both the needs of adults who are working full-time and the aims of the curriculum, which are to develop the four linguistic abilities of reading, writing, listening and speaking up to the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR Level B1. Taking into consideration a constructive use of both teaching hours and classrooms, as well as the limited time available to adult learners, a blended approach was chosen. The face-to-face (f2f lessons provide activities concentrating on the development of speaking and listening skills. The online lessons provide a collaborative workspace for interaction in the second language and present a flexible solution for working adults who can structure their study time when and where it is most convenient. This paper will attempt to draw several conclusions regarding the effectiveness of blending approaches for lifelong learning of a second language based on both learner and teacher interviews as well as quantitative and qualitative data collection through questionnaires and end of course evaluation.

  2. Collaborative Learning in Advanced Supply Systems: The KLASS Pilot Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Ed; Carter, Ruth

    2003-01-01

    The Knowledge and Learning in Advanced Supply Systems (KLASS) project developed collaborative learning networks of suppliers in the British automotive and aerospace industries. Methods included face-to-face and distance learning, work toward National Vocational Qualifications, and diagnostic workshops for senior managers on improving quality,…

  3. A Collaborative Action Research Approach to Professional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleicher, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    The field of professional development is moving towards the notion of professional learning, highlighting the active learning role that teachers play in changing their knowledge bases, beliefs and practice. This article builds on this idea and argues for creating professional learning that is guided by a collaborative action research (CAR)…

  4. Learning English Vocabulary Collaboratively in a Technology-Supported Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Cheng; Hsiao, Hsien-Sheng; Tseng, Sheng-ping; Chan, Hsin-jung

    2014-01-01

    This study was intended to investigate whether computer-assisted collaborative learning is comparable with computer-free and individual learning; in particular, it examined each of their effects on learning English vocabulary, followed by an analysis of their behavior patterns. In a junior high school in northern Taiwan, a normal classroom was…

  5. Learning in 3D Virtual Environments: Collaboration and Knowledge Spirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Brian G.; Martin, Barbara N.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this case study was to determine if learning occurred within a 3D virtual learning environment by determining if elements of collaboration and Nonaka and Takeuchi's (1995) knowledge spiral were present. A key portion of this research was the creation of a Virtual Learning Environment. This 3D VLE utilized the Torque Game Engine…

  6. Leveraging Collaborative, Thematic Problem-Based Learning to Integrate Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroufe, Robert; Ramos, Diane P.

    2015-01-01

    This study chronicles learning from faculty who designed and delivered collaborative, problem-based learning courses that anchor a one-year MBA emphasizing sustainability. While cultivating the application of learning across the curriculum, the authors engaged MBA students in solving complex, real-world sustainability challenges using a…

  7. Collaborative and Cooperative Learning in Malaysian Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md. Anowar; Tarmizi, Rohani Ahmad; Ayud, Ahmad Fauzi Mohd

    2012-01-01

    Collaborative and cooperative learning studies are well recognized in Malaysian mathematics education research. Cooperative learning is used to serve various ability students taking into consideration of their level of understanding, learning styles, sociological backgrounds that develop students' academic achievement and skills, and breeze the…

  8. Real-Time Mutual Gaze Perception Enhances Collaborative Learning and Collaboration Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Bertrand; Pea, Roy

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of an eye-tracking study on collaborative problem-solving dyads. Dyads remotely collaborated to learn from contrasting cases involving basic concepts about how the human brain processes visual information. In one condition, dyads saw the eye gazes of their partner on the screen; in a control group, they did not…

  9. Potential of Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning for Learners with Different Learning Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X. Christine; Hinn, D. Michelle; Kanfer, Alaina G.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates the effects of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) on learning style changes, learning outcomes, and learner satisfaction in a study conducted at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Results based on Kolb's Learning Style Theory and Learning Style Inventory showed CSCL supports diverse learning styles.…

  10. Using Mobile Devices to Support Online Collaborative Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santi Caballé

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile collaborative learning is considered the next step of on-line collaborative learning by incorporating mobility as a key and breakthrough requirement. Indeed, the current wide spread of mobile devices and wireless technologies brings an enormous potential to e-learning, in terms of ubiquity, pervasiveness, personalization, flexibility, and so on. For this reason, Mobile Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning has recently grown from a minor research field to significant research projects covering a fairly variety of formal and specially informal learning settings, from schools and universities to workplaces, museums, cities and rural areas. Much of this research has shown how mobile technology can offer new opportunities for groups of learners to collaborate inside and beyond the traditional instructor-oriented educational paradigm. However, mobile technologies, when specifically applied to collaborative learning activities, are still in its infancy and many challenges arise. In addition, current research in this domain points to highly specialized study cases, uses, and experiences in specific educational settings and thus the issues addressed in the literature are found dispersed and disconnected from each other. To this end, this paper attempts to bridge relevant aspects of mobile technologies in support for collaborative learning and provides a tighter view by means of a multidimensional approach.

  11. Collage, a Collaborative Learning Design Editor Based on Patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hernández-Leo, Davinia; Villasclaras-Fernández, Eloy; Jorrín-Abellán, Iván; Asensio-Pérez, Juan; Dimitriadis, Yannis; Ruiz-Requies, Inés; Rubia-Avi, Bartolomé

    2006-01-01

    CSCL (Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning) constitutes a significant field that has drawn the attention of many researchers and practitioners (Dillenbourg, 2002). This domain is characterized by the coexistence of very different expectations, requirements, knowledge and interests posed by both

  12. Collaborative Learning Experiences for Nursing Students in Environmental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Dolores J.

    2003-01-01

    An environmental health learning experience involved collaborative activities of graduate public health and undergraduate nursing students. Pre/postcourse measures (n=31) showed increased awareness of issues and competence in interdisciplinary teamwork. (Contains 13 references.) (SK)

  13. Intelligent Assistance for Teachers in Collaborative E-Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casamayor, Agustin; Amandi, Analia; Campo, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative learning environments provide a set of tools for students acting in groups to interact and accomplish an assigned task. In this kind of systems, students are free to express and communicate with each other, which usually lead to collaboration and communication problems that may require the intervention of a teacher. In this article,…

  14. Social Effects of Collaborative Learning in Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolmie, Andrew Kenneth; Topping, Keith J.; Christie, Donald; Donaldson, Caroline; Howe, Christine; Jessiman, Emma; Livingston, Kay; Thurston, Allen

    2010-01-01

    There is conflicting evidence on whether collaborative group work leads to improved classroom relations, and if so how. A before and after design was used to measure the impact on work and play relations of a collaborative learning programme involving 575 students 9-12 years old in single- and mixed-age classes across urban and rural schools. Data…

  15. Using a NIATx Based Local Learning Collaborative for Performance Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roosa, Mathew; Scripa, Joseph S.; Zastowny, Thomas R.; Ford, James H., II

    2011-01-01

    Local governments play an important role in improving substance abuse and mental health services. The structure of the local learning collaborative requires careful attention to old relationships and challenges local governmental leaders to help move participants from a competitive to collaborative environment. This study describes one county's…

  16. Distributed Leadership and Digital Collaborative Learning: A Synergistic Relationship?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Alma; Jones, Michelle; Baba, Suria

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the synergy between distributed leadership and digital collaborative learning. It argues that distributed leadership offers an important theoretical lens for understanding and explaining how digital collaboration is best supported and led. Drawing upon evidence from two online educational platforms, the paper explores the…

  17. Learning from Collaborative Research in Water Management Practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raadgever, G.T.; Mostert, E.; Van de Giesen, N.C.

    2012-01-01

    In order to deal with complex water management problems, it is increasingly claimed that researchers should collaborate with authorities and other stakeholders. According to the literature, such collaboration can enhance cognitive learning about the issues at stake, but there is little empirical evi

  18. Collaborative Pharmacy Student Learning Outline for Mobile Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Mohamed F. AlAjmi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available the idea of this research is for the concern of Collaborative learning based mobile factors by applying via pharmacy students of the college. We focus on three features, computer mutual learning, learning process module, and student learning mode. In this paper, student-focused instruct module, student edge section, teacher interface section, learner section, solution problem section, curriculum section, control section, and diagnose section are planned. This system permits students to be sustained with a real time approach, non-real time approach, mixture approach. The devices used contain smart phone, PDAs, mobile devices, transportable computers and tablet PDAs. This system is to become a more capable student learning environment so that student can get student’s learning done more efficiently. The development of a collaborative learning combines the advantages of an adaptive learning environment with the advantages of mobile telecommunication and the suppleness of mobile devices.

  19. COLLABORATIVE LEARNING IN TEACHING A SECOND LANGUAGE THROUGH THE INTERNET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilknur ISTIFCI

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We can call the education offered by using the Internet environment as “teaching through the Internet”. Such a teaching contributes to interaction, which is not sufficient in traditional classrooms most of the time. It gives the geographically separated students the opportunity of exchanging ideas and information, collaborative learning, discovering alternatives in learning and developing their own learning styles. In addition, this type of teaching allows learners to see subjects from different perspectives. Groups having special interests can share their own experiences even if they are too far from each other. When we look at the aims of this type of learning that is mostly used in higher education, it is seen that learners are encouraged to learn through distance education. Teaching through distance education can also be done on campus environments. Learners can participate in the courses and discussions whenever and wherever they want except from the pre-scheduled meetings. The Internet-based interactive environments offer the interaction which supports the learners in learning. Being independent of time and place, learners can work with each other, and interact and collaborate with their tutors and classmates. Collaboration brings solidarity with it. The aim of learning through collaboration is to obtain information and use this information to solve a problem. In general, collaborative learning creates a positive social environment and facilitates comprehension. Collaborative learning is based on the idea that learners working in groups towards a common goal can learn better than the students who can work on their own. The aim is to make learners to want each other’s success, to motivate each other, and to teach each other in order to achieve the learning objectives. Collaborative learning requires solidarity and reciprocal loyalty. Solidarity and reciprocal loyalty implies the active participation and contribution of each group

  20. Students perceptions of collaborative learning in intermedia and performing arts

    OpenAIRE

    Sicchio, Kate; Bridges, Grant

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines three case studies of student work from University Centre Doncaster. It explores the student perception of collaborative learning and working in interdisciplinary settings to create performance works. By exploring the notions of interdisciplinarity as discussed by Newell together with Dillenbourg-Pierre's concepts of collaborative learning, the student process is examined and applied to these theories, providing a practical example of how students in higher education may w...

  1. Collaborative learning model inquiring based on digital game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jiugen; Xing, Ruonan

    2012-04-01

    With the development of computer education software, digital educational game has become an important part in our life, entertainment and education. Therefore how to make full use of digital game's teaching functions and educate through entertainment has become the focus of current research. The thesis make a connection between educational game and collaborative learning, the current popular teaching model, and concludes digital game-based collaborative learning model combined with teaching practice.

  2. Blogs – Collaborative Learning for the Next Generation

    OpenAIRE

    Birney, Rosanne

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to determine the effectiveness of weblogs as a tool for collaborative learning in an online environment, with a particular focus on technology students. Some of the VLEs currently in use in third-level institutions restrict the way in which students interact with one another and with their tutors. The use of weblogs as a tool for collaborative learning can help to overcome several of the shortcomings of traditional VLEs by providing a dynamic, user-friendly way for students ...

  3. Cultivating Collaborative Improvement: An Action Learning Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middel, Rick; McNichols, Timothy

    2004-01-01

    As competitive pressure mounts to innovate in the global knowledge economy, many organizations are exploring new ways of collaborating with their supply chain partners. However, the process of implementing collaborative initiatives across disparate members of supply networks is fraught with difficul

  4. Collaborative Pharmacy Student Learning Outline for Mobile Atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Mohamed F. AlAjmi; Shakir Khan

    2014-01-01

    the idea of this research is for the concern of Collaborative learning based mobile factors by applying via pharmacy students of the college. We focus on three features, computer mutual learning, learning process module, and student learning mode. In this paper, student-focused instruct module, student edge section, teacher interface section, learner section, solution problem section, curriculum section, control section, and diagnose section are planned. This system permits students to be sus...

  5. A Multi-Agent Question-Answering System for E-Learning and Collaborative Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinaghi, Tannaz; Bahreininejad, Ardeshir

    2011-01-01

    The increasing advances of new Internet technologies in all application domains have changed life styles and interactions. E-learning and collaborative learning environment systems are originated through such changes and aim at providing facilities for people in different times and geographical locations to cooperate, collaborate, learn and work…

  6. Collaborative Learning: Cognitive and Computational Approaches. Advances in Learning and Instruction Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillenbourg, Pierre, Ed.

    Intended to illustrate the benefits of collaboration between scientists from psychology and computer science, namely machine learning, this book contains the following chapters, most of which are co-authored by scholars from both sides: (1) "Introduction: What Do You Mean by 'Collaborative Learning'?" (Pierre Dillenbourg); (2) "Learning Together:…

  7. Social Media, Collaboration and Social Learning--A Case-Study of Foreign Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondahl, Margrethe; Razmerita, Liana

    2014-01-01

    Social media has created new possibilities for digitally native students to engage, interact and collaborate in learning tasks that foster learning processes and the overall learning experience. Using both qualitative and quantitative data, this article discusses experiences and challenges of using a social media-enhanced collaborative learning…

  8. Virtual Reality for Collaborative E-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Teresa; McArdle, Gavin; Bertolotto, Michela

    2008-01-01

    In the past, the term e-learning referred to any method of learning that used electronic delivery methods. With the advent of the Internet however, e-learning has evolved and the term is now most commonly used to refer to online courses. A multitude of systems are now available to manage and deliver learning content online. While these have proved…

  9. Using visualizations to support collaboration and coordination during computer-supported collaborative learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, J.J.H.M.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis addresses the topic of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL in short). In a CSCL-environment, students work in small groups on complex and challenging tasks. Although the teacher guides this process at a distance, students have to regulate and monitor their own learning proces

  10. Teachers' Instructional Planning for Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning: Macro-Scripts as a Pedagogical Method to Facilitate Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamalainen, Raija; Hakkinen, Paivi

    2010-01-01

    Technological tools challenge teachers' pedagogical activities. The use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in education should help teachers integrate new pedagogical methods into their work. This study explores macro-level computer-supported collaborative learning scripts as a pedagogical method to facilitate collaboration.…

  11. Collaborative learning activities supported by intelligent agents

    OpenAIRE

    Alves, Paulo; Amaral, Luís; Pires, José Adriano

    2007-01-01

    The changes introduced by the Bologna Process in the educational paradigm, moving from a lecturer centered paradigm to a learner centered paradigm, involves a more supported learning process based on learning outcomes and the adoption of new pedagogical methodologies. To improve the learning process and facilitate the student support, we propose the adoption of intelligent agents in learning environments, with the mission to follow closely the student in their learning activities, coaching...

  12. Second graders’ collaborative learning around touchscreens in their classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jacob

    In “Second graders’ collaborative learning around touchscreens in their classroom”, Jacob Davidsen explores, analyses and discusses how eight- and nine-year-old children’s embodied collaborative interactions around touchscreens unfold in classroom settings. Having conducted micro...... and ethnographic observations, all from a year-long study of naturally occurring activities in two second grade classrooms at a public school in Denmark. The way of seeing and making visible children’s collaboration around touchscreens presented in this thesis is informed by CSCL, ethnomethodology and embodied......-studies contribute findings regarding children’s embodied practices of moment-to-moment co-operation of collaborative activities around touchscreens....

  13. Collaborative learning and competence development in school health nursing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordentoft, Helle Merete; Wistoft, Karen

    2012-01-01

    . Design/methodology/approach The article is based on data from a three-year health educational development project at primary schools in Denmark. These data are a) Observations from 12 reflective workshops with school nurses b) Two questionnaire surveys c) 5 focus group interviews with 5 of the 6......Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the process and learning outcomes of peer collaboration in a Danish health developmental project in school health nursing. The paper explores how peer collaboration influences the school nurses’ collaborative learning and competence development...... subprojects after the project was over. In the workshops, the questionnaire surveys and the focus group interviews the school nurses were asked to reflect on the developmental process, their collaboration, own and mutual pedagogical competence development. Findings Systematic peer collaboration between school...

  14. Differences That Make A Difference: A Study in Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchman, Stephanie

    Collaborative learning is a common teaching strategy in classrooms across age groups and content areas. It is important to measure and understand the cognitive process involved during collaboration to improve teaching methods involving interactive activities. This research attempted to answer the question: why do students learn more in collaborative settings? Using three measurement tools, 142 participants from seven different biology courses at a community college and at a university were tested before and after collaborating about the biological process of natural selection. Three factors were analyzed to measure their effect on learning at the individual level and the group level. The three factors were: difference in prior knowledge, sex and religious beliefs. Gender and religious beliefs both had a significant effect on post-test scores.

  15. Personalizing the Collaborative Learning Environment with Pictures

    OpenAIRE

    Brian Mackie; Charletta F. Gutierrez

    2005-01-01

    The Internet and Web-based technologies, as well as rapid globalization, are changing the way businesses communicate. Continuous progress in Information Technology (IT) enables effective and efficient communication, particularly with the use of collaborative systems. Such systems have many different types of interfaces and attributes, and one such attribute is the use of visuals. This research assesses the usefulness of participant pictures in a collaborative exchange. To evaluate the usefuln...

  16. Mobile Collaborative Informal Learning Design: Study of collaborative effectiveness using Activity Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Hasnain Zafar Baloch; Azizah Abdul. Rahman; Noorminshah A Ihad

    2012-01-01

    Smart Mobile Devices (SMD) are there for many years but using them as learning tools started to emerge as new research area. The trend to merge collaborative learning methodology by using mobile devices in informal context is important for implementation of Learner Centric Learning (LCL). Survey and numerous studies show that more than 95% of students in colleges are users of these smart mobile devices in developed world. Developing counties are also catching up and we can see this percentage...

  17. Using Wikis and Collaborative Learning for Science Teachers' Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y-H.; Jang, S-J.; Chen, P-J.

    2015-01-01

    Wiki bears great potential to transform learning and instruction by scaffolding personal and social constructivism. Past studies have shown that proper application of wiki benefits both students and teachers; however, few studies have integrated wiki and collaborative learning to examine the growth of science teachers' "Technological,…

  18. Virtual Portfolios for Collaboration in Distributed Web-Based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard; Tolsby, Haakon; Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone

    This paper addresses the problems of collaboration in distributed Web-based learning. It reviews, treats and discusses these problems from the learning theoretical perspective of "communities of practice" as presented by Etienne Wenger (1998), with reference to past and future Web-based designs. The paper suggests the concept and design of virtual…

  19. Team Learning and Collaboration between Online and Blended Learner Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Doo Hun; Yoon, Seung Won

    2008-01-01

    In an effort to compare team-level learning performance resulting from different instructional variables and settings, this study examined how online and blended delivery learner groups compared in terms of learning outcomes, collaboration, and perceived quality of instructional variables. Results indicated that the two teams were not different in…

  20. Collaborative Learning across Borders: Dealing with Student Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallinger, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Describes application of collaborative learning in a German business school, focusing on use of self-managed learning and examining the cultural implications for student-directed pedagogies. Strategies for dealing with student resistance are offered, including not taking students' resistant behavior personally, designing many process options,…

  1. Learning about Potential Users of Collaborative Information Retrieval Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, Madhu

    2009-01-01

    One of the key components of designing usable and useful collaborative information retrieval systems is to understand the needs of the users of these systems. Our research team has been exploring collaborative information behavior in a variety of organizational settings. Our research goals have been two-fold: First, to develop a conceptual understanding of collaborative information behavior and second, gather requirements for the design of collaborative information retrieval systems. In this paper, we present a brief overview of our fieldwork in a three different organizational settings, discuss our methodology for collecting data on collaborative information behavior, and highlight some lessons that we are learning about potential users of collaborative information retrieval systems in these domains.

  2. Collaborative Feature Learning from Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, Chen; Jin, Hailin; Yang, Jianchao; Lin, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Image feature representation plays an essential role in image recognition and related tasks. The current state-of-the-art feature learning paradigm is supervised learning from labeled data. However, this paradigm requires large-scale category labels, which limits its applicability to domains where labels are hard to obtain. In this paper, we propose a new data-driven feature learning paradigm which does not rely on category labels. Instead, we learn from user behavior data collected on social...

  3. The quality and impact of computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) in radiology case-based learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: The aim of this research was to explore (1) clinical years students' perceptions about radiology case-based learning within a computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) setting, (2) an analysis of the collaborative learning process, and (3) the learning impact of collaborative work on the radiology cases. Methods: The first part of this study focuses on a more detailed analysis of a survey study about CSCL based case-based learning, set up in the context of a broader radiology curriculum innovation. The second part centers on a qualitative and quantitative analysis of 52 online collaborative learning discussions from 5th year and nearly graduating medical students. The collaborative work was based on 26 radiology cases regarding musculoskeletal radiology. Results: The analysis of perceptions about collaborative learning on radiology cases reflects a rather neutral attitude that also does not differ significantly in students of different grade levels. Less advanced students are more positive about CSCL as compared to last year students. Outcome evaluation shows a significantly higher level of accuracy in identification of radiology key structures and in radiology diagnosis as well as in linking the radiological signs with available clinical information in nearly graduated students. No significant differences between different grade levels were found in accuracy of using medical terminology. Conclusion: Students appreciate computer supported collaborative learning settings when tackling radiology case-based learning. Scripted computer supported collaborative learning groups proved to be useful for both 5th and 7th year students in view of developing components of their radiology diagnostic approaches.

  4. Collaborative Language Learning for Professional Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesh, Linda Joy

    2010-01-01

    Institutions of higher education realise the importance of the role of learning organisations in terms of providing personnel training and updating. Yet further consideration should be given to flexible and accessible means for meeting the growing request for continuous learning. Jason Hughes describes an organization's capability to "learn how to…

  5. A Collaborative Model for Ubiquitous Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Jorge; Barbosa, Debora; Rabello, Solon

    2016-01-01

    Use of mobile devices and widespread adoption of wireless networks have enabled the emergence of Ubiquitous Computing. Application of this technology to improving education strategies gave rise to Ubiquitous e-Learning, also known as Ubiquitous Learning. There are several approaches to organizing ubiquitous learning environments, but most of them…

  6. Learning from Collaborative New Product Development Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinsmann, Maaike; Valkenburg, Rianne

    2005-01-01

    Purpose--In an empirical study learning opportunities were identified. Learning opportunities are enablers or disablers for the achievement of shared understanding. Design/methodology/approach--Actors were interviewed about their communication process. The learning history method was used to analyze and structure the data. From the learning…

  7. How Suitable are Web Interfaces for Collaborative Learning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Juárez Pacheco

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a pilot study carried out to compare two Web interfaces used to support a collaborative learning design for science education. The study is part of a wider research project, which aims at characterizing computer software for collaborative learning in science education. The results coming from a questionnaire applied to teachers and researchers reveal the necessity to design technological tools based mainly on users’ needs and to take into account the impact of these tools on the learning of curricular contents.

  8. Question Answering System for an Effective Collaborative Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Kohei Arai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing advances of Internet Technologies in all application domains have changed life styles and interactions. With the rapid development of E-Learning, collaborative learning is an important for teaching, learning methods and strategies. Interaction between the students also student with the teacher is important for student to gain knowledge. Based on the four basic teaching styles formal authority, demonstrator or personal model, facilitator and delegator, today combined between facilitator and delegator style is responsible for student learning. It is student centered and the teacher as facilitates the material and activities, but learning becomes part of valuable and effective when they collaborate with each other, and as the teacher who will delegates and facilitates the responsibility of learning to the students. In this paper, we introduce an effective question answering Q&A system for collaborative learning, which can act not just like a virtual teacher, but also virtual discussion for student. With the proposed system, brings a new Q&A system, student can attach their question when they want collaborate using collaborative learning capitalize on one another’s resources and skills. Students can ask their questions to the group when they want to collaborate with others, asking one another for information, evaluating one another’s ideas, then each of the answer will compare with encyclopedia data base. In this research, the Q&A system for the Senior High School in Indonesia, in this subject of Information Communication Technology implemented. From the the 40 question and 120 answer, the result is 90,48% precision 50% recall.

  9. COLLABORATION IN WEB BASED LEARNING: A SOCIAL COMPUTING PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.Pooranachandran

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The rapid advance of Information Communication Technology [ICT] has enabled Higher Education Institutions to reach out and educate students transcending the barriers of time and space. This technology supports structured, web-based learning activities, and provides diverse multilingual and multicultural settings and also facilities for self assessment. Structured collaboration, in the conventionaleducation system, has proven itself a successful and powerful learning method. Online learners do not enjoy the same collaborative benefits as face-to-face learners because the technology provides no guidance or direction during the online discussion sessions. This paper presents a Web Based Learning Environment [WBLE] from the perspective of social computing to bring collaborative learning benefits to online learners. The paper also highlights how the deployment of social computing tools can support the creation of an open and socially shared information space for better collaboration among the learners. With Social Network Analysis [SNA] techniques, collaboration among twenty learners is explored and metrics such as in-degree, out-degree and Betweenness and collaborative network mapping are presented.

  10. Facilitation of computer-supported collaborative learning in mixed- versus same-culture dyads: Does a collaboration script help?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popov, V.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Brinkman, B.; Kuznetsov, A.N.; Mulder, M.

    2013-01-01

    To foster collaboration and improve the quality of students' discussions in mixed- and same- culture learner groups engaged in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL), a collaboration script was introduced. A 2 × 2-factorial design was used to examine the effects of using this collaboration

  11. Collaborative Learning in Higher Education: Lecturers' Practices and Beliefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Hei, Miranda Suzanna Angelique; Strijbos, Jan-Willem; Sjoer, Ellen; Admiraal, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative learning can, if designed and implemented properly, contribute to student learning outcomes and prepare them for teamwork. However, the design and implementation of collaborative learning in practice depend on beliefs of lecturers about teaching and learning in general, and collaborative learning in particular. One hundred and…

  12. Using Wikis as a Support and Assessment Tool in Collaborative Digital Game-Based Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samur, Yavuz

    2011-01-01

    In computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environments, there are many researches done on collaborative learning activities; however, in game-based learning environments, more research and literature on collaborative learning activities are required. Actually, both game-based learning environments and wikis enable us to use new chances…

  13. Peer Assignment Review Process for Collaborative E-learning : Is the Student Learning Process Changing?

    OpenAIRE

    Evelyn Kigozi Kahiigi; Mikko Vesisenaho; Tusubira, F.F.; Henrik Hansson; Mats Danielson

    2012-01-01

    In recent years collaborative e-learning has been emphasized as a learning method that has facilitated knowledge construction and supported student learning. However some universities especially in developing country contexts are struggling to attain minimal educational benefits from its adoption and use. This paper investigates the application of a peer assignment review process for collaborative e-learning to third year undergraduate students. The study was aimed at evaluating the effect of...

  14. Collaborative Approaches to Deepen Student Learning: Information Literacy, Curriculum Design, and Student Learning Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurvitz, Tate; Benvau, Roxane; Parry, Megan

    2015-01-01

    Creating a collaborative environment across student services and instruction is often more challenging than it may first seem. Although effective collaboration is context specific, keeping student learning at the center of the work is a powerful element in successful collaborations. Grossmont College's first year experience program has attempted…

  15. Using IMS Learning Design to model collaborative learning activities

    OpenAIRE

    Tattersall, Colin

    2006-01-01

    IMS Learning Design provides a counter to the trend towards designing for lone-learners reading from screens. It guides staff and educational developers to start not with content, but with learning activities and the achievement of learning objectives. It recognises that learning can happen without learning objects, that learning is different from content consumption and that learning comes from being active. It recognises, too, that learning happens when learners cooperate to solve problems ...

  16. Learning Human Aspects of Collaborative Software Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadar, Irit; Sherman, Sofia; Hazzan, Orit

    2008-01-01

    Collaboration has become increasingly widespread in the software industry as systems have become larger and more complex, adding human complexity to the technological complexity already involved in developing software systems. To deal with this complexity, human-centric software development methods, such as Extreme Programming and other agile…

  17. Collaborative learning through computer-mediated argumentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanselaar, G.; Veerman, A.L.; Andriessen, J.E.B.

    1999-01-01

    This article reports on three studies that involved undergraduate students collaboratively working on authentic discussion tasks in synchronous and asynchronous Computer Mediated Communication systems (Netmeeting, Belvédère, Allaire Forums). The purposes of the assignments were respectively to deve

  18. Collaboration in Learning and Teaching Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseth, Cary J.; Garfield, Joan B.; Ben-Zvi, Dani

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides practical examples of how statistics educators may apply a cooperative framework to classroom teaching and teacher collaboration. Building on the premise that statistics instruction ought to resemble statistical practice, an inherently cooperative enterprise, our purpose is to highlight specific ways in which cooperative…

  19. Project-based learning in Geotechnics: cooperative versus collaborative teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho-Lopes, Margarida; Macedo, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Since 2007/2008 project-based learning models have been used to deliver two fundamental courses on Geotechnics in University of Aveiro, Portugal. These models have evolved and have encompassed either cooperative or collaborative teamwork. Using data collected in five editions of each course (Soil Mechanics I and Soil Mechanics II), the different characteristics of the models using cooperative or collaborative teamwork are pointed out and analysed, namely in terms of the students' perceptions. The data collected include informal feedback from students, monitoring of their marks and academic performance, and answers to two sets of questionnaires: developed for these courses, and institutional. The data indicate students have good opinion of the project-based learning model, though collaborative teamwork is the best rated. The overall efficacy of the models was analysed (sum of their effectiveness, efficiency and attractiveness). The collaborative model was found more adequate.

  20. Globally Networked Collaborative Learning in Industrial Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohemia, Erik; Ghassan, Aysar

    2012-01-01

    This article explores project-based cross-cultural and cross-institutional learning. Using Web 2.0 technologies, this project involved more than 240 students and eighteen academic staff from seven international universities. The focus of this article relates to a project-based learning activity named "The Gift". At each institution the students…

  1. "Conscientization," Dialogue and Collaborative Problem Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    It has been argued that Paulo Freire's concept of conscientization, where critical awareness and engagement are central to a problem-posing pedagogy, provides the philosophical principles to underpin Problem Based Learning (PBL). By using dialogue groups and a combination of learning strategies to discover the nature of a problem, understand its…

  2. Collaborative DFA learning applied to Grid administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Mulder; C.J.H. Jacobs; M. van Someren

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes a distributed learning mechanism that learns patterns from distributed datasets. The complex and dynamic settings of grid environments requires supporting systems to be of a more sophisticated level. Contemporary tools lack the ability to relate and infer events. We developed an

  3. The Answering Process for Multiple-Choice Questions in Collaborative Learning: A Mathematical Learning Model Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Nishi, Shinnosuke; Muramatsu, Yuta; Yasutake, Koichi; Yamakawa, Osamu; Tagawa, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a mathematical model for collaborative learning and the answering process for multiple-choice questions. The collaborative learning model is inspired by the Ising spin model and the model for answering multiple-choice questions is based on their difficulty level. An intensive simulation study predicts the possibility of…

  4. Student Collaboration and Standards-Based Music Learning: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangro, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This article is a review of relevant literature on collaborative, standards-based music learning. The review is organized as follows: (a) historical perspective, (b) collaborative music learning, (c) collaboration and creating, (d) collaboration and performing, (e) collaboration and responding, and (f) conclusions. In an effort to bridge the gap…

  5. Teachers'Collaborative Conceptual Change in Teaching and Learning in a Network for Generating Collaborative Learning in Classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    飯窪, 真也

    2012-01-01

    This paper shows the model of a learning environment design to foster teachers'conceptual change in teaching and learning through collaborative problem solving and examines accomplishments of a set of professional development programs based on the model. With 20 local education boards, we, the University of Tokyo's initiative on Consortium for Renovating Education of the Future, are trying to make the network for improving classroom learning based on the theory of recent cognitive science and...

  6. Collaborative Learning: Theoretical Foundations and Applicable Strategies to University Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Nestor D. Roselli

    2016-01-01

    Collaborative learning is a construct that identifies a current strong field, both in face-to-face and virtual education. Firstly, three converging theoretical sources are analyzed: socio-cognitive conflict theory, intersubjectivity theory and distributed cognition theory. Secondly, a model of strategies that can be implemented by teachers to develop socio-cognitive collaboration is presented. This model integrates and systematizes several academic group animation techniques developed within ...

  7. Editorial: Collaborative Knowledge Management and E-Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Helen S. Du; Christian Wagner

    2011-01-01

    Finding effective ways to collaborate, and to create and share knowledge among people who are connected via disperse networks is one of the most challenging tasks. Many of our traditional learning models and educational systems are not yet ready for new forms of collaboration and knowledge management due to recent technology advancement. To achieve effective education and training, we need to pay attention not only to the technology itself, but also to technology infrastructures, pedagogies, ...

  8. Project-based learning in Geotechnics: cooperative versus collaborative teamwork

    OpenAIRE

    M. Pinho-Lopes; Macedo, J.

    2015-01-01

    Since 2007/2008 project-based learning models have been used to deliver two fundamental courses on Geotechnics in University of Aveiro, Portugal. These models have evolved and have encompassed either cooperative or collaborative teamwork. Using data collected in five editions of each course (Soil Mechanics I and Soil Mechanics II), the different characteristics of the models using cooperative or collaborative teamwork are pointed out and analysed, namely in terms of the students’ perceptions....

  9. Experiences of collaborating and learning through Collab3DWorld

    OpenAIRE

    Kamvisi, Martha; Kleanthous, Styliani; Nisiotis, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Collaboration is an activity that is considered important during the learning process. Good communication between group members is essential to achieve quality output. Recently, virtual worlds gained excessive popularity in educational settings and more and more lecturers are incorporating live activity or lecturing sessions in environments like Second Life (SL). In this work we are investigating how students of a conventional university perceive collaboration, communication and attending lec...

  10. Learning about the past with new technologies : Fostering historical reasoning in computer-supported collaborative learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drie, J.P. van

    2005-01-01

    Recent technological developments have provided new environments for learning, giving rise to the question of how characteristics of such new learning environments can facilitate the process of learning in specific domains. The focus of this thesis is on computer-supported collaborative learning (CS

  11. Attitudes of Teacher Candidates Towards Technology Supported Collaborative Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fezile ÖZDAMLI

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Technology supported collaborative learning allows students to study together, and produce projectstogether using technology supported systems. This study aimed to gather attitudes of CEIT students’ in the matter oftechnology supported collaborative learning in the Near East University. Pre-experimental model used in this study. Datawere collected from the students at the start of the term and end. This study was applied to selected sample of 35 students (24male and 11 females of Computer Education and Instructional Technologies Department of Near East University and whogot the course “authorware tools” at the 1St term of 2007-2008 academic year. The participants got the course “authoringtools application in computer enviorment” which was carried out as a technology supported collaborative learning. Thetechnology supported collaborative learning and authoring tools were described to students by teachers at the begining of theterm. Each team has 2 or 3 members. Teams selected projects topics at the begining of term. The aim of the final projects wascreated a course software about their project topics. Students were discussed the topics with team members and researced thetopics then they created a course software. The course included a series of local face-to-face tutorials (four each week duringa term and was supported by e-mail, msn, and discussion forums in a website. Teachers and student teams were discussedthe topics and projects during terms and then presented their projects. “the role of the technology on the course” and“Adaptation to the collaborative learning criters” 5 point likert scales and “personal information forums” were used in thisstudy. The results were generally positive at the start and at the end of the term. Besides, students’ attidues were morepositive than after studying in technology supported collaborative learning.

  12. Monitoring Collaboration in Flexible and Personal Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Jesus Rodriguez-Triana

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Both virtual and personal learning environments (VLEs and PLEs are technologies widely used with educational purposes. Moreover, there also exists a pedagogical trend towards the development of high-level competences, such as the capacity to work collaboratively in a group. These two trends come to- gether within the field of computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL. The evaluation of CSCL situations requires to take into account, among other things, the process of collaboration. In response to this need, a number of collaboration analysis tools have been developed. However, the use of these tools in the decen- tralized scenarios typically found when integrating third-party external in VLEs and PLEs is a complex matter: the information retrieved and the access to it are heterogeneous; and the lack of data sharing standards between the learning soft- ware and the analysis tools reduces the probability of compatibility. The present work aims to delve into the problem of the integration of collaboration analysis tools and learning software. A solution is proposed to support monitoring in an architecture that already integrates third-party external tools in PLEs and VLEs named GLUE!. The proposal is illustrated by means of an example based on a real CSCL experience that took place in a course at our University.

  13. Robotics learning based on collaborative projects

    OpenAIRE

    López-de-Ipiña, Karmele; Pilar M. Calvo; Barroso, Nora

    2014-01-01

    [EN]Nowadays companies demand graduates able to work in multidisciplinary and collaborative projects. Hence, new educational methods are needed in order to support a more advanced society, and progress towards a higher quality of life and sustainability. The University of the Basque Country belongs to the European Higher Education Area, which was created as a result of the Bologna process to ensure the connection and quality of European national educational systems. In this framework, this pa...

  14. Possibilities of Computer-supported Collaborative Learning in Blended-learning

    OpenAIRE

    Ulmane-Ozoliņa, Lāsma

    2015-01-01

    Higher education institutions in Latvia offer blended learning where traditional face to face lectures are combined with e-learning options. Research on blended learning in Latvia is very little. Author offers her view on blended learning analysis in Latvia and possibility to introduce computer-supported collaborative learning as tool to involve students in more active learning and learners’ community building. As theoretical background author uses sociocultural theory and participatory metap...

  15. Virtual communities as educational potential of collaborative learning through ICT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.ª Ángeles REBOLLO CATALÁN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some results of an educational innovation based on the use of ICT as a learning environment. The main aim of this study is to describe an experience based collaborative learning in virtual communities of learning and reciprocal teaching and assessing students’ knowledge. For that, we design an educational proposal with three didactic units, which includes a kit of tasks and resources for learning. This study adopts a quantitative and qualitative methodology, applying attitudes scales, interviews and analysis of messages from online discussion forums. The study involved 56 students in first year of Pedagogy. We apply a Likert scale and a semantic differential about the learning experience and the methodology used. Also we conducted semi-structured group interviews to understand the perceptions and students’ evaluations about the methodology. The results show a very positive assessment about the learning experience and the methodology used. Peer interaction is focused on resolving technical queries, although there are also other forms of collaboration focused on joint interpretation and understanding of learning activities and assessment of the learning process. The results show that the intervention centers on teacher feedback and monitoring of learning tasks, reinforcing positive actions of the students and guiding the learning process. Finally, as to the benefits received by students, the results show that not only is development of social and communication skills, but also conceptual and emotional changes related to the subject.

  16. Collaborative Practices in Bilingual Cooperative Learning Classrooms

    OpenAIRE

    Gumperz, John; Cook-Gumperz, Jenny; Szymanski, Margaret

    1999-01-01

    It is by now well established that self-organized acts of learning can have important long-term cognitive benefits. The many programs of cooperative learning, while they vary in detail, all agree that participants must actively work together for such benefits to be realized (Cohen, 1990). Further, because cognitive change is revealed through the ways in which learners' sense of ownership and control over their intellectual products is increased over time, the changes are not easily observed a...

  17. Virtual Communities of Collaborative Learning for Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilda E. Sotomayor

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to outline and project three new learning scenarios for Higher Education that, after the emergence of ICT and communication through the Network-lnternet, have come under the generic name of virtual communities. To that end, we start from a previous conceptual analysis on collaborative learning, cooperative learning and related concepts taking place in these communities and serving as a basis for sorting them into three types in particular: communities of educational work of professional practice and scientific knowledge. Virtual communities where the activities undertaken and skills acquired are set as important parts of our personal learning development, wich are necessary to build the Knowledge Society.

  18. Critical Thinking and Collaboration: A Strategy to Enhance Student Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald A. Styron, Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In numerous studies relative to collaboration and critical thinking, an instructional strategy called Team- Based Learning has proven to be an effective approach to teaching and learning. Team-Based Learning utilizes a specific sequence of individual work, group work and immediate feedback to create a motivational framework in which students increasingly hold each other accountable for coming to class prepared and contributing to discussion. Using an action research conceptual model diffusion of innovation theory, the process of P-20 quality enhancement using Team-Based Learning is examined.

  19. Video games and collaborative learning. Experiences related to Primary Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta MARTÍN DEL POZO

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Video games are not only a way of entertainment, but also they can be used for learning as an educational resource. In that sense, the aim of this article is to perform a systematic review about experiences and research about the use of video games in the stage of Primary Education (that is to say, with children between 6 and 12 years old, but, in particularly, experiences with a collaborative learning approach and, also, with a pre and post achievement or learning test to show if students made learning gains. In order to fulfill the main objective, the article will be divided in five key sections showing the main aspects related to this topic: video games in education, collaborative learning, the methodology for the systematic review, results and conclusions about the results.  As a result, a total of 8 studies met the inclusion criteria and they were selected for the analysis. In that sense, we show that video games can be used in a collaborative learning approach, in contrast to the common idea that video games generate isolate persons, above all children and, furthermore, in general, students improve their learning achievement. In conclusion, video games can be a good resource for learning process and, for example, they can be used in a collaborative learning approach but it is necessary more information about that because of the limits we show at the end of the article, like, for example, more studies are required with pre and post achievement tests and using experimental and control groups.

  20. Question Answering for Collaborative Learning with Answer Quality Predictor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing advances of Internet Technologies in all application domains have changed life styles and interactions. With the rapid development of E-Learning, collaborative learning is an important for teaching, learning methods and strategies. Studies over the years shown that students had actively and more interactively involved in a classroom discussion to gain their knowledge. Students can ask their questions to the classroom discussion when they want to collaborate with others, asking one another for information, evaluating one another’s ideas. Therein, the activity allowing one question has many answer or information that should be selected. Every answer has a weighting and its very subjective to select it. In this paper, we introduce question answering for collaborative learning with answer quality predictor. By using answer quality predictor the quality of the information could be determined. Through the process of collaborative learning, the knowledge base will be enriched for future question answering. Further, not only the student could get answers form others but also provided by the system.

  1. A Model for Collaborative Learning in Undergraduate Climate Change Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teranes, J. L.

    2008-12-01

    Like several colleges and universities across the nation, the University of California, San Diego, has introduced climate change topics into many existing and new undergraduate courses. I have administered a program in this area at UCSD and have also developed and taught a new lower-division UCSD course entitled "Climate Change and Society", a general education course for non-majors. This class covers the basics of climate change, such as the science that explains it, the causes of climate change, climate change impacts, and mitigation strategies. The teaching methods for this course stress interdisciplinary approaches. I find that inquiry-based and collaborative modes of learning are particularly effective when applied to science-based climate, environmental and sustainability topics. Undergraduate education is often dominated by a competitive and individualistic approach to learning. In this approach, individual success is frequently perceived as contingent on others being less successful. Such a model is at odds with commonly stated goals of teaching climate change and sustainability, which are to equip students to contribute to the debate on global environmental change and societal adaptation strategies; and to help students become better informed citizens and decision makers. I present classroom-tested strategies for developing collaborative forms of learning in climate change and environmental courses, including team projects, group presentations and group assessment exercises. I show how critical thinking skills and long-term retention of information can benefit in the collaborative mode of learning. I find that a collaborative learning model is especially appropriate to general education courses in which the enrolled student body represents a wide diversity of majors, class level and expertise. I also connect collaborative coursework in interdisciplinary environmental topics directly to applications in the field, where so much "real-world" achievement in

  2. Applying Adaptive Swarm Intelligence Technology with Structuration in Web-Based Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yueh-Min; Liu, Chien-Hung

    2009-01-01

    One of the key challenges in the promotion of web-based learning is the development of effective collaborative learning environments. We posit that the structuration process strongly influences the effectiveness of technology used in web-based collaborative learning activities. In this paper, we propose an ant swarm collaborative learning (ASCL)…

  3. Live online communication facilitating collaborative learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    . This has paved the way for web conference systems that provide users with easy access to live online communication. Teachers and students are no longer limited to physical class rooms, but can go global via virtual class rooms that can be created in the available web conference system. Fast connections...... of the subject and the activities, whereas the students will adopt a more passive role. The traditional lecture model is based on a paradigm that views learning as the transmission of information from teacher to student. In addition, the web conference will amplify the role of the teacher in that he/she can...... becomes an exchange of information between teacher and student in a formal class room. This presentation stresses that the use of web conference systems for teaching must be based on a didactic model that views learning as an active and social process thus expanding the learning context and opportunities...

  4. An Interactive Zoo Guide: A Case Study of Collaborative Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Hao Shi

    2010-01-01

    Real Industry Projects and team work can have a great impact on student learning but providing these activities requires significant commitment from academics. It requires several years planning implementing to create a collaborative learning environment that mimics the real world ICT (Information and Communication Technology) industry workplace. In this project, staff from all the three faculties, namely the Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science, Faculty of Arts, Education and Human ...

  5. A kinesthetic-based collaborative learning system for distributed algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Nagataki, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Taichi; Yamauchi, Yukiko; Kakugawa, Hirotsugu; Masuzawa, Toshimitsu

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a learning support system DASE-E to help students understand fundamental concepts of distributed algorithms in computer science. DASE-E is a collaborative learning system, in which the task of students isto devise a distributed algorithm. DASE-E offers a set of small wireless terminals with accelerometers. Each student plays the role of a process with a terminal, according to the algorithm that students devised. Each terminal enables a student to take physical action...

  6. Utilizing FM software in collaborative design-learning

    OpenAIRE

    Schadewitz, Nicole; Garner, Steve; Ferreira, Giselle

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a case study of computer-supported collaborative learning in design using OpenLearn FlashMeeting software, a video conferencing tool. This 6-week experiment, involving Open University students and staff, aimed at exploring the capabilities of FlashMeeting software to support several phases of the design process including formulating a design brief, discovering user requirements, setting design specifications, concept generation, design embodiment and implementation ...

  7. Using IMS Learning Design to model collaborative learning activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tattersall, Colin

    2006-01-01

    IMS Learning Design provides a counter to the trend towards designing for lone-learners reading from screens. It guides staff and educational developers to start not with content, but with learning activities and the achievement of learning objectives. It recognises that learning can happen without

  8. Collaborative Learning: Theoretical Foundations and Applicable Strategies to University Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestor D. Roselli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative learning is a construct that identifies a current strong field, both in face-to-face and virtual education. Firstly, three converging theoretical sources are analyzed: socio-cognitive conflict theory, intersubjectivity theory and distributed cognition theory. Secondly, a model of strategies that can be implemented by teachers to develop socio-cognitive collaboration is presented. This model integrates and systematizes several academic group animation techniques developed within the collaborative learning field. These integrated techniques, within a coherent and unified didactic intention, allow talking more about strategies than independent and dissociated techniques. Each strategy is specifically described, which refers to six areas: encouragement of dialogue, listening to others and reciprocal assessment; collaboration for negotiation and consensus building; activity organization; study and appropriation of bibliographic information; conceptual development; collective writing. These strategies proposed (designed to stimulate the collaboration between 2, 4 and exceptionally, 6 or 8 students are not the only possible strategies, they can be combined with the ones the teacher might suggest. The strict pattern of each strategy is a characteristic of the proposal. The teacher is also encouraged to benchmark the results obtained using each strategy and those obtained using individual or non-collaborative strategies. Finally, conclusions and recommendations for the implementation of these strategies are discussed.

  9. Learning by collaborating on the Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundsgaard, Jeppe

    2007-01-01

    of preparing the cognitive subject matter, but also of organizing a motivating learning environ ment that incorporate and appreciate social relations so that the students experience benefits that counter - balance the greater efforts of writing and relating in virtual forums.These deliberations lead...

  10. The Year We Learned to Collaborate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Janice; Contreras, Kathia

    2011-01-01

    In 2008-09, Colegio Ingles had a watershed year in terms of teachers learning to enhance one another's skills. Beneath a deceptively congenial surface, teachers at this Mexican preK-9th grade school were avoiding professional confrontations and rarely observed one another's classes or shared teaching solutions and innovations. That same year, the…

  11. Principals' Collaborative Roles as Leaders for Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitchen, Margaret; Gray, Susan; Jeurissen, Maree

    2016-01-01

    This article draws on data from three multicultural New Zealand primary schools to reconceptualize principals' roles as leaders for learning. In doing so, the writers build on Sinnema and Robinson's (2012) article on goal setting in principal evaluation. Sinnema and Robinson found that even principals hand-picked for their experience fell short on…

  12. Designing Collaborative Learning Environments Using Educational Scenarios Based on SR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fotini Paraskeva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available As more and more studies acknowledge that students are basic contributors to the learning process, factors such as self concept, (computer self-efficacy and self-regulation are important in enhancing human performance. Nevertheless, these learner characteristics have received little attention in the e-learning environment. This paper presents the results of a study indicating significant positive relationships between learner characteristics, such as self-concept (academic achievement and job achievement, Computer Self Efficacy (CSE and Self-Regulation (SR constructs. Acknowledging the requirement for a strong shift of students towards developing self-regulated scenarios and strategies, we suggest that collaborative e-learning environments should be designed according to the self-regulated theory and self-beliefs. As a result, in this study we present a model examining how we can design educational scenarios based on self-regulation theory in a collaborative e-learning environment. This model is a tool for conducting experiments in e-learning university courses, studying the design, development and evaluation of the collaborative learning process.

  13. Editorial: Collaborative Knowledge Management and E-Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen S. Du

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Finding effective ways to collaborate, and to create and share knowledge among people who are connected via disperse networks is one of the most challenging tasks. Many of our traditional learning models and educational systems are not yet ready for new forms of collaboration and knowledge management due to recent technology advancement. To achieve effective education and training, we need to pay attention not only to the technology itself, but also to technology infrastructures, pedagogies, social, and management aspects. This special issue of the KM&EL international journal focuses on recent directions for the alignment of collaborative knowledge management and e-learning, and their rising impact on research and pedagogical practice.

  14. Students' Groupwork Management in Online Collaborative Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianzhong; Du, Jianxia; Fan, Xitao

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates empirical models of groupwork management in online collaborative learning environments, based on the data from 298 students (86 groups) in United States. Data revealed that, at the group level, groupwork management was positively associated with feedback and help seeking. Data further revealed that, at the individual…

  15. Conflict from Teamwork in Project-Based Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lim Ha; Chen, Ching-Huei

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the conflict occurring during teamwork among college seniors in project-based collaborative learning in a capstone course. It found that conflict emerged with poor communication, task management, and work allocation; unequal treatments among classmates; egocentricity; a clash of values; and lack of responsibility and…

  16. Student Perceptions of a Successful Online Collaborative Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Michael L.; Su, Jian

    2016-01-01

    This paper shares the perceptions of a group of 11 successful online students regarding the value of the collaborative learning community that developed as part of their participation in the first cohort of the WebIT online Master of Science Degree in Instructional Technology program, at The University of Tennessee at Knoxville during 2008-2010.…

  17. Collaborative Learning through Formative Peer Review: Pedagogy, Programs and Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondergaard, Harald; Mulder, Raoul A.

    2012-01-01

    We examine student peer review, with an emphasis on formative practice and collaborative learning, rather than peer grading. Opportunities to engage students in such formative peer assessment are growing, as a range of online tools become available to manage and simplify the process of administering student peer review. We consider whether…

  18. Teaching Introductory Economics with a Collaborative Learning Lab Component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Robert L.

    1998-01-01

    Answers the what, why, how, and for whom questions concerning a collaborative-learning-lab component of the introductory economics course at Occidental College (California). Reports on the program's effectiveness based on a student questionnaire: they overwhelmingly report that the lab is worthwhile and that group work is both enjoyable and…

  19. Emotional Intelligence and Collaborative Learning in Adult Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Luz M.

    2011-01-01

    The changing social and economic reality of our world continues to shape how learning is conducted and acquired in the adult classroom and beyond. Given the pivotal importance for an adult to develop a variety of cognitive and emotional skills and given the need to work in collaboration with others, within educational environments and the…

  20. An Active, Collaborative Approach to Learning Skills in Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Kathryn; Linden, Matthew D.; Lee-Pullen, Tracey; Fragall, Clayton; Erber, Wendy N.; Röhrig, Kimberley J.

    2016-01-01

    Advances in science education research have the potential to improve the way students learn to perform scientific interpretations and understand science concepts. We developed active, collaborative activities to teach skills in manipulating flow cytometry data using FlowJo software. Undergraduate students were given compensated clinical flow…

  1. Project-Based Learning in Geotechnics: Cooperative versus Collaborative Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho-Lopes, Margarida; Macedo, Joaquim

    2016-01-01

    Since 2007/2008 project-based learning models have been used to deliver two fundamental courses on Geotechnics in University of Aveiro, Portugal. These models have evolved and have encompassed either cooperative or collaborative teamwork. Using data collected in five editions of each course (Soil Mechanics I and Soil Mechanics II), the different…

  2. Creating a Collaborative Learning Community in the CIS Sandbox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydenberg, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of transforming a traditional university computer lab to create a collaborative learning community known as the CIS Sandbox, by remodeling a physical space and supporting it with a virtual presence through the use of social media tools. The discussion applies Selander's "designs for…

  3. Designing Collaborative Learning and Innovation Systems for Education Professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Angehrn, Albert; Maxwell, Katrina; Luccini, Marco; Rajola, Frederico

    2008-01-01

    Angehrn, A. A., Maxwell, K., Luccini, A. M., & Rajola, F. (2008). Designing Collaborative Learning and Innovation Systems for Education Professionals. In M. D. Lytras, J. M. Carroll, E. Damiani & R. D. Tennyson (Eds.), Proceedings of the 1st World Summit on the Knowledge Society: Emerging Technologi

  4. Mentoring and Coaching in Schools: Professional Learning through Collaborative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, Suzanne; Pomphrey, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    Can mentoring and coaching really improve professional practice? How can research and inquiry improve mentoring and coaching practice? "Mentoring and Coaching in Schools" explores the ways in which mentoring and coaching can be used as a dynamic collaborative process for effective professional learning. It demonstrates how the use of practitioner…

  5. Staging Events of Collaborative Design and Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binder, Thomas; Brandt, Eva; Horgen, Turid;

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we will focus on events where collaborating parties get together to further the design work, and on how these events get staged in time and space. Our consern is the micro-organisation of time and space, which we find is poorly explored in the literature on product development. We...... open the paper by provisionally placing this concern within the debate on engineering design and product development. We argue that seeing the process of product development as a chain of events, each propelling the design work-and deliberately designing such events, with a clear focus on space, time...... then present and discuss how we have taken part in developing what we believe to be supportive spatial and temporal environments for product development at two companies, Danfoss in Denmark and Xerox in the U.S. We end the paper by summing up what kinds of staging of events appear to be particularly productive...

  6. A Framework to Stimulate Collaborative e-Learning through Collaborative Educational Games Modeled Using IMS-LD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abderrahim El Mhouti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In an e-learning environment, learn in a collaborative way is not always so easy because one of the difficulties when arranging e-learning contents can be that these contents and learning paths are not adapted to this type of learning. Online courses are constructed in a way that does not stimulate interaction, cooperation and collaborative learning. This is why the e-learning often is seen as individual and lonely. In this sense, one way to reduce these problems and promote collaborative elearning and interaction learner-learner and learnerteacher is to model these contents in the form of collaborative educational games. The primary aim of this work is to exploit the potential of educational games to improve students‟ collaboration in e-learning environments. Thus, this paper presents a framework for designing, implementing and building collaborative educational games targeted to e-learning. The proposed framework is composed of two main phases: game design phase that consists to propose a collaborative design process of educational games; and game development phase that consists to implement, package, describe and deliver the games using the IMSLD standard. The paper describes the steps followed for modeling games, the framework architecture and adopted technical choices. The final framework supports the creation and the use of such games using one of the most popular tools of learning in the web era: the LMS (Learning Management System.

  7. Collaborative Language Learning for Professional Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Joy Mesh

    2009-01-01

    Sustainable support for educational development using new technologies in higher education depends on having a basic roadmap that links current demands for developmental support to a plan for ways in which longer term needs will be recognized and met. The growing demand for lifelong learning of a second language is evident within the workplace where new technologies offer flexible solutions. In order to meet the special needs of working adults, the University of Siena Language Center (CLA) ha...

  8. The Influences of Cognitive Styles on Individual Learning and Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sherry Y.; Chang, Li-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Both individual learning (IL) and collaborative learning (CL) provide students with different benefits. However, previous research indicates that cognitive styles affect students' learning preferences. Thus, it is necessary to examine how cognitive styles influence students' reactions to IL and CL. Among various cognitive styles, Pask's…

  9. Towards identifying Collaborative Learning groups using Social Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selver Softic

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This work reports about the preliminary results and ongoing research based upon profiling collaborative learning groups of persons within the social micro-blogging platforms like Twitter that share potentially common interests on special topic. Hereby the focus is held on spontaneously initiated collaborative learning in Social Media and detection of collaborative learning groups based upon their communication dynamics. Research questions targeted to be answered are: are there any useful data mining algorithms to fulfill the task of pre-selection and clustering of users in social networks, how good do they perform, and what are the metrics that could be used for detection and evaluation in the realm of this task. Basic approach presented here uses as preamble hypothesis that users and their interests in Social Networks can be identified through content generated by them and content they consume. Special focus is held on topic oriented approach as least common bounding point. Those should be also the basic criteria used to detect and outline the learning groups. The aim of this work is to deliver first scientific pre-work for successfully implementation of recommender systems using social network metrics and content features of social network users for the purposes of better learning group communication and information consumption.

  10. Creating Effective Collaborative Learning Groups in an Online Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane E. Brindley

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative learning in an online classroom can take the form of discussion among the whole class or within smaller groups. This paper addresses the latter, examining first whether assessment makes a difference to the level of learner participation and then considering other factors involved in creating effective collaborative learning groups. Data collected over a three year period (15 cohorts from the Foundations course in the Master of Distance Education (MDE program offered jointly by University of Maryland University College (UMUC and the University of Oldenburg does not support the authors’ original hypothesis that assessment makes a significant difference to learner participation levels in small group learning projects and leads them to question how much emphasis should be placed on grading work completed in study groups to the exclusion of other strategies. Drawing on observations of two MDE courses, including the Foundations course, their extensive online teaching experience, and a review of the literature, the authors identify factors other than grading that contribute positively to the effectiveness of small collaborative learning groups in the online environment. In particular, the paper focuses on specific instructional strategies that facilitate learner participation in small group projects, which result in an enhanced sense of community, increased skill acquisition, and better learning outcomes.

  11. Fostering Multimedia Learning with Collaborative Concept Mapping: The Effect of Cognitive Aid on Performance and on Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña, Santiago Roger; Aymes, Gabriela López; Medrano, Carlos Sergio López

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyzes the use of collaborative concept maps in multimedia learning tasks. Specifically, the effect of a cognitive aid (providing students a list of main concepts to generate a concept map) on the performance of collaborative concept mapping and on the level of collaboration in this task is discussed. The study was carried out with 57…

  12. Enhancing integrative motivation: The Japanese-American Collaborative Learning Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fumie Kato

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Collaborative Learning Project is a language exchange program in which American and Japanese university students have the opportunity to interact with native speakers over the course of a three-week period. This paper reports the outcomes of the Collaborative Learning Project in terms of its effectiveness in fulfilling student expectations and their integrative motivation, i.e. social and cultural motivation. Using quantitative and qualitative data, this research includes the first project (2012 as a preliminary study, and the second project (2013 as the basis of the formative assessment. In their responses to questionnaires, the majority of the students reported that the program fulfilled their expectations and fostered their integrative motivation. After participating in the project, the participants were motivated to continue learning Japanese and seemed to be more interested in the study abroad program/studying abroad.

  13. Faculty and Librarian Collaboration on Problem-based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Schmehl Hines

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a case study using a collaborative model of problem-based learning in library instruction as an innovative alternative to traditional methods. The authors examine the use of problem-based library instruction in three courses, including an examination of the results of the assignment students were given as part of the exercise. The authors found that the problem-based learning model increased student engagement with library resources and provided a mechanism for identifying and correcting deficiencies in students’ information literacy knowledge and skills. If a specific session of library instruction is intended to provide guidance on the use of the library for a particular assignment or project, then using a problem-based learning approach in collaboration with teaching faculty is a simple way to improve library instruction.

  14. Intellectual Amplification through Reflection and Didactic Change in Distributed Collaborative Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Elsebeth K.

    Presented at the Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL99, Stanford University, California, December 11-18, 1999 Presented at the Conference on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning, CSCL99, Stanford University, California, December 11-18, 1999...

  15. The Development of Online Interactive Whiteboard for Supporting Collaboration Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Settachai Chaisanit

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Learning innovation was currently considered as the most popular for education among university students. The aim of this study was to investigate if university students consider innovative Internet technology as a useful, meaningful learning environment that could support and enhance their learning. However many students face problems and difficult to learn, practice and time consuming. This is because collaborative time and media are not enough for them. Online learning environment is a one thing for creates a variety of ways to deliver and provide electronic resources for the learner. It’s includes many methods such as using system to deliver text, video chat and activity for learner. Thus, online learning environment is professionals cite benefits to the learner. The learner benefits from the opportunity to prepare them for increase their competitive in a globalization. Therefore the purposes of this research were: (1 to develop online interactive whiteboard for supporting collaboration learning based on PIDP development model, (2 to evaluation online interactive whiteboard for supporting collaboration learning. The samples of this study comprised of 40 students from Sripatum University, Chonburi Campus, Thailand. The sample was obtained by simple random sampling method, used control experimental group evaluation design. The results showed that: the satisfaction of the panel experts, the mean was 4.48 with the standard deviation was 0.36; the satisfaction was in the “High level”. In part of Control/Experimental group evaluation has shown that: the experimental group score higher that control group score. In part of learner’s satisfaction, the mean was 3.99 with the standard deviation was 0.54; the satisfaction was in the “High level”. This can summarized that developed system be successful, various aspects of the online environment should be considered such as application domain knowledge, conceptual theory, user interface design

  16. Collaborative Learning: Group Interaction in an Intelligent Mobile-Assisted Multiple Language Learning System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos TROUSSAS

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a student-oriented approach tailored to effective collaboration between students using mobile phones for language learning within the life cycle of an intelligent tutoring system. For this reason, in this research, a prototype mobile application has been developed for multiple language learning that incorporates intelligence in its modeling and diagnostic components. One of the primary aims of this research is the construction of student models which promote the misconception diagnosis. Furthermore, they are the key for collaboration, given that students can cooperate with their peers, discuss complex problems from various perspectives and use knowledge to answer questions and/or to solve problems. Summarizing, in this paper, a mobile tutoring framework, built up in the context of student collaboration, is presented. Collaborative student groups are created with respect to the corresponding user models. Finally, the prototype was evaluated and the results confirmed the usefulness of collaborative learning.

  17. Hybrid E-Learning Tool TransLearning: Video Storytelling to Foster Vicarious Learning within Multi-Stakeholder Collaboration Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meij, Marjoleine G.; Kupper, Frank; Beers, Pieter J.; Broerse, Jacqueline E. W.

    2016-01-01

    E-learning and storytelling approaches can support informal vicarious learning within geographically widely distributed multi-stakeholder collaboration networks. This case study evaluates hybrid e-learning and video-storytelling approach "TransLearning" by investigation into how its storytelling e-tool supported informal vicarious…

  18. Collaborative Learning and Knowledge Transfer in Consciousness Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Mihaela ION

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the expression "workplace learning” which states that the use of personal computers at work or at school reflects learning activities and work activities which are interchangeable at individual level, this paper presents collaborative models dedicated to processes of teaching, learning, assessment and research in education. One of the most important activities is represented by computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL which, from its occurrence, presented a special interest for researchers in informatics. CSCL is based on human-computer interaction (HCI and on computer supported cooperative work (CSCW. CSCL promotes in turn the development of computer supported collaborative research (CSCR. Information and communications technologies represent not only a media support but, most of all, a mean for accessing resources worldwide. The development of the information technology and of the information society brought benefits both to the traditional form of education, and to the distance education represented by the assisted instruction. The evolution of the information society led to the emergence of the society based on knowledge which represents an intermediary step between information society and consciousness society, who wants to be a moral society. This article highlights the transfer of data, information and knowledge (explicit and implicit during assisted instruction processes along with the possibility to create collaborative content in consciousness society.

  19. Stress in Japanese Learners Engaged in Online Collaborative Learning in English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Insung; Kudo, Masayuki; Choi, Sook-Kyoung

    2012-01-01

    Many studies report positive learning experience and improved performance in online collaborative learning. However, such learning can also incur unnecessary or excessive stress with a resultant adverse effect on the learning. This study aimed to determine the stress factors in online collaborative learning as perceived by 226 Japanese university…

  20. Towards a Personalised, Learning Style Based Collaborative Blended Learning Model with Individual Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Ilona BÉRES; Tímea MAGYAR; Turcsányi-Szabó, Márta

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we aim to describe the process by which our personalised web-based collaborative teaching/learning methodology (CECIP - Collaboration - Evaluation - Critical thinking - Individual assessment - learner Profile) evolved originating from Vygotsky's theory and based on the (C) collaborative construction of student's knowledge, (E) developing evaluation and assessment skills, (C) developing critical thinking skills, (I) integrating individual evaluation and (P) generating learner pro...

  1. Scalable learning of probabilistic latent models for collaborative filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langseth, Helge; Nielsen, Thomas Dyhre

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative filtering has emerged as a popular way of making user recommendations, but with the increasing sizes of the underlying databases scalability is becoming a crucial issue. In this paper we focus on a recently proposed probabilistic collaborative filtering model that explicitly...... variational Bayes learning and inference algorithm for these types of models. Empirical results show that the proposed algorithm achieves significantly better accuracy results than other straw-men models evaluated on a collection of well-known data sets. We also demonstrate that the algorithm has a highly...

  2. En retorisk forståelsesramme for Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (A Rhetorical Theory on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harlung, Asger

    2003-01-01

    The dissertation explores the potential of rhetorical theories for understanding, analyzing, or planning communication and learning processes, and for integrating the digitized contexts and human interaction and communication proccesses in a single theoretical framework. Based on Cicero's rhetori...... applied to two empirical case studies of Master programs, the dissertation develops and presents a new theory on Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL).......The dissertation explores the potential of rhetorical theories for understanding, analyzing, or planning communication and learning processes, and for integrating the digitized contexts and human interaction and communication proccesses in a single theoretical framework. Based on Cicero's rhetoric...

  3. Investigating Technical and Pedagogical Usability Issues of Collaborative Learning with Wikis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjerrouit, Said

    2012-01-01

    Wikis have been recently promoted as tools that foster collaborative learning. However, there has been little research devoted to the criteria that are suitable to address issues pertinent to collaborative learning. This paper proposes a set of criteria to explore technical and pedagogical usability issues of collaborative learning with wikis. The…

  4. Examining the Role of Collaborative Learning in a Public Speaking Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Hsiang-Ann

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative learning has been found to benefit students in various disciplines. Moreover, in the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics literature, it was noted that minority students benefited the most from collaborative learning. Studies on the effects of collaborative learning in communication are limited. As a result, I examined…

  5. Implementing Collaborative Design in the Next Series of eLearning Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropf, Dorothy

    2013-01-01

    Collaborative design empowers learning management system (LMS) providers and end users (online students) to develop a vibrant teaching and learning community. Successful periodic collaborations utilizing collaborative web tools between these two pivotal groups can produce the next series of eLearning platforms that are fertile grounds for…

  6. Bridging EO Research, Operations and Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarth, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Building flexible and responsive processing and delivery systems is key to getting EO information used by researchers, policy agents and the public. There are typically three distinct processes we tackle to get product uptake: undertake research, operationalise the validated research, and deliver information and garner feedback in an appropriate way. In many cases however, the gaps between these process elements are large and lead to poor outcomes. Good research may be "lost" and not adopted, there may be resistance to uptake by government or NGOs of significantly better operational products based on EO data, and lack of accessibility means that there is no use of interactive science outputs to improve cross disciplinary science or to start a dialog with citizens. So one of the the most important tasks, if we wish to have broad uptake of EO information and accelerate further research, is to link these processes together in a formal but flexible way. One of the ways to operationalize research output is by building a platform that can take research code and scale it across much larger areas. In remote sensing, this is typically a system that has access to current and historical corrected imagery with a processing pipeline built over the top. To reduce the demand on high level scientific programmers and allowing cross disciplinary researchers to hack and play and refine, this pipeline needs to be easy to use, collaborative and link to existing tools to encourage code experimentation and reuse. It is also critical to have efficient, tight integration with information delivery and extension components so that the science relevant to your user is available quickly and efficiently. The rapid expansion of open data licensing has helped this process, but building top-down web portals and tools without flexibility and regard for end user needs has limited the use of EO information in many areas. This research reports on the operalization of a scale independent time series

  7. Reuse of Digital Learning Resources in Collaborative Learning Environments

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    PhD thesis; With background in the proliferation of Information- and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in educational institutions, there is a growing interest in deploying ICT that complies with specifications and standards for learning technologies in these institutions. A key to obtaining the benefits of cost-efficiency and quality that motivate this interest is reuse of digital learning resources. Despite the significant efforts being made in design and deployment of learning technology s...

  8. Managing the Learning Quality in Physics by E-Learning Improvement with Collaborative Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanenaga, Masahiko; Suzuki, Masaru; Abe, Kohji; Nakamura, Jin; Takada, Tohru; Kokubo, Nobuhito; Fuseya, Yuki

    In 2010, the University of Electro-Communications (UEC) reconstructed the freshmen's curriculum in which all students learn the same contents of introductory physics and take the examination at same time. We had constructed Collaborative Education in order to support the students who had a various learning history in high school and the teachers who had not been experts in physics education. In this article, we show the result of Collaborative Education in UEC and its improvement strategy.

  9. E pluribus unum: the potential of collaborative learning to enhance Microbiology teaching in higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    Collaborative learning, where students work together towards a shared understanding of a concept, is a well-established pedagogy, and one which has great potential for higher education (HE). Through discussion and challenging each other's ideas, learners gain a richer appreciation for a subject than with solitary study or didactic teaching methods. However, collaborative learning does require some scaffolding by the teacher in order to be successful. Collaborative learning can be augmented by the use of Web 2.0 collaborative technologies, such as wikis, blogs and social media. This article reviews some of the uses of collaborative learning strategies in Microbiology teaching in HE. Despite the great potential of collaborative learning, evidence of its use in Microbiology teaching is, to date, limited. But the potential for collaborative learning approaches to develop self-regulated, deep learners is considerable, and so collaborative learning should be considered strongly as a viable pedagogy for HE. PMID:26459888

  10. E pluribus unum: the potential of collaborative learning to enhance Microbiology teaching in higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    Collaborative learning, where students work together towards a shared understanding of a concept, is a well-established pedagogy, and one which has great potential for higher education (HE). Through discussion and challenging each other's ideas, learners gain a richer appreciation for a subject than with solitary study or didactic teaching methods. However, collaborative learning does require some scaffolding by the teacher in order to be successful. Collaborative learning can be augmented by the use of Web 2.0 collaborative technologies, such as wikis, blogs and social media. This article reviews some of the uses of collaborative learning strategies in Microbiology teaching in HE. Despite the great potential of collaborative learning, evidence of its use in Microbiology teaching is, to date, limited. But the potential for collaborative learning approaches to develop self-regulated, deep learners is considerable, and so collaborative learning should be considered strongly as a viable pedagogy for HE.

  11. DISTRIBUTED LEADERSHIP COLLABORATION FACTORS TO SUPPORT IDEA GENERATION IN COMPUTER-SUPPORTED COLLABORATIVE e-LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niki Lambropoulos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to identify, discuss and analyze students’ collaboration factors related to distributed leadership (DL, which correlates with interaction quality evident in idea generation. Scripting computer-supported collaborative e-learning (CSCeL activities based on DL can scaffold students’ interactions that support collaboration and promote idea generation. Furthermore, the associated tools can facilitate collaboration via scripting and shed light on students’ interactions and dialogical sequences. Such detailed planning can result in effective short e-courses. In this case study, 21 MSc students’ teams worked on a DL project within a 2-day e-course at the IT Institute (ITIN, France. The research methods involved a self-reported questionnaire; the Non-Negative Matrix Factorization (NNMF algorithm with qualitative analysis; and outcomes from the Social Network Analysis (SNA tools implemented within the forums. The results indicated that scripting DL based on the identified distributed leadership attributes can support values such as collaboration and can be useful in supporting idea generation in short e-courses.

  12. A Proposed Collaborative Computer Network-Based Learning Model for Undergraduate Students with Different Learning Styles

    OpenAIRE

    Pichai TONGDEELERT

    2003-01-01

    In this information and communication technology age, computer network-based learning is widely used for expanding learning opportunities and facilitating learning activities to students separated by time and distance as well as for delivering effective content to students and instructors interacting with each other in a face-to-face classroom. Collaborative Computer Network Based Learning (CCNBL), in particular, is appropriate for learner center, constructivist, and problems-solving activiti...

  13. Assistive technologies and advantageous themes for collaboration, learning & teaching within 3D Virtual Learning Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Saleeb, Noha; Dafoulas, George

    2010-01-01

    E-learning assisted through 3D Virtual Worlds such as Second Life, extending the more traditional 2D Virtual Learning Environments, presents advantageous motifs for collaboration, learning and teaching online. These main motifs include enriching communication and teaching means through 3D environments and game-like interaction, and enhancing the learning experience through avatar and virtual persona engagement. This paper aims to provide evidence from practice for the afore mentioned motif...

  14. USING WIKIS AS A SUPPORT AND ASSESSMENT TOOL IN COLLABORATIVE DIGITAL GAME-BASED LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavuz SAMUR

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL environments, there are many researches done on collaborative learning activities; however, in game-based learning environments, more research and literature on collaborative learning activities are required. Actually, both game-based learning environments and wikis enable us to use new chances for learning, especially in collaborative learning activities. Therefore, in this paper, related literature on wikis and how game & instructional designers can leverage from wikis in game-based learning settings for enhancing students’ collaborative learning activities are examined. Based on the reviewed literature, two main suggestions are given in this paper with their underlying reasons. First, using wikis as a support tool for enhancing collaboration in digital game-based learning (DGBL environments, and second using wikis as an assessment tool in DGBL are suggested.

  15. Hybrid Collaborative Learning for Classification and Clustering in Sensor Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Sosnowski, Scott; Lane, Terran

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, nodes in a sensor network simply collect data and then pass it on to a centralized node that archives, distributes, and possibly analyzes the data. However, analysis at the individual nodes could enable faster detection of anomalies or other interesting events as well as faster responses, such as sending out alerts or increasing the data collection rate. There is an additional opportunity for increased performance if learners at individual nodes can communicate with their neighbors. In previous work, methods were developed by which classification algorithms deployed at sensor nodes can communicate information about event labels to each other, building on prior work with co-training, self-training, and active learning. The idea of collaborative learning was extended to function for clustering algorithms as well, similar to ideas from penta-training and consensus clustering. However, collaboration between these learner types had not been explored. A new protocol was developed by which classifiers and clusterers can share key information about their observations and conclusions as they learn. This is an active collaboration in which learners of either type can query their neighbors for information that they then use to re-train or re-learn the concept they are studying. The protocol also supports broadcasts from the classifiers and clusterers to the rest of the network to announce new discoveries. Classifiers observe an event and assign it a label (type). Clusterers instead group observations into clusters without assigning them a label, and they collaborate in terms of pairwise constraints between two events [same-cluster (mustlink) or different-cluster (cannot-link)]. Fundamentally, these two learner types speak different languages. To bridge this gap, the new communication protocol provides four types of exchanges: hybrid queries for information, hybrid "broadcasts" of learned information, each specified for classifiers-to-clusterers, and clusterers

  16. Forest-themed learning games as a context for learning via collaborative designing of crafts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinikka Pöllänen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This case study describes the types of learning games produced and the learning experiences of students who engaged in a project implementing the principles of learning by collaborative designing via forest-themed contextualization of crafts. The ultimate aim of this report is to describe how the project succeeded in changing the traditional instructional strategies used in craft education. This unique project was part of a craft course delivered as a component of primary school teacher education in the University of Eastern Finland. The students’ task was to design and produce a textilebased and forest-themed learning game for primary school children. The outputs of the study were the learning games produced (36 in number and student portfolios (215 pages. The games were illustrated and the written data analyzed using the inductive content approach and a hermeneutic viewpoint as the methodological basis. The results show that the design task guided learning in a multidisciplinary manner and increased the number of tools students could use to learn crafts and produce the games. Collaboration and working in teams changed the learning process from teacherand subject-centered to process-based. Forest-themed learning games may serve as a framework for collaborative designing; the approach offers a rich and non-traditional context for learning of crafts by university students. In terms of craft education, the approach highlights the importance of collaboration, the use of process-based crafts, and the possibilities afforded to shift the focus to more participatory activities to learn generic skills.Keywords: collaborative designing, crafts, craft education, learning by designing, learning game

  17. The QuarkNet/Grid collaborative learning e-lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bardeen, Marjorie; Gilbert, Eric; Jordan, Thomas; Nepywoda, Paul; Quigg, Elizabeth; /Fermilab; Wilde, Mike; /Argonne; Zhao, Yong; /Chicago U.

    2004-12-01

    We describe a case study that uses grid computing techniques to support the collaborative learning of high school students investigating cosmic rays. Students gather and upload science data to our e-Lab portal. They explore those data using techniques from the GriPhyN collaboration. These techniques include virtual data transformations, workflows, metadata cataloging and indexing, data product provenance and persistence, as well as job planners. Students use web browsers and a custom interface that extends the GriPhyN Chiron portal to perform all of these tasks. They share results in the form of online posters and ask each other questions in this asynchronous environment. Students can discover and extend the research of other students, modeling the processes of modern large-scale scientific collaborations. Also, the e-Lab portal provides tools for teachers to guide student work throughout an investigation.

  18. Introducing the Collaborative Learning Modeling Language (ColeML)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundsgaard, Jeppe

    2014-01-01

    the ground up. If these platforms are to find their way into everyday teaching and learning, they have to be easy and cheap to develop. Thus there is a need for easy to use application programming platforms. This paper argues that a visual modeling programming language would be an important part...... of such a platform. The Collaborative Learning Modeling Language (ColeML) makes it possible to articulate complex designs for learning visually and to activate these design models as interactive learning materials. ColeML is based on research in workflow and business process modeling. The traditional approach......” (Jørgensen, 2004, p. iii) It should not only be expert process modelers who are able to model processes; knowledge workers should also be able to do so themselves while the model is in use. ColeML is developed according to Jørgensen's (2004) design principles: 1) The modeling language should be simple...

  19. Web-Based Tools for Collaborative Evaluation of Learning Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Nesbit

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of large repositories of web-based learning resources has increased the need for valid and usable evaluation tools. This paper reviews current approaches to learning object evaluation and introduces eLera, a set of web-based tools we have developed for communities of teachers, learners, instructional designers and developers. Compatible with current metadata standards, eLera provides a learning object review instrument (LORI and other features supporting collaborative evaluation. eLera provides limited translation of evaluations and subject taxonomies across communities using different languages and terminology. eLera is designed to assist researchers to gather data on evaluation processes and has been used to teach educators how to assess the quality of multimedia learning resources.

  20. Developing students’ collaborative skills in interdisciplinary learning environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gnaur, Dorina; Svidt, Kjeld; Thygesen, Maria

    2015-01-01

    ' learning outcome are collected through observation, interviews and online questionnaires. The present investigation points at the dual effect of experiential learning in problem-based, interdisciplinary environments with regard to both actualizing core knowledge, skills and competences through solving...... complex real life problems and having to employ and thereby develop professional skills in the process of solving these problems....... is based on the principles of Building Information Modeling (BIM), which facilitate the coordination and collaboration between parties of a building design and construction team, and in this process, essential communication and interpersonal skills are mobilized and developed. Data about the students...

  1. Designing Collaborative Learning and Innovation Systems for Education Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Angehrn, Albert; Maxwell, Katrina; Luccini, Marco; Rajola, Frederico

    2008-01-01

    Angehrn, A. A., Maxwell, K., Luccini, A. M., & Rajola, F. (2008). Designing Collaborative Learning and Innovation Systems for Education Professionals. In M. D. Lytras, J. M. Carroll, E. Damiani & R. D. Tennyson (Eds.), Proceedings of the 1st World Summit on the Knowledge Society: Emerging Technologies and Information Systems for the Knowledge Society (pp. 167-176). September, 24-26, 2008, Athens, Greece: Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence, vol. 5288, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg.

  2. Collaborative Development of a PLE for Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Bogdanov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a report on the experimental collaborative and distributed development of a prototypic Widget-based PLE. The development process is described and detailed taking into account the requirements of a language learning scenario. First results are presented, and developer experiences are discussed critically with a focus on the development process as well as problems with current Widget technologies and interoperability

  3. Learning and Power Relations on Collaborative Knowledge Building Cyber- Discourse

    OpenAIRE

    Kwok, PLY

    2000-01-01

    This paper is mainly composed of two sections. Section (I) provides a review of Carl Bereiter’s and Marlene Scardamalia’s theories of knowledge, learning and mind in education. Firstly, to examine how they apply Karl Popper’s 3–world schema for collaborative knowledge building discourse with a brief evaluation of their ontological, pedagogical, scientific and technological justifications. Secondly, to mention the educational significance of inter-world interactions for cyber-based teachin...

  4. Structuring Task-based Interaction through Collaborative Learning Techniques (2)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William Littlewood

    2004-01-01

    @@ Techniques for collaborative learning In this section the focus will move from broad strategies to specific techniques (often also called "structures") through which the strategies can be realized. It gives a selection of techniques which have proved (in my own experience as well as that of others) particularly useful in pro-viding contexts for practice, exploration and /or interaction in the second language classroom.

  5. Using Online Presence to Improve Online Collaborative Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Jeremic

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Social software tools have become an integral part of students’ personal lives and their primary communication medium. Likewise, these tools are increasingly entering the enterprise world (within the recent trend known as Enterprise 2.0 and becoming a part of everyday work routines. Aiming to keep the pace with the job requirements and also to position learning as an integral part of students’ life, the field of education is challenged to embrace social software. Personal Learning Environments (PLEs emerged as a concept that makes use of social software to facilitate collaboration, knowledge sharing, group formation around common interests, active participation and reflective thinking in online learning settings. Furthermore, social software allows for establishing and maintaining one’s presence in the online world. By being aware of a student's online presence, a PLE is better able to personalize the learning settings, e.g., through recommendation of content to use or people to collaborate with. Aiming to explore the potentials of online presence for the provision of recommendations in PLEs, in the scope of the OP4L project, we have develop a software solution that is based on a synergy of Semantic Web technologies, online presence and socially-oriented learning theories. In this paper we present the current results of this research work.

  6. Informed Systems: Enabling Collaborative Evidence Based Organizational Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary M. Somerville

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective – In response to unrelenting disruptions in academic publishing and higher education ecosystems, the Informed Systems approach supports evidence based professional activities to make decisions and take actions. This conceptual paper presents two core models, Informed Systems Leadership Model and Collaborative Evidence-Based Information Process Model, whereby co-workers learn to make informed decisions by identifying the decisions to be made and the information required for those decisions. This is accomplished through collaborative design and iterative evaluation of workplace systems, relationships, and practices. Over time, increasingly effective and efficient structures and processes for using information to learn further organizational renewal and advance nimble responsiveness amidst dynamically changing circumstances. Methods – The integrated Informed Systems approach to fostering persistent workplace inquiry has its genesis in three theories that together activate and enable robust information usage and organizational learning. The information- and learning-intensive theories of Peter Checkland in England, which advance systems design, stimulate participants’ appreciation during the design process of the potential for using information to learn. Within a co-designed environment, intentional social practices continue workplace learning, described by Christine Bruce in Australia as informed learning enacted through information experiences. In addition, in Japan, Ikujiro Nonaka’s theories foster information exchange processes and knowledge creation activities within and across organizational units. In combination, these theories promote the kind of learning made possible through evolving and transferable capacity to use information to learn through design and usage of collaborative communication systems with associated professional practices. Informed Systems therein draws from three antecedent theories to create an original

  7. Collaborative Learning: Group Interaction in an Intelligent Mobile-Assisted Multiple Language Learning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troussas, Christos; Virvou, Maria; Alepis, Efthimios

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a student-oriented approach tailored to effective collaboration between students using mobile phones for language learning within the life cycle of an intelligent tutoring system. For this reason, in this research, a prototype mobile application has been developed for multiple language learning that incorporates intelligence in…

  8. Changing Teaching and Learning Relationships through Collaborative Action Research: Learning to Ask Different Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Paula; Gillam, Katy; Andrews, Jane; Day, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    The article reports work over one year by three teachers from the Milton Keynes Primary Schools Learning Network. Their collaborative classroom-focused action research investigated the limits and possibilities of pupils' and teachers' learning through self-evaluation. In phase one the teacher researchers used questionnaires, interviews and…

  9. Collaborative Design of Technology-Enhanced Learning: What Can We Learn from Teacher Talk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Susan; Boschman, Ferry; Pieters, Jules; Voogt, Joke

    2016-01-01

    The collaborative design of technology-enhanced learning is seen as a practical and effective professional development strategy, especially because teachers learn from each other as they share and apply knowledge. But how teacher design team participants draw on and develop their knowledge has not yet been investigated. This qualitative…

  10. A Collaborative Game-Based Learning Approach to Improving Students' Learning Performance in Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Han-Yu; Hwang, Gwo-Jen

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a collaborative game-based learning environment is developed by integrating a grid-based Mindtool to facilitate the students to share and organize what they have learned during the game-playing process. To evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed approach, an experiment has been conducted in an elementary school natural science…

  11. What Teacher Education Students Learn about Collaboration from Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Harvey, Rosalind; Pourshafie, Tahereh; Reyes, Wilma Santos

    2013-01-01

    Group work, an essential component of learning and teaching in problem-based learning (PBL), is compromised if students' experiences of PBL are colored by dissatisfaction with the process or outcomes. For the potential benefits of PBL to be realized PBL group work must be genuinely collaborative to address students' personal and professional…

  12. Collaborative learning using VoiceThread in an online graduate course

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Hui Ching; Yu-Chang Hsu

    2013-01-01

    Collaborative learning enables participants in a learning community to externalize and share knowledge, experiences, and practice. However, collaborative learning in an online environment can be challenging due to the lack of face-to face interaction. This current study examined twenty graduate students’ experiences of using VoiceThread for a collaborative activity in an entirely online course to explore students’ perceptions of using multi-modal communication for collaboration and knowledge ...

  13. Opportunities and Challenges for Teacher Professional Development: A Case of Collaborative Learning Community in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Minjeong; So, Kyunghee

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates how characteristics of a collaborative professional learning activity support and hinder teacher learning and growth by examining the experiences of three Korean secondary teachers who participated in a school-initiated collaborative teacher learning project. The findings demonstrated that this learning opportunity…

  14. Support of the collaborative inquiry learning process: influence of support on task and team regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Saab; W. van Joolingen; B. van Hout-Wolters

    2012-01-01

    Regulation of the learning process is an important condition for efficient and effective learning. In collaborative learning, students have to regulate their collaborative activities (team regulation) next to the regulation of their own learning process focused on the task at hand (task regulation).

  15. Social learning by whom? Assessing gendered opportunities for participation and social learning in collaborative forest governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicitas Egunyu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative forest governance enables forest-based communities access to and management responsibilities for forestry resources. Researchers argue that processes that enable social learning have the potential to contribute to the sustainable management of forests by engaging local people, helping them identify their collective needs and gain access to resource entitlements, and encouraging them to learn about and implement different management options. Although there is considerable attention to gender in the literature on collaborative forestry, particularly in developing countries, there is relatively little attention to gender in the social learning literature. Furthermore, there is almost no attention to these issues in postindustrial countries. Our purpose was to better understand how gender affects social learning and collaborative forest governance in forest-based communities in Canada and Uganda. Results showed that most participants in both countries started engaging in collaborative forest governance with limited knowledge and learned as they participated in various activities. However, we found that social learning opportunities and outcomes were affected by gender; in addition, they were also affected by the values that people held, education, and literacy. We suggest that practitioners should consider gender and other axes of difference if they want to design collaborative forest governance initiatives that are both participatory and inclusive.

  16. Enhancing the Quality of E-Learning in Virtual Learning Communities by Finding Quality Learning Content and Trustworthy Collaborators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Stephen J. H.; Chen, Irene Y. L.; Kinshuk; Chen, Nian-Shing

    2007-01-01

    Virtual learning communities encourage members to learn and contribute knowledge. However, knowledge sharing requires mutual-trust collaboration between learners and the contribution of quality knowledge. This task cannot be accomplished by simply storing learning content in repositories. It requires a mechanism to help learners find relevant…

  17. A case of web-based collaborative inquiry learning using OpenLearn technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Tractenberg, Leonel; Struchiner, Miriam; Okada, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    We describe and discuss the implementation of “WOPP in Cyberculture”, an elective discipline of the Erasmus Mundus’ European Master Program on Work, Organization and Personnel Psychology (WOPP), offered by the Faculty of Psychology, University of Coimbra, in 2008. We adopted a web-based collaborative inquiry-learning model supported by UK Open University’s OpenLearn technologies: a community-led virtual learning environment based on Moodle called LabSpace, and a knowledge mapping software cal...

  18. The Appropriation of Collaborative Learning : Qualitative Insights from a Flipped Classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Janson, Andreas; Söllner, Matthias; Leimeister, Jan Marco

    2016-01-01

    Collaborative learning is an important part of innovative learning scenarios such as flipped classrooms. However, little insights are available regarding the appropriation process of collaborative learning. Based on adaptive structuration theory, we derive insights on the appropriation process of collaborative learning by means of a qualitative approach. The results show that appropriation is characterized by initial appropriation and task-related discussions. Moreover, an analysis of the ide...

  19. Collaborative activities for improving the quality of science teaching and learning and learning to teach science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Kenneth

    2012-03-01

    I have been involved in research on collaborative activities for improving the quality of teaching and learning high school science. Initially the collaborative activities we researched involved the uses of coteaching and cogenerative dialogue in urban middle and high schools in Philadelphia and New York (currently I have active research sites in New York and Brisbane, Australia). The research not only transformed practices but also produced theories that informed the development of additional collaborative activities and served as interventions for research and creation of heuristics for professional development programs and teacher certification courses. The presentation describes a collage of collaborative approaches to teaching and learning science, including coteaching, cogenerative dialogue, radical listening, critical reflection, and mindful action. For each activity in the collage I provide theoretical frameworks and empirical support, ongoing research, and priorities for the road ahead. I also address methodologies used in the research, illustrating how teachers and students collaborated as researchers in multilevel investigations of teaching and learning and learning to teach that included ethnography, video analysis, and sophisticated analyses of the voice, facial expression of emotion, eye gaze, and movement of the body during classroom interactions. I trace the evolution of studies of face-to-face interactions in science classes to the current focus on emotions and physiological aspects of teaching and learning (e.g., pulse rate, pulse strength, breathing patterns) that relate to science participation and achievement.

  20. Undergraduate Students' Perceptions of Collaborative Learning in a Differential Equations Mathematics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajra, Sayonita Ghosh; Das, Ujjaini

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses collaborative learning strategies to examine students' perceptions in a differential equations mathematics course. Students' perceptions were analyzed using three collaborative learning strategies including collaborative activity, group-quiz and online discussion. The study results show that students identified both strengths and…

  1. Using Appropriate Digital Tools to Overcome Barriers to Collaborative Learning in Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardlow, Liane; Harm, Eian

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative learning provides students with vital opportunities to create and build knowledge. Existing technologies can facilitate collaborative learning. However, barriers exist to enacting collaborative practices related to the coverage of material for assessments and classroom management concerns, among others. Teachers can overcome these…

  2. Collaboration, Intragroup Conflict, and Social Skills in Project-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dabae; Huh, Yeol; Reigeluth, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    This case study was conducted in two high school classrooms that utilized collaborative project-based learning (PBL). Collaboration is an important instructional strategy, especially used in conjunction with PBL, and is an essential learning outcome for the twenty-first century. This study examined how collaboration can be achieved as a learning…

  3. Collaborative Action Research on Technology Integration for Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chien-Hsing; Ke, Yi-Ting; Wu, Jin-Tong; Hsu, Wen-Hua

    2012-02-01

    This paper briefly reports the outcomes of an action research inquiry on the use of blogs, MS PowerPoint [PPT], and the Internet as learning tools with a science class of sixth graders for project-based learning. Multiple sources of data were essential to triangulate the key findings articulated in this paper. Corresponding to previous studies, the incorporation of technology and project-based learning could motivate students in self-directed exploration. The students were excited about the autonomy over what to learn and the use of PPT to express what they learned. Differing from previous studies, the findings pointed to the lack information literacy among students. The students lacked information evaluation skills, note-taking and information synthesis. All these findings imply the importance of teaching students about information literacy and visual literacy when introducing information technology into the classroom. The authors suggest that further research should focus on how to break the culture of "copy-and-paste" by teaching the skills of note-taking and synthesis through inquiry projects for science learning. Also, further research on teacher professional development should focus on using collaboration action research as a framework for re-designing graduate courses for science teachers in order to enhance classroom technology integration.

  4. Supporting Communication in a Collaborative Discovery Learning Environment: the Effect of Instruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saab, Nadira; Joolingen, van Wouter R.; Hout-Wolters, van Bernadette H.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    We present a study on the effect of instruction on collaboration in a collaborative discovery learning environment. The instruction we used, called RIDE, is built upon four principles identified in the literature on collaborative processes: Respect, Intelligent collaboration, Deciding together, and

  5. Building information and communication competence in a collaborative learning environment (K3)

    OpenAIRE

    Bürger, Michael; Griesbaum, Joachim; Kuhlen, Rainer

    2003-01-01

    K3, work in progress, an acroncym for Kollaboration (collaboration), Kommunikation (communication) and Kompetenz (competence), will provide a knowledge management software that supports collaborative knowledge production in learning environments. The underlying hypothesis is that collaborative discourse conciliates information as well as communication competence in a better way than traditional methods of instruction. The collaborative, communicative paradigm of K3 is supported by asynchronou...

  6. Developing students’ collaborative skills in interdisciplinary learning environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gnaur, Dorina; Svidt, Kjeld; Thygesen, Maria

    2015-01-01

    in which professional learning is encouraged. The study is empirically grounded in a 3-day annual workshop that brings together students from all areas in the building sector including industry exponents to engage collaboratively in the processes of design and construction of a new building. The workshop......In the light of increasing demands on engineering curricula to integrate the development of professional skills in engineering education, this paper focuses on characteristics of effective educational environments and experiences for preparing students for future challenges by exploring ways...... is based on the principles of Building Information Modeling (BIM), which facilitate the coordination and collaboration between parties of a building design and construction team, and in this process, essential communication and interpersonal skills are mobilized and developed. Data about the students...

  7. Design Experiments in Japanese Elementary Science Education with Computer Support for Collaborative Learning: Hypothesis Testing and Collaborative Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Jun; Oshima, Ritsuko; Murayama, Isao; Inagaki, Shigenori; Takenaka, Makiko; Nakayama, Hayashi; Yamaguchi, Etsuji

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports design experiments on two Japanese elementary science lesson units in a sixth-grade classroom supported by computer support for collaborative learning (CSCL) technology as a collaborative reflection tool. We took different approaches in the experiments depending on their instructional goals. In the unit 'air and how things…

  8. University / Science Center Exhibit Development Collaboration: Strategies and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raddick, M. J.; Carliles, S.; Bartelme, L.; Patterson, J.

    2008-06-01

    Through funding from the NSF's Internship in Public Science Education (IPSE) program, Johns Hopkins University (JHU) and the Maryland Science Center (MSC) have worked together to create an exhibit based on JHU's research with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, a project to map the universe. The exhibit is a kiosk-based interactive presentation that connects to online data about the sky. It is currently displayed in SpaceLink, an area at the MSC that focuses on current events and research in astronomy. The person primarily responsible for the exhibit was a graduate student in computer science in the JHU Physics and Astronomy department. He worked with an EPO professional in the department and two members of the MSC's planetarium and exhibit staff to plan the exhibit. The team also worked with a coordinator in the JHU chemistry department, and an external evaluator. Along with increased public understanding of science, our goal was to create and evaluate a sustainable partnership between a research university and a local science center. We are producing an evaluation report discussing our collaboration and detailing lessons learned. We hope that our experience can be a model for other university / science center collaborations in the future. Some lessons that we have learned in our development effort are: start all design decisions with learning goals and objectives, write goals with evaluation in mind, focus on the process of science, and do not underestimate the challenges of working with the web as part of the exhibit technology.

  9. Integrating collaborative concept mapping in case based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Tifi

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Different significance of collaborative concept mapping and collaborative argumentation in Case Based Learning are discussed and compared in the different perspectives of answering focus questions, of fostering reflective thinking skills and in managing uncertainty in problem solving in a scaffolded environment. Marked differences are pointed out between the way concepts are used in constructing concept maps and the way meanings are adopted in case based learning through guided argumentation activities. Shared concept maps should be given different scopes, as for example a as an advance organizer in preparing a background system of concepts that will undergo transformation while accompanying the inquiry activities on case studies or problems; b together with narratives, to enhance awareness of the situated epistemologies that are being entailed in choosing certain concepts during more complex case studies, and c after-learning construction of a holistic vision of the whole domain by means of the most inclusive concepts, while scaffoldedcollaborative writing of narratives and arguments in describing-treating cases could better serve as a source of situated-inspired tools to create-refine meanings for particular concepts.

  10. Use of Collaborative Learning Technology to Support Cross-Faculty Group Learning

    OpenAIRE

    O'Kane, Colm; McDonnell, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The scope of applications of computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) has grown exponentially in recent years. This group of techniques has been found to be extremely effective as a collaborative tool to inspire scaffolding between students. It is also useful when several academic supervisors wish to view the same project work. This paper describes the process and the motivation behind the first implementation of a campus pack-based project in Year 3 of Dublin Institute of Technolo...

  11. Towards a Personalised, Learning Style Based Collaborative Blended Learning Model with Individual Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona BÉRES

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we aim to describe the process by which our personalised web-based collaborative teaching/learning methodology (CECIP - Collaboration - Evaluation - Critical thinking - Individual assessment - learner Profile evolved originating from Vygotsky's theory and based on the (C collaborative construction of student's knowledge, (E developing evaluation and assessment skills, (C developing critical thinking skills, (I integrating individual evaluation and (P generating learner profile. Our CECIP methodology integrates individual learning style dimensions and their preferences into e-learning environment by filling out MBTI, Gardner, GEFT and Felder-Silverman questionnaires during our four-semester-research. The paper covers the theoretical foundations of Learning Styles giving analogies to preferred learning strategies. A three-part-research process is described through which the described CECIP model emerged: (1 analysing Learning Styles and Learning Management Systems that claim to support their work; (2 raising the background knowledge of students in cognitive psychology in order to improve design and evaluation methodologies of multimedia learning materials; (3 personalising tasks and assessment based on Bloom's Taxonomy.

  12. Towards collaboration as learning: evaluation of an open CPD opportunity for HE teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrissi Nerantzi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Flexible, Distance and Online Learning (FDOL is an open online course offered as an informal cross-institutional collaboration based on a postgraduate module in the context of teacher education in higher education. The second iteration, FDOL132, was offered in 2013 using a problem-based learning (PBL design (FISh to foster collaborative learning. How this was experienced by participants and how it affected learning within facilitated small groups are explored in this paper. Findings show that authentic learning in groups can be applied directly to practice, and greater flexibility and a focus on the process of collaborative learning has the potential to increase engagement and learning.

  13. Social Regulation of Learning during Collaborative Inquiry Learning in Science: How Does It Emerge and What Are Its Functions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucan, Serkan; Webb, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Students' ability to regulate their learning is considered important for the quality of collaborative inquiry learning. However, there is still limited understanding about how students engage in social forms of regulation processes and what roles these regulatory processes may play during collaborative learning. The purpose of this study was to…

  14. Towards a Collaborative Open Environment of Project-Centred Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bongio, Aldo; van Bruggen, Jan; Ceri, Stefano;

    Nowadays, engineering studies are characterized by high mobility of students, lecturers and workforce and by the dynamics of multinational companies where “classes” or “students’ teams” composed of persons with different competencies and backgrounds, working together in projects to solve complex...... problems. Such an environment will become increasingly relevant in multinational universities and companies, and it has brought a number of challenges to existing e-learning technologies. COOPER is an ongoing project that focuses on developing and testing such a collaborative and project-centred leaning...

  15. Collaborative learning in engineering: A quest to improve student retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquard, Paul J.

    Colleges of engineering are concerned with retention of their undergraduates. Several studies have determined the reasons students leave engineering to major in other disciplines. The list includes poor teaching, a difficult curriculum, and a lack of belonging. This study alters the traditional lecture format of an engineering dynamics class by using a flipped classroom where scheduled class time emphasizes a collaborative learning pedagogy. Material coverage was facilitated with online lectures. After initiating this change, student attitudes and self-efficacy were measured as well as test performance and study time.

  16. Rethinking learning networks collaborative possibilities for a Deleuzian century

    CERN Document Server

    Kamp, Annelies

    2013-01-01

    In the face of today's complex policy challenges, various forms of 'joining-up' - networking, collaborating, partnering - have become key responses. However, institutions often fail to take advantage of the full benefits that joining-up offers. In this book, the author draws on ethnographic research into learning networks in post compulsory education and training in the state of Victoria, Australia, to explore why this might be the case and presents an argument for rethinking how joining-up works in practice. Throughout the book, Deleuzian concepts are engaged to forge a 'little complicating m

  17. Collaborative M-Learning Adoption Model: A Case Study for Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Alnabhan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates university students’ acceptance and readiness for adopting collaborative and context-aware mobile learning services. An acceptance evaluation study was conducted to identify challenges affecting successful implementation and adoption of collaborative m-learning system. The acceptance study has focused on learning contextual factors and learners requirements available at developing countries, where Jordan was considered as the case of this research. Results have confirmed that learning style, mobile device capability and perceived ease of use are having the most positive contribution towards learners’ behavior to use collaborative m-learning services. In light of the achieved results, this work provides a new user acceptance model focused toward the adoption of collaborative m-learning services. Finally, this research draws fundamental recommendations allowing for learning context adaptation and successful collaborative m-learning services implementation.

  18. Collaborative Digital Learning in Schools: Teacher Perceptions of Purpose and Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Roger; Smyth, Jane; Rickard, Angela; Quirk-Bolt, Nigel; Metcalfe, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    Research on the place of digital collaborative learning in schools has established its extensive use for the provision of online courses (Stevens, 2007), for learning within schools (Orech, 2009) and as a means of promoting inter-cultural education (Austin, 2006). Given that teachers' understanding and practice in collaborative learning is…

  19. Regulation during Cooperative and Collaborative Learning: A Theory-Based Review of Terms and Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoor, Cornelia; Narciss, Susanne; Körndle, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the terms and concepts that have been used for describing regulation of learning during cooperative and collaborative learning and suggests differentiating them on the basis of which parts of a regulatory feedback loop model are being shared. During cooperative and collaborative learning, not only self-regulation but also the…

  20. Development and Determination of Reliability and Validity of Professional Learning Community Collaborative Team Survey (CTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Joshua A.

    2013-01-01

    The study of transformative learning within collaborative teams was conducted to gain new applicable knowledge used to influence overall school improvement and implementation of professional learning communities. To obtain this new knowledge, the Professional Learning Community Collaborative Team Survey (CTS) was developed and psychometrically…

  1. An Information Processing Perspective on Divergence and Convergence in Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorczak, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model of collaborative learning that takes an information processing perspective of learning by social interaction. The collaborative information processing model provides a theoretical basis for understanding learning principles associated with social interaction and explains why peer-to-peer discussion is potentially more…

  2. Structuring and Regulating Collaborative Learning in Higher Education with Wireless Networks and Mobile Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvela, Sanna; Naykki, Piia; Laru, Jari; Luokkanen, Tiina

    2007-01-01

    In our recent research we have explored possibilities to scaffold collaborative learning in higher education with wireless networks and mobile tools. The pedagogical ideas are grounded on concepts of collaborative learning, including the socially shared origin of cognition, as well as self-regulated learning theory. This paper presents our three…

  3. Promoting College Student Development through Collaborative Learning: A Case Study of "Hevruta"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergom, Inger; Wright, Mary C.; Brown, Marie Kendall; Brooks, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Much has been written about the benefits of collaborative learning in terms of its impact on interpersonal skills and academic achievement. Many education studies suggest that students learn better when they work interactively with others and that retention of material is improved through collaborative learning. Others explain that the development…

  4. The Perceptions of Participation in a Mobile Collaborative Learning among Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shih-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    This study uses Facebook as a platform and arranges certain learning tasks to identify the feasibility of mobile collaborative learning for pre-service teachers. The pre-service teachers' sense of community and perceptions of collaborative learning are investigated. A total of 153 pre-service teachers volunteered to participate in an Intern Mobile…

  5. An Examination of Collaborative Learning Assessment through Dialogue (CLAD) in Traditional and Hybrid Human Development Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Wanda C.; Green, Peter J.; Fitch, Trey

    2010-01-01

    This investigation assessed the effectiveness of using Collaborative Learning Assessment through Dialogue (CLAD) (Fitch & Hulgin, 2007) with students in undergraduate human development courses. The key parts of CLAD are student collaboration, active learning, and altering the role of the instructor to a guide who enhances learning opportunities.…

  6. The Proposed Model of Collaborative Virtual Learning Environment for Introductory Programming Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Mahfudzah; Othman, Muhaini

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the proposed model of the collaborative virtual learning system for the introductory computer programming course which uses one of the collaborative learning techniques known as the "Think-Pair-Share". The main objective of this study is to design a model for an online learning system that facilitates the collaborative…

  7. Internal and external scripts in computer-supported collaborative inquiry learning

    OpenAIRE

    Kollar, Ingo; Fischer, Frank; Slotta, James D

    2007-01-01

    We investigated how differently structured external scripts interact with learners’ internal scripts concerning individual knowledge acquisition in a Web-based collaborative inquiry learning environment. 90 students from two secondary schools participated. Two versions of an external collaboration script (high vs. low structured) supporting collaborative argumentation were embedded within a Web-based collaborative inquiry learning environment. Students’ internal scripts were classified as eit...

  8. An Interactive Zoo Guide: A Case Study of Collaborative Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Hao

    2010-01-01

    Real Industry Projects and team work can have a great impact on student learning but providing these activities requires significant commitment from academics. It requires several years planning implementing to create a collaborative learning environment that mimics the real world ICT (Information and Communication Technology) industry workplace. In this project, staff from all the three faculties, namely the Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science, Faculty of Arts, Education and Human Development, and Faculty of Business and Law in higher education work together to establish a detailed project management plan and to develop the unit guidelines for participating students. The proposed project brings together students from business, multimedia and computer science degrees studying their three project-based units within each faculty to work on a relatively large IT project with our industry partner, Melbourne Zoo. This paper presents one multimedia software project accomplished by one of the multi-discipline...

  9. CosmoQuest Collaborative: Galvanizing a Dynamic Professional Learning Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, Whitney; Bracey, Georgia; Buxner, Sanlyn; Gay, Pamela L.; Noel-Storr, Jacob; CosmoQuest Team

    2016-10-01

    The CosmoQuest Collaboration offers in-depth experiences to diverse audiences around the nation and the world through pioneering citizen science in a virtual research facility. An endeavor between universities, research institutes, and NASA centers, CosmoQuest brings together scientists, educators, researchers, programmers—and citizens of all ages—to explore and make sense of our solar system and beyond. Leveraging human networks to expand NASA science, scaffolded by an educational framework that inspires lifelong learners, CosmoQuest engages citizens in analyzing and interpreting real NASA data, inspiring questions and defining problems.The QuestionLinda Darling-Hammond calls for professional development to be: "focused on the learning and teaching of specific curriculum content [i.e. NGSS disciplinary core ideas]; organized around real problems of practice [i.e. NGSS science and engineering practices] … [and] connected to teachers' collaborative work in professional learning community...." (2012) In light of that, what is the unique role CosmoQuest's virtual research facility can offer NASA STEM education?A Few AnswersThe CosmoQuest Collaboration actively engages scientists in education, and educators (and learners) in science. CosmoQuest uses social channels to empower and expand NASA's learning community through a variety of media, including science and education-focused hangouts, virtual star parties, and social media. In addition to creating its own supportive, standards-aligned materials, CosmoQuest offers a hub for excellent resources and materials throughout NASA and the larger astronomy community.In support of CosmoQuest citizen science opportunities, CQ initiatives (Learning Space, S-ROSES, IDEASS, Educator Zone) will be leveraged and shared through the CQPLN. CosmoQuest can be present and alive in the awareness its growing learning community.Finally, to make the CosmoQuest PLN truly relevant, it aims to encourage partnerships between scientists

  10. Teaching strategic and systems design to facilitate collaboration and learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Liem

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available As strategic and systems approaches are becoming more relevant in design education when it concerns collaborative projects with the industry, an explicit systems design methodology is needed to structure collaboration and learning among students, educators, and the Norwegian industry. This article describes three alternative studio projects for teaching strategic and systems design with the involvement of Norwegian companies. Besides this, the approaches and fundamental theories of design thinking and reasoning, which are characteristic of these projects, were reflected against each other. In the undergraduate (year 2 systems thinking design studio, the challenge was to train students to understand how system elements are rationally interconnected with their suprasystems and subsystems based on usability and man-machine interactions. In addition to the challenges pertaining to systems thinking, collabora­tive learning and designing based on a mentorship learning concept were introduced in the Vertical Design Studio, which involved second- and third-year students. Concerning the postgraduate fourth-year strategic design projects with the industry, the challenge was to involve Norwegian companies in product planning and goal finding as well as in innovation and design activities and to assess how supportive and receptive these companies were towards radical innovation/diversification. The analysis of completed projects shows that the Norwegian industry is supportive of strategic design but is rather conservative and risk averse when it concerns accepting and implementing radical innovation initiatives. Referring to user-centred and context-based innovation, this article also supports the implementation of a systems approach to facilitate social and hierarchical learning across the second-year systems design studio, second- and third-year vertical studios, and fourth-year strategic design studio.

  11. REVIEW: Cases on Collaboration In Virtual Learning Environments:
Processes and Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Reviewed by Yasin OZARSLAN

    2010-01-01

    Collaboration in Virtual Learning Environment brings meaningful learning interactions between learners in virtual environments. This book collects case studies of collaborative virtual learning environments focusing on the nature of human interactions in virtual spaces and defining the types and qualities of learning processes in these spaces from the perspectives of learners, teachers, designers, and professional and academic developers in various disciplines, learning communities and univer...

  12. Anthropology and Epidemiology: learning epistemological lessons through a collaborative venture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béhague, Dominique Pareja; Gonçalves, Helen; Victora, Cesar Gomes

    2008-01-01

    Collaboration between anthropology and epidemiology has a long and tumultuous history. Based on empirical examples, this paper describes a number of epistemological lessons we have learned through our experience of cross disciplinary collaboration. Although critical of both mainstream epidemiology and medical anthropology, our analysis focuses on the implications of addressing each discipline's main epistemological differences, while addressing the goal of adopting a broader social approach to health improvement. We believe it is important to push the boundaries of research collaborations from the more standard forms of "multidisciplinarity," to the adoption of theoretically imbued "interdisciplinarity." The more we challenge epistemological limitations and modify ways of knowing, the more we will be able to provide in-depth explanations for the emergence of disease-patterns and thus, to problem-solve. In our experience, both institutional support and the adoption of a relativistic attitude are necessary conditions for sustained theoretical interdisciplinarity. Until researchers acknowledge that methodology is merely a human-designed tool to interpret reality, unnecessary methodological hyper-specialization will continue to alienate one field of knowledge from the other.

  13. Constructing the Mode of Computer Supported Collaborative Learning in Food Science of Agriculture Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-juan Chu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we makes an attempt to find out the effect of applying Computer Supported Collaborative Learning to food science of agriculture research based on the Collaborative Learning Theory and the support of computer network technology. The mode of computer supported collaborative Learning in food science of agriculture research takes on far more advantages than the Product writing Approach, being beneficial to the development of students’ writing competence.

  14. Collaborative Learning: Group Interaction in an Intelligent Mobile-Assisted Multiple Language Learning System

    OpenAIRE

    Troussas, Christos; Virvou, Maria; Efthimios ALEPIS

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a student-oriented approach tailored to effective collaboration between students using mobile phones for language learning within the life cycle of an intelligent tutoring system. For this reason, in this research, a prototype mobile application has been developed for multiple language learning that incorporates intelligence in its modeling and diagnostic components. One of the primary aims of this research is the construction of student models which promote the misconcept...

  15. Social learning by whom? Assessing gendered opportunities for participation and social learning in collaborative forest governance

    OpenAIRE

    Felicitas Egunyu; Reed, Maureen G.

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative forest governance enables forest-based communities access to and management responsibilities for forestry resources. Researchers argue that processes that enable social learning have the potential to contribute to the sustainable management of forests by engaging local people, helping them identify their collective needs and gain access to resource entitlements, and encouraging them to learn about and implement different management options. Although there is considerable attenti...

  16. Collaborative Learning with Screen-Based Simulation in Health Care Education: An Empirical Study of Collaborative Patterns and Proficiency Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, L. O.; Soderstrom, T.; Ahlqvist, J.; Nilsson, T.

    2011-01-01

    This article is about collaborative learning with educational computer-assisted simulation (ECAS) in health care education. Previous research on training with a radiological virtual reality simulator has indicated positive effects on learning when compared to a more conventional alternative. Drawing upon the field of Computer-Supported…

  17. Collaborative e-Learning: e-Portfolios for Assessment, Teaching and Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wesel, Maarten

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an innovative approach to e-learning by exploring a number of initiatives where there is a move towards collaborative use of Personal Development Plans (PDPs) integrated with e-portfolios as mechanisms for delivering such plans. It considers whether such a move towards more produ

  18. Outcomes-Based Collaborative Teaching and Learning in Asian Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schalkwyk, Gertina J.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter explores the background and development of outcomes-based collaborative teaching and learning, and provides guidance for writing learning outcomes and engaging students in the Asian higher education context.

  19. Differential effects of problem-solving demands on individual and collaborative learning outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner, Femke; Paas, Fred; Kirschner, Paul A.; Janssen, Jeroen

    2011-01-01

    Kirschner, F., Paas, F., Kirschner, P. A., & Janssen, J. (2011). Differential effects of problem-solving demands on individual and collaborative learning outcomes. Learning and Instruction, 21, 587-599.

  20. How does feedback and peer feedback affect collaborative writing in a virtual learning environment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guasch, Teresa; Espasa, Anna; Alvarez, Ibis; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Guasch, T., Espasa, A., Alvarez, I., & Kirschner, P. A. (2011, 31 May). How does feedback and peer feedback affect collaborative writing in a virtual learning environment? Presentation at a Learning & Cognition meeting, Open Universiteit in the Netherlands, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  1. Epistemology of scientific inquiry and computer-supported collaborative learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkarainen, Kai Pekka Juhani

    1998-12-01

    The problem addressed in the study was whether 10- and 11-year-old children, collaborating within a computer-supported classroom, could learn a process of inquiry that represented certain principal features of scientific inquiry, namely (1) engagement in increasingly deep levels of explanation, (2) progressive generation of subordinate questions, and (3) collaborative effort to advance explanations. Technical infrastructure for the study was provided by the Computer-Supported Intentional Learning Environments, CSILE. The study was entirely based on qualitative content analysis of students' written productions posted to CSILE's database. Five studies were carried out to analyze CSILE students' process of inquiry. The first two studies aimed at analyzing changes in CSILE students' culture of inquiry in two CSILE classrooms across a three-year period. The results of the studies indicate that the classroom culture changed over three years following the introduction of CSILE. The explanatory level of knowledge produced by the students became increasingly deeper in tracking from the first to third year representing the first principal feature of scientific inquiry. Moreover, between-student communication increasingly focused on facilitating advancement of explanation (the third principal feature). These effects were substantial only in one classroom; the teacher of this class provided strong pedagogical support and epistemological guidance for the students. Detailed analysis of this classroom's inquiry, carried out in the last three studies, indicated that with teacher's guidance the students were able to produce meaningful intuitive explanations as well as go beyond the functional and empirical nature of their intuitive explanations and appropriate theoretical scientific explanations (the first principal feature). Advancement of the students' inquiry appeared to be closely associated with generation of new subordinate questions (the second principal feature) and peer

  2. An Interactive Zoo Guide: A case Study of Collaborative Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Shi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Real Industry Projects and team work can have a great impact on student learning but providing these activities requires significant commitment from academics. It requires several years planning implementing to create a collaborative learning environment that mimics the real world ICT (Information and Communication Technology industry workplace. In this project, staff from all the three faculties, namely the Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science, Faculty of Arts, Education and Human Development, and Faculty of Business and Law in higher education work together to establish a detailed project management plan and to develop the unit guidelines for participating students. The proposed project brings together students from business, multimedia and computer science degrees studying their three project-based units within each faculty to work on a relatively large IT project with our industry partner, Melbourne Zoo. This paper presents one multimedia software project accomplished by one of the multi-discipline student project teams. The project was called ‘Interactive ZooOz Guide’ and developed on a GPS-enabled PDA device in 2007. The developed program allows its users to navigate through the Zoo via an interactive map and provides multimedia information of animals on hotspots at the ‘Big Cats’ section of the Zoo so that it enriches user experience at the Zoo. A recent development in zoo applications is also reviewed. This paper is also intended to encourage academia to break boundaries to enhance students’ learning beyond classroom.

  3. Enhancing Collaborative and Meaningful Language Learning Through Concept Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Rita De Cássia Veiga; Torres, Patrícia Lupion

    This chapter aims to investigate new ways of foreign-language teaching/learning via a study of how concept mapping can help develop a student's reading, writing and oral skills as part of a blended methodology for language teaching known as LAPLI (Laboratorio de Aprendizagem de LInguas: The Language Learning Lab). LAPLI is a student-centred and collaborative methodology which encourages students to challenge their limitations and expand their current knowledge whilst developing their linguistic and interpersonal skills. We explore the theories that underpin LAPLI and detail the 12 activities comprising its programme with specify reference to the use of "concept mapping". An innovative table enabling a formative and summative assessment of the concept maps is formulated. Also presented are some of the qualitative and quantitative results achieved when this methodology was first implemented with a group of pre-service students studying for a degree in English and Portuguese languages at the Catholic University of Parana (PUCPR) in Brazil. The contribution of concept mapping and LAPLI to an under standing of language learning along with a consideration of the difficulties encountered in its implementation with student groups is discussed and suggestions made for future research.

  4. An Interactive Zoo Guide: A Case Study of Collaborative Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Shi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Real Industry Projects and team work can have a great impact on student learning but providing theseactivities requires significant commitment from academics. It requires several years planningimplementing to create a collaborative learning environment that mimics the real world ICT (Informationand Communication Technology industry workplace. In this project, staff from all the three faculties,namely the Faculty of Health, Engineering and Science, Faculty of Arts, Education and HumanDevelopment, and Faculty of Business and Law in higher education work together to establish a detailedproject management plan and to develop the unit guidelines for participating students. The proposedproject brings together students from business, multimedia and computer science degrees studying theirthree project-based units within each faculty to work on a relatively large IT project with our industrypartner, Melbourne Zoo. This paper presents one multimedia software project accomplished by one of themulti-discipline student project teams. The project was called ‘Interactive ZooOz Guide’ and developedon a GPS-enabled PDA device in 2007. The developed program allows its users to navigate through theZoo via an interactive map and provides multimedia information of animals on hotspots at the ‘Big Cats’section of the Zoo so that it enriches user experience at the Zoo. A recent development in zoo applicationsis also reviewed. This paper is also intended to encourage academia to break boundaries to enhancestudents’ learning beyond classroom.

  5. Professional learning communities: Teachers working collaboratively for continuous improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Louise Ann

    Current research indicates that a professional learning community (PLC) is an effective means for helping teachers to bridge the gap between research and practice. A PLC is a team of educators systematically working together to improve teaching practice and student learning. This study evaluated the PLC formed by teachers at a public elementary school. A 2-part formative assessment was conducted: an implementation evaluation to determine if PLC practices were in place and an evaluation to determine the PLC's progress towards meeting its goals. The PLC consisted of 6 4th grade and 5th grade teachers working to increase their science content and pedagogical knowledge. The foundation of this PLC was based in 4 areas of educational research and theory: constructivism, social learning, multiple intelligences, and differentiated instruction. Data were collected by means of interviews, participant observation, and analysis of artifacts. Data were then analyzed using an iterative set of phases: data reduction, data display, conclusion drawing and verification. The implementation evaluation showed that the PLC was in the developing stage. The progress evaluation showed that the PLC was making significant progress towards its goals of increased collaboration and pedagogical knowledge, but there was insufficient evidence to determine if participants' science content knowledge improved. An executive summary of the results and recommendations was presented to the stakeholders. The positive social change implications include knowledge useful for educators who are searching for direction in improving the quality of professional development offered to elementary teachers.

  6. Collaborative Learning and Authoring in the Frame of e-Projects

    OpenAIRE

    Totkov, George; Denev, Daniel; Doneva, Rositsa; Sokolova, Mariana

    2008-01-01

    It is presented a research on the application of a collaborative learning and authoring during all delivery phases of e-learning programmes or e-courses offered by educational institutions. The possibilities for modelling of an e-project as a specific management process based on planned, dynamically changing or accidentally arising sequences of learning activities, is discussed. New approaches for project-based and collaborative learning and authoring are presented. Special ty...

  7. The Comparison of Solitary and Collaborative Modes of Game-Based Learning on Students' Science Learning and Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Huei; Wang, Kuan-Chieh; Lin, Yu-Hsuan

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated and compared solitary and collaborative modes of game-based learning in promoting students' science learning and motivation. A total of fifty seventh grade students participated in this study. The results showed that students who played in a solitary or collaborative mode demonstrated improvement in learning…

  8. The role of perceived popularity on collaborative learning: A dyadic perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gommans, R.; Segers, P.C.J.; Burk, W.J.; Scholte, R.H.J.

    2015-01-01

    The current study investigated how perceived popularity and collaboration quality were associated with knowledge gain of adolescents during a collaborative learning task. Participants included 264 children ages 10-12 years (52.3% boys), who collaborated 3 times in same-sex dyads on a computer assign

  9. A Qualitative Case Study of Teachers' Perceptions of Professional Learning through Mandated Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, Barbara C.

    2016-01-01

    Teacher collaboration is a school improvement priority that has the potential to positively impact student learning by building the capacity of teachers. In some states, teacher collaboration is mandated by legislation. The literature indicates that policy-driven collaboration in a top-down approach results in unintentional consequences and…

  10. Effects of Mobile Instant Messaging on Collaborative Learning Processes and Outcomes: The Case of South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyewon; Lee, MiYoung; Kim, Minjeong

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the effects of mobile instant messaging on collaborative learning processes and outcomes. The collaborative processes were measured in terms of different types of interactions. We measured the outcomes of the collaborations through both the students' taskwork and their teamwork. The collaborative…

  11. Using an Intelligent Tutoring System to Support Collaborative as well as Individual Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Jennifer K.; Belenky, Daniel M.; Aleven, Vincent; Rummel, Nikol

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative learning has been shown to be beneficial for older students, but there has not been much research to show if these results transfer to elementary school students. In addition, collaborative and individual modes of instruction may be better for acquiring different types of knowledge. Collaborative Intelligent Tutoring Systems (ITS)…

  12. Collaborative learning through formative peer review: pedagogy, programs and potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søndergaard, Harald; Mulder, Raoul A.

    2012-12-01

    We examine student peer review, with an emphasis on formative practice and collaborative learning, rather than peer grading. Opportunities to engage students in such formative peer assessment are growing, as a range of online tools become available to manage and simplify the process of administering student peer review. We consider whether pedagogical requirements for student peer review are likely to be discipline-specific, taking computer science and software engineering as an example. We then summarise what attributes are important for a modern generic peer review tool, and classify tools according to four prevalent emphases, using currently available, mature tools to illustrate each. We conclude by identifying some gaps in current understanding of formative peer review, and discuss how online tools for student peer review can help create opportunities to answer some of these questions.

  13. Challenges and Prospects of Exchange Activities and Collaborative Learning Towards the Construction of Inclusive Education System : Focusing on eff ective methods of collaborative learning in the future

    OpenAIRE

    Kawai, Norimune; Nosaki, Hitomi

    2014-01-01

    Various studies on Exchange Activities have been conducted and revealed many instruction methods to promote exchanging between students with disabilities and those without disabilities. However, for Collaborative Learning that takes place in children between those students, the number of research studies are limited despite the fact that the importance of research on Collaborative Learning has been pointed out by many researchers and teachers. In this study, the nature of Exchange Activities ...

  14. Collaborative Learning in a Boundary Zone: A Case Study of Innovative Inter-institutional Collaboration in Israel

    OpenAIRE

    Edith Tabak; Ilana Margolin

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study focused on the collaboration between a school district and a college of education in Israel and aimed to explore how the participants created common understanding in order to promote educational change. The theoretical approach involved analyzing the institutional interconnections based on boundary practices and boundary objects and the ways these interconnections shaped the collaborative learning process, promoted educational change, and fostered educational leadership...

  15. The Role of the Constructivist Learning Theory and Collaborative Learning Environment on Wiki Classroom, and the Relationship between Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Ibraheem; Woollard, John

    2013-01-01

    This paper seeks to discover the relationship between both the social constructivist learning theory and the collaborative learning environment. This relationship can be identified by giving an example of the learning environment. Due to wiki characteristics, Wiki technology is one of the most famous learning environments that can show the…

  16. A MOBILE-DEVICE-SUPPORTED PEER-ASSISTED LEARNING SYSTEM FOR COLLABORATIVE EARLY EFL READING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ju Lan

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative learning methods which emphasize peer interaction have been widely applied to increase the intensity and effectiveness of EFL reading programs. However, simply grouping students heterogeneously and assigning them group goals does not guarantee that effective collaborative learning will ensue. The present research includes two studies. In Study One, the weaknesses of collaborative learning in a traditional EFL setting were observed. Then, in Study Two, a mobile-device-supported peer-assisted learning (MPAL system was developed for the purpose of addressing the identified weaknesses. Two classes of twenty-six third grade students participated in the present research to examine the unique contribution of MPAL to collaborative EFL reading activities. The collaborative behavior of elementary EFL learners was videotaped and analyzed. Detailed analysis of the videotaped behavior indicated that MPAL helped improve collaboration in elementary school level EFL learners and promotes their reading motivation.

  17. The Impact of Integrated Coaching and Collaboration within an Inquiry Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragon, Toby

    2013-01-01

    This thesis explores the design and evaluation of a collaborative, inquiry learning Intelligent Tutoring System for ill-defined problem spaces. The common ground in the fields of Artificial Intelligence in Education and Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning is investigated to identify ways in which tutoring systems can employ both automated…

  18. How Can Teachers' Entrepreneurial Competences Be Developed? A Collaborative Learning Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltonen, Katariina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of collaborative learning in the development of teachers' entrepreneurial competences in the school context at primary, secondary and vocational levels of education. Design/methodology/approach: The research is based on an interpretative and collaborative learning approach to teachers'…

  19. The Effect of Collaborative Learning and Self-Assessment on Self-Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatami, Ali

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of teacher assistants' collaborative learning and learners' self-assessment on self-regulation and academic achievement at high levels have been investigated. Collaborative learning teaching method (Jigsaw and teacher assistant) is used for one group and the other group had also the same as well as learners'…

  20. Teacher Competencies for the Implementation of Collaborative Learning in the Classroom: A Framework and Research Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaendler, Celia; Wiedmann, Michael; Rummel, Nikol; Spada, Hans

    2015-01-01

    This article describes teacher competencies for implementing collaborative learning in the classroom. Research has shown that the effectiveness of collaborative learning largely depends on the quality of student interaction. We therefore focus on what a "teacher" can do to foster student interaction. First, we present a framework that…

  1. Technology Trends in Mobile Computer Supported Collaborative Learning in Elementary Education from 2009 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapina, Mia; Boticki, Ivica

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyses mobile computer supported collaborative learning in elementary education worldwide focusing on technology trends for the period from 2009 to 2014. The results present representation of device types used to support collaborative activities, their distribution per users (1:1 or 1:m) and if students are learning through or around…

  2. Using Five Stage Model to Design of Collaborative Learning Environments in Second Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Sevil; Karaman, M. Kemal

    2014-01-01

    Specifically Second Life (SL) among virtual worlds draws attention of researchers to form collaborative learning environments (Sutcliffe & Alrayes, 2012) since it could be used as a rich platform to simulate a real environment containing many collaborative learning characteristics and interaction tools within itself. Five Stage Model (FSM)…

  3. Deposing the "Tyranny of Extroverts": Collaborative Learning in the Traditional Classroom Format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Elizabeth A.

    2000-01-01

    Describes in detail the design and implementation of a collaborative learning project in a Constitutional law class, then uses education and social science research to explore how best to create and implement a collaborative learning project. Relates the research to the experience of the class project. (EV)

  4. Enhancing socially shared regulation in collaborative learning groups: Designing for CSCL regulation tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Järvelä, Sanna; Kirschner, Paul; Panadero, Ernesto; Malmberg, Jonna; Phielix, Chris; Jaspers, Jos; Koivuniemi, Marika; Järvenoja, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    For effective computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL), socially shared regulation of learning (SSRL) is necessary. To this end, this article extends the idea first posited by Järvelä and Hadwin (Educ Psychol 48(1):25–39, 2013) that successful collaboration in CSCL contexts requires targeted

  5. Detecting and Understanding the Impact of Cognitive and Interpersonal Conflict in Computer Supported Collaborative Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, David Nadler; Baker, Ryan S. J. d.; Costa, Evandro d. B.; Rose, Carolyn P.; Cui, Yue; de Carvalho, Adriana M. J. B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a model which can automatically detect a variety of student speech acts as students collaborate within a computer supported collaborative learning environment. In addition, an analysis is presented which gives substantial insight as to how students' learning is associated with students' speech acts, knowledge that will…

  6. Blogging to Enhance In-Service Teachers' Professional Learning and Development during Collaborative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciampa, Katia; Gallagher, Tiffany L.

    2015-01-01

    Blogging has been recommended as a suitable tool for teacher professional learning due to its associated utility in collaborative learning, reflection, communication, and social support. In this study, blogging was incorporated into a collaborative inquiry project involving elementary and secondary teachers. In examining the frequency and nature…

  7. College Students' Perceptions of Short Message Service-Supported Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani-Miandashti, Naser; Ataei, Pouria

    2015-01-01

    Interaction is a major success factor that affects collaborative learning. This study examined the perceptions of college students about short message service (SMS) supported collaborative learning. Seventy-five BSc students from three classes were asked to cooperate on group assignments. The participants used their mobile phones to exchange text…

  8. Role of the Teacher in Computer-Supported Collaborative Inquiry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urhahne, Detlef; Schanze, Sascha; Bell, Thorsten; Mansfield, Amie; Holmes, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    The article presents an analysis of practices in teaching with computer-supported collaborative inquiry learning environments. We describe the role of the teacher in computer-supported collaborative inquiry learning by five principles that span the whole instructional process, from the preparation of the lesson up to the assessment of learning…

  9. Complexity Science and Professional Learning for Collaboration: A Critical Reconsideration of Possibilities and Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Tara

    2012-01-01

    Professionals increasingly must collaborate very closely, such as through inter-professional work arrangements. This involves learning both "in" and "for" collaboration. Some educational researchers have turned to complexity science to better understand these learning dynamics. This discussion asks, How useful is complexity science for examining…

  10. Preparing Graduates for Work in the Creative Industries: A Collaborative Learning Approach for Design Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Morag; Littlejohn, Allison; Allan, Malcolm

    2012-01-01

    Interest in the use of collaborative learning strategies in higher education is growing as educators seek better ways to prepare students for the workplace. In design education, teamwork and creativity are particularly valued; successful collaborative learning depends on knowledge sharing between students, and there is increasing recognition that…

  11. Working Together: How Teachers Teach and Students Learn in Collaborative Learning Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Burns

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Active Learning in Maths and Science (ALMS was a six-month face-to-face professional development program for middle school maths and science teachers carried out between June and November, 2010 in two Indian states. ALMS’s theory of action is grounded in the belief that collaborative learning serves as a “gateway” to learner-centered instruction. Designers theorized that this shift from individual to collaborative learning would redefine the teacher’s role; alter the teacher and student relationship; change teachers’ organizational, instructional and assessment practices; and begin to lay the groundwork for an eventual shift toward full learner-centered instruction. As this paper will discuss, this proposed theory of action was largely confirmed. Over 80 percent of teachers across the two states regularly implemented collaborative learning techniques and began the larger journey toward learner-centered instruction. This implementation also resulted in a number of benefits for students, including greater levels of engagement, increased confidence, and improved behavior. The research also suggests that when teachers see positive changes as a result of their actions, their deeply-held beliefs about traditional instruction may conflict with what they in fact witnessed in their classrooms. This is the beginning of the evolution of change.

  12. Peer Assignment Review Process for Collaborative E-learning: Is the Student Learning Process Changing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Kigozi Kahiigi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years collaborative e-learning has been emphasized as a learning method that has facilitated knowledge construction and supported student learning. However some universities especially in developing country contexts are struggling to attain minimal educational benefits from its adoption and use. This paper investigates the application of a peer assignment review process for collaborative e-learning to third year undergraduate students. The study was aimed at evaluating the effect of the peer assignment review process on the student learning process. Data was collected using a survey questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS Version 16.0. While the student reported positive impact of the peer assignment review process in terms of facilitating students to put more effort and improve their work; quick feedback on their assignments; effective sharing and development of knowledge and information and the need of computer competence to manipulate the peer assignment review system, analysis of the quantitative data indicated that the process had limited effect on the learning process. This is attributed to lack of review skills, absence of lecturer scaffolding, low ICT literacy levels and change management.

  13. Introducing the Collaborative E-Learning Design Method (CoED)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Buus, Lillian; Nyvang, Tom;

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, a specific learning design method is introduced and explained, namely the Collaborative E-learning Design method (CoED), which has been developed through various projects in “e-Learning Lab – Centre for User Driven Innovation, Learning and Design” (Nyvang & Georgsen, 2007). We...

  14. Risky Business or Sharing the Load?--Social Flow in Collaborative Mobile Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hokyoung; Parsons, David

    2012-01-01

    Mobile learning has been built upon the premise that we can transform traditional classroom or computer-based learning activities into a more ubiquitous and connected form of learning. Tentative outcomes from this assertion have been witnessed in many collaborative learning activities, but few analytic observations on what triggers this…

  15. Global Teamwork: A Study of Design Learning in Collaborative Virtual Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Gül, Leman Figen; Wang, Xiangyu; Bülbül, Tanyel Türkaslan; Çağdaş, Gülen; Tong, Hakan

    2009-01-01

    With the recent developments in communication and information technologies, using Collaborative Virtual Environments (CVEs) in design activity has experienced a remarkable increase. In this paper we present a collaborative learning activity between the University of Sydney (USYD), and the Istanbul Technical University (ITU). This paper shares our teaching experience and discusses the principles of collaborative design learning in virtual environments. Followed by a study on students’ percepti...

  16. LEARNERS AND COLLABORATIVE LEARNING IN VIRTUAL WORLDS: A Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    HANEWALD, Ria

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present selected literature on learners and collaborative learning in virtual worlds. Research in virtual worlds on collaborative learners is gradually emerging and will gain in significance, particularly in online and distance education environments. It will be argued that the design and functionality of virtual worlds provides a platform for collaboration, particularly for learners that have grown up with digitalized learning environments and may have develop...

  17. Wiring Role Taking in Collaborative Learning Environments. SNA and Semantic Web can improve CSCL script?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Capuano

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the past years the concept of role in distance education has become a promising construct for analysing and facilitating collaborative processes and outcomes. Designing effective collaborative learning processes is a complex task that can be supported by existing good practices formulated as pedagogical patterns or scripts. Over the past years, the research on technology enhanced learning has shown that collaborative scripts for learning act as mediating artefacts not only designing educational scenarios but also structuring and prescribing roles and activities. Conversely, existing learning systems are not able to provide dynamic role management in the definition and execution of collaborative scripts. This work proposes the application of Social Network Analysis in order to evaluate the expertise level of a learner when he/she is acting, with an assigned role, within the execution of a collaborative script. Semantic extensions to both IMS Learning Design and Information Packaging specifications are also proposed to support roles management.

  18. Garden Learning: A Study on European Botanic Gardens' Collaborative Learning Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Kapelari, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    "From 2007-2013 the European 7th Framework Program Science in Society (FP7) funded a multitude of formal and informal educational institutions to join forces and engage in alternative ways to teach science—inside and outside the classroom—all over Europe. This book reports on one of these projects named INQUIRE which was developed and implemented to support 14 Botanic Gardens and Natural History Museums in 11 European countries, to establish a collaborative learning network and expand their u...

  19. Social and cognitive factors driving teamwork in collaborative learning environments : Team learning beliefs and behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Bossche, P. van den; Segers, Mien; Kirschner, P.A.

    2006-01-01

    A team is more than a group of people in the same space, physical or virtual. In recent years, increasing attention has been devoted to the social bases of cognition, taking into consideration how social processes in groups and teams affect performance. This article investigates when and how teams in collaborative learning environments engage in building and maintaining mutually shared cognition, leading to increased perceived performance. In doing so, this research looks for discourse practi...

  20. Collaborative Learning in Problem Solving: A Case Study in Metacognitive Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly L. Wismath

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Problem solving and collaborative communication are among the key 21st century skills educators want students to develop. This paper presents results from a study of the collaborative work patterns of 133 participants from a university level course designed to develop transferable problem-solving skills. Most of the class time in this course was spent on actually solving puzzles, with minimal direct instruction; students were allowed to work either independently or in small groups of two or more, as they preferred, and to move back and forth between these two modalities as they wished. A distinctive student-driven pattern blending collaborative and independent endeavour was observed, consistently over four course offerings in four years. We discuss a number of factors which appear to be related to this variable pattern of independent and collaborative enterprise, including the thinking and learning styles of the individuals, the preference of the individuals, the types of problems being worked on, and the stage in a given problem at which students were working. We also consider implications of these factors for the teaching of problem solving, arguing that the development of collaborative problem solving abilities is an important metacognitive skill.

  1. Collaborative Group Learning using the SCALE-UP Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Gerald

    2011-10-01

    The time-honored conventional lecture (``teaching by telling'') has been shown to be an ineffective mode of instruction for science classes. In these cases, where the enhancement of critical thinking skills and the development of problem-solving abilities are emphasized, collaborative group learning environments have proven to be far more effective. In addition, students naturally improve their teamwork skills through the close interaction they have with their group members. Early work on the Studio Physics model at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in the mid-1990's was extended to large classes via the SCALE-UP model pioneered at North Carolina State University a few years later. In SCALE-UP, students sit at large round tables in three groups of three --- in this configuration, they carry out a variety of pencil/paper exercises (ponderables) using small whiteboards and perform hands-on activities like demos and labs (tangibles) throughout the class period. They also work on computer simulations using a shared laptop for each group of three. Formal lecture is reduced to a minimal level and the instructor serves more as a ``coach'' to facilitate the academic ``drills'' that the students are working on. Since its inception in 1997, the SCALE-UP pedagogical approach has been adopted by over 100 institutions across the country and about 20 more around the world. In this talk, I will present an overview of the SCALE-UP concept and I will outline the details of its deployment at George Washington University over the past 4 years. I will also discuss empirical data from assessments given to the SCALE-UP collaborative classes and the regular lecture classes at GWU in order to make a comparative study of the effectiveness of the two methodologies.

  2. The Role of the Teacher in Computer-Supported Collaborative Inquiry Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Urhahne, Detlef; Schanze, Sascha; Bell, Thorsten; Mansfield, Amie; Holmes, Jeff

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The article presents an analysis of practices in teaching with computer-supported collaborative inquiry learning environments. We describe the role of the teacher in computer-supported collaborative inquiry learning by five principles which span the whole instructional process, from the preparation of the lesson up to the assessment of learning achievement. For successful implementation of computer-supported projects the teacher has to (1) envision the lesson, (2) enable c...

  3. Collaborative M-Learning Adoption Model: A Case Study for Jordan

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Alnabhan; Yousef Aljaraideh

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates university students’ acceptance and readiness for adopting collaborative and context-aware mobile learning services. An acceptance evaluation study was conducted to identify challenges affecting successful implementation and adoption of collaborative m-learning system. The acceptance study has focused on learning contextual factors and learners requirements available at developing countries, where Jordan was considered as the case of this research. Results have confirme...

  4. Using multimedia and peer assessment to promote collaborative e-learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra, Enrique; Aguirre Herrera, Sandra; Ygnacio Pastor Caño, Jose; Quemada Vives, Juan

    2014-04-01

    Collaborative e-learning is increasingly appealing as a pedagogical approach that can positively affect student learning. We propose a didactical model that integrates multimedia with collaborative tools and peer assessment to foster collaborative e-learning. In this paper, we explain it and present the results of its application to the "International Seminars on Materials Science" online course. The proposed didactical model consists of five educational activities. In the first three, students review the multimedia resources proposed by the teacher in collaboration with their classmates. Then, in the last two activities, they create their own multimedia resources and assess those created by their classmates. These activities foster communication and collaboration among students and their ability to use and create multimedia resources. Our purpose is to encourage the creativity, motivation, and dynamism of the learning process for both teachers and students.

  5. Comparison of Mathematics Performance of First-Year High School Students in Collaborative Learning and Formative Evaluation Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Mozhgan Saghafikia; Mohammad Hassan Behzadi

    2015-01-01

    Educational system of Iran is suffering from the lack of active learning methods due to various reasons. Active learning methods motivate students to think and learn. One of these methods is collaborative learning which is more efficient than individual learning and develops a positive attitude in students toward teaching and learning. Another method is formative evaluation which enhances learning process. In this paper we investigate collaborative learning and formative evaluation in distinc...

  6. Universal Collaboration Strategies for Signal Detection: A Sparse Learning Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Khanduri, Prashant; Kailkhura, Bhavya; Thiagarajan, Jayaraman J.; Varshney, Pramod K.

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of high dimensional signal detection in a large distributed network whose nodes can collaborate with their one-hop neighboring nodes (spatial collaboration). We assume that only a small subset of nodes communicate with the Fusion Center (FC). We design optimal collaboration strategies which are universal for a class of deterministic signals. By establishing the equivalence between the collaboration strategy design problem and sparse PCA, we solve the problem e...

  7. Bridging the Gap between Students and Computers: Supporting Activity Awareness for Network Collaborative Learning with GSM Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.-C.; Tao, S.-Y.; Nee, J.-N.

    2008-01-01

    The internet has been widely used to promote collaborative learning among students. However, students do not always have access to the system, leading to doubt in the interaction among the students, and reducing the effectiveness of collaborative learning, since the web-based collaborative learning environment relies entirely on the availability…

  8. Collaborative Learning through Formative Peer Review with Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Carrie Diaz; Wade, Stephanie

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes a collaboration between a mathematician and a compositionist who developed a sequence of collaborative writing assignments for calculus. This sequence of developmentally appropriate assignments presents peer review as a collaborative process that promotes reflection, deepens understanding, and improves exposition. First, we…

  9. Examining the Roles of Blended Learning Approaches in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) Environments: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Hyo-Jeong; Bonk, Curtis J.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a Delphi method was used to identify and predict the roles of blended learning approaches in computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environments. The Delphi panel consisted of experts in online learning from different geographic regions of the world. This study discusses findings related to (a) pros and cons of blended…

  10. A Semantic Web-Based Authoring Tool to Facilitate the Planning of Collaborative Learning Scenarios Compliant with Learning Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isotani, Seiji; Mizoguchi, Riichiro; Isotani, Sadao; Capeli, Olimpio M.; Isotani, Naoko; de Albuquerque, Antonio R. P. L.; Bittencourt, Ig. I.; Jaques, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    When the goal of group activities is to support long-term learning, the task of designing well-thought-out collaborative learning (CL) scenarios is an important key to success. To help students adequately acquire and develop their knowledge and skills, a teacher can plan a scenario that increases the probability for learning to occur. Such a…

  11. Design Guidelines for Collaboration and Participation with Examples from the LN4LD (Learning Network for Learning Design)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgos, Daniel; Hummel, Hans; Tattersall, Colin; Brouns, Francis; Koper, Rob

    2007-01-01

    Burgos, D., Hummel, H. G. K., Tattersall, C., Brouns, F., & Koper, R. (2009). Design Guidelines for Collaboration and Participation with Examples from the LN4LD (Learning Network for Learning Design). In L. Lockyer, S. Bennett, S. Agostinho & B. Harper (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Learning Design

  12. Supporting Problem Solving with Case-Stories Learning Scenario and Video-based Collaborative Learning Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Hu

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we suggest that case-based resources, which are used for assisting cognition during problem solving, can be structured around the work of narratives in social cultural psychology. Theories and other research methods have proposed structures within narratives and stories which may be useful to the design of case-based resources. Moreover, embedded within cases are stories which are contextually rich, supporting the epistemological groundings of situated cognition. Therefore the purposes of this paper are to discuss possible frameworks of case-stories; derive design principles as to “what” constitutes a good case story or narrative; and suggest how technology can support story-based learning. We adopt video-based Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL technology to support problem solving with case-stories learning scenarios. Our hypothesis in this paper is that well-designed case-based resources are able to aid in the cognitive processes undergirding problem solving and meaning making. We also suggest the use of an emerging video-based collaborative learning technology to support such an instructional strategy.

  13. Virtual SceneBean: a Learning Object Model for Collaborative Virtual Learning Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinan FIAIDHI

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly agreed that a well-balanced mix of collaboration, training and simulation eventually produce a superior learner. Today's collaborative design and learning environments integrate variety of interactive objects as well as many technological aspects to achieve such balance. Unfortunately, the actual profit of the resulting learning systems is largely reduced by poorly represented interactive objects as well as poor interlinking between such objects. In particular, such objects appear isolated: they neither can be modified sufficiently (e.g., by choosing parameters or enhancing functionality nor be interlinked properly with their context (e.g., by synchronizing with a guided tour or metadata. We are presenting in this article a model for representing virtual and 3D scenes as learning objects. The model utilizes notions and techniques based on Scene Graphs, X3D, Java3D, and SceneBeans. The prototype accompanied with a simple client-server protocol for exchanging and viewing the 3D SceneBeans. This research aims to extend this protocol by utilizing Sun JXTA primitives to link to the POOL of other learning objects repositories.

  14. Working Together: Librarian and Student Collaboration for Active Learning in a Library Eclassroom

    OpenAIRE

    Marcie Lynne Jacklin; Heather Pfaff

    2010-01-01

    Active learning strategies based on several learning theories were incorporated during instruction sessions for second year Biological Sciences students. The instructional strategies described in this paper are based primarily on sociocultural and collaborative learning theory, with the goal being to expand the relatively small body of literature currently available that discusses the application of these learning theories to library instruction. The learning strategies employed successfully ...

  15. Utilizing the Active and Collaborative Learning Model in the Introductory Physics Course

    OpenAIRE

    Nam, Nguyen H.

    2014-01-01

    Model of active and collaborative learning applied in training specific subject makes clear advantage due to the goals of knowledge, skills that students got to develop successful future job. The author exploits the learning management system of Hanoi National University of Education to establish a learning environment in the Introductory Physics course Part 2, which supports to the blended learning, for the 1st year student. The method of pattern languages is taken to redesign learning conte...

  16. Exploring students' learning effectiveness and attitude in Group Scribbles-supported collaborative reading activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, C. P.; Lin, Chih-Cheng; Chen, W.;

    2014-01-01

    Improving students' reading comprehension is of significance. In this study, collaborative learning supported by Group Scribbles (GS), a networked technology, was integrated into a primary reading class. Forty-seven 10-year-old students from two 4th grade classes participated in the study....... Experimental and control groups were established to investigate the effectiveness of GS-supported collaborative learning in enhancing students' reading comprehension. The results affirmed the effectiveness of the intervention designed. In the experiment group, students' learning attitudes, motivation...... and interest were enhanced as well. Further analyses were done to probe students' interaction processes in the networked collaborative classroom and different collaboration patterns and behaviours were identified. Based on the findings obtained, implications for future learning design to empower L1 learning...

  17. Obstacle of Team Teaching and Collaborative Learning in Information Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marn-Ling Shing

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The field of information security includes diverse contents such as network security and computer forensics which are highly technical-oriented topics. In addition, information forensic requires the background of criminology. The information security also includes non-technical content such as information ethics and security laws. Because the diverse nature of information security, Shing et al. has proposed the use of team teaching and collaborative learning for the information security classes. Although team teaching seems to be efficient in information security, practically it needs a few challenges. The Purdue's case mentioned in Shing's paper has funding support of National Security Agency (NSA. However, a vast amount of resources may not be available for an instructor in a normal university. In addition, many obstacles are related to the administration problems. For example, how are the teaching evaluations computed if there are multiple instructors for a single course? How will instructors in a computer forensics class prepare students (criminal justice majors and information technology majors before taking the same class with diverse background? The paper surveyed approximately 25 students in a university in Virginia concerning the satisfaction of team-teaching. Finally, this paper describes ways to meet those challenges.

  18. Physics, Dyslexia and Learning: A Collaboration for Disabled Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskal, Barbara M.; Wright, Lyndsey; Taylor, P. C.

    2014-03-01

    Researchers have found that children with dyslexia reason differently with respect to language from those who do not have dyslexia. Dyslexic students' brains work differently than do students without dyslexia. Some researchers speculate that these differences provide dyslexic students with an advantage in science. The presentation will describe an outreach activity which developed and delivered instructional modules in physics to students in grades kindergarten through sixth. These modules were tested on thirty students who attended a summer camp designed for students who have been diagnosed with dyslexia. Eighty percent of students who have learning disabilities have dyslexia. Many of the students who attended this camp have experienced repeated failure in the traditional school system, which emphasizes literacy with little attention to science. A number of science and engineering professors collaborated with this camp to build instructional modules that were delivered one hour per day, during two weeks of this five week summer camp (ten hours of hands-on physics instruction). Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected with respect to the impact that this camp had on students' understanding and interests in science. The results of these efforts will be presented.

  19. Universal Collaboration Strategies for Signal Detection: A Sparse Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanduri, Prashant; Kailkhura, Bhavya; Thiagarajan, Jayaraman J.; Varshney, Pramod K.

    2016-10-01

    This paper considers the problem of high dimensional signal detection in a large distributed network whose nodes can collaborate with their one-hop neighboring nodes (spatial collaboration). We assume that only a small subset of nodes communicate with the Fusion Center (FC). We design optimal collaboration strategies which are universal for a class of deterministic signals. By establishing the equivalence between the collaboration strategy design problem and sparse PCA, we solve the problem efficiently and evaluate the impact of collaboration on detection performance.

  20. Developing a Preference for Collaboration Using Team-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Karl L.; Berry, Robert; Kumar, Anil; Kumar, Poonam; Scott, James P.

    2015-01-01

    Increased accountability in education has brought renewed emphasis on the assurance of learning, making certain that students meet specified learning objectives. Additional research has focused on ways individuals learn. Building upon research on learning styles, active learning, and team-based learning (TBL), this study assesses the impact of TBL…

  1. Modeling Learner Situation Awareness in Collaborative Mobile Web 2.0 Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Helmi; Nordin, Norazah; Din, Rosseni; Ally, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The concept of situation awareness is essential in enhancing collaborative learning. Learners require information from different awareness aspects to deduce a learning situation for decision-making. Designing learning environments that assist learners to understand situation awareness via monitoring actions and reaction of other learners has been…

  2. Constructive, Self-Regulated, Situated, and Collaborative Learning: An Approach for the Acquisition of Adaptive Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Corte, Erik

    2012-01-01

    In today's learning society, education must focus on fostering adaptive competence (AC) defined as the ability to apply knowledge and skills flexibly in different contexts. In this article, four major types of learning are discussed--constructive, self-regulated, situated, and collaborative--in relation to what students must learn in order to…

  3. Exploring Students' Language Awareness through Intercultural Communication in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Students seldom think about language unless they are instructed to do so or are made to do so during learning activities. To arouse students' awareness while learning English for Specific Purposes (ESP), this study formed a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) community to engage teachers and students from different domains and…

  4. Students Using Handheld Computers to Learn Collaboratively in a First Grade Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Megan Lynne

    2005-01-01

    This ethnographic study investigated how first grade students used handheld computers to learn in collaboration with others throughout the learning process. This research focused specifically on how the use of handheld computers impacts students' learning outcomes and relates to technology standards. A qualitative methodology was used to capture…

  5. Finnish Upper Secondary Students' Collaborative Processes in Learning Statistics in a CSCL Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikarinen, Juho Kaleva; Järvelä, Sanna; Kaasila, Raimo

    2014-01-01

    This design-based research project focuses on documenting statistical learning among 16-17-year-old Finnish upper secondary school students (N = 78) in a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environment. One novel value of this study is in reporting the shift from teacher-led mathematical teaching to autonomous small-group learning in…

  6. Utilizing the Active and Collaborative Learning Model in the Introductory Physics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Nguyen Hoai

    2014-01-01

    Model of active and collaborative learning (ACLM) applied in training specific subject makes clear advantage due to the goals of knowledge, skills that students got to develop successful future job. The author exploits the learning management system (LMS) of Hanoi National University of Education (HNUE) to establish a learning environment in the…

  7. Observing tutorial dialogues collaboratively: insights about human tutoring effectiveness from vicarious learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Michelene T H; Roy, Marguerite; Hausmann, Robert G M

    2008-03-01

    The goals of this study are to evaluate a relatively novel learning environment, as well as to seek greater understanding of why human tutoring is so effective. This alternative learning environment consists of pairs of students collaboratively observing a videotape of another student being tutored. Comparing this collaboratively observing environment to four other instructional methods-one-on-one human tutoring, observing tutoring individually, collaborating without observing, and studying alone-the results showed that students learned to solve physics problems just as effectively from observing tutoring collaboratively as the tutees who were being tutored individually. We explain the effectiveness of this learning environment by postulating that such a situation encourages learners to become active and constructive observers through interactions with a peer. In essence, collaboratively observing combines the benefit of tutoring with the benefit of collaborating. The learning outcomes of the tutees and the collaborative observers, along with the tutoring dialogues, were used to further evaluate three hypotheses explaining why human tutoring is an effective learning method. Detailed analyses of the protocols at several grain sizes suggest that tutoring is effective when tutees are independently or jointly constructing knowledge: with the tutor, but not when the tutor independently conveys knowledge. PMID:21635338

  8. SUPPORT FROM A DISTANCE: PERCEPTIONS OF MALAYSIAN STUDENTS ON COMPUTER MEDIATED COLLABORATIVE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Hamin STAPA

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to report findings from an on-going research using Computer-supported Collaborative Learning in an ESL classroom in Malaysia. Collaboration is the act of working together to produce a piece of work. Collaborative learning deals with instructional methods that seek to promote learning through collaborative efforts among students working on a given task. Class based CL fits well with the philosophy of teaching: working together, building together, learning together, changing together and improving together. Computer-supported CL (CSCL has an impact on the development of deep thinking about ideas as students are engaged in writing rather than talking. By doing so, they have more time to think about the responses; able to engage in developing arguments; have time to follow up references and read literature, etc. Selected students from Malaysia were asked to work collaboratively (through e-mail with students from the USA. At the end of the collaborative activities they were expected to complete written projects. The students were interviewed on their perceptions on this innovative way of learning. The findings indicate that the students have responded positively towards computer supported collaborative learning.

  9. Collaborative Work in Virtual Learning Environments: Some Reflections and Prospects of Students

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Mora-Vicariol; Carlene Hooper-Simpson

    2016-01-01

    The collaborative work in virtual learning environments becomes more relevant at a time when technology is used intensively. This paper shows the results of research conducted at the Universidad Estatal a Distancia (UNED) in Costa Rica, about students’ perceptions around the concept and implications of collaborative work in two online courses provided by Dirección de Extensión Universitaria (Dirextu). The aim of this study is to establish the difference between collaborative work and group wo...

  10. Collaborative Design in a Virtual Learning Environment : Three Design Experiments in Textile Teacher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Lahti, Henna

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze and facilitate collaborative design in a virtual learning environment (VLE). Discussions of virtual design in design education have typically focused on technological or communication issues, not on pedagogical issues. Yet in order to facilitate collaborative design, it is also necessary to address the pedagogical issues related to the virtual design process. In this study, the progressive inquiry model of collaborative designing was used to give a structur...

  11. Participating Virtually to a Scientific Conference: A Collaborative E-Learning Scenario for Authentic Learning In Higher Education

    OpenAIRE

    Basque, Josianne; Dao, Kim; Contamines, Julien

    2005-01-01

    Best Paper Awards - Used with permission from the Assn.for the Advancement of Computing in Education: www.aace.org. This paper presents a collaborative e-learning scenario inspired by socio-constructivist and situated learning theories which encourage authentic learning. Developed for a graduate distance education course, this scenario requires students to participate virtually in an asynchronous scientific conference. This paper presents the learning scenario, the technological environmen...

  12. The importance of task appropriateness in computer-supported collaborative learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy Buckner

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of learning in collaborative electronic environments is becoming established as Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL - an emergent sub-discipline of the more established Computer Supported Co-operative Work (CSCW discipline (Webb, 1995. Using computers for the development of shared understanding through collaboration has been explored by Crook who suggests that success may depend partly on having a clearly specified purpose or goal (Crook, 1994. It is our view that the appropriateness of the task given to the student is central to the success or otherwise of the learning experience. However, the tasks that are given to facilitate collaborative learning in face-toface situations are not always suitable for direct transfer to the electronic medium. It may be necessary to consider redesigning these tasks in relation to the medium in which they are to be undertaken and the functionality of the electronic conferencing software used.

  13. Task complexity as a driver for collaborative learning efficiency: The collective working-memory effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner, Femke; Paas, Fred; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Kirschner, F., Paas, F., & Kirschner, P. A. (2011). Task complexity as a driver for collaborative learning efficiency: The collective working-memory effect. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 25, 615–624. doi: 10.1002/acp.1730.

  14. Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Meme; Pryor, Boori Monty

    2000-01-01

    Describes, in the words of two Australian authors (one Aboriginal and one European-Australian), how they work together when they write books together, and how their collaboration goes beyond the two of them. (SR)

  15. NEW SCIENCE OF LEARNING: COGNITION, COMPUTERS AND COLLABORATION IN EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviewed by Onur DONMEZ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs have pervaded and changed much of our lives both on individual and societal scales. PCs, notebooks, tablets, cell phones, RSS feeds, emails, podcasts, tweets, social networks are all technologies we are familiar with and we are intensively using them in our daily lives. It is safe to say that our lives are becoming more and more digitized day by day.We have already invented bunch of terms to refer effects of these technologies on our lives. Digital nomads, grasshopper minds, millennium learners, digital natives, information age, knowledge building, knowledge society, network society are all terms invented to refer societal changes motivated by ICTs. New opportunities provided by ICTs are also shaping skill and quality demands of the next age. Individuals have to match these qualities if they want to earn their rightful places in tomorrow‘s world. Education is of course the sole light to guide them in their transformation to tomorrow‘s individual. One question arises however: ―are today‘s educational paradigms and practices ready to confront such a challenge?‖ There is a coherent and strong opinion among educators that the answer is ―NO‖. ―Today‘s students think and process information fundamentally differently from their predecessors‖(Prensky, 2001. And education has to keep pace with these students and their needs. But how? Khine & Saleh managed to gather distinguished colleagues around this question within their book titled ―New Science of Learning: Cognition, Computers and Collaboration‖. The book is composed of 29 chapters within three major topics which are: cognition, computers and collaboration.

  16. Collaborative Learning Using Wiki Web Sites for Computer Science Undergraduate Education: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, W.-T.; Li, W.; Elston, J.; Chen, Y.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a collaborative approach to enhancing the student learning experience based on Web 2.0 principles. Specifically, wiki Web sites are used by students for collaboration and for publication of course assignments, which are then shared with the class. Web 2.0 principles include: the Web as platform, harnessing collective…

  17. A Design and Development of Distance Learning Support Environment for Collaborative Problem Solving in Group Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Takuya; Takaoka, Ryo; Ahama, Shigeki; Shimokawa, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    The competency and curriculum for human resource development in knowledge based society are proposed in each country. We think the keywords are "collaborative problem solving" and "effective use of ICT". In particular, the competency to perform the collaborative problem solving and learning with others on the network is…

  18. Construction of Latent Hypotheses on Collaborative Learning from the Perceptions of Future Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Bernal, Bartolomé; Jiménez-Perez, Roque

    2013-01-01

    This work analyses the perceptions of future teachers at both primary education and secondary/university level, in relation to the use of virtual collaborative learning platforms. The collaborative working method was different at each level, in line with students' course requirements, skills, access to technology and the time available. An…

  19. Learners and Collaborative Learning in Virtual Worlds: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanewald, Ria

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present selected literature on learners and collaborative learning in virtual worlds. Research in virtual worlds on collaborative learners is gradually emerging and will gain in significance, particularly in online and distance education environments. It will be argued that the design and functionality of virtual…

  20. Using Representational Tools to Support Historical Reasoning in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Drie, Jannet; Van Boxtel, Carla; Erkens, Gijsbert; Kanselaar, Gellof

    2005-01-01

    In this article the authors focus on how features of a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environment can elicit and support domain-specific reasoning and more specifically historical reasoning. The CSCL environment enables students to collaborate on a historical inquiry task and in writing an argumentative essay. In order to support…

  1. Evaluating Interdisciplinary Collaborative Learning and Assessment in the Creative Arts and Humanities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Melissa; Rainbird, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This article responds to the rising emphasis placed on interdisciplinary collaborative learning and its implications for assessment in higher education. It presents findings from a research project that examined the effectiveness of an interdisciplinary collaborative student symposium as an assessment task in an art school/humanities environment.…

  2. An Experimental Study of Satisfaction Response: Evaluation of Online Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xusen; Wang, Xueyin; Huang, Jianqing; Zarifis, Alex

    2016-01-01

    On the one hand, a growing amount of research discusses support for improving online collaborative learning quality, and many indicators are focused to assess its success. On the other hand, thinkLets for designing reputable and valuable collaborative processes have been developed for more than ten years. However, few studies try to apply…

  3. Using Collaborative Research Projects to Facilitate Active Learning in Methods Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, Jeff R.

    2010-01-01

    This article proposes facilitation of active learning in methods courses using collaborative survey research projects. Students form groups in which they develop and administer questionnaires that explore public attitudes and behaviors. Each step requires they apply key concepts toward completion of the project. Collaborative research project…

  4. Quantitative Approach to Collaborative Learning: Performance Prediction, Individual Assessment, and Group Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cen, Ling; Ruta, Dymitr; Powell, Leigh; Hirsch, Benjamin; Ng, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of collaborative learning, although widely reported, lack the quantitative rigor and detailed insight into the dynamics of interactions within the group, while individual contributions and their impacts on group members and their collaborative work remain hidden behind joint group assessment. To bridge this gap we intend to address…

  5. Exploring the Impact of Students' Learning Approach on Collaborative Group Modeling of Blood Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shinyoung; Kang, Eunhee; Kim, Heui-Baik

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the effect on group dynamics of statements associated with deep learning approaches (DLA) and their contribution to cognitive collaboration and model development during group modeling of blood circulation. A group was selected for an in-depth analysis of collaborative group modeling. This group constructed a model in a…

  6. NSDC's Standards: Whether Building a Kitchen or Building a Learning Team, Collaboration Is Key

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnau, Lea

    2009-01-01

    Collaboration is critical for accomplishing difficult tasks. As with a kitchen remodel, shared responsibility and collegiality toward a common goal of increased student learning begin with a shared vision. In this article, the author discusses the importance of collaboration and how it guides and reinforces the work one does in schools.

  7. Co-Located Single Display Collaborative Learning for Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Florencia; Nussbaum, Miguel; Weitz, Juan F.; Lopez, Ximena; Mena, Javiera; Torres, Alex

    2013-01-01

    The benefits of collaborative learning are well documented. However, most of the research has been done with children beyond the ages of early childhood. This could be due to the common and erroneous belief that young children have not developed the capacity to work collaboratively toward a given aim. In this paper we show how small group…

  8. Four Social Neuroscience On-Going Requisites for Effective Collaborative Learning and the Altruistic Turn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphey, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Understandings from the field of social neuroscience can help educators cultivate collaborative students who get excited about learning from one another. To facilitate a collaborative atmosphere, educators first need to be able to show concern for their students beyond the subject matter. They also can help students understand how being social…

  9. Improvement of Learning Process and Learning Outcomes in Physics Learning by Using Collaborative Learning Model of Group Investigation at High School (Grade X, SMAN 14 Jakarta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astra, I. Made; Wahyuni, Citra; Nasbey, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to improve the quality of physics learning through application of collaborative learning of group investigation at grade X MIPA 2 SMAN 14 Jakarta. The method used in this research is classroom action research. This research consisted of three cycles was conducted from April to May in 2014. Each cycle consists of…

  10. Utilizing constructivism learning theory in collaborative testing as a creative strategy to promote essential nursing skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duane, Barbara T; Satre, Maria E

    2014-01-01

    In nursing education, students participate in individual learner testing. This process follows the instructionist learning theory of a system model. However, in the practice of nursing, success depends upon collaboration with numerous people in different capacities, critical thinking, clinical reasoning, and the ability to communicate with others. Research has shown that collaborative testing, a constructivism learning activity and a form of collaborative learning, enhances students' abilities to master these areas. Collaborative testing is a clear, creative strategy which constructivists would say supports the socio-linguistic base of their learning theory. The test becomes an active implementation of peer-mediated learning where individual knowledge is enhanced through problem solving or defense of an individual position with the collaborative method. There is criticism for the testing method's potential of grade inflation and for students to receive grade benefits with little effort. After a review of various collaborative testing methods, this nursing faculty implemented a collaborative testing format that addresses both the positive and negative aspects of the process.

  11. Utilizing constructivism learning theory in collaborative testing as a creative strategy to promote essential nursing skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duane, Barbara T; Satre, Maria E

    2014-01-01

    In nursing education, students participate in individual learner testing. This process follows the instructionist learning theory of a system model. However, in the practice of nursing, success depends upon collaboration with numerous people in different capacities, critical thinking, clinical reasoning, and the ability to communicate with others. Research has shown that collaborative testing, a constructivism learning activity and a form of collaborative learning, enhances students' abilities to master these areas. Collaborative testing is a clear, creative strategy which constructivists would say supports the socio-linguistic base of their learning theory. The test becomes an active implementation of peer-mediated learning where individual knowledge is enhanced through problem solving or defense of an individual position with the collaborative method. There is criticism for the testing method's potential of grade inflation and for students to receive grade benefits with little effort. After a review of various collaborative testing methods, this nursing faculty implemented a collaborative testing format that addresses both the positive and negative aspects of the process. PMID:23608232

  12. How social network analysis can help to measure cohesion in collaborative distance-learning

    OpenAIRE

    Reffay, Christophe; Chanier, Thierry

    2003-01-01

    It has been argued that cohesion plays a central role in collaborative learning. In face-to-face classes, it can be reckoned from several visual or oral cues. In a Learning Management System or CSCL environment, such cues are absent. In this paper, we show that Social Network Analysis concepts, adapted to the collaborative distance-learning context, can help measuring the cohesion of small groups.Working on data extracted from a 10-week distance-learning experiment, we computed cohesion in se...

  13. E-learning systems support of collaborative agreements: a theoretical model

    OpenAIRE

    Aguirre Herrera, Sandra; Quemada Vives, Juan

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a theoretical model for developing integrated degree programmes through e-learning systems as stipulated by a collaboration agreement signed by two universities. We have analysed several collaboration agreements between universities at the national, European, and transatlantic level as well as various e-learning frameworks. A conceptual model, a business model, and the architecture design are presented as part of the theoretical model. The paper presents a way of impleme...

  14. Tool Support for Collaborative Teaching and Learning of Object-Oriented Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus Marius; Ratzer, Anne Vinter

    2002-01-01

    Modeling is central to doing and learning object-oriented development. We present a new tool, Ideogramic UML, for gesture-based collaborative modeling with the Unified Modeling Language (UML), which can be used to collaboratively teach and learn modeling. Furthermore, we discuss how we have...... effectively used Ideogramic UML to teach object-oriented modeling and the UML to groups of students using the UML for project assignments....

  15. Gender differences in an elementary school learning environment: A study on how girls learn science in collaborative learning groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, Yvette Frank

    Girls are marked by low self-confidence manifested through gender discrimination during the early years of socialization and culturalization (AAUW, 1998). The nature of gender bias affects all girls in their studies of science and mathematics, particularly in minority groups, during their school years. It has been found that girls generally do not aspire in either mathematical or science-oriented careers because of such issues as overt and subtle stereotyping, inadequate confidence in ability, and discouragement in scientific competence. Grounded on constructivism, a theoretical framework, this inquiry employs fourth generation evaluation, a twelve-step evaluative process (Guba & Lincoln, 1989). The focus is to discover through qualitative research how fifth grade girls learn science in a co-sexual collaborative learning group, as they engage in hands-on, minds-on experiments. The emphasis is centered on one Hispanic girl in an effort to understand her beliefs, attitudes, and behavior as she becomes a stakeholder with other members of her six person collaborative learning group. The intent is to determine if cultural and social factors impact the learning of scientific concepts based on observations from videotapes, interviews, and student opinion questionnaires. QSR NUD*IST 4, a computer software program is utilized to help categorize and index data. Among the findings, there is evidence that clearly indicates girls' attitudes toward science are altered as they interact with other girls and boys in a collaborative learning group. Observations also indicate that cultural and social factors affect girls' performance as they explore and discover scientific concepts with other girls and boys. Based upon what I have uncovered utilizing qualitative research and confirmed according to current literature, there seems to be an appreciable impact on the way girls appear to learn science. Rooted in the data, the results mirror the conclusions of previous studies, which

  16. Incorporating Collaborative Technologies into University Curricula: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, C. Steven; Smith, Lola B.; Chen, Minder

    2010-01-01

    Web-based collaboration tools and groupware are uniquely qualified to address the emerging business opportunities heretofore hindered by location barriers, constraints of time, and expensive travel costs. Global business enterprises are implementing online collaboration software to augment their face-to-face meetings and group decision making in…

  17. Using Mendeley to Support Collaborative Learning in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khwaja, Tehmina; Eddy, Pamela L.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the use of Mendeley, a free online reference management and academic networking software, as a collaborative tool in the college classroom. Students in two iterations of a Graduate class used Mendeley to collaborate on a policy research project over the course of a semester. The project involved…

  18. Online Teacher Development: Collaborating in a Virtual Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernest, Pauline; Guitert Catasús, Montse; Hampel, Regine; Heiser, Sarah; Hopkins, Joseph; Murphy, Linda; Stickler, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Over recent years, educational institutions have been making increasing use of virtual environments to set up collaborative activities for learners. While it is recognized that teachers play an important role in facilitating learner collaboration online, they may not have the necessary skills to do so successfully. Thus, a small-scale professional…

  19. Student Perceptions of Collaborative Learning in Operations Management Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazici, Hulya Julie

    2004-01-01

    Given today's global work environment, business education should prepare learners not only for technical excellence but also for effective collaboration. In this article, the author describes how collaborative activities--ranging from exams to projects and role playing--enhance the understanding of operations management (OM). The author found that…

  20. Collaborative Learning in a Boundary Zone: A Case Study of Innovative Inter-institutional Collaboration in Israel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith Tabak

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study focused on the collaboration between a school district and a college of education in Israel and aimed to explore how the participants created common understanding in order to promote educational change. The theoretical approach involved analyzing the institutional interconnections based on boundary practices and boundary objects and the ways these interconnections shaped the collaborative learning process, promoted educational change, and fostered educational leadership in the district and in the college. The study observed the formation of a community of practice within the boundary zone, which was developed over a three-year period by a group of 20 superintendents, the district head, and two teacher educators. Beyond concrete outcomes, such as improvement of pupils' scores on the state-mandated achievement tests, the study showed a transformation in the superintendents' perception of their roles and a cultural change in the district. 


Tabak, E. & Margolin, I. (2013. Collaborative Learning in a Boundary Zone: A Case Study of Innovative Inter-Institutional Collaboration in Israel. International Journal of Education Policy & Leadership 8(4. Retrieved from www.ijepl.org .

  1. A Development of a Collaborative Blended Learning Model to Enhance Learning Achievement and Thinking Ability of Undergraduate Students at the Institute of Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingpum, Peerasak; Ruangsuwan, Chaiyot; Chaicharoen, Sumalee

    2015-01-01

    This research aimed to develop a model of a collaborative blended learning (CoBl) to develop learning achievement and thinking ability of undergraduate students in the Institute of Physical Education. The research is divided into three phases using the blended learning model via collaborative learning with thinking abilities approach as follows:…

  2. Learning languages through collaborative storytelling with iTEO

    OpenAIRE

    Kirsch, Claudine; Gretsch, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    Native Luxembourgish children learn German and French in order to access the country’s trilingual curriculum. Ethnic minority children must in addition learn Luxembourgish. Each language will be taught differently. This complex setting has inhibited research on the learning of multiple languages. Further, there is little consensus on effective language pedagogies in Luxembourg. Storying is a leading activity in language learning (Paley 1991, Dyson 1997). Children’s learning is mediated b...

  3. STUDENT OPINION TOWARDS USING AN OPEN SOURCE LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM TOGETHER WITH A COLLABORATIVE TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadire Cavus

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about a pilot study which has been carried out at the Near East University during the 2004/5 FallSemester using the Moodle LMS together with GREWPtool collaborative editor. The system has been tested with 36students taking the Java and the Pascal programming courses. The results of the pilot study showed that a LearningManagement System can be made more efficient if it is enhanced by a collaborative learning tool. Our results have alsoshown that programming languages such as Pascal and Java can be thought successfully in a web-based environment usingan LMS system together with a collaborative tool

  4. Finnish upper secondary students' collaborative processes in learning statistics in a CSCL environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleva Oikarinen, Juho; Järvelä, Sanna; Kaasila, Raimo

    2014-04-01

    This design-based research project focuses on documenting statistical learning among 16-17-year-old Finnish upper secondary school students (N = 78) in a computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environment. One novel value of this study is in reporting the shift from teacher-led mathematical teaching to autonomous small-group learning in statistics. The main aim of this study is to examine how student collaboration occurs in learning statistics in a CSCL environment. The data include material from videotaped classroom observations and the researcher's notes. In this paper, the inter-subjective phenomena of students' interactions in a CSCL environment are analysed by using a contact summary sheet (CSS). The development of the multi-dimensional coding procedure of the CSS instrument is presented. Aptly selected video episodes were transcribed and coded in terms of conversational acts, which were divided into non-task-related and task-related categories to depict students' levels of collaboration. The results show that collaborative learning (CL) can facilitate cohesion and responsibility and reduce students' feelings of detachment in our classless, periodic school system. The interactive .pdf material and collaboration in small groups enable statistical learning. It is concluded that CSCL is one possible method of promoting statistical teaching. CL using interactive materials seems to foster and facilitate statistical learning processes.

  5. THE EFFICIENCY OF DIFFERENTIATED LEARNING - INDEPENDENT LEARNING SITUATIONS VERSUS COLLABORATIVE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida D. STOIAN

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Current Romanian education emphasizes pupil group action in learning situations frontal organized, independently or in micro-groups. Thus, differentiated learning suffers, because it requires an individualized learning, and not just individual; there is necessary to alternate the organizing forms of learning situations, so they to produce progress in pupils’ learning. Using the method of the experiment, the undertaken research project has studied the impact of organizing individual learning situations compared to harmonizing the organizing forms of cooperative learning on pupil achievement in primary education. The experiential research sample consisted of 2 teachers and 56 pupils of class II. The control group comprised a class of 27 pupils, who have carried on an individual learning activity. The experiential group comprised 29 pupils who have carried out an activity based on the harmonizing different organizing forms of collaborationlearning. In the final assessment test, the results obtained by pupils confirmed the research hypothesis, demonstrating that in order to efficiently achieve the differentiated learning there is required a combination of organizing forms of learning and a stimulus for pupils’ collaborationwhich to increase their motivation for learning.

  6. Join The Board: A New Way of Collaborative Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Nazareth ÁLVAREZ ROSADO; Francisco José GARCÍA-PEÑALVO; Bravo Martín, Sergio; Álvarez Rosado, Susana

    2016-01-01

    [EN]This chapter presents an application, Join the Board (JTB), which provides shared and collaborative work environments between digital iPhone and iPad devices through a Network of Local Area (LAN) over a Wi-Fi connection. JTB allows using two connection types in the board: an off-line board (the user has a local and individualized work) and an on-line board (the user can create sessions that each one gives a collaborative board. All the devices that are interesting to work in this collabor...

  7. Use of Peer Tutoring, Cooperative Learning, and Collaborative Learning: Implications for Reducing Anti-Social Behavior of Schooling Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskay, M.; Onu, V. C.; Obiyo, N.; Obidoa, M.

    2012-01-01

    The study investigated the use of peer tutoring, cooperative learning, and collaborative learning as strategies to reduce anti-social behavior among schooling adolescents. The study is a descriptive survey study. The area of study was Nsukka education zone in Enugu State of Nigeria. The sample of the study was 200 teachers randomly sampled from…

  8. Different Modes of Digital Learning Object Use in School Settings: Do We Design for Individual or Collaborative Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Yavuz

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the studies reported in this paper is to gain classroom based empirical evidence on the learning effectiveness of learning objects used in two types of study settings: Collaborative and individual. A total of 127 seventh and ninth grade students participated in the experiments. They were assigned into one of the study modes and worked…

  9. Computer-Supported Collaborative Inquiry Learning and Classroom Scripts: Effects on Help-Seeking Processes and Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makitalo-Siegl, Kati; Kohnle, Carmen; Fischer, Frank

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the influence of classroom-script structure (high vs. low) during computer-supported collaborative inquiry learning on help-seeking processes and learning gains in 54 student pairs in secondary science education. Screen- and audio-capturing videos were analysed according to a model of the help-seeking process. The results…

  10. Indicators of analysis of collaborative learning processes in university virtual environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna ESCOFET ROIG

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative learning is characterized for the fact that pupils work together to help itself in the resolution of problems, the exchange of information, the production of knowledge and the improvement of the social interaction. The challenge of the collaborative learning mediated for virtual environments consists of finding ways of organizing the tasks and of forming the resources that his point of view leads the participants to modifying by means of the development of skills and competitions in order to reach commitments and to obtain the shared aims (Crook, 1998; Gros, 2005; Johnson, Johnson and Holubec, 1999; Monereo, 2005. The aim of this article is to present the results of a research that tried to obtain the indicators of collaborative virtual learning processes at the university. We studied the answers to a questionnaire of 56 students of degree of the Open University of Catalonia, organized in 15 groups of collaborative learning. The results obtained state the presence of a few organizational phases in the collaborative learning process and of a few indicators for every phase, which, in addition, they relate significantly to a better academic result of the group. We would emphasize, in this respect, the related indicators of a priority way with the process of formation of the workgroups that is realized during the phase of beginning; the agreements taken inside the group during the phase of planning; the aspects of communication and of attitudes that have to be given during the phase of development; the positive valuation of the results of the collaborative learning during the phase of closing; and, finally, the utilization of a technological resource. We can affirm that the collaborative learning is possible in a social environment and of relation that prioritizes the communication and the exchange, and it is in this context that ICT facilitates some characteristics of learning environment.

  11. Dynamic Shared Context Processing in an E-Collaborative Learning Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Jing; Deniaud, Samuel; Ferney, Michel

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a dynamic shared context processing method based on DSC (Dynamic Shared Context) model, applied in an e-collaborative learning environment. Firstly, we present the model. This is a way to measure the relevance between events and roles in collaborative environments. With this method, we can share the most appropriate event information for each role instead of sharing all information to all roles in a collaborative work environment. Then, we apply and verify this method in our project with Google App supported e-learning collaborative environment. During this experiment, we compared DSC method measured relevance of events and roles to manual measured relevance. And we describe the favorable points from this comparison and our finding. Finally, we discuss our future research of a hybrid DSC method to make dynamical information shared more effective in a collaborative work environment.

  12. Collaborative Group Learning Approaches for Teaching Comparative Planetology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, S. J.; Slater, T. F.

    2013-12-01

    Modern science education reform documents propose that the teaching of contemporary students should focus on doing science, rather than simply memorizing science. Duschl, Schweingruber, and Shouse (2007) eloquently argue for four science proficiencies for students. Students should: (i) Know, use, and interpret scientific explanations of the natural world; (ii) Generate and evaluate scientific evidence and explanations; (iii) Understand the nature and development of scientific knowledge; and (iv) Participate productively in scientific practices and discourse. In response, scholars with the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research are creating and field-tested two separate instructional approaches. The first of these is a series of computer-mediated, inquiry learning experiences for non-science majoring undergraduates based upon an inquiry-oriented teaching approach framed by the notions of backwards faded-scaffolding as an overarching theme for instruction. Backwards faded-scaffolding is a strategy where the conventional and rigidly linear scientific method is turned on its head and students are first taught how to create conclusions based on evidence, then how experimental design creates evidence, and only at the end introduces students to the most challenging part of inquiry - inventing scientifically appropriate questions. Planetary science databases and virtual environments used by students to conduct scientific investigations include the NASA and JPL Solar System Simulator and Eyes on the Solar System as well as the USGS Moon and Mars Global GIS Viewers. The second of these is known widely as a Lecture-Tutorial approach. Lecture-Tutorials are self-contained, collaborative group activities. The materials are designed specifically to be easily integrated into the lecture course and directly address the needs of busy and heavily-loaded teaching faculty for effective, student-centered, classroom-ready materials that do not require a drastic course

  13. Working Together: Librarian and Student Collaboration for Active Learning in a Library Eclassroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcie Lynne Jacklin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Active learning strategies based on several learning theories were incorporated during instruction sessions for second year Biological Sciences students. The instructional strategies described in this paper are based primarily on sociocultural and collaborative learning theory, with the goal being to expand the relatively small body of literature currently available that discusses the application of these learning theories to library instruction. The learning strategies employed successfully involved students in the learning process ensuring that the experiences were appropriate and effective. The researchers found that, as a result of these strategies (e.g. teaching moments based on the emerging needs of students students’ interest in learning information literacy was increased and students interacted with information given to them as well as with their peers. Collaboration between the Librarians, Co-op Student and Senior Lab Instructor helped to enhance the learning experience for students and also revealed new aspects of the active learning experiences. The primary learning objective, which was to increase the students’ information skills in the Biological Sciences, was realized. The advantages of active learning were realized by both instructors and students. Advantages for students attained during these sessions include having their diverse learning styles addressed; increased interaction with and retention of information; increased responsibility for their own learning; the opportunity to value not only the instructors, but also themselves and their peers as sources of authority and knowledge; improved problem solving abilities; increased interest and opportunities for critical thinking, as a result of the actively exchanging information in a group. The primary advantage enjoyed by the instructors was the opportunity to collaborate with colleagues to reduce the preparation required to create effective library instruction sessions

  14. Collaborative learning using VoiceThread in an online graduate course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hui Ching

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative learning enables participants in a learning community to externalize and share knowledge, experiences, and practice. However, collaborative learning in an online environment can be challenging due to the lack of face-to face interaction. This current study examined twenty graduate students’ experiences of using VoiceThread for a collaborative activity in an entirely online course to explore students’ perceptions of using multi-modal communication for collaboration and knowledge sharing. The results of this study revealed that graduate students had very positive experiences toward using VoiceThread for collaborative learning. The participants found VoiceThread easy to learn and use, and reported that audio and video interaction on VoiceThread helped connect them with their peers. More than half of the participants interacted with peers using audio, followed by text and then by video. Half of the students felt they were more connected to peers; however, feeling more connected did not result in more participation as most of the students only participated at the level that met the course requirement. Participants identified benefits and drawbacks of using VoiceThread for collaboration as compared to using text-based discussion forums. The most frequently mentioned benefit of using VoiceThread for collaboration exemplifies its multi-modal affordance that enables learners to communicate emotion, personality, and other non-verbal cues conducive to better understanding and interpretation of meanings. About half of the participants indicated that they preferred VoiceThread to text-based discussion forums for collaborative learning activity. Challenges and implications for future research are also discussed.

  15. An instructional intervention to encourage effective deep collaborative learning in undergraduate veterinary students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosa, Deep K; Volet, Simone E; Bolton, John R

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, veterinary education has received an increased amount of attention directed at the value and application of collaborative case-based learning. The benefit of instilling deep learning practices in undergraduate veterinary students has also emerged as a powerful tool in encouraging continued professional education. However, research into the design and application of instructional strategies to encourage deep, collaborative case-based learning in veterinary undergraduates has been limited. This study focused on delivering an instructional intervention (via a 20-minute presentation and student handout) to foster productive, collaborative case-based learning in veterinary education. The aim was to instigate and encourage deep learning practices in a collaborative case-based assignment and to assess the impact of the intervention on students' group learning. Two cohorts of veterinary students were involved in the study. One cohort was exposed to an instructional intervention, and the other provided the control for the study. The instructional strategy was grounded in the collaborative learning literature and prior empirical studies with veterinary students. Results showed that the intervention cohort spent proportionally more time on understanding case content material than did the control cohort and rated their face-to-face discussions as more useful in achieving their learning outcomes than did their control counterparts. In addition, the perceived difficulty of the assignment evolved differently for the control and intervention students from start to end of the assignment. This study provides encouraging evidence that veterinary students can change and enhance the way they interact in a group setting to effectively engage in collaborative learning practices.

  16. Cognitive Presence in Virtual Collaborative Learning: Assessing and Improving Critical Thinking in Online Discussion Forums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Jennifer; Weber, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to introduce a virtual collaborative learning setting called "Net Economy", which we established as part of an international learning network of currently six universities, and present our approach to continuously improve the course in each cycle. Design/ Methodology/Approach: Using the community of…

  17. A "Knowledge Trading Game" for Collaborative Design Learning in an Architectural Design Studio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wan-Ling; Shih, Shen-Guan; Chien, Sheng-Fen

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge-sharing and resource exchange are the key to the success of collaborative design learning. In an architectural design studio, design knowledge entails learning efforts that need to accumulate and recombine dispersed and complementary pieces of knowledge. In this research, firstly, "Knowledge Trading Game" is proposed to be a way for…

  18. From collaborative virtual research environment SOA to teaching and learning environment SOA

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert, Lester; Sitthisak, Onjira; Sim, Yee Wai; Wang, Chu; Wills, Gary

    2006-01-01

    Please, cite this publication as: Gilbert, L., & Sitthisak, O. (2006). From collaborative virtual research environment SOA to teaching and learning environment SOA. Proceedings of International Workshop in Learning Networks for Lifelong Competence Development, TENCompetence Conference. September 12th, 2006, Sofia, Bulgaria: TENCompetence. Retrieved June 30th, 2006, from http://dspace.learningnetworks.org

  19. Enhancing the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning through Micro-Level Collaboration across Two Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrington, Nancy McBride; Cohen, Adrienne

    2015-01-01

    Two professors from two disciplines--education and sociology--analyzed the commonalities, differences, successes, and challenges of conducting cross-disciplinary Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) research at the course level (micro-level). This case study of their collaboration resulted in a series of lessons learned which add to the…

  20. Cognitive Presence in Virtual Collaborative Learning: Assessing and Improving Critical Thinking in Online Discussion Forums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckmann, Jennifer; Weber, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The paper introduces a virtual collaborative learning setting called "Net Economy," which we established as part of an international learning network of currently seven universities. Using the Community of Inquiry framework as guidance and Canonical Action Research (CAR) as the chosen research design, the discussion forum of the online…

  1. Argumentation-based computer supported collaborative learning (ABCSCL). A synthesis of fifteen years of research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noroozi, O.; Weinberger, A.; Biemans, H.J.A.; Mulder, M.; Chizari, M.

    2012-01-01

    Learning to argue is an essential objective in education; and online environments have been found to support the sharing, constructing, and representing of arguments in multiple formats for what has been termed Argumentation-Based Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (ABCSCL). The purpose of th

  2. A Web-Based Tool for Collaboration and Transdisciplinary Learning Design in Communities of Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gitte Riis; Vestergård, Erik; Storm*, Helle

    2016-01-01

    , transforming ideas into practical solutions, through innovation, using collaborative and transdisciplinary learning designs contributing to new ways of welfare solutions for the Region of Zealand. The key focus is the contribution to innovation in partnership with the work field, students’ learning processes...

  3. Collaborative Learning in an Undergraduate Theory Course: An Assessment of Goals and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDuff, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    This project was designed to assess whether a collaborative learning approach to teaching sociological theory would be a successful means of improving student engagement in learning theory and of increasing both the depth of students' understanding of theoretical arguments and concepts and the ability of students to theorize for themselves. A…

  4. Towards Collaboration as Learning: Evaluation of an Open CPD Opportunity for HE Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerantzi, Chrissi; Gossman, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Flexible, Distance and Online Learning (FDOL) is an open online course offered as an informal cross-institutional collaboration based on a postgraduate module in the context of teacher education in higher education. The second iteration, FDOL132, was offered in 2013 using a problem-based learning (PBL) design (FISh) to foster collaborative…

  5. Collaborative Learning in Multicultural Classrooms: A Case Study of Dutch Senior Secondary Vocational Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tielman, Kennedy; den Brok, Perry; Bolhuis, Sanneke; Vallejo, Bertha

    2012-01-01

    This research presents a descriptive study regarding collaborative learning in a multicultural classroom at a vocational education school in The Netherlands. The study bridges two domains of research: research on culturally diverse learning environments--which has mostly concerned primary and general secondary education--and studies on…

  6. Promoting Collaboration in a Project-Based E-Learning Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, Kyparisia; Boubouka, Maria

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the value of collaboration scripts for promoting metacognitive knowledge in a project-based e-learning context. In an empirical study, 82 students worked individually and in groups on a project using the e-learning environment MyProject, in which the life cycle of a project is inherent. Students followed a particular…

  7. Introduction of Synchronous Peer Collaboration Activities in a Distance Learning Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenos, M.; Avouris, N.; Stavrinoudis, D.; Margaritis, M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the main findings, and lessons learned, from introducing a synchronous peer collaboration activity in a distance learning computer science course. Synergo, a software that supports such an approach, was used in this activity. The organizational, technical, and academic challenges of introducing this activity in the course are…

  8. Development of a Mobile Learning System Based on a Collaborative Problem-Posing Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Han-Yu; Hwang, Gwo-Jen; Chang, Ya-Chi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a problem-posing strategy is proposed for supporting collaborative mobile learning activities. Accordingly, a mobile learning environment has been developed, and an experiment on a local culture course has been conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Three classes of an elementary school in southern Taiwan…

  9. Relationships between Teacher Value Orientations, Collegiality, and Collaboration in School Professional Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Hoi Kwan; Lee, Daphnee; Lee, Wing On

    2015-01-01

    Unlike past research which has mainly examined whole school or whole department professional learning communities, this study focused on factors related to effective collaborative practices within teacher learning teams. Our main objective was to ascertain the roles of team value orientations (collectivism and power distance) and team collegiality…

  10. Improving Online Collaboration for FR Knowledge Preservation – Repositories, E-learning and Sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Knowledge Portals: 1. Focus on common theme (e.g. technology); 2. Central homepage for multiple services or resources related to theme; 3. Focus on “community with shared interest”; Possible service bundle examples: • knowledge repository or archive access; • related news and/or events; • e-learning (learning management system); • “social media” for organizational collaboration

  11. The Relation between Prior Knowledge and Students' Collaborative Discovery Learning Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gijlers, Hannie; de Jong, Ton

    2005-01-01

    In this study we investigate how prior knowledge influences knowledge development during collaborative discovery learning. Fifteen dyads of students (pre-university education, 15-16 years old) worked on a discovery learning task in the physics field of kinematics. The (face-to-face) communication between students was recorded and the interaction…

  12. Assessing Team Learning in Technology-Mediated Collaboration: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andres, Hayward P.; Akan, Obasi H.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effects of collaboration mode (collocated versus non-collocated videoconferencing-mediated) on team learning and team interaction quality in a team-based problem solving context. Situated learning theory and the theory of affordances are used to provide a framework that describes how technology-mediated collaboration…

  13. Collaborative Blended Learning Writing Environment: Effects on EFL Students' Writing Apprehension and Writing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challob, Ala'a Ismael; Bakar, Nadzrah Abu; Latif, Hafizah

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the effects of collaborative blended learning writing environment on students' writing apprehension and writing performance as perceived by a selected group of EFL students enrolled in one of the international schools in Malaysia. Qualitative case study method was employed using semi-structured interview, learning diaries and…

  14. A Case Study of Using a Social Annotation Tool to Support Collaboratively Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to understand student interaction and learning supported by a collaboratively social annotation tool--Diigo. The researcher examined through a case study how students participated and interacted when learning an online text with the social annotation tool--Diigo, and how they perceived their experience. The findings…

  15. Dimensions of Problem Based Learning--Dialogue and Online Collaboration in Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen,, Lars Birch; Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche

    2013-01-01

    The article contributes to the discussions on problem based learning and project work, building on and reflecting the experiences of the authors. Four perspectives are emphasized as central to a contemporary approach to problem- and project-based learning: the exploration of problems, projects as a method, online collaboration, and the dialogic…

  16. Fostering Collaborative Learning with Mobile Web 2.0 in Semi-Formal Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwanza-Simwami, Daisy

    2016-01-01

    Mobile Web 2.0 technologies such as: mobile apps, social networking sites and video sharing sites have become essential drivers for shaping daily activities and meeting learning needs in various settings. However, very few studies link mobile Web 2.0 to supporting collaborative learning in real-life problem solving activities in semi-formal…

  17. Active and Collaborative Learning in an Introductory Electrical and Computer Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotru, Sushma; Burkett, Susan L.; Jackson, David Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Active and collaborative learning instruments were introduced into an introductory electrical and computer engineering course. These instruments were designed to assess specific learning objectives and program outcomes. Results show that students developed an understanding comparable to that of more advanced students assessed later in the…

  18. The Role of Collaboration and Feedback in Advancing Student Learning in Media Literacy and Video Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casinghino, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Teaching advanced video production is an art that requires great sensitivity to the process of providing feedback that helps students to learn and grow. Some students experience difficulty in developing narrative sequences or cause-and-effect strings of motion picture sequences. But when students learn to work collaboratively through the revision…

  19. Group Formation in Mobile Computer Supported Collaborative Learning Contexts: A Systematic Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara, Sofiane; Macedo, Joaquim; Bendella, Fatima; Santos, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Learners are becoming increasingly divers. They may have much personal, social, cultural, psychological, and cognitive diversity. Forming suitable learning groups represents, therefore, a hard and time-consuming task. In Mobile Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (MCSCL) environments, this task is more difficult. Instructors need to consider…

  20. A Methodological Approach to Support Collaborative Media Creation in an E-Learning Higher Education Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornellas, Adriana; Muñoz Carril, Pablo César

    2014-01-01

    This article outlines a methodological approach to the creation, production and dissemination of online collaborative audio-visual projects, using new social learning technologies and open-source video tools, which can be applied to any e-learning environment in higher education. The methodology was developed and used to design a course in the…

  1. Implementation of a Framework for Collaborative Social Networks in E-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglajlic, Seid

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a framework for the construction and utilization of social networks in ELearning. These social networks aim to enhance collaboration between all E-Learning participants (i.e. both traineeto-trainee and trainee-to-tutor communication are targeted). E-Learning systems that include a so-called "social…

  2. Using the "Moodle" Learning Management System and "GREWPtool" Collaborative Tool for Teaching a Programming Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavus, Nadire; Uzunboylu, Huseyin; Ibrahim, Dogan

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental study which has been carried out at the Near East University using the Moodle Learning Management System (LMS) together with two types of Web-Based Collaborative Tools (CTs): Standard CT and Advanced CT to create a virtual learning environment to teach programming languages. The aim of this study was to find…

  3. Wikis as a Tool for Collaborative Learning: Implications for Literacy, Language Education and Multilingualism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Selami

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a review of the literature concerning the use of wikis as a tool for collaborative learning in the second language acquisition and foreign language learning process, as research on the use of wikis is relatively new. The study first introduces the theoretical background behind the use of wikis in the mentioned processes. Then,…

  4. Role of the Teacher in Computer-supported Collaborative Inquiry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urhahne, Detlef; Schanze, Sascha; Bell, Thorsten; Mansfield, Amie; Holmes, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    The article presents an analysis of practices in teaching with computer-supported collaborative inquiry learning environments. We describe the role of the teacher in computer-supported collaborative inquiry learning by five principles that span the whole instructional process, from the preparation of the lesson up to the assessment of learning achievement. For successful implementation of computer-supported projects, the teacher has to (1) envision the lesson, (2) enable collaboration, (3) encourage students, (4) ensure learning, and (5) evaluate achievement. We analyse classroom scenarios provided by eight teachers or mentors who implemented one of four different approaches developed by multimedia researchers: Web-based Inquiry Science Environment, Modeling Across the Curriculum, Collaborative Laboratories across Europe, or Resources for Collaborative Inquiry Learning. Teachers or mentors responded to a semi-structured questionnaire about their experiences in implementing the inquiry lesson. A comparison of different classroom scenarios according to the mentioned five principles informed our analysis of teacher activities that contribute to the success of student inquiry while using such technology-enhanced approaches. We conclude with a discussion of the often neglected role of the teacher in computer-supported learning.

  5. A Collaborative Algorithm for Ontological Matching in E-Learning Courseware Domain Knowledge Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanbi C. Olufisoye

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Domain Knowledge is the content repository of a courseware system consisting of a series of learning objects. However, the unstructured and inconsistent naming of domain knowledge components does not permit knowledge transfer across diverse collaborative systems due to differences in architecture, format and representations. To address this identified problem, we formulate an ontological matching algorithm that provides a sharable knowledge in collaborative learning environment in this paper. The Algorithm employs Hybrid Similarity Measure to compute both Concept and Relational similarity values of the various input graphs-learning objects .

  6. Boundary Crossings: Cooperative Learning, Collaborative Learning, and Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Neil; Major, Claire Howell

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1960s, there has been growing and sustained interest in small-group learning approaches at the school level and in higher education. A voluminous body of literature in this area addresses theory, research, classroom practice, and faculty development. The approaches most highly represented in the literature are cooperative learning,…

  7. [ACCOMPANY THE LEARNING OF INTERPROFESSIONAL COLLABORATION: A REQUIRED REFLEXIVE GOVERNANCE OF THE TRAINING PROJECT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiguier, Grégory; Poirette, Sabine; Pélissier, Marie-France

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive care for patients in hospital requires a collective practice of care. Interprofessional collaboration becomes a major issue for organizations of care but also for health schools. This text questions the pedagogical practices that promote an effective interprofessional collaboration of actors in caregiving situation. Theoretical reflection will lead to consider interprofessionality education as a collective learning process actors and organizations. Therefore, this learning must necessarily supported by an inter-institutional project (the care and training institutions) making this a common learning problems and requiring a reflective governance. The presentation of an inter-institutional learning project currently experienced and dedicated to interprofessional collaboration in the geriatric field will illustrate the point. It will present the activities of educational intervention and research-intervention performed by a group of actors (caregivers, health trainers and researchers in health ethics and pedagogy) responsible for ensuring the reflective control.

  8. Investigating the Relationship between Learning Style Preferences and Teaching Collaboration Skills and Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Seung L.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on an exploratory study that investigates the relationship between participants' learning style preferences and their perceptions of a professional workshop on collaboration and technology to support collaboration. The Learning Preference Scale-Students (LPSS) (Owens & Barnes......, 1992) was administered to identify participants' learning style preferences as cooperative, competitive and/or individualized. Using cluster analysis two groups, or categories, of learning style preferences among the participants emerged. Group 1 showed a strong preference for the cooperative learning...... style, and Group 2 showed a strong preference for competitive and cooperative learning styles. Group 1 rated the workshop more positively than Group 2. However, Group 2 reported a larger increase in self-efficacy compared to those in Group 1 (18.9% vs. 6.0%). Both groups provided different suggestions...

  9. An Intelligent Mediating Model for Collaborative e-Learning Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanbi Caleb Olufisoye

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available E-learning management systems(e- LMSs lack ontologies for sharing their domain knowledge learning objects with others due to differences or non-uniformity in architectures, platforms, protocols and representations. The effect of this on e-learners is that collaboration with other e-LMS during learning processes is not permitted. Hence, learning process is restricted only to the knowledge base of a particular E-LMS adopted by an institution, which may limit the mastery level of learners. To provide a remedy to this problem, an intelligent multi-agent mediating system model is proposed in this study using hybrid rule and case based reasoning scheme. Unified Modeling Language(UML is used as a design tool to specify the active and passive entities of the model in form class The model proposed provides a collaborative platform for sharing of the learning objects across multiple e-LMSs, during learning processes.

  10. How internal and external scripts guide argumentative knowledge construction in a web-based collaborative inquiry learning environment

    OpenAIRE

    Kollar, Ingo; Fischer, Frank

    2004-01-01

    Collaboration scripts are a powerful means to improve collaborative inquiry learning. More specifically, they can be designed to support argumentative knowledge construction, a core activity in inquiry learning. However, not only externally induced collaboration scripts but also the learners' internal scripts on collaborative argumentative knowledge construction influence the way they argue with scientific concepts and evidence, thereby affecting what kind of knowledge is acquired during coll...

  11. Enabling Students to Construct Theories of Collaborative Inquiry and Reflective Learning: Computer Support for Metacognitive Development

    OpenAIRE

    White, Barbara Y.; Shimoda, Todd A.; Frederiksen, John R.

    1999-01-01

    Part II of the Special Issue on Authoring Systems for Intelligent Tutoring Systems (editors: Tom Murray and Stephen Blessing) To develop lifelong learning skills, we argue that students need to learn how to learn via inquiry and understand the sociocognitive and metacognitive processes that are involved. We illustrate how software could play a central role in enabling students to develop such expertise. Our hypothesis is that sociocognitive systems, such as those needed for collaborative i...

  12. Effective collaborative learning in biomedical education using a web-based infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yunfeng; Zheng, Fang; Cai, Suxian; Xiang, Ning; Zhong, Zhangting; He, Jia; Xu, Fang

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a feature-rich web-based system used for biomedical education at the undergraduate level. With the powerful groupware features provided by the wiki system, the instructors are able to establish a community-centered mentoring environment that capitalizes on local expertise to create a sense of online collaborative learning among students. The web-based infrastructure can help the instructors effectively organize and coordinate student research projects, and the groupware features may support the interactive activities, such as interpersonal communications and data sharing. The groupware features also provide the web-based system with a wide range of additional ways of organizing collaboratively developed materials, which makes it become an effective tool for online active learning. Students are able to learn the ability to work effectively in teams, with an improvement of project management, design collaboration, and technical writing skills. With the fruitful outcomes in recent years, it is positively thought that the web-based collaborative learning environment can perform an excellent shift away from the conventional instructor-centered teaching to community- centered collaborative learning in the undergraduate education.

  13. Using Socrative and Smartphones for the support of collaborative learning

    OpenAIRE

    Awedh, Mohammad; Mueen, Ahmed; Zafar, Bassam; Manzoor, Umar

    2015-01-01

    The integration of new technologies in the classrooms opens new possibilities for the teaching and learning process. Technologies such as student response system (e.g. Clicker) are getting popularity among teachers due to its effects on student learning performance. In this study, our primary objective is to investigate the effect of Socrative with combination of smartphones on student learning performance. We also observed the benefits of interactivity between the teacher and the students an...

  14. LeaRN: A Collaborative Learning-Research Network for a WLCG Tier-3 Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Modern Physics of the University of Science and Technology of China is hosting a Tier-3 centre for the ATLAS experiment. A interdisciplinary team of researchers, engineers and students are devoted to the task of receiving, storing and analysing the scientific data produced by the LHC. In order to achieve the highest performance and to develop a knowledge base shared by all members of the team, the research activities and their coordination are being supported by an array of computing systems. These systems have been designed to foster communication, collaboration and coordination among the members of the team, both face-to-face and remotely, and both in synchronous and asynchronous ways. The result is a collaborative learning-research network whose main objectives are awareness (to get shared knowledge about other's activities and therefore obtain synergies), articulation (to allow a project to be divided, work units to be assigned and then reintegrated) and adaptation (to adapt information technologies to the needs of the group). The main technologies involved are Communication Tools such as web publishing, revision control and wikis, Conferencing Tools such as forums, instant messaging and video conferencing and Coordination Tools, such as time management, project management and social networks. The software toolkit has been deployed by the members of the team and it has been based on free and open source software.

  15. LeaRN: A Collaborative Learning-Research Network for a WLCG Tier-3 Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Calle, Elio

    2011-12-01

    The Department of Modern Physics of the University of Science and Technology of China is hosting a Tier-3 centre for the ATLAS experiment. A interdisciplinary team of researchers, engineers and students are devoted to the task of receiving, storing and analysing the scientific data produced by the LHC. In order to achieve the highest performance and to develop a knowledge base shared by all members of the team, the research activities and their coordination are being supported by an array of computing systems. These systems have been designed to foster communication, collaboration and coordination among the members of the team, both face-to-face and remotely, and both in synchronous and asynchronous ways. The result is a collaborative learning-research network whose main objectives are awareness (to get shared knowledge about other's activities and therefore obtain synergies), articulation (to allow a project to be divided, work units to be assigned and then reintegrated) and adaptation (to adapt information technologies to the needs of the group). The main technologies involved are Communication Tools such as web publishing, revision control and wikis, Conferencing Tools such as forums, instant messaging and video conferencing and Coordination Tools, such as time management, project management and social networks. The software toolkit has been deployed by the members of the team and it has been based on free and open source software.

  16. Examining Relationships of Collegiate Experiences, Gender, and Academic Area with Undergraduate Students��• Collaborative Learning Skills

    OpenAIRE

    Sahbaz, Sumeyra

    2015-01-01

    Collaborative learning skills are one of the essential learning outcomes for a college education in 21st century. College students are expected to possess the ability to collaborate with others in order to succeed in their career after graduating from college. However, the effects of collegiate experiences on collaborative learning for different gender and academic areas are almost unexplored. In addition, researchers highlight the need for more research on interaction effects to explore whe...

  17. Students’ Perceived Challenges in an Online Collaborative Learning Environment: A Case of Higher Learning Institutions in Nairobi, Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maina Elizaphan Muuro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Earlier forms of distance education were characterized by minimal social interaction like correspondence, television, video and radio. However, the World Wide Web (WWW and online learning introduced the opportunity for much more social interaction, particularly among learners, and this has been further made possible through social media in Web 2.0. The increased availability of collaborative tools in Web 2.0 has made it possible to have online collaborative learning realized in Higher Learning Institutions (HLIs. However, learners can perceive the online collaborative learning process as challenging and they fail to utilize these collaborative tools effectively. Although a number of challenges have been mentioned in the literature, considerable diversity exists among countries due to diversity in infrastructure support for e-learning and learners’ background. This motivated this study to investigate components of online collaborative learning perceived as challenging by learners in HLIs in Kenya. Using a questionnaire, a survey was conducted in two public universities and two private universities to identify students’ perceived challenges in an online collaborative learning environment. Through purposive sampling the questionnaire was distributed to 210 students using e-mail and 183 students responded. Based on descriptive analysis the following five major challenges were rated as high: lack of feedback from instructors, lack of feedback from peers, lack of time to participate, slow internet connectivity, and low or no participation of other group members. There was also a relationship between the university type (private or public with the perceived challenges which included: lack of feedback from the instructor (p=0.046 and work load not shared equally among group members (p=0.000. Apart from slow internet connectivity the rest of the challenges were in line with the observed challenges in the literature.These key challenges identified in

  18. An Integrated Framework Of Web 2.0 Technology And A Collaborative Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Madar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper contributes to the suitability of web 2.0 technology in implementing collaborative learning and proposes an integrated framework of Web 2.0 tools and collaborative learning activities. This paper is also identifying the mismatch between adopting web 2.0 technologies and the delivery of the curriculum on the cloud or via the Internet. It is found that Web 2.0 and a collaborative learning are two platforms to be easily synchronized due to their common attributes that enable their complementariness. This paper argues that integrated framework of Web 2.0 and CL allow users exploit teachinglearning materials maximally and at the same upsurges learners understanding in the subject knowledge. Suitable of Web 2.0 in implementing curriculum was also encouraged since the proposed framework consists of both components of Web 2.0 functions and activities of collaborative learning environment. Pedagogically there has been a mismatch between E-learning technologies and mode of delivery for instance E-learning platforms are widely used to increase content accessibility only while now this framework introduces that Web 2.0 technology of E-learning can also be used to create share knowledge among users. The proposed framework if efficiently exploited will also allow users at all levels create personalized learning environment which suits perspective teachinglearning styles of the users. Apart from academic achievement or enhancements of the teaching and learning processes the proposed framework also would help learners develop generic skills which are very important in the workplaces. As a result of this fast and independent learning technically depend on technology based pedagogy and in this case this proposed model has two dimensions which are very crucial to the enrichment of students learning activities.

  19. Building Collaborative Learning Opportunities between Future Veterinary and Design Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magallanes, Fernando; Stoskopf, Michael K.; Royal, Kenneth D.

    2015-01-01

    Positive inter-professional collaborations and interactions facilitate the effectiveness of veterinarians working on professional teams addressing a wide range of societal challenges. The need for these interactions extend far beyond the different medical professions, which is the limit of many discussions of inter-professional relations for…

  20. Content-Focused Classrooms and Learning English: How Teachers Collaborate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creese, Angela

    2010-01-01

    This article looks at the possibilities of content-based instruction in mainstream English secondary schools. It considers the continuum from a language to content focus in classrooms where teachers collaborate. English as an additional language (EAL) and subject curriculum teachers work together to support young people while they simultaneously…

  1. Preparing Learning Teachers: The Role of Collaborative Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a two-year action research study of 20 pre-service teachers (referred to in the context of this study as intern teachers) in their final 15-week practicum, during which they engaged in a type of action research known as collaborative inquiry. Over the course of their practicum, these intern teachers were interviewed monthly to…

  2. Learning Spaces and Collaborative Work: Barriers or Supports?

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Hayley

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on 18 months of fieldwork, this article discusses the use of physical, virtual and social space to support collaborative work in translator education programs. The study adopted a contrastive ethnography approach that incorporated single- and multiple-case design rationales for site selection. Extended observation, informal chats and…

  3. Modelling Global Pattern Formations for Collaborative Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grappiolo, Corrado; Cheong, Yun-Gyung; Khaled, Rilla;

    2012-01-01

    We present our research towards the design of a computational framework capable of modelling the formation and evolution of global patterns (i.e. group structures) in a population of social individuals. The framework is intended to be used in collaborative environments, e.g. social serious games...

  4. Playful Talk: Negotiating Opportunities to Learn in Collaborative Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Florence R.; Wilson, Nicholas C.

    2015-01-01

    This case study examines the role of playful talk in negotiating the "how" of collaborative group work in a 6th-grade science classroom. Here we develop and test a Vygotsky-derived hypothesis that postulates playful talk as a mechanism for identity exploration and group status negotiation. Our findings indicate that students utilized the…

  5. Using integrated electronic environments for collaborative teaching/learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner, P.A.

    2001-01-01

    Comparative international reports and evaluation reports or audits on the quality of university studies reflect a concern about the quality of graduates in their plea for more skillsoriented education, more real-life orientation of study, more group work and interdisciplinary collaboration, less emp

  6. Learning to Write Programs with Others: Collaborative Quadruple Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Ritu; Goel, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Most software development is carried out by teams of software engineers working collaboratively to achieve the desired goal. Consequently software development education not only needs to develop a student's ability to write programs that can be easily comprehended by others and be able to comprehend programs written by others, but also the ability…

  7. Lessons Learned: Collaborative Symbiosis and Responsive Disciplinary Literacy Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Phillip; Herro, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a case study of how a middle school literacy coach and a science teacher attempted to improve disciplinary literacy teaching in a sixth-grade science class. The collaborative inquiry exposed the disciplinary knowledge gap of the literacy coach (a former language arts teacher) and the science teacher's limited knowledge of…

  8. Group Awareness in Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadirian, Hajar; Ayub, Ahmad Fauzi Mohd; Silong, Abu Daud; Bakar, Kamariah Binti Abu; Hosseinzadeh, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    It is commonly discussed that a key challenge for online collaboration is to promote group awareness. Although this challenge has gained intensified consideration by scholars, scarce attempt has been devoted into development of a reasonable hypothetical comprehension of what group awareness really is and how it can be studied empirically. This…

  9. Wikis: A Knowledge Platform for Collaborative Learning in ESL Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Cynthia S.; Belknap, Joshua P.

    2013-01-01

    Wikis provide an effective technological tool to meet the pedagogical goals outlined in the new TESOL Technology Standards (Healey et al.,2009). A wiki, a cross between a website and a word document, is an interactive webpage that allows students to read, generate, and publish content online in an environment of collaboration. The flexibility and…

  10. Let's Scrum! Learning Digital Media Collaboratively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Daniel G.; Brown, Joshua; Burke, Adam A.

    2013-01-01

    The changing landscape of digital media and software development has immense impact on society, not only through consumer use of the products, but also in the way these technologies are developed. Modern software and media-development companies are using collaborative methods to develop innovative and useful products. Technology and engineering…

  11. Mixed reality learning spaces for collaborative experimentation: A challenge for engineering education and training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter Müller

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the vast majority of research in human-computer interaction involves only our senses of sight and hearing, with sporadic forays into touch, future laboratories used in engineering education will mostly benefit from developments beyond video and sound. Tangible and embedded interaction, augmented and mixed reality characterizes ultimate technologies for further applications in collaborative remote engineering and lab work. This paper presents our latest research to facilitate collaborative experimentation with such innovative technologies. Our vision is a collaborative learning space, which involves an amalgam of real, virtual and remote lab tools to support a wide spectrum of simple and complex, concrete and abstract, safe and dangerous experimentation settings. We will review related concepts and discuss lessons learned from our research and prototype development. Recent work involves the use of mixed reality (as opposed to ‘pure’ virtual reality techniques to support seamless collaborative work between remote sites. We describe this and identify areas for future research.

  12. Understanding Collaborative Learning Behavior from Moodle Log Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jingyan; Law, Nancy Wai Ying

    2012-01-01

    Although course management systems (CMSs) were originally designed for teachers to manage their teaching, little interest has been directed at students' learning. Moodle is usually regarded as a CMS. However, how to make full use of its powerful features and design them into learning tools has rarely been investigated. This study investigates two…

  13. Collaborative learning through advanced Web2.0 practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tambouris, Efthimios; Panopoulou, Eleni; Tarabanis, Konstantinos;

    2010-01-01

    Latest advances in ICT have started impacting also the field of education and training. Social computing and Web2.0 technologies have brought vigorous opportunities for learning and have realised a shift of the web‟s role in learning from an information carrier to a facilitator for the creation...

  14. Integrating Collaborative Learning inside and outside of the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Anne Goodsell; Dietrich, Alexa; Fitzgerald, Jason; Gordon, David

    2014-01-01

    Wagner College's academic program emphasizes interdisciplinary study, experiential learning, and reflection on theory and practice. The curriculum is enhanced by a rich array of opportunities in New York City. In the course of their undergraduate studies, students enroll in three learning communities, two of which include experiential…

  15. Collaborative Inquiry: Expert Analysis of Blended Learning in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wold, Kari

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on findings of a university focus group exploring blended learning in higher education. It first describes the findings regarding the amorphous definition of blended learning as well as whether and how universities might engage in the practice. This paper then explains the administrative, instructor, and student variables that…

  16. DIGITAL COMPETENCIES – COLLABORATING, WORKING AND LEARNING ACROSS CAMPUSES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tellerup, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    competencies for the entire group have been improved by using Podio as a shared learning platform, and by being trained in using Adobe Connect for efficient meetings. Furthermore, the training of a number of teams in the use of digital video and other digital tool as parts of teaching and learning designs has...

  17. Language Learning 2.0--International Collaboration Made Easy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotikoski, Tuula-Harriet; Doshi, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    The Internet has become part of our daily life and serves as a source of knowledge as well as a space for interaction. E-learning is thus a vital element in teaching, and digital media offer not only the possibility to support the individual learning processes of students, but also to foster multilingualism and to immerse into authentic learning…

  18. Gender in the Management Education Classroom: A Collaborative Learning Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilimoria, Diana; O'Neil, Deborah A.; Hopkins, Margaret M.; Murphy, Verena

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a classroom incident and their subsequent learnings about effectively managing issues of gender diversity in an MBA course titled "Women in Organizations." The authors employ Kolb's learning cycle as a framework for describing the incident ("concrete experience"), reflecting on and discussing what occurred…

  19. The Biggs and Moore Model in E-Learning: The Role of Motivation and Collaboration as Moderators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverila, Matti J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of a research conducted to evaluate the effect of e-learning experience on students' perceived learning outcomes, and more specifically the role of motivation and collaboration as moderators between the e-learning experience and the learning outcome. The perceived learning outcome was measured…

  20. Social Regulation of Learning During Collaborative Inquiry Learning in Science: How does it emerge and what are its functions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucan, Serkan; Webb, Mary

    2015-10-01

    Students' ability to regulate their learning is considered important for the quality of collaborative inquiry learning. However, there is still limited understanding about how students engage in social forms of regulation processes and what roles these regulatory processes may play during collaborative learning. The purpose of this study was to identify when and how co- and shared regulation of metacognitive, emotional and motivational processes emerge and function during collaborative inquiry learning in science. Two groups of three students (aged 12) from a private primary school in Turkey were videotaped during collaborative inquiry activities in a naturalistic classroom setting over a seven-week period, and the transcripts were analysed in order to identify their use of regulation processes. Moreover, this was combined with the analysis of stimulated-recall interviews with the student groups. Results indicated that co- and shared regulation processes were often initiated by particular events and played a crucial role in the success of students' collaborative inquiry learning. Co-regulation of metacognitive processes had the function of stimulating students to reflect upon and clarify their thinking, as well as facilitating the construction of new scientific understanding. Shared regulation of metacognitive processes helped students to build a shared understanding of the task, clarify and justify their shared perspective, and sustain the ongoing knowledge co-construction. Moreover, the use of shared emotional and motivational regulation was identified as important for sustaining reciprocal interactions and creating a positive socio-emotional atmosphere within the groups. In addition, the findings revealed links between the positive quality of group interactions and the emergence of co- and shared regulation of metacognitive processes. This study highlights the importance of fostering students' acquisition and use of regulation processes during collaborative