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Sample records for circuit qed dissipative

  1. Observation of a Dissipative Phase Transition in a One-Dimensional Circuit QED Lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias Fitzpatrick

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Condensed matter physics has been driven forward by significant experimental and theoretical progress in the study and understanding of equilibrium phase transitions based on symmetry and topology. However, nonequilibrium phase transitions have remained a challenge, in part due to their complexity in theoretical descriptions and the additional experimental difficulties in systematically controlling systems out of equilibrium. Here, we study a one-dimensional chain of 72 microwave cavities, each coupled to a superconducting qubit, and coherently drive the system into a nonequilibrium steady state. We find experimental evidence for a dissipative phase transition in the system in which the steady state changes dramatically as the mean photon number is increased. Near the boundary between the two observed phases, the system demonstrates bistability, with characteristic switching times as long as 60 ms—far longer than any of the intrinsic rates known for the system. This experiment demonstrates the power of circuit QED systems for studying nonequilibrium condensed matter physics and paves the way for future experiments exploring nonequilbrium physics with many-body quantum optics.

  2. Circuit QED with transmon qubits

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    Wulschner, Karl Friedrich; Puertas, Javier; Baust, Alexander; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Goetz, Jan; Haeberlein, Max; Schwarz, Manuel; Xie, Edwar; Zhong, Ling; Deppe, Frank; Fedorov, Kirill; Marx, Achim; Menzel, Edwin; Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Muenchen (Germany); Huebl, Hans [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Muenchen (Germany); Weides, Martin [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Superconducting quantum bits are basic building blocks for circuit QED systems. Applications in the fields of quantum computation and quantum simulation require long coherence times. We have fabricated and characterized superconducting transmon qubits which are designed to operate at a high ratio of Josephson energy and charging energy. Due to their low sensitivity to charge noise transmon qubits show good coherence properties. We couple transmon qubits to coplanar waveguide resonators and coplanar slotline resonators and characterize the devices at mK-temperatures. From the experimental data we derive the qubit-resonator coupling strength, the qubit relaxation time and calibrate the photon number in the resonator via Stark shifts.

  3. Nonequilibrium Quantum Simulation in Circuit QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, James John

    Superconducting circuits have become a leading architecture for quantum computing and quantum simulation. In particular, the circuit QED framework leverages high coherence qubits and microwave resonators to construct systems realizing quantum optics models with exquisite precision. For example, the Jaynes-Cummings model has been the focus of significant theoretical interest as a means of generating photon-photon interactions. Lattices of such strongly correlated photons are an exciting new test bed for exploring non-equilibrium condensed matter physics such as dissipative phase transitions of light. This thesis covers a series of experiments which establish circuit QED as a powerful tool for exploring condensed matter physics with photons. The first experiment explores the use of ultra high speed arbitrary waveform generators for the direct digital synthesis of complex microwave waveforms. This new technique dramatically simplifies the classical control chain for quantum experiments and enables high bandwidth driving schemes expected to be essential for generating interesting steady-states and dynamical behavior. The last two experiments explore the rich physics of interacting photons, with an emphasis on small systems where a high degree of control is possible. The first experiment realizes a two-site system called the Jaynes-Cummings dimer, which undergoes a self-trapping transition where the strong photon-photon interactions block photon hopping between sites. The observation of this dynamical phase transition and the related dissipation-induced transition are key results of this thesis. The final experiment augments the Jaynes-Cummings dimer by redesigning the circuit to include in-situ control over photon hopping between sites using a tunable coupler. This enables the study of the dimer's localization transition in the steady-state regime.

  4. From strong to ultrastrong coupling in circuit QED architectures

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    Niemczyk, Thomas

    2011-08-10

    The field of cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) studies the interaction between light and matter on a fundamental level: a single atom interacts with a single photon. If the atom-photon coupling is larger than any dissipative effects, the system enters the strong-coupling limit. A peculiarity of this regime is the possibility to form coherent superpositions of light and matter excitations - a kind of 'molecule' consisting of an atomic and a photonic contribution. The novel research field of circuit QED extends cavity QED concepts to solid-state based system. Here, a superconducting quantum bit is coupled to an on-chip superconducting one-dimensional waveguide resonator. Owing to the small mode-volume of the resonant cavity, the large dipole moment of the 'artificial atom' and the enormous engineering potential inherent to superconducting quantum circuits, remarkable atom-photon coupling strengths can be realized. This thesis describes the theoretical framework, the development of fabrication techniques and the implementation of experimental characterization techniques for superconducting quantum circuits for circuit QED applications. In particular, we study the interaction between superconducting flux quantum bits and high-quality coplanar waveguide resonators in the strong-coupling limit. Furthermore, we report on the first experimental realization of a circuit QED system operating in the ultrastrong-coupling regime, where the atom-photon coupling rate reaches a considerable fraction of the relevant system frequencies. In these experiments we could observe phenomena that can not be explained within the renowned Jaynes-Cummings model. (orig.)

  5. Nonlinear optics quantum computing with circuit QED.

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    Adhikari, Prabin; Hafezi, Mohammad; Taylor, J M

    2013-02-08

    One approach to quantum information processing is to use photons as quantum bits and rely on linear optical elements for most operations. However, some optical nonlinearity is necessary to enable universal quantum computing. Here, we suggest a circuit-QED approach to nonlinear optics quantum computing in the microwave regime, including a deterministic two-photon phase gate. Our specific example uses a hybrid quantum system comprising a LC resonator coupled to a superconducting flux qubit to implement a nonlinear coupling. Compared to the self-Kerr nonlinearity, we find that our approach has improved tolerance to noise in the qubit while maintaining fast operation.

  6. Circuit QED with 3D cavities

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    Xie, Edwar; Baust, Alexander; Zhong, Ling; Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Muenchen (Germany); Anderson, Gustav; Wang, Lujun; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Goetz, Jan; Haeberlein, Max; Schwarz, Manuel; Wulschner, Karl Friedrich; Deppe, Frank; Fedorov, Kirill; Huebl, Hans; Menzel, Edwin [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Marx, Achim [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In typical circuit QED systems on-chip superconducting qubits are coupled to integrated coplanar microwave resonators. Due to the planar geometry, the resonators are often a limiting factor regarding the total coherence of the system. Alternatively, similar hybrid systems can be realized using 3D microwave cavities. Here, we present design considerations for the 3D microwave cavity as well as the superconducting transmon qubit. Moreover, we show experimental data of a high purity aluminum cavity demonstrating quality factors above 1.4 .10{sup 6} at the single photon level and a temperature of 50 mK. Our experiments also demonstrate that the quality factor is less dependent on the power compared to planar resonator geometries. Furthermore, we present strategies for tuning both the cavity and the qubit individually.

  7. Circuit QED with 3D cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Edwar; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Goetz, Jan; Deppe, Frank; Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), 80799 Muenchen (Germany); Haeberlein, Max; Wulschner, Karl Friedrich [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Fedorov, Kirill; Marx, Achim [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In typical circuit QED systems, on-chip superconducting qubits are coupled to integrated coplanar microwave resonators. Due to the planar geometry, the resonators are often a limiting factor regarding the total coherence of the system. Alternatively, similar hybrid systems can be realized using 3D microwave cavities. Here, we present studies on transmon qubits capacitively coupled to 3D cavities. The internal quality factors of our 3D cavities, machined out of high purity aluminum, are above 1.4 .10{sup 6} at the single photon level and a temperature of 50 mK. For characterization of the sample, we perform dispersive shift measurements up to the third energy level of the qubit. We show simulations and data describing the effect of the transmon geometry on it's capacitive properties. In addition, we present progress towards an integrated quantum memory application.

  8. Employing circuit QED to measure non-equilibrium work fluctuations

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    Campisi, Michele; Blattmann, Ralf; Kohler, Sigmund; Zueco, David; Hänggi, Peter

    2013-10-01

    We study an interferometric method for measuring the statistics of work performed on a driven quantum system, which has been put forward recently (Dorner et al 2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 230601, Mazzola et al 2013 Phys. Rev. Lett. 110 230602). This method allows the replacement of two projective measurements of the energy of the driven system with qubit tomography of an ancilla that is appropriately coupled to it. We highlight that this method could be employed to obtain the work statistics of closed as well as open driven system, even in the strongly dissipative regime. We then illustrate an implementation of the method in a circuit QED setup, which allows one to experimentally obtain the work statistics of a parametrically driven harmonic oscillator. Our implementation is an extension of the original method, in which two ancilla-qubits are employed and the work statistics are retrieved through two-qubit state tomography. Our simulations demonstrate the experimental feasibility.

  9. Microwave Photon Detector in Circuit QED

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    Garcia-Ripoll, Juan Jose; Romero, Guillermo; Solano, Enrique

    2009-03-01

    In this work we propose a design for a microwave photodetector based on elements from circuit QED such as the ones used in qubit designs. Our proposal consists on a microwave guide in which we embed circuital elements that can absorb photons and irreversibly change state. These incoherent absorption processes constitute the measurement itself. We first model this design using a general master equation for the propagating photons and the absorbing elements. We find that the detection efficiency for a single absorber is limited to 50%, and that this efficiency can be quickly increased by adding more elements with a moderate separation, obtaining 80% and 90% for two and three absorbers. Our abstract design has at least one possible implementation in which the absorbers are current biased Josephson junction. We demonstrate that the coupling between the guide and the junctions is strong enough, irrespectively of the microwave guide size, and derivate realistic parameters for high fidelity operation with current experiments. Patent pending No. 200802933, Oficina Espanola de Patentes y Marcas, 17/10/2008.

  10. Quantum state transfer between hybrid qubits in a circuit QED

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    Feng, Zhi-Bo

    2012-01-01

    In this Brief Report, we propose a theoretical scheme to transfer quantum states between superconducting charge qubits and semiconductor spin qubits in a circuit QED device. Under dispersive conditions, resonator-assisted state transfer between qubits can be performed controllably only by addressing the flux bias applied to the charge qubits. The low infidelity and existing advantages show that the proposal may provide an effective route toward scalable quantum-information transfer with solid-state hybrid qubits.

  11. Circuit QED with hybrid metamaterial transmission lines

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    Ruloff, Stefan; Taketani, Bruno; Wilhelm, Frank [Theoretical Physics, Universitaet des Saarlandes, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We're working on the theory of metamaterials providing some interesting results. The negative refraction index causes an opposite orientation of the wave vector k and the Poynting vector S of the travelling waves. Hence the metamaterial has a falling dispersion relation ∂ω(k)/∂k < 0 implying that low frequencies correspond to short wavelengths. Metamaterials are simulated by left-handed transmission lines consisting of discrete arrays of series capacitors and parallel inductors to ground. Unusual physics arises when right-and left-handed transmission lines are coupled forming a hybrid metamaterial transmission line. E.g. if a qubit is placed in front of a hybrid metamaterial transmission line terminated in an open circuit, the spontaneous emission rate is weakened or unaffected depending on the transition frequency of the qubit. Some other research interests are the general analysis of metamaterial cavities and the mode structure of hybrid metamaterial cavities for QND readout of multi-qubit operators. Especially the precise answer to the question about the definition of the mode volume of a metamaterial cavity is one of our primary goals.

  12. Characterization of coherent population-trapped states in a circuit-QED Λ system

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    Premaratne, Shavindra P.; Wellstood, F. C.; Palmer, B. S.

    2017-10-01

    We examine coherent population trapping in a circuit-QED system consisting of an Al/AlOx/Al transmon qubit embedded in an Al three-dimensional cavity. By engineering the dissipation rate of the cavity to be much larger than that of the qubit and continuously pumping a two-photon process to an excited state of the cavity-qubit system, we are able to invert the population into the qubit excited state with a fidelity of 94%. Applying a second continuous drive tone at the dressed cavity frequency forms an effective Λ system and enables us to coherently trap the system in a dark state formed from a superposition of the excited and ground states of the qubit. By performing quantum state tomography we demonstrate that the position of the dark state on the Bloch sphere can be controlled by changing the relative amplitudes and phases of the two drives.

  13. Deep strong coupling in a circuit QED system (2) - experiment

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    Fuse, Tomoko; Yoshihara, Fumiki; Ashhab, Sahel; Semba, Kouichi

    Among a variety of cavity/circuit-QED systems, the superconducting flux qubit is a promising candidate for increasing the coupling strength further because of its huge magnetic moment. Using a flux qubit, g /ωr = 0 . 12 (g: coupling strength, ωr: bare resonator frequency) has been reported. However, g /ωr is still lower than 1. Here, instead of the widely used coplanar waveguide (CPW) resonators, we use a lumped-element resonator consisting of an inductor (L) and a capacitor (C). While CPW resonators are distributed-element circuits and are therefore restricted by impedance matching constraints, one can freely choose the ratio, L / C , of a lumped-element resonator. This allows us to design a much smaller inductance and to make the zero-point current fluctuation much larger. Using a flux qubit and a lumped-element resonator, we have achieved g /ωr comparable to or larger than 1, which is the deep strong coupling regime, where a variety of interesting physics is expected. In this presentation, the sample design and spectroscopy data will be shown. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 25220601.

  14. Dissipative in quantum mesoscopic RLC circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Pahlavani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The quantum theory for a mesoscopic electric circuit with charge discreteness is investigated. Taking the Caldirola-Kanai Hamiltonian in studding quantum mechanics of dissipative systems, we obtain the persistent current and the energy spectrum of a damped quantum LC-design mesoscopic circuit under the influence of a time-dependent external field.

  15. Photodetection of propagating quantum microwaves in circuit QED

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    Romero, Guillermo [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, USACH, Casilla 307, Santiago 2 (Chile); Garcia-Ripoll, Juan Jose [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Solano, Enrique [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad del PaIs Vasco - Euskal Herriko Unibertsitatea, Apdo. 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain)], E-mail: enrique_solano@ehu.es

    2009-12-15

    We develop the theory of a metamaterial composed of an array of discrete quantum absorbers inside a one-dimensional waveguide that implements a high-efficiency microwave photon detector. A basic design consists of a few metastable superconducting nanocircuits spread inside and coupled to a one-dimensional waveguide in a circuit QED setup. The arrival of a propagating quantum microwave field induces an irreversible change in the population of the internal levels of the absorbers, due to a selective absorption of photon excitations. This design is studied using a formal but simple quantum field theory, which allows us to evaluate the single-photon absorption efficiency for one and many absorber setups. As an example, we consider a particular design that combines a coplanar coaxial waveguide with superconducting phase qubits, a natural but not exclusive playground for experimental implementations. This work and a possible experimental realization may stimulate the possible arrival of 'all-optical' quantum information processing with propagating quantum microwaves, where a microwave photodetector could play a key role.

  16. Photodetection of propagating quantum microwaves in circuit QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Guillermo; José García-Ripoll, Juan; Solano, Enrique

    2009-12-01

    We develop the theory of a metamaterial composed of an array of discrete quantum absorbers inside a one-dimensional waveguide that implements a high-efficiency microwave photon detector. A basic design consists of a few metastable superconducting nanocircuits spread inside and coupled to a one-dimensional waveguide in a circuit QED setup. The arrival of a propagating quantum microwave field induces an irreversible change in the population of the internal levels of the absorbers, due to a selective absorption of photon excitations. This design is studied using a formal but simple quantum field theory, which allows us to evaluate the single-photon absorption efficiency for one and many absorber setups. As an example, we consider a particular design that combines a coplanar coaxial waveguide with superconducting phase qubits, a natural but not exclusive playground for experimental implementations. This work and a possible experimental realization may stimulate the possible arrival of 'all-optical' quantum information processing with propagating quantum microwaves, where a microwave photodetector could play a key role.

  17. Entangled Schrodinger cats in circuit QED: Experimental Architecture

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    Wang, Chen; Gao, Yvonne Y.; Reinhold, Philip; Heeres, Reinier W.; Ofek, Nissim; Chou, Kevin; Axline, Christopher; Frunzio, Luigi; Devoret, Michel H.; Schoelkopf, Robert J.

    The development of quantum information technology relies on creating and controling entanglement over an increasingly large Hilbert space. Superconducting cavities offer high-dimensional spaces for quantum states in a low-loss and hardware-efficient fashion, making it an ideal memory of quantum information and an important element towards fault-tolerant quantum computation. In this talk we present a cQED architecture that allows quantum control over the coherent state basis of two superconducting cavities with millisecond coherence. In particular, we show deterministic entanglement of coherent-state microwave fields in two superconducting cavities of the form: 1/√{ 2}open="(" separators="">open="|" separators=""/>" open="" separators="">βaopen="|" separators=""/>" open="" separators="">βa +/-open="|"> -" open="" separators="">βaopen="|"> -" open="" separators="">βa . We engineer the capability to measure the joint photon number parity to achieve complete state tomography of the two-cavity state. Following widespread efforts of realizing ``Schrodinger's cat''-like mesoscopic superposition in various physical systems, this experiment demonstrates mesoscopic entanglement between two ``Schrodinger's cats''.

  18. Non-linear dispersive interaction in superconducting circuit QED

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    Yin, Yi; Wang, Haohua; Mariantoni, Matteo; Bialczak, Radoslaw C.; Lenander, Mike; Lucero, Eric; Neeley, Matthew; O'Connell, Aaron; Sank, Daniel; Wenner, Jim; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Cleland, Andrew; Martinis, John

    2011-03-01

    In circuit quantum electrodynamics, the strong coupling between superconducting qubits and a coplanar waveguide resonator (CPW) has been utilized to study the light-atom interaction. When the qubit is detuned far away from the resonator in frequency, linear dispersive interaction has been used for the readout of qubit states by measuring the pulling frequency of the resonator. Alternatively, we investigate dispersive interaction in a broader regime by measuring the accumulated dynamic phase with Wigner tomography. In the quasi-adiabatic process of tuning the qubit frequency, the dynamic phase measurement can be pushed to the case of zero detuning with up to the five-photon Fock state in the CPW resonator. The exotic non-linear behaviors of the qubit on resonator cat state and coherent state have been revealed, strongly depending on the strength of dispersive interaction. Our experimental data are consistent with the numerical calculation using the Jaynes-Cumming model.

  19. Purcell filtering in circuit QED. Markovian and non-Markovian theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, Dominik; Wilhelm, Frank [Universitaet des Saarlandes, 66123 Saarbruecken (Germany); Marzlin, Karl-Peter [Department of Physics, St. Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia, B2G 2W5 (Canada)

    2016-07-01

    In circuit QED the measurement fidelity is limited by the Purcell effect, which means a decay of the qubit state through the resonator into the transmission line. This energy leakage can be suppressed by using a bandpass Purcell filter. We study decoherence effects of a system with a Purcell filter by deriving a master equation for the reduced density matrix. We look at the crossover between resonant and dispersive regime. We study in particular the non-Markovian regime to compare the Purcell filter to other suppression methods.

  20. Controllable high-fidelity quantum state transfer and entanglement generation in circuit QED.

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    Xu, Peng; Yang, Xu-Chen; Mei, Feng; Xue, Zheng-Yuan

    2016-01-25

    We propose a scheme to realize controllable quantum state transfer and entanglement generation among transmon qubits in the typical circuit QED setup based on adiabatic passage. Through designing the time-dependent driven pulses applied on the transmon qubits, we find that fast quantum sate transfer can be achieved between arbitrary two qubits and quantum entanglement among the qubits also can also be engineered. Furthermore, we numerically analyzed the influence of the decoherence on our scheme with the current experimental accessible systematical parameters. The result shows that our scheme is very robust against both the cavity decay and qubit relaxation, the fidelities of the state transfer and entanglement preparation process could be very high. In addition, our scheme is also shown to be insensitive to the inhomogeneous of qubit-resonator coupling strengths.

  1. Circuit-QED-based superconducting quantum simulator for the Holstein-polaron model

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    Mei, Feng; Stojanović, Vladimir; Siddiqi, Irfan; Tian, Lin

    2014-03-01

    We propose an analog quantum simulator for the Holstein molecular-crystal model based on a superconducting circuit-QED system in the dispersive regime. The many-body Hamiltonian of this model includes both bosonic and fermionic degrees of freedom. By varying the driving field on the superconducting resonators, one can readily access both the adiabatic and anti-adiabatic regimes of this model, and reach the strong e-ph coupling limit required for small-polaron formation. We show that small-polaron state of arbitrary quasimomentum can be generated by applying a microwave pulse to the resonators. We also show that significant squeezing in the resonator modes can be achieved in the polaron-crossover regime through a measurement-based scheme. The project was supported by NSF-0956064, NSF-0916303, SNSF, NCCR QSIT, and NSF-0939514.

  2. Controllable high-fidelity quantum state transfer and entanglement generation in circuit QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peng; Yang, Xu-Chen; Mei, Feng; Xue, Zheng-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a scheme to realize controllable quantum state transfer and entanglement generation among transmon qubits in the typical circuit QED setup based on adiabatic passage. Through designing the time-dependent driven pulses applied on the transmon qubits, we find that fast quantum sate transfer can be achieved between arbitrary two qubits and quantum entanglement among the qubits also can also be engineered. Furthermore, we numerically analyzed the influence of the decoherence on our scheme with the current experimental accessible systematical parameters. The result shows that our scheme is very robust against both the cavity decay and qubit relaxation, the fidelities of the state transfer and entanglement preparation process could be very high. In addition, our scheme is also shown to be insensitive to the inhomogeneous of qubit-resonator coupling strengths. PMID:26804326

  3. One-step quantum phase gate in the ultrastrong coupling regime of circuit QED

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    Xu, Xuexin; Liu, Xin; Liao, Qinghong; Zhou, Keya; Liu, Shutian

    2017-09-01

    In a previous publication (Phys Rev Lett 108: 120501, 2012), Romero et al. proposed an ultrastrong coupling circuit QED system that can implement a two-qubit quantum phase gate with four controlling pulses. Based on this architecture, we demonstrate that an ultrafast two-qubit phase gate can also be realized with only one oscillation and lower coupling strengths. In our operation scheme, two identical qubits evolve synchronously under a single pulse with a duration determined by a specific coupling strength. The phase gate can also be obtained periodically. The influences of parameter fluctuations are estimated. We demonstrate that the fidelities can be greater than 99% if the parameter fluctuations are controlled within 5%.

  4. Resonator reset in circuit QED by optimal control for large open quantum systems

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    Boutin, Samuel; Andersen, Christian Kraglund; Venkatraman, Jayameenakshi; Ferris, Andrew J.; Blais, Alexandre

    2017-10-01

    We study an implementation of the open GRAPE (gradient ascent pulse engineering) algorithm well suited for large open quantum systems. While typical implementations of optimal control algorithms for open quantum systems rely on explicit matrix exponential calculations, our implementation avoids these operations, leading to a polynomial speedup of the open GRAPE algorithm in cases of interest. This speedup, as well as the reduced memory requirements of our implementation, are illustrated by comparison to a standard implementation of open GRAPE. As a practical example, we apply this open-system optimization method to active reset of a readout resonator in circuit QED. In this problem, the shape of a microwave pulse is optimized such as to empty the cavity from measurement photons as fast as possible. Using our open GRAPE implementation, we obtain pulse shapes, leading to a reset time over 4 times faster than passive reset.

  5. Dissipation in microwave quantum circuits with hybrid nanowire Josephson elements

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    Mugnai, D.; Ranfagni, A.; Agresti, A.

    2017-04-01

    Recent experiments on hybrid Josephson junctions have made the argument a topical subject. However, a quantity which remains still unknown is the tunneling (or response) time, which is strictly connected to the role that dissipation plays in the dynamics of the complete system. A simple way for evaluating dissipation in microwave circuits, previously developed for describing the dynamics of conventional Josephson junctions, is now presented as suitable for application even to non-conventional junctions. The method is based on a stochastic model, as derived from the telegrapher's equation, and is particularly devoted to the case of junctions loaded by real transmission lines. When the load is constituted by lumped-constant circuits, a connection with the stochastic model is also maintained. The theoretical model demonstrated its ability to analyze both classically-allowed and forbidden processes, and has found a wide field of applicability, namely in all cases in which dissipative effects cannot be ignored.

  6. Circuit QED with qutrits: Coupling three or more atoms via virtual-photon exchange

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    Zhao, Peng; Tan, Xinsheng; Yu, Haifeng; Zhu, Shi-Liang; Yu, Yang

    2017-10-01

    We present a model to describe a generic circuit QED system which consists of multiple artificial three-level atoms, namely, qutrits, strongly coupled to a cavity mode. When the state transition of the atoms disobeys the selection rules the process that does not conserve the number of excitations can happen determinatively. Therefore, we can realize coherent exchange interaction among three or more atoms mediated by the exchange of virtual photons. In addition, we generalize the one-cavity-mode mediated interactions to the multicavity situation, providing a method to entangle atoms located in different cavities. Using experimentally feasible parameters, we investigate the dynamics of the model including three cyclic-transition three-level atoms, for which the two lowest energy levels can be treated as qubits. Hence, we have found that two qubits can jointly exchange excitation with one qubit in a coherent and reversible way. In the whole process, the population in the third level of atoms is negligible and the cavity photon number is far smaller than 1. Our model provides a feasible scheme to couple multiple distant atoms together, which may find applications in quantum information processing.

  7. Circuit QED: cross-Kerr effect induced by a superconducting qutrit without classical pulses

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    Liu, Tong; Zhang, Yang; Guo, Bao-Qing; Yu, Chang-Shui; Zhang, Wei-Ning

    2017-09-01

    The realization of cross-Kerr nonlinearity is an important task for many applications in quantum information processing. In this work, we propose a method for realizing cross-Kerr nonlinearity interaction between two superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators coupled by a three-level superconducting flux qutrit (coupler). Because the resonator photons are virtually excited and the coupler is unexcited for the entire process, the effect of resonator decay and the coupler decoherence are greatly minimized. More importantly, compared with the previous proposals, our proposal does not require classical pulses. Furthermore, due to use of only a three-level qutrit, the experimental setup is much simplified when compared with previous proposals requiring a four-level artificial atomic systems. In addition, we implement a two-resonator qubits controlled-phase gate and generate a two-resonator entangled coherent state. Numerical simulation shows that the high-fidelity implementation of the phase gate and creation of the entangled coherent state are feasible with current circuit QED technology.

  8. Characterization of low loss microstrip resonators as a building block for circuit QED in a 3D waveguide

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    Zoepfl, D.; Muppalla, P. R.; Schneider, C. M. F.; Kasemann, S.; Partel, S.; Kirchmair, G.

    2017-08-01

    Here we present the microwave characterization of microstrip resonators, made from aluminum and niobium, inside a 3D microwave waveguide. In the low temperature, low power limit internal quality factors of up to one million were reached. We found a good agreement to models predicting conductive losses and losses to two level systems for increasing temperature. The setup presented here is appealing for testing materials and structures, as it is free of wire bonds and offers a well controlled microwave environment. In combination with transmon qubits, these resonators serve as a building block for a novel circuit QED architecture inside a rectangular waveguide.

  9. Polarization entanglement purification of nonlocal microwave photons based on the cross-Kerr effect in circuit QED

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    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Qian; Xu, Xu-Sheng; Xiong, Jun; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Hayat, Tasawar; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2017-11-01

    Microwave photons have become very important qubits in quantum communication, as the first quantum satellite has been launched successfully. Therefore, it is a necessary and meaningful task for ensuring the high security and efficiency of microwave-based quantum communication in practice. Here, we present an original polarization entanglement purification protocol for nonlocal microwave photons based on the cross-Kerr effect in circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). Our protocol can solve the problem that the purity of maximally entangled states used for constructing quantum channels will decrease due to decoherence from environment noise. This task is accomplished by means of the polarization parity-check quantum nondemolition (QND) detector, the bit-flipping operation, and the linear microwave elements. The QND detector is composed of several cross-Kerr effect systems which can be realized by coupling two superconducting transmission line resonators to a superconducting molecule with the N -type level structure. We give the applicable experimental parameters of QND measurement system in circuit QED and analyze the fidelities. Our protocol has good applications in long-distance quantum communication assisted by microwave photons in the future, such as satellite quantum communication.

  10. Multi-qubit joint measurements in circuit QED: stochastic master equation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Criger, Ben; Ciani, Alessandro [RWTH, JARA Institut fuer Quanteninformation, Aachen (Germany); DiVincenzo, David P. [RWTH, JARA Institut fuer Quanteninformation, Aachen (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Juelich (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    We derive a family of stochastic master equations describing homodyne measurement of multi-qubit diagonal observables in circuit quantum electrodynamics. In the regime where qubit decay can be neglected, our approach replaces the polaron-like transformation of previous work, which required a lengthy calculation for the physically interesting case of three qubits and two resonator modes. The technique introduced here makes this calculation straightforward and manifestly correct. Using this technique, we are able to show that registers larger than one qubit evolve under a non-Markovian master equation. We perform numerical simulations of the three-qubit, two-mode case from previous work, obtaining an average post-measurement state fidelity of ∝94%, limited by measurement-induced decoherence and dephasing. (orig.)

  11. Fluctuation-dissipation relations of a tunnel junction driven by a quantum circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlavecchio, O; Altimiras, C; Souquet, J-R; Simon, P; Safi, I; Joyez, P; Vion, D; Roche, P; Esteve, D; Portier, F

    2015-03-27

    We derive fluctuation-dissipation relations for a tunnel junction driven through a resonator displaying strong quantum fluctuations. We find that the fluctuation-dissipation relations derived for classical external drives hold, provided the effect of the circuit's quantum fluctuations is incorporated into the modified nonlinear current voltage characteristics. We also demonstrate that all quantities measured under a time dependent bias can be reconstructed from their values measured under a dc bias using photoassisted tunneling relations. We confirm these predictions by implementing the circuit and measuring the dc current through the junction, its high frequency admittance, and its current noise at the frequency of the resonator.

  12. The upside of noise: engineered dissipation as a resource in superconducting circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapit, Eliot

    2017-09-01

    Historically, noise in superconducting circuits has been considered an obstacle to be removed. A large fraction of the research effort in designing superconducting circuits has focused on noise reduction, with great success, as coherence times have increased by four orders of magnitude in the past two decades. However, noise and dissipation can never be fully eliminated, and further, a rapidly growing body of theoretical and experimental work has shown that carefully tuned noise, in the form of engineered dissipation, can be a profoundly useful tool in designing and operating quantum circuits. In this article, I review important applications of engineered dissipation, including state generation, state stabilization, and autonomous quantum error correction, where engineered dissipation can mitigate the effect of intrinsic noise, reducing logical error rates in quantum information processing. Further, I provide a pedagogical review of the basic noise processes in superconducting qubits (photon loss and phase noise), and argue that any dissipative mechanism which can correct photon loss errors is very likely to automatically suppress dephasing. I also discuss applications for quantum simulation, and possible future research directions.

  13. Observation of high coherence in Josephson junction qubits measured in a three-dimensional circuit QED architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Hanhee; Schuster, D I; Bishop, Lev S; Kirchmair, G; Catelani, G; Sears, A P; Johnson, B R; Reagor, M J; Frunzio, L; Glazman, L I; Girvin, S M; Devoret, M H; Schoelkopf, R J

    2011-12-09

    Superconducting quantum circuits based on Josephson junctions have made rapid progress in demonstrating quantum behavior and scalability. However, the future prospects ultimately depend upon the intrinsic coherence of Josephson junctions, and whether superconducting qubits can be adequately isolated from their environment. We introduce a new architecture for superconducting quantum circuits employing a three-dimensional resonator that suppresses qubit decoherence while maintaining sufficient coupling to the control signal. With the new architecture, we demonstrate that Josephson junction qubits are highly coherent, with T2 ∼ 10 to 20  μs without the use of spin echo, and highly stable, showing no evidence for 1/f critical current noise. These results suggest that the overall quality of Josephson junctions in these qubits will allow error rates of a few 10(-4), approaching the error correction threshold.

  14. Charge Number Dependence of the Dephasing Rates of a Graphene Double Quantum Dot in a Circuit QED Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Guang-Wei; Wei, Da; Johansson, J R; Zhang, Miao-Lei; Li, Shu-Xiao; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Xiao, Ming; Tu, Tao; Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Hong-Wen; Nori, Franco; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2015-09-18

    We use an on-chip superconducting resonator as a sensitive meter to probe the properties of graphene double quantum dots at microwave frequencies. Specifically, we investigate the charge dephasing rates in a circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture. The dephasing rates strongly depend on the number of charges in the dots, and the variation has a period of four charges, over an extended range of charge numbers. Although the exact mechanism of this fourfold periodicity in dephasing rates is an open problem, our observations hint at the fourfold degeneracy expected in graphene from its spin and valley degrees of freedom.

  15. Non-Equilibrium Dynamics of C-QED Arrays in Strong Correlation Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin-Ding; Li, Zhi-Hang; Zhang, Xiao-Ming

    2016-11-01

    Recently increasing interests are attracted in the physics of controlled arrays of nonlinear cavity resonators because of the rapid experimental progress achieved in cavity and circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). For a driven-dissipative two-dimentional planar C-QED array, standard Markov master equation is generally used to study the dynamics of this system. However, when in the case that the on-site photon-photon interaction enters strong correlation regime, standard Markov master equation may lead to incorrect results. In this paper we study the non-equilibrium dynamics of a two-dimentional C-QED array, which is homogeneously pumped by an external pulse, at the same time dissipation exits. We study the evolution of the average photon number of a single cavity by deriving a modified master equation to. In comparison with the standard master equation, the numerical result obtained by our newly derived master equation shows significant difference for the non-equilibrium dynamics of the system.

  16. Exact stabilization of entangled states in finite time by dissipative quantum circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Peter D.; Ticozzi, Francesco; Viola, Lorenza

    2017-07-01

    Open quantum systems evolving according to discrete-time dynamics are capable, unlike continuous-time counterparts, to converge to a stable equilibrium in finite time with zero error. We consider dissipative quantum circuits consisting of sequences of quantum channels subject to specified quasi-locality constraints, and determine conditions under which stabilization of a pure multipartite entangled state of interest may be exactly achieved in finite time. Special emphasis is devoted to characterizing scenarios where finite-time stabilization may be achieved robustly with respect to the order of the applied quantum maps, as suitable for unsupervised control architectures. We show that if a decomposition of the physical Hilbert space into virtual subsystems is found, which is compatible with the locality constraint and relative to which the target state factorizes, then robust stabilization may be achieved by independently cooling each component. We further show that if the same condition holds for a scalable class of pure states, a continuous-time quasi-local Markov semigroup ensuring rapid mixing can be obtained. Somewhat surprisingly, we find that the commutativity of the canonical parent Hamiltonian one may associate to the target state does not directly relate to its finite-time stabilizability properties, although in all cases where we can guarantee robust stabilization, a (possibly noncanonical) commuting parent Hamiltonian may be found. Aside from graph states, quantum states amenable to finite-time robust stabilization include a class of universal resource states displaying two-dimensional symmetry-protected topological order, along with tensor network states obtained by generalizing a construction due to Bravyi and Vyalyi [Quantum Inf. Comput. 5, 187 (2005)]. Extensions to representative classes of mixed graph-product and thermal states are also discussed.

  17. Using a heat pipe (TPTC for dissipating energy generated by an electronic circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Correa

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental investigation aimed at estimating the thermal efficiency of a heat pipe compared to the most common elements for removing heat from a circuit (i.e., an electric fan and a fin - extended surface. The input voltage frequency for a standard power circuit was changed for the experiments, whilst all the other parameters were kept constant. An experimental statistical design was used as an analytical tool. Unexpectedly, the heat pipe showed the lowest thermal efficiency for all the experiments, although it had the advantage of being a passive element having low volume and no mobile parts.

  18. Nonperturbative QED vacuum birefringence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisov, V. I.; Dolgaya, E. E.; Sokolov, V. A.

    2017-05-01

    In this paper we represent nonperturbative calculation for one-loop Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) vacuum birefringence in presence of strong magnetic field. The dispersion relations for electromagnetic wave propagating in strong magnetic field point to retention of vacuum birefringence even in case when the field strength greatly exceeds Sauter-Schwinger limit. This gives a possibility to extend some predictions of perturbative QED such as electromagnetic waves delay in pulsars neighbourhood or wave polarization state changing (tested in PVLAS) to arbitrary magnetic field values. Such expansion is especially important in astrophysics because magnetic fields of some pulsars and magnetars greatly exceed quantum magnetic field limit, so the estimates of perturbative QED effects in this case require clarification.

  19. Dissipative preparation of entanglement in quantum optical and solid state systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reiter, Florentin

    the dynamics of a weakly driven system, we derive an effective master equation which reduces the evolution to the ground states. We obtain simple expressions for the effective operators which can be directly applied to reach effective equations of motion for the ground states, as is demonstrated considering...... superconducting qubits in a circuit QED setup. Combining resonator photon loss, a dissipative process already present in the setup, with an effective two-photon microwave drive, we engineer an effective decay mechanism which prepares a maximally entangled state of two qubits. We find that high fidelities...

  20. Hammering towards QED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin C. Blanchette

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper surveys the emerging methods to automate reasoning over large libraries developed with formal proof assistants. We call these methods hammers. They give the authors of formal proofs a strong "one-stroke" tool for discharging difficult lemmas without the need for careful and detailed manual programming of proof search.The main ingredients underlying this approach are efficient automatic theorem provers that can cope with hundreds of axioms, suitable translations of richer logics to their formalisms, heuristic and learning methods that select relevant facts from large libraries, and methods that reconstruct the automatically found proofs inside the proof assistants.We outline the history of these methods, explain the main issues and techniques, and show their strength on several large benchmarks. We also discuss the relation of this technology to the QED Manifesto and consider its implications for QED-style efforts.

  1. Parton distributions with QED corrections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Collaboration, The NNPDF; Ball, Richard D.; Bertone, Valerio; Carrazza, Stefano; Debbio, Luigi Del; Forte, Stefano; Guffanti, Alberto; Hartland, Nathan P.; Rojo, Juan

    2013-01-01

    We present a set of parton distribution functions (PDFs), based on the NNPDF2.3 set, which includes a photon PDF, and QED contributions to parton evolution. We describe the implementation of the combined QCD+QED evolution in the NNPDF framework. We then provide a first determination of the full set

  2. Engineered circuit QED with dense resonant modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egger, Daniel; Wilhelm, Frank [Universitaet des Saarlandes, Saarbruecken (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Meta-materials are systems engineered at a wavelength smaller than the radiation considered but larger than the atomic scale; they gain their properties from their structure. Of notable interest are left-handed meta-materials. They exhibit negative permittivity and permeability. On chip quantum optics routinely use right-handed transmission lines, made of a microwave strip-line, as information mediators. In this work, we discuss the properties of a left-handed/right-handed hybrid transmission line. The resulting mode structure presents a mode pile-up at a lower cut-off frequency. Placing a qubit near the hybrid line results in strong to ultra-strong coupling to a quasi-continuum of modes. This system generates strongly entangled multi-mode states and also serves as quantum simulator for a spin-boson model with a sub-sub-ohmic density of states.

  3. Multi-qubit circuit quantum electrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viehmann, Oliver

    2013-09-03

    Circuit QED systems are macroscopic, man-made quantum systems in which superconducting artificial atoms, also called Josephson qubits, interact with a quantized electromagnetic field. These systems have been devised to mimic the physics of elementary quantum optical systems with real atoms in a scalable and more flexible framework. This opens up a variety of possible applications of circuit QED systems. For instance, they provide a promising platform for processing quantum information. Recent years have seen rapid experimental progress on these systems, and experiments with multi-component circuit QED architectures are currently starting to come within reach. In this thesis, circuit QED systems with multiple Josephson qubits are studied theoretically. We focus on simple and experimentally realistic extensions of the currently operated circuit QED setups and pursue investigations in two main directions. First, we consider the equilibrium behavior of circuit QED systems containing a large number of mutually noninteracting Josephson charge qubits. The currently accepted standard description of circuit QED predicts the possibility of superradiant phase transitions in such systems. However, a full microscopic treatment shows that a no-go theorem for superradiant phase transitions known from atomic physics applies to circuit QED systems as well. This reveals previously unknown limitations of the applicability of the standard theory of circuit QED to multi-qubit systems. Second, we explore the potential of circuit QED for quantum simulations of interacting quantum many-body systems. We propose and analyze a circuit QED architecture that implements the quantum Ising chain in a time-dependent transverse magnetic field. Our setup can be used to study quench dynamics, the propagation of localized excitations, and other non-equilibrium features in this paradigmatic model in the theory of non-equilibrium thermodynamics and quantumcritical phenomena. The setup is based on a

  4. Cavity QED with hybrid nanocircuits: from atomic-like physics to condensed matter phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottet, Audrey; Dartiailh, Matthieu C; Desjardins, Matthieu M; Cubaynes, Tino; Contamin, Lauriane C; Delbecq, Matthieu; Viennot, Jérémie J; Bruhat, Laure E; Douçot, Benoit; Kontos, Takis

    2017-11-01

    Circuit QED techniques have been instrumental in manipulating and probing with exquisite sensitivity the quantum state of superconducting quantum bits coupled to microwave cavities. Recently, it has become possible to fabricate new devices in which the superconducting quantum bits are replaced by hybrid mesoscopic circuits combining nanoconductors and metallic reservoirs. This mesoscopic QED provides a new experimental playground to study the light-matter interaction in electronic circuits. Here, we present the experimental state of the art of mesoscopic QED and its theoretical description. A first class of experiments focuses on the artificial atom limit, where some quasiparticles are trapped in nanocircuit bound states. In this limit, the circuit QED techniques can be used to manipulate and probe electronic degrees of freedom such as confined charges, spins, or Andreev pairs. A second class of experiments uses cavity photons to reveal the dynamics of electron tunneling between a nanoconductor and fermionic reservoirs. For instance, the Kondo effect, the charge relaxation caused by grounded metallic contacts, and the photo-emission caused by voltage-biased reservoirs have been studied. The tunnel coupling between nanoconductors and fermionic reservoirs also enable one to obtain split Cooper pairs, or Majorana bound states. Cavity photons represent a qualitatively new tool to study these exotic condensed matter states.

  5. Cavity QED with hybrid nanocircuits: from atomic-like physics to condensed matter phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottet, Audrey; Dartiailh, Matthieu C.; Desjardins, Matthieu M.; Cubaynes, Tino; Contamin, Lauriane C.; Delbecq, Matthieu; Viennot, Jérémie J.; Bruhat, Laure E.; Douçot, Benoit; Kontos, Takis

    2017-11-01

    Circuit QED techniques have been instrumental in manipulating and probing with exquisite sensitivity the quantum state of superconducting quantum bits coupled to microwave cavities. Recently, it has become possible to fabricate new devices in which the superconducting quantum bits are replaced by hybrid mesoscopic circuits combining nanoconductors and metallic reservoirs. This mesoscopic QED provides a new experimental playground to study the light–matter interaction in electronic circuits. Here, we present the experimental state of the art of mesoscopic QED and its theoretical description. A first class of experiments focuses on the artificial atom limit, where some quasiparticles are trapped in nanocircuit bound states. In this limit, the circuit QED techniques can be used to manipulate and probe electronic degrees of freedom such as confined charges, spins, or Andreev pairs. A second class of experiments uses cavity photons to reveal the dynamics of electron tunneling between a nanoconductor and fermionic reservoirs. For instance, the Kondo effect, the charge relaxation caused by grounded metallic contacts, and the photo-emission caused by voltage-biased reservoirs have been studied. The tunnel coupling between nanoconductors and fermionic reservoirs also enable one to obtain split Cooper pairs, or Majorana bound states. Cavity photons represent a qualitatively new tool to study these exotic condensed matter states.

  6. The oscillator model for dissipative QED in an inhomogeneous dielectric

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wonderen, A. J.; Suttorp, L. G.

    2004-11-01

    The Ullersma model for the damped harmonic oscillator is coupled to the quantized electromagnetic field. All material parameters and interaction strengths are allowed to depend on position. The ensuing Hamiltonian is expressed in terms of canonical fields, and diagonalized by performing a normal-mode expansion. The commutation relations of the diagonalizing operators are in agreement with the canonical commutation relations. For the proof we replace all sums of normal modes by complex integrals with the help of the residue theorem. The same technique helps us to explicitly calculate the quantum evolution of all canonical and electromagnetic fields. We identify the dielectric constant and the Green function of the wave equation for the electric field. Both functions are meromorphic in the complex frequency plane. The solution of the extended Ullersma model is in keeping with well-known phenomenological rules for setting up quantum electrodynamics in an absorptive and spatially inhomogeneous dielectric. To establish this fundamental justification, we subject the reservoir of independent harmonic oscillators to a continuum limit. The resonant frequencies of the reservoir are smeared out over the real axis. Consequently, the poles of both the dielectric constant and the Green function unite to form a branch cut. Performing an analytic continuation beyond this branch cut, we find that the long-time behaviour of the quantized electric field is completely determined by the sources of the reservoir. Through a Riemann-Lebesgue argument we demonstrate that the field itself tends to zero, whereas its quantum fluctuations stay alive. We argue that the last feature may have important consequences for application of entanglement and related processes in quantum devices.

  7. Digital quantum Rabi and Dicke models in superconducting circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mezzacapo, A.; Las Heras, U.; Pedernales, J.S.; Di Carlo, L.; Solano, E.; Lamata, L.

    2014-01-01

    We propose the analog-digital quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi and Dicke models using circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). We find that all physical regimes, in particular those which are impossible to realize in typical cavity QED setups, can be simulated via unitary decomposition into

  8. Operator Gauge Symmetry in QED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamak Khademi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, operator gauge transformation, first introduced by Kobe, is applied to Maxwell's equations and continuity equation in QED. The gauge invariance is satisfied after quantization of electromagnetic fields. Inherent nonlinearity in Maxwell's equations is obtained as a direct result due to the nonlinearity of the operator gauge transformations. The operator gauge invariant Maxwell's equations and corresponding charge conservation are obtained by defining the generalized derivatives of the first and second kinds. Conservation laws for the real and virtual charges are obtained too. The additional terms in the field strength tensor are interpreted as electric and magnetic polarization of the vacuum.

  9. Scalar QED, NLO and PHOTOS Monte Carlo

    OpenAIRE

    Nanava, G.; Was, Z.

    2006-01-01

    Recently, QED bremsstrahlung in $B$-meson decays into pair of scalars (\\pi's and/or K's) is of interest. If experimental acceptance must be taken into account, PHOTOS Monte Carlo is often used in experimental simulations. We will use scalar QED to benchmark PHOTOS, even though this theory is of limited use for complex objects. We present the analytical form of the kernel used in the older versions of PHOTOS, and the new, exact (scalar QED) one. Matrix element and phase-space Jacobians are sep...

  10. Understanding the role of counter-rotating terms of Rabi Model under dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eryigit, Resul; Altintas, Ferdi

    2013-03-01

    Rabi Hamiltonian is one of the most complete quantum mechanical models that describe the interaction of a qubit with a quantized field which became more relevant with the recent developments in the circuit QED technologies that made possible to obtain strong coupling in the field-qubit interactions. In the dissipative regime, the standart Lindblandian quantum optical master equation with Rabi Hamiltonian leads to unphysical effects such as an increase of total excitation number in the qubit-field system with increasing cavity decay rate. Recently, a new Liouville superoperator describing the loses of the system have been derived [F.Beaudoin, J.M.Gambetta, A.Blais, Phys. Rev. A 84, 043832 (2011)] at the ultrastrong coupling regime. In this study, by using the new dissipators for cavity loses, we have investigated the role of counter-rotating terms on the dynamics of entanglement and quantum discord at ultrastrong coupling regime and provided a comprehensible picture for the role of counter-rotating terms on quantum correlations. Contrary to the standart dissipators case, the steady-state of the system is found to contain non-zero entanglement.

  11. Digital quantum Rabi and Dicke models in superconducting circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzacapo, A; Las Heras, U; Pedernales, J S; DiCarlo, L; Solano, E; Lamata, L

    2014-12-15

    We propose the analog-digital quantum simulation of the quantum Rabi and Dicke models using circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). We find that all physical regimes, in particular those which are impossible to realize in typical cavity QED setups, can be simulated via unitary decomposition into digital steps. Furthermore, we show the emergence of the Dirac equation dynamics from the quantum Rabi model when the mode frequency vanishes. Finally, we analyze the feasibility of this proposal under realistic superconducting circuit scenarios.

  12. Gauge anomalies in Lorentz-violating QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Tiago R. S.; Sobreiro, Rodrigo F.

    2016-12-01

    In this work we study the issue of gauge anomalies in Lorentz-violating QED. To do so, we opt to use the Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin formalism within the algebraic renormalization approach, reducing our study to a cohomology problem. Since this approach is independent of the renormalization scheme, the results obtained here are expected to be general. We find that the Lorentz-violating QED is free of gauge anomalies to all orders in perturbation theory.

  13. Cavity QED experiments with ion Coulomb crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskind, Peter Fønss; Dantan, Aurélien; Marler, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Cavity QED experimental results demonstrating collective strong coupling between ensembles of atomic ions cooled into Coulomb crystals and optical cavity fields have been achieved. Collective Zeeman coherence times of milliseconds have furthermore been obtained.......Cavity QED experimental results demonstrating collective strong coupling between ensembles of atomic ions cooled into Coulomb crystals and optical cavity fields have been achieved. Collective Zeeman coherence times of milliseconds have furthermore been obtained....

  14. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Dissipation in Unconventional Environments FOCUS ON QUANTUM DISSIPATION IN UNCONVENTIONAL ENVIRONMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grifoni, Milena; Paladino, Elisabetta

    2008-11-01

    'unconventional' questions were still open on the standard harmonic oscillator and spin baths. This includes both fundamental issues, such as the possibility of estimating the specific heat for a free particle in the presence of dissipation, and the development of methods suitable to dealing with long range correlations at zero temperature and with quantum chaotic environments. We believe that the present focus issue on Quantum Dissipation in Unconventional Environments, although certainly not exhaustive, provides an important open-access resource that presents the latest state of the art of research in this field along its different lines. Focus on Quantum Dissipation in Unconventional Environments Contents Dephasing by electron-electron interactions in a ballistic Mach-Zehnder interferometer Clemens Neuenhahn and Florian Marquardt Quantum frustration of dissipation by a spin bath D D Bhaktavatsala Rao, Heiner Kohler and Fernando Sols A random matrix theory of decoherence T Gorin, C Pineda, H Kohler and T H Seligman Dissipative dynamics of a biased qubit coupled to a harmonic oscillator: analytical results beyond the rotating wave approximation Johannes Hausinger and Milena Grifoni Dissipative dynamics of a two-level system resonantly coupled to a harmonic mode Frederico Brito and Amir O Caldeira Spin correlations in spin blockade Rafael Sánchez, Sigmund Kohler and Gloria Platero Landau-Zener tunnelling in dissipative circuit QED David Zueco, Peter Hänggi and Sigmund Kohler Quantum oscillations in the spin-boson model: reduced visibility from non-Markovian effects and initial entanglement F K Wilhelm Dynamics of dissipative coupled spins: decoherence, relaxation and effects of a spin-boson bath P Nägele, G Campagnano and U Weiss Spin chain model for correlated quantum channels Davide Rossini, Vittorio Giovannetti and Simone Montangero Finite quantum dissipation: the challenge of obtaining specific heat Peter Hänggi, Gert-Ludwig Ingold and Peter Talkner Dynamics of large

  15. Energy dissipators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vischer, D. L; Hager, Willi H; Hager, W. H

    1995-01-01

    .... the book comprises chapters in farious fields such as hydraulic jump, stilling basins, ski jumps and plunge pools but introduces also a general account on various methods of dissipation, as well...

  16. The Gribov problem in noncommutative QED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canfora, Fabrizio [Centro de Estudios Científicos (CECS),Casilla 1469, Valdivia (Chile); Kurkov, Maxim A. [Dipartimento di Matematica, Università di Napoli Federico II,Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); CMCC-Universidade Federal do ABC,Santo André, S.P. (Brazil); INFN, Sezione di Napoli,Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Rosa, Luigi; Vitale, Patrizia [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Napoli Federico II,Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli,Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2016-01-04

    It is shown that in the noncommutative version of QED (NCQED) Gribov copies induced by the noncommutativity of space-time appear in the Landau gauge. This is a genuine effect of noncommutative geometry which disappears when the noncommutative parameter vanishes.

  17. Charting the circuit QED design landscape using optimal control theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerz, Michael H.; Motzoi, Felix; Whaley, K. Birgitta; Koch, Christiane P.

    2017-09-01

    With recent improvements in coherence times, superconducting transmon qubits have become a promising platform for quantum computing. They can be flexibly engineered over a wide range of parameters, but also require us to identify an efficient operating regime. Using state-of-the-art quantum optimal control techniques, we exhaustively explore the landscape for creation and removal of entanglement over a wide range of design parameters. We identify an optimal operating region outside of the usually considered strongly dispersive regime, where multiple sources of entanglement interfere simultaneously, which we name the quasi-dispersive straddling qutrits regime. At a chosen point in this region, a universal gate set is realized by applying microwave fields for gate durations of 50 ns, with errors approaching the limit of intrinsic transmon coherence. Our systematic quantum optimal control approach is easily adapted to explore the parameter landscape of other quantum technology platforms.

  18. Charting the circuit QED design landscape using optimal control theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goerz, Michael H.; Motzoi, Felix; Whaley, K. Birgitta

    2017-01-01

    control techniques, we exhaustively explore the landscape for creation and removal of entanglement over a wide range of design parameters. We identify an optimal operating region outside of the usually considered strongly dispersive regime, where multiple sources of entanglement interfere simultaneously......, which we name the quasi-dispersive straddling qutrits regime. At a chosen point in this region, a universal gate set is realized by applying microwave fields for gate durations of 50 ns, with errors approaching the limit of intrinsic transmon coherence. Our systematic quantum optimal control approach......With recent improvements in coherence times, superconducting transmon qubits have become a promising platform for quantum computing. They can be flexibly engineered over a wide range of parameters, but also require us to identify an efficient operating regime. Using state-of-the-art quantum optimal...

  19. Noise and dissipation in magnetoelectronic nanostructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foros, J.; Brataas, A.; Bauer, G.E.W.; Tserkovnyak, Y.

    2009-01-01

    The interplay between current and magnetization fluctuations and dissipation in layered-ferromagnetic-normal-metal nanostructures is investigated. We use scattering theory and magnetoelectronic circuit theory to calculate charge and spin-current fluctuations. Via the spin-transfer torque,

  20. Quantum Simulation of the Ultrastrong-Coupling Dynamics in Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Ballester

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a method to get experimental access to the physics of the ultrastrong- and deep-strong-coupling regimes of light-matter interaction through the quantum simulation of their dynamics in standard circuit QED. The method makes use of a two-tone driving scheme, using state-of-the-art circuit-QED technology, and can be easily extended to general cavity-QED setups. We provide examples of ultrastrong- and deep-strong-coupling quantum effects that would be otherwise inaccessible.

  1. Parton distribution functions with QED corrections in the valon model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottaghizadeh, Marzieh; Taghavi Shahri, Fatemeh; Eslami, Parvin

    2017-10-01

    The parton distribution functions (PDFs) with QED corrections are obtained by solving the QCD ⊗QED DGLAP evolution equations in the framework of the "valon" model at the next-to-leading-order QCD and the leading-order QED approximations. Our results for the PDFs with QED corrections in this phenomenological model are in good agreement with the newly related CT14QED global fits code [Phys. Rev. D 93, 114015 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevD.93.114015] and APFEL (NNPDF2.3QED) program [Comput. Phys. Commun. 185, 1647 (2014), 10.1016/j.cpc.2014.03.007] in a wide range of x =[10-5,1 ] and Q2=[0.283 ,108] GeV2 . The model calculations agree rather well with those codes. In the latter, we proposed a new method for studying the symmetry breaking of the sea quark distribution functions inside the proton.

  2. QED corrections to the Altarelli-Parisi splitting functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florian, Daniel de [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Departamento de Fisica and IFIBA, FCEyN, Capital Federal (Argentina); UNSAM, International Center for Advanced Studies (ICAS), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sborlini, German F.R.; Rodrigo, German [Universitat de Valencia - Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Paterna, Valencia (Spain)

    2016-05-15

    We discuss the combined effect of QED and QCD corrections to the evolution of parton distributions. We extend the available knowledge of the Altarelli-Parisi splitting functions to one order higher in QED, and we provide explicit expressions for the splitting kernels up to O(α α{sub S}). The results presented in this article allow one to perform a parton distribution function analysis reaching full NLO QCD-QED combined precision. (orig.)

  3. Seeded QED cascades in counterpropagating laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grismayer, T; Vranic, M; Martins, J L; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2017-02-01

    The growth rates of seeded QED cascades in counterpropagating lasers are calculated with first-principles two- and three-dimensional QED-PIC (particle-in-cell) simulations. The dependence of the growth rate on the laser polarization and intensity is compared with analytical models that support the findings of the simulations. The models provide insight regarding the qualitative trend of the cascade growth when the intensity of the laser field is varied. A discussion about the cascade's threshold is included, based on the analytical and numerical results. These results show that relativistic pair plasmas and efficient conversion from laser photons to γ rays can be observed with the typical intensities planned to operate on future ultraintense laser facilities such as ELI or Vulcan.

  4. Tunable-Range, Photon-Mediated Atomic Interactions in Multimode Cavity QED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun D. Vaidya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Optical cavity QED provides a platform with which to explore quantum many-body physics in driven-dissipative systems. Single-mode cavities provide strong, infinite-range photon-mediated interactions among intracavity atoms. However, these global all-to-all couplings are limiting from the perspective of exploring quantum many-body physics beyond the mean-field approximation. The present work demonstrates that local couplings can be created using multimode cavity QED. This is established through measurements of the threshold of a superradiant, self-organization phase transition versus atomic position. Specifically, we experimentally show that the interference of near-degenerate cavity modes leads to both a strong and tunable-range interaction between Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs trapped within the cavity. We exploit the symmetry of a confocal cavity to measure the interaction between real BECs and their virtual images without unwanted contributions arising from the merger of real BECs. Atom-atom coupling may be tuned from short range to long range. This capability paves the way toward future explorations of exotic, strongly correlated systems such as quantum liquid crystals and driven-dissipative spin glasses.

  5. Tunable-Range, Photon-Mediated Atomic Interactions in Multimode Cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Varun D.; Guo, Yudan; Kroeze, Ronen M.; Ballantine, Kyle E.; Kollár, Alicia J.; Keeling, Jonathan; Lev, Benjamin L.

    2018-01-01

    Optical cavity QED provides a platform with which to explore quantum many-body physics in driven-dissipative systems. Single-mode cavities provide strong, infinite-range photon-mediated interactions among intracavity atoms. However, these global all-to-all couplings are limiting from the perspective of exploring quantum many-body physics beyond the mean-field approximation. The present work demonstrates that local couplings can be created using multimode cavity QED. This is established through measurements of the threshold of a superradiant, self-organization phase transition versus atomic position. Specifically, we experimentally show that the interference of near-degenerate cavity modes leads to both a strong and tunable-range interaction between Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) trapped within the cavity. We exploit the symmetry of a confocal cavity to measure the interaction between real BECs and their virtual images without unwanted contributions arising from the merger of real BECs. Atom-atom coupling may be tuned from short range to long range. This capability paves the way toward future explorations of exotic, strongly correlated systems such as quantum liquid crystals and driven-dissipative spin glasses.

  6. Asymptotic Behaviour of the QED Perturbation Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idrish Huet

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available I will summarize the present state of a long-term effort to obtain information on the large-order asymptotic behaviour of the QED perturbation series through the effective action. Starting with the constant-field case, I will discuss the Euler-Heisenberg Lagrangian in various dimensions and up to the three-loop level. This Lagrangian holds the information on the N-photon amplitudes in the low-energy limit, and combining it with Spinor helicity methods explicit all-N results can be obtained at the one-loop and, for the “all +” amplitudes, also at the two-loop level. For the imaginary part of the Euler-Heisenberg Lagrangian, an all-loop formula has been conjectured independently by Affleck, Alvarez, and Manton for Scalar QED and by Lebedev and Ritus for Spinor QED. This formula can be related through a Borel dispersion relation to the leading large-N behaviour of the N-photon amplitudes. It is analytic in the fine structure constant, which is puzzling and suggests a diagrammatic investigation of the large-N limit in perturbation theory. Preliminary results of such a study for the 1+1 dimensional case throw doubt on the validity of the conjecture.

  7. Single atoms on demand for cavity QED experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dotsenko, I.

    2007-09-06

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) describes electromagnetic fields in a confined space and the radiative properties of atoms in such fields. The simplest example of such system is a single atom interacting with one mode of a high-finesse resonator. Besides observation and exploration of fundamental quantum mechanical effects, this system bears a high potential for applications quantum information science such as, e.g., quantum logic gates, quantum communication and quantum teleportation. In this thesis I present an experiment on the deterministic coupling of a single neutral atom to the mode of a high-finesse optical resonator. In Chapter 1 I describe our basic techniques for trapping and observing single cesium atoms. As a source of single atoms we use a high-gradient magneto-optical trap, which captures the atoms from background gas in a vacuum chamber and cools them down to millikelvin temperatures. The atoms are then transferred without loss into a standing-wave dipole trap, which provides a conservative potential required for experiments on atomic coherence such as quantum information processing and metrology on trapped atoms. Moreover, shifting the standing-wave pattern allows us to deterministically transport the atoms (Chapter 2). In combination with nondestructive fluorescence imaging of individual trapped atoms, this enables us to control their position with submicrometer precision over several millimeters along the dipole trap. The cavity QED system can distinctly display quantum behaviour in the so-called strong coupling regime, i.e., when the coherent atom-cavity coupling rate dominates dissipation in the system. This sets the main requirements on the resonator's properties: small mode volume and high finesse. Chapter 3 is devoted to the manufacturing, assembling, and testing of an ultra-high finesse optical Fabry-Perot resonator, stabilized to the atomic transition. In Chapter 4 I present the transportation of single atoms into the

  8. boundary dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Camurdan

    1998-01-01

    are coupled by appropriate trace operators. This overall model differs from those previously studied in the literature in that the elastic chamber floor is here more realistically modeled by a hyperbolic Kirchoff equation, rather than by a parabolic Euler-Bernoulli equation with Kelvin-Voight structural damping, as in past literature. Thus, the hyperbolic/parabolic coupled system of past literature is replaced here by a hyperbolic/hyperbolic coupled model. The main result of this paper is a uniform stabilization of the coupled PDE system by a (physically appealing boundary dissipation.

  9. On the construction of QED using ERG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonoda, H.

    2007-08-01

    It has been known for some time that a smooth momentum cutoff is compatible with local gauge symmetries. In this paper, we show concretely how to construct QED using the exact renormalization group (ERG). First, we give a new derivation of the Ward identity for the Wilson action using the technique of composite operators. Second, parametrizing the theory by its asymptotic behaviour for a large cutoff, we show how to fine tune the parameters to satisfy the identity. Third, we recast the identity as an invariance of the Wilson action under a nonlinear BRST transformation.

  10. QED effects in the pseudoscalar meson sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsley, R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Peter Guthrie Tait Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3FD (United Kingdom); Nakamura, Y. [RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science, Kobe, Hyogo, 650-0047 (Japan); Perlt, H. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Leipzig, Brüderstrasse 16, Leipzig, 04109 (Germany); Pleiter, D. [Jülich Supercomputer Centre, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich, 52425 (Germany); Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Regensburg, Regensburg, 93040 (Germany); Rakow, P.E.L. [Theoretical Physics Division, Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Liverpool, Peach Street , Liverpool, L69 3BX (United Kingdom); Schierholz, G. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg, 22603 (Germany); Schiller, A. [Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Leipzig, Brüderstrasse 16, Leipzig, 04109 (Germany); Stokes, R. [CSSM, Department of Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, 5005 (Australia); Stüben, H. [Regionales Rechenzentrum, Universität Hamburg, Hamburg, 20146 (Germany); Young, R.D.; Zanotti, J.M. [CSSM, Department of Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, 5005 (Australia); Collaboration: the QCDSF and UKQCD collaboration

    2016-04-15

    In this paper we present results on the pseudoscalar meson masses from a fully dynamical simulation of QCD+QED, concentrating particularly on violations of isospin symmetry. We calculate the π{sup +}–π{sup 0} splitting and also look at other isospin violating mass differences. We have presented results for these isospin splittings in http://arxiv.org/abs/1508.06401. In this paper we give more details of the techniques employed, discussing in particular the question of how much of the symmetry violation is due to QCD, arising from the different masses of the u and d quarks, and how much is due to QED, arising from the different charges of the quarks. This decomposition is not unique, it depends on the renormalisation scheme and scale. We suggest a renormalisation scheme in which Dashen’s theorem for neutral mesons holds, so that the electromagnetic self-energies of the neutral mesons are zero, and discuss how the self-energies change when we transform to a scheme such as (MS)-bar , in which Dashen’s theorem for neutral mesons is violated.

  11. A Cavity QED Implementation of Deutsch-Jozsa Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Guerra, E. S.

    2004-01-01

    The Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm is a generalization of the Deutsch algorithm which was the first algorithm written. We present schemes to implement the Deutsch algorithm and the Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm via cavity QED.

  12. Threshold Corrections in Precision LHC Physics: QED otimes QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, B F L; Jadach, Stanislaw; Yost, S A

    2004-01-01

    With an eye toward LHC processes in which theoretical precisions of 1 percent are desired, we introduce the theory of the simultaneous YFS resummation of QED and QCD to compute the size of the expected resummed soft radiative threshold effects in precision studies of heavy particle production at the LHC. Our results show that both QED and QCD soft threshold effects must be controlled to be on the conservative side to achieve such precision goals.

  13. Laminated insulators having heat dissipation means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, R.C.; Mataya, K.F.; Gonczy, J.D.

    1980-04-24

    A laminated body is provided with heat dissipation capabilities. The insulator body is formed by dielectric layers interleaved with heat conductive layers, and bonded by an adhesive to form a composite structure. The heat conductive layers include provision for connection to an external thermal circuit.

  14. Superadiabatic holonomic quantum computation in cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bao-Jie; Huang, Zhen-Hua; Xue, Zheng-Yuan; Zhang, Xin-Ding

    2017-06-01

    Adiabatic quantum control is a powerful tool for quantum engineering and a key component in some quantum computation models, where accurate control over the timing of the involved pulses is not needed. However, the adiabatic condition requires that the process be very slow and thus limits its application in quantum computation, where quantum gates are preferred to be fast due to the limited coherent times of the quantum systems. Here, we propose a feasible scheme to implement universal holonomic quantum computation based on non-Abelian geometric phases with superadiabatic quantum control, where the adiabatic manipulation is sped up while retaining its robustness against errors in the timing control. Consolidating the advantages of both strategies, our proposal is thus both robust and fast. The cavity QED system is adopted as a typical example to illustrate the merits where the proposed scheme can be realized in a tripod configuration by appropriately controlling the pulse shapes and their relative strength. To demonstrate the distinct performance of our proposal, we also compare our scheme with the conventional adiabatic strategy.

  15. Dynamics of dissipative Landau-Zener transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhongkai; Zhao, Yang

    2018-01-01

    A nonperturbative treatment, the Dirac-Frenkel time-dependent variation is employed to examine dynamics of the Landau-Zener model with both diagonal and off-diagonal qubit-bath coupling using the multiple Davydov trial states. It is shown that steady-state transition probabilities agree with analytical predictions at long times. Landau-Zener dynamics at intermediate times is little affected by diagonal coupling, and is found to be determined by off-diagonal coupling and tunneling between two diabatic states. We investigate effects of bath spectral densities, coupling strengths, and interaction angles on Laudau-Zener dynamics. Thanks to the multiple Davydov trial states, detailed boson dynamics can also be analyzed in Landau-Zener transitions. The results presented here may help provide guiding principles to manipulate the Laudau-Zener transitions in circuit QED architectures by tuning off-diagonal coupling and tunneling strength.

  16. Uncontrollable dissipative systems: observability and embeddability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karikalan, Selvaraj; Belur, Madhu N.; Athalye, Chirayu D.; Razak, Rihab Abdul

    2014-01-01

    The theory of dissipativity is well developed for controllable systems. A more appropriate definition of dissipativity in the context of uncontrollable systems is in terms of the existence of a storage function, namely a function such that, along every system trajectory, its rate of change at each time instant is at most the power supplied to the system at that time. However, even when the supplied power is expressible in terms of just the external variables, the dissipativity property for uncontrollable systems crucially hinges on whether or not the storage function depends on variables unobservable/hidden from the external variables: this paper investigates the key aspects of both cases, and also proposes another intuitive definition of dissipativity. These three definitions are compared: we show that drawbacks of one definition are addressed by another. Dealing first with observable storage functions, under the conditions that no two uncontrollable poles add to zero and that dissipativity is strict as frequency tends to infinity, we prove that the dissipativities of a system and its controllable part are equivalent. We use the behavioural approach for formalising key notions: a system behaviour is the set of all system trajectories. We prove that storage functions have to be unobservable for 'lossless' uncontrollable systems. It is known, however, that unobservable storage functions result in certain 'fallacious' examples of lossless systems. We propose an intuitive definition of dissipativity: a system/behaviour is called dissipative if it can be embedded in a controllable dissipative superbehaviour. We prove embeddability results and use them to resolve the fallacy in the example termed 'lossless' due to unobservable storage functions. We next show that, quite unreasonably, the embeddability definition admits behaviours that are both strictly dissipative and strictly antidissipative. Drawbacks of the embeddability definition in the context of RLC circuits are

  17. QED Reloaded: Towards a Pluralistic Formal Library of Mathematical Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kohlhase

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Proposed in 1994, the ``QED project'' was one of the seminally influential initiatives in automated reasoning: It envisioned the formalization of ``all of mathematics'' and the assembly of these formalizations in a single coherent database. Even though it never led to the concrete system, communal resource, or even joint research envisioned in the QED manifesto, the idea lives on and shapes the research agendas of a significant part of the communityThis paper surveys a decade of work on representation languages and knowledge management tools for mathematical knowledge conducted in the KWARC research group at Jacobs University Bremen.It assembles the various research strands into a coherent agenda for realizing the QED dream with modern insights and technologies.

  18. Simplicity in the structure of QED and gravity amplitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badger, Simon [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Bjerrum-Bohr, N.E.J. [Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States). School of Natural Sciences; Vanhove, Pierre [Institut des Hautes Etudes Scientifiques IHES, Bures sur Yvette (France); CEA, IPhT, CNRS, URA, Gif-sur-Yvette, (France). Inst. de Physique Theorique

    2008-11-15

    We investigate generic properties of one-loop amplitudes in unordered gauge theories in four dimensions. For such theories the organisation of amplitudes in manifestly crossing symmetric expressions poses restrictions on their structure and results in remarkable cancellations. We show that one-loop multi-photon amplitudes in QED with at least eight external photons are given only by scalar box integral functions. This QED 'no-triangle' property is true for all helicity configurations and has similarities to the 'notriangle' property found in the case of maximal N=8 supergravity. Results are derived both via a world-line formalism as well as using on-shell unitarity methods. We show that the simple structure of the loop amplitude originates from the extremely good BCFW scaling behaviour of the QED tree-amplitude. (orig.)

  19. Absorption and photoluminescence in organic cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Felipe; Spano, Frank C.

    2017-05-01

    Organic microcavities can be engineered to reach exotic quantum regimes of strong and ultrastrong light-matter coupling. However, the microscopic interpretation of their spectroscopic signals can be challenging due to the competition between coherent and dissipative processes involving electrons, vibrations, and cavity photons. We develop here a theoretical framework based on the Holstein-Tavis-Cummings model and a Markovian treatment of dissipation to account for previously unexplained spectroscopic features of organic microcavities consistently. We identify conditions for the formation of dark vibronic polaritons, a class of light-matter excitations that are not visible in absorption but lead to strong photoluminescence lines. We show that photon leakage from dark vibronic polaritons can be responsible for enhancing photoluminescence at the lower polariton frequency, and also can explain the apparent breakdown of reciprocity between absorption and emission in the vicinity of the bare molecular transition frequency. Successful comparison with experimental data demonstrates the applicability of our theory.

  20. QED description of Raman scattering from molecules in plasmonic cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Mikolaj K; Gonzalez-Tudela, Alejandro; Giedke, Geza; Aizpurua, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Plasmon-enhanced Raman scattering can push single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy beyond a regime addressable by classical electrodynamics. We employ a quantum electrodynamics (QED) description of the coherent interaction of plasmons and molecular vibrations that reveal the emergence of nonlinearities in the inelastic response of the system. For realistic situations, we predict the onset of \\textit{phonon-stimulated Raman scattering} and an counter-intuitive dependence of the anti-Stokes emission on the frequency of excitation. We further show that this novel QED framework opens a venue to analyze the correlations of photons emitted at a plasmonic cavity

  1. Harvesting Multiqubit Entanglement from Ultrastrong Interactions in Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armata, F.; Calajo, G.; Jaako, T.; Kim, M. S.; Rabl, P.

    2017-11-01

    We analyze a multiqubit circuit QED system in the regime where the qubit-photon coupling dominates over the system's bare energy scales. Under such conditions a manifold of low-energy states with a high degree of entanglement emerges. Here we describe a time-dependent protocol for extracting these quantum correlations and converting them into well-defined multipartite entangled states of noninteracting qubits. Based on a combination of various ultrastrong-coupling effects, the protocol can be operated in a fast and robust manner, while still being consistent with experimental constraints on switching times and typical energy scales encountered in superconducting circuits. Therefore, our scheme can serve as a probe for otherwise inaccessible correlations in strongly coupled circuit QED systems. It also shows how such correlations can potentially be exploited as a resource for entanglement-based applications.

  2. Energy dissipation dataset for reversible logic gates in quantum dot-cellular automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, Ali Newaz; Rahman, Mohammad Maksudur; Nahid, Nur Mohammad; Hassan, Md Kamrul

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents an energy dissipation dataset of different reversible logic gates in quantum-dot cellular automata. The proposed circuits have been designed and verified using QCADesigner simulator. Besides, the energy dissipation has been calculated under three different tunneling energy level at temperature T=2 K. For estimating the energy dissipation of proposed gates; QCAPro tool has been employed.

  3. Fundamental limits of energy dissipation in computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boechler, Graham; Whitney, Jean; Lent, Craig; Orlov, Alexei; Snider, Greg

    2010-03-01

    The limiting factor for microprocessor development in recent years has been heat generation, which has led to a debate regarding the limits of energy dissipation required for computation. Landauer argued that energy is unavoidably lost only when data is erased---the so-called Landauer Principle. Quasi-adiabatic computation is a proposed solution which relies on recycling the energy used during computation. This has been challenged recently by the assertion that recovering the energy is impossible due to a fundamental minimum energy of kTln(2) that must be lost during the charging and discharging of an RC circuit. We experimentally measured the power dissipated in an RC circuit in the time and frequency domains. In both cases, we measure an energy dissipation less than kTln(2) in the resistor while many times kT is delivered to the capacitor. Our experiments demonstrate that there is no fundamental lower limit to the energy that must be dissipated in charging and discharging a capacitor, even for energy losses well below kT. This therefore provides experimental support for the Landauer Principle: there is no fundamental lower limit for energy dissipation required for computation.

  4. APFEL : A PDF Evolution Library with QED corrections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertone, Valerio; Carrazza, Stefano; Rojo, Juan

    Quantum electrodynamics and electroweak corrections are important ingredients for many theoretical predictions at the LHC. This paper documents APFEL, a new PDF evolution package that allows for the first time to perform DGLAP evolution up to NNLO in QCD and to LO in QED, in the

  5. Decoherence in semiconductor cavity QED systems due to phonon couplings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Per Kær; Mørk, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the effect of electron-phonon interactions on the coherence properties of single photons emitted from a semiconductor cavity QED (quantum electrodynamics) system, i.e., a quantum dot embedded in an optical cavity. The degree of indistinguishability, governing the quantum mechanical...... diagonalization approach. We find that for large cavity decay rates the perturbation theory may break down....

  6. APFEL: A PDF Evolution Library with QED corrections

    CERN Document Server

    Bertone, Valerio; Rojo, Juan

    2014-01-01

    Quantum electrodynamics and electroweak corrections are important ingredients for many theoretical predictions at the LHC. This paper documents APFEL, a new PDF evolution package that allows for the first time to perform DGLAP evolution up to NNLO in QCD and to LO in QED, in the variable-flavor-number scheme and with either pole or MSbar heavy quark masses. APFEL consistently accounts for the QED corrections to the evolution of quark and gluon PDFs and for the contribution from the photon PDF in the proton. The coupled QCD+QED equations are solved in x-space by means of higher order interpolation, followed by Runge-Kutta solution of the resulting discretized evolution equations. APFEL is based on an innovative and flexible methodology for the sequential solution of the QCD and QED evolution equations and their combination. In addition to PDF evolution, APFEL provides a module that computes Deep-Inelastic Scattering structure functions in the FONLL general-mass variable-flavor-number scheme up to O($\\alpha_s^2...

  7. Gamma-ray generation from laser-driven electron resonant acceleration: In the non-QED and the QED regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, B.; Chang, H. X.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; He, X. T.

    2017-12-01

    Electron acceleration and γ-ray emission by circularly polarized laser pulses interacting with near-critical-density plasmas are systematically investigated for both the non-quantum-electrodynamic (non-QED) and QED regimes. In the non-QED regime, since electron density in the plasma channel is small and the self-generated electromagnetic fields are weak, only a few electrons can achieve the resonant acceleration, leading to weak γ-ray emission. However, when it comes to the QED regime, the radiation recoil force significantly affects the electron dynamics, which helps in not only the trapping of electrons, but also the relaxing of the condition for electrons to hit the resonance with laser fields, resulting in the formation of an ultradense helical electron bunch under resonant acceleration in the plasma channel. Therefore, an intense γ-ray pulse with unprecedented flux can be generated. Theoretical analysis and three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are carried out to compare the dynamics in two different regimes.

  8. Combining NNPDF3.0 and NNPDF2.3QED through the APFEL evolution code

    CERN Document Server

    Bertone, Valerio

    2016-01-01

    We present sets of parton distribution functions (PDFs), based on the NNPDF3.0 family, which include the photon PDF from the NNPDF2.3QED sets, and leading-order QED contributions to the DGLAP evolution as implemented in the public code APFEL. The aim is to combine our state-of-the-art determination of quark and gluon PDFs with the so far only direct determination of the photon PDF from LHC data. In addition, the use of APFEL allowed us to employ a solution of the DGLAP equation that, differently from that used for the NNPDF2.3QED sets, includes QED corrections in a more accurate way. We briefly discuss how these sets are constructed and investigate the effect of the inclusion of the QED corrections on PDFs and parton luminosities. Finally, we compare the resulting sets, which we dubbed NNPDF3.0QED, to the older NNPDF2.3QED sets and to all presently available PDF sets that include QED corrections, namely CT14QED and MRST2004QED.

  9. Dissipative photonic lattice solitons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultanir, Erdem A; Stegeman, George I; Christodoulides, Demetrios N

    2004-04-15

    We show that discrete dissipative optical lattice solitons are possible in waveguide array configurations that involve periodically patterned semiconductor optical amplifiers and saturable absorbers. The characteristics of these low-power soliton states are investigated, and their propagation constant eigenvalues are mapped on Floquet-Bloch band diagrams. The prospect of observing such low-power dissipative lattice solitons is discussed in detail.

  10. Dissipative universal Lindbladian simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardi, Paolo; Marshall, Jeffrey; Campos Venuti, Lorenzo

    2016-02-01

    It is by now well understood that quantum dissipative processes can be harnessed and turned into a resource for quantum-information processing tasks. In this paper we demonstrate yet another way in which this is true by providing a dissipation-assisted protocol for the simulation of general Markovian dynamics. More precisely, we show how a suitable coherent coupling of a quantum system to a set of Markovian dissipating qubits allows one to enact an effective Liouvillian generator of any Lindbladian form. This effective dynamical generator arises from high-order virtual-dissipative processes and governs the system dynamics exactly in the limit of infinitely fast dissipation. Applications to the simulation of collective decoherence are discussed as an illustration.

  11. Convergence of the multimode quantum Rabi model of circuit quantum electrodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gely, M.F.; Parra-Rodriguez, Adrian; Bothner, D.; Blanter, Y.M.; Bosman, S.J.; Solano, Enrique; Steele, G.A.

    2017-01-01

    Circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED) studies the interaction of artificial atoms, open transmission lines, and electromagnetic resonators fabricated from superconducting electronics. While the theory of an artificial atom coupled to one mode of a resonator is well studied, considering multiple

  12. PHOTOS Monte Carlo for precision simulation of QED in decays

    CERN Document Server

    Was, Z; Nanava, G

    2007-01-01

    Because of properties of QED, the bremsstrahlung corrections to decays of particles or resonances can be calculated, with a good precision, separately from other effects. Thanks to the widespread use of event records such calculations can be embodied into a separate module of Monte Carlo simulation chains, as used in High Energy Experiments of today. The PHOTOS Monte Carlo program is used for this purpose since nearly 20 years now. In the following talk let us review the main ideas and constraints which shaped the program version of today and enabled it widespread use. We will concentrate specially on conflicting requirements originating from the properties of QED matrix elements on one side and degrading (evolving) with time standards of event record(s). These issues, quite common in other modular software applications, become more and more difficult to handle as precision requirements become higher.

  13. New uncertainties in QCD–QED rescaling factors using quadrature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mass scale down to the physical quark mass scale is parametrised by the QCD–. QED rescaling factors ηf defined by ηf = mf (mf )/mf (mt). This is an important parameter which appears in many expressions related for the predictions of GUTs at low-energy scale. The calculation of ηf involves the input values of e.m and.

  14. QED the strange theory of light and matter

    CERN Document Server

    Feynman, Richard Phillips

    2006-01-01

    Celebrated for his brilliantly quirky insights into the physical world, Nobel laureate Richard Feynman also possessed an extraordinary talent for explaining difficult concepts to the general public. Here Feynman provides a classic and definitive introduction to QED (namely quantum electrodynamics), that part of quantum field theory describing the interactions of light with charged particles. Using everyday language, spatial concepts, visualizations, and his renowned ""Feynman diagrams"" instead of advanced mathematics, Feynman clearly and humorously communicates both the substance and spiri

  15. Hard-Photon Production and Tests of QED at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Acciarri, M.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Ambrosi, G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Angelescu, T.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Baksay, L.; Balandras, A.; Ball, R.C.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Barone, L.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Bhattacharya, S.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brigljevic, V.; Brochu, F.; Buffini, A.; Buijs, A.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Button, A.; Cai, X.D.; Campanelli, Mario; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.M.; Casaus, J.; Castellini, G.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chaturvedi, U.K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colijn, A.P.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; Cotorobai, F.; Cozzoni, B.; de la Cruz, B.; Csilling, A.; Cucciarelli, S.; Dai, T.S.; van Dalen, J.A.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Degre, A.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; van Dierendonck, D.; Di Lodovico, F.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Dominguez, A.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Dufournaud, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Erne, F.C.; Extermann, P.; Fabre, M.; Faccini, R.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Ferroni, F.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Fredj, L.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gau, S.S.; Gentile, S.; Gheordanescu, N.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hasan, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hidas, P.; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Holzner, G.; Hoorani, H.; Hou, S.R.; Iashvili, I.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Khan, R.A.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, D.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, J.K.; Kim, S.C.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kiss, D.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopp, A.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Krenz, W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, H.J.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Leonardi, Emanuele; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, David; Lugnier, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Maity, M.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mangeol, D.; Marchesini, P.; Marian, G.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Massaro, G.G.G.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; von der Mey, M.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Molnar, P.; Monteleoni, B.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G.S.; Muheim, F.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musy, M.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niessen, T.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Oh, Y.D.; Organtini, G.; Oulianov, A.; Palomares, C.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Park, H.K.; Park, I.H.; Pascale, G.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pieri, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Pothier, J.; Produit, N.; Prokofev, D.O.; Prokofev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M.A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Raspereza, A.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; van Rhee, T.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Robohm, A.; Rodin, J.; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruschmeier, D.; Rykaczewski, H.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, M.P.; Sarakinos, M.E.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Sciarrino, D.; Seganti, A.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Smith, B.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stone, A.; Stone, H.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Sztaricskai, T.; Tang, X.W.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Uchida, Y.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobov, A.A.; Vorvolakos, A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, A.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wu, S.X.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Ye, J.B.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, An.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zichichi, A.; Zilizi, G.; Zoller, M.

    2000-01-01

    The total and differential cross sections of the process $\\epem \\ra n \\gamma$ with $n \\geq 2$ are measuredusing data collected by the L3 experiment at centre--of--mass energies of $\\sqrt{s}=183$ and $189$\\GeV{}. The results are in agreement with the Standard Model expectations. Limits are set on deviationsfrom QED, contact interaction cut-off parameters and masses of excited electrons.

  16. Production of the Smallest QED Atom: True Muonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Lebed, Richard F.

    2009-04-15

    The 'true muonium' ({mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}) and 'true tauonium' ({tau}{sup +}{tau}{sup -}) bound states are not only the heaviest, but also the most compact pure QED systems. The rapid weak decay of the {tau} makes the observation of true tauonium difficult. However, as we show, the production and study of true muonium is possible at modern electron-positron colliders.

  17. Low energy hadronic contribution to the QED vacuum polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhardt, H

    2005-01-01

    Recent improvements in the low energy e+e- annihilation data and their influence on the determination of the hadronic contribution to the running of the QED fine structure constant at m_Z are discussed. Using CMD-2 and KLOE measurements in the rho region we obtain Delta alpha(5)_had(s) = 0.02758 +/- 0.00035 at s = m_Z^2.

  18. Multimode circuit quantum electrodynamics with hybrid metamaterial transmission lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, D J; Wilhelm, F K

    2013-10-18

    Quantum transmission lines are central to superconducting and hybrid quantum computing. In this work we show how coupling them to a left-handed transmission line allows circuit QED to reach a new regime: multimode ultrastrong coupling. Out of the many potential applications of this novel device, we discuss the preparation of multipartite entangled states and the simulation of the spin-boson model where a quantum phase transition is reached up to finite size effects.

  19. Relativistic dissipative fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Geroch, R

    1993-01-01

    We observe in Nature fluids that manifest dissipation, e.g., the effects of heat conductivity and viscosity. We believe that all physical phenomena are to be described within the framework of General Relativity. What, then, is the appropriate description of a relativistic dissipative fluid? This is not only a question of principle, but also one of practical interest. There exist systems, such as certain neutron stars, in which relativity and dissipation are at the same time significant.

  20. Strong Coupling Cavity QED with Gate-Defined Double Quantum Dots Enabled by a High Impedance Resonator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Stockklauser

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The strong coupling limit of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED implies the capability of a matterlike quantum system to coherently transform an individual excitation into a single photon within a resonant structure. This not only enables essential processes required for quantum information processing but also allows for fundamental studies of matter-light interaction. In this work, we demonstrate strong coupling between the charge degree of freedom in a gate-defined GaAs double quantum dot (DQD and a frequency-tunable high impedance resonator realized using an array of superconducting quantum interference devices. In the resonant regime, we resolve the vacuum Rabi mode splitting of size 2g/2π=238  MHz at a resonator linewidth κ/2π=12  MHz and a DQD charge qubit decoherence rate of γ_{2}/2π=40  MHz extracted independently from microwave spectroscopy in the dispersive regime. Our measurements indicate a viable path towards using circuit-based cavity QED for quantum information processing in semiconductor nanostructures.

  1. Measuring circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Graf, Rudolf F

    1996-01-01

    This series of circuits provides designers with a quick source for measuring circuits. Why waste time paging through huge encyclopedias when you can choose the topic you need and select any of the specialized circuits sorted by application?This book in the series has 250-300 practical, ready-to-use circuit designs, with schematics and brief explanations of circuit operation. The original source for each circuit is listed in an appendix, making it easy to obtain additional information.Ready-to-use circuits.Grouped by application for easy look-up.Circuit source listings

  2. Oscillator circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Graf, Rudolf F

    1996-01-01

    This series of circuits provides designers with a quick source for oscillator circuits. Why waste time paging through huge encyclopedias when you can choose the topic you need and select any of the specialized circuits sorted by application?This book in the series has 250-300 practical, ready-to-use circuit designs, with schematics and brief explanations of circuit operation. The original source for each circuit is listed in an appendix, making it easy to obtain additional information.Ready-to-use circuits.Grouped by application for easy look-up.Circuit source listing

  3. Driver circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Raymond T. (Inventor); Higashi, Stanley T. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A driver circuit which has low power requirements, a relatively small number of components and provides flexibility in output voltage setting. The driver circuit comprises, essentially, two portions which are selectively activated by the application of input signals. The output signal is determined by which of the two circuit portions is activated. While each of the two circuit portions operates in a manner similar to silicon controlled rectifiers (SCR), the circuit portions are on only when an input signal is supplied thereto.

  4. Beyond Quantum Fields: A Classical Fields Approach to QED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chafin C.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A classical field theory is introduced that is defined on a tower of dimensionally in- creasing spaces and is argued to be equivalent to QED. The domain of dependence is discussed to show how an equal times picture of the many coordinate space gives QED results as part of a well posed initial value formalism. Identical particle symmetries are not, a priori, required but when introduced are clearly propagated. This construc- tion uses only classical fields to provide some explanation for why quantum fields and canonical commutation results have been successful. Some old and essential questions regarding causality of propagators are resolved. The problem of resummation, gener- ally forbidden for conditionally convergent series, is dis cussed from the standpoint of particular truncations of the infinite tower of functions an d a two step adiabatic turn on for scattering. As a result of this approach it is shown that the photon inherits its quantization ~ ω from the free lagrangian of the Dirac electrons despite the fact that the free electromagnetic lagrangian has no ~ in it. This provides a possible explanation for the canonical commutation relations for quantum operators , [ ˆ P , ˆ Q ] = i ~ , without ever needing to invoke such a quantum postulate. The form of the equal times conservation laws in this many particle field theory suggests a simplification of the radiation reaction process for fields that allows QED to arise from a sum of path integrals in the various particle time coordinates. A novel method of unifying this theory with gravity, but that has no obvious quantum field theoretic computational scheme , is introduced.

  5. Graphene heat dissipating structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Cody M.; Lambert, Timothy N.; Wheeler, David R.; Rodenbeck, Christopher T.; Railkar, Tarak A.

    2017-08-01

    Various technologies presented herein relate to forming one or more heat dissipating structures (e.g., heat spreaders and/or heat sinks) on a substrate, wherein the substrate forms part of an electronic component. The heat dissipating structures are formed from graphene, with advantage being taken of the high thermal conductivity of graphene. The graphene (e.g., in flake form) is attached to a diazonium molecule, and further, the diazonium molecule is utilized to attach the graphene to material forming the substrate. A surface of the substrate is treated to comprise oxide-containing regions and also oxide-free regions having underlying silicon exposed. The diazonium molecule attaches to the oxide-free regions, wherein the diazonium molecule bonds (e.g., covalently) to the exposed silicon. Attachment of the diazonium plus graphene molecule is optionally repeated to enable formation of a heat dissipating structure of a required height.

  6. Axial currents, supercurrents and anomalies in supersymmetric QED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, T.E.

    1979-01-01

    The currents associated with the superconformal symmetries are defined as moments of the supercurrent, V/sub ..mu... All of the current (non-) conservation equations are known once the generalized trace of the supercurrent, D/sup ..cap alpha../V/sub ..cap alpha cap alpha../, is found. The superconformal anomalies are shown to have coefficients given by ..beta.. of the Callan-Symanzik equation. In super QED there is an additional U(1) axial current whose anomaly has a coefficient with no radiative corrections. 5 references.

  7. Multiphoton production and tests of QED at LEP-II

    CERN Document Server

    Winter, M

    2001-01-01

    Data collected by the 4 LEP collaborations from 1995 to 2000 at collision energies ranging from 130 to 208 GeV were used to measure the cross-section of the process e/sup +/e/sup -/ to gamma gamma ( gamma ). QED predictions for this reaction were tested with a few per-cent accuracy and manifestations of physics beyond the standard model (SM) were investigated. Preliminary lower bounds on the cut-off parameter Lambda /sub +or-/, the mass of an excited electron, the string mass scale underlying low-scale quantum gravity and on energy scales expressing various contact interactions were derived.

  8. QED $\\otimes$ QCD Threshold Corrections at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Glosser, C; Ward, B F L; Yost, S A

    2004-01-01

    We use the theory of YFS resummation to compute the size of the expected resummed soft radiative threshold effects in precision studies of heavy particle production at the LHC, where accuracies of 1 percent are desired in some processes. We find that the soft QED threshold effects are at the level of 0.3 percent whereas the soft QCD threshold effects enter at the level of 20 percent and hence both must be controlled to be on the conservative side to achieve such goals.

  9. Low's Subleading Soft Theorem as a Symmetry of QED

    OpenAIRE

    Lysov, Vyacheslav; Pasterski, Sabrina; Strominger, Andrew E.

    2014-01-01

    It was shown by F. Low in the 1950s that the subleading terms of soft photon S-matrix elements obey a universal linear relation. In this paper we give a new interpretation to this old relation, for the case of massless QED, as an infinitesimal symmetry of the S-matrix. The symmetry is shown to be locally generated by a vector field on the conformal sphere at null infinity. Explicit expressions are constructed for the associated charges as integrals over null infinity and shown to generate the...

  10. Low's subleading soft theorem as a symmetry of QED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysov, Vyacheslav; Pasterski, Sabrina; Strominger, Andrew

    2014-09-12

    It was shown by Low in the 1950s that the subleading terms of soft-photon S-matrix elements obey a universal linear relation. In this Letter, we give a new interpretation to this old relation, for the case of massless QED, as an infinitesimal symmetry of the S matrix. The symmetry is shown to be locally generated by a vector field on the conformal sphere at null infinity. Explicit expressions are constructed for the associated charges as integrals over null infinity and shown to generate the symmetry. These charges are local generalizations of electric and magnetic dipole charges.

  11. Dissipative structures and chaos

    CERN Document Server

    Mori, Hazime

    1998-01-01

    This monograph consists of two parts and gives an approach to the physics of open nonequilibrium systems. Part I derives the phenomena of dissipative structures on the basis of reduced evolution equations and includes Bénard convection and Belousov-Zhabotinskii chemical reactions. Part II discusses the physics and structures of chaos. While presenting a construction of the statistical physics of chaos, the authors unify the geometrical and statistical descriptions of dynamical systems. The shape of chaotic attractors is characterized, as are the mixing and diffusion of chaotic orbits and the fluctuation of energy dissipation exhibited by chaotic systems.

  12. Quantum Dissipative Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Major advances in the quantum theory of macroscopic systems, in combination with stunning experimental achievements, have brightened the field and brought it to the attention of the general community in natural sciences. Today, working knowledge of dissipative quantum mechanics is an essential tool for many physicists. This book - originally published in 1990 and republished in 1999 as an enlarged second edition - delves much deeper than ever before into the fundamental concepts, methods, and applications of quantum dissipative systems, including the most recent developments. In this third edi

  13. Energy dissipation dataset for reversible logic gates in quantum dot-cellular automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Newaz Bahar

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an energy dissipation dataset of different reversible logic gates in quantum-dot cellular automata. The proposed circuits have been designed and verified using QCADesigner simulator. Besides, the energy dissipation has been calculated under three different tunneling energy level at temperature T=2 K. For estimating the energy dissipation of proposed gates; QCAPro tool has been employed.

  14. Chiral current generation in QED by longitudinal photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.L. Acosta Avalo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We report the generation of a pseudovector electric current having imbalanced chirality in an electron–positron strongly magnetized gas in QED. It propagates along the external applied magnetic field B as a chiral magnetic effect in QED. It is triggered by a perturbative electric field parallel to B, associated to a pseudovector longitudinal mode propagating along B. An electromagnetic chemical potential was introduced, but our results remain valid even when it vanishes. A nonzero fermion mass was assumed, which is usually considered vanishing in the literature. In the quantum field theory formalism at finite temperature and density, an anomaly relation for the axial current was found for a medium of massive fermions. It bears some analogy to the Adler–Bell–Jackiw anomaly. From the expression for the chiral current in terms of the photon self-energy tensor in a medium, it is obtained that electrons and positrons scattered by longitudinal photons (inside the light cone contribute to the chiral current, as well as the to pair creation due to longitudinal photons (out of light cone. In the static limit, an electric pseudovector current is obtained in the lowest Landau level.

  15. Chiral current generation in QED by longitudinal photons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acosta Avalo, J.L., E-mail: jlacosta@instec.cu [Instituto Superior de Tecnologías y Ciencias Aplicadas (INSTEC), Ave Salvador Allende, No. 1110, Vedado, La Habana 10400 (Cuba); Pérez Rojas, H., E-mail: hugo@icimaf.cu [Instituto de Cibernética, Matemática y Física (ICIMAF), Calle E esq 15, No. 309, Vedado, La Habana 10400 (Cuba)

    2016-08-15

    We report the generation of a pseudovector electric current having imbalanced chirality in an electron–positron strongly magnetized gas in QED. It propagates along the external applied magnetic field B as a chiral magnetic effect in QED. It is triggered by a perturbative electric field parallel to B, associated to a pseudovector longitudinal mode propagating along B. An electromagnetic chemical potential was introduced, but our results remain valid even when it vanishes. A nonzero fermion mass was assumed, which is usually considered vanishing in the literature. In the quantum field theory formalism at finite temperature and density, an anomaly relation for the axial current was found for a medium of massive fermions. It bears some analogy to the Adler–Bell–Jackiw anomaly. From the expression for the chiral current in terms of the photon self-energy tensor in a medium, it is obtained that electrons and positrons scattered by longitudinal photons (inside the light cone) contribute to the chiral current, as well as the to pair creation due to longitudinal photons (out of light cone). In the static limit, an electric pseudovector current is obtained in the lowest Landau level.

  16. Measurements of the QED Structure of the Photon

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Altekamp, N.; Anderson, K.J.; Anderson, S.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Ashby, S.F.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, J.R.; Baumann, S.; Bechtluft, J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bentvelsen, S.; Bethke, S.; Betts, S.; Biebel, O.; Biguzzi, A.; Blobel, V.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Chrisman, D.; Ciocca, C.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Conboy, J.E.; Cooke, O.C.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Coxe, R.L.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Davis, R.; De Jong, S.; de Roeck, A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Doucet, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Estabrooks, P.G.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanti, M.; Faust, A.A.; Fiedler, F.; Fierro, M.; Fleck, I.; Folman, R.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gascon, J.; Gascon-Shotkin, S.M.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Gibson, V.; Gibson, W.R.; Gingrich, D.M.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Gorn, W.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Hansroul, M.; Hapke, M.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hargrove, C.K.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herndon, M.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hildreth, M.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hobson, P.R.; Hoch, M.; Hocker, James Andrew; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Honma, A.K.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Imrie, D.C.; Ishii, K.; Jacob, F.R.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jimack, M.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayal, P.I.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klier, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Kolrep, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lauber, J.; Lautenschlager, S.R.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Lazic, D.; Lee, A.M.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; List, B.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Lui, D.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Mannelli, M.; Marcellini, S.; Markopoulos, C.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; Mckigney, E.A.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menke, S.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, J.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mir, R.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Ogren, H.O.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Palinkas, J.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Patt, J.; Perez-Ochoa, R.; Petzold, S.; Pfeifenschneider, P.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poffenberger, P.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Przybycien, M.; Rembser, C.; Rick, H.; Robertson, S.; Robins, S.A.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sang, W.M.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schmitt, S.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.P.; Sittler, A.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Steuerer, J.; Stoll, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Taras, P.; Tarem, S.; Teuscher, R.; Thiergen, M.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Towers, S.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turcot, A.S.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Van Kooten, Rick J.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Wackerle, F.; Wagner, A.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wermes, N.; White, J.S.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Yekutieli, G.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    1999-01-01

    The structure of both quasi-real and highly virtual photons is investigated using the reaction e+e- -> e+e-mu+mu-, proceeding via the exchange of two photons. The results are based on the complete OPAL dataset taken at e+e- centre-of-mass energies close to the mass of the Z boson. The QED structure function F_2^gamma and the differential cross-section dsigdx for quasi-real photons are obtained as functions of the fractional momentum x from the muon momentum which is carried by the struck muon in the quasi-real photon for values of Q**2 ranging from 1.5 to 400 GeV**2. The differential cross-section dsigdx for highly virtual photons is measured for 1.5 P**2. Based on azimuthal correlations the QED structure functions F_A^gamma and F_B^gamma for quasi-real photons are determined for an average Q**2 of 5.4 GeV**2.

  17. Large gauge symmetries and asymptotic states in QED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabai, Barak; Sever, Amit [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University,Ramat Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2016-12-19

    Large Gauge Transformations (LGT) are gauge transformations that do not vanish at infinity. Instead, they asymptotically approach arbitrary functions on the conformal sphere at infinity. Recently, it was argued that the LGT should be treated as an infinite set of global symmetries which are spontaneously broken by the vacuum. It was established that in QED, the Ward identities of their induced symmetries are equivalent to the Soft Photon Theorem. In this paper we study the implications of LGT on the S-matrix between physical asymptotic states in massive QED. In appose to the naively free scattering states, physical asymptotic states incorporate the long range electric field between asymptotic charged particles and were already constructed in 1970 by Kulish and Faddeev. We find that the LGT charge is independent of the particles’ momenta and may be associated to the vacuum. The soft theorem’s manifestation as a Ward identity turns out to be an outcome of not working with the physical asymptotic states.

  18. Multipartite quantum correlations among atoms in QED cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batle, J.; Farouk, A.; Tarawneh, O.; Abdalla, S.

    2018-02-01

    We study the nonlocality dynamics for two models of atoms in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED); the first model contains atoms in a single cavity undergoing nearest-neighbor interactions with no initial correlation, and the second contains atoms confined in n different and noninteracting cavities, all of which were initially prepared in a maximally correlated state of n qubits corresponding to the atomic degrees of freedom. The nonlocality evolution of the states in the second model shows that the corresponding maximal violation of a multipartite Bell inequality exhibits revivals at precise times, defining, nonlocality sudden deaths and nonlocality sudden rebirths, in analogy with entanglement. These quantum correlations are provided analytically for the second model to make the study more thorough. Differences in the first model regarding whether the array of atoms inside the cavity is arranged in a periodic or open fashion are crucial to the generation or redistribution of quantum correlations. This contribution paves the way to using the nonlocality multipartite correlation measure for describing the collective complex behavior displayed by slightly interacting cavity QED arrays.

  19. Quantum-circuit refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kuan Yen; Partanen, Matti; Lake, Russell E.; Govenius, Joonas; Masuda, Shumpei; Möttönen, Mikko

    2017-05-01

    Quantum technology promises revolutionizing applications in information processing, communications, sensing and modelling. However, efficient on-demand cooling of the functional quantum degrees of freedom remains challenging in many solid-state implementations, such as superconducting circuits. Here we demonstrate direct cooling of a superconducting resonator mode using voltage-controllable electron tunnelling in a nanoscale refrigerator. This result is revealed by a decreased electron temperature at a resonator-coupled probe resistor, even for an elevated electron temperature at the refrigerator. Our conclusions are verified by control experiments and by a good quantitative agreement between theory and experimental observations at various operation voltages and bath temperatures. In the future, we aim to remove spurious dissipation introduced by our refrigerator and to decrease the operational temperature. Such an ideal quantum-circuit refrigerator has potential applications in the initialization of quantum electric devices. In the superconducting quantum computer, for example, fast and accurate reset of the quantum memory is needed.

  20. Quantum-circuit refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kuan Yen; Partanen, Matti; Lake, Russell E.; Govenius, Joonas; Masuda, Shumpei; Möttönen, Mikko

    2017-01-01

    Quantum technology promises revolutionizing applications in information processing, communications, sensing and modelling. However, efficient on-demand cooling of the functional quantum degrees of freedom remains challenging in many solid-state implementations, such as superconducting circuits. Here we demonstrate direct cooling of a superconducting resonator mode using voltage-controllable electron tunnelling in a nanoscale refrigerator. This result is revealed by a decreased electron temperature at a resonator-coupled probe resistor, even for an elevated electron temperature at the refrigerator. Our conclusions are verified by control experiments and by a good quantitative agreement between theory and experimental observations at various operation voltages and bath temperatures. In the future, we aim to remove spurious dissipation introduced by our refrigerator and to decrease the operational temperature. Such an ideal quantum-circuit refrigerator has potential applications in the initialization of quantum electric devices. In the superconducting quantum computer, for example, fast and accurate reset of the quantum memory is needed. PMID:28480900

  1. Cutoff-Free Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekakhlagh, Moein; Petrescu, Alexandru; Türeci, Hakan E.

    2017-08-01

    Any quantum-confined electronic system coupled to the electromagnetic continuum is subject to radiative decay and renormalization of its energy levels. When coupled to a cavity, these quantities can be strongly modified with respect to their values in vacuum. Generally, this modification can be accurately captured by including only the closest resonant mode of the cavity. In the circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture, it is, however, found that the radiative decay rates are strongly influenced by far off-resonant modes. A multimode calculation accounting for the infinite set of cavity modes leads to divergences unless a cutoff is imposed. It has so far not been identified what the source of divergence is. We show here that unless gauge invariance is respected, any attempt at the calculation of circuit QED quantities is bound to diverge. We then present a theoretical approach to the calculation of a finite spontaneous emission rate and the Lamb shift that is free of cutoff.

  2. Extensions of time density functional theory to QED: QED-Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Angel

    n this talk we will review the recent advances within density-functional and many-body based schemes to describe spectroscopic properties of complex systems with special emphasis to modelling time and spatially resolved electron spectroscopies We will discuss the theoretical approaches developed in the group for the characterisation of matter out of equilibrium, the control material processes at the electronic level and tailor material properties, and master energy and information on the nanoscale to propose new devices with capabilities. We will focus on examples linked to the efficient conversion of light into electricity or chemical fuels (''artificial photosynthesis'') and the design on new nanostructured based optoelectronic devices based on inorganic nanotubes, among others. The goal is to provide a detailed, efficient, and at the same time accurate microscopic approach for the ab-initio description and control of the dynamics of decoherence and dissipation in quantum many-body systems. With the help of quantum optimal control (QOC) theory and the mastery over spectroscopy we could direct the movement of electrons, selectively trigger chemical reactions and processes, and create new materials

  3. Ultra-Low-Energy Sub-Threshold Circuits: Program Overview

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chandrakasan, Anantha

    2007-01-01

    .... This concept was demonstrated with a UWB baseband processor. We have developed a DC-DC converter to efficiently deliver sub-threshold voltage and minimize the power dissipation of an arbitrary digital circuit...

  4. Early dissipation and viscosity

    OpenAIRE

    Bozek, Piotr

    2008-01-01

    We consider dissipative phenomena due to the relaxation of an initial anisotropic local pressure in the fireball created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions, both for the Bjorken boost-invariant case and for the azimuthally symmetric radial expansion with boost-invariance. The resulting increase of the entropy can be counterbalanced by a suitable retuning of the initial temperature. An increase of the transverse collective flow is observed. The influence of the shear viscosity on the longitu...

  5. Measurement-induced qubit state mixing in circuit QED from up-converted dephasing noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slichter, D H; Vijay, R; Weber, S J; Boutin, S; Boissonneault, M; Gambetta, J M; Blais, A; Siddiqi, I

    2012-10-12

    We observe measurement-induced qubit state mixing in a transmon qubit dispersively coupled to a planar readout cavity. Our results indicate that dephasing noise at the qubit-readout detuning frequency is up-converted by readout photons to cause spurious qubit state transitions, thus limiting the nondemolition character of the readout. Furthermore, we use the qubit transition rate as a tool to extract an equivalent flux noise spectral density at f~1 GHz and find agreement with values extrapolated from a 1/f(α) fit to the measured flux noise spectral density below 1 Hz.

  6. Micromachined Integrated Quantum Circuit Containing a Superconducting Qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecht, T.; Chu, Y.; Axline, C.; Pfaff, W.; Blumoff, J. Z.; Chou, K.; Krayzman, L.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2017-04-01

    We present a device demonstrating a lithographically patterned transmon integrated with a micromachined cavity resonator. Our two-cavity, one-qubit device is a multilayer microwave-integrated quantum circuit (MMIQC), comprising a basic unit capable of performing circuit-QED operations. We describe the qubit-cavity coupling mechanism of a specialized geometry using an electric-field picture and a circuit model, and obtain specific system parameters using simulations. Fabrication of the MMIQC includes lithography, etching, and metallic bonding of silicon wafers. Superconducting wafer bonding is a critical capability that is demonstrated by a micromachined storage-cavity lifetime of 34.3 μ s , corresponding to a quality factor of 2 ×106 at single-photon energies. The transmon coherence times are T1=6.4 μ s , and T2echo=11.7 μ s . We measure qubit-cavity dispersive coupling with a rate χq μ/2 π =-1.17 MHz , constituting a Jaynes-Cummings system with an interaction strength g /2 π =49 MHz . With these parameters we are able to demonstrate circuit-QED operations in the strong dispersive regime with ease. Finally, we highlight several improvements and anticipated extensions of the technology to complex MMIQCs.

  7. Four-dimensional aether-like Lorentz-breaking QED revisited and problem of ambiguities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeta Scarpelli, A.P. [Setor Tecnico-Cientifico, Departamento de Policia Federal, Rua Hugo D' Antola, 95, Lapa, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Mariz, T. [Universidade Federal de Alagoas, Instituto de Fisica, Maceio, Alagoas (Brazil); Nascimento, J.R.; Petrov, A.Yu. [Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Departamento de Fisica, Caixa Postal 5008, Joao Pessoa, Paraiba (Brazil)

    2013-08-15

    In this paper, we consider the perturbative generation of the CPT-even aether-like Lorentz-breaking term in the extended Lorentz-breaking QED within different approaches and discuss its ambiguities. (orig.)

  8. Critical Exponents, Scaling Law, Universality and Renormalization Group Flow in Strong Coupling QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Kei-Ichi

    The critical behavior of strongly coupled QED with a chiral-invariant four-fermion interaction (gauged Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model) is investigated through the unquenched Schwinger-Dyson equation including the fermion loop effect at the one-loop level. It is shown that the critical exponents satisfy the (hyper)scaling relations as in the quenched case. However, the respective critical exponent takes the classical mean-field value, and consequently unquenched QED belongs to the same universality class as the zero-charge model. On the other hand, it is pointed out that quenched QED violates not only universality but also weak universality, due to continuously varying critical exponents. Furthermore, the renormalization group flow of constant renormalized charge is given. All the results are consistent with triviality of QED and the gauged Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model in the unquenched case.

  9. Phase structure of QED$_{3}$ at finite temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Aitchison, Ian Johnston Rhind; Klein-Kreisler, M; Mavromatos, Nikolaos E

    1992-01-01

    Dynamical symmetry breaking in three-dimensional QED with N fermion flavours is considered at finite temperature, in the large $N$ approximation. Using an approximate treatment of the Schwinger-Dyson equation for the fermion self-energy, we find that chiral symmetry is restored above a certain critical temperature which depends itself on $N$. We find that the ratio of the zero-momentum zero-temperature fermion mass to the critical temperature has a large value compared with four-fermion theories, as had been suggested in a previous work with a momentum-independent self-energy. Evidence of a temperature- dependent critical $N$ is shown to appear in this approximation. The phase diagram for spontaneous mass generation in the theory is presented in $T-N$ space.

  10. Quantum phase transition in many-flavor supersymmetric QED3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Jorge G.; Tierz, Miguel

    2017-02-01

    We study N =4 supersymmetric QED in three dimensions, on a 3-sphere, with 2 N massive hypermultiplets and a Fayet-Iliopoulos parameter. We identify the exact partition function of the theory with a conical (Mehler) function. This implies a number of analytical formulas, including a recurrence relation and a second-order differential equation, associated with an integrable system. In the large N limit, the theory undergoes a second-order phase transition on a critical line in the parameter space. We discuss the critical behavior and compute the two-point correlation function of a gauge invariant mass operator, which is shown to diverge as one approaches criticality from the subcritical phase. Finally, we comment on the asymptotic 1 /N expansion and on mirror symmetry.

  11. Quasiparticle lifetimes and infrared physics in QED and QCD plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaizot, J.P. [CEA-Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1997-09-22

    The perturbative calculation of the lifetime of fermion excitations in a QED plasma at high temperature is plagued with infrared divergences which are not eliminated by the screening corrections. The physical processes responsible for these divergences are the collisions involving the exchange of longwavelength, quasistatic, magnetic photons, which are not screened by plasma effects. The leading divergences can be resummed in a non-perturbative treatment based on a generalization of the Bloch-Nordsieck model at finite temperature. The resulting expression of the fermion propagator is free of infrared problems, and exhibits a non-exponential damping at large times: S{sub R}(t) {approx} exp(-{alpha}T t ln{omega}{sub p}t), where {omega}{sub p} = eT/3 is the plasma frequency and {alpha} = e{sup 2}/4{pi}.

  12. Non-linear Vacuum Phenomena in Non-commutative QED

    CERN Document Server

    Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís

    2001-01-01

    We show that the classic results of Schwinger on the exact propagation of particles in the background of constant field-strengths and plane waves can be readily extended to the case of non-commutative QED. It is shown that non-perturbative effects on constant backgrounds are the same as their commutative counterparts, provided the on-shell gauge invariant dynamics is referred to a non-perturbatively related space-time frame. For the case of the plane wave background, we find evidence of the effective extended nature of non-commutative particles, producing retarded and advanced effects in scattering. Besides the known `dipolar' character of non-commutative neutral particles, we find that charged particles are also effectively extended, but they behave instead as `half-dipoles'.

  13. The parity-preserving massive QED 3 : Vanishing β -function and no parity anomaly

    OpenAIRE

    Del Cima, O. M.

    2015-01-01

    The parity-preserving massive QED 3 exhibits vanishing gauge coupling β -function and is parity and infrared anomaly free at all orders in perturbation theory. Parity is not an anomalous symmetry, even for the parity-preserving massive QED 3 , in spite of some claims about the possibility of a perturbative parity breakdown, called parity anomaly. The proof is done by using the algebraic renormalization method, which is independent of any regularization scheme, based on general theorems of per...

  14. Two-loop QED corrections to the Altarelli-Parisi splitting functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florian, Daniel de [International Center for Advanced Studies (ICAS), UNSAM,Campus Miguelete, 25 de Mayo y Francia (1650) Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sborlini, Germán F.R.; Rodrigo, Germán [Instituto de Física Corpuscular, Universitat de València,Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas,Parc Científic, E-46980 Paterna, Valencia (Spain)

    2016-10-11

    We compute the two-loop QED corrections to the Altarelli-Parisi (AP) splitting functions by using a deconstructive algorithmic Abelianization of the well-known NLO QCD corrections. We present explicit results for the full set of splitting kernels in a basis that includes the leptonic distribution functions that, starting from this order in the QED coupling, couple to the partonic densities. Finally, we perform a phenomenological analysis of the impact of these corrections in the splitting functions.

  15. AN OVERVIEW OF POWER DISSIPATION AND CONTROL TECHNIQUES IN CMOS TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. ROMLI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Total power dissipation in CMOS circuits has become a huge challenging in current semiconductor industry due to the leakage current and the leakage power. The exponential growth of both static and dynamic power dissipations in any CMOS process technology option has increased the cost and efficiency of the system. Technology options are used for the execution specifications and usually it depends on the optimisation and the performance constraints over the chip. This article reviews the relevant researches of the source or power dissipation, the mechanism to reduce the dynamic power dissipation as well as static power dissipation and an overview of various circuit techniques to control them. Important device parameters including voltage threshold and switching capacitance impact to the circuit performance in lowering both dynamic and static power dissipation are presented. The demand for the reduction of power dissipation in CMOS technology shall remain a challenging and active area of research for years to come. Thus, this review shall work as a guideline for the researchers who wish to work on power dissipation and control techniques.

  16. The QED contribution to J/{psi} plus light hadrons production at B-factories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Zhi-Guo [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Wang, Jian-Xiong [Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics; Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing (China). Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities

    2013-01-15

    To understand the direct J/{psi}+X{sub non-c} {sub anti} {sub c} production mechanism in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation, in this work, we propose to measure the inclusive J/{psi} plus light hadrons (LH) production at B-factories and present a detailed study on its QED production due to {psi}(2S) feed-down, where the {psi}(2S) are produced in e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{psi}(2S)+{gamma} and e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{psi}(2S) +f anti f, f = lepton, lightquark, and QED contribution to direct J/{psi}+q anti q production with q = u, d, s quark. We find that the QED contribution is huge in the whole phase space region, but can be reduced largely and is in the same order as the QCD contribution when a suitable cut on the angel {theta}{sub J/{psi}} between J/{psi} and the e{sup +}e{sup -} beam is made. In this way, the cross section of J/{psi} + LH QCD production % which was predicted theoretical at next-to-leading order QCD together with relativistic correction, can be obtained by subtracting the QED contribution from the experimental measurement on inclusive J/{psi} plus light hadrons. To help to remove the QED background, we also calculate the angular and momentum distribution of J/{psi} in the QED contribution.

  17. Quantum dissipative systems

    CERN Document Server

    Weiss, Ulrich

    1993-01-01

    This book deals with the statistical mechanics and dynamics of open quantum systems moving irreversibly under the influence of a dissipative environment. The basic concepts and methods are described on the basis of a microscopic description with emphasis on the functional integral approach. The general theory for the time evolution of the density matrix of the damped system is developed. Many of the sophisticated ideas in the field are explained with simple models. The discussion includes, among others, the interplay between thermal and quantum fluctuations, quantum statistical decay, macrosco

  18. Power Dissipation in Division

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2008-01-01

    A few classes of algorithms to implement division in hardware have been used over the years: division by digit-recurrence, by reciprocal approximation by iterative methods and by polynomial approximation. Due to the differences in the algorithms, a comparison among their implementation in terms o...... of performance and precision is sometimes hard to make. In this work, we use power dissipation and energy consumption as metrics to compare among those different classes of algorithms. There are no previous works in the literature presenting such a comparison....

  19. Exploring the Physics of Semiconductor Quantum Dots using Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockklauser, Anna; Maisi, Ville; Ihn, Thomas; Ensslin, Klaus; Wallraff, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots and superconducting qubits both possess excitations in the microwave domain for which a wide range of novel approaches to create, store, manipulate and detect individual photons have been developed. A key ingredient are coplanar waveguide resonators in which the field energy of an excitation is distributed over a small mode volume. This feature creates sizable electromagnetic fields at the level of individual microwave photons mediating strong electromagnetic interactions with a variety of quantum systems. In an approach known as circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED) we both probe fundamental quantum optical effects and demonstrate basic features of quantum information processing. In this presentation, I will discuss experiments exploring the physics of semiconductor quantum dots in the context of circuit QED. We investigate the coherent dipole coupling of double dots to microwave photons and detect radiation emitted from the dots in inelastic electron tunneling processes. This approach may allow us to explore quantum coherent interfaces between semiconducting and superconducting qubits.

  20. Dissipation of Tidal Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The moon's gravity imparts tremendous energy to the Earth, raising tides throughout the global oceans. What happens to all this energy? This question has been pondered by scientists for over 200 years, and has consequences ranging from the history of the moon to the mixing of the oceans. Richard Ray at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. and Gary Egbert of the College of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Ore. studied six years of altimeter data from the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite to address this question. According to their report in the June 15 issue of Nature, about 1 terawatt, or 25 to 30 percent of the total tidal energy dissipation, occurs in the deep ocean. The remainder occurs in shallow seas, such as on the Patagonian Shelf. 'By measuring sea level with the TOPEX/Poseidon satellite altimeter, our knowledge of the tides in the global ocean has been remarkably improved,' said Richard Ray, a geophysicist at Goddard. The accuracies are now so high that this data can be used to map empirically the tidal energy dissipation. (Red areas, above) The deep-water tidal dissipation occurs generally near rugged bottom topography (seamounts and mid-ocean ridges). 'The observed pattern of deep-ocean dissipation is consistent with topographic scattering of tidal energy into internal motions within the water column, resulting in localized turbulence and mixing', said Gary Egbert an associate professor at OSU. One important implication of this finding concerns the possible energy sources needed to maintain the ocean's large-scale 'conveyor-belt' circulation and to mix upper ocean heat into the abyssal depths. It is thought that 2 terawatts are required for this process. The winds supply about 1 terawatt, and there has been speculation that the tides, by pumping energy into vertical water motions, supply the remainder. However, all current general circulation models of the oceans ignore the tides. 'It is possible that properly

  1. Implementing phase-covariant cloning in circuit quantum electrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Meng-Zheng [School of Physics and Material Science, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); School of Physics and Electronic Information, Huaibei Normal University, Huaibei 235000 (China); Ye, Liu, E-mail: yeliu@ahu.edu.cn [School of Physics and Material Science, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China)

    2016-10-15

    An efficient scheme is proposed to implement phase-covariant quantum cloning by using a superconducting transmon qubit coupled to a microwave cavity resonator in the strong dispersive limit of circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). By solving the master equation numerically, we plot the Wigner function and Poisson distribution of the cavity mode after each operation in the cloning transformation sequence according to two logic circuits proposed. The visualizations of the quasi-probability distribution in phase-space for the cavity mode and the occupation probability distribution in the Fock basis enable us to penetrate the evolution process of cavity mode during the phase-covariant cloning (PCC) transformation. With the help of numerical simulation method, we find out that the present cloning machine is not the isotropic model because its output fidelity depends on the polar angle and the azimuthal angle of the initial input state on the Bloch sphere. The fidelity for the actual output clone of the present scheme is slightly smaller than one in the theoretical case. The simulation results are consistent with the theoretical ones. This further corroborates our scheme based on circuit QED can implement efficiently PCC transformation.

  2. Fundamental limits of energy dissipation in charge-based computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boechler, Graham P.; Whitney, Jean M.; Lent, Craig S.; Orlov, Alexei O.; Snider, Gregory L.

    2010-09-01

    According to Landauer's principle, dissipation of energy is only necessary when information is erased, suggesting that vastly more efficient logical switches than transistors are possible. However, an influential analysis of binary switching suggests that representing information with electric charge is the root of the problem, that Landauer's principle is fundamentally flawed, and that any movement of charge, such as charging a capacitor, must dissipate at least kBT ln(2). Here, using a RC circuit, an energy loss of much less than kBT ln(2) is demonstrated while delivering energy of 100 kBT ln(2) to the capacitor. This shows that there is no fundamental lower limit to energy dissipation in moving charge.

  3. On the phase transition of light in cavity QED lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiro, Marco; Bordyuh, Mykola; Oztop, Baris; Tureci, Hakan

    2013-03-01

    Systems of strongly interacting atoms and photons, that can be realized wiring up individual cavity QED systems into lattices, are perceived as a new platform for quantum simulation. While sharing important properties with other systems of interacting quantum particles here we argue that the nature of light-matter interaction gives rise to unique features with no analogs in condensed matter or atomic physics setups. By discussing the physics of a lattice model of delocalized photons coupled locally with two-level systems through the elementary light-matter interaction described by the Rabi model, we argue that the inclusion of counter rotating terms, so far neglected, is crucial to stabilize finite-density quantum phases of correlated photons out of the vacuum, with no need for an artificially engineered chemical potential. We show that the competition between photon delocalization and Rabi non-linearity drives the system across a novel Z2 parity symmetry-breaking quantum criticality between two gapped phases which shares similarities with the Dicke transition of quantum optics and the Ising critical point of quantum magnetism. We discuss the phase diagram as well as the low-energy excitation spectrum and present analytic estimates for critical quantities.

  4. Phase Transition of Light in Cavity QED Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiró, M.; Bordyuh, M.; Öztop, B.; Türeci, H. E.

    2012-08-01

    Systems of strongly interacting atoms and photons, which can be realized wiring up individual cavity QED systems into lattices, are perceived as a new platform for quantum simulation. While sharing important properties with other systems of interacting quantum particles, here we argue that the nature of light-matter interaction gives rise to unique features with no analogs in condensed matter or atomic physics setups. By discussing the physics of a lattice model of delocalized photons coupled locally with two-level systems through the elementary light-matter interaction described by the Rabi model, we argue that the inclusion of counterrotating terms, so far neglected, is crucial to stabilize finite-density quantum phases of correlated photons out of the vacuum, with no need for an artificially engineered chemical potential. We show that the competition between photon delocalization and Rabi nonlinearity drives the system across a novel Z2 parity symmetry-breaking quantum criticality between two gapped phases that share similarities with the Dicke transition of quantum optics and the Ising critical point of quantum magnetism. We discuss the phase diagram as well as the low-energy excitation spectrum and present analytic estimates for critical quantities.

  5. Phase transition of light in cavity QED lattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiró, M; Bordyuh, M; Oztop, B; Türeci, H E

    2012-08-03

    Systems of strongly interacting atoms and photons, which can be realized wiring up individual cavity QED systems into lattices, are perceived as a new platform for quantum simulation. While sharing important properties with other systems of interacting quantum particles, here we argue that the nature of light-matter interaction gives rise to unique features with no analogs in condensed matter or atomic physics setups. By discussing the physics of a lattice model of delocalized photons coupled locally with two-level systems through the elementary light-matter interaction described by the Rabi model, we argue that the inclusion of counterrotating terms, so far neglected, is crucial to stabilize finite-density quantum phases of correlated photons out of the vacuum, with no need for an artificially engineered chemical potential. We show that the competition between photon delocalization and Rabi nonlinearity drives the system across a novel Z(2) parity symmetry-breaking quantum criticality between two gapped phases that share similarities with the Dicke transition of quantum optics and the Ising critical point of quantum magnetism. We discuss the phase diagram as well as the low-energy excitation spectrum and present analytic estimates for critical quantities.

  6. Dissipative Axial Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Notari, Alessio

    2016-12-22

    We analyze in detail the background cosmological evolution of a scalar field coupled to a massless abelian gauge field through an axial term $\\frac{\\phi}{f_\\gamma} F \\tilde{F}$, such as in the case of an axion. Gauge fields in this case are known to experience tachyonic growth and therefore can backreact on the background as an effective dissipation into radiation energy density $\\rho_R$, which which can lead to inflation without the need of a flat potential. We analyze the system, for momenta $k$ smaller than the cutoff $f_\\gamma$, including numerically the backreaction. We consider the evolution from a given static initial condition and explicitly show that, if $f_\\gamma$ is smaller than the field excursion $\\phi_0$ by about a factor of at least ${\\cal O} (20)$, there is a friction effect which turns on before that the field can fall down and which can then lead to a very long stage of inflation with a generic potential. In addition we find superimposed oscillations, which would get imprinted on any kind of...

  7. High precision hyperfine measurements in Bismuth challenge bound-state strong-field QED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmann, Johannes; Andelkovic, Zoran; Brandau, Carsten; Dax, Andreas; Geithner, Wolfgang; Geppert, Christopher; Gorges, Christian; Hammen, Michael; Hannen, Volker; Kaufmann, Simon; König, Kristian; Litvinov, Yuri A; Lochmann, Matthias; Maaß, Bernhard; Meisner, Johann; Murböck, Tobias; Sánchez, Rodolfo; Schmidt, Matthias; Schmidt, Stefan; Steck, Markus; Stöhlker, Thomas; Thompson, Richard C; Trageser, Christian; Vollbrecht, Jonas; Weinheimer, Christian; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried

    2017-05-16

    Electrons bound in highly charged heavy ions such as hydrogen-like bismuth 209 Bi 82+ experience electromagnetic fields that are a million times stronger than in light atoms. Measuring the wavelength of light emitted and absorbed by these ions is therefore a sensitive testing ground for quantum electrodynamical (QED) effects and especially the electron-nucleus interaction under such extreme conditions. However, insufficient knowledge of the nuclear structure has prevented a rigorous test of strong-field QED. Here we present a measurement of the so-called specific difference between the hyperfine splittings in hydrogen-like and lithium-like bismuth 209 Bi 82+,80+ with a precision that is improved by more than an order of magnitude. Even though this quantity is believed to be largely insensitive to nuclear structure and therefore the most decisive test of QED in the strong magnetic field regime, we find a 7-σ discrepancy compared with the theoretical prediction.

  8. High precision hyperfine measurements in Bismuth challenge bound-state strong-field QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullmann, Johannes; Andelkovic, Zoran; Brandau, Carsten; Dax, Andreas; Geithner, Wolfgang; Geppert, Christopher; Gorges, Christian; Hammen, Michael; Hannen, Volker; Kaufmann, Simon; König, Kristian; Litvinov, Yuri A.; Lochmann, Matthias; Maaß, Bernhard; Meisner, Johann; Murböck, Tobias; Sánchez, Rodolfo; Schmidt, Matthias; Schmidt, Stefan; Steck, Markus; Stöhlker, Thomas; Thompson, Richard C.; Trageser, Christian; Vollbrecht, Jonas; Weinheimer, Christian; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried

    2017-05-01

    Electrons bound in highly charged heavy ions such as hydrogen-like bismuth 209Bi82+ experience electromagnetic fields that are a million times stronger than in light atoms. Measuring the wavelength of light emitted and absorbed by these ions is therefore a sensitive testing ground for quantum electrodynamical (QED) effects and especially the electron-nucleus interaction under such extreme conditions. However, insufficient knowledge of the nuclear structure has prevented a rigorous test of strong-field QED. Here we present a measurement of the so-called specific difference between the hyperfine splittings in hydrogen-like and lithium-like bismuth 209Bi82+,80+ with a precision that is improved by more than an order of magnitude. Even though this quantity is believed to be largely insensitive to nuclear structure and therefore the most decisive test of QED in the strong magnetic field regime, we find a 7-σ discrepancy compared with the theoretical prediction.

  9. Optical Search for QED vacuum magnetic birefringence, Axions and photon Regeneration

    CERN Multimedia

    Pugnat, P; Hryczuk, A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Kral, M

    2007-01-01

    Since its prediction in 1936 by Euler, Heisenberg and Weisskopf in the earlier development of the Quantum Electrodynamic (QED) theory, the Vacuum Magnetic Birefringence (VMB) is still a challenge for optical metrology techniques. According to QED, the vacuum behaves as an optically active medium in the presence of an external magnetic field. It can be experimentally probed with a linearly polarized laser beam. After propagating through the vacuum submitted to a transverse magnetic field, the polarization of the laser beam will change to elliptical and the parameters of the polarization are directly related to fundamental constants such as the fine structure constant and the electron Compton wavelength. Contributions to the VMB could also arise from the existence of light scalar or pseudo-scalar particles like axions that couple to two photons and this would manifest itself as a sizeable deviation from the initial QED prediction. On one side, the interest in axion search, providing an answer to the strong-CP p...

  10. Reconfigurable CPLAG and Modified PFAL Adiabatic Logic Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously, authors have proposed CPLAG and MCPLAG circuits extracting benefits of CPL family implemented based upon semiadiabatic logic for low power VLSI circuit design along with gating concept. Also authors have communicated RCPLAG circuits adding another dimension of reconfigurability into CPLAG/MCPLAG circuits. Moving ahead, in this paper, authors have implemented/reconfigured RCPLAG universal Nand/And gate and universal Nor/Or gate for extracting behavior of dynamic positive edge triggered DFF. Authors have also implemented Adder/Subtractor circuit using different techniques. Authors have also reported modification in PFAL semiadiabatic circuit family to further reduce the power dissipation. Functionality of these is verified and found to be satisfactory. Further these are examined rigorously with voltage, Cload, temperature, and transistor size variation. Performance of these is examined with these variations with power dissipation, delays, rise, and fall times associated. From the analysis it is found that best operating condition for DFF based upon RCPLAG universal gate can be achieved at supply voltage lower than 3 V which can be used for different transistor size up to 36 μm. Average power dissipation is 0.2 μW at 1 V and 30 μW at 2 V at 100 ff Cload 25°C approximately. Average power dissipated by CPLAG Adder/Subtractot is 58 μW. Modified PFAL circuit reduces average power by 9% approximately.

  11. Designing Novel Quaternary Quantum Reversible Subtractor Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghparast, Majid; Monfared, Asma Taheri

    2018-01-01

    Reversible logic synthesis is an important area of current research because of its ability to reduce energy dissipation. In recent years, multiple valued logic has received great attention due to its ability to reduce the width of the reversible circuit which is a main requirement in quantum technology. Subtractor circuits are between major components used in quantum computers. In this paper, we will discuss the design of a quaternary quantum reversible half subtractor circuit using quaternary 1-qudit, 2-qudit Muthukrishnan-Stroud and 3-qudit controlled gates and a 2-qudit Generalized quaternary gate. Then a design of a quaternary quantum reversible full subtractor circuit based on the quaternary half subtractor will be presenting. The designs shall then be evaluated in terms of quantum cost, constant input, garbage output, and hardware complexity. The proposed quaternary quantum reversible circuits are the first attempt in the designing of the aforementioned subtractor.

  12. Designing Novel Quaternary Quantum Reversible Subtractor Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghparast, Majid; Monfared, Asma Taheri

    2017-10-01

    Reversible logic synthesis is an important area of current research because of its ability to reduce energy dissipation. In recent years, multiple valued logic has received great attention due to its ability to reduce the width of the reversible circuit which is a main requirement in quantum technology. Subtractor circuits are between major components used in quantum computers. In this paper, we will discuss the design of a quaternary quantum reversible half subtractor circuit using quaternary 1-qudit, 2-qudit Muthukrishnan-Stroud and 3-qudit controlled gates and a 2-qudit Generalized quaternary gate. Then a design of a quaternary quantum reversible full subtractor circuit based on the quaternary half subtractor will be presenting. The designs shall then be evaluated in terms of quantum cost, constant input, garbage output, and hardware complexity. The proposed quaternary quantum reversible circuits are the first attempt in the designing of the aforementioned subtractor.

  13. The parity-preserving massive QED3: Vanishing β-function and no parity anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.M. Del Cima

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The parity-preserving massive QED3 exhibits vanishing gauge coupling β-function and is parity and infrared anomaly free at all orders in perturbation theory. Parity is not an anomalous symmetry, even for the parity-preserving massive QED3, in spite of some claims about the possibility of a perturbative parity breakdown, called parity anomaly. The proof is done by using the algebraic renormalization method, which is independent of any regularization scheme, based on general theorems of perturbative quantum field theory.

  14. Simulations of QCD and QED with C* boundary conditions arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Martin; Patella, Agostino; Tantalo, Nazario

    We present exploratory results from dynamical simulations of QCD in isolation, as well as QCD coupled to QED, with C* boundary conditions. In finite volume, the use of C* boundary conditions allows for a gauge invariant and local formulation of QED without zero modes. In particular we show that the simulations reproduce known results and that masses of charged mesons can be extracted in a completely gauge invariant way. For the simulations we use a modified version of the HiRep code. The primary features of the simulation code are presented and we discuss some details regarding the implementation of C* boundary conditions and the simulated lattice action.

  15. Dissipative Effect and Tunneling Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samyadeb Bhattacharya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantum Langevin equation has been studied for dissipative system using the approach of Ford et al. Here, we have considered the inverted harmonic oscillator potential and calculated the effect of dissipation on tunneling time, group delay, and the self-interference term. A critical value of the friction coefficient has been determined for which the self-interference term vanishes. This approach sheds new light on understanding the ion transport at nanoscale.

  16. Thermoelectricity from wasted heat of integrated circuits

    KAUST Repository

    Fahad, Hossain M.

    2012-05-22

    We demonstrate that waste heat from integrated circuits especially computer microprocessors can be recycled as valuable electricity to power up a portion of the circuitry or other important accessories such as on-chip cooling modules, etc. This gives a positive spin to a negative effect of ever increasing heat dissipation associated with increased power consumption aligned with shrinking down trend of transistor dimension. This concept can also be used as an important vehicle for self-powered systemson- chip. We provide theoretical analysis supported by simulation data followed by experimental verification of on-chip thermoelectricity generation from dissipated (otherwise wasted) heat of a microprocessor.

  17. Is the Chiral Phase Transition in Non-Compact Lattice QED Driven by Monopole Condensation?

    OpenAIRE

    Goeckeler, M.; Horsley, R.; Rakow, P. E. L.; Schierholz, G.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the recent conjecture that the chiral phase transition in non-compact lattice QED is driven by monopole condensation. The comparison of analytic and numerical results shows that we have a quantitative understanding of monopoles in both the quenched and dynamical cases. We can rule out monopole condensation.

  18. The parity-preserving massive QED3: Vanishing β-function and no parity anomaly

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Del Cima, O.M

    2015-01-01

    ... and parity anomaly free at all orders [3] , despite some statements found out in the literature that still support that parity could be broken even perturbatively, called parity anomaly, which has already been discarded [3–6] . The massless QED 3 is parity-even at the classical and quantum level (at least perturbatively), however, at the classical level...

  19. QED's School Market Trends: Teacher Buying Behavior & Attitudes, 2001-2002. Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quality Education Data, Inc., Denver, CO.

    This study examined teachers' classroom material buying behaviors and trends. Data came from Quality Education Data's National Education Database, which includes U.S. K-12 public, private, and Catholic schools and districts. Researchers surveyed K-8 teachers randomly selected from QED's National Education Database. Results show that teachers spend…

  20. (2+1)-Dimensional QED with dynamically massive fermions in vacuum polarization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gusynin, VP; Hams, AH; Reenders, M

    1996-01-01

    We study chiral symmetry breaking in three-dimensional QED with N-f flavors of four-component fermions. A closed system of Schwinger-Dyson equations for fermion and photon propagators and the full fermion-photon vertex is proposed, which is consistent with the Ward-Takahashi identity. A simplified

  1. A Circuit-Theoretic Anomaly Resolved by Nonstandard Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Zemanian, A.H

    2005-01-01

    An anomaly in electrical circuit theory is the disappearance of some of the energy when two capacitors, one charged and the other uncharged, are connected together through resistanceless wires. Nonstandard analysis shows that, when the wires are taken to have infinitesimally small but nonzero resistance, the energy dissipated in the wires equals that substantial amount of enregy that had disappeared, and that all but an infinitesimal amount of this dissipation occurs during an infinitesimal i...

  2. Quantum Many-body Physics with Multimode Cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lev, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    Phase transitions, where observable properties of a many-body system change discontinuously, can occur in both open and closed systems. Ultracold atoms have provided an exemplary model system to demonstrate the physics of closed-system phase transitions, confirming many theoretical models and results. Our understanding of dissipative phase transitions in quantum systems is less developed, and experiments that probe this physics even less so. By placing cold atoms in optical cavities, and inducing strong coupling between light and excitations of the atoms, one can experimentally study phase transitions of open quantum systems. We will report our observation of a novel form of nonequilibrium phase transition, the condensation of supermode-density-wave-polaritons. These polaritons are formed from a hybrid ``supermode'' of cavity photons coupled to atomic density waves of a quantum gas. These results, found in the few-mode-degenerate cavity regime, demonstrate the potential of fully multimode cavities to exhibit physics beyond mean-field theories, possibly in the presence of dynamic synthetic gauge fields. Such systems will provide experimental access to nontrivial phase transitions in driven dissipative quantum systems as well as enabling the studies of novel non-equilibrium spin glasses and neuromorphic computation.

  3. Dissipative systems in a non-dissipative framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Umapada; Saha, Aparna; Ghosh, Subrata; Talukdar, Benoy

    2013-06-01

    Dissipative systems do not have a natural space in the variational formulation of mechanics. We introduce a change of variables such that in the transformed frame the dissipative Newtonian equations mimic those for conservative systems. We present solutions of (a) a linearly damped harmonic oscillator, (b) the corresponding quadratically damped system, (c) a modified Emden-type equation and (d) a generalized Emden equation using their first integrals and deal with the corresponding inverse variational problem to derive Lagrangian and Hamiltonian representations. We confirm that, as opposed to the original damped equations, the reduced equations can be solved by the use of Hamilton-Jacobi theory.

  4. Resonant circuit model for efficient metamaterial absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellier, Alexandre; Teperik, Tatiana V; de Lustrac, André

    2013-11-04

    The resonant absorption in a planar metamaterial is studied theoretically. We present a simple physical model describing this phenomenon in terms of equivalent resonant circuit. We discuss the role of radiative and dissipative damping of resonant mode supported by a metamaterial in the formation of absorption spectra. We show that the results of rigorous calculations of Maxwell equations can be fully retrieved with simple model describing the system in terms of equivalent resonant circuit. This simple model allows us to explain the total absorption effect observed in the system on a common physical ground by referring it to the impedance matching condition at the resonance.

  5. Affective Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    to the intersecting streams of goods, people, ideas, and money as they circulate between African migrants and their kin who remain back home. They also show the complex ways that emotions become entangled in these exchanges. Examining how these circuits operate in domains of social life ranging from child fosterage...... to binational marriages, from coming-of-age to healing and religious rituals, the book also registers the tremendous impact of state officials, laws, and policies on migrant experience. Together these essays paint an especially vivid portrait of new forms of kinship at a time of both intense mobility and ever...

  6. Energy Dissipation Processes in Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Wei, F. S.; Feng, X. S.; Xu, X. J.; Zhang, J.; Sun, T. R.; Zuo, P. B.

    2015-12-01

    Turbulence is a chaotic flow regime filled by irregular flows. The dissipation of turbulence is a fundamental problem in the realm of physics. Theoretically, dissipation ultimately cannot be achieved without collisions, and so how turbulent kinetic energy is dissipated in the nearly collisionless solar wind is a challenging problem. Wave particle interactions and magnetic reconnection (MR) are two possible dissipation mechanisms, but which mechanism dominates is still a controversial topic. Here we analyze the dissipation region scaling around a solar wind MR region. We find that the MR region shows unique multifractal scaling in the dissipation range, while the ambient solar wind turbulence reveals a monofractal dissipation process for most of the time. These results provide the first observational evidences for intermittent multifractal dissipation region scaling around a MR site, and they also have significant implications for the fundamental energy dissipation process.

  7. ENERGY DISSIPATION PROCESSES IN SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.; Wei, F. S.; Feng, X. S.; Sun, T. R.; Zuo, P. B. [SIGMA Weather Group, State Key Laboratory for Space Weather, National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Xu, X. J. [Space Science Institute, Macau University of Science and Technology, Macao (China); Zhang, J., E-mail: yw@spaceweather.ac.cn [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, MSN 3F3, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Turbulence is a chaotic flow regime filled by irregular flows. The dissipation of turbulence is a fundamental problem in the realm of physics. Theoretically, dissipation ultimately cannot be achieved without collisions, and so how turbulent kinetic energy is dissipated in the nearly collisionless solar wind is a challenging problem. Wave particle interactions and magnetic reconnection (MR) are two possible dissipation mechanisms, but which mechanism dominates is still a controversial topic. Here we analyze the dissipation region scaling around a solar wind MR region. We find that the MR region shows unique multifractal scaling in the dissipation range, while the ambient solar wind turbulence reveals a monofractal dissipation process for most of the time. These results provide the first observational evidences for intermittent multifractal dissipation region scaling around a MR site, and they also have significant implications for the fundamental energy dissipation process.

  8. LOGIC CIRCUIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, G.H.; Faught, M.L.

    1963-12-24

    A device for safety rod counting in a nuclear reactor is described. A Wheatstone bridge circuit is adapted to prevent de-energizing the hopper coils of a ball backup system if safety rods, sufficient in total control effect, properly enter the reactor core to effect shut down. A plurality of resistances form one arm of the bridge, each resistance being associated with a particular safety rod and weighted in value according to the control effect of the particular safety rod. Switching means are used to switch each of the resistances in and out of the bridge circuit responsive to the presence of a particular safety rod in its effective position in the reactor core and responsive to the attainment of a predetermined velocity by a particular safety rod enroute to its effective position. The bridge is unbalanced in one direction during normal reactor operation prior to the generation of a scram signal and the switching means and resistances are adapted to unbalance the bridge in the opposite direction if the safety rods produce a predetermined amount of control effect in response to the scram signal. The bridge unbalance reversal is then utilized to prevent the actuation of the ball backup system, or, conversely, a failure of the safety rods to produce the predetermined effect produces no unbalance reversal and the ball backup system is actuated. (AEC)

  9. Impacts on Dissipative Sonic Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yichao; Nesterenko, Vitali

    We investigate the propagating compression bell shape stress waves generated by the strikers with different masses impacting the sonic vacuum - the discrete dissipative strongly nonlinear metamaterial with zero long wave sound speed. The metamaterial is composed of alternating steel disks and Nitrile O-rings. Being a solid material, it has exceptionally low speed of the investigated stress waves in the range of 50 - 74 m/s, which is a few times smaller than the speed of sound or shock waves in air generated by blast. The shape of propagating stress waves was dramatically changed by the viscous dissipation. It prevented the incoming pulses from splitting into trains of solitary waves, a phenomenon characteristic of the non-dissipative strongly nonlinear discrete systems when the striker mass is larger than the cell mass. Both high-speed camera images and numerical simulations demonstrate the unusual rattling behavior of the top disk between the striker and the rest of the system. The linear momentum and energy from the striker were completely transferred to the metamaterial. This strongly nonlinear dissipative metamaterial can be designed for the optimal attenuation of dynamic loads generated by impact or contact explosion. Author 1 wants to acknowledge the support provided by UCSD.

  10. Dissipative effects in Multilevel Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, A I [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Schirmer, S G [Department of Applied Maths and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2007-11-15

    Dissipation is sometimes regarded as an inevitable and regrettable presence in the real evolution of a quantum system. However, the effects may not always be malign, although often non-intuitive and may even be beneficial. In this note we we display some of these effects for N-level systems, where N = 2,3,4. We start with an elementary introduction to dissipative effects on the Bloch Sphere, and its interior, the Bloch Ball, for a two-level system. We describe explicitly the hamiltonian evolution as well as the purely dissipative dynamics, in the latter case giving the t {yields} {infinity} limits of the motion. This discussion enables us to provide an intuitive feeling for the measures of control-reachable states. For the three-level case we discuss the impossibility of isolating a two-level (qubit) subsystem; this is a Bohm-Aharonov type consequence of dissipation. We finally exemplify the four-level case by giving constraints on the decay of two-qubit entanglement.

  11. Temperature evolution during dissipative collapse

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    numerous models that noncausal transport equations predict thermodynamical behaviours that can be far .... A radiating model. Following Govender et al [10] we consider a model in which the star undergoes dissipative collapse and evolves to a stable equilibrium state. .... Govender et al [8,9] have shown that the choice.

  12. Controllable circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    signal. The control unit comprises a first signal processing unit, a second signal processing unit, and a combiner unit. The first signal processing unit has an output and is supplied with a first carrier signal and an input signal. The second signal processing unit has an output and is supplied...... with a second carrier signal and the input signal. The combiner unit is connected to the first and second signal processing units combining the outputs of the first and the second signal processing units to form a signal representative of the control signal......A switch-mode power circuit comprises a controllable element and a control unit. The controllable element is configured to control a current in response to a control signal supplied to the controllable element. The control unit is connected to the controllable element and provides the control...

  13. Experiments on two-resonator circuit quantum electrodynamics. A superconducting quantum switch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Elisabeth Christiane Maria

    2013-05-29

    The field of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) studies the interaction between light and matter on a fundamental level. In typical experiments individual natural atoms are interacting with individual photons trapped in three-dimensional cavities. Within the last decade the prospering new field of circuit QED has been developed. Here, the natural atoms are replaced by artificial solid state quantum circuits offering large dipole moments which are coupled to quasi-onedimensional cavities providing a small mode volume and hence a large vacuum field strength. In our experiments Josephson junction based superconducting quantum bits are coupled to superconducting microwave resonators. In circuit QED the number of parameters that can be varied is increased and regimes that are not accessible using natural atoms can be entered and investigated. Apart from design flexibility and tunability of system parameters a particular advantage of circuit QED is the scalability to larger system size enabled by well developed micro- and nanofabrication tools. When scaling up the resonator-qubit systems beyond a few coupled circuits, the rapidly increasing number of interacting subsystems requires an active control and directed transmission of quantum signals. This can, for example, be achieved by implementing switchable coupling between two microwave resonators. To this end, a superconducting flux qubit is used to realize a suitable coupling between two microwave resonators, all working in the Gigahertz regime. The resulting device is called quantum switch. The flux qubit mediates a second order tunable and switchable coupling between the resonators. Depending on the qubit state, this coupling can compensate for the direct geometric coupling of the two resonators. As the qubit may also be in a quantum superposition state, the switch itself can be ''quantum'': it can be a superposition of ''on'' and ''off''. This work

  14. Design and Implementation of Voltage-Mode MIN/MAX Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Soleimani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a general architecture for analog implementation of MIN/MAX and other rank order circuits is presented. Based on general architecture, proposed MIN/MAX circuits are implemented. The proposed circuits are composed of a differential amplifier with merged n-inputs and a MCSAL circuit to choose the desired input. The advantages of the proposed structure are simplicity, very high resolution, very low supply voltage requirements, very low output resistor, low power dissipation, low active area and simple expansion for multiple inputs by adding only three transistors for each extra input. The post-layout simulation results of proposed circuits are presented by HSPICE software in 0.35-µm CMOS process technology. The total power dissipation of proposed circuits is about 110-µW. Also, the total active area is about 550-µm2 for five-input proposed circuits, and would be negligibly increased for each extra input.

  15. Non-degenerate light quark masses from 2+1f lattice QCD+QED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drury, Shane [Southampton U.; Blum, Thomas [RIKEN BNL; Hayakawa, Masashi [Nagoya U.; Izubuchi, Taku [RIKEN BNL; Sachrajda, Chris [Southampton U.; Zhou, Ran [Indiana U.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a calculation of the effects of isospin breaking in Lattice QCD+QED. This involves using Chiral Perturbation Theory with Electromagnetic corrections to find the renormalized, non-degenerate, light quark masses. The calculations are carried out on QCD ensembles generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations using Domain Wall Fermions and the Iwasaki and Iwasaki+DSDR Gauge Actions with unitary pion masses down to 170 MeV. Non-compact QED is treated in the quenched approximation. The simulations use a $32^3$ lattice size with $a^{-1}=2.28(3)$ GeV (Iwasaki) and 1.37(1) (Iwasaki+DSDR). This builds on previous work from the RBC/UKQCD collaboration with lattice spacing $a^{-1}=1.78(4)$ GeV.

  16. Test of QED in e sup + e sup - yields. gamma. gamma. at LEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeva, B.; Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Akbari, H.; Alcaraz, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alverson, G.; Alviggi, M.G.; An, Q.; Anderhub, H.; Anderson, A.L.; Andreev, V.P.; Angelov, T.; Antonov, L.; Antreasyan, D.; Arce, P.; Arefiev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Baba, P.V.K.S.; Bagnaia, P.; Bakken, J.A.; Baksay, L.; Ball, R.C.; Banerjee, S.; Bao, J.; Barone, L.; Bay, A.; Becker, U.; Behrens, J.; Beingessner, S.; Bencze, G.L.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biland, A.; Bizzarri, R.; Blaising, J.J.; Bloemeke, P.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bocciolini, M.; Boehlen, W.; Boehm, A.; Boehringer, T.; Borgia, B.; Borilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Boutigny, D.; Branson, J.G.; Brock, I.C.; Bryant, F.; Buisson, C.; Bujak, A.; Burger, J.D.; Burq, J.P.; Busenitz, J.; Cai, X.D.; Camps, C.; Capell, M.; Carbonara, F.; Carmianti, F.; Cartacci, A.M.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chang, Y.H.; Chaturvedi, U.K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, C.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chen, M.; Chen, M.L; L3 Collaboration

    1990-11-01

    We have measured the cross-section of the reaction e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{gamma}{gamma} at center of mass energies around the Z{sup 0} mass. The results are in good agreement with QED predictions. For the QED cutoff parameters the limit of {Lambda}{sub +}>103 GeV and {Lambda}{sub -}>118 GeV are found. For the decays Z{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma}, Z{sup 0}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma}, Z{sup 0}{yields}{eta}{gamma} and Z{sup 0}{yields}{gamma}{gamma}{gamma} we find upper limits of 2.9x10{sup -4}, 2.9x10{sup -4}, 4.1x10{sup -4} and 1.2x10{sup -4}, respectively. All limits are at 95% CL. (orig.).

  17. Gauge covariance of the fermion Schwinger–Dyson equation in QED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Shaoyang, E-mail: sjia@email.wm.edu [Physics Department, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Pennington, M.R., E-mail: michaelp@jlab.org [Physics Department, College of William & Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Theory Center, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2017-06-10

    Any practical application of the Schwinger–Dyson equations to the study of n-point Green's functions in a strong coupling field theory requires truncations. In the case of QED, the gauge covariance, governed by the Landau–Khalatnikov–Fradkin transformations (LKFT), provides a unique constraint on such truncation. By using a spectral representation for the massive fermion propagator in QED, we are able to show that the constraints imposed by the LKFT are linear operations on the spectral densities. We formally define these group operations and show with a couple of examples how in practice they provide a straightforward way to test the gauge covariance of any viable truncation of the Schwinger–Dyson equation for the fermion 2-point function.

  18. Mølmer-Sørensen entangling gate for cavity QED systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Hiroki; Nevado, Pedro; Keller, Matthias

    2017-10-01

    The Mølmer-Sørensen gate is a state-of-the-art entangling gate in ion trap quantum computing where the gate fidelity can exceed 99%. Here we propose an analogous implementation in the setting of cavity QED. The cavity photon mode acts as the bosonic degree of freedom in the gate in contrast to that played by the phonon mode in ion traps. This is made possible by utilising cavity assisted Raman transitions interconnecting the logical qubit states embedded in a four-level energy structure, making the ‘anti-Jaynes-Cummings’ term available under the rotating-wave approximation. We identify practical sources of infidelity and discuss their effects on the gate performance. Our proposal not only demonstrates an alternative entangling gate scheme but also sheds new light on the relationship between ion traps and cavity QED, in the sense that many techniques developed in the former are transferable to the latter through our framework.

  19. Gauge covariance of the fermion Schwinger–Dyson equation in QED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoyang Jia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Any practical application of the Schwinger–Dyson equations to the study of n-point Green's functions in a strong coupling field theory requires truncations. In the case of QED, the gauge covariance, governed by the Landau–Khalatnikov–Fradkin transformations (LKFT, provides a unique constraint on such truncation. By using a spectral representation for the massive fermion propagator in QED, we are able to show that the constraints imposed by the LKFT are linear operations on the spectral densities. We formally define these group operations and show with a couple of examples how in practice they provide a straightforward way to test the gauge covariance of any viable truncation of the Schwinger–Dyson equation for the fermion 2-point function.

  20. Direct measurement of alpha_QED(mZ)at the FCC-ee

    CERN Document Server

    Janot, Patrick

    2016-02-08

    When the measurements from the FCC-ee become available, an improved determination of the standard-model "input" parameters will be needed to fully exploit the new precision data towards either constraining or fitting the parameters of beyond-the-standard-model theories. Among these input parameters is the electromagnetic coupling constant estimated at the Z mass scale, alpha_QED(mZ). The measurement of the muon forward- backward asymmetry at the FCC-ee, just below and just above the Z pole, can be used to make a direct determination of alpha_QED(mZ) with an accuracy deemed adequate for an optimal use of the FCC-ee precision data.

  1. Atom-field entanglement in cavity QED: Nonlinearity and saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Robert; Cummings, Nick; Pedrotti, Leno M.; Rice, Perry

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the degree of entanglement between an atom and a driven cavity mode in the presence of dissipation. Previous work has shown that in the limit of weak driving fields, the steady-state entanglement is proportional to the square of the driving intensity. This quadratic dependence is due to the generation of entanglement by the creation of pairs of photons or excitations. In this work we investigate the entanglement between an atom and a cavity in the presence of multiple photons. Nonlinearity of the atomic response is needed to generate entanglement, but as that nonlinearity saturates the entanglement vanishes. We posit that this is due to spontaneous emission, which puts the atom in the ground state and the atom-field state into a direct product state. An intermediate value of the driving field, near the field that saturates the atomic response, optimizes the atom-field entanglement. In a parameter regime for which multiphoton resonances occur, we find that entanglement recurs at those resonances. In this regime, we find that the entanglement decreases with increasing photon number. We also investigate, in the bimodal regime, the entanglement as a function of atom and/or cavity detuning. Here we find that there is evidence of a phase transition in the entanglement, which occurs at 2 ɛ /g ≥1 .

  2. Treatment of the infrared contribution: NLO QED evolution as a pedagogic example

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, E. G.; Martin, A. D.; Ryskin, M. G.

    2013-08-01

    We show that the conventional prescription used for DGLAP parton evolution at NLO has an inconsistent treatment of the contribution from the infrared (IR) region. We illustrate the problem by studying the simple example of QED evolution, treating the electron and photon as partons. The deficiency is not present in a physical approach which removes the IR divergency and allows calculation in the normal 4-dimensional space.

  3. Lattice Perturbation Theory in Noncommutative Geometry and Parity Anomaly in 3D Noncommutative QED

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimura, J.; Vazquez-Mozo, M. A.

    2002-01-01

    We formulate lattice perturbation theory for gauge theories in noncommutative geometry. We apply it to three-dimensional noncommutative QED and calculate the effective action induced by Dirac fermions. In particular "parity invariance" of a massless theory receives an anomaly expressed by the noncommutative Chern-Simons action. The coefficient of the anomaly is labelled by an integer depending on the lattice action, which is a noncommutative counterpart of the phenomenon known in the commutat...

  4. Determination of the integrated luminosity at HERA using elastic QED Compton events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aaron, F.D. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2012-04-15

    A measurement of the integrated luminosity at the ep collider HERA is presented, exploiting the elastic QED Compton process ep{yields}e{gamma}p. The electron and the photon are detected in the backward calorimeter of the H1 experiment. The integrated luminosity of the data recorded in 2003 to 2007 is determined with a precision of 2.3%. The measurement is found to be compatible with the corresponding result obtained using the Bethe-Heitler process.

  5. Treatment of the infrared contribution: NLO QED evolution as a pedagogic example

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, E.G. de [University of Durham, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom); Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, C.P. 66318, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Martin, A.D. [University of Durham, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom); Ryskin, M.G. [University of Durham, Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom); NRC Kurchatov Institute, Gatchina, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15

    We show that the conventional prescription used for DGLAP parton evolution at NLO has an inconsistent treatment of the contribution from the infrared (IR) region. We illustrate the problem by studying the simple example of QED evolution, treating the electron and photon as partons. The deficiency is not present in a physical approach which removes the IR divergency and allows calculation in the normal 4-dimensional space. (orig.)

  6. Scalar-QED {beta}-functions near Planck`s scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pires, Gentil O. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Campos e Particulas

    1997-12-31

    The Renormalization Group Flow Equations of the Scalar-QED model near Planck`s scale are computed within the framework of the average effective action. Exact Flow Equations, corrected by Einstein Gravity, for the running self-interacting scalar coupling parameter and for the running v.e.v. of {phi} {sup *} {phi}, are computed taking into account threshold effects. Analytic solutions are given in the infrared and ultraviolet limits. (author) 17 refs.

  7. Critical behavior of the QED3-Gross-Neveu model: Duality and deconfined criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Lukas; He, Yin-Chen

    2017-11-01

    We study the critical properties of the QED3-Gross-Neveu model with 2 N flavors of two-component Dirac fermions coupled to a massless scalar field and a U(1) gauge field. For N =1 , this theory has recently been suggested to be dual to the SU(2) noncompact CP1 model that describes the deconfined phase transition between the Néel antiferromagnet and the valence bond solid on the square lattice. For N =2 , the theory has been proposed as an effective description of a deconfined critical point between chiral and Dirac spin liquid phases, and may potentially be realizable in spin-1 /2 systems on the kagome lattice. We demonstrate the existence of a stable quantum critical point in the QED3-Gross-Neveu model for all values of N . This quantum critical point is shown to escape the notorious fixed-point annihilation mechanism that renders plain QED3 (without scalar-field coupling) unstable at low values of N . The theory exhibits an upper critical space-time dimension of four, enabling us to access the critical behavior in a controlled expansion in the small parameter ɛ =4 -D . We compute the scalar-field anomalous dimension ηϕ, the correlation-length exponent ν , as well as the scaling dimension of the flavor-symmetry-breaking bilinear ψ ¯σzψ at the critical point, and compare our leading-order estimates with predictions of the conjectured duality.

  8. Charged hadrons in local finite-volume QED+QCD with C* boundary conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Lucini, Biagio; Ramos, Alberto; Tantalo, Nazario

    2016-01-01

    In order to calculate QED corrections to hadronic physical quantities by means of lattice simulations, a coherent description of electrically-charged states in finite volume is needed. In the usual periodic setup, Gauss's law and large gauge transformations forbid the propagation of electrically-charged states. A possible solution to this problem, which does not violate the axioms of local quantum field theory, has been proposed by Wiese and Polley, and is based on the use of C* boundary conditions. We present a thorough analysis of the properties and symmetries of QED in isolation and QED coupled to QCD, with C* boundary conditions. In particular we learn that a certain class of electrically-charged states can be constructed in this setup in a fully consistent fashion, without relying on gauge fixing. We argue that this class of states covers most of the interesting phenomenological applications in the framework of numerical simulations. We also calculate finite-volume corrections to the mass of stable charg...

  9. Kinetic approach to relativistic dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbana, A.; Mendoza, M.; Succi, S.; Tripiccione, R.

    2017-08-01

    Despite a long record of intense effort, the basic mechanisms by which dissipation emerges from the microscopic dynamics of a relativistic fluid still elude complete understanding. In particular, several details must still be finalized in the pathway from kinetic theory to hydrodynamics mainly in the derivation of the values of the transport coefficients. In this paper, we approach the problem by matching data from lattice-kinetic simulations with analytical predictions. Our numerical results provide neat evidence in favor of the Chapman-Enskog [The Mathematical Theory of Non-Uniform Gases, 3rd ed. (Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, U.K., 1970)] procedure as suggested by recent theoretical analyses along with qualitative hints at the basic reasons why the Chapman-Enskog expansion might be better suited than Grad's method [Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 2, 331 (1949), 10.1002/cpa.3160020403] to capture the emergence of dissipative effects in relativistic fluids.

  10. Resonator QED experiments with single {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ions; Resonator-QED-Experimente mit einzelnen {sup 40}Ca{sup +}-Ionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, B.

    2006-12-20

    Combining an optical resonator with an ion trap provides the possibility for QED experiments with single or few particles interacting with a single mode of the electro-magnetic field (Cavity-QED). In the present setup, fluctuations in the count rate on a time scale below 30 seconds were purely determined by the photon statistics due to finite emission and detection efficiency, whereas a marginal drift of the system was noticeable above 200 seconds. To find methods to increase the efficiency of the photon source, investigations were conducted and experimental improvements of the setup implemented in the frame of this thesis. Damping of the resonator field and coupling of ion and field were considered as the most important factors. To reduce the damping of the resonator field, a resonator with a smaller transmissivity of the output mirror was set up. The linear trap used in the experiment allows for the interaction of multiple ions with the resonator field, so that more than one photon may be emitted per pump pulse. This was investigated in this thesis with two ions coupled to the resonator. The cross correlation of the emitted photons was measured with the Hanbury Brown-Twiss method. (orig.)

  11. Dissipative Waves in Real Gases

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Neelam; Sharma, V. D.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we characterize a class of solutions to the unsteady 2-dimensional flow of a van der Waals fluid involving shock waves, and derive an asymptotic amplitude equation exhibiting quadratic and cubic nonlinearities including dissipation and diffraction. We exploit the theory of nonclassical symmetry reduction to obtain some exact solutions. Because of the nonlinearities present in the evolution equation, one expects that the wave profile will eventually encounter distortion and stee...

  12. Non-Equilibrium Quantum Dissipation

    OpenAIRE

    Segal, Dvira; Reichman, David R.; Millis, Andrew J.

    2007-01-01

    Dissipative processes in non-equilibrium many-body systems are fundamentally different than their equilibrium counterparts. Such processes are of great importance for the understanding of relaxation in single molecule devices. As a detailed case study, we investigate here a generic spin-fermion model, where a two-level system couples to two metallic leads with different chemical potentials. We present results for the spin relaxation rate in the nonadiabatic limit for an arbitrary coupling to ...

  13. Analog circuit design designing dynamic circuit response

    CERN Document Server

    Feucht, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    This second volume, Designing Dynamic Circuit Response builds upon the first volume Designing Amplifier Circuits by extending coverage to include reactances and their time- and frequency-related behavioral consequences.

  14. Analog circuit design designing waveform processing circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Feucht, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    The fourth volume in the set Designing Waveform-Processing Circuits builds on the previous 3 volumes and presents a variety of analog non-amplifier circuits, including voltage references, current sources, filters, hysteresis switches and oscilloscope trigger and sweep circuitry, function generation, absolute-value circuits, and peak detectors.

  15. Novel shift register eliminates logic gates and power switching circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, R. A.

    1971-01-01

    Register requiring two integrated circuits per stage has nominal power dissipation of 3.5 mW per stage, its use eliminates reset pulse, allowing data transfer to occur in less than 1 microsecond, and eliminates power application to both right and left portions of the register simultaneously.

  16. Efficient scheme for hybrid teleportation via entangled coherent states in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Jaewoo; Ginossar, Eran

    2016-06-01

    We propose a deterministic scheme for teleporting an unknown qubit state through continuous-variable entangled states in superconducting circuits. The qubit is a superconducting two-level system and the bipartite quantum channel is a microwave photonic entangled coherent state between two cavities. A Bell-type measurement performed on the hybrid state of solid and photonic states transfers a discrete-variable unknown electronic state to a continuous-variable photonic cat state in a cavity mode. In order to facilitate the implementation of such complex protocols we propose a design for reducing the self-Kerr nonlinearity in the cavity. The teleporation scheme enables quantum information processing operations with circuit-QED based on entangled coherent states. These include state verification and single-qubit operations with entangled coherent states. These are shown to be experimentally feasible with the state of the art superconducting circuits.

  17. Hysteresis in a quantized superfluid `atomtronic' circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Stephen; Lee, Jeffrey G.; Jendrzejewski, Fred; Murray, Noel; Clark, Charles W.; Lobb, Christopher J.; Phillips, William D.; Edwards, Mark; Campbell, Gretchen K.

    2014-02-01

    Atomtronics is an emerging interdisciplinary field that seeks to develop new functional methods by creating devices and circuits where ultracold atoms, often superfluids, have a role analogous to that of electrons in electronics. Hysteresis is widely used in electronic circuits--it is routinely observed in superconducting circuits and is essential in radio-frequency superconducting quantum interference devices. Furthermore, it is as fundamental to superfluidity (and superconductivity) as quantized persistent currents, critical velocity and Josephson effects. Nevertheless, despite multiple theoretical predictions, hysteresis has not been previously observed in any superfluid, atomic-gas Bose-Einstein condensate. Here we directly detect hysteresis between quantized circulation states in an atomtronic circuit formed from a ring of superfluid Bose-Einstein condensate obstructed by a rotating weak link (a region of low atomic density). This contrasts with previous experiments on superfluid liquid helium where hysteresis was observed directly in systems in which the quantization of flow could not be observed, and indirectly in systems that showed quantized flow. Our techniques allow us to tune the size of the hysteresis loop and to consider the fundamental excitations that accompany hysteresis. The results suggest that the relevant excitations involved in hysteresis are vortices, and indicate that dissipation has an important role in the dynamics. Controlled hysteresis in atomtronic circuits may prove to be a crucial feature for the development of practical devices, just as it has in electronic circuits such as memories, digital noise filters (for example Schmitt triggers) and magnetometers (for example superconducting quantum interference devices).

  18. Tidal Dissipation in WASP-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Nevin N.; Sun, Meng; Arras, Phil; Essick, Reed

    2017-11-01

    WASP-12 is a hot Jupiter system with an orbital period of P = 1.1 days, making it one of the shortest-period giant planets known. Recent transit timing observations by Maciejewski et al. and Patra et al. found a decreasing period with P/| \\dot{P}| = 3.2 Myr. This has been interpreted as evidence of either orbital decay due to tidal dissipation or a long-term oscillation of the apparent period due to apsidal precession. Here, we consider the possibility that it is orbital decay. We show that the parameters of the host star are consistent with either a M * ≃ 1.3 M ⊙ main sequence star or a M * ≃ 1.2 M ⊙ subgiant. We find that if the star is on the main sequence, the tidal dissipation is too inefficient to explain the observed \\dot{P}. However, if it is a subgiant, the tidal dissipation is significantly enhanced due to nonlinear wave-breaking of the dynamical tide near the star’s center. The subgiant models have a tidal quality factor Q{{\\prime} }* ≃ 2× {10}5 and an orbital decay rate that agrees well with the observed \\dot{P}. It would also explain why the planet survived for ≃3 Gyr while the star was on the main sequence and yet is now inspiraling on a 3 Myr timescale. Although this suggests that we are witnessing the last ∼0.1% of the planet’s life, the probability of such a detection is a few percent given the observed sample of ≃30 hot Jupiters in P 1.2 M ⊙ hosts.

  19. Designing Biomimetic, Dissipative Material Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balazs, Anna C. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.; Whitesides, George M. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology; Brinker, C. Jeffrey [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering. Dept. of Chemistry. Dept. of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology. Center for Micro-Engineered Materials; Aranson, Igor S. [UChicago, LLC., Argonne, IL (United States); Chaikin, Paul [New York Univ. (NYU), NY (United States). Dept. of Physics; Dogic, Zvonimir [Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Glotzer, Sharon [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering. Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering. Dept. of Macromolecular Science and Engineering Physics; Hammer, Daniel [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Science; Irvine, Darrell [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering and Biological Engineering; Little, Steven R. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Parikh, Atul N. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Biomedical Engineering. Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science; Stupp, Samuel [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering. Dept. of Chemistry. Dept. of Medicine. Dept. of Biomedical Engineering; Szostak, Jack [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Biology

    2016-01-21

    Throughout human history, new materials have been the foundation of transformative technologies: from bronze, paper, and ceramics to steel, silicon, and polymers, each material has enabled far-reaching advances. Today, another new class of materials is emerging—one with both the potential to provide radically new functions and to challenge our notion of what constitutes a “material”. These materials would harvest, transduce, or dissipate energy to perform autonomous, dynamic functions that mimic the behaviors of living organisms. Herein, we discuss the challenges and benefits of creating “dissipative” materials that can potentially blur the boundaries between living and non-living matter.

  20. Equivalent Quantum Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Escartin, Juan Carlos; Chamorro-Posada, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Quantum algorithms and protocols are often presented as quantum circuits for a better understanding. We give a list of equivalence rules which can help in the analysis and design of quantum circuits. As example applications we study quantum teleportation and dense coding protocols in terms of a simple XOR swapping circuit and give an intuitive picture of a basic gate teleportation circuit.

  1. Reversible Squaring Circuit for Low Power Digital Signal Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Singla

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available With the high demand of low power digital systems, energy dissipation in the digital system is one of the limiting factors. Reversible logic is one of the alternate to reduce heat/energy dissipation in the digital circuits and have a very significant importance in bioinformatics, optical information processing, CMOS design etc. In this paper the authors propose the design of new 2- bit binary Squaring circuit used in most of the digital signal processing hardware using Feynman & MUX gate. The proposed squaring circuit having less garbage outputs, constant inputs, Quantum cost and Total logical calculation i.e. less delay as compared to the traditional method of squaring operation by reversible multiplier. The simulating results and quantized results are also shown in the paper which shows the greatest improvement in the design against the previous methodology.

  2. Universal Quantum Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Bera, Debajyoti; Fenner, Stephen; Green, Frederic; Homer, Steve

    2008-01-01

    We define and construct efficient depth-universal and almost-size-universal quantum circuits. Such circuits can be viewed as general-purpose simulators for central classes of quantum circuits and can be used to capture the computational power of the circuit class being simulated. For depth we construct universal circuits whose depth is the same order as the circuits being simulated. For size, there is a log factor blow-up in the universal circuits constructed here. We prove that this construc...

  3. Circuit analysis for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Santiago, John

    2013-01-01

    Circuits overloaded from electric circuit analysis? Many universities require that students pursuing a degree in electrical or computer engineering take an Electric Circuit Analysis course to determine who will ""make the cut"" and continue in the degree program. Circuit Analysis For Dummies will help these students to better understand electric circuit analysis by presenting the information in an effective and straightforward manner. Circuit Analysis For Dummies gives you clear-cut information about the topics covered in an electric circuit analysis courses to help

  4. Solid-state circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Pridham, G J

    2013-01-01

    Solid-State Circuits provides an introduction to the theory and practice underlying solid-state circuits, laying particular emphasis on field effect transistors and integrated circuits. Topics range from construction and characteristics of semiconductor devices to rectification and power supplies, low-frequency amplifiers, sine- and square-wave oscillators, and high-frequency effects and circuits. Black-box equivalent circuits of bipolar transistors, physical equivalent circuits of bipolar transistors, and equivalent circuits of field effect transistors are also covered. This volume is divided

  5. Particle Acceleration in Dissipative Pulsar Magnetospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazanas, Z.; Kalapotharakos, C.; Harding, A.; Contopoulos, I.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsar magnetospheres represent unipolar inductor-type electrical circuits at which an EM potential across the polar cap (due to the rotation of their magnetic field) drives currents that run in and out of the polar cap and close at infinity. An estimate ofthe magnitude of this current can be obtained by dividing the potential induced across the polar cap V approx = B(sub O) R(sub O)(Omega R(sub O)/c)(exp 2) by the impedance of free space Z approx eq 4 pi/c; the resulting polar cap current density is close to $n {GJ} c$ where $n_{GJ}$ is the Goldreich-Julian (GJ) charge density. This argument suggests that even at current densities close to the GJ one, pulsar magnetospheres have a significant component of electric field $E_{parallel}$, parallel to the magnetic field, a condition necessary for particle acceleration and the production of radiation. We present the magnetic and electric field structures as well as the currents, charge densities, spin down rates and potential drops along the magnetic field lines of pulsar magnetospheres which do not obey the ideal MHD condition $E cdot B = 0$. By relating the current density along the poloidal field lines to the parallel electric field via a kind of Ohm's law $J = sigma E_{parallel}$ we study the structure of these magnetospheres as a function of the conductivity $sigma$. We find that for $sigma gg OmegaS the solution tends to the (ideal) Force-Free one and to the Vacuum one for $sigma 11 OmegaS. Finally, we present dissipative magnetospheric solutions with spatially variable $sigma$ that supports various microphysical properties and are compatible with the observations.

  6. Modular quantum-information processing by dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jeffrey; Campos Venuti, Lorenzo; Zanardi, Paolo

    2016-11-01

    Dissipation can be used as a resource to control and simulate quantum systems. We discuss a modular model based on fast dissipation capable of performing universal quantum computation, and simulating arbitrary Lindbladian dynamics. The model consists of a network of elementary dissipation-generated modules and it is in principle scalable. In particular, we demonstrate the ability to dissipatively prepare all single-qubit gates, and the controlled-not gate; prerequisites for universal quantum computing. We also show a way to implement a type of quantum memory in a dissipative environment, whereby we can arbitrarily control the loss in both coherence, and concurrence, over the evolution. Moreover, our dissipation-assisted modular construction exhibits a degree of inbuilt robustness to Hamiltonian and, indeed, Lindbladian errors, and as such is of potential practical relevance.

  7. Dissipative heat engine is thermodynamically inconsistent

    OpenAIRE

    A. M. Makarieva; Gorshkov, V. G.

    2009-01-01

    A heat engine operating on the basis of the Carnot cycle is considered, where the mechanical work performed is dissipated within the engine at the temperature of the warmer isotherm and the resulting heat is added to the engine together with an external heat input. The resulting work performed by the engine per cycle is increased at the expense of dissipated work produced in the previous cycle. It is shown that such a dissipative heat engine is thermodynamically inconsistent violating the fir...

  8. Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project quarterly environmental data summary (QEDS) for fourth quarter 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    This report contains the Quarterly Environmental Data Summary (QEDS) for the fourth quarter of 1998 in support of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project Federal Facilities Agreement. The data, except for air monitoring data and site KPA generated data (uranium analyses) were received from the contract laboratories, verified by the Weldon Spring Site verification group, and merged into the database during the fourth quarter of 1998. KPA results for on-site total uranium analyses performed during fourth quarter 1998 are included. Air monitoring data presented are the most recent complete sets of quarterly data.

  9. Two-Loop $N_{F}=1$ QED Bhabha Scattering Differential Cross Section

    CERN Document Server

    Bonciani, R; Mastrolia, Pierpaolo; Remiddi, E; Van der Bij, J J

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the two-loop virtual, UV renormalized corrections at order \\alpha^4 (N_F=1) in QED to the Bhabha scattering differential cross section, for arbitrary values of the squared c.m. energy s and momentum transfer t, and on-shell electrons and positrons of finite mass m. The calculation is carried out within the dimensional regularization scheme; the remaining IR divergences appear as polar singularities in (D-4). The result is presented in terms of 1- and 2-dimensional harmonic polylogarithms, of maximum weight 3.

  10. Vladimir Sudakov and double-logarithmic asymptotics of amplitudes in QED, QCD and gravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipatov L. N.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the Sudakov results on the double logarithmic asymptotics of the electron form-factor which were based on his parametrization of the virtual particle momenta in the Feynman diagrams. The high energy amplitudes for various QED and QCD processes in the double-logarithmic approximation are obtained by using the Bethe-Salpeter approach and the evolution equations. The ultraviolet divergency of the graviton Regge trajectory allows to derive the infrared evolution equation for the graviton-graviton scattering amplitude with a double-logarithmic accuracy. The asymptotic behavior of this amplitude depends essentially on the rank N of the super-symmetry.

  11. Bloch-wave engineered submicron-diameter quantum-dot micropillars for cavity QED experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Niels; Lermer, Matthias; Reitzenstein, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The semiconductor micropillar is attractive for cavity QED experiments. For strong coupling, the figure of merit is proportional to Q/√V, and a design combining a high Q and a low mode volume V is thus desired. However, for the standard submicron diameter design, poor mode matching between the ca...... the cavity and the DBR Bloch mode limits the Q. We present a novel adiabatic design where Bloch-wave engineering is employed to improve the mode matching, allowing the demonstration of a record-high vacuum Rabi splitting of 85 μeV and a Q of 13600 for a 850 nm diameter micropillar....

  12. Landau-Khalatnikov-Fradkin transformation for the fermion propagator in QED in arbitrary dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Shaoyang; Pennington, M. R.

    2017-04-01

    We explore the dependence of fermion propagators on the covariant gauge fixing parameter in quantum electrodynamics (QED) with the number of spacetime dimensions kept explicit. Gauge covariance is controlled by the the Landau -Khalatnikov-Fradkin transformation (LKFT). Utilizing its group nature, the LKFT for a fermion propagator in Minkowski space is solved exactly. The special scenario of 3D has been used to test claims made for general cases. When renormalized correctly, the simplification of the LKFT in 4D has been achieved with the help of fractional calculus.

  13. Strong-field QED processes in short laser pulses. One- and two-photon Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seipt, Daniel

    2012-12-20

    The purpose of this thesis is to advance the understanding of strong-field QED processes in short laser pulses. The processes of non-linear one-photon and two-photon Compton scattering are studied, that is the scattering of photons in the interaction of relativistic electrons with ultra-short high-intensity laser pulses. These investigations are done in view of the present and next generation of ultra-high intensity optical lasers which are supposed to achieve unprecedented intensities of the order of 10{sup 24} W/cm{sup 2} and beyond, with pulse lengths in the order of some femtoseconds. The ultra-high laser intensity requires a non-perturbative description of the interaction of charged particles with the laser field to allow for multi-photon interactions, which is beyond the usual perturbative expansion of QED organized in powers of the fine structure constant. This is achieved in strong-field QED by employing the Furry picture and non-perturbative solutions of the Dirac equation in the presence of a background laser field as initial and final state wave functions, as well as the laser dressed Dirac-Volkov propagator. The primary objective is a realistic description of scattering processes with regard to the finite laser pulse duration beyond the common approximation of infinite plane waves, which is made necessary by the ultra-short pulse length of modern high-intensity lasers. Non-linear finite size effects are identified, which are a result of the interplay between the ultra-high intensity and the ultra-short pulse length. In particular, the frequency spectra and azimuthal photon emission spectra are studied emphasizing the differences between pulsed and infinite laser fields. The proper description of the finite temporal duration of the laser pulse leads to a regularization of unphysical infinities (due to the infinite plane-wave description) of the laser-dressed Dirac-Volkov propagator and in the second-order strong-field process of two-photon Compton

  14. QED as the tensionless limit of the spinning string with contact interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Edwards

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available QED with spinor matter is argued to correspond to the tensionless limit of spinning strings with contact interactions. The strings represent electric lines of force with charges at their ends. The interaction is constructed from a delta-function on the world-sheet which, although off-shell, decouples from the world-sheet metric. Integrating out the string degrees of freedom with fixed boundary generates the super-Wilson loop that couples spinor matter to electromagnetism in the world-line formalism. World-sheet and world-line, but not spacetime, supersymmetry underpin the model.

  15. Nuclear polarization study: new frontiers for tests of QED in heavy highly charged ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotka, Andrey V; Plunien, Günter

    2014-07-11

    A systematic investigation of the nuclear polarization effects in one- and few-electron heavy ions is presented. The nuclear polarization corrections in the zeroth and first orders in 1/Z are evaluated to the binding energies, the hyperfine splitting, and the bound-electron g factor. It is shown that the nuclear polarization contributions can be substantially canceled simultaneously with the rigid nuclear corrections. This allows for new prospects for probing the QED effects in a strong electromagnetic field and the determination of fundamental constants.

  16. A proposal to implement a quantum delayed choice experiment assisted by cavity QED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, N.G. de; Avelar, A.T.; Cardoso, W.B., E-mail: wesleybcardoso@ufg.br

    2014-03-01

    We propose a scheme with current technology to implement a quantum delayed-choice experiment in the realm of cavity QED. Our scheme uses two-level atoms interacting on and off resonantly with a single mode of a high Q cavity. At the end of the protocol, the state of the cavity returns to its ground state, allowing new sequential operations. The particle and wave behavior, which are verified in a single experimental setup, are postselected after the atomic states are selectively detected.

  17. The QED engine spectrum - Fusion-electric propulsion for air-breathing to interstellar flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussard, Robert W.; Jameson, Lorin W.

    1993-01-01

    A new inertial-electrostatic-fusion direct electric power source can be used to drive a relativistic e-beam to heat propellant. The resulting system is shown to yield specific impulse and thrust/mass ratio 2-3 orders of magnitude larger than from other advanced propulsion concepts. This QED system can be applied to aerospace vehicles from air-breathing to near-interstellar flight. Examples are given for Earth/Mars flight missions, that show transit times of 40 d with 20 percent payload in single-stage vehicles.

  18. The QED engine - Fusion-electric propulsion for Cis-Oort/Quasi-Interstellar (QIS) flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussard, Robert W.; Jameson, Lorin W.; Froning, H. D., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    A summary is presented of QED fusion-direct-electric engine systems, their features, and performance ranges. The principles and characteristics of inertial-electrostatic-fusion (IEF) power source systems are then reviewed, and their application to the diluted-fusion-product (DFP) engine concept for QIS missions is discussed. Particular attention is given to vehicle performance over a range of very high specific impulses and to specifications of a typical candidate DFP/IEF engine and a single-stage vehicle for rapid flight to 550 AU.

  19. QED loop effects in the spacetime background of a Schwarzschild black hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelyanov, Viacheslav A.

    2017-12-01

    The black-hole evaporation implies that the quantum-field propagators in a local Minkowski frame acquire a correction, which gives rise to this process. The modification of the propagators causes, in turn, non-trivial local effects due to the radiative/loop diagrams in non-linear QFTs. In particular, there should be imprints of the evaporation in QED, if one goes beyond the tree-level approximation. Of special interest in this respect is the region near the black-hole horizon, which, already at tree level, appears to show highly non-classical features, e.g., negative energy density and energy flux into the black hole.

  20. Measurement of the Proton Structure Function $F_{2}$ at low $Q^{2}$ in QED Compton Scattering at HERA

    CERN Document Server

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Asmone, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berger, N.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Bohme, J.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bracinik, J.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.-B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Delcourt, B.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; Desch, K.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flucke, G.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garutti, E.; Garvey, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Gwilliam, C.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Henshaw, O.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Heuer, R.-D.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ibbotson, M.; Ismail, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Katzy, J.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Koblitz, B.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Koutouev, R.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Kuckens, J.; Kuhr, T.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leiner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lueders, H.; Luke, D.; Lux, T.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michine, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Milstead, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morozov, I.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Ossoskov, G.; Ozerov, D.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Poschl, R.; Portheault, B.; Povh, B.; Raicevic, N.; Ratiani, Z.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; Wessling, B.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Woehrling, E.-E.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2004-01-01

    The proton structure function F_2(x,Q^2) is measured in inelastic QED Compton scattering using data collected with the H1 detector at HERA. QED Compton events are used to access the kinematic range of very low virtualities of the exchanged photon, Q^2, down to 0.5 GeV^2, and Bjorken x up to \\sim 0.06, a region which has not been covered previously by inclusive measurements at HERA. The results are in agreement with the measurements from fixed target lepton-nucleon scattering experiments.

  1. Residual currents generated from vacuum by an electric field pulse in 2+1 dimensional QED models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smolyansky S.A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of strong field QED, the generation of a residual alternating polarization current is demonstrated, which remains after switching off an external field pulse. This effect is stipulated by inertial properties of the physical vacuum. In the standard vacuum D = 2+1 QED, this current is rapidly damped fast but can be available, apparently, for observation in the graphene, where the Fermi velocity vF ≪ c plays an analogous role as the light velocity.

  2. Universal resistance quantum in multichannel transport and dissipative field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt, Prasenjit; Schmidt, Thomas; Le Hur, Karyn

    2012-02-01

    The Landauer formula for coherent DC transport lies at the heart of nanoelectronics and embodies a startling prediction: the quantization of the conductance in one-dimensional metallic wires for ballistic transport, in steps of Rq-1=e^2/h for each channel. Scattering proccesses undergone by the electrons cause a deviation from this result. The resistance then depends on the transparency of the channel and assumes a nonuniversal value. Recently, the unit of resistance Rq has been shown to be a universal feature for AC transport through a single-channel quantum RC circuit with a large cavity. This result can be understood by mapping the system to the one-channel Kondo model and the emergent low-energy Fermi-liquid theory. In a different context Rq arises in a certain nonequilibrium setting for the multichannel quantum RC circuit. In this work, we study AC transport in the many-channel quantum RC circuit. Under certain well-defined conditions the charge relaxation resistance remains universal and equals Rq. We study the emergence of this universal resistance in the multi-channel limit by using the mapping with a dissipative particle on a ring and making an analogy with the Kondo model.

  3. Dissipative Shocks behind Bacteria Gliding

    CERN Document Server

    Virga, Epifanio G

    2014-01-01

    Gliding is a means of locomotion on rigid substrates utilized by a number of bacteria includingmyxobacteria and cyanobacteria. One of the hypotheses advanced to explain this motility mechanism hinges on the role played by the slime filaments continuously extruded from gliding bacteria. This paper solves in full a non-linear mechanical theory that treats as dissipative shocks both the point where the extruded slime filament comes in contact with the substrate, called the filament's foot, and the pore on the bacterium outer surface from where the filament is ejected. We prove that kinematic compatibility for shock propagation requires that the bacterium uniform gliding velocity (relative to the substrate) and the slime ejecting velocity (relative to the bacterium) must be equal, a coincidence that seems to have already been observed.

  4. The circuit designer's companion

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Tim

    1991-01-01

    The Circuit Designer's Companion covers the theoretical aspects and practices in analogue and digital circuit design. Electronic circuit design involves designing a circuit that will fulfill its specified function and designing the same circuit so that every production model of it will fulfill its specified function, and no other undesired and unspecified function.This book is composed of nine chapters and starts with a review of the concept of grounding, wiring, and printed circuits. The subsequent chapters deal with the passive and active components of circuitry design. These topics are foll

  5. Electronic devices and circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Pridham, Gordon John

    1972-01-01

    Electronic Devices and Circuits, Volume 3 provides a comprehensive account on electronic devices and circuits and includes introductory network theory and physics. The physics of semiconductor devices is described, along with field effect transistors, small-signal equivalent circuits of bipolar transistors, and integrated circuits. Linear and non-linear circuits as well as logic circuits are also considered. This volume is comprised of 12 chapters and begins with an analysis of the use of Laplace transforms for analysis of filter networks, followed by a discussion on the physical properties of

  6. Intuitive analog circuit design

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Intuitive Analog Circuit Design outlines ways of thinking about analog circuits and systems that let you develop a feel for what a good, working analog circuit design should be. This book reflects author Marc Thompson's 30 years of experience designing analog and power electronics circuits and teaching graduate-level analog circuit design, and is the ideal reference for anyone who needs a straightforward introduction to the subject. In this book, Dr. Thompson describes intuitive and ""back-of-the-envelope"" techniques for designing and analyzing analog circuits, including transistor amplifi

  7. Superconducting circuits for quantum information: an outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoret, M H; Schoelkopf, R J

    2013-03-08

    The performance of superconducting qubits has improved by several orders of magnitude in the past decade. These circuits benefit from the robustness of superconductivity and the Josephson effect, and at present they have not encountered any hard physical limits. However, building an error-corrected information processor with many such qubits will require solving specific architecture problems that constitute a new field of research. For the first time, physicists will have to master quantum error correction to design and operate complex active systems that are dissipative in nature, yet remain coherent indefinitely. We offer a view on some directions for the field and speculate on its future.

  8. Observed eddy dissipation in the Agulhas Current

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Braby, L

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Channel and south of Madagascar dissipate as they approach the Agulhas Current. By tracking the offshore position of the current core and its velocity at 30°S in relation to eddies, it is demonstrated that eddy dissipation occurs through a transfer...

  9. Sudden viscous dissipation of compressing turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Davidovits, S.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-01-01

    Compression of turbulent plasma can amplify the turbulent kinetic energy, if the compression is fast compared to the viscous dissipation time of the turbulent eddies. A sudden viscous dissipation mechanism is demonstrated, whereby this amplified turbulent kinetic energy is rapidly converted into thermal energy, suggesting a new paradigm for fast ignition inertial fusion.

  10. Sudden Viscous Dissipation of Compressing Turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovits, Seth; Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2016-03-11

    Compression of turbulent plasma can amplify the turbulent kinetic energy, if the compression is fast compared to the viscous dissipation time of the turbulent eddies. A sudden viscous dissipation mechanism is demonstrated, whereby this amplified turbulent kinetic energy is rapidly converted into thermal energy, suggesting a new paradigm for fast ignition inertial fusion.

  11. Measurement of the running of the QED coupling in small-angle Bhabha scattering at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.M.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; ONeale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2006-01-01

    Using the OPAL detector at LEP, the running of the effective QED coupling alpha(t) is measured for space-like momentum transfer through its effect on the angular spectrum of small-angle Bhabha scattering. In an almost ideal QED framework, with very favourable experimental conditions, we obtain: Delta alpha(-6.07GeV^2) - Delta alpha(-1.81GeV^2) = (440 pm 58 pm 43 pm 30) X 10^-5, where the first error is statistical, the second is the experimental systematic and the third is the theoretical uncertainty. This is the strongest direct evidence ever presented that the running of alpha is consistent with Standard Model expectations. The null hypothesis that alpha remains constant within the above interval of -t is excluded with a significance above 5sigma. Similarly, our results are inconsistent at the level of 3sigma with the hypothesis that only leptonic loops contribute to the running, and therefore provide the first clear experimental evidence that hadronic loops also contribute.

  12. Predictions for g-2 of the muon and $\\alpha_{QED}(M_{Z}^{2})$

    CERN Document Server

    Hagiwara, K; Nomura, D; Teubner, T; Nomura, Daisuke

    2004-01-01

    We calculate (g-2) of the muon and the QED coupling alpha(M_Z^2), by improving the determination of the hadronic vacuum polarization contributions and their uncertainties. We include the recently re-analysed CMD-2 data on e^+e^- -> pi^+ pi^-. We carefully combine a wide variety of data for the e^+e^- production of hadrons, and obtain the optimum form of R(s) = sigma_had^0(s)/sigma_pt(s), together with its uncertainty. Our results for the hadronic contributions to g-2 of the muon are a_mu^(had, LO) = (692.4 +- 5.9_exp +- 2.4_rad) * 10^(-10) and a_mu^(had, NLO) = (-9.8 +- 0.1_exp +- 0.0_rad) * 10^(-10), and for the QED coupling Delta alpha^(5)_had (M_Z^2)= (275.5 +- 1.9_exp +- 1.3_rad) * 10^(-4). These yield (g-2)/2 = 0.00116591763(74), which is about 2.4 sigma below the present world average measurement, and alpha(M_Z^2)^(-1) = 128.954 +- 0.031. We compare our (g-2) value with other predictions and, in particular, make a detailed comparison with the latest determination of (g-2) by Davier et al.

  13. Electron-electron bound states in Maxwell-Chern-Simons-Proca QED sub 3

    CERN Document Server

    Belich, H; Ferreira, M M J; Helayel-Neto, J A

    2002-01-01

    We start from a parity-breaking MCS QED sub 3 model with spontaneous breaking of the gauge symmetry as a framework for evaluation of the electron-electron interaction potential and for attainment of numerical values for the e sup - e sup - - bound state. Three expressions V sub e sub f sub f subarrow down subarrow down, V sub e sub f sub f subarrow down subarrow up, V sub e sub f sub f subarrow down subarrow down) are obtained according to the polarization state of the scattered electrons. In an energy scale compatible with condensed matter electronic excitations, these potentials become degenerated. The resulting potential is implemented in the Schroedinger equation and the variational method is applied to carry out the electronic binding energy. The resulting binding energies in the scale of 10-100 meV and a correlation length in the scale of 10 - 30 Angstrom are possible indications that the MCS-QED sub 3 model adopted may be suitable to address an eventual case of e sup - e sup - pairing in the presence o...

  14. Toward tests of QED and CPT with improved electron and positron g-factor measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novitski, Elise; Dorr, Joshua; Fogwell Hoogerheide, Shannon; Gabrielse, Gerald

    2013-05-01

    We describe progress toward improved measurements of the electron and positron g-factors using quantum jump spectroscopy between the lowest quantum states of either particle trapped in a 100 mK cylindrical Penning trap. In a new apparatus--designed for improved stability and a better geometry for cavity-assisted sideband cooling--we have trapped a single electron, driven and observed single cyclotron transitions, and trapped positrons in a loading trap. This should enable measurements of both g-factors with better than the 0.28 ppt precision of the best electron value (the most precise measurement of a fundamental property of an elementary particle), thereby improving the positron value by a factor of more than 15., These measurements, in combination with QED theory relating the electron g-factor to α, will improve on the most precise determination of α, the fine structure constant. The comparison of this value with an independent measurement of α is the most precise test of QED. The comparison of the e- and e+ g-factors will improve upon the best test of CPT symmetry in a lepton system. This work is supported by the NSF

  15. Up and Down Quark Masses and Corrections to Dashen's Theorem from Lattice QCD and Quenched QED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodor, Z; Hoelbling, C; Krieg, S; Lellouch, L; Lippert, Th; Portelli, A; Sastre, A; Szabo, K K; Varnhorst, L

    2016-08-19

    In a previous Letter [Borsanyi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 252001 (2013)] we determined the isospin mass splittings of the baryon octet from a lattice calculation based on N_{f}=2+1 QCD simulations to which QED effects have been added in a partially quenched setup. Using the same data we determine here the corrections to Dashen's theorem and the individual up and down quark masses. Our ensembles include 5 lattice spacings down to 0.054 fm, lattice sizes up to 6 fm, and average up-down quark masses all the way down to their physical value. For the parameter which quantifies violations to Dashen's theorem, we obtain ϵ=0.73(2)(5)(17), where the first error is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third is an estimate of the QED quenching error. For the light quark masses we obtain, m_{u}=2.27(6)(5)(4) and m_{d}=4.67(6)(5)(4)  MeV in the modified minimal subtraction scheme at 2  GeV and the isospin breaking ratios m_{u}/m_{d}=0.485(11)(8)(14), R=38.2(1.1)(0.8)(1.4), and Q=23.4(0.4)(0.3)(0.4). Our results exclude the m_{u}=0 solution to the strong CP problem by more than 24 standard deviations.

  16. PREFACE: Heavy-Ion Spectroscopy and QED Effects in Atomic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Ingvar; Martinson, Indrek; Schuch, Reinhold

    1993-01-01

    Experimental studies of heavy and highly charged ions have made remarkable progress in recent years. Today it is possible to produce virtually any ion up to hydrogen-like uranium; to study collisions of those ions with atoms, electrons, and solid surfaces; to excite such an ion and accurately measure the radiation emitted. This progress is largely due to the development of new experimental methods, for instance, the high-energy ion accelerators, laser-produced plasmas, advanced ion sources and ion traps (such as EBIS, EBIT, ECR, etc.), high temperature magnetically confined plasmas and heavy-ion storage rings. The motivations for studies of collisions with highly charged ions and for the understanding of the structure of heavy atomic systems are multi-faceted. Besides of the basic scientific aspects which are mainly the subject of this symposium, much incentive is experienced by applications, e.g., the interpretation of spectra from space (solar corona, solar flares and hot stars), the modelling of stellar atmospheres, the diagnostics of fusion plasma impurities, and the development of X-ray lasers. Since quite some time highly charged ions play a key role for high-precision metrology of atomic structure. These studies have been benchmarks for tests of advanced theories, including many-body theories of interelectronic correlations, relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic (QED) effects, effects due to the finite size of the nucleus and to parity non-conservation (PNC). The interest in QED effects in heavy ions has increased drastically in the last few years. The remarkable experiment on Li-like uranium, recently reported from Berkeley, has stimulated several groups to perform very accurate Lamb-shift calculations on such systems, and reports from three groups were given about such work. The agreement between the calculations as well as with experiment was generally very good, which implies that the problem of evaluating the first-order Lamb shift for any element is

  17. Optimizing the microstructure of dissipative materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Erik; Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    from experimental results in (Schaedler, 2011), where a highly energy absorbing material, constructed from structural elements with a small cross sectional area but large area moment of inertia, is presented. Furthermore, the applicability of multiscale finite element methods (Efendiev, 2009......The aim of this work is to present a method to design material microstructures with high dissipation using topology optimization. In order to compute the macroscopic energy dissipation in periodic structures, we focus both on capturing the physical dissipation mechanism and to find the effective...... macroscopic dissipation. The effective elastic material properties of a periodic structure can be found numerically using homogenization as describe in e.g. (Guedes and Kikuchi, 1990). For dissipative materials a quasi-static approach can be used to find the homogenized complex elasticity tensor, and thereby...

  18. Precisely timing dissipative quantum information processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kastoryano, Michael; Eisert, Jens [FU Berlin (Germany); Wolf, Michael [TU Muenchen (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Dissipative engineering constitutes a framework within which quantum information processing protocols are powered by system-environment interaction rather than by unitary dynamics alone. This framework embraces noise as a resource, and consequently, offers a number of advantages compared to one based on unitary dynamics alone, e.g., that the protocols are typically independent of the initial state of the system. However, the time independent nature of this scheme makes it difficult to imagine precisely timed sequential operations, conditional measurements or error correction. In this work, we provide a path around these challenges, by introducing basic dissipative gadgets which allow us to precisely initiate, trigger and time dissipative operations, while keeping the system Liouvillian time-independent. These gadgets open up novel perspectives for thinking of timed dissipative quantum information processing. As an example, we sketch how measurement based computation can be simulated in the dissipative setting.

  19. Analytical study of dissipative solitary waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dini, Fatemeh [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Emamzadeh, Mehdi Molaie [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khorasani, Sina [School of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11365-363, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bobin, Jean Louis [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Amrollahi, Reza [Department of Physics, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sodagar, Majid [School of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11365-363, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khoshnegar, Milad [School of Electrical Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, PO Box 11365-363, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-02-15

    In this paper, the analytical solution to a new class of nonlinear solitons is presented with cubic nonlinearity, subject to a dissipation term arising as a result of a first-order derivative with respect to time, in the weakly nonlinear regime. Exact solutions are found using the combination of the perturbation and Green's function methods up to the third order. We present an example and discuss the asymptotic behavior of the Green's function. The dissipative solitary equation is also studied in the phase space in the non-dissipative and dissipative forms. Bounded and unbounded solutions of this equation are characterized, yielding an energy conversation law for non-dissipative waves. Applications of the model include weakly nonlinear solutions of terahertz Josephson plasma waves in layered superconductors and ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

  20. Time in dissipative tunneling: Subtleties and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelkar, N. G.; Lozano Gómez, D.; Patiño, Edgar J.

    2017-07-01

    Characteristic features of tunneling times for dissipative tunneling of a particle through a rectangular barrier are studied within a semiclassical model involving dissipation in the form of a velocity dependent frictional force. The average dwell time and traversal time with dissipation are found to be less than those without dissipation. This counter-intuitive behavior is reversed if one evaluates the physically relevant transmission dwell time. Apart from these observations, we find that the percentage of energy lost by the tunneling particle is higher for smaller energies. The above observations are tested and confirmed in a realistic case by applying the dissipation model to study the current-voltage data in a Al/Al2O3/Al solid state junction at various temperatures. The friction coefficient for Al2O3 as a function of temperature is presented. It is found to decrease with increasing temperature.

  1. Material Systems for Blast-Energy Dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Schondel; Henry S. Chu

    2010-10-01

    Lightweight panels have been designed to protect buildings and vehicles from blast pressures by activating energy dissipation mechanisms under the influence of blast loading. Panels were fabricated which featured a variety of granular materials and hydraulic dissipative deformation mechanisms and the test articles were subjected to full-scale blast loading. The force time-histories transmitted by each technology were measured by a novel method that utilized inexpensive custom-designed force sensors. The array of tests revealed that granular materials can effectively dissipate blast energy if they are employed in a way that they easily crush and rearrange. Similarly, hydraulic dissipation can effectively dissipate energy if the panel features a high fraction of porosity and the panel encasement features low compressive stiffness.

  2. Electric circuits essentials

    CERN Document Server

    REA, Editors of

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Electric Circuits I includes units, notation, resistive circuits, experimental laws, transient circuits, network theorems, techniques of circuit analysis, sinusoidal analysis, polyph

  3. QED effects in 1s and 2s single and double ionization potentials of the noble gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, J; Jänkälä, K; Huttula, M; Föhlisch, A

    2017-04-14

    We present calculations on the quantum electrodynamics (QED) effects in 1s and 2s single and double ionization potentials of noble gases from Ne to Rn as perturbations on relativistic four-component Dirac-Fock wavefunctions. The most dominant effect originates from the self-energy of the core-electron that yields corrections of similar order as the transverse interaction. For 1s ionization potentials, a match within few eV against the known experimental values is obtained, and our work reveals considerable QED effects in the photoelectron binding energies across the periodic table-most strikingly even for Ne. We perform power-law fits for the corrections as a function of Z and interpolate the QED correction of ∼-0.55 eV for S1s. Due to this, the K-edge electron spectra of the third row and below need QED for a match in the absolute energy when using state-of-the-art instrumentation.

  4. Tensor network simulation of QED on infinite lattices: Learning from (1 +1 ) d , and prospects for (2 +1 ) d

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapp, Kai; Orús, Román

    2017-06-01

    The simulation of lattice gauge theories with tensor network (TN) methods is becoming increasingly fruitful. The vision is that such methods will, eventually, be used to simulate theories in (3 +1 ) dimensions in regimes difficult for other methods. So far, however, TN methods have mostly simulated lattice gauge theories in (1 +1 ) dimensions. The aim of this paper is to explore the simulation of quantum electrodynamics (QED) on infinite lattices with TNs, i.e., fermionic matter fields coupled to a U (1 ) gauge field, directly in the thermodynamic limit. With this idea in mind we first consider a gauge-invariant infinite density matrix renormalization group simulation of the Schwinger model—i.e., QED in (1 +1 ) d . After giving a precise description of the numerical method, we benchmark our simulations by computing the subtracted chiral condensate in the continuum, in good agreement with other approaches. Our simulations of the Schwinger model allow us to build intuition about how a simulation should proceed in (2 +1 ) dimensions. Based on this, we propose a variational ansatz using infinite projected entangled pair states (PEPS) to describe the ground state of (2 +1 ) d QED. The ansatz includes U (1 ) gauge symmetry at the level of the tensors, as well as fermionic (matter) and bosonic (gauge) degrees of freedom both at the physical and virtual levels. We argue that all the necessary ingredients for the simulation of (2 +1 ) d QED are, a priori, already in place, paving the way for future upcoming results.

  5. Charged hadrons in local finite-volume QED+QCD with C{sup ⋆} boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucini, B. [Physics Department, College of Science, Swansea University,Singleton Park, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Patella, A. [PH-TH, CERN,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); School of Computing and Mathematics & Centre for Mathematical Science, Plymouth University,Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Ramos, A. [PH-TH, CERN,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Tantalo, N. [Dipartimento di Fisica and INFN, Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”,Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); PH-TH, CERN,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2016-02-11

    In order to calculate QED corrections to hadronic physical quantities by means of lattice simulations, a coherent description of electrically-charged states in finite volume is needed. In the usual periodic setup, Gauss’s law and large gauge transformations forbid the propagation of electrically-charged states. A possible solution to this problem, which does not violate the axioms of local quantum field theory, has been proposed by Wiese and Polley, and is based on the use of C{sup ⋆} boundary conditions. We present a thorough analysis of the properties and symmetries of QED in isolation and QED coupled to QCD, with C{sup ⋆} boundary conditions. In particular we learn that a certain class of electrically-charged states can be constructed in a fully consistent fashion without relying on gauge fixing and without peculiar complications. This class includes single particle states of most stable hadrons. We also calculate finite-volume corrections to the mass of stable charged particles and show that these are much smaller than in non-local formulations of QED.

  6. QED effects in 1s and 2s single and double ionization potentials of the noble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, J.; Jänkälä, K.; Huttula, M.; Föhlisch, A.

    2017-04-01

    We present calculations on the quantum electrodynamics (QED) effects in 1s and 2s single and double ionization potentials of noble gases from Ne to Rn as perturbations on relativistic four-component Dirac-Fock wavefunctions. The most dominant effect originates from the self-energy of the core-electron that yields corrections of similar order as the transverse interaction. For 1s ionization potentials, a match within few eV against the known experimental values is obtained, and our work reveals considerable QED effects in the photoelectron binding energies across the periodic table—most strikingly even for Ne. We perform power-law fits for the corrections as a function of Z and interpolate the QED correction of ˜-0.55 eV for S1s. Due to this, the K-edge electron spectra of the third row and below need QED for a match in the absolute energy when using state-of-the-art instrumentation.

  7. Classical circuit theory

    CERN Document Server

    Wing, Omar

    2008-01-01

    Starting with the basic principles of circuits, this book derives their analytic properties in both the time and frequency domains. It develops an algorithmic method to design common and uncommon types of circuits, such as prototype filters, lumped delay lines, constant phase difference circuits, and delay equalizers.

  8. Signal sampling circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwsma, S.M.; Vertregt, Maarten

    2011-01-01

    A sampling circuit for sampling a signal is disclosed. The sampling circuit comprises a plurality of sampling channels adapted to sample the signal in time-multiplexed fashion, each sampling channel comprising a respective track-and-hold circuit connected to a respective analogue to digital

  9. Signal sampling circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Louwsma, S.M.; Vertregt, Maarten

    2010-01-01

    A sampling circuit for sampling a signal is disclosed. The sampling circuit comprises a plurality of sampling channels adapted to sample the signal in time-multiplexed fashion, each sampling channel comprising a respective track-and-hold circuit connected to a respective analogue to digital

  10. Piezoelectric drive circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treu, Jr., Charles A.

    1999-08-31

    A piezoelectric motor drive circuit is provided which utilizes the piezoelectric elements as oscillators and a Meacham half-bridge approach to develop feedback from the motor ground circuit to produce a signal to drive amplifiers to power the motor. The circuit automatically compensates for shifts in harmonic frequency of the piezoelectric elements due to pressure and temperature changes.

  11. Exact Threshold Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Podolskii, Vladimir V.

    2010-01-01

    with the well-studied corresponding hierarchies defined using ordinary threshold gates. A major open problem in Boolean circuit complexity is to provide an explicit super-polynomial lower bound for depth two threshold circuits. We identify the class of depth two exact threshold circuits as a natural subclass...

  12. Load testing circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    A load testing circuit a circuit tests the load impedance of a load connected to an amplifier. The load impedance includes a first terminal and a second terminal, the load testing circuit comprising a signal generator providing a test signal of a defined bandwidth to the first terminal of the load...

  13. Short-circuit logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Ponse, A.

    2010-01-01

    Short-circuit evaluation denotes the semantics of propositional connectives in which the second argument is only evaluated if the first argument does not suffice to determine the value of the expression. In programming, short-circuit evaluation is widely used. A short-circuit logic is a variant of

  14. Dissipatively coupled waveguide networks for coherent diffusive photonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sebabrata; Mogilevtsev, Dmitri; Slepyan, Gregory Ya; Doherty, Thomas H; Thomson, Robert R; Korolkova, Natalia

    2017-12-04

    A photonic circuit is generally described as a structure in which light propagates by unitary exchange and transfers reversibly between channels. In contrast, the term 'diffusive' is more akin to a chaotic propagation in scattering media, where light is driven out of coherence towards a thermal mixture. Based on the dynamics of open quantum systems, the combination of these two opposites can result in novel techniques for coherent light control. The crucial feature of these photonic structures is dissipative coupling between modes, via an interaction with a common reservoir. Here, we demonstrate experimentally that such systems can perform optical equalisation to smooth multimode light, or act as a distributor, guiding it into selected channels. Quantum thermodynamically, these systems can act as catalytic coherent reservoirs by performing perfect non-Landauer erasure. For lattice structures, localised stationary states can be supported in the continuum, similar to compacton-like states in conventional flat-band lattices.

  15. Observation of a Dissipation-Induced Classical to Quantum Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, James; Sadri, Darius; Schmidt, Sebastian; Türeci, Hakan; Houck, Andrew

    2014-03-01

    The emergence of non-trivial structure in many-body physics has been a central topic of research bearing on many branches of science. Important recent work has explored the nonequilibrium quantum dynamics of closed many-body systems. With the rapid technological advances in solid state quantum optics, it is now possible to experimentally study strongly correlated photons, and to build model systems whose open nature gives rise to rich emergent behavior. We report the experimental observation of a novel dissipation driven dynamical localization transition of strongly correlated photons in an extended superconducting circuit. Interaction with an environment has been argued to provide a mechanism for the emergence of classical behavior from a quantum system. Surprisingly, homodyne measurements reveal the observed localization transition to be from a regime of classical oscillations into a macroscopically self-trapped state manifesting revivals, a fundamentally quantum phenomenon. This experiment also demonstrates a new class of scalable quantum simulators with well controlled coherent and dissipative dynamics suited to the study of quantum many-body phenomena out of equilibrium. Supported by The Eric and Wendy Schmidt Transformative Technology Fund, the US National Science Foundation, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, and the US Army Research Office.

  16. Bifurcations in dissipative fermionic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitani, Paolo; Colonna, Maria; Di Prima, Mariangela

    2014-05-01

    The Boltzmann-Langevin One-Body model (BLOB), is a novel one-body transport approach, based on the solution of the Boltzmann-Langevin equation in three dimensions; it is used to handle large-amplitude phase-space fluctuations and has a broad applicability for dissipative fermionic dynamics. We study the occurrence of bifurcations in the dynamical trajectories describing heavy-ion collisions at Fermi energies. The model, applied to dilute systems formed in such collisions, reveals to be closer to the observation than previous attempts to include a Langevin term in Boltzmann theories. The onset of bifurcations and bimodal behaviour in dynamical trajectories, determines the fragment-formation mechanism. In particular, in the proximity of a threshold, fluctuations between two energetically favourable mechanisms stand out, so that when evolving from the same entrance channel, a variety of exit channels is accessible. This description gives quantitative indications about two threshold situations which characterise heavy-ion collisions at Fermi energies. First, the fusion-to-multifragmentation threshold in central collisions, where the system either reverts to a compact shape, or splits into several pieces of similar sizes. Second, the transition from binary mechanisms to neck fragmentation (in general, ternary channels), in peripheral collisions.

  17. Feedback in analog circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Ochoa, Agustin

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a consistent and direct methodology to the analysis and design of analog circuits with particular application to circuits containing feedback. The analysis and design of circuits containing feedback is generally presented by either following a series of examples where each circuit is simplified through the use of insight or experience (someone else’s), or a complete nodal-matrix analysis generating lots of algebra. Neither of these approaches leads to gaining insight into the design process easily. The author develops a systematic approach to circuit analysis, the Driving Point Impedance and Signal Flow Graphs (DPI/SFG) method that does not require a-priori insight to the circuit being considered and results in factored analysis supporting the design function. This approach enables designers to account fully for loading and the bi-directional nature of elements both in the feedback path and in the amplifier itself, properties many times assumed negligible and ignored. Feedback circuits a...

  18. MIS - An alternative for the dissipation equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aupoix, B.; Cousteix, J.; Liandrat, J.

    The application of the spectral integral method (French designation MIS), an extension of the model proposed by Comte-Bellot and Corrsin (1966) and Reynolds (1974), to the evaluation of dissipation phenomena in turbulent flows is described and demonstrated. The basic assumptions of the model are reviewed, and consideration is given to decaying turbulence, flows with energy production, and low-Re flows. The predictions of the MIS dissipation equation are then compared with experimental data in graphs, and the accuracy of an MIS model without tuned coefficients is shown to be equal to that of standard tuned dissipation equations for homogeneous strained or weakly sheared flows and superior for strongly sheared flows.

  19. Energy dissipation in biomolecular machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lervik, Anders

    2012-07-01

    thermodynamic efficiency is found to be low (< 13 %) in all cases for the experimental conditions considered, which means that a large amount of the energy released from the ATP-hydrolysis is dissipated as heat. A complementary molecular dynamics study targeted on a bilayer for which the protein shows a relatively large efficiency (compared to other bilayers) shows that membrane deformation and large efficiency are not mutually exclusive. Overall, this thesis highlights the usefulness of the mesoscopic non-equilibrium thermodynamic framework applied to molecular machines and energy transduction and dissipation in these. The main result is that the mesoscopic nonequilibrium thermodynamic framework is applicable to molecular pumps and can be extended to include heat effects. This framework is general and can be applied to other molecular machines as well. Further, the results also support the notion that the calcium pump may contribute to non-shivering thermogenesis in certain tissues.(Author)

  20. Dissipative structures and biological rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbeter, Albert

    2017-10-01

    Sustained oscillations abound in biological systems. They occur at all levels of biological organization over a wide range of periods, from a fraction of a second to years, and with a variety of underlying mechanisms. They control major physiological functions, and their dysfunction is associated with a variety of physiological disorders. The goal of this review is (i) to give an overview of the main rhythms observed at the cellular and supracellular levels, (ii) to briefly describe how the study of biological rhythms unfolded in the course of time, in parallel with studies on chemical oscillations, (iii) to present the major roles of biological rhythms in the control of physiological functions, and (iv) the pathologies associated with the alteration, disappearance, or spurious occurrence of biological rhythms. Two tables present the main examples of cellular and supracellular rhythms ordered according to their period, and their role in physiology and pathophysiology. Among the rhythms discussed are neural and cardiac rhythms, metabolic oscillations such as those occurring in glycolysis in yeast, intracellular Ca++ oscillations, cyclic AMP oscillations in Dictyostelium amoebae, the segmentation clock that controls somitogenesis, pulsatile hormone secretion, circadian rhythms which occur in all eukaryotes and some bacteria with a period close to 24 h, the oscillatory dynamics of the enzymatic network driving the cell cycle, and oscillations in transcription factors such as NF-ΚB and tumor suppressors such as p53. Ilya Prigogine's concept of dissipative structures applies to temporal oscillations and allows us to unify within a common framework the various rhythms observed at different levels of biological organization, regardless of their period and underlying mechanism.

  1. Power analysis dataset for QCA based multiplexer circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abdullah-Al-Shafi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Power consumption in irreversible QCA logic circuits is a vital and a major issue; however in the practical cases, this focus is mostly omitted.The complete power depletion dataset of different QCA multiplexers have been worked out in this paper. At −271.15 °C temperature, the depletion is evaluated under three separate tunneling energy levels. All the circuits are designed with QCADesigner, a broadly used simulation engine and QCAPro tool has been applied for estimating the power dissipation.

  2. Characterizing pesticide dissipation in food crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fantke, Peter; Juraske, R.; Jolliet, O.

    2013-01-01

    Ingestion of residues via consumption of food crops is the predominant exposure route of the general population toward pesticides. However, pesticide dissipation in crops constitutes a main source of uncertainty in estimating residues in harvested crop parts and subsequent human exposure....... Nevertheless, dissipation is a key mechanism in models assessing pesticide distribution in the cropenvironment and the magnitude of residues in harvest. We provide a consistent framework for characterizing pesticide dissipation in food crops for use in modeling approaches applied in health risk and impact...... assessment. We collected 4,482 unique dissipation half-lives for 341 substances applied to 182 different crop species and fully characterize these data by describing their variance, distribution and uncertainty as well as by identifying the influence of substance, crop and environmental characteristics. We...

  3. Open Boundary Conditions for Dissipative MHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier, E T

    2011-11-10

    In modeling magnetic confinement, astrophysics, and plasma propulsion, representing the entire physical domain is often difficult or impossible, and artificial, or 'open' boundaries are appropriate. A novel open boundary condition (BC) for dissipative MHD, called Lacuna-based open BC (LOBC), is presented. LOBC, based on the idea of lacuna-based truncation originally presented by V.S. Ryaben'kii and S.V. Tsynkov, provide truncation with low numerical noise and minimal reflections. For hyperbolic systems, characteristic-based BC (CBC) exist for separating the solution into outgoing and incoming parts. In the hyperbolic-parabolic dissipative MHD system, such separation is not possible, and CBC are numerically unstable. LOBC are applied in dissipative MHD test problems including a translating FRC, and coaxial-electrode plasma acceleration. Solution quality is compared to solutions using CBC and zero-normal derivative BC. LOBC are a promising new open BC option for dissipative MHD.

  4. Dissipation effects in mechanics and thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güémez, J.; Fiolhais, M.

    2016-07-01

    With the discussion of three examples, we aim at clarifying the concept of energy transfer associated with dissipation in mechanics and in thermodynamics. The dissipation effects due to dissipative forces, such as the friction force between solids or the drag force in motions in fluids, lead to an internal energy increase of the system and/or to heat transfer to the surroundings. This heat flow is consistent with the second law, which states that the entropy of the universe should increase when those forces are present because of the irreversibility always associated with their actions. As far as mechanics is concerned, the effects of the dissipative forces are included in Newton’s equations as impulses and pseudo-works.

  5. Low moduli elastomers with low viscous dissipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bejenariu, Anca Gabriela; Yu, Liyun; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2012-01-01

    A controlled reaction schema for addition curing silicones leads to both significantly lower elastic modulus and lower viscous dissipation than for the chemically identical network prepared by the traditional reaction schema....

  6. Lattice Perturbation Theory in Noncommutative Geometry and Parity Anomaly in 3D Noncommutative QED

    CERN Document Server

    Nishimura, J

    2003-01-01

    We formulate lattice perturbation theory for gauge theories in noncommutative geometry. We apply it to three-dimensional noncommutative QED and calculate the effective action induced by Dirac fermions. In particular "parity invariance" of a massless theory receives an anomaly expressed by the noncommutative Chern-Simons action. The coefficient of the anomaly is labelled by an integer depending on the lattice action, which is a noncommutative counterpart of the phenomenon known in the commutative theory. The parity anomaly can also be obtained using Ginsparg-Wilson fermions, where the masslessness is guaranteed at finite lattice spacing. This suggests a natural definition of the lattice-regularized Chern-Simons theory on a noncommutative torus, which could enable nonperturbative studies of quantum Hall systems.

  7. Macroscopic QED in linearly responding media and a Lorentz-Force approach to dispersion forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raabe, Christian

    2008-07-08

    In this thesis, a very general quantization scheme for the macroscopic electromagnetic field in arbitrary linearly responding media is presented. It offers a unified approach to QED in such media. Applying the quantization scheme, a theory of the dispersion forces on the basis of the Lorentz force is developed. By regarding the dispersion force as the (ground-state or thermal-state) expectation value of the Lorentz force that acts on appropriately defined charge and current densities, Casimir, Casimir-Polder, and van der Waals forces are united in a very natural way that makes transparent their common physical basis. Application of the theory to planar structures yields generalizations of well-known Lifschitz and Casimir-type formulas. (orig.)

  8. Condensation phenomena in two-flavor scalar QED at finite chemical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Alexander; Gattringer, Christof

    2014-01-01

    We study condensation in two-flavored, scalar QED with non-degenerate masses at finite chemical potential. The conventional formulation of the theory has a sign problem at finite density which can be solved using an exact reformulation of the theory in terms of dual variables. We perform a Monte Carlo simulation in the dual representation and observe a condensation at a critical chemical potential $\\mu_c$. After determining the low-energy spectrum of the theory we try to establish a connection between $\\mu_c$ and the mass of the lightest excitation of the system, which are naively expected to be equal. It turns out, however, that the relation of the critical chemical potential to the mass spectrum in this case is non-trivial: Taking into account the form of the condensate and making some simplifying assumptions we suggest an adequate explanation which is supported by numerical results.

  9. Addressing the Proton Radius Puzzle Using QED-NRQED Effective Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Steven

    2017-09-01

    The proton radius puzzle, i.e. the large discrepancy in the extraction of the proton charge radius between regular and muonic hydrogen, challenges our understanding of the structure of the proton. It can also be an indication of a new force that couples to muons, but not to electrons. An effective field theory analysis using Non Relativistic Quantum Electrodynamics (NRQED) indicates that the muonic hydrogen result can be interpreted as a large, compared to some model estimates, muon-proton spin-independent contact interaction. The muonic hydrogen result can be tested by a muon-proton scattering experiment, MUSE, that is planned at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. The typical momenta of the muons in this experiment are of the order of the muon mass. In this energy regime the muons are relativistic but the protons are still non-relativistic. The interaction between the muons and protons can be described by a hybrid QED-NRQED effective field theory.

  10. openQ*D simulation code for QCD+QED arXiv

    CERN Document Server

    Campos, Isabel; Hansen, Martin; Marinković, Marina Krstić; Patella, Agostino; Ramos, Alberto; Tantalo, Nazario

    The openQ*D code for the simulation of QCD+QED with C$^\\star$ boundary conditions is presented. This code is based on openQCD-1.6, from which it inherits the core features that ensure its efficiency: the locally-deflated SAP-preconditioned GCR solver, the twisted-mass frequency splitting of the fermion action, the multilevel integrator, the 4th order OMF integrator, the SSE/AVX intrinsics, etc. The photon field is treated as fully dynamical and C$^\\star$ boundary conditions can be chosen in the spatial directions. We discuss the main features of openQ*D, and we show basic test results and performance analysis. An alpha version of this code is publicly available and can be downloaded from http://rcstar.web.cern.ch/ .

  11. Fermion propagator in quenched QED3 in the light of the Landau-Khalatnikov-Fradkin tranformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bashir, A. [Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Apartado Postal 2-82, Morelia, Michoacan 58040 (Mexico); Raya, A. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima, Bernal Diaz del Castillo 340, Col. Villa San Sebastian, Colima, Colima 28045 (Mexico)

    2005-04-15

    We study the gauge dependence of the fermion propagator in quenched QED3, with and without dynamical symmetry breaking, in the light of its Landau-Khalatnikov-Fradkin transformation (LKFT). In the former case, starting with the massive bare propagator in the Landau gauge, we obtain non perturbative propagator in an arbitrary covariant gauge. Carrying out a perturbative expansion of this result, it yields correct wavefunction renormalization and the mass function up to the terms independent of the gauge parameter. Also, we obtain valuable information for the higher order perturbative expansion of the propagator. As for the case of dynamical chiral symmetry breaking, we start by approximating the numerical solution in Landau gauge in the rainbow approximation in terms of analytic functions. We then use LKFT to obtain the dynamically generated fermion propagator in an arbitrary covariant gauge. We find that the results obtained have all the required qualitative features. We also go beyond the rainbow and encounter similar desirable qualitative features.

  12. Asymptotic symmetries of QED and Weinberg’s soft photon theorem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campiglia, Miguel [Instituto de Física, Facultad de Ciencias,Montevideo 11400 (Uruguay); Laddha, Alok [Chennai Mathematical Institute,Siruseri 603103 (India)

    2015-07-22

    Various equivalences between so-called soft theorems which constrain scattering amplitudes and Ward identities related to asymptotic symmetries have recently been established in gauge theories and gravity. So far these equivalences have been restricted to the case of massless matter fields, the reason being that the asymptotic symmetries are defined at null infinity. The restriction is however unnatural from the perspective of soft theorems which are insensitive to the masses of the external particles. In this work we remove the aforementioned restriction in the context of scalar QED. Inspired by the radiative phase space description of massless fields at null infinity, we introduce a manifold description of time-like infinity on which the asymptotic phase space for massive fields can be defined. The “angle dependent” large gauge transformations are shown to have a well defined action on this phase space, and the resulting Ward identities are found to be equivalent to Weinberg’s soft photon theorem.

  13. Gauge Coupling Instability and Dynamical Mass Generation in N=1 Supersymmetric QED(3)

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell-Smith, A; Papavassiliou, J

    1999-01-01

    Using superfield Dyson-Schwinger equations, we compute the infrared dynamics of the semi-amputated full vertex, corresponding to the effective running gauge coupling, in N-flavour {\\mathcal N}=1 supersymmetric QED(3). It is shown that the presence of a supersymmetry-preserving mass for the matter multiplet stabilizes the infrared gauge coupling against oscillations present in the massless case, and we therefore infer that the massive vacuum is thus selected at the level of the (quantum) effective action. We further demonstrate that such a mass can indeed be generated dynamically in a self-consistent way by appealing to the superfield Dyson-Schwinger gap equation for the full matter propagator.

  14. Noise and dissipation in magnetoelectronic nanostructures

    OpenAIRE

    Foros, Jørn

    2008-01-01

    This thesis adresses electric and magnetic noise and dissipation in magnetoelectronic nanostructures. Charge and spin current fluctuations are studied in various nanosized metallic structures consisting of both ferromagnetic and non-magnetic elements. The interplay between current and magnetization fluctuations, and the relation of these fluctuations to the electric and magnetic dissipation of energy, are considered. Special focus is on the enhancement of magnetization damping due to so-calle...

  15. Electric circuits and signals

    CERN Document Server

    Sabah, Nassir H

    2007-01-01

    Circuit Variables and Elements Overview Learning Objectives Electric Current Voltage Electric Power and Energy Assigned Positive Directions Active and Passive Circuit Elements Voltage and Current Sources The Resistor The Capacitor The Inductor Concluding Remarks Summary of Main Concepts and Results Learning Outcomes Supplementary Topics on CD Problems and Exercises Basic Circuit Connections and Laws Overview Learning Objectives Circuit Terminology Kirchhoff's Laws Voltage Division and Series Connection of Resistors Current Division and Parallel Connection of Resistors D-Y Transformation Source Equivalence and Transformation Reduced-Voltage Supply Summary of Main Concepts and Results Learning Outcomes Supplementary Topics and Examples on CD Problems and Exercises Basic Analysis of Resistive Circuits Overview Learning Objectives Number of Independent Circuit Equations Node-Voltage Analysis Special Considerations in Node-Voltage Analysis Mesh-Current Analysis Special Conside...

  16. Analog circuits cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Hickman, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Analog Circuits Cookbook presents articles about advanced circuit techniques, components and concepts, useful IC for analog signal processing in the audio range, direct digital synthesis, and ingenious video op-amp. The book also includes articles about amplitude measurements on RF signals, linear optical imager, power supplies and devices, and RF circuits and techniques. Professionals and students of electrical engineering will find the book informative and useful.

  17. Analog circuit design

    CERN Document Server

    Dobkin, Bob

    2012-01-01

    Analog circuit and system design today is more essential than ever before. With the growth of digital systems, wireless communications, complex industrial and automotive systems, designers are being challenged to develop sophisticated analog solutions. This comprehensive source book of circuit design solutions aids engineers with elegant and practical design techniques that focus on common analog challenges. The book's in-depth application examples provide insight into circuit design and application solutions that you can apply in today's demanding designs. <

  18. Regenerative feedback resonant circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. Mark; Kelly, James F.; McCloy, John S.; McMakin, Douglas L.

    2014-09-02

    A regenerative feedback resonant circuit for measuring a transient response in a loop is disclosed. The circuit includes an amplifier for generating a signal in the loop. The circuit further includes a resonator having a resonant cavity and a material located within the cavity. The signal sent into the resonator produces a resonant frequency. A variation of the resonant frequency due to perturbations in electromagnetic properties of the material is measured.

  19. CMOS circuits manual

    CERN Document Server

    Marston, R M

    1995-01-01

    CMOS Circuits Manual is a user's guide for CMOS. The book emphasizes the practical aspects of CMOS and provides circuits, tables, and graphs to further relate the fundamentals with the applications. The text first discusses the basic principles and characteristics of the CMOS devices. The succeeding chapters detail the types of CMOS IC, including simple inverter, gate and logic ICs and circuits, and complex counters and decoders. The last chapter presents a miscellaneous collection of two dozen useful CMOS circuits. The book will be useful to researchers and professionals who employ CMOS circu

  20. Circuits and filters handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Wai-Kai

    2003-01-01

    A bestseller in its first edition, The Circuits and Filters Handbook has been thoroughly updated to provide the most current, most comprehensive information available in both the classical and emerging fields of circuits and filters, both analog and digital. This edition contains 29 new chapters, with significant additions in the areas of computer-aided design, circuit simulation, VLSI circuits, design automation, and active and digital filters. It will undoubtedly take its place as the engineer's first choice in looking for solutions to problems encountered in the design, analysis, and behavi

  1. Nanoscale Microelectronic Circuit Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-17

    Project 3: Low-Power All-Digital Chip-to-Chip Interface Circuits by Pavan Kumar Hanumolu (OSU) CDADIC Project 4: Nanoscale Clock and Data Recovery...CDADIC Project 3: Low-Power All-Digital Chip-to-Chip Interface Circuits by Pavan Kumar Hanumolu (OSU) CDADIC Project 6: Stochastic and Passive A/D...Area 3: Reconfigurable Mixed-Signal Circuits CDADIC Project 3: Low-Power All-Digital Chip-to-Chip Interface Circuits by Pavan Kumar Hanumolu (OSU

  2. Timergenerator circuits manual

    CERN Document Server

    Marston, R M

    2013-01-01

    Timer/Generator Circuits Manual is an 11-chapter text that deals mainly with waveform generator techniques and circuits. Each chapter starts with an explanation of the basic principles of its subject followed by a wide range of practical circuit designs. This work presents a total of over 300 practical circuits, diagrams, and tables.Chapter 1 outlines the basic principles and the different types of generator. Chapters 2 to 9 deal with a specific type of waveform generator, including sine, square, triangular, sawtooth, and special waveform generators pulse. These chapters also include pulse gen

  3. Electronic devices and circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Pridham, Gordon John

    1968-01-01

    Electronic Devices and Circuits, Volume 1 deals with the design and applications of electronic devices and circuits such as passive components, diodes, triodes and transistors, rectification and power supplies, amplifying circuits, electronic instruments, and oscillators. These topics are supported with introductory network theory and physics. This volume is comprised of nine chapters and begins by explaining the operation of resistive, inductive, and capacitive elements in direct and alternating current circuits. The theory for some of the expressions quoted in later chapters is presented. Th

  4. Security electronics circuits manual

    CERN Document Server

    MARSTON, R M

    1998-01-01

    Security Electronics Circuits Manual is an invaluable guide for engineers and technicians in the security industry. It will also prove to be a useful guide for students and experimenters, as well as providing experienced amateurs and DIY enthusiasts with numerous ideas to protect their homes, businesses and properties.As with all Ray Marston's Circuits Manuals, the style is easy-to-read and non-mathematical, with the emphasis firmly on practical applications, circuits and design ideas. The ICs and other devices used in the practical circuits are modestly priced and readily available ty

  5. MOS integrated circuit design

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfendale, E

    2013-01-01

    MOS Integral Circuit Design aims to help in the design of integrated circuits, especially large-scale ones, using MOS Technology through teaching of techniques, practical applications, and examples. The book covers topics such as design equation and process parameters; MOS static and dynamic circuits; logic design techniques, system partitioning, and layout techniques. Also featured are computer aids such as logic simulation and mask layout, as well as examples on simple MOS design. The text is recommended for electrical engineers who would like to know how to use MOS for integral circuit desi

  6. Energy dissipation mapping of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Diganta; Palmer, Xavier-Lewis; Kim, Jinhyun; Qian, Shizhi; Stacey, Michael

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to map the energy dissipation of Jurkat cells using a single 60 nanosecond pulse electric field (NsPEF), primarily through atomic force microscopy (AFM). The phase shift is generated by the sample elements that do not have a heterogeneous surface. Monitoring and manipulating the phase shift is a powerful way for determining the dissipated energy and plotting the topography. The dissipated energy is a relative value, so the silica wafer and cover slip are given a set reference while the transmission of energy between the tip of the cantilever and cell surfaces is measured. The most important finding is that the magnitude and the number of variations in the dissipated energy change with the strength of NsPEF applied. Utilizing a single low field strength NsPEF (15kV/cm), minor changes in dissipated energy were found. The application of a single high field strength NsPEF (60kV/cm) to Jurkat cells resulted in a higher dissipated energy change versus that of in the low field strength condition. Thus, the dissipated energy from the Jurkat cells changes with the strength of NsPEF. By analyzing the forces via investigation in the tapping mode of the AFM, the stabilization of the cytoskeleton and membrane of the cell are related to the strength of NsPEF applied. Furthermore, the strength of NsPEF indicates a meaningful relationship to the survival of the Jurkat cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Particle dynamics and spatial e-e+ density structures at QED cascading in circularly polarized standing waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashinov, A. V.; Kumar, P.; Kim, A. V.

    2017-04-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of longitudinal particle drifting in a standing circularly polarized wave at extreme intensities when quantum radiation reaction (RR) effects should be accounted for. To get an insight into the physics of this phenomenon we made a comparative study considering the RR force in the Landau-Lifshitz or quantum-corrected form, including the case of photon emission stochasticity. Specific features of particle dynamics have a strong impact on spatial structures of the electron-positron (e-e+ ) density created in vacuum through quantum electrodynamic (QED) cascades in counterpropagating laser pulses. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell modeling accounting for QED effects confirms realization of different pair plasma structures.

  8. Dual QED$_3$ at "$N_F = 1/2$" is an interacting CFT in the infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Roscher, Dietrich; Strack, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    We study the fate of weakly coupled dual QED$_3$ in the infrared, that is, a single two-component Dirac fermion coupled to an emergent U(1) gauge field, but without Chern-Simons term. This theory has recently been proposed as a dual description of 2D surfaces of certain topological insulators. Using the renormalization group, we find that the interplay of gauge fluctuations with generated interactions in the four-fermi sector stabilizes an interacting conformal field theory (CFT) with finite four-fermi coupling in the infrared. The emergence of this CFT is due to cancellations in the $\\beta$-function of the four-fermi coupling special to "$N_F = 1/2$". We also quantify how a possible "strong" Dirac fermion duality between a free Dirac cone and dual QED$_3$ would constrain the universal constants of the topological current correlator of the latter.

  9. Study of Dimuon Production in Photon-Photon Collisions and Measurement of QED Photon Structure Functions at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P.; Adye, T.; Adzic, P.; Azhinenko, I.; Albrecht, Z.; Alderweireld, T.; Alekseev, G.D.; Alemany, R.; Allmendinger, T.; Allport, P.P.; Almehed, S.; Amaldi, U.; Amapane, N.; Amato, S.; Anassontzis, E.G.; Andersson, P.; Andreazza, A.; Andringa, S.; Antilogus, P.; Apel, W.D.; Arnoud, Y.; Asman, B.; Augustin, J.E.; Augustinus, A.; Baillon, P.; Bambade, P.; Barao, F.; Barbiellini, G.; Barbier, R.; Bardin, D.Yu.; Barker, G.J.; Baroncelli, A.; Battaglia, M.; Baubillier, M.; Becks, K.H.; Begalli, M.; Behrmann, A.; Beilliere, P.; Belokopytov, Yu.; Benekos, N.C.; Benvenuti, A.C.; Berat, C.; Berggren, M.; Bertrand, D.; Besancon, M.; Bigi, M.; Bilenky, Mikhail S.; Bizouard, M.A.; Bloch, D.; Blom, H.M.; Bonesini, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Booth, P.S.L.; Borgland, A.W.; Borisov, G.; Bosio, C.; Botner, O.; Boudinov, E.; Bouquet, B.; Bourdarios, C.; Bowcock, T.J.V.; Boyko, I.; Bozovic, I.; Bozzo, M.; Bracko, M.; Branchini, P.; Brenner, R.A.; Bruckman, P.; Brunet, J.M.; Bugge, L.; Buran, T.; Buschbeck, B.; Buschmann, P.; Cabrera, S.; Caccia, M.; Calvi, M.; Camporesi, T.; Canale, V.; Carena, F.; Carroll, L.; Caso, C.; Castillo Gimenez, M.V.; Cattai, A.; Cavallo, F.R.; Chabaud, V.; Charpentier, P.; Checchia, P.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chierici, R.; Shlyapnikov, P.; Chochula, P.; Chorowicz, V.; Chudoba, J.; Cieslik, K.; Collins, P.; Contri, R.; Cortina, E.; Cosme, G.; Cossutti, F.; Crawley, H.B.; Crennell, D.; Crepe-Renaudin, Sabine; Crosetti, G.; Cuevas Maestro, J.; Czellar, S.; Davenport, M.; Da Silva, W.; Della Ricca, G.; Delpierre, P.; Demaria, N.; De Angelis, A.; De Boer, W.; De Clercq, C.; De Lotto, B.; De Min, A.; De Paula, L.; Dijkstra, H.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Dolbeau, J.; Doroba, K.; Dracos, M.; Drees, J.; Dris, M.; Duperrin, A.; Durand, J.D.; Eigen, G.; Ekelof, T.; Ekspong, G.; Ellert, M.; Elsing, M.; Engel, J.P.; Espirito Santo, M.C.; Fanourakis, G.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fayot, J.; Feindt, M.; Fenyuk, A.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Ferro, F.; Fichet, S.; Firestone, A.; Flagmeyer, U.; Foeth, H.; Fokitis, E.; Fontanelli, F.; Franek, B.; Frodesen, A.G.; Fruhwirth, R.; Fulda-Quenzer, F.; Fuster, J.; Galloni, A.; Gamba, D.; Gamblin, S.; Gandelman, M.; Garcia, C.; Gaspar, C.; Gaspar, M.; Gasparini, U.; Gavillet, P.; Gazis, Evangelos; Gele, D.; Ghodbane, N.; Gil Botella, Ines; Glege, F.; Gokieli, R.; Golob, B.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Gopal, G.; Gorn, L.; Gouz, Yu.; Gracco, V.; Grahl, J.; Graziani, E.; Gris, P.; Grosdidier, G.; Grzelak, K.; Guy, J.; Haag, C.; Hahn, F.; Hahn, S.; Haider, S.; Hallgren, A.; Hamacher, K.; Hansen, J.; Harris, F.J.; Hedberg, V.; Heising, S.; Hernandez, J.J.; Herquet, P.; Herr, H.; Hessing, T.L.; Heuser, J.M.; Higon, E.; Holmgren, S.O.; Holt, P.J.; Hoorelbeke, S.; Houlden, M.; Hrubec, J.; Huber, M.; Huet, K.; Hughes, G.J.; Hultqvist, K.; Jackson, John Neil; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, P.; Janik, R.; Jarlskog, C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarry, P.; Jean-Marie, B.; Jeans, D.; Johansson, Erik Karl; Jonsson, P.; Joram, C.; Juillot, P.; Jungermann, L.; Kapusta, Frederic; Karafasoulis, K.; Katsanevas, S.; Katsoufis, E.C.; Keranen, R.; Kernel, G.; Kersevan, B.P.; Khomenko, B.A.; Khovansky, N.N.; Kiiskinen, A.; King, B.; Kinvig, A.; Kjaer, N.J.; Klapp, O.; Klein, Hansjorg; Kluit, P.; Kokkinias, P.; Kostyukhin, V.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kuznetsov, O.; Krammer, M.; Kriznic, E.; Krumshtein, Z.; Kubinec, P.; Kurowska, J.; Kurvinen, K.; Lamsa, J.W.; Lane, D.W.; Lapin, V.; Laugier, J.P.; Lauhakangas, R.; Leder, G.; Ledroit, Fabienne; Lefebure, V.; Leinonen, L.; Leisos, A.; Leitner, R.; Lemonne, J.; Lenzen, G.; Lepeltier, V.; Lesiak, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Libby, J.; Liebig, W.; Liko, D.; Lipniacka, A.; Lippi, I.; Lorstad, B.; Loken, J.G.; Lopes, J.H.; Lopez, J.M.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Loukas, D.; Lutz, P.; Lyons, L.; MacNaughton, J.; Mahon, J.R.; Maio, A.; Malek, A.; Malmgren, T.G.M.; Maltezos, S.; Malychev, V.; Mandl, F.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Marechal, B.; Margoni, M.; Marin, J.C.; Mariotti, C.; Markou, A.; Martinez-Rivero, C.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Marti i Garcia, S.; Masik, J.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Matorras, F.; Matteuzzi, C.; Matthiae, G.; Mazzucato, F.; Mazzucato, M.; McCubbin, M.; McKay, R.; McNulty, R.; McPherson, G.; Meroni, C.; Meyer, W.T.; Myagkov, A.; Migliore, E.; Mirabito, L.; Mitaroff, W.A.; Mjornmark, U.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Moller, Rasmus; Monig, Klaus; Monge, M.R.; Moraes, D.; Moreau, X.; Morettini, P.; Morton, G.; Muller, U.; Munich, K.; Mulders, M.; Mulet-Marquis, C.; Muresan, R.; Murray, W.J.; Muryn, B.; Myatt, G.; Myklebust, T.; Naraghi, F.; Nassiakou, M.; Navarria, F.L.; Navas, Sergio; Nawrocki, K.; Negri, P.; Neufeld, N.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nielsen, B.S.; Niezurawski, P.; Nikolenko, M.; Nomokonov, V.; Nygren, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Onofre, A.; Orava, R.; Orazi, G.; Osterberg, K.; Ouraou, A.; Paganoni, M.; Paiano, S.; Pain, R.; Paiva, R.; Palacios, J.; Palka, H.; Papadopoulou, T.D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Pape, L.; Parkes, C.; Parodi, F.; Parzefall, U.; Passeri, A.; Passon, O.; Pavel, T.; Pegoraro, M.; Peralta, L.; Pernicka, M.; Perrotta, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolini, A.; Phillips, H.T.; Pierre, F.; Pimenta, M.; Piotto, E.; Podobnik, T.; Pol, M.E.; Polok, G.; Poropat, P.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Privitera, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Pullia, A.; Radojicic, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Rahmani, H.; Rames, J.; Ratoff, P.N.; Read, Alexander L.; Rebecchi, P.; Redaelli, Nicola Giuseppe; Regler, M.; Rehn, J.; Reid, D.; Reinhardt, R.; Renton, P.B.; Resvanis, L.K.; Richard, F.; Ridky, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Rohne, O.; Romero, A.; Ronchese, P.; Rosenberg, E.I.; Rosinsky, P.; Roudeau, P.; Rovelli, T.; Royon, C.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.; Ruiz, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sacquin, Y.; Sadovsky, A.; Sajot, G.; Salt, J.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sannino, M.; Schwemling, P.; Schwering, B.; Schwickerath, U.; Scuri, Fabrizio; Seager, P.; Sedykh, Yu.; Segar, A.M.; Seibert, N.; Sekulin, R.; Shellard, R.C.; Siebel, M.; Simard, L.; Simonetto, F.; Sisakian, A.N.; Smadja, G.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, G.R.; Sopczak, A.; Sosnowski, R.; Spassoff, T.; Spiriti, E.; Squarcia, S.; Stanescu, C.; Stanic, S.; Stanitzki, M.; Stevenson, K.; Stocchi, A.; Strauss, J.; Strub, R.; Stugu, B.; Szczekowski, M.; Szeptycka, M.; Tabarelli, T.; Taffard, A.; Chikilev, O.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Terranova, F.; Thomas, J.; Timmermans, Jan; Tinti, N.; Tkachev, L.G.; Tobin, M.; Todorova, S.; Tomaradze, A.; Tome, B.; Tonazzo, A.; Tortora, L.; Tortosa, P.; Transtromer, G.; Treille, D.; Tristram, G.; Trochimczuk, M.; Troncon, C.; Turluer, M.L.; Tyapkin, I.A.; Tzamarias, S.; Ullaland, O.; Uvarov, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallazza, E.; Vander Velde, C.; Van Dam, Piet; Van Den Boeck, W.; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Eldik, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vegni, G.; Ventura, L.; Venus, W.; Verbeure, F.; Verdier, P.; Verlato, M.; Vertogradov, L.S.; Verzi, V.; Vilanova, D.; Vitale, L.; Vlasov, E.; Vodopianov, A.S.; Voulgaris, G.; Vrba, V.; Wahlen, H.; Walck, C.; Washbrook, A.J.; Weiser, C.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, J.H.; Wilkinson, G.R.; Winter, M.; Witek, M.; Wolf, G.; Yi, J.; Yushchenko, O.; Zalewska, A.; Zalewski, P.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zevgolatakos, E.; Zimine, N.I.; Zinchenko, A.; Zoller, P.; Zucchelli, G.C.; Zumerle, G.

    2001-01-01

    Muon pair production in the process $e^+e^-\\to e^+e^-\\mu^+\\mu^-$ is studied using the data taken at LEP1 ($\\sqrt{s}\\simeq m_Z$) with the DELPHI detector during the years 1992-1995. The corresponding integrated luminosity is 138.5~pb$^{-1}$. The QED predictions have been tested over the whole $Q^2$ range accessible at LEP1 (from several GeV$^2/c^4$ to several hundred GeV$^2/c^4$) by comparing experimental distributions with distributions resulting from Monte Carlo simulations using various generators. Selected events are used to extract the leptonic photon structure function F 2 . Azimuthal correlations are used to obtain information on additional structure functions, FA and FB , which originate from interference terms of the scattering amplitudes. The measured ratios FA =F 2 and FB =F 2 are significantly different from zero and consistent with QED predictions.

  10. Offset cancelling circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiegerink, Remco J.; Seevinck, Evert; de Jager, Wim

    1989-01-01

    A monolithic offset cancelling circuit to reduce the offset voltage at an integrated audio-amplifier output is described. This offset voltage is detected using a low-pass filter with a very large time constant for which only one small on-chip capacitor is needed. The circuit was realized with a

  11. Synchronizing Hyperchaotic Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamasevicius, Arunas; Cenys, Antanas; Namajunas, Audrius

    1997-01-01

    Regarding possible applications to secure communications the technique of synchronizing hyperchaotic circuits with a single dynamical variable is discussed. Several specific examples including the fourth-order circuits with two positive Lyapunov exponents as well as the oscillator with a delay line...

  12. A Virtual Circuits Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vick, Matthew E.

    2010-01-01

    The University of Colorado's Physics Education Technology (PhET) website offers free, high-quality simulations of many physics experiments that can be used in the classroom. The Circuit Construction Kit, for example, allows students to safely and constructively play with circuit components while learning the mathematics behind many circuit…

  13. Relativistic, QED and nuclear effects in highly charged ions revealed by resonant electron-ion recombination in storage rings

    OpenAIRE

    Schippers, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) of few-electron ions has evolved into a sensitive spectroscopic tool for highly charged ions. This is due to technological advances in electron-beam preparation and ion-beam cooling techniques at heavy-ion storage rings. Recent experiments prove unambiguously that DR collision spectroscopy has become sensitive to 2nd order QED and to nuclear effects. This review discusses the most recent developments in high-resolution spectroscopy of low-energy DR resonances, ...

  14. Synchronizability of nonidentical weakly dissipative systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendiña-Nadal, Irene; Letellier, Christophe

    2017-10-01

    Synchronization is a very generic process commonly observed in a large variety of dynamical systems which, however, has been rarely addressed in systems with low dissipation. Using the Rössler, the Lorenz 84, and the Sprott A systems as paradigmatic examples of strongly, weakly, and non-dissipative chaotic systems, respectively, we show that a parameter or frequency mismatch between two coupled such systems does not affect the synchronizability and the underlying structure of the joint attractor in the same way. By computing the Shannon entropy associated with the corresponding recurrence plots, we were able to characterize how two coupled nonidentical chaotic oscillators organize their dynamics in different dissipation regimes. While for strongly dissipative systems, the resulting dynamics exhibits a Shannon entropy value compatible with the one having an average parameter mismatch, for weak dissipation synchronization dynamics corresponds to a more complex behavior with higher values of the Shannon entropy. In comparison, conservative dynamics leads to a less rich picture, providing either similar chaotic dynamics or oversimplified periodic ones.

  15. Dissipative structures, machines, and organisms: A perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondepudi, Dilip; Kay, Bruce; Dixon, James

    2017-10-01

    Self-organization in nonequilibrium systems resulting in the formation of dissipative structures has been studied in a variety of systems, most prominently in chemical systems. We present a study of a voltage-driven dissipative structure consisting of conducting beads immersed in a viscous medium of oil. In this simple system, we observed remarkably complex organism-like behavior. The dissipative structure consists of a tree structure that spontaneously forms and moves like a worm and exhibits many features characteristic of living organisms. The complex motion of the beads driven by the applied field, the dipole-dipole interaction between the beads, and the hydrodynamic flow of the viscous medium result in a time evolution of the tree structure towards states of lower resistance or higher dissipation and thus higher rates of entropy production. The resulting end-directed evolution manifests as the tree moving to locations seeking higher current, the current that sustains its structure and dynamics. The study of end-directed evolution in the dissipative structure gives us a means to distinguish the fundamental difference between machines and organisms and opens a path for the formulation of physics of organisms.

  16. Transient chaotic transport in dissipative drift motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyarzabal, R.S. [Pós-Graduação em Ciências/Física, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Szezech, J.D. [Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Batista, A.M., E-mail: antoniomarcosbatista@gmail.com [Departamento de Matemática e Estatística, Universidade Estadual de Ponta Grossa, 84030-900, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil); Souza, S.L.T. de [Departamento de Física e Matemática, Universidade Federal de São João del Rei, 36420-000, Ouro Branco, MG (Brazil); Caldas, I.L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 05315-970, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Viana, R.L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, 81531-990, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Sanjuán, M.A.F. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Tulipán s/n, 28933 Móstoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-04-22

    Highlights: • We consider a situation for which a chaotic transient is present in the dynamics of the two-wave model with damping. • The damping in plasma models can be a way for study a realistic behavior of confinement due the collisional effect. • The escape time as a function of the damping obey a power-law scaling. • We have made a qualitative transport analysis with a simple model that can be useful for more complete models. • We have shown that the pattern of the basin of attraction depends on the damping parameter. - Abstract: We investigate chaotic particle transport in magnetised plasmas with two electrostatic drift waves. Considering dissipation in the drift motion, we verify that the removed KAM surfaces originate periodic attractors with their corresponding basins of attraction. We show that the properties of the basins depend on the dissipation and the space-averaged escape time decays exponentially when the dissipation increases. We find positive finite time Lyapunov exponents in dissipative drift motion, consequently the trajectories exhibit transient chaotic transport. These features indicate how the transient plasma transport depends on the dissipation.

  17. Dissipative structures, machines, and organisms: A perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondepudi, Dilip; Kay, Bruce; Dixon, James

    2017-10-01

    Self-organization in nonequilibrium systems resulting in the formation of dissipative structures has been studied in a variety of systems, most prominently in chemical systems. We present a study of a voltage-driven dissipative structure consisting of conducting beads immersed in a viscous medium of oil. In this simple system, we observed remarkably complex organism-like behavior. The dissipative structure consists of a tree structure that spontaneously forms and moves like a worm and exhibits many features characteristic of living organisms. The complex motion of the beads driven by the applied field, the dipole-dipole interaction between the beads, and the hydrodynamic flow of the viscous medium result in a time evolution of the tree structure towards states of lower resistance or higher dissipation and thus higher rates of entropy production. The resulting end-directed evolution manifests as the tree moving to locations seeking higher current, the current that sustains its structure and dynamics. The study of end-directed evolution in the dissipative structure gives us a means to distinguish the fundamental difference between machines and organisms and opens a path for the formulation of physics of organisms.

  18. CMOS analog circuit design

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, Phillip E

    1987-01-01

    This text presents the principles and techniques for designing analog circuits to be implemented in a CMOS technology. The level is appropriate for seniors and graduate students familiar with basic electronics, including biasing, modeling, circuit analysis, and some familiarity with frequency response. Students learn the methodology of analog integrated circuit design through a hierarchically-oriented approach to the subject that provides thorough background and practical guidance for designing CMOS analog circuits, including modeling, simulation, and testing. The authors' vast industrial experience and knowledge is reflected in the circuits, techniques, and principles presented. They even identify the many common pitfalls that lie in the path of the beginning designer--expert advice from veteran designers. The text mixes the academic and practical viewpoints in a treatment that is neither superficial nor overly detailed, providing the perfect balance.

  19. Test Generation for Crosstalk-Induced Delay Faults in VLSI Circuits Using Modified FAN Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jayanthy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As design trends move toward nanometer technology, new problems due to noise effects lead to a decrease in reliability and performance of VLSI circuits. Crosstalk is one such noise effect which affects the timing behaviour of circuits. In this paper, an efficient Automatic Test Pattern Generation (ATPG method based on a modified Fanout Oriented (FAN to detect crosstalk-induced delay faults in VLSI circuits is presented. Tests are generated for ISCAS_85 and enhanced scan version of ISCAS_89 benchmark circuits. Experimental results demonstrate that the test program gives better fault coverage, less number of backtracks, and hence reduced test generation time for most of the benchmark circuits when compared to modified Path-Oriented Decision Making (PODEM based ATPG. The number of transitions is also reduced thus reducing the power dissipation of the circuit.

  20. A Memristive Diode Bridge-Based Canonical Chua’s Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A novel memristor circuit is presented, which is generated from the canonical Chua’s circuit by replacing the Chua’s diode with a first order memristive diode bridge. The circuit dynamical characteristics with the variations of circuit parameters are investigated both theoretically and numerically. It can be found that the circuit has three determined equilibrium points, including a zero saddle point and two nonzero saddle-foci with index 2. Specially, the circuit is non-dissipative in the neighborhood of the zero saddle point, and there exists complex nonlinear phenomena of coexisting bifurcation modes and coexisting chaotic attractors. Experimental observations are performed to verify the numerical simulation results.

  1. Energy Dissipation Control of Hysteretic Dampers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgsberg, Jan Riess; Krenk, Steen

    2006-01-01

    The efficiency of a damper depends on the amount of energy dissipation during a typical cycle experienced by the damper. For viscous dampers this leads to substantial frequency dependence, and typically implies that optimal tuning of a passive viscous damper is valid only for a particular mode....... In contrast the energy dissipated by a hysteretic damper is independent of frequency, but depends on the amplitude and also contains a stiffness component. The present paper presents a procedure for predicting the magnitude of the closed hysteresis loops and thereby the energy dissipation, and a procedure...... for on-line tuning of the damper properties for random response. The approach is illustrated for the bilinear elasto-plastic damper, where the optimal relation between yield level and displacement amplitude is derived....

  2. Dynamics of quasi-stable dissipative systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chueshov, Igor

    2015-01-01

    This book is  devoted to background material and recently developed mathematical methods in the study of infinite-dimensional dissipative systems. The theory of such systems is motivated by the long-term goal to establish rigorous mathematical models for turbulent and chaotic phenomena. The aim here is to offer general methods and abstract results pertaining to fundamental dynamical systems properties related to dissipative long-time behavior. The book systematically presents, develops and uses the quasi-stability method while substantially extending it by including for consideration new classes of models and PDE systems arising in Continuum Mechanics. The book can be used as a textbook in dissipative dynamics at the graduate level.   Igor Chueshov is a Professor of Mathematics at Karazin Kharkov National University in Kharkov, Ukraine.

  3. Turbulent Dissipation Challenge: A community Driven Effort

    CERN Document Server

    Parashar, Tulasi N

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the present document is to present the idea of, and convince the community to participate in, Turbulent Dissipation Challenge. The idea was discussed in Solar Heliospheric and Interplanetary ENvironment (SHINE) 2012 meeting. The proponents of the idea Tulasi Parashar and Chadi Salem have prepared this document to circulate the idea in the community. The Turbulent Dissipation Challenge idea is to bring the community together and simulate the same set of problems and try to come to a common set of conclusions about the relative strengths of two different kinds of dissipative processes (current sheets/ reconnection sites vs. wave particle interactions). To take the challenge further, the simulators will provide artificial spacecraft data from the simulations for the observers to analyze.

  4. Dissipative dark matter explains rotation curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot, R.

    2015-06-01

    Dissipative dark matter, where dark matter particles interact with a massless (or very light) boson, is studied. Such dark matter can arise in simple hidden sector gauge models, including those featuring an unbroken U (1 )' gauge symmetry, leading to a dark photon. Previous work has shown that such models can not only explain the large scale structure and cosmic microwave background, but potentially also dark matter phenomena on small scales, such as the inferred cored structure of dark matter halos. In this picture, dark matter halos of disk galaxies not only cool via dissipative interactions but are also heated via ordinary supernovae (facilitated by an assumed photon-dark photon kinetic mixing interaction). This interaction between the dark matter halo and ordinary baryons, a very special feature of these types of models, plays a critical role in governing the physical properties of the dark matter halo. Here, we further study the implications of this type of dissipative dark matter for disk galaxies. Building on earlier work, we develop a simple formalism which aims to describe the effects of dissipative dark matter in a fairly model independent way. This formalism is then applied to generic disk galaxies. We also consider specific examples, including NGC 1560 and a sample of dwarf galaxies from the LITTLE THINGS survey. We find that dissipative dark matter, as developed here, does a fairly good job accounting for the rotation curves of the galaxies considered. Not only does dissipative dark matter explain the linear rise of the rotational velocity of dwarf galaxies at small radii, but it can also explain the observed wiggles in rotation curves which are known to be correlated with corresponding features in the disk gas distribution.

  5. Approximate circuits for increased reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlet, Jason R.; Mayo, Jackson R.

    2015-08-18

    Embodiments of the invention describe a Boolean circuit having a voter circuit and a plurality of approximate circuits each based, at least in part, on a reference circuit. The approximate circuits are each to generate one or more output signals based on values of received input signals. The voter circuit is to receive the one or more output signals generated by each of the approximate circuits, and is to output one or more signals corresponding to a majority value of the received signals. At least some of the approximate circuits are to generate an output value different than the reference circuit for one or more input signal values; however, for each possible input signal value, the majority values of the one or more output signals generated by the approximate circuits and received by the voter circuit correspond to output signal result values of the reference circuit.

  6. Approximate circuits for increased reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlet, Jason R.; Mayo, Jackson R.

    2015-12-22

    Embodiments of the invention describe a Boolean circuit having a voter circuit and a plurality of approximate circuits each based, at least in part, on a reference circuit. The approximate circuits are each to generate one or more output signals based on values of received input signals. The voter circuit is to receive the one or more output signals generated by each of the approximate circuits, and is to output one or more signals corresponding to a majority value of the received signals. At least some of the approximate circuits are to generate an output value different than the reference circuit for one or more input signal values; however, for each possible input signal value, the majority values of the one or more output signals generated by the approximate circuits and received by the voter circuit correspond to output signal result values of the reference circuit.

  7. Appendix to Power Dissipation in Division

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    This document is an appendix to the paper: Wei Liu and Alberto Nannarelli, ”Power Dissipation in Division”, Proc. of 42nd Asilomar Conference on Signals, Systems, and Computers, October 2008. The purpose of the document is to provide the necessary information for the implementation of the archite......This document is an appendix to the paper: Wei Liu and Alberto Nannarelli, ”Power Dissipation in Division”, Proc. of 42nd Asilomar Conference on Signals, Systems, and Computers, October 2008. The purpose of the document is to provide the necessary information for the implementation...

  8. Periodic solutions of dissipative systems revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Górniewicz

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available We reprove in an extremely simple way the classical theorem that time periodic dissipative systems imply the existence of harmonic periodic solutions, in the case of uniqueness. We will also show that, in the lack of uniqueness, the existence of harmonics is implied by uniform dissipativity. The localization of starting points and multiplicity of periodic solutions will be established, under suitable additional assumptions, as well. The arguments are based on the application of various asymptotic fixed point theorems of the Lefschetz and Nielsen type.

  9. Periodic solutions of dissipative systems revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Górniewicz Lech

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We reprove in an extremely simple way the classical theorem that time periodic dissipative systems imply the existence of harmonic periodic solutions, in the case of uniqueness. We will also show that, in the lack of uniqueness, the existence of harmonics is implied by uniform dissipativity. The localization of starting points and multiplicity of periodic solutions will be established, under suitable additional assumptions, as well. The arguments are based on the application of various asymptotic fixed point theorems of the Lefschetz and Nielsen type.

  10. Dissipative fragmentation in a phase space approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adorno, A.; Di Toro, M.; Bonasera, A.; Gregoire, C.; Gulminelli, F.

    Semi-classical approaches have evidenced the role of one and two-body dissipation in nucleus-nucleus collisions. On the other hand, a substantial energy dissipation and some angular momentum transfer have been observed at moderate energy where a fragmentation process is the dominant reaction mechanism. In order to analyse main features of these reactions, we developed a phenomenological model taking into account phase space constraints. The transition between deep inelastic collisions and abrasion-like fragmentation is described and a general agreement with available data is found.

  11. Analysis of phononic bandgap structures with dissipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreassen, Erik; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    2013-01-01

    and longer wavelengths, we show that the two formulations produce nearly identical results in terms of propagation constant and wave decay. We use the k(ω)-formulation to compute loss factors with dissipative bandgap materials for steady-state wave propagation and create simplified diagrams that unify...... the spatial loss factor from dissipative and bandgap effects. Additionally, we demonstrate the applicability of the k(ω)-formulation for the computation of the band diagram for viscoelastic composites and compare the computed loss factors for low frequency wave propagation to existing results based on quasi...

  12. Complex Fluids in Energy Dissipating Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Galindo-Rosales

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of engineered systems for energy dissipation (or absorption during impacts or vibrations is an increasing need in our society, mainly for human protection applications, but also for ensuring the right performance of different sort of devices, facilities or installations. In the last decade, new energy dissipating composites based on the use of certain complex fluids have flourished, due to their non-linear relationship between stress and strain rate depending on the flow/field configuration. This manuscript intends to review the different approaches reported in the literature, analyses the fundamental physics behind them and assess their pros and cons from the perspective of their practical applications.

  13. Noise and Dissipation on Coadjoint Orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaudon, Alexis; De Castro, Alex L.; Holm, Darryl D.

    2018-02-01

    We derive and study stochastic dissipative dynamics on coadjoint orbits by incorporating noise and dissipation into mechanical systems arising from the theory of reduction by symmetry, including a semidirect product extension. Random attractors are found for this general class of systems when the Lie algebra is semi-simple, provided the top Lyapunov exponent is positive. We study in details two canonical examples, the free rigid body and the heavy top, whose stochastic integrable reductions are found and numerical simulations of their random attractors are shown.

  14. Dissipative phenomena in condensed matter some applications

    CERN Document Server

    Dattagupta, Sushanta

    2004-01-01

    From the field of nonequilibrium statistical physics, this graduate- and research-level volume treats the modeling and characterization of dissipative phenomena. A variety of examples from diverse disciplines like condensed matter physics, materials science, metallurgy, chemical physics etc. are discussed. Dattagupta employs the broad framework of stochastic processes and master equation techniques to obtain models for a wide range of experimentally relevant phenomena such as classical and quantum Brownian motion, spin dynamics, kinetics of phase ordering, relaxation in glasses, dissipative tunneling. It provides a pedagogical exposition of current research material and will be useful to experimentalists, computational physicists and theorists.

  15. Troubleshooting analog circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Pease, Robert A

    1991-01-01

    Troubleshooting Analog Circuits is a guidebook for solving product or process related problems in analog circuits. The book also provides advice in selecting equipment, preventing problems, and general tips. The coverage of the book includes the philosophy of troubleshooting; the modes of failure of various components; and preventive measures. The text also deals with the active components of analog circuits, including diodes and rectifiers, optically coupled devices, solar cells, and batteries. The book will be of great use to both students and practitioners of electronics engineering. Other

  16. Circuit analysis with Multisim

    CERN Document Server

    Baez-Lopez, David

    2011-01-01

    This book is concerned with circuit simulation using National Instruments Multisim. It focuses on the use and comprehension of the working techniques for electrical and electronic circuit simulation. The first chapters are devoted to basic circuit analysis.It starts by describing in detail how to perform a DC analysis using only resistors and independent and controlled sources. Then, it introduces capacitors and inductors to make a transient analysis. In the case of transient analysis, it is possible to have an initial condition either in the capacitor voltage or in the inductor current, or bo

  17. Optoelectronics circuits manual

    CERN Document Server

    Marston, R M

    2013-01-01

    Optoelectronics Circuits Manual covers the basic principles and characteristics of the best known types of optoelectronic devices, as well as the practical applications of many of these optoelectronic devices. The book describes LED display circuits and LED dot- and bar-graph circuits and discusses the applications of seven-segment displays, light-sensitive devices, optocouplers, and a variety of brightness control techniques. The text also tackles infrared light-beam alarms and multichannel remote control systems. The book provides practical user information and circuitry and illustrations.

  18. Plasmonic Nanoguides and Circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    Modern communication systems dealing with huge amounts of data at ever increasing speed try to utilize the best aspects of electronic and optical circuits. Electronic circuits are tiny but their operation speed is limited, whereas optical circuits are extremely fast but their sizes are limited by diffraction. Waveguide components utilizing surface plasmon (SP) modes were found to combine the huge optical bandwidth and compactness of electronics, and plasmonics thereby began to be considered as the next chip-scale technology. In this book, the authors concentrate on the SP waveguide configurati

  19. Modern TTL circuits manual

    CERN Document Server

    Marston, R M

    2013-01-01

    Modern TTL Circuits Manual provides an introduction to the basic principles of Transistor-Transistor Logic (TTL). This book outlines the major features of the 74 series of integrated circuits (ICs) and introduces the various sub-groups of the TTL family.Organized into seven chapters, this book begins with an overview of the basics of digital ICs. This text then examines the symbology and mathematics of digital logic. Other chapters consider a variety of topics, including waveform generator circuitry, clocked flip-flop and counter circuits, special counter/dividers, registers, data latches, com

  20. Ultralow-power GaAs MESFET MSI circuits using two-phase dynamic FET logic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Peter Stuhr; Long, S. I.; Nary, K. R.

    1993-01-01

    Two-phase dynamic FET logic (TDFL) gates are used in GaAs MESFET MSI circuits to implement very low power 4-b ripple carry adders and a variable modulus (2 to 31) prescaler. Operation of the adders is demonstrated at 500 MHz with an associated power dissipation of less than 1.0 mW and at 750 MHz...

  1. Dissipativity Analysis of Linear State/Input Delay Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guifang Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses dissipativity problem for system of linear state/input delay equations. Motivated by dissipativity theory of control systems, we choose a new quadratic supply rate. Using the concept of dissipativity, necessary and sufficient conditions for the linear state/input delay systems to be dissipative and exponentially dissipative are derived. The connection of dissipativity with stability is also considered. Finally, passivity and finite gain are explored, correspondingly. The positive-real and bounded-real lemmas are derived.

  2. Dynamics of dissipative multifluid neutron star cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haskell, B.; Andersson, N.; Comer, G.L.

    2012-01-01

    We present a Newtonian multifluid formalism for superfluid neutron star cores, focusing on the additional dissipative terms which arise when one takes into account the individual dynamical degrees of freedom associated with the coupled "fluids." The problem is of direct astrophysical interest as the

  3. Magnetization dissipation in ferromagnets from scattering theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brataas, A.; Tserkovnyak, Y.; Bauer, G.E.W.

    2011-01-01

    The magnetization dynamics of ferromagnets is often formulated in terms of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. The reactive part of this equation describes the response of the magnetization in terms of effective fields, whereas the dissipative part is parametrized by the Gilbert damping

  4. Dissipative preparation of entanglement in optical cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastoryano, Michael James; Reiter, Florentin; Sørensen, Anders Søndberg

    2011-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme for the preparation of a maximally entangled state of two atoms in an optical cavity. Starting from an arbitrary initial state, a singlet state is prepared as the unique fixed point of a dissipative quantum dynamical process. In our scheme, cavity decay is no longer...

  5. Balsa wood as an energy dissipator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoell, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    Studies have been undertaken to determine response of balsa wood in variety of environmental conditions. Response is dependent upon state of balsa wood as well as environment to which it is exposed, but certain combinations of conditions serve to increase significantly energy-dissipating capacity of wood relative to its normal capacity.

  6. Tidal Energy Dissipation from Topex/Poseidon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Richard D.; Egbert, G. D.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In a recent paper ({\\it Nature, 405,} 775, 2000) we concluded that 25 to 30\\% of the ocean's tidal energy dissipation, or about 1 terawatt, occurs in the deep ocean, with the remaining 2.6 TW in shallow seas. The physical mechanism for deep-ocean dissipation is apparently scattering of the surface tide into internal modes; Munk and Wunsch have suggested that this mechanism may provide half the power needed for mixing the deep-ocean. This paper builds further evidence for $1\\pm 0.2$ TW of deep-ocean dissipation. The evidence is extracted from tidal elevations deduced from seven years of Topex/Poseidon satellite altimeter data. The dissipation rate Is formed as a balance between the rate of working by tidal forces and the energy flux divergence. While dynamical assumptions are required to compute fluxes, area integrals of the energy balance are, owing to the tight satellite constraints, remarkably insensitive to these assumptions. A large suite of tidal solutions based on a wide range of dynamical assumptions, on perturbations to bathymetric models, and on simulated elevation data are used to assess this sensitivity. These and Monte Carlo error fields from a generalized inverse model are used to establish error uncertainties.

  7. Magnetohydrodynamic stokes problem for a dissipative heat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heat and Mass transfer MHD stokes problem for a dissipative heat generating fluid with radiation absorption, mass diffusion, Hall and ion-slip currents is presented. The set of governing equations for the problem are solved by a finite difference algorithm. Effects of the various parameters in the laminar boundary layer on ...

  8. Ionization-induced laser-driven QED cascade in noble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemenko, I. I.; Kostyukov, I. Yu.

    2017-09-01

    A formula for the ionization rate in an extremely intense electromagnetic field is proposed and used for numerical study of QED cascades in noble gases in the field of two counterpropagating laser pulses. It is shown that the number of the electron-positron pairs produced in the cascade increases with the atomic number of the gas, where the gas density is taken to be inversely proportional to the atomic number. While most of the electrons produced in the laser pulse front are expelled by the ponderomotive force from the region occupied by the strong laser field, there is a small portion of electrons staying in the laser field for a long time until the instance when the laser field is strong enough for cascading. This mechanism is relevant for all gases. For high-Z gases there is an additional mechanism associated with the ionization of inner shells at the instance when the laser field is strong enough for cascading. The role of both mechanisms for cascade initiation is revealed.

  9. Photon Berry phases, Instantons and Schrodinger Cats with oscillating parities in cavity QED

    CERN Document Server

    Yi-Xiang, Yu; Liu, W M; Zhang, CunLin

    2015-01-01

    The four standard quantum optics model in cavity QED such as Rabi, Dicke, Jaynes-Cummings ( JC ) and Tavis-Cummings (TC) model were proposed many decades ago. Despite their relative simple forms and many previous theoretical works, their solutions at a finite $ N $ inside the superradiant regime remain unknown. In view of recent remarkable experimental advances in several experimental systems such as cold atoms inside a cavity or superconducting qubits inside a microcavity to realize these models, it becomes topical and important to understand what would be the new phenomena in these models at a finite $ N $, especially inside the superradaint regime. In this work, we resolved this outstanding problem. We use three independent methods such as $ 1/J $ expansion, the strong coupling expansion and exact diagonization (ED) to study $ U(1)/Z_2 $ Dicke model at a finite $ N $ and different anisotropy parameters $ 0 \\leq \\beta \\leq 1 $ as the atom-photon interaction strength increases. This model include the four st...

  10. Perturbativity vs nonperturbativity in QED-effects for H-like atoms with Zα > 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roenko, A.; Sveshnikov, K.

    2017-08-01

    The behavior of levels near the threshold of the lower continuum in superheavy H-like atoms with Zα > 1, caused by the interaction ΔUAMM of the electron’s magnetic anomaly (AMM) dynamically screened at small distances ≪ 1/m, with the Coulomb field of atomic nucleus is considered by taking into account the complete dependence of electron’s wave function (WF) on Zα. It is shown that the calculation of the contribution caused by ΔUAMM via both the quark structure and the whole nucleus, considered as a uniformly charged extended Coulomb source, leads to results, which coincide within the accepted precision of calculations. It is also shown that there appears some difference in results between perturbative and nonperturbative methods of accounting for the contribution from ΔUAMM within the corresponding Dirac equation (DE) in favor of the latter. Moreover, the growth rate of the contribution from ΔUAMM reaches its maximum at Z ˜ 140-150, while by further increase of Z into the supercritical region Z ≫ Zcr,1, the shift of levels caused by ΔUAMM near the lower continuum decreases monotonically to zero. The last result is generalized to the whole self-energy contribution to the shift of levels and so to the possible behavior of radiative QED-effects with virtual photon exchange near the lower continuum.

  11. Elements of QED-NRQED effective field theory: NLO scattering at leading power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Steven P.; Gonderinger, Matthew; Paz, Gil

    2016-07-01

    The proton radius puzzle, i.e. the large discrepancy in the extraction of the proton charge radius between regular and muonic hydrogen, challenges our understanding of the structure of the proton. It can also be an indication of a new force that couples to muons, but not to electrons. An effective field theory analysis using nonrelativistic quantum electrodynamics (NRQED) indicates that the muonic hydrogen result can be interpreted as a large, compared to some model estimates, muon-proton spin-independent contact interaction. The muonic hydrogen result can be tested by a muon-proton scattering experiment, MUSE, that is planned at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. The typical momenta of the muons in this experiment are of the order of the muon mass. In this energy regime the muons are relativistic but the protons are still nonrelativistic. The interaction between the muons and protons can be described by a hybrid QED-NRQED effective field theory. We present some elements of this effective field theory. In particular we consider O (Z α ) scattering up to power m2/M2 , where m (M ) is the muon (proton) mass and Z =1 for a proton, and O (Z2α2) scattering at leading power. We show how the former reproduces Rosenbluth scattering up to power m2/M2 and the latter the relativistic scattering off a static potential. Proton structure corrections at O (Z2α2) will be considered in a subsequent paper.

  12. Dynamical fermion masses and constraints of gauge invariance in quenched QED3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bashir, A. [Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Apartado Postal 2-82, Morelia, Michoacan 58040 (Mexico)]. E-mail: adnan@itzel.ifm.umich.mx; Raya, A. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Colima, Bernal Diaz del Castillo no. 340, Col. Villa San Sebastian, Colima, Colima 28045 (Mexico)

    2005-03-07

    Numerical study of the Schwinger-Dyson equation (SDE) for the fermion propagator (FP) to obtain dynamically generated chirally asymmetric solution in an arbitrary covariant gauge {xi} is a complicated exercise specially if one employs a sophisticated form of the fermion-boson interaction complying with the key features of a gauge field theory. However, constraints of gauge invariance can help construct such a solution without having the need to solve the Schwinger-Dyson equation for every value of {xi}. In this article, we propose and implement a method to carry out this task in quenched quantum electrodynamics in a plane (QED3). We start from an approximate analytical form of the solution of the SDE for the FP in the Landau gauge. We consider the cases in which the interaction vertex (i) is bare and (ii) is full. We then apply the Landau-Khalatnikov-Fradkin transformations (LKFT) on the dynamically generated solution and find analytical results for arbitrary value of {xi}. We also compare our results with exact numerical solutions available for a small number of values of {xi} obtained through a direct analysis of the corresponding SDE.

  13. Laboratory Astrophysics, QED, and other Measurements using the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer at LLNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G V; Adams, J S; Beiersdorfer, P; Clementson, J; Frankel, M; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A; Koutroumpa, D; Leutenegger, M; Porter, F S; Thorn, D B; Trabert, E

    2009-08-25

    We have used the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS), a microcalorimeter instrument built by the calorimeter group at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, to make a variety of measurements since its installation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's EBIT facility. These include measurements of charge exchange between neutral gas and K- and L-shell ions, measurements of the X-ray transmission efficiency of optical blocking filters, high resolution measurements of transition energies for high-Z, highly charged ions, and measurements of M and L-shell emission from highly charged tungsten following on earlier measurements of L-shell gold. Our results will see application in the interpretation of the spectra from the Jovian atmosphere and of the diffuse soft X-ray background, in tests of QED, and in diagnosing inertial and magnetic confinement fusion plasmas. These measurements augment previous laboratory astrophysics, atomic physics, and calibration measurements made using earlier versions of NASA's microcalorimeter spectrometer.

  14. Secluded WIMPs, Dark QED with Massive Photons, and the Galactic Center Gamma-Ray Excess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortes, E. C. F. S.; Pleitez, V.; Stecker, F. W.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss a particular secluded WIMP dark matter model consisting of neutral fermions as the dark matter candidate and a Proca-Wentzel (PW) field as a mediator. In the model that we consider here, dark matter WIMPs interact with standard model (SM) particles only through the PW field of approximately MeV-multi-GeV mass particles. The interactions occur via a U(1)' mediator, V'(sub mu), which couples to the SM by kinetic mixing with U(1) hypercharge bosons, B'(sub mu). One important difference between our model and other such models in the literature is the absence of an extra singlet scalar, so that the parameter with dimension of mass M(sup 2, sub V) is not related to a spontaneous symmetry breaking. This QED based model is also renormalizable. The mass scale of the mediator and the absence of the singlet scalar can lead to interesting astrophysical signatures. The dominant annihilation channels are different from those usually considered in previous work. We show that the GeV energy gamma-ray excess in the galactic center region, as derived from Fermi-LAT Gamma-ray Space Telescope data, can be attributed to such secluded dark matter WIMPs, given parameters of the model that are consistent with both the cosmological dark matter density and the upper limits on WIMP spin-independent elastic scattering. Secluded WIMP models are also consistent with suggested upper limits on a DM contribution to the cosmic-ray antiproton flux.

  15. Non-linear Dynamics in $QED_{3}$ and Non-trivial Infrared Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Mavromatos, Nikolaos E

    1999-01-01

    In this work we consider a coupled system of Schwinger-Dyson equations for self-energy and vertex functions in QED_3. Using the concept of a semi-amputated vertex function, we manage to decouple the vertex equation and transform it in the infrared into a non-linear differential equation of Emden-Fowler type. Its solution suggests the following picture: in the absence of infrared cut-offs there is only a trivial infrared fixed-point structure in the theory. However, the presence of masses, for either fermions or photons, changes the situation drastically, leading to a mass-dependent non-trivial infrared fixed point. In this picture a dynamical mass for the fermions is found to be generated consistently. The non-linearity of the equations gives rise to highly non-trivial constraints among the mass and effective (`running') gauge coupling, which impose lower and upper bounds on the latter for dynamical mass generation to occur. Possible implications of this to the theory of high-temperature superconductivity are...

  16. Quantum circuits for cryptanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amento, Brittanney Jaclyn

    Finite fields of the form F2 m play an important role in coding theory and cryptography. We show that the choice of how to represent the elements of these fields can have a significant impact on the resource requirements for quantum arithmetic. In particular, we show how the Gaussian normal basis representations and "ghost-bit basis" representations can be used to implement inverters with a quantum circuit of depth O(mlog(m)). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first construction with subquadratic depth reported in the literature. Our quantum circuit for the computation of multiplicative inverses is based on the Itoh-Tsujii algorithm which exploits the property that, in a normal basis representation, squaring corresponds to a permutation of the coefficients. We give resource estimates for the resulting quantum circuit for inversion over binary fields F2 m based on an elementary gate set that is useful for fault-tolerant implementation. Elliptic curves over finite fields F2 m play a prominent role in modern cryptography. Published quantum algorithms dealing with such curves build on a short Weierstrass form in combination with affine or projective coordinates. In this thesis we show that changing the curve representation allows a substantial reduction in the number of T-gates needed to implement the curve arithmetic. As a tool, we present a quantum circuit for computing multiplicative inverses in F2m in depth O(m log m) using a polynomial basis representation, which may be of independent interest. Finally, we change our focus from the design of circuits which aim at attacking computational assumptions on asymmetric cryptographic algorithms to the design of a circuit attacking a symmetric cryptographic algorithm. We consider a block cipher, SERPENT, and our design of a quantum circuit implementing this cipher to be used for a key attack using Grover's algorithm as in [18]. This quantum circuit is essential for understanding the complexity of Grover's algorithm.

  17. Graphene Nanoelectronics From Materials to Circuits

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    The rapid growth of the electronics industry can be attributed in large part to the scalability of the transistor. Continued scaling of transistor dimensions has enabled increased functionality with each new generation of integrated circuits. Historically, this scaling has followed Moore’s Law – which became a self-fulfilling prophecy – wherein the number of transistors on a chip is doubled every 18-24 months. However, a number of bottlenecks arise beyond c. 2020 that will impede this progress and this will lead to high heat dissipation in ICs, large power consumption, and low chip yield. Thus, beyond c. 2020, the electronics industry needs novel technologies that enable continued increases in chip functionality. Considering that the transition from research to manufacturing can take 10 years or more for novel technologies, there is considerable effort world-wide to identify next-generation enablers for electronics. Graphene is one of the most promising materials to replace Silicon, and this book discus...

  18. High-Efficient Circuits for Ternary Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Faghih Mirzaee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available New ternary adders, which are fundamental components of ternary addition, are presented in this paper. They are on the basis of a logic style which mostly generates binary signals. Therefore, static power dissipation reaches its minimum extent. Extensive different analyses are carried out to examine how efficient the new designs are. For instance, the ternary ripple adder constructed by the proposed ternary half and full adders consumes 2.33 μW less power than the one implemented by the previous adder cells. It is almost twice faster as well. Due to their unique superior characteristics for ternary circuitry, carbon nanotube field-effect transistors are used to form the novel circuits, which are entirely suitable for practical applications.

  19. Electromagnetic Pulse Excitation of Finite-Long Dissipative Conductors over a Conducting Ground Plane in the Frequency Domain.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    campione, Salvatore [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Warne, Larry K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schiek, Richard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Basilio, Lorena I. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report details the modeling results for the response of a finite-length dissipative conductor interacting with a conducting ground to a hypothetical nuclear device with the same output energy spectrum as the Fat Man device. We use a frequency-domain method based on transmission line theory and implemented it in a code we call ATLOG - Analytic Transmission Line Over Ground. Select results are compared to ones computed using the circuit simulator Xyce. Intentionally Left Blank

  20. Color Coding of Circuit Quantities in Introductory Circuit Analysis Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisslein, Jana; Johnson, Amy M.; Reisslein, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Learning the analysis of electrical circuits represented by circuit diagrams is often challenging for novice students. An open research question in electrical circuit analysis instruction is whether color coding of the mathematical symbols (variables) that denote electrical quantities can improve circuit analysis learning. The present study…

  1. Dissipation of the striped pulsar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerutti, B.; Philippov, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    Context. Rapidly rotating neutron stars blow a relativistic, magnetized wind mainly composed of electron-positron pairs. The free expansion of the wind terminates far from the neutron star where a weakly magnetized pulsar wind nebula forms, implying efficient magnetic dissipation somewhere upstream. Aims: The wind current sheet that separates the two magnetic polarities is usually considered as the most natural place for magnetic dissipation via relativistic reconnection, but its efficiency remains an open question. Here, the goal of this work is to revisit this issue in light of the most recent progress in the understanding of reconnection and pulsar electrodynamics. Methods: We perform large two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of the oblique rotator to capture the multi-scale evolution of the wind. Our simulations are limited to the equatorial plane. Results: We find that the current sheet breaks up into a dynamical chain of magnetic islands separated by secondary thin current sheets. The sheet thickness increases linearly with radius while the Poynting flux decreases monotonically as reconnection proceeds. The radius of complete annihilation of the stripes is given by the plasma multiplicity parameter at the light cylinder. Current starvation within the sheets does not occur before complete dissipation as long as there is enough charges where the sheets form. Particles are efficiently heated up to a characteristic energy set by the magnetization parameter at the light cylinder. Energetic pulsed synchrotron emission peaks close to the light cylinder, and presents sub-pulse variability associated with the formation of plasmoids in the sheet. Conclusions: This study suggests that the striped component of the wind dissipates far before reaching the termination shock in isolated pulsars, even in very-high-multiplicity systems such as the Crab pulsar. Pulsars in binary systems may provide the best environments to study magnetic dissipation in the wind.

  2. Advances in quantum control of three-level superconducting circuit architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falci, G.; Paladino, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania (Italy); CNR-IMM UOS Universita (MATIS), Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Catania (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Catania (Italy); Di Stefano, P.G. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania (Italy); Centre for Theoretical Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast(United Kingdom); Ridolfo, A.; D' Arrigo, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Catania (Italy); Paraoanu, G.S. [Low Temperature Laboratory, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto University School of Science (Finland)

    2017-06-15

    Advanced control in Lambda (Λ) scheme of a solid state architecture of artificial atoms and quantized modes would allow the translation to the solid-state realm of a whole class of phenomena from quantum optics, thus exploiting new physics emerging in larger integrated quantum networks and for stronger couplings. However control solid-state devices has constraints coming from selection rules, due to symmetries which on the other hand yield protection from decoherence, and from design issues, for instance that coupling to microwave cavities is not directly switchable. We present two new schemes for the Λ-STIRAP control problem with the constraint of one or two classical driving fields being always-on. We show how these protocols are converted to apply to circuit-QED architectures. We finally illustrate an application to coherent spectroscopy of the so called ultrastrong atom-cavity coupling regime. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Vibration Damping Circuit Card Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Ronald Allen (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A vibration damping circuit card assembly includes a populated circuit card having a mass M. A closed metal container is coupled to a surface of the populated circuit card at approximately a geometric center of the populated circuit card. Tungsten balls fill approximately 90% of the metal container with a collective mass of the tungsten balls being approximately (0.07) M.

  4. An Optimal Dissipative Encoder for the Toric Code

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-16

    dissipative gadgets allowing the realization of different dissipative dynamics during subsequent time intervals. Here we examine the dissipative...Information Theory (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press) [20] Wolf M and Cirac J I 2008 Dividing quantum channels Commun. Math. Phys. 279 147 11

  5. Wind Turbine Control with Active Damage Reduction through Energy Dissipation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barradas Berglind, Jose de Jesus; Jayawardhana, Bayu; Wisniewski, Rafał

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose an active damage reduction control strategy for wind turbines based on dissipated energy. To this end we rely on the equivalences relating both damage in the rainflow counting sense and dissipated energy to the variations of Preisach hysteresis operators. Since dissipation

  6. A single-ended CMOS sensing circuit for MEMS gyroscope with noise cancellation

    KAUST Repository

    Elsayed, Mohannad Yomn

    2010-06-01

    In this work, a complete single-ended readout circuit for capacitive MEMS gyroscope using chopper stabilization technique is presented. A novel noise cancellation technique is used to get rid of the bias noise. The circuit offers superior performance over state of the art readout circuits in terms of cost, gain, and noise for the given area and power consumption. The full circuit exhibits a gain of 58dB, a power dissipation of 1.3mW and an input referred noise of 12nV/√Hz. This would significantly improve the overall sensitivity of the gyroscope. The full circuit has been fabricated in 0.6um CMOS technology and it occupies an area of 0.4mm × 1mm. © 2010 IEEE.

  7. Non-dissipative effects in nonequilibrium systems

    CERN Document Server

    Maes, Christian

    2018-01-01

    This book introduces and discusses both the fundamental aspects and the measurability of applications of time-symmetric kinetic quantities, outlining the features that constitute the non-dissipative branch of non-equilibrium physics. These specific features of non-equilibrium dynamics have largely been ignored in standard statistical mechanics texts. This introductory-level book offers novel material that does not take the traditional line of extending standard thermodynamics to the irreversible domain. It shows that although stationary dissipation is essentially equivalent with steady non-equilibrium and ubiquitous in complex phenomena, non-equilibrium is not determined solely by the time-antisymmetric sector of energy-entropy considerations. While this should not be very surprising, this book provides timely, simple reminders of the role of time-symmetric and kinetic aspects in the construction of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics.

  8. Micro-power dissipation device described

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, X.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, J.

    1985-11-01

    The common-emitter current gain beta of a common two-pole transistor is generally below 250. They are referred to as high-beta or high gain transistors when the beta of such transistors exceeds 300. When the beta of a transistor is higher than 1,000, it is called a super-beta transistor (SBT) or supergain transistor. The micropower dissipation type has the widest applications among the high-beta. Micropower dissipation high-beta means that there is a high gain or a superhigh gain under a microcurrent. The device is widely used in small signal-detection systems and stereo audio equipment because of their characteristics of high gain, low frequency and low noise under small signals.

  9. Assessing relative volatility/intermittency/energy dissipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E.; Pakkanen, Mikko S.; Schmiegel, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    process in particular. This estimation method is motivated by the assessment of relative energy dissipation in empirical data of turbulence, but it is also applicable in other areas. We develop a probabilistic asymptotic theory for realised relative power variations of Brownian semistationary processes......, and introduce inference methods based on the theory. We also discuss how to extend the asymptotic theory to other classes of processes exhibiting stochastic volatility/intermittency. As an empirical application, we study relative energy dissipation in data of atmospheric turbulence.......We introduce the notion of relative volatility/intermittency and demonstrate how relative volatility statistics can be used to estimate consistently the temporal variation of volatility/intermittency when the data of interest are generated by a non-semimartingale, or a Brownian semistationary...

  10. Patterns and Interfaces in Dissipative Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Pismen, L.M

    2006-01-01

    Spontaneous pattern formation in nonlinear dissipative systems far from equilibrium is a paradigmatic case of emergent behaviour associated with complex systems. It is encountered in a great variety of settings, both in nature and technology, and has numerous applications ranging from nonlinear optics through solid and fluid mechanics, physical chemistry and chemical engineering to biology. Nature creates its variety of forms through spontaneous pattern formation and self-assembly, and this strategy is likely to be imitated by future biomorphic technologies. This book is a first-hand account by one of the leading players in this field, which gives in-depth descriptions of analytical methods elucidating the complex evolution of nonlinear dissipative systems, and brings the reader to the forefront of current research. The introductory chapter on the theory of dynamical systems is written with a view to applications of its powerful methods to spatial and spatio-temporal patterns. It is followed by two chapters t...

  11. Stochastic resonance in dissipative drift motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarzabal, Ricardo S.; Szezech, José D., Jr.; Batista, Antonio M.; Seoane, Jesus M.; Sanjuán, Miguel A. F.

    2018-01-01

    We study a simple model of drift waves that describes the particle transport in magnetised plasmas. In particular, we focus our attention on the effects of noise on a dissipative drift wave model. In the noiseless case, the relationship between the escape time and the damping term obeys a power-law scaling. In this work, we show that peaks in the escape time are enhanced for certain values of the noise intensity, when noise is added in the dissipative drift motion. This enhancement occurs in the situation where stochastic resonance (SR) appears. We also observe that the noise produces significant alterations to the escape time distribution. This way, we expect this work to be useful for a better understanding of drift wave models in the presence of noise, since noise is a natural ingredient in the environment of this kind of physical problems.

  12. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M; Churkin, Dmitry V; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K

    2016-08-09

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin-Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system-spectrally dependent losses-achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin-Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering.

  13. Dissipative Systems Synthesis: a Linear Algebraic Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Belur, Madhu N.; Pillai, Harish K.; Trentelman, H.L.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of synthesis of dissipative systems for the case that first and higher order derivatives of the concerned variables also appear in the weighting function. The problem is formulated and solved using the behavioral approach to systems and control. We relate the problem of weighted H-infinity control as a special case of this synthesis problem. The synthesis problem and its solution can be systematically understood when one notices that it is similar to find...

  14. Acoustic vibration problem for dissipative fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Lepe, Felipe; Meddahi, Salim; Mora, David; Rodríguez, Rodolfo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we analyze a finite element method for solving a quadratic eigenvalue problem derived from the acoustic vibration problem for a heterogeneous dissipative fluid. The problem is shown to be equivalent to the spectral problem for a noncompact operator and athorough spectral characterization is given. The numerical discretization of the problem is based on Raviart-Thomas finite elements. The method is proved to be free of spurious modes and to converge with optimal order. Finally, w...

  15. Offshore heat dissipation for nuclear energy centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauman, H.F.

    1978-09-01

    The technical, environmental, and economic aspects of utilizing the ocean or other large water bodies for the dissipation of reject heat from Nuclear Energy Centers (NECs) were investigated. An NEC in concept is an aggregate of nuclear power plants of 10 GW(e) capacity or greater on a common site. The use of once-through cooling for large power installations offers advantages including higher thermal efficiencies, especially under summer peak-load conditions, compared to closed-cycle cooling systems. A disadvantage of once-through cooling is the potential for greater adverse impacts on the aquatic environment. A concept is presented for minimizing the impacts of such systems by placing water intake and discharge locations relatively distant from shore in deeper water than has heretofore been the practice. This technique would avoid impacts on relatively biologically productive and ecologically sensitive shallow inshore areas. The NEC itself would be set back from the shoreline so that recreational use of the shore area would not be impaired. The characteristics of a heat-dissipation system of the size required for a NEC were predicted from the known characteristics of a smaller system by applying hydraulic scaling laws. The results showed that adequate heat dissipation can be obtained from NEC-sized systems located in water of appropriate depth. Offshore intake and discharge structures would be connected to the NEC pump house on shore via tunnels or buried pipelines. Tunnels have the advantage that shoreline and beach areas would not be disturbed. The cost of an offshore heat-dissipation system depends on the characteristics of the site, particularly the distance to suitably deep water and the type of soil or rock in which water conduits would be constructed. For a favorable site, the cost of an offshore system is estimated to be less than the cost of a closed-cycle system.

  16. Analytical on shell QED results 3-loop vacuum polarization, 4-loop $\\beta$-function and the muon anomaly

    CERN Document Server

    Broadhurst, D J; Tarasov, O V

    1993-01-01

    We present the results of analytical calculations of the 3-loop contributions to the asymptotic photon vacuum polarization function, in the on shell scheme, and of the 4-loop contributions to the on shell QED beta-function. These are used to evaluate various 4-loop and 5-loop contributions to the muon anomaly. Our analytical contributions to (g-2)_\\mu differ significantly from previous numerical results. A very recent numerical re-evaluation of 4-loop muon-anomaly contributions has yielded results much closer to ours.

  17. Study of Multiphoton Final States and Tests of QED in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ up to 209 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Alcaraz, J.; Alemanni, G.; Allaby, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Anderhub, H.; Andreev, Valery P.; Anselmo, F.; Arefev, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Bagnaia, P.; Bajo, A.; Baksay, G.; Baksay, L.; Baldew, S.V.; Banerjee, S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Barczyk, A.; Barillere, R.; Bartalini, P.; Basile, M.; Batalova, N.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Bellucci, L.; Berbeco, R.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B.L.; Biasini, M.; Biglietti, M.; Biland, A.; Blaising, J.J.; Blyth, S.C.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bohm, A.; Boldizsar, L.; Borgia, B.; Bottai, S.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Braccini, S.; Branson, J.G.; Brochu, F.; Burger, J.D.; Burger, W.J.; Cai, X.D.; Capell, M.; Cara Romeo, G.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A.; Casaus, J.; Cavallari, F.; Cavallo, N.; Cecchi, C.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo, M.; Chang, Y.H.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, G.; Chen, G.M.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, H.S.; Chiefari, G.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Costantini, S.; de la Cruz, B.; Cucciarelli, S.; van Dalen, J.A.; de Asmundis, R.; Deglon, P.; Debreczeni, J.; Degre, A.; Deiters, K.; della Volpe, D.; Delmeire, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; De Salvo, A.; Diemoz, M.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dionisi, C.; Dittmar, M.; Doria, A.; Dova, M.T.; Duchesneau, D.; Echenard, B.; Eline, A.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F.J.; Ewers, A.; Extermann, P.; Falagan, M.A.; Falciano, S.; Favara, A.; Fay, J.; Fedin, O.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.H.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, P.H.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, I.; Forconi, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Furetta, C.; Galaktionov, Iouri; Ganguli, S.N.; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gataullin, M.; Gentile, S.; Giagu, S.; Gong, Z.F.; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Grimm, O.; Gruenewald, M.W.; Guida, M.; van Gulik, R.; Gupta, V.K.; Gurtu, A.; Gutay, L.J.; Haas, D.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hebbeker, T.; Herve, Alain; Hirschfelder, J.; Hofer, H.; Hohlmann, M.; Holzner, G.; Hou, S.R.; Hu, Y.; Jin, B.N.; Jones, Lawrence W.; de Jong, P.; Josa-Mutuberria, I.; Kafer, D.; Kaur, M.; Kienzle-Focacci, M.N.; Kim, J.K.; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; Konig, A.C.; Kopal, M.; Koutsenko, V.; Kraber, M.; Kraemer, R.W.; Krenz, W.; Kruger, A.; Kunin, A.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Laktineh, I.; Landi, G.; Lebeau, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leiste, R.; Levtchenko, P.; Li, C.; Likhoded, S.; Lin, C.H.; Lin, W.T.; Linde, F.L.; Lista, L.; Liu, Z.A.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y.S.; Lubelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, W.G.; Malgeri, L.; Malinin, A.; Mana, C.; Mangeol, D.; Mans, J.; Martin, J.P.; Marzano, F.; Mazumdar, K.; McNeil, R.R.; Mele, S.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W.J.; Mihul, A.; Milcent, H.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Mohanty, G.B.; Muanza, G.S.; Muijs, A.J.M.; Musicar, B.; Musy, M.; Nagy, S.; Natale, S.; Napolitano, M.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Newman, H.; Niessen, T.; Nisati, A.; Kluge, Hannelies; Ofierzynski, R.; Organtini, G.; Palomares, C.; Pandoulas, D.; Paolucci, P.; Paramatti, R.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, Thomas Cantzon; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pedace, M.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Petersen, B.; Piccolo, D.; Pierella, F.; Pioppi, M.; Piroue, P.A.; Pistolesi, E.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Pothier, J.; Prokofev, D.O.; Prokofiev, D.; Quartieri, J.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rahaman, M.A.; Raics, P.; Raja, N.; Ramelli, R.; Rancoita, P.G.; Ranieri, R.; Raspereza, A.; Razis, P.; Ren, D.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Riemann, S.; Riles, Keith; Roe, B.P.; Romero, L.; Rosca, A.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Roth, Stefan; Rosenbleck, C.; Roux, B.; Rubio, J.A.; Ruggiero, G.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sakharov, A.; Saremi, S.; Sarkar, S.; Salicio, J.; Sanchez, E.; Sanders, M.P.; Schafer, C.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmidt-Kaerst, S.; Schmitz, D.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D.J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Servoli, L.; Shevchenko, S.; Shivarov, N.; Shoutko, V.; Shumilov, E.; Shvorob, A.; Siedenburg, T.; Son, D.; Spillantini, P.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D.P.; Stoyanov, B.; Straessner, A.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L.Z.; Sushkov, S.; Suter, H.; Swain, J.D.; Szillasi, Z.; Tang, X.W.; Tarjan, P.; Tauscher, L.; Taylor, L.; Tellili, B.; Teyssier, D.; Timmermans, Charles; Ting, Samuel C.C.; Ting, S.M.; Tonwar, S.C.; Toth, J.; Tully, C.; Tung, K.L.; Ulbricht, J.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R.T.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Vetlitsky, I.; Vicinanza, D.; Viertel, G.; Villa, S.; Vivargent, M.; Vlachos, S.; Vodopianov, I.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobev, I.; Vorobyov, A.A.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, X.L.; Wang, Z.M.; Weber, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wilkens, H.; Wynhoff, S.; Xia, L.; Xu, Z.Z.; Yamamoto, J.; Yang, B.Z.; Yang, C.G.; Yang, H.J.; Yang, M.; Yeh, S.C.; Zalite, A.; Zalite, Yu.; Zhang, Z.P.; Zhao, J.; Zhu, G.Y.; Zhu, R.Y.; Zhuang, H.L.; Zichichi, A.; Zilizi, G.; Zimmermann, B.; Zoller, M.

    2002-01-01

    The process e+ e- -> n gamma with n>=2 is studied at centre-of-mass energies ranging from \\root(s)=192 to 208 GeV. The data sample corresponds to a total integrated luminosity of 427 1/pb. The total and differential cross sections are found to be in agreement with the QED expectations. Using all the data collected with the L3 detector above the Z pole, limits on deviations from QED, excited electrons, contact interactions, extra space dimensions and excited spin-3/2 leptons are set.

  18. Quadratic dissipation effect on the moonpool resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Heng-xu; Chen, Hai-long; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Wan-chao; Liu, Ming

    2017-12-01

    This paper adopted a semi-analytical method based on eigenfunction matching to solve the problem of sharp resonance of cylindrical structures with a moonpool that has a restricted entrance. To eliminate the sharp resonance and to measure the viscous effect, a quadratic dissipation is introduced by assuming an additional dissipative disk at the moonpool entrance. The fluid domain is divided into five cylindrical subdomains, and the velocity potential in each subdomain is obtained by meeting the Laplace equation as well as the boundary conditions. The free-surface elevation at the center of the moonpool, along with the pressure and velocity at the restricted entrance for first-order wave are evaluated. By choosing appropriate dissipation coefficients, the free-surface elevation calculated at the center of the moonpool is in coincidence with the measurements in model tests both at the peak period and amplitude at resonance. It is shown that the sharp resonance in the potential flow theory can be eliminated and the viscous effect can be estimated with a simple method in some provided hydrodynamic models.

  19. Magnetization dissipation in ferromagnets from scattering theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brataas, Arne; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Bauer, Gerrit E. W.

    2011-08-01

    The magnetization dynamics of ferromagnets is often formulated in terms of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. The reactive part of this equation describes the response of the magnetization in terms of effective fields, whereas the dissipative part is parametrized by the Gilbert damping tensor. We formulate a scattering theory for the magnetization dynamics and map this description on the linearized LLG equation by attaching electric contacts to the ferromagnet. The reactive part can then be expressed in terms of the static scattering matrix. The dissipative contribution to the low-frequency magnetization dynamics can be described as an adiabatic energy pumping process to the electronic subsystem by the time-dependent magnetization. The Gilbert damping tensor depends on the time derivative of the scattering matrix as a function of the magnetization direction. By the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, the fluctuations of the effective fields can also be formulated in terms of the quasistatic scattering matrix. The theory is formulated for general magnetization textures and worked out for monodomain precessions and domain-wall motions. We prove that the Gilbert damping from scattering theory is identical to the result obtained by the Kubo formalism.

  20. Correlated Photon Dynamics in Dissipative Rydberg Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeuthen, Emil; Gullans, Michael J.; Maghrebi, Mohammad F.; Gorshkov, Alexey V.

    2017-07-01

    Rydberg blockade physics in optically dense atomic media under the conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) leads to strong dissipative interactions between single photons. We introduce a new approach to analyzing this challenging many-body problem in the limit of a large optical depth per blockade radius. In our approach, we separate the single-polariton EIT physics from Rydberg-Rydberg interactions in a serialized manner while using a hard-sphere model for the latter, thus capturing the dualistic particle-wave nature of light as it manifests itself in dissipative Rydberg-EIT media. Using this approach, we analyze the saturation behavior of the transmission through one-dimensional Rydberg-EIT media in the regime of nonperturbative dissipative interactions relevant to current experiments. Our model is able to capture the many-body dynamics of bright, coherent pulses through these strongly interacting media. We compare our model with available experimental data in this regime and find good agreement. We also analyze a scheme for generating regular trains of single photons from continuous-wave input and derive its scaling behavior in the presence of imperfect single-photon EIT.

  1. Low Energy Dissipation Nano Device Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jenny

    2015-03-01

    The development of research on energy dissipation has been rapid in energy efficient area. Nano-material power FET is operated as an RF power amplifier, the transport is ballistic, noise is limited and power dissipation is minimized. The goal is Green-save energy by developing the Graphene and carbon nantube microwave and high performance devices. Higher performing RF amplifiers can have multiple impacts on broadly field, for example communication equipment, (such as mobile phone and RADAR); higher power density and lower power dissipation will improve spectral efficiency which translates into higher system level bandwidth and capacity for communications equipment. Thus, fundamental studies of power handling capabilities of new RF (nano)technologies can have broad, sweeping impact. Because it is critical to maximizing the power handling ability of grephene and carbon nanotube FET, the initial task focuses on measuring and understanding the mechanism of electrical breakdown. We aim specifically to determine how the breakdown voltage in graphene and nanotubes is related to the source-drain spacing, electrode material and thickness, and substrate, and thus develop reliable statistics on the breakdown mechanism and probability.

  2. Nonlinear Landau damping and Alfven wave dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinas, Adolfo F.; Miller, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Nonlinear Landau damping has been often suggested to be the cause of the dissipation of Alfven waves in the solar wind as well as the mechanism for ion heating and selective preacceleration in solar flares. We discuss the viability of these processes in light of our theoretical and numerical results. We present one-dimensional hybrid plasma simulations of the nonlinear Landau damping of parallel Alfven waves. In this scenario, two Alfven waves nonresonantly combine to create second-order magnetic field pressure gradients, which then drive density fluctuations, which in turn drive a second-order longitudinal electric field. Under certain conditions, this electric field strongly interacts with the ambient ions via the Landau resonance which leads to a rapid dissipation of the Alfven wave energy. While there is a net flux of energy from the waves to the ions, one of the Alfven waves will grow if both have the same polarization. We compare damping and growth rates from plasma simulations with those predicted by Lee and Volk (1973), and also discuss the evolution of the ambient ion distribution. We then consider this nonlinear interaction in the presence of a spectrum of Alfven waves, and discuss the spectrum's influence on the growth or damping of a single wave. We also discuss the implications for wave dissipation and ion heating in the solar wind.

  3. Ultralow-Dissipation Superfluid Micromechanical Resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souris, F.; Rojas, X.; Kim, P. H.; Davis, J. P.

    2017-04-01

    Micro- and nanomechanical resonators with ultralow dissipation have great potential as useful quantum resources. The superfluid micromechanical resonators presented here possess several advantageous characteristics: straightforward thermalization, dissipationless flow, and in situ tunability. We identify and quantitatively model the various dissipation mechanisms in two resonators, one fabricated from borosilicate glass and one from single-crystal quartz. As the resonators are cryogenically cooled into the superfluid state, the damping from thermal effects and from the normal-fluid component are strongly suppressed. At our lowest temperatures, damping is limited solely by internal dissipation in the substrate materials, and the resonators reach quality factors of up to 913 000 at 13 mK. By lifting this limitation through substrate-material choice and resonator design, modeling suggests that the resonators could reach quality factors as high as 108 at 100 mK, putting this architecture in an ideal position to harness mechanical quantum effects and to facilitate the study of superfluids in confined geometries.

  4. Offset cancelling circuit

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegerink, Remco J.; Seevinck, Evert; de Jager, Wim

    1989-01-01

    A monolithic offset cancelling circuit to reduce the offset voltage at an integrated audio-amplifier output is described. This offset voltage is detected using a low-pass filter with a very large time constant for which only one small on-chip capacitor is needed. The circuit was realized with a bipolar cell-based semicustom array. Measurements have shown that a -3-dB bandwidth below 5 Hz can be realized with a capacitor value of 50 pF. The resulting offset voltage at the audio-amplifier outpu...

  5. Primer printed circuit boards

    CERN Document Server

    Argyle, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Step-by-step instructions for making your own PCBs at home. Making your own printed circuit board (PCB) might seem a daunting task, but once you master the steps, it's easy to attain professional-looking results. Printed circuit boards, which connect chips and other components, are what make almost all modern electronic devices possible. PCBs are made from sheets of fiberglass clad with copper, usually in multiplelayers. Cut a computer motherboard in two, for instance, and you'll often see five or more differently patterned layers. Making boards at home is relatively easy

  6. Electronic circuits fundamentals & applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tooley, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Electronics explained in one volume, using both theoretical and practical applications.New chapter on Raspberry PiCompanion website contains free electronic tools to aid learning for students and a question bank for lecturersPractical investigations and questions within each chapter help reinforce learning Mike Tooley provides all the information required to get to grips with the fundamentals of electronics, detailing the underpinning knowledge necessary to appreciate the operation of a wide range of electronic circuits, including amplifiers, logic circuits, power supplies and oscillators. The

  7. Electrical Circuit Tester

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Frank

    2006-04-18

    An electrical circuit testing device is provided, comprising a case, a digital voltage level testing circuit with a display means, a switch to initiate measurement using the device, a non-shorting switching means for selecting pre-determined electrical wiring configurations to be tested in an outlet, a terminal block, a five-pole electrical plug mounted on the case surface and a set of adapters that can be used for various multiple-pronged electrical outlet configurations for voltages from 100 600 VAC from 50 100 Hz.

  8. Circuit design for reliability

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Yu; Wirth, Gilson

    2015-01-01

    This book presents physical understanding, modeling and simulation, on-chip characterization, layout solutions, and design techniques that are effective to enhance the reliability of various circuit units.  The authors provide readers with techniques for state of the art and future technologies, ranging from technology modeling, fault detection and analysis, circuit hardening, and reliability management. Provides comprehensive review on various reliability mechanisms at sub-45nm nodes; Describes practical modeling and characterization techniques for reliability; Includes thorough presentation of robust design techniques for major VLSI design units; Promotes physical understanding with first-principle simulations.

  9. Analysing half-lives for pesticide dissipation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, R E; Fantke, P; Trapp, S

    2015-01-01

    Overall dissipation of pesticides from plants is frequently measured, but the contribution of individual loss processes is largely unknown. We use a pesticide fate model for the quantification of dissipation by processes other than degradation. The model was parameterised using field studies. Scenarios were established for Copenhagen/Denmark and Shanghai/PR China, and calibrated with measured results. The simulated dissipation rates of 42 pesticides were then compared with measured overall dissipation from field studies using tomato and wheat. The difference between measured overall dissipation and calculated dissipation by non-degradative processes should ideally be contributable to degradation in plants. In 11% of the cases, calculated dissipation was above the measured dissipation. For the remaining cases, the non-explained dissipation ranged from 30% to 83%, depending on crop type, plant part and scenario. Accordingly, degradation is the most relevant dissipation process for these 42 pesticides, followed by growth dilution. Volatilisation was less relevant, which can be explained by the design of plant protection agents. Uptake of active compound from soil into plants leads to a negative dissipation process (i.e. a gain) that is difficult to quantify because it depends largely on interception, precipitation and plant stage. This process is particularly relevant for soluble compounds.

  10. Power amplifier circuit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takeya, Hideaki; Nauta, Bram

    2015-01-01

    PROBLEM TO BE SOLVED: To provide a power amplifier circuit which has high power efficiency while suppressing a fluctuation of output power relatively to a fluctuation of a power supply voltage in a high-efficiency switching amplifier which operates in a radio frequency band.SOLUTION: A duty ratio

  11. "Printed-circuit" rectenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    Rectifying antenna is less bulky structure for absorbing transmitted microwave power and converting it into electrical current. Printed-circuit approach, using microstrip technology and circularly polarized antenna, makes polarization orientation unimportant and allows much smaller arrays for given performance. Innovation is particularly useful with proposed electric vehicles powered by beam microwaves.

  12. Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majer, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes a number of experiments with superconducting cir- cuits containing small Josephson junctions. The circuits are made out of aluminum islands which are interconnected with a very thin insulating alu- minum oxide layer. The connections form a Josephson junction. The current trough

  13. ESD analog circuits and design

    CERN Document Server

    Voldman, Steven H

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive and in-depth review of analog circuit layout, schematic architecture, device, power network and ESD design This book will provide a balanced overview of analog circuit design layout, analog circuit schematic development, architecture of chips, and ESD design.  It will start at an introductory level and will bring the reader right up to the state-of-the-art. Two critical design aspects for analog and power integrated circuits are combined. The first design aspect covers analog circuit design techniques to achieve the desired circuit performance. The second and main aspect pres

  14. Fluctuations of energy flux in a simple dissipative out-of-equilibrium system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcón, Claudio; Falcon, Eric

    2009-04-01

    We report the statistical properties of the fluctuations of the energy flux in an electronic RC circuit driven with a stochastic voltage. The fluctuations of the power injected in the circuit are measured as a function of the damping rate and the forcing parameters. We show that its distribution exhibits a cusp close to zero and two asymmetric exponential tails, with the asymmetry being driven by the mean dissipation. This simple experiment allows one to capture the qualitative features of the energy flux distribution observed in more complex dissipative systems. We also show that the large fluctuations of injected power averaged on a time lag do not verify the fluctuation theorem even for long averaging time. This is in contrast to the findings of previous experiments due to their small range of explored fluctuation amplitude. The injected power in a system of N components either correlated or not is also studied to mimic systems with large number of particles, such as in a dilute granular gas.

  15. Taming Chaotic Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    coefficients and must be considered in light of the system’s physics. Dissipative parameters, like resistance , are easy to change. However, when... opamp RC filter. The differential equation for the VCO’s input is Cdv +v VR sin(wtr,, + o) = RE (7.11) where R and C set the filter’s pole and the filter...results and the performance of the program as it constructs those results Several nagging problems resist even this broad-based approach: modeling, nu

  16. Test of non-commutative QED in the process $e^{+}e^{-} \\to \\gamma \\gamma$ at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Buesser, K.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Elfgren, E.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kormos, Laura L.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kruger, K.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Masetti, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.J.; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Siroli, G.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2003-01-01

    Non-communicative QED would lead to deviations from the Standard Model depending on a new energy scale $\\Delta_{NC}$ and a unique direction in space defined by two angles $\\eta$ and $\\xi$. Here in this analysis $\\eta$ is defined as the angle between the unique direction and the rotation axis of the earth. The predictions of such a theory for the process $e^{+} e^{-} \\to \\gamma \\gamma$ are evalued for the specific orientation of the OPAL detector and compared to the measurements. Distributions of the polar and azimuthal scattering angles are used to extract limits on the energy scale $\\Delta_{NC}$ depending on the model parameter $\\eta$. At the 95% confidence level $\\Delta_{NC}$ is found to be larger than 141 GeV for all $\\eta$ and $\\xi$. It is shown that the time dependence of the total cross-section could be used to determine the model parameter $\\xi$ if there were a detectable signal. These are the first limits obtained on non-commutative QED from an $e^{+} e^{-}$ collider experiment.

  17. Utilization of Euler-Lagrange Equations in Circuits with Memory Elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Biolek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the equation of motion of a system can be set up using the Lagrangian and the dissipation function, which describe the conservative and dissipative parts of the system. However, this procedure, consisting in a systematic differentiation of the above state functions, cannot be used for circuits containing simultaneously conventional nonlinear elements such as the resistor, capacitor, and inductor, and their nonlinear memory versions – the memristor, memcapacitor, and meminductor. The paper provides a general solution to this problem and demonstrates it on the example of modeling Josephson’s junction.

  18. Reducing energy with asynchronous circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Rivas Barragan, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Reducing energy consumption using asynchronous circuits. The elastic clocks approach has been implemented along with a closed-feedback loop in order to achieve a lower energy consumption along with more reliability in integrated circuits.

  19. Tidal Dissipation in Hot Jupiter Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Eric T.

    2009-01-01

    Short-period extrasolar giant planets (hot Jupiters) experience periods of strong tidal dissipation. It is not well known whether tidal energy is deposited primarily in the deep interior or the surface layers of these planets, or what effect the location of tidal heating has on their evolution and observable properties (e.g. radii, spectra, and rate of mass loss in a planetary wind). I present a study of the local tidal heating rate as a function of latitude and depth in the radiative envelope and atmosphere (between pressure levels of about 1 kilobar and 0.001 microbars). Results are based on a nonadiabatic linear analysis of the tide in this region, which takes the form of an upward-propagating train of inertial-gravity waves excited at the interface between the convective interior and the stably-stratified envelope. Radiative damping dominates the dissipation. Careful attention is paid to the computation of the radiative relaxation timescale, using nongray radiative transfer to transition smoothly from the optically thick to the optically thin regime. The potential exists for conversion from inertial-gravity waves to pure inertial waves in the presence of strong radiative damping. This raises the possibility that a significant tidal energy flux can be transported as high as the base of the thermosphere, where it would contribute to driving atmospheric escape. Results can be used to chart local tidal heating rates over the lifetime of a hot Jupiter as its orbit and rotation rate evolve. Although the potential for high-altitude tidal heating is intriguing, I find that over a wide range of orbital parameters the bulk of the energy flux is dissipated nearer the IR photosphere. Tidal heating at those heights (around 0.1-10 bars) has the greatest potential to affect the emergent spectrum, and is least likely to slow the planet's rate of contraction.

  20. Diode, transistor & fet circuits manual

    CERN Document Server

    Marston, R M

    2013-01-01

    Diode, Transistor and FET Circuits Manual is a handbook of circuits based on discrete semiconductor components such as diodes, transistors, and FETS. The book also includes diagrams and practical circuits. The book describes basic and special diode characteristics, heat wave-rectifier circuits, transformers, filter capacitors, and rectifier ratings. The text also presents practical applications of associated devices, for example, zeners, varicaps, photodiodes, or LEDs, as well as it describes bipolar transistor characteristics. The transistor can be used in three basic amplifier configuration

  1. Assessing Relative Volatility/Intermittency/Energy Dissipation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole E.; Pakkanen, Mikko; Schmiegel, Jürgen

    process in particular. While this estimation method is motivated by the assessment of relative energy dissipation in empirical data of turbulence, we apply it also to energy price data. Moreover, we develop a probabilistic asymptotic theory for relative power variations of Brownian semistationary......We introduce the notion of relative volatility/intermittency and demonstrate how relative volatility statistics can be used to estimate consistently the temporal variation of volatility/intermittency even when the data of interest are generated by a non-semimartingale, or a Brownian semistationary...... processes and Ito semimartingales and discuss how it can be used for inference on relative volatility/intermittency....

  2. Dissipation and Decoherence in a Quantum Register

    OpenAIRE

    Zanardi, Paolo

    1997-01-01

    A model for a quantum register $\\cal R$ made of $N$ replicas of a $d$-dimensional quantum system (cell) coupled with the environment, is studied by means of a Born-Markov Master Equation (ME). Dissipation and decoherence are discussed in various cases in which a sub-decoherent enconding can be rigorously found. For the qubit case ($d=2$) we have solved, for small $N,$ the ME by numerical direct integration and studied, as a function of the coherence length $\\xi_c$ of the bath, fidelity and de...

  3. Dissipative Structures At Laser-Solid Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanai, Laszlo

    1989-05-01

    The questions which are discussed in this lecture refer to one of sections of laser-solid interactions, namely: to formation of different dissipative structures on the surface of metals and semiconductors when they are irradiated by intensive laser light in chemically active media (f.e.air). Some particular examples of the development at different spatial and time instabilities, periodic and stochastic structures, auto-wave processes are present-ed using testing materials vanadium metal and semiconducting V205 single crystals and light sources: cw and pulsed CO2 and YAG lasers.

  4. Massive black holes from dissipative dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Guido; Panci, Paolo; Lupi, Alessandro; Bovino, Stefano; Silk, Joe

    2018-01-01

    We show that a subdominant component of dissipative dark matter resembling the Standard Model can form many intermediate-mass black hole seeds during the first structure formation epoch. We also observe that, in the presence of this matter sector, the black holes will grow at a much faster rate with respect to the ordinary case. These facts can explain the observed abundance of supermassive black holes feeding high-redshift quasars. The scenario will have interesting observational consequences for dark substructures and gravitational wave production.

  5. Storing quantum states in bosonic dissipative networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Ponte, M A; Mizrahi, S S [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Caixa Postal 676, Sao Carlos, 13565-905, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Moussa, M H Y [Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Caixa Postal 369, 13560-590 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil)

    2008-11-14

    By considering a network of dissipative quantum harmonic oscillators, we deduce and analyse the optimum topologies which are able to store quantum superposition states, protecting them from decoherence, for the longest period of time. The storage is made dynamically, in that the states to be protected evolve through the network before being retrieved back in the oscillator where they were prepared. The decoherence time during the dynamic storage process is computed and we demonstrate that it is proportional to the number of oscillators in the network for a particular regime of parameters.

  6. Magnetization dynamics, Bennett clocking and associated energy dissipation in multiferroic logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi Fashami, Mohammad; Roy, Kuntal; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2011-04-01

    It has been recently shown that the magnetization of a multiferroic nanomagnet, consisting of a magnetostrictive layer elastically coupled to a piezoelectric layer, can be rotated by a large angle if a tiny voltage of a few tens of millivolts is applied to the piezoelectric layer. The potential generates stress in the magnetostrictive layer and rotates its magnetization by ~ 90° to implement Bennett clocking in nanomagnetic logic chains. Because of the small voltage needed, this clocking method is far more energy efficient than those that would employ spin transfer torque or magnetic fields to rotate the magnetization. In order to assess if such a clocking scheme can also be reasonably fast, we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a multiferroic logic chain with nearest-neighbor dipole coupling using the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. We find that clock rates of 2.5 GHz are feasible while still maintaining the exceptionally high energy efficiency. For this clock rate, the energy dissipated per clock cycle per bit flip is ~ 52 000 kT at room temperature in the clocking circuit for properly designed nanomagnets. Had we used spin transfer torque to clock at the same rate, the energy dissipated per clock cycle per bit flip would have been ~ 4 × 108 kT, while with current transistor technology we would have expended ~ 106 kT. For slower clock rates of 1 GHz, stress-based clocking will dissipate only ~ 200 kT of energy per clock cycle per bit flip, while spin transfer torque would dissipate about 108 kT. This shows that multiferroic nanomagnetic logic, clocked with voltage-generated stress, can emerge as a very attractive technique for computing and signal processing since it can be several orders of magnitude more energy efficient than current technologies.

  7. Magnetization dynamics, Bennett clocking and associated energy dissipation in multiferroic logic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fashami, Mohammad Salehi; Atulasimha, Jayasimha [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284 (United States); Roy, Kuntal; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo, E-mail: jatulasimha@vcu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA 23284 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    It has been recently shown that the magnetization of a multiferroic nanomagnet, consisting of a magnetostrictive layer elastically coupled to a piezoelectric layer, can be rotated by a large angle if a tiny voltage of a few tens of millivolts is applied to the piezoelectric layer. The potential generates stress in the magnetostrictive layer and rotates its magnetization by {approx} 90{sup 0} to implement Bennett clocking in nanomagnetic logic chains. Because of the small voltage needed, this clocking method is far more energy efficient than those that would employ spin transfer torque or magnetic fields to rotate the magnetization. In order to assess if such a clocking scheme can also be reasonably fast, we have studied the magnetization dynamics of a multiferroic logic chain with nearest-neighbor dipole coupling using the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. We find that clock rates of 2.5 GHz are feasible while still maintaining the exceptionally high energy efficiency. For this clock rate, the energy dissipated per clock cycle per bit flip is {approx} 52 000 kT at room temperature in the clocking circuit for properly designed nanomagnets. Had we used spin transfer torque to clock at the same rate, the energy dissipated per clock cycle per bit flip would have been {approx} 4 x 10{sup 8} kT, while with current transistor technology we would have expended {approx} 10{sup 6} kT. For slower clock rates of 1 GHz, stress-based clocking will dissipate only {approx} 200 kT of energy per clock cycle per bit flip, while spin transfer torque would dissipate about 10{sup 8} kT. This shows that multiferroic nanomagnetic logic, clocked with voltage-generated stress, can emerge as a very attractive technique for computing and signal processing since it can be several orders of magnitude more energy efficient than current technologies.

  8. Phase-slip-induced dissipation in an atomic Bose-Hubbard system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, D; White, M; Pasienski, M; DeMarco, B

    2008-05-01

    Phase-slips control dissipation in many bosonic systems, determining the critical velocity of superfluid helium and the generation of resistance in thin superconducting wires. Technological interest has been largely motivated by applications involving nanoscale superconducting circuit elements, such as standards based on quantum phase-slip junctions. Although phase slips caused by thermal fluctuations at high temperatures are well understood, controversy remains over the role of phase slips in small-scale superconductors--in solids, problems such as uncontrolled noise sources and disorder complicate their study and application. Here we show that phase slips can lead to dissipation in a clean and well-characterized Bose-Hubbard system, by experimentally studying the transport of ultracold atoms trapped in an optical lattice. In contrast to previous work, we explore a low-velocity regime described by the three-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model that is unaffected by instabilities, and we measure the effect of temperature on the dissipation strength. The damping rate of atomic motion (the analogue of electrical resistance in a solid) in the confining parabolic potential is well fitted by a model that includes finite damping at zero temperature. The low-temperature behaviour is consistent with the theory of quantum tunnelling of phase slips, whereas at higher temperatures a crossover consistent with a transition to thermal activation of phase slips is evident. Motion-induced features reminiscent of vortices and vortex rings associated with phase slips are also observed in time-of-flight imaging. These results clarify the role of phase slips in superfluid systems. They may also be of relevance in understanding the source of metallic phases observed in thin films, or serve as a test bed for theories of bosonic dissipation based upon variants of the Bose-Hubbard model.

  9. Circuit Bodging : Atari Punk Console

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allen, B.

    2009-01-01

    Circuit bodging is back! Maxwell is proud to present small, simple, but ultimately lovable little circuits to build for your own, personal pleasure. In this edition we are featuring: The Atari Punk Console. The Atari Punk Console (or APC) is a 555 timer IC based noise maker circuit. The original was

  10. Synthetic in vitro transcription circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitz, Maximilian; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2012-01-01

    With the help of only two enzymes--an RNA polymerase and a ribonuclease--reduced versions of transcriptional regulatory circuits can be implemented in vitro. These circuits enable the emulation of naturally occurring biochemical networks, the exploration of biological circuit design principles and the biochemical implementation of powerful computational models.

  11. High voltage MOSFET switching circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1994-01-01

    The problem of source lead inductance in a MOSFET switching circuit is compensated for by adding an inductor to the gate circuit. The gate circuit inductor produces an inductive spike which counters the source lead inductive drop to produce a rectangular drive voltage waveform at the internal gate-source terminals of the MOSFET.

  12. Neuromorphic Silicon Neuron Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indiveri, Giacomo; Linares-Barranco, Bernabé; Hamilton, Tara Julia; van Schaik, André; Etienne-Cummings, Ralph; Delbruck, Tobi; Liu, Shih-Chii; Dudek, Piotr; Häfliger, Philipp; Renaud, Sylvie; Schemmel, Johannes; Cauwenberghs, Gert; Arthur, John; Hynna, Kai; Folowosele, Fopefolu; Saighi, Sylvain; Serrano-Gotarredona, Teresa; Wijekoon, Jayawan; Wang, Yingxue; Boahen, Kwabena

    2011-01-01

    Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain–machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance-based Hodgkin–Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive integrate and fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips. PMID:21747754

  13. Neuromorphic silicon neuron circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo eIndiveri

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain-machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance based Hodgkin-Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive Integrate and Fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips.

  14. Integrated Circuit Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sketoe, J. G.; Clark, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a DOD E3 program overview on integrated circuit immunity. The topics include: 1) EMI Immunity Testing; 2) Threshold Definition; 3) Bias Tee Function; 4) Bias Tee Calibration Set-Up; 5) EDM Test Figure; 6) EMI Immunity Levels; 7) NAND vs. and Gate Immunity; 8) TTL vs. LS Immunity Levels; 9) TP vs. OC Immunity Levels; 10) 7805 Volt Reg Immunity; and 11) Seventies Chip Set. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  15. Cartography of serotonergic circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparta, Dennis R; Stuber, Garret D

    2014-08-06

    Serotonin is an essential neuromodulator, but the precise circuit connectivity that regulates serotonergic neurons has not been well defined. Using rabies virus tracing strategies Weissbourd et al. (2014) and Pollak Dorocic et al. (2014) in this issue of Neuron and Ogawa et al. (2014) in Cell Reports provide a comprehensive map of the inputs to serotonergic neurons, highlighting the complexity and diversity of potential upstream cellular regulators. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Efficient Heat Dissipation of Uncooled 400-Gbps (16×25-Gbps) Optical Transceiver Employing Multimode VCSEL and PD Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Tien-Tsorng; Chi, Yu-Chieh; Wang, Ruei-Nian; Wu, Chao-Hsin; Huang, Jian-Jang; Jou, Jau-Ji; Lee, Tai-Cheng; Kuo, Hao-Chung; Lin, Gong-Ru; Cheng, Wood-Hi

    2017-04-01

    An effective heat dissipation of uncooled 400-Gbps (16×25-Gbps) form-factor pluggable (CDFP) optical transceiver module employing chip-on-board multimode 25-Gbps vertical-surface-emitting-laser (VCSEL) and 25-Gbps photodiode (PD) arrays mounted on a brass metal core embedded within a printed circuit board (PCB) is proposed and demonstrated. This new scheme of the hollow PCB filling with thermally-dissipated brass metal core was simulated and used for high temperature and long term stability operation of the proposed 400-Gbps CDFP transceiver. During one-hour testing, a red-shift of central wavelength by 0.4-nm corresponding temperature increment of 6.7 °C was observed with the brass core assisted cooler module. Such a temperature change was significantly lower than that of 28.3 °C for the optical transceiver driven with conventional circuit board. After 100-m distance transmission over a multimode fiber (OM4), the 400-Gbps CDFP transceiver exhibited dispersion penalty of 2.6-dB, power budget of ≧ 3-dB, link loss of ≦ 0.63-dB, mask margin of 20%, and bit error rate (BER) of VCSEL and PD arrays, effective coupling lens arrays, and well thermal-dissipation brass metal core is suitable for use in the low-cost and high-performance data center applications.

  17. Quantum parameter space of dissipative directed transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermann, Leonardo; Carlo, Gabriel G.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum manifestations of isoperiodic stable structures (QISSs) have a crucial role in the current behavior of quantum dissipative ratchets. In this context, the simple shape of the ISSs has been conjectured to be an almost exclusive feature of the classical system. This has drastic consequences for many properties of the directed currents, the most important one being that it imposes a significant reduction in their maximum values, thus affecting the attainable efficiency at the quantum level. In this work we prove this conjecture by means of comprehensive numerical explorations and statistical analysis of the quantum states. We are able to describe the quantum parameter space of a paradigmatic system for different values of ℏeff in great detail. Moreover, thanks to this we provide evidence on a mechanism that we call parametric tunneling by which the sharp classical borders of the regions in parameter space become blurred in the quantum counterpart. We expect this to be a common property of generic dissipative quantum systems.

  18. Dissipative Topological Defects in Coupled Laser Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, Vishwa; Chriki, Ronen; Friesem, Asher A; Davidson, Nir

    2016-01-01

    Topologically protected defects have been observed and studied in a wide range of fields, such as cosmology, spin systems, cold atoms and optics as they are quenched across a phase transition into an ordered state. Revealing their origin and control is becoming increasingly important field of research, as they limit the coherence of the system and its ability to approach a fully ordered state. Here, we present dissipative topological defects in a 1-D ring network of phase-locked lasers, and show how their formation is related to the Kibble-Zurek mechanism and is governed in a universal manner by two competing time scales of the lasers, namely the phase locking time and synchronization time of their amplitude fluctuations. The ratio between these two time scales depends on the system parameters such as gain and coupling strength, and thus offers the possibility to control the probability of topological defects in the system. Enabling the system to dissipate to the fully ordered, defect-free state can be exploi...

  19. Cassini Can Constrain Tidal Dissipation in Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Jing; Fuller, Jim; Quataert, Eliot

    2017-10-01

    Tidal dissipation inside giant planets is important for the orbital evolution of their natural satellites. It is conventionally treated by parameterized equilibrium tidal the- ory, in which the tidal torque declines rapidly with distance, and orbital expansion was faster in the past. However, Lainey et al. (2017) find that some Saturnian satellites are currently migrating outward faster than predicted by equilibrium tidal theory. Reso- nance locking between satellites and internal oscillations of Saturn, proposed by Fuller et al. (2016), naturally matches the observed migration rates. Here, we show that the resonance locking theory predicts dynamical tidal perturbations to Saturn’s gravita- tional field in addition to those produced by equilibrium tidal bulges. We show that these perturbations can likely be detected during Cassini’s proximal orbits if migra- tion of satellites results from resonant gravity modes, but will likely be undetectable if migration results from inertial wave attractors or dissipation of the equilibrium tide. Additionally, we show that the detection of gravity modes would place constraints on the size of the hypothetical stably stratified region in Saturn.

  20. The Dissipation Mechanism in Collisionless Magnetic Reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Michael; Kuznetsova, M.; Birn, J.; Schindler, K.

    2006-01-01

    The dissipation mechanism of magnetic reconnection remains a subject of intense scientific interest. On one hand, one set of recent studies have shown that particle inertia-based processes, which include thermal and bulk inertial effects, provide the reconnection electric field in the diffusion region. On the other hand, a second set of studies emphasizes the role of wave-particle interactions in providing anomalous resistivity in the diffusion region. In this presentation, we present analytical theory results, as well as PIC simulations of guide-field magnetic reconnection. We will show that the thermal electron inertia-based dissipation mechanism, expressed through nongyrotropic electron pressure tensors, remains viable in three dimensions. We will demonstrate the thermal inertia effect through studies of electron distribution functions. Furthermore, we will show that the reconnection electric field provides a transient acceleration on particles traversing the inner reconnection region. This inertial effect can be described as a diffusion-like term of the current density, which matches key features of electron distribution functions.

  1. Generalized global symmetries and dissipative magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozdanov, Sašo; Hofman, Diego M.; Iqbal, Nabil

    2017-05-01

    The conserved magnetic flux of U (1 ) electrodynamics coupled to matter in four dimensions is associated with a generalized global symmetry. We study the realization of such a symmetry at finite temperature and develop the hydrodynamic theory describing fluctuations of a conserved 2-form current around thermal equilibrium. This can be thought of as a systematic derivation of relativistic magnetohydrodynamics, constrained only by symmetries and effective field theory. We construct the entropy current and show that at first order in derivatives, there are seven dissipative transport coefficients. We present a universal definition of resistivity in a theory of dynamical electromagnetism and derive a direct Kubo formula for the resistivity in terms of correlation functions of the electric field operator. We also study fluctuations and collective modes, deriving novel expressions for the dissipative widths of magnetosonic and Alfvén modes. Finally, we demonstrate that a nontrivial truncation of the theory can be performed at low temperatures compared to the magnetic field: this theory has an emergent Lorentz invariance along magnetic field lines, and hydrodynamic fluctuations are now parametrized by a fluid tensor rather than a fluid velocity. Throughout, no assumption is made of weak electromagnetic coupling. Thus, our theory may have phenomenological relevance for dense electromagnetic plasmas.

  2. Hyperbolic theory of relativistic conformal dissipative fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehner, Luis; Reula, Oscar A.; Rubio, Marcelo E.

    2018-01-01

    We develop a complete description of the class of conformal relativistic dissipative fluids of divergence form, following the formalism described in [R. Geroch and L. Lindblom, Phys. Rev. D 41, 1855 (1990), 10.1103/PhysRevD.41.1855, S. Pennisi, Some considerations on a non linear approach to extended thermodynamics and in Proceedings of Symposium of Kinetic Theory and Extended Thermodynamics, Bologna, 1987.]. This type of theory is fully described in terms of evolution variables whose dynamics are governed by total divergence-type conservation laws. Specifically, we give a characterization of the whole family of conformal fluids in terms of a single master scalar function defined up to second-order corrections in dissipative effects, which we explicitly find in general form. This allows us to identify the equilibrium states of the theory and derive constitutive relations and a Fourier-like law for the corresponding first-order theory heat flux. Finally, we show that among this class of theories—and near equilibrium configurations—there exist symmetric hyperbolic ones, implying that for them one can define well-posed initial value problems.

  3. Local equilibrium hypothesis and Taylor’s dissipation law

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goto, Susumu [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, 1-3 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka, 560-8531 (Japan); Vassilicos, J C, E-mail: goto@me.es.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: j.c.vassilicos@imperial.ac.jp [Department of Aeronautics, Imperial College, London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2016-04-15

    To qualitatively investigate the validity of Kolmogorov local equilibrium hypothesis and the Taylor dissipation law, we conduct direct numerical simulations of the three-dimensional turbulent Kolmogorov flow. Since strong scale-by-scale (i.e. Richardson-type) energy cascade events occur quasi-periodically, the kinetic energy of the turbulence and its dissipation rate evolve quasi-periodically too. In this unsteady turbulence driven by a steady force, instantaneous values of the dissipation rate obey the scaling recently discovered in wind tunnel experiments (Vassilicos 2015 Ann. Rev. Fluid Mech. 47 95–114) instead of the Taylor dissipation law. The Taylor dissipation law does not hold because the local equilibrium hypothesis does not hold in a relatively low wave-number range. The breakdown of this hypothesis is caused by the finite time needed for the energy at such large scales to reach the dissipative scale by the scale-by-scale energy cascade. (paper)

  4. Geometry, robustness, and emerging unitarity in dissipation-projected dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardi, Paolo; Campos Venuti, Lorenzo

    2015-05-01

    Quantum information can be encoded in the set of steady states (SSS) of a driven-dissipative system. Nonsteady states are separated by a large dissipative gap that adiabatically decouples them while the dynamics inside the SSS is governed by an effective, dissipation-projected, Hamiltonian. The latter results from the interplay between a weak driving and the fast relaxation process that continuously projects the system back to the SSS. This amounts to a different type of environment-induced quantum Zeno effect. We prove that the dissipation-projected dynamics is of geometric nature and that it is robust against different types of Hamiltonian and dissipative perturbations. Remarkably, in some cases an effective unitary dynamics can emerge out of purely dissipative interactions.

  5. Analysing half-lives for pesticide dissipation in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, R.E.; Fantke, Peter; Trapp, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Overall dissipation of pesticides from plants is frequently measured, but the contribution of individual loss processes is largely unknown. We use a pesticide fate model for the quantification of dissipation by processes other than degradation. The model was parameterised using field studies....... Scenarios were established for Copenhagen/Denmark and Shanghai/PR China, and calibrated with measured results. The simulated dissipation rates of 42 pesticides were then compared with measured overall dissipation from field studies using tomato and wheat. The difference between measured overall dissipation...... and scenario. Accordingly, degradation is the most relevant dissipation process for these 42 pesticides, followed by growth dilution. Volatilisation was less relevant, which can be explained by the design of plant protection agents. Uptake of active compound from soil into plants leads to a negative...

  6. Changes to the shuttle circuits

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2011-01-01

    To fit with passengers expectation, there will be some changes to the shuttle circuits as from Monday 10 October. See details on http://cern.ch/ShuttleService (on line on 7 October). Circuit No. 5 is cancelled as circuit No. 1 also stops at Bldg. 33. In order to guarantee shorter travel times, circuit No. 1 will circulate on Meyrin site only and circuit No. 2, with departures from Bldg. 33 and 500, on Prévessin site only. Site Services Section

  7. Power system with an integrated lubrication circuit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, Brian D [East Peoria, IL; Akasam, Sivaprasad [Peoria, IL; Algrain, Marcelo C [Peoria, IL; Johnson, Kris W [Washington, IL; Lane, William H [Chillicothe, IL

    2009-11-10

    A power system includes an engine having a first lubrication circuit and at least one auxiliary power unit having a second lubrication circuit. The first lubrication circuit is in fluid communication with the second lubrication circuit.

  8. ARTICLE Evaluations on Some Perturbative Quantum Dissipation Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Ding, Jin-jin; Xu, Rui-xue

    2010-12-01

    We compare the results of some perturbative quantum dissipation approaches to the exact linear absorption of two state systems. The considered approximate methods are the so-called complete second-order quantum dissipation theories, in either the chronological ordering prescription or the correlated driving-dissipation form. Analytical results can be derived for the linear absorption of two-state systems. Assessments on their applicability are then made by comparison to the exact results.

  9. Reversible gates and circuits descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracki, Krzystof

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents basic methods of reversible circuit description. To design reversible circuit a set of gates has to be chosen. Most popular libraries are composed of three types of gates so called CNT gates (Control, NOT and Toffoli). The gate indexing method presented in this paper is based on the CNT gates set. It introduces a uniform indexing of the gates used during synthesis process of reversible circuits. The paper is organized as follows. Section 1 recalls basic concepts of reversible logic. In Section 2 and 3 a graphical representation of the reversible gates and circuits is described. Section 4 describes proposed uniform NCT gates indexing. The presented gate indexing method provides gate numbering scheme independent of lines number of the designed circuit. The solution for a circuit consisting of smaller number of lines is a subset of solution for a larger circuit.

  10. Entropy model of dissipative structure on corporate social responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuozhi; Jiang, Jie

    2017-06-01

    Enterprise is prompted to fulfill the social responsibility requirement by the internal and external environment. In this complex system, some studies suggest that firms have an orderly or chaotic entropy exchange behavior. Based on the theory of dissipative structure, this paper constructs the entropy index system of corporate social responsibility(CSR) and explores the dissipative structure of CSR through Brusselator model criterion. Picking up listed companies of the equipment manufacturing, the research shows that CSR has positive incentive to negative entropy and promotes the stability of dissipative structure. In short, the dissipative structure of CSR has a positive impact on the interests of stakeholders and corporate social images.

  11. Inflationary Weak Anisotropic Model with General Dissipation Coefficient

    CERN Document Server

    Sharif, M

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the dynamics of warm intermediate and logamediate inflationary models during weak dissipative regime with a general form of dissipative coefficient. We analyze these models within the framework of locally rotationally symmetric Bianchi type I universe. In both cases, we evaluate solution of inflaton, effective scalar potential, dissipative coefficient, slow-roll parameters, scalar and tensor power spectra, scalar spectral index and tensor to scalar ratio under slow-roll approximation. We constrain the model parameters using recent data and conclude that anisotropic inflationary universe model with generalized dissipation coefficient remains compatible with WMAP9, Planck and BICEP2 data.

  12. Optoelectronics circuits manual

    CERN Document Server

    Marston, R M

    1999-01-01

    This manual is a useful single-volume guide specifically aimed at the practical design engineer, technician, and experimenter, as well as the electronics student and amateur. It deals with the subject in an easy to read, down to earth, and non-mathematical yet comprehensive manner, explaining the basic principles and characteristics of the best known devices, and presenting the reader with many practical applications and over 200 circuits. Most of the ICs and other devices used are inexpensive and readily available types, with universally recognised type numbers.The second edition

  13. Photonic Integrated Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krainak, Michael; Merritt, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Integrated photonics generally is the integration of multiple lithographically defined photonic and electronic components and devices (e.g. lasers, detectors, waveguides passive structures, modulators, electronic control and optical interconnects) on a single platform with nanometer-scale feature sizes. The development of photonic integrated circuits permits size, weight, power and cost reductions for spacecraft microprocessors, optical communication, processor buses, advanced data processing, and integrated optic science instrument optical systems, subsystems and components. This is particularly critical for small spacecraft platforms. We will give an overview of some NASA applications for integrated photonics.

  14. Integrated circuit cell library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Sterling R. (Inventor); Miles, Lowell H. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    According to the invention, an ASIC cell library for use in creation of custom integrated circuits is disclosed. The ASIC cell library includes some first cells and some second cells. Each of the second cells includes two or more kernel cells. The ASIC cell library is at least 5% comprised of second cells. In various embodiments, the ASIC cell library could be 10% or more, 20% or more, 30% or more, 40% or more, 50% or more, 60% or more, 70% or more, 80% or more, 90% or more, or 95% or more comprised of second cells.

  15. Electronics circuits and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Owen

    2007-01-01

    The material in Electronics - Circuits and Systems is a truly up-to-date textbook, with coverage carefully matched to the electronics units of the 2007 BTEC National Engineering and the latest AS and A Level specifications in Electronics from AQA, OCR and WJEC. The material has been organized with a logical learning progression, making it ideal for a wide range of pre-degree courses in electronics. The approach is student-centred and includes: numerous examples and activities; web research topics; Self Test features, highlighted key facts, formulae and definitions. Each chapter ends with a set

  16. Electronics circuits and systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, Owen

    2011-01-01

    The material in Electronics - Circuits and Systems is a truly up-to-date textbook, with coverage carefully matched to the electronics units of the 2007 BTEC National Engineering and the latest AS and A Level specifications in Electronics from AQA, OCR and WJEC. The material has been organized with a logical learning progression, making it ideal for a wide range of pre-degree courses in electronics. The approach is student-centred and includes: numerous examples and activities; web research topics; Self Test features, highlighted key facts, formulae and definitions. Ea

  17. Linear integrated circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Carr, Joseph

    1996-01-01

    The linear IC market is large and growing, as is the demand for well trained technicians and engineers who understand how these devices work and how to apply them. Linear Integrated Circuits provides in-depth coverage of the devices and their operation, but not at the expense of practical applications in which linear devices figure prominently. This book is written for a wide readership from FE and first degree students, to hobbyists and professionals.Chapter 1 offers a general introduction that will provide students with the foundations of linear IC technology. From chapter 2 onwa

  18. Electric circuits problem solver

    CERN Document Server

    REA, Editors of

    2012-01-01

    Each Problem Solver is an insightful and essential study and solution guide chock-full of clear, concise problem-solving gems. All your questions can be found in one convenient source from one of the most trusted names in reference solution guides. More useful, more practical, and more informative, these study aids are the best review books and textbook companions available. Nothing remotely as comprehensive or as helpful exists in their subject anywhere. Perfect for undergraduate and graduate studies.Here in this highly useful reference is the finest overview of electric circuits currently av

  19. Digital Optical Circuit Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    avait donc pour but de dresser un bilan des recherches; et des raisations intiEressant la technologie des circuits optiques et d󈨁udier leurs...experiment. 3. EXPERIMENTAL WAVEGUIDE DEVICE Experiments were performed using carbon disulphide, CS2 , as the nonlinear medium. CS2 has a high non- linear...x 1.60- 1.595- S1.590 15514 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 Temperature (I C) FIGURE 5 REFRACTIVE INDEX OF CARBON DISULPHIDE AT 1 .O6um AS A FUNCTION OF

  20. Digital Optical Circuit Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, B. L. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    The Proceedings for the 48th Meeting of the AGARD Avionics Panel contain the 18 papers presented a Technical Evaluation Report, and discussions that followed the presentations of papers. Seven papers were presented in the session devoted to optical bistability. Optical logic was addressed by three papers. The session on sources, modulators and demodulators presented three papers. Five papers were given in the final session on all optical systems. The purpose of this Specialists' Meeting was to present the research and development status of digital optical circuit technology and to examine its relevance in the broad context of digital processing, communication, radar, avionics and flight control systems implementation.

  1. Thermodynamique des moteurs thermiques aux structures dissipatives

    CERN Document Server

    Prigogine, Ilya

    1999-01-01

    Ce livre constitue à la fois une présentation complète de la thermodynamique et une introduction scientifique à l'œuvre de Prigogine. Les auteurs innovent en montrant comment la thermodynamique du non-équilibre est un prolongement naturel de la thermodynamique de l'équilibre. Elle constitue ainsi la science des processus irréversibles - " la flèche du temps " - dont les structures dissipatives sont les témoignages les plus éclatants. Les développements historiques en font, non seulement un texte de référence, mais aussi un livre de culture. Les nombreux exemples et exercices, comme les programmes informatiques et les références aux sites Internet en font un outil de travail irremplaçable.

  2. Effective field theory of dissipative fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Michael; Glorioso, Paolo; Liu, Hong

    2017-09-01

    We develop an effective field theory for dissipative fluids which governs the dynamics of long-lived gapless modes associated with conserved quantities. The resulting theory gives a path integral formulation of fluctuating hydrodynamics which systematically incorporates nonlinear interactions of noises. The dynamical variables are mappings between a "fluid spacetime" and the physical spacetime and an essential aspect of our formulation is to identify the appropriate symmetries in the fluid spacetime. The theory applies to nonlinear disturbances around a general density matrix. For a thermal density matrix, we require an additional Z 2 symmetry, to which we refer as the local KMS condition. This leads to the standard constraints of hydrodynamics, as well as a nonlinear generalization of the Onsager relations. It also leads to an emergent supersymmetry in the classical statistical regime, and a higher derivative deformation of supersymmetry in the full quantum regime.

  3. An extended dissipative particle dynamics model

    CERN Document Server

    Cotter, C J

    2003-01-01

    The method of dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) was introduced by Hoogerbrugge & Koelman to study meso-scale material processes. The theoretical investigation of the DPD method was initiated by Espanol who used a Fokker-Planck formulation of the DPD method and applied the Mori-Zwanzig projection operator calculus to obtain the equations of hydrodynamics for DPD. A current limitation of DPD is that it requires a clear separation of scales between the resolved and unresolved processes. In this note, we suggest a simple extension of DPD that allows for inclusion of unresolved processes with exponentially decaying variance for any value of the decay rate. The main point of the extension is that it is as easy to implement as DPD in a numerical algorithm.

  4. Polarizable protein model for Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Emanuel; Lykov, Kirill; Pivkin, Igor

    2015-11-01

    In this talk, we present a novel polarizable protein model for the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) simulation technique, a coarse-grained particle-based method widely used in modeling of fluid systems at the mesoscale. We employ long-range electrostatics and Drude oscillators in combination with a newly developed polarizable water model. The protein in our model is resembled by a polarizable backbone and a simplified representation of the sidechains. We define the model parameters using the experimental structures of 2 proteins: TrpZip2 and TrpCage. We validate the model on folding of five other proteins and demonstrate that it successfully predicts folding of these proteins into their native conformations. As a perspective of this model, we will give a short outlook on simulations of protein aggregation in the bulk and near a model membrane, a relevant process in several Amyloid diseases, e.g. Alzheimer's and Diabetes II.

  5. Quantum Markov Chain Mixing and Dissipative Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastoryano, Michael James

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is the fruit of investigations on the extension of ideas of Markov chain mixing to the quantum setting, and its application to problems of dissipative engineering. A Markov chain describes a statistical process where the probability of future events depends only on the state...... (stationary states). The aim of Markov chain mixing is to obtain (upper and/or lower) bounds on the number of steps it takes for the Markov chain to reach a stationary state. The natural quantum extensions of these notions are density matrices and quantum channels. We set out to develop a general mathematical...... framework for studying quantum Markov chain mixing. We introduce two new distance measures into the quantum setting; the quantum $\\chi^2$-divergence and Hilbert's projective metric. With the help of these distance measures, we are able to derive some basic bounds on the the mixing times of quantum channels...

  6. Neural network training as a dissipative process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Marco; Maggini, Marco; Rossi, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    This paper analyzes the practical issues and reports some results on a theory in which learning is modeled as a continuous temporal process driven by laws describing the interactions of intelligent agents with their own environment. The classic regularization framework is paired with the idea of temporal manifolds by introducing the principle of least cognitive action, which is inspired by the related principle of mechanics. The introduction of the counterparts of the kinetic and potential energy leads to an interpretation of learning as a dissipative process. As an example, we apply the theory to supervised learning in neural networks and show that the corresponding Euler-Lagrange differential equations can be connected to the classic gradient descent algorithm on the supervised pairs. We give preliminary experiments to confirm the soundness of the theory. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Backreacted DBI magnetotransport with momentum dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremonini, Sera; Hoover, Anthony; Li, Li

    2017-10-01

    We examine magnetotransport in a holographic Dirac-Born-Infeld model, taking into account the effects of backreaction on the geometry. The theory we consider includes axionic scalars, introduced to break translational symmetry and generate momentum dissipation. The generic structure of the DC conductivity matrix for these theories is extremely rich, and is significantly more complex than that obtained in the probe approximation. We find new classes of black brane solutions, including geometries that exhibit Lifshitz scaling and hyperscaling violation, and examine their implications on the transport properties of the system. Depending on the choice of theory parameters, these backgrounds can lead to metallic or insulating behavior. Negative magnetoresistance is observed in a family of dynoic solutions. Some of the new backreacted geometries also support magnetic-field-induced metal-insulator transitions.

  8. Dissipational galaxy formation - Confrontation with observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, J.; Norman, C.

    1981-01-01

    An exploration is presented of the hypothesis that a protogalaxy consists of an aggregate of interacting gas clouds which undergo mergers with neighboring systems, as envisaged by both the hierarchical clustering and fragmentation schemes of galaxy formation. Both gaseous dissipation and violet relaxation play fundamental roles in this galaxy formation model, in order to account for such diverse structural and dynamical properties of spheroidal galaxies as velocity anisotropy and metallicity gradients. Protogalaxy mergers during the initial stages of galaxy clustering can account for the observed spatial distribution of spiral, S0, and elliptical galaxies, and galaxy formation can occur slowly and at late epochs, since the time scale for disk formation is less than about 10 to the 10th years.

  9. Facilitated spin models of dissipative quantum glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos, Beatriz; Lesanovsky, Igor; Garrahan, Juan P

    2012-07-13

    We introduce a class of dissipative quantum spin models with local interactions and without quenched disorder that show glassy behavior. These models are the quantum analogs of the classical facilitated spin models. Just like their classical counterparts, quantum facilitated models display complex glassy dynamics despite the fact that their stationary state is essentially trivial. In these systems, dynamical arrest is a consequence of kinetic constraints and not of static ordering. These models display a quantum version of dynamic heterogeneity: the dynamics toward relaxation is spatially correlated despite the absence of static correlations. Associated dynamical fluctuation phenomena such as decoupling of time scales is also observed. Moreover, we find that close to the classical limit, quantum fluctuations can enhance glassiness, as recently reported for quantum liquids.

  10. Quantum metrology in local dissipative environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Sheng; Chen, Chong; An, Jun-Hong

    2017-11-01

    Quantum metrology allows us to attain a measurement precision that surpasses the classically achievable limit by using quantum characters. The metrology precision is raised from the standard quantum limit (SQL) to the Heisenberg limit (HL) by using entanglement. However, it has been reported that the HL returns to the SQL in the presence of local dephasing environments under the long encoding-time condition. We evaluate here the exact impacts of local dissipative environments on quantum metrology, based on the Ramsey interferometer. It is found that the HL is asymptotically recovered under the long encoding-time condition for a finite number of the probe atoms. Our analysis reveals that this is essentially due to the formation of a bound state between each atom and its environment. This provides an avenue for experimentation to implement quantum metrology under practical conditions via the engineering of the formation of the system–environment bound state.

  11. Master integrals for the NNLO virtual corrections to μe scattering in QED: the planar graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrolia, Pierpaolo; Passera, Massimo; Primo, Amedeo; Schubert, Ulrich

    2017-11-01

    We evaluate the master integrals for the two-loop, planar box-diagrams contributing to the elastic scattering of muons and electrons at next-to-next-to leading-order in QED. We adopt the method of differential equations and the Magnus exponential series to determine a canonical set of integrals, finally expressed as a Taylor series around four space-time dimensions, with coefficients written as combination of generalised polylogarithms. The electron is treated as massless, while we retain full dependence on the muon mass. The considered integrals are also relevant for crossing-related processes, such as di-muon production at e + e --colliders, as well as for the QCD corrections to top-pair production at hadron colliders.

  12. High-precision QED calculations of the hyperfine structure in hydrogen and transition rates in multicharged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volotka, A.V.

    2006-07-01

    Studies of the hyperfine splitting in hydrogen are strongly motivated by the level of accuracy achieved in recent atomic physics experiments, which yield finally model-independent informations about nuclear structure parameters with utmost precision. Considering the current status of the determination of corrections to the hyperfine splitting of the ground state in hydrogen, this thesis provides further improved calculations by taking into account the most recent value for the proton charge radius. Comparing theoretical and experimental data of the hyperfine splitting in hydrogen the proton-size contribution is extracted and a relativistic formula for this contribution is derived in terms of moments of the nuclear charge and magnetization distributions. An iterative scheme for the determination of the Zemach and magnetic radii of the proton is proposed. As a result, the Zemach and magnetic radii are determined and the values are compared with the corresponding ones deduced from data obtained in electron-proton scattering experiments. The extraction of the Zemach radius from a rescaled difference between the hyperfine splitting in hydrogen and in muonium is considered as well. Investigations of forbidden radiative transitions in few-electron ions within ab initio QED provide a most sensitive tool for probing the influence of relativistic electron-correlation and QED corrections to the transition rates. Accordingly, a major part of this thesis is devoted to detailed studies of radiative and interelectronic-interaction effects to the transition probabilities. The renormalized expressions for the corresponding corrections in one- and twoelectron ions as well as for ions with one electron over closed shells are derived employing the two-time Green's function method. Numerical results for the correlation corrections to magnetic transition rates in He-like ions are presented. For the first time also the frequency-dependent contribution is calculated, which has to be

  13. Direct check of QED in e/sup +/e/sup -/ interactions at high q/sup 2/- values

    CERN Document Server

    Alles-Borelli, V; Bollini, D; Brunini, P L; Fiorentino, E; Massam, Thomas; Monari, L; Palmonari, F; Zichichi, A

    1972-01-01

    A study of 1824 e/sup +/e/sup -/ to e/sup +or-/e/sup -or+/ events in the total centre-of-mass energy range from 1.6 GeV to 2.0 GeV, allows one to establish that production angular distributions, acollinearity and acoplanarity distributions, and absolute value of the cross- sections and their energy-dependence, follow QED predictions including first-order radiative corrections. In particular, the absolute value of the cross-section and the power of its energy-dependence agree with theoretical expectations within +or-6% and +or-2%, respectively. The inadequacy of the peaking approximation in the experimental conditions of observations has been measured to be (2.8+or-0.4)%. (6 refs).

  14. Optically controllable molecular logic circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Takahiro, E-mail: t-nishimura@ist.osaka-u.ac.jp; Fujii, Ryo; Ogura, Yusuke; Tanida, Jun [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Osaka University, 1-5 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2015-07-06

    Molecular logic circuits represent a promising technology for observation and manipulation of biological systems at the molecular level. However, the implementation of molecular logic circuits for temporal and programmable operation remains challenging. In this paper, we demonstrate an optically controllable logic circuit that uses fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for signaling. The FRET-based signaling process is modulated by both molecular and optical inputs. Based on the distance dependence of FRET, the FRET pathways required to execute molecular logic operations are formed on a DNA nanostructure as a circuit based on its molecular inputs. In addition, the FRET pathways on the DNA nanostructure are controlled optically, using photoswitching fluorescent molecules to instruct the execution of the desired operation and the related timings. The behavior of the circuit can thus be controlled using external optical signals. As an example, a molecular logic circuit capable of executing two different logic operations was studied. The circuit contains functional DNAs and a DNA scaffold to construct two FRET routes for executing Input 1 AND Input 2 and Input 1 AND NOT Input 3 operations on molecular inputs. The circuit produced the correct outputs with all possible combinations of the inputs by following the light signals. Moreover, the operation execution timings were controlled based on light irradiation and the circuit responded to time-dependent inputs. The experimental results demonstrate that the circuit changes the output for the required operations following the input of temporal light signals.

  15. Amphetamine enhances endurance by increasing heat dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Ekaterina; Yoo, Yeonjoo; Behrouzvaziri, Abolhassan; Zaretskaia, Maria; Rusyniak, Daniel; Zaretsky, Dmitry; Molkov, Yaroslav

    2016-09-01

    Athletes use amphetamines to improve their performance through largely unknown mechanisms. Considering that body temperature is one of the major determinants of exhaustion during exercise, we investigated the influence of amphetamine on the thermoregulation. To explore this, we measured core body temperature and oxygen consumption of control and amphetamine-trea ted rats running on a treadmill with an incrementally increasing load (both speed and incline). Experimental results showed that rats treated with amphetamine (2 mg/kg) were able to run significantly longer than control rats. Due to a progressively increasing workload, which was matched by oxygen consumption, the control group exhibited a steady increase in the body temperature. The administration of amphetamine slowed down the temperature rise (thus decreasing core body temperature) in the beginning of the run without affecting oxygen consumption. In contrast, a lower dose of amphetamine (1 mg/kg) had no effect on measured parameters. Using a mathematical model describing temperature dynamics in two compartments (the core and the muscles), we were able to infer what physiological parameters were affected by amphetamine. Modeling revealed that amphetamine administration increases heat dissipation in the core. Furthermore, the model predicted that the muscle temperature at the end of the run in the amphetamine-treated group was significantly higher than in the control group. Therefore, we conclude that amphetamine may mask or delay fatigue by slowing down exercise-induced core body temperature growth by increasing heat dissipation. However, this affects the integrity of thermoregulatory system and may result in potentially dangerous overheating of the muscles. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  16. Scalar dissipation rate statistics in turbulent swirling jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetsyuk, V.; Soulopoulos, N.; Hardalupas, Y.; Taylor, A. M. K. P.

    2016-07-01

    The scalar dissipation rate statistics were measured in an isothermal flow formed by discharging a central jet in an annular stream of swirling air flow. This is a typical geometry used in swirl-stabilised burners, where the central jet is the fuel. The flow Reynolds number was 29 000, based on the area-averaged velocity of 8.46 m/s at the exit and the diameter of 50.8 mm. The scalar dissipation rate and its statistics were computed from two-dimensional imaging of the mixture fraction fields obtained with planar laser induced fluorescence of acetone. Three swirl numbers, S, of 0.3, 0.58, and 1.07 of the annular swirling stream were considered. The influence of the swirl number on scalar mixing, unconditional, and conditional scalar dissipation rate statistics were quantified. A procedure, based on a Wiener filter approach, was used to de-noise the raw mixture fraction images. The filtering errors on the scalar dissipation rate measurements were up to 15%, depending on downstream positions from the burner exit. The maximum of instantaneous scalar dissipation rate was found to be up to 35 s-1, while the mean dissipation rate was 10 times smaller. The probability density functions of the logarithm of the scalar dissipation rate fluctuations were found to be slightly negatively skewed at low swirl numbers and almost symmetrical when the swirl number increased. The assumption of statistical independence between the scalar and its dissipation rate was valid for higher swirl numbers at locations with low scalar fluctuations and less valid for low swirl numbers. The deviations from the assumption of statistical independence were quantified. The conditional mean of the scalar dissipation rate, the standard deviation of the scalar dissipation rate fluctuations, the weighted probability of occurrence of the mean conditional scalar dissipation rate, and the conditional probability are reported.

  17. On Demand Internal Short Circuit Device Enables Verification of Safer, Higher Performing Battery Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darcy, Eric; Keyser, Matthew

    2017-05-15

    The Internal Short Circuit (ISC) device enables critical battery safety verification. With the aluminum interstitial heat sink between the cells, normal trigger cells cannot be driven into thermal runaway without excessive temperature bias of adjacent cells. With an implantable, on-demand ISC device, thermal runaway tests show that the conductive heat sinks protected adjacent cells from propagation. High heat dissipation and structural support of Al heat sinks show high promise for safer, higher performing batteries.

  18. Noise in biological circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Michael L; Cox, Chris D; Allen, Michael S; McCollum, James M; Dar, Roy D; Karig, David K; Cooke, John F

    2009-01-01

    Noise biology focuses on the sources, processing, and biological consequences of the inherent stochastic fluctuations in molecular transitions or interactions that control cellular behavior. These fluctuations are especially pronounced in small systems where the magnitudes of the fluctuations approach or exceed the mean value of the molecular population. Noise biology is an essential component of nanomedicine where the communication of information is across a boundary that separates small synthetic and biological systems that are bound by their size to reside in environments of large fluctuations. Here we review the fundamentals of the computational, analytical, and experimental approaches to noise biology. We review results that show that the competition between the benefits of low noise and those of low population has resulted in the evolution of genetic system architectures that produce an uneven distribution of stochasticity across the molecular components of cells and, in some cases, use noise to drive biological function. We review the exact and approximate approaches to gene circuit noise analysis and simulation, and review many of the key experimental results obtained using flow cytometry and time-lapse fluorescent microscopy. In addition, we consider the probative value of noise with a discussion of using measured noise properties to elucidate the structure and function of the underlying gene circuit. We conclude with a discussion of the frontiers of and significant future challenges for noise biology. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  19. Arithmetic circuits for DSP applications

    CERN Document Server

    Stouraitis, Thanos

    2017-01-01

    Arithmetic Circuits for DSP Applications is a complete resource on arithmetic circuits for digital signal processing (DSP). It covers the key concepts, designs and developments of different types of arithmetic circuits, which can be used for improving the efficiency of implementation of a multitude of DSP applications. Each chapter includes various applications of the respective class of arithmetic circuits along with information on the future scope of research. Written for students, engineers, and researchers in electrical and computer engineering, this comprehensive text offers a clear understanding of different types of arithmetic circuits used for digital signal processing applications. The text includes contributions from noted researchers on a wide range of topics, including a review o circuits used in implementing basic operations like additions and multiplications; distributed arithmetic as a technique for the multiplier-less implementation of inner products for DSP applications; discussions on look ...

  20. Integrated circuit cooled turbine blade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Um, Jae Y.; Holloman, Harry; Koester, Steven

    2017-08-29

    A turbine rotor blade includes at least two integrated cooling circuits that are formed within the blade that include a leading edge circuit having a first cavity and a second cavity and a trailing edge circuit that includes at least a third cavity located aft of the second cavity. The trailing edge circuit flows aft with at least two substantially 180-degree turns at the tip end and the root end of the blade providing at least a penultimate cavity and a last cavity. The last cavity is located along a trailing edge of the blade. A tip axial cooling channel connects to the first cavity of the leading edge circuit and the penultimate cavity of the trailing edge circuit. At least one crossover hole connects the penultimate cavity to the last cavity substantially near the tip end of the blade.

  1. Automated Design of Quantum Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Colin P.; Gray, Alexander G.

    2000-01-01

    In order to design a quantum circuit that performs a desired quantum computation, it is necessary to find a decomposition of the unitary matrix that represents that computation in terms of a sequence of quantum gate operations. To date, such designs have either been found by hand or by exhaustive enumeration of all possible circuit topologies. In this paper we propose an automated approach to quantum circuit design using search heuristics based on principles abstracted from evolutionary genetics, i.e. using a genetic programming algorithm adapted specially for this problem. We demonstrate the method on the task of discovering quantum circuit designs for quantum teleportation. We show that to find a given known circuit design (one which was hand-crafted by a human), the method considers roughly an order of magnitude fewer designs than naive enumeration. In addition, the method finds novel circuit designs superior to those previously known.

  2. Luminaries-level structure improvement of LEDs for heat dissipation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Heat dissipation enhancement of LED luminaries is of great significance to the large-scale application of LED. Luminaries-level structure improvement by the method of boring through-hole is adopted to intensify heat dissipation. Furthermore, the natural convection heat transfer process of LED luminaries is simulated by ...

  3. Marine Fouling and Thermal Dissipation of Undersea Wireless Power Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Energy Harvesting thermal dissipation marine fouling high-power coil undersea wireless power transfer...should be a priority when implementing a high-power WPT system for unmanned underwater vehicles (UUVs). Coils must be carefully designed to dissipate...require precision mating for the transfer of electrical energy . For the electrical socket configuration, any physical misalignments can lead to

  4. Quantum dissipative effect of one dimension coupled anharmonic oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sulaiman, A. [Badan Pengkajian dan Penerapan Teknologi, BPPT Bld. II (19thfloor), Jl. M.H. Thamrin 8, Jakarta 10340 (Indonesia); Indonesia Center for Theoretical and Mathematical Physics (ICTMP), Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Zen, Freddy P. [Theoretical Physics Laboratory (THEPI), Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Indonesia Center for Theoretical and Mathematical Physics (ICTMP), Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

    2015-04-16

    Quantum dissipative effect of one dimension coupled anharmonic oscillator is investigated. The systems are two coupled harmonic oscillator with the different masses. The dissipative effect is studied based on the quantum state diffusion formalism. The result show that the anharmonic effect increase the amplitude but the lifetime of the oscillation depend on the damping coefficient and do not depend on the temperature.

  5. Common Origin of Quantum Regression and Quantum Fluctuation Dissipation Theorems

    OpenAIRE

    Shiktorov, P.; Starikov, E.; Gruzinskis, V.; Reggiani, L.; L. Varani; Vaissiere, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    It is shown that the quantum fluctuation dissipation theorem can be considered as a mathematical formulation in the spectral representation of Onsager hypothesis on the regression of fluctuations in physical systems. It is shown that the quantum fluctuation dissipation theorem can be generalized to an arbitrary stationary state.

  6. 30 CFR 57.6602 - Static electricity dissipation during loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static electricity dissipation during loading... MINES Explosives Extraneous Electricity-Surface and Underground § 57.6602 Static electricity dissipation... generates a static electricity hazard— (a) An evaluation of the potential static electricity hazard shall be...

  7. 30 CFR 56.6602 - Static electricity dissipation during loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Static electricity dissipation during loading... Explosives Extraneous Electricity § 56.6602 Static electricity dissipation during loading. When explosive material is loaded pneumatically into a blasthole in a manner that generates a static electricity hazard...

  8. Dissipation and spontaneous symmetry breaking in brain dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Freeman, Walter J

    2008-01-01

    We compare the predictions of the dissipative quantum model of brain with neurophysiological data collected from electroencephalograms resulting from high-density arrays fixed on the surfaces of primary sensory and limbic areas of trained rabbits and cats. Functional brain imaging in relation to behavior reveals the formation of coherent domains of synchronized neuronal oscillatory activity and phase transitions predicted by the dissipative model.

  9. Intermittency, coherent structures and dissipation in plasma turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, M. [Department of Mechanics and Aerospace Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, Shenzhen, Guangdong 518055 (China); Matthaeus, W. H.; Parashar, T. N.; Wu, P. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Roytershteyn, V. [Space Science Institute, Boulder, Colorado 80301 (United States); Karimabadi, H. [12837 Caminito del Canto, Del Mar, California 92014 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    Collisionless dissipation in turbulent plasmas such as the solar wind and the solar corona has been an intensively studied subject recently, with new insights often emerging from numerical simulation. Here we report results from high resolution, fully kinetic simulations of plasma turbulence in both two (2D) and three (3D) dimensions, studying the relationship between intermittency and dissipation. The simulations show development of turbulent coherent structures, characterized by sheet-like current density structures spanning a range of scales. An approximate dissipation measure is employed, based on work done by the electromagnetic field in the local electron fluid frame. This surrogate dissipation measure is highly concentrated in small subvolumes in both 2D and 3D simulations. Fully kinetic simulations are also compared with magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulations in terms of coherent structures and dissipation. The interesting result emerges that the conditional averages of dissipation measure scale very similarly with normalized current density J in 2D and 3D particle-in-cell and in MHD. To the extent that the surrogate dissipation measure is accurate, this result implies that on average dissipation scales as ∼J{sup 2} in turbulent kinetic plasma. Multifractal intermittency is seen in the inertial range in both 2D and 3D, but at scales ∼ion inertial length, the scaling is closer to monofractal.

  10. Estimating half-lives for pesticide dissipation from plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantke, Peter; Gillespie, Brenda W; Juraske, Ronnie; Jolliet, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Pesticide risk and impact assessment models critically rely on and are sensitive to information describing dissipation from plants. Despite recent progress, experimental data are not available for all relevant pesticide-plant combinations, and currently no model predicting plant dissipation accounts for the influence of substance properties, plant characteristics, temperature, and study conditions. In this study, we propose models to estimate half-lives for pesticide dissipation from plants and provide recommendations for how to use our results. On the basis of fitting experimental dissipation data with reported average air temperatures, we estimated a reaction activation energy of 14.25 kJ/mol and a temperature coefficient Q10 of 1.22 to correct dissipation from plants for the influence of temperature. We calculated a set of dissipation half-lives for 333 substances applied at 20 °C under field conditions. Half-lives range from 0.2 days for pyrethrins to 31 days for dalapon. Parameter estimates are provided to correct for specific plant species, temperatures, and study conditions. Finally, we propose a predictive regression model for pesticides without available measured dissipation data to estimate half-lives based on substance properties at the level of chemical substance class. Estimated half-lives from our study are designed to be applied in risk and impact assessment models to either directly describe dissipation or as first proxy for describing degradation.

  11. Dissipative quantum trajectories in complex space: Damped harmonic oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chia-Chun

    2016-10-01

    Dissipative quantum trajectories in complex space are investigated in the framework of the logarithmic nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The logarithmic nonlinear Schrödinger equation provides a phenomenological description for dissipative quantum systems. Substituting the wave function expressed in terms of the complex action into the complex-extended logarithmic nonlinear Schrödinger equation, we derive the complex quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation including the dissipative potential. It is shown that dissipative quantum trajectories satisfy a quantum Newtonian equation of motion in complex space with a friction force. Exact dissipative complex quantum trajectories are analyzed for the wave and solitonlike solutions to the logarithmic nonlinear Schrödinger equation for the damped harmonic oscillator. These trajectories converge to the equilibrium position as time evolves. It is indicated that dissipative complex quantum trajectories for the wave and solitonlike solutions are identical to dissipative complex classical trajectories for the damped harmonic oscillator. This study develops a theoretical framework for dissipative quantum trajectories in complex space.

  12. Influence of nuclear dissipation on fission dynamics of the excited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-05-31

    May 31, 2016 ... The magnitude of nuclear dissipation is one of the most interesting and challenging problems in nuclear physics, particularly in low and intermediate energy regions of heavy ion physics. At present, there are sev- eral models for dissipation but they give dependences which are very different from each other ...

  13. DESIGN OF A LOW-POWER AND HIGH THROUGHPUT ERROR DETECTION AND CORRECTION CIRCUIT USING THE 4T EX-OR METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. KAVITHA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an efficient implementation of an error correction circuit based on single error detection and correction with check bit pre-computation. The core component of the proposed 4-bit EX-OR circuit was designed using the CMOS cascade method. This paper presents a 4-input EX-OR gate that was developed from a 2-input EX-OR gate using the bit slice method. The proposed architecture retains the modified Error Correction Code (ECC circuit. The proposed 4-input EX-OR gate and its auxiliary components such as AND, MUX and D Flip-Flop were schematized using the DSCH tool and the layouts was analysed using the BSIM4 analyser. The simulation results were obtained and compared with the performance of existing circuits. LVS verification was performed on the modified ECC circuit at CMOS 70 nm feature size and its corresponding voltage of 0.7V. The modified ECC circuit simulation results were analysed and compared with the performance of existing circuits in terms of propagation delay, power dissipation, area, latency, and throughput. The proposed ECC circuit showed an improved performance with existing circuit low power dissipation (94.41% and high throughput (95.20%.

  14. Comparison of ATLOG and Xyce for Bell Labs Electromagnetic Pulse Excitation of Finite-Long Dissipative Conductors over a Ground Plane.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    campione, Salvatore [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Warne, Larry K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schiek, Richard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Basilio, Lorena I. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report details the modeling results for the response of a finite-length dissipative conductor interacting with a conducting ground to the Bell Labs electromagnetic pulse excitation. We use both a frequency-domain and a time-domain method based on transmission line theory through a code we call ATLOG - Analytic Transmission Line Over Ground. Results are compared to the circuit simulator Xyce for selected cases. Intentionally Left Blank

  15. Dissipation gradients of phenanthrene and pyrene in the Rice rhizosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Y.; Wu, S.C.; Yu, X.Z. [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences and Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Wong, M.H., E-mail: mhwong@hkbu.edu.h [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences and Department of Biology, Hong Kong Baptist University, Kowloon Tong (Hong Kong); Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China)

    2010-08-15

    An experiment was conducted to reveal the effects of rice cultivation as well as polycyclic aromatic carbohydrates (PAHs) degrading bacterium (Acinetobacter sp.) on the dissipation gradients of two PAHs (PHE and PYR) in the rhizosphere. The results showed that the presence of rice root and bacteria significantly accelerated the dissipation rate of PHE and PYR. The root exudates contributed to the formation of dissipation gradients of PHE and PYR along the vertical direction of roots, with a higher dissipation rate in the rhizosphere and near rhizosphere zone than the soil far away the rhizosphere. - The formation of dissipation gradients of PAHs were attributed to the presence of rice root and the degrading bacteria in paddy soil.

  16. Manipulating scattering of ultracold atoms with light-induced dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail eLemeshko

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently it has been shown that pairs of atoms can form metastable bonds due to non-conservative forces induced by dissipation [Lemeshko&Weimer, Nature Comm. textbf{4}, 2230 (2013]. Here we study the dynamics of interaction-induced coherent population trapping -- the process responsible for the formation of dissipatively bound molecules. We derive the effective dissipative potentials induced between ultracold atoms by laser light, and study the time evolution of the scattering states. We demonstrate that binding occurs on short timescales of $sim10~mu$s, even if the initial kinetic energy of the atoms significantly exceeds the depth of the dissipative potential. Dissipatively-bound molecules with preordained bond lengths and vibrational wavefunctions can be created and detected in current experiments with ultracold atoms.

  17. Synthetic biology: integrated gene circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandagopal, Nagarajan; Elowitz, Michael B

    2011-09-02

    A major goal of synthetic biology is to develop a deeper understanding of biological design principles from the bottom up, by building circuits and studying their behavior in cells. Investigators initially sought to design circuits "from scratch" that functioned as independently as possible from the underlying cellular system. More recently, researchers have begun to develop a new generation of synthetic circuits that integrate more closely with endogenous cellular processes. These approaches are providing fundamental insights into the regulatory architecture, dynamics, and evolution of genetic circuits and enabling new levels of control across diverse biological systems.

  18. Unstable oscillators based hyperchaotic circuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murali, K.; Tamasevicius, A.; G. Mykolaitis, A.

    1999-01-01

    A simple 4th order hyperchaotic circuit with unstable oscillators is described. The circuit contains two negative impedance converters, two inductors, two capacitors, a linear resistor and a diode. The Lyapunov exponents are presented to confirm hyperchaotic nature of the oscillations in the circ......A simple 4th order hyperchaotic circuit with unstable oscillators is described. The circuit contains two negative impedance converters, two inductors, two capacitors, a linear resistor and a diode. The Lyapunov exponents are presented to confirm hyperchaotic nature of the oscillations...

  19. Electromagnetic Pulse Excitation of Finite-Long Dissipative Conductors over a Conducting Ground Plane in the Time Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campione, Salvatore [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Warne, Larry K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schiek, Richard [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Basilio, Lorena I. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    This report details the modeling results for the response of a finite-length dissipative conductor interacting with a conducting ground to a hypothetical nuclear device with the same output energy spectrum as the Fat Man device. We use a time-domain method based on transmission line theory that allows accounting for time-varying air conductivities. We implemented such method in a code we call ATLOG - Analytic Transmission Line Over Ground. Results are compared the frequency-domain version of ATLOG previously developed and to the circuit simulator Xyce in some instances. Intentionally Left Blank

  20. Viscous Dissipation and Criticality of Subducting Slabs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Mike; Karato, Shun; Yuen, Dave

    2016-04-01

    Rheology of subducting lithosphere appears to be complicated. In the shallow part, deformation is largely accomodated by brittle failure, whereas at greater depth, at higher confining pressures, ductile creep is expected to control slab strength. The amount of viscous dissipation ΔQ during subduction at greater depth, as constrained by experimental rock mechanics, can be estimated on the basis of a simple bending moment equation [1,2] 2ɛ˙0(z) ∫ +h/2 2 M (z) = h ṡ -h/2 4μ(y,z)y dy , (1) for a complex multi-phase rheology in the mantle transition zone, including the effects of a metastable phase transition as well as the pressure, temperature, grain-size and stress dependency of the relevant creep mechanisms; μ is here the effective viscosity and ɛ˙0(z) is a (reference) strain rate. Numerical analysis shows that the maximum bending moment, Mcrit, that can be sustained by a slab is of the order of 1019 Nm per m according to Mcrit˜=σp ∗h2/4, where σp is the Peierl's stress limit of slab materials and h is the slab thickness. Near Mcrit, the amount of viscous dissipation grows strongly as a consequence of a lattice instability of mantle minerals (dislocation glide in olivine), suggesting that thermo-mechanical instabilities become prone to occur at places where a critical shear-heating rate is exceeded, see figure. This implies that the lithosphere behaves in such cases like a perfectly plastic solid [3]. Recently available detailed data related to deep seismicity [4,5] seems to provide support to our conclusion. It shows, e.g., that thermal shear instabilities, and not transformational faulting, is likely the dominating mechanism for deep-focus earthquakes at the bottom of the transition zone, in accordance with this suggested "deep criticality" model. These new findings are therefore briefly outlined and possible implications are discussed. References [1] Riedel, M. R., Karato, S., Yuen, D. A. Criticality of Subducting Slabs. University of Minnesota

  1. Memristor Circuits and Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Zidan, Mohammed A.

    2015-05-01

    Current CMOS-based technologies are facing design challenges related to the continuous scaling down of the minimum feature size, according to Moore’s law. Moreover, conventional computing architecture is no longer an effective way of fulfilling modern applications demands, such as big data analysis, pattern recognition, and vector processing. Therefore, there is an exigent need to shift to new technologies, at both the architecture and the device levels. Recently, memristor devices and structures attracted attention for being promising candidates for this job. Memristor device adds a new dimension for designing novel circuits and systems. In addition, high-density memristor-based crossbar is widely considered to be the essential element for future memory and bio-inspired computing systems. However, numerous challenges need to be addressed before the memristor genuinely replaces current memory and computing technologies, which is the motivation behind this research effort. In order to address the technology challenges, we begin by fabricating and modeling the memristor device. The devices fabricated at our local clean room enriched our understanding of the memristive phenomenon and enabled the experimental testing for our memristor-based circuits. Moreover, our proposed mathematical modeling for memristor behavior is an essential element for the theoretical circuit design stage. Designing and addressing the challenges of memristor systems with practical complexity, however, requires an extra step, which takes the form of a reliable and modular simulation platform. We, therefore, built a new simulation platform for the resistive crossbar, which can simulate realistic size arrays filled with real memory data. In addition, this simulation platform includes various crossbar nonidealities in order to obtain accurate simulation results. Consequently, we were able to address the significant challenges facing the high density memristor crossbar, as the building block for

  2. A dishwasher for circuits

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2014-01-01

    You have always been told that electronic devices fear water. However, at the Surface Mount Devices (SMD) Workshop here at CERN all the electronic assemblies are cleaned with a machine that looks like a… dishwasher.   The circuit dishwasher. Credit: Clara Nellist.  If you think the image above shows a dishwasher, you wouldn’t be completely wrong. Apart from the fact that the whole pumping system and the case itself are made entirely from stainless steel and chemical resistant materials, and the fact that it washes electrical boards instead of dishes… it works exactly like a dishwasher. It’s a professional machine (mainly used in the pharmaceutical industry) designed to clean everything that can be washed with a water-based chemical soap. This type of treatment increases the lifetime of the electronic boards and therefore the LHC's reliability by preventing corrosion problems in the severe radiation and ozone environment of the LHC tunn...

  3. Modeling cortical circuits.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer, Brandon Robinson; Rothganger, Fredrick H.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Xavier, Patrick Gordon

    2010-09-01

    The neocortex is perhaps the highest region of the human brain, where audio and visual perception takes place along with many important cognitive functions. An important research goal is to describe the mechanisms implemented by the neocortex. There is an apparent regularity in the structure of the neocortex [Brodmann 1909, Mountcastle 1957] which may help simplify this task. The work reported here addresses the problem of how to describe the putative repeated units ('cortical circuits') in a manner that is easily understood and manipulated, with the long-term goal of developing a mathematical and algorithmic description of their function. The approach is to reduce each algorithm to an enhanced perceptron-like structure and describe its computation using difference equations. We organize this algorithmic processing into larger structures based on physiological observations, and implement key modeling concepts in software which runs on parallel computing hardware.

  4. Basic electronic circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Buckley, P M

    1980-01-01

    In the past, the teaching of electricity and electronics has more often than not been carried out from a theoretical and often highly academic standpoint. Fundamentals and basic concepts have often been presented with no indication of their practical appli­ cations, and all too frequently they have been illustrated by artificially contrived laboratory experiments bearing little relationship to the outside world. The course comes in the form of fourteen fairly open-ended constructional experiments or projects. Each experiment has associated with it a construction exercise and an explanation. The basic idea behind this dual presentation is that the student can embark on each circuit following only the briefest possible instructions and that an open-ended approach is thereby not prejudiced by an initial lengthy encounter with the theory behind the project; this being a sure way to dampen enthusiasm at the outset. As the investigation progresses, questions inevitably arise. Descriptions of the phenomena encounte...

  5. Five lowest S1 states of the Be atom calculated with a finite-nuclear-mass approach and with relativistic and QED corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanke, Monika; Komasa, Jacek; Bubin, Sergiy; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2009-08-01

    We have performed very accurate quantum mechanical calculations of the five lowest S states of the beryllium atom. In the nonrelativistic part of the calculations we used the variational method and we explicitly included the nuclear motion in the Schrödinger equation. The nonrelativistic wave functions of the five states were expanded in terms of explicitly correlated Gaussian functions. These wave functions were used to calculate the leading α2 relativistic correction ( α is the fine structure constant) and the α3 quantum electrodynamics (QED) correction. We also estimated the α4 QED correction by calculating its dominant component. A comparison of the experimental transition frequencies with the frequencies obtained based on the energies calculated in this work shows an excellent agreement.

  6. Leading-order hadronic contributions to a{sub {mu}} and {alpha}{sub QED} from N{sub f}=2+1+1 twisted mass fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xu [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Hotzel, Grit [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Jansen, Karl [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Petschlies, Marcus [The Cyprus Institute, Nicosia (Cyprus); Renner, Dru B. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2012-11-15

    We present the first four-flavour lattice calculation of the leading-order hadronic vacuum-polarisation contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, a{sup hvp}{sub {mu}}, and the hadronic running of the QED coupling constant, {Delta}{alpha}{sup hvp}{sub QED}(Q{sup 2}). In the heavy sector a mixed-action setup is employed. The bare quark masses are determined from matching the K- and D-meson masses to their physical values. Several light quark masses are used in order to yield a controlled extrapolation to the physical pion mass by utilising a recently proposed improved method. We demonstrate that this method also works in the four-flavour case.

  7. Leading-order hadronic contributions to a{sub μ} and α{sub QED} from N{sub f}=2+1+1 twisted mass fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xu [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba (Japan); Hotzel, Grit [Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Institut fuer Physik, Berlin (Germany); Jansen, Karl [NIC, DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Petschlies, Marcus [The Cyprus Institute, Nicosia (Cyprus); Renner, Dru [Jefferson Lab, Newport News (United States)

    2013-07-01

    We present the first four-flavour lattice calculation of the leading-order hadronic vacuum-polarisation contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, a{sub μ}{sup hvp}, and the hadronic running of the QED coupling constant, Δ α{sub QED}{sup hvp} (Q{sup 2}). In the heavy sector a mixed-action setup is employed. The bare quark masses are determined from matching the K- and D-meson masses to their physical values. Several light quark masses are used in order to yield a controlled extrapolation to the physical pion mass by utilising a recently proposed improved method. We demonstrate that this method also works in the four-flavour case.

  8. Leading-order hadronic contributions to a_{\\mu} and \\alpha_{QED} from N_f=2+1+1 twisted mass fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, Xu; Jansen, Karl; Petschlies, Marcus; Renner, Dru B

    2012-01-01

    We present the first four-flavour lattice calculation of the leading-order hadronic vacuum-polarisation contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, a_{\\mu}^{hvp}, and the hadronic running of the QED coupling constant, \\Delta \\alpha_{QED}^{hvp} (Q^2). In the heavy sector a mixed-action setup is employed. The bare quark masses are determined from matching the K- and D-meson masses to their physical values. Several light quark masses are used in order to yield a controlled extrapolation to the physical pion mass by utilising a recently proposed improved method. We demonstrate that this method also works in the four-flavour case.

  9. Leading order hadronic contributions to a{sub {mu}} and {alpha}{sub QED} from N{sub f} = 2 + 1 + 1 twisted mass fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Feng, Grit Hotzel, Karl Jansen, Marcus Petschlies, Dru B. Renner

    2012-12-01

    We present the first four-flavour lattice calculation of the leading-order hadronic vacuum polarisation contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, a{sub {mu}}{sup hvp}, and the hadronic running of the QED coupling constant, {Delta}{alpha}{sup hvp}{sub QED}(Q{sup 2}). In the heavy sector a mixed-action setup is employed. The bare quark masses are determined from matching the K- and D-meson masses to their physical values. Several light quark masses are used in order to yield a controlled extrapolation to the physical pion mass by utilising a recently proposed improved method. We demonstrate that this method also works in the four-flavour case.

  10. Convex Sobolev Inequalities Derived from Entropy Dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthes, Daniel; Jüngel, Ansgar; Toscani, Giuseppe

    2011-02-01

    We study families of convex Sobolev inequalities, which arise as entropy-dissipation relations for certain linear Fokker-Planck equations. Extending the ideas recently developed by the first two authors, a refinement of the Bakry-Émery method is established, which allows us to prove non-trivial inequalities even in situations where the classical Bakry-Émery criterion fails. The main application of our theory concerns the linearized fast diffusion equation in dimensions d ≧ 1, which admits a Poincaré, but no logarithmic Sobolev inequality. We calculate bounds on the constants in the interpolating convex Sobolev inequalities, and prove that these bounds are sharp on a specified range. In dimension d = 1, our estimates improve the corresponding results that can be obtained by the measure-theoretic techniques of Barthe and Roberto. As a by-product, we give a short and elementary alternative proof of the sharp spectral gap inequality first obtained by Denzler and McCann. In further applications of our method, we prove convex Sobolev inequalities for a mean field model for the redistribution of wealth in a simple market economy, and the Lasota model for blood cell production.

  11. Nonlocal dynamics of dissipative phononic fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Navid; Lee, Yoonkyung E.; Lafarge, Denis; Duclos, Aroune; Fang, Nicholas

    2017-06-01

    We describe the nonlocal effective properties of a two-dimensional dissipative phononic crystal made by periodic arrays of rigid and motionless cylinders embedded in a viscothermal fluid such as air. The description is based on a nonlocal theory of sound propagation in stationary random fluid/rigid media that was proposed by Lafarge and Nemati [Wave Motion 50, 1016 (2013), 10.1016/j.wavemoti.2013.04.007]. This scheme arises from a deep analogy with electromagnetism and a set of physics-based postulates including, particularly, the action-response procedures, whereby the effective density and bulk modulus are determined. Here, we revisit this approach, and clarify further its founding physical principles through presenting it in a unified formulation together with the two-scale asymptotic homogenization theory that is interpreted as the local limit. Strong evidence is provided to show that the validity of the principles and postulates within the nonlocal theory extends to high-frequency bands, well beyond the long-wavelength regime. In particular, we demonstrate that up to the third Brillouin zone including the Bragg scattering, the complex and dispersive phase velocity of the least-attenuated wave in the phononic crystal which is generated by our nonlocal scheme agrees exactly with that reproduced by a direct approach based on the Bloch theorem and multiple scattering method. In high frequencies, the effective wave and its associated parameters are analyzed by treating the phononic crystal as a random medium.

  12. Soap film vibration: origin of the dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharige, Sébastien Kosgodagan; Elias, Florence; Derec, Caroline

    2014-11-07

    We investigate the complex dispersion relationship of a transverse antisymmetric wave on a horizontal soap film. Experimentally, the complex wave number k at a fixed forcing frequency is determined by measuring the vibrating amplitude of the soap film: the wavelength (linked to the real part of k) is determined by the spatial variation of the amplitude; the decay length (linked to the imaginary part of k) is determined by analyzing the resonance curves of the vibrating wave as a function of frequency. Theoretically, we compute the complex dispersion relationship taking into account the physical properties of the bulk liquid and gas phase, and of the gas-liquid interfaces. The comparison between the computation (developed to the leading order under our experimental conditions) and the experimental results confirms that the phase velocity is fixed by the interplay between surface tension, and liquid and air inertia, as reported in previous studies. Moreover, we show that the attenuation of the transverse antisymmetric wave originates from the viscous dissipation in the gas phase surrounding the liquid film. This result is an important step in understanding the propagation of an acoustic wave in liquid foam, using a bottom-up approach.

  13. Constraints on dissipative unified dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velten, Hermano [Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Av. Fernando Ferrari, Goiabeiras, Vitória (Brazil); Schwarz, Dominik J., E-mail: velten@physik.uni-bielefeld.de, E-mail: dschwarz@physik.uni-bielefeld.de [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Bielefeld, Postfach 100131, 33501 Bielefeld (Germany)

    2011-09-01

    Modern cosmology suggests that the Universe contains two dark components — dark matter and dark energy — both unkown in laboratory physics and both lacking direct evidence. Alternatively, a unified dark sector, described by a single fluid, has been proposed. Dissipation is a common phenomenon in nature and it thus seems natural to consider models dominated by a viscous dark fluid. We focus on the study of bulk viscosity, as isotropy and homogeneity at large scales implies the suppression of shear viscosity, heat flow and diffusion. The generic ansatz ξ∝ρ{sup ν} for the coefficient of bulk viscosity (ρ denotes the mass/energy density), which for ν = −1/2 mimics the ΛCDM background evolution, offers excellent fits to supernova and H(z) data. We show that viscous dark fluids suffer from large contributions to the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect (generalising a previous study by Li and Barrow) and a suppression of structure growth at small-scales (as seen from a generalized Meszaros equation). Based on recent observations, we conclude that viscous dark fluid models (with ξ∝ρ{sup ν} and neglecting baryons) are strongly challenged.

  14. Energy dissipation of rockfalls by coppice structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ciabocco

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to develop elements to improve understanding of the behaviour of a coppice in relation to the phenomenon of falling boulders. The first section proposes an amendment to the equation for calculating the index which describes the probability of impact between a rock and plants in managed coppice forests. A study was carried out, using models to calculate the kinetic energy of a falling boulder along a slope considering the kinetic energy dissipated during the impact with the structure of forest plants managed by coppice. The output of the simulation models were then compared with the real dynamics of falling boulders in field tests using digital video.

    It emerged from an analysis of the results of this comparison that a modification to the 1989 Gsteiger equation was required, in order to calculate the "Average Distance between Contacts" (ADC. To this purpose, the concept of "Structure of Interception", proposed in this paper, was developed, valid as a first approach for describing the differences in the spatial distribution of stems between coppice and forest. This study also aims to provide suggestions for forestry management, in order to maintain or increase the protective capacity of a coppice managed with conventional techniques for the area studied, modifying the dendrometric characteristics.

  15. New Applications of Resummation in Non-Abelian Gauge Theories: QED X QCD Exponentiation for LHC Physics, IR-Improved DGLAP Theory and Resummed Quantum Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, B F L

    2006-01-01

    We present the elements of three applications of resummation methods in non-Abelian gauge theories: (1), QED X QCD exponentiation and shower/ME matching for LHC physics; (2), IR improvement of DGLAP theory; (3), resummed quantum gravity and the final state of Hawking radiation. In all cases, the extension of the YFS approach, originally introduced for Abelian gauge theory, to non-Abelian gauge theories, QCD and quantum general relativity, leads to new results and solutions which we briefly summarize.

  16. The radiative potential method for calculations of QED radiative corrections to energy levels and electromagnetic amplitudes in many-electron atoms

    OpenAIRE

    Flambaum, V. V.; Ginges, J. S. M.

    2005-01-01

    We derive an approximate expression for a "radiative potential" which can be used to calculate QED strong Coulomb field radiative corrections to energies and electric dipole (E1) transition amplitudes in many-electron atoms with an accuracy of a few percent. The expectation value of the radiative potential gives radiative corrections to the energies. Radiative corrections to E1 amplitudes can be expressed in terms of the radiative potential and its energy derivative (the low-energy theorem): ...

  17. Digital circuits using universal logic gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Sterling R. (Inventor); Miles, Lowell H. (Inventor); Cameron, Eric G. (Inventor); Donohoe, Gregory W. (Inventor); Gambles, Jody W. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    According to the invention, a digital circuit design embodied in at least one of a structural netlist, a behavioral netlist, a hardware description language netlist, a full-custom ASIC, a semi-custom ASIC, an IP core, an integrated circuit, a hybrid of chips, one or more masks, a FPGA, and a circuit card assembly is disclosed. The digital circuit design includes first and second sub-circuits. The first sub-circuits comprise a first percentage of the digital circuit design and the second sub-circuits comprise a second percentage of the digital circuit design. Each of the second sub-circuits is substantially comprised of one or more kernel circuits. The kernel circuits are comprised of selection circuits. The second percentage is at least 5%. In various embodiments, the second percentage could be at least 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, 60%, 70%, 80%, 90%, or 95%.

  18. Enhancement of Linear Circuit Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunholt, Hans; Dabu, Mihaela; Beldiman, Octavian

    1996-01-01

    In this report a preliminary user friendly interface has been added to the LCP2 program making it possible to describe an electronic circuit by actually drawing the circuit on the screen. Component values and other options and parameters can easily be set by the aid of the interface. The interface...

  19. Compact Circuit Preprocesses Accelerometer Output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Compact electronic circuit transfers dc power to, and preprocesses ac output of, accelerometer and associated preamplifier. Incorporated into accelerometer case during initial fabrication or retrofit onto commercial accelerometer. Made of commercial integrated circuits and other conventional components; made smaller by use of micrologic and surface-mount technology.

  20. Comminution circuits for compact itabirites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Ferreira Pinto

    Full Text Available Abstract In the beneficiation of compact Itabirites, crushing and grinding account for major operational and capital costs. As such, the study and development of comminution circuits have a fundamental importance for feasibility and optimization of compact Itabirite beneficiation. This work makes a comparison between comminution circuits for compact Itabirites from the Iron Quadrangle. The circuits developed are: a crushing and ball mill circuit (CB, a SAG mill and ball mill circuit (SAB and a single stage SAG mill circuit (SSSAG. For the SAB circuit, the use of pebble crushing is analyzed (SABC. An industrial circuit for 25 million tons of run of mine was developed for each route from tests on a pilot scale (grinding and industrial scale. The energy consumption obtained for grinding in the pilot tests was compared with that reported by Donda and Bond. The SSSAG route had the lowest energy consumption, 11.8kWh/t and the SAB route had the highest energy consumption, 15.8kWh/t. The CB and SABC routes had a similar energy consumption of 14.4 kWh/t and 14.5 kWh/t respectively.

  1. Global Regularity for Several Incompressible Fluid Models with Partial Dissipation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiahong; Xu, Xiaojing; Ye, Zhuan

    2017-09-01

    This paper examines the global regularity problem on several 2D incompressible fluid models with partial dissipation. They are the surface quasi-geostrophic (SQG) equation, the 2D Euler equation and the 2D Boussinesq equations. These are well-known models in fluid mechanics and geophysics. The fundamental issue of whether or not they are globally well-posed has attracted enormous attention. The corresponding models with partial dissipation may arise in physical circumstances when the dissipation varies in different directions. We show that the SQG equation with either horizontal or vertical dissipation always has global solutions. This is in sharp contrast with the inviscid SQG equation for which the global regularity problem remains outstandingly open. Although the 2D Euler is globally well-posed for sufficiently smooth data, the associated equations with partial dissipation no longer conserve the vorticity and the global regularity is not trivial. We are able to prove the global regularity for two partially dissipated Euler equations. Several global bounds are also obtained for a partially dissipated Boussinesq system.

  2. Photodiode circuits for retinal prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudin, J D; Cogan, S F; Mathieson, K; Sher, A; Palanker, D V

    2011-10-01

    Photodiode circuits show promise for the development of high-resolution retinal prostheses. While several of these systems have been constructed and some even implanted in humans, existing descriptions of the complex optoelectronic interaction between light, photodiode, and the electrode/electrolyte load are limited. This study examines this interaction in depth with theoretical calculations and experimental measurements. Actively biased photoconductive and passive photovoltaic circuits are investigated, with the photovoltaic circuits consisting of one or more diodes connected in series, and the photoconductive circuits consisting of a single diode in series with a pulsed bias voltage. Circuit behavior and charge injection levels were markedly different for platinum and sputtered iridium-oxide film (SIROF) electrodes. Photovoltaic circuits were able to deliver 0.038 mC/cm(2) (0.75 nC/phase) per photodiode with 50- μm platinum electrodes, and 0.54-mC/cm(2) (11 nC/phase) per photodiode with 50-μ m SIROF electrodes driven with 0.5-ms pulses of light at 25 Hz. The same pulses applied to photoconductive circuits with the same electrodes were able to deliver charge injections as high as 0.38 and 7.6 mC/cm(2) (7.5 and 150 nC/phase), respectively. We demonstrate photovoltaic stimulation of rabbit retina in-vitro, with 0.5-ms pulses of 905-nm light using peak irradiance of 1 mW/mm(2). Based on the experimental data, we derive electrochemical and optical safety limits for pixel density and charge injection in various circuits. While photoconductive circuits offer smaller pixels, photovoltaic systems do not require an external bias voltage. Both classes of circuits show promise for the development of high-resolution optoelectronic retinal prostheses.

  3. On Instantaneous Power Dissipation in Class B Amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristo Zhivomirov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes the analysis of the instantaneous power dissipation by the two active components in a class B power amplifier. Attention is paid to restrictions of the instantaneous power dissipation relations in reference literature, and the consequences of their misuse. A new generalized equation that takes into account the power dissipated by the two active devices is proposed. The theoretical statement is substantiated by Matlab® numeric computation and visualization, Cadence OrCAD® simulations and measurements of a real-world audio power amplifier performed by NI USB-6211 measurement complex.

  4. Thermodynamical properties of Strunz’s quantum dissipative models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zen, Freddy P. [Theoretical Physics Laboratory (THEPI), Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Indonesia Center for Theoretical and Mathematical Physics (ICTMP), Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Sulaiman, A. [Indonesia Center for Theoretical and Mathematical Physics (ICTMP), Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Geostech Laboratory, Badan Pengkajian dan Penerapan Teknologi (BPPT), Kawasan Puspiptek Serpong, Tanggerang Selatan (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    The existence of the negative of specific heat from quantum dissipative theory is investigated. Strunz’s quantum dissipative model will be used in this studies. The thermodynamical properties will be studied starts out from the thermo-dynamic partition function of the dissipative system. The path integral technique is used to calculate the partition function under consideration. The results shows that the specific heat can be negative if the damping parameter more than a half the oscillator frequency and also occur at low temperatures. For damping factor greater than the frequency of harmonic oscillator then specific heat will oscillate at low temperatures and approaching normal conditions at a high temperature.

  5. Characterization of Numerical Dissipation of PPM and WENO Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weirs, V. G.; Dursi, L. J.; Calder, A. C.; Fryxell, B.; Rosner, R.; Olson, K.; Ricker, P. M.; Timmes, F. X.; Zingale, M.; MacNeice, P.; Tufo, H.

    2000-11-01

    For compressible fluid flow simulations, shock-capturing schemes (such as TVD, ENO, PPM, and FCT) selectively add numerical dissipation to prevent or limit oscillations near discontinuities. In general, the numerical dissipation is dependent on the grid resolution and damps smooth high frequency features as well as discontinuities, and because it is highly nonlinear, its effects on the flowfield are difficult to determine. This work seeks to quantify the numerical dissipation of the weighted ENO and PPM schemes using several techniques, ranging from numerical experiments with simple, idealized equations to extracting diagnostic data from full-physics simulations.

  6. Relative Entropy, Interaction Energy and the Nature of Dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Gaveau

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Many thermodynamic relations involve inequalities, with equality if a process does not involve dissipation. In this article we provide equalities in which the dissipative contribution is shown to involve the relative entropy (a.k.a. Kullback-Leibler divergence. The processes considered are general time evolutions both in classical and quantum mechanics, and the initial state is sometimes thermal, sometimes partially so. By calculating a transport coefficient we show that indeed—at least in this case—the source of dissipation in that coefficient is the relative entropy.

  7. Stochastic dissipative quantum spin chains (I : Quantum fluctuating discrete hydrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Bauer, Denis Bernard, Tony Jin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by the search for a quantum analogue of the macroscopic fluctuation theory, we study quantum spin chains dissipatively coupled to quantum noise. The dynamical processes are encoded in quantum stochastic differential equations. They induce dissipative friction on the spin chain currents. We show that, as the friction becomes stronger, the noise induced dissipative effects localize the spin chain states on a slow mode manifold, and we determine the effective stochastic quantum dynamics of these slow modes. We illustrate this approach by studying the quantum stochastic Heisenberg spin chain.

  8. Global dissipativity analysis for delayed quaternion-valued neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Zhengwen; Cao, Jinde; Alsaedi, Ahmed; Hayat, Tasawar

    2017-05-01

    The problem of global dissipativity analysis for quaternion-valued neural networks (QVNNs) with time-varying delays is firstly investigated in this paper. The QVNN is studied as a single entirety without any decomposition. Several algebraic conditions ensuring the global dissipativity and globally exponential dissipativity for QVNNs are derived by employing Lyapunov theory and some analytic techniques. Furthermore, the positive invariant sets, globally attractive sets and globally exponentially attractive sets are figured out as well. Finally, the effectiveness is notarized by deducing two simulation examples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A Note on Kinetic Energy, Dissipation and Enstrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie-Zhi; Zhou, Ye; Fan, Meng

    1998-01-01

    The dissipation rate of a Newtonian fluid with constant shear viscosity can be shown to include three constituents: dilatation, vorticity, and surface strain. The last one is found to make no contributions to the change of kinetic energy. These dissipation constituents arc used to identify typical compact turbulent flow structures at high Reynolds numbers. The incompressible version of the simplified kinetic-energy equation is then cast to a novel form, which is free from the work rate done by surface stresses but in which the full dissipation re-enters.

  10. Turbulent viscosity and Jupiter's tidal Q. [energy dissipation function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldreich, P.; Nicholson, P. D.

    1977-01-01

    A recent estimate of tidal dissipation by turbulent viscosity in Jupiter's convective interior predicts that the current value of the planet's tidal Q is roughly 5 million. We point out a fundamental error in this calculation, and show that turbulent dissipation alone implies that at present Q is about 50 trillion. Our reduced estimate for the rate of tidal dissipation shows conclusively that tidal torques have produced only negligible modifications of the orbits of the Galilean satellites over the age of the solar system.

  11. Influence of queue propagation and dissipation on route travel times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raovic, Nevena

    into account (Bliemer, 2008). Yperman (2007) indicates that there is a significant difference in queue-propagation and queue-dissipation between the LTM and DQM. This results in different route travel times, and can further affect route choice. In this paper, different approaches to represent queue propagation...... and dissipation through the CTM, LTM and DQM are studied. A simple network allows to show how these approaches influence route travel time. Furthermore, the possibility of changing the existing DQM is considered in order to more realistically represent queue propagation and dissipation, which would lead to more...... accurate route travel times....

  12. Magnetic energy dissipation in force-free jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, Arnab Rai; Konigl, Arieh

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that a magnetic pressure-dominated, supersonic jet which expands or contracts in response to variations in the confining external pressure can dissipate magnetic energy through field-line reconnection as it relaxes to a minimum-energy configuration. In order for a continuous dissipation to occur, the effective reconnection time must be a fraction of the expansion time. The dissipation rate for the axisymmetric minimum-energy field configuration is analytically derived. The results indicate that the field relaxation process could be a viable mechanism for powering the synchrotron emission in extragalactic jets if the reconnection time is substantially shorter than the nominal resistive tearing time in the jet.

  13. Cavity QED analysis of an exciton-plasmon hybrid molecule via the generalized nonlocal optical response method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapuarachchi, Harini; Premaratne, Malin; Bao, Qiaoliang; Cheng, Wenlong; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Agrawal, Govind P.

    2017-06-01

    A metal nanoparticle coupled to a semiconductor quantum dot forms a tunable hybrid system which exhibits remarkable optical phenomena. Small metal nanoparticles possess nanocavitylike optical concentration capabilities due to the presence of strong dipolar excitation modes in the form of localized surface plasmons. Semiconductor quantum dots have strong luminescent capabilities widely used in many applications such as biosensing. When a quantum dot is kept in the vicinity of a metal nanoparticle, a dipole-dipole coupling occurs between the two nanoparticles giving rise to various optical signatures in the scattered spectra. This coupling makes the two nanoparticles behave like a single hybrid molecule. Hybrid molecules made of metal nanoparticles (MNPs) and quantum dots (QDs) under the influence of an external driving field have been extensively studied in literature, using the local response approximation (LRA). However, such previous work in this area was not adequate to explain some experimental observations such as the size-dependent resonance shift of metal nanoparticles which becomes quite significant with decreasing diameter. The nonlocal response of metallic nanostructures which is hitherto disregarded by such studies is a main reason for such nonclassical effects. The generalized nonlocal optical response (GNOR) model provides a computationally less-demanding path to incorporate such properties into the theoretical models. It allows unified theoretical explanation of observed experimental phenomena which previously seemed to require ab initio microscopic theory. In this paper, we analyze the hybrid molecule in an external driving field as an open quantum system using a cavity-QED approach. In the process, we quantum mechanically model the dipole moment operator and the dipole response field of the metal nanoparticle taking the nonlocal effects into account. We observe that the spectra resulting from the GNOR based model effectively demonstrate the

  14. Variational integrators for electric circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ober-Blöbaum, Sina, E-mail: sinaob@math.upb.de [Computational Dynamics and Optimal Control, University of Paderborn (Germany); Tao, Molei [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University (United States); Cheng, Mulin [Applied and Computational Mathematics, California Institute of Technology (United States); Owhadi, Houman; Marsden, Jerrold E. [Control and Dynamical Systems, California Institute of Technology (United States); Applied and Computational Mathematics, California Institute of Technology (United States)

    2013-06-01

    In this contribution, we develop a variational integrator for the simulation of (stochastic and multiscale) electric circuits. When considering the dynamics of an electric circuit, one is faced with three special situations: 1. The system involves external (control) forcing through external (controlled) voltage sources and resistors. 2. The system is constrained via the Kirchhoff current (KCL) and voltage laws (KVL). 3. The Lagrangian is degenerate. Based on a geometric setting, an appropriate variational formulation is presented to model the circuit from which the equations of motion are derived. A time-discrete variational formulation provides an iteration scheme for the simulation of the electric circuit. Dependent on the discretization, the intrinsic degeneracy of the system can be canceled for the discrete variational scheme. In this way, a variational integrator is constructed that gains several advantages compared to standard integration tools for circuits; in particular, a comparison to BDF methods (which are usually the method of choice for the simulation of electric circuits) shows that even for simple LCR circuits, a better energy behavior and frequency spectrum preservation can be observed using the developed variational integrator.

  15. Experimental Device for Learning of Logical Circuit Design using Integrated Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    石橋, 孝昭

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental device for learning of logical circuit design using integrated circuits and breadboards. The experimental device can be made at a low cost and can be used for many subjects such as logical circuits, computer engineering, basic electricity, electrical circuits and electronic circuits. The proposed device is effective to learn the logical circuits than the usual lecture.

  16. 30 CFR 77.800 - High-voltage circuits; circuit breakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false High-voltage circuits; circuit breakers. 77.800... COAL MINES Surface High-Voltage Distribution § 77.800 High-voltage circuits; circuit breakers. High-voltage circuits supplying power to portable or mobile equipment shall be protected by suitable circuit...

  17. Dissipative Structures of the Kuramoto–Sivashinsky Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Kudryashov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we study the features of dissipative structures formation described by the periodic boundary value problem for the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation. The numerical algorithm which is based on the pseudospectral method is presented. We prove the efficiency and accuracy of the proposed numerical method on the exact solution of the equation considered. Using this approach, we performed the numerical simulation of dissipative structure formations described by the Kuramoto–Sivashinsky equation. The influence of the problem parameters on these processes are studied. The quantitative and qualitative characteristics of dissipative structure formations are described. We have shown that there is a value of the control parameter at which the processes of dissipative structure formation are observed. In particular, using the cyclic convolution we define the average value of this parameter. Also, we find the dependence of the amplitude of the structures on the value of control parameter.

  18. A simple model for electron dissipation in trapped ion turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesur, M.; Cartier-Michaud, T.; Drouot, T.; Diamond, P. H.; Kosuga, Y.; Réveillé, T.; Gravier, E.; Garbet, X.; Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.

    2017-01-01

    Trapped ion resonance-driven turbulence is investigated in the presence of electron dissipation in a simplified tokamak geometry. A reduced gyrokinetic bounce-averaged model for trapped ions is adopted. Electron dissipation is modeled by a simple phase-shift δ between density and electric potential perturbations. The linear eigenfunction features a peak at the resonant energy, which becomes stronger with increasing electron dissipation. Accurately resolving this narrow peak in numerical simulation of the initial-value problem yields a stringent lower bound on the number of grid points in the energy space. Further, the radial particle flux is investigated in the presence of electron dissipation, including kinetic effects. When the density gradient is higher than the temperature gradient, and the phase-shift is finite but moderate ( δ≈0.02 ), the particle flux peaks at an order-of-magnitude above the gyro-Bohm estimate. Slight particle pinch is observed for δ<0.003 .

  19. Robust Performance And Dissipation of Stochastic Control Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro

    and topology on the space of supply rates. For instance, we give conditions under which the available storage is a continuous convex function of the supply rate. Dissipation theory in the existing literature applies only to deterministic systems. This is unfortunate since robust control applications typically...... also contain uncertainty which is better modelled in a probabilistic framework, such as measurement noise. This motivates an extension of the theory of dissipative dynamic systems to stochastic systems. This dissertation presents such an extension: We propose a definition and generalize fundamental...... in terms of dissipation, after which we give sufficient conditions for these requirements to be robust towards multi-dissipative perturbations. A final contribution of the dissertation concerns the problem of simultaneous H-infinity control of a finite number of linear time invariant plants. This problem...

  20. Dissipative effects in the expansion of the universe. I, II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzner, R. A.; Misner, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Consideration of dissipative processes in anisotropic homogeneous world models, showing that dissipation reduces the anisotropy. The viscosity approximation and its range of applicability is discussed. Examples are presented which have been calculated by the use of a simple approximation to the collision-time method, using the cross section appropriate to weak interaction neutrino scattering. It is found that such dissipation is quite effective except for one particular cosmological model which is axisymmetric and in which the entire expansion of the model is taken up by expansion along the axis. A detailed multicomponent model is developed for dissipative processes in Euclidean homogeneous cosmological models. These processes involve neutrinos which might have long mean free times in interaction with other constituents which are thermalized by electromagnetic interactions, and whose weak interactions produce thermal neutrinos.