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Sample records for circadian kaic phosphorylation

  1. Structural model of the circadian clock KaiB-KaiC complex and mechanism for modulation of KaiC phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattanayek, Rekha; Williams, Dewight R; Pattanayek, Sabuj; Mori, Tetsuya; Johnson, Carl H; Stewart, Phoebe L; Egli, Martin [Vanderbilt

    2010-03-08

    The circadian clock of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus can be reconstituted in vitro by the KaiA, KaiB and KaiC proteins in the presence of ATP. The principal clock component, KaiC, undergoes regular cycles between hyper- and hypo-phosphorylated states with a period of ca. 24 h that is temperature compensated. KaiA enhances KaiC phosphorylation and this enhancement is antagonized by KaiB. Throughout the cycle Kai proteins interact in a dynamic manner to form complexes of different composition. We present a three-dimensional model of the S. elongatus KaiB-KaiC complex based on X-ray crystallography, negative-stain and cryo-electron microscopy, native gel electrophoresis and modelling techniques. We provide experimental evidence that KaiB dimers interact with KaiC from the same side as KaiA and for a conformational rearrangement of the C-terminal regions of KaiC subunits. The enlarged central channel and thus KaiC subunit separation in the C-terminal ring of the hexamer is consistent with KaiC subunit exchange during the dephosphorylation phase. The proposed binding mode of KaiB explains the observation of simultaneous binding of KaiA and KaiB to KaiC, and provides insight into the mechanism of KaiB's antagonism of KaiA.

  2. Crystal Structure of the Redox-Active Cofactor Dibromothymoquinone Bound to Circadian Clock Protein KaiA and Structural Basis for Dibromothymoquinone's Ability to Prevent Stimulation of KaiC Phosphorylation by KaiA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattanayek, Rekha; Sidiqi, Said K.; Egli, Martin [Vanderbilt-MED

    2013-09-19

    KaiA protein that stimulates KaiC phosphorylation in the cyanobacterial circadian clock was recently shown to be destabilized by dibromothymoquinone (DBMIB), thus revealing KaiA as a sensor of the plastoquinone (PQ) redox state and suggesting an indirect control of the clock by light through PQ redox changes. Here we show using X-ray crystallography that several DBMIBs are bound to KaiA dimer. Some binding modes are consistent with oligomerization of N-terminal KaiA pseudoreceiver domains and/or reduced interdomain flexibility. DBMIB bound to the C-terminal KaiA (C-KaiA) domain and limited stimulation of KaiC kinase activity by C-KaiA in the presence of DBMIB demonstrate that the cofactor may weakly inhibit KaiA-KaiC binding.

  3. CryoEM and Molecular Dynamics of the Circadian KaiB-KaiC Complex Indicates That KaiB Monomers Interact with KaiC and Block ATP Binding Clefts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarreal, Seth A.; Pattanayek, Rekha; Williams, Dewight R.; Mori, Tetsuya; Qin, Ximing; Johnson, Carl H.; Egli, Martin; Stewart, Phoebe L. [Case Western; (Vanderbilt); (Vanderbilt-MED)

    2014-10-02

    The circadian control of cellular processes in cyanobacteria is regulated by a posttranslational oscillator formed by three Kai proteins. During the oscillator cycle, KaiA serves to promote autophosphorylation of KaiC while KaiB counteracts this effect. Here, we present a crystallographic structure of the wild-type Synechococcus elongatus KaiB and a cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) structure of a KaiBC complex. The crystal structure shows the expected dimer core structure and significant conformational variations of the KaiB C-terminal region, which is functionally important in maintaining rhythmicity. The KaiBC sample was formed with a C-terminally truncated form of KaiC, KaiC-Δ489, which is persistently phosphorylated. The KaiB–KaiC-Δ489 structure reveals that the KaiC hexamer can bind six monomers of KaiB, which form a continuous ring of density in the KaiBC complex. We performed cryoEM-guided molecular dynamics flexible fitting simulations with crystal structures of KaiB and KaiC to probe the KaiBC protein–protein interface. This analysis indicated a favorable binding mode for the KaiB monomer on the CII end of KaiC, involving two adjacent KaiC subunits and spanning an ATP binding cleft. A KaiC mutation, R468C, which has been shown to affect the affinity of KaiB for KaiC and lengthen the period in a bioluminescence rhythm assay, is found within the middle of the predicted KaiBC interface. The proposed KaiB binding mode blocks access to the ATP binding cleft in the CII ring of KaiC, which provides insight into how KaiB might influence the phosphorylation status of KaiC.

  4. Dephosphorylation of the Core Clock Protein KaiC in the Cyanobacterial KaiABC Circadian Oscillator Proceeds via an ATP Synthase Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egli, Martin; Mori, Tetsuya; Pattanayek, Rekha; Xu, Yao; Qin, Ximing; Johnson, Carl H. (Vanderbilt)

    2014-10-02

    The circadian clock of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus can be reconstituted in vitro from three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC in the presence of ATP, to tick in a temperature-compensated manner. KaiC, the central cog of this oscillator, forms a homohexamer with 12 ATP molecules bound between its N- and C-terminal domains and exhibits unusual properties. Both the N-terminal (CI) and C-terminal (CII) domains harbor ATPase activity, and the subunit interfaces between CII domains are the sites of autokinase and autophosphatase activities. Hydrolysis of ATP correlates with phosphorylation at threonine and serine sites across subunits in an orchestrated manner, such that first T432 and then S431 are phosphorylated, followed by dephosphorylation of these residues in the same order. Although structural work has provided insight into the mechanisms of ATPase and kinase, the location and mechanism of the phosphatase have remained enigmatic. From the available experimental data based on a range of approaches, including KaiC crystal structures and small-angle X-ray scattering models, metal ion dependence, site-directed mutagenesis (i.e., E318, the general base), and measurements of the associated clock periods, phosphorylation patterns, and dephosphorylation courses as well as a lack of sequence motifs in KaiC that are typically associated with known phosphatases, we hypothesized that KaiCII makes use of the same active site for phosphorylation and dephosphorlyation. We observed that wild-type KaiC (wt-KaiC) exhibits an ATP synthase activity that is significantly reduced in the T432A/S431A mutant. We interpret the first observation as evidence that KaiCII is a phosphotransferase instead of a phosphatase and the second that the enzyme is capable of generating ATP, both from ADP and P{sub i} (in a reversal of the ATPase reaction) and from ADP and P-T432/P-S431 (dephosphorylation). This new concept regarding the mechanism of dephosphorylation is also supported by the

  5. CRY Drives Cyclic CK2-Mediated BMAL1 Phosphorylation to Control the Mammalian Circadian Clock

    OpenAIRE

    Tamaru, Teruya; Hattori, Mitsuru; Honda, Kousuke; Nakahata, Yasukazu; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Ozawa, Takeaki; Takamatsu, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular circadian clocks, composed of clock genes that act in transcription-translation feedback loops, drive global rhythmic expression of the mammalian transcriptome and allow an organism to anticipate to the momentum of the day. Using a novel clock-perturbing peptide, we established a pivotal role for casein kinase (CK)-2-mediated circadian BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation (BMAL1-P) in regulating central and peripheral core clocks. Subsequent analysis of the underlying mechanism showed a ...

  6. CRY Drives Cyclic CK2-Mediated BMAL1 Phosphorylation to Control the Mammalian Circadian Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaru, Teruya; Hattori, Mitsuru; Honda, Kousuke; Nakahata, Yasukazu; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Ozawa, Takeaki; Takamatsu, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular circadian clocks, composed of clock genes that act in transcription-translation feedback loops, drive global rhythmic expression of the mammalian transcriptome and allow an organism to anticipate to the momentum of the day. Using a novel clock-perturbing peptide, we established a pivotal role for casein kinase (CK)-2-mediated circadian BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation (BMAL1-P) in regulating central and peripheral core clocks. Subsequent analysis of the underlying mechanism showed a novel role of CRY as a repressor for protein kinase. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments and real-time monitoring of protein–protein interactions revealed that CRY-mediated periodic binding of CK2β to BMAL1 inhibits BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation by CK2α. The FAD binding domain of CRY1, two C-terminal BMAL1 domains, and particularly BMAL1-Lys537 acetylation/deacetylation by CLOCK/SIRT1, were shown to be critical for CRY-mediated BMAL1–CK2β binding. Reciprocally, BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation is prerequisite for BMAL1-Lys537 acetylation. We propose a dual negative-feedback model in which a CRY-dependent CK2-driven posttranslational BMAL1–P-BMAL1 loop is an integral part of the core clock oscillator. PMID:26562092

  7. CRY Drives Cyclic CK2-Mediated BMAL1 Phosphorylation to Control the Mammalian Circadian Clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruya Tamaru

    Full Text Available Intracellular circadian clocks, composed of clock genes that act in transcription-translation feedback loops, drive global rhythmic expression of the mammalian transcriptome and allow an organism to anticipate to the momentum of the day. Using a novel clock-perturbing peptide, we established a pivotal role for casein kinase (CK-2-mediated circadian BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation (BMAL1-P in regulating central and peripheral core clocks. Subsequent analysis of the underlying mechanism showed a novel role of CRY as a repressor for protein kinase. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments and real-time monitoring of protein-protein interactions revealed that CRY-mediated periodic binding of CK2β to BMAL1 inhibits BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation by CK2α. The FAD binding domain of CRY1, two C-terminal BMAL1 domains, and particularly BMAL1-Lys537 acetylation/deacetylation by CLOCK/SIRT1, were shown to be critical for CRY-mediated BMAL1-CK2β binding. Reciprocally, BMAL1-Ser90 phosphorylation is prerequisite for BMAL1-Lys537 acetylation. We propose a dual negative-feedback model in which a CRY-dependent CK2-driven posttranslational BMAL1-P-BMAL1 loop is an integral part of the core clock oscillator.

  8. Computational modeling of protein interactions and phosphoform kinetics in the KaiABC cyanobacterial circadian clock

    CERN Document Server

    Byrne, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The KaiABC circadian clock from cyanobacteria is the only known three-protein oscillatory system which can be reconstituted outside the cell and which displays sustained periodic dynamics in various molecular state variables. Despite many recent experimental and theoretical studies there are several open questions regarding the central mechanism(s) responsible for creating this ~24 hour clock in terms of molecular assembly/disassembly of the proteins and site-dependent phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of KaiC monomers. Simulations of protein-protein interactions and phosphorylation reactions constrained by analytical fits to partial reaction experimental data support the central mechanism of oscillation as KaiB-induced KaiA sequestration in KaiABC complexes associated with the extent of Ser431 phosphorylation in KaiC hexamers. A simple two-state deterministic model in terms of the degree of phosphorylation of Ser431 and Thr432 sites alone can reproduce the previously observed circadian oscillation in the...

  9. CRY Drives Cyclic CK2-Mediated BMAL1 Phosphorylation to Control the Mammalian Circadian Clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Tamaru (Teruya); M. Hattori (Mitsuru); K. Honda (Kousuke); Y. Nakahata (Yasukazu); P. Sassone-Corsi (Paolo); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); T. Ozawa (Takeaki); K. Takamatsu (Ken)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntracellular circadian clocks, composed of clock genes that act in transcription-translation feedback loops, drive global rhythmic expression of the mammalian transcriptome and allow an organism to anticipate to the momentum of the day. Using a novel clock-perturbing peptide, we establi

  10. Single mutations in sasA enable a simpler ΔcikA gene network architecture with equivalent circadian properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultzaberger, Ryan K; Boyd, Joseph S; Katsuki, Takeo; Golden, Susan S; Greenspan, Ralph J

    2014-11-25

    The circadian input kinase of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 (CikA) is important both for synchronizing circadian rhythms with external environmental cycles and for transferring temporal information between the oscillator and the global transcriptional regulator RpaA (regulator of phycobilisome-associated A). KOs of cikA result in one of the most severely altered but still rhythmic circadian phenotypes observed. We chemically mutagenized a cikA-null S. elongatus strain and screened for second-site suppressor mutations that could restore normal circadian rhythms. We identified two independent mutations in the Synechococcus adaptive sensor A (sasA) gene that produce nearly WT rhythms of gene expression, likely because they compensate for the loss of CikA on the temporal phosphorylation of RpaA. Additionally, these mutations restore the ability to reset the clock after a short dark pulse through an output-independent pathway, suggesting that SasA can influence entrainment through direct interactions with KaiC, a property previously unattributed to it. These experiments question the evolutionary advantage of integrating CikA into the cyanobacterial clock, challenge the conventional construct of separable input and output pathways, and show how easily the cell can adapt to restore phenotype in a severely compromised genetic network. PMID:25385627

  11. Circadian Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body function and health? Circadian rhythms can influence sleep-wake cycles, hormone release, body temperature and other important bodily functions. They have been linked to various sleep disorders, such as insomnia. Abnormal circadian rhythms have also ...

  12. The effects of hydrogen peroxide on the circadian rhythms of Microcystis aeruginosa.

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    Haifeng Qian

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa is one of the principal bloom-forming cyanobacteria present in a wide range of freshwater ecosystems. M. aeruginosa produces cyanotoxins, which can harm human and animal health. Many metabolic pathways in M. aeruginosa, including photosynthesis and microcystin synthesis, are controlled by its circadian rhythms. However, whether xenobiotics affect the cyanobacterial circadian system and change its growth, physiology and biochemistry is unknown. We used real-time PCR to study the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 on the expression of clock genes and some circadian genes in M. aeruginosa during the light/dark (LD cycle. RESULTS: The results revealed that H(2O(2 changes the expression patterns of clock genes (kaiA, kaiB, kaiC and sasA and significantly decreases the transcript levels of kaiB, kaiC and sasA. H(2O(2 treatment also decreased the transcription of circadian genes, such as photosynthesis-related genes (psaB, psbD1 and rbcL and microcystin-related genes (mcyA, mcyD and mcyH, and changed their circadian expression patterns. Moreover, the physiological functions of M. aeruginosa, including its growth and microcystin synthesis, were greatly influenced by H(2O(2 treatment during LD. These results indicate that changes in the cyanobacterial circadian system can affect its physiological and metabolic pathways. CONCLUSION: Our findings show that a xenobiotic can change the circadian expression patterns of its clock genes to influence clock-controlled gene regulation, and these influences are evident at the level of cellular physiology.

  13. Cold-induced cysts of the photosynthetic dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum have an arrested circadian bioluminescence rhythm and lower levels of protein phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sougata; Letourneau, Louis; Morse, David

    2014-02-01

    Dinoflagellates are microscopic, eukaryotic, and primarily marine plankton. Temporary cyst formation is a well-known physiological response of dinoflagellate cells to environmental stresses. However, the molecular underpinnings of cold-induced cyst physiology have never been described. Cultures of the photosynthetic dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum readily form temporary cysts when placed at low (8°C±1°C) temperature and excyst to form normal motile cells following a return to normal temperature (18°C±1°C). The normal circadian bioluminescence rhythm and the expected changes in Luciferin Binding Protein abundance were arrested in L. polyedrum cysts. Furthermore, after excystment, the bioluminescence rhythm initiates at a time corresponding to zeitgeber 12, independent of the time when the cells encysted. Phosphoprotein staining after two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, as well as column-based phosphoprotein enrichment followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, showed cyst proteins are hypophosphorylated when compared with those from motile cells, with the most marked decreases found for predicted Casein Kinase2 target sites. In contrast to the phosphoproteome, the cyst proteome is not markedly different from motile cells, as assessed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. In addition to changes in the phosphoproteome, RNA sequencing revealed that cysts show a significant decrease in the levels of 132 RNAs. Of the 42 RNAs that were identified by sequence analysis, 21 correspond to plastid-encoded gene products and 11 to nuclear-encoded cell wall/plasma membrane components. Our data are consistent with a model in which the highly reduced metabolism in cysts is achieved primarily by alterations in the phosphoproteome. The stalling of the circadian rhythm suggests temporary cysts may provide an interesting model to address the circadian system of dinoflagellates. PMID:24335505

  14. Progress in the Molecular Mechanism of Circadian Clock in Cyanobacterium%蓝藻生物节律性分子调控机制的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李青雁; 庞羽彤; 李小龙; 周飞飞; 张芳; 霍宇鹏; 赵宇玮

    2013-01-01

    Circadian clocks are endogenous time-keeping mechanisms which are ubiquitous in a variety of o rganisms from bacteria to mammals. In order to coordinate with and adapt to the daily environmental changes which are driven by the self-rolling of the earth, the circadian clock controls various metabolic and biological activities with a circle period of 24 h. One of the cyanobacterial species, Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942 is a model organism for the circadian clock system. Three proteins encoded by the kaiA/B/C gene cluster, which is functional basis for the circadian rhythm, generate the basic timing loop of the circadian clock in Synechococcus. Circadian time clue is transmitted from the KaiABC-based central oscillator to the clock-controlled transcription factors. KaiC, an autokinase and autophosphatase, is the central component of the cyanobacterial circadian clock. The daily auto-phosphorylation and auto-dephosphorylation cycle of KaiC and the post-translational modification of the proteins, which consisted the inputing and output pathways of the circadian clock, have composed the transcriptional and translational feed-back loop (TTFL). In traditional theory of circadian clock model in cyanobacteria, TTFL regulation of clock genes are thought to be essential for sustaining and outputing of the basic circadian timing loop in Synechococcus. But surprisingly, KaiABC-based central oscillators are only found in cyanobacteria and very few prokaryotic species. It seems that this Kai-based clock is not an ubiquitous time-keeping mechanism that has been selected by organisms during natural evolution. Recently, some circadian clock research groups have demonstrated that non-transcriptional and translational oscillators could be the driving force of the generating and sustaining of biological circadian rhythm. The peroxiredoxins (PRX) are reported to be conserved markers of circadian rhythms, which are also thought to be a new focus of the researches on the molecular

  15. Circadian Rhythm Abnormalities

    OpenAIRE

    Zee, Phyllis C.; Attarian, Hrayr; Videnovic, Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This article reviews the recent advances in understanding of the fundamental properties of circadian rhythms and discusses the clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSDs).

  16. Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... psychiatric and other sleep disorders such as sleep apnea and individuals with a strong need for stable ... and circadian rhythm sleep disorder, free-running type. Prevalence • The prevalence of circadian rhythm sleep disorders in ...

  17. Activating PER repressor through a DBT-directed phosphorylation switch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saul Kivimäe

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphorylation plays an essential role in the generation of circadian rhythms, regulating the stability, activity, and subcellular localization of certain proteins that constitute the biological clock. This study examines the role of the protein kinase Doubletime (DBT, a Drosophila ortholog of human casein kinase I (CKIepsilon/delta. An enzymatically active DBT protein is shown to directly phosphorylate the Drosophila clock protein Period (PER. DBT-dependent phosphorylation sites are identified within PER, and their functional significance is assessed in a cultured cell system and in vivo. The per(S mutation, which is associated with short-period (19-h circadian rhythms, alters a key phosphorylation target within PER. Inspection of this and neighboring sequence variants indicates that several DBT-directed phosphorylations regulate PER activity in an integrated fashion: Alternative phosphorylations of two adjoining sequence motifs appear to be associated with switch-like changes in PER stability and repressor function.

  18. AMPK regulates circadian rhythms in a tissue- and isoform-specific manner.

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    Jee-Hyun Um

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: AMP protein kinase (AMPK plays an important role in food intake and energy metabolism, which are synchronized to the light-dark cycle. In vitro, AMPK affects the circadian rhythm by regulating at least two clock components, CKIα and CRY1, via direct phosphorylation. However, it is not known whether the catalytic activity of AMPK actually regulates circadian rhythm in vivo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: THE CATALYTIC SUBUNIT OF AMPK HAS TWO ISOFORMS: α1 and α2. We investigate the circadian rhythm of behavior, physiology and gene expression in AMPKα1-/- and AMPKα2-/- mice. We found that both α1-/- and α2-/- mice are able to maintain a circadian rhythm of activity in dark-dark (DD cycle, but α1-/- mice have a shorter circadian period whereas α2-/- mice showed a tendency toward a slightly longer circadian period. Furthermore, the circadian rhythm of body temperature was dampened in α1-/- mice, but not in α2-/- mice. The circadian pattern of core clock gene expression was severely disrupted in fat in α1-/- mice, but it was severely disrupted in the heart and skeletal muscle of α2-/- mice. Interestingly, other genes that showed circadian pattern of expression were dysreguated in both α1-/- and α2-/- mice. The circadian rhythm of nicotinamide phosphoryl-transferase (NAMPT activity, which converts nicotinamide (NAM to NAD+, is an important regulator of the circadian clock. We found that the NAMPT rhythm was absent in AMPK-deficient tissues and cells. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study demonstrates that the catalytic activity of AMPK regulates circadian rhythm of behavior, energy metabolism and gene expression in isoform- and tissue-specific manners.

  19. Circadian Misalignment and Health

    OpenAIRE

    Baron, Kelly Glazer; Reid, Kathryn J.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are near 24-hour patterns of physiology and behavior that are present independent of external cues including hormones, body temperature, mood, and sleep propensity. The term “circadian misalignment” describes a variety of circumstances, such as inappropriately timed sleep and wake, misalignment of sleep/wake with feeding rhythms, or misaligned central and peripheral rhythms. The predominance of early research focused on misalignment of sleep to the biological night. However,...

  20. Circadian rhythm sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgenthaler TI

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Bhanu P Kolla,1,2 R Robert Auger,1,2 Timothy I Morgenthaler11Mayo Center for Sleep Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Misalignment between endogenous circadian rhythms and the light/dark cycle can result in pathological disturbances in the form of erratic sleep timing (irregular sleep–wake rhythm, complete dissociation from the light/dark cycle (circadian rhythm sleep disorder, free-running type, delayed sleep timing (delayed sleep phase disorder, or advanced sleep timing (advanced sleep phase disorder. Whereas these four conditions are thought to involve predominantly intrinsic mechanisms, circadian dysrhythmias can also be induced by exogenous challenges, such as those imposed by extreme work schedules or rapid transmeridian travel, which overwhelm the ability of the master clock to entrain with commensurate rapidity, and in turn impair approximation to a desired sleep schedule, as evidenced by the shift work and jet lag sleep disorders. This review will focus on etiological underpinnings, clinical assessments, and evidence-based treatment options for circadian rhythm sleep disorders. Topics are subcategorized when applicable, and if sufficient data exist. The length of text associated with each disorder reflects the abundance of associated literature, complexity of management, overlap of methods for assessment and treatment, and the expected prevalence of each condition within general medical practice.Keywords: circadian rhythm sleep disorders, assessment, treatment

  1. Time for a Nuclear Meeting: Protein Trafficking and Chromatin Dynamics Intersect in the Plant Circadian System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eva Herrero; Seth J. Davis

    2012-01-01

    Circadian clocks mediate adaptation to the 24-h world.In Arabidopsis,most circadian-clock components act in the nucleus as transcriptional regulators and generate rhythmic oscillations of transcript accumulation.In this review,we focus on post-transcriptional events that modulate the activity of circadian-clock components,such as phosphorylation,ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation,changes in cellular localization,and protein-protein interactions.These processes have been found to be essential for circadian function,not only in plants,but also in other circadian systems.Moreover,light and clock signaling networks are highly interconnected.In the nucleus,light and clock components work together to generate transcriptional rhythms,leading to a general control of the timing of plant physiological processes.

  2. Circadian Clocks, Stress, and Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumbell, Rebecca; Matveeva, Olga; Oster, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, molecular circadian clocks are present in most cells of the body, and this circadian network plays an important role in synchronizing physiological processes and behaviors to the appropriate time of day. The hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal endocrine axis regulates the response to acute and chronic stress, acting through its final effectors – glucocorticoids – released from the adrenal cortex. Glucocorticoid secretion, characterized by its circadian rhythm, has an important role in synchronizing peripheral clocks and rhythms downstream of the master circadian pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Finally, glucocorticoids are powerfully anti-inflammatory, and recent work has implicated the circadian clock in various aspects and cells of the immune system, suggesting a tight interplay of stress and circadian systems in the regulation of immunity. This mini-review summarizes our current understanding of the role of the circadian clock network in both the HPA axis and the immune system, and discusses their interactions. PMID:27199894

  3. Temperature regulates transcription in the zebrafish circadian clock.

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    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available It has been well-documented that temperature influences key aspects of the circadian clock. Temperature cycles entrain the clock, while the period length of the circadian cycle is adjusted so that it remains relatively constant over a wide range of temperatures (temperature compensation. In vertebrates, the molecular basis of these properties is poorly understood. Here, using the zebrafish as an ectothermic model, we demonstrate first that in the absence of light, exposure of embryos and primary cell lines to temperature cycles entrains circadian rhythms of clock gene expression. Temperature steps drive changes in the basal expression of certain clock genes in a gene-specific manner, a mechanism potentially contributing to entrainment. In the case of the per4 gene, while E-box promoter elements mediate circadian clock regulation, they do not direct the temperature-driven changes in transcription. Second, by studying E-box-regulated transcription as a reporter of the core clock mechanism, we reveal that the zebrafish clock is temperature-compensated. In addition, temperature strongly influences the amplitude of circadian transcriptional rhythms during and following entrainment by light-dark cycles, a property that could confer temperature compensation. Finally, we show temperature-dependent changes in the expression levels, phosphorylation, and function of the clock protein, CLK. This suggests a mechanism that could account for changes in the amplitude of the E-box-directed rhythm. Together, our results imply that several key transcriptional regulatory elements at the core of the zebrafish clock respond to temperature.

  4. Biological Clocks & Circadian Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Laura; Jones, M. Gail

    2009-01-01

    The study of biological clocks and circadian rhythms is an excellent way to address the inquiry strand in the National Science Education Standards (NSES) (NRC 1996). Students can study these everyday phenomena by designing experiments, gathering and analyzing data, and generating new experiments. As students explore biological clocks and circadian…

  5. Chromatin Dynamics of Circadian Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilar-Arnal, Lorena; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The molecular circadian clock orchestrates the daily cyclical expression of thousands of genes. Disruption of this transcriptional program leads to a variety of pathologies, including insomnia, depression and metabolic disorders. Circadian rhythms in gene expression rely on specific chromatin transitions which are ultimately coordinated by the molecular clock. As a consequence, a highly plastic and dynamic circadian epigenome can be delineated across different tissues and cell types. Intrigui...

  6. Sleep and circadian rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, Timothy H.

    1991-01-01

    Three interacting processes are involved in the preservation of circadian rhythms: (1) endogenous rhythm generation mechanisms, (2) entrainment mechanisms to keep these rhythms 'on track', and (3) exogenous masking processes stemming from changes in environment and bahavior. These processes, particularly the latter two, can be dramatically affected in individuals of advanced age and in space travelers, with a consequent disruption in sleep and daytime functioning. This paper presents results of a phase-shift experiment investigating the age-related effects of the exogeneous component of circadian rhythms in various physiological and psychological functions by comparing these functions in middle aged and old subjects. Dramatic differences were found between the two age groups in measures of sleep, mood, activation, and performance efficiency.

  7. Postoperative circadian disturbances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gögenur, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    postoperative recovery parameters, and if pharmacological administration of chronobiotics could improve postoperative recovery. Circadian rhythm disturbances were found in all the examined endogenous rhythms. A delay was found in the endogenous rhythm of plasma melatonin and excretion of the metabolite of...... after major surgery was increased on the fourth day after surgery and the total excretion of AMT6s in urine was correlated to sleep efficiency and wake time after sleep onset, but was not correlated to the occurrence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction. We could only prove an effect of melatonin...... rhythm, autonomic nervous system tone, myocardial ischaemia and activity rhythm after surgery. Correlation exists between circadian rhythm parameters and measures of postoperative sleep quality and recovery. However, oral melatonin treatment in the first three nights after surgery, cannot yet be...

  8. Mini Screening of Kinase Inhibitors Affecting Period-length of Mammalian Cellular Circadian Clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In mammalian circadian rhythms, the transcriptional-translational feedback loop (TTFL) consisting of a set of clock genes is believed to elicit the circadian clock oscillation. The TTFL model explains that the accumulation and degradation of mPER and mCRY proteins control the period-length (tau) of the circadian clock. Although recent studies revealed that the Casein Kinase Iεδ (CKIεδ) regurates the phosphorylation of mPER proteins and the circadian period-length, other kinases are also likely to contribute the phosphorylation of mPER. Here, we performed small scale screening using 84 chemical compounds known as kinase inhibitors to identify candidates possibly affecting the circadian period-length in mammalian cells. Screening by this high-throughput real-time bioluminescence monitoring system revealed that the several chemical compounds apparently lengthened the cellular circadian clock oscillation. These compounds are known as inhibitors against kinases such as Casein Kinase II (CKII), PI3-kinase (PI3K) and c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) in addition to CKIεδ. Although these kinase inhibitors may have some non-specific effects on other factors, our mini screening identified new candidates contributing to period-length control in mammalian cells

  9. Circadian and pharmacological regulation of casein kinase I in the hamster suprachiasmatic nucleus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Patricia V. Agostino; Santiago A. Plano; Diego A. Golombek

    2008-12-01

    In mammals, the mechanism for the generation of circadian rhythms and entrainment by light–dark (LD) cycles resides in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), and the principal signal that adjusts this biological clock with environmental timing is the light:dark cycle. Within the SCN, rhythms are generated by a complex of molecular feedback loops that regulate the transcription of clock genes, including per and cry. Posttranslational modification plays an essential role in the regulation of biological rhythms; in particular, clock gene phosphorylation by casein kinase I, both epsilon (CKI) and delta (CKI), regulates key molecular mechanisms in the circadian clock. In this paper, we report for the first time that CKI activity undergoes a significant circadian rhythm in the SCN (peaking at circadian time 12, the start of the subjective night), and its pharmacological inhibition alters photic entrainment of the clock, indicating that CKI may be a key element in this pathway.

  10. Dominant-negative CK2alpha induces potent effects on circadian rhythmicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine M Smith

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks organize the precise timing of cellular and behavioral events. In Drosophila, circadian clocks consist of negative feedback loops in which the clock component PERIOD (PER represses its own transcription. PER phosphorylation is a critical step in timing the onset and termination of this feedback. The protein kinase CK2 has been linked to circadian timing, but the importance of this contribution is unclear; it is not certain where and when CK2 acts to regulate circadian rhythms. To determine its temporal and spatial functions, a dominant negative mutant of the catalytic alpha subunit, CK2alpha(Tik, was targeted to circadian neurons. Behaviorally, CK2alpha(Tik induces severe period lengthening (approximately 33 h, greater than nearly all known circadian mutant alleles, and abolishes detectable free-running behavioral rhythmicity at high levels of expression. CK2alpha(Tik, when targeted to a subset of pacemaker neurons, generates period splitting, resulting in flies exhibiting both long and near 24-h periods. These behavioral effects are evident even when CK2alpha(Tik expression is induced only during adulthood, implicating an acute role for CK2alpha function in circadian rhythms. CK2alpha(Tik expression results in reduced PER phosphorylation, delayed nuclear entry, and dampened cycling with elevated trough levels of PER. Heightened trough levels of per transcript accompany increased protein levels, suggesting that CK2alpha(Tik disturbs negative feedback of PER on its own transcription. Taken together, these in vivo data implicate a central role of CK2alpha function in timing PER negative feedback in adult circadian neurons.

  11. Circadian polymorphisms associated with affective disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kripke, Daniel F; Nievergelt, Caroline M; Joo, EJ; Shekhtman, Tatyana; Kelsoe, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Clinical symptoms of affective disorders, their response to light treatment, and sensitivity to other circadian interventions indicate that the circadian system has a role in mood disorders. Possibly the mechanisms involve circadian seasonal and photoperiodic mechanisms. Since genetic susceptibilities contribute a strong component to affective disorders, we explored whether circadian gene polymorphisms were associated with affective disorders in four complementary studies.Methods:...

  12. CULLIN-3 controls TIMELESS oscillations in the Drosophila circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Grima

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic circadian clocks rely on transcriptional feedback loops. In Drosophila, the PERIOD (PER and TIMELESS (TIM proteins accumulate during the night, inhibit the activity of the CLOCK (CLK/CYCLE (CYC transcriptional complex, and are degraded in the early morning. The control of PER and TIM oscillations largely depends on post-translational mechanisms. They involve both light-dependent and light-independent pathways that rely on the phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and proteasomal degradation of the clock proteins. SLMB, which is part of a CULLIN-1-based E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, is required for the circadian degradation of phosphorylated PER. We show here that CULLIN-3 (CUL-3 is required for the circadian control of PER and TIM oscillations. Expression of either Cul-3 RNAi or dominant negative forms of CUL-3 in the clock neurons alters locomotor behavior and dampens PER and TIM oscillations in light-dark cycles. In constant conditions, CUL-3 deregulation induces behavioral arrhythmicity and rapidly abolishes TIM cycling, with slower effects on PER. CUL-3 affects TIM accumulation more strongly in the absence of PER and forms protein complexes with hypo-phosphorylated TIM. In contrast, SLMB affects TIM more strongly in the presence of PER and preferentially associates with phosphorylated TIM. CUL-3 and SLMB show additive effects on TIM and PER, suggesting different roles for the two ubiquitination complexes on PER and TIM cycling. This work thus shows that CUL-3 is a new component of the Drosophila clock, which plays an important role in the control of TIM oscillations.

  13. Predicted Role of NAD Utilization in the Control of Circadian Rhythms during DNA Damage Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augustin Luna

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock is a set of regulatory steps that oscillate with a period of approximately 24 hours influencing many biological processes. These oscillations are robust to external stresses, and in the case of genotoxic stress (i.e. DNA damage, the circadian clock responds through phase shifting with primarily phase advancements. The effect of DNA damage on the circadian clock and the mechanism through which this effect operates remains to be thoroughly investigated. Here we build an in silico model to examine damage-induced circadian phase shifts by investigating a possible mechanism linking circadian rhythms to metabolism. The proposed model involves two DNA damage response proteins, SIRT1 and PARP1, that are each consumers of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD, a metabolite involved in oxidation-reduction reactions and in ATP synthesis. This model builds on two key findings: 1 that SIRT1 (a protein deacetylase is involved in both the positive (i.e. transcriptional activation and negative (i.e. transcriptional repression arms of the circadian regulation and 2 that PARP1 is a major consumer of NAD during the DNA damage response. In our simulations, we observe that increased PARP1 activity may be able to trigger SIRT1-induced circadian phase advancements by decreasing SIRT1 activity through competition for NAD supplies. We show how this competitive inhibition may operate through protein acetylation in conjunction with phosphorylation, consistent with reported observations. These findings suggest a possible mechanism through which multiple perturbations, each dominant during different points of the circadian cycle, may result in the phase advancement of the circadian clock seen during DNA damage.

  14. Circadian clocks, epigenetics, and cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Masri, Selma

    2015-01-01

    The interplay between circadian rhythm and cancer has been suggested for more than a decade based on the observations that shift work and cancer incidence are linked. Accumulating evidence implicates the circadian clock in cancer survival and proliferation pathways. At the molecular level, multiple control mechanisms have been proposed to link circadian transcription and cell-cycle control to tumorigenesis.The circadian gating of the cell cycle and subsequent control of cell proliferation is an area of active investigation. Moreover, the circadian clock is a transcriptional system that is intricately regulated at the epigenetic level. Interestingly, the epigenetic landscape at the level of histone modifications, DNA methylation, and small regulatory RNAs are differentially controlled in cancer cells. This concept raises the possibility that epigenetic control is a common thread linking the clock with cancer, though little scientific evidence is known to date.This review focuses on the link between circadian clock and cancer, and speculates on the possible connections at the epigenetic level that could further link the circadian clock to tumor initiation or progression.

  15. Endocrine Effects of Circadian Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedrosian, Tracy A; Fonken, Laura K; Nelson, Randy J

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of circadian rhythms, provoked by artificial lighting at night, inconsistent sleep-wake schedules, and transmeridian air travel, is increasingly prevalent in modern society. Desynchrony of biological rhythms from environmental light cycles has dramatic consequences for human health. In particular, disrupting homeostatic oscillations in endocrine tissues and the hormones that these tissues regulate can have cascading effects on physiology and behavior. Accumulating evidence suggests that chronic disruption of circadian organization of endocrine function may lead to metabolic, reproductive, sleep, and mood disorders. This review discusses circadian control of endocrine systems and the consequences of distorting rhythmicity of these systems. PMID:26208951

  16. Circadian Control of Global Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shujing; Zhang, Luoying

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms exist in most if not all organisms on the Earth and manifest in various aspects of physiology and behavior. These rhythmic processes are believed to be driven by endogenous molecular clocks that regulate rhythmic expression of clock-controlled genes (CCGs). CCGs consist of a significant portion of the genome and are involved in diverse biological pathways. The transcription of CCGs is tuned by rhythmic actions of transcription factors and circadian alterations in chromatin. Here, we review the circadian control of CCG transcription in five model organisms that are widely used, including cyanobacterium, fungus, plant, fruit fly, and mouse. Comparing the similarity and differences in the five organisms could help us better understand the function of the circadian clock, as well as its output mechanisms adapted to meet the demands of diverse environmental conditions. PMID:26682214

  17. Circadian Control of Global Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujing Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms exist in most if not all organisms on the Earth and manifest in various aspects of physiology and behavior. These rhythmic processes are believed to be driven by endogenous molecular clocks that regulate rhythmic expression of clock-controlled genes (CCGs. CCGs consist of a significant portion of the genome and are involved in diverse biological pathways. The transcription of CCGs is tuned by rhythmic actions of transcription factors and circadian alterations in chromatin. Here, we review the circadian control of CCG transcription in five model organisms that are widely used, including cyanobacterium, fungus, plant, fruit fly, and mouse. Comparing the similarity and differences in the five organisms could help us better understand the function of the circadian clock, as well as its output mechanisms adapted to meet the demands of diverse environmental conditions.

  18. Endocrine regulation of circadian physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Anthony H; Astiz, Mariana; Friedrichs, Maureen; Oster, Henrik

    2016-07-01

    Endogenous circadian clocks regulate 24-h rhythms of behavior and physiology to align with external time. The endocrine system serves as a major clock output to regulate various biological processes. Recent findings suggest that some of the rhythmic hormones can also provide feedback to the circadian system at various levels, thus contributing to maintaining the robustness of endogenous rhythmicity. This delicate balance of clock-hormone interaction is vulnerable to modern lifestyle factors such as shiftwork or high-calorie diets, altering physiological set points. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the communication between the circadian timing and endocrine systems, with a focus on adrenal glucocorticoids and metabolic peptide hormones. We explore the potential role of hormones as systemic feedback signals to adjust clock function and their relevance for the maintenance of physiological and metabolic circadian homeostasis. PMID:27106109

  19. The circadian clock goes genomic

    OpenAIRE

    Staiger, D; Shin, J; Johansson, M; Davis, S

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale biology among plant species, as well as comparative genomics of circadian clock architecture and clock-regulated output processes, have greatly advanced our understanding of the endogenous timing system in plants.

  20. Circadian Rhythm Management System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The value of measuring sleep-wake cycles is significantly enhanced by measuring other physiological signals that depend on circadian rhythms (such as heart rate and...

  1. Postoperative circadian disturbances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gögenur, Ismail

    2010-01-01

    reduced the first night after minimally invasive surgery. The core body temperature rhythm was disturbed after both major and minor surgery. There was a change in the sleep wake cycle with a significantly increased duration of REM-sleep in the day and evening time after major surgery compared with...... after major surgery was increased on the fourth day after surgery and the total excretion of AMT6s in urine was correlated to sleep efficiency and wake time after sleep onset, but was not correlated to the occurrence of postoperative cognitive dysfunction. We could only prove an effect of melatonin...... substitution in patients with lower than median pain levels for a three days period after laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In the series of studies included in this thesis we have systematically shown that circadian disturbances are found in the secretion of hormones, the sleep-wake cycle, core body temperature...

  2. The circadian clock in mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Zordan, Mauro; Kyriacou, Charalambos P

    2000-01-01

    The basic physiological and anatomical basis for circadian rhythms in mammalian behaviour and physiology is introduced. The pathways involved in photic entrainment of the circadian clock are discussed in relation of new findings that identify the molecules that are involved in signalling between the environment and the clock. The molecular basis of endogenous cycles is described in the mouse, and compared to the mechanism that is present in the fly. Finally we speculate on the relationship be...

  3. The circadian clock in mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Zordan, M. A.; Kyriacou, C P

    2005-01-01

    The basic physiological and anatomical basis for circadian rhythms in mammalian behaviour and physiology is introduced. The pathways involved in photic entrainment of the circadian clock are discussed in relation of new findings that identify the molecules that are involved in signalling between the environment and the clock. The molecular basis of endogenous cycles is described in the mouse, and compared to the mechanism that is present in the fly. Finally we speculate on the relationship be...

  4. Circadian Pacemaker – Temperature Compensation

    OpenAIRE

    Gerkema, Menno P.; Binder, Marc D.; Hirokawa, Nobutaka; Windhorst, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    One of the defining characteristics of circadian pacemakers and indicates the independence of the speed of circadian clock processes of environmental temperature. Mechanisms involved, so far not elucidated in full detail, entail at least two processes that are similarly affected by temperature changes, but with an opposing and counterbalancing effect on the periodicity of the clock system. As a result of temperature compensation, the increase in reaction velocity for every 10° rise in tempera...

  5. Die circadiane Uhr im Immunsystem

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Maren

    2010-01-01

    Daily rhythms of a variety of immunological phenomena and functions are well known, but so far they have largely been neglected. Examples of daily rhythms in the immune system are: circadian differences in susceptibility to bacterial infection and daily variations in the symptoms of diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis or asthma. Therefore, it is very important for clinical diagnosis and pharmacological therapies to elucidate the connections between the circadian clock and the immune system....

  6. ROS stress resets circadian clocks to coordinate pro-survival signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruya Tamaru

    Full Text Available Dysfunction of circadian clocks exacerbates various diseases, in part likely due to impaired stress resistance. It is unclear how circadian clock system responds toward critical stresses, to evoke life-protective adaptation. We identified a reactive oxygen species (ROS, H2O2 -responsive circadian pathway in mammals. Near-lethal doses of ROS-induced critical oxidative stress (cOS at the branch point of life and death resets circadian clocks, synergistically evoking protective responses for cell survival. The cOS-triggered clock resetting and pro-survival responses are mediated by transcription factor, central clock-regulatory BMAL1 and heat shock stress-responsive (HSR HSF1. Casein kinase II (CK2 -mediated phosphorylation regulates dimerization and function of BMAL1 and HSF1 to control the cOS-evoked responses. The core cOS-responsive transcriptome includes CK2-regulated crosstalk between the circadian, HSR, NF-kappa-B-mediated anti-apoptotic, and Nrf2-mediated anti-oxidant pathways. This novel circadian-adaptive signaling system likely plays fundamental protective roles in various ROS-inducible disorders, diseases, and death.

  7. Analysis of Circadian Leaf Movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Niels A; Jiménez-Gómez, José M

    2016-01-01

    The circadian clock is a molecular timekeeper that controls a wide variety of biological processes. In plants, clock outputs range from the molecular level, with rhythmic gene expression and metabolite content, to physiological processes such as stomatal conductance or leaf movements. Any of these outputs can be used as markers to monitor the state of the circadian clock. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, much of the current knowledge about the clock has been gained from time course experiments profiling expression of endogenous genes or reporter constructs regulated by the circadian clock. Since these methods require labor-intensive sample preparation or transformation, monitoring leaf movements is an interesting alternative, especially in non-model species and for natural variation studies. Technological improvements both in digital photography and image analysis allow cheap and easy monitoring of circadian leaf movements. In this chapter we present a protocol that uses an autonomous point and shoot camera and free software to monitor circadian leaf movements in tomato. PMID:26867616

  8. Nutrition and the circadian system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Gregory D M; Cade, Janet E; Grant, Peter J; Hardie, Laura J

    2016-08-01

    The human circadian system anticipates and adapts to daily environmental changes to optimise behaviour according to time of day and temporally partitions incompatible physiological processes. At the helm of this system is a master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the anterior hypothalamus. The SCN are primarily synchronised to the 24-h day by the light/dark cycle; however, feeding/fasting cycles are the primary time cues for clocks in peripheral tissues. Aligning feeding/fasting cycles with clock-regulated metabolic changes optimises metabolism, and studies of other animals suggest that feeding at inappropriate times disrupts circadian system organisation, and thereby contributes to adverse metabolic consequences and chronic disease development. 'High-fat diets' (HFD) produce particularly deleterious effects on circadian system organisation in rodents by blunting feeding/fasting cycles. Time-of-day-restricted feeding, where food availability is restricted to a period of several hours, offsets many adverse consequences of HFD in these animals; however, further evidence is required to assess whether the same is true in humans. Several nutritional compounds have robust effects on the circadian system. Caffeine, for example, can speed synchronisation to new time zones after jetlag. An appreciation of the circadian system has many implications for nutritional science and may ultimately help reduce the burden of chronic diseases. PMID:27221157

  9. Smooth-muscle BMAL1 participates in blood pressure circadian rhythm regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhongwen; Su, Wen; Liu, Shu; Zhao, Guogang; Esser, Karyn; Schroder, Elizabeth A; Lefta, Mellani; Stauss, Harald M; Guo, Zhenheng; Gong, Ming Cui

    2015-01-01

    As the central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) has long been considered the primary regulator of blood pressure circadian rhythm; however, this dogma has been challenged by the discovery that each of the clock genes present in the SCN is also expressed and functions in peripheral tissues. The involvement and contribution of these peripheral clock genes in the circadian rhythm of blood pressure remains uncertain. Here, we demonstrate that selective deletion of the circadian clock transcriptional activator aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like (Bmal1) from smooth muscle, but not from cardiomyocytes, compromised blood pressure circadian rhythm and decreased blood pressure without affecting SCN-controlled locomotor activity in murine models. In mesenteric arteries, BMAL1 bound to the promoter of and activated the transcription of Rho-kinase 2 (Rock2), and Bmal1 deletion abolished the time-of-day variations in response to agonist-induced vasoconstriction, myosin phosphorylation, and ROCK2 activation. Together, these data indicate that peripheral inputs contribute to the daily control of vasoconstriction and blood pressure and suggest that clock gene expression outside of the SCN should be further evaluated to elucidate pathogenic mechanisms of diseases involving blood pressure circadian rhythm disruption. PMID:25485682

  10. Circadian influences on myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virag, Jitka A I; Lust, Robert M

    2014-01-01

    Components of circadian rhythm maintenance, or "clock genes," are endogenous entrainable oscillations of about 24 h that regulate biological processes and are found in the suprachaismatic nucleus (SCN) and many peripheral tissues, including the heart. They are influenced by external cues, or Zeitgebers, such as light and heat, and can influence such diverse phenomena as cytokine expression immune cells, metabolic activity of cardiac myocytes, and vasodilator regulation by vascular endothelial cells. While it is known that the central master clock in the SCN synchronizes peripheral physiologic rhythms, the mechanisms by which the information is transmitted are complex and may include hormonal, metabolic, and neuronal inputs. Whether circadian patterns are causally related to the observed periodicity of events, or whether they are simply epi-phenomena is not well established, but a few studies suggest that the circadian effects likely are real in their impact on myocardial infarct incidence. Cycle disturbances may be harbingers of predisposition and subsequent response to acute and chronic cardiac injury, and identifying the complex interactions of circadian rhythms and myocardial infarction may provide insights into possible preventative and therapeutic strategies for susceptible populations. PMID:25400588

  11. Oxidative phosphorylation revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nath, Sunil; Villadsen, John

    2015-01-01

    The fundamentals of oxidative phosphorylation and photophosphorylation are revisited. New experimental data on the involvement of succinate and malate anions respectively in oxidative phosphorylation and photophosphorylation are presented. These new data offer a novel molecular mechanistic explan...

  12. Coupling of a core post-translational pacemaker to a slave transcription/translation feedback loop in a circadian system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximing Qin

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are the only model circadian clock system in which a circadian oscillator can be reconstituted in vitro. The underlying circadian mechanism appears to comprise two subcomponents: a post-translational oscillator (PTO and a transcriptional/translational feedback loop (TTFL. The PTO and TTFL have been hypothesized to operate as dual oscillator systems in cyanobacteria. However, we find that they have a definite hierarchical interdependency-the PTO is the core pacemaker while the TTFL is a slave oscillator that quickly damps when the PTO stops. By analysis of overexpression experiments and mutant clock proteins, we find that the circadian system is dependent upon the PTO and that suppression of the PTO leads to damped TTFL-based oscillations whose temperature compensation is not stable under different metabolic conditions. Mathematical modeling indicates that the experimental data are compatible with a core PTO driving the TTFL; the combined PTO/TTFL system is resilient to noise. Moreover, the modeling indicates a mechanism by which the TTFL can feed into the PTO such that new synthesis of clock proteins can phase-shift or entrain the core PTO pacemaker. This prediction was experimentally tested and confirmed by entraining the in vivo circadian system with cycles of new clock protein synthesis that modulate the phosphorylation status of the clock proteins in the PTO. In cyanobacteria, the PTO is the self-sustained core pacemaker that can operate independently of the TTFL, but the TTFL damps when the phosphorylation status of the PTO is clamped. However, the TTFL can provide entraining input into the PTO. This study is the first to our knowledge to experimentally and theoretically investigate the dynamics of a circadian clock in which a PTO is coupled to a TTFL. These results have important implications for eukaryotic clock systems in that they can explain how a TTFL could appear to be a core circadian clockwork when in fact the true

  13. Effect of melatonin on endogenous circadian rhythm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Feng; WANG Min; ZANG Ling-he

    2008-01-01

    Objective To further authenticate the role of melatonin on endogenous biologic clock system. Methods Pinealectomized mice were used in the experiments, a series of circadian rhythm of physiology index, such as glucocorticoid, amino acid neurotransmitter, immune function, sensitivity of algesia and body temperature were measured. Results Effects of melatonin on endogenous circadian rhythm roughly appeared four forms: 1) The model of inherent rhythm was invariant, but midvalue was removed. 2) Pacing function: pinealectomy and melatonin administration changed amplitude of the circadian vibration of aspartate, peripheral blood WBC and serum hemolysin. 3) Phase of rhythm changed, such as the effects on percentage of lymphocyte and sensitivity of algesia. 4) No effect, the circadian rhythm of body temperature belong to this form Conclusions Melatonin has effects some circadian rhythm, and it can adjust endogenous inherent rhythm and make the rhythm keep step with environmental cycle. Melatonin may be a kind of Zeitgeber, Pineal gland might being a rhythm bearing organ to some circadian rhythm.

  14. Metabolic consequences of sleep and circadian disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Depner, Christopher M.; Stothard, Ellen R.; Wright, Kenneth P.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythms modulate or control daily physiological patterns with importance for normal metabolic health. Sleep deficiencies associated with insufficient sleep schedules, insomnia with short-sleep duration, sleep apnea, narcolepsy, circadian misalignment, shift work, night eating syndrome and sleep-related eating disorder may all contribute to metabolic dysregulation. Sleep deficiencies and circadian disruption associated with metabolic dysregulation may contribute to weight g...

  15. Unraveling the circadian clock in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous timing system responsible for coordinating an organism’s biological processes with its environment. Interlocked transcriptional feedback loops constitute the fundamental architecture of the circadian clock. In Arabidopsis, three feedback loops, the core loop, morning loop and evening loop, comprise a network that is the basis of the circadian clock. The components of these three loops are regulated in distinct ways, including transcriptional, post-transcri...

  16. Circadian regulators of intestinal lipid absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, M. Mahmood; Pan, Xiaoyue

    2015-01-01

    Among all the metabolites present in the plasma, lipids, mainly triacylglycerol and diacylglycerol, show extensive circadian rhythms. These lipids are transported in the plasma as part of lipoproteins. Lipoproteins are synthesized primarily in the liver and intestine and their production exhibits circadian rhythmicity. Studies have shown that various proteins involved in lipid absorption and lipoprotein biosynthesis show circadian expression. Further, intestinal epithelial cells express circa...

  17. The Drosophila melanogaster circadian pacemaker circuit

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vasu Sheeba

    2008-12-01

    As an experimental model system, the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been seminal in shaping our understanding of the circadian clockwork. The wealth of genetic tools at our disposal over the past four decades has enabled discovery of the genetic and molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity. More recently, detailed investigation leading to the anatomical, neurochemical and electrophysiological characterization of the various neuronal subgroups that comprise the circadian machinery has revealed pathways through which these neurons come together to act as a neuronal circuit. Thus the D. melanogaster circadian pacemaker circuit presents a relatively simple and attractive model for the study of neuronal circuits and their functions.

  18. Circadian clocks are designed optimally

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are acquired through evolution to increase the chances for survival by synchronizing to the daylight cycle. Reliable synchronization is realized through two trade-off properties: regularity to keep time precisely, and entrainability to synchronize the internal time with daylight. Since both properties have been tuned through natural selection, their adaptation can be formalized in the framework of mathematical optimization. By using a succinct model, we found that simultaneous optimization of regularity and entrainability entails inherent features of the circadian mechanism irrespective of model details. At the behavioral level we discovered the existence of a dead zone, a time during which light pulses neither advance nor delay the clock. At the molecular level we demonstrate the role-sharing of two light inputs, phase advance and delay, as is well observed in mammals. We also reproduce the results of phase-controlling experiments and predict molecular elements responsible for the clockwork...

  19. Circadian influences on myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Virag, Jitka A. I.; Lust, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Components of circadian rhythm maintenance, or “clock genes,” are endogenous entrainable oscillations of about 24 h that regulate biological processes and are found in the suprachaismatic nucleus (SCN) and many peripheral tissues, including the heart. They are influenced by external cues, or Zeitgebers, such as light and heat, and can influence such diverse phenomena as cytokine expression immune cells, metabolic activity of cardiac myocytes, and vasodilator regulation by vascular endothelial...

  20. Design principles underlying circadian clocks.

    OpenAIRE

    Rand, D.A.; Shulgin, B. V.; D. Salazar; Millar, A. J.

    2004-01-01

    A fundamental problem for regulatory networks is to understand the relation between form and function: to uncover the underlying design principles of the network. Circadian clocks present a particularly interesting instance, as recent work has shown that they have complex structures involving multiple interconnected feedback loops with both positive and negative feedback. While several authors have speculated on the reasons for this, a convincing explanation is still lacking.We analyse both t...

  1. Cognitive dysfunction, elevated anxiety and reduced cocaine response in circadian clock-deficient cryptochrome knockout mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Valjent

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock comprises a set of genes involved in cell-autonomous transcriptional feedback loops that orchestrate the expression of a range of downstream genes, driving circadian patterns of behavior. Cognitive dysfunction, mood disorders, anxiety disorders and substance abuse disorders have been associated with disruptions in circadian rhythm and circadian clock genes, but the causal relationship of these associations is still poorly understood. In the present study, we investigate the effect of genetic disruption of the circadian clock, through deletion of both paralogs of the core gene cryptochrome (Cry1 and Cry2. Mice lacking Cry1 and Cry2 (Cry1-/-Cry2-/- displayed attenuated dark phase and novelty-induced locomotor activity. Moreover, they showed impaired recognition memory but intact fear memory. Depression-related behaviors in the forced swim test or sucrose preference tests were unaffected but Cry1-/-Cry2-/- mice displayed increased anxiety in the open field and elevated plus maze tests. Finally, hyperlocomotion and striatal phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK induced by a single cocaine administration are strongly reduced in Cry1-/-Cry2-/- mice. Interestingly, only some behavioral measures were affected in mice lacking either Cry1 or Cry2. Notably, recognition memory was impaired in both Cry1-/-Cry2+/+ and Cry1+/+Cry2-/- mice. Moreover, we further observed elevated anxiety in Cry1-/-Cry2+/+ and Cry1+/+Cry2-/- mice. Our data indicate that beyond their role in the control of circadian rhythm, cryptochrome genes have a direct influence in cognitive function, anxiety-related behaviors and sensitivity to psychostimulant drugs.

  2. Cognitive dysfunction, elevated anxiety, and reduced cocaine response in circadian clock-deficient cryptochrome knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bundel, Dimitri; Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Biever, Anne; Bonnefont, Xavier; Valjent, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock comprises a set of genes involved in cell-autonomous transcriptional feedback loops that orchestrate the expression of a range of downstream genes, driving circadian patterns of behavior. Cognitive dysfunction, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and substance abuse disorders have been associated with disruptions in circadian rhythm and circadian clock genes, but the causal relationship of these associations is still poorly understood. In the present study, we investigate the effect of genetic disruption of the circadian clock, through deletion of both paralogs of the core gene cryptochrome (Cry1 and Cry2). Mice lacking Cry1 and Cry2 (Cry1(-/-)Cry2(-/-) ) displayed attenuated dark phase and novelty-induced locomotor activity. Moreover, they showed impaired recognition memory but intact fear memory. Depression-related behaviors in the forced swim test or sucrose preference tests were unaffected but Cry1(-/-)Cry2(-/-) mice displayed increased anxiety in the open field and elevated plus maze tests. Finally, hyperlocomotion and striatal phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) induced by a single cocaine administration are strongly reduced in Cry1(-/-)Cry2(-/-) mice. Interestingly, only some behavioral measures were affected in mice lacking either Cry1 or Cry2. Notably, recognition memory was impaired in both Cry1(-/-)Cry2(+/+) and Cry1(+/+)Cry2(-/-) mice. Moreover, we further observed elevated anxiety in Cry1(-/-)Cry2(+/+) and Cry1(+/+)Cry2(-/-) mice. Our data indicate that beyond their role in the control of circadian rhythm, cryptochrome genes have a direct influence in cognitive function, anxiety-related behaviors and sensitivity to psychostimulant drugs. PMID:24187535

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Circadian Regulation During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, S. B.; Boyle, R.

    2012-01-01

    The physiology of both vertebrates and invertebrates follows internal rhythms coordinated in phase with the 24-hour daily light cycle. This circadian clock is governed by a central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) in the brain. However, peripheral circadian clocks or oscillators have been identified in most tissues. How the central and peripheral oscillators are synchronized is still being elucidated. Light is the main environmental cue that entrains the circadian clock. Under the absence of a light stimulus, the clock continues its oscillation in a free-running condition. In general, three functional compartments of the circadian clock are defined. The vertebrate retina contains endogenous clocks that control many aspects of retinal physiology, including retinal sensitivity to light, neurohormone synthesis (melatonin and dopamine), rod disk shedding, signalling pathways and gene expression. Neurons with putative local circadian rhythm generation are found among all the major neuron populations in the mammalian retina. In the mouse, clock genes and function are more localized to the inner retinal and ganglion cell layers. The photoreceptor, however, secrete melatonin which may still serve a an important circadian signal. The reception and transmission of the non-visual photic stimulus resides in a small subpopulation (1-3%) or retinal ganglion cells (RGC) that express the pigment melanopsin (Opn4) and are called intrisically photoreceptive RGC (ipRGC). Melanopsin peak absorption is at 420 nm and all the axons of the ipRGC reach the SCN. A common countermeasure for circadian re-entrainment utilizes blue-green light to entrain the circadian clock and mitigate the risk of fatigue and health and performance decrement due to circadian rhythm disruption. However, an effective countermeasure targeting the photoreceptor system requires that the basic circadian molecular machinery remains intact during spaceflight. We hypothesize that spaceflight may affect ip

  4. A colorful model of the circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppert, Steven M

    2006-01-27

    The migration of the colorful monarch butterfly provides biologists with a unique model system with which to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying a sophisticated circadian clock. The monarch circadian clock is involved in the induction of the migratory state and navigation over long distances, using the sun as a compass. PMID:16439193

  5. Circadian regulation of human cortical excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Julien Q M; Gaggioni, Giulia; Chellappa, Sarah L; Papachilleos, Soterios; Brzozowski, Alexandre; Borsu, Chloé; Rosanova, Mario; Sarasso, Simone; Middleton, Benita; Luxen, André; Archer, Simon N; Phillips, Christophe; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre; Massimini, Marcello; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged wakefulness alters cortical excitability, which is essential for proper brain function and cognition. However, besides prior wakefulness, brain function and cognition are also affected by circadian rhythmicity. Whether the regulation of cognition involves a circadian impact on cortical excitability is unknown. Here, we assessed cortical excitability from scalp electroencephalography (EEG) responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in 22 participants during 29 h of wakefulness under constant conditions. Data reveal robust circadian dynamics of cortical excitability that are strongest in those individuals with highest endocrine markers of circadian amplitude. In addition, the time course of cortical excitability correlates with changes in EEG synchronization and cognitive performance. These results demonstrate that the crucial factor for cortical excitability, and basic brain function in general, is the balance between circadian rhythmicity and sleep need, rather than sleep homoeostasis alone. These findings have implications for clinical applications such as non-invasive brain stimulation in neurorehabilitation. PMID:27339884

  6. The circadian clock coordinates ribosome biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Jouffe

    Full Text Available Biological rhythms play a fundamental role in the physiology and behavior of most living organisms. Rhythmic circadian expression of clock-controlled genes is orchestrated by a molecular clock that relies on interconnected negative feedback loops of transcription regulators. Here we show that the circadian clock exerts its function also through the regulation of mRNA translation. Namely, the circadian clock influences the temporal translation of a subset of mRNAs involved in ribosome biogenesis by controlling the transcription of translation initiation factors as well as the clock-dependent rhythmic activation of signaling pathways involved in their regulation. Moreover, the circadian oscillator directly regulates the transcription of ribosomal protein mRNAs and ribosomal RNAs. Thus the circadian clock exerts a major role in coordinating transcription and translation steps underlying ribosome biogenesis.

  7. Functional analysis of Casein Kinase 1 in a minimal circadian system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerben van Ooijen

    Full Text Available The Earth's rotation has driven the evolution of cellular circadian clocks to facilitate anticipation of the solar cycle. Some evidence for timekeeping mechanism conserved from early unicellular life through to modern organisms was recently identified, but the components of this oscillator are currently unknown. Although very few clock components appear to be shared across higher species, Casein Kinase 1 (CK1 is known to affect timekeeping across metazoans and fungi, but has not previously been implicated in the circadian clock in the plant kingdom. We now show that modulation of CK1 function lengthens circadian rhythms in Ostreococcustauri, a unicellular marine algal species at the base of the green lineage, separated from humans by ~1.5 billion years of evolution. CK1 contributes to timekeeping in a phase-dependent manner, indicating clock-mediated gating of CK1 activity. Label-free proteomic analyses upon overexpression as well as inhibition revealed CK1-responsive phosphorylation events on a set of target proteins, including highly conserved potentially clock-relevant cellular regulator proteins. These results have major implications for our understanding of cellular timekeeping and can inform future studies in any circadian organism.

  8. Differential effect of lithium on the circadian oscillator in young and old hamsters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lithium is one of the most commonly used drugs in the prophylaxis and treatment of bipolar disorder. It is also known to lengthen circadian period in several organisms. Previously, we reported that there was the association between lengthening circadian period by lithium and GSK-3 protein and its enzyme activity in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In this study, we show that lithium affects the circadian oscillator in young and old hamster SCN, in an age-dependent manner. We found that basal levels of phosphorylated GSK-3 (pGSK-3) protein expression in old hamsters are much lower than that in young hamsters. Furthermore, in the old hamsters, lithium did not affect the period of the locomotor activity rhythm or pGSK-3 expression, while changing period and pGSK-3 in the younger animals. These results indicate that the content of pGSK-3 in the SCN has an important role in age-dependent effects of lithium on the circadian oscillator

  9. Bypassing AMPK Phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Viollet, Benoit; Foretz, Marc; Schlattner, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) functions as a signaling hub to balance energy supply with demand. Phosphorylation of activation loop Thr172 has been considered as an essential step in AMPK activation. In this issue of Chemistry & Biology, Scott and colleagues show that the small molecule direct AMPK activator, A-769662, bypasses this phosphorylation event, and acts synergistically with AMP on naive AMPK.

  10. Circadian Clock Regulates Bone Resorption in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Cheng; Ochi, Hiroki; Fukuda, Toru; Sato, Shingo; Sunamura, Satoko; Takarada, Takeshi; Hinoi, Eiichi; Okawa, Atsushi; Takeda, Shu

    2016-07-01

    The circadian clock controls many behavioral and physiological processes beyond daily rhythms. Circadian dysfunction increases the risk of cancer, obesity, and cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Although clinical studies have shown that bone resorption is controlled by circadian rhythm, as indicated by diurnal variations in bone resorption, the molecular mechanism of circadian clock-dependent bone resorption remains unknown. To clarify the role of circadian rhythm in bone resorption, aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator-like (Bmal1), a prototype circadian gene, was knocked out specifically in osteoclasts. Osteoclast-specific Bmal1-knockout mice showed a high bone mass phenotype due to reduced osteoclast differentiation. A cell-based assay revealed that BMAL1 upregulated nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic, calcineurin-dependent 1 (Nfatc1) transcription through its binding to an E-box element located on the Nfatc1 promoter in cooperation with circadian locomotor output cycles kaput (CLOCK), a heterodimer partner of BMAL1. Moreover, steroid receptor coactivator (SRC) family members were shown to interact with and upregulate BMAL1:CLOCK transcriptional activity. Collectively, these data suggest that bone resorption is controlled by osteoclastic BMAL1 through interactions with the SRC family and binding to the Nfatc1 promoter. © 2016 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:26841172

  11. Nonphotic entrainment of the human circadian pacemaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerman, E. B.; Rimmer, D. W.; Dijk, D. J.; Kronauer, R. E.; Rizzo, J. F. 3rd; Czeisler, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    In organisms as diverse as single-celled algae and humans, light is the primary stimulus mediating entrainment of the circadian biological clock. Reports that some totally blind individuals appear entrained to the 24-h day have suggested that nonphotic stimuli may also be effective circadian synchronizers in humans, although the nonphotic stimuli are probably comparatively weak synchronizers, because the circadian rhythms of many totally blind individuals "free run" even when they maintain a 24-h activity-rest schedule. To investigate entrainment by nonphotic synchronizers, we studied the endogenous circadian melatonin and core body temperature rhythms of 15 totally blind subjects who lacked conscious light perception and exhibited no suppression of plasma melatonin in response to ocular bright-light exposure. Nine of these fifteen blind individuals were able to maintain synchronization to the 24-h day, albeit often at an atypical phase angle of entrainment. Nonphotic stimuli also synchronized the endogenous circadian rhythms of a totally blind individual to a non-24-h schedule while living in constant near darkness. We conclude that nonphotic stimuli can entrain the human circadian pacemaker in some individuals lacking ocular circadian photoreception.

  12. Circadian rhythms of women with fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerman, E. B.; Goldenberg, D. L.; Brown, E. N.; Maliszewski, A. M.; Adler, G. K.

    2001-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a chronic and debilitating disorder characterized by widespread nonarticular musculoskeletal pain whose etiology is unknown. Many of the symptoms of this syndrome, including difficulty sleeping, fatigue, malaise, myalgias, gastrointestinal complaints, and decreased cognitive function, are similar to those observed in individuals whose circadian pacemaker is abnormally aligned with their sleep-wake schedule or with local environmental time. Abnormalities in melatonin and cortisol, two hormones whose secretion is strongly influenced by the circadian pacemaker, have been reported in women with fibromyalgia. We studied the circadian rhythms of 10 women with fibromyalgia and 12 control healthy women. The protocol controlled factors known to affect markers of the circadian system, including light levels, posture, sleep-wake state, meals, and activity. The timing of the events in the protocol were calculated relative to the habitual sleep-wake schedule of each individual subject. Under these conditions, we found no significant difference between the women with fibromyalgia and control women in the circadian amplitude or phase of rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, and core body temperature. The average circadian phases expressed in hours posthabitual bedtime for women with and without fibromyalgia were 3:43 +/- 0:19 and 3:46 +/- 0:13, respectively, for melatonin; 10:13 +/- 0:23 and 10:32 +/- 0:20, respectively for cortisol; and 5:19 +/- 0:19 and 4:57 +/- 0:33, respectively, for core body temperature phases. Both groups of women had similar circadian rhythms in self-reported alertness. Although pain and stiffness were significantly increased in women with fibromyalgia compared with healthy women, there were no circadian rhythms in either parameter. We suggest that abnormalities in circadian rhythmicity are not a primary cause of fibromyalgia or its symptoms.

  13. Circadian Rhythms in Anesthesia and Critical Care Medicine: Potential importance of circadian disruptions

    OpenAIRE

    Brainard, Jason; Gobel, Merit; Bartels, Karsten; Scott, Benjamin; Koeppen, Michael; Eckle, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    The rotation of the earth and associated alternating cycles of light and dark–the basis of our circadian rhythms–are fundamental to human biology and culture. However, it was not until 1971 that researchers first began to describe the molecular mechanisms for the circadian system. During the last few years, groundbreaking research has revealed a multitude of circadian genes affecting a variety of clinical diseases, including diabetes, obesity, sepsis, cardiac ischemia, and sudden cardiac deat...

  14. Entrainment of the Neurospora circadian clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merrow, M; Boesl, C; Ricken, J; Messerschmitt, M; Goedel, M; Roenneberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Neurospora crassa has been systematically investigated for circadian entrainment behavior. Many aspects of synchronization can be investigated in this simple, cellular system, ranging from systematic entrainment and drivenness to masking. Clock gene expression during entrainment and entrainment with

  15. Mining Conditional Phosphorylation Motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Wu, Jun; Gong, Haipeng; Deng, Shengchun; He, Zengyou

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorylation motifs represent position-specific amino acid patterns around the phosphorylation sites in the set of phosphopeptides. Several algorithms have been proposed to uncover phosphorylation motifs, whereas the problem of efficiently discovering a set of significant motifs with sufficiently high coverage and non-redundancy still remains unsolved. Here we present a novel notion called conditional phosphorylation motifs. Through this new concept, the motifs whose over-expressiveness mainly benefits from its constituting parts can be filtered out effectively. To discover conditional phosphorylation motifs, we propose an algorithm called C-Motif for a non-redundant identification of significant phosphorylation motifs. C-Motif is implemented under the Apriori framework, and it tests the statistical significance together with the frequency of candidate motifs in a single stage. Experiments demonstrate that C-Motif outperforms some current algorithms such as MMFPh and Motif-All in terms of coverage and non-redundancy of the results and efficiency of the execution. The source code of C-Motif is available at: https://sourceforge. net/projects/cmotif/. PMID:26356863

  16. Neuroimaging, cognition, light and circadian rhythms

    OpenAIRE

    Gaggioni, Giulia; Maquet, Pierre; Schmidt, Christina, 1984-; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Vandewalle, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    In humans, sleep and wakefulness and the associated cognitive processes are regulated through interactions between sleep homeostasis and the circadian system. Chronic disruption of sleep and circadian rhythmicity is common in our society and there is a need for a better understanding of the brain mechanisms regulating sleep, wakefulness and associated cognitive processes. This review summarizes recent investigations which provide first neural correlates of the combined influence of sleep home...

  17. Sleep and circadian rhythm disruption in schizophrenia†

    OpenAIRE

    Wulff, Katharina; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Middleton, Benita; Foster, Russell G.; Joyce, Eileen M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Sleep disturbances comparable with insomnia occur in up to 80% of people with schizophrenia, but very little is known about the contribution of circadian coordination to these prevalent disruptions. Aims A systematic exploration of circadian time patterns in individuals with schizophrenia with recurrent sleep disruption. Method We examined the relationship between sleep-wake activity, recorded actigraphically over 6 weeks, along with ambient light exposure and simultaneous circadia...

  18. Circadian Clock Proteins in Mood Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Partonen, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Mood regulation is known to be affected by the change of seasons. Recent research findings have suggested that mood regulation may be influenced by the function of circadian clocks. In addition, the activity of brown adipocytes has been hypothesized to contribute to mood regulation. Here, the overarching link to mood disorders might be the circadian clock protein nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 1.

  19. Circadian Rhythms and Obesity in Mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Oren Froy

    2012-01-01

    Obesity has become a serious public health problem and a major risk factor for the development of illnesses, such as insulin resistance and hypertension. Attempts to understand the causes of obesity and develop new therapeutic strategies have mostly focused on caloric intake and energy expenditure. Recent studies have shown that the circadian clock controls energy homeostasis by regulating the circadian expression and/or activity of enzymes, hormones, and transport systems involved in metabol...

  20. Neuroanatomy of the Extended Circadian Rhythm System

    OpenAIRE

    Morin, Lawrence P

    2012-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), site of the primary clock in the circadian rhythm system, has three major afferent connections. The most important consists of a retinohypothalamic projection through which photic information, received by classical rod/cone photoreceptors and intrinsically photoreceptive retinal ganglion cells, gains access to the clock. This information influences phase and period of circadian rhythms. The two other robust afferent projections are the median raphe serotoner...

  1. Glaucoma Alters the Circadian Timing System

    OpenAIRE

    Drouyer, Elise; Dkhissi-Benyahya, Ouria; Chiquet, Christophe; WoldeMussie, Elizabeth; Ruiz, Guadalupe; Wheeler, Larry A.; Denis, Philippe; Cooper, Howard M.

    2008-01-01

    Glaucoma is a widespread ocular disease and major cause of blindness characterized by progressive, irreversible damage of the optic nerve. Although the degenerative loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) and visual deficits associated with glaucoma have been extensively studied, we hypothesize that glaucoma will also lead to alteration of the circadian timing system. Circadian and non-visual responses to light are mediated by a specialized subset of melanopsin expressing RGCs that provide photi...

  2. Visual impairment and circadian rhythm disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    Lockley, SW; Arendt, J; Skene, DJ

    2007-01-01

    Many aspects of human physiology and behavior are dominated by 24-hour circadian rhythms that have a major impact on our health and well-being, including the sleep-wake cycle, alertness and performance patterns, and many daily hormone profiles. These rhythms are spontaneously generated by an internal "pacemaker" in the hypothalamus, and daily light exposure to the eyes is required to keep these circadian rhythms synchronized both internally and with the external environment. Sighted individua...

  3. Circadian clock proteins in mood regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo ePartonen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mood regulation is known to be affected by the change of seasons. Recent research findings have suggested that mood regulation may be influenced by the function of circadian clocks. In addition, the activity of brown adipocytes has been hypothesized to contribute to mood regulation. Here, the overarching link to mood disorders might be the circadian clock protein NR1D1 (nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 1.

  4. Circadian Gene Networks In Bone Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan, Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggested that vitamin D played a significant role in bone regeneration, facilitating the establishment of implant osseointegration. A whole genome microarray study further suggested that the vitamin D axis might involve circadian rhythm gene expression in the bone peripheral tissue.OBJECTIVES: To identify key gene networks involved with vitamin D receptor in the bone regeneration process and to explore any correlation with circadian rhythm gene expression in bone...

  5. Evolution of circadian organization in vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Menaker

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available Circadian organization means the way in which the entire circadian system above the cellular level is put together physically and the principles and rules that determine the interactions among its component parts which produce overt rhythms of physiology and behavior. Understanding this organization and its evolution is of practical importance as well as of basic interest. The first major problem that we face is the difficulty of making sense of the apparently great diversity that we observe in circadian organization of diverse vertebrates. Some of this diversity falls neatly into place along phylogenetic lines leading to firm generalizations: i in all vertebrates there is a "circadian axis" consisting of the retinas, the pineal gland and the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, ii in many non-mammalian vertebrates of all classes (but not in any mammals the pineal gland is both a photoreceptor and a circadian oscillator, and iii in all non-mammalian vertebrates (but not in any mammals there are extraretinal (and extrapineal circadian photoreceptors. An interesting explanation of some of these facts, especially the differences between mammals and other vertebrates, can be constructed on the assumption that early in their evolution mammals passed through a "nocturnal bottleneck". On the other hand, a good deal of the diversity among the circadian systems of vertebrates does not fall neatly into place along phylogenetic lines. In the present review we will consider how we might better understand such "phylogenetically incoherent" diversity and what sorts of new information may help to further our understanding of the evolution of circadian organization in vertebrates

  6. Neuroimaging, cognition, light and circadian rhythms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia eGaggioni

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In humans, sleep and wakefulness and the associated cognitive processes are regulated through interactions between sleep homeostasis and the circadian system. Chronic disruption of sleep and circadian rhythmicity is common in our society and there is a need for a better understanding of the brain mechanisms regulating sleep, wakefulness and associated cognitive processes. This review summarizes recent investigations which provide first neural correlates of the combined influence of sleep homeostasis and circadian rhythmicity on cognitive brain activity. Markers of interindividual variations in sleep-wake regulation, such as chronotype and polymorphisms in sleep and clock genes, are associated with changes in cognitive brain responses in subcortical and cortical areas in response to manipulations of the sleep-wake cycle. This review also includes recent data showing that cognitive brain activity is regulated by light, which is a powerful modulator of cognition and alertness and also directly impacts sleep and circadian rhythmicity. The effect of light varied with age, psychiatric status, PERIOD3 genotype and changes in sleep homeostasis and circadian phase. These data provide new insights into the contribution of demographic characteristics, the sleep-wake cycle, circadian rhythmicity and light to brain functioning.

  7. Circadian Clock Control of Liver Metabolic Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, Hans; Asher, Gad

    2016-03-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous biological timekeeping system that synchronizes physiology and behavior to day/night cycles. A wide variety of processes throughout the entire gastrointestinal tract and notably the liver appear to be under circadian control. These include various metabolic functions such as nutrient uptake, processing, and detoxification, which align organ function to cycle with nutrient supply and demand. Remarkably, genetic or environmental disruption of the circadian clock can cause metabolic diseases or exacerbate pathological states. In addition, modern lifestyles force more and more people worldwide into asynchrony between the external time and their circadian clock, resulting in a constant state of social jetlag. Recent evidence indicates that interactions between altered energy metabolism and disruptions in the circadian clock create a downward spiral that can lead to diabetes and other metabolic diseases. In this review, we provide an overview of rhythmic processes in the liver and highlight the functions of circadian clock genes under physiological and pathological conditions; we focus on their roles in regulation of hepatic glucose as well as lipid and bile acid metabolism and detoxification and their potential effects on the development of fatty liver and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:26657326

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of Circadian Regulation During Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanello, Susana; Boyle, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of the regular environmental circadian cues in addition to stringent and demanding operational schedules are two main factors that undoubtedly impact sleep patterns and vigilant performance in the astronaut crews during spaceflight. Most research is focused on the behavioral aspects of the risk of circadian desynchronization, characterized by fatigue and health and performance decrement. A common countermeasure for circadian re-entrainment utilizes blue-green light to entrain the circadian clock and mitigate this risk. However, an effective countermeasure targeting the photoreceptor system requires that the basic circadian molecular machinery remains intact during spaceflight. The molecular clock consists of sets of proteins that perform different functions within the clock machinery: circadian oscillators (genes whose expression levels cycle during the day, keep the pass of cellular time and regulate downstream effector genes), the effector or output genes (those which impact the physiology of the tissue or organism), and the input genes (responsible for sensing the environmental cues that allow circadian entrainment). The main environmental cue is light. As opposed to the known photoreceptors (rods and cones), the non-visual light stimulus is received by a subset of the population of retinal ganglion cells called intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC) that express melanopsin (opsin 4 -Opn4-) as the photoreceptor. We hypothesize that spaceflight may affect ipRGC and melanopsin expression, which may be a contributing cause of circadian disruption during spaceflight. To answer this question, eyes from albino Balb/cJ mice aboard STS-133 were collected for histological analysis and gene expression profiling of the retina at 1 and 7 days after landing. Both vivarium and AEM (animal enclosure module) mice were used as ground controls. Opn4 expression was analyzed by real time RT/qPCR and retinal sections were stained for Opn4

  9. Natural selection against a circadian clock gene mutation in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, K.; Wikelski, Martin; Daan, Serge; Loudon, Andrew; Hau, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    Circadian rhythms with an endogenous period close or equal to the natural light-dark cycle are considered evolutionarily adaptive (‘circadian resonance hypothesis’). Despite remarkable insight into the molecular mechanisms driving circadian cycles, this hypothesis has not been tested under natural c

  10. Circadian rhythms and addiction: Mechanistic insights and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Logan, Ryan W.; Williams, Wilbur P.; McClung, Colleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are prominent in many physiological and behavioral functions. Circadian disruptions either by environmental or molecular perturbation can have profound health consequences, including the development and progression of addiction. Both animal and humans studies indicate extensive bidirectional relationships between the circadian system and drugs of abuse. Addicted individuals display disrupted rhythms, and chronic disruption or particular chronotypes, may increase the risk for...

  11. The circadian clock in cancer development and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most aspects of mammalian function display circadian rhythms driven by an endogenous clock. The circadian clock is operated by genes and comprises a central clock in the brain that responds to environmental cues and controls subordinate clocks in peripheral tissues via circadian output pathways. The...

  12. Phase resetting of the mammalian circadian clock by DNA damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oklejewicz, Malgorzata; Destici, Eugin; Tamanini, Filippo; Hut, Roelof A.; Janssens, Roel; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.

    2008-01-01

    To anticipate the momentum of the day, most organisms have developed an internal clock that drives circadian rhythms in metabolism, physiology, and behavior [1]. Recent studies indicate that cell-cycle progression and DNA-damage-response pathways are under circadian control [2-4]. Because circadian

  13. Circadian and wakefulness-sleep modulation of cognition in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Kenneth P; Lowry, Christopher A; Lebourgeois, Monique K

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive and affective processes vary over the course of the 24 h day. Time of day dependent changes in human cognition are modulated by an internal circadian timekeeping system with a near-24 h period. The human circadian timekeeping system interacts with sleep-wakefulness regulatory processes to modulate brain arousal, neurocognitive and affective function. Brain arousal is regulated by ascending brain stem, basal forebrain (BF) and hypothalamic arousal systems and inhibition or disruption of these systems reduces brain arousal, impairs cognition, and promotes sleep. The internal circadian timekeeping system modulates cognition and affective function by projections from the master circadian clock, located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), to arousal and sleep systems and via clock gene oscillations in brain tissues. Understanding the basic principles of circadian and wakefulness-sleep physiology can help to recognize how the circadian system modulates human cognition and influences learning, memory and emotion. Developmental changes in sleep and circadian processes and circadian misalignment in circadian rhythm sleep disorders have important implications for learning, memory and emotion. Overall, when wakefulness occurs at appropriate internal biological times, circadian clockwork benefits human cognitive and emotion function throughout the lifespan. Yet, when wakefulness occurs at inappropriate biological times because of environmental pressures (e.g., early school start times, long work hours that include work at night, shift work, jet lag) or because of circadian rhythm sleep disorders, the resulting misalignment between circadian and wakefulness-sleep physiology leads to impaired cognitive performance, learning, emotion, and safety. PMID:22529774

  14. Circadian and Wakefulness-Sleep Modulation of Cognition in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth P Wright

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive and affective processes vary over the course of the 24 hour day. Time of day dependent changes in human cognition are modulated by an internal circadian timekeeping system with a near-24-hour period. The human circadian timekeeping system interacts with sleep-wakefulness regulatory processes to modulate brain arousal, neurocognitive and affective function. Brain arousal is regulated by ascending brain stem, basal forebrain and hypothalamic arousal systems and inhibition or disruption of these systems reduces brain arousal, impairs cognition, and promotes sleep. The internal circadian timekeeping system modulates cognition and affective function by projections from the master circadian clock, located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei, to arousal and sleep systems and via clock gene oscillations in brain tissues. Understanding the basic principles of circadian and wakefulness-sleep physiology can help to recognize how the circadian system modulates human cognition and influences learning, memory and emotion. Developmental changes in sleep and circadian processes and circadian misalignment in circadian rhythm sleep disorders have important implications for learning, memory and emotion. Overall, when wakefulness occurs at appropriate internal biological times, circadian clockwork benefits human cognitive and emotion function throughout the lifespan. Yet, when wakefulness occurs at inappropriate biological times because of environmental pressures (e.g., early school start times, long work hours that include work at night, shift work, jet lag or because of circadian rhythm sleep disorders, the resulting misalignment between circadian and wakefulness-sleep physiology leads to impaired cognitive performance, learning, emotion, and safety.

  15. Optimal implementations for reliable circadian clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiko; Arita, Masanori

    2014-09-01

    Circadian rhythms are acquired through evolution to increase the chances for survival through synchronizing with the daylight cycle. Reliable synchronization is realized through two trade-off properties: regularity to keep time precisely, and entrainability to synchronize the internal time with daylight. We find by using a phase model with multiple inputs that achieving the maximal limit of regularity and entrainability entails many inherent features of the circadian mechanism. At the molecular level, we demonstrate the role sharing of two light inputs, phase advance and delay, as is well observed in mammals. At the behavioral level, the optimal phase-response curve inevitably contains a dead zone, a time during which light pulses neither advance nor delay the clock. We reproduce the results of phase-controlling experiments entrained by two types of periodic light pulses. Our results indicate that circadian clocks are designed optimally for reliable clockwork through evolution. PMID:25238386

  16. Circadian pattern in cerebro vascular disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalla A

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, various studies have been reported to evaluate the circadian pattern of cardiovascular and cerebro-vascular diseases. The data from Indian population is lacking. We undertook this prospective observational study to evaluate the circadian variation in disorders like cerebro-vascular accidents and transient ischemic attacks. Total of 146 patients (events were studied. Only 10 patients had TIA′s. 55% had hemorrhage and 45% had infarction. The 24 hours period was divided into 6 equal portions of 4 hours each. The maximum events were seen between 4 am to 8 am and 12 noon to 4 pm (23.28% each. Minimum events were seen between 12 midnight to 4 am 14/146 - 9.58%. The circadian variation in occurrence of cerebro-vascular disorders was present with two equal peaks.

  17. Circadian oscillators in the mouse brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin F; Rovsing, Louise; Møller, Morten

    2014-01-01

    The circadian timekeeper of the mammalian brain resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus (SCN), and is characterized by rhythmic expression of a set of clock genes with specific 24-h daily profiles. An increasing amount of data suggests that additional circadian oscillators...... residing outside the SCN have the capacity to generate peripheral circadian rhythms. We have recently shown the presence of SCN-controlled oscillators in the neocortex and cerebellum of the rat. The function of these peripheral brain clocks is unknown, and elucidating this could involve mice with...... conditional cell-specific clock gene deletions. This prompted us to analyze the molecular clockwork of the mouse neocortex and cerebellum in detail. Here, by use of in situ hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR, we show that clock genes are expressed in all six layers of the neocortex and the Purkinje and...

  18. Quantification of circadian rhythms in single cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pål O Westermark

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence techniques allow accurate monitoring of the circadian clock in single cells. We have analyzed bioluminescence data of Per gene expression in mouse SCN neurons and fibroblasts. From these data, we extracted parameters such as damping rate and noise intensity using two simple mathematical models, one describing a damped oscillator driven by noise, and one describing a self-sustained noisy oscillator. Both models describe the data well and enabled us to quantitatively characterize both wild-type cells and several mutants. It has been suggested that the circadian clock is self-sustained at the single cell level, but we conclude that present data are not sufficient to determine whether the circadian clock of single SCN neurons and fibroblasts is a damped or a self-sustained oscillator. We show how to settle this question, however, by testing the models' predictions of different phases and amplitudes in response to a periodic entrainment signal (zeitgeber.

  19. Coordination of the maize transcriptome by a conserved circadian clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harmon Frank G

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The plant circadian clock orchestrates 24-hour rhythms in internal physiological processes to coordinate these activities with daily and seasonal changes in the environment. The circadian clock has a profound impact on many aspects of plant growth and development, including biomass accumulation and flowering time. Despite recent advances in understanding the circadian system of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the contribution of the circadian oscillator to important agronomic traits in Zea mays and other cereals remains poorly defined. To address this deficit, this study investigated the transcriptional landscape of the maize circadian system. Results Since transcriptional regulation is a fundamental aspect of circadian systems, genes exhibiting circadian expression were identified in the sequenced maize inbred B73. Of the over 13,000 transcripts examined, approximately 10 percent displayed circadian expression patterns. The majority of cycling genes had peak expression at subjective dawn and dusk, similar to other plant circadian systems. The maize circadian clock organized co-regulation of genes participating in fundamental physiological processes, including photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, cell wall biogenesis, and phytohormone biosynthesis pathways. Conclusions Circadian regulation of the maize genome was widespread and key genes in several major metabolic pathways had circadian expression waveforms. The maize circadian clock coordinated transcription to be coincident with oncoming day or night, which was consistent with the circadian oscillator acting to prepare the plant for these major recurring environmental changes. These findings highlighted the multiple processes in maize plants under circadian regulation and, as a result, provided insight into the important contribution this regulatory system makes to agronomic traits in maize and potentially other C4 plant species.

  20. Modelling of intercellular synchronization in the Drosophila circadian clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jun-Wei; Chen Ai-Min; Zhang Jia-Jun; Yuan Zhan-Jiang; Zhou Tian-Shou

    2009-01-01

    In circadian rhythm generation, intercellular signaling factors are shown to play a crucial role in both sustaining intrinsic cellular rhythmicity and acquiring collective behaviours across a population of circadian neurons. However, the physical mechanism behind their role remains to be fully understood. In this paper, we propose an indirectly coupled multicellular model for the synchronization of Drosophila circadian oscillators combining both intracellular and intercellular dynamics. By simulating different experimental conditions, we find that such an indirect coupling way can synchronize both heterogeneous self-sustained circadian neurons and heterogeneous mutational damped circadian neurons. Moreover, they can also be entrained to ambient light-dark (LD) cycles depending on intercellular signaling.

  1. Development of circadian oscillators in neurosphere cultures during adult neurogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astha Malik

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are common in many cell types but are reported to be lacking in embryonic stem cells. Recent studies have described possible interactions between the molecular mechanism of circadian clocks and the signaling pathways that regulate stem cell differentiation. Circadian rhythms have not been examined well in neural stem cells and progenitor cells that produce new neurons and glial cells during adult neurogenesis. To evaluate circadian timing abilities of cells undergoing neural differentiation, neurospheres were prepared from the mouse subventricular zone (SVZ, a rich source of adult neural stem cells. Circadian rhythms in mPer1 gene expression were recorded in individual spheres, and cell types were characterized by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy at early and late developmental stages in vitro. Circadian rhythms were observed in neurospheres induced to differentiate into neurons or glia, and rhythms emerged within 3-4 days as differentiation proceeded, suggesting that the neural stem cell state suppresses the functioning of the circadian clock. Evidence was also provided that neural stem progenitor cells derived from the SVZ of adult mice are self-sufficient clock cells capable of producing a circadian rhythm without input from known circadian pacemakers of the organism. Expression of mPer1 occurred in high frequency oscillations before circadian rhythms were detected, which may represent a role for this circadian clock gene in the fast cycling of gene expression responsible for early cell differentiation.

  2. Retinal circadian clocks and non-visual photoreceptors: light input to the circadian system.

    OpenAIRE

    Ouria Dkhissi-Benyahya

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian retina contains an endogenous pacemaker that regulates retinal physiology and adjusts daily the temporal phase of the central circadian timing system with environmental time. This entrainment process involves rods, cones and melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells. In contrast with non mammalian retinas, in which the clock has been identified in photoreceptors, the location of the retinal circadian clock in mammals is still controversial. In addition, the impact of specific...

  3. Phosphorylating DNA with DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Yingfu; Breaker, Ronald R.

    1999-01-01

    Nearly 50 individual DNAs with polynucleotide kinase-like activity were isolated from a random-sequence pool by using in vitro selection. Each self-phosphorylating deoxyribozyme makes use of one or more of the eight standard NTPs or dNTPs as a source of activated phosphate. Although most prototypic deoxyribozymes poorly differentiate between the ribose and deoxyribose moieties, further optimization by in vitro selection produced variants that display up to 100-fold discrimination between rela...

  4. Synaptic plasticity and phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hey-Kyoung

    2006-01-01

    A number of neuronal functions, including synaptic plasticity, depend on proper regulation of synaptic proteins, many of which can be rapidly regulated by phosphorylation. Neuronal activity controls the function of these synaptic proteins by exquisitely regulating the balance of various protein kinase and protein phosphatase activity. Recent understanding of synaptic plasticity mechanisms underscores important roles that these synaptic phosphoproteins play in regulating both pre- and post-syn...

  5. Circadian metabolism in the light of evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhart-Hines, Zachary; Lazar, Mitchell A

    2015-06-01

    Circadian rhythm, or daily oscillation, of behaviors and biological processes is a fundamental feature of mammalian physiology that has developed over hundreds of thousands of years under the continuous evolutionary pressure of energy conservation and efficiency. Evolution has fine-tuned the body's clock to anticipate and respond to numerous environmental cues in order to maintain homeostatic balance and promote survival. However, we now live in a society in which these classic circadian entrainment stimuli have been dramatically altered from the conditions under which the clock machinery was originally set. A bombardment of artificial lighting, heating, and cooling systems that maintain constant ambient temperature; sedentary lifestyle; and the availability of inexpensive, high-calorie foods has threatened even the most powerful and ancient circadian programming mechanisms. Such environmental changes have contributed to the recent staggering elevation in lifestyle-influenced pathologies, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, depression, obesity, and diabetes. This review scrutinizes the role of the body's internal clocks in the hard-wiring of circadian networks that have evolved to achieve energetic balance and adaptability, and it discusses potential therapeutic strategies to reset clock metabolic control to modern time for the benefit of human health. PMID:25927923

  6. Circadian systems biology: When time matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luise Fuhr

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript we review the combination of experimental methodologies, bioinformatics and theoretical models that have been essential to explore this remarkable timing-system. Such an integrative and interdisciplinary approach may provide new strategies with regard to chronotherapeutic treatment and new insights concerning the restoration of the circadian timing in clock-associated diseases.

  7. Temperature compensation and entrainment in circadian rhythms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To anticipate daily variations in the environment and coordinate biological activities into a daily cycle many organisms possess a circadian clock. In the absence of external time cues the circadian rhythm persists with a period of approximately 24 h. The clock phase can be shifted by single pulses of light, darkness, chemicals, or temperature and this allows entrainment of the clock to exactly 24 h by cycles of these zeitgebers. On the other hand, the period of the circadian rhythm is kept relatively constant within a physiological range of constant temperatures, which means that the oscillator is temperature compensated. The mechanisms behind temperature compensation and temperature entrainment are not fully understood, neither biochemically nor mathematically. Here, we theoretically investigate the interplay of temperature compensation and entrainment in general oscillatory systems. We first give an analytical treatment for small temperature shifts and derive that every temperature-compensated oscillator is entrainable to external small-amplitude temperature cycles. Temperature compensation ensures that this entrainment region is always centered at the endogenous period regardless of possible seasonal temperature differences. Moreover, for small temperature cycles the entrainment region of the oscillator is potentially larger for rectangular pulses. For large temperature shifts we numerically analyze different circadian clock models proposed in the literature with respect to these properties. We observe that for such large temperature shifts sinusoidal or gradual temperature cycles allow a larger entrainment region than rectangular cycles. (paper)

  8. How Temperature Changes Reset a Circadian Oscillator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merrow, Martha; Loros, Jennifer J.; Dunlap, Jay C.

    1998-01-01

    Circadian rhythms control many physiological activities. The environmental entrainment of rhythms involves the immediate responses of clock components. Levels of the clock protein FRQ were measured in Neurospora at various temperatures; at higher temperatures, the amount of FRQ oscillated around hig

  9. Circadian clockwork and entrainment during development

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sumová, Alena; Sládek, Martin; Kováčiková, Zuzana; El-Hennamy, Rehab; Laurinová, Kristýna; Bendová, Zdena; Illnerová, Helena

    Frankfurt/Main : J.W. Goethe- University, 2005. s. 55-55. [Congress of the EPBRS /10./. 01.09.2005-05.09.2005, Frankfurt/Main] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : circadian clockwork * development Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  10. Circadian adaptations to meal timing: Neuroendocrine mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danica F Patton

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms of behavior and physiology are generated by central and peripheral circadian oscillators entrained by periodic environmental or physiological stimuli. A master circadian pacemaker in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus is directly entrained by daily light-dark cycles, and coordinates the timing of other oscillators by direct and indirect neural, hormonal and behavioral outputs. The daily rhythm of food intake provides stimuli that entrain most peripheral and central oscillators, some of which can drive a daily rhythm of food anticipatory activity if food is restricted to one daily mealtime. The location of food-entrainable oscillators (FEOs that drive food anticipatory rhythms, and the food-related stimuli that entrain these oscillators, remain to be clarified. Here, we critically examine the role of peripheral metabolic hormones as potential internal entrainment stimuli or outputs for FEOs controlling food anticipatory rhythms in rats and mice. Hormones for which data are available include corticosterone, ghrelin, leptin, insulin, glucagon, and glucagon-like peptide 1. All of these hormones exhibit daily rhythms of synthesis and secretion that are synchronized by meal timing. There is some evidence that ghrelin and leptin modulate the expression of food anticipatory rhythms, but none of the hormones examined so far are necessary for entrainment. Ghrelin and leptin likely modulate food-entrained rhythms by actions in hypothalamic circuits utilizing melanocortin and orexin signaling, although again food-entrained behavioral rhythms can persist in lesion and gene knockout models in which these systems are disabled. Actions of these hormones on circadian oscillators in central reward circuits remain to be evaluated. Food-entrained activity rhythms are likely mediated by a distributed system of circadian oscillators sensitive to multiple feeding related inputs. Metabolic hormones appear to play a modulatory role within this

  11. The role of circadian rhythm in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shujing; Ao, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    The circadian rhythm is an endogenous time keeping system shared by most organisms. The circadian clock is comprised of both peripheral oscillators in most organ tissues of the body and a central pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the central nervous system. The circadian rhythm is crucial in maintaining the normal physiology of the organism including, but not limited to, cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and cellular metabolism; whereas disruption of the circadian rhythm is closely related to multi-tumorigenesis. In the past several years, studies from different fields have revealed that the genetic or functional disruption of the molecular circadian rhythm has been found in various cancers, such as breast, prostate, and ovarian. In this review, we will investigate and present an overview of the current research on the influence of circadian rhythm regulating proteins on breast cancer. PMID:23997531

  12. Mechanisms by which circadian rhythm disruption may lead to cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. Roden

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Humans have evolved in a rhythmic environment and display daily (circadian rhythms in physiology, metabolism and behaviour that are in synchrony with the solar day. Modern lifestyles have compromised the exposure to bright light during the day and dark nights, resulting in the desynchronisation of endogenously generated circadian rhythms from the external environment and loss of coordination between rhythms within the body. This has detrimental effects on physical and mental health, due to the misregulation and uncoupling of important cellular and physiological processes. Long-term shift workers who are exposed to bright light at night experience the greatest disruption of their circadian rhythms. Studies have shown an association between exposure to light at night, circadian rhythm disruption and an increased risk of cancer. Previous reviews have explored the relevance of light and melatonin in cancer, but here we explore the correlation of circadian rhythm disruption and cancer in terms of molecular mechanisms affecting circadian gene expression and melatonin secretion.

  13. Circadian Organization of Behavior and Physiology in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allada, Ravi; Chung, Brian Y.

    2010-01-01

    Circadian clocks organize behavior and physiology to adapt to daily environmental cycles. Genetic approaches in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, have revealed widely conserved molecular gears of these 24-h timers. Yet much less is known about how these cell-autonomous clocks confer temporal information to modulate cellular functions. Here we discuss our current knowledge of circadian clock function in Drosophila, providing an overview of the molecular underpinnings of circadian clocks. We then describe the neural network important for circadian rhythms of locomotor activity, including how these molecular clocks might influence neuronal function. Finally, we address a range of behaviors and physiological systems regulated by circadian clocks, including discussion of specific peripheral oscillators and key molecular effectors where they have been described. These studies reveal a remarkable complexity to circadian pathways in this “simple” model organism. PMID:20148690

  14. Proteomics of the photoneuroendocrine circadian system of the brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Morten; Lund-Andersen, Casper; Rovsing, Louise;

    2010-01-01

    The photoneuroendocrine circadian system of the brain consists of (a) specialized photoreceptors in the retina, (b) a circadian generator located in the forebrain that contains "clock genes," (c) specialized nuclei in the forebrain involved in neuroendocrine secretion, and (d) the pineal gland. The...... circadian generator is a nucleus, called the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The neurons of this nucleus contain "clock genes," the transcription of which exhibits a circadian rhythm. Most circadian rhythms are generated by the neurons of this nucleus and, via neuronal and humoral connections, the SCN......-generating system in mammals is described, and recent proteomic studies that investigate day/night changes in the retina, SCN, and pineal gland are reviewed. Further circadian changes controlled by the SCN in gene and protein expression in the liver are discussed....

  15. Circadian genes differentially affect tolerance to ethanol in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Jascha B.; Ghezzi, Alfredo; Lew, Linda K.; Robles, Roseanna B.; Cormack, Lawrence; Atkinson, Nigel S.

    2016-01-01

    Background There is a strong relationship between circadian rhythms and ethanol responses. Ethanol consumption has been shown to disrupt physiological and behavioral circadian rhythms in mammals (Spanagel et al., 2005b). The Drosophila central circadian pacemaker is composed of proteins encoded by the per, tim, cyc, and Clk genes. Using Drosophila mutant analysis we asked whether these central components of the circadian clock make the equivalent contribution towards ethanol tolerance and whether rhythmicity itself is necessary for tolerance. Methods We tested flies carrying mutations in core clock genes for the capacity to acquire ethanol tolerance. Tolerance was assayed by comparing the sedation curves of populations during their first and second sedation. Animals that had acquired tolerance sedated more slowly. Movement was also monitored as the flies breathe the ethanol vapor to determine if other facets of the ethanol response were affected by the mutations. Gas chromatography was used to measure internal ethanol concentration. Constant light was used to non-genetically destabilize the PER and TIM proteins. Results A group of circadian mutations, all of which eliminate circadian rhythms, do not disrupt tolerance identically. Mutations in per, tim, and cyc completely block tolerance. However, a mutation in Clk does not interfere with tolerance. Constant light also disrupts the capacity to acquire tolerance. These lines did not differ in ethanol absorption. Conclusions Mutations affecting different parts of the intracellular circadian clock can block the capacity to acquire rapid ethanol tolerance. However, the role of circadian genes in ethanol tolerance is independent of their role in producing circadian rhythmicity. The interference in the capacity to acquire ethanol tolerance by some circadian mutations is not merely a downstream effect of a nonfunctional circadian clock, instead these circadian genes play an independent role in ethanol tolerance. PMID

  16. Circadian Rhythms, the Molecular Clock, and Skeletal Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Lefta, Mellani; Wolff, Gretchen; Esser, Karyn A

    2011-01-01

    Almost all organisms ranging from single cell bacteria to humans exhibit a variety of behavioral, physiological, and biochemical rhythms. In mammals, circadian rhythms control the timing of many physiological processes over a 24-h period, including sleep-wake cycles, body temperature, feeding, and hormone production. This body of research has led to defined characteristics of circadian rhythms based on period length, phase, and amplitude. Underlying circadian behaviors is a molecular clock me...

  17. Circadian Organization of Behavior and Physiology in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Allada, Ravi; Chung, Brian Y.

    2010-01-01

    Circadian clocks organize behavior and physiology to adapt to daily environmental cycles. Genetic approaches in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, have revealed widely conserved molecular gears of these 24-h timers. Yet much less is known about how these cell-autonomous clocks confer temporal information to modulate cellular functions. Here we discuss our current knowledge of circadian clock function in Drosophila, providing an overview of the molecular underpinnings of circadian clocks....

  18. A role for the circadian genes in drug addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Falcón, Edgardo; McClung, Colleen A.

    2008-01-01

    Diurnal and circadian rhythms are prominent in nearly all bodily functions. Chronic disruptions in normal sleep wake and social schedules can lead to serious health problems such as those seen in shift worker’s syndrome. Moreover, genetic disruptions in normal circadian gene functions have recently been linked to a variety of psychiatric conditions including depression, bipolar disorder, seasonal affective disorder and alcoholism. Recent studies are beginning to determine how these circadian ...

  19. A Clinical Approach to Circadian Rhythm Sleep Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Barion, Ana; Zee, Phyllis C.

    2007-01-01

    Circadian rhythm sleep disorders are characterized by complaints of insomnia and excessive sleepiness that are primarily due to alterations in the internal circadian timing system or a misalignment between the timing of sleep and the 24-hour social and physical environment. In addition to physiological and environmental factors, maladaptive behaviors often play an important role in the development of many of the circadian rhythm sleep disorders. This review will focus on the clinical approach...

  20. Circadian Clock Genes: Effects on Dopamine, Reward and Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Parekh, Puja K.; Ozburn, Angela R; McClung, Colleen A.

    2015-01-01

    Addiction is a widespread public health issue with social and economic ramifications. Substance abuse disorders are often accompanied by disruptions in circadian rhythms including sleep/wake cycles, which can exacerbate symptoms of addiction and dependence. Additionally, genetic disturbance of circadian molecular mechanisms can predispose some individuals to substance abuse disorders. In this review, we will discuss how circadian genes can regulate midbrain dopaminergic activity and subsequen...

  1. AMPK at the crossroads of circadian clocks and metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan, Sabine D.; Lamia, Katja A.

    2012-01-01

    Circadian clocks coordinate behavior and physiology with daily environmental cycles and thereby optimize the timing of metabolic processes such as glucose production and insulin secretion. Such circadian regulation of metabolism provides an adaptive advantage in diverse organisms. Mammalian clocks are primarily based on a transcription and translation feedback loop in which a heterodimeric complex of the transcription factors CLOCK (circadian locomotor output cycles kaput) and BMAL1 (brain an...

  2. Pathophysiology and pathogenesis of circadian rhythm sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hida Akiko

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Metabolic, physiological and behavioral processes exhibit 24-hour rhythms in most organisms, including humans. These rhythms are driven by a system of self-sustained clocks and are entrained by environmental cues such as light-dark cycles as well as food intake. In mammals, the circadian clock system is hierarchically organized such that the master clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus integrates environmental information and synchronizes the phase of oscillators in peripheral tissues. The transcription and translation feedback loops of multiple clock genes are involved in the molecular mechanism of the circadian system. Disturbed circadian rhythms are known to be closely related to many diseases, including sleep disorders. Advanced sleep phase type, delayed sleep phase type and nonentrained type of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSDs are thought to result from disorganization of the circadian system. Evaluation of circadian phenotypes is indispensable to understanding the pathophysiology of CRSD. It is laborious and costly to assess an individual's circadian properties precisely, however, because the subject is usually required to stay in a laboratory environment free from external cues and masking effects for a minimum of several weeks. More convenient measurements of circadian rhythms are therefore needed to reduce patients' burden. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology and pathogenesis of CRSD as well as surrogate measurements for assessing an individual's circadian phenotype.

  3. Circadian rhythms and addiction: mechanistic insights and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Ryan W; Williams, Wilbur P; McClung, Colleen A

    2014-06-01

    Circadian rhythms are prominent in many physiological and behavioral functions. Circadian disruptions either by environmental or molecular perturbation can have profound health consequences, including the development and progression of addiction. Both animal and humans studies indicate extensive bidirectional relationships between the circadian system and drugs of abuse. Addicted individuals display disrupted rhythms, and chronic disruption or particular chronotypes may increase the risk for substance abuse and relapse. Moreover, polymorphisms in circadian genes and an evening chronotype have been linked to mood and addiction disorders, and recent efforts suggest an association with the function of reward neurocircuitry. Animal studies are beginning to determine how altered circadian gene function results in drug-induced neuroplasticity and behaviors. Many studies suggest a critical role for circadian rhythms in reward-related pathways in the brain and indicate that drugs of abuse directly affect the central circadian pacemaker. In this review, we highlight key findings demonstrating the importance of circadian rhythms in addiction and how future studies will reveal important mechanistic insights into the involvement of circadian rhythms in drug addiction. PMID:24731209

  4. Circadian Clocks as Modulators of Metabolic Comorbidity in Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barandas, Rita; Landgraf, Dominic; McCarthy, Michael J; Welsh, David K

    2015-12-01

    Psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depressive disorder are often accompanied by metabolic dysfunction symptoms, including obesity and diabetes. Since the circadian system controls important brain systems that regulate affective, cognitive, and metabolic functions, and neuropsychiatric and metabolic diseases are often correlated with disturbances of circadian rhythms, we hypothesize that dysregulation of circadian clocks plays a central role in metabolic comorbidity in psychiatric disorders. In this review paper, we highlight the role of circadian clocks in glucocorticoid, dopamine, and orexin/melanin-concentrating hormone systems and describe how a dysfunction of these clocks may contribute to the simultaneous development of psychiatric and metabolic symptoms. PMID:26483181

  5. Circadian variation in the pharmacokinetics of verapamil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, C M; Frederiksen, M; Hansen, J F;

    1989-01-01

    Circadian variation in the metabolism of verapamil was investigated in 10 patients with stable angina pectoris during treatment with sustained-release verapamil 360 mg at 08.00 h or 22.0 h. No major difference in exercise parameters was found. During the evening dosage schedule a significantly...... greater bioavailability (AUC) and a prolonged time to peak concentration was found. During the night (24.00 h-06.00 h) the half-life of verapamil was significantly longer than during the day (16.00 h-22.00 h). These differences in pharmacokinetics may be due to reduced hepatic blood flow at night...... or to circadian variation in hepatic microsomal metabolism....

  6. Central Circadian Control of Female Reproductive Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BrookeHMiller

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past two decades, it has become clear just how much of our physiology is under the control of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN and the cell-intrinsic molecular clock that ticks with a periodicity of approximately 24 hours. The SCN prepares our digestive system for meals, our adrenal axis for the stress of waking up in the morning, and the genes expressed in our muscles when we prepare to exercise, Long before molecular studies of genes such as Clock, Bmal1, and the Per homologs were possible, it was obvious that female reproductive function was under strict circadian control at every level of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG axis, and in the establishment and successful maintenance of pregnancy. This review highlights our current understanding of the role that the SCN plays in regulating female reproductive physiology, with a special emphasis on the advances made possible through the use of circadian mutant mice.

  7. Circadian rhythm and cell population growth

    CERN Document Server

    Clairambault, Jean; Lepoutre, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Molecular circadian clocks, that are found in all nucleated cells of mammals, are known to dictate rhythms of approximately 24 hours (circa diem) to many physiological processes. This includes metabolism (e.g., temperature, hormonal blood levels) and cell proliferation. It has been observed in tumor-bearing laboratory rodents that a severe disruption of these physiological rhythms results in accelerated tumor growth. The question of accurately representing the control exerted by circadian clocks on healthy and tumour tissue proliferation to explain this phenomenon has given rise to mathematical developments, which we review. The main goal of these previous works was to examine the influence of a periodic control on the cell division cycle in physiologically structured cell populations, comparing the effects of periodic control with no control, and of different periodic controls between them. We state here a general convexity result that may give a theoretical justification to the concept of cancer chronothera...

  8. Circadian clock, cell cycle and cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cansu Özbayer

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There are a few rhythms of our daily lives that we are under the influence. One of them is characterized by predictable changes over a 24-hour timescale called circadian clock. This cellular clock is coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the anterior hypothalamus. The clock consist of an autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loop compose of four genes/proteins; BMAL1, Clock, Cyrptochrome, and Period. BMAL 1 and Clock are transcriptional factors and Period and Cyrptochrome are their targets. Period and Cyrptochrome dimerize in the cytoplasm to enter the nucleus where they inhibit Clock/BMAL activity.It has been demonstrate that circadian clock plays an important role cellular proliferation, DNA damage and repair mechanisms, checkpoints, apoptosis and cancer.

  9. The circadian clock, reward and memory

    OpenAIRE

    Urs eAlbrecht

    2011-01-01

    During our daily activities, we experience variations in our cognitive performance, which is often accompanied by cravings for small rewards, such as consuming coffee or chocolate. This indicates that the time of day, cognitive performance, and reward may be related to one another. This review will summarize data that describe the influence of the circadian clock on addiction and mood-related behavior and put the data into perspective in relation to memory processes.

  10. Circadian Metabolism in the Light of Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerhart-Hines, Zachary; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2015-01-01

    A review. Circadian rhythm, or daily oscillation, of behaviors and biol. processes is a fundamental feature of mammalian physiol. that has developed over hundreds of thousands of years under the continuous evolutionary pressure of energy conservation and efficiency. Evolution has fine-tuned the...... energetic balance and adaptability, and it discusses potential therapeutic strategies to reset clock metabolic control to modern time for the benefit of human health. [on SciFinder(R)]...

  11. Shift work and circadian dysregulation of reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen L. Gamble

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Health impairments, including reproductive issues, are associated with working nights or rotating shifts. For example, shift work has been associated with an increased risk of irregular menstrual cycles, endometriosis, infertility, miscarriage, low birth weight or pre-term delivery, and reduced incidence of breastfeeding. Based on what is known about circadian regulation of endocrine rhythms in rodents (and much less in humans, the circadian clock is an integral regulatory part of the reproductive system. When this 24-h program is disordered by environmental perturbation (such as shift work or genetic alterations, the endocrine system can be impaired. The purpose of this review is to explore the hypothesis that misalignment of reproductive hormones with the environmental light-dark cycle and/or sleep wake rhythms can disrupt menstrual cycles, pregnancy, and parturition. We highlight the role of the circadian clock in regulating human reproductive physiology and shift work-induced pathology within each step of the reproductive axis while exploring potential mechanisms from the animal model literature. In addition to documenting the reproductive hazards of shift work, we also point out important gaps in our knowledge as critical areas for future investigation. For example, future studies should examine whether forced desynchronization disrupts gonadotropin secretion rhythms and whether there are sleep/wake schedules that are better or worse for the adaptation of the reproductive system to shift work. These studies are necessary in order to define not only whether or not shift-work induced circadian misalignment impairs reproductive capacity, but also to identify strategies for the future that can minimize this desynchronization.

  12. Shift work and circadian dysregulation of reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Karen L; Resuehr, David; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2013-01-01

    Health impairments, including reproductive issues, are associated with working nights or rotating shifts. For example, shift work has been associated with an increased risk of irregular menstrual cycles, endometriosis, infertility, miscarriage, low birth weight or pre-term delivery, and reduced incidence of breastfeeding. Based on what is known about circadian regulation of endocrine rhythms in rodents (and much less in humans), the circadian clock is an integral regulatory part of the reproductive system. When this 24-h program is disordered by environmental perturbation (such as shift work) or genetic alterations, the endocrine system can be impaired. The purpose of this review is to explore the hypothesis that misalignment of reproductive hormones with the environmental light-dark cycle and/or sleep-wake rhythms can disrupt menstrual cycles, pregnancy, and parturition. We highlight the role of the circadian clock in regulating human reproductive physiology and shift work-induced pathology within each step of the reproductive axis while exploring potential mechanisms from the animal model literature. In addition to documenting the reproductive hazards of shift work, we also point out important gaps in our knowledge as critical areas for future investigation. For example, future studies should examine whether forced desynchronization disrupts gonadotropin secretion rhythms and whether there are sleep/wake schedules that are better or worse for the adaptation of the reproductive system to shift work. These studies are necessary in order to define not only whether or not shift work-induced circadian misalignment impairs reproductive capacity, but also to identify strategies for the future that can minimize this desynchronization. PMID:23966978

  13. Circadian clock, cell cycle and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Cansu Özbayer; İrfan Değirmenci

    2011-01-01

    There are a few rhythms of our daily lives that we are under the influence. One of them is characterized by predictable changes over a 24-hour timescale called circadian clock. This cellular clock is coordinated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus in the anterior hypothalamus. The clock consist of an autoregulatory transcription-translation feedback loop compose of four genes/proteins; BMAL1, Clock, Cyrptochrome, and Period. BMAL 1 and Clock are transcriptional factors and Period and Cyrptochrome ...

  14. Glaucoma alters the circadian timing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouyer, Elise; Dkhissi-Benyahya, Ouria; Chiquet, Christophe; WoldeMussie, Elizabeth; Ruiz, Guadalupe; Wheeler, Larry A; Denis, Philippe; Cooper, Howard M

    2008-01-01

    Glaucoma is a widespread ocular disease and major cause of blindness characterized by progressive, irreversible damage of the optic nerve. Although the degenerative loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) and visual deficits associated with glaucoma have been extensively studied, we hypothesize that glaucoma will also lead to alteration of the circadian timing system. Circadian and non-visual responses to light are mediated by a specialized subset of melanopsin expressing RGCs that provide photic input to mammalian endogenous clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In order to explore the molecular, anatomical and functional consequences of glaucoma we used a rodent model of chronic ocular hypertension, a primary causal factor of the pathology. Quantitative analysis of retinal projections using sensitive anterograde tracing demonstrates a significant reduction (approximately 50-70%) of RGC axon terminals in all visual and non-visual structures and notably in the SCN. The capacity of glaucomatous rats to entrain to light was challenged by exposure to successive shifts of the light dark (LD) cycle associated with step-wise decreases in light intensity. Although glaucomatous rats are able to entrain their locomotor activity to the LD cycle at all light levels, they require more time to re-adjust to a shifted LD cycle and show significantly greater variability in activity onsets in comparison with normal rats. Quantitative PCR reveals the novel finding that melanopsin as well as rod and cone opsin mRNAs are significantly reduced in glaucomatous retinas. Our findings demonstrate that glaucoma impacts on all these aspects of the circadian timing system. In light of these results, the classical view of glaucoma as pathology unique to the visual system should be extended to include anatomical and functional alterations of the circadian timing system. PMID:19079596

  15. Circadian Phase Preference in Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerri L. Kim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric bipolar disorder (BD rates have notably increased over the past three decades. Given the significant morbidity and mortality associated with BD, efforts are needed to identify factors useful in earlier detection to help address this serious public health concern. Sleep is particularly important to consider given the sequelae of disrupted sleep on normative functioning and that sleep is included in diagnostic criteria for both Major Depressive and Manic Episodes. Here, we examine one component of sleep—i.e., circadian phase preference with the behavioral construct of morningness/eveningness (M/E. In comparing 30 BD and 45 typically developing control (TDC participants, ages 7–17 years, on the Morningness-Eveningness Scale for Children (MESC, no between-group differences emerged. Similar results were found when comparing three groups (BD−ADHD; BD+ADHD; TDC. Consistent with data available on circadian phase preference in adults with BD, however, we found that BD adolescents, ages 13 years and older, endorsed significantly greater eveningness compared to their TDC peers. While the current findings are limited by reliance on subjective report and the high-rate of comorbid ADHD among the BD group, this finding that BD teens demonstrate an exaggerated shift towards eveningness than would be developmentally expected is important. Future studies should compare the circadian rhythms across the lifespan for individuals diagnosed with BD, as well as identify the point at which BD youth part ways with their healthy peers in terms of phase preference. In addition, given our BD sample was overall euthymic, it may be that M/E is more state vs. trait specific in latency age youth. Further work would benefit from assessing circadian functioning using a combination of rating forms and laboratory-based measures. Improved understanding of sleep in BD may identify behavioral targets for inclusion in prevention and intervention protocols.

  16. Glaucoma Alters the Circadian Timing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drouyer, Elise; Dkhissi-Benyahya, Ouria; Chiquet, Christophe; WoldeMussie, Elizabeth; Ruiz, Guadalupe; Wheeler, Larry A.; Denis, Philippe; Cooper, Howard M.

    2008-01-01

    Glaucoma is a widespread ocular disease and major cause of blindness characterized by progressive, irreversible damage of the optic nerve. Although the degenerative loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) and visual deficits associated with glaucoma have been extensively studied, we hypothesize that glaucoma will also lead to alteration of the circadian timing system. Circadian and non-visual responses to light are mediated by a specialized subset of melanopsin expressing RGCs that provide photic input to mammalian endogenous clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In order to explore the molecular, anatomical and functional consequences of glaucoma we used a rodent model of chronic ocular hypertension, a primary causal factor of the pathology. Quantitative analysis of retinal projections using sensitive anterograde tracing demonstrates a significant reduction (∼50–70%) of RGC axon terminals in all visual and non-visual structures and notably in the SCN. The capacity of glaucomatous rats to entrain to light was challenged by exposure to successive shifts of the light dark (LD) cycle associated with step-wise decreases in light intensity. Although glaucomatous rats are able to entrain their locomotor activity to the LD cycle at all light levels, they require more time to re-adjust to a shifted LD cycle and show significantly greater variability in activity onsets in comparison with normal rats. Quantitative PCR reveals the novel finding that melanopsin as well as rod and cone opsin mRNAs are significantly reduced in glaucomatous retinas. Our findings demonstrate that glaucoma impacts on all these aspects of the circadian timing system. In light of these results, the classical view of glaucoma as pathology unique to the visual system should be extended to include anatomical and functional alterations of the circadian timing system. PMID:19079596

  17. Avian Circadian Organization: A Chorus of Clocks

    OpenAIRE

    Cassone, Vincent M.

    2013-01-01

    In birds, biological clock function pervades all aspects of biology, controlling daily changes in sleep: wake, visual function, song, migratory patterns and orientation, as well as seasonal patterns of reproduction, song and migration. The molecular bases for circadian clocks are highly conserved, and it is likely the avian molecular mechanisms are similar to those expressed in mammals, including humans. The central pacemakers in the avian pineal gland, retinae and SCN dynamically interact to...

  18. Links between circadian rhythms and psychiatric disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilia N Karatsoreos

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Determining the cause of psychiatric disorders is a goal of modern neuroscience, and will hopefully lead to the discovery of treatments to either prevent or alleviate the suffering caused by these diseases. One roadblock to attaining this goal is the realization that neuropsychiatric diseases are rarely due to a single gene polymorphism, environmental exposure, or developmental insult. Rather, it is a complex interaction between these various influences that likely leads to the development of clinically relevant syndromes. Our lab is exploring the links between environmental exposures and neurobehavioral function by investigating how disruption of the circadian (daily clock alters the structure and function of neural circuits, with the hypothesis that disrupting this crucial homeostatic system can directly contribute to altered vulnerability of the organism to other factors that interact to produce psychiatric illness. This review explores some historical and more recent findings that link disrupted circadian clocks to neuropsychiatric disorders, particularly depression, mania, and schizophrenia. We take a comparative approach by exploring the effects observed in human populations, as well as some experimental models used in the laboratory to unravel mechanistic and causal relationships between disruption of the circadian clock and behavioral abnormalities. This is a rich area of research that we predict will contribute greatly to our understanding of how genes, environment, and development interact to modulate an individual’s vulnerability to psychiatric disorders.

  19. Imaging Multidimensional Therapeutically Relevant Circadian Relationships

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    Jamil Singletary

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks gate cellular proliferation and, thereby, therapeutically target availability within proliferative pathways. This temporal coordination occurs within both cancerous and noncancerous proliferating tissues. The timing within the circadian cycle of the administration of drugs targeting proliferative pathways necessarily impacts the amount of damage done to proliferating tissues and cancers. Concurrently measuring target levels and associated key pathway components in normal and malignant tissues around the circadian clock provides a path toward a fuller understanding of the temporal relationships among the physiologic processes governing the therapeutic index of antiproliferative anticancer therapies. The temporal ordering among these relationships, paramount to determining causation, is less well understood using two- or three-dimensional representations. We have created multidimensional multimedia depictions of the temporal unfolding of putatively causative and the resultant therapeutic effects of a drug that specifically targets these ordered processes at specific times of the day. The systems and methods used to create these depictions are provided, as well as three example supplementary movies.

  20. Cardiovascular tissues contain independent circadian clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, A. J.; London, B.; Block, G. D.; Menaker, M.

    2005-01-01

    Acute cardiovascular events exhibit a circadian rhythm in the frequency of occurrence. The mechanisms underlying these phenomena are not yet fully understood, but they may be due to rhythmicity inherent in the cardiovascular system. We have begun to characterize rhythmicity of the clock gene mPer1 in the rat cardiovascular system. Luciferase activity driven by the mPer1 gene promoter is rhythmic in vitro in heart tissue explants and a wide variety of veins and arteries cultured from the transgenic Per1-luc rat. The tissues showed between 3 and 12 circadian cycles of gene expression in vitro before damping. Whereas peak per1-driven bioluminescence consistently occurred during the late night in the heart and all arteries sampled, the phases of the rhythms in veins varied significantly by anatomical location. Varying the time of the culture procedure relative to the donor animal's light:dark cycle revealed that, unlike some other rat tissues such as liver, the phases of in vitro rhythms of arteries, veins, and heart explants were affected by culture time. However, phase relationships among tissues were consistent across culture times; this suggests diversity in circadian regulation among components of the cardiovascular system.

  1. Phosphorylation of rat melanopsin at Ser-381 and Ser-398 by light/dark and its importance for intrinsically photosensitive ganglion cells (ipRGCs) cellular Ca2+ signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahrenkrug, Jan; Falktoft, Birgitte; Georg, Birgitte; Hannibal, Jens; Kristiansen, Sarah Brøgger; Klausen, Thomas Kjær

    2014-01-01

    The G protein-coupled light-sensitive receptor melanopsin is involved in non-image-forming light responses including circadian timing. The predicted secondary structure of melanopsin indicates a long cytoplasmic tail with many potential phosphorylation sites. Using bioinformatics, we identified a...

  2. Aligning work and circadian time in shift workers improves sleep and reduces circadian disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Céline; Fischer, Dorothee; Matera, Joana L; Roenneberg, Till

    2015-03-30

    Sleep loss and circadian disruption-a state of misalignment between physiological functions and imposed sleep/wake behavior-supposedly play central roles in the etiology of shift work-related pathologies [1-4]. Circadian entrainment is, however, highly individual [5], resulting in different chronotypes [6, 7]. Chronotype in turn modulates the effects of working times: compared to late chronotypes, earlier ones sleep worse and shorter and show higher levels of circadian misalignment during night shifts, while late types experience more sleep and circadian disruption than early types when working morning shifts [8]. To promote sleep and reduce the mismatch between circadian and working time, we implemented a chronotype-adjusted (CTA) shift schedule in a factory. We abolished the most strenuous shifts for extreme chronotypes (i.e., mornings for late chronotypes, nights for early ones) and examined whether sleep duration and quality, social jetlag [9, 10], wellbeing, subjective stress perception, and satisfaction with leisure time improved in this schedule. Intermediate chronotypes (quartiles 2 and 3) served as a control group, still working morning (6:00-14:00), evening (14:00-22:00), and night (22:00-6:00) shifts, with two strenuous shifts (out of twelve per month) replaced by evening ones. We observed a significant increase of self-reported sleep duration and quality, along with increased wellbeing ratings on workdays among extreme chronotypes. The CTA schedule reduced overall social jetlag by 1 hr, did not alter stress levels, and increased satisfaction with leisure time (early types only). Chronotype-based schedules thus can reduce circadian disruption and improve sleep; potential long-term effects on health and economic indicators need to be elucidated in future studies. PMID:25772446

  3. Synergistic interactions between the molecular and neuronal circadian networks drive robust behavioral circadian rhythms in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron Weiss

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Most organisms use 24-hr circadian clocks to keep temporal order and anticipate daily environmental changes. In Drosophila melanogaster CLOCK (CLK and CYCLE (CYC initiates the circadian system by promoting rhythmic transcription of hundreds of genes. However, it is still not clear whether high amplitude transcriptional oscillations are essential for circadian timekeeping. In order to address this issue, we generated flies in which the amplitude of CLK-driven transcription can be reduced partially (approx. 60% or strongly (90% without affecting the average levels of CLK-target genes. The impaired transcriptional oscillations lead to low amplitude protein oscillations that were not sufficient to drive outputs of peripheral oscillators. However, circadian rhythms in locomotor activity were resistant to partial reduction in transcriptional and protein oscillations. We found that the resilience of the brain oscillator is depending on the neuronal communication among circadian neurons in the brain. Indeed, the capacity of the brain oscillator to overcome low amplitude transcriptional oscillations depends on the action of the neuropeptide PDF and on the pdf-expressing cells having equal or higher amplitude of molecular rhythms than the rest of the circadian neuronal groups in the fly brain. Therefore, our work reveals the importance of high amplitude transcriptional oscillations for cell-autonomous circadian timekeeping. Moreover, we demonstrate that the circadian neuronal network is an essential buffering system that protects against changes in circadian transcription in the brain.

  4. The CK2 kinase stabilizes CLOCK and represses its activity in the Drosophila circadian oscillator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aron Szabó

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation is a pivotal regulatory mechanism for protein stability and activity in circadian clocks regardless of their evolutionary origin. It determines the speed and strength of molecular oscillations by acting on transcriptional activators and their repressors, which form negative feedback loops. In Drosophila, the CK2 kinase phosphorylates and destabilizes the PERIOD (PER and TIMELESS (TIM proteins, which inhibit CLOCK (CLK transcriptional activity. Here we show that CK2 also targets the CLK activator directly. Downregulating the activity of the catalytic α subunit of CK2 induces CLK degradation, even in the absence of PER and TIM. Unexpectedly, the regulatory β subunit of the CK2 holoenzyme is not required for the regulation of CLK stability. In addition, downregulation of CK2α activity decreases CLK phosphorylation and increases per and tim transcription. These results indicate that CK2 inhibits CLK degradation while reducing its activity. Since the CK1 kinase promotes CLK degradation, we suggest that CLK stability and transcriptional activity result from counteracting effects of CK1 and CK2.

  5. Influence of weeks of circadian misalignment on leptin levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    June Nguyen

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available June Nguyen, Kenneth P Wright JrDepartment of Integrative Physiology, Sleep and Chronobiology Laboratory, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USAAbstract: The neurobiology of circadian, wakefulness–sleep, and feeding systems interact to influence energy homeostasis. Sleep and circadian disruptions are reported to be associated with increased risk of diabetes and obesity, yet the roles of energy balance hormones in these associations are largely unknown. Therefore, in the current study we aimed to assess the influence of several weeks of circadian misalignment (sleep and wakefulness occurring at an inappropriate biological time on the anorexigenic adipocyte hormone leptin. We utilized data from a previous study designed to assess physiological and cognitive consequences of changes in day length and light exposure as may occur during space flight, including exploration class space missions and exposure to the Martian Sol (day length. We hypothesized that circadian misalignment during an exploration class spaceflight simulation would reduce leptin levels. Following a three-week ~8 hours per night home sleep schedule, 14 healthy participants lived in the laboratory for more than one month. After baseline data collection, participants were scheduled to either 24.0 or 24.6 hours of wakefulness–sleep schedules for 25 days. Changes in the phase of the circadian melatonin rhythm, sleep, and leptin levels were assessed. Half of participants analyzed exhibited circadian misalignment with an average change in phase angle from baseline of ~4 hours and these participants showed reduced leptin levels, sleep latency, stage 2 and total sleep time (7.3 to 6.6 hours and increased wakefulness after sleep onset (all P < 0.05. The control group remained synchronized and showed significant increases in sleep latency and leptin levels. Our findings indicate that weeks of circadian misalignment, such as that which occurs in circadian sleep disorders, alters leptin

  6. Integration of human sleep-wake regulation and circadian rhythmicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijk, Derk-Jan; Lockley, Steven W.

    2002-01-01

    The human sleep-wake cycle is generated by a circadian process, originating from the suprachiasmatic nuclei, in interaction with a separate oscillatory process: the sleep homeostat. The sleep-wake cycle is normally timed to occur at a specific phase relative to the external cycle of light-dark exposure. It is also timed at a specific phase relative to internal circadian rhythms, such as the pineal melatonin rhythm, the circadian sleep-wake propensity rhythm, and the rhythm of responsiveness of the circadian pacemaker to light. Variations in these internal and external phase relationships, such as those that occur in blindness, aging, morning and evening, and advanced and delayed sleep-phase syndrome, lead to sleep disruptions and complaints. Changes in ocular circadian photoreception, interindividual variation in the near-24-h intrinsic period of the circadian pacemaker, and sleep homeostasis can contribute to variations in external and internal phase. Recent findings on the physiological and molecular-genetic correlates of circadian sleep disorders suggest that the timing of the sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms is closely integrated but is, in part, regulated differentially.

  7. Diurnal oscillations of soybean circadian clock and drought responsive genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Marcolino-Gomes

    Full Text Available Rhythms produced by the endogenous circadian clock play a critical role in allowing plants to respond and adapt to the environment. While there is a well-established regulatory link between the circadian clock and responses to abiotic stress in model plants, little is known of the circadian system in crop species like soybean. This study examines how drought impacts diurnal oscillation of both drought responsive and circadian clock genes in soybean. Drought stress induced marked changes in gene expression of several circadian clock-like components, such as LCL1-, GmELF4- and PRR-like genes, which had reduced expression in stressed plants. The same conditions produced a phase advance of expression for the GmTOC1-like, GmLUX-like and GmPRR7-like genes. Similarly, the rhythmic expression pattern of the soybean drought-responsive genes DREB-, bZIP-, GOLS-, RAB18- and Remorin-like changed significantly after plant exposure to drought. In silico analysis of promoter regions of these genes revealed the presence of cis-elements associated both with stress and circadian clock regulation. Furthermore, some soybean genes with upstream ABRE elements were responsive to abscisic acid treatment. Our results indicate that some connection between the drought response and the circadian clock may exist in soybean since (i drought stress affects gene expression of circadian clock components and (ii several stress responsive genes display diurnal oscillation in soybeans.

  8. Circadian rhythms and fractal fluctuations in forearm motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kun; Hilton, Michael F.

    2005-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that the circadian pacemaker --- an internal body clock located in the brain which is normally synchronized with the sleep/wake behavioral cycles --- influences key physiologic functions such as the body temperature, hormone secretion and heart rate. Surprisingly, no previous studies have investigated whether the circadian pacemaker impacts human motor activity --- a fundamental physiologic function. We investigate high-frequency actigraph recordings of forearm motion from a group of young and healthy subjects during a forced desynchrony protocol which allows to decouple the sleep/wake cycles from the endogenous circadian cycle while controlling scheduled behaviors. We investigate both static properties (mean value, standard deviation), dynamical characteristics (long-range correlations), and nonlinear features (magnitude and Fourier-phase correlations) in the fluctuations of forearm acceleration across different circadian phases. We demonstrate that while the static properties exhibit significant circadian rhythms with a broad peak in the afternoon, the dynamical and nonlinear characteristics remain invariant with circadian phase. This finding suggests an intrinsic multi-scale dynamic regulation of forearm motion the mechanism of which is not influenced by the circadian pacemaker, thus suggesting that increased cardiac risk in the early morning hours is not related to circadian-mediated influences on motor activity.

  9. Heritable circadian period length in a wild bird population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helm, B.; Visser, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Timing is essential, but circadian clocks, which play a crucial role in timekeeping, are almost unaddressed in evolutionary ecology. A key property of circadian clocks is their free-running period length (τ), i.e. the time taken for a full cycle under constant conditions. Under laboratory conditions

  10. Heritable circadian period length in a wild bird population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helm, Barbara; Visser, Marcel E.

    2010-01-01

    Timing is essential, but circadian clocks, which play a crucial role in timekeeping, are almost unaddressed in evolutionary ecology. A key property of circadian clocks is their free-running period length (tau), i.e. the time taken for a full cycle under constant conditions. Under laboratory conditio

  11. The Molecular Circadian Clock and Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udoh, Uduak S.; Valcin, Jennifer A.; Gamble, Karen L.; Bailey, Shannon M.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence from both experimental animal studies and clinical human investigations demonstrates strong connections among circadian processes, alcohol use, and alcohol-induced tissue injury. Components of the circadian clock have been shown to influence the pathophysiological effects of alcohol. Conversely, alcohol may alter the expression of circadian clock genes and the rhythmic behavioral and metabolic processes they regulate. Therefore, we propose that alcohol-mediated disruption in circadian rhythms likely underpins many adverse health effects of alcohol that cut across multiple organ systems. In this review, we provide an overview of the circadian clock mechanism and showcase results from new studies in the alcohol field implicating the circadian clock as a key target of alcohol action and toxicity in the liver. We discuss various molecular events through which alcohol may work to negatively impact circadian clock-mediated processes in the liver, and contribute to tissue pathology. Illuminating the mechanistic connections between the circadian clock and alcohol will be critical to the development of new preventative and pharmacological treatments for alcohol use disorders and alcohol-mediated organ diseases. PMID:26473939

  12. The Molecular Circadian Clock and Alcohol-Induced Liver Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uduak S. Udoh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence from both experimental animal studies and clinical human investigations demonstrates strong connections among circadian processes, alcohol use, and alcohol-induced tissue injury. Components of the circadian clock have been shown to influence the pathophysiological effects of alcohol. Conversely, alcohol may alter the expression of circadian clock genes and the rhythmic behavioral and metabolic processes they regulate. Therefore, we propose that alcohol-mediated disruption in circadian rhythms likely underpins many adverse health effects of alcohol that cut across multiple organ systems. In this review, we provide an overview of the circadian clock mechanism and showcase results from new studies in the alcohol field implicating the circadian clock as a key target of alcohol action and toxicity in the liver. We discuss various molecular events through which alcohol may work to negatively impact circadian clock-mediated processes in the liver, and contribute to tissue pathology. Illuminating the mechanistic connections between the circadian clock and alcohol will be critical to the development of new preventative and pharmacological treatments for alcohol use disorders and alcohol-mediated organ diseases.

  13. The Circadian Clock-Controlled Transcriptome of Developing Soybean Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A number of metabolic and physiological processes in plants are controlled by the circadian clock, which enables the plant to anticipate daily changes in the environment. Microarray expression profiling was used to identify circadian clock controlled genes expressed in developing soybean seeds. 1.8...

  14. Circadian clock genes universally control key agricultural traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circadian clocks are endogenous timers that enable plants to synchronize biological processes with daily and seasonal environmental conditions in order to allocate resources during the most beneficial times of day and year. The circadian clock regulates a number of central plant activities, includin...

  15. Development and entrainment of the colonic circadian clock during ontogenesis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Polidarová, Lenka; Olejníková, Lucie; Paušlyová, Lucia; Sládek, Martin; Soták, Matúš; Pácha, Jiří; Sumová, Alena

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 306, č. 4 (2014), G346-G356. ISSN 0193-1857 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1108 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : circadian clock * clock gene * ontogenesis * circadian entrainment Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.798, year: 2014

  16. Bidirectional Interactions between Circadian Entrainment and Cognitive Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritton, Howard J.; Kantorowski, Ana; Sarter, Martin; Lee, Theresa M.

    2012-01-01

    Circadian rhythms influence a variety of physiological and behavioral processes; however, little is known about how circadian rhythms interact with the organisms' ability to acquire and retain information about their environment. These experiments tested whether rats trained outside their endogenous active period demonstrate the same rate of…

  17. Effects of Gravity on Insect Circadian Rhythmicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoban-Higgins, Tana M.

    2000-01-01

    Circadian rhythms - endogenous daily rhythmic fluctuations in virtually all characteristics of life - are generated and coordinated by the circadian timing system (CTS). The CTS is synchronized to the external 24-hour day by time cues such as the light/dark cycle. In an environment without time cues, the length of an animal's day is determined by the period of its internal pacemaker (tau) and the animal is said to be free-running. All life on earth evolved under the solar day; the CTS exists as an adaptation that allows organisms to anticipate and to prepare for rhythmic environmental fluctuations. All life on earth also evolved under the force of earth's gravitational environment. While it is therefore not surprising that changes in the lighting environment affect the CTS, it is surprising that changes in the gravitational environment would do so. However, recent data from one of our laboratories using the brn-3.1 knockout mouse revealed that this model, which lacks the sensory receptor hair cells within the neurovestibular system, does not respond to exposure to a hyperdynamic environment in the same fashion as normal mice. The brn-3.1 mice did not show the expected suppression of circadian rhythmicity shown by control mice exposed to 2G. Exposure to altered ambient force environments affects the amplitude, mean and timing of circadian rhythms in species from unicellular organisms to man. In addition, there is a circadian influence on the homeostatic response to acute 2G acceleration and pulses of 2G can act as a time cue, synchronizing the CTS. This is of significance because maintenance of internal and external temporal coordination is critical for normal physiological and psychological function. Typically, during adaptation to an increased gravitational environment (+G), an initial acute reaction is followed by adaptation and, eventually, a new steady state (14-16), which can take weeks to months to establish. Until the development of space stations, exposure

  18. Dysglycemia induces abnormal circadian blood pressure variability

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    Kumarasamy Sivarajan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediabetes (PreDM in asymptomatic adults is associated with abnormal circadian blood pressure variability (abnormal CBPV. Hypothesis Systemic inflammation and glycemia influence circadian blood pressure variability. Methods Dahl salt-sensitive (S rats (n = 19 after weaning were fed either an American (AD or a standard (SD diet. The AD (high-glycemic-index, high-fat simulated customary human diet, provided daily overabundant calories which over time lead to body weight gain. The SD (low-glycemic-index, low-fat mirrored desirable balanced human diet for maintaining body weight. Body weight and serum concentrations for fasting glucose (FG, adipokines (leptin and adiponectin, and proinflammatory cytokines [monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α] were measured. Rats were surgically implanted with C40 transmitters and blood pressure (BP-both systolic; SBP and diastolic; DBP and heart rate (HR were recorded by telemetry every 5 minutes during both sleep (day and active (night periods. Pulse pressure (PP was calculated (PP = SBP-DBP. Results [mean(SEM]: The AD fed group displayed significant increase in body weight (after 90 days; p Conclusion These data validate our stated hypothesis that systemic inflammation and glycemia influence circadian blood pressure variability. This study, for the first time, demonstrates a cause and effect relationship between caloric excess, enhanced systemic inflammation, dysglycemia, loss of blood pressure control and abnormal CBPV. Our results provide the fundamental basis for examining the relationship between dysglycemia and perturbation of the underlying mechanisms (adipose tissue dysfunction induced local and systemic inflammation, insulin resistance and alteration of adipose tissue precursors for the renin-aldosterone-angiotensin system which generate abnormal CBPV.

  19. Circadian system from conception till adulthood

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sumová, Alena; Sládek, Martin; Polidarová, Lenka; Nováková, Marta; Houdek, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 199, č. 2012 (2012), s. 83-103. ISSN 0079-6123 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/09/0321; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0668; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA MZd(CZ) NT11474; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/12/1108 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : ontogenesis * suprachiasmatic nucleus * peripheral circadian clocks * clock gene Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.191, year: 2012

  20. Circadian clock components in the rat neocortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rath, Martin Fredensborg; Rohde, Kristian; Fahrenkrug, Jan;

    2013-01-01

    The circadian master clock of the mammalian brain resides in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. At the molecular level, the clock of the SCN is driven by a transcriptional/posttranslational autoregulatory network with clock gene products as core elements. Recent investigations...... have shown the presence of peripheral clocks in extra-hypothalamic areas of the central nervous system. However, knowledge on the clock gene network in the cerebral cortex is limited. We here show that the mammalian clock genes Per1, Per2, Per3, Cry1, Cry2, Bmal1, Clock, Nr1d1 and Dbp are expressed...

  1. The transcription factor DBP affects circadian sleep consolidation and rhythmic EEG activity

    OpenAIRE

    Franken, Paulus; Lopez Molina, Luis; Marcacci, Lysiane; Schibler, Ulrich; Tafti, Mehdi

    2000-01-01

    Albumin D-binding protein (DBP) is a PAR leucine zipper transcription factor that is expressed according to a robust circadian rhythm in the suprachiasmatic nuclei, harboring the circadian master clock, and in most peripheral tissues. Mice lacking DBP display a shorter circadian period in locomotor activity and are less active. Thus, although DBP is not essential for circadian rhythm generation, it does modulate important clock outputs. We studied the role of DBP in the circadian and homeosta...

  2. Properties of phosphorylated thymidylate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frączyk, Tomasz; Ruman, Tomasz; Wilk, Piotr; Palmowski, Paweł; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Cieśla, Joanna; Zieliński, Zbigniew; Nizioł, Joanna; Jarmuła, Adam; Maj, Piotr; Gołos, Barbara; Wińska, Patrycja; Ostafil, Sylwia; Wałajtys-Rode, Elżbieta; Shugar, David; Rode, Wojciech

    2015-12-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) may undergo phosphorylation endogenously in mammalian cells, and as a recombinant protein expressed in bacterial cells, as indicated by the reaction of purified enzyme protein with Pro-Q® Diamond Phosphoprotein Gel Stain (PGS). With recombinant human, mouse, rat, Trichinella spiralis and Caenorhabditis elegans TSs, expressed in Escherichia coli, the phosphorylated, compared to non-phosphorylated recombinant enzyme forms, showed a decrease in Vmax(app), bound their cognate mRNA (only rat enzyme studied), and repressed translation of their own and several heterologous mRNAs (human, rat and mouse enzymes studied). However, attempts to determine the modification site(s), whether endogenously expressed in mammalian cells, or recombinant proteins, did not lead to unequivocal results. Comparative ESI-MS/analysis of IEF fractions of TS preparations from parental and FdUrd-resistant mouse leukemia L1210 cells, differing in sensitivity to inactivation by FdUMP, demonstrated phosphorylation of Ser(10) and Ser(16) in the resistant enzyme only, although PGS staining pointed to the modification of both L1210 TS proteins. The TS proteins phosphorylated in bacterial cells were shown by (31)P NMR to be modified only on histidine residues, like potassium phosphoramidate (KPA)-phosphorylated TS proteins. NanoLC-MS/MS, enabling the use of CID and ETD peptide fragmentation methods, identified several phosphohistidine residues, but certain phosphoserine and phosphothreonine residues were also implicated. Molecular dynamics studies, based on the mouse TS crystal structure, allowed one to assess potential of several phosphorylated histidine residues to affect catalytic activity, the effect being phosphorylation site dependent. PMID:26315778

  3. Photoperiodic plasticity in circadian clock neurons in insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakiko eShiga

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Since Bünning’s observation of circadian rhythms and photoperiodism in the runner bean Phaseolus multiflorus in 1936, many studies have shown that photoperiodism is based on the circadian clock system. In insects, involvement of circadian clock genes or neurons has been recently shown in the photoperiodic control of developmental arrests, diapause. Based on molecular and neuronal studies in Drosophila melanogaster, photoperiodic changes have been reported for expression patterns of the circadian clock genes, subcellular distribution of clock proteins, fiber distribution, or the number of plausible clock neurons in different species. Photoperiod sets peaks of per or tim mRNA abundance at lights-off in Sarcophaga crassipalpis, Chymomyza costata and Protophormia terraenovae. Abundance of per and Clock mRNA changes by photoperiod in Pyrrhocoris apterus. Subcellular Per distribution in circadian clock neurons changes with photoperiod in P. terraenovae. Although photoperiodism is not known in Leucophaea maderae, under longer day length, more stomata and longer commissural fibers of circadian clock neurons have been found. These plastic changes in the circadian clock neurons could be an important constituent for photoperiodic clock mechanisms to integrate repetitive photoperiodic information and produce different outputs based on day length.

  4. Circadian Rhythms: Hijacking the Cyanobacterial Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyle, Nathaniel P.; O’Neill, John S

    2016-01-01

    The production of limitless carbon-free energy is a long-sought dream of scientists and politicians alike. One strategy for achieving this aim is the production of hydrogen by photosynthetic microorganisms – harnessing the effectively limitless power of the sun to power our cars, toasters and PCR machines. It may be tempting to think of host expression systems as miniature factories given over entirely to the production our molecule of interest. However, the biological nature of the host must be taken into account if we are to maximize productivity. The circadian rhythm, an organism’s entrainable oscillation of biological processes with a period of around 24 hours, is one such aspect that has received scant attention but is likely to be of particular importance to photosynthetic host systems. In this issue of current biology Xu et al. describe how our knowledge of the Synechococcus elongatus circadian clock can be leveraged to improve the production of exogeneous proteins, including those involved in the production of hydrogen [1]. PMID:24309283

  5. Circadian Role in Daily Pattern of Cardiovascular Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Hu, Kun; Chen, Zhi; Hilton, Michael F.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Shea, Steven A.

    2004-03-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies demonstrate that sudden cardiac death, pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, and stroke have a 24-hour daily pattern with a broad peak between 9-11am. Such a daily pattern in cardiovascular risk could be attributable to external factors, such as the daily behavior patterns, including sleep-wake cycles and activity levels, or internal factors, such as the endogenous circadian pacemaker. Findings of significant alternations in the temporal organization and nonlinear properties of heartbeat fluctuations with disease and with sleep-wake transitions raise the intriguing possibility that changes in the mechanism of control associated with behavioral sleep-wake transition may be responsible for the increased cardiac instability observed in particular circadian phases. Alternatively, we hypothesize that there is a circadian clock, independent of the sleep-wake cycle, which affects the cardiac dynamics leading to increased cardiovascular risk. We analyzed continuous recordings from healthy subjects during 7 cycles of forced desynchrony routine wherein subjects' sleep-wake cycles are adjusted to 28 hours so that their behaviors occur across all circadian phases. Heartbeat data were divided into one-hour segments. For each segment, we estimated the correlations and the nonlinear properties of the heartbeat fluctuations at the corresponding circadian phase. Since the sleep and wake contributions are equally weighted in our experiment, a change of the properties of the heartbeat dynamics with circadian phase suggest a circadian rhythm. We show significant circadian-mediated alterations in the correlation and nonlinear properties of the heartbeat resembling those observed in patients with heart failure. Remarkably, these dynamical alterations are centered at 60 degrees circadian phase, coinciding with the 9-11am window of cardiac risk.

  6. Sleep Deprivation and Circadian Disruption: Stress, Allostasis, and Allostatic Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwen, Bruce S; Karatsoreos, Ilia N

    2015-03-01

    Sleep has important homeostatic functions, and circadian rhythms organize physiology and behavior on a daily basis to insure optimal function. Sleep deprivation and circadian disruption can be stressors, enhancers of other stressors that have consequences for the brain and many body systems. Whether the origins of circadian disruption and sleep disruption and deprivation are from anxiety, depression, shift work, long-distance air travel, or a hectic lifestyle, there are consequences that impair brain functions and contribute to the cumulative wear and tear on body systems caused by too much stress and/or inefficient management of the systems that promote adaptation. PMID:26055668

  7. Circadian profile of cardiac autonomic nervous modulation in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnemeier, Hendrik; Richardt, Gert; Potratz, Jürgen;

    2003-01-01

    , awoke around 7 A.M., and had 6 to 8 hours of sleep. Circadian profiles of vagus-associated HRV parameters revealed a marked day-night pattern, with a peak at nighttime and a plateau at daytime. The characteristic nocturnal peak and the day-night amplitude diminished with aging by decade. Estimates of......UNLABELLED: Circadian Profile of Heart Rate Variability. INTRODUCTION: Although heart rate variability (HRV) has been established as a tool to study cardiac autonomic activity, almost no data are available on the circadian patterns of HRV in healthy subjects aged 20 to 70 years. METHODS AND RESULTS...

  8. [Directional hearing in relation to individual circadian biorhythm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnicki, C

    1990-01-01

    Acuity angle of the directional hearing was investigated in connection with the individual circadian rhythm. Two groups of 15 persons represented the morning and evening form of the circadian rhythm. Body temperature fixed the rhythm character. The evaluations of the angle acuity of the directional hearing were performed in the highest and the lowest point of body temperature as well as in the neutral point, which was determined in the morning group in the middle between the two extremes. The possibility of the sound localization in individual and linked with the body temperature circadian rhythm. PMID:2234972

  9. Chemistry of Phosphorylated Formaldehyde Derivatives. Part I

    OpenAIRE

    Vasily P. Morgalyuk

    2014-01-01

    The underinvestigated derivatives of unstable phosphorylated formaldehyde acetals and some of the structurally related compounds, such as thioacetals, aminonitriles, aminomethylphosphinoyl compounds, are considered. Separately considered are halogen aminals of phosphorylated formaldehyde, acetals of phosphorylated formaldehyde of H-phosphinate-type and a phosphorylated gem-diol of formaldehyde. Synthetic methods, chemical properties and examples of practical applications are given.

  10. Protein phosphorylation in chloroplasts - a survey of phosphorylation targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baginsky, Sacha

    2016-06-01

    The development of new software tools, improved mass spectrometry equipment, a suite of optimized scan types, and better-quality phosphopeptide affinity capture have paved the way for an explosion of mass spectrometry data on phosphopeptides. Because phosphoproteomics achieves good sensitivity, most studies use complete cell extracts for phosphopeptide enrichment and identification without prior enrichment of proteins or subcellular compartments. As a consequence, the phosphoproteome of cell organelles often comes as a by-product from large-scale studies and is commonly assembled from these in meta-analyses. This review aims at providing some guidance on the limitations of meta-analyses that combine data from analyses with different scopes, reports on the current status of knowledge on chloroplast phosphorylation targets, provides initial insights into phosphorylation site conservation in different plant species, and highlights emerging information on the integration of gene expression with metabolism and photosynthesis by means of protein phosphorylation. PMID:26969742

  11. Potent social synchronization can override photic entrainment of circadian rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchikawa, Taro; Eban-Rothschild, Ada; Nagari, Moshe; Shemesh, Yair; Bloch, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in behaviour and physiology are important for animal health and survival. Studies with individually isolated animals in the laboratory have consistently emphasized the dominant role of light for the entrainment of circadian rhythms to relevant environmental cycles. Although in nature interactions with conspecifics are functionally significant, social signals are typically not considered important time-givers for the animal circadian clock. Our results challenge this view. By studying honeybees in an ecologically relevant context and using a massive data set, we demonstrate that social entrainment can be potent, may act without direct contact with other individuals and does not rely on gating the exposure to light. We show for the first time that social time cues stably entrain the clock, even in animals experiencing conflicting photic and social environmental cycles. These findings add to the growing appreciation for the importance of studying circadian rhythms in ecologically relevant contexts. PMID:27210069

  12. Novel putative mechanisms to link circadian clocks to healthy aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa-Wagner, Aurel; Catalin, Bogdan; Buga, Ana-Maria

    2015-08-01

    The circadian clock coordinates the internal physiology to increase the homeostatic capacity thereby providing both a survival advantage to the system and an optimization of energy budgeting. Multiple-oscillator circadian mechanisms are likely to play a role in regulating human health and may contribute to the aging process. Our aim is to give an overview of how the central clock in the hypothalamus and peripheral clocks relate to aging and metabolic disorders, including hyperlipidemia and hyperglycemia. In particular, we unravel novel putative mechanisms to link circadian clocks to healthy aging. This review may lead to the design of large-scale interventions to help people stay healthy as they age by adjusting daily activities, such as feeding behavior, and or adaptation to age-related changes in individual circadian rhythms. PMID:24297467

  13. Synchronization and entrainment of coupled circadian oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Komin, Niko; Hernandez-Garcia, Emilio; Toral, Raul

    2010-01-01

    Circadian rhythms in mammals are controlled by the neurons located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus. In physiological conditions, the system of neurons is very efficiently entrained by the 24-hour light-dark cycle. Most of the studies carried out so far emphasize the crucial role of the periodicity imposed by the light dark cycle in neuronal synchronization. Nevertheless, heterogeneity as a natural and permanent ingredient of these cellular interactions is seemingly to play a major role in these biochemical processes. In this paper we use a model that considers the neurons of the suprachiasmatic nucleus as chemically-coupled modified Goodwin oscillators, and introduce non-negligible heterogeneity in the periods of all neurons in the form of quenched noise. The system response to the light-dark cycle periodicity is studied as a function of the interneuronal coupling strength, external forcing amplitude and neuronal heterogeneity. Our results indicate that the right amount of heterogeneity hel...

  14. Circadian variation in unexpected postoperative death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Pedersen, M H; Ramsing, T;

    1992-01-01

    Unexpected deaths still occur following major surgical procedures. The cause is often unknown but may be cardiac or thromboembolic in nature. Postoperative ischaemia, infarction and sudden cardiac death may be triggered by episodic or constant arterial hypoxaemia, which increases during the night....... This study examined the circadian variation of sudden unexpected death following abdominal surgery between 1985 and 1989 inclusive. Deaths were divided into those occurring during the day (08.00-16.00 hours), evening (16.00-24.00 hours) and night (24.00-08.00 hours). Twenty-three deaths were considered...... to have been totally unexpected. Of 16 such patients undergoing autopsy, pulmonary embolism was the cause of death in five. In the remaining 11 patients, death occurred at night in eight (P < 0.005). Five of the seven patients without an autopsy died at night (P < 0.04); overall, 13 of 18 unexpected...

  15. Propofol directly increases tau phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A Whittington

    Full Text Available In Alzheimer's disease (AD and other tauopathies, the microtubule-associated protein tau can undergo aberrant hyperphosphorylation potentially leading to the development of neurofibrillary pathology. Anesthetics have been previously shown to induce tau hyperphosphorylation through a mechanism involving hypothermia-induced inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A activity. However, the effects of propofol, a common clinically used intravenous anesthetic, on tau phosphorylation under normothermic conditions are unknown. We investigated the effects of a general anesthetic dose of propofol on levels of phosphorylated tau in the mouse hippocampus and cortex under normothermic conditions. Thirty min following the administration of propofol 250 mg/kg i.p., significant increases in tau phosphorylation were observed at the AT8, CP13, and PHF-1 phosphoepitopes in the hippocampus, as well as at AT8, PHF-1, MC6, pS262, and pS422 epitopes in the cortex. However, we did not detect somatodendritic relocalization of tau. In both brain regions, tau hyperphosphorylation persisted at the AT8 epitope 2 h following propofol, although the sedative effects of the drug were no longer evident at this time point. By 6 h following propofol, levels of phosphorylated tau at AT8 returned to control levels. An initial decrease in the activity and expression of PP2A were observed, suggesting that PP2A inhibition is at least partly responsible for the hyperphosphorylation of tau at multiple sites following 30 min of propofol exposure. We also examined tau phosphorylation in SH-SY5Y cells transfected to overexpress human tau. A 1 h exposure to a clinically relevant concentration of propofol in vitro was also associated with tau hyperphosphorylation. These findings suggest that propofol increases tau phosphorylation both in vivo and in vitro under normothermic conditions, and further studies are warranted to determine the impact of this anesthetic on the acceleration of

  16. The circadian clock and cell cycle: Interconnected biological circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Masri, Selma; Cervantes, Marlene; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock governs biological timekeeping on a systemic level, helping to regulate and maintain physiological processes, including endocrine and metabolic pathways with a periodicity of 24-hours. Disruption within the circadian clock machinery has been linked to numerous pathological conditions, including cancer, suggesting that clock-dependent regulation of the cell cycle is an essential control mechanism. This review will highlight recent advances on the ‘gating’ controls of the ci...

  17. Comprehensive analysis of circadian periodic pattern in plant transcriptome

    OpenAIRE

    Ptitsyn Andrey

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Circadian rhythm is a crucial factor in orchestration of plant physiology, keeping it in synchrony with the daylight cycle. Previous studies have reported that up to 16% of plant transcriptome are circadially expressed. Results Our studies of mammalian gene expression revealed circadian baseline oscillation in nearly 100% of genes. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of periodicity in two independent data sets. Application of the advanced algorithms and analytic appro...

  18. Circadian modulation of complex learning in diurnal and nocturnal Aplysia

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, Lisa C.; Rawashdeh, Oliver; Katzoff, Ayelet; Susswein, Abraham J.; Eskin, Arnold

    2005-01-01

    Understanding modulation of memory, as well as the mechanisms underlying memory formation, has become a key issue in neuroscience research. Previously, we found that the formation of long-term, but not short-term, memory for a nonassociative form of learning, sensitization, was modulated by the circadian clock in the diurnal Aplysia californica. To define the scope of circadian modulation of memory, we examined an associative operant learning paradigm, learning that food is inedible (LFI). Si...

  19. Heritable circadian period length in a wild bird population

    OpenAIRE

    Helm, Barbara; Visser, Marcel E

    2010-01-01

    Timing is essential, but circadian clocks, which play a crucial role in timekeeping, are almost unaddressed in evolutionary ecology. A key property of circadian clocks is their free-running period length (τ), i.e. the time taken for a full cycle under constant conditions. Under laboratory conditions, concordance of τ with the ambient light–dark cycle confers major fitness benefits, but little is known about period length and its implications in natural populations. We therefore studied natura...

  20. CIRCADIAN GENES AND REGULATION OF DIAPAUSE IN INSECT

    OpenAIRE

    Bajgar, Adam

    2013-01-01

    This thesis considers various roles of circadian clock genes in insect physiology. Application of molecular-biology methods in Pyrrhocoris apterus, non-model insect species, enable us to investigate involvement of circadian clock genes in photoperiod induced physiological responses. We discover involvement of neuroendocrine cells, and a role of Juvenile hormone (JH) signalization in transduction of photoperiodic signalization to peripheral tissues. We found new principles of JH signal diversi...

  1. The Melanocortin-4 Receptor Integrates Circadian Light Cues and Metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Arble, Deanna M.; Holland, Jenna; Ottaway, Nickki; Sorrell, Joyce; Pressler, Joshua W.; Morano, Rachel; Woods, Stephen C.; Seeley, Randy J.; Herman, James P.; Sandoval, Darleen A.; Perez-Tilve, Diego

    2015-01-01

    The melanocortin system directs diverse physiological functions from coat color to body weight homoeostasis. A commonality among melanocortin-mediated processes is that many animals modulate similar processes on a circannual basis in response to longer, summer days, suggesting an underlying link between circadian biology and the melanocortin system. Despite key neuroanatomical substrates shared by both circadian and melanocortin-signaling pathways, little is known about the relationship betwe...

  2. Methylphenidate Modifies the Motion of the Circadian Clock

    OpenAIRE

    Antle, Michael C.; van Diepen, Hester C; Deboer, Tom; Pedram, Pardis; Pereira, Rob Rodrigues; Meijer, Johanna H.

    2012-01-01

    People with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often experience sleep problems, and these are frequently exacerbated by the methylphenidate they take to manage their ADHD symptoms. Many of the changes to sleep are consistent with a change in the underlying circadian clock. The present study was designed to determine if methylphenidate alone could alter properties of the circadian clock. Young male mice were examined in light–dark cycles and in constant darkness and recordings wer...

  3. Temperature as a universal resetting cue for mammalian circadian oscillators

    OpenAIRE

    Buhr, Ethan D.; Yoo, Seung-Hee; Takahashi, Joseph S.

    2010-01-01

    Environmental temperature cycles are a universal entraining cue for all circadian systems at the organismal level with the exception of homeothermic vertebrates. We report here that resistance to temperature entrainment is a property of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) network and is not a cell autonomous property of mammalian clocks. This differential sensitivity to temperature allows the SCN to drive circadian rhythms in body temperature which can then act as a universal cue for the entrai...

  4. Circadian and wakefulness-sleep modulation of cognition in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Kenneth P.; Lowry, Christopher A.; LeBourgeois, Monique K.

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive and affective processes vary over the course of the 24 h day. Time of day dependent changes in human cognition are modulated by an internal circadian timekeeping system with a near-24 h period. The human circadian timekeeping system interacts with sleep-wakefulness regulatory processes to modulate brain arousal, neurocognitive and affective function. Brain arousal is regulated by ascending brain stem, basal forebrain (BF) and hypothalamic arousal systems and inhibition or disruption...

  5. Circadian rhythms and sleep—the metabolic connection

    OpenAIRE

    Albrecht, Urs

    2011-01-01

    The circadian system coordinates mammalian physiology and behavior with the environmental light–dark cycle. It allocates sleep to the inactivity phase using various mechanisms involving neurotransmitters, nuclear receptors, and protein kinases. These pathways are related to metabolism, indicating that the circadian system and sleep are connected via metabolic parameters. This suggests that organs other than the brain may “sleep.” A hypothetic view on this aspect is presented providing a diffe...

  6. Mistimed sleep disrupts circadian regulation of the human transcriptome.

    OpenAIRE

    Archer, SN; Laing, EE; Möller-Levet, CS; Van der Veen, DR; Bucca, G; Lazar, AS; Santhi, N.; Slak, A; Kabiljo, R.; von Schantz, M.; Smith, CP; DIJK, DJ

    2014-01-01

    Circadian organization of the mammalian transcriptome is achieved by rhythmic recruitment of key modifiers of chromatin structure and transcriptional and translational processes. These rhythmic processes, together with posttranslational modification, constitute circadian oscillators in the brain and peripheral tissues, which drive rhythms in physiology and behavior, including the sleep-wake cycle. In humans, sleep is normally timed to occur during the biological night, when body temperature i...

  7. Circadian rhythm and sleep influences on digestive physiology and disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughn, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    Bradley V Vaughn, Sean Rotolo, Heidi L Roth Division of Sleep Medicine, Department of Neurology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Abstract: Circadian rhythms and sleep influence a variety of physiological functions, including the digestive system. The digestive system also has intrinsic rhythms that interact dynamically with circadian rhythms. New advances in understanding the interaction of these rhythms and sleep provide the prospect of evaluating their...

  8. Circadian and Wakefulness-Sleep Modulation of Cognition in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Kenneth P.; Lowry, Christopher A.; LeBourgeois, Monique K.

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive and affective processes vary over the course of the 24 hour day. Time of day dependent changes in human cognition are modulated by an internal circadian timekeeping system with a near-24-hour period. The human circadian timekeeping system interacts with sleep-wakefulness regulatory processes to modulate brain arousal, neurocognitive and affective function. Brain arousal is regulated by ascending brain stem, basal forebrain and hypothalamic arousal systems and inhibition or disrup...

  9. Circadian control sheds light on fungal bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Anderson G; Stevani, Cassius V; Waldenmaier, Hans E; Viviani, Vadim; Emerson, Jillian M; Loros, Jennifer J; Dunlap, Jay C

    2015-03-30

    Bioluminescence, the creation and emission of light by organisms, affords insight into the lives of organisms doing it. Luminous living things are widespread and access diverse mechanisms to generate and control luminescence [1-5]. Among the least studied bioluminescent organisms are phylogenetically rare fungi-only 71 species, all within the ∼ 9,000 fungi of the temperate and tropical Agaricales order-are reported from among ∼ 100,000 described fungal species [6, 7]. All require oxygen [8] and energy (NADH or NADPH) for bioluminescence and are reported to emit green light (λmax 530 nm) continuously, implying a metabolic function for bioluminescence, perhaps as a byproduct of oxidative metabolism in lignin degradation. Here, however, we report that bioluminescence from the mycelium of Neonothopanus gardneri is controlled by a temperature-compensated circadian clock, the result of cycles in content/activity of the luciferase, reductase, and luciferin that comprise the luminescent system. Because regulation implies an adaptive function for bioluminescence, a controversial question for more than two millennia [8-15], we examined interactions between luminescent fungi and insects [16]. Prosthetic acrylic resin "mushrooms," internally illuminated by a green LED emitting light similar to the bioluminescence, attract staphilinid rove beetles (coleopterans), as well as hemipterans (true bugs), dipterans (flies), and hymenopterans (wasps and ants), at numbers far greater than dark control traps. Thus, circadian control may optimize energy use for when bioluminescence is most visible, attracting insects that can in turn help in spore dispersal, thereby benefitting fungi growing under the forest canopy, where wind flow is greatly reduced. PMID:25802150

  10. Circadian rhythms in cognitive performance: implications for neuropsychological assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdez P

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pablo Valdez, Candelaria Ramírez, Aída GarcíaLaboratory of Psychophysiology, School of Psychology, University of Nuevo León, Monterrey, Nuevo León, MéxicoAbstract: Circadian variations have been found in human performance, including the efficiency to execute many tasks, such as sensory, motor, reaction time, time estimation, memory, verbal, arithmetic calculations, and simulated driving tasks. Performance increases during the day and decreases during the night. Circadian rhythms have been found in three basic neuropsychological processes (attention, working memory, and executive functions, which may explain oscillations in the performance of many tasks. The time course of circadian rhythms in cognitive performance may be modified significantly in patients with brain disorders, due to chronotype, age, alterations of the circadian rhythm, sleep deprivation, type of disorder, and medication. This review analyzes the recent results on circadian rhythms in cognitive performance, as well as the implications of these rhythms for the neuropsychological assessment of patients with brain disorders such as traumatic head injury, stroke, dementia, developmental disorders, and psychiatric disorders.Keywords: human circadian rhythms, cognitive performance, neuropsychological assessment, attention, working memory, executive functions

  11. Circadian gating of neuronal functionality: a basis for iterative metaplasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Rajashekar; Wang, Tongfei A; Gillette, Martha U

    2014-01-01

    Brain plasticity, the ability of the nervous system to encode experience, is a modulatory process leading to long-lasting structural and functional changes. Salient experiences induce plastic changes in neurons of the hippocampus, the basis of memory formation and recall. In the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the central circadian (~24-h) clock, experience with light at night induces changes in neuronal state, leading to circadian plasticity. The SCN's endogenous ~24-h time-generator comprises a dynamic series of functional states, which gate plastic responses. This restricts light-induced alteration in SCN state-dynamics and outputs to the nighttime. Endogenously generated circadian oscillators coordinate the cyclic states of excitability and intracellular signaling molecules that prime SCN receptivity to plasticity signals, generating nightly windows of susceptibility. We propose that this constitutes a paradigm of ~24-h iterative metaplasticity, the repeated, patterned occurrence of susceptibility to induction of neuronal plasticity. We detail effectors permissive for the cyclic susceptibility to plasticity. We consider similarities of intracellular and membrane mechanisms underlying plasticity in SCN circadian plasticity and in hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). The emerging prominence of the hippocampal circadian clock points to iterative metaplasticity in that tissue as well. Exploring these links holds great promise for understanding circadian shaping of synaptic plasticity, learning, and memory. PMID:25285070

  12. Caenorhabditis elegans opens up new insights into circadian clock mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Kenji; Saigusa, Tetsu; Tamai, Yoichi

    2005-01-01

    The roundworm, Caenorhabditis elegans, is known to carry homologues of clock genes such as per (=period) and tim (=timeless), which constitute the core of the circadian clock in Drosophila and mammals: lin-42 and tim-1. Analyses using WormBase (C. elegans gene database) have identified with relatively high identity analogous of the clock genes recognized in Drosophila and mammals, with the notable exception of cry (=cryptochrome), which is lacking in C. elegans. All of these C. elegans cognates of the clock genes appear to belong to members of the PAS-superfamily and to participate in development or responsiveness to the environment but apparently are not involved in the C. elegans circadian clock. Nevertheless, C. elegans exhibits convincing circadian rhythms in locomotor behavior in the adult stage and in resistance to hyperosmotic stress in starved larvae (L1) after hatching, indicating that it has a circadian clock with a core design entirely different from that of Drosophila and mammals. Here two possibilities are considered. First, the core of the C. elegans circadian clock includes transcriptional/translational feedback loops between genes and their protein products that are entirely different from those of Drosophila and mammals. Second, a more basic principle such as homeostasis governs the circadian cellular physiology, and was established primarily to minimize the accumulation of DNA damage in response to an environment cycling at 24 h intervals. PMID:15865318

  13. CCL2 mediates the circadian response to low dose endotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duhart, José M; Brocardo, Lucila; Mul Fedele, Malena L; Guglielmotti, Angelo; Golombek, Diego A

    2016-09-01

    The mammalian circadian system is mainly originated in a master oscillator located in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in the hypothalamus. Previous reports from our and other groups have shown that the SCN are sensitive to systemic immune activation during the early night, through a mechanism that relies on the action of proinflammatory factors within this structure. Chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) is induced in the brain upon peripheral immune activation, and it has been shown to modulate neuronal physiology. In the present work we tested whether CCL2 might be involved in the response of the circadian clock to peripheral endotoxin administration. The CCL2 receptor, C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2), was detected in the SCN of mice, with higher levels of expression during the early night, when the clock is sensitive to immune activation. Ccl2 was induced in the SCN upon intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. Furthermore, mice receiving an intracerebroventricular (Icv) administration of a CCL2 synthesis inhibitor (Bindarit), showed a reduction LPS-induced circadian phase changes and Icv delivery of CCL2 led to phase delays in the circadian clock. In addition, we tested the possibility that CCL2 might also be involved in the photic regulation of the clock. Icv administration of Bindarit did not modify the effects of light pulses on the circadian clock. In summary, we found that CCL2, acting at the SCN level is important for the circadian effects of immune activation. PMID:27178133

  14. Properties of phosphorylated thymidylate synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frączyk, Tomasz; Ruman, Tomasz; Wilk, Piotr; Palmowski, Pawel; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Cieśla, Joanna; Zieliński, Zbigniew; Nizioł, Joanna; Jarmuła, Adam; Maj, Piotr; Gołos, Barbara; Wińska, Patrycja; Ostafil, Sylwia; Wałajtys-Rode, Elżbieta; Shugar, David; Rode, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) may undergo phosphorylation endogenously in mammalian cells, and as a recombinant protein expressed in bacterial cells, as indicated by the reaction of purified enzyme protein with Pro-Q® Diamond Phosphoprotein Gel Stain (PGS). With recombinant human, mouse, rat, Trichin......Thymidylate synthase (TS) may undergo phosphorylation endogenously in mammalian cells, and as a recombinant protein expressed in bacterial cells, as indicated by the reaction of purified enzyme protein with Pro-Q® Diamond Phosphoprotein Gel Stain (PGS). With recombinant human, mouse, rat......, Trichinella spiralis and Caenorhabditis elegans TSs, expressed in Escherichia coli, the phosphorylated, compared to non-phosphorylated recombinant enzyme forms, showed a decrease in Vmax(app), bound their cognate mRNA (only rat enzyme studied), and repressed translation of their own and several heterologous m......RNAs (human, rat and mouse enzymes studied). However, attempts to determine the modification site(s), whether endogenously expressed in mammalian cells, or recombinant proteins, did not lead to unequivocal results. Comparative ESI-MS/analysis of IEF fractions of TS preparations from parental and Fd...

  15. SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JOHN C WALKER

    2011-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

  16. Period1 gates the circadian modulation of memory-relevant signaling in mouse hippocampus by regulating the nuclear shuttling of the CREB kinase pP90RSK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawashdeh, Oliver; Jilg, Antje; Maronde, Erik; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Stehle, Jörg H

    2016-09-01

    Memory performance varies over a 24-h day/night cycle. While the detailed underlying mechanisms are yet unknown, recent evidence suggests that in the mouse hippocampus, rhythmic phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) are central to the circadian (~ 24 h) regulation of learning and memory. We recently identified the clock protein PERIOD1 (PER1) as a vehicle that translates information encoding time of day to hippocampal plasticity. We here elaborate how PER1 may gate the sensitivity of memory-relevant hippocampal signaling pathways. We found that in wild-type mice (WT), spatial learning triggers CREB phosphorylation only during the daytime, and that this effect depends on the presence of PER1. The time-of-day-dependent induction of CREB phosphorylation can be reproduced pharmacologically in acute hippocampal slices prepared from WT mice, but is absent in preparations made from Per1-knockout (Per1(-/-) ) mice. We showed that the PER1-dependent CREB phosphorylation is regulated downstream of MAPK. Stimulation of WT hippocampal neurons triggered the co-translocation of PER1 and the CREB kinase pP90RSK (pMAPK-activated ribosomal S6 kinase) into the nucleus. In hippocampal neurons from Per1(-/-) mice, however, pP90RSK remained perinuclear. A co-immunoprecipitation assay confirmed a high-affinity interaction between PER1 and pP90RSK. Knocking down endogenous PER1 in hippocampal cells inhibited adenylyl cyclase-dependent CREB activation. Taken together, the PER1-dependent modulation of cytoplasmic-to-nuclear signaling in the murine hippocampus provides a molecular explanation for how the circadian system potentially shapes a temporal framework for daytime-dependent memory performance, and adds a novel facet to the versatility of the clock gene protein PER1. We provide evidence that the circadian clock gene Period1 (Per1) regulates CREB phosphorylation in the mouse hippocampus

  17. Circadian misalignment increases cardiovascular disease risk factors in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher J; Purvis, Taylor E; Hu, Kun; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2016-03-01

    Shift work is a risk factor for hypertension, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease. This increased risk cannot be fully explained by classic risk factors. One of the key features of shift workers is that their behavioral and environmental cycles are typically misaligned relative to their endogenous circadian system. However, there is little information on the impact of acute circadian misalignment on cardiovascular disease risk in humans. Here we show-by using two 8-d laboratory protocols-that short-term circadian misalignment (12-h inverted behavioral and environmental cycles for three days) adversely affects cardiovascular risk factors in healthy adults. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) by 3.0 mmHg and 1.5 mmHg, respectively. These results were primarily explained by an increase in blood pressure during sleep opportunities (SBP, +5.6 mmHg; DBP, +1.9 mmHg) and, to a lesser extent, by raised blood pressure during wake periods (SBP, +1.6 mmHg; DBP, +1.4 mmHg). Circadian misalignment decreased wake cardiac vagal modulation by 8-15%, as determined by heart rate variability analysis, and decreased 24-h urinary epinephrine excretion rate by 7%, without a significant effect on 24-h urinary norepinephrine excretion rate. Circadian misalignment increased 24-h serum interleukin-6, C-reactive protein, resistin, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels by 3-29%. We demonstrate that circadian misalignment per se increases blood pressure and inflammatory markers. Our findings may help explain why shift work increases hypertension, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease risk. PMID:26858430

  18. 'The clocks that time us'-circadian rhythms in neurodegenerative disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videnovic, A.; Lazar, A.S.; Barker, R.A.; Overeem, S.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are physiological and behavioural cycles generated by an endogenous biological clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. The circadian system influences the majority of physiological processes, including sleep-wake homeostasis. Impaired sleep and alertness are common symptoms of neurodeg

  19. The intrinsic circadian clock within the cardiomyocyte directly regulates myocardial gene expression, metabolism, and contractile function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtually every mammalian cell, including cardiomyocytes, possesses an intrinsic circadian clock. The role of this transcriptionally based molecular mechanism in cardiovascular biology remains unknown. We hypothesized that circadian clock within the cardiomyocyte plays a role in regulating myocardia...

  20. Interactions between the circadian clock and metabolism: there are good times and bad times

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mi Shi; Xiangzhong Zheng

    2013-01-01

    An endogenous circadian (~24 h) clock regulates rhythmic processes of physiology,metabolism and behavior in most living organisms.While able to free-run under constant conditions,the circadian clock is coupled to day:night cycles to increase its amplitude and align the phase of circadian rhythms to the right time of the day.Disruptions of the circadian clock are correlated with brain dysfunctions,cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders.In this review,we focus on the interactions between the circadian clock and metabolism.We discuss recent findings on circadian clock regulation of feeding behavior and rhythmic expression of metabolic genes,and present evidence of metabolic input to the circadian clock.We emphasize how misalignment of circadian clocks within the body and with environmental cycles or daily schedules leads to the increasing prevalence of metabolic syndromes in modern society.

  1. Profiling molecular and behavioral circadian rhythms in the non-symbiotic sea anemone Nematostella vectensis

    OpenAIRE

    Oren, Matan; Tarrant, Ann M.; Alon, Shahar; Simon-Blecher, Noa; Elbaz, Idan; Appelbaum, Lior; Levy, Oren

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous circadian clocks are poorly understood within early-diverging animal lineages. We have characterized circadian behavioral patterns and identified potential components of the circadian clock in the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis: a model cnidarian which lacks algal symbionts. Using automatic video tracking we showed that Nematostella exhibits rhythmic circadian locomotor activity, which is persistent in constant dark, shifted or disrupted by external dark/light cues and...

  2. Protein phosphatase dependent circadian regulation of intermediate-term associative memory

    OpenAIRE

    Michel, Maximilian; Gardner, Jacob S.; Green, Charity L.; Organ, Chelsea L.; Lyons, Lisa C.

    2013-01-01

    The endogenous circadian clock is a principal factor modulating memory across species. Determining the processes through which the circadian clock modulates memory formation is a key issue in understanding and identifying mechanisms to improve memory. We used the marine mollusk Aplysia californica to investigate circadian modulation of intermediate-term memory (ITM) and the mechanisms through which the circadian clock phase specifically suppresses memory using the operant learning paradigm, l...

  3. Human Peripheral Clocks: Applications for Studying Circadian Phenotypes in Physiology and Pathophysiology

    OpenAIRE

    Saini, Camille; Brown, Steven A.; Dibner, Charna

    2015-01-01

    Most light-sensitive organisms on earth have acquired an internal system of circadian clocks allowing the anticipation of light or darkness. In humans, the circadian system governs nearly all aspects of physiology and behavior. Circadian phenotypes, including chronotype, vary dramatically among individuals and over individual lifespan. Recent studies have revealed that the characteristics of human skin fibroblast clocks correlate with donor chronotype. Given the complexity of circadian phenot...

  4. Circadian hormonal rhythms in two new cases of fatal familial insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avoni, P; Cortelli, P; Montagna, P; Tinuper, P; Sforza, E; Contin, M; Parchi, P; Pierangeli, G; Maltoni, P; Pavani, A

    1991-12-01

    We used a chronobiological inferential statistical method to investigate circadian rhythms of hypophyseal hormones, cortisol, melatonin and catecholamines in two females of the same family affected by fatal familial insomnia. Case 1 (confirmed at autopsy) presented an absent or progressive loss of circadian rhythms of all hormones. In case 2 there was a loss of GH circadian rhythm and a less significant rhythm for melatonin, catecholamines and gonadotropins. These results confirm the role of the thalamus in regulating hormonal circadian rhythm. PMID:1805556

  5. NPAS2 Compensates for Loss of CLOCK in Peripheral Circadian Oscillators

    OpenAIRE

    Landgraf, Dominic; Wang, Lexie L.; Diemer, Tanja; Welsh, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Heterodimers of CLOCK and BMAL1 are the major transcriptional activators of the mammalian circadian clock. Because the paralog NPAS2 can substitute for CLOCK in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), the master circadian pacemaker, CLOCK-deficient mice maintain circadian rhythms in behavior and in tissues in vivo. However, when isolated from the SCN, CLOCK-deficient peripheral tissues are reportedly arrhythmic, suggesting a fundamental difference in circadian clock function between SCN and periph...

  6. Dissociation of Ultradian and Circadian Phenotypes in Female and Male Siberian Hamsters

    OpenAIRE

    Prendergast, Brian J.; Cisse, Yasmine M.; Cable, Erin J.; Zucker, Irving

    2012-01-01

    Three experiments addressed whether pronounced alterations in the circadian system yielded concomitant changes in ultradian timing. Female Siberian hamsters were housed in a 16L:8D photoperiod after being subjected to a disruptive phase-shifting protocol that produced 3 distinct permanent circadian phenotypes: some hamsters entrained their circadian rhythms (CRs) with predominantly nocturnal locomotor activity (ENTR), others displayed free-running CRs (FR), and a third cohort was circadian ar...

  7. Circadian Rhythms and Mood Disorders: Are the Phenomena and Mechanisms Causally Related?

    OpenAIRE

    Bechtel, William

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the compelling evidence of disrupted circadian rhythms in individuals with mood disorders (major depressive disorder, seasonal affective disorder, and bipolar disorder) and that treatments such as bright light, designed to alter circadian rhythms, are effective in treating these disorders. Neurotransmitters in brain regions implicated in mood regulation exhibit circadian rhythms. A mouse model originally employed to identify a circadian gene has proven a potent mode...

  8. Circadian Rhythms and Mood Disorders: Are The Phenomena and Mechanisms Causally Related?

    OpenAIRE

    William eBechtel

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the compelling evidence of disrupted circadian rhythms in individuals with mood disorders (major depressive disorder, seasonal affective disorder, and bipolar disorder) and that treatments such as bright light, designed to alter circadian rhythms, are effective in treating these disorders. Neurotransmitters in brain regions implicated in mood regulation exhibit circadian rhythms. A mouse model originally employed to identify a circadian gene has proven a potent mode...

  9. The calcineurin-NFAT pathway controls activity-dependent circadian gene expression in slow skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Dyar, Kenneth A.; Stefano Ciciliot; Guidantonio Malagoli Tagliazucchi; Giorgia Pallafacchina; Jana Tothova; Carla Argentini; Lisa Agatea; Reimar Abraham; Miika Ahdesmäki; Mattia Forcato; Silvio Bicciato; Stefano Schiaffino; Bert Blaauw

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Physical activity and circadian rhythms are well-established determinants of human health and disease, but the relationship between muscle activity and the circadian regulation of muscle genes is a relatively new area of research. It is unknown whether muscle activity and muscle clock rhythms are coupled together, nor whether activity rhythms can drive circadian gene expression in skeletal muscle. Methods: We compared the circadian transcriptomes of two mouse hindlimb muscles wi...

  10. Directional and quantitative phosphorylation networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Claus; Linding, Rune

    2008-01-01

    for unravelling phosphorylation-mediated cellular interaction networks. In particular, we will discuss how the combination of new quantitative mass-spectrometric technologies and computational algorithms together are enhancing mapping of these largely uncharted dynamic networks. By combining quantitative......Directionality in protein signalling networks is due to modulated protein-protein interactions and is fundamental for proper signal progression and response to external and internal cues. This property is in part enabled by linear motifs embedding post-translational modification sites. These serve...... as recognition sites, guiding phosphorylation by kinases and subsequent binding of modular domains (e.g. SH2 and BRCT). Characterization of such modification-modulated interactions on a proteome-wide scale requires extensive computational and experimental analysis. Here, we review the latest advances in methods...

  11. Sleep disturbances and circadian CLOCK genes in borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Monika; Schäfer, Michael; Coogan, Andrew; Häßler, Frank; Thome, Johannes

    2012-10-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterised by a deep-reaching pattern of affective instability, incoherent identity, self-injury, suicide attempts, and disturbed interpersonal relations and lifestyle. The daily activities of BPD patients are often chaotic and disorganized, with patients often staying up late while sleeping during the day. These behavioural patterns suggest that altered circadian rhythms may be associated with BPD. Furthermore, BPD patients frequently report suffering from sleep disturbances. In this review, we overview the evidence that circadian rhythms and sleep are disturbed in BPD, and we explore the possibility that personality traits that are pertinent for BPD may be associated with circadian typology, and perhaps to circadian genotypes. With regards to sleep architecture, we review the evidence that BPD patients display altered non-REM and REM sleep. A possible cue to a deeper understanding of this temporal dysregulation might be an analysis of the circadian clock at the molecular and cellular level, as well as behavioural studies using actigraphy and we suggest avenues for further exploration of these factors. PMID:22806005

  12. When clocks go bad: neurobehavioural consequences of disrupted circadian timing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alun R Barnard

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Progress in unravelling the cellular and molecular basis of mammalian circadian regulation over the past decade has provided us with new avenues through which we can explore central nervous system disease. Deteriorations in measurable circadian output parameters, such as sleep/wake deficits and dysregulation of circulating hormone levels, are common features of most central nervous system disorders. At the core of the mammalian circadian system is a complex of molecular oscillations within the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus. These oscillations are modifiable by afferent signals from the environment, and integrated signals are subsequently conveyed to remote central neural circuits where specific output rhythms are regulated. Mutations in circadian genes in mice can disturb both molecular oscillations and measurable output rhythms. Moreover, systematic analysis of these mutants indicates that they can express an array of abnormal behavioural phenotypes that are intermediate signatures of central nervous system disorders. Furthermore, the response of these mutants to psychoactive drugs suggests that clock genes can modify a number of the brain's critical neurotransmitter systems. This evidence has led to promising investigations into clock gene polymorphisms in psychiatric disease. Preliminary indications favour the systematic investigation of the contribution of circadian genes to central nervous system disease.

  13. Dynamical mechanism of circadian singularity behavior in Neurospora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Maorong; Wang, Yi; Xu, Xin; Yang, Ling

    2016-09-01

    Many organisms have oscillators with a period of about 24 hours, called "circadian clocks". They employ negative biochemical feedback loops that are self-contained within a single cell (requiring no cell-to-cell interaction). Circadian singularity behavior is a phenomenon of the abolishment of circadian rhythmicities by a critical stimulus. These behaviors have been found experimentally in Neurospora, human and hamster, by temperature step-up or light pulse. Two alternative models have been proposed to explain this phenomenon: desynchronization of cell populations, and loss of oscillations in all cells by resetting each cell close to a steady state. In this work, we use a mathematical model to investigate the dynamical mechanism of circadian singularity behavior in Neurospora. Our findings suggest that the arrhythmic behavior after the critical stimulus is caused by the collaboration of the desynchronization and the loss of oscillation amplitude. More importantly, we found that the stable manifold of the unstable equilibrium point, instead of the steady state itself, plays a crucial role in circadian singularity behavior.

  14. Natural selection against a circadian clock gene mutation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoelstra, Kamiel; Wikelski, Martin; Daan, Serge; Loudon, Andrew S I; Hau, Michaela

    2016-01-19

    Circadian rhythms with an endogenous period close to or equal to the natural light-dark cycle are considered evolutionarily adaptive ("circadian resonance hypothesis"). Despite remarkable insight into the molecular mechanisms driving circadian cycles, this hypothesis has not been tested under natural conditions for any eukaryotic organism. We tested this hypothesis in mice bearing a short-period mutation in the enzyme casein kinase 1ε (tau mutation), which accelerates free-running circadian cycles. We compared daily activity (feeding) rhythms, survivorship, and reproduction in six replicate populations in outdoor experimental enclosures, established with wild-type, heterozygous, and homozygous mice in a Mendelian ratio. In the release cohort, survival was reduced in the homozygote mutant mice, revealing strong selection against short-period genotypes. Over the course of 14 mo, the relative frequency of the tau allele dropped from initial parity to 20%. Adult survival and recruitment of juveniles into the population contributed approximately equally to the selection for wild-type alleles. The expression of activity during daytime varied throughout the experiment and was significantly increased by the tau mutation. The strong selection against the short-period tau allele observed here contrasts with earlier studies showing absence of selection against a Period 2 (Per2) mutation, which disrupts internal clock function, but does not change period length. These findings are consistent with, and predicted by the theory that resonance of the circadian system plays an important role in individual fitness. PMID:26715747

  15. Temporal Regulation of Cytokines by the Circadian Clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuhito Nakao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several parameters of the immune system exhibit oscillations with a period of approximately 24 hours that refers to “circadian rhythms.” Such daily variations in host immune system status might evolve to maximize immune reactions at times when encounters with pathogens are most likely to occur. However, the mechanisms behind circadian immunity have not been fully understood. Recent studies reveal that the internal time keeping system “circadian clock” plays a key role in driving the daily rhythms evident in the immune system. Importantly, several studies unveil molecular mechanisms of how certain clock proteins (e.g., BMAL1 and CLOCK temporally regulate expression of cytokines. Since cytokines are crucial mediators for shaping immune responses, this review mainly summarizes the new knowledge that highlights an emerging role of the circadian clock as a novel regulator of cytokines. A greater understanding of circadian regulation of cytokines will be important to exploit new strategies to protect host against infection by efficient cytokine induction or to treat autoimmunity and allergy by ameliorating excessive activity of cytokines.

  16. Timing of temporal and frontal seizures in relation to the circadian phase : A prospective pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, Wytske A.; Gordijn, Marijke C. M.; van der Palen, Job; van Regteren, Renate; Grootemarsink, Bertine E.; de Weerd, Al W.

    2011-01-01

    There is strong evidence that epileptic seizures occur in diurnal or 24-h patterns. A study in rat models of partial epilepsy showed circadian seizure patterns, and in humans circadian rhythmicity in interictal discharges has been found, suggesting that circadian rhythm may play a role in epilepsy.

  17. Site-specific circadian expression of leptin and its receptor in human adipose tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Circadian variability of circulating leptin levels has been well established over the last decade. However, the circadian behavior of leptin in human adipose tissue remains unknown. This also applies to the soluble leptin receptor. We investigated the ex vivo circadian behavior of leptin and its rec...

  18. New Evidence for Cross Talk between Melatonin and Mitochondria Mediated by a Circadian-Compatible Interaction with Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Arese

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Extending our previous observations, we have shown on HaCat cells that melatonin, at ~10−9 M concentration, transiently raises not only the expression of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS mRNA, but also the nNOS protein synthesis and the nitric oxide oxidation products, nitrite and nitrate. Interestingly, from the cell bioenergetic point of view, the activated NO-related chemistry induces a mild decrease of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS efficiency, paralleled by a depression of the mitochondrial membrane potential. The OXPHOS depression is apparently balanced by glycolysis. The mitochondrial effects described have been detected only at nanomolar concentration of melatonin and within a time window of a few hours’ incubation; both findings compatible with the melatonin circadian cycle.

  19. Circadian Dysrhythmias, Physiological Aberrations, and the Link to Skin Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gutierrez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are core regulators of a variety of mammalian physiologic processes and oscillate in a 24-h pattern. Many peripheral organs possess endogenous rhythmicity that is then modulated by a master clock; the skin is one of these peripheral organs. The dysregulation of rhythms is associated with decreased ability to ameliorate cellular stressors at a local and global level, which then increases the propensity for the development of neoplastic growths. In this article, we review the implications of altered circadian rhythms on DNA repair as well as modified gene expression of core clock proteins with particular focus on skin models. These findings are then correlated with epidemiologic data regarding skin cancer to showcase the effects of circadian disruption on this phenomenon.

  20. Implications of circadian rhythm and stress in addiction vulnerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker-Krail, Darius; McClung, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    In the face of chronic stress, some individuals can maintain normal function while others go on to develop mental illness. Addiction, affecting one in every twelve people in America, is a substance use disorder long associated with stressful life events and disruptions in the sleep/wake cycle. The circadian and stress response systems have evolved to afford adaptability to environmental changes and allow for maintenance of functional stability, or homeostasis. This mini-review will discuss how circadian rhythms and stress individually affect drug response, affect each other, and how their interactions may regulate reward-related behavior. In particular, we will focus on the interactions between the circadian clock and the regulation of glucocorticoids by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Determining how these two systems act on dopaminergic reward circuitry may not only reveal the basis for vulnerability to addiction, but may also illuminate potential therapeutic targets for future investigation. PMID:26913197

  1. Circadian and ultradian influences on dreaming: a dual rhythm model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamsley, Erin J; Hirota, Yasutaka; Tucker, Matthew A; Smith, Mark R; Antrobus, John S

    2007-01-01

    The dual rhythm model of dreaming states that, under high sensory thresholds, heightened general cortical activation common to both REM/NREM and circadian-driven activation cycles sums to produce the main characteristics of dreaming. In addition, the unique pattern of regional brain activation characteristic of REM sleep amplifies the emotional intensity of the dream. Subjects were awakened from REM and NREM sleep once near the nadir of the core body temperature rhythm, where circadian-driven cortical activation was assumed to be low, and again in the late morning, where this activation was presumed to be high. As predicted, changes in the central characteristics of dream reports mirrored REM/NREM and circadian-driven fluctuations in general activation, while at the same time, the regional activation pattern unique to REM sleep amplified dream emotionality selectively in REM reports. PMID:17208651

  2. Relationship between Oxidative Stress, Circadian Rhythms, and AMD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanjul-Moles, María Luisa; López-Riquelme, Germán Octavio

    2016-01-01

    This work reviews concepts regarding oxidative stress and the mechanisms by which endogenous and exogenous factors produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). It also surveys the relationships between oxidative stress, circadian rhythms, and retinal damage in humans, particularly those related to light and photodamage. In the first section, the production of ROS by different cell organelles and biomolecules and the antioxidant mechanisms that antagonize this damage are reviewed. The second section includes a brief review of circadian clocks and their relationship with the cellular redox state. In the third part of this work, the relationship between retinal damage and ROS is described. The last part of this work focuses on retinal degenerative pathology, age-related macular degeneration, and the relationships between this pathology, ROS, and light. Finally, the possible interactions between the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), circadian rhythms, and this pathology are discussed. PMID:26885250

  3. Molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonny, Olivier; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Gumz, Michelle L; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2013-10-01

    The physiological processes that maintain body homeostasis oscillate during the day. Diurnal changes characterize kidney functions, comprising regulation of hydro-electrolytic and acid-base balance, reabsorption of small solutes and hormone production. Renal physiology is characterized by 24-h periodicity and contributes to circadian variability of blood pressure levels, related as well to nychthemeral changes of sodium sensitivity, physical activity, vascular tone, autonomic function and neurotransmitter release from sympathetic innervations. The circadian rhythmicity of body physiology is driven by central and peripheral biological clockworks and entrained by the geophysical light/dark cycle. Chronodisruption, defined as the mismatch between environmental-social cues and physiological-behavioral patterns, causes internal desynchronization of periodic functions, leading to pathophysiological mechanisms underlying degenerative, immune related, metabolic and neoplastic diseases. In this review we will address the genetic, molecular and anatomical elements that hardwire circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and subtend disarray of time-dependent changes in renal pathology. PMID:23901050

  4. Racial differences in the human endogenous circadian period.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark R Smith

    Full Text Available The length of the endogenous period of the human circadian clock (tau is slightly greater than 24 hours. There are individual differences in tau, which influence the phase angle of entrainment to the light/dark (LD cycle, and in doing so contribute to morningness-eveningness. We have recently reported that tau measured in subjects living on an ultradian LD cycle averaged 24.2 hours, and is similar to tau measured using different experimental methods. Here we report racial differences in tau. Subjects lived on an ultradian LD cycle (1.5 hours sleep, 2.5 hours wake for 3 days. Circadian phase assessments were conducted before and after the ultradian days to determine the change in circadian phase, which was attributed to tau. African American subjects had a significantly shorter tau than subjects of other races. We also tested for racial differences in our previous circadian phase advancing and phase delaying studies. In the phase advancing study, subjects underwent 4 days of a gradually advancing sleep schedule combined with a bright light pulse upon awakening each morning. In the phase delaying study, subjects underwent 4 days of a gradually delaying sleep schedule combined with evening light pulses before bedtime. African American subjects had larger phase advances and smaller phase delays, relative to Caucasian subjects. The racial differences in tau and circadian phase shifting have important implications for understanding normal phase differences between individuals, for developing solutions to the problems of jet lag and shift work, and for the diagnosis and treatment of circadian rhythm based sleep disorders such as advanced and delayed sleep phase disorder.

  5. Sleep, Circadian Rhythms, and Performance During Space Shuttle Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neri, David F.; Czeisler, Charles A.; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Wyatt, James K.; Ronda, Joseph M.; Hughes, Rod J.

    2003-01-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythms may be disturbed during spaceflight, and these disturbances can affect crewmembers' performance during waking hours. The mechanisms underlying sleep and circadian rhythm disturbances in space are not well understood, and effective countermeasures are not yet available. We investigated sleep, circadian rhythms, cognitive performance, and light-dark cycles in five astronauts prior to, during, and after the 16-day STS-90 mission and the IO-day STS-95 mission. The efficacy of low-dose, alternative-night, oral melatonin administration as a countermeasure for sleep disturbances was evaluated. During these missions, scheduled rest activity cycles were 20-35 minutes shorter than 24 hours. Light levels on the middeck and in the Spacelab were very low; whereas on the flight deck (which has several windows), they were highly variable. Circadian rhythm abnormalities were observed. During the second half of the missions, the rhythm of urinary cortisol appeared to be delayed relative to the sleep-wake schedule. Performance during wakefulness was impaired. Astronauts slept only about 6.5 hours per day, and subjective sleep quality was lower in space. No beneficial effects of melatonin (0.3 mg administered prior to sleep episodes on alternate nights) were observed. A surprising finding was a marked increase in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep upon return to Earth. We conclude that these Space Shuttle missions were associated with circadian rhythm disturbances, sleep loss, decrements in neurobehavioral performance, and alterations in REM sleep homeostasis. Shorter than 24-hour rest-activity schedules and exposure to light-dark cycles inadequate for optimal circadian synchronization may have contributed to these disturbances.

  6. Dysregulation of circadian rhythms following prolactin-secreting pituitary microadenoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodkin, Katy; Ayalon, Liat; Kanety, Hanna; Dagan, Yaron

    2005-01-01

    A patient who developed an irregular sleep-wake pattern following prolactin-secreting pituitary microadenoma is described. The patient reported difficulties in sleep onset and awakening at the desired time, which caused major dysfunction in his daily life activities. Despite these difficulties, the sleep-related complaints of the patient remained unrecognized for as long as three yrs. Statistical analyses of the patient's rest-activity patterns revealed that the disruption of the sleep-wake circadian rhythm originated from a disharmony between ultradian (semicircadian) and circadian components. The circadian component displayed shorter than 24 h periodicity most of the time, but the semicircadian component fluctuated between longer and shorter than 12 h periods. Additionally, desynchrony in terms of period length was found in the tentative analyses of the rest-activity pattern, salivary melatonin, and oral temperature. While the salivary melatonin time series data could be characterized by a best-fit cosine curve of 24 h, the time series data of oral temperature was more compatible with 28 h best-fit curve. The rest-activity cycle during the simultaneous measurements, however, was best approximated by a best-fit curve of 21 h. The dysregulation of circadian rhythms occurred concomitantly, but not beforehand, with the onset of pituitary disease, thus suggesting an association between the two phenomena. This association may have interesting implications to the modeling of the circadian time-keeping system. This case also highlights the need to raise the awareness to circadian rhythm sleep disorders and to consider disruptions of sleep-wake cycle in patients with pituitary adenoma. PMID:15865328

  7. Circadian rhythm of TSH secretion during TSH-suppression therapy

    OpenAIRE

    M A Sviridonova; A V Ilyin; V V Fadeyev

    2011-01-01

    Тo investigate circadian rhythm of TSH secretion during TSH-suppression therapy. 17 patients taking TSH-suppression therapy, at the age of 18–60 years have been included. Measurements of serum TSH were performed at8.00–9.00h and 14.00–16.00 during the day. The median of TSH concentrations in the morning was 0,016mU/l, at the daytime – 0.015mU/l. The amplitude of TSH circadian variability reached 200% (Me – 19%). At boundary TSH value stability of TSH-suppression can be broken. As specifying a...

  8. Machine learning helps identify CHRONO as a circadian clock component

    OpenAIRE

    Ron C Anafi; Yool Lee; Sato, Trey K; Anand Venkataraman; Chidambaram Ramanathan; Kavakli, Ibrahim H.; Michael E Hughes; Baggs, Julie E.; Jacqueline Growe; Andrew C Liu; Junhyong Kim; Hogenesch, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Machine Learning Helps Identify CHRONO as a Circadian Clock Component Ron C. Anafi1,2.*, Yool Lee3., Trey K. Sato3., Anand Venkataraman3, Chidambaram Ramanathan4, Ibrahim H. Kavakli5, Michael E. Hughes6, Julie E. Baggs7, Jacqueline Growe1,2, Andrew C. Liu4, Junhyong Kim8, John B. Hogenesch2,3* 1 Division of Sleep Medicine, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States of America, 2 Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology, Univer...

  9. Illuminating the circadian clock in monarch butterfly migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froy, Oren; Gotter, Anthony L; Casselman, Amy L; Reppert, Steven M

    2003-05-23

    Migratory monarch butterflies use a time-compensated Sun compass to navigate to their overwintering grounds in Mexico. Here, we report that constant light, which disrupts circadian clock function at both the behavioral and molecular levels in monarchs, also disrupts the time-compensated component of flight navigation. We further show that ultraviolet light is important for flight navigation but is not required for photic entrainment of circadian rhythms. Tracing these distinct light-input pathways into the brain should aid our understanding of the clock-compass mechanisms necessary for successful migration. PMID:12764200

  10. Gravitational biology and the mammalian circadian timing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Charles A.; Murakami, Dean M.; Sulzman, Frank M.

    1989-01-01

    Using published reports, this paper compares and contrasts results on the effects of altered gravitational fields on the regulation in mammals of several physiological and behavioral variables with the circadian regulation of the same variables. The variables considered include the temperature regulation, heart rate, activity, food intake, and calcium balance. It is shown that, in rats, the homeostatic regulation of the body temperature, heart rate, and activity becomes depressed following exposure to a 2 G hyperdynamic field, and recovers within 6 days of 1 G condition. In addition, the circadian rhythms of these variables exhibit a depression of the rhythm amplitude; a recovery of this condition requires a minimum of 7 days.

  11. Timing Matters: Circadian Rhythm in Sepsis, Obstructive Lung Disease, Obstructive Sleep Apnea, and Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Kimberly K; Lam, Michael T; Grandner, Michael A; Sassoon, Catherine S; Malhotra, Atul

    2016-07-01

    Physiological and cellular functions operate in a 24-hour cyclical pattern orchestrated by an endogenous process known as the circadian rhythm. Circadian rhythms represent intrinsic oscillations of biological functions that allow for adaptation to cyclic environmental changes. Key clock genes that affect the persistence and periodicity of circadian rhythms include BMAL1/CLOCK, Period 1, Period 2, and Cryptochrome. Remarkable progress has been made in our understanding of circadian rhythms and their role in common medical conditions. A critical review of the literature supports the association between circadian misalignment and adverse health consequences in sepsis, obstructive lung disease, obstructive sleep apnea, and malignancy. Circadian misalignment plays an important role in these disease processes and can affect disease severity, treatment response, and survivorship. Normal inflammatory response to acute infections, airway resistance, upper airway collapsibility, and mitosis regulation follows a robust circadian pattern. Disruption of normal circadian rhythm at the molecular level affects severity of inflammation in sepsis, contributes to inflammatory responses in obstructive lung diseases, affects apnea length in obstructive sleep apnea, and increases risk for cancer. Chronotherapy is an underused practice of delivering therapy at optimal times to maximize efficacy and minimize toxicity. This approach has been shown to be advantageous in asthma and cancer management. In asthma, appropriate timing of medication administration improves treatment effectiveness. Properly timed chemotherapy may reduce treatment toxicities and maximize efficacy. Future research should focus on circadian rhythm disorders, role of circadian rhythm in other diseases, and modalities to restore and prevent circadian disruption. PMID:27104378

  12. Circadian Rhythms and Mood Disorders: Are The Phenomena and Mechanisms Causally Related?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William eBechtel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews some of the compelling evidence of disrupted circadian rhythms in individuals with mood disorders (major depressive disorder, seasonal affective disorder, and bipolar disorder and that treatments such as bright light, designed to alter circadian rhythms, are effective in treating these disorders. Neurotransmitters in brain regions implicated in mood regulation exhibit circadian rhythms. A mouse model originally employed to identify a circadian gene has proven a potent model for mania. While this evidence is suggestive of an etiological role for altered circadian rhythms in mood disorders, it is compatible with other explanations, including that disrupted circadian rhythms and mood disorders are effects of a common cause and that genes and proteins implicated in both simply have pleiotropic effects. In light of this, the paper advances a proposal as to what evidence would be needed to establish a direct causal link between disruption of circadian rhythms and mood disorders.

  13. Circadian Rhythms and Mood Disorders: Are the Phenomena and Mechanisms Causally Related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtel, William

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the compelling evidence of disrupted circadian rhythms in individuals with mood disorders (major depressive disorder, seasonal affective disorder, and bipolar disorder) and that treatments such as bright light, designed to alter circadian rhythms, are effective in treating these disorders. Neurotransmitters in brain regions implicated in mood regulation exhibit circadian rhythms. A mouse model originally employed to identify a circadian gene has proven a potent model for mania. While this evidence is suggestive of an etiological role for altered circadian rhythms in mood disorders, it is compatible with other explanations, including that disrupted circadian rhythms and mood disorders are effects of a common cause and that genes and proteins implicated in both simply have pleiotropic effects. In light of this, the paper advances a proposal as to what evidence would be needed to establish a direct causal link between disruption of circadian rhythms and mood disorders. PMID:26379559

  14. The Circadian Timing System and Environmental Circadian Disruption: From Follicles to Fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Aritro; Sellix, Michael T

    2016-09-01

    The internal or circadian timing system is deeply integrated in female reproductive physiology. Considerable details of rheostatic timing function in the neuroendocrine control of pituitary hormone secretion, adenohypophyseal hormone gene expression and secretion, gonadal steroid hormone biosynthesis and secretion, ovulation, implantation, and parturition have been reported. The molecular clock, an autonomous feedback loop oscillator of interacting transcriptional regulators, dictates the timing and amplitude of gene expression in each tissue of the female hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Although multiple targets of the molecular clock have been identified, many associated with critical physiological functions in the HPG axis, the full extent of clock-driven gene expression and physiology in this critical system remains unknown. Environmental circadian disruption (ECD), the disturbance of temporal relationships within and between internal clocks (brain and periphery), and external timing cues (eg, light, nutrients, social cues) due to rotating/night shift work or transmeridian travel have been linked to reproductive dysfunction and subfertility. Moreover, ECD resulting from exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals, environmental toxins, and/or irregular hormone levels during sexual development can also reduce fertility. Thus, perturbations that disturb clock function at the molecular, cellular or systemic level correlate with significant declines in female reproductive function. Here we briefly review the evidence for molecular clock function in each tissue of the female HPG axis (GnRH neuron, pituitary, uterus, oviduct, and ovary), describe the human epidemiological and animal data supporting the negative effects of ECD on fertility, and explore the potential for novel chronotherapeutics in women's health and fertility. PMID:27501186

  15. Salt stress-induced protein phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein phosphorylation induced by salt stress in tomato germinating seeds were investigated by two-dimensional polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis of proteins labeled in vivo with (32P)-Phosphate. NaCl induced the phosphorylation of a 14 Kd polypeptide. Pulse-chase experiments revealed that the phosphorylated molecules of this polypeptide are only stable while the stress is present. Phosphorylated 14 Kd polypeptides could be detected in radicles of salt-shocked seedlings after 6 hours stress period. 14 Kd polypeptide phosphorylation was also observed in seeds germinating in the presence of abscisic acid (ABA). The amount of phosphorylated 14 Kd polypeptide was significantly increased in seeds treated simultaneously with NaCl and ABA

  16. Prebiotic phosphorylation of nucleosides in formamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoffstall, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented for an experimental study intended to assess phosphorylation under neither aqueous nor dry thermal conditions. Instead, phosphorylations were attempted in possible nonaqueous prebiotic solvents. Formamide appeared to be the most obvious candidate for phosphorylation studies. Three main classes of phosphorylated products were formed in formamide solution: adenosine monophosphates, cyclic adenosine phosphate, and adenosine diphosphates. Experiments were designed to investigate the extent of phosphorylation of nucleosides in formamide, the relative amounts of nucleoside monophosphate, diphosphates and cyclic phosphate formed and the relative effectiveness of different sources of phosphate as phosphorylating agents in formamide. Reaction variables were temperature, nature of the phosphate or condensed phosphate, nucleoside, concentration of reactants and possible effects of additives. Product identification was based on qualitative and quantitative thin layer chromatography.

  17. Threonine phosphorylation of rat liver glycogen synthase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    32P-labeled glycogen synthase specifically immunoprecipitated from 32P-phosphate incubated rat hepatocytes contains, in addition to [32P] phosphoserine, significant levels of [32P] phosphothreonine. When the 32P-immunoprecipitate was cleaved with CNBr, the [32P] phosphothreonine was recovered in the large CNBr fragment (CB-2, Mapp 28 Kd). Homogeneous rat liver glycogen synthase was phosphorylated by all the protein kinases able to phosphorylate CB-2 in vitro. After analysis of the immunoprecipitated enzyme for phosphoaminoacids, it was observed that only casein kinase II was able to phosphorylate on threonine and 32P-phosphate was only found in CB-2. These results demonstrate that rat liver glycogen synthase is phosphorylated at threonine site(s) contained in CB-2 and strongly indicate that casein kinase II may play a role in the ''in vivo'' phosphorylation of liver glycogen synthase. This is the first protein kinase reported to phosphorylate threonine residues in liver glycogen synthase

  18. Circadian secretion patterns of ß-endorphin and leucine enkephalin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. H. de Wet

    1992-07-01

    Full Text Available ß-endorphin and leucine enkephalin are neuropeptides with potent opioid activity. In a study to investigate the circadian secretion patterns of the above-mentioned, blood samples were collected hourly from 12 healthy males who were subjected to the experiment for 24 hours. Radioimmunoassays were used in the analysis of plasma samples for ß-endorphin and leucine enkephalin. Peak concentrations of ß-endorphin were demonstrated from 08:00-09:00, while peak concentrations of leucine enkephalin occured from 23:00-07:00. Trough concentrations of ß-endorphin occurred from 24:00-05:00, while trough con­centrations of leucine enkephalin were demonstrated from 09:00-12:00. The illustrated circadian secretion pattern for ß-endorphin simulates the well-known circadian rhythm of cortisol. The answer to this may be in the fact that ß-endorphin and corticotropin stem from the same precursor. The illustrated circadian secretion pattern for leucine enkephalin simulates that of melatonin. The reason for this is unclear.

  19. Circadian changes in long noncoding RNAs in the pineal gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coon, Steven L; Munson, Peter J; Cherukuri, Praveen F;

    2012-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) play a broad range of biological roles, including regulation of expression of genes and chromosomes. Here, we present evidence that lncRNAs are involved in vertebrate circadian biology. Differential night/day expression of 112 lncRNAs (0.3 to >50 kb) occurs in the ra...

  20. Disrupting circadian rhythms in rats induces retrograde amnesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fekete, Mátyás; Ree, J.M. van; Niesink, Raymond J.M.; Wied, D. de

    1985-01-01

    Disrupting circadian organization in rats by phase-shifting the illumination cycle or by exposure to a reversed day/night cycle or to continuous light, resulted in retrograde amnesia for passive avoidance behavior. This retrograde amnesia induced by phase-shifting lasted at least 2 days, and gradual

  1. Development of the circadian clockwork in the kidney

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mészáros, Krisztina; Pruess, Linda; Szabó, Attila J.; Gondan, Matthias; Ritz, Eberhard; Schaefer, Franz

    2014-01-01

    The circadian molecular clock is an internal time-keeping system composed of centrally synchronized tissue-level pacemakers. Here, we explored the ontogeny of the clock machinery in the developing kidney. Pregnant rats were housed at 12-12 h light-dark cycles. Offsprings were killed at 4-h...

  2. Statistical inference of regulatory networks for circadian regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderhold, Andrej; Husmeier, Dirk; Grzegorczyk, Marco

    2014-06-01

    We assess the accuracy of various state-of-the-art statistics and machine learning methods for reconstructing gene and protein regulatory networks in the context of circadian regulation. Our study draws on the increasing availability of gene expression and protein concentration time series for key circadian clock components in Arabidopsis thaliana. In addition, gene expression and protein concentration time series are simulated from a recently published regulatory network of the circadian clock in A. thaliana, in which protein and gene interactions are described by a Markov jump process based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics. We closely follow recent experimental protocols, including the entrainment of seedlings to different light-dark cycles and the knock-out of various key regulatory genes. Our study provides relative network reconstruction accuracy scores for a critical comparative performance evaluation, and sheds light on a series of highly relevant questions: it quantifies the influence of systematically missing values related to unknown protein concentrations and mRNA transcription rates, it investigates the dependence of the performance on the network topology and the degree of recurrency, it provides deeper insight into when and why non-linear methods fail to outperform linear ones, it offers improved guidelines on parameter settings in different inference procedures, and it suggests new hypotheses about the structure of the central circadian gene regulatory network in A. thaliana. PMID:24864301

  3. Circadian regulation of epithelial functions in the intestine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pácha, Jiří; Sumová, Alena

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 208, č. 1 (2013), s. 11-24. ISSN 1748-1708 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/10/0969; GA ČR(CZ) GAP303/11/0668 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : circadian rhythms * intestine * colon * proliferation * digestion * intestinal transport Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.251, year: 2013

  4. Studies on circadian rhythm disturbances and melatonin in delirium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.-M. de Jonghe

    2014-01-01

    The circadian sleep/wake rhythm disturbances that are seen in delirium and the role of melatonin supplementation provide a new angle in delirium research. More research is needed to determine the role of melatonin in the pathophysiological mechanisms of delirium and to determine whether the restorat

  5. Transcripts from the Circadian Clock: Telling Time and Season

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Brand (Karl)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe all know it when we wake mere moments before an alarm clock is scheduled to wake us: our body clock made the alarm clock redundant. This phenomenon is driven by an endogenous timer known as the biological, or circadian clock. Each revolution of the Earth about its own axis produces pe

  6. My Path from Chemistry to Phytochrome and Circadian Rhythms

    OpenAIRE

    Tobin, EM

    2016-01-01

    I summarize my scientific journey from my first interest in science to my career investigating how plants use the phytochrome photoreceptor to regulate what genes they express. I then describe how this work led to an understanding of how circadian rhythms function in plants and to the discovery of CCA1, a component of the plant central oscillator.

  7. Paternal irradiation perturbs the expression of circadian genes in offspring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Andre M.G.F.; Barber, Ruth C.; Dubrova, Yuri E., E-mail: yed2@le.ac.uk

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • We have analysed gene expression in the offspring of irradiated male mice. • CBA/Ca and BALB/c male mice were used in our study. • The pattern of gene expression was established in four tissues. • Expression of genes in involved in rhythmic process/circadian rhythm is compromised. • Our data may explain the phenomenon of transgenerational genomic instability. - Abstract: The circadian system represents a complex network which influences the timing of many biological processes. Recent studies have established that circadian alterations play an important role in the susceptibility to many human diseases, including cancer. Here we report that paternal irradiation in mice significantly affects the expression of genes involved in rhythmic processes in their first-generation offspring. Using microarrays, the patterns of gene expression were established for brain, kidney, liver and spleen samples from the non-exposed offspring of irradiated CBA/Ca and BALB/c male mice. The most over-represented categories among the genes differentially expressed in the offspring of control and irradiated males were those involved in rhythmic process, circadian rhythm and DNA-dependent regulation of transcription. The results of our study therefore provide a plausible explanation for the transgenerational effects of paternal irradiation, including increased transgenerational carcinogenesis described in other studies.

  8. My Path from Chemistry to Phytochrome and Circadian Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobin, Elaine M.

    2016-01-01

    I summarize my scientific journey from my first interest in science to my career investigating how plants use the phytochrome photoreceptor to regulate what genes they express. I then describe how this work led to an understanding of how circadian rhythms function in plants and to the discovery of CCA1, a component of the plant central oscillator. PMID:27014288

  9. Paternal irradiation perturbs the expression of circadian genes in offspring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We have analysed gene expression in the offspring of irradiated male mice. • CBA/Ca and BALB/c male mice were used in our study. • The pattern of gene expression was established in four tissues. • Expression of genes in involved in rhythmic process/circadian rhythm is compromised. • Our data may explain the phenomenon of transgenerational genomic instability. - Abstract: The circadian system represents a complex network which influences the timing of many biological processes. Recent studies have established that circadian alterations play an important role in the susceptibility to many human diseases, including cancer. Here we report that paternal irradiation in mice significantly affects the expression of genes involved in rhythmic processes in their first-generation offspring. Using microarrays, the patterns of gene expression were established for brain, kidney, liver and spleen samples from the non-exposed offspring of irradiated CBA/Ca and BALB/c male mice. The most over-represented categories among the genes differentially expressed in the offspring of control and irradiated males were those involved in rhythmic process, circadian rhythm and DNA-dependent regulation of transcription. The results of our study therefore provide a plausible explanation for the transgenerational effects of paternal irradiation, including increased transgenerational carcinogenesis described in other studies

  10. Circadian malfunctions in depression - neurobiological and psychosocial approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechita, Florina; Pîrlog, Mihail Cristian; ChiriŢă, Anca Livia

    2015-01-01

    Depression leads to disturbances in physiological rhythms, which result in disturbances in circadian sleep-wake cycles, hormonal secretion patterns and fluctuations in mood, all of which can be objectively measured. These disturbances, which are associated with depression, can be also used to define depression. Beyond these "transversal" time-related symptoms, there are the "longitudinal" time-related symptoms, since depression evolves over a long period of time, with a profound impact on a person's life and is often associated with long-term psychosocial consequences (Mendlewicz, 2010). The circadian rhythm reflects an approximate 24-hour cycle in the biochemical, physiological and behavioral processes of living entities, which crucially influences human well-being and health. Increasing evidence from clinical and neurobiological research suggests that disrupted temporal organization impairs behavior, cognition, mood, sleep and social activity and may be implicated in mental disorders. It has been proposed that circadian malfunction is a major core feature of mood disorders, depression in particular. In depressed patients, circadian rhythms and homeostatic processes are disrupted, thereby affecting mood, sleep, activity and a variety of biological functions such as hormone secretion and body temperature (Hajak & Landgrebe, 2010). Sleep difficulties are among the most current symptoms in depressed patients. Insomnia is often the reason why depressed patients seek help and relief of sleep disturbance may encourage compliance with antidepressant treatment. Apart from the discomfort that sleep problems produce, they may lead to exhaustion, poor functioning and they are associated with an increase in suicide risk (Wilson et al., 2013). PMID:26662127

  11. Heterogeneity induces rhythms of weakly coupled circadian neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Changgui; Liang, Xiaoming; Yang, Huijie; Rohling, Jos H T

    2016-01-01

    The main clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) regulates circadian rhythms in mammals. The SCN is composed of approximately twenty thousand heterogeneous self-oscillating neurons, that have intrinsic periods varying from 22 h to 28 h. They are coupled through neurotransmitters and neuropeptides to form a network and output a uniform periodic rhythm. Previous studies found that the heterogeneity of the neurons leads to attenuation of the circadian rhythm with strong cellular coupling. In the present study, we investigate the heterogeneity of the neurons and of the network in the condition of constant darkness. Interestingly, we found that the heterogeneity of weakly coupled neurons enables them to oscillate and strengthen the circadian rhythm. In addition, we found that the period of the SCN network increases with the increase of the degree of heterogeneity. As the network heterogeneity does not change the dynamics of the rhythm, our study shows that the heterogeneity of the neurons is vitally important for rhythm generation in weakly coupled systems, such as the SCN, and it provides a new method to strengthen the circadian rhythm, as well as an alternative explanation for differences in free running periods between species in the absence of the daily cycle. PMID:26898574

  12. Stochastic Simulation of Delay-Induced Circadian Rhythms in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhouyi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are ubiquitous in all eukaryotes and some prokaryotes. Several computational models with or without time delays have been developed for circadian rhythms. Exact stochastic simulations have been carried out for several models without time delays, but no exact stochastic simulation has been done for models with delays. In this paper, we proposed a detailed and a reduced stochastic model with delays for circadian rhythms in Drosophila based on two deterministic models of Smolen et al. and employed exact stochastic simulation to simulate circadian oscillations. Our simulations showed that both models can produce sustained oscillations and that the oscillation is robust to noise in the sense that there is very little variability in oscillation period although there are significant random fluctuations in oscillation peeks. Moreover, although average time delays are essential to simulation of oscillation, random changes in time delays within certain range around fixed average time delay cause little variability in the oscillation period. Our simulation results also showed that both models are robust to parameter variations and that oscillation can be entrained by light/dark circles. Our simulations further demonstrated that within a reasonable range around the experimental result, the rates that dclock and per promoters switch back and forth between activated and repressed sites have little impact on oscillation period.

  13. The circadian clock regulates auxin signaling and responses in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F Covington

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock plays a pervasive role in the temporal regulation of plant physiology, environmental responsiveness, and development. In contrast, the phytohormone auxin plays a similarly far-reaching role in the spatial regulation of plant growth and development. Went and Thimann noted 70 years ago that plant sensitivity to auxin varied according to the time of day, an observation that they could not explain. Here we present work that explains this puzzle, demonstrating that the circadian clock regulates auxin signal transduction. Using genome-wide transcriptional profiling, we found many auxin-induced genes are under clock regulation. We verified that endogenous auxin signaling is clock regulated with a luciferase-based assay. Exogenous auxin has only modest effects on the plant clock, but the clock controls plant sensitivity to applied auxin. Notably, we found both transcriptional and growth responses to exogenous auxin are gated by the clock. Thus the circadian clock regulates some, and perhaps all, auxin responses. Consequently, many aspects of plant physiology not previously thought to be under circadian control may show time-of-day-specific sensitivity, with likely important consequences for plant growth and environmental responses.

  14. New methods to assess circadian clocks in humans

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Marta; Sumová, Alena

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 52, č. 5 (2014), s. 404-412. ISSN 0019-5189 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT11474 Grant ostatní: Univerzita Karlova(CZ) 22810 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : circadian * clock gene * melatonin * human Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 0.835, year: 2014

  15. Circadian remodeling of neuronal circuits involved in rhythmic behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Paz Fernández

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Clock output pathways are central to convey timing information from the circadian clock to a diversity of physiological systems, ranging from cell-autonomous processes to behavior. While the molecular mechanisms that generate and sustain rhythmicity at the cellular level are well understood, it is unclear how this information is further structured to control specific behavioral outputs. Rhythmic release of pigment dispersing factor (PDF has been proposed to propagate the time of day information from core pacemaker cells to downstream targets underlying rhythmic locomotor activity. Indeed, such circadian changes in PDF intensity represent the only known mechanism through which the PDF circuit could communicate with its output. Here we describe a novel circadian phenomenon involving extensive remodeling in the axonal terminals of the PDF circuit, which display higher complexity during the day and significantly lower complexity at nighttime, both under daily cycles and constant conditions. In support to its circadian nature, cycling is lost in bona fide clockless mutants. We propose this clock-controlled structural plasticity as a candidate mechanism contributing to the transmission of the information downstream of pacemaker cells.

  16. Circadian rhythm in salivary melatonin in narcoleptic patiens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blažejová, K.; Illnerová, Helena; Hájek, Ivan; Nevšímalová, S.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 437, č. 2 (2008), s. 162-164. ISSN 0304-3940 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : narcolepsy * circadian system * melatonin Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.200, year: 2008

  17. Promiscuity and Selectivity in Phosphoryl Transferases

    OpenAIRE

    Barrozo, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoryl transfers are essential chemical reactions in key life processes, including energy production, signal transduction and protein synthesis. They are known for having extremely low reaction rates in aqueous solution, reaching the scale of millions of years. In order to make life possible, enzymes that catalyse phosphoryl transfer, phosphoryl transferases, have evolved to be tremendously proficient catalysts, increasing reaction rates to the millisecond timescale. Due to the nature of ...

  18. Phase analysis of circadian-related genes in two tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Leping

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent circadian clock studies using gene expression microarray in two different tissues of mouse have revealed not all circadian-related genes are synchronized in phase or peak expression times across tissues in vivo. Instead, some circadian-related genes may be delayed by 4–8 hrs in peak expression in one tissue relative to the other. These interesting biological observations prompt a statistical question regarding how to distinguish the synchronized genes from genes that are systematically lagged in phase/peak expression time across two tissues. Results We propose a set of techniques from circular statistics to analyze phase angles of circadian-related genes in two tissues. We first estimate the phases of a cycling gene separately in each tissue, which are then used to estimate the paired angular difference of the phase angles of the gene in the two tissues. These differences are modeled as a mixture of two von Mises distributions which enables us to cluster genes into two groups; one group having synchronized transcripts with the same phase in the two tissues, the other containing transcripts with a discrepancy in phase between the two tissues. For each cluster of genes we assess the association of phases across the tissue types using circular-circular regression. We also develop a bootstrap methodology based on a circular-circular regression model to evaluate the improvement in fit provided by allowing two components versus a one-component von-Mises model. Conclusion We applied our proposed methodologies to the circadian-related genes common to heart and liver tissues in Storch et al. 2, and found that an estimated 80% of circadian-related transcripts common to heart and liver tissues were synchronized in phase, and the other 20% of transcripts were lagged about 8 hours in liver relative to heart. The bootstrap p-value for being one cluster is 0.063, which suggests the possibility of two clusters. Our methodologies can

  19. Circadian preference and thinking styles: implications for school achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Morales, Juan Francisco; Escribano, Cristina

    2013-12-01

    Research has shown that thinking styles could have an influence on academic achievement. Previous studies have described that evening types are usually right-thinkers who tend to be creative and intuitive, whereas morning types tend to be left-thinkers who prefer verbal and analytic strategies in processing information. However, these studies have been realized among undergraduates, who have more freedom to choose their time schedules according to their circadian preference than adolescents or adult workers. On other hand, the relationship between thinking styles and circadian preference has not been analyzed considering school achievement. The present study aims (1) to investigate the relationship between circadian preference, that is, behavioral differences in circadian rhythmic expression, and thinking styles, referring to the preference toward information processing typical of the right versus the left cerebral hemisphere; and (2) to test the implications for self-reported school achievement. A sample of 1134 preadolescents and adolescents (581 girls; mean ± SD age: 12.1 ± 1.47, range: 10-14 yrs) completed the Morningness-Eveningness Scale for Children (MESC) as measure of circadian preference (morning, neither, or evening types), the Hemispheric Preference Test (HPT), conceived as a tool to measure thinking styles (right-, balanced-, and left-thinkers), and self-reported school achievement. Results indicated a greater percentage of left-thinkers among morning types and a greater percentage of right-thinkers among evening types. No differences were found among balanced-thinkers and neither types. Morning types and left-thinkers reported the highest subjective level of achievement, followed by evening types and left-thinkers, and morning types and right-thinkers. Evening types and right-thinkers reported the lowest subjective level of achievement. Finally, multivariate regression analysis indicated that age, left hemisphere and morning preferences accounted

  20. Circadian transcription contributes to core period determination in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Kadener

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The Clock-Cycle (CLK-CYC heterodimer constitutes a key circadian transcription complex in Drosophila. CYC has a DNA-binding domain but lacks an activation domain. Previous experiments also indicate that most of the transcriptional activity of CLK-CYC derives from the glutamine-rich region of its partner CLK. To address the role of transcription in core circadian timekeeping, we have analyzed the effects of a CYC-viral protein 16 (VP16 fusion protein in the Drosophila system. The addition of this potent and well-studied viral transcriptional activator (VP16 to CYC imparts to the CLK-CYC-VP16 complex strongly enhanced transcriptional activity relative to that of CLK-CYC. This increase is manifested in flies expressing CYC-VP16 as well as in S2 cells. These flies also have increased levels of CLK-CYC direct target gene mRNAs as well as a short period, implicating circadian transcription in period determination. A more detailed examination of reporter gene expression in CYC-VP16-expressing flies suggests that the short period is due at least in part to a more rapid transcriptional phase. Importantly, the behavioral effects require a period (per promoter and are therefore unlikely to be merely a consequence of generally higher PER levels. This indicates that the CLK-CYC-VP16 behavioral effects are a consequence of increased per transcription. All of this also suggests that the timing of transcriptional activation and not the activation itself is the key event responsible for the behavioral effects observed in CYC-VP16-expressing flies. The results taken together indicate that circadian transcription contributes to core circadian function in Drosophila.

  1. The effect of lens aging and cataract surgery on circadian rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shen-Shen; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Many organisms have evolved an approximately 24-hour circadian rhythm that allows them to achieve internal physiological homeostasis with external environment. Suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the central pacemaker of circadian rhythm, and its activity is entrained to the external light-dark cycle. The SCN controls circadian rhythm through regulating the synthesis of melatonin by pineal gland via a multisynaptic pathway. Light, especially short-wavelength blue light, is the most potent environmental time cue in circadian photoentrainment. Recently, the discovery of a novel type of retinal photoreceptors, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, sheds light on the mechanism of circadian photoentrainment and raises concerns about the effect of ocular diseases on circadian system. With age, light transmittance is significantly decreased due to the aging of crystalline lens, thus possibly resulting in progressive loss of circadian photoreception. In the current review, we summarize the circadian physiology, highlight the important role of light in circadian rhythm regulation, discuss about the correlation between age-related cataract and sleep disorders, and compare the effect of blue light- filtering intraocular lenses (IOLs) and ultraviolet only filtering IOLs on circadian rhythm. PMID:27500118

  2. SIMAC - A phosphoproteomic strategy for the rapid separation of mono-phosphorylated from multiply phosphorylated peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingholm, Tine E; Jensen, Ole N; Robinson, Phillip J;

    2008-01-01

    spectrometric analysis, such as immobilized metal affinity chromatography or titanium dioxide the coverage of the phosphoproteome of a given sample is limited. Here we report a simple and rapid strategy - SIMAC - for sequential separation of mono-phosphorylated peptides and multiply phosphorylated peptides from...... and an optimized titanium dioxide chromatographic method. More than double the total number of identified phosphorylation sites was obtained with SIMAC, primarily from a three-fold increase in recovery of multiply phosphorylated peptides....

  3. Circadian organization of the mammalian retina: from gene regulation to physiology and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Douglas G; Iuvone, P Michael; Tosini, Gianluca

    2014-03-01

    The retinal circadian system represents a unique structure. It contains a complete circadian system and thus the retina represents an ideal model to study fundamental questions of how neural circadian systems are organized and what signaling pathways are used to maintain synchrony of the different structures in the system. In addition, several studies have shown that multiple sites within the retina are capable of generating circadian oscillations. The strength of circadian clock gene expression and the emphasis of rhythmic expression are divergent across vertebrate retinas, with photoreceptors as the primary locus of rhythm generation in amphibians, while in mammals clock activity is most robust in the inner nuclear layer. Melatonin and dopamine serve as signaling molecules to entrain circadian rhythms in the retina and also in other ocular structures. Recent studies have also suggested GABA as an important component of the system that regulates retinal circadian rhythms. These transmitter-driven influences on clock molecules apparently reinforce the autonomous transcription-translation cycling of clock genes. The molecular organization of the retinal clock is similar to what has been reported for the SCN although inter-neural communication among retinal neurons that form the circadian network is apparently weaker than those present in the SCN, and it is more sensitive to genetic disruption than the central brain clock. The melatonin-dopamine system is the signaling pathway that allows the retinal circadian clock to reconfigure retinal circuits to enhance light-adapted cone-mediated visual function during the day and dark-adapted rod-mediated visual signaling at night. Additionally, the retinal circadian clock also controls circadian rhythms in disk shedding and phagocytosis, and possibly intraocular pressure. Emerging experimental data also indicate that circadian clock is also implicated in the pathogenesis of eye disease and compelling experimental data

  4. Symposia on Plant (Protein Phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacco C. De Vries

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available From September 14-16, 2011 the twelfth symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was held in Tübingen, Germany. The topic is as broad as the name suggests and covers all aspects of this important means of protein modification in plants. I have had the pleasure of attending the 2007 and the 2011 symposia. The interesting concept behind these meetings is to hear about the same biochemical mechanism operative in a multitude of experimental systems. The meetings are quite informal and present an excellent mix ranging from technology to biochemical experience and novel findings and tools.The two-and-a-half-day program was divided into five double sessions: biotic interactions, hormone signaling, abiotic interactions, Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK and Ca++ pathways and phosphoproteomics. It was hosted by the Zentrum für Molekularbiologie der Pflanzen (ZMBP and the organizing committee chaired by Klaus Harter.

  5. Phosphorylation by Cdk1 induces Plk1-mediated vimentin phosphorylation during mitosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yamaguchi, Tomoya; Goto, Hidemasa; Yokoyama, Tomoya; Silljé, Herman; Hanisch, Anja; Uldschmid, Andreas; Takai, Yasushi; Oguri, Takashi; Nigg, Erich A; Inagaki, Masaki

    2005-01-01

    Several kinases phosphorylate vimentin, the most common intermediate filament protein, in mitosis. Aurora-B and Rho-kinase regulate vimentin filament separation through the cleavage furrow-specific vimentin phosphorylation. Cdk1 also phosphorylates vimentin from prometaphase to metaphase, but its si

  6. Phosphorylation of the multidrug resistance associated glycoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drug-resistant cell lines derived from the mouse macrophage-like cell line J774.2 express the multidrug resistant phenotype which includes the overexpression of a membrane glycoprotein (130-140 kilodaltons). Phosphorylation of this resistant-specific glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein) in intact cells and in cell-free membrane fractions has been studied. The phosphorylated glycoprotein can be immunoprecipitated by a rabbit polyclonal antibody specific for the glycoprotein. Phosphorylation studies done with partially purified membrane fractions derived from colchicine-resistant cells indicated that (a) phosphorylation of the glycoprotein in 1 mM MgCl2 was enhanced a minimum of 2-fold by 10 μM cAMP and (b) the purified catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A) phosphorylated partially purified glycoprotein that was not phosphorylated by [γ-32P]ATP alone, suggesting that autophosphorylation was not involved. These results indicate that the glycoprotein is a phosphoprotein and that at least one of the kinases responsible for its phosphorylation is a membrane-associated protein kinase A. The state of phosphorylation of the glycoprotein, which is a major component of the multidrug resistance phenotype, may be related to the role of the glycoprotein in maintaining drug resistance

  7. Phosphorylation of the multidrug resistance associated glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado, W; Horwitz, S B

    1987-11-01

    Drug-resistant cell lines derived from the mouse macrophage-like cell line J774.2 express the multidrug resistance phenotype which includes the overexpression of a membrane glycoprotein (130-140 kilodaltons). Phosphorylation of this resistant-specific glycoprotein (P-glycoprotein) in intact cells and in cell-free membrane fractions has been studied. The phosphorylated glycoprotein can be immunoprecipitated by a rabbit polyclonal antibody specific for the glycoprotein. Phosphorylation studies done with partially purified membrane fractions derived from colchicine-resistant cells indicated that (a) phosphorylation of the glycoprotein in 1 mM MgCl2 was enhanced a minimum of 2-fold by 10 microM cAMP and (b) the purified catalytic subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A) phosphorylated partially purified glycoprotein that was not phosphorylated by [gamma-32P]ATP alone, suggesting that autophosphorylation was not involved. These results indicate that the glycoprotein is a phosphoprotein and that at least one of the kinases responsible for its phosphorylation is a membrane-associated protein kinase A. The state of phosphorylation of the glycoprotein, which is a major component of the multidrug resistance phenotype, may be related to the role of the glycoprotein in maintaining drug resistance. PMID:3427052

  8. The mood stabilizer valproic acid opposes the effects of dopamine on circadian rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgraf, Dominic; Joiner, William J; McCarthy, Michael J; Kiessling, Silke; Barandas, Rita; Young, Jared W; Cermakian, Nicolas; Welsh, David K

    2016-08-01

    Endogenous circadian (∼24 h) clocks regulate key physiological and cognitive processes via rhythmic expression of clock genes. The main circadian pacemaker is the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Mood disorders, including bipolar disorder (BD), are commonly associated with disturbed circadian rhythms. Dopamine (DA) contributes to mania in BD and has direct impact on clock gene expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that high levels of DA during episodes of mania contribute to disturbed circadian rhythms in BD. The mood stabilizer valproic acid (VPA) also affects circadian rhythms. Thus, we further hypothesized that VPA normalizes circadian disturbances caused by elevated levels of DA. To test these hypotheses, we examined locomotor rhythms and circadian gene cycling in mice with reduced expression of the dopamine transporter (DAT-KD mice), which results in elevated DA levels and mania-like behavior. We found that elevated DA signaling lengthened the circadian period of behavioral rhythms in DAT-KD mice and clock gene expression rhythms in SCN explants. In contrast, we found that VPA shortened circadian period of behavioral rhythms in DAT-KD mice and clock gene expression rhythms in SCN explants, hippocampal cell lines, and human fibroblasts from BD patients. Thus, DA and VPA have opposing effects on circadian period. To test whether the impact of VPA on circadian rhythms contributes to its behavioral effects, we fed VPA to DAT-deficient Drosophila with and without functioning circadian clocks. Consistent with our hypothesis, we found that VPA had potent activity-suppressing effects in hyperactive DAT-deficient flies with intact circadian clocks. However, these effects were attenuated in DAT-deficient flies in which circadian clocks were disrupted, suggesting that VPA functions partly through the circadian clock to suppress activity. Here, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence across species that elevated DA signaling lengthens the circadian

  9. Characterizing the Microenvironment Surrounding Phosphorylated Protein Sites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi-Cai Fan; Xue-Gong Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation plays an important role in various cellular processes. Due to its high complexity, the mechanism needs to be further studied. In the last few years, many methods have been contributed to this field, but almost all of them investigated the mechanism based on protein sequences around protein sites. In this study, we implement an exploration by characterizing the microenvironment surrounding phosphorylated protein sites with a modified shell model, and obtain some significant properties by the rank-sum test, such as the lack of some classes of residues, atoms, and secondary structures. Furthermore, we find that the depletion of some properties affects protein phosphorylation remarkably. Our results suggest that it is a meaningful direction to explore the mechanism of protein phosphorylation from microenvironment and we expect further findings along with the increasing size of phosphorylation and protein structure data.

  10. Phosphorylation of caldesmon by myosin light chain kinase increases its binding affinity for phosphorylated myosin filaments

    OpenAIRE

    Sobieszek, Apolinary; Sarg, Bettina; Seow, Chun Y.; Lindner, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    Phosphorylation of myosin by myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) is essential for smooth muscle contraction. In this study we show that caldesmon (CaD) is also phosphorylated in vitro by MLCK. The phosphorylation is calcium- and calmodulin (CaM)-dependent and requires a MLCK concentration close to that found in vivo. On average, approximately 2 mol Pi per mol of CaD are incorporated at Thr-626 and Thr-693, with additional partial phosphorylation at Ser-658 and Ser-702. The phosphorylation rate f...

  11. A role for Drosophila ATX2 in activation of PER translation and circadian behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Ling, Jinli; Yuan, Chunyan; Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Emery, Patrick

    2013-05-17

    A negative transcriptional feedback loop generates circadian rhythms in Drosophila. PERIOD (PER) is a critical state-variable in this mechanism, and its abundance is tightly regulated. We found that the Drosophila homolog of ATAXIN-2 (ATX2)--an RNA-binding protein implicated in human neurodegenerative diseases--was required for circadian locomotor behavior. ATX2 was necessary for PER accumulation in circadian pacemaker neurons and thus determined period length of circadian behavior. ATX2 was required for the function of TWENTY-FOUR (TYF), a crucial activator of PER translation. ATX2 formed a complex with TYF and promoted its interaction with polyadenylate-binding protein (PABP). Our work uncovers a role for ATX2 in circadian timing and reveals that this protein functions as an activator of PER translation in circadian neurons. PMID:23687048

  12. Disruption of Circadian Rhythms: A Crucial Factor in the Etiology of Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Salgado-Delgado; Araceli Tapia Osorio; Nadia Saderi; Carolina Escobar

    2011-01-01

    Circadian factors might play a crucial role in the etiology of depression. It has been demonstrated that the disruption of circadian rhythms by lighting conditions and lifestyle predisposes individuals to a wide range of mood disorders, including impulsivity, mania and depression. Also, associated with depression, there is the impairment of circadian rhythmicity of behavioral, endocrine, and metabolic functions. Inspite of this close relationship between both processes, the complex relationsh...

  13. Sex differences in the circadian regulation of sleep and waking cognition in humans

    OpenAIRE

    N. Santhi; Lazar, AS; McCabe, PJ; Lo, JC; Groeger, JA; DIJK, DJ

    2016-01-01

    The sleep–wake cycle and circadian rhythmicity both contribute to brain function, but whether this contribution differs between men and women and how it varies across cognitive domains and subjective dimensions has not been established. We examined the circadian and sleep–wake-dependent regulation of cognition in 16 men and 18 women in a forced desynchrony protocol and quantified the separate contributions of circadian phase, prior sleep, and elapsed time awake on cognition and sleep. The lar...

  14. Metabolic Consequences in Humans of Prolonged Sleep Restriction Combined with Circadian Disruption

    OpenAIRE

    Buxton, Orfeu M.; Cain, Sean W.; O’Connor, Shawn P; Porter, James H.; Duffy, Jeanne F.; Wang, Wei; Czeisler, Charles A.; Shea, Steven A.

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies link short sleep and circadian disruption with risk of metabolic syndrome and diabetes. We tested the hypotheses that prolonged sleep restriction with concurrent circadian disruption, as can occur with shift work, impairs glucose regulation and metabolism. Healthy adults spent >5 weeks in controlled laboratory conditions including: sleep extension (baseline), 3-week sleep restriction (5.6 h sleep/24 h) combined with circadian disruption (recurring 28-h ‘days’), and 9-d...

  15. Examining the Acute and Chronic Effects of Sepsis on the Circadian Clock in the Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    O'Callaghan, Emma

    2013-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are recurring patterns (~24hrs) in behaviour and physiology that are driven primarily by an endogenous biological timekeeping system, with the master pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Studies have indicated bidirectional relationships between the circadian and the immune systems, however while there is much evidence regarding the regulation of immune function by the circadian system, information regarding the impact of immune processes on the timekeeping syst...

  16. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring and Circadian Rhythm of Blood Pressure in Diabetes Mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Matteucci; Ottavio Giampietro

    2013-01-01

    Systolic and diastolic blood pressures display a circadian rhythmicity that can be assessed by 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and analysed using the cosinor procedure. Altered characteristics to the circadian rhythm of blood pressure, which may result in adverse health outcomes, have been observed in both prediabetes and diabetes. We have investigated the circadian variability of blood pressure in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Chronobiologically interpreted ambulator...

  17. Chronic Ethanol Intake Modulates Photic and Non-Photic Circadian Phase Responses in the Syrian Hamster

    OpenAIRE

    Seggio, Joseph A.; Logan, Ryan W.; Rosenwasser, Alan M.

    2007-01-01

    Chronic alcohol intake disrupts sleep and other circadian biological rhythms in both human alcoholics and in experimental animals. Recent studies from our laboratory indicate that these effects may be due, in part, to ethanol-induced alterations in fundamental properties of the circadian pacemaker. The present study explored the effects of chronic voluntary ethanol intake (25% v/v) on circadian phase responses to both photic and non-photic stimuli in Syrian hamsters. Hamsters were used in the...

  18. The hormonal Zeitgeber melatonin: role as a circadian modulator in memory processing

    OpenAIRE

    Oliver eRawashdeh; Erik eMaronde

    2012-01-01

    The neuroendocrine substance melatonin is a hormone synthesized rhythmically by the pineal gland under the influence of the circadian system and alternating light/dark cycles. Melatonin has been shown to have broad applications, and consequently becoming a molecule of great controversy. Undoubtedly, however, melatonin plays an important role as a time cue for the endogenous circadian system. This review focuses on melatonin as a regulator in the circadian modulation of memory processing. Memo...

  19. The mood stabilizer valproic acid opposes the effects of dopamine on circadian rhythms.

    OpenAIRE

    Landgraf, D; Joiner, WJ; McCarthy, MJ; Kiessling, S.; Barandas, R; Young, JW; Cermakian, N; Welsh, DK

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous circadian (∼24 h) clocks regulate key physiological and cognitive processes via rhythmic expression of clock genes. The main circadian pacemaker is the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Mood disorders, including bipolar disorder (BD), are commonly associated with disturbed circadian rhythms. Dopamine (DA) contributes to mania in BD and has direct impact on clock gene expression. Therefore, we hypothesized that high levels of DA during episodes of mania contribute to distu...

  20. Circadian Modulation of Dopamine Levels and Dopaminergic Neuron Development Contributes to Attention Deficiency and Hyperactive Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jian; Zhong, Zhaomin; Wang, Mingyong; Chen, Xifeng; Tan, Yicheng; Zhang, Shuqing; He, Wei; He, Xiong; Huang, Guodong; Lu, Haiping; Wu, Ping; Che, Yi; Yan, Yi-Lin; Postlethwait, John H.; Chen, Wenbiao

    2015-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders in children and adults. While ADHD patients often display circadian abnormalities, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here we found that the zebrafish mutant for the circadian gene period1b (per1b) displays hyperactive, impulsive-like, and attention deficit-like behaviors and low levels of dopamine, reminiscent of human ADHD patients. We found that the circadian clock directly regulates dopa...

  1. Immunity’s fourth dimension: approaching the circadian-immune connection

    OpenAIRE

    Arjona, Alvaro; Adam C Silver; Walker, Wendy E; Fikrig, Erol

    2012-01-01

    The circadian system ensures the generation and maintenance of self-sustained ~24 h rhythms in physiology that are linked to internal and environmental changes. In mammals, daily variations in light intensity and other cues are integrated by a hypothalamic master clock that conveys circadian information to peripheral molecular clocks that orchestrate physiology. Multiple immune parameters also vary throughout the day and disruption of circadian homeostasis is associated with immune-related di...

  2. The effects of the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine on circadian rhythms in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Keeffe, Saileog

    2010-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are patterns in behavioural, physiological and many others parameters that recur approximately every twenty four hours. Dysfunction of the circadian system is being linked to a number of common illnesses. The psychiatric condition Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) can be characterised by an early onset of sleep problems and breakdown of stable circadian rhythms which recent studies have shown. The drug atomoxetine used in this research project is used in the...

  3. Effects of chronic administration and withdrawal of antidepressant agents on circadian activity rhythms in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Wollnik, Franziska

    1992-01-01

    Experimental and clinical studies indicate that clinical depression may be associated with disturbances of circadian rhythms. To explore the interaction between circadian rhythmicity, behavioral state, and monoaminergic systems, the present study investigated the effects of chronic administration and withdrawal of the following antidepressant agents on circadian wheel-running rhythms of laboratory rats: a) moclobemide, a reversible and selective monoamine oxidase (MAO) type A inhibitor; b) Ro...

  4. Peripheral Skin Temperature and Circadian Biological Clock in Shift Nurses after a Day off

    OpenAIRE

    Massimo Bracci; Veronica Ciarapica; Alfredo Copertaro; Mariella Barbaresi; Nicola Manzella; Marco Tomasetti; Simona Gaetani; Federica Monaco; Monica Amati; Matteo Valentino; Venerando Rapisarda; Lory Santarelli

    2016-01-01

    The circadian biological clock is essentially based on the light/dark cycle. Some people working with shift schedules cannot adjust their sleep/wake cycle to the light/dark cycle, and this may result in alterations of the circadian biological clock. This study explored the circadian biological clock of shift and daytime nurses using non-invasive methods. Peripheral skin temperature, cortisol and melatonin levels in saliva, and Per2 expression in pubic hair follicle cells were investigated for...

  5. Circadian Rhythms of Crawling and Swimming in the Nudibranch Mollusc Melibe leonina

    OpenAIRE

    Newcomb, James M; Kirouac, Lauren E.; NAIMIE, AMANDA A.; BIXBY, KIMBERLY A.; Lee, Colin; MALANGA, STEPHANIE; RAUBACH, MAUREEN; Watson, Winsor H.

    2014-01-01

    Daily rhythms of activity driven by circadian clocks are expressed by many organisms, including molluscs. We initiated this study, with the nudibranch Melibe leonina, with four goals in mind: (1) determine which behaviors are expressed with a daily rhythm; (2) investigate which of these rhythmic behaviors are controlled by a circadian clock; (3) determine if a circadian clock is associated with the eyes or optic ganglia of Melibe, as it is in several other gastropods; and (4) test the hypothe...

  6. Circadian abnormalities in a mouse model of high trait anxiety and depression

    OpenAIRE

    Griesauer, Irene; Diao, Weifei; Ronovsky, Marianne; Elbau, Immanuel; Sartori, Simone; Singewald, Nicolas; Pollak, Daniela D.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Dysregulation of circadian rhythms is a key symptom of mood disorders, including anxiety disorders and depression. Whether the circadian abnormalities observed in depressed patients are cause or consequence of the disease remains elusive. Here we aimed to explore potential disturbances of circadian rhythms in a validated genetic animal model of high trait anxiety and co-morbid depression and examine its molecular correlates. Materials and methods Mice selectively bred for high (H...

  7. A circadian rhythm orchestrated by histone deacetylase 3 controls hepatic lipid metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Dan; Liu, Tao; Sun, Zheng;

    2011-01-01

    Disruption of the circadian clock exacerbates metabolic diseases, including obesity and diabetes. We show that histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) recruitment to the genome displays a circadian rhythm in mouse liver. Histone acetylation is inversely related to HDAC3 binding, and this rhythm is lost whe...... hepatic steatosis. Thus, genomic recruitment of HDAC3 by Rev-erbα directs a circadian rhythm of histone acetylation and gene expression required for normal hepatic lipid homeostasis....

  8. Functional Development of the Circadian Clock in the Zebrafish Pineal Gland

    OpenAIRE

    Zohar Ben-Moshe; Foulkes, Nicholas S.; Yoav Gothilf

    2014-01-01

    The zebrafish constitutes a powerful model organism with unique advantages for investigating the vertebrate circadian timing system and its regulation by light. In particular, the remarkably early and rapid development of the zebrafish circadian system has facilitated exploring the factors that control the onset of circadian clock function during embryogenesis. Here, we review our understanding of the molecular basis underlying functional development of the central clock in the zebrafish pine...

  9. Interaction of MAGED1 with nuclear receptors affects circadian clock function

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaohan; Tang, Jing; Xing, Lijuan; Shi, Guangsen; Ruan, Haibin; Gu, Xiwen; Liu, Zhiwei; Wu, Xi; Gao, Xiang; Xu, Ying

    2010-01-01

    The circadian clock has a central role in physiological adaption and anticipation of day/night changes. In a genetic screen for novel regulators of circadian rhythms, we found that mice lacking MAGED1 (Melanoma Antigen Family D1) exhibit a shortened period and altered rest–activity bouts. These circadian phenotypes are proposed to be caused by a direct effect on the core molecular clock network that reduces the robustness of the circadian clock. We provide in vitro and in vivo evidence indica...

  10. Dissociation of ultradian and circadian phenotypes in female and male Siberian hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prendergast, Brian J; Cisse, Yasmine M; Cable, Erin J; Zucker, Irving

    2012-08-01

    Three experiments addressed whether pronounced alterations in the circadian system yielded concomitant changes in ultradian timing. Female Siberian hamsters were housed in a 16L:8D photoperiod after being subjected to a disruptive phase-shifting protocol that produced 3 distinct permanent circadian phenotypes: some hamsters entrained their circadian rhythms (CRs) with predominantly nocturnal locomotor activity (ENTR), others displayed free-running CRs (FR), and a third cohort was circadian arrhythmic (ARR). The period of the ultradian locomotor rhythm (UR) did not differ among the 3 circadian phenotypes; neuroendocrine generation of URs remains viable in the absence of coherent circadian organization and appears to be mediated by substrates functionally and anatomically distinct from those that generate CRs. Pronounced light-dark differences in several UR characteristics in ENTR hamsters were completely absent in circadian arrhythmic hamsters. The disruptive phase-shifting protocol may compromise direct visual input to ultradian oscillators but more likely indirectly affects URs by interrupting visual afference to the circadian system. Additional experiments documented that deuterium oxide and constant light, each of which substantially lengthened the period of free-running CRs, failed to change the period of concurrently monitored URs. The resistance of URs to deuteration contrasts with the slowing of virtually all other biological timing processes, including CRs. Considered together, the present results point to the existence of separable control mechanisms for generation of circadian and ultradian rhythms. PMID:22855573

  11. Circadian pattern and burstiness in human communication activity

    CERN Document Server

    Jo, Hang-Hyun; Kertész, János; Kaski, Kimmo

    2011-01-01

    The temporal pattern of human communication is inhomogeneous and bursty, as reflected by the heavy tail distribution of the inter-event times. For the origin of this behavior two main mechanisms have been suggested: a) Externally driven inhomogeneities due to the circadian and weekly activity patterns and b) intrinsic correlation based inhomogeneity rooted deeply in the task handling strategies of humans. Here we address this question by providing systematic de-seasoning methods to remove the circadian and weekly patterns from the time series of communication events. We find that the heavy tails of the inter-event time distributions are robust with respect to this procedure indicating that burstiness is mostly caused by the latter mechanism b). Moreover, we find that our de-seasoning procedure improves the scaling behavior of the distribution.

  12. Circadian rhythm of lactate dehydrogenase in rat testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermouth, N T; Ponce, R H; Carriazo, C S; Blanco, A

    1984-01-01

    Activity of total lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and of the isozyme X (LDH X or C4) have been determined at 2 hr intervals during 24 hr cycles in testis of adult rats maintained since birth in a photoperiod of 14 hr light: 10 hr dark. LDH X activity of epididymal sections (caput, corpus and cauda) from the same animals was also determined. Total LDH and LDH X activities in testis exhibited circadian rhythms with different timing. LDH X in the three portions of epididymis showed diurnal variations similar to those in testis. Rats subjected to constant light or constant dark presented marked modifications of LDH X profiles, indicating that the photoperiod plays a synchronizer role. While total soluble proteins did not show variations in testis of rats exposed to the photoperiod, a circadian rhythm was demonstrated in animals maintained in constant light or dark. PMID:6467917

  13. Timing of Photoperiodic Flowering:Light Perception and Circadian Clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun Zhou; Xiao-Dong Sun; Min Ni

    2007-01-01

    Flowering symbolizes the transition of a plant from vegetative phase to reproductive phase and is controlled by fairly complex and highly coordinated regulatory pathways. Over the last decade, genetic studies in Arabidopsis have aided the discovery of many signaling components involved in these pathways. In this review, we discuss how the timing of flowering is regulated by photoperiod and the involvement of light perception and the circadian clock in this process. The specific regulatory mechanisms on CONSTANS expression and CONSTANS stability by the circadian clock and photoreceptors are described in detail. In addition, the roles of CONSTANS, FLOWERING LOCUS T, and several other light signaling and circadiandependent components in photoperiodic flowering are also highlighted.

  14. Circadian neuroendocrine physiology and electromagnetic field studies: Precautions and complexities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The suppression of melatonin by exposure to low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) 'the melatonin hypothesis' has been invoked as a possible mechanism through which exposure to these fields may result in an increased incidence of cancer. While the effect of light on melatonin is well established, data showing a similar effect due to EMF exposure are sparse and, where present, are often poorly controlled. The current review focuses on the complexities associated with using melatonin as a marker and the dynamic nature of normal melatonin regulation by the circadian neuroendocrine axis. These are issues which the authors believe contribute significantly to the lack of consistency of results in the current literature. Recommendations on protocol design are also made which, if followed, should enable researchers to eliminate or control for many of the confounding factors associated with melatonin being an output from the circadian clock. (author)

  15. Gravitational biology and the mammalian circadian timing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C A; Murakami, D M; Sulzman, F M

    1989-01-01

    Mammals have evolved under the influence of many selective pressures. Two of these pressures have been the static force of gravity and the daily variations in the environment due to the rotation of the earth. It is now clear that each of these pressures has led to specific adaptations which influence how organisms respond to changes in either gravity or daily time cues. However, several unpredicted responses to altered gravitational environments occur within the homeostatic and circadian control systems. These results may be particularly relevant to biological and medical issues related to spaceflight. This paper demonstrates that the homeostatic regulation of rat body temperature, heart rate, and activity become depressed following exposure to a 2 G hyperdynamic field, and recovers within 5-6 days. In addition, the circadian rhythms of these same variables exhibit a depression of rhythm amplitude; however, recovery required a minimum of 7 days. PMID:11537343

  16. Circadian neuroendocrine physiology and electromagnetic field studies: Precautions and complexities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warman, G.R.; Tripp, H.M.; Harman, V.L.; Arendt, J

    2003-07-01

    The suppression of melatonin by exposure to low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) 'the melatonin hypothesis' has been invoked as a possible mechanism through which exposure to these fields may result in an increased incidence of cancer. While the effect of light on melatonin is well established, data showing a similar effect due to EMF exposure are sparse and, where present, are often poorly controlled. The current review focuses on the complexities associated with using melatonin as a marker and the dynamic nature of normal melatonin regulation by the circadian neuroendocrine axis. These are issues which the authors believe contribute significantly to the lack of consistency of results in the current literature. Recommendations on protocol design are also made which, if followed, should enable researchers to eliminate or control for many of the confounding factors associated with melatonin being an output from the circadian clock. (author)

  17. Circadian clocks optimally adapt to sunlight for reliable synchronization

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Yoshihiko

    2014-01-01

    Circadian oscillation provides selection advantages through synchronization to the daylight cycle. However, a reliable clock must be designed through two conflicting properties: entrainability to properly respond to external stimuli such as sunlight, and regularity to oscillate with a precise period. These two aspects do not easily coexist because better entrainability favors higher sensitivity, which may sacrifice the regularity. To investigate conditions for satisfying the two properties, we analytically calculated the optimal phase-response curve with a variational method. Our result indicates an existence of a dead zone, i.e., a time during which external stimuli neither advance nor delay the clock. This result is independent of model details and a dead zone appears only when the input stimuli obey the time course of actual insolation. Our calculation demonstrates that every circadian clock with a dead zone is optimally adapted to the daylight cycle. Our result also explains the lack of a dead zone in osc...

  18. Circadian Transcription from Beta Cell Function to Diabetes Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelis, Mark; Ramsey, Kathryn Moynihan; Marcheva, Biliana; Bass, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    The mammalian circadian clock plays a central role in the temporal coordination of physiology across the 24-h light-dark cycle. A major function of the clock is to maintain energy constancy in anticipation of alternating periods of fasting and feeding that correspond with sleep and wakefulness. While it has long been recognized that humans exhibit robust variation in glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity across the sleep-wake cycle, experimental genetic analysis has now revealed that the clock transcription cycle plays an essential role in insulin secretion and metabolic function within pancreatic beta cells. This review addresses how studies of the beta cell clock may elucidate the etiology of subtypes of diabetes associated with circadian and sleep cycle disruption, in addition to more general forms of the disease. PMID:27440914

  19. Circadian regulation of sunflower heliotropism, floral orientation, and pollinator visits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamian, Hagop S; Creux, Nicky M; Brown, Evan A; Garner, Austin G; Blackman, Benjamin K; Harmer, Stacey L

    2016-08-01

    Young sunflower plants track the Sun from east to west during the day and then reorient during the night to face east in anticipation of dawn. In contrast, mature plants cease movement with their flower heads facing east. We show that circadian regulation of directional growth pathways accounts for both phenomena and leads to increased vegetative biomass and enhanced pollinator visits to flowers. Solar tracking movements are driven by antiphasic patterns of elongation on the east and west sides of the stem. Genes implicated in control of phototropic growth, but not clock genes, are differentially expressed on the opposite sides of solar tracking stems. Thus, interactions between environmental response pathways and the internal circadian oscillator coordinate physiological processes with predictable changes in the environment to influence growth and reproduction. PMID:27493185

  20. Analysis of protein phosphorylation using mass spectrometry: deciphering the phosphoproteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Matthias; Ong, Shao En; Grønborg, Mads;

    2002-01-01

    In signal transduction in eukaryotes, protein phosphorylation is a key event. To understand signaling processes, we must first acquire an inventory of phosphoproteins and their phosphorylation sites under different conditions. Because phosphorylation is a dynamic process, elucidation of signaling...

  1. Morning Circadian Misalignment during Short Sleep Duration Impacts Insulin Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Robert H; Depner, Christopher M; Perreault, Leigh; Markwald, Rachel R; Smith, Mark R; McHill, Andrew W; Higgins, Janine; Melanson, Edward L; Wright, Kenneth P

    2015-11-16

    Short sleep duration and circadian misalignment are hypothesized to causally contribute to health problems including obesity, diabetes, metabolic syndrome, heart disease, mood disorders, cognitive impairment, and accidents. Here, we investigated the influence of morning circadian misalignment induced by an imposed short nighttime sleep schedule on impaired insulin sensitivity, a precursor to diabetes. Imposed short sleep duration resulted in morning wakefulness occurring during the biological night (i.e., circadian misalignment)-a time when endogenous melatonin levels were still high indicating the internal circadian clock was still promoting sleep and related functions. We show the longer melatonin levels remained high after wake time, insulin sensitivity worsened. Overall, we find a simulated 5-day work week of 5-hr-per-night sleep opportunities and ad libitum food intake resulted in ∼20% reduced oral and intravenous insulin sensitivity in otherwise healthy men and women. Reduced insulin sensitivity was compensated by an increased insulin response to glucose, which may reflect an initial physiological adaptation to maintain normal blood sugar levels during sleep loss. Furthermore, we find that transitioning from the imposed short sleep schedule to 9-hr sleep opportunities for 3 days restored oral insulin sensitivity to baseline, but 5 days with 9-hr sleep opportunities was insufficient to restore intravenous insulin sensitivity to baseline. These findings indicate morning wakefulness and eating during the biological night is a novel mechanism by which short sleep duration contributes to metabolic dysregulation and suggests food intake during the biological night may contribute to other health problems associated with short sleep duration. PMID:26549253

  2. Sleep disturbances and circadian CLOCK genes in borderline personality disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Fleischer, Monika; Schafer, Michael; Coogan, Andrew; Hassler, Frank; Thome, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterised by a deep-reaching pattern of affective instability, incoherent identity, self-injury, suicide attempts, and disturbed interpersonal relations and lifestyle. The daily activities of BPD patients are often chaotic and disorganized, with patients often staying up late while sleeping during the day. These behavioural patterns suggest that altered circadian rhythms may be associated with BPD. Furthermore, BPD patients ...

  3. Circadian regulation of hormone signaling and plant physiology.

    OpenAIRE

    Atamian, HS; Harmer, SL

    2016-01-01

    The survival and reproduction of plants depend on their ability to cope with a wide range of daily and seasonal environmental fluctuations during their life cycle. Phytohormones are plant growth regulators that are involved in almost every aspect of growth and development as well as plant adaptation to myriad abiotic and biotic conditions. The circadian clock, an endogenous and cell-autonomous biological timekeeper that produces rhythmic outputs with close to 24-h rhythms, provides an adaptiv...

  4. When the circadian clock meets the melanin pigmentary system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Andrzej T; Hardeland, Rüdiger; Reiter, Russel J

    2015-04-01

    Silencing of BMAL1 and PER1 stimulates melanogenic activity of follicular and epidermal melanocytes, indicating a novel role for peripheral circadian clock processes in the regulation of melanin pigmentation. Linking the expression levels of BMAL1/PER1 with changes in melanogenesis opens exciting opportunities to study the role of the local molecular clock in modulation of melanocyte functions in the hair follicle and the epidermis with attendant effects on epidermal barrier functions in general. PMID:25785947

  5. What time is it? Deep learning approaches for circadian rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostinelli, Forest; Ceglia, Nicholas; Shahbaba, Babak; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; Baldi, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Circadian rhythms date back to the origins of life, are found in virtually every species and every cell, and play fundamental roles in functions ranging from metabolism to cognition. Modern high-throughput technologies allow the measurement of concentrations of transcripts, metabolites and other species along the circadian cycle creating novel computational challenges and opportunities, including the problems of inferring whether a given species oscillate in circadian fashion or not, and inferring the time at which a set of measurements was taken. Results: We first curate several large synthetic and biological time series datasets containing labels for both periodic and aperiodic signals. We then use deep learning methods to develop and train BIO_CYCLE, a system to robustly estimate which signals are periodic in high-throughput circadian experiments, producing estimates of amplitudes, periods, phases, as well as several statistical significance measures. Using the curated data, BIO_CYCLE is compared to other approaches and shown to achieve state-of-the-art performance across multiple metrics. We then use deep learning methods to develop and train BIO_CLOCK to robustly estimate the time at which a particular single-time-point transcriptomic experiment was carried. In most cases, BIO_CLOCK can reliably predict time, within approximately 1 h, using the expression levels of only a small number of core clock genes. BIO_CLOCK is shown to work reasonably well across tissue types, and often with only small degradation across conditions. BIO_CLOCK is used to annotate most mouse experiments found in the GEO database with an inferred time stamp. Availability and Implementation: All data and software are publicly available on the CircadiOmics web portal: circadiomics.igb.uci.edu/. Contacts: fagostin@uci.edu or pfbaldi@uci.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:27307647

  6. Effects of microgravity on circadian rhythms in insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpatov, A. M.; Hoban-Higgins, T. M.; Fuller, C. A.; Lazarev, A. O.; Rietveld, W. J.; Tschernyshev, V. B.; Tumurova, E. G.; Wassmer, G.; Zotov, V. A.

    1998-01-01

    The desert beetle Trigonoscelis gigas Reitt. was used as a biological model in studies that examined the effects of space flight on the circadian timing system. Results from studies aboard the Bion-10, Bion-11, and Photon-11 missions are reported. The control study is an ongoing Mir experiment. The studies indicate that the free-running period in beetles may be longer during space flight.

  7. Aging, circadian rhythms and depressive disorders: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Campos Costa, Inês; Nogueira Carvalho, Hugo; Fernandes, Lia

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Aging is typically associated with impairing behavioral patterns that are frequently and inappropriately seen as normal. Circadian rhythm changes and depressive disorders have been increasingly proposed as the two main overlapping and interpenetrating changes that take place in older age. This study aims to review the state of the art on the subject concerning epidemiology, pathophysiological mechanism, clinical findings and relevance, as well as available treatment options. Mat...

  8. Molecular bases of circadian rhythmicity in renal physiology and pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Bonny, Olivier; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Gumz, Michelle L.; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi

    2013-01-01

    The physiological processes that maintain body homeostasis oscillate during the day. Diurnal changes characterize kidney functions, comprising regulation of hydro-electrolytic and acid-base balance, reabsorption of small solutes and hormone production. Renal physiology is characterized by 24-h periodicity and contributes to circadian variability of blood pressure levels, related as well to nychthemeral changes of sodium sensitivity, physical activity, vascular tone, autonomic function and neu...

  9. Experience-Independent Development of the Hamster Circadian Visual System

    OpenAIRE

    Kampf-Lassin, August; Wei, Jenny; Galang, Jerome; Prendergast, Brian J

    2011-01-01

    Experience-dependent functional plasticity is a hallmark of the primary visual system, but it is not known if analogous mechanisms govern development of the circadian visual system. Here we investigated molecular, anatomical, and behavioral consequences of complete monocular light deprivation during extended intervals of postnatal development in Syrian hamsters. Hamsters were raised in constant darkness and opaque contact lenses were applied shortly after eye opening and prior to the introduc...

  10. Circadian regulation of bioluminescence in Gonyaulax involves translational control.

    OpenAIRE

    Morse, D.; Milos, P M; Roux, E.; Hastings, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    A 10-fold circadian variation in the amount of luciferin binding protein (LBP) in the marine dinoflagellate Gonyaulax polyedra is reported. This protein binds and stabilizes luciferin, the bioluminescence substrate. In early night phase, when bioluminescence is increasing and LBP levels are rising in the cell, pulse labeling experiments show that LBP is being rapidly synthesized in vivo. At other times, the rate of LBP synthesis is at least 50 times lower, while the rate of synthesis of most ...

  11. Delayed Sleep Phase Disorder. Prevalence, sleep, circadian rhythm and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Saxvig, Ingvild West

    2013-01-01

    Adolescence is often characterized by delayed and irregular sleep patterns, with potential negative consequences in terms of school performance and daytime functioning. At the most extreme, a stably delayed sleep phase may reflect a circadian rhythm sleep disorder of the delayed sleep phase type (delayed sleep phase disorder, DSPD). DSPD is assumed to be common amongst adolescents and young adults, but little is known about its prevalence and aetiology, and no guidelines exist ...

  12. Light and Gravity Effects on Circadian Rhythms of Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Charles

    1997-01-01

    Temporal integration of a biological organism's physiological, behavioral and biochemical systems depends upon its circadian timing system. The endogenous period of this timing system is typically synchronized to the 24- hour day by environmental cues. The daily alternation of light and dark has long been known as one of the most potent environmental synchronizers influencing the circadian timing system. Alterations in the lighting environment (length or intensity of light exposure) can also affect the homeostatic state of the organism. A series of experiments was performed using rhesus monkeys with the objective of defining the fundamental properties of the circadian rhythm of body temperature. Three major experiments were performed in addition to several preliminary studies. These experiments explored 1.) the response of the rhesus body temperature rhythm to varying day length and light intensity; 2.) the response of the body temperature rhythm to light exposure as a function of time of day; and 3.) the characteristics of the metabolic heat production rhythm which is responsible for the daily cycle in body temperature. Results of these three completed experiments will be reported here. In addition, preliminary experiments were also performed in social entrainment of rhesus circadian rhythms and the properties of rhesus body temperature rhythms in constant conditions, where no external time cues were provided. Four adult male rhesus monkeys served as subjects in all experiments. All experiments were performed at the California Regional Primate Research Center. Each animal was implanted with a biotelemetry unit that measured deep body temperature. All surgeries were performed by a board certified veterinary surgeon under sterile conditions. The biotelemetry implants also provided an index of activity level in each animal. For metabolic heat production measurements, oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production were measured and the caloric equivalent of these

  13. Circadian Rhythms, the Mesolimbic Dopaminergic Circuit, and Drug Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    McClung, Colleen A.

    2007-01-01

    Drug addiction is a devastating disease that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Through better understanding of the genetic variations that create a vulnerability for addiction and the molecular mechanisms that underlie the progression of addiction, better treatment options can be created for those that suffer from this condition. Recent studies point to a link between abnormal or disrupted circadian rhythms and the development of addiction. In addition, studies suggest a role for spe...

  14. Working around the clock: circadian rhythms and skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG, XIPING; Dube, Thomas J.; Esser, Karyn A.

    2009-01-01

    The study of the circadian molecular clock in skeletal muscle is in the very early stages. Initial research has demonstrated the presence of the molecular clock in skeletal muscle and that skeletal muscle of a clock-compromised mouse, Clock mutant, exhibits significant disruption in normal expression of many genes required for adult muscle structure and metabolism. In light of the growing association between the molecular clock, metabolism, and metabolic disease, it will also be important to ...

  15. Circadian rhythms in cognitive performance: implications for neuropsychological assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Valdez, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Pablo Valdez, Candelaria Ramírez, Aída GarcíaLaboratory of Psychophysiology, School of Psychology, University of Nuevo León, Monterrey, Nuevo León, MéxicoAbstract: Circadian variations have been found in human performance, including the efficiency to execute many tasks, such as sensory, motor, reaction time, time estimation, memory, verbal, arithmetic calculations, and simulated driving tasks. Performance increases during the d...

  16. Photoperiodic entrainment of the circadian clock in the mice SCN

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sosniyenko, Serhiy; Matějů, Kristýna; Sládek, Martin; Illnerová, Helena; Sumová, Alena

    Praha : FgÚ AV ČR, 2008. ---. [PhD Student Workshop of Institute of Physiology. 02.06.2008-04.06.2008, Seč] Grant ostatní: EUCLOCK(XE) 018741 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : spo2 * photoperiod * mice * circadian clock Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  17. Tyrosine phosphorylation of the asialoglycoprotein receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The asialoglycoprotein (ASGP) receptor undergoes constitutive endocytosis through the coated pit/coated vesicle pathway in hepatocytes. Studies on HepG2 cells have shown that the receptor is phosphorylated at serine under control conditions and following protein kinase C stimulation. This study examined whether the ASGP receptor could also serve as a substrate for a tyrosine kinase in HepG2 cells. 32P labeling was performed in membrane preparations, in permeabilized cells at 4 degrees C, and in intact cells at 37 degrees C. The phosphorylated ASGP receptor was isolated by immunoprecipitation, hydrolyzed in 6 N HCl at 110 degrees C, and analyzed by two-dimensional high voltage electrophoresis. The receptor isolated from a membrane preparation incubated in vitro with [gamma-32P]ATP incorporated radiolabel predominantly (greater than 90%) into phosphotyrosine. ASGP receptor phosphorylation at both tyrosine and serine was detected in intact cells incubated with phosphatase inhibitors for 60 min at 37 degrees C. The presence of both phenylarsine oxide (20 microM) and sodium orthovanadate (200 microM) was required for tyrosine phosphorylation. Use of these inhibitors together resulted in a 16.4-fold increase in phosphorylation of the immunoprecipitated ASGP receptor, whereas phosphorylation of total HepG2 membrane proteins was not significantly augmented by this procedure. Selective proteolytic digestion of ASGP receptors in isolated vesicles demonstrated that the phosphorylation site identified in these studies is located at tyrosine 5 in the cytoplasmic tail

  18. Toward a detailed computational model for the mammalian circadian clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leloup, Jean-Christophe; Goldbeter, Albert

    2003-06-01

    We present a computational model for the mammalian circadian clock based on the intertwined positive and negative regulatory loops involving the Per, Cry, Bmal1, Clock, and Rev-Erb genes. In agreement with experimental observations, the model can give rise to sustained circadian oscillations in continuous darkness, characterized by an antiphase relationship between Per/Cry/Rev-Erb and Bmal1 mRNAs. Sustained oscillations correspond to the rhythms autonomously generated by suprachiasmatic nuclei. For other parameter values, damped oscillations can also be obtained in the model. These oscillations, which transform into sustained oscillations when coupled to a periodic signal, correspond to rhythms produced by peripheral tissues. When incorporating the light-induced expression of the Per gene, the model accounts for entrainment of the oscillations by light-dark cycles. Simulations show that the phase of the oscillations can then vary by several hours with relatively minor changes in parameter values. Such a lability of the phase could account for physiological disorders related to circadian rhythms in humans, such as advanced or delayed sleep phase syndrome, whereas the lack of entrainment by light-dark cycles can be related to the non-24h sleep-wake syndrome. The model uncovers the possible existence of multiple sources of oscillatory behavior. Thus, in conditions where the indirect negative autoregulation of Per and Cry expression is inoperative, the model indicates the possibility that sustained oscillations might still arise from the negative autoregulation of Bmal1 expression.

  19. Systemic PPARγ deletion impairs circadian rhythms of behavior and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guangrui; Jia, Zhanjun; Aoyagi, Toshinori; McClain, Donald; Mortensen, Richard M; Yang, Tianxin

    2012-01-01

    Compelling evidence from both human and animal studies suggests a physiological link between the circadian rhythm and metabolism but the underlying mechanism is still incompletely understood. We examined the role of PPARγ, a key regulator of energy metabolism, in the control of physiological and behavioral rhythms by analyzing two strains of whole-body PPARγ null mouse models. Systemic inactivation of PPARγ was generated constitutively by using Mox2-Cre mice (MoxCre/flox) or inducibly by using the tamoxifen system (EsrCre/flox/TM). Circadian variations in oxygen consumption, CO(2) production, food and water intake, locomotor activity, and cardiovascular parameters were all remarkably suppressed in MoxCre/flox mice. A similar phenotype was observed in EsrCre/flox/TM mice, accompanied by impaired rhythmicity of the canonical clock genes in adipose tissues and liver but not skeletal muscles or the kidney. PPARγ inactivation in isolated preadipocytes following exposure to tamoxifen led to a similar blockade of the rhythmicity of the clock gene expression. Together, these results support an essential role of PPARγ in the coordinated control of circadian clocks and metabolic pathways. PMID:22899986

  20. Colour as a signal for entraining the mammalian circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Walmsley

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Twilight is characterised by changes in both quantity ("irradiance" and quality ("colour" of light. Animals use the variation in irradiance to adjust their internal circadian clocks, aligning their behaviour and physiology with the solar cycle. However, it is currently unknown whether changes in colour also contribute to this entrainment process. Using environmental measurements, we show here that mammalian blue-yellow colour discrimination provides a more reliable method of tracking twilight progression than simply measuring irradiance. We next use electrophysiological recordings to demonstrate that neurons in the mouse suprachiasmatic circadian clock display the cone-dependent spectral opponency required to make use of this information. Thus, our data show that some clock neurons are highly sensitive to changes in spectral composition occurring over twilight and that this input dictates their response to changes in irradiance. Finally, using mice housed under photoperiods with simulated dawn/dusk transitions, we confirm that spectral changes occurring during twilight are required for appropriate circadian alignment under natural conditions. Together, these data reveal a new sensory mechanism for telling time of day that would be available to any mammalian species capable of chromatic vision.

  1. Circadian rhythm of alpha-amylase in rat parotid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellavía, S L; Sanz, E G; Chiarenza, A P; Sereno, R; Vermouth, N T

    1990-01-01

    The circadian rhythm of alpha-amylase, E.C. 3.2.1.1. (alpha-1,4-glucan-4-glucanohydrolase) in parotid gland of 25 day old rats was studied under different experimental conditions (fast, reversed photoperiod, constant light or darkness and treatment with reserpine and alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine). The rhythm of rats fasted or exposed for 7 days to constant darkness did not change. There were modifications in the rhythm of rats submitted to a reversed photoperiod and it disappeared in animals submitted to constant light or darkness for 15 days or treated with reserpine or alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine. The rhythm persisted, with minor changes in the acrophase, in parotids of rats kept during their gestation and post-natal life in constant light or darkness. Results suggest that the circadian rhythm of alpha-amylase in parotid gland of young rats is endogenous, synchronized by the photoperiod, under autonomous nervous system control and maternal coordination. This model appears to be useful in the study of sympathetic nervous system control of target organs and circadian rhythms in general. PMID:2076161

  2. Regulated DNA Methylation and the Circadian Clock: Implications in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy M. Joska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Since the cloning and discovery of DNA methyltransferases (DNMT, there has been a growing interest in DNA methylation, its role as an epigenetic modification, how it is established and removed, along with the implications in development and disease. In recent years, it has become evident that dynamic DNA methylation accompanies the circadian clock and is found at clock genes in Neurospora, mice and cancer cells. The relationship among the circadian clock, cancer and DNA methylation at clock genes suggests a correlative indication that improper DNA methylation may influence clock gene expression, contributing to the etiology of cancer. The molecular mechanism underlying DNA methylation at clock loci is best studied in the filamentous fungi, Neurospora crassa, and recent data indicate a mechanism analogous to the RNA-dependent DNA methylation (RdDM or RNAi-mediated facultative heterochromatin. Although it is still unclear, DNA methylation at clock genes may function as a terminal modification that serves to prevent the regulated removal of histone modifications. In this capacity, aberrant DNA methylation may serve as a readout of misregulated clock genes and not as the causative agent. This review explores the implications of DNA methylation at clock loci and describes what is currently known regarding the molecular mechanism underlying DNA methylation at circadian clock genes.

  3. Biomarkers for Circadian Rhythm Disruption Independent of Time of Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dycke, Kirsten C. G.; Pennings, Jeroen L. A.; van Oostrom, Conny T. M.; van Kerkhof, Linda W. M.; van Steeg, Harry; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Rodenburg, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Frequent shift work causes disruption of the circadian rhythm and might on the long-term result in increased health risk. Current biomarkers evaluating the presence of circadian rhythm disturbance (CRD), including melatonin, cortisol and body temperature, require 24-hr (“around the clock”) measurements, which is tedious. Therefore, these markers are not eligible to be used in large-scale (human) studies. The aim of the present study was to identify universal biomarkers for CRD independent of time of day using a transcriptomics approach. Female FVB mice were exposed to six shifts in a clockwise (CW) and counterclockwise (CCW) CRD protocol and sacrificed at baseline and after 1 shift, 6 shifts, 5 days recovery and 14 days recovery, respectively. At six time-points during the day, livers were collected for mRNA microarray analysis. Using a classification approach, we identified a set of biomarkers able to classify samples into either CRD or non-disrupted based on the hepatic gene expression. Furthermore, we identified differentially expressed genes 14 days after the last shift compared to baseline for both CRD protocols. Non-circadian genes differentially expressed upon both CW and CCW protocol were considered useful, universal markers for CRD. One candidate marker i.e. CD36 was evaluated in serum samples of the CRD animals versus controls. These biomarkers might be useful to measure CRD and can be used later on for monitoring the effectiveness of intervention strategies aiming to prevent or minimize chronic adverse health effects. PMID:25984797

  4. Methylphenidate modifies the motion of the circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antle, Michael C; van Diepen, Hester C; Deboer, Tom; Pedram, Pardis; Pereira, Rob Rodrigues; Meijer, Johanna H

    2012-10-01

    People with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) often experience sleep problems, and these are frequently exacerbated by the methylphenidate they take to manage their ADHD symptoms. Many of the changes to sleep are consistent with a change in the underlying circadian clock. The present study was designed to determine if methylphenidate alone could alter properties of the circadian clock. Young male mice were examined in light-dark cycles and in constant darkness and recordings were performed on behavioral activity, sleep, and electrical activity in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of freely moving mice. Methylphenidate in the drinking water (0.08%) significantly increased activity in the mid-to-late night, and led to a delay in the onset of activity and sleep relative to the light-dark cycle. While locomotor levels returned to baseline after treatment ended, the phase angle of entrainment required at least a week to return to baseline levels. In constant darkness, the free-running period of both wheel-running and general locomotor rhythms was lengthened by methylphenidate. When the treatment ended, the free-running period either remained stable or only partially reverted to baseline levels. Methylphenidate also altered the electrical firing rate rhythms in the SCN. It induced a delay in the trough of the rhythm, an increment in rhythm amplitude, and a reduction in rhythm variability. These observations suggest that methylphenidate alters the underlying circadian clock. The observed changes are consistent with clock alterations that would promote sleep-onset insomnia. PMID:22763623

  5. Influence of gravity on the circadian timing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C A; Hoban-Higgins, T M; Griffin, D W; Murakami, D M

    1994-01-01

    The circadian timing system (CTS) is responsible for daily temporal coordination of physiological and behavioral functions both internally and with the external environment. Experiments in altered gravitational environments have revealed changes in circadian rhythms of species ranging from fungi to primates. The altered gravitational environments examined included both the microgravity environment of spaceflight and hyperdynamic environments produced by centrifugation. Acute exposure to altered gravitational environments changed homeostatic parameters such as body temperature. These changes were time of day dependent. Exposure to gravitational alterations of relatively short duration produced changes in both the homeostatic level and the amplitude of circadian rhythms. Chronic exposure to a non-earth level of gravity resulted in changes in the period of the expressed rhythms as well as in the phase relationships between the rhythms and between the rhythms and the external environment. In addition, alterations in gravity appeared to act as a time cue for the CTS. Altered gravity also affected the sensitivity of the pacemaker to other aspects of the environment (i.e., light) and to shifts of time cues. Taken together, these studies lead to the conclusion that the CTS is indeed sensitive to gravity and its alterations. This finding has implications for both basic biology and space medicine. PMID:11537948

  6. Circadian rhythm of body temperature during prolonged undersea voyages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquhoun, W P; Paine, M W; Fort, A

    1978-05-01

    Circadian rhythms of oral temperature were assessed in 12 watchkeepers during a prolonged submarine voyage and compared with a "standard" rhythm obtained from nonwatchkeepers ashore. Initially, the parameters of the rhythms were similar to those of the standard; however, among eight ratings working 4-h watches in a rapidly rotating cycle, considerable changes in the rhythms occurred as the voyage progressed, and concurrent alterations in sleep patterning were observed. The most characteristic change in the rhythm was a marked decline in its amplitude. In most subjects, the rhythm also tended to depart from its original circadian pattern; in at least one case, it effectively disintegrated. One subject's rhythm appeared to "free-run" with a period greater than 24 h. A strong circadian rhythm was maintained in only one of these eight subjects. In four officers whose watch times were at fixed hours, adaptation of the rhythm to unusual times of sleep occurred in 2 of 3 cases where the schedule demanded it. The results are discussed in relation to the design of optimal watchkeeping systems for submariners. PMID:655989

  7. Sleep Deprivation Influences Circadian Gene Expression in the Lateral Habenula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Sleep is governed by homeostasis and the circadian clock. Clock genes play an important role in the generation and maintenance of circadian rhythms but are also involved in regulating sleep homeostasis. The lateral habenular nucleus (LHb) has been implicated in sleep-wake regulation, since LHb gene expression demonstrates circadian oscillation characteristics. This study focuses on the participation of LHb clock genes in regulating sleep homeostasis, as the nature of their involvement is unclear. In this study, we observed changes in sleep pattern following sleep deprivation in LHb-lesioned rats using EEG recording techniques. And then the changes of clock gene expression (Per1, Per2, and Bmal1) in the LHb after 6 hours of sleep deprivation were detected by using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). We found that sleep deprivation increased the length of Non-Rapid Eye Movement Sleep (NREMS) and decreased wakefulness. LHb-lesioning decreased the amplitude of reduced wake time and increased NREMS following sleep deprivation in rats. qPCR results demonstrated that Per2 expression was elevated after sleep deprivation, while the other two genes were unaffected. Following sleep recovery, Per2 expression was comparable to the control group. This study provides the basis for further research on the role of LHb Per2 gene in the regulation of sleep homeostasis. PMID:27413249

  8. Protein-Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijakovic, Ivan; Petranovic, Dina; Bottini, N.;

    2005-01-01

    phosphorylation, indicating that this post-translational modifi cation could regulate physiological processes ranging from stress response and exopolysaccharide synthesis to DNA metabolism. Some interesting work in this fi eld was done in Bacillus subtilis , and we here present the current state of knowledge on...... protein-tyrosine phosphorylation in this gram-positive model organism. With its two kinases, two kinase modulators, three phosphatases and at least four different tyrosine-phosphorylated substrates, B. subtilis is the bacterium with the highest number of presently known participants in the global network...

  9. Circadian- and Light-Dependent Regulation of Resting Membrane Potential and Spontaneous Action Potential Firing of Drosophila Circadian Pacemaker Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Sheeba, Vasu; Gu, Huaiyu; Sharma, Vijay K.; O'Dowd, Diane K.; Holmes, Todd C.

    2007-01-01

    The ventral lateral neurons (LNvs) of adult Drosophila brain express oscillating clock proteins and regulate circadian behavior. Whole cell current-clamp recordings of large LNvs in freshly dissected Drosophila whole brain preparations reveal two spontaneous activity patterns that correlate with two underlying patterns of oscillating membrane potential: tonic and burst firing of sodium-dependent action potentials. Resting membrane potential and spontaneous action potential firing are rapidly ...

  10. Immunoreactivities to three circadian clock proteins in two ground crickets suggest interspecific diversity of the circadian clock structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shao, Q. M.; Sehadová, H.; Ichihara, N.; Sehnal, František; Takeda, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 2 (2006), s. 118-131. ISSN 0748-7304 Grant ostatní: Japan Society for the Promotion of Science(JP) JSPS 99L01205; Japan Society for the Promotion of Science(JP) ID No. P 04197 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50070508 Keywords : circadian rhythm * photoperiodic clock * cryptochrome (CRY) Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.633, year: 2006

  11. 铜绿微囊藻生物钟蛋白KaiC的自激活活性和自身相互作用研究%Studies on self-activation and self-interaction of circadian clock protein KaiC of Microcystis aeruginosa in yeast two hybridization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王靖; 徐虹; 李珣; 郑锦乾; 王立红

    2008-01-01

    通过PCR扩增了铜绿微囊藻的生物钟主控基因KaiC,并将其分别克隆到酵母双杂交系统的诱饵质粒pGBKT7和猎物质粒pGADT7中,然后将重组质粒pGBKT7-kaiC/pGADT7- kaiC和pGBKT7-kaiC/pGADT7分别共转化酵母菌AH109,经营养缺陷生长和β-半乳糖苷酶印迹检测表明,KaiC蛋白不具有毒性不会影响酵母细胞的生长,也不具有自激活活性,不会激活报告基因的表达,并且KaiC蛋白自身存在较强的相互作用.诱饵质粒pGBKT7-kaiC可用于从基因组文库中筛选KaiC的相互作用蛋白.

  12. Plasticity of the intrinsic period of the human circadian timing system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A J L Scheer

    Full Text Available Human expeditions to Mars will require adaptation to the 24.65-h Martian solar day-night cycle (sol, which is outside the range of entrainment of the human circadian pacemaker under lighting intensities to which astronauts are typically exposed. Failure to entrain the circadian time-keeping system to the desired rest-activity cycle disturbs sleep and impairs cognitive function. Furthermore, differences between the intrinsic circadian period and Earth's 24-h light-dark cycle underlie human circadian rhythm sleep disorders, such as advanced sleep phase disorder and non-24-hour sleep-wake disorders. Therefore, first, we tested whether exposure to a model-based lighting regimen would entrain the human circadian pacemaker at a normal phase angle to the 24.65-h Martian sol and to the 23.5-h day length often required of astronauts during short duration space exploration. Second, we tested here whether such prior entrainment to non-24-h light-dark cycles would lead to subsequent modification of the intrinsic period of the human circadian timing system. Here we show that exposure to moderately bright light ( approximately 450 lux; approximately 1.2 W/m(2 for the second or first half of the scheduled wake episode is effective for entraining individuals to the 24.65-h Martian sol and a 23.5-h day length, respectively. Estimations of the circadian periods of plasma melatonin, plasma cortisol, and core body temperature rhythms collected under forced desynchrony protocols revealed that the intrinsic circadian period of the human circadian pacemaker was significantly longer following entrainment to the Martian sol as compared to following entrainment to the 23.5-h day. The latter finding of after-effects of entrainment reveals for the first time plasticity of the period of the human circadian timing system. Both findings have important implications for the treatment of circadian rhythm sleep disorders and human space exploration.

  13. Circadian Modulation of Alcohol-Induced Sedation and Recovery in Male and Female Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nobrega, Aliza K; Lyons, Lisa C

    2016-04-01

    Delineating the factors that affect behavioral and neurological responses to alcohol is critical to facilitate measures for preventing or treating alcohol abuse. The high degree of conserved molecular and physiological processes makes Drosophila melanogaster a valuable model for investigating circadian interactions with alcohol-induced behaviors and examining sex-specific differences in alcohol sensitivity. We found that wild-type Drosophila exhibited rhythms in alcohol-induced sedation under light-dark and constant dark conditions with considerably greater alcohol exposure necessary to induce sedation during the late (subjective) day and peak sensitivity to alcohol occurring during the late (subjective) night. The circadian clock also modulated the recovery from alcohol-induced sedation with flies regaining motor control significantly faster during the late (subjective) day. As predicted, the circadian rhythms in sedation and recovery were absent in flies with a mutation in the circadian gene period or arrhythmic flies housed in constant light conditions. Flies lacking a functional circadian clock were more sensitive to the effects of alcohol with significantly longer recovery times. Similar to other animals and humans, Drosophila exhibit sex-specific differences in alcohol sensitivity. We investigated whether the circadian clock modulated the rhythms in the loss-of-righting reflex, alcohol-induced sedation, and recovery differently in males and females. We found that both sexes demonstrated circadian rhythms in the loss-of-righting reflex and sedation with the differences in alcohol sensitivity between males and females most pronounced during the late subjective day. Recovery of motor reflexes following alcohol sedation also exhibited circadian modulation in male and female flies, although the circadian clock did not modulate the difference in recovery times between the sexes. These studies provide a framework outlining how the circadian clock modulates alcohol

  14. Keeping the right time in space: importance of circadian clock and sleep for physiology and performance of astronauts

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Jin-Hu; Qu, Wei-Min; Chen, Shan-Guang; CHEN, XIAO-PING; Lv, Ke; Huang, Zhi-Li; Wu, Yi-Lan

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock and sleep are essential for human physiology and behavior; deregulation of circadian rhythms impairs health and performance. Circadian clocks and sleep evolved to adapt to Earth’s environment, which is characterized by a 24-hour light–dark cycle. Changes in gravity load, lighting and work schedules during spaceflight missions can impact circadian clocks and disrupt sleep, in turn jeopardizing the mood, cognition and performance of orbiting astronauts. In this review, we su...

  15. Phosphorylation of the human topoisomerase II protein

    OpenAIRE

    Fry, Andrew Mark.; Hickson, Ian D.; Dr. Ian Hickson

    1992-01-01

    DNA topoisomerase II is an essential enzyme in eukaryotes and is required for many aspects of DNA metabolism including DNA replication, recombination, chromosome segregation and chromosome condensation. It is also a major component of the nuclear scaffold. Topoisomerase II from lower eukaryotes has been shown to be phosphorylated in vivo and this phosphorylation leads to a modulation of activity. However, unlike these lower eukaryotes, human topoisomerase II exists as two c...

  16. Phosphorylation of Recombinant Tristetraprolin in Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Heping; Lin, Rui

    2008-01-01

    Tristetraprolin/zinc finger protein 36 (TTP/ZFP36) binds and destabilizes some proinflammatory cytokine mRNAs. TTP-deficient mice develop a profound inflammatory syndrome due to excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines. TTP gene expression is induced by various factors including insulin, cinnamon, and green tea extracts. Previous studies have shown that TTP is highly phosphorylated in vivo and multiple phosphorylation sites are identified in human TTP. This study evaluated the potent...

  17. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation in synaptic vesicles.

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, D T; Wang, J K; Valtorta, F; Benfenati, F; Greengard, P.

    1988-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation in purified synaptic vesicles from rat forebrain has been studied in the presence of Mn2+ and orthovanadate. High levels of endogenous protein tyrosine phosphorylation were observed. Four major phosphoproteins, with apparent molecular masses of 105, 94, 38, and 30 kDa, were shown to contain phosphotyrosine. The 38-kDa phosphoprotein was identified as synaptophysin (p38), a well-characterized integral membrane protein of synaptic vesicles. The three other phosp...

  18. Protein phosphorylation: Localization in regenerating optic axons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of axonal proteins display changes in phosphorylation during goldfish optic nerve regeneration. (1) To determine whether the phosphorylation of these proteins was closely linked to their synthesis in the retinal ganglion cell body, cycloheximide was injected intraocularly into goldfish whose optic nerves had been regenerating for 3 weeks. Cycloheximide reduced the incorporation of [3H]proline and 32P orthophosphate into total nerve protein by 84% and 46%, respectively. Of the 20 individual proteins examined, 17 contained less than 15% of the [3H]proline label measured in corresponding controls, whereas 18 proteins contained 50% or more of the 32P label, suggesting that phosphorylation was largely independent of synthesis. (2) To determine whether the proteins were phosphorylated in the ganglion cell axons, axonal transport of proteins was blocked by intraocular injection of vincristine. Vincristine reduced [3H]proline labeling of total protein by 88% and 32P labeling by 49%. Among the individual proteins [3H]proline labeling was reduced by 90% or more in 18 cases but 32P labeling was reduced only by 50% or less. (3) When 32P was injected into the cranial cavity near the ends of the optic axons, all of the phosphoproteins were labeled more intensely in the optic tract than in the optic nerve. These results suggest that most of the major phosphoproteins that undergo changes in phosphorylation in the course of regeneration are phosphorylated in the optic axons

  19. Protein phosphorylation during coconut zygotic embryo development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evidence was obtained on the occurrence of protein threonine, serine, and tyrosine (Tyr) kinases in developing coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) zygotic embryos, based on in vitro phosphorylation of proteins in the presence of [gamma-32P]ATP, alkaline treatment, and thin-layer chromatography analysis, which showed the presence of [32P]phosphoserine, [32P]phosphothreonine, and [32P]phosphotyrosine in [32P]-labeled protein hydrolyzates. Tyr kinase activity was further confirmed in extracts of embryos at different stages of development using antiphosphotyrosine monoclonal antibodies and the synthetic peptide derived from the amino acid sequence surrounding the phosphorylation site in pp60src (RR-SRC), which is specific for Tyr kinases. Anti-phosphotyrosine western blotting revealed a changing profile of Tyr-phosphorylated proteins during embryo development. Tyr kinase activity, as assayed using RR-SRC, also changed during embryo development, showing two peaks of activity, one during early and another during late embryo development. In addition, the use of genistein, a Tyr kinase inhibitor, diminished the ability of extracts to phosphorylate RR-SRC. Results presented here show the occurrence of threonine, serine, and Tyr kinases in developing coconut zygotic embryos, and suggest that protein phosphorylation, and the possible inference of Tyr phosphorylation in particular, may play a role in the coordination of the development of embryos in this species

  20. PKA regulates calcineurin function through the phosphorylation of RCAN1: Identification of a novel phosphorylation site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcineurin is a calcium/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase that has been implicated in T cell activation through the induction of nuclear factors of activated T cells (NFAT). We have previously suggested that endogenous regulator of calcineurin (RCAN1, also known as DSCR1) is targeted by protein kinase A (PKA) for the control of calcineurin activity. In the present study, we characterized the PKA-mediated phosphorylation site in RCAN1 by mass spectrometric analysis and revealed that PKA directly phosphorylated RCAN1 at the Ser 93. PKA-induced phosphorylation and the increase in the half-life of the RCAN1 protein were prevented by the substitution of Ser 93 with Ala (S93A). Furthermore, the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of RCAN1 at Ser 93 potentiated the inhibition of calcineurin-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression by RCAN1. Our results suggest the presence of a novel phosphorylation site in RCAN1 and that its phosphorylation influences calcineurin-dependent inflammatory target gene expression. - Highlights: • We identify novel phosphorylation sites in RCAN1 by LC-MS/MS analysis. • PKA-dependent phosphorylation of RCAN1 at Ser 93 inhibits calcineurin-mediated intracellular signaling. • We show the immunosuppressive function of RCAN1 phosphorylation at Ser 93 in suppressing cytokine expression

  1. PKA regulates calcineurin function through the phosphorylation of RCAN1: Identification of a novel phosphorylation site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seon Sook; Lee, Eun Hye [Department of Molecular Bioscience, College of Biomedical Science, Institute of Bioscience & Biotechnology, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kooyeon [Department of Bio-Health Technology, College of Biomedical Science, Institute of Bioscience & Biotechnology, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Su-Hyun, E-mail: suhyunjo@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Physiology, BK21 Plus Graduate Program, Institute of Bioscience & Biotechnology, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Su Ryeon, E-mail: suryeonseo@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Bioscience, College of Biomedical Science, Institute of Bioscience & Biotechnology, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-17

    Calcineurin is a calcium/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase that has been implicated in T cell activation through the induction of nuclear factors of activated T cells (NFAT). We have previously suggested that endogenous regulator of calcineurin (RCAN1, also known as DSCR1) is targeted by protein kinase A (PKA) for the control of calcineurin activity. In the present study, we characterized the PKA-mediated phosphorylation site in RCAN1 by mass spectrometric analysis and revealed that PKA directly phosphorylated RCAN1 at the Ser 93. PKA-induced phosphorylation and the increase in the half-life of the RCAN1 protein were prevented by the substitution of Ser 93 with Ala (S93A). Furthermore, the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of RCAN1 at Ser 93 potentiated the inhibition of calcineurin-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression by RCAN1. Our results suggest the presence of a novel phosphorylation site in RCAN1 and that its phosphorylation influences calcineurin-dependent inflammatory target gene expression. - Highlights: • We identify novel phosphorylation sites in RCAN1 by LC-MS/MS analysis. • PKA-dependent phosphorylation of RCAN1 at Ser 93 inhibits calcineurin-mediated intracellular signaling. • We show the immunosuppressive function of RCAN1 phosphorylation at Ser 93 in suppressing cytokine expression.

  2. Disturbances in the circadian pattern of activity and sleep after laparoscopic versus open abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gögenur, Ismail; Bisgaard, Thue; Burgdorf, Stefan;

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies on the circadian variation in bodily functions and sleep are important for understanding the pathophysiological processes in the postoperative period. We aimed to investigate changes in the circadian variation in activity after minimally invasive surgery (laparoscopic cholecys......BACKGROUND: Studies on the circadian variation in bodily functions and sleep are important for understanding the pathophysiological processes in the postoperative period. We aimed to investigate changes in the circadian variation in activity after minimally invasive surgery (laparoscopic...... scale (sleep quality, general well-being and pain) and fatigue was measured by a ten-point fatigue scale. The activity levels of the patients were monitored by actigraphy (a wrist-worn device measuring patient activity). Measures of circadian activity level [interday stability (IS), intraday variability...... circadian activity parameters (IS, IV and AMP). CONCLUSION: Severely disturbed circadian activity parameters was found after both LC and MAS with worse changes after MAS. Measures of circadian activity pattern analyses correlated significantly with postoperative subjective recovery parameters....

  3. Estimation methods for human circadian phase by use of peripheral tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Ritsuko; Node, Koichi; Akashi, Makoto

    2016-09-01

    Almost all living organisms, including humans, exhibit diurnal rhythms of physiology and behavior, which are driven by the circadian clock. Many studies have found that chronic misalignment between circadian and environmental/social rhythms carries a significant risk of various disorders, including sleep disorders, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. However, irregular sleep-wake cycles and circadian maladjustment often cause 'social jet lag', which is minor but chronic jet-lag in our daily lives. Establishment of objective and convenient circadian-phase estimation methods in the clinical setting would therefore greatly contribute not only to resolving this global health problem but also to developing chronomedicine, a clinical approach for optimizing the time of day of treatments. Traditional melatonin-based methods have limitations with respect to circadian-phase evaluation; however, estimation methods based on clock gene expression may be able to compensate for these limitations. As a representative application of circadian-phase estimation based on clock gene expression, our method of using hair follicle cells may aid in the rapid clinical detection of circadian-related sleep problems, especially circadian rhythm sleep disorders that are masked because of forced adaptation to social time schedules. PMID:27334057

  4. Circadian-Rhythm Sleep Disorders in Persons Who Are Totally Blind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sack, R. L.; Blood, M. L.; Hughes, R. J.; Lewy, A. J.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the diagnosis and management of "non-24-hour sleep-wake syndrome," a form of cyclic insomnia to which people who are totally blind are prone. Covered are incidence and clinical features, formal diagnostic criteria, the biological basis of circadian sleep disorders, circadian rhythms in blind people, pharmacological entrainment, and the…

  5. Rapid attenuation of circadian clock gene oscillations in the rat heart following ischemia-reperfusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    The intracellular circadian clock consists of a series of transcriptional modulators that together allow the cell to perceive the time of day. Circadian clocks have been identified within various components of the cardiovascular system (e.g., cardiomyocytes, vascular smooth muscle cells) and possess...

  6. Disruption of Circadian Rhythms: A Crucial Factor in the Etiology of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Salgado-Delgado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Circadian factors might play a crucial role in the etiology of depression. It has been demonstrated that the disruption of circadian rhythms by lighting conditions and lifestyle predisposes individuals to a wide range of mood disorders, including impulsivity, mania and depression. Also, associated with depression, there is the impairment of circadian rhythmicity of behavioral, endocrine, and metabolic functions. Inspite of this close relationship between both processes, the complex relationship between the biological clock and the incidence of depressive symptoms is far from being understood. The efficiency and the timing of treatments based on chronotherapy (e.g., light treatment, sleep deprivation, and scheduled medication indicate that the circadian system is an essential target in the therapy of depression. The aim of the present review is to analyze the biological and clinical data that link depression with the disruption of circadian rhythms, emphasizing the contribution of circadian desynchrony. Therefore, we examine the conditions that may lead to circadian disruption of physiology and behavior as described in depressive states, and, according to this approach, we discuss therapeutic strategies aimed at treating the circadian system and depression.

  7. Circadian variation in QT dispersion determined from a 12-lead Holter recording

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stig; Rasmussen, Verner; Larsen, Klaus;

    2007-01-01

    circadian variation using mean values of QTdisp 12, QTdisp 6, or QTdisp 2 obtained every hour, every 2, or every 4 hours, except in QTdisp 6, which demonstrated a significant circadian variation (P < 0.01) in 1-hour measurements. Analysis of all 95 subjects using measurements obtained every 4 hours revealed...

  8. Circadian timed wakefulness at dawn opposes compensatory sleep responses after sleep deprivation in Octodon degus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kas, M J; Edgar, D M

    1999-01-01

    The circadian timing system in mammals is thought to promote wakefulness and oppose sleep drive that accumulates across the activity phase in diurnal and nocturnal species. Whether the circadian system actively opposes compensatory sleep responses in mammals with episodes of alertness consolidated a

  9. Interaction of MAGED1 with nuclear receptors affects circadian clock function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohan; Tang, Jing; Xing, Lijuan; Shi, Guangsen; Ruan, Haibin; Gu, Xiwen; Liu, Zhiwei; Wu, Xi; Gao, Xiang; Xu, Ying

    2010-01-01

    The circadian clock has a central role in physiological adaption and anticipation of day/night changes. In a genetic screen for novel regulators of circadian rhythms, we found that mice lacking MAGED1 (Melanoma Antigen Family D1) exhibit a shortened period and altered rest–activity bouts. These circadian phenotypes are proposed to be caused by a direct effect on the core molecular clock network that reduces the robustness of the circadian clock. We provide in vitro and in vivo evidence indicating that MAGED1 binds to RORα to bring about positive and negative effects on core clock genes of Bmal1, Rev-erbα and E4bp4 expression through the Rev-Erbα/ROR responsive elements (RORE). Maged1 is a non-rhythmic gene that, by binding RORα in non-circadian way, enhances rhythmic input and buffers the circadian system from irrelevant, perturbing stimuli or noise. We have thus identified and defined a novel circadian regulator, Maged1, which is indispensable for the robustness of the circadian clock to better serve the organism. PMID:20300063

  10. Nursing frequency alters circadian patterns of mammary gene expression in lactating mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milking frequency impacts lactation in dairy cattle and in rodent models of lactation. The role of circadian gene expression in this process is unknown. The hypothesis tested was that changing nursing frequency alters the circadian patterns of mammary gene expression. Mid-lactation CD1 mice were stu...

  11. CUL1 Regulates TOC1 Protein Stability in the Arabidopsis Circadian Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    The circadian clock is the endogenous timer that coordinates physiological processes with daily and seasonal environmental changes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, establishment of the circadian period relies on targeted degradation of TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1 (TOC1) by the 26S proteasome. ZEITLUPE (ZTL)...

  12. Accuracy of human circadian entrainment under natural light conditions : Model Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beersma, Domien G.M.; Spoelstra, Kamiel; Daan, Serge

    1999-01-01

    The patterns of light intensity to which humans expose their circadian pacemakers in daily life are very irregular and vary greatly from day to day. The circadian pacemaker can adjust to such irregular exposure patterns by daily phase shifts, such as summarized in a phase response curve. It is demon

  13. Molecular mechanism of temperature sensing by the circadian clock of Neurospora crassa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diernfellner, ACR; Schafmeier, T; Merrow, MW; Brunner, M; Diernfellner, Axel C.R.

    2005-01-01

    Expression levels and ratios of the long (1) and short (s) isoforms of the Neurospora circadian clock protein FREQUENCY (FRQ) are crucial for temperature compensation of circadian rhythms. We show that the ratio of 1-FRQ versus s-FRQ is regulated by thermosensitive splicing of intron 6 of frq, a pro

  14. Genetic Disruption of the Core Circadian Clock Impairs Hippocampus-Dependent Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardlaw, Sarah M.; Phan, Trongha X.; Saraf, Amit; Chen, Xuanmao; Storm, Daniel R.

    2014-01-01

    Perturbing the circadian system by electrolytically lesioning the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) or varying the environmental light:dark schedule impairs memory, suggesting that memory depends on the circadian system. We used a genetic approach to evaluate the role of the molecular clock in memory. Bmal1[superscript -/-] mice, which are arrhythmic…

  15. Circadian rhythms of temperature and activity in obese and lean Zucker rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, D. M.; Horwitz, B. A.; Fuller, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    The circadian timing system is important in the regulation of feeding and metabolism, both of which are aberrant in the obese Zucker rat. This study tested the hypothesis that these abnormalities involve a deficit in circadian regulation by examining the circadian rhythms of body temperature and activity in lean and obese Zucker rats exposed to normal light-dark cycles, constant light, and constant dark. Significant deficits in both daily mean and circadian amplitude of temperature and activity were found in obese Zucker female rats relative to lean controls in all lighting conditions. However, the circadian period of obese Zucker rats did not exhibit differences relative to lean controls in either of the constant lighting conditions. These results indicate that although the circadian regulation of temperature and activity in obese Zucker female rats is in fact depressed, obese rats do exhibit normal entrainment and pacemaker functions in the circadian timing system. The results suggest a deficit in the process that generates the amplitude of the circadian rhythm.

  16. The circadian clock-associated gene zea mays gigantea1 affects maize developmental transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The circadian clock is the internal timing mechanism that allows plants to make developmental decisions in accordance with environmental conditions. The genes of the maize circadian clock are not well defined. Gigantea (gi) genes are conserved across flowering plants, including maize. In model plant...

  17. Circadian expression of adiponectin and its receptors in human adipose tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiponectin is one of the most clinically relevant cytokines associated with obesity. However, circadian rhythmicity of adiponectin in human adipose tissue (AT) has not been analyzed. To assess whether the mRNA levels of adiponectin and its receptors (ADIPOR1 and ADIPOR2) might show daily circadian ...

  18. Local modulation of human brain responses by circadian rhythmicity and sleep debt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muto, Vincenzo; Jaspar, Mathieu; Meyer, Christelle; Kussé, Caroline; Chellappa, Sarah L; Degueldre, Christian; Balteau, Evelyne; Shaffii-Le Bourdiec, Anahita; Luxen, André; Middleton, Benita; Archer, Simon N; Phillips, Christophe; Collette, Fabienne; Vandewalle, Gilles; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Maquet, Pierre

    2016-08-12

    Human performance is modulated by circadian rhythmicity and homeostatic sleep pressure. Whether and how this interaction is represented at the regional brain level has not been established. We quantified changes in brain responses to a sustained-attention task during 13 functional magnetic resonance imaging sessions scheduled across the circadian cycle, during 42 hours of wakefulness and after recovery sleep, in 33 healthy participants. Cortical responses showed significant circadian rhythmicity, the phase of which varied across brain regions. Cortical responses also significantly decreased with accrued sleep debt. Subcortical areas exhibited primarily a circadian modulation that closely followed the melatonin profile. These findings expand our understanding of the mechanisms involved in maintaining cognition during the day and its deterioration during sleep deprivation and circadian misalignment. PMID:27516598

  19. Mathematical modeling of the circadian dynamics of the neuroendocrine-immune network in experimentally induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, R; DuBois, D; Almon, R; Jusko, W J; Androulakis, I P

    2016-08-01

    The circadian dynamics of important neuroendocrine-immune mediators have been implicated in progression of rheumatoid arthritis pathophysiology, both clinically as well as in animal models. We present a mathematical model that describes the circadian interactions between mediators of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and the proinflammatory cytokines. Model predictions demonstrate that chronically elevated cytokine expression results in the development of adrenal insufficiency and circadian variability in paw edema. Notably, our model also predicts that an increase in mean secretion of corticosterone (CST) after the induction of the disease is accompanied by a decrease in the amplitude of the CST oscillation. Furthermore, alterations in the phase of circadian oscillation of both cytokines and HPA axis mediators are observed. Therefore, by incorporating the circadian interactions between the neuroendocrine-immune mediators, our model is able to simulate important features of rheumatoid arthritis pathophysiology. PMID:27221115

  20. The Importance of Stochastic Effects for Explaining Entrainment in the Zebrafish Circadian Clock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaela Heussen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock plays a pivotal role in modulating physiological processes and has been implicated, either directly or indirectly, in a range of pathological states including cancer. Here we investigate how the circadian clock is entrained by external cues such as light. Working with zebrafish cell lines and combining light pulse experiments with simulation efforts focused on the role of synchronization effects, we find that even very modest doses of light exposure are sufficient to trigger some entrainment, whereby a higher light intensity or duration correlates with strength of the circadian signal. Moreover, we observe in the simulations that stochastic effects may be considered an essential feature of the circadian clock in order to explain the circadian signal decay in prolonged darkness, as well as light initiated resynchronization as a strong component of entrainment.

  1. Circadian period integrates network information through activation of the BMP signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban J Beckwith

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms use biological clocks to maintain their internal temporal order and anticipate daily environmental changes. In Drosophila, circadian regulation of locomotor behavior is controlled by ∼150 neurons; among them, neurons expressing the PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF set the period of locomotor behavior under free-running conditions. To date, it remains unclear how individual circadian clusters integrate their activity to assemble a distinctive behavioral output. Here we show that the BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN (BMP signaling pathway plays a crucial role in setting the circadian period in PDF neurons in the adult brain. Acute deregulation of BMP signaling causes period lengthening through regulation of dClock transcription, providing evidence for a novel function of this pathway in the adult brain. We propose that coherence in the circadian network arises from integration in PDF neurons of both the pace of the cell-autonomous molecular clock and information derived from circadian-relevant neurons through release of BMP ligands.

  2. The hormonal Zeitgeber melatonin: Role as a circadian modulator in memory processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver eRawashdeh

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The neuroendocrine substance melatonin is a hormone synthesized rhythmically by the pineal gland under the influence of the circadian system and alternating light/dark cycles. Melatonin has been shown to have broad applications, and consequently becoming a molecule of great controversy. Undoubtedly, however, melatonin plays an important role as a time cue for the endogenous circadian system. This review focuses on melatonin as a regulator in the circadian modulation of memory processing. Memory processes (acquisition, consolidation and retrieval are modulated by the circadian system. However, the mechanism by which the biological clock is rhythmically influencing cognitive processes remains unknown. We also discuss, how the circadian system by generating cycling melatonin levels can implant information about daytime into memory processing, depicted as day and nighttime differences in acquisition, memory consolidation and/or retrieval.

  3. Circadian Period Integrates Network Information Through Activation of the BMP Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckwith, Esteban J.; Gorostiza, E. Axel; Berni, Jimena; Rezával, Carolina; Pérez-Santángelo, Agustín; Nadra, Alejandro D.; Ceriani, María Fernanda

    2013-01-01

    Living organisms use biological clocks to maintain their internal temporal order and anticipate daily environmental changes. In Drosophila, circadian regulation of locomotor behavior is controlled by ∼150 neurons; among them, neurons expressing the PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF) set the period of locomotor behavior under free-running conditions. To date, it remains unclear how individual circadian clusters integrate their activity to assemble a distinctive behavioral output. Here we show that the BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN (BMP) signaling pathway plays a crucial role in setting the circadian period in PDF neurons in the adult brain. Acute deregulation of BMP signaling causes period lengthening through regulation of dClock transcription, providing evidence for a novel function of this pathway in the adult brain. We propose that coherence in the circadian network arises from integration in PDF neurons of both the pace of the cell-autonomous molecular clock and information derived from circadian-relevant neurons through release of BMP ligands. PMID:24339749

  4. Circadian variation in dominant atrial fibrillation frequency in persistent atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Circadian variation in atrial fibrillation (AF) frequency is explored in this paper by employing recent advances in signal processing. Once the AF frequency has been estimated and tracked by a hidden Markov model approach, the resulting trend is analyzed for the purpose of detecting and characterizing the presence of circadian variation. With cosinor analysis, the results show that the short-term variations in the AF frequency exceed the variation that may be attributed to circadian. Using the autocorrelation method, circadian variation was found in 13 of 18 ambulatory ECG recordings (Holter) acquired from patients with long-standing persistent AF. Using the ensemble correlation method, the highest AF frequency usually occurred during the afternoon, whereas the lowest usually occurred during late night. It is concluded that circadian variation is present in most patients with long-standing persistent AF though the short-term variation in the AF frequency is considerable and should be taken into account

  5. Sex differences in the circadian regulation of sleep and waking cognition in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santhi, Nayantara; Lazar, Alpar S; McCabe, Patrick J; Lo, June C; Groeger, John A; Dijk, Derk-Jan

    2016-05-10

    The sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythmicity both contribute to brain function, but whether this contribution differs between men and women and how it varies across cognitive domains and subjective dimensions has not been established. We examined the circadian and sleep-wake-dependent regulation of cognition in 16 men and 18 women in a forced desynchrony protocol and quantified the separate contributions of circadian phase, prior sleep, and elapsed time awake on cognition and sleep. The largest circadian effects were observed for reported sleepiness, mood, and reported effort; the effects on working memory and temporal processing were smaller. Although these effects were seen in both men and women, there were quantitative differences. The amplitude of the circadian modulation was larger in women in 11 of 39 performance measures so that their performance was more impaired in the early morning hours. Principal components analysis of the performance measures yielded three factors, accuracy, effort, and speed, which reflect core performance characteristics in a range of cognitive tasks and therefore are likely to be important for everyday performance. The largest circadian modulation was observed for effort, whereas accuracy exhibited the largest sex difference in circadian modulation. The sex differences in the circadian modulation of cognition could not be explained by sex differences in the circadian amplitude of plasma melatonin and electroencephalographic slow-wave activity. These data establish the impact of circadian rhythmicity and sex on waking cognition and have implications for understanding the regulation of brain function, cognition, and affect in shift-work, jetlag, and aging. PMID:27091961

  6. Disrupting circadian homeostasis of sympathetic signaling promotes tumor development in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susie Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell proliferation in all rapidly renewing mammalian tissues follows a circadian rhythm that is often disrupted in advanced-stage tumors. Epidemiologic studies have revealed a clear link between disruption of circadian rhythms and cancer development in humans. Mice lacking the circadian genes Period1 and 2 (Per or Cryptochrome1 and 2 (Cry are deficient in cell cycle regulation and Per2 mutant mice are cancer-prone. However, it remains unclear how circadian rhythm in cell proliferation is generated in vivo and why disruption of circadian rhythm may lead to tumorigenesis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Mice lacking Per1 and 2, Cry1 and 2, or one copy of Bmal1, all show increased spontaneous and radiation-induced tumor development. The neoplastic growth of Per-mutant somatic cells is not controlled cell-autonomously but is dependent upon extracellular mitogenic signals. Among the circadian output pathways, the rhythmic sympathetic signaling plays a key role in the central-peripheral timing mechanism that simultaneously activates the cell cycle clock via AP1-controlled Myc induction and p53 via peripheral clock-controlled ATM activation. Jet-lag promptly desynchronizes the central clock-SNS-peripheral clock axis, abolishes the peripheral clock-dependent ATM activation, and activates myc oncogenic potential, leading to tumor development in the same organ systems in wild-type and circadian gene-mutant mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Tumor suppression in vivo is a clock-controlled physiological function. The central circadian clock paces extracellular mitogenic signals that drive peripheral clock-controlled expression of key cell cycle and tumor suppressor genes to generate a circadian rhythm in cell proliferation. Frequent disruption of circadian rhythm is an important tumor promoting factor.

  7. A Long Noncoding RNA Perturbs the Circadian Rhythm of Hepatoma Cells to Facilitate Hepatocarcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Cui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clock circadian regulator (CLOCK/brain and muscle arnt-like protein-1 (BMAL1 complex governs the regulation of circadian rhythm through triggering periodic alterations of gene expression. However, the underlying mechanism of circadian clock disruption in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC remains unclear. Here, we report that a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA, highly upregulated in liver cancer (HULC, contributes to the perturbations in circadian rhythm of hepatoma cells. Our observations showed that HULC was able to heighten the expression levels of CLOCK and its downstream circadian oscillators, such as period circadian clock 1 and cryptochrome circadian clock 1, in hepatoma cells. Strikingly, HULC altered the expression pattern and prolonged the periodic expression of CLOCK in hepatoma cells. Mechanistically, the complementary base pairing between HULC and the 5' untranslated region of CLOCK mRNA underlay the HULC-modulated expression of CLOCK, and the mutants in the complementary region failed to achieve the event. Moreover, immunohistochemistry staining and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction validated that the levels of CLOCK were elevated in HCC tissues, and the expression levels of HULC were positively associated with those of CLOCK in clinical HCC samples. In functional experiments, our data exhibited that CLOCK was implicated in the HULC-accelerated proliferation of hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo. Taken together, our data show that an lncRNA, HULC, is responsible for the perturbations in circadian rhythm through upregulating circadian oscillator CLOCK in hepatoma cells, resulting in the promotion of hepatocarcinogenesis. Thus, our finding provides new insights into the mechanism by which lncRNA accelerates hepatocarcinogenesis through disturbing circadian rhythm of HCC.

  8. Integration of light and temperature in the regulation of circadian gene expression in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharine E Boothroyd

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Circadian clocks are aligned to the environment via synchronizing signals, or Zeitgebers, such as daily light and temperature cycles, food availability, and social behavior. In this study, we found that genome-wide expression profiles from temperature-entrained flies show a dramatic difference in the presence or absence of a thermocycle. Whereas transcript levels appear to be modified broadly by changes in temperature, there is a specific set of temperature-entrained circadian mRNA profiles that continue to oscillate in constant conditions. There are marked differences in the biological functions represented by temperature-driven or circadian regulation. The set of temperature-entrained circadian transcripts overlaps significantly with a previously defined set of transcripts oscillating in response to a photocycle. In follow-up studies, all thermocycle-entrained circadian transcript rhythms also responded to light/dark entrainment, whereas some photocycle-entrained rhythms did not respond to temperature entrainment. Transcripts encoding the clock components Period, Timeless, Clock, Vrille, PAR-domain protein 1, and Cryptochrome were all confirmed to be rhythmic after entrainment to a daily thermocycle, although the presence of a thermocycle resulted in an unexpected phase difference between period and timeless expression rhythms at the transcript but not the protein level. Generally, transcripts that exhibit circadian rhythms both in response to thermocycles and photocycles maintained the same mutual phase relationships after entrainment by temperature or light. Comparison of the collective temperature- and light-entrained circadian phases of these transcripts indicates that natural environmental light and temperature cycles cooperatively entrain the circadian clock. This interpretation is further supported by comparative analysis of the circadian phases observed for temperature-entrained and light-entrained circadian locomotor behavior. Taken

  9. Later endogenous circadian temperature nadir relative to an earlier wake time in older people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, J. F.; Dijk, D. J.; Klerman, E. B.; Czeisler, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    The contribution of the circadian timing system to the age-related advance of sleep-wake timing was investigated in two experiments. In a constant routine protocol, we found that the average wake time and endogenous circadian phase of 44 older subjects were earlier than that of 101 young men. However, the earlier circadian phase of the older subjects actually occurred later relative to their habitual wake time than it did in young men. These results indicate that an age-related advance of circadian phase cannot fully account for the high prevalence of early morning awakening in healthy older people. In a second study, 13 older subjects and 10 young men were scheduled to a 28-h day, such that they were scheduled to sleep at many circadian phases. Self-reported awakening from scheduled sleep episodes and cognitive throughput during the second half of the wake episode varied markedly as a function of circadian phase in both groups. The rising phase of both rhythms was advanced in the older subjects, suggesting an age-related change in the circadian regulation of sleep-wake propensity. We hypothesize that under entrained conditions, these age-related changes in the relationship between circadian phase and wake time are likely associated with self-selected light exposure at an earlier circadian phase. This earlier exposure to light could account for the earlier clock hour to which the endogenous circadian pacemaker is entrained in older people and thereby further increase their propensity to awaken at an even earlier time.

  10. Brain photoreceptor pathways contributing to circadian rhythmicity in crayfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Jeremy M; Genco, Maria C; Marlow, Elizabeth D; Benton, Jeanne L; Beltz, Barbara S; Sandeman, David C

    2009-08-01

    Freshwater crayfish have three known photoreceptive systems: the compound eyes, extraretinal brain photoreceptors, and caudal photoreceptors. The primary goal of the work described here was to explore the contribution of the brain photoreceptors to circadian locomotory activity and define some of the underlying neural pathways. Immunocytochemical studies of the brain photoreceptors in the parastacid (southern hemisphere) crayfish Cherax destructor reveal their expression of the blue light-sensitive photopigment cryptochrome and the neurotransmitter histamine. The brain photoreceptors project to two small protocerebral neuropils, the brain photoreceptor neuropils (BPNs), where they terminate among fibers expressing the neuropeptide pigment-dispersing hormone (PDH), a signaling molecule in arthropod circadian systems. Comparable pathways are also described in the astacid (northern hemisphere) crayfish Procambarus clarkii. Despite exhibiting markedly different diurnal locomotor activity rhythms, removal of the compound eyes and caudal photoreceptors in both C. destructor and P. clarkii (leaving the brain photoreceptors intact) does not abolish the normal light/dark activity cycle in either species, nor prevent the entrainment of their activity cycles to phase shifts of the light/dark period. These results suggest, therefore, that crayfish brain photoreceptors are sufficient for the entrainment of locomotor activity rhythms to photic stimuli, and that they can act in the absence of the compound eyes and caudal photoreceptors. We also demonstrate that the intensity of PDH expression in the BPNs varies in phase with the locomotor activity rhythm of both crayfish species. Together, these findings suggest that the brain photoreceptor cells can function as extraretinal circadian photoreceptors and that the BPN represents part of an entrainment pathway synchronizing locomotor activity to environmental light/dark cycles, and implicating the neuropeptide PDH in these functions

  11. Circadian rhythms in human performance and mood under constant conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monk, T. H.; Buysse, D. J.; Reynolds, C. F. 3rd; Berga, S. L.; Jarrett, D. B.; Begley, A. E.; Kupfer, D. J.

    1997-01-01

    This study explored the relationship between circadian performance rhythms and rhythms in rectal temperature, plasma cortisol, plasma melatonin, subjective alertness and well-being. Seventeen healthy young adults were studied under 36 h of 'unmasking' conditions (constant wakeful bedrest, temporal isolation, homogenized 'meals') during which rectal temperatures were measured every minute, and plasma cortisol and plasma melatonin measured every 20 min. Hourly subjective ratings of global vigour (alertness) and affect (well-being) were obtained followed by one of two performance batteries. On odd-numbered hours performance (speed and accuracy) of serial search, verbal reasoning and manual dexterity tasks was assessed. On even-numbered hours, performance (% hits, response speed) was measured at a 25-30 min visual vigilance task. Performance of all tasks (except search accuracy) showed a significant time of day variation usually with a nocturnal trough close to the trough in rectal temperature. Performance rhythms appeared not to reliably differ with working memory load. Within subjects, predominantly positive correlations emerged between good performance and higher temperatures and better subjective alertness; predominantly negative correlations between good performance and higher plasma levels of cortisol and melatonin. Temperature and cortisol rhythms correlated with slightly more performance measures (5/7) than did melatonin rhythms (4/7). Global vigour correlated about as well with performance (5/7) as did temperature, and considerably better than global affect (1/7). In conclusion: (1) between-task heterogeneity in circadian performance rhythms appeared to be absent when the sleep/wake cycle was suspended; (2) temperature (positively), cortisol and melatonin (negatively) appeared equally good as circadian correlates of performance, and (3) subjective alertness correlated with performance rhythms as well as (but not better than) body temperature, suggesting that

  12. Circadian rhythmicity of synapses in mouse somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinska, Malgorzata; Grzegorczyk, Anna; Woznicka, Olga; Jasek, Ewa; Kossut, Malgorzata; Barbacka-Surowiak, Grazyna; Litwin, Jan A; Pyza, Elzbieta

    2015-10-01

    The circadian rhythmicity displayed by motor behavior of mice: activity at night and rest during the day; and the associated changes in the sensory input are reflected by cyclic synaptic plasticity in the whisker representations located in the somatosensory (barrel) cortex. It was not clear whether diurnal rhythmic changes in synapse density previously observed in the barrel cortex resulted from changes in the activity of the animals, from daily light/dark (LD) rhythm or are driven by an endogenous clock. These changes were investigated in the barrel cortex of C57BL/6 mouse strain kept under LD 12 : 12 h conditions and in constant darkness (DD). Stereological analysis of serial electron microscopic sections was used to assess numerical density of synapses. In mice kept under LD conditions, the total density of synapses and the density of excitatory synapses located on dendritic spines was higher during the light period (rest phase). In contrast, the density of inhibitory synapses located on dendritic spines increased during the dark period (activity phase). Under DD conditions, the upregulation of the inhibitory synapses during the activity phase was retained, but the cyclic changes in the density of excitatory synapses were not observed. The results show that the circadian plasticity concerns only synapses located on spines (and not those on dendritic shafts), and that excitatory and inhibitory synapses are differently regulated during the 24 h cycle: the excitatory synapses are influenced by light, whilst the inhibitory synapses are driven by the endogenous circadian clock. PMID:26274013

  13. Modeling an evolutionary conserved circadian cis-element.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric R Paquet

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Circadian oscillator networks rely on a transcriptional activator called CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC in insects and CLOCK/BMAL1 or NPAS2/BMAL1 in mammals. Identifying the targets of this heterodimeric basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor poses challenges and it has been difficult to decipher its specific sequence affinity beyond a canonical E-box motif, except perhaps for some flanking bases contributing weakly to the binding energy. Thus, no good computational model presently exists for predicting CLK/CYC, CLOCK/BMAL1, or NPAS2/BMAL1 targets. Here, we use a comparative genomics approach and first study the conservation properties of the best-known circadian enhancer: a 69-bp element upstream of the Drosophila melanogaster period gene. This fragment shows a signal involving the presence of two closely spaced E-box-like motifs, a configuration that we can also detect in the other four prominent CLK/CYC target genes in flies: timeless, vrille, Pdp1, and cwo. This allows for the training of a probabilistic sequence model that we test using functional genomics datasets. We find that the predicted sequences are overrepresented in promoters of genes induced in a recent study by a glucocorticoid receptor-CLK fusion protein. We then scanned the mouse genome with the fly model and found that many known CLOCK/BMAL1 targets harbor sequences matching our consensus. Moreover, the phase of predicted cyclers in liver agreed with known CLOCK/BMAL1 regulation. Taken together, we built a predictive model for CLK/CYC or CLOCK/BMAL1-bound cis-enhancers through the integration of comparative and functional genomics data. Finally, a deeper phylogenetic analysis reveals that the link between the CLOCK/BMAL1 complex and the circadian cis-element dates back to before insects and vertebrates diverged.

  14. Keeping the right time in space:importance of circadian clock and sleep for physiology and performance of astronauts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-Hu Guo; Wei-Min Qu; Shan-Guang Chen; Xiao-Ping Chen; Ke Lv; Zhi-Li Huang; Yi-Lan Wu

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock and sleep are essential for human physiology and behavior; deregulation of circadian rhythms impairs health and performance. Circadian clocks and sleep evolved to adapt to Earth’s environment, which is characterized by a 24-hour light–dark cycle. Changes in gravity load, lighting and work schedules during spaceflight missions can impact circadian clocks and disrupt sleep, in turn jeopardizing the mood, cognition and performance of orbiting astronauts. In this review, we summarize our understanding of both the influence of the space environment on the circadian timing system and sleep and the impact of these changes on astronaut physiology and performance.

  15. PhosPhAt: a database of phosphorylation sites in Arabidopsis thaliana and a plant-specific phosphorylation site predictor

    OpenAIRE

    Heazlewood, J.; Durek, P.; Hummel, J.; Selbig, J; Weckwerth, W. (Wolfram); Walther, D.; Schulze, W.

    2007-01-01

    The PhosPhAt database provides a resource consolidating our current knowledge of mass spectrometry-based identified phosphorylation sites in Arabidopsis and combines it with phosphorylation site prediction specifically trained on experimentally identified Arabidopsis phosphorylation motifs. The database currently contains 1187 unique tryptic peptide sequences encompassing 1053 Arabidopsis proteins. Among the characterized phosphorylation sites, there are over 1000 with unambiguous site assign...

  16. On the Effect of Lengthening Circadian Rhythm by Heavy Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhmedov T. R.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of time sensor of biological clock (BC attracts interest of many scientists, and a great number of experiments are being conducted to stud y the influence of vari- ous physical and chemical factors on functioning of BC. Special attention is drawn to studying the influence of heavy water (D 2 O on functioning of BC that always leads to lengthening of circadian rhythms (CR. This work presents theoretical consideration of lengthening of CR, when hydrogen (H 2 in water is replaced by deuterium (D 2 , that is based on spacial difference of energy levels with similar principle quantum numbers.

  17. Ontogenesis of the circadian clock within the rat liver

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sládek, Martin; Sumová, Alena; Jindráková, Zuzana; Bendová, Zdeňka; Illnerová, Helena

    Florida : Sage Publications, 2006. s. 89-90. [Meeting of Society for Research on Biological Rhythms /10./. 21.05.2006-25.05.2006, Sandestin] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/05/0350; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110605; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant ostatní: EU 6th Framework Project EUCLOCK(XE) 018741 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : circadian clock * liver * ontogenesis Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  18. Transcripts from the Circadian Clock: Telling Time and Season

    OpenAIRE

    Brand, Karl

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe all know it when we wake mere moments before an alarm clock is scheduled to wake us: our body clock made the alarm clock redundant. This phenomenon is driven by an endogenous timer known as the biological, or circadian clock. Each revolution of the Earth about its own axis produces periods of light and dark which define what we all experience as a ‘day’. This profound cyclic variation in solar energy is responsible for driving the evolution of adaptive responses as early as 3.8...

  19. Postnatal ontogenesis of the circadian clock within the rat liver

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sládek, Martin; Jindráková, Zuzana; Bendová, Zdeňka; Sumová, Alena

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 292, č. 3 (2007), R1224-R1229. ISSN 0363-6119 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/05/0350; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Grant ostatní: EUCLOCK(XE) LSH-2004-115-4-018741 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : circadian rhythms * development, * peripheral clock Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.661, year: 2007

  20. Circadian glomerular function: from physiology to molecular and therapeutical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuerzner, Grégoire; Firsov, Dmitri; Bonny, Olivier

    2014-08-01

    Life on earth is rhythmic by essence due to day/night alternation, and many biological processes are also cyclic. The kidney has a special role in the organism, controlling electrolytes and water balance, blood pressure, elimination of metabolic waste and xenobiotics and the production of several hormones. The kidney is submitted to changes throughout 24 h with periods of intense activity followed by calmer periods. Filtration, reabsorption and secretion are the three components determining renal function. Here, we review circadian changes related to glomerular function and proteinuria and emphasize the role of the clock in these processes. PMID:24516223

  1. Pulsatile, circhoral, and circadian rhythmicity in human TSH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 4 healthy human (2 female, 2 male) volunteers, serum TSH was determined over 24 h in 2 min intervals. A new sensitive TSH assay was used. TSH rhythmicity was found in all volunteers and on three levels of frequency and amplitude: a circadian rhythmicity (mean frequency 2/24 h; max. amplitude 1.4 mE/l), a circhoral rhythmicity (mean frequency 10/24 h; max. amplitude 0,9 mE/l), and a 'pulsatile' rhythmicity (mean frequency 54/24 h; max. amplitude 0.4 mE/l). (orig.)

  2. The Effects of Spaceflight on the Rat Circadian Timing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Charles A.; Murakami, Dean M.; Hoban-Higgins, Tana M.; Fuller, Patrick M.; Robinson, Edward L.; Tang, I.-Hsiung

    2003-01-01

    Two fundamental environmental influences that have shaped the evolution of life on Earth are gravity and the cyclic changes occurring over the 24-hour day. Light levels, temperature, and humidity fluctuate over the course of a day, and organisms have adapted to cope with these variations. The primary adaptation has been the evolution of a biological timing system. Previous studies have suggested that this system, named the circadian (circa - about; dies - a day) timing system (CTS), may be sensitive to changes in gravity. The NASA Neurolab spaceflight provided a unique opportunity to evaluate the effects of microgravity on the mammalian CTS. Our experiment tested the hypotheses that microgravity would affect the period, phasing, and light sensitivity of the CTS. Twenty-four Fisher 344 rats were exposed to 16 days of microgravity on the Neurolab STS-90 mission, and 24 Fisher 344 rats were also studied on Earth as one-G controls. Rats were equipped with biotelemetry transmitters to record body temperature (T(sub b)) and heart rate (HR) continuously while the rats moved freely. In each group, 18 rats were exposed to a 24-hour light-dark (LD 12:12) cycle, and six rats were exposed to constant dim red-light (LL). The ability of light to induce a neuronal activity marker (c-fos) in the circadian pacemaker of the brain, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), was examined in rats studied on flight days two (FD2) and 14 (FD14), and postflight days two (R+1) and 14 (R+13). The flight rats in LD remained synchronized with the LD cycle. However, their T(sub b), rhythm was markedly phase-delayed relative to the LD cycle. The LD flight rats also had a decreased T(sub b) and a change in the waveform of the T(sub b) rhythm compared to controls. Rats in LL exhibited free-running rhythms of T(sub b), and HR; however, the periods were longer in microgravity. Circadian period returned to preflight values after landing. The internal phase angle between rhythms was different in flight than

  3. Analysis of Protein Phosphorylation Using Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao-Chi Liao

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphorylation has been known to be a pivotalmodification regulating many cellular activities and functions.Except for several conventional techniques, mass spectrometry-based strategies are increasingly considered as vital toolsthat can be utilized to characterize phosphorylated peptides orproteins. In this article, we summarized currently availablemass spectrometry-based techniques for the analysis of phosphorylation.Due to the low abundance of phosphopeptides,enrichment steps such as specific antibodies, immobilizedmetal affinity chromatography, and specific tags are crucial fortheir use in detection. Since the non-specific binding of theenrichment techniques are constantly of major concerns, phosphatasetreatment, neutral loss scan, or precursor ion scanenable the recognition of the phosphopeptide signals. In addition,quantitative methods including isotope labeling and masstags are also discussed. Phosphoproteome analysis seems to provide elucidation of signalingnetworks and global decipherment of cell activities, which require powerful analytical methodsfor complete and routine identification of the phosphorylation event. Despite thatnumerous approaches have been exploited, comprehensive analysis of protein phosphorylationremains a challenging task. With the progressively more improvements of instrumentsand methodologies, we can foresee the implementation of a comprehensive approach for theanalysis of phosphorylation states of proteins.

  4. Extensive phosphorylation of AMPA receptors in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diering, Graham H; Heo, Seok; Hussain, Natasha K; Liu, Bian; Huganir, Richard L

    2016-08-16

    Regulation of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) function is a fundamental mechanism controlling synaptic strength during long-term potentiation/depression and homeostatic scaling. AMPAR function and membrane trafficking is controlled by protein-protein interactions, as well as by posttranslational modifications. Phosphorylation of the GluA1 AMPAR subunit at S845 and S831 play especially important roles during synaptic plasticity. Recent controversy has emerged regarding the extent to which GluA1 phosphorylation may contribute to synaptic plasticity. Here we used a variety of methods to measure the population of phosphorylated GluA1-containing AMPARs in cultured primary neurons and mouse forebrain. Phosphorylated GluA1 represents large fractions from 12% to 50% of the total population under basal and stimulated conditions in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, a large fraction of synapses are positive for phospho-GluA1-containing AMPARs. Our results support the large body of research indicating a prominent role of GluA1 phosphorylation in synaptic plasticity. PMID:27482106

  5. Regulation of gap junctions by protein phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sáez J.C.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Gap junctions are constituted by intercellular channels and provide a pathway for transfer of ions and small molecules between adjacent cells of most tissues. The degree of intercellular coupling mediated by gap junctions depends on the number of gap junction channels and their activity may be a function of the state of phosphorylation of connexins, the structural subunit of gap junction channels. Protein phosphorylation has been proposed to control intercellular gap junctional communication at several steps from gene expression to protein degradation, including translational and post-translational modification of connexins (i.e., phosphorylation of the assembled channel acting as a gating mechanism and assembly into and removal from the plasma membrane. Several connexins contain sites for phosphorylation for more than one protein kinase. These consensus sites vary between connexins and have been preferentially identified in the C-terminus. Changes in intercellular communication mediated by protein phosphorylation are believed to control various physiological tissue and cell functions as well as to be altered under pathological conditions.

  6. The human endogenous circadian system causes greatest platelet activation during the biological morning independent of behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A J L Scheer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Platelets are involved in the thromboses that are central to myocardial infarctions and ischemic strokes. Such adverse cardiovascular events have day/night patterns with peaks in the morning (~9 AM, potentially related to endogenous circadian clock control of platelet activation. The objective was to test if the human endogenous circadian system influences (1 platelet function and (2 platelet response to standardized behavioral stressors. We also aimed to compare the magnitude of any effects on platelet function caused by the circadian system with that caused by varied standardized behavioral stressors, including mental arithmetic, passive postural tilt and mild cycling exercise. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied 12 healthy adults (6 female who lived in individual laboratory suites in dim light for 240 h, with all behaviors scheduled on a 20-h recurring cycle to permit assessment of endogenous circadian function independent from environmental and behavioral effects including the sleep/wake cycle. Circadian phase was assessed from core body temperature. There were highly significant endogenous circadian rhythms in platelet surface activated glycoprotein (GP IIb-IIIa, GPIb and P-selectin (6-17% peak-trough amplitudes; p ≤ 0.01. These circadian peaks occurred at a circadian phase corresponding to 8-9 AM. Platelet count, ATP release, aggregability, and plasma epinephrine also had significant circadian rhythms but with later peaks (corresponding to 3-8 PM. The circadian effects on the platelet activation markers were always larger than that of any of the three behavioral stressors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data demonstrate robust effects of the endogenous circadian system on platelet activation in humans--independent of the sleep/wake cycle, other behavioral influences and the environment. The 9 AM timing of the circadian peaks of the three platelet surface markers, including platelet surface activated GPIIb-IIIa, the

  7. Phosphorylation state-dependent interaction between AKAP7δ/γ and phospholamban increases phospholamban phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigatti, Marc; Le, Andrew V; Gerber, Claire; Moraru, Ion I; Dodge-Kafka, Kimberly L

    2015-09-01

    Changes in heart rate and contractility in response to sympathetic stimulation occur via activation of cAMP dependent protein kinase A (PKA), leading to phosphorylation of numerous substrates that alter Ca(2+) cycling. Phosphorylation of these substrates is coordinated by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), which recruit PKA to specific substrates [1]. Phosphorylation of the PKA substrate phospholamban (PLB) is a critical determinant of Ca(2+) re-entry into the sarcoplasmic reticulum and is coordinated by AKAP7δ/γ [2,3]. Here, we further these findings by showing that phosphorylation of PLB requires interaction with AKAP7δ/γ and that this interaction occurs only when PLB is unphosphorylated. Additionally, we find that two mutants of PLB (R9C and Δ14), which are associated with dilated cardiomyopathy in humans, prevent association with AKAP7δ/γ and display reduced phosphorylation in vitro. This finding implicates the AKAP7δ/γ-PLB interaction in the pathology of the disease phenotype. Further exploration of the AKAP7δ/γ-PLB association demonstrated a phosphorylation state-dependence of the interaction. Computational modeling revealed that this mode of interaction allows for small amounts of AKAP and PKA (100-200nM) to regulate the phosphorylation of large quantities of PLB (50μM). Our results confirm that AKAP7γ/δ binding to PLB is important for phosphorylation of PLB, and describe a novel phosphorylation state-dependent binding mechanism that explains how phosphorylation of highly abundant PKA substrates can be regulated by AKAPs present at ~100-200 fold lower concentrations. PMID:26027516

  8. Phosphorylation-dephosphorylation of yeast pyruvate dehydrogenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (PDC) was purified to homogeneity from baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). No pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) kinase activity was detected at any stage of the purification. However, the purified PDC was phosphorylated and inactivated by purified PDH kinase from bovine kidney mitochondria, Mg2+, and [γ-32P]ATP. The protein-bound radioactivity was localized in the PDH α subunit. The phosphorylated, inactivated PDC was dephosphorylated and reactivated with purified bovine PDH phosphatase, Mg2+, and Ca2+. From a tryptic digest of phosphorylated yeast PDC a radioactive peptide was isolated by anion and reverse phase HPLC. The sequence of this tetradecapeptide is Tyr-Gly-Gly-His-Ser(P)-Met-Ser-Asp-Pro-Gly-Thr-Thr-Tyr-Arg. This sequence is very similar to the sequence of a tryptic phosphopeptide derived from the α subunit of bovine kidney and heart PDH: Tyr-His-Gly-His-Ser(P)-Met-Ser-Asp-Pro-Gly-Val-Ser-Tyr-Arg

  9. Hippocampal activity mediates the relationship between circadian activity rhythms and memory in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Stephanie M; Mumford, Jeanette A; Schnyer, David M

    2015-08-01

    Older adults experience parallel changes in sleep, circadian rhythms, and episodic memory. These processes appear to be linked such that disruptions in sleep contribute to deficits in memory. Although more variability in circadian patterns is a common feature of aging and predicts pathology, little is known about how alterations in circadian activity rhythms within older adults influence new episodic learning. Following 10 days of recording sleep-wake patterns using actigraphy, healthy older adults underwent fMRI while performing an associative memory task. The results revealed better associative memory was related to more consistent circadian activity rhythms, independent of total sleep time, sleep efficiency, and level of physical activity. Moreover, hippocampal activity during successful memory retrieval events was positively correlated with associative memory accuracy and circadian activity rhythm (CAR) consistency. We demonstrated that the link between consistent rhythms and associative memory performance was mediated by hippocampal activity. These findings provide novel insight into how the circadian rhythm of sleep-wake cycles are associated with memory in older adults and encourage further examination of circadian activity rhythms as a biomarker of cognitive functioning. PMID:26205911

  10. Research on sleep, circadian rhythms and aging - Applications to manned spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czeisler, Charles A.; Chiasera, August J.; Duffy, Jeanne F.

    1991-01-01

    Disorders of sleep and circadian rhythmicity are characteristic of both advancing age and manned spaceflight. Sleep fragmentation, reduced nocturnal sleep tendency and sleep efficiency, reduced daytime alertness, and increased daytime napping are common to both of these conditions. Recent research on the pathophysiology and treatment of disrupted sleep in older people has led to a better understanding of how the human circadian pacemaker regulates the timing of the daily sleep-wake cycle and how it responds to the periodic changes in the light-dark cycle to which we are ordinarily exposed. These findings have led to new treatments for some of the sleep disorders common to older individuals, using carefully timed exposure to bright light and darkness to manipulate the phase and/or amplitude of the circadian timing system. These insights and treatment approaches have direct applications in the design of countermeasures allowing astronauts to overcome some of the challenges which manned spaceflight poses for the human circadian timing system. We have conducted an operational feasibility study on the use of scheduled exposure to bright light and darkness prior to launch in order to facilitate adaptation of the circadian system of a NASA Space Shuttle crew to the altered sleep-wake schedule required for their mission. The results of this study illustrate how an understanding of the properties of the human circadian timing system and the consequences of circadian disruption can be applied to manned spaceflight.

  11. Partitioning circadian transcription by SIRT6 leads to segregated control of cellular metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masri, Selma; Rigor, Paul; Cervantes, Marlene; Ceglia, Nicholas; Sebastian, Carlos; Xiao, Cuiying; Roqueta-Rivera, Manuel; Deng, Chuxia; Osborne, Timothy F; Mostoslavsky, Raul; Baldi, Pierre; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2014-07-31

    Circadian rhythms are intimately linked to cellular metabolism. Specifically, the NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase SIRT1, the founding member of the sirtuin family, contributes to clock function. Whereas SIRT1 exhibits diversity in deacetylation targets and subcellular localization, SIRT6 is the only constitutively chromatin-associated sirtuin and is prominently present at transcriptionally active genomic loci. Comparison of the hepatic circadian transcriptomes reveals that SIRT6 and SIRT1 separately control transcriptional specificity and therefore define distinctly partitioned classes of circadian genes. SIRT6 interacts with CLOCK:BMAL1 and, differently from SIRT1, governs their chromatin recruitment to circadian gene promoters. Moreover, SIRT6 controls circadian chromatin recruitment of SREBP-1, resulting in the cyclic regulation of genes implicated in fatty acid and cholesterol metabolism. This mechanism parallels a phenotypic disruption in fatty acid metabolism in SIRT6 null mice as revealed by circadian metabolome analyses. Thus, genomic partitioning by two independent sirtuins contributes to differential control of circadian metabolism. PMID:25083875

  12. Redox regulation and pro-oxidant reactions in the physiology of circadian systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, Isabel; Vázquez-Martínez, Olivia; Hernández-Muñoz, Rolando; Valente-Godínez, Héctor; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio

    2016-05-01

    Rhythms of approximately 24 h are pervasive in most organisms and are known as circadian. There is a molecular circadian clock in each cell sustained by a feedback system of interconnected "clock" genes and transcription factors. In mammals, the timing system is formed by a central pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus, in coordination with a collection of peripheral oscillators. Recently, an extensive interconnection has been recognized between the molecular circadian clock and the set of biochemical pathways that underlie the bioenergetics of the cell. A principle regulator of metabolic networks is the flow of electrons between electron donors and acceptors. The concomitant reduction and oxidation (redox) reactions directly influence the balance between anabolic and catabolic processes. This review summarizes and discusses recent findings concerning the mutual and dynamic interactions between the molecular circadian clock, redox reactions, and redox signaling. The scope includes the regulatory role played by redox coenzymes (NAD(P)+/NAD(P)H, GSH/GSSG), reactive oxygen species (superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide), antioxidants (melatonin), and physiological events that modulate the redox state (feeding condition, circadian rhythms) in determining the timing capacity of the molecular circadian clock. In addition, we discuss a purely metabolic circadian clock, which is based on the redox enzymes known as peroxiredoxins and is present in mammalian red blood cells and in other biological systems. Both the timing system and the metabolic network are key to a better understanding of widespread pathological conditions such as the metabolic syndrome, obesity, and diabetes. PMID:25926044

  13. The ancestral circadian clock of monarch butterflies: role in time-compensated sun compass orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppert, S M

    2007-01-01

    The circadian clock has a vital role in monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) migration by providing the timing component of time-compensated sun compass orientation, which contributes to navigation to the overwintering grounds. The location of circadian clock cells in monarch brain has been identified in the dorsolateral protocerebrum (pars lateralis); these cells express PERIOD, TIMELESS, and a Drosophila-like cryptochrome designated CRY1. Monarch butterflies, like all other nondrosophilid insects examined so far, express a second cry gene (designated insect CRY2) that encodes a vertebrate-like CRY that is also expressed in pars lateralis. An ancestral circadian clock mechanism has been defined in monarchs, in which CRY1 functions as a blue light photoreceptor for photic entrainment, whereas CRY2 functionswithin the clockwork as themajor transcriptional repressor of an intracellular negative transcriptional feedback loop. A CRY1-staining neural pathway has been identified that may connect the circadian (navigational) clock to polarized light input important for sun compass navigation, and a CRY2-positive neural pathway has been discovered that may communicate circadian information directly from the circadian clock to the central complex, the likely site of the sun compass. The monarch butterfly may thus use the CRY proteins as components of the circadian mechanism and also as output molecules that connect the clock to various aspects of the sun compass apparatus. PMID:18419268

  14. Chronic hyperammonemia alters the circadian rhythms of corticosteroid hormone levels and of motor activity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahabrach, Hanan; Piedrafita, Blanca; Ayad, Abdelmalik; El Mlili, Nisrin; Errami, Mohammed; Felipo, Vicente; Llansola, Marta

    2010-05-15

    Patients with liver cirrhosis may present hepatic encephalopathy with a wide range of neurological disturbances and alterations in sleep quality and in the sleep-wake circadian rhythm. Hyperammonemia is a main contributor to the neurological alterations in hepatic encephalopathy. We have assessed, in an animal model of chronic hyperammonemia without liver failure, the effects of hyperammonemia per se on the circadian rhythms of motor activity, temperature, and plasma levels of adrenal corticosteroid hormones. Chronic hyperammonemia alters the circadian rhythms of locomotor activity and of cortisol and corticosterone levels in blood. Different types of motor activity are affected differentially. Hyperammonemia significantly alters the rhythm of spontaneous ambulatory activity, reducing strongly ambulatory counts and slightly average velocity during the night (the active phase) but not during the day, resulting in altered circadian rhythms. In contrast, hyperammonemia did not affect wheel running at all, indicating that it affects spontaneous but not voluntary activity. Vertical activity was affected only very slightly, indicating that hyperammonemia does not induce anxiety. Hyperammonemia abolished completely the circadian rhythm of corticosteroid hormones in plasma, completely eliminating the peaks of cortisol and corticosterone present in control rats at the start of the dark period. The data reported show that chronic hyperammonemia, similar to that present in patients with liver cirrhosis, alters the circadian rhythms of corticosteroid hormones and of motor activity. This suggests that hyperammonemia would be a relevant contributor to the alterations in corticosteroid hormones and in circadian rhythms in patients with liver cirrhosis. PMID:19998493

  15. Emergence of noise-induced oscillations in the central circadian pacemaker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline H Ko

    Full Text Available Bmal1 is an essential transcriptional activator within the mammalian circadian clock. We report here that the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN of Bmal1-null mutant mice, unexpectedly, generates stochastic oscillations with periods that overlap the circadian range. Dissociated SCN neurons expressed fluctuating levels of PER2 detected by bioluminescence imaging but could not generate circadian oscillations intrinsically. Inhibition of intercellular communication or cyclic-AMP signaling in SCN slices, which provide a positive feed-forward signal to drive the intracellular negative feedback loop, abolished the stochastic oscillations. Propagation of this feed-forward signal between SCN neurons then promotes quasi-circadian oscillations that arise as an emergent property of the SCN network. Experimental analysis and mathematical modeling argue that both intercellular coupling and molecular noise are required for the stochastic rhythms, providing a novel biological example of noise-induced oscillations. The emergence of stochastic circadian oscillations from the SCN network in the absence of cell-autonomous circadian oscillatory function highlights a previously unrecognized level of circadian organization.

  16. NPAS2 Compensates for Loss of CLOCK in Peripheral Circadian Oscillators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic Landgraf

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Heterodimers of CLOCK and BMAL1 are the major transcriptional activators of the mammalian circadian clock. Because the paralog NPAS2 can substitute for CLOCK in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN, the master circadian pacemaker, CLOCK-deficient mice maintain circadian rhythms in behavior and in tissues in vivo. However, when isolated from the SCN, CLOCK-deficient peripheral tissues are reportedly arrhythmic, suggesting a fundamental difference in circadian clock function between SCN and peripheral tissues. Surprisingly, however, using luminometry and single-cell bioluminescence imaging of PER2 expression, we now find that CLOCK-deficient dispersed SCN neurons and peripheral cells exhibit similarly stable, autonomous circadian rhythms in vitro. In CLOCK-deficient fibroblasts, knockdown of Npas2 leads to arrhythmicity, suggesting that NPAS2 can compensate for loss of CLOCK in peripheral cells as well as in SCN. Our data overturn the notion of an SCN-specific role for NPAS2 in the molecular circadian clock, and instead indicate that, at the cellular level, the core loops of SCN neuron and peripheral cell circadian clocks are fundamentally similar.

  17. Altered circadian clock gene expression in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Anne-Sofie; Owe-Larsson, Björn; Hetta, Jerker; Lundkvist, Gabriella B

    2016-07-01

    Impaired circadian rhythmicity has been reported in several psychiatric disorders. Schizophrenia is commonly associated with aberrant sleep-wake cycles and insomnia. It is not known if schizophrenia is associated with disturbances in molecular rhythmicity. We cultured fibroblasts from skin samples obtained from patients with chronic schizophrenia and from healthy controls, respectively, and analyzed the circadian expression during 48h of the clock genes CLOCK, BMAL1, PER1, PER2, CRY1, CRY2, REV-ERBα and DBP. In fibroblasts obtained from patients with chronic schizophrenia, we found a loss of rhythmic expression of CRY1 and PER2 compared to cells from healthy controls. We also estimated the sleep quality in these patients and found that most of them suffered from poor sleep in comparison with the healthy controls. In another patient sample, we analyzed mononuclear blood cells from patients with schizophrenia experiencing their first episode of psychosis, and found decreased expression of CLOCK, PER2 and CRY1 compared to blood cells from healthy controls. These novel findings show disturbances in the molecular clock in schizophrenia and have important implications in our understanding of the aberrant rhythms reported in this disease. PMID:27132483

  18. Circadian clock and the onset of cardiovascular events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Norihiko; Maemura, Koji

    2016-06-01

    The onset of cardiovascular diseases often shows time-of-day variation. Acute myocardial infarction or ventricular arrhythmia such as ventricular tachycardia occurs mainly in the early morning. Multiple biochemical and physiological parameters show circadian rhythm, which may account for the diurnal variation of cardiovascular events. These include the variations in blood pressure, activity of the autonomic nervous system and renin-angiotensin axis, coagulation cascade, vascular tone and the intracellular metabolism of cardiomyocytes. Importantly, the molecular clock system seems to underlie the circadian variation of these parameters. The center of the biological clock, also known as the central clock, exists in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. In contrast, the molecular clock system is also activated in each cell of the peripheral organs and constitute the peripheral clock. The biological clock system is currently considered to have a beneficial role in maintaining the homeostasis of each organ. Discoordination, however, between the peripheral clock and external environment could potentially underlie the development of cardiovascular events. Therefore, understanding the molecular and cellular pathways by which cardiovascular events occur in a diurnal oscillatory pattern will help the establishment of a novel therapeutic approach to the management of cardiovascular disorders. PMID:26888119

  19. Protecting the Melatonin Rhythm through Circadian Healthy Light Exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angeles Bonmati-Carrion

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, in developed countries, nights are excessively illuminated (light at night, whereas daytime is mainly spent indoors, and thus people are exposed to much lower light intensities than under natural conditions. In spite of the positive impact of artificial light, we pay a price for the easy access to light during the night: disorganization of our circadian system or chronodisruption (CD, including perturbations in melatonin rhythm. Epidemiological studies show that CD is associated with an increased incidence of diabetes, obesity, heart disease, cognitive and affective impairment, premature aging and some types of cancer. Knowledge of retinal photoreceptors and the discovery of melanopsin in some ganglion cells demonstrate that light intensity, timing and spectrum must be considered to keep the biological clock properly entrained. Importantly, not all wavelengths of light are equally chronodisrupting. Blue light, which is particularly beneficial during the daytime, seems to be more disruptive at night, and induces the strongest melatonin inhibition. Nocturnal blue light exposure is currently increasing, due to the proliferation of energy-efficient lighting (LEDs and electronic devices. Thus, the development of lighting systems that preserve the melatonin rhythm could reduce the health risks induced by chronodisruption. This review addresses the state of the art regarding the crosstalk between light and the circadian system.

  20. Circadian rhythms and post-transcriptional regulation in higher plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres eRomanowski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The circadian clock of plants allows them to cope with daily changes in their environment. This is accomplished by the rhythmic regulation of gene expression, in a process that involves many regulatory steps. One of the key steps involved at the RNA level is post-transcriptional regulation, which ensures a correct control on the different amounts and types of mRNA that will ultimately define the current physiological state of the plant cell. Recent advances in the study of the processes of regulation of pre-mRNA processing, RNA turn-over and surveillance, regulation of translation, function of lncRNAs, biogenesis and function of small RNAs and the development of bioinformatics tools have helped to vastly expand our understanding of how this regulatory step performs its role. In this work we review the current progress in circadian regulation at the post-transcriptional level research in plants. It is the continuous interaction of all the information flow control post-transcriptional processes that allow a plant to precisely time and predict daily environmental changes.

  1. Drosophila spaghetti and doubletime link the circadian clock and light to caspases, apoptosis and tauopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Means

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available While circadian dysfunction and neurodegeneration are correlated, the mechanism for this is not understood. It is not known if age-dependent circadian dysfunction leads to neurodegeneration or vice-versa, and the proteins that mediate the effect remain unidentified. Here, we show that the knock-down of a regulator (spag of the circadian kinase Dbt in circadian cells lowers Dbt levels abnormally, lengthens circadian rhythms and causes expression of activated initiator caspase (Dronc in the optic lobes during the middle of the day or after light pulses at night. Likewise, reduced Dbt activity lengthens circadian period and causes expression of activated Dronc, and a loss-of-function mutation in Clk also leads to expression of activated Dronc in a light-dependent manner. Genetic epistasis experiments place Dbt downstream of Spag in the pathway, and Spag-dependent reductions of Dbt are shown to require the proteasome. Importantly, activated Dronc expression due to reduced Spag or Dbt activity occurs in cells that do not express the spag RNAi or dominant negative Dbt and requires PDF neuropeptide signaling from the same neurons that support behavioral rhythms. Furthermore, reduction of Dbt or Spag activity leads to Dronc-dependent Drosophila Tau cleavage and enhanced neurodegeneration produced by human Tau in a fly eye model for tauopathy. Aging flies with lowered Dbt or Spag function show markers of cell death as well as behavioral deficits and shortened lifespans, and even old wild type flies exhibit Dbt modification and activated caspase at particular times of day. These results suggest that Dbt suppresses expression of activated Dronc to prevent Tau cleavage, and that the circadian clock defects confer sensitivity to expression of activated Dronc in response to prolonged light. They establish a link between the circadian clock factors, light, cell death pathways and Tau toxicity, potentially via dysregulation of circadian neuronal remodeling in

  2. The relationship between circadian disruption and the development of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karatsoreos IN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ilia N Karatsoreos Department of Integrative Physiology and Neuroscience, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, USA Abstract: Circadian (daily rhythms are pervasive in nature, and expressed in nearly every behavioral and physiological process. In mammals, circadian rhythms are regulated by the master brain clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus that coordinates the activity of “peripheral” oscillators throughout the brain and body. While much progress has been made in understanding the basic functioning of the circadian clock at the level of genes, molecules, and cells, our understanding of how these clocks interact with complex systems is still in its infancy. Much recent work has focused on the role of circadian clocks in the etiology of disorders as diverse as cancer, diabetes, and obesity. Given the rapid rise in obesity, and the economic costs involved in treating its associated cardiometabolic disorders such as heart disease and diabetes mellitus, understanding the development of obesity and metabolic dysregulation is crucial. Significant epidemiological data indicate a role for circadian rhythms in metabolic disorders. Shift workers have a higher incidence of obesity and diabetes, and laboratory studies in humans show misaligning sleep and the circadian clock leads to hyperinsulinemia. In animal models, body-wide “clock gene” knockout mice are prone to obesity. Further, disrupting the circadian clock by manipulating the light–dark cycle can result in metabolic dysregulation and development of obesity. At the molecular level, elegant studies have shown that targeted disruption of the genetic circadian clock in the pancreas leads to diabetes, highlighting the fact that the circadian clock is directly coupled to metabolism at the cellular level. Keywords: glucose, metabolism, sleep, rhythms, obesity

  3. Assembly of a comprehensive regulatory network for the mammalian circadian clock: a bioinformatics approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Lehmann

    Full Text Available By regulating the timing of cellular processes, the circadian clock provides a way to adapt physiology and behaviour to the geophysical time. In mammals, a light-entrainable master clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN controls peripheral clocks that are present in virtually every body cell. Defective circadian timing is associated with several pathologies such as cancer and metabolic and sleep disorders. To better understand the circadian regulation of cellular processes, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline encompassing the analysis of high-throughput data sets and the exploitation of published knowledge by text-mining. We identified 118 novel potential clock-regulated genes and integrated them into an existing high-quality circadian network, generating the to-date most comprehensive network of circadian regulated genes (NCRG. To validate particular elements in our network, we assessed publicly available ChIP-seq data for BMAL1, REV-ERBα/β and RORα/γ proteins and found strong evidence for circadian regulation of Elavl1, Nme1, Dhx6, Med1 and Rbbp7 all of which are involved in the regulation of tumourigenesis. Furthermore, we identified Ncl and Ddx6, as targets of RORγ and REV-ERBα, β, respectively. Most interestingly, these genes were also reported to be involved in miRNA regulation; in particular, NCL regulates several miRNAs, all involved in cancer aggressiveness. Thus, NCL represents a novel potential link via which the circadian clock, and specifically RORγ, regulates the expression of miRNAs, with particular consequences in breast cancer progression. Our findings bring us one step forward towards a mechanistic understanding of mammalian circadian regulation, and provide further evidence of the influence of circadian deregulation in cancer.

  4. Visualizing and Quantifying Intracellular Behavior and Abundance of the Core Circadian Clock Protein PERIOD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyllie, Nicola J; Pilorz, Violetta; Boyd, James; Meng, Qing-Jun; Saer, Ben; Chesham, Johanna E; Maywood, Elizabeth S; Krogager, Toke P; Spiller, David G; Boot-Handford, Raymond; White, Michael R H; Hastings, Michael H; Loudon, Andrew S I

    2016-07-25

    Transcriptional-translational feedback loops (TTFLs) are a conserved molecular motif of circadian clocks. The principal clock in mammals is the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. In SCN neurons, auto-regulatory feedback on core clock genes Period (Per) and Cryptochrome (Cry) following nuclear entry of their protein products is the basis of circadian oscillation [1, 2]. In Drosophila clock neurons, the movement of dPer into the nucleus is subject to a circadian gate that generates a delay in the TTFL, and this delay is thought to be critical for oscillation [3, 4]. Analysis of the Drosophila clock has strongly influenced models of the mammalian clock, and such models typically infer complex spatiotemporal, intracellular behaviors of mammalian clock proteins. There are, however, no direct measures of the intracellular behavior of endogenous circadian proteins to support this: dynamic analyses have been limited and often have no circadian dimension [5-7]. We therefore generated a knockin mouse expressing a fluorescent fusion of native PER2 protein (PER2::VENUS) for live imaging. PER2::VENUS recapitulates the circadian functions of wild-type PER2 and, importantly, the behavior of PER2::VENUS runs counter to the Drosophila model: it does not exhibit circadian gating of nuclear entry. Using fluorescent imaging of PER2::VENUS, we acquired the first measures of mobility, molecular concentration, and localization of an endogenous circadian protein in individual mammalian cells, and we showed how the mobility and nuclear translocation of PER2 are regulated by casein kinase. These results provide new qualitative and quantitative insights into the cellular mechanism of the mammalian circadian clock. PMID:27374340

  5. Pinealectomy abolishes circadian behavior and interferes with circadian clock gene oscillations in brain and liver but not retina in a migratory songbird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Amit Kumar; Malik, Shalie; Rani, Sangeeta; Kumar, Vinod

    2016-03-15

    In songbirds, the pineal gland is part of the multi-oscillatory circadian timing system, with participating component oscillators in the eyes and hypothalamus. This study investigated the role of the pineal gland in development of the nighttime migratory restlessness (Zugunruhe) and generation of circadian gene oscillations in the retina, brain and liver tissues in migratory redheaded buntings (Emberiza bruniceps). Pinealectomized (pinx) and sham-operated buntings entrained to short days (8h light: 16h darkness, 8L:16D) were sequentially exposed for 10days each to stimulatory long days (13L: 11D) and constant dim light (LLdim; a condition that tested circadian rhythm persistence). Whereas activity-rest pattern was monitored continuously, the mRNA expressions of clock genes (bmal1, clock, npas2, per2, cry1, rorα, reverα) were measured in the retina, hypothalamus, telencephalon, optic tectum and liver tissues at circadian times, CT, 1, 6, 13, 17 and 21 (CT 0, activity onset) on day 11 of the LLdim. The absence of the pineal gland did not affect the development of long-day induced Zugunruhe but caused decay of the circadian rhythm in Zugunruhe as well as the clock gene oscillations in the hypothalamus, but not in the retina. Further, there were variable effects of pinealectomy in the peripheral brain and liver tissue circadian gene oscillations, notably the persistence of per 2 and cry1 (optic tectum), rorα (telencephalon) and npas2 (liver) mRNA oscillations in pinx birds. We suggest the pineal gland dependence of the generation of circadian gene oscillations in the hypothalamus, not retina, and peripheral brain and liver tissues in migratory redheaded buntings. PMID:26801391

  6. Entrainment of the circadian clock in humans: mechanism and implications for sleep disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Metcalfe

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Humans exhibit behaviour and physiology controlled by a circadian clock. The circadian period is genetically determined and administered by a series of interlocked autoregulatory feedback loops largely in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus. The phase of the clock is, however, synchronised by a number of external environmental cues such as light. A failure or change in any one of the requisite clock components may result in the onset of a long-term sleep disorder. This review discusses the mechanism regulating circadian physiology in humans and explores how disturbances of this mechanism may result in sleep pathologies.

  7. Effect of cataract surgery on regulation of circadian rhythms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erichsen, Jesper Høiberg; Brøndsted, Adam E; Kessel, Line

    2015-01-01

    UNLABELLED: This review looked at the effect of cataract surgery on the regulation of circadian rhythms and compared the effect of blue light-filtering and clear intraocular lenses (IOLs) on circadian rhythms. A systematic review and metaanalysis were performed, and the level of evidence was...... Trials web site. Trials that reported the effect of cataract surgery on circadian rhythms were included. Outcomes were the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) global score, number of poor sleepers, Epworth Sleepiness Score, sleep efficiency, and mean concentration of melatonin. Cataract surgery...

  8. Circadian clocks and life-history related traits: is pupation height affected by circadian organization in Drosophila melanogaster?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dhanashree A. Paranjpe; D. Anitha; Vijay Kumar Sharma; Amitabh Joshi

    2004-04-01

    In D. melanogaster, the observation of greater pupation height under constant darkness than under constant light has been explained by the hypothesis that light has an inhibitory effect on larval wandering behaviour, preventing larvae from crawling higher up the walls of culture vials prior to pupation. If this is the only role of light in affecting pupation height, then various light : dark regimes would be predicted to yield pupation heights intermediate between those seen in constant light and constant darkness. We tested this hypothesis by measuring pupation height under various light : dark regimes in four laboratory populations of Drosophila melanogaster. Pupation height was the greatest in constant darkness, intermediate in constant light, and the least in a light / dark regime of LD 14:14 h. The results clearly suggest that there is more to light regime effects on pupation height than mere behavioural inhibition of wandering larvae, and that circadian organization may play some role in determining pupation height, although the details of this role are not yet clear. We briefly discuss these results in the context of the possible involvement of circadian clocks in life-history evolution.

  9. Identification of extracellularly phosphorylated membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghoff, Sandra; Willberg, Wibke; Schrader, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Ecto-protein kinases phosphorylate extracellular membrane proteins and exhibit similarities to casein kinases and protein kinases A and C. However, the identification of their protein substrates still remains a challenge because a clear separation from intracellular phosphoproteins is difficult. Here, we describe a straightforward method for the identification of extracellularly phosphorylated membrane proteins in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and K562 cells which used the protease bromelain to selectively remove ectoproteins from intact cells and combined this with the subsequent analysis using IMAC and LC-MS/MS. A "false-positive" strategy in which cells without protease treatment served as controls was applied. Using this approach we identified novel phosphorylation sites on five ectophosphoproteins (NOTCH1, otopetrin 1, regulator of G-protein signalling 13 (RGS13), protein tyrosine phosphatase receptor type D isoform 3 (PTPRD), usherin isoform B (USH2A)). Use of bromelain appears to be a reliable technique for the further identification of phosphorylated surface-exposed peptides when extracellular adenosine-5'-triphosphate is elevated during purinergic signalling. PMID:26152529

  10. Phosphorylation of plastoglobular proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohscheider, Jens N; Friso, Giulia; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2016-06-01

    Plastoglobules (PGs) are plastid lipid-protein particles with a small specialized proteome and metabolome. Among the 30 core PG proteins are six proteins of the ancient ABC1 atypical kinase (ABC1K) family and their locations in an Arabidopsis mRNA-based co-expression network suggested central regulatory roles. To identify candidate ABC1K targets and a possible ABC1K hierarchical phosphorylation network within the chloroplast PG proteome, we searched Arabidopsis phosphoproteomics data from publicly available sources. Evaluation of underlying spectra and/or associated information was challenging for a variety of reasons, but supported pSer sites and a few pThr sites in nine PG proteins, including five FIBRILLINS. PG phosphorylation motifs are discussed in the context of possible responsible kinases. The challenges of collection and evaluation of published Arabidopsis phosphorylation data are discussed, illustrating the importance of deposition of all mass spectrometry data in well-organized repositories such as PRIDE and ProteomeXchange. This study provides a starting point for experimental testing of phosho-sites in PG proteins and also suggests that phosphoproteomics studies specifically designed toward the PG proteome and its ABC1K are needed to understand phosphorylation networks in these specialized particles. PMID:26962209

  11. Mapping of p140Cap phosphorylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Repetto, Daniele; Aramu, Simona; Boeri Erba, Elisabetta;

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation tightly regulates specific binding of effector proteins that control many diverse biological functions of cells (e. g. signaling, migration and proliferation). p140Cap is an adaptor protein, specifically expressed in brain, testis and epithelial cells, that undergoes phosp...

  12. Protein-Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Bacillus subtilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mijakovic, Ivan; Petranovic, Dina; Bottini, N.; Deutscher, J.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2005-01-01

    phosphorylation, indicating that this post-translational modifi cation could regulate physiological processes ranging from stress response and exopolysaccharide synthesis to DNA metabolism. Some interesting work in this fi eld was done in Bacillus subtilis , and we here present the current state of knowledge on...

  13. Ion channels, phosphorylation and mammalian sperm capacitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pablo E Visconti; Dario Krapf; José Luis de la Vega-Beltrán; Juan José Acevedo; Alberto Darszon

    2011-01-01

    Sexually reproducing animals require an orchestrated communication between spermatozoa and the egg to generate a new individual. Capacitation, a maturational complex phenomenon that occurs in the female reproductive tract, renders spermatozoa capable of binding and fusing with the oocyte, and it is a requirement for mammalian fertilization. Capacitation encompasses plasma membrane reorganization, ion permeability regulation, cholesterol loss and changes in the phosphorylation state of many proteins. Novel tools to study sperm ion channels, image intracellular ionic changes and proteins with better spatial and temporal resolution, are unraveling how modifications in sperm ion transport and phosphorylation states lead to capacitation. Recent evidence indicates that two parallel pathways regulate phosphorylation events leading to capacitation, one of them requiring activation of protein kinase A and the second one involving inactivation of ser/thr phosphatases. This review examines the involvement of ion transporters and phosphorylation signaling processes needed for spermatozoa to achieve capacitation. Understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to fertilization is central for societies to deal with rising male infertility rates, to develop safe male gamete-based contraceptives and to preserve biodiversity through better assisted fertilization strategies.

  14. Regulation of protein phosphorylation in oat mitochondria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We sought to identify phosphorylated proteins in isolated oat mitocchondria and to characterize the enzymatic and regulatory properties of the protein kinase(s). Mitochondria from oats (Avena sativa L. cv. Garry) were purified on Percoll gradients. Mitochondria were incubated with 32P-γ-ATP; proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE. A small number of bands was detected on autoradiograms, most prominently at 70 kD and 42 kD; the latter band has been tentatively identified as a subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, a well-known phosphoprotein. The protein kinase(s) could also phosphorylate casein, but not histone. Spermine enhanced the phosphorylation of casein and inhibited the phosphorylation of the 42 kD band. These studies were carried out on both intact and burst mitochondria. Control by calcium and other ions was investigated. The question of the action of regulators on protein kinase or protein phosphatase was studied by the use of 35S-adenosine thiotriphosphate

  15. Phosphorylation sites within Ebola virus nucleoprotein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sora; Yasri; Viroj; Wiwanitkit

    2015-01-01

    To understand the infection process, the viral multiplication and entry to the cell is widely studied. The Ebola virus nucleoprotein is the important problem for the pathological process. Focusing on the specific biological process, the post translational modification is needed. Here, the authors used the bioinformatics study to find the phosphorylation sites within the Ebola virus nucleoprotein and could identify many new sites.

  16. Protein Synthesis Initiation Factors: Phosphorylation and Regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karen S. Browning

    2009-06-15

    The initiation of the synthesis of proteins is a fundamental process shared by all living organisms. Each organism has both shared and unique mechanisms for regulation of this vital process. Higher plants provide for a major amount of fixation of carbon from the environment and turn this carbon into food and fuel sources for our use. However, we have very little understanding of how plants regulate the synthesis of the proteins necessary for these metabolic processes. The research carried out during the grant period sought to address some of these unknowns in the regulation of protein synthesis initiation. Our first goal was to determine if phosphorylation plays a significant role in plant initiation of protein synthesis. The role of phosphorylation, although well documented in mammalian protein synthesis regulation, is not well studied in plants. We showed that several of the factors necessary for the initiation of protein synthesis were targets of plant casein kinase and showed differential phosphorylation by the plant specific isoforms of this kinase. In addition, we identified and confirmed the phosphorylation sites in five of the plant initiation factors. Further, we showed that phosphorylation of one of these factors, eIF5, affected the ability of the factor to participate in the initiation process. Our second goal was to develop a method to make initiation factor 3 (eIF3) using recombinant methods. To date, we successfully cloned and expressed 13/13 subunits of wheat eIF3 in E. coli using de novo gene construction methods. The final step in this process is to place the subunits into three different plasmid operons for co-expression. Successful completion of expression of eIF3 will be an invaluable tool to the plant translation community.

  17. Expression conservation within the circadian clock of a monocot: natural variation at barley Ppd-H1 affects circadian expression of flowering time genes, but not clock orthologs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campoli Chiara

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The circadian clock is an endogenous mechanism that coordinates biological processes with daily changes in the environment. In plants, circadian rhythms contribute to both agricultural productivity and evolutionary fitness. In barley, the photoperiod response regulator and flowering-time gene Ppd-H1 is orthologous to the Arabidopsis core-clock gene PRR7. However, relatively little is known about the role of Ppd-H1 and other components of the circadian clock in temperate crop species. In this study, we identified barley clock orthologs and tested the effects of natural genetic variation at Ppd-H1 on diurnal and circadian expression of clock and output genes from the photoperiod-response pathway. Results Barley clock orthologs HvCCA1, HvGI, HvPRR1, HvPRR37 (Ppd-H1, HvPRR73, HvPRR59 and HvPRR95 showed a high level of sequence similarity and conservation of diurnal and circadian expression patterns, when compared to Arabidopsis. The natural mutation at Ppd-H1 did not affect diurnal or circadian cycling of barley clock genes. However, the Ppd-H1 mutant was found to be arrhythmic under free-running conditions for the photoperiod-response genes HvCO1, HvCO2, and the MADS-box transcription factor and vernalization responsive gene Vrn-H1. Conclusion We suggest that the described eudicot clock is largely conserved in the monocot barley. However, genetic differentiation within gene families and differences in the function of Ppd-H1 suggest evolutionary modification in the angiosperm clock. Our data indicates that natural variation at Ppd-H1 does not affect the expression level of clock genes, but controls photoperiodic output genes. Circadian control of Vrn-H1 in barley suggests that this vernalization responsive gene is also controlled by the photoperiod-response pathway. Structural and functional characterization of the barley circadian clock will set the basis for future studies of the adaptive significance of the circadian clock in

  18. Circadian regulation of human sleep and age-related changes in its timing, consolidation and EEG characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijk, D. J.; Duffy, J. F.

    1999-01-01

    The light-entrainable circadian pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus regulates the timing and consolidation of sleep by generating a paradoxical rhythm of sleep propensity; the circadian drive for wakefulness peaks at the end of the day spent awake, ie close to the onset of melatonin secretion at 21.00-22.00 h and the circadian drive for sleep crests shortly before habitual waking-up time. With advancing age, ie after early adulthood, sleep consolidation declines, and time of awakening and the rhythms of body temperature, plasma melatonin and cortisol shift to an earlier clock hour. The variability of the phase relationship between the sleep-wake cycle and circadian rhythms increases, and in old age sleep is more susceptible to internal arousing stimuli associated with circadian misalignment. The propensity to awaken from sleep advances relative to the body temperature nadir in older people, a change that is opposite to the phase delay of awakening relative to internal circadian rhythms associated with morningness in young people. Age-related changes do not appear to be associated with a shortening of the circadian period or a reduction of the circadian drive for wake maintenance. These changes may be related to changes in the sleep process itself, such as reductions in slow-wave sleep and sleep spindles as well as a reduced strength of the circadian signal promoting sleep in the early morning hours. Putative mediators and modulators of circadian sleep regulation are discussed.

  19. Individual variation in circadian rhythms of sleep, EEG, temperature, and activity among monkeys - Implications for regulatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, T. J.; Halberg, F.; Kripke, D. F.; Pegram, G. V.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of circadian rhythms in a number of variables related to sleep, EEG, temperature, and motor activity in rhesus monkeys on an LD 12:12 schedule. Circadian rhythms were found to appear in each of 15 variables investigated. Statistical procedures assessed the variables for evidence of common regulation in these aspects of their circadian rhythms: acrophase (timing), amplitude (extent of change), and level (24-hr mean value). Patterns appearing in the data suggested that the circadian rhythms of certain variables are regulated in common. The circadian modulation of activity in the beta and sigma frequency bands of the EEG was correlated with statistical significance in acrophase, level, and amplitude. The delta frequency band appeared to be under circadian rhythm regulation distinct from that of the other bands. The circadian rhythm of REM stage sleep was like that of beta activity in level and amplitude. The data indicate that REM stage may share some common regulation of circadian timing with both stage 3-4 sleep and with temperature. Generally, however, the circadian rhythm of temperature appeared to bear little relation to the circadian rhythms of motor activity, EEG, or sleep.

  20. Phosphorylation in vitro of human fibrinogen with casein kinase TS and characterization of phosphorylated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human fibrinogen was phosphorylated by casein kinase TS. The [32P]phosphate incorporated varied between 0.5 and 1 mol of phosphate per mole of fibrinogen. The phosphate was localized to Ser523 and Ser590 and serine and threonine residues between amino acids 259 and 268 in the A alpha-chain. In addition, Thr416 and Ser420 were phosphorylated in the gamma'-chain, which is a variant of the gamma-chain, constituting 7-10% of the gamma-chain population. The functional significance of casein kinase TS-induced phosphorylation of fibrinogen remains unknown; however, a slight but consistent increase of the turbidity in a gelation assay was observed for phosphorylated compared to unphosphorylated fibrinogen

  1. Modelling and analysis of the feeding regimen induced entrainment of hepatocyte circadian oscillators using petri nets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar Hayat Khan Tareen

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms are certain periodic behaviours exhibited by living organism at different levels, including cellular and system-wide scales. Recent studies have found that the circadian rhythms of several peripheral organs in mammals, such as the liver, are able to entrain their clocks to received signals independent of other system level clocks, in particular when responding to signals generated during feeding. These studies have found SIRT1, PARP1, and HSF1 proteins to be the major influencers of the core CLOCKBMAL1:PER-CRY circadian clock. These entities, along with abstracted feeding induced signals were modelled collectively in this study using Petri Nets. The properties of the model show that the circadian system itself is strongly robust, and is able to continually evolve. The modelled feeding regimens suggest that the usual 3 meals/day and 2 meals/day feeding regimens are beneficial with any more or less meals/day negatively affecting the system.

  2. Running a little late: chloroplast Fe status and the circadian clock

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Grandon T; Erin L Connolly

    2013-01-01

    Iron homeostasis is essential for plant growth and survival. Two papers now report that chloroplast Iron levels also regulate the period of the circadian clock, which might confer fitness advantage by linking iron status to daily changes in environmental conditions.

  3. A time to remember: Consequences of ageing on the circadian memory modulation in rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Biemans, Barbara Agatha Maria

    2003-01-01

    Dít proefschrift bevatstudies die zijn uitgevoerd in het kader van de NWO prioriteitenprogramma "Geheugenproces en dementie", en die tot doel hadden te onderzoeken hoe circadiane processen geheugenfunctie beinvloeden, en of veroudering deze interacties verandert. dissertaties ... Zie: Samenvatting

  4. A baculovirus photolyase with DNA repair activity and circadian clock regulatory function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biernat, M.A.; Eker, A.P.M.; Oers, van M.M.; Vlak, J.M.; Horst, van der G.T.J.; Chaves, I.

    2012-01-01

    Cryptochromes and photolyases belong to the same family of flavoproteins but, despite being structurally conserved, display distinct functions. Photolyases use visible light to repair ultraviolet-induced DNA damage. Cryptochromes, however, function as blue-light receptors, circadian photoreceptors,

  5. Protein phosphorylation in isolated human adipocytes - Adrenergic control of the phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of adrenergic agents on protein phosphorylation in human adipocytes was examined. Freshly isolated human fat cells were incubated with 32PO4 in order to label intracellular ATP, then treated with a variety of adrenergic and other pharmacologic agents. Treatment with the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol led to a significant increase in phosphate content of at least five protein bands (Mr 52, 53, 63, 67, 84 kDa). The increase in phosphorylation was partially inhibited by the α-2 agonist clonidine. Epinephrine, a combined α and β agonist, was less effective at increasing phosphate content of the proteins than was isoproterenol. Neither insulin nor the α-1 agonist phenylephrine had any discernible effect on the pattern of protein phosphorylation. The 84 kDa phosphorylated peptide band appears to contain hormone-sensitive lipase, a key enzyme in the lipolytic pathway which is activated by phosphorylation. These results are somewhat different than previously reported results for rat adipocytes, and represent the first report of overall pattern and adrenergic modulation of protein phosphorylation in human adipocytes

  6. Kinase-specific prediction of protein phosphorylation sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Martin Lee; Blom, Nikolaj

    2009-01-01

    As extensive mass spectrometry-based mapping of the phosphoproteome progresses, computational analysis of phosphorylation-dependent signaling becomes increasingly important. The linear sequence motifs that surround phosphorylated residues have successfully been used to characterize kinase...

  7. Circadian Clock Genes Are Essential for Normal Adult Neurogenesis, Differentiation, and Fate Determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astha Malik

    Full Text Available Adult neurogenesis creates new neurons and glia from stem cells in the human brain throughout life. It is best understood in the dentate gyrus (DG of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ. Circadian rhythms have been identified in the hippocampus, but the role of any endogenous circadian oscillator cells in hippocampal neurogenesis and their importance in learning or memory remains unclear. Any study of stem cell regulation by intrinsic circadian timing within the DG is complicated by modulation from circadian clocks elsewhere in the brain. To examine circadian oscillators in greater isolation, neurosphere cultures were prepared from the DG of two knockout mouse lines that lack a functional circadian clock and from mPer1::luc mice to identify circadian oscillations in gene expression. Circadian mPer1 gene activity rhythms were recorded in neurospheres maintained in a culture medium that induces neurogenesis but not in one that maintains the stem cell state. Although the differentiating neural stem progenitor cells of spheres were rhythmic, evidence of any mature neurons was extremely sparse. The circadian timing signal originated in undifferentiated cells within the neurosphere. This conclusion was supported by immunocytochemistry for mPER1 protein that was localized to the inner, more stem cell-like neurosphere core. To test for effects of the circadian clock on neurogenesis, media conditions were altered to induce neurospheres from BMAL1 knockout mice to differentiate. These cultures displayed unusually high differentiation into glia rather than neurons according to GFAP and NeuN expression, respectively, and very few BetaIII tubulin-positive, immature neurons were observed. The knockout neurospheres also displayed areas visibly devoid of cells and had overall higher cell death. Neurospheres from arrhythmic mice lacking two other core clock genes, Cry1 and Cry2, showed significantly reduced growth and increased astrocyte

  8. Circadian distribution of sleep phases after major abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gogenur, I.; Wildschiotz, G.; Rosenberg, J.

    2008-01-01

    Background. It is believed that the severely disturbed night-time sleep architecture after surgery is associated with increased cardiovascular morbidity with rebound of rapid eye movement (REM). The daytime sleep pattern of patients after major general surgery has not been investigated before. We...... decided to study the circadian distribution of sleep phases before and after surgery. Methods. Eleven patients undergoing elective major abdominal surgery were included in the study. Continuous ambulatory polysomnographic monitoring was made 24 h before surgery and 36 h after surgery, thus including two...... nights after operation. Sleep was scored independently by two blinded observers and the recordings were reported as awake, light sleep (LS, stages I and II), slow wave sleep (SWS, stages III and IV), and REM sleep. Results. There was significantly increased REM sleep (P=0.046), LS (P=0.020), and reduced...

  9. Using the principles of circadian physiology enhances shift schedule design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power plants must operate 24 h, 7 days a week. For the most part, shift schedules currently in use at nuclear power plants have been designed to meet operational needs without considering the biological clocks of the human operators. The development of schedules that also take circadian principles into account is a positive step that can be taken to improve plant safety by optimizing operator alertness. These schedules reduce the probability of human errors especially during backshifts. In addition, training programs that teach round-the-clock workers how to deal with the problems of shiftwork can help to optimize performance and alertness. These programs teach shiftworkers the underlying causes of the sleep problems associated with shiftwork and also provide coping strategies for improving sleep and dealing with the transition between shifts. When these training programs are coupled with an improved schedule, the problems associated with working round-the-clock can be significantly reduced

  10. A Simple Complex Case: Restoration of Circadian Cortisol Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragini C Bhake

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A 38-year-old librarian with confirmed Carney complex (PRKAR1a mutation was referred for further evaluation of ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome. Previously, she was known to have schwannoma (excised, adenomyoepithelioma and normal annual echocardiograms. Over three years prior to current presentation, she had become aware of coarse hair on her chin and abdomen, as well as centripetal weight gain. She had noticed subtle but definite reduction in her girdle muscle strength. She had acquired some mood changes atypical of her personality, and had developed an interrupted sleep pattern. To our knowledge, this is the first published report of circadian RU486 therapy for PPNAD in a patient with Carney complex. It may have been possible to restore low levels surrounding the midnight hours using other agents, but the side-effect profile and lack of significantly elevated levels of cortisol made them less favorable options.

  11. The Effect of Cataract Surgery on Circadian Photoentrainment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Adam Elias; Sander, Birgit; Haargaard, Birgitte;

    2015-01-01

    of cataract surgery on circadian photoentrainment and to determine any difference between blue-blocking and neutral intraocular lenses (IOLs). DESIGN: The study was a single-center, investigator-driven, double-masked, block-randomized clinical trial. PARTICIPANTS: One eye in 76 patients with...... bilateral age-related cataract eligible for cataract surgery was included. METHODS: Intervention was cataract surgery by phacoemulsification. Patients were randomized to receive a blue-blocking or neutral IOL. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome was activation of intrinsic photosensitive ganglion cells...... (P = 0.004) for actigraphy and a tendency toward an earlier melatonin onset (P = 0.095) were found. Peak salivary melatonin concentration increased after surgery (P = 0.037). No difference was detected between blue-blocking and neutral IOLs, whereas low preoperative blue light transmission was...

  12. Complementary approaches to understanding the plant circadian clock

    CERN Document Server

    Akman, Ozgur E; Loewe, Laurence; Troein, Carl; 10.4204/EPTCS.19.1

    2010-01-01

    Circadian clocks are oscillatory genetic networks that help organisms adapt to the 24-hour day/night cycle. The clock of the green alga Ostreococcus tauri is the simplest plant clock discovered so far. Its many advantages as an experimental system facilitate the testing of computational predictions. We present a model of the Ostreococcus clock in the stochastic process algebra Bio-PEPA and exploit its mapping to different analysis techniques, such as ordinary differential equations, stochastic simulation algorithms and model-checking. The small number of molecules reported for this system tests the limits of the continuous approximation underlying differential equations. We investigate the difference between continuous-deterministic and discrete-stochastic approaches. Stochastic simulation and model-checking allow us to formulate new hypotheses on the system behaviour, such as the presence of self-sustained oscillations in single cells under constant light conditions. We investigate how to model the timing of...

  13. WIDE AWAKE mediates the circadian timing of sleep onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sha; Lamaze, Angelique; Liu, Qili; Tabuchi, Masashi; Yang, Yong; Fowler, Melissa; Bharadwaj, Rajnish; Zhang, Julia; Bedont, Joseph; Blackshaw, Seth; Lloyd, Thomas E; Montell, Craig; Sehgal, Amita; Koh, Kyunghee; Wu, Mark N

    2014-04-01

    How the circadian clock regulates the timing of sleep is poorly understood. Here, we identify a Drosophila mutant, wide awake (wake), that exhibits a marked delay in sleep onset at dusk. Loss of WAKE in a set of arousal-promoting clock neurons, the large ventrolateral neurons (l-LNvs), impairs sleep onset. WAKE levels cycle, peaking near dusk, and the expression of WAKE in l-LNvs is Clock dependent. Strikingly, Clock and cycle mutants also exhibit a profound delay in sleep onset, which can be rescued by restoring WAKE expression in LNvs. WAKE interacts with the GABAA receptor Resistant to Dieldrin (RDL), upregulating its levels and promoting its localization to the plasma membrane. In wake mutant l-LNvs, GABA sensitivity is decreased and excitability is increased at dusk. We propose that WAKE acts as a clock output molecule specifically for sleep, inhibiting LNvs at dusk to promote the transition from wake to sleep. PMID:24631345

  14. Using the principles of circadian physiology enhances shift schedule design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, J.J.; Moore-Ede, M.C.

    1987-01-01

    Nuclear power plants must operate 24 h, 7 days a week. For the most part, shift schedules currently in use at nuclear power plants have been designed to meet operational needs without considering the biological clocks of the human operators. The development of schedules that also take circadian principles into account is a positive step that can be taken to improve plant safety by optimizing operator alertness. These schedules reduce the probability of human errors especially during backshifts. In addition, training programs that teach round-the-clock workers how to deal with the problems of shiftwork can help to optimize performance and alertness. These programs teach shiftworkers the underlying causes of the sleep problems associated with shiftwork and also provide coping strategies for improving sleep and dealing with the transition between shifts. When these training programs are coupled with an improved schedule, the problems associated with working round-the-clock can be significantly reduced.

  15. Mechanics and Resonance of the Cyanobacterial Circadian Oscillator

    CERN Document Server

    Karafyllidis, Ioannis G

    2012-01-01

    Recent experiments elucidated the structure and function of the cyanobacterial circadian oscillator, which is driven by sunlight intensity variation and therefore by Earth's rotation. It is known that cyanobacteria appeared about 3.5 billion years ago and that Earth's rotational speed is continuously decreasing because of tidal friction. What is the effect of the continuous slowdown of Earth's rotation on the operation of the cyanobacterial oscillator? To answer this question we derived the oscillator's equation of motion directly from experimental data, coupled it with Earth's rotation and computed its natural periods and its resonance curve. The results show that there are two resonance peaks of the "cyanobacterial oscillator-rotating Earth" system, indicating that cyanobacteria used more efficiently the solar energy during the geological period in which the day length varied from about 11 to 15 hours and make more efficient use of solar energy at the geological period which started with a day length of 21 ...

  16. Electric light, particularly at night, disrupts human circadian rhythmicity: is that a problem?

    OpenAIRE

    Stevens, Richard G.; Zhu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 3 billion years, an endogenous circadian rhythmicity has developed in almost all life forms in which daily oscillations in physiology occur. This allows for anticipation of sunrise and sunset. This physiological rhythmicity is kept at precisely 24 h by the daily cycle of sunlight and dark. However, since the introduction of electric lighting, there has been inadequate light during the day inside buildings for a robust resetting of the human endogenous circadian rhythmicity, and ...

  17. Identification of the molecular components of a Tigriopus californicus (Crustacea, Copepoda) circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbit, Katherine T; Christie, Andrew E

    2014-12-01

    Copepods of the genus Tigriopus have been proposed as marine models for investigations of environmental perturbation. One rapidly increasing anthropogenic stressor for intertidal organisms is light pollution. Given the sensitivity of circadian rhythms to exogenous light, the genes/proteins of a Tigriopus circadian pacemaker represent a potential system for investigating the influences of artificial light sources on circadian behavior in an intertidal species. Here, the molecular components of a putative Tigriopus californicus circadian clock were identified using publicly accessible transcriptome data; the recently deduced circadian proteins of the copepod Calanus finmarchicus were used as a reference. Transcripts encoding homologs of all commonly recognized ancestral arthropod core clock proteins were identified (i.e. CLOCK, CRYPTOCHROME 2, CYCLE, PERIOD and TIMELESS), as were ones encoding proteins likely to modulate the core clock (i.e. CASEIN KINASE II, CLOCKWORK ORANGE, DOUBLETIME, PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 1, PROTEIN PHOSPHATASE 2A, SHAGGY, SUPERNUMERARY LIMBS and VRILLE) or to act as inputs to it (i.e. CRYPTOCHROME 1). PAR DOMAIN PROTEIN 1 was the only circadian-associated protein not identified in Tigriopus; it appears absent in Calanus too. These data represent just the third full set of molecular components for a crustacean circadian pacemaker (Daphnia pulex and C. finmarchicus previously), and only the second obtained from transcribed sequences (C. finmarchicus previously). Given Tigriopus' proposed status as a model for investigating the influences of anthropogenic stressors in the marine environment, these data provide the first suite of gene/protein targets for understanding how light pollution may influence circadian physiology and behavior in an intertidal organism. PMID:25310881

  18. Timing of human sleep: recovery process gated by a circadian pacemaker

    OpenAIRE

    DAAN, S; BEERSMA, DGM; BORBELY, AA

    1984-01-01

    A model for the timing of human sleep is presented, It is based on a sleep-regulating variable (S)-possibly, but not necessarily, associated with a neurochemical substance-which increases during wakefulness and decreases during sleep. Sleep onset is triggered when S approaches an upper threshold (H); awakening occurs when S reaches a lower threshold (L). The thresholds show a circadian rhythm controlled by a single circadian pacemaker. Time constants of the S process were derived from rates o...

  19. Circadian clock manipulation for cancer prevention and control and the relief of cancer symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrushesky, William J M; Grutsch, James; Wood, Patricia; Yang, Xiaoming; Oh, Eun-Young; Ansell, Christine; Kidder, Stephanie; Ferrans, Carol; Quiton, Dinah Faith T; Reynolds, Justin; Du-Quiton, Jovelyn; Levin, Robert; Lis, Christopher; Braun, Donald

    2009-12-01

    Life has evolved on this planet with regular daily spans of direct solar energy availability alternating with nocturnal spans of dark. Virtually every earth-borne life form has factored this circadian pattern into its biology to ensure the temporal coordination with its resonating environment, a task essential for its individual survival and that of its species. The first whole genome inspections of mutations in human colon and breast cancer have observed specific retained clock gene mutations. Single nucleotide polymorphisms within the genes of clock, clock-controlled, and melatonin pathways have been found to confer excess cancer risk or protection from cancer. Experimental studies have shown that specific core clock genes (Per2 and Per1) are tumor suppressors because their genetic absence doubles tumor numbers, and decreasing their expression in cancer cells doubles cancer growth rate, whereas their overexpression decreases cancer growth rate and diminishes tumor numbers. Experimental interference with circadian clock function increases cancer growth rate, and clinical circadian disruption is associated with higher cancer incidence, faster cancer progression, and shorter cancer patient survival. Patients with advanced lung cancer suffering greater circadian activity/sleep cycle disruption suffer greater interference with function, greater anxiety and depression, poorer nighttime sleep, greater daytime fatigue, and poorer quality of life than comparable patients who maintain good circadian integration. We must now determine whether strategies known to help synchronize the circadian clocks of normal individuals can do so in advanced cancer patients and whether doing so allows cancer patients to feel better and/or live longer. Several academic laboratories and at least 2 large pharmaceutical firms are screening for small molecules targeting the circadian clock to stabilize its phase and enhance its amplitude and thereby consolidate and coordinate circadian

  20. Circadian Oscillation of the Lettuce Transcriptome under Constant Light and Light–Dark Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Takanobu; Aoki, Koh; Nagano, Atsushi J.; Honjo, Mie N.; Fukuda, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Although, the circadian clock is a universal biological system in plants and it orchestrates important role of plant production such as photosynthesis, floral induction and growth, there are few such studies on cultivated species. Lettuce is one major cultivated species for both open culture and plant factories and there is little information concerning its circadian clock system. In addition, most of the relevant genes have not been identified. In this study, we detected circadian oscillation in the lettuce transcriptome using time-course RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) data. Constant light (LL) and light–dark (LD) conditions were used to detect circadian oscillation because the circadian clock has some basic properties: one is self-sustaining oscillation under constant light and another is entrainment to environmental cycles such as light and temperature. In the results, 215 contigs were detected as common oscillating contigs under both LL and LD conditions. The 215 common oscillating contigs included clock gene-like contigs CCA1 (CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1)-like, TOC1 (TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1)-like and LHY (LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL)-like, and their expression patterns were similar to those of Arabidopsis. Functional enrichment analysis by GO (gene ontology) Slim and GO Fat showed that the GO terms of response to light stimulus, response to stress, photosynthesis and circadian rhythms were enriched in the 215 common oscillating contigs and these terms were actually regulated by circadian clocks in plants. The 215 common oscillating contigs can be used to evaluate whether the gene expression pattern related to photosynthesis and optical response performs normally in lettuce. PMID:27512400

  1. Does the circadian pattern for acute cardiac events presentation vary with fasting?

    OpenAIRE

    Suwaidi Al; Bener A; Gehani A; Behair S; Mohanadi D; Salam A; Binali HA

    2006-01-01

    Background: Over one billion Muslims fast worldwide during the month of Ramadan. The impact of fasting on circadian presentation with acute cardiac events is unknown. Aim: To determine if fasting has any effect on the circadian presentation of acute cardiac events. Setting and Design: A prospective study in a general hospital. Materials and Methods: Patients with acute coronary events were divided into two groups based on the history of fasting. Information about age, gender, cardiova...

  2. Effects of Ovarian Hormones on Internal Circadian Organization in Rats1

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Zachary C.; Pezuk, Pinar; Menaker, Michael; Sellix, Michael T

    2013-01-01

    The circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is the central pacemaker driving rhythms in endocrine physiology. Gonadal steroid hormones affect behavioral rhythms and clock gene expression. However, the impact of fluctuating ovarian steroid levels during the estrous cycle on internal circadian organization remains to be determined. Further, it is not known if steroid hormone depletion, as in menopause, affects the timing system. To determine the influence of est...

  3. Non-Ocular Circadian Oscillators and Photoreceptors Modulate Long Term Memory Formation in Aplysia

    OpenAIRE

    Lyons, Lisa C.; Rawashdeh, Oliver; Eskin, Arnold

    2006-01-01

    In Aplysia californica, memory formation for long-term sensitization (LTS) and for a more complex type of associative learning, learning that food is inedible (LFI), is modulated by a circadian clock. For both types of learning, formation of long-term memory occurs during the day and significantly less during the night. Aplysia eyes contain a well-characterized circadian oscillator that is strongly coupled to the locomotor activity rhythm. Thus, the authors hypothesized that the ocular circad...

  4. Predicting the physiological role of circadian metabolic regulation in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Schäuble

    Full Text Available Although the number of reconstructed metabolic networks is steadily growing, experimental data integration into these networks is still challenging. Based on elementary flux mode analysis, we combine sequence information with metabolic pathway analysis and include, as a novel aspect, circadian regulation. While minimizing the need of assumptions, we are able to predict changes in the metabolic state and can hypothesise on the physiological role of circadian control in nitrogen metabolism of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  5. Is the cell division cycle gated by a circadian clock? The case of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Circadian oscillators are known to regulate the timing of cell division in many organisms. In the case of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, however, this conclusion has been challenged by several investigators. We have reexamined this issue and find that the division behavior of Chlamydomonas meets all the criteria for circadian rhythmicity: persistence of a cell division rhythm (a) with a period of approximately 24 h under free-running conditions, (b) that is temperature compensated, and (c) which ...

  6. Circadian Rhythms and Mood Regulation: Insights from Pre-Clinical Models

    OpenAIRE

    McClung, Colleen A.

    2011-01-01

    Affective disorders such as major depression, bipolar disorder, and seasonal affective disorder are associated with major disruptions in circadian rhythms. Indeed, altered sleep/wake cycles are a critical feature for diagnosis in the DSM IV and several of the therapies used to treat these disorders have profound effects on rhythm length and stabilization in human populations. Furthermore, multiple human genetic studies have identified polymorphisms in specific circadian genes that associate w...

  7. Acute ethanol impairs photic and nonphotic circadian phase resetting in the Syrian hamster

    OpenAIRE

    Ruby, Christina L.; Prosser, Rebecca A.; Marc A. DePaul; Roberts, Randy J.; Glass, J. David

    2008-01-01

    Disrupted circadian rhythmicity is associated with ethanol (EtOH) abuse, yet little is known about how EtOH affects the mammalian circadian clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). Clock timing is regulated by photic and nonphotic inputs to the SCN involving glutamate release from the retinohypothalamic tract and serotonin (5-HT) from the midbrain raphe, respectively. Our recent in vitro studies in the SCN slice revealed that EtOH blocks photic phase-resetting action of glutamate and enhan...

  8. Chronic ethanol attenuates circadian photic phase resetting and alters nocturnal activity patterns in the hamster

    OpenAIRE

    Ruby, Christina L.; Brager, Allison J.; Marc A. DePaul; Prosser, Rebecca A.; Glass, J. David

    2009-01-01

    Acute ethanol (EtOH) administration impairs circadian clock phase resetting, suggesting a mode for the disruptive effect of alcohol abuse on human circadian rhythms. Here, we extend this research by characterizing the chronobiological effects of chronic alcohol consumption. First, daily profiles of EtOH were measured in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and subcutaneously using microdialysis in hamsters drinking EtOH. In both cases, EtOH peaked near lights-off and declined throughout the dark...

  9. Use of melatonin in circadian rhythm disorders and following phase shifts

    OpenAIRE

    Skene, DJ; Deacon, S; Arendt, J

    1996-01-01

    Following abrupt phase shifts (real or simulated time zone changes, night shift work) there is desynchronisation between the internal circadian rhythms (including melatonin) and the external environment with consequent disturbances in sleep, mood and performance. In humans the pineal hormone melatonin has phase-shifting and resynchronising properties with regard to a number of circadian rhythms. Suitably timed melatonin adrninstration hastened adaptation to phase shift and significantly impro...

  10. The circadian cycle: daily rhythms from behaviour to genes: First in the Cycles Review Series

    OpenAIRE

    Merrow, M; Spoelstra, K; T. Roenneberg

    2005-01-01

    The daily recurrence of activity and rest are so common as to seem trivial. However, they reflect a ubiquitous temporal programme called the circadian clock. In the absence of either anatomical clock structures or clock genes, the timing of sleep and wakefulness is disrupted. The complex nature of circadian behaviour is evident in the fact that phasing of the cycle during the day varies widely for individuals, resulting in extremes colloquially called 'larks' and 'owls'. These behavioural osc...

  11. Entrainment of the circadian clock in humans: mechanism and implications for sleep disorders.

    OpenAIRE

    David Metcalfe

    2007-01-01

    Humans exhibit behaviour and physiology controlled by a circadian clock. The circadian period is genetically determined and administered by a series of interlocked autoregulatory feedback loops largely in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus. The phase of the clock is, however, synchronised by a number of external environmental cues such as light. A failure or change in any one of the requisite clock components may result in the onset of a long-term sleep disorder. This review discu...

  12. Oscillating perceptions: the ups and downs of the CLOCK protein in the mouse circadian system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jason P. Debruyne

    2008-12-01

    A functional mouse CLOCK protein has long been thought to be essential for mammalian circadian clockwork function, based mainly on studies of mice bearing a dominant negative, antimorphic mutation in the Clock gene. However, new discoveries using recently developed Clock-null mutant mice have shaken up this view. In this review, I discuss how this recent work impacts and alters the previous view of the role of CLOCK in the mouse circadian clockwork.

  13. Identification of scalp EEG circadian variation using a novel correlation sum measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahidi Zandi, Ali; Boudreau, Philippe; Boivin, Diane B.; Dumont, Guy A.

    2015-10-01

    Objective. In this paper, we propose a novel method to determine the circadian variation of scalp electroencephalogram (EEG) in both individual and group levels using a correlation sum measure, quantifying self-similarity of the EEG relative energy across waking epochs. Approach. We analysed EEG recordings from central-parietal and occipito-parietal montages in nine healthy subjects undergoing a 72 h ultradian sleep-wake cycle protocol. Each waking epoch (˜1 s) of every nap opportunity was decomposed using the wavelet packet transform, and the relative energy for that epoch was calculated in the desired frequency band using the corresponding wavelet coefficients. Then, the resulting set of energy values was resampled randomly to generate different subsets with equal number of elements. The correlation sum of each subset was then calculated over a range of distance thresholds, and the average over all subsets was computed. This average value was finally scaled for each nap opportunity and considered as a new circadian measure. Main results. According to the evaluation results, a clear circadian rhythm was identified in some EEG frequency ranges, particularly in 4-8 Hz and 10-12 Hz. The correlation sum measure not only was able to disclose the circadian rhythm on the group data but also revealed significant circadian variations in most individual cases, as opposed to previous studies only reporting the circadian rhythms on a population of subjects. Compared to a naive measure based on the EEG absolute energy in the frequency band of interest, the proposed measure showed a clear superiority using both individual and group data. Results also suggested that the acrophase (i.e., the peak) of the circadian rhythm in 10-12 Hz occurs close to the core body temperature minimum. Significance. These results confirm the potential usefulness of the proposed EEG-based measure as a non-invasive circadian marker.

  14. Rod photoreceptors drive circadian photoentrainment across a wide range of light intensities

    OpenAIRE

    Altimus, C. M.; Güler, A. D.; N.M. Alam; Arman, A.C.; Prusky, G.T.; Sampath, A.P.; Hattar, S.

    2010-01-01

    In mammals, synchronization of the circadian pacemaker in the hypothalamus is achieved through direct input from the eyes conveyed by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs). Circadian photoentrainment can be maintained by rod and cone photoreceptors, but their functional contributions and their retinal circuits that impinge on ipRGCs are not well understood. We demonstrate in genetic mouse models lacking functional rods, or where rods are the only functional photorecepto...

  15. Interval timing in mice does not rely upon the circadian pacemaker

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, PA; Miall, RC; Daan, S; Kacelnik, A.

    2003-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus is a precise timekeeper that controls and synchronizes the circadian period of countless physiological and behavioural functions and entrains them to the 24 h light/dark cycle. We examined the possibility that it is also indirectly involved in measurement of a briefer interval by observing the effects of lesions targeted at the SCN, and abolishing circadian rhythmicity, upon interval timing behaviour. Fourteen house mice (Mus musculus) wer...

  16. A wheel of time: the circadian clock, nuclear receptors, and physiology

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Xiaoyong

    2010-01-01

    It is a long-standing view that the circadian clock functions to proactively align internal physiology with the 24-h rotation of the earth. Recent studies, including one by Schmutz and colleagues (pp. 345–357) in the February 15, 2010, issue of Genes & Development, delineate strikingly complex connections between molecular clocks and nuclear receptor signaling pathways, implying the existence of a large-scale circadian regulatory network coordinating a diverse array of physiological processes...

  17. Prospective evaluation of the Circadian Efficacy of (Day)Light in Rooms

    OpenAIRE

    Pechacek, C.; Andersen, Marilyne; Lockley, S. W.

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies have attempted to link environmental cues, such as lighting, with human performance and health, and initial findings seem to indicate a positive correlation between the two. Light is the major environmental time cue that resets the human circadian pacemaker, an endogenous clock in the hypothalamus that controls the timing of many 24-hour rhythms in physiology and behavior. Insufficient or inappropriate light exposure can disrupt normal circadian rhythms which may result in adve...

  18. Assessment of regression methods for inference of regulatory networks involved in circadian regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Aderhold, A.; Husmeier, D.; Smith, V A; Millar, A. J.; Grzegorczyk, M.

    2013-01-01

    We assess the accuracy of three established regression methods for reconstructing gene and protein regulatory networks in the context of circadian regulation. Data are simulated from a recently published regulatory network of the circadian clock in Arabidopsis thaliana, in which protein and gene interactions are described by a Markov jump process based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics. We closely follow recent experimental protocols, including the entrainment of seedlings to dif...

  19. CLOCK and NPAS2 have overlapping roles in the suprachiasmatic circadian clock

    OpenAIRE

    DeBruyne, Jason P.; Weaver, David R.; Reppert, Steven M.

    2007-01-01

    Heterodimers of CLOCK and BMAL1, bHLH-PAS transcription factors, are believed to be the major transcriptional regulators of the circadian clock mechanism in mammals. However, a recent study shows that CLOCK-deficient mice continue to exhibit robust behavioral and molecular rhythms. Here we report that the transcription factor NPAS2 (MOP4) is able to functionally substitute for CLOCK in the master brain clock in mice to regulate circadian rhythmicity.

  20. Analysis and Simulation of Circadian Multi-Oscillator Systems in a Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Bohn, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) is an adaptation of photosynthetic organisms to drought stress: improved water-use efficiency is achieved by an optimized temporal arrangement of photosynthetic subprocesses, which are driven by an endogenous pacemaker, i.e. a circadian clock. The present work deals with the hypothesis that the circadian rhythm of gas-exchange of entire leaves of the CAM plant Kalanchoë daigremontiana has to be understood as the collective signal of the population of cells i...

  1. Effects of chronic administration and withdrawal of antidepressant agents on circadian activity rhythms in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollnik, F

    1992-10-01

    Experimental and clinical studies indicate that clinical depression may be associated with disturbances of circadian rhythms. To explore the interaction between circadian rhythmicity, behavioral state, and monoaminergic systems, the present study investigated the effects of chronic administration and withdrawal of the following antidepressant agents on circadian wheel-running rhythms of laboratory rats: a) moclobemide, a reversible and selective monoamine oxidase (MAO) type A inhibitor; b) Ro 19-6327, a selective MAO type B inhibitor; c) desipramine, a preferential norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor; d) clomipramine and e) fluoxetine, both serotonin reuptake inhibitors; and f) levoprotiline, an atypical antidepressant whose biochemical mechanism is still unknown. Wheel-running activity rhythms were studied in three inbred strains of laboratory rats (ACI, BH, LEW) under constant darkness (DD). Two of these inbred strains (BH and LEW) show profound abnormalities in their circadian activity rhythms, namely, a reduced overall level of activity and bimodal or multimodal activity patterns. Chronic treatment with moclobemide and desipramine consistently increased the overall level, as well as the circadian amplitude, of the activity rhythm. Furthermore, the abnormal activity pattern of the LEW strain was changed into a unimodal activity pattern like that of other laboratory rats. The free-running period tau was slightly shortened by moclobemide and dramatically shortened by desipramine. Effects of moclobemide and desipramine treatment on overall activity level and duration were reversed shortly after termination of treatment, whereas long aftereffects were observed for the free-running period. All other substances tested had no systematic effects on the activity rhythms of any of the strains. The fact that moclobemide and desipramine altered the period, amplitude, and pattern of circadian activity rhythms is consistent with the hypothesis that monoaminergic transmitters

  2. The circadian system is a target and modulator of prenatal cocaine effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva H Shang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prenatal exposure to cocaine can be deleterious to embryonic brain development, but the results in humans remain controversial, the mechanisms involved are not well understood and effective therapies are yet to be designed. We hypothesize that some of the prenatal effects of cocaine might be related to dysregulation of physiological rhythms due to alterations in the integrating circadian clock function. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Here we introduce a new high-throughput genetically well-characterized diurnal vertebrate model for studying the mechanisms of prenatal cocaine effects by demonstrating reduced viability and alterations in the pattern of neuronal development following repeated cocaine exposure in zebrafish embryos. This effect is associated with acute cocaine-induced changes in the expression of genes affecting growth (growth hormone, zGH and neurotransmission (dopamine transporter, zDAT. Analysis of circadian gene expression, using quantitative real-time RT-PCR (QPCR, demonstrates that cocaine acutely and dose-dependently changes the expression of the circadian genes (zPer-3, zBmal-1 and genes encoding melatonin receptors (zMelR that mediate the circadian message to the entire organism. Moreover, the effects of prenatal cocaine depend on the time of treatment, being more robust during the day, independent of whether the embryos are raised under the light-dark cycle or in constant light. The latter suggests involvement of the inherited circadian factors. The principal circadian hormone, melatonin, counteracts the effects of cocaine on neuronal development and gene expression, acting via specific melatonin receptors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings demonstrate that, in a diurnal vertebrate, prenatal cocaine can acutely dysregulate the expression of circadian genes and those affecting melatonin signaling, growth and neurotransmission, while repeated cocaine exposure can alter neuronal development. Daily

  3. Interactions between circadian clocks and photosynthesis for the temporal and spatial coordination of metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Dodd, Antony N; Belbin, Fiona E.; Frank, Alexander; Webb, Alex A. R.

    2015-01-01

    All plant productivity, including the food that we eat, arises from the capture of solar energy by plants. At most latitudes sunlight is available for only part of the 24 h day due to the rotation of the planet. This rhythmic and predictable alteration in the environment has driven the evolution of the circadian clock, which has an extremely pervasive influence upon plant molecular biology, physiology and phenology. A number of recent studies have demonstrated that the circadian clock is inte...

  4. Regulation of Fatty Acid Metabolism by Cell Autonomous Circadian Clocks: Time to Fatten up on Information?*

    OpenAIRE

    Bray, Molly S; Young, Martin E.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular, cellular, and animal-based studies have recently exposed circadian clocks as critical regulators of energy balance. Invariably, mouse models of genetically manipulated circadian clock components display features indicative of altered lipid/fatty acid metabolism, including differential adiposity and circulating lipids. The purpose of this minireview is to provide a comprehensive summary of current knowledge regarding the regulation of fatty acid metabolism by distinct cell autonomou...

  5. Interaction of circadian clock proteins PER2 and CRY with BMAL1 and CLOCK

    OpenAIRE

    Bordon Alain; Tallone Tiziano; Langmesser Sonja; Rusconi Sandro; Albrecht Urs

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Circadian oscillation of clock-controlled gene expression is mainly regulated at the transcriptional level. Heterodimers of CLOCK and BMAL1 act as activators of target gene transcription; however, interactions of PER and CRY proteins with the heterodimer abolish its transcriptional activation capacity. PER and CRY are therefore referred to as negative regulators of the circadian clock. To further elucidate the mechanism how positive and negative components of the clock int...

  6. Efficacy of a single sequence of intermittent bright light pulses for delaying circadian phase in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Gronfier, Claude; Wright, Kenneth P.; Kronauer, Richard E.; Jewett, Megan E.; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2004-01-01

    It has been shown in animal studies that exposure to brief pulses of bright light can phase shift the circadian pacemaker, and that the resetting action of light is most efficient during the first minutes of light exposure. In humans, multiple consecutive days of exposure to brief bright light pulses have been shown to phase shift the circadian pacemaker. The aim of the present study was to determine if a single sequence of brief bright light pulses administered during the early biological ni...

  7. Circadian rhythms of cyanobacteria: monitoring the biological clocks of individual colonies by bioluminescence.

    OpenAIRE

    Kondo, T.; Ishiura, M

    1994-01-01

    Reproducible circadian rhythms of bioluminescence from individual colonies of cyanobacteria (Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942) has been observed. Phenotypic monitoring of colonies on agar plates will enable us to genetically analyze the molecular mechanism of the circadian clock of cyanobacteria by screening for clock mutants. By the introduction of a bacterial luciferase gene, we previously developed a transformed cyanobacterial strain (AMC149) that expresses luciferase as a bioluminescent ...

  8. Modeling the emergence of circadian rhythms in a clock neuron network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Diambra

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms in pacemaker cells persist for weeks in constant darkness, while in other types of cells the molecular oscillations that underlie circadian rhythms damp rapidly under the same conditions. Although much progress has been made in understanding the biochemical and cellular basis of circadian rhythms, the mechanisms leading to damped or self-sustained oscillations remain largely unknown. There exist many mathematical models that reproduce the circadian rhythms in the case of a single cell of the Drosophila fly. However, not much is known about the mechanisms leading to coherent circadian oscillation in clock neuron networks. In this work we have implemented a model for a network of interacting clock neurons to describe the emergence (or damping of circadian rhythms in Drosophila fly, in the absence of zeitgebers. Our model consists of an array of pacemakers that interact through the modulation of some parameters by a network feedback. The individual pacemakers are described by a well-known biochemical model for circadian oscillation, to which we have added degradation of PER protein by light and multiplicative noise. The network feedback is the PER protein level averaged over the whole network. In particular, we have investigated the effect of modulation of the parameters associated with (i the control of net entrance of PER into the nucleus and (ii the non-photic degradation of PER. Our results indicate that the modulation of PER entrance into the nucleus allows the synchronization of clock neurons, leading to coherent circadian oscillations under constant dark condition. On the other hand, the modulation of non-photic degradation cannot reset the phases of individual clocks subjected to intrinsic biochemical noise.

  9. Pregnancy-induced changes in ultradian rhythms persist in circadian arrhythmic Siberian hamsters

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Z. Yan; Cable, Erin J.; Zucker, Irving; Prendergast, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    The impact of pregnancy and lactation on ultradian rhythms (URs) and circadian rhythms (CRs) of locomotor activity was assessed in circadian rhythmic and arrhythmic Siberian hamsters maintained in a long-day photoperiod (16 h light/day). Progressive decrements in CR robustness and amplitude over the course of gestation were accompanied by enhanced URs. Dark-phase UR period and amplitude increased during early gestation and complexity and robustness increased during late gestation. The persist...

  10. Modeling circadian and sleep-homeostatic effects on short-term interval timing

    OpenAIRE

    Jakub Späti; Andrea Hans Meyer

    2015-01-01

    Short-term interval timing i.e., perception and action relating to durations in the seconds range, has been suggested to display time-of-day as well as wake dependent fluctuations due to circadian and sleep-homeostatic changes to the rate at which an underlying pacemaker emits pulses; pertinent human data being relatively sparse and lacking in consistency however, the phenomenon remains elusive and its mechanism poorly understood. To better characterize the putative circadian and sleep-homeos...

  11. An autonomous circadian clock in the inner mouse retina regulated by dopamine and GABA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Xiang Ruan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the mammalian retinal circadian clock on retinal physiology and function is widely recognized, yet the cellular elements and neural regulation of retinal circadian pacemaking remain unclear due to the challenge of long-term culture of adult mammalian retina and the lack of an ideal experimental measure of the retinal circadian clock. In the current study, we developed a protocol for long-term culture of intact mouse retinas, which allows retinal circadian rhythms to be monitored in real time as luminescence rhythms from a PERIOD2::LUCIFERASE (PER2::LUC clock gene reporter. With this in vitro assay, we studied the characteristics and location within the retina of circadian PER2::LUC rhythms, the influence of major retinal neurotransmitters, and the resetting of the retinal circadian clock by light. Retinal PER2::LUC rhythms were routinely measured from whole-mount retinal explants for 10 d and for up to 30 d. Imaging of vertical retinal slices demonstrated that the rhythmic luminescence signals were concentrated in the inner nuclear layer. Interruption of cell communication via the major neurotransmitter systems of photoreceptors and ganglion cells (melatonin and glutamate and the inner nuclear layer (dopamine, acetylcholine, GABA, glycine, and glutamate did not disrupt generation of retinal circadian PER2::LUC rhythms, nor did interruption of intercellular communication through sodium-dependent action potentials or connexin 36 (cx36-containing gap junctions, indicating that PER2::LUC rhythms generation in the inner nuclear layer is likely cell autonomous. However, dopamine, acting through D1 receptors, and GABA, acting through membrane hyperpolarization and casein kinase, set the phase and amplitude of retinal PER2::LUC rhythms, respectively. Light pulses reset the phase of the in vitro retinal oscillator and dopamine D1 receptor antagonists attenuated these phase shifts. Thus, dopamine and GABA act at the molecular level of PER

  12. Circadian Oscillation of the Lettuce Transcriptome under Constant Light and Light-Dark Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Takanobu; Aoki, Koh; Nagano, Atsushi J; Honjo, Mie N; Fukuda, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    Although, the circadian clock is a universal biological system in plants and it orchestrates important role of plant production such as photosynthesis, floral induction and growth, there are few such studies on cultivated species. Lettuce is one major cultivated species for both open culture and plant factories and there is little information concerning its circadian clock system. In addition, most of the relevant genes have not been identified. In this study, we detected circadian oscillation in the lettuce transcriptome using time-course RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) data. Constant light (LL) and light-dark (LD) conditions were used to detect circadian oscillation because the circadian clock has some basic properties: one is self-sustaining oscillation under constant light and another is entrainment to environmental cycles such as light and temperature. In the results, 215 contigs were detected as common oscillating contigs under both LL and LD conditions. The 215 common oscillating contigs included clock gene-like contigs CCA1 (CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED 1)-like, TOC1 (TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1)-like and LHY (LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL)-like, and their expression patterns were similar to those of Arabidopsis. Functional enrichment analysis by GO (gene ontology) Slim and GO Fat showed that the GO terms of response to light stimulus, response to stress, photosynthesis and circadian rhythms were enriched in the 215 common oscillating contigs and these terms were actually regulated by circadian clocks in plants. The 215 common oscillating contigs can be used to evaluate whether the gene expression pattern related to photosynthesis and optical response performs normally in lettuce. PMID:27512400

  13. Evidences of Polymorphism Associated with Circadian System and Risk of Pathologies: A Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Valenzuela, F. J.; Vera, J.; Venegas, C.; S Muñoz; Oyarce, S.; K. Muñoz; Lagunas, C.

    2016-01-01

    The circadian system is a supraphysiological system that modulates different biological functions such as metabolism, sleep-wake, cellular proliferation, and body temperature. Different chronodisruptors have been identified, such as shift work, feeding time, long days, and stress. The environmental changes and our modern lifestyle can alter the circadian system and increase the risk of developing pathologies such as cancer, preeclampsia, diabetes, and mood disorder. This system is organized b...

  14. Adaptation to short photoperiods augments circadian food anticipatory activity in Siberian hamsters

    OpenAIRE

    Bradley, Sean P.; Prendergast, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Both the light-dark cycle and the timing of food intake can entrain circadian rhythms. Entrainment to food is mediated by a food entrainable circadian oscillator (FEO) that is formally and mechanistically separable from the hypothalamic light-entrainable oscillator. This experiment examined whether seasonal changes in day length affect the function of the FEO in male Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus). Hamsters housed in long (LD; 15 h light/day) or short (SD; 9 h light/day) photoperiods w...

  15. Local Modulation of Human Brain Responses by Circadian Rhythmicity and Sleep Debt

    OpenAIRE

    Muto, V.; Jaspar, M; Meyer, C.; Kussé, C; Chellappa, SL; Degueldre, C.; Balteau, E.; Shaffii-Le Bourdiec, A; Luxen, A; Middleton, B; Archer, SN; Phillips, C.; Collette, F.; Vandewalle, G; Dijk, D

    2016-01-01

    Human performance results from an interaction between circadian rhythmicity and homeostatic sleep pressure. Whether and how this interaction is represented at the regional brain level is not established. We quantified changes in brain responses to a sustained-attention task during 13 functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sessions scheduled across the circadian cycle during 42h of wakefulness and following recovery sleep, in 33 healthy participants. Cortical responses showed significant...

  16. Millisecond flashes of light phase delay the human circadian clock during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitzer, Jamie M; Fisicaro, Ryan A; Ruby, Norman F; Heller, H Craig

    2014-10-01

    The human circadian timing system is most sensitive to the phase-shifting effects of light during the biological nighttime, a time at which humans are most typically asleep. The overlap of sleep with peak sensitivity to the phase-shifting effects of light minimizes the effectiveness of using light as a countermeasure to circadian misalignment in humans. Most current light exposure treatments for such misalignment are mostly ineffective due to poor compliance and secondary changes that cause sleep deprivation. Using a 16-day, parallel group design, we examined whether a novel sequence of light flashes delivered during sleep could evoke phase changes in the circadian system without disrupting sleep. Healthy volunteers participated in a 2-week circadian stabilization protocol followed by a 2-night laboratory stay. During the laboratory session, they were exposed during sleep to either darkness (n = 7) or a sequence of 2-msec light flashes given every 30 sec (n = 6) from hours 2 to 3 after habitual bedtime. Changes in circadian timing (phase) and micro- and macroarchitecture of sleep were assessed. Subjects exposed to the flash sequence during sleep exhibited a delay in the timing of their circadian salivary melatonin rhythm compared with the control dark condition (p 0.30) during the flash stimulus. Exposing sleeping individuals to 0.24 sec of light spread over an hour shifted the timing of the circadian clock and did so without major alterations to sleep itself. While a greater number of matched subjects and more research will be necessary to ascertain whether these light flashes affect sleep, our data suggest that this type of passive phototherapy might be developed as a useful treatment for circadian misalignment in humans. PMID:25227334

  17. Different circadian oscillators control Ca2+ fluxes and Lhcb gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    Sai, Jiqing; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    1999-01-01

    Circadian biological clocks control many biological events, but the pathways by which these events are controlled are largely unknown. Based on a model suggesting that cytosolic-free calcium levels control the expression of the Lhcb gene in plants, we tested whether the circadian oscillation of free calcium is responsible for driving the rhythm of Lhcb expression. We found that these rhythms free-run with different periods in tobacco seedlings in constant conditions. Moreover, robust oscillat...

  18. Alterations in circadian rhythms are associated with increased lipid peroxidation in females with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudney, Lauren E; Sassi, Roberto B; Behr, Guilherme A; Streiner, David L; Minuzzi, Luciano; Moreira, Jose C F; Frey, Benicio N

    2014-05-01

    Disturbances in both circadian rhythms and oxidative stress systems have been implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD), yet no studies have investigated the relationship between these systems in BD. We studied the impact of circadian rhythm disruption on lipid damage in 52 depressed or euthymic BD females, while controlling for age, severity of depressive symptoms and number of psychotropic medications, compared to 30 healthy controls. Circadian rhythm disruption was determined by a self-report measure (Biological Rhythm Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry; BRIAN), which measures behaviours such as sleep, eating patterns, social rhythms and general activity. Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were measured as a proxy of lipid peroxidation. We also measured the activity of total and extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST). Multiple linear regressions showed that circadian rhythm disturbance was independently associated with increased lipid peroxidation in females with BD (p GST activity between bipolar females and controls. Circadian rhythms were not associated with lipid peroxidation in healthy controls, where aging was the only significant predictor. These results suggest an interaction between the circadian system and redox metabolism, in that greater disruption in daily rhythms was associated with increased lipid peroxidation in BD only. Antioxidant enzymes have been shown to follow a circadian pattern of expression, and it is possible that disturbance of sleep and daily rhythms experienced in BD may result in decreased antioxidant defence and therefore increased lipid peroxidation. This study provides a basis for further investigation of the links between oxidative stress and circadian rhythms in the neurobiology of BD. PMID:24438530

  19. Circadian polymorphisms in night owls, in bipolars, and in non-24-hour sleep cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Kripke, DF; Klimecki, WT; Nievergelt, CM; Rex, KM; Murray, SS; Shekhtman, T; Tranah, GJ; Loving, RT; Lee, HJ; Rhee, MK; Shadan, FF; Steven Poceta, J; Jamil, SM; Kline, LE; Kelsoe, JR

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 Korean Neuropsychiatric Association. People called night owls habitually have late bedtimes and late times of arising, sometimes suffering a heritable circadian disturbance called delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS). Those with DSPS, those with more severe progressively-late non-24-hour sleep-wake cycles, and those with bipolar disorder may share genetic tendencies for slowed or delayed circadian cycles. We searched for polymorphisms associated with DSPS in a case-control study of DSPS...

  20. Sex difference in the near-24-hour intrinsic period of the human circadian timing system

    OpenAIRE

    Duffy, Jeanne F.; Cain, Sean W.; Chang, Anne-Marie; Phillips, Andrew J. K.; Münch, Mirjam Y.; Gronfier, Claude; Wyatt, James K.; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Wright, Kenneth P.; Czeisler, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    The circadian rhythms of melatonin and body temperature are set to an earlier hour in women than in men, even when the women and men maintain nearly identical and consistent bedtimes and wake times. Moreover, women tend to wake up earlier than men and exhibit a greater preference for morning activities than men. Although the neurobiological mechanism underlying this sex difference in circadian alignment is unknown, multiple studies in nonhuman animals have demonstrated a sex difference in cir...

  1. Does the core circadian clock in the moss Physcomitrella patens (Bryophyta comprise a single loop?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedman Harald

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The endogenous circadian clock allows the organism to synchronize processes both to daily and seasonal changes. In plants, many metabolic processes such as photosynthesis, as well as photoperiodic responses, are under the control of a circadian clock. Comparative studies with the moss Physcomitrella patens provide the opportunity to study many aspects of land plant evolution. Here we present a comparative overview of clock-associated components and the circadian network in the moss P. patens. Results The moss P. patens has a set of conserved circadian core components that share genetic relationship and gene expression patterns with clock genes of vascular plants. These genes include Myb-like transcription factors PpCCA1a and PpCCA1b, pseudo-response regulators PpPRR1-4, and regulatory elements PpELF3, PpLUX and possibly PpELF4. However, the moss lacks homologs of AtTOC1, AtGI and the AtZTL-family of genes, which can be found in all vascular plants studied here. These three genes constitute essential components of two of the three integrated feed-back loops in the current model of the Arabidopsis circadian clock mechanism. Consequently, our results suggest instead a single loop circadian clock in the moss. Possibly as a result of this, temperature compensation of core clock gene expression appears to be decreased in P. patens. Conclusions This study is the first comparative overview of the circadian clock mechanism in a basal land plant, the moss P. patens. Our results indicate that the moss clock mechanism may represent an ancestral state in contrast to the more complex and partly duplicated structure of subsequent land plants. These findings may provide insights into the understanding of the evolution of circadian network topology.

  2. Casein kinase 2 associates with and phosphorylates dishevelled.

    OpenAIRE

    Willert, K; Brink, M; Wodarz, A.; Varmus, H.; Nusse, R.

    1997-01-01

    The dishevelled (dsh) gene of Drosophila melanogaster encodes a phosphoprotein whose phosphorylation state is elevated by Wingless stimulation, suggesting that the phosphorylation of Dsh and the kinase(s) responsible for this phosphorylation are integral parts of the Wg signaling pathway. We found that immunoprecipitated Dsh protein from embryos and from cells in tissue culture is associated with a kinase activity that phosphorylates Dsh in vitro. Purification and peptide sequencing of a 38 k...

  3. Sequential Phosphorylation of Smoothened Transduces Graded Hedgehog Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Ying; Ospina, Jason K.; Zhang, Junzheng; Michelson, Andrew P.; Schoen, Adam M.; Zhu, Alan Jian

    2011-01-01

    The correct interpretation of a gradient of the morphogen Hedgehog (Hh) during development requires phosphorylation of the Hh signaling activator Smoothened (Smo); however, the molecular mechanism by which Smo transduces graded Hh signaling is not well understood. We show that regulation of the phosphorylation status of Smo by distinct phosphatases at specific phosphorylated residues creates differential thresholds of Hh signaling. Phosphorylation of Smo was initiated by adenosine 3′,5′-monop...

  4. Tau phosphorylation affects its axonal transport and degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Martín, Teresa; Cuchillo-Ibáñez, Inmaculada; Noble, Wendy; Nyenya, Fanon; Anderton, Brian H; Hanger, Diane P.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylated forms of microtubule-associated protein tau accumulate in neurofibrillary tangles in Alzheimer's disease. To investigate the effects of specific phosphorylated tau residues on its function, wild type or phosphomutant tau was expressed in cells. Elevated tau phosphorylation decreased its microtubule binding and bundling, and increased the number of motile tau particles, without affecting axonal transport kinetics. In contrast, reducing tau phosphorylation enhanced the amount of ...

  5. Measuring Gli2 Phosphorylation by Selected Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Ahrends, Robert; Niewiadomski, Pawel; Teruel, Mary N.; Rohatgi, Rajat

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation is an important mechanism by which Gli proteins are regulated. When the Hedgehog (Hh) pathway is activated, multiple serine and threonine residues of Gli2 are dephosphorylated, while at least one residue undergoes phosphorylation. These changes in phosphorylation have functional relevance for the transcriptional activity of Gli proteins, as shown by in vitro and in vivo assays on Gli mutants lacking the phosphorylated residues. Here, we describe a method of quantitatively moni...

  6. The importance of intrinsic disorder for protein phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Lilia M Iakoucheva; Radivojac, Predrag; Celeste J Brown; O'Connor, Timothy R.; Sikes, Jason G.; Obradovic, Zoran; Dunker, A. Keith

    2004-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation provides a major regulatory mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Due to the high variability of amino acid residues flanking a relatively limited number of experimentally identified phosphorylation sites, reliable prediction of such sites still remains an important issue. Here we report the development of a new web-based tool for the prediction of protein phosphorylation sites, DISPHOS (DISorder-enhanced PHOSphorylation predictor, http://www.ist.temple.edu/DISPHOS...

  7. Genes influencing circadian differences in blood pressure in hypertensive mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Francine Z; Campain, Anna E; Davern, Pamela J; Yang, Yee Hwa J; Head, Geoffrey A; Morris, Brian J

    2011-01-01

    Essential hypertension is a common multifactorial heritable condition in which increased sympathetic outflow from the central nervous system is involved in the elevation in blood pressure (BP), as well as the exaggerated morning surge in BP that is a risk factor for myocardial infarction and stroke in hypertensive patients. The Schlager BPH/2J mouse is a genetic model of hypertension in which increased sympathetic outflow from the hypothalamus has an important etiological role in the elevation of BP. Schlager hypertensive mice exhibit a large variation in BP between the active and inactive periods of the day, and also show a morning surge in BP. To investigate the genes responsible for the circadian variation in BP in hypertension, hypothalamic tissue was collected from BPH/2J and normotensive BPN/3J mice at the 'peak' (n = 12) and 'trough' (n = 6) of diurnal BP. Using Affymetrix GeneChip® Mouse Gene 1.0 ST Arrays, validation by quantitative real-time PCR and a statistical method that adjusted for clock genes, we identified 212 hypothalamic genes whose expression differed between 'peak' and 'trough' BP in the hypertensive strain. These included genes with known roles in BP regulation, such as vasopressin, oxytocin and thyrotropin releasing hormone, as well as genes not recognized previously as regulators of BP, including chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 19, hypocretin and zinc finger and BTB domain containing 16. Gene ontology analysis showed an enrichment of terms for inflammatory response, mitochondrial proton-transporting ATP synthase complex, structural constituent of ribosome, amongst others. In conclusion, we have identified genes whose expression differs between the peak and trough of 24-hour circadian BP in BPH/2J mice, pointing to mechanisms responsible for diurnal variation in BP. The findings may assist in the elucidation of the mechanism for the morning surge in BP in essential hypertension. PMID:21541337

  8. Ultrasonic vocalizations in rats anticipating circadian feeding schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opiol, Hanna; Pavlovski, Ilya; Michalik, Mateusz; Mistlberger, Ralph E

    2015-05-01

    Rats readily learn to anticipate a reward signaled by an external stimulus. Anticipatory behaviors evoked by conditioned stimuli include 50 kHz ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs), a proposed behavioral correlate of positive affect and activation of midbrain dopamine pathways. Rats can also anticipate a reward, such as food, provided once daily, without external cueing. Anticipation of a daily reward exhibits formal properties of a circadian rhythm. The neural circuits that regulate the timing and amplitude of these rhythms remain an open question, but evidence suggests a role for dopamine. To gain further insight into the neural and affective correlates of circadian food anticipatory rhythms, we made 2h and 24h USV recordings in rats fed 2h/day in the light period, a procedure that induces robust anticipation 2-3h before mealtime. Potential interactions between internal and external time cues in USV production were evaluated by inclusion of a 3 kHz tone 15 min before mealtime. Prior to scheduled feeding, spontaneous 50 kHz USVs were rare during the light period. During scheduled feeding, flat and frequency modulated (FM) 50kHz USVs occurred prior to and during mealtime. FM USVs were more closely related to anticipation, while flat USVs were more dependent on food access. USVs also occurred during spontaneous waking at other times of day. The tone did not evoke USVs but did modulate activity. Behavioral anticipation of a daily meal is accompanied by USVs consistent with a positive affective state and elevated dopamine transmission. PMID:25677650

  9. Circadian phenotyping of obese and diabetic db/db mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosbellet, Edith; Dumont, Stephanie; Schuster-Klein, Carole; Guardiola-Lemaitre, Beatrice; Pevet, Paul; Criscuolo, François; Challet, Etienne

    2016-05-01

    Growing evidence links metabolic disorders to circadian alterations. Genetically obese db/db mice, lacking the long isoform of leptin receptor, are a recognized model of type 2 diabetes. In this study, we aimed at characterizing the potential circadian alterations of db/db mice in comparison to db/+ control mice. By using telemetry devices, we first reported arrhythmicity in general activity of most db/db mice under both light-dark cycle and constant darkness, while their rhythm of body temperature is less dramatically disrupted. Water access restricted to nighttime restores significant rhythmicity in behaviorally arrhythmic db/db mice, indicating a masking effect of polydipsia when water is available ad libitum. Endogenous period of temperature rhythm under constant dark conditions is significantly increased (+30 min) in db/db compared with db/+ mice. Next, we studied the oscillations of clock proteins (PER1, PER2 and BMAL1) in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN), the site of the master clock, and detected no difference according to the genotype. Furthermore, c-FOS and P-ERK1/2 expression in response to a light pulse in late night was significantly increased (+80 and +55%, respectively) in the SCN of these diabetic mice. We previously showed that, in addition to altered activity rhythms, db/db mice exhibit altered feeding rhythm. Therefore, we investigated daily patterns of clock protein expression in medial hypothalamic oscillators involved in feeding behavior (arcuate nucleus, ventro- and dorso-medial hypothalamic nuclei). Compared with db/+ mice, very subtle or no difference in oscillations of PER1 and BMAL1 is found in the medial hypothalamus. Although we did not find a clear link between altered hypothalamic clockwork and behavioral rhythms in db/db mice, our results highlight a lengthened endogenous period and altered photic integration in these genetically obese and diabetic mice. PMID:26144489

  10. Electric light, particularly at night, disrupts human circadian rhythmicity: is that a problem?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Richard G; Zhu, Yong

    2015-05-01

    Over the past 3 billion years, an endogenous circadian rhythmicity has developed in almost all life forms in which daily oscillations in physiology occur. This allows for anticipation of sunrise and sunset. This physiological rhythmicity is kept at precisely 24 h by the daily cycle of sunlight and dark. However, since the introduction of electric lighting, there has been inadequate light during the day inside buildings for a robust resetting of the human endogenous circadian rhythmicity, and too much light at night for a true dark to be detected; this results in circadian disruption and alters sleep/wake cycle, core body temperature, hormone regulation and release, and patterns of gene expression throughout the body. The question is the extent to which circadian disruption compromises human health, and can account for a portion of the modern pandemics of breast and prostate cancers, obesity, diabetes and depression. As societies modernize (i.e. electrify) these conditions increase in prevalence. There are a number of promising leads on putative mechanisms, and epidemiological findings supporting an aetiologic role for electric lighting in disease causation. These include melatonin suppression, circadian gene expression, and connection of circadian rhythmicity to metabolism in part affected by haem iron intake and distribution. PMID:25780233

  11. Profiling molecular and behavioral circadian rhythms in the non-symbiotic sea anemone Nematostella vectensis.

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    Oren, Matan; Tarrant, Ann M; Alon, Shahar; Simon-Blecher, Noa; Elbaz, Idan; Appelbaum, Lior; Levy, Oren

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous circadian clocks are poorly understood within early-diverging animal lineages. We have characterized circadian behavioral patterns and identified potential components of the circadian clock in the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis: a model cnidarian which lacks algal symbionts. Using automatic video tracking we showed that Nematostella exhibits rhythmic circadian locomotor activity, which is persistent in constant dark, shifted or disrupted by external dark/light cues and maintained the same rate at two different temperatures. This activity was inhibited by a casein kinase 1δ/ε inhibitor, suggesting a role for CK1 homologue(s) in Nematostella clock. Using high-throughput sequencing we profiled Nematostella transcriptomes over 48 hours under a light-dark cycle. We identified 180 Nematostella diurnally-oscillated transcripts and compared them with previously established databases of adult and larvae of the symbiotic coral Acropora millepora, revealing both shared homologues and unique rhythmic genes. Taken together, this study further establishes Nematostella as a non-symbiotic model organism to study circadian rhythms and increases our understanding about the fundamental elements of circadian regulation and their evolution within the Metazoa. PMID:26081482

  12. Reduced anxiety and depression-like behaviours in the circadian period mutant mouse afterhours.

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    Robert Keers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Disruption of the circadian rhythm is a key feature of bipolar disorder. Variation in genes encoding components of the molecular circadian clock has been associated with increased risk of the disorder in clinical populations. Similarly in animal models, disruption of the circadian clock can result in altered mood and anxiety which resemble features of human mania; including hyperactivity, reduced anxiety and reduced depression-like behaviour. One such mutant, after hours (Afh, an ENU-derived mutant with a mutation in a recently identified circadian clock gene Fbxl3, results in a disturbed (long circadian rhythm of approximately 27 hours. METHODOLOGY: Anxiety, exploratory and depression-like behaviours were evaluated in Afh mice using the open-field, elevated plus maze, light-dark box, holeboard and forced swim test. To further validate findings for human mania, polymorphisms in the human homologue of FBXL3, genotyped by three genome wide case control studies, were tested for association with bipolar disorder. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Afh mice showed reduced anxiety- and depression-like behaviour in all of the behavioural tests employed, and some evidence of increased locomotor activity in some tests. An analysis of three separate human data sets revealed a gene wide association between variation in FBXL3 and bipolar disorder (P = 0.009. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are consistent with previous studies of mutants with extended circadian periods and suggest that disruption of FBXL3 is associated with mania-like behaviours in both mice and humans.

  13. Circadian modulation of dopamine levels and dopaminergic neuron development contributes to attention deficiency and hyperactive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian; Zhong, Zhaomin; Wang, Mingyong; Chen, Xifeng; Tan, Yicheng; Zhang, Shuqing; He, Wei; He, Xiong; Huang, Guodong; Lu, Haiping; Wu, Ping; Che, Yi; Yan, Yi-Lin; Postlethwait, John H; Chen, Wenbiao; Wang, Han

    2015-02-11

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most prevalent psychiatric disorders in children and adults. While ADHD patients often display circadian abnormalities, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here we found that the zebrafish mutant for the circadian gene period1b (per1b) displays hyperactive, impulsive-like, and attention deficit-like behaviors and low levels of dopamine, reminiscent of human ADHD patients. We found that the circadian clock directly regulates dopamine-related genes monoamine oxidase and dopamine β hydroxylase, and acts via genes important for the development or maintenance of dopaminergic neurons to regulate their number and organization in the ventral diencephalic posterior tuberculum. We then found that Per1 knock-out mice also display ADHD-like symptoms and reduced levels of dopamine, thereby showing highly conserved roles of the circadian clock in ADHD. Our studies demonstrate that disruption of a circadian clock gene elicits ADHD-like syndrome. The circadian model for attention deficiency and hyperactive behavior sheds light on ADHD pathogenesis and opens avenues for exploring novel targets for diagnosis and therapy for this common psychiatric disorder. PMID:25673850

  14. Peripheral Skin Temperature and Circadian Biological Clock in Shift Nurses after a Day off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracci, Massimo; Ciarapica, Veronica; Copertaro, Alfredo; Barbaresi, Mariella; Manzella, Nicola; Tomasetti, Marco; Gaetani, Simona; Monaco, Federica; Amati, Monica; Valentino, Matteo; Rapisarda, Venerando; Santarelli, Lory

    2016-01-01

    The circadian biological clock is essentially based on the light/dark cycle. Some people working with shift schedules cannot adjust their sleep/wake cycle to the light/dark cycle, and this may result in alterations of the circadian biological clock. This study explored the circadian biological clock of shift and daytime nurses using non-invasive methods. Peripheral skin temperature, cortisol and melatonin levels in saliva, and Per2 expression in pubic hair follicle cells were investigated for 24 h after a day off. Significant differences were observed in peripheral skin temperature and cortisol levels between shift and daytime nurses. No differences in melatonin levels were obtained. Per2 maximum values were significantly different between the two groups. Shift nurses exhibited lower circadian variations compared to daytime nurses, and this may indicate an adjustment of the circadian biological clock to continuous shift schedules. Non-invasive procedures, such as peripheral skin temperature measurement, determination of cortisol and melatonin in saliva, and analysis of clock genes in hair follicle cells, may be effective approaches to extensively study the circadian clock in shift workers. PMID:27128899

  15. Drosophila Ionotropic Receptor 25a mediates circadian clock resetting by temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chenghao; Buhl, Edgar; Xu, Min; Croset, Vincent; Rees, Johanna S; Lilley, Kathryn S; Benton, Richard; Hodge, James J L; Stanewsky, Ralf

    2015-11-26

    Circadian clocks are endogenous timers adjusting behaviour and physiology with the solar day. Synchronized circadian clocks improve fitness and are crucial for our physical and mental well-being. Visual and non-visual photoreceptors are responsible for synchronizing circadian clocks to light, but clock-resetting is also achieved by alternating day and night temperatures with only 2-4 °C difference. This temperature sensitivity is remarkable considering that the circadian clock period (~24 h) is largely independent of surrounding ambient temperatures. Here we show that Drosophila Ionotropic Receptor 25a (IR25a) is required for behavioural synchronization to low-amplitude temperature cycles. This channel is expressed in sensory neurons of internal stretch receptors previously implicated in temperature synchronization of the circadian clock. IR25a is required for temperature-synchronized clock protein oscillations in subsets of central clock neurons. Extracellular leg nerve recordings reveal temperature- and IR25a-dependent sensory responses, and IR25a misexpression confers temperature-dependent firing of heterologous neurons. We propose that IR25a is part of an input pathway to the circadian clock that detects small temperature differences. This pathway operates in the absence of known 'hot' and 'cold' sensors in the Drosophila antenna, revealing the existence of novel periphery-to-brain temperature signalling channels. PMID:26580016

  16. Circadian modulation of gene expression, but not glutamate uptake, in mouse and rat cortical astrocytes.

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    Christian Beaulé

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Circadian clocks control daily rhythms including sleep-wake, hormone secretion, and metabolism. These clocks are based on intracellular transcription-translation feedback loops that sustain daily oscillations of gene expression in many cell types. Mammalian astrocytes display circadian rhythms in the expression of the clock genes Period1 (Per1 and Period2 (Per2. However, a functional role for circadian oscillations in astrocytes is unknown. Because uptake of extrasynaptic glutamate depends on the presence of Per2 in astrocytes, we asked whether glutamate uptake by glia is circadian. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We measured glutamate uptake, transcript and protein levels of the astrocyte-specific glutamate transporter, Glast, and the expression of Per1 and Per2 from cultured cortical astrocytes and from explants of somatosensory cortex. We found that glutamate uptake and Glast mRNA and protein expression were significantly reduced in Clock/Clock, Per2- or NPAS2-deficient glia. Uptake was augmented when the medium was supplemented with dibutyryl-cAMP or B27. Critically, glutamate uptake was not circadian in cortical astrocytes cultured from rats or mice or in cortical slices from mice. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that glutamate uptake levels are modulated by CLOCK, PER2, NPAS2, and the composition of the culture medium, and that uptake does not show circadian variations.

  17. Peripheral Skin Temperature and Circadian Biological Clock in Shift Nurses after a Day off

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Bracci

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The circadian biological clock is essentially based on the light/dark cycle. Some people working with shift schedules cannot adjust their sleep/wake cycle to the light/dark cycle, and this may result in alterations of the circadian biological clock. This study explored the circadian biological clock of shift and daytime nurses using non-invasive methods. Peripheral skin temperature, cortisol and melatonin levels in saliva, and Per2 expression in pubic hair follicle cells were investigated for 24 h after a day off. Significant differences were observed in peripheral skin temperature and cortisol levels between shift and daytime nurses. No differences in melatonin levels were obtained. Per2 maximum values were significantly different between the two groups. Shift nurses exhibited lower circadian variations compared to daytime nurses, and this may indicate an adjustment of the circadian biological clock to continuous shift schedules. Non-invasive procedures, such as peripheral skin temperature measurement, determination of cortisol and melatonin in saliva, and analysis of clock genes in hair follicle cells, may be effective approaches to extensively study the circadian clock in shift workers.

  18. PPARα is a potential therapeutic target of drugs to treat circadian rhythm sleep disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent progress at the molecular level has revealed that nuclear receptors play an important role in the generation of mammalian circadian rhythms. To examine whether peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα) is involved in the regulation of circadian behavioral rhythms in mammals, we evaluated the locomotor activity of mice administered with the hypolipidemic PPARα ligand, bezafibrate. Circadian locomotor activity was phase-advanced about 3 h in mice given bezafibrate under light-dark (LD) conditions. Transfer from LD to constant darkness did not change the onset of activity in these mice, suggesting that bezafibrate advanced the phase of the endogenous clock. Surprisingly, bezafibrate also advanced the phase in mice with lesions of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN; the central clock in mammals). The circadian expression of clock genes such as period2, BMAL1, and Rev-erbα was also phase-advanced in various tissues (cortex, liver, and fat) without affecting the SCN. Bezafibrate also phase-advanced the activity phase that is delayed in model mice with delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS) due to a Clock gene mutation. Our results indicated that PPARα is involved in circadian clock control independently of the SCN and that PPARα could be a potent target of drugs to treat circadian rhythm sleep disorders including DSPS

  19. [Circadian organization of the indices of external respiration in bronchial asthma patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoseev, G B; Degtiareva, Z Ia; Savich, A A; Alekseev, M Iu; Bolodon, S A

    1985-01-01

    Circadian rhythms of external respiration function (ERF) and body function (BF) were studied in 20 patients with mild bronchial asthma, 20 patients with bronchial asthma of medium gravity and in 14 healthy subjects. Circadian rhythms of the medium-group parameters of ERF were shown to be statistically insignificant, whereas individual circadian chronograms demonstrated circadian rhythms for all the patients with BA and healthy subjects. Essential differences were found in the organization of the temporary structure of circadian rhythms of ERF in BA patients and healthy subjects. It was discovered that in BA patients, the maximal pathological alterations develop within the period from the midnight to 8 a. m., whereas the minimal disorders of ERF are recorded within the period from the noon to 8 p. m. It is suggested that deterioration of bronchial patency which brings about the development of obstruction in BA patients is the result of hypersynchronization and increased amplitude of the circadian rhythms of those parameters of ERF which determine the bronchial patency. PMID:4002163

  20. Dynamic circadian protein-protein interaction networks predict temporal organization of cellular functions.

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    Thomas Wallach

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Essentially all biological processes depend on protein-protein interactions (PPIs. Timing of such interactions is crucial for regulatory function. Although circadian (~24-hour clocks constitute fundamental cellular timing mechanisms regulating important physiological processes, PPI dynamics on this timescale are largely unknown. Here, we identified 109 novel PPIs among circadian clock proteins via a yeast-two-hybrid approach. Among them, the interaction of protein phosphatase 1 and CLOCK/BMAL1 was found to result in BMAL1 destabilization. We constructed a dynamic circadian PPI network predicting the PPI timing using circadian expression data. Systematic circadian phenotyping (RNAi and overexpression suggests a crucial role for components involved in dynamic interactions. Systems analysis of a global dynamic network in liver revealed that interacting proteins are expressed at similar times likely to restrict regulatory interactions to specific phases. Moreover, we predict that circadian PPIs dynamically connect many important cellular processes (signal transduction, cell cycle, etc. contributing to temporal organization of cellular physiology in an unprecedented manner.