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Sample records for cintichem target irradiated

  1. Safety analysis for operating the Annular Core Research Reactor with Cintichem-type targets installed in the central region of the core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PARMA JR.,EDWARD J.

    2000-01-01

    Production of the molybdenum-99 isotope at the Annular Core Research Reactor requires highly enriched, uranium oxide loaded targets to be irradiated for several days in the high neutron-flux region of the core. This report presents the safety analysis for the irradiation of up to seven Cintichem-type targets in the central region of the core and compares the results to the Annular Core Research Reactor Safety Analysis Report. A 19 target grid configuration is presented that allows one to seven targets to be irradiated, with the remainder of the grid locations filled with aluminum ''void'' targets. Analyses of reactor, neutronic, thermal hydraulics, and heat transfer calculations are presented. Steady-state operation and accident scenarios are analyzed with the conclusion that the reactor can be operated safely with seven targets in the grid, and no additional risk to the public.

  2. Decommissioning ALARA programs Cintichem decommissioning experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, J.J.; LaGuardia, T.S. [TLG Services, Inc., Bridgewater, CT (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The Cintichem facility, originally the Union Carbide Nuclear Company (UCNC) Research Center, consisted primarily of a 5MW pool type reactor linked via a four-foot-wide by twelve-foot-deep water-filled canal to a bank of five adjacent hot cells. Shortly after going into operations in the early 1960s, the facility`s operations expanded to provide various reactor-based products and services to a multitude of research, production, medical, and education groups. From 1968 through 1972, the facility developed a process of separating isotopes from mixed fission products generated by irradiating enriched Uranium target capsules. By the late 1970s, 20 to 30 capsules were being processed weekly, with about 200,000 curies being produced per week. Several isotopes such as Mo{sup 99}, I{sup 131}, and Xe{sup 133} were being extracted for medical use.

  3. Scalability of the LEU-Modified Cintichem Process: 3-MeV Van de Graaff and 35-MeV Electron Linear Accelerator Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotsch, David A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Brossard, Tom [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Roussin, Ethan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Quigley, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Chemerisov, Sergey [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Gromov, Roman [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Jonah, Charles [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Hafenrichter, Lohman [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Tkac, Peter [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Krebs, John [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2016-10-31

    Molybdenum-99, the mother of Tc-99m, can be produced from fission of U-235 in nuclear reactors and purified from fission products by the Cintichem process, later modified for low-enriched uranium (LEU) targets. The key step in this process is the precipitation of Mo with α-benzoin oxime (ABO). The stability of this complex to radiation has been examined. Molybdenum-ABO was irradiated with 3 MeV electrons produced by a Van de Graaff generator and 35 MeV electrons produced by a 50 MeV/25 kW electron linear accelerator. Dose equivalents of 1.7–31.2 kCi of Mo-99 were administered to freshly prepared Mo-ABO. Irradiated samples of Mo-ABO were processed according to the LEU Modified-Cintichem process. The Van de Graaff data indicated good radiation stability of the Mo-ABO complex up to ~15 kCi dose equivalents of Mo-99 and nearly complete destruction at doses >24 kCi Mo-99. The linear accelerator data indicate that even at 6.2 kCi of Mo-99 equivalence of dose, the sample lost ~20% of Mo-99. The 20% loss of Mo-99 at this low dose may be attributed to thermal decomposition of the product from the heat deposited in the sample during irradiation.

  4. Uranium briquettes for irradiation target

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    Saliba-Silva, Adonis Marcelo; Garcia, Rafael Henrique Lazzari; Martins, Ilson Carlos; Carvalho, Elita Fontenele Urano de; Durazzo, Michelangelo, E-mail: saliba@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Direct irradiation on targets inside nuclear research or multiple purpose reactors is a common route to produce {sup 99}Mo-{sup 99m}Tc radioisotopes. Nevertheless, since the imposed limits to use LEU uranium to prevent nuclear armament production, the amount of uranium loaded in target meats has physically increased and new processes have been proposed for production. Routes using metallic uranium thin film and UAl{sub x} dispersion have been used for this purpose. Both routes have their own issues, either by bringing difficulties to disassemble the aluminum case inside hot cells or by generating great amount of alkaline radioactive liquid rejects. A potential route might be the dispersion of powders of LEU metallic uranium and nickel, which are pressed as a blend inside a die and followed by pulse electroplating of nickel. The electroplating provides more strength to the briquettes and creates a barrier for gas evolution during neutronic disintegration of {sup 235}U. A target briquette platted with nickel encapsulated in an aluminum case to be irradiated may be an alternative possibility to replace other proposed targets. This work uses pulse Ni-electroplating over iron powder briquette to simulate the covering of uranium by nickel. The following parameters were applied 10 times for each sample: 900Hz, -0.84A/square centimeters with duty cycle of 0.1 in Watts Bath. It also presented the optical microscopy analysis of plated microstructure section. (author)

  5. Irradiation of target volumes with concave outlines

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    De Neve, W.; Fortan, L.; Derycke, S.; Van Duyse, B.; DE Wagter, C. [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde

    1995-12-01

    A heuristic planning procedure allowing to obtain a 3-dimensional conformal dose distribution for target volumes with concavities has been investigated. The procedure divides the planning problem into a number of sub-problems each solvable by known methods. By patching together the solutions to the sub-problems, a solution with a predictable dosimetric outcome can be obtained. The procedure can be applied to most 3-dimensional systems. The procedure is described and its applications to the irradiation of neoplasms are discussed. (A.S.).

  6. Development of production of {sup 99}Mo from LEU target

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    Adang, H.G.; Mutalib, A.; Lubis, H. [Radioisotope Production Centre, National Atomic Energy Agency, Kawasan Puspiptek, Serpong (Indonesia)] [and others

    1998-10-01

    {sup 99}TC, the most popular radioisotope in nuclear medicine, is daughter of {sup 99}Mo. {sup 99}Mo is produced in research reactor by irradiating of high enriched uranium (HEU). However, in recent year, strict regulation that has been implemented by USA DOE and NPT has led to the difficulty in getting HEU. Therefore, BATAN has tried to develop the production of {sup 99}Mo by using low enriched uranium (LEU). The research involves the use of LEU in the production of {sup 99}Mo. This research was started in 1994 by joint-research between BATAN and Argonne National Laboratory USA. This program is divided into three research groups. The first group emphasizes its research on fabrication of LEU foil that is going to be irradiated. The second group studies the irradiation`s aspects and physical characteristic of irradiated LEU foils. The third group studies the radiochemical separation process of fission product {sup 99}Mo from solution of irradiated LEU foils. There are five steps that are carried out in studying of radiochemical separation of {sup 99}Mo from irradiated LEU. First is designing a dissolver that is going to be used in dissolving of LEU foil and testing its reliability. Second is dissolving LEU in the new design dissolver. Third is evaluation the modified of Cintichem`s radiochemical separation process of {sup 99}Mo from LEU. Forth is modifying the Cintichem`s radiochemical separation process of {sup 99}Mo from the solution of irradiated LEU. And fifth is using the modified of Cintichem`s radiochemical separation process for separation {sup 99}Mo from solution of irradiated LEU. The first through the forth steps of experiments were already carried out and will be reported in this workshop, whereas the fifth step of experiment is going to be conducted in February 1998. (author)

  7. Recovery of uranium from an irradiated solid target after removal of molybdenum-99 produced from the irradiated target

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    Reilly, Sean Douglas; May, Iain; Copping, Roy; Dale, Gregory Edward

    2017-10-17

    A process for minimizing waste and maximizing utilization of uranium involves recovering uranium from an irradiated solid target after separating the medical isotope product, molybdenum-99, produced from the irradiated target. The process includes irradiating a solid target comprising uranium to produce fission products comprising molybdenum-99, and thereafter dissolving the target and conditioning the solution to prepare an aqueous nitric acid solution containing irradiated uranium. The acidic solution is then contacted with a solid sorbent whereby molybdenum-99 remains adsorbed to the sorbent for subsequent recovery. The uranium passes through the sorbent. The concentrations of acid and uranium are then adjusted to concentrations suitable for crystallization of uranyl nitrate hydrates. After inducing the crystallization, the uranyl nitrate hydrates are separated from a supernatant. The process results in the purification of uranyl nitrate hydrates from fission products and other contaminants. The uranium is therefore available for reuse, storage, or disposal.

  8. Preliminary Beam Irradiation Test for RI Production Targets at KOMAC

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    Yoon, Sang Pil; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Kim, Han Sung; Cho, Yong Sub; Seol, Kyung Tae; Song, Young Gi; Kim, Dae Il; Jung, Myung Hwan; Kim, Kye Ryung; Min, Yi Sub [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The new beamline and target irradiation facility has been constructed for the production of therapeutic radio-isotope. Sr-82 and Cu-67 were selected as the target isotope in this facility, they are promising isotope for the PET imaging and cancer therapy. For the facility commissioning, the irradiation test for the prototype-target was conducted to confirm the feasibility of radio-isotope production, the proto-type targets are made of RbCl pellet and the natural Zn metal for Sr-82 and Cu-67 production respectively, In this paper, an introduction to the RI production targetry system and the results of the preliminary beam irradiation test are discussed. the low-flux beam irradiation tests for proto-type RI target have been conducted. As a result of the beam irradiation tests, we could obtain the evidence of Sr-82 and Cu-67 production, have confirmed the feasibility of Sr-82 and Cu-67 production at KOMAC RI production facility.

  9. Symmetry issues in Directly Irradiated Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramis R.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In direct drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF, the typical laser beam to laser beam angle is around 30°. This fact makes the study of the irradiation symmetry a genuine 3D problem. In this paper we use the three dimensional version of the MULTI hydrocode to assess the symmetry of such ICF implosions. More specifically, we study a shock-ignition proposal for the Laser-Mégajoule facility (LMJ in which two of the equatorial beam cones are used to implode and precompress a spherical capsule (the “reference” capsule of HiPER project made of 0.59 mg of pure Deuterium-Tritium mixture. The symmetry of this scheme is analysed and optimized to get a design inside the operating limits of LMJ. The studied configuration has been found essentially axial-symmetric, so that the use of 2D hydrocodes would be appropriate for this specific situation.

  10. Waste Treatment of Acidic Solutions from the Dissolution of Irradiated LEU Targets for 99-Mo Production

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    Bakel, Allen J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Conner, Cliff [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Quigley, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2016-10-01

    One of the missions of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program (and now the National Nuclear Security Administrations Material Management and Minimization program) is to facilitate the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) targets for 99Mo production. The conversion from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to LEU targets will require five to six times more uranium to produce an equivalent amount of 99Mo. The work discussed here addresses the technical challenges encountered in the treatment of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH)/nitric acid solutions remaining after the dissolution of LEU targets. Specifically, the focus of this work is the calcination of the uranium waste from 99Mo production using LEU foil targets and the Modified Cintichem Process. Work with our calciner system showed that high furnace temperature, a large vent tube, and a mechanical shield are beneficial for calciner operation. One- and two-step direct calcination processes were evaluated. The high-temperature one-step process led to contamination of the calciner system. The two-step direct calcination process operated stably and resulted in a relatively large amount of material in the calciner cup. Chemically assisted calcination using peroxide was rejected for further work due to the difficulty in handling the products. Chemically assisted calcination using formic acid was rejected due to unstable operation. Chemically assisted calcination using oxalic acid was recommended, although a better understanding of its chemistry is needed. Overall, this work showed that the two-step direct calcination and the in-cup oxalic acid processes are the best approaches for the treatment of the UNH/nitric acid waste solutions remaining from dissolution of LEU targets for 99Mo production.

  11. Post-Irradiation Examination of Array Targets - Part I

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    Icenhour, A.S.

    2004-01-23

    During FY 2001, two arrays, each containing seven neptunium-loaded targets, were irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor in Idaho to examine the influence of multi-target self-shielding on {sup 236}Pu content and to evaluate fission product release data. One array consisted of seven targets that contained 10 vol% NpO{sub 2} pellets, while the other array consisted of seven targets that contained 20 vol % NpO{sub 2} pellets. The arrays were located in the same irradiation facility but were axially separated to minimize the influence of one array on the other. Each target also contained a dosimeter package, which consisted of a small NpO{sub 2} wire that was inside a vanadium container. After completion of irradiation and shipment back to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, nine of the targets (four from the 10 vol% array and five from the 20 vol% array) were punctured for pressure measurement and measurement of {sup 85}Kr. These nine targets and the associated dosimeters were then chemically processed to measure the residual neptunium, total plutonium production, {sup 238}Pu production, and {sup 236}Pu concentration at discharge. The amount and isotopic composition of fission products were also measured. This report provides the results of the processing and analysis of the nine targets.

  12. Advanced targets preparation for TNSA laser irradiation and their characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccio, G.; Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.

    2016-04-01

    Thin targets have been investigated at low laser intensity in order to prepare foils for TNSA (Target Normal Sheath Acceleration) laser irradiation at high intensity. Foils were prepared with different techniques, such as deposition of metallic nanoparticles on polymeric substrates. Polymer films were covered by solutions containing nanoparticles or embedded inside or covered by nanostructures. Such advanced targets permit to enhance the laser wavelength absorbance. Thick and thin targets were irradiated using laser radiation at 1010 W/cm2 intensity and prepared to be submitted to laser irradiation at higher intensity. The foils were characterized by optical measurements of absorbance and transmittance as a function of wavelength in the regions UV, VIS and IR. Laser irradiation measurements using a Nd:YAG laser simulate the prepulse of high laser intensity. Accelerated ions were measured with ion collectors using time of flight techniques. The protons and ions acceleration and their yields were measured as a function of the equivalent atomic number of the foils and of other characteristics, as it will be presented and discussed.

  13. Final Report on MEGAPIE Target Irradiation and Post-Irradiation Examination

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    Yong, Dai [Paul Scherrer-Institut (Switzerland)

    2015-06-30

    Megawatt pilot experiment (MEGAPIE) was successfully performed in 2006. One of the important goals of MEGAPIE is to understand the behaviour of structural materials of the target components exposed to high fluxes of high-energy protons and spallation neutrons in flowing LBE (liquid lead-bismuth eutectic) environment by conducting post-irradiation examination (PIE). The PIE includes four major parts: non-destructive test, radiochemical analysis of production and distribution of radionuclides produced by spallation reaction in LBE, analysis of LBE corrosion effects on structural materials, T91 and SS 316L steels, and mechanical testing of the T91 and SS 316L steels irradiated in the lower part of the target. The non-destructive test (NDT) including visual inspection and ultrasonic measurement was performed in the proton beam window area of the T91 calotte of the LBE container, the most intensively irradiated part of the MEGAPIE target. The visual inspection showed no visible failure and the ultrasonic measurement demonstrated no detectable change in thickness in the beam window area. Gamma mapping was also performed in the proton beam window area of the AlMg3 safety-container. The gamma mapping results were used to evaluate the accumulated proton fluence distribution profile, the input data for determining irradiation parameters. Radiochemical analysis of radionuclides produced by spallation reaction in LBE is to improve the understanding of the production and distribution of radionuclides in the target. The results demonstrate that the radionuclides of noble metals, 207Bi, 194Hg/Au are rather homogeneously distributed within the target, while radionuclides of electropositive elements are found to be deposited on the steel-LBE interface. The corrosion effect of LBE on the structural components under intensive irradiation was investigated by metallography. The results show that no evident corrosion damages. However, unexpected deep

  14. Target development for diversified irradiations at a medical cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellerberg, S; Scholten, B; Spahn, I; Bolten, W; Holzgreve, M; Coenen, H H; Qaim, S M

    2015-10-01

    The irradiation facility at an old medical cyclotron (Ep=17 MeV; Ed=10 MeV) was upgraded by extending the beam line and incorporation of solid state targetry. Tests performed to check the quality of the available beam are outlined. Results on nuclear data measurements and improvement of radiochemical separations are described. Using solid targets, with the proton beam falling at a slanting angle of 20°, a few radionuclides, e.g. (75)Se, (120)I, (124)I, etc. were produced with medium currents (up to 20 µA) in no-carrier-added form in quantities sufficient for local use. The extended irradiation facility has considerably enhanced the utility of the medical cyclotron. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. HYDROGENATED TARGETS FOR HIGH ENERGY PROTON GENERATION FROM LASER IRRADIATING IN TNSA REGIME

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzo Torrisi; Mariapompea Cutroneo; Jiri Ullschmied

    2015-01-01

    Polyethylene-based thin targets were irradiated in high vacuum in the TNSA (Target Normal Sheath Acceleration) regime using the PALS laser facility. The plasmais produced in forward direction depending on the laser irradiation conditions, the composition of the target and the geometry. The optical properties of the polymer use nanostructures to increase the laser absorbance. Proton kinetic energies from hundreds keV up to about 3MeV were obtained for optimal conditions enhancing the electric ...

  16. Gas generation during waste treatment of acidic solutions from the dissolution of irradiated LEU targets for 99Mo production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakel, Allen J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Conner, Cliff [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Quigley, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The goal of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program is to limit the use of high-enriched uranium (HEU) in research and test reactors by substituting low-enriched uranium (LEU) wherever possible. The work reported here documents our work to develop the calcining technologies and processes that will be needed for 99Mo production using LEU foil targets and the Modified Cintichem Process. The primary concern with the conversion to LEU from HEU targets is that it would result in a five- to six-fold increase in the total uranium. This increase results in more liquid waste from the process. We have been working to minimize the increase in liquid waste and to minimize the impact of any change in liquid waste. Direct calcination of uranium-rich nitric acid solutions generates NO2 gas and UO3 solid. We have proposed two processes for treating the liquid waste from a Modified Cintichem Process with a LEU foil. One is an optimized direct calcination process that is similar to the process currently in use. The other is a uranyl oxalate precipitation process. The specific goal of the work reported here was to characterize and compare the chemical reactions that occur during these two processes. In particular, the amounts and compositions of the gaseous and solid products were of interest. A series of experiments was carried out to show the effects of temperature and the redox potential of the reaction atmosphere. The primary products of the direct calcination process were mixtures of U3O8 and UO3 solids and NO2 gas. The primary products of the oxalate precipitation process were mixtures of U3O8 and UO2 solid and CO2 gas. Higher temperature and a reducing atmosphere tended to favor quadrivalent over hexavalent uranium in the solid product. These data will help producers to decide between the two processes. In addition, the data can be used

  17. Determination of the accuracy for targeted irradiations of cellular substructures at SNAKE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebenwirth, C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Greubel, C. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Drexler, S.E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich (Germany); Girst, S.; Reindl, J. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Walsh, D.W.M. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Dollinger, G. [Institut für Angewandte Physik und Messtechnik (LRT2), Universität der Bundeswehr München, Neubiberg (Germany); Friedl, A.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Munich (Germany); and others

    2015-04-01

    In the last 10 years the ion microbeam SNAKE, installed at the Munich 14 MV tandem accelerator, has been successfully used for radiobiological experiments by utilizing pattern irradiation without targeting single cells. Now for targeted irradiation of cellular substructures a precise irradiation device was added to the live cell irradiation setup at SNAKE. It combines a sub-micrometer single ion irradiation facility with a high resolution optical fluorescence microscope. Most systematic errors can be reduced or avoided by using the same light path in the microscope for beam spot verification as well as for and target recognition. In addition online observation of the induced cellular responses is possible. The optical microscope and the beam delivering system are controlled by an in-house developed software which integrates the open-source image analysis software, CellProfiler, for semi-automatic target recognition. In this work the targeting accuracy was determined by irradiation of a cross pattern with 55 MeV carbon ions on nucleoli in U2OS and HeLa cells stably expressing a GFP-tagged repair protein MDC1. For target recognition, nuclei were stained with Draq5 and nucleoli were stained with Syto80 or Syto83. The damage response was determined by live-cell imaging of MDC1-GFP accumulation directly after irradiation. No systematic displacement and a random distribution of about 0.7 μm (SD) in x-direction and 0.8 μm (SD) in y-direction were observed. An independent analysis after immunofluorescence staining of the DNA damage marker yH2AX yielded similar results. With this performance a target with a size similar to that of nucleoli (i.e. a diameter of about 3 μm) is hit with a probability of more than 80%, which enables the investigation of the radiation response of cellular subcompartments after targeted ion irradiation in the future.

  18. Gastric irradiation for MALT lymphoma: Reducing the target volume, fast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, A.; Teo, A.; Wittwer, H.; MacManus, M.; Ryan, G. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, Melbourne, VIC (Australia). Departments of Radiation Oncology and Radiotherapy

    1999-02-01

    A case of low-grade gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma treated with radiotherapy alone is reported here. This case highlights treatment issues related to the variability in size and position of the stomach, and the substantial reduction in the size of the irradiated volume achieved by treating the patient in a fasting state. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd 10 refs., 5 figs.

  19. HYDROGENATED TARGETS FOR HIGH ENERGY PROTON GENERATION FROM LASER IRRADIATING IN TNSA REGIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Torrisi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene-based thin targets were irradiated in high vacuum in the TNSA (Target Normal Sheath Acceleration regime using the PALS laser facility. The plasmais produced in forward direction depending on the laser irradiation conditions, the composition of the target and the geometry. The optical properties of the polymer use nanostructures to increase the laser absorbance. Proton kinetic energies from hundreds keV up to about 3MeV were obtained for optimal conditions enhancing the electric field driving the ion acceleration.

  20. The Mitochondria-targeted Nitroxide JP4-039 Augments Potentially Lethal Irradiation Damage Repair

    OpenAIRE

    RAJAGOPALAN, MALOLAN S.; GUPTA, KANIKA; EPPERLY, MICHAEL W.; FRANICOLA, DARCY; ZHANG, XICHEN; WANG, HONG; ZHAO, HONG; TYURIN, VLADIMIR A.; PIERCE, JOSHUA G.; KAGAN, VALERIAN E.; WIPF, PETER; KANAI, ANTHONY J.; GREENBERGER, JOEL S.

    2009-01-01

    It was unknown if a mitochondria-targeted nitroxide (JP4-039) could augment potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) of cells in quiescence. We evaluated 32D cl 3 murine hematopoietic progenitor cells which were irradiated and then either centrifuged to pellets (to simulate PLDR conditions) or left in exponential growth for 0, 24, 48 or 72 h. Pelleted cells demonstrated cell cycle arrest with a greater percentage in the G1-phase than did exponentially growing cells. Irradiation survival curves...

  1. Shock dynamics induced by double-spot laser irradiation of layered targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliverdiev Abutrab A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied the interaction of a double-spot laser beam with targets using the Prague Asterix Laser System (PALS iodine laser working at 0.44 μm wavelength and intensity of about 1015 W/cm2. Shock breakout signals were recorder using time-resolved self-emission from target rear side of irradiated targets. We compared the behavior of pure Al targets and of targets with a foam layer on the laser side. Results have been simulated using hydrodynamic numerical codes.

  2. Separation of Plutonium from Irradiated Fuels and Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, Leonard W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Holliday, Kiel S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Murray, Alice [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Thompson, Major [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Thorp, Donald T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Yarbro, Stephen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Venetz, Theodore J. [Hanford Site, Benton County, WA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Spent nuclear fuel from power production reactors contains moderate amounts of transuranium (TRU) actinides and fission products in addition to the still slightly enriched uranium. Originally, nuclear technology was developed to chemically separate and recover fissionable plutonium from irradiated nuclear fuel for military purposes. Military plutonium separations had essentially ceased by the mid-1990s. Reprocessing, however, can serve multiple purposes, and the relative importance has changed over time. In the 1960’s the vision of the introduction of plutonium-fueled fast-neutron breeder reactors drove the civilian separation of plutonium. More recently, reprocessing has been regarded as a means to facilitate the disposal of high-level nuclear waste, and thus requires development of radically different technical approaches. In the last decade or so, the principal reason for reprocessing has shifted to spent power reactor fuel being reprocessed (1) so that unused uranium and plutonium being recycled reduce the volume, gaining some 25% to 30% more energy from the original uranium in the process and thus contributing to energy security and (2) to reduce the volume and radioactivity of the waste by recovering all long-lived actinides and fission products followed by recycling them in fast reactors where they are transmuted to short-lived fission products; this reduces the volume to about 20%, reduces the long-term radioactivity level in the high-level waste, and complicates the possibility of the plutonium being diverted from civil use – thereby increasing the proliferation resistance of the fuel cycle. In general, reprocessing schemes can be divided into two large categories: aqueous/hydrometallurgical systems, and pyrochemical/pyrometallurgical systems. Worldwide processing schemes are dominated by the aqueous (hydrometallurgical) systems. This document provides a historical review of both categories of reprocessing.

  3. Spot-welding solid targets for high current cyclotron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Paul A.; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Graves, Stephen A.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Nickles, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Zirconium-89 finds broad application for use in positron emission tomography. Its cyclotron production has been limited by the heat transfer from yttrium targets at high beam currents. A spot welding technique allows a three-fold increase in beam current, without affecting 89Zr quality. An yttrium foil, welded to a jet-cooled tantalum support base accommodates a 50 μA proton beam degraded to 14 MeV. The resulting activity yield of 48 ± 4 MBq/(μA·hr) now extends the outreach of 89Zr for a broader distribution. PMID:27771445

  4. Lithium target for accelerator based BNCT neutron source: Influence by the proton irradiation on lithium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, R.; Imahori, Y.; Nakakmura, M.; Takada, M.; Kamada, S.; Hamano, T.; Hoshi, M.; Sato, H.; Itami, J.; Abe, Y.; Fuse, M.

    2012-12-01

    The neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is in the transition stage from nuclear reactor to accelerator based neutron source. Generation of low energy neutron can be achieved by 7Li (p, n) 7Be reaction using accelerator based neutron source. Development of small-scale and safe neutron source is within reach. The melting point of lithium that is used for the target is low, and durability is questioned for an extended use at a high current proton beam. In order to test its durability, we have irradiated lithium with proton beam at the same level as the actual current density, and found no deterioration after 3 hours of continuous irradiation. As a result, it is suggested that lithium target can withstand proton irradiation at high current, confirming suitability as accelerator based neutron source for BNCT.

  5. Development of a Ne gas target for {sup 22}Na production by proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Bidhan Ch., E-mail: mechbidhan@gmail.com; Pal, Gautam [Mechanical Engineering Group, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700 064 (India); Barua, Luna; Das, Sujata Saha [Radiopharmaceuticals Laboratory, Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology, Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata 700 064 (India)

    2016-03-15

    The article presents the design and development of a neon gas target for the production of {sup 22}Na using a proton beam from the room temperature cyclotron in Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata. The target design is made to handle a beam power of 85 W (17 MeV, 5 μA). The design is based on simulation using the computer code FLUKA for the beam dump and CFD-CFX for target cooling. The target has been successfully used for the production of {sup 22}Na in a 6 day long 17 MeV, 5 μA proton irradiation run.

  6. Validation of a New Design of Tellurium Dioxide-Irradiated Target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Fllaoui

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Production of iodine-131 by neutron activation of tellurium in tellurium dioxide (TeO2 material requires a target that meets the safety requirements. In a radiopharmaceutical production unit, a new lid for a can was designed, which permits tight sealing of the target by using tungsten inert gas welding. The leakage rate of all prepared targets was assessed using a helium mass spectrometer. The accepted leakage rate is ≤ 10−4 mbr.L/s, according to the approved safety report related to iodine-131 production in the TRIGA Mark II research reactor (TRIGA: Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics. To confirm the resistance of the new design to the irradiation conditions in the TRIGA Mark II research reactor's central thimble, a study of heat effect on the sealed targets for 7 hours in an oven was conducted and the leakage rates were evaluated. The results show that the tightness of the targets is ensured up to 600°C with the appearance of deformations on lids beyond 450°C. The study of heat transfer through the target was conducted by adopting a one-dimensional approximation, under consideration of the three transfer modes—convection, conduction, and radiation. The quantities of heat generated by gamma and neutron heating were calculated by a validated computational model for the neutronic simulation of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor using the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code. Using the heat transfer equations according to the three modes of heat transfer, the thermal study of I-131 production by irradiation of the target in the central thimble showed that the temperatures of materials do not exceed the corresponding melting points. To validate this new design, several targets have been irradiated in the central thimble according to a preplanned irradiation program, going from 4 hours of irradiation at a power level of 0.5 MW up to 35 hours (7 h/d for 5 days a week at 1.5 MW. The results show that the irradiated targets are

  7. Characterization of advanced polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) targets for TNSA laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, L., E-mail: Lorenzo.Torrisi@unime.it [Department of Physics and Earth Science, Messina University, V.le F.S. d’Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Cutroneo, M.; Semian, V. [Nuclear Physics Institute, ASCR, 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Ceccio, G. [Department of Physics and Earth Science, Messina University, V.le F.S. d’Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • The manuscript presents the procedure to prepare thin advanced targets based on PMMA polymer in order to obtain high ion acceleration in laser-generated plasma. • The manuscript is original for the procedures of polymer preparation and preliminary techniques used. - Abstract: Characterization of advanced micrometric foils suitable for TNSA regime were performed using optical spectroscopy, microscopy and Nd:YAG low laser intensity. Micrometric acrylic beads were produced in polymethylmethacrylate foils through complex physical and technical procedures in order to enhance the absorption coefficient in the IR region. Moreover, Au nanoparticles were embedded in the polymer in order to induce surface plasmon resonance absorption and plasma electron density enhancement. The suitably prepared polymers were investigated at low laser intensity to have evidence of their capability to absorb IR wavelength radiations and promote enhancement of the plasma temperature and density. Results indicate that the high transparence of PMMA foils can be strongly reduced by the presences of the micrometric acrylic beads and that the obtainable laser-generated plasma improves the ion acceleration when high beads density and high Au nanoparticles concentrations are employed.

  8. Post Irradiation Examination Results of the NT-02 Graphite Fins NUMI Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammigan, K. [Fermilab; Hurh, P. [Fermilab; Sidorov, V. [Fermilab; Zwaska, R. [Fermilab; Asner, D. M. [PNL, Richland; Casella, Casella,A.M [PNL, Richland; Edwards, D. J. [PNL, Richland; Schemer-Kohrn, A. L. [PNL, Richland; Senor, D. J. [PNL, Richland

    2017-02-10

    The NT-02 neutrino target in the NuMI beamline at Fermilab is a 95 cm long target made up of segmented graphite fins. It is the longest running NuMI target, which operated with a 120 GeV proton beam with maximum power of 340 kW, and saw an integrated total proton on target of 6.1 1020. Over the last half of its life, gradual degradation of neutrino yield was observed until the target was replaced. The probable causes for the target performance degradation are attributed to radiation damage, possibly including cracking caused by reduction in thermal shock resistance, as well as potential localized oxidation in the heated region of the target. Understanding the long-termstructural response of target materials exposed to proton irradiation is critical as future proton accelerator sources are becoming increasingly more powerful. As a result, an autopsy of the target was carried out to facilitate post-irradiation examination of selected graphite fins. Advanced microstructural imaging and surface elemental analysis techniques were used to characterize the condition of the fins in an effort to identify degradation mechanisms, and the relevant findings are presented in this paper.

  9. Target volume delineation in external beam partial breast irradiation: less inter-observer variation with preoperative- compared to postoperative delineation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leij, F. van der; Elkhuizen, P.H.M.; Janssen, T.M.; Poortmans, P.M.P.; Sangen, M. van der; Scholten, A.N.; Vliet-Vroegindeweij, C. van; Boersma, L.J.

    2014-01-01

    The challenge of adequate target volume definition in external beam partial breast irradiation (PBI) could be overcome with preoperative irradiation, due to less inter-observer variation. We compared the target volume delineation for external beam PBI on preoperative versus postoperative CT scans of

  10. High energy irradiations simulating cosmic-ray-induced planetary gamma ray production. I - Fe target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, A. E.; Parker, R. H.; Yellin, J.

    1986-01-01

    Two thick Fe targets were bombarded by a series of 6 GeV proton irradiations for the purpose of simulating the cosmic ray bombardment of planetary objects in space. Gamma ray energy spectra were obtained with a germanium solid state detector during the bombardment, and 46 of the gamma ray lines were ascribed to the Fe targets. A comparison between observed and predicted values showed good agreement for Fe lines from neutron inelastic scattering and spallation reactions, and less satisfactory agreement for neutron capture reactions, the latter attributed to the difference in composition between the Fe target and the mean lunar abundance used in the modeling. Through an analysis of the irradiation results together with continuum data obtained in lunar orbit, it was found that 100 hours of measurement with a current instrument should generate a spectrum containing approximately 20 lines due to Fe alone, with a 2-sigma sensitivity for detection of about 0.2 percent.

  11. Proton driven acceleration by intense laser pulses irradiating thin hydrogenated targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, L., E-mail: lorenzo.torrisi@unime.it [Dip.to di Fisica, Università di Messina, V.le F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 44, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cutroneo, M.; Cavallaro, S.; Giuffrida, L.; Andò, L.; Cirrone, P. [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 44, 95123 Catania (Italy); Bertuccio, G.; Puglisi, D. [Dip.to di Ing. Elettronica e Sci. dell’Informaz., Pol. di Milano,V. Ponzio34, 20133 Milano (Italy); Calcagno, L. [Dip.to di Fisica, Università di Catania, Via S. Sofia 44, 95123 Catania (Italy); Verona, C. [Dip.to di Ing. Meccanica, Univ. Roma “Tor Vergata”, V. del Politecnico 1, Roma (Italy); Picciotto, A. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler–IRST, Via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Krasa, J.; Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Laska, L.; Krousky, E.; Pfeiffer, M.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, v.v.i., 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Wolowski, J. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, IPPLM,23 Hery Str. 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); and others

    2013-05-01

    The Asterix iodine laser of the PALS laboratory in Prague, operating at 1315 nm fundamental frequency, 300 ps pulse duration, 600 J maximum pulse energy and 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2} intensity, is employed to irradiate thin hydrogenated targets placed in high vacuum. Different metallic and polymeric targets allow to generate multi-energetic and multi-specie ion beams showing peculiar properties. The plasma obtained by the laser irradiation is monitored, in terms of properties of the emitted charge particles, by using time-of-flight techniques and Thomson parabola spectrometer (TPS). A particular attention is given to the proton beam production in terms of the maximum energy, emission yield and angular distribution as a function of the laser energy, focal position (FP), target thickness and composition.

  12. Proton driven acceleration by intense laser pulses irradiating thin hydrogenated targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Cavallaro, S.; Giuffrida, L.; Andò, L.; Cirrone, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Puglisi, D.; Calcagno, L.; Verona, C.; Picciotto, A.; Krasa, J.; Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Laska, L.; Krousky, E.; Pfeiffer, M.; Skala, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Wolowski, J.; Badziak, J.; Rosinski, M.; Ryc, L.; Szydlowski, A.

    2013-05-01

    The Asterix iodine laser of the PALS laboratory in Prague, operating at 1315 nm fundamental frequency, 300 ps pulse duration, 600 J maximum pulse energy and 1016 W/cm2 intensity, is employed to irradiate thin hydrogenated targets placed in high vacuum. Different metallic and polymeric targets allow to generate multi-energetic and multi-specie ion beams showing peculiar properties. The plasma obtained by the laser irradiation is monitored, in terms of properties of the emitted charge particles, by using time-of-flight techniques and Thomson parabola spectrometer (TPS). A particular attention is given to the proton beam production in terms of the maximum energy, emission yield and angular distribution as a function of the laser energy, focal position (FP), target thickness and composition.

  13. The development of uranium foil farication technology utilizing twin roll method for Mo-99 irradiation target

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, C K; Park, H D

    2002-01-01

    MDS Nordion in Canada, occupying about 75% of global supply of Mo-99 isotope, has provided the irradiation target of Mo-99 using the rod-type UAl sub x alloys with HEU(High Enrichment Uranium). ANL (Argonne National Laboratory) through co-operation with BATAN in Indonesia, leading RERTR (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors) program substantially for nuclear non-proliferation, has designed and fabricated the annular cylinder of uranium targets, and successfully performed irradiation test, in order to develop the fabrication technology of fission Mo-99 using LEU(Low Enrichment Uranium). As the uranium foils could be fabricated in laboratory scale, not in commercialized scale by hot rolling method due to significant problems in foil quality, productivity and economic efficiency, attention has shifted to the development of new technology. Under these circumstances, the invention of uranium foil fabrication technology utilizing twin-roll casting method in KAERI is found to be able to fabricate LEU or...

  14. Laser irradiations of advanced targets promoting absorption resonance for ion acceleration in TNSA regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, L., E-mail: Lorenzo.Torrisi@unime.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e SdT, Università di Messina, Messina (Italy); Calcagno, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Università di Catania (Italy); Giulietti, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Cutroneo, M. [Nuclear Physics Institute, ASCR, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic); Zimbone, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Università di Catania (Italy); Skala, J. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, v.v.i., 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-15

    Advanced targets based on Au nanoparticles embedded in polymers films show high absorption coefficient in the UV–visible and infrared region. They can be employed to enhance the proton and ion acceleration from the laser-generated plasma in TNSA regime. In conditions of “p” polarized laser irradiations at 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} intensity, in these films can be induced resonant absorption due to plasma wave excitation. Plasma on-line diagnostics is based on SiC detectors, Thomson spectrometry and X-ray streak camera imaging. Measurements of kinetic energy of accelerated ions indicate a significant increment using polymer targets containing gold nanoparticles and “p” polarized laser light with respect to pure polymers and unpolarized light irradiation.

  15. Laser irradiations of advanced targets promoting absorption resonance for ion acceleration in TNSA regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Calcagno, L.; Giulietti, D.; Cutroneo, M.; Zimbone, M.; Skala, J.

    2015-07-01

    Advanced targets based on Au nanoparticles embedded in polymers films show high absorption coefficient in the UV-visible and infrared region. They can be employed to enhance the proton and ion acceleration from the laser-generated plasma in TNSA regime. In conditions of "p" polarized laser irradiations at 1015 W/cm2 intensity, in these films can be induced resonant absorption due to plasma wave excitation. Plasma on-line diagnostics is based on SiC detectors, Thomson spectrometry and X-ray streak camera imaging. Measurements of kinetic energy of accelerated ions indicate a significant increment using polymer targets containing gold nanoparticles and "p" polarized laser light with respect to pure polymers and unpolarized light irradiation.

  16. Behavior of structural and target materials irradiated in spallation neutron environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stubbins, J.F. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Wechsler, M. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Borden, M.; Sommer, W.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes considerations for selection of structural and target materials for accelerator-driven neutron sources. Due to the operating constraints of proposed accelerator-driven neutron sources, the criteria for selection are different than those commonly applied to fission and fusion systems. Established irradiation performance of various alloy systems is taken into account in the selection criteria. Nevertheless, only limited materials performance data are available which specifically related to neutron energy spectra anticipated for spallation sources.

  17. Bystander-induced differentiation: A major response to targeted irradiation of a urothelial explant model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyakov, Oleg V. [Gray Cancer Institute, P.O. Box 100, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex HA6 2JR (United Kingdom) and Radiation and Environmental Science Centre, Dublin Institute of Technology, Focas Institute, Kevin St., Dublin 9 (Ireland)]. E-mail: oleg.belyakov@stuk.fi; Folkard, Melvyn [Gray Cancer Institute, P.O. Box 100, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex HA6 2JR (United Kingdom); Mothersill, Carmel [Radiation and Environmental Science Centre, Dublin Institute of Technology, Focas Institute, Kevin St., Dublin 9 (Ireland); Prise, Kevin M. [Gray Cancer Institute, P.O. Box 100, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex HA6 2JR (United Kingdom); Michael, Barry D. [Gray Cancer Institute, P.O. Box 100, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, Middlesex HA6 2JR (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-11

    A ureter primary explant technique, using porcine tissue sections was developed to study bystander effects under in vivo like conditions where dividing and differentiated cells are present. Targeted irradiations of ureter tissue fragments were performed with the Gray Cancer Institute charged particle microbeam at a single location (2 {mu}m precision) with 10 {sup 3}He{sup 2+} particles (5 MeV; LET 70 keV/{mu}m). After irradiation the ureter tissue section was incubated for 7 days allowing explant outgrowth to be formed. Differentiation was estimated using antibodies to Uroplakin III, a specific marker of terminal urothelial differentiation. Even although only a single region of the tissue section was targeted, thousands of additional cells were found to undergo bystander-induced differentiation in the explant outgrowth. This resulted in an overall increase in the fraction of differentiated cells from 63.5 {+-} 5.4% to 76.6 {+-} 5.6%. These changes are much greater than that observed for the induction of damage in this model. One interpretation of these results is that in the tissue environment, differentiation is a much more significant response to targeted irradiation and potentially a protective mechanism.

  18. Target temperature dependence of contact angle of water for silica glasses irradiated by argon ions without mass-separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okabe, Yoshio; Tanisawa, Kazuhiko; Ito, Katsutaka; Kawajiri, Kyoji [Saitama Inst. of Tech., Okabe (Japan); Nakao, Aiko; Iwaki, Masaya; Ogiso, Hisato; Nakano, Shizuka

    1995-06-01

    Target temperature dependence of the contact angle of pure water for silica glasses during argon ion irradiation is studied in order to reduce or suppress the adsorption of hydrocarbons on silica glasses accompanying to ion beam irradiation. Argon ions were irradiated with a straight type ion implanter SIT-100 with ion acceleration voltage of 80 kV and a quantity of electricity for ion irradiation of 0.1 to 20 mC/cm{sup 2}. The target temperature during ion irradiation is controlled by the temperature control of the circulating water through the target holder. Temperature of the circulating water is 3 to 57degC. The contact angle of silica glass irradiated with Ar ions is high as 70 - 80deg in case of 1 mC/cm{sup 2} irradiation at a temperature of about 40degC and low as 30 to 40deg at 3 to 31degC. Results of the quantitative analysis of the surface compositions by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy show that the carbon concentration at the glass surface is similar to that of the unirradiated glass in case of low target temperature. Consequently, the target temperature during the irradiation is found to be one of factors to reduce the hydrocarbon adsorption. (T.H.).

  19. Single freeform surface design for prescribed input wavefront and target irradiance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bösel, Christoph; Gross, Herbert

    2017-09-01

    In beam shaping applications, the minimization of the number of necessary optical elements for the beam shaping process can benefit the compactness of the optical system and reduce its cost. The single freeform surface design for input wavefronts, which are neither planar nor spherical, is therefore of interest. In this work, the design of single freeform surfaces for a given zero-étendue source and complex target irradiances is investigated. Hence, not only collimated input beams or point sources are assumed. Instead, a predefined input ray direction vector field and irradiance distribution on a source plane, which has to be redistributed by a single freeform surface to give the predefined target irradiance, is considered. To solve this design problem, a partial differential equation (PDE) or PDE system, respectively, for the unknown surface and its corresponding ray mapping is derived from energy conservation and the ray-tracing equations. In contrast to former PDE formulations of the single freeform design problem, the derived PDE of Monge-Ampère type is formulated for general zero-étendue sources in Cartesian coordinates. The PDE system is discretized with finite differences, and the resulting nonlinear equation system is solved by a root-finding algorithm. The basis of the efficient solution of the PDE system builds the introduction of an initial iterate construction approach for a given input direction vector field, which uses optimal mass transport with a quadratic cost function. After a detailed description of the numerical algorithm, the efficiency of the design method is demonstrated by applying it to several design examples. This includes the redistribution of a collimated input beam beyond the paraxial approximation, the shaping of point source radiation, and the shaping of an astigmatic input wavefront into a complex target irradiance distribution.

  20. Production of krypton and xenon isotopes in thick stony and iron targets isotropically irradiated with 1600 MeV protons

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gilabert, E; Lavielle, B; Michel, R; Leya, I; Neumann, S; Herpers, U

    2002-01-01

    Abstract— Two spherical targets made of gabbro with a radius of 25 cm and of steel with a radius of 10 cm were irradiated isotropically with 1600 MeV protons at the SATURNE synchrotron at Laboratoire National Saturne (LNS...

  1. Gamma Knife irradiation method based on dosimetric controls to target small areas in rat brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constanzo, Julie; Paquette, Benoit; Charest, Gabriel; Masson-Côté, Laurence; Guillot, Mathieu

    2015-05-01

    Targeted and whole-brain irradiation in humans can result in significant side effects causing decreased patient quality of life. To adequately investigate structural and functional alterations after stereotactic radiosurgery, preclinical studies are needed. The purpose of this work is to establish a robust standardized method of targeted irradiation on small regions of the rat brain. Euthanized male Fischer rats were imaged in a stereotactic bed, by computed tomography (CT), to estimate positioning variations relative to the bregma skull reference point. Using a rat brain atlas and the stereotactic bregma coordinates obtained from CT images, different regions of the brain were delimited and a treatment plan was generated. A single isocenter treatment plan delivering ≥ 100 Gy in 100% of the target volume was produced by Leksell GammaPlan using the 4 mm diameter collimator of sectors 4, 5, 7, and 8 of the Gamma Knife unit. Impact of positioning deviations of the rat brain on dose deposition was simulated by GammaPlan and validated with dosimetric measurements. The authors' results showed that 90% of the target volume received 100 ± 8 Gy and the maximum of deposited dose was 125 ± 0.7 Gy, which corresponds to an excellent relative standard deviation of 0.6%. This dose deposition calculated with GammaPlan was validated with dosimetric films resulting in a dose-profile agreement within 5%, both in X- and Z-axes. The authors' results demonstrate the feasibility of standardizing the irradiation procedure of a small volume in the rat brain using a Gamma Knife.

  2. Gamma Knife irradiation method based on dosimetric controls to target small areas in rat brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constanzo, Julie; Paquette, Benoit; Charest, Gabriel [Center for Radiotherapy Research, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiobiology, Université de Sherbrooke, 3001 12th Avenue Nord, Sherbrooke, Québec J1H 5N4 (Canada); Masson-Côté, Laurence; Guillot, Mathieu, E-mail: mathieu.guillot@usherbrooke.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, 3001 12th Avenue Nord, Sherbrooke, Québec J1H 5N4, Canada and Center for Radiotherapy Research, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Radiobiology, Université de Sherbrooke, 3001 12th Avenue Nord, Sherbrooke, Québec J1H 5N4 (Canada)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: Targeted and whole-brain irradiation in humans can result in significant side effects causing decreased patient quality of life. To adequately investigate structural and functional alterations after stereotactic radiosurgery, preclinical studies are needed. The purpose of this work is to establish a robust standardized method of targeted irradiation on small regions of the rat brain. Methods: Euthanized male Fischer rats were imaged in a stereotactic bed, by computed tomography (CT), to estimate positioning variations relative to the bregma skull reference point. Using a rat brain atlas and the stereotactic bregma coordinates obtained from CT images, different regions of the brain were delimited and a treatment plan was generated. A single isocenter treatment plan delivering ≥100 Gy in 100% of the target volume was produced by Leksell GammaPlan using the 4 mm diameter collimator of sectors 4, 5, 7, and 8 of the Gamma Knife unit. Impact of positioning deviations of the rat brain on dose deposition was simulated by GammaPlan and validated with dosimetric measurements. Results: The authors’ results showed that 90% of the target volume received 100 ± 8 Gy and the maximum of deposited dose was 125 ± 0.7 Gy, which corresponds to an excellent relative standard deviation of 0.6%. This dose deposition calculated with GammaPlan was validated with dosimetric films resulting in a dose-profile agreement within 5%, both in X- and Z-axes. Conclusions: The authors’ results demonstrate the feasibility of standardizing the irradiation procedure of a small volume in the rat brain using a Gamma Knife.

  3. Post-irradiation analysis of the tantalum container of an ISOLDE LBE target

    CERN Document Server

    Noah, E; Bruetsch, R; Catherall, R; Gavillet, D; Krbanjevic, J; Linder, H P; Martin, M; Neuhausen, J; Schumann, D; Stora, T; Zanini, L

    2012-01-01

    CERN-ISOLDE operates a range of oxides, carbides, refractory metal foils and liquid metal targets for the production of radioactive ion beams. Following irradiation with a pulsed beam of 1 GeV and 1.4 GeV protons at temperatures reaching 600 degrees C, the tantalum container of a liquid lead bismuth eutectic (LBE) target was examined. A thin layer of Pb/Bi was observed on the inner surface of the container. A sample of the surface prepared using the focused ion beam technique was investigated using SEM and EDX. Results show a higher concentration of bismuth at the interface with tantalum and micron-sized cracks in the tantalum filled with LBE. Implications of these results for the lifetime of the target container which has been known to fail under pulsed beam operation are discussed. (C) 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Reduced cost design of liquid lithium target for international fusion material irradiation facility (IFMIF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Ida, Mizuho; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Hiroshi [Department of Fussion Engineering Research, Naka Fusion Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Yutani, Toshiaki [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-01-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is being jointly planned to provide an accelerator-based D-Li neutron source to produce intense high energy neutrons (2 MW/m{sup 2}) up to 200 dpa and a sufficient irradiation volume (500 cm{sup 3}) for testing the candidate materials and components up to about a full lifetime of their anticipated use in ITER and DEMO. To realize such a condition, 40 MeV deuteron beam with a current of 250 mA is injected into high speed liquid lithium flow with a speed of 20 m/s. Following Conceptual Design Activity (1995-1998), a design study with focus on cost reduction without changing its original mission has been done in 1999. The following major changes to the CAD target design have been considered in the study and included in the new design: i) number of the Li target has been changed from 2 to 1, ii) spare of impurity traps of the Li loop was removed although the spare will be stored in a laboratory for quick exchange, iii) building volume was reduced via design changes in lithium loop length. This paper describes the reduced cost design of the lithium target system and recent status of Key Element Technology activities. (author)

  5. Mono-energetic ions emission by nanosecond laser solid target irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muoio, A., E-mail: Annamaria.Muoio@lns.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Tudisco, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Altana, C. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Catania, Via S. Sofia 64, 95123 Catania (Italy); Lanzalone, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Università degli Studi di Enna “Kore”, Via delle Olimpiadi, 94100 Enna (Italy); Mascali, D.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Schillaci, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare – Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy); Trifirò, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Messina, Viale F.S. D’Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina (Italy); Sezione INFN, Catania (Italy)

    2016-09-01

    An experimental campaign aiming to investigate the acceleration mechanisms through laser–matter interaction in nanosecond domain has been carried out at the LENS (Laser Energy for Nuclear Science) laboratory of INFN-LNS, Catania. Pure Al targets were irradiated by 6 ns laser pulses at different pumping energies, up to 2 J. Advanced diagnostics tools were used to characterize the plasma plume and ion production. We show the preliminary results of this experimental campaign, and especially the ones showing the production of multicharged ions having very narrow energy spreads.

  6. Recovery and purification of nickel-63 from HFIR-irradiated targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, D.F.; O`Kelley, G.D.; Knauer, J.B.; Porter, C.E.; Wiggins, J.T.

    1993-06-01

    The production of large quantities of high-specific-activity {sup 63}Ni (>10 Ci/g) requires both a highly enriched {sup 62}Ni target and a long irradiation period at high neutron flux. Trace impurities in the nickel and associated target materials are also activated and account for a significant fraction of the discharged activity and essentially all of the gamma activity. While most of these undesirable activation products can be removed as chloride complexes during anion exchange, chromium, present at {sup 51}Cr, and scandium, present as {sup 46}Sc, are exceptions and require additional processing to achieve the desired purity. Optimized flowsheets are discussed based upon the current development and production experience.

  7. Recovery and purification of nickel-63 from HFIR-irradiated targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, D.F.; O' Kelley, G.D.; Knauer, J.B.; Porter, C.E.; Wiggins, J.T.

    1993-06-01

    The production of large quantities of high-specific-activity [sup 63]Ni (>10 Ci/g) requires both a highly enriched [sup 62]Ni target and a long irradiation period at high neutron flux. Trace impurities in the nickel and associated target materials are also activated and account for a significant fraction of the discharged activity and essentially all of the gamma activity. While most of these undesirable activation products can be removed as chloride complexes during anion exchange, chromium, present at [sup 51]Cr, and scandium, present as [sup 46]Sc, are exceptions and require additional processing to achieve the desired purity. Optimized flowsheets are discussed based upon the current development and production experience.

  8. X-ray and fast ion generation from metal targets by femtosecond laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okano, Yasuaki; Kishimura, Hiroaki; Hironaka, Yoichiro; Nakamura, Kazutaka G.; Kondo, Ken-ichi

    2002-09-30

    X-ray and fast ion generation has been studied by femtosecond laser irradiation (52 fs, 790 nm) on metal targets (copper and iron), where hard X-ray emission takes place at power density up to 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. X-ray intensities and kinetic energy distributions of ions are observed as a function of the power density. The ion energy distributions for each target show several peak components, which are fast ions (high-energy component in keV range), and additional low-energy component (a few hundreds of eV). Average fast ion energshow a strong dependence on the power density, and are comparable to ponderomotive potential.

  9. Mass-limited Sn target irradiated by dual laser pulses for an extreme ultraviolet lithography source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Y.; Tillack, M. S.; Harilal, S. S.; Sequoia, K. L.; Burdt, R. A.; Najmabadi, F.

    2007-05-01

    A thin Sn film was investigated as a mass-limited target for an extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography source. It was found that those energetic ions that are intrinsic with the mass-limited Sn target could be efficiently mitigated by introducing a low-energy prepulse. High in-band conversion efficiency from a laser to 13.5 nm EUV light could be obtained using an Sn film with a thickness down to 30 nm when irradiated by dual laser pulses. It was shown that the combination of dual pulse and inert Ar gas could fully mitigate ions with a low ambient pressure nearly without the penalty of the absorption of the EUV light.

  10. Low-Dose Irradiation Enhances Gene Targeting in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatada, Seigo; Subramanian, Aparna; Mandefro, Berhan; Ren, Songyang; Kim, Ho Won; Tang, Jie; Funari, Vincent; Baloh, Robert H; Sareen, Dhruv; Arumugaswami, Vaithilingaraja; Svendsen, Clive N

    2015-09-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are now being used for both disease modeling and cell therapy; however, efficient homologous recombination (HR) is often crucial to develop isogenic control or reporter lines. We showed that limited low-dose irradiation (LDI) using either γ-ray or x-ray exposure (0.4 Gy) significantly enhanced HR frequency, possibly through induction of DNA repair/recombination machinery including ataxia-telangiectasia mutated, histone H2A.X and RAD51 proteins. LDI could also increase HR efficiency by more than 30-fold when combined with the targeting tools zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases, and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats. Whole-exome sequencing confirmed that the LDI administered to hPSCs did not induce gross genomic alterations or affect cellular viability. Irradiated and targeted lines were karyotypically normal and made all differentiated lineages that continued to express green fluorescent protein targeted at the AAVS1 locus. This simple method allows higher throughput of new, targeted hPSC lines that are crucial to expand the use of disease modeling and to develop novel avenues of cell therapy. The simple and relevant technique described in this report uses a low level of radiation to increase desired gene modifications in human pluripotent stem cells by an order of magnitude. This higher efficiency permits greater throughput with reduced time and cost. The low level of radiation also greatly increased the recombination frequency when combined with developed engineered nucleases. Critically, the radiation did not lead to increases in DNA mutations or to reductions in overall cellular viability. This novel technique enables not only the rapid production of disease models using human stem cells but also the possibility of treating genetically based diseases by correcting patient-derived cells. ©AlphaMed Press.

  11. Blast-Wave Generation and Propagation in Rapidly Heated Laser-Irradiated Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, S. T.; Stillman, C. R.; Nilson, P. M.; Solodov, A. A.; Froula, D. H.

    2017-10-01

    Time-resolved extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectroscopy was used to study the creation and propagation of a >100-Mbar blast wave in a target irradiated by an intense (>1018WWcm2 cm2) laser pulse. Blast waves provide a platform to generate immense pressures in the laboratory. A temporal double flash of XUV radiation was observed when viewing the rear side of the target, which is attributed to the emergence of a blast wave following rapid heating by a fast-electron beam generated from the laser pulse. The time-history of XUV emission in the photon energy range of 50 to 200 eV was recorded with an x-ray streak camera with 7-ps temporal resolution. The heating and expansion of the target was simulated with an electron transport code coupled to 1-D radiation-hydrodynamics simulations. The temporal delay between the two flashes measured in a systematic study of target thickness and composition was found to evolve in good agreement with a Sedov-Taylor blast-wave solution. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and Department of Energy Office of Science Award Number DE-SC-0012317.

  12. Chlorin e6 Conjugated Interleukin-6 Receptor Aptamers Selectively Kill Target Cells Upon Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Kruspe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT uses the therapeutic properties of light in combination with certain chemicals, called photosensitizers, to successfully treat brain, breast, prostate, and skin cancers. To improve PDT, current research focuses on the development of photosensitizers to specifically target cancer cells. In the past few years, aptamers have been developed to directly deliver cargo molecules into target cells. We conjugated the photosensitizer chlorin e6 (ce6 with a human interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R binding RNA aptamer, AIR-3A yielding AIR-3A-ce6 for application in high efficient PDT. AIR-3A-ce6 was rapidly and specifically internalized by IL-6R presenting (IL-6R+ cells. Upon light irradiation, targeted cells were selectively killed, while free ce6 did not show any toxic effect. Cells lacking the IL-6R were also not affected by AIR-3A-ce6. With this approach, we improved the target specificity of ce6-mediated PDT. In the future, other tumor-specific aptamers might be used to selectively localize photosensitizers into cells of interest and improve the efficacy and specificity of PDT in cancer and other diseases.

  13. Design and Demonstration of a Material-Plasma Exposure Target Station for Neutron Irradiated Samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapp, Juergen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Aaron, A. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bell, Gary L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burgess, Thomas W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ellis, Ronald James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Giuliano, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kiggans, James O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lessard, Timothy L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ohriner, Evan Keith [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perkins, Dale E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Varma, Venugopal Koikal [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-20

    Fusion energy is the most promising energy source for the future, and one of the most important problems to be solved progressing to a commercial fusion reactor is the identification of plasma-facing materials compatible with the extreme conditions in the fusion reactor environment. The development of plasma–material interaction (PMI) science and the technology of plasma-facing components are key elements in the development of the next step fusion device in the United States, the so-called Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF). All of these PMI issues and the uncertain impact of the 14-MeV neutron irradiation have been identified in numerous expert panel reports to the fusion community. The 2007 Greenwald report classifies reactor plasma-facing materials (PFCs) and materials as the only Tier 1 issues, requiring a “. . . major extrapolation from the current state of knowledge, need for qualitative improvements and substantial development for both the short and long term.” The Greenwald report goes on to list 19 gaps in understanding and performance related to the plasma–material interface for the technology facilities needed for DEMO-oriented R&D and DEMO itself. Of the 15 major gaps, six (G7, G9, G10, G12, G13) can possibly be addressed with ORNL’s proposal of an advanced Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment. Establishing this mid-scale plasma materials test facility at ORNL is a key element in ORNL’s strategy to secure a leadership role for decades of fusion R&D. That is to say, our end goal is to bring the “signature facility” FNSF home to ORNL. This project is related to the pre-conceptual design of an innovative target station for a future Material–Plasma Exposure eXperiment (MPEX). The target station will be designed to expose candidate fusion reactor plasma-facing materials and components (PFMs and PFCs) to conditions anticipated in fusion reactors, where PFCs will be exposed to dense high-temperature hydrogen plasmas providing steady

  14. Development of a PVD-based manufacturing process of monolithic LEU irradiation targets for {sup 99}Mo production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollmer, Tobias

    2015-08-03

    {sup 99}Mo is the most important radioisotope in nuclear medicine. It is produced by fission of uranium in irradiation targets. The usage of cylindrical monolithic targets can ensure a safe supply of {sup 99}Mo and at the same reduce the amount of highly radioactive waste generated during production. To manufacture these targets, a novel PVD-based technique was developed. Both the feasibility and the high efficiency of this process were demonstrated in a prototype apparatus.

  15. Durability of targets and foils irradiated by intense heavy ion beams in experiments on synthesis of superheavy nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagaidak, R. N.

    2017-09-01

    Durability of targets and window foils irradiated by intense heavy ion (HI) beams in the experiments on synthesis of superheavy nuclei, which are carried out in Dubna with Gas-Filled Recoil Separator (DGFRS), has been viewed in various ways. High fluxes of HI and heat generations, which are realized within relatively small areas and thicknesses of these elements of DGFRS, are inherent in such experiments. The lifetimes of the targets and window foils are estimated as the result of HI beam actions such as radiation damages, sputtering and evaporation of atoms. The most critical processes determining the durability of the targets and window foils are discussed. The processes of heat transfer due to thermal conductivity, convection and radiation are also considered from the point of view of possible ways of cooling of the elements irradiated by an intense HI beam. Temperatures of the targets and window foils as functions of time are calculated in the conditions of their pulse heating by the beam followed by radiative cooling of their surfaces. Such pulsing mode is realized in the DGFRS operation with the rotation of target and window foils irradiated by a continuous HI beam. Estimates show that radiative cooling in such conditions can be the most effective way of heat removal at the temperature of several hundred degrees. Such temperature can be reached on the surfaces of the target and window foils irradiated by HI beams at the intensity 1013 s-1.

  16. Live cell imaging of mitochondria following targeted irradiation in situ reveals rapid and highly localized loss of membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Dietrich W M; Siebenwirth, Christian; Greubel, Christoph; Ilicic, Katarina; Reindl, Judith; Girst, Stefanie; Muggiolu, Giovanna; Simon, Marina; Barberet, Philippe; Seznec, Hervé; Zischka, Hans; Multhoff, Gabriele; Schmid, Thomas E; Dollinger, Guenther

    2017-04-25

    The reliance of all cell types on the mitochondrial function for survival makes mitochondria an interesting target when trying to understand their role in the cellular response to ionizing radiation. By harnessing highly focused carbon ions and protons using microbeams, we have performed in situ live cell imaging of the targeted irradiation of individual mitochondria stained with Tetramethyl rhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE), a cationic fluorophore which accumulates electrophoretically in polarized mitochondria. Targeted irradiation with both carbon ions and protons down to beam spots of <1 μm induced a near instant loss of mitochondrial TMRE fluorescence signal in the targeted area. The loss of TMRE after targeted irradiation represents a radiation induced change in mitochondrial membrane potential. This is the first time such mitochondrial responses have been documented in situ after targeted microbeam irradiation. The methods developed and the results obtained have the ability to shed new light on not just mitochondria's response to radiation but to further elucidate a putative mechanism of radiation induced depolarization and mitochondrial response.

  17. Systems and methods for managing shared-path instrumentation and irradiation targets in a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinold, Mark R.; Berger, John F.; Loper, Milton H.; Runkle, Gary A.

    2015-12-29

    Systems and methods permit discriminate access to nuclear reactors. Systems provide penetration pathways to irradiation target loading and offloading systems, instrumentation systems, and other external systems at desired times, while limiting such access during undesired times. Systems use selection mechanisms that can be strategically positioned for space sharing to connect only desired systems to a reactor. Selection mechanisms include distinct paths, forks, diverters, turntables, and other types of selectors. Management methods with such systems permits use of the nuclear reactor and penetration pathways between different systems and functions, simultaneously and at only distinct desired times. Existing TIP drives and other known instrumentation and plant systems are useable with access management systems and methods, which can be used in any nuclear plant with access restrictions.

  18. Proton radiography of magnetic field produced by ultra-intense laser irradiating capacity-coil target

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, W W; Chen, J; Cai, H B; He, S K; Zhou, W M; Shan, L Q; Lu, F; Wu, Y C; Hong, W; Liu, D X; Bi, B; Zhang, F; Xue, F B; Li, B Y; Zhang, B; He, Y L; He, W; Jiao, J L; Dong, K G; Zhang, F Q; Deng, Z G; Zhang, Z M; Cui, B; Han, D; Zhou, K N; Wang, X D; Zhao, Z Q; Cao, L F; Zhang, B H; He, X T; Gu, Y Q

    2014-01-01

    Ultra-intense ultra-short laser is firstly used to irradiate the capacity-coil target to generate magnetic field. The spatial structure and temporal evolution of huge magnetic fields were studied with time-gated proton radiography method. A magnetic flux density of 40T was measured by comparing the proton deflection and particle track simulations. Although the laser pulse duration is only 30fs, the generated magnetic field can last for over 100 picoseconds. The energy conversion efficiency from laser to magnetic field can reach as high as ~20%. The results indicate that tens of tesla (T) magnetic field could be produced in many ultra intense laser facilities around the world, and higher magnetic field could be produced by picosecond lasers.

  19. Estrogen enhanced cell-cell signalling in breast cancer cells exposed to targeted irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Held Kathryn D

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Radiation-induced bystander responses, where cells respond to their neighbours being irradiated are being extensively studied. Although evidence shows that bystander responses can be induced in many types of cells, it is not known whether there is a radiation-induced bystander effect in breast cancer cells, where the radiosensitivity may be dependent on the role of the cellular estrogen receptor (ER. This study investigated radiation-induced bystander responses in estrogen receptor-positive MCF-7 and estrogen receptor-negative MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Methods The influence of estrogen and anti-estrogen treatments on the bystander response was determined by individually irradiating a fraction of cells within the population with a precise number of helium-3 using a charged particle microbeam. Damage was scored as chromosomal damage measured as micronucleus formation. Results A bystander response measured as increased yield of micronucleated cells was triggered in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. The contribution of the bystander response to total cell damage in MCF-7 cells was higher than that in MDA-MB-231 cells although the radiosensitivity of MDA-MB-231 was higher than MCF-7. Treatment of cells with 17β-estradiol (E2 increased the radiosensitivity and the bystander response in MCF-7 cells, and the effect was diminished by anti-estrogen tamoxifen (TAM. E2 also increased the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS in MCF-7 cells in the absence of radiation. In contrast, E2 and TAM had no influence on the bystander response and ROS levels in MDA-MB-231 cells. Moreover, the treatment of MCF-7 cells with antioxidants eliminated both the E2-induced ROS increase and E2-enhanced bystander response triggered by the microbeam irradiation, which indicates that ROS are involved in the E2-enhanced bystander micronuclei formation after microbeam irradiation. Conclusion The observation of bystander responses in breast

  20. Wall interactions with plasma generated by vacuum arcs and targets irradiated by intense laser beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beilis, Isak I [Electrical Discharge and Plasma Laboratory, School of Electrical Engineering, Fleischman Faculty of Engineering Tel Aviv University, PO Box 39040, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2009-02-01

    The theory of plasma-wall interactions in vacuum arc spots and in laser irradiated spots is reviewed in light of Langmuir's fundamental contributions to the theory of plasmas, sheaths, evaporation and electron emission. The mechanisms of plasma generation in the electrode and laser-target vapors are described. Models of sheath structures at surfaces which emit vapor and electrons are presented and the influence of the relation between the rates of electron and vapor emission on the electrical current continuity at the plasma-electrode boundary is discussed. The mechanisms of current continuity in the vacuum arc anode region, in the short vacuum arc, and in transient cathode spots are described. The important role of the near-target sheath in laser generated plasma is shown, indicating the effect of converting laser radiation absorbed in plasma into kinetic and potential energy of charged particles that impinge on the target. The description is summarized showing that understanding these phenomena relies on Langmuir's pioneering work.

  1. Role of choline PET/CT in guiding target volume delineation for irradiation of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzenboeck, S.M.; Kurth, J. [University Medical Centre Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Gocke, C.; Kuhnt, T.; Hildebrandt, G. [University Medical Centre Rostock, Department of Radiotherapy, Rostock (Germany); Krause, B.J. [University Medical Centre Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Universitaet Rostock, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Universitaetsmedizin Rostock, Rostock (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Choline PET/CT has shown limitations for the detection of primary prostate cancer and nodal metastatic disease, mainly due to limited sensitivity and specificity. Conversely in the restaging of prostate cancer recurrence, choline PET/CT is a promising imaging modality for the detection of local regional and nodal recurrence with an impact on therapy management. This review highlights current literature on choline PET/CT for radiation treatment planning in primary and recurrent prostate cancer. Due to limited sensitivity and specificity in differentiating between benign and malignant prostatic tissues in primary prostate cancer, there is little enthusiasm for target volume delineation based on choline PET/CT. Irradiation planning for the treatment of single lymph node metastases on the basis of choline PET/CT is controversial due to its limited lesion-based sensitivity in primary nodal staging. In high-risk prostate cancer, choline PET/CT might diagnose lymph node metastases, which potentially can be included in the conventional irradiation field. Prior to radiation treatment of recurrent prostate cancer, choline PET/CT may prove useful for patient stratification by excluding distant disease which would require systemic therapy. In patients with local recurrence, choline PET/CT can be used to delineate local sites of recurrence within the prostatic resection bed allowing a boost to PET-positive sites. In patients with lymph node metastases outside the prostatic fossa and regional metastatic lymph nodes, choline PET/CT might influence radiation treatment planning by enabling extension of the target volume to lymphatic drainage sites with or without a boost to PET-positive lymph nodes. Further clinical randomized trials are required to assess treatment outcomes following choline-based biological radiation treatment planning in comparison with conventional radiation treatment planning. (orig.)

  2. Synthesis of specific nanoparticles for targeting tumor angiogenesis using electron-beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshayes, Stephanie, E-mail: stephanie.deshayes@u-bordeaux2.f [Universite de Bordeaux, UMR CNRS 5084, CNAB, Chimie Bio-Organique, 33076 Bordeaux (France); Ecole Polytechnique, CEA, UMR CNRS 7642, Laboratoire des Solides Irradies, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Maurizot, Victor [Universite de Bordeaux, UMR CNRS 5084, CNAB, Chimie Bio-Organique, 33076 Bordeaux (France); Clochard, Marie-Claude; Berthelot, Thomas; Baudin, Cecile [Ecole Polytechnique, CEA, UMR CNRS 7642, Laboratoire des Solides Irradies, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Deleris, Gerard [Universite de Bordeaux, UMR CNRS 5084, CNAB, Chimie Bio-Organique, 33076 Bordeaux (France)

    2010-03-15

    Angiogenesis plays a critical role in both growth and metastasis of tumors. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endogenous mediator of tumor angiogenesis. Blocking associations of the VEGF with its corresponding receptors (KDR) have become critical for anti-tumor therapy. A cyclo-peptide (CBO-P11), derived from VEGF, able to inhibit the interaction between the growth factor and its receptor, was synthesized in our laboratory to provide a target for angiogenesis. We have prepared biocompatible poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) nanoparticles in order to obtain long blood circulating systems. Electron-beam (EB) irradiation was used to activate the PVDF nanoparticles. From electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements, we studied the radical stability in order to optimize the radio-grafting of acrylic acid (AA). Further functionalization of PVDF-g-PAA nanoparticles with the cyclo-peptide via a spacer arm was also possible by performing coupling reactions. High resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HRMAS NMR) and MALDI mass spectrometry allowed us to follow each chemical step of this peptide immobilization. We designed a new nanodevice suggesting a great potential for targeting angiogenesis. 7727-21-1

  3. A process for the separation of {sup 177}Lu from neutron irradiated {sup 176}Yb targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horwitz, E.P. [PG Research Foundation, Inc., 8205 S. Cass Ave., Suite 106, Darien, IL 60561 (United States)]. E-mail: phorwitz@pgrf.com; McAlister, D.R. [PG Research Foundation, Inc., 8205 S. Cass Ave., Suite 106, Darien, IL 60561 (United States); Bond, A.H. [PG Research Foundation, Inc., 8205 S. Cass Ave., Suite 106, Darien, IL 60561 (United States); Barrans, R.E. [PG Research Foundation, Inc., 8205 S. Cass Ave., Suite 106, Darien, IL 60561 (United States); Williamson, J.M. [Eichrom Technologies, Inc., 8205 S. Cass Ave., Suite 106, Darien, IL 60561 (United States)

    2005-07-01

    A conceptual flowsheet has been developed for the separation of {sup 177}Lu from a 300 mg neutron irradiated {sup 176}Yb enriched target. The key component of the process is an extraction chromatographic (EXC) resin containing 2-ethylhexyl 2-ethylhexylphosphonic acid (HEH[EHP]) sorbed onto a 25-53 {mu}m Amberchrom CG-71 substrate. The process is divided into three sections: (1) front-end target removal system (2) primary separation system and (3) secondary separation system. Each section involves the separation of Yb and Lu using the HEH[EHP] resin followed by concentration and acid adjustment of the Lu-rich eluate using an EXC material containing a diglycolamide extractant. The use of the diglycolamide EXC material is a significant feature of the flowsheet, allowing one to avoid lengthy evaporations and acidity adjustments between successive HEH[EHP] column runs while removing adventitious impurities from the {sup 177}Lu. The overall recovery of {sup 177}Lu is estimated at 73% with an overall decontamination factor from Yb of 10{sup 6}. The overall processing time can be as short as 4 h.

  4. Results of the six-and-a-half day electron-accelerator irradiation of enriched Mo-100 targets for the production of Mo-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chemerisov, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bailey, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heltemes, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jonah, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Makarashvili, V. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tkac, P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rotsch, D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Virgo, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, G. F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-01

    A six-and-a-half day irradiation of enriched Mo-100 target disks was performed by Argonne’s electron linac. This report describes the irradiation conditions and the means used to process the targets for shipment to NorthStar Medical Isotopes, LLC, for feed to their RadioGenixTM technetium generator.

  5. Performance of target irradiation in a high-power laser with a continuous phase plate and spectral dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiujuan; Li, Jinghui; Wu, Rong; Zhu, Zhengtao; Zhou, Shenlei; Lin, Zunqi

    2013-11-01

    We report on the performance of target irradiation at the SG-II high-power laser facility with a continuous phase plate (CPP) and the technique of smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). Simulative and experimental results are presented, where the irradiation uniformity and energy concentration of the target spots are analyzed. The results show that the designed CPP can focus the spot energy into the desired region and shape a profile with steep edge and flat top, but the actual performance of the fabricated CPP needs some improvements. It is also proved that the CPP is insensitive to the long-scale wavefront distortion in the incident beam. The one-dimensional SSD configuration evidently works in smoothing the fine-scale intensity modulation inside the target spot.

  6. Optical imaging of irradiated cyclotron target window foils using Cerenkov and radioluminescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, A. E.; Boschi, F.; Calandrino, R.

    2017-05-01

    Radioisotopes production for PET radiopharmaceuticals is performed using cyclotrons resulting in radio activation of different cyclotron components. It is thus necessary to measure the level of radiation exposure and, if possible, to image the areas where most of the radiations are emitted in particular during maintenance or decommissioning procedures. In this work we present a novel optical imaging approach using Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) and radioluminescence imaging (RLI). CLI was performed by placing a glass Cerenkov radiator on a target window (Havar foils) and RLI data were obtained by covering the Havar foils with an intensifying screen. CLI or RLI were acquired using a small animal optical imaging system used in bioluminescence mode without the use of any optical filters. The analysis of the normalized radiance line profiles of both CLI and RLI images showed a similar pattern, however the absolute radiance of the RLI signal is several order of magnitude higher with respect to CLI. We conclude that optical imaging with CLI and RLI can be considered a novel method to detect and image activation areas in irradiated samples from a medical cyclotron.

  7. SU-D-304-02: Magnetically Focused Proton Irradiation of Small Field Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McAuley, GA; Slater, JM [Loma Linda University, Loma Linda, CA (United States); Slater, JD; Wroe, AJ [Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of magnetic focusing for small field proton irradiations. It is hypothesized that magnetic focusing will provide significant dose distribution benefits over standard collimated beams for fields less than 10 mm diameter. Methods: Magnets consisting of 24 segments of radiation hard samarium-cobalt adhered into hollow cylinders were designed and manufactured. Two focusing magnets were placed on a positioning track on our Gantry 1 treatment table. Proton beams with energies of 127 and 157 MeV, 15 and 30 mm modulation, and 8 mm initial diameters were delivered to a water tank using single-stage scattering. Depth dose distributions were measured using a PTW PR60020 diode detector and transverse profiles were measured with Gafchromic EBT3 film. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed - both for comparison with experimental data and to further explore the potential of magnetic focusing in silica. For example, beam spot areas (based on the 90% dose contour) were matched at Bragg depth between simulated 100 MeV collimated beams and simulated beams focused by two 400 T/m gradient magnets. Results: Preliminary experimental results show 23% higher peak to entrance dose ratios and flatter spread out Bragg peak plateaus for 8 mm focused beams compared with uncollimated beams. Monte Carlo simulations showed 21% larger peak to entrance ratios and a ∼9 fold more efficient dose to target delivery compared to spot-sized matched collimated beams. Our latest results will be presented. Conclusion: Our results suggest that rare earth focusing magnet assemblies could reduce skin dose and beam number while delivering dose to nominally spherical radiosurgery targets over a much shorter time compared to unfocused beams. Immediate clinical applications include those associated with proton radiosurgery and functional radiosurgery of the brain and spine, however expanded treatment sites can be also envisaged.

  8. [The study of the human complement cascade of proteolysis as a target of laser irradiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galebskaia, L V; Andreeva, L A; Solovtsova, I L; Solov'eva, M A; Petrishchev, N N

    2009-01-01

    Samples of human blood plasma were irradiated with the laser beam (lamda=633 nm, P=13 mW, t=20 min) in vitro. In experimental and control (incubated in the dark) samples the complement hemolytic activity was measured. Laser irradiation had minor influence on the duration of lag-period and the rate of complement-dependent hemolysis via classical and alternative pathways; it also did not alter the functional activity of factor B, components C2 and C3. Nevertheless laser irradiation effect was seen in essential reduction of a bystander lysis coefficient. This new fact can elucidate some aspects of the clinical effectiveness of the blood laser irradiation.

  9. Measurement of prompt gamma profiles in inhomogeneous targets with a knife-edge slit camera during proton irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priegnitz, M.; Helmbrecht, S.; Janssens, G.; Perali, I.; Smeets, J.; Vander Stappen, F.; Sterpin, E.; Fiedler, F.

    2015-06-01

    Proton and ion beam therapies become increasingly relevant in radiation therapy. To fully exploit the potential of this irradiation technique and to achieve maximum target volume conformality, the verification of particle ranges is highly desirable. Many research activities focus on the measurement of the spatial distributions of prompt gamma rays emitted during irradiation. A passively collimating knife-edge slit camera is a promising option to perform such measurements. In former publications, the feasibility of accurate detection of proton range shifts in homogeneous targets could be shown with such a camera. We present slit camera measurements of prompt gamma depth profiles in inhomogeneous targets. From real treatment plans and their underlying CTs, representative beam paths are selected and assembled as one-dimensional inhomogeneous targets built from tissue equivalent materials. These phantoms have been irradiated with monoenergetic proton pencil beams. The accuracy of range deviation estimation as well as the detectability of range shifts is investigated in different scenarios. In most cases, range deviations can be detected within less than 2 mm. In close vicinity to low-density regions, range detection is challenging. In particular, a minimum beam penetration depth of 7 mm beyond a cavity is required for reliable detection of a cavity filling with the present setup. Dedicated data post-processing methods may be capable of overcoming this limitation.

  10. Proton emission from thin hydrogenated targets irradiated by laser pulses at 1016 W/cm2a)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Giuffrida, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Cirrone, P.; Picciotto, A.; Krasa, J.; Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Laska, L.; Ullschmied, J.; Wolowski, J.; Badziak, J.; Rosinski, M.

    2012-02-01

    The iodine laser at PALS Laboratory in Prague, operating at 1315 nm fundamental harmonics and at 300 ps FWHM pulse length, is employed to irradiate thin hydrogenated targets placed in vacuum at intensities on the order of 1016 W/cm2. The laser-generated plasma is investigated in terms of proton and ion emission in the forward and backward directions. The time-of-flight technique, using ion collectors and semiconductor detectors, is used to measure the ion currents and the corresponding velocities and energies. Thomson parabola spectrometer is employed to separate the contribution of the ion emission from single laser shots. A particular attention is given to the proton production in terms of the maximum energy, emission yield, and angular distribution as a function of the laser energy, focal position, target thickness, and composition. Metallic and polymeric targets allow to generate protons with large energy range and different yield, depending on the laser, target composition, and target geometry properties.

  11. Near monochromatic 20 Me V proton acceleration using fs laser irradiating Au foils in target normal sheath acceleration regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, L., E-mail: Lorenzo.Torrisi@unime.it; Ceccio, G.; Cannavò, A. [Department of Physics Sciences-MIFT, Messina University, V.le F.S. d' Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Cutroneo, M. [Nuclear Physics Institute, ASCR, 250 68 Rez (Czech Republic); Batani, D.; Boutoux, G.; Jakubowska, K.; Ducret, J. E. [CELIA, Université de Bordeaux 1, UMR5107–CNRS - CEA, Talence (France)

    2016-04-15

    A 200 mJ laser pulse energy, 39 fs-pulse duration, 10 μm focal spot, p-polarized radiation has been employed to irradiate thin Au foils to produce proton acceleration in the forward direction. Gold foils were employed to produce high density relativistic electrons emission in the forward direction to generate a high electric field driving the ion acceleration. Measurements were performed by changing the focal position in respect of the target surface. Proton acceleration was monitored using fast SiC detectors in time-of-flight configuration. A high proton energy, up to about 20 Me V, with a narrow energy distribution, was obtained in particular conditions depending on the laser parameters, the irradiation conditions, and a target optimization.

  12. Near monochromatic 20 Me V proton acceleration using fs laser irradiating Au foils in target normal sheath acceleration regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L.; Cutroneo, M.; Ceccio, G.; Cannavò, A.; Batani, D.; Boutoux, G.; Jakubowska, K.; Ducret, J. E.

    2016-04-01

    A 200 mJ laser pulse energy, 39 fs-pulse duration, 10 μm focal spot, p-polarized radiation has been employed to irradiate thin Au foils to produce proton acceleration in the forward direction. Gold foils were employed to produce high density relativistic electrons emission in the forward direction to generate a high electric field driving the ion acceleration. Measurements were performed by changing the focal position in respect of the target surface. Proton acceleration was monitored using fast SiC detectors in time-of-flight configuration. A high proton energy, up to about 20 Me V, with a narrow energy distribution, was obtained in particular conditions depending on the laser parameters, the irradiation conditions, and a target optimization.

  13. Targeted increase in cerebral blood flow by transcranial near-infrared laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uozumi, Yoichi; Nawashiro, Hiroshi; Sato, Shunichi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Shima, Katsuji; Kikuchi, Makoto

    2010-08-01

    Brain function is highly dependent on cerebral blood flow (CBF). The precise mechanisms by which blood flow is controlled by NIR laser irradiation on the central nervous system (CNS) have not been elucidated. In this study, we examined the effect of 808 nm laser diode irradiation on CBF in mice. We examined the effect of NIR irradiation on CBF at three different power densities (0.8, 1.6 and 3.2 W/cm(2)) and directly measured nitric oxide (NO) in brain tissue during NIR laser irradiation using an amperometric NO-selective electrode. We also examined the contribution of NO and a neurotransmitter, glutamate, to the regulation of CBF by using a nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor, N(g)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME), and an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blocker, MK-801, respectively. We examined the change in brain tissue temperature during NIR laser irradiation. We also investigated the protection effect of NIR laser irradiation on transient cerebral ischemia using transient bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) in mice. We showed that NIR laser irradiation (1.6 W/cm(2) for 15-45 minutes) increased local CBF by 30% compared to that in control mice. NIR laser irradiation also induced a significant increase in cerebral NO concentration. In mice that received L-NAME, NIR laser irradiation did not induce any increase in CBF. Mice administered MK-801 showed an immediate increase but did not show a delayed additional increase in local CBF. The increase in brain tissue temperature induced by laser irradiation was estimated to be as low as 0.8 degrees C at 1.6 W/cm(2), indicating that the heating effect is not a main mechanism of the CBF increase in this condition. Pretreatment with NIR laser irradiation improved residual CBF and reduced the numbers of apoptotic cells in the hippocampus. Our data suggest that NIR laser irradiation is a promising experimental and therapeutic tool in the field of cerebral circulation research. (c

  14. Generation of hard X-ray from solid target irradiated by UV high intensity ultrashort pulse laser

    CERN Document Server

    Tao Ye; Tang Xiu Zhang; Shan Yu Sheng; Wang Nai Yan

    2002-01-01

    Hard X-ray continuum generated from interaction of UV high intensity ultrashort pulse laser with solid target has been investigated by experiment. P-polarized light irradiating 5 mm Cu slab with 45 degree, the hard X-ray with energy of 200 keV has been detected. Fitting the experiment data by Maxwellian distribution, the temperature of hot electron is 67 keV. The experiment data are the results of combination of several absorption mechanisms

  15. Influence of Different Moderator Materials on Characteristics of Neutron Fluxes Generated under Irradiation of Lead Target with Proton Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Sosnin, A N; Polanski, A; Petrochenkov, S A; Golovatyuk, V M; Krivopustov, M I; Bamblevski, V P; Westmeier, W; Odoj, R; Brandt, R; Robotham, H; Hashemi-Nezhad, S R; Zamani-Valassiadou, M

    2002-01-01

    Neutron fields generated in extended heavy (Z\\geq 82) targets under irradiation with proton beams at energies in the range of 1 GeV are investigated. Influence of different moderators on the spectra and multiplicities of neutrons escaping the surface of the assembly consisting of a lead target (\\varnothing 8 cm\\times 20 cm or \\varnothing 8cm\\times 50 cm) screened by variable thickness of polyethylene or graphite, respectively, was compared in the present work. It is shown that the effectiveness of graphite as a material used in such assemblies to moderate spallation neutrons down to thermal energies is significantly lower than that of paraffin.

  16. Possible version of the compression degradation of the thermonuclear indirect-irradiation targets at the national ignition facility and a reason for the failure of ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozanov, V. B., E-mail: rozanov@sci.lebedev.ru; Vergunova, G. A., E-mail: verg@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    The main parameters of compression of a target and tendencies at change in the irradiation conditions are determined by analyzing the published results of experiments at the megajoule National Ignition Facility (NIF) on the compression of capsules in indirect-irradiation targets by means of the one-dimensional RADIAN program in the spherical geometry. A possible version of the “failure of ignition” of an indirect-irradiation target under the NIF conditions is attributed to radiation transfer. The application of onedimensional model to analyze the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) experiments allows identifying conditions corresponding to the future ignition regime and distinguishing them from conditions under which ignition does not occur.

  17. Possible version of the compression degradation of the thermonuclear indirect-irradiation targets at the national ignition facility and a reason for the failure of ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanov, V. B.; Vergunova, G. A.

    2017-01-01

    The main parameters of compression of a target and tendencies at change in the irradiation conditions are determined by analyzing the published results of experiments at the megajoule National Ignition Facility (NIF) on the compression of capsules in indirect-irradiation targets by means of the one-dimensional RADIAN program in the spherical geometry. A possible version of the "failure of ignition" of an indirect-irradiation target under the NIF conditions is attributed to radiation transfer. The application of onedimensional model to analyze the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) experiments allows identifying conditions corresponding to the future ignition regime and distinguishing them from conditions under which ignition does not occur.

  18. Investigations of ultrafast charge dynamics in laser-irradiated targets by a self probing technique employing laser driven protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, H. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Kar, S., E-mail: s.kar@qub.ac.uk [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Cantono, G. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Department of Physics “E. Fermi”, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Research Unit Adriano Gozzini, via G. Moruzzi 1, Pisa 56124 (Italy); Nersisyan, G. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Brauckmann, S. [Institut für Laser-und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf (Germany); Doria, D.; Gwynne, D. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Macchi, A. [Department of Physics “E. Fermi”, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Research Unit Adriano Gozzini, via G. Moruzzi 1, Pisa 56124 (Italy); Naughton, K. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Willi, O. [Institut für Laser-und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Düsseldorf (Germany); Lewis, C.L.S.; Borghesi, M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-01

    The divergent and broadband proton beams produced by the target normal sheath acceleration mechanism provide the unique opportunity to probe, in a point-projection imaging scheme, the dynamics of the transient electric and magnetic fields produced during laser-plasma interactions. Commonly such experimental setup entails two intense laser beams, where the interaction produced by one beam is probed with the protons produced by the second. We present here experimental studies of the ultra-fast charge dynamics along a wire connected to laser irradiated target carried out by employing a ‘self’ proton probing arrangement – i.e. by connecting the wire to the target generating the probe protons. The experimental data shows that an electromagnetic pulse carrying a significant amount of charge is launched along the wire, which travels as a unified pulse of 10s of ps duration with a velocity close to speed of light. The experimental capabilities and the analysis procedure of this specific type of proton probing technique are discussed. - Highlights: • Prompt charging of laser irradiated target generates ultra-short EM pulses. • Its ultrafast propagation along a wire was studied by self-proton probing technique. • Self-proton probing technique is the proton probing with one laser pulse. • Pulse temporal profile and speed along the wire were measured with high resolution.

  19. An Experimental Benchmark for Improved Simulation of Absolute Soft X-Ray Emission from Polystyrene Targets Irradiated With the Nike Laser

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weaver, J. L; Busquet, M; Colombant, D. G; Mostovych, A. N; Feldman, U; Klapisch, M; Seely, J. F; Brown, C; Holland, G

    2005-01-01

    Absolutely calibrated, time-resolved spectral intensity measurements of soft x-ray emission from laser-irradiated polystyrene targets are compared to radiation-hydrodynamic simulations that include...

  20. Post-irradiation analysis of an ISOLDE lead-bismuth target: Stable and long-lived noble gas nuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leya, I., E-mail: Ingo.Leya@space.unibe.ch [University of Bern, Space Science and Planetology, Bern (Switzerland); Grimberg, A. [University of Bern, Space Science and Planetology, Bern (Switzerland); Isotope Geochemistry, ETH Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); David, J.-C. [CEA/Saclay, Irfu/SPhN, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette, Cedex (France); Schumann, D.; Neuhausen, J. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Zanini, L. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); European Spallation Source ESS AB, P.O. Box 117, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Noah, E. [University of Geneva, Département de Physique Nucléaire et Corpusculaire, Geneve (Switzerland)

    2016-07-15

    We measured the isotopic concentrations of long-lived and stable He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe isotopes in a sample from a lead-bismuth eutectic target irradiated with 1.0 and 1.4 GeV protons. Our data indicate for most noble gases nearly complete release with retention fractions in the range of percent or less. Higher retention fractions result from the decay of long-lived radioactive progenitors from groups 1, 2, or 7 of the periodic table. From the data we can calculate a retention fraction for {sup 3}H of 2–3%. For alkaline metals we find retention fractions of about 10%, 30%, and 50% for Na, Rb, and Cs, respectively. For the alkaline earth metal Ba we found complete retention. Finally, the measured Kr and Xe concentrations indicate that there was some release of the halogens Br and I during and/or after the irradiation.

  1. Interobserver variations of target volume delineation and its impact on irradiated volume in accelerated partial breast irradiation with intraoperative interstitial breast implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Raj Upreti

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the interobserver variations in delineation of lumpectomy cavity (LC and clinical target volume (CTV, and its impact on irradiated volume in accelerated partial breast irradiation using intraoperative multicatheter brachytherapy. Material and methods : Delineation of LC and CTV was done by five radiation oncologists on planning computed tomography (CT scans of 20 patients with intraoperative interstitial breast implant. Cavity visualization index (CVI, four-point index ranging from (0 = poor to (3 = excellent was created and assigned by observers for each patient. In total, 200 contours for all observers and 100 treatment plans were evaluated. Spatial concordance (conformity index, CI common , and CIgen, average shift in the center of mass (COM, and ratio of maximum and minimum volumes (V max /V min of LC and CTV were quantified among all observers and statistically analyzed. Variation in active dwell positions (0.5 cm step for each catheter, total reference air kerma (TRAK, volume enclosed by prescription isodose (V100% among observers and its spatial concordance were analyzed. Results : The mean ± SD CI common of LC and CTV was 0.54 ± 0.09, and 0.58 ± 0.08, respectively. Conformity index tends to increase, shift in COM and V max /V min decrease significantly (p < 0.05, as CVI increased. Out of total 309 catheters, 29.8% catheters had no change, 29.8% and 17.5% catheters had variations of 1 and 2 dwell positions (0.5 cm and 1 cm, respectively. 9.3% catheters shown variations ≥ 10 dwell positions (5 cm. The mean ± SD CI common of V100% was 0.75 ± 0.11. The mean observed V max /V min of prescription isodose and TRAK was 1.18 (range, 1.03 to 1.56 and 1.11 (range, 1.03 to 1.35, respectively. Conclusions : Interobserver variability in delineation of target volume was found to be significantly related to CVI. Smaller variability was observed with excellent visualization of LC. Interobserver variations showed dosimetric

  2. Development of a Charged Particle Microbeam for Targeted and Single Particle Subcellular Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanch, Jacquelyn C.

    2004-03-12

    The development of a charged particle microbeam for single particle, subcellular irradiations at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Laboratory for Accelerator Beam Applications (MIT LABA) was initiated under this NEER aeard. The Microbeam apparatus makes use of a pre-existing electrostatic accelerator with a horizontal beam tube.

  3. Laser ablation impulse generated by irradiating aluminum target with nanosecond laser pulses at normal and oblique incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Impulse generation by irradiating aluminum targets with repetitive laser pulses at normal and oblique incidence was investigated using impulse measurements with a torsion pendulum at various incidence angles under different laser beam fluence conditions. The fluence varied from 5.8-20.0 J/cm2 for normal incidence. For oblique incidence, momentum coupling is sensitive to the incident angle at fluences of 6.3 J/cm2 and 9.2 J/cm2 because of target surface reflectivity changes and plume shielding effects. At fluence of 19.3 J/cm2, the fluence on the target surface becomes dominant for impulse generation compared with the angle of incidence effect in a large angular range. Beam fluence optimization for momentum coupling at oblique incidence is discussed based on the impulse characteristics obtained.

  4. Technical Note: Immunohistochemical evaluation of mouse brain irradiation targeting accuracy with 3D-printed immobilization device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarghami, Niloufar, E-mail: nzargham@uwo.ca; Jensen, Michael D. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Talluri, Srikanth; Dick, Frederick A. [Department of Biochemistry, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada); Foster, Paula J. [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, 100 Perth Drive, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Chambers, Ann F. [Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada); Wong, Eugene [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); Department of Oncology, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada); London Regional Cancer Program, London Health Sciences Centre, 800 Commissioners Road East, London, Ontario N6A 5W9 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Small animal immobilization devices facilitate positioning of animals for reproducible imaging and accurate focal radiation therapy. In this study, the authors demonstrate the use of three-dimensional (3D) printing technology to fabricate a custom-designed mouse head restraint. The authors evaluate the accuracy of this device for the purpose of mouse brain irradiation. Methods: A mouse head holder was designed for a microCT couch using CAD software and printed in an acrylic based material. Ten mice received half-brain radiation while positioned in the 3D-printed head holder. Animal placement was achieved using on-board image guidance and computerized asymmetric collimators. To evaluate the precision of beam localization for half-brain irradiation, mice were sacrificed approximately 30 min after treatment and brain sections were stained for γ-H2AX, a marker for DNA breaks. The distance and angle of the γ-H2AX radiation beam border to longitudinal fissure were measured on histological samples. Animals were monitored for any possible trauma from the device. Results: Visualization of the radiation beam on ex vivo brain sections with γ-H2AX immunohistochemical staining showed a sharp radiation field within the tissue. Measurements showed a mean irradiation targeting error of 0.14 ± 0.09 mm (standard deviation). Rotation between the beam axis and mouse head was 1.2° ± 1.0° (standard deviation). The immobilization device was easily adjusted to accommodate different sizes of mice. No signs of trauma to the mice were observed from the use of tooth block and ear bars. Conclusions: The authors designed and built a novel 3D-printed mouse head holder with many desired features for accurate and reproducible radiation targeting. The 3D printing technology was found to be practical and economical for producing a small animal imaging and radiation restraint device and allows for customization for study specific needs.

  5. Technical Note: Immunohistochemical evaluation of mouse brain irradiation targeting accuracy with 3D-printed immobilization device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarghami, Niloufar; Jensen, Michael D; Talluri, Srikanth; Foster, Paula J; Chambers, Ann F; Dick, Frederick A; Wong, Eugene

    2015-11-01

    Small animal immobilization devices facilitate positioning of animals for reproducible imaging and accurate focal radiation therapy. In this study, the authors demonstrate the use of three-dimensional (3D) printing technology to fabricate a custom-designed mouse head restraint. The authors evaluate the accuracy of this device for the purpose of mouse brain irradiation. A mouse head holder was designed for a microCT couch using cad software and printed in an acrylic based material. Ten mice received half-brain radiation while positioned in the 3D-printed head holder. Animal placement was achieved using on-board image guidance and computerized asymmetric collimators. To evaluate the precision of beam localization for half-brain irradiation, mice were sacrificed approximately 30 min after treatment and brain sections were stained for γ-H2AX, a marker for DNA breaks. The distance and angle of the γ-H2AX radiation beam border to longitudinal fissure were measured on histological samples. Animals were monitored for any possible trauma from the device. Visualization of the radiation beam on ex vivo brain sections with γ-H2AX immunohistochemical staining showed a sharp radiation field within the tissue. Measurements showed a mean irradiation targeting error of 0.14±0.09 mm (standard deviation). Rotation between the beam axis and mouse head was 1.2°±1.0° (standard deviation). The immobilization device was easily adjusted to accommodate different sizes of mice. No signs of trauma to the mice were observed from the use of tooth block and ear bars. The authors designed and built a novel 3D-printed mouse head holder with many desired features for accurate and reproducible radiation targeting. The 3D printing technology was found to be practical and economical for producing a small animal imaging and radiation restraint device and allows for customization for study specific needs.

  6. Proton emission from thin hydrogenated targets irradiated by laser pulses at 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrisi, L. [INFN-LNS Via S. Sofia 44, 95123 Catania (Italy); Dip.to di Fisica, Universita di Messina, V.le F.S. D' Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Giuffrida, L.; Cirrone, P. [INFN-LNS Via S. Sofia 44, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cutroneo, M. [Dip.to di Fisica, Universita di Messina, V.le F.S. D' Alcontres 31, 98166 S. Agata, Messina (Italy); Picciotto, A. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler-IRST, Via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); Krasa, J.; Margarone, D.; Velyhan, A.; Laska, L.; Ullschmied, J. [Institute of Physics, ASCR, v.v.i., 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Wolowski, J.; Badziak, J.; Rosinski, M. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, IPPLM, 23 Hery Str. 01-497 Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-02-15

    The iodine laser at PALS Laboratory in Prague, operating at 1315 nm fundamental harmonics and at 300 ps FWHM pulse length, is employed to irradiate thin hydrogenated targets placed in vacuum at intensities on the order of 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}. The laser-generated plasma is investigated in terms of proton and ion emission in the forward and backward directions. The time-of-flight technique, using ion collectors and semiconductor detectors, is used to measure the ion currents and the corresponding velocities and energies. Thomson parabola spectrometer is employed to separate the contribution of the ion emission from single laser shots. A particular attention is given to the proton production in terms of the maximum energy, emission yield, and angular distribution as a function of the laser energy, focal position, target thickness, and composition. Metallic and polymeric targets allow to generate protons with large energy range and different yield, depending on the laser, target composition, and target geometry properties.

  7. Proton emission from thin hydrogenated targets irradiated by laser pulses at 10(16) W∕cm2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, L; Giuffrida, L; Cutroneo, M; Cirrone, P; Picciotto, A; Krasa, J; Margarone, D; Velyhan, A; Laska, L; Ullschmied, J; Wolowski, J; Badziak, J; Rosinski, M

    2012-02-01

    The iodine laser at PALS Laboratory in Prague, operating at 1315 nm fundamental harmonics and at 300 ps FWHM pulse length, is employed to irradiate thin hydrogenated targets placed in vacuum at intensities on the order of 10(16) W∕cm(2). The laser-generated plasma is investigated in terms of proton and ion emission in the forward and backward directions. The time-of-flight technique, using ion collectors and semiconductor detectors, is used to measure the ion currents and the corresponding velocities and energies. Thomson parabola spectrometer is employed to separate the contribution of the ion emission from single laser shots. A particular attention is given to the proton production in terms of the maximum energy, emission yield, and angular distribution as a function of the laser energy, focal position, target thickness, and composition. Metallic and polymeric targets allow to generate protons with large energy range and different yield, depending on the laser, target composition, and target geometry properties.

  8. Direct flow separation strategy, to isolate no-carrier-added {sup 90}Nb from irradiated Mo or Zr targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radchenko, Valery; Roesch, Frank [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry; Filosofov, Dmitry V.; Dadakhanov, Jakhongir [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems; Karaivanov, Dimitar V. [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems; Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy; Marinova, Atanaska [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems; Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria). Faculty of Chemistry and Pharmacy; Baimukhanova, Ayagoz [Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation). Dzhelepov Laboratory of Nuclear Problems; Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2016-11-01

    {sup 90}Nb has an intermediate half-life of 14.6 h, a high positron branching of 53% and optimal β{sup +} emission energy of only E{sub mean} 0.35 MeV per decay. These favorable characteristics suggest it may be a potential candidate for application in immuno-PET. Our recent aim was to conduct studies on distribution coefficients for Zr{sup IV} and Nb{sup V} in mixtures of HCl/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and HCl/oxalic acid for anion exchange resin (AG 1 x 8) and UTEVA resin to develop a ''direct flow'' separation strategy for {sup 90}Nb. The direct flow concept refers to a separation accomplished using a single eluent on multiple columns, effectively streamlining the separation process and increasing the time efficiency. Finally, we also demonstrated that this separation strategy is applicable to the production of the positron emitter {sup 90}Nb via the irradiation of molybdenum targets and isolation of {sup 90}Nb from the irradiated molybdenum target.

  9. Target irradiation induced bystander effects between stem-like and non stem-like cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Kobayashi, Alisa; Maeda, Takeshi; Fu, Qibin; Oikawa, Masakazu; Yang, Gen; Konishi, Teruaki; Uchihori, Yukio; Hei, Tom K; Wang, Yugang

    2015-03-01

    Tumors are heterogeneous in nature and consist of multiple cell types. Among them, cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are suggested to be the principal cause of tumor metastasis, resistance and recurrence. Therefore, understanding the behavior of CSCs in direct and indirect irradiations is crucial for clinical radiotherapy. Here, the CSCs and their counterpart non stem-like cancer cells (NSCCs) in human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell line were sorted and labeled, then the two cell subtypes were mixed together and chosen separately to be irradiated via a proton microbeam. The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) between the CSCs and NSCCs was measured by imaging 53BP1 foci, a widely used indicator for DNA double strand break (DSB). CSCs were found to be less active than NSCCs in both the generation and the response of bystander signals. Moreover, the nitric oxide (NO) scavenger c-PTIO can effectively alleviate the bystander effect in bystander NSCCs but not in bystander CSCs, indicating a difference of the two cell subtypes in NO signal response. To our knowledge, this is the first report shedding light on the RIBE between CSCs and NSCCs, which might contribute to a further understanding of the out-of-field effect in cancer radiotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Results of four one-day electron-accelerator irradiations of enriched Mo-100 targets for the production of Mo-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chemerisov, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bailey, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heltemes, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jonah, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gromov, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Makarashvili, V. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tkac, P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Rotsch, D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Virgo, M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, G. F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-01

    A series of four one-day irradiations was conducted with 100Mo-enriched disk targets. After irradiation, the enriched disks were removed from the target and dissolved. The resulting solution was processed using a NorthStar RadioGenix™ 99mTc generator either at Argonne National Laboratory or at the NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes facility. Runs on the RadioGenix system produced inconsistent analytical results for 99mTc in the Tc/Mo solution. These inconsistencies were attributed to the impurities in the solution or improper column packing. During the irradiations, the performance of the optic transitional radiation (OTR) and infrared cameras was tested in high radiation field. The OTR cameras survived all irradiations, while the IR cameras failed every time. The addition of X-ray and neutron shielding improved camera survivability and decreased the number of upsets.

  11. Efficient soft x-ray sources from laser-irradiated gold foam targets with well-controlled impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yunsong; Yang, Jiamin; Song, Tianming; Shang, Wanli; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Chengwu; Zhu, Tuo; Zhang, Wenhai; Li, Zhichao; Zhan, Xiayu; Du, Huabing; Wang, Feng; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2018-01-01

    As an important x-ray source, enhancement of x-ray emissions from laser-produced plasmas is significant for various applications. Due to less expanding kinetic loss, gold foam with low initial density can have an enhanced x-ray conversion efficiency compared with solid-density gold. However, low-Z impurities within gold foam targets will diminish the enhancement remarkably, and should be tightly controlled. This paper presents an experimental study of a high brightness laser plasma soft x-ray source, based on a 0.36 g cm-3 gold foam target with negligible impurities irradiated by nanosecond laser pulses with power density around 3  ×  1014 W cm-2 at the Shenguang II laser facility. A conversion efficiency, from multi-eV to multi-keV, of 51.2 % is achieved in the x-ray emissions—about 21% relative enhancement compared with a solid-density gold target, and the highest conversion efficiency for Au foam planar targets yet. Good agreement has been achieved between the semi-analytical model prediction and the experimental results.

  12. Temperature effect of irradiated target surface on distribution of nanoparticles formed by implantation

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanov, A L; Popok, V N

    2001-01-01

    The composition layers, containing the metal nanoparticles, synthesized thorough implantation of the Ag sup + ions with the energy of 60 keV and the dose of 3 x 10 sup 1 sup 6 ion/cm sup 2 into the sodium-calcium silicate glass by the ion current of 3 mu A/cm sup 2 and the sublayer temperature of 35 deg C are studied. The obtained implantation results are analyzed in dependence on the temperature effects, developing for the glass samples of various thickness. The data on the silver distribution, the metal nanoparticles formation and growth by depth are obtained from the optical reflection spectra. It is demonstrated that minor changes in the surface temperature of the irradiated glass sublayer lead to noticeable diversities in the regularities of the nanoparticles formation in the sample volume

  13. Target irradiation induced bystander effects between stem-like and non stem-like cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yu [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kobayashi, Alisa [Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Maeda, Takeshi [Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Fu, Qibin [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Oikawa, Masakazu [Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Yang, Gen, E-mail: gen.yang@pku.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Konishi, Teruaki, E-mail: tkonishi@nirs.go.jp [Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Uchihori, Yukio [Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Technical Support and Development, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); and others

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Existence of radiation induced bystander effects (RIBE) between cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and non stem-like cancer cells (NSCCs) in human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. • Existence of significant difference in generation and response of bystander signals between CSCs and NSCCs. • CSCs are significantly less sensitive to NO scavenger than that of NSCCs in terms of DNA double strand breaks induced by RIBE. - Abstract: Tumors are heterogeneous in nature and consist of multiple cell types. Among them, cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are suggested to be the principal cause of tumor metastasis, resistance and recurrence. Therefore, understanding the behavior of CSCs in direct and indirect irradiations is crucial for clinical radiotherapy. Here, the CSCs and their counterpart non stem-like cancer cells (NSCCs) in human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cell line were sorted and labeled, then the two cell subtypes were mixed together and chosen separately to be irradiated via a proton microbeam. The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) between the CSCs and NSCCs was measured by imaging 53BP1 foci, a widely used indicator for DNA double strand break (DSB). CSCs were found to be less active than NSCCs in both the generation and the response of bystander signals. Moreover, the nitric oxide (NO) scavenger c-PTIO can effectively alleviate the bystander effect in bystander NSCCs but not in bystander CSCs, indicating a difference of the two cell subtypes in NO signal response. To our knowledge, this is the first report shedding light on the RIBE between CSCs and NSCCs, which might contribute to a further understanding of the out-of-field effect in cancer radiotherapy.

  14. Strong soft X-ray emission from a double-stream gas puff target irradiated with a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedorowicz, H.; Bartnik, A.; Rakowski, R.; Szczurek, M. [Military Univ. of Technology, Warsaw (Poland). Inst. of Optoelectronics; Daido, H.; Suzuki, M.; Yamagami, S.; Choi, I.W.; Tang, H.J. [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering

    2001-07-01

    Soft X-ray emission from a new double-stream gas puff target irradiated with a nanosecond, high-power Nd:YAG laser pulse has been studied. The target was formed by pulsed injection of gas into a hollow gas stream made from helium by using a double-nozzle setup. Strong X-ray emissions near 10 nm from the double-stream krypton/helium, near 11 nm from the xenon/helium, and at 13 nm from the oxygen/helium targets were observed. The emission from the double-stream gas puff target was several times higher as compared to the ordinary gas puff targets, and comparable to the emission from the solid targets irradiated in the same conditions. (orig.)

  15. Study of intense pulse irradiation effects on silicon targets considered as ground matter for optical detectors; Etude des effets d`irradiations pulsees intenses sur des cibles de silicium considere en tant que materiau de base pour detecteurs optiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muller, O.

    1994-12-01

    This study aim was centered on morphological and structural alterations induced by laser irradiation on silicon targets considered as ground matter for optical detectors. First we recalled the main high light intensity effects on the condensed matter. Then we presented the experimental aspects. The experimental studies were achieved on two sample types: SiO{sub 2}/Si and Si. Two topics were studied: the defect chronology according to wavelength and pulse length, and the crystalline quality as well as the structure defects of irradiated zones by Raman spectroscopy. Finally, irradiation of Si targets by intense pulsed beams may lead to material fusion. This phenomenon is particularly easy when the material is absorbent, when the pulse is short and when the material is superficially oxidized. (MML). 204 refs., 93 figs., 21 tabs., 1 appendix.

  16. Secondary neutron production from thick Pb target by light particle irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Adloff, J C; Debeauvais, M; Fernández, F; Krivopustov, M; Kulakov, B A; Sosnin, A; Zamani, M

    1999-01-01

    Neutron multiplicities from spallation neutron sources were measured by Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors. Light particles as protons, deuterons and alphas in the GeV range were used on Pb targets. For neutron thermalization the targets were covered by 6 cm paraffin moderator. Neutron multiplicity distributions were studied inside and on the moderator surface. Comparison of SSNTDs results were made for thermal-epithermal neutrons with sup 1 sup 3 sup 9 La activation method as well as with Dubna DCM/CEM code. Discussion including previous sup 1 sup 2 C results are given.

  17. Femtosecond optical diagnostics and hydrodynamic simulation of Ag plasma created by laser irradiation of a solid target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veysman, M E; Agranat, M B; Andreev, N E; Ashitkov, S I; Fortov, V E; Khishchenko, K V; Kostenko, O F; Levashov, P R; Ovchinnikov, A V; Sitnikov, D S [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaya 13 bldg 2, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: bme@ihed.ras.ru

    2008-06-28

    A combined experimental-theoretical method of diagnostics of the plasma created on a surface of Ag target irradiated by intense femtosecond laser pulses is proposed. The method is based on semiempirical wide-range models of optical, transport and thermodynamic properties of Ag plasma. Numerical coefficients in these models are chosen so as to ensure the best accordance of simulations to measurements of a complex absorption coefficient of Ag plasma by means of femtosecond interference microscopy. A two-temperature hydrodynamic modelling of non-stationary laser-produced Ag plasma is carried out; calculated results are presented in comparison with experiments. Unexpectedly high values of the phase of the complex reflection coefficient at short (200 fs) time delay between pump and probe laser pulses are obtained experimentally; possible explanations of this phenomenon are discussed.

  18. Target irradiation facility and targetry development at 160 MeV proton beam of Moscow linac

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuikov, B L; Konyakhin, N A; Vincent, J

    1999-01-01

    A facility has been built and successfully operated with the 160 MeV proton beam of Moscow Meson factory LINAC, Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) of Russian Academy of Science, Troitsk. The facility was created for various isotope production goals as well as for fundamental nuclear investigations at high intensity beam (100 mu A and more). An important part of the facility targetry system is a high-intensity beam monitoring collimator device. Measurements of the temperature distribution between collimator sectors, cooling water flow and temperature, and the beam current, provide an opportunity to compute beam losses and beam position. The target holder design allows easy insertion by manipulator and simultaneous bombardment of several different targets of various types and forms, and variation of proton energy on each target over a wide range below 160 MeV. The main target utilized for commercial sup 8 sup 2 Sr isotope production is metallic rubidium in a stainless-steel container. A regular wet chemistry ...

  19. A simplified procedure for semi-targeted lipidomic analysis of oxidized phosphatidylcholines induced by UVA irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Florian; Bicker, Wolfgang; Oskolkova, Olga V.; Tschachler, Erwin; Bochkov, Valery N.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs) are increasingly recognized as signaling mediators that are not only markers of oxidative stress but are also “makers” of pathology relevant to disease pathogenesis. Understanding the biological role of individual molecular species of OxPLs requires the knowledge of their concentration kinetics in cells and tissues. In this work, we describe a straightforward “fingerprinting” procedure for analysis of a broad spectrum of molecular species generated by oxidation of the four most abundant species of polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines (OxPCs). The approach is based on liquid-liquid extraction followed by reversed-phase HPLC coupled to electrospray ionization MS/MS. More than 500 peaks corresponding in retention properties to polar and oxidized PCs were detected within 8 min at 99 m/z precursor values using a single diagnostic product ion in extracts from human dermal fibroblasts. Two hundred seventeen of these peaks were fluence-dependently and statistically significantly increased upon exposure of cells to UVA irradiation, suggesting that these are genuine oxidized or oxidatively fragmented species. This method of semitargeted lipidomic analysis may serve as a simple first step for characterization of specific “signatures” of OxPCs produced by different types of oxidative stress in order to select the most informative peaks for identification of their molecular structure and biological role. PMID:22414483

  20. Numerical Study of K{\\alpha} X-ray Emission from Multi-layered Cold and Compressed Targets Irradiated by Ultrashort Laser Pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Kelardeh, Hamed Koochaki

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the generation of K{\\alpha} X-ray produced by interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with metal targets has been studied numerically. Several targets were assumed to be irradiated by high intensity ultra-short laser pulses for the calculations. Using Maxwell Boltzmann distribution function for hot electron and applying an analytical model, the number of K{\\alpha} photons were calculated as a function of hot electron temperature, target thickness and K-shell ionization cross section. Also, simulation results of K{\\alpha} yield versus target thickness variations from two and three layer metals have been presented. These calculations are useful for optimization of X-ray yield produced by irradiation of metal targets with high intensity laser pulses. We also generalized this model and present simulation results on K{\\alpha} fluorescence measurement produced by fast electron propagation in shock compressed materials.

  1. Stability of target irradiation for high-repetition rate direct-drive facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiavi Angelo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The illumination of a spherical target for Inertial Confinement Fusion is studied in the direct-drive approach. Three main sources of laser parameter fluctuation are taken into account, and a statistical analysis of the illumination configuration has been carried out in order to assess the stability of the illumination, and the shot-to-shot fluctuation of the laser intensity pattern.

  2. Measurements of Ionizing Radiation Doses Induced by High Irradiance Laser on Targets in LCLS MEC Instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Liu, J. C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Prinz, A. A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Rokni, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Tran, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Woods, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Xia, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Galter, e. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lee, H. -J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Milathianaki, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nagler, B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2014-01-21

    Comprehensive measurements for photon and neutron radiation doses generated from laser-plasma interaction at SLAC’s MEC laser facility have been conducted. The goals of the measurements were to; determine the radiation dose per laser shot as a function of laser, optic and target parameters that are relevant to the MEC laser operations; validate the RPD-developed analytic model for photon dose calculations; and evaluate the performance of various types of passive and active detectors in the laser-induced radiation fields.

  3. Production of krypton and xenon isotopes in thick stony and iron targets isotropically irradiated with 1600 MeV protons

    CERN Document Server

    Gilabert, E; Lavielle, B; Leya, I; Michel, R; Neumann, S

    2002-01-01

    Two spherical targets made of gabbro with a radius of 25 cm and of steel with a radius of 10 cm were irradiated isotropically with 1600 MeV protons at the SATURNE synchrotron at Laboratoire National Saturne (LNS)/CEN Saclay, in order to simulate the production of nuclides in meteorites induced by galactic cosmic-ray protons in space. These experiments supply depth-dependent production rate data for a wide range of radioactive and stable isotopes in up to 28 target elements. In this paper, we report results for /sup 78/Kr, /sup 80-86/Kr isotopes in Rb, Sr, Y and Zr and for /sup 124/Xe, /sup 126/Xe, /sup 128-132/Xe, /sup 134/Xe, /sup 136/Xe isotopes in Ba and La. Krypton and xenon concentrations have been measured at different depths in the spheres by using conventional mass spectrometry. Based on Monte-Carlo techniques, theoretical production rates are calculated by folding depth-dependent spectra of primary and secondary protons and secondary neutrons with the excitation functions of the relevant nuclear reac...

  4. Triton Emission Spectra in Some Target Nuclei Irradiated by Ultra-Fast Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tel, E.; Kaplan, A.; Aydın, A.; Büyükuslu, H.; Demirkol, İ.; Arasoğlu, A.

    2010-08-01

    High-current proton accelerator technologies make use of spallation neutrons produced in ( p,xn) and ( n,xn) nuclear reactions on high-Z targets. The produced neutrons are moderated by heavy water. These moderated neutrons are subsequently captured on 3He to produce tritium via the ( n,p) reaction. Tritium self-sufficiency must be maintained for a commercial power plant. So, working out the systematics of ( n,t) reaction cross sections and triton emission differential data are important for the given reaction taking place on various nuclei at different energies. In this study, triton emission spectra by using ultra-fast neutrons (incident neutron energy >50 MeV), the ( n,xt) reactions for some target nuclei as 16O, 27Al, 56Fe, 59Co, 208Pb and 209Bi have been investigated. In the calculations, the pre-equilibrium and equilibrium effects have been used. The calculated results have been compared with the experimental data taken from the literature.

  5. Neutron Productions from thin Be target irradiated by 50 MeV/u 238U beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Hee-Seock

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutrons generated from thin beryllium target by 50 MeV/u 238U beam were measured using activation analysis at 15, 30, 45, and 90 degrees from the beam direction. A 0.085 mm-thick Be stripper of RIBF was used as the neutron generating target. Activation detectors of bismuth, cobalt, and aluminum were placed out of the stripper chamber. The threshold reactions of 209Bi(n, xn210-xBi(x=4~8, 59Co(n, xn60-xCO(x=2~5, 59Co(n, 2nα54Mn, 27Al(n, α24Na, and 27Al(n,2nα22Na were applied to measure the production rates of radionuclides. The neutron spectra were obtained using an unfolding method with the SAND-II code. All of production rates and neutron spectra were compared with the calculated results using Monte Carlo codes, the PHITS and the FLUKA. The FLUKA results showed better agreement with the measurements than the PHITS. The discrepancy between the measurements and the calculations were discussed.

  6. Secondary radiation yield from a surface of heavy targets, irradiated by protons of average energies (E sub p approx 1 GeV)

    CERN Document Server

    Krupnyj, G I; Yanovich, A A

    2001-01-01

    Experimental data on the nuclear reaction rates of threshold rhodium, indium, phosphorus, sulfur, aluminium, carbon, niobium and bismuth activated detectors are presented. The detectors were set up on the cylindrical surface of full absorption targets: tungsten, uranium and chloride with the molar ratios of the 70 % NaCl and 30 % PbCl sub 2 salts. The targets were irradiated by protons with the energies from 0.8 to 1.21 GeV. Growth of the reaction rate with increasing reaction of primary protons and raising atomic number of the targets, presence of the target profile, where the maximum reaction rate is observed, are noted

  7. Extraction separation of no-carrier-added {sup 103}Pd from irradiated Rh target, Cu and Zn using {alpha}-furyldioxime, dimethylglyoxime and {alpha}-benzildioxime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi, Mahdi [Isotopes Research Group, Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, P.O. Box: 31485/498, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: msadeghi@nrcam.org; Shirazi, Behrouz [Isotopes Research Group, Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, P.O. Box: 31485/498, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Solvent extraction of no-carrier-added {sup 103}Pd from irradiated rhodium target hydrochloric solution was investigated using {alpha}-furyldioxime, dimethylglyoxime and {alpha}-benzildioxime as extracts in chloroform. The best extractant yield for a single run was 96.9% with dimethylglyoxime from 0.93 M HCl and {sup 103}Pd purity was better than 99.99%.

  8. Fast targeted gene transfection and optogenetic modification of single neurons using femtosecond laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antkowiak, Maciej; Torres-Mapa, Maria Leilani; Witts, Emily C.; Miles, Gareth B.; Dholakia, Kishan; Gunn-Moore, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    A prevailing problem in neuroscience is the fast and targeted delivery of DNA into selected neurons. The development of an appropriate methodology would enable the transfection of multiple genes into the same cell or different genes into different neighboring cells as well as rapid cell selective functionalization of neurons. Here, we show that optimized femtosecond optical transfection fulfills these requirements. We also demonstrate successful optical transfection of channelrhodopsin-2 in single selected neurons. We extend the functionality of this technique for wider uptake by neuroscientists by using fast three-dimensional laser beam steering enabling an image-guided “point-and-transfect” user-friendly transfection of selected cells. A sub-second transfection timescale per cell makes this method more rapid by at least two orders of magnitude when compared to alternative single-cell transfection techniques. This novel technology provides the ability to carry out large-scale cell selective genetic studies on neuronal ensembles and perform rapid genetic programming of neural circuits. PMID:24257461

  9. UV-C irradiation of HSV-1 infected fibroblasts (HSV-FS) enhances human natural killer (NK) cell activity against these targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettera, L.; Fitzgerald-Bocarsly, P. (New Jersey Medical School, Newark (United States))

    1991-03-11

    Expression of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) immediate early gene products has been bound to be sufficient for NK cell mediated lysis of HSV-1 infected FS. To block the targets at various stages in the infectious cycle, HSV-FS were irradiated with UV light for 1 min at 2, 6, and 20 hr post-infection. NK mediated lysis of 2 hr and 5 hr UV treated HSV-FS was 2-fold higher than non-UV treated HSV-FS despite a {gt}99% inhibition in virus yield. In contrast, 20 hr infected targets were lysed less well than 2 and 6 hr targets despite strong glycoprotein expression and induction of high levels of interferon-alpha (IFN-{alpha}) production by effector PBMC's; this lysis was not enhanced by UV treatment. Since NK lysis of HSV-FS has been found to be dependent on an HLA-DR{sup +} accessory cell (AC), lysis of irradiated HSV-FS by PBMC's depleted of AC was measured. Such depletion eradicated NK lysis of the UV treated HSV-FS indicating that irradiation does not overcome the AC requirement for NK lysis. UV irradiation of another HLA-DR{sup +} dependent target, Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) infected FS led to a dramatic reduction in both NK lysis and IFN-{alpha} induction. HSV-1 is a DNA virus whose genes are expressed in a cascade fashion whereas VSV is an RNA virus. The authors hypothesize that the enhancement in AC dependent NK activity observed for UV irradiated HSV-FS, but not VSV-FS, targets is due to overproduction of either a cellular or viral gene product which specifically occurs early in the HSV-1 infectious cycle and is downregulated by 20 hr post-infection.

  10. Experimental and theoretical study of the yields of residual product nuclei produced in thin targets irradiated by 100-2600 MeV protons

    CERN Document Server

    Titarenko, Y E; Karpikhin, E I

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the project is measurements and computer simulations of independent and cumulative yields of residual product nuclei in thin targets relevant as target materials and structure materials for hybrid accelerator-driven systems coupled to high-energy proton accelerators. The yields of residual product nuclei are of great importance when estimating such basic radiation-technology characteristics of hybrid facility targets as the total target activity, target 'poisoning', buildup of long-lived nuclides that, in turn, are to be transmuted, product nuclide (Po) alpha-activity, content of low-pressure evaporated nuclides (Hg), content of chemically-active nuclides that spoil drastically the corrosion resistance of the facility structure materials, etc. In view of the above, radioactive product nuclide yields from targets and structure materials were determined by an experiment using the ITEP U-10 proton accelerator in 51 irradiation runs for different thin targets: sup 1 sup 8 sup 2 sup , sup 1 sup 8 ...

  11. Spatial distribution of neutrons in paraffin moderator surrounding a lead target irradiated with protons at intermediate energies

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, J; Bradnova, V

    2002-01-01

    The distribution of neutrons emitted during the irradiation with 0.65, 1.0 and 1.5 GeV protons from a lead target (O / = 8 cm, l = 20 cm) and moderated by a surrounding paraffin moderator of 6 cm thick was studied with a radiochemical sensor along the beam axis on top of the moderator. Small sup 1 sup 3 sup 9 La-sensors of approximately 1 g were used to measure essentially the thermal neutron fluence at different depths near the surface: i.e., on top of the moderator, in 10 mm deep holes and in 20 mm deep holes. The reaction sup 1 sup 3 sup 9 La(n, gamma) sup 1 sup 4 sup 0 La (tau sub 1 sub / sub 2 = 40.27 h) was studied using standard procedures of gamma spectroscopy and data analysis. The neutron induced activity of sup 1 sup 4 sup 0 La increases strongly with the depth of the hole inside the moderator, its activity distribution along the beam direction on top of the moderator has its maximum about 10 cm downstream the entrance of the protons into the lead and the induced activity increases about linearity ...

  12. Differential Regulation of Ferritin Subunits and Iron Transport Proteins: An Effect of Targeted Hepatic X-Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naila Naz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study aimed to investigate radiation-induced regulation of iron proteins including ferritin subunits in rats. Rat livers were selectively irradiated in vivo at 25 Gy. This dose can be used to model radiation effects to the liver without inducing overt radiation-induced liver disease. Sham-irradiated rats served as controls. Isolated hepatocytes were irradiated at 8 Gy. Ferritin light polypeptide (FTL was detectable in the serum of sham-irradiated rats with an increase after irradiation. Liver irradiation increased hepatic protein expression of both ferritin subunits. A rather early increase (3 h was observed for hepatic TfR1 and Fpn-1 followed by a decrease at 12 h. The increase in TfR2 persisted over the observed time. Parallel to the elevation of AST levels, a significant increase (24 h in hepatic iron content was measured. Complete blood count analysis showed a significant decrease in leukocyte number with an early increase in neutrophil granulocytes and a decrease in lymphocytes. In vitro, a significant increase in ferritin subunits at mRNA level was detected after irradiation which was further induced with a combination treatment of irradiation and acute phase cytokine. Irradiation can directly alter the expression of ferritin subunits and this response can be strongly influenced by radiation-induced proinflammatory cytokines. FTL can be used as a serum marker for early phase radiation-induced liver damage.

  13. Comparison on the production of radionuclides in 1.4 GeV proton irradiated LBE targets of different thickness

    CERN Document Server

    Maiti, Moumita; Mendonça, Tania M; Stora, Thierry; Lahiri, Susanta

    2014-01-01

    This is the first report on the inventory of radionuclides produced in 1.4 GeV proton induced reaction on Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) targets. LBE targets of 6 mm diameter and 1 to 8 mm lengths were irradiated with 1.4 GeV protons. The radionuclides ranging from Be-7 (53.12 days) to Po-207 (5.8 h) were identified in the samples with the help of time resolved gamma-ray spectroscopy. However, there is no signature of formation of At radioisotopes, which can be produced by the interaction of secondary particles, typical for thick targets.

  14. Conversion of Molybdenum-99 production process to low enriched uranium: Neutronic and thermal hydraulic analyses of HEU and LEU target plates for irradiation in Pakistan Research Reactor-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mushtaq, Ahmad, E-mail: amushtaq1@hotmail.com [Isotope Production Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Iqbal, Masood; Bokhari, Ishtiaq Hussain; Mahmood, Tayyab; Muhammad, Atta [Nuclear Engineering Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2012-09-15

    Technetium-99m, the daughter product of Molybdenum-99 is the most widely needed radionuclide for diagnostic studies in Pakistan. Molybdenum-99 Production Facility has been established at PINSTECH. Highly enriched uranium (93% {sup 235}U) U/Al alloy targets have been irradiated in Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) for the generation of fission Mo-99, while basic dissolution technique is used for separation of Mo-99 from target matrix activity. In line with the international objective of minimizing and eventually eliminating the use of HEU in civil commerce, national and international efforts have been underway to shift the production of medical isotopes from HEU to LEU (LEU; <20% {sup 235}U enrichment) targets. To achieve the equivalent amount of {sup 99}Mo with LEU targets, approximately 5 times uranium is needed. LEU aluminum uranium dispersion target has been developed, which may replace existing HEU aluminum/uranium alloy targets for production of {sup 99}Mo using basic dissolution technique. Neutronic and thermal hydraulic calculations were performed for safe irradiation of targets in the core of PARR-1.

  15. Cross-sections of residual nuclei from deuteron irradiation of thin thorium target at energy 7 GeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vespalec, Radek; Adam, Jindrich; Baldin, Anton Alexandrovich; Khushvaktov, Jurabek; Solnyshkin, Alexander Alexandrovich; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, Vsevolod Mikhailovich; Tyutyunikov, Sergey Ivanovich; Vrzalova, Jitka; Zavorka, Lukas; Zeman, Miroslav

    2017-09-01

    The residual nuclei yields are of great importance for the estimation of basic radiation-technology characteristics (like a total target activity, production of long-lived nuclides etc.) of accelerator driven systems planned for transmutation of spent nuclear fuel and for a design of radioisotopes production facilities. Experimental data are also essential for validation of nuclear codes describing various stages of a spallation reaction. Therefore, the main aim of this work is to add new experimental data in energy region of relativistic deuterons, as similar data are missing in nuclear databases. The sample made of thin natural thorium foil was irradiated at JINR Nuclotron accelerator with a deuteron beam of the total kinetic energy 7 GeV. Integral number of deuterons was determined with the use of aluminum activation detectors. Products of deuteron induced spallation reaction were qualified and quantified by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy method. Several important spectroscopic corrections were applied to obtain results of high accuracy. Experimental cumulative and independent cross-sections were determined for more than 80 isotopes including meta-stable isomers. The total uncertainty of results rarely exceeded 9%. Experimental results were compared with MCNP6.1 Monte-Carlo code predictions. Generally, experimental and calculated cross-sections are in a reasonably good agreement, with the exception of a few light isotopes in a fragmentation region, where the calculations are highly under-estimated. Measured data will be useful for future development of high-energy nuclear codes. After completion, final data will be added into the EXFOR database.

  16. Cross-sections of residual nuclei from deuteron irradiation of thin thorium target at energy 7 GeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vespalec Radek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The residual nuclei yields are of great importance for the estimation of basic radiation-technology characteristics (like a total target activity, production of long-lived nuclides etc. of accelerator driven systems planned for transmutation of spent nuclear fuel and for a design of radioisotopes production facilities. Experimental data are also essential for validation of nuclear codes describing various stages of a spallation reaction. Therefore, the main aim of this work is to add new experimental data in energy region of relativistic deuterons, as similar data are missing in nuclear databases. The sample made of thin natural thorium foil was irradiated at JINR Nuclotron accelerator with a deuteron beam of the total kinetic energy 7 GeV. Integral number of deuterons was determined with the use of aluminum activation detectors. Products of deuteron induced spallation reaction were qualified and quantified by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy method. Several important spectroscopic corrections were applied to obtain results of high accuracy. Experimental cumulative and independent cross-sections were determined for more than 80 isotopes including meta-stable isomers. The total uncertainty of results rarely exceeded 9%. Experimental results were compared with MCNP6.1 Monte-Carlo code predictions. Generally, experimental and calculated cross-sections are in a reasonably good agreement, with the exception of a few light isotopes in a fragmentation region, where the calculations are highly under-estimated. Measured data will be useful for future development of high-energy nuclear codes. After completion, final data will be added into the EXFOR database.

  17. Transportation risk assessment for the shipment of irradiated FFTF tritium target assemblies from the Hanford Site to the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, D. L.

    1997-11-19

    A Draft Technical Information Document (HNF-1855) is being prepared to evaluate proposed interim tritium and medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This report examines the potential health and safety impacts associated with transportation of irradiated tritium targets from FFTF to the Savannah River Site for processing at the Tritium Extraction Facility. Potential risks to workers and members of the public during normal transportation and accident conditions are assessed.

  18. Re-irradiation after gross total resection of recurrent glioblastoma : Spatial pattern of recurrence and a review of the literature as a basis for target volume definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straube, Christoph; Elpula, Greeshma; Gempt, Jens; Gerhardt, Julia; Bette, Stefanie; Zimmer, Claus; Schmidt-Graf, Friederike; Meyer, Bernhard; Combs, Stephanie E

    2017-06-14

    Currently, patients with gross total resection (GTR) of recurrent glioblastoma (rGBM) undergo adjuvant chemotherapy or are followed up until progression. Re-irradiation, as one of the most effective treatments in macroscopic rGBM, is withheld in this situation, as uncertainties about the pattern of re-recurrence, the target volume, and also the efficacy of early re-irradiation after GTR exist. Imaging and clinical data from 26 consecutive patients with GTR of rGBM were analyzed. The spatial pattern of recurrences was analyzed according to the RANO-HGG criteria ("response assessment in neuro-oncology criteria for high-grade gliomas"). Progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier method. Furthermore, a systematic review was performed in PubMed. All but 4 patients underwent adjuvant chemotherapy after GTR. Progression was diagnosed in 20 of 26 patients and 70% of recurrent tumors occurred adjacent to the resection cavity. The median extension beyond the edge of the resection cavity was 20 mm. Median PFS was 6 months; OS was 12.8 months. We propose a target volume containing the resection cavity and every contrast enhancing lesion as the gross tumor volume (GTV), a spherical margin of 5-10 mm to generate the clinical target volume (CTV), and a margin of 1-3 mm to generate the planning target volume (PTV). Re-irradiation of this volume is deemed to be safe and likely to prolong PFS. Re-irradiation is worth considering also after GTR, as the volumes that need to be treated are limited and re-irradiation has already proven to be a safe treatment option in general. The strategy of early re-irradiation is currently being tested within the GlioCave/NOA 17/Aro 2016/03 trial.

  19. An automated flow system incorporating in-line acid dissolution of bismuth metal from a cyclotron irradiated target assembly for use in the isolation of astatine-211

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O’Hara, Matthew J.; Krzysko, Anthony J.; Niver, Cynthia M.; Morrison, Samuel S.; Owsley, Stanley L.; Hamlin, Donald K.; Dorman, Eric F.; Scott Wilbur, D.

    2017-04-01

    Astatine-211 (211At) is a promising cyclotron-produced radionuclide being investigated for use in targeted alpha therapy of blood borne and metastatic cancers, as well as treatment of tumor remnants after surgical resections. The isolation of trace quantities of 211At, produced within several grams of a Bi metal cyclotron target, involves a complex, multi-step procedure: (1) Bi metal dissolution in strong HNO3, (2) distillation of the HNO3 to yield Bi salts containing 211At, (3) dissolution of the salts in strong HCl, (4) solvent extraction of 211At from bismuth salts with diisopropyl ether (DIPE), and (5) back-extraction of 211At from DIPE into NaOH, leading to a purified 211At product. Step (1) has been addressed first to begin the process of automating the onerous 211At isolation process. A computer-controlled Bi target dissolution system has been designed. The system performs in-line dissolution of Bi metal from the target assembly using an enclosed target dissolution block, routing the resulting solubilized 211At/Bi mixture to the subsequent process step. The primary parameters involved in Bi metal solubilization (HNO3 concentration and influent flow rate) were optimized prior to evaluation of the system performance on replicate cyclotron irradiated targets. The results indicate that the system performs reproducibly, having nearly quantitative release of 211At from irradiated targets, with cumulative 211At recoveries that follow a sigmoidal function. The predictable nature of the 211At release profile allows the user to tune the system to meet target processing requirements.

  20. Progress in chemical processing of LEU targets for {sup 99}Mo production -- 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandegrift, G.F.; Conner, C.; Sedlet, J.; Wygmans, D.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wu, D. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Iskander, F.; Landsberger, S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Presented here are recent experimental results of the continuing development activities associated with converting current processes for producing fission-product {sup 99}Mo from targets using high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). Studies were focused in four areas: (1) measuring the chemical behavior of iodine, rhodium, and silver in the LEU-modified Cintichem process, (2) performing experiments and calculations to assess the suitability of zinc fission barriers for LEU metal foil targets, (3) developing an actinide separations method for measuring alpha contamination of the purified {sup 99}Mo product, and (4) developing a cooperation with Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory that will lead to approval by the US Federal Drug Administration for production of {sup 99}Mo from LEU targets. Experimental results continue to show the technical feasibility of converting current HEU processes to LEU.

  1. Assembly and Irradiation Modeling of Residual Stresses in Low-Enriched Uranium Foil-Based Annular Targets for Molybdenum-99 Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srisharan G. Govindarajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers a composite cylindrical structure, with low-enriched uranium (LEU foil enclosed between two aluminum 6061-T6 cylinders. A recess is cut all around the outer circumference of the inner tube to accommodate the LEU foil of open-cross section. To obtain perfect contact at the interfaces of the foil and the tubes, an internal pressure is applied to the inner tube, thereby plastically and elastically deforming it. The residual stresses resulting from the assembly process are used along with a thermal stress model to predict the stress margins in the cladding during irradiation. The whole process was simulated as a steady-state two-dimensional problem using the commercial finite element code Abaqus FEA. The irradiation behavior of the annular target has been presented, and the effect of the assembly residual stresses has been discussed.

  2. Protons and electrons generated from a 5-{mu}m thick copper tape target irradiated by s-, circularly-, and p-polarized 55-fs laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Z. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umeimidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: lizhong@sinap.ac.cn; Daido, H. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umeimidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Fukumi, A. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umeimidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Anagawa 4-9-1, Inage, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Bulanov, S.V.; Sagisaka, A.; Ogura, K.; Yogo, A.; Nishiuchi, M.; Orimo, S.; Mori, M. [Advanced Photon Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Umeimidai 8-1, Kizu, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Oishi, Y.; Nayuki, T.; Fujii, T.; Nemoto, K. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Nagasaka 2-6-1, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-0196 (Japan); Nakamura, S.; Noda, A. [Institute of Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Choi, I.W.; Sung, J.H.; Ko, D.-K.; Lee, J. [Advanced Photonics Research Institute, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-10-01

    The angular distribution and energy spectra of energetic protons emitted from a 5-{mu}m thick copper tape target irradiated by p-, circularly-, and s-polarized 55-fs laser pulses with intensity of 8-9x10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} are measured. The protons are found in the rear target normal direction while the hot electrons are found in the laser propagation direction. The maximum energy of protons is equal to 1.34 MeV for p-polarized irradiation. The energy spectrum of protons depends strongly on the total amount of electrons but it does not so strongly depend on the electron angular distribution under our experiment conditions. Two-dimensional particle in cell simulations also show the maximal proton acceleration for the p-polarized pulse, less efficient acceleration for the circular polarization, and lower acceleration efficiency in the case of the s-polarization, which is related to the electron acceleration efficiency at the front side of the target.

  3. Effect of spatial nonuniformity of heating on compression and burning of a thermonuclear target under direct multibeam irradiation by a megajoule laser pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bel’kov, S. A.; Bondarenko, S. V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, All-Russia Research Institute of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Vergunova, G. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Garanin, S. G. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, All-Russia Research Institute of Experimental Physics (Russian Federation); Gus’kov, S. Yu.; Demchenko, N. N.; Doskoch, I. Ya. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Zmitrenko, N. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Keldysh Institute of Applied Mathematics (Russian Federation); Kuchugov, P. A., E-mail: pkuchugov@gmail.com; Rozanov, V. B.; Stepanov, R. V.; Yakhin, R. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    Direct-drive fusion targets are considered at present as an alternative to targets of indirect compression at a laser energy level of about 2 MJ. In this approach, the symmetry of compression and ignition of thermonuclear fuel play the major role. We report on the results of theoretical investigation of compression and burning of spherical direct-drive targets in the conditions of spatial nonuniformity of heating associated with a shift of the target from the beam center of focusing and possible laser radiation energy disbalance in the beams. The investigation involves numerous calculations based on a complex of 1D and 2D codes RAPID, SEND (for determining the target illumination and the dynamics of absorption), DIANA, and NUT (1D and multidimensional hydrodynamics of compression and burning of targets). The target under investigation had the form of a two-layer shell (ablator made of inertial material CH and DT ice) filled with DT gas. We have determined the range of admissible variation of compression and combustion parameters of the target depending on the variation of the spatial nonuniformity of its heating by a multibeam laser system. It has been shown that low-mode (long-wavelength) perturbations deteriorate the characteristics of the central region due to less effective conversion of the kinetic energy of the target shell into the internal energy of the center. Local initiation of burning is also observed in off-center regions of the target in the case of substantial asymmetry of irradiation. In this case, burning is not spread over the entire volume of the DT fuel as a rule, which considerably reduces the thermonuclear yield as compared to that in the case of spherical symmetry and central ignition.

  4. Comparison of the (p,xn) cross sections from /sup 238/U, /sup 235/U, and /sup 232/Th targets irradiated with 200-MeV protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Y.Y.; Zhou, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    We have measured absolute cross sections for (p,xn) reactions (x ranges from 0 to 8) from /sup 238/U, /sup 235/U, and /sup 232/Th targets irradiated with 200-MeV protons at the Brookhaven AGS Linac injector. Chemical yields were determined by using /sup 239/Np and /sup 233/Pa as tracers. Yield patterns obtained in this work can be compared to the experimental results and theoretical calculations from earlier work, and they are consistent within the framework of intranuclear cascade followed by neutron evaporation and fission competition.

  5. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER AND OTHER LASER APPLICATIONS: Changes in the emission properties of metal targets during pulse-periodic laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konov, Vitalii I.; Pimenov, S. M.; Prokhorov, A. M.; Chapliev, N. I.

    1988-02-01

    A scanning electron microscope was used with a pulse-periodic CO2 laser to discover the laws governing the correlation of the modified microrelief of metal surfaces, subjected to the action of multiple laser pulses, with the emission of charged particles and the luminescence of the irradiated zone. It was established that the influence of sorption and laser-induced desorption on the emission signals may be manifested differently depending on the regime of current generation in the "target-vacuum chamber" circuit.

  6. Project and implantation of automation in irradiation systems for solid, liquid and gaseous targets in cyclotrons aiming the production of radioisotopes

    CERN Document Server

    Araujo, S G D

    2001-01-01

    Nowadays, two cyclotron are being operated at IPEN-CNEN/SP: one model CV-28, capable of accelerating p, d sup 3 He sub 4 and alpha, with energies of 24, 14, 36 and 28 MeV, respectively, and beam currents up to 30 mu A; the other one, model Cyclone 30, accelerates protons with energy of 30 MeV and currents up to 350 mu A. Both have the objective of irradiating targets both for radioisotopes production for use in nuclear medicine, such as sup 6 sup 7 Ga, sup 2 sup 0 sup 1 Tl, sup 1 sup 2 sup 3 I, sup 1 sup 8 F and general research. The development of irradiating systems completely automatic was the objective of this work, always aiming to reduce the radiation exposition dose to the workers and to increase the reliability of use of these systems, because very high activities are expected in these processes. In the automation, a Programmable Logical Controller (PCL) was used connected to a feedback net, to manage all the variables involved in the irradiation processes. The program of the PCL was developed using S...

  7. Fast neutrons from thick deuterium target irradiated by 15.8 MeV protons and 14.1 MeV deuterons

    CERN Document Server

    Bem, P; Cvachovec, F; Götz, M; Kroha, V; Nikolskii, E Y; Simeckova, E; Vincour, J

    1999-01-01

    The energy spectra of neutrons emitted by a thick deuterium target at 0 deg. angle, irradiated by a beam of 15.8 MeV protons and 14.1 MeV deuterons were measured in an open geometry with a stilbene scintillator and with a two-dimensional n-gamma discrimination technique. The evaluated spectral yields were compared with those of p+Be and d+Be reactions at relevant energies. This comparison shows that the D-target spectra are substantially harder having small relative contribution of low-energy neutrons, which makes these reactions useful as intense neutron sources for biomedical and analytical purposes. The total neutron yield from the d+D reaction is in good agreement with values calculated from published differential cross-section data. The p+D reaction seems to be the most effective fast neutron source, based on low-energy (E<40 MeV) cyclotrons.

  8. Recommendations from GEC ESTRO Breast Cancer Working Group (I): Target definition and target delineation for accelerated or boost Partial Breast Irradiation using multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy after breast conserving closed cavity surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strnad, Vratislav; Hannoun-Levi, Jean-Michel; Guinot, Jose-Luis; Lössl, Kristina; Kauer-Dorner, Daniela; Resch, Alexandra; Kovács, György; Major, Tibor; Van Limbergen, Erik

    2015-06-01

    The aim was to develop a delineation guideline for target definition for APBI or boost by consensus of the Breast Working Group of GEC-ESTRO. Appropriate delineation of CTV (PTV) with low inter- and intra-observer variability in clinical practice is complex and needs various steps as: (1) Detailed knowledge of primary surgical procedure, of all details of pathology, as well as of preoperative imaging. (2) Definition of tumour localization before breast conserving surgery inside the breast and translation of this information in the postoperative CT imaging data set. (3) Calculation of the size of total safety margins. The size should be at least 2 cm. (4) Definition of the target. (5) Delineation of the target according to defined rules. Providing guidelines based on the consensus of a group of experts should make it possible to achieve a reproducible and consistent definition of CTV (PTV) for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (APBI) or boost irradiation after breast conserving closed cavity surgery, and helps to define it after selected cases of oncoplastic surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical target volume localization using conventional methods (anatomy and palpation) and ultrasonography in early breast cancer post-operative external irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdagni, R; Italia, C; Montanaro, P; Ciocca, M; Morandi, G; Salvadori, B

    1997-03-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of three methods, anatomy (A), palpation (P) and ultrasounds (US) in localizing the clinical target volume (CTV) in patients (pts) with early breast cancer (EBC) undergoing breast external irradiation as part of conservation therapy. One hundred consecutive pts with EBC (T(is) 1%, T1 78%, T2 21%, N- 68%, N+ 32%), treated with conservation surgery and breast irradiation with opposed tangential portals, were prospectively analyzed. Anatomically, palpatory or ultrasound defined field borders for CTV localizations were determined in the same position thanks to the utilization of a vacuum-formed cellulose acetate immobilization cast, removed during CTV definitions. P and US CTV localizations have been found to coincide on the four margins (superior, inferior, medial, lateral) in only 1/100 pts, while no pt showed identical A and US CTV localizations. Only 31/397 (8%) field measurements with A, and 98/395 (25%) with P corresponded to US border definition. If mean and median values of each field border were considered, the CTV was generally overestimated with P appearing more accurate than A in a gross definition of the target (P palpatory reference lines appeared to be more accurate than A-method (P < 0.01). Conventional methods frequently appear inadequate to localize residual mammary gland in EBC post-operative external irradiation. This analysis evidentiates the inaccuracy of empirical CTV definition, and suggests that palpation or anatomical reference borders should be critically used and that state of art imaging methods should be included in treatment planning, particularly in pre-menopausal pts. If economical or individual variables have to be taken into account, palpation might be considered in post-menopausal women.

  10. Effect of the background gas pressure on the effectiveness of laser-induced material removal from deep cavities in irradiated targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palya, Austin; Ranjbar, Omid A.; Lin, Zhibin; Volkov, Alexey N.

    2018-01-01

    Two-dimensional expansion of a plume, induced by short-pulse laser irradiation of a bottom of a cylindrical cavity in a copper target, into argon background gas at pressure ranging from 0 to 1 bar is studied numerically based on a hybrid computational model that includes a heat conduction equation for the irradiated target and a kinetic model of the gas mixture flow. It is found that an increasing pressure of non-reactive background gas can induce an order-of-magnitude increase in the effectiveness of removal of the laser ablation products from the cavity as compared to ablation under vacuum conditions. The effectiveness of the material removal, measured as the ratio of the mass of the ablated products leaving the cavity to the evaporated mass, is determined by the interplay between the confinement and focusing effects of the background gas, which decelerate the plume expansion and concentrate the ablation products far from the cavity wall, correspondingly. At small background gas pressure, the plume expansion is dominated by the focusing effect, which enhances the efficiency of the material removal. At large pressure, the confinement effect dominates and suppresses the material removal. As a result, there is an optimum background gas pressure that maximizes the efficiency of the material removal from the cavity. This optimum background gas pressure depends on the characteristic pressure in the plume and strongly increases with an increase in the absorbed intensity of laser radiation.

  11. An analytic solution for calculating the beam intensity profiles useful to irradiate target volumes with bi-concave outlines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Neve, W.; Derycke, S.; De Wagter, C. [Ghent Rijksuniversiteit (Belgium). Kliniek voor Radiotherapie en Kerngeneeskunde

    1995-12-01

    A heuristic planing procedure allowing to obtain a 3-dimensional conformal dose distribution in radiotherapy for target volumes with a bi-concave or multi-concave shape has been developed. The described method is tested on a phantom simulating a pelvic target, described by Brahme.

  12. Mechanism of pain relief by low-power infrared irradiation: ATP is an IR-target molecule in nociceptive neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yachnev, Igor L; Plakhova, Vera B; Podzorova, Svetlana A; Shelykh, Tatiana N; Rogachevsky, Ilya V; Krylov, Boris V

    2012-01-01

    Effects of infrared (IR) radiation generated by a low-power CO2-laser on the membrane of cultured dissociated nociceptive neurons of newborn rat spinal ganglia were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp method. Low-power IR radiation diminished the voltage sensitivity of activation gating machinery of slow sodium channels (Na(v)1.8). Ouabain known to block both transducer and pumping functions of Na+,K+-ATPase eliminated IR irradiation effects. The molecular mechanism of interaction of CO2-laser radiation with sensory membrane was proposed. The primary event of this interaction is the process of energy absorption by ATP molecules. The transfer of vibrational energy from Na+,K+- ATPase-bound and vibrationally excited ATP molecules to Na+,K+-ATPase activates this enzyme and converts it into a signal transducer. This effect leads to a decrease in the voltage sensitivity of Na(v)1.8 channels. The effect of IR-radiation was elucidated by the combined application of a very sensitive patch-clamp method and an optical facility with a controlled CO2-laser. As a result, the mechanism of interaction of non-thermal low-power IR radiation with the nociceptive neuron membrane is suggested.

  13. Measurements of neutron spectrum from stopping-length target irradiated by several tens-MeV/u particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meigo, Shin-ichiro; Takada, Hiroshi; Nakashima, Hiroshi; Sasa, Toshinobu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Tanaka, Susumu; Shin, Kazuo; Ono, Shinji

    1997-03-01

    Using a Time-of-Flight technique, we have measured neutron spectra from stopping-length targets bombarded with 68-MeV protons and 100-MeV {alpha}-particles. The measured spectra were used to validate the results calculated by the Quantum Molecular Dynamics (QMD) plus Statistical Decay Model (SDM). The results of QMD plus SDM code agreed fairly well with the experimental data for the light target. On the other hand, the QMD plus SDM gives a larger value than the experimental for the heavy target. (author)

  14. Role of Hypoxia-inducible factor-1 and its target genes in human lung adenocarcinoma cells after photon- versus carbon ion irradiation; Expression HIF-1-abhaengiger Gene in humanen Lungenadenokarzinom (A549)-Zellen und deren Regulation nach Photonen- und Schwerionenbestrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bill, Verena Maria

    2013-11-26

    Exposed to hypoxia tumor cells are notably resistant to photon irradiation. The hypoxiainducible transcription factor 1α (HIF-1α) seems to play a fundamental role in this resistance, while its role after heavy-ion beam remains unknown. The intention of this study was to determine how A549-cells (non-small-cell lung carcinoma) react in different oxygenation states after irradiation with photons or heavy ions, particularly in regards to their expression of HIF-1 target genes. Resistance of hypoxic A549 cells after photon irradiation was documented by cellular and clonogenic survival. In contrast, cellular survival after heavy-ion irradiation in hypoxic cells was not elevated to normoxic cells. Among the oxygen dependent regulation of HIF-1 target genes, gene expression analyses showed an increased expression of GLUT-1, LDH-A, PDK-1 and VEGF after photon irradiation but not after heavy-ion irradiation after 48 hours in normoxic cells. As expected, CDKN1A as inhibitor of cell cycle progression showed higher expression after both radiation forms; interestingly CDKN1A was also in an oxygen dependent manner lightly upregulated. In western blot analyses we demonstrated a significant increase of HIF-1 and GLUT-1 caused by hypoxia, but only a tendency of increased protein level in hypoxia after photon irradiation and no changes after heavy-ion irradiation. Significantly higher protein level of secreted VEGF-A could be measured 72 hours after photon irradiation in normoxic cells by ELISA analyses. Controversially discussed, I could not detect an association between HIF-1 and SCF or Trx-1 in A549-cells in this study. Whereas Trx-1-expression was neither influenced by changed oxygen partial pressure nor irradiation, I could show increased SCF mRNA by quantitative Real Time-PCR and secreted protein level by ELISA after photon irradiation independent of oxygen state. In summary, this study showed that HIF-1 and its target genes (GLUT-1, LDHA; PDK, VEGF) and also SCF was

  15. Coupling of morphology to surface transport in ion-beam-irradiated surfaces: normal incidence and rotating targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Garcia, Javier [Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos (GISC) and School of Mathematical Sciences and Complex and Adaptive Systems Laboratory, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cuerno, Rodolfo [Departamento de Matematicas and GISC, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Avenida de la Universidad 30, E-28911 Leganes (Spain); Castro, Mario [GISC and Grupo de Dinamica No Lineal (DNL), Escuela Tecnica Superior de IngenierIa (ICAI), Universidad Pontificia Comillas de Madrid, E-28015 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: javiermunozgarcia@gmail.com, E-mail: cuerno@math.uc3m.es, E-mail: mariocastro73@gmail.com

    2009-06-03

    Continuum models have proved their applicability to describe nanopatterns produced by ion-beam sputtering of amorphous or amorphizable targets at low and medium energies. Here we pursue the recently introduced 'hydrodynamic approach' in the cases of bombardment at normal incidence, or of oblique incidence onto rotating targets, known to lead to self-organized arrangements of nanodots. Our approach stresses the dynamical roles of material (defect) transport at the target surface and of local redeposition. By applying results previously derived for arbitrary angles of incidence, we derive effective evolution equations for these geometries of incidence, which are then numerically studied. Moreover, we show that within our model these equations are identical (albeit with different coefficients) in both cases, provided surface tension is isotropic in the target. We thus account for the common dynamics for both types of incidence conditions, namely formation of dots with short-range order and long-wavelength disorder, and an intermediate coarsening of dot features that improves the local order of the patterns. We provide for the first time approximate analytical predictions for the dependence of stationary dot features (amplitude and wavelength) on phenomenological parameters, that improve upon previous linear estimates. Finally, our theoretical results are discussed in terms of experimental data.

  16. X-ray emission from Au-Sm alloy target irradiated with high power sub nanosecond laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaurasia, S.; Munda, D. S.; Tripathi, S.; Kumar, M.; Gupta, N. K.; Dhareshwar, L. J.; Bajaj, P. N.

    2010-02-01

    The hohlraum cavity is generally made out of gold (Au) and recently it has been shown that laser-target coupling efficiency can be increased by using cocktail or mixed targets such as gold-samarium (Au-Sm). We report here results of experiments performed on Au-Sm alloy in various spectral regions for various compositions. In these experiments, a 12 Joule/500ps Nd:glass laser has been used. It is observed that the soft x-ray emission in the spectral region 0.7 -1.56 keV is enhanced by about 40-50% by using a composition of Au:Sm:: 3:7 as compared to pure Au .However, in case of hard x-ray emission (3.2 -5 keV), there is a reduction in x-ray emission from Au-Sm target as compared to pure gold. This behaviour, that enhancement occurs in soft x-rays in the case of mixed Au-Sm targets is desirable in the ICF scheme.

  17. Note: Proton irradiation at kilowatt-power and neutron production from a free-surface liquid-lithium target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfon, S; Arenshtam, A; Kijel, D; Paul, M; Weissman, L; Aviv, O; Berkovits, D; Dudovitch, O; Eisen, Y; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Haquin, G; Hazenshprung, N; Kreisel, A; Mardor, I; Shimel, G; Shor, A; Silverman, I; Tessler, M; Yungrais, Z

    2014-05-01

    The free-surface Liquid-Lithium Target, recently developed at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), was successfully used with a 1.9 MeV, 1.2 mA (2.3 kW) continuous-wave proton beam. Neutrons (~2 × 10(10) n/s having a peak energy of ~27 keV) from the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction were detected with a fission-chamber detector and by gold activation targets positioned in the forward direction. The setup is being used for nuclear astrophysics experiments to study neutron-induced reactions at stellar energies and to demonstrate the feasibility of accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

  18. Volatile elements production rates in a 1.4 Gev proton-irradiated molten lead-bismuth target

    CERN Document Server

    Zanini, L; Everaerts, P; Fallot, M; Franberg, H; Gröschel, F; Jost, C; Kirchner, T; Kojima, Y; Köster, U; Lebenhaft, J; Manfrina, E; Pitcher, E J; Ravn, H L; Tall, Y; Wagner, W; Wohlmuther, M

    2005-01-01

    Production rates of volatile elements following spallation reaction of 1.4 GeV protons on a liquid Pb/Bi target have been measured. The experiment was performed at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. These data are of interest for the developments of targets for accelerator driven systems such as MEGAPIE. Additional data have been taken on a liquid Pb target. Calculations were performed using the FLUKA and MCNPX Monte Carlo codes coupled with the evolution codes ORIHET3 and FISPACT using different options for the intra-nuclear cascades and evaporation models. Preliminary results from the data analysis show good comparison with calculations for Hg and for noble gases. For other elements such as I it is apparent that only a fraction of the produced isotopes is released. The agreement with the experimental data varies depending on the model combination used. The best results are obtained using MCNPX with the INCL4/ABLA models and with FLUKA. Discrepancies are found for some isotopes produced by fission using the MCNPX ...

  19. Spallation Neutron Spectrum on a Massive Lead/Paraffin Target Irradiated with 1 GeV Protons

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, J; Barashenkov, V S; Brandt, R; Golovatiouk, V M; Kalinnikov, V G; Katovsky, K; Krivopustov, M I; Kumar, V; Kumawat, H; Odoj, R; Pronskikh, V S; Solnyshkin, A A; Stegailov, V I; Tsoupko-Sitnikov, V M; Westmeier, W

    2004-01-01

    The spectra of gamma-ray emitted by decaying residual nuclei, produced by spallation neutrons with (n, xn), (n,xnyp), (n,p), (n,gamma) reactions in activation threshold detectors - namely, ^{209}Bi, ^{197}Au, ^{59}Co, ^{115}In, ^{232}Th, were measured in the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems (LNP), JINR, Dubna, Russia. Spallation neutrons were generated by bombarding a 20 cm long cylindrical lead target, 8 cm in diameter, surrounded by a 6 cm thick layer of paraffin moderator, with a 1 GeV proton beam from the Nuclotron accelerator. Reaction rates and spallation neutron spectrum were measured and compared with CASCADE code calculations.

  20. Extension of excitation functions up to 50 MeV for activation products in deuteron irradiations of Pr and Tm targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermanne, A., E-mail: aherman@vub.ac.be [Cyclotron, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels B1050 (Belgium); Tárkányi, F.; Takács, S.; Ditrói, F. [Cyclotron, ATOMKI, Debrecen H4026 (Hungary)

    2016-09-15

    Extension up to 50 MeV incident deuteron energy is presented for excitation functions of activation products formed in monoisotopic Tm ({sup 169}Tm) and Pr ({sup 141}Pr). By stacked foil irradiations direct and/or cumulative production of {sup 140,139m,138}Nd, {sup 138m}Pr, {sup 141,139,137m,135}Ce on Pr and {sup 166,169}Yb, {sup 166,167,168}Tm on Tm targets were measured. Confirmation of earlier experimental results for all investigated radionuclides is found and the influence of the higher energy on thick target yields and batch production of medically relevant radionuclides ({sup 140}Nd, {sup 139}Pr (as decay product of {sup 139m}Nd), {sup 166,169}Yb, {sup 167}Tm) is discussed. A comparison of experimental values with TALYS1.6 code results (predicted values from TENDL-2015 on-line library) shows a better description of the (d,pxn) reactions than older ones.

  1. Hot surface ionic line emission and cold K-inner shell emission from petawatt-laser irradiated Cu foil targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theobald, W; Akli, K; Clarke, R; Delettrez, J A; Freeman, R R; Glenzer, S; Green, J; Gregori, G; Heathcote, R; Izumi, N; King, J A; Koch, J A; Kuba, J; Lancaster, K; MacKinnon, A J; Key, M; Mileham, C; Myatt, J; Neely, D; Norreys, P A; Park, H; Pasely, J; Patel, P; Regan, S P; Sawada, H; Shepherd, R; Snavely, R; Stephens, R B; Stoeckl, C; Storm, M; Zhang, B; Sangster, T C

    2005-12-13

    A hot, T{sub e} {approx} 2- to 3-keV surface plasma was observed in the interaction of a 0.7-ps petawatt laser beam with solid copper-foil targets at intensities >10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. Copper K-shell spectra were measured in the range of 8 to 9 keV using a single-photon-counting x-ray CCD camera. In addition to K{sub {alpha}} and K{sub {beta}} inner-shell lines, the emission contained the Cu He{sub {alpha}} and Ly{sub {alpha}} lines, allowing the temperature to be inferred. These lines have not been observed previously with ultrafast laser pulses. For intensities less than 3 x 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2}, only the K{sub {alpha}} and K{sub {beta}} inner-shell emissions are detected. Measurements of the absolute K{sub {alpha}} yield as a function of the laser intensity are in agreement with a model that includes refluxing and confinement of the suprathermal electrons in the target volume.

  2. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is not relevant for targeted therapy and irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas Koch, Dominik; Pickhard, Anja; Gebel, Lena; Buchberger, Anna Maria S; Bas, Murat; Mogler, Carolin; Reiter, Rudolf; Piontek, Guido; Wirth, Markus

    2017-05-16

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an important regulator of cell growth and survival, and is highly variable in tumor cells. The most prevalent variation of the EGFR extracellular domain is the EGFR variant III (EGFRvIII). Some studies imply that EGFRvIII may be responsible for the poor response to the monoclonal EGFR-antibody Cetuximab, used therapeutically in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Due to inconsistent data in the literature regarding EGFRvIII prevalence and clinical relevance in HNSCC, especially its predictive value, we examined EGFRvIII-transfected cell lines and patient tissue samples. In contrast to other recent publications, we were able to demonstrate EGFRvIII expression in HNSCC. However, we noted that the different detection methods yielded inconsistent results. Furthermore, our EGFRvIII transfected and EGFR wild type cell lines exhibited similar characteristics and response rates in the performed in vitro experiments. We conducted various inhibition and combined irradiation experiments using three EGFRvIII-transfected cell lines. Moreover, a patient cohort of 149 cases consisting of formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) and fresh-frozen specimens was assayed via reverse transcriptase PCR (rtPCR) with gel electrophoresis and sequencing for EGFRvIII prevalence. In the rtPCR assays, we used five previously published EGFRvIII primers and EGFRvIII-positive glioblastoma tissue as a positive control. In addition, immunohistochemical staining was conducted. EGFRvIII can be detected in HNSCC patient samples. Nevertheless, the low prevalence and similar response rates to targeted drugs and irradiation in vitro cast doubt regarding the clinical relevance of EGFRvIII in HNSCC.

  3. Recommendations from GEC ESTRO Breast Cancer Working Group (II): Target definition and target delineation for accelerated or boost partial breast irradiation using multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy after breast conserving open cavity surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Major, Tibor; Gutiérrez, Cristina; Guix, Benjamin; van Limbergen, Erik; Strnad, Vratislav; Polgár, Csaba

    2016-01-01

    To prepare guidelines for target definition and delineations after open cavity breast conserving surgery in accelerated partial breast irradiations or boost treatments using multicatheter interstitial brachytherapy based on the consensus of the Breast Working Group of GEC-ESTRO. Following a study on interobserver variations of target volume delineation in multicatheter breast brachytherapy after open cavity surgery and a number of discussions in consensus meetings these guidelines were worked out by experts on the field. (1) Consistent windowing has to be used for proper cavity visualization. (2) The cavity visualization score has to be at least 3 in order to minimize the interobserver variations of target definition. (3) At delineation of surgical cavity only the homogeneous part of the postoperative seroma has to be included in the contours and protrusions or sharp irregularities have to be excluded. When surgical clips are present, they have to be surrounded by the contour with close contact. (4) CTV is created from the outlined surgical cavity with a nonisotropic geometrical extension. In each direction the safety margin is calculated by taking into account the size of the free resection margin. The total size of safety margin is always 20mm which is the sum of the surgical and added safety margins. CTV is limited to chest wall/pectoral muscles and 5mm below the skin surface. Following these guidelines the target volume definition in breast brachytherapy after open cavity surgery is expected to be accomplished in more consistent way with low interobserver variations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Accelerating and guiding of C6 + by an intense laser irradiating on a foil target with a tapered channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chong; Wan, Feng; Hou, Ya-Juan; Hong, Xue-Ren; Jia, Mo-Ran; Sang, Hai-Bo; Xie, Bai-Song

    2017-08-01

    A novel scheme with a tapered channel attached to an ultra-thin carbon foil is proposed to accelerate and guide carbon ions via breakout afterburner mechanism. Also, the problems involved are investigated by using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is demonstrated that the tapered channel can efficiently accelerate and guide carbon ions and result in a much better quality beam with an order of magnitude higher in density and 22% larger in cut-off energy than that without the tapered channel. The enhanced reasons are analyzed in detail, which are mainly attributed to the guidance of the longitudinal electric field and the focus of the transverse electric field, as well as the convergence effect of the tapered channel. All of them are certified to guide greatly carbon ions to move along the longitudinal direction. Besides, during the simulation time, the ion beam with a tapered channel can remain eight times smaller in divergence angle than that without the tapered channel. Such a target may be beneficial to many applications such as ion fast ignition in inertial fusion, high-energy physics, and proton therapy.

  5. Postirradiation evaluations of capsules HANS-1 and HANS-2 irradiated in the HFIR target region in support of fuel development for the advanced neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofman, G.L.; Snelgrove, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Copeland, G.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This report describes the design, fabrication, irradiation, and evaluation of two capsule tests containing U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel particles in contact with aluminum. The tests were in support of fuel qualification for the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor, a high-powered research reactor that was planned for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. At the time of these tests, the fuel consisted of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, containing highly enriched uranium dispersed in aluminum at a volume fraction of {approximately}0.15. The extremely high thermal flux in the target region of the High Flux Isotope Reactor provided up to 90% burnup in one 23-d cycle. Temperatures up to 450{degrees}C were maintained by gamma heating. Passive SiC temperature monitors were employed. The very small specimen size allowed only microstructural examination of the fuel particles but also allowed many specimens to be tested at a range of temperatures. The determination of fission gas bubble morphology by microstructural examination has been beneficial in developing a fuel performance model that allows prediction of fuel performance under these extreme conditions. The results indicate that performance of the reference fuel would be satisfactory under the ANS conditions. In addition to U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, particles of U{sub 3}Si, UAl{sub 2}, UAl{sub x}, and U{sub 3}O{sub 8} were tested.

  6. Pulsed irradiation improves target selectivity of infrared laser-evoked gene operator for single-cell gene induction in the nematode C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motoshi Suzuki

    Full Text Available Methods for turning on/off gene expression at the experimenter's discretion would be useful for various biological studies. Recently, we reported on a novel microscope system utilizing an infrared laser-evoked gene operator (IR-LEGO designed for inducing heat shock response efficiently in targeted single cells in living organisms without cell damage, thereby driving expression of a transgene under the control of a heat shock promoter. Although the original IR-LEGO can be successfully used for gene induction, several limitations hinder its wider application. Here, using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans as a subject, we have made improvements in IR-LEGO. For better spatial control of heating, a pulsed irradiation method using an optical chopper was introduced. As a result, single cells of C. elegans embryos as early as the 2-cell stage and single neurons in ganglia can be induced to express genes selectively. In addition, the introduction of site-specific recombination systems to IR-LEGO enables the induction of gene expression controlled by constitutive and cell type-specific promoters. The strategies adopted here will be useful for future applications of IR-LEGO to other organisms.

  7. Radiochemical separation of {sup 76,77}Br and {sup 66,67}Ga from irradiated ZnSe targets using anion-exchange chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shehata, M.M. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Neurowissenschaften und Medizin; Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). Accelerators and Ion Source Dept.; Scholten, B.; Spahn, I.; Coenen, H.H.; Qaim, S.M. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Neurowissenschaften und Medizin

    2012-07-01

    The separation of no-carrier-added (n.c.a.) radiobromine and radiogallium from an irradiated ZnSe target was developed using anion-exchange chromatography. The adsorption behaviour of n.c.a. radiobromine, n.c.a. radiogallium, and macro amounts of zinc and selenium towards the anion-exchange resin Dowex 1 x 10, in Cl{sup -} and OH{sup -} form, was investigated. Radiobromide was strongly adsorbed on the resin at a low KOH concentration, while n.c.a. radiogallium, zinc and selenium were weakly adsorbed. The adsorbed n.c.a. radiobromine was recovered by 0.2 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, followed by addition of KOH, evaporation and redissolution of residue. Finally a K{sup *} Br solution was obtained containing about 93 {+-} 3% of the n.c.a. radiobromine loaded onto the column. The chloride strength in the residual solution (containing n.c.a. radiogallium and macro amounts of zinc and selenium) was increased to 4 M and then loaded onto the Dowex 1 x 10 column in Cl{sup -} form. Radiogallium (n.c.a.) was adsorbed while zinc and selenium were not. About 94 {+-} 2% of the n.c.a. radiogallium loaded on the column was then eluted with 0.1 M HCl. Using this method {sup 76,77}Br and {sup 66,67}Ga could be obtained in high purity. The radionuclidic purity of the {sup 66}Ga/{sup 67}Ga theragnostic pair is high enough for use in medicine. In the case of the {sup 76}Br/{sup 77}Br pair, however, highly enriched {sup 76}Se and {sup 77}Se would be needed as target materials, in order to achieve the required radionuclidic purity. (orig.)

  8. Fast heating of fuel assembled in a spherical deuterated polystyrene shell target by counter-irradiating tailored laser pulses delivered by a HAMA 1 Hz ICF driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Y.; Nishimura, Y.; Hanayama, R.; Nakayama, S.; Ishii, K.; Kitagawa, Y.; Sekine, T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Kurita, T.; Satoh, N.; Kawashima, T.; Komeda, O.; Nishi, T.; Azuma, H.; Hioki, T.; Motohiro, T.; Sunahara, A.; Sentoku, Y.; Miura, E.

    2017-11-01

    Fast heating is a method of heating an assembled high-density plasma into a hot state by irradiating it with short-duration (sub-picosecond), high-intensity (> 1018 W cm-2 ) laser pulses before the plasma expands and dissolves hydrodynamically. In this paper, we present detailed experimental results of fast heating fuel assembled in a spherical deuterated polystyrene shell target of 500 μ m diameter and 7 μm thickness with counterbeam illumination by using a HAMA 1 Hz, 5.9 J inertial confinement fusion laser driver with pulse tailoring. These tailored pulses contain three pulses in sequence: a ‘foot’ pulse of 2.4 J/25 ns, a ‘spike’ pulse of 0.5 J/300 ps and a ‘heater’ pulse of 0.4 J/110 fs; these pulses are designed to assemble the fuel and heat it. By varying the energy of the foot pulse, we find that fast heating the fuel is achieved only if the fuel is weakly ablated by the foot pulse and then shock-assembled by the spike pulse into the target centre so that the heater pulse can access the fuel with a focal intensity greater than 1018 W cm-2 . Without a foot pulse, the heater pulse contributes to assembling the fuel. For higher foot-pulse energies, the heater pulse drives a hydrodynamic motion with speeds of the order 107 cm s-1 with intensities of the order 1017 W cm-2 , resulting in re-assembling and additional heating of the pre-assembled fuel. Once a shock-assembled core is achieved at the target centre, we succeed qualitatively in fast heating the core for shots in sequence with variations of laser energy within 18%. The coupling efficiency from the heating laser to the core is inferred to be (10 +/- 2) % in total: (8 +/- 1.6) % for the ionized bulk electrons and (2 +/- 0.4) % for the bulk ions. The fusion neutron spectrum detected on the laser axis exhibits peaks at 1.0 MeV, 1.7 MeV and 3.8 MeV. These peaks are attributed to the C(d, n){\\hspace{0pt}}13 N and d(d, n){\\hspace{0pt}}3 He reactions induced by counterpropagating fast deuterons

  9. WE-G-BRE-09: Targeted Radiotherapy Enhancement During Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation (ABPI) Using Controlled Release of Gold Nanoparticles (GNPs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cifter, G; Ngwa, W [University of Massachusetts (United States); Harvard Medical School, Dana Farber Cancer Institute (United States); Chin, J; Cifter, F; Sajo, E [University of Massachusetts (United States); Sinha, N [Wentworth Institute of Technology, Boston, MA (United States); Bellon, J [Harvard Medical School, Dana Farber Cancer Institute (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Several studies have demonstrated low rates of local recurrence with brachytherapy-based accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI). However, long-term outcomes on toxicity (e.g. telangiectasia), and cosmesis remain a major concern. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric feasibility of using targeted non-toxic radiosensitizing gold nanoparticles (GNPs) for localized dose enhancement to the planning target volume (PTV) during APBI while reducing dose to normal tissue. Methods: Two approaches for administering the GNPs were considered. In one approach, GNPs are assumed to be incorporated in a micrometer-thick polymer film on the surface of routinely used mammosite balloon applicators, for sustained controlled in-situ release, and subsequent treatment using 50-kVp Xoft devices. In case two, GNPs are administered directly into the lumpectomy cavity e.g. via injection or using fiducials coated with the GNP-loaded polymer film. Recent studies have validated the use of fiducials for reducing the PTV margin during APBI with 6 MV beams. An experimentally determined diffusion coefficient was used to determine space-time customizable distribution of GNPs for feasible in-vivo concentrations of 43 mg/g. An analytic calculational approach from previously published work was employed to estimate the dose enhancement due to GNPs (2 and 10 nm) as a function of distance up to 1 cm from lumpectomy cavity. Results: Dose enhancement due to GNP was found to be about 130% for 50-kVp x-rays, and 110% for 6-MV external beam radiotherapy, 1 cm away from the lumpectomy cavity wall. Higher customizable dose enhancement could be achieved at other distances as a function of nanoparticle size. Conclusion: Our preliminary results suggest that significant dose enhancement can be achieved to residual tumor cells targeted with GNPs during APBI with electronic brachytherapy or external beam therapy. The findings provide a useful basis for developing nanoparticle

  10. Food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-02-28

    A brief article examines the controversy over food irradiation regarding the wholesomeness of irradiated food, its microbiological safety, loss of vitamins and changes in flavour. The benefits of food irradiation are also outlined including the destruction of certain food-borne pathogens and the prolongation of the shelf-life of food by killing pests and delaying the deterioration process.

  11. In-situ small-angle x-ray scattering study of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by pulsed laser irradiation of metallic targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavisse, L.; Jouvard, J.-M.; Girault, M.; Potin, V.; Andrzejewski, H.; Marco de Lucas, M. C.; Bourgeois, S. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS-Universite de Bourgogne, 9 Avenue A. Savary, BP 47870-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Le Garrec, J.-L.; Carles, S.; Mitchell, J. B. A. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR 6251 CNRS-Universite de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Hallo, L. [CEA CESTA, 15 Avenue des Sablieres CS 60001, 33116 Le Barp Cedex (France); Perez, J. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Decloux, J. [Kaluti System, Optique et Laser, Centre Scientifique d' Orsay, 91400 Orsay (France)

    2012-04-16

    Small angle x-ray scattering was used to probe in-situ the formation of nanoparticles in the plasma plume generated by pulsed laser irradiation of a titanium metal surface under atmospheric conditions. The size and morphology of the nanoparticles were characterized as function of laser irradiance. Two families of nanoparticles were identified with sizes on the order of 10 and 70 nm, respectively. These results were confirmed by ex-situ transmission electron microscopy experiments.

  12. Irradiation damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, L.M

    2000-07-01

    There is considerable interest in irradiation effects in intermetallic compounds from both the applied and fundamental aspects. Initially, this interest was associated mainly with nuclear reactor programs but it now extends to the fields of ion-beam modification of metals, behaviour of amorphous materials, ion-beam processing of electronic materials, and ion-beam simulations of various kinds. The field of irradiation damage in intermetallic compounds is rapidly expanding, and no attempt will be made in this chapter to cover all of the various aspects. Instead, attention will be focused on some specific areas and, hopefully, through these, some insight will be given into the physical processes involved, the present state of our knowledge, and the challenge of obtaining more comprehensive understanding in the future. The specific areas that will be covered are: point defects in intermetallic compounds; irradiation-enhanced ordering and irradiation-induced disordering of ordered alloys; irradiation-induced amorphization.

  13. p53-dependent stimulation of redox-related genes in the lymphoid organs of γ-irradiated mice—identification of Haeme-oxygenase 1 as a direct p53 target gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiller, Anne; Alvarez, Sandra; Drané, Pascal; Lallemand, Christophe; Blanchard, Brigitte; Tovey, Micheal; May, Evelyne

    2007-01-01

    Recent data showed that p53 stimulates the expression of genes encoding not only pro- but also antioxidant enzymes. It was suggested that antioxidant genes could be induced under physiologic levels of stress while the prooxidant ones respond to higher level of stress. Results presented in this article illustrate an additional degree of complexity. We show that the expression of Haeme-oxygenase 1 (HO-1), a stress-inducible gene that codes for an enzyme having antioxidant properties, is stimulated in a p53-dependent manner in the thymus and spleen of irradiated mice. We prove that HO-1 is a direct p53 target gene by showing that the p53RE identified within human and mouse genes is specifically bound by p53. The threshold of irradiation dose required to induce a significant response of HO-1 in the lymphoid organs of the irradiated mice is higher than that for Waf1/p21 that encodes an universal inhibitor of cell cycle. Moreover, induction of HO-1 occurs later than that of Waf1/p21. Finally, the higher stimulation of HO-1 is reached when Waf1/p21 stimulation starts to decrease. PMID:17933770

  14. Materials irradiation research in neutron science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noda, Kenji; Oyama, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-11-01

    Materials irradiation researches are planned in Neutron Science Research Program. A materials irradiation facility has been conceived as one of facilities in the concept of Neutron Science Research Center at JAERI. The neutron irradiation field of the facility is characterized by high flux of spallation neutrons with very wide energy range up to several hundred MeV, good accessibility to the irradiation field, good controllability of irradiation conditions, etc. Extensive use of such a materials irradiation facility is expected for fundamental materials irradiation researches and R and D of nuclear energy systems such as accelerator-driven incineration plant for long-lifetime nuclear waste. In this paper, outline concept of the materials irradiation facility, characteristics of the irradiation field, preliminary technical evaluation of target to generate spallation neutrons, and materials researches expected for Neutron Science Research program are described. (author)

  15. Irradiation subassembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, O.S.; Filewicz, E.C.; Hutter, E.

    1973-10-23

    An irradiation subassembly for use in a nuclear reactor is described which includes a bundle of slender elongated irradiation -capsules or fuel elements enclosed by a coolant tube and having yieldable retaining liner between the irradiation capsules and the coolant tube. For a hexagonal bundle surrounded by a hexagonal tube the yieldable retaining liner may consist either of six segments corresponding to the six sides of the tube or three angular segments each corresponding in two adjacent sides of the tube. The sides of adjacent segments abut and are so cut that metal-tometal contact is retained when the volume enclosed by the retaining liner is varied and Springs are provided for urging the segments toward the center of the tube to hold the capsules in a closely packed configuration. (Official Gazette)

  16. Analysis of methods for obtaining of a uniform particle distribution on a target on its irradiation by a beam of the krypton ions extracted from the implantator IC-100

    CERN Document Server

    Gikal, B N; Kazarinov, N

    2002-01-01

    Some methods of the target uniform irradiation by heavy ions have been analyzed. As a result the scanning system for the sup 8 sup 4 Kr sup 1 sup 5 sup + ion beam extracted from the cyclotron IC-100 has been chosen and worked up. It consists of two deflecting yokes creating horizontal and vertical magnetic fields. The yokes are supplied by generators of saw-tooth current having the definitely fixed frequencies. When both generators work synchronously the centre of mass of the ion beam 'draws' a pattern on the target. The dimensions of the pattern cells are determined by the ratio of these frequencies. The correlation between the generator frequencies when heterogeneity of the particle density distribution does not exceed the required value of +- 5% is obtained. It has been shown that for the moving target the chosen scanning scheme allows one to obtain its uniform density distribution. For the slow target velocities (20-50 cm/s) this scheme also allows one to compensate the collapse in the particle density di...

  17. Influence of the reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles in the plasma plume induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metallic targets at atmospheric pressure and high repetition rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girault, M. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Le Garrec, J.-L.; Mitchell, J.B.A. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR 6251 CNRS-Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Jouvard, J.-M. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Carvou, E. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR 6251 CNRS-Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Menneveux, J.; Yu, J. [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306 Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Ouf, F.-X. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sureté Nucléaire IRSN/PSN-RES/SCA/LPMA BP 68, 91192 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Carles, S. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, UMR 6251 CNRS-Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Potin, V.; Pillon, G.; Bourgeois, S. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Perez, J. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Marco de Lucas, M.C., E-mail: delucas@u-bourgogne.fr [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne, UMR 6303 CNRS-Univ. Bourgogne Franche-Comté, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); and others

    2016-06-30

    Highlights: • NPs formed in a plasma-plume during laser irradiation of metals (Al, Ti, Ag) were studied. • In situ SAXS and ex situ TEM, XRD and Raman spectra were measured. • NPs size decreased when increasing the O{sub 2} fraction in a controlled O{sub 2}+N{sub 2} atmosphere. • The oxidation of metal NPs in the plasma restricts the increase of the size of the NPs. - Abstract: The influence of a reactive atmosphere on the formation of nanoparticles (NPs) in the plasma plume generated by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation of metal targets (Ti, Al, Ag) was probed in situ using Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS). Air and different O{sub 2}–N{sub 2} gas mixtures were used as reactive gas within atmospheric pressure. SAXS results showed the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume with a mean radius varying in the 2–5 nm range. A decrease of the NPs size with increasing the O{sub 2} percentage in the O{sub 2}–N{sub 2} gas mixture was also showed. Ex situ observations by transmission electron microscopy and structural characterizations by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were also performed for powders collected in experiments done using air as ambient gas. The stability of the different metal oxides is discussed as being a key parameter influencing the formation of NPs in the plasma-plume.

  18. Absorption spectra measurements of the x-ray radiation heated sio{sub 2} aerogel plasma in 'dog-bone' targets irradiated by high power laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y; Dong, Q-L; Wang, S-J; Li, Y-T; Zhang, J [Laboratory of Optical Physics, Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Wei, H-G; Shi, J-R; Zhao, G [National Astronomical Observatories of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Beijing 100012 (China); Zhang, J-Y; Wen, T-S; Zhang, W-H; Hu, X; Liu, S-Y; Ding, Y-K; Zhang, L; Tang, Y-J; Zhang, B-H; Zheng, Z-J [Research Center for Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Nishimura, H; Fujioka, S [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: yizhang@aphy.iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: ytli@aphy.iphy.ac.cn, E-mail: jzhang@aphy.iphy.ac.cn (and others)

    2008-05-01

    We studied the opacity effect of the SiO{sub 2} aerogel plasma heated by x-ray radiation produced by high power laser pulses irradiating the inner surface of golden 'dog-bone' targets. The PET crystal spectrometer was used to measure the absorption spectra of the plasmas in the range from 6.4 A to 7.4 A, among which the line emissions involving the K shell of Si ions from He-like to neutral atom were located. The experimental results were analyzed with Detailed-Level-Accounting method. As the plasma temperature increased, the characteristic lines of highly ionized ions gradually dominated the absorption spectrum.

  19. Separation of no-carrier-added {sup 203}Pb, a surrogate radioisotope, from proton irradiated {sup nat}Tl{sub 2}CO{sub 3} target using calcium alginate hydrogel beads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, Kangkana; Sen, Kamalika [Univ. of Calcutta, Kolkata (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Lahiri, Susanta [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata (India)

    2016-07-01

    {sup 203}Pb is a promising radioisotope in the field of medical science as an imaging surrogate of {sup 212}Pb. In the present investigation {sup 203}Pb was produced by proton irradiation of natural Tl{sub 2}CO{sub 3} target and was separated from the bulk Tl target using calcium alginate (CA) hydrogel beads with a high separation factor (3.8 x 10{sup 4} at 10{sup -3} M HNO{sub 3}). During the separation process {sup 203}Pb was encapsulated in CA beads and desorption of the radioisotope could only be achieved in 1M HNO{sub 3}. Possibility of Tl uptake was also checked in Fe doped CA (Fe-CA) beads after oxidation of Tl(I) to Tl(III) by sodium bismuthate. No significant uptake of Tl(III) was noticed in the Fe-CA beads. The matrix is therefore suitable for isolation of {sup 203}Pb from the target as well as its storage in the bead for therapeutic as well as diagnostic purpose.

  20. Investigation on the production and isolation of {sup 149,150,151}Tb from {sup 12}C irradiation natural praseodymium target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiti, M.; Lahiri, S. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Kolkata (India). Chemical Sciences Div.; Tomar, B.S. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India). Radiochemistry Div.

    2011-07-01

    Short lived {alpha}-emitting radionuclides have enormous potential to be used in the targeted therapy. 149Tb (4.118 h) is among the few {alpha}-emitting radionuclides which are projected for human clinical use. Therefore, direct production of {sup 149}Tb was aimed from the {sup 12}C induced reaction on natural praseodymium target of 15 mg/cm{sup 2} thickness at 71.5 MeV incident beam energy. No-carrier-added (nca) {sup 149,150,151}Tb radionuclides were produced in the target matrix along with {sup 149}Gd, which is also the decay product of {sup 149}Tb, with relatively high yield of {sup 149}Tb. An efficient radiochemical separation method was developed to separate nca {sup 149-151}Tb from bulk praseodymium and coproduced Gd by liquid-liquid extraction (LLX) using aqueous HCl and liquid cation extracting agent di-(2-ethylhexyl)phosphoric acid (HDEHP) dissolved in cyclohexane. Quantitative extraction of nca {sup 149-151}Tb was achieved from bulk target with a high separation factor of 4.7 x 10{sup 5}. (orig.)

  1. High-Linear Energy Transfer Irradiation Targeted to Skeletal Metastases by the Alpha Emitter Ra-223: Adjuvant or Alternative to Conventional Modalities?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruland, Oyvind S.; Nilsson, Sten; Fisher, Darrell R.; Larsen, Roy H.

    2006-10-15

    The bone-seeking, alpha-particle emitting radiopharmaceutical Alpharadin, 223RaCl2 (t1/2 = 11.4 days) is under clinical development as a novel treatment for skeletal metastases from breast and prostate cancer. This paper summarizes the current status of preclinical and clinical research on 223RaCl2. Potential advantages of 223Ra to that of external beam irradiation or registered beta-emitting bone-seekers are discussed. Published data of 223Ra dosimetry in mice and a therapeutic study in a skeletal metastases model in nude rats have indicated significant therapeutic potential of bone-seeking alpha-emitters. This paper provides short-term and long-term results from the first clinical single dosage trial. We present data from a repeated dosage study of five consecutive injections of 50 kBq/kg bodyweight, once every third week, or two injections of 125 kBq/kg bodyweight, six weeks apart. Furthermore, preliminary results are given for a randomized phase II trial involving 64 patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer and painful skeletal metastases who received four monthly injections of 223Ra or saline as an adjuvant to external beam radiotherapy. Also presented are preliminary dose estimates for 223Ra in humans. Results indicate that repeated dosing is feasible and that opportunities are available for combined treatment strategies.

  2. FY 2013 Summary Report: Post-Irradiation Examination of Zircaloy-4 Samples in Target Capsules and Initiation of Bending Fatigue Testing for Used Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, Richard H [ORNL; Yan, Yong [ORNL; Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL

    2013-10-01

    This report documents ongoing work performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Department of Energy, Office of Fuel Cycle Technology Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC), and satisfies the deliverable for milestone M2FT-13OR0805041, “Data Report on Hydrogen Doping and Irradiation in HFIR.” This work is conducted under WBS 1.02.08.05, Work Package FT-13OR080504 ST “Storage and Transportation-Experiments – ORNL.” The objectives of work packages that make up the S&T Experiments Control Account are to conduct the separate effects tests (SET) and small-scale tests that have been identified in the Used Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Data Gap Prioritization (FCRD-USED-2012-000109). In FY 2013, the R&D focused on cladding and container issues and small-scale tests as identified in Sections A-2.9 and A-2.12 of the prioritization report.

  3. Status of Post Irradiation Examination of FCAB and FCAT Irradiation Capsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD)

    2016-09-29

    A series of irradiation programs are ongoing to address the need for determining the radiation tolerance of FeCrAl alloys. These irradiation programs, deemed the FCAT and FCAB irradiation programs, use the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to irradiate second generation wrought FeCrAl alloys and early-generation powder-metallurgy (PM) oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) FeCrAl alloys. Irradiations have been or are being performed at temperatures of 200°C, 330°C, and 550°C from doses of 1.8 dpa up to 16 dpa. Preliminary post-irradiation examination (PIE) on low dose (<2 dpa) irradiation capsules of tensile specimens has been performed. Analysis of co-irradiated SiC thermometry have shown reasonable matching between the nominal irradiation temperatures and the target irradiation temperatures. Room temperature tensile tests have shown typical radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement at irradiations of 200°C and 330°C, but a propensity for softening when irradiated to 550°C for the wrought alloys. The PM-ODS FeCrAl specimens showed less hardening compared to the wrought alloys. Future PIE includes high temperature tensile tests on the low dose irradiation capsules as well as the determination of reference fracture toughness transition temperature, To, in alloys irradiated to 7 dpa and higher.

  4. Synthesis of surface molecular imprinted TiO{sub 2}/graphene photocatalyst and its highly efficient photocatalytic degradation of target pollutant under visible light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, Cui, E-mail: laicui@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China); Wang, Man-Man [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China); Zeng, Guang-Ming, E-mail: zgming@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China); Liu, Yun-Guo; Huang, Dan-Lian; Zhang, Chen; Wang, Rong-Zhong; Xu, Piao; Cheng, Min; Huang, Chao; Wu, Hai-Peng; Qin, Lei [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • The surface molecular imprinting technique was successfully combined with photocatalyst. • Molecularly imprinted photocatalyst exhibits recognition ability to the target molecules. • MIP-TiO{sub 2}/GR shows higher adsorption capacity and selectivity than NIP-TiO{sub 2}/GR. • The photocatalytic activity of MIP-TiO{sub 2}/GR is enhanced for target molecules. - Abstract: The molecular imprinted TiO{sub 2}/graphene photocatalyst (MIP-TiO{sub 2}/GR) was successfully prepared with bisphenol A (BPA) as the template molecule (target pollutant) and o-phenylenediamine (OPDA) as functional monomers by the surface molecular imprinting method. The combination between BPA and OPDA led to the formation of the precursor, and the subsequent polymerization of OPDA initiated by ultraviolet radiation can ensure the realization of MIP-TiO{sub 2}/GR. The samples were characterized by SEM, EDS, XRD, BET, UV–vis DRS and Zeta potential. In addition, adsorption capacities, adsorption selectivity and visible light photocatalytic performances of MIP-TiO{sub 2}/GR and non-imprinted TiO{sub 2}/graphene (NIP-TiO{sub 2}/GR) were evaluated. Moreover, the effects of pH and initial BPA concentration on removal efficiency of BPA were also investigated. The results showed that MIP-TiO{sub 2}/GR exhibited better adsorption capacity and adsorption selectivity towards the template molecule compared to NIP-TiO{sub 2}/GR due to the imprinted cavities on the surface of MIP-TiO{sub 2}/GR. Moreover, the photocatalytic activity of MIP-TiO{sub 2}/GR toward the target molecules was stronger than that of NIP-TiO{sub 2}/GR as a result of large adsorption capacity to target molecules and narrow band gap energy on MIP-TiO{sub 2}/GR. Therefore, modifying the photocatalyst by the surface molecular imprinting is a promising method to improve the molecule recognition and photocatalytic efficiency of photocatalyst for target pollutant.

  5. Investigation of Space and Energy Distributions of Neutrons Generated in Lead Target and Uranium Blanket of the Electronuclear System "Energy plus Transmutation" under Irradiation with Protons at 1.5 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuk, I V; Krivopustov, M I; Sosnin, A N; Chultem, D; Vestmaer, V; Tumendelger, T; Zaveryukha, O S; Pavlyuk, A B

    2002-01-01

    The work contains the results of space-energy distributions of neutrons in U/Pb assembly, consisting of extended lead target and the model of natural uranium blanket irradiated with relativistic protons at 1.5 GeV. The research is carried out in the framework of a series of experiments using the model of subcritical heterogeneous electronuclear system at the Laboratory of High Energies, JINR, Dubna ("Investigation of Physical Aspects of Electronuclear Method of Energy Production and Transmutation of Radioactive Waste Using Beams from JINR Synchrophasotron/Nuclotron" - project "Energy plus Transmutation"). The results of measurements and calculations of ^{235}U, ^{238}U and ^{232}Th fission rate distributions as well as threshold spectral indexes {\\bar\\sigma_f^{^{232}Th}}/{\\bar\\sigma_f^{^{235}U}} and {\\bar\\sigma_f^{^{238}U}}/{\\bar\\sigma_f^{^{235}U}} along the radius of the target and model uranium blanket are presented. The results of measurements and calculations of ^{234}U, ^{236}U and ^{237}Np fission rate ...

  6. High-frequency jet ventilation for complete target immobilization and reduction of planning target volume in stereotactic high single-dose irradiation of stage I non-small cell lung cancer and lung metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Peter; Kraus, Hans-Jörg; Mühlnickel, Werner; Sassmann, Volker; Hering, Werner; Strauch, Konstantin

    2010-09-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of complete target immobilization by means of high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV); and to show that the saving of planning target volume (PTV) on the stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) under HFJV, compared with SBRT with respiratory motion, can be predicted with reliable accuracy by computed tomography (CT) scans at peak inspiration phase. A comparison regarding different methods for defining the PTV was carried out in 22 patients with tumors that clearly moved with respiration. A movement span of the gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined by fusing respiration-correlated CT scans. The PTV enclosed the GTV positions with a safety margin throughout the breathing cycle. To create a PTV from CT scans acquired under HFJV, the same margins were drawn around the immobilized target. In addition, peak inspiration phase CT images (PIP-CTs) were used to approximate a target immobilized by HFJV. The resulting HFJV-PTVs were between 11.6% and 45.4% smaller than the baseline values calculated as respiration-correlated CT-PTVs (median volume reduction, 25.4%). Tentative planning by means of PIP-CT PTVs predicted that in 19 of 22 patients, use of HFJV would lead to a reduction in volume of >or=20%. Using this threshold yielded a positive predictive value of 0.89, as well as a sensitivity of 0.94 and a specificity of 0.5. In all patients, SBRT under HFJV provided a reliable immobilization of the GTVs and achieved a reduction in PTVs, regardless of patient compliance. Tentative planning facilitated the selection of patients who could better undergo radiation in respiratory standstill, both with greater accuracy and lung protection. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Targets for Precision Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveland, W.; Yao, L.; Asner, D. M.; Baker, R. G.; Bundgaard, J.; Burgett, E.; Cunningham, M.; Deaven, J.; Duke, D. L.; Greife, U.; Grimes, S.; Heffner, M.; Hill, T.; Isenhower, D.; Klay, J. L.; Kleinrath, V.; Kornilov, N.; Laptev, A. B.; Massey, T. N.; Meharchand, R.; Qu, H.; Ruz, J.; Sangiorgio, S.; Selhan, B.; Snyder, L.; Stave, S.; Tatishvili, G.; Thornton, R. T.; Tovesson, F.; Towell, D.; Towell, R. S.; Watson, S.; Wendt, B.; Wood, L.

    2014-05-01

    The general properties needed in targets (sources) for high precision, high accuracy measurements are reviewed. The application of these principles to the problem of developing targets for the Fission TPC is described. Longer term issues, such as the availability of actinide materials, improved knowledge of energy losses and straggling and the stability of targets during irradiation are also discussed.

  8. Au-Pt alloy nanoparticles obtained by nanosecond laser irradiation of gold and platinum bulk targets in an ethylene glycol solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniri, Samira; Reza Hantehzadeh, Mohammad; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood; Asadi Asadabad, Mohsen

    2017-07-01

    Au-Pt alloy nanoparticles (NPs) of different compositions ( Au0Pt100 , Au30Pt70 , Au50Pt50 , Au70Pt30 , and Au100Pt0 were obtained using the nanosecond laser ablation of gold and platinum bulk targets in ethylene glycol, followed by mixing highly monodisperse Au and Pt nanocolloids, for the first time. UV-vis absorption spectra of NPs showed that by increasing the Au content in the Au-Pt NPs, the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) peak red-shifted, from 260 to 573nm in a nonlinear way. In addition, the mean crystalline size, crystal structure, d-spacing, and lattice parameters of NPs were estimated from the XRD spectra. Microscopy studies revealed the most NPs have a spherical or near-spherical shape, and the average sizes of Au0Pt100 , Au30Pt70 , Au50Pt50 , Au70Pt30 , and Au100Pt0 NPs were calculated to be 12.50, 14.15, 18.53, 19.29, and 26.38nm, respectively. Also, the chemical identity of the molecules adhering to the NPs surface was considered by Raman and FT-IR spectroscopy techniques. Among different synthesis methods, the demonstrated technique allows easy synthesis of alloy NPs in aqueous media at room temperature with no formation of by-products.

  9. Phytosanitary Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy J. Hallman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Phytosanitary treatments disinfest traded commodities of potential quarantine pests. Phytosanitary irradiation (PI treatments use ionizing radiation to accomplish this, and, since their international commercial debut in 2004, the use of this technology has increased by ~10% annually. Generic PI treatments (one dose is used for a group of pests and/or commodities, although not all have been tested for efficacy are used in virtually all commercial PI treatments, and new generic PI doses are proposed, such as 300 Gy, for all insects except pupae and adult Lepidoptera (moths. Fresh fruits and vegetables tolerate PI better than any other broadly used treatment. Advances that would help facilitate the use of PI include streamlining the approval process, making the technology more accessible to potential users, lowering doses and broadening their coverage, and solving potential issues related to factors that might affect efficacy.

  10. Analytical models for development of high performance metal targets irradiated in IPEN-CNEN/SP Cyclone 30 and Cyclone 18 cyclotrons; Modelos analiticos para o desenvolvimento de alvos metalicos de alta performance irradiados nos ciclotrons Cyclone 30 e Cyclone 18 do IPEN-CNEN/SP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Henrique Barcellos de

    2009-07-01

    Analytical models were developed that describe the basic elements for metal targets irradiation in cyclotrons. Important parameters such as maximum beam current value and thermal power deposited on target were obtained and compared with practical situations. In an unprecedented way, were determined analytically the features found in intense thermal transient situations, when high protons concentrations in a small region of the beam cause intense temperature gradients in small regions of the target. Comparing with results found in the literature showed that the developed models are satisfactory, in view of all limitations of the proposed model. (author)

  11. Irradiation Facilities at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Gkotse, Blerina; Carbonez, Pierre; Danzeca, Salvatore; Fabich, Adrian; Garcia, Alia, Ruben; Glaser, Maurice; Gorine, Georgi; Jaekel, Martin, Richard; Mateu,Suau, Isidre; Pezzullo, Giuseppe; Pozzi, Fabio; Ravotti, Federico; Silari, Marco; Tali, Maris

    2017-01-01

    CERN provides unique irradiation facilities for applications in many scientific fields. This paper summarizes the facilities currently operating for proton, gamma, mixed-field and electron irradiations, including their main usage, characteristics and information about their operation. The new CERN irradiation facilities database is also presented. This includes not only CERN facilities but also irradiation facilities available worldwide.

  12. Studies on the separation of {sup 89}Sr(II) from irradiated yttria target using 4, 4{sup '}(5{sup '}) di-tert-butyl-cyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) by solvent extraction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Debasish; Vithya, Jayagopal; Kumar, Ramalingam; Venkata Subramani, Canchipuram Ramamoorthy; Vasudeva Rao, Polur Ranga [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam (India). Chemistry Group

    2016-07-01

    The radioisotope {sup 89}Sr as {sup 89}SrCl{sub 2} is medically useful for bone pain palliation and is produced in fast reactors using the {sup 89}Y(n, p){sup 89}Sr reaction. A procedure for isolation of the radionuclide {sup 89}Sr by chemical processing of the irradiated Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} target has been standardised and trial runs have been carried out at the Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR), Kalpakkam. The chemical processing of the irradiated Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} target involves (i) the removal of target Y(III) by TBP extraction and (ii) further purification of the separated {sup 89}Sr fraction by cationic exchange chromatography. However a selective isolation of {sup 89}Sr by the Sr-specific crown ether makes the above chemical processing faster and relatively simple. This work presents a study on the selective removal of Sr from the irradiated target dissolver solution using the Sr-specific crown ether 4,4{sup '}(5{sup '}) di-tert-butyl-cyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) in octanol medium. The separation behaviour of the other impurities such as Ce(IV), Y(III), Tb(III), Eu(III), Zn(II), Mn(II) and Rb(I) present along with Sr(II) in the irradiated sample was also investigated. The method of separation by using the crown ether DtBuCH18C6 is proved to be a potential tool for the purification of {sup 89}Sr(II) source produced from yttria target in fast reactors.

  13. Attenuation measurements show that the presence of a TachoSil surgical patch will not compromise target irradiation in intra-operative electron radiation therapy or high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmento, Sandra; Costa, Filipa; Pereira, Alexandre; Lencart, Joana; Dias, Anabela; Cunha, Luís; Sousa, Olga; Silva, José Pedro; Santos, Lúcio

    2015-01-09

    Surgery of locally advanced and/or recurrent rectal cancer can be complemented with intra-operative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) to deliver a single dose of radiation directly to the unresectable margins, while sparing nearby sensitive organs/structures. Haemorrhages may occur and can affect the dose distribution, leading to an incorrect target irradiation. The TachoSil (TS) surgical patch, when activated, creates a fibrin clot at the surgical site to achieve haemostasis. The aim of this work was to determine the effect of TS on the dose distribution, and ascertain whether it could be used in combination with IOERT. This characterization was extended to include high dose rate (HDR) intraoperative brachytherapy, which is sometimes used at other institutions instead of IOERT. CT images of the TS patch were acquired for initial characterization. Dosimetric measurements were performed in a water tank phantom, using a conventional LINAC with a hard-docking system of cylindrical applicators. Percentage Depth Dose (PDD) curves were obtained, and measurements made at the depth of dose maximum for the three clinically used electron energies (6, 9 and 12MeV), first without any attenuator and then with the activated patch of TS completely covering the tip of the IOERT applicator. For HDR brachytherapy, a measurement setup was improvised using a solid water phantom and a Farmer ionization chamber. Our measurements show that the attenuation of a TachoSil patch is negligible, both for high energy electron beams (6 to 12MeV), and for a HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy source. Our results cannot be extrapolated to lower beam energies such as 50 kVp X-rays, which are sometimes used for breast IORT. The TachoSil surgical patch can be used in IORT procedures using 6MeV electron energies or higher, or HDR (192)Ir brachytherapy.

  14. Triple ion beam irradiation facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, M.B.; Allen, W.R.; Buhl, R.A.; Packan, N.H.; Cook, S.W.; Mansur, L.K.

    1988-12-01

    A unique ion irradiation facility consisting of three accelerators is described. The accelerators can be operated simultaneously to deliver three ion beams on one target sample. The energy ranges of the ions are 50 to 400 keV, 200 keV to 2.5 MeV, and 1.0 to 5.0 MeV. Three different ions in the appropriate mass range can be simultaneously implanted to the same depth in a target specimen as large as 100 mm/sup 2/ in area. Typical depth ranges are 0.1 to 1.0 ..mu..m. The X-Y profiles of all three ion beams are measured by a system of miniature Faraday cups. The low-voltage accelerator can periodically ramp the ion beam energy during the implantation. Three different types of target chambers are in use at this facility. The triple-beam high-vacuum chamber can hold nine transmission electron microscopy specimens at elevated temperature during a irradiation by the three simultaneous beams. A second high-vacuum chamber on the medium-voltage accelerator beamline houses a low- and high-temperature translator and a two-axis goniometer for ion channeling measurements. The third chamber on the high-energy beamline can be gas-filled for special stressed specimen irradiations. Special applications for the surface modification of materials with this facility are described. Appendixes containing operating procedures are also included. 18 refs., 27 figs., 1 tab.

  15. The ISOLDE target robots

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilein Brice

    2002-01-01

    ISOLDE targets need to be changed frequently, around 80 times per year. The high radiation levels do not permit this to be done by human hands and the target changes are effected by 2 industrial robots (picture _01). On the left, in the distance, the front-end of the GPS (General Purpose Separator) is seen, while the HRS (High Resolution Separator) is at the right. Also seen are the doors to the irradiated-target storage.

  16. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analysis of a device for irradiation of LEU UAl{sub x}-Al targets for {sup 99}Mo production in the IEA-R1 reactor; Analises neutronica e termo-hidraulica de um dispositivo para irradiacao de alvos tipo LEU de UAl{sub x}-Al para producao de {sup 99}MO no reator IEA-R1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiyama, Pedro Julio Batista de Oliveira

    2012-07-01

    Technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc), the product of radioactive decay of molybdenum-99 ( Mo), is one of the most widely used radioisotope in nuclear medicine, covering approximately 80% of all radiodiagnosis procedures in the world. Nowadays, Brazil requires an amount of about 450 Ci of {sup 99}Mo per week. Due to the crisis and the shortage of {sup 99}Mo supply chain that has been observed on the world since 2008, IPEN/CNEN-SP decided to develop a project to produce {sup 99}Mo through fission of uranium-235. The objective of this dissertation was the development of neutronic and thermal-hydraulic calculations to evaluate the operational safety of a device for {sup 99}Mo production to be irradiated in the IEA-Rl reactor core at 5 MW. In this device will be placed ten targets of UAl{sub x}-Al dispersion fuel with low enriched uranium (LEU) and density of 2.889 gU/cm{sup 3}. For the neutronic calculations were utilized the computer codes HAMMER-TECHNION and CITATION and the maximum temperatures reached in the targets were calculated with the code MTRCR-IEA-R1. The analysis demonstrated that the device irradiation will occur without adverse consequences to the operation of the reactor. The total amount of {sup 99}Mo was calculated with the program SCALE and considering that the time needed for the chemical processing and recovering of the {sup 99}Mo will be five days after the irradiation, we have that the {sup 99}Mo activity available for distribution will be 176 Ci for 3 days of irradiation, 236 Ci for 5 days of irradiation and 272 Ci for 7 days of targets irradiation. (author)'.

  17. Modelling property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperature

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kok, S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method is proposed to predict the irradiation induced property changes in nuclear; graphite, including the effect of a change in irradiation temperature. The currently used method; to account for changes in irradiation temperature, the scaled...

  18. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  19. Radiation Biology Irradiator Dose Verification Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Kurt H; Kunugi, Keith A; Hammer, Clifford G; Culberson, Wesley S; DeWerd, Larry A

    2016-02-01

    Interest in standardized dosimetry for radiobiological irradiators has expanded over the last decade. At a symposium held at NIST, "The Importance of Standardization of Dosimetry in Radiobiology", a set of 12 criteria necessary for adequate irradiation was developed by the authors. Here we report on our review of dosimetry methods from various peer-reviewed publications and found that none of them satisfied all 12 criteria set forth by the authors of the NIAD/NCI/NIST proceedings. The inadequate reporting of dosimetry methods in the literature raises questions regarding the accuracy of the dose delivered to animal test subjects and the resulting experimental results. For this reason, we investigated the level of accuracy of dose delivery in radiation biology studies. We performed an irradiator output verification study of 12 radiation biology laboratories (7 gamma and 5 X-ray units) using polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) mouse phantoms and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) readouts at the University of Wisconsin Medical Radiation Research Center (UWMRRC). The laboratories housing each of these irradiators were asked to deliver specific doses to individual mouse phantoms. Simultaneously, mouse phantoms at the UWMRRC were irradiated with NIST-traceable reference beams representative of the subject laboratories' beam energies. The irradiated mouse phantoms were returned from the various institutions to the UWMRRC and the TLDs were processed, with their measured dose response compared to the known dose response of the calibration phantom TLDs. Of the five facilities using X-ray irradiators, only one delivered an output within 5% of the target dose. The dose differences for the other four X-ray irradiators ranged from 12 to 42%. These results indicate the potential need for standardization of dose determination and additional oversight of radiobiology investigations.

  20. Load and unload system optimization on H{sub 2} {sup 18} O irradiation target used for {sup 18}F{sup -} production at the cyclotron cyclone 30 from IPEN-CNEN/SP, Brazil; Otimizacao do sistema de carga e descarga no porta-alvo de irradiacao de H{sub 2} {sup 18} O utilizado para a producao de {sup 18}F{sup -} no ciclotron cyclone 30 do IPEN-CNEN/SP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Osvaldo Luiz da

    2009-07-01

    The demand growing in Brazil by the radiopharmaceutical [{sup 18}F] FDG in positron emission tomography (PET-CT) and the 109,7 minutes half life claim special attention to the productive chain of this radiopharmaceutical. Since the [{sup 18}O]water irradiation until the tomograph patient scanning, in sequential procedures that may spent about six hours, all the productive chain stages must be as reliable as possible, because any stage failed will be perceived in productive chain extremity. The position indication absence from Load and Unload {sup 18}F{sup -} Target System valve in Cyclotron Accelerators Center resulted in {sup 18}F{sup -} production loss, Irradiation Room contamination and the increase workers dose responsible by operation and maintenance of irradiation systems. This study tested the behaviour of three types of position sensors (micro switch, reed switch and inductive sensor), into Irradiation Room 1.2 environment of the Cyclotron Accelerators Center, where there are high gamma radiation and neutrons rates because the routine {sup 18}F{sup -} and {sup 123}I production, through this test was possible to discover the fitter position sensor to run on {sup 18}F{sup -} Target, and after rewriting the programmable logic controller software was possible avoid this type of fail at {sup 18}F{sup -} production time in Cyclotron Accelerators Center, and to grow up the reliability on [{sup 18}F]FDG productive chain. (author)

  1. Load unload system optimization on H{sub 2}{sup 18}O irradiation target used for {sup 18}F{sup -} production at the cyclotron cyclone 30 from IPEN-CNEN/SP; Otimizacao do sistema carga e descarga no portal-alvo de irradiacao de H{sub 2}{sup 18}O utilizado para a producao de {sup 18}F{sup -} no ciclotron cyclone 30 do IPEN-CNEN/SP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Osvaldo Luiz da

    2009-07-01

    The demand growing in Brazil by the radiopharmaceutical [{sup 18}F]FDG in positron emission tomography (PET-CT) and the 109,7 minutes half life claim special attention to the productive chain of this radiopharmaceutical. Since the [{sup 18}O]water irradiation until the tomograph patient scanning, in sequential procedures that may spent about six hours, all the productive chain stages must be as reliable as possible, because any stage failed will be perceived in productive chain extremity. The position indication absence from Load and Unload {sup 18}F- Target System valve in Cyclotron Accelerators Center resulted in {sup 18}F- production loss, Irradiation Room contamination and the increase workers' dose responsible by operation and maintenance of irradiation systems. This study tested the behaviour of three types of position sensors (micro switch, reed switch and inductive sensor), into Irradiation Room 1.2 environment of the Cyclotron Accelerators Center, where there are high gamma radiation and neutrons rates because the routine {sup 18}F- and {sup 1}'2{sup 3}I production, through this test was possible to discover the fitter position sensor to run on {sup 18}F- Target, and after rewriting the programmable logic controller software was possible avoid this type of fail at {sup 18}F- production time in Cyclotron Accelerators Center, and to grow up the reliability on [{sup 18}F]FDG productive chain. (author)

  2. AGC-2 Irradiation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrbaugh, David Thomas [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Windes, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swank, W. David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a helium-cooled, very high temperature reactor (VHTR) with a large graphite core. In past applications, graphite has been used effectively as a structural and moderator material in both research and commercial high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) designs.[ , ] Nuclear graphite H 451, used previously in the United States for nuclear reactor graphite components, is no longer available. New nuclear graphites have been developed and are considered suitable candidates for the new NGNP reactor design. To support the design and licensing of NGNP core components within a commercial reactor, a complete properties database must be developed for these current grades of graphite. Quantitative data on in service material performance are required for the physical, mechanical, and thermal properties of each graphite grade with a specific emphasis on data related to the life limiting effects of irradiation creep on key physical properties of the NGNP candidate graphites. Based on experience with previous graphite core components, the phenomenon of irradiation induced creep within the graphite has been shown to be critical to the total useful lifetime of graphite components. Irradiation induced creep occurs under the simultaneous application of high temperatures, neutron irradiation, and applied stresses within the graphite components. Significant internal stresses within the graphite components can result from a second phenomenon—irradiation induced dimensional change. In this case, the graphite physically changes i.e., first shrinking and then expanding with increasing neutron dose. This disparity in material volume change can induce significant internal stresses within graphite components. Irradiation induced creep relaxes these large internal stresses, thus reducing the risk of crack formation and component failure. Obviously, higher irradiation creep levels tend to relieve more internal stress, thus allowing the

  3. Integration of three-dimensional magnetic resonance spectrometry to the irradiation treatment plan for glioblastomas: definition of new target volumes; Integration de la spectrometrie par resonance magnetique tridimensionnelle au plan de traitement par irradiation des glioblastomes: definition de nouveaux volumes cibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ken, S.; Vieillevigne, L.; Cohen-Jonathan, E.M.; Laprie, A. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut Claudius-Regaud, 31 - Toulouse (France); Ken, S.; Franceries, X.; Lotterie, J.A.; Lubrano, V.; Catalaa, I.; Celsis, P.; Berry, I.; Laprie, A. [Inserm UMR 825 Imagerie cerebrale et handicaps neurologiques, 31 - Toulouse (France); Lotterie, J.A.; Lubrano, V.; Berry, I. [Departement de biophysique, centre hospitalier universitaire de Rangueil, 31 - Toulouse (France); Catalaa, I. [Departement de radiologie, centre hospitalier universitaire de Purpan, 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2010-10-15

    Based on a clinic trial, the authors report the definition of a new reliable and reproducible method to delimit and integrate targets to the treatment plan which are specific to magnetic resonance spectrometry imagery for the radiotherapy of glioblastomas, in order to perform a treatment by intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT). A weighted conventional MRI has been performed before radiotherapy. The importation of anatomic-metabolic images into the dose planning system comprises two steps: normalization on the whole volume of magnetic resonance spectrometry imagery, and segmentation of target volumes specific to spectrometry anomalies. This integration of target volumes is thus facilitated. Short communication

  4. Graphite target for the spiral project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putaux, J.C.; Ducourtieux, M.; Ferro, A.; Foury, P.; Kotfila, L.; Mueller, A.C.; Obert, J.; Pauwels, N.; Potier, J.C.; Proust, J. [Paris-11 Univ., 91 - Orsay (France). Inst. de Physique Nucleaire; Bertrand, P. [Grand Accelerateur National d`Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14 - Caen (France); Loiselet, M. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-La-Neuve (Belgium)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    A study of the thermal and physical properties of graphite targets for the SPIRAL project is presented. The main objective is to develop an optimized set-up both mechanically and thermally resistant, presenting good release properties (hot targets with thin slices). The results of irradiation tests concerning the mechanical and thermal resistance of the first prototype of SPIRAL target with conical geometry are presented. The micro-structural properties of the graphite target is also studied, in order to check that the release properties are not deteriorated by the irradiation. Finally, the results concerning the latest pilot target internally heated by an electrical current are shown. (author). 5 refs.

  5. Measurements of gas and volatile element production rates from an irradiated molten lead and lead-bismuth spallation target with proton beams of 1 and 1.4 GeV; Mesures de taux de production d'elements gazeux et volatiles lors de reactions induites par des protons de 1 et 1,4 GeV sur des cibles epaisses de plomb et plomb-bismuth liquides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tall, Y

    2008-03-15

    The integrated project EUROTRANS (European Research Programme for the Transmutation of High Level Nuclear Waste in an Accelerator Driven System) of the 6. EURATOM Framework Programme aims to demonstrate the transmutation of radioactive waste in ADS (Accelerator Driven Sub-critical system). It will carry out a first advanced design of an experimental facility to demonstrate the technical feasibility of transmutation, and will produce a conceptual design of an industrial facility dedicated to transmutation. An ADS consists of three fundamental elements: the accelerator of protons, the sub-critical core and the spallation target. SUBATECH (physique Sub-Atomique et des Technologies associees) laboratory is involved to the study of the chosen liquid lead-bismuth as a spallation ADS target. The irradiation of liquid lead-bismuth target with energetic proton beam generates in addition to neutrons, volatile and radioactive residues. In order to determine experimentally the production rates of gas and volatile elements following a spallation reaction in a lead-bismuth target, the experiment IS419 was performed at the ISOLDE facility at CERN (Centre Europeen de la Recherche Nucleaire). This experiment constitutes the frame of the thesis whose main objective is to assess and study the production and release rates of many gas and volatile element from the irradiated lead-bismuth target with an energetic proton beam. The obtained data are compared to Monte Carlo simulation code (MCNPX) results in order to test the intranuclear cascade model of Bertini and of Cugnon, and the evaporation options of Dresner and Schmidt. (author)

  6. The Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Dervan, P; Hodgson, P; Marin-Reyes, H; Wilson, J

    2013-01-01

    At the end of 2012 the proton irradiation facility at the CERN PS [1] will shut down for two years. With this in mind, we have been developing a new ATLAS scanning facility at the University of Birmingham Medical Physics cyclotron. With proton beams of energy approximately 30 MeV, fluences corresponding to those of the upgraded Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) can be reached conveniently. The facility can be used to irradiate silicon sensors, optical components and mechanical structures (e.g. carbon fibre sandwiches) for the LHC upgrade programme. Irradiations of silicon sensors can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box that can be scanned through the beam. The facility is described in detail along with the first tests carried out with mini (1 x 1 cm^2 ) silicon sensors.

  7. Tensile properties of CLAM steel irradiated up to 20.1 dpa in STIP-V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hongen; Peng, Lei; Dai, Yong; Huang, Qunying; Ye, Minyou

    2016-01-01

    Specimens of China low activation martensitic steel (CLAM) were irradiated in the fifth experiment of SINQ Target Irradiation Program (STIP-V) up to 20.1 dpa/1499 appm He/440 °C. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature (R.T) and irradiation temperatures (Tirr) in the range of 25-450 °C. The tensile results demonstrated strong effect of irradiation dose and irradiation temperature on hardening and embrittlement. With Tirr below ˜314 °C, CLAM steel specimens tested at R.T and Tirr showed similar evolution trend with irradiation dose, compared to other reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels in similar irradiation conditions. At higher Tirr above ˜314 °C, it is interesting that the hardening effect decreases and the ductility seems to recover, probably due to a strong effect of high irradiation temperature.

  8. Fuel or irradiation subassembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, O.S.; Hutter, E.

    1975-12-23

    A subassembly for use in a nuclear reactor is described which incorporates a loose bundle of fuel or irradiation pins enclosed within an inner tube which in turn is enclosed within an outer coolant tube and includes a locking comb consisting of a head extending through one side of the inner sleeve and a plurality of teeth which extend through the other side of the inner sleeve while engaging annular undercut portions in the bottom portion of the fuel or irradiation pins to prevent movement of the pins.

  9. Biological effect of penetration controlled irradiation with ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi; Shimizu, Takashi; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Yamashita, Takao

    1997-03-01

    To investigate the effect of local irradiation with ion beams on biological systems, technique for penetration controlled irradiation has been established. The range in a target was controlled by changing the distance from beam window in the atmosphere, and could be controlled linearly up to about 31 {mu}m in biological material. In addition, the effects of the penetration controlled irradiations with 1.5 MeV/u C and He ions were examined using tobacco pollen. The increased frequency of leaky pollen produced by ion beams suggests that the efficient pollen envelope damages would be induced at the range-end of ion beams. (author)

  10. NSUF Irradiated Materials Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, James Irvin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Nuclear Science User Facilities has been in the process of establishing an innovative Irradiated Materials Library concept for maximizing the value of previous and on-going materials and nuclear fuels irradiation test campaigns, including utilization of real-world components retrieved from current and decommissioned reactors. When the ATR national scientific user facility was established in 2007 one of the goals of the program was to establish a library of irradiated samples for users to access and conduct research through competitively reviewed proposal process. As part of the initial effort, staff at the user facility identified legacy materials from previous programs that are still being stored in laboratories and hot-cell facilities at the INL. In addition other materials of interest were identified that are being stored outside the INL that the current owners have volunteered to enter into the library. Finally, over the course of the last several years, the ATR NSUF has irradiated more than 3500 specimens as part of NSUF competitively awarded research projects. The Logistics of managing this large inventory of highly radioactive poses unique challenges. This document will describe materials in the library, outline the policy for accessing these materials and put forth a strategy for making new additions to the library as well as establishing guidelines for minimum pedigree needed to be included in the library to limit the amount of material stored indefinitely without identified value.

  11. Childhood Head and Neck Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thyroid Association ® www.thyroid.org Childhood Head & Neck Irradiation What is the thyroid gland? The thyroid gland ... Thyroid Association ® www.thyroid.org Childhood Head & Neck Irradiation Thyroid nodules (see Thyroid Nodule brochure) • Thyroid nodules ...

  12. TH-C-12A-11: Target Correlation of a 3D Surface Surrogate for Left Breast Irradiation Using the Respiratory-Gated Deep-Inspiration Breath-Hold Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Y; Walston, S [A Quick, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the use of 3D optical surface imaging as a new surrogate for respiratory motion gated deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) technique for left breast cancer patients. Methods: Patients with left-sided breast cancer after lumpectomy or mastectomy were selected as candidates for DIBH technique for their external beam radiation therapy. Treatment plans were created on both free breathing (FB) and DIBH CTs to determine whether DIBH was beneficial in reducing heart doses. The Real-time Position Management (RPM) system was used to acquire patient's breathing trace during DIBH CT acquisition and treatment delivery. The reference 3D surface models from FB and DIBH CTs were generated and transferred to the “AlignRT” system for patient positioning and real-time treatment monitoring. MV Cine images were acquired for each beam as quality assurance for intra-fractional position verification. The chest wall excursions measured on these images were used to define the actual target position during treatment, and to investigate the accuracy and reproducibility of RPM and AlignRT. Results: Reduction in heart dose can be achieved for left-sided breast patients using DIBH. Results showed that RPM has poor correlation with target position, as determined by the MV Cine imaging. This indicates that RPM may not be an adequate surrogate in defining the breath-hold level when used alone. Alternatively, the AlignRT surface imaging demonstrated a better correlation with the actual CW excursion during DIBH. Both the vertical and magnitude real-time deltas (RTDs) reported by AlignRT can be used as the gating parameter, with a recommend threshold of ±3 mm and 5 mm, respectively. Conclusion: 3D optical surface imaging serves as a superior target surrogate for the left breast treatment when compared to RPM. Working together with the realtime MV Cine imaging, they ensure accurate patient setup and dose delivery, while minimizing the imaging dose to patients.

  13. X-ray irradiation of yeast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, Alessandra; Batani, Dimitri; Previdi, Fabio; Conti, Aldo; Pisani, Francesca; Botto, Cesare; Bortolotto, Fulvia; Torsiello, Flavia; Turcu, I. C. Edmond; Allott, Ric M.; Lisi, Nicola; Milani, Marziale; Costato, Michele; Pozzi, Achille; Koenig, Michel

    1997-10-01

    Saccharomyces Cerevisiae yeast cells were irradiated using the soft X-ray laser-plasma source at Rutherford Laboratory. The aim was to produce a selective damage of enzyme metabolic activity at the wall and membrane level (responsible for fermentation) without interfering with respiration (taking place in mitochondria) and with nuclear and DNA activity. The source was calibrated by PIN diodes and X-ray spectrometers. Teflon stripes were chosen as targets for the UV laser, emitting X-rays at about 0.9 keV, characterized by a very large decay exponent in biological matter. X-ray doses to the different cell compartments were calculated following a Lambert-Bouguet-Beer law. After irradiation, the selective damage to metabolic activity at the membrane level was measured by monitoring CO2 production with pressure silicon detectors. Preliminary results gave evidence of pressure reduction for irradiated samples and non-linear response to doses. Also metabolic oscillations were evidenced in cell suspensions and it was shown that X-ray irradiation changed the oscillation frequency.

  14. HANARO fuel irradiation test(I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Dong Sung; Jeon, Byung Jin; Kim, Hak No; Kang, Byung Wee; Lee, Jong Tak; Kim, Bong Ku; Lim, In Chul; Chae, Hee Taek; Park, Cheol; Lee, Byung Cheol; Oh, Yeon Wo; Ahn, Sang Bok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-07-01

    Various types of test fuel has been reviewed and a 36 element hexagonal bundle design, with only 6 fuel elements at the corners of the peripheral positions and with A1 dummy rods or hollow elements at the remained 30 positions, was selected. The design enables the assembly to get local power boosting and to achieve higher power and faster burnup accumulation than other driver fuel in the core. For the three central positions (CT, IR 1 and IR 2) with maximum neutron flux, three different target burnup levels of {approx} 40, {approx} 65 and 85 {approx} 90 a/o have been chosen for the three test assemblies. One test assembly will be instrumented with thermocouples, neutron and gamma detectors to verify the irradiation condition. The instrumented test assembly has been fabricated in KAERI and other two test assemblies without any instruments were supplied by AECL. Two un-instrumented assemblies was inserted into HANARO at the end of December 1995 and has been under irradiation at IR 1 and IR 2 core positions without any problem. The measured data in the first cycle was conformed well to the predicted results. In the first cycle irradiation, the best estimated maximum power was 100.5 kw/m (MCNP) and the conservative maximum power was 117.7 kw/m. The instrumented test assembly will be irradiated from the second cycle. 5 tabs., 11 figs., 8 refs. (Author).

  15. Safety of irradiated foods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwahara, Shigeo (Foods Medicines Safety Center (Japan)); Kobayashi, Kazuo

    1983-01-01

    The safety of 7 irradiated foods (potato, onion, rice, wheat, vienna sausage, fish paste and mandarine orange), in terms of 2-year long-term toxic effect, reproductive physiology and possible teratogenesis, was studied using 3 generations of rats, mice and monkeys. The genetic toxicity was studied by means of various mutagenicity tests. The details of the studies conducted by the authors to date and some overseas data were reported. The available data showed no toxic effect.

  16. Transportation of reactive oxygen species in a tissue phantom after plasma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Toshiyuki; Kuroeda, Gouya; Sei, Ryuhei; Yamaguchi, Masaaki; Yoshinaga, Reishi; Yamashita, Riho; Tasaki, Hikaru; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2018-01-01

    The transportation of reactive oxygen species (ROSs) in a tissue phantom after plasma irradiation was studied using a two-layered target consisting of a KI-starch gel reagent and an agarose tissue phantom. The two-layered target can visualize the two-dimensional concentration distribution of ROSs after passing through the tissue phantom. ROSs were accumulated in the tissue phantom by the plasma irradiation, and they continued to be transported in the depth direction with the standing time after the plasma irradiation. The amount of ROS after passing through the tissue phantom increased in proportion to both plasma irradiation time and standing time. In this case, the ROS distribution patterns did not depend on these times. The ROS transportation speed after plasma irradiation was 0.05 mm/min in the tissue phantom. The ROS penetration rate depended on the standing time, not on the plasma irradiation time, and it was less than 1%.

  17. Understanding the Irradiation Behavior of Zirconium Carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Morgan, Dane [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Szlufarska, Izabela [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-10-11

    -induced microstructures mapped spatially and temporally, microstructural evolution during post-irradiation annealing, and atomistic modeling of defect formation and transport energetics will provide new, critical understanding about property changes in ZrC. The behavior of materials under irradiation is determined by the balance between damage production, defect clustering, and lattice response. In order to predict those effects at high temperatures so targeted testing can be expanded and extrapolated beyond the known database, it is necessary to determine the defect energetics and mobilities as these control damage accumulation and annealing. In particular, low-temperature irradiations are invaluable for determining the regions of defect mobility. Computer simulation techniques are particularly useful for identifying basic defect properties, especially if closely coupled with a well-constructed and complete experimental database. The close coupling of calculation and experiment in this project will provide mutual benchmarking and allow us to glean a deeper understanding of the irradiation response of ZrC, which can then be applied to the prediction of its behavior in reactor conditions.

  18. TU-H-CAMPUS-TeP2-02: FLASH Irradiation Improves the Therapeutic Index Following GI Tract Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueler, E; Trovati, S; King, G; Lartey, F; Rafat, M; Loo, B; Maxim, P [Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate and characterize the radiobiological effectiveness of very high dose rate radiotherapy (FLASH) compared to conventional irradiation in an in vivo model. Methods: The gastrointestinal (GI) tract of C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with doses ranging between 10 and 18 Gy using a custom stereotactic jig. A Varian Clinac 21EX was modified to allow dose rates ranging from 0.05 to 240 Gy/s at the position of the mirror. With the gantry at 180 degrees, the jig holding the individual animals was placed above the mirror to take advantage of the reduced source to target distance. Mice were irradiated with 20MeV electrons. Following irradiation, the mice were monitored twice daily for morbidity and daily for weight changes. Results: Mice irradiated with FLASH irradiation had lower weight loss compared to the mice receiving conventional irradiation. Following FLASH irradiation, a maximum weight loss of ∼20% was observed at day 6 with subsequent recovery, while following conventional irradiation, higher weight losses was observed with fewer instances of recovery. Concerning survival, all mice in the conventionally irradiated groups had a 100% mortality in the range of 15.5–18 Gy, while the mice irradiated with FLASH irradiation had a 100% survival in the same range. Conclusion: These results have demonstrated proof of principle that FLASH irradiations have a dramatic impact on the overall survival of mice following GI tract irradiations. If the increase in the therapeutic window can be validated and understood, this would revolutionize the field of radiation oncology and lead to increased cure rates with reduced side effects following treatment, resulting in increased quality of life for cancer survivors. Funding: DoD, Award#:W81XWH-14-1-0014, Weston Havens Foundation, Bio-X (Stanford University), the Office of the Dean of the Medical School, the Office of the Provost (Stanford University), and the Swedish Childhood Cancer Foundation; BL and PM are

  19. ATF Neutron Irradiation Program Irradiation Vehicle Design Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geringer, J. W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Cetiner, N. O. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Petrie, Christian M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Smith, Kurt R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; McDuffee, J. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division

    2016-03-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) under the Civil Nuclear Energy Working Group (CNWG) is engaged in a cooperative research effort with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to explore issues related to nuclear energy, including research on accident-tolerant fuels and materials for use in light water reactors. This work develops a draft technical plan for a neutron irradiation program on the candidate accident-tolerant fuel cladding materials and elements using the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The research program requires the design of a detailed experiment, development of test vehicles, irradiation of test specimens, possible post irradiation examination and characterization of irradiated materials and the shipment of irradiated materials to Japan. This report discusses the conceptual design, the development and irradiation of the test vehicles.

  20. Low-oxygen atmospheric treatment improves the performance of irradiation-sterilized male cactus moths used in SIT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) programs, irradiation can effectively induce sterility in insects by damaging genomic DNA. However, irradiation also induces other off-target side effects that reduce the quality and performance of sterilized males. Thus, treatments that reduce off-target ef...

  1. Proton irradiation effects on beryllium – A macroscopic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simos, Nikolaos, E-mail: simos@bnl.gov [Nuclear Sciences & Technology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States); Elbakhshwan, Mohamed [Nuclear Sciences & Technology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States); Zhong, Zhong [Photon Sciences, NSLS II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States); Camino, Fernando [Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Beryllium, due to its excellent neutron multiplication and moderation properties, in conjunction with its good thermal properties, is under consideration for use as plasma facing material in fusion reactors and as a very effective neutron reflector in fission reactors. While it is characterized by unique combination of structural, chemical, atomic number, and neutron absorption cross section it suffers, however, from irradiation generated transmutation gases such as helium and tritium which exhibit low solubility leading to supersaturation of the Be matrix and tend to precipitate into bubbles that coalesce and induce swelling and embrittlement thus degrading the metal and limiting its lifetime. Utilization of beryllium as a pion production low-Z target in high power proton accelerators has been sought both for its low Z and good thermal properties in an effort to mitigate thermos-mechanical shock that is expected to be induced under the multi-MW power demand. To assess irradiation-induced changes in the thermal and mechanical properties of Beryllium, a study focusing on proton irradiation damage effects has been undertaken using 200 MeV protons from the Brookhaven National Laboratory Linac and followed by a multi-faceted post-irradiation analysis that included the thermal and volumetric stability of irradiated beryllium, the stress-strain behavior and its ductility loss as a function of proton fluence and the effects of proton irradiation on the microstructure using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The mimicking of high temperature irradiation of Beryllium via high temperature annealing schemes has been conducted as part of the post-irradiation study. This paper focuses on the thermal stability and mechanical property changes of the proton irradiated beryllium and presents results of the macroscopic property changes of Beryllium deduced from thermal and mechanical tests.

  2. Craniospinal irradiation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarlatescu, Ioana, E-mail: scarlatescuioana@gmail.com; Avram, Calin N. [Faculty of Physics, West University of Timisoara, Bd. V. Parvan 4, 300223 Timisoara (Romania); Virag, Vasile [County Hospital “Gavril Curteanu” - Oradea (Romania)

    2015-12-07

    In this paper we present one treatment plan for irradiation cases which involve a complex technique with multiple beams, using the 3D conformational technique. As the main purpose of radiotherapy is to administrate a precise dose into the tumor volume and protect as much as possible all the healthy tissues around it, for a case diagnosed with a primitive neuro ectoderm tumor, we have developed a new treatment plan, by controlling one of the two adjacent fields used at spinal field, in a way that avoids the fields superposition. Therefore, the risk of overdose is reduced by eliminating the field divergence.

  3. Target Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — [Part of the ATLAS user facility.] The Physics Division operates a target development laboratory that produces targets and foils of various thickness and substrates,...

  4. International Developments of Food Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loaharanu, P. [Head, Food Preservation Section, Joint FAO/IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Wagramerstr. 5, A-1400, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-12-31

    Food irradiation is increasingly accepted and applied in many countries in the past decade. Through its use, food losses and food-borne diseases can be reduced significantly, and wider trade in many food items can be facilitated. The past five decades have witnessed a positive evolution on food irradiation according to the following: 1940`s: discovery of principles of food irradiation; 1950`s: initiation of research in advanced countries; 1960`s: research and development were intensified in some advanced and developing countries; 1970`s: proof of wholesomeness of irradiated foods; 1980`s: establishment of national regulations; 1990`s: commercialization and international trade. (Author)

  5. Food irradiation and the consumer

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Thomas, P.

    The poster presents a review of research work undertaken on the perception and understanding that consumers have of food irradiation. Food irradiation is not a revolutionary new food processing technique, in fact it is probably one of the most investigated methods presently available. Many countries such as Belgium, France, Denmark, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands and the United States of America permit food irradiation. In Britain it is presently banned although this is currently under review. Awareness of food irradiation by the general public in Britain, although not extensively researched would appear to be increasing, especially in the light of recent media coverage. New quantitative and qualitative work indicates that the general public are concerned about the safety and effectiveness of food irradiation. Research has shown that a large proportion of consumers in Britain, if given the opportunity to purchase irradiated food, would not do so. Further exploration into this response revealed the fact that consumers are confused over what food irradiation is. In addition, there is concern over the detection of irradiated food. The views presented in this paper, of the consumer reaction to irradiated food are of great importance to those involved in the food industry and industries allied to it, which are ultimately dependent on the consumer for their commercial survival.

  6. Food irradiation and sterilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Edward S.

    Radiation sterilization of food (radappertization) requires exposing food in sealed containers to ionizing radiation at absorbed doses high enough (25-70 kGy) to kill all organisms of food spoilage and public health significance. Radappertization is analogous to thermal canning is achieving shelf stability (long term storage without refrigeration). Except for dry products in which autolysis is negligible, the radappertization process also requires that the food be heated to an internal temperature of 70-80°C (bacon to 53°C) to inactivate autolytic enzymes which catalyze spoilage during storage without refrigeration. To minimize the occurence of irradiation induced off-flavors and odors, undesirable color changes, and textural and nutritional losses from exposure to the high doses required for radappertization, the foods are vacuum sealed and irradiated frozen (-40°C to -20°C). Radappertozed foods have the characteristic of fresh foods prepared for eating. Radappertization can substitute in whole or in part for some chemical food additives such as ethylene oxide and nitrites which are either toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic. After 27 years of testing for "wholesomeness" (safety for consumption) of radappertized foods, no confirmed evidence has been obtained of any adverse effecys of radappertization on the "wholesomeness" characteristics of these foods.

  7. Radiation doses to normal tissues during craniospinal irradiation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohamed Farouk Mostafa

    2011-10-15

    Oct 15, 2011 ... From the above mentioned study we can conclude that, the dose of radiation received by the target volume and the organs at risk during craniospinal irradiation of children with high risk medulloblastoma with the use of our new linear accelera- tor and treatment planning system Elekta and Precise Elekta is.

  8. Montmorillonite clay-promoted, solvent-free cross-aldol condensations under focused microwave irradiation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rocchi, Damiano; González, Juan F; Menéndez, J Carlos

    2014-01-01

    .... This method involved solvent-free reaction conditions under microwave irradiation in the presence of a clay-based catalyst, and afforded the target compounds in good yields and short reaction times...

  9. Design of matrix irradiation system for external tissue phototherapy with temperature control

    Science.gov (United States)

    López S., F. Yonadab; Stolik Isakina, Suren; de La Rosa Vázquez, José Manuel

    2013-11-01

    This paper presents the design and development of a matrix irradiation system for studies and application of dermatological phototherapies with temperature control. The developed system has a power control to irradiate the target tissue with an adequate power density. Also, the irradiation time it is automated. Temperature infrared sensor is used in the irradiated sample to control the temperature. The temperature control allows the study of photodynamic therapy effects in synergy with the thermotherapy effects in the treatment of different diseases in external tissue.

  10. Commercial scale irradiation for insect disinfestation preserves peach quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Heather; McCulloch, Mary; Caporaso, Fred; Winborne, Ian; Oubichon, Michon; Rakovski, Cyril; Prakash, Anuradha

    2012-06-01

    Irradiation is approved as a generic quarantine treatment by the US Department of Agriculture, Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Due to the effectiveness of irradiation in controlling insects on commodities, there is a growing need to understand the effects of low dose irradiation on fruit quality. The goal of this study was to determine the sensitivity of peaches (Prunus persica) to irradiation, and secondly, to determine the effect of commercial scale treatment on shelf-life, overall quality and consumer liking. Six varieties of peaches were irradiated in small batches at 0.29, 0.49, 0.69 and 0.90 kGy to observe the sensitivity of peaches at different dose levels. Changes in quality were evaluated by 8 trained panelists using descriptive analysis. Sensory characteristics (color, smoothness, aroma, touch firmness, mouth firmness, graininess, overall flavor and off-flavor) were evaluated at 2-4 day intervals and untreated samples served as control. To simulate commercial treatment, peaches were irradiated in pallet quantities at a target dose level of 0.4 kGy. The average absorbed dose was 0.66 kGy with an average dose uniformity ratio of 1.57. Commercially treated peaches were evaluated by 40-80 untrained consumers for acceptability routinely throughout the shelf life. Titratable acidity, Brix, texture and weight loss were also monitored for both commercial and small scale irradiated peaches. There was no dose effect on TA, Brix and weight loss due to irradiation. Peaches irradiated at 0.69 and 0.90 kGy were darker in flesh color, more juicy and less firm as determined by the trained panel and analytical pressure tests. Commercial scale irradiation did not adversely affect shelf life but was seen to enhance ripening. This, however, was perceived as a positive change by consumers. Overall, consumers rated the acceptability of irradiated peaches higher than untreated peaches. Statistical analysis was performed using linear mixed models to find determinates

  11. Antitumor Immunity Induced after α Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Gorin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Radioimmunotherapy (RIT is a therapeutic modality that allows delivering of ionizing radiation directly to targeted cancer cells. Conventional RIT uses β-emitting radioisotopes, but recently, a growing interest has emerged for the clinical development of α particles. α emitters are ideal for killing isolated or small clusters of tumor cells, thanks to their specific characteristics (high linear energy transfer and short path in the tissue, and their effect is less dependent on dose rate, tissue oxygenation, or cell cycle status than γ and X rays. Several studies have been performed to describe α emitter radiobiology and cell death mechanisms induced after α irradiation. But so far, no investigation has been undertaken to analyze the impact of α particles on the immune system, when several studies have shown that external irradiation, using γ and X rays, can foster an antitumor immune response. Therefore, we decided to evaluate the immunogenicity of murine adenocarcinoma MC-38 after bismuth-213 (213Bi irradiation using a vaccination approach. In vivo studies performed in immunocompetent C57Bl/6 mice induced a protective antitumor response that is mediated by tumor-specific T cells. The molecular mechanisms potentially involved in the activation of adaptative immunity were also investigated by in vitro studies. We observed that 213Bi-treated MC-38 cells release “danger signals” and activate dendritic cells. Our results demonstrate that α irradiation can stimulate adaptive immunity, elicits an efficient antitumor protection, and therefore is an immunogenic cell death inducer, which provides an attractive complement to its direct cytolytic effect on tumor cells.

  12. Sensorial evaluation of irradiated mangoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broisler, Paula Olhe; Cruz, Juliana Nunes da; Sabato, Susy Frey [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mails: paulabroisler@hotmail.com; juliananc@ig.com.br; sfsabato@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    Mango (Mangifera indica L.) is a tropical fruit of great economical relevance in the world, mainly for tropical countries like Brazil. It consists in the second tropical fruit more important grown in the world. On the other hand it is a very perishable fruit and its delivery to distant points is restricted due to short shelf life at environmental temperature. Food irradiation process is applied to fruits for their preservation, once it promotes disinfestation and even maturation retard, among other mechanisms. The Brazilian legislation permits the food irradiation and does not restrict the doses to be delivered. In order to verify eventual changes, sensorial evaluation is very important to study how irradiation affects the quality of the fruit and its acceptability. Mangoes were irradiated in a Cobalto-60 source, from the Radiation Technology Center, CTR, of IPEN/CNEN-SP at doses 0,5 kGy e 0,75 kGy. The sensorial evaluation was measured through Acceptance Test where irradiated samples were offered together with control sample to the tasters who answered their perception through hedonic scale. The parameters Color, Odor, Flavor and Texture were analyzed. Statistical analysis showed that only Odor parameter was different from control (sample irradiated at 0.5 kGy). Few tasters indicated that irradiated mangoes had fewer odors in relation to non-irradiated samples. (author)

  13. Channeling irradiation of LiNbO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, Tobias; Schrempel, Frank; Gischkat, Thomas; Wesch, Werner [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The influence of the crystal orientation on the damage formation of x- and z-cut LiNbO{sub 3} single crystals irradiated with 550 and 750 keV Si-ions was investigated. The irradiation was carried out along the corresponding axial channel as well as at different tilt angles. The damage accumulation was investigated by means of Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS/C). Because the channelled ions are prevented from close collisions with the target atoms, the projected range of the ions is increased and the number of defects created by channelled ions at a certain ion fluence is less compared to a random irradiation. As a consequence the damage distribution is shifted to larger depths if the irradiation is performed along low index crystallographic directions. Selected samples were etched at 40 {sup circle} C in a HF-solution of 3.7% and 40%, respectively. Compared to the random irradiation with 550 keV Si-ions, the etched depth increases by a factor of 1.4 and 1.2 if the irradiation is carried out along the x- and the z-axis, respectively. From the dependence of the shift of the damage peak on the tilt angle a critical angle to avoid channeling of about 1.35 {sup circle} was determined for 750 keV Si-ions.

  14. Modulated volume irradiation of retroperitoneal sarcomas; Irradiation volumique modulee des sarcomes retroperitoneaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moscardo, C.L.; Fenoglietto, P. [Institut de Recherche en Cancerologie de Montpellier (IRCM), 34 - Montpellier (France)

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: The irradiation of retroperitoneal sarcomas as well as other complex localisation such members roots, axial and truncus tumors stays an important technical challenge, according to the tolerance to ionizing radiation of some critical organs and their proximity to the target volume. The conformal radiotherapy by intensity modulation (I.M.R.T.) has demonstrated in other localizations its superiority to the classical radiotherapy techniques in the reduction of doses delivered to organs at risk and its conformation to the target volume. Several companies propose today I.M.R.T. with a rotation of the source around the patient able to bring an additional therapy benefit. A solution using a linear accelerator is today used in our institution for the treatment of retroperitoneal sarcomas. Conclusion: The irradiation of retroperitoneal sarcomas is realised with the Rapid Arc technology, whatever be the size and the shape of the volume. The coverage of the volume and the preservation of sane tissues hints at a possible preoperative irradiation for patients who could not benefit from prior. (N.C.)

  15. Pulsed-Laser Irradiation Space Weathering Of A Carbonaceous Chondrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, M. S.; Keller, L. P.; Christoffersen, R.; Loeffler, M. J.; Morris, R. V.; Graff, T. G.; Rahman, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Grains on the surfaces of airless bodies experience irradiation from solar energetic particles and melting, vaporization and recondensation processes associated with micrometeorite impacts. Collectively, these processes are known as space weathering and they affect the spectral properties, composition, and microstructure of material on the surfaces of airless bodies, e.g. Recent efforts have focused on space weathering of carbonaceous materials which will be critical for interpreting results from the OSIRIS-REx and Hayabusa2 missions targeting primitive, organic-rich asteroids. In addition to returned sample analyses, space weathering processes are quantified through laboratory experiments. For example, the short-duration thermal pulse from hypervelocity micrometeorite impacts have been simulated using pulsed-laser irradiation of target material e.g. Recent work however, has shown that pulsed-laser irradiation has variable effects on the spectral properties and microstructure of carbonaceous chondrite samples. Here we investigate the spectral characteristics of pulsed-laser irradiated CM2 carbonaceous chondrite, Murchison, including the vaporized component. We also report the chemical and structural characteristics of specific mineral phases within the meteorite as a result of pulsed-laser irradiation.

  16. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analysis of devices for irradiation of LEU targets type of UAL{sub x}-Al and U-Ni to production of {sup 99}Mo in reactor IEA-R1 and RMB; Analises neutronicas e termo-hidraulica de dispositivos para irradiacao de alvos tipo LEU de UAL{sub x}-Al e U-Ni para producao de {sup 99}Mo nos reatores IEA-R1 e RMB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingos, Douglas Borges

    2014-07-01

    In this work neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analyses were made to compare three types of targets (UAl{sub 2}-Al, U-Ni cylindrical and U-Ni plate) used for the production of {sup 99}Mo by fission of {sup 235}U. Some experiments were conducted to validate the neutronic and thermal-hydraulics methodologies used in this work. For the neutronic calculations the computational programs NJOY99.0, AMPX-II and HAMMERTECHNION were used to generate the cross sections. SCALE 6.0 and CITATION computational programs were used for three-dimensional calculations of the reactor cores, fuel burning and the production of {sup 99}Mo. The computational programs MTRCR-IEAR1 and ANSYS CFX were used to calculate the thermal and hydraulic parameters of the irradiation devices and for comparing them to limits and design criteria. First were performed neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analyzes for the reactor IEA-R1 with the targets of UAl{sub 2}-Al (10 mini plates). Analyses have shown that the total activity obtained for {sup 99}Mo on the mini plates does not meet the demand of Brazilian hospitals (450 Ci/week) and that no limit of thermo-hydraulic design is overtaken. Next, the same calculations were performed for the three target types in Multipurpose Brazilian Reactor (MBR). The neutronic analyzes demonstrated that the three targets meet the demand of Brazilian hospitals. The thermal hydraulic analysis shows that a minimum speed of 7 m/s for the target UAl{sub 2}-Al, 8 m/s for the cylindrical target U-Ni and 9 m/s for the target U-Ni plate will be necessary in the irradiation device to not exceed the design limits. Were performed experiments using a test bench for validate the methodologies for the thermal-hydraulic calculation. The experiments performed to validate the neutronic calculations were made in the reactor IPEN/MB-01. All experiments were simulated with the methodologies described above and the results compared. The simulations results showed good agreement with experimental

  17. Consumer acceptance of irradiated food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loaharanu, P. [Head, Food Preservation Section, Joint FAO/ IAEA Division of Nuclear Techniques in Food and Agriculture, Wagramerstr. 5, A-1400, Vienna (Austria)

    1997-12-31

    There was a widely held opinion during the 1970`s and 1980`s that consumers would be reluctant to purchase irradiated food, as it was perceived that consumers would confuse irradiated food with food contaminated by radionuclides. Indeed, a number of consumer attitude surveys conducted in several western countries during these two decades demonstrated that the concerns of consumers on irradiated food varied from very concerned to seriously concerned.This paper attempts to review parameters conducting in measuring consumer acceptance of irradiated food during the past three decades and to project the trends on this subject. It is believed that important lessons learned from past studies will guide further efforts to market irradiated food with wide consumer acceptance in the future. (Author)

  18. Irradiation of fresh fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh-jen, Yen; Jin-lai, Zhou; Shao-chun, Lai

    Occasionally, in China, marine products can not be provided for the markets in good quality, for during the time when they are being transported from the sea port to inland towns or even at the time when they are unloaded from the ship, they are beginning to spoil. Obviously, it is very important that appropiate measures should be taken to prevent them from decay. Our study has proved that the shelf life of fresh Flatfish (Cynoglossue robustus) and Silvery pomfret (stromateoides argenteus), which, packed in sealed containers, are irradiated by 1.5 kGy, 2.2 kGy and 3.0 kGy, can be stored for about 13-26 days at 3° - 5° C.

  19. Irradiation for xenogeneic transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halperin, E.C.; Knechtle, S.J.; Harland, R.C.; Yamaguchi, Yasua; Sontag, M.; Bollinger, R.R. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA). Dept. of Radiology Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA). Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology)

    1990-05-01

    Xenogeneic transplantation (XT) is the transplantation of organs or tissues from a member of one species to a member of another. Mammalian species frequently have circulating antibody which is directed against the foreign organ irrespective of known prior antigen exposure. This antibody may lead to hyperacute rejection once it ensues so efforts must be directed towards eliminating the pre-existing antibody. In those species in which hyperacute rejection of xenografts does not occur, cell-mediated refection, similar to allograft rejection, may occur. It is in the prevention of this latter form of refection that radiation is most likely to be beneficial in XT. Both total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) and selective lyphoid irradiation (LSI) have been investigated for use in conjunction with XT. TLI has contributed to the prolongation of pancreatic islet-cell xenografts from hamsters to rats. TLI has also markedly prolonged the survival of cardiac transplants from hamsters to rats. A more modest prolongation of graft survival has been seen with the use of TLI in rabbit-to-rat exchanges. Therapy with TLI, cyclosporine, and splenectomy has markedly prolonged the survival of liver transplants from hamsters to rats, and preliminary data suggest that TLI may contribute to the prolongation of graft survival in the transplantation of hearts from monkeys to baboons. SLI appears to have prolonged graft survival, when used in conjunction with anti-lymphocyte globulin, in hamster-to-rat cardiac graft exchanges. The current state of knowledge of the use of irradiaiton in experimental XT is reviewed. (author). 38 refs.; 1 fig.; 5 tabs.

  20. Performance degradation of ferrofluidic feedthroughs in a mixed irradiation field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simos, Nikolaos; Fernandes, S.; Mittig, Wolfgang; Pellemoine, Frederique; Avilov, M.; Kostin, M.; Mausner, L.; Ronningen, R.; Schein, M.; Bollen, G.

    2017-01-01

    Ferrofluidic feedthrough (FF) rotary seals containing either NdFeB or SmCo-type permanent magnets have been considered for use in the target and beam dump systems of the Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB). To evaluate their performance under irradiation three FF seals were irradiated in a mixed field consisting of fast neutrons, protons and γ-rays to an average absorbed dose of 0.2, 2.0, and 20.0 MGy at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer facility (BLIP). The radiation types and energy profiles mimic those expected at the FRIB facility. Degradation of the operational performance of these devices due to irradiation is expected to be the result of the de-magnetization of the permanent magnets contained within the seal and the changes in the ferrofluid properties. Post-irradiation performance was evaluated by determining the ferrofluidic seal vacuum tightness and torque under static and dynamic conditions. The study revealed that the ferrofluidic feedthrough seal irradiated to a dose of 0.2 MGy maintained its vacuum tightness under both static and rotational condition while the one irradiated to a dose of 2.0 MGy exhibited signs of ferrofluid damage but no overall performance loss. At 20 MGy dose the effects of irradiation on the ferrofluid properties (viscosity and particle agglomeration) were shown to be severe. Furthermore, limited de-magnetization of the annular shaped Nd2Fe14B and Sm2Co17 magnets located within the irradiated FFs was observed for doses of 0.2 MGy and 20 MGy respectively.

  1. Post irradiation characterization of beryllium and beryllides after high temperature irradiation up to 3000 appm helium production in HIDOBE-01

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedorov, A.V., E-mail: fedorov@nrg.eu [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Postbus 25, Petten, 1755 ZG (Netherlands); Til, S. van; Stijkel, M.P. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, Westerduinweg 3, Postbus 25, Petten, 1755 ZG (Netherlands); Nakamichi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho (Japan); Zmitko, M. [The European Joint Undertaking for ITER and the Development of Fusion Energy, c/ Josep Pla, n° 2, Torres Diagonal Litoral, Edificio B3, Barcelona 08019 (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    Titanium beryllides are considered as advanced candidate material for neutron multiplier for the helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB) and/or the water cooled ceramic breeder (WCCB) breeder blankets. In the HIDOBE-01 (HIgh DOse irradiation of BEryllium) experiment, beryllium and beryllide pellets with 5 at% and 7 at% Ti are irradiated at four different target temperatures (T{sub irr}): 425 °C, 525 °C, 650 °C and 750 °C up to the dose corresponding to 3000 appm He production in beryllium. The pellets were supplied by JAEA. During post irradiation examinations the critical properties of volumetric swelling and tritium retention were studied. Both titanium beryllide grades show significantly less swelling than the beryllium grade, with the difference increasing with the irradiation temperature. The irradiation induced swelling was studied by using direct dimensions. Both beryllide grades showed much less swelling as compare to the reference beryllium grade. Densities of the grades were studied by Archimedean immersion and by He-pycnometry, giving indications of porosity formation. While both beryllide grades show no significant reduction in density at all irradiation temperatures, the beryllium density falls steeply at higher T{sub irr}. Finally, the tritium release and retention were studied by temperature programmed desorption (TPD). Beryllium shows the same strong tritium retention as earlier observed in studies on beryllium pebbles, while the tritium inventory of the beryllides is significantly less, already at the lowest T{sub irr} of 425 °C.

  2. Morphological and spectroscopic characterization of laser-ablated tungsten at various laser irradiances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akram, Mahreen; Bashir, Shazia; Hayat, Asma; Mahmood, Khaliq; Dawood, Asadullah [Government College University, Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, Lahore (Pakistan); Rafique, Muhammad Shahid [University of Engineering and Technology, Department of Physics, Lahore (Pakistan); Bashir, M.F. [COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Department of Physics, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2015-06-15

    The variation in surface morphology and plasma parameters of laser irradiated tungsten has been investigated as a function of irradiance. For this purpose, Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm, 10 ns, 10 Hz) is employed. Tungsten targets were exposed to various laser irradiances ranging from 6 to 50 GW/cm{sup 2} under ambient environment of argon at a pressure of 20 Torr. Scanning electron microscope analysis has been performed to analyze the surface modification of irradiated tungsten. It revealed the formation of micro- and nanoscale surface structures. In central ablated area, distinct grains and crack formation are observed, whereas peripheral ablated areas are dominated by cones and pinhole formation. It was observed that at irradiances exceeding a value of 13 GW/cm{sup 2}, the morphological trend of the observed structures has been changed from erosion to melting and re-deposition dominant phase. Ablation efficiency as a function of laser irradiance has also been investigated by measuring the crater depth using surface profilometry analysis. It is found to be maximum at an irradiance of 13 GW/cm{sup 2} and decreases at high laser irradiances. In order to correlate the accumulated effects of plasma parameters with the surface modification, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy analysis has been performed. The electron temperature and number density of tungsten plasma have been evaluated at various laser irradiances. Initially with the increase of the laser irradiance up to 13 GW/cm{sup 2}, an increasing trend is observed for both plasma parameters due to enhanced energy deposition. Afterward, a decreasing trend is achieved which is attributed to the shielding effect. With further increase in irradiance, a saturation stage comes and insignificant changes are observed in plasma parameters. This saturation is explainable on the basis of the formation of a self-regulating regime near the target surface. Surface modifications of laser irradiated tungsten have been correlated with

  3. Study of graphite erosion under lateral radiation from target plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sofronov, V.; Arkhipov, N.; Bakhtin, V.; Kurkin, S.; Toporkov, D.; Vasenin, S.; Zhitlukhin, A. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research, Troisk, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Wuerz, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    Tokamak disruptive heat load results in a sudden evaporation of plasma irradiated material and produces a target plasma cloud which protects divertor plates from further excessive evaporation. A bulk of incoming energy flux is absorbed in the target plasma and is effectively (up to 95%) dissipated into outcoming radiation. The intense radiation of target plasma causes a high heat load at nearby components and consequently it can produce their surface erosion. The problem of environmental component protection from this secondary irradiation is under investigation now.The experimental results on interaction of target plasma radiation with solid targets and material damage are presented in this paper. (author)

  4. Elastic wave from fast heavy ion irradiation on solids

    CERN Document Server

    Kambara, T; Kanai, Y; Kojima, T M; Nanai, Y; Yoneda, A; Yamazaki, Y

    2002-01-01

    To study the time-dependent mechanical effects of fast heavy ion irradiations, we have irradiated various solids by a short-bunch beam of 95 MeV/u Ar ions and observed elastic waves generated in the bulk. The irradiated targets were square-shaped plates of poly-crystals of metals (Al and Cu), invar alloy, ceramic (Al sub 2 O sub 3), fused silica (SiO sub 2) and single crystals of KC1 and LiF with a thickness of 10 mm. The beam was incident perpendicular to the surface and all ions were stopped in the target. Two piezo-electric ultrasonic sensors were attached to the surface of the target and detected the elastic waves. The elastic waveforms as well as the time structure and intensity of the beam bunch were recorded for each shot of a beam bunch. The sensor placed opposite to the beam spot recorded a clear waveform of the longitudinal wave across the material, except for the invar and fused silica targets. From its propagation time along with the sound velocity and the thickness of the target, the depth of the...

  5. AFIP-4 Irradiation Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danielle M Perez; Misti A Lillo; Gray S. Chang; Glenn A Roth; Nicolas Woolstenhulme; Daniel M Wachs

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full size plate In center flux trap Position (AFIP) experiment AFIP-4 was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuels at a scale prototypic of research reactor fuel plates. The AFIP-4 test further examine the fuel/clad interface and its behavior under extreme conditions. After irradiation, fission gas retention measurements will be performed during post irradiation (PIE). The following report summarizes the life of the AFIP-4 experiment through end of irradiation, including a brief description of the safety analysis, as-run neutronic analysis results, hydraulic testing results, and thermal analysis results.

  6. AFIP-4 Irradiation Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danielle M Perez; Misti A Lillo; Gray S. Chang; Glenn A Roth; Nicolas Woolstenhulme; Daniel M Wachs

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full size plate In center flux trap Position (AFIP) experiment AFIP-4 was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuels at a scale prototypic of research reactor fuel plates. The AFIP-4 test further examine the fuel/clad interface and its behavior under extreme conditions. After irradiation, fission gas retention measurements will be performed during post irradiation (PIE)1,2. The following report summarizes the life of the AFIP-4 experiment through end of irradiation, including a brief description of the safety analysis, as-run neutronic analysis results, hydraulic testing results, and thermal analysis results.

  7. Craniospinal Irradiation for Trilateral Retinoblastoma Following Ocular Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, Lawrence B.; Bentel, Gunilla; Sherouse, George W.; Spencer, David P.; Light, Kim

    2015-01-15

    A case study is presented. Craniospinal radiotherapy and a three-field pineal boost for trilateral retinoblastoma were delivered to a patient previously irradiated for ocular retinoblastoma. The availability of CT-based three-dimensional treatment planning provided the capability of identifying the previously irradiated volume as a three-dimensional anatomic structure and of designing a highly customized set of treatment beams that minimized reirradiation of that volume.

  8. (Irradiation creep of graphite)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, C.R.

    1990-12-21

    The traveler attended the Conference, International Symposium on Carbon, to present an invited paper, Irradiation Creep of Graphite,'' and chair one of the technical sessions. There were many papers of particular interest to ORNL and HTGR technology presented by the Japanese since they do not have a particular technology embargo and are quite open in describing their work and results. In particular, a paper describing the failure of Minor's law to predict the fatigue life of graphite was presented. Although the conference had an international flavor, it was dominated by the Japanese. This was primarily a result of geography; however, the work presented by the Japanese illustrated an internal program that is very comprehensive. This conference, a result of this program, was better than all other carbon conferences attended by the traveler. This conference emphasizes the need for US participation in international conferences in order to stay abreast of the rapidly expanding HTGR and graphite technology throughout the world. The United States is no longer a leader in some emerging technologies. The traveler was surprised by the Japanese position in their HTGR development. Their reactor is licensed and the major problem in their graphite program is how to eliminate it with the least perturbation now that most of the work has been done.

  9. Stillbirths and male irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boice, John D. Jr. [International Epidemiology Institute, Rockville, MD (United States)]. E-mail: boicej@compuserve.com; Robison, Leslie L. [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Mertens, Ann [University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Stovall, Marilyn; Green, Daniel M.; Mulvihill, John J.; ); Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma City, OK (US))

    2000-09-01

    Little (1999) recently reviewed the evidence that paternal preconception irradiation in the Sellafield workforce (Parker et al 1999) and among Japanese atomic bomb survivors (Otake et al 1990) might be associated with an increased risk of stillbirth. He concluded that the association reported for radiation workers was statistically incompatible with the absence of an association seen among the exposed Japanese parents. These studies and analyses illustrate the considerable difficulty in assessing stillbirths conceived by men exposed to ionising radiation at work. For example, occupational doses may not be sufficiently large to result in a detectable effect and maternal factors that are associated with stillbirths and important to adjust for may not be available. These papers also bring to focus a relevant but not well-studied public health issue, namely, what are the reproductive risks for men and women exposed to potential mutagens? We wish to emphasise here the theoretical and practical advantages of addressing this issue in persons not with low dose occupational or acute atomic bomb exposures, but with higher dose medical experiences; in particular, in survivors of cancers of childhood, adolescents, and young adulthood (Blatt 1999, Bryne et al 1998, Sankila et al 1998, Green et al 1997, Hawkins and Stevens 1996). Letter-to-the-editor.

  10. Effects of X-ray irradiation on different stages of Sesamia nonagrioides Lefebvre (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and DNA damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avan Aksoy, Hatice; Yazıcı, Nizamettin; Erel, Yakup

    2017-01-01

    The corn stalk borer, Sesamia nonagrioides Lefebvre (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is an important corn pest in the Mediterranean countries. In this study, we investigated the influence of X-ray irradiation on different developmental stages, reproduction and DNA damage to the insect. Eggs (0-24 h old), larvae (5th instar), pupae (5 days after pupation) and adults (24 h after emergence) were irradiated with X-ray irradiation at target doses of 0 (control), 50, 100, 150 and 200 Gy. Eggs irradiated at all doses did not hatch. When 5th instar were irradiated pupation and adult emergence significantly decreased. Fecundity of adults from irradiated pupae was inhibited and no eggs were laid. Moreover, adult longevity decreased after irradiation compared to control. Larvae, pupae, and adults of S. nonagrioides were studied using the single-cell gel electrophoresis (DNA comet) directly after irradiation. X-ray irradiated larvae, pupae, and adults showed typical DNA fragmentation in a dose-dependent manner compared with cells from non-irradiated groups. The amount of DNA damage increased as doses increased and possibly could be used to estimate dose applied in commercial phytosanitary irradiation treatments. Furthermore, irradiation would be an effective phytosanitary treatment for shipped commodities at risk infestation with S. nonagrioides.

  11. Radionuclide production calculations: A GUI to determine irradiation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, S.; Riauka, T.; Jans, H.; Gagnon, K.

    2017-05-01

    There is a wide diversity of production methods for radionuclides. With these, intensive calculations are often required to characterize the different radionuclide production strategies and to determine optimal irradiation parameters. These calculations are essential for predicting the yield and radionuclidic purity of the resulting product. In this work, a graphical user interface (GUI) has been built in Matlab® to facilitate these production calculations and compare production methods. The user is able to import cross-sections, define target compositions and outline irradiation conditions for calculating yields. This GUI facilitates the process of varying irradiation parameters and allows the user to determine the yield of radionuclides as a function of energy and time.

  12. Irradiation pretreatment for coal desulfurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, G. C.

    1979-01-01

    Process using highly-penetrating nuclear radiation (Beta and Gamma radiation) from nuclear power plant radioactive waste to irradiate coal prior to conventional desulfurization procedures increases total extraction of sulfur.

  13. UV irradiance radiometers calibration procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Doctorovich I. V.; Butenko V. K.; Hodovaniouk V. N.; Fodchuk I. M.; Yuriev V. G.

    2008-01-01

    The paper deals with the problems arising at calibration of narrow-band spectral-sensitive radiometers. The procedure of irradiance unit transfer to UV radiometers — UV radiometers calibration procedure — is presented.

  14. URAM-2 Cryogenic Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Shabalin, E P; Kulikov, S A; Kulagin, E N; Melihov, V V; Belyakov, A A; Golovanov, L B; Borzunov, Yu T; Konstantinov, V I; Androsov, A V

    2002-01-01

    The URAM-2 irradiation facility has been built and mounted at the channel No. 3 of the IBR-2 reactor. It was constructed for study of radiolysis effects by fast neutron irradiation in some suitable for effective cold neutron production materials (namely: solid methane, methane hydrate, water ice, etc.). The facility cooling system is based on using liquid helium as a coolant material. The original charging block of the rig allows the samples to be loaded by condensing gas into irradiation cavity or by charging beads of ice prepared before. Preliminary tests for each facility block and assembling them at the working position were carried out. Use of the facility for study accumulation of chemical energy under irradiation at low temperature in materials mentioned above and its spontaneous release was started.

  15. Microstructure and microhardness of CLAM steel irradiated up to 20.8 dpa in STIP-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Lei, E-mail: penglei@ustc.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Ge, Hongen [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Dai, Yong [Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Huang, Qunying [Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Ye, Minyou [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Specimens of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel were irradiated in the fifth experiment of SINQ target irradiation program (STIP-V) up to 20.8 dpa/1564 appm He. Microhardness measurements and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations have been performed to investigate irradiation induced hardening effects. The results of CLAM steel specimens show similar trend in microhardness and microstructure changes with irradiation dose, compared to F82H/Optimax-A steels irradiated in STIP-I/II. Defects and helium bubbles were observed in all specimens, even at a very low dose of 5.4 dpa. For defects and bubbles, the mean size and number density increased with increasing irradiation dose to 13 dpa, and then the mean size increased and number density decreased with the increasing irradiation dose to 20.8 dpa.

  16. Microstructure and microhardness of CLAM steel irradiated up to 20.8 dpa in STIP-V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lei; Ge, Hongen; Dai, Yong; Huang, Qunying; Ye, Minyou

    2016-01-01

    Specimens of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel were irradiated in the fifth experiment of SINQ target irradiation program (STIP-V) up to 20.8 dpa/1564 appm He. Microhardness measurements and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations have been performed to investigate irradiation induced hardening effects. The results of CLAM steel specimens show similar trend in microhardness and microstructure changes with irradiation dose, compared to F82H/Optimax-A steels irradiated in STIP-I/II. Defects and helium bubbles were observed in all specimens, even at a very low dose of 5.4 dpa. For defects and bubbles, the mean size and number density increased with increasing irradiation dose to 13 dpa, and then the mean size increased and number density decreased with the increasing irradiation dose to 20.8 dpa.

  17. Development of irradiator {sup 60}Co sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosca, Rodrigo C.; Moura, Eduardo S.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Mathor, Monica B., E-mail: rcmosca@usp.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    According to a recent report by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) / WHO (2008-2010), the global impact of cancer more than doubled in 30 years. In this report, it was estimated that occurred about 12 million new cancer cases and 7 million deaths. In Brazil in 2010, with estimates for the year 2011, point to the occurrence of 489,270 new cases of cancer. Among the possibilities for cancer treatment, radiotherapy is one of the most important therapeutic and resources used to combat it. However, inherent complications of treatment can occur such as tiredness, loss of appetite, radiodermatitis and in more extreme cases late radionecrosis. In order to reproduce a point of radionecrosis in the vicinity of radiodermatitis to mimic these effects in animals, producing a model for assessment of tissue repair, we propose the setting up of an irradiator source of collimated {sup 60}Co. The development of was based on 11 sources of {sup 60}Co with 1 mm thickness that were inserted by inference in stainless steel 'gate-source' screw (patent pending) and later adjusted in a cross-shaped arrangement reinforced so that the beam radiation is directed to a target point, saving for other regions around this target point. The main use of this irradiator with sources of {sup 60}Co is just one cause radionecrosis point (target point) of approximately 5 mm{sup 2} with a surrounding and adjacent area of radiodermatitis around about 8 to 10 mm{sup 2} in laboratory animals for subsequent coating with epidermal-dermal matrix populated by a cell culture of human fibroblasts, keratinocytes and mesenchymal stem cells. With that said, its use will be valuable for evaluation of curative treatments against the bone and radionecrosis or palliative treatment rather than as it is currently assumed. (author)

  18. Metabolic and diffusional limitations of photosynthesis in fluctuating irradiance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Elias; Morales, Alejandro; Harbinson, Jeremy; Heuvelink, Ep; Prinzenberg, Aina E.; Marcelis, Leo F. M.

    2016-01-01

    A better understanding of the metabolic and diffusional limitations of photosynthesis in fluctuating irradiance can help identify targets for improving crop yields. We used different genotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana to characterise the importance of Rubisco activase (Rca), stomatal conductance (gs), non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence (NPQ) and sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) on photosynthesis in fluctuating irradiance. Leaf gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence were measured in leaves exposed to stepwise increases and decreases in irradiance. rwt43, which has a constitutively active Rubisco enzyme in different irradiance intensities (except in darkness), showed faster increases than the wildtype, Colombia-0, in photosynthesis rates after step increases in irradiance. rca-2, having decreased Rca concentration, showed lower rates of increase. In aba2-1, high gs increased the rate of change after stepwise irradiance increases, while in C24, low gs tended to decrease it. Differences in rates of change between Colombia-0 and plants with low levels of NPQ (npq1-2, npq4-1) or SPS (spsa1) were negligible. In Colombia-0, the regulation of Rubisco activation and of gs were therefore limiting for photosynthesis in fluctuating irradiance, while levels of NPQ or SPS were not. This suggests Rca and gs as targets for improvement of photosynthesis of plants in fluctuating irradiance. PMID:27502328

  19. Vaporization of perfluorocarbon droplets using optical irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric; Rui, Min; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Micron-sized liquid perfluorocarbon (PFC) droplets are currently being investigated as activatable agents for medical imaging and cancer therapy. After injection into the bloodstream, superheated PFC droplets can be vaporized to a gas phase for ultrasound imaging, or for cancer therapy via targeted drug delivery and vessel occlusion. Droplet vaporization has been previously demonstrated using acoustic methods. We propose using laser irradiation as a means to induce PFC droplet vaporization using a method we term optical droplet vaporization (ODV). In order to facilitate ODV of PFC droplets which have negligible absorption in the infrared spectrum, optical absorbing nanoparticles were incorporated into the droplet. In this study, micron-sized PFC droplets loaded with silica-coated lead sulfide (PbS) nanoparticles were evaluated using a 1064 nm laser and ultra-high frequency photoacoustic ultrasound (at 200 and 375 MHz). The photoacoustic response was proportional to nanoparticle loading and successful optical droplet vaporization of individual PFC droplets was confirmed using photoacoustic, acoustic, and optical measurements. A minimum laser fluence of 1.4 J/cm(2) was required to vaporize the droplets. The vaporization of PFC droplets via laser irradiation can lead to the activation of PFC agents in tissues previously not accessible using standard ultrasound-based techniques.

  20. Low doses of gamma-irradiation induce an early bystander effect in zebrafish cells which is sufficient to radioprotect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Sandrine; Malard, Véronique; Ravanat, Jean-Luc; Davin, Anne-Hélène; Armengaud, Jean; Foray, Nicolas; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle

    2014-01-01

    The term "bystander effect" is used to describe an effect in which cells that have not been exposed to radiation are affected by irradiated cells though various intracellular signaling mechanisms. In this study we analyzed the kinetics and mechanisms of bystander effect and radioadaptation in embryonic zebrafish cells (ZF4) exposed to chronic low dose of gamma rays. ZF4 cells were irradiated for 4 hours with total doses of gamma irradiation ranging from 0.01-0.1 Gy. In two experimental conditions, the transfer of irradiated cells or culture medium from irradiated cells results in the occurrence of DNA double strand breaks in non-irradiated cells (assessed by the number of γ-H2AX foci) that are repaired at 24 hours post-irradiation whatever the dose. At low total irradiation doses the bystander effect observed does not affect DNA repair mechanisms in targeted and bystander cells. An increase in global methylation of ZF4 cells was observed in irradiated cells and bystander cells compared to control cells. We observed that pre-irradiated cells which are then irradiated for a second time with the same doses contained significantly less γ-H2AX foci than in 24 h gamma-irradiated control cells. We also showed that bystander cells that have been in contact with the pre-irradiated cells and then irradiated alone present less γ-H2AX foci compared to the control cells. This radioadaptation effect is significantly more pronounced at the highest doses. To determine the factors involved in the early events of the bystander effect, we performed an extensive comparative proteomic study of the ZF4 secretomes upon irradiation. In the experimental conditions assayed here, we showed that the early events of bystander effect are probably not due to the secretion of specific proteins neither the oxidation of these secreted proteins. These results suggest that early bystander effect may be due probably to a combination of multiple factors.

  1. Food irradiation: Gamma processing facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunstadt, P. [MDS Nordion International, 447 March Road. Kanata, Ontario, K2K148 (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    The number of products being radiation processed is constantly increasing and today include such diverse items as medical disposable, fruits and vegetables, bulk spices, meats, sea foods and waste effluents. Not only do the products differ but also many products, even those within the same groupings, require different minimum and maximum radiation doses. These variations create many different requirements in the irradiator design. The design of Cobalt-60 radiation processing facilities is well established for a number of commercial applications. Installations in over 40 countries, with some in operation since the early 1960s, are testimony to the fact that irradiator design, manufacture, installation and operation is a well established technology. However, in order to design gamma irradiators for the preservation of foods one must recognize those parameters typical to the food irradiation process as well as those systems and methods already well established in the food industry. This paper discusses the basic design concepts for gamma food irradiators. They are most efficient when designed to handle a limited product density range at an established dose. Safety of Cobalt-60 transport, safe facility operation principles and the effect of various processing parameters on economics, will also be discussed. (Author)

  2. Proton irradiation for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Chiba, Shunya [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Tanaka, Naomi

    1999-02-01

    A curative effect of high dose proton irradiation for hepatoma was investigated. In cases of single nodular type HCC, radiation field was limited to tumor, and in cases of multi nodular type HCC, irradiation was also fractionated. An average dose of radiation was 4 Gy/time, average times were 16, and an average total dose was 72 Gy. Tumor size reduction rate at 6 months after proton irradiation (123 cases) was CR (17.9%), PR (52.0%), NC (29.3%) and PD (0.8%). And the reduction rate of tumor size in monotherapy cases was 100% (after 3 weeks), 96% (after 1 year) and 88% (after 2 years). The local control rate was 99.1% (after 1 year) and 91.4% (after 3-5 years). AFP value significantly decreased from 571.0{+-}1266.6 ng/ml before radiation to 145.4{+-}346.3 ng/ml after radiation (p<0.0005). The recurrence after radiation occurred more at outside of radiation field, significantly. Indication basis of proton irradiation was showed in this article. Because selective radiation is possible, the proton irradiation should be optimum therapy in specific carcinomas of deep organ. (K.H.)

  3. Elective ilioingunial lymph node irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, R.H.; Parsons, J.T.; Morgan, L.; Million, R.R.

    1984-06-01

    Most radiologists accept that modest doses of irradiation (4500-5000 rad/4 1/2-5 weeks) can control subclinical regional lymph node metastases from squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck and adenocarcinomas of the breast. There have been few reports concerning elective irradiation of the ilioinguinal region. Between October 1964 and March 1980, 91 patients whose primary cancers placed the ilioinguinal lymph nodes at risk received elective irradiation at the University of Florida. Included are patients with cancers of the vulva, penis, urethra, anus and lower anal canal, and cervix or vaginal cancers that involved the distal one-third of the vagina. In 81 patients, both inguinal areas were clinically negative; in 10 patients, one inguinal area was positive and the other negative by clinical examination. The single significant complication was a bilateral femoral neck fracture. The inguinal areas of four patients developed mild to moderate fibrosis. One patient with moderate fibrosis had bilateral mild leg edema that was questionably related to irradiation. Complications were dose-related. The advantages and dis-advantages of elective ilioinguinal node irradiation versus elective inguinal lymph node dissection or no elective treatment are discussed.

  4. Currently developing opportunities in food irradiation and modern irradiation facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanke, R. [Director Business Development. SteriGenics International Inc. 17901 East Warren Avenue No. 4, Detroit, Michigan 48224-1333 (United States)

    1997-12-31

    I. Factor currently influencing advancing opportunities for food irradiation include: heightened incidence and awareness of food borne illnesses and causes. Concerns about ensuring food safety in international as well as domestic trade. Regulatory actions regarding commonly used fumigants/pesticides e.g. Me Br. II. Modern irradiator design: the SteriGenics {sup M}ini Cell{sup .} A new design for new opportunities. Faster installation of facility. Operationally and space efficient. Provides local {sup o}nsite control{sup .} Red meat: a currently developing opportunity. (Author)

  5. Antiproton Target

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    Antiproton target used for the AA (antiproton accumulator). The first type of antiproton production target used from 1980 to 1982 comprised a rod of copper 3mm diameter and 120mm long embedded in a graphite cylinder that was itself pressed into a finned aluminium container. This assembly was air-cooled and it was used in conjunction with the Van der Meer magnetic horn. In 1983 Fermilab provided us with lithium lenses to replace the horn with a view to increasing the antiproton yield by about 30%. These lenses needed a much shorter target made of heavy metal - iridium was chosen for this purpose. The 50 mm iridium rod was housed in an extension to the original finned target container so that it could be brought very close to the entrance to the lithium lens. Picture 1 shows this target assembly and Picture 2 shows it mounted together with the lithium lens. These target containers had a short lifetime due to a combination of beam heating and radiation damage. This led to the design of the water-cooled target in...

  6. Acclimation to a dynamic irradiance regime changes excessive irradiance sensitivity of Emiliania huxleyi and Thalassiosira weissflogii

    OpenAIRE

    van De Poll, Willem H.; Visser, Ronald J. W.; Buma, Anita G. J.

    2007-01-01

    Effects of fluctuating irradiance regimes on excessive photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and ultraviolet (UV) radiation sensitivity were assessed for Emiliania huxleyi (Lohman) and Thalassiosira weissflogii (Grunow) Fryxell and Hasle. Cultures acclimated to low irradiance were subjected to two irradiance regimes of equal daily dose: dynamic irradiance simulating vertical mixing within the water column and constant irradiance. For each regime two irradiance levels were studied. Growth ...

  7. Gas Production in the MEGAPIE Spallation Target

    OpenAIRE

    Thiollière, Nicolas; Zanini, Luca; David, Jean-Christophe; Eikenberg, Jost; Guertin, Arnaud; Konobeyev, Alexander Yu.; Lemaire, Sébastien; Panebianco, Stefano

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The MEGAwatt PIlot Experiment (MEGAPIE) project was started in 2000 to design, build, and operate a liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) spallation neutron target at the power level of 1 MW. The target was irradiated for 4 months in 2006 at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland. Gas samples wereextracted in various phases of operation and analyzed by g spectroscopy, leading to the determination of the main radioactive isotopes released from the LBE. Comparison with ...

  8. Dynamic nuclear polarization in irradiated ammonia below 05K

    CERN Document Server

    Niinikoski, T O

    1979-01-01

    The authors have reached +90.5% and -93.6% dynamic proton polarisations in solid NH/sub 3/ using paramagnetic radicals created by proton irradiation of 40 Mrad total dose. The dynamic polarisation experiments were performed at 25 kG field in a dilution refrigerator. These results may indicate a breakthrough in the development of better polarised target materials for high-energy physics experiments. (7 refs).

  9. Directional irradiances and fractional clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagh Nielsen, Kristian; Andersen, Elsa; Dragsted, Janne; Furbo, Simon

    2017-04-01

    For large scale implementation of solar energy, better understanding of the directional and temporal variations in the solar resource is needed. This includes understanding the shading within a multiple row field of solar panels and how this affects the electricity or heat production. We have studied directional irradiances measured simultaneously from 16 downward directions at 1 minute temporal resolution. Also, we have performed measurements of the variations in the field of view across individual solar heating panels in the operational solar district heating plant in Hedehusene in Denmark. By combining a model of directional diffuse irradiances with the field of view variation across a solar panel in a solar panel field we can quantify the effect of shading of diffuse irradiances on the heat flow from the panel.

  10. Endodontics and the irradiated patient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, F.L.

    1976-11-01

    With increasingly larger numbers of irradiated patients in our population, it seems likely that all dentists will eventually be called upon to manage the difficult problems that these patients present. Of utmost concern should be the patient's home care program and the avoidance of osteroradionecrosis. Endodontics and periodontics are the primary areas for preventing or eliminating the infection that threatens osteoradionecrosis. Endodontic treatment must be accomplished with the utmost care and maximum regard for the fragility of the periapical tissues. Pulpally involved teeth should never be left open in an irradiated patient, and extreme care must be taken with the between-visits seal. If one is called upon for preradiation evaluation, routine removal of all molar as well as other compromised teeth should be considered. Attention should be directed to the literature for further advances in the management of irradiated patients.

  11. Liver irradiation causes distal bystander effects in the rat brain and affects animal behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Anna; Mychasiuk, Richelle; Muhammad, Arif; Hossain, Shakhawat; Ilnytskyy, Slava; Ghose, Abhijit; Kirkby, Charles; Ghasroddashti, Esmaeel; Kovalchuk, Olga; Kolb, Bryan

    2016-01-26

    Radiation therapy can not only produce effects on targeted organs, but can also influence shielded bystander organs, such as the brain in targeted liver irradiation. The brain is sensitive to radiation exposure, and irradiation causes significant neuro-cognitive deficits, including deficits in attention, concentration, memory, and executive and visuospatial functions. The mechanisms of their occurrence are not understood, although they may be related to the bystander effects.We analyzed the induction, mechanisms, and behavioural repercussions of bystander effects in the brain upon liver irradiation in a well-established rat model.Here, we show for the first time that bystander effects occur in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus regions upon liver irradiation, where they manifest as altered gene expression and somewhat increased levels of γH2AX. We also report that bystander effects in the brain are associated with neuroanatomical and behavioural changes, and are more pronounced in females than in males.

  12. Irradiation test of high density Si material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Man Soon; Choo, Kee Nam; Lee, Chul Yong; Yang, Seong Woo; Shim, Kyue Taek; Park, Sang Jun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The feasibility of irradiation test for the high-density Si material entrusted by Guju Inc. was reviewed. The high density Si material is used for a sealing of the penetration holes of piping at the nuclear power plants. The irradiation test was performed and the density changes between before and after irradiation test were measured. The irradiation tests were performed 2 times for 1 day and 20 days at IP 4 hole of HANARO. The 3 Si specimens irradiated were without flaws and the density changes after irradiation were successfully measured. The result satisfies the requirement of the design specification.

  13. Notes on irradiation of neodymium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woods, W.K.

    1966-06-07

    The fission product, promethium-147, would be much more desirable as a heat-producing radioisotope if it were not in such short supply. C.A. Rohrmann`s chart ``Characteristics of Radioisotopic Heat Sources`` lists the annual availability of Pm-147 as 5-5 kw, corresponding to about 17 kg. Hence, consideration has been given to irradiation of neodymium-146 in order to augment the supply of Pm-147, A method for separating Nd-146 from other neodymium isotopes does not exist today. This memorandum presents the results of a brief look at the irradiation of mixed neodymium isotopes which are available without isotopic separation.

  14. Significance of irradiation of blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Eisuke; Mochizuki, Sachio (Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1992-10-01

    Many reports of fatal GVHD occurring in non-immunocompromised patients after blood transfusion have been published in Japan. One explantation is that transfused lymphocytes were simulated and attack the recipient organs recognized as HLA incompatible. That is so called 'one-way matching'. To reduce the risk of post-transfusion GVHD, one of the most convenient methods is to irradiate the donated blood at an appropriate dose for inactivation of lymphocytes. Because no one knows about the late effect of irradiated blood, it is necessary to make the prospective safety control. (author).

  15. Broad-beam three-dimensional irradiation system for heavy-ion radiotherapy at HIMAC

    CERN Document Server

    Futami, Y; Fujita, M; Tomura, H; Higashi, A; Matsufuji, N; Miyahara, N; Endo, M; Kawachi, K

    1999-01-01

    A three-dimensional irradiation system using a broad beam has been installed for heavy-ion cancer therapy at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) facility. Only the target region is irradiated at the 100% dose level; the dose level at other parts of irradiated tissues is less, using a range shifter, a multileaf collimator and a compensator. The devices are the same as those used in two-dimensional irradiation, except that the setting values of the devices can be dynamically changed during the treatment. The thickness of the absorber and the aperture of the multileaf collimator are dynamically controlled during irradiation, so that the Bragg peak is swept in the depth direction and the Bragg peak outside of the target volume is blocked by the multileaf collimator. The performance of this system was checked by irradiation of a phantom using a 290 MeV/nucleon carbon beam. The dose distribution realized by this three-dimensional irradiation agreed satisfactorily with the planned one.

  16. Leptin induction following irradiation is a conserved feature in mammalian epithelial cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licursi, Valerio; Cestelli Guidi, Mariangela; Del Vecchio, Giorgia; Mannironi, Cecilia; Presutti, Carlo; Amendola, Roberto; Negri, Rodolfo

    2017-09-01

    Leptin (LEP) is a peptide hormone with multiple physiological functions. Besides its systemic actions, it has important peripheral roles such as a mitogen action on keratinocytes following skin lesions. We previously showed that LEP mRNA is significantly induced in response to neutron irradiation in mouse skin and that the protein increases in the irradiated epidermis and in the related subcutaneous adipose tissue. In this work, we investigated the post-transcriptional regulation of LEP by miRNAs and the conservation of LEP's role in radiation response in human cells. We used microarray analysis and real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to analyze modulation of miRNAs potentially targeting LEP in mouse skin following irradiation and bioinformatic analysis of transcriptome of irradiated human cell lines and cancer tissues from radiotherapy-treated patients to evaluate LEP expression. We show that a network of miRNAs potentially targeting LEP mRNA is modulated in irradiated mouse skin and that LEP itself is significantly modulated by irradiation in human epithelial cell lines and in breast cancer tissues from radiotherapy-treated patients. These results confirm and extend the previous evidence that LEP has a general and important role in the response of mammalian cells to irradiation.

  17. [Technique for postoperative irradiation of patients with breast cancer using electron and cobalt beams].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawska-Kaczyńska, M; Kukołowicz, P

    1990-01-01

    The method of chest wall and mammary lymph node irradiation using obliquely incident electron beams is presented. Dose distributions measured in Rando phantom and calculated by computer programme are discussed. The conditions for geting homogenous dose distribution within the target volume are given. The use of this technique is limited by the degree of curvature of the chest wall and depth of tumour volume where maximum obliquity occurs. In order to minimize the lung irradiation the use of compensating boluses is recommended.

  18. Whole breast and regional nodal irradiation in prone versus supine position in left sided breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Deseyne, Pieter; Speleers, Bruno; De Neve, Wilfried; Boute, Bert; PAELINCK, LEEN; Van Hoof, Tom; Van De Velde, Joris; VAN GREVELING, ANNICK; Monten, Chris; Post, Giselle; Depypere, Herman; Veldeman, Liv

    2017-01-01

    Background Prone whole breast irradiation (WBI) leads to reduced heart and lung doses in breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant radiotherapy. In this feasibility trial, we investigated the prone position for whole breast?+?lymph node irradiation (WB?+?LNI). Methods A new support device was developed for optimal target coverage, on which patients are positioned in a position resembling a phase from the crawl swimming technique (prone crawl position). Five left sided breast cancer patients w...

  19. Void formation in pure aluminium irradiated with high-energetic electron beams and gamma-quanta

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gan, V. V.; Ozhigou, L. S.; Yamnitsky, V. A.

    1983-01-01

    The spatial distribution of displaced atoms and helium atoms and also the spectra of damaging energies of primary displaced atoms in a thick aluminium target irradiated with electrons of 225 MeV energy were calculated. Pure aluminium (99.9999%) irradiated up to 0.04 dose was studied by electron-m......-microscopy. Voids of size 5 to 40 nm were obtained and their vacancy nature was estimated. The dislocation structure of the material was studied...

  20. Proton irradiated graphite grades for a long baseline neutrino facility experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Simos, N; Nocera, P.; Z. Zhong; Zwaska, R.; Mokhov, N.; Misek, J.; Ammigan, K.; Hurh, P.; Z. Kotsina

    2017-01-01

    In search of a low-Z pion production target for the Long Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF) of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) four graphite grades were irradiated with protons in the energy range of 140–180 MeV, to peak fluence of ∼6.1×10^{20}  p/cm^{2} and irradiation temperatures between 120–200 °C. The test array included POCO ZXF-5Q, Toyo-Tanso IG 430, Carbone-Lorraine 2020 and SGL R7650 grades of graphite. Irradiation was performed at the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Produce...

  1. Irradiation effects on c-axis lattice parameter in EuBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} irradiated with energetic ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Norito; Chimi, Yasuhiro; Iwase, Akihiro; Maeta, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Tsuru, Koji; Michikami, Osamu

    1997-03-01

    We report an irradiation effect on c-axis lattice parameter in EuBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y} oxide superconductors when irradiated with ions of energy ranging from 0.85 to 200 MeV. For the irradiation with low energy (0.85-2 MeV) ions, the defect production and the resultant c-axis lattice expansion were dominated by elastic collisions. On the other hand, for the irradiation with high energy (120-200 MeV) ions, the change in the c-axis lattice parameter was found to be much greater than that expected from the elastic displacement of target atoms. For high energy ion irradiation we could observe the excessive increase of c-axis lattice parameter reflecting additional production of defects which can be attributed to the electronic excitation. The large increase in c-axis lattice parameter due to high energy ion irradiation should be taken into account for the study on the interaction between vortices and irradiation-induced defects. (author)

  2. New Irradiation Method with Indocyanine Green-Loaded Nanospheres for Inactivating Periodontal Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Sasaki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT has been proposed as an adjunctive strategy for periodontitis treatments. However, use of aPDT for periodontal treatment is complicated by the difficulty in accessing morphologically complex lesions such as furcation involvement, which the irradiation beam (which is targeted parallel to the tooth axis into the periodontal pocket cannot access directly. The aim of this study was to validate a modified aPDT method that photosensitizes indocyanine green-loaded nanospheres through the gingivae from outside the pocket using a diode laser. To establish this trans-gingival irradiation method, we built an in vitro aPDT model using a substitution for gingivae. Irradiation conditions and the cooling method were optimized before the bactericidal effects on Porphyromonas gingivalis were investigated. The permeable energy through the gingival model at irradiation conditions of 2 W output power in a 50% duty cycle was comparable with the transmitted energy of conventional irradiation. Intermittent irradiation with air cooling limited the temperature increase in the gingival model to 2.75 °C. The aPDT group showed significant bactericidal effects, with reductions in colony-forming units of 99.99% after 5 min of irradiation. This effect of aPDT against a periodontal pathogen demonstrates the validity of trans-gingival irradiation for periodontal treatment.

  3. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Morgan, Dane; Jiao, Zhijie; Almer, Jonathan; Brown, Donald

    2016-04-01

    These proceedings contain the papers presented at two symposia, the Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) and Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation, held in the TMS 2015, 144th Annual Meeting & Exhibition at Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida, USA on March 15-19, 2015.

  4. Progress in food irradiation: Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, J.F.

    1982-11-01

    The report by the FRG deals with irradiation of foodstuffs, such as potatoes, onions, fish and meats, with gamma and X-rays and with radiochemical changes. Radioresistence is tested for in Salmonella. Wholesomeness studies and mutagenicity tests were carried out showing high losses in vitamins whereas long-lived, free radicals could be measured obtaining to dried material only.

  5. Inhomogeneous microstructural growth by irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishan, K.; Singh, Bachu Narain; Leffers, Torben

    1985-01-01

    In the present paper we discuss the development of heterogeneous microstructure for uniform irradiation conditions. It is shown that microstructural inhomogeneities on a scale of 0.1 μm can develop purely from kinematic considerations because of the basic structure of the rate equations used...

  6. Solar Spectral Irradiance and Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilewskie, P.; Woods, T.; Cahalan, R.

    2012-01-01

    Spectrally resolved solar irradiance is recognized as being increasingly important to improving our understanding of the manner in which the Sun influences climate. There is strong empirical evidence linking total solar irradiance to surface temperature trends - even though the Sun has likely made only a small contribution to the last half-century's global temperature anomaly - but the amplitudes cannot be explained by direct solar heating alone. The wavelength and height dependence of solar radiation deposition, for example, ozone absorption in the stratosphere, absorption in the ocean mixed layer, and water vapor absorption in the lower troposphere, contribute to the "top-down" and "bottom-up" mechanisms that have been proposed as possible amplifiers of the solar signal. New observations and models of solar spectral irradiance are needed to study these processes and to quantify their impacts on climate. Some of the most recent observations of solar spectral variability from the mid-ultraviolet to the near-infrared have revealed some unexpected behavior that was not anticipated prior to their measurement, based on an understanding from model reconstructions. The atmospheric response to the observed spectral variability, as quantified in climate model simulations, have revealed similarly surprising and in some cases, conflicting results. This talk will provide an overview on the state of our understanding of the spectrally resolved solar irradiance, its variability over many time scales, potential climate impacts, and finally, a discussion on what is required for improving our understanding of Sun-climate connections, including a look forward to future observations.

  7. Status of irradiation technology development in JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inaba, Y.; Inoue, S.; Izumo, H.; Kitagishi, S.; Tsuchiya, K.; Saito, T.; Ishitsuka, E. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Ibaraki (Japan)

    2008-11-15

    Irradiation Engineering Section of the Neutron Irradiation and Testing Reactor Centre was organised to development the new irradiation technology for the application at JMTR re-operation. The new irradiation engineering building was remoulded from the old RI development building, and was started to use from the end of September, 2008. Advanced in-situ instrumentation technology(high temperature multi-paired thermocouple, ceramic sensor,application of optical measurement), {sup 99}Mo production technology by new Mo solution irradiation method,recycling technology on used beryllium reflector, and so on are planned as the development of new irradiation technologies. The development will be also important for the education and training programs through the development of young generation in not only Japan but also Asian countries. In this report, as the status of the development the new irradiation technology, new irradiation engineering building, high temperature multi-paired thermocouple, experiences of optical measurement, recycling technology on used beryllium reflector are introduced.

  8. Status of Irradiation technology development in JMTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inaba, Y.; Inoue, S.; Izumo, H.; Kitagishi, S.; Tsuchiya, K.; Saito, T.; Ishitsuka, E. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki Ken (Japan)

    2008-11-15

    Irradiation Engineering Section of the Neutron Irradiation and Testing Reactor Center was organized to development the new irradiation technology for the application at JMTR re operation. The new irradiation engineering building was remodeled from the old RI development building, and was started to use from the end of September, 2008. Advanced in situ instrumentation technology (high temperature multi paired thermocouple, ceramic sensor, application of optical measurement), {sup 99M}o production technology by new Mo solution irradiation method, recycling technology on used beryllium reflector, and so on are planned as the development of new irradiation technologies. The development will be also important for the education and training programs through the development of young generation in not only Japan but also Asian counties. In this report, as the status of the development the new irradiation technology, new irradiation engineering building, high temperature multi paired thermocouple, experiences of optical measurement, recycling technology on used beryllium reflector are introduced.

  9. Comparison of Dried Plum Puree, Rosemary Extract, and BHA/BHT as Antioxidants in Irradiated Ground Beef Patties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia Movileanu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fresh ground beef patties with (1 no antioxidant (control, (2 0.02% butylated hydroxyanisole/butylated hydroxytoluene (BHA/BHT, (3 3% dried plum puree, or (4 0.25% rosemary extract were aerobically packaged, irradiated at target doses of 0, 1.5, or 2.0 kGy (1.7 and 2.3 kGy actual doses, and stored at C. The samples were evaluated for lipid oxidation on 0, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days of storage after irradiation. When compared to the control, all antioxidant treatments were effective in retarding ( irradiation-induced lipid oxidation during storage as determined by 2-thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARs values. Rosemary extracts had the same antioxidant effect ( as BHA/BHT in irradiated and nonirradiated beef patties, followed by the dried plum puree treatment. Irradiation increased TBARs values, but no differences were noted in oxidation between irradiation dose levels.

  10. Ultrasonic Transducer Irradiation Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daw, Joshua [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Palmer, Joe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Keller, Paul [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Montgomery, Robert [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chien, Hual-Te [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kohse, Gordon [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Tittmann, Bernhard [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Reinhardt, Brian [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rempe, Joy [Rempe and Associates, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high-accuracy and -resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other ongoing efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of identified ultrasonic transducer materials capable of long term performance under irradiation test conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an ATR NSUF project to evaluate the performance of promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2. The goal of this research is to characterize and demonstrate magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer operation during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation-tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test is an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data is collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers. To date, one piezoelectric

  11. Neutron irradiation effects on plasma facing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabash, V.; Federici, G.; Rödig, M.; Snead, L. L.; Wu, C. H.

    2000-12-01

    This paper reviews the effects of neutron irradiation on thermal and mechanical properties and bulk tritium retention of armour materials (beryllium, tungsten and carbon). For each material, the main properties affected by neutron irradiation are described and the specific tests of neutron irradiated armour materials under thermal shock and disruption conditions are summarized. Based on current knowledge, the expected thermal and structural performance of neutron irradiated armour materials in the ITER plasma facing components are analysed.

  12. Targeted Learning

    CERN Document Server

    van der Laan, Mark J

    2011-01-01

    The statistics profession is at a unique point in history. The need for valid statistical tools is greater than ever; data sets are massive, often measuring hundreds of thousands of measurements for a single subject. The field is ready to move towards clear objective benchmarks under which tools can be evaluated. Targeted learning allows (1) the full generalization and utilization of cross-validation as an estimator selection tool so that the subjective choices made by humans are now made by the machine, and (2) targeting the fitting of the probability distribution of the data toward the targe

  13. Food irradiation for phytosanitary and quarantine treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irradiation at doses less than 1 kGy is an effective phytosanitary measure with minimal adverse effects on the quality of most fresh produce. There are internationally recognized guidelines for the use of irradiation as a phytosanitary measure and for the conduct of trade in irradiated fresh produce...

  14. Enhancing utilization of cowpeas through gamma irradiation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several techniques including the use of gamma irradiation are available to Food Scientists in this respect. Gamma irradiation has the potential to modify the functional properties of cowpeas mainly through its effects on inherent protein and starch components. The effects of γ-irradiation on the functional properties of cowpea ...

  15. Irradiation-induced hardening and softening of CLAM steel under Fe ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingshan; Shen, Yinzhong; Huang, Xi; Xu, Zhiqiang; Zhu, Jun

    2017-11-01

    The irradiation-induced hardening and softening of CLAM steel irradiated with 3.5 MeV Fe13+ ions at temperatures of 300 °C and 550 °C were investigated by nanoindentation tests in combination with microstructures. Irradiation- induced hardening occurred in the steel irradiated at 300 °C to doses of 0.46 dpa, 0.94 dpa, and 2.79 dpa. The hardening occurred at 300 °C is mainly attributed to the formation of irradiation-produced dislocation loops and a network of tangled dislocations in the irradiated steel samples. Significant hardening was found in the steel irradiated at 550 °C to 0.38 dpa. On the contrary, irradiation-induced softening occurred in the steel irradiated at 550 °C to both 0.76 dpa and 2.75 dpa. Irradiation-produced dislocation loops are not dominant effect on the irradiation hardening of the steel samples irradiated at 550 °C. The hardening and softening of the irradiated steel were explained in terms of the irradiation-produced defects and recovery process occurred during the irradiation.

  16. Development of data base on food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Hitoshi; Kume, Tamikazu; Hashimoto, Shoji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Izumi, Fumio

    1995-12-01

    For the exact understanding on food irradiation in Japan, it is important to provide information of food irradiation to consumers, industries and government offices. However, many of information on food irradiation are only restricted in a few experts or institutes relating to this field. For this reason, data base of food irradiation has been completed together with the systems necessary for input the data using computer. In this data base, about 630 data with full reports were inputted in computer in the field of wholesomeness studies, irradiation effects on food, radiation engineering, detection methods of irradiated food and Q and A of food irradiation for easy understanding. Many of these data are inputted by Japanese language. Some English reports on wholesomeness studies are also included which were mainly obtained from international projects of food irradiation. Many of data on food irradiation are responsible in the fields of food science, dietetics, microbiology, radiation biology, molecular biology, medical science, agricultural science, radiation chemistry, radiation engineering and so on. Data base of food irradiation contains many useful data which can apply to many other fields of radiation processing not only on food irradiation but also on sterilization of medical equipments, upgrading of agricultural wastes and others. (author).

  17. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Early Vascular Response in Prostate Tumors Irradiated with Carbon Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Palmowski

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Individualized treatments with combination of radiotherapy and targeted drugs require knowledge about the behavior of molecular targets after irradiation. Angiogenic marker expression has been studied after conventional radiotherapy, but little is known about marker response to charged particles. For the very first time, we used molecular ultrasound imaging to intraindividually track changes in angiogenic marker expression after carbon ion irradiation in experimental tumors. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and of αvβ3-integrin in subcutaneous AT-1 prostate cancers in rats treated with carbon ions (16 Gy was studied using molecular ultrasound and immunohistochemistry. For this purpose, cyanoacrylate microbubbles were synthesized and linked to specific ligands. The accumulation of targeted microbubbles in tumors was quantified before and 36 hours after irradiation. In addition, tumor vascularization was analyzed using volumetric Doppler ultrasound. In tumors, the accumulation of targeted microbubbles was significantly higher than in nonspecific ones and could be inhibited competitively. Before irradiation, no difference in binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific or ICAM-1-specific microbubbles was observed in treated and untreated animals. After irradiation, however, treated animals showed a significantly higher binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific microbubbles and an enhanced binding of ICAM-1-specific microbubbles than untreated controls. In both groups, a decrease in vascularization occurred during tumor growth, but no significant difference was observed between irradiated and nonirradiated tumors. In conclusion, carbon ion irradiation upregulates ICAM-1 and αvβ3-integrin expression in tumor neovasculature. Molecular ultrasound can indicate the regulation of these markers and thus may help to identify the optimal drugs and time points in individualized therapy regimens.

  18. Food irradiation development in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, I.

    The large scale trials were held to extend the storage life of potatoes, onions and dry fruits by gamma radiation. It was concluded that radiation preservation of potatoes and onions was much cheaper as compared to conventional methods. A dose of 1 kGy can control the insects in dry fruits and nuts. The consumers' acceptability and market testing performed during the last four years are also conducive to the commercialization of the technology in this country. The Government of Pakistan has accorded clearance for the irradiation of some food items like potatoes, onions, garlic and spices for human consumption. The Pakistan Radiation Services (PARAS), the commercial irradiator (200 Kci) at Lahore, has already started functioning in April, 1987. It is planned to start large scale sterilization of spices by gamma radiation in PARAS shortly.

  19. [The intraoperative irradiation of tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyrianov, B N; Chakhlov, V L; Khodkevich, B S; Anisenia, I I

    1992-01-01

    Intraoperative irradiation of tumor was performed in 40 patients with cancer of the lung, stomach, breast, bone and soft tissues. It included irradiation of the bed of tumor removed. Fast electron beam was produced by a small betatron (collimator size--5 x 6 cm and 8 x 12 cm) installed in the operating room. Radiation was given to a single or to multiple fields in a single dose of 10-20 Gy to each field. Location of the radioactive source in the operating room proved technically, economically and medically advantageous since it was cheaper, assured a shorter period of the treatment and delivered from patient transportation to a radiotherapy department and ensuing complications. The procedure did not interfere with postoperative period. The efficacy of the treatment modality will be evaluated as soon as sufficient end results have been obtained.

  20. Spectrophotometric analysis of irradiated spices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josimovic, L.; Cudina, I.

    1987-01-01

    Seven different spices (thyme, cinnamon, coriander, caraway, pimento, paprika, black pepper) were treated by gamma radiation at an absorbed dose of 10 kGy, and the effect on chemical quality was determined. The effects of this dose were assessed by spectrophotometric analysis of some water-soluble constituents of spices (carbohydrates; carbonyl compounds) and on the content of water-insoluble steam-volatile oils. The colour of paprika and the content of piperine in pepper held in different packaging materials were measured in unirradiated and irradiated samples as a function of storage time. In all cases irradiation does not bring about any distinct qualitative or quantitative chemical changes based on spectrophotometric analysis of spice extracts.

  1. Study of rice. gamma. -irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lien, J.J.; Chau, R.S.; Chen, S.C.; Chu, S.L.; Fu, Y.K.; Fang, C.K.; Fu, Y.H.

    1981-03-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to investigate whether the /sup 60/Co gamma-irradiated milled rice packed in economic and practical sealed bags could be preserved in common granaries in Taiwan for more than one year rather than slightly over one month without quality deterioration. As a result of this experiment we found that during the preservation of over a period of 18 months, the contents, such as moisture, ash, protein and fiber, of Tainan-5 Bon-Lai (Japonica Type) rice irradiated with 20 and 40 krad doses were quite stable, whereas reducing sugar showed slight fluctuations but did not vary significantly either. The fat, vitamin B/sub 1/ and niacin contents were found being reduced, while the increase in fatty acid content was an inevitable phenomenon along with the proceeding of the preservation.

  2. Quantitative evaluation of changes in irradiated lung fields after stereotactic irradiation by the Polygon Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yuji; Shiomi, Hiroya; Sumida, Iori; Suzuki, Osamu; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Oh, Ryoong-Jin; Tanaka, Eiichi; Inoue, Takehiro; Nakamura, Hironobu

    2004-01-01

    To evaluate areas of change in lung after thoracic stereotactic irradiation (STI). We developed a method of evaluation named the Polygon Method, to measure the irradiated lung fields of 12 lung tumors treated by STI. Before treatment, each targeted field was divided into several circular zones of 2 cm in width centered at the tumor on high resolution computed tomography, and the areas of each zone before and after treatment were compared. Six months after treatment, the areas of the zone within 2 cm from the tumor decreased, and the mean ratio of areas after and before STI was 0.849 (range, 0.515 to 1.052, p=0.0254). By contrast, the areas of zones located at 4 to 6, 6 to 8, 8 to 10, and more than 10 cm from the tumor tended to increase, with mean ratios of 1.059, 1.058, 1.089 (p=0.0374), and 1.084, respectively. After thoracic STI, volume loss in the lung is limited to the field in close proximity to the tumor, while compensatory expansion of the lung occurs in fields distant from the tumor.

  3. Future Satellite Observations of Solar Irradiance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalan, R. F.; Rottman, G.; Woods, T.; Lawrence, G.; Harder, J.; McClintock, W.; Kopp, G.

    2003-01-01

    Required solar irradiance measurements for climate studies include those now being made by the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM) and the Spectral Irradiance Monitor (SIM) onboard the SORCE satellite, part of the Earth Observing System fleet of NASA satellites. Equivalent or better measures of Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and Spectral Solar Irradiance (SSI, 200 to 2000 nm) are planned for the post-2010 satellites of the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System ("OESS). The design life of SORCE is 5 years, so a "Solar Irradiance Gap Filler" EOS mission is being planned for launch in the 2007 time frame, to include the same TSI and SSI measurements. Besides avoiding any gap, overlap of the data sources is also necessary for determination of possible multi-decadal trends in solar irradiance. We discuss these requirements and the impacts of data gaps, and data overlaps, that may occur in the monitoring of the critical solar radiative forcing.

  4. Tensile properties in zircaloy-II after 590 MeV proton irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Y. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Victoria, M. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    In order to investigate radiation potential damage effects on the SINQ Zircaloy-rod target, four Zircaloy-II tensile specimens were irradiated at the PIREX facility in 1995 to a proton fluence about 3x10{sup 20} p/cm{sup 2}, which produced a radiation damage of about 1.35 displacements per atom (dpa). Tensile test results show that, although there is some reduction in tensile elongation, substantial ductility still exists after such irradiation dose which corresponds to the peak value obtained in the SINQ target for 23 days operation at 1 mA. (author) 1 fig., 2 refs.

  5. Innovative real-time and non-destructive method of beam profile measurement under large beam current irradiation for BNCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, M.; Kamada, S.; Suda, M.; Fujii, R.; Nakamura, M.; Hoshi, M.; Sato, H.; Endo, S.; Hamano, T.; Arai, S.; Higashimata, A.

    2012-10-01

    We developed a real-time and non-destructive method of beam profile measurement on a target under large beam current irradiation, and without any complex radiation detectors or electrical circuits. We measured the beam profiles on a target by observing the target temperature using an infrared-radiation thermometer camera. The target temperatures were increased and decreased quickly by starting and stopping the beam irradiation within 1 s in response speed. Our method could trace beam movements rapidly. The beam size and position were calibrated by measuring O-ring heat on the target. Our method has the potential to measure beam profiles at beam current over 1 mA for proton and deuteron with the energy around 3 MeV and allows accelerator operators to adjust the beam location during beam irradiation experiments without decreasing the beam current.

  6. Innovative real-time and non-destructive method of beam profile measurement under large beam current irradiation for BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, M., E-mail: m_takada@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kamada, S.; Suda, M. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Fujii, R.; Nakamura, M. [Cancer Intelligence Care Systems, Inc., 3-5-7 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0063 (Japan); Hoshi, M. [Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Sato, H. [Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, 4669-2, Ami Ami-Cho, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Endo, S. [Quantum Energy Applications, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Hamano, T. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Arai, S.; Higashimata, A. [Sanki Industry Co., 318-6, Sannoh, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-0002 (Japan)

    2012-10-11

    We developed a real-time and non-destructive method of beam profile measurement on a target under large beam current irradiation, and without any complex radiation detectors or electrical circuits. We measured the beam profiles on a target by observing the target temperature using an infrared-radiation thermometer camera. The target temperatures were increased and decreased quickly by starting and stopping the beam irradiation within 1 s in response speed. Our method could trace beam movements rapidly. The beam size and position were calibrated by measuring O-ring heat on the target. Our method has the potential to measure beam profiles at beam current over 1 mA for proton and deuteron with the energy around 3 MeV and allows accelerator operators to adjust the beam location during beam irradiation experiments without decreasing the beam current.

  7. Microstructural processes in irradiated materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Morgan, Dane; Jiao, Zhijie; Almer, Jonathan; Brown, Donald

    2016-04-01

    This is an editorial article (preface) for the publication of symposium papers in the Journal of Nuclear materials: These proceedings contain the papers presented at two symposia, the Microstructural Processes in Irradiated Materials (MPIM) and Characterization of Nuclear Reactor Materials and Components with Neutron and Synchrotron Radiation, held in the TMS 2015, 144th Annual Meeting & Exhibition at Walt Disney World, Orlando, Florida, USA on March 15–19, 2015.

  8. Spectroscopic analysis of irradiated erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selim, Nabila S. [Biophysics Lab, Radiation Physics Department, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology (NCRRT), AEA, P.O. Box 29, Madinat Nasr, Cairo (Egypt); Desouky, Omar S., E-mail: omardesouky@yahoo.com [Biophysics Lab, Radiation Physics Department, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology (NCRRT), AEA, P.O. Box 29, Madinat Nasr, Cairo (Egypt); Ismail, Nagla M.; Dakrory, Amira Z. [Physics Department, Faculty of Girls for Arts, Sciences and Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-12-15

    The aim of the present work is to study the effect of gamma radiation on the lipid part of the erythrocyte membrane, and to test the efficiency of lipoic acid as a radioprotector. This effect was evaluated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The results showed an increase in the number of spin density by 14%, 22% and 65% after exposure to 25, 50 and 100 Gy respectively; whereas there was a decline in the obtained density after incubation with lipoic acid by a factor of approximately 32%. The FT-IR spectra of the irradiated erythrocytes samples showed a marked decrease in the intensity of all characteristic peaks, which increased as the irradiation dose increased. The second-derivative of these spectra, allow the conformationally sensitive membrane acyl chain methylene stretching modes to be separated from the protein (mostly hemoglobin) vibrations that dominate the spectra of intact cells. The 2850 cm{sup -1} band showed changes in the band shape and position after exposure to 50 and 100 Gy. Therefore it can be concluded that the band at 2850 cm{sup -1} only is useful in monitoring the radiation effect of the lipids cell membrane intact cells. - Highlights: > Effect of {gamma} radiation on erythrocyte membrane was studied using EPR and FT-IR. > Efficiency of {alpha}-lipoic acid as radioprotector was tested. > Lipoic acid diminished the free radicals number after gamma irradiation by 32%. > FT-IR spectra of the irradiated erythrocyte showed a decrease in their intensity. > Lipoic acid enhances the membrane to resist the action of gamma radiation.

  9. Food Preservation by Irradiation (Rev.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urrows, Grace M.

    1968-01-01

    Up to 30% of food harvests are lost in some parts of the world because of animal pests and microorganisms. Nuclear techniques can help reduce and extend the shelf life of these foods. Around 55 countries now have food irradiation programs. The use of radiation is the most recent step in man's attempts to preserve some of his harvest for the lean part of the year.

  10. Implant therapy in irradiated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammartino, Gilberto; Marenzi, Gaetano; Cioffi, Iacopo; Teté, Stefano; Mortellaro, Carmen

    2011-03-01

    In this multicenter study, submerged implants were prospectively followed to evaluate their long-term prognosis in irradiated patients. In a total of 77 patients treated for oral or neck cancer, 188 implants were consecutively placed. After a healing period, the successfully integrated implants were restored with 69 removable and 38 fixed restorations. The implants cumulative survival and success rates were evaluated over a period of at least 36 months. In addition, cumulative success rates were calculated for implant subgroups divided per implant site (mandible or maxilla), radiation dosage, and the time interval between the last irradiation and implant placement. During the healing period, 20 implants did not successfully integrate, whereas 168 implants were classified as success (including both survival and success rates). The analysis of implant subgroups showed slightly more favorable cumulative success rate for mandibular implants (98.4%) compared with maxillary implants (57.1%) and clearly better success rate for a radiation dosage minor of 50-Gy doses. A time greater than 12 months as interval between last irradiation and implant placement seems not to promote better clinical results.

  11. Structured targets for advanced laser-driven sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedeli, L.; Formenti, A.; Cialfi, L.; Sgattoni, A.; Cantono, G.; Passoni, M.

    2018-01-01

    Structured targets offer great control over ultra-intense laser-plasma interaction, allowing the optimization of laser-target coupling for specific applications. By means of particle-in-cell simulations we investigated three applications in particular: high-order harmonic generation (HHG) with grating targets, enhanced target coupling with multilayer targets and the generation of intense laser-driven terahertz (THz) pulses with structured targets. The irradiation of a solid grating target at the resonance angle for surface plasmon excitation enhances the HHG with respect to flat targets. Multilayer targets consisting of solid foils coated with a very low-density near-critical layer lead to a strong laser absorption and hot electron production that can improve laser-driven ion acceleration. We also explored the generation of THz radiation showing how using either gratings or multilayer targets the emission can be strongly enhanced with respect to simple flat targets.

  12. Gold Nanoparticles and Microwave Irradiation Inhibit Beta-Amyloid Amyloidogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastus Neus

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Peptide-Gold nanoparticles selectively attached to β-amyloid protein (Aβ amyloidogenic aggregates were irradiated with microwave. This treatment produces dramatic effects on the Aβ aggregates, inhibiting both the amyloidogenesis and the restoration of the amyloidogenic potential. This novel approach offers a new strategy to inhibit, locally and remotely, the amyloidogenic process, which could have application in Alzheimer’s disease therapy. We have studied the irradiation effect on the amyloidogenic process in the presence of conjugates peptide-nanoparticle by transmission electronic microscopy observations and by Thioflavine T assays to quantify the amount of fibrils in suspension. The amyloidogenic aggregates rather than the amyloid fibrils seem to be better targets for the treatment of the disease. Our results could contribute to the development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit the amyloidogenic process in Alzheimer’s disease.

  13. Irradiation effect of different heavy ions and track section on the silkworm Bombyx mori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu Zhenli E-mail: tu514@yahoo.co.jp; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Kiguchi, Kenji; Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2003-05-01

    In order to compare the irradiation effects of different ions, wandering larvae were whole-body exposed or locally irradiated with 50-MeV {sup 4}He{sup 2+}, 220-MeV {sup 12}C{sup 5+}, and 350-MeV {sup 20}Ne{sup 8+} ions, respectively. For the whole-body-exposed individuals, the survival rates at the cocooning, pupation, and emergence stages all decreased as dose increased, and a range-dependent difference was clearly observed. For local irradiation of ovaries, irradiation effects depend very strongly on the projectile range. In the case of local irradiation of dermal cells by different track sections of heavy ions, the closer the target was to the high-LET section of the track, the more pronounced were the radiation effects. These results indicated that by selectively using ion species and adjusting the irradiation depth to the target, heavy-ion radiosurgery on particular tissues or organs of small experimental animals can be performed more accurately.

  14. Scrotal Irradiation in Primary Testicular Lymphoma: Review of the Literature and In Silico Planning Comparative Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brouwer, Charlotte L., E-mail: c.l.brouwer@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Wiesendanger, Esther M.; Hulst, Peter C. van der [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Imhoff, Gustaaf W. van [Department of Hematology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A.; Beijert, Max [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2013-02-01

    We examined adjuvant irradiation of the scrotum in primary testicular lymphoma (PTL) by means of a literature review in MEDLINE, a telephone survey among Dutch institutes, and an in silico planning comparative study on scrotal irradiation in PTL. We did not find any uniform adjuvant irradiation technique assuring a safe planning target volume (PTV) coverage in published reports, and the definition of the clinical target volume is unclear. Histopathologic studies of PTL show a high invasion rate of the tunica albuginea, the epididymis, and the spermatic cord. In retrospective studies, a prescribed dose of at least 30 Gy involving the scrotum is associated with best survival. The majority of Dutch institutes irradiate the whole scrotum without using a planning computed tomography scan, with a single electron beam and a total dose of 30 Gy. The in silico planning comparative study showed that all evaluated approaches met a D{sub 95%} scrotal dose of at least 85% of the prescription dose, without exceeding the dose limits of critical organs. Photon irradiation with 2 oblique beams using wedges resulted in the best PTV coverage, with a mean value of 95% of the prescribed dose, with lowest maximum dose. Adjuvant photon or electron irradiation of the whole scrotum including the contralateral testicle with a minimum dose of 30 Gy is recommended in PTL. Computed tomography-based radiation therapy treatment planning with proper patient positioning and position verification guarantees optimal dose coverage.

  15. Irradiation effects on austenitic stainless steels for structural materials of IFMIF components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jitsukawa, S.; Suzuki, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Zinkle, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Div., AK TN (United States); Hirose, T. [Blanket Engineering Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Austenitic stainless steel, such as 316 stainless steel is one of the candidate structural materials for the target component and test modules of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility IFMIF, as well as that for ITER shield blanket. Anticipated displacement damage levels for the ITER shield blanket are as large as 3 displacements per atom (dpa), while those for the IFMIF target components and test modules will attain a high damage level of 50 dpa or even higher, depending on the service period. The anticipated operating temperature of the components is lower than 400 deg. C; therefore irradiation will cause hardening and reduction of elongation, as well as degradation of fracture toughness. This paper reviews the degradation of mechanical properties of austenitic stainless steels introduced by irradiation to some tens of dpa level; degradation of fatigue properties, fracture toughness and ductility, as well as irradiation induced creep. Additional data, especially those at temperatures lower than 300 deg. C, are also introduced. The results have been obtained during the collaborative irradiation experiment between JAEA and US-DOE using HFIR. Irradiation causes degradation in mechanical properties of the austenitic stainless steels. However, residual ductility and fracture toughness still seem to be large enough for the application as structural materials. This, however, does not assure that the current design criterion is applicable for the component engineering. A dedicated effort to develop engineering design criteria also needs to be accomplished. (authors)

  16. Neutronic Characterization of the Megapie Target

    CERN Document Server

    Panebianco, Stefano; Bokov, Pavel; Chabod, Sebastien; Chartier, Frederic; Dupont, Emmeric; Dore, Diane; Ledoux, Xavier; Letourneau, Alain; Oriol, Ludovic; Prevost, Aurelien; Ridikas, Danas; Toussaint, Jean-Christian

    2007-01-01

    The MEGAPIE project is one of the key experiments towards the feasibility of Accelerator Driven Systems. On-line operation and post-irradiation analysis will provide the scientific community with unique data on the behavior of a liquid spallation target under realistic irradiation conditions. A good neutronics performance of such a target is of primary importance towards an intense neutron source, where an extended liquid metal loop requires some dedicated verifications related to the delayed neutron activity of the irradiated PbBi. In this paper we report on the experimental characterization of the MEGAPIE neutronics in terms of the prompt neutron (PN) flux inside the target and the delayed neutron (DN) flux on the top of it. For the PN measurements, a complex detector, made of 8 microscopic fission chambers, has been built and installed in the central part of the target to measure the absolute neutron flux and its spatial distribution. Moreover, integral information on the neutron energy distribution as a f...

  17. Levels of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone in ground beef patties irradiated by low-energy X-ray and gamma rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijaz, Faraj M; Smith, J Scott

    2010-01-01

    Food irradiation improves food safety and maintains food quality by controlling microorganisms and extending shelf life. However, acceptance and commercial adoption of food irradiation is still low. Consumer groups such as Public Citizen and the Food and Water Watch have opposed irradiation because of the formation of 2-alkylcyclobutanones (2-ACBs) in irradiated, lipid-containing foods. The objectives of this study were to measure and to compare the level of 2-dodecylcyclobutanone (2-DCB) in ground beef irradiated by low-energy X-rays and gamma rays. Beef patties were irradiated by low-energy X-rays and gamma rays (Cs-137) at 3 targeted absorbed doses of 1.5, 3.0, and 5.0 kGy. The samples were extracted with n-hexane using a Soxhlet apparatus, and the 2-DCB concentration was determined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The 2-DCB concentration increased linearly (P gamma-ray and low-energy X-ray irradiated patties. There was no significant difference in 2-DCB concentration between gamma-ray and low-energy X-ray irradiated patties (P > 0.05) at all targeted doses. © 2010 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. Effects of gamma irradiation on different stages of mealybug Dysmicoccus neobrevipes (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    The, Doan Thi, E-mail: doanthithe@yahoo.com [Research and Development Center for Radiation Technology, Vietnam Atomic Energy Institute, 202A Street 11, Linh Xuan Ward, Thu Duc District, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Khanh, Nguyen Thuy; Lang, Vo Thi Kim; Van Chung, Cao [Research and Development Center for Radiation Technology, Vietnam Atomic Energy Institute, 202A Street 11, Linh Xuan Ward, Thu Duc District, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); An, Tran Thi Thien; Thi, Nguyen Hoang Hanh [Agriculture and Forestry University, Linh Trung Ward, Thu Duc District, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam)

    2012-01-15

    Utilization of phytosanitary irradiation as a potential treatment to disinfest agricultural commodities in trade has expanded rapidly in the recent years. Cobalt-60 gamma ray target doses of 100, 150, 200 and 250 Gy were used to irradiate immatures and adults of Dysmicoccus neobrevipes (Beardsley) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) infesting dragon fruits to find the most tolerant stage and the most optimal dose range for quarantine treatment. In general, irradiation affected significantly all life stages of D. neobrevipes mortality and adult reproduction. The pattern of tolerance to irradiation in D. neobrevipes was 1st instars<2nd instars<3rd instarsirradiation, predicted doses for 100% mortality of each different development stage in the above mentioned pattern were 224.6, 241.3, 330.9 and 581.5 Gy, respectively. No survived female adult produced offspring at 200 and 250 Gy. Dose range between 200 and 250 Gy could be efficient to prevent the reproduction of this mealybug. - Highlights: > Gamma Co-60 irradiation as a potential phytosanitary for quarantine treatments. > Reproduction ability of D. neobrevipes has been efficiently inhibited at low dose. > Pattern of tolerance to irradiation was 1st<2nd<3rd instars Doses from 200 to 250 Gy could be efficient to prevent the reproduction of mealybug.

  19. AGR 3/4 Irradiation Test Final As Run Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collin, Blaise P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Several fuel and material irradiation experiments have been planned for the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Reactor Technologies Technology Development Office Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program (referred to as the INL ART TDO/AGR fuel program hereafter), which supports the development and qualification of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for use in HTGRs. The goals of these experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination and safety testing (INL 05/2015). AGR-3/4 combined the third and fourth in this series of planned experiments to test TRISO coated low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide fuel. This combined experiment was intended to support the refinement of fission product transport models and to assess the effects of sweep gas impurities on fuel performance and fission product transport by irradiating designed-to-fail fuel particles and by measuring subsequent fission metal transport in fuel-compact matrix material and fuel-element graphite. The AGR 3/4 fuel test was successful in irradiating the fuel compacts to the burnup and fast fluence target ranges, considering the experiment was terminated short of its initial 400 EFPD target (Collin 2015). Out of the 48 AGR-3/4 compacts, 42 achieved the specified burnup of at least 6% fissions per initial heavy-metal atom (FIMA). Three capsules had a maximum fuel compact average burnup < 10% FIMA, one more than originally specified, and the maximum fuel compact average burnup was <19% FIMA for the remaining capsules, as specified. Fast neutron fluence fell in the expected range of 1.0 to 5.5×1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for all compacts. In addition, the AGR-3/4 experiment was globally successful in keeping the

  20. Irradiation damage in aluminium single crystals produced by 50-keV aluminium and copper ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, L.; Johansen, A.; Koch, J.

    1968-01-01

    Aluminium single crystals, thin enough to be examined by electron microscopy, have been irradiated with 50-keV aluminium and copper ions. The irradiation fluxes were in the range 1011–1014 cm−2 s−1 and the doses were from 6 × 1012 to 6 × 1014 cm−2. Irradiation along either a or a direction produces...... rows of dislocation loops all lying parallel to one particular direction. If the aluminium target is quenched from 600 °C and annealed at room temperature prior to irradiation with aluminium ions, the rows of loops are suppressed. The amount of damage observed is considerably less than would...

  1. Transgenerational effects of proton beam irradiation on Caenorhabditis elegans germline apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Hyemin; Sung, Minhee; Son, Miseol; Kawasaki, Ichiro; Shim, Yhong-Hee

    2017-08-26

    When treating cancer using radiation therapy, it is critical to increase patient survival rates and to reduce side effects. In this respect, proton beam radiation treatment performs better than other radiation treatments because of its high target specificity. However, complications still remain after proton beam radiation treatment. Among them, the risk to progeny after irradiation of their parents is a major concern. In this study, we analyzed the transgenerational effects of proton beam irradiation using the model organism Caenorhabditis. elegans. We found that germline apoptosis increased after proton beam irradiation and its effects were sustained transgenerationally. Moreover, we identified that a germline-specific histone methyltransferase component, SET-2, has a critical role in transmitting the transgenerational effect on germline apoptosis to the next generation after proton beam irradiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation using GEANT4 of the transit dose in the Tunisian gamma irradiator for insect sterilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mannai, K. [Unite de Recherche de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes energies, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, El-Manar 2092 (Tunisia); Askri, B. [Unite de Recherche de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes energies, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, El-Manar 2092 (Tunisia); Loussaief, A. [Unite de Recherche de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes energies, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, El-Manar 2092 (Tunisia); Trabelsi, A. [Unite de Recherche de Physique Nucleaire et des Hautes energies, Departement de Physique, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, El-Manar 2092 (Tunisia); Centre National des Sciences et Technologies Nucleaires, Technopole de Sidi-Thabet 2020 (Tunisia); E-mail: adel.trabelsi@cern.ch

    2007-06-15

    A simulation study of the Tunisian Gamma Irradiation Facility for sterile insects release programs has been realized using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo code of CERN. The dose was calculated and measured for high and low dose values inside the irradiation cell. The calculated high dose was in good agreement with measurements. However, a discrepancy between calculated and measured values occurs at dose levels commonly used for sterilization of insects. We argue that this discrepancy is due to the transit dose absorbed during displacement of targets from their initial position towards their irradiation position and displacement of radiation source pencils from storage towards their irradiation position. The discrepancy is corrected by taking into account the transit dose.

  3. Performance of HTGR biso- and triso-coated fertile particles irradiated in capsule HT-34

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, E.L. Jr.; Tiegs, T.N.; Robbins, J.M.; Kania, M.J.

    1981-08-01

    Experiment HT-34, irradiated in the target region of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), was designed to correlate HTGR Biso- and Triso-coated particle performance with fabrication parameters. Gamma analysis of the irradiated Triso-coated ThO/sub 2/ particles showed that the SiC deposited at the highest coating rate apparently had the best cesium-retention properties. Results of a similar analysis of the irradiated Biso-coated ThO/sub 2/ particles showed no differences in performance that could be related to coating conditions, but all the particles showed a significant loss of cesium (> 50%) at the higher temperatures. Pressure-vessel failures occurred with a significant number of particles; however, fission-gas-content measurements made at room temperature showed that the intact Biso particles from all batches except one became permeable during irradiation.

  4. Effect of irradiation on the Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chang Hee; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [School of Dentistry, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    The aim of this study was to observe a direct effect of irradiation on the periodontopathic Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis). P. gingivalis 2561 was exposed to irradiation with a single absorbed dose of 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy. Changes in viability and antibiotic sensitivity, morphology, transcription, and protein profile of the bacterium after irradiation were examined by pour plating method, disc diffusion method, transmission electron microscopy, RT-PCR, and immunoblot, respectively. Viability of irradiated P. gingivalis drastically reduced as irradiation dose was increased. Irradiated P. gingivalis was found to have become more sensitive to antibiotics as radiation dose was increased. With observation under the transmission electron microscope, the number of morphologically abnormal cells was increased with increasing of irradiation dose. In RT-PCR, decrease in the expression of fim A and sod was observed in irradiated P. gingivalis. In immunoblot, change of profile in irradiated P. gingivalis was found in a number of proteins including 43-kDa fimbrillin. These results suggest that irradiation may affect the cell integrity of P. gingivalis, which is manifested by the change in cell morphology and antibiotic sensitivity, affecting viability of the bacterium.

  5. Development of detection methods for irradiated foods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jae Seung; Kim, Chong Ki; Lee, Hae Jung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Insitiute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyong Su [Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-04-01

    To identify irradiated foods, studies have been carried out with electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy on bone containing foods, such as chicken, pork, and beef. The intensity of the signal induced in bones increased linearly with irradiation doses in the range of 1.0 kGy to 5.0 kGy, and it was possible to distinguish between samples given low and high doses of irradiation. The signal stability for 6 weeks made them ideal for the quick and easy identification of irradiated meats. The analysis of DNA damage made on single cells by agarose gel electrophoresis (DNA 'comet assay') can be used to detect irradiated food. All the samples irradiated with over 0.3 kGy were identified to detect post-irradiation by the tail length of their comets. Irradiated samples showed comets with long tails, and the tail length of the comets increased with the dose, while unirradiated samples showed no or very short tails. As a result of the above experiment, the DNA 'comet assay' might be applied to the detection of irradiated grains as a simple, low-cost and rapid screening test. When fats are irradiated, hydrocarbons contained one or two fewer carbon atoms are formed from the parent fatty acids. The major hydrocarbons in irradiated beef, pork and chicken were 1,7-hexadecadiene and 8-heptadecene originating from leic acid. 1,7 hexadecadiene was the highest amount in irradiated beef, pork and chicken. Eight kinds of hydrocarbons were identified from irradiated chicken, among which 1,7-hexadecadiene and 8-heptadecen were detected as major compounds. The concentration of radiation-induced hydrocarbons was relatively constant during 16 weeks.

  6. Effect of irradiation on the streptococcus mutans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Ki Dong; Kim, Gyu Tae; Choi, Yong Suk; Hwang, Eui Hwan [Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-03-15

    To observe direct effect of irradiation on cariogenic Streptococcus mutans. S. mutans GS5 was exposed to irradiation with a single absorbed dose of 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy. Viability and changes in antibiotic sensitivity, morphology, transcription of virulence factors, and protein profile of bacterium after irradiation were examined by pour plate, disc diffusion method, Transmission electron microscopy. RT-PCR, and SDS-PAGE, respectively. After irradiation with 10 and 20 Gy, viability of S. mutans was reduced. Further increase in irradiation dose, however, did not affect the viability of the remaining cells of S. mutans. Irradiated S. mutans was found to have become sensitive to antibiotics. In particular, the bacterium irradiated with 40 Gy increased its susceptibility to cefotaxime, penicillin, and tetracycline. Under the transmission electron microscope, number of morphologically abnormal cells was increased as the irradiation dose was increased. S. mutans irradiated with 10 Gy revealed a change in the cell wall and cell membrane. As irradiation dose was increased. a higher number of cells showed thickened cell wall and cell membrane and lysis, and appearance of ghost cells was noticeable. In RT-PCR, no difference was detected in expression of gtfB and spaP between cells with and without irradiation of 40 Gy. In SDS-PAGE, proteins with higher molecular masses were gradually diminished as irradiation dose was increased. These results suggest that irradiation affects the cell integrity of S. mutans, as observed by SDS-PAGE, and as manifested by the change in cell morphology, antibiotic sensitivity, and eventually viability of the bacterium.

  7. Optimizing irradiation dose for sterility induction and quality of Bactrocera tryoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, S R; Weldon, C W; Banos, C; Taylor, P W

    2009-10-01

    The current study is an important step toward calibrating, validating, and improving irradiation methods used for Bactrocera tryoni (Froggatt) sterile insect technique (SIT). We used routine International Atomic Energy Agency/U.S. Department of Agriculture/Food and Agriculture Organization quality control tests assessing percentage of emergence, flight ability, sex ratio, mortality under stress, reproductive sterility, and sexual competitiveness, as well as a nonstandard test of longevity under nutritional stress to assess the impact of a range of target irradiation doses (60, 65, 70, 75, and 80 Gy) on the product quality of mass reared B. tryoni used in SIT. Sterility induction remained adequate (>99.5%) for sterile male-fertile female crosses, and 100% sterility was achieved in fertile male-sterile female crosses and sterile male-sterile female crosses for each irradiation doses tested. There was significant increase in mortality under stress as irradiation dose increased, and reduced participation in mating by males irradiated at higher doses. The current target-sterilizing dose for SIT of 70-75 Gy is associated with significant reduction in fly product "quality". Our data suggest that adequate sterility and improved fly quality could be achieved through a small reduction in target sterilizing dose.

  8. Radiochemical aspects of liquid mercury spallation targets

    CERN Document Server

    Neuhausen, Joerg; Eichler, Bernd; Eller, Martin; Horn, Susanne; Schumann, Dorothea; Stora, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    Liquid metal spallation targets using mercury as target material are used in state-of-the-art high power pulsed neutron sources that have been constructed in the USA and Japan within the last decade. Similar target concepts were also proposed for next generation ISOL, beta-beam and neutrino facilities. A large amount of radioactivity will be induced in the liquid metal during operation caused by the interaction of the target material with the intense proton beam. This radioactivity - carried by a wide range of radioisotopes of all the elements of the periodic table from hydrogen up to thallium - must be considered for the assessment of safe operation and maintenance procedures as well as for a final disposal of the used target material and components. This report presents an overview on chemical investigations performed in our laboratory that deal with the behavior of radionuclides in proton irradiated mercury samples. The solubility of elements in mercury was calculated using thermodynamical data obtained by...

  9. Modeling alignment enhancement for solid polarized targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, D.

    2017-07-01

    A model of dynamic orientation using optimized radiofrequency (RF) irradiation produced perpendicular to the holding field is developed for the spin-1 system required for tensor-polarized fixed-target experiments. The derivation applies to RF produced close to the Larmor frequency of the nucleus and requires the electron spin-resonance linewidth to be much smaller than the nuclear magnetic resonance frequency. The rate equations are solved numerically to study a semi-saturated steady-state resulting from the two sources of irradiation: microwave from the DNP process and the additional RF used to manipulate the tensor polarization. The steady-state condition and continuous-wave NMR lineshape are found that optimize the spin-1 alignment in the polycrystalline materials used as solid polarized targets in charged-beam nuclear and particle physics experiments.

  10. Modeling alignment enhancement for solid polarized targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, D. [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2017-07-15

    A model of dynamic orientation using optimized radiofrequency (RF) irradiation produced perpendicular to the holding field is developed for the spin-1 system required for tensor-polarized fixed-target experiments. The derivation applies to RF produced close to the Larmor frequency of the nucleus and requires the electron spin-resonance linewidth to be much smaller than the nuclear magnetic resonance frequency. The rate equations are solved numerically to study a semi-saturated steady-state resulting from the two sources of irradiation: microwave from the DNP process and the additional RF used to manipulate the tensor polarization. The steady-state condition and continuous-wave NMR lineshape are found that optimize the spin-1 alignment in the polycrystalline materials used as solid polarized targets in charged-beam nuclear and particle physics experiments. (orig.)

  11. Charge Transport in Non-Irradiated and Irradiated Silicon Diodes

    CERN Document Server

    Leroy, C; Casse, G L; Glaser, M; Grigoriev, E; Lemeilleur, F

    1999-01-01

    A model describing the transport of charge carriers generated in silicon detectors (standard planar float zone and MESA diodes) by ionizing particles is presented. The current pulse response induced by $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$ particles in non-irradiated detectors and detectors irradiated up to fluences $\\Phi \\approx 3 \\cdot 10^{14}$ particles/cm$^2$ is reproduced through this model: i) by adding a small n-type region 15 $\\mu$m deep on the $p^+$ side for the standard planar float zone detectors at fluences beyond the n to p-type inversion and ii) for the MESA detectors, by considering one dead layer 14 $\\mu$m deep (observed experimentally) on each side, and introducing a second (delayed) component. For both types of detectors, the model gives mobilities decreasing linearily up to fluences of about $5 \\cdot 10^{13}$ particles/cm$^2$ and converging, beyond, to saturation values of about 1000 cm$^2$/Vs and 455 cm$^2$/Vs for electrons and holes, respectively. At a fluence $\\Phi \\approx 10^{14}$ particles/cm$^2$, char...

  12. Thermal analysis applied to irradiated propolis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Andrea Harumi; Machado, Luci Brocardo; del Mastro, Nélida Lucia

    2002-03-01

    Propolis is a resinous hive product, collected by bees. Raw propolis requires a decontamination procedure and irradiation appears as a promising technique for this purpose. The valuable properties of propolis for food and pharmaceutical industries have led to increasing interest in its technological behavior. Thermal analysis is a chemical analysis that gives information about changes on heating of great importance for technological applications. Ground propolis samples were 60Co gamma irradiated with 0 and 10 kGy. Thermogravimetry curves shown a similar multi-stage decomposition pattern for both irradiated and unirradiated samples up to 600°C. Similarly, through differential scanning calorimetry , a coincidence of melting point of irradiated and unirradiated samples was found. The results suggest that the irradiation process do not interfere on the thermal properties of propolis when irradiated up to 10 kGy.

  13. Thermal analysis applied to irradiated propolis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Andrea Harumi; Machado, Luci Brocardo; Mastro, N.L. del E-mail: nelida@usp.br

    2002-03-01

    Propolis is a resinous hive product, collected by bees. Raw propolis requires a decontamination procedure and irradiation appears as a promising technique for this purpose. The valuable properties of propolis for food and pharmaceutical industries have led to increasing interest in its technological behavior. Thermal analysis is a chemical analysis that gives information about changes on heating of great importance for technological applications. Ground propolis samples were {sup 60}Co gamma irradiated with 0 and 10 kGy. Thermogravimetry curves shown a similar multi-stage decomposition pattern for both irradiated and unirradiated samples up to 600 deg. C. Similarly, through differential scanning calorimetry , a coincidence of melting point of irradiated and unirradiated samples was found. The results suggest that the irradiation process do not interfere on the thermal properties of propolis when irradiated up to 10 kGy.

  14. Irradiation preservation of seafood: Literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molton, P.M.

    1987-10-01

    The application of gamma-irradiation for extending the shelf life of seafood has been of interest for many years. This report reviews a number of studies on seafood irradiation conducted over the past several years. Topics covered include seafood irradiation techniques and dosages, species applicability and differences, the effects of packaging on seafood preservation, and changes in organoleptic acceptability as a result of irradiation. Particular attention is given to radiation effects (likely and unlikely) of concern to the public. These include the potential for generation of toxic chemical products, botulinum toxin production, and other health concerns. No scientifically defensible evidence of any kind was found for any harmful effect of irradiation of seafoods at the doses being considered (less than 300 krad), and all indications are that irradiation is an acceptable and needed additional tool for seafood preservation. 49 refs., 14 figs., 14 tabs.

  15. Integration of optical imaging with a small animal irradiator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weersink, Robert A., E-mail: robert.weersink@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Techna Institute, University Health Network, 124-100 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada); Ansell, Steve; Wang, An; Wilson, Graham [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Shah, Duoaud [Techna Institute, University Health Network, 124-100 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada); Lindsay, Patricia E. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A1 (Canada); Jaffray, David A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Techna Institute, University Health Network, 124-100 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A1 (Canada); Ontario Cancer Institute, Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A1 (Canada)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: The authors describe the integration of optical imaging with a targeted small animal irradiator device, focusing on design, instrumentation, 2D to 3D image registration, 2D targeting, and the accuracy of recovering and mapping the optical signal to a 3D surface generated from the cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging. The integration of optical imaging will improve targeting of the radiation treatment and offer longitudinal tracking of tumor response of small animal models treated using the system. Methods: The existing image-guided small animal irradiator consists of a variable kilovolt (peak) x-ray tube mounted opposite an aSi flat panel detector, both mounted on a c-arm gantry. The tube is used for both CBCT imaging and targeted irradiation. The optical component employs a CCD camera perpendicular to the x-ray treatment/imaging axis with a computer controlled filter for spectral decomposition. Multiple optical images can be acquired at any angle as the gantry rotates. The optical to CBCT registration, which uses a standard pinhole camera model, was modeled and tested using phantoms with markers visible in both optical and CBCT images. Optically guided 2D targeting in the anterior/posterior direction was tested on an anthropomorphic mouse phantom with embedded light sources. The accuracy of the mapping of optical signal to the CBCT surface was tested using the same mouse phantom. A surface mesh of the phantom was generated based on the CBCT image and optical intensities projected onto the surface. The measured surface intensity was compared to calculated surface for a point source at the actual source position. The point-source position was also optimized to provide the closest match between measured and calculated intensities, and the distance between the optimized and actual source positions was then calculated. This process was repeated for multiple wavelengths and sources. Results: The optical to CBCT registration error was 0.8 mm. Two

  16. Effects of weak electromagnetic irradiation on various types of behavior in the mealworm Tenebrio molitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheiman, I M; Kreshchenko, N D

    2010-10-01

    The effects of weak electromagnetic irradiation on simple forms of behavior were studied using adult Tenebrio molitor mealworms. The beetles' motor behavior was studied in conditions of different motivations, i.e., positive (food) and negative (avoidance of light), in otherwise identical experimental conditions. The beetles had to navigate a defined space to reach their target - potato or cover from light. Experiments consisted of one trial per day for five days. Target attainment time was measured in groups of beetles. Behavior in both cases developed as follows: an initial orientation reaction appeared and was followed by adaptation to the apparatus. Exposure to weak electromagnetic irradiation led to increases in the response time at the initial stages of the experiments. The effects of irradiation were seasonal in nature and differed in the two types of behavior.

  17. Lymphangioma secondary to irradiation after mastectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveti,Aline; Biasi, Tatiana Basso; Funchal, Gabriella Di Giunta

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Lymphangioma is a rare benign disease of the lymphatic vessels. Typically, they are primary conditions but may be acquired secondarily, such as those caused by irradiation during radiotherapy for the treatment of breast cancer. The local lymphatic obstruction provoked by irradiation causes the appearance of asymptomatic hyaline vesicles on the irradiated skin. The present report describes a 78-year-old female patient, who initially presented hyaline vesicles that progressed into mult...

  18. Food Irradiation Update and Cost Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-01

    spices in the United States. In Japan, 10,000 tons of potatoes are irradiated each year to prevent sprouting (chemical treatments to inhibit potato... irradiation can extend the shelf life of refrigerated products, which reduces losses due to spoilage. It can also greatly reduce the pathogens in foods...AD-A273 506 ýil il lit i i1 ii , TECHNICAL REPORT AD NATICK /TR-92 / 002 FOOD IRRADIATION UPDATE-,. .•0 , AND COST ANALYSIS f. .• By Robert T

  19. Resistance of acrylic vessel to gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro, Andre Cavalcanti; Menezes, Maria Angela de B.C.; Pereira, Marcio Tadeu; Rocha, Nirlando Antonio; Vilela, Jefferson Jose, E-mail: andreccarneiro@gmail.com, E-mail: menezes@cdtn.br, E-mail: mtp@cdtn.br, E-mail: nar@cdtn.br, E-mail: jjv@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Braga, Mario Roberto Martins S.S., E-mail: mariomartins@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the preliminary studies made in acrylic material in order to verify the effects of radiolysis in acrylic recipients in which the uranium ore standards are conditioned and check if the material is able to keep the {sup 222}Rn inside the vessel. The preliminary results after gamma irradiation of two kinds of recipients indicate no differences between the vessels irradiated and the ones no irradiated, related to color changes and tension resistance. (author)

  20. Squamous cell carcinoma in situ after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kambara, Takeshi; Nishiyama, Takafumi; Yamada, Rie; Nagatani, Tetsuo; Nakajima, Hiroshi [Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Sugiyama, Asami

    1997-12-31

    We report two cases with Squamous Cell Carcinoma (SCC) in situ caused by irradiation to hand eczemas, resistant to any topical therapies. Both of our cases clinically show palmer sclerosis and flexor restriction of the fingers, compatible to chronic radiation dermatitis. Although SCC arising in chronic radiation dermatitis is usually developed ten to twenty years after irradiation, in our cases SCC were found more than forty years after irradiation. (author)

  1. Acclimation to a dynamic irradiance regime changes excessive irradiance sensitivity of Emiliania huxleyi and Thalassiosira weissflogii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Poll, Willem H.; Visser, Ronald J. W.; Buma, Anita G. J.

    Effects of fluctuating irradiance regimes on excessive photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and ultraviolet (UV) radiation sensitivity were assessed for Emiliania huxleyi (Lohman) and Thalassiosira weissflogii (Grunow) Fryxell and Hasle. Cultures acclimated to low irradiance were subjected to

  2. Tolerance of edible flowers to gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koike, Amanda C.R.; Araujo, Michel M.; Costa, Helbert S.F.; Almeida, Mariana C.; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C.H., E-mail: ackoike@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    People have been eating flowers and using them in culinary creations for hundreds of years. Edible flowers are increasingly being used in meals as an ingredient in salads or garnish, entrees, drinks and desserts. The irradiation process is an alternative method that can be used in disinfestation of food and flowers, using doses that do not damage the product. The sensitivity of flowers to irradiation varies from species to species. In the present research was irradiated with doses up to 1 kGy some edible flowers to examine their physical tolerance to gamma-rays. Furthermore, high doses gamma irradiation causes petal withering, browning process and injury in edible flowers. (author)

  3. Detection of hydrocarbons in irradiated foods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyahara, Makoto; Maitani, Tamio [National Inst. of Health Sciences, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Akiko; Kamimura, Tomomi; Nagasawa, Taeko [Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Allied Health Sciences; Kobayashi, Yasuo; Ito, Hitoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Establishment

    2003-06-01

    The hydrocarbon method for the detection of irradiated foods is now recognized as the international technique. This method is based on radiolysis of fatty acids in food to give hydrocarbons. In order to expand this technique's application, ten foods (butter, cheese, chicken, pork, beef, tuna, dry shrimp, avocado, papaya, and mango) were irradiated in the range from 0.5 to 10 kGy and the hydrocarbons in them were detected. Recoveries of the hydrocarbons from most foods were acceptable (38-128%). Some hydrocarbons were found in non-irradiated foods, particularly, in butter, cheese, tuna, and shrimp. Seven irradiated foods, butter, cheese, chicken, beef, pork, tuna, dry shrimp, and avocado were detectable at their practical doses by measuring the appropriate marker hydrocarbons. In most case, marker hydrocarbon will be 1,7-hexadecadiene. However, the marker hydrocarbons produced only in irradiated foods varied from food to food; therefore, it is necessary to check a specific irradiated food for marker hydrocarbons. On the other hand, two irradiated foods (papaya and mango which were irradiated at their practical doses) were difficult to distinguish from non-irradiated foods using this method. (author)

  4. Free radical kinetics on irradiated fennel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoki, Rumi; Kimura, Shojiro; Ohta, Masatoshi

    2008-09-01

    Herein, an electron spin resonance study on the behavior of organic radicals in fennel before and after irradiation is reported. The spectrum of irradiated fennel composed of the spectrum component derived from the un-irradiated sample (near g=2.005) and the spectra components derived from carbohydrates. The time decay of intensity spectral components was well explained by first-order kinetics with a variety of rate constants. Especially, the signal at near g=2.02 ascribed to stable cellulose-derivative components is expected to be a good indicator in the identification of irradiated plant samples.

  5. Stability of Y-Ti-O nanoparticles in ODS alloys during heat treatment and high temperature swift heavy ion irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skuratov, V.A. [FLNR, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dubna State University, Dubna (Russian Federation); Sohatsky, A.S.; Kornieieva, K. [FLNR, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); O' Connell, J.H.; Neethling, J.H. [CHRTEM, NMMU, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Nikitina, A.A.; Ageev, V.S. [JSC VNIINM, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zdorovets, M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Astana (Kazakhstan); Ural Federal University, Yekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Volkov, A.D. [Nazarbayev University, Astana (Kazakhstan)

    2016-12-15

    Aim of this report is to compare the morphology of swift (167 and 220 MeV) Xe ion induced latent tracks in Y{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} nanoparticles during post-irradiation heat treatment and after irradiation at different temperatures in pre-thinned TEM foils and TEM targets prepared from hundreds microns thick irradiated oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel. No difference in track parameters was found in room temperature irradiated nanoparticles in pre-thinned and conventional samples. Microstructural data gathered from pre-thinned foils irradiated in the temperature range 350-650 C or annealed at similar temperatures demonstrate that amorphous latent tracks interact with the surrounding matrix, changing the track and nanoparticle morphology, while such effect is not observed in conventional ODS material treated at the same conditions. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Effect of helium/neon laser irradiation on nerve growth factor synthesis and secretion in skeletal muscle cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Fidi; Brodie, Chaya; Appel, Elana; Kazimirsky, Gila; Shainberg, Asher

    2002-04-01

    Low energy laser irradiation therapy in medicine is widespread but the mechanisms are not fully understood. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mechanism by which the light might induce therapeutic effects. Skeletal muscle cultures were chosen as a target for light irradiation and nerve growth factor (NGF) was the biochemical marker for analysis. It was found that there is a transient elevation of intracellular calcium in the myotubes immediately after irradiation (Pneon irradiation (633 nm) with an energy of 3 J/cm(2). In addition, helium/neon irradiation augmented the level of NGF mRNA fivefold and increased NGF release to the medium of the myotubes. Thus, it is speculated that transient changes in calcium caused by light can modulate NGF release from the myotubes and also affect the nerves innervating the muscle. The NGF is probably responsible for the beneficial effects of low-level light.

  7. Comparison of Dried Plum Puree, Rosemary Extract, and BHA/BHT as Antioxidants in Irradiated Ground Beef Patties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movileanu, Iulia; Núñez de González, Máryuri T; Hafley, Brian; Miller, Rhonda K; Keeton, Jimmy T

    2013-01-01

    Fresh ground beef patties with (1) no antioxidant (control), (2) 0.02% butylated hydroxyanisole/butylated hydroxytoluene (BHA/BHT), (3) 3% dried plum puree, or (4) 0.25% rosemary extract were aerobically packaged, irradiated at target doses of 0, 1.5, or 2.0 kGy (1.7 and 2.3 kGy actual doses), and stored at 4°C. The samples were evaluated for lipid oxidation on 0, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days of storage after irradiation. When compared to the control, all antioxidant treatments were effective in retarding (P 0.05) as BHA/BHT in irradiated and nonirradiated beef patties, followed by the dried plum puree treatment. Irradiation increased TBARs values, but no differences were noted in oxidation between irradiation dose levels.

  8. Study of color centers induced by PIXE irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Absil, J; Strivay, D; Oger, C; Weber, G

    2002-01-01

    The particle induced X-ray emission method is perfectly adapted to the study, by external beam, of art objects (like paintings) and allows non-destructive analysis of the atomic composition of the target. However, a strange phenomenon occurs during irradiation on some pigments: dark brownish stains appear, and this could be due to the formation of color centers. In fact, these darkening spots progressively fade out and disappear after a few weeks. Heat and UV light accelerate the decreasing process. The aim of this study is to understand the physical processes of the stain creation and to find a way to make stains disappear, avoiding any damage for the painting.

  9. Microbeam evolution: From single cell irradiation to preclinical studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghita, Mihaela; Fernandez-Palomo, Cristian; Fukunaga, Hisanori

    2018-01-01

    of radiation to selected individual cells in vitro or even to target subcellular organelles. These abilities have led to the development of a range of microbeam facilities around the world allowing the delivery of precisely defined beams of charged particles, X-rays, or electrons. In addition, microbeams have......Purpose: This review follows the development of microbeam technology from the early days of single cell irradiations, to investigations of specific cellular mechanisms and to the development of new treatment modalities in vivo. A number of microbeam applications are discussed with a focus...

  10. Irradiation gamma on chitosan films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mello, Luana Miranda Lopes de; Souza, Adriana Regia Marques de; Arthur, Valter, E-mail: lumilopes@hotmail.com, E-mail: drilavras@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Universidade Federal do Tocantins (UFT), Palmas,TO (Brazil). Departmento de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Alimentos; Universidade Federal de Goias (UFGO), Goiania (Brazil). Departmento de Ciencia e Tecnologia de Alimentos; Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Films are preformed structures, independent, that are used to wrap food after processing, increasing their shelf life and enhancing its bright and attractive appearance. They are prepared from biological materials as an alternative to the plastic synthetic containers to improve the quality of the environment. Chitosan is a biodegradable polymer composed of β-(1-4) linked D-glucosamine (deacetylated unit) and N-acetyl-D- glucosamine (acetylated unit). It is produced commercially by deacetylation of chitin, which is a structural component of the exoskeleton of crustaceans. She is able to form films and edible and/or biodegradable coatings. With the objective to evaluate the effect of different doses of gamma radiation (0, 5, 10 and 15 kGy) and chitosan concentrations (1 and 2%) in film properties, it was evaluated its optical, mechanical and morphological properties. The films were produced by casting. Irradiation did not affect the thickness of the films, but influenced its colors, increasing the tone of the film for a stronger yellowish color. This fact can be attributed to the increased concentration of C = O bonds of chitosan due to the breakdown of the chain reaction and the Maillard reaction. Irradiated films showed smoother surface and less rough, due to the degradation of the chitosan molecule and poor mechanical properties, not showing good flexibility and stretching. (author)

  11. Effect of neon plasma pre-irradiation on surface morphology and deuterium retention of tungsten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, L.; De Temmerman, G.; van Emmichoven, P. A. Zeijlma; Ji, G.; Zhou, H. B.; Wang, B.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Lu, G. H.

    2015-01-01

    Neon and deuterium plasma irradiation of polycrystalline tungsten targets have been performed at high fluxes of ∼1024 ions m−2 s−1 to study the interaction of neon with tungsten and the influence of neon on deuterium retention. Tungsten exposure to neon plasma leads to the

  12. Metabolic and diffusional limitations of photosynthesis in fluctuating irradiance in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaiser, Elias; Morales Sierra, Alejandro; Harbinson, Jeremy; Heuvelink, Ep; Prinzenberg, Aina E.; Marcelis, Leo F.M.

    2016-01-01

    A better understanding of the metabolic and diffusional limitations of photosynthesis in fluctuating irradiance can help identify targets for improving crop yields. We used different genotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana to characterise the importance of Rubisco activase (Rca), stomatal conductance

  13. Infectivity of irradiated and non-irradiated metacestodes of Taenia saginata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geerts, S.; Borchgrave, J. de; Brandt, J.R.A.; Kumar, V.; Deken, R. de; Falla, N.; Brabant, R. van (Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp (Belgium). Veterinary Dept.)

    No data are available on the fate of irradiated cysticerci of T. saginata in the human intestine. Since there is no definitive host of T. saginata other than man, this experiment was set up to study the infectivity of irradiated cysticerci of T. saginata in human volunteers in order to determine the minimal effective irradiation dose to inhibit their development. (Author).

  14. Neutron Irradiation Tests of Calibrated Cryogenic Sensors at Low Temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Junquera, T; Thermeau, J P; Casas-Cubillos, J

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents the advancement of a program being carried out in view of selecting the cryogenic temperature sensors to be used in the LHC accelerator. About 10,000 sensors will be installed around the 26.6 km LHC ring, and most of them will be exposed to high radiation doses during the accelerator lifetime. The following thermometric sensors : carbon resistors, thin films, and platinum resistors, have been exposed to high neutron fluences (>10$^15$ n/cm$^2$) at the ISN (Grenoble, France) Cryogenic Irradiation Test Facility. A cryostat is placed in a shielded irradiation vault where a 20 MeV deuteron beam hits a Be target, resulting in a well collimated and intense neutron beam. The cryostat, the on-line acquisition system, the temperature references and the main characteristics of the irradiation facility are described. The main interest of this set-up is its ability to monitor online the evolution of the sensors by comparing its readout with temperature references that are in principle insensitive to t...

  15. Effects of ion beam irradiation on semiconductor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nashiyama, Isamu; Hirao, Toshio; Itoh, Hisayoshi; Ohshima, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Energetic heavy-ion irradiation apparatus has been developed for single-event effects (SEE) testing. We have applied three irradiation methods such as a scattered-ion irradiation method, a recoiled-atom irradiation method, and a direct-beam irradiation method to perform SEE testing efficiently. (author)

  16. POLYMERS CONTAINING Cu NANOPARTICLES IRRADIATED BY LASER TO ENHANCE THE ION ACCELERATION

    OpenAIRE

    Mariapompea Cutroneo; Lorenzo Torrisi; Anna Mackova; Andriy Velyhan

    2015-01-01

    Target Normal Sheath Acceleration method was employed at PALS to accelerate ions from laser-generated plasma at intensities above 1015 W/cm2. Laser parameters, irradiation conditions and target geometry and composition control the plasma properties and the electric field driving the ion acceleration. Cu nanoparticles deposited on the polymer promote resonant absorption effects increasing the plasma electron density and enhancing the proton acceleration. Protons can be accelerated in forward d...

  17. Laser targets and experiments for the sake of science and energy in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It was the first laser in the world for spherical irradiation of targets. Polymer and glass shell targets were produced and delivered for 'KALMAR' experiments during. 1974–1983. Then, 'DOLPHIN' laser (128 beams, 4 kJ, 1.05 µm) started in LPI produced spherical targets from predeuterated polystyrene and glass microballoon.

  18. Death receptor pathways mediate targeted and non-targeted effects of ionizing radiations in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luce, A.; Courtin, A.; Levalois, C.; Altmeyer-Morel, S.; Chevillard, S.; Lebeau, J. [CEA, DSV, iRCM, SREIT, Laboratoire de Cancerologie Experimentale, Fontenay-aux-Roses, F-92265 (France); Romeo, P.H. [CEA, DSV, iRCM, SCSR, Laboratoire de recherche sur la Reparation et la Transcription dans les cellules Souches, Fontenay-aux-Roses, F-92265 (France)

    2009-07-01

    Delayed cell death by mitotic catastrophe is a frequent mode of solid tumor cell death after {gamma}-irradiation, a widely used treatment of cancer. Whereas the mechanisms that underlie the early {gamma}-irradiation-induced cell death are well documented, those that drive the delayed cell death are largely unknown. Here we show that the Fas, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha} death receptor pathways mediate the delayed cell death observed after {gamma}-irradiation of breast cancer cells. Early after irradiation, we observe the increased expression of Fas, TRAIL-R and TNF-R that first sensitizes cells to apoptosis. Later, the increased expression of FasL, TRAIL and TNF-{alpha} permit the apoptosis engagement linked to mitotic catastrophe. Treatments with TNF-{alpha}, TRAIL or anti-Fas antibody, early after radiation exposure, induce apoptosis, whereas the neutralization of the three death receptors pathways impairs the delayed cell death. We also show for the first time that irradiated breast cancer cells excrete soluble forms of the three ligands that can induce the death of sensitive bystander cells. Overall, these results define the molecular basis of the delayed cell death of irradiated cancer cells and identify the death receptors pathways as crucial actors in apoptosis induced by targeted as well as non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation. (authors)

  19. Cherry Irradiation Studies. 1984 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eakin, D.E.; Hungate, F.P.; Tingey, G.L.; Olsen, K.L.; Fountain, J.B.; Burditt, A.K. Jr.; Moffit, H.R.; Johnson, D.A.; Lunden, J.D.

    1985-04-01

    Fresh cherries, cherry fruit fly larvae, and codling moth larvae were irradiated using the PNL cobalt-60 facility to determine the efficacy of irradiation treatment for insect disinfestation and potential shelf life extension. Irradiation is an effective disinfestation treatment with no significant degradation of fruit at doses well above those required for quarantine treatment. Sufficient codling moth control was achieved at projected doses of less than 25 krad; cherry fruit fly control, at projected doses of less than 15 krad. Dose levels up to 60 krad did not adversely affect cherry quality factors tested. Irradiation above 60 krad reduced the firmness of cherries but had no significant impact on other quality factors tested. Irradiation of cherries below 80 krad did not result in any significant differences in sensory evaluations (appearance, flavor, and firmness) in tests conducted at OSU. Irradiation up to 200 krad at a temperature of about 25/sup 0/C (77/sup 0/F) did not measurably extend shelf life. Irradiation at 500 krad at 25/sup 0/C (77/sup 0/F) increased mold and rotting of cherries tested. There is no apparent advantage of irradiation over low-temperature fumigation.

  20. Improving bambara groundnut productivity using gamma irradiation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In recent times efforts are being made to improve the productivity of bambara groundnut. Studies were initiated (i) to characterise and evaluate landraces and to select superior ones for irradiation, (ii) to induce genetic variation through gamma irradiation and (iii) to use biotechnological approaches to shorten the generation ...

  1. Mechanical response of proton beam irradiated nitinol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afzal, Naveed [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, Lahore (Pakistan); Ghauri, I.M., E-mail: ijaz.phys@gmail.co [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, Lahore (Pakistan); Mubarik, F.E.; Amin, F. [Centre for Advanced Studies in Physics, GC University, Lahore (Pakistan)

    2011-01-01

    The present investigation deals with the study of mechanical behavior of proton beam irradiated nitinol at room temperature. The specimens in austenitic phase were irradiated over periods of 15, 30, 45 and 60 min at room temperature using 2 MeV proton beam obtained from Pelletron accelerator. The stress-strain curves of both unirradiated and irradiated specimens were obtained using a universal testing machine at room temperature. The results of the experiment show that an intermediate rhombohedral (R) phase has been introduced between austenite and martensite phase, which resulted in the suppression of direct transformation from austenite to martensite (A-M). Stresses required to start R-phase ({sigma}{sub RS}) and martensitic phase ({sigma}{sub MS}) were observed to decrease with increase in exposure time. The hardness tests of samples before and after irradiation were also carried out using Vickers hardness tester. The comparison reveals that the hardness is higher in irradiated specimens than that of the unirradiated one. The increase in hardness is quite sharp in specimens irradiated for 15 min, which then increases linearly as the exposure time is increased up to 60 min. The generation of R-phase, variations in the transformation stresses {sigma}{sub RS} and {sigma}{sub MS} and increase in hardness of irradiated nitinol may be attributed to lattice disorder and associated changes in crystal structure induced by proton beam irradiation.

  2. Food irradiation; Global aspects and future prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuyama, Akira (Tokyo Univ. of Agriculture (Japan). Nodai Research Institute)

    1990-07-01

    This paper reviews researches, commentaries, and conference and public records of food irradiation, published mainly during the period 1987-1989, focusing on the current conditions of food irradiation that may pose not only scientific or technologic problems but also political issues or consumerism. Approximately 50 kinds of food, although not enough to fill economic benefit, are now permitted for food irradiation in the world. Consumerism is pointed out as the major factor that precludes the feasibility of food irradiation in the world. In the United States, irradiation is feasible only for spices. Food irradiation has already been feasible in France, Hollands, Belgium, and the Soviet Union; has under consideration in the Great Britain, and has been rejected in the West Germany. Although the feasibility of food irradiation is projected to increase gradually in the future, commercial success or failure depends on the final selection of consumers. In this respect, the role of education and public information are stressed. Meat radicidation and recent progress in the method for detecting irradiated food are referred to. (N.K.) 128 refs.

  3. Status of food irradiation in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, O.K. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    1996-12-31

    Research on food irradiation in Brazil started in 1968 at the Center of Nuclear Energy for Agriculture (CENA), Piracicaba, Sao Paulo. At the Institute of Nuclear and Energy Research (IPEN-CNEN/SP), Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, research on detection of irradiated foods is in progress. In 1973, the Brazilian government established a regulation about food irradiation. Nowadays, the products authorized to be irradiated are: rice, poultry, fish and fish products, potatoes, onions, avocados, persimmons, pineapples, wheat flour, maize, beans, spices, tomatoes, guavas, oranges, lemons, strawberries, mangoes, melons and papayas. The other recommended products to be approved in the future are: acerolas, apples, beans (dose > 1 kGy), beef, blueberries, cherries, cheeses, coffee, figs, fresh guaranas, garlics, grapefruits, grapes, mushrooms, nuts and pork. Today, there is only one commercial facility for irradiation services in the country, the Empresa Brasileira de Radiacoes Ltda. (EMBRARAD). This company operates a Nordion JS-7500 irradiator, with a present activity of about 1,000 kCi, designed for sterilizing medical devices. It also irradiates spices, dried foods, gemstones, cosmetics, wood and raw materials for pharmaceuticals. The plant operates 24 hours a day and the spices and dried foods represent 15% of the business. Powder of guarana seeds is irradiated also for exportation. There are two other commercial facilities for radiation sterilization in Brazil, operating exclusively for their own production. (J.P.N.)

  4. Brazilian Consumer views on food irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behrens, J.H.; Barcellos, M.N.; Frewer, L.J.; Nunes, T.P.; Landgraf, M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the consumer attitude to food irradiation in São Paulo, Brazil, through a qualitative research perspective. Three focus groups were conducted with 30 consumers, responsible for food choices and purchases. Both irradiated and nonirradiated food samples were served in the

  5. Models of Solar Irradiance Variations: Current Status

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Regular monitoring of solar irradiance has been carried out since 1978 to show that solar total and spectral irradiance varies at different time scales. Whereas variations on time scales of minutes to hours are due to solar oscillations and granulation, variations on longer time scales are driven by the ...

  6. Splenic irradiation for hairy cell leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Moundhri, A.; Graham, P.H. [St George Hospital, Kogarah, NSW, (Australia). Department of Radiation Oncology

    1997-11-01

    Splenic irradiation in the management of hairy cell leukaemia is previously unreported. A case is presented here to illustrate that splenic irradiation may be a useful addition to systemic therapies. It achieved local splenic and blood picture response and remission similar to splenectomy without any significant toxicity. (authors). 7 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Schedule and status of irradiation experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Robertson, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The current status of reactor irradiation experiments is presented in tables summarizing the experimental objectives, conditions, and schedule. Currently, the program has one irradiation experiment in reactor and five experiments in the design or construction stages. Postirradiation examination and testing is in progress on ten experiments.

  8. Advances in SEM beam micro-irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, I.; Mackay, G.; Haythornthwaite, R.

    1991-03-01

    An instrument designed to measure the dose deposited by the beam under routine irradiation conditions using Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) dosimeter cells is described. The dosimeter response is calibrated against various types of radiation sources to enable intercomparisons with Co-60, electrons and protons. The technique enables Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) users to carry out micro-irradiations of operating devices.

  9. Influence of Endothelial Cells on Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Phenotype after Irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milliat, Fabien; François, Agnès; Isoir, Muriel; Deutsch, Eric; Tamarat, Radia; Tarlet, Georges; Atfi, Azeddine; Validire, Pierre; Bourhis, Jean; Sabourin, Jean-Christophe; Benderitter, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Damage to vessels is one of the most common effects of therapeutic irradiation on normal tissues. We undertook a study in patients treated with preoperative radiotherapy and demonstrated in vivo the importance of proliferation, migration, and fibrogenic phenotype of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in radiation-induced vascular damage. These lesions may result from imbalance in the cross talk between endothelial cells (ECs) and VSMCs. Using co-culture models, we examined whether ECs influence proliferation, migration, and fibrogenic phenotype of VSMCs. In the presence of irradiated ECs, proliferation and migration of VSMCs were increased. Moreover, expressions of α-smooth muscle actin, connective tissue growth factor, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1, heat shock protein 27, and collagen type III, alpha 1 were up-regulated in VSMCs exposed to irradiated ECs. Secretion of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 was increased after irradiation of ECs, and irradiated ECs activated the Smad pathway in VSMCs by inducing Smad3/4 nuclear translocation and Smad-dependent promoter activation. Using small interferring RNA targeting Smad3 and a TGFβ-RII neutralizing antibody, we demonstrate that a TGF-β1/TGF-β-RII/Smad3 pathway is involved in the fibrogenic phenotype of VSMCs induced by irradiated ECs. In conclusion, we show the importance of proliferation, migration, and fibrogenic phenotype of VSMCs in patients. Moreover, we demonstrate in vitro that ECs influence these fundamental mechanisms involved in radiation-induced vascular damages. PMID:17003501

  10. [Doses to organs at risk in conformational radiotherapy and stereotaxic irradiation: The heart].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandendorpe, B; Servagi Vernat, S; Ramiandrisoa, F; Bazire, L; Kirova, Y M

    2017-10-01

    Radiation therapy of breast cancer, Hodgkin lymphoma, lung cancer and others thoracic irradiations induce an ionizing radiation dose to the heart. Irradiation of the heart, associated with patient cardiovascular risk and cancer treatment-induced cardiotoxicity, increase cardiovascular mortality. The long survival after breast or Hodgkin lymphoma irradiation requires watching carefully late treatment toxicity. The over-risk of cardiac events is related to the dose received by the heart and the irradiated cardiac volume. The limitation of cardiac irradiation should be a priority in the planning of thoracic irradiations. Practices have to be modified, using modern techniques to approach of the primary objective of radiotherapy which is to optimize the dose to the target volume, sparing healthy tissues, in this case the heart. We have reviewed the literature on cardiac toxicity induced by conformational tridimensional radiation therapy, intensity-modulated radiation therapy or stereotactic body radiation therapy, in order to evaluate the possibilities to limit cardiotoxicity. Finally, we summarise the recommendations on dose constraints to the heart and coronary arteries. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Pre-irradiation testing of actively cooled Be-Cu divertor modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, J.; Duwe, R.; Kuehnlein, W. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    A set of neutron irradiation tests is prepared on different plasma facing materials (PFM) candidates and miniaturized components for ITER. Beside beryllium the irradiation program which will be performed in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, includes different carbon fiber composites (CFQ) and tungsten alloys. The target values for the neutron irradiation will be 0.5 dpa at temperatures of 350{degrees}C and 700{degrees}C, resp.. The post irradiation examination (PIE) will cover a wide range of mechanical tests; in addition the degradation of thermal conductivity will be investigated. To determine the high heat flux (HHF) performance of actively cooled divertor modules, electron beam tests which simulate the expected heat loads during the operation of ITER, are scheduled in the hot cell electron beam facility JUDITH. These tests on a selection of different actively cooled beryllium-copper and CFC-copper divertor modules are performed before and after neutron irradiation; the pre-irradiation testing is an essential part of the program to quantify the zero-fluence high heat flux performance and to detect defects in the modules, in particular in the brazed joints.

  12. Design of sample carrier for neutron irradiation facility at TRIGA MARK II nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Y.; Hamid, N. A.; Mansor, M. A.; Ahmad, M. H. A. R. M.; Yusof, M. R.; Yazid, H.; Mohamed, A. A.

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this work is to design a sample carrier for neutron irradiation experiment at beam ports of research nuclear reactor, the Reaktor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP). The sample carrier was designed so that irradiation experiment can be performed safely by researchers. This development will resolve the transferring of sample issues faced by the researchers at the facility when performing neutron irradiation studies. The function of sample carrier is to ensure the sample for the irradiation process can be transferred into and out from the beam port of the reactor safely and effectively. The design model used was House of Quality Method (HOQ) which is usually used for developing specifications for product and develop numerical target to work towards and determining how well we can meet up to the needs. The chosen sample carrier (product) consists of cylindrical casing shape with hydraulic cylinders transportation method. The sample placing can be done manually, locomotion was by wheel while shielding used was made of boron materials. The sample carrier design can shield thermal neutron during irradiation of sample so that only low fluencies fast neutron irradiates the sample.

  13. Induction of interleukin-1β by mouse mammary tumor irradiation promotes triple negative breast cancer cells invasion and metastasis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Gina; Therriault, Hélène; Bujold, Rachel; Saucier, Caroline; Paquette, Benoit

    2017-05-01

    Radiotherapy increases the level of inflammatory cytokines, some of which are known to promote metastasis. In a mouse model of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), we determined whether irradiation of the mammary tumor increases the level of key cytokines and favors the development of lung metastases. D2A1 TNBC cells were implanted in the mammary glands of a Balb/c mouse and then 7 days old tumors were irradiated (4 × 6 Gy). The cytokines IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17 and MIP-2 were quantified in plasma before, midway and after irradiation. The effect of tumor irradiation on the invasion of cancer cells, the number of circulating tumor cells (CTC) and lung metastases were also measured. TNBC tumor irradiation significantly increased the plasma level of IL-1β, which was associated with a greater number of CTC (3.5-fold) and lung metastases (2.3-fold), compared to sham-irradiated animals. Enhancement of D2A1 cell invasion in mammary gland was associated with an increase of the matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 activity (MMP-2, -9). The ability of IL-1β to stimulate the invasiveness of irradiated D2A1 cells was confirmed by in vitro invasion chamber assays. Irradiation targeting a D2A1 tumor and its microenvironment increased the level of the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β and was associated with the promotion of cancer cell invasion and lung metastasis development.

  14. Tensile properties of CLAM steel irradiated up to 20.1 dpa in STIP-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Hongen [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Peng, Lei, E-mail: penglei@ustc.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Dai, Yong [Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Huang, Qunying [Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Ye, Minyou [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Specimens of China low activation martensitic steel (CLAM) were irradiated in the fifth experiment of SINQ Target Irradiation Program (STIP-V) up to 20.1 dpa/1499 appm He/440 °C. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature (R.T) and irradiation temperatures (T{sub irr}) in the range of 25–450 °C. The tensile results demonstrated strong effect of irradiation dose and irradiation temperature on hardening and embrittlement. With T{sub irr} below ∼314 °C, CLAM steel specimens tested at R.T and T{sub irr} showed similar evolution trend with irradiation dose, compared to other reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels in similar irradiation conditions. At higher T{sub irr} above ∼314 °C, it is interesting that the hardening effect decreases and the ductility seems to recover, probably due to a strong effect of high irradiation temperature.

  15. Effect of phytosanitary irradiation and methyl bromide fumigation on the physical, sensory, and microbiological quality of blueberries and sweet cherries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thang, Karen; Au, Kimberlee; Rakovski, Cyril; Prakash, Anuradha

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether irradiation could serve as a suitable phytosanitary treatment alternative to methyl bromide (MB) fumigation for blueberries and sweet cherry and also to determine the effect of phytosanitary irradiation treatment on survival of Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes on these fruit. 'Bluecrop' blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum) and 'Sweetheart' cherries (Prunus avium) were irradiated at 0.4 kGy or fumigated with methyl bromide and evaluated for quality attributes during storage. Irradiation caused an immediate decrease in firmness of both fruit without further significant change during storage. Fumigated fruit, in contrast, softened by 11-14% during storage. Irradiation did not adversely affect blueberry and cherry shelf-life. MB fumigation did not impact blueberry and cherry quality attributes initially; however, fumigated fruit exhibited greater damage and mold growth than the control and irradiated samples during storage. Irradiation at 400 Gy resulted in a ∼1 log CFU g(-1) reduction in Salmonella spp. and Listeria monocytogenes counts, indicating that this treatment cannot significantly enhance safety. This study indicates that irradiation at a target dose of 0.4 kGy for phytosanitary treatment does not negatively impact blueberry and cherry quality and can serve as an alternative to methyl bromide fumigation. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. AGR-1 Post Irradiation Examination Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demkowicz, Paul Andrew [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The post-irradiation examination (PIE) of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-1 experiment was a multi-year, collaborative effort between Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the performance of UCO (uranium carbide, uranium oxide) tristructural isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel fabricated in the U.S. and irradiated at the Advanced Test Reactor at INL to a peak burnup of 19.6% fissions per initial metal atom. This work involved a broad array of experiments and analyses to evaluate the level of fission product retention by the fuel particles and compacts (both during irradiation and during post-irradiation heating tests to simulate reactor accident conditions), investigate the kernel and coating layer morphology evolution and the causes of coating failure, and explore the migration of fission products through the coating layers. The results have generally confirmed the excellent performance of the AGR-1 fuel, first indicated during the irradiation by the observation of zero TRISO coated particle failures out of 298,000 particles in the experiment. Overall release of fission products was determined by PIE to have been relatively low during the irradiation. A significant finding was the extremely low levels of cesium released through intact coatings. This was true both during the irradiation and during post-irradiation heating tests to temperatures as high as 1800°C. Post-irradiation safety test fuel performance was generally excellent. Silver release from the particles and compacts during irradiation was often very high. Extensive microanalysis of fuel particles was performed after irradiation and after high-temperature safety testing. The results of particle microanalysis indicate that the UCO fuel is effective at controlling the oxygen partial pressure within the particle and limiting kernel migration. Post-irradiation examination has provided the final body of data that speaks to the quality of the AGR-1 fuel, building

  17. Feasibility evaluation of a new irradiation technique: three-dimensional unicursal irradiation with the Vero4DRT (MHI-TM2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizowaki, Takashi; Takayama, Kenji; Nagano, Kazuo; Miyabe, Yuki; Matsuo, Yukinori; Kaneko, Shuji; Kokubo, Masaki; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    The Vero4DRT (MHI-TM2000) is a newly designed unique image-guided radiotherapy system consisting of an O-ring gantry. This system can realize a new irradiation technique in which both the gantry head and O-ring continuously and simultaneously rotate around the inner circumference of the O-ring and the vertical axis of the O-ring, respectively, during irradiation. This technique creates three-dimensional (3D) rotational dynamic conformal arc irradiation, which we term '3D unicursal irradiation'. The aim of this study was to present the concept and to estimate feasibility and potential advantages of the new irradiation technique. Collision maps were developed for the technique and a 3D unicursal plan was experimentally created in reference to the collision map for a pancreatic cancer case. Thereafter, dosimetric comparisons among the 3D unicursal, a two-dimensionally rotational dynamic conformal arc irradiation (2D-DCART), and an intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plan were conducted. Dose volume data of the 3D unicursal plan were comparable or improved compared to those of the 2D-DCART and IMRT plans with respect to both the target and the organs at risk. The expected monitor unit (MU) number for the 3D unicursal plan was only 7% higher and 22.1% lower than the MUs for the 2D-DCART plan and IMRT plan, respectively. It is expected that the 3D unicursal irradiation technique has potential advantages in both treatment time and dose distribution, which should be validated under various conditions with a future version of the Vero4DRT fully implemented the function.

  18. Identification of irradiated pepper with comet assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prieto Miranda, Enrique Fco.; Moreno Alvarez, Damaris L.; Carro Palacio, Sandra [Centro de Aplicaciones Tecnologicas y Desarrollo Nuclear. (CEADEN), Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba)]. E-mail: efprieto@ceaden.edu.cu; damaris@ceaden.edu.cu; Iglesia Enriquez, Isora [Instituto de Investigacion para la Industria Alimenticia (IIIA), Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba)

    2007-07-01

    The treatment of foods with ionizing radiations is a technological process utilized in order to increase the hygienic quality and the storage time of the foods. Several methods of detection of irradiated foods have been recommended. The comet assay of DNA is one fast and economical technique for the qualitative identification of irradiated foods. The objective of the present paper was to identify with the comet assay technique the modifications of the DNA molecule of irradiated pepper storage at environment and refrigeration temperatures and different post-irradiation times for different absorbed dose values, (0.1, 0.3 and 0.5 kGy). It was demonstrated that for the high absorbed dose values was observed a greater break into fragments of the DNA molecule, which shows the application of this technique for the identification of irradiated foods. (author)

  19. Anti-fungal activity of irradiated chitosan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham ThiLe Ha; Tran Thi Thuy; Nguyen Quoc Hien [Nuclear Research Inst., No.1 Nguyen Tu Luc, Dalat (Viet Nam); Nagasawa, Naotsugu; Kume, Tamikazu [Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Gunma (Japan)

    1999-09-01

    Anti-fungal activity of chitosan induced by irradiation has been investigated. Commercial chitosan samples of 8B (80% deacetylation) and l0B (99% deacetylation) were irradiated by {gamma}-ray in dry condition. Highly deacethylated chitosan (10B) at low dose irradiation (75 kGy) was effective for inhibition of fungal growth. The sensitivities of Exobasidium vexans, Septoria chrysanthemum and Gibberella fujikuroi for the irradiated chitosan were different and the necessary concentrations of chitosan were 550, 350 and 250 {mu}g/ml, respectively. For the plant growth, low deacethylation (chitosan 8B) and high dose (500 kGy) was effective and the growth of chrysanthemum was promoted by spraying the irradiated chitosan. (author)

  20. ATF Neutron Irradiation Program Technical Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geringer, J. W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division; Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Materials Science and Technology Division

    2016-03-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) under the Civil Nuclear Energy Working Group (CNWG) is engaged in a cooperative research effort with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to explore issues related to nuclear energy, including research on accident-tolerant fuels and materials for use in light water reactors. This work develops a draft technical plan for a neutron irradiation program on the candidate accident-tolerant fuel cladding materials and elements using the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The research program requires the design of a detailed experiment, development of test vehicles, irradiation of test specimens, possible post-irradiation examination and characterization of irradiated materials and the shipment of irradiated materials to JAEA in Japan. This report discusses the technical plan of the experimental study.

  1. AFIP-3 Irradiation Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danielle M Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme; D. M. Wachs

    2012-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full size plate In center flux trap Position (AFIP) experiment AFIP-3 was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic fuels at a prototypic scale of 2.25 inches x 21.5 inches x 0.050 inches (5.75 cm x 54.6 cm x 0.13cm). The AFIP-3 experiment was fabricated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and consists of two plates, one with a zirconium (Zr) diffusion barrier and one with a silicon (Si) enhanced fuel/clad interface1,2. The following report summarizes the life of the AFIP-3 experiment through end of irradiation, including a brief description of the safety analysis, as-run neutronic analysis results, hydraulic testing results, and thermal analysis results.

  2. AFIP-3 Irradiation Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danielle M Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme; D. M. Wachs

    2011-05-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full size plate In center flux trap Position (AFIP) experiment AFIP-3 was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic fuels at a prototypic scale of 2.25 inches x 21.5 inches x 0.050 inches (5.75 cm x 54.6 cm x 0.13cm). The AFIP-3 experiment was fabricated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and consists of two plates, one with a zirconium (Zr) diffusion barrier and one with a silicon (Si) enhanced fuel/clad interface1,2. The following report summarizes the life of the AFIP-3 experiment through end of irradiation, including a brief description of the safety analysis, as-run neutronic analysis results, hydraulic testing results, and thermal analysis results.

  3. AFIP-1 Irradiation Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. M. Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme; D. M. Wachs

    2011-05-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full size plate In center flux trap Position (AFIP) experiment AFIP-1 was designed to demonstrate the performance of second-generation dispersion fuels at a prototypic scale with a length of 21.5 inches (54.6 cm), width of 2.25 inches (5.75 cm) and a thickness of 0.050 inch (0.13 cm). The experiment was fabricated using commercially standard practices at BWX Technology, Inc. (BWXT). The U-7Mo fuel particles were supplied by the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) using equipment intended for commercial supply. Two fuel plates were tested that incorporated two different matrix compositions, Al-2Si and Al-4043.1 The following report summarizes the life of the AFIP-1 experiment through end of irradiation, including a brief description of the safety analysis, as-run neutronic analysis results, hydraulic testing results, and thermal analysis results

  4. AFIP-2 Irradiation Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danielle M Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme; D. M. Wachs

    2011-05-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full size plate In center flux trap Position (AFIP) experiment AFIP-2 was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic fuels at a prototypic scale of 2.25 inches x 21.5 inches x 0.050 inches (5.75 cm x 54.6 cm x 0.13cm). The AFIP-2 experiment was fabricated by friction bond (FB) and consists of two plates, one with a zirconium (Zr) diffusion barrier and one with a silicon (Si) enhanced fuel/clad interface1,2. The following report summarizes the life of the AFIP-2 experiment through end of irradiation, including a brief description of the safety analysis, as-run neutronic analysis results, hydraulic testing results, and thermal analysis results. The safety analyses performed for AFIP-2 are summarized in Table 5 of the following report.

  5. AFIP-2 Irradiation Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danielle M Perez

    2011-04-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Full size plate In center flux trap Position (AFIP) experiment AFIP-2 was designed to evaluate the performance of monolithic fuels at a prototypic scale of 2.25 inches x 21.5 inches x 0.050 inches (5.75 cm x 54.6 cm x 0.13cm). The AFIP-2 experiment was fabricated by friction bond (FB) and consists of two plates, one with a zirconium (Zr) diffusion barrier and one with a silicon (Si) enhanced fuel/clad interface1,2. The following report summarizes the life of the AFIP-2 experiment through end of irradiation, including a brief description of the safety analysis, as-run neutronic analysis results, hydraulic testing results, and thermal analysis results. The safety analyses performed for AFIP-2 are summarized in Table 5 of the following report.

  6. Osteonecrosis of acetabulum after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, Gintaro; Matuda, Tatsuo; Takeuchi, Norihiro; Itoh, Haruo [Tokyo Koseinenkin Hospital (Japan)

    1996-11-01

    A case of osteonecrosis 8 years post irradiation was reported. The 70 years old female patient who, 8 years ago, received abdominal hysterectomy due to cervical cancer and then radiotherapy of 92.1 Gy within about 1.5 mo, had a pain at the left hip joint with a slight elevation of ALP. The roentgenography showed the fracture and callus of the left acetabulum; bone scintigraphy, a high accumulation of {sup 99m}Tc at the site; CT, abnormal fracture; MRI, low bright T1-weighted image and equi-bright T2-image; and MRI with Gd-DTPA, enhanced image. The hip joint was surgically reconstructed with cement (THR). Surgical and histopathological findings confirmed osteonecrosis without tumoral finding and the lesion was considered radiogenic. (K.H.)

  7. High dose irradiation with hyperfractionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asakura, Hideo; Kurashima, Shoji; Hasegawa, Maki; Akiyama, Kazuo (Sagamihara National Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1990-10-01

    From March 1988 to January 1990, 12 patients including 7 primary lung cancers, 2 lung metastases of colorectal cancer, and each 1 gall bladder cancer, ovarian cancer, and spinal cord metastasis of prostatic cancer, received {sup 60}Co-irradiation with high dose by hyperfractionation. This hyperfractionation consisted of 1.2 Gy per fraction, twice a day with 6 hour interval, and 5 days (10 fractions) a week. The total dose administered was 81.6{approx}100 Gy. The acute reaction of skin, lung, and intestines was tolerable, and it seemed that the late damage of normal tissues was slighter and the treatment result was favorable in comparison with the conventional fractionation, but this estimation was not definite because of short observation period. It was discussed that further reduction of dose per fraction (1 Gy or below) and more increased total dose (100 Gy or more) would be promising in hyperfractionation. (author).

  8. IRRADIATION DEVICE FOR IRRADIATION TESTING OF COATED PARTICLE FUEL AT HANARO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BONG GOO KIM

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Korean Nuclear-Hydrogen Technology Development (NHTD Plan will be performing irradiation testing of coated particle fuel at HANARO to support the development of VHTR in Korea. This testing will be carried out to demonstrate and qualify TRISO-coated particle fuel for use in VHTR. The testing will be irradiated in an inert gas atmosphere without on-line temperature monitoring and control combined with on-line fission product monitoring of the sweep gas. The irradiation device contains two test rods, one has nine fuel compacts and the other five compacts and eight graphite specimens. Each compact contains about 260 TRISO-coated particles. The irradiation device is being loaded and irradiated into the OR5 hole of the in HANARO core from August 2013. The device will be operated for about 150 effective full-power days at a peak temperature of about 1030°C in BOC (Beginning of Cycle during irradiation testing. After a peak burn-up of about 4 atomic percentage and a peak fast neutron fluence of about 1.7×1021 n/cm2, PIE (Post-Irradiation Examination of the irradiated coated particle fuel will be performed at IMEF (Irradiated Material Examination Facility. This paper reviews the design of test rod and irradiation device for coated particle fuel, and discusses the technical results for irradiation testing at HANARO.

  9. SORCE Level 3 Total Solar Irradiance Daily Means V017

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) data set SOR3TSID contains the total solar irradiance (a.k.a solar constant) data collected by the Total Irradiance Monitor (TIM)...

  10. HRB-22 capsule irradiation test for HTGR fuel. JAERI/USDOE collaborative irradiation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minato, Kazuo; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Fukuda, Kousaku [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    1998-03-01

    As a JAERI/USDOE collaborative irradiation test for high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel, JAERI fuel compacts were irradiated in the HRB-22 irradiation capsule in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Postirradiation examinations also were performed at ORNL. This report describes 1) the preirradiation characterization of the irradiation samples of annular-shaped fuel compacts containing the Triso-coated fuel particles, 2) the irradiation conditions and fission gas releases during the irradiation to measure the performance of the coated particle fuel, 3) the postirradiation examinations of the disassembled capsule involving visual inspection, metrology, ceramography and gamma-ray spectrometry of the samples, and 4) the accident condition tests on the irradiated fuels at 1600 to 1800degC to obtain information about fuel performance and fission product release behavior under accident conditions. (author)

  11. Metabolic profiling by (1)H NMR of ground beef irradiated at different irradiation doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanardi, Emanuela; Caligiani, Augusta; Palla, Luigi; Mariani, Mario; Ghidini, Sergio; Di Ciccio, Pierluigi Aldo; Palla, Gerardo; Ianieri, Adriana

    2015-05-01

    This work describes a metabolic profiling study of non-irradiated and irradiated beef (at 2.5, 4.5 and 8 kGy) using (1)H NMR and chemometrics. The assignment of all major NMR signals of the aqueous/methanolic extracts was performed. A comprehensive multivariate data analysis proved the ability to distinguish between the irradiated and non-irradiated beef. Classification trees revealed that three metabolites (glycerol, lactic acid esters and tyramine or a p-substituted phenolic compound) are important biomarkers for classification of the irradiated and non-irradiated beef samples. Overall, the achieved metabolomic results show that the changes in the metabolic profile of meat provide a valuable insight to be used in detecting irradiated beef. The use of the NMR-based approach simplifies sample preparation and decrease the time required for analysis, compared to available official analytical procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Annealing for plant life management: hardness, tensile and Charpy toughness properties of irradiated, annealed and re-irradiated mock-up low alloy nuclear pressure vessel steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tipping, Philip; Cripps, Robin (Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland))

    1994-01-01

    Hardness, tensile and Charpy properties of an irradiated (I) and irradiated-annealed-reirradiated (IAR) mock-up pressure vessel steel are presented. Spectrum tailored pressurized light water reactor (PWR) irradiation at 290[sup o]C by fast neutrons up to nominal fluences of 5 x 10[sup 19]/cm[sup 2] (E [>=] 1 MeV) in a swimming pool type reactor caused the hardness, tensile yield stress and tensile strength to increase. Embrittlement also occurred as indicated by Charpy toughness tests. The optimum annealing heat treatment for the main program was determined using isochronal and isothermal runs on the material and measuring the Vickers microhardness. The response to an intermediate annealing treatment (460[sup o]C for 18 h), when 50% of the target fluence has been reached and then irradiating to the required end fluence (IAR condition) was then monitored further by Charpy and tensile mechanical properties. Annealing was beneficial in mitigating overall hardening or embrittlement effects. The rate of re-embrittlement after annealing and re-irradiating was no faster than when no annealing had been performed. Annealing temperatures below 440[sup o]C were indicated as requiring relatively long times, i.e. [>=] 168 h to achieve some reduction in radiation induced hardness for example. (Author).

  13. Cintichem modified process - {sup 99}Mo precipitation step: application of statistical analysis tools over the reaction parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teodoro, Rodrigo; Dias, Carla R.B.R.; Osso Junior, Joao A., E-mail: jaosso@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fernandez Nunez, Eutimio Gustavo [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EP/USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica. Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    2011-07-01

    Precipitation of {sup 99}Mo by {alpha}-benzoin oxime ({alpha}-Bz) is a standard precipitation method for molybdenum due the high selectivity of this agent. Nowadays, statistical analysis tools have been employed in analytical systems to prove its efficiency and feasibility. IPEN has a project aiming the production of {sup 99}Mo by the fission of {sup 235}U route. The processing uses as the first step the precipitation of {sup 99}Mo with {alpha}-Bz. This precipitation step involves many key reaction parameters. The aim of this work is based on the development of the already known acidic route to produce {sup 99}Mo as well as the optimization of the reactional parameters applying statistical tools. In order to simulate {sup 99}Mo precipitation, the study was conducted in acidic media using HNO{sub 3}, {alpha}Bz as precipitant agent and NaOH /1%H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as dissolver solution. Then, a Mo carrier, KMnO{sub 4} solutions and {sup 99}Mo tracer were added to the reaction flask. The reactional parameters ({alpha}-Bz/Mo ratio, Mo carrier, reaction time and temperature, and cooling reaction time before filtration) were evaluated under a fractional factorial design of resolution V. The best values of each reactional parameter were determined by a response surface statistical planning. The precipitation and recovery yields of {sup 99}Mo were measured using HPGe detector. Statistical analysis from experimental data suggested that the reactional parameters {alpha}-Bz/Mo ratio, reaction time and temperature have a significant impact on {sup 99}Mo precipitation. Optimization statistical planning showed that higher {alpha}Bz/Mo ratios, room temperature, and lower reaction time lead to higher {sup 99}Mo yields. (author)

  14. The evaluation study of high performance gas target system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hur, Min Goo; Yang, Seung Dae; Kim, Sang Wook

    2008-06-15

    The object of this study is a improvement of a gas target and targetry for increasing the radioisotope production yields. The main results are as follows 1. Improvement of beam entrance of the gas target : In this work, deep hole grid was designed for improvement of beam entrance. Using FEM(Finite Elements Method) analysis, it was verified that this design is more effective than the old one. 2. Improvement of target gas loading and withdrawing system : For the targetry, Helium gas and vacuum lines was installed for evaluating the production yields. Using these lines, it was proved that the recovery yields was improved and the residual impurity was reduced. 3. Improvement of target cooling efficiency : In case of the cylindrical target, it is more effective to use short length of target cavity for the high production yields. For improving the cooling efficiency, cooling fin was suggested to the target design. It is more effective to put the cooling fins inside the target cavity for the suppressed target pressure and density reduction effect during the proton beam irradiation. In conclusion, the target with fins inside the target cavity was better for high current irradiation and mass RI production.

  15. Radiation-Induced Epigenetic Alterations after Low and High LET Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aypar, Umut; Morgan, William F.; Baulch, Janet E.

    2011-02-01

    Epigenetics, including DNA methylation and microRNA (miRNA) expression, could be the missing link in understanding the delayed, non-targeted effects of radiation including radiationinduced genomic instability (RIGI). This study tests the hypothesis that irradiation induces epigenetic aberrations, which could eventually lead to RIGI, and that the epigenetic aberrations induced by low linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation are different than those induced by high LET irradiations. GM10115 cells were irradiated with low LET x-rays and high LET iron (Fe) ions and evaluated for DNA damage, cell survival and chromosomal instability. The cells were also evaluated for specific locus methylation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB), tumor suppressor in lung cancer 1 (TSLC1) and cadherin 1 (CDH1) gene promoter regions, long interspersed nuclear element 1 (LINE-1) and Alu repeat element methylation, CpG and non-CpG global methylation and miRNA expression levels. Irradiated cells showed increased micronucleus induction and cell killing immediately following exposure, but were chromosomally stable at delayed times post-irradiation. At this same delayed time, alterations in repeat element and global DNA methylation and miRNA expression were observed. Analyses of DNA methylation predominantly showed hypomethylation, however hypermethylation was also observed. MiRNA shown to be altered in expression level after x-ray irradiation are involved in chromatin remodeling and DNA methylation. Different and higher incidence of epigenetic changes were observed after exposure to low LET x-rays than high LET Fe ions even though Fe ions elicited more chromosomal damage and cell killing. This study also shows that the irradiated cells acquire epigenetic changes even though they are chromosomally stable suggesting that epigenetic aberrations may arise in the cell without initiating RIGI.

  16. Systematization of the Mechanism by Which Plasma Irradiation Causes Cell Growth and Tumor Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Nobuyuki

    2015-09-01

    New methods and technologies have improved minimally invasive surgical treatment and saved numerous patients. Recently, plasma irradiation has been demonstrated that might be useful in medical field and the plasma irradiation device is expected to become practically applicable. Mild plasma coagulator showed some advantages such as hemostasis and adhesion reduction in experimental animal model, but the mechanism of plasma irradiation remains unclear. Our study group aim to clarify the mechanism of plasma irradiation effects, mainly focusing on oxidative stress using cultured cell lines and small animal model. First, a study using cultured cell lines showed that the culture medium that was activated by plasma irradiation (we called this kind of medium as ``PAM'' -plasma activated medium-) induced tumor cell death. Although this effect was mainly found to be due to hydrogen peroxide, the remaining portion was considered as the specific effect of the plasma irradiation and we are now studying focusing on this effect. Second, we established a mouse intra-peritoneal adhesion model and checked biological reaction that occurred in the adhesion part. Histopathological study showed inflammatory cells infiltration into adhesion part and the expression of PTX3 that might involve tissue repair around adhesion part. We also confirmed that cytokines IL-6 and IL-10 might be useful as a marker of adhesion formation in this model. Applying ``PAM'' or mild plasma irradiation in this model, we examine the effects of plasma on inflamed cells. The samples in these experiments would be applied to targeted proteomics analysis, and we aim to demonstrate the systematization of the cell's reaction by plasma irradiation.

  17. Recovery of Ra-223 from natural thorium irradiated by protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasiliev, Aleksandr N.; Ostapenko, Valentina S. [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation); Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow-Troitsk (Russian Federation). Inst. for Nuclear Research; Lapshina, Elena V.; Ermolaev, Stanislav V.; Zhuikov, Boris L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow-Troitsk (Russian Federation). Inst. for Nuclear Research; Danilov, Sergey S. [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation); Kalmykov, Stepan N. [Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation); National Research Center ' Kurchatov Institute' (NRC ' Kurchatov Institute' ), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-01

    Irradiation of natural thorium with medium-energy protons is considered to be a prospective approach to large-scale production of {sup 225}Ac and {sup 223}Ra. In addition to the earlier-developed method of {sup 225}Ac isolation, the present work focuses on the simultaneous recovery of {sup 223}Ra from the same thorium target. Radiochemical procedure is based on liquid-liquid extraction, cation exchange and extraction chromatography. The procedure provides separation of radium from spallation and fission products generated in the thorium target. High chemical yield (85-90%) and radionuclide purity of {sup 223}Ra (> 99.8% except {sup 224}Ra and {sup 225}Ra isotopes) have been achieved.

  18. Characterization of thin films for TNSA laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutroneo, M.; Torrisi, L.; Calcagno, L.; Torrisi, A.

    2014-04-01

    Thin films of hydrogenated materials have been prepared, at Messina University, to be irradiated by high intensity lasers in TNSA conditions in order to accelerate high energetic protons with high yield and directivity. Film composition was based on polymers, metals, multilayers and nanostructures embedded in polymers. The preparation methods were different and based on different deposition techniques. High vacuum condition, nanostructures, carbon nanotubes, metal oxides and hydrates, were employed. Targets were prepared as a sheath with thicknesses ranging between 0.1 and 100 μm and surfaces of the order of some cm2. Targets were characterized in terms of thickness, roughness, surface morphology, colours and absorption coefficient in the wavelength range 250 nm-1300 nm. Peculiar attention is given to samples with high absorption coefficient in order to improve the energy transfer from the coherent light to the generated plasma.

  19. Saturation behavior of irradiation hardening in F82H irradiated in the HFIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, T. [Blanket Engineering Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan); Shiba, K.; Tanigawa, H.; Ando, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States); Stoller, R. [ORNL - Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Div., Oak Ridge, AK TN (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Post irradiation tensile tests on reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel, F82H have been conducted over the past two decades using Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) of JAEA, and Fast Flux Testing Facility (FFTF) of PNNL and High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of ORNL, USA, under Japan/US collaboration programs. According to these results, F82H does not demonstrate irradiation hardening above 673 K up to 60 dpa. The current study has been concentrated on hardening behavior at temperature around 573 K. A series of low temperature irradiation experiment has been conducted at the HFIR under the international collaborative research between JAEA/US-DOE. In this collaboration, the irradiation condition is precisely controlled by the well matured capsule designing and instrumentation. This paper summarizes recent results of the irradiation experiments focused on F82H and its modified steels compared with the irradiation properties database on F82H. Post irradiation tensile tests have been conducted on the F82H and its modified steels irradiated at 573 K and the dose level was up to 25 dpa. According to these results, irradiation hardening of F82H is saturated by 9 dpa and the as-irradiated 0.2 % proof stress is less than 1 GPa at ambient temperature. The deterioration of total elongation was also saturated by 9 dpa irradiation. The ductility of some modified steels which showed larger total elongation than that of F82H before irradiation become the same level as that of standard F82H steel after irradiation, even though its magnitude of irradiation hardening is smaller than that of F82H. This suggests that the more ductile steel demonstrates the more ductility loss at this temperature, regardless to the hardening level. The difference in ductility loss behavior between various tensile specimens will be discussed as the ductility could depend on the specimen dimension. (authors)

  20. Graphite oxide based targets applied in laser matter interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutroneo, Mariapompea; Torrisi, Lorenzo; Badziak, Jan; Rosinski, Marcin; Havranek, Vladimir; Mackova, Anna; Malinsky, Petr; Sofer, Zdenek; Luxa, Jan; Cannavò, Antonino; Lorincik, Jan

    2018-01-01

    In the present work, we propose the production of a hybrid graphene based material suitable to be laser irradiated with the aim to produce quasi-monoenergetic proton beams using a femtosecond laser system. The unique lattice structure of the irradiated solid thin target can affect the inside electron propagation, their outgoing from the rear side of a thin foil, and subsequently the plasma ion acceleration. The produced targets, have been characterized in composition, roughness and structure and for completeness irradiated. The yield and energy of the ions emitted from the laser-generated plasma have been monitored and the emission of proton stream profile exhibited an acceleration of the order of several MeVs/charge state.

  1. Graphite oxide based targets applied in laser matter interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cutroneo Mariapompea

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we propose the production of a hybrid graphene based material suitable to be laser irradiated with the aim to produce quasi-monoenergetic proton beams using a femtosecond laser system. The unique lattice structure of the irradiated solid thin target can affect the inside electron propagation, their outgoing from the rear side of a thin foil, and subsequently the plasma ion acceleration. The produced targets, have been characterized in composition, roughness and structure and for completeness irradiated. The yield and energy of the ions emitted from the laser-generated plasma have been monitored and the emission of proton stream profile exhibited an acceleration of the order of several MeVs/charge state.

  2. Production of high energy electrons by irradiation of fs-pulse laser on copper film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oishi, Yuji; Nayuki, Takuya; Fujii, Takashi; Nemoto, Koshichi [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan); Kayoiji, Tsutomu [Tokyo Inst. of Technology, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Okano, Yasuaki; Hironaka, Yoichiro; Nakamura, Kazutaka G.; Kondo, Ken-ichi [Tokyo Inst. of Technology, Materials and Structures Laboratory, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Fast electrons with energy corresponding to the ponderomotive potential were produced by laser irradiation of 43-fs, 2.7 X 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} on a 30 {mu}m thick copper target. The energy spectra of the electrons were directly measured using a magnetic spectrometer with an imaging plate. The typical temperature was 350 keV for irradiation at 15deg incidence angle. The energy spectra of high-energy photons, which were expected to be produced from the electrons, were also calculated. (author)

  3. Monitoring of the morphologic reconstruction of deposited ablation products in laser irradiation of silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasova M.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Using electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, and IR spectroscopy, it was established that, in the regime of continuous laser irradiation of silicon at P = 170 W in different gaseous atmospheres with an oxygen impurity, SiOx composite films with a complex morphology form. The main components of ablation products are clusters that form during flight of ablation products and as a result of separation of SiOx-clusters from the zone of the irradiation channel. The roughness and density of the films depend on the heating temperature of the target surface and the type of deposited clusters.

  4. Ionizing irradiation quarantine treatment against oriental fruit moth (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in ambient and hypoxic atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallman, Guy J

    2004-06-01

    Oriental fruit moth, Grapholita molesta (Busck), is a pest of many rosaceous temperate fruits, including pomes, Malus spp., and stone fruits, Prunus spp., in much of the world. However, some areas are free of the pest, and shipments of fruit hosts from infested to noninfested areas may be regulated. Current quarantine treatments for oriental fruit moth include methyl bromide fumigation and cold storage for several weeks. Methyl bromide use is being restricted because it is a stratospheric ozone-depleting substance, and alternatives are sought. Cold is not tolerated by many hosts of oriental fruit moth. The objective of this research was to develop irradiation quarantine treatments against the pest under ambient and hypoxic storage conditions because some hosts of oriental fruit moth are stored in hypoxic atmospheres, and hypoxia is known to lessen the effects of irradiation. In ambient atmospheres, no adults emerged from 58,779 fifth instars (the most radiotolerant stage present in fruit) irradiated with a target dose of 200 Gy (195-232 Gy measured). In atmospheres flushed with nitrogen, 5.3% of adults emerged from 44,050 fifth instars irradiated with a target dose of 200 Gy (194-230 Gy measured), but they died at a faster rate than control adults and without laying eggs. A dose of 232 Gy (the maximum recorded when 200 Gy was targeted) is recommended to disinfest any fruit of oriental fruit moth under ambient and hypoxic atmospheres.

  5. Nitric oxide-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by heavy-ion microbeam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Masanori; Matsumoto, Hideki; Funayama, Tomoo; Yokota, Yuichiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Maeda, Munetoshi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-01

    In general, a radiation-induced bystander response is known to be a cellular response induced in non-irradiated cells after receiving bystander signaling factors released from directly irradiated cells within a cell population. Bystander responses induced by high-linear energy transfer (LET) heavy ions at low fluence are an important health problem for astronauts in space. Bystander responses are mediated via physical cell-cell contact, such as gap-junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and/or diffusive factors released into the medium in cell culture conditions. Nitric oxide (NO) is a well-known major initiator/mediator of intercellular signaling within culture medium during bystander responses. In this study, we investigated the NO-mediated bystander signal transduction induced by high-LET argon (Ar)-ion microbeam irradiation of normal human fibroblasts. Foci formation by DNA double-strand break repair proteins was induced in non-irradiated cells, which were co-cultured with those irradiated by high-LET Ar-ion microbeams in the same culture plate. Foci formation was suppressed significantly by pretreatment with an NO scavenger. Furthermore, NO-mediated reproductive cell death was also induced in bystander cells. Phosphorylation of NF-κB and Akt were induced during NO-mediated bystander signaling in the irradiated and bystander cells. However, the activation of these proteins depended on the incubation time after irradiation. The accumulation of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), a downstream target of NO and NF-κB, was observed in the bystander cells 6 h after irradiation but not in the directly irradiated cells. Our findings suggest that Akt- and NF-κB-dependent signaling pathways involving COX-2 play important roles in NO-mediated high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander responses. In addition, COX-2 may be used as a molecular marker of high-LET heavy-ion-induced bystander cells to distinguish them from directly irradiated cells, although this may depend on the time

  6. AGC-1 Post Irradiation Examination Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Swank

    2011-09-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Graphite R&D program is currently measuring irradiated material property changes in several grades of nuclear graphite for predicting their behavior and operating performance within the core of new Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment consisting of six irradiation capsules will generate this irradiated graphite performance data for NGNP reactor operating conditions. All six AGC capsules in the experiment will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), disassembled in the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF), and examined at the INL Research Center (IRC) or Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This is the first in a series of status reports on the progress of the AGC experiment. As the first capsule, AGC1 was irradiated from September 2009 to January 2011 to a maximum dose level of 6-7 dpa. The capsule was removed from ATR and transferred to the HFEF in April 2011 where the capsule was disassembled and test specimens extracted from the capsules. The first irradiated samples from AGC1 were shipped to the IRC in July 2011and initial post irradiation examination (PIE) activities were begun on the first 37 samples received. PIE activities continue for the remainder of the AGC1 specimen as they are received at the IRC.

  7. [Near infrared light irradiator using halogen lamp].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Yasuo

    2012-07-01

    The practical electric light bulb was invented by Thomas Alva Edison in 1879. Halogen lamp is the toughest and brightest electric light bulb. With light filter, it is used as a source of near infrared light. Super Lizer and Alphabeam are made as near infrared light irradiator using halogen lamp. The light emmited by Super Lizer is linear polarized near infrared light. The wave length is from 600 to 1,600 nm and strongest at about 1,000 nm. Concerning Super Lizer, there is evidence of analgesic effects and normalization of the sympathetic nervous system. Super Lizer has four types of probes. SG type is used for stellate ganglion irradiation. B type is used for narrow area irradiation. C and D types are for broad area irradiation. The output of Alphabeam is not polarized. The wave length is from 700 to 1,600 nm and the strongest length is about 1,000nm. Standard attachment is used for spot irradiation. Small attachment is used for stellate ganglion irradiation. Wide attachment is used for broad area irradiation. The effects of Alphabeam are thought to be similar to that of Super Lizer.

  8. Steam-chemical reactivity for irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderl, R.A.; McCarthy, K.A.; Oates, M.A.; Petti, D.A.; Pawelko, R.J.; Smolik, G.R. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental investigation to determine the influence of neutron irradiation effects and annealing on the chemical reactivity of beryllium exposed to steam. The work entailed measurements of the H{sub 2} generation rates for unirradiated and irradiated Be and for irradiated Be that had been previously annealed at different temperatures ranging from 450degC to 1200degC. H{sub 2} generation rates were similar for irradiated and unirradiated Be in steam-chemical reactivity experiments at temperatures between 450degC and 600degC. For irradiated Be exposed to steam at 700degC, the chemical reactivity accelerated rapidly and the specimen experienced a temperature excursion. Enhanced chemical reactivity at temperatures between 400degC and 600degC was observed for irradiated Be annealed at temperatures of 700degC and higher. This reactivity enhancement could be accounted for by the increased specific surface area resulting from development of a surface-connected porosity in the irradiated-annealed Be. (author)

  9. ESR identification of irradiated foodstuffs: LARQUA research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raffi, J. [Laboratoire de Recherche sur la Qualite des Aliments, Marseille (France)

    1996-12-31

    As electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy is the leading method for identification of irradiated foodstuffs, meat and fish bones, fruit and relative products (of vegetable origin), sea-food etc. were studied. In order to prepare a large co-trial on ESR identification of irradiation of irradiated foodstuffs, experiments were carried out at LARQUA, especially on fruits and vegetables. The radicals induced in the fruit pulp are not stable because the water content of fruit is generally high, but ESR can be used with dried fruit or dry components such as achenes, pips or stones. Different responses are observed, depending on the fruit. In ``sugatype`` fruits (papaya, dried grapes), an ESR multicomponent signal is radio-induced, but the non-irradiated fruit presents no ESR signal or a single-line, while in ``cellulose type`` fruits (pistachio nut, berries), a triplet is induced. But a six line signal due to Mn{sup 2+} and a central single line may also be present both in irradiated and non-irradiated samples. In the case of aromatic herbs, the proposed official CEN protocol for irradiated food containing cellulose was used. (author).

  10. Analysis of gamma irradiated pepper constituents, 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takagi, Kazuko; Okuyama, Tsuneo; Ishikawa, Toshihiro.

    1988-11-01

    Gamma irradiated peppers (10 krad, 100 krad, 1 Mrad) were analyzed by HPLC. The extraction method and HPLC conditions were same as the first report, that is, the extraction from pepper was performed by Automatic Air Hammer and the extracted samples were separated on a reversed phase C/sub 8/ column with a concave gradient from 0.1% trifluoroaceticacid (TFA) in water to 75% acetonitrile-0.1% TFA in water for 60 minutes and detected at 210 nm, 280 nm. It is difficult to compare with irradiated and unirradiated pepper constituents by their peak height or area. And the method of multivariant statistically analysis was introduced. The 'peak n area/peak n + 1 area' ratio was calculated by computer. Each peak area was accounted by integrator. The value of these ratio were called 'parameter'. Each chromatogram has 741 parameters calculated with 39 chromatographic peaks. And these parameters were abopted to the multivariant statiscally analysis. Comparison of constituents between irradiated pepper and unirradiated pepper was done by 741 parameters. The correlation of parameters between irradiated and unirradiated was investigated by use of computer. Some parameters of irradiated case were selected as which had no correlation with unirradiated case. That is to say these parameters were thought to be changed with gamma spectrum irradiation. By this method, Coumarin was identified as a changed component with gamma irradiation.

  11. The behaviour under irradiation of molybdenum matrix for inert matrix fuel containing americium oxide (CerMet concept)

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agata, E.; Knol, S.; Fedorov, A. V.; Fernandez, A.; Somers, J.; Klaassen, F.

    2015-10-01

    Americium is a strong contributor to the long term radiotoxicity of high activity nuclear waste. Transmutation by irradiation in nuclear reactors or Accelerator Driven System (ADS, subcritical reactors dedicated to transmutation) of long-lived nuclides like 241Am is therefore an option for the reduction of radiotoxicity of waste packages to be stored in a repository. In order to safely burn americium in a fast reactor or ADS, it must be incorporated in a matrix that could be metallic (CerMet target) or ceramic (CerCer target). One of the most promising matrix to incorporate Am is molybdenum. In order to address the issues (swelling, stability under irradiation, gas retention and release) of using Mo as matrix to transmute Am, two irradiation experiments have been conducted recently at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten (The Netherland) namely HELIOS and BODEX. The BODEX experiment is a separate effect test, where the molybdenum behaviour is studied without the presence of fission products using 10B to ;produce; helium, the HELIOS experiment included a more representative fuel target with the presence of Am and fission product. This paper covers the results of Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) of the two irradiation experiments mentioned above where molybdenum behaviour has been deeply investigated as possible matrix to transmute americium (CerMet fuel target). The behaviour of molybdenum looks satisfying at operating temperature but at high temperature (above 1000 °C) more investigation should be performed.

  12. The behaviour under irradiation of molybdenum matrix for inert matrix fuel containing americium oxide (CerMet concept)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Agata, E., E-mail: elio.dagata@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport, P.O. Box 2, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Knol, S.; Fedorov, A.V. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Fernandez, A.; Somers, J. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Klaassen, F. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group, P.O. Box 25, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2015-10-15

    Americium is a strong contributor to the long term radiotoxicity of high activity nuclear waste. Transmutation by irradiation in nuclear reactors or Accelerator Driven System (ADS, subcritical reactors dedicated to transmutation) of long-lived nuclides like {sup 241}Am is therefore an option for the reduction of radiotoxicity of waste packages to be stored in a repository. In order to safely burn americium in a fast reactor or ADS, it must be incorporated in a matrix that could be metallic (CerMet target) or ceramic (CerCer target). One of the most promising matrix to incorporate Am is molybdenum. In order to address the issues (swelling, stability under irradiation, gas retention and release) of using Mo as matrix to transmute Am, two irradiation experiments have been conducted recently at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten (The Netherland) namely HELIOS and BODEX. The BODEX experiment is a separate effect test, where the molybdenum behaviour is studied without the presence of fission products using {sup 10}B to “produce” helium, the HELIOS experiment included a more representative fuel target with the presence of Am and fission product. This paper covers the results of Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) of the two irradiation experiments mentioned above where molybdenum behaviour has been deeply investigated as possible matrix to transmute americium (CerMet fuel target). The behaviour of molybdenum looks satisfying at operating temperature but at high temperature (above 1000 °C) more investigation should be performed.

  13. Projected Improvements in Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using a Novel Breast Stereotactic Radiotherapy Device: A Dosimetric Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, James W; Mutaf, Yildirim; Nichols, Elizabeth; Hall, Andrea; Vadnais, Patrick; Regine, William F; Feigenberg, Steven J

    2017-01-01

    Accelerated partial breast irradiation has caused higher than expected rates of poor cosmesis. At our institution, a novel breast stereotactic radiotherapy device has demonstrated dosimetric distributions similar to those in brachytherapy. This study analyzed comparative dose distributions achieved with the device and intensity-modulated radiation therapy accelerated partial breast irradiation. Nine patients underwent computed tomography simulation in the prone position using device-specific immobilization on an institutional review board-approved protocol. Accelerated partial breast irradiation target volumes (planning target volume_10mm) were created per the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project B-39 protocol. Additional breast stereotactic radiotherapy volumes using smaller margins (planning target volume_3mm) were created based on improved immobilization. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy and breast stereotactic radiotherapy accelerated partial breast irradiation plans were separately generated for appropriate volumes. Plans were evaluated based on established dosimetric surrogates of poor cosmetic outcomes. Wilcoxon rank sum tests were utilized to contrast volumes of critical structures receiving a percentage of total dose ( Vx). The breast stereotactic radiotherapy device consistently reduced dose to all normal structures with equivalent target coverage. The ipsilateral breast V20-100 was significantly reduced ( P irradiation in this series indicate a potential to improve outcomes. Clinical trials investigating this benefit have begun accrual.

  14. Neutron irradiation creep in stainless steel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuele, Wolfgang (Commission of the European Union, Institute for Advanced Materials, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy)); Hausen, Hermann (Commission of the European Union, Institute for Advanced Materials, I-21020 Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See) (Italy))

    1994-09-01

    Irradiation creep elongations were measured in the HFR at Petten on AMCR steels, on 316 CE-reference steels, and on US-316 and US-PCA steels varying the irradiation temperature between 300 C and 500 C and the stress between 25 and 300 MPa. At the beginning of an irradiation a type of primary'' creep stage is observed for doses up to 3-5 dpa after which dose the secondary'' creep stage begins. The primary'' creep strain decreases in cold-worked steel materials with decreasing stress and decreasing irradiation temperature achieving also negative creep strains depending also on the pre-treatment of the materials. These primary'' creep strains are mainly attributed to volume changes due to the formation of radiation-induced phases, e.g. to the formation of [alpha]-ferrite below about 400 C and of carbides below about 700 C, and not to irradiation creep. The secondary'' creep stage is found for doses larger than 3 to 5 dpa and is attributed mainly to irradiation creep. The irradiation creep rate is almost independent of the irradiation temperature (Q[sub irr]=0.132 eV) and linearly dependent on the stress. The total creep elongations normalized to about 8 dpa are equal for almost every type of steel irradiated in the HFR at Petten or in ORR or in EBR II. The negative creep elongations are more pronounced in PCA- and in AMCR-steels and for this reason the total creep elongation is slightly smaller at 8 dpa for these two steels than for the other steels. ((orig.))

  15. MEET ISOLDE - Target Production

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    MEET ISOLDE - Target Production. Everything at ISOLDE starts with a target and the target production team realise on more then 50 years of experience to build and develop new targets for ISOLDE’s wide physics program.

  16. Preparation of targets by electrodeposition for heavy element studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberhardt, K. E-mail: klaus.eberhardt@uni-mainz.de; Schaedel, M.; Schimpf, E.; Thoerle, P.; Trautmann, N

    2004-03-21

    For heavy element studies at GSI, lanthanide and actinide targets have been prepared by molecular plating. The deposition occurs from an isopropanolic solution at 1000-1200 V with current densities of a few mA/cm{sup 2}. Several lanthanide targets have been prepared for test experiments. With {sup nat}Gd deposited on a 10 {mu}m thick Be backing foil a target density of 1100 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} could be achieved. Gd-targets were used for the production of {alpha}-emitting isotopes of Os, the homologue of hassium (Hs; Z=108), in order to develop a chemical separation procedure for Hs. {sup 248}Cm targets with densities up to 730 {mu}g/cm{sup 2} have been produced for recent experiments to investigate the chemical behaviour of Hs. Here, a rotating wheel system with a multi-target device has been applied enabling higher beam intensities, compared to a stationary target. The targets were irradiated with a pulsed {sup 26}Mg{sup 5+} beam applying beam currents up to 6.6 {mu}A{sub electr}. An {alpha}-spectroscopic investigation of the irradiated Cm-targets showed that the Cm-material is not evenly distributed over the entire target area. Very often, for heavy element investigations, chemical separation procedures are required to ensure high purity of the deposited actinide materials.

  17. 44gSc from metal calcium targets for PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Severin, Gregory; Gagnon, K.; Engle, J. W.

    2012-01-01

    A low-cost and efficient method for producing pre-clinical scale quantities of 44gSc is presented. Production involves proton irradiation of natural unenriched calcium metal followed by rapid separation of radioscandium from the target using hydroxmate functionalized resin.© 2012 American Institu...

  18. Radiation induced cavitation: A possible phenomenon in liquid targets?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, C.D.

    1998-07-01

    The proposed design of a new, short-pulse spallation neutron source includes a liquid mercury target irradiated with a 1 GeV proton beam. This paper explores the possibility that cavitation bubbles may be formed in the mercury and briefly discusses some design features that could avoid harmful effects should cavitation take place.

  19. Identification of irradiated crab using EPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maghraby, A. [Radiation Dosimetry Department, National Institute for Standards (NIS), Ministry of Scientific Research, Haram, 12211- Giza, P.O. Box: 136 (Egypt)]. E-mail: maghrabism@yahoo.com

    2007-02-15

    EPR spectroscopy is a fast and powerful technique for the identification of irradiated food. Crab exoskeleton was divided into six parts: dactyl, cheliped, carapace, apron, swimming legs, and walking legs. Samples of the exoskeleton were prepared and irradiated to Cs-137 gamma radiation in the range (1.156-5.365 kGy). EPR spectra of unirradiated as well as irradiated samples were recorded and analyzed. Response to gamma radiation was plotted for each part of the exoskeleton, dactyl was found to be the most sensitive part, followed by the apron (38%), cheliped (37%), walking legs (30%), swimming legs (24%), and carapace (21%) relative to the dactyl response.

  20. Lymphangioma secondary to irradiation after mastectomy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveti, Aline; Biasi, Tatiana Basso; Funchal, Gabriella Di Giunta

    2017-01-01

    Lymphangioma is a rare benign disease of the lymphatic vessels. Typically, they are primary conditions but may be acquired secondarily, such as those caused by irradiation during radiotherapy for the treatment of breast cancer. The local lymphatic obstruction provoked by irradiation causes the appearance of asymptomatic hyaline vesicles on the irradiated skin. The present report describes a 78-year-old female patient, who initially presented hyaline vesicles that progressed into multiple papules with serous exudation of a yellowish and odorless secretion on the area of chronic radiodermitis in right breast. Despite the rarity of the case, we emphasize the importance of knowledge regarding dermatological disease for early diagnosis and proper medical conduct.

  1. Pathogenesis of irradiation-induced cognitive dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abayomi, O.K. [Howard Univ. Hospital, Washington, DC (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    1996-12-31

    Neurocognitive dysfunction is a common sequela of cranial irradiation that is especially severe in young children. The underlying mechanisms of this disorder have not been described. The present review describes the role of the hippocampus and the anatomically related cortex in memory function and its marked susceptibility to ischemic and hypoxic injury. Based on studies of animal models of human amnesia and histopathological findings in the irradiated brain, the neurocognitive sequela of cranial irradiation can be seen to be mediated through vascular injury, resulting in ischemia and hypoxia in the hippocampal region. Recognition of the site and mechanisms of this injury may lead to the development of techniques to minimize the risks. (orig.).

  2. Measurements of radioactivity production in the IFMIF target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mollendorff, U.V.; Feuerstein, H.; Giese, H. [Association Euratom-FZK Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    In a simulation experiment with 40 MeV deuterons on a thick lithium target, the production of Be-7 and H-3 in the target of the projected International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) was measured. The Be-7 yield is 0.27 atoms {+-}10% per 100 incident deuterons. The preliminary estimate for the tritium yield is 4.5 atoms (-30%... +100%) per 100 incident deuterons. (authors)

  3. Introduction to radiobiology of targeted radionuclide therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre ePOUGET

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, new radionuclide-based targeted therapies have emerged as efficient tools for cancer treatment. Targeted radionuclide therapies (TRT are based on a multidisciplinary approach that involves the cooperation of specialists in several research fields. Among them, radiobiologists investigate the biological effects of ionizing radiation, specifically the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the radiation response. Most of the knowledge about radiation effects concerns external beam radiation therapy (EBRT and radiobiology has then strongly contributed to the development of this therapeutic approach. Similarly, radiobiology and dosimetry are also assumed to be ways for improving TRT, in particular in the therapy of solid tumors which are radioresistant. However, extrapolation of EBRT radiobiology to TRT is not straightforward. Indeed, the specific physical characteristics of TRT (heterogeneous and mixed irradiation, protracted exposure and low absorbed dose rate differ from those of conventional EBRT (homogeneous irradiation, short exposure and high absorbed dose rate, and consequently the response of irradiated tissues might be different. Therefore, specific TRT radiobiology needs to be explored. Determining dose-effect correlation is also a prerequisite for rigorous preclinical radiobiology studies because dosimetry provides the necessary referential to all TRT situations. It is required too for developing patient-tailored TRT in the clinic in order to estimate the best dose for tumor control, while protecting the healthy tissues, thereby improving therapeutic efficacy. Finally, it will allow to determine the relative contribution of targeted effects (assumed to be dose-related and non-targeted effects (assumed to be non-dose-related of ionizing radiation. However, conversely to EBRT where it is routinely used, dosimetry is still challenging in TRT. Therefore, it constitutes with radiobiology, one of the main

  4. Nanostructured targets for TNSA laser ion acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torrisi Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured targets, based on hydrogenated polymers with embedded nanostructures, were prepared as thin micrometric foils for high-intensity laser irradiation in TNSA regime to produce high-ion acceleration. Experiments were performed at the PALS facility, in Prague, by using 1315 nm wavelength, 300 ps pulse duration and an intensity of 1016 W/cm2 and at the IPPLM, in Warsaw, by using 800 nm wavelength, 40 fs pulse duration, and an intensity of 1019 W/cm2. Forward plasma diagnostic mainly uses SiC detectors and ion collectors in time of flight (TOF configuration. At these intensities, ions can be accelerated at energies above 1 MeV per nucleon. In presence of Au nanoparticles, and/or under particular irradiation conditions, effects of resonant absorption can induce ion acceleration enhancement up to values of the order of 4 MeV per nucleon.

  5. Food irradiation - pros and cons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-01-01

    The use of ionising radiation for food preservation is a much-disputed topic, both among experts and among consumers. Pros and cons of this issue were discussed in detail at the consumers' forum. Professor Dr. Johannes Friedrich Diehl, Director of the Institute for Biochemistry of the Food Research Centre, Karlsruhe, is a well-known supporter of the new method of food preservation; he sees advantages in the radiopreservation of food because, for example, losses due to inedibility are reduced, the danger of salmonellosis is decreased, just as the use of chemicals. He thinks this method to be without danger to health, shown by many years of experience. Opponents to food irradiation like Prof. Dr. Konrad Pfeilsticker, Professor for food science and food chemistry at the Bonn University deem the method to be unnecessary and raise the problem of qualitative changes caused in the food. In the course of the discussions, the pros and cons seemed to balance each other out.

  6. Functional assessment of laser irradiation. Annual progress report July 1978-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbins, D.O.

    1979-07-01

    The use of high-resolution, chromatic targets to assess the adverse effects of laser irradiation on rhesus visual acuity provides a much more sensitive measure of the acquired visual deficits than can be observed with achromatic targets. The use of chromatic targets, however, does not appear to indicate a high degree of selectivity in terms of the visible spectrum most affected by laser exposure. This nonselective nature of the acquired deficit was also observed in our electrophysiological studies of changes in spectral sensitivity and receptive field organization following brief and prolonged laser exposures.

  7. Exogenous Nitric Oxide Suppresses in Vivo X-ray-Induced Targeted and Non-Targeted Effects in Zebrafish Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Y. Kong

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present paper studied the X-ray-induced targeted effect in irradiated zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio, as well as a non-targeted effect in bystander naïve embryos partnered with irradiated embryos, and examined the influence of exogenous nitric oxide (NO on these targeted and non-targeted effects. The exogenous NO was generated using an NO donor, S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP. The targeted and non-targeted effects, as well as the toxicity of the SNAP, were assessed using the number of apoptotic events in the zebrafish embryos at 24 h post fertilization (hpf revealed through acridine orange (AO staining. SNAP with concentrations of 20 and 100 µM were first confirmed to have no significant toxicity on zebrafish embryos. The targeted effect was mitigated in zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 100 µM SNAP prior to irradiation with an X-ray dose of 75 mGy but was not alleviated in zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 20 µM SNAP. On the other hand, the non-targeted effect was eliminated in the bystander naïve zebrafish embryos if they were pretreated with 20 or 100 µM SNAP prior to partnering with zebrafish embryos having been subjected to irradiation with an X-ray dose of 75 mGy. These findings revealed the importance of NO in the protection against damages induced by ionizing radiations or by radiation-induced bystander signals, and could have important impacts on development of advanced cancer treatment strategies.

  8. Helium measurements in support of MHTGR lithium target testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliver, B.M. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.; Rogers, J.W. [EG and G-Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering Lab.

    1994-12-31

    The New Production-Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (NP-MHTGR) development program sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) has as part of its task the irradiation testing of the lithium target material. The lithium target material tritium ({sup 3}H) production is predominantly through the {sup 6}Li (n,{alpha}){sup 3}H reaction which also produces equal amounts of {sup 4}He ({alpha}). The tritium produced decays to {sup 3}He (12.38 year half-life), with some of this {sup 3}He being converted back to tritium during irradiation via the {sup 3}He(n,p){sup 3}H reaction. From these reactions, and the irradiation time-history, the measurement of the {sup 4}He and {sup 3}He content of a lithium monitor or target material sample can be used to determine several important variables associated with the target material performance, as well as to independently determine the neutron fields associated with the test environment. Helium measurements have been used to determine lithium burnup, tritium retention in target pellets, pellet material composition and variation and threshold temperature for helium release from the pellets. The present paper presents selected results obtained form the various helium measurements and discusses their relevance and importance to the MHTGR target development program.

  9. Standardization of accelerator irradiation procedures for simulation of neutron induced damage in reactor structural materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Lin; Gigax, Jonathan; Chen, Di; Kim, Hyosim; Garner, Frank A.; Wang, Jing; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

    2017-10-01

    Self-ion irradiation is widely used as a method to simulate neutron damage in reactor structural materials. Accelerator-based simulation of void swelling, however, introduces a number of neutron-atypical features which require careful data extraction and in some cases introduction of innovative irradiation techniques to alleviate these issues. We briefly summarize three such atypical features: defect imbalance effects, pulsed beam effects, and carbon contamination. The latter issue has just been recently recognized as being relevant to simulation of void swelling and is discussed here in greater detail. It is shown that carbon ions are entrained in the ion beam by Coulomb force drag and accelerated toward the target surface. Beam-contaminant interactions are modeled using molecular dynamics simulation. By applying a multiple beam deflection technique, carbon and other contaminants can be effectively filtered out, as demonstrated in an irradiation of HT-9 alloy by 3.5 MeV Fe ions.

  10. Photocatalytic dye degradation with copper–titanium dioxide nanocomposites under sunlight and visible light irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayyum Khan, Abdul; Yuan, Shuai; Niu, Sheng; Liu, Fengjiang; Feng, Guang; Jiang, Mengci; Zeng, Heping

    2018-01-01

    Photocatalytic methalyne blue dye degradation was carried out with copper (Cu)–titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanocomposites under sunlight and visible light irradiation. The Cu–TiO2 nanocomposites were fabricated via femtosecond laser ablation of pressed targets in water. The current method provides a facile route for Cu–TiO2 nanocomposites preparation, which is free from impurities on the catalysts surface. The Cu–TiO2 nanocomposites (with Cu content of 5 wt%) have shown 3 folds faster dye degradation kinetics compared with TiO2 nanoparticles under sunlight irradiation. While under visible light irradiation, the same nanocomposites exhibited 2.6 folds faster kinetics compared with TiO2 nanoparticles. The faster light harvesting efficiency of the catalysts is attributed to more hydroxyl radical generation.

  11. Influence of penetration controlled irradiation with charged particles on tobacco pollen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Dept. of Radiation Research for Environment and Resources; Tanaka, Atsushi; Tano, Shigemitsu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Advanced Science Research Center; Inoue, Masayoshi [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Agriculture

    1997-09-01

    To investigate the effect of local irradiation on biological systems, an apparatus for penetration controlled irradiation with charged particles was set up. By comparison of ranges of 1.5 MeV/u He{sup 2+} between the theoretically calculated ranges and the practical ranges using RCD dosimeter, it was demonstrated that the range of particles could be controlled linearly by changing the distance from the beam window in the atmosphere to a target. In addition, the penetration controlled irradiation of tobacco pollen increased the frequency of `leaky pollen`. The increased frequency of the leaky pollen suggests that a damage in the pollen envelope would be induced at the range-end. (orig.)

  12. Wavelength influence on nitrogen insertion into titanium by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation in air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torrent, F.; Lavisse, L. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Berger, P. [CEA/DSM/IRAMIS/SIS2M, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); SIS2M, UMR CEA-CNRS 3299, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Jouvard, J.-M.; Andrzejewski, H.; Pillon, G.; Bourgeois, S.; Marco de Lucas, M.C. [Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire Carnot de Bourgogne (ICB), UMR 6303 CNRS-Université de Bourgogne, 9 Av. A. Savary, BP 47 870, F-21078 Dijon Cedex (France)

    2013-08-01

    We studied in this work the influence of the wavelength (532 vs. 1064 nm) on the insertion of nitrogen in titanium targets by surface laser treatments in air. The laser pulses were of 5 ns and the irradiance was lower than 25 × 10{sup 12} W/m{sup 2}. Results obtained using a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm were compared with those previously reported for laser treatments at 1064 nm. Nuclear reaction analysis and micro-Raman spectroscopy were used for determining the composition and the structure of the surface layers, respectively. Results showed the lower efficiency of irradiation at 532 nm for nitrogen insertion, which is possible only above threshold conditions depending on both the laser irradiance and the number of cumulated impacts per point. This was explained as being due to a higher ablative effect in the visible range. The insertion of oxygen giving rise to the growth of titanium oxynitrides was also discussed.

  13. Vaporization of perfluorocarbon droplets using optical irradiation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Strohm, Eric; Rui, Min; Gorelikov, Ivan; Matsuura, Naomi; Kolios, Michael

    2011-01-01

    .... Droplet vaporization has been previously demonstrated using acoustic methods. We propose using laser irradiation as a means to induce PFC droplet vaporization using a method we term optical droplet vaporization (ODV...

  14. Endoscopic appearance of irradiated gastric mucosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Sagher, L.I.; Van den Heule, B.; Van Houtte, P.; Engelholm, L.; Balikdjan, D.; Bleiberg, H.

    1979-09-01

    Irradiation of the epigastric area for gastric cancer may induce actinic lesions of the stomach characterized on endoscopic examination by ulcerations, haemorrhagic gastritis, fragility of the mucosa, thickening and congestion of the gastric folds.

  15. Total lymphoid irradiation in alloimmunity and autoimmunity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strober, S.

    1987-12-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation has been used as an immunosuppressive regimen in autoimmune disease and organ transplantation. The rationale for its use originated from studies of patients with Hodgkin disease, in whom this radiotherapy regimen was noted to induce profound and long-lasting immune suppression and yet was well tolerated, with few long-term side effects. Total lymphoid irradiation is a unique immunosuppressive regimen that produces a selective (and long-lasting) reduction in the number and function of helper T cells and certain subsets of B cells. Conventional immunosuppressive drugs show little selectivity, and their effects are short-lived. The most important aspect of total lymphoid irradiation is the potential for achieving transplantation tolerance and permanent remissions in autoimmune disease in laboratory animals. Attempts are being made to achieve similar goals in humans given total lymphoid irradiation, so that immunosuppressive drugs can be ultimately withdrawn from transplant recipients and patients with lupus nephritis. 28 references.

  16. Neoplasia in fast neutron-irradiated beagles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, E.W.; Zook, B.C.; Casarett, G.W.; Deye, J.A.; Adoff, L.M.; Rogers, C.C.

    1981-09-01

    One hundred fifty-one beagle dogs were irradiated with either photons or fast neutrons (15 MeV) to one of three dose-limiting normal tissues--spinal cord, lung, or brain. The radiation was given in four fractions per week for 5 weeks (spinal cord), 6 weeks (lung), or 7 weeks (brain) to total doses encompassing those given clinically for cancer management. To date, no nonirradiated dogs or photon-irradiated dogs have developed any neoplasms. Seven dogs receiving fast neutrons have developed 9 neoplasms within the irradiated field. Of the neutron-irradiated dogs at risk, the incidence of neoplasia was 15%. The latent period for radiation-induced cancers has varied from 1 to 4 1/2 years at this time in the study.

  17. Neoplasia in fast neutron-irradiated beagles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, E.W. (George Washington Univ. Medical Center, Washington, DC); Zook; B.C.; Casarett, G.W.

    1981-09-01

    One hundred fifty-one beagle dogs were irradiated with either photons or fast neutrons (15 MeV) to one of three dose-limiting normal tissues - spinal cord, lung, or brain. The radiation was given in four fractions per week for 5 weeks (spinal cord), 6 weeks (lung), 7 weeks (brain) to total doses encompassing those given clinically for cancer management. To date, no nonirradiated dogs or photon-irradiated dogs have developed neoplasms within the irradiated field. Of the neutron-irradiated dogs at risk, the incidence of neoplasia was 15%. The latent period for radiation-induced cancers has varied from 1 to 4 1/2 years at this time in the study.

  18. Downscaling of global solar irradiation in R

    CERN Document Server

    Antonanzas-Torres, F; Antonanzas, J; Perpiñán, O

    2013-01-01

    A methodology for downscaling solar irradiation from satellite-derived databases is described using R software. Different packages such as raster, parallel, solaR, gstat, sp and rasterVis are considered in this study for improving solar resource estimation in areas with complex topography, in which downscaling is a very useful tool for reducing inherent deviations in satellite-derived irradiation databases, which lack of high global spatial resolution. A topographical analysis of horizon blocking and sky-view is developed with a digital elevation model to determine what fraction of hourly solar irradiation reaches the Earth's surface. Eventually, kriging with external drift is applied for a better estimation of solar irradiation throughout the region analyzed. This methodology has been implemented as an example within the region of La Rioja in northern Spain, and the mean absolute error found is a striking 25.5% lower than with the original database.

  19. Argon laser irradiation of the otolithic organ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, T.; Nomura, Y.; Young, Y.H.; Hara, M. (Univ. of Tokyo (Japan))

    1990-12-01

    An argon laser was used to irradiate the otolithic organs of guinea pigs and cynomolgus monkeys. After stapedectomy, the argon laser (1.5 W x 0.5 sec/shot) irradiated the utricle or saccule without touching the sensory organs. The stapes was replaced over the oval window after irradiation. The animals used for acute observation were killed immediately for morphologic studies; those used for long-term observation were kept alive for 2, 4, or 10 weeks. Acute observation revealed that sensory and supporting cells were elevated from the basement membrane only in the irradiated area. No rupture of the membranous labyrinth was observed. Long-term observation revealed that the otolith of the macula utriculi had disappeared in 2-week specimens. The entire macula utricili had disappeared in 10-week specimens. No morphologic changes were observed in cochlea, semicircular canals, or membranous labyrinth. The saccule showed similar changes.

  20. Food Irradiation: What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... shelf life of foods by reducing or eliminating microorganisms and insects. Like pasteurizing milk and canning fruits ... and delay ripening of fruit to increase longevity. Sterilization – irradiation can be used to sterilize foods, which ...

  1. Van de Graaff Irradiation of Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quigley, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chemerisov, Sergey [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Tkac, Peter [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Through irradiations using our 3 MeV Van de Graaf accelerator, Argonne is testing the radiation stability of components of equipment that are being used to dispense molybdenum solutions for use as feeds to 99mTc generators and in the 99mTc generators themselves. Components have been irradiated by both a direct electron beam and photons generated from a tungsten convertor.

  2. Molecular dynamics for irradiation driven chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sushko, Gennady B.; Solov'yov, Ilia A.; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2016-01-01

    involving small molecules or molecular fragments. We advocate that the quantum transformations, such as molecular bond breaks, creation and annihilation of dangling bonds, electronic charge redistributions, changes in molecular topologies, etc., could be incorporated locally into the molecular force fields......A new molecular dynamics (MD) approach for computer simulations of irradiation driven chemical transformations of complex molecular systems is suggested. The approach is based on the fact that irradiation induced quantum transformations can often be treated as random, fast and local processes...

  3. BNCT irradiation facility at the JRR-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torii, Y.; Kishi, T.; Kumada, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Sakurai, F.; Takayanagi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-10-01

    The JRR--4 was modified for fuel enrichment reducing and reactor equipment renewal. And also a medical irradiation facility for the Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) was installed at the JRR--4 in that time. The medical irradiation facility has been composed of a heavy water tank, a collimator and an irradiation room. The heavy water tank has four layers of heavy water for spectrum shifter and 75cm-thickness aluminum for the shield of fast neutron. The collimator is for collimating thermal neutron and epithermal neutron using polyethylene with lithium-fluoride and shielding gamma ray by bismuth. The irradiation room has sufficient space at exit side of the beam, to accommodate a large working area for setting the patient. Both of the medical treatment room and the patient-monitoring area were prepared adjacent to the irradiation room. The medical irradiation facility in the JRR-4 is designed to permit selection of neutron energies from thermal neutron to epithermal neutron by changing the thickness of heavy water layers. Therefore it is available to continue the same kind of BNCT with thermal neutron used to perform in the JRR-2, as well as to commence the research and development of BNCT with epithermal neutron, which will make the brain tumor treatment possible at a deep part of brain. The full power operation of the JRR-4 was resumed with LEU fuel in October 1998 and currently performing some experiments to measure the neutron fluxes and physical doses for determinate characterization of the medical irradiation facility. The first medical irradiation for BNCT was carried out on 25th October 1999. The patient was treated by Tsukuba University group using thermal neutron beam included epi-thermal neutrons. (author)

  4. Development of detection methods for irradiated foods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jae Seung; Nam, Hye Seon; Oh, Kyong Nam; Woo, Si Ho; Kim, Kyeung Eun; Yi, Sang Duk; Park, Jun Young; Kim, Kyong Su; Hwang, Keum Taek

    2000-04-01

    In 1999, we have been studied (1) on the detection of irradiated foods by ESR spectroscopy, by thermoluminescence, and by viscometry for physical measurements, (2) on the detection of hydrocarbons and 2-alkylcyclobutanones derived from fatty foods by GC/MS for chemical measurements, (3) on the screening and detection of irradiated foods by Comet assay and immunochemical (ELISA) technique for biological or biochemical measurements.

  5. Embrittlement of irradiated ferritic/martensitic steels in the absence of irradiation hardening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge Noational Laboratory, TN (United States); Shiba, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Sokolov, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Div., TN (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Neutron irradiation of 9-12% Cr ferritic/martensitic steels below 425-450 deg. C produces microstructural defects that cause an increase in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength. This irradiation hardening causes embrittlement, which is observed in Charpy impact and toughness tests as an increase in ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). Based on observations that show little change in strength in these steels irradiated above 425-450 deg. C, the general conclusion has been that no embrittlement occurs above this irradiation-hardening temperature regime. In a recent study of F82H steel irradiated at 300, 380, and 500 deg. C, irradiation hardening-an increase in yield stress-was observed in tensile specimens irradiated at the two lower temperatures, but no change was observed for the specimens irradiated at 500 deg. C. As expected, an increase in DBTT occurred for the Charpy specimens irradiated at 300 and 380 deg. C. However, there was an unexpected increase in the DBTT of the specimens irradiated at 500 deg. C. The observed embrittlement was attributed to the irradiation-accelerated precipitation of Laves phase. This conclusion was based on results from a detailed thermal aging study of F82H, in which tensile and Charpy specimens were aged at 500, 550, 600, and 650 deg. C to 30,000 h. These studies indicated that there was a decrease in yield stress at the two highest temperatures and essentially no change at the two lowest temperatures. Despite the strength decrease or no change, the DBTT increased for Charpy specimens irradiated at all four temperatures. Precipitates were extracted from thermally aged specimens, and the amount of precipitate was correlated with the increase in transition temperature. Laves phase was identified in the extracted precipitates by X-ray diffraction. Earlier studies on conventional elevated-temperature steels also showed embrittlement effects above the irradiation-hardening temperature

  6. Development of detection methods for irradiated foods; development of immunological identification of irradiated foods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyong Ae; Lee, Yoon Jin; Choi, Yoon Jung; Han, Su Kyong [Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    Enzyme-linked Immunosorbent assay systems for the identification of irradiated egg, pork and chicken was developed. Eggs were irradiated in their shells to 0.5{approx}7kGy. Pork was irradiated to 0.5{approx}3kGy and chicken irradiated to 0.5kGy{approx}5kGy. The most sensitive proteins to irradiation were screened by SDS-PAGE and purified. Ovalbumin from egg, salt soluble protein(p) from pork, and salt soluble protein(c) from chicken showed the most sensitivity to irradiation. To investigate for a practical use in identifying of irradiated egg, pork and chicken, competitive ELISA was performed. The binding activity of ovalbumin to anti-ovalbumin IgG was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by irradiating up to 7kGy, and considerably lowered after irradiating at 7kGy. The concentration of 50% inhibition of ovalbumin to IgG was increased to 1.5(0.5kGy){approx}3.7(7kGy) times in an dose-dependent relationship. The binding activity of salt soluble protein(p) to anti-salt soluble protein IgG (anti-SSPp IgG)was also reduced in a dose-dependent manner by irradiating up to 3kGy, and considerably lowered after irradiating at 3kGy. The concentration of 50% inhibition of salt soluble protein to IgG was increased to 1.1(0.5kGy){approx}5.2(3kGy) times in a dose-dependent relationship. On the other hand, the binding activity of salt soluble protein(c) to anti-salt soluble protein IgG(anti-SSPc IgG) was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by irradiating up to 5kGy, too, and considerably lowered after irradiating at 5kGy. The concentration of 50% inhibition of salt soluble protein to IgG was increased to 1.1{approx}2.3 times in a dose-dependent relationship. SDS-PAGE of the irradiation sensitive proteins showed the partial breakdown of it was induced by irradiation. So, the lowering of binding activity was probably due to the partial breakdown of ovalbumin by irradiation. 25 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  7. Food Irradiation | RadTown USA | US EPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-07

    Using radiation to kill bacteria and other pathogens in food is called food irradiation. Irradiating food kills bacteria and molds that can make people sick. Irradiation does not remove toxins that are already in food. The high energy of the radiation breaks chemical bonds to stop bacteria and other pathogens from multiplying. Irradiation does not make food radioactive.

  8. Total lymphoid irradiation and discordant cardiac xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaplan, E.; Dresdale, A.R.; Diehl, J.T.; Katzen, N.A.; Aronovitz, M.J.; Konstam, M.A.; Payne, D.D.; Cleveland, R.J. (Tufts Univ. School of Medicine, Boston, MA (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation can prolong concordant cardiac xenografts. The effects of total lymphoid irradiation in a discordant xenograft model (guinea pig to rat) were studied with and without adjuvant pharmacologic immunosuppression. Inbred Lewis rats were randomly allocated to one of four groups. Group 1 (n = 6) served as a control group and rats received no immunosuppression. Group 2 (n = 5) received triple-drug therapy that consisted of intraperitoneal azathioprine (2 mg/kg), cyclosporine (20 mg/kg), and methylprednisolone (1 mg/kg) for 1 week before transplantation. Group 3 animals (n = 5) received 15 Gy of total lymphoid irradiation in 12 divided doses over a 3-week period. Group 4 (n = 6) received both triple-drug therapy and total lymphoid irradiation as described for groups 2 and 3. Complement-dependent cytotoxicity assay was performed to determine if a correlation between complement-dependent cytotoxicity and rejection-free interval existed. Rejection was defined as cessation of graft pulsation and was confirmed by histologic test results. Only groups 1 and 2 showed a difference in survival (group 1, 6.9 +/- 1.0 minutes; group 2, 14.2 +/- 2.7 minutes, p = 0.02). Although total lymphoid irradiation did decrease complement-dependent cytotoxicity, linear regression revealed no correlation between complement-dependent cytotoxicity and graft survival (coefficient of correlation, 0.30). Unlike concordant cardiac xenografts, total lymphoid irradiation with or without triple-drug therapy does not prolong graft survival.

  9. Thermal conductivity of electron-irradiated graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasinghe, Asanka; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2017-10-01

    We report results of a systematic analysis of thermal transport in electron-irradiated, including irradiation-induced amorphous, graphene sheets based on nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations. We focus on the dependence of the thermal conductivity, k, of the irradiated graphene sheets on the inserted irradiation defect density, c, as well as the extent of defect passivation with hydrogen atoms. While the thermal conductivity of irradiated graphene decreases precipitously from that of pristine graphene, k0, upon introducing a low vacancy concentration, c graphene lattice, further reduction of the thermal conductivity with the increasing vacancy concentration exhibits a weaker dependence on c until the amorphization threshold. Beyond the onset of amorphization, the dependence of thermal conductivity on the vacancy concentration becomes significantly weaker, and k practically reaches a plateau value. Throughout the range of c and at all hydrogenation levels examined, the correlation k = k0(1 + αc)-1 gives an excellent description of the simulation results. The value of the coefficient α captures the overall strength of the numerous phonon scattering centers in the irradiated graphene sheets, which include monovacancies, vacancy clusters, carbon ring reconstructions, disorder, and a rough nonplanar sheet morphology. Hydrogen passivation increases the value of α, but the effect becomes very minor beyond the amorphization threshold.

  10. Helium irradiation induced hardening in MNHS steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Minghuan; Wang, Ji; Wang, Zhiguang; Shen, Tielong; Wei, Kongfang; Yao, Cunfeng; Sun, Jianrong; Gao, Ning; Zhu, Yabin; Pang, Lilong; Wang, Dong; Zhu, Huiping; Han, Yi; Fang, Xuesong

    2017-09-01

    A recently developed reduced activation martensitic MNHS steel was irradiated with 200 keV helium (He) ions to a fluence of 1.0 × 1020 ions/m2 at 300 °C and 1.0 × 1021 ions/m2 at 300 °C and 450 °C. After irradiation, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and nano-indentation measurements were used to investigate the hardness change and defects induced by He irradiation. Two kinds of defects including He bubbles and dislocation loops are observed by TEM. Irradiation induces hardening of MNHS steels and peak hardness values occur in all irradiated samples. Hardness increments induced by He bubbles and dislocation loops are predicted and fitted with the experimental peak hardness increment, based on the dispersed barrier-hardening (DBH) model and the size and number density of the two defects. A good agreement is got between the predicted and experimental hardness increment and the obstacle strength factor of He bubbles is a little stronger than the obstacle strength of dislocation loops. Other possible contributions to irradiation induced hardening are also discussed.

  11. Development of Pneumatic Transfer Irradiation Facility (PTS no.2) for Neutron Activation Analysis at HANARO Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Y. S.; Moon, J. H.; Kim, S. H.; Sun, G. M.; Baek, S. Y.; Kim, H. R.; Kim, Y. J

    2008-03-15

    A pneumatic transfer irradiation system (PTS) is one of the most important facilities used during neutron irradiation of a target material for instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in a research reactor. In particular, a fast pneumatic transfer system is essential for the measurement of a short half-life nuclide and a delayed neutron counting system. The pneumatic transfer irradiation system (PTS no.2) involving a manual system and an automatic system for delayed neutron activation analysis (DNAA) were reconstructed with new designs of a functional improvement at the HANARO research reactor in 2006. In this technical report, the conception, design, operation and control of PTS no.2 was described. Also the experimental results and the characteristic parameters measured by a mock-up test, a functional operation test and an irradiation test of these systems, such as the transfer time of irradiation capsule, automatic operation control by personal computer, delayed neutron counting system, the different neutron flux, the temperature of the irradiation position with an irradiation time, the radiation dose rate when the rabbit is returned, etc. are reported to provide a user information as well as a reactor's management and safety.

  12. Reduction of the IgE-binding ability and maintenance of immunogenicity of gamma-irradiated Dermatophagoides farinae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju-Woon; Seo, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Jae-Hun [Radiation Application Research Division, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Jeongeup 580 185 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Soo-Young [Department of Pediatrics, Ajou University School of medicine, Suwon 442 749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Joong-Won [Department of Allergy and Immunology, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University, Seoul 120 752 (Korea, Republic of); Byun, Myung-Woo [Radiation Application Research Division, Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Jeongeup 580 185 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: mwbyun@kaeri.re.kr

    2007-11-15

    House dust mites, Dermatophagoides farinae (DF) and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, are major allergens in the most common indoor allergen and are important risk factor for asthma. The modified antigen has been studied to treat allergic disorder. This study was carried out to measure possibility of modified allergen using gamma irradiation to treat allergy such as asthma. DF solutions (2 mg/ml) as target allergen were irradiated with Co-60 at 50 and 100 kGy. Conformational alternation of irradiated DF was observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Levels of anti-irradiated DF mouse IgGs (sub-isotypes) against intact DF were measured similar to that of anti-intact DF IgGs. The binding abilities of house dust mite-allergic patients' IgE were reduced depending on radiation dose, and irradiation could inhibit the binding ability of patients' IgE more than 40%. This study has shown that the binding ability of IgE was reduced by conformational alteration by irradiation and the irradiated DF had epitopes capable to induce immunogeniciy.

  13. Target materials for exotic ISOL beams

    CERN Document Server

    Gottberg, A

    2016-01-01

    The demand for intensity, purity, reliability and availability of short-lived isotopes far from stability is steadily high, and considerably exceeding the supply. In many cases the ISOL (Isotope Separation On-Line) method can provide beams of high intensity and purity. Limitations in terms of accessible chemical species and minimum half-life are driven mainly by chemical reactions and physical processes inside of the thick target. A wide range of materials are in use, ranging from thin metallic foils and liquids to refractory ceramics, while poly-phasic mixed uranium carbides have become the reference target material for most ISOL facilities world-wide. Target material research and development is often complex and especially important post-irradiation analyses are hindered by the high intrinsic radiotoxicity of these materials. However, recent achievements have proven that these investigations are possible if the effort of different facilities is combined, leading to the development of new material matrices t...

  14. Targeted and non-targeted effects from combinations of low doses of energetic protons and iron ions in human fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongying; Magpayo, Nicole; Held, Kathryn D

    2011-03-01

    In space, astronauts are exposed to mixed radiation fields consisting of energetic protons and high atomic number, high energy (HZE) particles at low dose rates. Therefore, it is critical to understand effects of combinations of low doses of different radiation types at the cellular level. AG01522 normal human skin fibroblasts and a transwell insert co-culture system were used. Irradiations used were 1 GeV/amu (gigaelectron volt/atomic mass unit) protons and 1 GeV/amu iron (Fe) ions. DNA damage was measured as micronucleus (MN) formation and p53 binding protein 1 (53BP1) foci induction. The same magnitude of DNA damage was induced in cells sequentially exposed to 1 cGy protons and 1 cGy Fe ions as in cells irradiated with either protons or Fe ions alone. The same magnitude of DNA damage was also observed in non-irradiated bystander cells sharing medium with cells irradiated with either 1 cGy protons or iron ions or protons plus iron ions. However, when the 'bystander' cells were exposed to 1 cGy protons up to 3 h before co-culture with Fe ion-irradiated cells, no DNA damage in the 'bystander' cells was observed. These data provide the first evidence of interactions between targeted and non-targeted DNA damage caused by dual exposure to low doses of energetic protons and iron ions.

  15. Thermoluminescence method for detection of irradiated food

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinnioja, S

    1998-12-31

    A method of thermoluminescence (TL) analysis was developed for the detection of irradiated foods. The TL method is based on the determination of thermoluminescence of adhering or contaminating minerals separated from foods by wet sieving and treatment with high density liquid. Carbon tetrachloride provided a suitable alternative for foods that form gels with water. Thermoluminescence response of minerals in a first TL measurement is normalised with a second TL measurement of the same mineral sample after calibration irradiation to a dose of 5 kGy. The decision about irradiation is made on the basis of a comparison of the two TL spectra: if the two TL glow curves match in shape and intensity the sample has been irradiated, and if they are clearly different it has not been irradiated. An attractive feature of TL analysis is that the mineral material itself is used for calibration; no reference material is required. Foods of interest in the investigation were herbs, spices, berries and seafood. The presence of minerals in samples is a criterion for application of the method, and appropriate minerals were found in all herbs, spices and berries. The most common minerals in terrestrial food were tecto-silicates - quartz and feldspars - which with their intense and stable thermoluminescence were well suited for the analysis. Mica proved to be useless for detection purposes, whereas carbonate in the form of calcite separated from intestines of seafood was acceptable. Fading of the TL signal is considerable in the low temperature part of the glow curve during a storage of several months after irradiation. However, spices and herbs could easily be identified as irradiated even after two years storage. Conditions for seafood, which is stored in a freezer, are different, and only slight fading was observed after one year. The effect of mineral composition and structure on TL was studied for feldspars. Feldspars originating from subtropical and tropical regions exhibit lower TL

  16. How gamma-rays and electron-beam irradiation would affect the antimicrobial activity of differently processed wild mushroom extracts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, M J; Fernandes, Â; Barreira, J C M; Lourenço, I; Fernandes, D; Moura, A; Ribeiro, A R; Salgado, J; Antonio, A; Ferreira, I C F R

    2015-03-01

    The effects of irradiation (gamma-rays and electron-beams), up to 10 kGy, in the antimicrobial activity of mushroom species (Boletus edulis, Hydnum repandum, Macrolepiota procera and Russula delica) differently processed (fresh, dried, freeze) were evaluated. Clinical isolates with different resistance profiles from hospitalized patients in Local Health Unit of Mirandela, Northeast of Portugal, were used as target micro-organisms. The mushrooms antimicrobial activity did not suffer significant changes that might compromise applying irradiation as a possible mushroom conservation technology. Two kGy dose (independently of using gamma-rays or electron-beams) seemed to be the most suitable choice to irradiate mushrooms. This study provides important results in antimicrobial activity of extracts prepared from irradiated mushroom species. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Evaluation of induced radioactivity in 10 MeV-electron irradiated spices, (1); [gamma]-ray measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, Masakazu; Katayama, Tadashi; Ito, Norio; Mizohata, Akira; Matsunami, Tadao; Shibata, Setsuko; Toratani, Hirokazu (Osaka Prefectural Univ., Sakai (Japan). Research Inst. for Advanced Science and Technology); Takeda, Atsuhiko

    1994-02-01

    Black pepper, white pepper, red pepper, ginger and turmeric were irradiated with 10 MeV electrons from a linear accelerator to a dose of 100 kGy and radioactivity was measured in order to estimate induced radioactivity in the irradiated foods. Induced radioactivity could not be detected significantly by [gamma]-ray spectrometry in the irradiated samples except for spiked samples which contain some photonuclear target nuclides in the list of photonuclear reactions which could produce radioactivity below 10 MeV. From the amount of observed radioactivities of short-lived photonuclear products in the spiked samples and calculation of H[sub 50] according to ICRP Publication 30, it was concluded that the induced radioactivity and its biological effects in the 10 MeV electron-irradiated natural samples were negligible in comparison with natural radioactivity from [sup 40]K contained in the samples. (author).

  18. Effects of gamma irradiation on different stages of mealybug Dysmicoccus neobrevipes (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The, Doan Thi; Khanh, Nguyen Thuy; Lang, Vo Thi Kim; Van Chung, Cao; An, Tran Thi Thien; Thi, Nguyen Hoang Hanh

    2012-01-01

    Utilization of phytosanitary irradiation as a potential treatment to disinfest agricultural commodities in trade has expanded rapidly in the recent years. Cobalt-60 gamma ray target doses of 100, 150, 200 and 250 Gy were used to irradiate immatures and adults of Dysmicoccus neobrevipes (Beardsley) (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) infesting dragon fruits to find the most tolerant stage and the most optimal dose range for quarantine treatment. In general, irradiation affected significantly all life stages of D. neobrevipes mortality and adult reproduction. The pattern of tolerance to irradiation in D. neobrevipes was 1st instars<2nd instars<3rd instarsirradiation, predicted doses for 100% mortality of each different development stage in the above mentioned pattern were 224.6, 241.3, 330.9 and 581.5 Gy, respectively. No survived female adult produced offspring at 200 and 250 Gy. Dose range between 200 and 250 Gy could be efficient to prevent the reproduction of this mealybug.

  19. Irradiation-induced structure and property changes in tokamak plasma-facing, carbon-carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchell, T. D.

    Carbon-carbon composites are an attractive choice for fusion reactor plasma-facing components because of their low atomic number, superior thermal shock resistance, and low neutron activation. Next generation plasma fusion reactors, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), will require advanced carbon-carbon composite materials possessing high thermal conductivity to manage the anticipated severe heat loads. Moreover, ignition machines such as ITER will produce large neutron fluxes. Consequently, the influence of neutron damage on the structure and properties of carbon-carbon composite materials must be evaluated. Data from two irradiation experiments are reported and discussed here. Carbon-carbon composite materials were irradiated in target capsules in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A peak damage dose of 4.7 displacements per atom (dpa) at 600 C was attained. The carbon materials irradiated included unidirectional, two-directional, and three-directional carbon-carbon composites. Dimensional changes are reported for the composite materials and are related to single crystal dimensional changes through fiber and composite structural models. Moreover, the irradiation-induced dimensional changes are reported and discussed in terms of their architecture, fiber type, and graphitization temperature. The effect of neutron irradiation on thermal conductivity of two three-directional, carbon-carbon composites is reported and the recovery of thermal conductivity due to thermal annealing is discussed.

  20. Mechanisms of taste bud cell loss after head and neck irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Ha M.; Reyland, Mary E.; Barlow, Linda A.

    2012-01-01

    Taste loss in human patients following radiotherapy for head and neck cancer is a common and significant problem, but the cellular mechanisms underlying this loss are not understood. Taste stimuli are transduced by receptor cells within taste buds, and like epidermal cells, taste cells are regularly replaced throughout adult life. This renewal relies on a progenitor cells adjacent to taste buds, which continually supply new cells to each bud. Here we treated adult mice with a single 8 Gy dose of X-ray irradiation to the head and neck, and analyzed taste epithelium at 1–21 days post-irradiation (dpi). We found irradiation targets the taste progenitor cells, which undergo cell cycle arrest (1–3 dpi) and apoptosis (within 1 dpi). Taste progenitors resume proliferation at 5–7 dpi, with the proportion of cells in S and M phase exceeding control levels at 5–6 and 6 dpi, respectively, suggesting that proliferation is accelerated and/or synchronized following radiation damage. Using BrdU birthdating to identify newborn cells, we found that the decreased proliferation following irradiation reduces the influx of cells at 1–2 dpi, while the robust proliferation detected at 6 dpi accelerates entry of new cells into taste buds. By contrast, the number of differentiated taste cells was not significantly reduced until 7 dpi. These data suggest a model where continued natural taste cell death, paired with temporary interruption of cell replacement underlies taste loss after irradiation. PMID:22399770

  1. Final report of the HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor) irradiation facilities improvement project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montgomery, B.H.; Thoms, K.R.; West, C.D.

    1987-09-01

    The High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has outstanding neutronics characteristics for materials irradiation, but some relatively minor aspects of its mechanical design severely limited its usefulness for that purpose. In particular, though the flux trap region in the center of the annular fuel elements has a very high neutron flux, it had no provision for instrumentation access to irradiation capsules. The irradiation positions in the beryllium reflector outside the fuel elements also have a high flux; however, although instrumented, they were too small and too few to replace the facilities of a materials testing reactor. To address these drawbacks, the HFIR Irradiation Facilities Improvement Project consisted of modifications to the reactor vessel cover, internal structures, and reflector. Two instrumented facilities were provided in the flux trap region, and the number of materials irradiation positions in the removable beryllium (RB) was increased from four to eight, each with almost twice the available experimental space of the previous ones. The instrumented target facilities were completed in August 1986, and the RB facilities were completed in June 1987.

  2. Magnetic resonance thermometry for monitoring photothermal effects of interstitial laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, Jessica; Jose, Jessnie; Figueroa, Daniel; Le, Kelvin; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.; Hode, Tomas; Chen, Wei R.

    2012-03-01

    Selective photothermal interaction using dye-assisted non-invasive laser irradiation has limitations when treating deeper tumors or when the overlying skin is heavily pigmented. We developed an interstitial laser irradiation method to induce the desired photothermal effects. An 805-nm near-infrared laser with a cylindrical diffuser was used to treat rat mammary tumors by placing the active tip of the fiber inside the target tumors. Three different power settings (1.0 to 1.5 watts) were applied to treat animal tumors with an irradiation duration of 10 minutes. The temperature distributions of the treated tumors were measured by a 7.1-Tesla magnetic resonance imager using proton resonance frequency (PRF) method. Three-dimensional temperature profiles were reconstructed and assessed using PRF. This is the first time a 7.1-Tesla magnetic resonance imager has been used to monitor interstitial laser irradiation via PRF. This study provides a basic understanding of the photothermal interaction needed to control the thermal damage inside tumor using interstitial laser irradiation. It also shows that PRF can be used effectively in monitoring photothermal interaction. Our long-term goal is to develop a PRF-guided laser therapy for cancer treatment.

  3. Transformation of hydroxyapatite to fluorapatite by irradiation with high-energy CO2 laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurman, J H; Hemmerlé, J; Voegel, J C; Rauhamaa-Mäkinen, R; Luomanen, M

    1997-01-01

    High-energy laser irradiation has been shown to cause crystalline transformations in apatites, which may lead to the formation of tricalcium phosphates with a resulting decrease in acid resistance. Depending on the nature and energy density of laser irradiation used, however, an increase of acid resistance of dental enamel has also been reported after laser irradiation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the phase transformation of hydroxyapatite (HA) to fluorapatite (FA) in a model system that incorporates sodium fluoride (NaF) into apatite structure by using laser irradiation. A CO2 laser was used at energy densities ranging from 21 to 500 J/cm2. Synthetic HA mixed with NaF (10:1) was the target of laser irradiation. The crystalline structures were then investigated using X-ray diffraction analysis. The results showed that a phase transformation of HA to FA could be realized, and that the threshold energy density needed was 38 J/cm2. Not only is the finding crystallographically important, but it also opens new perspectives for future research regarding the development of laser technology for clinical purposes.

  4. Comparative nephrotoxicity of native or Co-60 gamma rays irradiated crotoxin in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Andre Moreira; Alves, Glaucie J.; Aires, Raquel da Silva; Turibio, Thompson O.; Thomazi, Gabriela O. Coelho; Spencer, Patrick J.; Nascimento, Nanci do, E-mail: andrerocha@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nascimento-Rocha, Josefa M.; Magalhaes Filho, Asterio Souza, E-mail: 0304@prof.itpacporto.com.br [Instituto Tocantinense Presidente Antonio Carlos Porto (ITPAC), Porto Nacional, TO (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Snake venoms are complex mixtures of proteins and peptides with a wide spectrum of physiological targets such as the blood coagulation and cardiovascular systems and the motor end plate among others. Acute renal failure is a common complication in accidents with the South American rattlesnake. The toxin involved in this pathology is the crotoxin, a major component of the venom in terms of concentration and toxicity. Snake venoms, when irradiated with {sup 60}Co gamma rays present a significant decrease in toxicity while the immunogenic properties of its components are preserved. The use of irradiated venom is an attractive alternative for antisera production since it might reduce the appearance of renal lesions improving the welfare and lifespan of those animals employed on antivenom production. At the present work, we have compared the effects of native and irradiated crotoxin on the mice renal function. Tubular lesions were observed in all the samples from the animal group injected with native crotoxin. Animals injected with the irradiated toxin presented alteration only after 30 minutes and 1 hour after injection. These data suggest that the onset of the renal lesions is delayed and that the severity of the lesions might be lower when using irradiated crotoxin. (author)

  5. Urban solar irradiance and power prediction from nearby stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zihao Chen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available With the proliferation of small-scale solar PV installations, global horizontal irradiance (GHI and power predictions are becoming critical elements in the integration of PV generation into the grid. This paper considers short-term prediction, from 5 minutes to a few hours, based on historical meteorological measurement data from weather and power monitoring stations located in the Canberra (Australia region. The specific objective of this study is to produce skilful forecasts for (a generic target station using a minimal amount of observations from nearby stations. Thus, although a large number of weather and power variables are collected and used for developing and testing the prediction algorithms, the ultimate aim is to rely on a few predictors, mainly meteorologically based. This will allow the identification of critical instruments which would need to be installed in order to provide satisfactory PV power predictions while limiting capital and operating costs of monitoring. Relative mean absolute error (rMAE is used here to indicate prediction performance. Three statistical methods are tested for two different seasons, a winter and a summer. The relative importance of predictors and stations is assessed. A conversion from GHI to global irradiance on tilted surfaces, by means of simple geometry arguments and notion of irradiance components at a nearby site, is also introduced and tested. Finally, the prediction accuracy is categorised according to different clear-sky indices. Results show that when the clear-sky index exceeds 0.9 (near-to-cloudless conditions, the prediction performance is distinctly better than at lower clear sky indices, by at least 0.05 and 0.2 in terms of rMAE in summer and winter, respectively.

  6. Hot deuteron generation and neutron production in deuterated nanowire array irradiated at relativistic intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Alden; Calvi, Chase; Tinsley, Jim; Hollinger, Reed; Wang, Shoujun; Rockwood, Alex; Wang, Yong; Buss, Conrad; Shlyaptsev, Vyacheslav; Kaymak, V.; Pukhov, Alexander; Rocca, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    Irradiation of arrays of aligned high aspect ratio nanowires with high contrast femtosecond laser pulses of relativistic intensity was recently shown to volumetrically heat near solid density plasmas to multi-KeV energy. Using aligned arrays of deuterated polyethylene nanowires (CD2) irradiated at laser intensities of up to 1 ×1020 W/cm2 we are able to generate near solid density plasmas in which the tail of the deuteron distribution was measured to reach energies of up to 3 MeV, in agreement with particle-in-cell simulations. Comparative measurements conducted using flat CD2 targets irradiated by the same laser pulses show the maximum deuteron energies are sub-MeV. We also observed a 100x increase in the number of neutrons produced as compared to flat CD2 targets irradiated at the same conditions, with the highest yield shots producing above 106 neutrons per Joule of laser energy. Work supported by AFOSR Award FA9560-14-10232 and NSTec SDRD program.

  7. Ten-Year Survival Results of a Randomized Trial of Irradiation of Internal Mammary Nodes After Mastectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennequin, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.hennequin@sls.aphp.fr [Hôpital Saint-Louis, AP-HP et Université de Paris VII (France); Bossard, Nadine [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Service de Biostatistique, Université Lyon 1, Lyon, and CNRS, UMR5558, Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive, Equipe Biotatistique-Santé, Villeurbanne (France); Servagi-Vernat, Stéphanie [Centre hospitalier Universitaire de Besançon (France); Maingon, Philippe [Centre François Leclerc, Dijon (France); Dubois, Jean-Bernard [Centre Val d' Aurelle, Montpellier (France); Datchary, Jean [Centre Hospitalier d' Annecy (France); Carrie, Christian [Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon (France); Roullet, Bernard [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Limoges (France); Suchaud, Jean-Philippe [Centre Hospitalier de Roanne (France); Teissier, Eric [Centre de Radiothérapie de Mougins (France); Lucardi, Audrey [Hospices Civils de Lyon (France); Gerard, Jean-Pierre [Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Belot, Aurélien [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Service de Biostatistique, Université Lyon 1, Lyon, and CNRS, UMR5558, Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive, Equipe Biotatistique-Santé, Villeurbanne (France); Institut de Veille Sanitaire, Département des Maladies Chroniques et des Traumatismes, Saint-Maurice (France); and others

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of irradiation of internal mammary nodes (IMN) on 10-year overall survival in breast cancer patients after mastectomy. Methods and Patients: This multicenter phase 3 study enrolled patients with positive axillary nodes (pN+) or central/medial tumors with or without pN+. Other inclusion criteria were age <75 and a Karnofsky index ≥70. All patients received postoperative irradiation of the chest wall and supraclavicular nodes and were randomly assigned to receive IMN irradiation or not. Randomization was stratified by tumor location (medial/central or lateral), axillary lymph node status, and adjuvant therapy (chemotherapy vs no chemotherapy). The prescribed dose of irradiation to the target volumes was 50 Gy or equivalent. The first 5 intercostal spaces were included in the IMN target volume, and two-thirds of the dose (31.5 Gy) was given by electrons. The primary outcome was overall survival at 10 years. Disease-free survival and toxicity were secondary outcomes. Results: T total of 1334 patients were analyzed after a median follow-up of 11.3 years among the survivors. No benefit of IMN irradiation on the overall survival could be demonstrated: the 10-year overall survival was 59.3% in the IMN-nonirradiated group versus 62.6% in the IMN-irradiated group (P=.8). According to stratification factors, we defined 6 subgroups (medial/central or lateral tumor, pN0 [only for medial/central] or pN+, and chemotherapy or not). In all these subgroups, IMN irradiation did not significantly improve overall survival. Conclusions: In patients treated with 2-dimensional techniques, we failed to demonstrate a survival benefit for IMN irradiation. This study cannot rule out a moderate benefit, especially with more modern, conformal techniques applied to a higher risk population.

  8. The influence of respiratory motion on dose delivery in a mouse lung tumour irradiation using the 4D MOBY phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heyden, Brent; van Hoof, Stefan J; Schyns, Lotte E J R; Verhaegen, Frank

    2017-01-01

    During precision irradiation of a preclinical lung tumour model, the tumour is subject to breathing motion and it can partially move out of the irradiation field. This work aimed to perform a quantitative analysis of the impact of respiratory motion on a mouse lung tumour irradiation with small fields. A four-dimensional digital mouse whole body phantom (MOBY) with a virtual 4-mm spherical lung tumour at different locations in both lungs is used to simulate a breathing anaesthetized mouse in different breathing phases representing a full breathing cycle. The breathing curve is determined by fluoroscopic imaging of an anaesthetized mouse. Each MOBY time frame is loaded in a dedicated treatment planning system (small animal radiotherapy-Plan) and is irradiated by a full arc with a 5-mm circular collimator. Mean and time-dependent organ doses are calculated for the tumour, heart and spinal cord. Depending on the location of the lung tumour, an overestimation of the mean tumour dose up to 11% is found. The mean heart dose could be both overestimated or underestimated because the heart moves in or out of the irradiation field depending on the beam target location. The respiratory motion does not affect the mean spinal cord dose. A dose gradient is visible in the time-dependent tumour dose distribution. In the future, new methods need to be developed to track the lung tumour motion before preclinical irradiation to adjust the irradiation plan. Margins, collimator diameter and target dose could be changed easily, but they all have their drawbacks. State-of-the-art clinical techniques such as respiratory gating or motion tracking may offer a solution for the cold spots in the time-dependent tumour dose. Advances in knowledge: A suitable method is found to quantify changes in organ dose due to respiratory motion in mouse lung tumour image-guided precision irradiation.

  9. A Solar Irradiance Climate Data Record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddington, O.; Lean, J. L.; Pilewskie, P.; Snow, M.; Lindholm, D.

    2016-08-01

    We present a new climate data record for total solar irradiance and solar spectral irradiance between 1610 and the present day with associated wavelength and time-dependent uncertainties and quarterly updates. The data record, which is part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Climate Data Record (CDR) program, provides a robust, sustainable, and scientifically defensible record of solar irradiance that is of sufficient length, consistency, and continuity for use in studies of climate variability and climate change on multiple time scales and for user groups spanning climate modeling, remote sensing, and natural resource and renewable energy industries. The data record, jointly developed by the University of Colorado’s Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), is constructed from solar irradiance models that determine the changes with respect to quiet sun conditions when facular brightening and sunspot darkening features are present on the solar disk where the magnitude of the changes in irradiance are determined from the linear regression of a proxy magnesium (Mg) II index and sunspot area indices against the approximately decade-long solar irradiance measurements of the Solar Radiation and Climate Experiment (SORCE). To promote long-term data usage and sharing for a broad range of users, the source code, the dataset itself, and supporting documentation are archived at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). In the future, the dataset will also be available through the LASP Interactive Solar Irradiance Data Center (LISIRD) for user-specified time periods and spectral ranges of interest.

  10. Irradiation test plan of DUPIC fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Ki Kwang; Song, K. C.; Park, H. S. and others

    2000-04-01

    The objective of the irradiation test of DUPIC fuel at HANARO is to obtain the data of in-core behavior and evaluate the nuclear, thermal and mechanical performance of DUPIC fuel. The irradiation of DUPIC fuel will start at April 25, 2000 for about 2 months, and the burnup of 2,000 MWD/MTU will be attained for this period. The pre-irradiation examinations for DUPIC fuel, such as visual inspection, dimension measurement, He leak test and microstructure observation, was carried out. The post-irradiation examination items for the irradiated DUPIC fuel are planned to be the NDA test, visual inspection and dimension measurement, as well as the analyses for the fission gas release, the microstructure of pellets and the distribution and shape of imbedded nuclides. The DUPIC mini-elements were fabricated in the DFDF (IMEF M6 cell) using the G23-G2 rod. For the HANARO core calculation, the initial composition of DUPIC fuel was estimated using ORIGEN-2 code based on the burnup history of the G23-G2 rod. The design features of DUPIC pellets, the mini-element and the irradiation capsule, were supplemented considering the characteristics of DUPIC fuel and the results from the irradiation test of the simulated DUPIC fuel performed in 1999. The nuclear, thermohydraulic and mechanical characteristics of DUPIC fuel under the normal operation condition were evaluated for the safety analysis on the HANARO. Using these results, potential accidents initiated by DUPIC fuel were estimated, and Safety analyses on the locked rotor and RIA accidents were carried out in order to assess the integrity of DUPIC fuel under the accident condition initiated by the HANARO. Based on the results of these safety analyses, the supplemental countermeasures for securing the sufficient thermal margins were set up, as well. At the last, similar overseas and domestic cases were introduced.

  11. Research and development on materials for the SPES target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corradetti Stefano

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The SPES project at INFN-LNL (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro is focused on the production of radioactive ion beams. The core of the SPES facility is constituted by the target, which will be irradiated with a 40 MeV, 200 µA proton beam in order to produce radioactive species. In order to efficiently produce and release isotopes, the material constituting the target should be able to work under extreme conditions (high vacuum and temperatures up to 2000 °C. Both neutron-rich and proton-rich isotopes will be produced; in the first case, carbon dispersed uranium carbide (UCx will be used as a target, whereas to produce p-rich isotopes, several types of targets will have to be irradiated. The synthesis and characterization of different types of material will be reported. Moreover, the results of irradiation and isotopes release tests on different uranium carbide target prototypes will be discussed.

  12. Studies of Non-Targeted Effects of Ionising Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oleg V Belyakov; Heli Mononen; Marjo Peraelae [STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland)

    2006-07-01

    The discovery of ionising radiation induced non-targeted effects is important for understanding the dose-response mechanisms relevant to low dose irradiation in vivo. One important question is whether the non-targeted effects relates to a protective mechanism or whether, conversely, it amplifies the number of cells damaged by the isolated radiation tracks of low dose exposures leading to an increased risk of carcinogenesis. One theory supported by the experimental data obtained during this project is that the main functions of the non-targeted effects are to decrease the risk of transformation in a multicellular organism exposed to radiation. Differences in the gene expression profiles, temporal and spatial patterns of key proteins expressed in directly irradiated and bystander cells may determine how the cells ultimately respond to low doses of radiation. Such a mechanism of co-operative response would make the tissue system much more robust. (N.C.)

  13. Quality of gamma ray-irradiated iceberg lettuce and treatments to minimize irradiation-induced disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irradiation of Iceberg lettuce was recently approved by the FDA to enhance microbial safety and to extend shelf-life at doses up to 4 kGy. However, the radiation tolerance of whole head lettuce is unclear. The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of irradiation on the quality of he...

  14. Path dependent models to predict property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperatures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kok, S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available .co.za ] Path dependent models to predict property changes in graphite irradiated at changing irradiation temperatures S KOK CSIR Advanced Mathematical Modelling, Modelling and Digital Science, PO Box 395, Pretoria, 0001, South Africa E-mail: skok...

  15. Detection of low amount of irradiated ingredients in non-irradiated precooked meals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchioni, E; Horvatovich, P; Ndiaye, B; Miesch, M; Hasselmann, C

    The application of the European Standards for the detection of irradiated food by thermo luminescence of silicates, electron-spin resonance spectroscopy of bones or gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of 2-alkylcyclobutanones does not allow the detection of irradiated ingredients included in small

  16. Biological Effects after Prenatal Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streffer, C.

    2004-07-01

    A Task Group of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has finished a report Biological Effects after Prenatal Irradiation (Embryo and Fetus) which has been approved by the Main Commission and Will be Published. Some new important scientific data shall be discussed in this contribution. During the preimplantation period lethality of the mammalian embryo is the dominating radiation effect. However, in mouse strains with genetic predispositions it has been shown that also malformations can be caused. This effect is genetically determined and its mechanisms is different from the induction of malformations during major organogenesis. Radiation exposures during this prenatal period leads ato an increase of genomic instability of cells in the normal appearing fetuses. These radiation effects can be transmitted to the next generation. A renewed analysis of individuals with severe mental retardation after exposures during the 8th to 15th week post conception in Hiroshima and Nagasaki gives evidence that a threshold dose exists for this effect around 300 mGy. This is supported by a number of experimental animal data which have been obtained from cellular and molecular investigations during the brain development. The data show the high radiosensitivity of the developing brain but also the various compensatory mechanisms and the enormous plasticity of these processes. The radiosensitivity varies strongly during the prenatal development. The highest sensitivity is found during the early and mid fetal period which is coinciding with weeks 8-15 post conception in humans. The lowest doses causing persistent damage are in the range of 100 to 300 mGy. For intelligence quotient scores a linear dose response model provides a satisfactory fit. From the experimental data it can be concluded that the fetal stage is most sensitive to the carcinogenic effect in comparison to the other prenatal stages. Such as clear situation cannot be obtained from the

  17. Solid targets for production of radioisotopes with cyclotron; Blancos solidos para produccion de radioisotopos con ciclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes G, L.; Balcazar G, M. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Direccion de Investigacion Tecnologica, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The design of targets for production of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals of cyclotron to medical applications requires a detailed analysis of several variables such as: cyclotron operation conditions, choice of used materials as target and their physicochemical characteristics, activity calculation, the yielding of each radioisotope by irradiation, the competition of nuclear reactions in function of the projectiles energy and the collision processes amongst others. The objective of this work is to determine the equations for the calculation for yielding of solid targets at the end of the proton irradiation. (Author)

  18. Chemoresistance to 5-FU inhibited by 635 nm LED irradiation in CD133+ KB cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghwi; Park, Mineon; Jang, Hyunwoong; Hyun, Hoon; Lim, Wonbong

    2018-01-01

    Consistent with cancer stem cell theory, a small fraction of cancer cells, described as cancer stem cells (CSCs), may promote tumor recurrence and anti-cancer drug resistance. Therefore, much effort has been devoted to the development of CSC targeted therapy to vanquish drug resistance. In this study, we have investigated the effect of multiple light-emitting diode (LED) irradiation treatments with conventional anti-cancer drugs on CSC-like oral cancer cells that acquired stemness by ectopic over expression of CD133. To evaluate combined LED irradiation anti-cancer drug effects, we investigated the chemosensitizing effect of 635 nm irradiation on 5-fluorouracil (5FU)-treated KBCD133+ and KBVec cells, interrogating the underlying molecular mechanisms associated with stemness and apoptosis that are responsible for chemopreventive activity. In addition, combination therapy with LED irradiation and 5-FU treatment was carried out in KBCD133+ and KBVec cell-inoculated mouse models. LED irradiation of 635 nm inhibited CSC-like properties consistent with a decrease in OCT4 and NANOG protein expression, reducing colony-forming ability. In addition, LED irradiation enhanced 5-FU-induced cytotoxicity and improved 5-FU chemosensitivity in KBCD133+ via enhancement of apoptosis. These findings were validated in vivo, wherein LED irradiation combined with 5-FU treatment inhibited tumor growth in KBCD133+-inoculated mice. Collectively, our results provide novel evidence for 635 nm irradiation-induced 5-FU chemosensitization of CSC in oral cancer. In addition, this research highlights that 635 nm LED irradiation may serve as an adjunct treatment to conventional chemotherapeutic drugs in patients with oral cancer.

  19. Behavioral, Morphological, and Gene Expression Changes Induced by 60Co-γ Ray Irradiation in Bactrocera tau (Walker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Cai

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The sterile insect technique (SIT may reduce pest populations by allowing sufficient amount of irradiation-induced sterile males to mate with wild females whilst maintaining mating ability comparable to wild males. Although the SIT methods are well understood, the optimal sterilizing dose and processing development stage for application vary among species. To ensure effective pest control programs, effects of irradiation on physiology, behavior, and gene function in the target species should be defined, however, little is known about irradiation effects in Bactrocera tau. Here, the effects of irradiation on rates of fecundity, egg hatch, eclosion, mating competitiveness, flight capability, morphology of reproductive organs, and yolk protein (YP gene expression were studied. The results showed that rates of female fecundity and egg hatch decreased significantly (51 ± 19 to 0.06 ± 0.06 and 98.90 ± 1.01 to 0, respectively when pupae were treated with >150 Gy irradiation. Flight capability and mating competitiveness were not significantly influenced at doses <250 Gy. Ovaries and fallopian tubes became smaller after irradiation, but there was no change in testes size. Finally, we found that expression of the YP gene was up-regulated by irradiation at 30 and 45 days post-emergence, but the mechanisms were unclear. Our study provides information on the determination of the optimal irradiation sterilizing dose in B. tau, and the effects of irradiation on physiology, morphology and gene expression that will facilitate an understanding of sub-lethal impacts of the SIT and expand its use to the control of other species.

  20. KEY RESULTS FROM IRRADIATION AND POST-IRRADIATION EXAMINATION OF AGR-1 UCO TRISO FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demkowicz, Paul A.; Hunn, John D.; Petti, David A.; Morris, Robert N.

    2016-11-01

    The AGR-1 irradiation experiment was performed as the first test of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel in the US Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The experiment consisted of 72 right cylinder fuel compacts containing approximately 3×105 coated fuel particles with uranium oxide/uranium carbide (UCO) fuel kernels. The fuel was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor for a total of 620 effective full power days. Fuel burnup ranged from 11.3 to 19.6% fissions per initial metal atom and time average, volume average irradiation temperatures of the individual compacts ranged from 955 to 1136°C. This paper focuses on key results from the irradiation and post-irradiation examination, which revealed a robust fuel with excellent performance characteristics under the conditions tested and have significantly improved the understanding of UCO coated particle fuel irradiation behavior within the US program. The fuel exhibited a very low incidence of TRISO coating failure during irradiation and post-irradiation safety testing at temperatures up to 1800°C. Advanced PIE methods have allowed particles with SiC coating failure to be isolated and meticulously examined, which has elucidated the specific causes of SiC failure in these specimens. The level of fission product release from the fuel during irradiation and post-irradiation safety testing has been studied in detail. Results indicated very low release of krypton and cesium through intact SiC and modest release of europium and strontium, while also confirming the potential for significant silver release through the coatings depending on irradiation conditions. Focused study of fission products within the coating layers of irradiated particles down to nanometer length scales has provided new insights into fission product transport through the coating layers and the role various fission products may have on coating integrity. The broader implications of these results and the application of

  1. K-vacancy production by secondaries due to charged projectiles in thick targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onegin, M.S. [St. Petersburg Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Pashuk, V.V. [St. Petersburg Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Tverskoy, M.G. [St. Petersburg Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Gatchina (Russian Federation); Vodopyanov, I.B. [St. Petersburg Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    1997-03-01

    K-vacancy production due to ionization of atoms by charged projectiles in thick targets is investigated. Secondary particles contribution is taken into account. The calculations were performed for Pb and U targets irradiated by 1 GeV protons. The results are compared with the experimental data. (orig.).

  2. The influence of Gamma Irradiation on flavonoïds content during storage of irradiated clementina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oufedjikh, H.; Mahrouz, M.; Lacroix, M.; Amiot, M. J.; Taccini, M.

    1998-06-01

    The influence of Gamma irradiation on content of some important flavonoïds (flavonones glycosides and polymethoxylated flavones) was evaluated during storage of Moroccan clementina treated at a mean dose of 0.3 kGy and stored three months at 3'C. Results shows that at day one, gamma irradiation induced degradation of small quantities of these flavonoïds, however after 14 days of storage, the content of these compounds was significantly higher (p≤0.05) in irradiated samples. Irradiation stimulated biosynthesis of flavonoïds after 14 days of storage. Hesperidin was the major flavanones compounds in clementines. Nobiletin and Heptamethoxyflavone were the major polymethoxylated flavones in clementines. Our study demonstrated that the content of these compounds was significantly higher (p≤0.05) in irradiated samples.

  3. The influence of Gamma Irradiation on flavonoieds content during storage of irradiated clementina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oufedjikh, H.; Mahrouz, M.; Lacroix, M.; Amiot, M.J.; Taccini, M

    1998-06-01

    The influence of Gamma irradiation on content of some important flavonoieds (flavonones glycosides and polymethoxylated flavones) was evaluated during storage of Moroccan clementina treated at a mean dose of 0.3 kGy and stored three months at 3 deg. C. Results shows that at day one, gamma irradiation induced degradation of small quantities of these flavonoieds, however after 14 days of storage, the content of these compounds was significantly higher (p{<=}0.05) in irradiated samples. Irradiation stimulated biosynthesis of flavonoieds after 14 days of storage. Hesperidin was the major flavanones compounds in clementines. Nobiletin and Heptamethoxyflavone were the major polymethoxylated flavones in clementines. Our study demonstrated that the content of these compounds was significantly higher (p{<=}0.05) in irradiated samples.

  4. Assessing Nutrients Availability of Irradiated and Non-Irradiated Biosolids for the Agriculture Re-use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magnavacca, Cecilia; Sanchez, Monica

    2003-07-01

    Irradiation provides a fast and reliable means to disinfect biosolids generated by municipal wastewater treatment processes. The chemical integrity of some substances may be altered thus change the availability of plant nutrients. Chemical analyses on the biosolids showed a release of mineral forms of Nitrogen while Phosphorus chemical forms were not altered. Higher amounts of mineralized N were indirectly demonstrated in soils with irradiated biosolids by a respiration experiment, and higher nitrate concentrations were measured in the irradiated biosolids amended soils at field experiments. Crop field experiments (lettuce and sugarcane) confirmed that irradiated biosolids have higher fertilizing capability than equal amounts of non-irradiated biosolids. Maximum dose rate had no additive effect but a depleted result, thus marking the importance of the use of moderate biosolids rates. (author)

  5. Low irradiance losses of photovoltaic modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavromatakis, F.; Vignola, F.; Marion, B.

    2017-11-01

    The efficiency of a photovoltaic cell/module changes, as the intensity of incident irradiance decreases, in a non linear way and these changes are referred to as low irradiance losses. In this study data from field experiments, developed and organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, are used to evaluate the low irradiance losses for a variety of module technologies. The results demonstrate that the ratio of the normalized power divided by the normalized short circuit current provide a good measure of the module's low light efficiency losses after both the maximum power and the short circuit current are adjusted for temperature effects. The normalized efficiencies determined through the field data, spanning for several months, are in good agreement with those determined under controlled conditions in a solar simulator. An analytical relation for the normalized efficiency is proposed based on existing formulation for the fill factor. Despite the approximate nature of the fill factor relation, this approach produces reliable results. It will be shown that a normalized efficiency curve can be used to extract information on the series and shunt resistances of the PV module and that the shunt resistance as a function of solar irradiance can be studied. Alternately, this formulation can be used to study the low irradiance losses of a module when the internal resistances are known.

  6. RESTORATION INDUCED BY CATALASE IN IRRADIATED MICROORGANISMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latarjet, Raymond; Caldas, Luis Renato

    1952-01-01

    1. E. coli, strain K-12, and B. megatherium 899, irradiated in strict but still undefined physiological conditions with certain heavy doses of ultraviolet light, are efficiently restored by catalase, which acts on or fixes itself upon the bacteria in a few minutes. This restoration (C. R.), different from photorestoration, is aided by a little visible light. 2. At 37° the restorability lasts for about 2 hours after UV irradiation; the restored cells begin to divide at the same time as the normal survivors. 3. C. R. is not produced after x-irradiation. 4. B. megatherium Mox and E. coli, strain B/r show little C. R.; E. coli strain B shows none. None of these three strains is lysogenic, whereas the two preceding catalase-restorable strains are. 5. Phage production in the system "K-12 infected with T2 phage" is restored by catalase after UV irradiation, whereas phage production in the system "infected B" is not. 6. With K-12, catalase does not prevent the growth of phage and the lysis induced by UV irradiation (Lwoff's phenomenon). 7. Hypotheses are discussed concerning: (a) the chemical nature of this action of catalase; (b) a possible relation between C. R. and lysogenicity of the sensitive bacteria; (c) the consequences of such chemical restorations on the general problem of cell radiosensitivity. PMID:14898028

  7. Mechanical performance of irradiated beryllium pebbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Dalle-Donne, M.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik

    1998-01-01

    For the Helium Cooled Pebble Bed (HCPB) Blanket, which is one of the two reference concepts studied within the European Fusion Technology Programme, the neutron multiplier consists of a mixed bed of about 2 and 0.1-0.2 mm diameter beryllium pebbles. Beryllium has no structural function in the blanket, however microstructural and mechanical properties are important, as they might influence the material behavior under neutron irradiation. The EXOTIC-7 as well as the `Beryllium` experiments carried out in the HFR reactor in Petten are considered as the most detailed and significant tests for investigating it. This paper reviews the present status of beryllium post-irradiation examinations performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe with samples from these irradiation experiments, emphasizing the effects of irradiation of essential material properties and trying to elucidate the processes controlling the property changes. The microstructure, the porosity distribution, the impurity content, the behavior under compression loads and the compatibility of the beryllium pebbles with lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) during the in-pile irradiation are presented and critically discussed. Qualitative information on ductility and creep obtained by hardness-type measurements are also supplied. (author)

  8. Infrared Irradiation: Toward Green Chemistry, a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Escobedo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This review provides a comprehensive overview of where infrared irradiation has been employed, mainly as regards activating green mode for natural products extractions, as well as to favor a reaction, highlighting its actual importance. It is also underlined that infrared irradiation heating has been around for a long time; however, only in the last eighteen years have many of its advantages been applied to satisfy a wide range of chemical processes, natural products extractions, and for the promotion of many kinds of reactions. In addition, it is brought to light that near infrared irradiation is more efficient than middle and far infrared irradiations, being easily controllable and with the quality of a fast responding heat source. Thus, the main objective of this review is to offer infrared irradiation as an alternative clean energy source to activate reactions, in addition to favor the selective extraction of natural products, all of which is within the Green Chemistry protocol. Some recent results from our laboratory are also included.

  9. Infrared Irradiation: Toward Green Chemistry, a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo, René; Miranda, René; Martínez, Joel

    2016-03-26

    This review provides a comprehensive overview of where infrared irradiation has been employed, mainly as regards activating green mode for natural products extractions, as well as to favor a reaction, highlighting its actual importance. It is also underlined that infrared irradiation heating has been around for a long time; however, only in the last eighteen years have many of its advantages been applied to satisfy a wide range of chemical processes, natural products extractions, and for the promotion of many kinds of reactions. In addition, it is brought to light that near infrared irradiation is more efficient than middle and far infrared irradiations, being easily controllable and with the quality of a fast responding heat source. Thus, the main objective of this review is to offer infrared irradiation as an alternative clean energy source to activate reactions, in addition to favor the selective extraction of natural products, all of which is within the Green Chemistry protocol. Some recent results from our laboratory are also included.

  10. ESR spectroscopic properties of irradiated gum Arabic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonor, S J; Gómez, J A; Kinoshita, A; Calandreli, I; Tfouni, E; Baffa, O

    2013-12-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of irradiated gum Arabic with doses between 0.5 and 5 kGy were studied. A linear relationship between the absorbed dose and the intensities of the ESR spectra was observed. ESR spectra of irradiated gum Arabic showed a decay of relative concentrations of free radicals originated by radiation and the production of at least two species of free radicals with half-times: 3.3 and 125.4 h. The results of spectral simulations for these radical groups were giso=2.0046; A=1.2 mT and gx=gy=2.0062, gz=2.0025. Hydration and dehydration of irradiated gum Arabic returns the ESR spectrum to its initial state before irradiation. The results show that ESR can be used as simple and reliable method to detect irradiated gum Arabic up to 60 days after initial radiation with doses on the order of 5 kGy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Novel technique for high-precision stereotactic irradiation of mouse brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, J.; Woelfelschneider, J.; Derer, A.; Fietkau, R.; Gaipl, U.S.; Bert, C.; Frey, B. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Stache, C.; Buslei, R.; Hoelsken, A. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Institute of Neuropathology, Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Schwarz, M.; Baeuerle, T. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Institute of Radiology, Preclinical Imaging Platform Erlangen (PIPE), Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Small animal irradiation systems were developed for preclinical evaluation of tumor therapy closely resembling the clinical situation. Mostly only clinical LINACs are available, so protocols for small animal partial body irradiation using a conventional clinical system are essential. This study defines a protocol for conformal brain tumor irradiations in mice. CT and MRI images were used to demarcate the target volume and organs at risk. Three 6 MV photon beams were planned for a total dose of 10 fractions of 1.8 Gy. The mouse position in a dedicated applicator was verified by an X-ray patient positioning system before each irradiation. Dosimetric verifications (using ionization chambers and films) were performed. Irradiation-induced DNA damage was analyzed to verify the treatment effects on the cellular level. The defined treatment protocol and the applied fractionation scheme were feasible. The in-house developed applicator was suitable for individual positioning at submillimeter accuracy of anesthetized mice during irradiation, altogether performed in less than 10 min. All mice tolerated the treatment well. Measured dose values perfectly matched the nominal values from treatment planning. Cellular response was restricted to the target volume. Clinical LINAC-based irradiations of mice offer the potential to treat orthotopic tumors conformably. Especially with respect to lateral penumbra, dedicated small animal irradiation systems exceed the clinical LINAC solution. (orig.) [German] Kleintierbestrahlungsanlagen wurden entwickelt um praeklinische Studien in der Tumortherapie unter moeglichst klinischen Bedingungen durchzufuehren. Da an den meisten Instituten nur klinische LINACs zur Verfuegung stehen, werden Standardprotokolle zur Kleintierbestrahlung benoetigt, die konventionelle Systeme nutzen. In dieser Studie wird ein solches Protokoll fuer tumorkonforme Hirnbestrahlung von Maeusen definiert. CT- und MRT-Bilder wurden aufgenommen, um Zielvolumen und

  12. Assessment of positioning uncertainties for patients treated by intensity-modulated conformational irradiation for hypophyseal adenoma; Evaluation des incertitudes de positionnement chez les patients traites par irradiation conformationelle avec modulation d'intensite pour adenome hypophysaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chekrine, T.; De Bari, B.; Favrel, V.; Mornex, F. [Departement de radiotherapie-oncologie, centre hospitalier Lyon-Sud, chemin du Grand-Revoyet, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France); EA3738, 69 - Lyon (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors discuss the results of an investigation based on 230 measurements performed on ten patients treated by intensity-modulated conformational irradiation for a hypophyseal adenoma. The patients were immobilized by a thermoformed mask. The study determined systematic and random positioning errors in different directions, and the margins to obtain the planning target volume (PTV) in three directions. Short communication

  13. n_TOF New target commissioning and beam characterization

    CERN Multimedia

    Igashira, M

    A full characterization of the neutron beam and experimental conditions for measurement with the new spallation target installed at the n_TOF facility is proposed. In a first step, the behavior the target assembly under the proton beam irradiation will be investigated, in order to complete the target commissioning. Subsequently the neutron beam parameters required to analyze the physics measurements, i.e. neutron fluence, beam profile, energy resolution function and beam related backgrounds as a function of the neutron energy, will be determined.

  14. Mutation induced with ion beam irradiation in rose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Nagatomi, S.; Morishita, T.; Degi, K.; Tanaka, A.; Shikazono, N.; Hase, Y.

    2003-05-01

    The effects of mutation induction by ion beam irradiation on axillary buds in rose were investigated. Axillary buds were irradiated with carbon and helium ion beams, and the solid mutants emerged after irradiation by repeated cutting back. In helium ion irradiation, mutations were observed in plants derived from 9 buds among 56 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini' and in plants derived from 10 buds among 61 irradiated buds in 'Red Minimo'. In carbon ion, mutations were observed in plants derived from 12 buds among 88 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini'. Mutations were induced not only in higher doses but also in lower doses, with which physiological effect by irradiation was hardly observed. Irradiation with both ion beams induced mutants in the number of petals, in flower size, in flower shape and in flower color in each cultivar.

  15. Mutation induced with ion beam irradiation in rose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, H. E-mail: yhiroya@nias.affrc.go.jp; Nagatomi, S.; Morishita, T.; Degi, K.; Tanaka, A.; Shikazono, N.; Hase, Y

    2003-05-01

    The effects of mutation induction by ion beam irradiation on axillary buds in rose were investigated. Axillary buds were irradiated with carbon and helium ion beams, and the solid mutants emerged after irradiation by repeated cutting back. In helium ion irradiation, mutations were observed in plants derived from 9 buds among 56 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini' and in plants derived from 10 buds among 61 irradiated buds in 'Red Minimo'. In carbon ion, mutations were observed in plants derived from 12 buds among 88 irradiated buds in 'Orange Rosamini'. Mutations were induced not only in higher doses but also in lower doses, with which physiological effect by irradiation was hardly observed. Irradiation with both ion beams induced mutants in the number of petals, in flower size, in flower shape and in flower color in each cultivar.

  16. Montmorillonite Clay-Promoted, Solvent-Free Cross-Aldol Condensations under Focused Microwave Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damiano Rocchi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An environmentally benign, clean and general protocol was developed for the synthesis of aryl and heteroaryl trans-chalcones. This method involved solvent-free reaction conditions under microwave irradiation in the presence of a clay-based catalyst, and afforded the target compounds in good yields and short reaction times. Furthermore, the same conditions allowed the synthesis of symmetrical, diarylmethylene-α,β-unsaturated ketones from aromatic aldehydes and ketones.

  17. Simulation of neutron-induced damage in tungsten by irradiation with energetic self-ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogorodnikova, O.V., E-mail: igra32@rambler.ru [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); National Research Nuclear University “MEPHI”, Kashirskoe sh.31, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gann, V. [National Science Centre “Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology”, Kharkov (Ukraine)

    2015-05-15

    A direct comparison of the deuterium (D) decoration of radiation-induced damage in polycrystalline tungsten irradiated with self-ions [present work] and neutrons in the high-flux isotope reactor (HFIR) (Hatano et al., 2013) shows a reasonably good agreement at least up to 0.3 displacement per atom indicating that MeV heavy ions can be a good proxy to simulate neutron-produced damage at room temperature and low dpa. The coefficient of similarity between two kinds of irradiation was obtained experimentally to be K{sub exp} ∼ 0.65 ± 0.1 in the case of the deuterium decoration of both kinds of radiation-induced defects with low and high de-trapping energies for deuterium. We introduced the theoretical estimation for coefficient of similarity between neutron- and self-ion-irradiations, which is a fraction of common area under the curves of two overlapping damage energy spectra of primary knock-on atom (PKA) produced in tungsten by these two types of irradiation. In other words, K{sub sim} is a part of displaced atoms produced in the similar conditions under two different types of irradiation. The theoretical values of K{sub sim} = 0.34 and K{sub sim} = 0.29 were obtained for tungsten target irradiated with 20 MeV self-ions in comparison to irradiation with neutrons in HFIR reactor (>0.1 MeV) and 14 MeV neutrons, respectively. The theoretical value of K{sub sim} = 0.34 is about two times less than the experimental value of K{sub exp} = 0.65. It means that high energy PKAs can play more important role in the production of similar damage structure by irradiation with self-ions and neutrons which is responsible for deuterium retention. The model assuming that all cascades with an energy higher than T{sub c} = 150 keV split into identical sub-cascades gives the value of K{sub sim} = 0.64 ± 0.01 for the coefficient of similarity between HFIR-neutron and 20 MeV self-ion irradiations that is in an agreement with experimental value of K{sub exp} = 0.65 ± 0.1. Consequently

  18. Public health aspects of food irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käferstein, F K; Moy, G G

    1993-01-01

    In view of the enormous health and economic consequences of foodborne diseases, the World Health Organization (WHO) encourages its Member States to consider all measures to eliminate or reduce foodborne pathogens in food and improve their supplies of safe and nutritious food. With the wholesomeness of irradiated food clearly established by extensive scientific studies, food irradiation has important roles to play in both ensuring food safety and reducing food losses. Food irradiation may be one of the most significant contributions to public health to be made by food science and technology since the introduction of pasteurization. Because the promotion of a safe, nutritious and adequate food supply is an essential component of its primary health care strategy, WHO is concerned that the unwarranted rejection of this process may endanger public health and deprive consumers of the choice of food processed for safety.

  19. Proton irradiation effects in silicon devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simoen, E.; Vanhellemont, J.; Alaerts, A. [IMEC, Leuven (Belgium)] [and others

    1997-03-01

    Proton irradiation effects in silicon devices are studied for components fabricated in various substrates in order to reveal possible hardening effects. The degradation of p-n junction diodes increases in first order proportionally with the fluence, when submitted to 10 MeV proton irradiations in the range 5x10{sup 9} cm{sup -2} to 5x10{sup 11} cm{sup -2}. The damage coefficients for both p- and n-type Czochralski, Float-Zone and epitaxial wafers are reported. Charge-Coupled Devices fabricated in a 1.2 {mu}m CCD-CMOS technology are shown to be quite resistant to 59 MeV H{sup +} irradiations, irrespective of the substrate type. (author)

  20. Degradation of insulating ceramics due to irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Tomohiro; Terai, Takayuki; Yoneoka, Toshiaki; Tanaka, Satoru [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-01

    Radiation-induced electrical degradation was investigated on single crystal alumina under 2.2 MeV electron irradiation with a dose rate of 5.7 x 10{sup 5} Gy/s and an electrical field of 1.6 x 10{sup 5} V/m at 773 K. After irradiation, electrical resistivity both on the surface and in the bulk decreased in the temperature range of 300 to 773 K. Substantial resistivity decreased from the initial value due to the irradiation, the degradation ratio was much smaller than the case of poly-crystalline specimens. On the other hands, surface resistivity decreased with increasing temperature for measurement with an abrupt change by 4 orders of magnitude around 600 K, and it showed thermal hysteresis. (author)

  1. Signal development in irradiated silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kramberger, Gregor; Mikuz, Marko

    2001-01-01

    This work provides a detailed study of signal formation in silicon detectors, with the emphasis on detectors with high concentration of irradiation induced defects in the lattice. These defects give rise to deep energy levels in the band gap. As a consequence, the current induced by charge motion in silicon detectors is signifcantly altered. Within the framework of the study a new experimental method, Charge correction method, based on transient current technique (TCT) was proposed for determination of effective electron and hole trapping times in irradiated silicon detectors. Effective carrier trapping times were determined in numerous silicon pad detectors irradiated with neutrons, pions and protons. Studied detectors were fabricated on oxygenated and non-oxygenated silicon wafers with different bulk resistivities. Measured effective carrier trapping times were found to be inversely proportional to fuence and increase with temperature. No dependence on silicon resistivity and oxygen concentration was observ...

  2. Irradiation creep of vanadium-base alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Billone, M.C.; Strain, R.V.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Matsui, H. [Tohoku Univ. (Japan)

    1998-03-01

    A study of irradiation creep in vanadium-base alloys is underway with experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in the United States. Test specimens are thin-wall sealed tubes with internal pressure loading. The results from the initial ATR irradiation at low temperature (200--300 C) to a neutron damage level of 4.7 dpa show creep rates ranging from {approx}0 to 1.2 {times} 10{sup {minus}5}/dpa/MPa for a 500-kg heat of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy. These rates were generally lower than reported from a previous experiment in BR-10. Because both the attained neutron damage levels and the creep strains were low in the present study, however, these creep rates should be regarded as only preliminary. Substantially more testing is required before a data base on irradiation creep of vanadium alloys can be developed and used with confidence.

  3. Horizontal modular dry irradiated fuel storage system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Larry E.; McInnes, Ian D.; Massey, John V.

    1988-01-01

    A horizontal, modular, dry, irradiated fuel storage system (10) includes a thin-walled canister (12) for containing irradiated fuel assemblies (20), which canister (12) can be positioned in a transfer cask (14) and transported in a horizontal manner from a fuel storage pool (18), to an intermediate-term storage facility. The storage system (10) includes a plurality of dry storage modules (26) which accept the canister (12) from the transfer cask (14) and provide for appropriate shielding about the canister (12). Each module (26) also provides for air cooling of the canister (12) to remove the decay heat of the irradiated fuel assemblies (20). The modules (26) can be interlocked so that each module (26) gains additional shielding from the next adjacent module (26). Hydraulic rams (30) are provided for inserting and removing the canisters (12) from the modules (26).

  4. Status of food irradiation in the world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kume, Tamikazu [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Quantum Beam Science Directorate, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan); Furuta, Masakazu [Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Todoriki, Setsuko [National Food Research Institute, 2-1-12 Kannonndai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8642 (Japan); Uenoyama, Naoki [Department of International Cooperation and Industrial Infrastructure Development, Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, Inc., Shimbashi Fuji Bld., 2-1-3, Shimbashi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8605 Japan (Japan); Kobayashi, Yasuhiko [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)], E-mail: kobayashi.yasuhiko@jaea.go.jp

    2009-03-15

    The status of food irradiation in the world in 2005 was investigated using published data, a questionnaire survey and direct visits. The results showed that the quantity of irradiated foods in the world in 2005 was 405,000 ton and comprised 1,86,000 ton (46%) for disinfection of spices and dry vegetables, 82,000 ton (20%) for disinfestation of grains and fruits, 32,000 ton (8%) for disinfection of meat and fish, 88,000 ton (22%) for sprout inhibition of garlic and potato, and 17,000 ton (4%) of other food items that included health foods, mushroom, honey, etc. Commercial food irradiation is increasing significantly in Asia, but decreasing in EU.

  5. POSTHARVEST OF IRRADIATED TAHITI LIME FRUITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIMONE RODRIGUES DA SILVA

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to evaluate the postharvest quality evolution of gamma-irradiated ‘Tahiti’ limes. Shiny, olivegreen fruits with coarse skin (56 cm equatorial diameter harvested in commercial orchars and processed in commercial packing house line were used. In a preliminary assay, fruits harvested in April 2011 were exposed to a gamma radiation range from 0 to 750 Gy. The 250 and 750 Gy doses negatively affected skin quality and pulp of exposed fruits. For this reason, new assays were carried out using lower doses to irradiate fruits harvested in July 2011 (off-season and January 2012 (regular harvest period. Fruit harvested in both periods were selected and exposed to radiation doses of 0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 Gy. All irradiations occurred at a rate of 0.46 Gy/h. After fruit irradiation, physical and chemical analyses were performed along a 20-day storage period at room temperature (24 ± 1ºC and 80 ± 5% RH. Irradiation of fruits harvested in July 2011 and January 2012 and treated with doses of up to 200 Gy did not affect the ascorbic acid content, but doses > 100 Gy caused skin yellowing of fruits harvested on both periods. Gamma radiation at doses = 50 Gy reduced the total soluble solids content in off-season fruits. Exposure of fruits harvested in the main harvest period to radiation doses = 150 Gy increased weight loss. Irradiation of ‘Tahiti’ limes at doses between 50 Gy and 700 Gy did not preserve postharvest quality during storage at room temperature.

  6. G-values for gas production from ion-irradiated polystyrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, M.B. (Metals and Ceramics Div., Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Lee, E.H. (Metals and Ceramics Div., Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Natural and deuterium-substituted polystyrene targets have been irradiated with energetic ion beams in order to make quantitative measurements of gas emission products. Targets with the deuterium substitution made at the pendant hydrogen group site were compared with targets in which the substitution was made at the hydrogen sites of the pendant phenyl group. The gases were measured with a residual gas analyzer; the primary gas products measured were H[sub 2], CH[sub 4], C[sub 2]H[sub 2], C[sub 3]H[sub 4], C[sub 6]H[sub 6], and their various deuterium-substituted forms. It was shown that the G-values for the production of gas molecules by ion-irradiation are strongly dependent on the linear energy transfer (LET) of the ion. Evidence was given that the primary origin of the saturated hydrocarbon gas methane could be traced to scission of the polymer main chain while the primary origin of most of the unsaturated hydrocarbon gases could be traced to the pendant phenyl group in the macromolecule. Based upon zero-point energy theory, the effective reaction temperature for C-H bond scission during 1 MeV Ar[sup +] irradiation is [approx]1600 C. (orig.)

  7. Realistic respiratory motion margins for external beam partial breast irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conroy, Leigh; Quirk, Sarah [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Smith, Wendy L., E-mail: wendy.smith@albertahealthservices.ca [Department of Medical Physics, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N2 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Department of Oncology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    described. It was found that the currently used respiratory margin of 5 mm in partial breast irradiation may be overly conservative for many 3DCRT PBI patients. Amplitude alone was found to be insufficient to determine patient-specific margins: individual respiratory trace shape and baseline drift both contributed to the dosimetric target coverage. With respiratory coaching, individualized respiratory margins smaller than the full extent of motion could reduce planning target volumes while ensuring adequate coverage under respiratory motion.

  8. Agglomeration defects on irradiated carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steini Moura, Cassio [Faculty of Physics, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul, 90619-900, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Balzaretti, Naira Maria; Amaral, Livio [Institute of Physics, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, C.P.: 15051, 91501-070, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Gribel Lacerda, Rodrigo; Pimenta, Marcos A. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, C.P.: 702, 31270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) were irradiated in the longitudinal and perpendicular directions, with low energy carbon and helium ions in order to observe the formation of defects in the atomic structure. Analysis through Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated bundle rupture and ion track formation on nanotube bundles. Aligned CNT presented a kind of defect comprising ravine formation and tube agglomeration on top of the substrate. The latter structure is possibly caused by static charge accumulation induced by the incoming ions. Fluence plays a role on the short range order. Higher fluence irradiation transforms CNT into amorphous carbon nanowires.

  9. Electric field distribution in irradiated silicon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Castaldini, A; Polenta, L; Nava, F; Canali, C

    2002-01-01

    Particle irradiation causes dramatic changes in bulk properties of p sup + -n-n sup + silicon structures operating as particle detectors. Several attempts to model and justify such variations have been proposed in the last few years. The main unsolved problem remains in the determination of the electric field and depletion layer distributions as key-parameters to estimate the collection efficiency of the detector. By using optical beam induced current (OBIC) and surface potential (SP) measurements we determined the behavior of the electric field and confirmed the existence of a double-junction structure appearing after irradiation.

  10. Electric field distribution in irradiated silicon detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaldini, A.; Cavallini, A. E-mail: anna.cavallini@bo.infn.it; Polenta, L.; Nava, F.; Canali, C

    2002-01-11

    Particle irradiation causes dramatic changes in bulk properties of p{sup +}-n-n{sup +} silicon structures operating as particle detectors. Several attempts to model and justify such variations have been proposed in the last few years. The main unsolved problem remains in the determination of the electric field and depletion layer distributions as key-parameters to estimate the collection efficiency of the detector. By using optical beam induced current (OBIC) and surface potential (SP) measurements we determined the behavior of the electric field and confirmed the existence of a double-junction structure appearing after irradiation.

  11. Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosseel, T.M.

    2000-04-01

    Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents that have the potential for major contamination release. Because the RPV is the only key safety-related component of the plant for which a redundant backup system does not exist, it is imperative to fully understand the degree of irradiation-induced degradation of the RPV's fracture resistance that occurs during service. For this reason, the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program has been established.

  12. Agglomeration defects on irradiated carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássio Stein Moura

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT were irradiated in the longitudinal and perpendicular directions, with low energy carbon and helium ions in order to observe the formation of defects in the atomic structure. Analysis through Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy indicated bundle rupture and ion track formation on nanotube bundles. Aligned CNT presented a kind of defect comprising ravine formation and tube agglomeration on top of the substrate. The latter structure is possibly caused by static charge accumulation induced by the incoming ions. Fluence plays a role on the short range order. Higher fluence irradiation transforms CNT into amorphous carbon nanowires.

  13. Evaluation of CERES surface irradiance products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, S.; Loeb, N. G.; Rose, F. G.; Rutan, D. A.; Doelling, D.; Radkevich, A.; Ham, S. H.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the surface radiation budget is important for several reasons. At the global and large temporal scales, it should balance with the sum of surface latent and sensible heat fluxes and ocean heating. At regional scales, it is an indispensable boundary condition for ocean or snow models or any other models that need energy input to the surface. NASA's Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) project provides surface irradiance data products for a range of temporal and spatial scales computed using a radiative transfer model initialized using satellite-derived cloud and aerosol properties. Other inputs to the radiative transfer model include temperature and humidity profiles from NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office's (GMAO) reanalysis. The CERES team uses more than 80 surface observation sites located over land and ocean to evaluate computed irradiances. When computed monthly 1° by 1° gridded mean downward irradiances are compared with 10 years of observed irradiances, the bias averaged over all land and ocean sites are, respectively, -1.7 Wm-2 and 4.7 Wm-2 for shortwave and -1.0 Wm-2 and -2.0 Wm-2 for longwave. The shortwave agreement is significantly better than other satellite-based surface irradiance products. One of reasons for the better agreement is careful treatment of diurnal cycle of clouds by merging 3-hourly geostationary satellite-derived cloud properties. In addition, computed surface irradiance variability shows a remarkable agreement with observed variability. However, these data sets have their shortcomings. The uncertainty in nighttime surface longwave irradiance over polar regions is larger than that of other regions primarily due to the difficulty of cloud detection and large uncertainties in skin temperature and near-surface temperature and humidity. The large uncertainty in polar region surface irradiances hampers, for example, investigation of surface radiation budget changes in response to changes in sea ice

  14. Effects of gamma irradiation on deteriorated paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicchieri, Marina; Monti, Michela; Piantanida, Giovanna; Sodo, Armida

    2016-08-01

    Even though gamma radiation application, also at the minimum dosage required for disinfection, causes depolymerization and degradation of the paper substrate, recently published papers seemed, instead, to suggest that γ-rays application could be envisaged in some conditions for Cultural Heritage original documents and books. In some of the published papers, the possible application of γ-rays was evaluated mainly by using mechanical tests that scarcely reflect the chemical modifications induced in the cellulosic support. In the present article the effect of low dosage γ-irradiation on cellulosic substrates was studied and monitored applying different techniques: colorimetry, spectroscopic measurements, carbonyl content and average viscometric degree of polymerization. Two different papers were investigated, a non-sized, non-filled cotton paper, and a commercial permanent paper. To simulate a real deteriorated document, which could need γ-rays irradiation, some samples were submitted to a hydrolysis treatment. We developed a treatment based on the exposition of paper to hydrochloric acid vapors, avoiding any contact of the samples with water. This method induces a degradation similar to that observed on original documents. The samples were then irradiated with 3 kGy γ-rays at a 5258 Gy/h rate. The aforementioned analyses were performed on the samples just irradiated and after artificial ageing. All tests showed negative effects of gamma irradiation on paper. Non-irradiated paper preserves better its appearance and chemical properties both in the short term and after ageing, while the irradiated samples show appreciable color change and higher oxidation extent. Since the Istituto centrale restauro e conservazione patrimonio archivistico e librario is responsible for the choice of all restoration treatments that could be applied on library and archival materials under the protection of the Italian State (http://www.icpal.beniculturali.it/allegati/DM-7

  15. Oxygen interstitial trapping in electron irradiated sapphire

    CERN Document Server

    Morono, A

    2002-01-01

    An existing model for first stage anion vacancy stabilization in irradiated alkali halides has been applied to sapphire. To monitor the F centre concentration growth during irradiation, radioluminescence instead of optical absorption measurements has been employed. The results indicate that the model is valid for sapphire and suggest that the F centre stabilization process depends on oxygen interstitial trapping. This implies that the resistance to radiation damage at low doses should depend on the impurity and dislocation content of the material. One presumes the model may be extended to other oxides.

  16. Evaluation of irradiated coating material specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yong Jin; Nam, Seok Woo; Cho, Lee Moon [RCS Korea Co., Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    Evaluation result of irradiated coating material specimens - Coating material specimens radiated Gamma Energy(Co 60) in air condition. - Evaluation conditions was above 1 X 10{sup 4} Gy/hr, and radiated TID 2.0 X 10{sup 6} Gy. - The radiated coating material specimens, No Checking, Cracking, Flaking, Delamination, Peeling and Blistering. - Coating system at the Kori no. 1 and APR 1400 Nuclear power plant, evaluation of irradiated coating materials is in accordance with owner's requirement(2.0 X 10{sup 6} Gy)

  17. Effect of UV irradiation on cutaneous cicatrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Eva; Rossen, Kristian; Sorensen, Lars Tue

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on human cutaneous cicatrices. In this randomized, controlled study, dermal punch biopsy wounds served as a wound healing model. Wounds healed by primary or second intention and were randomized to postoperative solar UV...... postoperatively, UV-irradiated cicatrices healing by second intention: (i) were significantly pointed out as the most disfiguring; (ii) obtained significantly higher scores of colour, infiltration and cicatrix area; and (iii) showed significantly higher increase in skin-reflectance measurements of skin-pigmentation...

  18. Neutron Spectrum Measurements from Irradiations at NCERC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackman, Kevin Richard [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mosby, Michelle A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bredeweg, Todd Allen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hutchens, Gregory Joe [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); White, Morgan Curtis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Several irradiations have been conducted on assemblies (COMET/ZEUS and Flattop) at the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) located at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Configurations of the assemblies and irradiated materials changed between experiments. Different metallic foils were analyzed using the radioactivation method by gamma-ray spectrometry to understand/characterize the neutron spectra. Results of MCNP calculations are shown. It was concluded that MCNP simulated spectra agree with experimental measurements, with the caveats that some data are limited by statistics at low-energies and some activation foils have low activities.

  19. Microprobe investigations of irradiated uranium carbide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleykamp, H.

    1973-12-01

    A shielded Cameca microprobe, MS 46, was used to examine a UC sample canned in SAP and irradiated to a burnup of 0.7%. An annular zone at about 40% of the outer sample radius was seen to contain precipitates loaded with fission products; microprobe analysis showed the precipitates to be U/sub 2/ (Tc, Ru, Rh)C/sub 2/. Small amounts of palladium can be stabilized in this phase. Zirconium and molybdenum were verified in homogeneous distribution in the fuel. The Vickers hardness of the irradiated UC is 1000 to 1200 kg/mm/sup 2/. No signs of incompatibility with the canning material were detected. (auth)

  20. Cationic hetero diffusion and mechanical properties of yttria-stabilized zirconia: influence of irradiation; Heterodiffusion cationique et proprietes mecaniques de la zircone stabilisee a l'oxyde d'yttrium: influence de l'irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menvie Bekale, V

    2007-12-15

    Cubic yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is a promising material as target for the transmutation of radioactive waste. In this context, the present work is dedicated to the study of the atomic transport and the mechanical properties of this ceramic, as well as the influence of irradiation on these properties. The preliminary step concerns the synthesis of YSZ cubic zirconia ceramic undoped and doped with rare earths to form homogeneous Ce-YSZ or Gd-YSZ solid solutions with the highest density. The diffusion experiments of Ce and Gd in YSZ or Ce-YSZ were performed in air from 900 to 1400 C, and the depth profiles were established by SIMS. The bulk diffusion decreases when the ionic radius of diffusing element increases. The comparison with literature data of activation energies for bulk diffusion suggests that the cationic diffusion occurs via a vacancy mechanism. The diffusion results of Ce in YSZ irradiated with 4 or 20 MeV Au ions show a bulk diffusion slowing-down at 1000 and 1100 C when the radiation damage becomes important (30 dpa). The mechanical properties of YSZ ceramics irradiated with 944 MeV Pb ions and non irradiated samples were studied by Vickers micro indentation and Berkovitch nano indentation techniques. The hardness of the material increases when the average grain size decreases. Furthermore, the hardness and the toughness increase with irradiation fluence owing to the occurrence of compressive residual stresses in the irradiated area. (author)