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Sample records for cinryze tm c1

  1. Preventing Hereditary Angioedema Attacks in Children Using Cinryze®: Interim Efficacy and Safety Phase 3 Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aygören-Pürsün, Emel; Soteres, Daniel; Moldovan, Dumitru; Christensen, Jim; Van Leerberghe, Arthur; Hao, James; Schranz, Jennifer; Jacobson, Kraig W.; Martinez-Saguer, Inmaculada

    2017-01-01

    Background Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a rare genetic disease causing unpredictable and potentially life-threatening subcutaneous and submucosal edematous attacks. Cinryze® (Shire ViroPharma Inc., Lexington, MA, USA), a nanofiltered C1 inhibitor (C1-INH), is approved in Europe for the treatment, preprocedure prevention, and routine prophylaxis of HAE attacks, and for the routine prophylaxis of attacks in the USA. This phase 3 study assessed the safety and efficacy of 2 C1-INH doses in preventing attacks in children aged 6–11 years. Methods A randomized single-blind crossover study was initiated in March 2014. Results for the first 6 patients completing the study are reported here. After a 12-week qualifying observation period, patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 C1-INH doses, 500 or 1,000 U, every 3–4 days for 12 weeks and crossed over to the alternative dose for a second 12-week period. The primary efficacy endpoint was the number of angioedema attacks per month. Results Six females with HAE type I and a median age of 10.5 years received 2 doses of C1-INH (500 and 1,000 U). The mean (SD) difference in the number of monthly angioedema attacks between the baseline observation period and the treatment period was −1.89 (1.31) with 500 U and −1.89 (1.11) with 1,000 U. During the treatment periods, cumulative attack severity, cumulative daily severity, and the number of attacks needing acute treatment were lower. No serious adverse events or study drug discontinuations occurred. Conclusions Interim findings from this study indicate that routine prevention with intravenous administration of C1-INH is efficacious, safe, and well tolerated in children ≥6 years of age. PMID:28662509

  2. Self-administered C1 esterase inhibitor concentrates for the management of hereditary angioedema: usability and patient acceptance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li HH

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Huamin Henry Li Institute for Asthma and Allergy, Chevy Chase, MD, USA Abstract: Hereditary angioedema (HAE is a rare genetic disease characterized by episodic subcutaneous or submucosal swelling. The primary cause for the most common form of HAE is a deficiency in functional C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH. The swelling caused by HAE can be painful, disfiguring, and life-threatening. It reduces daily function and compromises the quality of life of affected individuals and their caregivers. Among different treatment strategies, replacement with C1-INH concentrates is employed for on-demand treatment of acute attacks and long-term prophylaxis. Three human plasma-derived C1-INH preparations are approved for HAE treatment in the US, the European Union, or both regions: Cinryze®, Berinert®, and Cetor®; however, only Cinryze is approved for long-term prophylaxis. Postmarketing studies have shown that home therapy (self-administered or administered by a caregiver is a convenient and safe option preferred by many HAE patients. In this review, we summarize the role of self-administered plasma-derived C1-INH concentrate therapy with Cinryze at home in the prophylaxis of HAE. Keywords: C1-INH concentrate, hereditary angioedema, disease management, first line, prophylaxis, self-administration 

  3. C 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thien; Karčiauskas, Kęstutis; Peters, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Geometrically continuous ( G k ) constructions naturally yield families of finite elements for isogeometric analysis (IGA) that are C k also for non-tensor-product layout. This paper describes and analyzes one such concrete C 1 geometrically generalized IGA element (short: gIGA element) that generalizes bi-quadratic splines to quad meshes with irregularities. The new gIGA element is based on a recently-developed G 1 surface construction that recommends itself by its a B-spline-like control net, low (least) polynomial degree, good shape properties and reproduction of quadratics at irregular (extraordinary) points. Remarkably, for Poisson's equation on the disk using interior vertices of valence 3 and symmetric layout, we observe O ( h 3 ) convergence in the L ∞ norm for this family of elements. Numerical experiments confirm the elements to be effective for solving the trivariate Poisson equation on the solid cylinder, deformations thereof (a turbine blade), modeling and computing geodesics on smooth free-form surfaces via the heat equation, for solving the biharmonic equation on the disk and for Koiter-type thin-shell analysis.

  4. tmRDB (tmRNA database)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwieb, Christian; Gorodkin, Jan; Knudsen, Bjarne

    2003-01-01

    manually, assisted by computational tools, to determine base pairs supported by comparative sequence analysis. The tmRNA alignment, available in a variety of formats, provides the basis for the secondary and tertiary structure of each tmRNA molecule. Three-dimensional models of the tm......Maintained at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler, Texas, the tmRNA database (tmRDB) is accessible at the URL http://psyche.uthct.edu/dbs/tmRDB/tmRDB.html with mirror sites located at Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama (http://www.ag.auburn.edu/mirror/tm......RDB/) and the Bioinformatics Research Center, Aarhus, Denmark (http://www.bioinf.au.dk/tmRDB/). The tmRDB collects and distributes information relevant to the study of tmRNA. In trans-translation, this molecule combines properties of tRNA and mRNA and binds several proteins to form the tmRNP. Related RNPs are likely...

  5. P, = C ~ !~, 1 ~ t2 )

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P, = C ~ !~, 1 ~ t2 ). (1). Observe that if t is rational, then Pt is a rational point; that is, its coordinates are rational. (This formula permits us, in principle, to enumerate all rational points on C.) Let. B denote the point (1,0). Then APt = 2/V'f+t2 and. B Pt = 2t / V'f+t2, so if t is such that t and J 1 + t2 are rational, then IAPtl and IBPtl ...

  6. Translation-Memory (TM) Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Anne Gram; Christensen, Tina Paulsen

    2010-01-01

    to be representative of the research field as a whole. Our analysis suggests that, while considerable knowledge is available about the technical side of TMs, more research is needed to understand how translators interact with TM technology and how TMs influence translators' cognitive translation processes.......  It is no exaggeration to say that the advent of translation-memory (TM) systems in the translation profession has led to drastic changes in translators' processes and workflow, and yet, though many professional translators nowadays depend on some form of TM system, this has not been the object...... of much research. Our paper attempts to find out what we know about the nature, applications and influences of TM technology, including translators' interaction with TMs, and also how we know it. An essential part of the analysis is based on a selection of empirical TM studies, which we assume...

  7. Alcohol binding in the C1 (C1A + C1B) domain of protein kinase C epsilon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pany, Satyabrata; Das, Joydip

    2015-01-01

    Background Alcohol regulates the expression and function of protein kinase C epsilon (PKCε). In a previous study we identified an alcohol binding site in the C1B, one of the twin C1 subdomains of PKCε. Methods In this study, we investigated alcohol binding in the entire C1 domain (combined C1A and C1B) of PKCε. Fluorescent phorbol ester, SAPD and fluorescent diacylglycerol (DAG) analog, dansyl-DAG were used to study the effect of ethanol, butanol, and octanol on the ligand binding using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). To identify alcohol binding site(s), PKCεC1 was photolabeled with 3-azibutanol and 3-azioctanol, and analyzed by mass spectrometry. The effects of alcohols and the azialcohols on PKCε were studied in NG108-15 cells. Results In the presence of alcohol, SAPD and dansyl-DAG showed different extent of FRET, indicating differential effects of alcohol on the C1A and C1B subdomains. Effects of alcohols and azialcohols on PKCε in NG108-15 cells were comparable. Azialcohols labeled Tyr-176 of C1A and Tyr-250 of C1B. Inspection of the model structure of PKCεC1 reveals that these residues are 40 Å apart from each other indicating that these residues form two different alcohol binding sites. Conclusions The present results provide evidence for the presence of multiple alcohol-binding sites on PKCε and underscore the importance of targeting this PKC isoform in developing alcohol antagonists. PMID:26210390

  8. Virally encoded 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Waldhoer, M; Lüttichau, H R

    2001-01-01

    expression of this single gene in certain lymphocyte cell lineages leads to the development of lesions which are remarkably similar to Kaposi's sarcoma, a human herpesvirus 8 associated disease. Thus, this and other virally encoded 7TM receptors appear to be attractive future drug targets....

  9. Microbial growth on C1 compounds: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crawford, R.L.; Hanson, R.S.

    1984-01-01

    This book contains individual papers prepared for the 4th International Symposium on Microbial Growth on One Carbon Compounds. Individual reports were abstracted and indexed for EDB. Topics presented were in the areas of the physiology and biochemistry of autotraps, physiology and biochemistry of methylotrophs and methanotrops, physiology and biochemistry of methanogens, genetics of microbes that use C 1 compounds, taxonomy and ecology of microbes tht grow on C 1 compounds, applied aspects of microbes that grow on C 1 compounds, and new directions in C 1 metabolism. (DT)

  10. GS2000{sup TM} software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, A. [Caneta Research Inc., Mississauga, ON (Canada)

    2000-12-01

    Ground heat exchangers that are not adequately sized lead to additional capital costs and increased circulation pump energy consumption, which in turn reduce the cost effectiveness of ground-source technology. The GS2000{sup TM}, Version 2.0 software program was developed to let the designer input important information such as monthly heat pump loads for the building, ground properties, heat exchanger configuration, geographic location and others that have an influence on the length of ground heat exchanger. The modelling of horizontal, slinky and vertical heat exchangers is possible using the GS2000{sup TM} Version 2.0 software, which is based on the cylindrical source heat transfer equation. The determination of the heat exchanger length needed to ensure the water/anti-freeze fluid temperature that enters the heat pumps remains within the minimum and maximum specified by the user is made by the software. Peak load analysis allowing for extreme conditions, and supplemental heat rejection allowing the modelling of cooling tower/heat exchanger hybrid systems are two of the other features offered by the software. The process followed for the design, using the GS2000{sup TM}, of a ground-source heat pump heat exchanger for an office building in Ottawa, Ontario is described in this paper. DOE 2.1E was used to determine the monthly space loads for the building. Grout selection and borehole spacing on the heat exchanger design was done using the GS2000{sup TM} software. It resulted in the drilling of shorter boreholes or fewer boreholes of equal depth. The information obtained allowed for a cost comparison with other alternatives. 2 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  11. On the string equation at c=1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsu, Toshio.

    1994-07-01

    The analogue of the string equation which specifies the partition function of c=1 string with a compactification radius β is an element of Z ≥1 is described in the framework of Toda lattice hierarchy. (author)

  12. CCD TV camera, TM1300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takano, Mitsuo; Endou, Yukio; Nakayama, Hideo

    1982-01-01

    Development has been made of a black-and-white TV camera TM 1300 using an interline-transfer CCD, which excels in performance frame-transfer CCDs marketed since 1980: it has a greater number of horizontal picture elements and far smaller input power (less than 2 W at 9 V), uses hybrid ICs for the CCD driver unit to reduce the size of the camera, has no picture distortion, no burn-in; in addition, it has peripheral equipment, such as the camera housing and the pan and till head miniaturized as well. It is also expected to be widened in application to industrial TV. (author)

  13. On orientifolds of c=1 orbifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dijkstra, T.P.T. [NIKHEF, PO Box 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gato-Rivera, B. [NIKHEF, PO Box 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Riccioni, F. [NIKHEF, PO Box 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: f.riccioni@damtp.cam.ac.uk; Schellekens, A.N. [NIKHEF, PO Box 41882, 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2004-10-25

    The aim of this paper is to study orientifolds of c=1 conformal field theories. A systematic analysis of the allowed orientifold projections for c=1 orbifold conformal field theories is given. We compare the Klein bottle amplitudes obtained at rational points with the orientifold projections that we claim to be consistent for any value of the orbifold radius. We show that the recently obtained Klein bottle amplitudes corresponding to exceptional modular invariants, describing bosonic string theories at fractional square radius, are also in agreement with those orientifold projections.

  14. Equilibration in Transcendental Meditation (TM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Bagheri

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Today in the realm of theoretical and applied humanities, the main concern is the ways to attain inner equilibrium than prosperity and the ways to discover it. Equilibrium, in some way, evokes the development of tolerance and a peaceful life which is mostly, a controversial issue in Christianity and with a few differences, in sophism controversies. The present meaning seeking human or modern and post-modern human is testing different anti-progress and prophetic theories for peace and inner equilibrium to end his adversary and outer contradictions. By the massive advertisement on meditation and Transcendental Meditation (TM and its effects on health and equanimity which has been started since 1960s in Europe and continued to spread everywhere with the help of global networks, it seems necessary to study the roots, vitality, necessity, levels and related techniques and compare it with Islamic religious and cultural concepts and investigate the positive and negative aspects of these practices. The present study aims at discovering whether the equilibrium or peace attained through TM is genuine and beatific.

  15. BIRADS{sup TM} mammography: Exercises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balleyguier, Corinne [Radiology Department, Institut de Cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)]. E-mail: balleyguier@igr.fr; Bidault, Francois [Radiology Department, Institut de Cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Mathieu, Marie Christine [Biopathology Department, Institut de Cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 94805 Villejuif (France); Ayadi, Salma [Radiology Department, Institut de Cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Couanet, Dominique [Radiology Department, Institut de Cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France); Sigal, Robert [Radiology Department, Institut de Cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif Cedex (France)

    2007-02-15

    Some radiological cases are presented in this article to train the reader to the BIRADS{sup TM} classification in mammography. Each case is described according to Fourth American version of the BIRADS{sup TM} lexicon. Some classifications difficulties will also be presented, in order to show the complexity and the observer variability, commonly encountered in BIRADS{sup TM} 3 and 4 categories.

  16. A quenched c = 1 critical matrix model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Zongan; Rey, Soo-Jong.

    1990-12-01

    We study a variant of the Penner-Distler-Vafa model, proposed as a c = 1 quantum gravity: 'quenched' matrix model with logarithmic potential. The model is exactly soluble, and exhibits a two-cut branching as observed in multicritical unitary matrix models and multicut Hermitian matrix models. Using analytic continuation of the power in the conventional polynomial potential, we also show that both the Penner-Distler-Vafa model and our 'quenched' matrix model satisfy Virasoro algebra constraints

  17. Cooperative Research in C1 Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2000-10-27

    C1 chemistry refers to the conversion of simple carbon-containing materials that contain one carbon atom per molecule into valuable products. The feedstocks for C1 chemistry include natural gas, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methanol and synthesis gas (a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Synthesis gas, or syngas, is produced primarily by the reaction of natural gas, which is principally methane, with steam. It can also be produced by gasification of coal, petroleum coke, or biomass. The availability of syngas from coal gasification is expected to increase significantly in the future because of increasing development of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation. Because of the abundance of remote natural gas, the advent of IGCC, and environmental advantages, C1 chemistry is expected to become a major area of interest for the transportation fuel and chemical industries in the relatively near future. The CFFLS will therefore perform a valuable national service by providing science and engineering graduates that are trained in this important area. Syngas is the source of most hydrogen. Approximately 10 trillion standard cubic feet (SCF) of hydrogen are manufactured annually in the world. Most of this hydrogen is currently used for the production of ammonia and in a variety of refining and chemical operations. However, utilization of hydrogen in fuel cells is expected to grow significantly in the next century. Syngas is also the feedstock for all methanol and Fischer-Tropsch plants. Currently, world consumption of methanol is over 25 million tons per year. There are many methanol plants in the U.S. and throughout the world. Methanol and oxygenated transportation fuel products play a significant role in the CFFLS C1 program. Currently, the only commercial Fischer-Tropsch plants are overseas, principally in South Africa (SASOL). However, new plants are being built or planned for a number of locations. One possible location for future F

  18. The TM3270 Media-processor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Waerdt, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    I n this thesis, we present the TM3270 VLIW media-processor, the latest of TriMedia processors, and describe the innovations with respect to its prede- cessor: the TM3260. We describe enhancements to the load/store unit design, such as a new data prefetching technique, and architectural

  19. Magnetic ordering in TmGa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cadogan, J.M.; Stewart, G.A.; Muños Pérez, S.

    2014-01-01

    We have determined the magnetic structure of the intermetallic compound TmGa by high-resolution neutron powder diffraction and 169Tm Mössbauer spectroscopy. This compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic (Cmcm) CrB-type structure and its magnetic structure is characterized by magnetic order...... to be a first-order transition. At 3 K the magnetic structure of TmGa is predominantly ferromagnetic but a weakened incommensurate component remains. The ferromagnetic Tm moment reaches 6.7(2) μB at 3 K and the amplitude of the remaining incommensurate component is 2.7(4) μB. The 169Tm hyperfine magnetic field...

  20. COOPERATIVE RESEARCH IN C1 CHEMISTRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2001-04-30

    Faculty and students from five universities (Kentucky, West Virginia, Utah, Pittsburgh and Auburn) are collaborating on a basic research program to develop novel C1 chemistry processes for the production of clean, high quality transportation fuel. An Industrial Advisory Board (IAB) with members from Chevron, Eastman Chemical, Energy International, Teir Associates, and the Department of Defense has been formed to provide practical guidance to the program. The program has two principal objectives. (1) Develop technology for conversion of C1 source materials (natural gas, synthesis gas, carbon dioxide and monoxide, and methanol) into clean, high efficiency transportation fuel. (2) Develop novel processes for producing hydrogen from natural gas and other hydrocarbons. Some of the principal accomplishments of the program in its first two years are: (1) The addition of acetylenic compounds in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is found to produce significant amounts of oxygenated products in FT diesel fuels. Such oxygenated products should decrease particulate matter (PM) emissions. (2) Nanoscale, binary, Fe-based catalysts supported on alumina have been shown to have significant activity for the decomposition of methane into pure hydrogen and potentially valuable multi-walled carbon nanotubes. (3) Catalytic synthesis processes have been developed for synthesis of diethyl carbonate, higher ethers, and higher alcohols from C1 source materials. Testing of the effect of adding these oxygenates to diesel fuel on PM emissions has begun using a well-equipped small diesel engine test facility. (4) Supercritical fluid (SCF) FT synthesis has been conducted under SCF hexane using both Fe and Co catalysts. There is a marked effect on the hydrocarbon product distribution, with a shift to higher carbon number products. These and other results are summarized.

  1. Luminescence of YAG:Tm, Tb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholl, M.S.; Trimmier, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    Two rare earth cations, thulium (Tm) and terbium (Tb) have been incorporated into a yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) host material to obtain a blue phosphor. Thulium concentrations of up to 5% yield a saturated dark blue phosphor which exhibits a low efficiency. The highest efficiency for YAG:Tm occurs at a Tm concentration of 2%. A 0.5% concentration of terbium yields an unsaturated blue phosphor with an efficiency of approximately a factor of 15 times greater than that of Tm. The cathodoluminescence spectrum of YAG:Tm, Tb depicts features identifiable with YAG:Tb even at low Tb concentrations (0.5%). The light emitted by a Tb, Tm coactivated phosphor exhibits a clear shift toward the green region of the spectrum. There appears to be a resonant energy transfer from the 1 D 2 Tm 3+ state to the 5 D 4 Tb 3+ state. In the case of small concentrations of Tb in YAG, thulium behaves as a sensitizer for Tb cathodoluminescence

  2. Magnetic ordering in TmGa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadogan, J M; Stewart, G A; Muñoz Pérez, S; Cobas, R; Hansen, B R; Avdeev, M; Hutchison, W D

    2014-03-19

    We have determined the magnetic structure of the intermetallic compound TmGa by high-resolution neutron powder diffraction and (169)Tm Mössbauer spectroscopy. This compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic (Cmcm) CrB-type structure and its magnetic structure is characterized by magnetic order of the Tm sublattice along the a-axis. The initial magnetic ordering occurs at 15(1) K and yields an incommensurate antiferromagnetic structure described by the propagation vector k1 = [0 0.275(2) 0]. At 12 K the dominant ferromagnetic ordering of the Tm sublattice along the a-axis develops in what appears to be a first-order transition. At 3 K the magnetic structure of TmGa is predominantly ferromagnetic but a weakened incommensurate component remains. The ferromagnetic Tm moment reaches 6.7(2) μB at 3 K and the amplitude of the remaining incommensurate component is 2.7(4) μB. The (169)Tm hyperfine magnetic field at 5 K is 631(1) T.

  3. Microbial growth on C1 compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, M. B.; Quayle, J. R.

    1967-01-01

    1. A study has been made of the incorporation of carbon from [14C]formaldehyde and [14C]formate by cultures of Pseudomonas methanica growing on methane. 2. The distribution of radioactivity within the non-volatile constituents of the ethanol-soluble fractions of the cells, after incubation with labelled compounds for periods of up to 1min., has been analysed by chromatography and radioautography. 3. Radioactivity was fixed from [14C]formaldehyde mainly into the phosphates of the sugars, glucose, fructose, sedoheptulose and allulose. 4. Very little radioactivity was fixed from [14C]formate; after 1min. the only products identified were serine and malate. 5. The distribution of radioactivity within the carbon skeleton of glucose, obtained from short-term incubations with [14C]methanol of Pseudomonas methanica growing on methane, has been investigated. At the earliest time of sampling over 70% of the radioactivity was located in C-1; as the time increased the radioactivity spread throughout the molecule. 6. The results have been interpreted in terms of a variant of the pentose phosphate cycle, involving the condensation of formaldehyde with C-1 of ribose 5-phosphate to give allulose phosphate. PMID:6030306

  4. ScoutTM, a portable MCA system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, A.Y.; Ziemba, F.P.; Browning, J.E.; Szluk, N.

    1998-01-01

    Quantrad Sensor's hand-held multichannel analyzer (MCA), the Scout TM , has evolved considerably from the initial licensing from Pacific Northwest Laboratories (operated by Battelle Memorial Institute for the U.S. DOE). The Scout TM has grown into a flexible MCA system with alpha-, gamma-, X-ray and neutron detection capabilities with wide ranging applications. The development philosophy is discussed along with specific examples of design choices in areas such as manufacturability, upgradability, probe interchangability and software user interface. Recently introduced products include: software enhancements, additional probes, customized software and a second generation instrument, the Scout512 TM , that boasts increased capabilities. Future developments are also discussed. (author)

  5. The tmRDB and SRPDB resources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Rosenblad, Magnus Alm; Larsen, Niels

    2006-01-01

    in investigations of the tmRNP (a ribonucleoprotein complex which liberates stalled bacterial ribosomes) and the SRP (a particle which recognizes signal sequences and directs secretory proteins to cell membranes). The curated tmRNA and SRP RNA alignments consider base pairs supported by comparative sequence...... analysis. Also shown are alignments of the tmRNA-associated proteins SmpB, ribosomal protein S1, alanyl-tRNA synthetase and Elongation Factor Tu, as well as the SRP proteins SRP9, SRP14, SRP19, SRP21, SRP54 (Ffh), SRP68, SRP72, cpSRP43, Flhf, SRP receptor (alpha) and SRP receptor (beta). All alignments can...

  6. Unitarity relations in c=1 Liouville theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, D.A.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the authors consider the S-matrix of c = 1 Liouville theory with vanishing cosmological constant. The authors examine some of the constraints imposed by unitarity. These completely determine (N,2) amplitudes at tree level in terms of the (N,1) amplitudes when the plus tachyon momenta take generic values. A surprising feature of the matrix model results is the lack of particle creation branch cuts in the higher genus amplitudes. In fact, the authors show that the naive field theory limit of Liouville theory would predict such branch cuts. However, unitarity in the full string theory ensures that such cuts do not appear in genus one (N,1) amplitudes. The authors conclude with some comments about the genus one (N,2) amplitudes

  7. The GEMnet (TM) global data communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Byung K.; Chitty, Richard; Walters, Dave; Howard, Regan

    1995-01-01

    The GEMnet(TM) (Global Electronics Message network) will provide global digital data communications anywhere in the world at any time for minimum cost. GEMnet(TM) is an end-to-end Non-Voice Non-Geostationary Mobile Satellite (NVNG) (sometimes dubbed 'Little LEO') System which consists of a constellation of 38 low Earth orbiting small satellites and a ground segment. The GEMnet(TM) ground segment will consist of subscriber user terminals, gateway stations, a Network Operational Center(NOC), and a backbone network interconnecting the NOC and gateways. This paper will describe the GEMnet(TM) system concept including ground and space segments, system heritage, data communication services, and protocols.

  8. Normative data for TM electrocochleography measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Signe Schuster Grasel

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: Normative data for TM ECochG parameters were established in 100 normal hearing subjects without MD. These data can be used to distinguish normal from pathological findings and in follow-up of MD patients.

  9. AP1000TM plant modularization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantarero L, C.; Demetri, K. J.; Quintero C, F. P.

    2016-09-01

    The AP1000 TM plant is an 1100 M We pressurized water reactor (PWR) with passive safety features and extensive plant simplifications that enhance construction, operation, maintenance and safety. Modules are used extensively in the design of the AP1000 plant nuclear island. The AP1000 plant uses modern, modular-construction techniques for plant construction. The design incorporates vendor-designed skids and equipment packages, as well as large, multi-ton structural modules and special equipment modules. Modularization allows traditionally sequential construction tasks to be completed simultaneously. Factory-built modules can be installed at the site in a planned construction schedule. The modularized AP1000 plant allows many more construction activities to proceed in parallel. This reduces plant construction calendar time, thus lowering the costs of plant financing. Furthermore, performing less work onsite significantly reduces the amount of skilled field-craft labor, which costs more than shop labor. In addition to labor cost savings, doing more welding and fabrication in a factory environment raises the quality of work, allowing more scheduling flexibility and reducing the amount of specialized tools required onsite. The site layout for the AP1000 plant has been established to support modular construction and efficient operations during construction. The plant layout is compact, using less space than previous conventional plant layouts. This paper provides and overview of the AP1000 plant modules with an emphasis on structural modules. Currently the Westinghouse AP1000 plant has four units under construction in China and four units under construction in the United States. All have shown successful fabrication and installation of various AP1000 plant modules. (Author)

  10. MRI tracheomalacia (TM) assessment in pediatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciet, P.; Wielopolski, P.; Lever, S.

    Purpose: TM is an excessive narrowing of the intrathoracic part of the trachea. TM is a common congenital pediatric anomaly, but it’s often not recognized due to its unspecific clinical presentation. The aims of our study are: 1) to develop cine-MRI sequences to visualize central airways in static...... 3mm3 voxels. “Dynamic” scans were performed with the same parameters but covering only the central thorax (1/3 volume), temporal resolution was 500 ms per volume using the TRICKS. In-house developed software for segmentation and analysis was used. Results: All subjects managed to follow the required...... breathing maneuvers. Images of central airways during static and dynamic conditions were acquired and could be analyzed. Three out of the 8 children had a TM just above the carina during forced expiration, confirmed by bronchoscopy. Conclusion: This pilot study shows that Dynamic-MRI is feasible...

  11. PC server ULTRASAVER{sub TM} MAGNIA{sub TM} 7010FR; PC server ULTRASAVER{sub TM} MAGNIA{sub TM} 7010FR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    A PC server ULTRASAVER{sub TM} MAGNIA{sub TM} 7010FR has been commercialized, with its reliability enhanced thanks to a newly installed failure-remedy function. In this field of business, it is the first high-performance CPU Pentium(reg sign) III Xeon-loaded server equipped with the quick rollback mechanism which is a failure remedy function. The design enables the system to return to the previous step for re-execution in case of a transient failure, and this in turn realizes a 50% reduction (according to Toshiba's survey) in server stoppage for the enhancement of reliability. The server is shipped with a MAGNIA{sub TM} RESCUE service (valid for one year) incorporated thereinto. This program has a log tracing function which collects information on failure and then automatically forwards the information to a maintenance center for log analysis for the assurance of prompt maintenance. (translated by NEDO)

  12. Concentration effect of Tm3+ on cathodoluminescence properties of SiO2: Tm3+ and SiO2:Ho3+, Tm3+ systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dhlamini, MS

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available .physb.2011.09.091 Concentration effect of Tm3+ on cathodoluminescence properties of SiO2: Tm 3+ and SiO2:Ho 3+, Tm3+ systems M.S. Dhlamini, G.H. Mhlongo, H.C. Swart, O.M. Ntwaeaborwa, K.T. Hillie ABSTRACT: Cathodoluminescence (CL) properties of SiO...

  13. EEM{sup TM} wireless supervision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilic, H. [Ericsson-Nikola Tesla d.d. Zagreb (Croatia)

    2000-07-01

    By adding the GSM network to the communication level of Energy Management systems, energy operating centres (EOC) can offer wireless access to the supervised equipment. Furthermore EOC can profit from rapid service development in the GSM networks. With implementation of GPRS to the GSM network EOC can instantly offer wireless access to external IP based networks such as Internet and corporate Intranets. The author describes architecture and key characteristic of Ericsson EnergyMaster{sup TM} (EEM{sup TM}) system for Energy Management, how and where to implement wireless supervision, wireless access to IP addresses and also how to implement new services provided by the GSM network. (orig.)

  14. Reactivation of methionine synthase from Thermotoga maritima (TM0268) requires the downstream gene product TM0269.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sha; Romanchuk, Gail; Pattridge, Katherine; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A; Matthews, Rowena G; Ludwig, Martha

    2007-08-01

    The crystal structure of the Thermotoga maritima gene product TM0269, determined as part of genome-wide structural coverage of T. maritima by the Joint Center for Structural Genomics, revealed structural homology with the fourth module of the cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase (MetH) from Escherichia coli, despite the lack of significant sequence homology. The gene specifying TM0269 lies in close proximity to another gene, TM0268, which shows sequence homology with the first three modules of E. coli MetH. The fourth module of E. coli MetH is required for reductive remethylation of the cob(II)alamin form of the cofactor and binds the methyl donor for this reactivation, S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet). Measurements of the rates of methionine formation in the presence and absence of TM0269 and AdoMet demonstrate that both TM0269 and AdoMet are required for reactivation of the inactive cob(II)alamin form of TM0268. These activity measurements confirm the structure-based assignment of the function of the TM0269 gene product. In the presence of TM0269, AdoMet, and reductants, the measured activity of T. maritima MetH is maximal near 80 degrees C, where the specific activity of the purified protein is approximately 15% of that of E. coli methionine synthase (MetH) at 37 degrees C. Comparisons of the structures and sequences of TM0269 and the reactivation domain of E. coli MetH suggest that AdoMet may be bound somewhat differently by the homologous proteins. However, the conformation of a hairpin that is critical for cobalamin binding in E. coli MetH, which constitutes an essential structural element, is retained in the T. maritima reactivation protein despite striking divergence of the sequences.

  15. Associations with Minspeak[TM] Icons

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, Elmarie; Alant, Erna

    2004-01-01

    Although the Minspeak[TM] approach is used on communication devices worldwide, little research has been conducted on its applicability within specific cultural contexts. The impact that users' familiarity of symbols and associations can have on learnability necessitates more systematic research. This study was an investigation into the…

  16. 26 CFR 1.1092(c)-1 - Qualified covered calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Qualified covered calls. 1.1092(c)-1 Section 1.1092(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Wash Sales of Stock Or Securities § 1.1092(c)-1 Qualified covered calls. (a) In...

  17. C0 and C1 N-terminal Ig domains of myosin binding protein C exert different effects on thin filament activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Samantha P; Belknap, Betty; Van Sciver, Robert E; White, Howard D; Galkin, Vitold E

    2016-02-09

    Mutations in genes encoding myosin, the molecular motor that powers cardiac muscle contraction, and its accessory protein, cardiac myosin binding protein C (cMyBP-C), are the two most common causes of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Recent studies established that the N-terminal domains (NTDs) of cMyBP-C (e.g., C0, C1, M, and C2) can bind to and activate or inhibit the thin filament (TF). However, the molecular mechanism(s) by which NTDs modulate interaction of myosin with the TF remains unknown and the contribution of each individual NTD to TF activation/inhibition is unclear. Here we used an integrated structure-function approach using cryoelectron microscopy, biochemical kinetics, and force measurements to reveal how the first two Ig-like domains of cMyPB-C (C0 and C1) interact with the TF. Results demonstrate that despite being structural homologs, C0 and C1 exhibit different patterns of binding on the surface of F-actin. Importantly, C1 but not C0 binds in a position to activate the TF by shifting tropomyosin (Tm) to the "open" structural state. We further show that C1 directly interacts with Tm and traps Tm in the open position on the surface of F-actin. Both C0 and C1 compete with myosin subfragment 1 for binding to F-actin and effectively inhibit actomyosin interactions when present at high ratios of NTDs to F-actin. Finally, we show that in contracting sarcomeres, the activating effect of C1 is apparent only once low levels of Ca(2+) have been achieved. We suggest that Ca(2+) modulates the interaction of cMyBP-C with the TF in the sarcomere.

  18. Analysis list: Nr3c1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Nr3c1 Adipocyte,Blood,Breast,Embryo,Embryonic fibroblast,Liver,Neural + mm9 http://...dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Nr3c1.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Nr3c1.5.tsv http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Nr3c1.10.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscie...ncedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Nr3c1.Adipocyte.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp.../kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Nr3c1.Blood.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Nr3c1.Breast.tsv,http:

  19. TM01 mode accelerating cavity optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manca, J.J.; Knapp, E.A.

    1978-08-01

    The cost of an accelerator depends greatly upon the effective use of rf power for particle acceleration. Before completing an accelerator design, an optimization of the accelerating cells relative to the effective shunt impedance should be made to measure the structure's efficiency in providing a high and effective acceleration of particles for a given rf power. Optimization of the accelerating cell resonant at f/sub r/ = 1350 MHz (TM 01 mode) relative to the maximum effective shunt impedance ZT 2 was performed at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory using the computer program SUPERFISH. The study was parametric; one parameter was changed while the others were held constant. Frequency adjustments were made by changing the cavity radius. Results presented in this report can be used to design similar cavities at different resonant frequencies or to design a more complicated cavity (TM 02 mode) for the disk and washer structure

  20. BIRADS{sup TM} classification in mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balleyguier, Corinne [Department of Radiology, Institut de Cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France)]. E-mail: balleyguier@igr.fr; Ayadi, Salma [Department of Radiology, Institut de Cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France); Van Nguyen, Kim [Department of Radiology, Institut de Cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France); Vanel, Daniel [Department of Radiology, Institut de Cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France); Dromain, Clarisse [Department of Radiology, Institut de Cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France); Sigal, Robert [Department of Radiology, Institut de Cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulins, 94805 Villejuif (France)

    2007-02-15

    The Breast Imaging Report and Data System (BIRADS) of the American College of Radiology (ACR) is today largely used in most of the countries where breast cancer screening is implemented. It is a tool defined to reduce variability between radiologists when creating the reports in mammography, ultrasonography or MRI. Some changes in the last version of the BIRADS{sup TM} have been included to reduce the inaccuracy of some categories, especially for category 4. The BIRADS{sup TM} includes a lexicon and descriptive diagrams of the anomalies, recommendations for the mammographic report as well as councils and examples of mammographic cases. This review describes the mammographic items of the BIRADS classification with its more recent developments, while detailing the advantages and limits of this classification.

  1. PRIze{sup TM} 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    PRIze{sup TM} 1.2 is a computer program that evaluates the improved oil recovery (IOR) potential of petroleum reservoirs including the use of horizontal wells. It was created in 1992 and has since been used in over 800 reservoir evaluations. The tool provides information on the feasibility of IOR processes based on reservoir parameters. PRIze{sup TM} makes predictions for chemical, gas injection and thermal IOR processes based on both vertical and horizontal wells. The program provides a uniform data entry screen that allows the user to input 42 average values of geological parameters, fluid properties and oil production mechanism information into a data file. The data can be used to provide a production forecast, and enable the user to establish, to a first order approximation, the economic viability of a given process.

  2. 17 CFR 240.15c1-1 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Definitions. 240.15c1-1... Exchange Act of 1934 Rules Relating to Over-The-Counter Markets § 240.15c1-1 Definitions. As used in any rule adopted pursuant to section 15(c)(1) of the Act: (a) The term customer shall not include a broker...

  3. Usefulness of C1 Esterase Inhibitor Protein Concentrate in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-04

    Apr 4, 2018 ... of this case report is to describe the lifesaving use of a novel C1‑INH protein concentrate in a patient with mild‑to‑moderate dyspnea caused by swelling of the upper airway (larynx) and tongue. Keywords: C1 esterase inhibitor protein, hereditary angioedema, laryngeal edema, oropharyngeal swelling.

  4. Anti-C1q in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojan, G; Petri, M

    2016-07-01

    C1q is the first component of the classical complement pathway. Both clinically validated in-house ELISA assays as well as commercial ELISA kits are used for detection of anti-C1q antibodies. Anti-C1q autoantibodies can be detected in a wide range of autoimmune diseases and are highly sensitive for hypocomplementemic uticarial vasculitis. In SLE, anti-C1q are strongly associated with proliferative lupus nephritis, and their absence carries a negative predictive value for development of lupus nephritis of close to 100%. Anti-C1q in combination with anti-dsDNA and low complement has the strongest serological association with renal involvement. The anti-C1q titers correlate with global disease activity scores in patients with renal involvement, and higher titers seem to precede renal flares. After the successful treatment of a renal flare, anti-C1q has the tendency to decrease or even become undetectable. The main obstacle to the inclusion of anti-C1q in the classification criteria and clinical management of SLE is the lack of standardized laboratory assays. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Usefulness of C1 esterase inhibitor protein concentrate in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hereditary angioedema is an autosomal‑dominant disorder caused by mutation of the gene encoding the C1 esterase inhibitor (C1‑INH). It manifests as painless, nonpruritic, nonpitting episodic swelling of the subcutaneous tissues, gastrointestinal, and upper respiratory tracts in the absence of urticaria. An attack typically ...

  6. Direct interaction between CD91 and C1q

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duus, Karen; Hansen, Erik W; Tacnet, Pascale

    2010-01-01

    receptor, or low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein) and calreticulin, with CD91 being the transmembrane part and calreticulin acting as the C1q-binding molecule. In the present study, we observe that C1q binds cells from a CD91 expressing monocytic cell line as well as monocytes from human blood....... C1q binding to monocytes was shown to be correlated with CD91 expression and could be inhibited by the CD91 chaperone, receptor-associated protein. We also report data showing a direct interaction between CD91 and C1q. The interaction was investigated using various protein interaction assays......1q. The results obtained show for the first time that CD91 recognizes C1q directly. On the basis of these findings, we propose that CD91 is a receptor for C1q and that this multifunctional scavenger receptor uses a subset of its ligand-binding sites for clearance of C1q and C1q bound material....

  7. Usefulness of C1 Esterase Inhibitor Protein Concentrate in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-04

    Apr 4, 2018 ... concentrate in a patient with mild‑to‑moderate dyspnea caused by swelling of the upper airway (larynx) and tongue. Keywords: C1 esterase inhibitor protein, hereditary angioedema, laryngeal edema, oropharyngeal swelling. Usefulness of C1 Esterase Inhibitor Protein Concentrate in the. Management of ...

  8. Safety and Usage of C1-Inhibitor in Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riedl, Marc A; Bygum, Anette; Lumry, William

    2016-01-01

    of this study was to describe safety and usage patterns of pnfC1-INH. METHODS: A multicenter, observational, registry was conducted between 2010 and 2014 at 30 United States and 7 European sites to obtain both prospective (occurring after enrollment) and retrospective (occurring before enrollment) safety...... and usage data on subjects receiving pnfC1-INH for any reason. RESULTS: Of 343 enrolled patients, 318 received 1 or more doses of pnfC1-INH for HAE attacks (11,848 infusions) or for prophylaxis (3142 infusions), comprising the safety population. Median dosages per infusion were 10.8 IU/kg (attack treatment......, international patient registry documented widespread implementation of pnfC1-INH self-administration outside of a health care setting consistent with current HAE guidelines. These real-world data revealed pnfC1-INH usage for a variety of reasons in patients with HAE and showed a high level of safety regardless...

  9. Ab initio structures and stabilities of HeTM3+ (TM=Sc-Cu)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, David J.D.; Marsden, Colin J.; Nagy-Felsobuki, Ellak I. von

    2002-01-01

    The electronic structure and molecular properties of triply charged transition metal helides, HeTM 3+ (where TM = Sc-Cu), have been investigated employing CCSD(T), MCSCF and MRCI methods. Dissociation energies and harmonic vibrational frequencies have also been determined. For all the triply charged helides, the ground state is dominated by the 3d n electronic configuration. In addition, states with configurations that have holes in the metal 3d σ orbital exhibit greater binding energies. The suitability of single-reference methods and diagnostics for this series has been investigated, with the MCSCF wave function being the most reliable diagnostic tool for the applicability of SCF methods

  10. Ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) promotes cell migration Involvement of a specific C1P receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granado, María H; Gangoiti, Patricia; Ouro, Alberto; Arana, Lide; González, Monika; Trueba, Miguel; Gómez-Muñoz, Antonio

    2009-03-01

    Ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid that is implicated in the regulation of cell homeostasis and the control of inflammation. It is mitogenic for fibroblasts and macrophages, and has been described as potent inhibitor of apoptosis. Using RAW 264.7 macrophages we have now discovered a new biological activity of C1P: stimulation of cell migration. This novel action can only be observed when C1P is applied exogenously to the cells in culture, and not by increasing the intracellular levels of C1P. This fact led to identify a specific receptor through which C1P stimulates cell migration. The receptor is coupled to G(i) proteins and causes phosphorylation of extracellularly regulated kinases 1 and 2, and protein kinase B (also known as Akt) upon ligation with C1P. Inhibition of either of these pathways completely abolished C1P-stimulated macrophage migration. In addition, C1P stimulated the DNA binding activity of nuclear factor kappa B, and blockade of this transcription factor resulted in complete inhibition of macrophage migration. This newly identified receptor could be an important drug target for treatment of illnesses that are associated to inflammatory processes, or to diseases in which cell migration is a major cause of pathology, as it occurs in metastatic tumors.

  11. Powernext Day-AheadTM. Powernext futuresTM. Activity report - 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The introduction of a power exchange in France is a direct response to the opening up of the European electricity markets. Powernext SA is a Multilateral Trading Facility in charge of managing the French power exchange through an optional and anonymous organised exchange offering: - Day-ahead contracts for the management of volume risk on Powernext Day-Ahead TM since 21 November 2001, - Medium term contracts for the management of price risk on Powernext Futures TM since 18 June 2004. This document is the 2004 activity report of Powernext SA, it presents the key figures of the power market and of Powernext in 2004: - Increasing volumes: Powernext Day-Ahead TM 's traded volumes increased by 89%, from 7.48 to 14.18 TWh. Powernext Futures TM kicks off to a promising debut with 12.86 TWh traded in less than 7 months. - Less volatile prices: During 2004, the base price averaged 28.13 euro/MWh, and the peak prices averaged 33.71 euro/MWh. Compared to 2003, these prices decreased by an average of 3.7% on base-load and 10.9% on peak-load. In comparison to the two previous years, the daily volatility has noticeably settled down with 27% on base-load and 37% on peak-load. - Increasing liquidity: 10 new members joined Powernext Day-Ahead TM in 2004. The activity level of the members remains very high as 89% of them trade on an actual daily basis during 2004. The market resiliency stays strong. In December, an additional market 50 MW order on each hour resulted in a balance price variation of only 0.16 euro/MWh, or 0.53% of this balance price. For a 100 MW order, the resiliency is 0.32 euro/MWh, or 1.07% of the balance price. Thus, in 2004, Powernext Day-Ahead TM consolidates its role as a short term reference price. Moreover, in 2004, Powernext launched a futures market, Powernext Futures TM . This new market segment proposes contracts tradable up to 2 years ahead of delivery

  12. Optical Properties of Tm(3+) Ions in Alkali Germanate Glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Brian M.; Barnes, Norman P.; Reichle, Donald J.; Jiang, Shibin

    2006-01-01

    Tm-doped alkali germanate glass is investigated for use as a laser material. Spectroscopic investigations of bulk Tm-doped germanate glass are reported for the absorption, emission and luminescence decay. Tm:germanate shows promise as a fiber laser when pumped with 0.792 m diodes because of low phonon energies. Spectroscopic analysis indicates low nonradiative quenching and pulsed laser performance studies confirm this prediction by showing a quantum efficiency of 1.69.

  13. An exact bosonization rule for c = 1 noncritical string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Nobuyuki; Yamaguchi, Atsushi

    2007-01-01

    We construct a string field theory for c = 1 noncritical strings using the loop variables as the string field. We show how one can express the nonrelativistic free fermions which describes the theory, in terms of these string fields

  14. Anti-C1q antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbai, A-M; Truedsson, L; Sturfelt, G; Nived, O; Fang, H; Alarcón, G S; Gordon, C; Merrill, Jt; Fortin, P R; Bruce, I N; Isenberg, D A; Wallace, D J; Ramsey-Goldman, R; Bae, S-C; Hanly, J G; Sanchez-Guerrero, J; Clarke, A E; Aranow, C B; Manzi, S; Urowitz, M B; Gladman, D D; Kalunian, K C; Costner, M I; Werth, V P; Zoma, A; Bernatsky, S; Ruiz-Irastorza, G; Khamashta, M A; Jacobsen, S; Buyon, J P; Maddison, P; Dooley, M A; Van Vollenhoven, R F; Ginzler, E; Stoll, T; Peschken, C; Jorizzo, J L; Callen, J P; Lim, S S; Fessler, B J; Inanc, M; Kamen, D L; Rahman, A; Steinsson, K; Franks, A G; Sigler, L; Hameed, S; Pham, N; Brey, R; Weisman, M H; McGwin, G; Magder, L S; Petri, M

    2015-01-01

    Anti-C1q has been associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis in previous studies. We studied anti-C1q specificity for SLE (vs rheumatic disease controls) and the association with SLE manifestations in an international multicenter study. Information and blood samples were obtained in a cross-sectional study from patients with SLE (n = 308) and other rheumatologic diseases (n = 389) from 25 clinical sites (84% female, 68% Caucasian, 17% African descent, 8% Asian, 7% other). IgG anti-C1q against the collagen-like region was measured by ELISA. Prevalence of anti-C1q was 28% (86/308) in patients with SLE and 13% (49/389) in controls (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.8-4, p lupus nephritis. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  15. Unilateral extended suboccipital approach for a C1 dumbbell schwanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorgan R.M.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Craniovertebral junction tumors represent a complex pathology carrying a high risk of injuring the vertebral artery and the lower cranial nerves. Dumbbell C1- C2 schannomas are very rare tumors in this location. We present a case of a 66 years old male accepted for left laterocervical localized pain, headache and vertigo, with a large C1 dumbbell schwannoma extending in lateral over the C1 arch and displacing the C3 segment of the vertebral artery superiorly and anteriorly. Complete removal of the tumor was achieved using a far lateral approach. The approach is discussed with focus on the vertebral artery anatomy as the approach should give enough space to gain control of the artery without creating instability. Safe removal of C1 nerve root schwanomas can be achieved even if they compress and displace the vertebral artery by entering a fibrous tissue plane between the tumor and the vertebral artery.

  16. Two-matrix models and c =1 string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonora, L.; Xiong Chuansheng

    1994-05-01

    We show that the most general two-matrix model with bilinear coupling underlies c = 1 string theory. More precisely we prove that W 1+∞ constraints, a subset of the correlation functions and the integrable hierarchy characterizing such two-matrix model, correspond exactly to the W 1+∞ constraints, to the discrete tachyon correlation functions and the integrable hierarchy of the c = 1 string theory. (orig.)

  17. 26 CFR 1.1402(c)-1 - Trade or business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Trade or business. 1.1402(c)-1 Section 1.1402(c... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Tax on Self-Employment Income § 1.1402(c)-1 Trade or business. In order for an individual to have net earnings from self-employment, he must carry on a trade or business, either as an...

  18. MRI tracheomalacia (TM) assessment in pediatric patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciet, P.; Wielopolski, P.; Lever, S.

    and dynamic conditions in patients that were able to follow specific breathing manoeuvres;2) to develop post-processing tools for image analysis. Methods and Materials: To date 10 subjects (7 males; 2 adults) were enrolled in the pilot study: mean age 15, (range 6 to 30yrs). Volunteers were trained to perform...... spirometry controlled breathing maneuvers (peak flow and coughing) using a MRI compatible spirometer. “Static” 13-second breath-hold scans covering the entire thoracic region were acquired at end-inspiration and end-expiration using a 3D GRE with TR/TE=1.2/0.5 ms, alpha = 2, sagittal isotropic volume (2.8) x...... breathing maneuvers. Images of central airways during static and dynamic conditions were acquired and could be analyzed. Three out of the 8 children had a TM just above the carina during forced expiration, confirmed by bronchoscopy. Conclusion: This pilot study shows that Dynamic-MRI is feasible...

  19. Spectroscopic analysis of LiTmF4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.P.

    1979-01-01

    The absorption spectra of Tm3+ in LiTmF4 have been measured at 2, 10, 30, and 50 K in the spectral interval 4000-25 000 cm-1. The energy levels of the ground-state configuration were calculated by diagonalizing the Hamiltonian of the electron-electron interaction, the spin-orbit coupling, and the...

  20. Accelerated Math[TM]. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2011

    2011-01-01

    "Accelerated Math"[TM], published by Renaissance Learning, is a software tool used to customize assignments and monitor progress in math for students in grades 1-12. The "Accelerated Math"[TM] software creates individualized assignments aligned with state standards and national guidelines, scores student work, and generates…

  1. SpellRead[TM]. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "SpellRead"[TM], formerly known as "SpellRead Phonological Auditory Training"[R], is a small-group literacy program for struggling readers in grades 2-12. "SpellRead"[TM] integrates the auditory and visual aspects of the reading process and emphasizes specific skill mastery through systematic and explicit instruction.…

  2. Efficacy of porcine dermal collagen (Permacol TM ) injection for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Efficacy of porcine dermal collagen (Permacol TM ) injection for passive faecal incontinence in a dedicated Colorectal Unit at the Wits Donald Gordon Medical ... Conclusion: Trans-anal submucosal PermacolTM injections produced a significant improvement in both faecal continence and quality of life scores in patients with ...

  3. Sealing ability of grar MTA AngelusTM, CPM TM and MBPc used as apical plugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Accorsi Orosco

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the sealing ability of apical plugs fabricated with gray MTA AngelusTM sealer, CPM TM sealer and MBPc sealer. The root canals of 98 extracted single-rooted human teeth were instrumented with #5 to #1 Gates Glidden drills according to the crown-down technique until the #1 drill could pass through the apical foramen. The specimens were then prepared with K-files, starting with an ISO 50 until an ISO 90 could be visualized 1 mm beyond the apex. After root canal preparation, the external surface of each root was rendered impermeable and roots were assigned to 3 experimental groups (n = 30, which received a 5-mm thick apical plug of gray MTA AngelusTM, CPM TM and MBPc, and two control groups (n=4. The remaining portion of the canal in the experimental groups was filled by the lateral condensation technique. The teeth of each group, properly identified, were fixed on utility wax by their crowns and were placed in plastic flasks, leaving the apex free and facing upward. The flasks were filled with 0.2% Rhodamine B solution, pH 7.0, so as to completely cover the root apex of all teeth. The sealing ability was analyzed by measuring 0.2% Rhodamine B leakage after all groups had been maintained in this solution for 48 hours. Data were analyzed statistically by Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunn test with a=5%. The results showed that, among the tested materials used for fabrication of apical plugs, MBPc sealer had the least amount of leakage with statistically significant difference (p<0.05.

  4. 75 FR 57846 - Airworthiness Directives; Robert E. Rust, Jr. Model DeHavilland DH.C1 Chipmunk 21, DH.C1 Chipmunk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Robert E. Rust, Jr. Model DeHavilland DH.C1 Chipmunk 21, DH.C1 Chipmunk 22, and DH.C1... installation, with replacement as necessary for Robert E. Rust, Jr. Model DeHavilland DH.C1 Chipmunk 21, DH.C1...

  5. Comparative study of Tm-doped and Tm-Sc co-doped Lu3Al5O12 scintillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Makoto; Yanagida, Takayuki; Fujimoto, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    The crystals of Tm doped and Tm-Sc co-doped Lu 3 Al 5 O 12 (LuAG) grown by the floating zone (FZ) method were examined for their optical and scintillation properties. In transmittance spectra, strong absorption lines due to Tm 3+ 4f–4f transitions were observed. X-ray excited radioluminescence spectra were measured and broad and sharp emission peaks were detected. The former one was attributed to Sc 3+ and the latter one was due to Tm 3+ 4f–4f transitions. Scintillation yield enhancement due to Sc co-doping was observed by means of 137 Cs pulse height spectra. Scintillation decay times were several tens of μs under pulse X-ray excitation. - Highlights: • LuAG:Tm and LuAG:Tm, Sc single crystals have been grown by the FZ method. • Tm 3+ 4f–4f absorption has been observed in transmittance spectra. • Scintillation yield of Tm-doped LuAG has been enhanced by Sc co-doping

  6. Pediatric hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkas Henriette

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hereditary angioedema (HAE resulting from the deficiency of the C1 inhibitor (C1-INH is a rare, life-threatening disorder. It is characterized by attacks of angioedema involving the skin and/or the mucosa of the upper airways, as well as the intestinal mucosa. In approximately 50 per cent of cases, clinical manifestations may appear during childhood. The complex management of HAE in pediatric patients is in many respects different from the management of adults. Establishing the diagnosis early, preferably before the onset of clinical symptoms, is essential in cases with a positive family history. Complement studies usually afford accurate diagnosis, whereas molecular genetics tests may prove helpful in uncertain cases. Appropriate therapy, supported by counselling, suitable modification of lifestyle, and avoidance of triggering factors (which primarily include mechanical trauma, mental stress and airway infections in children may spare the patient unnecessary surgery and may prevent mortality. Prompt control of edematous attacks, short-term prophylaxis and intermittent therapy are recommended as the primary means for the management of pediatric cases. Medicinal products currently used for the treatment of children with hereditary angioedema include antifibrinolytics, attenuated androgens, and C1-INH replacement therapy. Current guidelines favour antifibrinolytics for long-term prophylaxis because of their favorable safety profile but efficacy may be lacking. Attenuated androgens administered in the lowest effective dose are another option. C1-INH replacement therapy is also an effective and safe agent for children. Regular monitoring and follow-up of patients are necessary.

  7. Expression of functional human C1 inhibitor in COS cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eldering, E.; Nuijens, J. H.; Hack, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    Full length human C1 inhibitor cDNA was cloned into a vector suitable for transient expression in COS-1 cells. Transfected COS cells secreted an immunoreactive protein of Mr approximately 110,000 that appeared to be functionally equivalent to the plasma-derived protein as established by the

  8. C1 metabolism in Paracoccus denitrificans : genetics of Paracoccus denitrificans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harms, N; van Spanning, R J

    Paracoccus denitrificans is able to grow on the C1 compounds methanol and methylamine. These compounds are oxidized to formaldehyde which is subsequently oxidized via formate to carbon dioxide. Biomass is produced by carbon dioxide fixation via the ribulose biphosphate pathway. The first oxidation

  9. C1q Nephropathy: The Unique Underrecognized Pathological Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Devasahayam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available C1q nephropathy is a rare glomerular disease with characteristic mesangial C1q deposition noted on immunofluorescence microscopy. It is histologically defined and poorly understood. Light microscopic features are heterogeneous and comprise minimal change disease (MCD, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS, and proliferative glomerulonephritis. Clinical presentation is also diverse, and ranges from asymptomatic hematuria or proteinuria to frank nephritic or nephrotic syndrome in both children and adults. Hypertension and renal insufficiency at the time of diagnosis are common findings. Optimal treatment is not clear and is usually guided by the underlying light microscopic lesion. Corticosteroids are the mainstay of treatment, with immunosuppressive agents reserved for steroid resistant cases. The presence of nephrotic syndrome and FSGS appear to predict adverse outcomes as opposed to favorable outcomes in those with MCD. Further research is needed to establish C1q nephropathy as a universally recognized distinct clinical entity. In this paper, we discuss the current understanding of pathogenesis, histopathology, clinical features, therapeutic options, and outcomes of C1q nephropathy.

  10. Intracellular distribution of TM4SF1 and internalization of TM4SF1-antibody complex in vascular endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciuto, Tracey E.; Merley, Anne; Lin, Chi-Iou [Center for Vascular Biology Research and Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School (United States); Richardson, Douglas [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University (United States); Liu, Yu [Department of Pharmacology, Shanxi Medical University, Xinjiannanlu 56, Shanxi Province, Taiyuan 030001 (China); Li, Dan; Dvorak, Ann M. [Center for Vascular Biology Research and Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School (United States); Dvorak, Harold F., E-mail: hdvorak@bidmc.harvard.edu [Center for Vascular Biology Research and Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School (United States); Jaminet, Shou-Ching S., E-mail: sjaminet@bidmc.harvard.edu [Center for Vascular Biology Research and Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School (United States)

    2015-09-25

    Transmembrane-4 L-six family member-1 (TM4SF1) is a small plasma membrane-associated glycoprotein that is highly and selectively expressed on the plasma membranes of tumor cells, cultured endothelial cells, and, in vivo, on tumor-associated endothelium. Immunofluorescence microscopy also demonstrated TM4SF1 in cytoplasm and, tentatively, within nuclei. With monoclonal antibody 8G4, and the finer resolution afforded by immuno-nanogold transmission electron microscopy, we now demonstrate TM4SF1 in uncoated cytoplasmic vesicles, nuclear pores and nucleoplasm. Because of its prominent surface location on tumor cells and tumor-associated endothelium, TM4SF1 has potential as a dual therapeutic target using an antibody drug conjugate (ADC) approach. For ADC to be successful, antibodies reacting with cell surface antigens must be internalized for delivery of associated toxins to intracellular targets. We now report that 8G4 is efficiently taken up into cultured endothelial cells by uncoated vesicles in a dynamin-dependent, clathrin-independent manner. It is then transported along microtubules through the cytoplasm and passes through nuclear pores into the nucleus. These findings validate TM4SF1 as an attractive candidate for cancer therapy with antibody-bound toxins that have the capacity to react with either cytoplasmic or nuclear targets in tumor cells or tumor-associated vascular endothelium. - Highlights: • Anti-TM4SF1 antibody 8G4 was efficiently taken up by cultured endothelial cells. • TM4SF1–8G4 internalization is dynamin-dependent but clathrin-independent. • TM4SF1–8G4 complexes internalize along microtubules to reach the perinuclear region. • Internalized TM4SF1–8G4 complexes pass through nuclear pores into the nucleus. • TM4SF1 is an attractive candidate for ADC cancer therapy.

  11. Improvement of the HANA{sup TM}-4 Tubing Workability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoon-HO; Park, Min-Young; Kim, In-Kyu; Mok, Yong-Kyoon [KEPCO NF, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyun-Gil [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    HANA{sup TM} cladding has been developed for high burn-up fuel cladding exceeding 70,000 MWD/MTU. HIPER fuels using HANA{sup TM}-6 material are currently being conducted in-reactor test in commercial nuclear reactors. HANA{sup TM}-6 was produced successfully for the fuel tubing by KEPCO NF. However, the production of fuel tubing of HANA{sup TM}-4 has not reached to target yield due to cracking during tube pilgering. The purpose of this study has been carried out to improve workability of HANA{sup TM}-4 tubing. An improvement on the manufacturing parameters and the alloy compositions adjustments in order to improve workability HANA{sup TM}-4 tubing was performed in the producing HANA{sup TM}-4 cladding successfully without cracking. However, it is necessary to minor change the design of Mandrel and Die to improve the surface quality. The effects on corrosion properties and microstructure by an adjustment in manufacturing parameters and alloy compositions are currently being evaluated.

  12. ASTROCULTURE (TM) root metabolism and cytochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porterfield, D. M.; Barta, D. J.; Ming, D. W.; Morrow, R. C.; Musgrave, M. E.

    2000-01-01

    Physiology of the root system is dependent upon oxygen availability and tissue respiration. During hypoxia nutrient and water acquisition may be inhibited, thus affecting the overall biochemical and physiological status of the plant. For the Astroculture (TM) plant growth hardware, the availability of oxygen in the root zone was measured by examining the changes in alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activity within the root tissue. ADH activity is a sensitive biochemical indicator of hypoxic conditions in plants and was measured in both spaceflight and control roots. In addition to the biochemical enzyme assays, localization of ADH in the root tissue was examined cytochemically. The results of these analyses showed that ADH activity increased significantly as a result of spaceflight exposure. Enzyme activity increased 248% to 304% in dwarf wheat when compared with the ground controls and Brassica showed increases between 334% and 579% when compared with day zero controls. Cytochemical staining revealed no differences in ADH tissue localization in any of the dwarf wheat treatments. These results show the importance of considering root system oxygenation in designing and building nutrient delivery hardware for spaceflight plant cultivation and confirm previous reports of an ADH response associated with spaceflight exposure.

  13. Brilliant blue, green and orange-red emission band on Tm3+-, Tb3+- and Eu3+-doped ZrO2 nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, V. H.; De la Rosa, E.; López-Luke, T.; Salas, P.; Angeles-Chavez, C.

    2010-11-01

    Tm3+-, Tb3+- and Eu3+-doped ZrO2 nanocrystals were prepared by a facile precipitation method with a hydrothermal process. Structural characterization showed a crystallite size ranging from 30 to 40 nm, and monoclinic and tetragonal zirconia phases were observed depending on the dopant concentration. The monoclinic phase was dominant for 0.5 mol% of Tb3+ and Eu3+, and the tetragonal phase was 100% stabilized for 2 mol% of Tm3+ and Tb3+. The structure of emission bands associated with Eu3+ confirms the substitution of Zr4+ located at C1 and D2h symmetry sites for the monoclinic and tetragonal phases. The emission of three primary colours, red, green and blue, was obtained from Eu3+, Tb3+ and Tm3+, respectively, which makes this nanophosphor an excellent candidate for use in photonics applications. The emitted signal was analysed as a function of ion concentration and the optimum concentration was determined.

  14. Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in Tm3+:YAG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, A. L.; Lauro, R.; Louchet, A.; Chaneliere, T.; Le Goueet, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the experimental demonstration of stimulated Raman adiabatic passage in a Tm 3+ :YAG crystal. Tm 3+ :YAG is a promising material for use in quantum information processing applications, but as yet there are few experimental investigations of coherent Raman processes in this material. We investigate the effect of inhomogeneous broadening and Rabi frequency on the transfer efficiency and the width of the two-photon spectrum. Simulations of the complete Tm 3+ :YAG system are presented along with the corresponding experimental results

  15. Construction of covalently coupled, concatameric dimers of 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terpager, Marie; Scholl, D Jason; Kubale, Valentina

    2009-01-01

    -Ala repeats flanked by flexible spacers and positively charged residues to ensure correct inside-out orientation plus an extracellular HA-tag to construct covalently coupled dimers of 7TM receptors. Such 15 TM concatameric homo- and heterodimers of the beta(2)-adrenergic and the NK(1) receptors, which...... for either of the protomers, which was not observed upon simple coexpression of the two receptors. It is concluded that covalently joined 7TM receptor dimers with surprisingly normal receptor properties can be constructed with use of an artificial transmembrane connector, which perhaps can be used to fuse...

  16. Review of Tm and Ho Materials; Spectroscopy and Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Brian M.

    2008-01-01

    A review of Tm and Ho materials is presented, covering some fundamental aspects on the spectroscopy and laser dynamics in both single and co-doped systems. Following an introduction to 2- m lasers, applications and historical development, the physics of quasi-four level lasers, energy transfer and modeling are discussed in some detail. Recent developments in using Tm lasers to pump Ho lasers are discussed, and seen to offer some advantages over conventional Tm:Ho lasers. This article is not intended as a complete review, but as a primer for introducing concepts and a resource for further study.

  17. Quantum and classical aspects of deformed c = 1 strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsu, T.; Tsujimaru, S.; Takasaki, K.

    1995-01-01

    The quantum and classical aspects of a deformed c=1 matrix model proposed by Jevicki and Yoneya are studied. String equations are formulated in the framework of the Toda lattice hierarchy. The Whittaker functions now play the role of generalized Airy functions in c<1 strings. This matrix model has two distinct parameters. Identification of the string coupling constant is thereby not unique, and leads to several different perturbative interpretations of this model as a string theory. Two such possible interpretations are examined. In both cases, the classical limit of the string equations, which turns out to give a formal solution of Polchinski's scattering equations, shows that the classical scattering amplitudes of massless tachyons are insensitive to deformations of the parameters in the matrix model. (author)

  18. Anti-C1q antibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbai, A-M; Truedsson, L; Sturfelt, G

    2015-01-01

    : Prevalence of anti-C1q was 28% (86/308) in patients with SLE and 13% (49/389) in controls (OR = 2.7, 95% CI: 1.8-4, p 4, p = 0.015), anti-dsDNA (OR = 3.4, 95% CI: 1.9-6.1, p ... associated with renal involvement (OR = 14.9, 95% CI: 5.8-38.4, p 

  19. Isometric C1-immersions for pairs of Riemannian metrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Ambra, Giuseppina; Datta, Mahuya

    2001-08-01

    Let h 1 , h 2 be two Euclidean metrics on R q , and let V be a C ∞ -manifold endowed with two Riemannian metrics g 1 and g 2 . We study the existence of C 1 -immersions f:(V,g 1 ,g 2 )→(R q ,h 1 ,h 2 ) such that f*(h i )=g i for i=1,2. (author)

  20. BOREAS TE-18, 30-m, Radiometrically Rectified Landsat TM Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The BOREAS TE-18 team used a radiometric rectification process to produce standardized DN values for a series of Landsat TM images of the BOREAS SSA and NSA in order...

  1. Lightweight Metal RubberTM Sensors and Interconnects Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this NASA Phase II program is to develop and increase the Technology Readiness Level of multifunctional Metal RubberTM (MRTM) materials that can be...

  2. BOREAS TE-18, 60-m, Radiometrically Rectified Landsat TM Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The BOREAS TE-18 team used a radiometric rectification process to produce standardized DN values for a series of Landsat TM images of the BOREAS SSA and NSA in order...

  3. BOREAS TE-18, 60-m, Radiometrically Rectified Landsat TM Imagery

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The BOREAS TE-18 team used a radiometric rectification process to produce standardized DN values for a series of Landsat TM images of the BOREAS SSA and...

  4. Field applications of the ScoutTM portable MCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, A.Y.; Ziemba, F.P.; Browning, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    The use of Quantrad Sensor's Scout TM in field type applications is described. The portability of the Scout TM enables the user to obtain more accurate information in the field versus a survey meter. Isotopic identification is possible when ancillary information is combined with built-in software libraries. Data from the Scout TM in remediation at Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC), NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material) measurements in California's Central Valley oil fields, medical isotope identification at nuclear pharmaceutical company and emergency response applications are presented. Additionally, custom software enabled the use of the Scout TM in identification, qualification and detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) in illicit trafficking and portal monitoring applications. (author)

  5. Ultrabroadband TM reflection from high contrast grating: why?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gushchin, I.; Tishchenko, A.V.; Parriaux, O.; Hoekstra, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    A grating mode analysis of the unusually broadband TM reflection from a high contrast binary grating sheds light on the origin of this effect. This interpretation will be submitted to the workshop attendance.

  6. Lightweight Metal RubberTM Sensors and Interconnects, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this NASA Phase II program is to develop and increase the Technology Readiness Level of multifunctional Metal RubberTM (MRTM) materials that can be...

  7. Spaceflight 2 um Tm Fiber MOPA Amplifier, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fibertek proposes to design, develop, and test a spaceflight prototype 2051 nm thulium (Tm)-doped fiber amplifier (TDFA) optical master oscillator power amplifier...

  8. Selectfluor TM: A novel and efficient reagent for the rapid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. The direct α-thiocyanation of ketones with ammonium thiocyanate has been achieved using SelectfluorTM under mild and neutral conditions to produce -ketothiocyanates, in excellent yields and with high selectivity.

  9. Landsat TM and ETM+ Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Satellite Image Database (KSID):2000-2001 consists of terrain-corrected, precision rectified spring, summer, and fall Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper (TM) and...

  10. SynLam(TM) Primary Mirror Evaluation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group, Inc. (CRG), has developed sandwich core composite material (SynLam(TM)) and related fabrication technology to address the drawbacks of...

  11. Tri-Decadal Global Landsat Orthorectified TM Scene V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract: The Landsat Orthorectified data collection consists of a global set of high-quality, relatively cloud-free orthorectified MSS, TM and ETM+ imagery from...

  12. Tri-Decadal Global Landsat Orthorectified TM Mosaic V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract: The Landsat Orthorectified data collection consists of a global set of high-quality, relatively cloud-free orthorectified MSS, TM and ETM+ imagery from...

  13. Family C 7TM receptor dimerization and activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Sheikh, Søren P; Hansen, Jakob Lerche

    2006-01-01

    The family C seven transmembrane (7TM) receptors constitutes a small and especially well characterized subfamily of the large 7TM receptor superfamily. Approximately 50% of current prescription drugs target 7TM receptors, this biologically important family represents the largest class of drug......-targets today. It is well established that family C 7TM receptors form homo- or hetero-dimers on the cell surface of living cells. The large extra-cellular domains (ECD) have been crystallized as a dimer in the presence and absence of agonist. Upon agonist binding, the dimeric ECD undergoes large conformational...... changes that lead to receptor activation. Despite extensive studies of the receptor transmembrane domain, several key features, including the exact organization of the complete receptor dimer, the sequence of events leading to receptor activation, and the functional significance of dimerization, have yet...

  14. AP1000{sup TM} plant modularization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantarero L, C.; Demetri, K. J. [Westinghouse Electric Co., 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States); Quintero C, F. P., E-mail: cantarc@westinghouse.com [Westinghouse Electric Spain, Padilla 17, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2016-09-15

    The AP1000{sup TM} plant is an 1100 M We pressurized water reactor (PWR) with passive safety features and extensive plant simplifications that enhance construction, operation, maintenance and safety. Modules are used extensively in the design of the AP1000 plant nuclear island. The AP1000 plant uses modern, modular-construction techniques for plant construction. The design incorporates vendor-designed skids and equipment packages, as well as large, multi-ton structural modules and special equipment modules. Modularization allows traditionally sequential construction tasks to be completed simultaneously. Factory-built modules can be installed at the site in a planned construction schedule. The modularized AP1000 plant allows many more construction activities to proceed in parallel. This reduces plant construction calendar time, thus lowering the costs of plant financing. Furthermore, performing less work onsite significantly reduces the amount of skilled field-craft labor, which costs more than shop labor. In addition to labor cost savings, doing more welding and fabrication in a factory environment raises the quality of work, allowing more scheduling flexibility and reducing the amount of specialized tools required onsite. The site layout for the AP1000 plant has been established to support modular construction and efficient operations during construction. The plant layout is compact, using less space than previous conventional plant layouts. This paper provides and overview of the AP1000 plant modules with an emphasis on structural modules. Currently the Westinghouse AP1000 plant has four units under construction in China and four units under construction in the United States. All have shown successful fabrication and installation of various AP1000 plant modules. (Author)

  15. The KiteShip (TM) project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De winter, Francis; Swenson, Ronald B; Culp, David [Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Foreseeable crude oil shortages provide an incentive to use wind power in the merchant marine again, to save fuel by providing propulsion power. Out prototype KiteShip (TM), a lightweight fiberglass proa 7 m long, has been sailed with 2 different sizes of kites in fresh water. The kites are shaped like parafoil wings, with areas of 4 sq m and 9 sq m. Steering is accomplished with two coupled rudders, one fore and one aft. We have been encouraged by the boat speed and the handling, although we have encountered only light winds up to now, of no more than about 20 km/ht. In the next phase we will employ a custom-built kite of 2 sq m. and will also start sailing in the ocean with heavier winds, of 40 km/hr and above. [Spanish] La escasez previsible de petroleo motiva volver a utilizar la fuerza del viento en la marina mercante, para ahorrar combustible al suministrar la potencia de propulsion. Nuestro prototipo KiteShip (MR), con una proa ligera de fibra de vidrio con 7 m de longitud, ha navegado con dos diferentes tipos de vela ({sup k}ite{sup )} en agua dulce. Los kites tienen forma de alas de parafol, con areas de 4 m{sup 2} y 9 m{sup 2}. La direccion se logra con dos timones acoplados, uno en la proa y otro en la popa. Nos entusiasmo la velocidad del bote y su manejo, aunque hemos encontrado hasta ahora solo vientos ligeros de no mas de alrededor de 20 km/hr. En la siguiente fase emplearemos un kite hecho a la medida, de 28 m{sup 2} y tambien comenzaremos a navegar en el oceano con vientos mas fuertes de 40 km/hr o mas.

  16. Cryogenic-cooled Tm:SBN tunable laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švejkar, Richard; Šulc, Jan; Němec, Michal; Jelínková, Helena; Doroshenko, Maxim E.; Papashvili, Alexander G.; Batygov, Sergei H.; Osiko, Vyacheslav V.

    2017-12-01

    In this work the temperature dependence of spectroscopic and laser properties of new ac- tive medium Tm:SBN (Strontium-Barium Niobate, SrxBa1-xNb2O6, x = 0.61). The tested sample of Tm:SBN (2 wt. % of Tm2O3) appropriate for generation of laser radiation at 1.88 μm had plan-parallel polished faces without anti-reflection (thickness 6.65 mm). During spectroscopy and laser experiments the Tm:SBN was at- tached to temperature-controlled copper holder and was placed in a vacuum chamber. The transmission and emission spectra of Tm:SBN and the fluorescence decay time were measured depending on temperature range 80 - 350 K. The fluorescence decay time was measured to be 3.5 ms and 2.8 ms at 80 and 350 K, respectively. Longitudinal excitation of Tm:SBN was carried out by a fibre-coupled laser diode (pulse duration 10 ms, rep- etition rate 10 Hz, pump wavelength 793 nm). The laser resonator was hemispherical, 146 mm long, with flat pumping mirror (HR @1.8 - 2.1 μm) and spherical output coupler (r = 150 mm, R = 97.5 % @1.8 - 2.1 μm). The Tm:SBN laser properties were investigated at temperature range 80 - 300 K. The highest slope efficiency with respect to absorbed pumped power was 3 % at 80 K. The maximum output peak amplitude power was 0.12 W at 80 K, i.e. 3.2 times higher than it was measured at 200 K. Tunability of laser wavelength at 80 K in the range of 1827 - 1962 nm was obtained by using SiO2 birefringent filter. At 300 K, wavelength tunability reached 1859 - 1970 nm. Thus, the new Tm:SBN crystal can be an useful laser material in the region of 2 μm.

  17. Spectroscopic and lasing properties of Ho:Tm:LuAG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Norman P.; Filer, Elizabeth D.; Naranjo, Felipe L.; Rodriguez, Waldo J.; Kokta, Milan R.

    1993-01-01

    Ho:Tm:LuAG has been grown, examined spectroscopically, and lased at 2.1 microns. Ho:Tm:LuAG was selected for this experimental investigation when quantum-mechanical modeling predicted that it would be a good laser material for Ho laser operation on one of the 5I7 to 5I8 transitions. Lasing was achieved at 2.100 microns, one of the three wavelengths predicted to be most probable for laser action.

  18. Efficient C1-continuous phase-potential upwind (C1-PPU) schemes for coupled multiphase flow and transport with gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jiamin; Younis, Rami M.

    2017-10-01

    In the presence of counter-current flow, nonlinear convergence problems may arise in implicit time-stepping when the popular phase-potential upwinding (PPU) scheme is used. The PPU numerical flux is non-differentiable across the co-current/counter-current flow regimes. This may lead to cycles or divergence in the Newton iterations. Recently proposed methods address improved smoothness of the numerical flux. The objective of this work is to devise and analyze an alternative numerical flux scheme called C1-PPU that, in addition to improving smoothness with respect to saturations and phase potentials, also improves the level of scalar nonlinearity and accuracy. C1-PPU involves a novel use of the flux limiter concept from the context of high-resolution methods, and allows a smooth variation between the co-current/counter-current flow regimes. The scheme is general and applies to fully coupled flow and transport formulations with an arbitrary number of phases. We analyze the consistency property of the C1-PPU scheme, and derive saturation and pressure estimates, which are used to prove the solution existence. Several numerical examples for two- and three-phase flows in heterogeneous and multi-dimensional reservoirs are presented. The proposed scheme is compared to the conventional PPU and the recently proposed Hybrid Upwinding schemes. We investigate three properties of these numerical fluxes: smoothness, nonlinearity, and accuracy. The results indicate that in addition to smoothness, nonlinearity may also be critical for convergence behavior and thus needs to be considered in the design of an efficient numerical flux scheme. Moreover, the numerical examples show that the C1-PPU scheme exhibits superior convergence properties for large time steps compared to the other alternatives.

  19. Powernext Day-AheadTM statistics - June 30, 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of a power exchange in France is a direct response to the opening up of the European electricity markets. Powernext SA is a Multilateral Trading Facility in charge of managing an optional and anonymous organised exchange offering: - Day-ahead contracts for the management of volume risk on Powernext Day-Ahead TM since 21 November 2001, - Medium term contracts for the management of price risk on Powernext Futures TM since 18 June 2004. This document presents in a series of tables and graphics the June 30, 2006 update of Powernext Day-Ahead TM statistics: daily traded volumes and base-load prices from November 2001 to June 2006, monthly overview from June 2005 to June 2006 (volumes and prices), weekly overview from March to June 2006 (volumes and prices), daily and hourly overview and market resilience for June 2006, power consumption in May and June 2006 (average consumption, average forecasted consumption and average price on Powernext Day-Ahead TM ), power consumption on the French hub from July 2005 to May 2006 and Powernext Day-Ahead TM prices, transfer capacities in June 2006 (auction results for France-Germany, France-Belgium, France-UK, France-Spain and France-Italy, and daily capacity allocation for France-Switzerland), temperature variations in France from January 2005 to June 2006 and base-load Powernext Day-Ahead TM prices, and balancing mechanism for April, May and June 2006 (half-hourly imbalance settlement prices). (J.S.)

  20. The distortive mechanism for the activation of complement component C1 supported by studies with a monoclonal antibody against the "arms" of C1q

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekzema, R.; Martens, M.; Brouwer, M. C. [=Maria Clara; Hack, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody (IgG1 isotype) against human C1q (MAb 130) is presented that activates C1 in serum through its antigen-binding sites at an optimal molar ratio of 3 MAbs:1 C1q. The antibody does not inhibit binding of C1q to IgG. Experiments with pepsin- and collagenase-digested C1q

  1. Formation and characterization of ZnO : Tm+ optical waveguides fabricated by Tm+ and O+ ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming Xianbing; Lu Fei; Liu Hanping; Chen Ming; Wang Lei

    2009-01-01

    Planar optical waveguides were formed in ZnO crystal by Tm + and O + ion implantation. The distributions of Tm + in as-implanted and annealed ZnO samples were investigated by the RBS technique. A shift of the Tm + peak towards the sample surface and out diffusion were observed after thermal treatment and subsequent O + ion implantation. Waveguide formation was determined after O + implantation in Tm + -implanted ZnO crystal. By using the prism-coupling method two guided modes were detected. The refractive index profile in the implanted waveguide was reconstructed according to the SRIM and RCM simulation. The RBS/channelling measurements show that the lattice structure of ZnO did not suffer detectable damage after O + implantation.

  2. Measurements of the 169Tm(n ,2 n )168Tm cross section from threshold to 15 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soter, J.; Bhike, M.; Finch, S. W.; Krishichayan, Tornow, W.

    2017-12-01

    Measurements of the 169Tm(n ,2 n )168Tm cross section have been performed via the activation technique at 13 energies between 8.5 and 15.0 MeV. The purpose of this comprehensive data set is to provide an alternative diagnostic tool for obtaining subtle information on the neutron energy distribution produced in inertial confinement deuterium-tritium fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The 169Tm(n ,2 n )168Tm reaction not only provides the primary 14-MeV neutron fluence, but also the important down-scattered neutron fluence, the latter providing information on the density achieved in the deuterium-tritium plasma during a laser shot.

  3. Laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry on nanostructured semiconductor substrates: DIOS(TM) and QuickMass(TM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, K. P.

    2010-02-01

    In the era of systems biology, new analytical platforms are under demand. Desorption/ionization on silicon mass spectrometry (DIOS-MS) is a promising high throughput laser mass spectrometry approach that has attracted a lot of attention, and has been commercialized. Another substrate material manufactured by physical method has also been made commercially available under the trade name of QuickMass(TM). These two commercial substrates, DIOS(TM) and QuickMass(TM), were investigated independently from the manufacturers and were characterized by a number of advanced surface techniques. This work determined (1) the correlation between the substrate physicochemical properties and their LDI activity, (2) the feasibility of metabolic profiling from complex biological matrices and (3) the laser desorption/ionization mechanism. The DIOS(TM) substrate was characterized with a thick nano-sized porous layer, a high surface concentration of fluorocarbon and silicon oxides and super-hydrophobicity. In contrast, the QuickMass(TM) substrate consisted of a non-porous germanium thin-film. The relatively high ionization efficiency obtained from the DIOS(TM) substrate was contributed to the fluorosilane manufacturing processes and its porous morphology. Despite the QuickMass(TM) substrate being less effective, it was noted that the use of germanium affords a self-cleaning mechanism and suppresses background interference of mass spectra. The suitability of DIOS(TM) substrates for metabolic profiling of complex biological matrices was demonstrated. DIOS mass spectra of human blood plasma, human urine and animal liver tissue extracts were produced. Suitable extraction methods were found to be important, but relatively simplified approaches were sufficient. Further investigations of the DIOS desorption/ionization mechanism were carried out. The previously proposed sub-surface state reaction could be a molten-solid interfacial state reaction of the substrate and this had a significant

  4. Ends of the line for tmRNA-SmpB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Corey M; Lau, Britney Y; Williams, Kelly P

    2014-01-01

    Genes for the RNA tmRNA and protein SmpB, partners in the trans-translation process that rescues stalled ribosomes, have previously been found in all bacteria and some organelles. During a major update of The tmRNA Website (relocated to http://bioinformatics.sandia.gov/tmrna), including addition of an SmpB sequence database, we found some bacteria that lack functionally significant regions of SmpB. Three groups with reduced genomes have lost the central loop of SmpB, which is thought to improve alanylation and EF-Tu activation: Carsonella, Hodgkinia, and the hemoplasmas (hemotropic Mycoplasma). Carsonella has also lost the SmpB C-terminal tail, thought to stimulate the decoding center of the ribosome. We validate recent identification of tmRNA homologs in oomycete mitochondria by finding partner genes from oomycete nuclei that target SmpB to the mitochondrion. We have moreover identified through exhaustive search a small number of complete, but often highly derived, bacterial genomes that appear to lack a functional copy of either the tmRNA or SmpB gene (but not both). One Carsonella isolate exhibits complete degradation of the tmRNA gene sequence yet its smpB shows no evidence for relaxed selective constraint, relative to other genes in the genome. After loss of the SmpB central loop in the hemoplasmas, one subclade apparently lost tmRNA. Carsonella also exhibits gene overlap such that tmRNA maturation should produce a non-stop smpB mRNA. At least some of the tmRNA/SmpB-deficient strains appear to further lack the ArfA and ArfB backup systems for ribosome rescue. The most frequent neighbors of smpB are the tmRNA gene, a ratA/rnfH unit, and the gene for RNaseR, a known physical and functional partner of tmRNA-SmpB.

  5. Ends of the line for tmRNA-SmpB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey M. Hudson

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Genes for the RNA tmRNA and protein SmpB, partners in the trans-translation process that rescues stalled ribosomes, have previously been found in all bacteria and some organelles. During a major update of The tmRNA Website (relocated to http://bioinformatics.sandia.gov/tmrna, including addition of an SmpB sequence database, we found some bacteria that lack functionally significant regions of SmpB. Three groups with reduced genomes have lost the central loop of SmpB, which is thought to improve alanylation and EF-Tu activation: Carsonella, Hodgkinia and the hemoplasmas (hemotropic Mycoplasma. Carsonella has also lost the SmpB C-terminal tail, thought to stimulate the decoding center of the ribosome. We validate recent identification of tmRNA homologs in oomycete mitochondria by finding partner genes from oomycete nuclei that target SmpB to the mitochondrion. We have moreover identified through exhaustive search a small number of complete, but often highly derived, bacterial genomes that appear to lack a functional copy of either the tmRNA or SmpB gene (but not both. One Carsonella isolate exhibits complete degradation of the tmRNA gene sequence yet its smpB shows no evidence for relaxed selective constraint, relative to other genes in the genome. After loss of the SmpB central loop in the hemoplasmas, one subclade apparently lost tmRNA. Carsonella also exhibits gene overlap such that tmRNA maturation should produce a non-stop smpB mRNA. At least some of the tmRNA/SmpB-deficient strains appear to further lack the ArfA and ArfB backup systems for ribosome rescue. The most frequent neighbors of smpB are the tmRNA gene, a ratA/rnfH unit, and the gene for RNaseR, a known physical and functional partner of tmRNA-SmpB.

  6. Comparative assessment of the performance of two generations of Tewameter: TM210 and TM300.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, C; Pinto, P; Rodrigues, L M

    2005-08-01

    The measurement of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) has been established as one of the main parameters in the assessment of skin barrier function. One of the most widely employed devices to measure TEWL is the Tewameter. Courage and Khazaka launched the TM300 in 2003 and successfully eliminated some of the limitations of the previous model. In the more recent device, the sensors inside the probe head can be pre-heated to a temperature close to that of the skin, which considerably decreases sampling time. Additionally, the new technology of the probe does not require frequent and time-consuming recalibration with different solutions. The main objective of this work was to perform a comparative assessment of the performance of the two different Tewameter models. Fifteen volunteers were used in this study, which was conducted in the mid-portion of the volar forearm. The standard measurements assessed differences in the basal values, time necessary for a stable value and coefficient of variability under normal and extreme conditions. The dynamic measurements performed were based on a plastic occlusion stress test (POST), involving the application of an occlusive patch for 24 h, after which the TEWL desorption curves were recorded. A mathematical model was adjusted to the data points using a specially modified simplex routine. Calculated parameters considered relevant to the study were t(1/2evap) (evaporation half-life) and dynamic water mass (DWM). Results show slight differences in the performance the two models, which are nevertheless statistically significant. The TM300 seems to be more sensitive to differences in TEWL and presents a much quicker measurement capacity. These results confirm a marked improvement in the more recent Tewameter model, when compared with its predecessor. The main conclusion of this work is that caution is advised when comparing results obtained with the two different models and that studies should be carried out entirely with the same

  7. Microbial growth on C1 compounds. Incorporation of C1 units into allulose phosphate by extracts of Pseudomonas methanica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, M. B.; Quayle, J. R.

    1966-01-01

    1. Incubation of cell-free extracts of methane- or methanol-grown Pseudomonas methanica with [14C]formaldehyde and d-ribose 5-phosphate leads to incorporation of radioactivity into a non-volatile product, which has the chromatographic properties of a phosphorylated compound. 2. Treatment of this reaction product with a phosphatase, followed by chromatography, shows the presence of two compounds whose chromatographic properties are consistent with their being free sugars. 3. The minor component of the dephosphorylated products has been identified as fructose. The major component has been identified as allulose (psicose) on the basis of co-chromatography, co-crystallization of the derived phenylosazone and dinitrophenylosazone with authentic derivatives of allulose and behaviour towards oxidation with bromine water. 4. It is suggested that the bacterial extracts catalyse the condensation of a C1 unit identical with, or derived from, formaldehyde with ribose 5-phosphate to give allulose 6-phosphate. 5. Testing of hexose phosphates and pentose phosphates as substrates has so far shown the reaction to be specific for ribose 5-phosphate. 6. The condensation reaction is not catalysed by extracts of methanol-grown Pseudomonas AM1. 7. A variant of the pentose phosphate cycle, involving this condensation reaction, is suggested as an explanation for the net synthesis of C3 compounds from C1 units by P. methanica. PMID:5965346

  8. C1,1 regularity for degenerate elliptic obstacle problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalopoulos, Panagiota; Feehan, Paul M. N.

    2016-03-01

    The Heston stochastic volatility process is a degenerate diffusion process where the degeneracy in the diffusion coefficient is proportional to the square root of the distance to the boundary of the half-plane. The generator of this process with killing, called the elliptic Heston operator, is a second-order, degenerate-elliptic partial differential operator, where the degeneracy in the operator symbol is proportional to the distance to the boundary of the half-plane. In mathematical finance, solutions to the obstacle problem for the elliptic Heston operator correspond to value functions for perpetual American-style options on the underlying asset. With the aid of weighted Sobolev spaces and weighted Hölder spaces, we establish the optimal C 1 , 1 regularity (up to the boundary of the half-plane) for solutions to obstacle problems for the elliptic Heston operator when the obstacle functions are sufficiently smooth.

  9. Intestinal and Hepatic Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Woo Park

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Polytopic transmembrane protein, Niemann-Pick C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1 is localized at the apical membrane of enterocytes and the canalicular membrane of hepatocytes. It mediates intestinal cholesterol absorption and prevents extensive loss of cholesterol by transporting biliary cholesterol into hepatocytes. NPC1L1 is a molecular target of ezetimibe, an agent for hypercholesterolemia. Recently, NPC1L1 inhibition has been shown to prevent metabolic disorders such as fatty liver disease, obesity, diabetes, and atherosclerosis. In this review, the identification and characterization of NPC1L1, NPC1L1-dependent cholesterol transport, the relationship with pathogenesis of metabolic disease and its newly introduced function for virus entry are discussed.

  10. Plasma enhanced C1 chemistry for green technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro

    2013-09-01

    Plasma catalysis is one of the innovative next generation green technologies that meet the needs for energy and materials conservation as well as environmental protection. Non-thermal plasma uniquely generates reactive species independently of reaction temperature, and these species are used to initiate chemical reactions at unexpectedly lower temperatures than normal thermochemical reactions. Non-thermal plasma thus broadens the operation window of existing chemical conversion processes, and ultimately allows modification of the process parameters to minimize energy and material consumption. We have been specifically focusing on dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) as one of the viable non-thermal plasma sources for practical fuel reforming. In the presentation, room temperature one-step conversion of methane to methanol and hydrogen using a miniaturized DBD reactor (microplasma reactor) is highlighted. The practical impact of plasma technology on existing C1-chemistry is introduced, and then unique characteristics of plasma fuel reforming such as non-equilibrium product distribution is discussed.

  11. A Selection of Recent Advances in C1 Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesters, Carl

    2016-06-07

    This review presents a selection of recent publications related to the chemistry and catalysis of C1 molecules, including methane, methanol, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. These molecules play an important role in the current supply of energy and chemicals and will likely become even more relevant because of the need to decarbonize fuels (shift from coal to natural gas) in line with CO2 capture and use to mitigate global warming, as well as a gradual shift on the supply side from crude oil to natural gas. This review includes both recent industrial developments, such as the huge increase in methanol-to-olefins-capacity build in China and the demonstration of oxidative coupling of methane, and scientific developments in these chemistries facilitated by improved capabilities in, for example, analytical tools and computational modeling.

  12. The Castor 120 (TM) motor: Development and qualification testing results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilden, Jack G.; Poirer, Beverly M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses Thiokol Corporation's static test results for the development and qualification program of the Castor 120(TM) motor. The demonstration program began with a 25,000-pound motor to demonstrate the new technologies and processes that would be used on the larger Castor 120(TM) motor. The Castor 120(TM) motor was designed to be applicable as a first stage, second stage, or strap-on motor. Static test results from the Castor 25 and two Castor 120(TM) motors are discussed in this paper. The results verified the feasibility of tailoring the propellant grain configuration and nozzle throat diameter to meet various customer requirements. The first and second motors were conditioned successfully at ambient temperature and 28 F, respectively, to demonstrate that the design could handle a wide range of environmental launch conditions. Furthermore, the second Castor 120(TM) motor demonstrated a systems tunnel and forward skirt extension to verify flight-ready stage hardware. It is anticipated that the first flight motor will be ready by the fall of 1994.

  13. Interaction of C1q and mannan-binding lectin (MBL) with C1r, C1s, MBL-associated serine proteases 1 and 2, and the MBL-associated protein MAp19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thiel, S; Petersen, Steen Vang; Vorup-Jensen, T

    2000-01-01

    Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and C1q activate the complement cascade via attached serine proteases. The proteases C1r and C1s were initially discovered in a complex with C1q, whereas the MBL-associated serine proteases 1 and 2 (MASP-1 and -2) were discovered in a complex with MBL. There is controv......Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and C1q activate the complement cascade via attached serine proteases. The proteases C1r and C1s were initially discovered in a complex with C1q, whereas the MBL-associated serine proteases 1 and 2 (MASP-1 and -2) were discovered in a complex with MBL......, whereas MASP-1, MASP-2, and a third protein, MAp19 (19-kDa MBL-associated protein), were found to be associated only with MBL. The bulk of MASP-1 and MAp19 was found in association with each other and was not bound to MBL or MASP-2. The interactions of MASP-1, MASP-2, and MAp19 with MBL differ from those...... of C1r and C1s with C1q in that both high salt concentrations and calcium chelation (EDTA) are required to fully dissociate the MASPs or MAp19 from MBL. In the presence of calcium, most of the MASP-1, MASP-2, and MAp19 emerged on gel-permeation chromatography as large complexes that were not associated...

  14. 75 FR 53861 - Airworthiness Directives; Robert E. Rust, Jr. Model DeHavilland DH.C1 Chipmunk 21, DH.C1 Chipmunk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-02

    ... Airworthiness Directives; Robert E. Rust, Jr. Model DeHavilland DH.C1 Chipmunk 21, DH.C1 Chipmunk 22, and DH.C1...). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for all Robert E. Rust... CFR part 39) to include an AD that would apply to all Robert E. Rust, Jr. Models DeHavilland DH.C1...

  15. Powernext FuturesTM statistics. April 30, 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of a power exchange in France is a direct response to the opening up of the European electricity markets. Powernext SA is a Multilateral Trading Facility in charge of managing an optional and anonymous organised exchange offering: - Day-ahead contracts for the management of volume risk on Powernext Day-Ahead TM since 21 November 2001, - Medium term contracts for the management of price risk on Powernext Futures TM since 18 June 2004. This document presents in a series of tables and graphics the April 30, 2006 update of Powernext Futures TM statistics: year, quarter and month contracts for April 2006, base-load and peak-load contracts overview from November 2005 to April 2006 (monthly volume in MW, open interest by delivery year in MWh, daily settlement price of the upcoming delivery period), and market liquidity in April 2006 (average bid ask spread and availability for base-load and peak-load contracts). (J.S.)

  16. Powernext FuturesTM statistics. Jun 30, 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of a power exchange in France is a direct response to the opening up of the European electricity markets. Powernext SA is a Multilateral Trading Facility in charge of managing an optional and anonymous organised exchange offering: - Day-ahead contracts for the management of volume risk on Powernext Day-Ahead TM since 21 November 2001, - Medium term contracts for the management of price risk on Powernext Futures TM since 18 June 2004. This document presents in a series of tables and graphics the June 30, 2006 update of Powernext Futures TM statistics: year, quarter and month contracts for June 2006, base-load and peak-load contracts overview from January 2006 to June 2006 (monthly volume in MW, open interest by delivery year in MWh, daily settlement price of the upcoming delivery period), and market liquidity in June 2006 (average bid ask spread and availability for base-load and peak-load contracts). (J.S.)

  17. Powernext futuresTM statistics November 30, 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-11-01

    The introduction of a power exchange in France is a direct response to the opening up of the European electricity markets. Powernext SA is a Multilateral Trading Facility in charge of managing an optional and anonymous organised exchange offering: - Day-ahead contracts for the management of volume risk on Powernext Day-Ahead TM since 21 November 2001, - Medium term contracts for the management of price risk on Powernext Futures TM since 18 June 2004. This document presents in a series of tables and graphics the November 30, 2004 update of Powernext Futures TM statistics: year, quarter and month contracts for November 2004, base-load and peak-load contracts overview from June 2004 to November 2004 (daily volume in lots, open interest by delivery year in MWh, daily settlement price of the upcoming delivery period, base-load and peak-load price spreads), and market liquidity in November 2004 (average bid ask spread and availability). (J.S.)

  18. DC Stark addressing for quantum memory in Tm:YAG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimov Konstantin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We observed a linear DC Stark effect for 3H6 – 3H4 optical transition of Tm3+ ions in Y3Al5O12. We observed that application of electric field pulse suppresses the two-pulse photon echo signal. If we then apply a second electric pulse of opposite polarity the echo signal is restored again, which indicates the linear nature of the observed effect. The effect is present despite the D2 symmetry of the Tm3+ sites that prohibits a linear Stark effect. Experimental data analysis shows that the observed electric field influence can be attributed to defects that break the local crystal field symmetry near Tm3+ ions. Using this effect we demonstrate selective retrieval of light pulses in two-pulse photon echo.

  19. Assembly Bow Characteristics of the HIPER16TM Fuel Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Sang-Youn; Kwon, O-Cheol; Ha, Dong-Geun; Kim, Jae-Ik

    2015-01-01

    The out-of-pile tests were performed either in air or in a hydraulic loop and at room temperature or operating temperature conditions. The test results include the required physical and thermal-hydraulic data needed to verify the HIPER16 TM fuel design. The mechanical integrity and safety of HIPER16 TM fuel design has been verified based on the final verification tests and evaluations. The visual examinations and dimensional measurements were performed on the LTAs using poolside examination equipment. The in-reactor verification test results showed that the HIPER16 TM fuel design met the irradiation related design requirement. The poolside examinations after 3rd irradiation cycle of LTA will be performed in the end of 2015.

  20. Hydrological planning studies using Landsat-4 Thematic Mapper (TM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervin, J. C.; Mulligan, P. J.; Lu, Y. C.; Marcell, R. F.

    1984-01-01

    NASA, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is evaluating the capabilities of Landsat 4 Thematic Mapper (TM) data for environmental and hydrological applications. Attention is given to the results of studies conducted at the Clinton River Basin in Michigan and the eastern shore of the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland. In the former, the evaluation conducted was for the band combinations: (1) 2, 3, and 4; (2) 3, 4, and 5; (3) 3, 4, 5, and 6; and (4) all seven bands. In the latter case, Multispectral Scanner (MSS) and TM data were classified for combinations (1), (3) and (4). Wetland classification accuracy for the 7-band TM data in this study was found to be 9 percent higher than with MSS data, allowing more reliable and accurate monitoring.

  1. Extremely large magnetoresistance and electronic structure of TmSb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Yan; Zhang, Hongyun; Lu, Xiao-Qin; Sun, Lin-Lin; Xu, Sheng; Lu, Zhong-Yi; Liu, Kai; Zhou, Shuyun; Xia, Tian-Long

    2018-02-01

    We report the magnetotransport properties and the electronic structure of TmSb. TmSb exhibits extremely large transverse magnetoresistance and Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) oscillation at low temperature and high magnetic field. Interestingly, the split of Fermi surfaces induced by the nonsymmetric spin-orbit interaction has been observed from SdH oscillation. The analysis of the angle-dependent SdH oscillation illustrates the contribution of each Fermi surface to the conductivity. The electronic structure revealed by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and first-principles calculations demonstrates a gap at the X point and the absence of band inversion. Combined with the trivial Berry phase extracted from SdH oscillation and the nearly equal concentrations of electron and hole from Hall measurements, it is suggested that TmSb is a topologically trivial semimetal and the observed XMR originates from the electron-hole compensation and high mobility.

  2. Powernext Day-AheadTM products and market organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-06-01

    The introduction of a power exchange in France is a direct response to the opening up of the European electricity markets. Powernext SA is a Multilateral Trading Facility in charge of managing the French power exchange through an optional and anonymous organised exchange offering: - Day-ahead contracts for the management of volume risk on Powernext Day-Ahead TM since 21 November 2001, - Medium term contracts for the management of price risk on Powernext Futures TM since 18 June 2004. This document presents the principle of the trading of hourly contracts on Powernext Day-Ahead TM , the accessibility of the market, the SAPRI trading platform operated by Nord Pool, the Scandinavian power exchange, the validation of the auction results, the collaboration with LCH.Clearnet SA to secure and facilitate the transactions, and the delivery guarantee implemented by RTE (the French energy transport network). (J.S.)

  3. Estimation of immune complexes by a microplate-adapted C1q-Protein A enzyme-linked-immunosorbent-assay (C1q-PA-ELISA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, L; Glikmann, G; Jensenius, J C

    1983-01-01

    of IC were found in the majority of sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and SLE. The described C1q-PA-ELISA is a simple and inexpensive method for detection of C1q-binding immune complexes. The reproducibility is acceptable and the sensitivity is higher than for most IC-methods based on C1q-binding....

  4. Catalytic routes to fuels from C1 and oxygenate molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Shuai

    2017-02-23

    This account illustrates concepts in chemical kinetics underpinned by the formalism of transition state theory using catalytic processes that enable the synthesis of molecules suitable as fuels from C-1 and oxygenate reactants. Such feedstocks provide an essential bridge towards a carbon-free energy future, but their volatility and low energy density require the formation of new C-C bonds and the removal of oxygen. These transformations are described here through recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms and site requirements in catalysis by surfaces, with emphasis on enabling concepts that tackle ubiquitous reactivity and selectivity challenges. The hurdles in forming the first C-C bond from C-1 molecules are illustrated by the oxidative coupling of methane, in which surface O-atoms form OH radicals from O-2 and H2O molecules. These gaseous OH species act as strong H-abstractors and activate C-H bonds with earlier transition states than oxide surfaces, thus rendering activation rates less sensitive to the weaker C-H bonds in larger alkane products than in CH4 reactants. Anhydrous carbonylation of dimethyl ether forms a single C-C bond on protons residing within inorganic voids that preferentially stabilize the kinetically-relevant transition state through van der Waals interactions that compensate for the weak CO nucleophile. Similar solvation effects, but by intrapore liquids instead of inorganic hosts, also become evident as alkenes condense within MCM-41 channels containing isolated Ni2+ active sites during dimerization reactions. Intrapore liquids preferentially stabilize transition states for C-C bond formation and product desorption, leading to unprecedented reactivity and site stability at sub-ambient temperatures and to 1-alkene dimer selectivities previously achieved only on organometallic systems with co-catalysts or activators. C-1 homologation selectively forms C-4 and C-7 chains with a specific backbone (isobutane, triptane) on solid

  5. PLUS7TM In-Reactor Operating Performance and Economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyutae; Jang, Youngki; Choi, Joonhyung; Lee, Jinseok; Kim, Yoonho; Suh, Jungmin

    2006-01-01

    KNFC has developed an advanced fuel, PLUS7 TM , for the Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plants(KSNPs) through the joint development program with Westinghouse. With the help of various out-of-pile tests, it is found that the PLUS7 TM shows much better performance than the current fuel, GUARDIAN TM from the safety and economy points of view. Now four Lead Test Assembles(LTAs) of the PLUS7 TM are being irradiated for the 3 rd cycle after the successful completion of the 1 st and 2 nd irradiation cycles. During the 1 st and 2 nd irradiation cycles, no fuel failure was observed at LTAs and their nuclear-related parameters matched their design values well. During the overhaul period, on the other hand, pool side examinations were performed for four LTAs to generate key in-reactor fuel performance data such as fuel rod and assembly growths, fuel rod-to-top nozzle gap, fuel assembly bow and twist, fuel rod bow, spacer grid width, fuel rod diameter and fuel rod oxide layer thickness. It is found that all measured values are bounded by upper and lower predicted ones. The detailed economic analyses have shown that significant fuel cycle cost can be reduced by more than one million dollars per cycle of one KSNP with the introduction of the PLUS7 TM assembly. Furthermore, more than one hundred million dollars with power up-rating of 5% can be saved annually for currently operating eight KSNPs, which is easily and safety achievable with the PLUS7 TM assembly

  6. Comparative evaluation of two methods for 172Tm production in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, I.M.; Hayes, Alejandro; Melcer, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of two methods for the production of 172 Tm in nuclear reactors is carried out. They are respectively based on two chains of double neutron capture reactions, 170 Er(n,γ) 171 Er(n,γ) 172 Er(β - ) 172 Tm and 170 Er(n,γ) 171 Er(β - ) 171 Tm(n,γ) 172 Tm, and a chain of triple neutron capture: 169 Tm(n,γ) 170 Tm(n,γ) 71 Tm(n,γ) 172 Tm. Theoretical considerations with respect to both ways of production are formulated and the mathematical equation are solved. Experiments of irradiation of Er 2 O 3 and Tm 2 O 3 were performed. Advantages and drawbacks of both methods are discussed. (author)

  7. Magnetic anomaly in superconducting TmRh4B4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.L.; Huang, C.Y.; Tsou, J.J.; Ho, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    The magnetic and superconducting properties of TmRh 4 B 4 (which becomes superconducting at 9.6 K) by means of ac and dc magnetic susceptibility and specific heat measurements are investigated. At 10.7 K, an ac susceptibility peak similar to those found in spin glasses has been observed. In addition, a pronounced specific heat peak has been observed at 11.4 K. The susceptibility peak is essentially unaffected by substitution of 1% Lu or Er for the Tm, but it diminishes when much larger amounts of Er are substituted. The physical origin of this anomalous peak will be discussed

  8. Family C 7TM receptor dimerization and activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Sheikh, Søren P; Hansen, Jakob Lerche

    2006-01-01

    changes that lead to receptor activation. Despite extensive studies of the receptor transmembrane domain, several key features, including the exact organization of the complete receptor dimer, the sequence of events leading to receptor activation, and the functional significance of dimerization, have yet...... to be fully defined. This review presents the biochemical support for family C 7TM receptor dimerization and discusses its importance for receptor biosynthesis, surface expression, ligand binding and activation, since lessons learnt here may well be applicable to the whole superfamily of 7TM receptors....

  9. Entanglement entropy of two disjoint intervals in c = 1 theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alba, Vincenzo; Tagliacozzo, Luca; Calabrese, Pasquale

    2011-01-01

    We study the scaling of the Rényi entanglement entropy of two disjoint blocks of critical lattice models described by conformal field theories with central charge c = 1. We provide the analytic conformal field theory result for the second order Rényi entropy for a free boson compactified on an orbifold describing the scaling limit of the Ashkin–Teller (AT) model on the self-dual line. We have checked this prediction in cluster Monte Carlo simulations of the classical two-dimensional AT model. We have also performed extensive numerical simulations of the anisotropic Heisenberg quantum spin chain with tree tensor network techniques that allowed us to obtain the reduced density matrices of disjoint blocks of the spin chain and to check the correctness of the predictions for Rényi and entanglement entropies from conformal field theory. In order to match these predictions, we have extrapolated the numerical results by properly taking into account the corrections induced by the finite length of the blocks on the leading scaling behavior

  10. Conserved water-mediated hydrogen bond network between TM-I, -II, -VI, and -VII in 7TM receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Rie; Hansen, Louise Valentin; Mokrosinski, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Five highly conserved polar residues connected by a number of structural water molecules together with two rotamer micro-switches, TrpVI:13 and TyrVII:20, constitute an extended hydrogen bond network between the intracellular segments of TM-I, -II, -VI, and -VII of 7TM receptors. Molecular dynamics...... simulations showed that, although the fewer water molecules in rhodopsin were relatively movable, the hydrogen bond network of the beta2-adrenergic receptor was fully loaded with water molecules that were surprisingly immobilized between the two rotamer switches, both apparently being in their closed...... (AsnI:18, AspII:10, and AsnVII:13), whereas others (AsnVII:12 and AsnVII:16) located one helical turn apart and sharing a water molecule were shown to be essential for agonist-induced signaling. It is concluded that the conserved water hydrogen bond network of 7TM receptors constitutes an extended...

  11. Recombinant C1-Inhibitor Effects on Coagulation and Fibrinolysis in Patients with Hereditary Angioedema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Relan, Anurag; Bakhtiari, Kamran; van Amersfoort, Edwin S.; Meijers, Joost C. M.; Hack, C. Erik

    2012-01-01

    Background: Recombinant human C1-inhibitor (rhC1INH; Ruconest (R)) has been developed for treatment of acute angioedema attacks in patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE) due to heterozygous deficiency of C1INH. Previous reports suggest that administration of plasma-derived C1INH products may be

  12. Recombinant human C1-inhibitor in the treatment of acute angioedema attacks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Choi, Goda; Soeters, Maarten R.; Farkas, Henriette; Varga, Lilian; Obtulowicz, Krystyna; Bilo, Barbara; Porebski, Greg; Hack, C. Erik; Verdonk, Rene; Nuijens, Jan; Levi, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with hereditary C1-inhibitor deficiency have recurrent attacks of angioedema, preferably treated with C1-inhibitor concentrate. A recombinant human C1-inhibitor (rHuC1INH) was developed, derived from milk from transgenic rabbits. This study was undertaken to investigate the

  13. BACTEC MGIT 960 TM system for screening of Mycobacterium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was aimed to evaluate the recent technique (BACTEC MGIT 960 TM system) for screening of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex among cattle in Egypt. From the 1180 cattle examined in three different Governorates (El-Sharkia, El-Gharbia and El-Monefeia) by single intradermal tuberculin test, 29 animals ...

  14. Evaluation of NGAL TestTM on Cobas 6000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Young B L; Damgaard, Anette; Poulsen, Jørgen H

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin (NGAL) is a promising biomarker for acute kidney injury (AKI). Our objectives were to evaluate the NGAL Test(TM) from Bioporto for both urine NGAL and plasma NGAL on the Cobas 6000 c501 (Roche Diagnostics, Rotkreuz, Switzerland) with matched...

  15. Modeling woody vegetation resources using Landsat TM imagery in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modeling woody vegetation resources using Landsat TM imagery in northern Namibia. Alex Verlinden, Risto Laamanen. Abstract. In 1995 a forest inventory covering northern Namibia was initiated, based on stratified systematic field sampling of plots with a radius of up to 30 m. In these plots detailed tree parameters were ...

  16. Tm2+ luminescent materials for solar radiation conversion devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Kolk, E.

    2015-01-01

    A solar radiation conversion device is described that comprises a luminescent Tm 2+ inorganic material for converting solar radiation of at least part of the UV and/or visible and/or infra red solar spectrum into infrared solar radiation, preferably said infrared solar radiation having a wavelength

  17. Teaching Engineering Design through Lego[R] Mindstorms[TM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringwood, J. V.; Monaghan, K.; Maloco, J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines a particular methodology of teaching engineering design to undergraduate engineering students, which relies on Lego[R] Mindstorms[TM]. A number of important issues are addressed, including the timing of the design module within the programme, prior knowledge required and assessment components. The module, which has been running…

  18. Unmixing-based Landsat TM and MERIS FR data fusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zurita Milla, R.; Clevers, J.G.P.W.; Schaepman, M.E.

    2008-01-01

    An unmixing-based data fusion technique is used to generate images that have the spatial resolution of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and the spectral resolution provided by the Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) sensor. The method requires the optimization of the following two parameters:

  19. Supporting Moral Development: The Virtues Project[TM

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moor, Gerrit

    2011-01-01

    The Virtues Project[TM] was founded in Canada in 1991 by Linda Kavelin Popov, Dan Popov, and John Kavelin who were concerned about the level of violence among families and youth. In studying sacred traditions and cultures around the world, they identified a set of common virtues. These were used to develop a pedagogical model that has applications…

  20. Words Their Way[TM]. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Words Their Way"[TM] is an approach to phonics, vocabulary, and spelling instruction for students in kindergarten through high school. The program can be implemented as a core or supplemental curriculum and aims to provide a practical way to study words with students. The purpose of word study (which involves examining, manipulating,…

  1. Doors to Discovery[TM]. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Doors to Discovery"]TM] is a preschool literacy curriculum that uses eight thematic units of activities to help children build fundamental early literacy skills in oral language, phonological awareness, concepts of print, alphabet knowledge, writing, and comprehension. The eight thematic units cover topics such as nature, friendship,…

  2. Caelyx (TM) in malignant mesothelioma : A phase II EORTC study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, P; van Meerbeeck, J; Groen, H; Schouwink, H; Burgers, S; Daamen, S; Giaccone, G

    Background: The use of doxorubicin has shown some activity in malignant mesothelioma but prolonged administration is hampered by cardiotoxicity. Caelyx(TM), a new liposomal and pegylated form of doxorubicin has shown a better pharmacokinetic and toxic profile then doxorubicin. In a phase II study,

  3. Minehound TM trials in Cambodia, Bosnia, and Angola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, David J.; Curtis, Paul

    2006-05-01

    This paper describes the trials of the MINEHOUND TM dual sensor, land mine detector carried out in Cambodia, Bosnia and Angola. MINEHOUND TM has been developed for use in humanitarian demining as a means of improving the efficiency of clearance operations. The trials were sponsored by the UK Department for International Development (DFID). ERA Technology Ltd conducted the trials, which were monitored by staff drawn from the countries participating in the International Test and Evaluation Programme (ITEP) for humanitarian de-mining. Experienced deminers from the Mines Advisory Group (MAG) and Norwegian Peoples Aid (NPA) used the pre-production units in live minefields. The objectives of the trial were: 1. To record information on the performance of MINEHOUND TM when used in a live minefield. 2. To determine the reduction in False Alarm Rate (FAR) that could be achieved using a dual sensor mine detector. The trials were conducted in three mine-affected countries for a period of eight weeks per country; the programme of trials ran from July 2005 to December 2005, with an additional smaller trial in late February 2006. The results of the trials showed that MINEHOUND TM achieved 100% detection of the mines encountered and an improvement in FAR of better than 5:1 compared with a basic metal detector. The trials enabled optimisation of the production design and clearly demonstrated that new technology can be brought to humanitarian clearance operations in a safe and controlled manner. As a result of the highly successful trials, Vallon and ERA will produce the MINEHOUND TM (Type number VMR1) starting in Q3 of 2006.

  4. Forest Attributes Estimation Using Aerial Laser Scanner and TM Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Shataee Joibary

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: The aim of this study was performance of four non-parametric algorithms including the k-NN, SVR, RF and ANN to estimate forest volume and basal area attributes using combination of Aerial Laser Scanner and Landsat-TM data.Area of study: Data in small part of a mixed managed forest in the Waldkirch region, Germany.Material and methods: The volume/ha and basal area/ha in the 411 circular plots were estimated based on DBH and height of trees using volume functions of study area. The low density ALS raw data as first and last pulses were prepared and automatically classified into vegetation and ground returns to generate two fine resolution digital terrain and surface models after noise removing. Plot-based height and density metrics were extracted from ALS data and used both separated and combined with orthorectified and processed TM bands. The algorithms implemented with different options including k-NN with different distance measures, SVR with the best regularized parameters for four kernel types, RF with regularized decision tree parameters and ANN with different types of networks. The algorithm performances were validated using computing absolute and percentage RMSe and bias on unused test samples.Main results: Results showed that among four methods, SVR using the RBF kernel could better estimate volume/ha with lower RMSe and bias (156.02 m3 ha–1 and 0.48, respectively compared to others. In basal area/ha, k-NN could generate results with similar RMSe (11.79 m3 ha–1 but unbiased (0.03 compared to SVR with RMSe of 11.55 m3 ha–1 but slightly biased (–1.04.Research highlights: Results exposed that combining Lidar with TM data could improve estimations compared to using only Lidar or TM data.Key words: forest attributes estimation; ALS; TM; non-parametric algorithms.

  5. CONTINUOUS-WAVE MICROCHIP LASER GENERATION OF Tm:KLu(WO42 AND Tm:KY(WO42 CRYSTALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Dernovich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diode-pumped solid-state lasers are attractive for a variety of practical applications in many fields of human activity due to their high efficiency, compactness, and long durability. For applications in remote sensing lasers emitting in the spectral range of about 2 microns are required. Materials doped with trivalent thulium ions are promising active media emitting in this spectral range. Potassium rare-earth tungstates are attractive materials among Tm-doped crystals due to their suitable characteristics, such as high values of absorption and stimulated emission cross sections, incignificant concentration quenching of luminescence, well-proven technology of the high quality crystals growth. The purpose of this paper was to compare lasing properties of lasers based on potassium lutetium and potassium yttrium tungstate crystals doped with thulium ions in continuous-wave regime. Experiments were carried out with a diode pumping in microchip cavity configuration. The maximum power of laser radiation at 1947 nm of 1010 mW was obtained with Tm:KY(WO42 crystal with the slope efficiency with respect to the absorbed pump power of 51 %. When Tm:KLu(WO42 crystal was utilized an output power of 910 mW at 1968 nm wavelength with the slope efficiency of 38 % was obtained. With Tm:KLu(WO42 laser a tuning range over 160 nm range was realized with a prism inserted into the laser cavity. 

  6. Veritex(TM) Patches for Structural Repair and Re-Use, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group, Inc. (CRG) proposes to develop a bonded composite patch repair and re-use system based on CRG's VeritexTM materials. VeritexTM is a...

  7. Spectroscopy and microchip laser operation of Tm, Ho:KYW crystals with different Ho concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusakova, N. V.; Kurilchik, S. V.; Yasukevich, A. S.; Kisel, V. E.; Dashkevich, V. I.; Orlovich, V. A.; Pavlyuk, A. A.; Vatnik, S. M.; Bagaev, S. N.; Kuleshov, N. V.

    2018-02-01

    The spectroscopic properties of Tm, Ho:KYW crystals with different Ho concentrations were investigated. The diode-pumped microchip laser operation of Tm (5 at.%), Ho (0.5 at.%):KYW and Tm (5 at.%), Ho (1 at.%):KYW was demonstrated. The highest, to our knowledge, output power of 480 mW with slope efficiency of 31% for CW Tm (5 at.%), Ho (0.5 at.%):KYW microchip laser was obtained.

  8. Human diploid fibroblasts have receptors for the globular domain of C1Q

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordin, S.; Page, R.C.

    1986-01-01

    The authors showed that mass cultures of fibroblasts grown from gingival explants in DB medium with 10% human serum are enriched in a phenotype that binds C1q with an affinity much higher than the rest of the population. Because of potential biologic importance of C1q receptors, the authors studied whether the interaction between C1q and this phenotype was mediated by the globular or collagenous domains of the molecule. Globular fragments were prepared by digesting C1q with collagenase, and collagenous fragments obtained after pepsin treatment. C1q binding on cells in suspension was determined by reaction with 125 I-C1q as reported. Competition experiments were performed under conditions in which intact 125 I-C1q binding saturated all available receptors. The results showed that collagenous fragments inhibited 20% of the 125 I-C1q binding to high affinity receptors, whereas inhibition by globular fragments was 70%. Unlabeled intact C1q and collagen type 1 were used as controls, and inhibited 92% and 17% of C1q binding, respectively. These studies show that C1q interacts with the fibroblast phenotype expressing high affinity receptors through its globular domain. The authors suggest that at sites of trauma, native C1 may bind to the surface of these cells via the globular domain of C1q, and that this unique phenotype may play an important role in tissue repair

  9. Proton Radioactivity Measurements at HRIBF: Ho, Lu, and Tm Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akovali, Y.; Batchelder, J.C.; Bingham, C.R.; Davinson, T.; Ginter, T.N.; Gross, C.J.; Grzywacz, R.; Hamilton, J.H.; Janas, Z.; Karny, M.; Kim, S.H.; MacDonald, B.D.; Mas, J.F.; McConnell, J.W.; Piechaczek, A.; Ressler, J.J.; Rykaczewski, K.; Slinger, R.C.; Szerypo, J.; Toth, K.S.; Weintraub, W.; Woods, P.J.; Yu, C.-H.; Zganjar, E.F.

    1998-01-01

    Two new isotopes, 145 Tm and 140 Ho and three isomers in previously known isotopes, 141m Ho, 150m Lu and 151m Lu have been discovered and studied via their decay by proton emission. These proton emitters were produced at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) by heavy-ion fusion-evaporation reactions, separated in A/Q with a recoil mass spectrometer (RMS), and detected in a double-sided silicon strip detector (DSSD). The decay energy and half-life was measured for each new emitter. An analysis in terms of a spherical shell model is applied to the Tm and Lu nuclei, but Ho is considerably deformed and requires a collective model interpretation

  10. Powernext futuresTM front office user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-07-01

    The introduction of a power exchange in France is a direct response to the opening up of the European electricity markets. Powernext SA is a Multilateral Trading Facility in charge of managing the French power exchange through an optional and anonymous organised exchange offering: - Day-ahead contracts for the management of volume risk on Powernext Day-Ahead TM since 21 November 2001, - Medium term contracts for the management of price risk on Powernext Futures TM since 18 June 2004. This document is the front office user's guide, it presents: the market model (characteristics, regulation, contractual framework), the members (traders, clearers, quotation providers, fees structure), the products (specifications, use, liquidity and market efficiency), the trading system (architecture, hardware and software requirements, installation process and connecting to server), the trading (session, screen, sending an order, order execution). Contracts codifications and a glossary are given in the appendix. (J.S.)

  11. Self-administration of C1-inhibitor concentrate in patients with hereditary or acquired angioedema caused by C1-inhibitor deficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levi, Marcel; Choi, Goda; Picavet, Charles; Hack, C. Erik

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Administration of C1-inhibitor concentrate is effective for prophylaxis and treatment of severe angioedema attacks caused by C1-inhibitor deficiency. The concentrate should be administered intravenously and hence needs to be administered by health care professionals, which might cause

  12. Chronic C1-C2 Rotatory Subluxation Reduced by C1 Lateral Mass Screws and C2 Translaminar Screws: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavelle, William F; Palomino, Kathryn; Badve, Siddharth A; Albanese, Stephen A

    C1-C2 rotatory subluxation can result from a variety or etiologies. Pediatric patients are particularly susceptible to C1-C2 rotatory subluxation. If left untreated the condition is termed an atlantoaxial rotatory fixation (AARF) and chronic neck pain and deformity can result. Patients failing conservative treatment or those with recurrent or chronic rotatory subluxation may require halo treatment or surgical intervention. This illustrative case report is about a patient with chronic C1-C2 AARF who was treated with C1 lateral mass screws and C2 translaminar screws, a treatment that has not been addressed by this technique in a pediatric population. This is a retrospective case review. After an unsuccessful attempt at reduction, an 11-year-old girl underwent surgery to treat her C1-C2 AARF. Through an all posterior approach, screws were placed bilaterally into the C1 lateral masses followed by the placement of C2 translaminar screws bilaterally. A small amount of distraction was applied through the screw construct to open up the C1-C2 articulation and the AARF was open reduced and fused. A detailed postoperative computed tomographic scan focused on the occiput C1-C2 joint confirmed the anatomical reduction of the joint complex. The patient had cosmetically pleasing relief of her torticollis and was doing well at 60 months after surgery. Level IV.

  13. Κ-electron capture probability in 167Tm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sree Krishna Murty, G.; Chandrasekhar Rao, M.V.S.; Radha Krishna, K.; Bhuloka Reddy, S.; Satyanarayana, G.; Ramana Rao, P.V.; Sastry, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The Κ-electron capture probability in the decay of 167 Tm for the first-forbidden transition 1/2 + →3/2 - was measured using the sum-coincidence method and employing a hyper-pure Ge system. The P Κ value is found to be 0.835±0.029, in agreement with the theoretical value of 0.829. (author)

  14. Kappa. -electron capture probability in sup 167 Tm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sree Krishna Murty, G.; Chandrasekhar Rao, M.V.S.; Radha Krishna, K.; Bhuloka Reddy, S.; Satyanarayana, G.; Ramana Rao, P.V.; Sastry, D.L. (Andhra Univ., Visakhapatnam (India). Labs. for Nuclear Research); Chintalapudi, S.N. (Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Calcutta (India))

    1990-07-01

    The {Kappa}-electron capture probability in the decay of {sup 167}Tm for the first-forbidden transition 1/2{sup +}{yields}3/2{sup -} was measured using the sum-coincidence method and employing a hyper-pure Ge system. The P{sub {Kappa}} value is found to be 0.835{plus minus}0.029, in agreement with the theoretical value of 0.829. (author).

  15. Experiences with OpenMP in tmLQCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deuzeman, A.

    2013-11-01

    An overview is given of the lessons learned from the introduction of multi-threading using OpenMP in tmLQCD. In particular, programming style, performance measurements, cache misses, scaling, thread distribution for hybrid codes, race conditions, the overlapping of communication and computation and the measurement and reduction of certain overheads are discussed. Performance measurements and sampling profiles are given for different implementations of the hopping matrix computational kernel.

  16. CHROMITITE PROSPECTING USING LANDSAT TM AND ASTER REMOTE SENSING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Beiranvand Pour

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Studying the ophiolite complexes using multispectral remote sensing satellite data are interesting because of high diversity of minerals and the source of podiform chromitites. This research developed an approach to discriminate lithological units and detecting host rock of chromitite bodies within ophiolitic complexes using the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER and Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM satellite data. Three main ophiolite complexes located in south of Iran have been selected for the study. Spectral transform techniques, including minimum noise fraction (MNF and specialized band ratio were employed to detect different rock units and the identification of high-potential areas of chromite ore deposits within ophiolitic complexes. A specialized band ratio (4/1, 4/5, 4/7 of ASTER, MNF components and Spectral Angle Mapper (SAM on ASTER and Landsat TM data were used to distinguish ophiolitic rock units. Results show that the specialized band ratio was able to identify different rock units and serpentinized dunite as host rock of chromitites within ophiolitic complexes, appropriately. MNF components of ASTER and Landsat TM data were suitable to distinguish ophiolitic rock complexes at a regional scale. The integration of SAM and Feature Level Fusion (FLF used in this investigation discriminated the ophiolitic rock units and prepared detailed geological map for the study area. Accordingly, high potential areas (serpentinite dunite were identified in the study area for chromite exploration targets.The approach used in this research offers the image processing techniques as a robust, reliable, fast and cost-effective method for detecting serpentinized dunite as host rock of chromitite bodies within vast ophiolite complexes using ASTER and Landsat TM satellite data.

  17. An evaluation of the Human Capital BRidgeTM framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpho D. Magau

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The methodologies employed for achieving two important goals of human resource (HR measurement, namely to enhance decisions about human capital and to connect HR and business strategy, are rarely empirically investigated.Research purpose: The aim of the present study was therefore to use the Human Capital (HC BRidgeTM framework to compare the views of HR practitioners with those of line management on HC solutions towards achieving strategic business objectives.Motivation for the study: The motivation for this study was to determine whether the HC BRidgeTM framework can create a useful platform for leveraging human capital solutions and for demonstrating HR value-add.Research design: A census-based survey was conducted on a target population of 787 supervisors and managers in specific categories in a mining company, which yielded 202 responses. The measuring instrument used was based on the HC BRidgeTM framework and on the company’s strategic objectives. Item intercorrelations on the subscales were followed by factor analyses and iterative item analyses.Main findings/results: The self-developed measuring instrument yielded an overall Cronbach alpha coefficient of 0.97. Statistically significant differences were found between line management’s and HR practitioners’ views in respect of the three strategic business objectives.Practical/managerial implications: The results suggested that HR management was not yet fully aligned in respect of strategic business objectives and of becoming a strategic business partner.Contribution/value-add: The study therefore suggested that the HC BRidgeTM framework can be used as a method to connect human capital processes with business strategy to leverage business results and to demonstrate value-add.

  18. Very high coupling of TM polarised light in photonic crystal directional couplers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borel, Peter Ingo; Thorhauge, Morten; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2003-01-01

    The experimental and simulated spectra for TE and TM polarised light for the transmission through photonic crystal directional couplers are presented. The 3D FDTD simulations successfully explain all the major features of the experimental spectra as well as the actual transmission level. Especially...... noteworthy is the transmission level, experimentally found to be above -3 dB in the wavelength range 1520-1690 nm, for TM polarised light in the coupled channel. It is noted that even though band calculations show that the propagation of the TM polarisation takes place below the TM valence band, very high...... and spectrally smooth coupling is observed for the TM polarisation in this wavelength range....

  19. ALDUO(TM) Algae Cultivation Technology for Delivering Sustainable Omega-3s, Feed, and Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Xuemei [Cellana LLC

    2012-09-24

    * ALDUO(TM) Algae Production Technology Cellana?s Proprietary, Photosynthetic, & Proven * ALDUO(TM) Enables Economic Algae Production Unencumbered by Contamination by Balancing Higher-Cost PBRs with Lower-Cost Open Ponds * ALDUO(TM) Advantages * ALDUO(TM) Today o Large collection of strains for high value co-products o Powerful Mid-scale Screening & Optimization System o Solution to a Conflicting Interest o Split Pond Yield Enhancement o Heterotrophy & mixotrophy as a "finishing step" o CO2 Mitigation-flue Gas Operation o Worldwide Feed Trials with Livestock & Aquatic Species * ALDUO(TM) Technology Summarized

  20. A new comprehensive index for drought monitoring with TM data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyuan

    2017-10-01

    Drought is one of the most important and frequent natural hazards to agriculture production in North China Plain. To improve agriculture water management, accurate drought monitoring information is needed. This study proposed a method for comprehensive drought monitoring by combining a meteorological index and three satellite drought indices of TM data together. SPI (Standard Precipitation Index), the meteorological drought index, is used to measure precipitation deficiency. Three satellite drought indices (Temperature Vegetation Drought Index, Land Surface Water Index, Modified Perpendicular Drought Index) are used to evaluate agricultural drought risk by exploring data from various channels (VIS, NIR, SWIR, TIR). Considering disparities in data ranges of different drought indices, normalization is implemented before combination. First, SPI is normalized to 0 — 100 given that its normal range is -4 - +4. Then, the three satellite drought indices are normalized to 0 - 100 according to the maximum and minimum values in the image, and aggregated using weighted average method (the result is denoted as ADI, Aggregated drought index). Finally, weighed geometric mean of SPI and ADI are calculated (the result is denoted as DIcombined). A case study in North China plain using three TM images acquired during April-May 2007 show that the method proposed in this study is effective. In spatial domain, DIcombined demonstrates dramatically more details than SPI; in temporal domain, DIcombined shows more reasonable drought development trajectory than satellite indices that are derived from independent TM images.

  1. Pool boiling performance of NovecTM 649 engineered fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, Eric; Buongiorno, Jacopo; McKrell, Thomas; Hu, Lin-Wen

    2009-01-01

    A new fluorinated ketone, C 2 F 5 C(O)CF(CF 3 ) 2 , is currently being considered as an environmentally friendly alternative for power electronics cooling applications due to its high dielectric strength and low global warming potential (GWP). Sold commercially by the 3M Company as Novec TM 649 Engineered Fluid, C 2 F 5 C(O)CF(CF 3 ) 2 exhibits very low acute toxicity while maintaining long-term stability. To assess the general two-phase heat transfer performance of Novec TM 649, pool boiling tests were conducted by resistively heating a 0.01 in. diameter nickel wire at the fluid's atmospheric saturation temperature of 49 deg C. The nucleate boiling heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux (CHF) obtained for the fluorinated ketone compare favorably with results obtained for FC-72, a fluorocarbon widely used for the direct cooling of electronic devices. Initial results indicate that Novec TM 649 may prove to be a viable alternative to FC-72 and other halo alkanes for the cooling of high power density electronic devices. (author)

  2. Electromagnetic cloaking devices for TE and TM polarizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilotti, Filiberto; Tricarico, Simone; Vegni, Lucio

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design of an electromagnetic cloaking device working for both transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations. The theoretical approach to cloaking used here is inspired by the one presented by Alu and Engheta (2005 Phys. Rev. E 72 016623) for TM polarization. The case of TE polarization is firstly considered and, then, an actual inclusion-based cloak for TE polarization is also designed. In such a case, the cloak is made of a mu-near-zero (MNZ) metamaterial, as the dual counterpart of the epsilon-near-zero (ENZ) material that can be used for purely dielectric objects. The operation and the robustness of the cloaking device for the TE polarization is deeply investigated through a complete set of full-wave numerical simulations. Finally, the design and an application of a cloak operating for both TE and TM polarizations employing both magnetic inclusions and the parallel plate medium already used by Silveirinha et al (Phys. Rev. E 75 036603) are presented.

  3. Powernext futuresTM statistics 31st, July 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-07-01

    The introduction of a power exchange in France is a direct response to the opening up of the European electricity markets. Powernext SA is a Multilateral Trading Facility in charge of managing an optional and anonymous organised exchange offering: - Day-ahead contracts for the management of volume risk on Powernext Day-Ahead TM since 21 November 2001, - Medium term contracts for the management of price risk on Powernext Futures TM since 18 June 2004. This document presents in a series of tables and graphics the July 31, 2004 update of Powernext Futures TM statistics: year, quarter and month contracts for July 2004, base-load and peak-load contracts overview from June 2004 to July 2004 (daily volume in lots, open interest by delivery year in MWh, daily settlement price of the upcoming delivery period, base-load and peak-load price spreads), and market liquidity from mid-June to end of July 2004 (average bid ask spread and availability). (J.S.)

  4. Assessing UiTM TESL Students’ Knowledge of Vocabulary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leele Susana Jamian

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning the vocabulary of a language is vital in the process of acquiring the language because it serves several functions which assist learners to be good at the language, even though learning can be complicated and burdening for learners (Jiang, 2004; Cobb & Horst, 2004. The aim of the study was to investigate the English vocabulary levels of the TESL mainstream students in Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM. This research study also examined the differences in vocabulary levels between the male and female students. The study involved 90 respondents that were enrolled in the TESL programme at the Faculty of Education in UiTM, Shah Alam. The findings revealed that most of the UiTM TESL students scored an average of 15 correct answers in the 2,000 word-level, 12 for the 3,000 word-level, 8 for the 5,000 word-level, 10 for the University Word Level and 6 for the 10,000 word-level. The study also revealed that even though the students were highly engaged with listening, reading, speaking and writing activities, these involvements did not correlate with the mastery of vocabulary knowledge.

  5. TmCd quadrupolar ordering and magnetic interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleonard, R.; Morin, P.

    1979-01-01

    The paramagnetic compound TmCd crystallizes with the CsCl-type structure. Its Jahn-Teller behavior was first observed by Luethi and coworkers. We analyze here various physical properties with a pure-harmonic-elasticity model. The structural transition between cubic and tetragonal phases is now fully described (first-order character and temperature of occurrence) as well as the magnetic susceptibility, magnetization process, specific-heat, elastic-constant, and strain data. The relevant Hamiltonian takes into account the second-order magnetoelastic coupling and the quadrupolar exchange in addition to the cubic crystal field and the Heisenberg bilinear interactions. TmCd appears to be closely related to isomorphous TmZn and completes the illustration of the competition between bilinear and quadrupolar interactions occurring in some rare-earth intermetallics. In these two compounds, the quadrupolar exchange is many times stronger than the magnetoelastic coupling and the quadrupolar ordering then drives the structural transition. This situation is opposite to that occurring in (actual) Jahn-Teller compounds

  6. The role of ficolins and MASPs in hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csuka, Dorottya; Munthe-Fog, Lea; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency (HAE-C1-INH) causes disturbances in the complement system. However, the influence of HAE-C1-INH on the lectin pathway of complement is unresolved. Thus, we studied the main initiator molecules, enzymes and regulators in the lectin pathway...

  7. Safety of C1-Esterase Inhibitor in Acute and Prophylactic Therapy of Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busse, Paula; Bygum, Anette; Edelman, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The plasma-derived, pasteurized C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) concentrate, Berinert has a 4-decade history of use in hereditary angioedema (HAE), with a substantial literature base that demonstrates safety and efficacy. Thromboembolic events have rarely been reported with C1-INH products, typ...

  8. Effects of fenofibrate on hyperlipidemia and postprandial triglyceride metabolism in human apolipoprotein C1 transgenic mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, M.C.; Dahlmans, V.E.H.; Princen, H.M.G.; Hofker, M.H.; Havekes, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    To study the in vivo role of apolipoprotein (apo) C1 in lipoprotein metabolism, we have generated transgenic mice expressing the human apo C1 gene. Apo C1 is a small 6.6 kDa protein that is primarily synthesized by the liver and is present on chylomicrons, very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and

  9. 26 CFR 1.666(c)-1A - Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed. 1.666(c)-1A Section 1.666(c)-1A Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(c)-1A Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed...

  10. 26 CFR 1.666(c)-1 - Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed. 1.666(c)-1 Section 1.666(c)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Taxable Years Beginning Before January 1, 1969 § 1.666(c)-1 Pro rata portion of taxes deemed distributed...

  11. 26 CFR 1.860C-1 - Taxation of holders of residual interests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Taxation of holders of residual interests. 1.860C-1 Section 1.860C-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Real Estate Investment Trusts § 1.860C-1 Taxation of holders...

  12. Prevalence and clinical significance of anti-C1q antibodies in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Autoantibodies against C1q are strongly linked to immune-complex disorders like systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Although anti-C1q antibodies have received much interest in the recent years, their biological functions remain unclear. Anti-C1q antibodies are strongly associated with lupus nephritis. The aim of this ...

  13. Amino Acids in the TM4-TM5 loop of Na,K-ATPase Are Important for Biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jesper Roland; Houghton-Larsen, Jens; Jacobsen, Mette Dorph

    2003-01-01

    -sensitive folding mutants, as they induce the unfolded protein response at 30°C but not at 15°C. We used an algorithm to predict that residues 868ENGFLIPIHLL878 in the L78 loop exposed to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen constitute the most likely BiP binding site. Correct folding of this sequence may be important...... in the endoplasmic reticulum quality control, as the same loop is responsible for the a-ß-associations required to leave this compartment. On the basis of the Ca-ATPase crystal structure and the presented data, we propose a model to account for the role of the TM4-TM5 loop in Na,K-ATPase biosynthesis....

  14. Amino Acids in the TM4-TM5 loop of Na,K-ATPase Are Important for Biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jesper Roland; Houghton-Larsen, Jens; Jacobsen, Mette Dorph

    2003-01-01

    in the endoplasmic reticulum quality control, as the same loop is responsible for the a-ß-associations required to leave this compartment. On the basis of the Ca-ATPase crystal structure and the presented data, we propose a model to account for the role of the TM4-TM5 loop in Na,K-ATPase biosynthesis.......The ten-transmembrane Na,K-ATPase a-subunit exposes very few amino acids to the extra membrane space except for an approximately 408 residue-long loop between transmembrane segments four and five. The present paper focuses on the role of this loop in biosynthesis of functional Na,K-ATPase...

  15. Modeling a Hypothetical 170Tm Source for Brachytherapy Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enger, Shirin A.; D'Amours, Michel; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To perform absorbed dose calculations based on Monte Carlo simulations for a hypothetical 170 Tm source and to investigate the influence of encapsulating material on the energy spectrum of the emitted electrons and photons. Methods: GEANT4 Monte Carlo code version 9.2 patch 2 was used to simulate the decay process of 170 Tm and to calculate the absorbed dose distribution using the GEANT4 Penelope physics models. A hypothetical 170 Tm source based on the Flexisource brachytherapy design with the active core set as a pure thulium cylinder (length 3.5 mm and diameter 0.6 mm) and different cylindrical source encapsulations (length 5 mm and thickness 0.125 mm) constructed of titanium, stainless-steel, gold, or platinum were simulated. The radial dose function for the line source approximation was calculated following the TG-43U1 formalism for the stainless-steel encapsulation. Results: For the titanium and stainless-steel encapsulation, 94% of the total bremsstrahlung is produced inside the core, 4.8 and 5.5% in titanium and stainless-steel capsules, respectively, and less than 1% in water. For the gold capsule, 85% is produced inside the core, 14.2% inside the gold capsule, and a negligible amount ( 170 Tm source is primarily a bremsstrahlung source, with the majority of bremsstrahlung photons being generated in the source core and experiencing little attenuation in the source encapsulation. Electrons are efficiently absorbed by the gold and platinum encapsulations. However, for the stainless-steel capsule (or other lower Z encapsulations) electrons will escape. The dose from these electrons is dominant over the photon dose in the first few millimeter but is not taken into account by current standard treatment planning systems. The total energy spectrum of photons emerging from the source depends on the encapsulation composition and results in mean photon energies well above 100 keV. This is higher than the main gamma-ray energy peak at 84 keV. Based on our

  16. 1H, 13C and 15N NMR Assignments of the C1A and C1B Subdomains of PKC-delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Brian P.; Booth, Jamie C.; Jones, David N. M.

    2015-01-01

    The Protein Kinase C family of enzymes is a group of serine/threonine kinases that play central roles in cell-cycle regulation, development and cancer. A key step in the activation of PKC is translocation to membranes and binding of membrane-associated activators including diacylglycerol (DAG). Interaction of novel and conventional isotypes of PKC with DAG and phorbol esters occurs through the two C1 regulatory domains (C1A and C1B), which exhibit distinct ligand binding selectivity that likely controls enzyme activation by different co-activators. PKC has also been implicated in physiological responses to alcohol consumption and it has been proposed that PKCα [1, 2], PKCε [3] and PKCδ [4, 5] contain specific alcohol-binding sites in their C1 domains. We are interested in understanding how ethanol affects signal transduction processes through its affects on the structure and function of the C1 domains of PKC. Here we present the 1H, 15N and 13C NMR chemical shift assignments for the Rattus norvegicus PKCδ C1A and C1B proteins. PMID:21132404

  17. Somatic 'soluble' adenylyl cyclase isoforms are unaffected in Sacy tm1Lex/Sacy tm1Lex 'knockout' mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Farrell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mammalian Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC, Adcy10, or Sacy represents a source of the second messenger cAMP distinct from the widely studied, G protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases. Genetic deletion of the second through fourth coding exons in Sacy(tm1Lex/Sacy(tm1Lex knockout mice results in a male sterile phenotype. The absence of any major somatic phenotype is inconsistent with the variety of somatic functions identified for sAC using pharmacological inhibitors and RNA interference. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We now use immunological and molecular biological methods to demonstrate that somatic tissues express a previously unknown isoform of sAC, which utilizes a unique start site, and which 'escapes' the design of the Sacy(tm1Lex knockout allele. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies reveal increased complexity at the sAC locus, and they suggest that the known isoforms of sAC play a unique function in male germ cells.

  18. χc1 and χc2 Resonance Parameters with the Decays χc1,c2 →j /ψμ+μ-

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Alfonso Albero, A.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; D'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Atzeni, M.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Baranov, A.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baryshnikov, F.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Beiter, A.; Bel, L. J.; Beliy, N.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Beranek, S.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Berninghoff, D.; Bertholet, E.; Bertolin, A.; Betancourt, C.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M. O.; Van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, Ia; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørn, M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bordyuzhin, I.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J.V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brundu, D.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Byczynski, W.; Cadeddu, S.; Cai, H.; Calabrese, R.; Calladine, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D. H.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Chamont, D.; Chapman, M. G.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Cheung, S. F.; Chitic, S. G.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Chubykin, A.; Ciambrone, P.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E.L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Colombo, T.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Costa Sobral, C. M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. T.; Decamp, D.; Del Buono, L.; Dembinski, H. P.; Demmer, M.; Dendek, A.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Douglas, L.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dujany, G.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziewiecki, M.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fazzini, D.; Federici, L.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez, G.; Fernandez Declara, P.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Franco Lima, V.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Funk, W.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gabriel, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Govorkova, E.; Grabowski, J. P.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greim, R.; Grillo, L.; Gruber, L.; Gruberg Cazon, B. R.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hancock, T. H.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Hasse, C.; Hatch, M.; Hecker, M.; Heinicke, K.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, P. H.; Huard, Z. C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hutchcroft, D.; Ibis, P.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kazeev, N.; Kecke, M.; Keizer, F.; Kelsey, M.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Klimkovich, T.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Kopecna, R.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kotriakhova, S.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreps, M.; Kress, F.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Lionetto, F.; Lisovskyi, V.; Loh, D.; Loi, A.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luchinsky, A.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Macko, V.; Mackowiak, P.; Maddrell-Mander, S.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Maisuzenko, D.; Majewski, M. W.; Malde, S.; Malecki, B.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Marangotto, D.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marinangeli, M.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurice, E.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Mead, J. V.; Meadows, B.; Meaux, C.; Meier, F.; Meinert, N.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Millard, E.; Minard, M. N.; Minzoni, L.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Mombächer, T.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morello, M. J.; Morgunova, O.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nogay, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J.G.; Ossowska, A.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pisani, F.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Placinta, V.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poli Lener, M.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Ponce, S.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Pullen, H.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Quintana, B.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Ratnikov, F.; Raven, G.; Ravonel Salzgeber, M.; Reboud, M.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Ruiz Vidal, J.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarpis, G.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schreiner, H. F.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M. H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepulveda, E. S.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva De Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Soares Lavra, L.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J.P.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stepanova, M.; Stevens, H.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, J.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szumlak, T.; Szymanski, M.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Toriello, F.; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, R.; Tournefier, E.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Usachov, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagner, A.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; Van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Verlage, T. A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viana Barbosa, J. V.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Viemann, H.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vitti, M.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Weisser, C.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Winn, M.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, M.; Yang, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yao, Y.; Yin, H.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhukov, V.; Zonneveld, J. B.; Zucchelli, S.

    2017-01-01

    The decays χc1→J/ψμ+μ- and χc2→J/ψμ+μ- are observed and used to study the resonance parameters of the χc1 and χc2 mesons. The masses of these states are measured to be m(χc1)=3510.71±0.04(stat)±0.09(syst) MeV and m(χc2)=3556.10±0.06(stat)±0.11(syst) MeV, where the knowledge of the momentum scale for

  19. Characterization of recombinant human C1 inhibitor secreted in milk of transgenic rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veen, Harrie A; Koiter, Jaco; Vogelezang, Carla J M; van Wessel, Noucha; van Dam, Tijtje; Velterop, Ingeborg; van Houdt, Kristina; Kupers, Luc; Horbach, Danielle; Salaheddine, Mourad; Nuijens, Jan H; Mannesse, Maurice L M

    2012-12-31

    C1 inhibitor (C1INH) is a single-chain glycoprotein that inhibits activation of the contact system of coagulation and the complement system. C1INH isolated from human blood plasma (pd-hC1INH) is used for the management of hereditary angioedema (HAE), a disease caused by heterozygous deficiency of C1INH, and is a promise for treatment of ischemia-reperfusion injuries like acute myocardial or cerebral infarction. To obtain large quantities of C1INH, recombinant human C1INH (rhC1INH) was expressed in the milk of transgenic rabbits (12 g/l) harboring genomic human C1INH sequences fused to 5' bovine αS(1) casein promoter sequences. Recombinant hC1INH was isolated from milk to a specific activity of 6.1 U/mg and a purity of 99%; by size-exclusion chromatography the 1% impurities consisted of multimers and N-terminal cleaved C1INH species. Mass spectrometric analysis of purified rhC1INH revealed a relative molecular mass (M(r)) of 67,200. Differences in M(r) on SDS PAGE and mass spectrometric analysis between rhC1INH and pd-hC1INH are explained by differential glycosylation (calculated carbohydrate contents of 21% and 28%, respectively), since protein sequencing analysis of rhC1INH revealed intact N- and C-termini. Host-related impurity analysis by ELISA revealed trace amounts of rabbit protein (approximately 10 ppm) in purified batches, but not endogenous rabbit C1INH. The kinetics of inhibition of the target proteases C1s, Factor XIIa, kallikrein and Factor XIa by rhC1INH and pd-hC1INH, indicated comparable inhibitory potency and specificity. Recently, rhC1INH (Ruconest(®)) has been approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of acute attacks of HAE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. C1-inhibitor polymers activate the FXII-dependent kallikrein-kinin system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elenius Madsen, Daniel; Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen; Biltoft, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    attacks. HAE is caused by mutations in the C1-inh encoding gene, and we recently demonstrated that some mutations give rise to the presence of polymerized C1-inh in the plasma of HAE patients. METHODS: C1-inh polymers corresponding to the size of polymers observed in vivo were produced using heat...... denaturation and gel filtration. The ability of these polymers to facilitate FXII activation was assessed in vitro in an FXII activation bandshift assay. After spiking of plasma with C1-inh polymers, kallikrein generation was analyzed in a global kallikrein generation method. Prekallikrein consumption...... in the entire Danish HAE cohort was analyzed using an ELISA method. RESULTS: C1-inh polymers mediated FXII activation, and a dose dependent kallikrein generation in plasma spiked with C1-inh polymers. An increased (pre)kallikrein consumption was observed in plasma samples from HAE patients presenting with C1...

  1. Marked variability in clinical presentation and outcome of patients with C1q immunodeficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Schaarenburg, Rosanne A; Schejbel, Lone; Truedsson, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Globally approximately 60 cases of C1q deficiency have been described with a high prevalence of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). So far treatment has been guided by the clinical presentation rather than the underlying C1q deficiency. Recently, it was shown that C1q production can...... survey, of clinicians treating C1q deficient patients. A high response rate of >70% of the contacted clinicians yielded information on 45 patients with C1q deficiency of which 25 are published. RESULTS: Follow-up data of 45 patients from 31 families was obtained for a median of 11 years after diagnosis......-fatality before the age of 20, and at least 50% of patients are expected to reach their middle ages. CONCLUSION: Here we report the largest phenotypic data set on C1q deficiency to date, revealing high variance; with high mortality but also a subset of patients with an excellent prognosis. Management of C1q...

  2. Effect of the hinge protein on the heme iron site of cytochrome c1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, C.H.; Yencha, A.J.; Bunker, G.; Zhang, G.; Chance, B.; King, T.E.

    1989-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) studies on cytochrome c 1 from beef heart mitochondria were conducted to identify the effect of the hinge protein on the structure of the heme site in cytochrome c 1 . A comparison of XAS data of highly purified one-band and two-band cytochrome c 1 demonstrates that the hinge protein exerts a rather pronounced effect on the heme environment of the cytochrome c 1 : a conformational change occurs within a radius of approximately 5 angstrom from the heme iron in cytochrome c 1 when the hinge protein is bound to cytochrome c 1 . This result may be correlated with the previous observations that the structure and reactivity of cytochrome c 1 are affected by the hinge protein

  3. Draft Genome Sequence of a Chitinase-producing Biocontrol Bacterium Serratia sp. C-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seur Kee Park

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The chitinase-producing bacterial strain C-1 is one of the key chitinase-producing biocontrol agents used for effective bioformulations for biological control. These bioformulations are mixed cultures of various chitinolytic bacteria. However, the precise identification, biocontrol activity, and the underlying mechanisms of the strain C-1 have not been investigated so far. Therefore, we evaluated in planta biocontrol efficacies of C-1 and determined the draft genome sequence of the strain in this study. The bacterial C-1 strain was identified as a novel Serratia sp. by a phylogenic analysis of its 16S rRNA sequence. The Serratia sp. C-1 bacterial cultures showed strong in planta biocontrol efficacies against some major phytopathogenic fungal diseases. The draft genome sequence of Serratia sp. C-1 indicated that the C-1 strain is a novel strain harboring a subset of genes that may be involved in its biocontrol activities.

  4. Presence of C1-inhibitor polymers in a subset of patients suffering from hereditary angioedema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Elenius Madsen

    Full Text Available Hereditary angioedema (HAE is a potentially life-threatening disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the serine protease inhibitor (serpin C1 inhibitor (C1-inh. The mutations cause decreased functional plasma levels of C1-inh, which triggers unpredictable recurrent edema attacks. Subjects suffering from HAE have been classified in type I patients with decreased functional and antigenic levels of C1-inh, and type II patients with decreased functional but normal antigenic C1-inh levels. However, a few reports have demonstrated that some mutations cause C1-inh polymerization in vitro, and it is speculated that C1-inh polymers may exist in patient plasma, challenging the current classification of HAE patients. To investigate the presence of C1-inh polymers in patient plasma samples, we developed an immunological method, where monoclonal antibodies produced against polymerized C1-inh were applied in native PAGE western blotting. Using this approach we analyzed genuine plasma samples from 31 Danish HAE families, and found that plasma samples from three genotypically distinct HAE type I families (classified upon C1-inh plasma concentrations contained C1-inh polymers. Identical C1-inh polymerization phenotypes were observed in four affected family members from one of these families. Genotyping of the families revealed that the polymerogenic mutations of two families were located in proximity to the reactive center loop insertion site in C1-inh (p.Ile271Thr and p.Ser258_Pro260del,and one mutation affected helix C (p.Thr167Asn. In conclusion, we demonstrate that C1-inh polymers are present in the plasma of a subgroup of HAE type I patients.

  5. Posterior C1-C2 screw-rod fixation and autograft fusion for the treatment of os odontoideum with C1-C2 instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Da-Geng; Wang, Tao; Hao, Ding-Jun; He, Bao-Rong; Liu, Tuan-Jiang; Ma, Xiao-Wen; Yu, Cheng-Cheng; Feng, Hang; Zhao, Song-Chuan; Hui, Hua

    2017-12-01

    To report our experience treating os odontoideum with C1-C2 instability via C1-C2 screw-rod fixation and autograft fusion and to explore the clinical efficacy of such a treatment strategy. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who were diagnosed with os odontoideum with C1-C2 instability and treated by posterior C1-C2 screw-rod fixation and fusion. Neurological deficits were measured with the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scoring system and neck pain was assessed using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score. Fusion was determined based on the presence of bridging bone in computed tomography (CT) imaging, whereas stability was determined based on the lack of movement in dynamic radiographs. Thirty-two patients (18 males) were included in the study. The surgery was successfully accomplished in all patients. Thirty (93.8%) patients had confirmed C1-C2 bony fusion in CT images and all patients (100%) were stable in dynamic radiographs. The mean preoperative JOA score was 14.3±1.4 (range 11-16); at the final visit, it increased to 16.2±0.8 (range 14-17) (pos odontoideum with C1-C2 instability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Image reconstruction for the ClearPET{sup TM} Neuro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Simone [Central Institute for Electronics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)]. E-mail: s.weber@fz-juelich.de; Morel, Christian [Universite de la Mediterranee, Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille (France); Simon, Luc [Institut Curie, Paris (France); Krieguer, Magalie [Vrije Universiteit Brussels (Belgium); Rey, Martin [Universite de Lausanne (Switzerland); Gundlich, Brigitte [Central Institute for Electronics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Khodaverdi, Maryam [Central Institute for Electronics, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2006-12-20

    ClearPET{sup TM} is a family of small-animal PET scanners which are currently under development within the Crystal Clear Collaboration (CERN). All scanners are based on the same detector block design using individual LSO and LuYAP crystals in phoswich configuration, coupled to multi-anode photomultiplier tubes. One of the scanners, the ClearPET{sup TM} Neuro is designed for applications in neuroscience. Four detector blocks with 64 2x2x10 mm LSO and LuYAP crystals, arranged in line, build a module. Twenty modules are arranged in a ring with a ring diameter of 13.8 cm and an axial size of 11.2 cm. An insensitive region at the border of the detector heads results in gaps between the detectors axially and tangentially. The detectors are rotating by 360{sup o} in step and shoot mode during data acquisition. Every second module is shifted axially to compensate partly for the gaps between the detector blocks in a module. This unconventional scanner geometry requires dedicated image reconstruction procedures. Data acquisition acquires single events that are stored with a time mark in a dedicated list mode format. Coincidences are associated off line by software. After sorting the data into 3D sinograms, image reconstruction is performed using the Ordered Subset Maximum A Posteriori One-Step Late (OSMAPOSL) iterative algorithm implemented in the Software for Tomographic Image Reconstruction (STIR) library. Due to the non-conventional scanner design, careful estimation of the sensitivity matrix is needed to obtain artifact-free images from the ClearPET{sup TM} Neuro.

  7. TracWorksTM-global fuel assembly data management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooney, B.F.

    1997-01-01

    The TracWorks TM Data Management System is a workstation-based software product that provides a utility with a single, broadly available, regularly updated source for virtually every data item available for a fuel assembly or core component. TracWorks is designed to collect, maintain and provide information about assembly and component locations and movements during the refueling process and operation, assembly burnup and isotopic inventory (both in-core and out-of-core), pin burnup and isotopics for pins that have been removed from their original assemblies, assembly and component inspection results (including video) and manufacturing data provided by the fabrication plant

  8. Wakefield calculation for superconducting TM110 cavity without azimuthal symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellantoni, Leo; /Fermilab; Burt, Graeme; /Lancaster U.

    2006-08-01

    The 3.9GHz TM{sub 110} mode deflecting cavity developed at FNAL has many applications, including use as a longitudinal bunch profile diagnostic, and as a crab cavity candidate for the ILC. These applications involve beams with substantial time structure. For the 13-cell version intended for the bunch profile application, long-range wakes have been evaluated in the frequency domain and short-range wakes have been evaluated in the time domain. Higher-order interactions of the main field in the cavity with the beam have also been parameterized. Pedagogic derivations are included as appendices.

  9. Ho:YLF Laser Pumped by TM:Fiber Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mizutani Kohei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 2-micron Ho:YLF laser end-pumped by 1.94-micron Tm:fiber laser is described. A ring resonator of 3m length is adopted for the oscillator. The laser is a master oscillator and an amplifier system. It is operated at high repetition rate of 200-5000 Hz in room temperature. The laser outputs were about 9W in CW and more than 6W in Q-switched operation. This laser was developed to be used for wind and CO2 measurements.

  10. ADAPT(tm trocar use for laparoscopic procedures in equidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.P.M. Teixeira

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho é descrever o uso do trocater modelo Adapt(tm no acesso laparoscópico em animais da família dos equídeos. O procedimento cirúrgico foi realizado em 15 equídeos (quatro jumentas, seis cavalos e cinco éguas, com peso médio de 320kg (290kg e 450kg, pesos máximo e mínimo, respectivamente. Os pacientes foram mantidos em posição quadrupedal, sob sedação e bloqueio local. Primeiramente, realizou-se o preparo asséptico, e o acesso foi feito pelo flanco direito ou pelo esquerdo, dependendo da estrutura a ser visualizada. Em todos os procedimentos, foi utilizado o trocater modelo Seal AdaptTM Ports (Teleflex Medical Introduces TautTM, USA, com diâmetro de 12mm. Inicialmente se fez uma incisão de pele de aproximadamente 15mm para inserção da ponta do trocater. Este foi inserido na ferida cirúrgica, realizando-se movimentos de 180º em sentido horário e anti-horário, até atingir a cavidade abdominal. Após esta etapa, o obturador do trocater foi retirado, e a ótica inserida para confirmar o acesso à cavidade abdominal. A síntese das camadas superficiais da muscular foi realizada com fio nylon nº 0, em um padrão Sultan, e posteriormente a dermorrafia, também com nylon nº 0, no padrão de Wolf. O equipamento apresentou eficiência nos procedimentos de dissecação das camadas subcutânea, musculares e peritônio, não ocorrendo significativa hemorragia nessas camadas. Em um paciente muar, ocorreu afastamento do peritônio parietal, e em alguns casos (40% ocorreu pequeno enfisema subcutâneo no pós-cirúrgico. Todos os pacientes apresentaram boa cicatrização da ferida cirúrgica. O trocater modelo AdaptTM mostrou-se eficiente na abordagem laparoscópica em equinos, apresentando segurança em se estabelecer o acesso e versatilidade no emprego de diversos instrumentais.

  11. Empty 4f states in TmS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachter, P.; Grioni, M.

    1998-01-01

    The reflectivity of TmS single crystals has been measured between 2 meV and 12 eV at room temperature and at 6 K. Besides 3p 6 -5d interband transitions a plasma edge due to free carriers is observed. In the middle infrared (near 50 meV) two sharp lines are found which are interpreted as transitions from the Fermi level into empty crystal field split 4f 13 states. A Bremsstrahlen isochromat spectroscopy (BIS) measurement supports the assumption that the empty 4f 13 state is close to the Fermi energy. (orig.)

  12. Immunogenicity assessment of recombinant human c1-inhibitor: an integrated analysis of clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, C Erik; Mannesse, Maurice; Baboeram, Aartie; Oortwijn, Beatrijs; Relan, Anurag

    2012-10-01

    Recombinant human C1-inhibitor (rhC1INH) is used to treat acute angioedema attacks in hereditary angioedema (HAE) due to a genetic C1INH deficiency. Recombinant proteins in general may induce antibody responses and therefore evaluation of such responses in the target population is an essential step in the clinical development program of a recombinant protein. Here we report the assessment of the immunogenicity of rhC1INH in symptomatic HAE patients. Blood samples collected before and after administration of rhC1INH were tested for antibodies against plasma-derived (pd) or rhC1INH, or against host-related impurities (HRI). Above cut-off screening results were confirmed with displacement assays, and also tested for neutralizing anti-C1INH antibodies. Finally, the relation of antibodies to clinical efficacy and safety of rhC1INH was analyzed. Data from 155 HAE patients who received 424 treatments with rhC1INH were analyzed. 1.5% of all pre-exposure tests and 1.3% of all post-exposure tests were above the cut-off level in the screening assay for anti-C1INH antibodies. Six patients (3.9%) had anti-rhC1INH antibodies positive in the confirmatory assay. In two patients, confirmed antibodies were pre-existing with no increase post-exposure; in three patients, the antibodies occurred on a single occasion post-exposure; and in one patient, on subsequent occasions post-exposure. Neutralizing anti-pdC1INH antibodies were not found. Anti-HRI antibodies in the screening assay occurred in <0.7% of the tests before exposure to rhC1INH, in <1.9% after first exposure and in <3.1% after repeat treatment with rhC1INH. Five patients had anti-HRI antibodies positive in the confirmatory assay. In one patient, the antibodies were pre-existing, whereas in three of the 155 rhC1INH-treated patients (1.9%), confirmed anti-HRI antibodies occurred at more time points. Antibody findings were not associated with altered efficacy of rhC1INH or adverse events. These results indicate a reassuring

  13. Occurrence and Antioxidant Activity of C1 Degradation Products in Cocoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Taeye, Cédric; Cibaka, Marie-Lucie Kankolongo; Collin, Sonia

    2017-02-28

    Procyanidin C1 is by far the main flavan-3-ol trimer in cocoa. Like other flavan-3-ols, however, it suffers a lot during heat treatments such as roasting. RP-HPLCHRMS/MS(ESI(-))analysis applied to an aqueous model medium containing commercial procyanidin C1 proved that epimerization is the main reaction involved in its degradation (accounting for 62% of degradation products). In addition to depolymerization, cocoa procyanidin C1 also proved sensitive to oxidation, yielding once- and twice-oxidized dimers. No chemical oligomer involving the native trimer was found in either model medium or cocoa, while two C1 isomers were retrieved. C1 degradation products exhibited antioxidant activity (monitored by RPHPLC-Online TEAC) close to that of C1 (when expressed in µM TE/mg·kg-1).

  14. Characterization of two new dominant ClC-1 channel mutations associated with myotonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Morten; Jespersen, Thomas; Colding-Jørgensen, Eskild

    2003-01-01

    laevis oocytes for electrophysiological characterization. Both ClC-1 mutants, M128V and E193K, showed a large rightward shift in the current-voltage relationship. In addition, the activation kinetics were slowed in the ClC-1 M128V mutant, as compared to the wild-type ClC-1. Interestingly, ClC-1 E193K...... revealed a change in reversal potential compared to wild-type channels. This finding supports the notion that the E193 amino acid is an important determinant in the selectivity filter of the human ClC-1 channel. The electrophysiological behavior of both mutants demonstrates a severe reduction in ClC-1...

  15. Functional properties of Virus-Encoded and Virus-Regulated 7TM Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiess, Katja; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2014-01-01

    During co-evolution with their hosts, viruses have developed several survival strategies that involve exploitation of 7TM receptors. These include virus-encoded 7TM receptors and ligands and viral regulation of endogenous receptors. Many functional properties have been ascribed to virus-exploited 7......TM receptors, and although the list of putative functions is steadily growing, the presence and/or utilization of 7TM receptors are still poorly understood for many of these. This review focuses on three well described functional properties: 1) the immune evasion strategies, exemplified by γ1...... by the human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8)-encoded ORF74, HCMV-US28 and EBV-BILF1. Given the general high “druggability” of 7TM receptors, and the recent progress in the understanding of in particular immune evasive functions of the virus-exploited 7TM receptors, we put a special emphasis on the progress of novel anti...

  16. Immunosafety of recombinant human C1-inhibitor in hereditary angioedema: evaluation of ige antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, C Erik; Relan, Anurag; Baboeram, Aartie; Oortwijn, Beatrijs; Versteeg, Serge; van Ree, Ronald; Pijpstra, Rienk

    2013-04-01

    Recombinant human C1-inhibitor (rhC1INH) purified from milk of transgenic rabbits is used for the treatment of acute attacks in patients with hereditary angioedema (HAE) due to C1-inhibitor (C1INH) deficiency. The objective was to investigate the risk of rhC1INH inducing IgE antibodies or eliciting anaphylactic reactions. In subjects treated with rhC1INH, we retrospectively analysed the frequency and clinical relevance of pre-exposure and potentially newly induced IgE antibodies against rabbit and other animal allergens including cow's milk by the ImmunoCAP(®) Specific IgE blood test system. 130 HAE patients and 14 healthy subjects received 300 administrations of rhC1INH, 65 subjects (47.4 %) on one occasion; 72 (52.6 %) on at least two occasions (range 2-12; median 2). Five subjects had pre-existing anti-rabbit epithelium IgE; the subject with the highest levels and a previously undisclosed rabbit allergy developed an anaphylactic reaction upon first exposure to rhC1INH, whereas the other four subjects with lower pre-existing IgE levels (Class 1-3), did not. No other anaphylactic reactions were identified in any of the subjects exposed to rhC1INH. Analysis of post-exposure samples revealed that the risk of inducing new or boosting existing IgE responses to rabbit or cow's milk allergens was negligible. The propensity of rhC1INH to induce IgE antibodies following repeated administration of rhC1INH is low. Subjects with substantially elevated anti-rabbit epithelium IgE antibodies and/or clinical allergy to rabbits may have an increased risk for an allergic reaction. No other risk factors for allergic reactions to rhC1INH have been identified.

  17. Population pharmacokinetics of recombinant human C1 inhibitor in patients with hereditary angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Colm; Hayes, Siobhan; Relan, Anurag; van Amersfoort, Edwin S; Pijpstra, Rienk; Hack, C Erik

    2013-12-01

    To characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK) of recombinant human C1 inhibitor (rhC1INH) in healthy volunteers and hereditary angioedema (HAE) patients. Plasma levels of C1INH following 294 administrations of rhC1INH in 133 subjects were fitted using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling. The model was used to simulate maximal C1INH levels for the proposed dosing scheme. A one-compartment model with Michaelis-Menten elimination kinetics described the data. Baseline C1INH levels were 0.901 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.839-0.968] and 0.176 U ml(-1) (95% CI: 0.154-0.200) in healthy volunteers and HAE patients, respectively. The volume of distribution of rhC1INH was 2.86 l (95% CI: 2.68-3.03). The maximal rate of elimination and the concentration corresponding to half this maximal rate were 1.63 U ml(-1) h(-1) (95% CI: 1.41-1.88) and 1.60 U ml(-1) (95% CI: 1.14-2.24), respectively, for healthy volunteers and symptomatic HAE patients. The maximal elimination rate was 36% lower in asymptomatic HAE patients. Peak C1INH levels did not change upon repeated administration of rhC1INH. Bodyweight was found to be an important predictor of the volume of distribution. Simulations of the proposed dosing scheme predicted peak C1INH concentrations above the lower level of the normal range (0.7 U ml(-1)) for at least 94% of all patients. The population PK model for C1INH supports a dosing scheme on a 50 U kg(-1) basis up to 84 kg, with a fixed dose of 4200 U above 84 kg. The PK of rhC1INH following repeat administration are consistent with the PK following the first administration. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  18. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tssC1 Links Type VI Secretion and Biofilm-Specific Antibiotic Resistance▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Hinz, Aaron J.; Nadeau, Jean-Paul; Mah, Thien-Fah

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance is influenced by multiple factors. We demonstrated that Pseudomonas aeruginosa tssC1, a gene implicated in type VI secretion (T6S), is important for resistance of biofilms to a subset of antibiotics. We showed that tssC1 expression is induced in biofilms and confirmed that tssC1 is required for T6S. PMID:21784934

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa tssC1 Links Type VI Secretion and Biofilm-Specific Antibiotic Resistance▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Li; Hinz, Aaron J.; Nadeau, Jean-Paul; Mah, Thien-Fah

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm-specific antibiotic resistance is influenced by multiple factors. We demonstrated that Pseudomonas aeruginosa tssC1, a gene implicated in type VI secretion (T6S), is important for resistance of biofilms to a subset of antibiotics. We showed that tssC1 expression is induced in biofilms and confirmed that tssC1 is required for T6S.

  20. Enhanced Ig production by human peripheral lymphocytes induced by aggregated C1q

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daha, M. R.; Klar, N.; Hoekzema, R.; van Es, L. A.

    1990-01-01

    Because B cells express receptors for C1q, we have investigated the role of C1q in the stimulation of B cells. When B cells were cultured in the presence of C1q that had been frozen, T cells, and suboptimal concentrations of PWM, there was a dose-dependent enhancement of IgM, IgG, and IgA by the B

  1. Cell surface expression and function of the macromolecular C1 complex on the surface of human monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinga K Hosszu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of the subunits of the C1 complex (C1q, C1s, C1r, and its regulator C1 inhibitor (C1-Inh by human monocytes has been previously established. However, surface expression of these molecules by monocytes has not been shown. Using flow cytometry and antigen-capture ELISA, we show here for the first time that, in addition to C1q, PB monocytes and the monocyte-derived U937 cells express C1s and C1r, as well as Factor B and C1-Inh on their surface. C1s and C1r immunoprecipitated with C1q, suggesting that at least some of the C1q on these cells is part of the C1 complex. Furthermore, the C1 complex on U937 cells was able to trigger complement activation via the classical pathway. The presence of C1-Inh may ensure that an unwarranted autoactivation of the C1 complex does not take place. Since C1-Inh closely monitors the activation of the C1 complex in a sterile or infectious inflammatory environment, further elucidation of the role of C1 complex is crucial to dissect its function in monocyte, DC and T cell activities, and its implications in host defense and tolerance.

  2. Casing drilling TM : a viable technology for coal bed methane?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madell, G.; Muqeem, M. [Tesco Corp., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2001-07-01

    This paper highlighted the experience that Tesco has gained by drilling more than 30 wells using only casings as the drill stem, suggesting that such technology could be advantageous for Coal Bed Methane (CBM) exploration and development. Tesco has manufactured a mobile and compact hydraulic drilling rig that is ideal to meet the great demand for CBM development in Canada. The Casing Drilling TM system, when used in conjunction with the drilling rig, could be very effective and efficient for exploration and development of CBM reserves which typically require extensive coring. Continuous coring while drilling ahead and wire line retrieval can offer time savings and quick core recovery of large diameter core required for exploration core desorption tests. The proposed system may also have the potential to core or drill typically tight gas sands or coal beds under balanced with air or foam. This would reduce drilling fluid damage while finding gas at the same time. Compared to conventional drill pipes, Casing Drilling TM could also be effective with water production from shallow sands because of the smaller annual clearance which requires less air volumes to lift any produced water. 8 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs.

  3. Micro-Fuel Cells{sup TM} for portable electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hockaday, R.G.; DeJohn, M.; Navas, C.; Turner, P.S.; Vaz, H.L.; Vazul, L.L. [Energy Related Devices Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2000-05-01

    The Micro-Fuel Cell{sup TM} is a new power supply which provides a superior alternative compared to rechargeable batteries. A prototype has been developed by Manhattan Scientifics Inc. in collaboration with Energy Related Devices Inc. This mass-producible high-energy power supply can be used for cellular telephones, portable computers and other portable devices. Instead of being recharged, it can be easily refueled with methanol. The approach taken in designing this product was to develop a competitive product with definite advantages over existing products. The Micro-Fuel Cell{sup TM} is based on the idea that a fuel cell can be built onto an engineered microplastic substrate. In this case, the integrated design makes use of thin film vacuum deposition techniques to coat patterned, etched-nuclear-particle-track plastic membranes. This process forms catalytically active surface area electrodes on either side of a single structured proton-exchange-membrane electrolyte. Methanol was the choice fuel for this system because compared to hydrogen and metal hydrides, it was considered to be safer and more compact. In addition, the theoretical specific energy of methanol is significantly higher than for lithium-ion batteries. The problem of crossover, whereby methanol fuel diffuses across the fuel cell from the anode to the cathode, has also been solved by using a selectively permeable membrane. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Powernext futuresTM back office user's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-05-01

    The introduction of a power exchange in France is a direct response to the opening up of the European electricity markets. Powernext SA is a Multilateral Trading Facility in charge of managing the French power exchange through an optional and anonymous organised exchange offering: - Day-ahead contracts for the management of volume risk on Powernext Day-Ahead TM since 21 November 2001, - Medium term contracts for the management of price risk on Powernext Futures TM since 18 June 2004. This document is the back office user's guide, it presents: the market model (specifications, regulation, legal framework), the members (traders, clearers, quotation providers, fees structure), the products (specifications, use, liquidity and market efficiency), the clearing (recording transactions, risk management before delivery period, last settlement of contracts, risk management during delivery, additional margin, examples, default management), the LCH.Clearnet Ltd clearing system (hardware and software requirements, setup of the VPN client software, functionalities, market information disclosure), the delivery (nomination, file characteristics and transmission), the payment (financial flows, eligible assets provided to cover margin requirements). ECS reports, treasury documents, contracts codification, FTP server arborescence, latent and carried-out margins and a glossary are given in the appendix. (J.S.)

  5. Comparative Spectroscopic Investigation of Tm3+:Tellurite Glasses for 2-μm Lasing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Cankaya

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We performed a comparative spectroscopic analysis on three novel Tm3+:tellurite-based glasses with the following compositions Tm2O3:TeO2-ZnO (TeZnTm, Tm2O3:TeO2-Nb2O5 (TeNbTm, and Tm3+:TeO2-K2O-Nb2O5 (TeNbKTm, primarily for 2-μm laser applications. Tellurite glasses were prepared at different doping concentrations in order to investigate the effect of Tm3+ ion concentration as well as host composition on the stimulated emission cross sections and the luminescence quantum efficiencies. By performing Judd–Ofelt analysis, we determined the average radiative lifetimes of the 3H4 level to be 2.55 ± 0.07 ms, 2.76 ± 0.03 ms and 2.57 ± 0.20 ms for the TeZnTm, TeNbTm and TeNbKTm samples, respectively. We clearly observed the effect of the cross-relaxation, which becomes significant at higher Tm2O3 concentrations, leading to the quenching of 1460-nm emission and enhancement of 1860-nm emission. Furthermore, with increasing Tm2O3 concentrations, we observed a decrease in the fluorescence lifetimes as a result of the onset of non-radiative decay. For the 3H4 level, the highest obtained quantum efficiency was 32% for the samples with the lowest Tm2O3 ion concentration. For the 1860-nm emission band, the average emission cross section was determined to measure around 6.33 ± 0.34 × 10−21 cm2, revealing the potential of thulium-doped tellurite gain media for 2-μm laser applications in bulk and fiber configurations.

  6. Engineering Botulinum Neurotoxin C1 as a Molecular Vehicle for Intra-Neuronal Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Cintron, Edwin J; Beske, Phillip H; Tenezaca, Luis; Tran, Bao Q; Oyler, Jonathan M; Glotfelty, Elliot J; Angeles, Christopher A; Syngkon, Aurelia; Mukherjee, Jean; Kalb, Suzanne R; Band, Philip A; McNutt, Patrick M; Shoemaker, Charles B; Ichtchenko, Konstantin

    2017-02-21

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) binds to and internalizes its light chain into presynaptic compartments with exquisite specificity. While the native toxin is extremely lethal, bioengineering of BoNT has the potential to eliminate toxicity without disrupting neuron-specific targeting, thereby creating a molecular vehicle capable of delivering therapeutic cargo into the neuronal cytosol. Building upon previous work, we have developed an atoxic derivative (ad) of BoNT/C1 through rationally designed amino acid substitutions in the metalloprotease domain of wild type (wt) BoNT/C1. To test if BoNT/C1 ad retains neuron-specific targeting without concomitant toxic host responses, we evaluated the localization, activity, and toxicity of BoNT/C1 ad in vitro and in vivo. In neuronal cultures, BoNT/C1 ad light chain is rapidly internalized into presynaptic compartments, but does not cleave SNARE proteins nor impair spontaneous neurotransmitter release. In mice, systemic administration resulted in the specific co-localization of BoNT/C1 ad with diaphragmatic motor nerve terminals. The mouse LD 50 of BoNT/C1 ad is 5 mg/kg, with transient neurological symptoms emerging at sub-lethal doses. Given the low toxicity and highly specific neuron-targeting properties of BoNT/C1 ad, these data suggest that BoNT/C1 ad can be useful as a molecular vehicle for drug delivery to the neuronal cytoplasm.

  7. Overview of hereditary angioedema caused by C1-inhibitor deficiency: assessment and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bork, K; Davis-Lorton, M

    2013-02-01

    Hereditary angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency (HAE-C1-INH) is a rare, autosomal-dominant disease. HAE-C1-INH is characterized by recurrent attacks of marked, diffuse, nonpitting and nonpruritic skin swellings, painful abdominal attacks, and laryngeal edema. The extremities and the gastrointestinal tract are most commonly affected. Swelling of the upper respiratory mucosa poses the greatest risk because death from asphyxiation can result from laryngealedema. HAE-C1-INH attacks are variable, unpredictable, and may be induced by a variety of stimuli, including stress or physical trauma. Because the clinical presentation of HAE-C1-INH is similar to other types of angioedema, the condition may be a challenge to diagnose. Accurate identification of HAE-C1-INH is critical in order to avoid asphyxiation by laryngeal edema and to improve the burden of disease. Based on an understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of IHAE-C1-INH, drugs targeted specifically to the disease, such as C1-inhibitor therapy, bradykinin B2-receptor antagonists, and kallikrein-inhibitors, have become available for both treatment and prevention of angioedema attacks. This article reviews the clinical features, differential diagnosis, and current approaches to management of HAE-C1-INH.

  8. Observation of $B^0_s\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1}\\phi$ decay and study of $B^0\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1,2}K^{*0}$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258707; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Di Ruscio, F; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Holtrop, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    The first observation of the decay $B^0_s\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1}\\phi$ and a study of $B^0\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1,2}K^{*0}$ decays are presented. The analysis is performed using a dataset, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$, collected by the LHCb experiment in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. The following ratios of branching fractions are measured: \\begin{equation*} \\begin{array}{lll} \\dfrac{\\cal{B}(B^0_s\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1}\\phi)}{\\cal{B}(B^0_s\\rightarrow J/\\psi\\phi)} &=& (18.9 \\pm1.8\\,(stat)\\pm1.3\\,(syst)\\pm0.8\\,(\\cal{B})) \\times 10^{-2}, \\\\ \\dfrac{\\cal{B}(B^0\\rightarrow\\chi_{c1}K^{*0})}{\\cal{B}(B^0\\rightarrow J/\\psi K^{*0})} &=& (19.8 \\pm1.1\\,(stat)\\pm1.2\\,(syst)\\pm0.9\\,(\\cal{B})) \\times 10^{-2}, \\\\ \\dfrac{\\cal{B}(B^0\\rightarrow\\chi_{c2}K^{*0})}{\\cal{B}(B^0\\rightarrow\\chi_{c 1}K^{*0})} &=& (17.1 \\pm5.0\\,(stat)\\pm1.7\\,(syst)\\pm1.1\\,(\\cal{B})) \\times 10^{-2}, \\\\ \\end{array} \\end{equation*} where the third uncertainty is due to the limited knowledge o...

  9. A novel role for Tm7sf2 gene in regulating TNFα expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Bellezza

    Full Text Available We have explored the role of Tm7sf2 gene, which codifies for 3β-hydroxysterol Δ14-reductase, an endoplasmic reticulum resident protein, in the sensitivity to endoplasmic reticulum stress and in the resulting inflammatory response. We used mouse embryonic fibroblasts, derived from Tm7sf2(+/+ and Tm7sf2(-/- mice, to determine the in vitro effects of thapsigargin on NF-κB activation. Our results show that the Tm7sf2 gene controls the launch of the unfolded protein response and presides an anti-inflammatory loop thus its absence correlates with NF-κB activation and TNFα up-regulation. Our data also show that Tm7sf2 gene regulates liver X receptor activation and its absence inhibits LXR signalling. By expressing the hTm7sf2 gene in KO MEFs and observing a reduced NF-κB activation, we have confirmed that Tm7sf2 gene is linked to NF-κB activation. Finally we used genetically modified mice in an in vivo model of ER stress and of inflammation. Our results show a significant increase in renal TNFα expression after tunicamycin exposure and in the oedematogenic response in Tm7sf2(-/- mice. In conclusion, we have shown that the Tm7sf2 gene, to date involved only in cholesterol biosynthesis, also controls an anti-inflammatory loop thereby confirming the existence of cross talk between metabolic pathways and inflammatory response.

  10. Study of electroless nickel plating on PerFactoryTM rapid prototype model

    OpenAIRE

    J.C. Rajaguru; C. Au, M. Duke

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of electroless nickel plating on PerFactoryTM rapid prototype model built on PerFactoryTM R05 material. PerFactoryTM R05 is acrylic based photo sensitive resin. It is a popular material in rapid prototyping using PerFactoryTM method which employs addictive manufacturing technique to build prototypes for visual inspection, assembly etc. Metallization of such a prototype can extend the application envelop of the rapid prototyping technique as they can be use...

  11. Crystal growth, spectroscopic and laser properties of Tm:LuAG crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X. D.; Wang, X. D.; Lin, Z. F.; Cheng, Y.; Li, D. Z.; Cheng, S. S.; Wu, F.; Zhao, Z. W.; Gao, C. Q.; Gao, M. W.; Xu, J.

    2009-11-01

    Tm:Lu3Al5O12 (Tm:LuAG) crystal was grown by the Czochralski method. The segregation coefficient was measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometer. The cell parameters were analyzed with X-ray powder diffraction experiments. The absorption and fluorescence spectra of Tm:LuAG crystal at room temperature were investigated. With a 20 W fiber-coupled diode laser as pump source, the continuous-wave (CW) laser action of Tm:LuAG crystal was demonstrated. The maximum output power at 2020 nm was obtained to be 3.04 W, and the slope efficiency was 25.3%.

  12. Energy transfer upconversion in Er3+-Tm3+ codoped sodium silicate glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vinod; Pandey, Anurag; Ntwaeaborwa, O. M.; Swart, H. C.

    2018-04-01

    Er3+/Tm3+ doped and codoped Na2O-SiO2-ZnO (NSZO) glasses were prepared by the conventional melt-quenching method. The amorphous nature of the prepared glasses was confirmed by the X-ray diffraction analysis. The optical absorption spectrum displayed several peaks, which correspond to Er3+ and Tm3+ dopant ions embedded into the NSZO glass. Both dopants experienced upconversion emission under 980 nm excitation. Efficient energy transfer from Er3+ to Tm3+ was observed in the co-doped samples to enhance the near infrared emission of the Tm3+ ions.

  13. Rigidized Inflatable Veritex(TM) Structured For RF Antennas, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Cornerstone Research Group inc. (CRG) proposes to demonstrate the feasibility of a lightweight, deployable Veritex TM supporting annulus structure to support large...

  14. Research and Development of High Energy 2 - Micron Lasers Based on TM: Doped Ceramic Laser Gain Media and TM: Doped Optical Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-20

    OPTICAL FIBERS Robert Byer LELAND STANFORD JUNIOR UNIV CA 450 SERRA MALL STANFORD, CA 94305-2004 07/20/2016 Final Report DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution...TM: DOPED OPTICAL FIBERS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-10-1-0560 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Robert L. Byer (PI...LASERS BASED ON TM: DOPED CERAMIC LASER GAIN MEDIA AND TM: DOPED OPTICAL FIBERS AFOSR FA9550-10-1-0560 PI - Robert L. Byer Ginzton Laboratory

  15. Complement protein C1q induces maturation of human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csomor, Eszter; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Sándor, Noémi; Kristóf, Katalin; Arlaud, Gérard J; Thiel, Steffen; Erdei, Anna

    2007-07-01

    Maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) is known to be induced by several stimuli, including microbial products, inflammatory cytokines and immobilized IgG, as demonstrated recently. Since immune complexes formed in vivo also contain C1q, moreover apoptotic cells and several pathogens fix C1q in the absence of antibodies, we undertook to investigate whether this complement protein has an impact on various functions of human DCs. Maturation of monocyte-derived immature DCs (imMDCs) cultured on immobilized C1q was followed by monitoring expression of CD80, CD83, CD86, MHCII and CCR7. The functional activity of the cells was assessed by measuring cytokine secretion and their ability to activate allogeneic T lymphocytes. Cytokine production by T cells co-cultured with C1q-matured DCs was also investigated. C1q, but not the structurally related mannose-binding lectin was found to bind to imMDC in a dose-dependent manner and induced NF-kappaB translocation to the nucleus. Immobilized C1q induced maturation of MDCs and enhanced secretion of IL-12 and TNF-alpha, moreover, elevated their T-cell stimulating capacity. As IFN-gamma levels were increased in supernatants of MDC-T cell co-cultures, our data suggest that C1q-induced DC maturation generates a Th1-type response. Interestingly, IL-10 levels were elevated by C1q-treated MDCs but not in the supernatant of their co-cultures with allogeneic T cells. Taken together, these results indicate that C1q-opsonized antigens may play a role in the induction and regulation of immune response. Moreover our data are relevant in view of the role of C1q in removal of apoptotic cells and the association between C1q-deficiency and autoimmunity.

  16. The C1q family of proteins: insights into the emerging non-traditional functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berhane eGhebrehiwet

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Research conducted over the past 20 years have helped us unravel not only the hidden structural and functional subtleties of human C1q, but also has catapulted the molecule from a mere recognition unit of the classical pathway to a well-recognized molecular sensor of damage modified self or non-self antigens. Thus, C1q is involved in a rapidly expanding list of pathological disorders—including autoimmunity, trophoblast migration, preeclampsia and cancer. The results of two recent reports are provided to underscore the critical role C1q plays in health and disease. First is the observation by Singh and colleagues showing that pregnant C1q-/- mice recapitulate the key features of human preeclampsia that correlate with increased fetal death. Treatment of the C1q-/- mice with pravastatin restored trophoblast invasiveness, placental blood flow, and angiogenic balance and, thus, prevented the onset of preeclampsia. Second is the report by Hong et al., which showed that C1q can induce apoptosis of prostate cancer cells by activating the tumor suppressor molecule WW-domain containing oxydoreductase (WWOX or WOX1 and destabilizing cell adhesion. Downregulation of C1q on the other hand enhanced prostate hyperplasia and cancer formation due to failure of WOX1 activation. Recent evidence also shows that C1q belongs to a family of structurally and functionally related TNFα-like family of proteins that may have arisen from a common ancestral gene. Therefore C1q not only shares the diverse functions with the TNF family of proteins, but also explains why C1q has retained some of its ancestral cytokine-like activities. This review is intended to highlight some of the structural and functional aspects of C1q by underscoring the growing list of its non-traditional functions.

  17. Genetic analysis of complement C1s deficiency associated with systemic lupus erythematosus highlights alternative splicing of normal C1s gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armano, MT; Ferriani, VP; Florido, MP

    2008-01-01

    ' fibroblasts when analyzed by confocal microscopy. We show that all four siblings are homozygous for a mutation at position 938 in exon 6 of the C1s cDNA that creates a premature stop codon. Our investigations led us to reveal the presence of previously uncharacterized splice variants of C1s mRNA transcripts...... in normal human cells. These variants are derived from the skipping of exon 3 and from the use of an alternative 3' splice site within intron 1 which increases the size of exon 2 by 87 nucleotides....

  18. Growth and optical characteristics of Tm-doped AlGaN layer grown by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatsu, J.; Fuji, R.; Tatebayashi, J.; Timmerman, D.; Lesage, A.; Gregorkiewicz, T.; Fujiwara, Y.

    2018-04-01

    We report on the growth and optical properties of Tm-doped AlGaN layers by organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE). The morphological and optical properties of Tm-doped GaN (GaN:Tm) and Tm-doped AlGaN (AlGaN:Tm) were investigated by Nomarski differential interference contrast microscopy and photoluminescence (PL) characterization. Nomarski images reveal an increase of surface roughness upon doping Tm into both GaN and AlGaN layers. The PL characterization of GaN:Tm shows emission in the near-infrared range originating from intra-4f shell transitions of Tm3+ ions. In contrast, AlGaN:Tm also exhibits blue light emission from Tm3+ ions. In that case, the wider band gap of the AlGaN host allows energy transfer to higher states of the Tm3+ ions. With time-resolved PL measurements, we could distinguish three types of luminescent sites of Tm3+ in the AlGaN:Tm layer, having different decay times. Our results confirm that Tm ions can be doped into GaN and AlGaN by OMVPE, and show potential for the fabrication of novel high-color-purity blue light emitting diodes.

  19. 17 CFR 240.24c-1 - Access to nonpublic information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Access to nonpublic information. (a) For purposes of this section, the term “nonpublic information” means... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Access to nonpublic information. 240.24c-1 Section 240.24c-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION...

  20. 17 CFR 270.18c-1 - Exemption of privately held indebtedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... indebtedness. 270.18c-1 Section 270.18c-1 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... indebtedness. The issuance or sale of more than one class of senior securities representing indebtedness by a... outstanding any publicly held indebtedness, and all securities of any such class are (a) privately held by the...

  1. C1 polymerisation and related C-C bond forming ‘carbene insertion’ reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jellema, E.; Jongerius, A.L.; Reek, J.N.H.; de Bruin, B.

    2010-01-01

    In this critical review we summarise the currently available ‘C1 polymerisation’ techniques as valuable alternatives for ‘C2 polymerisation’ in the preparation of saturated main-chain carbon-based polymers. C1 polymerisation involves the growth of polymers from monomers delivering only one

  2. Administration of C1 inhibitor reduces neutrophil activation in patients with sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeerleder, Sacha; Caliezi, Christoph; van Mierlo, Gerard; Eerenberg-Belmer, Anke; Sulzer, Irmela; Hack, C. Erik; Wuillemin, Walter A.

    2003-01-01

    Forty patients with severe sepsis or septic shock recently received C1 inhibitor. In the present study we studied the effect of C1 inhibitor therapy on circulating elastase-alpha(1)-antitrypsin complex (EA) and lactoferrin (LF) levels in these patients to gain further insight about agonists involved

  3. Amplitude analysis of the chi(c1) -> eta pi(+)pi(-) decays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haddadi, Z.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Löhner, H.; Messchendorp, J. G.; Tiemens, M.

    2017-01-01

    Using 448.0 x 10(6) psi(3686) events collected with the BESIII detector, an amplitude analysis is performed for psi(3686) -> gamma chi(c1), chi(c1) ->eta pi(+)pi(-) decays. The most dominant two- body structure observed is a(0)(980)(+/-) pi(-/+); a(0)(980)(+/-) -> eta pi(+/-.) line shape is modeled

  4. 17 CFR 240.15c1-9 - Use of pro forma balance sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... pro forma balance sheets. The term manipulative, deceptive, or other fraudulent device or contrivance... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of pro forma balance sheets. 240.15c1-9 Section 240.15c1-9 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE...

  5. 26 CFR 1.267(c)-1 - Constructive ownership of stock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Constructive ownership of stock. 1.267(c)-1...) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Items Not Deductible § 1.267(c)-1 Constructive ownership of stock. (a) In general. (1) The determination of stock ownership for purposes of section 267(b) shall be in...

  6. Functional C1-inhibitor diagnostics in hereditary angioedema: assay evaluation and recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenaar-Bos, Ineke G A; Drouet, Christian; Aygören-Pursun, Emel

    2008-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by recurrent episodes of potentially life-threatening angioedema. The most widespread underlying genetic deficiency is a heterozygous deficiency of the serine protease inhibitor C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-Inh). In addition ...

  7. Autoantibodies against C1q in systemic lupus erythematosus are antigen-driven

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaller, Monica; Bigler, Cornelia; Danner, Doris

    2009-01-01

    Autoantibodies against complement C1q (anti-C1q Abs) were shown to strongly correlate with the occurrence of severe nephritis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), suggesting a potential pathogenic role by interfering with the complement cascade. To analyze the humoral immune...

  8. Optimal Entry Point and Trajectory for Anterior C1 Lateral Mass Screw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yong; Dong, Wei-Xin; Spiker, William Ryan; Yuan, Zhen-Shan; Sun, Xiao-Yang; Zhang, Jiao; Xie, Hui; Albert, Todd J

    2017-06-01

    A radiographic analysis of the anatomy of the C1 lateral mass using computed tomography (CT) scans and Mimics software. To define the anatomy of the C1 lateral mass and make recommendations for optimal entry point and trajectory for anterior C1 lateral mass screws. Although various posterior insertion angles and entry points for screw insertion have been proposed for posterior C1 lateral mass screws, no large series have been performed to assess the ideal entry point and optimal trajectory for anterior C1 lateral mass screw placement. The C1 lateral mass was evaluated using CT scans and a 3-dimensional imaging application (Mimics software). Measuring the space available for the anterior C1 lateral mass screw (SAS) at different camber angles from 0 to 30 degrees (5-degree intervals) was performed to identify the ideal camber angle of insertion. Measuring the range of sagittal angles was performed to calculate the ideal sagittal angle. Other measurements involving the height of the C1 lateral mass were also made. The optimal screw entry point was found to be located on the anterior surface of the atlas 12.88 mm (±1.10 mm) lateral to the center of the anterior tubercle. This optimal entry point was found to be 6.81 mm (±0.59 mm) superior to the anterior edge of the atlas inferior articulating process. The mean ideal camber angle was 20.92 degrees laterally and the mean ideal sagittal angle was 5.80 degrees downward. These measurements define the optimal entry point and trajectory for anterior C1 lateral mass screws and facilitate anterior C1 lateral mass screw placement. A thorough understanding of the local anatomy may decrease the risk of injury to the spinal cord, vertebral artery, and internal carotid artery. Delineating the anatomy in each case with preoperative 3D CT evaluation is recommended.

  9. Pharmacogenetic characterization of naturally occurring germline NT5C1A variants to chemotherapeutic nucleoside analogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Jason; Zabriskie, Ryan; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Powell, Bradford C; Hicks, Stephanie; Kimmel, Marek; Meng, Qingchang; Ritter, Deborah I; Wheeler, David A; Gibbs, Richard A; Tsai, Francis T F; Plon, Sharon E

    2016-01-01

    Background Mutations or alteration in expression of the 5’ nucleotidase gene family can confer altered responses to treatment with nucleoside analogs. While investigating leukemia susceptibility genes, we discovered a very rare p.L254P NT5C1A missense variant in the substrate recognition motif. Given the paucity of cellular drug response data from NT5C1A germline variation, we characterized p.L254P and eight rare variants of NT5C1A from genomic databases. Methods Through lentiviral infection, we created HEK293 cell lines that stably overexpress wildtype NT5C1A, p.L254P, or eight NT5C1A variants reported in the NHLBI Exome Variant server (one truncating and seven missense). IC50 values were determined by cytotoxicity assays after exposure to chemotherapeutic nucleoside analogs (Cladribine, Gemcitabine, 5-Fluorouracil). In addition, we used structure-based homology modeling to generate a 3D model for the C-terminal region of NT5C1A. Results The p.R180X (truncating), p.A214T, and p.L254P missense changes were the only variants that significantly impaired protein function across all nucleotide analogs tested (>5-fold difference versus WT; p<.05). Several of the remaining variants individually displayed differential effects (both more and less resistant) across the analogs tested. The homology model provided a structural framework to understand the impact of NT5C1A mutants on catalysis and drug processing. The model predicted active site residues within NT5C1A motif III and we experimentally confirmed that p.K314 (not p.K320) is required for NT5C1A activity. Conclusion We characterized germline variation and predicted protein structures of NT5C1A. Individual missense changes showed substantial variation in response to the different nucleoside analogs tested, which may impact patients’ responses to treatment. PMID:26906009

  10. Trichinella spiralis Calreticulin Binds Human Complement C1q As an Immune Evasion Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Limei; Shao, Shuai; Chen, Yi; Sun, Ximeng; Sun, Ran; Huang, Jingjing; Zhan, Bin; Zhu, Xinping

    2017-01-01

    As a multicellular parasitic nematode, Trichinella spiralis regulates host immune responses by producing a variety of immunomodulatory molecules to escape from host immune attack, but the mechanisms underlying the immune evasion are not well understood. Here, we identified that T. spiralis calreticulin ( Ts -CRT), a Ca 2+ -binding protein, facilitated T. spiralis immune evasion by interacting with the first component of human classical complement pathway, C1q. In the present study, Ts -CRT was found to be expressed on the surface of different developmental stages of T. spiralis as well as in the secreted products of adult and muscle larval worms. Functional analysis identified that Ts -CRT was able to bind to human C1q, resulting in the inhibition of C1q-initiated complement classical activation pathway reflected by reduced C4/C3 generation and C1q-dependent lysis of antibody-sensitized sheep erythrocytes. Moreover, recombinant Ts -CRT (r Ts -CRT) binding to C1q suppressed C1q-induced THP-1-derived macrophages chemotaxis and reduced monocyte-macrophages release of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs). Blocking Ts -CRT on the surface of newborn larvae (NBL) of T. spiralis with anti- Ts -CRT antibody increased the C1q-mediated adherence of monocyte-macrophages to larvae and impaired larval infectivity. All of these results suggest that T. spiralis -expressed Ts -CRT plays crucial roles in T. spiralis immune evasion and survival in host mostly by directly binding to host complement C1q, which not only reduces C1q-mediated activation of classical complement pathway but also inhibits the C1q-induced non-complement activation of macrophages.

  11. Endogenous C1-inhibitor production and expression in the heart after acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmens, Reindert W; Baylan, Umit; Juffermans, Lynda J M; Karia, Rashmi V; Ylstra, Bauke; Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha; Simsek, Suat; van Ham, Marieke; Niessen, Hans W M; Krijnen, Paul A J

    2016-01-01

    Complement activation contributes significantly to inflammation-related damage in the heart after acute myocardial infarction. Knowledge on factors that regulate postinfraction complement activation is incomplete however. In this study, we investigated whether endogenous C1-inhibitor, a well-known inhibitor of complement activation, is expressed in the heart after acute myocardial infarction. C1-inhibitor and complement activation products C3d and C4d were analyzed immunohistochemically in the hearts of patients who died at different time intervals after acute myocardial infarction (n=28) and of control patients (n=8). To determine putative local C1-inhibitor production, cardiac transcript levels of the C1-inhibitor-encoding gene serping1 were determined in rats after induction of acute myocardial infarction (microarray). Additionally, C1-inhibitor expression was analyzed (fluorescence microscopy) in human endothelial cells and rat cardiomyoblasts in vitro. C1-inhibitor was found predominantly in and on jeopardized cardiomyocytes in necrotic infarct cores between 12h and 5days old. C1-inhibitor protein expression coincided in time and colocalized with C3d and C4d. In the rat heart, serping1 transcript levels were increased from 2h up until 7days after acute myocardial infarction. Both endothelial cells and cardiomyoblasts showed increased intracellular expression of C1-inhibitor in response to ischemia in vitro (n=4). These observations suggest that endogenous C1-inhibitor is likely involved in the regulation of complement activity in the myocardium following acute myocardial infarction. Observations in rat and in vitro suggest that C1-inhibitor is produced locally in the heart after acute myocardial infarction. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. χc 1 and χc 2 Resonance Parameters with the Decays χc 1 ,c 2→J /ψ μ+μ-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Alfonso Albero, A.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Arnau Romeu, J.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Atzeni, M.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Babuschkin, I.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Balagura, V.; Baldini, W.; Baranov, A.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Baryshnikov, F.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Beiter, A.; Bel, L. J.; Beliy, N.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belous, K.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Beranek, S.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Berninghoff, D.; Bertholet, E.; Bertolin, A.; Betancourt, C.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bezshyiko, Ia.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Bjørn, M.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Boettcher, T.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bordyuzhin, I.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bossu, F.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brundu, D.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Byczynski, W.; Cadeddu, S.; Cai, H.; Calabrese, R.; Calladine, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Camboni, A.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D. H.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Chamont, D.; Chapman, M. G.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S. F.; Chitic, S.-G.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Chubykin, A.; Ciambrone, P.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collins, P.; Colombo, T.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombs, G.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Costa Sobral, C. M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Da Cunha Marinho, F.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Serio, M.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C. T.; Decamp, D.; Del Buono, L.; Dembinski, H.-P.; Demmer, M.; Dendek, A.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Douglas, L.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziewiecki, M.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Ebert, M.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fazzini, D.; Federici, L.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez, G.; Fernandez Declara, P.; Fernandez Prieto, A.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fini, R. A.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Franco Lima, V.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Fu, J.; Funk, W.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gabriel, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Garcia Martin, L. M.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gizdov, K.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gorelov, I. V.; Gotti, C.; Govorkova, E.; Grabowski, J. P.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greim, R.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Gruber, L.; Gruberg Cazon, B. R.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hancock, T. H.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Hasse, C.; Hatch, M.; He, J.; Hecker, M.; Heinicke, K.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hombach, C.; Hopchev, P. H.; Hu, W.; Huard, Z. C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hutchcroft, D.; Ibis, P.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jiang, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Karacson, M.; Kariuki, J. M.; Karodia, S.; Kazeev, N.; Kecke, M.; Keizer, F.; Kelsey, M.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Klimkovich, T.; Koliiev, S.; Kolpin, M.; Kopecna, R.; Koppenburg, P.; Kosmyntseva, A.; Kotriakhova, S.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreps, M.; Kress, F.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemaitre, F.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, P.-R.; Li, T.; Li, Y.; Li, Z.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Lionetto, F.; Lisovskyi, V.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Loi, A.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Luchinsky, A.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Macko, V.; Mackowiak, P.; Maddrell-Mander, S.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Maisuzenko, D.; Majewski, M. W.; Malde, S.; Malecki, B.; Malinin, A.; Maltsev, T.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Marangotto, D.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marinangeli, M.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurice, E.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Mead, J. V.; Meadows, B.; Meaux, C.; Meier, F.; Meinert, N.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Millard, E.; Minard, M.-N.; Minzoni, L.; Mitzel, D. S.; Mogini, A.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Mombächer, T.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morello, M. J.; Morgunova, O.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mulder, M.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Nogay, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Ossowska, A.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Pais, P. R.; Palano, A.; Palutan, M.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Pastore, A.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pisani, F.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Placinta, V.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Polci, F.; Poli Lener, M.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Pomery, G. J.; Ponce, S.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Poslavskii, S.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Prisciandaro, J.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Pullen, H.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Quintana, B.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Ratnikov, F.; Raven, G.; Ravonel Salzgeber, M.; Reboud, M.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Remon Alepuz, C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Robert, A.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Rollings, A.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Rudolph, M. S.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Ruiz Vidal, J.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sadykhov, E.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarpis, G.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schellenberg, M.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schreiner, H. F.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepulveda, E. S.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Simone, S.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Soares Lavra, l.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefko, P.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stemmle, S.; Stenyakin, O.; Stepanova, M.; Stevens, H.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, J.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Syropoulos, V.; Szumlak, T.; Szymanski, M.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tilley, M. J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Toriello, F.; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, R.; Tournefier, E.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tully, A.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Usachov, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagner, A.; Vagnoni, V.; Valassi, A.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Venkateswaran, A.; Verlage, T. A.; Vernet, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Viana Barbosa, J. V.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Viemann, H.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vitti, M.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voneki, B.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Wark, H. M.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Weisser, C.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Winn, M.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, M.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yao, Y.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zarebski, K. A.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhu, X.; Zhukov, V.; Zonneveld, J. B.; Zucchelli, S.; LHCb Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    The decays χc 1→J /ψ μ+μ- and χc 2→J /ψ μ+μ- are observed and used to study the resonance parameters of the χc 1 and χc 2 mesons. The masses of these states are measured to be m (χc 1)=3510.71 ±0.04 (stat ) ±0.09 (syst ) MeV and m (χc 2)=3556.10 ±0.06 (stat ) ±0.11 (syst ) MeV , where the knowledge of the momentum scale for charged particles dominates the systematic uncertainty. The momentum-scale uncertainties largely cancel in the mass difference m (χc 2)-m (χc 1)=45.39 ±0.07 (stat ) ±0.03 (syst ) MeV . The natural width of the χc 2 meson is measured to be Γ (χc 2)=2.10 ±0.20 (stat ) ±0.02 (syst ) MeV . These results are in good agreement with and have comparable precision to the current world averages.

  13. χ_{c1} and χ_{c2} Resonance Parameters with the Decays χ_{c1,c2}→J/ψμ^{+}μ^{-}.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Alfonso Albero, A; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Andreassi, G; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Archilli, F; d'Argent, P; Arnau Romeu, J; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Atzeni, M; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Babuschkin, I; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baker, S; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Baranov, A; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Baryshnikov, F; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Beiter, A; Bel, L J; Beliy, N; Bellee, V; Belloli, N; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Beranek, S; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Berninghoff, D; Bertholet, E; Bertolin, A; Betancourt, C; Betti, F; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bezshyiko, Ia; Bifani, S; Billoir, P; Birnkraut, A; Bizzeti, A; Bjørn, M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Boettcher, T; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bordyuzhin, I; Borghi, S; Borisyak, M; Borsato, M; Bossu, F; Boubdir, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Braun, S; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brundu, D; Buchanan, E; Burr, C; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Byczynski, W; Cadeddu, S; Cai, H; Calabrese, R; Calladine, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D H; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carniti, P; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Cattaneo, M; Cavallero, G; Cenci, R; Chamont, D; Chapman, M G; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chatzikonstantinidis, G; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S F; Chitic, S-G; Chobanova, V; Chrzaszcz, M; Chubykin, A; Ciambrone, P; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collins, P; Colombo, T; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombs, G; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Costa Sobral, C M; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A; Cruz Torres, M; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Da Cunha Marinho, F; Dall'Occo, E; Dalseno, J; Davis, A; De Aguiar Francisco, O; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Serio, M; De Simone, P; Dean, C T; Decamp, D; Del Buono, L; Dembinski, H-P; Demmer, M; Dendek, A; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Nezza, P; Dijkstra, H; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Douglas, L; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dufour, L; Dujany, G; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziewiecki, M; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Ebert, M; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fazzini, D; Federici, L; Ferguson, D; Fernandez, G; Fernandez Declara, P; Fernandez Prieto, A; Ferrari, F; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fini, R A; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fleuret, F; Fohl, K; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forshaw, D C; Forty, R; Franco Lima, V; Frank, M; Frei, C; Fu, J; Funk, W; Furfaro, E; Färber, C; Gabriel, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garcia Martin, L M; García Pardiñas, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Garsed, P J; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Gerick, D; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Girard, O G; Giubega, L; Gizdov, K; Gligorov, V V; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorelov, I V; Gotti, C; Govorkova, E; Grabowski, J P; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greim, R; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Gruber, L; Gruberg Cazon, B R; Grünberg, O; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Göbel, C; Hadavizadeh, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hamilton, B; Han, X; Hancock, T H; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Hasse, C; Hatch, M; He, J; Hecker, M; Heinicke, K; Heister, A; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P H; Hu, W; Huard, Z C; Hulsbergen, W; Humair, T; Hushchyn, M; Hutchcroft, D; Ibis, P; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jawahery, A; Jiang, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Kariuki, J M; Karodia, S; Kazeev, N; Kecke, M; Keizer, F; Kelsey, M; Kenzie, M; Ketel, T; Khairullin, E; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Kirn, T; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Klimkovich, T; Koliiev, S; Kolpin, M; Kopecna, R; Koppenburg, P; Kosmyntseva, A; Kotriakhova, S; Kozeiha, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreps, M; Kress, F; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Krzemien, W; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kuonen, A K; Kvaratskheliya, T; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Lefèvre, R; Lemaitre, F; Lemos Cid, E; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, P-R; Li, T; Li, Y; Li, Z; Likhomanenko, T; Lindner, R; Lionetto, F; Lisovskyi, V; Liu, X; Loh, D; Loi, A; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lucchesi, D; Luchinsky, A; Lucio Martinez, M; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Lusiani, A; Lyu, X; Machefert, F; Maciuc, F; Macko, V; Mackowiak, P; Maddrell-Mander, S; Maev, O; Maguire, K; Maisuzenko, D; Majewski, M W; Malde, S; Malecki, B; Malinin, A; Maltsev, T; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marangotto, D; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marinangeli, M; Marino, P; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martin, M; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Massacrier, L M; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathad, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mauri, A; Maurice, E; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Mead, J V; Meadows, B; Meaux, C; Meier, F; Meinert, N; Melnychuk, D; Merk, M; Merli, A; Michielin, E; Milanes, D A; Millard, E; Minard, M-N; Minzoni, L; Mitzel, D S; Mogini, A; Molina Rodriguez, J; Mombächer, T; Monroy, I A; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morello, M J; Morgunova, O; Moron, J; Morris, A B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Mulder, M; Müller, D; Müller, J; Müller, K; Müller, V; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nandi, A; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nieswand, S; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nogay, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Ossowska, A; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pais, P R; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parker, W; Parkes, C; Passaleva, G; Pastore, A; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Petrov, A; Petruzzo, M; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pikies, M; Pinci, D; Pisani, F; Pistone, A; Piucci, A; Placinta, V; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poli Lener, M; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Pomery, G J; Ponce, S; Popov, A; Popov, D; Poslavskii, S; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Pullen, H; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Quagliani, R; Quintana, B; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rama, M; Ramos Pernas, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Ratnikov, F; Raven, G; Ravonel Salzgeber, M; Reboud, M; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Dos Reis, A C; Remon Alepuz, C; Renaudin, V; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Robert, A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Lopez, J A; Rogozhnikov, A; Roiser, S; Rollings, A; Romanovskiy, V; Romero Vidal, A; Ronayne, J W; Rotondo, M; Rudolph, M S; Ruf, T; Ruiz Valls, P; Ruiz Vidal, J; Saborido Silva, J J; Sadykhov, E; Sagidova, N; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santimaria, M; Santovetti, E; Sarpis, G; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schael, S; Schellenberg, M; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schmelling, M; Schmelzer, T; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schreiner, H F; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sepulveda, E S; Sergi, A; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Siddi, B G; Silva Coutinho, R; Silva de Oliveira, L; Simi, G; Simone, S; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, E; Smith, I T; Smith, J; Smith, M; Soares Lavra, L; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Stefko, P; Stefkova, S; Steinkamp, O; Stemmle, S; Stenyakin, O; Stepanova, M; Stevens, H; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Stramaglia, M E; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Sun, J; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Syropoulos, V; Szumlak, T; Szymanski, M; T'Jampens, S; Tayduganov, A; Tekampe, T; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tilley, M J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Toriello, F; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, R; Tournefier, E; Traill, M; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tully, A; Tuning, N; Ukleja, A; Usachov, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagner, A; Vagnoni, V; Valassi, A; Valat, S; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; van Veghel, M; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Venkateswaran, A; Verlage, T A; Vernet, M; Vesterinen, M; Viana Barbosa, J V; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Viemann, H; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vitti, M; Volkov, V; Vollhardt, A; Voneki, B; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Vázquez Sierra, C; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Wark, H M; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Weiden, A; Weisser, C; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Williams, T; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Winn, M; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wraight, K; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xu, M; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yang, Z; Yao, Y; Yin, H; Yu, J; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zarebski, K A; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zheng, Y; Zhu, X; Zhukov, V; Zonneveld, J B; Zucchelli, S

    2017-12-01

    The decays χ_{c1}→J/ψμ^{+}μ^{-} and χ_{c2}→J/ψμ^{+}μ^{-} are observed and used to study the resonance parameters of the χ_{c1} and χ_{c2} mesons. The masses of these states are measured to be m(χ_{c1})=3510.71±0.04(stat)±0.09(syst)  MeV and m(χ_{c2})=3556.10±0.06(stat)±0.11(syst)  MeV, where the knowledge of the momentum scale for charged particles dominates the systematic uncertainty. The momentum-scale uncertainties largely cancel in the mass difference m(χ_{c2})-m(χ_{c1})=45.39±0.07(stat)±0.03(syst)  MeV. The natural width of the χ_{c2} meson is measured to be Γ(χ_{c2})=2.10±0.20(stat)±0.02(syst)  MeV. These results are in good agreement with and have comparable precision to the current world averages.

  14. Explicit TE/TM scheme for particle beam simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dohlus, M.; Zagorodnov, I.

    2008-10-01

    In this paper we propose an explicit two-level conservative scheme based on a TE/TM like splitting of the field components in time. Its dispersion properties are adjusted to accelerator problems. It is simpler and faster than the implicit version. It does not have dispersion in the longitudinal direction and the dispersion properties in the transversal plane are improved. The explicit character of the new scheme allows a uniformly stable conformal method without iterations and the scheme can be parallelized easily. It assures energy and charge conservation. A version of this explicit scheme for rotationally symmetric structures is free from the progressive time step reducing for higher order azimuthal modes as it takes place for Yee's explicit method used in the most popular electrodynamics codes. (orig.)

  15. Leanergy(TM): how lean manufacturing can improve energy efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riche, Jean-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Energy efficiency has become a competitive issue for industrial companies. The evolution of energy prices and regulation will make this issue even more important in the future. For several years, the energy-intensive chemical industry has been implementing corrective actions. Helped by the absorption of base load energy consumption by larger production volumes, specific energy consumption (KWh per production unit) has been significantly reduced in recent years. However, most plants have reached the end of their first action plan based on improving the utilities performance. The Leanergy(TM) method developed by the consultancy company Okavango-energy, is a structured approach based on lean manufacturing which widens the scope of saving sources to process and operations. Starting from the analysis of actual production requirements, Okavango is able to adjust consumption to minimum requirements and so remove any energy consumption that does not contribute to the added value creation.

  16. Low temperature properties of the magnetic semiconductor TmTe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, Takeshi; Nakamura, Shintaro; Goto, Terutaka; Amitsuka, Hiroshi; Matsuhira, Kazuyuki; Sakakibara; Toshiro; Suzuki, Takashi

    1998-01-01

    The magnetic susceptibility, elastic constant, specific heat and magnetization of the magnetic semiconductor TmTe have been measured in detail. A phase transition which is likely to be an antiferro quadrupolar ordering was found to occur at 1.8 K. The specific heat measurements under magnetic fields along the three main crystal axes revealed the unusual characters of this phase transition. The (H-T) phase diagram below 5 T is very similar to that of the antiferro quadrupolar ordering in CeB 6 . Above 5 T, however, the phase line for H parallels (100) begins to close toward T = 0 K. The physical properties in the paramagnetic region at high temperatures are discussed in the mean field approximation. The theoretical fitting of the elastic softening indicates the antiferro inter-ionic quadrupolar interactions. However, the mean field theory can not explain the specific heat results. (author). 50 refs

  17. BioinformatiqTM - integrating data types for proteomic discovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, J.W.; Harrison, M.; Manoharan, A.; Traini, M.; Shaw, E.; Wilkins, M.

    2001-01-01

    Proteomics (Wilkins et al. 1997) involves the large-scale analysis of expressed proteins. At each stage of the discovery process the researcher accumulates large volumes of data. These include: clinical or biological data about the sample being studied; details of sample purification and separation; images of 2D gels and associated information; MALDI mass spectra; MS/MS and PSD spectra; as well as meta-data relating to the projects undertaken and experiments performed. All this must be combined with existing databases of protein and EST sequences, post-translational modifications, and protein glycosylation, then processed with sophisticated bioinformatics tools in order to extract meaningful answers to questions of biological, clinical, and agricultural significance. BioinformatlQ TM is a web-based application for the storage, management, and automated bioinformatic analysis of proteomic information. This poster will demonstrate the integration of these disparate data sources in proteomics

  18. Interplay between magnetic order at Mn and Tm sites alongside the structural distortion in multiferroic films of o -TmMn O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, Y. W.; Ramakrishnan, M.; Rettig, L.; Alberca, A.; Bothschafter, E. M.; Staub, U.; Shimamoto, K.; Hu, Y.; Lippert, T.; Schneider, C. W.

    2015-06-01

    We employ resonant soft x-ray diffraction to individually study the magnetic ordering of the Mn and the Tm sublattices in single-crystalline films of orthorhombic (o -) TmMn O3 . The same magnetic ordering wave vector of (0 q 0 ) with q ≈0.46 is found for both ionic species, suggesting that the familiar antiferromagnetic order of the Mn ions induces a magnetic order on the Tm unpaired 4 f electrons. Indeed, intensity variations of magnetic reflections with temperature corroborate this scenario. Calculated magnetic fields at the Tm sites are used as a model magnetic structure for the Tm, which correctly predicts intensity variations at the Tm resonance upon azimuthal rotation of the sample. The model allows ruling out a b c -cycloid modulation of the Mn ions as the cause for the incommensurate ordering, as found in TbMn O3 . The structural distortion, which occurs in the ferroelectric phase below TC, was followed through nonresonant diffraction of structural reflections forbidden by the high-temperature crystal symmetry. The (0 q 0 ) magnetic reflection appears at the Mn resonance well above TC, indicating that this reflection is sensitive also to the intermediate sinusoidal magnetic phase. The model presented suggests that the Tm 4 f electrons are polarized well above the ferroelectric transition and are possibly not affected by the transition at TC. The successful description of the induced order observed at the Tm resonance is a promising example for future element-selective studies in which "spectator" ions may allow access to previously unobtainable information about other constituent ions.

  19. The Space House TM : Space Technologies in Architectural Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gampe, F.; Raitt, D.

    2002-01-01

    The word "space" has always been associated with and had a profound impact upon architectural design. Until relatively recently, however, the term has been used in a different sense to that understood by the aerospace community - for them, space was less abstract, more concrete and used in the context of space flight and space exploration, rather than, say, an empty area or space requiring to be filled by furniture. However, the two senses of the word space have now converged to some extent. Interior designers and architects have been involved in designing the interior of Skylab, the structure of the International Space Station, and futuristic space hotels. Today, architects are designing, and builders are building, houses, offices and other structures which incorporate a plethora of new technologies, materials and production processes in an effort not only to introduce innovative and adventurous ideas but also in an attempt to address environmental and social issues. Foremost among these new technologies and materials being considered today are those that have been developed for and by the space industry. This paper examines some of these space technologies, such as energy efficient solar cells, durable plastics, air and water filtration techniques, which have been adapted to both provide power while reducing energy consumption, conserve resources and so on. Several of these technologies have now been employed by the European Space Agency to develop a Space House TM - the first of its kind, which will be deployed not so much on planets like Mars, but rather here on Earth. The Space House TM, which exhibits many innovative features such as high strength light-weight carbon composites, active noise-damped, (glass and plastic) windows, low-cost solar arrays and latent heat storage, air and water purification systems will be described.

  20. COMPARATIVE STUDY TO FIND THE EFFECT OF MULLIGANS SNAG TECHNIQUE (C1-C2 VERSUS MAITLANDS TECHNIQUE (C1-C2 IN CERVICOGENIC HEADACHE AMONG INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY PROFESSIONALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeti Christian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Headache is a common condition which physiotherapists have to deal with in clinical practice.Headaches which arise from the cervical spine are termed as Cervicogenic headaches (CGH, and these types of headaches are common form of a chronic and recurrent headache.The diagnostic criteria for CGH are outlined by the IHS (International Headache Society. The upper cervical joints, namely the occiput-C1 and C1-C2 segments are the most common origin of pain. Office and computer workers have the highest incidence of neck disorders than other occupations; the prevalence of neck disorders is above 50% among them. The purpose of this study is to find the effectiveness of Mulligan’s SNAG technique (C1-C2 and Maitland’s technique (C1-C2 in CGH and to compare these manual therapy techniques (Mulligan’s SNAG technique and Maitland’s technique with a control group. Methods: 30 subjects were selected for the study among them 23 subjects completed the study. The subjects were randomly allocated to 3 groups. The range of motion (ROM and severity of a headache were assessed pre and post intervention using FRT and HDI respectively. Result: The comparison revealed that SNAG group had a greater increase in cervical rotation (p<0.01 range than the Maitland’s technique and control groups. The mean value between pre-post differences shows a decrease in severity of a headache among all three groups. The significant difference between 3 groups was found through Tukey’s post hoc test using ANOVA method (Group A versus Group C; p<0.01 and Group B versus Group C; p<0.05. Conclusion: The present study suggested that C1-C2 SNAG technique showed statistically significant improvement in reducing headache and disability when compared to the Maitland’s mobilization technique among cervicogenic headache subjects

  1. Hereditary and acquired C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema: from pathophysiology to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeerleder, Sacha; Levi, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    Uncontrolled generation of bradykinin (BK) due to insufficient levels of protease inhibitors controlling contact phase (CP) activation, increased activity of CP proteins, and/or inadequate degradation of BK into inactive peptides increases vascular permeability via BK-receptor 2 (BKR2) and results in subcutaneous and submucosal edema formation. Hereditary and acquired angioedema due to C1-inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE and -AAE) are diseases characterized by serious and potentially fatal attacks of subcutaneous and submucosal edemas of upper airways, facial structures, abdomen, and extremities, due to inadequate control of BK generation. A decreased activity of C1-inhibitor is the hallmark of C1-INH-HAE (types 1 and 2) due to a mutation in the C1-inhibitor gene, whereas the deficiency in C1-inhibitor in C1-INH-AAE is the result of autoimmune phenomena. In HAE with normal C1-inhibitor, a significant percentage of patients have an increased activity of factor XIIa due to a FXII mutation (FXII-HAE). Treatment of C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema focuses on restoring control of BK generation by inhibition of CP proteases by correcting the balance between CP inhibitors and BK breakdown or by inhibition of BK-mediated effects at the BKR2 on endothelial cells. This review will address the pathophysiology, clinical picture, diagnosis and available treatment in C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema focusing on BK-release and its regulation. Key Messages Inadequate control of bradykinin formation results in the formation of characteristic subcutaneous and submucosal edemas of the skin, upper airways, facial structures, abdomen and extremities as seen in hereditary and acquired C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema. Diagnosis of hereditary and acquired C1-inhibitor-dependent angioedema may be troublesome as illustrated by the fact that there is a significant delay in diagnosis; a certain grade of suspicion is therefore crucial for quick diagnosis. Submucosal edema formation in

  2. Tm-doped TiO2 and Tm2Ti2O7 pyrochlore nanoparticles: enhancing the photocatalytic activity of rutile with a pyrochlore phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desiré M. De los Santos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Tm-doped TiO2 nanoparticles were synthesized using a water-controlled hydrolysis reaction. Analysis was performed in order to determine the influence of the dopant concentration and annealing temperature on the phase, crystallinity, and electronic and optical properties of the resulting material. Various characterization techniques were utilized such as X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV–vis spectroscopy. For the samples annealed at 773 and 973 K, anatase phase TiO2 was obtained, predominantly internally doped with Tm3+. ICP–AES showed that a doping concentration of up to 5.8 atom % was obtained without reducing the crystallinity of the samples. The presence of Tm3+ was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV–vis spectroscopy: the incorporation of Tm3+ was confirmed by the generation of new absorption bands that could be assigned to Tm3+ transitions. Furthermore, when the samples were annealed at 1173 K, a pyrochlore phase (Tm2Ti2O7 mixed with TiO2 was obtained with a predominant rutile phase. The photodegradation of methylene blue showed that this pyrochlore phase enhanced the photocatalytic activity of the rutile phase.

  3. Prenatal BoBs TM in the cytogenetic analysis of products of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All were screened for the frequent aneuploidies (chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X and Y) in addition to nine microdeletion/ microduplication syndrome regions by Prenatal BoBsTM. Standard karyotyping was performed on 51 samples, but failed in 38 cases. Results. Prenatal BoBsTM identified one trisomy 21 and one deletion of ...

  4. Ligand binding and micro-switches in 7TM receptor structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Rie; Frimurer, Thomas M; Holst, Birgitte

    2009-01-01

    The past couple of years have seen several novel X-ray structures of 7 transmembrane (7TM) receptors in complex with antagonists and even with a peptide fragment of a G protein. These structures demonstrate that the main ligand-binding pocket in 7TM receptors is like a funnel with a partial 'lid...

  5. The role of transmembrane segment II in 7TM receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Rosenkilde, M M

    2009-01-01

    During the two past decades tremendous effort has been put into uncovering the activation mechanism of 7TM receptors. The majority of such studies have focused on the major binding pocket, comprised of transmembrane segments (TM) -III through -VII, as most non-peptide and peptide ligands, in addi...

  6. High-power diode-pumped Tm:YLF slab laser

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Schellhorn, M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim is to develop a high-power Tm:YLF slab laser which can be utilized to pump a Ho slab laser. A 68 W Tm:YLF slab laser was recently presented in [1] pumped from one end by a single 6-bar stack delivering ~300 W of pump power. In this work, we...

  7. Seroepidemiology of TmPV1 infection in captive and wild Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donà, Maria Gabriella; Rehtanz, Manuela; Adimey, Nicole M; Bossart, Gregory D; Jenson, Alfred B; Bonde, Robert K; Ghim, Shin-je

    2011-07-01

    In 1997, cutaneous papillomatosis caused by Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris [Tm]) papillomavirus 1 (TmPV1) was detected in seven captive manatees at the Homosassa Springs Wildlife State Park, Florida, USA, and, subsequently, in two wild manatees from the adjacent Homosassa River. Since then, papillomatosis has been reported in captive manatees housed in other locations, but not in wild animals. To determine TmPV1 antibody prevalence in captive and wild manatees sampled at various locations throughout Florida coastal regions, virus-like particles, composed of the L1 capsid protein of TmPV1, were generated with a baculovirus expression system and used to measure anti-TmPV1 antibodies in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Serologic analysis of 156 manatees revealed a TmPV1 antibody prevalence of 26.3%, with no significant difference between captive (n=39) and wild (n=117) manatees (28.2% and 25.6%, respectively). No antibody-positive wild animal showed PV-induced cutaneous lesions, whereas papillomatosis was observed in 72.7% of antibody-positive captive manatees. Our data indicate that Florida manatees living in the wild are naturally infected by TmPV1 but rarely show TmPV1-induced papillomatosis. Hence, it appears that the wild population would not be harmed in a case of contact with captive animals without visible lesions and productive infections, which could be thus released into the wild.

  8. Does LibQUAL+[TM] Account for Student Loyalty to a University College Library?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgesen, Oyvind; Nesset, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to find out whether LibQUAL+[TM]can account for student loyalty to the library of an institution of higher education. LibQUAL+[TM] is a marketing tool that is used to measure perceived service quality of libraries, and the present analysis aims at validating this service quality instrument within a more…

  9. In search of an uncultured human-associated TM7 bacterium in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis, Jorge M; Barton, David E; Ghadiri, Jamsheed; Surendar, Deepa; Reddy, Kavitha; Velasquez, Fernando; Chaffee, Carol L; Lee, Mei-Chong Wendy; Gavrilova, Helen; Ozuna, Hazel; Smits, Samuel A; Ouverney, Cleber C

    2011-01-01

    We have identified an environmental bacterium in the Candidate Division TM7 with ≥98.5% 16S rDNA gene homology to a group of TM7 bacteria associated with the human oral cavity and skin. The environmental TM7 bacterium (referred to as TM7a-like) was readily detectable in wastewater with molecular techniques over two years of sampling. We present the first images of TM7a-like cells through FISH technique and the first images of any TM7 as viable cells through the STARFISH technique. In situ quantification showed TM7 concentration in wastewater up to five times greater than in human oral sites. We speculate that upon further characterization of the physiology and genetics of the TM7a-like bacterium from environmental sources and confirmation of its genomic identity to human-associated counterparts it will serve as model organisms to better understand its role in human health. The approach proposed circumvents difficulties imposed by sampling humans, provides an alternative strategy to characterizing some diseases of unknown etiology, and renders a much needed understanding of the ecophysiological role hundreds of unique Bacteria and Archaea strains play in mixed microbial communities.

  10. In search of an uncultured human-associated TM7 bacterium in the environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge M Dinis

    Full Text Available We have identified an environmental bacterium in the Candidate Division TM7 with ≥98.5% 16S rDNA gene homology to a group of TM7 bacteria associated with the human oral cavity and skin. The environmental TM7 bacterium (referred to as TM7a-like was readily detectable in wastewater with molecular techniques over two years of sampling. We present the first images of TM7a-like cells through FISH technique and the first images of any TM7 as viable cells through the STARFISH technique. In situ quantification showed TM7 concentration in wastewater up to five times greater than in human oral sites. We speculate that upon further characterization of the physiology and genetics of the TM7a-like bacterium from environmental sources and confirmation of its genomic identity to human-associated counterparts it will serve as model organisms to better understand its role in human health. The approach proposed circumvents difficulties imposed by sampling humans, provides an alternative strategy to characterizing some diseases of unknown etiology, and renders a much needed understanding of the ecophysiological role hundreds of unique Bacteria and Archaea strains play in mixed microbial communities.

  11. Evaluation of Montanide TM ISA 71 VG adjuvant during profilin vaccination against experimental coccidiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chickens were immunized subcutaneously with an Eimeria recombinant profilin protein plus MontanideTM ISA 70 VG (ISA 70) or MontanideTM ISA 71 VG (ISA 71) water-in-oil adjuvants, or with profilin alone, and comparative RNA microarray analyses were performed to ascertain global transcriptomic changes ...

  12. Magnetic Structure of Tb-Tm Alloys Studied by Neutron Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, P.; Lebech, Bente

    1976-01-01

    Single crystals of Tb-Tm alloys with Tm contents of 12%, 40%, 55% and 65% were investigated by neutron diffractometry over the temperature range 4.2-300K. All these alloys order magnetically to a basal plane spiral below the Neel temperature. Below the Curie temperature the magnetic ordering...

  13. 77 FR 69548 - Price for the 2012 Limited Edition Silver Proof SetTM

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Price for the 2012 Limited Edition Silver Proof Set TM AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The United States Mint is announcing a price of $149.95 for the 2012 Limited Edition Silver Proof Set TM . FOR FURTHER...

  14. C1-esterase inhibitor protects against early vein graft remodeling under arterial blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krijnen, Paul A J; Kupreishvili, Koba; de Vries, Margreet R; Schepers, Abbey; Stooker, Wim; Vonk, Alexander B A; Eijsman, Leon; Van Hinsbergh, Victor W M; Zeerleder, Sacha; Wouters, Diana; van Ham, Marieke; Quax, Paul H A; Niessen, Hans W M

    2012-01-01

    Arterial pressure induced vein graft injury can result in endothelial loss, accelerated atherosclerosis and vein graft failure. Inflammation, including complement activation, is assumed to play a pivotal role herein. Here, we analyzed the effects of C1-esterase inhibitor (C1inh) on early vein graft remodeling. Human saphenous vein graft segments (n=8) were perfused in vitro with autologous blood either supplemented or not with purified human C1inh at arterial pressure for 6h. The vein segments and perfusion blood were analyzed for cell damage and complement activation. In addition, the effect of purified C1inh on vein graft remodeling was analyzed in vivo in atherosclerotic C57Bl6/ApoE3 Leiden mice, wherein donor caval veins were interpositioned in the common carotid artery. Application of C1inh in the in vitro perfusion model resulted in significantly higher blood levels and significantly more depositions of C1inh in the vein wall. This coincided with a significant reduction in endothelial loss and deposition of C3d and C4d in the vein wall, especially in the circular layer, compared to vein segments perfused without supplemented C1inh. Administration of purified C1inh significantly inhibited vein graft intimal thickening in vivo in atherosclerotic C57Bl6/ApoE3 Leiden mice, wherein donor caval veins were interpositioned in the common carotid artery. C1inh significantly protects against early vein graft remodeling, including loss of endothelium and intimal thickening. These data suggest that it may be worth considering its use in patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of a 170Tm source for mercury monitoring studies in humans using XRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timmaraju, K. Phanisree; Fajurally, Bibi Najah; Armstrong, Andrea F.; Chettle, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The goals of the present study were to develop a 170 Tm radioisotope and generate a K XRF spectrum of mercury. Thulium foil and thulium oxide powder were both tested for impurities and the latter was found to be a better prospect for further studies. The 170 Tm radioisotope was developed from thulium oxide powder following the method of disolution and absorption. A suitable source holder and collimator were also designed based on Monte Carlo simulations. Using the radioisotope thus developed, a mercury XRF spectrum was successfully generated. - Highlights: • We tested the purity of thulium samples by XRF and NAA techniques. • Developed a procedure to generate Tm-170 isotope out of thulium oxide powder. • Designed a collimator and source holder • Generated XRF spectrum of mercury using the Tm-170 isotope. • Compared the highlights in mercury spectra from Tm-170 and Cd-109 isotopes.

  16. The role of transmembrane segment II in 7TM receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Rosenkilde, M M

    2009-01-01

    During the two past decades tremendous effort has been put into uncovering the activation mechanism of 7TM receptors. The majority of such studies have focused on the major binding pocket, comprised of transmembrane segments (TM) -III through -VII, as most non-peptide and peptide ligands......, in addition to biogenic amines and retinal a.m.o. bind to residues in this region. Consequently the major helical movements occur here during activation, as described recently in the Global Toggle Switch Model for Family A (also known as rhodopsin-like) members of the 7TM receptors. As a result, the minor......, accumulating evidence emphasize that this is not the case. In this review, we focus on TM-II with an emphasis on position II:20/2.60, and present data from structure-activity studies on a range of Family A 7TM receptors including chemokine, ghrelin and melanocortin receptors in addition to the orphan EBI2...

  17. Scintillation characteristics of Tm3+ in Ca3(BO3)2 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimoto, Yutaka; Yanagida, Takayuki; Yokota, Yuui; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Fukuda, Kentaro; Totsuka, Daisuke; Watanabe, Kenichi; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Basic optical properties and radiation responses of undoped, Tm 3+ 1.0% and 2.0% activated Ca 3 (BO 3 ) 2 (CBO) crystalline scintillator prepared by the micro-pulling down (μ-PD) method are reported. Tm 3+ : CBO crystals showed three weak absorption bands around 190, 260 and 350 nm, owing to the Tm 3+ 4f–4f transition. Strong blue luminescence peaks at 360 and 460 nm which are ascribed to the 1 D 2 – 3 H 6 and 1 D 2 – 3 F 4 transitions of Tm 3+ respectively were observed under 241 Am 5.5 MeV α-ray excitation. The scintillation light yield of 2.0% Tm 3+ -doped CBO crystal was evaluated to be about 250 ph/n from the 252 Cf excited pulse height spectrum.

  18. Occurrence and Antioxidant Activity of C1 Degradation Products in Cocoa

    OpenAIRE

    De Taeye, Cédric; Kankolongo Cibaka, Marie-Lucie; Collin, Sonia

    2017-01-01

    Procyanidin C1 is by far the main flavan-3-ol trimer in cocoa. Like other flavan-3-ols, however, it suffers a lot during heat treatments such as roasting. RP-HPLC-HRMS/MS(ESI(?))analysis applied to an aqueous model medium containing commercial procyanidin C1 proved that epimerization is the main reaction involved in its degradation (accounting for 62% of degradation products). In addition to depolymerization, cocoa procyanidin C1 also proved sensitive to oxidation, yielding once- and twice-ox...

  19. A microplate adaptation of the solid-phase C1q immune complex assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J.S.; Kennedy, M.P.; Barber, K.E.; McGiven, A.R.

    1980-01-01

    A method has been developed for the detection of C1q binding immune complexes in serum in which microculture plates are used as the solid-phase matrix for adsorption of C1q. This micromethod used only one-tenth of the amount of both C1q and [ 125 I]antihuman immunoglobulin per test and enabled 7 times as many samples to be tested in triplicate in comparison with the number performed in duplicate by the standard tube assay. (Auth.)

  20. Methyl Chloride Measurements in the Taylor Dome M3C1 Ice Core, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes methyl chloride (CH3CI) measurements made on air extracted from 62 samples from the Taylor Dome M3C1 ice core in East Antarctica. CH3CI was...

  1. Comparison of the TL intensity of the sintered composites of CaSO4+Tm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junot, O.D.; Sousa, F.L. de; Chagas, M.A.P.; Souza, D.N.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work is to compare the thermoluminescent intensity (TL) of CaSO 4 +Tm, CaSO 4 +Tm+glass and glass+Tm composites for use as thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD). The route used to prepare the CaSO 4 +Tm and the CaSO 4 +Tm+glass was by mixing 1 g of CaSO 4 with 0.02 g of thulium oxide (99,9% purity) and 0.3 g of commercial and colorless glass. To mixing the composites were taken to a magnetic stirrer for 30 min with 10 mL of distilled water for better homogenization. The powder mixtures were dried in a stove at 100 deg C for 24 h. After drying, it was added polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) to improve the binding material. The pellets were compacted by application of an uniaxial pressing and sintered at 700 deg C/ 6 h. The route used in the preparation of glass+Tm pellets was similar to one previously mentioned, except by the use of 1 g of glass and 0.02 of Tm. After the sintering, the pellets dimensions were 1 mm thick and 6 mm in diameter. All samples were irradiated by a beta source ( 90 Sr + 90 Y) and received doses from 1.00 Gy to 20 Gy. Each composite presented a characteristic emission curve. The dosimeter of CaSO 4 +Tm+glass presented two peaks, the first at 115 deg C, and the second, very intense, ate 150 deg C. The CaSO 4 +Tm dosimeter showed a less intense peak at 140 deg C and another, more intense, at 235 deg C. In the composites of glass+Tm, the most intense peak has a thermoluminescent signal 94,04% lower than the most intense peak of CaSO 4 +Tm+glass and 81.57% lower than the most intense peak of CaSO 4 +Tm. After the analysis of TL emission curves, we observed that the CaSO 4 +Tm+glass have the highest TL intensity and a TL response proportional to the dose absorbed. (author)

  2. 17 CFR 240.15c1-8 - Sales at the market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sales at the market. 240.15c1... Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Rules Relating to Over-The-Counter Markets § 240.15c1-8 Sales at the market... securities exchange that such security is being offered to such customer “at the market” or at a price...

  3. Complications of the lateral C1-C2 puncture myelography for cervical spinal canal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihale, J.; Traubner, P.

    1998-01-01

    This reviewed the complications of 106 patients of the lateral C1-C2 puncture myelography for cervical spinal canal and cervical spinal cord disorders. Spinal cord puncture and contrast injection, puncture between the occiput and C1, and blood vessel puncture were the main complications. These principally depended on the misdirection of the X ray beam. For preventing major arterial puncture determined the pathway of the vertebral arteries and incidence of anomaly. (authors)

  4. Minimum variance and variance of outgoing quality limit MDS-1(c1, c2) plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, C.; Vidya, R.

    2016-06-01

    In this article, the outgoing quality (OQ) and total inspection (TI) of multiple deferred state sampling plans MDS-1(c1,c2) are studied. It is assumed that the inspection is rejection rectification. Procedures for designing MDS-1(c1,c2) sampling plans with minimum variance of OQ and TI are developed. A procedure for obtaining a plan for a designated upper limit for the variance of the OQ (VOQL) is outlined.

  5. Analysis of healthy cohorts for single nucleotide polymorphisms in C1q gene cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA A. RADANOVA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available C1q is the first component of the classical pathway of complement activation. The coding region for C1q is localized on chromosome 1p34.1–36.3. Mutations or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in C1q gene cluster can cause developing of Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE because of C1q deficiency or other unknown reason. We selected five SNPs located in 7.121 kbp region on chromosome 1, which were previously associated with SLE and/or low C1q level, but not causing C1q deficiency and analyzed them in terms of allele frequencies and genotype distribution in comparison with Hispanic, Asian, African and other Caucasian cohorts. These SNPs were: rs587585, rs292001, rs172378, rs294179 and rs631090. One hundred eighty five healthy Bulgarian volunteers were genotyped for the selected five C1q SNPs by quantative real-time PCR methods. International HapMap Project has been used for information about genotype distribution and allele frequencies of the five SNPs in, Hispanics, Asians, Africans and others Caucasian cohorts. Bulgarian healthy volunteers and another pooled Caucasian cohort had similar frequencies of genotypes and alleles of rs587585, rs292001, rs294179 and rs631090 SNPs. Nevertheless, genotype AA of rs172378 was significantly overrepresented in Bulgarians when compared to other healthy Caucasians from USA and UK (60% vs 31%. Genotype distribution of rs172378 in Bulgarians was similar to Greek-Cyriot Caucasians. For all Caucasians the major allele of rs172378 was A. This is the first study analyzing the allele frequencies and genotype distribution of C1q gene cluster SNPs in Bulgarian healthy population.

  6. Two human homeobox genes, c1 and c8: structure analysis and expression in embryonic development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simeone, A.; Mavilio, F.; Acampora, D.

    1987-01-01

    Two human cDNA clones (HHO.c1.95 and HHO.c8.5111) containing a homeobox region have been characterized, and the respective genomic regions have been partially analyzed. Expression of the corresponding genes, termed c1 and c8, was evaluated in different organs and body parts during human embryonic/fetal development. HHO.c1.95 apparently encodes a 217-amino acid protein containing a class I homeodomain that shares 60 out of 61 amino acid residues with the Antennapedia homeodomain of Drosophila melanogaster. HHO.c8.5111 encodes a 153-amino acid protein containing a homeodomains identical to that of the frog AC1 gene. Clones HHO.c1 and HHO.c8 detect by blot-hybridization one and two specific polyadenylylated transcripts, respectively. These are differentially expressed in spinal cord, backbone rudiments, limb buds (or limbs), heart, and skin of human embryos and early fetuses in the 5- to 9-week postfertilization period, thus suggesting that the c1 and c8 genes play a key role in a variety of developmental processes. Together, the results of the embryonic/fetal expression of c1 and c8 and those of two previously analyzed genes (c10 and c13) indicate a coherent pattern of expression of these genes in early human ontogeny

  7. C1q aggregate binding for the determination of anti-complementary activity of immunoglobulin products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakopoulos, Thanae; Tatford, Owen C; Gurevich, Vladimir; Bertolini, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Aggregates in human immunoglobulin (Ig) products can develop due to employed manufacturing, formulation and storage conditions and can cause adverse reactions in patients. The test for anti-complementary activity (ACA) recommended by the European Pharmacopoeia (EP) is insensitive, variable and time consuming. We have optimised a commercial assay for the detection and quantitation of C1q binding aggregates in intravenous and intramuscular IgG preparations. The generation of C4d, iC3b and SC5b-9 induced by aggregates in vitro was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). In establishing the sensitivity of the C1q aggregate binding assay to detect IgG aggregates in comparison to turbidity and ACA, pure IgG at neutral and acidic pH was heated for various lengths of time to generate varying amounts of aggregates. The level of C1q binding aggregates was 7 fold greater in intramuscular samples. These aggregates were capable of activating complement in vitro and correlated with an increase in ACA. C1q aggregate binding was apparent before any quantifiable turbidity and ACA in the heat-treated samples. Furthermore, the C1q binding assay could discriminate between different levels of aggregates where ACA had reached a plateau. C1q aggregate binding is a sensitive, convenient, specific and robust means of detecting aggregates with a propensity for complement activation. Copyright © 2010 The International Association for Biologicals. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Vertebral artery variations at the C1-2 level diagnosed by magnetic resonance angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchino, Akira; Saito, Naoko; Watadani, Takeyuki; Okada, Yoshitaka; Kozawa, Eito; Nishi, Naoko; Mizukoshi, Waka; Inoue, Kaiji; Nakajima, Reiko; Takahashi, Masahiro [Saitama Medical University International Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Hidaka, Saitama (Japan)

    2012-01-15

    The craniovertebral junction is clinically important. The vertebral artery (VA) in its several variations runs within this area. We report the prevalence of these VA variations on magnetic resonance angiography (MRA). We retrospectively reviewed MRA images, obtained using two 1.5-T imagers, of 2,739 patients, and paid special attention to the course and branching of the VA at the level of the C1-2 vertebral bodies. There were three types of VA variation at the C1-2 level: (1) persistent first intersegmental artery (FIA), (2) VA fenestration, and (3) posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) originating from the C1/2 level. The overall prevalence of these three variations was 5.0%. There was no laterality in frequency, but we found female predominance (P < 0.05). We most frequently observed the persistent FIA (3.2%), which was sometimes bilateral. We found VA fenestration (0.9%) and PICA of C1/2 origin (1.1%) with almost equal frequency. Two PICAs of C1/2 origin had no normal VA branch. We frequently observed VA variations at the C1-2 level and with female predominance. The persistent FIA was most prevalent and sometimes seen bilaterally. Preoperative identification of these variations in VA is necessary to avoid complications during surgery at the craniovertebral junction. (orig.)

  9. Complement protein C1q induces maturation of human dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cosmor, E; Bajtay, Z; Sándor, N

    2007-01-01

    activity of the cells was assessed by measuring cytokine secretion and their ability to activate allogeneic T lymphocytes. Cytokine production by T cells co-cultured with C1q-matured DCs was also investigated. C1q, but not the structurally related mannose-binding lectin was found to bind to imMDC in a dose......q-induced DC maturation generates a Th1-type response. Interestingly, IL-10 levels were elevated by C1q-treated MDCs but not in the supernatant of their co-cultures with allogeneic T cells. Taken together, these results indicate that C1q-opsonized antigens may play a role in the induction......Maturation of dendritic cells (DCs) is known to be induced by several stimuli, including microbial products, inflammatory cytokines and immobilized IgG, as demonstrated recently. Since immune complexes formed in vivo also contain C1q, moreover apoptotic cells and several pathogens fix C1q...

  10. Antithrombin III/SerpinC1 insufficiency exacerbates renal ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Zhang, Guangyuan; Lu, Zeyuan; Geurts, Aron M; Usa, Kristie; Jacob, Howard J; Cowley, Allen W; Wang, Niansong; Liang, Mingyu

    2015-10-01

    Antithrombin III, encoded by SerpinC1, is a major anti-coagulation molecule in vivo and has anti-inflammatory effects. We found that patients with low antithrombin III activities presented a higher risk of developing acute kidney injury after cardiac surgery. To study this further, we generated SerpinC1 heterozygous knockout rats and followed the development of acute kidney injury in a model of modest renal ischemia/reperfusion injury. Renal injury, assessed by serum creatinine and renal tubular injury scores after 24 h of reperfusion, was significantly exacerbated in SerpinC1(+/-) rats compared to wild-type littermates. Concomitantly, renal oxidative stress, tubular apoptosis, and macrophage infiltration following this injury were significantly aggravated in SerpinC1(+/-) rats. However, significant thrombosis was not found in the kidneys of any group of rats. Antithrombin III is reported to stimulate the production of prostaglandin I2, a known regulator of renal cortical blood flow, in addition to having anti-inflammatory effects and to protect against renal failure. Prostaglandin F1α, an assayable metabolite of prostaglandin I2, was increased in the kidneys of the wild-type rats at 3 h after reperfusion. The increase of prostaglandin F1α was significantly blunted in SerpinC1(+/-) rats, which preceded increased tubular injury and oxidative stress. Thus, our study found a novel role of SerpinC1 insufficiency in increasing the severity of renal ischemia/reperfusion injury.

  11. Thyroid hormone transport and metabolism by OATP1C1 and consequences of genetic variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Deure, Wendy M; Hansen, Pia Skov; Peeters, Robin P

    2008-01-01

    OATP1C1 has been characterized as a specific thyroid hormone transporter. Based on its expression in capillaries in different brain regions, OATP1C1 is thought to play a key-role in transporting thyroid hormone across the blood-brain barrier. For this reason, we studied the specificity of iodothy......OATP1C1 has been characterized as a specific thyroid hormone transporter. Based on its expression in capillaries in different brain regions, OATP1C1 is thought to play a key-role in transporting thyroid hormone across the blood-brain barrier. For this reason, we studied the specificity...... with TH levels, nor did they affect transport function in vitro. In conclusion, OATP1C1 mediates transport of T4, T4S and rT3 and increases the access of these substrates to the intracellular active sites of the deiodinases. No effect of genetic variation on the function of OATP1C1 was observed....

  12. Specific, sensitive, precise, and rapid functional chromogenic assay of activated first complement component (C1) in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkvad, S; Jespersen, J; Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen

    1990-01-01

    We present a new functional assay for the first complement component (C1) in plasma, based on its activation by inhibition of the C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-inh) when monospecific antiserum to C1-inh is added to the plasma. After maximal activation, we can determine the concentration of activated ...

  13. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specification C Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53 Protection of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-1 Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Concentration Ranges..., June 22, 2010, table C-1 to subpart C was revised, effective Aug. 23, 2010. For the convenience of the...

  14. Impact of Oatp1c1 deficiency on thyroid hormone metabolism and action in the mouse brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Mayerl (Steffen); T.J. Visser (Theo); V.M. Darras (Veerle); S. Horn (Sigrun); H. Heuer (Heike)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractOrganic anion-transporting polypeptide 1c1 (Oatp1c1) (also known as Slco1c1 and Oatp14) belongs to the family of Oatp and has been shown to facilitate the transport of T 4. In the rodent brain, Oatp1c1 is highly enriched in capillary endothelial cells and choroid plexus structures where

  15. The Tm7sf2 Gene Deficiency Protects Mice against Endotoxin-Induced Acute Kidney Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Gatticchi

    Full Text Available Cholesterol is essential for diverse cellular functions and cellular and whole-body cholesterol homeostasis is highly controlled. Cholesterol can also influence cellular susceptibility to injury. The connection between cholesterol metabolism and inflammation is exemplified by the Tm7sf2 gene, the absence of which reveals an essential role in cholesterol biosynthesis under stress conditions but also results in an inflammatory phenotype, i.e. NF-κB activation and TNFα up-regulation. Here, by using Tm7sf2+/+and Tm7sf2-/- mice, we investigated whether the Tm7sf2 gene, through its role in cholesterol biosynthesis under stress conditions, is involved in the renal failure induced by the administration of LPS. We found that the loss of Tm7sf2 gene results in significantly reduced blood urea nitrogen levels accompanied by decreased renal inflammatory response and neutral lipid accumulation. The increased expression of fatty acids catabolic enzymes reduces the need of the renal autophagy, a known crucial nutrient-sensing pathway in lipid metabolism. Moreover, we observed that the Tm7sf2 insufficiency is responsible for the inhibition of the NF-κB signalling thus dampening the inflammatory response and leading to a reduced renal damage. These results suggest a pivotal role for Tm7sf2 in renal inflammatory and lipotoxic response under endotoxemic conditions.

  16. Applying TM-polarization geoelectric exploration for study of low-contrast three-dimensional targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlobinskiy, Arkadiy; Mogilatov, Vladimir; Shishmarev, Roman

    2018-03-01

    With using new field and theoretical data, it has been shown that applying the electromagnetic field of transverse magnetic (TM) polarization will give new opportunities for electrical prospecting by the method of transient processes. Only applying a pure field of the TM polarization permits poor three-dimensional objects (required metalliferous deposits) to be revealed in a host horizontally-layered medium. This position has good theoretical grounds. There is given the description of the transient electromagnetic method, that uses only the TM polarization field. The pure TM mode is excited by a special source, which is termed as a circular electric dipole (CED). The results of three-dimensional simulation (by the method of finite elements) are discussed for three real geological situations for which applying electromagnetic fields of transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations are compared. It has been shown that applying the TE mode gives no positive results, while applying the TM polarization field permits the problem to be tackled. Finally, the results of field works are offered, which showed inefficiency of application of the classical TEM method, whereas in contrast, applying the field of TM polarization makes it easy to identify the target.

  17. Photoluminescence studies of rare earth (Er, Eu, Tm) in situ doped GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoemmerich, U.; Nyein, Ei Ei; Lee, D.S.; Heikenfeld, J.; Steckl, A.J.; Zavada, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The emission properties of rare earth (RE)-doped GaN are of significant current interest for applications in full color displays, white lighting technology, and optical communications. We are currently investigating the photoluminescence (PL) properties of RE (Er, Eu, Tm)-doped GaN thin-films prepared by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. The most intense visible PL under above-gap excitation is observed from GaN:Eu (red: 622 nm) followed by GaN:Er (green: 537 nm, 558 nm), and then GaN:Tm (blue: 479 nm). In this paper, we present spectroscopic results on the Ga-flux dependence of the Er 3+ PL properties from GaN:Er and we report on the identification of different Eu 3+ centers in GaN:Eu through high-resolution PL excitation (PLE) studies. In addition, we observed an enhancement of the blue Tm 3+ PL from AlGaN:Tm compared to GaN:Tm. Intense blue PL from Tm 3+ ions was also obtained from AlN:Tm under below-gap pumping

  18. Energy Transfer and Thermalization Between Tm^3+ and Ho^3+ Ions in YLF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Brian M.; di Bartolo, Baldassare

    1996-03-01

    The dynamical interaction between Tm^3+ and Ho^3+ ions in co-doped YLF:Tm,Ho is probed by direct excitation of the Tm ^3F4 level with a Co:MgF2 laser tuned to 1.75μm. Energy transfer and thermalization between the Tm ^3F4 and Ho ^5I7 levels is observed by measuring the luminescence temporal response of these levels following the excitation pulse. Direct evidence for the transfer is seen by a correspondence between the initial decay of Tm ^3F4 luminescence and the initial rise in Ho ^5I7 luminescence. Thermalization is observed at later times when the two levels reach thermal equilibrium and begin to decay at the same rate. A rate equation approach is presented to model the temporal response data. Treating the Tm-Ho system as a coupled set of rate equations, they are solved in closed form for low excitation densities. These closed form solutions governing the excited state populations residing in the Tm ^3F4 and Ho ^5I7 levels are fit to the luminescence temporal response data. Values for the fitting parameters are obtained from which energy transfer rates are extracted. (This research was supported by NASA grant NAG1-955)

  19. Approaches for optimizing the calibration standard of Tewameter TM 300.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miteva, Maria; Richter, Stefan; Elsner, Peter; Fluhr, Joachim W

    2006-11-01

    Calibration of devices measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL) is in intensive discussion. Comparative studies revealed that comparable measuring systems, e.g. open and closed chamber systems, do not always deliver the same results, even when expressing the measured values in SI units, namely in g/m(2)/h. Therefore, adequate and reliable calibration procedures need to be established. We were able to test the reliability of a multi-step calibration algorithm for an open chamber system such as Tewameter TM 300. In order to achieve reliable measurements, the maintenance of stable microclimate conditions without air turbulences is mandatory. The TEWL values should be compared with those determined gravimetrically on heated skin simulators. The reproducibility of the results is warranted by consecutive measurements on different adjacent spots of a defined area. Preheating of the probe sensors is an effective approach for shortening the measuring time and gaining a rapid steady-state. The accurate calibration of the probe can be checked under laboratory conditions any time. The critical point of the calibration and ultimately the accuracy of in vivo measurements maintain the steady functional capacity of the probes during the entire duration of continuous studies. The studied calibration procedure ensures these requirements.

  20. Mallard Use of Hen HousesTM in Eastern Ontario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ryan Zimmerling

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Nesting structures for ground-nesting waterfowl may be an effective technique for increasing nesting success in regions in which nest success is below the 15% threshold needed to maintain a stable population. We studied the occupancy rate of artificial nesting structures called hen housesTM by Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos nesting in two different wetland habitats, beaver ponds and sewage lagoons, in eastern Ontario during 1999-2001. We hypothesized that, because natural cover was sparse on sewage lagoons, Mallards would occupy hen houses at a higher rate on sewage lagoons than on beaver ponds. However, of the 248 hen houses distributed between beaver ponds and sewage lagoons, none was occupied by waterfowl. Common Grackles (Quiscalus quiscula were the only avian species that nested in hen houses. However, Mallards successfully nested directly under several structures (n = 6 when water levels were low enough to expose the ground beneath them. Mayfield daily nest survival estimates for Mallards nesting in natural cover were similar on sewage lagoons and beaver ponds for all years (mean = 0.99 and were higher than most published estimates. Factors such as nesting cover, predation pressures, and structure design and material may influence the use of artificial hen houses and should be considered when planning a hen house program outside of the Prairie Pothole Region.

  1. BiodentineTM is cytocompatible with human primary osteoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Zaccaro SCELZA

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium silicate-based materials have been widely studied due to their resemblance to, and similar applicability of, mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA. Among these, Biodentine™ (BD was specifically designed as a “dentin replacement” material for applications such as root perforations, apexification, treatment of resorptive lesions, and as a retrograde filling material. The present study aimed to assess the in vitro response of human primary osteoblasts to BD using MTA AngelusTM as a reference material, by simultaneously analyzing three different cell viability parameters, namely mitochondrial activity, membrane integrity, and cell density. BD and MTA extracts were prepared by incubation on culture media for 24 h or 42 days after mixing. Primary human osteoblasts were exposed to extracts for 24 h, at 37oC with 5% CO2, and cell viability was evaluated by the XTT, NRU, and CVDE assays. Both materials induced cell viability levels higher than 70% when extracted for 24 h. However, when cells were exposed to extracts with increased conditioning times, MTA presented significant cytotoxic effects (p < 0.05 in comparison to the control and MTA at 24 h. After 42 days, the XTT assay identified a significant reduction in cell viability by BD when compared to the control (p<0.05, despite the fact that levels above the 70% viability cutoff were attained for biocompatible materials. It can be concluded that BD is cytocompatible with human primary osteoblasts, indicating its adequacy in direct contact with bone tissues.

  2. NaKnowBaseTM: The EPA Nanomaterials Research ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ability to predict the environmental and health implications of engineered nanomaterials is an important research priority due to the exponential rate at which nanotechnology is being incorporated into consumer, industrial and biomedical applications. To address this need and develop predictive capability, we have created the NaKnowbaseTM, which provides a platform for the curation and dissemination of EPA nanomaterials data to support functional assay development, hazard risk models and informatic analyses. To date, we have combined relevant physicochemical parameters from other organizations (e.g., OECD, NIST), with those requested for nanomaterial data submitted to EPA under the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA). Physiochemical characterization data were collated from >400 unique nanomaterials including metals, metal oxides, carbon-based and hybrid materials evaluated or synthesized by EPA researchers. We constructed parameter requirements and table structures for encoding research metadata, including experimental factors and measured response variables. As a proof of concept, we illustrate how SQL-based queries facilitate a range of interrogations including, for example, relationships between nanoparticle characteristics and environmental or toxicological endpoints. The views expressed in this poster are those of the authors and may not reflect U.S. EPA policy. The purpose of this submission for clearance is an abstract for submission to a scientific

  3. The Janus faces of acquired angioedema: C1-inhibitor deficiency, lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Maddalena Alessandra; Castelli, Roberto

    2016-02-01

    Several clinical and biological features of lymphoproliferative diseases have been associated with an increased risk of developing autoimmune manifestations. Acquired deficiency of C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) (AAE) is a rare syndrome clinically similar to hereditary angioedema (HAE) characterized by local increase in vascular permeability (angioedema) of the skin and the gastrointestinal and oro-pharyngo-laryngeal mucosa. Bradykinin, a potent vasoactive peptide, released from high molecular weight kininogen when it is cleaved by plasma kallikrein (a serine protease controlled by C1-INH), is the mediator of symptoms. In total 46% of AAE patients carry an underlying hematological disorder including monoclonal gammopathy of uncertain significance (MGUS) or B cell malignancies. However, 74% of AAE patients have anti-C1-INH autoantibodies without hematological, clinical or instrumental evidence of lymphoproliferative disease. Unlike HAE patients, AAE patients usually have late-onset symptoms, do not have a family history of angioedema and present variable response to treatment due to the hypercatabolism of C1-INH. Experiments show that C1-INH and/or the classical complement pathway were consumed by the neoplastic lymphatic tissues and/or anti-C1-INH neutralizing autoantibodies. Therapy of AAE follows two directions: 1) prevention/reversal of the symptoms of angioedema; and 2) treatment of the associated disease. Different forms of B cell disorders coexist and/or evolve into each other in AAE and seem to be dominated by an altered control of B cell proliferation, thus AAE represents an example of the strict link between autoimmunity and lymphoproliferation.

  4. Effect of C1-Esterase-inhibitor in angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor-induced angioedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Jens; Bas, Murat; Hoffmann, Thomas K; Schuler, Patrick J; Weller, Patrick; Kojda, Georg; Strassen, Ulrich

    2015-06-01

    The study objective was to generate pilot data to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of C1-esterase-inhibitor concentrate (C1-INH) compared to standard treatment in patients with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEi)-induced angioedema affecting the upper aerodigestive tract. Proof-of-concept case series with historical control. Adult patients with angioedema in the upper aerodigestive tract presenting to the emergency department were included. After establishing the diagnosis of ACEi-induced angioedema based on patient history and thorough clinical examination, all patients were administered 1,000 international units (IU) of C1-INH intravenously. A historical control group consisting of adult patients with ACEi-induced angioedema who had been treated with intravenous corticosteroids and antihistamines at the same institution over the past 8 years was used for comparison. The most important parameters assessed were the time to complete resolution of symptoms and the need for intubation or tracheotomy. Ten patients were included in the C1-INH group and 47 in the corticosteroid/antihistamine group. The time to complete resolution of symptoms was considerably longer in the historical control group (33.1 ± 19.4 hours) than in the C1-INH group (10.1 ± 3.0 hours). No intubation or tracheotomy was needed in the C1-INH group (0/10 patients), whereas three out of the 47 historical controls required tracheotomy and two were intubated (5/47). The results suggest a role for C1-INH as an effective and safe therapeutic option in patients with ACEi-induced angioedema, which needs to be confirmed by further larger and double-blinded studies. 4. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  5. Surgical treatment of adult and pediatric C1/C2 subluxation with intraoperative computed tomography guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Ji Min; Tiruchelvarayan, Rajendra; Seow, Wan T.; Ng, Hua BI

    2013-01-01

    Background: Surgical treatment of C1/C2 subluxation has evolved significantly over the past 2 decades, from the relatively simpler posterior wiring to more technically demanding instrumentations such as C1 lateral mass screws – C2 pedicle screws, C1/C2 transarticular screws, and occipital cervical fusion. Navigation with fluoroscopy is currently the standard of practice in most centers. However, fluoroscopy at this level carries several major drawbacks, such as blockage by the mandible and inability to produce axial images for assessment of the reduction of rotatory subluxation. Methods: The authors report a series of 21 patients with C1/C2 subluxation treated surgically with intraoperative computed tomography (ICT) guidance. Results: There were 7 children and 14 adults. Eight patients underwent C1/C2 fixation with a Harm's construct, and 13 patients underwent occipital cervical fusion. One out of 17 (6%) C1 lateral mass screws has breached the medial wall of lateral mass by 1 mm. Two out of 20 (10%) C2 pedicle screws have breached the foramen transversarium by 1 mm (Neo classification grade 1). The position of all subaxial screws (49 lateral mass screws and 13 pedicle screws) and occipital screws (50 screws) appeared satisfactory. No neurovascular damage occurred in all the patients. Conclusions: Ninety eight percent of the screws were placed in ideal position with the aid of ICT. Only 2% of the screws deviated from the planned position, but the breaches were not clinically significant and hence no revision was required. This showed that ICT guidance can help to achieve a high accuracy of surgical instrumentation for the treatment of C1/C2 subluxation. PMID:23646272

  6. Lyme Disease and YouTubeTM: A Cross-Sectional Study of Video Contents

    OpenAIRE

    Basch, Corey H.; Mullican, Lindsay A.; Boone, Kwanza D.; Yin, Jingjing; Berdnik, Alyssa; Eremeeva, Marina E.; Fung, Isaac Chun-Hai

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne disease. People seek health information on Lyme disease from YouTubeTM videos. In this study, we investigated if the contents of Lyme disease-related YouTubeTM videos varied by their sources. Methods Most viewed English YouTubeTM videos (n = 100) were identified and manually coded for contents and sources. Results Within the sample, 40 videos were consumer-generated, 31 were internet-based news, 16 were professional, and 13 were TV news. C...

  7. Investigation of high-power diode-end-pumped Tm:YLF laser in slab geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yingjie; Duan, Xiaoming; Yuan, Jinhe; Dai, Tongyu; Yao, Baoquan; Wang, Yuezhu

    2015-03-10

    Comparative investigations of high-power diode-end-pumped Tm:YLF laser with a-cut and c-cut slab crystals were demonstrated. A maximum output power of 87.5 W of 1907.8 nm Tm:YLF laser with two slab crystals was achieved, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 35.9% and an optical-to-optical efficiency of 32.1% with respect to the pump power. The c-cut slab Tm:YLF laser operated at 1907.8 nm with a beam quality factor of M2∼1.79 at the output power level of 71.0 W.

  8. Effect of TM on lodging resistance and yield components of barley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bingkui; Jin Ziyu; Zhao Miaozhen

    1995-01-01

    120 ppm TM treatment on barley at the tiller stage had effects of enhancing tiller of seedling, controlling the elongation growth of plant at joining and booting stages and reducing the inter-node length of the basal stem and 2nd from the basal stem, thereby increased the ability of lodging resistance. In addition, TM increased the number of grains, reduced the number of blighted grains with no 1000 grains weight decrease. The results from the test of 14 C-glucose trace showed that TM enhanced the intensity of milky at the milky stage

  9. The minor binding pocket: a major player in 7TM receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, Mette Marie; Benned-Jensen, Tau; Frimurer, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    From the deep part of the main ligand-binding crevice, a minor, often shallower pocket extends between the extracellular ends of transmembrane domains (TM)-I, II, III and VII of 7TM receptors. This minor binding pocket is defined by a highly conserved kink in TM-II that is induced by a proline...... residue located in one of two adjacent positions. Here we argue that this minor binding pocket is important for receptor activation. Functional coupling of the receptors seems to be mediated through the hydrogen bond network located between the intracellular segments of these TMs, with the allosteric...

  10. A copper 3.9 GHz TM110 cavity for emittance exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeth, T.W.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Fliller, R.P., III; Bellantoni, L.; Edwards, D.A.; Edwards, H.T.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    An experiment is being developed at the FNAL Photoinjector Lab to demonstrate the exchange of longitudinal emittance with a transverse horizontal emittance. The longitudinal electric field of a TM{sub 110} cavity vanishes on axis and increases linearly with transverse displacement. This 'shearing' electric field is pivotal to the exchange. The design of this TM{sub 110} cavity is a variant of the Fermilab 3.9 GHz superconducting deflecting mode cavity; however, the cavity was constructed of OFHC copper. The authors report on the construction, field flatness, polarization and high power testing of a TM{sub 110} cavity.

  11. Amorphous TM1−xBx alloy particles prepared by chemical reduction (invited)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linderoth, Søren; Mørup, Steen

    1991-01-01

    Amorphous transition-metal boron (TM-B) alloy particles can be prepared by chemical reduction of TM ions by borohydride in aqueous solutions. ln the last few years systematic studies of the parameters which control the composition, and, in turn, many of the properties of the alloy particles, have...... been performed and are reviewed in the present paper. The most important preparation parameters which influence the composition are the concentration of the borohydride solution and the pH of the TM salt solution. By controlling these parameters it is possible to prepare amorphous alloy samples...

  12. Prevalence of Bacteria of Division TM7 in Human Subgingival Plaque and Their Association with Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Brinig, Mary M.; Lepp, Paul W.; Ouverney, Cleber C.; Armitage, Gary C.; Relman, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Members of the uncultivated bacterial division TM7 have been detected in the human mouth, but little information is available regarding their prevalence and diversity at this site. Human subgingival plaque samples from healthy sites and sites exhibiting various stages of periodontal disease were analyzed for the presence of TM7 bacteria. TM7 ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was found in 96% of the samples, and it accounted for approximately 0.3%, on average, of all bacterial rDNA in the samples as determ...

  13. Electrochemistry of thulium on inert electrodes and electrochemical formation of a Tm-Al alloy from molten chlorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castrillejo, Y.; Fernandez, P.; Bermejo, M.R.; Barrado, E.; Martinez, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of TmCl 3 solutions was studied in the eutectic LiCl-KCl in the temperature range 673-823 K using inert and reactive electrodes, i.e. W and Al, respectively. On an inert electrode, Tm(III) ions are reduced to metallic thulium through two consecutive steps: Tm(III) + 1e ↔ Tm(II) and Tm(II) + 2e ↔ Tm(0) The electroreduction of Tm(III) to Tm(II) was found to be quasi-reversible. The intrinsic rate constant of charge transfer, k 0 , as well as of the charge transfer coefficient, α, have been calculated by simulation of the cyclic voltammograms and logarithmic analysis of the convoluted curves. Electrocrystallization of thulium plays an important role in the electrodeposition process, being the nucleation mode affected by temperature. The diffusion coefficients of Tm(III) and Tm(II) ions have been found to be equal. The validity of the Arrhenius law was verified by plotting the variation of the logarithm of the diffusion coefficients vs. 1/T. The electrode reactions of Tm(III) solutions at an Al electrode were also investigated. The results showed that for the extraction of thulium from molten chlorides, the use of a reactive electrode made of aluminium leading to Al-Tm alloys seems to be a pertinent route. Potentiometric titrations of Tm(III) solutions with oxide donors, using a ytria stabilized zirconia electrode 'YSZE' as a pO 2- indicator electrode, have shown the formation of thulium oxychloride and thulium oxide and their corresponding solubility products have been determined at 723 K (pk s (TmOCl) = 8.0 ± 0.3 pk s (Tm 2 O 3 ) = 18.8 ± 0.7).

  14. TM4SF1 Promotes Gemcitabine Resistance of Pancreatic Cancer In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Cao

    Full Text Available TM4SF1 is overexpressed in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC and affects the development of this cancer. Also, multidrug resistance (MDR is generally associated with tumor chemoresistance in pancreatic cancer. However, the correlation between TM4SF1 and MDR remains unknown. This research aims to investigate the effect of TM4SF1 on gemcitabine resistance in PDAC and explore the possible molecular mechanism between TM4SF1 and MDR.The expression of TM4SF1 was evaluated in pancreatic cancer cell lines and human pancreatic duct epithelial (HPDE cell lines by quantitative RT-PCR. TM4SF1 siRNA transfection was carried out using Hiperfect transfection reagent to knock down TM4SF1. The transcripts were analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR, RT-PCR and western blotting for further study. The cell proliferation and apoptosis were obtained to investigate the sensitivity to gemcitabine of pancreatic cancer cells after silencing TM4SF1 in vitro. We demonstrated that cell signaling of TM4SF1 mediated chemoresistance in cancer cells by assessing the expression of multidrug resistance (MDR genes using quantitative RT-PCR. In vivo, we used orthotopic pancreatic tumor models to investigate the effect of proliferation after silencing TM4SF1 by a lentivirus-mediated shRNA in MIA PaCa-2 cell lines.The mRNA expression of TM4SF1 was higher in seven pancreatic cancer cell lines than in HPDE cell lines. In three gemcitabine-sensitive cell lines (L3.6pl, BxPC-3, SU86.86, the expression of TM4SF1 was lower than that in four gemcitabine-resistant cell lines (MIA PaCa-2, PANC-1, Hs766T, AsPC-1. We evaluated that TM4SF1 was a putative target for gemcitabine resistance in pancreatic cancer cells. Using AsPC-1, MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1, we investigated that TM4SF1 silencing affected cell proliferation and increased the percentages of cell apoptosis mediated by treatment with gemcitabine compared with cells which were treated with negative control. This resistance was associated

  15. Deposition Velocities of C1 - C5 Alkyl Nitrates at a Northern Colorado Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abeleira, A.; Sive, B. C.; Farmer, D.; Swarthout, B.

    2017-12-01

    Organic nitrates (RONO2) are ubiquitous in the troposphere and are part of gas-phase oxidized nitrogen (NOy = NOx + HNO3 + HONO + N2O5 + HO2NO2 + PAN + NO3 + RONO2). RONO2 can act as both sinks and sources of HOx (RO + RO2 + OH) and NOx (NO + NO2), contributing to the nonlinearity of ozone (O3) formation. It is thus potentially important to understand sinks of RONO2, and how they change seasonally, in order to predict O3 on local, regional and global scales. We focus here on speciated C1 - C5 monofunctional alkyl nitrates (C1 - C5 ANs). In polluted continental regions the dominant source of C1 - C5 ANs is the OH-initiated oxidation of parent alkanes in the presence of NO, and thus changes seasonally with OH mixing ratios. Direct emissions of C1 - C2 ANs include oceanic sources and biomass burning. The sinks of C1 - C5 ANs include OH oxidation and photolysis, both of which release O3 precursors. Chemical transport models tend to overestimate the mixing ratios of small ANs indicating that a missing sink is not included. Wet deposition of C1 - C5 ANs is typically ignored due to the very low Henry's Law constants of these species. However, dry deposition of total organic nitrogen has been observed to be substantial. The dry deposition velocity of methyl nitrate has previously been estimated from summer observations at a rural New England site with a value of 0.13 cm s-1. Here we report deposition velocities for C1 - C5 ANs from surface observations at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) in Erie, Colorado during winter 2011 and spring 2015. We calculate deposition velocities from the observed decay in C1 - C5 ANs at night during periods with a stable nocturnal boundary layer height of 100 - 200 meters. Ideal meteorological conditions were observed for 5 nights during the 2011 NACHTT campaign (February - March 2011), and for 5 nights during the 2015 SONGNEX campaign (March - May 2015). Deposition velocities increased with alkyl nitrate size, ranging from 0.15 cm

  16. Procyanidin trimer C1 derived from Theobroma cacao reactivates latent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 provirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Takanori; Barnor, Jacob; Huu, Tung Nguyen; Morinaga, Osamu; Hamano, Akiko; Ndzinu, Jerry; Frimpong, Angela; Minta-Asare, Keren; Amoa-Bosompem, Mildred; Brandful, James; Odoom, John; Bonney, Joseph; Tuffour, Isaac; Owusu, Baffour-Awuah; Ofosuhene, Mark; Atchoglo, Philip; Sakyiamah, Maxwell; Adegle, Richard; Appiah-Opong, Regina; Ampofo, William; Koram, Kwadwo; Nyarko, Alexander; Okine, Laud; Edoh, Dominic; Appiah, Alfred; Uto, Takuhiro; Yoshinaka, Yoshiyuki; Uota, Shin; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Yamaoka, Shoji

    2015-04-03

    Despite remarkable advances in combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection remains incurable due to the incomplete elimination of the replication-competent virus, which persists in latent reservoirs. Strategies for targeting HIV reservoirs for eradication that involves reactivation of latent proviruses while protecting uninfected cells by cART are urgently needed for cure of HIV infection. We screened medicinal plant extracts for compounds that could reactivate the latent HIV-1 provirus and identified a procyanidin trimer C1 derived from Theobroma cacao as a potent activator of the provirus in human T cells latently infected with HIV-1. This reactivation largely depends on the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways because either overexpression of a super-repressor form of IκBα or pretreatment with a MEK inhibitor U0126 diminished provirus reactivation by C1. A pan-PKC inhibitor significantly blocked the phorbol ester-induced but not the C1-induced HIV-1 reactivation. Although C1-induced viral gene expression persisted for as long as 48 h post-stimulation, NF-κB-dependent transcription peaked at 12 h post-stimulation and then quickly declined, suggesting Tat-mediated self-sustainment of HIV-1 expression. These results suggest that procyanidin C1 trimer is a potential compound for reactivation of latent HIV-1 reservoirs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. In silico Analysis of osr40c1 Promoter Sequence Isolated from Indica Variety Pokkali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.S.I. de Silva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The promoter region of a drought and abscisic acid (ABA inducible gene, osr40c1, was isolated from a salt-tolerant indica rice variety Pokkali, which is 670 bp upstream of the putative translation start codon. In silico promoter analysis of resulted sequence showed that at least 15 types of putative motifs were distributed within the sequence, including two types of common promoter elements, TATA and CAAT boxes. Additionally, several putative cis-acing regulatory elements which may be involved in regulation of osr40c1 expression under different conditions were found in the 5′-upstream region of osr40c1. These are ABA-responsive element, light-responsive elements (ATCT-motif, Box I, G-box, GT1-motif, Gap-box and Sp1, myeloblastosis oncogene response element (CCAAT-box, auxin responsive element (TGA-element, gibberellin-responsive element (GARE-motif and fungal-elicitor responsive elements (Box E and Box-W1. A putative regulatory element, required for endosperm-specific pattern of gene expression designated as Skn-1 motif, was also detected in the Pokkali osr40c1 promoter region. In conclusion, the bioinformatic analysis of osr40c1 promoter region isolated from indica rice variety Pokkali led to the identification of several important stress-responsive cis-acting regulatory elements, and therefore, the isolated promoter sequence could be employed in rice genetic transformation to mediate expression of abiotic stress induced genes.

  18. Second-order optimality conditions for problems with C1 data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginchev, Ivan; Ivanov, Vsevolod I.

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we obtain second-order optimality conditions of Karush-Kuhn-Tucker type and Fritz John one for a problem with inequality constraints and a set constraint in nonsmooth settings using second-order directional derivatives. In the necessary conditions we suppose that the objective function and the active constraints are continuously differentiable, but their gradients are not necessarily locally Lipschitz. In the sufficient conditions for a global minimum we assume that the objective function is differentiable at and second-order pseudoconvex at , a notion introduced by the authors [I. Ginchev, V.I. Ivanov, Higher-order pseudoconvex functions, in: I.V. Konnov, D.T. Luc, A.M. Rubinov (Eds.), Generalized Convexity and Related Topics, in: Lecture Notes in Econom. and Math. Systems, vol. 583, Springer, 2007, pp. 247-264], the constraints are both differentiable and quasiconvex at . In the sufficient conditions for an isolated local minimum of order two we suppose that the problem belongs to the class C1,1. We show that they do not hold for C1 problems, which are not C1,1 ones. At last a new notion parabolic local minimum is defined and it is applied to extend the sufficient conditions for an isolated local minimum from problems with C1,1 data to problems with C1 one.

  19. C1-esterase inhibitor blocks T lymphocyte proliferation and cytotoxic T lymphocyte generation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Mogens Holst; Bregenholt, S; Nording, J A

    1998-01-01

    cultures grown in the presence of complement-inactivated serum. Read-outs were cell proliferation, lymphokine production and development of T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. We found that addition of C1-inh to MLC and mitogen-exposed murine and human lymphocyte cultures inhibited proliferation, the development...... beta2m in nanomolar amounts to a one-way allogenic mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) increased the endogenous production of IL-2 and the generation of allo-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. C1-inh was purified from fresh human plasma and added to human or murine MLC and mitogen-stimulated lymphocyte...... of allospecific cytotoxic activity, and changed the endogenous production of IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 and IFN-gamma. These data clearly demonstrate a regulatory function of C1-inh on T cell-mediated immune functions....

  20. C1 Inhibitor Deficiency and Angioedema of the Small Intestine Masquerading as Crohn’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly W Burak

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of C1 inhibitor deficiency presenting as localized edema of the small intestine is described. A 16-year-old, previously healthy woman presented with recurrent attacks of abdominal pain and vomiting following minor abdominal trauma. Investigations including computed tomography scan and barium studies confirmed localized edema of the jejunum. At laparoscopy, Crohn’s disease was suspected; however, a subsequent enteroscopy was normal. Complement levels revealed a low C4 level, and C1 inhibitor deficiency was later confirmed. Attacks of abdominal pain began after starting oral contraceptives and have not returned since stopping the birth control pill. This rare cause of abdominal pain is examined, and C1 inhibitor deficiency and angioedema are reviewed.

  1. Carbon isotope anomaly in the major plant C1 pool and its global biogeochemical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Keppler

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We report that the most abundant C1 units of terrestrial plants, the methoxyl groups of pectin and lignin, have a unique carbon isotope signature exceptionally depleted in 13C. Plant-derived C1 volatile organic compounds (VOCs are also anomalously depleted in 13C compared with Cn+1 VOCs. The results confirm that the plant methoxyl pool is the predominant source of biospheric C1 compounds of plant origin such as methanol, chloromethane and bromomethane. Furthermore this pool, comprising ca 2.5% of carbon in plant biomass, could be an important substrate for methanogenesis and thus be envisaged as a possible source of isotopically light methane entering the atmosphere. Our findings have significant implications for the use of carbon isotope ratios in elucidation of global carbon cycling. Moreover methoxyl groups could act as markers for biological activity in organic matter of terrestrial and extraterrestrial origin.

  2. Identification and Analysis of the Chloroplast rpoC1 Gene Differentially Expressed in Wild Ginseng

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Kwang-Ho

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Panax ginseng is a well-known herbal medicine in traditional Asian medicine, and wild ginseng is widely accepted to be more active than cultivated ginseng in chemoprevention. However, little has actually been reported on the difference between wild ginseng and cultivated ginseng. Thus, to identify and analyze those differences, we used suppressive subtraction hybridization (SSH sequences with microarrays, realtime polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and reverse transcription PCRs (RT-PCRs. One of the clones isolated in this research was the chloroplast rpoC1 gene, a β subunit of RNA polymerase. Real-time RT-PCR results showed that the expression of the rpoC1 gene was significantly upregulated in wild ginseng as compared to cultivated ginseng, so, we conclude that the rpoC1 gene may be one of the important markers of wild ginseng.

  3. C1 Polymerization: a unique tool towards polyethylene-based complex macromolecular architectures

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, De

    2017-05-09

    The recent developments in organoborane initiated C1 polymerization (chain grows by one atom at a time) of ylides opens unique horizons towards well-defined/perfectly linear polymethylenes (equivalent to polyethylenes, PE) and PE-based complex macromolecular architectures. The general mechanism of C1 polymerization (polyhomologation) involves the formation of a Lewis complex between a methylide (monomer) and a borane (initiator), followed by migration/insertion of a methylene into the initiator and after oxidation/hydrolysis to afford OH-terminated polyethylenes. This review summarizes efforts towards conventional and newly discovered borane-initiators and ylides (monomers), as well as a combination of polyhomologation with other polymerization methods. Initial efforts dealing with C3 polymerization and the synthesis of the first C1/C3 copolymers are also given. Finally, some thoughts for the future of these polymerizations are presented.

  4. A PP2C-1 Allele Underlying a Quantitative Trait Locus Enhances Soybean 100-Seed Weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiang; Xiong, Qing; Cheng, Tong; Li, Qing-Tian; Liu, Xin-Lei; Bi, Ying-Dong; Li, Wei; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Ma, Biao; Lai, Yong-Cai; Du, Wei-Guang; Man, Wei-Qun; Chen, Shou-Yi; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2017-05-01

    Cultivated soybeans may lose some useful genetic loci during domestication. Introgression of genes from wild soybeans could broaden the genetic background and improve soybean agronomic traits. In this study, through whole-genome sequencing of a recombinant inbred line population derived from a cross between a wild soybean ZYD7 and a cultivated soybean HN44, and mapping of quantitative trait loci for seed weight, we discovered that a phosphatase 2C-1 (PP2C-1) allele from wild soybean ZYD7 contributes to the increase in seed weight/size. PP2C-1 may achieve this function by enhancing cell size of integument and activating a subset of seed trait-related genes. We found that PP2C-1 is associated with GmBZR1, a soybean ortholog of Arabidopsis BZR1, one of key transcription factors in brassinosteroid (BR) signaling, and facilitate accumulation of dephosphorylated GmBZR1. In contrast, the PP2C-2 allele with variations of a few amino acids at the N-terminus did not exhibit this function. Moreover, we showed that GmBZR1 could promote seed weight/size in transgenic plants. Through analysis of cultivated soybean accessions, we found that 40% of the examined accessions do not have the PP2C-1 allele, suggesting that these accessions can be improved by introduction of this allele. Taken together, our study identifies an elite allele PP2C-1, which can enhance seed weight and/or size in soybean, and pinpoints that manipulation of this allele by molecular-assisted breeding may increase production in soybean and other legumes/crops. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of diacyltetrol lipids as activators for the C1 domain of protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamidi, Narsimha; Gorai, Sukhamoy; Mukherjee, Rakesh; Manna, Debasis

    2012-04-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) family of serine/threonine kinases is an attractive drug target for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. Diacylglycerol (DAG), phorbol esters and others act as ligands for the C1 domain of PKC isoforms. Inspection of the crystal structure of the PKCδ C1b subdomain in complex with phorbol-13-O-acetate shows that one carbonyl group and two hydroxyl groups play pivotal roles in recognition of the C1 domain. To understand the importance of two hydroxyl groups of phorbol esters in PKC binding and to develop effective PKC activators, we synthesized DAG like diacyltetrols (DATs) and studied binding affinities with C1b subdomains of PKCδ and PKCθ. DATs, with the stereochemistry of natural DAGs at the sn-2 position, were synthesized from (+)-diethyl L-tartrate in four to seven steps as single isomers. The calculated EC(50) values for the short and long chain DATs varied in the range of 3-6 μM. Furthermore, the fluorescence anisotropy values of the proteins were increased in the presence of DATs in a similar manner to that of DAGs. Molecular docking of DATs (1b-4b) with PKCδ C1b showed that the DATs form hydrogen bonds with the polar residues and backbone of the protein, at the same binding site, as that of DAG and phorbol esters. Our findings reveal that DATs represent an attractive group of C1 domain ligands that can be used as research tools or further structurally modified for potential drug development.

  6. Identifying Tm-C82 isomers with density functional theory calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Limin; He Hongqing; Yang Minghui; Zeng Qun; Yang Mingli

    2010-01-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to study the geometrical and electronic properties of endohedral metallofullerene Tm-C 82 isomers. Three energetically favorable isomers (with C s , C 2 and C 2v symmetry, respectively) are identified which are consistent with the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) observations. The simulated ultraviolet photoelectron spectra (UPS) based on the three structures agree well with the measurements. Particularly, the parent cage of the experimentally observed Tm-C 82 isomer with C s symmetry is newly assigned, which matches the experiments better than early assignments. In addition, strong interaction between an endohedral Tm atom and the C 82 cage is discussed and is thought to be responsible for the dramatic change in the relative stability of C 82 isomers when Tm is encapsulated.

  7. Spaceflight 1.94 Micron Tm Fiber Laser Transmitter, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fibertek will develop a spaceflight prototype 1940 nm, 100 W thulium (Tm) laser suitable for NASA spaceflight and long-duration unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)...

  8. Spaceflight 1.94 micron Tm Fiber Laser Transmitter, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fibertek proposes to develop a spaceflight prototype 1940 nm, 100 W thulium (Tm) laser suitable for NASA spaceflight and long-duration unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV)...

  9. Analysis of CMOS Compatible Cu-Based TM-Pass Optical Polarizer

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Tien Khee

    2012-02-10

    A transverse-magnetic-pass (TM-pass) optical polarizer based on Cu complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor technology platform is proposed and analyzed using the 2-D method-of-lines numerical model. In designing the optimum configuration for the polarizer, it was found that the metal-insulator-metal (MIM) polarizer structure is superior compared to the insulator-metal-insulator polarizer structure due to its higher polarization extinction ratio (PER) and low insertion loss. An optimized MIM TM-pass polarizer exhibits simulated long wavelength pass filter characteristics of > ?1.2 ?m, with fundamental TM 0 and TE 0 mode transmissivity of >70% and <5%, respectively, and with PER ?11.5 dB in the wavelength range of 1.2-1.6 ?m. The subwavelength and submicrometer features of this TM-polarizer are potentially suitable for compact and low power photonics integrated circuit implementation on silicon-based substrates. © 1989-2012 IEEE.

  10. Emergency medicine residents' beliefs about contributing to a Google DocsTM presentation: a survey protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Archambault

    2011-07-01

    Conclusion To our knowledge, this study will be the first to use a theory based framework to identify healthcare trainees' salient beliefs concerning their decision whether to contribute to an online collaborative writing project using Google DocsTM.

  11. Tm:germanate Fiber Laser for Planetary Water Vapor Atmospheric Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Norman P.; De Young, Russell

    2009-01-01

    The atmospheric profiling of water vapor is necessary for finding life on Mars and weather on Earth. The design and performance of a water vapor lidar based on a Tm:germanate fiber laser is presented.

  12. Health technology assessment demonstrates efficient health promotion bu Transcendental Meditation (TM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    2002-01-01

    -actualisation; (3) Independence of stimulantia including tobacco and alcohol; (4) Cardiologic health. RESULTS: This health promotion is explained by a cybernetic model based on 'The Limbic System'. A sample of records collected by the Internet shows significant compliance between the self-reports of TM......-practitioners and controls without specific health promotion. The TM-group has a relative high level of education. TM is organized as a private, standardised dissemination of the original, Indoeuropean mantrameditation. This standardisation creates economies-of-scale 1) using local instructors with a short education, 2...... is expected to approach 0 for young people. This favours the onset of 'stressmanagement by in-depth-relaxation' for students in the midst of their education gaining QALY's free of cost. DISCUSSION: Actually, medical evidence on TM adds up to the level required for pharmaceuticals. Moreover the problem...

  13. LBA-ECO LC-10 Landsat TM Data for Legal Amazon: 1986-1994

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set includes Landsat TM scenes from across the Legal Amazon region. A single image is provided for each spatial tile, representing the most...

  14. Efficient High Power 2 micron Tm3+-Doped Fiber Laser, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is for the development of new Tm3+ doped germanate glass fibers for efficient high power 2-micron fiber lasers capable of generating an output power of...

  15. LBA-ECO LC-24 Land Cover Classes from Landsat TM, Uruara, Para: 1986-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides course land cover classifications derived from Landsat TM images for 1986, 1988, and 1991 for the area surrounding the municipality of Uruara,...

  16. Histological and biochemical effects of Arteether tm on the liver of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    resistant malarial parasites. This study examined the effects of arteetherTM on enzyme biomarkers of the liver, serum protein concentrations, and liver morphology. Twenty (20) adult albino Wistar rats weighing 200 – 250 g were randomly divided ...

  17. Functional properties of Virus-Encoded and Virus-Regulated 7TM Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spiess, Katja; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2014-01-01

    During co-evolution with their hosts, viruses have developed several survival strategies that involve exploitation of 7TM receptors. These include virus-encoded 7TM receptors and ligands and viral regulation of endogenous receptors. Many functional properties have been ascribed to virus-exploited 7......TM receptors, and although the list of putative functions is steadily growing, the presence and/or utilization of 7TM receptors are still poorly understood for many of these. This review focuses on three well described functional properties: 1) the immune evasion strategies, exemplified by γ1......-herpesvirus-encoded BILF1 receptors, the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded US28 receptor and the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-regulated EBI2 (or GPR183), 2) the tissue tropism and virus-dissemination properties, exemplified by the murine CMV-encoded M33, and 3) the tumorigenic properties, exemplified...

  18. BOREAS TE-18 Landsat TM Physical Classification Image of the NSA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The objective of this classification is to provide BOREAS investigators with a data product that characterizes the land cover of the NSA. A Landsat-5 TM...

  19. BOREAS TE-18 Landsat TM Physical Classification Image of the NSA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this classification is to provide BOREAS investigators with a data product that characterizes the land cover of the NSA. A Landsat-5 TM image from...

  20. BOREAS TE-18 Landsat TM Physical Classification Image of the SSA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The objective of this classification is to provide BOREAS investigators with a data product that characterizes the land cover of the SSA. A Landsat-5 TM...

  1. Efficient high power 2 micron Tm3+-Doped Fiber Laser, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is for the development of new Tm3+ doped germanate glass fibers for efficient high power 2 micron fiber lasers capable of generating an output power of...

  2. Label-free, multiplexed detection of bacterial tmRNA using silicon photonic microring resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheler, Ott; Kindt, Jared T; Qavi, Abraham J; Kaplinski, Lauris; Glynn, Barry; Barry, Thomas; Kurg, Ants; Bailey, Ryan C

    2012-01-01

    A label-free biosensing method for the sensitive detection and identification of bacterial transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) is presented employing arrays of silicon photonic microring resonators. Species specific tmRNA molecules are targeted by complementary DNA capture probes that are covalently attached to the sensor surface. Specific hybridization is monitored in near real-time by observing the resonance wavelength shift of each individual microring. The sensitivity of the biosensing platform allowed for detection down to 53 fmol of Streptococcus pneumoniae tmRNA, equivalent to approximately 3.16×10(7) CFU of bacteria. The simplicity and scalability of this biosensing approach makes it a promising tool for the rapid identification of different bacteria via tmRNA profiling. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Walk Score(TM), Perceived Neighborhood Walkability, and walking in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckel, Peter; Milczarski, William

    2015-03-01

    To investigate both the Walk Score(TM) and a self-reported measure of neighborhood walkability ("Perceived Neighborhood Walkability") as estimators of transport and recreational walking among Americans. The study is based upon a survey of a nationally-representative sample of 1224 American adults. The survey gauged walking for both transport and recreation and included a self-reported measure of neighborhood walkability and each respondent's Walk Score(TM). Binary logistic and linear regression analyses were performed on the data. The Walk Score(TM) is associated with walking for transport, but not recreational walking nor total walking. Perceived Neighborhood Walkability is associated with transport, recreational and total walking. Perceived Neighborhood Walkability captures the experiential nature of walking more than the Walk Score(TM).

  4. BOREAS TE-18 Landsat TM Maximum Likelihood Classification Image of the SSA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A Landsat-5 TM image from 06-Aug-1990 was used to derive this classification, the objective of which is to provide BOREAS investigators with a data product that...

  5. BOREAS TE-18 Landsat TM Maximum Likelihood Classification Image of the NSA

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this classification is to provide the BOREAS investigators with a data product that characterizes the land cover of the NSA. A Landsat-5 TM image...

  6. Origin of modulated phases and magnetic hysteresis in TmB4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierschem, Keola; Sunku, Sai Swaroop; Kong, Tai; Ito, Toshimitsu; Canfield, Paul C.; Panagopoulos, Christos; Sengupta, Pinaki

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the low-temperature magnetic phases in TmB4 , a metallic quantum magnet on the geometrically frustrated Shastry-Sutherland lattice, using coordinated experimental and theoretical studies. Our results provide an explanation for the appearance of the intriguing fractional plateau in TmB4 and accompanying magnetic hysteresis. Together with observation of the bump in the half plateau, our results support the picture that the magnetization plateau structure in TmB4 is strongly influenced by the zero-field modulated phases. We present a phenomenological model to explain the appearance of the modulated phases and a microscopic Hamiltonian that captures the complete magnetic behavior of TmB4 .

  7. Efficient Tm-Fiber-Pumped Ho:YLF Laser System for Coherent LIDAR Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to employ a recently developed, efficient, high-power, heavily-doped Tm:silica-fiber technology as a high-gain fiber pre-amplifier and as a...

  8. The impact of translation-memory (TM) technology on cognitive processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tina Paulsen; Schjoldager, Anne

    2011-01-01

    The use of Translation-Memory (TM) technology and other translation software is bound to influence translators' cognitive processes. Unfortunately we still lack empirically founded knowledge of this. Our paper therefore presents and discusses the theoretical background, setup and preliminary...

  9. Measurement and analysis for neutron resonance parameters of 169Tm below 100 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wenming; Li Xia; Zhao Zhixiang; Zhou Zuying; Kim, G.N.

    2012-01-01

    As part of nuclear data library, neutron resonance parameter (NRP) plays a very important part in the application for national defense, industrial production and theoretical research. For some reason, there are no such research conditions for NRP in China, either experimental or theoretical. The analysis of NRP should base on experimental data, so a total cross-section measurement was done on the Pohang Neutron Facility (PNF), yielding a new set of transmission data of 169 Tm below 100 eV, as well as a new set of NRP of 169 Tm using SAMMY code. Taking all data collected for 169 Tm NRP into consideration, a new set of 169 Tm NPR was evaluated and recommended. After this work, the methodology and analyzing-flow for NRP evaluation were summarized, as a technological reservation for the future work. (authors)

  10. On Fire regime modelling using satellite TM time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddi, F.; . Ghermandi, L.; Lanorte, A.; Lasaponara, R.

    2009-04-01

    Wildfires can cause an environment deterioration modifying vegetation dynamics because they have the capacity of changing vegetation diversity and physiognomy. In semiarid regions, like the northwestern Patagonia, fire disturbance is also important because it could impact on the potential productivity of the ecosystem. There is reduction plant biomass and with that reducing the animal carrying capacity and/or the forest site quality with negative economics implications. Therefore knowledge of the fires regime in a region is of great importance to understand and predict the responses of vegetation and its possible effect on the regional economy. Studies of this type at a landscape level can be addressed using GIS tools. Satellite imagery allows detect burned areas and through a temporary analysis can be determined to fire regime and detecting changes at landscape scale. The study area of work is located on the east of the city of Bariloche including the San Ramon Ranch (22,000 ha) and its environs in the ecotone formed by the sub Antarctic forest and the patagonian steppe. We worked with multiespectral Landsat TM images and Landsat ETM + 30m spatial resolution obtained at different times. For the spatial analysis we used the software Erdas Imagine 9.0 and ArcView 3.3. A discrimination of vegetation types has made and was determined areas affected by fires in different years. We determined the level of change on vegetation induced by fire. In the future the use of high spatial resolution images combined with higher spectral resolution will allows distinguish burned areas with greater precision on study area. Also the use of digital terrain models derived from satellite imagery associated with climatic variables will allows model the relationship between them and the dynamics of vegetation.

  11. Australian manufacture of QuadrametTM (Samarium-153 EDTMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, N.R.; Whitwell, J.

    1997-01-01

    Quadramet T (Samarium-153 EDTMP) has been shown overseas to be potentially useful in the palliation of painful osteoblastic skeletal metastases and has been approved this year for general marketing in the USA. Australian Radioisotopes (ARI) has licensed this product from the Australian patent holders, Dow Chemical. Within the facilities of ARI, a hot cell has been dedicated to this product and fitted out to manufacture it weekly on a cycle related to the operating cycle of the Australian reactor HIFAR. Due to neutron flux limitations of HIFAR, the local formulation has an elemental Samarium content up to 200μg/mL whereas the overseas formulation has a level of 20-46μg/mL. All other specifications of the two products are essentially the same. In 1995 and 1996 a small clinical trial with 19 patients was held which demonstrated that the pharmacokinetic behaviour was also essentially the same by measuring blood clearance rates and skeletal uptake dynamics. Soft tissue uptake was also qualitatively determined. The ARI version is now the subject of an application for general marketing within Australia. Some useful characteristics of this agent are: almost complete excretion or fixation in the skeleton within 6 hours, rapid onset of clinical effect, applicability in most cases where an abnormal diagnostic bone scan correlates with painful sites, dosage can be tailored to individual patient uptake due to easy dose measurement and retreatment is quite possible. The use of this class of agents in pain palliation continues to increase. Australian manufacture of Quadramet TM provides a further option in the management of these difficult cases

  12. Fiber-optic thermometry using thermal radiation from Tm end doped SiO2 fiber sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Kentaro; Katsumata, Toru; Komuro, Shuji; Aizawa, Hiroaki

    2014-04-01

    Fiber-optic thermometry based on temperature dependence of thermal radiation from Tm(3+) ions was studied using Tm end doped SiO2 fiber sensor. Visible light radiation peaks due to f-f transition of Tm(3+) ion were clearly observed at λ = 690 and 790 nm from Tm end doped SiO2 fibers sensor at the temperature above 600 °C. Thermal radiation peaks are assigned with f-f transition of Tm(3+) ion, (1)D2-(3)H6, and (1)G4-(3)H6. Peak intensity of thermal radiation from Tm(3+) ion increases with temperature. Intensity ratio of thermal radiation peaks at λ = 690 nm against that at λ = 790 nm, I790/690, is suitable for the temperature measurement above 750 °C. Two-dimensional temperature distribution in a flame is successfully evaluated by Tm end doped SiO2 fiber sensor.

  13. Characterization of TM8, a MADS-box gene expressed in tomato flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daminato, Margherita; Masiero, Simona; Resentini, Francesca; Lovisetto, Alessandro; Casadoro, Giorgio

    2014-11-30

    The identity of flower organs is specified by various MIKC MADS-box transcription factors which act in a combinatorial manner. TM8 is a MADS-box gene that was isolated from the floral meristem of a tomato mutant more than twenty years ago, but is still poorly known from a functional point of view in spite of being present in both Angiosperms and Gymnosperms, with some species harbouring more than one copy of the gene. This study reports a characterization of TM8 that was carried out in transgenic tomato plants with altered expression of the gene. Tomato plants over-expressing either TM8 or a chimeric repressor form of the gene (TM8:SRDX) were prepared. In the TM8 up-regulated plants it was possible to observe anomalous stamens with poorly viable pollen and altered expression of several floral identity genes, among them B-, C- and E-function ones, while no apparent morphological modifications were visible in the other whorls. Oblong ovaries and fruits, that were also parthenocarpic, were obtained in the plants expressing the TM8:SRDX repressor gene. Such ovaries showed modified expression of various carpel-related genes. No apparent modifications could be seen in the other flower whorls. The latter plants had also epinastic leaves and malformed flower abscission zones. By using yeast two hybrid assays it was possible to show that TM8 was able to interact in yeast with MACROCALIX. The impact of the ectopically altered TM8 expression on the reproductive structures suggests that this gene plays some role in the development of the tomato flower. MACROCALYX, a putative A-function MADS-box gene, was expressed in all the four whorls of fully developed flowers, and showed quantitative variations that were opposite to those of TM8 in the anomalous stamens and ovaries. Since the TM8 protein interacted in vitro only with the A-function MADS-box protein MACROCALYX, it seems that for the correct differentiation of the tomato reproductive structures possible interactions between

  14. The Ecological Controls on the Prevalence of Candidate Division TM7 in Polar Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tristrom eWinsley

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The candidate division TM7 is ubiquitous and yet uncultured phylum of the Bacteria that encompasses a commonly environmental associated clade, TM7-1, and a ‘host-associated’ clade, TM7-3. However, as members of the TM7 phylum have not been cultured, little is known about what differs between these two clades. We hypothesized that these clades would have different environmental niches. To test this, we used a large-scale global soil dataset, encompassing 223 soil samples, their environmental parameters and associated bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequence data. We correlated chemical, physical and biological parameters of each soil with the relative abundance of the two major classes of the phylum to deduce factors that influence the groups’ seemingly ubiquitous nature. The two classes of the phylum (TM7-1 and TM7-3 were indeed distinct from each other in their habitat requirements. A key determinant of each class’ prevalence appears to be the pH of the soil. The class TM7-1 displays a facultative anaerobic nature with correlations to more acidic soils with total iron, silicon, titanium and copper indicating a potential for siderophore production. However, the TM7-3 class shows a more classical oligotrophic, heterotroph nature with a preference for more alkaline soils, and a probable pathogenic role with correlations to extractable iron, sodium and phosphate. In addition, the TM7-3 was abundant in diesel contaminated soils highlighting a resilient nature along with a possible carbon source. In addition to this both classes had unique co-occurrence relationships with other bacterial phyla. In particular, both groups had opposing correlations to the Gemmatimonadetes phylum, with the TM7-3 class seemingly being outcompeted by this phylum to result in a negative correlation. These ecological controls allow the characteristics of a TM7 phylum preferred niche to be defined and give insight into possible avenues for cultivation of this previously

  15. Presence of C1-Inhibitor Polymers in a Subset of Patients Suffering from Hereditary Angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elenius Madsen, Daniel; Hansen, Søren Werner Karlskov; Gram, Jørgen Brodersen

    2014-01-01

    phenotypes were observed in four affected family members from one of these families. Genotyping of the families revealed that the polymerogenic mutations of two families were located in proximity to the reactive center loop insertion site in C1-inh (p.Ile271Thr and p.Ser258_Pro260del),and one mutation...... affected helix C (p.Thr167Asn). In conclusion, we demonstrate that C1-inh polymers are present in the plasma of a subgroup of HAE type I patients....

  16. Endovascular Treatment of a Vertebral Artery Pseudoaneurysm Following Posterior C1-C2 Transarticular Screw Fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendez, Jose C.; Gonzalez-Llanos, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    We present a case of vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm after a posterior C1-C2 transarticular screw fixation procedure that was effectively treated with endovascular coil occlusion. Vertebral artery pseudoaneurysm complicating posterior C1-C2 transarticular fixation is extremely rare, with only one previous case having been reported previously. Endovascular occlusion is better achieved in the subacute phase of the pseudoaneurysm, when the wall of the pseudoaneurysm has matured and stabilized. Further follow-up angiographies are mandatory in order to confirm that there is no recurrence of the lesion

  17. Two-dimensional black hole as a topological coset model of c = 1 string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhi, S.; Vafa, C.

    1993-01-01

    We show that a special superconformal coset (with c=3) is equivalent to c=1 matter coupled to two-dimensional gravity. This identification allows a direct computation of the correlation functions of the c=1 non-critical string to all genus, and at nonzero cosmological constant, directly from the continuum approach. The results agree with those of the matrix model. Moreover we connect our coset with a twisted version of a euclidean two-dimensional black hole, in which the ghost and matter systems are mixed. (orig.)

  18. Gaussian quadrature rules for C 1 quintic splines with uniform knot vectors

    KAUST Repository

    Bartoň, Michael

    2017-03-21

    We provide explicit quadrature rules for spaces of C1C1 quintic splines with uniform knot sequences over finite domains. The quadrature nodes and weights are derived via an explicit recursion that avoids numerical solvers. Each rule is optimal, that is, requires the minimal number of nodes, for a given function space. For each of nn subintervals, generically, only two nodes are required which reduces the evaluation cost by 2/32/3 when compared to the classical Gaussian quadrature for polynomials over each knot span. Numerical experiments show fast convergence, as nn grows, to the “two-third” quadrature rule of Hughes et al. (2010) for infinite domains.

  19. Improving C1-C2 Complex Fusion Rates: An Alternate Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghostine, Samer S; Kaloostian, Paul E; Ordookhanian, Christ; Kaloostian, Sean; Zarrini, Parham; Kim, Terrence; Scibelli, Stephen; Clark-Schoeb, Scott J; Samudrala, Srinath; Lauryssen, Carl; Gill, Amandip S; Johnson, Patrick J

    2017-11-29

    The surgical repair of atlantoaxial instabilities (AAI) presents complex and unique challenges, originating from abnormalities and/or trauma within the junction regions of the C1-C2 atlas-axis, to surgeons. When this region is destabilized, surgical fusion becomes of key importance in order to prevent spinal cord injury. Several techniques can be utilized to provide for the adequate fusion of the atlantoaxial construct. Nevertheless, many individuals have less than ideal rates of fusion, below 35%-40%, which also involves the C2 nerve root being sacrificed. This suboptimal and unavoidable iatrogenic complication results in the elevated probability of complications typically composed of vertebral artery injury. This review is a retrospective analysis of 87 patients from Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California, who had the C1-C2 surgical fusion procedure performed within the time frame from 2001 to 2008, with a mean follow-up period of three years. These patients had presented with typical AAI symptoms of fatigability, limited mobility, and clumsiness. Diagnosis of C1-C2 instability was documented via radiographic studies, typically utilizing computed tomography (CT) scans or x-rays. All patients had bilateral C1 lateral masses and C2 pedicle screws. In addition, the C1-C2 joint was accessed by retracting the C2 nerve root superiorly and exposing the joint by utilizing a high-speed burr. The cavity that is developed within the joint is packed with local autologous bone from the cephalad resection of the C2 laminae. Fusion of the C1-C2 joint was achieved in all patients and a final follow-up was conducted approximately three years postoperative. Of the 87 patients, two presented with occipital headaches resulting from the C1 screws impinging on the C2 nerve root. The issue was rectified by removing instrumentation in both patients after documenting complete fusion via radiographic studies, with complete resolution of symptoms. No vertebral

  20. Modular organization of proteins containing C1q-like globular domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, U; Reid, K B

    1999-05-01

    The first step in the activation of the classical pathway of complement cascade by immune complexes involves the binding of the six globular heads of C1q to the Fc regions of immunoglobulin G (IgG) or immunoglobulin M (IgM). The globular heads of C1q are located C-terminal to the six triple-helical stalks present in the molecule, each head is considered to be composed of the C-terminal halves (3 x 135 residues) of one A-, one B- and one C-chain. It is not known if the C-terminal globular regions, present in each of the three types of chains, are independently folded modules (with each chain having distinct binding properties towards immunoglobulins) or whether the different binding functions of C1q are dependent upon a globular structure which relies on contributions from all three chains. Recent reports of recombinant production and characterisation of soluble globular head regions of all the three chains indicate that the globular regions of C1q may adopt a modular organization, i.e., each globular head of C1q may be composed of three, structurally and functionally, independent domains, thus retaining multivalency in the form of a heterotrimer. Modules of the same type as the C1q C-terminal module are also found in a variety of noncomplement proteins that include the C-terminal regions of the human type VIII and type X collagens, precerebellin, the chipmunk hibernation proteins, the human endothelial cell protein, multimerin, the serum protein, Acrp-30 which is secreted from mouse adipocytes, and the sunfish inner-ear specific structural protein. The C1q molecule is the only one of these proteins for which, to date, a function has been ascribed to the module. The existence of a shared structural region between C1q and certain collagens may suggest an evolutionarily common ancestral precursor. Various structural and biochemical data suggest that these modules may be responsible for multimerisation through patches of aromatic residues within them.

  1. Characterization of expression, activity and role in antibacterial immunity of Anopheles gambiae lysozyme c-1

    OpenAIRE

    Kajla, Mayur K.; Andreeva, Olga; Gilbreath, Thomas M.; Paskewitz, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    There are eight lysozyme genes in the Anopheles gambiae genome. Transcripts of one of these genes, LYSC-1, increased in Anopheles gambiae cell line 4a3B by 24 h after exposure to heat-killed Micrococcus luteus. Lysozyme activity was also identified in conditioned media from the cell line from which the protein was purified to homogeneity using ion exchange and gel filtration. Mass spectrometric analysis of the purified protein showed 100% identity to lysozyme c-1. Purified lysozyme c-1 was te...

  2. Procyanidin C1 Causes Vasorelaxation Through Activation of the Endothelial NO/cGMP Pathway in Thoracic Aortic Rings

    OpenAIRE

    Byun, Eui-Baek; Sung, Nak-Yun; Yang, Mi-So; Song, Du-Sup; Byun, Eui-Hong; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Lee, Ju-Woon; Park, Sang-Hyun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Kim, Jae-Hun

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the efficacy of procyanidin C1 (Pro C1) for modulating vascular tone. Pro C1 induced a potent vasorelaxant effect on phenylephrine-constricted endothelium-intact thoracic aortic rings, but had no effect on denuded thoracic aortic rings. Moreover, Pro C1 caused a significant increase in nitric oxide (NO) production in endothelial cells. Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation and Pro C1-induced NO production were significantly decreased in the presence of a nonspecif...

  3. Broadband topology-optimized photonic crystal components for both TE and TM polarizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Têtu, A.; Kristensen, M.; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2005-01-01

    Several planar photonic crystal components topology-optimized for TE-polarized light, including 60º bends, Y-splitters, and 90º bends, have been characterized for the TM polarization. The experimental results are confirmed by finite-difference time-domain calculations. The surprising efficiency f...... for TM-polarized light is found and paves the way for photonic crystal components suitable for both polarizations....

  4. Impact of the Low-Temperature Reactivity of Reillex(TM) HPQ on Actinide Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurinat, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    Reactive System Screening Tool(TM) data and a computational model are used to predict the impact of pressurization on a typical process-scale ion exchange column due to gases generated by a low temperature exothermic reaction (LTE). The LTE results from a reaction between nitric acid and the ethylbenzene pendant groups of the Reillex(TM) HPQ resin. This reaction would occur if the resin bed were inadvertently heated above 70 degrees C

  5. Health technology assessment demonstrates efficient health promotion bu Transcendental Meditation (TM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Health Technology Assessment of mantrameditation implemented as Transcendental Meditation (TM) METHODS: MEDLINE contains October 2001 335 titles on 'Transcendental Meditation' including various metaanalyses and a series of randomised, controlled trials: In summary...... mantrameditation (TM) is evidenced to produce a wakeful, hypometabolic state (in-depth-relaxation) independent of personality or individual mantras. A general metaanalysis summarizes the long-termed meditation effects as (1) a low baseline function; (2) release of stress and anxiety empowering self...

  6. Characterization of Tm{sup 3+} doped TNZL glass laser material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lachheb, R. [Laboratoire Géoressources, Matériaux, Environnement et Changements Globaux, Faculty of Sciences of Sfax, Sfax University, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Otto-Schott-Institut, Jena University, Fraunhoferstrasse 6, 07743 Jena (Germany); Damak, K., E-mail: Kamel.Damak@fss.rnu.tn [Laboratory of Radio Analysis and Environment, Sfax University, ENIS, 3038 Sfax (Tunisia); Assadi, A.A. [Laboratoire Géoressources, Matériaux, Environnement et Changements Globaux, Faculty of Sciences of Sfax, Sfax University, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Otto-Schott-Institut, Jena University, Fraunhoferstrasse 6, 07743 Jena (Germany); Herrmann, A. [Otto-Schott-Institut, Jena University, Fraunhoferstrasse 6, 07743 Jena (Germany); Yousef, E. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Al Azhar University, Assuit branch, Assuit (Egypt); Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, King Khalid University, P. O. Box 9004, Abha (Saudi Arabia); Rüssel, C. [Otto-Schott-Institut, Jena University, Fraunhoferstrasse 6, 07743 Jena (Germany); Maâlej, R. [Laboratoire Géoressources, Matériaux, Environnement et Changements Globaux, Faculty of Sciences of Sfax, Sfax University, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, a new tellurite glass (85TeO{sub 2}·5.0Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}·5.0ZnO·5.0LiF) doped with 1 mol% Tm{sub 2}O{sub 3} was prepared by melt-quenching technique. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements indicate a good thermal stability, X-ray diffraction patterns show no sign of crystallization. Precise refractive index measurements were performed on five different wavelengths by a prism spectrometer. The optical energy gap, the Sellmeier energy gap and the dispersion energy were estimated. Judd–Ofelt intensity parameters were evaluated in order to obtain electric and magnetic-dipole transition probabilities, branching ratios and radiative lifetimes of several excited states of Tm{sup 3+}. The classical McCumber theory was used to evaluate the emission cross-sections for the {sup 3}F{sub 4}→{sup 3}H{sub 6} transition at a wavelength of around 1.8 µm. The characteristics of down-conversion luminescence in the visible range were studied by exciting Tm{sup 3+} ions into the {sup 1}G{sub 4} level. Furthermore the structure of this glass was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. - Highlights: • A new thermally stable tellurite glass (TNZL doped 1 mol% Tm{sup 3+}) was synthesized by a melt-quenching method. • A complete Judd–Ofelt spectroscopic evaluation of the TNZL:Tm glass is presented. • A high gain coefficient and emission cross section are obtained for Tm{sup 3+} in TNZL glass in the 1.8 μm region. • The TNZL:Tm glass would be a potential laser operation around 1.8 μm emission. • TNZL:Tm is a good candidate for generate a blue light for color display devices and light emitting diodes.

  7. Single-Cell Enumeration of an Uncultivated TM7 Subgroup in the Human Subgingival Crevice

    OpenAIRE

    Ouverney, Cleber C.; Armitage, Gary C.; Relman, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Specific oligonucleotide hybridization conditions were established for single-cell enumeration of uncultivated TM7 and IO25 bacteria by using clones expressing heterologous 16S rRNA. In situ analysis of human subgingival crevice specimens revealed that a greater proportion of samples from sites of chronic periodontitis than from healthy sites contained TM7 subgroup IO25. In addition, IO25 bacterial cells from periodontitis site samples were more abundant and fourfold longer than IO25 cells fr...

  8. Cluster K Mycobacteriophages: Insights into the Evolutionary Origins of Mycobacteriophage TM4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Welkin H.; Ferreira, Christina M.; Jacobs-Sera, Deborah; Benjamin, Robert C.; Davis, Ariangela J.; DeJong, Randall J.; Elgin, Sarah C. R.; Guilfoile, Forrest R.; Forsyth, Mark H.; Harris, Alexander D.; Harvey, Samuel E.; Hughes, Lee E.; Hynes, Peter M.; Jackson, Arrykka S.; Jalal, Marilyn D.; MacMurray, Elizabeth A.; Manley, Coreen M.; McDonough, Molly J.; Mosier, Jordan L.; Osterbann, Larissa J.; Rabinowitz, Hannah S.; Rhyan, Corwin N.; Russell, Daniel A.; Saha, Margaret S.; Shaffer, Christopher D.; Simon, Stephanie E.; Sims, Erika F.; Tovar, Isabel G.; Weisser, Emilie G.; Wertz, John T.; Weston-Hafer, Kathleen A.; Williamson, Kurt E.; Zhang, Bo; Cresawn, Steven G.; Jain, Paras; Piuri, Mariana; Jacobs, William R.; Hendrix, Roger W.; Hatfull, Graham F.

    2011-01-01

    Five newly isolated mycobacteriophages –Angelica, CrimD, Adephagia, Anaya, and Pixie – have similar genomic architectures to mycobacteriophage TM4, a previously characterized phage that is widely used in mycobacterial genetics. The nucleotide sequence similarities warrant grouping these into Cluster K, with subdivision into three subclusters: K1, K2, and K3. Although the overall genome architectures of these phages are similar, TM4 appears to have lost at least two segments of its genome, a central region containing the integration apparatus, and a segment at the right end. This suggests that TM4 is a recent derivative of a temperate parent, resolving a long-standing conundrum about its biology, in that it was reportedly recovered from a lysogenic strain of Mycobacterium avium, but it is not capable of forming lysogens in any mycobacterial host. Like TM4, all of the Cluster K phages infect both fast- and slow-growing mycobacteria, and all of them – with the exception of TM4 – form stable lysogens in both Mycobacterium smegmatis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis; immunity assays show that all five of these phages share the same immune specificity. TM4 infects these lysogens suggesting that it was either derived from a heteroimmune temperate parent or that it has acquired a virulent phenotype. We have also characterized a widely-used conditionally replicating derivative of TM4 and identified mutations conferring the temperature-sensitive phenotype. All of the Cluster K phages contain a series of well conserved 13 bp repeats associated with the translation initiation sites of a subset of the genes; approximately one half of these contain an additional sequence feature composed of imperfectly conserved 17 bp inverted repeats separated by a variable spacer. The K1 phages integrate into the host tmRNA and the Cluster K phages represent potential new tools for the genetics of M. tuberculosis and related species. PMID:22053209

  9. Expression of the novel wheat gene TM20 confers enhanced cadmium tolerance to bakers' yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu-Young; Kim, Do-Young; Shim, Donghwan; Song, Won-Yong; Lee, Joohyun; Schroeder, Julian I; Kim, Sanguk; Moran, Nava; Lee, Youngsook

    2008-06-06

    Cadmium causes the generation of reactive oxygen species, which in turn causes cell damage. We isolated a novel gene from a wheat root cDNA library, which conferred Cd(II)-specific tolerance when expressed in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The gene, which we called TaTM20, for Triticum aestivum transmembrane 20, encodes a putative hydrophobic polypeptide of 889 amino acids, containing 20 transmembrane domains arranged as a 5-fold internal repeating unit of 4 transmembrane domains each. Expression of TaTM20 in yeast cells stimulated Cd(II) efflux resulting in a decrease in the content of yeast intracellular cadmium. TaTM20-induced Cd(II) tolerance was maintained in yeast even under conditions of reduced GSH. These results demonstrate that TaTM20 enhances Cd(II) tolerance in yeast through the stimulation of Cd(II) efflux from the cell, partially independent of GSH. Treatment of wheat seedlings with Cd(II) induced their expression of TaTM20, decreasing subsequent root Cd(II) accumulation and suggesting a possible role for TaTM20 in Cd(II) tolerance in wheat.

  10. Growth and characterization of Tm-doped Y 2O 3 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mun, J. H.; Jouini, A.; Novoselov, A.; Guyot, Y.; Yoshikawa, A.; Ohta, H.; Shibata, H.; Waseda, Y.; Boulon, G.; Fukuda, T.

    2007-07-01

    The rare-earth sesquioxides (RE2O3, RE = Lu, Y and Sc) are promising host materials for solid-state lasers due to their low phonon energy and high thermal conductivity. On the other hand, Tm3+ and Yb3+ are preferable activators for advanced laser diode pumped solid-state lasers. In addition to that, Tm-doped materials can be used for eye-safe lasers application. Tm-doped Y2O3 single crystals were grown using the micro-pulling-down method. Crystals were transparent with gray and blue colors of 4.2 mm in diameter and 13-20 mm in length. The crystallinity was characterized using X-ray rocking curve analysis. Tm-doped Y2O3 single crystals have a good compositional homogeneity along the growth axis and their thermal conductivity was calculated from the measurements of thermal diffusivity, heat capacity and density. We have also recorded absorption, fluorescence spectra and measured fluorescence lifetimes as a function of the Tm content, we have found a very attractive fluorescence around the eye-safe wavelength of 1.9 mm which corresponds to a 3F4 → 3H6 transition of Tm3+.

  11. Water quality change in reservoirs of Shenzhen, China: detection using LANDSAT/TM data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yunpeng; Xia Hao; Fu Jiamo; Sheng Guoying

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this research is to explore a precise and fast way of monitoring water chemical and biochemical quality in the reservoirs of Shenzhen, China. Water quality change in 1988 and 1996 are detected by synthesizing satellite data and ground-based data. One scene Thematic Mapper (TM) image in winter of 1996 was acquired and the simultaneous in situ measurement, sampling and analysis were performed. Main methods include radiometric calibration of TM remote sensor, atmospheric correction to image data and statistical model construction. The results indicate that satellite-based estimates and in situ measured water reflectance have very high correlation, and the root mean square differences between two kinds of indices are close to 0.02-0.03 for each TM band in Visible-Near Infrared (VI-NIR) range. Statistical relationship between calibrated image data (average of 5x5 pixels) of TM bands and laboratory analyzed data of water samples indicated reflectance of TM band 1 to band 4 and organic pollution measurements such as TOC, BOD and COD had higher correlation. The same scene TM data in the winter of 1988 was processed in the same procedure. Results indicate that water quality of most reservoirs have become worse. Water of eastern reservoirs near Dongjiang River is characterized with higher TOC and TSS, and water of western reservoirs is characterized with higher BOD and COD

  12. Impacts of doping concentration on the saturable characteristics of Tm-Ho codoped fiber saturable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Mengmeng; Feng, Guobin; Yu, Ting; Ye, Xisheng; Wang, Zhenbao; Shen, Yanlong; Zhao, Jun

    2018-03-01

    Impacts of Tm ion concentration and Ho ion concentration on the saturable behaviors of Tm-Ho codoped fiber saturable absorbers and the output characteristics of the passively Q-switched laser systems are investigated and analyzed both at the initial lasing state and the stable passive Q-switching state. Simulations show that, varying concentrations of Tm and Ho ions have different impacts on the temporal evolution processes but similar effects on the macroscopic characteristics of the laser system. The root for the impacts of dopant concentrations is the population of the 3H6 energy level and the cavity loss it induces. For Tm ions, the rise of the Tm concentration improves the population of the 3H6 energy level directly, while, for Ho ions, higher Ho concentration leads to larger recovery rate of the 3H6 energy level, thus increasing the population of the 3H6 energy level indirectly. As for limited total dopant concentration, the Tm:Ho concentration ratio can be optimized for different applications.

  13. Ho3+/Tm3+ codoped lead silicate glass for 2 μm laser materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Cao, Ruijie; Cai, Muzhi; Shen, Lingling; Tian, Ying; Huang, Feifei; Xu, Shiqing; Zhang, Junjie

    2017-12-01

    The mid-infrared emission of low phonon (963 cm-1) lead silicate glass system with Ho3+/Tm3+ co-doped has been investigated. Luminescence at ∼2.1 μm corresponding to 5I7 → 5I8 transition in holmium was obtained by energy transfer between Tm3+ and Ho3+ ions. Energy transfer mechanism between them was analyzed. And the highest value of the luminescence intensity was obtained in glass co-doped with 1Tm2O3/0.3Ho2O3. The full width at half maximum of the (Ho3+/Tm3+) emission reached to 350 nm in 1Tm2O3/0.1Ho2O3 sample. Absorption and emission cross section have also been calculated and analyzed. The maximum emission cross section was 3.9 × 10-21 cm2 around 2.0 μm. And when P > 0.4, a positive gain can be obtained at wavelengths >1941 nm. Results demonstrated that the prepared Ho3+/Tm3+ co-doped lead silicate glasses have excellent spectroscopic properties in mid-infrared wavelengths and can obtain high gain in fiber lasers.

  14. 2-micron lasing in Tm:Lu2O3 ceramic: initial operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrovec, John; Filgas, David M.; Smith, Carey A.; Copeland, Drew A.; Litt, Amardeep S.; Briscoe, Eldridge; Schirmer, Ernestina

    2018-03-01

    We report on initial lasing of Tm:Lu2O3 ceramic laser with tunable output in the vicinity of 2 μm. Tm:Lu2O3 ceramic gain materials offer a much lower saturation fluence than the traditionally used Tm:YLF and Tm:YAG materials. The gain element is pumped by 796 nm diodes via a "2-for-1" crossrelaxation energy transfer mechanism, which enables high efficiency. The high thermal conductivity of the Lu2O3 host ( 18% higher than YAG) in combination with low quantum defect of 20% supports operation at high-average power. Konoshima's ceramic fabrication process overcomes the scalability limits of single crystal sesquioxides. Tm:Lu2O3 offers wide-bandwidth amplification of ultrashort pulses in a chirped-pulse amplification (CPA) system. A laser oscillator was continuously tuned over a 230 nm range from 1890 to 2120 nm while delivering up to 43W QCW output with up to 37% efficiency. This device is intended for initial testing and later seeding of a multi-pass edge-pumped disk amplifier now being developed by Aqwest which uses composite Tm:Lu2O3 disk gain elements.

  15. C1 lateral mass screws for posterior segmental stabilization of the upper cervical spine and a new method of three-point rigid fixation of the C1-C2 complex Parafusos na massa lateral de C1 para instrumentação segmentar da coluna cervical alta e um novo método de fixação em três pontos do complexo C1-C2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo D. Vilela

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe our experience with C1 lateral mass screws as part of a construct for C1-2 stabilization and report an alternate method of C1-C2 complex three-point fixation. METHOD: All patients that had at least one screw placed in the lateral mass of C1 as part of a construct for stabilization of the C1-C2 complex entered this study. In selected patients who had a higher chance of nonunion an alternate construct was used: transarticular C1-C2 screws combined with C1 lateral mass screws. RESULTS: Twenty-one C1 lateral mass screws were placed in 11 patients. In three patients the alternate construct was used. All patients had a demonstrable solid and stable fusion on follow-up. CONCLUSION: C1 lateral mass screws are safe and provide immediate stability. The use of C1-C2 transarticular screws combined with C1 lateral mass screws is a feasible and also an excellent alternative for a three-point fixation of the C1-C2 complex.OBJETIVO: Descrever nossa experiência com o uso de parafusos na massa lateral de C1 como parte de uma montagem para estabilização do complexo C1-C2 e relatar uma fixação alternativa em três pontos do complexo C1-C2. MÉTODO: Todos os pacientes em que pelo menos um parafuso na massa lateral de C1 foi colocado como parte de uma montagem para estabilização C1-C2 entraram neste estudo. Em certos pacientes com maior chance de não-união, uma montagem alternativa foi usada: parafusos transarticulares C1-C2 associados a parafusos na massa lateral de C1. RESULTADOS: Foram colocados 21 parafusos na massa lateral de C1 em 11 pacientes e em três pacientes foi usada a montagem alternativa. Todos os pacientes evoluíram para uma união sólida e estável. CONCLUSÃO: Parafusos na massa lateral de C1 são seguros e conferem estabilidade imediata. Parafusos na massa lateral de C1 combinados a parafusos transarticulares são exequíveis e também excelente alternativa para fixação rígida em três pontos do complexo C1-C2.

  16. Luminescence properties of Yb:Nd:Tm:KY3F10 nanophosphor and thermal treatment effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Laércio; Linhares, Horácio Marconi da Silva M.D.; Ichikawa, Rodrigo Uchida; Martinez, Luis Gallego; Ranieri, Izilda Marcia

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we present the spectroscopic properties of KY 3 F 10 (KY3F) nanocrystals activated with thulium and codoped with ytterbium and neodymium ions. The most important processes that lead to the thulium upconversion emissions in the blue region were identified. A time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy technique was employed to measure the luminescence decays and to determine the most important mechanisms involved in the upconversion process that populates 1 G 4 (Tm 3+ ) excited states. Analysis of the energy-transfer processes dynamics using selective pulsed-laser excitations in Yb:Nd:Tm, Nd:KY3F nanocrystals shows that the direct energy transfer from Nd 3+ to Tm 3+ ions is the mechanism responsible for the 78% of the blue upconversion luminescence in the Yb:Nd:Tm:KY3F when compared with the Yb:Nd:Tm:KY3F bulk crystal for an laser excitation at 802 nm. An investigation of the 1 G 4 level luminescence kinetic of Tm 3+ in Yb/Nd/Tm system revealed that the luminescence efficiency ( 1 G 4 ) starts with a very low value (0.38%) for the synthesized nanocrystal (as grown) and strongly increases to 97% after thermal treatment at 550 °C for 6 h under argon flow. As a consequence of the thermal treatment at T=550 °C, the contributions of the (Nd×Tm) (Up 1 ) and (Nd×Yb×Tm) (Up 2 ) upconversion processes to the 1 G 4 luminescence are 33% (Up 1 ) and 67% for Up 2 . Up 2 process represented by Nd 3+ ( 4 F 3/2 )→Yb 3+ ( 2 F 7/2 ) followed by Yb 3+ ( 2 F 5/2 )→Tm ( 3 H 4 )→Tm 3+ ( 1 G 4 ) was previously reported as the main mechanism to produce the blue luminescence in Yb:Nd:Tm:YLiF 4 and KY 3 F 10 bulk crystals. Results of X-ray diffraction analysis of nanopowder using the Rietveld method reveled that crystallite sizes remain unchanged (12–14 nm) after thermal treatments with T≤400 °C, while the 1 G 4 luminescence efficiency strongly increases from 0.38% (T=25 °C) to 12% (T=400 °C). Results shown that the Nd 3+ ions distribution has a concentration

  17. Methyl Bromide Measurements in the Taylor Dome M3C1 Ice Core, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The data set includes methyl bromide (CH3Br) measurements made on air extracted from 70 samples from the Taylor Dome M3C1 ice core. CH3Br was measured in air from...

  18. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appel, M.J.; Capron, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground. This waste site was the primary burial ground for general wastes from the operation of the 105-C Reactor and received process tubes, aluminum fuel spacers, control rods, reactor hardware, spent nuclear fuel and soft wastes

  19. C1 compounds as auxiliary substrate for engineered Pseudomonas putida S12

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, F.W.; De Winde, J.H.; Ruijssenaars, H.J.

    2009-01-01

    The solvent-tolerant bacterium Pseudomonas putida S12 was engineered to efficiently utilize the C1 compounds methanol and formaldehyde as auxiliary substrate. The hps and phi genes of Bacillus brevis, encoding two key steps of the ribulose monophosphate (RuMP) pathway, were introduced to construct a

  20. C1-continuous Virtual Element Method for Poisson-Kirchhoff plate problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gyrya, Vitaliy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Mourad, Hashem Mohamed [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-20

    We present a family of C1-continuous high-order Virtual Element Methods for Poisson-Kirchho plate bending problem. The convergence of the methods is tested on a variety of meshes including rectangular, quadrilateral, and meshes obtained by edge removal (i.e. highly irregular meshes). The convergence rates are presented for all of these tests.

  1. Relation of the vertebral artery segment from C1 to C2 vertebrae: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ayman Ahmad Khanfour

    2014-06-20

    Jun 20, 2014 ... The anatomical measurements obtained from C2 vertebra are statistically analyzed in Table 2 and represented graphi- cally in (Fig. 6). 3.2. Cadaveric results. In all specimens the segment of VA between C1 and C2, the third and the fourth parts of vertebral artery were dissected. (Figs. 7 and 9–12) (see Fig.

  2. [Anaesthesic management of vaginal delivery in a parturient with C1 esterase deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libert, N; Schérier, S; Dubost, C; Franck, L; Rouquette, I; Tortosa, J-C; Rousseau, J-M

    2009-04-01

    Hereditary and acquired angioedema (HAE/AAE) are the clinical translation of a qualitative or a quantitative deficit of C1 esterase inhibitor (C1 INH). The frequency and severity of clinical manifestations vary greatly, ranging from a moderate swelling of the extremities to obstruction of upper airway. Anaesthesiologists and intensivists must be prepared to manage acute manifestations of this disease in case of life-threatening laryngeal edema. Surgery, physical trauma and labour are classical triggers of the disease. The anaesthesiologists should be aware of the drugs used as prophylaxis and treatment of acute attacks when considering labour and caesarean section. Androgens are contraindicated during pregnancy. If prophylaxis is required, tranexamic acid may be used with caution. The safest obstetric approach appears to be to administer a predelivery infusion of C1 INH concentrate. It is important to avoid manipulation of the airway as much as possible by relying on regional techniques. We report the case of a patient suffering from an HAE discovered during pregnancy. The management included administration of C1 INH during labor and early epidural analgesia for pain relief. A short review of the pathophysiology and therapeutic options follows.

  3. Cleanup Verification Package for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. J. Appel and J. M. Capron

    2007-07-25

    This cleanup verification package documents completion of remedial action for the 118-C-1, 105-C Solid Waste Burial Ground. This waste site was the primary burial ground for general wastes from the operation of the 105-C Reactor and received process tubes, aluminum fuel spacers, control rods, reactor hardware, spent nuclear fuel and soft wastes.

  4. Mutational spectrum and phenotypes in Danish families with hereditary angioedema because of C1 inhibitor deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygum, A; Fagerberg, C R; Ponard, D

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE), type I and II, is an autosomal dominant disease with deficiency of functional C1 inhibitor protein causing episodic swellings of skin, mucosa and viscera. HAE is a genetically heterogeneous disease with more than 200 different mutations in the SERPING1 gene. A genotype...

  5. Mechanical test results on Dipole model C-1 25 mm aluminum collars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, C.

    1985-02-01

    This report is a summary of procedures used in collaring the SSC Dipole model C-1. Included are descriptions of the collars, instrumentation, collar pack preparation, collaring procedures, and collar dimension and coil pressure data measurements taken during and testing of the magnet

  6. Dyslexia and DYX1C1: deficits in reading and spelling associated with a missense mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, T C; Lind, P A; Luciano, M; Montgomery, G W; Martin, N G; Wright, M J

    2010-12-01

    The status of DYX1C1 (C15q21.3) as a susceptibility gene for dyslexia is unclear. We report the association of this gene with reading and spelling ability in a sample of adolescent twins and their siblings. Family-based association analyses were carried out on 13 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DYX1C1, typed in 790 families with up to 5 offspring and tested on 6 validated measures of lexical processing (irregular word) and grapheme-phoneme decoding (pseudo-word) reading- and spelling-based measures of dyslexia, as well as a short-term memory measure. Significant association was observed at the misssense mutation rs17819126 for all reading measures and for spelling of lexical processing words, and at rs3743204 for both irregular and nonword reading. Verbal short-term memory was associated with rs685935. Support for association was not found at rs3743205 and rs61761345 as previously reported by Taipale et al., but these SNPs had very low (0.002 for rs3743205) minor allele frequencies in this sample. These results suggest that DYX1C1 influences reading and spelling ability with additional effects on short-term information storage or rehearsal. Missense mutation rs17819126 is a potential functional basis for the association of DYX1C1 with dyslexia.

  7. Chitinase Chi1 from Myceliophthora thermophila C1, a Thermostable Enzyme for Chitin and Chitosan Depolymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krolicka, M.; Hinz, Sandra W.A.; Koetsier, Martijn J.; Joosten, Rob; Eggink, G.; Broek, van den Ben; Boeriu, C.G.

    2018-01-01

    A thermostable Chitinase Chi1 from Myceliophthora thermophila C1 was homologously produced and characterized. Chitinase Chi1 shows high thermostability at 40 °C (>140 h 90% activity), 50 °C (>168 h 90% activity), and 55 °C (half-life 48 h). Chitinase Chi1 has broad substrate specificity and

  8. Relation of the vertebral artery segment from C1 to C2 vertebrae: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ayman Ahmad Khanfour

    2014-06-20

    Jun 20, 2014 ... The atlas vertebra (C1) has unique anatomy due to the absence of the vertebral body and its ring-like shape which makes it dif- ferent from other cervical vertebrae. Absence of the vertebral. * Corresponding author. Tel.: +20 01223815866. E-mail addresses: aymn222@hotmail.com. (A.A. Khanfour),.

  9. Hyperlipidemia and cutaneous abnormalities in transgenic mice overexpressing human apolipoprotein C1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, M.C.; Gijbels, M.J.J.; Dahlmans, V.E.H.; Gorp, P.J.J. van; Koopman, S.-J.; Ponec, M.; Hofker, M.H.; Havekes, L.M.

    1998-01-01

    Transgenic mice were generated with different levels of human apolipoprotein C1 (APOC1) expression in liver and skin. At 2 mo of age, serum levels of cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), and FFA were strongly elevated in APOC1 transgenic mice compared with wild-type mice. These elevated levels of serum

  10. Development of atopic dermatitis in mice transgenic for human apolipoprotein C1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nagelkerken, Lex; Verzaal, Perry; Lagerweij, Tonny; Persoon-Deen, Carla; Berbee, Jimmy F. P.; Prens, Errol P.; Havekes, Louis M.; Oranje, Arnold P.

    Mice with transgenic expression of human apolipoprotein C1 (APOC1) in liver and skin have strongly increased serum levels of cholesterol, triglycerides, and free fatty acids, indicative of a disturbed lipid metabolism. Importantly, these mice display a disturbed skin barrier function, evident from

  11. 26 CFR 31.3306(c)(1)-1 - Agricultural labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 15 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Agricultural labor. 31.3306(c)(1)-1 Section 31... Agricultural labor. Services performed by an employee for the person employing him which constitute “agricultural labor” as defined in section 3306(k) are excepted from employment. For provisions relating to the...

  12. 17 CFR 240.8c-1 - Hypothecation of customers' securities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hypothecation of customers... Securities Exchange Act of 1934 Hypothecation of Customers' Securities § 240.8c-1 Hypothecation of customers... any customer under circumstances: (1) That will permit the commingling of securities carried for the...

  13. C1-2 vertebral anomalies in 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konen, Osnat; Armstrong, Derek; Clarke, Howard; Padfield, Nancy; Weksberg, Rosanna; Blaser, Susan

    2008-07-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome (22q11DS) is characterized by cleft palate, cardiac anomalies, characteristic facies, high prevalence of skeletal anomalies and learning disability. To evaluate the prevalence of craniovertebral junction anomalies in children with 22q11DS and compare these findings to those in nonsyndromic children with velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Sequential CT scans performed for presurgical carotid assessment in 76 children (45 children positive for chromosome 22q11.2 deletion and 31 negative for the deletion) with VPI were retrospectively evaluated for assessment of C1-2 anomalies. C1-2 vertebral anomalies, specifically midline C1 defects, uptilted or upswept posterior elements of C2 and fusions of C2-3, were nearly universal in our cohort of 22q11DS patients with VPI. They were strikingly absent in the majority of non-22q11DS patients with VPI. C1-2 vertebral anomalies, particularly those listed above, are important radiographic markers for 22q11DS.

  14. 17 CFR 240.15c1-6 - Disclosure of interest in distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... contrivance, as used in section 15(c)(1) of the Act, is hereby defined to include any act of any broker who is acting for a customer or for both such customer and some other person, or of any dealer or municipal securities dealer who receives or has promise of receiving a fee from a customer for advising such customer...

  15. 12 CFR 563c.1 - Form and content of financial statements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... ACCOUNTING REQUIREMENTS Form and Content of Financial Statements § 563c.1 Form and content of financial... statements shall: (1) Be prepared and presented in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Form and content of financial statements. 563c...

  16. Characterization of expression, activity and role in antibacterial immunity of Anopheles gambiae lysozyme c-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajla, Mayur K.; Andreeva, Olga; Gilbreath, Thomas M.; Paskewitz, Susan M.

    2009-01-01

    There are eight lysozyme genes in the Anopheles gambiae genome. Transcripts of one of these genes, LYSC-1, increased in Anopheles gambiae cell line 4a3B by 24 h after exposure to heat-killed Micrococcus luteus. Lysozyme activity was also identified in conditioned media from the cell line from which the protein was purified to homogeneity using ion exchange and gel filtration. Mass spectrometric analysis of the purified protein showed 100% identity to lysozyme c-1. Purified lysozyme c-1 was tested against non-mosquito derived as well as culturable bacteria isolated from mosquito midguts. Lysozyme c-1 had negligible effects on the growth of most mosquito-derived bacteria in vitro but did inhibit the growth of M. luteus. Although Lys c-1 did not directly kill most bacteria, knockdown of LYSC-1 resulted in significant mortality in mosquitoes subjected to hemocoelic infections with Escherichia coli but not M. luteus thus suggesting that this protein plays an important role in antibacterial defense against selected bacteria. PMID:19932188

  17. C1-2 vertebral anomalies in 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konen, Osnat; Armstrong, Derek; Padfield, Nancy; Blaser, Susan [Hospital for Sick Children, Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Clarke, Howard [Hospital for Sick Children, Plastic Surgery, Toronto (Canada); Weksberg, Rosanna [Hospital for Sick Children, Clinical and Metabolic Genetics, Toronto (Canada)

    2008-07-15

    Chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome (22q11DS) is characterized by cleft palate, cardiac anomalies, characteristic facies, high prevalence of skeletal anomalies and learning disability. To evaluate the prevalence of craniovertebral junction anomalies in children with 22q11DS and compare these findings to those in nonsyndromic children with velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Sequential CT scans performed for presurgical carotid assessment in 76 children (45 children positive for chromosome 22q11.2 deletion and 31 negative for the deletion) with VPI were retrospectively evaluated for assessment of C1-2 anomalies. C1-2 vertebral anomalies, specifically midline C1 defects, uptilted or upswept posterior elements of C2 and fusions of C2-3, were nearly universal in our cohort of 22q11DS patients with VPI. They were strikingly absent in the majority of non-22q11DS patients with VPI. C1-2 vertebral anomalies, particularly those listed above, are important radiographic markers for 22q11DS. (orig.)

  18. C1-2 vertebral anomalies in 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konen, Osnat; Armstrong, Derek; Padfield, Nancy; Blaser, Susan; Clarke, Howard; Weksberg, Rosanna

    2008-01-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome (22q11DS) is characterized by cleft palate, cardiac anomalies, characteristic facies, high prevalence of skeletal anomalies and learning disability. To evaluate the prevalence of craniovertebral junction anomalies in children with 22q11DS and compare these findings to those in nonsyndromic children with velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI). Sequential CT scans performed for presurgical carotid assessment in 76 children (45 children positive for chromosome 22q11.2 deletion and 31 negative for the deletion) with VPI were retrospectively evaluated for assessment of C1-2 anomalies. C1-2 vertebral anomalies, specifically midline C1 defects, uptilted or upswept posterior elements of C2 and fusions of C2-3, were nearly universal in our cohort of 22q11DS patients with VPI. They were strikingly absent in the majority of non-22q11DS patients with VPI. C1-2 vertebral anomalies, particularly those listed above, are important radiographic markers for 22q11DS. (orig.)

  19. Prevalence and clinical significance of anti-C1q antibodies in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Asmaa Hegazy

    2012-04-21

    Apr 21, 2012 ... system [1]. The complement system is one of the major effector mech- anisms of the innate immune system and it plays an important role in immunity [2]. C1q is the first component of the classical pathway of complement activation, and its main function is to clear immune complexes from tissues and self ...

  20. Retro-odontoid cystic mass treated by laminectomy and C1-C2 fixation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dasheng Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Retro-odontoid cysts associated with chronic atlantoaxial subluxation are extremely rare. This article describes a case of retro-odontoid cystic mass associated with chronic atlantoaxial subluxation and its management with posterior C1 and partial C2 laminectomy and C1-C2 pedicle screw fixation without resection of the retro-odontoid cyst. A 64-year-old woman experienced a sudden onset of neck pain, hand and foot paresthesia. Atlantoaxial instability associated with a retro-odontoid cystic mass was found in the imaging. The patient underwent posterior C1 and partial C2 laminectomy and C1-C2 pedicle screws fixation without resection of the retro-odontoid cyst. During the 24 months followup period, the cyst disappeared completely and the patient remained symptom free and returned to independent daily living. These findings suggest that posterior laminectomy and fixation without resection of the retro-odontoid cyst is relatively simple and safe and the results are satisfactory.

  1. In vitro screening of reversible and time-dependent inhibition on CYP3A by TM208 and TM209 in rat liver microsomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miaoran Ning

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available TM208 and TM209, dithiocarbamate derivatives with potential anti-cancer effects, were evaluated in reversible and time-dependent cytochrome P450 (CYP 3A inhibition assays in rat liver microsomes using testosterone as probe substrate. Both compounds were found to be weak reversible inhibitors and moderate mechanism-based inhibitors of rat CYP3A. For reversible inhibition on rat CYP3A, the Ki values of competitive inhibition model were 12.10±1.75 and 13.94±1.31 μM, respectively. For time-dependent inhibition, the inactivation constants (Kl were 31.93±12.64 and 32.91±15.58 μM, respectively, and the maximum inactivation rates (kinact were 0.03497±0.0069 and 0.07259±0.0172 min−1 respectively. These findings would provide useful in vitro information for future in vivo DDI studies on TM208 or TM209.

  2. Genetic Determinants of C1 Inhibitor Deficiency Angioedema Age of Onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianni, Panagiota; Loules, Gedeon; Zamanakou, Maria; Kompoti, Maria; Csuka, Dorottya; Psarros, Fotis; Magerl, Markus; Moldovan, Dimitru; Maurer, Marcus; Speletas, Matthaios G; Farkas, Henriette; Germenis, Anastasios E

    2017-01-01

    In view of the large heterogeneity in the clinical presentation of hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE), great efforts are being made towards detecting measurable biological determinants of disease severity that can help to improve the management of the disease. Considering the central role that plasma kallikrein plays in bradykinin production, we investigated the contribution of the functional polymorphism KLKB1-428G/A to the disease phenotype. We studied 249 C1-INH-HAE patients from 114 European families, and we explored possible associations of C1-INH-HAE clinical features with carriage of KLKB1-428G/A, combined or not with that of the functional F12-46C/T polymorphism. Carriers of the G allele of the KLKB1-428G/A polymorphism exhibited a significantly delayed disease onset (i.e., by 4.1 years [p < 0.001], depending on the zygocity status), while carriers of both the KLKB1-428G/A and the F12-46C/T polymorphism displayed an 8.8-year delay in disease onset (p < 0.001) and a 64% lower probability of needing long-term prophylactic treatment (p = 0.019). These findings support our initial hypothesis that functional alterations in genes of proteins involved in bradykinin metabolism and function affect the clinical phenotype and possibly contribute to the pathogenesis of C1-INH-HAE. Given that an earlier onset of symptoms is inversely correlated with the subsequent course of the disease and, eventually, the need for long-term prophylaxis, these polymorphisms may be helpful prognostic biomarkers of disease severity. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. International consensus on the diagnosis and management of pediatric patients with hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Farkas, H.; Martinez?Saguer, I.; Bork, K.; Bowen, T.; Craig, T.; Frank, M.; Germenis, A. E.; Grumach, A. S.; Luczay, A.; Varga, L.; Zanichelli, A.; Aberer, Werner; Andrejevic, Sladjana; Aygoeren?P?rs?n, Emel; Banerji, Alena

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The consensus documents published to date on hereditary angioedema with C1 inhibitor deficiency (C1-INH-HAE) have focused on adult patients. Many of the previous recommendations have not been adapted to pediatric patients. We intended to produce consensus recommendations for the diagnosis and management of pediatric patients with C1-INH-HAE.METHODS: During an expert panel meeting that took place during the 9th C1 Inhibitor Deficiency Workshop in Budapest, 2015 (www.haenet.hu), ped...

  4. Complement C1q regulates LPS-induced cytokine production in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masahide; Oritani, Kenji; Kaisho, Tsuneyasu; Ishikawa, Jun; Yoshida, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Isao; Kawamoto, Shinichirou; Ishida, Naoko; Ujiie, Hidetoshi; Masaie, Hiroaki; Botto, Marina; Tomiyama, Yoshiaki; Matsuzawa, Yuji

    2004-01-01

    We show here that C1q suppresses IL-12p40 production in LPS-stimulated murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDC). Serum IL-12p40 concentration of C1q-deficient mice was higher than that of wild-type mice after intraperitoneal LPS-injection. Because neither globular head of C1q (gC1q) nor collagen-like region of C1q (cC1q) failed to suppress LPS-induced IL-12p40 production, both gC1q and cC1q, and/or some specialized conformation of native C1q may be required for the inhibition. While C1q did not affect mRNA expression of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), MD-2, and myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88), BMDC treated with C1q showed the reduced activity of NF-kappaB and the delayed phosphorylation of p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase after LPS-stimulation. CpG oligodeoxynucleotide-induced IL-12p40 and TNF-alpha production, another MyD88-dependent TLR-mediated signal, was also suppressed by C1q treatment. Therefore, C1q is likely to suppress MyD88-dependent pathway in TLR-mediated signals. In contrast, C1q failed to suppress colony formation of B cells responding to LPS or LPS-induced CD40 and CD86 expression on BMDC in MyD88-deficient mice, indicating that inhibitory effects of C1q on MyD88-independent pathways may be limited. Taken together, C1q may regulate innate and adaptive immune systems via modification of signals mediated by interactions between invading pathogens and TLR.

  5. DC-SIGN, C1q, and gC1qR form a trimolecular receptor complex on the surface of monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosszu, Kinga K.; Valentino, Alisa; Vinayagasundaram, Uma; Vinayagasundaram, Rama; Joyce, M. Gordon; Ji, Yan; Peerschke, Ellinor I. B.

    2012-01-01

    C1q modulates the differentiation and function of cells committed to the monocyte-derived dendritic cell (DC) lineage. Because the 2 C1q receptors found on the DC surface—gC1qR and cC1qR—lack a direct conduit into intracellular elements, we postulated that the receptors must form complexes with transmembrane partners. In the present study, we show that DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin expressed on DCs, binds directly to C1q, as assessed by ELISA, flow cytometry, and immunoprecipitation experiments. Surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the interaction was specific, and both intact C1q and the globular portion of C1q bound to DC-SIGN. Whereas IgG reduced this binding significantly, the Arg residues (162-163) of the C1q-A chain, which are thought to contribute to the C1q-IgG interaction, were not required for C1q binding to DC-SIGN. Binding was reduced significantly in the absence of Ca2+ and by preincubation of DC-SIGN with mannan, suggesting that C1q binds to DC-SIGN at its principal Ca2+-binding pocket, which has increased affinity for mannose residues. Antigen-capture ELISA and immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that C1q and gC1qR associate with DC-SIGN on blood DC precursors and immature DCs. The results of the present study suggest that C1q/gC1qR may regulate DC differentiation and function through the DC-SIGN–mediated induction of cell-signaling pathways. PMID:22700724

  6. Improvements Realized on the NiThrowTM Solution - 13075

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moggia, F.; Objois, L.; Damerval, F.; Toulemonde, V.; Varet, T.; Guillot, S.; Richard, F.

    2013-01-01

    such as corners..). In this paper, the 'step by step' strategy to achieve those ambitious developments will be presented with a special attention to the NiThrow TM carrier development. (authors)

  7. Evaluation of land use classification accuracy based upon TM and CBERS-02B HR data fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guifang; Lu, Heli

    2010-11-01

    Data fusions from SAR and TM, SPOT and TM, ASTER and TM, MODIS and ETM, etc are the common methods. But that from TM and CBERS-02B is rare. With HR camera working in September 19th 2007, Chinese-Brazil Earth Resources Satellite 02B (CBERS-02B) became the first civilian high-resolution satellite in China. It could provide 2.36m panchromatic image which is better to Landsat TM. Meanwhile the spectral resolution of TM is better than CBERS-02B. So it's a good idea to take advantage of benefits from CBERS-02B HR and TM through data fusion. In this study, images of TM and CBERS-02B HR in 2007 were used as data sources. After image registration and noiseremoval process, data fusion methods of IHS and PCA were adopted. Then unsupervised classification and supervised classification were used for land use classification. Finally, classification accuracy between original image and fusion image was compared and evaluated. The result shows: (1) Compared with original TM or CBERS-02B HR image, the fusion image not only retains abundance spectrum but also enhances the object details. Residential texture, lake morphological, the relative position between roads, industrial and mining sites, etc, was identified easily. (2) Results from IHS and PCA are different. IHS image had higher spatial resolution but more spectral distortion. Spectral differences between some objects became smaller and classification accuracy was lower. Supervised classification accuracy assessment shows that overall Kappa index and overall land use classification accuracy decreased by 0.237 and 11% respectively. Meanwhile PCA image not only had high spatial resolution, but also smaller spectral distortion. Different land use / cover types can be better distinguished. (3) Disadvantages of low spatial resolution in TM and single color in CBERS-02B HR image are overcome in PCA fusion image to a certain extent. In this research under supervised classification in PCA image Kappa index of farm land, forest land and

  8. Coevolution and hierarchical interactions of Tomato mosaic virus and the resistance gene Tm-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Ishibashi

    Full Text Available During antagonistic coevolution between viruses and their hosts, viruses have a major advantage by evolving more rapidly. Nevertheless, viruses and their hosts coexist and have coevolved, although the processes remain largely unknown. We previously identified Tm-1 that confers resistance to Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV, and revealed that it encodes a protein that binds ToMV replication proteins and inhibits RNA replication. Tm-1 was introgressed from a wild tomato species Solanum habrochaites into the cultivated tomato species Solanum lycopersicum. In this study, we analyzed Tm-1 alleles in S. habrochaites. Although most part of this gene was under purifying selection, a cluster of nonsynonymous substitutions in a small region important for inhibitory activity was identified, suggesting that the region is under positive selection. We then examined the resistance of S. habrochaites plants to ToMV. Approximately 60% of 149 individuals from 24 accessions were resistant to ToMV, while the others accumulated detectable levels of coat protein after inoculation. Unexpectedly, many S. habrochaites plants were observed in which even multiplication of the Tm-1-resistance-breaking ToMV mutant LT1 was inhibited. An amino acid change in the positively selected region of the Tm-1 protein was responsible for the inhibition of LT1 multiplication. This amino acid change allowed Tm-1 to bind LT1 replication proteins without losing the ability to bind replication proteins of wild-type ToMV. The antiviral spectra and biochemical properties suggest that Tm-1 has evolved by changing the strengths of its inhibitory activity rather than diversifying the recognition spectra. In the LT1-resistant S. habrochaites plants inoculated with LT1, mutant viruses emerged whose multiplication was not inhibited by the Tm-1 allele that confers resistance to LT1. However, the resistance-breaking mutants were less competitive than the parental strains in the absence of Tm-1. Based on

  9. 18 CFR 3c.1 - Cross-reference to employee ethical conduct standards and financial disclosure regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... employee ethical conduct standards and financial disclosure regulations. 3c.1 Section 3c.1 Conservation of... STANDARDS OF CONDUCT § 3c.1 Cross-reference to employee ethical conduct standards and financial disclosure... branch-wide financial disclosure regulations at 5 CFR part 2634, the Standards of Ethical Conduct for...

  10. 17 CFR 230.160 - Registered investment company exemption from Section 101(c)(1) of the Electronic Signatures in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... exemption from Section 101(c)(1) of the Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act. 230.160...(c)(1) of the Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act. A prospectus for an... 101(c)(1) of the Electronic Signatures in Global and National Commerce Act. [65 FR 47284, Aug. 2, 2000] ...

  11. Counting Tm dopant atoms around GaN dots using high-angle annular dark field images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouvière, J-L; Okuno, H; Jouneau, P H; Bayle-Guillemaud, P; Daudin, B

    2011-01-01

    High resolution Z-contrast STEM imaging is used to study the Tm doping of GaN quantum dots grown in AlN by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). High-angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging allows us to visualize directly individual Tm atoms in the AlN matrix and even to count the number of Tm atoms in a given AlN atomic column. A new visibility coefficient to determine quantitatively the number of Tm atoms in a given atomic column is introduced. It is based on locally integrated intensities rather than on peak intensities of HAADF images. STEM image simulations shows that this new visibility is less sensitive to the defocus-induced blurring or to the position of the Tm atom within the thin lamella. Most of the Tm atoms diffuse out of GaN dots. Tm atoms are found at different positions in the AlN matrix, (i) Above the wetting layer, Tm atoms are spread within a thickness of 14 AlN monolayers (MLs). (ii) Above the quantum dots all the Tm are located in the same plane situated at 2-3 MLs above the apex of the GaN dot, i.e. at a distance of 14 MLs from the wetting layer, (iii) In addition, Tm can diffuse very far from the GaN dot by following threading dislocations lines.

  12. Everything you need to know to operate on Day-Ahead{sup TM}; Tout ce que vous devez savoir pour intervenir sur Powernext Day-Ahead{sup TM}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-05-15

    The introduction of a power exchange in France is a direct response to the opening up of the European electricity markets. Powernext SA is a Multilateral Trading Facility in charge of managing the French power exchange through an optional and anonymous organised exchange offering: - Day-ahead contracts for the management of volume risk on Powernext Day-Ahead{sup TM} since 21 November 2001, - Medium term contracts for the management of price risk on Powernext Futures{sup TM} since 18 June 2004. This document is the user's guide of Powernext Day-Ahead{sup TM}. It presents: 1 - the power exchange in France (market model, Powernext's regulatory environment, general market operations, 2 - Powernext Day-Ahead{sup TM} members (membership, agreement, start-up notification, tariffs, standing obligations, membership termination), 3 - Powernext Day-Ahead{sup TM} products (specifications, management), 4 - trading (connections, system flow chart, ElWeb client installation and daily connections, portfolio-management, single bidding, type of order, submitting, importing, saving, sending, modifying or canceling an order form, transmission problems, block bidding block bid characteristics, sending, saving, transmitting, modifying and canceling a block bid, price calculations, blind auction procedure, example, taking into account block bids, rounding off rules, consulting and saving the results, sample documents, auction validation), 5 - clearing (LCH.Clearnet SA, legal framework, clearing agreement, PP-DPES agreement, market security, initial margin, daily adjustments, additional margin calls, trade-related financial flows, net financial position, value-added tax, settlement statements, general idea, characteristics and transmission method of settlement statements sample Documents, cash calls, settlement, default, sample cash call documents, financial Reports), 6 - delivery (balance responsible entity, file characteristics and transmission, imbalance settlement

  13. Posturografia do Balance Rehabilitation Unit (BRU TM na vertigem posicional paroxística benigna Balance Rehabilitation Unit (BRU TM posturography in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Roberta Gesteira Monteiro

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A posturografia tem sido utilizada na avaliação de pacientes com vestibulopatias. OBJETIVO: Avaliar o equilíbrio corporal à posturografia do Balance Rehabilitation Unit (BRU TM em pacientes com vertigem posicional paroxística benigna (VPPB. Desenho de Estudo: Caso controle prospectivo. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Estudo transversal controlado em 45 pacientes com VPPB e por um grupo controle homogêneo constituído de 45 indivíduos hígidos. Os pacientes foram submetidos à avaliação otoneurológica, incluindo a posturografia do Balance Rehabilitation Unit (BRU TM. RESULTADOS: A média dos valores da área de elipse e da velocidade de oscilação no grupo experimental foi significantemente maior (p Posturography has been used in the evaluation of patients with vestibular disorders. AIM: To evaluate balance control with the Balance Rehabilitation Unit (BRU TM posturography in patients with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo. Study design: Prospective case-control. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional controlled study was carried out in 45 patients with BPPV, and a homogeneous control group consisting of 45 healthy individuals. Patients were submitted to a balance function evaluation by means of the Balance Rehabilitation Unit (BRU TM posturography. RESULTS: The mean values of the ellipse area and the sway velocity in a firm surface and saccadic stimulation (p = 0.060. CONCLUSION: The Balance Rehabilitation Unit (BRU TM posturography enables to identify postural control abnormalities in patients with BPPV.

  14. Use of the Aromascan(TM) Instrument for Nonsubjective Evaluation of Rodent Spaceflight Hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribner, K. A.; Steele, M. K.; Hinds, W. E.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the verification and utilization of the AromaScan(TM) (Hollis, NH) instrument for the ground-based evaluation of odor containment by various spaceflight habitats developed at NASA's Ames Research Center (ARC). The AromaScan(TM) instrument is an electronic odor detection system consisting of 32 polymer sensors that respond differentially to 10 different chemical groups present in an air sample. The AromaScan(TM) system also includes neural network software for constructing a database of known odors, against which an unknown odor can be compared. At present, the standard method for characterizing rodent odor containment during the development and testing of spaceflight hardware is the use of a human odor assessment panel. However, this can be a very time consuming and costly process, and the results are inherently subjective. The AromaScan(TM) system should produce more consistent and objective results, as well as a cost savings in the long term. To test and verify the AromaScan(TM) instrument, daily air samples will be collected from the exhaust port of rodent habitats, during experiment development tests, then injected into the instrument and used to create a database of recognizable odors. Human sniff tests will be performed in conjunction with the AromaScan(TM) analysis, and the results will be correlated. We will then teach the neural network to differentiate between an acceptable and an unacceptable odor profile, as defined by the human sniff test, and to be able to accurately identify an odor that would not pass a sniff panel. The results of our efforts will be to verify that the AromaScan(TM) system is a valuable alternative to human sniff panel assessments for the early iterative process of designing and testing rodent waste filters for spaceflight. Acceptance by a human panel will remain one of the final criteria for successful rodent habitat development.

  15. Crystal growth and characterization of Tm doped mixed rare-earth aluminum perovskite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Totsuka, Daisuke, E-mail: totsuka@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Nihon Kessho Kogaku Co., Ltd., 810-5 Nobe-cho, Tatebayashi, Gunma 374-0047 (Japan); Yanagida, Takayuki [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), 6-6-10 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan); Sugiyama, Makoto; Fujimoto, Yutaka; Yokota, Yuui [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Akira [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), 6-6-10 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer (Lu{sub x}Gd{sub y}Y{sub 0.99-x-y}Tm{sub 0.01})AP single crystals were grown by the {mu}-PD method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The grown crystals were single phase with perovskite structure (Pbnm). Significant segregation of Lu and Gd was detected in the growth direction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some absorption bands due to Tm{sup 3+}, Gd{sup 3+} and color centers were exhibited. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radioluminescence spectra showed several emission peaks ascribed to Tm{sup 3+} and Gd{sup 3+}. -- Abstract: In this work, we present results of structural characterization and optical properties including radio luminescence of (Lu{sub x}Gd{sub y}Y{sub 0.99-x-y}Tm{sub 0.01})AP single crystal scintillators for (x, y) = (0.30, 0.19), (0, 0.19) and (0, 0) grown by the micro-pulling-down ({mu}-PD) method. The grown crystals were single phase materials with perovskite structure (Pbnm) as confirmed by XRD and had a good crystallinity. The distribution of the crystal constituents in growth direction was evaluated, and significant segregation of Lu and Gd was detected in (Lu{sub 0.30}Gd{sub 0.19}Y{sub 0.50}Tm{sub 0.01})AP sample. The crystals demonstrated 70% transmittance in visible wavelength range and some absorption bands due to Tm{sup 3+}, Gd{sup 3+} and color centers were exhibited in 190-900 nm. The radioluminescence measurement under X-ray irradiation demonstrated several emission peaks ascribed to 4f-4f transitions of Tm{sup 3+} and Gd{sup 3+}. The ratio of emission intensity in longer wavelength range was increased when Y was replaced by Lu or Gd.

  16. Electrochemical study of Tm (III) ions on W and oxo acidity reactions in the LiCI-KCI eutectic; Estudio electroquimico de disoluciones de Tm (III) sobre W y reacciones de oxoacidez en el eutectico LiCI.-KCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez Requejo, P.

    2010-07-01

    Study of the electrochemical behaviour of Tm (III) dissolutions in the LiCI-KCI eutectic mixture using inert electrodes (W) and reagent electrodes (Al). On W, TM (III) ions are reduced in two consecutives stages sufficiently separated. The TM electro-reduction on Al makes room for the formation of intermetallic compounds so the use of an Ai electrode is appropriate to decontamination operations.

  17. Fishing for biodiversity: Novel methanopterin-linked C1 transfergenes deduced from the Sargasso Sea metagenome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Nercessian, Olivier; Lapidus, Alla; Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2004-07-01

    The recently generated database of microbial genes from anoligotrophic environment populated by a calculated 1,800 of major phylotypes (the Sargasso Sea metagenome) presents a great source for expanding local databases of genes indicative of a specific function. In this paper we analyze the Sargasso Sea metagenome in terms of the presence of methanopterin-linked C1 transfer genes that are signature for methylotrophy. We conclude that more than 10 phylotypes possessing genes of interest are present in this environment, and a few of these are relatively abundant species. The sequences representative of the major phylotypes do not appear to belong to any known microbial group capable of methanopterin-linked C1 transfer. Instead, they separate from all known sequences on phylogenetic trees, pointing towards their affiliation with a novel microbial phylum. These data imply a broader distribution of methanopterin-linked functions in the microbial world than previously known.

  18. Cytochrome c and c1 heme lyases are essential in Plasmodium berghei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posayapisit, Navaporn; Songsungthong, Warangkhana; Koonyosying, Pongpisid; Falade, Mofolusho O; Uthaipibull, Chairat; Yuthavong, Yongyuth; Shaw, Philip J; Kamchonwongpaisan, Sumalee

    Malaria parasites possess a de novo heme synthetic pathway. Interestingly, this pathway is dispensable during the blood stages of development in mammalian hosts. The assembly of the two most important hemeproteins, cytochromes c and c1, is mediated by cytochrome heme lyase enzymes. Plasmodium spp. possess two cytochrome heme lyases encoded by separate genes. Given the redundancy of heme synthesis, we sought to determine if heme lyase function also exhibits redundancy. To answer this question, we performed gene knockout experiments. We found that the PBANKA_143950 and PBANKA_0602600 Plasmodium berghei genes encoding cytochrome c (Pbcchl) and cytochrome c1 (Pbcc 1 hl) heme lyases, respectively, can only be disrupted when a complementary gene is present. In contrast, four genes in the de novo heme synthesis pathway can be disrupted without complementation. This work provides evidence that Pbcchl and Pbcc 1 hl are both essential and thus may be antimalarial targets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. 1/2-BPS correlators as c = 1 S-matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jevicki, Antal; Yoneya, Tamiaki

    2007-01-01

    We argue from two complementary viewpoints of Holography that the 2-point correlation functions of 1/2-BPS multi-trace operators in the large-N (planar) limit are nothing but the (Wick-rotated) S-matrix elements of c = 1 matrix model. On the bulk side, we consider an Euclideanized version of the so-called bubbling geometries and show that the corresponding droplets reach the conformal boundary. Then the scattering matrix of fluctuations of the droplets gives directly the two-point correlators through the GKPW prescription. On the Yang-Mills side, we show that the two-point correlators of holomorphic and anti-holomorphic operators are essentially equivalent with the transformation functions between asymptotic in- and out-states of c = 1 matrix model. Extension to non-planar case is also discussed

  20. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2003-03-31

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of transportation fuel from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, Energy International, the Department of Defense, and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research.

  1. The C1XS X-ray Spectrometer on Chandrayaan-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, M.; Maddison, B. J.; Howe, C. J.; Kellett, B. J.; Sreekumar, P.; Huovelin, J.; Crawford, I. A.; Duston, C. L.; Smith, D.; Anand, M.; Bhandari, N.; Cook, A.; Fernandes, V.; Foing, B.; Gasnaut, O.; Goswami, J. N.; Holland, A.; Joy, K. H.; Kochney, D.; Lawrence, D.; Maurice, S.; Okada, T.; Narendranath, S.; Pieters, C.; Rothery, D.; Russell, S. S.; Shrivastava, A.; Swinyard, B.; Wilding, M.; Wieczorek, M.

    2009-06-01

    The Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spectrometer (C1XS) is a compact X-ray spectrometer for the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) Chandrayaan-1 lunar mission. It exploits heritage from the D-CIXS instrument on ESA's SMART-1 mission. As a result of detailed developments to all aspects of the design, its performance as measured in the laboratory greatly surpasses that of D-CIXS. In comparison with SMART-1, Chandrayaan-1 is a science-oriented rather than a technology mission, leading to far more favourable conditions for science measurements. C1XS is designed to measure absolute and relative abundances of major rock-forming elements (principally Mg, Al, Si, Ca and Fe) in the lunar crust with spatial resolution ⩽25 FWHM km, and to achieve relative elemental abundances of better than 10%.

  2. Electrodril system field test program. Phase II: Task C-1-deep drilling system demonstration. Final report for Phase II: Task C-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, P D

    1981-04-01

    The Electrodril Deep Drilling System field test demonstrations were aborted in July 1979, due to connector problems. Subsequent post test analyses concluded that the field replacable connectors were the probable cause of the problems encountered. The designs for both the male and female connectors, together with their manufacturing processes, were subsequently modified, as was the acceptance test procedures. A total of nine male and nine female connectors were manufactured and delivered during the 2nd Quarter 1980. Exhaustive testing was then conducted on each connector as a precursor to formal qualification testing conducted during the month of October 1980, at the Brown Oil Tool test facility located in Houston, Texas. With this report, requirements under Phase II, Task C-1 are satisfied. The report documents the results of the connector qualification test program which was successfully completed October 28, 1980. In general, it was concluded that connector qualification had been achieved and plans are now in progress to resume the field test demonstration program so that Electrodril System performance predictions and economic viability can be evaluated.

  3. Rapid Reactivation of Deep Subsurface Microbes in the Presence of C-1 Compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauliina Rajala

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms in the deep biosphere are believed to conduct little metabolic activity due to low nutrient availability in these environments. However, destructive penetration to long-isolated bedrock environments during construction of underground waste repositories can lead to increased nutrient availability and potentially affect the long-term stability of the repository systems, Here, we studied how microorganisms present in fracture fluid from a depth of 500 m in Outokumpu, Finland, respond to simple carbon compounds (C-1 compounds in the presence or absence of sulphate as an electron acceptor. C-1 compounds such as methane and methanol are important intermediates in the deep subsurface carbon cycle, and electron acceptors such as sulphate are critical components of oxidation processes. Fracture fluid samples were incubated in vitro with either methane or methanol in the presence or absence of sulphate as an electron acceptor. Metabolic response was measured by staining the microbial cells with fluorescent dyes that indicate metabolic activity and transcriptional response with RT-qPCR. Our results show that deep subsurface microbes exist in dormant states but rapidly reactivate their transcription and respiration systems in the presence of C-1 substrates, particularly methane. Microbial activity was further enhanced by the addition of sulphate as an electron acceptor. Sulphate- and nitrate-reducing microbes were particularly responsive to the addition of C-1 compounds and sulphate. These taxa are common in deep biosphere environments and may be affected by conditions disturbed by bedrock intrusion, as from drilling and excavation for long-term storage of hazardous waste.

  4. Explicit Gaussian quadrature rules for C^1 cubic splines with symmetrically stretched knot sequence

    KAUST Repository

    Ait-Haddou, Rachid

    2015-06-19

    We provide explicit expressions for quadrature rules on the space of C^1 cubic splines with non-uniform, symmetrically stretched knot sequences. The quadrature nodes and weights are derived via an explicit recursion that avoids an intervention of any numerical solver and the rule is optimal, that is, it requires minimal number of nodes. Numerical experiments validating the theoretical results and the error estimates of the quadrature rules are also presented.

  5. Impaired Autophagy in the Lipid-Storage Disorder Niemann-Pick Type C1 Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sarkar, Sovan; Carroll, Bernadette; Buganim, Yosef; Maetzel, Dorothea; Ng, Alex H.M.; Cassady, John P.; Cohen, Malkiel A.; Chakraborty, Souvik; Wang, Haoyi; Spooner, Eric; Ploegh, Hidde; Gsponer, Joerg; Korolchuk, Viktor I.; Jaenisch, Rudolf

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy dysfunction has been implicated in misfolded protein accumulation and cellular toxicity in several diseases. Whether alterations in autophagy also contribute to the pathology of lipid-storage disorders is not clear. Here, we show defective autophagy in Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) disease associated with cholesterol accumulation, where the maturation of autophagosomes is impaired because of defective amphisome formation caused by failure in SNARE machinery, whereas the lysosomal prot...

  6. Treatment of hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloisa Malbrán

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of the worldwide approval of new drugs for the treatment of acute C1-INH-HAE attacks may still not reach all patients. Identifying the current barriers in the access to medication, as well as conducting a detailed assessment of the progress in this area, is essential to achieve universal treatment. Two hundred and twenty five patients registered in the Argentina Hereditary Angioedema Patient Association (AHAEPA were randomly selected and invited to participate in a web based questionnaire on accessibility to icatibant and pdC1-INH, self-treatment, delay to treatment, and coverage. The data retrieved was compared to our previous reports in 2008 and 2013. We collected 156/225 answers. One hundred and eighteen (76% patients have either pdC1-INH (n = 86, icatibant (n = 10 or both (n = 22, while 38 (24% do not have access to treatment. In 2008, 26% had access while 82% had it in 2013. Thirty-two subjects (22% self-inject themselves, similar to 29% in 2013, even though between studies, widespread self-injection training activities have taken place. However, considering injections by proxy, home treatment reached 56%. Only half of the patients decide to receive treatment early during the attack. Ninety-nine patients (63% have full coverage, thirty (19% have no coverage at all and the rest only obtain partial reimbursement. Twenty-nine families (31% share a single treatment dose of the medication, better than 36% in 2013. Argentina's C1-INH-HAE patients had a sustained improvement in their access to medication. Efforts should continue to further improve accessibility and optimal management of HAE acute attacks to all patients in the country.

  7. Cloning and tissue expression of cytochrome P450 1B1 and 1C1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cytochrome P450 1 (CYP1) is widely used as an indicator of exposure to environmental contaminants. In the study, two full-length complementary DNAs encode for CYP1B1 and CYP1C1 were cloned from medaka liver exposed to 500 ppb β-naphthoflavone for 24 h. CYP1B1, having 1984 bp, contains an open reading ...

  8. Polygonumnolides C1-C4; minor dianthrone glycosides from the roots of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian-Bo; Li, Li; Dai, Zhong; Wu, Yu; Geng, Xing-Chao; Li, Bo; Ma, Shuang-Cheng; Wang, Ai-Guo; Su, Ya-Lun

    2016-09-01

    Four new dianthrone glycosides, named polygonumnolides C1-C4 (1-4), were isolated from the dried roots of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb, together with two known emodin dianthrones (5-6). Their hepatotoxicities were evaluated against L-02 cell lines. Compounds 1-4 showed weak hepatotoxicity against L-02 cell lines with IC50 values of 313.05, 205.20, 294.20, and 207.35 μM, respectively.

  9. Overcoming Intrinsic Restriction Enzyme Barriers Enhances Transformation Efficiency in Arthrospira platensis C1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeamton, Wattana; Dulsawat, Sudarat; Tanticharoen, Morakot; Vonshak, Avigad; Cheevadhanarak, Supapon

    2017-04-01

    The development of a reliable genetic transformation system for Arthrospira platensis has been a long-term goal, mainly for those trying either to improve its performance in large-scale cultivation systems or to enhance its value as food and feed additives. However, so far, most of the attempts to develop such a transformation system have had limited success. In this study, an efficient and stable transformation system for A. platensis C1 was successfully developed. Based on electroporation and transposon techniques, exogenous DNA could be transferred to and stably maintained in the A. platensis C1 genome. Most strains of Arthrospira possess strong restriction barriers, hampering the development of a gene transfer system for this group of cyanobacteria. By using a type I restriction inhibitor and liposomes to protect the DNA from nuclease digestion, the transformation efficiency was significantly improved. The transformants were able to grow on a selective medium for more than eight passages, and the transformed DNA could be detected from the stable transformants. We propose that the intrinsic endonuclease enzymes, particularly the type I restriction enzyme, in A. platensis C1 play an important role in the transformation efficiency of this industrial important cyanobacterium. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Recombinant human C1-inhibitor prevents acute antibody-mediated rejection in alloimmunized baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillou, Xavier; Poirier, Nicolas; Le Bas-Bernardet, Stéphanie; Hervouet, Jeremy; Minault, David; Renaudin, Karine; Vistoli, Fabio; Karam, Georges; Daha, Mohamed; Soulillou, Jean Paul; Blancho, Gilles

    2010-07-01

    Acute antibody-mediated rejection is an unsolved issue in transplantation, especially in the context of pretransplant immunization. The deleterious effect of preformed cytotoxic anti-HLA antibodies through complement activation is well proven, but very little is known concerning complement blockade to prevent/cure this rejection. Here, we used a baboon model of preimmunization to explore the prevention of acute antibody-mediated rejection by an early inhibition of the classical complement pathway using human recombinant C1-inhibitor. Baboons were immunized against peripheral blood mononuclear cells from allogeneic donors and, once a specific and stable immunization had been established, they received a kidney from the same donor. Rejection occurred at day 2 posttransplant in untreated presensitized recipients, with characteristic histological lesions and complement deposition. As recombinant human C1-inhibitor blocks in vitro cytotoxicity induced by donor-specific antibodies, other alloimmunized baboons received the drug thrice daily intravenously during the first 5 days after transplant. Rejection was prevented during this treatment but occurred after discontinuation of treatment. We show here that early blockade of complement activation by recombinant human C1-inhibitor can prevent acute antibody-mediated rejection in presensitized recipients. This treatment could also be useful in other forms of acute antibody-mediated rejection caused by induced antibodies.

  11. Clinical presentation of human C1q deficiency: How much of a lupus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegert, Mihaela; Bock, Merete; Trendelenburg, Marten

    2015-09-01

    Hereditary human C1q deficiency has been well described to be associated with high susceptibility for the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The majority of subjects present a clinical syndrome closely related to SLE. However, limited information is available about the primary diagnosis and particular clinical manifestations of SLE in this specific subgroup of patients. In this review, we performed a comprehensive search of electronic databases up to November 2014 to identify and analyze reports on patients with C1q deficiency. We identified 71 C1q-deficient patients descending from 45 families that had been published. According to the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) diagnostic criteria for SLE 39/71 (55%) subjects could be classified as having SLE. Another 16/71 (22.5%) presented a SLE-like syndrome (defined as 3 positive ACR criteria) whereas in 16/71 (22.5%) no SLE could be diagnosed at time of publication. Symptoms began at a median age of 5 years, male and females being equally affected. Discoid rash (56% versus 10%, poral ulcers (49% versus 24%, pmanifestations were found to occur similarly frequent. The severe course of disease in some patients seemed to be mostly due to severe infections at early ages and not in particular due to more aggressive SLE manifestations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Initial Results from the C1XS X-Ray Spectrometer on Chandrayaan-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grande, M.; Kellett, B. J.; Maddison, B.. J.; Sreekumar, P.; Huovelin, J.; Howe, C. J.; Crawford, I. A.

    2009-04-01

    The Chandrayaan-1 lunar mission, which was successfully launched by the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) on 22 October, carried as part of its payload the C1XS Chandrayaan-1 X-ray Spec-trometer [1]. It exploits heritage from the D-CIXS instrument [2] on ESA's SMART-1 mission. Whereas SMART-1 was a technology mission, Chandrayaan-1 is science oriented, with a far more favourable orbit for science measurements. C1XS is designed to measure abundances of major rock-forming elements (princi-pally Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti and Fe). The instrument has been commissioned, and is operating nominally. The Sun continues to show X-ray emission charac-teristic of the Solar minimum. As has been commented by [7], the onset of this solar maximum is significantly delayed. However, C1XS has been able to observe the Moon even in these very low illumination conditions. Figure 3 shows the result of an integration during an A class flare on the 12th Dec. 2008. Characteristic energy lines at Mg, Al and Si are clearly seen and resolved from the average extreme quiet time data background. This performance shows that the instrument is easily meeting its design requirements, and in the higher illumination conditions expected during the rest of the mission will be capable of meeting its science goals.

  13. M5TM alloy high burnup behavior and worldwide licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mardon, J.P.; Hoffmann, P.B.; Garner, G.L.

    2005-01-01

    The in-reactor behavior of advanced PWR Zirconium alloys at burnups equal to or below licensing limits has been widely reported. Specifically, the advanced alloy M5 has demonstrated impressive improvements over Zircaloy-4 for fuel rod cladding and fuel assembly structural components. To demonstrate superiority of the alloy at burnups beyond current licensing limits, M5 has been operated in PWR at burnups exceeding 71 GWd/tU in the United States and 78 GWd/tU in Europe. Two extensive irradiation programs have been performed in the United States to demonstrate alloy M5 performance beyond current licensing limits. Four M5 TM fuel rods were exposed to four 24-month cycles in a 15x15 reactor beginning in 1995. Additionally, one 17x17 lead assembly containing M5 fuel rods and guide tubes was operated for four 18-month cycles beginning from 1997. Post-irradiation examinations (PIE) performed after all four cycles in the 15x15 demonstration program revealed excellent performance in the licensed burnup and in the high burnup stages of the experience. Examination of the 4th cycle 17x17 assembly will be accomplished in two stages the first of which is scheduled for June 2005. Moreover, several irradiation campaigns have been performed in Europe in order to confirm the excellent M5 in-pile behavior in demanding PWRs irradiation conditions with regard to void fraction, heat flux, lithium content and temperature. Results from the high burnup fuel examinations verify that the excellent performance achieved up to 62 GWd/tU was continued into higher burnup. The results of high burnup PIE campaigns for European and American PWR's are presented in this paper. Measured performance indicators include fuel assembly dimensional stability parameters (assembly length, fuel rod length, assembly bow, fuel rod bow, fuel rod radial creep and spacer grid width), oxidation measurements (fuel rod and guide tube) and hydrogen pick-up data (fuel rod). In the framework of PCI studies, power ramp

  14. Control of the energy transfer between Tm3+ and Yb3+ ions in Tm,Yb-codoped ZnO grown by sputtering-assisted metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatebayashi, J.; Yoshii, G.; Nakajima, T.; Kamei, H.; Takatsu, J.; Lebrun, D. M.; Fujiwara, Y.

    2018-04-01

    We report on the epitaxial growth and the optical properties of Tm,Yb-codoped ZnO (ZnO:Tm,Yb) thin films by sputtering-assisted metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The characteristic light emission due to the intra-4f shell transitions of Tm3+ and Yb3+ ions in the ZnO host is observed at 4 K by using photoluminescence (PL) characterization. The time-resolved PL measurements on the Tm3+ and Yb3+ emission reveals that the carrier decay time of each ion can vary by changing the concentration of both Tm3+ and Yb3+ ions, which depends on a mixing ratio of Tm2O3 and Yb2O3 in a sputtering target. The energy transfer from Tm3+ to Yb3+ ions occurs in the sample with the high mixing ratio, and the reversed energy transfer process occurs with the lower mixing ratio. These results indicate that the concentration, and thus the carrier dynamics of Tm3+ and Yb3+ ions in the ZnO:Tm,Yb host, can be controlled by altering the mixing ratio of the sputter target and the frequency power.

  15. Crystal Chemistry and Magnetism of Ternary Actinoid Boron Carbides UB 1- xC 1+ x and U 1- xMxB 2C with M = Sc, Lu, and Th

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogl, P.; Rupp, B.; Felner, I.; Fischer, P.

    1993-06-01

    ). ThB 2C and 1-UB 2C both are temperature independent paramagnets, whereas h-UB 2C is a ferromagnet with the rather high Curie temperature TM = 80(2) K. TM and the saturation magnetiziation per U atom both successively decrease on substitution of U by Th, Sc, or Lu in UB 2C, whereas the U-moments remain practically unchanged at μ eff(U) ˜ 1.9 μ B. Uranium L 3-XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure) spectroscopy revealed increased d-band localization, comparable to uranium-transition metal alloys, in nonmagnetic UB 1- xC 1+ x ( x = 0, 0.22). No superconductivity was observed down to 1.5 K; no hydrogen uptake was observed for UB 2C and ThB 2C even under hydrogen pressures as high as 7 × 10 7 Pa at 670 K.

  16. Lyme Disease and YouTubeTM: A Cross-Sectional Study of Video Contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Corey H.; Mullican, Lindsay A.; Boone, Kwanza D.; Yin, Jingjing; Berdnik, Alyssa; Eremeeva, Marina E.; Fung, Isaac Chun-Hai

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne disease. People seek health information on Lyme disease from YouTubeTM videos. In this study, we investigated if the contents of Lyme disease-related YouTubeTM videos varied by their sources. Methods Most viewed English YouTubeTM videos (n = 100) were identified and manually coded for contents and sources. Results Within the sample, 40 videos were consumer-generated, 31 were internet-based news, 16 were professional, and 13 were TV news. Compared with consumer-generated videos, TV news videos were more likely to mention celebrities (odds ratio [OR], 10.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.13–52.58), prevention of Lyme disease through wearing protective clothing (OR, 5.63; 95% CI, 1.23–25.76), and spraying insecticides (OR, 7.71; 95% CI, 1.52–39.05). Conclusion A majority of the most popular Lyme disease-related YouTubeTM videos were not created by public health professionals. Responsible reporting and creative video-making facilitate Lyme disease education. Partnership with YouTubeTM celebrities to co-develop educational videos may be a future direction. PMID:28904853

  17. Use of Readycult[tm] - LMX for enumeration of total coliforms and Escherichia coli in milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beloti Vanerli

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Readycult[tm] - LMX is a rapid method to test for the presence of total coliform bacteria and Escherichia coli in water, giving results in 24h. It is based on reactions of specific microbial enzymes or indicator nutrients of the medium. The goal of this paper was to study the use of Readycult[tm] - LMX to detect total coliform and E. coli in milk. One hundred twenty five samples of pasteurized and raw milk, collected in Londrina, PR, Brazil, were tested simultaneously by the most probable number (MPN method using Brilliant Green Bile Lactose Broth (2% (BRILA and Readycult[tm] - LMX. The Readycult[tm] - LMX test was evaluated for sensitivity, simplicity, and speed of results. There was a significant correlation between the results obtained by the two methods for total coliforms (r: 0.8224 and for E. coli (r: 0.8603. The two methods yielded similar results, but Readycult[tm] - LMX was easier to use. In addition, results were available as early as 24h.

  18. Detection of soil erosion within pinyon-juniper woodlands using Thematic Mapper (TM) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Kevin P.

    1993-01-01

    Multispectral measurements collected by Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) were correlated with field measurements, direct soil loss estimates, and Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) estimates to determine the sensitivity of TM data to varying degrees of soil erosion in pinyon-juniper woodland in central Utah. TM data were also evaluated as a predictor of the USLE Crop Management C factor for pinyon-juniper woodlands. TM spectral data were consistently better predictors of soil erosion factors than any combination of field factors. TM data were more sensitive to vegetation variations than the USLE C factor. USLE estimates showed low annual rates of erosion which varied little among the study sites. Direct measurements of rate of soil loss using the SEDIMENT (Soil Erosion DIrect measureMENT) technique, indicated high and varying rates of soil loss among the sites since tree establishment. Erosion estimates from the USLE and SEDIMENT methods suggest that erosion rates have been severe in the past, but because significant amounts of soil have already been eroded, and the surface is now armored by rock debris, present erosion rates are lower. Indicators of accelerated erosion were still present on all sites, however, suggesting that the USLE underestimated erosion within the study area.

  19. 66.7-keV γ -line intensity of 171Tm determined via neutron activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigand, M.; Heftrich, T.; Düllmann, Ch. E.; Eberhardt, K.; Fiebiger, S.; Glorius, J.; Göbel, K.; Haas, R.; Langer, C.; Lohse, S.; Reifarth, R.; Renisch, D.; Wolf, C.

    2018-03-01

    Background: About 50% of the heavy elements are produced in stars during the slow neutron capture process. The analysis of branching points allows to set constraints on the temperature and the neutron density in the interior of stars. The temperature dependence of the branch point 171Tm is weak. Hence, the 171Tm neutron capture cross section can be used to constrain the neutron density during the main component of the s process in thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch stars. Purpose: In order to perform neutron capture experiments on 171Tm, sample material has to be produced and characterized. The characterization is done by γ spectroscopy, relying on the intensities of the involved γ lines. Only the 66.7-keV γ line can be observed whose intensity was uncertain so far. Method: An enriched 170Er sample was activated with thermal neutrons at the TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) research reactor at the Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz. The activation resulted in an easily quantifiable number of 171Er nuclei that subsequently decayed to 171Tm. Result: The intensity of the 66.7-keV γ line of the 171Tm decay was measured to Iγ=(0.144 ±0.010 )% . Conclusions: Our result is in good agreement with the value found in the literature.

  20. Crystal growth, spectroscopic characterization and laser performance of Tm/Mg:LiNbO3 crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, P. X.; Yin, J. G.; Zhang, R.; Li, H. Q.; Xu, J. Q.; Hang, Y.

    2014-03-01

    A Tm, Mg co-doped LiNbO3 crystal was grown by the traditional Czochralski method. The room-temperature absorption, photo-luminescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime of Tm3+ ions in the crystal have been investigated. The experimental results show that the co-doped of MgO can lead to the lengthening of the measured fluorescence lifetime of the upper Tm3+:3F4 level. Based on the Judd-Ofelt approach, the intensity parameters Ω2,4,6 of Tm3+ were calculated to be Ω2 (6.29 × 10-20 cm2), Ω4 (0.54 × 10-20 cm2) and Ω6 (0.79 × 10-20 cm2). Other spectroscopic parameters that relate to laser performance were also obtained. Non-photorefractive continuous wave laser operation with a Tm, Mg:LiNbO3 single crystal is demonstrated at room temperature for the first time. We obtained 1.026 W output power at 1.885 μm with a slope efficiency of near 14%, which, to the best of our knowledge, is the largest output power and the highest slope efficiency obtained for this crystal thus far. The output power was observed to be stable, and the crystal showed no sign of photorefractive damage.

  1. Lyme Disease and YouTubeTM: A Cross-Sectional Study of Video Contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basch, Corey H; Mullican, Lindsay A; Boone, Kwanza D; Yin, Jingjing; Berdnik, Alyssa; Eremeeva, Marina E; Fung, Isaac Chun-Hai

    2017-08-01

    Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne disease. People seek health information on Lyme disease from YouTube TM videos. In this study, we investigated if the contents of Lyme disease-related YouTube TM videos varied by their sources. Most viewed English YouTube TM videos (n = 100) were identified and manually coded for contents and sources. Within the sample, 40 videos were consumer-generated, 31 were internet-based news, 16 were professional, and 13 were TV news. Compared with consumer-generated videos, TV news videos were more likely to mention celebrities (odds ratio [OR], 10.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.13-52.58), prevention of Lyme disease through wearing protective clothing (OR, 5.63; 95% CI, 1.23-25.76), and spraying insecticides (OR, 7.71; 95% CI, 1.52-39.05). A majority of the most popular Lyme disease-related YouTube TM videos were not created by public health professionals. Responsible reporting and creative video-making facilitate Lyme disease education. Partnership with YouTube TM celebrities to co-develop educational videos may be a future direction.

  2. Prevalence of Bacteria of Division TM7 in Human Subgingival Plaque and Their Association with Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinig, Mary M.; Lepp, Paul W.; Ouverney, Cleber C.; Armitage, Gary C.; Relman, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Members of the uncultivated bacterial division TM7 have been detected in the human mouth, but little information is available regarding their prevalence and diversity at this site. Human subgingival plaque samples from healthy sites and sites exhibiting various stages of periodontal disease were analyzed for the presence of TM7 bacteria. TM7 ribosomal DNA (rDNA) was found in 96% of the samples, and it accounted for approximately 0.3%, on average, of all bacterial rDNA in the samples as determined by real-time quantitative PCR. Two new phylotypes of this division were identified, and members of the division were found to exhibit filamentous morphology by fluorescence in situ hybridization. The abundance of TM7 rDNA relative to total bacterial rDNA was higher in sites with mild periodontitis (0.54% ± 0.1%) than in either healthy sites (0.21% ± 0.05%, P < 0.01) or sites with severe periodontitis (0.29% ± 0.06%, P < 0.05). One division subgroup, the I025 phylotype, was detected in 1 of 18 healthy samples and 38 of 58 disease samples. These data suggest that this phylotype, and the TM7 bacterial division in general, may play a role in the multifactorial process leading to periodontitis. PMID:12620860

  3. Evaluation of the MoleMateTM training program for assessment of suspicious pigmented lesions in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annabel Wood

    2008-05-01

    Conclusion The MoleMateTM training program is a potentially effective and acceptable informatics tool to teach practitioners to recognise the features of SPLs identified by the MoleMateTM system. It will be used as part of the intervention in a randomised controlled trial to compare the diagnostic accuracy and appropriate referral rates of practitioners using the MoleMateTM system with best practice in primary care.

  4. Does acetylcholine released within the C1 area of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVL) tonically maintain arterial pressure?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arneric, S.P.; Giuliano, R.; Ernsberger, P.; Underwood, M.D.; Reis, D.J.

    1986-01-01

    The RVL, which contains C1 epinephrine neurons (C1 area), plays a major role in the maintenance and reflex control of arterial pressure (AP). Muscarinic cholinergic stimulation of the C1 area is sympathoexcitatory. They sought to determine whether the C1 area of rat: (1) contains choline acetyltransferase (ChAT); (2) releases acetylcholine (ACh); and (3) has ACh receptors. ChAT was immunocytochemically localized to neurons in the C1 area. ChAT activity (pmol/mg prot./40 min; N=5) varied 10-fold over 19 regions microdissected from medulla; it was highest in the hypoglossal and vagal nuclei (203 +/- 63), lowest in the pyramidal tract (19 +/- 4) and moderate in the C1 area (96 +/- 12). Muscarinic binding sites labeled by 3 H-quinuclidinyl benzylate (2 nM) and identified autoradiographically had a similar distribution. Release of 3 H-ACh from (1.0 x 0.5 mm) punches of the C1 area was Ca 2+ -dependent and graded with respect to the depolarization stimulus (5-55 mM K + ). Bilateral microinjection of atropine sulfate (5.0 nmol/100nl) into the C1 area of urethane anesthetized rats, but not adjacent raphen., lowered MAP (mmHg: - 38 +/- 7; N=7). They conclude that the C1 area contains muscarinic cholinergic receptors and that local neurons synthesize, store and release substantial amounts of ACh. ACh released within the C1 area may participate in the tonic maintenance of resting AP

  5. The Severe Accident Mitigation Concept of Arena NPPs EPR{sup TM} Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, M. [AREVA NP, Erlangen (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    All AREVA NP Gen-3 reactors, the EPR{sup TM} and ATMEA1{sup TM} PWR, as well as KERENA BWR, give extended consideration to the prevention of severe accidents. Despite the so-achieved very low core melt frequencies, additional 'beyond-safety' measures are implemented in these designs. They are aimed at drastically reducing the environmental impact of a severe accident (SA), should it nevertheless occur, as well as at eliminating the need for emergency evacuations of the surrounding population and long-term restrictions with respect to the consumption of LOCAy grown food. The adopted safety concepts meet advanced regulatory requirements, incl. IAEA safety guide, Technical Guidelines (GPR/German experts), and SECY 93-087 (NRC). The chosen SA concept is illustrated at the example of the EPR{sup TM} plant which is currently under construction in Finland, France and China.

  6. Simple countermeasures against the TM110-beam-blowup-mode in biperiodic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Euteneuer, H.; Herminghaus, H.; Schoeler, H.

    1984-01-01

    The two fundamental methods of fighting beam blow-up in rf-accelerating-structures are staggered detuning and selective Q-spoiling of their higher order modes. Biperiodic structures offer a very simple way of applying the latter technique of the most dangerous TM 110 -like blowup mode at 1.7 times the accelerating frequency: letting this mode propagate but giving a large gap to the TM 110 -passband. This gap must be positive for electric coupling (f(phi=0) =1.7c. With asymmetric coupling elements between the cavities of a structure, one has a simple tool for staggered detuning: a change of the relative orientation of these elements spreads the resonance frequencies not only of the TM 110 -mode, but of at least all dipole modes. (orig.)

  7. Cubic to tetragonal phase transition of Tm3+ doped nanocrystals in oxyfluoride glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yiming; Fu, Yuting; Shi, Yahui; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Yu, Hua; Zhao, Lijuan

    2016-01-01

    Tm 3+ ions doped β-PbF 2 nanocrystals in oxyfluoride glass ceramics with different doping concentrations and thermal temperatures are prepared by a traditional melt-quenching and thermal treatment method to investigate the structure and the phase transition of Tm 3+ doped nanocrystals. The structures are characterized by X-ray diffraction Rietveld analysis and confirmed with numerical simulation. The phase transitions are proved further by the emission spectra. Both of the doping concentration and thermal temperature can induce an O h to D 4h site symmetry distortion and a cubic to tetragonal phase transition. The luminescence of Tm 3+ doped nanocrystals at 800 nm was modulated by the phase transition of the surrounding crystal field

  8. Integrated Cu-based TM-pass polarizer using CMOS technology platform

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Tien Khee

    2010-01-01

    A transverse-magnetic-pass (TM-pass) copper (Cu) polarizer is proposed and analyzed using the previously published two-dimensional Method-of-Lines beam-propagation model. The proposed polarizer exhibits a simulated high-pass filter characteristics, with TM0 and TE0 mode transmissivity of >70% and <5%, respectively, in the wavelength regime of 1.2-1.6 μm. The polarization extinction ratio (PER) given by 10 log10 (PTM0)/(PTE0) is +11.5 dB across the high-pass wavelength regime. To the best of the authors\\' knowledge, we report here the smallest footprint CMOS-platform compatible TM-polarizer.

  9. Detection of soil erosion within pinyon-juniper woodlands using Thematic Mapper (TM) satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Kevin P.; Ridd, Merrill K.

    1991-01-01

    The sensitivity of Landsat TM data for detecting soil erosion within pinyon-juniper woodlands, and the potential of the spectral data for assigning the universal soil loss equation (USLE) crop managemnent (C) factor to varying cover types within the woodlands are assessed. Results show greatly accelerated rates of soil erosion on pinyon-juniper sites. Percent cover by pinyon-juniper, total soil-loss, and total nonliving ground cover accounted for nearly 70 percent of the variability in TM channels 2, 3, 4, and 5. TM spectral data were consistently better predictors of soil erosion than the biotic and abiotic field variables. Satellite data were more sensitive to vegetation variation than the USLE C factor, and USLE was found to be a poor predictor of soil loss on pinyon-juniper sites. A new string-to-ground soil erosion prediction technique is introduced.

  10. REGIONAL GEOLGICAL MAPPING IN TROPICAL ENVIRONMENTS USING LANDSAT TM AND SRTM REMOTE SENSING DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Beiranvand Pour

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM and Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM data were used to produce geological maps in tropical environments. Lineament, lithology and landform maps were produced for all states in peninsular Malaysia in this study. Kedah, Perak and Terengganu states have been selected as case studies to demonstrate the results of the data and techniques used. Directional filtering technique was applied to Landsat TM bands 4, 5 and 3 for lineament mapping. The lithology map was produced using Landsat TM bands combination consist of bands 4, 3 and 2. Digital elevation model and landform map were produced using SRTM data in 3 Dimension (3D and 2 Dimension (2D perspective views, respectively. The produced geological maps and the remote sensing data and methods applied in this study are mostly appropriate for hazard risk mapping applications and mineral exploration projects in the peninsular Malaysia and tropical environments.

  11. Characterization of thermoluminescent response of Al2O3:Tm/Teflon for gamma rays dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho Junior, Alvaro B. de; Barros, Vinicius S.M. de; Elihimas, Diego Rafael M.; Khoury, Helen J.; Azevedo, Walter M. de

    2011-01-01

    In this work, α-Al 2 O 3 doped with Tm 3+ was prepared by combustion synthesis techniques for thermoluminescent (TL) ionizing radiation dosimetry applications. After this, Al 2 O 3 :Tm (0.1%) pellets were manufactured from a 2:1 homogeneous mixture of Al 2 O 3 :Tm (0.1%) and powdered Teflon (PTFE). Ten pellets were used to characterize the dosimetric properties. The dosimetric characterization was performed by analyses of the reproducibility, sensitivity of the TL response vs. dose between 1 and 10 Gy to 60 Co source and fading. The results showed a glow curve with a peak near to 225 deg C, a linear TL response with the gamma radiation dose in the range investigated and a reproducibility < 10%. These results indicate a potential use of these pellets for gamma radiation dosimetry. (author)

  12. Microstructure-property relationships in Al-Cu-Li-Ag-Mg Weldalite (tm) alloys, part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, T. J.; Pickens, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of the ultrahigh strength Al-Cu-Li-Ag-Mg alloy, Weldalite (tm) 049, were studied. Specifically, the microstructural features along with tensile strength, weldability, Young's modulus and fracture toughness were studied for Weldalite (tm) 049 type alloys with Li contents ranging from 1.3 to 1.9 wt. pct. The tensile properties of Weldalite 049 and Weldalite 049 reinforced with TiB2 particles fabricated using the XD (tm) process were also evaluated at cryogenic, room, and elevated temperatures. In addition, an experimental alloy, similar in composition to Weldalite 049 but without the Ag+Mg, was fabricated. The microstructure of this alloy was compared with that of Weldalite 049 in the T6 condition to assess the effect of Ag+Mg on nucleation of strengthening phases in the absence of cold work.

  13. Cartographic feature extraction with integrated SIR-B and Landsat TM images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, R.; Ehlers, Manfred

    1988-01-01

    A digital cartographic multisensor image database of excellent geometry and improved resolution was created by registering SIR-B images to a rectified Landsat TM reference image and applying intensity-hue-saturation enhancement techniques. When evaluated against geodetic control, RMSE(XY) values of approximately + or - 20 m were noted for the composite SIR-B/TM images. The completeness of cartographic features extracted from the composite images exceeded those obtained from separate SIR-B and TM image data sets by approximately 10 and 25 percent, respectively, indicating that the composite images may prove suitable for planimetric mapping at a scale of 1:100,000 or smaller. At present, the most effective method for extracting cartographic information involves digitizing features directly from the image processing display screen.

  14. High temperature phase transition of Tm2Ti2O7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shlyakhtina, A.V.; Shcherbakova, L.G.; Knot'ko, A.V.; Larina, L.L.; Borichev, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    A high temperature phase transition type order-disorder is investigated in Tm 2 Ti 2 O 7 at t>1600 Deg C. It is shown that this transformation is irreversible. Ion conductivity of synthesized at 1670 Deg C nanocrystalline Tm 2 Ti 2 O 7 constitutes 2x10 -3 S/cm at 740 Deg C and remains constant after heat treatment at 860 Deg C for 240 h in the air. It is revealed that the conductivity of specimens (grain size of 20-30 nm) on the basis of Tm 2 Ti 2 O 7 high temperature modification with a structure of disordered pyrochlore is independent of grain size [ru

  15. Molecular mechanism of 7TM receptor activation--a global toggle switch model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwartz, Thue W; Frimurer, Thomas M; Holst, Birgitte

    2006-01-01

    active conformation, where the extracellular segments of TM-VI and -VII are bent inward toward TM-III, by acting as molecular glue deep in the main ligand-binding pocket between the helices, whereas larger agonists, peptides, and proteins can stabilize a similar active conformation by acting as Velcro......The multitude of chemically highly different agonists for 7TM receptors apparently do not share a common binding mode or active site but nevertheless act through induction of a common molecular activation mechanism. A global toggle switch model is proposed for this activation mechanism to reconcile...... the accumulated biophysical data supporting an outward rigid-body movement of the intracellular segments, as well as the recent data derived from activating metal ion sites and tethered ligands, which suggests an opposite, inward movement of the extracellular segments of the transmembrane helices. According...

  16. Characterization of a gC1qR from the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Ting; Huang, Xin; Wang, Xian-Wei; Shi, Yan-Ru; Hui, Kai-Min; Ren, Qian

    2015-03-01

    gC1qR, as a multicompartmental and a multifunctional protein, plays an important role in innate immunity. In this study, a gC1qR homolog (MrgC1qR) in the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii was identified. MrgC1qR, a 258-amino-acid polypeptide, shares high identities with gC1qR from other species. MrgC1qR gene was expressed in different tissues and was highest expressed in the hepatopancreas. In addition, the MrgC1qR transcript was significantly enhanced after 6 h of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection or post 2 h, 24 h of Vibrio anguillarum challenge compared to appropriate controls. Moreover, recombinant MrgC1qR (rMrgC1qR) had bacterial binding activity, the result also revealed that rMrgC1qR could bind pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) such as LPS or PGN, suggesting that MrgC1qRmight function as a pathogen-recognition receptor (PRR). Furthermore, glutathione S-transferase (GST) pull-down assays showed that rMrgC1qR with GST-tag could bind to rMrFicolin1 or rMrFicolin2 with His-tag. Altogether, these results may demonstrate a role for MrgC1qR in innate immunity in the giant freshwater prawns. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Combinatorial selection of a two-dimensional 3d-TM-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TM-TCNQ) monolayer as a high-activity nanocatalyst for CO oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Qingming; Wu, Tiantian; Chen, Guibin

    2018-01-01

    catalyzed by Sc-TCNQ (CO + O2* → OOCO*) can follow the LH mechanism with free energy barriers as low as 0.73 eV at 300 K. The second step of CO + O* → CO2 can occur with rather small energy barriers via either LH or ER mechanisms. The high activity of Sc-TCNQ can be attributed to its unique structural......The CO oxidation reaction on single 3d-transition metal catalytic sites in experimentally realized tetracyanoquinodimethane (TM-TCNQ) monolayers (TM = Sc-Zn) is systematically investigated by means of first-principles calculations. Considering the stabilities, adsorption characteristics...... and thermodynamics of all the ten candidates (Sc-Zn), Sc-TCNQ is found to display the lowest activation energies and yield the highest catalytic activity for room temperature CO oxidation. Exploring the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms, we find that the rate-limiting step of CO oxidation...

  18. New polyamide 12 grades for large diameter oil and pipes: VESTAMID{sup TM} LX9020 and VESTAMID{sup TM} LX9030

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowe, Andreas; Baron, Christian; Coelho, Germano [Evonik Degussa GmbH, Arlington Heights, IL(United States)

    2008-07-01

    Polyamide 12 (PA 12) is a high performance polymer with outstanding mechanical properties and excellent chemical stability. It is the preferred material in many demanding applications, e. g. in the automotive industry for fuel lines of passenger cars or for air brake tubing's in trucks. In recent years PA 12 pipes underwent an approval process for the use in high-pressure gas distribution and offshore oil explorations. Also the applications lining and rehabilitation of pipes are under investigation. Especially the swelling behavior and the outstanding resistance to oil and other petrochemicals make VESTAMID{sup TM} the material of choice for rehabilitation and lining applications. The authors will give an introduction to the excellent technical performance of PA 12. The very high melt viscosity and stiffness of the newly developed VESTAMID{sup TM} grades enables new applications of PA 12 in oil and gas applications which will be discussed in this paper. (author)

  19. The role of charge transfer in the oxidation state change of Ce atoms in the TM13-CeO2(111) systems (TM = Pd, Ag, Pt, Au): a DFT + U investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tereshchuk, Polina; Freire, Rafael L H; Ungureanu, Crina G; Seminovski, Yohanna; Kiejna, Adam; Da Silva, Juarez L F

    2015-05-28

    Despite extensive studies of transition metal (TM) clusters supported on ceria (CeO2), fundamental issues such as the role of the TM atoms in the change in the oxidation state of Ce atoms are still not well understood. In this work, we report a theoretical investigation based on static and ab initio molecular dynamics density functional theory calculations of the interaction of 13-atom TM clusters (TM = Pd, Ag, Pt, Au) with the unreduced CeO2(111) surface represented by a large surface unit cell and employing Hubbard corrections for the strong on-site Coulomb correlation in the Ce f-electrons. We found that the TM13 clusters form pyramidal-like structures on CeO2(111) in the lowest energy configurations with the following stacking sequence, TM/TM4/TM8/CeO2(111), while TM13 adopts two-dimensional structures at high energy structures. TM13 induces a change in the oxidation state of few Ce atoms (3 of 16) located in the topmost Ce layer from Ce(IV) (itinerant Ce f-states) to Ce(III) (localized Ce f-states). There is a charge flow from the TM atoms to the CeO2(111) surface, which can be explained by the electronegativity difference between the TM (Pd, Ag, Pt, Au) and O atoms, however, the charge is not uniformly distributed on the topmost O layer due to the pressure induced by the TM13 clusters on the underlying O ions, which yields a decrease in the ionic charge of the O ions located below the cluster and an increase in the remaining O ions. Due to the charge flow mainly from the TM8-layer to the topmost O-layer, the charge cannot flow from the Ce(IV) atoms to the O atoms with the same magnitude as in the clean CeO2(111) surface. Consequently, the effective cationic charge decreases mainly for the Ce atoms that have a bond with the O atoms not located below the cluster, and hence, those Ce atoms change their oxidation state from IV to III. This increases the size of the Ce(III) compared with the Ce(IV) cations, which builds-in a strain within the topmost Ce layer, and

  20. KevlarTM Fiber-Reinforced Polybenzoxazine Alloys for Ballistic Impact Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanchira Jubsilp

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A light weight ballistic composites from KevlarTM-reinforcing fiber having polybenzoxazine (BA/urethane prepolymer (PU alloys as a matrix were investigated in this work. The effect of alloy compositions on the ballistic composite properties was determined. The results revealed that the enhancement in the glass transition temperature (Tg of the KevlarTM-reinforced BA/PU composites compared to that of the KevlarTM-reinforced polybenzoxazine composite was observed. The increase of the elastomeric PU content in the BA/PU alloy resulted in samples with tougher characteristics. The storage modulus of the KevlarTM-reinforced BA/PU composites increased with increasing the mass fraction of polybenzoxazine. A ballistic impact test was also performed on the KevlarTM-reinforced BA/PU composites using a 9 mm handgun. It was found that the optimal contents of PU in the BA/PU alloys should be approximately 20wt%. The extent of the delaminated area and interfacial fracture were observed to change with the varied compositions of the matrix alloys. The appropriate thickness of KevlarTM-reinforced 80/20 BA/PU composite panel was 30 plies and 50 plies to resist the penetration from the ballistic impact equivalent to levels II-A and III-A of NIJ standard. The arrangement of composite panels with the higher stiffness panel at the front side also showed the best efficiency of ballistic penetration resistance.

  1. Tm:GGAG crystal for 2μm tunable diode-pumped laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šulc, Jan; Boháček, Pavel; Němec, Michal; Fibrich, Martin; Jelínková, Helena; Trunda, Bohumil; Havlák, Lubomír.; Jurek, Karel; Nikl, Martin

    2016-04-01

    The spectroscopy properties and wavelength tunability of diode pumped laser based on Tm-doped mixed gadolinium-gallium-aluminium garnet Gd3(GaxAl1-x)5O12 (Tm:GGAG) single crystal were investigated for the first time. The crystal was grown by Czochralski method in a slightly oxidative atmosphere using an iridium crucible. The tested Tm:GGAG sample was cut from the grown crystal boule perpendicularly to growth direction (c-axis). The composition of sample was determined using electron microprobe X-ray elemental analysis. For spectroscopy and laser experiments 3.5mm thick plane-parallel face-polished plate (without AR coatings) with composition Gd2.76Tm0.0736Ga2.67Al2.50O12 (2.67 at.% Tm/Gd) was used. A fiber (core diameter 400 μm, NA= 0.22) coupled laser diode (emission wavelength 786 nm) was used for longitudinal Tm:GGAG pumping. The laser diode was operating in the pulsed regime (10 ms pulse length, 10 Hz repetition rate, maximum power amplitude 18 W). The 145mm long semi-hemispherical laser resonator consisted of a flat pumping mirror (HR @ 1.8- 2.10 μm, HT @ 0.78 μm) and curved (r = 150mm) output coupler with a reflectivity of » 97% @ 1.8- 2.10 µm. The maximum laser output power amplitude 1.14W was obtained at wavelength 2003nm for absorbed pump power amplitude 4.12W. The laser slope efficiency was 37% in respect to absorbed pumping power. Wavelength tuning was accomplished by using 2mm thick MgF2 birefringent filter placed inside the laser resonator at the Brewster angle. The laser was continuously tunable over 180nm in a spectral region from 1856nm to 2036 nm.

  2. Effects of Lu and Tm Doping on Thermoelectric Properties of Bi2Te3 Compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaprintsev, Maxim; Lyubushkin, Roman; Soklakova, Oxana; Ivanov, Oleg

    2018-02-01

    The Bi2Te3, Bi1.9Lu0.1Te3 and Bi1.9Tm0.1Te3 thermoelectrics of n-type conductivity have been prepared by the microwave-solvothermal method and spark plasma sintering. These compounds behave as degenerate semiconductors from room temperature up to temperature T d ≈ 470 K. Within this temperature range the temperature behavior of the specific electrical resistivity is due to the temperature changes of electron mobility determined by acoustic and optical phonon scattering. Above T d, an onset of intrinsic conductivity takes place when electrons and holes are present. At the Lu and Tm doping, the Seebeck coefficient increases, while the specific electrical resistivity and total thermal conductivity decrease within the temperature 290-630 K range. The increase of the electrical resistivity is related to the increase of electron concentration since the Tm and Lu atoms are donor centres in the Bi2Te3 lattice. The increase of the density-of-state effective mass for conduction band can be responsible for the increase of the Seebeck coefficient. The decrease of the total thermal conductivity in doped Bi2Te3 is attributed to point defects like the antisite defects and Lu or Tm atoms substituting for the Bi sites. In addition, reducing the electron thermal conductivity due to forming a narrow impurity (Lu or Tm) band having high and sharp density-of-states near the Fermi level can effectively decrease the total thermal conductivity. The thermoelectric figure-of-merit is enhanced from ˜ 0.4 for undoped Bi2Te3 up to ˜ 0.7 for Bi1.9Tm0.1Te3 and ˜ 0.9 for Bi1.9Lu0.1Te3.

  3. Thermal stability and glass-forming ability of amorphous Nd-Al-TM (TM=Fe, Co, Ni or Cu) alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, A.; Zhang Tao

    1997-01-01

    Bulk amorphous alloys were prepared for Nd 70 Al 10 TM 20 and Nd 60 Al 10 TM 30 (TM=Fe or Co) alloys by copper mold casting. The maximum sample thickness for glass formation reaches 15 mm for the Nd-Al-Fe alloys and 5 mm for the Nd-Al-Co alloys. A significant difference in the phase transition upon heating is recognized between the Fe- and Co-containing alloys. No glass transition before crystallization is observed for the Nd-Al-Fe alloys, but the Nd-Al-Co alloys exhibit the glass transition. The ΔT x (=T x -T g ) and T g /T m are 40-55 K and 0.65-0.67, respectively, for the latter alloys. The absence of supercooled liquid for the former alloys is different from those for all bulk amorphous alloys reported up to date. The T x /T m and ΔT m (=T m -T x ) are 0.85-0.89 and 88-137 K, respectively, for the Nd-Al-Fe alloys and, hence, the large glass-forming ability is presumably due to the high T x /T m and small ΔT m values. (orig.)

  4. Introduction of Zirlo''TM as a structural component material in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, M. A.; Pereda, R.; King, S. J.

    1998-01-01

    The more and more severe nuclear fuel operating conditions have made necessary the use of advanced fuel cladding alloys like Zirlo''TM, which allow to obtain a response clearly above Zircaloy-4 because of the elevated corrosion resistance that provides, as well as a the greater dimensional stability. The superiority in properties is also applicable to the structural components, where this dimensional stability is critical to maintain the control rod insertability. In this paper the current operating experience with Zirlo''TM as a structural component material for PWR fuel assemblies is presented, the associated advantages are detailed and, finally, the irradiation and verification programs that support these advantages are described. (Author)

  5. Quantification of left ventricular function by gated myocardial perfusion SPECT using multidimTM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jin; Song Wenzhong; Chen Mingxi

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of left ventricular function by gated SPECT using the software Multidim TM . Methods: Rest gated SPECT was performed on 42 cases involved 26 normal subjects and 16 patients with myocardial infarct (MI). All cases underwent rest equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography (ERNA) within 1 w. Results: (1)End diastolic volume (EDV), end systolic volume (ESV) and left ventricular ejection fraction(LVEF)were calculated using the software MultidimtMand ERNA. The correlation coefficient between the two Methods was 0.90,0.89,0.92 respectively(P TM , but the EDV and ESV value measured by this software maybe high with small heart. (authors)

  6. Development of a (170)Tm source for mercury monitoring studies in humans using XRF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmaraju, K Phanisree; Fajurally, Bibi Najah; Armstrong, Andrea F; Chettle, David R

    2016-04-01

    The goals of the present study were to develop a (170)Tm radioisotope and generate a K XRF spectrum of mercury. Thulium foil and thulium oxide powder were both tested for impurities and the latter was found to be a better prospect for further studies. The (170)Tm radioisotope was developed from thulium oxide powder following the method of disolution and absorption. A suitable source holder and collimator were also designed based on Monte Carlo simulations. Using the radioisotope thus developed, a mercury XRF spectrum was successfully generated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Backbone assignments for the SPOUT methyltransferase MTT Tm , a knotted protein from Thermotoga maritima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burban, David J; Jennings, Patricia A

    2017-10-01

    The SPOUT family of methyltransferase proteins is noted for containing a deep trefoil knot in their defining backbone fold. This unique fold is of high interest for furthering the understanding of knots in proteins. Here, we report the 1 H, 13 C, 15 N assignments for MTT Tm , a canonical member of the SPOUT family. This protein is unique, as it is one of the smallest members of the family, making it an ideal system for probing the unique properties of the knot. Our present work represents the foundation for further studies into the topology of MTT Tm , and understanding how its structure affects both its folding and function.

  8. Fretting wear damage of HexTOOL{sup TM} composite depending on the different fibre orientations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terekhina, S; Salvia, M; Fouvry, S [Laboratoire de Tribologie et Dynamique des Systemes, UMR CNRS ECL ENISE ENSMSE 5513, Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 69134 Ecully cedex (France); Malysheva, G; Tarasova, T, E-mail: svetlana.terekhina@ec-lyon.fr, E-mail: svetlanaterekhina@yandex.ru [Bauman Moscow State Technical University, 105005 Moscow, 5, 2nd Baumanskaya str (Russian Federation)

    2009-09-15

    The composites have drawn considerable interest in the mould processes. The vibrations and fatigue stresses induced in the moulds made evident to characterize the composite HexTOOL{sup TM} under fretting conditions. Fretting is a small-amplitude oscillatory motion between contacting surfaces. The running conditions fretting maps (RCFM) of composite at ambient conditions were established. The influence of different fiber orientations of HexTOOL{sup TM} composite on the wear kinetics was shown. An energy wear approach was developed. According to results of dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA), the viscoelastic properties of composite material were obtained.

  9. Pauli paramagnetic effects on vortices in superconducting TmNi2B2C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeBeer-Schmitt, L.; Eskildsen, Morten Ring; Ichioka, M.

    2007-01-01

    The magnetic field distribution around the vortices in TmNi2B2C in the paramagnetic phase was studied experimentally as well as theoretically. The vortex form factor, measured by small-angle neutron scattering, is found to be field independent up to 0.6H(c2) followed by a sharp decrease at higher...... fields. The data are fitted well by solutions to the Eilenberger equations when paramagnetic effects due to the exchange interaction with the localized 4f Tm moments are included. The induced paramagnetic moments around the vortex cores act to maintain the field contrast probed by the form factor....

  10. Single-Cell Enumeration of an Uncultivated TM7 Subgroup in the Human Subgingival Crevice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouverney, Cleber C.; Armitage, Gary C.; Relman, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Specific oligonucleotide hybridization conditions were established for single-cell enumeration of uncultivated TM7 and IO25 bacteria by using clones expressing heterologous 16S rRNA. In situ analysis of human subgingival crevice specimens revealed that a greater proportion of samples from sites of chronic periodontitis than from healthy sites contained TM7 subgroup IO25. In addition, IO25 bacterial cells from periodontitis site samples were more abundant and fourfold longer than IO25 cells from healthy site samples. PMID:14532094

  11. The S8 serine, C1A cysteine and A1 aspartic protease families in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Eric P; Jones, Alan M; Dickerman, Allan W

    2004-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana genome has over 550 protease sequences representing all five catalytic types: serine, cysteine, aspartic acid, metallo and threonine (MEROPS peptidase database, http://merops.sanger.ac.uk/), which probably reflect a wide variety of as yet unidentified functions performed by plant proteases. Recent indications that the 26S proteasome, a T1 family-threonine protease, is a regulator of light and hormone responsive signal transduction highlight the potential of proteases to participate in many aspects of plant growth and development. Recent discoveries that proteases are required for stomatal distribution, embryo development and disease resistance point to wider roles for four additional multigene families that include some of the most frequently studied (yet poorly understood) plant proteases: the subtilisin-like, serine proteases (family S8), the papain-like, cysteine proteases (family C1A), the pepsin-like, aspartic proteases (family A1) and the plant matrixin, metalloproteases (family M10A). In this report, 54 subtilisin-like, 30 papain-like and 59 pepsin-like proteases from Arabidopsis, are compared with S8, C1A and A1 proteases known from other plant species at the functional, phylogenetic and gene structure levels. Examples of structural conservation between S8, C1A and A1 genes from rice, barley, tomato and soybean and those from Arabidopsis are noted, indicating that some common, essential plant protease roles were established before the divergence of monocots and eudicots. Numerous examples of tandem duplications of protease genes and evidence for a variety of restricted expression patterns suggest that a high degree of specialization exists among proteases within each family. We propose that comprehensive analysis of the functions of these genes in Arabidopsis will firmly establish serine, cysteine and aspartic proteases as regulators and effectors of a wide range of plant processes.

  12. Structural Basis for Specificity of Propeptide-Enzyme Interaction in Barley C1A Cysteine Peptidases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambra, Inés; Hernández, David; Diaz, Isabel; Martinez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    C1A cysteine peptidases are synthesized as inactive proenzymes. Activation takes place by proteolysis cleaving off the inhibitory propeptide. The inhibitory capacity of propeptides from barley cathepsin L and B-like peptidases towards commercial and barley cathepsins has been characterized. Differences in selectivity have been found for propeptides from L-cathepsins against their cognate and non cognate enzymes. Besides, the propeptide from barley cathepsin B was not able to inhibit bovine cathepsin B. Modelling of their three-dimensional structures suggests that most propeptide inhibitory properties can be explained from the interaction between the propeptide and the mature cathepsin structures. Their potential use as biotechnological tools is discussed. PMID:22615948

  13. Chitinase Chi1 from Myceliophthora thermophila C1, a Thermostable Enzyme for Chitin and Chitosan Depolymerization

    OpenAIRE

    Krolicka, M.; Hinz, Sandra W.A.; Koetsier, Martijn J.; Joosten, Rob; Eggink, G.; Broek, van den, Ben; Boeriu, C.G.

    2018-01-01

    A thermostable Chitinase Chi1 from Myceliophthora thermophila C1 was homologously produced and characterized. Chitinase Chi1 shows high thermostability at 40 °C (>140 h 90% activity), 50 °C (>168 h 90% activity), and 55 °C (half-life 48 h). Chitinase Chi1 has broad substrate specificity and converts chitin, chitosan, modified chitosan, and chitin oligosaccharides. The activity of Chitinase Chi1 is strongly affected by the degree of deacetylation (DDA), molecular weight (Mw), and side ch...

  14. Complete absence of the posterior arch of C1: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Khanna

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Posterior atlas arch anomalies are relatively common, but have a variety of presentations ranging from partial clefts to complete agenesis of the posterior arch. Partial clefts are prevalent in 4% of patients and are generally asymptomatic. However, complete agenesis of the posterior arch is extremely rare. We report the case of a 46-year-old man who presented with upper cervical spine and occipital pain as well as left sided headaches. Imaging revealed congenital complete absence of the posterior arch of C1 (Type E without any radiographic evidence of instability. We discuss our case in light of other reported cases and detail its management.

  15. Synthesis of C-9-14C-1,8-dihydroxy-3-carboxyanthraquinone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Witte, P.; Lemli, J.

    1988-01-01

    The synthesis of C-9- 14 C-rhein is reported using 14 CO 2 as a 14 C-source. After preparing 14 C-1, 8-dimethoxy-3-methylanthraquinone by a condensation reaction, the product is demethylated and the 3-methyl group converted to the corresponding 3-carboxy group. The radio-active yield of the total synthesis, starting with 1 Ci 14 CO 2 is 6,9% (6, 9 mCi); 352 mg 14 rhein is produced with a specific activity of 55,7 mCi/mmol. (author)

  16. iAK692: a genome-scale metabolic model of Spirulina platensis C1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klanchui, Amornpan; Khannapho, Chiraphan; Phodee, Atchara; Cheevadhanarak, Supapon; Meechai, Asawin

    2012-06-15

    Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis is a well-known filamentous cyanobacterium used in the production of many industrial products, including high value compounds, healthy food supplements, animal feeds, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics, for example. It has been increasingly studied around the world for scientific purposes, especially for its genome, biology, physiology, and also for the analysis of its small-scale metabolic network. However, the overall description of the metabolic and biotechnological capabilities of S. platensis requires the development of a whole cellular metabolism model. Recently, the S. platensis C1 (Arthrospira sp. PCC9438) genome sequence has become available, allowing systems-level studies of this commercial cyanobacterium. In this work, we present the genome-scale metabolic network analysis of S. platensis C1, iAK692, its topological properties, and its metabolic capabilities and functions. The network was reconstructed from the S. platensis C1 annotated genomic sequence using Pathway Tools software to generate a preliminary network. Then, manual curation was performed based on a collective knowledge base and a combination of genomic, biochemical, and physiological information. The genome-scale metabolic model consists of 692 genes, 837 metabolites, and 875 reactions. We validated iAK692 by conducting fermentation experiments and simulating the model under autotrophic, heterotrophic, and mixotrophic growth conditions using COBRA toolbox. The model predictions under these growth conditions were consistent with the experimental results. The iAK692 model was further used to predict the unique active reactions and essential genes for each growth condition. Additionally, the metabolic states of iAK692 during autotrophic and mixotrophic growths were described by phenotypic phase plane (PhPP) analysis. This study proposes the first genome-scale model of S. platensis C1, iAK692, which is a predictive metabolic platform for a global understanding of

  17. Essential Boundary Conditions with Straight C1 Finite Elements in Curved Domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferraro, N.M.; Jardin, S.C.; Luo, X.

    2010-01-01

    The implementation of essential boundary conditions in C1 finite element analysis requires proper treatment of both the boundary conditions on second-order differentials of the solution and the curvature of the domain boundary. A method for the imposition of essential boundary conditions using straight elements (where the elements are not deformed to approximate a curved domain) is described. It is shown that pre-multiplication of the matrix equation by the local rotation matrix at each boundary node is not the optimal transformation. The uniquely optimal transformation is found, which does not take the form of a similarity transformation due to the non-orthogonality of the transformation to curved coordinates.

  18. Structural basis for specificity of propeptide-enzyme interaction in barley C1A cysteine peptidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambra, Inés; Hernández, David; Diaz, Isabel; Martinez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    C1A cysteine peptidases are synthesized as inactive proenzymes. Activation takes place by proteolysis cleaving off the inhibitory propeptide. The inhibitory capacity of propeptides from barley cathepsin L and B-like peptidases towards commercial and barley cathepsins has been characterized. Differences in selectivity have been found for propeptides from L-cathepsins against their cognate and non cognate enzymes. Besides, the propeptide from barley cathepsin B was not able to inhibit bovine cathepsin B. Modelling of their three-dimensional structures suggests that most propeptide inhibitory properties can be explained from the interaction between the propeptide and the mature cathepsin structures. Their potential use as biotechnological tools is discussed.

  19. Gennemgang af en ny type hereditært angioødem med normal komplement C1-inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okholm-Hansen, Maria Bach; Winther, Anna Hillert; Fagerberg, Christina

    2018-01-01

    Hereditary angio-oedema (HAE) is a rare, potentially fatal disease characterized by recurrent swelling of skin and mucosa. Besides HAE with quantitative (type I) or qualitative (type II) deficiency of complement C1-inhibitor (C1-INH), a new subtype of HAE is now described with normal levels of C1......-INH. This subtype is possibly underdiagnosed, and a treatment regimen and general knowledge about the condition is still in its infancy. The purpose of this article is to inform Danish doctors about the disease to identify more Danish patients.......Hereditary angio-oedema (HAE) is a rare, potentially fatal disease characterized by recurrent swelling of skin and mucosa. Besides HAE with quantitative (type I) or qualitative (type II) deficiency of complement C1-inhibitor (C1-INH), a new subtype of HAE is now described with normal levels of C1...

  20. Impact of Maple(TM) on the design, instruction and performance in an undergraduate physics mathematical methods course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runge, Alan Paul

    1997-10-01

    A traditional undergraduate physics course on mathematical methods has been redesigned to incorporate the use of Maplesp{sc {TM}}, a computer algebra program, during all aspects of the course. Topics covered were: complex number theory; series approximations; matrix theory; partial differentiation; vector algebra; and vector calculus. Five undergraduate students were enrolled, from sophomore to senior in academic class standing. A qualitative case study methodology was used to describe the changes in the course design resulting from the incorporation of Maplesp{sc {TM}} and their impact on the instruction of the course, and to determine the effects on the students' learning and development of problem solving skills in physics using Maplesp{sc {TM}} as a problem solving tool. The impact of using Maplesp{sc {TM}} on the number and types of interactions is presented. The entire semester long course was included in this study. Each class session is described in detail. Examples of the Maplesp{sc {TM}} materials used are given. The use of the Maplesp{sc {TM}} program was allowed on all homework and exams with each student having their own computer during class. Constraints were made so that the assessment emphasis remained on the mathematics and the conceptual understanding of the problem solving methods. All of the students demonstrated some level of proficiency in using Maplesp{TM} to solve the assigned problems. Strategies for effectively using Maplesp{TM} were presented and were individualized by the students. The students reported positive and negative impacts of using Maplesp{sc {TM}}. All of the students satisfactorily completed the course requirements, receiving final course grades from B to A+. All of them continued to voluntarily use Maplesp{sc {TM}} during the following semester. Instructional methods used included various lecture techniques without Maplesp{sc {TM}} assistance, lectures and demonstrations using only Maplesp{sc {TM}}, and student tasks

  1. Association between the presence of anti-C1q antibodies and active nephritis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargiulo, María De Los Ángeles; Gómez, Graciela; Khoury, Marina; Collado, María Victoria; Suárez, Lorena; Álvarez, Clarisa; Sarano, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a severe complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). A retrospective analysis was carried out on a group of 24 patients with SLE to evaluate whether the presence of anti-C1q antibodies (anti-C1q) is related to renal involvement and to explore the behaviour of anti-C1q with respect to LN during a four-year follow-up period. A first serum sample stored at the serum bank, taken not more than three years after SLE diagnosis and one serum sample per year for the subsequent four years were used to detect anti-C1q. Lupus clinical manifestations and serological markers of activity corresponding to the date of each serum sample selected were collected from medical records. In the first serum sample, anti-C1q were found in 8 active SLE. LN was confirmed by histology in 5/8 patients who were positive for anti-C1q and in 1/16 patients who were negative for these autoantibodies (p = 0.0069). Three patients (3/8) had anti-C1q without renal involvement but with lupus skin manifestation. Anti-C1q levels decreased in 3/5 patients with LN who responded to treatment and remained higher in 2/5 patients who needed a new renal biopsy which showed severe renal disease. The 15 patients without severe kidney disease and anti-C1q negative at diagnosis did not develop LN and anti-C1q remained negative in the 4 years of follow up. Anti-C1q were found in SLE patients with active renal involvement or with lupus skin disease. The absence of anti-C1q seemed to be linked to low probabilities of renal involvement.

  2. ELISA to measure neutralizing capacity of anti-C1-inhibitor antibodies in plasma of angioedema patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Ruchira; Rensink, Irma; Roem, Dorina; Brouwer, Mieke; Kalei, Asma; Perry, Dawn; Zeerleder, Sacha; Wouters, Diana; Hamann, Dörte

    2015-11-01

    Neutralizing autoantibodies (NAbs) against plasma serpin C1-inhibitor (C1-inh) are implicated in the rare disorder, acquired angioedema (AAE). There is insufficient understanding of the process of antibody formation and its correlation with disease progression and severity. We have developed an ELISA for detecting neutralizing capacity of anti-C1-inh positive plasma samples that can be used to study changes in NAb repertoire in patient plasma over the course of disease. The ELISA is based on the specific interaction of active C1-inh with its target protease C1s. Decrease in the amount of C1s bound to immobilized C1-inh in the presence of test samples is proportional to the neutralizing capacity of the sample. Assay specificity, intra- and inter-assay variation and assay cut-off are determined using anti-C1-inh antibodies. Assay capability is demonstrated using plasma samples from AAE patients. The assay is specific to a neutralizing anti-C1-inh antibody and shows no interference by a non-neutralizing anti-C1-inh antibody or by the plasma matrix. Intra-assay and inter-assay variations are determined as 17 and 18% respectively. Neutralizing capacity of antibody positive AAE patient plasma samples (n=16) with IgG or IgM type antibodies is readily determined. All samples show positive neutralizing capacity. We have developed a robust, specific and semi-quantitative assay to detect the neutralizing capacity of plasma samples containing anti-C1-inh antibodies. This assay can be an important tool for the study of clinical implications of anti-C1-inh NAbs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Association between the presence of anti-c1q antibodies and active nephritis in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María De Los Ángeles Gargiulo

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN is a severe complication of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. A retrospective analysis was carried out on a group of 24 patients with SLE to evaluate whether the presence of anti-C1q antibodies (anti-C1q is related to renal involvement and to explore the behaviour of anti-C1q with respect to LN during a four-year follow-up period. A first serum sample stored at the serum bank, taken not more than three years after SLE diagnosis and one serum sample per year for the subsequent four years were used to detect anti-C1q. Lupus clinical manifestations and serological markers of activity corresponding to the date of each serum sample selected were collected from medical records. In the first serum sample, anti-C1q were found in 8 active SLE. LN was confirmed by histology in 5/8 patients who were positive for anti-C1q and in 1/16 patients who were negative for these autoantibodies (p = 0.0069. Three patients (3/8 had anti-C1q without renal involvement but with lupus skin manifestation. Anti-C1q levels decreased in 3/5 patients with LN who responded to treatment and remained higher in 2/5 patients who needed a new renal biopsy which showed severe renal disease. The 15 patients without severe kidney disease and anti-C1q negative at diagnosis did not develop LN and anti-C1q remained negative in the 4 years of follow up. Anti-C1q were found in SLE patients with active renal involvement or with lupus skin disease. The absence of anti-C1q seemed to be linked to low probabilities of renal involvement.

  4. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins C1/C2 identified as autoantigens by biochemical and mass spectrometric methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    HH Heegaard, Niels; R Larsen, Martin; Muncrief, Terri; Wiik , Allan; Roepstorff, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Introduction: The classification of antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) is important for diagnosis and prognosis and for understanding the molecular pathology of autoimmune disease. Many of the proteins that associate with RNA in the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes of the spliceosome have been found to react with some types of ANA [1], including proteins of the heterogeneous nuclear RNP (hnRNP) complex that associate with newly transcribed pre-mRNA. Autoantibodies to the A2, B1, and B2 proteins of hnRNP found in some patients may be markers of several overlap syndromes [2]. However, ANAs with specificity for these proteins as well as for the D protein also appear to occur in many distinct connective-tissue diseases, although epitope specificities may differ [3]. ANAs with specificity for the C component of hnRNP (consisting of the C1 and C2 proteins) have to our knowledge so far been described in only one case [4]. We here describe the approach taken to unambiguously identify the C1/C2 proteins as ANA targets in the sera of some patients. Aims: To determine the fine specificity of sera containing an unusual speckled ANA-staining pattern using a combination of 2D gel electrophoresis and MS. Methods: Patient sera were screened for ANAs by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy on HEp-2 cells (cultured carcinoma cells). Sera with an unusual, very regular, speckled ANA pattern were tested for reactivity with components of nuclear extracts of HeLa cells that were separated by one-dimensional (1D) or 2D gel electrophoresis or by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). IgG reactivity was assessed by immunoblotting. Reactive protein spots from 2D separations were excised from the gels and subjected to in-gel digestion with trypsin for subsequent peptide mapping, partial peptide sequencing, and protein identification by MS and tandem MS on a hybrid electrospray ionization/quadrupole/time-of-flight (ESI-Q-TOF) mass spectrometer [5,6,7]. Results: We observed

  5. Human and pneumococcal cell surface glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) proteins are both ligands of human C1q protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrasse, Rémi; Tacnet-Delorme, Pascale; Moriscot, Christine; Pérard, Julien; Schoehn, Guy; Vernet, Thierry; Thielens, Nicole M; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Frachet, Philippe

    2012-12-14

    C1q, a key component of the classical complement pathway, is a major player in the response to microbial infection and has been shown to detect noxious altered-self substances such as apoptotic cells. In this work, using complementary experimental approaches, we identified the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a C1q partner when exposed at the surface of human pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and human apoptotic cells. The membrane-associated GAPDH on HeLa cells bound the globular regions of C1q as demonstrated by pulldown and cell surface co-localization experiments. Pneumococcal strains deficient in surface-exposed GAPDH harbored a decreased level of C1q recognition when compared with the wild-type strains. Both recombinant human and pneumococcal GAPDHs interacted avidly with C1q as measured by surface plasmon resonance experiments (K(D) = 0.34-2.17 nm). In addition, GAPDH-C1q complexes were observed by transmission electron microscopy after cross-linking. The purified pneumococcal GAPDH protein activated C1 in an in vitro assay unlike the human form. Deposition of C1q, C3b, and C4b from human serum at the surface of pneumococcal cells was dependent on the presence of surface-exposed GAPDH. This ability of C1q to sense both human and bacterial GAPDHs sheds new insights on the role of this important defense collagen molecule in modulating the immune response.

  6. Human and Pneumococcal Cell Surface Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) Proteins Are Both Ligands of Human C1q Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrasse, Rémi; Tacnet-Delorme, Pascale; Moriscot, Christine; Pérard, Julien; Schoehn, Guy; Vernet, Thierry; Thielens, Nicole M.; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Frachet, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    C1q, a key component of the classical complement pathway, is a major player in the response to microbial infection and has been shown to detect noxious altered-self substances such as apoptotic cells. In this work, using complementary experimental approaches, we identified the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a C1q partner when exposed at the surface of human pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and human apoptotic cells. The membrane-associated GAPDH on HeLa cells bound the globular regions of C1q as demonstrated by pulldown and cell surface co-localization experiments. Pneumococcal strains deficient in surface-exposed GAPDH harbored a decreased level of C1q recognition when compared with the wild-type strains. Both recombinant human and pneumococcal GAPDHs interacted avidly with C1q as measured by surface plasmon resonance experiments (KD = 0.34–2.17 nm). In addition, GAPDH-C1q complexes were observed by transmission electron microscopy after cross-linking. The purified pneumococcal GAPDH protein activated C1 in an in vitro assay unlike the human form. Deposition of C1q, C3b, and C4b from human serum at the surface of pneumococcal cells was dependent on the presence of surface-exposed GAPDH. This ability of C1q to sense both human and bacterial GAPDHs sheds new insights on the role of this important defense collagen molecule in modulating the immune response. PMID:23086952

  7. GRIM5-C1: Combination solution of the global gravity field to degree and order 120

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Thomas; Bode, Albert; Reigber, Christoph; Schwintzer, Peter; Balmino, Georges; Biancale, Richard; Lemoine, Jean-Michel

    2000-12-01

    The new satellite Earth gravity field model GRIM5-S1 was recently prepared in a joint GFZ and GRGS effort. Based on this satellite solution and terrestrial and altimetric gravity anomalies from NIMA, a combined model GRIM5-C1, with full variance-covariance matrix up to degree and order 120, was computed. Surface gravity and altimetric gravity data are corrected for several systematic effects, such as ellipsoidal corrections and aliasing. A weighting scheme for gravity anomalies, according to their given standard deviations was developed. From each data set full normal equations were set up and finally combined with the GRIM5-S1 normals. To take into account good information from the satellite-only model a procedure was developed to identify such coefficients and appropriately weighed them in the final normal equation system. Internal error propagation and comparisons to external data sets show, that the GRIM5-C1 model represents the best state of long wavelength gravity field models.

  8. Development of dysphagia and trismus developed after c1-2 posterior fusion in extended position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Haruo; Tanaka, Masato; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Koshimune, Kouichiro; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    Cervical misalignment after upper cervical fusion including the occipital bone may cause trismus or dysphagia, because the occipito-atlanto joint is associated with most of the flex and extended motion of the cervical spine. There are no reports of dysphagia and trismus after C1-2 fusion. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the potential risk of dysphagia and trismus even after upper cervical short fusion without the occipital bone. The patient was a 69-year-old man with myelopathy caused by os odontoideum and Klippel-Feil syndrome, who developed dysphagia and trismus immediately after C1-2 fusion and C3-6 laminoplasty. Radiographs and CT revealed that his neck posture was extended, but his symptoms still existed a week after surgery. The fixation angle was hyperextended 12 days after the first surgery. His symptoms disappeared immediately after revision surgery. The fixation in the neck-flexed position is thought to be the main cause of the patient's post-operative dysphagia and trismus. Dysphagia and trismus may occur even after short upper cervical fusion without the occipital bone or cervical fusion in the neck-extended position. The pre-operative cervical alignment and range of motion of each segment should be thoroughly evaluated.

  9. ZNF32 protects against oxidative stress-induced apoptosis by modulating C1QBP transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Wei, Yuyan; Gong, Di; Gao, Junping; Zhang, Jie; Tan, Weiwei; Wen, Tianfu; Zhang, Le; Huang, Lugang; Xiang, Rong; Lin, Ping; Wei, Yuquan

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-driven oxidative stress has been recognized as a critical inducer of cancer cell death in response to therapeutic agents. Our previous studies have demonstrated that zinc finger protein (ZNF)32 is key to cell survival upon oxidant stimulation. However, the mechanisms by which ZNF32 mediates cell death remain unclear. Here, we show that at moderate levels of ROS, Sp1 directly binds to two GC boxes within the ZNF32 promoter to activate ZNF32 transcription. Alternatively, at cytotoxic ROS concentrations, ZNF32 expression is repressed due to decreased binding activity of Sp1. ZNF32 overexpression maintains mitochondrial membrane potential and enhances the antioxidant capacity of cells to detoxify ROS, and these effects promote cell survival upon pro-oxidant agent treatment. Alternatively, ZNF32-deficient cells are more sensitive and vulnerable to oxidative stress-induced cell injury. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that complement 1q-binding protein (C1QBP) is a direct target gene of ZNF32 that inactivates the p38 MAPK pathway, thereby exerting the protective effects of ZNF32 on oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our findings indicate a novel mechanism by which the Sp1-ZNF32-C1QBP axis protects against oxidative stress and implicate a promising strategy that ZNF32 inhibition combined with pro-oxidant anticancer agents for hepatocellular carcinoma treatment. PMID:26497555

  10. Cytochrome c1 exhibits two binding sites for cytochrome c in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Beltrán, Blas; Díaz-Quintana, Antonio; González-Arzola, Katiuska; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; De la Rosa, Miguel A; Díaz-Moreno, Irene

    2014-10-01

    In plants, channeling of cytochrome c molecules between complexes III and IV has been purported to shuttle electrons within the supercomplexes instead of carrying electrons by random diffusion across the intermembrane bulk phase. However, the mode plant cytochrome c behaves inside a supercomplex such as the respirasome, formed by complexes I, III and IV, remains obscure from a structural point of view. Here, we report ab-initio Brownian dynamics calculations and nuclear magnetic resonance-driven docking computations showing two binding sites for plant cytochrome c at the head soluble domain of plant cytochrome c1, namely a non-productive (or distal) site with a long heme-to-heme distance and a functional (or proximal) site with the two heme groups close enough as to allow electron transfer. As inferred from isothermal titration calorimetry experiments, the two binding sites exhibit different equilibrium dissociation constants, for both reduced and oxidized species, that are all within the micromolar range, thus revealing the transient nature of such a respiratory complex. Although the docking of cytochrome c at the distal site occurs at the interface between cytochrome c1 and the Rieske subunit, it is fully compatible with the complex III structure. In our model, the extra distal site in complex III could indeed facilitate the functional cytochrome c channeling towards complex IV by building a "floating boat bridge" of cytochrome c molecules (between complexes III and IV) in plant respirasome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2004-03-31

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center (Tank & Automotive Command--TACOM), and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this research program during the six months of the subject contract from October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003. The results are presented in thirteen detailed reports on research projects headed by various faculty members at each of the five CFFS Universities. Additionally, an Executive Summary has been prepared that summarizes the principal results of all of these projects during the six-month reporting period.

  12. Absorbance nephelometry of C1q-precipitable immune complexes: method comparisons and clinical correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, S S; Goldman, J

    1983-12-01

    Using a double-beam spectrophotometer, we investigated the clinical utility of a nephelometric method for assaying immune complexes. The complexes were concentrated from serum by precipitation with polyethylene glycol (PEG) and assayed by reaction with C1q. Testing of more than 100 sera showed a Spearman's rank correlation (p) between the present assay and the C1q-binding assay of 0.57, and 0.39 between the Raji cell assay and the present assay. Clinical sensitivity of the methods was not statistically different (p less than or equal to 0.5). Twenty-four of 30 patients with symptoms of disease showed increased concentrations of immune complexes by the present assay; only one of 38 normal individuals showed an increase. In a longitudinal study, we found that the concentrations of immune complexes paralleled clinical changes, indicating good clinical utility. The use of this assay with single-beam analyzers is limited because of the poor aqueous solubility of the PEG precipitate. Ongoing investigations designed to circumvent this problem are described.

  13. Synthesis of the C1-C28 Portion of Spongistatin 1 (Altohyrtin A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claffey, Michelle M.; Hayes, Christopher J.; Heathcock, Clayton H.

    1999-10-29

    A synthetic approach was developed to the C1-C28 subunit of spongistatin 1 (altohyrtin A, 65). The key step was the coupling of the AB and CD spiroketal moieties via an anti-aldol reaction of aldehyde 62 and ethyl ketone 57. The development of a method for the construction of the AB spiroketal fragment is described and included the desymmetrization of C(2)-symmetric diketone 10 and the differentiation of the two primary alcohols of 16. Further elaboration of this advanced intermediate to the desired aldehyde 62 included an Evans' syn-aldol reaction and Tebbe olefination. The synthesis of the CD spiroketal fragment 56 involved the ketalization of a triol-dione, generated in situ by deprotection of 45, to provide a favorable ratio (6-7:1) of spiroketal isomers 46 and 47, respectively. The overall protecting group strategy, involving many selective manipulations of silyl protecting groups, was successfully developed to provide the desired C1-C28 subunit of spongistatin 1 (altohyrtin A) (65).

  14. C1 Chemistry for the Production of Ultra-Clean Liquid Transportation Fuels and Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2005-03-31

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center (Tank & Automotive Command--TACOM), and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this research program during the six months of the subject contract from October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003. The results are presented in thirteen detailed reports on research projects headed by various faculty members at each of the five CFFS Universities. Additionally, an Executive Summary has been prepared that summarizes the principal results of all of these projects during the six-month reporting period.

  15. Ecallantide is a novel treatment for attacks of hereditary angioedema due to C1 inhibitor deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkas H

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Henriette Farkas, Lilian Varga3rd Department of Internal Medicine, Semmelweis University, Budapest, HungaryAbstract: Hereditary angioedema (HAE resulting from the deficiency of the C1 inhibitor protein is a rare disease, characterized by paroxysms of edema formation in the subcutis and in the submucosa. Edema can cause obstruction of the upper airway, which may lead to suffocation. Prompt elimination of edema is necessary to save patients from this life-threatening condition. Essentially, these edematous attacks are related to the activation of the kinin-kallikrein system and the consequent release of bradykinin. Ecallantide (known as DX-88 previously, a potent and specific inhibitor of plasma kallikrein is an innovative medicinal product. This is the only agent approved recently by the FDA for all localizations of edematous HAE attacks. Its advantages include no risk of viral contamination, high selectivity, very rapid onset of action, good tolerability, and straightforward subcutaneous administration. Owing to the risk of anaphylaxis, ecallantide should be administered by a health care professional. A postmarketing survey to improve risk-assessment and risk-minimization has been launched. The results of these studies may lead to the approval of ecallantide for self-administration.Keywords: hereditary angioedema, C1-inhibitor deficiency, treatment, bradykinin, kallikrein inhibitor, subcutaneous administration

  16. C1 Chemistry for the Production of Ultra-Clean Liquid Transportation Fuels and Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2003-03-31

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of transportation fuel from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, Energy International, the Department of Defense, and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this research program during the first six months of the subject contract (DE-FC26-02NT-4159), from October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003.

  17. DNA Vaccines Encoding Toxoplasma gondii Cathepsin C 1 Induce Protection against Toxoplasmosis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yali; Zhou, Aihua; Lu, Gang; Zhao, Guanghui; Sha, Wenchao; Wang, Lin; Guo, Jingjing; Zhou, Jian; Zhou, Huaiyu; Cong, Hua; He, Shenyi

    2017-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii cathepsin C proteases (TgCPC1, 2, and 3) are important for the growth and survival of T. gondii. In the present study, B-cell and T-cell epitopes of TgCPC1 were predicted using DNAstar and the Immune Epitope Database. A TgCPC1 DNA vaccine was constructed, and its ability to induce protective immune responses against toxoplasmosis in BALB/c mice was evaluated in the presence or absence of the adjuvant α-GalCer. As results, TgCPC1 DNA vaccine with or without adjuvant α-GalCer showed higher levels of IgG and IgG2a in the serum, as well as IL-2 and IFN-γ in the spleen compared to controls (PBS, pEGFP-C1, and α-Galcer). Upon challenge infection with tachyzoites of T. gondii (RH), pCPC1/α-Galcer immunized mice showed the longest survival among all the groups. Mice vaccinated with DNA vaccine without adjuvant (pCPC1) showed better protective immunity compared to other controls (PBS, pEGFP-C1, and α-Galcer). These results indicate that a DNA vaccine encoding TgCPC1 is a potential vaccine candidate against toxoplasmosis.

  18. Catalytic palladium phosphination: modular synthesis of C1-symmetric biaryl-based diphosphines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnafoux, Laurence; Gramage-Doria, Rafael; Colobert, Françoise; Leroux, Frédéric R

    2011-09-19

    A new family of C(1)-symmetric bis(diphenylphosphino)biphenyls have been prepared starting from readily available ortho,ortho'-dihalobiphenyl precursors by a palladium-catalyzed C-P coupling reaction. This process does not require the use of an additional ligand. To date, the synthesis of such diphosphines, by reaction of an intermediate biphenyldiyl dianion with ClPPh(2), mainly afforded the undesired cyclic phosphafluorene derivative. So far, no synthetic pathway has been found to avoid this intramolecular reaction. Herein we report the first general and external-ligand-free palladium-catalyzed phosphination reaction that allows the synthesis of a wide variety of substituted ortho,ortho'-bis(diphenylphosphino)biphenyls. With the aim of illustrating the scope and efficiency of this methodology, we applied it to the establishment of a straightforward access to C(1)-symmetrical analogues of the most powerful ligands used in homogenous catalysis and extended it to more challenging substrates. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Response of TLD-100{sup TM} microtubes to two RQR3 quality radiation beams; Resposta de microcubos de TLD-100{sup TM} a dois feixes de qualidade RQR 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, M.G.; Villani, D.; Almeida, S.B.; Vivolo, V.; Yoriyaz, H., E-mail: dvillani@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Louis, G.M.J. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-07-01

    The present work compares the response of TLD-100{sup TM} microcubes to two RQR 3 diagnostic radiology reference quality radiation beams, defined by IEC-61267 norm, aiming to evaluate the detectability of TLD-100{sup TM} energy dependence reported in literature within the same reference quality radiation range. TLD-100{sup TM} microcubes reproducibility is assessed through the response of a second set of TLD-100{sup TM} microcubes, evaluated in a second thermoluminescence reader, to the RQR 3 diagnostic radiology reference quality radiation beam implemented at the Laboratorio de Calibracao de Instrumentos of IPEN, Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil. The dependence of TLD-100{sup TM} microcubes TL response was not detectable in these conditions and the reproducibility of the measurements is 90,2%. (author)

  20. Enhanced Photoluminescent Properties and Crystalline Morphology of LiBaPO4:Tm3+ Phosphor through Microwave Sintering Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsuan-Lin Lai

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of the photoluminescent properties and crystalline morphology of blue emitting LiBa1−xPO4:xTm3+ phosphors with various concentrations (x = 0.005–0.030 of Tm3+ ions were synthesized by microwave sintering. For comparison, the LiBa1−xPO4:xTm3+ powders sintered at the same sintering condition but in a conventional furnace were also investigated. LiBaPO4 without second phase was formed no matter which furnace was used. More uniform grain size distributions are obtained by microwave sintering. When the concentration of Tm3+ ion was x = 0.015, the luminescence intensity reached a maximum value, and then decreased with the increases of the Tm3+ concentration due to concentration quenching effect. The microwave sintering significantly enhanced the emission intensity of LiBa1−xPO4:xTm3+ phosphors. Additionally, the d-d interaction is the key mechanism of concentration quenching for LiBaPO4:Tm3+. The chromaticity (x, y for all LiBa1−xPO4:xTm3+ phosphors are located at (0.16, 0.05, which will be classified as a blue region.

  1. Characteristics of "Tween" Participants and Non-Participants in the VERB[TM] Summer Scorecard Physical Activity Promotion Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickelson, Jen; Alfonso, Moya L.; McDermott, Robert J.; Bumpus, Elizabeth C.; Bryant, Carol A.; Baldwin, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Creating community-based opportunities for youth to be physically active is challenging for many municipalities. A Lexington, Kentucky community coalition designed and piloted a physical activity program, "VERB[TM] summer scorecard (VSS)", leveraging the brand equity of the national VERB[TM]--It's What You Do! campaign. Key elements of…

  2. Shedding light on microbial dark matter: a TM6 bacterium as natural endosymbiont of a free-living amoeba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delafont, Vincent; Samba-Louaka, Ascel; Bouchon, Didier; Moulin, Laurent; Héchard, Yann

    2015-12-01

    The TM6 phylum belongs to the so-called microbial dark matter that gathers uncultivated bacteria detected only via DNA sequencing. Recently, the genome sequence of a TM6 bacterium (TM6SC1) has led to suggest that this bacterium would adopt an endosymbiotic life. In the present paper, free-living amoebae bearing a TM6 strain were isolated from a water network. The amoebae were identified as Vermamoeba vermiformis and the presence of a TM6 strain was detected by polymerase chain reaction and microscopy. The partial sequence of its 16S rRNA gene showed this strain to be closely related to the sequenced TM6SC1 strain. These bacteria displayed a pyriform shape and were found within V. vermiformis. Therefore, these bacteria were named Vermiphilus pyriformis. Interactions studies showed that V. pyriformis was highly infectious and that its relation with V. vermiformis was specific and highly stable. Finally, it was found that V. pyriformis inhibited the encystment of V. vermiformis. Overall, this study describes for the first time an endosymbiotic relationship between a TM6 bacterium and a free-living amoeba in the environment. It suggests that other bacteria of the TM6 phylum might also be endosymbiotic bacteria and may be found in other free-living amoebae or other organisms. © 2015 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. The Vitamin E Analog Gamma-Tocotrienol (GT3 and Statins Synergistically Up-Regulate Endothelial Thrombomodulin (TM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupak Pathak

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Statins; a class of routinely prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs; inhibit 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzymeA reductase (HMGCR and strongly induce endothelial thrombomodulin (TM; which is known to have anti-inflammatory; anti-coagulation; anti-oxidant; and radioprotective properties. However; high-dose toxicity limits the clinical use of statins. The vitamin E family member gamma-tocotrienol (GT3 also suppresses HMGCR activity and induces TM expression without causing significant adverse side effects; even at high concentrations. To investigate the synergistic effect of statins and GT3 on TM; a low dose of atorvastatin and GT3 was used to treat human primary endothelial cells. Protein-level TM expression was measured by flow cytometry. TM functional activity was determined by activated protein C (APC generation assay. Expression of Kruppel-like factor 2 (KLF2, one of the key transcription factors of TM, was measured by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. TM expression increased in a dose-dependent manner after both atorvastatin and GT3 treatment. A combined treatment of a low-dose of atorvastatin and GT3 synergistically up-regulated TM expression and functional activity. Finally; atorvastatin and GT3 synergistically increased KLF2 expression. These findings suggest that combined treatment of statins with GT3 may provide significant health benefits in treating a number of pathophysiological conditions; including inflammatory and cardiovascular diseases.

  4. ELECTRO-INTERFERENCE TEST ON MINUTEMAN FIGURE A 9233 POWER SUPPLY SET, C/D AND T/M,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contents: Section I - Electro-Inteference Test on Minuteman Figure A 9233, Power Supply Set, C/D and T/M; Section II - Electro-Interference Test on...Minuteman Figure A 9233, Power Supply Set, C/D and T/M, Visual/Aural Warning Drawer.

  5. The sound of operation and the acoustic attenuation of the Ohmeda Medical Giraffe OmniBed TM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M Wubben

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The neonatal intensive care unit (NICU is an environment that provides premature and fragile infants with health provisions needed to make a complete recovery. Premature infants are often born before their auditory systems have had an opportunity to fully mature. Research has shown that the ambient acoustic environment in the NICU exceeds the maximum noise level recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics, even after measures have been taken to decrease noise levels. The purpose of this study is to evaluate noise levels inside an Ohmeda Medical Giraffe TM OmniBed TM , the natural attenuation of the incubator, and the effects of modifications on attenuation and reverberation within the Giraffe TM OmniBed TM . The normal operation of the Giraffe TM OmniBed TM is 41.7 dBA which indicates a lower noise of operation than previous studies. The Giraffe TM OmniBed TM naturally attenuates 12 dBA. Leaving an access latch or portal door open causes a statistically significant (P=.001 increase in sound within the bassinet. All modifications in the no-noise and the noise conditions showed a statistically significant (P=.001 drop in Leq when compared to baseline.

  6. Exome-wide association study identifies a TM6SF2 variant that confers susceptibility to nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozlitina, Julia; Smagris, Eriks; Stender, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    -density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides and alkaline phosphatase in 3 independent populations (n > 80,000). When recombinant protein was expressed in cultured hepatocytes, 50% less Glu167Lys TM6SF2 protein was produced relative to wild-type TM6SF2. Adeno-associated virus-mediated short hairpin RNA...

  7. Tunable luminescence mediated by energy transfer in Tm3+/Dy3+ co-doped phosphate glasses under UV excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yong; Chen, Guohua; Liu, Xiangyu; Yuan, Changlai; Zhou, Changrong

    2017-11-01

    Tm3+/Dy3+ co-doped phosphate glasses for white light-emitting diodes were synthesized by a conventional melting-quenching method. A spectroscopic research based on optical, photoluminescence spectrum and decay time curves in Tm3+/Dy3+ co-doped phosphate glasses was carried out. The color of luminescence could be tuned by altering the concentrations of Tm3+ ions. Under UV light excitation, the CIE chromaticity coordinates (0.3471, 0.3374) and color correlate temperature (CCT = 4866.21 K) close to the standard white-light illumination (0.333, 0.333 and CCT = 5454.12 K) could be achieved in 0.4 Tm3+/0.6 Dy3+ (mol %) co-doped glass sample. The decrease of the Dy3+ emission decay time in existence of Tm3+ ascertained that non-radiative energy transfer from Dy3+ to Tm3+ occurred. Moreover, the research of energy transfers between Dy3+ and Tm3+ based on the Inokuti-Hirayama model revealed that an electric quadrupole-quadrupole interaction might be the predominant mechanism participated in the energy transfer. This finding suggests that the as-prepared Tm3+/Dy3+ co-doped phosphate glasses may be promising candidate for white LEDs and other display devices.

  8. Microstructural Evolution, Thermodynamics, and Kinetics of Mo-Tm2O3 Powder Mixtures during Ball Milling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Luo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The microstructural evolution, thermodynamics, and kinetics of Mo (21 wt % Tm2O3 powder mixtures during ball milling were investigated using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Ball milling induced Tm2O3 to be decomposed and then dissolved into Mo crystal. After 96 h of ball milling, Tm2O3 was dissolved completely and the supersaturated nanocrystalline solid solution of Mo (Tm, O was obtained. The Mo lattice parameter increased with increasing ball-milling time, opposite for the Mo grain size. The size and lattice parameter of Mo grains was about 8 nm and 0.31564 nm after 96 h of ball milling, respectively. Ball milling induced the elements of Mo, Tm, and O to be distributed uniformly in the ball-milled particles. Based on the semi-experimental theory of Miedema, a thermodynamic model was developed to calculate the driving force of phase evolution. There was no chemical driving force to form a crystal solid solution of Tm atoms in Mo crystal or an amorphous phase because the Gibbs free energy for both processes was higher than zero. For Mo (21 wt % Tm2O3, it was mechanical work, not the negative heat of mixing, which provided the driving force to form a supersaturated nanocrystalline Mo (Tm, O solid solution.

  9. Existence of different but overlapping IgG- and IgM-binding sties on the globular domain of human C1q

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zlatarova, A.S.; Rouseva, M.; Roumenina, L.T.

    2006-01-01

    C1q is the first subcomponent of the classical complement pathway that binds antigen-bound IgG or IgM and initiates complement activation via association of serine proteases C1r and C1s. The globular domain of C1q (gC1q), which is the ligand-recognition domain, is a heterotrimeric structure compo...

  10. Surgical overreduction and hyperlordotic fusion of C1-C2 joint are associated with cervical sagittal malalignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ji-Chen; Qian, Bang-Ping; Qiu, Yong; Yu, Yang; Ni, Hong-Bin

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that hyperlordotic C1-C2 fusion was related to postoperative subaxial kyphosis. However, most of the patients in these studies were complicated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Moreover, no studies have specifically evaluated the relationship between C1-C2 fusion angle and cervical sagittal vertical axis (cSVA), T1 slope or cranial tilt (CRT) after posterior C1-C2 fusion. This study aimed to investigate the cervical sagittal alignment in non-RA patients following posterior C1-C2 fusion and the correlation between C1-C2 fusion angle and postoperative cervical sagittal alignment. From August 2004 to December 2015, twenty-eight consecutive patients with an average age of 39.2 years (range 6-70 years) who underwent posterior C1-C2 fusion from a single institution were enrolled. The mean follow-up period was 30.7 months (range 12-77 months). Angles of Oc-C1, C1-C2, C2-C3 and C2-C7, cSVA, T1 slope and CRT were measured in lateral cervical radiographs in neutral position before surgery and at the final follow-up. C1-C2 angle significantly increased from 13.6° ± 12.4° to 22.0° ± 8.1° at the final follow-up (P fusion angle was significantly associated with Oc-C1, C2-C7 angle, cSVA and CRT at the final follow-up. A significant correlation was also observed between postoperative change of C1-C2 angle and that of Oc-C1, C2-C7 angle, cSVA and CRT. Apart from decreased subaxial lordosis, posterior C1-C2 fusion in hyperextension may also lead to kyphotic change of atlanto-occipital alignment and increased tilting forward of the cervical spine. Therefore, intraoperative overreduction of C1-C2 angle and hyperlordotic C1-C2 fusion should be avoided to maintain the physiologic cervical sagittal alignment.

  11. Influence of cooling rate and cerium addition on rapidly solidified Al-TM alloys

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michalcová, A.; Vojtěch, D.; Schumacher, G.; Novák, P.; Klementová, Mariana; Šerák, J.; Mudrová, M.; Valdaufová, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 1 (2010), s. 1-7 ISSN 0023-432X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : rapid solidification * Al-TM * microstructure * aluminium Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.471, year: 2010

  12. Attitudes toward Learning about and Working with Computers of Students at UiTM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Rugayah; Mustapha, Wan Narita

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the attitudes toward learning about and working with computers of Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), Shah Alam students. Attitudes were studied in an attempt to ascertain factors such as anxiety, confidence, liking and, usefulness at the university level. A total of 300 students at various stages of education…

  13. Introgression of Clearfield(TM) rice crop traits into weedy red rice outcrosses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies were conducted to determine the impact of introgression of crop alleles into weedy rice populations. Seeds of 89 weedy rice accessions collected from Arkansas fields in 11 counties, with a history of Clearfield(TM) rice production, were planted in 2011 and treated with two applications of im...

  14. The Academic English Language Needs of Industrial Design Students in UiTM Kedah, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzmi, Nor Aslah; Bidin, Samsiah; Ibrahim, Syazliyati; Jusoff, Kamaruzaman

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the academic English language lacks and needs of Industrial Design students in Universiti Teknologi MARA Kedah (UiTM). It highlights the lacks and needs for English for Academic Purposes in helping the students to succeed in the program through the usage of English language. The research tools used were in…

  15. RIMS/sup tm/ - radiological information management system: software package EI-029-S86

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    RIMS/sup tm/ has been developed for health physics record keeping and reporting. It provides for the management needs relating to radiological information control at a nuclear facility. The program is comprised of the following modules: Personnel Radiological Information, Radiological Work Permit, Radiation Survey Records, Access Control, ALARA Reporting, and Respirator and Survey Instrument Inventory Modules

  16. LALAGE - a computer program to calculate the TM01 modes of cylindrically symmetrical multicell resonant structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, P.

    1982-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the LALA program to compute resonant frequencies and fields for all the modes of the lowest TM 01 band-pass of multicell structures. The results are compared with those calculated by another popular rf cavity code and with experimentally measured quantities. (author)

  17. Landsat 5 TM images and DEM in lithologic mapping of Payen Volcanic Field (Mendoza Province, Argentina)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornaciai, A.; Bisson, M.; Mazzarini, F.; Del Carlo, P.; Pasquare, G.

    2009-01-01

    Satellite image such as Landsat 5 TM scene provides excellent representation of Earth and synoptic view of large geographic areas in different band combination. Landsat TM images allow automatic and semi-automatic classification of land cover, nevertheless the software frequently may some difficulties in distinguishing between similar radiometric surfaces. In this case, the use of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) can be an important tool to identify different surface covers. In this study, several False Color Composite (FCC) of Landsat 5 TM Image, DEM and the respective draped image of them, were used to delineate lithological boundaries and tectonic features of regional significance of the Paven Volcanic Field (PVF). PFV is a Quaternary fissural structure belonging to the black-arc extensional areas of the Andes in the Mendoza Province (Argentina) characterized by many composite basaltic lava flow fields. The necessity to identify different lava flows with the same composition, and then with same spectral features, allows to highlight the improvement of synergic use of TM images and shaded DEM in the visual interpretation. Information obtained from Satellite data and DEM have been compared with previous geological maps and transferred into a topographical base map. Based on these data a new lithological map at 1:100.000 scale has been presented [it

  18. VUV spectroscopy of Tm3+ and Mn2+ doped LiSrAlF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    True, M.; Kirm, M.; Negodine, E.; Vielhauer, S.; Zimmerer, G.

    2004-01-01

    LiSrAlF 6 (LiSAF) crystals doped with either Tm 3+ or Mn 2+ were obtained by solid-state reaction and investigated spectroscopically using synchrotron radiation in the vacuum-ultra-violet and ultra-violet spectral regions. In the Tm 3+ doped LiSAF crystals, the slow spin-forbidden 5d-4f emission peaking at 166 nm with a lifetime of at least 1 μs was observed. The respective excitation spectrum consists of several bands in the range of 160-110 nm arising due to the 4f-5d absorption. The f-f emissions of Tm 3+ are well excited in the range of 135-110 nm, but not under excitation into the lower lying d-bands. The excitation mechanisms of different emissions will be discussed including the F - to Tm 3+ charge transfer excitation peaking at 127 nm in LiSAF. The characteristic broad 4 T 1 → 6 A 1 emission band of Mn 2+ peaking at 508 (504) nm was observed in LiSAF:Mn 2+ crystal at 10 (300) K. Three intense excitation bands, tentatively ascribed to the 3d-4s transitions of Mn 2+ , were revealed in the range of 170-110 nm

  19. Glimpses of the humorous in T.M. Aluko's short stories | Babalola ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TM. Aluko's short stories mark his entry into the literary world. Most of these narratives were published in the late nineteenth-forties However, a critical analysis and appreciation of Aluko's writing at this level has not been done. The present essay lays emphasis on satiric humour in these tales about Yoruba city life which ...

  20. Synthesis and up-conversion emissions of Yb3+/Er3+, Yb3+/Tm3+ ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    42

    microscopy (FE-SEM) results suggested the additive adding had effects on the size and the morphology of the material, which affected the UC emissions further. Green/Red UC emissions of Er3+, UV/blue/IR UC emissions of Tm3+, and UV UC emissions of Gd3+ were observed in the orthorhombic phase of KLu2F7 ...