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Sample records for cinnabar toxicologically similar

  1. Mercury in traditional medicines: Is cinnabar toxicologically similar to common mercurials?

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Jie; Shi, Jing-Zheng; Yu, Li-Mei; Goyer, Robert A.; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2008-01-01

    Mercury is a major toxic metal ranking top in the Toxic Substances List. Cinnabar (contains mercury sulfide) has been used in traditional medicines for thousands years as an ingredient in various remedies, and 40 cinnabar-containing traditional medicines are still used today. Little is known about toxicology profiles or toxicokinetics of cinnabar and cinnabar-containing traditional medicines, and the high mercury content in these Chinese medicines raises justifiably escalations of public conc...

  2. Neurotoxicological effects of cinnabar (a Chinese mineral medicine, HgS) in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cinnabar, a naturally occurring mercuric sulfide (HgS), has long been used in combination with traditional Chinese medicine as a sedative for more than 2000 years. Up to date, its pharmacological and toxicological effects are still unclear, especially in clinical low-dose and long-term use. In this study, we attempted to elucidate the effects of cinnabar on the time course of changes in locomotor activities, pentobarbital-induced sleeping time, motor equilibrium performance and neurobiochemical activities in mice during 3- to 11-week administration at a clinical dose of 10 mg/kg/day. The results showed that cinnabar was significantly absorbed by gastrointestinal (G-I) tract and transported to brain tissues. The spontaneous locomotor activities of male mice but not female mice were preferentially suppressed. Moreover, frequencies of jump and stereotype-1 episodes were progressively decreased after 3-week oral administration in male and female mice. Pentobarbital-induced sleeping time was prolonged and the retention time on a rotating rod (60 rpm) was reduced after treatment with cinnabar for 6 weeks and then progressively to a greater extent until the 11-week experiment. In addition, the biochemical changes in blood and brain tissues were studied; the inhibition of Na+/K+-ATPase activities, increased production of lipid peroxidation (LPO) and nitric oxide (NO) were found with a greater extent in male mice than those in female mice, which were apparently correlated with their differences in the neurological responses observed. In conclusion, these findings, for the first time, provide evidence of the pharmacological and toxicological basis for understanding the sedative and neurotoxic effects of cinnabar used as a Chinese mineral medicine for more than 2000 years

  3. ToxDBScan: Large-Scale Similarity Screening of Toxicological Databases for Drug Candidates

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Römer; Linus Backert; Johannes Eichner; Andreas Zell

    2014-01-01

    We present a new tool for hepatocarcinogenicity evaluation of drug candidates in rodents. ToxDBScan is a web tool offering quick and easy similarity screening of new drug candidates against two large-scale public databases, which contain expression profiles for substances with known carcinogenic profiles: TG-GATEs and DrugMatrix. ToxDBScan uses a set similarity score that computes the putative similarity based on similar expression of genes to identify chemicals with similar genotoxic and hep...

  4. ToxDBScan: Large-Scale Similarity Screening of Toxicological Databases for Drug Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Römer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a new tool for hepatocarcinogenicity evaluation of drug candidates in rodents. ToxDBScan is a web tool offering quick and easy similarity screening of new drug candidates against two large-scale public databases, which contain expression profiles for substances with known carcinogenic profiles: TG-GATEs and DrugMatrix. ToxDBScan uses a set similarity score that computes the putative similarity based on similar expression of genes to identify chemicals with similar genotoxic and hepatocarcinogenic potential. We propose using a discretized representation of expression profiles, which use only information on up- or down-regulation of genes as relevant features. Therefore, only the deregulated genes are required as input. ToxDBScan provides an extensive report on similar compounds, which includes additional information on compounds, differential genes and pathway enrichments. We evaluated ToxDBScan with expression data from 15 chemicals with known hepatocarcinogenic potential and observed a sensitivity of 88 Based on the identified chemicals, we achieved perfect classification of the independent test set. ToxDBScan is publicly available from the ZBIT Bioinformatics Toolbox.

  5. Adsorption of I- ions on cinnabar for 129I waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adsorption of I- ions on natural cinnabars, whose localities are Spain, USA, and Mexico, have been studied by batch method. Only Spain cinnabar (S-cinnabar) was found to have relatively high adsorptivity to I- ions even in the presence of Cl- ions. The value of distribution ratio (Kd) is 103 ml/g under the conditions of initial [I-] = 1.0 x 10-6 M (1 M = 1 mol/dm3), pH 6.0, and solution/S-cinnabar = 100 ml/g. It was found that the adsorptivities of S-cinnabar to I- ions increase with an increase in the specific surface area and a decrease in pH, that the adsorption of I- ions on S-cinnabar is irreversible, and that S-cinnabars heated at temperatures higher than 100 C decrease the adsorptivities to I- ions. Furthermore, I- ions were found to be not adsorbed on HgS reagent which is the main component of cinnabar. From these results, the adsorption of I- ions on S-cinnabar is considered to be due to the reaction between I- ions and certain species in the surface, which are thermally unstable and minor component. (orig.)

  6. Cinnabar alteration in archaeological wall paintings: an experimental and theoretical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neiman, Madeleine Kegelman; Balonis, Magdalena; Kakoulli, Ioanna

    2015-11-01

    The red mineral pigment known as cinnabar (HgS) was commonly employed in Roman fresco wall paintings. Fresco artists of the period favored this pigment for its striking red color. However, upon excavation and exposure to air and light, cinnabar-pigmented surfaces recovered from archaeological contexts often proved to be unstable. Mural paintings colored with cinnabar that have been exposed in the open air frequently demonstrate a disfiguring, irreversible darkening of the surface. Traditionally, scholars have attributed this alteration to a light-induced phase change from red α-cinnabar to black β-cinnabar (meta-cinnabar). While this transformation has not been totally excluded, the prevailing view among conservation scientists is that chlorine plays a key role in the darkening process through the formation of light-sensitive mercury chloride compounds, or as a catalyst in the photochemical redox of Hg(II)S into Hg(0) and S(0). Using laboratory-based experiments and thermodynamic modeling, this paper attempts to further clarify the mechanism(s) and kinetics of cinnabar alteration in fresco applications, especially the role of light, humidity, and chlorine ions. Additionally, it explores possible pathways and preventive as well as remedial conservation treatments during or immediately following excavation, to inhibit or retard darkening of cinnabar-pigmented fresco surfaces.

  7. Bacterial Influence on the Solubility of Cinnabar and Metacinnabar at New Idria, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jew, A. D.; Rytuba, J. J.; Spormann, A. M.; Brown, G. E.

    2007-12-01

    Mercury in the forms of cinnabar (α-HgS) and metacinnabar (β-HgS) is generally considered to be unreactive and of little environmental concern. To determine if this current belief is valid, a consortium of bacteria (including a Thiomonas intermedia-like bacterium) was taken from the acid mine drainage (AMD) pond at the New Idria Hg Mine, San Benito Co., CA, and inoculated into filter-sterilized AMD pond water (pH = 4) containing either ground cinnabar or metacinnabar crystals (Experiments conducted with (1) α- HgS or β-HgS in the presence of killed bacteria (anaerobic), (2) α-HgS with pond water (abiotic), and (3) β-HgS with AMD pond water (abiotic) showed drops in aqueous Hg to below the detection limit (0.1ng/L) within 12 days. Anaerobic growth of the bacterial consortium showed a pattern similar to those of the abiotic water-HgS experiments, except that Hg levels dropped below detection limit within 6 days. These combined results suggest that HgS degradation by this bacterial consortium is an aerobic process. Killed bacteria incubated aerobically showed a slight increase in Hg levels over background water levels (enzymes might be involved in the dissolution of HgS and were still viable for ~6 days after sterilization. In aerobic living incubations, the activities of different mercury and sulfide species were estimated using the thermodynamic modeling program Minteq with AMD pond water chemistry determined by ICP-MS and total mercury and total sulfide analyses. These calculations give an equilibrium solubility product for the dissolution of HgS up to 25 orders of magnitude higher than HgS under standard conditions. When compared to calculations by Paquette et al., 1997 and Benoit et al., 1999, the bacterial consortium at New Idria causes an increase in the pK for all reported reactions including H+, HS-, and H2S of 11-13 orders of magnitude. These results indicate that the biofilm consortium at the New Idria AMD pond has a profound effect on the solubility

  8. Cinnabar presence ar round the Valentin stream in Florida district of Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some little grains of cinnabar were found in Valentin River, Florida, Uruguay during the Gold Exploration Project on the Area in 1991. We present some chemical data to prove the existence of mercury probably related to a greissen hydrothermal event.

  9. Cinnabar-Induced Subchronic Renal Injury Is Associated with Increased Apoptosis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the role of apoptosis in cinnabar-induced renal injury in rats. To test this role, rats were dosed orally with cinnabar (1 g/kg/day for 8 weeks or 12 weeks, and the control rats were treated with 5% carboxymethylcellulose solution. Levels of urinary mercury (UHg, renal mercury (RHg, serum creatinine (SCr, and urine kidney injury molecule 1 (KIM-1 were assessed, and renal pathology was analyzed. Apoptotic cells were identified and the apoptotic index was calculated. A rat antibody array was used to analyze expression of cytokines associated with apoptosis. Results from these analyses showed that UHg, RHg, and urine KIM-1, but not SCr, levels were significantly increased in cinnabar-treated rats. Renal pathological changes in cinnabar-treated rats included vacuolization of tubular cells, formation of protein casts, infiltration of inflammatory cells, and increase in the number of apoptotic tubular cells. In comparison to the control group, expression of FasL, Fas, TNF-α, TRAIL, activin A, and adiponectin was upregulated in the cinnabar-treated group. Collectively, our results suggest that prolonged use of cinnabar results in kidney damage due to accumulation of mercury and that the underlying mechanism involves apoptosis of tubular cells via a death receptor-mediated pathway.

  10. Toxicology elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work studies the different aspects of the modern toxicology: toxico-kinetic, biological, medico legal, food, professional, pharmaceuticals, environmental, social and regulatory. It is divided in three parts that consider the principle problems of general toxicology and analytical toxicology. (N.C.)

  11. BACILLUS THURINGIENSIS VAR. KURSTAKI AFFECTS A BENEFICIAL INSECT, THE CINNABAR MOTH (LEPIDOPTERA: ARCTIIDAE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The microbial insecticide bacillus thuringiensis Berliner var. kurstaki is used to control forest pests in regions where tansy ragwort, Senecio jacobaea L. occurs. iological control of this noxious weed may be compromised if the cinnabar moth, Tyria jacobaeae (L), is susceptible ...

  12. Evaluation of hepatotoxicity potential of cinnabar-containing An-Gong-Niu-Huang Wan, a patent traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuan-Fu; Wu, Qin; Liang, Shi-Xia; Miao, Jia-Wei; Shi, Jing-Shan; Liu, Jie

    2011-07-01

    An-Gong-Niu-Huang Wan (AGNH) is a patent traditional Chinese medicine for brain disorders. It contains 10% cinnabar (HgS). Hg is known to produce toxicity to the kidney, brain and liver. Is AGNH safe? Liver is a major organ for drug metabolism, whether the long-term use of AGNH would affect hepatic P450 enzymes is unknown. To address these concerns, mice were given orally cinnabar (300mg/kg), cinnabar-containing AGNH daily for 44days, and liver toxicity was examined and compared with that of methylmercury (MeHg, 2.6mg/kg) and mercuric chloride (HgCl(2), 32mg/kg). Serum aminotransferases were increased by MeHg and HgCl(2) only. Histopathology showed more severe liver damage in MeHg- and HgCl(2)-treated mice than in the cinnabar and AGNH groups. Accumulation of Hg in MeHg- and HgCl(2)-treated mice was 96- and 71-fold higher than controls, respectively, but was only 2-fold after cinnabar and AGNH administration. Expressions of metallothionein-1 and heme oxygenase-1, biomarkers for Hg toxicity, were increased by MeHg and HgCl(2,) but were not altered in cinnabar- and AGNH-treated mice. Expression of hepatic cytochrome P450 genes, such as Cyp1a1, Cyp1b1 and Cyp4a10 was increased only after MeHg and HgCl(2), and the expressions of Cyp3a11and Cyp3a25 were increased by all treatments, indicating the potential Hg-drug interactions after long-term use of cinnabar-containing traditional medicines. Taken together, the results demonstrate that AGNH is much less hepatotoxic than common mercurials, and that the use of total Hg content to evaluate the toxicity of cinnabar-containing traditional Chinese medicines appears to be inappropriate. PMID:21435368

  13. Chronic mercury exposure in Late Neolithic/Chalcolithic populations in Portugal from the cultural use of cinnabar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, Steven D.; Brasso, Rebecka; Patterson, William P.; Carlos Valera, António; McKenzie, Ashley; Maria Silva, Ana; Gleason, James D.; Blum, Joel D.

    2015-10-01

    Cinnabar is a natural mercury sulfide (HgS) mineral of volcanic or hydrothermal origin that is found worldwide. It has been mined prehistorically and historically in China, Japan, Europe, and the Americas to extract metallic mercury (Hg0) for use in metallurgy, as a medicinal, a preservative, and as a red pigment for body paint and ceramics. Processing cinnabar via combustion releases Hg0 vapor that can be toxic if inhaled. Mercury from cinnabar can also be absorbed through the gut and skin, where it can accumulate in organs and bone. Here, we report moderate to high levels of total mercury (THg) in human bone from three Late Neolithic/Chalcolithic (5400-4100 B.P.) sites in southern Portugal that were likely caused by cultural use of cinnabar. We use light stable isotope and Hg stable isotope tracking to test three hypotheses on the origin of mercury in this prehistoric human bone. We traced Hg in two individuals to cinnabar deposits near Almadén, Spain, and conclude that use of this mineral likely caused mild to severe mercury poisoning in the prehistoric population. Our methods have applications to bioarchaeological investigations worldwide, and for tracking trade routes and mobility of prehistoric populations where cinnabar use is documented.

  14. Behavioral toxicology.

    OpenAIRE

    Needleman, H L

    1995-01-01

    The new fields of behavioral toxicology and behavioral teratology investigate the outcome of specific toxic exposures in humans and animals on learning, memory, and behavioral characteristics. Three important classes of behavioral neurotoxicants are metals, solvents, and pesticides. The clearest data on the deleterious effects of prenatal exposure to toxicants comes from the study of two metals, lead and mercury, and from epidemiological investigations of the effects of alcohol taken during p...

  15. Exposure to Low Dose of Cinnabar (a Naturally Occurring Mercuric Sulfide (HgS Caused Neurotoxicological Effects in Offspring Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Fa Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cinnabar, a naturally occurring mercuric sulfide (HgS, has long been used in Chinese mineral medicine for more than 2000 years. Although mercury is well-known for its toxicity, whether cinnabar induces neurotoxicity, especially in infants and children, is unknown. The purpose of this study was to explore the neurotoxic effects of low-dose of cinnabar (10 mg/kg/day on developing mice. The results revealed neurobehavioral defects in F1-C-Cin group, which were associated with Hg accumulation, increased NOx levels in whole blood, and Na+/K+-ATPase activities in brain tissues. F1- and F2-Cin-V groups were found to increase brain Hg contents and prominent neurobehavioral defects compared with F1-C-V group, suggesting that the fetal brain was more susceptible to irreversible effects for cinnabar-induced damage. Moreover, F1- and F2-Cin-Cin groups had severely neurobehavioral dysfunctions, closely correlated with the further alteration of NOx levels and Na+/K+-ATPase activities than F1- and F2-C-Cin groups. Effects in F2-Cin-Cin group were more significant than those in F1-Cin-Cin group. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that exposure to low-dose of cinnabar during the perinatal and developmental stages results in irreversible and severe injuries of the neurotoxicity in offspring, and NOx and Na+/K+-ATPase activities may exist potential and useful biomarkers for neurotoxicity-induced by low-doses of mercuric compounds.

  16. Iodide retention by cinnabar (HgS) and chalcocite (Cu{sub 2}S)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, H.L.; Balsley, S.D.; Brady, P.V.

    1995-07-01

    Sorption of iodide (I{sup {minus}}) on cinnabar (HgS) and chalcocite (Cu{sub 2}S) was examined as a function of pH at 25{degrees}C in a series of batch experiments. Calculated distribution ratios (K{sub d}) far exceed those reported for other minerals; maximal K{sub d}`s of 1375 cc/g (Cu{sub 2}S) and 3080 c/g (HgS) were observed between pH 4-5, but wre substantial at all pH`s measured (4 < pH < 10). Iodide sorption apparently occurs by the formation of an insoluble surface solid solution with exposed Hg and Cu sites. Surface solid solution formation is favored at low pH due to the lessened electrostatic repulsion of the iodide ion by the sulfide surfaces.

  17. Chemical ecology of the cinnabar moth ( Tyria jacobaeae ) on a newly recorded host Senecio adonidifolius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrieling, Klaas

    2006-09-01

    The cinnabar moth ( Tyria jacobaeae, Arctiidae) normally feeds on Senecio jacobaea in the field. For the first time, naturally occurring populations of T. jacobaeae have been found thriving on Senecio adonidifolius, even though the moth's preferred host, S. jacobaea, is available within 50-400 m. In the laboratory, the cinnabar moth has been shown to feed on and develop on S. adonidifolius despite its different leaf morphology, pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA) profile and a large taxonomic distance to S. jacobaea. Here I examined whether T. jacobaeae has adapted to this new host in the field using adult oviposition behavior and plant acquired defense chemistry in pupae as criteria. Choice tests indicated local adaptation to this newly recorded host. T. jacobaeae reared on S. adonidifolius hosts laid more egg batches and total eggs on it than T. jacobaeae from S. jacobaea. The egg batches were smaller on S. adonidifolius possibly due to highly pinnate thread-like structure of its leaves. The bouquet of plant acquired PAs and the insect metabolized callimorphine in pupae differed widely between pupae collected from the two hosts. T. jacobaeae pupae taken from S. adonidifolius hosts contained more of the insect metabolized callimorphine than pupae taken from S. jacobaea hosts, but they did not differ in total PA concentration. Pupae taken from S. jacobaea hosts contained more unmetabolized plant PA's than pupae from S. adonidifolius hosts. Additionally, 10% of T. jacobaeae larvae taken from S. adonidifolius in Biausse were infested with Carcelia dubia, a parasitic and rare tachinid fly that typically attacks arctiid moths.

  18. Mercury in soils and plants in an abandoned cinnabar mining area (SW Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Sánchez, A; Murciego, A; Alvarez-Ayuso, E; Regina, I Santa; Rodríguez-González, M A

    2009-09-15

    An abandoned cinnabar mining area located in the South-West of Spain has been studied with the aim of assessing its mercury pollution level and enhancing the knowledge about the Hg soil/plant relationship. To do so, soils and plants were sampled near an inactive smelter and around two mining sites present in this area. Critical total Hg concentrations were found in the close environs of pollutant sources. These also show high levels of elemental Hg (up to 8 mg kg(-1)), but quite low exchangeable Hg contents (0.008-0.038 mg kg(-1)). Most plant specimens display in their aboveground tissues Hg concentrations comprised in the range 0.1-10 mg kg(-1), with a great proportion (50%) showing critical levels. Greater Hg contents were found in plant specimens growing in soils with higher elemental Hg concentrations. The plant species displaying the greatest Hg levels are either perennial species of small-medium size and/or showing medium-highly corrugated leaves, or annual plants of small size. Marrubium vulgare L., Bromus madritensis L. and Trifolium angustifolium L. are the plant species with the highest Hg contents (37.6, 12.7 and 9.0 mg kg(-1), respectively). Leaf specific surface seems an important feature in the atmospheric Hg uptake by plants. PMID:19345007

  19. Forensic toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummer, Olaf H

    2010-01-01

    Forensic toxicology has developed as a forensic science in recent years and is now widely used to assist in death investigations, in civil and criminal matters involving drug use, in drugs of abuse testing in correctional settings and custodial medicine, in road and workplace safety, in matters involving environmental pollution, as well as in sports doping. Drugs most commonly targeted include amphetamines, benzodiazepines, cannabis, cocaine and the opiates, but can be any other illicit substance or almost any over-the-counter or prescribed drug, as well as poisons available to the community. The discipline requires high level skills in analytical techniques with a solid knowledge of pharmacology and pharmacokinetics. Modern techniques rely heavily on immunoassay screening analyses and mass spectrometry (MS) for confirmatory analyses using either high-performance liquid chromatography or gas chromatography as the separation technique. Tandem MS has become more and more popular compared to single-stage MS. It is essential that analytical systems are fully validated and fit for the purpose and the assay batches are monitored with quality controls. External proficiency programs monitor both the assay and the personnel performing the work. For a laboratory to perform optimally, it is vital that the circumstances and context of the case are known and the laboratory understands the limitations of the analytical systems used, including drug stability. Drugs and poisons can change concentration postmortem due to poor or unequal quality of blood and other specimens, anaerobic metabolism and redistribution. The latter provides the largest handicap in the interpretation of postmortem results. PMID:20358697

  20. Formation of cinnabar--estimation of favourable conditions in a proposed Swedish repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Margareta; Düker, Anders; Allard, Bert

    2006-08-25

    A deep repository for permanent storage of mercury will be designed and built in Sweden. The preferred chemical state for mercury in such a repository would be the sulphide HgS (cinnabar), which is a highly insoluble and the dominating natural mercury mineral. The possible formation of HgS from HgO or Hg(0) by reaction with a sulphur source (S, FeS or FeS(2)) is discussed from thermodynamic considerations, and pe-pH-diagrams are constructed by using the computer code MEDUSA to illustrate under which conditions HgS would dominate. Calculations of the speciation (PHREEQE) under varying conditions (S/Hg-ratios, presence of chloride) are given. Long-term laboratory experiments are performed, where the formation of HgS from the basic components is demonstrated (after mixing under various conditions and storage at room temperature for up to 3 years). The feasibility of HgS-formation with time in a geologic repository under conditions representative of deep granitic bedrock (calcium-bicarbonate buffered to pH 7-8.5) is discussed, as well as effects of alkaline conditions (concrete environment, pH 10.5-12.5). Formation of soluble polysulphides is not expected as long as the S/Hg mole ratio is within 1-1.3 and pH is below 10.5-11. Concrete should be used with caution. Suitable ballast materials could be introduced that would reduce porewater-pH that otherwise would be above 12. PMID:16504396

  1. Biomarkers in Computational Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biomarkers are a means to evaluate chemical exposure and/or the subsequent impacts on toxicity pathways that lead to adverse health outcomes. Computational toxicology can integrate biomarker data with knowledge of exposure, chemistry, biology, pharmacokinetics, toxicology, and e...

  2. Toxicology Education Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bodies and our world. Welcome to the Toxicology Education Foundation! Our mission is to enhance public understanding ... TEF In the Classroom Our Goal The Toxicology Education Foundation seeks to help build the public's understanding ...

  3. lazar: a modular predictive toxicology framework

    OpenAIRE

    ChristophHelma; AndreasMaunz

    2013-01-01

    lazar (lazy structure–activity relationships) is a modular framework for predictive toxicology. Similar to the read across procedure in toxicological risk assessment, lazar creates local QSAR (quantitative structure–activity relationship) models for each compound to be predicted. Model developers can choose between a large variety of algorithms for descriptor calculation and selection, chemical similarity indices, and model building. This paper presents a high level description of the lazar f...

  4. Cinnabar, arsenian pyrite and thallium-enrichment in active shallow submarine hydrothermal vents at Paleochori Bay, Milos Island, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kati, Marianna; Voudouris, Panagiotis; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia; Magganas, Andreas; Baltatzis, Emmanouil; Kanellopoulos, Christos; Mavrogonatos, Constantinos

    2015-04-01

    We herein report the discovery of active cinnabar-depositing hydrothermal vents in a submarine setting at Paleochori Bay, within the offshore southeastern extension of the Milos Island Geothermal Field, South Aegean Active Volcanic Arc. Active, low temperature (up to 115 °C) hydrothermal venting through volcaniclastic material has led to a varied assemblage of sulfide and alteration mineral phases in an area of approximately 1 km2. Our samples recovered from Paleochori Bay are hydrothermal edifices composed of volcaniclastic detrital material cemented by pyrite, or pure sulfide (mainly massive pyrite) mounts. Besides pyrite and minor marcasite, the hydrothermal minerals include cinnabar, amorphous silica, hydrous ferric oxides, carbonates (aragonite and calcite), alunite-jarosite solid solution and Sr-rich barite. Among others, growth textures, sieve-textured pyrite associated with barite, alunite-jarosite solid solution and hydrous ferric oxides rims colloform-banded pyrite layers. Overgrowths of arsenian pyrite layers (up to 3.2 wt. % As and/or up to 1.1 wt. % Mn) onto As-free pyrite indicate fluctuation in As content of the hydrothermal fluid. Mercury, in the form of cinnabar, occurs in up to 5 μm grains within arsenian pyrite layers, usually forming distinct cinnabar-enriched micro-layers. Hydrothermal Sr-rich barite (barite-celestine solid solution), pseudocubic alunite-jarosite solid solution and Mn- and Sr-enriched carbonates occur in various amounts and closely associated with pyrite and/or hydrous ferric oxides. Thallium-bearing sulfides and/or sulfosalts were not detected during our study; however, hydrous ferric oxides show thallium content of up to 0.5 wt. % Tl. The following scenarios may have played a role in pyrite precipitation at Paleochori: (a) H2S originally dissolved in the deep fluid but separated upon boiling could have reacted with oxygenated seawater under production of sulphuric acid, thus causing leaching and dissolution of primary iron

  5. Laser Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopies of natural semiconductor mineral cinnabar, α-HgS, from various mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural minerals α-HgS from various mines have been studied by laser Raman spectroscopy and resonance Raman spectroscopy. The crystals differ from each other in the content of selenium impurity, included in samples from some mines. Based on the Raman spectra and the factor-group analysis the classification of the first order phonons and then the comparison of the results with the results from other works were carried out. The Raman spectra analysis of minerals from various mines show the selenium impurity gap vibration at 203 cm-1 and 226 cm-1 frequencies, respectively. On the basis of statistical measurements of the Raman spectra one can conclude that impurity frequencies of α-HgS may be generally used for the identification of the mine. Resonance Raman scattering for pure minerals has been studied by a dye laser. Phonon resonance in the indirect semiconductor α-HgS is found to be far more intense than the indirect resonance detected until now in various semiconductors in the proximity of the first indirect band Eg, for instance, in GaP. In our opinion, this may be conditioned by cinnabar band structure peculiarities. Low resonance has also been fixed in 'dirty' minerals at the spectral band frequency of 203 cm-1 characterizing gap vibration of isomorphic impurity Se in cinnabar

  6. Genetic toxicology: web resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert R

    2002-04-25

    Genetic toxicology is the scientific discipline dealing with the effects of chemical, physical and biological agents on the heredity of living organisms. The Internet offers a wide range of online digital resources for the field of Genetic Toxicology. The history of genetic toxicology and electronic data collections are reviewed. Web-based resources at US National Library of Medicine (NLM), including MEDLINE, PUBMED, Gateway, Entrez, and TOXNET, are discussed. Search strategies and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) are reviewed in the context of genetic toxicology. The TOXNET group of databases are discussed with emphasis on those databases with genetic toxicology content including GENE-TOX, TOXLINE, Hazardous Substances Data Bank, Integrated Risk Information System, and Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System. Location of chemical information including chemical structure and linkage to health and regulatory information using CHEMIDPLUS at NLM and other databases is reviewed. Various government agencies have active genetic toxicology research programs or use genetic toxicology data to assist fulfilling the agency's mission. Online resources at the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Institutes of Environmental Health Sciences, and the National Toxicology Program (NTP) are outlined. Much of the genetic toxicology for pharmaceuticals, industrial chemicals and pesticides that is performed in the world is regulatory-driven. Regulatory web resources are presented for the laws mandating testing, guidelines on study design, Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) regulations, and requirements for electronic data collection and reporting. The Internet provides a range of other supporting resources to the field of genetic toxicology. The web links for key professional societies and journals in genetic toxicology are listed. Distance education, educational media resources, and job placement services are also

  7. Green Toxicology – Application of predictive toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Wedebye, Eva Bay; Taxvig, Camilla;

    2014-01-01

    reduction. This objective is partly achieved through core principles of green chemistry. However, better utilization of existing predictive toxicological tools alongside new inventions is still required. For this, input from toxicologists early in the chemical enterprise is necessary to make informed...... safer chemicals and to identify problematic compounds already in use such as industrial compounds, drugs, pesticides and cosmetics, is required. Green toxicology is the application of predictive toxicology to the production of chemicals with the specific intent of improving their design for hazard...... be applied in chemical risk assessment to a greater extent than is currently the case. Greater focus on these tools, their strengths and weaknesses, should be part of chemistry training at the university level, thus ensuring constant focus on the issue and fostering new inventions into the future....

  8. Toxicological evaluation and risk assessment of chemical mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cassee, F.R.; Groten, J.P.; Bladeren, P.J. van; Feron, V.J.

    1998-01-01

    A major objective of combination toxicology is to establish whether a mixture of chemicals will result in an effect similar to that expected on the basis of additivity. This requires understanding of the basic concepts of the combined toxicological action of the compounds of the mixture: simple simi

  9. Occupational medicine and toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer Axel

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This editorial is to announce the Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology, a new Open Access, peer-reviewed, online journal published by BioMed Central. Occupational medicine and toxicology belong to the most wide ranging disciplines of all medical specialties. The field is devoted to the diagnosis, prevention, management and scientific analysis of diseases from the fields of occupational and environmental medicine and toxicology. It also covers the promotion of occupational and environmental health. The complexity of modern industrial processes has dramatically changed over the past years and today's areas include effects of atmospheric pollution, carcinogenesis, biological monitoring, ergonomics, epidemiology, product safety and health promotion. We hope that the launch of the Journal of Occupational Medicine and Toxicology will aid in the advance of these important areas of research bringing together multi-disciplinary research findings.

  10. TOXNET: Toxicology Data Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for over 600 chemicals from authoritative groups worldwide Animal Testing Alternatives ALTBIB Resources on Alternatives to the Use of Live Vertebrates in Biomedical Research and Testing Archived, No Longer Updated ... cancer tests GENE-TOX Genetic Toxicology Data Bank. ...

  11. Aerospace Toxicology and Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.; Parmet, A. J.; Pierson, Duane L.

    2007-01-01

    Toxicology dates to the very earliest history of humanity with various poisons and venom being recognized as a method of hunting or waging war with the earliest documentation in the Evers papyrus (circa 1500 BCE). The Greeks identified specific poisons such as hemlock, a method of state execution, and the Greek word toxos (arrow) became the root of our modern science. The first scientific approach to the understanding of poisons and toxicology was the work during the late middle ages of Paracelsus. He formulated what were then revolutionary views that a specific toxic agent or "toxicon" caused specific dose-related effects. His principles have established the basis of modern pharmacology and toxicology. In 1700, Bernardo Ramazzini published the book De Morbis Artificum Diatriba (The Diseases of Workers) describing specific illnesses associated with certain labor, particularly metal workers exposed to mercury, lead, arsenic, and rock dust. Modern toxicology dates from development of the modern industrial chemical processes, the earliest involving an analytical method for arsenic by Marsh in 1836. Industrial organic chemicals were synthesized in the late 1800 s along with anesthetics and disinfectants. In 1908, Hamilton began the long study of occupational toxicology issues, and by WW I the scientific use of toxicants saw Haber creating war gases and defining time-dosage relationships that are used even today.

  12. Animal-free toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lisbeth E

    2013-01-01

    assessment, in accordance with the legislation on chemical, medicine and food safety. Toxicology studies based on human mechanistic and exposure information can replace animal studies. These animal-free approaches can be further supplemented by new in silico methods and chemical structure......-activity relationships. The inclusion of replacement expertise in the international Three Rs centres, the ongoing exploration of alternatives to animal research, and the improvement of conditions for research animals, all imply the beginning of a paradigm shift in toxicology research toward the use of human data....

  13. Toxicological aspects of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different toxicological aspects of water have been studied, remarking the activity of various chemical substances in the organism. These substances are divided in: trace metals (Sb, As, Cd, Zn, Cu, Cr, Fe, Mn, Hg, Ni, Pb, Se), other contaminants (CN-, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, phenols, pesticides, detergents) and radioactivity. Finally, some considerations on this subject are made

  14. Toxicology of inorganic tin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tin(II) or stannous ion as a reducing agent is important in nuclear medicine because it is an essential component and common denominator for many in vivo radiodiagnostic agents, commonly called kits for the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals. This report is intended to alert nuclear medicine community regarding the wide range of biological effects that the stannous ion is capable of producing, and is a review of a large number of selected publications on the toxicological potential of tin(II)

  15. Toxicological Benchmarks for Wildlife

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, B.E. Opresko, D.M. Suter, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated by using a two-tiered process. In the first tier, a screening assessment is performed where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to no observed adverse effects level (NOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks. These benchmarks represent concentrations of chemicals (i.e., concentrations presumed to be nonhazardous to the biota) in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.). While exceedance of these benchmarks does not indicate any particular level or type of risk, concentrations below the benchmarks should not result in significant effects. In practice, when contaminant concentrations in food or water resources are less than these toxicological benchmarks, the contaminants may be excluded from further consideration. However, if the concentration of a contaminant exceeds a benchmark, that contaminant should be retained as a contaminant of potential concern (COPC) and investigated further. The second tier in ecological risk assessment, the baseline ecological risk assessment, may use toxicological benchmarks as part of a weight-of-evidence approach (Suter 1993). Under this approach, based toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. Other sources of evidence include media toxicity tests, surveys of biota (abundance and diversity), measures of contaminant body burdens, and biomarkers. This report presents NOAEL- and lowest observed adverse effects level (LOAEL)-based toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 85 chemicals on 9 representative mammalian wildlife species (short-tailed shrew, little brown bat, meadow vole, white-footed mouse, cottontail rabbit, mink, red fox, and whitetail deer) or 11 avian wildlife species (American robin, rough-winged swallow, American woodcock, wild turkey, belted kingfisher, great blue heron, barred owl, barn owl, Cooper's hawk, and red

  16. Synthetic toxicology: where engineering meets biology and toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Markus; Pei, Lei

    2011-03-01

    This article examines the implications of synthetic biology (SB) for toxicological sciences. Starting with a working definition of SB, we describe its current subfields, namely, DNA synthesis, the engineering of DNA-based biological circuits, minimal genome research, attempts to construct protocells and synthetic cells, and efforts to diversify the biochemistry of life through xenobiology. Based on the most important techniques, tools, and expected applications in SB, we describe the ramifications of SB for toxicology under the label of synthetic toxicology. We differentiate between cases where SB offers opportunities for toxicology and where SB poses challenges for toxicology. Among the opportunities, we identified the assistance of SB to construct novel toxicity testing platforms, define new toxicity-pathway assays, explore the potential of SB to improve in vivo biotransformation of toxins, present novel biosensors developed by SB for environmental toxicology, discuss cell-free protein synthesis of toxins, reflect on the contribution to toxic use reduction, and the democratization of toxicology through do-it-yourself biology. Among the identified challenges for toxicology, we identify synthetic toxins and novel xenobiotics, biosecurity and dual-use considerations, the potential bridging of toxic substances and infectious agents, and do-it-yourself toxin production. PMID:21068213

  17. History of wildlife toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattner, Barnett A

    2009-10-01

    The field of wildlife toxicology can be traced to the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Initial reports included unintentional poisoning of birds from ingestion of spent lead shot and predator control agents, alkali poisoning of waterbirds, and die-offs from maritime oil spills. With the advent of synthetic pesticides in the 1930s and 1940s, effects of DDT and other pesticides were investigated in free-ranging and captive wildlife. In response to research findings in the US and UK, and the publication of Silent Spring in 1962, public debate on the hazards of pollutants arose and national contaminant monitoring programs were initiated. Shortly thereafter, population-level effects of DDT on raptorial and fish-eating birds were documented, and effects on other species (e.g., bats) were suspected. Realization of the global nature of organochlorine pesticide contamination, and the discovery of PCBs in environmental samples, launched long-range studies in birds and mammals. With the birth of ecotoxicology in 1969 and the establishment of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry in 1979, an international infrastructure began to emerge. In the 1980s, heavy metal pollution related to mining and smelting, agrichemical practices and non-target effects, selenium toxicosis, and disasters such as Chernobyl and the Exxon Valdez dominated the field. Biomarker development, endocrine disruption, population modeling, and studies with amphibians and reptiles were major issues of the 1990s. With the turn of the century, there was interest in new and emerging compounds (pharmaceuticals, flame retardants, surfactants), and potential population-level effects of some compounds. Based upon its history, wildlife toxicology is driven by chemical use and misuse, ecological disasters, and pollution-related events affecting humans. Current challenges include the need to more thoroughly estimate and predict exposure and effects of chemical-related anthropogenic

  18. Overview: developmental toxicology: new directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuey, Dana; Kim, James H

    2011-10-01

    Since regulatory agencies began implementing the use of standardized developmental toxicology protocols in the mid-1960s, our knowledge base of embryo-fetal development and technologies for experimentation has grown exponentially. These developmental toxicology protocols were a direct result of the thalidomide tragedy from earlier that decade, when large numbers of women were exposed to the drug and over 10,000 cases of phocomelia resulted. In preventing a recurrence of such tragedies, the testing protocols are immensely successful and the field of toxicology has been dedicated to using them to advance safety and risk assessment of chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Recently, our perspectives on toxicity testing have been challenged by a growing awareness that while we have excelled in hazard identification, we are in dire need of improved methodologies for human health risk assessment, particularly with respect to the large numbers of environmental chemicals for which we have little toxicology data and to the growing sentiment that better alternatives to whole animals tests are needed. To provide a forum for scientists, researchers, and regulators, the Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Technical Committee of the Health and Environmental Sciences Institute organized a 2-day workshop titled "Developmental Toxicology-New Directions" to evaluate lessons learned over the past 30 years and discuss the future of toxicology testing. The following four articles describe different presentations and discussions that were held over the course of those 2 days. PMID:21770024

  19. Theoretical studies of the pressure-induced zinc-blende to cinnabar phase transition in CdTe and thermodynamical properties of each phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luminescence of CdTe quantum dots embedded in ZnTe is quenched at pressure of about 4.5 GPa in the high-pressure experiments. This pressure-induced quenching is attributed to the “zinc-blende–cinnabar” phase transition in CdTe, which was confirmed by the first-principles calculations. Theoretical analysis of the pressure at which the phase transition occurs for CdTe was performed using the CASTEP module of Materials Studio package with both generalized gradient approximation (GGA) and local density approximation (LDA). The calculated phase transition pressures are equal to about 4.4 GPa and 2.6 GPa, according to the GGA and LDA calculations, respectively, which is in a good agreement with the experimental value. Theoretically estimated value of the pressure coefficient of the band-gap luminescence in zinc-blende structure is in very good agreement with that recently measured in the QDs structures. The calculated Debye temperature, elastic constants and specific heat capacity for the zinc-blend structure agree well with the experimental data; the data for the cinnabar phase are reported here for the first time to the best of the authors' knowledge. - Highlights: • Quenching of luminescence of CdTe quantum dots embedded in ZnTe is theoretically explained. • The theoretical calculation of elastic and thermodynamic properties of CdTe by two types of ab-initio methods. • Theoretical calculations of some optical properties of CdTe under pressure in zinc-blende and cinnabar phases

  20. Modal Similarity

    OpenAIRE

    Vigo , Dr. Ronaldo

    2009-01-01

    Just as Boolean rules define Boolean categories, the Boolean operators define higher-order Boolean categories referred to as modal categories. We examine the similarity order between these categories and the standard category of logical identity (i.e. the modal category defined by the biconditional or equivalence operator). Our goal is 4-fold: first, to introduce a similarity measure for determining this similarity order; second, to show that such a measure is a good predictor of the similari...

  1. Web Similarity

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Andrew; Vitányi, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Normalized web distance (NWD) is a similarity or normalized semantic distance based on the World Wide Web or any other large electronic database, for instance Wikipedia, and a search engine that returns reliable aggregate page counts. For sets of search terms the NWD gives a similarity on a scale from 0 (identical) to 1 (completely different). The NWD approximates the similarity according to all (upper semi)computable properties. We develop the theory and give applications. The derivation of ...

  2. Toxicology of Biodiesel Combustion products

    Science.gov (United States)

    1. Introduction The toxicology of combusted biodiesel is an emerging field. Much of the current knowledge about biological responses and health effects stems from studies of exposures to other fuel sources (typically petroleum diesel, gasoline, and wood) incompletely combusted. ...

  3. Aggregated Computational Toxicology Resource (ACTOR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Aggregated Computational Toxicology Resource (ACTOR) is a database on environmental chemicals that is searchable by chemical name and other identifiers, and by...

  4. Aggregated Computational Toxicology Online Resource

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Aggregated Computational Toxicology Online Resource (AcTOR) is EPA's online aggregator of all the public sources of chemical toxicity data. ACToR aggregates data...

  5. American College of Medical Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Club ACMT Grand Rounds Medical Toxicology LLSA JMT Peer Reviewer Webinar Resident-Medical Student Webinars 2015 Fellows-in-Training Research Webinar Other Enduring Education PEHSU National Classroom Chemical Agents of Opportunity Webinars Podcasts Public Health ...

  6. Behavioral assays in environmental toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, B.

    1979-01-01

    Environmental toxicology is too permeated by questions about how the whole organism functions to abandon intact animals as test systems. Behavior does not participate as a single entity or discipline. It ranges across the total spectrum of functional toxicity, from tenuous subjective complaints to subtle sensory and motor disturbances demanding advanced instrumentation for their evaluation. Three facets of behavioral toxicology that illustrate its breadth of interests and potential contributions are discussed.

  7. [Toxicologic blood emergency screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Sabine; Manat, Aurélie; Dumont, Benoit; Bévalot, Fabien; Manchon, Monique; Berny, Claudette

    2010-01-01

    In order to overcome the stop marketing by Biorad company of automated high performance liquid chromatograph with UV detection (Remedi), we developed a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to detect and to give an approximation of the overdose of molecules frequently encountered in drug intoxications. Therefore two hundred eighty seventeen blood samples were collected over a period of one year and allowed us to evaluate and compare the performance of these two techniques. As identification, GC-MS does not identify all molecules detected by Remedi in 24.2% of cases; there is a lack of sensitivity for opiates and the systematic absence of certain molecules such as betablockers. However, in 75.8% of cases the GC-MS detects all molecules found by Remedi and other molecules such as meprobamate, paracetamol, benzodiazepines and phenobarbital. The concentrations obtained are interpreted in terms of overdose showed 15.7% of discrepancy and 84.3% of concordance between the two techniques. The GC-MS technique described here is robust, fast and relatively simple to implement; the identification is facilitated by macro commands and the semi quantification remains manual. Despite a sequence of cleaning the column after each sample, carryover of a sample to the next remains possible. This technique can be used for toxicologic screening in acute intoxications. Nevertheless it must be supplemented by a HPLC with UV detection if molecules such as betablockers are suspected. PMID:20348049

  8. Coincidence of needs in radiological and toxicological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research needs for radiological protection and research programs that have evolved to meet these needs parallel closely those in the chemical toxicology field. The similarity of these needs is described as perceived from the radiological side. Further, the frame work for radiologically-related research, out lines of the research programs, and the development of the facilities at Chalk River Nuclear Labs were presented

  9. Cancer and Toxicology Section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cancer and Toxicology Section is concerned with the investigation of the mechanisms by which chemicals, radiation, and viruses cause the changes broadly identified as cancer. In addition, the study of mechanisms has been extended to include the nontumorigenic effects of various agents associated with fossil energy and fuels. Research in molecular genetics of carcinogenesis focuses largely on the transposon properties of the genomes of retroviruses. The transposon structure of the DNA genomes of endogenous murine N-tropic and B-tropic type C retroviruses is being elucidated, and their chromosomal location mapped in hamster-mouse cell hybrids. A model of the mechanism of retrovirus induction by radiation and chemicals is being developed, and experiments have established that compounds such as hydroxyurea act as inducer. There is the possibility that transposition of sequences of this endogenous virus may be linked to leukemogenesis. Research in regulation of gene expression aims at defining in molecular terms the mechanisms determining expression of specific genes, how these are regulated by hormones, and the events responsible for dysfunction of gene expression in cancer. In corollary work, a library of cloned cDNAs specific for products of genes of special interest to regulation is being developed. Improvement of reversed-phase chromatography as a means of isolating bacterial plasmids and restriction fragments of DNA is underway. Newly developed techniques permit the isolation of supercoiled plasmid DNA directly from bacterial extracts. The technology has been developed recently for the photosynthetic growth of the chemo-autotrophic organism Rhodospirillum rubrum and the enzyme ribulosebisphosphate carboxylase has been produced in quantity

  10. Pre implanted mouse embryos as model for uranium toxicology studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The search of 'in vitro' toxicology model that can predict toxicology effects 'in vivo' is a permanent challenge. A toxicology experimental model must to fill to certain requirements: to have a predictive character, an appropriate control to facilitate the interpretation of the data among the experimental groups, and to be able to control the independent variables that can interfere or modify the results that we are analyzing. The preimplantation embryos posses many advantages in this respect: they are a simple model that begins with the development of only one cell. The 'in vitro' model reproduces successfully the 'in vivo' situation. Due to the similarity that exists among the embryos of mammals during this period the model is practically valid for other species. The embryo is itself a stem cell, the toxicology effects are early observed in his clonal development and the physical-chemical parameters are easily controllable. The purpose of the exhibition is to explain the properties of the pre implanted embryo model for toxicology studies of uranium and to show our experimental results. The cultivation 'in vitro' of mouse embryos with uranylo nitrate demonstrated that the uranium causes from the 13 μgU/ml delay of development, decrease the number of cells per embryo and hipoploidy in the embryonic blastomere. (author)

  11. TRANSGENIC FISH MODEL IN ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Sharma

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A number of experiments and the use of drugs have been performed in fish. The fish may be used as model organism in various biological experiments, including environmental toxicology. Aquatic animals are being engineered to increase aquaculture production, for medical and industrial research, and for ornamental reasons. Fish have been found to play an important role in assessing potential risks associated with exposure to toxic substances in aquatic environment. Hence, it has been thought that the development of transgenic fish can enhance the use of fish in environmental toxicology. India has developed experimental transgenics of rohu fish, zebra fish, cat fish and singhi fish. Genes, promoters and vectors of indigenous origin are now available for only two species namely rohu and singhi for engineering growth. Development of fish model carrying identical transgenes to those found in rodents is beneficial and has shown that several aspects of in vivo mutagenesis are similar between the two classes of vertebrates. Fish shows the frequencies of spontaneous mutations similar to rodents and respond to mutagen exposure consistent with known mutagenic mechanisms. The feasibility of in vivo mutation analysis using transgenic fish has been demonstrated and the potential value of transgenic fish as a comparative animal model has been illustrated. Therefore, the transgenic fish can give the significant contribution to study the environmental toxicity in animals as a whole.

  12. Trangenic fish as models in environmental toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, R N

    2001-01-01

    Historically, fish have played significant roles in assessing potential risks associated with exposure to chemical contamination in aquatic environments. Considering the contributions of transgenic rodent models to biomedicine, it is reasoned that the development of transgenic fish could enhance the role of fish in environmental toxicology. Application of transgenic fish in environmental studies remains at an early stage, but recent introduction of new models and methods demonstrates progress. Rapid advances are most evident in the area of in vivo mutagenesis using fish carrying transgenes that serve as recoverable mutational targets. These models highlight many advantages afforded by fish as models and illustrate important issues that apply broadly to transgenic fish in environmental toxicology. Development of fish models carrying identical transgenes to those found in rodents is beneficial and has revealed that numerous aspects of in vivo mutagenesis are similar between the two classes of vertebrates. Researchers have revealed that fish exhibit frequencies of spontaneous mutations similar to rodents and respond to mutagen exposure consistent with known mutagenic mechanisms. Results have demonstrated the feasibility of in vivo mutation analyses using transgenic fish and have illustrated their potential value as a comparative animal model. Challenges to development and application of transgenic fish relate to the needs for improved efficiencies in transgenic technology and in aspects of fish husbandry and use. By taking advantage of the valuable and unique attributes of fish as test organisms, it is anticipated that transgenic fish will make significant contributions to studies of environmentally induced diseases. PMID:11581523

  13. Toxicología clínica comunitaria Community Clinical Toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Leal

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available En algunos países de América Latina las intoxicaciones agudas se manejan de manera profesional por médicos especialistas en la mate-ria. Algo similar ocurre con las intoxicaciones crónicas de origen laboral en el sector formal. No obstante, una realidad diferente ocurre en cuanto a la evaluación de las intoxicaciones crónicas de origen ambiental, dado que éstas por su naturaleza, son más difíciles de diagnosticar. Para el tratamiento de las intoxicaciones agudas se han organizado Centros de Información y Atención Toxicológica, pero para las intoxicaciones crónicas ambientales no se ha generado organismos semejantes. Por consiguiente, en este trabajo sugerimos un modelo de atención de la intoxicaciones crónicas a través de grupos multidisciplinarios bajo el esquema de una nueva disciplina: la Toxicología Clínica Comunitaria, cuyo objetivo sería la atención simultánea de las intoxicaciones agudas que generalmente se atienden en un ámbito hospitalario y de las intoxicaciones ambientales que por lo normal se presentan a nivel comunitario. El objetivo final es aprovechar la experiencia que existe en la Región en cuanto a Toxicología Clínica para organizar el trabajo comunitario.In some Latin American countries acute intoxication is professionally managed by specialized physicians qualified in the area. Something similar occurs with work-related chronic intoxication in the formal sector. However, a different reality prevails for the assessment of chronic intoxication of environmental origin, since it is by definition more difficult to diagnose. For treatment of acute intoxication, Toxicological Information and Care Centers have been set up, though similar bodies have not been created for chronic environmental intoxication. Therefore, in this study a model of chronic intoxication care is proposed, using multidisciplinary teams adopting a new approach, namely Community Clinical Toxicology, the goal of which would be the

  14. Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology Database (DART)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — A bibliographic database on the National Library of Medicine's (NLM) Toxicology Data Network (TOXNET) with references to developmental and reproductive toxicology...

  15. Predictive toxicology of chemicals and database mining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The toxic chemicals from the database Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS) were analyzed by structural similarity comparison, which shows that the structure patterns or characteristics of toxic chemicals exist in a sufficiently large database. Then, a two-step strategy was proposed to explore noncongeneric toxic chemicals in the database: the screening of structure patterns by similarity comparison and the derivation of detailed relationship between structure and activity by using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) of Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) technologies. From the performance of the procedure, such a stepwise scheme is demonstrated to be feasible and effective to mine a database of toxic chemicals. It can be anticipated that database mining of toxic chemicals will be a new area for predictive toxicology of chemicals.

  16. Arsenic and Mercury Containing Traditional Chinese Medicine (Realgar and Cinnabar) Strongly Inhibit Organic Anion Transporters, Oat1 and Oat3, In Vivo in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen-Hao; Zhang, Na; Qi, Jin-Feng; Sun, Chen; Wang, Yong-Hui; Lin, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Toxic heavy metals, including mercury (Hg) and arsenic (As), accumulate preferentially in kidneys and always cause acute renal failure. The aim of this study was to investigate whether these samples affect organic anion transporters, Oat1 and Oat3, in vivo in mice kidney. Mice (n = 10) were orally treated with investigational samples. After last administration, all mice were i.v. p-aminohippuric acid (PAH), and the blood and kidneys samples were collected. The concentrations of PAH were quantified by spectrophotometry. mRNA expressions of Oat1 and Oat3 were assayed by real-time PCR. In comparison with corresponding control, major pharmacokinetic parameters of PAH in sera were significantly changed by investigational samples (p Oat1 and Oat3 mRNA expression were significantly inhibited in investigational sample groups. Arsenic and mercury containing traditional Chinese medicine (Realgar and Cinnabar) probably induce kidney damage through inhibiting several members of the organic anion transporters (such as OAT1 and OAT3). PMID:26788513

  17. Pulmonary toxicology of respirable particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 44 papers presented in these proceedings that deal will radioactive particles. The last paper (Stannard) in the proceedings is an historical review of the field of inhalation toxicology and is not included in the analytics

  18. Toxicological evaluation of chemical mixtures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feron, V.J.; Groten, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses major developments in the safety evaluation of chemical mixtures during the past 15 years, reviews today's state of the art of mixture toxicology, and discusses challenges ahead. Well-thought-out tailor-made mechanistic and empirical designs for studying the toxicity of mixtures

  19. Toxicology Selective Toxicity dan Test

    OpenAIRE

    Mansyur

    2002-01-01

    Toxicology adalah pemahaman-pemahaman mengenai effek-effek bahan kimia yang merugikan bagi organisme. Dari definisi tersebut, jelas terdapat unsur-unsur bahan kimia dan organisme, dimana didalam kedua unsur-unsur ini terdapat istilah-istilah toksisitas dan animal test-test. Tulisan ini bermaskud membicarakan mengenai selective toxicity dan animal toxicity tetst. kedokteran-mansyur5

  20. Toxicological evaluation of chemical mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feron, V J; Groten, J P

    2002-06-01

    This paper addresses major developments in the safety evaluation of chemical mixtures during the past 15 years, reviews today's state of the art of mixture toxicology, and discusses challenges ahead. Well-thought-out tailor-made mechanistic and empirical designs for studying the toxicity of mixtures have gradually substituted trial-and-error approaches, improving the insight into the testability of joint action and interaction of constituents of mixtures. The acquired knowledge has successfully been used to evaluate the safety of combined exposures and complex mixtures such as, for example, the atmosphere at hazardous waste sites, drinking water disinfection by-products, natural flavouring complexes, and the combined intake of food additives. To consolidate the scientific foundation of mixture toxicology, studies are in progress to revisit the biological concepts and mathematics underlying formulas for low-dose extrapolation and risk assessment of chemical mixtures. Conspicuous developments include the production of new computer programs applicable to mixture research (CombiTool, BioMol, Reaction Network Modelling), the application of functional genomics and proteomics to mixture studies, the use of nano-optochemical sensors for in vivo imaging of physiological processes in cells, and the application of optical sensor micro- and nano-arrays for complex sample analysis. Clearly, the input of theoretical biologists, biomathematicians and bioengineers in mixture toxicology is essential for the development of this challenging branch of toxicology into a scientific subdiscipline of full value. PMID:11983277

  1. Surprises and omissions in toxicology

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rašková, H.; Zídek, Zdeněk

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 12, - (2004), S94-S96. ISSN 1210-7778. [Inderdisciplinary Czech-Slovak Toxicological Conference /8./. Praha, 03.09.2004-05.09.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5008914 Keywords : bacterial toxins Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry

  2. Toxicological evaluation of organic residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo de la Peña de Torres

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available It is pointed out the importance of short term assays for the characterization of organic residues, specially some methods for toxicological, mutagenic, genotoxic and cytotoxic evaluation (Vibrio fischeri, Salmonella typhimurium and Allium cepa, used in the characterization of environmental complex mixtures lixiviates. These methods take part together with other bioassays in the evaluation by toxicological identification (VIT, which allows the evaluation of other ecotoxicological effects: a bioluminescence inhibition of Vibrio fischeri; b germination and root length of Lepidum sativum; c root length of Allium cepa and Tradescantia sp.; d inhibition of the mobility of Daphnia magna; and e abnormalities in the development of Oryzias latipes, or medaka fish. All these assays take part in the EU battery of bioassays, applied to discriminate and select between those environmental matrixes which must be subject to more complex and specific chemical characterizations.We make a review of the methods for toxicological evaluation, used for the characterization of chemical compounds or complex mixtures, as well as the use of its results for the human and environmental risk assessment. This evaluation consists, in short, of the identification of dangers, evaluation of dose-response ratio, evaluation of exposure and risk characterization, resulting in the analysis, use and communication of this risk. It is emphasized the high predictive value for carcinogenicity of some of these bioassays.It is shown the utility of short term assays for the evaluation of substances, products and complex mixtures, which would contribute to improve the toxicological knowledge of a greater number substances. This is a vital need in the EU, due to the lack of complete toxicological information of about the 70% of the 106.000 existing and used substances.It is emphasized the great value that mutagenicity assays represent inside the toxicological tests in the basic level, which

  3. The Emergence of Systematic Review in Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Martin L; Betts, Kellyn; Beck, Nancy B; Cogliano, Vincent; Dickersin, Kay; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne; Freeman, James; Gray, George; Hartung, Thomas; McPartland, Jennifer; Rooney, Andrew A; Scherer, Roberta W; Verloo, Didier; Hoffmann, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    The Evidence-based Toxicology Collaboration hosted a workshop on "The Emergence of Systematic Review and Related Evidence-based Approaches in Toxicology," on November 21, 2014 in Baltimore, Maryland. The workshop featured speakers from agencies and organizations applying systematic review approaches to questions in toxicology, speakers with experience in conducting systematic reviews in medicine and healthcare, and stakeholders in industry, government, academia, and non-governmental organizations. Based on the workshop presentations and discussion, here we address the state of systematic review methods in toxicology, historical antecedents in both medicine and toxicology, challenges to the translation of systematic review from medicine to toxicology, and thoughts on the way forward. We conclude with a recommendation that as various agencies and organizations adapt systematic review methods, they continue to work together to ensure that there is a harmonized process for how the basic elements of systematic review methods are applied in toxicology. PMID:27208075

  4. Characterization of the toxicological hazards of hydrocarbon solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckee, Richard H; Adenuga, M David; Carrillo, Juan-Carlos

    2015-04-01

    Hydrocarbon solvents are liquid hydrocarbon fractions derived from petroleum processing streams, containing only carbon and hydrogen atoms, with carbon numbers ranging from approximately C5-C20 and boiling between approximately 35-370°C. Many of the hydrocarbon solvents have complex and variable compositions with constituents of 4 types, alkanes (normal paraffins, isoparaffins, and cycloparaffins) and aromatics (primarily alkylated one- and two-ring species). Because of the compositional complexity, hydrocarbon solvents are now identified by a nomenclature ("the naming convention") that describes them in terms of physical/chemical properties and compositional elements. Despite the compositional complexity, most hydrocarbon solvent constituents have similar toxicological properties, and the overall toxicological hazards can be characterized in generic terms. To facilitate hazard characterization, the solvents were divided into 9 groups (categories) of substances with similar physical and chemical properties. Hydrocarbon solvents can cause chemical pneumonitis if aspirated into the lung, and those that are volatile can cause acute CNS effects and/or ocular and respiratory irritation at exposure levels exceeding occupational recommendations. Otherwise, there are few toxicologically important effects. The exceptions, n-hexane and naphthalene, have unique toxicological properties, and those solvents containing constituents for which classification is required under the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) are differentiated by the substance names. Toxicological information from studies of representative substances was used to fulfill REACH registration requirements and to satisfy the needs of the OECD High Production Volume (HPV) initiative. As shown in the examples provided, the hazard characterization data can be used for hazard classification and for occupational exposure limit recommendations. PMID:25868376

  5. Amanita muscaria: chemistry, biology, toxicology, and ethnomycology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelot, Didier; Melendez-Howell, Leda Maria

    2003-02-01

    The fly agaric is a remarkable mushroom in many respects; these are its bearing, history, chemical components and the poisoning that it provokes when consumed. The 'pantherina' poisoning syndrome is characterized by central nervous system dysfunction. The main species responsible are Amanita muscaria and A. pantherina (Amanitaceae); however, some other species of the genus have been suspected for similar actions. Ibotenic acid and muscimol are the active components, and probably, some other substances detected in the latter species participate in the psychotropic effects. The use of the mushroom started in ancient times and is connected with mysticism. Current knowledge on the chemistry, toxicology, and biology relating to this mushroom is reviewed, together with distinctive features concerning this unique species. PMID:12747324

  6. Toxicologic methods: controlled human exposures.

    OpenAIRE

    Utell, M J; Frampton, M W

    2000-01-01

    The assessment of risk from exposure to environmental air pollutants is complex, and involves the disciplines of epidemiology, animal toxicology, and human inhalation studies. Controlled, quantitative studies of exposed humans help determine health-related effects that result from breathing the atmosphere. The major unique feature of the clinical study is the ability to select, control, and quantify pollutant exposures of subjects of known clinical status, and determine their effects under id...

  7. Toxicological Assessment of Noxious Inhalants

    OpenAIRE

    Kleinsasser, N. H.; Sassen, A. W.; Wallner, B. W.; Staudenmaier, R.; Harréus, U. A.; Richter, E

    2004-01-01

    In the past centuries mankind has been exposed to various forms of air pollution not only at his occupational but also in his social environment. He mainly gets exposed with these pollutants through the respiratory organs and partially absorbs them into the body. Many of these airborne substances can be harmful for humans and some of them may account for tumorigenic effects. The following essay describes the main features of toxicological assessment of inhalative environmental and workplace x...

  8. Discussion on Improvement of Toxicological Pathology Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RenJin

    2003-01-01

    Toxicological pathology plays a key role in drug safety assessment. To enhance the research level of toxicological pathology, the following stud-ies should be carried out urgently: setting up a standard operation procedure (SOP) for toxico-logical pathology assessment; emphasizing on immunotoxicology evaluation; adopting a new ex-periment model of replacement, featuring high speed and reliability; introducing new techniques and new models in toxicological mechanism re-search; and establishing a new appraisal system to screen innovative drug and rapid and high pre-cision methods for early security assessment, de-tection and measurement.

  9. Graduate Training in Toxicology in Colleges of Veterinary Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robens, J. F.; Buck, W. B.

    1979-01-01

    Presented are an American Board of Veterinary Toxicology survey and evaluation of the training resources available in graduate programs in toxicology located in colleges of veterinary medicine. Regulatory toxicology, number of toxicologists needed, and curriculum are also discussed. (JMD)

  10. Toxicological Assessment of Noxious Inhalants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleinsasser, N. H.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past centuries mankind has been exposed to various forms of air pollution not only at his occupational but also in his social environment. He mainly gets exposed with these pollutants through the respiratory organs and partially absorbs them into the body. Many of these airborne substances can be harmful for humans and some of them may account for tumorigenic effects.The following essay describes the main features of toxicological assessment of inhalative environmental and workplace xenobiotics. The essay also explains relevant characteristics and limit values of noxious compounds and gases and depicts modern testing methods. To this end, emphasis is given on methods characterizing the different stages of tumorigenic processes. Various test systems have been developed which can be used in vivo, ex vivo or in vitro. They are to a great part based on the evidence of changes in DNA or particular genes of cells. Among others they have highlighted the impact of interindividual variability on enzymatic activation of xenobiotics and on susceptibility of the host to tumor diseases.Unfortunately, for many inhalative environmental noxious agents no sufficient risk profiles have been developed. The completion of these profiles should be the goal of toxicological assessment in order to allow reasonable socioeconomic or individual-based risk reduction.

  11. Toxicological assessment of noxious inhalants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinsasser, N H; Sassen, A W; Wallner, B W; Staudenmaier, R; Harréus, U A; Richter, E

    2004-01-01

    In the past centuries mankind has been exposed to various forms of air pollution not only at his occupational but also in his social environment. He mainly gets exposed with these pollutants through the respiratory organs and partially absorbs them into the body. Many of these airborne substances can be harmful for humans and some of them may account for tumorigenic effects.The following essay describes the main features of toxicological assessment of inhalative environmental and workplace xenobiotics. The essay also explains relevant characteristics and limit values of noxious compounds and gases and depicts modern testing methods. To this end, emphasis is given on methods characterizing the different stages of tumorigenic processes. Various test systems have been developed which can be used in vivo, ex vivo or in vitro. They are to a great part based on the evidence of changes in DNA or particular genes of cells. Among others they have highlighted the impact of interindividual variability on enzymatic activation of xenobiotics and on susceptibility of the host to tumor diseases.Unfortunately, for many inhalative environmental noxious agents no sufficient risk profiles have been developed. The completion of these profiles should be the goal of toxicological assessment in order to allow reasonable socioeconomic or individual-based risk reduction. PMID:22073045

  12. Evolution of toxicology information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wassom, J.S.; Lu, P.Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1990-12-31

    Society today is faced with new health risk situations that have been brought about by recent scientific and technical advances. Federal and state governments are required to assess the many potential health risks to exposed populations from the products (chemicals) and by-products (pollutants) of these advances. Because a sound analysis of any potential health risk should be based on the use of relevant information, it behooves those individuals responsible for making the risk assessments to know where to obtain needed information. This paper reviews the origins of toxicology information systems and explores the specialized information center concept that was proposed in 1963 as a means of providing ready access to scientific and technical information. As a means of illustrating this concept, the operation of one specialized information center (the Environmental Mutagen Information Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory) will be discussed. Insights into how toxicological information resources came into being, their design and makeup, will be of value to those seeking to acquire information for risk assessment purposes. 7 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  13. Toxicologic Study of Monochloroacetic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Bo; Zhan Ping

    2006-01-01

    @@ Monochloroacetic Acid (MCA) is a chlorinated analog of acetic acids. MCA and its sodium salt (SMCA) are widely used as a chemical intermediate (primarily in the manufacture of chlorophenoxy herbicides,carboxymethylcelluose, glycine and indigoid dyes).Moreover, MCA has been found as a common by-product of the chlorination of drinking water. Chloroacetates are ubiquitous in the environment, and MCA is the most abundant among chloroacetates. A background level of 0.1 - 1μg/L is expected to occur in precipitation[1]. Total world wide annual production of MCA reported was about 400 000 tons[2]. Many studies have showed that MCA not only caused acute or chronic damage to the skin , liver, kidney, heart, brain and other organs, but also caused acute death systemically under high concentration[2,3]. So this article will discuss the toxic effect of Monochloroacetic Acid in Toxicology.

  14. Common questions in veterinary toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, N; Rawson-Harris, P; Edwards, N

    2015-05-01

    Toxicology is a vast subject. Animals are exposed to numerous drugs, household products, plants, chemicals, pesticides and venomous animals. In addition to the individual toxicity of the various potential poisons, there is also the question of individual response and, more importantly, of species differences in toxicity. This review serves to address some of the common questions asked when dealing with animals with possible poisoning, providing evidence where available. The role of emetics, activated charcoal and lipid infusion in the management of poisoning in animals, the toxic dose of chocolate, grapes and dried fruit in dogs, the use of antidotes in paracetamol poisoning, timing of antidotal therapy in ethylene glycol toxicosis and whether lilies are toxic to dogs are discussed. PMID:25728477

  15. human and environmental nuclear toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the civil nuclear is in expansion, this book takes stock of the situation on the geochemical processes implied the accumulation of radioactive or stable chemical elements and on the toxicity and all that is ensuing. It is important to answer at the best to increasing demands of toxicology, ecotoxicology for evaluation and management of environmental and sanitary risks. This work is divided in five parts: the behaviour of chemical species in biosphere, particularly for the living, the cell molecular mechanisms of interactions among the living, their consequences on human health and the ecosystems, the state of knowledge, element by element and the new development of technology opened with the knowledge progress. The fields of application, goes from the detection to the treatments of contaminations, from environment to man. (N.C.)

  16. Predictive toxicology: the paths of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prevention of possible noxious effects in relation with the exposure to one or several chemical, physical or biological agents present in our domestic or professional environment is one of today's big public health stakes. Another stake is the better assessment of the risks linked with the use of health-care products. The efficacy and predictiveness of toxicology studies are directly related to the combination of alternate complementary methods and animal experiments (obtaining data from different species and with different models: in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo). Despite important efforts, the toxicological evaluation remains perfectible. The proceedings of this 2010 congress of the French Society of cell pharmaco-toxicology deal with recent advances, both scientific and technological, in 'predictive toxicology'. Four main topics are approached: cell and organ models, 'omics', in silico modeling, and new technologies (imaging, cell ships, high-speed processing). Among the different presentations, 3 abstracts present some recent advances in imaging techniques applied to toxicology studies. These are: 1 - first uses in toxicology of TOF-SIMS mass spectroscopy imaging (O. Laprevote, Paris-Descartes Univ. (FR)); 2 - Small animal imaging, a tool for predictive toxicology (A. Le Pape, CNRS Orleans (FR)); 3 - uranium localization at cell level using SIMS imaging technique (C. Rouas et al., IRSN Fontenay-aux-Roses (FR)). (J.S.)

  17. Historical perspectives on cadmium toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first health effects of cadmium (Cd) were reported already in 1858. Respiratory and gastrointestinal symptoms occurred among persons using Cd-containing polishing agent. The first experimental toxicological studies are from 1919. Bone effects and proteinuria in humans were reported in the 1940's. After World War II, a bone disease with fractures and severe pain, the itai-itai disease, a form of Cd-induced renal osteomalacia, was identified in Japan. Subsequently, the toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of Cd were described including its binding to the protein metallothionein. International warnings of health risks from Cd-pollution were issued in the 1970's. Reproductive and carcinogenic effects were studied at an early stage, but a quantitative assessment of these effects in humans is still subject to considerable uncertainty. The World Health Organization in its International Program on Chemical Safety, WHO/IPCS (1992) (Cadmium. Environmental Health Criteria Document 134, IPCS. WHO, Geneva, 1-280.) identified renal dysfunction as the critical effect and a crude quantitative evaluation was presented. In the 1990's and 2000 several epidemiological studies have reported adverse health effects, sometimes at low environmental exposures to Cd, in population groups in Japan, China, Europe and USA (reviewed in other contributions to the present volume). The early identification of an important role of metallothionein in cadmium toxicology formed the basis for recent studies using biomarkers of susceptibility to development of Cd-related renal dysfunction such as gene expression of metallothionein in peripheral lymphocytes and autoantibodies against metallothionein in blood plasma. Findings in these studies indicate that very low exposure levels to cadmium may give rise to renal dysfunction among sensitive subgroups of human populations such as persons with diabetes.

  18. Time Dependent Radio-toxicology of Fission Products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiation, emitted by radiological materials, is known to cause damage to biological tissue. Prolonged exposure to radiation may cause a vast array of harmful medical effects, from enhancing future probability of cancer, up to Acute Radiation Syndrome resulting in multi-system failure. In complex radiologic release events involving fission products (nuclear fallout, reactor failures), the products' physical decay chains dictate a time dependent product inventory. As the ratios between different products vary, so does the toxicology of the radioactive inventory as a whole. The temporally varying toxicological factors should be taken into account when producing radiological risk assessments for populations. In this paper we study the time varying toxicology of fission products, using a specialized model named Koala, developed in Soreq NRC. A significant and monotonous rise in the aggregate toxicity of ingested fission products was noted. This result carries important implications for risk assessment, as it partially cancels out the fission product physical decay. A similar, albeit less pronounced rise was found for external exposure. Factoring activity and toxicity together allows computation of effective source terms for simple events involving fission products. We demonstrate one such source term, based on fallout from a nuclear explosion. This source term may be easily introduced into suitable atmospheric dispersion models

  19. Multiscale Toxicology- Building the Next Generation Tools for Toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retterer, S. T. [ORNL; Holsapple, M. P. [Battelle Memorial Institute

    2013-10-31

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was established between Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) with the goal of combining the analytical and synthetic strengths of the National Laboratories with BMI's expertise in basic and translational medical research to develop a collaborative pipeline and suite of high throughput and imaging technologies that could be used to provide a more comprehensive understanding of material and drug toxicology in humans. The Multi-Scale Toxicity Initiative (MSTI), consisting of the team members above, was established to coordinate cellular scale, high-throughput in vitro testing, computational modeling and whole animal in vivo toxicology studies between MSTI team members. Development of a common, well-characterized set of materials for testing was identified as a crucial need for the initiative. Two research tracks were established by BMI during the course of the CRADA. The first research track focused on the development of tools and techniques for understanding the toxicity of nanomaterials, specifically inorganic nanoparticles (NPs). ORNL"s work focused primarily on the synthesis, functionalization and characterization of a common set of NPs for dissemination to the participating laboratories. These particles were synthesized to retain the same surface characteristics and size, but to allow visualization using the variety of imaging technologies present across the team. Characterization included the quantitative analysis of physical and chemical properties of the materials as well as the preliminary assessment of NP toxicity using commercially available toxicity screens and emerging optical imaging strategies. Additional efforts examined the development of high-throughput microfluidic and imaging assays for measuring NP uptake, localization, and

  20. A medical-toxicological view of tattooing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, Peter; Tralau, Tewes; Tentschert, Jutta; Blume, Annegret; Al Dahouk, Sascha; Bäumler, Wolfgang; Bernstein, Eric; Bocca, Beatrice; Alimonti, Alessandro; Colebrook, Helen; de Cuyper, Christa; Dähne, Lars; Hauri, Urs; Howard, Paul C; Janssen, Paul; Katz, Linda; Klitzman, Bruce; Kluger, Nicolas; Krutak, Lars; Platzek, Thomas; Scott-Lang, Victoria; Serup, Jørgen; Teubner, Wera; Schreiver, Ines; Wilkniß, Elena; Luch, Andreas

    2016-01-23

    Long perceived as a form of exotic self-expression in some social fringe groups, tattoos have left their maverick image behind and become mainstream, particularly for young people. Historically, tattoo-related health and safety regulations have focused on rules of hygiene and prevention of infections. Meanwhile, the increasing popularity of tattooing has led to the development of many new colours, allowing tattoos to be more spectacular than ever before. However, little is known about the toxicological risks of the ingredients used. For risk assessment, safe intradermal application of these pigments needs data for toxicity and biokinetics and increased knowledge about the removal of tattoos. Other concerns are the potential for phototoxicity, substance migration, and the possible metabolic conversion of tattoo ink ingredients into toxic substances. Similar considerations apply to cleavage products that are formed during laser-assisted tattoo removal. In this Review, we summarise the issues of concern, putting them into context, and provide perspectives for the assessment of the acute and chronic health effects associated with tattooing. PMID:26211826

  1. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF ACROLEIN (2003 Final)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is announcing the release of the final report, Toxicological Review of Acrolein: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). The updated Summary for Acrolein and accompanying Quickview have also been added to the IRIS Database.

  2. MINING ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY INFORMATION WEB RESOURCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental toxicology is the study of the ecological effects of anthropogenic substances released into the environment. It is a relatively diverse field addressing impacts to aquatic and terrestrial organisms and communities. The determination of potential risk associated with...

  3. Pulmonary toxicology of respirable particles. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanders, C.L.; Cross, F.T.; Dagle, G.E.; Mahaffey, J.A. (eds.)

    1980-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 44 papers presented in these proceedings. The last paper (Stannard) in the proceedings is an historical review of the field of inhalation toxicology and is not included in the analytics. (DS)

  4. Techniques for Investigating Molecular Toxicology of Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanli; Li, Chenchen; Yao, Chenjie; Ding, Lin; Lei, Zhendong; Wu, Minghong

    2016-06-01

    Nanotechnology has been a rapidly developing field in the past few decades, resulting in the more and more exposure of nanomaterials to human. The increased applications of nanomaterials for industrial, commercial and life purposes, such as fillers, catalysts, semiconductors, paints, cosmetic additives and drug carriers, have caused both obvious and potential impacts on human health and environment. Nanotoxicology is used to study the safety of nanomaterials and has grown at the historic moment. Molecular toxicology is a new subdiscipline to study the interactions and impacts of materials at the molecular level. To better understand the relationship between the molecular toxicology and nanomaterials, this review summarizes the typical techniques and methods in molecular toxicology which are applied when investigating the toxicology of nanomaterials and include six categories: namely; genetic mutation detection, gene expression analysis, DNA damage detection, chromosomal aberration analysis, proteomics, and metabolomics. Each category involves several experimental techniques and methods. PMID:27319209

  5. Multiscale Toxicology - Building the Next Generation Tools for Toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thrall, Brian D.; Minard, Kevin R.; Teeguarden, Justin G.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2012-09-01

    A Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was sponsored by Battelle Memorial Institute (Battelle, Columbus), to initiate a collaborative research program across multiple Department of Energy (DOE) National Laboratories aimed at developing a suite of new capabilities for predictive toxicology. Predicting the potential toxicity of emerging classes of engineered nanomaterials was chosen as one of two focusing problems for this program. PNNL’s focus toward this broader goal was to refine and apply experimental and computational tools needed to provide quantitative understanding of nanoparticle dosimetry for in vitro cell culture systems, which is necessary for comparative risk estimates for different nanomaterials or biological systems. Research conducted using lung epithelial and macrophage cell models successfully adapted magnetic particle detection and fluorescent microscopy technologies to quantify uptake of various forms of engineered nanoparticles, and provided experimental constraints and test datasets for benchmark comparison against results obtained using an in vitro computational dosimetry model, termed the ISSD model. The experimental and computational approaches developed were used to demonstrate how cell dosimetry is applied to aid in interpretation of genomic studies of nanoparticle-mediated biological responses in model cell culture systems. The combined experimental and theoretical approach provides a highly quantitative framework for evaluating relationships between biocompatibility of nanoparticles and their physical form in a controlled manner.

  6. Current developments in toxicological research on arsenic

    OpenAIRE

    Bolt, Hermann M.

    2013-01-01

    There is a plethora of recent publications on all aspects relevant to the toxicology of arsenic (As). Over centuries exposures to arsenic continue to be a major public health problem in many countries. In particular, the occurrence of high As concentrations in groundwater of Southeast Asia receives now much attention. Therefore, arsenic is a high-priority matter for toxicological research. Key exposure to As are (traditional) medicines, combustion of As-rich coal, presence of As in groundwate...

  7. [Cosmetic colorants. Toxicology and regulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platzek, T; Krätke, R; Klein, G; Schulz, C

    2005-01-01

    Some recent publications raised concern over a possible link between hair dye use and the incidence of bladder tumours in a Californian population. The Scientific Committee for Cosmetic Products and Non-Food Products intended for Consumers (SCCNFP) demanded the toxicological testing of all hair dyes used in Europe to exclude any risk. The EU commission initiated corresponding measures. Only safe hair dyes will be included on a positive list while all other hair dyes will be banned. The hair dye lawsone--the dyeing ingredient of henna--was evaluated by the SCCNFP as genotoxic but the BfR came to another conclusion. The regulation of both lawsone and henna remains an open question. Furthermore, some cosmetic colorants were critically discussed. The azo dyes CI 12150, CI 26100, CI 27290 and CI 20170 are allowed for use in cosmetics. On cleavage they form the carcinogenic aromatic amines o-anisidine, 4-aminoazobenzene and 2,4-xylidine, respectively. For three of these dyes the cleavage by human skin bacteria in vitro to the respective arylamine was shown experimentally. Further problems may arise from colorants used for tattoos and permanent makeup. These products up to now are not subject to legislation and there are no regulatory stipulations with respect to health safety and purity for colorants used for these purposes. PMID:15650909

  8. Role of quinones in toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, J L; Trush, M A; Penning, T M; Dryhurst, G; Monks, T J

    2000-03-01

    Quinones represent a class of toxicological intermediates which can create a variety of hazardous effects in vivo, including acute cytotoxicity, immunotoxicity, and carcinogenesis. The mechanisms by which quinones cause these effects can be quite complex. Quinones are Michael acceptors, and cellular damage can occur through alkylation of crucial cellular proteins and/or DNA. Alternatively, quinones are highly redox active molecules which can redox cycle with their semiquinone radicals, leading to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and ultimately the hydroxyl radical. Production of ROS can cause severe oxidative stress within cells through the formation of oxidized cellular macromolecules, including lipids, proteins, and DNA. Formation of oxidatively damaged bases such as 8-oxodeoxyguanosine has been associated with aging and carcinogenesis. Furthermore, ROS can activate a number of signaling pathways, including protein kinase C and RAS. This review explores the varied cytotoxic effects of quinones using specific examples, including quinones produced from benzene, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, estrogens, and catecholamines. The evidence strongly suggests that the numerous mechanisms of quinone toxicity (i.e., alkylation vs oxidative stress) can be correlated with the known pathology of the parent compound(s). PMID:10725110

  9. Introduction: biomarkers in neurodevelopment toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Needleman, H.L.

    1987-10-01

    The search for markers of toxicant exposure and effect upon the development of organisms presents a set of challenges that differ in many ways from those encountered in the study of markers in reproduction or pregnancy. These latter two fields specify a relatively narrow set of organs or biological systems. The term development, on the other hand, can apply to any organ system, or to any set of phenomena that changes in an ordered way over time. For this reason the papers presented in the session on development were chosen to narrow the focus to neurodevelopmental markers, as such markers may be altered by neurotoxic exposure. In attempting to meet this task, the authors have been able to select a group of investigators who work at the leading edges of their respective fields of developmental neuroanatomy, neurotoxicology, neuroendocrinology, neuropsychology, and infant development. The notion that toxicants could affect behavior certainly is not new. Recent knowledge that behavioral aberrations can occur at exposures below those which produce organic changes, and that behavioral aberrations can occur at exposures below those which produce organic changes, and that behavioral observation might provide early markers of effect has given rise to two new fields: behavioral toxicology and behavioral teratology.

  10. [Toxicological evaluation in the childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Amparo; Rodrigo, Carlos; Marrón, M Teresa

    2014-03-01

    Intoxications in infancy require urgent medical treatment within national health systems. In our country they represent 0.3% of paediatric urgencies. Most of them are accidental intoxications but is not infrequent to find some related to child abuse or to suicidal intentions, especially in adolescence. The objectives of the study are to evaluate both clinical health care and medical legal aspects in intoxications in infancy. Medical assistance is described and it includes clinical diagnosis, typology of the more common toxics, percentages and referral to social work and emergency care equipment units of the Ministry of Social Welfare and the Department of Health or, where appropriate, directly to prosecutors and courts for their intervention. In cases of detection of alcohol, drugs or medication in infants, the importance of the correct interpretation of the results of toxicological findings is discussed. Several studies for the interpretation of results concerning the detection of these toxics are reported. Both legal aspects and the forensic medical opinion are assessed. The findings will be analysed by the judicial authority in order to circumscribe responsibilities or to take appropriate decisions concerning the protection of infants' interests. In conclusion intoxication in infancy can lead to legal proceedings requiring specific actions for their protection. Both physicians and hospitals must comply with the legal requirement of the submission to the court of judicial parties. On the other hand, this information is an interesting step toward reinforcing public health surveillance. PMID:24913753

  11. Non-precautionary aspects of toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Empirical studies in toxicology aim at deciphering complex causal relationships, especially in regard to human disease etiologies. Several scientific traditions limit the usefulness of documentation from current toxicological research, in regard to decision-making based on the precautionary principle. Among non-precautionary aspects of toxicology are the focus on simplified model systems and the effects of single hazards, one by one. Thus, less attention is paid to sources of variability and uncertainty, including individual susceptibility, impacts of mixed and variable exposures, susceptible life-stages, and vulnerable communities. In emphasizing the need for confirmatory evidence, toxicology tends to penalize false positives more than false negatives. An important source of uncertainty is measurement error that results in misclassification, especially in regard to exposure assessment. Standard statistical analysis assumes that the exposure is measured without error, and imprecisions will usually result in an underestimation of the dose-effect relationship. In testing whether an effect could be considered a possible result of natural variability, a 5% limit for 'statistical significance' is usually applied, even though it may rule out many findings of causal associations, simply because the study was too small (and thus lacked statistical power) or because some imprecision or limited sensitivity of the parameters precluded a more definitive observation. These limitations may be aggravated when toxicology is influenced by vested interests. Because current toxicology overlooks the important goal of achieving a better characterization of uncertainties and their implications, research approaches should be revised and strengthened to counteract the innate ideological biases, thereby supporting our confidence in using toxicology as a main source of documentation and in using the precautionary principle as a decision procedure in the public policy arena

  12. Lupinus mutabilis: Composition, Uses, Toxicology, and Debittering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal-Larenas, F E; Linnemann, A R; Nout, M J R; Koziol, M; van Boekel, M A J S

    2016-07-01

    Lupinus mutabilis has protein (32.0-52.6 g/100 g dry weight) and lipid (13.0-24.6 g/100 g dry weight) contents similar to soya bean (Glycine max). The Ω3, Ω6, and Ω9 contents are 1.9-3.0, 26.5-39.6, and 41.2-56.2 g/100 g lipid, respectively. Lupins can be used to fortify the protein content of pasta, bread, biscuits, salads, hamburgers, sausages, and can substitute milk and soya bean. Specific lupin protein concentrates or isolates display protein solubility (>90%), water-absorption capacity (4.5 g/g dry weight), oil-absorption capacity (3.98 g/g), emulsifying capacity (2000 mL of oil/g), emulsifying stability (100%, 60 hours), foaming capacity (2083%), foaming stability (78.8%, 36 hours), and least gelation concentration (6%), which are of industrial interest. Lupins contain bitter alkaloids. Preliminary studies on their toxicity suggest as lethal acute dose for infants and children 10 mg/kg bw and for adults 25 mg/kg bw. However, alkaloids can also have medical use for their hypocholesterolemic, antiarrhythmic, and immunosuppressive activity. Bitter lupins can be detoxified by biological, chemical, or aqueous processes. The shortest debittering process requires one hour. This review presents the nutritional composition of lupins, their uses (as food, medicine, and functional protein isolates), toxicology, and debittering process scenarios. It critically evaluates the data, infers conclusions, and makes suggestions for future research. PMID:26054557

  13. Reviews of environmental contamination and toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ware, G. (ed.)

    2007-07-01

    Review of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology attempts to provide concise, critical reviews of timely advances, philosophy and significant areas of accomplished or needed endeavour in the total field of xenobiotics, in any segment of the environment, as well as toxicological implications. This edition contains a paper 'Health effects of arsenic, fluorine and selenium from indoor burning of Chinese coal, by Liu Guijian, Zheng Liugen, Nurdan S. Duzgoren-Aydin, Gao Lianfen, Liu Junhua, and Peng Zicheng. Other papers are: Chemistry and fate of simazine; Ethanol production: energy, economic, and environmental losses; Arsenic behaviour from groundwater and soil to crops: impacts on agriculture and food safety; Mercury content of hair in different populations relative to fish consumption; and Toxicology of 1,3-butadiene, chloroprene, and isoprene. 15 ills.

  14. Toxicological issues after depleted uranium weapons attacked

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depleted Uranium (DU) is a byproduct of the uranium enrichment for producing nuclear reactor or nuclear weapon. DU is used in the military as an armor-piercing projectile due to its hardness, strength, and density. A lot of DU weapons were fired in the Gulf War, and bring about critical environmental and internal contamination. Therefore, DU becomes suddenly a hot issue. Some toxicological problems after DU weapons attacked have been reviewed, which include features of internal DU contamination. Hazard of wound contamination and inhalation with insoluble uranium, and other urgent toxicological issues. The healthy effects of implanted with depleted uranium pellets were illustrated in particular

  15. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife: 1996 Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to present toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of certain chemicals on mammalian and avian wildlife species. Publication of this document meets a milestone for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Risk Assessment Program. This document provides the ER Program with toxicological benchmarks that may be used as comparative tools in screening assessments as well as lines of evidence to support or refute the presence of ecological effects in ecological risk assessments. The chemicals considered in this report are some that occur at US DOE waste sites, and the wildlife species evaluated herein were chosen because they represent a range of body sizes and diets

  16. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife: 1996 Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, B.E.; Opresko, D.M.; Suter, G.W., II

    1996-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to present toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of certain chemicals on mammalian and avian wildlife species. Publication of this document meets a milestone for the Environmental Restoration (ER) Risk Assessment Program. This document provides the ER Program with toxicological benchmarks that may be used as comparative tools in screening assessments as well as lines of evidence to support or refute the presence of ecological effects in ecological risk assessments. The chemicals considered in this report are some that occur at US DOE waste sites, and the wildlife species evaluated herein were chosen because they represent a range of body sizes and diets.

  17. Risk assessment and toxicology databases for health effects assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, P.Y.; Wassom, J.S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)

    1990-12-31

    Scientific and technological developments bring unprecedented stress to our environment. Society has to predict the results of potential health risks from technologically based actions that may have serious, far-reaching consequences. The potential for error in making such predictions or assessment is great and multiplies with the increasing size and complexity of the problem being studied. Because of this, the availability and use of reliable data is the key to any successful forecasting effort. Scientific research and development generate new data and information. Much of the scientific data being produced daily is stored in computers for subsequent analysis. This situation provides both an invaluable resource and an enormous challenge. With large amounts of government funds being devoted to health and environmental research programs and with maintenance of our living environment at stake, we must make maximum use of the resulting data to forecast and avert catastrophic effects. Along with the readily available. The most efficient means of obtaining the data necessary for assessing the health effects of chemicals is to utilize applications include the toxicology databases and information files developed at ORNL. To make most efficient use of the data/information that has already been prepared, attention and resources should be directed toward projects that meticulously evaluate the available data/information and create specialized peer-reviewed value-added databases. Such projects include the National Library of Medicine`s Hazardous Substances Data Bank, and the U.S. Air Force Installation Restoration Toxicology Guide. These and similar value-added toxicology databases were developed at ORNL and are being maintained and updated. These databases and supporting information files, as well as some data evaluation techniques are discussed in this paper with special focus on how they are used to assess potential health effects of environmental agents. 19 refs., 5 tabs.

  18. The placenta in toxicology. Part IV: Battery of toxicological test systems based on human placenta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göhner, Claudia; Svensson-Arvelund, Judit; Pfarrer, Christiane; Häger, Jan-Dirk; Faas, Marijke; Ernerudh, Jan; Cline, J Mark; Dixon, Darlene; Buse, Eberhard; Markert, Udo R

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the potential and also some limitations of using human placentas, or placental cells and structures for toxicology testing. The placenta contains a wide spectrum of cell types and tissues, such as trophoblast cells, immune cells, fibroblasts, stem cells, endothelial cells, vessels, glands, membranes, and many others. It may be expected that in many cases the relevance of results obtained from human placenta will be higher than those from animal models due to species specificity of metabolism and placental structure. For practical and economical reasons, we propose to apply a battery of sequential experiments for analysis of potential toxicants. This should start with using cell lines, followed by testing placenta tissue explants and isolated placenta cells, and finally by application of single and dual side ex vivo placenta perfusion. With each of these steps, the relative workload increases while the number of feasible repeats decreases. Simultaneously, the predictive power enhances by increasing similarity with in vivo human conditions. Toxic effects may be detected by performing proliferation, vitality and cell death assays, analysis of protein and hormone expression, immunohistochemistry or testing functionality of signaling pathways, gene expression, transport mechanisms, and so on. When toxic effects appear at any step, the subsequent assays may be cancelled. Such a system may be useful to reduce costs and increase specificity in testing questionable toxicants. Nonetheless, it requires further standardization and end point definitions for better comparability of results from different toxicants and to estimate the respective in vivo translatability and predictive value. PMID:23548605

  19. Toxicology of chemical mixtures: a challenging quest along empirical sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groten, John P; Heijne, Wilbert H M; Stierum, Rob H; Freidig, Andreas P; Feron, Victor J

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the "quest" of our institute trying to assess the toxicology of chemical mixtures. In this overview, we will discuss some critical developments in hazard identification and risk assessment of chemical mixtures during these past 15 years. We will stand still at empirical and mechanistic modeling. "Empirical" means that only information on doses or concentrations and effects is available in addition to an often empirically selected quantitative dose-response relationship. Empirical models have played a dominant role in the last decade to identify health and safety characteristics of chemical mixtures. Many of these models are based on the work of pioneers in mixture toxicology who defined three basic types of action for combinations of chemicals: simple similar action, simple dissimilar action and interaction. Nowadays, empirical models are mainly based on response-surface analysis and make use of advanced statistical designs. However, possible interactions between components in a mixture can also be given in terms of mechanistic models. In terms of "mechanistic" (or biological) understanding, interactions between compounds may occur in the kinetic phase (processes of uptake, distribution, metabolism and excretion) or in the dynamic phase (effects of chemicals on the receptor, cellular target or organ). A biological phenomenon such as competitive agonism as described for mixtures of drugs (biotransformation enzymes) or sensory irritants (nerve receptors) can accurately predict the effect of any of these mixtures. Thus, far mechanistic and empirical analyses of interactions are usually unrelated. It is one of the future challenges for mixtures research to combine information from both approaches. Also, our current biology-based models have their limitations, since they cannot integrate every relevant biological mechanism. In this respect, mechanistic modeling of mixtures may benefit from the developments coming from the arena of molecular biology

  20. A prospective toxicology analysis in alcoholics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jørgen Lange; Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Felby, Søren;

    1997-01-01

    A prospective and comprehensive investigation was done on 73 medico–legal autopsies in alcoholics. The results of the toxicology analyses are described. Alcohol intoxication was the cause of death in 8%, combined alcohol/drug intoxication in 15% and drugs alone in 19%. Alcoholic ketoacidosis was...... than the exception in deaths in alcoholics....

  1. FISH PHYSIOLOGY, TOXICOLOGY, AND WATER QUALITY:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty-one participants from Europe, North America and China convened in Chongqing, China, October 12-14, 2005, for the Eighth International Symposium in Fish Physiology, Toxicology and Water Quality. The subject of the meeting was "Hypoxia in vertebrates: Comparisons of terrestr...

  2. Distance learning in toxicology: Australia's RMIT program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RMIT University was the first to offer a comprehensive Masters of Toxicology in Australasia 19 years ago. In 2001 the program was transformed into two stages, leading to a Graduate Diploma and Master of Applied Science in Toxicology. Now, these programs are fully online and suitable for graduates living and working anywhere in the world. The modular distance-learning courses are specifically designed to equip students with essential skills for entering fields such as chemical and drug evaluation; risk assessment of chemicals in the workplace; environmental and food toxicology. RMIT's online course delivery system has made it possible to deliver the toxicology programs, both nationally and internationally. The learning material and interactive activities (tests and quizzes, discussion boards, chat sessions) use Blackboard and WebBoard, each with a different educational function. Students log in to a Learning Hub to access their courses. The Learning Hub enables students to extend their learning beyond the classroom to the home, workplace, library and any other location with Internet access. The teaching staff log in to the Learning Hub to maintain and administer the online programs and courses which they have developed and/or which they teach. The Learning Hub is also a communication tool for students and staff, providing access to email, a diary and announcements. The early experience of delivering a full toxicology program online is very positive. However this mode of teaching continues to present many interesting technical, educational and cultural challenges, including: the design and presentation of the material; copyright issues; internationalisation of content; interactive participation; and the assessment procedures

  3. Substance-tailored testing strategies in toxicology : an in silico methodology based on QSAR modeling of toxicological thresholds and Monte Carlo simulations of toxicological testing

    OpenAIRE

    Pery, Alexandre; Desmots, Sophie; Mombelli, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    International audience The design of toxicological testing strategies aimed at identifying the toxic effects of chemicals without (or with a minimal) recourse to animal experimentation is an important issue for toxicological regulations and for industrial decision-making. This article describes an original approach which enables the design of substance-tailored testing strategies with a specified performance in terms of false-positive and false-negative rates. The outcome of toxicological ...

  4. Textual Spatial Cosine Similarity

    OpenAIRE

    Crocetti, Giancarlo

    2015-01-01

    When dealing with document similarity many methods exist today, like cosine similarity. More complex methods are also available based on the semantic analysis of textual information, which are computationally expensive and rarely used in the real time feeding of content as in enterprise-wide search environments. To address these real-time constraints, we developed a new measure of document similarity called Textual Spatial Cosine Similarity, which is able to detect similitude at the semantic ...

  5. Current developments in toxicological research on arsenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolt, Hermann M

    2013-01-01

    There is a plethora of recent publications on all aspects relevant to the toxicology of arsenic (As). Over centuries exposures to arsenic continue to be a major public health problem in many countries. In particular, the occurrence of high As concentrations in groundwater of Southeast Asia receives now much attention. Therefore, arsenic is a high-priority matter for toxicological research. Key exposure to As are (traditional) medicines, combustion of As-rich coal, presence of As in groundwater, and pollution due to mining activities. As-induced cardiovascular disorders and carcinogenesis present themselves as a major research focus. The high priority of this issue is now recognized politically in a number of countries, research funds have been made available. Also experimental research on toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics and on modes of toxic action is moving very rapidly. The matter is of high regulatory concern, and effective preventive measures are required in a number of countries. PMID:27092031

  6. Regulatory assessment of reproductive toxicology data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This chapter outlines a regulator's personal approach to the assessment of reproductive toxicology data in the context of the assessment of the overall nonclinical data package for pharmaceutical agents. Using as a framework the International Conference on Harmonisation Common Technical Document headings, guidance is provided on the expectations of regulators for the presentation and discussion of the data by the applicant to facilitate the risk assessment process. Consideration is given to the use of reproductive toxicology data in the assessment process for both clinical trial applications (CTAs) and marketing authorization applications (MAAs). Suggestions for some guiding principles in drafting of the various product information documents (for example the Investigator's Brochure (IB) for CTAs and the Nonclinical Overview and Summary of Product Characteristics for MAAs) are included. PMID:23138923

  7. Toxicology of iodine: A mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilin Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Iodine is necessary for all living organisms. Deficiency of iodine in the organism leads to various diseases (including mental and increased rates of cancer. It is well known that one third of the world’s population lived in iodine-deficient areas. At present time, the primary intervention for preventing iodine deficiency disorders worldwide is through the iodization of salt. The two most common types of fortificant used to iodize salt are potassium iodide and potassium iodate. Iodine-containing compounds are also widely used in clinical medicine as a highly effective topical antimicrobial agent that has been used clinically in the treatment of wounds. Hence, the genetic toxicology of iodine and iodine-containing compounds is very essential topic. In this literature review are analyzed the data concerning genetic toxicology and the influence of these compounds on tumor rates in epidemiological and experimental studies.

  8. Toxicology of Nanomaterials: Permanent interactive learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castranova Vince

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Particle and Fibre Toxicology wants to play a decisive role in a time where particle research is challenged and driven by the developments and applications of nanomaterials. This aim is not merely quantitative in publishing a given number of papers on nanomaterials, but also qualitatively since the field of nanotoxicology is rapidly emerging and benchmarks for good science are needed. Since then a number of things have happened that merit further analysis. The interactive learning issue is best shown by report and communications on the toxicology of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNT. A special workshop on the CNT has now been organized twice in Nagano (Japan and this editorial contains a summary of the most important outcomes. Finally, we take the opportunity discuss some recent reports from the nanotech literature, and more specifically a Chinese study that claims severe consequences of nanoparticle exposure.

  9. Nano-technology and nano-toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L. Maynard

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Rapid developments in nano-technology are likely to confer significant benefits on mankind. But, as with perhaps all new technologies, these benefits are likely to be accompanied by risks, perhaps by new risks. Nano-toxicology is developing in parallel with nano-technology and seeks to define the hazards and risks associated with nano-materials: only when risks have been identified they can be controlled. This article discusses the reasons for concern about the potential effects on health of exposure to nano-materials and relates these to the evidence of the effects on health of the ambient aerosol. A number of hypotheses are proposed and the dangers of adopting unsubstantiated hypotheses are stressed. Nano-toxicology presents many challenges and will need substantial financial support if it is to develop at a rate sufficient to cope with developments in nano-technology.

  10. Toxicology in Asia--Past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, T

    2015-12-01

    The Asian Society of Toxicology (ASIATOX), which consists of the seven national toxicology member societies of Japan, Korea, China, Taiwan, Thailand, Singapore, and Iran, now boasts of more than 3,000 members from a variety of industries, academia, and regulatory organizations. ASIATOX congresses are spaced three years apart and rotated among the member societies. In 1995, ASIATOX joined the International Union of Toxicology (IUTOX) as a regional society, and now serves as the scientific voice of toxicology in Asia under the IUTOX umbrella. Since its inauguration, the society has worked diligently to handle matters deemed essential to promoting the vision set fourth by its founders. Future perspectives of ASIATOX include the establishment of education and training programs, and the certification and accreditation of toxicologists. As the leading voice of toxicology in Asia, the society seeks to extend knowledge of toxicological issues to developing nations in Asia based on the following missions and goals: (1) to provide leadership as a worldwide scientific organization that objectively addresses global issues involving the toxicological sciences, (2) to broaden the geographical base of toxicology as a discipline and profession to all countries of the world, and (3) to pursue capacity building in toxicology, particularly in developing countries, while utilizing its global perspective and network to contribute to the enhancement of toxicology education and the career development of young toxicologists. PMID:26614818

  11. Society of Toxicologic Pathology position paper: organ weight recommendations for toxicology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Rani S; Morton, Daniel; Michael, Bindhu; Roome, Nigel; Johnson, Julie K; Yano, Barry L; Perry, Rick; Schafer, Ken

    2007-08-01

    The evaluation of organ weights in toxicology studies is an integral component in the assessment of pharmaceuticals, chemicals, and medical devices. The Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) has created recommendations for weighing organs in GLP general toxicology studies lasting from 7 days to 1 year. The STP recommends that liver, heart, kidneys, brain, testes, and adrenal glands be weighed in all multidose general toxicology studies. Thyroid gland and pituitary gland weights are recommended for all species except mice. Spleen and thymus should be weighed in rodent studies and may be weighed in non-rodent studies. Weighing of reproductive organs is most valuable in sexually mature animals. Variability in age, sexual maturity, and stage of cycle in non-rodents and reproductive senescence in female rodents may complicate or limit interpretation of reproductive organ weights. The STP recommends that testes of all species be weighed in multidose general toxicology studies. Epididymides and prostate should be weighed in rat studies and may be weighed on a case-by-case basis in non-rodent and mouse studies. Weighing of other organs including female reproductive organs should be considered on a case-by-case basis. Organ weights are not recommended for any carcinogenicity studies including the alternative mouse bioassays. Regardless of the study type or organs evaluated, organ weight changes must be evaluated within the context of the compound class, mechanism of action, and the entire data set for that study. PMID:17849358

  12. Toxicological awakenings: the rebirth of hormesis as a central pillar of toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper assesses historical reasons that may account for the marginalization of hormesis as a dose-response model in the biomedical sciences in general and toxicology in particular. The most significant and enduring explanatory factors are the early and close association of the concept of hormesis with the highly controversial medical practice of homeopathy and the difficulty in assessing hormesis with high-dose testing protocols which have dominated the discipline of toxicology, especially regulatory toxicology. The long-standing and intensely acrimonious conflict between homeopathy and 'traditional' medicine (allopathy) lead to the exclusion of the hormesis concept from a vast array of medical- and public health-related activities including research, teaching, grant funding, publishing, professional societal meetings, and regulatory initiatives of governmental agencies and their advisory bodies. Recent publications indicate that the hormetic dose-response is far more common and fundamental than the dose-response models [threshold/linear no threshold (LNT)] used in toxicology and risk assessment, and by governmental regulatory agencies in the establishment of exposure standards for workers and the general public. Acceptance of the possibility of hormesis has the potential to profoundly affect the practice of toxicology and risk assessment, especially with respect to carcinogen assessment

  13. Arsenic Exposure and Toxicology: A Historical Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Michael F.; Beck, Barbara D.; Chen, Yu; Lewis, Ari S.; Thomas, David J

    2011-01-01

    The metalloid arsenic is a natural environmental contaminant to which humans are routinely exposed in food, water, air, and soil. Arsenic has a long history of use as a homicidal agent, but in the past 100 years arsenic, has been used as a pesticide, a chemotherapeutic agent and a constituent of consumer products. In some areas of the world, high levels of arsenic are naturally present in drinking water and are a toxicological concern. There are several structural forms and oxidation states o...

  14. Nano-technology and nano-toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Maynard, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Rapid developments in nano-technology are likely to confer significant benefits on mankind. But, as with perhaps all new technologies, these benefits are likely to be accompanied by risks, perhaps by new risks. Nano-toxicology is developing in parallel with nano-technology and seeks to define the hazards and risks associated with nano-materials: only when risks have been identified they can be controlled. This article discusses the reasons for concern about the potential effects on health of ...

  15. Modern Instrumental Methods in Forensic Toxicology*

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Michael L.; Vorce, Shawn P.; Holler, Justin M.; Shimomura, Eric; Magluilo, Joe; Jacobs, Aaron J.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews modern analytical instrumentation in forensic toxicology for identification and quantification of drugs and toxins in biological fluids and tissues. A brief description of the theory and inherent strengths and limitations of each methodology is included. The focus is on new technologies that address current analytical limitations. A goal of this review is to encourage innovations to improve our technological capabilities and to encourage use of these analytical techniques...

  16. Methods in radioimmunoassay, toxicology, and related areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following topics were discussed at the conference: past, present, and potential of radioimmunoassay; measurement of biogenic amines at the picogram level; parathyroid hormone; in vitro radioisotope methods for clinical evaluation of vitamin B12 and folic acid metabolism; forensic toxicology; role of biotransformation reactions in prenatal and postnatal chemical toxicity; the use of electrochemical techniques in FDA analytical procedures; and atomic absorption in food analysis

  17. Toxicology of Nanomaterials: Permanent interactive learning

    OpenAIRE

    Castranova Vince; Borm Paul

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Particle and Fibre Toxicology wants to play a decisive role in a time where particle research is challenged and driven by the developments and applications of nanomaterials. This aim is not merely quantitative in publishing a given number of papers on nanomaterials, but also qualitatively since the field of nanotoxicology is rapidly emerging and benchmarks for good science are needed. Since then a number of things have happened that merit further analysis. The interactive learning is...

  18. Wind of Change Challenges Toxicological Regulators

    OpenAIRE

    Tralau, Tewes; Riebeling, Christian; Pirow, Ralph; Oelgeschläger, Michael; Seiler, Andrea; Liebsch, Manfred; Luch, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Background: In biomedical research, the past two decades have seen the advent of in vitro model systems based on stem cells, humanized cell lines, and engineered organotypic tissues, as well as numerous cellular assays based on primarily established tumor-derived cell lines and their genetically modified derivatives. Objective: There are high hopes that these systems might replace the need for animal testing in regulatory toxicology. However, despite increasing pressure in recent years to red...

  19. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife: 1994 Revision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process by which ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated is two-tiered. The first tier is a screening assessment where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to toxicological benchmarks which represent concentrations of chemicals in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.) that are presumed to be nonhazardous to the surrounding biota. The second tier is a baseline ecological risk assessment where toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. The report presents toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 76 chemicals on 8 representative mammalian wildlife species and 31 chemicals on 9 avian wildlife species. The chemicals are some of those that occur at United States Department of Energy waste sites; the wildlife species were chosen because they are widely distributed and provide a representative range of body sizes and diets. Further descriptions of the chosen wildlife species and chemicals are provided in the report. The benchmarks presented in this report represent values believed to be nonhazardous for the listed wildlife species. These benchmarks only consider contaminant exposure through oral ingestion of contaminated media; exposure through inhalation or direct dermal exposure are not considered in this report

  20. ICPP radiological and toxicological sabotage analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In June of 1993, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued Notice 5630.3A, open-quotes Protection of Departmental Facilities Against Radiological and Toxicological Sabotage,close quotes which states that all significant radiological and toxicological hazards at Department facilities must be examined for potential sabotage. This analysis has been completed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The ICPP radiological and toxicological hazards include spent government and commercial fuels, Special Nuclear Materials (SNM), high-level liquid wastes, high-level solid wastes, and process and decontamination chemicals. The analysis effort included identification and assessment of quantities of hazardous materials present at the facility; identification and ranking of hazardous material targets; development of worst case scenarios detailing possible sabotage actions and hazard releases; performance of vulnerability assessments using table top and computer methodologies on credible threat targets; evaluation of potential risks to the public, workers, and the environment; evaluation of sabotage risk reduction options; and selection of cost effective prevention and mitigation options

  1. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife: 1994 Revision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opresko, D.M.; Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W. II

    1994-09-01

    The process by which ecological risks of environmental contaminants are evaluated is two-tiered. The first tier is a screening assessment where concentrations of contaminants in the environment are compared to toxicological benchmarks which represent concentrations of chemicals in environmental media (water, sediment, soil, food, etc.) that are presumed to be nonhazardous to the surrounding biota. The second tier is a baseline ecological risk assessment where toxicological benchmarks are one of several lines of evidence used to support or refute the presence of ecological effects. The report presents toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 76 chemicals on 8 representative mammalian wildlife species and 31 chemicals on 9 avian wildlife species. The chemicals are some of those that occur at United States Department of Energy waste sites; the wildlife species were chosen because they are widely distributed and provide a representative range of body sizes and diets. Further descriptions of the chosen wildlife species and chemicals are provided in the report. The benchmarks presented in this report represent values believed to be nonhazardous for the listed wildlife species. These benchmarks only consider contaminant exposure through oral ingestion of contaminated media; exposure through inhalation or direct dermal exposure are not considered in this report.

  2. In silico toxicology for the pharmaceutical sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applied use of in silico technologies (a.k.a. computational toxicology, in silico toxicology, computer-assisted tox, e-tox, i-drug discovery, predictive ADME, etc.) for predicting preclinical toxicological endpoints, clinical adverse effects, and metabolism of pharmaceutical substances has become of high interest to the scientific community and the public. The increased accessibility of these technologies for scientists and recent regulations permitting their use for chemical risk assessment supports this notion. The scientific community is interested in the appropriate use of such technologies as a tool to enhance product development and safety of pharmaceuticals and other xenobiotics, while ensuring the reliability and accuracy of in silico approaches for the toxicological and pharmacological sciences. For pharmaceutical substances, this means active and impurity chemicals in the drug product may be screened using specialized software and databases designed to cover these substances through a chemical structure-based screening process and algorithm specific to a given software program. A major goal for use of these software programs is to enable industry scientists not only to enhance the discovery process but also to ensure the judicious use of in silico tools to support risk assessments of drug-induced toxicities and in safety evaluations. However, a great amount of applied research is still needed, and there are many limitations with these approaches which are described in this review. Currently, there is a wide range of endpoints available from predictive quantitative structure-activity relationship models driven by many different computational software programs and data sources, and this is only expected to grow. For example, there are models based on non-proprietary and/or proprietary information specific to assessing potential rodent carcinogenicity, in silico screens for ICH genetic toxicity assays, reproductive and developmental toxicity, theoretical

  3. Approximate similarity search

    OpenAIRE

    Amato, Giuseppe

    2000-01-01

    Similarity searching is fundamental in various application areas. Recently it has attracted much attention in the database community because of the growing need to deal with large volume of data. Consequently, efficiency has become a matter of concern in design. Although much has been done to develop structures able to perform fast similarity search, results are still not satisfactory, and more research is needed. The performance of similarity search for complex features deteriorates and does...

  4. Clustering by Pattern Similarity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-xun Wang; Jian Pei

    2008-01-01

    The task of clustering is to identify classes of similar objects among a set of objects. The definition of similarity varies from one clustering model to another. However, in most of these models the concept of similarity is often based on such metrics as Manhattan distance, Euclidean distance or other Lp distances. In other words, similar objects must have close values in at least a set of dimensions. In this paper, we explore a more general type of similarity. Under the pCluster model we proposed, two objects are similar if they exhibit a coherent pattern on a subset of dimensions. The new similarity concept models a wide range of applications. For instance, in DNA microarray analysis, the expression levels of two genes may rise and fall synchronously in response to a set of environmental stimuli. Although the magnitude of their expression levels may not be close, the patterns they exhibit can be very much alike. Discovery of such clusters of genes is essential in revealing significant connections in gene regulatory networks. E-commerce applications, such as collaborative filtering, can also benefit from the new model, because it is able to capture not only the closeness of values of certain leading indicators but also the closeness of (purchasing, browsing, etc.) patterns exhibited by the customers. In addition to the novel similarity model, this paper also introduces an effective and efficient algorithm to detect such clusters, and we perform tests on several real and synthetic data sets to show its performance.

  5. Caenorhabditis elegans, a Biological Model for Research in Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejeda-Benitez, Lesly; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus

    2016-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a nematode of microscopic size which, due to its biological characteristics, has been used since the 1970s as a model for research in molecular biology, medicine, pharmacology, and toxicology. It was the first animal whose genome was completely sequenced and has played a key role in the understanding of apoptosis and RNA interference. The transparency of its body, short lifespan, ability to self-fertilize and ease of culture are advantages that make it ideal as a model in toxicology. Due to the fact that some of its biochemical pathways are similar to those of humans, it has been employed in research in several fields. C. elegans' use as a biological model in environmental toxicological assessments allows the determination of multiple endpoints. Some of these utilize the effects on the biological functions of the nematode and others use molecular markers. Endpoints such as lethality, growth, reproduction, and locomotion are the most studied, and usually employ the wild type Bristol N2 strain. Other endpoints use reporter genes, such as green fluorescence protein, driven by regulatory sequences from other genes related to different mechanisms of toxicity, such as heat shock, oxidative stress, CYP system, and metallothioneins among others, allowing the study of gene expression in a manner both rapid and easy. These transgenic strains of C. elegans represent a powerful tool to assess toxicity pathways for mixtures and environmental samples, and their numbers are growing in diversity and selectivity. However, other molecular biology techniques, including DNA microarrays and MicroRNAs have been explored to assess the effects of different toxicants and samples. C. elegans has allowed the assessment of neurotoxic effects for heavy metals and pesticides, among those more frequently studied, as the nematode has a very well defined nervous system. More recently, nanoparticles are emergent pollutants whose toxicity can be explored using this nematode

  6. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute annual report 1987-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    section, Deposition and Fate of Inhaled Toxicants, describes factors influencing the uptake of inhaled materials and their initial interactions in the body. The third and fourth sections, Health Effects of Inhaled Radionuclides and Health Effects of Inhaled Chemical Toxicants, describe recent progress in the fields of radiation and chemical toxicology, respectively. The fifth section, Mechanisms of Carcinogenesis, reflects progress in the understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and chemicals induce cancer. Similarly, the sixth section, Mechanisms of Non-Carcinogenic Responses to Inhaled Toxicants describes research on the development of diseases other than cancer. The seventh section, The Application of Mathematical Modeling to Health Issues, describes efforts to predict health risks by using computer-based models and limited experimental or epidemiological data. The final section, Studies at the University of Utah, describes progress in studies conducted by University of Utah scientists funded by subcontract through this Institute

  7. Advancing Risk Assessment through the Application of Systems Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, John Michael; Kleensang, André; Peitsch, Manuel C.; Hayes, A. Wallace

    2016-01-01

    Risk assessment is the process of quantifying the probability of a harmful effect to individuals or populations from human activities. Mechanistic approaches to risk assessment have been generally referred to as systems toxicology. Systems toxicology makes use of advanced analytical and computational tools to integrate classical toxicology and quantitative analysis of large networks of molecular and functional changes occurring across multiple levels of biological organization. Three presentations including two case studies involving both in vitro and in vivo approaches described the current state of systems toxicology and the potential for its future application in chemical risk assessment. PMID:26977253

  8. The semantic similarity ensemble

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ballatore

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Computational measures of semantic similarity between geographic terms provide valuable support across geographic information retrieval, data mining, and information integration. To date, a wide variety of approaches to geo-semantic similarity have been devised. A judgment of similarity is not intrinsically right or wrong, but obtains a certain degree of cognitive plausibility, depending on how closely it mimics human behavior. Thus selecting the most appropriate measure for a specific task is a significant challenge. To address this issue, we make an analogy between computational similarity measures and soliciting domain expert opinions, which incorporate a subjective set of beliefs, perceptions, hypotheses, and epistemic biases. Following this analogy, we define the semantic similarity ensemble (SSE as a composition of different similarity measures, acting as a panel of experts having to reach a decision on the semantic similarity of a set of geographic terms. The approach is evaluated in comparison to human judgments, and results indicate that an SSE performs better than the average of its parts. Although the best member tends to outperform the ensemble, all ensembles outperform the average performance of each ensemble's member. Hence, in contexts where the best measure is unknown, the ensemble provides a more cognitively plausible approach.

  9. Reproductive toxicology and nutritional studies on mahua oil (Madhuca latifolia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukmini, C

    1990-09-01

    Mahua (Madhuca latifolia, Sapotaceae) seed oil is a common ingredient of hydrogenated fat in India. It is obtained from the seed kernels (which contain 45% oil, w/w), and is a pale yellow, semi-solid fat at room temperature. It has palmitic (19%), stearic (15%), oleic (42%) and linoleic (24%) as a major fatty acids. The physicochemical parameters of the oil are similar to those of other edible oils. The unsaponifiable fraction contains several unidentified polyenes. Nutritional studies were carried out in groups of 15 weanling albino rats of each sex, fed for 14 wk on a 20% protein diet, adequate in all vitamins and minerals, containing 10% mahua oil. A similar (control) group was simultaneously maintained on the same basic diet containing 10% groundnut oil. The growth, fat absorption, and retention of nitrogen, calcium and phosphorus were similar in the two groups, as were the lipid profiles of the serum, liver and heart. Multigeneration reproduction studies in groups of 15 rats of each sex, fed a diet containing 10% mahua oil, as used in the above study, indicated poor reproductive performance in the second generation. All the male rats became sterile. Histological studies indicated bilateral testicular atrophy with degenerative changes in the seminiferous tubules in the affected animals. On withdrawal of mahua oil from the diet and rehabilitation, the male animals regained their fertility. These results indicate temporary male sterility on feeding mahua oil to rats. No other adverse toxicological effects were found. PMID:2272556

  10. Gender similarities and differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Janet Shibley

    2014-01-01

    Whether men and women are fundamentally different or similar has been debated for more than a century. This review summarizes major theories designed to explain gender differences: evolutionary theories, cognitive social learning theory, sociocultural theory, and expectancy-value theory. The gender similarities hypothesis raises the possibility of theorizing gender similarities. Statistical methods for the analysis of gender differences and similarities are reviewed, including effect sizes, meta-analysis, taxometric analysis, and equivalence testing. Then, relying mainly on evidence from meta-analyses, gender differences are reviewed in cognitive performance (e.g., math performance), personality and social behaviors (e.g., temperament, emotions, aggression, and leadership), and psychological well-being. The evidence on gender differences in variance is summarized. The final sections explore applications of intersectionality and directions for future research. PMID:23808917

  11. Toxicology of sulfur in ruminants: review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kandylis, K.

    1984-10-01

    This review deals with the toxicology of sulfur in ruminants including toxicity, neurotoxic effects, and mechanism of toxic action of hydrogen sulfide, clinical signs, and treatment. It will report effects of excessive intake of sulfur by ruminants on feed intake, animal performance, ruminal digestion and motility, rumination, and other physiological functions. Poisoning of animals with sulfur from industrial emissions (sulfur dioxide) also is discussed. Excessive quantities of dietary sulfur (above .3 to .4%) as sulfate or elemental sulfur may cause toxic effects and in extreme cases can be fatal. The means is discussed whereby consumption of excessive amounts of sulfur leads to toxic effects. 53 references, 1 table.

  12. Collaborative development of predictive toxicology applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Barry; Douglas, Nicki; Helma, Christoph; Rautenberg, Micha; Jeliazkova, Nina; Jeliazkov, Vedrin; Nikolova, Ivelina; Benigni, Romualdo; Tcheremenskaia, Olga; Kramer, Stefan; Girschick, Tobias; Buchwald, Fabian; Wicker, Joerg; Karwath, Andreas; Gütlein, Martin; Maunz, Andreas; Sarimveis, Haralambos; Melagraki, Georgia; Afantitis, Antreas; Sopasakis, Pantelis; Gallagher, David; Poroikov, Vladimir; Filimonov, Dmitry; Zakharov, Alexey; Lagunin, Alexey; Gloriozova, Tatyana; Novikov, Sergey; Skvortsova, Natalia; Druzhilovsky, Dmitry; Chawla, Sunil; Ghosh, Indira; Ray, Surajit; Patel, Hitesh; Escher, Sylvia

    2010-01-01

    OpenTox provides an interoperable, standards-based Framework for the support of predictive toxicology data management, algorithms, modelling, validation and reporting. It is relevant to satisfying the chemical safety assessment requirements of the REACH legislation as it supports access to experimental data, (Quantitative) Structure-Activity Relationship models, and toxicological information through an integrating platform that adheres to regulatory requirements and OECD validation principles. Initial research defined the essential components of the Framework including the approach to data access, schema and management, use of controlled vocabularies and ontologies, architecture, web service and communications protocols, and selection and integration of algorithms for predictive modelling. OpenTox provides end-user oriented tools to non-computational specialists, risk assessors, and toxicological experts in addition to Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) for developers of new applications. OpenTox actively supports public standards for data representation, interfaces, vocabularies and ontologies, Open Source approaches to core platform components, and community-based collaboration approaches, so as to progress system interoperability goals.The OpenTox Framework includes APIs and services for compounds, datasets, features, algorithms, models, ontologies, tasks, validation, and reporting which may be combined into multiple applications satisfying a variety of different user needs. OpenTox applications are based on a set of distributed, interoperable OpenTox API-compliant REST web services. The OpenTox approach to ontology allows for efficient mapping of complementary data coming from different datasets into a unifying structure having a shared terminology and representation.Two initial OpenTox applications are presented as an illustration of the potential impact of OpenTox for high-quality and consistent structure-activity relationship modelling of REACH

  13. Collaborative development of predictive toxicology applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Barry

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OpenTox provides an interoperable, standards-based Framework for the support of predictive toxicology data management, algorithms, modelling, validation and reporting. It is relevant to satisfying the chemical safety assessment requirements of the REACH legislation as it supports access to experimental data, (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship models, and toxicological information through an integrating platform that adheres to regulatory requirements and OECD validation principles. Initial research defined the essential components of the Framework including the approach to data access, schema and management, use of controlled vocabularies and ontologies, architecture, web service and communications protocols, and selection and integration of algorithms for predictive modelling. OpenTox provides end-user oriented tools to non-computational specialists, risk assessors, and toxicological experts in addition to Application Programming Interfaces (APIs for developers of new applications. OpenTox actively supports public standards for data representation, interfaces, vocabularies and ontologies, Open Source approaches to core platform components, and community-based collaboration approaches, so as to progress system interoperability goals. The OpenTox Framework includes APIs and services for compounds, datasets, features, algorithms, models, ontologies, tasks, validation, and reporting which may be combined into multiple applications satisfying a variety of different user needs. OpenTox applications are based on a set of distributed, interoperable OpenTox API-compliant REST web services. The OpenTox approach to ontology allows for efficient mapping of complementary data coming from different datasets into a unifying structure having a shared terminology and representation. Two initial OpenTox applications are presented as an illustration of the potential impact of OpenTox for high-quality and consistent structure

  14. Toxicological applications of neutron-activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal neutron-activation analysis is recognised as a useful tool for trace element studies in toxicology. This paper describes some recent applications of the technique to three elements when ingested by people in excess of normal intake Two of the elements (copper and chromium) are essential to life and one (bromine) is as yet unclassified. Three deaths were investiagted and trace element levels compared with normal levels from healthy subjects in the same geographical area who had died as a result of violence. (author)

  15. [Meta-analysis in neurobehavioral toxicological studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y X; Liang, Y X

    1994-09-01

    Meta-analysis was used to deal with the data collected in neurobehavioral toxicological studies to synthesize their findings quantitatively. Results revealed neurotoxic chemicals could cause changes in cognitive abilities, psychomotor function and emotion of persons exposed. However, each toxicant had its distinct effects on neurobehavior, for example, lead mainly impairs touch sense, memory, emotion and cognitive abilities, mercury does intelligence, concentration and motor stability, and carbon disulfide does eye-hand coordination. It suggested meta-analysis could be directive to selecting the best combination of neurobehavioral tests. PMID:7842892

  16. The Global Educational Toxicology Uniting Project (GETUP): an Analysis of the First Year of a Novel Toxicology Education Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Anselm; Vohra, Rais; Ruha, Anne-Michelle; Koutsogiannis, Zeff; Graeme, Kimberlie; Dargan, Paul I; Wood, David M; Greene, Shaun L

    2015-09-01

    The international boundaries to medical education are becoming less marked as new technologies such as multiuser videoconferencing are developed and become more accessible to help bridge the communication gaps. The Global Educational Toxicology Uniting Project (GETUP) is aimed at connecting clinicians in countries with established clinical toxicology services to clinicians in countries without clinical toxicologists around the globe. Centers that manage or consult on toxicology cases were registered through the American College of Medical Toxicology website via Survey Monkey®. Data was analyzed retrospectively from February 2014 to January 2015. Google hangouts® was used as the main conferencing software, but some sites preferred the use of Skype®. Registration data included contact details and toxicology background and qualifications. Thirty sites in 19 different countries in Australasia, Europe, Africa, and America were registered. Twenty-eight (93 %) sites were located in a major urban center, one (3.5 %) site in a major rural center and one (3.5 %) a private practice. Expectations of GETUP included sharing toxicology cases and education (30, 100 % of sites), assistance with toxicology management guidelines (2, 7 %), assistance with providing a toxicology teaching curriculum in languages other than English (2, 7 %), and managing toxicology presentations in resource-poor settings, international collaboration, and toxicovigilance (2 sites, 7 %). Twenty-two conferences were performed during the first 12 months with a mean of 3 cases per conference. GETUP has connected countries and clinical units with and without toxicology services and will provide a platform to improve international collaboration in clinical toxicology. PMID:25952764

  17. IRIS Toxicological Review of Methanol (Noncancer) (Interagency Science Discussion Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    On May 3, 2013, the Toxicological Review of Methanol (noncancer) (Revised External Review Draft) was posted for public review and comment. Subsequently, the draft Toxicological Review, Appendices, and draft IRIS Summary were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agenci...

  18. Toxicología de metales y minerales

    OpenAIRE

    García Fernández, Antonio Juan

    2011-01-01

    Presentaciones de los temas de Toxicología de metales y minerales: mercurio, cadmio, plomo, cobre, arsénico, flúor, selenio, zinc, talio, etc impartidas en la asignatura de Toxicología en el curso 2011/12. Se aborda desde las perspectivas ambiental, alimentaria y clínica, tanto sobre los animales como sobre las personas.

  19. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM (INTERAGENCY SCIENCE CONSULTATION DRAFT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    On Septemeber 30, 2010, the draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agenc...

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF REFERENCE ARTEMIA III FOR MARINE TOXICOLOGICAL STUDIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    ASTM Practice for Using Brine Shrimp Nauplii as Food for Test Animals in Aquatic Toxicology Tests (E 1203) suggests use of Reference Artemis as a reference standard for evaluating other batches of brine shrimp as food for organisms used in toxicology. in 1988, the U.S. EPA was ab...

  1. IRIS Toxicological Review of Urea (Interagency Science Consultation Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    On September 28, 2010, the Toxicological Review of Urea and the charge to external peer reviewers were released for external peer review and public comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agencies and White House Of...

  2. Male Reproductive Toxicology: Environmental Exposures vs Reproductive Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Like the lecture this chapter begins with an overview of male reproductive biology and transitions into male reproductive toxicology. It ends with a brief discussion of the strengths and weaknesses in male reproductive toxicology and epidemiology today. This chapter is highly il...

  3. [Problems in the standardization of inpatient health care in clinical toxicology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostapenko, Iu N; Litvinov, N N; Rozhkov, P G; Il'iashenko, K K; Gol'dfarb, Iu S

    2008-01-01

    Standardization of inpatient toxicological care is an urgent task to reduce mortality from acute chemical poisonings. Since 2005, health care standards and patient management protocols in poisonings with psychotropic and hypnotic agents, ethanol and other alcohols, and ethylene glycol have been developed and work is in progress on standards for intoxication with corrosive substances, soaps, detergents, carbon dioxide, other gases, smokes, and vapors. Major difficulties have been revealed. These are the lack of coincidence of the "Nomenclature of work and services in public health service" at the federal level with the similar regional documents; improper presentation of toxicological diagnostic and medical technologies; orientation of the Ministry of Health and Social Development of Russia towards only simple services; the "List of Essential and Most Important Drugs" that does not contain the heading "antidote agents" at all is to be completed. PMID:19227285

  4. Constructive Similarity of Soils

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koudelka, Petr

    Singapore : Design, CRC a iTEK CMS Web solutions, 2012 - (Phoon, K.; Beer, M.; Quek, S.; Pang, S.), s. 206-211 ISBN 978-981-07-2218-0. [APS on Structural Reliability and Its Application – Sustainable Civil Infrastructures /5./. Singapore (SG), 23.05.2012-25.05.2012] Grant ostatní: GA ČR(CZ) GAP105/11/1160 Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : model similarity * database of soil properties * soil similarity characteristic * statistical analysis * ultimate limit states Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering

  5. Cognitive residues of similarity

    OpenAIRE

    OToole, Stephanie; Keane, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    What are the cognitive after-effects of making a similarity judgement? What, cognitively, is left behind and what effect might these residues have on subsequent processing? In this paper, we probe for such after-effects using a visual search task, performed after a task in which pictures of real-world objects were compared. So, target objects were first presented in a comparison task (e.g., rate the similarity of this object to another) thus, presumably, modifying some of their features befor...

  6. Space Toxicology Challenges and Ethical Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Before delineating specific ways that nanotechnology enterprises might contribute to better management of toxicological risks during spaceflight, I will show how ethical considerations and several theories of justice can be applied to nanotechnology strategic plans. The principles that guide an ethical technical enterprise include autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, veracity and justice. Veracity (truth) is the underpinning principle; however, beyond this, proponents of nanotechnology must think carefully about balancing conflicting principles. For example, autonomy must yield to beneficence when fearful individuals simply lack knowledge to appreciate nanotechnology's beneficial advances. Justice is a complex topic upon which I will place six models: utilitarian, distributive, free-exchange/choice, individual dignity (social participation), equity vs. greed, and liberation of the poor. After briefly summarizing each model, I will present what I call an iterative-hybrid model of justice to show specifically how our thinking can be applied to nanotechnology enterprises. Within that broad landscape, I will discuss a single feature: how our early effort to understand health risks of carbon nanotubes fits into the iterative model. Finally, I will suggest ways that nanotechnology might advance our management of toxicological risks during spaceflight, but always with an eye toward how such advances might result in a more just world.

  7. The Chemistry and Toxicology of Depleted Uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney A. Katz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural uranium is comprised of three radioactive isotopes: 238U, 235U, and 234U. Depleted uranium (DU is a byproduct of the processes for the enrichment of the naturally occurring 235U isotope. The world wide stock pile contains some 1½ million tons of depleted uranium. Some of it has been used to dilute weapons grade uranium (~90% 235U down to reactor grade uranium (~5% 235U, and some of it has been used for heavy tank armor and for the fabrication of armor-piercing bullets and missiles. Such weapons were used by the military in the Persian Gulf, the Balkans and elsewhere. The testing of depleted uranium weapons and their use in combat has resulted in environmental contamination and human exposure. Although the chemical and the toxicological behaviors of depleted uranium are essentially the same as those of natural uranium, the respective chemical forms and isotopic compositions in which they usually occur are different. The chemical and radiological toxicity of depleted uranium can injure biological systems. Normal functioning of the kidney, liver, lung, and heart can be adversely affected by depleted uranium intoxication. The focus of this review is on the chemical and toxicological properties of depleted and natural uranium and some of the possible consequences from long term, low dose exposure to depleted uranium in the environment.

  8. PIXE applications to the toxicological field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Several studies have been carried out in order to investigate the toxicological properties of some chemical elements in different type of biological samples. lon beam techniques, in particular PIXE, have been successfully used to analyze the elemental composition of food, beverage, plants and animal tissues. In this context, the PIXE line of the lon Implantation Laboratory (Porto Alegre, Brazil) have been used in the last few years to study food and beverage processing and biological specimens exposed to contaminated environment. The aim of this study is to present some of our results using PIXE analysis applied to toxicological research field. For instance, a recent published research [1] investigated the genotoxic and mutagenic effects in tobacco farmers exposed to metal-based formulated pesticides. Levels of Mg, AI, CI, Zn, Cr and Br, elements associated with DNA damage, were higher in the blood samples of tobacco farmers exposed to pesticide than in the non-exposed group. The occupational genotoxicity among copper smelters was also investigated [2]. The elemental content of blood samples were analyzed by PIXE. DNA damage in the peripheral blood Iymphocytes of workers exposed to copper smelter was observed. However, no clear correlation was found between the metal content and DNA damage. [1] F. R. da Silva, J. da Silva, M. C. AlIgayer, C. F. Simon, J. F. Dias, C. E. I. dos Santos, M. Salvador, C. Branco, N. B. Schneider, V. Kahl, P. Rohr, K. Kvitko, J. Hazard. Mat., 225-226 (2012) 81-90. (author)

  9. PIXE applications to the toxicological field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, C.E.I. dos; Dias, J.F.; Jobim, P.F.C.; Yoneama, M.L. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica. Laboratorio de Implantacao Ionica; Andrade, V.M. [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Criciuma, SC (Brazil). Laboratorio de Biologia Celular e Molecular; Amaral, L.; Silva, J. da [Universidade Luterana do Brasil, Canoas, RS (Brazil). Laboratorio de Toxicologia Generica

    2013-07-01

    Full text: Several studies have been carried out in order to investigate the toxicological properties of some chemical elements in different type of biological samples. lon beam techniques, in particular PIXE, have been successfully used to analyze the elemental composition of food, beverage, plants and animal tissues. In this context, the PIXE line of the lon Implantation Laboratory (Porto Alegre, Brazil) have been used in the last few years to study food and beverage processing and biological specimens exposed to contaminated environment. The aim of this study is to present some of our results using PIXE analysis applied to toxicological research field. For instance, a recent published research [1] investigated the genotoxic and mutagenic effects in tobacco farmers exposed to metal-based formulated pesticides. Levels of Mg, AI, CI, Zn, Cr and Br, elements associated with DNA damage, were higher in the blood samples of tobacco farmers exposed to pesticide than in the non-exposed group. The occupational genotoxicity among copper smelters was also investigated [2]. The elemental content of blood samples were analyzed by PIXE. DNA damage in the peripheral blood Iymphocytes of workers exposed to copper smelter was observed. However, no clear correlation was found between the metal content and DNA damage. [1] F. R. da Silva, J. da Silva, M. C. AlIgayer, C. F. Simon, J. F. Dias, C. E. I. dos Santos, M. Salvador, C. Branco, N. B. Schneider, V. Kahl, P. Rohr, K. Kvitko, J. Hazard. Mat., 225-226 (2012) 81-90. (author)

  10. Similarity of molecular shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, A Y; Richards, W G

    1991-10-01

    The similarity of one molecule to another has usually been defined in terms of electron densities or electrostatic potentials or fields. Here it is expressed as a function of the molecular shape. Formulations of similarity (S) reduce to very simple forms, thus rendering the computerised calculation straightforward and fast. 'Elements of similarity' are identified, in the same spirit as 'elements of chirality', except that the former are understood to be variable rather than present-or-absent. Methods are presented which bypass the time-consuming mathematical optimisation of the relative orientation of the molecules. Numerical results are presented and examined, with emphasis on the similarity of isomers. At the extreme, enantiomeric pairs are considered, where it is the dissimilarity (D = 1 - S) that is of consequence. We argue that chiral molecules can be graded by dissimilarity, and show that D is the shape-analog of the 'chirality coefficient', with the simple form of the former opening up numerical access to the latter. PMID:1770379

  11. The Qualitative Similarity Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Peter V.; Lee, Chongmin

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the qualitative similarity hypothesis (QSH) with respect to children and adolescents who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing. The primary focus is on the development of English language and literacy skills, and some information is provided on the acquisition of English as a second language. The QSH is briefly discussed within…

  12. Limiting Similarity Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Szabo, P; Meszena, G.

    2005-01-01

    We reinvestigate the validity of the limiting similarity principle via numerical simulations of the Lotka-Volterra model. A Gaussian competition kernel is employed to describe decreasing competition with increasing difference in a one-dimensional phenotype variable. The simulations are initiated by a large number of species, evenly distributed along the phenotype axis. Exceptionally, the Gaussian carrying capacity supports coexistence of all species, initially present. In case of any other, d...

  13. Compression-based similarity

    OpenAIRE

    Vitányi, Paul

    2011-01-01

    First we consider pair-wise distances for literal objects consisting of finite binary files. These files are taken to contain all of their meaning, like genomes or books. The distances are based on compression of the objects concerned, normalized, and can be viewed as similarity distances. Second, we consider pair-wise distances between names of objects, like "red" or "christianity." In this case the distances are based on searches of the Internet. Such a search can be performed by any search...

  14. The Placenta in Toxicology. Part IV: Battery of Toxicological Test Systems Based on Human Placenta

    OpenAIRE

    Göhner, Claudia; Svensson-Arvelund, Judit; Pfarrer, Christiane; Häger, Jan-Dirk; Faas, Marijke; Ernerudh, Jan; Cline, J. Mark; Dixon, Darlene; Buse, Eberhard; Markert, Udo R.

    2013-01-01

    This review summarizes the potential and also some limitations of using human placentas, or placental cells and structures for toxicology testing. The placenta contains a wide spectrum of cell types and tissues, such as trophoblast cells, immune cells, fibroblasts, stem cells, endothelial cells, vessels, glands, membranes, and many others. It may be expected that in many cases the relevance of results obtained from human placenta will be higher than those from animal models due to species spe...

  15. The placenta in toxicology. Part IV : Battery of toxicological test systems based on human placenta

    OpenAIRE

    Göhner, Claudia; Svensson-Arvelund, Judit; Pfarrer, Christiane; Häger, Jan-Dirk; Faas, Marijke; Ernerudh, Jan; Cline, J. Mark; Dixon, Darlene; Buse, Eberhard; Markert, Udo R.

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the potential and also some limitations of using human placentas, or placental cells and structures for toxicology testing. The placenta contains a wide spectrum of cell types and tissues, such as trophoblast cells, immune cells, fibroblasts, stem cells, endothelial cells, vessels, glands, membranes, and many others. It may be expected that in many cases the relevance of results obtained from human placenta will be higher than those from animal models due to species spe...

  16. Recent developments in preclinical toxicological pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the late nineteenth century, microscopists developed a quaint method for examining the fine structure of biological specimens: paraffin embedding and staining with hematoxylin and eosin. This ancient technology is here to stay for the foreseeable future, because it can and does reveal the truth about biological processes. However, the role of pathology is developing with ever greater worldwide interaction between pathologists, and better communication and agreeing of international standards. Furthermore, recent techniques including immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy and image analysis complement the traditional tried and tested tools. There is also in toxicologic pathology a willingness to use pathology methods and skills in new contexts, drug discovery in particular. But even in these days of genetic modification, proteomics and high throughput screening, pathologists continue to rely on dyes extracted from a Central American logwood used in Mexico before the Spanish invasion in 1520

  17. Handbook of toxicology of chemical warfare agents

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    This groundbreaking book covers every aspect of deadly toxic chemicals used as weapons of mass destruction and employed in conflicts, warfare and terrorism. Including findings from experimental as well as clinical studies, this one-of-a-kind handbook is prepared in a very user- friendly format that can easily be followed by students, teachers and researchers, as well as lay people. Stand-alone chapters on individual chemicals and major topics allow the reader to easily access required information without searching through the entire book. This is the first book that offers in-depth coverage of individual toxicants, target organ toxicity, major incidents, toxic effects in humans, animals and wildlife, biosensors, biomarkers, on-site and laboratory analytical methods, decontamination and detoxification procedures, prophylactic, therapeutic and countermeasures, and the role of homeland security. Presents a comprehensive look at all aspects of chemical warfare toxicology in one reference work. This saves research...

  18. Toxicological benchmarks for wildlife. Environmental Restoration Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opresko, D.M.; Sample, B.E.; Suter, G.W.

    1993-09-01

    This report presents toxicological benchmarks for assessment of effects of 55 chemicals on six representative mammalian wildlife species (short-tailed shrew, white-footed mouse, cottontail ink, red fox, and whitetail deer) and eight avian wildlife species (American robin, woodcock, wild turkey, belted kingfisher, great blue heron, barred owl, Cooper`s hawk, and redtailed hawk) (scientific names are presented in Appendix C). These species were chosen because they are widely distributed and provide a representative range of body sizes and diets. The chemicals are some of those that occur at United States Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. The benchmarks presented in this report are values believed to be nonhazardous for the listed wildlife species.

  19. Integrative Systems Biology Applied to Toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsbak, Kristine Grønning

    that were in concordance with their effects in experimental animals. In project II, I profiled the effects on rat liver gene expression levels following exposure to a 14-chemical mixture ± the presence of an endocrine disrupting chemical. This project helped us shed light on the mechanism of action of......Humans are exposed to various chemical agents through food, cosmetics, pharmaceuticals and other sources. Exposure to chemicals is suspected of playing a main role in the development of some adverse health effects in humans. Additionally, European regulatory authorities have recognized the risk...... associated with combined exposure to multiple chemicals. Testing all possible combinations of the tens of thousands environmental chemicals is impractical. This PhD project was launched to apply existing computational systems biology methods to toxicological research. In this thesis, I present in three...

  20. Applicability of Computational Systems Biology in Toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsbak, Kristine Grønning; Hadrup, Niels; Audouze, Karine Marie Laure;

    2014-01-01

    and databases are used to model and predict effects of chemicals on, for instance, human health. In toxicology, computational systems biology enables identification of important pathways and molecules from large data sets; tasks that can be extremely laborious when performed by a classical literature search....... However, computational systems biology offers more advantages than providing a high-throughput literature search; it may form the basis for establishment of hypotheses on potential links between environmental chemicals and human diseases, which would be very difficult to establish experimentally....... This is possible due to the existence of comprehensive databases containing information on networks of human protein–protein interactions and protein–disease associations. Experimentally determined targets of the specific chemical of interest can be fed into these networks to obtain additional information that can...

  1. Functional Toxicogenomics: Mechanism-Centered Toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris D. Vulpe

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Traditional toxicity testing using animal models is slow, low capacity, expensive and assesses a limited number of endpoints. Such approaches are inadequate to deal with the increasingly large number of compounds found in the environment for which there are no toxicity data. Mechanism-centered high-throughput testing represents an alternative approach to meet this pressing need but is limited by our current understanding of toxicity pathways. Functional toxicogenomics, the global study of the biological function of genes on the modulation of the toxic effect of a compound, can play an important role in identifying the essential cellular components and pathways involved in toxicity response. The combination of the identification of fundamental toxicity pathways and mechanism-centered targeted assays represents an integrated approach to advance molecular toxicology to meet the challenges of toxicity testing in the 21st century.

  2. 朱砂灌胃给药后汞在孕大鼠脏器内的分布和排泄途径研究%Study on Distribution in Organs and Excretion Pathway of Mercury in Pregnant Rats after Administration of Cinnabar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤家铭; 米金霞; 吴文斌; 谷颖敏; 李咏梅; 夏晶; 张甦; 曹帅; 季申

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the distribution and excretion pathway of mercury in pregnant rats after administration of cinnabar. Methods; Compared with the reproductive toxicity test, the female SD rats after mating were randomly divided into high (1 000 mg/kg) , medium (300 mg/kg) , and low-dose (100 mg/kg) cinnabar groups, and negative control group (0.5% CMC-Na) , with ten rats in each group. The rats in different dose cinnabar groups were administered intragastrically with cinnabar from the sixth day to the fifteenth day after pregnancy, and all the rats were sacrificed on the twentieth day of pregnancy. The main organs (including heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, brain and uterus) , blood, placentae, fetuses and urine of the pregnant rats were obtained to detect the mercury concentration by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry ( ICP-MS) ; the feces were taken at different time points to determine the mercury concentration by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometer (ICP-OES) ; the distribution in different organs and the excretion pathway of mercury were analyzed. Results: The mercury concentrations of the heart, liver, kidney and uterus of the rats in different dose cinnabar groups were higher than those of the rats in negative control group, and the concentration increased with the enhanced dose; there was no statistical difference on the mercury concentrations of the brain, placentae and fetuses between different dose cinnabar groups and negative control group. There were large amount of mercury in the feces on the second day after administration, and the mercury excretion accounted for 38. 2% ~ 50.4% of HgS intake; while the mercury excretion accounted for72.2% -86.6% on the tenth day after administration; The a-mount of HgS discharged in the feces decreased rapidly on the fourth day after drug discontinuation. Only extreme trace of mercury excreted from urine with dose-dependent pattern, and the mercury excretion maintained the high

  3. Contaminación y Toxicología Ambiental

    OpenAIRE

    García Fernández, Antonio Juan

    2011-01-01

    Presentaciones de los temas 43 al 45 del programa de Toxicología de la Licenciatura en Veterinaria del curso 2011/12. Estos temas están dedicados a la toxicología de las radiaciones (contaminación física), la toxicología de los contaminantes ambientales sobre los seres humanos, animales domésticos, plantas y medio ambiente en general. Comentario de los efectos relacionados con los problemas regionales de contaminación ambiental.

  4. National toxicology program chemical nomination and selection process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selkirk, J.K. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    1990-12-31

    The National Toxicology Program (NTP) was organized to support national public health programs by initiating research designed to understand the physiological, metabolic, and genetic basis for chemical toxicity. The primary mandated responsibilities of NTP were in vivo and vitro toxicity testing of potentially hazardous chemicals; broadening the spectrum of toxicological information on known hazardous chemicals; validating current toxicological assay systems as well as developing new and innovative toxicity testing technology; and rapidly communicating test results to government agencies with regulatory responsibilities and to the medical and scientific communities. 2 figs.

  5. [Development and Application of Metabonomics in Forensic Toxicology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hui; Shen, Min

    2015-06-01

    Metabonomics is an important branch of system biology following the development of genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics. It can perform high-throughput detection and data processing with multiple parameters, potentially enabling the identification and quantification of all small metabolites in a biological system. It can be used to provide comprehensive information on the toxicity effects, toxicological mechanisms and biomarkers, sensitively finding the unusual metabolic changes caused by poison. This article mainly reviews application of metabonomics in toxicological studies of abused drugs, pesticides, poisonous plants and poisonous animals, and also illustrates the new direction of forensic toxicology research. PMID:26442377

  6. The qualitative similarity hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Peter V; Lee, Chongmin

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the qualitative similarity hypothesis (QSH) with respect to children and adolescents who are d/Deaf or hard of hearing. The primary focus is on the development of English language and literacy skills, and some information is provided on the acquisition of English as a second language. The QSH is briefly discussed within the purview of two groups of cognitive models: those that emphasize the cognitive development of individuals and those that pertain to disciplinary or knowledge structures. It is argued that the QSH has scientific merit with implications for classroom instruction. Future research should examine the validity of the QSH in other disciplines such as mathematics and science and should include perspectives from social as well as cognitive models. PMID:20415280

  7. Self Similar Optical Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Zheng-Xuan

    This research proposes Self Similar optical fiber (SSF) as a new type of optical fiber. It has a special core that consists of self similar structure. Such a structure is obtained by following the formula for generating iterated function systems (IFS) in Fractal Theory. The resulted SSF can be viewed as a true fractal object in optical fibers. In addition, the method of fabricating SSF makes it possible to generate desired structures exponentially in numbers, whereas it also allows lower scale units in the structure to be reduced in size exponentially. The invention of SSF is expected to greatly ease the production of optical fiber when a large number of small hollow structures are needed in the core of the optical fiber. This dissertation will analyze the core structure of SSF based on fractal theory. Possible properties from the structural characteristics and the corresponding applications are explained. Four SSF samples were obtained through actual fabrication in a laboratory environment. Different from traditional conductive heating fabrication system, I used an in-house designed furnace that incorporated a radiation heating method, and was equipped with automated temperature control system. The obtained samples were examined through spectrum tests. Results from the tests showed that SSF does have the optical property of delivering light in a certain wavelength range. However, SSF as a new type of optical fiber requires a systematic research to find out the theory that explains its structure and the associated optical properties. The fabrication and quality of SSF also needs to be improved for product deployment. As a start of this extensive research, this dissertation work opens the door to a very promising new area in optical fiber research.

  8. IRIS Toxicological Review of Urea (Interagency Science Discussion Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is releasing the draft report, Toxicological Review of Urea,, that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the IRIS Assessment Development Process. C...

  9. Comparative Toxicology of Libby Amphibole and Naturally Occurring Asbestos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary sentence: Comparative toxicology of Libby amphibole (LA) and site-specific naturally occurring asbestos (NOA) provides new insights on physical properties influencing health effects and mechanisms of asbestos-induced inflammation, fibrosis, and tumorigenesis.Introduction/...

  10. Principals Of Radiation Toxicology: Important Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri; Maliev, Slava; Jones, Jeffrey

    “All things are poison, and nothing is without poison; only the dose permits something not to be poisonous.” Paracelsus Key Words: Radiation Toxins (RT), Radiation Toxicants (RTc), Radiation Poisons (RP), Radiation Exposure (RE), Radiation Toxicology is the science about radiation poisons. [D.Popov et al. 2012,J.Zhou et al. 2007,] Radiation Toxins is a specific proteins with high enzymatic activity produced by living irradiated mammals. [D.Popov et al. 2012,] Radiation Toxicants is a substances that produce radiomimetics effects, adverse biological effects which specific for radiation. [D.Popov et al. 2012,] Radiation Toxic agent is specific proteins that can produce pathological biological effects specific for physical form of radiation.[D.Popov et al. 1990,2012,V. Maliev 2007] Different Toxic Substances isolated from cells or from blood or lymph circulation. [Kudriashov I. et al. 1970, D.Popov et al. 1990,2012,V. Maliev et al. 2007,] Radiation Toxins may affects many organs or specific organ, tissue, specific group of cells. [Kudriashov I. et al. 1970, D.Popov et al. 1990,2012,V. Maliev et al. 2007] For example: Radiation Toxins could induce collective toxic clinical states to include: systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS),toxic multiple organ injury (TMOI), toxic multiple organ dysfunction syndromes (TMODS),and finally, toxic multiple organ failure (TMOF). [T. Azizova et al. 2005, Konchalovsky et al., 2005, D. Popov et al 2012] However, Radiation Toxins could induce specific injury of organs or tissue and induce Acute Radiation Syndromes such as Acute Radiation Cerebrovascular Syndrome, Acute Radiation Cardiovascular Syndrome, Acute Radiation Hematopoietic Syndrome, Acute Radiation GastroIntestinal Syndrome. [ D.Popov et al. 1990, 2012, V. Maliev et al. 2007] Radiation Toxins correlates with Radiation Exposure and the dose-response relationship is a fundamental and essential concept in classic Toxicology and Radiation Toxicology.[ D.Popov et al

  11. Results of toxicological testing of Jefferson Parish pilot plant samples.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, R.G.; Kopfler, F C; Condie, L W; Pereira, M. A.; Meier, J. R.; Ringhand, H P; Robinson, M; Casto, B. C.

    1986-01-01

    Five toxicological tests were performed using concentrated drinking water samples collected at a pilot-scale drinking water treatment plant that had streams treated with different disinfectants (no disinfectant, ozone, chlorine dioxide, monochloramine, or chlorine) before treatment with granular activated carbon (GAC). The toxicological tests used in this study were the Ames Salmonella assay, a subchronic in vivo toxicity assay in mice, the SENCAR mouse skin initiation-promotion assay, a rat ...

  12. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry—The 2012 Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Wiegand, Timothy; Wax, Paul; Smith, Eric; Hart, Katherine; Brent, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    In 2010, the American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) established its Case Registry, the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC). All cases are entered prospectively and include only suspected and confirmed toxic exposures cared for at the bedside by board-certified or board-eligible medical toxicologists at its participating sites. The primary aims of establishing this Registry include the development of a realtime toxico-surveillance system in order to identify and describe current...

  13. Functional toxicology: tools to advance the future of toxicity testing

    OpenAIRE

    Gaytán, Brandon D.; Vulpe, Chris D.

    2014-01-01

    The increased presence of chemical contaminants in the environment is an undeniable concern to human health and ecosystems. Historically, by relying heavily upon costly and laborious animal-based toxicity assays, the field of toxicology has often neglected examinations of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of toxicity for the majority of compounds—information that, if available, would strengthen risk assessment analyses. Functional toxicology, where cells or organisms with gene deletions o...

  14. TOXICOLOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF SOME ORNAMENTAL PLANTS USED IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Yilmaz, Hasan; AKPINAR, Elif; Yilmaz, Hilal

    2009-01-01

    Owing to the toxicological substances the carry, many plants used inside and exterior sites have alot of adverse effects with respect to the human and environmental health. There are many extremely poisonous plants known only by experts as well as those known by everybody. In this study, it is aimed to give a catalogue of poisonous plants used in open and gren areas. We have examined the plants in respect of their toxicological characteristics, given their poisonous parts, chemical compounds ...

  15. A short history of the toxicology of inhaled particles

    OpenAIRE

    Donaldson Ken; Seaton Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Particle toxicology arose in order to understand the mechanisms of adverse effects of 3 major particle types that had historically exerted the greatest toll of ill-health—quartz, coal and asbestos. By the middle of the last century rat inhalation studies had been carried out and the pathology documented, but true mechanistic particle toxicology did not really take off until the 1970s when cell culture techniques became available. By the 1980s glass fibres were a major focus of intere...

  16. A short history of the toxicology of inhaled particles

    OpenAIRE

    Donaldson, Kenneth; Seaton, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Particle toxicology arose in order to understand the mechanisms of adverse effects of 3 major particle types that had historically exerted the greatest toll of ill-health - quartz, coal and asbestos. By the middle of the last century rat inhalation studies had been carried out and the pathology documented, but true mechanistic particle toxicology did not really take off until the 1970s when cell culture techniques became available. By the 1980s glass fibres were a major focus of int...

  17. Computer-assisted systems for forensic pathology and forensic toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druid, H; Holmgren, P; Löwenhielm, P

    1996-09-01

    A computer software, RättsBASE (RB), was developed for all forensic pathology units in Sweden and introduced in 1992. Simultaneously, a corresponding software, ToxBASE (TB), was developed for the Department of Forensic Toxicology, where all forensic toxicology in Sweden is managed. Both of the databases were created using dBASE IV, and the programming was carried out according to specifications from the staff at the forensic toxicology and forensic pathology units. since the development or RB and TB was coordinated, the systems can run together smoothly. The purpose of both systems was to automate the offices and to enable compilation of detailed statistics. Installation of Novell Netware and ISDN-connections (Integrated Service Digital Network) has enabled rapid communication between the units and easy compilation of nationwide statistics of forensic pathology and forensic toxicology. the systems offer a wide spectrum of reports and include a simple module for evaluation of the importance of the forensic efforts for th whole death investigation. The configuration of the softwares has also enabled processing of a large amount of related toxicological and autopsy data that in turn has yielded a base for compilation of toxicology interpretation lists. This article includes a summary of the features of the software and a discussion of its benefits and limitations. PMID:15637819

  18. Toxicology as a nanoscience? – Disciplinary identities reconsidered

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maasen Sabine

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Toxicology is about to establish itself as a leading scientific discipline in addressing potential health effects of materials on the nanosize level. Entering into a cutting-edge field, has an impact on identity-building processes within the involved academic fields. In our study, we analyzed the ways in which the entry into the field of nanosciences impacts on the formation of disciplinary identities. Using the methods of qualitative interviews with particle toxicologists in Germany, Holland, Switzerland and the USA, we could demonstrate that currently, toxicology finds itself in a transitional phase. The development of its disciplinary identity is not yet clear. Nearly all of our interview partners stressed the necessity of repositioning toxicology. However, they each suggested different approaches. While one part is already propagandizing the establishment of a new discipline – 'nanotoxicology'- others are more reserved and are demanding a clear separation of traditional and new research areas. In phases of disciplinary new-orientation, research communities do not act consistently. Rather, they establish diverse options. By expanding its disciplinary boundaries, participating in new research fields, while continuing its previous research, and only vaguely defining its topics, toxicology is feeling its way into the new fields without giving up its present self-conception. However, the toxicological research community is also discussing a new disciplinary identity. Within this, toxicology could develop from an auxiliary into a constitutive position, and take over a basic role in the cognitive, institutional and social framing of the nanosciences.

  19. Challenges of toxicology for the millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, S H

    2000-02-01

    In meeting the challenges of toxicology, clinical and forensic toxicologists should expand their services and engage in research and development to meet changing needs. Expanding roles could potentially derive from the threat of terrorism, genotyping for interpretation of potential toxic drug interactions, and criminalistic testings. At the threshold of the next millennium, terrorism via weapons of mass destruction (WMD) has migrated from the war zones to civilian settings. These WMD may be in the form of nuclear, biological, and chemical devices (NBC). Recently, the possible use of chemical/biological weapons in the Middle East conflicts, the use of sarin in a Tokyo subway station, and the unregulated availability of nuclear fuel in some countries all have heightened the potential for international and domestic NBC. In preparation for NBC, both government and civilians in major American cities have been trained for safe handling of patients and casualties. Forensic and clinical toxicologists should be knowledgeable about the clinical pharmacology, safe samples processing, and possible screening and/or analysis of samples exposed to or containing: vesicants; cyanide; and nerve, riot control, and pulmonary agents. These samples may be transported for further analysis and confirmed by designated central laboratories. In criminal/correctional settings, toxicologists should engage in quality assurance and consultation with attorneys, judges, and correctional professionals. With the emergence of pharmacogenetics, genotyping may enhance rational drug therapy for enhanced patient care, and may explain adverse or fatal drug reactions in postmortem analysis. PMID:10688259

  20. Reproductive toxicological aspects of chromium in males

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To expand our present understanding of the effects of chromium on male fertility a number of studies were designed to achieve this through the use of chromium intoxicated experimental animals and through investigation of sexual hormones and sperm quality in welders. Also in view of the lack of an experimental model for effects of noxious substance on the epididymal spermatozoa the main objectives of the series of studies reviewed here were: A. To establish a model for evaluation of epididymal sperm count and motility in the rat. B. To investigate and compare the effects of tri- and hexavalent chromium on epididymal spermatozoa. Further to describe the effects of low-dose long-time exposure of rats to the most toxicological interesting chromium oxidative state - hexavalent chromium. C. By the use of autoradiography and γ-countinuing to expand the present knowledge on the distribution of chromium in the body with special reference to the male reproductive organs. D. To describe the effects of exposure to hexavalent chromium in welding fume on levels of sexual hormones and semen parameters in welders. (EG)

  1. applications of nanomaterials and their toxicological evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. López-Alonso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available La necesidad de herramientas informáticas para procesar toda la información generada en el ámbito de la nanotecnología ha originado el desarrollo de una nueva disciplina conocida como nanoinformática. En los próximos años es esperable poder disponer de bases de datos con información, no sólo de las propiedades físico-químicas de los nanomateriales, sino también con información de sus posibles interacciones con el medio ambiente y sistemas biológicos, lo que favorecerá la investigación de nuevas aplicaciones biomédicas de los nanomateriales, sin olvidar sus aspectos toxicológicos. En este artículo se presentan diversos recursos de estandarización, ontologías, bases de datos, iniciativas y colaboraciones que ayudan a gestionar la información generada sobre nanomateriales, especialmente orientados a favorecer la Investigación biomédica y la toxicología de los nanomateriales. Además, se presentan otros recursos web complementarios que facilitarán el proceso de autoaprendizaje y el desarrollo de contenidos curriculares en escuelas superiores y facultades, útiles en la formación de esta nueva disciplina, denominada nanotecnología.

  2. Oleoresin Capsicum toxicology evaluation and hazard review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archuleta, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    Oleoresin Capsicum (OC) is an extract of the pepper plant used for centuries as a culinary spice (hot peppers). This material has been identified as a safe and effective Less-Than- Lethal weapon for use by Law enforcement and security professionals against assault. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ) is currently also evaluating its use in conjunction with other Less-Than-Lethal agents such as aqueous foam for use in corrections applications. Therefore, a comprehensive toxicological review of the literature was performed for the National Institute of Justice Less-Than-Lethal Force program to review and update the information available on the toxicity and adverse health effects associated with OC exposure. The results of this evaluation indicate that exposure to OC can result in dermatitis, as well as adverse nasal, pulmonary, and gastrointestinal effects in humans. The primary effects of OC exposure include pain and irritation of the mucous membranes of the eyes, nose, and lining of the mouth. Blistering and rash have been shown to occur after chronic or prolonged dermal exposure. Ingestion of capsicum may cause acute stinging of the lips, tongue, and oral mucosa and may lead to vomiting and diarrhea with large doses. OC vapors may also cause significant pulmonary irritation and prolonged cough. There is no evidence of long term effects associated with an acute exposure to OC, and extensive use as a culinary additive and medicinal ointment has further provided no evidence of long term adverse effects following repeated or prolonged exposure.

  3. Nano-silicon dioxide toxicological characterization on two human kidney cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon dioxide nanoparticles (n-SiO2) have recently encountered a wide variety of applications in medicine or engineering but their toxicological effects are poorly understood. In this study, we have used SiO2-25 nm and SiO2-100 nm mono-dispersed nanoparticles labeled with Rhodamine B and TMPyP respectively. These two fluorophores were incorporated during synthesis in order to track nanoparticles cell incorporation. Up-to-date, no evaluation of the toxicological effects of these nanoparticles upon human kidney has been published. As kidney is one of the major traditional retention organs, the aim of our study is to evaluate the potential toxicity of these nanoparticles on two human cell lines from proximal tubule (Caki-1 and Hek293). Our results report that the two cell lines do not show similar responses after 24 hours of exposure to SiO2-nanoparticles disregarding a similar origin in the kidney. Interestingly, our results indicate that for both tested SiO2-nanoparticles, Caki-1 cells present a higher sensitivity in terms of cytotoxicity and genotoxicity than Hek293 cells. Furthermore, our results show that for similar concentration of exposure, SiO2-25 nm seems to be more cytotoxic and genotoxic than SiO2-100nm for both tested cell lines.

  4. Latin America's present and future challenges in toxicology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Industrialization that Latin America has experienced during the past 50 years, the increase of population and the growth of chemical-related industries has generated a variety of environmental problems that must be addressed. After assessing these profound changes, greater emphasis should be placed on the study of environmental health and toxicology. Latin American countries face many problems that are common to other developing nations. Therefore, there is a demand for safety assessment and regulatory control of chemicals that create a need for increasing numbers of toxicologists. To meet this demand, educational programs in toxicology have to be designed. This paper utilizes a consultation questionnaire that includes toxicology-network members, scientists and educational institutions where toxicology is taught. An analysis of the information collected is made, with an emphasis on what we currently lack and on future challenges for toxicology professionals. Although the response from the study institutions was 65% (13 countries out of 20), the paper aims to assess the present situation of toxicology. The convenience for a certification/recognition for toxicologists is also evaluated. Action needs to be taken to promote scientific development based on regional specific needs that require increasing at the number of toxicology programs, and promoting of cooperation between academics and researchers. Among the limitations we have are the variability of curricula, objectives and priorities. The increasing globalization of markets and regulations requires the harmonization of graduate/postgraduate programs to ensure that risk assessment and management are dealt with uniformly. Cooperation among our countries and international assistance should play a more prominent role in the promotion of regional integration and the more efficient utilization of international experience in defining educational policies

  5. Toxicological Perspective on Climate Change: Aquatic Toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botana, Luis M

    2016-04-18

    In recent years, our group and several others have been describing the presence of new, not previously reported, toxins of high toxicity in vectors that may reach the human food chain. These include tetrodotoxin in gastropods in the South of Europe, ciguatoxin in fish in the South of Spain, palytoxin in mussels in the Mediterranean Sea, pinnatoxin all over Europe, and okadaic acid in the south of the U.S. There seem to be new marine toxins appearing in areas that are heavy producers of seafood, and this is a cause of concern as most of these new toxins are not included in current legislation and monitoring programs. Along with the new toxins, new chemical analogues are being reported. The same phenomenom is being recorded in freshwater toxins, such as the wide appearance of cylindrospermopsin and the large worldwide increase of microcystin. The problem that this phenomenon, which may be linked to climate warming, poses for toxicologists is very important not only because there is a lack of chronic studies and an incomplete comprehension of the mechanism driving the production of these toxins but also because the lack of a legal framework for them allows many of these toxins to reach the market. In some cases, it is very difficult to control these toxins because there are not enough standards available, they are not always certified, and there is an insufficient understanding of the toxic equivalency factors of the different analogues in each group. All of these factors have been revealed and grouped through the massive increase in the use of LC-MS as a monitoring tool, legally demanded, creating more toxicological problems. PMID:26958981

  6. The role of urine toxicology in chronic opioid analgesic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Peggy

    2007-12-01

    The current trend of treating chronic nonmalignant pain with opioid therapy means that pain management nurses are increasingly involved in the care of patients who are prescribed and using potent opioid analgesics on a daily basis. Although demonstrated to be quite effective in certain patients, sanctioned access to these medications brings with it risks for abuse, addiction, and diversion. Urine toxicology analysis is a valuable, yet underutilized, tool to monitor patterns of medication use and potential use of illicit drugs to evaluate the effect of these on health outcomes. This review provides a guide for the use of urine toxicology in the nursing management of chronic pain patients on opioid therapy, detailing the information provided by urine toxicology analysis, the benefits and limitations of urine drug testing, principles of sample collection, and correct interpretation of findings. It is emphasized that the results of urine toxicology analysis should never be used in isolation to identify abuse, addiction, or diversion, and that patterns of medication and other drug use should always be evaluated with respect to evidence of improved functionality. Nurses involved in the care of patients with chronic pain are encouraged to consider urine toxicology analysis as an integral component in care plan for those on chronic opioid therapy, and to knowledgeably implement and interpret this powerful tool in the practice of pain care. PMID:18036504

  7. Multivariate Time Series Similarity Searching

    OpenAIRE

    Jimin Wang; Yuelong Zhu; Shijin Li; Dingsheng Wan; Pengcheng Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Multivariate time series (MTS) datasets are very common in various financial, multimedia, and hydrological fields. In this paper, a dimension-combination method is proposed to search similar sequences for MTS. Firstly, the similarity of single-dimension series is calculated; then the overall similarity of the MTS is obtained by synthesizing each of the single-dimension similarity based on weighted BORDA voting method. The dimension-combination method could use the existing similarity searchin...

  8. Applications of scientific imaging in environmental toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Demerdash, Aref M.

    The national goals of clean air, clean water, and healthy ecosystems are a few of the primary forces that drive the need for better environmental monitoring. As we approach the end of the 1990s, the environmental questions at regional to global scales are being redefined and refined in the light of developments in environmental understanding and technological capability. Research in the use of scientific imaging data for the study of the environment is urgently needed in order to explore the possibilities of utilizing emerging new technologies. The objective of this research proposal is to demonstrate the usability of a wealth of new technology made available in the last decade to providing a better understanding of environmental problems. Research is focused in two imaging techniques macro and micro imaging. Several examples of applications of scientific imaging in research in the field of environmental toxicology were presented. This was achieved on two scales, micro and macro imaging. On the micro level four specific examples were covered. First, the effect of utilizing scanning electron microscopy as an imaging tool in enhancing taxa identification when studying diatoms was presented. Second, scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive x-ray analyzer were demonstrated as a valuable and effective tool for identifying and analyzing household dust samples. Third, electronic autoradiography combined with FT-IR microscopy were used to study the distribution pattern of [14C]-Malathion in rats as a result of dermal exposure. The results of the autoradiography made on skin sections of the application site revealed the presence of [ 14C]-activity in the first region of the skin. These results were evidenced by FT-IR microscopy. The obtained results suggest that the penetration of Malathion into the skin and other tissues is vehicle and dose dependent. The results also suggest the use of FT-IR microscopy imaging for monitoring the disposition of

  9. Radiotracer Approaches to Carbamate Insecticide Toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methylcarbamates constitute one of the major groups of insecticides. Many unresolved problems in their toxicology may be readily approached with radiotracer studies. Dimethylcarbamates have been prepared with carbonyl-C14-labelling and methylcarbamates withmethyl-, carbonyl-and ring-labelling utilizing carbon-14. The pharmacological action of these.compounds presumably results from acetylcholinesterase inhibition and may involve carbamylation. Reaction of carbonyl- or methyl-labelled carbamates with purified cholinesterase or other esterases would allow a critical examination of this carbamylation reaction and the ease of spontaneous and induced reactivation or decarbamylation. The physiological significance of cholinesterase inhibition might be examined by administering acetate-C14 and analysis for radiolabelled acetylcholine accumulation in nervous tissue, or by utilizing acetyl-C14-choline as the substrate for in vitro determination of the degree of cholinesterase inhibition in tissues of poisoned animals with minimal dilution of the inhibitors and enzymes during analysis. Some progress has been made with radiolabelled materials in investigating the metabolism of carbamate insecticides. Sevin (1-naphthyl methylcarbamate) has been most extensively studied along with its potential hydrolysis products. The assumption that the metabolism of Sevin involves an initial hydrolysis and then further decomposition of the fragments was not supported by carbon-14 studies. The major detoxification mechanism in mammals, and probably also in insects, results from initial oxidative attack on the carbamate by the microsomes in the presence of reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Sevin is rapidly metabolized in mammals, but the fate of certain of the fragments has not been resolved. Some of the metabolites appear in the milk of lactating animals. One step in the metabolism appears to be formation of the N-methylol derivative. Preliminary studies on the metabolism

  10. Preparation and characterization of "Libby Amphibole" toxicological testing material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowers, Heather; Wilson, Stephen A.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Benzel, William M.; Meeker, Gregory P.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) began work in Libby, Mont. in 1999 when an Emergency Response Team was sent to investigate local concern and media reports regarding asbestos-contaminated vermiculite. Since that time, the site has been granted Superfund status and site remediation to a safe level of asbestos has been ongoing. The amphibole asbestos from the Vermiculite Mountain vermiculite deposit near Libby, Mont. (Libby amphibole) is unusual in the sense that it is currently not classified as one of the regulated six asbestos minerals—chrysotile (a serpentine mineral) and the amphibole minerals amosite (asbestiform cummingtonite-grunerite), crocidolite (asbestiform riebeckite), asbestiform anthophyllite, asbestiform tremolite, and asbestiform actinolite. The amphiboles from the Vermiculite Mountain vermiculite deposit, primarily winchite and richterite, are related to tremolite and in the past have been referred to as sodium-rich tremolite or soda tremolite (Larsen, 1942; Boettcher, 1966; Wylie and Verkouteren, 2000; Gunter and others, 2003; Meeker and others, 2003). The public health issues in Libby, Mont. have brought to light many of the inconsistencies in the literature regarding fiber characteristics, nomenclature, and toxicology. To better understand the toxicological characteristics of the Libby amphibole, investigators require a sufficient quantity of material representing the range of fibrous amphiboles present in the vicinity of Vermiculite Mountain to use in toxicology studies. The material collected in 2000 (Meeker and others, 2003) has been exhausted and a second collection and preparation effort, funded by the USEPA, was conducted in 2007. Both the 2000 (LA2000) and 2007 (LA2007) materials were generated to support research needs identified by the USEPA and the National Toxicology Program, and new in-vivo and in-vitro toxicology studies are underway. This Open-File Report describes the process of preparation and summarizes the

  11. Stem cell-derived systems in toxicology assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter-Dick, Laura; Alves, Paula M; Blaauboer, Bas J; Bremm, Klaus-Dieter; Brito, Catarina; Coecke, Sandra; Flick, Burkhard; Fowler, Paul; Hescheler, Jürgen; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus; Jennings, Paul; Kelm, Jens M; Manou, Irene; Mistry, Pratibha; Moretto, Angelo; Roth, Adrian; Stedman, Donald; van de Water, Bob; Beilmann, Mario

    2015-06-01

    Industrial sectors perform toxicological assessments of their potential products to ensure human safety and to fulfill regulatory requirements. These assessments often involve animal testing, but ethical, cost, and time concerns, together with a ban on it in specific sectors, make appropriate in vitro systems indispensable in toxicology. In this study, we summarize the outcome of an EPAA (European Partnership of Alternatives to Animal Testing)-organized workshop on the use of stem cell-derived (SCD) systems in toxicology, with a focus on industrial applications. SCD systems, in particular, induced pluripotent stem cell-derived, provide physiological cell culture systems of easy access and amenable to a variety of assays. They also present the opportunity to apply the vast repository of existing nonclinical data for the understanding of in vitro to in vivo translation. SCD systems from several toxicologically relevant tissues exist; they generally recapitulate many aspects of physiology and respond to toxicological and pharmacological interventions. However, focused research is necessary to accelerate implementation of SCD systems in an industrial setting and subsequent use of such systems by regulatory authorities. Research is required into the phenotypic characterization of the systems, since methods and protocols for generating terminally differentiated SCD cells are still lacking. Organotypical 3D culture systems in bioreactors and microscale tissue engineering technologies should be fostered, as they promote and maintain differentiation and support coculture systems. They need further development and validation for their successful implementation in toxicity testing in industry. Analytical measures also need to be implemented to enable compound exposure and metabolism measurements for in vitro to in vivo extrapolation. The future of SCD toxicological tests will combine advanced cell culture technologies and biokinetic measurements to support regulatory and

  12. 40 CFR 158.2173 - Experimental use permit microbial pesticides toxicology data requirements table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... pesticides toxicology data requirements table. 158.2173 Section 158.2173 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Microbial Pesticides § 158.2173 Experimental use permit microbial pesticides toxicology data requirements table....

  13. In silico toxicology – non-testing methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannu eRaunio

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In silico toxicology in its broadest sense means anything that we can do with a computer in toxicology. Many different types of in silico methods have been developed to characterise and predict toxic outcomes in humans and environment. The term non-testing methods denote grouping approaches, structure-activity relationship (SAR, and expert systems. These methods are already used for regulatory purposes and it is anticipated that their role will be much more prominent in the near future. This Perspective will delineate the basic principles of non-testing methods and evaluate their role in current and future risk assessment of chemical compounds.

  14. The minipig as a platform for new technologies in toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forster, Roy; Ancian, Philippe; Fredholm, Merete;

    2010-01-01

    that we examined, basic knowledge and technical capabilities are greater for the pig than the dog or monkey. In concrete terms, in application to safety testing we have seen that: (i) The Göttingen minipig is well positioned for the performance of toxicogenomics studies, (ii) The close sequence...... homology between pigs and humans suggest that minipigs will be useful for the testing of biotechnology products (and possibly for in silico toxicology) and (iii) the minipig is the only non-rodent toxicology model where transgenic animals can be readily generated, and reproductive technologies are well...

  15. FORUM - FutureTox II: In vitro Data and In Silico Models for Predictive Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    FutureTox II, a Society of Toxicology Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology workshop, was held in January, 2014. The meeting goals were to review and discuss the state of the science in toxicology in the context of implementing the NRC 21st century vision of predicting in vivo resp...

  16. Functional Similarity and Interpersonal Attraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neimeyer, Greg J.; Neimeyer, Robert A.

    1981-01-01

    Students participated in dyadic disclosure exercises over a five-week period. Results indicated members of high functional similarity dyads evidenced greater attraction to one another than did members of low functional similarity dyads. "Friendship" pairs of male undergraduates displayed greater functional similarity than did "nominal" pairs from…

  17. Teratogenicity and the Threshold of Toxicological Concern concept

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schothorst F van; Piersma AH; TOX

    2003-01-01

    The Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC) is a principle that refers to the possibility of establishing a human exposure threshold value for all chemicals below which there is no significant risk to human health. The threshold value is primarily based on carcinogenesis data. For other potentiall

  18. Radiological/toxicological sabotage assessments at the Savannah River Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the methods being employed by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) to perform graded assessments of radiological and toxicological sabotage vulnerability at Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities. These assessments are conducted to ensure that effective measures are in place to prevent, mitigate, and respond to a potential sabotage event which may cause an airborne release of radiological/toxicological material, causing an adverse effect on the health and safety of employees, the public, and the environment. Department of Energy (DOE) Notice 5630.3A, open-quotes Protection of Departmental Facilities Against Radiological and Toxicological Sabotage,close quotes and the associated April 1993 DOE-Headquarters guidance provide the requirements and outline an eight-step process for hazardous material evaluation. The process requires the integration of information from a variety of disciplines, including safety, safeguards and security, and emergency preparedness. This paper summarizes WSRC's approach towards implementation of the DOE requirements, and explains the inter-relationships between the Radiological and Toxicological Assessments developed using this process, and facility Hazard Assessment Reports (HAs), Safety Analysis Reports (SARs), and Facility Vulnerability Assessments (VAs)

  19. The need for a paradigm shift in toxicology xx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This manuscript briefly reviews the impact of the NAS report “Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and A Strategy” and it’s potential impact on the field of toxicology. ). This report provides a strategic and tactical framework for attaining the goals of deter...

  20. Toxicogenomics: Applications of new functional genomics technologies in toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Heijne, W.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Toxicogenomics studies toxic effects of substances on organisms in relation to the composition of the genome. It applies the functional genomics technologies transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics that determine expression of the genes, proteins and metabolites in a sample. These methods could facilitate toxicological research and eventually, toxicogenomics could improve human health risk assessment. This thesis evaluated applications of toxicogenomics, especially to investigate mechani...

  1. Comment on " An update on toxicology of aluminum phosphide "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Mehrpour

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available I read with interest the recent published article by Dr Moghadamnia titled "An update on toxicology of aluminum phosphide". Since aluminum phosphide (AlP poisoning is an important medical concern in Iran, I have had the opportunities to work and publish many papers in this regard. I would like to comment on that paper.

  2. SYMPOSIUM IN ITALY: FISH PHYSIOLOGY, TOXICOLOGY, AND WATER QUALITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists from Europe, North America and South America convened in Capri, Italy, April 24-28, 2006 for the Ninth International Symposium on Fish Physiology, Toxicology, and Water Quality. The subject of the meeting was Eutrophication: The toxic effects of ammonia, nitrite and th...

  3. Consideraciones importantes acerca de la cuarentena de perros como Biomodelos experimentales en Toxicología

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arencibia Arrebola Daniel Francisco, Pardo Acosta Balia, Gámez Menéndez Rafael

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Las sustancias químicas son indispensables en la vida del hombre,contribuyen al aumento de la producción de alimentos, alivian muchasenfermedades y facilitan la existencia cotidiana de nuestra sociedad. El desarrollo de la toxicología como una ciencia independiente se ha ido consolidando durante los últimos años ante la necesidad de profundizar los conocimientos para abordar y resolver los problemas que a esta ciencia competen. El uso del perro como biomodelo experimental en toxicología viene dado tras los resultados favorables obtenidos en disímiles experimentos, planteándose que en esta especie los procesos metabólicosson similares a los del humano. En este trabajo nos trazamos como objetivo debatir todo lo concerniente a la cuarentena de perros de laboratorio, así como los factores que intervienen en la misma, con una duración de 3-4 semanas desde la llegada de los animales hasta su empleo en las diferentes investigaciones. Se tuvieron en cuenta la transportación, recepción, ambiente en los locales, acciones posteriores a la recepción, frecuencias de las observaciones, local de aislamiento, limpieza y desinfección, consumo de alimento y agua, así como los criterios y métodos de eutanasia.

  4. Distance learning and toxicology: New horizons for Paracelsus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distance learning offers many advantages to students and teachers of almost any scientific discipline. Toxicology is no exception. For example, should Paracelsus be interested in learning more about toxicology at Drexel University, he would have the opportunity to take two courses in this subject utilizing the content management software, WebCT. The two courses would offer a website from which he could view and/or download his notes for each class. He could correspond with the instructor as well as fellow students, participate in discussions about timely topics, and make presentations to the class, all via electronic communication. Moreover, his examinations would also be computerized. Although he might have the option of attending traditional 'face-to-face' lectures with other students in the class, he could also access these lectures at any time from a remote location by using the archive of taped lectures on the class website. Overall, Paracelsus would have access to many tools to enhance his understanding of toxicology, and he probably would never have to worry about parking before class (!). The two WebCT modules in toxicology that we have developed at Drexel represent the successful migration of two courses from a traditional 'face-to-face' model of classroom instruction to hybrid models that combine 'face-to-face' interaction with online instruction. Student and faculty evaluations of these courses have been very positive. Future plans include linking the two modules together so that students in the advanced class can do 'review' or 'remedial' work in the basic module. Furthermore, a library of video clips is also planned in which researchers will be discussing their work on various toxicologic topics. Students will be able to access these clips as resources from which to write research papers

  5. [The challenges of the ethics of personalism to clinical toxicology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusiło, Jerzy

    2011-01-01

    The fields of philosophical anthropology and the ethics of personalism overlap in the area of many difficult personal situations involving clinical toxicology. These therapeutic situations need an integral, multidimensional, and personal approach for both the patient and the toxicologist. This means that man is treated not only as a physical (biological) being but also there is an appreciation for the mental sphere, which includes rational, emotional, and spiritual elements while not forgetting that the human person is also part of the human community. Studying such an individual's personal decision as suicide, we must realize that it's not just physiological or biochemical poisons but also includes the poisoning of the psyche, as well as poisoning relationships with loved ones (family), poisoning social relations (in school or the workplace) and poisoning the spirit, in other words, there is no meaning in life itself, nor the meaning of God's existence, nor the meaning of faith, hope and love. Not only is there a greater "variety of poisons" than before, they are much more extensive and deep. For example, we can name environmental pollution, industrial poisons, chemical waste, genetic modification, powerful medications, or even the toxic social environment of evil ideas, malicious manipulation of the human mind (destructive religious sects). In approaching the challenges of clinical toxicology, the doctor must not only be a specialist in chemistry, biochemistry and pharmacology. What then is of future of toxicology because of this human dimension (anthropological, ethical and spiritual) of this teaching? As today marks the occasion of the 45th anniversary of the Clinic of Toxicology CM UJ, should we shape the ethos of young doctors who want to deal with toxicology seriously? PMID:22010425

  6. Distance learning and toxicology: new horizons for Paracelsus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, Jane; Morris, John; Peterson, C Erik

    2005-09-01

    Distance learning offers many advantages to students and teachers of almost any scientific discipline. Toxicology is no exception. For example, should Paracelsus be interested in learning more about toxicology at Drexel University, he would have the opportunity to take two courses in this subject utilizing the content management software, WebCT. The two courses would offer a website from which he could view and/or download his notes for each class. He could correspond with the instructor as well as fellow students, participate in discussions about timely topics, and make presentations to the class, all via electronic communication. Moreover, his examinations would also be computerized. Although he might have the option of attending traditional "face-to-face" lectures with other students in the class, he could also access these lectures at any time from a remote location by using the archive of taped lectures on the class website. Overall, Paracelsus would have access to many tools to enhance his understanding of toxicology, and he probably would never have to worry about parking before class (!). The two WebCT modules in toxicology that we have developed at Drexel represent the successful migration of two courses from a traditional "face-to-face" model of classroom instruction to hybrid models that combine "face-to-face" interaction with online instruction. Student and faculty evaluations of these courses have been very positive. Future plans include linking the two modules together so that students in the advanced class can do "review" or "remedial" work in the basic module. Furthermore, a library of video clips is also planned in which researchers will be discussing their work on various toxicologic topics. Students will be able to access these clips as resources from which to write research papers. PMID:15979660

  7. Finding toxicological information: An approach for occupational health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Giuliano

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It can be difficult for occupational health professionals to assess which toxicological databases available on the Internet are the most useful for answering their questions. Therefore we evaluated toxicological databases for their ability to answer practical questions about exposure and prevention. We also propose recommended practices for searching for toxicological properties of chemicals. Methods We used a systematic search to find databases available on the Internet. Our criteria for the databases were the following: has a search engine, includes factual information on toxic and hazardous chemicals harmful for human health, and is free of charge. We developed both a qualitative and a quantitative rating method, which was used by four independent assessors to determine appropriateness, the quality of content, and ease of use of the database. Final ratings were based on a consensus of at least two evaluators. Results Out of 822 results we found 21 databases that met our inclusion criteria. Out of these 21 databases 14 are administered in the US, five in Europe, one in Australia, and one in Canada. Nine are administered by a governmental organization. No database achieved the maximum score of 27. The databases GESTIS, ESIS, Hazardous Substances Data Bank, TOXNET and NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards all scored more than 20 points. The following approach was developed for occupational health professionals searching for the toxicological properties of chemicals: start with the identity of the chemical; then search for health hazards, exposure route and measurement; next the limit values; and finally look for the preventive measures. Conclusion A rating system of toxicological databases to assess their value for occupational health professionals discriminated well between databases in terms of their appropriateness, quality of information, and ease of use. Several American and European databases yielded high scores and

  8. A COMPARISON OF SEMANTIC SIMILARITY MODELS IN EVALUATING CONCEPT SIMILARITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. X. Xu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The semantic similarities are important in concept definition, recognition, categorization, interpretation, and integration. Many semantic similarity models have been established to evaluate semantic similarities of objects or/and concepts. To find out the suitability and performance of different models in evaluating concept similarities, we make a comparison of four main types of models in this paper: the geometric model, the feature model, the network model, and the transformational model. Fundamental principles and main characteristics of these models are introduced and compared firstly. Land use and land cover concepts of NLCD92 are employed as examples in the case study. The results demonstrate that correlations between these models are very high for a possible reason that all these models are designed to simulate the similarity judgement of human mind.

  9. Learning Multi-modal Similarity

    CERN Document Server

    McFee, Brian

    2010-01-01

    In many applications involving multi-media data, the definition of similarity between items is integral to several key tasks, e.g., nearest-neighbor retrieval, classification, and recommendation. Data in such regimes typically exhibits multiple modalities, such as acoustic and visual content of video. Integrating such heterogeneous data to form a holistic similarity space is therefore a key challenge to be overcome in many real-world applications. We present a novel multiple kernel learning technique for integrating heterogeneous data into a single, unified similarity space. Our algorithm learns an optimal ensemble of kernel transfor- mations which conform to measurements of human perceptual similarity, as expressed by relative comparisons. To cope with the ubiquitous problems of subjectivity and inconsistency in multi- media similarity, we develop graph-based techniques to filter similarity measurements, resulting in a simplified and robust training procedure.

  10. Roget's Thesaurus and Semantic Similarity

    OpenAIRE

    Jarmasz, Mario; Szpakowicz, Stan

    2012-01-01

    We have implemented a system that measures semantic similarity using a computerized 1987 Roget's Thesaurus, and evaluated it by performing a few typical tests. We compare the results of these tests with those produced by WordNet-based similarity measures. One of the benchmarks is Miller and Charles' list of 30 noun pairs to which human judges had assigned similarity measures. We correlate these measures with those computed by several NLP systems. The 30 pairs can be traced back to Rubenstein ...

  11. Africa's present and future needs in toxicology education: Southern African perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degrees and diplomas as well as certificates that are granted by universities and technikons in South Africa in scientific disciplines, such as forensic medicine, pharmacology, marine and veterinary sciences, environmental health, and occupational hygiene, include toxicology as one of the subjects in their overall syllabus. However, aspects of toxicology included in each of these courses are biased towards that particular subdiscipline and basic level of toxicology may be taught. Educational needs in toxicology in South Africa can be summarized as follows: (a) recognition of toxicology as a discipline in its own right at these tertiary education institutions and (b) creation of opportunities to study and obtain higher degrees in one or more of the many subdisciplines of toxicology. The results from a survey conducted on the toxicology syllabi offered at these tertiary education institutions are used to substantiate these needs

  12. Personalized recommendation with corrected similarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Personalized recommendation has attracted a surge of interdisciplinary research. Especially, similarity-based methods in applications of real recommendation systems have achieved great success. However, the computations of similarities are overestimated or underestimated, in particular because of the defective strategy of unidirectional similarity estimation. In this paper, we solve this drawback by leveraging mutual correction of forward and backward similarity estimations, and propose a new personalized recommendation index, i.e., corrected similarity based inference (CSI). Through extensive experiments on four benchmark datasets, the results show a greater improvement of CSI in comparison with these mainstream baselines. And a detailed analysis is presented to unveil and understand the origin of such difference between CSI and mainstream indices. (paper)

  13. Synthesis and comparative toxicology of a series of polyhedral borane anion-substituted tetraphenyl porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Myoung-Seo; Ozawa, Tomoko; Santos, Raquel A; Lamborn, Kathleen R; Bollen, Andrew W; Deen, Dennis F; Kahl, Stephen B

    2007-02-22

    Three structurally similar tetraphenylporphyrins bearing polyhedral borane anions have been synthesized and their toxicological profiles obtained in rats. These conjugates were found to have quite different acute toxicities as manifested at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD). When given at the MTD and observed over 28 days, the most acutely toxic porphyrin was found to be devoid of toxicity, as measured by blood chemistry panels. The remaining two less acutely toxic compounds both elicited significant changes, characterized by moderate to severe thrombocytopenia, failure to gain weight normally and changes in liver enzymes indicative of mild hepatotoxicity. All toxic effects were transient, with platelets rebounding to above normal levels at day 28. We conclude that thrombocytopenia is the dose limiting toxicity for boronated porphyrins in mammals and suggest that these effects may be due to the porphyrin, not the borane or carborane. PMID:17253677

  14. The National Toxicology Program chemical nomination selection and testing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heindel, J J

    1988-01-01

    The NTP is an interagency program of the Federal Government which coordinates toxicological programs at the NIH (NIEHS), FDA (NCTR), and CDC (NIOSH) with input from NCI, NIH, OSHA, CPSC, EPA, and ATSDR. The NTP has the capability to completely characterize the toxicologic profile of a chemical, including studies of chemical disposition, genetic toxicity, immunotoxicity, teratology, reproductive toxicity, carcinogenicity, neurotoxicity, and specific organ toxicity. The NTP encourages nominations of chemicals of human health concern from all sectors of the public, including industry, labor, and the general public. The specific process of nomination, evaluation, and selection of chemicals for testing by the NTP is described. It is a multicomponent system with several evaluations and a public peer review step to assure adequate consideration of all nominated chemicals. The results of NTP studies are all peer reviewed and available to the general public as well as to the scientific community. PMID:2980357

  15. [Advance on oxidative stress mechanism of arsenic toxicology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; An, Yan

    2009-09-01

    Inorganic arsenic is one of proven human carcinogens, which there are so far no sound laboratory-based evidences and there are very few reports in the literature regarding arsenic carcinogenic effects in in vivo animal experiment. Because of this lack of adequate evidences, the mechanism for understanding arsenic toxicology remains vague. Recently, many modes of action for arsenic carcinogenesis have been proposed, oxidative stress is one of the stronger theories of arsenic action modes which have a substantial mass of supporting data. Further more, many researchers have pointed out that induction of oxidative stress by methylated metabolites of inorganic arsenics plays an important role in the toxicity and carcinogenicity of arsenics. The role of oxidative stress induced by arsenic in arsenic toxicology was reviewed. PMID:19877531

  16. Toxicological perspectives on perfluorinated compounds in avian species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giesy, J.; Jones, P. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Perfluorinated chemicals have been widely used in commerce for the last few decades. Until recently little was known about their environmental fate and even less was known about their potential environmental effects. Since Giesy and co-workers first demonstrated the widespread occurrence of perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) in wildlife there has been renewed interest in determining the biological and possible ecological effects of these compounds. The assessment of possible effects of these chemicals has been hampered by a limited understanding of their mode of action and by a lack of toxicological data for wildlife species. Here we summarize recently obtained toxicological studies available for perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) in two avian species and use this information and environmental concentration data to evaluate the potential for environmental risk that these compounds pose.

  17. Toxicological Analysis of Some Drugs of Abuse in Biological Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Marie Ciobanu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of drugs of abuse is a scourge of modern world. Abuse, drug addiction and their consequences are one of the major current problems of European society because of the significant repercussions in individual, family, social and economic level. In this context, toxicological analysis of the drugs of abuse in biological samples is a useful tool for: diagnosis of drug addiction, checking an auto-response, mandatory screening in some treatment programs, identification of a substance in the case of an overdose, determining compliance of the treatment. The present paper aims to address the needs of healthcare professionals involved in drugs addiction treatment through systematic presentation of information regarding their toxicological analysis. Basically, it is a tool that help you to select the suitable biological sample and the right collecting time, as well as the proper analysis technique, depending on the purpose of analysis, pharmacokinetic characteristics of the drugs of abuse, available equipment and staff expertise.

  18. Proceedings of the workshop on research needs in toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A workshop on the theme 'Research Needs in Toxicology' was held at the Chalk River laboratories in November 1987. A program in toxicological protection aims to develop a fundamental and unified understanding of the behaviour of toxic agents in the environment and workplace, and of the consequent effects on human health. This understanding is necessary so that risks from such agents can be assessed quantitatively and realistically. These assessments, together with consideration of economic and social factors, provide a sound basis for decisions made to safeguard health. Where are the gaps in our current knowledge and ability to make such assessments? What research is needed? In these workshop proceedings, a number of eminent toxicologists from Canada and the U.S.A. discuss these questions

  19. Genomics, proteomics and metabonomics in toxicology: hopefully not 'fashionomics'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pognan, Francois

    2004-10-01

    Genomics, proteomics and metabonomics are applied to toxicology either as stand-alone technologies or in combination, with the intention of providing a more efficient assessment of the potential side effects of new chemical entities. Two different approaches are taken: a predictive/proactive strategy based on a statistical analogy of 'signatures' of drugs to many known toxicant gene or metabolite fingerprints; and a mechanistic/reactive strategy based on the in-depth biological analysis of the gene, protein or metabolite profiles induced by one or a few compounds of interest. This article focuses on the advantages and disadvantages of these technologies, as well as the many hurdles associated with both these approaches in toxicology that have to be considered before applying them to the assessment of future drugs. PMID:15469409

  20. Salvia divinorum: toxicological aspects and analysis in human biological specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalho, Cláudia; Corte-Real, Francisco; López-Rivadulla, Manuel; Gallardo, Eugenia

    2016-07-01

    The identification and quantitation of the main psychoactive component of Salvia divinorum (salvinorin A) in biological specimens are crucial in forensic and clinical toxicology. Despite all the efforts made, its uncontrolled abuse has increased quickly, exposing its users' health to serious risks both in the short and long term. The use of alternative biological matrices in toxicological analyzes can be advantageous as complementary postmortem samples, or in situations when neither blood nor urine can be collected; they may be useful tools in those determinations, providing important information about prior exposure. The aim of this article is to present a brief summary of legal aspects of Salvia divinorum and salvinorin A, including the methods used for the determination of the latter in biological matrices. PMID:27277872

  1. Natural uranium toxicology - evaluation of internal contamination in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After reminding the physical and chemical properties of natural uranium which might affect its toxicology, a comprehensive investigation upon natural uranium metabolism and toxicity and after applying occupational exposure standards to this particular poison, it has been determined, from accident reports and human experience reported in the related literature, a series of formulae obtained by theoretical mathematical development giving principles for internal contamination monitoring and disclosure by determining uranium in the urine of occupationally exposed individuals. An assay is performed to determine individual internal contamination according to the various contamination cases. The outlined purposes, mainly practical, required some options and extrapolations. The proposed formula allows a preliminary approach and also to determine shortly a contamination extent or to discuss the systematical urinalysis results as compared with individual radio-toxicology monitoring professional standards. (author)

  2. Self-similar aftershock rates

    CERN Document Server

    Davidsen, Jörn

    2016-01-01

    In many important systems exhibiting crackling noise --- intermittent avalanche-like relaxation response with power-law and, thus, self-similar distributed event sizes --- the "laws" for the rate of activity after large events are not consistent with the overall self-similar behavior expected on theoretical grounds. This is in particular true for the case of seismicity and a satisfying solution to this paradox has remained outstanding. Here, we propose a generalized description of the aftershock rates which is both self-similar and consistent with all other known self-similar features. Comparing our theoretical predictions with high resolution earthquake data from Southern California we find excellent agreement, providing in particular clear evidence for a unified description of aftershocks and foreshocks. This may offer an improved way of time-dependent seismic hazard assessment and earthquake forecasting.

  3. Learning Multi-modal Similarity

    OpenAIRE

    McFee, Brian; Lanckriet, Gert

    2010-01-01

    In many applications involving multi-media data, the definition of similarity between items is integral to several key tasks, e.g., nearest-neighbor retrieval, classification, and recommendation. Data in such regimes typically exhibits multiple modalities, such as acoustic and visual content of video. Integrating such heterogeneous data to form a holistic similarity space is therefore a key challenge to be overcome in many real-world applications. We present a novel multiple kernel learning t...

  4. Similarity measures for protein ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    Analyses of similarities and changes in protein conformation can provide important information regarding protein function and evolution. Many scores, including the commonly used root mean square deviation, have therefore been developed to quantify the similarities of different protein conformations...... synthetic example from molecular dynamics simulations. We then apply the algorithms to revisit the problem of ensemble averaging during structure determination of proteins, and find that an ensemble refinement method is able to recover the correct distribution of conformations better than standard single...

  5. SELF-SIMILAR TRAFFIC GENERATOR

    OpenAIRE

    Linawati Linawati; I Made Suartika

    2009-01-01

    Network traffic generator can be produced using OPNET. OPNET generates the traffic as explicit traffic or background traffic. This paper demonstrates generating traffic in OPNET 7.0 as background traffic. The traffi generator that was simulated is self-similar traffic with different Hurst parameter. The simulation results proved that OPNET with background traffic function can be as a qualified self-similar traffic generator. These results can help in investigating and analysing network perfor...

  6. Molecular similarity of MDR inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Simon Gibbons; Mire Zloh

    2004-01-01

    Abstract: The molecular similarity of multidrug resistance (MDR) inhibitors was evaluated using the point centred atom charge approach in an attempt to find some common features of structurally unrelated inhibitors. A series of inhibitors of bacterial MDR were studied and there is a high similarity between these in terms of their shape, presence and orientation of aromatic ring moieties. A comparison of the lipophilic properties of these molecules has also been conducted suggesting that this ...

  7. HOW DISSIMILARLY SIMILAR ARE BIOSIMILARS?

    OpenAIRE

    Ramshankar Vijayalakshmi; Kesavan Sabitha; Krishnamurthy Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Recently Biopharmaceuticals are the new chemotherapeutical agents that are called as “Biosimilars” or “follow on protein products” by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the American regulatory agencies (Food and Drug Administration) respectively. Biosimilars are extremely similar to the reference molecule but not identical, however close their similarities may be. A regulatory framework is therefore in place to assess the application for marketing authorisation of biosimilars. When a bi...

  8. Method of similarity for cavitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The knowledge of possible cavitation in subassembly nozzles of the fast reactor core implies the realization of a fluid dynamic model test. We propose a method of similarity based on the non-dimensionalization of the equation of motion for viscous capillarity fluid issued from the Cahn and Hilliard model. Taking into account the dissolved gas effect, a condition of compatibility is determined. This condition must be respected by the fluid in experiment, along with the scaling between the two similar flows. (author)

  9. Supervised Learning with Similarity Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Kar, Purushottam; Jain, Prateek

    2012-01-01

    We address the problem of general supervised learning when data can only be accessed through an (indefinite) similarity function between data points. Existing work on learning with indefinite kernels has concentrated solely on binary/multi-class classification problems. We propose a model that is generic enough to handle any supervised learning task and also subsumes the model previously proposed for classification. We give a "goodness" criterion for similarity functions w.r.t. a given superv...

  10. Representation is representation of similarities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, S

    1998-08-01

    Advanced perceptual systems are faced with the problem of securing a principled (ideally, veridical) relationship between the world and its internal representation. I propose a unified approach to visual representation, addressing the need for superordinate and basic-level categorization and for the identification of specific instances of familiar categories. According to the proposed theory, a shape is represented internally by the responses of a small number of tuned modules, each broadly selective for some reference shape, whose similarity to the stimulus it measures. This amounts to embedding the stimulus in a low-dimensional proximal shape space spanned by the outputs of the active modules. This shape space supports representations of distal shape similarities that are veridical as Shepard's (1968) second-order isomorphisms (i.e., correspondence between distal and proximal similarities among shapes, rather than between distal shapes and their proximal representations). Representation in terms of similarities to reference shapes supports processing (e.g., discrimination) of shapes that are radically different from the reference ones, without the need for the computationally problematic decomposition into parts required by other theories. Furthermore, a general expression for similarity between two stimuli, based on comparisons to reference shapes, can be used to derive models of perceived similarity ranging from continuous, symmetric, and hierarchical ones, as in multidimensional scaling (Shepard 1980), to discrete and nonhierarchical ones, as in the general contrast models (Shepard & Arabie 1979; Tversky 1977). PMID:10097019

  11. Alternative methods in toxicology: pre-validated and validated methods

    OpenAIRE

    Kandárová, Helena; Letašiová, Silvia

    2011-01-01

    The development of alternative methods to animal experimentation has progressed rapidly over the last 20 years. Today, in vitro and in silico methods have an important role in the hazard identification and assessment of toxicology profile of compounds. Advanced alternative methods and their combinations are also used for safety assessment of final products. Several alternative methods, which were scientifically validated and accepted by competent regulatory bodies, can be used for regulatory ...

  12. Phytochemical, Antioxidant and Toxicological Investigation of Morinda citrifolia L. Blossoms

    OpenAIRE

    Shixin Deng; West, Brett J.; 'Afa K. Palu; C. Jarakae Jensen

    2012-01-01

    Noni blossoms have a long history of medicinal uses in tropical areas. This study was conducted to investigate the major phytochemical components, toxicological properties, and antioxidant activity of noni blossoms. An HPLC-PDA method was developed and validated for the identification and quantification of major components. The major phytochemicals were iridoid glycosides, deacetylasperulosidic acid and asperulosidic acid, and flavonoids, quercetin-3-O-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1→6)-β-D-glucopyran...

  13. Carbon nanotube dosimetry: from workplace exposure assessment to inhalation toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Erdely, Aaron; Dahm, Matthew; Chen, Bean T.; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C.; Fernback, Joseph E.; Birch, M. Eileen; Evans, Douglas E.; Kashon, Michael L; Deddens, James A.; Hulderman, Tracy; Bilgesu, Suzan A; Battelli, Lori; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Leonard, Howard D.; McKinney, Walter

    2013-01-01

    Background Dosimetry for toxicology studies involving carbon nanotubes (CNT) is challenging because of a lack of detailed occupational exposure assessments. Therefore, exposure assessment findings, measuring the mass concentration of elemental carbon from personal breathing zone (PBZ) samples, from 8 U.S.-based multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) manufacturers and users were extrapolated to results of an inhalation study in mice. Results Upon analysis, an inhalable elemental carbon mass concentration ar...

  14. Cichorium intybus: Traditional Uses, Phytochemistry, Pharmacology, and Toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Renée A. Street; Jasmeen Sidana; Gerhard Prinsloo

    2013-01-01

    The genus Cichorium (Asteraceae) is made up of six species with major geographical presence in Europe and Asia. Cichorium intybus, commonly known as chicory, is well known as a coffee substitute but is also widely used medicinally to treat various ailments ranging from wounds to diabetes. Although this plant has a rich history of use in folklore, many of its constituents have not been explored for their pharmacological potential. Toxicological data on C. intybus is currently limited. This rev...

  15. Artemia in aquatic toxicology: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Persoone, G.; Wells, P.G.

    1987-01-01

    Due to commercial availability of dried cysts from which live test material can be hatched at will, Artemia is used extensively in research and applied toxicology.Despite the extensive literature on dose-effect relationships of chemicals on brine shrimp, it was not until 1980 that an experimental protocol was developed for a simple acute toxicity test with Artemia nauplii, meeting the prerequisites for standardization.The reliability and accuracy of this short-term test were determined during...

  16. Behavior as a common focus of toxicology and nutrition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, B.

    1980-01-01

    Behavior as an index of toxicity parallels its role as an index of nutritional impairment, just as toxicology and nutrition share other common themes. Intersections among the three disciplines arise because foodstuffs serve as one of the major routes of toxic exposure and also because food elements modify toxicity. With this perspective, the safety of our food supply is examined in the contexts of essential nutrients, toxins, toxic metals, manufactured contaminants, self-administered toxicants, and food additives.

  17. Toxicologic evaluation of analytes from Tank 241-C-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westinghouse Hanford Company requested PNL to assemble a toxicology review panel (TRP) to evaluate analytical data compiled by WHC, and provide advice concerning potential health effects associated with exposure to tank-vapor constituents. The team's objectives would be to (1) review procedures used for sampling vapors from tanks, (2) identify constituents in tank-vapor samples that could be related to symptoms reported by workers, (3) evaluate the toxicological implications of those constituents by comparison to establish toxicological databases, (4) provide advice for additional analytical efforts, and (5) support other activities as requested by WHC. The TRP represents a wide range of expertise, including toxicology, industrial hygiene, and occupational medicine. The TRP prepared a list of target analytes that chemists at the Oregon Graduate Institute/Sandia (OGI), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and PNL used to establish validated methods for quantitative analysis of head-space vapors from Tank 241-C-103. this list was used by the analytical laboratories to develop appropriate analytical methods for samples from Tank 241-C-103. Target compounds on the list included acetone, acetonitrile, ammonia, benzene, 1, 3-butadiene, butanal, n-butanol, hexane, 2-hexanone, methylene chloride, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, nitrous oxide, dodecane, tridecane, propane nitrile, sulfur oxide, tributyl phosphate, and vinylidene chloride. The TRP considered constituent concentrations, current exposure limits, reliability of data relative to toxicity, consistency of the analytical data, and whether the material was carcinogenic or teratogenic. A final consideration in the analyte selection process was to include representative chemicals for each class of compounds found

  18. Aerospace toxicology overview: aerial application and cabin air quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Arvind K

    2011-01-01

    Aerospace toxicology is a rather recent development and is closely related to aerospace medicine. Aerospace toxicology can be defined as a field of study designed to address the adverse effects of medications, chemicals, and contaminants on humans who fly within or outside the atmosphere in aviation or on space flights. The environment extending above and beyond the surface of the Earth is referred to as aerospace. The term aviation is frequently used interchangeably with aerospace. The focus of the literature review performed to prepare this paper was on aerospace toxicology-related subject matters, aerial application and aircraft cabin air quality. Among the important topics addressed are the following: · Aerial applications of agricultural chemicals, pesticidal toxicity, and exposures to aerially applied mixtures of chemicals and their associated formulating solvents/surfactants The safety of aerially encountered chemicals and the bioanalytical methods used to monitor exposures to some of them · The presence of fumes and smoke, as well as other contaminants that may generally be present in aircraft/space vehicle cabin air · And importantly, the toxic effects of aerially encountered contaminants, with emphasis on the degradation products of oils, fluids, and lubricants used in aircraft, and finally · Analytical methods used for monitoring human exposure to CO and HCN are addressed in the review, as are the signs and symptoms associated with exposures to these combustion gases. Although many agricultural chemical monitoring studies have been published, few have dealt with the occurrence of such chemicals in aircraft cabin air. However, agricultural chemicals do appear in cabin air; indeed, attempts have been made to establish maximum allowable concentrations for several of the more potentially toxic ones that are found in aircraft cabin air. In this article, I emphasize the need for precautionary measures to be taken to minimize exposures to aerially

  19. Toxicological Analysis of Some Drugs of Abuse in Biological Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Marie Ciobanu; Daniela Baconi; Cristian Bălălău; Carolina Negrei; Miriana Stan; Maria Bârcă

    2015-01-01

    Consumption of drugs of abuse is a scourge of modern world. Abuse, drug addiction and their consequences are one of the major current problems of European society because of the significant repercussions in individual, family, social and economic level. In this context, toxicological analysis of the drugs of abuse in biological samples is a useful tool for: diagnosis of drug addiction, checking an auto-response, mandatory screening in some treatment programs, identification of a substance ...

  20. Special-purpose fiber type 475--toxicological assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, D M

    2007-02-01

    Type 475 special-purpose glass fiber is rather unique among the family of synthetic mineral fibers. It is used not for insulation but for "high-end" filtration products designed for high and ultra-high purity filtration of air and liquids. The designation for these types of filters varies with country and includes HEPA, ULPA, EU 10-13, EN1822, and S3. In its evaluation, type 475 has been grouped together with E-glass another special-purpose fibre often with little distinction made in terms of its chemistry and corresponding toxicological response. The detailed review of the available toxicology data on type 475 glass fibers clearly shows that following inhalation of this fiber even at relatively high doses, which likely exceed that at which lung overload in the rat is known to occur, type 475 glass fibers are not fibrogenic and do not cause tumors. These data clearly show an important differentiation in potency between type 475 glass fibers and E-glass and support treating these two types of fibers independently and not equating them though the term "special-purpose fibers." Analysis of the intraperitoneal studies taking into account fibre dimensions shows that at 109 fibers injected, there was a 0.3 tumor incidence. While these studies indicate according to the European Commission (EC) classification criteria that 475 should not be fully exonerated as a carcinogen, the results of the inhalation study fully support classification in category 3. The IP results are more difficult to interpret, however, the IP study itself provides no toxicological basis for determining what range of dose-response should correspond to EU category 3 or 2. Following the EC classification criteria, the toxicological data clearly indicate that 475 fibers are appropriately classified in EC category 3. PMID:17169862

  1. Toxicological evaluation of lactase derived from recombinant Pichia pastoris.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiying Zou

    Full Text Available A recombinant lactase was expressed in Pichia pastoris, resulting in enzymatic activity of 3600 U/mL in a 5 L fermenter. The lactase product was subjected to a series of toxicological tests to determine its safety for use as an enzyme preparation in the dairy industry. This recombinant lactase had the highest activity of all recombinant strains reported thus far. Acute oral toxicity, mutagenicity, genotoxic, and subchronic toxicity tests performed in rats and mice showed no death in any groups. The lethal dose 50% (LD50 based on the acute oral toxicity study is greater than 30 mL/kg body weight, which is in accordance with the 1500 L milk consumption of a 50 kg human daily. The lactase showed no mutagenic activity in the Ames test or a mouse sperm abnormality test at levels of up to 5 mg/plate and 1250 mg/kg body weight, respectively. It also showed no genetic toxicology in a bone marrow cell micronucleus test at levels of up to 1250 mg/kg body weight. A 90-day subchronic repeated toxicity study via the diet with lactase levels up to 1646 mg/kg (1000-fold greater than the mean human exposure did not show any treatment-related significant toxicological effects on body weight, food consumption, organ weights, hematological and clinical chemistry, or histopathology compared to the control groups. This toxicological evaluation system is comprehensive and can be used in the safety evaluation of other enzyme preparations. The lactase showed no acute, mutagenic, genetic, or subchronic toxicity under our evaluation system.

  2. Integrating zebrafish toxicology and nanoscience for safer product development

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Ki-Tae; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The design, manufacture and application of safer products and manufacturing processes have been important goals over the last decade and will advance in the future under the umbrella of "Green Chemistry". In this review, we focus on the burgeoning diversity of new engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) and the prescient need for a nanotoxicology paradigm that quickly identifies potentially hazardous nanochemistries. Advances in predictive toxicological modeling in the developing zebrafish offer the ...

  3. The New Toxicology of Sophisticated Materials: Nanotoxicology and Beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Maynard, Andrew D.; David B Warheit; Philbert, Martin A.

    2010-01-01

    It has long been recognized that the physical form of materials can mediate their toxicity—the health impacts of asbestiform materials, industrial aerosols, and ambient particulate matter are prime examples. Yet over the past 20 years, toxicology research has suggested complex and previously unrecognized associations between material physicochemistry at the nanoscale and biological interactions. With the rapid rise of the field of nanotechnology and the design and production of increasingly c...

  4. Nanoparticles & Nanotechnology : Clinical, Toxicological, Social, Regulatory & other aspects of Nanotechnology

    OpenAIRE

    Gourish Chakarvarty

    2013-01-01

    In last few decades, there has been a considerable research interest in the area of drug delivery using particulate delivery systems as carriers for small and large molecules like nanoparticles. The continuing advancement of nanotechnology represents a tremendous opportunities of society because of the unique traits that nanoscale material possess but there are many clinical, toxicological, social, regulatory and other aspects of nanotechnology which are matter of concern. The United States F...

  5. Synaptonemal complex analysis in genetic toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synaptonemal complex analysis provides a unique means of visualizing the behavior of meiotic chromosomes. The technique has been applied to the study of normal karyotypes and mutant stocks of mice. Recent work demonstrating the usefulness of SC analysis for the detection of chromosome damage suggests its potential application in a variety of mechanistic and applied studies. Studies investigated cell-stage specific damage included by radiation and expressed as SC and/or metaphase chromosome aberrations. Radiation was found to exhibit a similar stage-specific clastogenic activity for SCs as it does for meiotic metaphase chromosomes. The nature of the chromosome damage detected depend upon the cell stage exposed and on the endpoint harvested for analysis

  6. Toxicology profiles of chemical and radiological contaminants at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document summarizes toxicology information required under Section 3.3 (Toxicity Assessment) of HSRAM, and can also be used to develop the short toxicology profiles required in site assessments (described in HSRAM, Section 3.3.5). Toxicology information is used in the dose-response step of the risk assessment process. The dose-response assessment describes the quantitative relationship between the amount of exposure to a substance and the extent of toxic injury or disease. Data are derived from animal studies or, less frequently, from studies in exposed human populations. The risks of a substance cannot be ascertained with any degree of confidence unless dose-response relations are quantified. This document summarizes dose-response information available from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The contaminants selected for inclusion in this document represent most of the contaminants found at Hanford (both radiological and chemical), based on sampling and analysis performed during site investigations, and historical information on waste disposal practices at the Hanford Site

  7. Toxicology profiles of chemical and radiological contaminants at Hanford

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harper, B.L.; Strenge, D.L.; Stenner, R.D.; Maughan, A.D.; Jarvis, M.K.

    1995-07-01

    This document summarizes toxicology information required under Section 3.3 (Toxicity Assessment) of HSRAM, and can also be used to develop the short toxicology profiles required in site assessments (described in HSRAM, Section 3.3.5). Toxicology information is used in the dose-response step of the risk assessment process. The dose-response assessment describes the quantitative relationship between the amount of exposure to a substance and the extent of toxic injury or disease. Data are derived from animal studies or, less frequently, from studies in exposed human populations. The risks of a substance cannot be ascertained with any degree of confidence unless dose-response relations are quantified. This document summarizes dose-response information available from the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The contaminants selected for inclusion in this document represent most of the contaminants found at Hanford (both radiological and chemical), based on sampling and analysis performed during site investigations, and historical information on waste disposal practices at the Hanford Site.

  8. Functional toxicology: tools to advance the future of toxicity testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon David Gaytán

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The increased presence of chemical contaminants in the environment is an undeniable concern to human health and ecosystems. Historically, by relying heavily upon costly and laborious animal-based toxicity assays, the field of toxicology has often neglected examinations of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of toxicity for the majority of compounds – information that, if available, would strengthen risk assessment analyses. Functional toxicology, where cells or organisms with gene deletions or depleted proteins are used to assess genetic requirements for chemical tolerance, can advance the field of toxicity testing by contributing data regarding chemical mechanisms of toxicity. Functional toxicology can be accomplished using available genetic tools in yeasts, other fungi and bacteria, and eukaryotes of increased complexity, including zebrafish, fruit flies, rodents, and human cell lines. Underscored is the value of using less complex systems such as yeasts to direct further studies in more complex systems such as human cell lines. Functional techniques can yield (1 novel insights into chemical toxicity; (2 pathways and mechanisms deserving of further study; and (3 candidate human toxicant susceptibility or resistance genes.

  9. Toxicology research for precautionary decision-making and the role of Human & Experimental Toxicology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grandjean, P

    2015-01-01

    being the strict criteria for scientific proof usually required for decision-making in regard to prevention. The present study ascertains the coverage of environmental chemicals in four volumes of Human & Experimental Toxicology and the presentation and interpretation of research findings in published...... articles. Links in SciFinder showed that the 530 articles published in four selected volumes between 1984 and 2014 primarily dealt with metals (126 links) and other toxicants that have received substantial attention in the past. Thirteen compounds identified by US authorities in 2006 as high......-priority substances, for which toxicology documentation is badly needed, were not covered in the journal issues at all. When reviewing published articles, reliance on p values was standard, and non-significant findings were often called 'negative.' This tradition may contribute to the perceived need to extend...

  10. OpenTox predictive toxicology framework: toxicological ontology and semantic media wiki-based OpenToxipedia

    OpenAIRE

    Tcheremenskaia Olga; Benigni Romualdo; Nikolova Ivelina; Jeliazkova Nina; Escher Sylvia E; Batke Monika; Baier Thomas; Poroikov Vladimir; Lagunin Alexey; Rautenberg Micha; Hardy Barry

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The OpenTox Framework, developed by the partners in the OpenTox project (http://www.opentox.org), aims at providing a unified access to toxicity data, predictive models and validation procedures. Interoperability of resources is achieved using a common information model, based on the OpenTox ontologies, describing predictive algorithms, models and toxicity data. As toxicological data may come from different, heterogeneous sources, a deployed ontology, unifying the terminol...

  11. Similarity measures for face recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Vezzetti, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Face recognition has several applications, including security, such as (authentication and identification of device users and criminal suspects), and in medicine (corrective surgery and diagnosis). Facial recognition programs rely on algorithms that can compare and compute the similarity between two sets of images. This eBook explains some of the similarity measures used in facial recognition systems in a single volume. Readers will learn about various measures including Minkowski distances, Mahalanobis distances, Hansdorff distances, cosine-based distances, among other methods. The book also summarizes errors that may occur in face recognition methods. Computer scientists "facing face" and looking to select and test different methods of computing similarities will benefit from this book. The book is also useful tool for students undertaking computer vision courses.

  12. Aqueous foam toxicology evaluation and hazard review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archuleta, M.M.

    1995-10-01

    Aqueous foams are aggregates of bubbles mechanically generated by passing air or other gases through a net, screen, or other porous medium that is wetted by an aqueous solution of surface-active foaming agents (surfactants). Aqueous foams are important in modem fire-fighting technology, as well as for military uses for area denial and riot or crowd control. An aqueous foam is currently being developed and evaluated by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) as a Less-Than-Lethal Weapon for the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). The purpose of this study is to evaluate the toxicity of the aqueous foam developed for the NIJ and to determine whether there are any significant adverse health effects associated with completely immersing individuals without protective equipment in the foam. The toxicity of the aqueous foam formulation developed for NIJ is determined by evaluating the toxicity of the individual components of the foam. The foam is made from a 2--5% solution of Steol CA-330 surfactant in water generated at expansion ratios ranging from 500:1 to 1000:1. SteoI CA-330 is a 35% ammonium laureth sulfate in water and is produced by Stepan Chemical Company and containing trace amounts (<0.1%) of 1,4-dioxane. The results of this study indicate that Steol CA-330 is a non-toxic, mildly irritating, surfactant that is used extensively in the cosmetics industry for hair care and bath products. Inhalation or dermal exposure to this material in aqueous foam is not expected to produce significant irritation or systemic toxicity to exposed individuals, even after prolonged exposure. The amount of 1,4-dioxane in the surfactant, and subsequently in the foam, is negligible and therefore, the toxicity associated with dioxane exposure is not significant. In general, immersion in similar aqueous foams has not resulted in acute, immediately life-threatening effects, or chronic, long-term, non-reversible effects following exposure.

  13. Metabolism and toxicology of the uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three important points to be considered in the metabolic behaviour of uranium are: 1) ionic behaviour which depends only on its chemical characteristics; 2) behaves in the organism as a unique element and has no metabolism similar to others like for example Sr-90 and Ba-140 which are akin to Ca; and 3) metabolism is identical for the three isotopes of uranium and has no isotopic effect. The metabolic decomposition undergoes three phases namely: 1) absorption of the components up to the blood streams; 2) distribution through the blood into the organs; and 3) elimination. The mode of entry in the organism is through inhalation, ingestion, wounds, absorption through the skin, and entry by the eyes. Uranium decomposes in the blood after its entry, disperses in the extracellular medium and deposits in the different organs of the body. However, it has no definite fixation and the different compartments are always in equilibrium with each other. Elimination of contamination is through the feces and urine. In case of massive absorption, that is either acute or sub-acute toxicity, the following are the subsequent effects: a) clinical effects major lesion in the kidneys whatever the mode of entry may be and feebleness of the muscles, apathy and nausea are noted; b) lesions in the renal region-yellowish gray in the medular and critical region; c) biological effects-appearance of proteinuria and catalysuria, cellular wastes in the urine and a change in the capacity to reabsorb Na+, Cl-, and glucose. The lethal dose is 1 mg U-nat/kg.wt. The dose provoking renal lesion is 0.1mg U/kg.wt. The maximum permissible dose is: a) annual dose 40 mg U-nat/yr; b) Inhalation 2.5 mg/day; c) Ingestion 150 mg/2 days consecutive (soluble = 4.7x10-1 μCi, insoluble = 3.4x10-2 μCi

  14. FutureTox II: In vitro Data and In Silico Models for Predictive Toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Knudsen, Thomas B,; Keller, Douglas A.; Sander, Miriam; Carney, Edward W.; Doerrer, Nancy G.; Eaton, David L.; Fitzpatrick, Suzanne Compton; Hastings, Kenneth L.; Donna L. Mendrick; Tice, Raymond R.; Watkins, Paul B.; Whelan, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    FutureTox II, a Society of Toxicology Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology workshop, was held in January, 2014. The meeting goals were to review and discuss the state of the science in toxicology in the context of implementing the NRC 21st century vision of predicting in vivo responses from in vitro and in silico data, and to define the goals for the future. Presentations and discussions were held on priority concerns such as predicting and modeling of metabolism, cell growth and differentiati...

  15. Similarity Measures for Comparing Biclusterings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Danilo; Campello, Ricardo J G B

    2014-01-01

    The comparison of ordinary partitions of a set of objects is well established in the clustering literature, which comprehends several studies on the analysis of the properties of similarity measures for comparing partitions. However, similarity measures for clusterings are not readily applicable to biclusterings, since each bicluster is a tuple of two sets (of rows and columns), whereas a cluster is only a single set (of rows). Some biclustering similarity measures have been defined as minor contributions in papers which primarily report on proposals and evaluation of biclustering algorithms or comparative analyses of biclustering algorithms. The consequence is that some desirable properties of such measures have been overlooked in the literature. We review 14 biclustering similarity measures. We define eight desirable properties of a biclustering measure, discuss their importance, and prove which properties each of the reviewed measures has. We show examples drawn and inspired from important studies in which several biclustering measures convey misleading evaluations due to the absence of one or more of the discussed properties. We also advocate the use of a more general comparison approach that is based on the idea of transforming the original problem of comparing biclusterings into an equivalent problem of comparing clustering partitions with overlapping clusters. PMID:26356865

  16. Approaches to Sequence Similarity Representation

    OpenAIRE

    Sokolov, Artem; Rachkovskij, Dmitri

    2006-01-01

    We discuss several approaches to similarity preserving coding of symbol sequences and possible connections of their distributed versions to metric embeddings. Interpreting sequence representation methods with embeddings can help develop an approach to their analysis and may lead to discovering useful properties.

  17. A square from similar rectangles

    OpenAIRE

    Dorichenko, Sergey; Skopenkov, Mikhail

    2013-01-01

    In the present popular science paper we determine when a square can be dissected into rectangles similar to a given rectangle. The approach to the question is based on a physical interpretation using electrical networks. Only secondary school background is assumed in the paper.

  18. HOW DISSIMILARLY SIMILAR ARE BIOSIMILARS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramshankar Vijayalakshmi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Recently Biopharmaceuticals are the new chemotherapeutical agents that are called as “Biosimilars” or “follow on protein products” by the European Medicines Agency (EMA and the American regulatory agencies (Food and Drug Administration respectively. Biosimilars are extremely similar to the reference molecule but not identical, however close their similarities may be. A regulatory framework is therefore in place to assess the application for marketing authorisation of biosimilars. When a biosimilar is similar to the reference biopharmaceutical in terms of safety, quality, and efficacy, it can be registered. It is important to document data from clinical trials with a view of similar safety and efficacy. If the development time for a generic medicine is around 3 years, a biosimilar takes about 6-9 years. Generic medicines need to demonstrate bioequivalence only unlike biosimilars that need to conduct phase I and Phase III clinical trials. In this review, different biosimilars that are already being used successfully in the field on Oncology is discussed. Their similarity, differences and guidelines to be followed before a clinically informed decision to be taken, is discussed. More importantly the regulatory guidelines that are operational in India with a work flow of making a biosimilar with relevant dos and dont’s are discussed. For a large populous country like India, where with improved treatments in all sectors including oncology, our ageing population is increasing. For the health care of this sector, we need more newer, cheaper and effective biosimilars in the market. It becomes therefore important to understand the regulatory guidelines and steps to come up with more biosimilars for the existing population and also more information is mandatory for the practicing clinicians to translate these effectively into clinical practice.

  19. Benefits of the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and maximum tolerated concentration (MTC) concept in aquatic toxicology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hutchinson, Thomas H. [Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Prospect Place, The Hoe, Plymouth PL1 3DH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: thom1@pml.ac.uk; Boegi, Christian [BASF SE, Product Safety, GUP/PA, Z470, 67056 Ludwigshafen (Germany); Winter, Matthew J. [AstraZeneca Safety, Health and Environment, Brixham Environmental Laboratory, Devon TQ5 8BA (United Kingdom); Owens, J. Willie [The Procter and Gamble Company, Central Product Safety, 11810 East Miami River Road, Cincinnati, OH 45252 (United States)

    2009-02-19

    There is increasing recognition of the need to identify specific sublethal effects of chemicals, such as reproductive toxicity, and specific modes of actions of the chemicals, such as interference with the endocrine system. To achieve these aims requires criteria which provide a basis to interpret study findings so as to separate these specific toxicities and modes of action from not only acute lethality per se but also from severe inanition and malaise that non-specifically compromise reproductive capacity and the response of endocrine endpoints. Mammalian toxicologists have recognized that very high dose levels are sometimes required to elicit both specific adverse effects and present the potential of non-specific 'systemic toxicity'. Mammalian toxicologists have developed the concept of a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) beyond which a specific toxicity or action cannot be attributed to a test substance due to the compromised state of the organism. Ecotoxicologists are now confronted by a similar challenge and must develop an analogous concept of a MTD and the respective criteria. As examples of this conundrum, we note recent developments in efforts to validate protocols for fish reproductive toxicity and endocrine screens (e.g. some chemicals originally selected as 'negatives' elicited decreases in fecundity or changes in endpoints intended to be biomarkers for endocrine modes of action). Unless analogous criteria can be developed, the potentially confounding effects of systemic toxicity may then undermine the reliable assessment of specific reproductive effects or biomarkers such as vitellogenin or spiggin. The same issue confronts other areas of aquatic toxicology (e.g., genotoxicity) and the use of aquatic animals for preclinical assessments of drugs (e.g., use of zebrafish for drug safety assessment). We propose that there are benefits to adopting the concept of an MTD for toxicology and pharmacology studies using fish and other aquatic

  20. Benefits of the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and maximum tolerated concentration (MTC) concept in aquatic toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is increasing recognition of the need to identify specific sublethal effects of chemicals, such as reproductive toxicity, and specific modes of actions of the chemicals, such as interference with the endocrine system. To achieve these aims requires criteria which provide a basis to interpret study findings so as to separate these specific toxicities and modes of action from not only acute lethality per se but also from severe inanition and malaise that non-specifically compromise reproductive capacity and the response of endocrine endpoints. Mammalian toxicologists have recognized that very high dose levels are sometimes required to elicit both specific adverse effects and present the potential of non-specific 'systemic toxicity'. Mammalian toxicologists have developed the concept of a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) beyond which a specific toxicity or action cannot be attributed to a test substance due to the compromised state of the organism. Ecotoxicologists are now confronted by a similar challenge and must develop an analogous concept of a MTD and the respective criteria. As examples of this conundrum, we note recent developments in efforts to validate protocols for fish reproductive toxicity and endocrine screens (e.g. some chemicals originally selected as 'negatives' elicited decreases in fecundity or changes in endpoints intended to be biomarkers for endocrine modes of action). Unless analogous criteria can be developed, the potentially confounding effects of systemic toxicity may then undermine the reliable assessment of specific reproductive effects or biomarkers such as vitellogenin or spiggin. The same issue confronts other areas of aquatic toxicology (e.g., genotoxicity) and the use of aquatic animals for preclinical assessments of drugs (e.g., use of zebrafish for drug safety assessment). We propose that there are benefits to adopting the concept of an MTD for toxicology and pharmacology studies using fish and other aquatic organisms and the

  1. Predictive Toxicology: Modeling Chemical Induced Toxicological Response Combining Circular Fingerprints with Random Forest and Support Vector Machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexios eKoutsoukas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Modern drug discovery and toxicological research are under pressure, as the cost of developing and testing new chemicals for potential toxicological risk is rising. Extensive evaluation of chemical products for potential adverse effects is a challenging task, due to the large number of chemicals and the possible hazardous effects on human health. Safety regulatory agencies around the world are dealing with two major challenges. First, the growth of chemicals introduced every year in household products and medicines that need to be tested, and second the need to protect public welfare. Hence, alternative and more efficient toxicological risk assessment methods are in high demand. The Toxicology in the 21st Century (Tox21 consortium a collaborative effort was formed to develop and investigate alternative assessment methods. A collection of 10,000 compounds composed of environmental chemicals and approved drugs were screened for interference in biochemical pathways and released for crowdsourcing data analysis. The physicochemical space covered by Tox21 library was explored, measured by Molecular Weight (MW and the octanol/water partition coefficient (cLogP. It was found that on average chemical structures had MW of 272.6 Daltons. In case of cLogP the average value was 2.476. Next relationships between assays were examined based on compounds activity profiles across the assays utilizing the Pearson correlation coefficient r. A cluster was observed between the Androgen and Estrogen Receptors and their ligand bind domains accordingly indicating presence of cross talks among the receptors. The highest correlations observed were between NR.AR and NR.AR_LBD, where it was r=0.66 and between NR.ER and NR.ER_LBD, where it was r=0.5.Our approach to model the Tox21 data consisted of utilizing circular molecular fingerprints combined with Random Forest and Support Vector Machine by modeling each assay independently. In all of the 12 sub-challenges our modeling

  2. Network chemistry, network toxicology, network informatics, and network behavioristics: A scientific outline

    OpenAIRE

    WenJun Zhang

    2016-01-01

    In present study, I proposed some new sciences: network chemistry, network toxicology, network informatics, and network behavioristics. The aims, scope and scientific foundation of these sciences are outlined.

  3. Toxicological study of the hepatotherapeutic herbal formula, Chunggan extract, in beagle dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Woo-Jin; Shin, Jang-Woo; Son, Jin-Young; Seo, Dong-Seok; Park, Hark-Soo; Han, Seung-Hyun; Sung, Ha-Jung; Cho, Jung-Hyo; Cho, Chong-Kwan; Yoo, Hwa-Seung; Yeon-Weol LEE; Son, Chang-Gue

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the pharmaceutical safety of a Chinese herbal formula, Chunggan extract (CGX), traditionally prescribed as a hepatotherapeutic drug via systemic acute and subacute toxicological study.

  4. [Management of acute intoxication with paracetamol--Polish Medical Society, Section of Clinical Toxicology position statement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldman, Wojciech; Groszek, Barbara; Burda, Piotr; Wiśniewski, Marek; Sein Anand, Jacek

    2012-01-01

    Paper presents Polish Medical Society, Section of Clinical Toxicology position statement on the prehospital and hospital management in case of suspicion of intoxication with paracetamol. PMID:23243910

  5. Retrieval of similar chess positions

    OpenAIRE

    Ganguly, Debasis; LEVELING, JOHANNES; Jones, Gareth J.F.

    2014-01-01

    We address the problem of retrieving chess game positions similar to a given query position from a collection of archived chess games. We investigate this problem from an information retrieval (IR) perspective. The advantage of our proposed IR-based approach is that it allows using the standard inverted organization of stored chess positions, leading to an ecient retrieval. Moreover, in contrast to retrieving exactly identical board positions, the IR-based approach is able to provide approxim...

  6. Scaling Group Testing Similarity Search

    OpenAIRE

    Iscen, Ahmet; Amsaleg, Laurent; Furon, Teddy

    2016-01-01

    The large dimensionality of modern image feature vectors, up to thousands of dimensions, is challenging the high dimensional indexing techniques. Traditional approaches fail at returning good quality results within a response time that is usable in practice. However, similarity search techniques inspired by the group testing framework have recently been proposed in an attempt to specifically defeat the curse of dimensionality. Yet, group testing does not scale and fails at indexing very large...

  7. SPATIO-TEXTUAL SIMILARITY JOIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch Shylaja and Supreethi K.P

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Data mining is the process of discovering interesting patterns and knowledge from large amounts of data. Spatial databases store large space related data, such as maps, preprocessed remote sensing or medical imaging data. Modern mobile phones and mobile devices are equipped with GPS devices; this is the reason for the Location based services to gain significant attention. These Location based services generate large amounts of spatio- textual data which contain both spatial location and textual description. The spatiotextual objects have different representations because of deviations in GPS or due to different user descriptions. This calls for the need of efficient methods to integrate spatio-textual data. Spatio-textual similarity join meets this need. Spatio-textual similarity join: Given two sets of spatio-textual data, it finds all the similar pairs. Filter and refine framework will be developed to device the algorithms. The prefix filter technique will be extended to generate spatial and textual signatures and inverted indexes will be built on top of these signatures. Candidate pairs will be found using these indexes. Finally the candidate pairs will be refined to get the result. MBR-prefix based signature will be used to prune dissimilar objects. Hybrid signature will be used to support spatial and textual pruning simultaneously.

  8. Roget's Thesaurus and Semantic Similarity

    CERN Document Server

    Jarmasz, Mario

    2012-01-01

    We have implemented a system that measures semantic similarity using a computerized 1987 Roget's Thesaurus, and evaluated it by performing a few typical tests. We compare the results of these tests with those produced by WordNet-based similarity measures. One of the benchmarks is Miller and Charles' list of 30 noun pairs to which human judges had assigned similarity measures. We correlate these measures with those computed by several NLP systems. The 30 pairs can be traced back to Rubenstein and Goodenough's 65 pairs, which we have also studied. Our Roget's-based system gets correlations of .878 for the smaller and .818 for the larger list of noun pairs; this is quite close to the .885 that Resnik obtained when he employed humans to replicate the Miller and Charles experiment. We further evaluate our measure by using Roget's and WordNet to answer 80 TOEFL, 50 ESL and 300 Reader's Digest questions: the correct synonym must be selected amongst a group of four words. Our system gets 78.75%, 82.00% and 74.33% of ...

  9. Toxicology of mono-, di-, and triethanolamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaak, J B; Leung, H W; Stott, W T; Busch, J; Bilsky, J

    1997-01-01

    , N-dimethyl DEA. Dietary intake of DEA by rats for 13 wk at levels greater than 90 mg kg-1 d-1 resulted in degenerative changes in renal tubular epithelial cells and fatty degeneration of the liver. Similar effects were noted in drinking water studies. The findings are believed to be due to alterations in the structure and function of biomembranes brought about by the incorporation of DEA and methylated DEA in headgroups. TEA is not metabolized in the liver or incorporated into phospholipids. TEA, however, is readily eliminated in urine. Repeated oral administration to rats (7 d/wk, 24 wk) at dose levels up to and including 1600 mg kg-1 d-1 produced histopathological changes restricted to kidney and liver. Lesions in the liver consisted of cloudy swelling and occasional fatty changes, while cloudy swelling of the convoluted tubules and loop of Henle were observed in kidneys. Chronic administration (2 yr) of TEA in drinking water (0, 1%, or 2% w/v; 525 and 1100 mg kg-1 d-1 in males and 910 and 1970 mg kg-1 d-1 in females) depressed body and kidney weights in F-344 rats. Histopathological findings consisted of an "acceleration of so-called chronic nephropathy" commonly found in the kidneys of aging F-344 rats. In B6C3F1 mice, chronic administration of TEA in drinking water (0, 1%, or 2%) produced no significant change in terminal body weights between treated and control animals or gross pathological changes. TEA was not considered to be carcinogenic. Systemic effects in rats chronically administered TEA dermally (0, 32, 64, or 125 mg kg-1 d-1 in males; 0, 63, 125, or 250 mg kg-1 d-1 in females) 5 d/wk for 2 yr were primarily limited to hyperplasia of renal tubular epithelium and small microscopic adenomas. In a companion mouse dermal study, the most significant change was associated with nonneoplastic changes in livers of male mice consistent with chronic bacterial hepatitis. PMID:8956558

  10. Meta-analysis of ionic liquid literature and toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckenbach, Mary E; Romero, Felicia N; Green, Matthew D; Halden, Rolf U

    2016-05-01

    A meta-analysis was conducted to compare the total amount of ionic liquid (IL) literature (n = 39,036) to the body of publications dealing with IL toxicity (n = 213) with the goal of establishing the state of knowledge and existing information gaps. Additionally, patent literature pertaining to issued patents utilizing ILs (n = 3358) or dealing with IL toxicity (n = 112) were analyzed. Total publishing activity and patent count served to gauge research activity, industrial usage and toxicology knowledge of ILs. Five of the most commonly studied IL cations were identified and used to establish a relationship between toxicity data and potential of commercial use: imidazolium, ammonium, phosphonium, pyridinium, and pyrrolidinium. Toxicology publications for all IL cations represented 0.55% ± 0.27% of the total publishing activity; compared with other industrial chemicals, these numbers indicate that there is still a paucity of studies on the adverse effects of this class of chemical. Toxicity studies on ILs were dominated by the use of in vitro models (18%) and marine bacteria (15%) as studied biological systems. Whole animal studies (n = 87) comprised 31% of IL toxicity studies, with a subset of in vivo mammalian models consisting of 8%. Human toxicology data were found to be limited to in vitro analyses, indicating substantial knowledge gaps. Risks from long-term and chronic low-level exposure to ILs have not been established yet for any model organisms, reemphasizing the need to fill crucial knowledge gaps concerning human health effects and the environmental safety of ILs. Adding to the existing knowledge of the molecular toxicity characteristics of ILs can help inform the design of greener, less toxic and more benign IL technologies. PMID:26907595

  11. Toxicología aguda del D-004 en conejos

    OpenAIRE

    Ariadne Gutiérrez Martínez; Rafael Gámez Menéndez; Rosa Más Ferreiro; Miriam Noa Puig; Balia Pardo Acosta; Eddy Goicochea Carrero; Dayisell Curveco Sánchez; Haydée García Cambián

    2007-01-01

    El D-004 es un extracto lipídico obtenido del fruto de la palma real (Roystonea regia) (Arecaceae) que consiste en una mezcla reproducible de ácidos grasos, en la cual el ácido oleico, el láurico y el palmítico son los más abundantes. El tratamiento oral con D-004 inhibe significativamente la hiperplasia prostática inducida por testosterona en roedores. La toxicología preclínica de un nuevo compuesto incluye la evaluación aguda en una especie no roedora. Con este objetivo se realizó el ensayo...

  12. Cichorium intybus: Traditional Uses, Phytochemistry, Pharmacology, and Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Renée A; Sidana, Jasmeen; Prinsloo, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The genus Cichorium (Asteraceae) is made up of six species with major geographical presence in Europe and Asia. Cichorium intybus, commonly known as chicory, is well known as a coffee substitute but is also widely used medicinally to treat various ailments ranging from wounds to diabetes. Although this plant has a rich history of use in folklore, many of its constituents have not been explored for their pharmacological potential. Toxicological data on C. intybus is currently limited. This review focuses on the economic and culturally important medicinal uses of C. intybus. Traditional uses, scientific validation, and phytochemical composition are discussed in detail. PMID:24379887

  13. Review of Toxicology of Atrazine and Chlorpyrifos on Fish

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xu; LI Jilong; XING Houjuan; XU Shiwen

    2011-01-01

    Atrazine (ATR) and chlorpyrifos (CPF) are widely used in agriculture, but have resulted in a series of toxicological and environmental problems. They were heavily used which have potential threat to fish and rodents. Several recent laboratory studies have shown ATR and CPF could lead to oxidative damage, immunocyte reduced and inhibit acetylcholinesterase (ACHE). In order to clarify the toxicity of ATR and CPF, this paper summarized the adverse effects of ATR and CPF on reproduction, nerve and immune systems in fish.

  14. Toxicological and radiobiological characteristics of some S -derivatives of meprin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural variants with radiobiological properties of alpha-mercaptopropinolylglycine (α-MPG, thiol, meprin) are searched with the aim of revealing preparations with increased radioprotective properties. Results of studying toxicologic and radioprotective properties of a number of synthesized compounds-thiosulphate (TSPG) isothiouranium (ITPG) diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTCPG) and thiophosphate (TPPG) α-MPG derivatives, are presented. The experiments on mice have shown that PSPG has low toxicity and satisfactory radioprotective activity when introduced 4 hours before irradiation. DDTCPG brings about a slight protective effect in the dose of 1300 mg/kg it does not produce radioprotective effect. Low toxicity and high radioprotective TPPG effect prove the necessity of its further study

  15. A computational approach to mechanistic and predictive toxicology of pesticides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsbak, Kristine Grønning; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Hadrup, Niels;

    2014-01-01

    Emerging challenges of managing and interpreting large amounts of complex biological data have given rise to the growing field of computational biology. We investigated the applicability of an integrated systems toxicology approach on five selected pesticides to get an overview of their modes...... protein interactome. Then, we explored modes of action of the chemicals, by integrating protein-disease information to the resulting protein networks. The dominating human adverse effects affected were reproductive disorders followed by adrenal diseases. Our results indicated that prochloraz, tebuconazole...

  16. Proceedings of the 33. International Symposium of Industrial Toxicology 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Conference included the following sessions: Lectures; (I) Accidents and security risk in industry, civil protection and crisis communication; (II) Analytical methods in toxicology and environment; (III) Chemicals in the environment and health services; (IV) Radioactivity in the environment, nuclear chemistry and renewable sources of energy); (V-VI) Radioactivity in the environment, nuclear chemistry and renewable sources of energy; Contaminants in food, agriculture and animal products; Biodegradable renewable resources of raw materials and disposal with waste; (VII) Posters. Relevant papers were included into the database INIS.

  17. Mechanisms for similarity based cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traulsen, A.

    2008-06-01

    Cooperation based on similarity has been discussed since Richard Dawkins introduced the term “green beard” effect. In these models, individuals cooperate based on an aribtrary signal (or tag) such as the famous green beard. Here, two different models for such tag based cooperation are analysed. As neutral drift is important in both models, a finite population framework is applied. The first model, which we term “cooperative tags” considers a situation in which groups of cooperators are formed by some joint signal. Defectors adopting the signal and exploiting the group can lead to a breakdown of cooperation. In this case, conditions are derived under which the average abundance of the more cooperative strategy exceeds 50%. The second model considers a situation in which individuals start defecting towards others that are not similar to them. This situation is termed “defective tags”. It is shown that in this case, individuals using tags to cooperate exclusively with their own kind dominate over unconditional cooperators.

  18. Implications of gender differences for human health risk assessment and toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper from The Human Health working group of SGOMSEC 16 examines a broad range of issues on gender effects in toxicology. Gender differences in toxicology begin at the gamete and embryo stage, continuing through development and maturation and into old age. Sex influences exp...

  19. Genomics and systems biology - How relevant are the developments to veterinary pharmacology, toxicology and therapeutics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witkamp, R.F.

    2005-01-01

    This review discusses some of the recent developments in genomics and its current and future relevance for veterinary pharmacology and toxicology. With the rapid progress made in this field several new approaches in pharmacological and toxicological research have developed and drug discovery and dru

  20. The Salmonella Mutagenicity Assay: The Stethoscope of Genetic Toxicology for the 21 st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    OBJECTIVES: According to the 2007 National Research Council report Toxicology for the Twenty-first Century, modem methods ("omics," in vitro assays, high-throughput testing, computational methods, etc.) will lead to the emergence of a new approach to toxicology. The Salmonella ma...

  1. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION COEFFICIENTS AND RADIOLOGICAL AND TOXICOLOGICAL EXPOSURE METHODOLOGY FOR USE IN TANK FARMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GRIGSBY KM

    2011-04-07

    This report presents the atmospheric dispersion coefficients used in Tank Farms safety analysis. The basis equations for calculating radiological and toxicological exposures are also included. In this revision, the time averaging for toxicological consequence evaluations is clarified based on a review of DOE complex guidance and a review of tank farm chemicals.

  2. TOXNET and Beyond - Using the NLMs Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal-February

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Templin-Branner, W.

    2010-02-24

    The purpose of this training is to familiarize participants with reliable online environmental health and toxicology information, from the National Library of Medicine and other reliable sources. Skills and knowledge acquired in this training class will enable participants to access, utilize, and refer others to environmental health and toxicology information.

  3. 75 FR 60454 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the..., ``Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk..., 2010. The listening session on the draft assessment for hexavalent chromium will be held on November...

  4. 76 FR 20349 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the..., ``Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk... workshop on the draft assessment for Hexavalent Chromium will be held on May 12, 2011, beginning at 8:30...

  5. 75 FR 69064 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the... period on September 30, 2010 (75 FR 60454) for the external review draft human health assessment titled, ``Toxicological Review of Hexavalent Chromium: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated...

  6. 40 CFR 158.2140 - Microbial pesticides toxicology data requirements table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Microbial pesticides toxicology data... (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS DATA REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Microbial Pesticides § 158.2140 Microbial pesticides toxicology data requirements table. (a) General. Sections 158.100 through 158.130 describe how...

  7. Performance Indexes: Similarities and Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Machado Caldeira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The investor of today is more rigorous on monitoring a financial assets portfolio. He no longer thinks only in terms of the expected return (one dimension, but in terms of risk-return (two dimensions. Thus new perception is more complex, since the risk measurement can vary according to anyone’s perception; some use the standard deviation for that, others disagree with this measure by proposing others. In addition to this difficulty, there is the problem of how to consider these two dimensions. The objective of this essay is to study the main performance indexes through an empirical study in order to verify the differences and similarities for some of the selected assets. One performance index proposed in Caldeira (2005 shall be included in this analysis.

  8. Features Based Text Similarity Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Kent, Chow Kok

    2010-01-01

    As the Internet help us cross cultural border by providing different information, plagiarism issue is bound to arise. As a result, plagiarism detection becomes more demanding in overcoming this issue. Different plagiarism detection tools have been developed based on various detection techniques. Nowadays, fingerprint matching technique plays an important role in those detection tools. However, in handling some large content articles, there are some weaknesses in fingerprint matching technique especially in space and time consumption issue. In this paper, we propose a new approach to detect plagiarism which integrates the use of fingerprint matching technique with four key features to assist in the detection process. These proposed features are capable to choose the main point or key sentence in the articles to be compared. Those selected sentence will be undergo the fingerprint matching process in order to detect the similarity between the sentences. Hence, time and space usage for the comparison process is r...

  9. Semantically enabled image similarity search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casterline, May V.; Emerick, Timothy; Sadeghi, Kolia; Gosse, C. A.; Bartlett, Brent; Casey, Jason

    2015-05-01

    Georeferenced data of various modalities are increasingly available for intelligence and commercial use, however effectively exploiting these sources demands a unified data space capable of capturing the unique contribution of each input. This work presents a suite of software tools for representing geospatial vector data and overhead imagery in a shared high-dimension vector or embedding" space that supports fused learning and similarity search across dissimilar modalities. While the approach is suitable for fusing arbitrary input types, including free text, the present work exploits the obvious but computationally difficult relationship between GIS and overhead imagery. GIS is comprised of temporally-smoothed but information-limited content of a GIS, while overhead imagery provides an information-rich but temporally-limited perspective. This processing framework includes some important extensions of concepts in literature but, more critically, presents a means to accomplish them as a unified framework at scale on commodity cloud architectures.

  10. The Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing - Europe (CAAT-EU): a transatlantic bridge for the paradigm shift in toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshian, Mardas; Leist, Marcel; Hartung, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing - Europe (CAAT-EU) was founded based collaboration between the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and the University of Konstanz. CAAT-EU, housed at the University of Konstanz, will coordinate transatlantic activities to promote humane science in research and education, and participate, as partner or coordinator, in publicly and privately funded European projects. Thomas Hartung will serve as program liaison representing Johns Hopkins University and Marcel Leist as the University of Konstanz liaison. CAAT-EU aims to: 1) Set up transatlantic consortia for international research projects on alternative methods. 2) Establish a CAAT Europe faculty and advisory board composed of sponsor representatives and prominent academics from Europe . 3) Participate in the Transatlantic Think Tank for Toxicology (t4) devoted to conceptual work for the paradigm shift in toxicology. 4) Coordinate a series of information days in Europe on relevant developments in the US, similar to the 2009 series CAAT held in the US on EU issues (one on the 7th Amendment to the EU Cosmetics Directive and one on EU and US chemical regulation). 5) Support ALTEX as the official journal of CAAT and CAAT-EU. 6) Develop strategic projects with sponsors to promote humane science and new toxicology, especially with CAAT faculty members. 7) Develop a joint education program between Johns Hopkins and the University of Konstanz, such as e-courses and the existing Humane Science Certificate program developed by CAAT, a student exchange program, and collaboration with the International Graduate School "Cell-based Characterization of De- and Regeneration" in Konstanz. PMID:20390240

  11. Proceedings of the 2015 National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Susan A; Farman, Cindy A; Hailey, James R; Kovi, Ramesh C; Malarkey, David E; Morrison, James P; Neel, Jennifer; Pesavento, Patricia A; Porter, Brian F; Szabo, Kathleen A; Teixeira, Leandro B C; Quist, Erin M

    2016-06-01

    The 2015 Annual National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium, entitled "Pathology Potpourri" was held in Minneapolis, Minnesota, at the American College of Veterinary Pathologists/American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology/Society of Toxicologic Pathology combined meeting. The goal of this symposium is to present and discuss diagnostic pathology challenges or nomenclature issues. Because of the combined meeting, both laboratory and domestic animal cases were presented. This article presents summaries of the speakers' talks, including challenging diagnostic cases or nomenclature issues that were presented, along with select images that were used for audience voting and discussion. Some lesions and topics covered during the symposium included hepatocellular lesions, a proposed harmonized diagnostic approach to rat cardiomyopathy, crop milk in a bird, avian feeding accoutrement, heat exchanger in a tuna, metastasis of a tobacco carcinogen-induced pulmonary carcinoma, neurocytoma in a rat, pituicytoma in a rat, rodent mammary gland whole mounts, dog and rat alveolar macrophage ultrastructure, dog and rat pulmonary phospholipidosis, alveolar macrophage aggregation in a dog, degenerating yeast in a cat liver aspirate, myeloid leukemia in lymph node aspirates from a dog, Trypanosoma cruzi in a dog, solanum toxicity in a cow, bovine astrovirus, malignant microglial tumor, and nomenclature challenges from the Special Senses International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria Organ Working Group. PMID:27075180

  12. Gasoline toxicology: overview of regulatory and product stewardship programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swick, Derek; Jaques, Andrew; Walker, J C; Estreicher, Herb

    2014-11-01

    Significant efforts have been made to characterize the toxicological properties of gasoline. There have been both mandatory and voluntary toxicology testing programs to generate hazard characterization data for gasoline, the refinery process streams used to blend gasoline, and individual chemical constituents found in gasoline. The Clean Air Act (CAA) (Clean Air Act, 2012: § 7401, et seq.) is the primary tool for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to regulate gasoline and this supplement presents the results of the Section 211(b) Alternative Tier 2 studies required for CAA Fuel and Fuel Additive registration. Gasoline blending streams have also been evaluated by EPA under the voluntary High Production Volume (HPV) Challenge Program through which the petroleum industry provide data on over 80 refinery streams used in gasoline. Product stewardship efforts by companies and associations such as the American Petroleum Institute (API), Conservation of Clean Air and Water Europe (CONCAWE), and the Petroleum Product Stewardship Council (PPSC) have contributed a significant amount of hazard characterization data on gasoline and related substances. The hazard of gasoline and anticipated exposure to gasoline vapor has been well characterized for risk assessment purposes. PMID:24956589

  13. Environmental Sciences Division Toxicology Laboratory standard operating procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kszos, L.A.; Stewart, A.J.; Wicker, L.F.; Logsdon, G.M.

    1989-09-01

    This document was developed to provide the personnel working in the Environmental Sciences Division's Toxicology Laboratory with documented methods for conducting toxicity tests. The document consists of two parts. The first part includes the standard operating procedures (SOPs) that are used by the laboratory in conducting toxicity tests. The second part includes reference procedures from the US Environmental Protection Agency document entitled Short-Term Methods for Estimating the Chronic Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Freshwater Organisms, upon which the Toxicology Laboratory's SOPs are based. Five of the SOPs include procedures for preparing Ceriodaphnia survival and reproduction test. These SOPs include procedures for preparing Ceriodaphnia food (SOP-3), maintaining Ceriodaphnia cultures (SOP-4), conducting the toxicity test (SOP-13), analyzing the test data (SOP-13), and conducting a Ceriodaphnia reference test (SOP-15). Five additional SOPs relate specifically to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larval survival and growth test: methods for preparing fathead minnow larvae food (SOP-5), maintaining fathead minnow cultures (SOP-6), conducting the toxicity test (SOP-9), analyzing the test data (SOP-12), and conducting a fathead minnow reference test (DOP-14). The six remaining SOPs describe methods that are used with either or both tests: preparation of control/dilution water (SOP-1), washing of glassware (SOP-2), collection and handling of samples (SOP-7), preparation of samples (SOP-8), performance of chemical analyses (SOP-11), and data logging and care of technical notebooks (SOP-16).

  14. Toxicological risk assessment of complex mixtures through the Wtox model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Gerson Matias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical models are important tools for environmental management and risk assessment. Predictions about the toxicity of chemical mixtures must be enhanced due to the complexity of eects that can be caused to the living species. In this work, the environmental risk was accessed addressing the need to study the relationship between the organism and xenobiotics. Therefore, ve toxicological endpoints were applied through the WTox Model, and with this methodology we obtained the risk classication of potentially toxic substances. Acute and chronic toxicity, citotoxicity and genotoxicity were observed in the organisms Daphnia magna, Vibrio scheri and Oreochromis niloticus. A case study was conducted with solid wastes from textile, metal-mechanic and pulp and paper industries. The results have shown that several industrial wastes induced mortality, reproductive eects, micronucleus formation and increases in the rate of lipid peroxidation and DNA methylation of the organisms tested. These results, analyzed together through the WTox Model, allowed the classication of the environmental risk of industrial wastes. The evaluation showed that the toxicological environmental risk of the samples analyzed can be classied as signicant or critical.

  15. Environmental Sciences Division Toxicology Laboratory standard operating procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document was developed to provide the personnel working in the Environmental Sciences Division's Toxicology Laboratory with documented methods for conducting toxicity tests. The document consists of two parts. The first part includes the standard operating procedures (SOPs) that are used by the laboratory in conducting toxicity tests. The second part includes reference procedures from the US Environmental Protection Agency document entitled Short-Term Methods for Estimating the Chronic Toxicity of Effluents and Receiving Waters to Freshwater Organisms, upon which the Toxicology Laboratory's SOPs are based. Five of the SOPs include procedures for preparing Ceriodaphnia survival and reproduction test. These SOPs include procedures for preparing Ceriodaphnia food (SOP-3), maintaining Ceriodaphnia cultures (SOP-4), conducting the toxicity test (SOP-13), analyzing the test data (SOP-13), and conducting a Ceriodaphnia reference test (SOP-15). Five additional SOPs relate specifically to the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) larval survival and growth test: methods for preparing fathead minnow larvae food (SOP-5), maintaining fathead minnow cultures (SOP-6), conducting the toxicity test (SOP-9), analyzing the test data (SOP-12), and conducting a fathead minnow reference test (DOP-14). The six remaining SOPs describe methods that are used with either or both tests: preparation of control/dilution water (SOP-1), washing of glassware (SOP-2), collection and handling of samples (SOP-7), preparation of samples (SOP-8), performance of chemical analyses (SOP-11), and data logging and care of technical notebooks (SOP-16)

  16. Pollutants bioavailability and toxicological risk from microplastics to marine mussels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microplastics represent a growing environmental concern for the oceans due to their potential of adsorbing chemical pollutants, thus representing a still unexplored source of exposure for aquatic organisms. In this study polyethylene (PE) and polystyrene (PS) microplastics were shown to adsorb pyrene with a time and dose-dependent relationship. Results also indicated a marked capability of contaminated microplastics to transfer this model PAH to exposed mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis; tissue localization of microplastics occurred in haemolymph, gills and especially digestive tissues where a marked accumulation of pyrene was also observed. Cellular effects included alterations of immunological responses, lysosomal compartment, peroxisomal proliferation, antioxidant system, neurotoxic effects, onset of genotoxicity; changes in gene expression profile was also demonstrated through a new DNA microarray platform. The study provided the evidence that microplastics adsorb PAHs, emphasizing an elevated bioavailability of these chemicals after the ingestion, and the toxicological implications due to responsiveness of several molecular and cellular pathways to microplastics. - Highlights: • Polyethylene and polystyrene microplastics efficiently adsorbed pyrene. • Pyrene adsorbed on microplastics was readily bioavailable for mussels. • Microplastics affected several molecular and cellular pathways. • Potential toxicological risk can arise from virgin and contaminated microplastics. - Pyrene adsorbed on microplastics is accumulated in tissues of marine mussels. Transcriptional and cellular responses highlight the potential risk of virgin and contaminated polymers

  17. TOXNET and Beyond: Using the National Library of Medicine's Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Templin-Branner, W.

    2010-10-20

    The National Library of Medicine's Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal provides access to numerous databases that can help you explore environmental chemicals and risks. TOXNET and Beyond: Using NLM's Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal conveys the fundamentals of searching the NLM's TOXNET system of databases in chemistry, toxicology, environmental health, and related fields. In addition to TOXNET, the course will highlight various resources available through the Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal.

  18. Alaska, Gulf spills share similarities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accidental Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska and the deliberate dumping of crude oil into the Persian Gulf as a tactic of war contain both glaring differences and surprising similarities. Public reaction and public response was much greater to the Exxon Valdez spill in pristine Prince William Sound than to the war-related tragedy in the Persian Gulf. More than 12,000 workers helped in the Alaskan cleanup; only 350 have been involved in Kuwait. But in both instances, environmental damages appear to be less than anticipated. Natures highly effective self-cleansing action is primarily responsible for minimizing the damages. One positive action growing out of the two incidents is increased international cooperation and participation in oil-spill clean-up efforts. In 1990, in the aftermath of the Exxon Valdez spill, 94 nations signed an international accord on cooperation in future spills. The spills can be historic environmental landmarks leading to creation of more sophisticated response systems worldwide

  19. Relativistic Self-similar Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, M J; Cai, Mike J.; Shu, Frank H.

    2002-01-01

    We formulate and solve by semi-analytic means the axisymmetric equilibria of relativistic self-similar disks of infinitesimal vertical thickness. These disks are supported in the horizontal directions against their self-gravity by a combination of isothermal (two-dimensional) pressure and a flat rotation curve. The dragging of inertial frames restricts possible solutions to rotation speeds that are always less than 0.438 times the speed of light, a result first obtained by Lynden-Bell and Pineault in 1978 for a cold disk. We show that prograde circular orbits of massive test particles exist and are stable for all of our model disks, but retrograde circular orbits cannot be maintained with particle velocities less than the speed of light once the disk develops an ergoregion. We also compute photon trajectories, planar and non-planar, in the resulting spacetime, for disks with and without ergoregions. We find that all photon orbits, except for a set of measure zero, tend to be focused by the gravity of the flat...

  20. NMR-based metabolomic studies on the toxicological effects of cadmium and copper on green mussels Perna viridis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traditional toxicology studies have focused on selected biomarkers to characterize the biological stress induced by metals in marine organisms. In this study, a system biology tool, metabolomics, was applied to the marine mussel Perna viridis to investigate changes in the metabolic profiles of soft tissue as a response to copper (Cu) and cadmium (Cd), both as single metal and as a mixture. The major metabolite changes corresponding to metal exposure are related to amino acids, osmolytes, and energy metabolites. Following metal exposure for 1 week, there was a significant increase in the levels of branched chain amino acids, histidine, glutamate, glutamine, hypotaurine, dimethylglycine, arginine and ATP/ADP. For the Cu + Cd co-exposed mussels, the levels of lactate, branched chain amino acid, succinate, and NAD increased, whereas the levels of glucose, glycogen, and ATP/ADP decreased, indicating a different metabolic profile for the single metal exposure groups. After 2 weeks of exposure, the mussels showed acclimatization to Cd exposure based on the recovery of some metabolites. However, the metabolic profile induced by the metal mixture was very similar to that from Cu exposure, suggesting that Cu dominantly induced the metabolic disturbances. Both Cu and Cd may lead to neurotoxicity, disturbances in energy metabolism, and osmoregulation changes. These results demonstrate the high applicability and reliability of NMR-based metabolomics in interpreting the toxicological mechanisms of metals using global metabolic biomarkers.

  1. Successful adaption of a forensic toxicological screening workflow employing nontargeted liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to water analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steger, Julia; Arnhard, Kathrin; Haslacher, Sandra; Geiger, Klemens; Singer, Klaus; Schlapp, Michael; Pitterl, Florian; Oberacher, Herbert

    2016-04-01

    Forensic toxicology and environmental water analysis share the common interest and responsibility in ensuring comprehensive and reliable confirmation of drugs and pharmaceutical compounds in samples analyzed. Dealing with similar analytes, detection and identification techniques should be exchangeable between scientific disciplines. Herein, we demonstrate the successful adaption of a forensic toxicological screening workflow employing nontargeted LC/MS/MS under data-dependent acquisition control and subsequent database search to water analysis. The main modification involved processing of an increased sample volume with SPE (500 mL vs. 1-10 mL) to reach LODs in the low ng/L range. Tandem mass spectra acquired with a qTOF instrument were submitted to database search. The targeted data mining strategy was found to be sensitive and specific; automated search produced hardly any false results. To demonstrate the applicability of the adapted workflow to complex samples, 14 wastewater effluent samples collected on seven consecutive days at the local wastewater-treatment plant were analyzed. Of the 88,970 fragment ion mass spectra produced, 8.8% of spectra were successfully assigned to one of the 1040 reference compounds included in the database, and this enabled the identification of 51 compounds representing important illegal drugs, members of various pharmaceutical compound classes, and metabolites thereof. PMID:26791338

  2. Toxicological Studies of Mycotoxins Using Enzymatic and Histochemical Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies concerning mycotoxins involve activities of relevant potential for furthering knowledge in the fields of toxicology and environmental analysis. Using bioanalytical methods (biosensors, histochemistry), the conducted research aims at contributing to raising the awareness of local, national, and international media in relation to the safety of obtaining and processing vegetal and animal foods, by analyzing the possible effects of aflatoxins and ochratoxins, promoting animal health, food hygiene, in view of ensuring animal and human health. The study using laboratory animals (mice) while being part of one of the current national research directions, also holds international priority, by its contribution to a better understanding of several fundamental mechanisms of life at molecular level and to the characterization of certain biological processes that appear in mycotoxicosis.

  3. Environmental and human toxicology, the use of combined spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In case of accidental or chronic exposure to radionuclides, internal toxicity is related to both emitted radiation and to the in-vivo circulation scheme. Consequently the need for a better understanding of the radionuclide pathways in biological systems is of fundamental importance with regards to the assessment of nuclear risk. The approach developed by our group consists in combining radio-analytical and molecular chemistry for a comprehensive description of the transfer processes, accumulation and internalization of radioisotopes including human nuclear toxicology. This presentation will browse some examples of environmental transfers as well as biological interactions. Radiometry, IR spectroscopy, and XAS have been used as complementary analytical and structural probes in combination with quantum chemical calculations in order to fully describe the chemical mechanisms involved. (author)

  4. Long-term toxicological effects of paracetamol in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Majeed,

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The analgesic and antipyretic properties of paracetamol were first described in 1893, then it has been widely available as a non-prescription drug, with a therapeutic profile that reflects widespread safety and efficacy as well as paracetamol became the most widely used analgesic and antipyretic in children. It is the most frequently used over-the counter medicine in young children and is nearly universally used in infants. The drug is used by millions of children every day. The study was designed to study the toxicological effect of therapeutic dose of paracetamol after oral administration for three months in laboratory rats (Rattus norvegicous on the heart, kidney and liver. Results showed oral administration of the paracetamol for three months in laboratory rats showed that this drug has a severe damaging effect on most of the vital organs in the body like kidney, liver and heart.

  5. Toxicological Studies of Mycotoxins Using Enzymatic and Histochemical Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badea, Mihaela, E-mail: badeamihaela@yahoo.com; Taus, Nicoleta [Transilvania University of Brasov, Faculty of Medicine (Romania); Potrovita, Monica [Sanitary-Veterinary and Food Safety Direction of Brasov (Romania); Moarcas, Monica [Transilvania University of Brasov, Faculty of Medicine (Romania)

    2009-08-15

    Studies concerning mycotoxins involve activities of relevant potential for furthering knowledge in the fields of toxicology and environmental analysis. Using bioanalytical methods (biosensors, histochemistry), the conducted research aims at contributing to raising the awareness of local, national, and international media in relation to the safety of obtaining and processing vegetal and animal foods, by analyzing the possible effects of aflatoxins and ochratoxins, promoting animal health, food hygiene, in view of ensuring animal and human health. The study using laboratory animals (mice) while being part of one of the current national research directions, also holds international priority, by its contribution to a better understanding of several fundamental mechanisms of life at molecular level and to the characterization of certain biological processes that appear in mycotoxicosis.

  6. Poisonings and clinical toxicology: a template for Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tormey, W P

    2013-03-01

    Poisons information is accessed around the clock in the British Isles from six centres of which two are in Ireland at Dublin and Belfast accompanied by consultant toxicologist advisory service. The numbers of calls in Ireland are down to about 40 per day due to easy access to online data bases. Access to Toxbase, the clinical toxicology database of the National Poisons Information Service is available to National Health Service (NHS) health professionals and to Emergency Departments and Intensive Care units in the Republic of Ireland. There are 59 Toxbase users in the Republic of Ireland and 99 % of activity originates in Emergency Departments. All United States Poison Control Centres primarily use Poisindex which is a commercial database from Thomson Reuters.

  7. Ethnobotanical, phytochemical and toxicological studies of Xanthium strumarium L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Rashedul; Uddin, Mohammad Zashim; Rahman, Mohammad Sharifur; Tutul, Ershad; Rahman, Mohammed Zakiur; Hassan, Md Abul; Faiz, M A; Hossain, Moazzem; Hussain, Maleeha; Rashid, Mohammad Abdur

    2009-12-01

    The present study describes the ethnobotanical, phytochemical, and toxicological evaluations of Xanthium strumarium L. growing in Bangladesh. In toxicity evaluation on rats, the methanol extract of seedlings showed mortality, while both seedling and mature plant extracts raised the serum alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase values and produced significant abnormalities in the histopathology of liver and kidney of rats. On the other hand, the aqueous soluble fraction of methanol extract of mature plant (LC50 = 0.352 microg/mL) and methanol crude extract of seedlings (LC50 = 0.656 microg/mL) demonstrated significant toxicity in the brine shrimp lethality bioassay. A total of four compounds were purified and characterized as stigmasterol (1), 11-hydroxy-11-carboxy-4-oxo-1(5),2(Z)-xanthadien-12,8-olide (2), daucosterol (3) and lasidiol-10-anisate (4). The present study suggests that X. strumarium is toxic to animal. PMID:20922910

  8. Toxicological studies of a new chelating agent 8102

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of toxicological studies of a new chelating agent 8102 in different kinds of animals (mice, rats, rabbits and dogs) were reported. The results show that for mice, LD50 is 782 +- 21 mg/kg (i.v) and 3.17 +- 0.06 g/kg (i.m), and for rats, LD50 is 478 +- 15 mg/kg (i.v) and 3.04 +- 0.08 g/kg (i.m). In subacute experiments for dogs, the agent 8102 in doses of 50, 100, 150 mg(kg.day) was injected i.m. and for control group 0.9% saline was injected i.m.. Treatment was continued for 30 days. In pathological and clinical chemical analysis no essential change was observed. The experimental results suggest that the toxicity of this new chelating agent 8102 is low

  9. Predictive toxicology: the paths of the future; Toxicologie predictive: les voies du futur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detilleux, Ph.; Vallier, L.; Legallais, C.; Leclerc, E.; Prot, J.M.; Choucha, L.; Baudoin, R.; Dufresne, M.; Gautier, A.; Carpentier, B.; Mansuy, D.; Pery, A.; Brochot, C.; Manivet, Ph.; Rabilloud, Th.; Spire, C.; Coumoul, X.; Junot, Ch.; Laprevote, O.; Le pape, A.; Le Guevel, R.; Tourneur, E.; Ben Mkaddem, S.; Chassin, C.; Aloulou, M.; Goujon, J.M.; Hertif, A.; Ouali, N.; Vimont, S.; Monteiro, R.; Rondeau, E.; Elbim, C.; Werts, C.; Vandewalle, A.; Ben Mkaddem, S.; Pedruzzi, E.; Coant, N.; Bens, M.; Cluzeaud, F.; Ogier-Denis, E.; Pongnimitprasert, N.; Babin-Chevaye, C.; Fay, M.; Bernard, M.; Dupuy, C.; Ei Benna, J.; Gougerot-Pocidale, M.A.; Braut-Boucher, F.; Pinton, Ph.; Lucioli, J.; Tsybulskyy, D.; Joly, B.; Laffitte, J.; Bourges-Abella, N.; Oswald, I.P.; Kolf-Clauw, M.; Pierre, St.; Bats, A.S.; Chevallier, A.; Bui, L.Ch.; Ambolet-Camoit, A.; Garlatti, M.; Aggerbeck, M.; Barouki, R.; Al Khansa, I.; Blanck, O.; Guillouzo, A.; Bars, R.; Rouas, C.; Bensoussan, H.; Suhard, D.; Tessier, C.; Grandcolas, L.; Pallardy, M.; Gueguen, Y.; Sparfel, L.; Pinel-Marie, M.L.; Boize, M.; Koscielny, S.; Desmots, S.; Pery, A.; Fardel, O.; Alvergnas, M.; Rouleau, A.; Lucchi, G.; Mantion, G.; Heyd, B.; Richert, L.; Ducoroy, P.; Martin, H.; Val, St.; Martinon, L.; Cachier, H.; Yahyaoui, A.; Marfaing, H.; Baeza-Squiban, A.; Martin-Chouly, C.; Bonvallet, M.; Morzadec, C.; Fardel, O.; Vernhet, L.; Baverel, G.; El Hage, M.; Nazaret, R.; Conjard-Duplany, A.; Ferrier, B.; Martin, G.; Legendre, A.; Desmots, S.; Lecomte, A.; Froment, P.; Habert, R.; Lemazurier, E.; Robinel, F.; Dupont, O.; Sanfins, E.; Dairou, J.; Chaffotte, A.F.; Busi, F.; Rodrigues Lima, F.; Dupret, J.M.; Mayati, A.; Le Ferrec, E.; Levoin, N.; Paris, H.; Uriac, Ph.; N' Diaye, M.; Lagadic-Gossmann, D.; Fardel, O.; Assemat, E.; Boublil, L.; Borot, M.C.; Marano, F.; Baeza-Squiban, A.; Martiny, V.Y.; Moroy, G.; Badel, A.; Miteva, M.A.; Hussain, S.; Ferecatu, I.; Borot, C.; Andreau, K.; Baeza-Squiban, A. [and others

    2010-07-01

    Prevention of possible noxious effects in relation with the exposure to one or several chemical, physical or biological agents present in our domestic or professional environment is one of today's big public health stakes. Another stake is the better assessment of the risks linked with the use of health-care products. The efficacy and predictiveness of toxicology studies are directly related to the combination of alternate complementary methods and animal experiments (obtaining data from different species and with different models: in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo). Despite important efforts, the toxicological evaluation remains perfectible. The proceedings of this 2010 congress of the French Society of cell pharmaco-toxicology deal with recent advances, both scientific and technological, in 'predictive toxicology'. Four main topics are approached: cell and organ models, 'omics', in silico modeling, and new technologies (imaging, cell ships, high-speed processing). Among the different presentations, 3 abstracts present some recent advances in imaging techniques applied to toxicology studies. These are: 1 - first uses in toxicology of TOF-SIMS mass spectroscopy imaging (O. Laprevote, Paris-Descartes Univ. (FR)); 2 - Small animal imaging, a tool for predictive toxicology (A. Le Pape, CNRS Orleans (FR)); 3 - uranium localization at cell level using SIMS imaging technique (C. Rouas et al., IRSN Fontenay-aux-Roses (FR)). (J.S.)

  10. Managing Toxicological Risks: The Legacy of Shuttle Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Space toxicology greatly matured as a result of research and operations associated with the Shuttle. Materials offgassing had been a manageable concern since the Apollo days, but we learned to pay careful attention to compounds that could escape containment, to combustion events, to toxic propellants, to overuse of utility compounds, and to microbial and human metabolites. We also learned that flying real-time hardware to monitor air pollutants was a pathway with unanticipated speed bumps. Each new orbiter was tested for any excess offgassing products that could pollute the air during flight. In the late 1990s toxicologists and safety experts developed a 5-level toxicity rating system to guide containment of toxic compounds. This system is now in use aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Several combustion events during Shuttle Mir and also during Shuttle free-flight impelled toxicologists to identify hardware capable of monitoring toxic products; however, rapid adaptation of the hardware for the unique conditions of spaceflight caused unexpected missteps. Current and planned combustion analyzers would be useful to commercial partners that wish to manage the risk of health effects from thermal events. Propellants received special attention during the Shuttle program because of the possibility of bringing them into the habitable volume on extravehicular activity suits. Monitors for the airlocks were developed to mitigate this risk. Utility materials, such as lubricants, posed limited toxicological problems because water was not recovered. One clearly documented case of microbial metabolites polluting the Shuttle atmosphere was noted, and this has implications for commercial flights and control of microbes. Finally, carbon dioxide, the major human metabolite, episodically presented air quality problems aboard Shuttle, especially when nominal air flows were obstructed. Commercial vehicles must maintain robust air circulation given the anticipated high density

  11. Gender differences in drug abuse in the forensic toxicological approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buccelli, C; Della Casa, E; Paternoster, M; Niola, M; Pieri, M

    2016-08-01

    Gender differences in substance use/abuse have been the focus of research in the last 15 years. Initiation, use patterns, acceleration of disease course, and help-seeking patterns are known to be influenced by gender differences with regard to biological, psychological, cultural and socioeconomic factors. This paper presents a systematic review of published data on gender differences in the use/abuse of psychoactive and psychotic drugs, focusing on the importance of a multidisciplinary approach. The basis for this paper was obtained by Medline searches using the search terms "human" and "gender", combined with individual drug names or "drugs of abuse". The reference lists of these papers were further checked for other relevant studies. The gender difference in drug abuse is more evident in adults than in adolescents (13-19 years): adult men are 2-3 times more likely than women to develop drug abuse/dependence disorders and approximately 4 times as likely to have an alcohol use disorder. Such prevalence rates have not been observed in adolescents. Differences between men and women involve: (i) the biological response to the drug, (ii) the progression to drug dependence, and (iii) the comorbid psychiatric diagnoses, which may be due to both sociocultural factors and innate biological differences. A crucial role played by ovarian hormones (oestrogens and progesterone) has been documented in both human and animal model studies. Epidemiological data on how particular psychobiological and physiological characteristics in females influence vulnerability to both drug addiction and toxicological consequences of drugs are still in their infancy. Significant gaps remain in our knowledge, which are primarily attributable to the lack of empirical data that only a systematic and multidisciplinary approach to the topic can generate. The introduction of gender into forensic toxicological evaluations may help elucidate the relationship between the body's absorption of abused drugs

  12. The Annapolis Accords on the use of toxicology in decision-making. Annapolis Center Workshop Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, G.M.; Baskin, S.I.; Charnley, G.; Cohen, J.T.; Gold, L.S.; Kerkvliet, N.I.; Koenig, H.M.; Lewis, S.C.; McClain, R.M.; Rhomberg, L.R.; Snyder, J.W.; Weekley, L.B.

    2000-12-01

    The science of toxicology plays an important role in identifying safe conditions of use or exposure for many different kinds of environmental agents. The use of toxicologic information in risk assessment requires careful analysis, evaluation of data, and scientific judgment. These Annapolis Accords are intended to guide appropriate use in risk assessment of the scientific information from toxicology. We believe that application of these principles will improve the scientific credibility of risk assessment and the quality of decisions aimed at reducing and eliminating risks to human health and the environment.

  13. Particle and Fibre Toxicology, a new journal to meet a real need

    OpenAIRE

    Borm Paul; Donaldson Ken

    2004-01-01

    Abstract This Editorial is to announce Particle and Fibre Toxicology, a new Open Access, peer-reviewed, online journal published by BioMed Central. The field of particle and fibre toxicology has a long and famous history stretching from Agricola and Paracelsus in the 15th and 16th century to the challenges of the 21st century-nanoparticles, nanotubes and particulate matter (PM10) to name just three. Throughout this time there has been no single journal dedicated to the toxicology of particles...

  14. Using Domestic and Free-Ranging Arctic Canid Models for Environmental Molecular Toxicology Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harley, John R; Bammler, Theo K; Farin, Federico M; Beyer, Richard P; Kavanagh, Terrance J; Dunlap, Kriya L; Knott, Katrina K; Ylitalo, Gina M; O'Hara, Todd M

    2016-02-16

    The use of sentinel species for population and ecosystem health assessments has been advocated as part of a One Health perspective. The Arctic is experiencing rapid change, including climate and environmental shifts, as well as increased resource development, which will alter exposure of biota to environmental agents of disease. Arctic canid species have wide geographic ranges and feeding ecologies and are often exposed to high concentrations of both terrestrial and marine-based contaminants. The domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris) has been used in biomedical research for a number of years and has been advocated as a sentinel for human health due to its proximity to humans and, in some instances, similar diet. Exploiting the potential of molecular tools for describing the toxicogenomics of Arctic canids is critical for their development as biomedical models as well as environmental sentinels. Here, we present three approaches analyzing toxicogenomics of Arctic contaminants in both domestic and free-ranging canids (Arctic fox, Vulpes lagopus). We describe a number of confounding variables that must be addressed when conducting toxicogenomics studies in canid and other mammalian models. The ability for canids to act as models for Arctic molecular toxicology research is unique and significant for advancing our understanding and expanding the tool box for assessing the changing landscape of environmental agents of disease in the Arctic. PMID:26730740

  15. Toxicological safety and stability of the components of an irradiated Korean medicinal herb, Paeoniae Radix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Young-Beob; Jeong, Ill-Yun; Park, Hae-Ran; Oh, Heon; Jung, Uhee; Jo, Sung-Kee

    2004-09-01

    As utilization of medicinal herbs in food and bio-industry increases, mass production and the supply of herbs with a high quality are required. As the use of fumigants and preservatives for herbs is being restricted, safe hygienic technologies are demanded. To consider the possibility of the application of irradiation technology for this purpose, the genotoxicological safety and stability of the active components of the γ-irradiated Paeoniae Radix were studied. The herb was irradiated with γ-rays at a practical dosage of 10 kGy, and then it was extracted with hot water. The genotoxicity of the extract of the irradiated herb was examined in two short-term in vitro tests: (1) Ames test in Salmonella typhimurium; (2) Micronucleus test in cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The extract of the irradiated herb did not show mutagenicity in the Ames test of the Salmonella reverse mutation assay, and did not show cytogenetic toxicity in the culture of the CHO cells. HPLC chromatogram of paeoniflorin in the irradiated Paeoniae Radix was similar with that of the non-irradiated sample. The quantity of paeoniflorin did not change significantly with irradiation. These results suggest that γ-irradiated Paeoniae Radix is toxicologically safe and chemically stable.

  16. Wholesomeness and toxicological safety of irradiated animal feed by-products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to assess the wholesomeness and toxicological safety of irradiated animal feed by-products after eliminating the pathogenic microorganisms by using gamma irradiation. Five groups of Dokki-4 chicks each group consists of 60 one-day old cockerels were fed for 24 weeks on a ration containing irradiated fish, meat, and blood meals by dose level 0.5, 10.0, 20.0, and 50,0 KGY for 24 weeks. The ratio of animal proteins to the total protein of ration fed was 56% for non-irradiated or irradiated meals. The effects of consumption of irradiated meals on live body weight and internal organ weights (heart, liver, spleen, lungs, and kidneys) were studied. The observation gave an indication that body weight of all group as well as organs weight were normal and similar for the control group. Also, there was no clinically significant differences among the groups regarding red and white blood cells counts, haemoglobin contents, haematocrite value, and ESR for all groups. The results also showed no differences in total plasma protein, alkaline phosphatase activity and plasma Na, K, Mg, and Zn ions between the five groups studied

  17. Dependency Similarity, Attraction and Perceived Happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Janak

    1978-01-01

    Subjects were asked to evaluate either a similar personality or a dissimilar personality. Subjects rated similar others more positively than dissimilar others and, additionally, perceived similar others as more helpful and sympathetic than dissimilar others. (Author)

  18. Opinions expressed by Italian National Advisory Toxicological Committee on some active ingredients of pesticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camoni, I. [Ist. Superiore di Sanita`, Rome (Italy). Lab. di Tossicologia Applicata

    1996-03-01

    The opinions expressed by the Italian National Advisory Toxicological Committee (CCTN) on some active ingredients of pesticides are presented. Carcinogenic and mutagenic effects of these substances have been examined and, on this basis, an evaluation and relative classification were expressed.

  19. A Case-Based Toxicology Elective Course to Enhance Student Learning in Pharmacotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Stacy D.; Pond, Brooks B.; Creekmore, Kathryn A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To assess the impact of a case-based toxicology elective course on student learning in related required courses and student performance on the Pharmacy Curriculum Outcomes Assessment (PCOA) examination.

  20. Current status and prospects of the toxicological assessment of engineered nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nano toxicology is a branch of experimental toxicology dealing with identification and characterization of the harmful biological effects of engineered nanomaterials. The physico-chemical properties of these materials affect their biological level interactions. From the first generation of experimental studies it showed the need for adaptation to nanomaterials methodologies and toxicological evaluation of current strategies. Special challenges are presented by the variety of materials to be tested, from the definition of relevant dose quantities, by the standardization of the preparation and characterization of the nanomaterial in the biological sample matrices, by techniques for the determination of the biodistribution in the body. 'Omics' technologies are now an innovative tool for toxicological approach based on understanding the mechanisms of action, which will allow the most advanced laboratories to implement high-performance screening test.

  1. Waste tank safety program annual status report for FY 1993, Task 5: Toxicology and epidemiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A toxicology team independently reviewed analytical data and provided advice concerning potential health effects associated with exposure to tank-vapor constituents at the Hanford site. Most of the emphasis was directed toward Tank 241-C-103, but a preliminary assessment was also made of the toxicologic implication of the cyanide levels in the headspace of Tank 241-C-108. The objectives of this program are to (1) review procedures used for sampling vapors from various tanks, (2) identify constituents in tank-vapor samples that could be related to symptoms reported by waste-tank workers, (3) evaluate the toxicologic implications of those constituents by comparison to established toxicologic data bases, (4) provide advice for additional analytical efforts, and (5) support other activities as requested by the project manager and the cognizant Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Vapor Issues Safety Resolution Manager

  2. IRIS Toxicological Review of Halogenated Platinum Salts and Platinum Compounds (External Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA released the draft toxicological review for public comment under the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) Program. The original draft assessment (January 2009) has been archived but is available on this web page for the sake of transparency.

  3. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ethylene Glycol Mono-Butyl Ether (EGBE) (Interagency Science Discussion Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is releasing the draft report, Toxicological Review for Ethylene Glycol Mono-Butyl Ether , that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the IRIS Assessme...

  4. Waste tank safety program annual status report for FY 1993, Task 5: Toxicology and epidemiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahlum, D.D.; Young, J.Y.

    1993-09-01

    A toxicology team independently reviewed analytical data and provided advice concerning potential health effects associated with exposure to tank-vapor constituents at the Hanford site. Most of the emphasis was directed toward Tank 241-C-103, but a preliminary assessment was also made of the toxicologic implication of the cyanide levels in the headspace of Tank 241-C-108. The objectives of this program are to (1) review procedures used for sampling vapors from various tanks, (2) identify constituents in tank-vapor samples that could be related to symptoms reported by waste-tank workers, (3) evaluate the toxicologic implications of those constituents by comparison to established toxicologic data bases, (4) provide advice for additional analytical efforts, and (5) support other activities as requested by the project manager and the cognizant Westinghouse Hanford Company Tank Vapor Issues Safety Resolution Manager.

  5. Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute. Annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikula, K.J.; Belinsky, S.A.; Bradley, P.L. [eds.

    1993-11-01

    This annual report for the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute for 1992-1993 consists of 60 individual reports prepared separately by investigators describing progress in their own projects. Most papers are 2-5 pages long.

  6. Student Preferences Regarding Teaching Methods in a Drug-Induced Diseases and Clinical Toxicology Course

    OpenAIRE

    Rivkin, Anastasia; Gim, Suzanna

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To determine which teaching method in a drug-induced diseases and clinical toxicology course was preferred by students and whether their preference correlated with their learning of drug-induced diseases.

  7. The Toxicology Investigators Consortium Case Registry--the 2012 experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Timothy; Wax, Paul; Smith, Eric; Hart, Katherine; Brent, Jeffrey

    2013-12-01

    In 2010, the American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) established its Case Registry, the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC). All cases are entered prospectively and include only suspected and confirmed toxic exposures cared for at the bedside by board-certified or board-eligible medical toxicologists at its participating sites. The primary aims of establishing this Registry include the development of a realtime toxico-surveillance system in order to identify and describe current or evolving trends in poisoning and to develop a research tool in toxicology. ToxIC allows for extraction of data from medical records from multiple sites across a national and international network. All cases seen by medical toxicologists at participating institutions were entered into the database. Information characterizing patients entered in 2012 was tabulated and data from the previous years including 2010 and 2011 were included so that cumulative numbers and trends could be described as well. The current report includes data through December 31st, 2012. During 2012, 38 sites with 68 specific institutions contributed a total of 7,269 cases to the Registry. The total number of cases entered into the Registry at the end of 2012 was 17,681. Emergency departments remained the most common source of consultation in 2012, accounting for 61 % of cases. The most common reason for consultation was for pharmaceutical overdose, which occurred in 52 % of patients including intentional (41 %) and unintentional (11 %) exposures. The most common classes of agents were sedative-hypnotics (1,422 entries in 13 % of cases) non-opioid analgesics (1,295 entries in 12 % of cases), opioids (1,086 entries in 10 % of cases) and antidepressants (1,039 entries in 10 % of cases). N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was the most common antidote administered in 2012, as it was in previous years, followed by the opioid antagonist naloxone, sodium bicarbonate, physostigmine and flumazenil. Anti-crotalid Fab

  8. Distance learning in toxicology: Resident and remote; Scotland, IPCS, IUPAC, and the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Globally, very few college or university chemistry courses incorporate toxicology although public perception of chemicals and the chemical industry as threats to health and the environment has had an adverse effect on chemistry and on the use of its products. The International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) through its Commission on Toxicology recognized this and, with the support of the Committee on the Teaching of Chemistry has used the IUPAC web site to promote distance learning in toxicology for chemists. After preparation of a thoroughly refereed consensus Glossary of Terms for Chemists of Terms Used in Toxicology, a textbook Fundamental Toxicology for Chemists and a set of educational modules entitled Essential Toxicology were compiled and put through the normal thorough review procedure of IUPAC before being approved by the organization. There is now an additional Glossary of Terms Used in Toxicokinetics. The modules are freely downloadable in Adobe PDF format and are designed to be used both by educators and by students. Educators are asked to select whatever is appropriate to their students and to use the material as they wish, adding content specifically relevant to their circumstances. For self-study, the web modules have self-assessment questions and model answers. Currently the original Glossary for Chemists of Terms Used in Toxicology is being revised and it is expected that this will lead to further developments. The currently available components of the IUPAC programme may be accessed through the IUPAC website at the Subcommittee on Toxicology and Risk Assessment page: http://www.iupac.org/divisions/VII/VII.C.2/index.html

  9. Evaluation of Cases Consulted to Forensic Toxicology Laboratory between 2008 and 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Gören, İsmail Ethem; Duysak, Mustafa İlker; Dağlıoğlu, Nebile; Efeoğlu, Pınar; Gülmen, Mete Korkut

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, we aimed to determine annual and seasonal distribution of cases and affecting factors of the distribution in Cukurova University Hospital, Forensic Toxicology Laboratory. Method: Five-year (up to 2012 from 2008) archives of cases consulted to our forensic toxicology laboratory was investigated and classified according to gender, situation of case, type of poisoning, seasonal distribution, findings were statistically evaluated by SPSS v20.0 software Results: After sc...

  10. Coastal marine pollution and toxicology : overview of current research and future needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents are marine pollution and toxicology studies at Universiti Sains Malaysia, their facilities, and research projects have been done on this subject. In coastal pollution monitoring and baseline studies, the emphasis have been on determination of levels of trace-metals in the coastal marine environment, in relation to other physico-chemical parameters. The future needs and goals of marine pollution and toxicology studies in Malaysia also discussed

  11. Application of toxicogenomics in hepatic systems toxicology for risk assessment: Acetaminophen as a case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hepatic systems toxicology is the integrative analysis of toxicogenomic technologies, e.g., transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics, in combination with traditional toxicology measures to improve the understanding of mechanisms of hepatotoxic action. Hepatic toxicology studies that have employed toxicogenomic technologies to date have already provided a proof of principle for the value of hepatic systems toxicology in hazard identification. In the present review, acetaminophen is used as a model compound to discuss the application of toxicogenomics in hepatic systems toxicology for its potential role in the risk assessment process, to progress from hazard identification towards hazard characterization. The toxicogenomics-based parallelogram is used to identify current achievements and limitations of acetaminophen toxicogenomic in vivo and in vitro studies for in vitro-to-in vivo and interspecies comparisons, with the ultimate aim to extrapolate animal studies to humans in vivo. This article provides a model for comparison of more species and more in vitro models enhancing the robustness of common toxicogenomic responses and their relevance to human risk assessment. To progress to quantitative dose-response analysis needed for hazard characterization, in hepatic systems toxicology studies, generation of toxicogenomic data of multiple doses/concentrations and time points is required. Newly developed bioinformatics tools for quantitative analysis of toxicogenomic data can aid in the elucidation of dose-responsive effects. The challenge herein is to assess which toxicogenomic responses are relevant for induction of the apical effect and whether perturbations are sufficient for the induction of downstream events, eventually causing toxicity.

  12. TOXICOLOGICAL EVALUATION OF REALISTIC EMISSIONS OF SOURCE AEROSOLS (TERESA): APPLICATION TO POWER PLANT-DERIVED PM2.5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Annette Rohr

    2004-12-02

    This report documents progress made on the subject project during the period of March 1, 2004 through August 31, 2004. The TERESA Study is designed to investigate the role played by specific emissions sources and components in the induction of adverse health effects by examining the relative toxicity of coal combustion and mobile source (gasoline and/or diesel engine) emissions and their oxidative products. The study involves on-site sampling, dilution, and aging of coal combustion emissions at three coal-fired power plants, as well as mobile source emissions, followed by animal exposures incorporating a number of toxicological endpoints. The DOE-EPRI Cooperative Agreement (henceforth referred to as ''the Agreement'') for which this technical progress report has been prepared covers the analysis and interpretation of the field data collected at the first power plant (henceforth referred to as Plant 0, and located in the Upper Midwest), followed by the performance and analysis of similar field experiments at two additional coal-fired power plants (Plants 1 and 2) utilizing different coal types and with different plant configurations. Significant progress was made on the Project during this reporting period, with field work being initiated at Plant 0. Initial testing of the stack sampling system and reaction apparatus revealed that primary particle concentrations were lower than expected in the emissions entering the mobile chemical laboratory. Initial animal exposures to primary emissions were carried out (Scenario 1) to ensure successful implementation of all study methodologies and toxicological assessments. Results indicated no significant toxicological effects in response to primary emissions exposures. Exposures were then carried out to diluted, oxidized, neutralized emissions with the addition of secondary organic aerosol (Scenario 5), both during the day and also at night when primary particle concentrations in the sampled stack emissions

  13. Synthesis, characterization and toxicological evaluation of a core-shell copper oxide/polyaniline nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Ana Letícia de O F; Vicentini, Denice S; Costa, Cristina H; Melegari, Silvia P; Matias, William G

    2014-08-01

    The newest generation of copper oxide NPs (CuO NPs) is the CuO core-shell (CS), which has potential applications in several areas (e.g., electronics and paint) and is able to provide a greater service life due to its coating; however, its toxicity is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to synthesize, characterize and evaluate the aquatic toxicology of CuO NPs and CuO core-shells through acute and chronic toxicity tests with the freshwater microcrustaceans Daphnia magna and to evaluate its acute toxicity with the marine bioluminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The NPs were synthesized by direct thermal decomposition after being coated as a CS with polyaniline (PANI). With respect to acute toxicity with D. magna, the CuO NPs and CS CuO/PANI presented EC50 values of 0.32 mg L(-1) and 0.48 mg L(-1), respectively. For the tests with V. fischeri, the CuO NPs (EC50-15 min=7.79 mg L(-1)) exhibited behavior similar to that of the CS CuO/PANI (EC50-15 min=9.05 mg L(-1)) after 15 min of exposure. Regarding chronic toxicity, both forms showed a statistically significant effect (ptoxicity results, it can be concluded that both forms of CuO were toxic and presented similar behaviors during the acute tests; however, after 21 d of exposure, CS CuO/PANI showed higher toxicity to the reproduction parameter, highlighting the importance of a complete study of the NP to better understand its toxicity mechanism. PMID:24875919

  14. Toxicological Considerations, Toxicity Assessment, and Risk Management of Inhaled Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakand, Shahnaz; Hayes, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Novel engineered nanoparticles (NPs), nanomaterial (NM) products and composites, are continually emerging worldwide. Many potential benefits are expected from their commercial applications; however, these benefits should always be balanced against risks. Potential toxic effects of NM exposure have been highlighted, but, as there is a lack of understanding about potential interactions of nanomaterials (NMs) with biological systems, these side effects are often ignored. NPs are able to translocate to the bloodstream, cross body membrane barriers effectively, and affect organs and tissues at cellular and molecular levels. NPs may pass the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and gain access to the brain. The interactions of NPs with biological milieu and resulted toxic effects are significantly associated with their small size distribution, large surface area to mass ratio (SA/MR), and surface characteristics. NMs are able to cross tissue and cell membranes, enter into cellular compartments, and cause cellular injury as well as toxicity. The extremely large SA/MR of NPs is also available to undergo reactions. An increased surface area of the identical chemical will increase surface reactivity, adsorption properties, and potential toxicity. This review explores biological pathways of NPs, their toxic potential, and underlying mechanisms responsible for such toxic effects. The necessity of toxicological risk assessment to human health should be emphasised as an integral part of NM design and manufacture. PMID:27314324

  15. Melanin and neuromelanin binding of drugs and chemicals: toxicological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Oskar; Lindquist, Nils Gunnar

    2016-08-01

    Melanin is a polyanionic pigment that colors, e.g., the hair, skin and eyes. The pigment neuromelanin is closely related to melanin and is mainly produced in specific neurons of the substantia nigra. Certain drugs and chemicals bind to melanin/neuromelanin and are retained in pigment cells for long periods. This specific retention is thought to protect the cells but also to serve as a depot that slowly releases accumulated compounds and may cause toxicity in the eye and skin. Moreover, neuromelanin and compounds with high neuromelanin affinity have been suggested to be implicated in the development of adverse drug reactions in the central nervous system (CNS) as well as in the etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Epidemiologic studies implicate the exposure to pesticides, metals, solvents and other chemicals as risk factors for PD. Neuromelanin interacts with several of these toxicants which may play a significant part in both the initiation and the progression of neurodegeneration. MPTP/MPP(+) that has been casually linked with parkinsonism has high affinity for neuromelanin, and the induced dopaminergic denervation correlates with the neuromelanin content in the cells. Recent studies have also reported that neuromelanin may interact with α-synuclein as well as activate microglia and dendritic cells. This review aims to provide an overview of melanin binding of drugs and other compounds, and possible toxicological implications, with particular focus on the CNS and its potential involvement in neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:27311820

  16. Zebrafish as a systems toxicology model for developmental neurotoxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Yuhei; Murakami, Soichiro; Ashikawa, Yoshifumi; Sasagawa, Shota; Umemoto, Noriko; Shimada, Yasuhito; Tanaka, Toshio

    2015-02-01

    The developing brain is extremely sensitive to many chemicals. Exposure to neurotoxicants during development has been implicated in various neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders, including autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactive disorder, schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and Alzheimer's disease. Although rodents have been widely used for developmental neurotoxicity testing, experiments using large numbers of rodents are time-consuming, expensive, and raise ethical concerns. Using alternative non-mammalian animal models may relieve some of these pressures by allowing testing of large numbers of subjects while reducing expenses and minimizing the use of mammalian subjects. In this review, we discuss some of the advantages of using zebrafish in developmental neurotoxicity testing, focusing on central nervous system development, neurobehavior, toxicokinetics, and toxicodynamics in this species. We also describe some important examples of developmental neurotoxicity testing using zebrafish combined with gene expression profiling, neuroimaging, or neurobehavioral assessment. Zebrafish may be a systems toxicology model that has the potential to reveal the pathways of developmental neurotoxicity and to provide a sound basis for human risk assessments. PMID:25109898

  17. Toxicology and environmental digital resources from and for citizen groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, P; Pellerano, M B

    2001-01-12

    Since the late 1970s, grass-roots community groups, consumer advocates, and national (and international) environmental organizations have made two main contributions to public discussions, and public policies, affecting the production, use, and disposal of toxic materials. With the advent of e-mail, listservs, and the World Wide Web, such groups formed global "early warning" networks that have (1) alerted people to many uses of toxic materials and their effects on wildlife and humans, and (2) advocated new prevention-based public policies, including: assessment of available alternatives as a means of supplementing risk assessments; clean production as a way of avoiding the use of toxic materials; the substitution principle as a way of systematically reducing the use of toxic materials as time passes; the precautionary principle as a policy response to uncertainties in toxicological science; and zero discharge of persistent or bioaccumulative substances. We describe and discuss numerous important digital resources (web sites, discussion lists, and databases) created and maintained by and for citizen groups. PMID:11164976

  18. Amphetamine Positive Urine Toxicology Screen Secondary to Atomoxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua L. Fenderson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to report the first case of atomoxetine leading to false-positive urine drug screen. An otherwise healthy 27-year-old female with a history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD treated with atomoxetine had an acute onset tonic-clonic seizure. On arrival to the hospital, a urine toxicological drug screen with immunochemical cloned enzyme donor immunoassay (CEDIA was performed. Results were positive for amphetamines; however, the presence of these substances could not be confirmed with urine gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. She denied any illicit drug use, herbal medications, or supplements, and her other prescription medications have not been previously known to cause a false-positive result for amphetamines. While stimulant treatments for ADHD could certainly result in a positive result on urine screen for amphetamines, there have been no reports of false-positive results for amphetamines secondary to patients using atomoxetine. We implicate atomoxetine, and/or its metabolites, as a compound or compounds which may interfere with urine drug immunoassays leading to false-positive results for amphetamines CEDIA assays.

  19. Toxicological relevance of emerging contaminants for drinking water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriks, Merijn; Heringa, Minne B; van der Kooi, Margaretha M E; de Voogt, Pim; van Wezel, Annemarie P

    2010-01-01

    The detection of many new compounds in surface water, groundwater and drinking water raises considerable public concern, especially when human health based guideline values are not available it is questioned if detected concentrations affect human health. In an attempt to address this question, we derived provisional drinking water guideline values for a selection of 50 emerging contaminants relevant for drinking water and the water cycle. For only 10 contaminants, statutory guideline values were available. Provisional drinking water guideline values were based upon toxicological literature data. The maximum concentration levels reported in surface waters, groundwater and/or drinking water were compared to the (provisional) guideline values of the contaminants thus obtained, and expressed as Benchmark Quotient (BQ) values. We focused on occurrence data in the downstream parts of the Rhine and Meuse river basins. The results show that for the majority of compounds a substantial margin of safety exists between the maximum concentration in surface water, groundwater and/or drinking water and the (provisional) guideline value. The present assessment therefore supports the conclusion that the majority of the compounds evaluated pose individually no appreciable concern to human health. PMID:19766285

  20. The community conditioning hypothesis and its application to environmental toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the authors present the community conditions hypothesis, ecological communities retain information bout events in their history. This hypothesis, which was derived from the concept of nonequilibrium community ecology, was developed as a framework for understanding the persistence of dose-related responses in multispecies toxicity tests. The authors present data from three standardized aquatic microcosm (SAM) toxicity tests using the water-soluble fractions from turbine fuels (Jet-A, JP-4, and JP-8). In all three tests, the toxicants depressed the Daphnia populations for several weeks, which resulted in algal blooms in the dosed microcosms due to lower predation rates. These effects were short-lived, and by the second and third months of the experiments, the Daphnia populations appeared to have recovered. However, multivariate analysis of the data released dose/response differences that reappeared during the later part of the tests, often due to differences in other consumers (rotifers, ostracods, ciliates), or algae that are not normally consumed (filamentous green algae and bluegreen algae). The findings are consistent with ecological theories that describe communities as the unique production of their etiologies. The implications of this to environmental toxicology are that almost all environmental events leave lasting effects, whether or not they have observed them

  1. Silver nanoparticles: synthesis, properties, toxicology, applications and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Quang Huy; Quy Nguyen, Van; Le, Anh-Tuan

    2013-09-01

    In recent years the outbreak of re-emerging and emerging infectious diseases has been a significant burden on global economies and public health. The growth of population and urbanization along with poor water supply and environmental hygiene are the main reasons for the increase in outbreak of infectious pathogens. Transmission of infectious pathogens to the community has caused outbreaks of diseases such as influenza (A/H5N1), diarrhea (Escherichia coli), cholera (Vibrio cholera), etc throughout the world. The comprehensive treatments of environments containing infectious pathogens using advanced disinfectant nanomaterials have been proposed for prevention of the outbreaks. Among these nanomaterials, silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) with unique properties of high antimicrobial activity have attracted much interest from scientists and technologists to develop nanosilver-based disinfectant products. This article aims to review the synthesis routes and antimicrobial effects of Ag-NPs against various pathogens including bacteria, fungi and virus. Toxicology considerations of Ag-NPs to humans and ecology are discussed in detail. Some current applications of Ag-NPs in water-, air- and surface- disinfection are described. Finally, future prospects of Ag-NPs for treatment and prevention of currently emerging infections are discussed.

  2. Alternaria in Food: Ecophysiology, Mycotoxin Production and Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyang Burm; Patriarca, Andrea; Magan, Naresh

    2015-06-01

    Alternaria species are common saprophytes or pathogens of a wide range of plants pre- and post-harvest. This review considers the relative importance of Alternaria species, their ecology, competitiveness, production of mycotoxins and the prevalence of the predominant mycotoxins in different food products. The available toxicity data on these toxins and the potential future impacts of Alternaria species and their toxicity in food products pre- and post-harvest are discussed. The growth of Alternaria species is influenced by interacting abiotic factors, especially water activity (aw), temperature and pH. The boundary conditions which allow growth and toxin production have been identified in relation to different matrices including cereal grain, sorghum, cottonseed, tomato, and soya beans. The competitiveness of Alternaria species is related to their water stress tolerance, hydrolytic enzyme production and ability to produce mycotoxins. The relationship between A. tenuissima and other phyllosphere fungi has been examined and the relative competitiveness determined using both an Index of Dominance (ID) and the Niche Overlap Index (NOI) based on carbon-utilisation patterns. The toxicology of some of the Alternaria mycotoxins have been studied; however, some data are still lacking. The isolation of Alternaria toxins in different food products including processed products is reviewed. The future implications of Alternaria colonization/infection and the role of their mycotoxins in food production chains pre- and post-harvest are discussed. PMID:26190916

  3. Current developments in food additive toxicology in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recently published proposal (Fed. Reg. 66 (2001) 4706) for mandatory submission of information on all plant-derived bioengineered foods fed to humans or animals will be reviewed. Under this proposal, information such as data on identity, level and function of the introduced substance(s); an estimate of dietary exposure; allergenic potential of the protein; data relevant to other safety issues that may be associated with the substance; selection of a comparable food; historic uses of comparable food; composition and characteristics of bioengineered food versus those of the comparable food should be provided. In addition, characterization of the parent plant; construction of the transformation vector and introduced genetic material along with number of insertion sites and genes; data on the genetic material and any newly inserted genes for antibiotic resistance should be submitted with the notification. The Interagency Coordinating Committee for Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM) was identified by the U.S. Congress as the organization to review and validate new alternative toxicological test methods for 14 U.S. government agencies. Validated and accepted alternative toxicity tests will be incorporated into toxicity testing recommendations for regulatory agencies

  4. Toxicology Strategies for Drug Discovery: Present and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomme, Eric A G; Will, Yvonne

    2016-04-18

    Attrition due to nonclinical safety represents a major issue for the productivity of pharmaceutical research and development (R&D) organizations, especially during the compound optimization stages of drug discovery and the early stages of clinical development. Focusing on decreasing nonclinical safety-related attrition is not a new concept, and various approaches have been experimented with over the last two decades. Front-loading testing funnels in Discovery with in vitro toxicity assays designed to rapidly identify unfavorable molecules was the approach adopted by most pharmaceutical R&D organizations a few years ago. However, this approach has also a non-negligible opportunity cost. Hence, significant refinements to the "fail early, fail often" paradigm have been proposed recently to reflect the complexity of accurately categorizing compounds with early data points without taking into account other important contextual aspects, in particular efficacious systemic and tissue exposures. This review provides an overview of toxicology approaches and models that can be used in pharmaceutical Discovery at the series/lead identification and lead optimization stages to guide and inform chemistry efforts, as well as a personal view on how to best use them to meet nonclinical safety-related attrition objectives consistent with a sustainable pharmaceutical R&D model. The scope of this review is limited to small molecules, as large molecules are associated with challenges that are quite different. Finally, a perspective on how several emerging technologies may impact toxicity evaluation is also provided. PMID:26588328

  5. Basis for the toxicological evaluation of engineered nanomaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Porredon Guarch

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available El aumento de producción anual de nanomateriales eleva la exposición humana y ambiental, y tiene un posible impacto en la opinión pública. Con el fin de reglamentar esta producción, organizaciones internacionales como la Organización para la Cooperación y Desarrollo Económico (OECD y la Comisión Europea a través de la reglamentación REACH han establecido algunas medidas para evaluar la seguridad para la salud y el medio ambiente de los nanomateriales. Esta revisión intenta analizar las medidas propuestas por estas instituciones de acuerdo con las pruebas estándar usadas en toxicología, las distintas clasificaciones de los nanomateriales y los principales mecanismos de toxicidad conocidos de los nanomateriales. Como resultado de este análisis se cree conveniente continuar desarrollando tests específicos para la evaluación de nanomateriales, ya que las medidas establecidas por las organizaciones de referencia no son suficientes para conseguir unas bases estándares para testar nanomateriales. En gran parte esto es debido a la gran diversidad de nanomateriales existentes y la importancia de la manipulación, técnicas y sistemas experimentales escogidos en los resultados de toxicidad.

  6. Toxicological Considerations, Toxicity Assessment, and Risk Management of Inhaled Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakand, Shahnaz; Hayes, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Novel engineered nanoparticles (NPs), nanomaterial (NM) products and composites, are continually emerging worldwide. Many potential benefits are expected from their commercial applications; however, these benefits should always be balanced against risks. Potential toxic effects of NM exposure have been highlighted, but, as there is a lack of understanding about potential interactions of nanomaterials (NMs) with biological systems, these side effects are often ignored. NPs are able to translocate to the bloodstream, cross body membrane barriers effectively, and affect organs and tissues at cellular and molecular levels. NPs may pass the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and gain access to the brain. The interactions of NPs with biological milieu and resulted toxic effects are significantly associated with their small size distribution, large surface area to mass ratio (SA/MR), and surface characteristics. NMs are able to cross tissue and cell membranes, enter into cellular compartments, and cause cellular injury as well as toxicity. The extremely large SA/MR of NPs is also available to undergo reactions. An increased surface area of the identical chemical will increase surface reactivity, adsorption properties, and potential toxicity. This review explores biological pathways of NPs, their toxic potential, and underlying mechanisms responsible for such toxic effects. The necessity of toxicological risk assessment to human health should be emphasised as an integral part of NM design and manufacture. PMID:27314324

  7. Preparation and Acute Toxicology of Nano-Magnetic Ferrofluid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Zefeng; WANG Guobin; TAO Kaixiong; LI Jianxing; Tian Yuan

    2005-01-01

    The nano-magnetic ferrofluid was prepared by chemical coprecipitation and its acute toxicology was investigated. The effective diameter (Eff. Diam. ) of the magnetic particles was about 19.9 nm, and the concentration of the ferrofluid was 17.54 mg/ml. The acute toxic reaction and the main viscera pathological morphology of mice were evaluated after oral, intravenous and intraperitoneal administration of the nano-magnetic ferrofluid of different doses respectively. Half lethal dose ( LD50 ) > 2104.8 mg/kg, maximum non-effect dose (ED0) = 320. 10mg/kg with oral; LD50 >438.50 mg/kg, ED0 = 160.05 mg/kg with intravenous route; and LD50>1578.6 mg/kg, ED0 =320.10 mg/kg with intraperitoneal administration. Degeneration and necrosis of viscera were not found. So the nano-magnetic ferrofluid, ofwhich toxicity is very low, may be used as a drug carri-er.

  8. General and Genetic Toxicology of Guayusa Concentrate (Ilex guayusa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Robert W; Mendes, Odete; Roy, Shambhu; McQuate, Robert S; Kraska, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Tea from the leaves of guayusa (Ilex guayusa) has a long history of consumption by Ecuadorian natives in regions where the plant is indigenous. The tea contains the methylxanthines caffeine and theobromine as well as chlorogenic acids, flavonoids, and sugars. Various studies were performed to evaluate the general and genetic toxicology of a standardized liquid concentrate of guayusa (GC). Guayusa concentrate was found to be negative in in vitro genotoxicity tests including the Ames test and a chromosome aberration study in human lymphocytes. The oral median lethal dose (LD50) of GC was >5,000 mg/kg for female rats. Guayusa concentrate was administered to male and female rats in a 90-day subchronic study at 1,200, 2,500, and 5,000 mg/kg/d of GC and a caffeine-positive control at 150 mg/kg/d corresponding to the amount of caffeine in the high-dose GC group. Effects observed in the GC-treated groups were comparable to those in the caffeine control group and included reductions in body weights, food efficiency, triglycerides values, and fat pad weights and increases in blood chemistry values for serum aspartate aminotransferase, serum alanine aminotransferase, and cholesterol and adaptive salivary gland hypertrophy. No signs of incremental toxicity due to any other components of guayusa were observed. The studies indicate no harmful effects of GC in these test systems. PMID:26811391

  9. Covert poisoning with difenacoum: clinical and toxicological observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, P T; Cox, A D; Harrington, D J; Evely, R S; Hampton, E; al-Sabah, A I; Massey, E; Jackson, H; Ferguson, T

    1997-03-01

    1. The coumarin anticoagulant difenacoum was detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with multi-wavelength UV detection in plasma from a 41 years old man who presented with a severe deficiency of vitamin K-dependent clotting factors of unknown aetiology. A longitudinal toxicological study of the consequent coagulopathy is described. 2. Plasma concentrations of difenacoum declined from 0.97 to 0.11 mgl-1 in 47 days with a terminal half life of 11.7 days. Rifampacin (300 mg bd) had no apparent effect on the terminal half life of the drug. Subsequently plasma concentrations of difenacoum and descarboxyprothrombin (DCP) unexpectedly increased. 3. Seven months after exposure clotting times were prolonged. The patient continued to have episodes of epistaxis, haematoma, purpurae and bruising and he required frequent treatment with Fresh Frozen Plasma in additional to oral phylloquinone (200 mg day-1). 4. Intermittent and unexpected increases in plasma concentrations of difenacoum and descarboxypro-thrombin suggested that covert, repeated ingestion of the anticoagulant was the most likely cause of the poisoning. The measurement of low concentrations of plasma phylloquinone except following supervised ingestion of the vitamin indicated that as an outpatient, the subject was not compliant with treatment despite his protestations to the contrary. He continued to deny this even when confronted by laboratory findings and at no time did he ever admit to self-poisoning. PMID:9088970

  10. “New designer drugs” in aspects of forensic toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyna Maciów-Głąb

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study : In autumn of 2010, in response to an ever-increasing market of “new designer drugs” and in view of new legal regulations, the Sanitary Inspection inspected numerous so-called “smart shops” where such products were sold. In the course of mass inspections, 3545 packages of various preparations were secured on the market in the Malopolska province. A total of 942 preparations were collected for analysis; of this number, 539 were sold as tablets and pills and 403 as plant-derived substances. The objective of the study was to determine potentially psychoactive components of the investigated preparations. Material and methods : The prepared samples were identified by employing an analytical procedure where the analytes were investigated by gas chromatography-electron impact mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS and thus a library of mass spectra was created. Results: The analysis revealed the following substances in the investigated products: piperazine derivatives (BZP, MPMP, TFMPP, cathinone derivatives (N-ethylcathinone, buthylone, ethylone, methylone, buphedrone, flephedrone, pyrovalerone derivatives (MDPV, naphyrone, and synthetic cannabinoids (AM-694, JWH-019, JWH-073, JWH-081, JWH-122, JWH-200, JWH-250. Conclusions : An unlimited source, i.e. the Internet, continues to provide the worldwide market with preparations of this type and their composition is constantly modified. The scale and complexity of the problem pose a challenge to forensic and clinical toxicology in the field of new designer drugs.

  11. Silver nanoparticles: synthesis, properties, toxicology, applications and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years the outbreak of re-emerging and emerging infectious diseases has been a significant burden on global economies and public health. The growth of population and urbanization along with poor water supply and environmental hygiene are the main reasons for the increase in outbreak of infectious pathogens. Transmission of infectious pathogens to the community has caused outbreaks of diseases such as influenza (A/H5N1), diarrhea (Escherichia coli), cholera (Vibrio cholera), etc throughout the world. The comprehensive treatments of environments containing infectious pathogens using advanced disinfectant nanomaterials have been proposed for prevention of the outbreaks. Among these nanomaterials, silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) with unique properties of high antimicrobial activity have attracted much interest from scientists and technologists to develop nanosilver-based disinfectant products. This article aims to review the synthesis routes and antimicrobial effects of Ag-NPs against various pathogens including bacteria, fungi and virus. Toxicology considerations of Ag-NPs to humans and ecology are discussed in detail. Some current applications of Ag-NPs in water-, air- and surface- disinfection are described. Finally, future prospects of Ag-NPs for treatment and prevention of currently emerging infections are discussed. (review)

  12. Occupational and environmental toxicology of mercury and its compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, H

    2000-04-01

    Mercury exists in various chemical forms. The important forms from a toxicological viewpoint are the metallic form, also called the elemental form, the divalent inorganic forms and methylmercury compounds. Elemental (Hg0) mercury has a high vapor pressure and the vapor causes a number of cases of poisoning via inhalation. Classical mercury poisoning is characterized by a triad of signs, namely tremors, erethism and gingivitis. Mercurial erethism, which is characterized by behavioral and personality changes such as extreme shyness, excitability, loss of memory, and insomnia are also observed. Recently, the effects of mercury exposure at levels around 0.05 mg/m3 or lower have been of concern and may include minor renal tubular damage, increased complaints of tiredness, memory disturbance and other symptoms, subclinical finger tremor, abnormal EEG by computerized analysis and impaired performance in neurobehavioral or neuropsychological tests. Abnormal gait, dysarthria, ataxia, deafness and constriction of the visual field are typical of the symptoms of methylmercury poisoning observed in Minamata and Iraqi outbreaks, as well as in occupational methylmercury poisoning cases. Furthermore, an infant born to a mother with excessive methylmercury consumption showed various neurological disturbances and delayed development. Since several populations are believed to be still exposed to methylmercury through the consumption of fish and sea mammals, neurobehavioral deviations in children of these populations have recently been investigated. PMID:10812838

  13. Emerging pattern mining to aid toxicological knowledge discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherhod, Richard; Judson, Philip N; Hanser, Thierry; Vessey, Jonathan D; Webb, Samuel J; Gillet, Valerie J

    2014-07-28

    Knowledge-based systems for toxicity prediction are typically based on rules, known as structural alerts, that describe relationships between structural features and different toxic effects. The identification of structural features associated with toxicological activity can be a time-consuming process and often requires significant input from domain experts. Here, we describe an emerging pattern mining method for the automated identification of activating structural features in toxicity data sets that is designed to help expedite the process of alert development. We apply the contrast pattern tree mining algorithm to generate a set of emerging patterns of structural fragment descriptors. Using the emerging patterns it is possible to form hierarchical clusters of compounds that are defined by the presence of common structural features and represent distinct chemical classes. The method has been tested on a large public in vitro mutagenicity data set and a public hERG channel inhibition data set and is shown to be effective at identifying common toxic features and recognizable classes of toxicants. We also describe how knowledge developers can use emerging patterns to improve the specificity and sensitivity of an existing expert system. PMID:24873983

  14. Induction of drug metabolism: Species differences and toxicological relevance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large number of drugs and other chemicals have been shown to induce hepatic microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) forms in experimental animals and humans. Most CYP forms are induced by receptor-mediated mechanisms leading to an increase in gene transcription. Important nuclear receptors involved in the induction of CYP1A, CYP2B, CYP3A and CYP4A subfamily forms comprise, respectively, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, the constitutive androstane receptor, the pregnane X receptor and the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha. Hepatic CYP form induction can be assessed by in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro methods. Significant species differences can exist in the enzyme induction response to a given chemical and also in the toxicological consequences of induction. Hepatic CYP form induction in humans may lead to clinically important drug-drug interactions. In rodents hepatic CYP form induction can be associated with the formation of tumours by non-genotoxic modes of action in the liver, thyroid and other tissues

  15. Cyclooxygenases in the skin: pharmacological and toxicological implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cyclooxygenase (COX), a prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase (PTGS), catalyzes the formation of prostaglandins from arachidonic acid. Prostaglandins are lipid signaling mediators that play a central role in a broad range of diverse physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inflammation, reproduction, nocioception, and gastrointestinal protection. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase activity is the mechanism by which nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDS) exert their analgesic, antipyretic, antiinflammatory, and antithrombotic effects. COX is currently believed to exist in three isoforms. In this review, we provide a concise state-of-the-art description of the role of COX in pharmacology and toxicology of skin including its involvement in normal physiology, cutaneous inflammation, nociception, wound healing, and tumorigenesis. COX-dependent pathways influence keratinocyte differentiation, hair follicle development, and hair growth. The critical role of COX-2 in pathophysiology of skin is also addressed. COX-2 mediates inflammatory processes in skin, including inflammatory hyperalgesia and nociception, and administration of specific COX-2 inhibitors reduces edema, vascular permeability, and other markers of cutaneous inflammation. A number of studies in animal models and in humans show that COX-2 inhibitors possess cancer chemopreventive properties. Selective COX-2 inhibitors have a more favorable side-effect profile. Topical formulations of COX-2 inhibitors are being developed as a novel pharmacologic approach for the treatment of COX-2 mediated skin diseases

  16. A New Path Forward: The Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM) and National Toxicology Program's Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods (NICEATM)

    OpenAIRE

    Casey, Warren; Jacobs, Abigail; Maull, Elizabeth; Matheson, Joanna; Clarke, Carol; Lowit, Anna

    2015-01-01

    In 2000, the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM) was congressionally established, with representatives from Federal regulatory and research agencies that require, use, generate, or disseminate toxicologic and safety testing information. For over 15 y, ICCVAM and the National Toxicology Program's Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods (NICEATM) have worked together to promote the development, validation, and r...

  17. The U.S. National Library of Medicine's Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For nearly 40 years, the National Library of Medicine's (NLM) Toxicology and Environmental Health Information Program (TEHIP) has been a significant leader in organizing and providing public access to an extensive storehouse of toxicological information through its online databases. With the advent of the Internet, TEHIP has expanded its role to also serve as a pre-eminent portal to toxicological information worldwide. Its primary databases reside within the web-based TOXNET system, and include the scientifically peer-reviewed Hazardous Substances Data Bank (HSDB), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) and Toxics Release Inventory, the National Cancer Institute's Chemical Carcinogenesis Research Information System (CCRIS) and the TOXLINE file of over 3 million bibliographic references. TEHIP's ChemIDplus is an extensive chemical dictionary that extends beyond simple nomenclature to offer displays of molecular structures and links from particular chemicals to other databases containing more information. Specialty files in occupational safety and health, and household products have recently been added to TEHIP's suite of resources. Additional databases in risk assessment, drugs, toxicology education, and global resources, are under development. ''Special Topics'' pages lead users to structured summaries and links in areas such as arsenic, chemical warfare agents, biological warfare, and West Nile Virus. A database on alternatives to the use of live animals, a three-module toxicology tutor, and a glossary of terms in toxicology are among TEHIP's other information aids, as well an increasing commitment to serving consumers, as witnessed by the animated ToxTown program. Outside the sphere of TEHIP, NLM offers additional databases, such as PubMed, of significant value to toxicology researchers

  18. Asthma and COPD: Differences and Similarities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and COPD: differences and similarities Share | Asthma and COPD: Differences and Similarities This article has been reviewed ... or you could have Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) , such as emphysema or chronic bronchitis. Because asthma ...

  19. Shape Similarity Measures of Linear Entities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The essential of feature matching technology lies in how to measure the similarity of spatial entities.Among all the possible similarity measures,the shape similarity measure is one of the most important measures because it is easy to collect the necessary parameters and it is also well matched with the human intuition.In this paper a new shape similarity measure of linear entities based on the differences of direction change along each line is presented and its effectiveness is illustrated.

  20. Learning Good Edit Similarities with Generalization Guarantees

    OpenAIRE

    Bellet, Aurélien; Habrard, Amaury; Sebban, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Similarity and distance functions are essential to many learning algorithms, thus training them has attracted a lot of interest. When it comes to dealing with structured data (e.g., strings or trees), edit similarities are widely used, and there exists a few methods for learning them. However, these methods offer no theoretical guarantee as to the generalization performance and discriminative power of the resulting similarities. Recently, a theory of learning with good similarity functions wa...

  1. Composing Measures for Computing Text Similarity

    OpenAIRE

    Bär, Daniel; Zesch, Torsten; Gurevych, Iryna

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of computing similarity between texts. We start from the observation that while the concept of similarity is well grounded in psychology, text similarity is much less well-defined in the natural language processing community. We thus define the notion of text similarity and distinguish it from related tasks such as textual entailment and near-duplicate detection. We then identify multiple text dimensions, i.e. characteristics inherent to texts that can be used...

  2. Appropriate Similarity Measures for Author Cocitation Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    van Eck, Nees Jan; Waltman, Ludo

    2007-01-01

    textabstractWe provide a number of new insights into the methodological discussion about author cocitation analysis. We first argue that the use of the Pearson correlation for measuring the similarity between authors’ cocitation profiles is not very satisfactory. We then discuss what kind of similarity measures may be used as an alternative to the Pearson correlation. We consider three similarity measures in particular. One is the well-known cosine. The other two similarity measures have not ...

  3. Representation Independent Proximity and Similarity Search

    OpenAIRE

    Chodpathumwan, Yodsawalai; Aleyasin, Amirhossein; Termehchy, Arash; Sun, Yizhou

    2015-01-01

    Finding similar or strongly related entities in a graph database is a fundamental problem in data management and analytics with applications in similarity query processing, entity resolution, and pattern matching. Similarity search algorithms usually leverage the structural properties of the data graph to quantify the degree of similarity or relevance between entities. Nevertheless, the same information can be represented in many different structures and the structural properties observed ove...

  4. Similarity Structure of Wave-Collapse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rypdal, Kristoffer; Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Thomsen, Kenneth

    1985-01-01

    the significance of similarity in the evolution of a collapsing wave packet is investigated. Numerical solutions in radial symmetry demonstrate that the similarity behaviour is local in space and time, and that some similarity solutions must be classified as improper solutions. The nature of the...

  5. Toxicological assessment of polyhexamethylene biguanide for water treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asiedu-Gyekye Isaac J.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB is an antiseptic with antiviral and antibacterial properties used in a variety of products including wound care dressings, contact lens cleaning solutions, perioperative cleansing products, and swimming pool cleaners. There are regulatory concerns with regard to its safety in humans for water treatment. We decided to assess the safety of this chemical in Sprague-Dawley rats. PHMB was administered in a single dose by gavage via a stomach tube as per the manufacturer’s instruction within a dose range of 2 mg/kg to 40 mg/kg. Subchronic toxicity studies were also conducted at doses of 2 mg/kg, 8 mg/kg and 32 mg/kg body weight and hematological, biochemical and histopathological findings of the major organs were assessed. Administration of a dose of 25.6 mg/kg, i.e. 1.6 mL of 0.4% PHMB solution (equivalent to 6.4×103 mg/L of 0.1% solution resulted in 50% mortality. Histopathological analysis in the acute toxicity studies showed that no histopathological lesions were observed in the heart and kidney samples but 30% of the animals had mild hydropic changes in zone 1 of their liver samples, while at a dosage of 32 mg/kg in the subchronic toxicity studies, 50% of the animals showed either mild hepatocyte cytolysis with or without lymphocyte infiltration and feathery degeneration. Lymphocyte infiltration was, for the first time, observed in one heart sample, whereas one kidney sample showed mild tubular damage. The acute studies showed that the median lethal dose (LD50 is 25.6 mg/kg (LC50 of 1.6 mL of 0.4% PHMB. Subchronic toxicological studies also revealed few deleterious effects on the internal organs examined, as seen from the results of the biochemical parameters evaluated. These results have implications for the use of PHMB to make water potable.

  6. Different approaches to the toxicological evaluation of irradiated starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toxicological evaluation of irradiated starch is performed either through long-term experiments on rats (24 months) and mice (18 months) or through determination of the semichronic toxicity in rats (6 months) of previously identified and determined radiation-induced products. A trial with five groups each of 80 rats (40 males and 40 females; controls receiving the diet raw or cooked; other animals receiving the diet raw after irradiation to 300krad and raw or cooked after irradiation to 600krad) consists of a toxicity test and a study of the reproductive functions. The trial with mice - the same number of animals divided into three groups (standard control, control and 300krad) - consists of a study of the reproductive functions with an examination of teratogenicity and the study of cancerogenic and mutagenic potentiality. In no case have the authors found significant differences between the groups. Of the 35 starch radiolysis products so far identified the authors considered nine (formic acid, hydrogen peroxide, methyl alcohol, acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, glyceraldehyde, malonaldehyde and glyoxal). After an acute and subacute toxicity trial with a mixture of the nine compounds, a six-month semichronic toxicity trial was carried out with four groups of animals (15 males and 15 females). The daily uptake of 0.3g of the mixture per kilogram was found to have no effect on the rats. This daily uptake corresponds to a quantity of radiolytic products 800 times greater than what would be taken up by a baby consuming 30g of irradiated starch (300krad) and is below the threshold of true general toxicity, which is masked here by the caustic effect of the formic acid. (author)

  7. Comparative toxicological studies on the effects of internal exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Age-related changes in bone metabolism of normal beagle dogs, from 3 months to 17 years of age, were examined by morphometric and serum biochemical values. From 3 months to 2 years of age, bone volume (BV/TV) and trabecular thickness (Th. Tb.) in the iliac trabecular bone, labeled with tetracycline and calcein, increased rapidly with an increase of body weight. Mineral apposition rate (MAR) and bone formation rate (BFR, equivalent to bone turnover rate) decreased. The BFR at 3 months was approximately 11 times in males and 15 times in females higher than that at 2 years when bone metabolism was of adult type. From 2 to 10 years of age, BV/TV or Th. Tb. did not remarkably change, whereas both MAR and BFR had a tendency to decrease gradually with age. Parathyroid hormone level increased from 3 months to 17 years. Testosterone level increased up to 2 years and remained almost constant thereafter. Serum osteocalcin, alkaline phosphatase, and phosphorus decreased rapidly up to 2 years, although calcium did not change with age. Effects of swimming (exercise) and lactate calcium on osteoporotic bones in rats were examined. The BV/TV and Th. Tb. increased, but the MAR and BFR were improved to be sustained. These changes were promoted by the administration of calcium and vitamin D3. Toxicological study on DTPA revealed the following results: (1) Both hypocalcemia, following an increase of blood pressure, and heart failure were observed by iv injection of Zn-DTPA, but not observed by iv injection of Ca-DTPA. When DTPA was given orally, Ca-DTPA was more toxic than Zn-DTPA. DTPA toxicity induced dysfunction of the kidney and liver, hemorrhage and congestion in the lamina propria, and vascular expansion of the small intestine. Vascular permeability was also enhanced by either Ca-DTPA or Zn-DTPA. DTPA toxicity was found to be manifested by disturbed cardiovascular system. (Namekawa, K)

  8. Toxicological Assessment of the International Space Station Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.; Limero, T.; Beck, S.; Yang, L.; Martin, M.; Covington, P.; Boyd, J.; Lind, D.; Billica, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Space-faring crews must have safe breathing air throughout their missions to ensure adequate performance and good health. Toxicological assessment of air quality depends on the standards that define acceptable air quality, measurements of pollutant levels during the flight, and reports from the crew on their in-flight perceptions of air quality. Air samples from ISS flight 2A showed that contaminants in the Zarya module were at higher concentrations than the Unity module. At the crew's first entry, the amount of non-methane volatile organic compounds (NMVOCs) in Zarya was 23 Mg/cubic meter, whereas in the amount of NMVOCs in Unity was 5.3 mg/cubic meter. Approximately 26 hours later at egress from the modules, the NMVOCs were comparable indicating good mixing of the atmospheres. The 2A crew reported no adverse health effects related to air pollution during their flight. Ingress air samples from 2A.1, which was flown more than 5 months after 2A, again showed that the Zarya had accumulated more unscrubbed pollutants than Unity. The NMVOCs in Unity were 3.5 mg/cubic meter, whereas the were 20 mg/cubic meter in Zarya. After almost 80 hours of ISS operations, the NMVOCs were 7.5 and 12 mg/cubic meter in Unity and Zarya, respectively. This suggests that the atmospheres in the modules were not mixing very well. The 2A.1 crew felt that the air quality in Zarya deteriorated when they were working in a group at close quarters, when the panels had been removed, and after they had worked in an area for some time. The weight of evidence suggests that human metabolic products (carbon dioxide, water vapor, heat) were not being effectively removed from the crew's work area, and these caused their symptoms. Additional local measurements of pollutants are planned for the 2A.2 mission to the ISS.

  9. Toxicological findings in a fatal multidrug intoxication involving mephedrone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerace, Enrico; Petrarulo, Michele; Bison, Fabrizio; Salomone, Alberto; Vincenti, Marco

    2014-10-01

    The distribution of mephedrone in the body fluids and tissues of a subject found dead after the concomitant intake of cocaine and mephedrone is reported. Mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) is a designer drug of the phenethylamine family that is able to cause central nervous system stimulation, psychoactivity and hallucinations and that is becoming popular among youth as a recreational drug. Mephedrone has been available in Europe since 2007, and it is sold through the internet and by local shops as bath salt or plant food. In the case reported here, a 25-year-old man was found dead in the apartment of a friend after a night spent in several local clubs. A fragment of a blue diamond-shaped pill was found in the pocket of the trousers worn by the decedent. During the autopsy, no evidence of natural disease or trauma was found to account for this death. Blood, urine and gastric content samples were collected and submitted for toxicological analysis. Moreover, bile, brain, lung and hair samples were collected as additional matrices. The content of the pill was submitted to a general screening analysis in order to determine its composition. Mephedrone was detected in the blood, urine, gastric contents and in the additional matrices using an expressly validated GC/MS method. The blood and urine concentrations were 1.33mg/L and 144mg/L, respectively. Contextually, cocaine and cocaethylene were found in the blood and urine specimens. The distribution of mephedrone in the body organs was evaluated by analyzing the brain, bile and lung specimens. Hair analysis revealed a past exposure to mephedrone, ketamine, MDMA and cocaine. Sildenafil was identified as the main component of the blue, diamond-shaped pill. The quantitative determination of mephedrone in several body fluids and tissues provides significant knowledge about the distribution of this new drug of abuse in the human body after massive ingestion. PMID:24846124

  10. Toxicological studies on irradiated food and food constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selected aspects of the genotoxicology and chemistry of irradiated foods and food components are critically examined and compared with other food processing operations such as cooking, and intentional use of food additives. For example, it is estimated that if 10% of an average daily diet contained irradiated (<1.0Mrad) foods, the daily consumption of radiolytic products would be 2-20mg/d compared with a total of approximately 4000mg/d of intentional food additives and approximately 80mg/d of toxic inorganic and organic environmentally derived contaminants. Several recommendations for the genotoxicological testing of irradiated foods are given, including: (1) that feeding tests include a control diet consisting of food processed by one of the standard methods such as thermalization; (2) that more use be made of positive controls so as to have a 'built-in' measure of sensitivity and responsiveness; (3) that a battery of in vitro and in vivo short-term mutagenicity tests be performed prior to the carrying out of the long-term feeding tests; and (4) that an irradiated food be tested after it is cooked in the manner normally consumed, which may, of course, include the raw or uncooked state as well. An outline of current genetic-toxicological testing schemes is provided and examined. Emphasis is given to a modification in the protocols for the Ames mutagenicity tests leading to a reduction in the evidence of false positives and false negatives. Also described is a procedure for systematically studying combined or interactive effects, acute or chronic, which requires no more effort than that needed for testing a single agent and which yields complete dose-response curves. It is concluded that food irradiation, as a physical process, appears more advantageous from the genotoxicological, chemical, and pollution aspects than well-accepted, but actually rarely tested, physical processes such as canning. (author)

  11. Toxicological Studies on Irradiated Food and Food Constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selected aspects of the genotoxicology and chemistry of irradiated foods and food components are critically examined and compared with other food processing operations such as cooking, and intentional use of food additives. For example, it is estimated that if 10% of an average daily diet contained irradiated (< 1.0 Mrad) foods, the daily consumption of radiolytic products would be 2-20 mg/d compared with a total of ∼4000 mg/d of intentional food additives and ∼ 80 mg/d of toxic inorganic and organic environmentally derived contaminants. Several recommendations for the genotoxicological testing of irradiated foods are given, including: (1) that feeding tests include a control diet consisting of food processed by one of the standard methods such as thermalization; (2) that more use be made of positive controls so as to have a 'built-in' measure of sensitivity and responsiveness; (3) that a battery of in vitro and in vivo short-term mutagenicity tests be performed prior to the carrying out of the long-term feeding tests; and (4) that an irradiated food be tested after it is cooked in the manner normally consumed, which may, of course, include the raw or uncooked state as well. An outline of current genetic-toxicological testing schemes is provided and examined. Emphasis is given to a modification in the protocols for the Ames mutagenicity tests leading to a reduction in the evidence of false positives and false negatives. Also described is a procedure for systematically studying combined or interactive effects, acute or chronic, which requires no more effort than that needed for testing a single agent and which yields complete dose-response curves. It is concluded that food irradiation, as a physical process, appears more advantageous from the genotoxicological, chemical, and pollution aspects than well-accepted, but actually rarely tested, physical processes such as canning. (author)

  12. A critical review on toxicological safety of 2-alkylcyclobutanones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Beom-Seok; Choi, Soo-Jeong; Jin, Young-Bae; Park, Jong-Heum; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Byun, Eui-Baek; Kim, Jae-Hun; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Gang-Sung; Marchioni, Eric

    2014-10-01

    2-Alkylcyclobutanones (2-ACBs) are known as unique radiolytic products generated from the major fatty acids and triglycerides in food through only irradiation. Since 1990, studies on the toxicological safety of 2-ACBs have been conducted extensively with synthetic compounds. Mutagenicity tests of 2-ACBs on the microorganisms reviewed in this study clearly indicate that no evidence was observed, while several in vitro studies demonstrated the cytotoxicity of 2-ACBs through cell death. Moreover, the genotoxicity of 2-ACBs was suggested as DNA strand breaks were observed. However, these findings should be interpreted with caution because genotoxicity may result from cytotoxicity, which causes DNA damage or from cell membrane destruction and indirect oxidative DNA damage. Therefore, elucidation of the mechanism of genotoxic effects is needed. With regards to the suggestion of Raul et al. (2002) who showed the promoting effect of colon cancer by the administration of 2-ACBs, further studies are needed to correct some experimental design errors. Moreover, an in-vivo experiment that evaluated the metabolism of 2-ACBs has revealed that 2-dDCB was metabolized into cyclic alcohol and excreted through fecal discharge. In conclusion, it is considered that the ingestion of 2-ACBs through irradiated foods is unlikely to affect the human health. However, more specific studies are required to identify the fate of 2-ACBs in body and the LD50 values. The determination of chronic toxicity by long-term exposure to low concentrations of 2-ACBs has to be evaluated more clearly to determine if these compounds are safe to human.

  13. A critical review on toxicological safety of 2-alkylcyclobutanones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2-Alkylcyclobutanones (2-ACBs) are known as unique radiolytic products generated from the major fatty acids and triglycerides in food through only irradiation. Since 1990, studies on the toxicological safety of 2-ACBs have been conducted extensively with synthetic compounds. Mutagenicity tests of 2-ACBs on the microorganisms reviewed in this study clearly indicate that no evidence was observed, while several in vitro studies demonstrated the cytotoxicity of 2-ACBs through cell death. Moreover, the genotoxicity of 2-ACBs was suggested as DNA strand breaks were observed. However, these findings should be interpreted with caution because genotoxicity may result from cytotoxicity, which causes DNA damage or from cell membrane destruction and indirect oxidative DNA damage. Therefore, elucidation of the mechanism of genotoxic effects is needed. With regards to the suggestion of Raul et al. (2002) who showed the promoting effect of colon cancer by the administration of 2-ACBs, further studies are needed to correct some experimental design errors. Moreover, an in-vivo experiment that evaluated the metabolism of 2-ACBs has revealed that 2-dDCB was metabolized into cyclic alcohol and excreted through fecal discharge. In conclusion, it is considered that the ingestion of 2-ACBs through irradiated foods is unlikely to affect the human health. However, more specific studies are required to identify the fate of 2-ACBs in body and the LD50 values. The determination of chronic toxicity by long-term exposure to low concentrations of 2-ACBs has to be evaluated more clearly to determine if these compounds are safe to human. - Highlights: • Mutagenicity 2-ACBs on the microorganisms was not observed. • Several in vitro studies demonstrated the cytotoxicity of 2-ACBs. • Genotoxicity of 2-ACBs was suggested, but elucidation of the mechanism is needed. • 2-dDCB was metabolized into cyclic alcohol and excreted in feces. • Further studies for toxicity of 2-ACBs following

  14. Toxicological studies of aqueous extract of Acacia nilotica root

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alli Lukman Adewale

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acacia nilotica is a widely used plant in traditional medical practice in Northern Nigeria and many African countries. The aim of this study was to determine the toxicological effects of a single dose (acute and of repeated doses (sub-acute administration of aqueous extract of A. nilotica root in rodents, following our earlier study on antiplasmodial activity. In the acute toxicity test, three groups of Swiss albino mice were orally administered aqueous extract of A. nilotica (50, 300 and 2000 mg/kg body weight and signs of toxicity were observed daily for 14 days. In the sub-acute toxicity study, four groups of 12 rats (6 male and 6 female were used. Group 1 received 10 ml/kg b.w distilled water (control, while groups 2, 3 and 4 received 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg b.w of the extract, respectively, for 28 consecutive days by oral gavage. Signs of toxicity/mortality, food and water intake and body weight changes were observed. Biochemical parameters were analysed in both plasma and liver homogenate. In the acute and sub-acute toxicity studies, the extract did not cause mortality. A significant reduction in the activity of lactate dehydrogenase was observed at 250 and 500 mg/kg b.w, while alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activities were significantly higher than control values at 500 mg/kg b.w. The aqueous extract of A. nilotica was found to be safe in single dose administration in mice but repeated administration of doses higher than 250 mg/kg b.w of the extract for 28 days in rats may cause hepatotoxicity.

  15. Allergological and Toxicological Aspects in a Multiple Chemical Sensitivity Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo D. Pigatto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS is a chronic condition characterized by an exaggerated response to toxicants. We ascertained the prevalence of allergy to metals and toxicological aspects in MCS patients. Methods. We conducted a retrospective review of medical records of 41 patients with MCS. We performed patch testing (n=21 for dental series and did lymphocyte transformation test (n=18 for metals. We measured mercury in samples of blood (n=19, urine (n=19, saliva (n=20, and scalp hair (n=17 to investigate the association between mercury levels and cases of MCS. Results. The prevalence of metal immune hypersensitivity in a subset of 26 patients was 92.3 percent. Elevations of mercury occurred in 81.2 percent (26 of 32. The mean (±SD in blood concentrations of mercury was 7.6±13.6 μg/L; mean in urine was 1.9±2.5 μg/L; mean in scalp hair was 2.2±2.5 μg/g; mean in saliva was 38.1±52.1 μg/L. Subgroup analyses showed that elevation of mercury levels in biological matrices were associated with mercury amalgams in patients with MCS (22 patients, compared with controls (8 patients (odds ratio 11 : 95 percent confidence interval 1.5 to 81.6; P=0.023. Conclusions. Our data show an increased prevalence of metal allergy and elevation of mercury levels in bioindicators among patients with MCS.

  16. Different Approaches to the Toxicological Evaluation of Irradiated Starch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toxicological evaluation of irradiated starch is performed either through long-term experiments on rats (24 months) and mice (18 months) or through determination of the semichronic toxicity in rats ( 6 months) of previously identified and determined radiation induced products. A trial with five groups each of 80 rats (40 males and 40 females; controls receiving the diet raw or cooked; other animals receiving the diet raw after irradiation to 300 krad and raw or cooked after irradiation to 600 krad) consists of a toxicity test and a study of the reproductive functions. The trial with mice - the same number of animals divided into three groups (standard control, control and 300 krad) - consists of a study of the reproductive functions with an examination of teratogenicity and the study of cancerogenic and mutagenic potentiality. In no case have the authors found significant differences between the groups. Of the 35 starch radiolysis products so far identified the authors considered nine (formic acid, hydrogen peroxide, methyl alcohol, acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, glycolaldehyde, glyceraldehyde, malonaldehyde and glyoxal). After an acute and subacute toxicity trial with a mixture of the nine compounds, a six-month semichronic toxicity trial was carried out with four groups of animals (15 males and 15 females). The daily uptake of 0.3 g of the mixture per kilogram was found to have no effect on the rats. This daily uptake corresponds to a quantity of radiolytic products 800 times greater than what would be taken up by a baby consuming 30 g of irradiated starch (300 krad) and is below the threshold of true general toxicity, which is masked here by the caustic effect of the formic acid. (author)

  17. Toxicological evaluation of natural rubber films from vulcanized latex by the conventional process and the alternative process with ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The industrial vulcanization of natural rubber latex (NRL) is made all over the world by conventional process using sulphur and heat but it can be made by an alternative process using ionizing radiation. In this research the NRL was tested by 13 physical, chemical and mechanical assays which showed its good quality. It was done a preliminary study of the toxicological properties of 4 natural rubber films obtained by casting process of NRL: one non vulcanized, other vulcanized by the conventional process and two vulcanized by the alternative process. In the alternative process the films were obtained by irradiation of NRL by gamma rays from the 60 Co source at 250 kGy in the absence of sensitizer and irradiated NRL at 12 kGy in the presence of 4ph r of n-butyl acrylate / 0.2 phr of KOH. These vulcanization doses were determined from broken tensile strength. In the conventional process, sulphur vulcanized NRL was made using a classical composition. Another film was made with non vulcanized NRL. The preliminary evaluation of the toxicological properties was made from in vitro cytotoxicity and in vivo systemic toxicity assays. The LBN films vulcanized by the alternative process have less cytotoxicity than the NRL film vulcanized by the conventional process. The sensitized vulcanized films by gamma rays and non vulcanized films showed similar cytotoxicity while the vulcanized films without sensitizer showed a slight lower cytotoxicity. The non vulcanized NRL film and the NRL films vulcanized by the alternative process did not show toxic effects int he 72 hours period of the systemic toxicity assay. However the NRL film vulcanized with sulphur induced effects like allaying and motor in coordination on the animals treated with an oil extract at the fourth hour and recovering after that. The alternative process promoted lower toxic effects than conventional process because there was no toxic substances present. (author)

  18. Code Similarity on High Level Programs

    CERN Document Server

    Bernal, M Miron; Nazuno, J Figueroa

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach for code similarity on High Level programs. Our technique is based on Fast Dynamic Time Warping, that builds a warp path or points relation with local restrictions. The source code is represented into Time Series using the operators inside programming languages that makes possible the comparison. This makes possible subsequence detection that represent similar code instructions. In contrast with other code similarity algorithms, we do not make features extraction. The experiments show that two source codes are similar when their respective Time Series are similar.

  19. Toxicological evaluations of rare earths and their health impacts to workers: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Kyung Taek; Koo, Kwon Ho; Park, Jung Sun

    2013-03-01

    In concert with the development of new materials in the last decade, the need for toxicological studies of these materials has been increasing. These new materials include a group of rare earths (RE). The use of RE nanotechnology is being considered in some green applications, to increase their efficiency by using nano-sized RE compounds, and therefore hazard evaluation and risk assessment are highly recommended. This review was conducted through an extensive contemplation of the literatures in toxicology with in vitro and in vivo studies. Major aspects reviewed were the toxicological evaluations of these elements and metallic compounds at the molecular and cellular level, animal and human epidemiological studies and environmental and occupational health impacts on workers. We also discuss the future prospect of industries with appliances using RE together with the significance of preventive efforts for workers' health. To establish a safe and healthy working environment for RE industries, the use of biomarkers is increasing to provide sustainable measure, due to demand for information about the health risks from unfavorable exposures. Given the recent toxicological results on the exposure of cells, animals and workers to RE compounds, it is important to review the toxicological studies to improve the current understanding of the RE compounds in the field of occupational health. This will help to establish a sustainable, safe and healthy working environment for RE industries. PMID:23516020

  20. TOXNET and Beyond - Using the National Library of Medicine's Environmental Health and Toxicology Portal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this training is to familiarize participants with reliable online environmental health and toxicology information, from the National Library of Medicine and other reliable sources. Skills and knowledge acquired in this training class will enable participants to access, utilize, and refer others to environmental health and toxicology information. After completing this course, participants will be able to: (1) Identify quality, accurate, and authoritative online resources pertaining to environmental health, toxicology, and related medical information; (2) Demonstrate the ability to perform strategic search techniques to find relevant online information; and (3) Apply the skills and knowledge obtained in this class to their organization's health information needs. NLMs TOXNET (Toxicology Data Network) is a free, Web-based system of databases on toxicology, environmental health, hazardous chemicals, toxic releases, chemical nomenclatures, and specialty areas such as occupational health and consumer products. Types of information in the TOXNET databases include: (1) Specific chemicals, mixtures, and products; (2) Unknown chemicals; and (3) Special toxic effects of chemicals in humans and/or animals.

  1. Stability of similarity measurements for bipartite networks

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jian-Guo; Pan, Xue; Guo, Qiang; Zhou, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Similarity is a fundamental measure in network analyses and machine learning algorithms, with wide applications ranging from personalized recommendation to socio-economic dynamics. We argue that an effective similarity measurement should guarantee the stability even under some information loss. With six bipartite networks, we investigate the stabilities of fifteen similarity measurements by comparing the similarity matrixes of two data samples which are randomly divided from original data sets. Results show that, the fifteen measurements can be well classified into three clusters according to their stabilities, and measurements in the same cluster have similar mathematical definitions. In addition, we develop a top-$n$-stability method for personalized recommendation, and find that the unstable similarities would recommend false information to users, and the performance of recommendation would be largely improved by using stable similarity measurements. This work provides a novel dimension to analyze and eval...

  2. In vitro toxicological effects of estrogenic mycotoxins on human placental cells: Structure activity relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is a non-steroid estrogen mycotoxin produced by numerous strains of Fusarium which commonly contaminate cereals. After oral administration, ZEN is reduced via intestinal and hepatic metabolism to α- and β-zearalenol (αZEL and βZEL). These reduced metabolites possess estrogenic properties, αZEL showing the highest affinity for ERs. ZEN and reduced metabolites cause hormonal effects in animals, such as abnormalities in the development of the reproductive tract and mammary gland in female offspring, suggesting a fetal exposure to these contaminants. In our previous work, we have suggested the potential impact of ZEN on placental cells considering this organ as a potential target of xenobiotics. In this work, we first compared the in vitro effects of αZEL and βΖΕL on cell differentiation to their parental molecule on human trophoblast (BeWo cells). Secondly, we investigated their molecular mechanisms of action by investigating the expression of main differentiation biomarkers and the implication of nuclear receptor by docking prediction. Conversely to ZEN, reduced metabolites did not induce trophoblast differentiation. They also induced significant changes in ABC transporter expression by potential interaction with nuclear receptors (LXR, PXR, PR) that could modify the transport function of placental cells. Finally, the mechanism of ZEN differentiation induction seemed not to involve nuclear receptor commonly involved in the differentiation process (PPARγ). Our results demonstrated that in spite of structure similarities between ZEN, αZEL and βZEL, toxicological effects and toxicity mechanisms were significantly different for the three molecules. -- Highlights: ► ZEN and metabolites have differential effect on trophoblast differentiation. ► ZEN and metabolites have differential effect on ABC transporter expression. ► ZEN and metabolites effects involved nuclear receptors interaction.

  3. In vitro toxicological effects of estrogenic mycotoxins on human placental cells: Structure activity relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prouillac, Caroline, E-mail: c.prouillac@vetagro-sup.fr [Université Lyon, US/C 1233 INRA VetAgroSup, Métabolisme et Toxicologie Comparée des Xénobiotiques, 1 avenue Bourgelat, BP 83, 69280 Marcy l' Etoile (France); Koraichi, Farah; Videmann, Bernadette; Mazallon, Michelle [Université Lyon, US/C 1233 INRA VetAgroSup, Métabolisme et Toxicologie Comparée des Xénobiotiques, 1 avenue Bourgelat, BP 83, 69280 Marcy l' Etoile (France); Rodriguez, Frédéric; Baltas, Michel [Université Paul Sabatier, SPCMIB-UMR5068, Laboratoire de Synthèse et de Physicochimie des Molécules d' Intérêt Biologique, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 TOULOUSE cedex 9 (France); Lecoeur, Sylvaine [Université Lyon, US/C 1233 INRA VetAgroSup, Métabolisme et Toxicologie Comparée des Xénobiotiques, 1 avenue Bourgelat, BP 83, 69280 Marcy l' Etoile (France)

    2012-03-15

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is a non-steroid estrogen mycotoxin produced by numerous strains of Fusarium which commonly contaminate cereals. After oral administration, ZEN is reduced via intestinal and hepatic metabolism to α- and β-zearalenol (αZEL and βZEL). These reduced metabolites possess estrogenic properties, αZEL showing the highest affinity for ERs. ZEN and reduced metabolites cause hormonal effects in animals, such as abnormalities in the development of the reproductive tract and mammary gland in female offspring, suggesting a fetal exposure to these contaminants. In our previous work, we have suggested the potential impact of ZEN on placental cells considering this organ as a potential target of xenobiotics. In this work, we first compared the in vitro effects of αZEL and βΖΕL on cell differentiation to their parental molecule on human trophoblast (BeWo cells). Secondly, we investigated their molecular mechanisms of action by investigating the expression of main differentiation biomarkers and the implication of nuclear receptor by docking prediction. Conversely to ZEN, reduced metabolites did not induce trophoblast differentiation. They also induced significant changes in ABC transporter expression by potential interaction with nuclear receptors (LXR, PXR, PR) that could modify the transport function of placental cells. Finally, the mechanism of ZEN differentiation induction seemed not to involve nuclear receptor commonly involved in the differentiation process (PPARγ). Our results demonstrated that in spite of structure similarities between ZEN, αZEL and βZEL, toxicological effects and toxicity mechanisms were significantly different for the three molecules. -- Highlights: ► ZEN and metabolites have differential effect on trophoblast differentiation. ► ZEN and metabolites have differential effect on ABC transporter expression. ► ZEN and metabolites effects involved nuclear receptors interaction.

  4. Ochratoxin A: a toxicologic evaluation using in vitro and in vivo bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Adriana DEHELEAN

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Ochratoxin A (OTA is a secondary fungal metabolite that enters the food chain by cereals, beer and other products. Its toxicity is an important aim regarding the human pathologies such as nephrotoxicity. This mechanism is intense studied because of the affinity for blood albumins and the renal accumulation by the organic anion transporter. Its serum half-life is different in humans (850 h and chicken (4.1 h after oral administration. These data could lead to the idea of analyzing the deep mechanism in contact with blood elements. An important protocol for observation of necrosis/ toxicity and angiogenesis is CAM (chorioallantoic membrane assay developed on embryonated chicken eggs. This test could be correlated with the red blood cell test (RBC. In this study the toxicological effect of Ochratoxin A was tested. The Ochratoxin A was disolved in corn oil, in the similar concentration used in test on rats. The lipophilic solvent assures an important penetrability for tested compound on vascular plexus. The evolution of embryo vessels was observed after 15 minutes, 1h and 1 day. Samples were collected for haematoxilin-eosin staining and imunohistochemical evaluation. The same corn oil solution was used for the tests on blood red cells to see the damages. The OTA was also administered to Sprague Dawley male rats and a detailed blood test was made. The main results indicated that OTA influences the blood vessels and blood quality in vitro and in vivo. The irritation created on blood vessels is moderate comparing to strong irritants but it is significant. It determines moderate changes on blood elements after a period of presence of a few weeks in sytemic ic circulation.

  5. Studying of Semantic Similarity Methods in Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahideh Reshadat

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Humans are able to easily judge if a pair of concepts are related in some way. Understanding of how humans are able to perform this task is not easy. Semantic similarity denotes computing the similarity between concepts, having the same meaning or related information, which are not necessarily lexically similar. Semantic similarity between concepts plays an important role in Semantic Web, knowledge sharing, Web mining, semantic sense understanding and text summarization. This also is an important problem in Natural Language Processing and Information Retrieval Researches. These techniques are becoming important components of most of the Information Retrieval (IR, Information Extraction (IE and other intelligent knowledge based systems. Therefore it has received considerable attention in the literature. Ontology has a good hierarchical structure of concepts. In the ontology, semantic information can be realized through the semantic relationship of concepts. Ontology-based semantic similarity techniques can estimate the semantic similarity between two hierarchically expressed concepts in a given ontology or taxonomy. Semantic similarity is usually computed by mapping concepts to ontology and by examining their relationships in it. The most popular semantic similarity methods are implemented and evaluated using WordNet and MeSH. Several algorithmic approaches for computing semantic similarity have been proposed. This paper discusses the various approaches used for identifying semantically similar concepts in ontology.

  6. Biennal Report 1979/80 of the Institute for Genetics and Toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research activities of the Genetics and the Toxicology Divisions of the Institute for Genetics and Toxicology of Fissile Materials during the period January 1979 to December 1980 are decribed. In addition to scientific reports on the various research topics the report gives an overview of the external scientific and teaching activities of the staff members during the review period. The main emphasis of the toxicology program has been on studies of the radiotoxicology of the actinides and other heavy metals, especially in relation to chelation therapy and to the development of biochemical and physical methods for investigation of their metabolic behaviour. In the field of radiation genetics most of the interest has been focussed on the mechanisms of gene repair, gene regulation and the molecular biology of tumor viruses. (orig.)

  7. Triennial report 1981-83 of the Institute for Genetics and for Toxicology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scientific activity of the Divisions of Genetics and of Toxicology of the Institute for Genetics and for Toxicology during the period January 1981 to December 1983 is described. In addition to reports on the various research topics this second 'Report' also gives an overview of the external scientific and teaching activities of the staff members during the period. In the field of radiation genetics most of the interest has been focussed on the mechanisms of gene repair, gene regulation and the molecular biology of tumor viruses in human and other mammalian cells. The main emphasis of the long term toxicology program has been on studies of radiotoxicology of the actinides and other heavy metals, especially in relation to chelation therapy and to the development of biochemical and physical methods for investigation of their metabolic behaviour. (orig.)

  8. Toxicological evaluation of two children diagnosed as Munchausen syndrome by proxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türkmen, Zeynep; Ziyalar, Neylan; Tari, Itir; Mercan, Selda; Kayiran, Sinan Mahir; Sener, Dicle; Cengiz, Salih; Akçakaya, Necla

    2012-01-01

    Munchausen syndrome by proxy is a kind of child abuse in which affected children are often hospitalized for long periods and endure repetitive, painful and expensive diagnostic attempts. We present herein two toxicologically confirmed cases of Munchausen syndrome by proxy. Case 1 is a 16-month-old male who had fever, peripheral cyanosis, tremor, and reported cardiac arrest. Symptoms recurred in the hospital when the mother administered fluids. Toxicology detected 3.5 ng/ml mercury (Hg) in the fluid and 9.4 microg Hg/g creatinine in the urine. Case 2 is a 14-year-old female who had irregular blood findings and multiple hospitalizations. Serum analysis detected warfarin. Both mothers were transferred to psychiatric care. Munchausen syndrome by proxy should be suspected when clinical/laboratory findings are negative, illness descriptions are inconsistent, and frequent hospitalization yields no diagnosis. Psychiatric evaluation and toxicological analysis are recommended. PMID:23094539

  9. Toxicological evaluation of chicken-breast meat with high-dose irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, toxicity and safety of high-dose irradiated chicken-breast meat were evaluated. For assays of acute toxicity, genetic toxicity, and sub-chronic toxicity, ames test, mice bone marrow erythrocyte micronucleus, and mice sperm abnormality were performed. The results showed that, in the acute oral toxicity tests, median lethal dose (more than 10 000 mg kg-1) in male and female ICR mice showed no toxicological signs. For subacute 30-d oral toxicology of irradiated chicken-breast meat with dose of 10, 15 and 25 kGy in both male and female SD rats, no noticeable toxicological effects were observed. It is concluded that chicken-breast meat with high-dose irradiation has no acute toxicity and no genotoxicity, nor harmful effects on the animal body at the tested dosage range. Therefore, high-dose irradiated chicken-breast meat is safe for pet consumption

  10. Good edit similarity learning by loss minimization

    OpenAIRE

    Bellet, Aurélien; Habrard, Amaury; Sebban, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Similarity functions are a fundamental component of many learning algorithms. When dealing with string or tree-structured data, edit distancebased measures are widely used, and there exists a few methods for learning them from data. However, these methods offer no theoretical guarantee as to the generalization ability and discriminative power of the learned similarities. In this paper, we propose a loss minimization-based edit similarity learning approach, called GESL. It is driven by the not...

  11. Dark matter halo's and self similarity

    OpenAIRE

    Alard, C.

    2012-01-01

    This papers explores the self similar solutions of the Vlasov-Poisson system and their relation to the gravitational collapse of dynamically cold systems. Analytic solutions are derived for power law potential in one dimension, and extensions of these solutions in three dimensions are proposed. Next the self similarity of the collapse of cold dynamical systems is investigated numerically. The fold system in phase space is consistent with analytic self similar solutions, the solutions present ...

  12. Learning music similarity from relative user ratings

    OpenAIRE

    Wolff, D.; Weyde, T.

    2013-01-01

    Computational modelling of music similarity is an increasingly important part of personalisation and optimisation in music information retrieval and research in music perception and cognition. The use of relative similarity ratings is a new and promising approach to modelling similarity that avoids well known problems with absolute ratings. In this article, we use relative ratings from the MagnaTagATune dataset with new and existing variants of state-of-the-art algorithms and provide the firs...

  13. Secure sketch search for document similarity

    OpenAIRE

    Örencik, Cengiz; Orencik, Cengiz; Alewiwi, Mahmoud Khaled; SAVAŞ, Erkay; Savas, Erkay

    2015-01-01

    Document similarity search is an important problem that has many applications especially in outsourced data. With the wide spread of cloud computing, users tend to outsource their data to remote servers which are not necessarily trusted. This leads to the problem of protecting the privacy of sensitive data. We design and implement two secure similarity search schemes for textual documents utilizing locality sensitive hashing techniques for cosine similarity. While the first one provides very ...

  14. Similarity and a Duality for Fullerenes

    OpenAIRE

    Jennifer J. Edmond; Graver, Jack E.

    2015-01-01

    Fullerenes are molecules of carbon that are modeled by trivalent plane graphs with only pentagonal and hexagonal faces. Scaling up a fullerene gives a notion of similarity, and fullerenes are partitioned into similarity classes. In this expository article, we illustrate how the values of two important fullerene parameters can be deduced for all fullerenes in a similarity class by computing the values of these parameters for just the three smallest representatives of that class. In addition, i...

  15. Molecular quantum similarity using conceptual DFT descriptors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Patrick Bultinck; Ramon carbó-dorca

    2005-09-01

    This paper reports a Molecular Quantum Similarity study for a set of congeneric steroid molecules, using as basic similarity descriptors electron density ρ (r), shape function (r), the Fukui functions +(r) and -(r) and local softness +(r) and -(r). Correlations are investigated between similarity indices for each couple of descriptors used and compared to assess whether these different descriptors sample different information and to investigate what information is revealed by each descriptor.

  16. Quadruplet-Wise Image Similarity Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Law M.T.; Thome N.; Cord M.

    2013-01-01

    International audience This paper introduces a novel similarity learning frame-work. Working with inequality constraints involving quadruplets of images, our approach aims at efficiently modeling similarity from rich or complex semantic label relationships. From these quadruplet-wise constraints, we propose a similarity learning framework relying on a con-vex optimization scheme. We then study how our metric learning scheme can exploit specific class relationships, such as class ranking (r...

  17. Efficient Authentication of Outsourced String Similarity Search

    OpenAIRE

    Dong, Boxiang; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing enables the outsourcing of big data analytics, where a third party server is responsible for data storage and processing. In this paper, we consider the outsourcing model that provides string similarity search as the service. In particular, given a similarity search query, the service provider returns all strings from the outsourced dataset that are similar to the query string. A major security concern of the outsourcing paradigm is to authenticate whether the service provider...

  18. Biosequence Similarity Search on the Mercury System

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnamurthy, Praveen; Buhler, Jeremy; Chamberlain, Roger; Franklin, Mark; Gyang, Kwame; Jacob, Arpith; Lancaster, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Biosequence similarity search is an important application in modern molecular biology. Search algorithms aim to identify sets of sequences whose extensional similarity suggests a common evolutionary origin or function. The most widely used similarity search tool for biosequences is BLAST, a program designed to compare query sequences to a database. Here, we present the design of BLASTN, the version of BLAST that searches DNA sequences, on the Mercury system, an architecture that supports high...

  19. Persistent Homology and Partial Similarity of Shapes

    OpenAIRE

    Di Fabio, Barbara; Landi, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    The ability to perform shape retrieval based not only on full similarity, but also partial similarity is a key property for any content-based search engine. We prove that persistence diagrams can reveal a partial similarity between two shapes by showing a common subset of points. This can be explained using the Mayer-Vietoris formulas that we develop for ordinary, relative and extended persistent homology. An experiment outlines the potential of persistence diagrams as shape descriptors in re...

  20. Cluster Tree Based Hybrid Document Similarity Measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Varshana Devi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available similarity measure is established to measure the hybrid similarity. In cluster tree, the hybrid similarity measure can be calculated for the random data even it may not be the co-occurred and generate different views. Different views of tree can be combined and choose the one which is significant in cost. A method is proposed to combine the multiple views. Multiple views are represented by different distance measures into a single cluster. Comparing the cluster tree based hybrid similarity with the traditional statistical methods it gives the better feasibility for intelligent based search. It helps in improving the dimensionality reduction and semantic analysis.

  1. Scientific Opinion on the toxicological evaluation of phenol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available EFSA was asked by the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR to re-evaluate the TDI for phenol of 1.5 mg/kg bw/day, since this value is within the same dose range which was reported to be associated with some haematotoxic and immunotoxic effects in an oral study on phenol. The Panel comprehensively reviewed the available toxicological studies, mainly those using an oral route of exposure. The CEF experts did not consider immunotoxicity as a suitable endpoint on which to base a new TDI for phenol, given the study limitations and the lack of confirmation of phenol-induced immunotoxic effects in other studies. The Panel considered a gavage developmental toxicity study and an oral two-generation reproduction toxicity study as the two most robust toxicity studies, and performed a dose-response analysis of these data using the benchmark dose (BMD approach. The lower 95 % confidence bound (one-sided of the BMD, denoted BMDL, was then taken as the reference point. The lowest reference point for deriving a health based guidance value was provided by the BMDL10 of 52 mg/kg bw/day for reduced maternal body weight gain from a developmental toxicity study where rats were exposed to phenol by gavage from gestational day 6 to 16. The CEF Panel set a TDI for phenol to 0.5 mg/kg bw/day, by applying a standard uncertainty factor of 100 (for inter- and intra-species differences to this BMDL10 value. The Panel did not assess the hazards related to the possible oxidation products of phenol, e.g. quinones/hydroquinones. Therefore, the above TDI only covers phenol. Exposure to phenol may occur via sources other than food contact materials, e.g. flavourings, smoke flavourings, traditionally smoked foods, floor waxes, cosmetics, disinfectants, etc.. The European Commission may wish to take note of all these sources of exposure if setting a restriction for phenol in food contact materials.

  2. Pesticides and Arthropods: Sublethal Effects and Demographic Toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Marčić

    2007-01-01

    refers to an evaluation of individuals, rather than populations, and it is the latter that are required for a more reliable evaluation of effectiveness of pesticides in real life. A demographic-toxicologicalapproach has been proposed therefore as a way of integrating the effects that a toxicant may cause at population level, which includes the construction of life tables and computation of population growth parameters, including intrinsic rate of increase (rm as a crucialparameter. Compared to other laboratory toxicity tests, the demographic-toxicological bioassay has been found superior in terms of a capacity to evaluate overall effects of pesticides, and such approach in evaluating pesticide effects is crucial for environmentally-based programmes of integrated plant protection and a competent evaluation of ecotoxicological risks of pesticide applications.

  3. Toxicological, Antidiarrheal and Spasmolytic Activities of Solanum paniculatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementino-Neto, José; Pereira, Joedna C; Vasconcelos, Luiz H C; de Souza, Iara L L; Silva, Anne D S; Silva, Telma M G; Ramos, Natalia S M; Pessôa, Hilzeth L F; Silva, Tania M S; da Silva, Bagnólia A; de Cavalcante, Fabiana A

    2016-01-01

    Solanum paniculatum is popularly known as "jurubeba-verdadeira". In folk medicine, its roots, stems, and leaves are used as tonics, anti-inflammatories, carminatives, diuretics, and for gastrointestinal disorders. This species is listed in the Brazilian Pharmacopoeia and belongs to the "Relação Nacional de Plantas Medicinais de Interesse ao SUS". Based on folk medicine data of the Solanum genus, we decided to investigate whether the crude ethanol extract from S. paniculatum aerial parts presents toxicological, antidiarrheal, and spasmolytic activities. The crude ethanol extract from S. paniculatum aerial parts did not produce in vitro or in vivo toxicity and showed dose-dependent antidiarrheal activity, inhibiting equipotently both the defecation frequency (ED50 = 340.3 ± 35.1 mg/kg) and liquid stool formation (ED50 = 370.1 ± 19.4 mg/kg) in mice. Conversely, the crude ethanol extract from S. paniculatum aerial parts did not inhibit normal intestinal transit, even though it has shown a dose-dependent reduction of both the castor oil-induced intestinal transit (Emax = 36.9 ± 1.3 %, ED50 = 242.0 ± 8.6 mg/kg) and intestinal fluid content (Emax = 74.8 ± 2.4 %, ED50 = 328.9 ± 15.9 mg/kg). Additionally, the crude ethanol extract from S. paniculatum aerial parts was approximately 2-fold more potent in antagonizing the phasic contractions induced with histamine (IC50 = 63.7 ± 3.5 µg/mL) than carbachol 10(-6) M (IC50 = 129.3 ± 14.1 µg/mL). Therefore, we concluded that the crude ethanol extract from S. paniculatum aerial parts presents antidiarrheal activity in mice related to the inhibition of small intestinal motility and secretion as well as nonselective spasmolytic activity on the guinea pig ileum. PMID:26366752

  4. Human exposure to soil contamination: a qualitative and quantitative analysis towards proposals for human toxicological intervention values (partly revised edition)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg R van den; LBG

    1994-01-01

    In view of a revision of the Dutch Soil Protection act, proposals are presented in this report for human toxicologically based intervention values for soil and groundwater, calculated from human toxicological guideline values and human exposure. To this purpose the exposure model CSOIL is presented

  5. Institute for Genetics and Toxicology of Fission Materials. Annual report on research and development work in 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report covers the research results achieved in 1989 in the following subject fields: Gene repair and gene regulation, biological carcinogenesis, molecular genetics of eukaryontic genes, radiotoxicology of the actinides, cellular inhalation toxicology, cellular and molecular toxicology, and in vitro fractionation and speciation of actinides. A list of publications of the Institute in 1989 shows printed original reports and conference papers. (MG)

  6. 76 FR 21736 - Draft Toxicological Review of Methanol (Non-Cancer) in Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Methanol (Non-Cancer) in Support of Summary Information on the... Review of Methanol (Non-Cancer): In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information... released an external peer review draft IRIS Toxicological Review for methanol...

  7. 75 FR 69065 - Draft Toxicological Review of Urea: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    ... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Urea: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk... the draft human health assessment titled, ``Toxicological Review of Urea: In Support of Summary... workshop on the draft assessment for Urea will be held via teleconference on December 13, 2010,...

  8. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hexahydro-1,3,5-Trinitro-1,3,5-Triazine (Rdx) (Interagency Science Consultation Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    On March 10, 2016, the public comment draft Toxicological Review of Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine and the draft charge to external peer reviewers were released for public review and comment. The Toxicological Review and charge were reviewed internally by EPA and by othe...

  9. Current role of capillary electrophoretic/electrokinetic techniques in forensic toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliaro, Franco; Bortolotti, Federica; Pascali, Jennifer P

    2007-08-01

    The current application of capillary electrophoresis in forensic toxicology has been critically reviewed with special focus on the areas where this technique has shown real advantages over chromatographic methods. For example, capillary electrophoresis has been most successfully applied to the chiral analysis of some drugs of forensic interest, including amphetamines and their congeners. Another typical application field of capillary electrophoresis is represented by protein analysis. Recently, special interest has been paid to carbohydrate deficient transferrin (CDT), the most important biological marker of chronic alcohol abuse. Other specific applications of capillary electrophoresis of potential forensic toxicological concern are also discussed. The review includes 62 references. PMID:17572886

  10. Databases in the fields of toxicology, occupational and environmental health at DIMDI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DIMDI, the German Institute for Medical Documentation and Information, is a governmental institute and affiliated to the Federal Ministry for Health. It was founded in 1969 in Cologne. At present DIMDI hosts about seventy international and national bibliographic and factual databases in the field of biosciences, such as medicine, public health, pharmacology, toxicology, occupational and environmental health, nutrition, biology, psychology, sociology, sports, and agricultural sciences. The most important databases with toxicological and ecotoxicological information, which contain data useful for managers of chemical and nucelar power plants are the factual databases HSDB, ECDIN, SIGEDA, RTECS, and CCRIS, and the bibliographic databases TOXALL, ENVIROLINE, SCISEARCH, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and BIOSIS PREVIEWS. (orig.)

  11. Actual problems of toxicology and radiobiology. Russian scientific conference with international participation. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection contains abstracts of the Russian scientific conference with international participation, which took place May 19-20, 2011 in St. Petersburg. Proceedings of the conference include a general description of the chemical and radiological factors of nature, questions of radiation ecology and ecotoxicology. Modern methods of toxicological and radiobiological researches, including evaluation of radiation and chemical risks, mechanisms of development, pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of various forms of toxic and radiation processes are under consideration. Current approaches to prevention and early therapy of chemical and radiation injuries are given. Issues of radiation and chemical safety, as well as the problems of training in toxicology and radiobiology are discussed

  12. Integration of clinical chemistry, expression, and metabolite data leads to better toxicological class separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spicker, Jeppe; Brunak, Søren; Frederiksen, K.S.;

    2008-01-01

    A large number of databases are currently being implemented within toxicology aiming to integrate diverse biological data, such as clinical chemistry, expression, and other types of data. However, for these endeavors to be successful, tools for integration, visualization, and interpretation are...... needed. This paper presents a method for data integration using a hierarchical model based on either principal component analysis or partial least squares discriminant analysis of clinical chemistry, expression, and nuclear magnetic resonance data using a toxicological study as case. The study includes...

  13. Similarity indices I: what do they measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for estimating the effects of environmental effusions on ecosystems is described. The characteristics of 25 similarity indices used in studies of ecological communities were investigated. The type of data structure, to which these indices are frequently applied, was described as consisting of vectors of measurements on attributes (species) observed in a set of samples. A general similarity index was characterized as the result of a two-step process defined on a pair of vectors. In the first step an attribute similarity score is obtained for each attribute by comparing the attribute values observed in the pair of vectors. The result is a vector of attribute similarity scores. These are combined in the second step to arrive at the similarity index. The operation in the first step was characterized as a function, g, defined on pairs of attribute values. The second operation was characterized as a function, F, defined on the vector of attribute similarity scores from the first step. Usually, F was a simple sum or weighted sum of the attribute similarity scores. It is concluded that similarity indices should not be used as the test statistic to discriminate between two ecological communities

  14. Similarity indices I: what do they measure.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, J.W.

    1976-11-01

    A method for estimating the effects of environmental effusions on ecosystems is described. The characteristics of 25 similarity indices used in studies of ecological communities were investigated. The type of data structure, to which these indices are frequently applied, was described as consisting of vectors of measurements on attributes (species) observed in a set of samples. A general similarity index was characterized as the result of a two-step process defined on a pair of vectors. In the first step an attribute similarity score is obtained for each attribute by comparing the attribute values observed in the pair of vectors. The result is a vector of attribute similarity scores. These are combined in the second step to arrive at the similarity index. The operation in the first step was characterized as a function, g, defined on pairs of attribute values. The second operation was characterized as a function, F, defined on the vector of attribute similarity scores from the first step. Usually, F was a simple sum or weighted sum of the attribute similarity scores. It is concluded that similarity indices should not be used as the test statistic to discriminate between two ecological communities.

  15. Perceived Similarity, Proactive Adjustment, and Organizational Socialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammeyer-Mueller, John D.; Livingston, Beth A.; Liao, Hui

    2011-01-01

    The present study explores how perceived demographic and attitudinal similarity can influence proactive behavior among organizational newcomers. We propose that newcomers who perceive themselves as similar to their co-workers will be more willing to seek new information or build relationships, which in turn will lead to better long-term…

  16. Outsourced similarity search on metric data assets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yiu, Man Lung; Assent, Ira; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard;

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers a cloud computing setting in which similarity querying of metric data is outsourced to a service provider. The data is to be revealed only to trusted users, not to the service provider or anyone else. Users query the server for the most similar data objects to a query example...

  17. Some Effects of Similarity Self-Disclosure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kevin C.; Strong, Stanley R.

    1972-01-01

    College males were interviewed about how college had altered their friendships, values, and plans. The interviewers diclosed experiences and feelings similar to those revealed by the students. Results support Byrne's Law of Similarity in generating interpersonal attraction in the interview and suggest that the timing of self-disclosures is…

  18. Quaternionic Salkowski Curves and Similar Curves

    CERN Document Server

    Önder, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we give the definitions and characterizations of spatial quaternionic Salkowski, anti-Salkowski and similar curves. We show that quaternionic Salkowski and anti-Salkowski curves are quaternionic slant helices. Moreover, we obtain that the families of quaternionic Salkowski and anti-Salkowski curves form the families of quaternionic similar curves.

  19. Similarity Measures for Boolean Search Request Formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radecki, Tadeusz

    1982-01-01

    Proposes a means for determining the similarity between search request formulations in online information retrieval systems, and discusses the use of similarity measures for clustering search formulations and document files in such systems. Experimental results using the proposed methods are presented in three tables. A reference list is provided.…

  20. Measure of Node Similarity in Multilayer Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mollgaard, Anders; Dammeyer, Jesper; Jensen, Mogens H; Lehmann, Sune; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The weight of links in a network is often related to the similarity of the nodes. Here, we introduce a simple tunable measure for analysing the similarity of nodes across different link weights. In particular, we use the measure to analyze homophily in a group of 659 freshman students at a large university. Our analysis is based on data obtained using smartphones equipped with custom data collection software, complemented by questionnaire-based data. The network of social contacts is represented as a weighted multilayer network constructed from different channels of telecommunication as well as data on face-to-face contacts. We find that even strongly connected individuals are not more similar with respect to basic personality traits than randomly chosen pairs of individuals. In contrast, several socio-demographics variables have a significant degree of similarity. We further observe that similarity might be present in one layer of the multilayer network and simultaneously be absent in the other layers. For a...

  1. Semantic Similarity Calculation of Chinese Word

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqiang Pan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper puts forward a two layers computing method to calculate semantic similarity of Chinese word. Firstly, using Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA subject model to generate subject spatial domain. Then mapping word into topic space and forming topic distribution which is used to calculate semantic similarity of word(the first layer computing. Finally, using semantic dictionary "HowNet" to deeply excavate semantic similarity of word (the second layer computing. This method not only overcomes the problem that it’s not specific enough merely using LDA to calculate semantic similarity of word, but also solves the problems such as new words (haven’t been added in dictionary and without considering specific context when calculating semantic similarity based on semantic dictionary "HowNet". By experimental comparison, this thesis proves feasibility,availability and advantages of the calculation method.

  2. Similarity and a Duality for Fullerenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer J. Edmond

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Fullerenes are molecules of carbon that are modeled by trivalent plane graphs with only pentagonal and hexagonal faces. Scaling up a fullerene gives a notion of similarity, and fullerenes are partitioned into similarity classes. In this expository article, we illustrate how the values of two important fullerene parameters can be deduced for all fullerenes in a similarity class by computing the values of these parameters for just the three smallest representatives of that class. In addition, it turns out that there is a natural duality theory for similarity classes of fullerenes based on one of the most important fullerene construction techniques: leapfrog construction. The literature on fullerenes is very extensive, and since this is a general interest journal, we will summarize and illustrate the fundamental results that we will need to develop similarity and this duality.

  3. Criteria for dynamic similarity in bouncing gaits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullimore, Sharon R; Donelan, J Maxwell

    2008-01-21

    Animals of different sizes tend to move in a dynamically similar manner when travelling at speeds corresponding to equal values of a dimensionless parameter (DP) called the Froude number. Consequently, the Froude number has been widely used for defining equivalent speeds and predicting speeds of locomotion by extinct species and on other planets. However, experiments using simulated reduced gravity have demonstrated that equality of the Froude number does not guarantee dynamic similarity. This has cast doubt upon the usefulness of the Froude number in locomotion research. Here we use dimensional analysis of the planar spring-mass model, combined with Buckingham's Pi-Theorem, to demonstrate that four DPs must be equal for dynamic similarity in bouncing gaits such as trotting, hopping and bipedal running. This can be reduced to three DPs by applying the constraint of maintaining a constant average speed of locomotion. Sensitivity analysis indicates that all of these DPs are important for predicting dynamic similarity. We show that the reason humans do not run in a dynamically similar manner at equal Froude number in different levels of simulated reduced gravity is that dimensionless leg stiffness decreases as gravity increases. The reason that the Froude number can predict dynamic similarity in Earth gravity is that dimensionless leg stiffness and dimensionless vertical landing speed are both independent of size. In conclusion, although equal Froude number is not sufficient for dynamic similarity, it is a necessary condition. Therefore, to detect fundamental differences in locomotion, animals of different sizes should be compared at equal Froude number, so that they can be as close to dynamic similarity as possible. More generally, the concept of dynamic similarity provides a powerful framework within which similarities and differences in locomotion can be interpreted. PMID:17983630

  4. Contrasting Theories of Interaction in Epidemiology and Toxicology

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, Gregory J.; Webster, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Epidemiologists and toxicologists face similar problems when assessing interactions between exposures, yet they approach the question very differently. The epidemiologic definition of “interaction” leads to the additivity of risk differences (RDA) as the fundamental criterion for causal inference about biological interactions. Toxicologists define “interaction” as departure from a model based on mode of action: concentration addition (CA; for similarly acting compounds) or indepen...

  5. Measure of Node Similarity in Multilayer Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollgaard, Anders; Zettler, Ingo; Dammeyer, Jesper; Jensen, Mogens H; Lehmann, Sune; Mathiesen, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The weight of links in a network is often related to the similarity of the nodes. Here, we introduce a simple tunable measure for analysing the similarity of nodes across different link weights. In particular, we use the measure to analyze homophily in a group of 659 freshman students at a large university. Our analysis is based on data obtained using smartphones equipped with custom data collection software, complemented by questionnaire-based data. The network of social contacts is represented as a weighted multilayer network constructed from different channels of telecommunication as well as data on face-to-face contacts. We find that even strongly connected individuals are not more similar with respect to basic personality traits than randomly chosen pairs of individuals. In contrast, several socio-demographics variables have a significant degree of similarity. We further observe that similarity might be present in one layer of the multilayer network and simultaneously be absent in the other layers. For a variable such as gender, our measure reveals a transition from similarity between nodes connected with links of relatively low weight to dis-similarity for the nodes connected by the strongest links. We finally analyze the overlap between layers in the network for different levels of acquaintanceships. PMID:27300084

  6. Efficient Privacy Preserving Protocols for Similarity Join

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Hawashin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available During the similarity join process, one or more sources may not allow sharing its data with other sources. In this case, a privacy preserving similarity join is required. We showed in our previous work [4] that using long attributes, such as paper abstracts, movie summaries, product descriptions, and user feedbacks, could improve the similarity join accuracy using supervised learning. However, the existing secure protocols for similarity join methods can not be used to join sources using these long attributes. Moreover, the majority of the existing privacy‐preserving protocols do not consider the semantic similarities during the similarity join process. In this paper, we introduce a secure efficient protocol to semantically join sources when the join attributes are long attributes. We provide two secure protocols for both scenarios when a training set exists and when there is no available training set. Furthermore, we introduced the multi‐label supervised secure protocol and the expandable supervised secure protocol. Results show that our protocols can efficiently join sources using the long attributes by considering the semantic relationships among the long string values. Therefore, it improves the overall secure similarity join performance.

  7. Notions of similarity for computational biology models

    KAUST Repository

    Waltemath, Dagmar

    2016-03-21

    Computational models used in biology are rapidly increasing in complexity, size, and numbers. To build such large models, researchers need to rely on software tools for model retrieval, model combination, and version control. These tools need to be able to quantify the differences and similarities between computational models. However, depending on the specific application, the notion of similarity may greatly vary. A general notion of model similarity, applicable to various types of models, is still missing. Here, we introduce a general notion of quantitative model similarities, survey the use of existing model comparison methods in model building and management, and discuss potential applications of model comparison. To frame model comparison as a general problem, we describe a theoretical approach to defining and computing similarities based on different model aspects. Potentially relevant aspects of a model comprise its references to biological entities, network structure, mathematical equations and parameters, and dynamic behaviour. Future similarity measures could combine these model aspects in flexible, problem-specific ways in order to mimic users\\' intuition about model similarity, and to support complex model searches in databases.

  8. The baryonic self similarity of dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alard, C., E-mail: alard@iap.fr [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2014-06-20

    The cosmological simulations indicates that dark matter halos have specific self-similar properties. However, the halo similarity is affected by the baryonic feedback. By using momentum-driven winds as a model to represent the baryon feedback, an equilibrium condition is derived which directly implies the emergence of a new type of similarity. The new self-similar solution has constant acceleration at a reference radius for both dark matter and baryons. This model receives strong support from the observations of galaxies. The new self-similar properties imply that the total acceleration at larger distances is scale-free, the transition between the dark matter and baryons dominated regime occurs at a constant acceleration, and the maximum amplitude of the velocity curve at larger distances is proportional to M {sup 1/4}. These results demonstrate that this self-similar model is consistent with the basics of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) phenomenology. In agreement with the observations, the coincidence between the self-similar model and MOND breaks at the scale of clusters of galaxies. Some numerical experiments show that the behavior of the density near the origin is closely approximated by a Einasto profile.

  9. Similarity-based pattern analysis and recognition

    CERN Document Server

    Pelillo, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    This accessible text/reference presents a coherent overview of the emerging field of non-Euclidean similarity learning. The book presents a broad range of perspectives on similarity-based pattern analysis and recognition methods, from purely theoretical challenges to practical, real-world applications. The coverage includes both supervised and unsupervised learning paradigms, as well as generative and discriminative models. Topics and features: explores the origination and causes of non-Euclidean (dis)similarity measures, and how they influence the performance of traditional classification alg

  10. A Similarity Search Using Molecular Topological Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshifumi Fukunishi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A molecular similarity measure has been developed using molecular topological graphs and atomic partial charges. Two kinds of topological graphs were used. One is the ordinary adjacency matrix and the other is a matrix which represents the minimum path length between two atoms of the molecule. The ordinary adjacency matrix is suitable to compare the local structures of molecules such as functional groups, and the other matrix is suitable to compare the global structures of molecules. The combination of these two matrices gave a similarity measure. This method was applied to in silico drug screening, and the results showed that it was effective as a similarity measure.

  11. Interpersonal attraction and personality: what is attractive--self similarity, ideal similarity, complementarity or attachment security?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klohnen, Eva C; Luo, Shanhong

    2003-10-01

    Little is known about whether personality characteristics influence initial attraction. Because adult attachment differences influence a broad range of relationship processes, the authors examined their role in 3 experimental attraction studies. The authors tested four major attraction hypotheses--self similarity, ideal-self similarity, complementarity, and attachment security--and examined both actual and perceptual factors. Replicated analyses across samples, designs, and manipulations showed that actual security and self similarity predicted attraction. With regard to perceptual factors, ideal similarity, self similarity, and security all were significant predictors. Whereas perceptual ideal and self similarity had incremental predictive power, perceptual security's effects were subsumed by perceptual ideal similarity. Perceptual self similarity fully mediated actual attachment similarity effects, whereas ideal similarity was only a partial mediator. PMID:14561124

  12. Discovering Music Structure via Similarity Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arenas-García, Jerónimo; Parrado-Hernandez, Emilio; Meng, Anders;

    Automatic methods for music navigation and music recommendation exploit the structure in the music to carry out a meaningful exploration of the “song space”. To get a satisfactory performance from such systems, one should incorporate as much information about songs similarity as possible; however...... semantics”, in such a way that all observed similarities can be satisfactorily explained using the latent semantics. Therefore, one can think of these semantics as the real structure in music, in the sense that they can explain the observed similarities among songs. The suitability of the PLSA model for...... representing music structure is studied in a simplified scenario consisting of 4412 songs and two similarity measures among them. The results suggest that the PLSA model is a useful framework to combine different sources of information, and provides a reasonable space for song representation....

  13. Distance and Similarity Measures for Soft Sets

    CERN Document Server

    Kharal, Athar

    2010-01-01

    In [P. Majumdar, S. K. Samanta, Similarity measure of soft sets, New Mathematics and Natural Computation 4(1)(2008) 1-12], the authors use matrix representation based distances of soft sets to introduce matching function and distance based similarity measures. We first give counterexamples to show that their Definition 2.7 and Lemma 3.5(3) contain errors, then improve their Lemma 4.4 making it a corllary of our result. The fundamental assumption of Majumdar et al has been shown to be flawed. This motivates us to introduce set operations based measures. We present a case (Example 28) where Majumdar-Samanta similarity measure produces an erroneous result but the measure proposed herein decides correctly. Several properties of the new measures have been presented and finally the new similarity measures have been applied to the problem of financial diagnosis of firms.

  14. HYPOTHESIS TESTING WITH THE SIMILARITY INDEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulltilocus DNA fingerprinting methods have been used extensively to address genetic issues in wildlife populations. Hypotheses concerning population subdivision and differing levels of diversity can be addressed through the use of the similarity index (S), a band-sharing coeffic...

  15. Bilateral Trade Flows and Income Distribution Similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Current models of bilateral trade neglect the effects of income distribution. This paper addresses the issue by accounting for non-homothetic consumer preferences and hence investigating the role of income distribution in the context of the gravity model of trade. A theoretically justified gravity model is estimated for disaggregated trade data (Dollar volume is used as dependent variable) using a sample of 104 exporters and 108 importers for 1980–2003 to achieve two main goals. We define and calculate new measures of income distribution similarity and empirically confirm that greater similarity of income distribution between countries implies more trade. Using distribution-based measures as a proxy for demand similarities in gravity models, we find consistent and robust support for the hypothesis that countries with more similar income-distributions trade more with each other. The hypothesis is also confirmed at disaggregated level for differentiated product categories. PMID:27137462

  16. Correlation between social proximity and mobility similarity

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Chao; Huang, Junming; Rong, Zhihai; Zhou, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Human behaviors exhibit ubiquitous correlations in many aspects, such as individual and collective levels, temporal and spatial dimensions, content, social and geographical layers. With rich Internet data of online behaviors becoming available, it attracts academic interests to explore human mobility similarity from the perspective of social network proximity. Existent analysis shows a strong correlation between online social proximity and offline mobility similari- ty, namely, mobile records between friends are significantly more similar than between strangers, and those between friends with common neighbors are even more similar. We argue the importance of the number and diversity of com- mon friends, with a counter intuitive finding that the number of common friends has no positive impact on mobility similarity while the diversity plays a key role, disagreeing with previous studies. Our analysis provides a novel view for better understanding the coupling between human online and offline behaviors, and will...

  17. Learning content similarity for music recommendation

    CERN Document Server

    McFee, Brian; Lanckriet, Gert

    2011-01-01

    Many tasks in music information retrieval, such as recommendation, and playlist generation for online radio, fall naturally into the query-by-example setting, wherein a user queries the system by providing a song, and the system responds with a list of relevant or similar song recommendations. Such applications ultimately depend on the notion of similarity between items to produce high-quality results. Current state-of-the-art systems employ collaborative filter methods to represent musical items, effectively comparing items in terms of their constituent users. While collaborative filter techniques perform well when historical data is available for each item, their reliance on historical data impedes performance on novel or unpopular items. To combat this problem, practitioners rely on content-based similarity, which naturally extends to novel items, but is typically out-performed by collaborative filter methods. In this article, we propose a method for optimizing contentbased similarity by learning from a sa...

  18. Integrated Semantic Similarity Model Based on Ontology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Ya-Jun; ZHAO Yun

    2004-01-01

    To solve the problem of the inadequacy of semantic processing in the intelligent question answering system, an integrated semantic similarity model which calculates the semantic similarity using the geometric distance and information content is presented in this paper.With the help of interrelationship between concepts, the information content of concepts and the strength of the edges in the ontology network, we can calculate the semantic similarity between two concepts and provide information for the further calculation of the semantic similarity between user's question and answers in knowlegdge base.The results of the experiments on the prototype have shown that the semantic problem in natural language processing can also be solved with the help of the knowledge and the abundant semantic information in ontology.More than 90% accuracy with less than 50 ms average searching time in the intelligent question answering prototype system based on ontology has been reached.The result is very satisfied.

  19. Bilateral Trade Flows and Income Distribution Similarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Zarzoso, Inmaculada; Vollmer, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    Current models of bilateral trade neglect the effects of income distribution. This paper addresses the issue by accounting for non-homothetic consumer preferences and hence investigating the role of income distribution in the context of the gravity model of trade. A theoretically justified gravity model is estimated for disaggregated trade data (Dollar volume is used as dependent variable) using a sample of 104 exporters and 108 importers for 1980-2003 to achieve two main goals. We define and calculate new measures of income distribution similarity and empirically confirm that greater similarity of income distribution between countries implies more trade. Using distribution-based measures as a proxy for demand similarities in gravity models, we find consistent and robust support for the hypothesis that countries with more similar income-distributions trade more with each other. The hypothesis is also confirmed at disaggregated level for differentiated product categories. PMID:27137462

  20. Distances and similarities in intuitionistic fuzzy sets

    CERN Document Server

    Szmidt, Eulalia

    2014-01-01

    This book presents the state-of-the-art in theory and practice regarding similarity and distance measures for intuitionistic fuzzy sets. Quantifying similarity and distances is crucial for many applications, e.g. data mining, machine learning, decision making, and control. The work provides readers with a comprehensive set of theoretical concepts and practical tools for both defining and determining similarity between intuitionistic fuzzy sets. It describes an automatic algorithm for deriving intuitionistic fuzzy sets from data, which can aid in the analysis of information in large databases. The book also discusses other important applications, e.g. the use of similarity measures to evaluate the extent of agreement between experts in the context of decision making.

  1. Interpersonal Congruency, Attitude Similarity, and Interpersonal Attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touhey, John C.

    1975-01-01

    As no experimental study has examined the effects of congruency on attraction, the present investigation orthogonally varied attitude similarity and interpersonal congruency in order to compare the two independent variables as determinants of interpersonal attraction. (Author/RK)

  2. Media segmentation using self-similarity decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Jonathan T.; Cooper, Matthew L.

    2003-01-01

    We present a framework for analyzing the structure of digital media streams. Though our methods work for video, text, and audio, we concentrate on detecting the structure of digital music files. In the first step, spectral data is used to construct a similarity matrix calculated from inter-frame spectral similarity.The digital audio can be robustly segmented by correlating a kernel along the diagonal of the similarity matrix. Once segmented, spectral statistics of each segment are computed. In the second step,segments are clustered based on the self-similarity of their statistics. This reveals the structure of the digital music in a set of segment boundaries and labels. Finally, the music is summarized by selecting clusters with repeated segments throughout the piece. The summaries can be customized for various applications based on the structure of the original music.

  3. Outsourced similarity search on metric data assets

    KAUST Repository

    Yiu, Man Lung

    2012-02-01

    This paper considers a cloud computing setting in which similarity querying of metric data is outsourced to a service provider. The data is to be revealed only to trusted users, not to the service provider or anyone else. Users query the server for the most similar data objects to a query example. Outsourcing offers the data owner scalability and a low-initial investment. The need for privacy may be due to the data being sensitive (e.g., in medicine), valuable (e.g., in astronomy), or otherwise confidential. Given this setting, the paper presents techniques that transform the data prior to supplying it to the service provider for similarity queries on the transformed data. Our techniques provide interesting trade-offs between query cost and accuracy. They are then further extended to offer an intuitive privacy guarantee. Empirical studies with real data demonstrate that the techniques are capable of offering privacy while enabling efficient and accurate processing of similarity queries.

  4. ToxEvaluator: an integrated computational platform to aid the interpretation of toxicology study-related findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, D; Wiegers, T C; Enayetallah, A; Kibbey, C; Gosink, M; Koza-Taylor, P; Mattingly, C J; Lawton, M

    2016-01-01

    Attempts are frequently made to investigate adverse findings from preclinical toxicology studies in order to better understand underlying toxicity mechanisms. These efforts often begin with limited information, including a description of the adverse finding, knowledge of the structure of the chemical associated with its cause and the intended pharmacological target. ToxEvaluator was developed jointly by Pfizer and the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (http://ctdbase.org) team at North Carolina State University as an in silico platform to facilitate interpretation of toxicity findings in light of prior knowledge. Through the integration of a diverse set of in silico tools that leverage a number of public and proprietary databases, ToxEvaluator streamlines the process of aggregating and interrogating diverse sources of information. The user enters compound and target identifiers, and selects adverse event descriptors from a safety lexicon and mapped MeSH disease terms. ToxEvaluator provides a summary report with multiple distinct areas organized according to what target or structural aspects have been linked to the adverse finding, including primary pharmacology, structurally similar proprietary compounds, structurally similar public domain compounds, predicted secondary (i.e. off-target) pharmacology and known secondary pharmacology. Similar proprietary compounds and their associated in vivo toxicity findings are reported, along with a link to relevant supporting documents. For similar public domain compounds and interacting targets, ToxEvaluator integrates relationships curated in Comparative Toxicogenomics Database, returning all direct and inferred linkages between them. As an example of its utility, we demonstrate how ToxEvaluator rapidly identified direct (primary pharmacology) and indirect (secondary pharmacology) linkages between cerivastatin and myopathy. PMID:27161010

  5. Two-way migration between similar countries

    OpenAIRE

    Kreickemeier, Udo; Wrona, Jens

    2011-01-01

    We develop a model to explain two-way migration of high-skilled individuals between countries that are similar in their economic characteristics. High-skilled migration is explained by a combination of two features: In both countries there is a continuum of workers with differing abilities, which are private knowledge, and the production technology gives incentives to firms for hiring workers of similar ability. In the presence on migration cost, high-skilled workers self-select into the grou...

  6. Privacy-preserving matching of similar patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatsalan, Dinusha; Christen, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The identification of similar entities represented by records in different databases has drawn considerable attention in many application areas, including in the health domain. One important type of entity matching application that is vital for quality healthcare analytics is the identification of similar patients, known as similar patient matching. A key component of identifying similar records is the calculation of similarity of the values in attributes (fields) between these records. Due to increasing privacy and confidentiality concerns, using the actual attribute values of patient records to identify similar records across different organizations is becoming non-trivial because the attributes in such records often contain highly sensitive information such as personal and medical details of patients. Therefore, the matching needs to be based on masked (encoded) values while being effective and efficient to allow matching of large databases. Bloom filter encoding has widely been used as an efficient masking technique for privacy-preserving matching of string and categorical values. However, no work on Bloom filter-based masking of numerical data, such as integer (e.g. age), floating point (e.g. body mass index), and modulus (numbers wrap around upon reaching a certain value, e.g. date and time), which are commonly required in the health domain, has been presented in the literature. We propose a framework with novel methods for masking numerical data using Bloom filters, thereby facilitating the calculation of similarities between records. We conduct an empirical study on publicly available real-world datasets which shows that our framework provides efficient masking and achieves similar matching accuracy compared to the matching of actual unencoded patient records. PMID:26707453

  7. Protein structural similarity search by Ramachandran codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Chih-Hung

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein structural data has increased exponentially, such that fast and accurate tools are necessary to access structure similarity search. To improve the search speed, several methods have been designed to reduce three-dimensional protein structures to one-dimensional text strings that are then analyzed by traditional sequence alignment methods; however, the accuracy is usually sacrificed and the speed is still unable to match sequence similarity search tools. Here, we aimed to improve the linear encoding methodology and develop efficient search tools that can rapidly retrieve structural homologs from large protein databases. Results We propose a new linear encoding method, SARST (Structural similarity search Aided by Ramachandran Sequential Transformation. SARST transforms protein structures into text strings through a Ramachandran map organized by nearest-neighbor clustering and uses a regenerative approach to produce substitution matrices. Then, classical sequence similarity search methods can be applied to the structural similarity search. Its accuracy is similar to Combinatorial Extension (CE and works over 243,000 times faster, searching 34,000 proteins in 0.34 sec with a 3.2-GHz CPU. SARST provides statistically meaningful expectation values to assess the retrieved information. It has been implemented into a web service and a stand-alone Java program that is able to run on many different platforms. Conclusion As a database search method, SARST can rapidly distinguish high from low similarities and efficiently retrieve homologous structures. It demonstrates that the easily accessible linear encoding methodology has the potential to serve as a foundation for efficient protein structural similarity search tools. These search tools are supposed applicable to automated and high-throughput functional annotations or predictions for the ever increasing number of published protein structures in this post-genomic era.

  8. Limit theorems for self-similar tilings

    CERN Document Server

    Bufetov, Alexander I

    2012-01-01

    We study deviation of ergodic averages for dynamical systems given by self-similar tilings on the plane and in higher dimensions. The main object of our paper is a special family of finitely-additive measures for our systems. An asymptotic formula is given for ergodic integrals in terms of these finitely-additive measures, and, as a corollary, limit theorems are obtained for dynamical systems given by self-similar tilings.

  9. Web Search Results Summarization Using Similarity Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawant V.V.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Now day’s internet has become part of our life, the WWW is most important service of internet because it allows presenting information such as document, imaging etc. The WWW grows rapidly and caters to a diversified levels and categories of users. For user specified results web search results are extracted. Millions of information pouring online, users has no time to surf the contents completely .Moreover the information available is repeated or duplicated in nature. This issue has created the necessity to restructure the search results that could yield results summarized. The proposed approach comprises of different feature extraction of web pages. Web page visual similarity assessment has been employed to address the problems in different fields including phishing, web archiving, web search engine etc. In this approach, initially by enters user query the number of search results get stored. The Earth Mover's Distance is used to assessment of web page visual similarity, in this technique take the web page as a low resolution image, create signature of that web page image with color and co-ordinate features .Calculate the distance between web pages by applying EMD method. Compute the Layout Similarity value by using tag comparison algorithm and template comparison algorithm. Textual similarity is computed by using cosine similarity, and hyperlink analysis is performed to compute outward links. The final similarity value is calculated by fusion of layout, text, hyperlink and EMD value. Once the similarity matrix is found clustering is employed with the help of connected component. Finally group of similar web pages i.e. summarized results get displayed to user. Experiment conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of four methods to generate summarized result on different web pages and user queries also.

  10. Some more similarities between Peirce and Skinner

    OpenAIRE

    Moxley, Roy A

    2002-01-01

    C. S. Peirce is noted for pioneering a variety of views, and the case is made here for the similarities and parallels between his views and B. F. Skinner's radical behaviorism. In addition to parallels previously noted, these similarities include an advancement of experimental science, a behavioral psychology, a shift from nominalism to realism, an opposition to positivism, a selectionist account for strengthening behavior, the importance of a community of selves, a recursive approach to meth...

  11. Computing Similarity Dependencies with Pattern Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Baixeries, Jaume; Kaytoue, Mehdi; Napoli, Amedeo

    2013-01-01

    Functional dependencies provide valuable knowledge on the relations between the attributes of a data table. To extend their use, generalizations have been proposed, among which purity and approximate dependencies. After discussing those generalizations, we provide an alternative definition, the similarity dependencies, to handle a similarity relation between data-values, hence un-crisping the basic definition of functional dependencies. This work is rooted in formal concept analysis, and we s...

  12. A probabilistic approach to melodic similarity

    OpenAIRE

    Bernabeu Briones, José Francisco; CALERA RUBIO, JORGE; Iñesta Quereda, José Manuel; Rizo Valero, David

    2009-01-01

    Melodic similarity is an important research topic in music information retrieval. The representation of symbolic music by means of trees has proven to be suitable in melodic similarity computation, because they are able to code rhythm in their structure leaving only pitch representations as a degree of freedom for coding. In order to compare trees, different edit distances have been previously used. In this paper, stochastic k-testable tree-models, formerly used in other domains like structur...

  13. Learning semantic similarity for very short texts

    OpenAIRE

    De Boom, Cedric; Van Canneyt, Steven; Bohez, Steven; Demeester, Thomas; Dhoedt, Bart

    2015-01-01

    Levering data on social media, such as Twitter and Facebook, requires information retrieval algorithms to become able to relate very short text fragments to each other. Traditional text similarity methods such as tf-idf cosine-similarity, based on word overlap, mostly fail to produce good results in this case, since word overlap is little or non-existent. Recently, distributed word representations, or word embeddings, have been shown to successfully allow words to match on the semantic level....

  14. Protein structural similarity search by Ramachandran codes

    OpenAIRE

    Chang Chih-Hung; Huang Po-Jung; Lo Wei-Cheng; Lyu Ping-Chiang

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Protein structural data has increased exponentially, such that fast and accurate tools are necessary to access structure similarity search. To improve the search speed, several methods have been designed to reduce three-dimensional protein structures to one-dimensional text strings that are then analyzed by traditional sequence alignment methods; however, the accuracy is usually sacrificed and the speed is still unable to match sequence similarity search tools. Here, we ai...

  15. Mobile P2P Fast Similarity Search

    OpenAIRE

    Bocek, T; Hecht, F. V.; Hausheer, D; Hunt, E; Stiller, B.

    2009-01-01

    In informal data sharing environments, misspellings cause problems for data indexing and retrieval. This is even more pronounced in mobile environments, in which devices with limited input devices are used. In a mobile environment, similarity search algorithms for finding misspelled data need to account for limited CPU and bandwidth. This demo shows P2P fast similarity search (P2PFastSS) running on mobile phones and laptops that is tailored to uncertain data entry and use...

  16. Similarity Theory of Withdrawn Water Temperature Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Yunpeng Han; Xueping Gao

    2015-01-01

    Selective withdrawal from a thermal stratified reservoir has been widely utilized in managing reservoir water withdrawal. Besides theoretical analysis and numerical simulation, model test was also necessary in studying the temperature of withdrawn water. However, information on the similarity theory of the withdrawn water temperature model remains lacking. Considering flow features of selective withdrawal, the similarity theory of the withdrawn water temperature model was analyzed theoretical...

  17. SIMILARITY NETWORK FOR SEMANTIC WEB SERVICES SUBSTITUTION

    OpenAIRE

    Cherifi, Chantal

    2013-01-01

    Web services substitution is one of the most challenging tasks for automating the composition process of multiple Web services. It aims to improve performances and to deal efficiently with Web services failures. Many existing solutions have approached the problem through classification of substitutable Web services. To go a step further, we propose in this paper a network based approach where nodes are Web services operations and links join similar operations. Four similarity measures based o...

  18. Scalable Similarity Matching in Streaming Time Series

    OpenAIRE

    Marascu, Alice; Ali Khan, Suleiman; Palpanas, Themis

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays online monitoring of data streams is essential in many real life applications, like sensor network monitoring, manufacturing process control, and video surveillance. One major problem in this area is the online identification of streaming sequences similar to a predefined set of pattern-sequences. In this paper, we present a novel solution that extends the state of the art both in terms of effectiveness and efficiency. We propose the first online similarity matching algorithm based o...

  19. Activity-relevant similarity values for fingerprints and implications for similarity searching

    OpenAIRE

    Swarit Jasial; Ye Hu; Martin Vogt; Jürgen Bajorath

    2016-01-01

    A largely unsolved problem in chemoinformatics is the issue of how calculated compound similarity relates to activity similarity, which is central to many applications. In general, activity relationships are predicted from calculated similarity values. However, there is no solid scientific foundation to bridge between calculated molecular and observed activity similarity. Accordingly, the success rate of identifying new active compounds by similarity searching is limited. Although various att...

  20. Toxicology in the 21st century - Working our way towards a visionary reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, N.; Wever, B.de; Fuchs, H.W.; Gaca, M.; Krul, C.A.M.; Roggen, E.L.

    2011-01-01

    In November 2009 the In Vitro Testing Industrial Platform (IVTIP) organized a meeting entitled '. Toxicology in the 21st century - working our way towards a visionary reality'. Participating delegates included scientists, key opinion leaders, developers and users of 3Rs-related tests and testing str

  1. Docking-based classification models for exploratory toxicology studies on high-quality estrogenic experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Exploratory toxicology is a new emerging research area whose ultimate mission is that of protecting human health and environment from risks posed by chemicals. In this regard, the ethical and practical limitation of animal testing has encouraged the promotion of compu...

  2. Why insecticides are more toxic to insects than people: The unique toxicology of insects

    OpenAIRE

    Casida, J E; Quistad, G B

    2004-01-01

    The unique toxicology of insects provides the safety mechanisms for the major insecticides. The selectivity of insecticidal nerve poisons is attributable to structural differences in binding subsites (acetylcholinesterase and nicotinic receptor) or receptor subunit interfaces (gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor) or transmembrane regions (voltage-sensitive sodium channel) supplemented by metabolic activation and detoxification. Slow action limits the use of the remarkably selective insecticides ...

  3. Phytochemical and toxicological investigations of crude methanolic extracts, subsequent fractions and crude saponins of Isodon rugosus

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Background Isodon rugosus is used traditionally in the management of hypertension, rheumatism, tooth-ache and pyrexia. Present study was arranged to investigate I. rugosus for phytoconstituents, phytotoxic and cytotoxic activities to explore its toxicological, pharmacological potentials and to rationalize its ethnomedicinal uses. Briefly, qualitative phytochemical analysis of the plant extracts were carried out for the existence of alkaloids, flavonoids, saponins, oils, glycosides, anthraquin...

  4. Amanita phalloides poisoning: A 5-year survey of the Czech Toxicological Information Centre

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Křenová, M.; Navrátil, Tomáš; Pelclová, D.

    Athens: European Association of Poisons Centres and Clinical Toxicologists, 2007. s. 51. [International Congress EAPCCT /27./. 01.05.2007-04.05.2007, Athens] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Toxicological information centre * amanita phalloides Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  5. Amanita phalloides poisoning: A 5-year survey of the Czech Toxicological Information Centre

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pelclová, D.; Navrátil, Tomáš; Křenová, M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 4 (2007), s. 345-345. ISSN 0731-3810. [European Association of Poisons Centres and Clinical Toxicologists International Congress /27./. 01.05.2007-04.05.2007, Athens] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Czech Toxicological Information Centre * amanita phalloides Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  6. The Role of Toxicological Science in Meeting the Challenges and Opportunities of Hydraulic Fracturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    We briefly describe how toxicology can inform the discussion and debate of the merits of hydraulic fracturing by providing information on the potential toxicity of the chemical and physical agents associated with this process, individually and in combination. We consider upstream...

  7. Chemical constituents and toxicological studies of leaves from Mimosa caesalpiniifolia Benth., a Brazilian honey plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayana Bruna Nery Monção

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mimosa caesalpiniifolia Benth. (Leguminosae is widely found in the Brazilian Northeast region and markedly contributes to production of pollen and honey, being considered an important honey plant in this region. Objective: To investigate the chemical composition of the ethanol extract of leaves from M. caesalpiniifolia by GC-MS after derivatization (silylation, as well as to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo toxicological effects and androgenic activity in rats. Materials and Methods: The ethanol extract of leaves from Mimosa caesalpiniifolia was submitted to derivatization by silylation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS to identification of chemical constituents. In vitro toxicological evaluation was performed by MTT assay in murine macrophages and by Artemia salina lethality assay, and the in vivo acute oral toxicity and androgenic evaluation in rats. Results: Totally, 32 components were detected: Phytol-TMS (11.66%, lactic acid-2TMS (9.16%, α-tocopherol-TMS (7.34% and β-sitosterol-TMS (6.80% were the major constituents. At the concentrations analyzed, the ethanol extract showed low cytotoxicity against brine shrimp (Artemia salina and murine macrophages. In addition, the extract did not exhibit any toxicological effect or androgenic activity in rats. Conclusions: The derivatization by silylation allowed a rapid identification of chemical compounds from the M. caesalpiniifolia leaves extract. Besides, this species presents a good safety profile as observed in toxicological studies, and possess a great potential in the production of herbal medicines or as for food consumption.

  8. 78 FR 13347 - Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Toxicology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Clinical Chemistry and Clinical Toxicology Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. This notice announces...

  9. Principles of Pharmacology and Toxicology Also Govern Effects of Chemicals on the Endocrine System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Autrup, Herman; Barile, Frank A; Blaauboer, Bas J; Degen, Gisela H; Dekant, Wolfgang; Dietrich, Daniel; Domingo, Jose L; Gori, Gio Batta; Greim, Helmuth; Hengstler, Jan G; Kacew, Sam; Marquardt, Hans; Pelkonen, Olavi; Savolainen, Kai; Vermeulen, Nico P

    2015-01-01

    The present debate on chemicals with Hormonal activity, often termed 'endocrine disruptors', is highly controversial and includes challenges of the present paradigms used in toxicology and in hazard identification and risk characterization. In our opinion, chemicals with hormonal activity can be ...

  10. Indoor and outdoor airborne particles. An in vitro study on mutagenic potential and toxicological implications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houdt, van J.J.

    1988-01-01

    IntroductionAir pollution components are present as gases and as particulate matter. As particle deposition takes place in various parts of the respiratory system particulate matter may have other toxicological implications than gaseous pollutants, which all may penetrate in the low

  11. Toxicology of the herbicide dichlobenil (2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile) and its main metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Genderen, H. van; Esch, G.J. van

    1968-01-01

    A review of the toxicology of dichlobenil presents the results of acute tests in rats, mice and rabbits, short-term tests in rats, pigs and rabbits, long-term and reproduction studies in rats and a test for teratogenicity in mice. The compound is more toxic on acute administration to rabbits than to

  12. TOXICOLOGICAL STUDR OF DL-111-IT,A NEW NON-STEROID EARLY PREGNANCY TERMINATING AGENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANGRui-Ying; ZHOUHui-Jun; YANGBao-Zhu; LIUHe-Chu; XUJian-Hua; LOUYi-Jia; ZHANGYuan-Pei

    1989-01-01

    DL-111-IT (3-ethylpheny1-5- (3-methoxyphenyl) -1, 2, 4-triazole) is highly effective for terminating early pregnancy in several species of animals without delayoel embryotoxic and teratogenic effects on the secondary embryo in rats. The present paper is a toxicological study of DI-111-IT.

  13. Size Distributions and Characterization of Native and Ground Samples for Toxicology Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, David S.; Cooper, Bonnie L.; Taylor, Larry A.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation shows charts and graphs that review the particle size distribution and characterization of natural and ground samples for toxicology studies. There are graphs which show the volume distribution versus the number distribution for natural occurring dust, jet mill ground dust, and ball mill ground dust.

  14. 75 FR 16106 - Draft Toxicological Review of Dichloromethane: In Support of Summary Information on the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-31

    ... science-based human health assessments to support the Agency's regulatory activities. The IRIS database... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Dichloromethane: In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice of...

  15. 75 FR 26956 - Draft Toxicological Review of Hexachloroethane: In Support of the Summary Information in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... science-based human health assessments to support the Agency's regulatory activities. The IRIS database... AGENCY Draft Toxicological Review of Hexachloroethane: In Support of the Summary Information in the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice...

  16. Eco-toxicological impact of “metals” on the aquatic and terrestrial ecosystem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizzol, Massimo; Christensen, Per; Schmidt, Jannick Højrup;

    2011-01-01

    The assessment of eco-toxicological impacts related to the emission of contaminants into the environment has peculiar characteristics in the context of Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), and many different Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) methodologies can be used. However, previous studies recogniz...

  17. Predictive Toxicology and In Vitro to In Vivo Extrapolation (AsiaTox2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A significant challenge in toxicology is the “too many chemicals” problem. Humans and environmental species are exposed to as many as tens of thousands of chemicals, few of which have been thoroughly tested using standard in vivo test methods. This talk will discuss several appro...

  18. 78 FR 19499 - Request for Information: The National Toxicology Program Requests Information On Assays and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    ... cell- based assays or alternative (non-rodent) animal models, that might be used to prioritize compounds for in vivo neurotoxicity testing. DATES: The deadline for receipt of information is May 1, 2013... program established in 1978 (43 FR 53060) to coordinate toxicology research and testing across...

  19. Toxicological evaluation of fracturing fluids; Toxikologische Bewertung von Fracking-Fluiden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frimmel, Fritz H.; Gordalla, Birgit [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Wasserchemie und Wassertechnologie und DVGW-Forschungsstelle Engler-Bunte-Inst.; Ewers, Ulrich [Hygiene-Institut des Ruhrgebiets, Gelsenkirchen (Germany). Abt. fuer Umweltmedizin und Toxikologie; Schmitt-Jansen, Mechthild; Altenburger, Rolf [Helmholtz-Zentrum fuer Umweltforschung - UFZ, Leipzig (Germany). Dept. Bioanalytische Oekotoxikologie

    2012-11-01

    The fracturing technology utilizes chemicals which have to be evaluated according to the safety and environmental compatibility. Under this aspect, the authors of the contribution under consideration present an integrated evaluation in terms of human toxicology, ecotoxicology as well as in terms of protection of drinking water on the basis of selected examples.

  20. In silico toxicology models and databases as FDA Critical Path Initiative toolkits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerio Luis G

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In silico toxicology methods are practical, evidence-based and high throughput, with varying accuracy. In silico approaches are of keen interest, not only to scientists in the private sector and to academic researchers worldwide, but also to the public. They are being increasingly evaluated and applied by regulators. Although there are foreseeable beneficial aspects -- including maximising use of prior test data and the potential for minimising animal use for future toxicity testing -- the primary use of in silico toxicology methods in the pharmaceutical sciences are as decision support information. It is possible for in silico toxicology methods to complement and strengthen the evidence for certain regulatory review processes, and to enhance risk management by supporting a more informed decision regarding priority setting for additional toxicological testing in research and product development. There are also several challenges with these continually evolving methods which clearly must be considered. This mini-review describes in silico methods that have been researched as Critical Path Initiative toolkits for predicting toxicities early in drug development based on prior knowledge derived from preclinical and clinical data at the US Food and Drug Administration, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research.

  1. The third United States-Japan meeting on the Toxicological Characterization of Environmental Chemicals.

    OpenAIRE

    Kurokawa, Y; Damstra, T

    1992-01-01

    This report summarizes the discussion of the Third U.S.-Japan Meeting on the Toxicological Characterization of Environmental Chemicals held under the auspices of the U.S.-Japan cooperative in research and development in science and technology. Recent data on the interrelationships between toxicity, cell proliferation, and carcinogenicity are presented.

  2. Reflections on the Origins and Evolution of Genetic Toxicology and the Environmental Mutagen Society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wassom, John S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Retired); Malling, Heinrich V. [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS); Sankaranarayanan, K. [Leiden University; Lu, Po-Yung [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    This article traces the development of the field of mutagenesis and its metamorphosis into the research area we now call genetic toxicology. In 1969 this transitional event led to the founding of the Environmental Mutagen Society (EMS). The charter of this new Society was to encourage interest in and study of mutagens in the human environment, particularly as these may be of concern to public health. As the mutagenesis field unfolded and expanded, the lexicon changed and new wording appeared to better describe this evolving area of research. The term genetic toxicology was coined and became an important subspecialty of the broad area of toxicology. Genetic toxicology is now set for a thorough reappraisal of its methods, goals, and priorities to meet the challenges of the 21st Century. To better understand these challenges, we have revisited the primary goal that the EMS founders had in mind for the Society s main mission and objective, namely, the quantitative assessment of genetic (hereditary) risks to human populations exposed to environmental agents. We also have reflected upon some of the seminal events over the last 40 years that have influenced the advancement of the genetic toxicology discipline and the extent to which the Society s major goal and allied objectives have been achieved. Additionally, we have provided suggestions on how EMS can further advance the science of genetic toxicology in the postgenome era. Chronicling all events and publications that influenced the development of the mutagenesis and genetic toxicology research area for this article was not possible, but some key happenings that contributed to the field s development have been reviewed. Events that led to the origin of EMS are also presented in celebration of the Society s 40th anniversary. Any historical accounting will have perceived deficiencies. Key people, publications, or events that some readers may feel have had significant impact on development of the subject under review may

  3. Toxicologic Assessment of a Commercial Decolorized Whole Leaf Aloe Vera Juice, Lily of the Desert Filtered Whole Leaf Juice with Aloesorb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inder Sehgal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aloe vera, a common ingredient in cosmetics, is increasingly being consumed as a beverage supplement. Although consumer interest in aloe likely stems from its association with several health benefits, a concern has also been raised by a National Toxicology Program Report that a nondecolorized whole leaf aloe vera extract taken internally by rats was associated with intestinal mucosal hyperplasia and ultimately malignancy. We tested a decolorized whole leaf (DCWL aloe vera, treated with activated charcoal to remove the latex portion of the plant, for genotoxicity in bacteria, acute/subacute toxicity in B6C3F1 mice, and subchronic toxicity in F344 rats. We found this DCWL aloe vera juice to be nongenotoxic in histidine reversion and DNA repair assays. Following acute administration, mice exhibited no adverse signs at 3- or 14-day evaluation periods. When fed to male and female F344 rats over 13 weeks, DCWL aloe led to no toxicity as assessed by behavior, stools, weight gain, feed consumption, organ weights, and hematologic or clinical chemistry profiles. These rats had intestinal mucosal morphologies—examined grossly and microscopically—that were similar to controls. Our studies show that oral administration of this DCWL aloe juice has a different toxicology profile than that of the untreated aloe juice at exposures up to 13 weeks.

  4. Molecular similarity-based predictions of the Tox21 screening outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Natalia Drwal

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available To assess the toxicity of new chemicals and drugs, regulatory agencies require in vivo testing for many toxic endpoints, resulting in millions of animal experiments conducted each year. However, following the Replace, Reduce, Refine (3R principle, the development and optimization of alternative methods, in particular in silico methods, has been put into focus in the recent years. It is generally acknowledged that the more complex a toxic endpoint, the more difficult it is to model. Therefore, computational toxicology is shifting from modelling general and complex endpoints to the investigation and modelling of pathways of toxicity and the underlying molecular effects.The U.S. Toxicology in the 21st Century (Tox21 initiative has screened a large library of compounds, including approximately 10K environmental chemicals and drugs, for different mechanisms responsible for eliciting toxic effects, and made the results publicly available. Through the Tox21 Data Challenge, the consortium has established a platform for computational toxicologists to develop and validate their predictive models.Here, we present a fast and successful method for the prediction of different outcomes of the nuclear receptor and stress response pathway screening from the Tox21 Data Challenge 2014. The method is based on the combination of molecular similarity calculations and a naïve Bayes machine learning algorithm and has been implemented as a KNIME pipeline. Molecules are represented as binary vectors consisting of a concatenation of common two-dimensional molecular fingerprint types with topological compound properties. The prediction method has been optimized individually for each modelled target and evaluated in a cross-validation as well as with the independent Tox21 validation set. Our results show that the method can achieve good prediction accuracies and rank among the top algorithms submitted to the prediction challenge, indicating its broad applicability in

  5. Identifying mechanistic similarities in drug responses

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, C.

    2012-05-15

    Motivation: In early drug development, it would be beneficial to be able to identify those dynamic patterns of gene response that indicate that drugs targeting a particular gene will be likely or not to elicit the desired response. One approach would be to quantitate the degree of similarity between the responses that cells show when exposed to drugs, so that consistencies in the regulation of cellular response processes that produce success or failure can be more readily identified.Results: We track drug response using fluorescent proteins as transcription activity reporters. Our basic assumption is that drugs inducing very similar alteration in transcriptional regulation will produce similar temporal trajectories on many of the reporter proteins and hence be identified as having similarities in their mechanisms of action (MOA). The main body of this work is devoted to characterizing similarity in temporal trajectories/signals. To do so, we must first identify the key points that determine mechanistic similarity between two drug responses. Directly comparing points on the two signals is unrealistic, as it cannot handle delays and speed variations on the time axis. Hence, to capture the similarities between reporter responses, we develop an alignment algorithm that is robust to noise, time delays and is able to find all the contiguous parts of signals centered about a core alignment (reflecting a core mechanism in drug response). Applying the proposed algorithm to a range of real drug experiments shows that the result agrees well with the prior drug MOA knowledge. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  6. Guidance on assessing the methodological and reporting quality of toxicologically relevant studies: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Gbeminiyi O; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Wright, Robert A; Lalu, Manoj Mathew; Patlewicz, Grace; Becker, Richard A; DeGeorge, George L; Fergusson, Dean; Hartung, Thomas; Lewis, R Jeffrey; Stephens, Martin L

    2016-01-01

    Assessments of methodological and reporting quality are critical to adequately judging the credibility of a study's conclusions and to gauging its potential reproducibility. To aid those seeking to assess the methodological or reporting quality of studies relevant to toxicology, we conducted a scoping review of the available guidance with respect to four types of studies: in vivo and in vitro, (quantitative) structure-activity relationships ([Q]SARs), physico-chemical, and human observational studies. Our aims were to identify the available guidance in this diverse literature, briefly summarize each document, and distill the common elements of these documents for each study type. In general, we found considerable guidance for in vivo and human studies, but only one paper addressed in vitro studies exclusively. The guidance for (Q)SAR studies and physico-chemical studies was scant but authoritative. There was substantial overlap across guidance documents in the proposed criteria for both methodological and reporting quality. Some guidance documents address toxicology research directly, whereas others address preclinical research generally or clinical research and therefore may not be fully applicable to the toxicology context without some translation. Another challenge is the degree to which assessments of methodological quality in toxicology should focus on risk of bias - as in clinical medicine and healthcare - or be broadened to include other quality measures, such as confirming the identity of test substances prior to exposure. Our review is intended primarily for those in toxicology and risk assessment seeking an entry point into the extensive and diverse literature on methodological and reporting quality applicable to their work. PMID:27039952

  7. Similarity Metrics for Closed Loop Dynamic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whorton, Mark S.; Yang, Lee C.; Bedrossian, Naz; Hall, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    To what extent and in what ways can two closed-loop dynamic systems be said to be "similar?" This question arises in a wide range of dynamic systems modeling and control system design applications. For example, bounds on error models are fundamental to the controller optimization with modern control design methods. Metrics such as the structured singular value are direct measures of the degree to which properties such as stability or performance are maintained in the presence of specified uncertainties or variations in the plant model. Similarly, controls-related areas such as system identification, model reduction, and experimental model validation employ measures of similarity between multiple realizations of a dynamic system. Each area has its tools and approaches, with each tool more or less suited for one application or the other. Similarity in the context of closed-loop model validation via flight test is subtly different from error measures in the typical controls oriented application. Whereas similarity in a robust control context relates to plant variation and the attendant affect on stability and performance, in this context similarity metrics are sought that assess the relevance of a dynamic system test for the purpose of validating the stability and performance of a "similar" dynamic system. Similarity in the context of system identification is much more relevant than are robust control analogies in that errors between one dynamic system (the test article) and another (the nominal "design" model) are sought for the purpose of bounding the validity of a model for control design and analysis. Yet system identification typically involves open-loop plant models which are independent of the control system (with the exception of limited developments in closed-loop system identification which is nonetheless focused on obtaining open-loop plant models from closed-loop data). Moreover the objectives of system identification are not the same as a flight test and

  8. Earthquake detection through computationally efficient similarity search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Clara E; O'Reilly, Ossian; Bergen, Karianne J; Beroza, Gregory C

    2015-12-01

    Seismology is experiencing rapid growth in the quantity of data, which has outpaced the development of processing algorithms. Earthquake detection-identification of seismic events in continuous data-is a fundamental operation for observational seismology. We developed an efficient method to detect earthquakes using waveform similarity that overcomes the disadvantages of existing detection methods. Our method, called Fingerprint And Similarity Thresholding (FAST), can analyze a week of continuous seismic waveform data in less than 2 hours, or 140 times faster than autocorrelation. FAST adapts a data mining algorithm, originally designed to identify similar audio clips within large databases; it first creates compact "fingerprints" of waveforms by extracting key discriminative features, then groups similar fingerprints together within a database to facilitate fast, scalable search for similar fingerprint pairs, and finally generates a list of earthquake detections. FAST detected most (21 of 24) cataloged earthquakes and 68 uncataloged earthquakes in 1 week of continuous data from a station located near the Calaveras Fault in central California, achieving detection performance comparable to that of autocorrelation, with some additional false detections. FAST is expected to realize its full potential when applied to extremely long duration data sets over a distributed network of seismic stations. The widespread application of FAST has the potential to aid in the discovery of unexpected seismic signals, improve seismic monitoring, and promote a greater understanding of a variety of earthquake processes. PMID:26665176

  9. Nanocrystal energetics via quantum similarity measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We first develop a descriptor-based representation of atomic environments by devising two local similarity indices defined from an atom-partitioned quantum-chemical descriptor. Then, we employ this representation to explore the size-, shape- and composition-dependent nanocrystal energetics. For this purpose, we utilize an energy difference μ that is related to the atomic chemical potential, which enables one to characterize energetic heterogeneities. Employing first-principles calculations based on the density functional theory for a set of database systems, namely unary atomic clusters in the shape of regular polyhedra and the bulk solids of C, Si, Pd and Pt, we explore the correlations between the energy difference μ and similarity indices. We find that there exists an interconnection between nanocrystal energetics and quantum similarity measures. Accordingly, we develop a means for computing total energy differences from the similarity indices via interpolation, and utilize a test set comprising a variety of unary nanocrystals and binary nanoalloys/nanocompounds for validation. Our findings indicate that the similarity-based energies could be utilized in computer-aided design of nanoparticles. (paper)

  10. Image fusion using bi-directional similarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Chunshan; Luo, Xiaoyan

    2015-05-01

    Infrared images are widely used in the practical applications to capture abundant information. However, it is still challenging to enhance the infrared image by the visual image. In this paper, we propose an effective method using bidirectional similarity. In the proposed method, we aim to find an optimal solution from many feasible solutions without introducing intermediate image. We employ some priori constraints to meet the requirements of image fusion which can be detailed to preserve both good characteristics in the infrared image and spatial information in the visual image. In the iterative step, we use the matrix with the square of the difference between images to integrate the image holding most information. We call this matrix the bidirectional similarity distance. By the bidirectional similarity distance, we can get the transitive images. Then, we fuse the images according to the weight. Experimental results show that, compared to the traditional image fusion algorithm, fusion images from bidirectional similarity fusion algorithm have greatly improved in the subjective vision, entropy, structural similarity index measurement. We believe that the proposed scheme can have a wide applications.

  11. The prediction method of similar cycles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhan-Le Du; Hua-Ning Wang

    2011-01-01

    The concept of degree of similarity (η),is proposed to quantitatively describe the similarity of a parameter (e.g.the maximum amplitude Rmax) of a solar cycle relative to a referenced one,and the prediction method of similar cycles is further developed.For two parameters,the solar minimum (Rmin) and rising rate (βa),which can be directly measured a few months after the minimum,a synthesis degree of similarity (ηs) is defined as the weighted-average of the η values around Rmin and βa,with the weights given by the coefficients of determination ofRmax withRmin and βa,respectively.The monthly values of the whole referenced cycle can be predicted by averaging the corresponding values in the most similar cycles with the weights givenby the ηs values.As an application,Cycle 24 is predicted to peak around January 2013 ±8 (month) with a size of about Rmax =84 + 17 and to end around September 2019.

  12. Efficient Video Similarity Measurement and Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, S-C S

    2002-12-19

    The amount of information on the world wide web has grown enormously since its creation in 1990. Duplication of content is inevitable because there is no central management on the web. Studies have shown that many similar versions of the same text documents can be found throughout the web. This redundancy problem is more severe for multimedia content such as web video sequences, as they are often stored in multiple locations and different formats to facilitate downloading and streaming. Similar versions of the same video can also be found, unknown to content creators, when web users modify and republish original content using video editing tools. Identifying similar content can benefit many web applications and content owners. For example, it will reduce the number of similar answers to a web search and identify inappropriate use of copyright content. In this dissertation, they present a system architecture and corresponding algorithms to efficiently measure, search, and organize similar video sequences found on any large database such as the web.

  13. Visual Similarity Based Document Layout Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Di Wen; Xiao-Qing Ding

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a visual similarity based document layout analysis (DLA) scheme is proposed, which by using clustering strategy can adaptively deal with documents in different languages, with different layout structures and skew angles. Aiming at a robust and adaptive DLA approach, the authors first manage to find a set of representative filters and statistics to characterize typical texture patterns in document images, which is through a visual similarity testing process.Texture features are then extracted from these filters and passed into a dynamic clustering procedure, which is called visual similarity clustering. Finally, text contents are located from the clustered results. Benefit from this scheme, the algorithm demonstrates strong robustness and adaptability in a wide variety of documents, which previous traditional DLA approaches do not possess.

  14. Efficient Similarity Join Method Using Unsupervised Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Hawashin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an efficient similarity join method using unsupervised learning, when no labeled datais available. In our previous work, we showed that the performance of similarity join could improve whenlong string attributes, such as paper abstracts, movie summaries, product descriptions, and user feedback,are used under supervised learning, where a training set exists. In this work, we adopt using long stringattributes during the similarity join under unsupervised learning. Along with its importance when nolabeled data exists, unsupervised learning is used when no labeled data is available, it acts also as a quickpreprocessing method for huge datasets. Here, we show that using long attributes during the unsupervisedlearning can further enhance the performance. Moreover, we provide an efficient dynamically expandablealgorithm for databases with frequent transactions.

  15. Stochastic Self-Similar and Fractal Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Iovane, G; Tortoriello, F S

    2004-01-01

    The structures formation of the Universe appears as if it were a classically self-similar random process at all astrophysical scales. An agreement is demonstrated for the present hypotheses of segregation with a size of astrophysical structures by using a comparison between quantum quantities and astrophysical ones. We present the observed segregated Universe as the result of a fundamental self-similar law, which generalizes the Compton wavelength relation. It appears that the Universe has a memory of its quantum origin as suggested by R.Penrose with respect to quasi-crystal. A more accurate analysis shows that the present theory can be extended from the astrophysical to the nuclear scale by using generalized (stochastically) self-similar random process. This transition is connected to the relevant presence of the electromagnetic and nuclear interactions inside the matter. In this sense, the presented rule is correct from a subatomic scale to an astrophysical one. We discuss the near full agreement at organic...

  16. Modelling of flashing flows using similarity fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is presented for the investigation of thermodynamic and fluid dynamic similarity in the two-phase, liquid-vapor region. A simplified model fluid is developed based on a set of heuristic assumptions. The fundamental governing equations are reduced to dimensionless form through the introduction of appropriate scales. Although the methodology outlined is general in its scope, it has been applied to the case of similarity between water substance and refrigerant 114 (R114). Sample calculations are presented for the solution of the flow of a two-phase fluid from the flash point to the choking point. The correspondence based on our similarity analysis is shown to be very good. The advantages of being able to substitute R114 for water in laboratory experiments include lower pressures, temperatures, and flow rates as well as a significant reduction in the physical size of the apparatus

  17. Quantifying the similarities within fold space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Andrew; Pearl, Frances; Mott, Richard; Thornton, Janet; Orengo, Christine

    2002-11-01

    We have used GRATH, a graph-based structure comparison algorithm, to map the similarities between the different folds observed in the CATH domain structure database. Statistical analysis of the distributions of the fold similarities has allowed us to assess the significance for any similarity. Therefore we have examined whether it is best to represent folds as discrete entities or whether, in fact, a more accurate model would be a continuum wherein folds overlap via common motifs. To do this we have introduced a new statistical measure of fold similarity, termed gregariousness. For a particular fold, gregariousness measures how many other folds have a significant structural overlap with that fold, typically comprising 40% or more of the larger structure. Gregarious folds often contain commonly occurring super-secondary structural motifs, such as beta-meanders, greek keys, alpha-beta plait motifs or alpha-hairpins, which are matching similar motifs in other folds. Apart from one example, all the most gregarious folds matching 20% or more of the other folds in the database, are alpha-beta proteins. They also occur in highly populated architectural regions of fold space, adopting sandwich-like arrangements containing two or more layers of alpha-helices and beta-strands.Domains that exhibit a low gregariousness, are those that have very distinctive folds, with few common motifs or motifs that are packed in unusual arrangements. Most of the superhelices exhibit low gregariousness despite containing some commonly occurring super-secondary structural motifs. In these folds, these common motifs are combined in an unusual way and represent a small proportion of the fold (<10%). Our results suggest that fold space may be considered as continuous for some architectural arrangements (e.g. alpha-beta sandwiches), in that super-secondary motifs can be used to link neighbouring fold groups. However, in other regions of fold space much more discrete topologies are observed with

  18. Quantifying the similarity of seismic polarizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Joshua P.; Eaton, David W.; Caffagni, Enrico

    2016-02-01

    Assessing the similarities of seismic attributes can help identify tremor, low signal-to-noise (S/N) signals and converted or reflected phases, in addition to diagnosing site noise and sensor misalignment in arrays. Polarization analysis is a widely accepted method for studying the orientation and directional characteristics of seismic phases via computed attributes, but similarity is ordinarily discussed using qualitative comparisons with reference values or known seismic sources. Here we introduce a technique for quantitative polarization similarity that uses weighted histograms computed in short, overlapping time windows, drawing on methods adapted from the image processing and computer vision literature. Our method accounts for ambiguity in azimuth and incidence angle and variations in S/N ratio. Measuring polarization similarity allows easy identification of site noise and sensor misalignment and can help identify coherent noise and emergent or low S/N phase arrivals. Dissimilar azimuths during phase arrivals indicate misaligned horizontal components, dissimilar incidence angles during phase arrivals indicate misaligned vertical components and dissimilar linear polarization may indicate a secondary noise source. Using records of the Mw = 8.3 Sea of Okhotsk earthquake, from Canadian National Seismic Network broad-band sensors in British Columbia and Yukon Territory, Canada, and a vertical borehole array at Hoadley gas field, central Alberta, Canada, we demonstrate that our method is robust to station spacing. Discrete wavelet analysis extends polarization similarity to the time-frequency domain in a straightforward way. Time-frequency polarization similarities of borehole data suggest that a coherent noise source may have persisted above 8 Hz several months after peak resource extraction from a `flowback' type hydraulic fracture.

  19. Toxicological aspects associated with the ecology of Donax trunculus (Bivalvia, Mollusca) in a polluted environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study provides data on the ecology and toxicology observed in the population of Donax trunculus, a sand dwelling mussel, in the shallow subtidal of Haifa Bay (Mediterranean Sea, Israel). The studied population of the mussel forms a dominant fraction in a community of sand-dwelling molluscs in a zone located 5-25 m from the shoreline, and at depths of 20-120 cm, numbering up to 2000 per m2. Samples of the mussel were collected from three sites, located within 9 km of shore in Haifa Bay. These included a clean site (Akko), a site polluted by a chemical PVC-polymer industry (Frutarom), and a site polluted with oil and waste from the petrochemical industry (Qiryat Yam). Metal analysis indicated site-dependent variations in levels of cadmium, lead, copper and mercury in the mussel soft tissues. Copper levels were similar in the bivalves collected from all the sites. Levels of mercury were significantly higher in specimens from the PVC-polluted site (Frutarom) while levels of cadmium were higher in Akko and Qiryat Yam compared to Frutarom. Lead residues were found only in Donax from Akko. The residual contents of mercury, copper and cadmium were relatively high in the young and noticeably low in Donax of medium body size. The main site of deposition of metals was in the soft tissues of the bivalve, but bioaccumulation of metals was also found in the shells. A marked increase in permeability of gills and mantle to the fluorescent anionic dye-fluorescein (FLU) was detected in Donax from Qiryat Yam and especially Frutarom, compared to the bivalves sampled from Akko. Multiple foci of enhanced permeability (multiple fluorescent spots) were detected in all the individuals sampled from Frutarom but none in the bivalve samples from Akko. Lysosomal accumulation of the metachromatic fluorescent cationic probe, acridine orange - (AO), was significantly decreased in the tissues of D. trunculus from polluted sites, especially polluted by the PVC factory. This decrease correlated

  20. The law of similars: current biases in its application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Silvestri

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. Homeopathic prescription is based on the so-called law of similars, i.e. 1 on a patient sharing symptoms with the artificial and reversible disease caused by a drug taken in the state of health in a proving (Materia Medica Pura; 2 on systematic observations of pathogenetic effects due to accidental drug abuse (toxicology. However, in contemporary homeopathy, distortions in the application of the law are not infrequent, and they will be considered here. Methods. Two main biases are described and analyzed: 1 the shift towards the law of the same, concerning methods like isopathy and homotoxicology; 2 the a priori attribution of therapeutic properties to high dilutions of a given substance. The first twist can be retraced to the extension of the concept of drainage. Drainage is aimed to restore a blocked function by making use of a drug with affinity for a given anatomic district or a specific function – tropism. To some extent this technique is compatible with classical homeopathy, though not based on the law of similars. In any case, drainage has limited effects and typically precedes the use of a simillimum identified within a holistic view. The second kind of distortion is due to the influence of the ancient doctrine of signaturae. In the Organon S. Hahnemann warns against the temptation of ascribing to remedies any effect or property without a preliminary screening through proving. However, while doctrine of signaturae was regarded by classical masters as a further support to experimental findings, rather than being used to infer ex novo substance properties, several homeopaths have expanded its application to the point of using it as an alternative approach to Materia Medica. Conclusions. In a picture of contemporary homeopathy based on these premises, we can draw a line which goes from methods combining isopathy and drainage, acting only on a local level, to approaches somewhat related to the doctrine