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Sample records for ciliary motility disorders

  1. HEATR2 plays a conserved role in assembly of the ciliary motile apparatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine P Diggle

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cilia are highly conserved microtubule-based structures that perform a variety of sensory and motility functions during development and adult homeostasis. In humans, defects specifically affecting motile cilia lead to chronic airway infections, infertility and laterality defects in the genetically heterogeneous disorder Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD. Using the comparatively simple Drosophila system, in which mechanosensory neurons possess modified motile cilia, we employed a recently elucidated cilia transcriptional RFX-FOX code to identify novel PCD candidate genes. Here, we report characterization of CG31320/HEATR2, which plays a conserved critical role in forming the axonemal dynein arms required for ciliary motility in both flies and humans. Inner and outer arm dyneins are absent from axonemes of CG31320 mutant flies and from PCD individuals with a novel splice-acceptor HEATR2 mutation. Functional conservation of closely arranged RFX-FOX binding sites upstream of HEATR2 orthologues may drive higher cytoplasmic expression of HEATR2 during early motile ciliogenesis. Immunoprecipitation reveals HEATR2 interacts with DNAI2, but not HSP70 or HSP90, distinguishing it from the client/chaperone functions described for other cytoplasmic proteins required for dynein arm assembly such as DNAAF1-4. These data implicate CG31320/HEATR2 in a growing intracellular pre-assembly and transport network that is necessary to deliver functional dynein machinery to the ciliary compartment for integration into the motile axoneme.

  2. Esophageal motility disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the better understanding of esophageal motility, the muscle texture and the distribution of skeletal and smooth muscle fibers in the esophagus are of crucial importance. Esophageal physiology will be shortly mentioned as far as necessary for a comprehensive understanding of peristaltic disturbances. Besides the pure depiction of morphologic criteria, a complete esophageal study has to include an analysis of the motility. New diagnostic tools with reduced radiation for dynamic imaging (digital fluoroscopy, videofluoroscopy) at 4-30 frames/s are available. Radiomanometry is a combination of a functional pressure measurement and a simultaneous dynamic morphologic analysis. Esophageal motility disorders are subdivided by radiologic and manometric criteria into primary, secondary, and nonclassifiable forms. Primary motility disorders of the esophagus are achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus, and the hypertonic lower esophageal sphincter. The secondary motility disorders include pseudoachalasia, reflux-associated motility disorders, functionally caused impactions, Boerhaave's syndrome, Chagas' disease, scleroderma, and presbyesophagus. The nonclassificable motility disorders (NEMD) are a very heterogeneous collective. (orig.)

  3. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Gfroerer, Stefan; Rolle, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric intestinal motility disorders affect many children and thus not only impose a significant impact on pediatric health care in general but also on the quality of life of the affected patient. Furthermore, some of these conditions might also have implications for adulthood. Pediatric intestinal motility disorders frequently present as chronic constipation in toddler age children. Most of these conditions are functional, meaning that constipation does not have an organic etiology, but i...

  4. CFAP54 is required for proper ciliary motility and assembly of the central pair apparatus in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Casey W; Craige, Branch; Kroeger, Tiffany V; Finn, Rozzy; Wyatt, Todd A; Sisson, Joseph H; Pavlik, Jacqueline A; Strittmatter, Lara; Hendricks, Gregory M; Witman, George B; Lee, Lance

    2015-09-15

    Motile cilia and flagella play critical roles in fluid clearance and cell motility, and dysfunction commonly results in the pediatric syndrome primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). CFAP221, also known as PCDP1, is required for ciliary and flagellar function in mice and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, where it localizes to the C1d projection of the central microtubule apparatus and functions in a complex that regulates flagellar motility in a calcium-dependent manner. We demonstrate that the genes encoding the mouse homologues of the other C. reinhardtii C1d complex members are primarily expressed in motile ciliated tissues, suggesting a conserved function in mammalian motile cilia. The requirement for one of these C1d complex members, CFAP54, was identified in a mouse line with a gene-trapped allele. Homozygous mice have PCD characterized by hydrocephalus, male infertility, and mucus accumulation. The infertility results from defects in spermatogenesis. Motile cilia have a structural defect in the C1d projection, indicating that the C1d assembly mechanism requires CFAP54. This structural defect results in decreased ciliary beat frequency and perturbed cilia-driven flow. This study identifies a critical role for CFAP54 in proper assembly and function of mammalian cilia and flagella and establishes the gene-trapped allele as a new model of PCD. PMID:26224312

  5. Scintigraphic evaluation of gastrointestinal motility disorders

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    Choe, Jae Gol [College of Medicine, Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-02-01

    Current scintigraphic tests of gastrointestinal motor function provides relevant pathophysiologic information, but their clinical utility is controversial. Many scintigraphic methods are developed to investigate gastrointestinal motility from oral cavity to colon. These are esophageal transit scintigraphy, oropharyngeal transit study, gastric emptying test, small bowel transit time measurement, colon transit study and gastroesopahgeal reflux scintigraphy. Scintigraphy of gastrointestinal tract is the most physiologic and noninvasive method to evaluate gastrointestinal motility disorders. Stomach emptying test is regarded as a gold standard in motility study. Gastrointestinal transit scintigraphy also has a certain role in assessment of drug effect to GI motility and changes after theraphy of motility disorders. Scintigraphy provides noninvasive and quantitative assessment of physiological transit throughout the gastrointestinal tract, and it is extremely useful for diagnosing gastrointestinal motor dysfunction. This article reviews the current procedures, indications, significance and guidelines for gastrointestinal motility measurements by scintigraphy.

  6. The role of hair cells, cilia and ciliary motility in otolith formation in the zebrafish otic vesicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stooke-Vaughan, Georgina A; Huang, Peng; Hammond, Katherine L; Schier, Alexander F; Whitfield, Tanya T

    2012-05-01

    Otoliths are biomineralised structures required for the sensation of gravity, linear acceleration and sound in the zebrafish ear. Otolith precursor particles, initially distributed throughout the otic vesicle lumen, become tethered to the tips of hair cell kinocilia (tether cilia) at the otic vesicle poles, forming two otoliths. We have used high-speed video microscopy to investigate the role of cilia and ciliary motility in otolith formation. In wild-type ears, groups of motile cilia are present at the otic vesicle poles, surrounding the immotile tether cilia. A few motile cilia are also found on the medial wall, but most cilia (92-98%) in the otic vesicle are immotile. In mutants with defective cilia (iguana) or ciliary motility (lrrc50), otoliths are frequently ectopic, untethered or fused. Nevertheless, neither cilia nor ciliary motility are absolutely required for otolith tethering: a mutant that lacks cilia completely (MZovl) is still capable of tethering otoliths at the otic vesicle poles. In embryos with attenuated Notch signalling [mindbomb mutant or Su(H) morphant], supernumerary hair cells develop and otolith precursor particles bind to the tips of all kinocilia, or bind directly to the hair cells' apical surface if cilia are absent [MZovl injected with a Su(H)1+2 morpholino]. However, if the first hair cells are missing (atoh1b morphant), otolith formation is severely disrupted and delayed. Our data support a model in which hair cells produce an otolith precursor-binding factor, normally localised to tether cell kinocilia. We also show that embryonic movement plays a minor role in the formation of normal otoliths. PMID:22461562

  7. Esophageal motility disorders; Motilitaetsstoerungen des Oesophagus

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    Hannig, C.; Rummeny, E. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Muenchen (Germany); Wuttge-Hannig, A. [Gemeinschaftspraxis fuer Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Strahlentherapie, Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-02-15

    For the better understanding of esophageal motility, the muscle texture and the distribution of skeletal and smooth muscle fibers in the esophagus are of crucial importance. Esophageal physiology will be shortly mentioned as far as necessary for a comprehensive understanding of peristaltic disturbances. Besides the pure depiction of morphologic criteria, a complete esophageal study has to include an analysis of the motility. New diagnostic tools with reduced radiation for dynamic imaging (digital fluoroscopy, videofluoroscopy) at 4-30 frames/s are available. Radiomanometry is a combination of a functional pressure measurement and a simultaneous dynamic morphologic analysis. Esophageal motility disorders are subdivided by radiologic and manometric criteria into primary, secondary, and nonclassifiable forms. Primary motility disorders of the esophagus are achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus, and the hypertonic lower esophageal sphincter. The secondary motility disorders include pseudoachalasia, reflux-associated motility disorders, functionally caused impactions, Boerhaave's syndrome, Chagas' disease, scleroderma, and presbyesophagus. The nonclassificable motility disorders (NEMD) are a very heterogeneous collective. (orig.) [German] Zum Verstaendnis der Motilitaet des Oesophagus sind muskulaere Architektur und Verteilung der quergestreiften und glatten Muskelfasern von Bedeutung. Die Physiologie des Oesophagus wird in soweit kurz dargestellt, als sie fuer das Verstaendnis von peristaltischen Stoerungen notwendig ist. Neben der Erfassung rein morphologischer Kriterien ist bei der Untersuchung der Speiseroehre eine diagnostische Bewertung der Motilitaet erforderlich. Es stehen uns heute strahlungsarme dynamische Aufzeichnungsverfahren (digitale dynamische Aufzeichnung, Videofluoroskopie) mit Bildsequenzen von 4-30 Bildern/s zur Verfuegung. Die Kombination einer funktionellen Methode zur Darstellung der Morphologie und der

  8. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, Michael R; Zariwala, Maimoona; Leigh, Margaret

    2016-09-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a recessive genetically heterogeneous disorder of motile cilia with chronic otosinopulmonary disease and organ laterality defects in ∼50% of cases. The prevalence of PCD is difficult to determine. Recent diagnostic advances through measurement of nasal nitric oxide and genetic testing has allowed rigorous diagnoses and determination of a robust clinical phenotype, which includes neonatal respiratory distress, daily nasal congestion, and wet cough starting early in life, along with organ laterality defects. There is early onset of lung disease in PCD with abnormal airflow mechanics and radiographic abnormalities detected in infancy and early childhood. PMID:27514592

  9. Targeting ion channels for the treatment of gastrointestinal motility disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Beyder, Arthur; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2012-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) functional and motility disorders are highly prevalent and responsible for long-term morbidity and sometimes mortality in the affected patients. It is estimated that one in three persons has a GI functional or motility disorder. However, diagnosis and treatment of these widespread conditions remains challenging. This partly stems from the multisystem pathophysiology, including processing abnormalities in the central and peripheral (enteric) nervous systems and motor dysf...

  10. Digital radiography in the evaluation of oesophageal motility disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AIMS: To develop a simple technique for examination of the oesophagus by digital radiography and to assess its role in the evaluation of motility disorders of the oesophagus. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-nine patients and 44 control subjects underwent manometry and digital examination of the oesophagus. The digital study consisted of two parts: firstly examination of the pharynx and cervical oesophagus using 15 ml of fluid barium in anterio-posterior (AP) and lateral views, with image acquisition of four frames/s for 2 s. Secondly, examination of the thoracic oesophagus and oesophagogastric junction using 25 ml of barium in two prone oblique and one supine AP series, with image acquisition of one frame/s for 20 s. Oesophageal transit time (OTT) was measured in each case. Abnormal or non-peristaltic contractions were described regarding their morphology, time of visualization and length. The presence or absence of hiatal hernia, reflux or any associated organic lesions was noted. RESULTS: Digital radiography diagnosed 14 cases of achalasia and 28 cases of non-specific oesophageal motility disorder (NOMD). Normal OTT was 11.95 ± 1.304 s. The OTT was prolonged (16 s or more) in all patients except five; four of these were cases of NOMD. Abnormal contractions were classified into circular and longitudinal types. The circular non-obliterating type was commoner. Achalasia was diagnosed in all cases, as failure of relaxation of the inferior oesophageal sphincter was always present and easily depicted by digital radiography. Abnormal contractions in the body of the oesophagus were elicited in 57% of cases of achalasia. The sensitivity of digital radiography in detecting oesophageal motility disorders was 85.7% based on the presence of abnormal contractions and 91.6% by eliciting a prolonged OTT. CONCLUSIONS: Examination of the oesophagus by digital radiography is simple, non-invasive, reproducible, rapid and without discomfort to patients. It allows the diagnosis of

  11. Peroral Endoscopic Myotomy for Treating Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Young Hoon; Minami, Hitomi; Chiu, Philip Wai Yan; Park, Hyojin

    2016-01-31

    Peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) is the application of esophageal myotomy to the concept of natural orifice transluminal surgery (NOTES) by utilizing a submucosal tunneling method. Since the first case of POEM was performed for treating achalasia in Japan in 2008, this procedure is being more widely used by many skillful endosopists all over the world. Currently, POEM is a spotlighted, emerging treatment option for achalasia, and the indications for POEM are expanding to include long-standing, sigmoid shaped esophagus in achalasia, even previously failed endoscopic treatment or surgical myotomy, and other spastic esophageal motility disorders. Accumulating data about POEM demonstrate excellent short-term outcomes with minimal risk of major adverse events, and some existing long-term data show the efficacy of POEM to be long lasting. In this review article, we review the technical details and clinical outcomes of POEM, and discuss some considerations of POEM in special situations. PMID:26717928

  12. Oesophageal motility disorders in patients with psychiatric disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinical and experimental observations indicate that the motility of the oesophagus may be affected by emotional stimuli. The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of oesophageal contractility impairment in patients suffering from a psychiatric disorder. Fifty-one patients admitted to the psychiatric department were submitted to an oesophageal transit study by means of krypton-81m. All patients with an abnormal oesophageal transit underwent manometry and endoscopy. The level of depression and anxiety was evaluated by the treating psychiatrist, using the Hamilton Depression and Anxiety Rating Scales. The oesophageal transit was abnormal in 13 patients. Two of these 13 patients refused manometric investigation. In ten of the 11 remaining patients, the manometry revealed functional motor abnormalities. Endoscopy, performed in all these ten patients, was normal. In conclusion, a high percentage of oesophageal contractility disturbances was found in psychiatric patients complaining of anxiety and/or depression. These abnormalities were detected by scintigraphy as well as by manometry. Owing to the normal endoscopic findings, these contraction abnormalities are likely to reflect a functional motor impairment. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs

  13. CCDC39 is required for assembly of inner dynein arms and the dynein regulatory complex and for normal ciliary motility in humans and dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merveille, Anne-Christine; Davis, Erica E; Becker-Heck, Anita;

    2011-01-01

    -assembly factors of axonemal dyneins, but these mutations account for only about 50% of cases of PCD. We exploited the unique properties of dog populations to positionally clone a new PCD gene, CCDC39. We found that loss-of-function mutations in the human ortholog underlie a substantial fraction of PCD cases with...... axonemal disorganization and abnormal ciliary beating. Functional analyses indicated that CCDC39 localizes to ciliary axonemes and is essential for assembly of inner dynein arms and the dynein regulatory complex....

  14. A case report of primary ciliary dyskinesia, laterality defects and developmental delay caused by the co-existence of a single gene and chromosome disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Casey, Jillian P

    2015-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterised by abnormal ciliary motion and impaired mucociliary clearance, leading to recurrent respiratory infections, sinusitis, otitis media and male infertility. Some patients also have laterality defects. We recently reported the identification of three disease-causing PCD genes in the Irish Traveller population; RSPH4A, DYX1C1 and CCNO. We have since assessed an additional Irish Traveller family with a complex phenotype involving PCD who did not have any of the previously identified PCD mutations.

  15. Motility of small nematodes in disordered wet granular media

    OpenAIRE

    Juarez, G.; Lu, K.; Sznitman, J.; Arratia, P.E.

    2010-01-01

    The motility of the worm nematode \\textit{Caenorhabditis elegans} is investigated in shallow, wet granular media as a function of particle size dispersity and area density ($\\phi$). Surprisingly, we find that the nematode's propulsion speed is enhanced by the presence of particles in a fluid and is nearly independent of area density. The undulation speed, often used to differentiate locomotion gaits, is significantly affected by the bulk material properties of wet mono- and polydisperse granu...

  16. Gastrointestinal motility disorders in patients with anorexia nervosa – a review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Agnieszka Weterle- Smolińska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Anorexia nervosa is a disease carrying havoc on many levels of the body functioning. The presence of numerous somatic complications as a consequence of starvation is an important part of the clinical picture of this disease. Symptoms of the gastrointestinal tract are one of the most common complaints reported by patients, especially in the initial period of realimentation. Most common symptoms are associated with gastrointestinal motility disorders. The available data show that as many as half of patients suffering from anorexia nervosa manifest significant gastrointestinal motility disorders (incomplete relaxation of the upper and lower oesophageal sphincter, impaired compliance of the stomach, delayed gastric emptying, intestinal transit extension, decreased motility of the rectum and anus. These disorders along with gastrointestinal tract ailments may impede the restoration of proper diet, if not detected early and treated. There are relatively few studies on gastrointestinal motility disorders in patients suffering from anorexia nervosa, which do not clearly answer the question whether these disorders are genetic, or result from cachexia and whether they disappear along with the restoration of the normal body weight. No reference of research results to the clinical practice, and the lack of standard procedures for diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal disorders in patients with anorexia nervosa are significant problems for specialists in the field of psychiatry and gastroenterology.

  17. Evaluation of methods for assessment of esophageal motility disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to compare two forms of parametric imaging of esophageal motility, the condensed image and the esophageal kinetogram, with a standard esophageal transit study in 64 patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease. The diagnosis was confirmed by endoscopy. A multiple swallow test with a liquid tracer of 150 MBq 99mTc-DTPA was used. During the investigation-time of 9 min 300 pictures were recorded and with the KANDI DS-system the parametric images generated and the clearance time, the transit time and the index of reflux were determined. The comparison of kinetogram and condensed image shows a higher sensitivity to detect functional disturbances in the multiple swallow test (kinetogram). In the diagnosis of the reflux disease the transit study and the parametric imaging demonstrated a comparable sensitivity. (orig.)

  18. Gastrointestinal motility disorders in patients with anorexia nervosa – a review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    Katarzyna Agnieszka Weterle- Smolińska; Marcin Banasiuk; Marcin Dziekiewicz; Michał Ciastoń; Gabriela Jagielska; Aleksandra Banaszkiewicz

    2015-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a disease carrying havoc on many levels of the body functioning. The presence of numerous somatic complications as a consequence of starvation is an important part of the clinical picture of this disease. Symptoms of the gastrointestinal tract are one of the most common complaints reported by patients, especially in the initial period of realimentation. Most common symptoms are associated with gastrointestinal motility disorders. The available data show that as many as...

  19. Primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Jason; Zariwala, Maimoona A; Noone, Peadar G

    2015-04-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of cilia structure, function, and biogenesis leading to chronic infections of the respiratory tract, fertility problems, and disorders of organ laterality. The diagnosis can be challenging, using traditional tools such as characteristic clinical features, ciliary function, and ultrastructural defects and newer screening tools such as nasal nitric oxide levels and genetic testing add to the diagnostic algorithm. There are 32 known PCD-causing genes, and in the future, comprehensive genetic testing may screen young infants before developing symptoms, thus improving survival. Therapies include surveillance of pulmonary function and microbiology, in addition to airway clearance, antibiotics, and early referral to bronchiectasis centers. As with cystic fibrosis (CF), standardized care at specialized centers using a multidisciplinary approach likely improves outcomes. In conjunction with the CF foundation, the PCD foundation, with experienced investigators and clinicians, is developing a network of PCD clinical centers to coordinate the effort in North America and Europe. As the network grows, clinical care and knowledge will improve. PMID:25826585

  20. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: clinical and genetic aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D’Auria

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is a rare, genetically heterogeneous disease, characterized by ciliary disfunction and impaired mucociliary clearance, resulting in a range of clinical manifestations such as chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, chronic rhino-sinusitis, chronic otitis media, situs viscerum inversus in almost 40-50% of cases and male infertility. The triad situs viscerum inversus, bronchiectasis and sinusitis is known as Kartagener syndrome. Up to now little is known about genetic, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of primary motile ciliary diseases in children: for this reason, diagnosis is generally delayed and almost all treatments for PCD are not based on randomized studies but extrapolated from cystic fibrosis guidelines. The aim of this review is to propose to pediatricians a summary of current clinical and diagnostic evidence to obtain better knoledwge of this condition. The earlier diagnosis and the right treatment are both crucial to improve the prognosis of PCD.

  1. Parametric imaging technique for visualization of esophageal motility and its disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fifty-eight healthy individuals and patients with esophageal dysfunction (achalasia, reflux, morphea, PSS, Sharp syndrome) were studied with esophageal parametric imaging (EPI) (acquisition of 15-20 swallows per patient; image creation by special ''space time'' matrix) and results were compared with standard esophageal function scintigraphy (EPS). We could demonstrate that normal function and motility disorders result in defined parametric image patterns. Pathologic findings on EFS always showed abnormal findings on EPI. Normal findings on EPI always showed normal findings on EFS. However, ten of 15 patients with normal EFS had pathologic EPI. Compared with EFS, evaluation of dysfunction in EPI is not referred to single but multiple swallowing and demonstrated a higher sensitivity by comparable specificity

  2. Initial experience with magnetic resonance fluoroscopy in the evaluation of oesophageal motility disorders. Comparison with manometry and barium fluoroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panebianco, Valeria; Anzidei, Michele; Catalano, Carlo; Passariello, Roberto [University of Rome ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Habib, Fortunee I.; Tomei, Ernesto [University of Rome ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Division of Gastroenterology, Rome (Italy); Paolantonio, Pasquale; Laghi, Andrea [University of Rome ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Department of Radiological Sciences - Polo Didattico Pontino I.C.O.T, Rome (Italy)

    2006-09-15

    The aim of this paper was to assess the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance (MR) fluoroscopy in the study of oesophageal motility disorders and to compare MR fluoroscopy results with those of manometry and barium contrast radiography. Twenty-five subjects referred for dysphagia and three patients in follow-up after pneumatic dilatation of the lower oesophageal sphincter to treat severe achalasia underwent esophageal manometry, barium contrast radiography and MR fluoroscopy. Examinations were performed on a 1.5 T scanner. Dynamic turbo- fast low angle shot (turbo-FLASH) sequences acquired during oral contrast agent administration were used to perform MR fluoroscopy. MR fluoroscopy correctly diagnosed achalasia in nine patients, uncoordination of esophageal body motility in ten and scleroderma oesophagus in one. Diagnostic performance was satisfactory, with a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 100% in the general depiction of motility alterations. Our work demonstrates that MR fluoroscopic examination in subject affected by oesophageal motility disorders is feasible and can properly depict motility and morphology alterations, achieving correct diagnosis in the majority of cases. Studies on larger populations are necessary to obtain statistically significant results. (orig.)

  3. Initial experience with magnetic resonance fluoroscopy in the evaluation of oesophageal motility disorders. Comparison with manometry and barium fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper was to assess the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance (MR) fluoroscopy in the study of oesophageal motility disorders and to compare MR fluoroscopy results with those of manometry and barium contrast radiography. Twenty-five subjects referred for dysphagia and three patients in follow-up after pneumatic dilatation of the lower oesophageal sphincter to treat severe achalasia underwent esophageal manometry, barium contrast radiography and MR fluoroscopy. Examinations were performed on a 1.5 T scanner. Dynamic turbo- fast low angle shot (turbo-FLASH) sequences acquired during oral contrast agent administration were used to perform MR fluoroscopy. MR fluoroscopy correctly diagnosed achalasia in nine patients, uncoordination of esophageal body motility in ten and scleroderma oesophagus in one. Diagnostic performance was satisfactory, with a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 100% in the general depiction of motility alterations. Our work demonstrates that MR fluoroscopic examination in subject affected by oesophageal motility disorders is feasible and can properly depict motility and morphology alterations, achieving correct diagnosis in the majority of cases. Studies on larger populations are necessary to obtain statistically significant results. (orig.)

  4. DNAH6 and Its Interactions with PCD Genes in Heterotaxy and Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, You; Yagi, Hisato; Onuoha, Ezenwa Obi; Damerla, Rama Rao; Francis, Richard; Furutani, Yoshiyuki; Tariq, Muhammad; King, Stephen M; Hendricks, Gregory; Cui, Cheng; Saydmohammed, Manush; Lee, Dong Min; Zahid, Maliha; Sami, Iman; Leatherbury, Linda; Pazour, Gregory J; Ware, Stephanie M; Nakanishi, Toshio; Goldmuntz, Elizabeth; Tsang, Michael; Lo, Cecilia W

    2016-02-01

    Heterotaxy, a birth defect involving left-right patterning defects, and primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), a sinopulmonary disease with dyskinetic/immotile cilia in the airway are seemingly disparate diseases. However, they have an overlapping genetic etiology involving mutations in cilia genes, a reflection of the common requirement for motile cilia in left-right patterning and airway clearance. While PCD is a monogenic recessive disorder, heterotaxy has a more complex, largely non-monogenic etiology. In this study, we show mutations in the novel dynein gene DNAH6 can cause heterotaxy and ciliary dysfunction similar to PCD. We provide the first evidence that trans-heterozygous interactions between DNAH6 and other PCD genes potentially can cause heterotaxy. DNAH6 was initially identified as a candidate heterotaxy/PCD gene by filtering exome-sequencing data from 25 heterotaxy patients stratified by whether they have airway motile cilia defects. dnah6 morpholino knockdown in zebrafish disrupted motile cilia in Kupffer's vesicle required for left-right patterning and caused heterotaxy with abnormal cardiac/gut looping. Similarly DNAH6 shRNA knockdown disrupted motile cilia in human and mouse respiratory epithelia. Notably a heterotaxy patient harboring heterozygous DNAH6 mutation was identified to also carry a rare heterozygous PCD-causing DNAI1 mutation, suggesting a DNAH6/DNAI1 trans-heterozygous interaction. Furthermore, sequencing of 149 additional heterotaxy patients showed 5 of 6 patients with heterozygous DNAH6 mutations also had heterozygous mutations in DNAH5 or other PCD genes. We functionally assayed for DNAH6/DNAH5 and DNAH6/DNAI1 trans-heterozygous interactions using subthreshold double-morpholino knockdown in zebrafish and showed this caused heterotaxy. Similarly, subthreshold siRNA knockdown of Dnah6 in heterozygous Dnah5 or Dnai1 mutant mouse respiratory epithelia disrupted motile cilia function. Together, these findings support an oligogenic disease

  5. Pseudotumor of Ciliary Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Varghese

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Orbital pseudotumor is a benign disease involving the orbital structures. Pseudotumor of the ciliary body is rare. We present a case of a 27-year-old male who presented with gradual visual loss, pain, and redness in his left eye. On examination he was found to have a yellowish white mass at the periphery of anterior chamber in his left eye and ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM revealed a ciliary body mass in the same eye. He was treated with systemic steroids, which was tapered over a period of 8 weeks. His symptoms improved and the ciliary body mass disappeared with no recurrence over the next 6 months. UBM is an important diagnostic tool for diagnosing ciliary body mass. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment with systemic steroids may help resolve pseudotumor of the ciliary body.

  6. Role of cineoesophageal scintigraphy in primary and secondary oesophageal motility disorders. About a 12000 radionuclide transit study experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cineoesophageal scintigraphy (COS) and evaluation of oesophageal motility disorders. A 12 000 COS experience with 99mTC-sulfur colloid radiolabeled liquids is detailed. Functional qualitative and quantitative isotopic imaging parameters describe the propulsion abnormalities: mainly achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus, non-specific motor disorders, systemic sclerosis, diabetes. Respective advantages and drawbacks of manometry and scintigraphy are discussed. Manometry only can measure pressures, scintigraphy only can measure bolus propulsion by peristaltic waves. Physiological and comfortable conditions, sensitivity, quantitative functional imaging, evidence of lung aspiration when swallowing advantage. (authors). 117 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs

  7. Reduced accuracy of 14C-D-xylose breath test for detecting bacterial overgrowth in gastrointestinal motility disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of the 14C-D-xylose breath test in the diagnosis of small-bowel bacterial overgrowth was prospectively evaluated in 10 patients with motility disorders: 6 myopathic, 3 neuropathic, and 1 mechanical obstruction. 6 of 10 patients had small-bowel bacterial overgrowth on culture of small-bowel aspirate. Increased breath 14CO2 levels were documented in 3 of 6 patients with positive cultures and in 2 of 4 with negative cultures. 2 patients with positive results by both methods and 1 of 2 with positive breath 14CO2 but negative cultures had previously undergone gastric surgery. 3 patients with myopathic dysmotility had positive cultures but negative breath tests. Cultures of duodenal aspirates and the D-xylose test had sensitivities of 80% and 40%, respectively, for the finding of hypoalbuminemia. Compared with cultures, the sensitivity and specificity of the breath test were 60% and 40%, respectively. Impaired delivery of 14C-D-xylose for bacterial metabolism may result from postprandial antral hypomotility or low amplitude small-bowel motility, contributing to the false-negative breath tests. Thus, cultures is the optimal method to detect small-bowel bacterial overgrowth in patients with motility disorders. 25 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  8. Botulinum toxin injection for hypercontractile or spastic esophageal motility disorders: may high-resolution manometry help to select cases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjoux, S; Brochard, C; Roman, S; Gincul, R; Pagenault, M; Ponchon, T; Ropert, A; Mion, F

    2015-01-01

    Endoscopic injections of botulinum toxin in the cardia or distal esophagus have been advocated to treat achalasia and spastic esophageal motility disorders. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate whether manometric diagnosis using the Chicago classification in high-resolution manometry (HRM) would be predictive of the clinical response. Charts of patients with spastic and hypertensive motility disorders diagnosed with HRM and treated with botulinum toxin were retrospectively reviewed at two centers. HRM recordings were systematically reanalyzed, and a patient's phone survey was conducted. Forty-five patients treated between 2008 and 2013 were included. Most patients had achalasia type 3 (22 cases). Other diagnoses were jackhammer esophagus (8 cases), distal esophageal spasm (7 cases), esophagogastric junction outflow obstruction (5 cases), nutcracker esophagus (1 case), and 2 unclassified cases. Botulinum toxin injections were performed into the cardia only in 9 cases, into the wall of the distal esophagus in 19 cases, and in both locations (cardia and distal esophagus) in 17 cases. No complication occurred in 31 cases. Chest pain was noticed for less than 7 days in 13 cases. One death related to mediastinitis occurred 3 weeks after botulinum toxin injection. Efficacy was assessed in 42 patients: 71% were significantly improved 2 months after botulinum toxin, and 57% remained satisfied for more than 6 months. No clear difference was observed in terms of response according to manometric diagnosis; however, type 3 achalasia previously dilated and with normal integrated relaxation pressure (4s-integrated relaxation pressure esophageal motility disorders. The manometric Chicago classification diagnosis does not seem to predict the results. Prospective randomized trials are required to identify patients most likely to benefit from esophageal botulinum toxin treatment. PMID:25212219

  9. Inter-observer agreement for diagnostic classification of esophageal motility disorders defined in high-resolution manometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, M R; Pandolfino, J E; Sweis, R; Sauter, M; Abreu Y Abreu, A T; Anggiansah, A; Bogte, A; Bredenoord, A J; Dengler, W; Elvevi, A; Fruehauf, H; Gellersen, S; Ghosh, S; Gyawali, C P; Heinrich, H; Hemmink, M; Jafari, J; Kaufman, E; Kessing, K; Kwiatek, M; Lubomyr, B; Banasiuk, M; Mion, F; Pérez-de-la-Serna, J; Remes-Troche, J M; Rohof, W; Roman, S; Ruiz-de-León, A; Tutuian, R; Uscinowicz, M; Valdovinos, M A; Vardar, R; Velosa, M; Waśko-Czopnik, D; Weijenborg, P; Wilshire, C; Wright, J; Zerbib, F; Menne, D

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution esophageal manometry (HRM) is a recent development used in the evaluation of esophageal function. Our aim was to assess the inter-observer agreement for diagnosis of esophageal motility disorders using this technology. Practitioners registered on the HRM Working Group website were invited to review and classify (i) 147 individual water swallows and (ii) 40 diagnostic studies comprising 10 swallows using a drop-down menu that followed the Chicago Classification system. Data were presented using a standardized format with pressure contours without a summary of HRM metrics. The sequence of swallows was fixed for each user but randomized between users to avoid sequence bias. Participants were blinded to other entries. (i) Individual swallows were assessed by 18 practitioners (13 institutions). Consensus agreement (≤ 2/18 dissenters) was present for most cases of normal peristalsis and achalasia but not for cases of peristaltic dysmotility. (ii) Diagnostic studies were assessed by 36 practitioners (28 institutions). Overall inter-observer agreement was 'moderate' (kappa 0.51) being 'substantial' (kappa > 0.7) for achalasia type I/II and no lower than 'fair-moderate' (kappa >0.34) for any diagnosis. Overall agreement was somewhat higher among those that had performed >400 studies (n = 9; kappa 0.55) and 'substantial' among experts involved in development of the Chicago Classification system (n = 4; kappa 0.66). This prospective, randomized, and blinded study reports an acceptable level of inter-observer agreement for HRM diagnoses across the full spectrum of esophageal motility disorders for a large group of clinicians working in a range of medical institutions. Suboptimal agreement for diagnosis of peristaltic motility disorders highlights contribution of objective HRM metrics. PMID:25185507

  10. Gated entry into the ciliary compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Daisuke; Verhey, Kristen J

    2016-01-01

    Cilia and flagella play important roles in cell motility and cell signaling. These functions require that the cilium establishes and maintains a unique lipid and protein composition. Recent work indicates that a specialized region at the base of the cilium, the transition zone, serves as both a barrier to entry and a gate for passage of select components. For at least some cytosolic proteins, the barrier and gate functions are provided by a ciliary pore complex (CPC) that shares molecular and mechanistic properties with nuclear gating. Specifically, nucleoporins of the CPC limit the diffusional entry of cytosolic proteins in a size-dependent manner and enable the active transport of large molecules and complexes via targeting signals, importins, and the small G protein Ran. For membrane proteins, the septin protein SEPT2 is part of the barrier to entry whereas the gating function is carried out and/or regulated by proteins associated with ciliary diseases (ciliopathies) such as nephronophthisis, Meckel–Gruber syndrome and Joubert syndrome. Here, we discuss the evidence behind these models of ciliary gating as well as the similarities to and differences from nuclear gating. PMID:26472341

  11. [Effectiveness of pinaverium bromide therapy on colonic motility disorders in irritable bowel syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, T; Fehér, A; Rosztóczy, A; Jánosi, J

    1999-02-28

    The special patterns of the slow wave activity in irrittable bowel syndrome by means of surface electromyography were examined and the effect of pinaverium bromide on the symptoms and on the colonic motility in this disease was estimated. Twenty two patients with irritable bowel syndrome and 7 healthy controls were selected to the study. The clinical symptoms were abdominal pain and bloating in all patients, constipation in 9, and diarrhoea in 6 cases. Surface electromyography was carried out before and on the 14th day of the treatment with pinaverium bromide (50 mg t. i. d). The colonic motility was analysed in a 2 hour fasting and a 2 hour postprandial period following a standard (800 kCal) meal. The slow wave frequency of 0.01-0.04 Hz were selected and analysed. The mean frequency of activity peaks (n/10 min) and power-index (area under curve, microV 10 min) were measured. For statistical analysis Student's t-test was applied. Electromyogram of patients with irritable bowel syndrome showed a significant increase of the measured colonic motility parameters both in fasting and postprandial states. Fourteen days of pinaverium bromide treatment was able to significantly reduce the intensity of the colonic motor activity. Administration of pinaverium bromide completely released in 6 and significantly improved the abdominal pain in other 12 patients, while the bloating disappeared in 12 and was significantly improved in 5 from 22 patients. Pinaverium bromide was able to normalise the stool frequency: the weekly number of stools was decreased from 16 to 7 in the patients complaining diarrhoea ant it was increased from 2 to 6 in the patients with constipation. PMID:10204402

  12. Radionuclide examination of motility disorders of the esophagus: a comparative study with manometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary aim of this investigation is to determine the value of radionuclide studies for clinical diagnostics in the light of its advantages over the manometric examination by means of available casuistics. A general review of the development of the examinations for assessment of the motility of the esophagus is given and both normal and disturbed motor function are described. The details of the patient groups and the techniques used in this study are presented. The results obtained for normal subjects and patients with achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, systemic connective tissue diseases with esophageal involvement and reflux esophagitis are reported and discussed. (Auth.)

  13. Motile Cilia of Human Airway Epithelia Are Chemosensory

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Alok S.; Ben-Shahar, Yehuda; Moninger, Thomas O.; Kline, Joel N.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Cilia are microscopic projections that extend from eukaryotic cells. There are two general types of cilia; primary cilia serve as sensory organelles, whereas motile cilia exert mechanical force. The motile cilia emerging from human airway epithelial cells propel harmful inhaled material out of the lung. We found that these cells express sensory bitter taste receptors, which localized on motile cilia. Bitter compounds increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration and stimulated ciliary beat f...

  14. MRI of the orbit in posttraumatic functional disorders of eye motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analysed retrospectively the results of 38 MR examinations of the orbit in 31 patients with posttraumatic motility impairment with preserved visus. 18 patients underwent MRI preoperatively. From this group 5 patients were additionally examined postoperatively. Another 5 patients who had not been examined prior to surgery were controlled postoperatively. Hence, a total of 10 patients with persisting disturbances was examined postoperatively. 8 patients who underwent MRI were not treated by surgery because of only minor disturbances. In all patients conventional radiography of the orbit was performed prior to MRI. Additional CT imaging was carried out in 12 patients. In 18 patients examined preoperatively we found displacement of orbital fat tissue, displacement and entrapment of orbital muscles, swelling of muscles and oedema in retrobulbar fat tissue. 10 patients from the postoperative group exhibited remaining prolapsed fat tissue, oedema in fat tissue and/or swelling of muscles. 8 patients had only small soft tissue changes which did not require surgery. (orig./MG)

  15. Computational modelling elucidates the mechanism of ciliary regulation in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hundhausen Christian

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ciliary dysfunction leads to a number of human pathologies, including primary ciliary dyskinesia, nephronophthisis, situs inversus pathology or infertility. The mechanism of cilia beating regulation is complex and despite extensive experimental characterization remains poorly understood. We develop a detailed systems model for calcium, membrane potential and cyclic nucleotide-dependent ciliary motility regulation. Results The model describes the intimate relationship between calcium and potassium ionic concentrations inside and outside of cilia with membrane voltage and, for the first time, describes a novel type of ciliary excitability which plays the major role in ciliary movement regulation. Our model describes a mechanism that allows ciliary excitation to be robust over a wide physiological range of extracellular ionic concentrations. The model predicts the existence of several dynamic modes of ciliary regulation, such as the generation of intraciliary Ca2+ spike with amplitude proportional to the degree of membrane depolarization, the ability to maintain stable oscillations, monostable multivibrator regimes, all of which are initiated by variability in ionic concentrations that translate into altered membrane voltage. Conclusions Computational investigation of the model offers several new insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of ciliary pathologies. According to our analysis, the reported dynamic regulatory modes can be a physiological reaction to alterations in the extracellular environment. However, modification of the dynamic modes, as a result of genetic mutations or environmental conditions, can cause a life threatening pathology.

  16. The Progress in Clinical and Basic Research of the Effect ofAcupuncture in Treating Disorders of Gastrointestinal Motility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Though the function of “spleen” in TCM refers to a lot of systems, it is mainly related to digestive system, reflecting changes of physiology and pathology of gastrointestinal tract. The deficiency of Spleen Qi is correlated to the disorders of gastrointestinal motility.(19) In recent years the research has been developed in adjustment of Spleen and Stomach function and the improvement of gastrointestinal motility by acupuncturing mainly Zusanli, which formed a theoretic base for acupuncture therapy of disorders of gastrointestinal motility.Effect of Acupuncture on Gastric Peristalsis  Observation by gastroendoscopy and B-ultrasonography showed that, acupuncture at Zusanli could decrease gastric tension and resolve spasm of cardia, gastric body and pylorus, and improve delayed opening of pylorus, so as to make gastric hyperperistalsis tend to go placid and normalize retarding. It is demonstrated that acupuncture at Zusanli could adjust the function of gastric peristalsis bi-directionally.(20,21) In healthy volunteers after acupuncture at Zusanli the frequency and the amplititude of gastric peristalsis both increased. In patients whose pylorus ring could not open during the operation of gastroscopy, acupuncture at Zusanli could relax and open it. Acupuncture at Neiguan could produce either opening or closing the bi-directional effect of pylorus.(22) In patients with disorders of gastrointestinal motility it was observed that the amplititude and frequency of constriction of sphincter pylori increased and the strength and frequency of stomach improved after acupuncture at Zusanli according to the measurement of gastroscopic manometry.(23) Acupuncture may accelerate or reduce the speed of gastric evacuation.(24,25) In addition, acupuncture can increase the volume of gastric antrum. Observed by B-ultrasonography, acupuncture Zusanli, Shangjuxu (ST37), Chongyang (ST42) and Neiting (ST44) in the lower extremity section of the Yangming meridian of the foot could

  17. Diagnosis by ultrastructural study of primary ciliary dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melgarejo-Moreno P

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objective: Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD, also known as ciliary immotility (SIC syndrome is an inherited disorder that includes a group of diseases in which respiratory cilia are immobile, ciliary movement is dyskinetic and ineffective or no cilia . The aim of this study is to determine the ciliary ultrastructure in patients with suspected DCP. Method: In 8 patients with suspected DCP nasal mucosa biopsy is performed with endoscopy at the inferior turbinate in the middle third by the ENT service under local anesthesia. Results: Of the 8 cases studied in 2 cases no ciliary ultrastructural level defects were found. In two cases with abnormal ciliary ultrastructure is present Kartagener syndrome. In a case no cilia were observed in the nasal mucosa. Discussion: The DCP and SIC are synonymous terms from clinical and pathogenetic view: immobility and dyskinesia lead to an absence of mucociliary transport, stasis of respiratory secretions with their consequences: chronic infections of lower respiratory tract and from birth . The most common ultrastructural defect is the total or partial absence of dynein. Conclusions: The ultrastructural study allows the diagnosis of PCD because genetic diagnosis is complicated and therefore get an early diagnosis of this condition which serves to improve the morbidity and mortality of these patients.

  18. Investigations of disorders of motility of the esophagus in chronic diseases. 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronic diseases of the esophagus impair the transport function of this organ. Esophageal scintigraphy investigates the transport function under physiological circumstances. Various test meals are radioactively labelled and swallowed by the patient. depending on the cause of a transport disorder the investigation lasts only 60s up to half an hour. Parametric imaging techniques like the so called condensed pictures give information about extent and peristalsis of transport disorders. The determination of transit times and/or percent of residuum in the eso-phagus allows for quantitating functional disorders. The use of multiple swallow technique or of various tracers during one investigation leads to high sensitivity in the detection of esophageal transport disorders, even in an early stage of a chronic disease, like morphea or sclero-derma. The documentation of successful therapeutical interventions is possible, for example in achalasia. In obscure complaints or in thoracic pain without coronary heart disease esophageal scintigraphy may confirm or exclude a disease of the esophagus. (author). 40 refs.; 5 figs

  19. Conservation of ciliary proteins in plants with no cilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodges Matthew E

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic cilia are complex, highly conserved microtubule-based organelles with a broad phylogenetic distribution. Cilia were present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor and many proteins involved in cilia function have been conserved through eukaryotic diversification. However, cilia have also been lost multiple times in different lineages, with at least two losses occurring within the land plants. Whereas all non-seed plants produce cilia for motility of male gametes, some gymnosperms and all angiosperms lack cilia. During these evolutionary losses, proteins with ancestral ciliary functions may be lost or co-opted into different functions. Results Here we identify a core set of proteins with an inferred ciliary function that are conserved in ciliated eukaryotic species. We interrogate this genomic dataset to identify proteins with a predicted ancestral ciliary role that have been maintained in non-ciliated land plants. In support of our prediction, we demonstrate that several of these proteins have a flagellar localisation in protozoan trypanosomes. The phylogenetic distribution of these genes within the land plants indicates evolutionary scenarios of either sub- or neo-functionalisation and expression data analysis shows that these genes are highly expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana pollen cells. Conclusions A large number of proteins possess a phylogenetic ciliary profile indicative of ciliary function. Remarkably, many genes with an ancestral ciliary role are maintained in non-ciliated land plants. These proteins have been co-opted to perform novel functions, most likely before the loss of cilia, some of which appear related to the formation of the male gametes.

  20. Cellular Mechanisms of Ciliary Length Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Keeling

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cilia and flagella are evolutionarily conserved, membrane-bound, microtubule-based organelles on the surface of most eukaryotic cells. They play important roles in coordinating a variety of signaling pathways during growth, development, cell mobility, and tissue homeostasis. Defects in ciliary structure or function are associated with multiple human disorders called ciliopathies. These diseases affect diverse tissues, including, but not limited to the eyes, kidneys, brain, and lungs. Many processes must be coordinated simultaneously in order to initiate ciliogenesis. These include cell cycle, vesicular trafficking, and axonemal extension. Centrioles play a central role in both cell cycle progression and ciliogenesis, making the transition between basal bodies and mitotic spindle organizers integral to both processes. The maturation of centrioles involves a functional shift from cell division toward cilium nucleation which takes place concurrently with its migration and fusion to the plasma membrane. Several proteinaceous structures of the distal appendages in mother centrioles are required for this docking process. Ciliary assembly and maintenance requires a precise balance between two indispensable processes; so called assembly and disassembly. The interplay between them determines the length of the resulting cilia. These processes require a highly conserved transport system to provide the necessary substances at the tips of the cilia and to recycle ciliary turnover products to the base using a based microtubule intraflagellar transport (IFT system. In this review; we discuss the stages of ciliogenesis as well as mechanisms controlling the lengths of assembled cilia.

  1. Is there a role for dynamic swallowing MRI in the assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease and oesophageal motility disorders?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulinna-Cosentini, Christiane; Koelblinger, C.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Weber, M.; Kleinhansl, P. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Schima, W. [Abteilung fuer Radiologie und bildgebende Diagnostik, KH Goettlicher Heiland, Vienna (Austria); Lenglinger, J.; Riegler, M.; Cosentini, E.P. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Bischof, G. [Hospital St. Josef, Department of Surgery, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-02-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of dynamic MRI swallowing in patients with symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). Thirty-seven patients (17 m/20f) with typical signs of GERD underwent MR swallowing in the supine position at 1.5 T with a phased-array body coil. Using dynamic, gradient echo sequences (B-FFE) in the coronal, sagittal and axial planes, the bolus passages of buttermilk spiked with gadolinium chelate were tracked. MRI, pH-metry and manometry were performed within 31 days and results were compared. MRI results were concordant with pH-metry in 82% (23/28) of patients diagnosed with abnormal oesophageal acid exposure by pH-metry. Five patients demonstrated typical symptoms of GERD and had positive findings with pH monitoring, but false negative results with MRI. In four of six patients (67%), there was a correct diagnosis of oesophageal motility disorder, according to manometric criteria, on dynamic MRI. The overall accuracy of MRI diagnoses was 79% (27/34). A statistically significant difference was found between the size of hiatal hernia, grade of reflux in MRI, and abnormal acid exposure on pH-monitoring. MR fluoroscopy may be a promising radiation-free tool in assessing the functionality and morphology of the GE junction. (orig.)

  2. ZMYND10 is mutated in primary ciliary dyskinesia and interacts with LRRC6

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zariwala, Maimoona A; Gee, Heon Yung; Kurkowiak, Małgorzata;

    2013-01-01

    Defects of motile cilia cause primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), characterized by recurrent respiratory infections and male infertility. Using whole-exome resequencing and high-throughput mutation analysis, we identified recessive biallelic mutations in ZMYND10 in 14 families and mutations in the...

  3. Melatonin Attenuates Noise Stress-induced Gastrointestinal Motility Disorder and Gastric Stress Ulcer: Role of Gastrointestinal Hormones and Oxidative Stress in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lei; Gong, Ji T; Zhang, Hu Q; Song, Quan H; Xu, Guang H; Lei CAI; Tang, Xiao D; Zhang, Hai F; Liu, Fang-E; Jia, Zhan S.; Zhang, Hong W

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims There are increasing evidences for gastrointestinal motility disorder (GIMD) and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress. The present study was to investigate the reversed effect of melatonin on GIMD and gastric stress ulcer induced by noise stress and potential mechanism. Methods Noise stress was induced on rats, and melatonin (15 mg/kg) was administered to rats by intraperitoneal injection. Differences were assessed in gastric residual rate (GRR), small intestine propul...

  4. Mutation of Growth Arrest Specific 8 Reveals a Role in Motile Cilia Function and Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Wesley R; Malarkey, Erik B; Tritschler, Douglas; Bower, Raqual; Pasek, Raymond C; Porath, Jonathan D; Birket, Susan E; Saunier, Sophie; Antignac, Corinne; Knowles, Michael R; Leigh, Margaret W; Zariwala, Maimoona A; Challa, Anil K; Kesterson, Robert A; Rowe, Steven M; Drummond, Iain A; Parant, John M; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Porter, Mary E; Yoder, Bradley K; Berbari, Nicolas F

    2016-07-01

    Ciliopathies are genetic disorders arising from dysfunction of microtubule-based cellular appendages called cilia. Different cilia types possess distinct stereotypic microtubule doublet arrangements with non-motile or 'primary' cilia having a 9+0 and motile cilia have a 9+2 array of microtubule doublets. Primary cilia are critical sensory and signaling centers needed for normal mammalian development. Defects in their structure/function result in a spectrum of clinical and developmental pathologies including abnormal neural tube and limb patterning. Altered patterning phenotypes in the limb and neural tube are due to perturbations in the hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. Motile cilia are important in fluid movement and defects in motility result in chronic respiratory infections, altered left-right asymmetry, and infertility. These features are the hallmarks of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD, OMIM 244400). While mutations in several genes are associated with PCD in patients and animal models, the genetic lesion in many cases is unknown. We assessed the in vivo functions of Growth Arrest Specific 8 (GAS8). GAS8 shares strong sequence similarity with the Chlamydomonas Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex (NDRC) protein 4 (DRC4) where it is needed for proper flagella motility. In mammalian cells, the GAS8 protein localizes not only to the microtubule axoneme of motile cilia, but also to the base of non-motile cilia. Gas8 was recently implicated in the Hh signaling pathway as a regulator of Smoothened trafficking into the cilium. Here, we generate the first mouse with a Gas8 mutation and show that it causes severe PCD phenotypes; however, there were no overt Hh pathway phenotypes. In addition, we identified two human patients with missense variants in Gas8. Rescue experiments in Chlamydomonas revealed a subtle defect in swim velocity compared to controls. Further experiments using CRISPR/Cas9 homology driven repair (HDR) to generate one of these human missense variants in

  5. Loss-of-Function GAS8 Mutations Cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia and Disrupt the Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Olbrich, Heike; Cremers, Carolin; Loges, Niki T.; Werner, Claudius; Nielsen, Kim G.; Marthin, June K.; Philipsen, Maria; Wallmeier, Julia; Pennekamp, Petra; Menchen, Tabea; Edelbusch, Christine; Dougherty, Gerard W.; Schwartz, Oliver; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine

    2015-01-01

    Multiciliated epithelial cells protect the upper and lower airways from chronic bacterial infections by moving mucus and debris outward. Congenital disorders of ciliary beating, referred to as primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), are characterized by deficient mucociliary clearance and severe, recurrent respiratory infections. Numerous genetic defects, most of which can be detected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), are so far known to cause different abnormalities of the ciliary axoneme...

  6. Nutritional aspects in patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders and motor dysfunction in the gut. Working team report of the Swedish Motility Group (SMoG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simrén, M; Abrahamsson, H; Bosaeus, I; Brummer, R J; Dolk, A; Lindberg, G; Nyhlin, H; Ohlsson, B; Sjölund, K; Törnblom, H

    2007-05-01

    In reviews regarding the management of patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders and motility disturbances within the gut nutritional aspects and dietary advice is often put forward as being of great importance. However, there are relatively few high-quality, interventional studies in the literature supporting an important role for general dietary advice to improve symptoms in these patients. Nutritional supplementation to patients with malnutrition due to severe dysfunction of the gastrointestinal tract is of course less controversial, even though different views on how this should be performed exist. The content of this article is based on presentations given by the authors during the second meeting of the Swedish Motility Group held in Gothenburg in March 2005, and aims to give an overview on the role of dietary advice and nutritional supplementation to patients with gastrointestinal dysfunction of different severity. PMID:17368120

  7. Optimal ciliary beating patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilfan, Andrej; Osterman, Natan

    2011-11-01

    We introduce a measure for energetic efficiency of single or collective biological cilia. We define the efficiency of a single cilium as Q2 / P , where Q is the volume flow rate of the pumped fluid and P is the dissipated power. For ciliary arrays, we define it as (ρQ) 2 / (ρP) , with ρ denoting the surface density of cilia. We then numerically determine the optimal beating patterns according to this criterion. For a single cilium optimization leads to curly, somewhat counterintuitive patterns. But when looking at a densely ciliated surface, the optimal patterns become remarkably similar to what is observed in microorganisms like Paramecium. The optimal beating pattern then consists of a fast effective stroke and a slow sweeping recovery stroke. Metachronal waves lead to a significantly higher efficiency than synchronous beating. Efficiency also increases with an increasing density of cilia up to the point where crowding becomes a problem. We finally relate the pumping efficiency of cilia to the swimming efficiency of a spherical microorganism and show that the experimentally estimated efficiency of Paramecium is surprisingly close to the theoretically possible optimum.

  8. Ciliary kinematics of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in Complex Fluids: Role of viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, Arvind; Qin, Boyang; Arratia, Paulo

    2014-11-01

    The motility behavior of microorganisms can be significantly affected by the rheology of their fluidic environment. Guided by our experiments on the swimming gait of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in viscoelastic fluids, we focus on ciliary waveforms in Newtonian fluids and systematically study the effect of increasing viscosity. We find that the beat frequency as well as the wave speed are both strongly influenced by fluid viscosity. Interestingly, ciliary waveforms at low viscosity show a larger influence of the cell body than waveforms at higher viscosity. We use slender body theory and principal component analysis to elucidate the role of fluid viscosity in regulating the kinematics of the swimming process.

  9. [Obesity and gastrointestinal motility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joon Seong

    2006-08-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) motility has a crucial role in the food consumption, digestion and absorption, and also controls the appetite and satiety. In obese patients, various alterations of GI motility have been investigated. The prevalence of GERD and esophageal motor disorders in obese patients are higher than those of general population. Gastric emptying of solid food is generally accelerated and fasting gastric volume especially in distal stomach is larger in obese patients without change in accommodation. Contractile activity of small intestine in fasting period is more prominent, but orocecal transit is delayed. Autonomic dysfunction is frequently demonstrated in obese patients. These findings correspond with increased appetite and delayed satiety in obese patients, but causes or results have not been confirmed. Therapeutic interventions of these altered GI motility have been developed using botulinum toxin, gastric electrical stimulation in obese patients. Novel agents targeted for GI hormone modulation (such as ghrelin and leptin) need to be developed in the near future. PMID:16929152

  10. Flagellar Motility of Trypanosoma cruzi Epimastigotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ballesteros-Rodea

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The hemoflagellate Trypanosoma cruzi is the causative agent of American trypanosomiasis. Despite the importance of motility in the parasite life cycle, little is known about T. cruzi motility, and there is no quantitative description of its flagellar beating. Using video microscopy and quantitative vectorial analysis of epimastigote trajectories, we find a forward parasite motility defined by tip-to-base symmetrical flagellar beats. This motion is occasionally interrupted by base-to-tip highly asymmetric beats, which represent the ciliary beat of trypanosomatid flagella. The switch between flagellar and ciliary beating facilitates the parasite's reorientation, which produces a large variability of movement and trajectories that results in different distance ranges traveled by the cells. An analysis of the distance, speed, and rotational angle indicates that epimastigote movement is not completely random, and the phenomenon is highly dependent on the parasite behavior and is characterized by directed and tumbling parasite motion as well as their combination, resulting in the alternation of rectilinear and intricate motility paths.

  11. Cell Motility

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Cell motility is a fascinating example of cell behavior which is fundamentally important to a number of biological and pathological processes. It is based on a complex self-organized mechano-chemical machine consisting of cytoskeletal filaments and molecular motors. In general, the cytoskeleton is responsible for the movement of the entire cell and for movements within the cell. The main challenge in the field of cell motility is to develop a complete physical description on how and why cells move. For this purpose new ways of modeling the properties of biological cells have to be found. This long term goal can only be achieved if new experimental techniques are developed to extract physical information from these living systems and if theoretical models are found which bridge the gap between molecular and mesoscopic length scales. Cell Motility gives an authoritative overview of the fundamental biological facts, theoretical models, and current experimental developments in this fascinating area.

  12. Active transport and diffusion barriers restrict Joubert Syndrome-associated ARL13B/ARL-13 to an Inv-like ciliary membrane subdomain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebiha Cevik

    Full Text Available Cilia are microtubule-based cell appendages, serving motility, chemo-/mechano-/photo- sensation, and developmental signaling functions. Cilia are comprised of distinct structural and functional subregions including the basal body, transition zone (TZ and inversin (Inv compartments, and defects in this organelle are associated with an expanding spectrum of inherited disorders including Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS, Meckel-Gruber Syndrome (MKS, Joubert Syndrome (JS and Nephronophthisis (NPHP. Despite major advances in understanding ciliary trafficking pathways such as intraflagellar transport (IFT, how proteins are transported to subciliary membranes remains poorly understood. Using Caenorhabditis elegans and mammalian cells, we investigated the transport mechanisms underlying compartmentalization of JS-associated ARL13B/ARL-13, which we previously found is restricted at proximal ciliary membranes. We now show evolutionary conservation of ARL13B/ARL-13 localisation to an Inv-like subciliary membrane compartment, excluding the TZ, in many C. elegans ciliated neurons and in a subset of mammalian ciliary subtypes. Compartmentalisation of C. elegans ARL-13 requires a C-terminal RVVP motif and membrane anchoring to prevent distal cilium and nuclear targeting, respectively. Quantitative imaging in more than 20 mutants revealed differential contributions for IFT and ciliopathy modules in defining the ARL-13 compartment; IFT-A/B, IFT-dynein and BBS genes prevent ARL-13 accumulation at periciliary membranes, whereas MKS/NPHP modules additionally inhibit ARL-13 association with TZ membranes. Furthermore, in vivo FRAP analyses revealed distinct roles for IFT and MKS/NPHP genes in regulating a TZ barrier to ARL-13 diffusion, and intraciliary ARL-13 diffusion. Finally, C. elegans ARL-13 undergoes IFT-like motility and quantitative protein complex analysis of human ARL13B identified functional associations with IFT-B complexes, mapped to IFT46 and IFT74

  13. Beyond the mucus escalator: Complex ciliary hydrodynamics in disease and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawroth, Janna; Guo, Hanliang; John, Dabiri; Kanso, Eva; McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    2015-11-01

    Cilia are microscopic, hair-like structures lining external and internal body surfaces where they interact with fluids. The main function of motile cilia is often described as that of a ``mucus escalator'', i.e., a homogeneous ciliary carpet moving along layer of mucus along the surface to transport food, germ cells, debris, or pathogens. Accordingly, the performance of ciliary systems is usually measured in terms of a single metric, transport velocity, or its presumed proxy, ciliary beat frequency. We challenge this simple view through the observation that both healthy and diseased biological systems exhibit a variety of cilia morphologies, beat patterns, and arrangements, resulting in complex flow patterns and transport phenomena that cannot be reduced to a single parameter. Here we present two case studies. In one system, the ciliated surface creates two distinct flow regimes for first trapping and then sheltering potential symbiont bacteria for further biochemical screening. In the other system, chronic disease induces a misalignment of ciliary beat, leading to a pathological transition from uniform mucus transport to a pattern of stagnation and circulation. These studies suggest that (a), we need to develop a wider range of metrics for describing ciliary transport in biological and clinical contexts, and (b), engineered ciliated systems exploiting a variety of design parameters could provide novel ways of manipulating fluids at the microscale.

  14. Up to date on primary ciliary dyskinesia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pifferi, Massimo; Di Cicco, Maria; Piras, Martina; Cangiotti, Angela M; Saggese, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a congenital, clinically and ultrastructurally heterogeneous disease due to abnormal structure and/or function of cilia, with impaired mucociliary transport leading to several respiratory disorders. PCD can be diagnosed by the combination of thorough clinical examination with functional and ultrastructural analysis of the cilia. This paper shows progresses in PCD diagnosis obtained by ciliogenesis in culture evaluation of ciliated respiratory cells and by genetic analysis of mutations in candidate genes. Moreover, since to date no specific treatments are available to correct the ciliary dysfunction, the paper shows the proper therapeutical approach by the use of respiratory physiotherapy and regular exercise to favour airways clearance, by antibiotics administration to control acute airway infections. Macrolides administration as antiinflammatory option is suggested. PMID:23973004

  15. Rat ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF)

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, P.; Sendtner, M.; Meyer, Michael; Thoenen, Hans

    1993-01-01

    The structure of the rat ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) gene and the regulation of CNTF mRNA levels in cultured glial cells were investigated. The rat mRNA is encoded by a simple two-exon transcription unit. Sequence analysis of the region upstream of the transcription start-site did not reveal a typical TATA-box consensus sequence. Low levels of CNTF mRNA were detected in cultured Schwann cells, and CNTF mRNA was not increased by a variety of treatments. Three-week-old astrocyte-enriched...

  16. Ciliary ultrastructure of polyplacophorans (Mollusca, Amphineura, Polyplacophora).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, K; Schander, C

    2001-01-01

    This study is part of a series of papers aiming to investigate the phylogenetic significance of ciliary ultrastructure among molluscs and to test the hypothesis of a relationship between Xenoturbella and the molluscs. The ultrastructure of the ciliary apparatus on the gills of the polyplacophorans Leptochiton asellus and Tonicella rubra was studied. The gill cilia of the two species are similar in shape. The free part of the cilium is long with a slender distal part. There are two ciliary rootlets. One of them is short, broad and placed on the anterior face of the basal body. The other rootlet is conical and has a vertical orientation. Among the mollusca, two ciliary rootlets in the ciliary apparatus of multiciliate ectodermal cells have only been reported from the Chaetodermomorpha and Neomeniomorpha. This character state is likely plesiomorphic for the Mollusca and indicates a basal (nonderived) position of these taxa among the molluscs. No possible synapomorphic character with Xenoturbella bocki was found. PMID:11686414

  17. Neurokinin NK1 and NK3 receptors as targets for drugs to treat gastrointestinal motility disorders and pain

    OpenAIRE

    Sanger, Gareth J

    2004-01-01

    NK1 and NK3 receptors do not appear to play significant roles in normal GI functions, but both may be involved in defensive or pathological processes. NK1 receptor antagonists are antiemetic, operating via vagal sensory and motor systems, so there is a need to study their effects on other gastro-vagal functions thought to play roles in functional bowel disorder's. Interactions between NK1 receptors and enteric nonadrenergic, noncholinergic motorneurones suggest a need to explore the role of t...

  18. Evidence for two extremes of ciliary motor response in a single swimming microorganism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ilyong; Powers, Thomas R; Valles, James M

    2014-01-01

    Because arrays of motile cilia drive fluids for a range of processes, the versatile mechano-chemical mechanism coordinating them has been under scrutiny. The protist Paramecium presents opportunities to compare how groups of cilia perform two distinct functions, swimming propulsion and nutrient uptake. We present how the body cilia responsible for propulsion and the oral-groove cilia responsible for nutrient uptake respond to changes in their mechanical environment accomplished by varying the fluid viscosity over a factor of 7. Analysis with a phenomenological model of trajectories of swimmers made neutrally buoyant with magnetic forces combined with high-speed imaging of ciliary beating reveal that the body cilia exert a nearly constant propulsive force primarily by reducing their beat frequency as viscosity increases. By contrast, the oral-groove cilia beat at a nearly constant frequency. The existence of two extremes of motor response in a unicellular organism prompts unique investigations of factors controlling ciliary beating. PMID:24411242

  19. Discinesia ciliar primária Primary ciliary dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ WELLINGTON ALVES DOS SANTOS

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Discinesia ciliar primária é uma doença autossômica recessiva caracterizada pela história de infecções repetidas do trato respiratório superior e inferior, otite média, bronquite e rinossinusite, associada a situs inversus na metade dos casos. O diagnóstico é estabelecido pela análise ciliar ultra-estrutural de espécimes respiratórios, após a exclusão inicial de outras doenças, como fibrose cística, deficiência de alfa-1-antitripsina, imunodeficiências (IgG, neutrófilos e complemento e síndrome de Young. O propósito deste artigo é revisar os achados clínicos, o diagnóstico e o manejo da discinesia ciliar primária, incluindo um fluxograma diagnóstico.Primary ciliary dyskinesia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a history of recurrent upper and lower respiratory tract infections with chronic otitis media, bronchitis and rhinosinusitis, associated with situs inversus in 50% of cases. The diagnosis is established by ciliary ultrastructural analysis of respiratory specimens, after ruling out some disorders as cystic fibrosis, alpha-1 anti-trypsin deficiency, immune deficiencies (IgG, neutrophils and complement and Young's syndrome. The purpose of this paper is to review the clinical features, diagnosis and management of primary ciliary dyskinesia, including a diagnostic algorithm.

  20. Role of cineoesophageal scintigraphy in primary and secondary oesophageal motility disorders. About a 12000 radionuclide transit study experience; Place de la cine-oesophagoscintigraphie dans les troubles moteurs oesophagiens primitifs et secondaires. A propos de 12000 explorations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillet, J.; Role, C.; Imbert, Y.

    1996-12-31

    Cineoesophageal scintigraphy (COS) and evaluation of oesophageal motility disorders. A 12 000 COS experience with {sup 99m}TC-sulfur colloid radiolabeled liquids is detailed. Functional qualitative and quantitative isotopic imaging parameters describe the propulsion abnormalities: mainly achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, nutcracker esophagus, non-specific motor disorders, systemic sclerosis, diabetes. Respective advantages and drawbacks of manometry and scintigraphy are discussed. Manometry only can measure pressures, scintigraphy only can measure bolus propulsion by peristaltic waves. Physiological and comfortable conditions, sensitivity, quantitative functional imaging, evidence of lung aspiration when swallowing advantage. (authors). 117 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Analysis of Axonemal Assembly During Ciliary Regeneration in Chlamydomonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Emily L; Sale, Winfield S; Alford, Lea M

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an outstanding model genetic organism for study of assembly of cilia. Here, methods are described for synchronization of ciliary regeneration in Chlamydomonas to analyze the sequence in which ciliary proteins assemble. In addition, the methods described allow analysis of the mechanisms involved in regulation of ciliary length, the proteins required for ciliary assembly, and the temporal expression of genes encoding ciliary proteins. Ultimately, these methods can contribute to discovery of conserved genes that when defective lead to abnormal ciliary assembly and human disease. PMID:27514926

  2. Achalasia and Esophageal Motility Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... frequently performed using minimally invasive techniques (laparoscopic or robotic ) using five small incisions although it can also ... for a few days slowly progressing to a soft diet for a few weeks. If swallowing is ...

  3. Motility Disorders of the Stomach

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pseudo-Obstruction Small Bowel Bacterial Overgrowth The Large Intestine (Colon) Constipation Diarrhea Hirschsprung's Disease Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) The Anorectum and Pelvic Floor Fecal Incontinence ...

  4. LRRC6 mutation causes primary ciliary dyskinesia with dynein arm defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amjad Horani

    Full Text Available Despite recent progress in defining the ciliome, the genetic basis for many cases of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD remains elusive. We evaluated five children from two unrelated, consanguineous Palestinian families who had PCD with typical clinical features, reduced nasal nitric oxide concentrations, and absent dynein arms. Linkage analyses revealed a single common homozygous region on chromosome 8 and one candidate was conserved in organisms with motile cilia. Sequencing revealed a single novel mutation in LRRC6 (Leucine-rich repeat containing protein 6 that fit the model of autosomal recessive genetic transmission, leading to a change of a highly conserved amino acid from aspartic acid to histidine (Asp146His. LRRC6 was localized to the cytoplasm and was up-regulated during ciliogenesis in human airway epithelial cells in a Foxj1-dependent fashion. Nasal epithelial cells isolated from affected individuals and shRNA-mediated silencing in human airway epithelial cells, showed reduced LRRC6 expression, absent dynein arms, and slowed cilia beat frequency. Dynein arm proteins were either absent or mislocalized to the cytoplasm in airway epithelial cells from a primary ciliary dyskinesia subject. These findings suggest that LRRC6 plays a role in dynein arm assembly or trafficking and when mutated leads to primary ciliary dyskinesia with laterality defects.

  5. Clinical genetics and pathobiology of ciliary chondrodysplasias

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidts, M.

    2014-01-01

    Ciliary chondrodysplasias represent a heterogenous group of rare, nearly exclusively autosomal recessively inherited developmental conditions. While the skeletal phenotype, mainly affecting limbs, ribs and sometimes the craniofacial skeleton, is predominant, extraskeletal disease affecting the kidneys, liver, heart, eyes and other organs and tissues is observed inconsistently. Significant lethality, resulting from cardiorespiratory failure due to thoracic constriction as well as from renal an...

  6. Cytoskeleton and Cell Motility

    CERN Document Server

    Risler, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The present article is an invited contribution to the Encyclopedia of Complexity and System Science, Robert A. Meyers Ed., Springer New York (2009). It is a review of the biophysical mechanisms that underly cell motility. It mainly focuses on the eukaryotic cytoskeleton and cell-motility mechanisms. Bacterial motility as well as the composition of the prokaryotic cytoskeleton is only briefly mentioned. The article is organized as follows. In Section III, I first present an overview of the diversity of cellular motility mechanisms, which might at first glance be categorized into two different types of behaviors, namely "swimming" and "crawling". Intracellular transport, mitosis - or cell division - as well as other extensions of cell motility that rely on the same essential machinery are briefly sketched. In Section IV, I introduce the molecular machinery that underlies cell motility - the cytoskeleton - as well as its interactions with the external environment of the cell and its main regulatory pathways. Sec...

  7. Photoreceptor Sensory Cilium: Traversing the Ciliary Gate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Hemant

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are antenna-like extensions of the plasma membrane found in nearly all cell types. In the retina of the eye, photoreceptors develop unique sensory cilia. Not much was known about the mechanisms underlying the formation and function of photoreceptor cilia, largely because of technical limitations and the specific structural and functional modifications that cannot be modeled in vitro. With recent advances in microscopy techniques and molecular and biochemical approaches, we are now beginning to understand the molecular basis of photoreceptor ciliary architecture, ciliary function and its involvement in human diseases. Here, I will discuss the studies that have revealed new knowledge of how photoreceptor cilia regulate their identity and function while coping with high metabolic and trafficking demands associated with processing light signal. PMID:26501325

  8. Photoreceptor Sensory Cilium: Traversing the Ciliary Gate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Khanna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cilia are antenna-like extensions of the plasma membrane found in nearly all cell types. In the retina of the eye, photoreceptors develop unique sensory cilia. Not much was known about the mechanisms underlying the formation and function of photoreceptor cilia, largely because of technical limitations and the specific structural and functional modifications that cannot be modeled in vitro. With recent advances in microscopy techniques and molecular and biochemical approaches, we are now beginning to understand the molecular basis of photoreceptor ciliary architecture, ciliary function and its involvement in human diseases. Here, I will discuss the studies that have revealed new knowledge of how photoreceptor cilia regulate their identity and function while coping with high metabolic and trafficking demands associated with processing light signal.

  9. Zebrafish Ciliopathy Screen Plus Human Mutational Analysis Identifies C21orf59 and CCDC65 Defects as Causing Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    OpenAIRE

    Austin-Tse, Christina; Halbritter, Jan; Zariwala, Maimoona A.; Gilberti, Renée M.; Gee, Heon Yung; Hellman, Nathan; Pathak, Narendra; Liu, Yan; Panizzi, Jennifer R.; Patel-King, Ramila S.; Tritschler, Douglas; Bower, Raqual; O’Toole, Eileen; Porath, Jonathan D.; Hurd, Toby W.

    2013-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is caused when defects of motile cilia lead to chronic airway infections, male infertility, and situs abnormalities. Multiple causative PCD mutations account for only 65% of cases, suggesting that many genes essential for cilia function remain to be discovered. By using zebrafish morpholino knockdown of PCD candidate genes as an in vivo screening platform, we identified c21orf59, ccdc65, and c15orf26 as critical for cilia motility. c21orf59 and c15orf26 knockd...

  10. Ciliary neurotrophic factor is an endogenous pyrogen.

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, L; Zhang, X. X.; Rupp, R G; Wolff, S. M.; Dinarello, C A

    1993-01-01

    Fever is initiated by the action of polypeptide cytokines called endogenous pyrogens, which are produced by the host during inflammation, trauma, or infection and which elevate the thermoregulatory set point in the hypothalamus. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) supports the differentiation and survival of central and peripheral neurons. We describe the activity of CNTF as intrinsically pyrogenic in the rabbit. CNTF induced a monophasic fever which rose rapidly (within the first 12 min) foll...

  11. Diagnostic methods in primary ciliary dyskinesia

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas, Jane S; Paff, Tamara; Goggin, Patricia; Haarman, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosing primary ciliary dyskinesia is difficult. With no reference standard, a combination of tests is needed; most tests require expensive equipment and specialist scientists. We review the advances in diagnostic testing over the past hundred years, with emphasis on recent advances. We particularly focus on use of high-speed video analysis, transmission electron microscopy, nasal nitric oxide and genetic testing. We discuss the international efforts that are in place to advance the eviden...

  12. Diagnostic Methods in Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Jane S; Paff, Tamara; Goggin, Patricia; Haarman, Eric

    2016-03-01

    Diagnosing primary ciliary dyskinesia is difficult. With no reference standard, a combination of tests is needed; most tests require expensive equipment and specialist scientists. We review the advances in diagnostic testing over the past hundred years, with emphasis on recent advances. We particularly focus on use of high-speed video analysis, transmission electron microscopy, nasal nitric oxide and genetic testing. We discuss the international efforts that are in place to advance the evidence base for diagnostic tests. PMID:26362507

  13. Both ciliary and non-ciliary functions of Foxj1a confer Wnt/β-catenin signaling in zebrafish left-right patterning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Zhu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The Wnt/β-catenin pathway is implicated in left-right (LR axis determination; however, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Prompted by our recent discovery that Wnt signaling regulates ciliogenesis in the zebrafish Kupffer's vesicle (KV via Foxj1a, a ciliogenic transcription factor, we decided to elucidate functions of Foxj1a in Wnt-regulated LR pattern formation. We showed that targeted injection of wnt8a mRNA into a single cell at the 128-cell stage is sufficient to induce ectopic foxj1a expression and ectopic cilia. By interrogating the transcription circuit of foxj1a regulation, we found that both Lef1 and Tcf7 bind to a consensus element in the foxj1a promoter region. Depletion of Lef1 and Tcf7 inhibits foxj1a transcription in the dorsal forerunner cells, downregulates cilia length and number in KV, and randomizes LR asymmetry. Targeted overexpression of a constitutively active form of Lef1 also induced an ectopic protrusion that contains ectopic transcripts for sox17, foxj1a, and charon, and ectopic monocilia. Further genetic studies using this ectopic expression platform revealed two distinct functions of Foxj1a; mediating Wnt-governed monocilia length elongation as well as charon transcription. The novel Foxj1a-charon regulation is conserved in KV, and importantly, it is independent of the canonical role of Foxj1a in the biosynthesis of motile cilia. Together with the known function of motile cilia movement in generating asymmetric expression of charon, our data put forward a hypothesis that Foxj1a confers both ciliary and non-ciliary functions of Wnt signaling, which converge on charon to regulate LR pattern formation.

  14. Both ciliary and non-ciliary functions of Foxj1a confer Wnt/β-catenin signaling in zebrafish left-right patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ping; Xu, Xiaolei; Lin, Xueying

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin pathway is implicated in left-right (LR) axis determination; however, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. Prompted by our recent discovery that Wnt signaling regulates ciliogenesis in the zebrafish Kupffer's vesicle (KV) via Foxj1a, a ciliogenic transcription factor, we decided to elucidate functions of Foxj1a in Wnt-regulated LR pattern formation. We showed that targeted injection of wnt8a mRNA into a single cell at the 128-cell stage is sufficient to induce ectopic foxj1a expression and ectopic cilia. By interrogating the transcription circuit of foxj1a regulation, we found that both Lef1 and Tcf7 bind to a consensus element in the foxj1a promoter region. Depletion of Lef1 and Tcf7 inhibits foxj1a transcription in the dorsal forerunner cells, downregulates cilia length and number in KV, and randomizes LR asymmetry. Targeted overexpression of a constitutively active form of Lef1 also induced an ectopic protrusion that contains ectopic transcripts for sox17, foxj1a, and charon, and ectopic monocilia. Further genetic studies using this ectopic expression platform revealed two distinct functions of Foxj1a; mediating Wnt-governed monocilia length elongation as well as charon transcription. The novel Foxj1a-charon regulation is conserved in KV, and importantly, it is independent of the canonical role of Foxj1a in the biosynthesis of motile cilia. Together with the known function of motile cilia movement in generating asymmetric expression of charon, our data put forward a hypothesis that Foxj1a confers both ciliary and non-ciliary functions of Wnt signaling, which converge on charon to regulate LR pattern formation. PMID:26432885

  15. Diagnostic and Therapeutic Strategies of Gastric Motility Disorder in Different Stages of Diabetes%不同阶段糖尿病胃运动障碍诊治对策

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝宇; 路国涛

    2012-01-01

    Gastric motility disorder is common in patients with diabetes. The cardinal symptoms include bloating, early satiety, epigastric discomfort, nausea, vomiting and delayed gastric emptying. Delayed gastric emptying affects pharmacokinetics of hypoglycemic agents, causes mismatch of peak postprandial blood glucose level and peak concentration of insulin and oral hypoglycemic agents, thereby affects glycemic control. There are different patterns of gastric motility disorder in different stages of diabetes. The most commonly used diagnostic method for gastric emptying is scintigraphic measurement. Treatment of gastric motility disorder in diabetes includes dietary modifications and prokinetic agents to ameliorate symptoms and improve glycemic control. Therapeutic approaches of gastroparesis include gastric electrical stimulation, endoscopic pyloric injection of botulinum toxin A, endoscopic placement of nasal-jejunum nutrient feeding tube and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy/jejunostomy and surgical therapy.%糖尿病患者常见胃运动障碍,表现为上腹胀、早饱、上腹不适、恶心、呕吐等症状以及胃排空延迟,胃排空延迟影响降血糖药的药代动力学,造成餐后血糖升高与降血糖药或胰岛素的血浓度高峰不匹配,进而影响血糖的控制与稳定.糖尿病不同阶段胃运动障碍表现形式不同.核素法是最常用的胃排空诊断方法.糖尿病胃运动障碍的处理包括饮食调节、促动力药以减轻症状、控制血糖,针对胃轻瘫的治疗包括胃电刺激、内镜下幽门注射肉毒杆菌毒素A、内镜下放置鼻胃空肠营养管或经皮内镜下胃(空肠)造瘘、外科手术等.

  16. The Pediatric Choroidal and Ciliary Body Melanoma Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Jamal, Rana'a T; Cassoux, Nathalie; Desjardins, Laurence;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To collect comprehensive data on choroidal and ciliary body melanoma (CCBM) in children and to validate hypotheses regarding pediatric CCBM: children younger than 18 years, males, and those without ciliary body involvement (CBI) have more favorable survival prognosis than young adults 18...

  17. Artificial ciliary bundles with nano fiber tip links

    CERN Document Server

    Asadnia, Mohsen; Miao, Jianmin; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mechanosensory ciliary bundles in fishes are the inspiration for carefully engineered artificial flow sensors. We report the development of a new class of ultrasensitive MEMS flow sensors that mimic the intricate morphology of the ciliary bundles, including the stereocilia, tip links, and the cupula, and thereby achieve threshold detection limits that match the biological example. An artificial ciliary bundle is achieved by fabricating closely-spaced arrays of polymer micro-pillars with gradiating heights. Tip links that form the fundamental sensing elements are realized through electrospinning aligned PVDF piezoelectric nano-fibers that link the distal tips of the polymer cilia. An optimized synthesis of hyaluronic acid-methacrylic anhydride hydrogel that results in properties close to the biological cupula, together with drop-casting method are used to form the artificial cupula that encapsulates the ciliary bundle. In testing, fluid drag force causes the ciliary bundle to slide, stretching the flexible nan...

  18. NCAM regulates cell motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prag, Søren; Lepekhin, Eugene A; Kolkova, Kateryna;

    2002-01-01

    Cell migration is required during development of the nervous system. The regulatory mechanisms for this process, however, are poorly elucidated. We show here that expression of or exposure to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) strongly affected the motile behaviour of glioma cells...... independently of homophilic NCAM interactions. Expression of the transmembrane 140 kDa isoform of NCAM (NCAM-140) caused a significant reduction in cellular motility, probably through interference with factors regulating cellular attachment, as NCAM-140-expressing cells exhibited a decreased attachment to a...... fibronectin substratum compared with NCAM-negative cells. Ectopic expression of the cytoplasmic part of NCAM-140 also inhibited cell motility, presumably via the non-receptor tyrosine kinase p59(fyn) with which NCAM-140 interacts. Furthermore, we showed that the extracellular part of NCAM acted as a paracrine...

  19. Does Hypothyroidism Affect Gastrointestinal Motility?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Yaylali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Gastrointestinal motility and serum thyroid hormone levels are closely related. Our aim was to analyze whether there is a disorder in esophagogastric motor functions as a result of hypothyroidism. Materials and Methods. The study group included 30 females (mean age ± SE 45.17 ± 2.07 years with primary hypothyroidism and 10 healthy females (mean age ± SE 39.40 ± 3.95 years. All cases underwent esophagogastric endoscopy and scintigraphy. For esophageal scintigraphy, dynamic imaging of esophagus motility protocol, and for gastric emptying scintigraphy, anterior static gastric images were acquired. Results. The mean esophageal transit time (52.56 ± 4.07 sec for patients; 24.30 ± 5.88 sec for controls; P=.02 and gastric emptying time (49.06 ± 4.29 min for the hypothyroid group; 30.4 ± 4.74 min for the control group; P=.01 were markedly increased in cases of hypothyroidism. Conclusion. Hypothyroidism prominently reduces esophageal and gastric motor activity and can cause gastrointestinal dysfunction.

  20. Mutations in DNAJB13, Encoding an HSP40 Family Member, Cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia and Male Infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khouri, Elma; Thomas, Lucie; Jeanson, Ludovic; Bequignon, Emilie; Vallette, Benoit; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Montantin, Guy; Copin, Bruno; Dastot-Le Moal, Florence; Blanchon, Sylvain; Papon, Jean François; Lorès, Patrick; Yuan, Li; Collot, Nathalie; Tissier, Sylvie; Faucon, Catherine; Gacon, Gérard; Patrat, Catherine; Wolf, Jean Philippe; Dulioust, Emmanuel; Crestani, Bruno; Escudier, Estelle; Coste, André; Legendre, Marie; Touré, Aminata; Amselem, Serge

    2016-08-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal-recessive disease due to functional or ultra-structural defects of motile cilia. Affected individuals display recurrent respiratory-tract infections; most males are infertile as a result of sperm flagellar dysfunction. The great majority of the PCD-associated genes identified so far encode either components of dynein arms (DAs), which are multiprotein-ATPase complexes essential for ciliary motility, or proteins involved in DA assembly. To identify the molecular basis of a PCD phenotype characterized by central complex (CC) defects but normal DA structure, a phenotype found in ∼15% of cases, we performed whole-exome sequencing in a male individual with PCD and unexplained CC defects. This analysis, combined with whole-genome SNP genotyping, identified a homozygous mutation in DNAJB13 (c.833T>G), a gene encoding a HSP40 co-chaperone whose ortholog in the flagellated alga Chlamydomonas localizes to the radial spokes. In vitro studies showed that this missense substitution (p.Met278Arg), which involves a highly conserved residue of several HSP40 family members, leads to protein instability and triggers proteasomal degradation, a result confirmed by the absence of endogenous DNAJB13 in cilia and sperm from this individual. Subsequent DNAJB13 analyses identified another homozygous mutation in a second family; the study of DNAJB13 transcripts obtained from airway cells showed that this mutation (c.68+1G>C) results in a splicing defect consistent with a loss-of-function mutation. Overall, this study, which establishes mutations in DNAJB13 as a cause of PCD, unveils the key role played by DNAJB13 in the proper formation and function of ciliary and flagellar axonemes in humans. PMID:27486783

  1. On ciliary pumping and sieving in bryozoans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Poul Scheel; Riisgård, H. U.

    2002-01-01

    result of water currents driven out between tentacles by the water pumping lateral cilia, is characterised by nearly parabolic profiles with highest velocity along the centreline of the lophophore. In intact animals, the centreline velocity first increases from its value at the inlet to a maximal value...... relation between velocity distribution in the lophophore and variation of pumping rate along tentacles. Typical variations are given and compared to those obtained by a more accurate two-dimensional numerical solution. Based on observed velocity distributions in the lophophore, particle tracks and tentacle...... in the absence of a particle. This is hypothesised to stimulate the sensing mechanism triggering observed flicks. The energy cost of pumping is estimated at 1 to 4% of the metabolic power of a "standard" zooid. Keywords: Feeding in bryozoans; Flow in lophophore; Ciliary sieving; Particle retention...

  2. On ciliary pumping and sieving in bryozoans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Poul Scheel; Riisgård, H. U.

    result of water currents driven out between tentacles by the water pumping lateral cilia, is characterised by nearly parabolic profiles with highest velocity along the centreline of the lophophore. In intact animals, the centreline velocity first increases from its value at the inlet to a maximal value...... relation between velocity distribution in the lophophore and variation of pumping rate along tentacles. Typical variations are given and compared to those obtained by a more accurate two-dimensional numerical solution. Based on observed velocity distributions in the lophophore, particle tracks and tentacle...... in the absence of a particle. This is hypothesised to stimulate the sensing mechanism triggering observed flicks. The energy cost of pumping is estimated at 1 to 4% of the metabolic power of a "standard" zooid. Keywords: Feeding in bryozoans; Flow in lophophore; Ciliary sieving; Particle retention...

  3. Genetics, diagnosis, and future treatment strategies for primary ciliary dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, M. Leigh Anne; Noone, Peadar G.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetically heterogeneous recessive disorder resulting in chronic oto-sino-pulmonary disease. While PCD is estimated to occur in 1 in 20,000 individuals, fewer than 1,000 patients in the US have a well-established diagnosis. Areas Covered We provide an overview of the clinical manifestations of PCD, describe the evolution of diagnostic methods, and critique the literature on management of PCD. Expert Opinion Although interest in clinical studies in non-CF bronchiectasis has increased in recent years, some of whom enroll patients with PCD, the literature regarding therapy for PCD as a distinct entity is lacking, as the numbers are small, and there have been no sub-analyses published. However, with improved screening and diagnostic methods, the development of clinical and research consortiums, and actively enrolling registries of PCD patients, the environment is conducive to perform longitudinal studies of disease course and therapeutic studies to alter that course. PMID:26998415

  4. A rare case of respiratory disorders associated with two autosomal recessive diseases and male infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Mendeluk, Gabriela Ruth; Costa, Sergio López; Scigliano, Sergio; Menga, Guillermo; Demiceu, Sergio; Palaoro, Luis Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The study of nasal ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and ultrastructure may contribute to the understanding of pathognomonic cases of male infertility associated with defects in sperm motility. This study was designed to report a particular case of male infertility, characterized by the association of two respiratory autosomal recessive genetic diseases (alpha-1-antitrypsin deficiency [AAT-D] and primary ciliary dyskinesia [PCD]). A 39-year-old patient with complete sperm immotility, AAT-D, and br...

  5. Ciliary and non-ciliary expression and function of PACRG during vertebrate development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thumberger Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Park2-co-regulated gene (PACRG is evolutionarily highly conserved from green algae to mammals. In Chlamydomonas and trypanosomes, the PACRG protein associates with flagella. Loss of PACRG results in shortened or absent flagella. In mouse the PACRG protein is required for spermatogenesis. The purpose of the present study was to analyze (1 the expression patterns of PACRG during vertebrate embryogenesis, and (2 whether the PACRG protein was required for left-right (LR axis specification through cilia-driven leftward flow in Xenopus laevis. Methods PACRG cDNAs were cloned and expression was analyzed during early embryonic development of Xenopus, mouse, rabbit and zebrafish. Antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (MO mediated gene knockdown was applied in Xenopus to investigate LR development at the level of tissue morphology, leftward flow and asymmetric marker gene expression, using timelapse videography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and whole-mount in situ hybridization. Results were statistically evaluated using Wilcoxon paired and χ2 tests. Results PACRG mRNA expression was found in cells and tissues harboring cilia throughout the vertebrates. Highly localized expression was also detected in the brain. During early development, PACRG was specifically localized to epithelia where leftward flow arises, that is, the gastrocoel roof plate (GRP in Xenopus, the posterior notochord (PNC in mammals and Kupffer’s vesicle (KV in zebrafish. Besides its association with ciliary axonemes, subcellular localization of PACRG protein was found around the nucleus and in a spotty pattern in the cytoplasm. A green fluorescent protein (GFP fusion construct preferentially labeled cilia, rendering PACRG a versatile marker for live imaging. Loss-of-function in the frog resulted dose dependently in LR, neural tube closure and gastrulation defects, representing ciliary and non-ciliary functions of PACRG. Conclusions The PACRG protein is a novel

  6. Aging and intestinal motility: a review of factors that affect intestinal motility in the aged.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Mahony, Denis

    2012-02-03

    Normal aging is associated with significant changes in the function of most organs and tissues. In this regard, the gastrointestinal tract is no exception. The purpose of this review is to detail the important age-related changes in motor function of the various parts of the gastrointestinal tract and to highlight some of the important motility changes that may occur, either in relation to common age-related disorders, or as a result of certain drugs commonly prescribed in the aged. A major confounding factor in the interpretation of motor phenomena throughout the gastrointestinal tract in this age group is the frequent coexistence of neurological, endocrinological and other disease states, which may be independently associated with dysmotility. Overall, current data are insufficient to implicate normal aging as a cause of dysmotility in the elderly. Normal aging is associated with various changes in gastrointestinal motility, but the clinical significance of such changes remains unclear. More important is the impact of various age-related diseases on gastrointestinal motility in the elderly: for example, long-standing diabetes mellitus may reduce gastric emptying in up to 50% of patients; depression significantly prolongs whole-gut transit time; hypothyroidism may prolong oro-caecal transit time; and chronic renal failure is associated with impaired gastric emptying. In addition, various, frequently used drugs in the elderly cause disordered gastrointestinal motility. These drugs include anticholinergics, especially antidepressants with an anticholinergic effect, opioid analgesics and calcium antagonists.

  7. RPGR-containing protein complexes in syndromic and non-syndromic retinal degeneration due to ciliary dysfunction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Carlos A. Murga-Zamalloa; Anand Swaroop; Hemant Khanna

    2009-12-01

    Dysfunction of primary cilia due to mutations in cilia-centrosomal proteins is associated with pleiotropic disorders. The primary (or sensory) cilium of photoreceptors mediates polarized trafficking of proteins for efficient phototransduction. Retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) is a cilia-centrosomal protein mutated in >70% of X-linked RP cases and 10%–20% of simplex RP males. Accumulating evidence indicates that RPGR may facilitate the orchestration of multiple ciliary protein complexes. Disruption of these complexes due to mutations in component proteins is an underlying cause of associated photoreceptor degeneration. Here, we highlight the recent developments in understanding the mechanism of cilia-dependent photoreceptor degeneration due to mutations in RPGR and RPGR-interacting proteins in severe genetic diseases, including retinitis pigmentosa, Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA), Joubert syndrome, and Senior–Loken syndrome, and explore the physiological relevance of photoreceptor ciliary protein complexes.

  8. CCDC151 mutations cause primary ciliary dyskinesia by disruption of the outer dynein arm docking complex formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjeij, Rim; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Watson, Christopher M;

    2014-01-01

    disorder of ciliary and flagellar dysmotility characterized by chronic upper and lower respiratory infections and defects in laterality. Here, by combined high-throughput mapping and sequencing, we identified CCDC151 loss-of-function mutations in five affected individuals from three independent families...... whose cilia showed a complete loss of ODAs and severely impaired ciliary beating. Consistent with the laterality defects observed in these individuals, we found Ccdc151 expressed in vertebrate left-right organizers. Homozygous zebrafish ccdc151(ts272a) and mouse Ccdc151(Snbl) mutants display a spectrum...... of situs defects associated with complex heart defects. We demonstrate that CCDC151 encodes an axonemal coiled coil protein, mutations in which abolish assembly of CCDC151 into respiratory cilia and cause a failure in axonemal assembly of the ODA component DNAH5 and the ODA-DC-associated components...

  9. Cellular mechanics and motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hénon, Sylvie; Sykes, Cécile

    2015-10-01

    The term motility defines the movement of a living organism. One widely known example is the motility of sperm cells, or the one of flagellar bacteria. The propulsive element of such organisms is a cilium(or flagellum) that beats. Although cells in our tissues do not have a flagellum in general, they are still able to move, as we will discover in this chapter. In fact, in both cases of movement, with or without a flagellum, cell motility is due to a dynamic re-arrangement of polymers inside the cell. Let us first have a closer look at the propulsion mechanism in the case of a flagellum or a cilium, which is the best known, but also the simplest, and which will help us to define the hydrodynamic general conditions of cell movement. A flagellum is sustained by cellular polymers arranged in semi-flexible bundles and flagellar beating generates cell displacement. These polymers or filaments are part of the cellular skeleton, or "cytoskeleton", which is, in this case, external to the cellular main body of the organism. In fact, bacteria move in a hydrodynamic regime in which viscosity dominates over inertia. The system is thus in a hydrodynamic regime of low Reynolds number (Box 5.1), which is nearly exclusively the case in all cell movements. Bacteria and their propulsion mode by flagella beating are our unicellular ancestors 3.5 billion years ago. Since then, we have evolved to form pluricellular organisms. However, to keep the ability of displacement, to heal our wounds for example, our cells lost their flagellum, since it was not optimal in a dense cell environment: cells are too close to each other to leave enough space for the flagella to accomplish propulsion. The cytoskeleton thus developed inside the cell body to ensure cell shape changes and movement, and also mechanical strength within a tissue. The cytoskeleton of our cells, like the polymers or filaments that sustain the flagellum, is also composed of semi-flexible filaments arranged in bundles, and also in

  10. Progressive hemifacial atrophy with ciliary body atrophy and ocular hypotony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Ashwini Kini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive hemifacial atrophy (PHA is a disease of unknown etiology affecting one-half of the face. Ocular involvement is uncommon. Atrophy of iris is rare, with only a few cases of partial atrophy being reported in the literature. We report a case of total atrophy of iris and ciliary body with associated ocular hypotony in a 16-year-old girl with PHA. We believe this is the first reported case of complete atrophy of iris and ciliary body in PHA. Ocular hypotony in PHA was thought to be due to intra-ocular inflammation. However in our case it appears to be secondary to severe atrophy of the ciliary body.

  11. Angioleiomyoma of the Ciliary Body:A Case Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhua Yan; Zhongyao Wu; Yongping Li; Guanguang Feng; Hao Zhang

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To report a rare case of angioleiomyoma of the ciliary body Methods :The clinical manifestation, imaging findings, histopathologic characteristics were analyzed in a 32-year-old male patient with angioleiomyoma of the ciliary body. Results:The tumor was removed intact with local resection. Histopathologic examination revealed that the tumor was full of vessels and it was composed of spindle cells with abundant cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical studies showed positive for SMA and Desmin and negative for S100 and HMB-45. Conclusions: Angioleiomyoma of the ciliary body is a rare tumor that can be successfully treated with local surgical resection in this area. It needs to be differentiated from other tumors, especially malignant melanoma. Eye Science 2004;20:19-22.

  12. TGF-β Signaling Regulates the Differentiation of Motile Cilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janos Tözser

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The cilium is a small cellular organelle with motility- and/or sensory-related functions that plays a crucial role during developmental and homeostatic processes. Although many molecules or signal transduction pathways that control cilia assembly have been reported, the mechanisms of ciliary length control have remained enigmatic. Here, we report that Smad2-dependent transforming growth factor β (TGF-β signaling impacts the length of motile cilia at the Xenopus left-right (LR organizer, the gastrocoel roof plate (GRP, as well as at the neural tube and the epidermis. Blocking TGF-β signaling resulted in the absence of the transition zone protein B9D1/MSKR-1 from cilia in multi-ciliated cells (MCCs of the epidermis. Interestingly, this TGF-β activity is not mediated by Mcidas, Foxj1, and RFX2, the known major regulators of ciliogenesis. These data indicate that TGF-β signaling is crucial for the function of the transition zone, which in turn may affect the regulation of cilia length.

  13. Chloral hydrate alters the organization of the ciliary basal apparatus and cell organelles in sea urchin embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, A.; Schatten, H.; Mitchell, K. D.; Crosser, M.; Taylor, M.

    1998-01-01

    The mitotic inhibitor, chloral hydrate, induces ciliary loss in the early embryo phase of Lytechinus pictus. It causes a breakdown of cilia at the junction of the cilium and the basal body known as the basal plate. This leaves the plasma membrane temporarily unsealed. The basal apparatus accessory structures, consisting of the basal body, basal foot, basal foot cap, striated side arm, and striated rootlet, are either misaligned or disintegrated by treatment with chloral hydrate. Furthermore, microtubules which are associated with the basal apparatus are disassembled. Mitochondria accumulate at the base of cilia - underneath the plasma membrane - and show alterations in their structural organization. The accumulation of mitochondria is observed in 40% of all electron micrograph sections while 60% show the areas mostly devoid of mitochondria. The microvilli surrounding a cilium and striated rootlet remain intact in the presence of chloral hydrate. These results suggest that deciliation in early sea urchin embryos by chloral hydrate is caused by combined effects on the ciliary membrane and on microtubules in the cilia. Furthermore, it is suggested that chloral hydrate can serve as a tool to explore the cytoskeletal mechanisms that are involved in cilia motility in the developing sea urchin embryo.

  14. The accommodative ciliary muscle function is preserved in older humans

    OpenAIRE

    Tabernero, Juan; Chirre, Emmanuel; Hervella, Lucia; Prieto, Pedro; Artal, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Presbyopia, the loss of the eye’s accommodation capability, affects all humans aged above 45–50 years old. The two main reasons for this to happen are a hardening of the crystalline lens and a reduction of the ciliary muscle functionality with age. While there seems to be at least some partial accommodating functionality of the ciliary muscle at early presbyopic ages, it is not yet clear whether the muscle is still active at more advanced ages. Previous techniques used to visualize the accomm...

  15. Ultrastructural pathology of primary ciliary dyskinesia: report about 125 cases in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theegarten Dirk

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is a rare genetically induced disorder of cilia inducing mainly respiratory diseases. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis of ciliary ultrastructure is classically used for diagnosis. We report our experience of TEM investigations in a large series of patients. Methods TEM analysis performed of 742 biopsies from patients with suspected PCD was reviewed retrospectively. Ultrastructural defects were analysized further in 125 cases with changes typical for PCD. Results In 18.1% of patients diagnosis of PCD was made because of morphological alterations, in 68.2% secondary changes were seen. In 13.7% material was not feasible for analysis. Mostly defects of dynein arms were detected in PCD (96.8%. In particular defects of the inner arms (51.2% and combined dynein defects (37.6% were found. Total loss of dynein arms was dominant. Only in 3.2% deficiencies of central structures were found alone. Associated situs inversus or dextracardia was reported clinically in 21.4%. Conclusions TEM analysis is possible in most patients and a useful tool for diagnosis of PCD. Functional and genetic analysis should be done additionally. Registers should be installed to collect all available informations and push further research.

  16. Characterization of specific binding sites for PAF in the iris and ciliary body of rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The protective effect exerted by BN 52021 a specific PAF-receptor antagonist in experimentally induced ocular inflammatory disorders led us to investigate the possible presence of specific receptors for PAF in rabbit iris and ciliary body. Two classes of PAF binding sites were found in isolated iris and ciliary process of pigmented rabbit eyes: a high affinity site Kd1 congruent to 4.9 +/- 0.47 nM, Bmax1 congruent to 3.17 +/- 0.50 pmoles/mg protein, a low affinity sites Kd2 congruent to 11.6 +/- 0.33 nM, Bmax2 congruent to 12.46 +/- 2.3 pmoles/mg protein for iris. The specific binding was not affected by lyso-PAF the biologically inactive precursor and metabolite of PAF, up to 10(-6) M; inhibition by unlabelled PAF demonstrated a biphasic curve partially antagonized by BN 52021. The present results demonstrate the presence of specific binding sites for PAF in rabbit eyes which could mediate the action of this mediator in eye inflammatory processes and explain the protective effect observed with BN 52021

  17. Mutations in GAS8, a Gene Encoding a Nexin-Dynein Regulatory Complex Subunit, Cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia with Axonemal Disorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanson, Ludovic; Thomas, Lucie; Copin, Bruno; Coste, André; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Dastot-Le Moal, Florence; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Montantin, Guy; Collot, Nathalie; Tissier, Sylvie; Papon, Jean-François; Clement, Annick; Louis, Bruno; Escudier, Estelle; Amselem, Serge; Legendre, Marie

    2016-08-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by chronic respiratory infections of the upper and lower airways, hypofertility, and, in approximately half of the cases, situs inversus. This complex phenotype results from defects in motile cilia and sperm flagella. Among the numerous genes involved in PCD, very few-including CCDC39 and CCDC40-carry mutations that lead to a disorganization of ciliary axonemes with microtubule misalignment. Focusing on this particular phenotype, we identified bi-allelic loss-of-function mutations in GAS8, a gene that encodes a subunit of the nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC) orthologous to DRC4 of the flagellated alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Unlike the majority of PCD patients, individuals with GAS8 mutations have motile cilia, which, as documented by high-speed videomicroscopy, display a subtle beating pattern defect characterized by slightly reduced bending amplitude. Immunofluorescence studies performed on patients' respiratory cilia revealed that GAS8 is not required for the proper expression of CCDC39 and CCDC40. Rather, mutations in GAS8 affect the subcellular localization of another N-DRC subunit called DRC3. Overall, this study, which identifies GAS8 as a PCD gene, unveils the key importance of the corresponding protein in N-DRC integrity and in the proper alignment of axonemal microtubules in humans. PMID:27120127

  18. The accommodative ciliary muscle function is preserved in older humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabernero, Juan; Chirre, Emmanuel; Hervella, Lucia; Prieto, Pedro; Artal, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Presbyopia, the loss of the eye's accommodation capability, affects all humans aged above 45-50 years old. The two main reasons for this to happen are a hardening of the crystalline lens and a reduction of the ciliary muscle functionality with age. While there seems to be at least some partial accommodating functionality of the ciliary muscle at early presbyopic ages, it is not yet clear whether the muscle is still active at more advanced ages. Previous techniques used to visualize the accommodation mechanism of the ciliary muscle are complicated to apply in the older subjects, as they typically require fixation stability during long measurement times and/or to have an ultrasound probe directly in contact with the eye. Instead, we used our own developed method based on high-speed recording of lens wobbling to study the ciliary muscle activity in a small group of pseudophakic subjects (around 80 years old). There was a significant activity of the muscle, clearly able to contract under binocular stimulation of accommodation. This supports a purely lenticular-based theory of presbyopia and it might stimulate the search for new solutions to presbyopia by making use of the remaining contraction force still presented in the aging eye. PMID:27151778

  19. Ciliary photoreceptors in the cerebral eyes of a protostome larva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passamaneck Yale J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eyes in bilaterian metazoans have been described as being composed of either ciliary or rhabdomeric photoreceptors. Phylogenetic distribution, as well as distinct morphologies and characteristic deployment of different photopigments (ciliary vs. rhabdomeric opsins and transduction pathways argue for the co-existence of both of these two photoreceptor types in the last common bilaterian ancestor. Both receptor types exist throughout the Bilateria, but only vertebrates are thought to use ciliary photoreceptors for directional light detection in cerebral eyes, while all other invertebrate bilaterians studied utilize rhabdomeric photoreceptors for this purpose. In protostomes, ciliary photoreceptors that express c-opsin have been described only from a non-visual deep-brain photoreceptor. Their homology with vertebrate rods and cones of the human eye has been hypothesized to represent a unique functional transition from non-visual to visual roles in the vertebrate lineage. Results To test the hypothesis that protostome cerebral eyes employ exclusively rhabdomeric photoreceptors, we investigated the ultrastructure of the larval eyes in the brachiopod Terebratalia transversa. We show that these pigment-cup eyes consist of a lens cell and a shading pigment cell, both of which are putative photoreceptors, deploying a modified, enlarged cilium for light perception, and have axonal connections to the larval brain. Our investigation of the gene expression patterns of c-opsin, Pax6 and otx in these eyes confirms that the larval eye spots of brachiopods are cerebral eyes that deploy ciliary type photoreceptors for directional light detection. Interestingly, c-opsin is also expressed during early embryogenesis in all potential apical neural cells, becoming restricted to the anterior neuroectoderm, before expression is initiated in the photoreceptor cells of the eyes. Coincident with the expression of c-opsin in the presumptive neuroectoderm

  20. Motility initiation in active gels

    CERN Document Server

    Recho, Pierre; Truskinovsky, Lev

    2015-01-01

    Motility initiation in crawling cells requires a symmetry breaking mechanism which transforms a symmetric state into a polarized state. Experiments on keratocytes suggest that polarization is triggered by increased contractility of motor proteins. In this paper we argue that contraction can be responsible not only for the symmetry breaking transition but also for the incipient translocation of the segment of an active gel mimicking the crawling cell. Our model suggests that when the contractility increases sufficiently far beyond the motility initiation threshold, the cell can stop and re-symmetrizes. The proposed theory reproduces the motility initiation pattern in fish keratocytes and the behavior of keratocytes prior to cell division.

  1. The Contribution of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Receptors to Adult Motor Neuron Survival In Vivo Is Specific to Insult Type and Distinct From That for Embryonic Motor Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Nancy; Rydyznski, Carolyn E.; Spearry, Rachel P.; Robitz, Rachel; MacLennan, A. John

    2013-01-01

    Exogenous ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes motor neuron (MN) survival following trauma and in genetic models of MN disease. Unconditional disruption of the mouse CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα) gene leads to MN loss, demonstrating a developmental role for endogenous CNTF receptor signaling. These data also suggest that CNTF receptors may promote adult MN survival and that appropriately manipulating the receptors could effectively treat adult MN disorders. This effort would greatly benefit...

  2. Effects of L-carnitine and Pentoxifylline on the Activity of Lactate Dehydrogenase C4 isozyme and Motility of Testicular Spermatozoa in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Aliabadi, Elham; Karimi, Fatemeh; Rasti, Mozhgan; Akmali, Masoumeh; Esmaeilpour, Tahereh

    2013-01-01

    Background Extracted sperm from the testis have poor motility. Moreover, their motility changes during their journey through epidydimis. Meanwhile, they face high concentration of L-carnitin. In addition, lactate dehydrogenase C4 (LDH-C4) gene disorders has been shown to cause impaired sperm motility, leading to infertility in male mice. The aim of this study was to evaluate sperm motility and LDH-C4 enzyme activity upon L-carnitine (LC) and Pentoxifylline (PTX) administrations in mice. Metho...

  3. [A rare case of primary ciliary dyskinesia with heterotaxy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintela, Cátia; Meireles, Cláudia; Bettencourt, Maria João; Ribeirinho, Augusto; Bentes, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia is an autosomal recessive disease with a clinical history of upper and lowers respiratory infections, rhinosinusitis and bronquitis associated with complete or partial situs inversus. The authors present a 78 -year -old male caucasian patient with rhinosinusitis, lower respiratory tract infection and dyspnea, chronic otitis with hearing deficit and infertility followed in Gastroenterology for dyspepsia and constipation. The radiological studies revealed agenesis of right frontal sinus; bronchial wall thickening; bronchiectasis; cecum and ascending colon located on the left and small bowel occupies right side of abdomen. He had no immunodeficiency, allergies, cystic fibrosis and others. We concluded primary ciliary dyskinesia with heterotaxy. For the rarity of this case we decided to present it. PMID:19145394

  4. Systemic administration of ciliary neurotrophic factor induces cachexia in rodents.

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, J T; Seniuk, N A; Richardson, P.M.; Gauldie, J; Roder, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has previously been shown to promote the survival of several classes of neurons and glial. We report here that in addition to its effects on the nervous system, CNTF can induce potent effects in extra-neural tissues. Implantation of C6 glioma cells engineered to secrete CNTF either subcutaneously or into the peritoneal cavity of adult mice, or systemic injections of purified rat or human recombinant CNTF, resulted in a rapid syndrome of weight loss resulting...

  5. Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Receptor Regulation of Adult Forebrain Neurogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Nancy; Batt, Myra K.; Cronier, Brigitte A.; Jackson, Michele C.; Bruno Garza, Jennifer L; Trinh, Dennis S.; Mason, Carter O.; Spearry, Rachel P.; Bhattacharya, Shayon; Robitz, Rachel; Nakafuku, Masato; MacLennan, A. John

    2013-01-01

    Appropriately targeted manipulation of endogenous neural stem progenitor (NSP) cells may contribute to therapies for trauma, stroke, and neurodegenerative disease. A prerequisite to such therapies is a better understanding of the mechanisms regulating adult NSP cells in vivo. Indirect data suggest that endogenous ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) receptor signaling may inhibit neuronal differentiation of NSP cells. We challenged subventricular zone (SVZ) cells in vivo with low concentrations...

  6. Effect of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on motoneuron survival

    OpenAIRE

    Sendtner, Michael; Arakawa, Yoshihiro; Stöckli, Kurt A.; Kreutzberg, Georg W.; Thoenen, Hans

    2010-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the extensive degeneration of motoneurons in the rat facial nucleus after transection of the facial nerve in newborn rats can be prevented by local ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) administration. CNTF differs distinctly from known neurotrophic molecules such as NGF, BDNF and NT-3 in both its molecular characteristics (CNTF is a cytosolic rather than a secretory molecule) and its broad spectrum of biological activities. CNTF is expressed selectively by Schwann cell...

  7. Meiotic chromosome behaviour in Cenchrus ciliaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Visser

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available A basic chromosome number of x = 9 has been confirmed for Cenchrus ciliaris L. Polyploidy is common and levels vary from tetraploid to hexaploid. Aneuploidv is reported for a single specimen, where two chromosomes of a single genome were lost. Various meiotic irregularities were observed. The highest incidence of meiotic abnormalities was observed in the pentaploid specimens. This was attributed to their uneven polyploid level All specimens varied from segmental alloploid to alloploid.

  8. Myristoylated CIL-7 regulates ciliary extracellular vesicle biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguire, Julie E; Silva, Malan; Nguyen, Ken C Q; Hellen, Elizabeth; Kern, Andrew D; Hall, David H; Barr, Maureen M

    2015-08-01

    The cilium both releases and binds to extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs may be used by cells as a form of intercellular communication and mediate a broad range of physiological and pathological processes. The mammalian polycystins (PCs) localize to cilia, as well as to urinary EVs released from renal epithelial cells. PC ciliary trafficking defects may be an underlying cause of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD), and ciliary-EV interactions have been proposed to play a central role in the biology of PKD. In Caenorhabditis elegans and mammals, PC1 and PC2 act in the same genetic pathway, act in a sensory capacity, localize to cilia, and are contained in secreted EVs, suggesting ancient conservation. However, the relationship between cilia and EVs and the mechanisms generating PC-containing EVs remain an enigma. In a forward genetic screen for regulators of C. elegans PKD-2 ciliary localization, we identified CIL-7, a myristoylated protein that regulates EV biogenesis. Loss of CIL-7 results in male mating behavioral defects, excessive accumulation of EVs in the lumen of the cephalic sensory organ, and failure to release PKD-2::GFP-containing EVs to the environment. Fatty acylation, such as myristoylation and palmitoylation, targets proteins to cilia and flagella. The CIL-7 myristoylation motif is essential for CIL-7 function and for targeting CIL-7 to EVs. C. elegans is a powerful model with which to study ciliary EV biogenesis in vivo and identify cis-targeting motifs such as myristoylation that are necessary for EV-cargo association and function. PMID:26041936

  9. Photosynthesis of Digitaria ciliaris during repeated soil drought and rewatering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YaYong Luo; XueYong Zhao; JingHui Zhang; YuLin Li; XiaoAn Zuo; DianChao Sun

    2015-01-01

    The ability of psammophyte photosynthesis to withstand and recover from severe droughts is crucial for vegetation sta-bility in semi-arid sandy lands. The responses of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence of an annual grass, Digitaria ciliaris, were measured through three soil drought and rewatering cycles. Results showed that the net photosynthesis rate (Pn) decreased by 92%, 95%, and 63%at end of the three drought periods, respectively, water use efficiency (WUE) de-creased by 67%, 54%, and 48%, while the constant intercellular CO2 concentration (Ci) increased by 1.08, 0.88, and 0.45 times. During those three cycles, the trapping probability with no dark adaptation (Fv′/Fm′) decreased by 55%, 51%, and 9%, the electron transport per cross section (ET0′/CS0′) decreased by 63%, 42%, and 18%, and the dissipation per cross section (DI0′/CS0′) increased by 97%, 96%, and 21%. These results indicated that D. ciliaris was subjected to photoinhi-bition and some non-stomatal limitation of photosynthesis under drought. However, after four days of rewatering, its photosynthetic characteristics were restored to control values. This capability to recover from drought may contribute to making the plant's use of water as efficient as possible. Furthermore, the photosynthesis decreased more slowly in the subsequent drought cycles than in the first cycle, allowing D. ciliaris to enhance its future drought tolerance after drought hardening. Thus, it acclimatizes itself to repeated soil drought.

  10. Stochastic models of cell motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gradinaru, Cristian

    2012-01-01

    interdisciplinary field focusing on the study of biological processes at the nanoscale level, with a range of technological applications in medicine and biological research, has emerged. The work presented in this thesis is at the interface of cell biology, image processing, and stochastic modeling. The stochastic...... coefficient. By adding a persistence component to simple random motion I introduce the standard Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process. I build on this commonly used cell motility model to address the challenges of working with real-life data: positional (centroid coordinate measuring) error and time discretization (due...... generalizing the Orstein-Uhlenbeck process to study cell motility on anisotropic substrates. I apply the general model to analyze cell motility on a series of anisotropic substrates and discuss the implications of our observations. This work is potentially useful to cell biologists by addressing their need for...

  11. Biometry of the ciliary muscle during dynamic accommodation assessed with OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, Marco; Hernandez, Victor; de Freitas, Carolina; Manns, Fabrice; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2014-02-01

    Little is known about the structural changes of the ciliary muscle with age and how it may contribute to presbyopia. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used to perform ciliary muscle biometry at different age and accommodative states with low resolution and speed. Dynamic imaging and accurate biometry of the ciliary muscle requires high-speed, high-resolution and correction of the OCT image distortions. We integrate an existing custom-made Spectral Domain OCT (SD-OCT) platform working at 840nm for biometry of the human eye with a SD-OCT system working at 1325nm that enables high-speed and high-resolution transscleral imaging of the ciliary muscle dynamically during accommodation and we developed an algorithm to provide corrected thickness measurements of the ciliary muscle.

  12. Oligodendroglioma of the ciliary body: a unique case report and the review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To date, there is no report in the international literature of an oligodendroglioma of the ciliary body, nor is there an analysis of the possible origins of this lesion. Here we report on a 52-year-old man admitted to our hospital with a ciliary body tumor revealed by clinical examination and ultrasound, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging studies. Following enucleation, pathological and immunohistochemical analyses were performed. Postoperative histopathological staining results included OLIGO-2(+) and GFAP(-), leading to a pathological diagnosis of oligodendroglioma of the ciliary body in the right eye (WHO grade II). Since malignant gliomas derive from transformed neural stem cells, the presence of oligodendroglioma in the ciliary body supports the hypothesis that gliomas can occur wherever neural stem cells exist. Tumors of the ciliary body derived from oligodendrocytes are difficult to diagnose; pathological analyses are essential

  13. Physical models of cell motility

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book surveys the most recent advances in physics-inspired cell movement models. This synergetic, cross-disciplinary effort to increase the fidelity of computational algorithms will lead to a better understanding of the complex biomechanics of cell movement, and stimulate progress in research on related active matter systems, from suspensions of bacteria and synthetic swimmers to cell tissues and cytoskeleton.Cell motility and collective motion are among the most important themes in biology and statistical physics of out-of-equilibrium systems, and crucial for morphogenesis, wound healing, and immune response in eukaryotic organisms. It is also relevant for the development of effective treatment strategies for diseases such as cancer, and for the design of bioactive surfaces for cell sorting and manipulation. Substrate-based cell motility is, however, a very complex process as regulatory pathways and physical force generation mechanisms are intertwined. To understand the interplay between adhesion, force ...

  14. Common basis for cellular motility

    OpenAIRE

    Zot, Henry G.; Javier E Hasbun; Minh, Nguyen Van

    2015-01-01

    Motility is characteristic of life, but a common basis for movement has remained to be identified. Diverse systems in motion shift between two states depending on interactions that turnover at the rate of an applied cycle of force. Although one phase of the force cycle terminates the decay of the most recent state, continuation of the cycle of force regenerates the original decay process in a recursive cycle. By completing a cycle, kinetic energy is transformed into probability of sustaining ...

  15. Gender effects on esophageal motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dantas R.O.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that there are no gender effects on esophageal motility. However, in previous studies the subjects did not perform multiple swallows and the quantitative features of esophageal contractions were not evaluated. In order to investigate the gender effects on esophageal motility we studied 40 healthy normal volunteers, 20 men aged 37 ± 15 years (mean ± SD, and 20 women aged 38 ± 14 years. We used the manometric method with an eight-lumen polyvinyl catheter and continuous perfusion. The upper and lower esophageal sphincter pressures were measured by the rapid pull-through method. With the catheter positioned with one lumen opening in the lower esophageal sphincter, and the others at 5, 10 and 15 cm above the sphincter, ten swallows of a 5-ml water bolus alternated with ten dry swallows were performed. Statistical analysis was done by the Student t-test and Mann-Whitney test. Gender differences (P<0.05 were observed for wet swallows in the duration of contractions 5 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter (men: 3.7 ± 0.2 s, women: 4.5 ± 0.3 s, mean ± SEM, and in the velocity of contractions from 15 to 10 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter (men: 4.7 ± 0.3 cm/s, women: 3.5 ± 0.2 cm/s. There was no difference (P>0.05 in sphincter pressure, duration and percentage of complete lower esophageal sphincter relaxation, amplitude of contractions, or in the number of failed, multipeaked and synchronous contractions. We conclude that gender may cause some differences in esophageal motility which, though of no clinical significance, should be taken into consideration when interpreting esophageal motility tests.

  16. Reading networks in children with dyslexia compared to children with ocular motility disturbances revealed by fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibone Saralegui

    2014-11-01

    Our results suggest that ocular motility disturbances do not play a causal role in dyslexia. Dyslexia seems to be a neurological disorder that requires early recognition and evidence-based assessments and treatment to achieve the best possible outcome.

  17. Automatic analysis of ciliary beat frequency using optical flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figl, Michael; Lechner, Manuel; Werther, Tobias; Horak, Fritz; Hummel, Johann; Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) can be a useful parameter for diagnosis of several diseases, as e.g. primary ciliary dyskinesia. (PCD). CBF computation is usually done using manual evaluation of high speed video sequences, a tedious, observer dependent, and not very accurate procedure. We used the OpenCV's pyramidal implementation of the Lukas-Kanade algorithm for optical flow computation and applied this to certain objects to follow the movements. The objects were chosen by their contrast applying the corner detection by Shi and Tomasi. Discrimination between background/noise and cilia by a frequency histogram allowed to compute the CBF. Frequency analysis was done using the Fourier transform in matlab. The correct number of Fourier summands was found by the slope in an approximation curve. The method showed to be usable to distinguish between healthy and diseased samples. However there remain difficulties in automatically identifying the cilia, and also in finding enough high contrast cilia in the image. Furthermore the some of the higher contrast cilia are lost (and sometimes found) by the method, an easy way to distinguish the correct sub-path of a point's path have yet to be found in the case where the slope methods doesn't work.

  18. Expression of nitric oxide synthase and guanylate cyclase in the human ciliary body and trabecular meshwork

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ren-yi; MA Ning

    2012-01-01

    Background The role played by the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway in the aqueous humor dynamics is still unclear.This study was designed to investigate the expression and distribution of NO synthase (NOS) isoforms and guanylate cyclase (GC) in human ciliary body,trabecular meshwork and the Schlemm's canal.Methods Twelve eyes after corneal transplantation were used.Expression of three NOS isoforms (i.e.neuronal NOS (nNOS),inducible NOS (iNOS) and endothelial NOS (eNOS)) and GC were assessed in 10 eyes by immunohistochemical staining using monoclonal or polyclonal antibody of NOS and GC.Ciliary bodies were dissected free and the total proteins were extracted.Western blotting was performed to confirm the protein expression of 3 NOS isoforms and GC.Results Expression of 3 NOS isoforms and GC were observed in the ciliary epithelium,ciliary muscle,trabecular meshwork and the endothelium of the Schlemm's canal.Immunoreactivity of nNOS was detected mainly along the apical cytoplasmic junction of the non-pigmented epithelium (NPE) and pigmented epithelial (PE) cells.Protein expressions of 3 NOS isoforms and GC were confirmed in isolated human ciliary body by Western blotting.Conclusions The expression of NOS isoforms and GC in human ciliary body suggest the possible involvement of NO and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cyclic GMP,cGMP) signaling pathway in the ciliary body,and may play a role in both processes of aqueous humor formation and drainage.

  19. WHAT IS THE REAL IMPAIRMENT ON ESOPHAGEAL MOTILITY IN PATIENTS WITH GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela FALCÃO

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Context Impairment of esophageal motility is a common finding in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD as reduced lower esophageal sphincter (LES basal pressure. A very low LES pressure might facilitate the occurrence of more gastroesophageal reflux whereas abnormal esophageal peristalsis may contribute to impaired esophageal clearance after reflux. Objective Evaluate the esophageal motor function of the lower esophageal sphincter and esophageal body in the various forms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Methods The manometrics records of 268 patients, who had evaluation of the esophageal motility as part of the diagnostic gastroesophageal reflux disease were split into four groups, as follows: 33 patients who had no esophagitis; 92 patients who had erosive esophagitis; 101 patients who had short Barrett's esophagus and 42 patients who had long Barrett's esophagus. Results The group who had long Barrett's esophagus showed smaller mean LES pressure and higher percentage of marked LES hypotonia; in the distal segment of the esophageal body the this group showed higher percentage of marked hypocontractility of the distal segment (<30 mm Hg; this same group showed higher percentage of esophageal motility disorders. Conclusions The most intense esophageal motility disorders and lower pressure of lower esophageal sphincter were noted in the group with long Barrett's esophagus. Those with reflux esophagitis and short Barrett's esophagus had esophageal motility impairment, intermediate among patients with esophagitis and long Barrett's esophagus. Patients with typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux but without esophagitis by endoscopy study showed no impairment of esophageal motility.

  20. Intraocular electro-optic lens with ciliary muscle controlled accommodation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doornaert, Dries; Glorieux, Christ; De Gersem, Herbert; Puers, Robert; Spileers, Werner; Blanckaert, Johan

    2013-01-01

    In this paper a concept is proposed of an intraocular lens implant with electro-optic accommodation of a variable-focus hybrid liquid-crystal-based lens. The dioptric strength of the lens is electronically controlled by a signal that is derived from the change of inductance of a sensing coil due to a marker implanted in the nearby contracting or decontracting ciliary muscle. Analytical, numerical and experimental results are reported on the dependency of the frequency of a Colpitts oscillator circuit on the location of a nearby conductive marker. A concept is also reported on the use as an electro-optic lens of a device based on a liquid crystal in planar alignment, which is held between a flat and a curved window coated with optically transparent and electrically conductive layers. PMID:24110406

  1. Genotypic Variation for Salinity Tolerance in Cenchrus ciliaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dakheel, Abdullah J.; Hussain, M. Iftikhar

    2016-01-01

    Scarcity of irrigation water and increasing soil salinization has threatened the sustainability of forage production in arid and semi-arid region around the globe. Introduction of salt-tolerant perennial species is a promising alternative to overcome forage deficit to meet future livestock needs in salt-affected areas. This study presents the results of a salinity tolerance screening trial which was carried out in plastic pots buried in the open field for 160 buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris L.) accessions for three consecutive years (2003–2005). The plastic pots were filled with sand, organic, and peat moss mix and were irrigated with four different quality water (EC 0, 10, 15, and 20 dS m−1). The results indicate that the average annual dry weights (DW) were in the range from 122.5 to 148.9 g/pot in control; 96.4–133.8 g/pot at 10 dS m−1; 65.6–80.4 g/pot at 15 dS m−1, and 55.4–65.6 g/pot at 20 dS m−1. The highest DW (148.9 g/pot) was found with accession 49 and the lowest with accession 23. Principle component analysis shows that PC-1 contributed 81.8% of the total variability, while PC-2 depicted 11.7% of the total variation among C. ciliaris accessions for DW. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed that a number of accessions collected from diverse regions could be grouped into a single cluster. Accessions 3, 133, 159, 30, 23, 142, 141, 95, 49, 129, 124, and 127 were stable, salt tolerant, and produced good dry biomass yield. These accessions demonstrate sufficient salinity tolerance potential for promotion in marginal lands to enhance farm productivity and reduce rural poverty. PMID:27516762

  2. Genotypic Variation for Salinity Tolerance in Cenchrus ciliaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dakheel, Abdullah J; Hussain, M Iftikhar

    2016-01-01

    Scarcity of irrigation water and increasing soil salinization has threatened the sustainability of forage production in arid and semi-arid region around the globe. Introduction of salt-tolerant perennial species is a promising alternative to overcome forage deficit to meet future livestock needs in salt-affected areas. This study presents the results of a salinity tolerance screening trial which was carried out in plastic pots buried in the open field for 160 buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris L.) accessions for three consecutive years (2003-2005). The plastic pots were filled with sand, organic, and peat moss mix and were irrigated with four different quality water (EC 0, 10, 15, and 20 dS m(-1)). The results indicate that the average annual dry weights (DW) were in the range from 122.5 to 148.9 g/pot in control; 96.4-133.8 g/pot at 10 dS m(-1); 65.6-80.4 g/pot at 15 dS m(-1), and 55.4-65.6 g/pot at 20 dS m(-1). The highest DW (148.9 g/pot) was found with accession 49 and the lowest with accession 23. Principle component analysis shows that PC-1 contributed 81.8% of the total variability, while PC-2 depicted 11.7% of the total variation among C. ciliaris accessions for DW. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed that a number of accessions collected from diverse regions could be grouped into a single cluster. Accessions 3, 133, 159, 30, 23, 142, 141, 95, 49, 129, 124, and 127 were stable, salt tolerant, and produced good dry biomass yield. These accessions demonstrate sufficient salinity tolerance potential for promotion in marginal lands to enhance farm productivity and reduce rural poverty. PMID:27516762

  3. Aerobic fitness in children and young adults with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Astrid Hellerup; Green, Kent; Buchvald, Frederik;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although aerobic fitness is regarded as an overall prognostic measure of morbidity and mortality, its evaluation in the chronic progressive sinopulmonary disease primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) has been infrequently and inconsistently reported. Here we assessed peak oxygen uptake (VO...

  4. Adenoma of nonpigmented epithelium in ciliary body:literature review and case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Adenomas of the nonpigmented ciliary epithelium (NPCE) are often clinically indistinguishable from amelanotic malignant melanomas of the ciliary body or metastatic carcinomas. This paper reports a case study of a distinctive variant of adenoma of the NPCE, which clinically appears as epiretinal membrane in the macular region. Histopathologic studies have revealed this is an adenoma of the NPCE. Identification of this clinic feature is important because it will miss the diagnosis of the adenoma of the NPCE. In this case study, B-scan ultrasonography as well as computerized tomography (CT) has been used to provide help in diagnosing the ciliary body tumor. Because of their anterior location in the ciliary body, partial lamellar sclerouvectomy is an effective method of treatment.

  5. Simultaneous sinus and lung infections in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alanin, Mikkel Christian; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Aanaes, Kasper;

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The sinuses should be considered as a bacterial reservoir and a target for surgery and antibiotic treatment in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). The observed decrease in serum precipitating antibodies (precipitins) against Pseudomonas aeruginosa may indicate a beneficial...

  6. Ciliary neurotrophic factor prevents retrograde neuronal death in the adult central nervous system.

    OpenAIRE

    Clatterbuck, R E; Price, D L; Koliatsos, V E

    1993-01-01

    The neurocytokine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) was described originally as an activity that supports the survival of neurons of the chicken ciliary ganglia in vitro. The widespread expression of CNTF and its principal binding protein, CNTF receptor alpha, in the central and peripheral nervous systems suggests a broader trophic role for this peptide. In the present study, we report that CNTF prevents axotomy-induced cell death of neurons in the anteroventral and anterodorsal thalamic nuc...

  7. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: evaluation using cilia beat frequency assessment via spectral analysis of digital microscopy images

    OpenAIRE

    Olm, Mary A. K.; Kögler, João E.; Macchione, Mariangela; Shoemark, Amelia; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Rodrigues, Joaquim C.

    2011-01-01

    Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) measurements provide valuable information for diagnosing of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). We developed a system for measuring CBF, used it in association with electron microscopy to diagnose PCD, and then analyzed characteristics of PCD patients.1 The CBF measurement system was based on power spectra measured through digital imaging. Twenty-four patients suspected of having PCD (age 1–19 yr) were selected from a group of 75 children and adolescents with pneumo...

  8. Transition fibre protein FBF1 is required for the ciliary entry of assembled intraflagellar transport complexes

    OpenAIRE

    WEI, QING; Xu, Qingwen; Zhang, Yuxia; Li, Yujie; Zhang, Qing; Hu, Zeng; Harris, Peter C.; Torres, Vicente E.; Ling, Kun; Hu, Jinghua

    2013-01-01

    Sensory organelle cilia play critical roles in mammalian embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) machinery is required for the assembly and maintenance of cilia. Yet how this large complex passes through the size-dependent barrier at the ciliary base remains enigmatic. Here we report that FBF1, a highly conserved transition fibre protein, is required for the ciliary import of assembled IFT particles at the cilia base. We cloned dyf-19, the C. elegans homol...

  9. Roles of paroxetine and corticosterone on adult mammalian ciliary body cell proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hua; LAU Benson WM; YAU Suk-yu; LI Suk-yee; LEUNG Nelson; WANG Ning-li; TANG Siu-wa; LEE Tatia MC; SO Kwok-fai

    2010-01-01

    Background The neurogenesis in retina of adult mammals is generally abolished, and this renders the retina lack of regenerative capacity.Despite this, there is a small population of nestin-positive cells in the ciliary epithelium which retains neurogenic potential.The present study aimed at investigating the effect of two drugs, corticosterone and paroxetine, on the cell proliferation of the ciliary body.Methods Adult Sprague-Dawley rats were given vehicle, corticosterone, paroxetine, or both corticosterone and paroxetine treatment for 14 days.Cell proliferation in the ciliary body was quantified using 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) immunohistochemistry.Co-labelling of BrdU and stem cell marker was used to phenotype the BrdU immunoreactive cells.Results Corticosterone treatment suppressed while paroxetine treatment increased the cell proliferation of the ciliary body.Co-labelling with cell markers revealed that the BrdU positive cells also showed nestin expression but not glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP).Conclusions The results illustrate that proliferation of retinal progenitor cells situated in ciliary body are subjected to regulation by selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) and corticosteroid, which is similar to our previous findings in neurogenic regions in central nervous system (CNS).Paroxetine treatment could reverse the suppressive effect of corticosterone on ciliary body cell proliferation.This provides information for future investigation of retinal stem cell biology and potential treatment of retinal degenerative diseases.

  10. Gaslike model of social motility

    CERN Document Server

    Parravano, A; 10.1103/PhysRevE.78.026120

    2009-01-01

    We propose a model to represent the motility of social elements. The model is completely deterministic, possesses a small number of parameters, and exhibits a series of properties that are reminiscent of the behavior of comunities in social-ecological competition; these are: (i) similar individuals attract each other; (ii) individuals can form stable groups; (iii) a group of similar individuals breaks into subgroups if it reaches a critical size; (iv) interaction between groups can modify the distribution of the elements as a result of fusion, fission, or pursuit; (v) individuals can change their internal state by interaction with their neighbors. The simplicity of the model and its richness of emergent behaviors, such as, for example, pursuit between groups, make it a useful toy model to explore a diversity of situations by changing the rule by which the internal state of individuals is modified by the interactions with the environment.

  11. Active Gel Model of Amoeboid Cell Motility

    CERN Document Server

    Callan-Jones, A C

    2013-01-01

    We develop a model of amoeboid cell motility based on active gel theory. Modeling the motile apparatus of a eukaryotic cell as a confined layer of finite length of poroelastic active gel permeated by a solvent, we first show that, due to active stress and gel turnover, an initially static and homogeneous layer can undergo a contractile-type instability to a polarized moving state in which the rear is enriched in gel polymer. This agrees qualitatively with motile cells containing an actomyosin-rich uropod at their rear. We find that the gel layer settles into a steadily moving, inhomogeneous state at long times, sustained by a balance between contractility and filament turnover. In addition, our model predicts an optimal value of the gel-susbstrate adhesion leading to maximum layer speed, in agreement with cell motility assays. The model may be relevant to motility of cells translocating in complex, confining environments that can be mimicked experimentally by cell migration through microchannels.

  12. A型肉毒毒素治疗消化道动力性疾病的新进展%The new progress of botulinum toxin A in the therapy of gastrointestinal motility disorders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈英; 刘庆森; 杨云生; 杨春敏; 郭明洲

    2011-01-01

    自上世纪八十年代以来,A型肉毒毒素(BTX-A)已广泛应用于肌肉痉挛性疾病的治疗,主要是神经病学、眼科学、美容医学、疼痛学等领域.近来,越来越多的实验表明,BTX-A 用于消化道平滑肌运动障碍性疾病的治疗是有效的,尤其是治疗贲门失迟缓症和肛裂的研究开展得最为广泛.而将BTX-A应用于病态肥胖领域的新研究,近年来也取得了初步成效.本文描述了BTX-A应用于消化道平滑肌功能失调方面的作用原理、使用方法、适应证、副反应等,同时也比较了BTX-A与其他方法的不同.%Since 1980's, botulinum toxin has been employed for the treatment of various voluntary muscle spastic disorders. Botulinum toxin has been proved to be effective in the therapy of dyskinetic smooth muscle disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Achalasia and anal fissure are the gastrointestinal disorders in which botulinum toxin therapy has been most extensively investigated. More recently, the new research in the therapy of pathologic pathosis obesity is beginning. This article described the mechanism of action, rationale of employment, indications and side-effects of botulinum toxin application in smooth muscle disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, and compared the results of different techniques of botulinum toxin therapeutic application.

  13. Reduction of ciliary beat frequency in vitro by sputum from patients with bronchiectasis: a serine proteinase effect.

    OpenAIRE

    Smallman, L A; Hill, S. L.; Stockley, R A

    1984-01-01

    We have examined the effect of adding elastase positive sputum from six patients with purulent bronchiectasis on the ciliary beat frequency of nasal epithelium from normal subjects. Control studies of cilia suspended in tissue culture medium showed little change in ciliary beat frequency over six hours. Cilia incubated in elastase positive secretions, however, showed a considerable decrease in ciliary beat frequency over the period, falling from a mean of 13 X 40 beats/second to 6 X 78 beats/...

  14. Force-inhibiting effect of Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 2A inhibitors on bovine ciliary muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    石田, 美織

    2015-01-01

    Ciliary muscle is a smooth muscle characterized by a rapid response to muscarinic receptor stimulation and sustained contraction. Although it is evident that these contractions are Ca(2+)-dependent, detailed molecular mechanisms are still unknown. In order to elucidate the role of Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in ciliary muscle contraction, we examined the effects of okadaic acid and other PP2A inhibitors on contractions induced by carbachol (CCh) and ionomycin in bovine ciliary muscl...

  15. Ciliary abnormalities in senescent human fibroblasts impair proliferative capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Loretta; Prosser, Suzanna L; Cuffe, Sandra; Morrison, Ciaran G

    2014-01-01

    Somatic cells senesce in culture after a finite number of divisions indefinitely arresting their proliferation. DNA damage and senescence increase the cellular number of centrosomes, the 2 microtubule organizing centers that ensure bipolar mitotic spindles. Centrosomes also provide the basal body from which primary cilia extend to sense and transduce various extracellular signals, notably Hedgehog. Primary cilium formation is facilitated by cellular quiescence a temporary cell cycle exit, but the impact of senescence on cilia is unknown. We found that senescent human fibroblasts have increased frequency and length of primary cilia. Levels of the negative ciliary regulator CP110 were reduced in senescent cells, as were levels of key elements of the Hedgehog pathway. Hedgehog inhibition reduced proliferation in young cells with increased cilium length accompanying cell cycle arrest suggesting a regulatory function for Hedgehog in primary ciliation. Depletion of CP110 in young cell populations increased ciliation frequencies and reduced cell proliferation. These data suggest that primary cilia are potentially novel determinants of the reduced cellular proliferation that initiates senescence. PMID:25486364

  16. Ciliary abnormalities in senescent human fibroblasts impair proliferative capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breslin, Loretta; Prosser, Suzanna L; Cuffe, Sandra; Morrison, Ciaran G

    2014-01-01

    Somatic cells senesce in culture after a finite number of divisions indefinitely arresting their proliferation. DNA damage and senescence increase the cellular number of centrosomes, the 2 microtubule organizing centers that ensure bipolar mitotic spindles. Centrosomes also provide the basal body from which primary cilia extend to sense and transduce various extracellular signals, notably Hedgehog. Primary cilium formation is facilitated by cellular quiescence a temporary cell cycle exit, but the impact of senescence on cilia is unknown. We found that senescent human fibroblasts have increased frequency and length of primary cilia. Levels of the negative ciliary regulator CP110 were reduced in senescent cells, as were levels of key elements of the Hedgehog pathway. Hedgehog inhibition reduced proliferation in young cells with increased cilium length accompanying cell cycle arrest suggesting a regulatory function for Hedgehog in primary ciliation. Depletion of CP110 in young cell populations increased ciliation frequencies and reduced cell proliferation. These data suggest that primary cilia are potentially novel determinants of the reduced cellular proliferation that initiates senescence. PMID:25486364

  17. PICADAR: a diagnostic predictive tool for primary ciliary dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behan, Laura; Dimitrov, Borislav D.; Kuehni, Claudia E.; Hogg, Claire; Carroll, Mary; Evans, Hazel J.; Goutaki, Myrofora; Harris, Amanda; Packham, Samantha; Walker, Woolf T.

    2016-01-01

    Symptoms of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) are nonspecific and guidance on whom to refer for testing is limited. Diagnostic tests for PCD are highly specialised, requiring expensive equipment and experienced PCD scientists. This study aims to develop a practical clinical diagnostic tool to identify patients requiring testing. Patients consecutively referred for testing were studied. Information readily obtained from patient history was correlated with diagnostic outcome. Using logistic regression, the predictive performance of the best model was tested by receiver operating characteristic curve analyses. The model was simplified into a practical tool (PICADAR) and externally validated in a second diagnostic centre. Of 641 referrals with a definitive diagnostic outcome, 75 (12%) were positive. PICADAR applies to patients with persistent wet cough and has seven predictive parameters: full-term gestation, neonatal chest symptoms, neonatal intensive care admittance, chronic rhinitis, ear symptoms, situs inversus and congenital cardiac defect. Sensitivity and specificity of the tool were 0.90 and 0.75 for a cut-off score of 5 points. Area under the curve for the internally and externally validated tool was 0.91 and 0.87, respectively. PICADAR represents a simple diagnostic clinical prediction rule with good accuracy and validity, ready for testing in respiratory centres referring to PCD centres. PMID:26917608

  18. Plankton motility patterns and encounter rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Visser, Andre; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    measure of run length to reaction distance determines whether the underlying encounter is ballistic or diffusive. Since ballistic interactions are intrinsically more efficient than diffusive, we predict that organisms will display motility with long correlation run lengths compared to their reaction...... distances to their prey, but short compared to the reaction distances of their predators. We show motility data for planktonic organisms ranging from bacteria to copepods that support this prediction. We also present simple ballistic and diffusive motility models for estimating encounter rates, which lead...

  19. Mammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffney, E. A.; Gadêlha, H.; Smith, D. J.; Blake, J. R.; Kirkman-Brown, J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian spermatozoa motility is a subject of growing importance because of rising human infertility and the possibility of improving animal breeding. We highlight opportunities for fluid and continuum dynamics to provide novel insights concerning the mechanics of these specialized cells, especially during their remarkable journey to the egg. The biological structure of the motile sperm appendage, the flagellum, is described and placed in the context of the mechanics underlying the migration of mammalian sperm through the numerous environments of the female reproductive tract. This process demands certain specific changes to flagellar movement and motility for which further mechanical insight would be valuable, although this requires improved modeling capabilities, particularly to increase our understanding of sperm progression in vivo. We summarize current theoretical studies, highlighting the synergistic combination of imaging and theory in exploring sperm motility, and discuss the challenges for future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics.

  20. Human follicular fluid adverses hamster spermatozoa motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzels, A; Goverde, H J; Bastiaans, L A; Rolland, R

    1989-01-01

    To determine the optimal conditions for in vitro spermatozoa vitality, human and hamster spermatozoa were incubated at 37 degrees C in T6 medium supplemented with different biologic fluids (10% v/v). The fluids tested were human serum (HUS), hamster serum (HAS), and human follicular fluid (HUF). After incubation the spermatozoa were investigated for their qualitative and quantitative motility. Human spermatozoa maintained a good vitality in all fluids tested (approximately 25% motility after 18-h incubation). The hamster spermatozoa had after an incubation of 4 h a motility of 28.4% in HUS, 14.2% in HAS, and 2.2% in HUF. The quality of the motility was also extremely low in HUF, whereas it was adequate in HUS and in HAS. The presence of species-specific substances in mammalian follicular fluid is discussed. PMID:2589906

  1. Mammalian Sperm Motility: Observation and Theory

    KAUST Repository

    Gaffney, E.A.

    2011-01-21

    Mammalian spermatozoa motility is a subject of growing importance because of rising human infertility and the possibility of improving animal breeding. We highlight opportunities for fluid and continuum dynamics to provide novel insights concerning the mechanics of these specialized cells, especially during their remarkable journey to the egg. The biological structure of the motile sperm appendage, the flagellum, is described and placed in the context of the mechanics underlying the migration of mammalian sperm through the numerous environments of the female reproductive tract. This process demands certain specific changes to flagellar movement and motility for which further mechanical insight would be valuable, although this requires improved modeling capabilities, particularly to increase our understanding of sperm progression in vivo. We summarize current theoretical studies, highlighting the synergistic combination of imaging and theory in exploring sperm motility, and discuss the challenges for future observational and theoretical studies in understanding the underlying mechanics. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  2. Fiber optic laser light scattering measurement of ciliary function of the fallopian tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbert, Sheridan A.; Lim, Kap; Lee, Wylie I.

    1990-07-01

    A fiber-optic laser light-scattering system (FLS) for measuring ciliary function was evaluated by means of three sets of in vitro experiments. First, FLS performance was compared to that of a previously proven benchtop laser system (BLS). Using tissue excised from rabbit fallopian tubes, ciliary beat frequency (CBF) of each sample was measured with FLS and BLS. Paired CBF measurements showed excellent correlation between the two systems (r =0.93). Second, the FLS was used to evaluate the dependency of CBF on temperature (T) by using tissue sampies of rabbit oviductal fimbna. Regression analysis of CBF vs T showed a linear relationship over the range of 18-37°C for both individual samples (r =0.98) and pooled data from all experiments (r = 0.84). Fmally, the relalionship between CBF and ciliary ovum transport rate (TR) was tested by using T to modulate CBF of rabbit fimbria, in vitro. The relationship was linear over the range of CBF from 10 to 30 Hz (r2 = 0.83). At 37°C, CBF = 31+/-1 Hz, and TR = O.12+/-.02 mm/sec. equal to ovum transport rate in situ. The FLS is a valuable tool for characterizing ciliary activity and thus ovum transport function. Owing to the fact that ciliary dyskinesia resulting from disease of the fallopian tube is associated with infeitility, the FLS may be useful to acquire data important to the clinical evaluation of fallopian tube function and female infertility.

  3. Arf4 is required for Mammalian development but dispensable for ciliary assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Follit

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The primary cilium is a sensory organelle, defects in which cause a wide range of human diseases including retinal degeneration, polycystic kidney disease and birth defects. The sensory functions of cilia require specific receptors to be targeted to the ciliary subdomain of the plasma membrane. Arf4 has been proposed to sort cargo destined for the cilium at the Golgi complex and deemed a key regulator of ciliary protein trafficking. In this work, we show that Arf4 binds to the ciliary targeting sequence (CTS of fibrocystin. Knockdown of Arf4 indicates that it is not absolutely required for trafficking of the fibrocystin CTS to cilia as steady-state CTS levels are unaffected. However, we did observe a delay in delivery of newly synthesized CTS from the Golgi complex to the cilium when Arf4 was reduced. Arf4 mutant mice are embryonic lethal and die at mid-gestation shortly after node formation. Nodal cilia appeared normal and functioned properly to break left-right symmetry in Arf4 mutant embryos. At this stage of development Arf4 expression is highest in the visceral endoderm but we did not detect cilia on these cells. In the visceral endoderm, the lack of Arf4 caused defects in cell structure and apical protein localization. This work suggests that while Arf4 is not required for ciliary assembly, it is important for the efficient transport of fibrocystin to cilia, and also plays critical roles in non-ciliary processes.

  4. Transition fibre protein FBF1 is required for the ciliary entry of assembled intraflagellar transport complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qing; Xu, Qingwen; Zhang, Yuxia; Li, Yujie; Zhang, Qing; Hu, Zeng; Harris, Peter C; Torres, Vicente E; Ling, Kun; Hu, Jinghua

    2013-01-01

    Sensory organelle cilia have critical roles in mammalian embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. Intraflagellar transport (IFT) machinery is required for the assembly and maintenance of cilia. Yet, how this large complex passes through the size-dependent barrier at the ciliary base remains enigmatic. Here we report that FBF1, a highly conserved transition fibre protein, is required for the ciliary import of assembled IFT particles at the ciliary base. We cloned dyf-19, the Caenorhabditis elegans homologue of human FBF1, in a whole-genome screen for ciliogenesis mutants. DYF-19 localizes specifically to transition fibres and interacts directly with the IFT-B component DYF-11/IFT54. Although not a structural component of transition fibres, DYF-19 is required for the transit of assembled IFT particles through the ciliary base. Furthermore, we found that human FBF1 shares conserved localization and function with its worm counterpart. We conclude that FBF1 is a key functional transition fibre component that actively facilitates the ciliary entry of assembled IFT machinery. PMID:24231678

  5. Cell motility as random motion: A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmeczi, Dávid; Li, Liwen; Pedersen, Leif;

    2008-01-01

    The historical co-evolution of biological motility models with models of Brownian motion is outlined. Recent results for how to derive cell-type-specific motility models from experimental cell trajectories are reviewed. Experimental work in progress, which tests the generality of this...... phenomenological model building is reported. So is theoretical work in progress, which explains the characteristic time scales and correlations of phenomenological models in terms of the dynamics of cytoskeleton, lamellipodia, and pseudopodia....

  6. Novel mechanisms power bacterial gliding motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Beiyan; Zusman, David R

    2016-07-01

    For many bacteria, motility is essential for survival, growth, virulence, biofilm formation and intra/interspecies interactions. Since natural environments differ, bacteria have evolved remarkable motility systems to adapt, including swimming in aqueous media, and swarming, twitching and gliding on solid and semi-solid surfaces. Although tremendous advances have been achieved in understanding swimming and swarming motilities powered by flagella, and twitching motility powered by Type IV pili, little is known about gliding motility. Bacterial gliders are a heterogeneous group containing diverse bacteria that utilize surface motilities that do not depend on traditional flagella or pili, but are powered by mechanisms that are less well understood. Recently, advances in our understanding of the molecular machineries for several gliding bacteria revealed the roles of modified ion channels, secretion systems and unique machinery for surface movements. These novel mechanisms provide rich source materials for studying the function and evolution of complex microbial nanomachines. In this review, we summarize recent findings made on the gliding mechanisms of the myxobacteria, flavobacteria and mycoplasmas. PMID:27028358

  7. 25-Gauge pars plana vitrectomy for ciliary block (malignant) glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Li; Wei, Wenbin; Li, Yanlong; Hui, Xiaoying; Han, Xiaodong; Shi, Xiaobo

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of 25-ga pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) and 25-ga PPV combined with phacoemulsification surgery for managing ciliary block (malignant) glaucoma. The medical records of 11 eyes, in nine consecutive patients with malignant glaucoma were retrospectively reviewed to determine the efficacy of 25-ga PPV for alleviating this disease. All phakic eyes underwent phacoemulsification surgery during vitrectomy. Control of intraocular pressure (IOP), pre- and postoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), and development of intra- and postoperative complications were evaluated during follow-up. Malignant glaucoma was promptly resolved, and recurrence was not observed during a mean follow-up period of 12.7 ± 3.2 (range 6-18) months. The mean IOP decreased from 35.9 ± 2.9 mmHg, preoperatively, to 16.0 ± 1.4 mmHg, measured at last visit (P = 0.013). Although IOP control was achieved in all eyes after surgery, two eyes required long-term topical antiglaucoma medication. The mean logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution BCVA improved from +0.69 ± 0.11, preoperatively, to +0.29 ± 0.07, postoperatively (P = 0.027). No severe intraoperative complications were observed. Postoperative complications mostly occurred during the first week after surgery, including transient corneal edema and Descemet's membrane folds in three eyes, fibrotic exudation in 2, local iris posterior synechia in 1, and transient hypotony in 1, which were resolved spontaneously or with medication. The 25-ga PPV procedure seems to be safe and effective for treating malignant glaucoma. Combined vitrectomy with phacoemulsification surgery and a staged surgical approach may improve the success rate. PMID:25062710

  8. Ammonia excretion in mytilid mussels is facilitated by ciliary beating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, J; Himmerkus, N; Holland, N; Sartoris, F J; Bleich, M; Tresguerres, M

    2016-08-01

    The excretion of nitrogenous waste products in the form of ammonia (NH3) and ammonium (NH4 (+)) is a fundamental process in aquatic organisms. For mytilid bivalves, little is known about the mechanisms and sites of excretion. This study investigated the localization and the mechanisms of ammonia excretion in mytilid mussels. An Rh protein was found to be abundantly expressed in the apical cell membrane of the plicate organ, which was previously described as a solely respiratory organ. The Rh protein was also expressed in the gill, although at significantly lower concentrations, but was not detectable in mussel kidney. Furthermore, NH3/NH4 (+) was not enriched in the urine, suggesting that kidneys are not involved in active NH3/NH4 (+) excretion. Exposure to elevated seawater pH of 8.5 transiently reduced NH3/NH4 (+) excretion rates, but they returned to control values following 24 h acclimation. These mussels had increased abundance of V-type H(+)-ATPase in the apical membranes of plicate organ cells; however, NH3/NH4 (+) excretion rates were not affected by the V-type H(+)-ATPase specific inhibitor concanamycin A (100 nmol l(-1)). In contrast, inhibition of ciliary beating with dopamine and increased seawater viscosity significantly reduced NH3 excretion rates under control pH (8.0). These results suggest that NH3/NH4 (+) excretion in mytilid mussels takes place by passive NH3 diffusion across respiratory epithelia via the Rh protein, facilitated by the water current produced for filter feeding, which prevents accumulation of NH3 in the boundary layer. This mechanism would be energy efficient for sessile organisms, as they already generate water currents for filter feeding. PMID:27489216

  9. Brachytherapy, A viable option of globe salvage in treatment of large ciliary body melanocytoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh P Shanmugam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of large histopathologically proven melanocytoma of the ciliary body in a 15-year-old male, presented with rapid extraocular growth following incisional biopsy with scleral patch graft. We chose brachytherapy with Ruthenium 106 plaque over enucleation as the later was refused by the parents. The initial apical height of the tumor was 14.2 mm on ultrasonography. Two weeks after brachytherapy, the mass regressed to a size of 8.1 mm and 1 year later to 6.7 mm. This is the first case report showing the response of brachytherapy to ciliary body melanocytoma, which results in ocular and visual acuity salvation with considerable decreased in size of the tumor. The authors conclude that brachytherapy is an option in the management of non-resectable melanocytoma of the ciliary body.

  10. Quantitative optical coherence tomography imaging of intermediate flow defect phenotypes in ciliary physiology and pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Brendan K.; Gamm, Ute A.; Jonas, Stephan; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Choma, Michael A.

    2015-03-01

    Cilia-driven fluid flow is a critical yet poorly understood aspect of pulmonary physiology. Here, we demonstrate that optical coherence tomography-based particle tracking velocimetry can be used to quantify subtle variability in cilia-driven flow performance in Xenopus, an important animal model of ciliary biology. Changes in flow performance were quantified in the setting of normal development, as well as in response to three types of perturbations: mechanical (increased fluid viscosity), pharmacological (disrupted serotonin signaling), and genetic (diminished ciliary motor protein expression). Of note, we demonstrate decreased flow secondary to gene knockdown of kif3a, a protein involved in ciliogenesis, as well as a dose-response decrease in flow secondary to knockdown of dnah9, an important ciliary motor protein.

  11. Ciliary contact interactions dominate surface scattering of swimming eukaryotes

    CERN Document Server

    Kantsler, Vasily; Polin, Marco; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-01-01

    Interactions between swimming cells and surfaces are essential to many microbiological processes, from bacterial biofilm formation to human fertilization. However, in spite of their fundamental importance, relatively little is known about the physical mechanisms that govern the scattering of flagellated or ciliated cells from solid surfaces. A more detailed understanding of these interactions promises not only new biological insights into structure and dynamics of flagella and cilia, but may also lead to new microfluidic techniques for controlling cell motility and microbial locomotion, with potential applications ranging from diagnostic tools to therapeutic protein synthesis and photosynthetic biofuel production. Due to fundamental differences in physiology and swimming strategies, it is an open question whether microfluidic transport and rectification schemes that have recently been demonstrated for pusher-type microswimmers such as bacteria and sperm cells, can be transferred to puller-type algae and other...

  12. Effects of diabetes mellitus on gastric motility in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common endocrine diseases that affects most body organs. Peristaltic disorders and gastric distension have also been observed in diabetes. Because the effect of diabetes on gastric motility has not been fully examined, we decided to determine if gastric motility is also affected by diabetes in rat. This study was carried out at Kerman University of Medical Science, Kerman, Iran from October 2004 to February 2005. Three groups of male wistar rats (control, vehicle, diabetic) weighing 200-250 g were used. Diabetic state was induced by intraperitoneal injection of 45 mg/kg streptozotocin. Animals were anesthetized by intraperitoneal (IP) injection of 50 mg/kg thiopental sodium. After tracheostomy and laparatomy, a balloon was inserted into the stomach, which was attached to a pressure transducer system via a cannula and this whole system was connected to a physiograph. Acetylcholine (Ach) was the stimulant agent which was used intraperitoneally. There was no significant difference between basal intragastric pressures in three groups. Also there was no significant difference in the basal and Ach-stimulated intragastric pressure among the three groups. But Ach-stimulated intragastric pressure was more than the basal state in each group (control 28.3+-1.77 vs 14+-1.4, vehicle 30.8+-2.03 vs 15.9+-1.56 and diabetic 30.6+-0.05 vs 13.7+-0.84 mmHg). Although it has been shown that diabetes can change gastric acid and pepsin secretion in rats, no significant change in gastric motility could be shown. (author)

  13. Motility modes of the parasite Trypanosoma brucei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Fatma Zeynep; Qu, Zijie; McAllaster, Michael; de Graffenried, Christopher; Breuer, Kenneth

    2015-11-01

    The parasitic single-celled protozoan Trypanosoma brucei causes African Sleeping Sickness, which is a fatal disease in humans and animals that threatens more than 60 million people in 36 African countries. Cell motility plays a critical role in the developmental phases and dissemination of the parasite. Unlike many other motile cells such as bacteria Escherichia coli or Caulobacter crescentus, the flagellum of T. brucei is attached along the length of its awl-like body, producing a unique mode of motility that is not fully understood or characterized. Here, we report on the motility of T. brucei, which swims using its single flagellum employing both rotating and undulating propulsion modes. We tracked cells in real-time in three dimensions using fluorescent microscopy. Data obtained from experiments using both short-term tracking within the field of view and long-term tracking using a tracking microscope were analyzed. Motility modes and swimming speed were analyzed as functions of cell size, rotation rate and undulation pattern. Research supported by NSF.

  14. Membrane carbonic anhydrase (IV) and ciliary epithelium. Carbonic anhydrase activity is present in the basolateral membranes of the non-pigmented ciliary epithelium of rabbit eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, H; Murakami, M; Wynns, G C; Conroy, C W; Mead, A; Maren, T H; Sears, M L

    1996-04-01

    Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors (CAIs) lower intraocular pressure by reducing aqueous flow. It has been thought that this pharmacologic reduction of aqueous flow is mediated by the ciliary epithelium, but it is not known whether this cellular action is effected by inhibition of the membranal (CA IV) and/or cytosolic (CA II) carbonic anhydrases of the ciliary epithelium. The isolated ciliary epithelial bilayer maintains its anatomic and functional polarity and generates a transepithelial potential difference (TEP) in an Ussing type chamber. Depletion of HCO3-, accomplished either with an HCO3(-)-free solution bathing the epithelial bilayer, or, with addition of freely permeant CAIs to HCO3(-)-containing media, (from either the PE or NPE side of the bilayer) depolarizes the preparation. Addition of CAIs to an HCO3(-)-depleted preparation has no further effect, indicating the specific action of the CAIs. The CAI, 2-p-NH2 benzenesulfonamido-1,3,4,-thiadiazole-5-SO2NH2, linked to polybutadiene maleic acid yields an impermeant polymer of 20000 Da with no loss of activity. At 45 microM this impermeant polymer caused a 60% increase in the SCC, seen only when the compound was applied to the NPE side of the bilayer. This latter result indicates an effect from inhibition of CA IV in the basolateral membranes of the NPE. Thus there are probably two different cellular actions of CAIs upon the ciliary epithelium to reduce aqueous inflow, cytoplasmic and membranal. The action of NPE basolateral membranal CA IV is probably linked to the chloride/bicarbonate exchanger. PMID:8795459

  15. 氯波必利生物黏附型缓释片对实验性胃溃疡和胃肠动力障碍的作用研究%Study on Effects of Clebopride Bioadhesive Sustained-release Tablets on Experimental Gastric Ulcer and Gastrointestinal Motility Disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾春莲; 徐雄波; 张青松; 刘鹰; 刘卫平; 马宁

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To study the effects of Clebopride(CBP)bioadhensive sustained-release tablets on experimental gas-tric ulcer and gastrointestinal motility disorder. METHODS:Gastric ulcer rat model was induced by ethanol and aspirin,and then divided into model group (normal saline),common tablet (CBP tablet 0.072 mg/kg) and sustained-release tablet high-dose and low-dose groups (CBP bioadhensive sustained-release tablet 0.072,0.036 mg/kg);normal rats were included in normal control group (normal saline);they were given relevant medicine intragastrically,twice a day for sustained-release tablet,three times a day for other. Ulcer area were observed 2 and 4 days after medication to calculate healing rate of ulcer(n=6). Gastrointestinal mo-tility disorder mice model was induced by atropine,and then divided into model group (normal saline),common tablet group (CBP tablet 0.1 mg/kg)and sustained-release tablet high-dose,medium-dose and low-dose groups(CBP bioadhensive sustained-re-lease tablet 0.1,0.05,0.025 mg/kg);normal mice were included in normal control group(normal saline);they were given rele-vant medicine intragastrically,once a day,for consecutive 3 days. The rate of gastric emptying and small intestinal propulsion were detected (n=6). RESULTS:Compared with normal control group,ulcer area of rats increased in model group;compared with model group,that of rats decreased in common tablet group and sustained-release tablet high-dose,low-dose groups,with statisti-cal significance (P<0.01);healing rates of gastric ulcer were 32.35%-48.24% 2 days after medication,and those were above 70% 4 days after medication. Compared with normal control group,the rate of gastric emptying and small intestinal propulsion in mice decreased in model group;compared with model group,those of mice increased in common tablet group and sustained-re-lease tablet high-dose,medium-dose,low-dose groups. The effects of sustained-release tablet high-dose and medium-dose groups were better than that of

  16. Optical Investigations of Endothelial Cell Motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossen, Ninna Struck

    A monolayer of endothelial cells lines the entire circulatory system and create a barrier between the circulatory system and the tissues. To create and maintain an intact barrier, the individual cells have to connect tightly with their neighbors, which causes a highly correlated motion between the...... cells within the monolayer. The cells have to maintain this barrier while apoptotic cells are being replaced and even while new blood vessels are being created. Meanwhile they are constantly exposed to a shear stress from the ow of blood through the vessels. These extreme micro-environmental conditions...... knowledge of endothelial cells and cell motility; Part 2 describes the projects conducted with twodimensional motility; and Part 3 describes the projects conducted with three-dimensional motility. The projects described in Part 2 all relate the endothelial cells' ability to maintain a barrier, both while...

  17. A Case of Incomplete Central Retinal Artery Occlusion Associated with Short Posterior Ciliary Artery Occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Makino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To our knowledge, incomplete central retinal artery occlusion associated with short posterior ciliary artery occlusion is extremely rare. Herein, we describe a case of a 62-year-old man who was referred to our hospital with of transient blindness in his right eye. At initial examination, the patient’s best-corrected visual acuity was 18/20 in the right eye. Fundus examination showed multiple soft exudates around the optic disc and mild macular retinal edema in his right eye; however, a cherry red spot on the macula was not detected. Fluorescein angiography revealed delayed dye inflow into the nasal choroidal hemisphere that is supplied by the short posterior ciliary artery. The following day, the patient’s visual acuity improved to 20/20. Soft exudates around the optic disc increased during observation and gradually disappeared. His hemodynamic parameters revealed subclavian steal syndrome as examined by cervical ultrasonography and digital subtraction angiography. We speculate that his transient blindness was due to ophthalmic artery spasms. In this particular case, spasms of the ophthalmic artery and occlusion of the short posterior ciliary artery occurred simultaneously. As the short posterior ciliary artery branches from the ophthalmic artery, the anatomical location of the lesion might be near the branching of both arteries.

  18. Characterization of a putative acetylcholine receptor in chick ciliary ganglion neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies to the main immunogenic region on the alpha subunit of acetylcholine receptors in muscle and electric organ recognize membrane components in chick brain and ciliary ganglia that are candidates for the neuronal receptor. The component in chick brain has been purified by immunoaffinity chromatography. It specifically binds nicotine but not alpha-bungarotoxin, and can be affinity labeled with (3H)bromoacetylcholine. The cross-reacting component in ciliary ganglion neurons is concentrated in synaptic membrane, and can be modulated by exposure of the cells to cholinergic ligands in culture. The cross-reacting component in ciliary ganglion neurons is an integral membrane component that binds concanavalin A, and it is distinct from the alpha-bungarotoxin binding component. The acetylcholine receptor function in these neurons can be locked by affinity alkylation with bromoacetylcholine, indicating similarity in this respect to receptors from muscle and electric organ. Antisera raised against the partially purified component from chick brain also block receptor function on ciliary ganglion neurons. The subcellular distribution of the ganglion component in culture is assessed, and it is shown that approximately 2/3 of the cross-reacting components are intracellular; the majority of these seem not to be destined for insertion into the plasma membrane

  19. Multicenter analysis of body mass index, lung function, and sputum microbiology in primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maglione, Marco; Bush, Andrew; Nielsen, Kim G;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: No studies longitudinally, simultaneously assessed body mass index (BMI) and spirometry in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). METHODS: We determined BMI and spirometry in 158 PCD children and adolescents from London, UK (n = 75), Naples, Italy (n = 23) and Copenhagen, Denmark (n = 60) ...

  20. Ciliary muscle contraction force and trapezius muscle activity during manual tracking of a moving visual target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domkin, Dmitry; Forsman, Mikael; Richter, Hans O

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have shown an association of visual demands during near work and increased activity of the trapezius muscle. Those studies were conducted under stationary postural conditions with fixed gaze and artificial visual load. The present study investigated the relationship between ciliary muscle contraction force and trapezius muscle activity across individuals during performance of a natural dynamic motor task under free gaze conditions. Participants (N=11) tracked a moving visual target with a digital pen on a computer screen. Tracking performance, eye refraction and trapezius muscle activity were continuously measured. Ciliary muscle contraction force was computed from eye accommodative response. There was a significant Pearson correlation between ciliary muscle contraction force and trapezius muscle activity on the tracking side (0.78, p<0.01) and passive side (0.64, p<0.05). The study supports the hypothesis that high visual demands, leading to an increased ciliary muscle contraction during continuous eye-hand coordination, may increase trapezius muscle tension and thus contribute to the development of musculoskeletal complaints in the neck-shoulder area. Further experimental studies are required to clarify whether the relationship is valid within each individual or may represent a general personal trait, when individuals with higher eye accommodative response tend to have higher trapezius muscle activity. PMID:26746010

  1. Continued administration of ciliary neurotrophic factor protects mice from inflammatory pathology in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlmann, Tanja; Remington, Leah; Cognet, Isabelle;

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that leads to loss of myelin and oligodendrocytes and damage to axons. We show that daily administration (days 8 to 24) of murine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a neurotrophic factor that has been described as a...

  2. A prefoldin-associated WD-repeat protein (WDR92) is required for the correct architectural assembly of motile cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel-King, Ramila S; King, Stephen M

    2016-04-15

    WDR92 is a highly conserved WD-repeat protein that has been proposed to be involved in apoptosis and also to be part of a prefoldin-like cochaperone complex. We found that WDR92 has a phylogenetic signature that is generally compatible with it playing a role in the assembly or function of specifically motile cilia. To test this hypothesis, we performed an RNAi-based knockdown of WDR92 gene expression in the planarianSchmidtea mediterraneaand were able to achieve a robust reduction in mRNA expression to levels undetectable under our standard RT-PCR conditions. We found that this treatment resulted in a dramatic reduction in the rate of organismal movement that was caused by a switch in the mode of locomotion from smooth, cilia-driven gliding to muscle-based, peristaltic contractions. Although the knockdown animals still assembled cilia of normal length and in similar numbers to controls, these structures had reduced beat frequency and did not maintain hydrodynamic coupling. By transmission electron microscopy we observed that many cilia had pleiomorphic defects in their architecture, including partial loss of dynein arms, incomplete closure of the B-tubule, and occlusion or replacement of the central pair complex by accumulated electron-dense material. These observations suggest that WDR92 is part of a previously unrecognized cytoplasmic chaperone system that is specifically required to fold key components necessary to build motile ciliary axonemes. PMID:26912790

  3. Local excision of ciliary body tumors:a long-term prospective cohort study in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI Wen-bin; YANG Wen-li; HU Shi-min; LI Bin

    2008-01-01

    Background Ciliary body tumors are usually difficult to diagnose and treat in early stages.However,treatment of such tumors has trended toward ocular conservation instead of enucleation.Local excision of ciliary body tumors has become effective with the development of the modern vitrectomy,but long-term outcomes are still not clear.Therefore,we reported the outcome of locally excised ciliary body tumors after long-term follow-up.Methods Twenty-two patients (22 eyes),who had been diagnosed with ciliary body tumors in Beijing Tongren Hospital from January 1996 to June 2001,were enrolled in this prospective cohort study.Localized lamellar sclera-ciliary excisions were performed.In some cases,vitrectomies,scleral graft transplantations,and further excisions of the anterior choroid were performed.Diagnoses were confirmed by histopathologic examination.Patients were followed from five to eleven years after surgery.Their visual acuity,intraocular pressure and local recurrence were recorded with descriptive percentages.Results After surgery,all patients maintained normal eyeball appearances.Six patients maintained circular pupils.The final best corrected visual acuities (BCVA) varied from 0.02-1.00,including 18 patients (81.82%) who had BCVA equal to or better than that before surgery.Fifteen patients (68.18%) had BCVA better than 0.3.Only two patients had intraocular pressure (IOP) of less than 10 mmHg and the other patients maintained normal IOP.Nine cases (40.91%) were given confirmed diagnosis of malignant melanoma,four (18.18%) of melanocytoma,six (27.27%) of nonpigmented ciliary epithelial adenoma,two (9.09%) of neurofibroma,and one (4.55%) of neurinoma.Twenty patients (90.91%) had no recurrence during the follow-up period.In one case melanocytoma recurred seven years after surgery and enucleation was performed.One patient,whose operation removed a malignant melanoma with a diameter of 16 mm,died of hepatic metastasis five years after the operation.Conclusion For

  4. Growth of the crabgrass species Digitaria ciliaris and Digitaria nuda Crescimento das espécies de capim-colchão Digitaria ciliaris e Digitaria nuda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Souza

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research paper was to compare the growth of D. ciliaris and D. nuda crabgrass species under non-competitive conditions. To this end, two experiments were conducted, one from March - July 2010 and the other from February - June 2011. The experimental design of both trials was completely randomized making a factorial (2 seasons x 2 species crabgrass x 12 evaluation periods with four replications. Assessments began at 15 days after sowing (DAS, and repeated weekly until 92 DAS. The variables evaluated were total dry matter (roots+leaves+stems, leaf area, leaf number and tiller. The results were submitted to analysis of variance and the absolute growth rate, relative growth rate and leaf area ratio were calculated using the means, which were adjusted regression models. The crabgrass species were significantly different in leaf area, leaf number, tiller number and dry matter per plant. D. ciliaris for all variables was statistically higher than D. nuda. Regarding the speed at which the growth of the species occurred, the absolute growth rate and relative growth rate of D. ciliaris was also greater than D. nuda. In addition, D. ciliaris also had a lower leaf area ratio indicating greater efficiency in converting light energy into carbohydrates. It can be concluded that D. ciliaris has a higher growth rate in conditions where there is no limitation of nutrients and water availability in relation to D. nuda, mainly due to D. ciliaris have greater leaf area, number of leaves and dry matter accumulation per plant.O objetivo da presente pesquisa foi comparar o crescimento das espécies de capim colchão D. ciliaris e D. nuda, em condições não-competitivas. Para isso, foram conduzidos dois experimentos, um de março a julho de 2010 e outro de fevereiro a junho de 2011. O delineamento experimental de ambos os ensaios foi inteiramente casualizado, perfazendo um esquema fatorial (2 épocas x 2 espécies de capim colchão x 12 períodos de

  5. LBP based detection of intestinal motility in WCE images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Giovanni; Granata, Eliana

    2011-03-01

    In this research study, a system to support medical analysis of intestinal contractions by processing WCE images is presented. Small intestine contractions are among the motility patterns which reveal many gastrointestinal disorders, such as functional dyspepsia, paralytic ileus, irritable bowel syndrome, bacterial overgrowth. The images have been obtained using the Wireless Capsule Endoscopy (WCE) technique, a patented, video colorimaging disposable capsule. Manual annotation of contractions is an elaborating task, since the recording device of the capsule stores about 50,000 images and contractions might represent only the 1% of the whole video. In this paper we propose the use of Local Binary Pattern (LBP) combined with the powerful textons statistics to find the frames of the video related to contractions. We achieve a sensitivity of about 80% and a specificity of about 99%. The achieved high detection accuracy of the proposed system has provided thus an indication that such intelligent schemes could be used as a supplementary diagnostic tool in endoscopy.

  6. Radionuclide examination of motility disorders of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scintigraphic results in relation to manometry obtained for normal subjects and patients with achalasia, diffuse esophageal spasm, systemic connective tissue diseases with esophageal involvement and reflux esophagitis are reported and discussed. In 17 patients with reflux esophagitis no relation could be found between the endoscopic grading and the persistence of activity in one or more regions of interest. Four out of 23 patients with abnormal results of a 24-h pH study and a normal manometry had abnormal results of a radionuclide study. This supports but does not prove the view of Russell et al. that radionuclide studies are more sensitive than manometry. A plea is made to study a larger group of patients using the same definitions and methods. 13 refs.; 5 figs.; 3 tabs

  7. Maintenance of motility bias during cyanobacterial phototaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Rosanna Man Wah; Ursell, Tristan; Wang, Shuo; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Bhaya, Devaki

    2015-04-01

    Signal transduction in bacteria is complex, ranging across scales from molecular signal detectors and effectors to cellular and community responses to stimuli. The unicellular, photosynthetic cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 transduces a light stimulus into directional movement known as phototaxis. This response occurs via a biased random walk toward or away from a directional light source, which is sensed by intracellular photoreceptors and mediated by Type IV pili. It is unknown how quickly cells can respond to changes in the presence or directionality of light, or how photoreceptors affect single-cell motility behavior. In this study, we use time-lapse microscopy coupled with quantitative single-cell tracking to investigate the timescale of the cellular response to various light conditions and to characterize the contribution of the photoreceptor TaxD1 (PixJ1) to phototaxis. We first demonstrate that a community of cells exhibits both spatial and population heterogeneity in its phototactic response. We then show that individual cells respond within minutes to changes in light conditions, and that movement directionality is conferred only by the current light directionality, rather than by a long-term memory of previous conditions. Our measurements indicate that motility bias likely results from the polarization of pilus activity, yielding variable levels of movement in different directions. Experiments with a photoreceptor (taxD1) mutant suggest a supplementary role of TaxD1 in enhancing movement directionality, in addition to its previously identified role in promoting positive phototaxis. Motivated by the behavior of the taxD1 mutant, we demonstrate using a reaction-diffusion model that diffusion anisotropy is sufficient to produce the observed changes in the pattern of collective motility. Taken together, our results establish that single-cell tracking can be used to determine the factors that affect motility bias, which can then be coupled with

  8. Glucagon-like peptide-1 gastrointestinal regulatory role in metabolism and motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, Per M

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) motility, primarily gastric emptying, balances the hormonal output that takes place after food intake in order to maintain stable blood sugar. The incretin hormones, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP), work together to reduce postprandial hyperglycemia by glucose-dependent insulin secretion and inhibition of glucagon release, as well as inhibition of GI motility and gastric emptying. GLP-1 is considered the more effective of the two incretins due to its additional inhibitory effects on GI motility. It is observed that patients on treatment with GLP-1 analogues or exenatide achieve a considerable weight loss during treatment. This is of benefit to improve insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. Furthermore, weight loss per se is of considerable benefit in an even longer health perspective. The weight loss is considered to be due to the inhibition of GI motility. This effect has been studied in animal experimentation, and from there taken to involve studies on GI motility in healthy volunteers and patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Evolving to a phase II study in IBS, the GLP-1 analogue (ROSE-010) was recently shown to be effective for treatment of acute pain attacks in IBS. Taken together, data speak in favor of GI motility as a central component not only in metabolic disorders but also in IBS, be it due to a direct relaxing effect on GI smooth muscle or a slow emptying of gastric contents resulting in a less outspoken nutritional demand on hormonal regulatory functions in the GI tract. PMID:21094906

  9. Multi-Scale Motility Amplitude Associated with Suicidal Thoughts in Major Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Premananda Indic; Greg Murray; Carlo Maggini; Mario Amore; Tiziana Meschi; Loris Borghi; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Paola Salvatore

    2012-01-01

    Major depression occurs at high prevalence in the general population, often starts in juvenile years, recurs over a lifetime, and is strongly associated with disability and suicide. Searches for biological markers in depression may have been hindered by assuming that depression is a unitary and relatively homogeneous disorder, mainly of mood, rather than addressing particular, clinically crucial features or diagnostic subtypes. Many studies have implicated quantitative alterations of motility...

  10. The Complex of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor-Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Receptor α Up-Regulates Connexin43 and Intercellular Coupling in Astrocytes via the Janus Tyrosine Kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription PathwayD⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Ozog, Mark A.; Bernier, Suzanne M; Bates, Dave C.; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Lo, Cecilia W.; Naus, Christian C.G.

    2004-01-01

    Cytokines regulate numerous cell processes, including connexin expression and gap junctional coupling. In this study, we examined the effect of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on connexin43 (Cx43) expression and intercellular coupling in astrocytes. Murine cortical astrocytes matured in vitro were treated with CNTF (20 ng/ml), soluble ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor α (CNTFRα) (200 ng/ml), or CNTF-CNTFRα. Although CNTF and CNTFRα alone had no effect on Cx43 expression, the heterodimer...

  11. Real-time gastric motility monitoring using transcutaneous intraluminal impedance measurements (TIIM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poscente, M D; Wang, G; Filip, D; Ninova, P; Yadid-Pecht, O; Andrews, C N; Mintchev, M P

    2014-02-01

    The stomach plays a critical role in digestion, processing ingested food mechanically and breaking it up into particles, which can be effectively and efficiently processed by the intestines. When the motility of the stomach is compromised, digestion is adversely affected. This can lead to a variety of disorders. Current diagnostic techniques for gastric motility disorders are seriously lacking, and are based more on eliminating other possibilities rather than on specific tests. Presently, gastric motility can be assessed by monitoring gastric emptying, food transit, intragastric pressures, etc. The associated tests are usually stationary and of relatively short duration. The present study proposes a new method of measuring gastric motility, utilizing the attenuation of an oscillator-induced electrical signal across the gastric tissue, which is modulated by gastric contractions. The induced high-frequency oscillator signal is generated within the stomach, and is picked up transluminally by cutaneous electrodes positioned on the abdominal area connected to a custom-designed data acquisition instrument. The proposed method was implemented in two different designs: first a transoral catheter was modified to emit the signal inside the stomach; and second, a gastric retentive pill was designed to emit the signal. Both implementations were applied in vivo on two mongrel dogs (25.50 kg and 25.75 kg). Gastric contractions were registered and quantitatively compared to recordings from force transducers sutured onto the serosa of the stomach. Gastric motility indices were calculated for each minute, with transluminal impedance measurements and the measurements from the force transducers showing statistically significant (p impedance measurement has the potential with further research and development to become a useful diagnostic technique. PMID:24398539

  12. Real-time gastric motility monitoring using transcutaneous intraluminal impedance measurements (TIIM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stomach plays a critical role in digestion, processing ingested food mechanically and breaking it up into particles, which can be effectively and efficiently processed by the intestines. When the motility of the stomach is compromised, digestion is adversely affected. This can lead to a variety of disorders. Current diagnostic techniques for gastric motility disorders are seriously lacking, and are based more on eliminating other possibilities rather than on specific tests. Presently, gastric motility can be assessed by monitoring gastric emptying, food transit, intragastric pressures, etc. The associated tests are usually stationary and of relatively short duration. The present study proposes a new method of measuring gastric motility, utilizing the attenuation of an oscillator-induced electrical signal across the gastric tissue, which is modulated by gastric contractions. The induced high-frequency oscillator signal is generated within the stomach, and is picked up transluminally by cutaneous electrodes positioned on the abdominal area connected to a custom-designed data acquisition instrument. The proposed method was implemented in two different designs: first a transoral catheter was modified to emit the signal inside the stomach; and second, a gastric retentive pill was designed to emit the signal. Both implementations were applied in vivo on two mongrel dogs (25.50 kg and 25.75 kg). Gastric contractions were registered and quantitatively compared to recordings from force transducers sutured onto the serosa of the stomach. Gastric motility indices were calculated for each minute, with transluminal impedance measurements and the measurements from the force transducers showing statistically significant (p < 0.05) Pearson correlation coefficients (0.65 ± 0.08 for the catheter-based design and 0.77 ± 0.03 for the gastric retentive pill design). These results show that transcutaneous intraluminal impedance measurement has the potential with further research

  13. Effect of cAMP on short-circuit current in isolated human ciliary body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Ren-yi; MA Ning; HU Qian-qian

    2013-01-01

    Background Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) could activate chloride channels in bovine ciliary body and trigger an increase in the ionic current (short-circuit current,Isc) across the ciliary processes in pigs.The purpose of this study was to investigate how cAMP modulates Isc in isolated human ciliary processes and the possible involvement of chloride transport across the tissue in cAMP-induced Isc change.Methods In an Ussing-type chamber system,the Isc changes induced by the cAMP analogue 8-bromo-cAMP and an adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin in isolated human ciliary processes were assessed.The involvement of Cl-component in the bath solution was investigated.The effect of Cl-channel (10 μmol/L niflumic acid and 1 mmol/L 4,4′-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid (DIDS)),K+ channel (10 mmol/L tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA)),or Na+ channel blockers (1 mmol/L amiloride) on 8-bromo-cAMP-induced Isc change was also studied.Results Dose-dependently,8-bromo-cAMP (10 nmol/L-30 μmol/L) or forskolin (10 nmol/L-3 μmol/L) increased Isc across the ciliary processes with an increase in negative potential difference on the non-pigmented epithelium (NPE) side of the tissue.Isc increase induced by 8-bromo-cAMP was more pronounced when the drug was applied on the NPE side than on the pigmented epithelium side.When the tissue was bathed in low Cl-solutions,the Isc increase was significantly inhibited.Finally,niflumic acid and DIDS,but not TEA or amiloride,significantly prevented the Isc increase induced by 8-bromo-cAMP.Conclusions cAMP stimulates stroma-to-aqueous anionic transport in isolated human ciliary processes.Chloride is likely to be among the ions,the transportation of which across the tissue is triggered by cAMP,suggesting the potential role of cAMP in the process of aqueous humor formation in human eyes.

  14. Bardet–Biedl syndrome proteins 1 and 3 regulate the ciliary trafficking of polycystic kidney disease 1 protein

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Xuefeng; Driscoll, Kaitlin; Yao, Gang; Raed, Anas; Wu, Maoqing; Beales, Philip L.; Zhou, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Bardet–Biedl syndrome (BBS) and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) are two genetically distinct ciliopathies but share common phenotypes such as renal cysts. Seven BBS proteins form a complex called the BBSome which is localized at the basal body or ciliary axoneme and regulates the ciliary entry or flagellar exit of several signaling molecules. Here, we demonstrate that, unlike the seven-span somatostatin receptor 3 or the leptin receptor that interacts with all subunits of...

  15. Renin-angiotensin system expression and secretory function in cultured human ciliary body non-pigmented epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Cullinane, A B; Leung, P S; Ortego, J.; Coca-Prados, M; Harvey, B J

    2002-01-01

    Background: Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) components have been identified in human ciliary body and aqueous humour, pointing to a role for the RAS in the regulation of aqueous humour dynamics. Here, the authors examine the functional expression of a RAS and the effects of angiotensin II (AII) on a signal transduction pathway and ion secretion mechanism in cultured human ciliary body non-pigmented epithelium (HNPE).

  16. Voltage-gated potassium channel Kvl.3 in rabbit ciliary epithelium regulates the membrane potential via coupling intracellular calcium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan-feng; ZHUO Ye-hong; BI Wei-na; BAI Yu-jing; LI Yan-na; WANG Zhi-jian

    2008-01-01

    Background The cell layer of the ciliary epithelium is responsible for aqueous humor secretion and maintenance.Ion channels play an important role in these processes.The main aim of this study was to determine whether the well-characterized members of the Kvl family (Kv1.3) contribute to the Kv currents in ciliary epithelium.Methods New Zealand White rabbits were maintained in a 12 hours light/dark cycle.Ciliary epithelium samples were isolated from the rabbits.We used Western blotting and immunocytochemistry to identify the expression and location of a voltage-gated potassium channel Kvl.3 in ciliary body epithelium.Membrane potential change after adding of Kv1.3 inhibitor margatoxin (MgTX) was observed with a fluorescence method.Results Western blotting and immunocytochemical studies showed that the Kv1.3 protein expressed in pigment ciliary epithelium and nonpigment ciliary epithelium,however it seemed to express more in the apical membrane of the nonpigmented epithelial cells.One nmol/L margatoxin,a specific inhibitor of Kv1.3 channels caused depolarization of the cultured nonpigmented epithelium (NPE) membrane potential.The cytosotic calcium increased after NPE cell depolarization,this increase of cytosolic calcium was partially blocked by 12.5 μmol/L dantrolene and 10 μmol/L nifedipine.These observations suggest that Kv1.3 channels modulate ciliary epithelium potential and effect calcium dependent mechanisms.Conclusion Kv1.3 channels contribute to K+ efflux at the membrane of rabbit ciliary epithelium.

  17. Relationship of Total Motile Sperm Count and Percentage Motile Sperm to Successful Pregnancy Rates Following Intrauterine Insemination

    OpenAIRE

    Pasqualotto, Eleonora B.; Daitch, James A.; Hendin, Benjamin N.; Falcone, Tommaso; Thomas, Anthony J.; Nelson, David R; Agarwal, Ashok

    1999-01-01

    Purpose:This study sought (i) to investigate the relationship between postwash total motile sperm count and postwash percentage motile sperm in predicting successful intrauterine insemination and (ii) to determine the minimal postwash total motile sperm count required to achieve pregnancy with intrauterine insemination.

  18. Bacterial motility in the sea and its ecological implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossart, Hans-Peter; Riemann, Lasse; Azam, F.

    2001-01-01

    heterotrophic nanoflagellates. However, it was positively related with particulate organic carbon throughout diel sampling on 24 to 26 September 1997. During a mesocosm diatom bloom % motile rose sharply as the bloom crashed, suggesting algal detritus may elicit motility. Enhanced % motile resulted in increased...... colonization of living and dead algal cells by bacteria. Filtering seawater through a 1 µm filter reduced % motile, again suggesting the importance of particulate loci. Enrichment with dissolved organic nutrients enhanced % motile only after 6 h but it rapidly (=1 h) increased the time individual bacteria were...

  19. New advances in gastrointestinal motility research

    CERN Document Server

    Pullan, A; Farrugia, G

    2013-01-01

    Research into gastrointestinal motility has received renewed interest in part due to recent advances in the techniques for measuring the structure and function of gastrointestinal cells, tissue and organs. The integration of this wealth of data into biophysically based computation models can aid in interpretation of experimental and clinical measurements and the refinement of measurement techniques. The contents of this book span multiple scales - from cell, tissue, organ, to whole body and is divided into four broad sections covering: i) gastrointestinal cellular activity and tissue structure; (ii) techniques for measuring, analyzing and visualizing high-resolution extra-cellular recordings; (iii) methods for sensing gastroelectrical activity using non-invasive bio-electro-magnetic fields and for modulating the underlying gastric electrical activity, and finally; (iv) methods for assessing manometric and videographic motility patterns and the application of these data for predicting the flow and mixing behav...

  20. Symbiosis and the origin of eukaryotic motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulis, L.; Hinkle, G.

    1991-01-01

    Ongoing work to test the hypothesis of the origin of eukaryotic cell organelles by microbial symbioses is discussed. Because of the widespread acceptance of the serial endosymbiotic theory (SET) of the origin of plastids and mitochondria, the idea of the symbiotic origin of the centrioles and axonemes for spirochete bacteria motility symbiosis was tested. Intracellular microtubular systems are purported to derive from symbiotic associations between ancestral eukaryotic cells and motile bacteria. Four lines of approach to this problem are being pursued: (1) cloning the gene of a tubulin-like protein discovered in Spirocheata bajacaliforniesis; (2) seeking axoneme proteins in spirochets by antibody cross-reaction; (3) attempting to cultivate larger, free-living spirochetes; and (4) studying in detail spirochetes (e.g., Cristispira) symbiotic with marine animals. Other aspects of the investigation are presented.

  1. Hydrodynamic Contributions to Amoeboid Cell Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Owen; Guy, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Understanding the methods by which cells move is a fundamental problem in modern biology. Recent evidence has shown that the fluid dynamics of cytoplasm can play a vital role in cellular motility. The slime mold Physarum polycephalum provides an excellent model organism for the study of amoeboid motion. In this research, we use a simply analytic model in conjuction with computational experiments to investigate intracellular fluid flow in a simple model of Physarum. Of particlar interest are stresses generated by cytoplasmic flow which may be used to aid in cellular motility. In our numerical model, the Immersed Boundary Method is used to account for such stresses. We investigate the relationship between contraction waves, flow waves, adhesion, and locomotive forces in an attempt to characterize conditions necessary to generate directed motion.

  2. Barriers to bacterial motility on unsaturated surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Smets, Barth F.

    2013-01-01

    characterized by complex 3D geometry and variable hydration. To approach these questions we take advantage of the Porous Surface Model (PSM) a unique experimental platform that allows direct monitoring of microbial motion under precisely controlled matric potential. Using gfp-tagged Pseudomonas strains and......Our knowledge of the spatial organization and spatial dynamics of microbial populations in soil at a scale close to that of the microorganisms is scarce. While passive dispersal via water ow or soil biota is probably a major dispersal route, it is reasonable to consider that active dispersal also...... contributes to microbial spatial dynamics. In bacteria, active dispersal is enabled by a diversity of appendages and, in the case of swarming motility, by the secretion of surface active biomolecules. It is however unclear to which degree di_erent types of motility can take place in the soil pores, a habitat...

  3. Automated measurement of cell motility and proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goff Julie

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Time-lapse microscopic imaging provides a powerful approach for following changes in cell phenotype over time. Visible responses of whole cells can yield insight into functional changes that underlie physiological processes in health and disease. For example, features of cell motility accompany molecular changes that are central to the immune response, to carcinogenesis and metastasis, to wound healing and tissue regeneration, and to the myriad developmental processes that generate an organism. Previously reported image processing methods for motility analysis required custom viewing devices and manual interactions that may introduce bias, that slow throughput, and that constrain the scope of experiments in terms of the number of treatment variables, time period of observation, replication and statistical options. Here we describe a fully automated system in which images are acquired 24/7 from 384 well plates and are automatically processed to yield high-content motility and morphological data. Results We have applied this technology to study the effects of different extracellular matrix compounds on human osteoblast-like cell lines to explore functional changes that may underlie processes involved in bone formation and maintenance. We show dose-response and kinetic data for induction of increased motility by laminin and collagen type I without significant effects on growth rate. Differential motility response was evident within 4 hours of plating cells; long-term responses differed depending upon cell type and surface coating. Average velocities were increased approximately 0.1 um/min by ten-fold increases in laminin coating concentration in some cases. Comparison with manual tracking demonstrated the accuracy of the automated method and highlighted the comparative imprecision of human tracking for analysis of cell motility data. Quality statistics are reported that associate with stage noise, interference by non

  4. Serum Response Factor (SRF mediated gene activity in physiological and pathological processes of neuronal motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Knoll

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the transcription factor SRF (serum response factor was shown to contribute to various physiological processes linked to neuronal motility. The latter include cell migration, axon guidance and e.g. synapse function relying on cytoskeletal dynamics, neurite outgrowth, axonal and dendritic differentiation, growth cone motility and neurite branching. SRF teams up with MRTFs (myocardin related transcription factors and TCFs (ternary complex factors to mediate cellular actin cytoskeletal dynamics and the immediate-early gene (IEG response, a bona fide indicator of neuronal activation. Herein, I will discuss how SRF and cofactors might modulate physiological processes of neuronal motility. Further, potential mechanisms engaged by neurite growth promoting molecules and axon guidance cues to target SRF’s transcriptional machinery in physiological neuronal motility will be presented. Of note, altered cytoskeletal dynamics and rapid initiation of an IEG response are a hallmark of injured neurons in various neurological disorders. Thus, SRF and its MRTF and TCF cofactors might emerge as a novel trio modulating peripheral and central axon regeneration.

  5. Downstream collecting in ciliary suspension feeders: the catch-up principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgård, Hans Ulrik; Nielsen, Claus; Larsen, Poul Scheel

    2000-01-01

    Based on observations of feeding structures and currents in the polychaete Spirorbis tridentatus, the entoproct Loxosoma pectinaricola and the cycliophore Symbion pandora, which all possess compound cilia, it is hypothesized that their capture mechanism is based on the catch-up principle. According...... to this principle, the compound cilia constitute the pump which generates a flow with suspended particles that enters the ciliary region. In this region the same cilia, during their power stroke, catch up with suspended particles and transfer the particles to a food groove, or a mouth cavity. In the...... the ciliary bands of some rotifers and of the various types of trochophora larvae of annelids, molluscs and entoprocts, it is hypothesized that the feeding mechanisms of these organisms are based on the catch-up principle....

  6. Ciliary and mucus-net filter feeding, with special reference to fluid mechanical characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, C.B.; Kiørboe, Thomas; Møhlenberg, F.;

    1984-01-01

    Filter characteristics were determined and compared in ciliary and mucus-net filter feeders. The ciliary feeders include the polychaete Sabella penicillus, the brachiopod Terebratulina retusa, the marine bivalves Monia squama, Cardium glaucum, and Petricola pholadiformis, and the freshwater...... bivalves Dreissena polymorpha, Unio pictorum and Anodonta cygnea. The mucus-net feeders are the polychaete Chaetopterus variopedatus, the gastropod Crepidula fornicata and the ascidians Styela clava, Ciona intestinalis, Ascidia virginea, A. obliqua and A. mentula. Efficiencies of particle retention as a...... function of particle size was determined by counting of particles in samples of inhalant and exhalant water. The lower threshold for efficient particle retention varied from .apprx. 6 .mu.m in T. retuso to .apprx. 1 .mu.m in D. polymorpha. Mucus nets efficiently retained particles down to 1-2 .mu.m. Filter...

  7. Barriers to bacterial motility on unsaturated surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Smets, Barth F

    2013-01-01

    Our knowledge of the spatial organization and spatial dynamics of microbial populations in soil at a scale close to that of the microorganisms is scarce. While passive dispersal via water ow or soil biota is probably a major dispersal route, it is reasonable to consider that active dispersal also contributes to microbial spatial dynamics. In bacteria, active dispersal is enabled by a diversity of appendages and, in the case of swarming motility, by the secretion of surface active biomolecules...

  8. Asian Motility Studies in Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Oh Young

    2010-01-01

    Altered motility remains one of the important pathophysiologic factors in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) who commonly complain of abdominal pain and stool changes such as diarrhea and constipation. The prevalence of IBS has increased among Asian populations these days. Gastrointestinal (GI) physiology may vary between Asian and Western populations because of differences in diets, socio-cultural backgrounds, and genetic factors. The characteristics and differences of GI dysmotili...

  9. Swimming Motility Reduces Deposition to Silica Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Nanxi [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Massoudieh, Arash [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Liang, Xiaomeng [The Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States); Hu, Dehong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kamai, Tamir [Agricultural Research Organization, Bet Dagan (Israel); Ginn, Timothy R. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Zilles, Julie L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Nguyen, Thanh H. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The role of swimming motility on bacterial transport and fate in porous media was evaluated. We present microscopic evidence showing that strong swimming motility reduces attachment of Azotobacter vinelandii cells to silica surfaces. Applying global and cluster statistical analyses to microscopic videos taken under non-flow conditions, wild type, flagellated A. vinelandii strain DJ showed strong swimming ability with an average speed of 13.1 μm/s, DJ77 showed impaired swimming averaged at 8.7 μm/s, and both the non-flagellated JZ52 and chemically treated DJ cells were non-motile. Quantitative analyses of trajectories observed at different distances above the collector of a radial stagnation point flow cell (RSPF) revealed that both swimming and non-swimming cells moved with the flow when at a distance of at least 20 μm from the collector surface. Near the surface, DJ cells showed both horizontal and vertical movement diverging them from reaching surfaces, while chemically treated DJ cells moved with the flow to reach surfaces, suggesting that strong swimming reduced attachment. In agreement with the RSPF results, the deposition rates obtained for two-dimensional multiple-collector micromodels were also lowest for DJ, while DJ77 and JZ52 showed similar values. Strong swimming specifically reduced deposition on the upstream surfaces of the micromodel collectors.

  10. Conditional, genetic disruption of ciliary neurotrophic factor receptors reveals a role in adult motor neuron survival

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Nancy; Robitz, Rachel; Zurbrugg, Rebekah J; Karpman, Adam M; Mahler, Ashley M.; Cronier, Samantha A.; Vesey, Rachel; Spearry, Rachel P.; Zolotukhin, Sergei; MacLennan, A. John

    2008-01-01

    Indirect evidence suggests that endogenous ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) receptor signaling can promote motor neuron (MN) survival in the adult. If so, proper targeting of this signaling may selectively counteract the effects of adult MN diseases. However, direct evidence for CNTF receptor involvement in adult MN survival is lacking, presumably because the unconditional blockade of the mouse CNTF receptor in vivo [through genetic disruption of the essential CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα) gene]...

  11. Circulating levels of ciliary neurotrophic factor in normal pregnancy and preeclampsia

    OpenAIRE

    Akahori, Yoichiro; Takamoto, Norio; Masumoto,Akio; Inoue,Seiji; Nakatsukasa, Hideki; MASUYAMA, HISASHI; Hiramatsu,Yuji

    2010-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has been shown to decrease food intake in mouse models of obesity and to improve insulin sensitivity. It is well known that tight regulation of glucose metabolism is essential for successful gestational outcomes (e.g. fetal growth), and that abnormal insulin resistance is associated with preeclampsia (PE). To investigate the possibility that CNTF might be involved in the regulation of insulin resistance during pregnancy, circulating levels of CNTF w...

  12. Ciliary neurotrophic factor has intrinsic and extrinsic roles in regulating B cell differentiation and bone structure.

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Askmyr; White, Kirby E; Tanja Jovic; King, Hannah A.; Quach, Julie M.; Maluenda, Ana C.; Baker, Emma K; Smeets, Monique F.; Walkley, Carl R.; Purton, Louise E.

    2015-01-01

    The gp130 receptor and its binding partners play a central role in cytokine signalling. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is one of the cytokines that signals through the gp130 receptor complex. CNTF has previously been shown to be a negative regulator of trabecular bone remodelling and important for motor neuron development. Since haematopoietic cell maintenance and differentiation is dependent on the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment, where cells of the osteoblastic lineage are important r...

  13. Expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor and its receptor in experimental obstructive nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Byoung-Seung; Choi, Jae-Youn; Cha, Jung-Ho

    2011-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is well known as a growth/survival factor of neuronal tissue. We investigated the expression of CNTF and its specific receptor alpha (CNTFRα) in a unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) model. Complete UUO was produced by left ureteral ligation in Sprague-Dawley rats. The animals were sacrificed on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, 21, and 28 after UUO. The kidneys were fixed, and processed for both immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. CNTF immunoreactivity in ...

  14. Perivascular Cells Increase Expression of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Following Partial Denervation of the Rat Neurohypophysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lo, David; SunRhodes, Neil; Watt, John A.

    2008-01-01

    The expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) was investigated immunocytochemically during the axonal degeneration and collateral axonal sprouting response that follows partial denervation of the rat neurohypophysis. A significant increase in the number of CNTF-immunoreactive (CNTF-ir) cells was observed in the neurohypophysis of partially denervated animals compared to age-matched sham-operated controls by 5 days post-denervation, remaining elevated throughout the 30 day post denervat...

  15. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide Induction by Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor in Donor Human Corneal Endothelium in situ

    OpenAIRE

    Koh, Shay-Whey M.; Guo, Yan; Bernstein, Steve L.; Waschek, James A.; Liu, Xiuhuai; Symes, Aviva J

    2007-01-01

    After peripheral nerve axotomy, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) gene expression is upregulated in neurons, whereas ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) accumulates extracellularly at the lesion site. Although CNTF-induced VIP gene expression has been reported in cultured sympathetic neurons and neuroblastoma cells, it still remains to be determined if CNTF and VIP play interrelated roles in nerve injury. The corneal endothelium, like sympathetic neurons, derives from the neural crest. Previ...

  16. Ciliary neurotrophic factor coordinately activates transcription of neuropeptide genes in a neuroblastoma cell line.

    OpenAIRE

    Symes, A.J.; Rao, M S; Lewis, S. E.; Landis, S C; Hyman, S E; Fink, J S

    1993-01-01

    Differentiation factors have been identified that influence the phenotype of sympathetic neurons by altering expression of classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides. Investigation of the molecular mechanisms through which such factors act would be facilitated by the availability of a neuronal cell line that responds to these factors in a fashion similar to sympathetic neurons. We have identified a human neuroblastoma cell line, NBFL, that responds to the differentiation factor ciliary neu...

  17. Crystal structure of dimeric human ciliary neurotrophic factor determined by MAD phasing.

    OpenAIRE

    McDonald, N. Q.; Panayotatos, N; Hendrickson, W A

    1995-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes the survival and differentiation of developing motor neurons and is a potential therapeutic for treating neurodegeneration and nerve injury. The crystal structure of human CNTF has been determined at 2.4 A resolution using multi-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) phasing from a single Yb3+ ions. The structure reveals that CNTF is dimeric, with a novel anti-parallel arrangement of the subunits, not previously observed for other cytokines. Each su...

  18. Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Protects Striatal Neurons against Excitotoxicity by Enhancing Glial Glutamate Uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Beurrier, Corinne; Faideau, Mathilde; Bennouar, Khaled-Ezaheir; Escartin, Carole; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia; Bonvento, Gilles; Gubellini, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a potent neuroprotective cytokine in different animal models of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity, although its action mechanisms are still poorly characterized. We tested the hypothesis that an increased function of glial glutamate transporters (GTs) could underlie CNTF-mediated neuroprotection. We show that neuronal loss induced by in vivo striatal injection of the excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QA) was significantly reduced (by ∼75%) in CNTF-treated anima...

  19. Ciliary neurotrophic factor prevents the degeneration of motor neurons in mouse mutant progressive motor neuronopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Sendtner, Michael; Stöckli, Kurt A.; Thoenen, Hans; Schmalbruch, H.; Carroll, P.; Kreutzberg, Georg W.

    2010-01-01

    CILIARY neurotrophic factor (CNTF) supports the survival of embryonic motor neurons in vitro and in vivo and prevents lesion-mediated degeneration of rat motor neuron~ during early post-natal stages. Here we report that CNTF greatly reduces all the functional and morphological changes in pmnlpmn mice5, an autosomal recessive mutant leading to progressive caudo-cranial motor neuron degeneration. The first manifestations of progressive motor neuronopathy in homozygous pmnl pmn mice become appar...

  20. Continued Administration of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Protects Mice from Inflammatory Pathology in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhlmann, Tanja; Remington, Leah; Cognet, Isabelle; Bourbonniere, Lyne; Zehntner, Simone; Guilhot, Florence; Herman, Alexandra; Guay-Giroux, Angélique; Antel, Jack P.; Owens, Trevor; Gauchat, Jean-François

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that leads to loss of myelin and oligodendrocytes and damage to axons. We show that daily administration (days 8 to 24) of murine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a neurotrophic factor that has been described as a survival and differentiation factor for neurons and oligodendrocytes, significantly ameliorates the clinical course of a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. In the acute phase of experimental autoimmune en...

  1. The relationship between ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) genotype and motor unit physiology: preliminary studies

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrell Robert; Hurley Ben; Roth Stephen; Stashuk Daniel; Ling Shari; Conwit Robin A; Metter E Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is important for neuronal and muscle development, and genetic variation in the CNTF gene has been associated with muscle strength. The effect of CNTF on nerve development suggests that CNTF genotype may be associated with force production via its influence on motor unit size and firing patterns. The purpose of this study is to examine whether CNTF genotype differentially affects motor unit activation in the vastus medialis with increasing...

  2. Ciliary neurotrophic factor corrects obesity and diabetes associated with leptin deficiency and resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Gloaguen, Isabelle; Costa, Patrizia; Demartis, Anna; Lazzaro, Domenico; Di Marco, Annalise; Graziani, Rita; Paonessa, Giacomo; Chen, Fang; Rosenblum, Charles I.; Van der Ploeg, Lex H. T.; Cortese, Riccardo; Ciliberto, Gennaro; Laufer, Ralph

    1997-01-01

    Receptor subunits for the neurocytokine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) share sequence similarity with the receptor for leptin, an adipocyte-derived cytokine involved in body weight homeostasis. We report here that CNTF and leptin activate a similar pattern of STAT factors in neuronal cells, and that mRNAs for CNTF receptor subunits, similarly to the mRNA of leptin receptor, are localized in mouse hypothalamic nuclei involved in the regulation of energy balance. Systemic administration of ...

  3. Sox10 regulates ciliary neurotrophic factor gene expression in Schwann cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ito, Yasuhiro; Wiese, Stefan; Funk, Natalja; Chittka, Alexandra; Rossoll, Wilfried; Bömmel, Heike; Watabe, Kazuhiko; Wegner, Michael; Sendtner, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (Cntf) plays an essential role in postnatal maintenance of spinal motoneurons. Whereas the expression of this neurotrophic factor is low during embryonic development, it is highly up-regulated after birth in myelinating Schwann cells of rodents. To characterize the underlying transcriptional mechanisms, we have analyzed and compared the effects of various glial transcription factors. In contrast to Pit-1, Oct-1, Unc-86 homology region (POU) domain class 3, transcri...

  4. Ciliary neurotrophic factor prevents degeneration of adult rat substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    T. Hagg; Varon, S

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the neuroprotective effects of recombinant human ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) for injured dopaminergic neurons of the adult rat substantia nigra compacta. Fourteen days after a unilateral transection of the nigrostriatal pathway two-thirds of the neurons (identified by retrograde labeling) had degenerated. In sharp contrast, 73% (a few cases, > 90%) of this cell loss was prevented by continuous infusion of CNTF close to the injured neurons. However, CNTF did not pre...

  5. Identification of Ciliary and Ciliopathy Genes in Caenorhabditis Elegans through Comparative Genomics

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Nansheng; Mah, Allan; Oliver E Blacque; Chu, Jeffrey; Phgora, Kiran; Bakhoum, Mathieu W.; Newbury, C. Rebecca Hunt; Khattra, Jaswinder; Chan, Susanna; Efimenko, Evgheni; Johnsen, Robert; Phirke, Prasad; Swoboda, Peter; Marra, Marco; Moerman, Donald

    2006-01-01

    Background The recent availability of genome sequences of multiple related Caenorhabditis species has made it possible to identify, using comparative genomics, similarly transcribed genes in Caenorhabditis elegans and its sister species. Taking this approach, we have identified numerous novel ciliary genes in C. elegans, some of which may be orthologs of unidentified human ciliopathy genes. Results By screening for genes possessing canonical X-box sequences in promoters of three Caenorhabditi...

  6. The isolated ciliary bilayer is useful for studies of aqueous humor formation.

    OpenAIRE

    Sears, M L; Yamada, E.; Cummins, D; Mori, N; Mead, A.; Murakami, M.

    1991-01-01

    An intact ciliary epithelial bilayer has been isolated from the rabbit eye by perfusion, microsurgical dissection, and recovery techniques. Vital subcellular organelles and intercellular junctions of this epithelial bilayer preparation are very well preserved. The total electrical resistance of the epithelial bilayer is 350 ohms, and the transepithelial potential is 650 microV, nonpigmented epithelium side negative. The electrical resistance is reduced by 0.2 mM EGTA and the transepithelial p...

  7. Rootletin organizes the ciliary rootlet to achieve neuron sensory function in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jieyan V.; Kao, Ling-Rong; Jana, Swadhin C.; Sivan-Loukianova, Elena; Mendonça, Susana; Cabrera, Oscar A.; Singh, Priyanka; Cabernard, Clemens; Eberl, Daniel F.; Bettencourt-Dias, Monica; Timothy L. Megraw

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are essential for cell signaling and sensory perception. In many cell types, a cytoskeletal structure called the ciliary rootlet links the cilium to the cell body. Previous studies indicated that rootlets support the long-term stability of some cilia. Here we report that Drosophila melanogaster Rootletin (Root), the sole orthologue of the mammalian paralogs Rootletin and C-Nap1, assembles into rootlets of diverse lengths among sensory neuron subtypes. Root mutant neurons lack rootlets a...

  8. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanru; Zhang, Hui; Katiella, Kaka; Huang, Wenhua

    2014-07-15

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune rejection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regeneration. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anastomosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone. PMID:25221592

  9. Chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes sciatic nerve repair

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanru Zhang; Hui Zhang; Kaka Katiella; Wenhua Huang

    2014-01-01

    A chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft can reduce postoperative immune re-jection, similar to an autologous nerve graft, and can guide neural regeneration. However, it remains poorly understood whether a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with neurotrophic factors provides a good local environment for neural regenera-tion. This study investigated the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve using a chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve graft combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor. An autologous nerve anastomosis group and a chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group were prepared as controls. At 8 weeks after repair, sciatic functional index, evoked potential amplitude of the soleus muscle, triceps wet weight recovery rate, total number of myelinated nerve fibers and myelin sheath thickness were measured. For these indices, values in the three groups showed the autologous nerve anastomosis group > chemically extracted acellular nerve graft + ciliary neurotrophic factor group > chemical acellular allogeneic nerve bridging group. These results suggest that chemically extracted acellular nerve grafts combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor can repair sciatic nerve defects, and that this repair is inferior to autologous nerve anasto-mosis, but superior to chemically extracted acellular allogeneic nerve bridging alone.

  10. Ruthenium-106 brachytherapy, local resection and pars plana vitrectomy for a ciliary body melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This case report deals with brachytherapy, subsequent local resection and pars plana vitrectomy for a large ciliary body melanoma. In 1990 a 6 mm high ciliary body melanoma was treated with Ruthenium 106. In spite of early regression of the tumour infiltrating the choroid the remaining ciliary body melanoma was removed by local resection with simultaneous cataract surgery and anterior vitrectomy. 6 months later a focal PVR retinal detachment at the site of the scar of the Ruthenium-106 plaque developed and was treated by vitrectomy, membrane peeling and SF-6 gas tamponade. After 1 year of follow up the retina remained reattached, the tumor had regressed to a chorioatrophic scar. Internal examination could not reveal any sign of metastasis, visual acuity was 1/36 due to a maculopathy. Regarding to our knowledge of cell biology development of metastasis is a much more complex procedure than pure mechanical dissemination of tumor cells. In our opinion cataract or even vitreoretinal surgery may be justified in case of a necrotic tumor. (authors)

  11. Long-term clearance from small airways in subjects with ciliary dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hjelte Lena

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The objective of this study was to investigate if long-term clearance from small airways is dependent on normal ciliary function. Six young adults with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD inhaled 111 Indium labelled Teflon particles of 4.2 μm geometric and 6.2 μm aerodynamic diameter with an extremely slow inhalation flow, 0.05 L/s. The inhalation method deposits particles mainly in the small conducting airways. Lung retention was measured immediately after inhalation and at four occasions up to 21 days after inhalation. Results were compared with data from ten healthy controls. For additional comparison three of the PCD subjects also inhaled the test particles with normal inhalation flow, 0.5 L/s, providing a more central deposition. The lung retention at 24 h in % of lung deposition (Ret24 was higher (p 24 with slow inhalation flow was 73.9 ± 1.9 % compared to 68.9 ± 7.5 % with normal inhalation flow in the three PCD subjects exposed twice. During day 7–21 the three PCD subjects exposed twice cleared 9 % with normal flow, probably representing predominantly alveolar clearance, compared to 19 % with slow inhalation flow, probably representing mainly small airway clearance. This study shows that despite ciliary dysfunction, clearance continues in the small airways beyond 24 h. There are apparently additional clearance mechanisms present in the small airways.

  12. Asymmetric wavefront aberrations and pupillary shapes induced by electrical stimulation of ciliary nerve in cats measured with compact wavefront aberrometer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suguru Miyagawa

    Full Text Available To investigate the changes in the wavefront aberrations and pupillary shape in response to electrical stimulation of the branches of the ciliary nerves in cats. Seven eyes of seven cats were studied under general anesthesia. Trains of monophasic pulses (current, 0.1 to 1.0 mA; duration, 0.5 ms/phase; frequency, 5 to 40 Hz were applied to the lateral or medial branch of the short ciliary nerve near the posterior pole of the eye. A pair of electrodes was hooked onto one or both branch of the short ciliary nerve. The electrodes were placed about 5 mm from the scleral surface. The wavefront aberrations were recorded continuously for 2 seconds before, 8 seconds during, and for 20 seconds after the electrical stimulation. The pupillary images were simultaneously recorded during the stimulation period. Both the wavefront aberrations and the pupillary images were obtained 10 times/sec with a custom-built wavefront aberrometer. The maximum accommodative amplitude was 1.19 diopters (D produced by electrical stimulation of the short ciliary nerves. The latency of the accommodative changes was very short, and the accommodative level gradually increased up to 4 seconds and reached a plateau. When only one branch of the ciliary nerve was stimulated, the pupil dilated asymmetrically, and the oblique astigmatism and one of the asymmetrical wavefront terms was also altered. Our results showed that the wavefront aberrations and pupillary dilations can be measured simultaneously and serially with a compact wavefront aberrometer. The asymmetric pupil dilation and asymmetric changes of the wavefront aberrations suggest that each branch of the ciliary nerve innervates specific segments of the ciliary muscle and dilator muscle of the pupil.

  13. Effects of radiation upon gastrointestinal motility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mary F Otterson

    2007-01-01

    Whether due to therapeutic or belligerent exposure, the gastrointestinal effects of irradiation produce symptoms dreaded by a majority of the population. Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal cramping are hallmarks of the prodromal phase of radiation sickness, occurring hours to days following radiation exposure. The prodromal phase is distinct from acute radiation sickness in that the absorptive, secretory and anatomic changes associated with radiation damage are not easily identifiable. It is during this phase of radiation sickness that gastrointestinal motility significantly changes. In addition, there is evidence that motor activity of the gut contributes to some of the acute and chronic effects of radiation.

  14. Regulation of thymocyte positive selection and motility by GIT2

    OpenAIRE

    Phee, Hyewon; Dzhagalov, Ivan; Mollenauer, Marianne; Wang, Yana; Irvine, Darrell J.; Robey, Ellen; Weiss, Arthur

    2010-01-01

    Thymocytes are highly motile cells that migrate under the influence of chemokines in distinct thymic compartments as they mature. The motility of thymocytes is tightly regulated; however, the molecular mechanisms that control thymocyte motility are not well understood. Here we report that G protein–coupled receptor kinase-interactor 2 (GIT2) was required for efficient positive selection. Notably, Git2−/− double-positive thymocytes showed greater activation of the small GTPase Rac, actin polym...

  15. Flagellar motility confers epiphytic fitness advantages upon Pseudomonas syringae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of flagellar motility in determining the epiphytic fitness of an ice-nucleation-active strain of Pseudomonas syringae was examined. The loss of flagellar motility reduced the epiphytic fitness of a normally motile P. syringae strain as measured by its growth, survival, and competitive ability on bean leaf surfaces. Equal population sizes of motile parental or nonmotile mutant P. syringae strains were maintained on bean plants for at least 5 days following the inoculation of fully expanded primary leaves. However, when bean seedlings were inoculated before the primary leaves had expanded and bacterial populations on these leaves were quantified at full expansion, the population size of the nonmotile derivative strain reached only 0.9% that of either the motile parental or revertant strain. When fully expanded bean primary leaves were coinoculated with equal numbers of motile and nonmotile cells, the population size of a nonmotile derivative strain was one-third of that of the motile parental or revertant strain after 8 days. Motile and nonmotile cells were exposed in vitro and on plants to UV radiation and desiccating conditions. The motile and nonmotile strains exhibited equal resistance to both stresses in vitro. However, the population size of a nonmotile strain on leaves was less than 20% that of a motile revertant strain when sampled immediately after UV irradiation. Epiphytic populations of both motile and nonmotile P. syringae declined under desiccating conditions on plants, and after 8 days, the population size of a nonmotile strain was less than one-third that of the motile parental or revertant strain

  16. The unique paradigm of spirochete motility and chemotaxis

    OpenAIRE

    Charon, Nyles W.; Cockburn, Andrew; Li, Chunhao; Liu, Jun; Miller, Kelly A.; MILLER, MICHAEL R.; Motaleb, Md.; Wolgemuth, Charles W.

    2012-01-01

    Spirochete motility is enigmatic: It differs from the motility of most other bacteria in that the entire bacterium is involved in translocation in the absence of external appendages. Using the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb) as a model system, we explore the current research on spirochete motility and chemotaxis. Bb has periplasmic flagella (PFs) subterminally attached to each end of the protoplasmic cell cylinder, and surrounding the cell is an outer membrane. These interna...

  17. Sodium Benzoate, a Metabolite of Cinnamon and a Food Additive, Upregulates Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor in Astrocytes and Oligodendrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Khushbu K; Jana, Malabendu; Mondal, Susanta; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-11-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a promyelinating trophic factor that plays an important role in multiple sclerosis (MS). However, mechanisms by which CNTF expression could be increased in the brain are poorly understood. Recently we have discovered anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities of sodium benzoate (NaB), a metabolite of cinnamon and a widely-used food additive. Here, we delineate that NaB is also capable of increasing the mRNA and protein expression of CNTF in primary mouse astrocytes and oligodendrocytes and primary human astrocytes. Accordingly, oral administration of NaB and cinnamon led to the upregulation of astroglial and oligodendroglial CNTF in vivo in mouse brain. Induction of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, an animal model of MS, reduced the level of CNTF in the brain, which was restored by oral administration of cinnamon. While investigating underlying mechanisms, we observed that NaB induced the activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and H-89, an inhibitor of PKA, abrogated NaB-induced expression of CNTF. The activation of cAMP response element binding (CREB) protein by NaB, the recruitment of CREB and CREB-binding protein to the CNTF promoter by NaB and the abrogation of NaB-induced expression of CNTF in astrocytes by siRNA knockdown of CREB suggest that NaB increases the expression of CNTF via the activation of CREB. These results highlight a novel myelinogenic property of NaB and cinnamon, which may be of benefit for MS and other demyelinating disorders. PMID:26399250

  18. Bacterial Motility Reveals Unknown Molecular Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchesne, Ismaël; Rainville, Simon; Galstian, Tigran

    2015-11-17

    The water solubility of lyotropic liquid crystals (LCs) makes them very attractive to study the behavior of biological microorganisms in an environment where local symmetry is broken (as often encountered in nature). Several recent studies have shown a dramatic change in the behavior of flagellated bacteria when swimming in solutions of the lyotropic LC disodium cromoglycate (DSCG). In this study, the movements of Escherichia coli bacteria in DSCG-water solutions of different concentrations are observed to improve our understanding of this phenomenon. In addition, the viscosity of DSCG aqueous solutions is measured as a function of concentration at room temperature. We also experimentally identify a previously undescribed isotropic pretransition zone where bacteria start sticking to each other and to surfaces. Simple estimations show that the unbalanced osmotic pressure induced depletion force might be responsible for this sticking phenomenon. An estimate of the bacteria propulsive force and the DSCG aggregates length (versus concentration) are calculated from the measured viscosity of the medium. All these quantities are found to undergo a strong increase in the pretransition zone, starting at a threshold concentration of 6±1 wt % DSCG that is well below the known isotropic-LC transition (∼10 wt %). This study also shines light on the motility of flagellated bacteria in realistic environments, and it opens new avenues for interesting applications such as the use of motile microorganisms to probe the physical properties of their host or smart bandages that could guide bacteria out of wounds. PMID:26588572

  19. Mechanics and polarity in cell motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosi, D.; Zanzottera, A.

    2016-09-01

    The motility of a fish keratocyte on a flat substrate exhibits two distinct regimes: the non-migrating and the migrating one. In both configurations the shape is fixed in time and, when the cell is moving, the velocity is constant in magnitude and direction. Transition from a stable configuration to the other one can be produced by a mechanical or chemotactic perturbation. In order to point out the mechanical nature of such a bistable behaviour, we focus on the actin dynamics inside the cell using a minimal mathematical model. While the protein diffusion, recruitment and segregation govern the polarization process, we show that the free actin mass balance, driven by diffusion, and the polymerized actin retrograde flow, regulated by the active stress, are sufficient ingredients to account for the motile bistability. The length and velocity of the cell are predicted on the basis of the parameters of the substrate and of the cell itself. The key physical ingredient of the theory is the exchange among actin phases at the edges of the cell, that plays a central role both in kinematics and in dynamics.

  20. Bacterial signaling and motility: Sure bets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhulin, Igor B [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK) & Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2008-01-01

    The IX International Conference on Bacterial Locomotion and Signal Transduction (BLAST IX) was held from 14 to 19 January 2007 in Laughlin, NV, a town in the Mojave Desert on the Nevada-Arizona border near old Route 66 and along the banks of the Colorado River. This area is a home to rattlesnakes, sagebrush, abandoned gold mines, and compulsive gamblers. What better venue could scientists possibly dream of for a professional meeting? So there they were, about 190 scientists gathered in the Aquarius Casino Resort, the largest hotel and casino in Laughlin, discussing the latest advances in the field. Aside from a brief excursion to an abandoned gold mine and a dinner cruise on the Colorado River, the scientists focused on nothing but their data and hypotheses, in spirited arguments and rebuttals, and outlined their visions and future plans in a friendly and open environment. The BLAST IX program was dense, with nearly 50 talks and over 90 posters. For that reason, this meeting report will not attempt to be comprehensive; instead it will first provide general background information on the central topics of the meeting and then highlight only a few talks that were of special interest to us and hopefully to the wider scientific community. We will also attempt to articulate some of the future directions or perspectives to the best of our abilities. The best known and understood bacterial motility mechanism is swimming powered by flagella. The rotation of bacterial flagella drives this form of bacterial movement in an aqueous environment. A bacterial flagellum consists of a helical filament attached to the cell body through a complex structure known as the hook-basal body, which drives flagellar rotation. The essential components of the basal body are the MotA-MotB motor-stator proteins bound to the cytoplasmic membrane. These stator proteins interact with proteins that comprise the supramembrane and cytoplasmic rings, which are components of the motor imbedded in the

  1. Gastric pH and motility in a porcine model of acute lung injury using a wireless motility capsule

    OpenAIRE

    Rauch, Stefan; Muellenbach, Ralf M.; Johannes, Amélie; Zollhöfer, Bernd; Roewer, Norbert

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Evaluation of gastric pH and motility in a porcine model of acute lung injury using a novel, wireless motility capsule. Material/Methods A motility capsule was applied into the stomach of 7 Pietrain pigs with acute lung injury induced by high volume saline lavage. Wireless transmission of pH, pressure and temperature data was performed by a recorder attached to the animal’s abdomen. Gastric motility was evaluated using pH and pressure values, and capsule location was confir...

  2. Neuroblastoma cells contain a trophic factor sharing biological and molecular properties with ciliary neurotrophic factor.

    OpenAIRE

    Heymanns, J.; Unsicker, K

    1987-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a protein supporting the in vitro survival of a characteristic spectrum of embryonic chicken and rat peripheral neurons. High-speed supernatants of extracts from two neuroblastoma (NB) cell lines--the mouse C 1300 N2a and the human IMR 32--mimic the effects of CNTF on identical target neurons. Promotion of survival is dose-dependent with an ED50 of 80 micrograms (IMR 32) and 140 micrograms (C 1300 N2a) of protein per ml and saturable at plateau values for...

  3. Ciliary neurotrophic factor induces cholinergic differentiation of rat sympathetic neurons in culture

    OpenAIRE

    S. Saadat; Sendtner, Michael; H. Rohrer(Universität Mainz, Germany)

    1989-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) influences the levels of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in cultures of dissociated sympathetic neurons from newborn rats. In the presence of CNTF both the total and specific activity of ChAT was increased 7 d after culture by 15- and 18-fold, respectively, as compared to cultures kept in the absence of CNTF. Between 3 and 21 d in culture in the presence of CNTF the total ChAT activity increased by a factor of greater than 100....

  4. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) prevents the degeneration of motor neurons after axotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Sendtner, Michael; Kreutzberg, Georg W.; Thoenen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    The period of natural cell death in the development of rodent motor neurons is followed by a period of sensitivity to axonal injury1-3. In the rat this early postnatal period of vulnerability coincides with that of very low ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) levels in the sciatic nerve before CNTF increases to the high, adult levels4. The developmental time course of CNTF expression, its regional tissue distribution and its cytosolic localization (as suggested by its primary structure)4*5 fav...

  5. Localization of the gene for the ciliary neutrotrophic factor receptor (CNTFR) to human chromosome 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donaldson, D.H.; Jones, C.; Patterson, D. (Eleanor Roosevelt Institute, Denver, CO (United States) Univ. of Colorado Health Science Center, Denver, CO (United States)); Britt, D.E.; Jackson, C.L. (Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to be important for the survival of motor neurons and has shown activity in animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). CNTF therefore holds promise as a treatment for ALS, and it and its receptor (CNTFR) are candidates for a gene involved in familial ALS. The CNTFR gene was mapped to chromosome 9 by PCR on a panel of human/CHO somatic cell hybrids and localized to 9p13 by PCR on a panel of radiation hybrids. 18 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. The primary cilium as a cellular receiver: organizing ciliary GPCR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgendorf, Keren I; Johnson, Carl T; Jackson, Peter K

    2016-04-01

    The primary cilium is an antenna-like cellular protrusion mediating sensory and neuroendocrine signaling. Its localization within tissue architecture and a growing list of cilia-localized receptors, in particular G-protein-coupled receptors, determine a host of crucial physiologies, which are disrupted in human ciliopathies. Here, we discuss recent advances in the identification and characterization of ciliary signaling components and pathways. Recent studies have highlighted the unique signaling environment of the primary cilium and we are just beginning to understand how this design allows for highly amplified and regulated signaling. PMID:26926036

  7. Changes in the number of chick ciliary ganglion neuron processes with time in cell culture

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the shape of chick ciliary ganglion neurons dissociated from embryonic day 8 or 9 ganglia and maintained in vitro. Most of the neurons were multipolar during the first three days after plating, with an average of 6.0 processes extending directly from the cell body. The neurons became unipolar with time. The remaining primary process accounted for greater than 90% of the total neuritic arbor. This striking change in morphology was not due to the select...

  8. Vagal tone: effects on sensitivity, motility, and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaz, B; Sinniger, V; Pellissier, S

    2016-04-01

    The vagus nerve (VN) is a key element of the autonomic nervous system. As a mixed nerve, the VN contributes to the bidirectional interactions between the brain and the gut, i.e., the brain-gut axis. In particular, after integration in the central autonomic network of peripheral sensations such as inflammation and pain via vagal and spinal afferents, an efferent response through modulation of preganglionic parasympathetic neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and/or preganglionic sympathetic neurons of the spinal cord is able to modulate gastrointestinal nociception, motility, and inflammation. A low vagal tone, as assessed by heart rate variability, a marker of the sympatho-vagal balance, is observed in functional digestive disorders and inflammatory bowel diseases. To restore a normal vagal tone appears as a goal in such diseases. Among the therapeutic tools, such as drugs targeting the cholinergic system and/or complementary medicine (hypnosis, meditation…), deep breathing, physical exercise, VN stimulation (VNS), either invasive or non-invasive, appears as innovative. There is new evidence in the current issue of this Journal supporting the role of VNS in the modulation of gastrointestinal functions. PMID:27010234

  9. Recent insights into digestive motility in functional dyspepsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuta, Yohei; Shikuwa, Saburo; Isomoto, Hajime; Mishima, Ryosuke; Akazawa, Yuko; Masuda, Jun-ichi; Omagari, Katsuhisa; Takeshima, Fuminao; Kohno, Shigeru

    2006-11-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders, such as functional dyspepsia (FD) and irritable bowel syndrome, are common pathologies of the gut. FD is a clinical syndrome defined as chronic or recurrent pain or discomfort of unknown origin in the upper abdomen. The pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for FD have not been fully elucidated, but new ideas regarding its pathophysiology and the significance of the pathophysiology with respect to the symptom pattern of FD have emerged. In particular, there is growing interest in alterations in gastric motility, such as accommodation to a meal or gastric emptying, and visceral sensation in FD. The mechanisms underlying impaired gastroduodenal motor function are unclear, but possible factors include abnormal neurohormonal function, autonomic dysfunction, visceral hypersensitivity to acid or mechanical distention, Helicobacter pylori infection, acute gastrointestinal infection, psychosocial comorbidity, and stress. Although the optimum treatment for FD is not yet clearly established, acid-suppressive drugs, prokinetic agents, eradication of H. pylori, and antidepressants have been widely used in the management of patients with FD. The therapeutic efficacy of prokinetics such as itopride hydrochloride and mosapride citrate in the treatment of FD is supported by the results of relatively large and well-controlled studies. In addition, recent research has yielded new therapeutic agents and modalities for dysmotility in FD, including agonists/antagonists of various sensorimotor receptors, activation of the nitrergic pathway, kampo medicine, acupuncture, and gastric electric stimulation. This review discusses recent research on the pathophysiology of and treatment options for FD, with special attention given to digestive dysmotility. PMID:17160514

  10. Gene expression in Pseudomonas aeruginosa swarming motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déziel Eric

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is capable of three types of motilities: swimming, twitching and swarming. The latter is characterized by a fast and coordinated group movement over a semi-solid surface resulting from intercellular interactions and morphological differentiation. A striking feature of swarming motility is the complex fractal-like patterns displayed by migrating bacteria while they move away from their inoculation point. This type of group behaviour is still poorly understood and its characterization provides important information on bacterial structured communities such as biofilms. Using GeneChip® Affymetrix microarrays, we obtained the transcriptomic profiles of both bacterial populations located at the tip of migrating tendrils and swarm center of swarming colonies and compared these profiles to that of a bacterial control population grown on the same media but solidified to not allow swarming motility. Results Microarray raw data were corrected for background noise with the RMA algorithm and quantile normalized. Differentially expressed genes between the three conditions were selected using a threshold of 1.5 log2-fold, which gave a total of 378 selected genes (6.3% of the predicted open reading frames of strain PA14. Major shifts in gene expression patterns are observed in each growth conditions, highlighting the presence of distinct bacterial subpopulations within a swarming colony (tendril tips vs. swarm center. Unexpectedly, microarrays expression data reveal that a minority of genes are up-regulated in tendril tip populations. Among them, we found energy metabolism, ribosomal protein and transport of small molecules related genes. On the other hand, many well-known virulence factors genes were globally repressed in tendril tip cells. Swarm center cells are distinct and appear to be under oxidative and copper stress responses. Conclusions Results reported in this study show that, as opposed to

  11. Clinical value of measurement of pulmonary radioaerosol mucociliary clearance in the work up of primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Mathias; Nielsen, Kim Gjerum; Mortensen, Jann

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We aimed to evaluate and define the general clinical applicability and impact of pulmonary radioaerosol mucociliary clearance (PRMC) on the work up of patients suspected of having primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). In addition, we wanted to evaluate the accuracy of the reference values...... primarily to results from nasal ciliary function testing, to electron microscopic (EM) examination of the ultrastructure of the cilia, and to the final clinical diagnosis. RESULTS: Of the 239 patients, 27 ended up with a final clinical diagnosis of definitive PCD. No patients with a PRMC test that was...... from updated data....

  12. Quantification of motility of carabid beetles in farmland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allema, A B; van der Werf, W; Groot, J C J; Hemerik, L; Gort, G; Rossing, W A H; van Lenteren, J C

    2015-04-01

    Quantification of the movement of insects at field and landscape levels helps us to understand their ecology and ecological functions. We conducted a meta-analysis on movement of carabid beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae), to identify key factors affecting movement and population redistribution. We characterize the rate of redistribution using motility μ (L2 T-1), which is a measure for diffusion of a population in space and time that is consistent with ecological diffusion theory and which can be used for upscaling short-term data to longer time frames. Formulas are provided to calculate motility from literature data on movement distances. A field experiment was conducted to measure the redistribution of mass-released carabid, Pterostichus melanarius in a crop field, and derive motility by fitting a Fokker-Planck diffusion model using inverse modelling. Bias in estimates of motility from literature data is elucidated using the data from the field experiment as a case study. The meta-analysis showed that motility is 5.6 times as high in farmland as in woody habitat. Species associated with forested habitats had greater motility than species associated with open field habitats, both in arable land and woody habitat. The meta-analysis did not identify consistent differences in motility at the species level, or between clusters of larger and smaller beetles. The results presented here provide a basis for calculating time-varying distribution patterns of carabids in farmland and woody habitat. The formulas for calculating motility can be used for other taxa. PMID:25673121

  13. Evolutionary aspects of collective motility in pathogenic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deforet, Maxime; Xavier, Joao

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a pathogenic bacteria that can use its single polar flagellum to swim through liquids. It can move collectively over semisolid surfaces, a behavior called swarming. It can also settle and form surface-attached communities called biofilms that protect them from antibiotics. The transition from single motility (swimming) to collective motility (swarming) is biologically relevant as it enables exploring environments that a single bacterium cannot explore on its own. It is also clinically relevant since swarming and biofilm formation are thought to be antagonistic. We investigate the mechanisms of bacterial collective motility using a multidisciplinary approach that combines mathematical modeling, quantitative experiments, and microbial genetics. We aim to identify how these mechanisms may evolve under the selective pressure of population expansion, and consequently reinforce or hinder collective motility. In particular, we clarify the role of growth rate and motility in invasive populations.

  14. Motility of copepod nauplii and implications for food encounter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Titelman, Josefin; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Velocity differences drive all encounter processes. Therefore, knowledge of both prey and predator motility are essential in order to understand feeding behavior and predict food acquisition rates. Here, we describe and quantify the motility behavior of young and old naupliar stages of 6 copepods...... local food depletion.......Velocity differences drive all encounter processes. Therefore, knowledge of both prey and predator motility are essential in order to understand feeding behavior and predict food acquisition rates. Here, we describe and quantify the motility behavior of young and old naupliar stages of 6 copepods...... smoother glide of varying continuity. We apply observed time budgets and behavior-specific speeds in simple models to examine mechanisms of food encounter. The motility of all nauplii may account for clearance rates reported in the literature, but through different mechanisms. Smoothly swimming nauphi...

  15. Thyroxin Is Useful to Improve Sperm Motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendeluk Gabriela Ruth

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the non-genomic action of thyroxin on sperm kinetic and its probable use to improve sperm recovery after applying an en- richment method like “swim-up” in comparison with the available one, pentoxifylline. Materials and Methods This is an experimental study. A total of 50 patients were re- cruited, followed by infertility consultation. Conventional sperm assays were performed according to World Health Organization criteria-2010 (WHO-2010. A Computer Aided Semen Analysis System was employed to assess kinetic parameters and concentrations. Number of the motile sperm recovered after preparation technique was calculated. Results Addition of T4 (0.002 µg/ml to semen samples increased hypermotility at 20 minutes (control: 14.18 ± 5.1% vs. 17.66 ± 8.88%, P<0.03, data expressed as mean ± SD and remained unchanged after 40 minutes. Significant differences were found in the motile sperm recovered after swim-up (control: 8.93×106 ± 9.52× 06vs. 17.20×106 ± 21.16×106, P<0.03, achieving all of the tested samples a desirable threshold value for artificial insemination outcome, while adding pentoxifylline increased the number of recovered sperm after swim-up in 60% of the studied cases. No synergism between two treatments could be determined. Conclusion We propose a new physiological tool to artificially improve insemination. The discussion opens windows to investigate unknown pathways involved in sperm ca- pacitation and gives innovative arguments to better understand infertility mechanisms.

  16. Disturbances of motility and visceral hypersensitivity in irritable bowel syndrome: biological markers or epiphenomenon.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2012-02-03

    Motility and visceral hypersentitivity are regarded as the primary mechanisms of symptom development in irritable bowel syndrome(IBS). While a variety of motor abnormalities have been described throughout the gastrointestinal tract in IBS, their specificity and relationship to symptoms remain unclear. Visceral hypersensitivity is ubiquitous in functional gastrointestinal disease and is especially common in IBS. Again, however, its specificity for IBS has been questioned. Many factors, including stress and psychopathology,complicate the interpretation of these phenomena and new re-search suggests that mucosal inflammation and luminal factors may be more fundamental to the etiology of this common disorder.

  17. Ciliary metachronal wave propagation on the compliant surface of Paramecium cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narematsu, Naoki; Quek, Raymond; Chiam, Keng-Hwee; Iwadate, Yoshiaki

    2015-12-01

    Ciliary movements in protozoa exhibit metachronal wave-like coordination, in which a constant phase difference is maintained between adjacent cilia. It is at present generally thought that metachronal waves require hydrodynamic coupling between adjacent cilia and the extracellular fluid. To test this hypothesis, we aspirated a Paramecium cell using a micropipette which completely sealed the surface of the cell such that no fluid could pass through the micropipette. Thus, the anterior and the posterior regions of the cell were hydrodynamically decoupled. Nevertheless, we still observed that metachronal waves continued to propagate from the anterior to the posterior ends of the cell, suggesting that in addition to hydrodynamic coupling, there are other mechanisms that can also transmit the metachronal waves. Such transmission was also observed in computational modeling where the fluid was fully decoupled between two partitions of a beating ciliary array. We also imposed cyclic stretching on the surface of live Paramecium cells and found that metachronal waves persisted in the presence of cyclic stretching. This demonstrated that, in addition to hydrodynamic coupling, a compliant substrate can also play a critical role in mediating the propagation of metachronal waves. PMID:26616106

  18. The Role of Ion Channels to Regulate Airway Ciliary Beat Frequency During Allergic Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joskova, M; Sutovska, M; Durdik, P; Koniar, D; Hargas, L; Banovcin, P; Hrianka, M; Khazaei, V; Pappova, L; Franova, S

    2016-01-01

    Overproduction of mucus is a hallmark of asthma. The aim of this study was to identify potentially effective therapies for removing excess mucus. The role of voltage-gated (Kir 6.1, KCa 1.1) and store-operated ion channels (SOC, CRAC) in respiratory cilia, relating to the tracheal ciliary beat frequency (CBF), was compared under the physiological and allergic airway conditions. Ex vivo experiments were designed to test the local effects of Kir 6.1, KCa 1.1 and CRAC ion channel modulators in a concentration-dependent manner on the CBF. Cilia, obtained with the brushing method, were monitored by a high-speed video camera and analyzed with ciliary analysis software. In natural conditions, a Kir 6.1 opener accelerated CBF, while CRAC blocker slowed it in a concentration-dependent manner. In allergic inflammation, the effect of Kir 6.1 opener was insignificant, with a tendency to decrease CBF. A cilio-inhibitory effect of a CRAC blocker, while gently reduced by allergic inflammation, remained significant. A KCa 1.1 opener turned out to significantly enhance the CBF under the allergic OVA-sensitized conditions. We conclude that optimally attuned concentration of KCa 1.1 openers or special types of bimodal SOC channel blockers, potentially given by inhalation, might benefit asthma. PMID:27369295

  19. [A case of primary ciliary dyskinesia who had been treated as asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoki, Koa; Fujisawa, Takao; Masuda, Sawako; Usui, Satoko; Ito, Hiroaki; Nagao, Mizuho; Terada, Akihiko; Iguchi, Kousei; Ogawa, Satoru; Nakatani, Kaname; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko

    2010-07-01

    We report a case of 18-old girl with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) who had been diagnosed as asthma. Since birth, she had presented with unexplained productive cough, sputum, rhinorrhea, and stridor with situs solitus. Her familial history was negative for PCD. At 2 years of age, ciliary beat frequency and beat pattern were normal. She was diagnosed as rhinosinusitis, chronic secretory otitis media. At 3 years of age, she was diagnosed as asthma because of wheezing not associated with respiratory infection. Various asthma medications were then administered, including DSCG, inhaled corticosteroids, and salmeterol, but varying responses to the treatment were noted. Spirometry revealed persistent severe small airway obstruction. Beta2 agonist reversibility was recognized by impulse oscillation system, not with FEV1. At age of 18, chest CT disclosed bronchiectasis, and nasal nitric oxide concentration was very low, 98 ppb and a diagnostic approach for PCD was performed. Electron microscopic analysis of nasal cilia demonstrated defects of the outer and inner dynein arms, and the diagnosis of PCD was made. Mutations in DNAH1 and DNAI1 genes were found. The diagnosis of PCD is often difficult in the absence of situs inversus totalis. Recurrent wheeze with chronic rhinosinusitis, chronic otitis media, and brochiectasis may warrant detailed investigations for PCD, especially with nasal NO measurement. PMID:20703071

  20. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: evaluation using cilia beat frequency assessment via spectral analysis of digital microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kögler, João E.; Macchione, Mariangela; Shoemark, Amelia; Saldiva, Paulo H. N.; Rodrigues, Joaquim C.

    2011-01-01

    Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) measurements provide valuable information for diagnosing of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). We developed a system for measuring CBF, used it in association with electron microscopy to diagnose PCD, and then analyzed characteristics of PCD patients.1 The CBF measurement system was based on power spectra measured through digital imaging. Twenty-four patients suspected of having PCD (age 1–19 yr) were selected from a group of 75 children and adolescents with pneumopathies of unknown causes. Ten healthy, nonsmoking volunteers (age ≥17 yr) served as a control group. Nasal brush samples were collected, and CBF and electron microscopy were performed. PCD was diagnosed in 12 patients: 5 had radial spoke defects, 3 showed absent central microtubule pairs with transposition, 2 had outer dynein arm defects, 1 had a shortened outer dynein arm, and 1 had a normal ultrastructure. Previous studies have reported that the most common cilia defects are in the dynein arm. As expected, the mean CBF was higher in the control group (P < 0.001) and patients with normal ultrastructure (P < 0.002), than in those diagnosed with cilia ultrastructural defects (i.e., PCD patients). An obstructive ventilatory pattern was observed in 70% of the PCD patients who underwent pulmonary function tests. All PCD patients presented bronchial wall thickening on chest computed tomography scans. The protocol and diagnostic techniques employed allowed us to diagnose PCD in 16% of patients in this study. PMID:21551013

  1. Posterior Ciliary Artery Occlusion Caused by Hyaluronic Acid Injections Into the Forehead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiu Zhuo; Hu, Jun Yan; Wu, Peng Sen; Yu, Sheng Bo; Kikkawa, Don O.; Lu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although cosmetic facial soft tissue fillers are generally safe and effective, improper injections can lead to devastating and irreversible consequences. We represent the first known case of posterior ciliary artery occlusion caused by hyaluronic acid. A 41-year-old female presented with right visual loss 7 hours after receiving cosmetic hyaluronic acid injections into her forehead. Examination revealed no light perception in the right eye and multiple dark ischemic area of injection over the forehead and nose. The right fundus revealed a pink retina with optic nerve edema. Fluorescein angiogram showed several filling defects in the choroidal circulation and late hyperfluorescence in the choroid. A right posterior ciliary artery occlusion and embolic occlusion of facial artery braches was diagnosed. With hyaluronidase injection, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, oral aspirin, oral acetazolamide and dexamethasone venotransfuse treatment, the patient's forehead and nasal skin improved and vision recovered to hand movements. With proper technique, vascular occlusion is rare following facial filler injection. Vision consequences can be severe if filler emboli enter the ocular circulation. Physicians should be aware of this potential side effect, recognize its presentation, and be knowledgeable of effective management. PMID:26986163

  2. Posterior Ciliary Artery Occlusion Caused by Hyaluronic Acid Injections Into the Forehead: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiu Zhuo; Hu, Jun Yan; Wu, Peng Sen; Yu, Sheng Bo; Kikkawa, Don O; Lu, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Although cosmetic facial soft tissue fillers are generally safe and effective, improper injections can lead to devastating and irreversible consequences. We represent the first known case of posterior ciliary artery occlusion caused by hyaluronic acid. A 41-year-old female presented with right visual loss 7 hours after receiving cosmetic hyaluronic acid injections into her forehead. Examination revealed no light perception in the right eye and multiple dark ischemic area of injection over the forehead and nose. The right fundus revealed a pink retina with optic nerve edema. Fluorescein angiogram showed several filling defects in the choroidal circulation and late hyperfluorescence in the choroid. A right posterior ciliary artery occlusion and embolic occlusion of facial artery braches was diagnosed. With hyaluronidase injection, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, oral aspirin, oral acetazolamide and dexamethasone venotransfuse treatment, the patient's forehead and nasal skin improved and vision recovered to hand movements. With proper technique, vascular occlusion is rare following facial filler injection. Vision consequences can be severe if filler emboli enter the ocular circulation. Physicians should be aware of this potential side effect, recognize its presentation, and be knowledgeable of effective management. PMID:26986163

  3. Effects of perfluorooctane sulfonate on tracheal ciliary beating frequency in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is one of the emerging persistent organic pollutants, ubiquitously found in the global environment, even in human serum. PFOS has been reported to perturb Ca2+ homeostasis in Paramecium, cardiomyocytes and neurons. Since ciliary beat frequency (CBF) in the trachea is known to be increased by cytoplasmic Ca2+ elevation, the effects of PFOS on CBF were evaluated in a slice preparation using video-enhanced contrast microscopy. PFOS increased CBF by 11% (P 2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in mouse tracheal ciliary cells. In Ca2+-free solution, PFOS at 100 μM failed to increase CBF (0.96-fold of vehicle control). The addition of Gd3+ (1 μM), a store-operated Ca2+ channel blocker, did not prevent the increase in CBF (1.09-fold (P + concentration (50 mM), which causes depolarization of the plasma membrane potential and a transient increase in [Ca2+]i, increased CBF by 20% (P 2+ channels (VDCCs) in stimulation of CBF. Nifedipine (30 μM), a selective VDCC blocker, antagonized the effects of high K+ (0.92-fold of high K+ solution) and PFOS (0.96-fold of vehicle control) on CBF. In cells from peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)-null mice, PFOS still increased CBF (1.12-fold (P 2+ through VDCC

  4. Convergent evolution of RFX transcription factors and ciliary genes predated the origin of metazoans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Nansheng

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intraflagellar transport (IFT genes, which are critical for the development and function of cilia and flagella in metazoans, are tightly regulated by the Regulatory Factor X (RFX transcription factors (TFs. However, how and when their evolutionary relationship was established remains unknown. Results We have identified evidence suggesting that RFX TFs and IFT genes evolved independently and their evolution converged before the first appearance of metazoans. Both ciliary genes and RFX TFs exist in all metazoans as well as some unicellular eukaryotes. However, while RFX TFs and IFT genes are found simultaneously in all sequenced metazoan genomes, RFX TFs do not co-exist with IFT genes in most pre-metazoans and thus do not regulate them in these organisms. For example, neither the budding yeast nor the fission yeast possesses cilia although both have well-defined RFX TFs. Conversely, most unicellular eukaryotes, including the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, have typical cilia and well conserved IFT genes but lack RFX TFs. Outside of metazoans, RFX TFs and IFT genes co-exist only in choanoflagellates including M. brevicollis, and only one fungus Allomyces macrogynus of the 51 sequenced fungus genomes. M. brevicollis has two putative RFX genes and a full complement of ciliary genes. Conclusions The evolution of RFX TFs and IFT genes were independent in pre-metazoans. We propose that their convergence in evolution, or the acquired transcriptional regulation of IFT genes by RFX TFs, played a pivotal role in the establishment of metazoan.

  5. Ciliary IFT80 balances canonical versus non-canonical hedgehog signalling for osteoblast differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xue; Cao, Jay; He, Xiaoning; Serra, Rosa; Qu, Jun; Cao, Xu; Yang, Shuying

    2016-01-01

    Intraflagellar transport proteins (IFT) are required for hedgehog (Hh) signalling transduction that is essential for bone development, however, how IFT proteins regulate Hh signalling in osteoblasts (OBs) remains unclear. Here we show that deletion of ciliary IFT80 in OB precursor cells (OPC) in mice results in growth retardation and markedly decreased bone mass with impaired OB differentiation. Loss of IFT80 blocks canonical Hh–Gli signalling via disrupting Smo ciliary localization, but elevates non-canonical Hh–Gαi–RhoA–stress fibre signalling by increasing Smo and Gαi binding. Inhibition of RhoA and ROCK activity partially restores osteogenic differentiation of IFT80-deficient OPCs by inhibiting non-canonical Hh–RhoA–Cofilin/MLC2 signalling. Cytochalasin D, an actin destabilizer, dramatically restores OB differentiation of IFT80-deficient OPCs by disrupting actin stress fibres and promoting cilia formation and Hh–Gli signalling. These findings reveal that IFT80 is required for OB differentiation by balancing between canonical Hh–Gli and non-canonical Hh–Gαi–RhoA pathways and highlight IFT80 as a therapeutic target for craniofacial and skeletal abnormalities. PMID:26996322

  6. Measurement of ciliary beat frequency using ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jason J.; Jing, Joseph C.; Su, Erica; Badger, Christopher; Coughlan, Carolyn A.; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2016-02-01

    Ciliated epithelial cells populate up to 80% of the surface area of the human airway and are responsible for mucociliary transport, which is the key protective mechanism that provides the first line of defense in the respiratory tract. Cilia beat in a rhythmic pattern and may be easily affected by allergens, pollutants, and pathogens, altering ciliary beat frequency (CBF) subsequently. Diseases including cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and primary ciliary dyskinesia may also decrease CBF. CBF is therefore a critical component of respiratory health. The current clinical method of measuring CBF is phase-contrast microscopy, which involves a tissue biopsy obtained via brushing of the nasal cavity. While this method is minimally invasive, the tissue sample must be oriented to display its profile view, making the visualization of a single layer of cilia challenging. In addition, the conventional method requires subjective analysis of CBF, e.g., manually counting by visual inspection. On the contrary, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used to study the retina in ophthalmology as well as vasculature in cardiology, and offers higher resolution than conventional computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Based on this technology, our lab specifically developed an ultra-high resolution OCT system to image the microstructure of the ciliated epithelial cells. Doppler analysis was also performed to determine CBF. Lastly, we also developed a program that utilizes fast Fourier transform to determine CBF under phase-contrast microscopy, providing a more objective method compared to the current method.

  7. Genotypic variation in response to salinity in a new sexual germplasm of Cenchrus ciliaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroga, Mariana; Tommasino, Exequiel; Griffa, Sabrina; Ribotta, Andrea; Colomba, Eliana López; Carloni, Edgardo; Grunberg, Karina

    2016-05-01

    As part of a breeding program for new salt-tolerant sexual genotypes of Cenchrus ciliaris L., here we evaluated the salt-stress response of two new sexual hybrids, obtained by controlled crosses, at seedling and germination stages. A seedling hydroponic experiment with 300 mM NaCl was performed and physiological variables and growth components were evaluated. While salt-treated sexual material did not show a decrease in productivity with respect to control plants, a differential response in some physiological characteristics was observed. Sexual hybrid 1-9-1 did not suffer oxidative damage and its proline content did not differ from that of control treatment. By contrast, sexual hybrid 1-7-11 suffered oxidative damage and accumulated proline, maintaining its growth under saline stress. At the germination stage, sexual hybrid 1-9-1 presented the highest Germination Rate Index at the maximum NaCl concentration assayed, suggesting an ecological advantage in this genotype. These new sexual resources are promising maternal parental with differential response to salt and could be incorporated in a breeding program of C. ciliaris in the search of new genotypes tolerant to salinity. PMID:26906150

  8. C2 Domains as Protein-Protein Interaction Modules in the Ciliary Transition Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Remans

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available RPGR-interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP1 is mutated in the eye disease Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA and its structural homolog, RPGRIP1-like (RPGRIP1L, is mutated in many different ciliopathies. Both are multidomain proteins that are predicted to interact with retinitis pigmentosa G-protein regulator (RPGR. RPGR is mutated in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and is located in photoreceptors and primary cilia. We solved the crystal structure of the complex between the RPGR-interacting domain (RID of RPGRIP1 and RPGR and demonstrate that RPGRIP1L binds to RPGR similarly. RPGRIP1 binding to RPGR affects the interaction with PDEδ, the cargo shuttling factor for prenylated ciliary proteins. RPGRIP1-RID is a C2 domain with a canonical β sandwich structure that does not bind Ca2+ and/or phospholipids and thus constitutes a unique type of protein-protein interaction module. Judging from the large number of C2 domains in most of the ciliary transition zone proteins identified thus far, the structure presented here seems to constitute a cilia-specific module that is present in multiprotein transition zone complexes.

  9. A randomised, controlled study of small intestinal motility in patients treated with sacral nerve stimulation for irritable bowel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Fassov, Janne; Lundby, Lilli; Worsøe, Jonas; Buntzen, Steen; Laurberg, Søren; Krogh, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is among the most common gastrointestinal disorders worldwide. In selected patients with severe diarrhoea-predominant or mixed IBS subtypes sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) alleviates IBS-specific symptoms and improves quality of life. The mode of action, however, remains unknown. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of SNS on small intestinal motility in IBS patients. Methods Twenty patients treated with SNS for severe diarrhoea-predominant o...

  10. Electroejaculated Baboon (Papio anubis) Sperm Requires a Higher Dosage of Pentoxifylline to Enhance Motility

    OpenAIRE

    Cseh, Sandor; Chan, Philip J.; Corselli, Johannah; Bailey, Leonard L.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: Sperm collected by electroejaculation often showpoor motility. The objective was to determine whether theaddition of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, pentoxifylline,would stimulate electroejaculated baboon sperm motility.

  11. Pattern formation mechanisms in motility mutants of Myxococcus xanthus

    CERN Document Server

    Starruss, Joern; Jakovljevic, Vladimir; Sogaard-Andersen, Lotte; Deutsch, Andreas; Baer, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Formation of spatial patterns of cells is a recurring theme in biology and often depends on regulated cell motility. Motility of M. xanthus depends on two motility machineries: the S-engine and A-engine. Moving M. xanthus cells can organize into spreading colonies or spore-filled fruiting bodies depending on their nutritional status. To understand these two pattern formation processes and the contributions by the two motility machineries, as well as cell reversal, we analyze spatial self-organization in 3 strains: i) a mutant that moves unidirectionally without reversing by the A-motility system only, ii) a unidirectional mutant that is also equipped with the S-motility system, and iii) the wild-type that, in addition to the two motility systems, reverses its direction of movement. The mutant moving by the A-engine illustrates that collective motion in the form of large moving clusters can arise in gliding bacteria due to steric interactions of the rod-shaped cells, without the need of invoking any biochemica...

  12. Quorum sensing positively regulates flagellar motility in pathogenic Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Defoirdt, Tom

    2015-04-01

    Vibrios belonging to the Harveyi clade are among the major pathogens of aquatic organisms. Quorum sensing (QS) is essential for virulence of V. harveyi towards different hosts. However, most virulence factors reported to be controlled by QS to date are negatively regulated by QS, therefore suggesting that their impact on virulence is limited. In this study, we report that QS positively regulates flagellar motility. We found that autoinducer synthase mutants showed significantly lower swimming motility than the wild type, and the swimming motility could be restored by adding synthetic signal molecules. Further, motility of a luxO mutant with inactive QS (LuxO D47E) was significantly lower than that of the wild type and of a luxO mutant with constitutively maximal QS activity (LuxO D47A). Furthermore, we found that the expression of flagellar genes (both early, middle and late genes) was significantly lower in the luxO mutant with inactive QS when compared with wild type and the luxO mutant with maximal QS activity. Motility assays and gene expression also revealed the involvement of the quorum-sensing master regulator LuxR in the QS regulation of motility. Finally, the motility inhibitor phenamil significantly decreased the virulence of V. harveyi towards gnotobiotic brine shrimp larvae. PMID:24528485

  13. Regulation of protein phosphorylation of the intermediate-sized filament vimentin in the ciliary epithelium of the mammalian eye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intermediate-sized filaments of vimentin-type (Mr = 57,000) have been identified biochemically and immunochemically as a major cytoskeleton component in the ciliary epithelium of the mammalian eye. When human or rabbit ciliary processes, or cultured ciliary epithelial-derived cells were incubated in serum-free medium containing [32P]orthophosphate and any of the following agents: 1) beta-adrenergic agonists (isoproterenol or epinephrine), 2) direct activators of adenylate cyclase (cholera toxin or forskolin), 3) analogs of cyclic AMP (8-Br-cAMP), or 4) prostaglandin E1, the phosphorylation of vimentin was significantly enhanced. The maximal enhancement ranged, in vivo and in vitro, from about 3-fold in human to 5-fold in rabbit, with either 1 mM 8-Br-cAMP or 0.1 microM forskolin. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy using a monoclonal antibody, anti-vimentin, allowed the localization of vimentin filaments in cultured ciliary epithelial cells. Treatment of these cells in culture with the catecholamine hormone, isoproterenol (1 microM), resulted in a profound reorganization of vimentin filaments. This may be correlated with the enhanced levels of phosphorylated vimentin observed upon increasing cellular cyclic AMP

  14. Codon optimization and factorial screening for enhanced soluble expression of human ciliary neurotrophic factor in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Itkonen, Jaakko M; Urtti, Arto; Bird, Louise E.; Sarkhel, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Neurotrophic factors influence survival, differentiation, proliferation and death of neuronal cells within the central nervous system. Human ciliary neurotrophic factor (hCNTF) has neuroprotective properties and is also known to influence energy balance. Consequently, hCNTF has potential therapeutic applications in neurodegenerative, obesity and diabetes relat...

  15. Exopolysaccharide-independent social motility of Myxococcus xanthus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hu

    Full Text Available Social motility (S motility, the coordinated movement of large cell groups on agar surfaces, of Myxococcus xanthus requires type IV pili (TFP and exopolysaccharides (EPS. Previous models proposed that this behavior, which only occurred within cell groups, requires cycles of TFP extension and retraction triggered by the close interaction of TFP with EPS. However, the curious observation that M. xanthus can perform TFP-dependent motility at a single-cell level when placed onto polystyrene surfaces in a highly viscous medium containing 1% methylcellulose indicated that "S motility" is not limited to group movements. In an apparent further challenge of the previous findings for S motility, mutants defective in EPS production were found to perform TFP-dependent motility on polystyrene surface in methylcellulose-containing medium. By exploring the interactions between pilin and surface materials, we found that the binding of TFP onto polystyrene surfaces eliminated the requirement for EPS in EPS(- cells and thus enabled TFP-dependent motility on a single cell level. However, the presence of a general anchoring surface in a viscous environment could not substitute for the role of cell surface EPS in group movement. Furthermore, EPS was found to serve as a self-produced anchoring substrate that can be shed onto surfaces to enable cells to conduct TFP-dependent motility regardless of surface properties. These results suggested that in certain environments, such as in methylcellulose solution, the cells could bypass the need for EPS to anchor their TPF and conduct single-cell S motility to promote exploratory movement of colonies over new specific surfaces.

  16. Coordination of glioblastoma cell motility by PKCι

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldwin R Mitchell

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma is one of the deadliest forms of cancer, in part because of its highly invasive nature. The tumor suppressor PTEN is frequently mutated in glioblastoma and is known to contribute to the invasive phenotype. However the downstream events that promote invasion are not fully understood. PTEN loss leads to activation of the atypical protein kinase C, PKCι. We have previously shown that PKCι is required for glioblastoma cell invasion, primarily by enhancing cell motility. Here we have used time-lapse videomicroscopy to more precisely define the role of PKCι in glioblastoma. Results Glioblastoma cells in which PKCι was either depleted by shRNA or inhibited pharmacologically were unable to coordinate the formation of a single leading edge lamellipod. Instead, some cells generated multiple small, short-lived protrusions while others generated a diffuse leading edge that formed around the entire circumference of the cell. Confocal microscopy showed that this behavior was associated with altered behavior of the cytoskeletal protein Lgl, which is known to be inactivated by PKCι phosphorylation. Lgl in control cells localized to the lamellipod leading edge and did not associate with its binding partner non-muscle myosin II, consistent with it being in an inactive state. In PKCι-depleted cells, Lgl was concentrated at multiple sites at the periphery of the cell and remained in association with non-muscle myosin II. Videomicroscopy also identified a novel role for PKCι in the cell cycle. Cells in which PKCι was either depleted by shRNA or inhibited pharmacologically entered mitosis normally, but showed marked delays in completing mitosis. Conclusions PKCι promotes glioblastoma motility by coordinating the formation of a single leading edge lamellipod and has a role in remodeling the cytoskeleton at the lamellipod leading edge, promoting the dissociation of Lgl from non-muscle myosin II. In addition PKCι is required

  17. The Semen pH Affects Sperm Motility and Capacitation

    OpenAIRE

    Ji Zhou; Li Chen; Jie Li; Hongjun Li; Zhiwei Hong; Min Xie; Shengrong Chen; Bing Yao

    2015-01-01

    As the chemical environment of semen can have a profound effect on sperm quality, we examined the effect of pH on the motility, viability and capacitation of human sperm. The sperm in this study was collected from healthy males to avoid interference from other factors. The spermatozoa cultured in sperm nutrition solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were analyzed for sperm total motility, progressive motility (PR), hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) rate, and sperm penetration. Our results showed tha...

  18. Effectiveness of Hair Bundle Motility as the Cochlear Amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Sul, Bora; Iwasa, Kuni H.

    2009-01-01

    The effectiveness of hair bundle motility in mammalian and avian ears is studied by examining energy balance for a small sinusoidal displacement of the hair bundle. The condition that the energy generated by a hair bundle must be greater than energy loss due to the shear in the subtectorial gap per hair bundle leads to a limiting frequency that can be supported by hair-bundle motility. Limiting frequencies are obtained for two motile mechanisms for fast adaptation, the channel re-closure mode...

  19. Tug of war in motility assay experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamics of two groups of molecular motors pulling in opposite directions on a rigid filament is studied theoretically. To this end we first consider the behavior of one set of motors pulling in a single direction against an external force using a new mean-field approach. Based on these results we analyze a similar setup with two sets of motors pulling in opposite directions in a tug of war in the presence of an external force. In both cases we find that the interplay of fluid friction and protein friction leads to a complex phase diagram where the force–velocity relations can exhibit regions of bistability and spontaneous symmetry breaking. Finally, motivated by recent work, we turn to the case of motility assay experiments where motors bound to a surface push on a bundle of filaments. We find that, depending on the absence or the presence of bistability in the force–velocity curve at zero force, the bundle exhibits anomalous or biased diffusion on long-time and large-length scales

  20. [Progress of Researches on Relationship between Acu-moxibustion Induced Modulation of Small Intestinal Motility and Autonomic Nervous Activity ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Yu, Zhi; Xu, Bin

    2014-12-01

    A large body of evidence of clinical and experimental outcomes showed that acupuncture and moxibustion can effectively treat disorders of small intestinal motility. The present articJe collected related literatures and made an analysis on the correlation between the effect of acupuncture-moxibustion intervention and needle-manipulation techniques, stimulating quantities, acupoint recipes, and the body functional states, as well as the corresponding mechanisms. Results indicate that acupuncture stimulation of acupoints of the limbs mainly enhance the motility of the small intestine, while acupuncture stimulation of acupoints in the abdominal region predominately suppress it, which may be closely associated with its effects on activities of the autonomic nervous system. This conclusion tells us that in clinical treatment of small intestinal hypodynamia, acupoints of the limbs should be selected first while in treating intestinal hyperdynamia, those acupoints in the abdominal region should be taken preferably. In ad- dition, at present, non-invaded detection techniques of the small intestinal motility are definitely and urgently needed and will greatly promote the progress of researches of acu-moxibustion on the mechanism underlying modulation of small intestinal motility. PMID:25632580

  1. Proton-beam irradiated epithelioid cell melanoma of the ciliary body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A malignant ciliary body melanoma received proton-beam irradiation. After an apparent failure of the tumor to respond, the eye was enucleated. A predominantly epithelioid cell tumor appeared viable by light microscopy, and a low degree of mitotic activity persisted, despite therapy. The tumor cells, however, displayed degenerative changes ultrastructurally, presumably results of the radiotherapy. These consisted of numerous cytoskeletal filaments, lipid vacuoles, prominent phagolysosomes, and nuclear convolutions and fragmentations. The mitochondria were fewer in number in the present tumor than typically encountered in epithelioid cells. A rare leptomeric structure was discovered, probably an organizational modification of the cytoplasmic filaments. The tumor's capillaries showed radiation-induced changes in terms of thickened basement membranes and perivascular fibrin deposition. The foregoing features are indicative of cellular and metabolic injury from the radiotherapy, but these were evidently not sufficiently injurious to sterilize the tumor

  2. Choice of nasal nitric oxide technique as first-line test for primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marthin, J K; Nielsen, K G

    2011-01-01

    Nasal nitric oxide (nNO) has a well-known potential as an indirect discriminative marker between patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) and healthy subjects, but real-life experience and usefulness in young children is sparsely reported. Three nNO sampling methods were examined and compared...... as first-line tests for PCD. Healthy subjects, confirmed PCDs, consecutive referrals with PCD-like symptoms and patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) had nNO sampled during breath hold (BH-nNO), oral exhalation against resistance (OE-R-nNO) and tidal breathing (TB-nNO) aiming to expand age range into...... infancy. 282 subjects, 117 consecutive referrals, 59 PCDs, 49 CF patients and 57 healthy subjects, were included. All methods separated significantly between PCD and non-PCD, including CF with reliability, in ranking order BH-nNO>OE-R-nNO>TB-nNO. Acceptability in children ranked in reverse order. A...

  3. The presence of synaptic and chromosome disjunction mutants in Cenchrus ciliaris (Poaceae: Paniceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Visser

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic mutants are present in  Cenchrus ciliaris L This species, due to the presence of linear bivalents and occasion­al trivalents and quadrivalents, is an intermediate desynaptic species. In addition, geographical distribution and environmental factors, such as high temperatures and low humidity, could also have had an influence on the desynapsis observed.The disjunction of chromosomes during anaphase I was mostly abnormal in this desynaptic species. Precocious disjunction of chromosomes into chromatids occurred during anaphase I Due to the high incidence of this chromosome abnormality, a mutant gene,  'pc'  responsible for the disjunction of chromosomes, must be present. The absence of cytokinesis in one specimen indicates a recessive mutant gene,  'va' to be active in this species.

  4. The isolated ciliary bilayer is useful for studies of aqueous humor formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, M L; Yamada, E; Cummins, D; Mori, N; Mead, A; Murakami, M

    1991-01-01

    An intact ciliary epithelial bilayer has been isolated from the rabbit eye by perfusion, microsurgical dissection, and recovery techniques. Vital subcellular organelles and intercellular junctions of this epithelial bilayer preparation are very well preserved. The total electrical resistance of the epithelial bilayer is 350 ohms, and the transepithelial potential is 650 microV, nonpigmented epithelium side negative. The electrical resistance is reduced by 0.2 mM EGTA and the transepithelial potential reduced by 0.1 mM ouabain. Bicarbonate depletion at a constant pH of 7.4 rapidly and significantly reduces the transepithelial potential. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors decrease transmembrane potential by as much as 30%. These morphologic and physiologic experiments authenticate the validity of this bilayered epithelial preparation for future use in detailed studies of the mechanism of aqueous humor formation. PMID:1808804

  5. Efficiency optimization and symmetry-breaking in a model of ciliary locomotion

    CERN Document Server

    Michelin, Sebastien

    2010-01-01

    A variety of swimming microorganisms, called ciliates, exploit the bending of a large number of small and densely-packed organelles, termed cilia, in order to propel themselves in a viscous fluid. We consider a spherical envelope model for such ciliary locomotion where the dynamics of the individual cilia are replaced by that of a continuous overlaying surface allowed to deform tangentially to itself. Employing a variational approach, we determine numerically the time-periodic deformation of such surface which leads to low-Reynolds locomotion with minimum rate of energy dissipation (maximum efficiency). Employing both Lagrangian and Eulerian points of views, we show that in the optimal swimming stroke, individual cilia display weak asymmetric beating, but that a significant symmetry-breaking occurs at the organism level, with the whole surface deforming in a wave-like fashion reminiscent of metachronal waves of biological cilia. This wave motion is analyzed using a formal modal decomposition, is found to occu...

  6. Cytokine-Like Factor 1, an Essential Facilitator of Cardiotrophin-Like Cytokine:Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Receptor α Signaling and sorLA-Mediated Turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Anders Mejer; Pallesen, Lone Tjener; Bauer, Johannes; Vægter, Christian Bjerggaard; Nielsen, Morten Schallburg; Madsen, Peder

    2016-01-01

    Cardiotrophin-like cytokine:cytokine-like factor-1 (CLC:CLF-1) is a heterodimeric neurotropic cytokine that plays a crucial role during neuronal development. Mice lacking CLC:CLF-1 die soon after birth due to a suckling defect and show reduced numbers of motor neurons. Humans carrying mutations in CLC:CLF-1 develop similar disorders, known as Sohar-Crisponi or cold-induced sweating syndrome, and have a high risk of early death. It is well known that CLC binds the ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor α (CNTFRα) and is a prerequisite for signaling through the gp130/leukemia inhibitory factor receptor β (LIFRβ) heterodimer, whereas CLF-1 serves to promote the cellular release of CLC. However, the precise role of CLF-1 is unclear. Here, we report that CLF-1, based on its binding site for CLC and on two additional and independent sites for CNTFRα and sorLA, is a key player in CLC and CNTFRα signaling and turnover. The site for CNTFRα enables CLF-1 to promote CLC:CNTFRα complex formation and signaling. The second site establishes a link between the endocytic receptor sorLA and the tripartite CLC:CLF-1:CNTFRα complex and allows sorLA to downregulate the CNTFRα pool in stimulated cells. Finally, sorLA may bind and concentrate the tripartite soluble CLC:CLF-1:CNTFRα complex on cell membranes and thus facilitate its signaling through gp130/LIFRβ. PMID:26858303

  7. Foxg1-Cre Mediated Lrp2 Inactivation in the Developing Mouse Neural Retina, Ciliary and Retinal Pigment Epithelia Models Congenital High Myopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Cases

    Full Text Available Myopia is a common ocular disorder generally due to increased axial length of the eye-globe. Its extreme form high myopia (HM is a multifactorial disease leading to retinal and scleral damage, visual impairment or loss and is an important health issue. Mutations in the endocytic receptor LRP2 gene result in Donnai-Barrow (DBS and Stickler syndromes, both characterized by HM. To clearly establish the link between Lrp2 and congenital HM we inactivated Lrp2 in the mouse forebrain including the neural retina and the retinal and ciliary pigment epithelia. High resolution in vivo MRI imaging and ophthalmological analyses showed that the adult Lrp2-deficient eyes were 40% longer than the control ones mainly due to an excessive elongation of the vitreal chamber. They had an apparently normal intraocular pressure and developed chorioretinal atrophy and posterior scleral staphyloma features reminiscent of human myopic retinopathy. Immunomorphological and ultrastructural analyses showed that increased eye lengthening was first observed by post-natal day 5 (P5 and that it was accompanied by a rapid decrease of the bipolar, photoreceptor and retinal ganglion cells, and eventually the optic nerve axons. It was followed by scleral thinning and collagen fiber disorganization, essentially in the posterior pole. We conclude that the function of LRP2 in the ocular tissues is necessary for normal eye growth and that the Lrp2-deficient eyes provide a unique tool to further study human HM.

  8. Cytokine-Like Factor 1, an Essential Facilitator of Cardiotrophin-Like Cytokine:Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Receptor α Signaling and sorLA-Mediated Turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Jakob Vejby; Kristensen, Anders Mejer; Pallesen, Lone Tjener; Bauer, Johannes; Vægter, Christian Bjerggaard; Nielsen, Morten Schallburg; Madsen, Peder; Petersen, Claus Munck

    2016-04-15

    Cardiotrophin-like cytokine:cytokine-like factor-1 (CLC:CLF-1) is a heterodimeric neurotropic cytokine that plays a crucial role during neuronal development. Mice lacking CLC:CLF-1 die soon after birth due to a suckling defect and show reduced numbers of motor neurons. Humans carrying mutations in CLC:CLF-1 develop similar disorders, known as Sohar-Crisponi or cold-induced sweating syndrome, and have a high risk of early death. It is well known that CLC binds the ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor α (CNTFRα) and is a prerequisite for signaling through the gp130/leukemia inhibitory factor receptor β (LIFRβ) heterodimer, whereas CLF-1 serves to promote the cellular release of CLC. However, the precise role of CLF-1 is unclear. Here, we report that CLF-1, based on its binding site for CLC and on two additional and independent sites for CNTFRα and sorLA, is a key player in CLC and CNTFRα signaling and turnover. The site for CNTFRα enables CLF-1 to promote CLC:CNTFRα complex formation and signaling. The second site establishes a link between the endocytic receptor sorLA and the tripartite CLC:CLF-1:CNTFRα complex and allows sorLA to downregulate the CNTFRα pool in stimulated cells. Finally, sorLA may bind and concentrate the tripartite soluble CLC:CLF-1:CNTFRα complex on cell membranes and thus facilitate its signaling through gp130/LIFRβ. PMID:26858303

  9. Mass sperm motility is associated with fertility in sheep

    OpenAIRE

    David, Ingrid; Kohnke, Philippa; Lagriffoul, Gilles; Praud, Olivier; Plouarboué, Franck; Degond, Pierre; Druart, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The study was to focus on the relationship between wave motion (mass sperm motility, measured by a mass sperm motility score, manually assessed by artificial insemination (AI) center operators) and fertility in male sheep. A dataset of 711,562 artificial inseminations performed in seven breeds by five French AI centers during the 2001–2005 time period was used for the analysis. Factors influencing the outcome of the insemination, which is a binary response observed at lambing of either succes...

  10. Cell motility as persistent random motion: Theories from experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmeczi, D.; Mosler, S.; Hagedorn, P.H.; Larsen, N.B.; Flyvbjerg, H.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental time series for trajectories of motile cells may contain so much information that a systematic analysis will yield cell-type- specific motility models. Here we demonstrate how, using human keratinocytes and fibroblasts as examples. The two resulting models reflect the cells' differen...... roles in the organism, it seems, and show that a cell has a memory of past velocities. They also suggest how to distinguish quantitatively between various surfaces' compatibility with the two cell types....

  11. Endothelial cell motility, coordination and pattern formation during vasculogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Czirok, Andras

    2013-01-01

    How vascular networks assemble is a fundamental problem of developmental biology that also has medical importance. To explain the organizational principles behind vascular patterning, we must understand how can tissue level structures be controlled through cell behavior patterns like motility and adhesion that, in turn, are determined by biochemical signal transduction processes? We discuss the various ideas that have been proposed as mechanisms for vascular network assembly: cell motility gu...

  12. Motility of the jejunum after proctocolectomy and ileal pouch anastomosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Chaussade, S; Merite, F; Hautefeuille, M; Valleur, P; Hautefeuille, P.; Couturier, D

    1989-01-01

    Proctocolectomy with ileal pouch anastomosis could modify motility of the small intestine through two mechanisms: obstruction or bacterial overgrowth. Motility of the jejunum was measured in 11 patients with ileoanal anastomosis six (n = 6), or 12 (n = 5) months after closure of the loop ileostomy. Manometric recording from the jejunum were made during fasting (four hours) and after a liquid meal (one hour). These findings were compared with those of six healthy volunteers. Motor events were ...

  13. Ocular Motility Disturbances in Orbital Wall Fracture Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang Hun; Lew, Helen; Yun, Young Soo

    2005-01-01

    It is difficult to identify the exact cause of ocular motility disturbances in orbital wall fracture patients. By performing CT and ocular motility tests before and after surgery, this study analyzes the functions of the extraocular muscles and determines correlations between the results. Between February 2001 and January 2003, 45 eyes of 45 patients with orbital wall fractures, whose medical records could be traced back at least 6 months, underwent surgical repair in our hospital. All variab...

  14. Radiation-induced motility alterations in medulloblastoma cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rieken, Stefan; Rieber, Juliane; Brons, Stephan; Habermehl, Daniel; Rief, Harald; Orschiedt, Lena; Lindel, Katja; Klaus J. Weber; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2015-01-01

    Photon irradiation has been repeatedly suspected of increasing tumor cell motility and promoting locoregional recurrence of disease. This study was set up to analyse possible mechanisms underlying the potentially radiation-altered motility in medulloblastoma cells. Medulloblastoma cell lines D425 and Med8A were analyzed in migration and adhesion experiments with and without photon and carbon ion irradiation. Expression of integrins was determined by quantitative FACS analysis. Matrix metallop...

  15. Development of Gastrointestinal Motility and Feeding Techniques in Premature Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Aydın, Ahmet; Çam, Halit; Fıçıcıoğlu, Can; Mıkla, Şerare

    1994-01-01

    Premature infants have high energy and nutrient requirements for their rapid growth On the other hand they have many feeding problems caused by motility immaturities such as poor sucking and swallow reflexes a small stomach capacity and a weak gag reflex The purpose of this review is to discuss the enteral feeding techniques and the feeding schedule in premature infants Key words: Premature Infant Development Of Gastrointestinal Motility Feeding Techniques

  16. Effects of ouabain and furosemide on transepithelial electrical parameters of the isolated shark ciliary epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiederholt, M; Zadunaisky, J A

    1987-08-01

    Sections of the ciliary epithelium of adult sharks (Squalus acanthias) were mounted in Ussing-type chambers (area 0.2 cm2) for measurements of transepithelial potential difference (PD), short circuit current (SCC) and calculation of transepithelial resistance (R). In 15 preparations PD was aqueous side negative (-0.51 +/- 0.12 mV; SCC 18.3 +/- 2.5 microA cm-2; R 30.7 +/- 3.1 Ohm cm2). However, in 15 other preparations incubated in identical Ringer's solution PD was aqueous side positive (0.53 +/- 0.09 mV; SCC -19.6 +/- 2.3 microA cm-2; R 27.9 +/- 2.8 Ohm cm2). 10(-5) M ouabain or 10(-4) M furosemide were applied either to the aqueous or blood side of the isolated ciliary epithelium at transepithelial negative or positive PD. When the transepithelial PD was positive on the aqueous side ouabain decreased PD and SCC within 15 to 45 min. When the spontaneous PD was negative both PD and SCC decreased when ouabain was applied to the blood side. When the drug was given to the aqueous side a biphasic response (first stimulation, then inhibition) of PD and SCC was observed. Furosemide when given to the blood side (with aqueous side PD positive) or to the aqueous side (with aqueous side PD negative) decreased PD and SCC. However, a transient stimulation of both electrical parameters was observed when furosemide was applied to either the blood side (with aqueous side PD negative) or to the aqueous side (with aqueous side PD positive). The polarity and magnitude of PD and SCC probably depend on the relative activity of sodium and chloride pumps across the cell membranes of the non-pigmented and/or pigmented cell layer. However, additional transport mechanisms cannot be excluded. PMID:3038770

  17. Histamine Stimulates Ciliary Beat Frequency via the H2 Receptor in the Protochordate Botryllus schlosseri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cima, Francesca; Franchi, Nicola

    2016-05-01

    Histamine is a biogenic molecule that plays a role in many physiological pathways via binding to a specific receptor. Histaminergic receptors belong to the large family of seven-transmembrane α-helix domain receptors classified in mammals into four distinct classes: H1, H2, H3, and H4. Despite being widely studied in vertebrates, few data are available on the invertebrate receptors, with only predicted H1 and H2 sequences for nonchordate deuterostomes. Here, we report the first characterized transcript sequence for an H2 receptor from the colonial ascidian Botryllus schlosseri, describing the localization of both transcript and protein during blastogenic development through in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Its phylogenetic relationships with deuterostome orthologous proteins are reported, its role in ciliary beat frequency (CBF) in cultured stigma cells of the branchial basket is outlined, and the effects of histamine and its receptor agonists and antagonists are analyzed. In the presence of increasing concentrations of histamine in the medium, CBF increases similarly to the selective H2 receptor agonist dimaprit. In contrast, ranitidine, which is an inhibitor of the H2 receptor, causes a significant inhibition of CBF, similar to that observed after preincubation with the specific anti-BsHRH2 or the anti-human HRH2 antibody. In cells bordering the branchial basket stigmata, both antibodies colocalize in the proximal region of the ciliary plasmalemma, and histamine is present inside vesicles of the apical region, thus supporting the hypothesis of a histamine-binding H2 receptor control of the pharyngeal mucociliary transport similar to that of the upper respiratory tract and middle ear in mammals. PMID:27139577

  18. Guaifenesin and increased sperm motility: a preliminary case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Means

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Gary Means1, Cristóbal S Berry-Cabán2, Kurt Hammermeuller11Department of Family Medicine, 2Department of Research, Womack Army Medical Center, Fort Bragg, NC, USABackground: A review of the literature and an extensive Medline search revealed that this is the first case report of the use of guaifenesin to increase sperm motility.Case: A 32-year-old male presented for an infertility evaluation. He reported an inability to conceive with his wife after 18 months of unprotected intercourse. A semen analysis was performed that included spermatozoa count, liquefaction, morphology, motility, viscosity and volume. Initial results of the semen analysis demonstrated low sperm count and motility. The provider offered treatment with guaifenesin 600 mg extended release tablets twice daily. Two months after guaifenesin therapy the semen analysis was repeated that demonstrated marked improvement in both total sperm count and motility.Conclusion: Evidence for the effectiveness of guaifenesin is almost entirely anecdotal. Given the mechanism of action of guaifenesin, it is not clear from this case why the patient demonstrated such a large improvement in both sperm count and motility. Additional studies of the effects of guaifenesin on male fertility could yield information of the medication's effect on men with normal or decreased total sperm counts.Keywords: sperm motility, guaifenesin, infertility, male pregnancy

  19. Transcriptional profiling of C. elegans DAF-19 uncovers a ciliary base-associated protein and a CDK/CCRK/LF2p-related kinase required for intraflagellar transport

    OpenAIRE

    Phirke, Prasad; Efimenko, Evgeni; Mohan, Swetha; Burghoorn, Jan; Crona, Filip; Bakhoum, Mathieu W.; Trieb, Maria; Schuske, Kim; Erik M. Jorgensen; Piasecki, Brian P.; Leroux, Michel R.; Swoboda, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Cilia are ubiquitous cell surface projections that mediate various sensory- and motility-based processes and are implicated in a growing number of multi-organ genetic disorders termed ciliopathies. To identify new components required for cilium biogenesis and function, we sought to further define and validate the transcriptional targets of DAF-19, the ciliogenic C. elegans RFX transcription factor. Transcriptional profiling of daf-19 mutants (which do not form cilia) and wild-type animals was...

  20. Ciliary neurotrophic factor activates leptin-like pathways and reduces body fat, without cachexia or rebound weight gain, even in leptin-resistant obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, P. D.; Anderson, K. D.; Sleeman, M. W.; Wong, V.; Tan, J.; Hijarunguru, A.; Corcoran, T L; Murray, J. D.; Thabet, K. E.; Yancopoulos, G D; Wiegand, S J

    2001-01-01

    Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF) was first characterized as a trophic factor for motor neurons in the ciliary ganglion and spinal cord, leading to its evaluation in humans suffering from motor neuron disease. In these trials, CNTF caused unexpected and substantial weight loss, raising concerns that it might produce cachectic-like effects. Countering this possibility was the suggestion that CNTF was working via a leptin-like mechanism to cause weight loss, based on the find...

  1. Differences between the neurogenic and proliferative abilities of Müller glia with stem cell characteristics and the ciliary epithelium from the adult human eye

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatia, Bhairavi; Jayaram, Hari; Singhal, Shweta; Jones, Megan F; Limb, G. Astrid

    2011-01-01

    Much controversy has arisen on the nature and sources of stem cells in the adult human retina. Whilst ciliary epithelium has been thought to constitute a source of neural stem cells, a population of Müller glia in the neural retina has also been shown to exhibit neurogenic characteristics. This study aimed to compare the neurogenic and proliferative abilities between these two major cell populations. It also examined whether differences exist between the pigmented and non-pigmented ciliary ep...

  2. The anti-motility signaling mechanism of TGFβ3 that controls cell traffic during skin wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Arum; Bandyopadhyay, Balaji; Jayaprakash, Priyamvada; Lua, Ingrid; Sahu, Divya; Chen, Mei; Woodley, David T; Li, Wei

    2012-12-15

    When skin is wounded, migration of epidermal keratinocytes at the wound edge initiates within hours, whereas migration of dermal fibroblasts toward the wounded area remains undetectable until several days later. This "cell type traffic" regulation ensures proper healing of the wound, as disruptions of the regulation could either cause delay of wound healing or result in hypertrophic scars. TGFβ3 is the critical traffic controller that selectively halts migration of the dermal, but not epidermal, cells to ensure completion of wound re-epithelialization prior to wound remodeling. However, the mechanism of TGFβ3's anti-motility signaling has never been investigated. We report here that activated TβRII transmits the anti-motility signal of TGFβ3 in full to TβRI, since expression of the constitutively activated TβRI-TD mutant was sufficient to replace TGFβ3 to block PDGF-bb-induced dermal fibroblast migration. Second, the three components of R-Smad complex are all required. Individual downregulation of Smad2, Smad3 or Smad4 prevented TGFβ3 from inhibiting dermal fibroblast migration. Third, Protein Kinase Array allowed us to identify the protein kinase A (PKA) as a specific downstream effector of R-Smads in dermal fibroblasts. Activation of PKA alone blocked PDGF-bb-induced dermal fibroblast migration, just like TGFβ3. Downregulation of PKA's catalytic subunit nullified the anti-motility signaling of TGFβ3. This is the first report on anti-motility signaling mechanism by TGFβ family cytokines. Significance of this finding is not only limited to wound healing but also to other human disorders, such as heart attack and cancer, where the diseased cells have often managed to avoid the anti-motility effect of TGFβ. PMID:23259050

  3. The anti-motility signaling mechanism of TGFβ3 that controls cell traffic during skin wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arum Han

    2012-09-01

    When skin is wounded, migration of epidermal keratinocytes at the wound edge initiates within hours, whereas migration of dermal fibroblasts toward the wounded area remains undetectable until several days later. This “cell type traffic” regulation ensures proper healing of the wound, as disruptions of the regulation could either cause delay of wound healing or result in hypertrophic scars. TGFβ3 is the critical traffic controller that selectively halts migration of the dermal, but not epidermal, cells to ensure completion of wound re-epithelialization prior to wound remodeling. However, the mechanism of TGFβ3's anti-motility signaling has never been investigated. We report here that activated TβRII transmits the anti-motility signal of TGFβ3 in full to TβRI, since expression of the constitutively activated TβRI-TD mutant was sufficient to replace TGFβ3 to block PDGF-bb-induced dermal fibroblast migration. Second, the three components of R-Smad complex are all required. Individual downregulation of Smad2, Smad3 or Smad4 prevented TGFβ3 from inhibiting dermal fibroblast migration. Third, Protein Kinase Array allowed us to identify the protein kinase A (PKA as a specific downstream effector of R-Smads in dermal fibroblasts. Activation of PKA alone blocked PDGF-bb-induced dermal fibroblast migration, just like TGFβ3. Downregulation of PKA's catalytic subunit nullified the anti-motility signaling of TGFβ3. This is the first report on anti-motility signaling mechanism by TGFβ family cytokines. Significance of this finding is not only limited to wound healing but also to other human disorders, such as heart attack and cancer, where the diseased cells have often managed to avoid the anti-motility effect of TGFβ.

  4. The interplay between RPGR, PDEδ and Arl2/3 regulate the ciliary targeting of farnesylated cargo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wätzlich, Denise; Vetter, Ingrid; Gotthardt, Katja; Miertzschke, Mandy; Chen, Yong-Xiang; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Ismail, Shehab

    2013-01-01

    Defects in primary cilia result in human diseases known as ciliopathies. The retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR), mutated in the most severe form of the eye disease, is located at the transition zone of the ciliary organelle. The RPGR-interacting partner PDEδ is involved in trafficking of farnesylated ciliary cargo, but the significance of this interaction is unknown. The crystal structure of the propeller domain of RPGR shows the location of patient mutations and how they perturb the structure. The RPGR·PDEδ complex structure shows PDEδ on a highly conserved surface patch of RPGR. Biochemical experiments and structural considerations show that RPGR can bind with high affinity to cargo-loaded PDEδ and exposes the Arl2/Arl3-binding site on PDEδ. On the basis of these results, we propose a model where RPGR is acting as a scaffold protein recruiting cargo-loaded PDEδ and Arl3 to release lipidated cargo into cilia. PMID:23559067

  5. Ascorbate blocks endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF)-mediated vasodilatation in the bovine ciliary vascular bed and rat mesentery

    OpenAIRE

    McNeish, Alister J.; Wilson, William S; Martin, William

    2002-01-01

    The effects of ascorbate were assessed on vasodilatation mediated by endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) in the ciliary vascular bed of the bovine isolated perfused eye and in the rat isolated perfused mesenteric arterial bed.In the bovine eye, EDHF-mediated vasodilator responses induced by acetylcholine or bradykinin were powerfully blocked when ascorbate (50 μM) was included in the perfusion medium for at least 120 min; with acetylcholine a normally-masked muscarinic vasoconst...

  6. Effects of ciliary neurotrophic factor on retrograde cell reaction after facial nerve crush in young adults rats

    OpenAIRE

    Gispen, W.H.; Ulenkate, H.J.L.M.; Jennekens, F.G.I.

    1996-01-01

    Locally applied ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has a powerful effect on retrograde axonal reaction following facial nerve crush in neonatal rats. We examined whether it also exerts a strong effect on retrograde axonal reaction in young adult rats when administered subcutaneously. The dose was 1 mg/kg body weight, three times a week, similar to that used in a previous experiment in which CNTF was reported to have an effect. We studied changes in the morphology of the motor nerve cell bodie...

  7. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) for human retinal degeneration: Phase I trial of CNTF delivered by encapsulated cell intraocular implants

    OpenAIRE

    Sieving, Paul A.; Caruso, Rafael C.; Tao, Weng; Coleman, Hanna R.; Thompson, Darby J. S.; Fullmer, Keri R.; Bush, Ronald A.

    2006-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors are agents with a promising ability to retard progression of neurodegenerative diseases and are effective in slowing photoreceptor degeneration in animal models of retinitis pigmentosa. Here we report a human clinical trial of a neurotrophic factor for retinal neurodegeneration. In this Phase I safety trial, human ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) was delivered by cells transfected with the human CNTF gene and sequestered within capsules that were surgically implanted in...

  8. Effect of Locally Administered Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor on the Survival of Transected and Repaired Adult Sheep Facial Nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Rashid Al Abri; Arif Ali Kolethekkat; Kelleher, Michael O.; Lynn M. Myles; Michael A. Glasby

    2014-01-01

    Objective: to determine whether the administration of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF) at the site of repaired facial nerve enhances regeneration in the adult sheep model. Methods: Ten adult sheep were divided into 2 groups: control and study group (CNTF group). In the CNTF group, the buccal branch of the facial nerve was transected and then repaired by epineural sutures. CNTF was injected over the left depressor labii maxillaris muscle in the vicinity of the transected and repaired ner...

  9. Use of suppression subtractive hybridization to identify genes regulated by ciliary neurotrophic factor in postnatal retinal explants

    OpenAIRE

    Roger, Jérôme; Goureau, Olivier; Sahel, José-Alain; Guillonneau, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Purpose The retinal progenitors are multipotential, and the decision taken by a progenitor to differentiate along a particular path depends on both cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic factors. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a member of the interleukin-6 (IL-6) family, added to rat postnatal retinal progenitors inhibits rod photoreceptor cell differentiation, promotes Müller glia genesis and enhances the expression of bipolar neuron markers. We hypothesized that those transcripts regulated ...

  10. Opposite effects of a high-fat diet and calorie restriction on ciliary neurotrophic factor signalling in the mouse hypothalamus

    OpenAIRE

    AntonioGiordano; SaverioCinti

    2013-01-01

    In the mouse hypothalamus, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is mainly expressed by ependymal cells and tanycytes of the ependymal layer covering the third ventricle. Since exogenously administered CNTF causes reduced food intake and weight loss, we tested whether endogenous CNTF might be involved in energy balance regulation. We thus evaluated CNTF production and responsiveness in the hypothalamus of mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD), of ob/ob obese mice, and of mice fed a calorie restriction ...

  11. Ciliary neurotrophic factor cell-based delivery prevents synaptic impairment and improves memory in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The development of novel therapeutic strategies for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) represents one of the biggest unmet medical needs today. Application of neurotrophic factors able to modulate neuronal survival and synaptic connectivity is a promising therapeutic approach for AD. We aimed to determine whether the loco-regional delivery of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) could prevent amyloid-beta oligomer-induced synaptic damages and associated cognitive impairments that typify AD. To ensure lo...

  12. gp130 signaling in proopiomelanocortin neurons mediates the acute anorectic response to centrally applied ciliary neurotrophic factor

    OpenAIRE

    Janoschek, Ruth; Plum, Leona; Koch, Linda; Münzberg, Heike; Diano, Sabrina; Shanabrough, Marya; Müller, Werner; Horvath, Tamas L.; Brüning, Jens C.

    2006-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) exerts anorectic effects by overcoming leptin resistance via activation of hypothalamic neurons. However, the exact site of CNTF action in the hypothalamus has not yet been identified. Using Cre-loxP-mediated recombination in vivo, we have selectively ablated the common cytokine signaling chain gp130, which is required for functional CNTF signaling, in proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing neurons. POMC-specific gp130 knockout mice exhibit unaltered numbers ...

  13. Expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and its tripartite receptor complex by cells of the human optic nerve head

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiaochun; Clark, Abbot F.; Wordinger, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes gene expression, cell survival and differentiation in various types of peripheral and central neurons, glia and nonneural cells. The level of CNTF rises rapidly upon injury to neural tissue, suggesting that CNTF exerts its cytoprotective effects after release from cells via mechanisms induced by cell injury. The purpose of this study was to determine if cells in the optic nerve head express CNTF and its tripartite receptor complex. Methods W...

  14. Opposite effects of a high-fat diet and calorie restriction on ciliary neurotrophic factor signaling in the mouse hypothalamus

    OpenAIRE

    Severi, Ilenia; Perugini, Jessica; Mondini, Eleonora; Smorlesi, Arianna; Frontini, Andrea; Cinti, Saverio; Giordano, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In the mouse hypothalamus, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is mainly expressed by ependymal cells and tanycytes of the ependymal layer covering the third ventricle. Since exogenously administered CNTF causes reduced food intake and weight loss, we tested whether endogenous CNTF might be involved in energy balance regulation. We thus evaluated CNTF production and responsiveness in the hypothalamus of mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD), of ob/ob obese mice, and of mice fed a calorie restriction ...

  15. Synthesis and localization of ciliary neurotrophic factor in the sciatic nerve of the adult rat after lesion and during regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Sendtner, Michael; Stöckli, K. A.; Thoenen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is expressed in high quantities in Schwann cells of peripheral nerves during postnatal development of the rat. The absence of a hydrophobic leader sequence and the immunohistochemical localization of CNTF within the cytoplasm of these cells indicate that the factor might not be available to responsive neurons under physiological conditions. However, CNTF supports the survival of a variety of embryonic neurons, including spinal motoneurons in culture. Moreove...

  16. Long-term lentiviral-mediated expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor in the striatum of Huntington's disease transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Zala, Diana; Bensadoun, Jean-Charles; Pereira de Almeida, Luis; Leavitt, Blair R.; Gutekunst, Claire-Anne; Aebischer, Patrick; Hayden, Michael R; Déglon, Nicole

    2004-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has been shown to prevent behavioral deficits and striatal degeneration in neurotoxic models of Huntington's disease (HD), but its effect in a genetic model has not been evaluated. Lentiviral vectors expressing the human CNTF or LacZ reporter gene were therefore injected in the striatum of wild-type (WT) and transgenic mice expressing full-length huntingtin with 72 CAG repeats (YAC72). Behavioral analysis showed increased locomotor activity in 5- to 6-month-...

  17. Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Stimulates Muscle Glucose Uptake by a PI3-Kinase–Dependent Pathway That Is Impaired With Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Steinberg, Gregory R.; Watt, Matthew J.; Ernst, Matthias; Birnbaum, Morris J.; Kemp, Bruce E.; Jørgensen, Sebastian Beck

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) reverses muscle insulin resistance by increasing fatty acid oxidation through gp130-LIF receptor signaling to the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). CNTF also increases Akt signaling in neurons and adipocytes. Because both Akt and AMPK regulate glucose uptake, we investigated muscle glucose uptake in response to CNTF signaling in lean and obese mice. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Mice were injected intraperitoneally with saline or CNTF, and blood g...

  18. Identification of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) residues essential for leukemia inhibitory factor receptor binding and generation of CNTF receptor antagonists.

    OpenAIRE

    Di Marco, A; Gloaguen, I; Graziani, R; Paonessa, G; Saggio, I; Hudson, K R; Laufer, R

    1996-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) drives the sequential assembly of a receptor complex containing the ligand-specific alpha-receptor subunit (CNTFR alpha) and the signal transducers gp130 and leukemia inhibitory factor receptor-beta (LIFR). The D1 structural motif, located at the beginning of the D-helix of human CNTF, contains two amino acid residues, F152 and K155, which are conserved among all cytokines that signal through LIFR. The functional importance of these residues was assessed by ...

  19. Identification of the probable site of synthesis of butyrylcholinesterase in the superior cervical and ciliary ganglia of the cat.

    OpenAIRE

    Uchida, E; Koelle, G B

    1983-01-01

    The source of butyrylcholinesterase (acylcholine acylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.8) in the ganglion cells of the cat superior cervical and ciliary ganglia has been elusive, inasmuch as the enzyme is present in high concentrations in the neuropil, where it is confined largely to the dendritic and perikaryonal plasma membranes, but appears to be absent from the perikarya. In the present study, ganglionic butyrylcholinesterase was near-totally inactivated by the injection of tetramonoisopropyl pyyrophos...

  20. Ciliary neurotrophic factor promotes motor reinnervation of the musculocutaneous nerve in an experimental model of end-to-side neurorrhaphy

    OpenAIRE

    Čelakovský Pavel; Stejskal Lubomír; Raška Otakar; Klusáková Ilona; Dubový Petr; Haninec Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background It is difficult to repair nerve if proximal stump is unavailable or autogenous nerve grafts are insufficient for reconstructing extensive nerve damage. Therefore, alternative methods have been developed, including lateral anastomosis based on axons' ability to send out collateral sprouts into denervated nerve. The different capacity of a sensory or motor axon to send a sprout is controversial and may be controlled by cytokines and/or neurotrophic factors like ciliary neuro...

  1. Multi-scale motility amplitude associated with suicidal thoughts in major depression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premananda Indic

    Full Text Available Major depression occurs at high prevalence in the general population, often starts in juvenile years, recurs over a lifetime, and is strongly associated with disability and suicide. Searches for biological markers in depression may have been hindered by assuming that depression is a unitary and relatively homogeneous disorder, mainly of mood, rather than addressing particular, clinically crucial features or diagnostic subtypes. Many studies have implicated quantitative alterations of motility rhythms in depressed human subjects. Since a candidate feature of great public-health significance is the unusually high risk of suicidal behavior in depressive disorders, we studied correlations between a measure (vulnerability index [VI] derived from multi-scale characteristics of daily-motility rhythms in depressed subjects (n = 36 monitored with noninvasive, wrist-worn, electronic actigraphs and their self-assessed level of suicidal thinking operationalized as a wish to die. Patient-subjects had a stable clinical diagnosis of bipolar-I, bipolar-II, or unipolar major depression (n = 12 of each type. VI was associated inversely with suicidal thinking (r = -0.61 with all subjects and r = -0.73 with bipolar disorder subjects; both p<0.0001 and distinguished patients with bipolar versus unipolar major depression with a sensitivity of 91.7% and a specificity of 79.2%. VI may be a useful biomarker of characteristic features of major depression, contribute to differentiating bipolar and unipolar depression, and help to detect risk of suicide. An objective biomarker of suicide-risk could be advantageous when patients are unwilling or unable to share suicidal thinking with clinicians.

  2. Host Gut Motility Promotes Competitive Exclusion within a Model Intestinal Microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Travis J; Jemielita, Matthew; Baker, Ryan P; Schlomann, Brandon H; Logan, Savannah L; Ganz, Julia; Melancon, Ellie; Eisen, Judith S; Guillemin, Karen; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2016-07-01

    The gut microbiota is a complex consortium of microorganisms with the ability to influence important aspects of host health and development. Harnessing this "microbial organ" for biomedical applications requires clarifying the degree to which host and bacterial factors act alone or in combination to govern the stability of specific lineages. To address this issue, we combined bacteriological manipulation and light sheet fluorescence microscopy to monitor the dynamics of a defined two-species microbiota within a vertebrate gut. We observed that the interplay between each population and the gut environment produces distinct spatiotemporal patterns. As a consequence, one species dominates while the other experiences sudden drops in abundance that are well fit by a stochastic mathematical model. Modeling revealed that direct bacterial competition could only partially explain the observed phenomena, suggesting that a host factor is also important in shaping the community. We hypothesized the host determinant to be gut motility, and tested this mechanism by measuring colonization in hosts with enteric nervous system dysfunction due to a mutation in the ret locus, which in humans is associated with the intestinal motility disorder known as Hirschsprung disease. In mutant hosts we found reduced gut motility and, confirming our hypothesis, robust coexistence of both bacterial species. This study provides evidence that host-mediated spatial structuring and stochastic perturbation of communities can drive bacterial population dynamics within the gut, and it reveals a new facet of the intestinal host-microbe interface by demonstrating the capacity of the enteric nervous system to influence the microbiota. Ultimately, these findings suggest that therapeutic strategies targeting the intestinal ecosystem should consider the dynamic physical nature of the gut environment. PMID:27458727

  3. Normal aspects of colorectal motility and abnormalities in slow transit constipation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabrio Bassotti; Giuseppe de Roberto; Danilo Castellani; Luca Sediari; Antonio Morelli

    2005-01-01

    Human colonic motility is a relatively difficult topic to investigate. However, the refinement of manometric techniques in recent years enabled us to study both the proximal and distal segments of the viscus. The present paper reviews our knowledge about normal aspects of colorectal motility in man and the abnormalities found in slow transit constipation (STC), one of the most frequent and difficult to treat subtypes of constipation. An internetbased search strategy of the Medline and Science Citation Index was performed using the keywords colon, colonic,colorectal, constipation, slow transit, motility, recal, rectum in various combinations with the Boolean operators AND, OR and NOT. Only articles related to human studies were used, and manual cross-referencing was also performed.Most of colonic motor activity is represented by single nonpropagated contractions, rarely organized in bursts; this activity is maximal during the day, especially after waking and following meals. In addition, a specialized propagated activity with propulsive features is detectable, represented by high- and low-amplitude propagated contractions. In the severe form of constipation represented by the slow transit type, the above motor activity is completely deranged. In fact, both basal segmental activity (especially in response to meals) and propagated activity (especially that of high amplitude) are usually decreased, and this may represent a physiologic marker of this disorder. Human colonic motor activity is quite a complex issue, still only partly understood and investigated, due to anatomic and physiological difficulties. In recent years, however, some more data have been obtained, even in proximal segments. These data have helped in elucidating, althoughonly in part, some pathophysiological mechanisms of chronic constipation, and especially of the STC subtype.

  4. Motility alterations in celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto-Sanchez, Maria Ines; Bercik, Premysl; Verdu, Elena F

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of gut motility is complex and involves neuromuscular, immune and environmental mechanisms. It is well established that patients with celiac disease (CD) often display gut dysmotility. Studies have shown the presence of disturbed esophageal motility, altered gastric emptying, and dysmotility of the small intestine, gallbladder and colon in untreated CD. Most of these motor abnormalities resolve after a strict gluten-free diet, suggesting that mechanisms related to the inflammatory condition and disease process are responsible for the motor dysfunction. Motility abnormalities are also a hallmark of functional bowel disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), where it has been proposed as underlying mechanism for symptom generation (diarrhea, constipation, bloating). Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a poorly defined entity, mostly self-diagnosed, that presents clinically with IBS symptoms in the absence of specific celiac markers. Patients with NCGS are believed to react symptomatically to wheat components, and some studies have proposed the presence of low-grade inflammation in these patients. There is little information regarding the functional characterization of these patients before and after a gluten-free diet. A study suggested the presence of altered gastrointestinal transit in NCGS patients who also have a high prevalence of nonspecific anti-gliadin antibodies. Results of an ongoing clinical study in NCGS patients with positive anti-gliadin antibodies before and after a gluten-free diet will be discussed. Elucidating the mechanisms for symptom generation in NCGS patients is important to find new therapeutic alternatives to the burden of imposing a strict gluten-free diet in patients who do not have CD. PMID:25925923

  5. Rac and Rho GTPases in cancer cell motility control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parri Matteo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rho GTPases represent a family of small GTP-binding proteins involved in cell cytoskeleton organization, migration, transcription, and proliferation. A common theme of these processes is a dynamic reorganization of actin cytoskeleton which has now emerged as a major switch control mainly carried out by Rho and Rac GTPase subfamilies, playing an acknowledged role in adaptation of cell motility to the microenvironment. Cells exhibit three distinct modes of migration when invading the 3 D environment. Collective motility leads to movement of cohorts of cells which maintain the adherens junctions and move by photolytic degradation of matrix barriers. Single cell mesenchymal-type movement is characterized by an elongated cellular shape and again requires extracellular proteolysis and integrin engagement. In addition it depends on Rac1-mediated cell polarization and lamellipodia formation. Conversely, in amoeboid movement cells have a rounded morphology, the movement is independent from proteases but requires high Rho GTPase to drive elevated levels of actomyosin contractility. These two modes of cell movement are interconvertible and several moving cells, including tumor cells, show an high degree of plasticity in motility styles shifting ad hoc between mesenchymal or amoeboid movements. This review will focus on the role of Rac and Rho small GTPases in cell motility and in the complex relationship driving the reciprocal control between Rac and Rho granting for the opportunistic motile behaviour of aggressive cancer cells. In addition we analyse the role of these GTPases in cancer progression and metastatic dissemination.

  6. Bidirectional motility of the fission yeast kinesin-5, Cut7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edamatsu, Masaki, E-mail: cedam@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • Motile properties of Cut7 (fission yeast kinesin-5) were studied for the first time. • Half-length Cut7 moved toward plus-end direction of microtubule. • Full-length Cut7 moved toward minus-end direction of microtubule. • N- and C-terminal microtubule binding sites did not switch the motile direction. - Abstract: Kinesin-5 is a homotetrameric motor with its motor domain at the N-terminus. Kinesin-5 crosslinks microtubules and functions in separating spindle poles during mitosis. In this study, the motile properties of Cut7, fission yeast kinesin-5, were examined for the first time. In in vitro motility assays, full-length Cut7 moved toward minus-end of microtubules, but the N-terminal half of Cut7 moved toward the opposite direction. Furthermore, additional truncated constructs lacking the N-terminal or C-terminal regions, but still contained the motor domain, did not switch the motile direction. These indicated that Cut7 was a bidirectional motor, and microtubule binding regions at the N-terminus and C-terminus were not involved in its directionality.

  7. Control of actin-based motility through localized actin binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide variety of cell biological and biomimetic systems use actin polymerization to drive motility. It has been suggested that an object such as a bacterium can propel itself by self-assembling a high concentration of actin behind it, if it is repelled by actin. However, it is also known that it is essential for the moving object to bind actin. Therefore, a key question is how the actin tail can propel an object when it both binds and repels the object. We present a physically consistent Brownian dynamics model for actin-based motility that includes the minimal components of the dendritic nucleation model and allows for both attractive and repulsive interactions between actin and a moveable disc. We find that the concentration gradient of filamentous actin generated by polymerization is sufficient to propel the object, even with moderately strong binding interactions. Additionally, actin binding can act as a biophysical cap, and may directly control motility through modulation of network growth. Overall, this mechanism is robust in that it can drive motility against a load up to a stall pressure that depends on the Young’s modulus of the actin network and can explain several aspects of actin-based motility. (paper)

  8. Sodium affects the sperm motility in the European eel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vílchez, M Carmen; Morini, Marina; Peñaranda, David S; Gallego, Víctor; Asturiano, Juan F; Pérez, Luz

    2016-08-01

    The role of seminal plasma sodium and activation media sodium on sperm motility was examined by selectively removing the element from these two media, in European eel sperm. Sperm size (sperm head area) was also measured using an ASMA (Automated Sperm Morphometry Analyses) system, in the different conditions. Intracellular sodium [Na(+)]i was quantitatively analyzed by first time in the spermatozoa from a marine fish species. Measurement of [Na(+)]i was done before and after motility activation, by Flow Cytometry, using CoroNa Green AM as a dye. Sperm motility activation induced an increase in [Na(+)]i, from 96.72mM in quiescent stage to 152.21mM post-activation in seawater. A significant decrease in sperm head area was observed post-activation in seawater. There was a notable reduction in sperm motility when sodium was removed from the seminal plasma, but not when it was removed from the activation media. Sodium removal was also linked to a significant reduction in sperm head area in comparison to the controls. Our results indicate that the presence of the ion Na(+) in the seminal plasma (or in the extender medium) is necessary for the preservation of sperm motility in European eel, probably because it plays a role in maintaining an appropriate sperm cell volume in the quiescent stage of the spermatozoa. PMID:27085371

  9. Bidirectional motility of the fission yeast kinesin-5, Cut7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Motile properties of Cut7 (fission yeast kinesin-5) were studied for the first time. • Half-length Cut7 moved toward plus-end direction of microtubule. • Full-length Cut7 moved toward minus-end direction of microtubule. • N- and C-terminal microtubule binding sites did not switch the motile direction. - Abstract: Kinesin-5 is a homotetrameric motor with its motor domain at the N-terminus. Kinesin-5 crosslinks microtubules and functions in separating spindle poles during mitosis. In this study, the motile properties of Cut7, fission yeast kinesin-5, were examined for the first time. In in vitro motility assays, full-length Cut7 moved toward minus-end of microtubules, but the N-terminal half of Cut7 moved toward the opposite direction. Furthermore, additional truncated constructs lacking the N-terminal or C-terminal regions, but still contained the motor domain, did not switch the motile direction. These indicated that Cut7 was a bidirectional motor, and microtubule binding regions at the N-terminus and C-terminus were not involved in its directionality

  10. Effects of surface passivation on gliding motility assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Maloney

    Full Text Available In this study, we report differences in the observed gliding speed of microtubules dependent on the choice of bovine casein used as a surface passivator. We observed differences in both speed and support of microtubules in each of the assays. Whole casein, comprised of α(s1, α(s2, β, and κ casein, supported motility and averaged speeds of 966±7 nm/s. Alpha casein can be purchased as a combination of α(s1 and α(s2 and supported gliding motility and average speeds of 949±4 nm/s. Beta casein did not support motility very well and averaged speeds of 870±30 nm/s. Kappa casein supported motility very poorly and we were unable to obtain an average speed. Finally, we observed that mixing alpha, beta, and kappa casein with the proportions found in bovine whole casein supported motility and averaged speeds of 966±6 nm/s.

  11. TMEM107 recruits ciliopathy proteins to subdomains of the ciliary transition zone and causes Joubert syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambacher, Nils J; Bruel, Ange-Line; van Dam, Teunis J P; Szymańska, Katarzyna; Slaats, Gisela G; Kuhns, Stefanie; McManus, Gavin J; Kennedy, Julie E; Gaff, Karl; Wu, Ka Man; van der Lee, Robin; Burglen, Lydie; Doummar, Diane; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Faivre, Laurence; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Saunier, Sophie; Curd, Alistair; Peckham, Michelle; Giles, Rachel H; Johnson, Colin A; Huynen, Martijn A; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Blacque, Oliver E

    2016-01-01

    The transition zone (TZ) ciliary subcompartment is thought to control cilium composition and signalling by facilitating a protein diffusion barrier at the ciliary base. TZ defects cause ciliopathies such as Meckel-Gruber syndrome (MKS), nephronophthisis (NPHP) and Joubert syndrome (JBTS). However, the molecular composition and mechanisms underpinning TZ organization and barrier regulation are poorly understood. To uncover candidate TZ genes, we employed bioinformatics (coexpression and co-evolution) and identified TMEM107 as a TZ protein mutated in oral-facial-digital syndrome and JBTS patients. Mechanistic studies in Caenorhabditis elegans showed that TMEM-107 controls ciliary composition and functions redundantly with NPHP-4 to regulate cilium integrity, TZ docking and assembly of membrane to microtubule Y-link connectors. Furthermore, nematode TMEM-107 occupies an intermediate layer of the TZ-localized MKS module by organizing recruitment of the ciliopathy proteins MKS-1, TMEM-231 (JBTS20) and JBTS-14 (TMEM237). Finally, MKS module membrane proteins are immobile and super-resolution microscopy in worms and mammalian cells reveals periodic localizations within the TZ. This work expands the MKS module of ciliopathy-causing TZ proteins associated with diffusion barrier formation and provides insight into TZ subdomain architecture. PMID:26595381

  12. Sonic Hedgehog dependent phosphorylation by CK1α and GRK2 is required for ciliary accumulation and activation of smoothened.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbin Chen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh signaling regulates embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis through the GPCR-like protein Smoothened (Smo, but how vertebrate Smo is activated remains poorly understood. In Drosophila, Hh dependent phosphorylation activates Smo. Whether this is also the case in vertebrates is unclear, owing to the marked sequence divergence between vertebrate and Drosophila Smo (dSmo and the involvement of primary cilia in vertebrate Hh signaling. Here we demonstrate that mammalian Smo (mSmo is activated through multi-site phosphorylation of its carboxyl-terminal tail by CK1α and GRK2. Phosphorylation of mSmo induces its active conformation and simultaneously promotes its ciliary accumulation. We demonstrate that graded Hh signals induce increasing levels of mSmo phosphorylation that fine-tune its ciliary localization, conformation, and activity. We show that mSmo phosphorylation is induced by its agonists and oncogenic mutations but is blocked by its antagonist cyclopamine, and efficient mSmo phosphorylation depends on the kinesin-II ciliary motor. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Hh signaling recruits CK1α to initiate mSmo phosphorylation, and phosphorylation further increases the binding of CK1α and GRK2 to mSmo, forming a positive feedback loop that amplifies and/or sustains mSmo phosphorylation. Hence, despite divergence in their primary sequences and their subcellular trafficking, mSmo and dSmo employ analogous mechanisms for their activation.

  13. Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, and phobias Bipolar disorder Depression Mood disorders Personality disorders Psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia There are many causes of mental disorders. Your genes and family history ...

  14. OFD1, as a Ciliary Protein, Exhibits Neuroprotective Function in Photoreceptor Degeneration Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wang

    Full Text Available Ofd1 is a newly identified causative gene for Retinitis pigmentosa (RP, a photoreceptor degenerative disease. This study aimed to examine Ofd1 localization in retina and further to investigate its function in photoreceptor degeneration models. Ofd1 localization in rat retina was examined using immunofluorescence. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU-induced rats and Royal College of Surgeons (RCS rats were used as photoreceptor degeneration models. The expression pattern of Ofd1, other ciliary associated genes and Wnt signaling pathway genes were examined in rat models. Furthermore, pEGFP-Ofd1-CDS and pSUPER-Ofd1-shRNA were constructed to overexpress and knockdown the expression level in 661W and R28 cells. MNU was also used to induce cell death. Cilia formation was observed using immunocytochemistry (ICC. Reactive oxygen species (ROS were detected using the 2', 7'-Dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA assay. Apoptosis genes expression was examined using qRT-PCR, Western blotting and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. Ofd1 localized to outer segments of rat retina photoreceptors. Ofd1 and other ciliary proteins expression levels increased from the 1st and 4th postnatal weeks and decreased until the 6th week in the RCS rats, while their expression consistently decreased from the 1st and 7th day in the MNU rats. Moreover, Wnt signaling pathway proteins expression was significantly up-regulated in both rat models. Knockdown of Ofd1 expression resulted in a smaller population, shorter length of cell cilia, and lower cell viability. Ofd1 overexpression partially attenuated MNU toxic effects by reducing ROS levels and mitigating apoptosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating Ofd1 localization and its function in rat retina and in retinal degeneration rat models. Ofd1 plays a role in controlling photoreceptor cilium length and number. Importantly, it demonstrates a neuroprotective function by protecting the photoreceptor

  15. Recent invasion of buffel grass (Cenchrus ciliaris of a natural protected area from the southern Sonoran Desert Invasión reciente de zacate buffel (Cenchrus ciliaris en un área natural protegida del desierto sonorense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick De la Barrera

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The Centro Ecológico de Sonora is a natural protected area where the natural vegetation remained undisturbed at least until 1997. Since then, Cenchrus ciliaris has become a prominent element of the vegetation because of disturbance. Climate, soil properties, population structure and biological activity for C. ciliaris were studied to gain understanding of the ecological mechanisms that favored the invasion by this exotic grass. Mean air temperature and annual rainfall were 24.8°C and 302 mm. The soil was a loamy-sand that was poor in most nutrients, but particularly rich in phosphorus. Pennisetum ciliare was the most abundant species at the Centro Ecológico, representing over one third of total plant ground cover. Basal area for individual plants ranged from less than 1 cm² to almost 1 m². Living leaves per plant increased with precipitation, peaking at 199 leaves in March 2005, and no living leaves were found after 103 days without rain. The environmental conditions prevalent at Centro Ecológico are very favorable for C. ciliaris, whose establishment was apparently triggered by a major disturbance caused by the development of housing projects.El Centro Ecológico de Sonora es un área natural protegida donde la vegetación autóctona permaneció sin disturbios por lo menos hasta 1997. Desde entonces, Cenchrus ciliaris se ha convertido en un elemento prominente de la vegetación. Se estudiaron el clima, las propiedades del suelo, la estructura de la población y la actividad biológica de C. ciliaris, como una aproximación al entendimiento de los mecanismos ecológicos que favorecieron la invasión por este pasto exótico. La temperatura media del aire y la precipitación anual fueron de 24.8 °C y 302 mm. El suelo fue una arena limosa pobre en minerales, pero particularmente rica en fósforo. Cenchrus ciliaris fue la especie herbácea más abundante en el Centro Ecológico, representando más de un tercio de la cobertura vegetal. El

  16. Single cell motility and trail formation in populations of microglia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung Jin

    2009-03-01

    Microglia are a special type of glia cell in brain that has immune responses. They constitute about 20 % of the total glia population within the brain. Compared to other glia cells, microglia are very motile, constantly moving to destroy pathogens and to remove dead neurons. While doing so, they exhibit interesting body shapes, have cell-to-cell communications, and have chemotatic responses to each other. Interestingly, our recent in vitro studies show that their unusual motile behaviors can self-organize to form trails, similar to those in populations of ants. We have studied the changes in the physical properties of these trails by varying the cell population density and by changing the degree of spatial inhomogeneities (``pathogens''). Our experimental observations can be quite faithfully reproduced by a simple mathematical model involving many motile cells whose mechanical motion are driven by actin polymerization and depolymerization process within the individual cell body and by external chemical gradients.

  17. Model for self-polarization and motility of keratocyte fragments

    KAUST Repository

    Ziebert, F.

    2011-10-19

    Computational modelling of cell motility on substrates is a formidable challenge; regulatory pathways are intertwined and forces that influence cell motion are not fully quantified. Additional challenges arise from the need to describe a moving deformable cell boundary. Here, we present a simple mathematical model coupling cell shape dynamics, treated by the phase-field approach, to a vector field describing the mean orientation (polarization) of the actin filament network. The model successfully reproduces the primary phenomenology of cell motility: discontinuous onset of motion, diversity of cell shapes and shape oscillations. The results are in qualitative agreement with recent experiments on motility of keratocyte cells and cell fragments. The asymmetry of the shapes is captured to a large extent in this simple model, which may prove useful for the interpretation of experiments.

  18. Pentavalent single-domain antibodies reduce Campylobacter jejuni motility and colonization in chickens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Riazi

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial foodborne illness in the world, with symptoms ranging from acute diarrhea to severe neurological disorders. Contaminated poultry meat is a major source of C. jejuni infection, and therefore, strategies to reduce this organism in poultry, are expected to reduce the incidence of Campylobacter-associated diseases. We have investigated whether oral administration of C. jejuni-specific single-domain antibodies would reduce bacterial colonization levels in chickens. Llama single-domain antibodies specific for C. jejuni were isolated from a phage display library generated from the heavy chain IgG variable domain repertoire of a llama immunized with C. jejuni flagella. Two flagella-specific single-domain antibodies were pentamerized to yield high avidity antibodies capable of multivalent binding to the target antigen. When administered orally to C. jejuni-infected two-day old chicks, the pentabodies significantly reduced C. jejuni colonization in the ceca. In vitro, the motility of the bacteria was also reduced in the presence of the flagella-specific pentabodies, suggesting the mechanism of action is through either direct interference with flagellar motility or antibody-mediated aggregation. Fluorescent microscopy and Western blot analyses revealed specific binding of the anti-flagella pentabodies to the C. jejuni flagellin.

  19. Second-harmonic generation scattering directionality predicts tumor cell motility in collagen gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kathleen A.; Dawes, Ryan P.; Cheema, Mehar K.; Van Hove, Amy; Benoit, Danielle S. W.; Perry, Seth W.; Brown, Edward

    2015-05-01

    Second-harmonic generation (SHG) allows for the analysis of tumor collagen structural changes throughout metastatic progression. SHG directionality, measured through the ratio of the forward-propagating to backward-propagating signal (F/B ratio), is affected by collagen fibril diameter, spacing, and disorder of fibril packing within a fiber. As tumors progress, these parameters evolve, producing concurrent changes in F/B. It has been recently shown that the F/B of highly metastatic invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC) breast tumors is significantly different from less metastatic tumors. This suggests a possible relationship between the microstructure of collagen, as measured by the F/B, and the ability of tumor cells to locomote through that collagen. Utilizing in vitro collagen gels of different F/B ratios, we explored the relationship between collagen microstructure and motility of tumor cells in a "clean" environment, free of the myriad cells, and signals found in in vivo. We found a significant relationship between F/B and the total distance traveled by the tumor cell, as well as both the average and maximum velocities of the cells. Consequently, one possible mechanism underlying the observed relationship between tumor F/B and metastatic output in IDC patient samples is a direct influence of collagen structure on tumor cell motility.

  20. Analysis of ependymal ciliary beat pattern and beat frequency using high speed imaging: comparison with the photomultiplier and photodiode methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Callaghan Chris

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to compare beat frequency measurements of ependymal cilia made by digital high speed imaging to those obtained using the photomultiplier and modified photodiode techniques. Using high speed video analysis the relationship of the power and recover strokes was also determined. Methods Ciliated strips of ependyma attached to slices from the brain of Wistar rats were incubated at 30°C and observed using a ×50 water immersion lens. Ciliary beat frequency was measured using each of the three techniques: the high speed video, photodiode and photomultiplier. Readings were repeated after 30 minutes incubation at 37°C. Ependymal cilia were observed in slow motion and the precise movement of cilia during the recovery stroke relative to the path travelled during the power stroke was measured. Results The mean (95% confidence intervals beat frequencies determined by the high speed video, photomultiplier and photodiode at 30°C were 27.7 (26.6 to 28.8, 25.5 (24.4 to 26.6 and 20.8 (20.4 to 21.3 Hz, respectively. The mean (95% confidence intervals beat frequencies determined by the high speed video, photomultiplier and photodiode at 37°C were 36.4 (34 to 39.5, 38.4 (36.8 to 39.9 and 18.8 (16.9 to 20.5 Hz. The inter and intra observer reliability for measurement of ciliary beat frequency was 3.8% and 1%, respectively. Ependymal cilia were observed to move in a planar fashion during the power and recovery strokes with a maximum deviation to the right of the midline of 12.1(11.8 to 13.0° during the power stroke and 12.6(11.6 to 13.6° to the left of the midline during the recovery stroke. Conclusion The photodiode technique greatly underestimates ciliary beat frequency and should not be used to measure ependymal ciliary beat frequency at the temperatures studied. Ciliary beat frequency from the high speed video and photomultiplier techniques cannot be used interchangeably. Ependymal cilia had minimal deviation to

  1. Cell motility and antibiotic tolerance of bacterial swarms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Wenlong

    Many bacteria species can move across moist surfaces in a coordinated manner known as swarming. It is reported that swarm cells show higher tolerance to a wide variety of antibiotics than planktonic cells. We used the model bacterium E. coli to study how motility affects the antibiotic tolerance of swarm cells. Our results provide new insights for the control of pathogenic invasion via regulating cell motility. Mailing address: Room 306 Science Centre North Block, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. Hong Kong SAR. Phone: +852-3943-6354. Fax: +852-2603-5204. E-mail: zwlong@live.com.

  2. Effects of Surface Passivation on Gliding Motility Assays

    OpenAIRE

    Maloney, Andy; Lawrence J. Herskowitz; Steven J. Koch

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we report differences in the observed gliding speed of microtubules dependent on the choice of bovine casein used as a surface passivator. We observed differences in both speed and support of microtubules in each of the assays. Whole casein, comprised of αs1, αs2, β, and κ casein, supported motility and averaged speeds of 966±7 nm/s. Alpha casein can be purchased as a combination of αs1 and αs2 and supported gliding motility and average speeds of 949±4 nm/s. Beta casein did not...

  3. Gastric motility measurement and evaluation of functional dyspepsia by a bio-impedance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to investigate the complex course of the electrical and mechanical processes of functional dyspepsia (FD), it is necessary to extract gastric motility information on both electricity and mechanism. According to the clinical standardization, 36 volunteers with functional dyspepsia were selected. The signal processing device has been designed by Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications. Multi-resolution analysis (MRA) decomposed the two signals of impedance gastric motility (IGM) and electrogastrogram (EGG) collected from the body surface. The wavelet transform is addressed to separate the IGM and EGG signals from impedance signals due to breathing and blood flow. By means of the energy and frequency spectrum analysis technique, the signals can be classified according to the dominant power and dominant frequency. Some indices, such as frequencies of EGG and IGM, signal power spectrum and dynamic spectrum, the rates of rhythm and power for the normal EGG and IGM and so on, can also be calculated. The primary experiments of gastric motility measurement and evaluation are executed by including healthy humans (control group: CG) and patients with FD (pathologic group: PG). There are significant differences in the temporal-domain and frequency-domain properties between the two groups. The main frequency of the CG belongs to 2–4 CPM and is clear and very regular, while the main frequency of the PG is much disordered. The peak of the maximal power of the CG belongs to 2–4 CPM and 1–2 CPM for the PG. The percentage of normal frequency (PNF) for the CG is 0.704 ± 0.255 and 0.402 ± 1.145 for the PG. The frequency instability coefficient (FIC) for the CG is 0.182 ± 0.059 and 0.374 ± 0.086 for the PG. The percentage of normal power (PNP) for the CG is 0.592 ± 0.044 and 0.468 ± 0.142 for the PG. The power instability coefficient (PIC) for the CG is 1.576 ± 0.481 and 4.006 ± 0.711 for the PG. The results of the experiments show that the proposed

  4. Alteration of the digestive motility linked with radiation-induced inflammatory processes in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to ionizing radiation, whether accidental or for medical reasons, may lead to gastro-intestinal injury, characterized by nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal cramps. The aetiology of radiation-induced diarrhea remains to date unclear. In this study, we have investigated the acute effects of a 10 Gy abdominal irradiation on rat digestive functions. The objective of the first study was to evaluate the role of sensory afferent neurons, capsaicin-sensitive, on morphological changes and the inflammatory response following exposure. Three days after irradiation, we observed an inflammatory response characterized by neutrophils infiltration and mast cells de-granulation. No effect of capsaicin pre-treatment was seen on these parameters. However, neutrophils infiltration was increased as early as one day after irradiation in capsaicin-treated rats. No difference in severity of diarrhea was observed after denervation nor in morphological changes. These data demonstrate that abdominal irradiation results in diarrhea concomitant with an inflammatory response, and that sensory innervation does not play a major protective role. The objective of the rest of the work was in the first instance to characterize radiation-induced alterations of intestinal and colonic motility leading to diarrhea and secondly to evaluate the role of serotonin in such disorders. Perturbations in intestinal (MMC) and colonic (LSB) motor profiles were observed from the first day onwards. Migrating motor complexes (MMC) were completely disrupted at three days at the same time as the onset of diarrhea. In addition to inhibition of LSB, colonic fluid absorptive capacity was decreased and serotonin colonic tissue levels were increased three days after irradiation. Radiation-induced diarrhea was reduced by treatment with an antagonist of 5-HT3 receptors, granisetron, as were alterations of colonic motility and serotonin tissue levels. However, this treatment did not significantly ameliorate fluid

  5. Effects of psychological stress on small intestinal motility and bacteria and mucosa in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao-Xuan Wang; Wan-Chun Wu

    2005-01-01

    to the small intestinal motility disorder and dysbacteriosis and the damage of mucosa probably caused by psychological stress.

  6. Ciliary neurotrophic factor has intrinsic and extrinsic roles in regulating B cell differentiation and bone structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askmyr, Maria; White, Kirby E; Jovic, Tanja; King, Hannah A; Quach, Julie M; Maluenda, Ana C; Baker, Emma K; Smeets, Monique F; Walkley, Carl R; Purton, Louise E

    2015-01-01

    The gp130 receptor and its binding partners play a central role in cytokine signalling. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is one of the cytokines that signals through the gp130 receptor complex. CNTF has previously been shown to be a negative regulator of trabecular bone remodelling and important for motor neuron development. Since haematopoietic cell maintenance and differentiation is dependent on the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment, where cells of the osteoblastic lineage are important regulators, we hypothesised that CNTF may also have important roles in regulating haematopoiesis. Analysis of haematopoietic parameters in male and female Cntf(-/-) mice at 12 and 24 weeks of age revealed altered B lymphopoiesis. Strikingly, the B lymphocyte phenotype differed based on sex, age and also the BM microenvironment in which the B cells develop. When BM cells from wildtype mice were transplanted into Cntf(-/-) mice, there were minimal effects on B lymphopoiesis or bone parameters. However, when Cntf(-/-) BM cells were transplanted into a wildtype BM microenvironment, there were changes in both haematopoiesis and bone parameters. Our data reveal that haematopoietic cell-derived CNTF has roles in regulating BM B cell lymphopoiesis and both trabecular and cortical bone, the latter in a sex-dependent manner. PMID:26487326

  7. Ciliary neurotrophic factor protects striatal neurons against excitotoxicity by enhancing glial glutamate uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Beurrier

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is a potent neuroprotective cytokine in different animal models of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity, although its action mechanisms are still poorly characterized. We tested the hypothesis that an increased function of glial glutamate transporters (GTs could underlie CNTF-mediated neuroprotection. We show that neuronal loss induced by in vivo striatal injection of the excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QA was significantly reduced (by approximately 75% in CNTF-treated animals. In striatal slices, acute QA application dramatically inhibited corticostriatal field potentials (FPs, whose recovery was significantly higher in CNTF rats compared to controls (approximately 40% vs. approximately 7%, confirming an enhanced resistance to excitotoxicity. The GT inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate greatly reduced FP recovery in CNTF rats, supporting the role of GT in CNTF-mediated neuroprotection. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from striatal medium spiny neurons showed no alteration of basic properties of striatal glutamatergic transmission in CNTF animals, but the increased effect of a low-affinity competitive glutamate receptor antagonist (gamma-D-glutamylglycine also suggested an enhanced GT function. These data strongly support our hypothesis that CNTF is neuroprotective via an increased function of glial GTs, and further confirms the therapeutic potential of CNTF for the clinical treatment of progressive neurodegenerative diseases involving glutamate overflow.

  8. Brain Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF and hypothalamic control of energy homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vacher Claire-Marie

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines play an important role in energy-balance regulation. Notably leptin, an adipocyte-secreted cytokine, regulates the activity of hypothalamic neurons that are involved in the modulation of appetite. Leptin decreases appetite and stimulates weight loss in rodents. Unfortunately, numerous forms of obesity in humans seem to be resistant to leptin action. The ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is a neurocytokine that belongs to the same family as leptin and that was originally characterized as a neurotrophic factor that promotes the survival of a broad spectrum of neuronal cell types and that enhances neurogenesis in adult rodents. It presents the advantage of stimulating weight loss in humans, despite the leptin resistance. Moreover, the weight loss persists several weeks after the cessation of treatment. Hence, CNTF has been considered as a promising therapeutic tool for the treatment of obesity and has prompted intense research aimed at identifying the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying its potent anorexigenic properties. It has been found that CNTF shares signaling pathways with leptin and is expressed in the arcuate nucleus (ARC, a key hypothalamic region controlling food intake. Endogenous CNTF may also participate in the control of energy balance. Indeed, its expression in the ARC is inversely correlated to body weight in rats fed a high-sucrose diet. Thus hypothalamic CNTF may act, in some individuals, as a protective factor against weight gain during hypercaloric diet and could account for individual differences in the susceptibility to obesity.

  9. Automated image analysis reveals the dynamic 3-dimensional organization of multi-ciliary arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico F. Galati

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-ciliated cells (MCCs use polarized fields of undulating cilia (ciliary array to produce fluid flow that is essential for many biological processes. Cilia are positioned by microtubule scaffolds called basal bodies (BBs that are arranged within a spatially complex 3-dimensional geometry (3D. Here, we develop a robust and automated computational image analysis routine to quantify 3D BB organization in the ciliate, Tetrahymena thermophila. Using this routine, we generate the first morphologically constrained 3D reconstructions of Tetrahymena cells and elucidate rules that govern the kinetics of MCC organization. We demonstrate the interplay between BB duplication and cell size expansion through the cell cycle. In mutant cells, we identify a potential BB surveillance mechanism that balances large gaps in BB spacing by increasing the frequency of closely spaced BBs in other regions of the cell. Finally, by taking advantage of a mutant predisposed to BB disorganization, we locate the spatial domains that are most prone to disorganization by environmental stimuli. Collectively, our analyses reveal the importance of quantitative image analysis to understand the principles that guide the 3D organization of MCCs.

  10. Stigmasterol Tetracosanoate, a New Stigmasterol Ester from the Egyptian Blepharis ciliaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shanawany, M A; Sayed, H M; Ibrahim, S R M; Fayed, M A A

    2015-07-01

    A new stigmasterol ester: stigmasterol tetracosanoate (3), along with 7 compounds: β-sitosterol (1), stigmasterol (2), (2S,3S,4R)-2[(2'R)-2'-(hydroxyeicosanoyl amino) octadecane-1,3,4-triol (4), apigenin (5), β-sitosterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (6), stigmasterol-3-O-β-D-glucopyranose (7), and apigenin-7-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (8) were isolated from Blepharis ciliaris aerial parts. Compounds 1, 2, and 5-7 are reported here for the first time from the plant and 4 for the first time from the family. GCMS analysis revealed the presence of 45 fatty acids, 53 hydrocarbons, and 24 sterols. The different fractions exhibited mild cytotoxic in brine shrimp assay and anti-hyperglycaemic activities. The EtOAc fraction and TME (total MeOH extract) showed weak anti-malarial activity against P. falciparum. The CHCl3 fraction gave potent -anti-inflammatory activity compared with indomethacin. PMID:24992497

  11. Peripheral sensory processing in mammalian gravity receptors - Observations of ciliary tuft configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Donovan, Kathleen; Rogers, Charles

    1987-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy was used to study dynamic polarizations of clustered cells of the anterior part of rat saccular macula and to shed light on the possible roles of two types of hair cells integrated into the same neural circuitry: those with short stereocilia and long kinocilium (ss/lk), and those with long stereocilia and still longer kinocilium (ls/lk). It was found that the ss/lk-type cells could be further subdivided into two types, whereas the ls/lk cells consisted of four major kinds. It was also found that the kinocilium was most often fixed in a recovery stroke position (curved basally, and the upper portion projected back over the tuft) and that the kinocilia were not aligned in parallel in any given part of a macula, even though each cilium pointed in the proper direction relative to the striola line. The possibility of a relationship between the ciliary tuft morphology and the function of the hair cell of which it is a part is discussed.

  12. Circulating levels of ciliary neurotrophic factor in normal pregnancy and preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akahori,Yoichiro

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF has been shown to decrease food intake in mouse models of obesity and to improve insulin sensitivity. It is well known that tight regulation of glucose metabolism is essential for successful gestational outcomes (e.g. fetal growth, and that abnormal insulin resistance is associated with preeclampsia (PE. To investigate the possibility that CNTF might be involved in the regulation of insulin resistance during pregnancy, circulating levels of CNTF were assessed in non-pregnant, normal pregnant, postpartum, and pregnant women with PE. Sera from healthy non-pregnant women (n10, pregnant women (n30:1st trimester;n10, 2nd trimester n10;3rd trimester;n10, postpartum women (n10, and patients with PE (n11 were studied with Western blotting. Circulating CNTF was detected by Western blotting, and the levels of CNTF in pregnant women were decreased as compared with those in non-pregnant women, and tended to decrease as pregnancy progressed. A significant decrease was found in PE as compared with normal pregnancy. Circulating CNTF might be associated with physiological and abnormal insulin resistance during pregnancy.

  13. Ciliary body and choroidal melanomas treated by proton beam irradiation. Histopathologic study of eyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton beam irradiation resulted in clinical and/or histopathological regression of large ciliary body and choroidal melanomas in three eyes. Enucleations were performed 6 1/2 weeks, five months, and 11 months after irradiation for angle-closure glaucoma from total retinal detachment, increase in retinal detachment, and neovascular glaucoma, respectively. A direct relationship was found between the length of the interval from irradiation to enucleation and the degree of histologic changes. Vascular changes in the tumors included endothelial cell swelling and decreased lumen size, basement membrane thickening, collapse of sinusoidal vessels, and thrombosis of vessels. Although apparently unaltered tumor cells remained, degenerative changes occurred in some melanoma cells, including lipid vacuoles in cytoplasm, pyknotic nuclei, and balloon cell formation. Patchy areas of necrosis and proteinaceous exudate were present. Pigment-laden macrophages were found near tumor vessels and all had a substantial chronic inflammatory infiltrate. The effect of proton beam irradiation on tumor vessels probably plays an important role in uveal melanoma regression

  14. Effects of fractionated abdominal irradiation on small intestinal motility. Studies in a novel in vitro animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disordered small intestinal motility occurs frequently during acute radiation enteritis. However, the characteristics and time course of the motor dysfunction are poorly defined. These parameters were assessed in a novel animal model of radiation enteritis. Ileal pressures were recorded in vitro with perfused microanometric catheter using an arterially perfused ileal loop in 22 ferrets following fractionated abdominal irradiation (9 doses 2.50 Gz thrice weekly for 3 weeks). Tissue damage was graded histologically. Studies were performed 3 to 29 days after irradiation. Tissue from 7 control animals was also studied. All treated animals developed diarrhoea. Histology showed changes consistent with mild to moderate radiation enteritis. Following irradiation, there was an initial increase in frequency followed by a non-significant reduction in the frequency, but not the amplitude of ileal pressure waves. The frequency of pressure waves showed an inverse relationship with time after radiation (r=-0.634, p<0.002). There was no relationship between motility and histology. We conclude that abdominal irradiation is associated with a time-dependent reduction in ileal motility which does not correlate with light microscopic changes. (orig.)

  15. Effects of fractionated abdominal irradiation on small intestinal motility. Studies in a novel in vitro animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, R.; Frisby, C.; Horowitz, M. [Royal Adelaide Hospital (Australia). Dept. of Medicine; Schirmer, M.; Yeoh, E. [Royal Adelaide Hospital (Australia). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Blackshaw, A. [Royal Adelaide Hospital (Australia). Dept. of Gastrointestinal Medicine; Langman, J.; Rowland, R. [Division of Tissue Pathology, Inst. of Medical and Veterinary Science, Adelaide (Australia)

    1997-12-31

    Disordered small intestinal motility occurs frequently during acute radiation enteritis. However, the characteristics and time course of the motor dysfunction are poorly defined. These parameters were assessed in a novel animal model of radiation enteritis. Ileal pressures were recorded in vitro with perfused microanometric catheter using an arterially perfused ileal loop in 22 ferrets following fractionated abdominal irradiation (9 doses 2.50 Gz thrice weekly for 3 weeks). Tissue damage was graded histologically. Studies were performed 3 to 29 days after irradiation. Tissue from 7 control animals was also studied. All treated animals developed diarrhoea. Histology showed changes consistent with mild to moderate radiation enteritis. Following irradiation, there was an initial increase in frequency followed by a non-significant reduction in the frequency, but not the amplitude of ileal pressure waves. The frequency of pressure waves showed an inverse relationship with time after radiation (r=-0.634, p<0.002). There was no relationship between motility and histology. We conclude that abdominal irradiation is associated with a time-dependent reduction in ileal motility which does not correlate with light microscopic changes. (orig.).

  16. Mental Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mental disorders include a wide range of problems, including Anxiety disorders, including panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post- ... disorders, including schizophrenia There are many causes of mental disorders. Your genes and family history may play a ...

  17. Autocrine regulation of human sperm motility by tachykinins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinto Francisco M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We examined the presence and function of tachykinins and the tachykinin-degrading enzymes neprilysin (NEP and neprilysin-2 (NEP2 in human spermatozoa. Methods Freshly ejaculated semen was collected from forty-eight normozoospermic human donors. We analyzed the expression of substance P, neurokinin A, neurokinin B, hemokinin-1, NEP and NEP2 in sperm cells by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, western blot and immunocytochemistry assays and evaluated the effects of the neprilysin and neprilysin-2 inhibitor phosphoramidon on sperm motility in the absence and presence of tachykinin receptor-selective antagonists. Sperm motility was measured using WHO procedures or computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA. Results The mRNAs of the genes that encode substance P/neurokinin A (TAC1, neurokinin B (TAC3, hemokinin-1 (TAC4, neprilysin (MME and neprilysin-2 (MMEL1 were expressed in human sperm. Immunocytochemistry studies revealed that tachykinin and neprilysin proteins were present in spermatozoa and show specific and differential distributions. Phosphoramidon increased sperm progressive motility and its effects were reduced in the presence of the tachykinin receptor antagonists SR140333 (NK1 receptor-selective and SR48968 (NK2 receptor-selective but unmodified in the presence of SR142801 (NK3 receptor-selective. Conclusion These data show that tachykinins are present in human spermatozoa and participate in the regulation of sperm motility. Tachykinin activity is regulated, at least in part, by neprilysins.

  18. A computational model of gastro-intestinal motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, K. F.; Goossens, D. J.

    2001-12-01

    A simulated neural network model of a section of enteric nervous system is presented. The network is a layered feed-forward network consisting of integrate and fire units. The network shows the basic form of intestinal motility; a descending wave of relaxation followed by a wave of contraction. It also shows interesting (but not biologically realistic) spontaneous behaviours when no stimulus is present.

  19. Photoacclimation state determines the photobehaviour of motile microalgae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ezequiel, João; Laviale, Martin; Frankenbach, Silja; Sousa Dias Cartaxana, Paulo Jorge; Serôdio, João

    2015-01-01

    High productivity in intertidal microphytobenthic communities is achieved despite exposure to extreme and dynamic conditions (e.g. light, salinity, temperature). As an adaptation to this hostile environment, most of the microalgae species inhabiting fine-sediment habitats are motile, being able to...

  20. Effects of Ergot Alkaloids on Bovine Sperm Motility In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergot alkaloids are synthesized by endophyte-infected (Neotyphodium coenophialum) tall fescue (Lolium arundinaceum (Schreb.) S.J. Darbyshire). Our objective was to determine direct effects of ergot alkaloids (ergotamine, dihydroergotamine and ergonovine) on the motility of bovine spermatozoa in vit...

  1. HES6 enhances the motility of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absract: HES6, a member of the hairy-enhancer-of-split family of transcription factors, plays multiple roles in myogenesis. It is a direct target of the myogenic transcription factor MyoD and has been shown to regulate the formation of the myotome in development, myoblast cell cycle exit and the organization of the actin cytoskeleton during terminal differentiation. Here we investigate the expression and function of HES6 in rhabdomyosarcoma, a soft tissue tumor which expresses myogenic genes but fails to differentiate into muscle. We show that HES6 is expressed at high levels in the subset of alveolar rhabdomyosarcomas expressing PAX/FOXO1 fusion genes (ARMSp). Knockdown of HES6 mRNA in the ARMSp cell line RH30 reduces proliferation and cell motility. This phenotype is rescued by expression of mouse Hes6 which is insensitive to HES6 siRNA. Furthermore, expression microarray analysis indicates that the HES6 knockdown is associated with a decrease in the levels of Transgelin, (TAGLN), a regulator of the actin cytoskeleton. Knockdown of TAGLN decreases cell motility, whilst TAGLN overexpression rescues the motility defect resulting from HES6 knockdown. These findings indicate HES6 contributes to the pathogenesis of ARMSp by enhancing both proliferation and cell motility.

  2. Involving Policymakers in Research Partnership: The MOTILL Project Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Farrow, Robert; Fulantelli, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the experience of working with policymakers to disseminate the research findings of the MOTILL project, an EU funded project for research into mobile lifelong learning. We explain the rationale for the research, outline the challenges involved and describe strategies for effective dissemination.

  3. Cholecystokinin, secretin, pancreatic polypeptide in relation to gallbladder dynamics and gastrointestinal interdigestive motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, N; Oster-Jørgensen, E; Rasmussen, L; Pedersen, S A; Olsen, O; Cantor, P; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, O B

    1990-01-01

    Using a combined technique of hepatobiliary scintigraphy and gastrointestinal motility recordings, the changes in blood concentrations of cholecystokinin (CCK), secretin and pancreatic polypeptide (PP) were studied in relation to gastrointestinal motility and gallbladder dynamics in the interdige...

  4. α3Na+/K+-ATPase deficiency causes brain ventricle dilation and abrupt embryonic motility in zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doganli, Canan; Beck, Hans Christian; Ribera, Angeles B;

    2013-01-01

    Na+/K+-ATPases are transmembrane ion pumps that maintain ion gradients across the basolateral plasma membrane in all animal cells to facilitate essential biological functions. Mutations in the Na+/K+-ATPase α3 subunit gene (ATP1A3) cause rapid-onset dystonia-parkinsonism, a rare movement disorder...... knockdown of Atp1a3a or Atp1a3b. Our data thus strongly support the role of α3Na+/K+-ATPase in zebrafish motility and brain development, associating for the first time the α3Na+/K+-ATPase deficiency with brain ventricle dilation....

  5. Dose-dependent neuroprotective effect of ciliary neurotrophic factor delivered via tetracycline-regulated lentiviral vectors in the quinolinic acid rat model of Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régulier, E; Pereira de Almeida, L; Sommer, B; Aebischer, P; Déglon, N

    2002-11-01

    The ability to regulate gene expression constitutes a prerequisite for the development of gene therapy strategies aimed at the treatment of neurologic disorders. In the present work, we used tetracycline (Tet)-regulated lentiviral vectors to investigate the dose-dependent neuroprotective effect of human ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) in the quinolinic acid (QA) model of Huntington's disease (HD). The Tet system was split in two lentiviruses, the first one containing the CNTF or green fluorescent protein (GFP) cDNAs under the control of the Tet-response element (TRE) and a second vector encoding the transactivator (tTA). Preliminary coinfection study demonstrated that 63.8% +/- 2.0% of infected cells contain at least two viral copies. Adult rats were then injected with CNTF- and GFP-expressing viral vectors followed 3 weeks later by an intrastriatal administration of QA. A significant reduction of apomorphine-induced rotations was observed in the CNTF-on group. In contrast, GFP-treated animals or CNTF-off rats displayed an ipsilateral turning behavior in response to apomorphine. A selective sparing of DARPP-32-, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT)-, and NADPH-d-positive neurons was observed in the striatum of CNTF-on rats compared to GFP animals and CNTF-off group. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) performed on striatal samples of rats sacrificed at the same time point indicated that this neuroprotective effect was associated with the production of 15.5 +/- 4.7 ng CNTF per milligram of protein whereas the residual CNTF expression in the off state (0.54 +/- 0.02 ng/mg of protein) was not sufficient to protect against QA toxicity. These results establish the proof of principle of neurotrophic factor dosing for neurodegenerative diseases and demonstrate the feasibility of lentiviral-mediated tetracycline-regulated gene transfer in the brain. PMID:12427308

  6. Lung disease assessment in primary ciliary dyskinesia: a comparison between chest high-field magnetic resonance imaging and high-resolution computed tomography findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iacotucci Paola

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is associated with pulmonary involvement that requires periodical assessment. Chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT has become the method of choice to evaluate chronic lung disease, but entails exposure to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been proposed as a potential radiation-free technique in several chest disorders. Aim of our study is to evaluate whether high-field MRI is as effective as HRCT in identifying PCD pulmonary abnormalities. We also analyzed the relationships between the severity and extension of lung disease, and functional data. Methods Thirteen PCD patients (8 children/5 adults; median age, 15.2 yrs underwent chest HRCT and high-field 3T MRI, spirometry, and deep throat or sputum culture. Images were scored using a modified version of the Helbich system. Results HRCT and MRI total scores were 12 (range, 6–20 and 12 (range, 5–17, respectively. Agreement between HRCT and MRI scores was good or excellent (r > 0.8. HRCT and MRI total scores were significantly related to forced vital capacity (r = -0.5, p = 0.05; and r = -0.7, p = 0.009, respectively and forced expiratory volume at 1 second (r = -0.6, p = 0.03; and r = -0.7, p = 0.009, respectively. Conclusion Chest high-field 3T MRI appears to be as effective as HRCT in assessing the extent and severity of lung abnormalities in PCD. MRI scores might be used for longitudinal assessment and be an outcome surrogate in future studies.

  7. Measurements of Boar Spermatozoa Motility Using PFG NMR Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evaluation of spermatozoa motility, viability and morphology is an essential parameter in the examination of sperm quality and in the establishment of correlations between sperm quality and fertility. Until now, assessment of sperm quality has been based on subjective evaluation of parameters, such as motility and viability, and on objective parameters, such as semen concentration and morphology abnormalities. When subjective optical microscopic evaluation was used in humans and animals, variations of 30 to 60% have been reported in the estimation of the motility parameters of the same ejaculates. To overcome this variability, different systems have been proposed such as turbidimetry, laser-Doppler spectroscopy, and photometric methods. Other accurate techniques, such as flow cytometry, which allows the evaluation of concentration, and cellulose-acetate/nitrate filter measure only a single semen parameter. The more recent track semen analysis system, based on individual spermatozoon evaluation, offers an accurate calculation of different semen parameters. Although some interesting results have already been obtained, many questions remain, which have to be answered to allow for further development in veterinary medicine, clinical fertility settings, physiological, and toxicology research activities. Pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance (PFG NMR) techniques have been presented demonstrating the potential to study flow and transport processes in complex systems. By PFG NMR, the molecular displacement can be measured that occurs during a time interval D, between two consecutive magnetic field gradient pulses. In this poster we present the results of PFG-NMR obtained for a number of samples of boar spermatozoa with varying motility and discuss whether this method can be useful for fast and reliable spermatozoa motility evaluation. (author)

  8. Flagellar motility is necessary for Aeromonas hydrophila adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yingxue; Lin, Guifang; Chen, Wenbo; Xu, Xiaojin; Yan, Qingpi

    2016-09-01

    Adhesion to host surface or cells is the initial step in bacterial pathogenesis, and the adhesion mechanisms of the fish pathogenic bacteria Aeromonas hydrophila were investigated in this study. First, a mutagenesis library of A. hydrophila that contained 332 random insertion mutants was constructed via mini-Tn10 Km mutagenesis. Four mutants displayed the most attenuated adhesion. Sequence analysis revealed that the mini-Tn10 insertion sites in the four mutant strains were flgC(GenBank accession numbers KX261880), cytb4(GenBank accession numbers JN133621), rbsR(GenBank accession numbers KX261881) and flgE(GenBank accession numbers JQ974982). To further study the roles of flgC and flgE in the adhesion of A. hydrophila, some biological characteristics of the wild-type strain B11, the mutants M121 and M240, and the complemented strains C121 and C240 were investigated. The results showed that the mutation in flgC or flgE led to the flagellar motility of A. hydrophila significant reduction or abolishment. flgC was not necessary for flagellar biosynthesis but was necessary for the full motility of A. hydrophila, flgE was involved in both flagellar biosynthesis and motility. The flagellar motility is necessary for A. hydrophila to adhere to the host mucus, which suggests flagellar motility plays crucial roles in the early infection process of this bacterium. PMID:27432325

  9. Acidification Activates Toxoplasma gondii Motility and Egress by Enhancing Protein Secretion and Cytolytic Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Roiko, Marijo S.; Svezhova, Nadezhda; Carruthers, Vern B.

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic microbes rely on environmental cues to initiate key events during infection such as differentiation, motility, egress and invasion of cells or tissues. Earlier investigations showed that an acidic environment activates motility of the protozoan parasite T. gondii. Conversely, potassium ions, which are abundant in the intracellular milieu that bathes immotile replicating parasites, suppress motility. Since motility is required for efficient parasite cell invasion and egress we sough...

  10. [Effect of some pharmacological substances on the motility of the Cryptocotyle lingua cercaria (Heterophyidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstenkov, O O; Prokof'ev, V V; Terenina, N B; Galaktionov, K V

    2010-01-01

    The effect of some biologically active substances (acetylcholine, serotonin, octopamine, sodium nitroprussid and FMRF-amide) on the motility of the Cryptocotyle lingua cercariae was studied. Solutions of FMRF-amide, octopamine, and sodium nitroprussid have no statistically significant influence on the motility of C. lingua. Acetylcholine and serotonin in solutions affected the motility through the prolongation of the active phase of swimming. Further research is required to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the cercarial motility. PMID:21061596

  11. The challenge of segmental small bowel motility quantitation using MR enterography

    OpenAIRE

    Menys, A.; Plumb, A.; Atkinson, D.; Taylor, S A

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Analysis of “cine” MRI using segmental regions of interest (ROIs) has become increasingly popular for investigating bowel motility; however, variation in motility in healthy subjects both within and between scans remains poorly described. Methods: 20 healthy individuals (mean age, 28 years; 14, males) underwent MR enterography to acquire dynamic motility scans in both breath hold (BH) and free breathing (FB) on 2 occasions. Motility data were quantitatively assessed by placing four...

  12. Discinesia ciliar primária: quando o pediatra deve suspeitar e como diagnosticar? Primary ciliary dyskinesia: when the pediatrician must suspect and how to do the diagnosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Anne K. Olm

    2007-12-01

    from secondary ciliary defects and to describe the clinical features, screening and diagnostic laboratorial tests, and the clinical management of this disorder. DATA SOURCES: A bibliographical search was obtained from Medline, Lilacs and SciELO databases, from 1980 to 2007. DATA SYNTHESIS: PCD is an autossomic recessive disorder with abnormal structure and/or function of the cilia, leading to reduced mucociliary clearance. The clinical manifestations include upper and lower respiratory tracts, with recurrent ear, sinus and lung infections that may progress to bronchiectasis. Situs inversus and male infertility are other clinical features of this disorder. PCD should be suspected by pediatricians in the following clinical situations: full term neonates with respiratory distress without apparent causes, presence of dextrocardia, infants with chronic cough and/or recurrent upper airways infections in the absence of immunodeficiency and cystic fibrosis, children with atypical asthma and bronchiectasis without a definitive cause. The diagnostic screening tests are the saccharine and nasal nitric oxide tests. Functional and ultrastructural evaluations demand an electronic microscopic analysis and the observation of the frequency and the pattern of the ciliary movement. CONCLUSIONS: Although the prevalence of PCD is low, the difficulties in establishing the diagnosis due to the complex investigations demanded and the unfamiliarity of the disease by physicians lead to underdiagnosis. Early diagnosis and treatment of PCD are essential to reduce the morbidity and to avoid complications.

  13. EFFECT OF CRYOPRESERVATION AND THEOPHYLLINE ON MOTILITY CHARACTERISTICS OF LAKE STURGEON (ACIPENSER FULVESCENS) SPERMATOZOA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Computer-assisted motility analysis (CASA) was used to evaluate the effect of cryopreservation and theophylline treatment on sperm motility of lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens).Motility was recorded at 0 and 5 min postactivation.The effect of cryopreservation on sperm acrosin-...

  14. The relationship between ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF genotype and motor unit physiology: preliminary studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrell Robert

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is important for neuronal and muscle development, and genetic variation in the CNTF gene has been associated with muscle strength. The effect of CNTF on nerve development suggests that CNTF genotype may be associated with force production via its influence on motor unit size and firing patterns. The purpose of this study is to examine whether CNTF genotype differentially affects motor unit activation in the vastus medialis with increasing isometric force during knee extension. Results Sixty-nine healthy subjects were genotyped for the presence of the G and A (null alleles in the CNTF gene (n = 57 G/G, 12 G/A. They were tested using a dynamometer during submaximal isometric knee extension contractions that were from 10–50% of their maximal strength. During the contractions, the vastus medialis was studied using surface and intramuscular electromyography with spiked triggered averaging to assess surface-detected motor unit potential (SMUP area and mean firing rates (mFR from identified motor units. CNTF genotyping was performed using standard PCR techniques from DNA obtained from leucocytes of whole blood samples. The CNTF G/A genotype was associated with smaller SMUP area motor units and lower mFR at higher force levels, and fewer but larger units at lower force levels than G/G homozygotes. The two groups used motor units with different size and activation characteristics with increasing force generation. While G/G subjects tended to utilize larger motor units with increasing force, G/A subjects showed relatively less increase in size by using relatively larger units at lower force levels. At higher force levels, G/A subjects were able to generate more force per motor unit size suggesting more efficient motor unit function with increasing muscle force. Conclusion Differential motor unit responses were observed between CNTF genotypes at force levels utilized in daily activities.

  15. Gene expression and functional annotation of the human ciliary body epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah F Janssen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The ciliary body (CB of the human eye consists of the non-pigmented (NPE and pigmented (PE neuro-epithelia. We investigated the gene expression of NPE and PE, to shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the most important functions of the CB. We also developed molecular signatures for the NPE and PE and studied possible new clues for glaucoma. METHODS: We isolated NPE and PE cells from seven healthy human donor eyes using laser dissection microscopy. Next, we performed RNA isolation, amplification, labeling and hybridization against 44×k Agilent microarrays. For microarray conformations, we used a literature study, RT-PCRs, and immunohistochemical stainings. We analyzed the gene expression data with R and with the knowledge database Ingenuity. RESULTS: The gene expression profiles and functional annotations of the NPE and PE were highly similar. We found that the most important functionalities of the NPE and PE were related to developmental processes, neural nature of the tissue, endocrine and metabolic signaling, and immunological functions. In total 1576 genes differed statistically significantly between NPE and PE. From these genes, at least 3 were cell-specific for the NPE and 143 for the PE. Finally, we observed high expression in the (NPE of 35 genes previously implicated in molecular mechanisms related to glaucoma. CONCLUSION: Our gene expression analysis suggested that the NPE and PE of the CB were quite similar. Nonetheless, cell-type specific differences were found. The molecular machineries of the human NPE and PE are involved in a range of neuro-endocrinological, developmental and immunological functions, and perhaps glaucoma.

  16. Immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for simulation of muco-ciliary transport: effect of mucus depth at various amounts of cilia beat frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahmardan, M. M.; Sedaghat, M. H.; Norouzi, M.; Nazari, M.

    2015-12-01

    Numerical simulation based on immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method has been employed to study 2D muco-ciliary transport problem. The periciliary liquid (PCL) and mucus layers in this study are considered as the Newtonian and viscoelastic fluid respectively. An Oldroyd-B model is used as the constitutive equations of mucus layer. To simulate accurate effects of the cilia and PCL-mucus interface on the fluid, immersed boundary method is used. Numerical simulations have been performed to investigate the effects of mucus depth on the muco-ciliary clearance at various values of cilia beat frequencies. Our results show that, by increasing mucus depth, which results from air pollution and smoking, mean mucus velocity decreases. But it can be completely modified by increasing cilia beat frequency and the cilia beat frequency has great effect on the muco-ciliary clearance.

  17. The Cytokine Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF) Activates Hypothalamic Urocortin-Expressing Neurons Both In Vitro and In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Purser, Matthew J.; Dalvi, Prasad S.; Wang, Zi C.; Belsham, Denise D.

    2013-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) induces neurogenesis, reduces feeding, and induces weight loss. However, the central mechanisms by which CNTF acts are vague. We employed the mHypoE-20/2 line that endogenously expresses the CNTF receptor to examine the direct effects of CNTF on mRNA levels of urocortin-1, urocortin-2, agouti-related peptide, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and neurotensin. We found that treatment of 10 ng/ml CNTF significantly increased only urocortin-1 mRNA by 1.84-fold...

  18. Ciliary neurotrophic factor-treated astrocyte-conditioned medium increases the intracellular free calcium concentration in rat cortical neurons

    OpenAIRE

    SUN, MEIQUN; Liu, Hongli; MIN, SHENGPING; Wang, Hongtao; Wang, Xiaojing

    2016-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is involved in the activation of astrocytes. A previous study showed that CNTF-treated astrocyte-conditioned medium (CNTF-ACM) contributed to the increase of the calcium current and the elevation of corresponding ion channels in cortical neurons. On this basis, it is reasonable to assume that CNTF-ACM may increase the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in neurons. In the present study, the effects of CNTF-ACM on [Ca2+]i in rat cortical neuron...

  19. Rat ciliary neurothrophic factor (CNTF): gene structure and regulation of mRNA levels in glial cell cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Carroll, Patrick; Sendtner, Michael; Meyer, Michael; Thoenen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    The structure of the rat ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) gene and the regulation ofCNTF mRNA levels in cultured glial cells were investigated. The rat mRNA is encoded by a simple two-exon transcription unit. Sequence analysis of the region upstream of the transcription start-site did not reveal a typical TATA-box consensus sequence. Low levels of CNTF mRNA were detected in cultured Schwann cells, and CNTF mRNA was not increased by a variety of treatments. Three-week-old astrocyteenriched c...

  20. Suppression of IκBα increases the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in human ciliary muscle cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lan, Yu-Qing; Zhang, Chi; Xiao, Jian-Hui; Zhuo, Ye-hong; Guo, Hui; Peng, Wei; Ge, Jian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose An increase of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) has been found to improve outflow through the uveoscleral pathway. This experiment was designed to test whether reduction of inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B alpha (IκBα) levels could enhance MMP-2 expression in human ciliary muscle (HCM) cells in vitro. Methods The small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa B (IκBα) was transfected into HCM cells. The mRNA and protein levels of IκBα, nuclear factor-ka...

  1. Dopaminergic and beta-adrenergic effects on gastric antral motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, K; Hovendal, C P; Gottrup, F;

    1984-01-01

    bethanechol or pentagastrin inducing motor activity patterns as in the phase III of the MMC and the digestive state respectively. The stimulated antral motility was dose-dependently inhibited by dopamine. The effect was significantly blocked by specifically acting dopaminergic blockers, while alpha- and beta......-adrenergic blockers were without any significant effects. Dose-response experiments with bethanechol and dopamine showed inhibition of a non-competitive type. Isoprenaline was used alone and in conjunction with selective blockade of beta 1- and beta 2-receptors during infusion of bethanechol which induces a pattern...... similar to phase III in the migrating myoelectric complex. The stimulated antral motility was dose-dependently inhibited by isoprenaline. The effect could be significantly blocked by propranolol (beta 1 + beta 2-adrenoceptor blocker) and by using in conjunction the beta 1-adrenoceptor blocker practolol...

  2. Persistence-driven durotaxis: Generic, directed motility in rigidity gradients

    CERN Document Server

    Novikova, Elizaveta A; Discher, Dennis E; Storm, Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    Cells move differently on substrates with different elasticities. In particular, the persistence time of their motion is higher on stiffer substrates. We show that this behavior will result in a net transport of cells directed up a soft-to-stiff gradient. Using simple random walk models with controlled persistence and stochastic simulations, we characterize this propensity to move in terms of the durotactic index measured in experiments. A one-dimensional model captures the essential features of this motion and highlights the competition between diffusive spreading and linear, wavelike propagation. Since the directed motion is rooted in a non-directional change in the behavior of individual cells, the motility is a kinesis rather than a taxis. Persistence-driven durokinesis is generic and may be of use in the design of instructive environments for cells and other motile, mechanosensitive objects.

  3. Gastrointestinal transit times and motility in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedsund, Caroline; Gregersen, Tine; Jønsson, Iben;

    2012-01-01

    AND METHODS: Ten CF patients (five women, median age 23) with pancreatic insufficiency were studied. Total gastrointestinal transit time (GITT) and segmental colonic transit times (SCTT) were assessed by radiopaque markers. Gastric emptying and small intestinal transit were evaluated using the magnet......OBJECTIVE: Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) often suffer from gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction including obstructive symptoms, malabsorption and pain, but the underlying pathophysiology remains obscure. AIM: To compare GI motility and transit times in CF patients and healthy controls. MATERIAL......-based motility tracking system (MTS-1). With each method patients were compared with 16 healthy controls. RESULTS: Basic contraction frequencies of the stomach and small intestine were normal, but the pill reached the cecum after 7 h in only 20% of CF patients while in 88% of controls (p = 0.001). Paradoxically...

  4. Endothelial cell motility, coordination and pattern formation during vasculogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czirok, Andras

    2013-01-01

    How vascular networks assemble is a fundamental problem of developmental biology that also has medical importance. To explain the organizational principles behind vascular patterning, we must understand how can tissue level structures be controlled through cell behavior patterns like motility and adhesion that, in turn, are determined by biochemical signal transduction processes? We discuss the various ideas that have been proposed as mechanisms for vascular network assembly: cell motility guided by extracellular matrix alignment (contact guidance), chemotaxis guided by paracrine and autocrine morphogens, and multicellular sprouting guided by cell-cell contacts. All of these processes yield emergent patterns, thus endothelial cells can form an interconnected structure autonomously, without guidance from an external pre-pattern. PMID:23857825

  5. Particle-based simulations of self-motile suspensions

    CERN Document Server

    Hinz, Denis F; Kim, Tae-Yeon; Fried, Eliot

    2013-01-01

    A simple model for simulating flows of active suspensions is investigated. The approach is based on dissipative particle dynamics. While the model is potentially applicable to a wide range of self-propelled particle systems, the specific class of self-motile bacterial suspensions is considered as a modeling scenario. To mimic the rod-like geometry of a bacterium, two dissipative particle dynamics particles are connected by a stiff harmonic spring to form an aggregate dissipative particle dynamics molecule. Bacterial motility is modeled through a constant self-propulsion force applied along the axis of each such aggregate molecule. The model accounts for hydrodynamic interactions between self-propelled agents through the pairwise dissipative interactions conventional to dissipative particle dynamics. Numerical simulations are performed using a customized version of the open-source LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator) software package. Detailed studies of the influence of agent con...

  6. Motility-driven glass and jamming transitions in biological tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Bi, Dapeng; Marchetti, M Cristina; Manning, M Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Cell motion inside dense tissues governs many biological processes, including embryonic development and cancer metastasis, and recent experiments suggest that these tissues exhibit collective glassy behavior. To make quantitative predictions about glass transitions in tissues, we study a self-propelled Voronoi (SPV) model that simultaneously captures polarized cell motility and multi-body cell-cell interactions in a confluent tissue, where there are no gaps between cells. We demonstrate that the model exhibits a jamming transition from a solid-like state to a fluid-like state that is controlled by three parameters: the single-cell motile speed, the persistence time of single-cell tracks, and a target shape index that characterizes the competition between cell-cell adhesion and cortical tension. In contrast to traditional particulate glasses, we are able to identify an experimentally accessible structural order parameter that specifies the entire jamming surface as a function of model parameters. We demonstrat...

  7. Curvature-guided motility of microalgae in geometric confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Ostapenko, Tanya; Böddeker, Thomas; Kreis, Christian; Cammann, Jan; Mazza, Marco G; Bäumchen, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Microorganisms often live in microhabitats that consist of a liquid phase and a plethora of typically curved interfaces. The ways in which motile cells possessing propulsive appendages sense and interact with the physical nature of their environment remains unclear today. For pusher-type microswimmers with rear-mounted flagella, such as bacteria and spermatozoa, cell trapping at a wall was attributed to contrasting microscopic mechanisms, namely hydrodynamic and contact interactions. Here, we demonstrate that, in confined spaces, the geometry of the habitat controls the motility of microalgae that propel themselves by the beating of two anterior flagella. Brownian dynamics simulations and analytical theory both quantitatively match the experimental data and capture a characteristic curvature scaling observed in the experiments. This curvature-guided navigation of the microalgae originates from only two essential ingredients: excluded volume resulting in predominantly ballistic swimming in confinement and the ...

  8. Accumulation of motile elongated micro-organisms in turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Zhan, Caijuan; Sardina, Gaetano; Lushi, Enkeleida; Brandt, Luca

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of turbulence on marine life by performing numerical simulations of motile microorganisms, modelled as prolate spheroids, in isotropic homogeneous turbulence. We show that the clustering and patchiness observed in laminar flows, linear shear and vortex flows, are significantly reduced in a three-dimensional turbulent flow mainly because of the complex topology; elongated micro-orgamisms show some level of clustering in the case of swimmers without any preferential alignmen...

  9. Influence of endoscopic submucosal dissection on esophageal motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Guo Bu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To assess esophageal motility after esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD. METHODS: Twelve patients (6 men and 6 women aged 53-64 years (mean age, 58 years who underwent regular examination 3-12 mo after esophageal ESD for neoplasms of the esophageal body were included in this study. The ESD procedure was performed under deep sedation using a combination of propofol and fentanyl, and involved a submucosal injection to lift the lesion and use of a dual-knife and an insulated-tip knife to create a circumferential incision around the lesion extending into the submucosa. Esophageal motility was examined using a high-resolution manometry system. Dysphagia was graded using a five-point scale according to the Mellow and Pinkas scoring system. Patient symptoms and the results of esophageal manometry were then analyzed. RESULTS: Of the 12 patients enrolled, 1 patient had grade 2 dysphagia, 1 patient had grade 1 dysphagia, and 3 patients complained of sporadic dysphagia. Ineffective esophageal motility was observed in 5 of 6 patients with above semi-circumference of resection extension. Of these 5 patients, 1 patient complained of grade 2 dysphagia (with esophageal stricture, one patient complained of grade 1 dysphagia, and 3 patients complained of sporadic dysphagia. Normal esophageal body manometry was observed in all 6 patients with below semi-circumference of resection extension. The 6 patients with normal esophageal motility did not complain of dysphagia. CONCLUSION: Extensive esophageal ESD may cause esophageal dysmotility in some patients, and might also have an influence on dysphagia although without esophageal stricture.

  10. The Semen pH Affects Sperm Motility and Capacitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Zhou

    Full Text Available As the chemical environment of semen can have a profound effect on sperm quality, we examined the effect of pH on the motility, viability and capacitation of human sperm. The sperm in this study was collected from healthy males to avoid interference from other factors. The spermatozoa cultured in sperm nutrition solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were analyzed for sperm total motility, progressive motility (PR, hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS rate, and sperm penetration. Our results showed that these parameters were similar in pH 7.2 and 8.2 sperm nutrition solutions, but decreased in pH 5.2 and 6.2 solutions. The HOS rate exhibited positive correlation with the sperm total motility and PR. In addition, the sperm Na(+/K(+-ATPase activity at different pHs was measured, and the enzyme activity was significantly lower in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media, comparing with that in pH 8.2 and pH 7.2 solutions. Using flow cytometry (FCM and laser confocal scanning microscopy (LCSM analysis, the intracellular Ca2(+ concentrations of sperm cultured in sperm capacitation solution at pH 5.2, 6.2, 7.2 and 8.2 were determined. Compared with that at pH 7.2, the mean fluorescence intensity of sperm in pH 5.2 and 6.2 media decreased significantly, while that of pH 8.2 group showed no difference. Our results suggested that the declined Na(+/K(+-ATPase activity at acidic pHs result in decreased sperm movement and capacitation, which could be one of the mechanisms of male infertility.

  11. Opiate Modulation of Gastrointestinal Motility and the Actions of Trimebutine

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Stephen M.; Daniel, Edwin E.

    1991-01-01

    Trimebutine is an opiate ligand that interacts with the μ, σ and κ receptor subclasses with approximately equal affinity. Since opiate receptors are widely distributed in the gut, and because opiate receptor subtypes may be involved in excitatory or inhibitory control mechanisms, trimebutine has an unusual profile of action that cannot be predicted on the basis of experience with other synthetic opiates such as codeine, morphine or loperamide. Trimebutine influences motility throughout the ga...

  12. Chemical tethering of motile bacteria to silicon surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Bearinger, Jane P.; Dugan, Lawrence C.; Wu, Ligang; Hill, Haley; Christian, Allen T.; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    We chemically immobilized live, motile Escherichia coli on micrometer-scale, photocatalytically patterned silicon surfaces via amine- and carboxylic acid–based chemistries. Immobilization facilitated (i) controlled positioning; (ii) high resolution cell wall imaging via atomic force microscopy (AFM); and (iii) chemical analysis with time-of-flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Spinning motion of tethered bacteria, captured with fast-acquisition video, proved microbe viability. W...

  13. GLP-1: broadening the incretin concept to involve gut motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström, Per M

    2009-08-01

    The incretin effect of the gut peptide hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is a combined result of inhibition of gastric emptying and stimulation of insulin secretion via an incretin mechanism. The temporal pattern of these events implicate that gastric emptying is primarily delayed, while later in the digestive process insulin is released for nutrient disposal. Since the inhibitory effect of GLP-1 on gastric motility is very outspoken, we considered it of value to study its effects on gut motility. Animal experimentation in the rat clearly showed that not only gastric emptying, but also small bowel motility with the migrating myoelectric complex was profoundly inhibited by GLP-1 at low doses. Similar effects were seen with analogues of the peptide. Extending the studies to man supported our earliest data indicating that the migrating motor complex of the small intestine was affected, and even more noticeable, the summarized motility index inhibited. Further extension of our studies to patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) displayed similar results. This encouraged us to embark on a clinical pain-relief multi-centre study in IBS patients using a GLP-1 analogue, ROSE-010, with longer half-life than the native peptide. The outcome of the IBS study proved ROSE-010 to be superior to placebo with a pain-relief response rate of 24% for ROSE-010 compared to 12% for placebo. Taken together, the GLP-1 analogue ROSE-010 is believed to cause relaxation of the gut and can thereby relieve an acute pain attack of IBS, even though its precise mechanism is yet to be defined. PMID:19362109

  14. Influence of electromagnetic SHF-waves on motility of tubifex

    OpenAIRE

    I. K. Smolyarenko; O. A. Shugurov; O. O. Shugurov

    2005-01-01

    We investigated influence of electromagnetic superhigh frequency (SHF) waves (10 hHz) on mechanical parameters of motility of bunch tubifex (1300 - 1500 units) at a different load and sequence of its mechanical stimulation. Is shown, that after a пот-thermal waveirradiation (1 MVt/sm2) latency and forward front of mechanograms is increased on 5 - 10 %, amplitude and duration of the answers simultaneously decreases. The maximal mass, which can lift single unit tubifex is decreased. The capacit...

  15. Habitual rapid food intake and ineffective esophageal motility

    OpenAIRE

    Kong-Ling Li; Ji-Hong Chen; Qian Zhang; Huizinga, Jan D.; Shawn Vadakepeedika; Yu-Rong Zhao; Wen-Zhen Yu; He-Sheng Luo

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To study non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP) in relation to ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) and rapid food intake. METHODS: NCCP patients with a self-reported habit of fast eating underwent esophageal manometry for the diagnosis of IEM. Telephone interviews identified eating habits of additional IEM patients. Comparison of manometric features was done among IEM patients with and without the habit of rapid food intake and healthy controls. A case study investigated the effect of 6-mo gum ...

  16. Hydrogel Walkers with Electro-Driven Motility for Cargo Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Chao Yang; Wei Wang; Chen Yao; Rui Xie; Xiao-Jie Ju; Zhuang Liu; Liang-Yin Chu

    2015-01-01

    In this study, soft hydrogel walkers with electro-driven motility for cargo transport have been developed via a facile mould-assisted strategy. The hydrogel walkers consisting of polyanionic poly(2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid-co-acrylamide) exhibit an arc looper-like shape with two “legs” for walking. The hydrogel walkers can reversibly bend and stretch via repeated “on/off” electro-triggers in electrolyte solution. Based on such bending/stretching behaviors, the hydrogel walkers ...

  17. Ciliary intraflagellar transport protein 80 balances canonical versus non-canonical hedgehog signaling for osteoblast differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutation of different IFT proteins cause numerous different clinical bone disorders accompanied with or without the disruption of cilia formation. Currently, there is no any effective treatment for these disorders due to lack of understanding in the function and mechanism of these proteins. IFT80 is...

  18. [Capacity, motility and emptying of the ileal reservoir].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultén, L

    1993-01-01

    The ileal pouch design has been considered to be an important functional determinant. Whether reported differences are attributed to properties of a specific pouch or simply due to different length of ileum used for their construction is controversial. The pouch motility pattern has been considered to be another important functional determinator. There is evidence that pouches with a low volume threshold, i.e. those in which even a moderate volume distension generates high pressure waves, are associated with poor function. Manovolumetric data and results on the functional outcome carefully analyzed in our colorectal unit fail to support some of these statements. While the expanding property and volume capacity of the S- and K-pouch (design according to the Kock folding principle) are both superior to those of the J-configurated pouch the one year functional result appears quite similar. While ileal pouches which on distension exhibited vivid motility pattern generating high pressure waves were sometimes associated with poor function the observation was not consistent. Evacuation and sensory function of the pelvic pouch differ from that of the normal rectum. The motor compound of the defecation reflex is absent and patients evacuate by straining. Pouch design and motility only explain a fraction of the total variability in function. Factors like stool volume and consistency, and canal deformity, social habits and other patients related factors may also play an important role. PMID:8161131

  19. Motility of the jejunum after proctocolectomy and ileal pouch anastomosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaussade, S; Merite, F; Hautefeuille, M; Valleur, P; Hautefeuille, P; Couturier, D

    1989-01-01

    Proctocolectomy with ileal pouch anastomosis could modify motility of the small intestine through two mechanisms: obstruction or bacterial overgrowth. Motility of the jejunum was measured in 11 patients with ileoanal anastomosis six (n = 6), or 12 (n = 5) months after closure of the loop ileostomy. Manometric recording from the jejunum were made during fasting (four hours) and after a liquid meal (one hour). These findings were compared with those of six healthy volunteers. Motor events were classified as follows: migrating motor complex (MMC), propagated contractions, or discrete clustered contractions. All patients were investigated for bacterial overgrowth (D-glucose breath test). Only two patients had bacterial overgrowth. The frequency of MMC remained unchanged after ileo-anal anastomosis (2.83 (0.37)/four hours) compared with normal volunteers (2.81 (0.29)/four hours). During fasting, four patients had numerous propagated contractions in the jejunum. This condition was associated in two with bacterial overgrowth and in two with intubation of the reservoir. Discrete clustered contractions were found in the seven patients studied postprandially (7.6 (2.5)/h), but not in volunteers. These seven patients emptied their pouch spontaneously and bacterial overgrowth was found in only one. As this motility pattern was previously described in partial small intestinal obstruction, it is postulated that discrete clustered contractions could be the consequence of a functional obstruction as a result of anastomosis of the small intestine to the high pressure zone of the anal sphincters. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:2707637

  20. Radiation-induced motility alterations in medulloblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieken, Stefan; Rieber, Juliane; Brons, Stephan; Habermehl, Daniel; Rief, Harald; Orschiedt, Lena; Lindel, Katja; Weber, Klaus J; Debus, Jürgen; Combs, Stephanie E

    2015-05-01

    Photon irradiation has been repeatedly suspected of increasing tumor cell motility and promoting locoregional recurrence of disease. This study was set up to analyse possible mechanisms underlying the potentially radiation-altered motility in medulloblastoma cells. Medulloblastoma cell lines D425 and Med8A were analyzed in migration and adhesion experiments with and without photon and carbon ion irradiation. Expression of integrins was determined by quantitative FACS analysis. Matrix metalloproteinase concentrations within cell culture supernatants were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test. Both photon and carbon ion irradiation significantly reduced chemotactic medulloblastoma cell transmigration through 8-μm pore size membranes, while simultaneously increasing adherence to fibronectin- and collagen I- and IV-coated surfaces. Correspondingly, both photon and carbon ion irradiation downregulate soluble MMP9 concentrations, while upregulating cell surface expression of proadhesive extracellular matrix protein-binding integrin α5. The observed phenotype of radiation-altered motility is more pronounced following carbon ion than photon irradiation. Both photon and (even more so) carbon ion irradiation are effective in inhibiting medulloblastoma cell migration through downregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9 and upregulation of proadhesive cell surface integrin α5, which lead to increased cell adherence to extracellular matrix proteins. PMID:25736470

  1. Radiation-induced motility alterations in medulloblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photon irradiation has been repeatedly suspected of increasing tumor cell motility and promoting locoregional recurrence of disease. This study was set up to analyse possible mechanisms underlying the potentially radiation-altered motility in medulloblastoma cells. Medulloblastoma cell lines D425 and Med8A were analyzed in migration and adhesion experiments with and without photon and carbon ion irradiation. Expression of integrins was determined by quantitative FACS analysis. Matrix metalloproteinase concentrations within cell culture supernatants were investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Statistical analysis was performed using Student's t-test. Both photon and carbon ion irradiation significantly reduced chemotactic medulloblastoma cell transmigration through 8-μm pore size membranes, while simultaneously increasing adherence to fibronectin- and collagen I- and IV-coated surfaces. Correspondingly, both photon and carbon ion irradiation downregulate soluble MMP9 concentrations, while upregulating cell surface expression of proadhesive extracellular matrix protein-binding integrin α5. The observed phenotype of radiation-altered motility is more pronounced following carbon ion than photon irradiation. Both photon and (even more so) carbon ion irradiation are effective in inhibiting medulloblastoma cell migration through downregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9 and upregulation of proadhesive cell surface integrin α5, which lead to increased cell adherence to extracellular matrix proteins. (author)

  2. Characterization of pro-inflammatory flagellin proteins produced by Lactobacillus ruminis and related motile Lactobacilli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Anne Neville

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus ruminis is one of at least twelve motile but poorly characterized species found in the genus Lactobacillus. Of these, only L. ruminis has been isolated from mammals, and this species may be considered as an autochthonous member of the gastrointestinal microbiota of humans, pigs and cows. Nine L. ruminis strains were investigated here to elucidate the biochemistry and genetics of Lactobacillus motility. Six strains isolated from humans were non-motile while three bovine isolates were motile. A complete set of flagellum biogenesis genes was annotated in the sequenced genomes of two strains, ATCC25644 (human isolate and ATCC27782 (bovine isolate, but only the latter strain produced flagella. Comparison of the L. ruminis and L. mali DSM20444(T motility loci showed that their genetic content and gene-order were broadly similar, although the L. mali motility locus was interrupted by an 11.8 Kb region encoding rhamnose utilization genes that is absent from the L. ruminis motility locus. Phylogenetic analysis of 39 motile bacteria indicated that Lactobacillus motility genes were most closely related to those of motile carnobacteria and enterococci. Transcriptome analysis revealed that motility genes were transcribed at a significantly higher level in motile L. ruminis ATCC27782 than in non-motile ATCC25644. Flagellin proteins were isolated from L. ruminis ATCC27782 and from three other Lactobacillus species, while recombinant flagellin of aflagellate L. ruminis ATCC25644 was expressed and purified from E. coli. These native and recombinant Lactobacillus flagellins, and also flagellate L. ruminis cells, triggered interleukin-8 production in cultured human intestinal epithelial cells in a manner suppressed by short interfering RNA directed against Toll-Like Receptor 5. This study provides genetic, transcriptomic, phylogenetic and immunological insights into the trait of flagellum-mediated motility in the lactobacilli.

  3. Caenorhabditis elegans ciliary protein NPHP-8, the homologue of human RPGRIP1L, is required for ciliogenesis and chemosensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lin; Zhang, Mingshu; Xia, Zhiping; Xu, Pingyong; Chen, Liangyi; Xu, Tao

    2011-07-01

    Nephronophthisis (NPHP) is the most frequent genetic cause of end-stage renal failure in children and young adults. NPHP8/RPGRIP1L is a novel ciliary gene that, when mutated, in addition to causing NPHP, also causes Joubert syndrome (JBTS) and Meckel syndrome (MKS). The exact function of NPHP8 and how defects in NPHP8 lead to human diseases are poorly understood. Here, we studied the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog nphp-8 (C09G5.8) and explored the possible function of NPHP-8 in ciliated sensory neurons. We determined the gene structure of nphp-8 through rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) analysis and discovered an X-box motif that had been previously overlooked. Moreover, NPHP-8 co-localized with NPHP-4 at the transition zone at the base of cilia. Mutation of nphp-8 led to abnormal dye filling (Dyf) and shorter cilia lengths in a subset of ciliary neurons. In addition, chemotaxis to several volatile attractants was significantly impaired in nphp-8 mutants. Our data suggest that NPHP-8/RPGRIP1L plays an important role in cilia formation and cilia-mediated chemosensation in a cell type-specific manner. PMID:21689635

  4. Action of Administered Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor on the Mouse Dorsal Vagal Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senzacqua, Martina; Severi, Ilenia; Perugini, Jessica; Acciarini, Samantha; Cinti, Saverio; Giordano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) induces weight loss in obese rodents and humans through activation of the hypothalamic Jak-STAT (Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription) signaling pathway. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CNTF also affects the brainstem centers involved in feeding and energy balance regulation. To this end, wild-type and leptin-deficient (ob/ob and db/db) obese mice were acutely treated with intraperitoneal recombinant CNTF. Coronal brainstem sections were processed for immunohistochemical detection of STAT3, STAT1, STAT5 phosphorylation and c-Fos. In wild-type mice, CNTF treatment for 45 min induced STAT3, STAT1, and STAT5 phosphorylation in neurons as well as glial cells of the area postrema; here, the majority of CNTF-responsive cells activated multiple STAT isoforms, and a significant proportion of CNTF-responsive glial cells bore the immaturity and plasticity markers nestin and vimentin. After 120 min CNTF treatment, c-Fos expression was intense in glial cells and weak in neurons of the area postrema, it was intense in several neurons of the rostral and caudal solitary tract nucleus (NTS), and weak in some cholinergic neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. In the ob/ob and db/db mice, Jak-STAT activation and c-Fos expression were similar to those induced in wild-type mouse brainstem. Treatment with CNTF (120 min, to induce c-Fos expression) and leptin (25 min, to induce STAT3 phosphorylation) demonstrated the co-localization of the two transcription factors in a small neuron population in the caudal NTS portion. Finally, weak immunohistochemical CNTF staining, detected in funiculus separans, and meningeal glial cells, matched the modest amount of CNTF found by RT-qPCR in micropunched area postrema tissue, which in contrast exhibited a very high amount of CNTF receptor. Collectively, the present findings show that the area postrema and the NTS exhibit high, distinctive responsiveness to circulating

  5. Action of Administered Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor on the Mouse Dorsal Vagal Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senzacqua, Martina; Severi, Ilenia; Perugini, Jessica; Acciarini, Samantha; Cinti, Saverio; Giordano, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) induces weight loss in obese rodents and humans through activation of the hypothalamic Jak-STAT (Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription) signaling pathway. Here, we tested the hypothesis that CNTF also affects the brainstem centers involved in feeding and energy balance regulation. To this end, wild-type and leptin-deficient (ob/ob and db/db) obese mice were acutely treated with intraperitoneal recombinant CNTF. Coronal brainstem sections were processed for immunohistochemical detection of STAT3, STAT1, STAT5 phosphorylation and c-Fos. In wild-type mice, CNTF treatment for 45 min induced STAT3, STAT1, and STAT5 phosphorylation in neurons as well as glial cells of the area postrema; here, the majority of CNTF-responsive cells activated multiple STAT isoforms, and a significant proportion of CNTF-responsive glial cells bore the immaturity and plasticity markers nestin and vimentin. After 120 min CNTF treatment, c-Fos expression was intense in glial cells and weak in neurons of the area postrema, it was intense in several neurons of the rostral and caudal solitary tract nucleus (NTS), and weak in some cholinergic neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus. In the ob/ob and db/db mice, Jak-STAT activation and c-Fos expression were similar to those induced in wild-type mouse brainstem. Treatment with CNTF (120 min, to induce c-Fos expression) and leptin (25 min, to induce STAT3 phosphorylation) demonstrated the co-localization of the two transcription factors in a small neuron population in the caudal NTS portion. Finally, weak immunohistochemical CNTF staining, detected in funiculus separans, and meningeal glial cells, matched the modest amount of CNTF found by RT-qPCR in micropunched area postrema tissue, which in contrast exhibited a very high amount of CNTF receptor. Collectively, the present findings show that the area postrema and the NTS exhibit high, distinctive responsiveness to circulating

  6. A conserved role for Notch in priming the cellular response to Shh through ciliary localisation of the key Shh transducer, Smoothened

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stasiulewicz, Magdalena; Gray, Shona; Mastromina, Ioanna;

    2015-01-01

    , we show Notch activity promotes longer primary cilia both in vitro and in vivo. Strikingly, these Notch-regulated effects are Shh-independent. These data identify Notch signalling as a novel modulator of Shh signalling which acts mechanistically via regulation of ciliary localisation of key...

  7. Ciliary neurotrophic factor activates NF-κB to enhance mitochondrial bioenergetics and prevent neuropathy in sensory neurons of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Saleh, Ali; Roy Chowdhury, Subir K.; Smith, Darrel R.; Balakrishnan, Savitha; Tessler, Lori; Martens, Corina; Morrow, Dwane; Schartner, Emily; Frizzi, Katie E.; Calcutt, Nigel A.; Fernyhough, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes causes mitochondrial dysfunction in sensory neurons that may contribute to peripheral neuropathy. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes sensory neuron survival and axon regeneration and prevents axonal dwindling, nerve conduction deficits and thermal hypoalgesia in diabetic rats. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that CNTF protects sensory neuron function during diabetes through normalization of impaired mitochondrial bioenergetics. In addition, we investigated whether th...

  8. Intravitreal injection of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) causes peripheral remodeling and does not prevent photoreceptor loss in canine RPGR mutant retina

    OpenAIRE

    Beltran, William A.; Wen, Rong; Acland, Gregory M.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.

    2007-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) rescues photoreceptors in several animal models of retinal degeneration and is currently being evaluated as a potential treatment for retinitis pigmentosa in humans. This study was conducted to test whether CNTF prevents photoreceptor cell loss in XLPRA2, an early onset canine model of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa caused by a frameshift mutation in RPGR exon ORF15.

  9. Mutations in ZMYND10, a gene essential for proper axonemal assembly of inner and outer dynein arms in humans and flies, cause primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Daniel J; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Shoemark, Amelia;

    2013-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a ciliopathy characterized by airway disease, infertility, and laterality defects, often caused by dual loss of the inner dynein arms (IDAs) and outer dynein arms (ODAs), which power cilia and flagella beating. Using whole-exome and candidate-gene Sanger resequ...

  10. Effects of environment factors on initiation of sperm motility in sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li; Shao, Mingyu; Bao, Zhenmin; Hu, Jingjie; Zhang, Zhifeng

    2011-06-01

    Sperm of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus (Selenka) were quiescent in electrolyte NaCl solution and artificial seawater (ASW) and nonelectrolyte glucose and mannitol solutions when the osmolality was less than 200 mOsm kg-1. The sperm started to be motile as a result of increased osmolality, indicating an osmolality-dependent initiation of sperm motility in sea cucumber. After a brief incubation in hypotonic NaCl and glucose solutions with osmolalities of 200 and 400 mOsm kg-1, sperm lost partial motile ability. Sperm became immobilized when pH was 6.0 in NaCl, glucose and mannitol solutions, suggesting that an H+ release is involved in sperm activation. The decreased pH had no effect on the percentage of motile sperm in ASW, whereas it delayed the time period to reach the maximum motility (motilitymax). Extracellular Ca2+ in electrolyte solutions was not essential for motility stimulation but shortened the time of reaching motilitymax. When Ca2+ was mixed in nonelectrolyte solutions the sperm motility was completely suppressed. The K+ channel blocker, quinine, suppressed the sperm motility in electrolyte solution, showing a possible involvement of K+ transport in the process. High K+ concentration did not affect the sperm motility in NaCl solution, but decreased it in ASW and almost entirely suppressed it in nonelectrolyte solutions. The different effects of pH and K+ in ASW and NaCl solution indicate that external ions may also regulate sperm motility.

  11. TMJ disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    TMD; Temporomandibular joint disorders; Temporomandibular muscle disorders ... vessels, and nerves Teeth For many people with temporomandibular joint disorders, the cause is unknown. Some causes given for ...

  12. Phonological disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Articulation disorder; Developmental articulation disorder; Speech distortion; Sound distortion ... Children should be examined for disorders such as: Cognitive problems (such as intellectual disability ) Hearing impairment Neurological ...

  13. Accuracy and repeatability of direct ciliary sulcus diameter measurements by full-scale 50-megahertz ultrasound biomicroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI De-jiao; WANG Ning-li; CHEN Shu; LI Shu-ning; MU Da-peng; WANG Tao

    2009-01-01

    Background Phakic intraocular lens (pIOL) implantation has been a popular means for the treatment of high ametropia. Measurements of ciliary sulcus diameter is important for pIOL size determining. But till now, no perfect system can directly measure it. The present study was to evaluate the accuracy, repeatability and reproducibility of direct sulcus diameter measurements obtained by a full-scale 50-megahertz (MHz) ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM).Methods A fresh cadaver human eye with a scale marker inserted through the posterior chamber plane from 3 o'clock to 9 o'clock meridian and 30 randomly selected eyes from 30 normal subjects were scanned by full-scale 50-MHz UBM in horizontal meridional scan plane. The distance between the scales and the whole length of the marker inside the cadaver eye were measured by the same observer using the "built-in" measurement tools and the indicating error of instrument was calculated. Reproducibility of the measurement was evaluated in 30 eyes by 2 operators using Blander and Altman plot test. Repeatability was evaluated from 10 successive eyes randomly selected from the 30 eyes by one operator.Results On a scale of 1 mm, the greatest indicating error was 40 μm; the mean largest indicating error of 1 mm scale from the 10 images was (26±14) μm; on a scale of 11 mm, the greatest indicating error was 70 μo; the error rate was 0.64%. The mean length of the needle inside the eye of the 10 images was 11.05 mm, with the mean indicating error of 47 μm, the average error rate was 0.43%. For ciliary sulcus diameter measurements in vivo, the coefficient of variation was 0.38%; the coefficients of repeatability for intra-observer and inter-observer measurements were 1.99% and 2.55%, respectively. The limits of agreement for intra-observer and inter-observer measurement were-0.41 mm to 0.48 mm and -0.59 mm to 0.58 ram, respectively.Conclusion The full-scale 50-MHz UBM can be a high accuracy and good repeatability means for direct

  14. Forage supply in thinned Caatinga enriched with buffel grass (Cenchrus ciliaris L. grazed by goats and sheep=Oferta de forragem em Caatinga raleada e enriquecida com capim buffel (Cenchrus ciliaris L. pastejada por ovinos e caprinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo da Costa Soares

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Forage supply from herbs was assessed in a thinned Caatinga enriched with buffel grass (Cenchrus ciliaris L. exposed to goat and sheep grazing. The 2.4 ha experimental area, located at the Experimental Station of the Federal University of Campina Grande, in Santa Terezinha, Paraíba State, Brazil, was divided into four 0.6 ha paddocks, which were further subdivided into two 0.3 ha experimental plots. Twelve F1 (Boer x SRD goats and 12 Santa Inês sheep were divided in four groups of six animals of the same species. The herbaceous vegetation was separated into buffel grass (Cenchrus ciliaris L., dicotyledons and other grass species. Treatments were randomized to plots according to a completely random design with two treatments, four replications, with measures repeated in time (July/1, Aug/1, Sept/1 and Oct/1. Buffel grass dry mater (DM availability was higher in the sheep grazed than in the goat-grazed area. Buffel grass DM supply did not change from July to September, while dicotyledons DM supply decreased. Grazing affected availability, accumulation rate and supply of the forage produced (DM basis by dicotyledonous herbs. Buffel grass forage availability was not affected during the experimental period.Objetivou-se avaliar a oferta de forragem do estrato herbáceo de uma Caatinga raleada e enriquecida com capim buffel (Cenchrus ciliaris L., submetida ao pastejo de caprinos e ovinos. O experimento foi realizado na Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, Estado da Paraíba. A área experimental foi de 2,4 ha, dividida em quatro piquetes de 0,6 ha, nos quais foram alocadas parcelas experimentais de 0,3 ha. Utilizaram-se 12 caprinos F1 (Bôer x SRD e 12 ovinos Santa Inês, que foram distribuídos em quatro grupos de seis animais. A vegetação herbácea foi separada em capim buffel (Cenchrus ciliaris L., dicotiledôneas e outras gramínea. Utilizou-se um delineamento inteiramente casualizado, com observações repetidas no tempo (1/jul., 1/ago., 1

  15. Influences of dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate and forskolin on human sperm motility in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-HongLIU; YangLI; Zheng-GuoCAO; Zhang-QunYE

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To study the influences of dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (dbcAMP) and forskolin on human sperm motility in vitro. Methods: Semen samples, aseptically obtained by masturbation and prepared by swim-up technique from 20 fertile men, were incubated with different concenlrations of dbcAMP and forskolin at 37℃. Measurements were carried out after l0 min, 20 min, 30 min and 60 min incubation. Motility parameters were estimated by using an automatic analyzing system. Results: Treatment with dbcAMP or forskolin resulted in a significant increase in sperm motility and progressive motility. The larger the concenlrations of dbcAMP or forskolin,the greater the effect appeared. The straight linear velocity and curvilinear velocity were not affected by both agents.Conclusion: dbcAMP and forskolin increase the motility and progressive motility of human sperm in vitro. ( Asian J Androl 2003 Jun; 5: 113-115)

  16. Effect of enhanced UV-B radiation on motile microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of slightly increased UV-B radiation was studied in four taxonomically very different microorganisms: the gliding prokaryotic cyanobacterium, Phormidium, the unicellular green alga Cosmarium, the flagellate Euglena and the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium. UV-B doses which can be expected as a result of a slight decrease of the protective ozone layer in the stratosphere, do not kill or damage the microorganisms visibly. However, such UV-B doses impair the development, motility and photoorientation of these organisms. Due to the inhibition of these physiological important parameters the organisms cannot respond adequately to the changing factors in their environment, which prevents the survival of the populations. (orig.)

  17. Stimulation of pyloric motility by intraduodenal dextrose in normal subjects.

    OpenAIRE

    Heddle, R; Fone, D; Dent, J; Horowitz, M

    1988-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the pylorus may play an important role in the regulation of the gastric emptying of nutrient liquids in man. Dextrose solutions in the range 5-25 g/dl have been reported to empty from the human stomach at a constant caloric rate of 2.1 kcal/min. This study examined, in 12 healthy volunteers, the effects of intraduodenal dextrose on pyloric motility. Dextrose solutions, 5, 10, 15, and 25 gde/dl and saline solutions, 0.9 and 2.7 g/dl were infused into the duodenum at...

  18. Rectal motility after sacral nerve stimulation for faecal incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, H B; Worsøe, J; Krogh, K;

    2010-01-01

    Sacral nerve stimulation (SNS) is effective against faecal incontinence, but the mode of action is obscure. The aim of this study was to describe the effects of SNS on fasting and postprandial rectal motility. Sixteen patients, 14 women age 33-73 (mean 58), with faecal incontinence of various...... contractions, total time with cyclic rectal contractions, the number of aborally and orally propagating contractions, the number of anal sampling reflexes or rectal wall tension during contractions. Postprandial changes in rectal tone were significantly reduced during SNS (P < 0.02). Before SNS, median rectal...

  19. Guaifenesin and increased sperm motility: a preliminary case report

    OpenAIRE

    Gary Means; Cristóbal S Berry-Cabán; Kurt Hammermeuller

    2010-01-01

    Gary Means1, Cristóbal S Berry-Cabán2, Kurt Hammermeuller11Department of Family Medicine, 2Department of Research, Womack Army Medical Center, Fort Bragg, NC, USABackground: A review of the literature and an extensive Medline search revealed that this is the first case report of the use of guaifenesin to increase sperm motility.Case: A 32-year-old male presented for an infertility evaluation. He reported an inability to conceive with his wife after 18 months of unprotect...

  20. Relationships between parameters of gallbladder motility and brain electrical activity

    OpenAIRE

    Marfiyan, Olena M; Zukow, Walery; Popovych, Milentyna V; Ganyk, Lyubov M; Kit, Yevgen I; Ivanyts’ka, Oksana M; Kyjenko, Valeriy M

    2016-01-01

    Marfiyan Olena M, Zukow Walery, Popovych Milentyna V, Ganyk Lyubov M, Kit Yevgen I, Ivanyts’ka Oksana M, Kyjenko Valeriy M. Relationships between parameters of gallbladder motility and brain electrical activity. Journal of Education, Health and Sport. 2016;6(8):11-20. eISSN 2391-8306. DOI http://dx.doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.59271 http://ojs.ukw.edu.pl/index.php/johs/article/view/3728 https://pbn.nauka.gov.pl/sedno-webapp/works/740334     The journal has had 7 ...

  1. Influence of electromagnetic SHF-waves on motility of tubifex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Smolyarenko

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigated influence of electromagnetic superhigh frequency (SHF waves (10 hHz on mechanical parameters of motility of bunch tubifex (1300 - 1500 units at a different load and sequence of its mechanical stimulation. Is shown, that after a пот-thermal waveirradiation (1 MVt/sm2 latency and forward front of mechanograms is increased on 5 - 10 %, amplitude and duration of the answers simultaneously decreases. The maximal mass, which can lift single unit tubifex is decreased. The capacity of single unit is reduced on the average about 80 %. The authors make conclusion about temporary negative influence SHF-waves on simple biological systems.

  2. Motility of small nematodes in wet granular media

    CERN Document Server

    Juarez, G; Sznitman, J; Arratia, P E

    2010-01-01

    The motility behavior of the \\textit{Caenorhabditis elegans} is investigated in wet granular medium as a function of area density ($\\phi$) and dispersity. Surprisingly, the locomotion speed increases in granular media compared to free swimming. The surrounding structure of the medium leads to enhanced undulatory propulsion due to its ability to sustain a finite shear stress and convert lateral force into forward motion. For $\\phi > 0.55$, the nematode is observed to change its gate from swimming to crawling in polydisperse media \\textit{only}. This highlights the subtle difference in local structure between media.

  3. Phenomenological modeling of the motility of self-propelled microorganisms

    CERN Document Server

    Zaoli, Silvia; Formentin, Marco; Azaele, Sandro; Rinaldo, Andrea; Maritan, Amos

    2014-01-01

    The motility of microorganisms in liquid media is an important issue in active matter and it is not yet fully understood. Previous theoretical approaches dealing with the microscopic description of microbial movement have modeled the propelling force exerted by the organism as a Gaussian white noise term in the equation of motion. We present experimental results for ciliates of the genus Colpidium, which do not agree with the Gaussian white noise hypothesis. We propose a new stochastic model that goes beyond such assumption and displays good agreement with the experimental statistics of motion, such as velocity distribution and velocity autocorrelation.

  4. Efficacy of hyaluronic acid binding assay in selecting motile spermatozoa with normal morphology at high magnification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauri Ana L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the hyaluronic acid (HA binding assay in the selection of motile spermatozoa with normal morphology at high magnification (8400x. Methods A total of 16592 prepared spermatozoa were selected and classified into two groups: Group I, spermatozoa which presented their head attached to an HA substance (HA-bound sperm, and Group II, those spermatozoa that did not attach to the HA substance (HA-unbound sperm. HA-bound and HA-unbound spermatozoa were evaluated according to the following sperm forms: 1-Normal morphology: normal nucleus (smooth, symmetric and oval configuration, length: 4.75+/-2.8 μm and width: 3.28+/-0.20 μm, no extrusion or invagination and no vacuoles occupied more than 4% of the nuclear area as well as acrosome, post-acrosomal lamina, neck, tail, besides not presenting a cytoplasmic droplet or cytoplasm around the head; 2-Abnormalities of nuclear form (a-Large/small; b-Wide/narrow; c-Regional disorder; 3-Abnormalities of nuclear chromatin content (a-Vacuoles: occupy >4% to 50% of the nuclear area and b-Large vacuoles: occupy >50% of the nuclear area using a high magnification (8400x microscopy system. Results No significant differences were obtained with respect to sperm morphological forms and the groups HA-bound and HA-unbound. 1-Normal morphology: HA-bound 2.7% and HA-unbound 2.5% (P = 0.56. 2-Abnormalities of nuclear form: a-Large/small: HA-bound 1.6% vs. HA-unbound 1.6% (P = 0.63; b-Wide/narrow: HA-bound 3.1% vs. HA-unbound 2.7% (P = 0.13; c-Regional disorders: HA-bound 4.7% vs. HA-unbound 4.4% (P = 0.34. 3. Abnormalities of nuclear chromatin content: a-Vacuoles >4% to 50%: HA-bound 72.2% vs. HA-unbound 72.5% (P = 0.74; b-Large vacuoles: HA-bound 15.7% vs. HA-unbound 16.3% (P = 0.36. Conclusions The findings suggest that HA binding assay has limited efficacy in selecting motile spermatozoa with normal morphology at high magnification.

  5. Isolation of motile Aeromonas spp. from fish and their cytotoxic effect on Vero cell cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Karabasil Neđeljko; Ašanin Ružica; Baltić Milan Ž.; Teodorović V.; Dimitrijević Mirjana

    2002-01-01

    The presence of motile Aeromonas spp. in fish and other sea food on the Belgrade retail market was investigated with the aim of determining the ability of these bacteria to produce and secrete toxins. Nine strains of motile Aeromonas spp. were isolated from seventy-eight food samples. Aer. sobria was identified in three cases, while six of the obtained strains were identified as Aer. hydrophila. Strains of motile Aeromonas spp. from different sources were analyzed for cytotoxicity on Vero cel...

  6. Experimental observations consistent with a surface tension model of gliding motility of Myxococcus xanthus.

    OpenAIRE

    Dworkin, M; Keller, K H; Weisberg, D.

    1983-01-01

    We have presented experimental evidence to support the model that gliding motility of Myxococcus xanthus is driven by surface tension. (i) Motility is inhibited by the addition of sufficient exogenous, nontoxic surfactants to swamp out the cells' own surfactant gradient. (ii) M. xanthus does not move polystyrene latex beads over its surface. (iii) Motility is prevented by elimination of an interfacial surface tension either by embedding the cells in soft agar or by placing them at an agar-aqu...

  7. Endogenous thrombospondin-1 and proteases in the regulation of lymphocyte adhesion and motility

    OpenAIRE

    Forslöw, Anna

    2008-01-01

    The human immune system, which protects the body from invading pathogens, largely depends on the proper function of lymphocytes, which are highly motile and constantly recirculate the blood and lymph. Adhesive and motile capability is often amplified or uncontrolled during chronic inflammatory conditions such as autoimmune diseases. This thesis comprises four studies of T lymphocyte motility and adhesion aiming to elucidate the regulative role of endogenous secretion of enzy...

  8. COMPARATIVE THERAPEUTIC EFFECTS OF VARIOUS MORPHOLOGICAL FORMS OF NASYA (NASAL ROUTE OF DRUG DELIVERY IN PRATISHYAYA (RHINOSINUSITIS WITH REFERENCE TO NASAL MUCO-CILIARY FUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhardwaj Atul

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Different morphological forms of Nasyas (Nasal route of drug administration in Ayurveda like Taila and Ghrita (lipid based nasal drops, churna (dry fine powder and Avpeeda nasya (Aqueous based medicated decoction nasal drops are commonly used as nasal drugs for the management of rhinological disorders in Ayurveda and they distinctly behave differently in the nasal cavity when introduced. This present study explores how these different morphological forms of Nasyas effects the nasal health and mucociliary mechanism in the patients of Pratishyaya i.e. Rhinosinusitis with the help of Goldman’s saccharin test which is carried out at various stages of this study. Clinically, endoscopically and radiologically diagnosed patients of Pratishyaya i.e. rhinosinusitis, satisfying the inclusion criteria were divided randomly by table method into four groups. A total of 40 patients were subjected in this trial after ramification into four trial groups with 10 patients in each group. Anu taila nasya, Shadbindu ghrita nasya, Katphala churna nasya and Pippali Avapeeda nasya respectively were selected for the present study in trial groups I – IV as they are the most frequently prescribed drugs in Ayurveda (Indian system of medicine for the management of the disease Pratishyaya i.e. Rhinosinusitis. These selected drugs subtly represent medicated oils/lipids, powder insufflations (errhines and medicated aqueous base decoction form of nasal drug administration when visualized in morphological appearance and modern perspective. Goldman’s saccharin test, which is used for the present study is a gold standard test for the evaluation of nasal mucociliary function and is directly related to nasal health. Powder form of nasal administered drug i.e. Katphala Churna nasya (powder form was found to be most effective in improvement of endoscopic and radiological parameters of rhinosinusitis. Mucoadhesive properties of Anu Taila nasya and Shadbindu ghrita nasya (both

  9. The motile and invasive capacity of human endometrial stromal cells: implications for normal and impaired reproductive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimar, Charlotte H E; Macklon, Nick S; Post Uiterweer, Emiel D; Brosens, Jan J; Gellersen, Birgit

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mechanisms underlying early reproductive loss in the human are beginning to be elucidated. The migratory and invasive capacity of human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) is increasingly recognized to contribute to the intense tissue remodelling associated with embryo implantation, trophoblast invasion and endometrial regeneration. In this review, we examine the signals and mechanisms that control ESC migration and invasion and assess how deregulation of these cell functions contributes to common reproductive disorders. METHODS The PubMed database was searched for publications on motility and invasiveness of human ESCs in normal endometrial function and in reproductive disorders including implantation failure, recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL), endometriosis and adenomyosis, covering the period 2000-2012. RESULTS Increasing evidence suggests that implantation failure and RPL involve abnormal migratory responses of decidualizing ESCs to embryo and trophoblast signals. Numerous reports indicate that endometriosis, as well as adenomyosis, is associated with increased basal and stimulated invasiveness of ESCs and their progenitor cells, suggesting a link between a heightened menstrual repair response and the formation of ectopic implants. Migration and invasiveness of ESCs are controlled by a complex array of hormones, growth factors, chemokines and inflammatory mediators, and involve signalling through Rho GTPases, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. CONCLUSIONS Novel concepts are extending our understanding of the key functions of ESCs in effecting tissue repair imposed by cyclic menstruation and parturition. Migration of decidualizing ESCs also serves to support blastocyst implantation and embryo selection through discriminate motile responses directed by embryo quality. Targeting regulatory molecules holds promise for developing new strategies for the treatment of reproductive disorders such as endometriosis and

  10. Reg-2, A Downstream Signaling Protein in the Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Survival Pathway, Alleviates Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Tian, Ke-Wei; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Beibei; Han, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), originally described as a neurocytokine that could support the survival of neurons, has been recently found to alleviate demyelination, prevent axon loss, and improve functional recovery in a rat model of acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, poor penetration into the brain parenchyma and unfavorable side effects limit the utility of CNTF. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of a protein downstream of CNTF, regeneration gene protein 2 (Reg-2). Using multiple morphological, molecular biology, and electrophysiological methods to assess neuroinflammation, axonal loss, demyelination, and functional impairment, we observed that Reg-2 and CNTF exert similar effects in the acute phase of EAE. Both treatments attenuated axonal loss and demyelination, improved neuronal survival, and produced functional improvement. With a smaller molecular weight and improved penetration into the brain parenchyma, Reg-2 may be a useful substitute for CNTF therapy in EAE and multiple sclerosis (MS). PMID:27242448

  11. Megalin–deficiency causes high myopia, retinal pigment epithelium-macromelanosomes and abnormal development of the ciliary body in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Tina; Heegaard, Steffen; Christensen, Erik I; Nielsen, Rikke

    2014-01-01

    In man, mutations of the megalin-encoding gene causes the rare Donnai-Barrow/Facio-Oculo-Acoustico-Renal Syndrome, which is partially characterized by high-grade myopia. Previous studies of renal megalin function have established that megalin is crucial for conservation of renal filtered nutrients...... megalin localizes to vesicular structures in the RPE and NPCBE cells. Histological investigations of ocular mouse tissue also identified a severe myopia phenotype as well as enlarged RPE melanosomes and abnormal ciliary body development in the megalin-deficient mice. In conclusion, the complex ocular...... phenotype observed in the megalin-deficient mice suggests that megalin-mediated developmental abnormalities may contribute to the high myopia phenotype observed in the Donnai-Barrow Syndrome patients and, thus, that megalin harbors important roles in ocular development and physiology. Finally, our data show...

  12. Reg-2, A Downstream Signaling Protein in the Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Survival Pathway, Alleviates Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Tian, Ke-Wei; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Beibei; Han, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), originally described as a neurocytokine that could support the survival of neurons, has been recently found to alleviate demyelination, prevent axon loss, and improve functional recovery in a rat model of acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, poor penetration into the brain parenchyma and unfavorable side effects limit the utility of CNTF. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of a protein downstream of CNTF, regeneration gene protein 2 (Reg-2). Using multiple morphological, molecular biology, and electrophysiological methods to assess neuroinflammation, axonal loss, demyelination, and functional impairment, we observed that Reg-2 and CNTF exert similar effects in the acute phase of EAE. Both treatments attenuated axonal loss and demyelination, improved neuronal survival, and produced functional improvement. With a smaller molecular weight and improved penetration into the brain parenchyma, Reg-2 may be a useful substitute for CNTF therapy in EAE and multiple sclerosis (MS). PMID:27242448

  13. Exhaled breath analysis using electronic nose in cystic fibrosis and primary ciliary dyskinesia patients with chronic pulmonary infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, Odin; Paff, Tamara; Haarman, Eric G;

    2014-01-01

    The current diagnostic work-up and monitoring of pulmonary infections may be perceived as invasive, is time consuming and expensive. In this explorative study, we investigated whether or not a non-invasive exhaled breath analysis using an electronic nose would discriminate between cystic fibrosis...... (CF) and primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) with or without various well characterized chronic pulmonary infections. We recruited 64 patients with CF and 21 with PCD based on known chronic infection status. 21 healthy volunteers served as controls. An electronic nose was employed to analyze exhaled......, this method significantly discriminates CF patients suffering from a chronic pulmonary P. aeruginosa (PA) infection from CF patients without a chronic pulmonary infection. Further studies are needed for verification and to investigate the role of electronic nose technology in the very early diagnostic...

  14. Effect of dopamine on bethanechol-stimulated gastric antral motility in dogs with gastric fistula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, K; Hovendal, C P

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of dopamine on gastric antral motility in conscious dogs with gastric fistula, using intraluminal strain-gauge transducers. Infusion of bethanechol increased the motility with regard to both frequency and strength. Dopamine, an endogenous...... on gastric antral motility predominantly through dopaminergic receptors. beta-Adrenergic receptors, which are active in the impairment of gastric acid secretion, do not seem to be involved in the motility response. Dose-response investigations with five increasing doses of bethanechol and one dose of...

  15. Cross-talk between ciliary epithelium and trabecular meshwork cells in-vitro: a new insight into glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Lerner

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: It is assumed that the non-pigmented ciliary epithelium plays a role in regulating intraocular pressure via its neuroendocrine activities. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the effect on a human trabecular meshwork (TM cell line (NTM of co-culture with a human non-pigmented ciliary epithelium cell line (ODM-2. METHODS: The cellular cross-talk between ODM-2 and NTM cells was studied in a co-culture system in which the two cell types were co-cultured for 5 to 60 min or 2, 4 and 8h and then removed from the co-culture and analyzed. Analyses of the ERK and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways and of the activity of TM phosphatases and matrix metalloproteins (MMPs were performed. Acid and alkaline phosphatase activity was determined by the DiFMUP (6, 8-difluoro-4-methylumbelliferyl phosphate assay. MMP levels were determined by gelatin zymography. RESULTS: Exposure of NTM cells to ODM-2 cells led to the activation of the MAPK signal transduction pathways in NTM cells within 5 min of co-culture. Phosphorylation of ERK1/ERK2 and p38 peaked at 10 and 15 min and then decreased over time. Interaction between ODM-2 and NTM cells promoted the expression of MMP-9 in the NTM cells after 4h of co-culture. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings provide support for the hypothesis that crosstalk does indeed take place between ODM-2 and NTM cells. Future studies should be designed to determine the relationship between the MMP system, MAPK kinases and phosphatases. Manipulation of these signaling molecules and the related NTM signal transduction pathways may provide targets for developing improved treatments for glaucoma.

  16. Inhibitory Effect of Dexamethasone on TGF-β1 Expression of Rabbit Ciliary Pigment Epithelia Cultured in Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Xinchun; XI Zulian; MIAO Juan; LI Qinglin; ZHANG Haijiang; HU Yizhen; WEI Houren

    2006-01-01

    In order to elucidate the effect of dexamethasone on the expression of transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1) in ciliary pigment epithelial (CPE) cells cultured in vitro, rabbit CPE cells were cultured in vitro, treated with DMEM medium containing 0,1×10-8 , 5×10-8 , 10 × 10-8 and 50×10-8 mol/L dexamethasone respectively for 5 days. The TGF-β1 expression was detected by immunohistochemistry Supervision methods and analyzed semi-quantitatively by HMIAS-2000 image system. As opposed to in vivo, rabbit CPE cells expressed TGF-β1 under cultured circumstance in vitro. The gray scales of the positive yellow staining in the groups of 1×10-8, 5×10-8, 10×10-8 and 50× 10-8 mol/L dexamethasone were 136. 57±4.43, 140. 20±6.10, 142.98±2. 99, 146. 80± 1.68 and 150. 05± 1.94 respectively. When the concentrations of dexamethasone were equal to or higher than 5×10-8 mol/L and, the expression of TGF-β1 was inhibited. 10-7 mol/L dexamethasone showed a significant inhibition. It was suggested that CPE cells possess the potential ability of synthesizing and expressing TGF-β1. The inhibition of TGF-β1 expression by dexamethasone may be beneficial to the treatment of proliferative vitroretinopathy, also exert some influence on the secretion of aqueous humor and ciliary inflammation.

  17. The development of the larval nervous system, musculature and ciliary bands of Pomatoceros lamarckii (Annelida: heterochrony in polychaetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimeld Sebastian M

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To understand the evolution of animals it is essential to have taxon sampling across a representative spread of the animal kingdom. With the recent rearrangement of most of the Bilateria into three major clades (Ecdysozoa, Lophotrochozoa and Deuterostomia it has become clear that the Lophotrochozoa are relatively poorly represented in our knowledge of animal development, compared to the Ecdysozoa and Deuterostomia. We aim to contribute towards redressing this balance with data on the development of the muscular, nervous and ciliary systems of the annelid Pomatoceros lamarckii (Serpulidae. We compare our data with other lophotrochozoans. Results P. lamarckii develops locomotory and feeding structures that enable it to become a swimming, planktotrophic larva within 24 hours. Formation of the trochophore includes development of a prototroch, metatroch and neurotroch, development of apical and posterior nervous elements at similar times, and development of musculature around the ciliary bands and digestive tract prior to development of any body wall muscles. The adult nervous and muscular systems are essentially preformed in the late larva. Interestingly, the muscular systems of the larvae and juvenile worms do not include the circular muscles of the body wall, which are considered to be plesiomorphic for annelids, although the possibility that circular muscles develop after these stages cannot be ruled out at this point. Conclusion A comparison between polychaetes shows variability in the timing (heterochrony of development of body wall muscles and elements of the nervous system. These heterochronies are one route for evolution of different life history strategies, such as adaptations to feeding requirements.

  18. Host Matrix Modulation by Tumor Exosomes Promotes Motility and Invasiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Mu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are important intercellular communicators, where tumor exosomes (TEX severely influence hematopoiesis and premetastatic organ cells. With the extracellular matrix (ECM being an essential constituent of non-transformed tissues and tumors, we asked whether exosomes from a metastatic rat tumor also affect the organization of the ECM and whether this has consequences on host and tumor cell motility. TEX bind to individual components of the ECM, the preferential partner depending on the exosomes' adhesion molecule profile such that high CD44 expression is accompanied by hyaluronic acid binding and high α6β4 expression by laminin (LN 332 binding, which findings were confirmed by antibody blocking. TEX can bind to the tumor matrix already during exosome delivery but also come in contact with distinct organ matrices. Being rich in proteases, TEX modulate the ECM as demonstrated for degradation of collagens, LNs, and fibronectin. Matrix degradation by TEX has severe consequences on tumor and host cell adhesion, motility, and invasiveness. By ECM degradation, TEX also promote host cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance. Taken together, the host tissue ECM modulation by TEX is an important factor in the cross talk between a tumor and the host including premetastatic niche preparation and the recruitment of hematopoietic cells. Reorganization of the ECM by exosomes likely also contributes to organogenesis, physiological and pathologic angiogenesis, wound healing, and clotting after vessel disruption.

  19. Gastroesophageal Reflux and Altered Motility in Lung Transplant Rejection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castor, John M; Wood, Richard K.; Muir, Andrew J.; Palmer, Scott M.; Shimpi, Rahul A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Lung transplantation has become an effective therapeutic option for selected patients with end stage lung disease. Long-term survival is limited by chronic rejection manifest as bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). The aspiration of gastric contents has been implicated as a causative or additive factor leading to BOS. Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and altered foregut motility are common both before and after lung transplantation. Further, the normal defense mechanisms against reflux are impaired in the allograft. Recent studies using biomarkers of aspiration have added to previous association studies to provide a growing body of evidence supporting the link between rejection and GER. Further, the addition of high-resolution manometry (HRM) and impedance technology to characterize bolus transit and the presence and extent of reflux regardless of pH might better identify at-risk patients. Although additional prospective studies are needed, fundoplication appears useful in the prevention or treatment of post-transplant BOS. Purpose This review will highlight the existing literature on the relationship of gastroesophageal reflux and altered motility to lung transplant rejection, particularly BOS. The article will conclude with a discussion of the evaluation and management of patients undergoing lung transplantation at our center. PMID:20507544

  20. Realizing the Physics of Motile Cilia Synchronization with Driven Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruot, Nicolas; Cicuta, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    Cilia and flagella in biological systems often show large scale cooperative behaviors such as the synchronization of their beats in "metachronal waves." These are beautiful examples of emergent dynamics in biology, and are essential for life, allowing diverse processes from the motility of eukaryotic microorganisms, to nutrient transport and clearance of pathogens from mammalian airways. How these collective states arise is not fully understood, but it is clear that individual cilia interact mechanically, and that a strong and long-ranged component of the coupling is mediated by the viscous fluid. We review here the work by ourselves and others aimed at understanding the behavior of hydrodynamically coupled systems, and particularly a set of results that have been obtained both experimentally and theoretically by studying actively driven colloidal systems. In these controlled scenarios, it is possible to selectively test aspects of living motile cilia, such as the geometrical arrangement, the effects of the driving profile and the distance to no-slip boundaries. We outline and give examples of how it is possible to link model systems to observations on living systems, which can be made on microorganisms, on cell cultures or on tissue sections. This area of research has clear clinical application in the long term, as severe pathologies are associated with compromised cilia function in humans.

  1. We do, therefore we think: time, motility, and consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Barbara Gwenn

    2010-01-01

    This article is a philosopher's expanded review of two recent books on neurophysiology: Rodolfo Llinás's I of the Vortex and György Buszáki's Rhythms of the Brain. Researchers such as these are converging on a view of consciousness as originating in motility and as inherently temporal due to the brainwave oscillations that underlay it. Most current discussions of consciousness include implicit philosophical presuppositions inherited from the canon of Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, and Kant, e.g. that consciousness is self-reflective, passive, and timeless. Because of this, Llinás's and Buszáki's insights may not be fully appreciated. Western philosophy, however, also includes what might be described as a counter-tradition--and one that is more compatible with empirical biological science than the usual canon. Heraclitus, Spinoza, Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, and especially the 20th century French philosopher and psychologist, Merleau-Ponty, all anticipated aspects of Llinás's and Buszáki's approaches. Their alternative conceptual vocabularies are useful for strengthening Llinás's and Buszáki's approaches, sketching out a notion of consciousness emerging from motility, and generating new hypotheses for neurophysiological research. PMID:21280454

  2. Particle-based simulations of self-motile suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Denis F.; Panchenko, Alexander; Kim, Tae-Yeon; Fried, Eliot

    2015-11-01

    A simple model for simulating flows of active suspensions is investigated. The approach is based on dissipative particle dynamics. While the model is potentially applicable to a wide range of self-propelled particle systems, the specific class of self-motile bacterial suspensions is considered as a modeling scenario. To mimic the rod-like geometry of a bacterium, two dissipative particle dynamics particles are connected by a stiff harmonic spring to form an aggregate dissipative particle dynamics molecule. Bacterial motility is modeled through a constant self-propulsion force applied along the axis of each such aggregate molecule. The model accounts for hydrodynamic interactions between self-propelled agents through the pairwise dissipative interactions conventional to dissipative particle dynamics. Numerical simulations are performed using a customized version of the open-source software package LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator) software package. Detailed studies of the influence of agent concentration, pairwise dissipative interactions, and Stokes friction on the statistics of the system are provided. The simulations are used to explore the influence of hydrodynamic interactions in active suspensions. For high agent concentrations in combination with dominating pairwise dissipative forces, strongly correlated motion patterns and a fluid-like spectral distributions of kinetic energy are found. In contrast, systems dominated by Stokes friction exhibit weaker spatial correlations of the velocity field. These results indicate that hydrodynamic interactions may play an important role in the formation of spatially extended structures in active suspensions.

  3. Motility-Driven Glass and Jamming Transitions in Biological Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Dapeng; Yang, Xingbo; Marchetti, M. Cristina; Manning, M. Lisa

    2016-04-01

    Cell motion inside dense tissues governs many biological processes, including embryonic development and cancer metastasis, and recent experiments suggest that these tissues exhibit collective glassy behavior. To make quantitative predictions about glass transitions in tissues, we study a self-propelled Voronoi model that simultaneously captures polarized cell motility and multibody cell-cell interactions in a confluent tissue, where there are no gaps between cells. We demonstrate that the model exhibits a jamming transition from a solidlike state to a fluidlike state that is controlled by three parameters: the single-cell motile speed, the persistence time of single-cell tracks, and a target shape index that characterizes the competition between cell-cell adhesion and cortical tension. In contrast to traditional particulate glasses, we are able to identify an experimentally accessible structural order parameter that specifies the entire jamming surface as a function of model parameters. We demonstrate that a continuum soft glassy rheology model precisely captures this transition in the limit of small persistence times and explain how it fails in the limit of large persistence times. These results provide a framework for understanding the collective solid-to-liquid transitions that have been observed in embryonic development and cancer progression, which may be associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in these tissues.

  4. Lichen Secondary Metabolite, Physciosporin, Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Park, So-Yeon; Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Yu, Young Hyun; Nguyen, Tru Van; Sun, Eun Gene; Udeni, Jayalal; Jeong, Min-Hye; Pereira, Iris; Moon, Cheol; Ha, Hyung-Ho; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2015-01-01

    Lichens produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. To screen for novel lichen secondary metabolites showing inhibitory activity against lung cancer cell motility, we tested acetone extracts of 13 lichen samples collected in Chile. Physciosporin, isolated from Pseudocyphellaria coriacea (Hook f. & Taylor) D.J. Galloway & P. James, was identified as an effective compound and showed significant inhibitory activity in migration and invasion assays against human lung cancer cells. Physciosporin treatment reduced both protein and mRNA levels of N-cadherin with concomitant decreases in the levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers such as snail and twist. Physciosporin also suppressed KITENIN (KAI1 C-terminal interacting tetraspanin)-mediated AP-1 activity in both the absence and presence of epidermal growth factor stimulation. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of the metastasis suppressor gene, KAI1, was increased while that of the metastasis enhancer gene, KITENIN, was dramatically decreased by physciosporin. Particularly, the activity of 3'-untranslated region of KITENIN was decreased by physciosporin. Moreover, Cdc42 and Rac1 activities were decreased by physciosporin. These results demonstrated that the lichen secondary metabolite, physciosporin, inhibits lung cancer cell motility through novel mechanisms of action. PMID:26371759

  5. Lichen Secondary Metabolite, Physciosporin, Inhibits Lung Cancer Cell Motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Yang

    Full Text Available Lichens produce various unique chemicals that can be used for pharmaceutical purposes. To screen for novel lichen secondary metabolites showing inhibitory activity against lung cancer cell motility, we tested acetone extracts of 13 lichen samples collected in Chile. Physciosporin, isolated from Pseudocyphellaria coriacea (Hook f. & Taylor D.J. Galloway & P. James, was identified as an effective compound and showed significant inhibitory activity in migration and invasion assays against human lung cancer cells. Physciosporin treatment reduced both protein and mRNA levels of N-cadherin with concomitant decreases in the levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers such as snail and twist. Physciosporin also suppressed KITENIN (KAI1 C-terminal interacting tetraspanin-mediated AP-1 activity in both the absence and presence of epidermal growth factor stimulation. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the expression of the metastasis suppressor gene, KAI1, was increased while that of the metastasis enhancer gene, KITENIN, was dramatically decreased by physciosporin. Particularly, the activity of 3'-untranslated region of KITENIN was decreased by physciosporin. Moreover, Cdc42 and Rac1 activities were decreased by physciosporin. These results demonstrated that the lichen secondary metabolite, physciosporin, inhibits lung cancer cell motility through novel mechanisms of action.

  6. Membrane tension and cytoskeleton organization in cell motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell membrane shape changes are important for many aspects of normal biological function, such as tissue development, wound healing and cell division and motility. Various disease states are associated with deregulation of how cells move and change shape, including notably tumor initiation and cancer cell metastasis. Cell motility is powered, in large part, by the controlled assembly and disassembly of the actin cytoskeleton. Much of this dynamic happens in close proximity to the plasma membrane due to the fact that actin assembly factors are membrane-bound, and thus actin filaments are generally oriented such that their growth occurs against or near the membrane. For a long time, the membrane was viewed as a relatively passive scaffold for signaling. However, results from the last five years show that this is not the whole picture, and that the dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton are intimately linked to the mechanics of the cell membrane. In this review, we summarize recent findings concerning the role of plasma membrane mechanics in cell cytoskeleton dynamics and architecture, showing that the cell membrane is not just an envelope or a barrier for actin assembly, but is a master regulator controlling cytoskeleton dynamics and cell polarity. (topical review)

  7. In silico reconstitution of actin-based symmetry breaking and motility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Dayel

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells assemble viscoelastic networks of crosslinked actin filaments to control their shape, mechanical properties, and motility. One important class of actin network is nucleated by the Arp2/3 complex and drives both membrane protrusion at the leading edge of motile cells and intracellular motility of pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes. These networks can be reconstituted in vitro from purified components to drive the motility of spherical micron-sized beads. An Elastic Gel model has been successful in explaining how these networks break symmetry, but how they produce directed motile force has been less clear. We have combined numerical simulations with in vitro experiments to reconstitute the behavior of these motile actin networks in silico using an Accumulative Particle-Spring (APS model that builds on the Elastic Gel model, and demonstrates simple intuitive mechanisms for both symmetry breaking and sustained motility. The APS model explains observed transitions between smooth and pulsatile motion as well as subtle variations in network architecture caused by differences in geometry and conditions. Our findings also explain sideways symmetry breaking and motility of elongated beads, and show that elastic recoil, though important for symmetry breaking and pulsatile motion, is not necessary for smooth directional motility. The APS model demonstrates how a small number of viscoelastic network parameters and construction rules suffice to recapture the complex behavior of motile actin networks. The fact that the model not only mirrors our in vitro observations, but also makes novel predictions that we confirm by experiment, suggests that the model captures much of the essence of actin-based motility in this system.

  8. Characterization of Novel Factors Involved in Swimming and Swarming Motility in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Andrea Deditius

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica utilizes flagellar motility to swim through liquid environments and on surfaces. The biosynthesis of the flagellum is regulated on various levels, including transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms. Here, we investigated the motility phenotype of 24 selected single gene deletions that were previously described to display swimming and swarming motility effects. Mutations in flgE, fliH, ydiV, rfaG, yjcC, STM1267 and STM3363 showed an altered motility phenotype. Deletions of flgE and fliH displayed a non-motile phenotype in both swimming and swarming motility assays as expected. The deletions of STM1267, STM3363, ydiV, rfaG and yjcC were further analyzed in detail for flagellar and fimbrial gene expression and filament formation. A ΔydiV mutant showed increased swimming motility, but a decrease in swarming motility, which coincided with derepression of curli fimbriae. A deletion of yjcC, encoding for an EAL domain-containing protein, increased swimming motility independent on flagellar gene expression. A ΔSTM1267 mutant displayed a hypermotile phenotype on swarm agar plates and was found to have increased numbers of flagella. In contrast, a knockout of STM3363 did also display an increase in swarming motility, but did not alter flagella numbers. Finally, a deletion of the LPS biosynthesis-related protein RfaG reduced swimming and swarming motility, associated with a decrease in transcription from flagellar class II and class III promoters and a lack of flagellar filaments.

  9. Visceral hypersensitivity and altered colonic motility after subsidence of inflammation in a rat model of colitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-Ho La; Tae-Wan Kim; Tae-Sik Sung; Jeoung-Woo Kang; Kyun-Ju Kim; Il-Suk Yang

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a functional bowel disorder characterized by visceral hypersensitivity and altered bowel motility. There is increasing evidence suggesting the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of IBS, which addresses the possibility that formerly established rat model of colitis could be used as an TBS model after the inflammation subsided.METHODS: Colitis was induced by intracolonic instillation of 4 % acetic acid in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The extent of inflammation was assessed by histological examination and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity assay. After subsidence of colitis, the rats were subjected to rectal distension and restraint stress, then the abdominal withdrawal reflex and the number of stress-induced fecal output were measured,respectively.RESULTS: At 2 days post-induction of colitis, the colon showed characteristic inflammatory changes in histology and 8-fold increase in MPO activity. At 7 days post-induction of colitis, the histological features and MPO activity returned to normal. The rats at 7 days post-induction of colitis showed hypersensitive response to rectal distension without an accompaning change in rectal compliance, and defecated more stools than control animals when under stress.CONCLUSION: These results concur largely with the characteristic features of IBS, visceral hypersensitivity and altered defecation pattern in the absence of detectable disease, suggesting that this animal model is a methodologically convenient and useful model for studying a subset of IBS.

  10. Esophageal motility in patients with gastroesophageal reflux liquid and semisolid transit scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To detect oesophageal motility disorders in children with gastroesophageal reflux (GER), and to determine their reversibility with medical treatment, we employed the esophageal transit scintigraphy (ETS) with liquid and semisolid boluses, calculating the global 'transit time' (TT). 41 patients underwent an ETS (32 liquid and 26 semisolid). Results: The esophageal TT in liquid studies was not different from that obtained in the control group (14.9 ± 19.6 vs 8.7 ± 2.2 sec). Semisolid TT was significantly higher in patients than in controls (37.2 ± 36.2 vs 9.9 ± 3.3 sec; p ≤ 0.001). After 6 months of treatment semisolid TT significantly decreased (p ≤ 0.005), whereas no changes were observed with the liquid technique. Conclusion: These data support that the mild esophageal motor disturbances seen in children with GER are secondary and partially reversible with treatment, and can only be detected by sensitive techniques such as ETS with semisolid bolus

  11. A molecular mechanism to regulate lysosome motility for lysosome positioning and tubulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinran; Rydzewski, Nicholas; Hider, Ahmad; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yang, Junsheng; Wang, Wuyang; Gao, Qiong; Cheng, Xiping; Xu, Haoxing

    2016-04-01

    To mediate the degradation of biomacromolecules, lysosomes must traffic towards cargo-carrying vesicles for subsequent membrane fusion or fission. Mutations of the lysosomal Ca(2+) channel TRPML1 cause lysosomal storage disease (LSD) characterized by disordered lysosomal membrane trafficking in cells. Here we show that TRPML1 activity is required to promote Ca(2+)-dependent centripetal movement of lysosomes towards the perinuclear region (where autophagosomes accumulate) following autophagy induction. ALG-2, an EF-hand-containing protein, serves as a lysosomal Ca(2+) sensor that associates physically with the minus-end-directed dynactin-dynein motor, while PtdIns(3,5)P2, a lysosome-localized phosphoinositide, acts upstream of TRPML1. Furthermore, the PtdIns(3,5)P2-TRPML1-ALG-2-dynein signalling is necessary for lysosome tubulation and reformation. In contrast, the TRPML1 pathway is not required for the perinuclear accumulation of lysosomes observed in many LSDs, which is instead likely to be caused by secondary cholesterol accumulation that constitutively activates Rab7-RILP-dependent retrograde transport. Ca(2+) release from lysosomes thus provides an on-demand mechanism regulating lysosome motility, positioning and tubulation. PMID:26950892

  12. Disruption of TgPHIL1 alters specific parameters of Toxoplasma gondii motility measured in a quantitative, three-dimensional live motility assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline M Leung

    Full Text Available T. gondii uses substrate-dependent gliding motility to invade cells of its hosts, egress from these cells at the end of its lytic cycle and disseminate through the host organism during infection. The ability of the parasite to move is therefore critical for its virulence. T. gondii engages in three distinct types of gliding motility on coated two-dimensional surfaces: twirling, circular gliding and helical gliding. We show here that motility in a three-dimensional Matrigel-based environment is strikingly different, in that all parasites move in irregular corkscrew-like trajectories. Methods developed for quantitative analysis of motility parameters along the smoothed trajectories demonstrate a complex but periodic pattern of motility with mean and maximum velocities of 0.58 ± 0.07 µm/s and 2.01 ± 0.17 µm/s, respectively. To test how a change in the parasite's crescent shape might affect trajectory parameters, we compared the motility of Δphil1 parasites, which are shorter and wider than wild type, to the corresponding parental and complemented lines. Although comparable percentages of parasites were moving for all three lines, the Δphil1 mutant exhibited significantly decreased trajectory lengths and mean and maximum velocities compared to the parental parasite line. These effects were either partially or fully restored upon complementation of the Δphil1 mutant. These results show that alterations in morphology may have a significant impact on T. gondii motility in an extracellular matrix-like environment, provide a possible explanation for the decreased fitness of Δphil1 parasites in vivo, and demonstrate the utility of the quantitative three-dimensional assay for studying parasite motility.

  13. Disruption of TgPHIL1 alters specific parameters of Toxoplasma gondii motility measured in a quantitative, three-dimensional live motility assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Jacqueline M; Rould, Mark A; Konradt, Christoph; Hunter, Christopher A; Ward, Gary E

    2014-01-01

    T. gondii uses substrate-dependent gliding motility to invade cells of its hosts, egress from these cells at the end of its lytic cycle and disseminate through the host organism during infection. The ability of the parasite to move is therefore critical for its virulence. T. gondii engages in three distinct types of gliding motility on coated two-dimensional surfaces: twirling, circular gliding and helical gliding. We show here that motility in a three-dimensional Matrigel-based environment is strikingly different, in that all parasites move in irregular corkscrew-like trajectories. Methods developed for quantitative analysis of motility parameters along the smoothed trajectories demonstrate a complex but periodic pattern of motility with mean and maximum velocities of 0.58 ± 0.07 µm/s and 2.01 ± 0.17 µm/s, respectively. To test how a change in the parasite's crescent shape might affect trajectory parameters, we compared the motility of Δphil1 parasites, which are shorter and wider than wild type, to the corresponding parental and complemented lines. Although comparable percentages of parasites were moving for all three lines, the Δphil1 mutant exhibited significantly decreased trajectory lengths and mean and maximum velocities compared to the parental parasite line. These effects were either partially or fully restored upon complementation of the Δphil1 mutant. These results show that alterations in morphology may have a significant impact on T. gondii motility in an extracellular matrix-like environment, provide a possible explanation for the decreased fitness of Δphil1 parasites in vivo, and demonstrate the utility of the quantitative three-dimensional assay for studying parasite motility. PMID:24489670

  14. Neuroradiology in the ocular motility disorders : II. nuclear and infranuclear pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear and infranuclear pathway of eye movement begins from the ocular motor nuclei situated in the brain stem, where the axons originate and form three ocular motor nerves. Although each of the ocular motor nerves follows a distinct route to reach the end organ, the extraocular muscles, they also have common housings in the cavernous sinus and at the orbital apex, where part or all of them are frequently and simultaneously affected by a common disease process. Since the fine details of normal and diseased structures can frequently be seen on radiologic imaging, especially magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, a knowledge of the basic anatomy involved in nuclear and infranuclear eye movement is important. In this description, in addition to the normal nuclear and infranuclear pathway of eye movement, we have noted the radiologic findings of typical diseases involving each segment of the nuclear and infranuclear pathway, particularly as seen on magnetic resonance images. Brief comments on ocular motor pseudopalsy, which mimics ocular motor palsy, are also included

  15. Bacteria: a new player in gastrointestinal motility disorders--infections, bacterial overgrowth, and probiotics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2012-02-03

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) may result from a dysfunctional interaction between the indigenous flora and the intestinal mucosa, which in turn leads to immune activation in the colonic mucosa. Some propose that bacterial overgrowth is a common causative factor in the pathogenesis of symptoms in IBS; others point to evidence suggesting that the cause stems from more subtle qualitative changes in the colonic flora. Bacterial overgrowth will probably prove not to be a major factor in what will eventually be defined as IBS. Nevertheless, short-term therapy with either antibiotics or probiotics seems to reduce symptoms among IBS patients. However, in the long term, safety issues will favor the probiotic approach; results of long-term studies with these agents are eagerly awaited.

  16. Oesophageal and gastric motility disorders in patients categorised as having primary anorexia nervosa.

    OpenAIRE

    Stacher, G; Kiss, A; Wiesnagrotzki, S; Bergmann, H; Höbart, J; Schneider, C

    1986-01-01

    Gastrointestinal motor function in patients with primary anorexia nervosa has rarely been investigated. We studied oesophageal motor activity in 30 consecutive patients meeting standard diagnostic criteria for primary anorexia nervosa (Feighner et al; DSM III). Seven were found to suffer from achalasia instead of primary anorexia nervosa, one from diffuse oesophageal spasm and one from severe gastro-oesophageal reflux and upper oesophageal sphincter hypertonicity, while partly non-propulsive ...

  17. Therapy-refractory gastrointestinal motility disorder in a child with c-kit mutations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian; Breuer; Jun; Oh; Gerhard; J; Molderings; Michael; Schemann; Birgit; Kuch; Ertan; Mayatepek; Rüdiger; Adam

    2010-01-01

    Constipation and fecal impaction are frequent and distressing complaints in pediatric gastroenterology. Especially in neurologically handicapped children, treatment of severe forms of slow-transit constipation (STC) can be difficult. In the majority of cases, STC is of unknown etiology. However, in recent years, there is growing evidence that interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs), which serve as electrical pacemakers and generate spontaneous electrical slow waves in the gastrointestinal tract, might play an im...

  18. A bifunctional O-GlcNAc transferase governs flagellar motility through anti-repression

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Aimee; Kamp, Heather D.; Gründling, Angelika; Darren E Higgins

    2006-01-01

    Flagellar motility is an essential mechanism by which bacteria adapt to and survive in diverse environments. Although flagella confer an advantage to many bacterial pathogens for colonization during infection, bacterial flagellins also stimulate host innate immune responses. Consequently, many bacterial pathogens down-regulate flagella production following initial infection. Listeria monocytogenes is a facultative intracellular pathogen that represses transcription of flagellar motility genes...

  19. Scintigraphic evaluation of gastric emptying and motility; Nuklearmedizinische Diagnostik der Magenmotilitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, R. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany)

    2003-06-01

    The stomach consists of two functionally distinct parts. The fundus and upper corpus mainly serve as a reservoir and exert primarily a tonic activity, which presses ingesta towards the antrum and duodenum. The phasic contractility of the lower corpus and antrum cause mechanical breakdown and mixing of the food particels. A complex regulation of these mechanisms provides a regular gastric emptying. Various disorders such as diabetes mellitus, mixed connective tissue diseases, gastritis, tumors, dyspeptic disorders but also drugs and gastric surgery may influence or impair gastric function and may cause typical symptoms such as upper abdominal discomfort, bloating, nausea and vomiting. However, the interpretation of gastrointestinal symptoms often is difficult. Radionuclide studies of gastric emptying and motility are the most physiologic tools available for studying gastric motor function. Gastric scintigraphy is non-invasive, uses physiologic meal and is quantitative. Emptying curves generated from the gastric ROI offer information whether a disorder is accompanied by a regular, fast or slow gastric emptying. Data on gastric contractions (amplitude and frequency) provide additional information to results obtained by conventional emptying studies. Depending on the underlying disorder, gastric emptying and peristalsis showed both corresponding and discrepant findings. Therefore, both parameters should be routinely assessed to further improve characterisation of gastric dysfunction by scintigraphy. (orig.) [German] Proximaler und distaler Magen haben funktionell unterschiedliche Aufgaben. Waehrend der proximale Magen die Nahrung voruebergehend speichert und ueber die Generierung eines gastroduodenalen Druckgefaelles eine fraktionierte Entleerung in den Duenndarm bewirkt, dient die Peristaltik des distalen Magens der Durchmischung und Zerkleinerung des Speisebreis. Eine komplexe hormonelle, humorale und nervale Regulation dieser ineinandergreifenden Funktionen

  20. Accumulation of motile elongated micro-organisms in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Caijuan; Sardina, Gaetano; Lushi, Enkeleida; Brandt, Luca

    2014-01-01

    We study the effect of turbulence on marine life by performing numerical simulations of motile microorganisms, modelled as prolate spheroids, in isotropic homogeneous turbulence. We show that the clustering and patchiness observed in laminar flows, linear shear and vortex flows, are significantly reduced in a three-dimensional turbulent flow mainly because of the complex topology; elongated micro-orgamisms show some level of clustering in the case of swimmers without any preferential alignment whereas spherical swimmers remain uniformly distributed. Micro-organisms with one preferential swimming direction (e.g. gyrotaxis) still show significant clustering if spherical in shape, whereas prolate swimmers remain more uniformly distributed. Due to their large sensitivity to the local shear, these elongated swimmers react slower to the action of vorticity and gravity and therefore do not have time to accumulate in a turbulent flow. These results show how purely hydrodynamic effects can alter the ecology of microorganisms that can vary their shape and their preferential orientation.

  1. Effects of ginseng on Pseudomonas aeruginosa motility and biofilm formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Hong; Lee, Baoleri; Yang, Liang;

    2011-01-01

    Biofilm-associated chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis are virtually impossible to eradicate with antibiotics because biofilm-growing bacteria are highly tolerant to antibiotics and host defense mechanisms. Previously, we found that ginseng treatments....... aeruginosa, but significantly prevented P. aeruginosa from forming biofilm. Exposure to 0.5% ginseng aqueous extract for 24 h destroyed most 7-day-old mature biofilms formed by both mucoid and nonmucoid P. aeruginosa strains. Ginseng treatment enhanced swimming and twitching motility, but reduced swarming of...... P. aeruginosa at concentrations as low as 0.25%. Oral administration of ginseng extracts in mice promoted phagocytosis of P. aeruginosa PAO1 by airway phagocytes, but did not affect phagocytosis of a PAO1-filM mutant. Our study suggests that ginseng treatment may help to eradicate the biofilm...

  2. Accumulation of motile elongated micro-organisms in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Zhan, Caijuan; Lushi, Enkeleida; Brandt, Luca

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of turbulence on marine life by performing numerical simulations of motile microorganisms, modelled as prolate spheroids, in isotropic homogeneous turbulence. We show that the clustering and patchiness observed in laminar flows, linear shear and vortex flows, are significantly reduced in a three-dimensional turbulent flow mainly because of the complex topology; elongated micro-orgamisms show some level of clustering in the case of swimmers without any preferential alignment whereas spherical swimmers remain uniformly distributed. Micro-organisms with one preferential swimming direction (e.g. gyrotaxis) still show significant clustering if spherical in shape, whereas prolate swimmers remain more uniformly distributed. Due to their large sensitivity to the local shear, these elongated swimmers react slower to the action of vorticity and gravity and therefore do not have time to accumulate in a turbulent flow. These results show how purely hydrodynamic effects can alter the ecology of microor...

  3. Membrane tension feedback on shape and motility of eukaryotic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Benjamin; Aranson, Igor S.; Ziebert, Falko

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of a phase field model of a single cell crawling on a substrate, we investigate how the properties of the cell membrane affect the shape and motility of the cell. Since the membrane influences the cell dynamics on multiple levels and provides a nontrivial feedback, we consider the following fundamental interactions: (i) the reduction of the actin polymerization rate by membrane tension; (ii) area conservation of the cell's two-dimensional cross-section vs. conservation of the circumference (i.e. membrane inextensibility); and (iii) the contribution from the membrane's bending energy to the shape and integrity of the cell. As in experiments, we investigate two pertinent observables - the cell's velocity and its aspect ratio. We find that the most important effect is the feedback of membrane tension on the actin polymerization. Bending rigidity has only minor effects, visible mostly in dynamic reshaping events, as exemplified by collisions of the cell with an obstacle.

  4. Endoplasmic motility spectral characteristics in plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avsievich, T. I.; Ghaleb, K. E. S.; Frolov, S. V.; Proskurin, S. G.

    2015-03-01

    Spectral Fourier analysis of experimentally acquired velocity time dependencies, V(t), of shuttle endoplasmic motility in an isolated strand of plasmodium of slime mold Physarum Polycephalum has been realized. V(t) registration was performed in normal conditions and after the treatment by respiration inhibitors, which lead to a complete cessation of endoplasmic motion in the strand. Spectral analysis of the velocity time dependences of the endoplasm allows obtaining two distinct harmonic components in the spectra. Their ratio appeared to be constant in all cases, ν2/ν1=1.97±0.17. After the inhibitors are washed out respiratory system becomes normal, gradually restoring the activity of both harmonic oscillatory sources with time. Simulated velocity time dependences correspond to experimental data with good accuracy.

  5. Sperm motility and ATP content in seminal hyperviscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendeluk, G R; Munuce, M J; Carizza, C; Sardi, M; Bregni, C

    1997-01-01

    Objective spermatic motility (Hamilton Thorne Research), the rapid progressive spermatozoa (grade A) recovery after swim-up, and the spermatozoa ATP content (bioluminescence) were studied in normoviscous and hyperviscous asthenospermic samples. The amplitude of lateral head displacement (ALH) was significantly lower in hyperviscous semen (normal: 4.6 +/- 0.7 microns [n = 20], high: 3.5 +/- 1.2 microns [n = 16]; p semens with high consistency (normal: 71.0 +/- 38.0 [n = 14], high: 181.3 +/- 108.9 [n = 6]; p < .05). The ATP content per living spermatozoa was in the normal consistency group 449.4 +/- 65.1 pmol per million living spermatozoa (n = 29) and in the high consistency batch 605.1 +/- 242.8 (n = 9), p < .05. In asthenospermia, the spermatozoa from hyperviscous samples have minor ALH values, better response to swim-up, and high ATP content than those from normoviscous ejaculates. PMID:9352034

  6. Effect of short abstinence time on sperm motility parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alipour, Hiva; Dardmeh, Fereshteh; Van Der Horst, Gerhard;

    2015-01-01

    differences in the details of the sperm movement (kinematics) of human sperm provided by computerized sperm analysis systems. This study was designed to assess the effect of two different media pH levels on kinematic parameters of the human sperm. Samples were prepared using the 40%/80% Pureception (Sage, USA...... of this study illustrated a general insignificant decrease in the ratio of progressively motile and hyperactive sperm after 6 and 24 hours. However a significant difference between the test groups was observed in the curvilinear, straight line and Mean path velocity and Straightness after 6 and 24 hours....... Linearity and Wobble showed significant difference after 24 hours. This study demonstrated a difference in the sperm motion pattern and velocity in different environmental pH levels. Based on these findings, further investigations are required to elucidate knowledge about possible effect of marginal p...

  7. Langevin Dynamics Deciphers the Motility Pattern of Swimming Parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaburdaev, Vasily; Uppaluri, Sravanti; Pfohl, Thomas; Engstler, Markus; Friedrich, Rudolf; Stark, Holger

    2011-05-01

    The parasite African trypanosome swims in the bloodstream of mammals and causes the highly dangerous human sleeping sickness. Cell motility is essential for the parasite’s survival within the mammalian host. We present an analysis of the random-walk pattern of a swimming trypanosome. From experimental time-autocorrelation functions for the direction of motion we identify two relaxation times that differ by an order of magnitude. They originate from the rapid deformations of the cell body and a slower rotational diffusion of the average swimming direction. Velocity fluctuations are athermal and increase for faster cells whose trajectories are also straighter. We demonstrate that such a complex dynamics is captured by two decoupled Langevin equations that decipher the complex trajectory pattern by referring it to the microscopic details of cell behavior.

  8. Bacillus subtilis Hfq: A role in chemotaxis and motility

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CHANDRAKANT B JAGTAP; PRADEEP KUMAR; K KRISHNAMURTHY RAO

    2016-09-01

    Hfq is a global post-transcriptional regulator that modulates the translation and stability of target mRNAs and therebyregulates pleiotropic functions, such as growth, stress, virulence and motility, in many Gram-negative bacteria.However, comparatively little is known about the regulation and function(s) of Hfq in Gram-positive bacteria.Recently, in Bacillus subtilis, a role for Hfq in stationary phase survival has been suggested, although the possibilityof Hfq having an additional role(s) cannot be ruled out. In this study we show that an ortholog of Hfq in B. subtilis isregulated by the stress sigma factor, σB, in addition to the stationary phase sigma factor, σH. We further demonstratethat Hfq positively regulates the expression of flagellum and chemotaxis genes (fla/che) that control chemotaxis andmotility, thus assigning a new function for Hfq in B. subtilis.

  9. Preliminary remarks for a study of urban motilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mubi Brighenti

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We could conceive a sociology of urban motilities associated to the act of going to work as composed of: 1. a dromology of displacements. This includes the study of speeds of material and immaterial (informational transfers, kinetic energy in relation to the type of propulsion or fuel (animal, mechanic, fossil, electric etc. and the type of medium (earth, water, air, wires, aether; average and instantaneous speed of transport, coefficients of velocity (= speed + directional vector, thus considering movements of entrance, exit, turning, etc., accelerations, decelerations, queues, jams, accidents, collisions, and their consequences; the study of transfer vectors, i.e. means of displacement (in relation to the different speeds each type of vehicle ensures, be it private, public, or hybrid transport and the infrastructures for displacement (in relation to the different speeds they ensure, impose or invite; description of distances and travel durations, daily and weekly overall time spent on travelling etc

  10. Inhibitory neurotransmission regulates vagal efferent activity and gastric motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMenamin, Caitlin A; Travagli, R Alberto; Browning, Kirsteen N

    2016-06-01

    The gastrointestinal tract receives extrinsic innervation from both the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous systems, which regulate and modulate the function of the intrinsic (enteric) nervous system. The stomach and upper gastrointestinal tract in particular are heavily influenced by the parasympathetic nervous system, supplied by the vagus nerve, and disruption of vagal sensory or motor functions results in disorganized motility patterns, disrupted receptive relaxation and accommodation, and delayed gastric emptying, amongst others. Studies from several laboratories have shown that the activity of vagal efferent motoneurons innervating the upper GI tract is inhibited tonically by GABAergic synaptic inputs from the adjacent nucleus tractus solitarius. Disruption of this influential central GABA input impacts vagal efferent output, hence gastric functions, significantly. The purpose of this review is to describe the development, physiology, and pathophysiology of this functionally dominant inhibitory synapse and its role in regulating vagally determined gastric functions. PMID:27302177

  11. Differential dynamic microscopy to characterize Brownian motion and bacteria motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, David; Leocmach, Mathieu; Gibaud, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a lab module for undergraduate students, which involves the process of quantifying the dynamics of a suspension of microscopic particles using Differential Dynamic Microscopy (DDM). DDM is a relatively new technique that constitutes an alternative method to more classical techniques such as dynamic light scattering (DLS) or video particle tracking (VPT). The technique consists of imaging a particle dispersion with a standard light microscope and a camera and analyzing the images using a digital Fourier transform to obtain the intermediate scattering function, an autocorrelation function that characterizes the dynamics of the dispersion. We first illustrate DDM in the textbook case of colloids under Brownian motion, where we measure the diffusion coefficient. Then we show that DDM is a pertinent tool to characterize biological systems such as motile bacteria.

  12. Live from under the lens: exploring microbial motility with dynamic imaging and microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Kwangmin; Brumley, Douglas R; Stocker, Roman

    2015-12-01

    Motility is one of the most dynamic features of the microbial world. The ability to swim or crawl frequently governs how microorganisms interact with their physical and chemical environments, and underpins a myriad of microbial processes. The ability to resolve temporal dynamics through time-lapse video microscopy and the precise control of the physicochemical microenvironment afforded by microfluidics offer powerful new opportunities to study the many motility adaptations of microorganisms and thereby further our understanding of their ecology. In this Review, we outline recent insights into the motility strategies of microorganisms brought about by these techniques, including the hydrodynamic signature of microorganisms, their locomotion mechanics, chemotaxis, their motility near and on surfaces, swimming in moving fluids and motility in dense microbial suspensions. PMID:26568072

  13. Enhancement of flagellated bacterial motility in polymer solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyu; Sha, Sha; Pelcovits, Robert; Tang, Jay

    2015-11-01

    Measurements of the swimming speed of many species of flagellated bacteria in polymer solutions have shown that with the addition of high molecular weight polymers, the speed initially increases as a function of the kinematic viscosity. It peaks at around 1.5-2 cP with typically 10-30% higher values than in cell media without added polymers (~ 1 cP). Past the peak, the average speed gradually decreases as the solution becomes more viscous. Swimming motility persists until solution viscosity reaches 5-10 cP. Models have been proposed to account for this behavior, and the magnitude of the peak becomes a crucial test of theoretical predictions. The status of the field is complicated in light of a recent report (Martinez et al., PNAS, 2014), stressing that low-molecular weight impurities account for the peaked speed-viscosity curves in some cases. We measured the swimming speed of a uni-flagellated bacterium, caulobacter crescentus, in solutions of a number of polymers of several different sizes. Our findings confirm the peaked speed-viscosity curve, only as the molecular weight of the flexible polymers used surpassed ~ 50,000 da. The threshold molecular weight required to augment swimming speed varies somewhat with the polymer species, but it generally corresponds to radius of gyration over tens of nanometers. This general feature is consistent with the model of Powers et al. (Physics of Fluid, 2009), predicting that nonlinear viscoelasticity of the fluid enhances swimming motility. Work Supported by the NSF Fluid Physics Program (Award number CBET 1438033).

  14. Psychoactive cannabinoids reduce gastrointestinal propulsion and motility in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shook, J E; Burks, T F

    1989-05-01

    Marijuana has been reported to be an effective antinauseant and antiemetic in patients receiving cancer chemotherapy. Whether this is due to psychological changes, central antiemetic properties and/or direct effects on gastrointestinal (GI) function is not known. The purpose of these investigations was to determine whether the major constituents of marijuana and the synthetic cannabinoid nabilone have any effects on GI function which can be detected in rodent models of GI transit and motility. Intravenous delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9-THC) slowed the rate of gastric emptying and small intestinal transit in mice and in rats. Delta 9,11-THC, cannabinol and nabilone given i.v. also inhibited small intestinal transit in mice, but were less effective in reducing gastric emptying. Cannabidiol given i.v. had no effect on gastric emptying or intestinal transit. Those cannabinoids which inhibited GI transit did so at doses equal to, or lower, than those reported to produce central nervous system activity. In rats, delta 9-THC produced greater inhibition of gastric emptying and small intestinal transit than large bowel transit, indicating a selectivity for the more proximal sections of the gut. In addition, i.v. delta 9-THC decreased the frequency of both gastric and intestinal contractions without altering intraluminal pressure. Such changes probably reflect a decrease in propulsive activity, without change in basal tone. These data indicate that delta 9-THC, delta 9,11-THC, cannabinol and nabilone (but not cannabidiol) exert an inhibitory effect on GI transit and motility in rats. PMID:2542532

  15. NDE1 and GSK3β Associate with TRAK1 and Regulate Axonal Mitochondrial Motility: Identification of Cyclic AMP as a Novel Modulator of Axonal Mitochondrial Trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Fumiaki; Murphy, Laura C; Malavasi, Elise L V; O'Sullivan, Shane T; Torrance, Helen S; Porteous, David J; Millar, J Kirsty

    2016-05-18

    Mitochondria are essential for neuronal function, providing the energy required to power neurotransmission, and fulfilling many important additional roles. In neurons, mitochondria must be efficiently transported to sites, including synapses, where their functions are required. Neurons, with their highly elongated morphology, are consequently extremely sensitive to defective mitochondrial trafficking which can lead to neuronal ill-health/death. We recently demonstrated that DISC1 associates with mitochondrial trafficking complexes where it associates with the core kinesin and dynein adaptor molecule TRAK1. We now show that the DISC1 interactors NDE1 and GSK3β also associate robustly with TRAK1 and demonstrate that NDE1 promotes retrograde axonal mitochondrial movement. GSK3β is known to modulate axonal mitochondrial motility, although reports of its actual effect are conflicting. We show that, in our system, GSK3β promotes anterograde mitochondrial transport. Finally, we investigated the influence of cAMP elevation upon mitochondrial motility, and found a striking increase in mitochondrial motility and retrograde movement. DISC1, NDE1, and GSK3β are implicated as risk factors for major mental illness. Our demonstration that they function together within mitochondrial trafficking complexes suggests that defective mitochondrial transport may be a contributory disease mechanism in some cases of psychiatric disorder. PMID:26815013

  16. TMJ Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... referred Sally and her parents to a local dentist who specialized in jaw disorders. After examining Sally ... having symptoms of a TMJ disorder, let your dentist know. The earlier a TMJ disorder is diagnosed ...

  17. Mathematics disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathematics disorder is a condition in which a child's math ability is far below normal for their ... Children who have mathematics disorder have trouble with simple ... disorder may appear with: Developmental coordination ...

  18. Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This can cause a medical condition called a genetic disorder. You can inherit a gene mutation from ... during your lifetime. There are three types of genetic disorders: Single-gene disorders, where a mutation affects ...

  19. Pathogenesis of Congenital Rubella Virus Infection in Human Fetuses: Viral Infection in the Ciliary Body Could Play an Important Role in Cataractogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thong Van Nguyen

    2015-01-01

    Interpretation: Our study based on the pathological examination demonstrated that the rubella virus infection occurred via systemic organs of human fetuses. This fact was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and direct detection of viral RNA in multiple organs. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report demonstrating that the rubella virus infection occurred via systemic organs of the human body. Importantly, virus infection of the ciliary body could play an important role in cataractogenesis.

  20. The ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor α component induces the secretion of and is required for functional responses to cardiotrophin-like cytokine

    OpenAIRE

    Plun-Favreau, Hélène; Elson, Greg; Chabbert, Marie; Froger, Josy; deLapeyrière, Odile; Lelièvre, Eric; Guillet, Catherine; Hermann, Jacques; Gauchat, Jean-François; Gascan, Hugues; Chevalier, Sylvie

    2001-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is involved in the survival of a number of different neural cell types, including motor neurons. CNTF functional responses are mediated through a tripartite membrane receptor composed of two signalling receptor chains, gp130 and the leukaemia inhibitory factor receptor (LIFR), associated with a non-signalling CNTF binding receptor α component (CNTFR). CNTFR-deficient mice show profound neuronal deficits at birth, leading to a lethal phenotype. In contrast, i...

  1. Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Promotes the Migration of Corneal Epithelial Stem/progenitor Cells by Up-regulation of MMPs through the Phosphorylation of Akt

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jialin; Chen, Peng; Backman, Ludvig J; Zhou, Qingjun; Danielson, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    The migration of limbal epithelial stem cells is important for the homeostasis and regeneration of corneal epithelium. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has been found to promote corneal epithelial wound healing by activating corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells. However, the possible effect of CNTF on the migration of corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells is not clear. This study found the expression of CNTF in mouse corneal epithelial stem/progenitor cells (TKE2) to be up-regulated ...

  2. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) plus soluble CNTF receptor α increases cyclooxygenase-2 expression, PGE2 release and interferon-γ-induced CD40 in murine microglia

    OpenAIRE

    Li Hong; Jain Mohit; Lin Hsiao-Wen; Levison Steven W

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has been regarded as a potent trophic factor for motor neurons. However, recent studies have shown that CNTF exerts effects on glial cells as well as neurons. For instance, CNTF stimulates astrocytes to secrete FGF-2 and rat microglia to secrete glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which suggest that CNTF exerts effects on astrocytes and microglia to promote motor neuron survival indirectly. As CNTF is structurally related ...

  3. Sortilin Facilitates Signaling of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor and Related Helical Type 1 Cytokines Targeting the gp130/Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor β Heterodimer ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Jakob Vejby; Hansen, Maria; Møller, Bjarne; Madsen, Peder; SCHELLER, JÜRGEN; Nielsen, Morten; Petersen, Claus Munck

    2010-01-01

    Sortilin is a member of the Vps10p domain family of neuropeptide and neurotrophin binding neuronal receptors. The family members interact with and partly share a variety of ligands and partake in intracellular sorting and protein transport as well as in transmembrane signal transduction. Thus, sortilin mediates the transport of both neurotensin and nerve growth factor and interacts with their respective receptors to facilitate ligand-induced signaling. Here we report that ciliary neurotrophic...

  4. Ciliary neurotrophic factor inhibits brain and peripheral tumor necrosis factor production and, when coadministered with its soluble receptor, protects mice from lipopolysaccharide toxicity.

    OpenAIRE

    Benigni, F; Villa, P.; Demitri, M. T.; S. Sacco; Sipe, J. D.; Lagunowich, L.; Panayotatos, N; Ghezzi, P

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The receptor of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) contains the signal transduction protein gp130, which is also a component of the receptors of cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-6, leukemia-inhibitory factor (LIF), IL-11, and oncostatin M. This suggests that these cytokines might share common signaling pathways. We previously reported that CNTF augments the levels of corticosterone (CS) and of IL-6 induced by IL-1 and induces the production of the acute-phase protein serum amylo...

  5. Proliferative responses and binding properties of hematopoietic cells transfected with low-affinity receptors for leukemia inhibitory factor, oncostatin M, and ciliary neurotrophic factor.

    OpenAIRE

    Gearing, D P; Ziegler, S F; Comeau, M R; Friend, D; Thoma, B; Cosman, D; Park, L.; Mosley, B

    1994-01-01

    Specific low-affinity receptors for leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), oncostatin M (OSM; gp130), and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF; receptor alpha, CNTFR alpha) may be utilized in various combinations to generate high-affinity binding sites and signal transduction. We have tested the ability of combinations of these receptors to transduce a proliferative signal in BAF-B03 cells. Coexpression of the LIF receptor and gp130 in these cells conferred high-affinity LIF and OSM binding and respo...

  6. Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Induces Genes Associated with Inflammation and Gliosis in the Retina: A Gene Profiling Study of Flow-Sorted, Müller Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Wei; Cojocaru, Radu I.; Dudley, V. Joseph; Brooks, Matthew; Swaroop, Anand; Sarthy, Vijay P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a member of the interleukin-6 cytokine family, has been implicated in the development, differentiation and survival of retinal neurons. The mechanisms of CNTF action as well as its cellular targets in the retina are poorly understood. It has been postulated that some of the biological effects of CNTF are mediated through its action via retinal glial cells; however, molecular changes in retinal glia induced by CNTF have not been elucidated. We hav...

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging-quantified small bowel motility is a sensitive marker of response to medical therapy in Crohn's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Plumb, A. A.; Menys, A.; Russo, E; Prezzi, D.; Bhatnagar, G.; Vega, R; Halligan, S; Orchard, T R; Taylor, S A

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) can measure small bowel motility, reduction in which reflects inflammatory burden in Crohn's Disease (CD). However, it is unknown if motility improves with successful treatment.

  8. Gastrointestinal symptoms and disorders in patients with eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yasuhiro; Fukudo, Shin

    2015-10-01

    The two most clinically serious eating disorders are anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. A drive for thinness and fear of fatness lead patients with anorexia nervosa either to restrict their food intake or binge-eat then purge (through self-induced vomiting and/or laxative abuse) to reduce their body weight to much less than the normal range. A drive for thinness leads patients with bulimia nervosa to binge-eat then purge but fail to reduce their body weight. Patients with eating disorders present with various gastrointestinal disturbances such as postprandial fullness, abdominal distention, abdominal pain, gastric distension, and early satiety, with altered esophageal motility sometimes seen in patients with anorexia nervosa. Other common conditions noted in patients with eating disorders are postprandial distress syndrome, superior mesenteric artery syndrome, irritable bowel syndrome, and functional constipation. Binge eating may cause acute gastric dilatation and gastric perforation, while self-induced vomiting can lead to dental caries, salivary gland enlargement, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and electrolyte imbalance. Laxative abuse can cause dehydration and electrolyte imbalance. Vomiting and/or laxative abuse can cause hypokalemia, which carries a risk of fatal arrhythmia. Careful assessment and intensive treatment of patients with eating disorders is needed because gastrointestinal symptoms/disorders can progress to a critical condition. PMID:26499370

  9. Successful treatment of chronic lower respiratory tract infection by macrolide administration in a patient with intralobar pulmonary sequestration and primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubouchi, Hironobu; Matsumoto, Nobuhiro; Yanagi, Shigehisa; Ashitani, Jun-Ichi; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2015-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetic disease associated with abnormalities in ciliary structure and function. Although recurrent respiratory infection associated with ciliary dysfunction is a common clinical feature, there is no standardized treatment or management of respiratory infection in PCD patients. Here, we report that respiratory infection with PCD and intralobar sequestration (ILS) were treated successfully with clarithromycin before the surgical resection of ILS. A 15-year-old non-smoking Japanese woman was admitted for productive cough and dyspnea on exertion. Chest CT scan on admission showed complex cystic LESIONS with air-fluid level in the right lower lobe, and diffuse nodular shadows in the whole lobe of the lung. On flexible bronchoscopy examination, sputum and bronchiolar fluid cultures revealed Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). An electron microscopic examination of the cilia showed inner dynein arm deficiency. Administration of clarithromycin improved the lower respiratory tract infection associated with S. aureus. CT angiography after clarithromycin treatment demonstrated an aberrant systemic artery arising from the celiac trunk and supplying the cystic mass lesions that were incorporated into the normal pulmonary parenchyma without their own pleural covering. Based on these results, the patient was diagnosed with PCD and ILS. Because of the clarithromycin treatment, resection of the ILS was performed safely without any complications. Although further observation of clarithromycin treatment is needed, we believe that clarithromycin may be considered one of the agents for treating PCD. PMID:26236606

  10. A G-protein activation cascade from Arl13B to Arl3 and implications for ciliary targeting of lipidated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotthardt, Katja; Lokaj, Mandy; Koerner, Carolin; Falk, Nathalie; Gießl, Andreas; Wittinghofer, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    Small G-proteins of the ADP-ribosylation-factor-like (Arl) subfamily have been shown to be crucial to ciliogenesis and cilia maintenance. Active Arl3 is involved in targeting and releasing lipidated cargo proteins from their carriers PDE6δ and UNC119a/b to the cilium. However, the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) which activates Arl3 is unknown. Here we show that the ciliary G-protein Arl13B mutated in Joubert syndrome is the GEF for Arl3, and its function is conserved in evolution. The GEF activity of Arl13B is mediated by the G-domain plus an additional C-terminal helix. The switch regions of Arl13B are involved in the interaction with Arl3. Overexpression of Arl13B in mammalian cell lines leads to an increased Arl3·GTP level, whereas Arl13B Joubert-Syndrome patient mutations impair GEF activity and thus Arl3 activation. We anticipate that through Arl13B's exclusive ciliary localization, Arl3 activation is spatially restricted and thereby an Arl3·GTP compartment generated where ciliary cargo is specifically released. PMID:26551564

  11. Panic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Anxiety disorder - panic attacks References American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders . 5th ed. Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. 2013. ...

  12. Phonological disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Articulation disorder; Developmental articulation disorder; Speech distortion; Sound distortion ... unknown. Close relatives may have had speech and language problems. ... sounds. These changes may include cleft palate and problems ...

  13. Pharyngoesophageal swallowing disorders in Parkinson disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper evaluates pharyngeal and esophageal swallowing disorders in Parkinson disease. Clinical, videofluorographic and manometric investigations were performed prospectively in 12 control subjects (eight men and four women; mean age, 60 years) and 21 patients with Parkinson disease (10 men and 11 women; mean age, 64 years) to study oral, pharyngeal, and esophageal motoricity. Seventeen patients (81%) complained of swallowing disorders: buccal bolus retention (48%), split swallowing (48%), and saliva buccal outflow (57%). Videofluorography was normal in control subjects and in eight patients (40%). Abnormal findings included vallecular and piriform recesses retention (60%) and split swallowing (35%). Manometry showed a nonperistaltic pharyngeal motoricity with simultaneous contraction in 14 patients (67%) and incomplete upper esophageal sphincter relaxation in three patients (14%). Body esophageal motoricity disorders indicated achalasia in five patients (24%), diffuse esophageal spasm in six (29%), and nonspecific esophageal motility disorder in five (24%)

  14. Development of a methodology to measure the effect of ergot alkaloids on forestomach motility using real-time wireless telemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of these experiments were to characterize rumen motility patterns of cattle fed once daily using a real-time wireless telemetry system, determine when to measure rumen motility with this system, and determine the effect of ruminal dosing of ergot alkaloids on rumen motility. Ruminally...

  15. Inhibitory effects of secondary metabolites from the red alga Delisea pulchra on swarming motility of Proteus mirabilis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone; de Nys, R.; Maximilien, R.;

    1996-01-01

    Abnormal, uncoordinated swarming motility of the opportunistic human pathogen Proteus mirabilis was seen when a crude extract of the Australian red alga Delisea pulchra was added to the medium, This occurred at concentrations at which growth rate, swimming motility, cell elongation, polynucleation...... of furanones on swarming motility by P. mirabilis...

  16. Panic Disorder and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disorder. Other types of anxiety disorders include generalized anxiety disorder , obsessive compulsive disorder , social phobia , and post-traumatic stress disorders . Panic disorder affects women twice as often ...

  17. Subjective experiences in schizophrenia and bipolar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduini, Luca; Kalyvoka, Artemis; Stratta, Paolo; Gianfelice, Daniela; Rinaldi, Osvaldo; Rossi, Alessandro

    2002-02-01

    Studies comparing 'subjective experiences' in schizophrenic and affective disorders have reached inconclusive results. We investigated the pattern of 'subjective perceived cognitive disturbances' in a group of 55 schizophrenic patients and 39 bipolar patients hospitalized for an index psychotic episode. The assessment of the subjective experiences was made using the Frankfurter Beschwerde-Fragebogen (FBF). Comparing the two groups on the four FBF factors, schizophrenic patients showed significantly higher scores in the areas of 'central cognitive disturbances', 'perception and motility' other than a significantly higher FBF total score. Our results suggest that cognitive, perception and motility disturbances are the most characteristic subjective experiences of schizophrenic patients in comparison with bipolar patients. This finding need to be further explored in light of the issue of cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia. PMID:12056578

  18. Investigation of motility and biofilm formation by intestinal Campylobacter concisus strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavrencic Peter

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Motility helps many pathogens swim through the highly viscous intestinal mucus. Given the differing outcomes of Campylobacter concisus infection, the motility of eight C. concisus strains isolated from patients with Crohn’s disease (n=3, acute (n=3 and chronic (n=1 gastroenteritis and a healthy control (n=1 were compared. Following growth on solid or liquid media the eight strains formed two groups; however, the type of growth medium did not affect motility. In contrast, following growth in viscous liquid medium seven of the eight strains demonstrated significantly decreased motility. In media of increasing viscosities the motility of C. concisus UNSWCD had two marked increases at viscosities of 20.0 and 74.7 centipoises. Determination of the ability of UNSWCD to swim through a viscous medium, adhere to and invade intestinal epithelial cells showed that while adherence levels significantly decreased with increasing viscosity, invasion levels did not significantly change. In contrast, adherence to and invasion of UNSWCD to mucus-producing intestinal cells increased upon accumulation of mucus, as did bacterial aggregation. Given this aggregation, we determined the ability of the eight C. concisus strains to form biofilms, and showed that all strains formed biofilms. In conclusion, the finding that C. concisus strains could be differentiated into two groups based on their motility may suggest that strains with high motility have an increased ability to swim through the intestinal mucus and reach the epithelial layer.

  19. The Actin Filament-Binding Protein Coronin Regulates Motility in Plasmodium Sporozoites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bane, Kartik S.; Singer, Mirko; Reinig, Miriam; Klug, Dennis; Heiss, Kirsten; Baum, Jake; Mueller, Ann-Kristin; Frischknecht, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    Parasites causing malaria need to migrate in order to penetrate tissue barriers and enter host cells. Here we show that the actin filament-binding protein coronin regulates gliding motility in Plasmodium berghei sporozoites, the highly motile forms of a rodent malaria-causing parasite transmitted by mosquitoes. Parasites lacking coronin show motility defects that impair colonization of the mosquito salivary glands but not migration in the skin, yet result in decreased transmission efficiency. In non-motile sporozoites low calcium concentrations mediate actin-independent coronin localization to the periphery. Engagement of extracellular ligands triggers an intracellular calcium release followed by the actin-dependent relocalization of coronin to the rear and initiation of motility. Mutational analysis and imaging suggest that coronin organizes actin filaments for productive motility. Using coronin-mCherry as a marker for the presence of actin filaments we found that protein kinase A contributes to actin filament disassembly. We finally speculate that calcium and cAMP-mediated signaling regulate a switch from rapid parasite motility to host cell invasion by differentially influencing actin dynamics. PMID:27409081

  20. Gliding motility of Babesia bovis merozoites visualized by time-lapse video microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahito Asada

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Babesia bovis is an apicomplexan intraerythrocytic protozoan parasite that induces babesiosis in cattle after transmission by ticks. During specific stages of the apicomplexan parasite lifecycle, such as the sporozoites of Plasmodium falciparum and tachyzoites of Toxoplasma gondii, host cells are targeted for invasion using a unique, active process termed "gliding motility". However, it is not thoroughly understood how the merozoites of B. bovis target and invade host red blood cells (RBCs, and gliding motility has so far not been observed in the parasite. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gliding motility of B. bovis merozoites was revealed by time-lapse video microscopy. The recorded images revealed that the process included egress of the merozoites from the infected RBC, gliding motility, and subsequent invasion into new RBCs. The gliding motility of B. bovis merozoites was similar to the helical gliding of Toxoplasma tachyzoites. The trails left by the merozoites were detected by indirect immunofluorescence assay using antiserum against B. bovis merozoite surface antigen 1. Inhibition of gliding motility by actin filament polymerization or depolymerization indicated that the gliding motility was driven by actomyosin dependent process. In addition, we revealed the timing of breakdown of the parasitophorous vacuole. Time-lapse image analysis of membrane-stained bovine RBCs showed formation and breakdown of the parasitophorous vacuole within ten minutes of invasion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first report of the gliding motility of B. bovis. Since merozoites of Plasmodium parasites do not glide on a substrate, the gliding motility of B. bovis merozoites is a notable finding.

  1. Integrative analysis of T cell motility from multi-channel microscopy data using TIAM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayya, Viveka; Neiswanger, Willie; Medina, Ricardo; Wiggins, Chris H; Dustin, Michael L

    2015-01-01

    Integrative analytical approaches are needed to study and understand T cell motility as it is a highly coordinated and complex process. Several computational algorithms and tools are available to track motile cells in time-lapse microscopy images. In contrast, there has only been limited effort towards the development of tools that take advantage of multi-channel microscopy data and facilitate integrative analysis of cell-motility. We have implemented algorithms for detecting, tracking, and analyzing cell motility from multi-channel time-lapse microscopy data. We have integrated these into a MATLAB-based toolset we call TIAM (Tool for Integrative Analysis of Motility). The cells are detected by a hybrid approach involving edge detection and Hough transforms from transmitted light images. Cells are tracked using a modified nearest-neighbor association followed by an optimization routine to join shorter segments. Cell positions are used to perform local segmentation for extracting features from transmitted light, reflection and fluorescence channels and associating them with cells and cell-tracks to facilitate integrative analysis. We found that TIAM accurately captures the motility behavior of T cells and performed better than DYNAMIK, Icy, Imaris, and Volocity in detecting and tracking motile T cells. Extraction of cell-associated features from reflection and fluorescence channels was also accurate with less than 10% median error in measurements. Finally, we obtained novel insights into T cell motility that were critically dependent on the unique capabilities of TIAM. We found that 1) the CD45RO subset of human CD8 T cells moved faster and exhibited an increased propensity to attach to the substratum during CCL21-driven chemokinesis when compared to the CD45RA subset; and 2) attachment area and arrest coefficient during antigen-induced motility of the CD45A subset is correlated with surface density of integrin LFA1 at the contact. PMID:25445324

  2. Estimate of oxygen consumption and intracellular zinc concentration of human spermatozoa in relation to motility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wolf-BernhardSchill; KerstinDefosse; Hans-HilhelmKoyro; NorbertWeissmann

    2003-01-01

    Aim:To investigate the human sperm oxygen/energy consumption and zinc content in relation to motility.Methods:In washed spermatozoa from 67 ejaculates,the oxygen consumption was determined.Following calculation of the total oxygen consumed by the Ideal Gas Law,the energy consumption of spermatozoa was calculated.In addition,the zinc content of the sperm was determined using an atomic absorption spectrometer.The resulting data were correlated to the vitality and motility.Results:The oxygen consumption averaged 0.24μmol/106 sperm×24h,0.28μmol/106 live sperm×24h and 0.85μmol/106 live & motile sperm×24h.Further calculations revealed that sperm motility was the most energy consuming process(164.31mJ/106 motile spermatozoa×24h),while the oxygen consumption of the total spermatozoa was 46.06mJ/106 spermatozoa ×24h.The correlation of the oxygen/energy consumption and zinc content with motility showed significant negative correlations(r=-0.759;P<0.0001 and r=-0.441;P<0.0001,respectively).However,when correlating sperm energy consumption with the zinc content,a significant positive relation(r=0.323;P=0.01)was observed.Conclusion:Poorly motile sperm are actually wasting the available energy.Moreover,our data clearly support the “Geometric Clutch Model”of the oneme function and demonstrate the importance of the outer dense fibers for the generation of sperm motility,especially progressive motility.

  3. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii identifies orthologs of ciliary disease genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolc, Viktor; Samanta, Manoj Pratim; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2005-01-01

    The important role that cilia and flagella play in human disease creates an urgent need to identify genes involved in ciliary assembly and function. The strong and specific induction of flagellar-coding genes during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii suggests that transcriptional profiling of such cells would reveal new flagella-related genes. We have conducted a genome-wide analysis of RNA transcript levels during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas by using maskless photolithography method-produced DNA oligonucleotide microarrays with unique probe sequences for all exons of the 19,803 predicted genes. This analysis represents previously uncharacterized whole-genome transcriptional activity profiling study in this important model organism. Analysis of strongly induced genes reveals a large set of known flagellar components and also identifies a number of important disease-related proteins as being involved with cilia and flagella, including the zebrafish polycystic kidney genes Qilin, Reptin, and Pontin, as well as the testis-expressed tubby-like protein TULP2.

  4. Effect of Locally Administered Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor on the Survival of Transected and Repaired Adult Sheep Facial Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashid Al Abri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine whether the administration of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF at the site of repaired facial nerve enhances regeneration in the adult sheep model. Methods: Ten adult sheep were divided into 2 groups: control and study group (CNTF group. In the CNTF group, the buccal branch of the facial nerve was transected and then repaired by epineural sutures. CNTF was injected over the left depressor labii maxillaris muscle in the vicinity of the transected and repaired nerve for 28 days under local anesthesia. In the CNTF group, the sheep were again anesthetized after nine months and the site of facial nerve repair was exposed. Detailed electrophysiological, tension experiments and morphometric studies were carried out and then analyzed statistically. Results: The skin CV min, refractory period, Jitter and tension parameters were marginally raised in the CNTF group than the control but the difference was statistically insignificant between the two groups. Morphometric indices also did not show any significant changes in the CNTF group. Conclusion: CNTF has no profound effect on neuronal regeneration of adult sheep animal model.

  5. Collagen scaffolds combined with collagen-binding ciliary neurotrophic factor facilitate facial nerve repair in mini-pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chao; Meng, Danqing; Cao, Jiani; Xiao, Zhifeng; Cui, Yi; Fan, Jingya; Cui, Xiaolong; Chen, Bing; Yao, Yao; Zhang, Zhen; Ma, Jinling; Pan, Juli; Dai, Jianwu

    2015-05-01

    The preclinical studies using animal models play a very important role in the evaluation of facial nerve regeneration. Good models need to recapitulate the distance and time for axons to regenerate in humans. Compared with the most used rodent animals, the structure of facial nerve in mini-pigs shares more similarities with humans in microanatomy. To evaluate the feasibility of repairing facial nerve defects by collagen scaffolds combined with ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), 10-mm-long gaps were made in the buccal branch of mini-pigs' facial nerve. Three months after surgery, electrophysiological assessment and histological examination were performed to evaluate facial nerve regeneration. Immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscope observation showed that collagen scaffolds with collagen binding (CBD)-CNTF could promote better axon regeneration, Schwann cell migration, and remyelination at the site of implant device than using scaffolds alone. Electrophysiological assessment also showed higher recovery rate in the CNTF group. In summary, combination of collagen scaffolds and CBD-CNTF showed promising effects on facial nerve regeneration in mini-pig models. PMID:25098760

  6. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF): New facets of an old molecule for treating neurodegenerative and metabolic syndrome pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquin, Sarah; Sharma, Mukut; Gauchat, Jean-François

    2015-10-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is the most extensively studied member of the cytokine family that signal through intracellular chains of the gp130/LIFRβ receptor. The severe phenotype in patients suffering from mutations inactivating LIFRβ indicates that members of this cytokine family play key, non-redundant roles during development. Accordingly, three decades of research has revealed potent and promising trophic and regulatory activities of CNTF in neurons, oligodendrocytes, muscle cells, bone cells, adipocytes and retinal cells. These findings led to clinical trials to test the therapeutic potential of CNTF and CNTF derivatives for treating neurodegenerative and metabolic diseases. Promising results have encouraged continuation of studies for treating retinal degenerative diseases. Results of some clinical trials showed that side-effects may limit the systemically administrated doses of CNTF. Therefore, therapies being currently tested rely on local delivery of CNTF using encapsulated cytokine-secreting implants. Since the side effects of CNTF might be linked to its ability to activate the alternative IL6Rα-LIFRβ-gp130 receptor, CNTFR-specific mutants of CNTF have been developed that bind to the CNTFRα-LIFRβ-gp130 receptor. These developments may prove to be a breakthrough for therapeutic applications of systemically administered CNTF in pathologies such as multiple sclerosis or Alzheimer's disease. The "designer cytokine approach" offers future opportunities to further enhance specificity by conjugating mutant CNTF with modified soluble CNTFRα to target therapeutically relevant cells that express gp130-LIFRβ and a specific cell surface marker. PMID:26187860

  7. The cytokine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF activates hypothalamic urocortin-expressing neurons both in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Purser

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF induces neurogenesis, reduces feeding, and induces weight loss. However, the central mechanisms by which CNTF acts are vague. We employed the mHypoE-20/2 line that endogenously expresses the CNTF receptor to examine the direct effects of CNTF on mRNA levels of urocortin-1, urocortin-2, agouti-related peptide, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and neurotensin. We found that treatment of 10 ng/ml CNTF significantly increased only urocortin-1 mRNA by 1.84-fold at 48 h. We then performed intracerebroventricular injections of 0.5 mg/mL CNTF into mice, and examined its effects on urocortin-1 neurons post-exposure. Through double-label immunohistochemistry using specific antibodies against c-Fos and urocortin-1, we showed that central CNTF administration significantly activated urocortin-1 neurons in specific areas of the hypothalamus. Taken together, our studies point to a potential role for CNTF in regulating hypothalamic urocortin-1-expressing neurons to mediate its recognized effects on energy homeostasis, neuronal proliferaton/survival, and/or neurogenesis.

  8. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the human and mouse genes encoding the {alpha} receptor component for ciliary neurotrophic factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenzuela, D.M.; Rojas, E.; McClain, J. [Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Tarrytown, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to share receptor components with, and to be structurally related to, a family of broadly acting cytokines, including interleukin-6, leukemia inhibitory factor, and oncostatin M. However, the CNTF receptor complex also includes a CNTF-specific component known as CNTF receptor {alpha} (CNTFR{alpha}). Here we describe the molecular cloning of the human and mouse genes encoding CNTFR. We report that the human and mouse genes have an identical intron-exon structure that correlates well with the domain structure of CNTFR{alpha}. That is, the signal peptide and the immunoglobulin-like domain are each encoded by single exons, the cytokine receptor-like domain is distributed among 4 exons, and the C-terminal glycosyl phosphatidylinositol recognition domain in encoded by the final coding exon. The position of the introns within the cytokine receptor-like domain corresponds to those found in other members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. Confirming a recent study using radiation hybrids, we have also mapped the human CNTFR gene to chromosome band 9p13 and the mouse gene to a syntenic region of chromosome 4. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Protein Profiling of Human Nonpigmented Ciliary Epithelium Cell Secretome: The Differentiation Factors Characterization for Retinal Ganglion Cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hui Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper was to characterize proteins secreted from the human nonpigmented ciliary epithelial (HNPE cells, which have differentiated a rat retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5. Undifferentiated RGC-5 cells have been shown to express several marker proteins characteristic of retinal ganglion cells. However, RGC-5 cells do not respond to N-methyl-D aspartate (NMDA, or glutamate. HNPE cells have been shown to secrete numbers of neuropeptides or neuroproteins also found in the aqueous humor, many of which have the ability to influence the activity of neuronal cells. This paper details the profile of HNPE cell-secreted proteins by proteomic approaches. The experimental results revealed the identification of 132 unique proteins from the HNPE cell-conditioned SF-medium. The biological functions of a portion of these identified proteins are involved in cell differentiation. We hypothesized that a differentiation system of HNPE cell-conditioned SF-medium with RGC-5 cells can induce a differentiated phenotype in RGC-5 cells, with functional characteristics that more closely resemble primary cultures of rat retinal ganglion cells. These proteins may replace harsh chemicals, which are currently used to induce cell differentiation.

  10. Correlation between chemical composition of seminal plasma and sperm motility characteristics of Prussian carp (Carassius gibelio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mehdi Taati

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study were to determine the relationships between chemicalscompositions of seminal plasma with sperm motility traits in Prussian carp, Carassius gibelio (Bloch,1782. There were significant positive correlations between sperm movment duration and Ca+2 of semen.Also, a significant positive relationship was found between percentage of motile spermatozoa and Ca+2 ofsemen. On the other hand, Na+, Cl- and pH correlated negatively with sperm movment duration.Understanding of such correlations can be useful to evaluation of sperm quality and make media(extender for dilution of semen and improving sperm motility parameters of Prussian carp.

  11. Isolation of motile Aeromonas spp. from fish and their cytotoxic effect on Vero cell cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karabasil Neđeljko

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of motile Aeromonas spp. in fish and other sea food on the Belgrade retail market was investigated with the aim of determining the ability of these bacteria to produce and secrete toxins. Nine strains of motile Aeromonas spp. were isolated from seventy-eight food samples. Aer. sobria was identified in three cases, while six of the obtained strains were identified as Aer. hydrophila. Strains of motile Aeromonas spp. from different sources were analyzed for cytotoxicity on Vero cell cultures. A cytotoxic effect was detected for all tested strains, but of different intensity.

  12. Enhanced diffusion of non-swimmers in a 3D bath of motile bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Jepson, A; Schwarz-Linek, J; Morozov, A; Poon, W C K

    2013-01-01

    We show using differential dynamic microscopy that the diffusive motion of non-motile cells in a three-dimensional population of motile E. coli is enhanced by an amount that is strictly proportional to the active cell flux. While non-motile mutants without flagella and mutants with paralysed flagella have quite different thermal diffusivities and therefore hydrodynamic radii, their diffusivities are enhanced to the same extent by swimmers in the regime of cell densities explored here. Integrating the motion of non-swimmers caused by swimmers with finite persistence-length trajectories predicts quantitatively the observed linear dependence of enhanced diffusivity and active cell flux.

  13. Involvement of myosin in intracellular motility and cytomorphogenesis in Micrasterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oertel, Anke; Holzinger, Andreas; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula

    2003-01-01

    Myosin was detected on Western blots of Micrasterias denticulata extracts by use of antibodies from different sources. Inhibitors with different targets of the actomyosin system, such as the myosin ATPase-blockers N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) and 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), or the myosin light chain kinase inhibitor 1-(5-iodonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl)-1H-hexhydro-1,4-diazapine (ML7), had similar effects on intracellular motility during cell development in the green alga Micrasterias, thus pointing towards a participation of myosin in these processes. The drugs markedly altered the mode of postmitotic nuclear migration, slowed down cytoplasmic streaming, changed cell pattern development and prevented normal chloroplast distribution and spreading into the growing semicell. In addition, an increase and dilatations in ER cisternae and marked morphological changes of the Golgi system were observed by transmission electron microscopy after exposure of growing cells to BDM. Neither BDM nor ML7 exhibited any effect on the distribution or arrangement of the cortical F-actin network nor on the F-actin basket around the nucleus, characteristic of untreated growing Micrasterias cells (J Cell Sci 107 (1994) 1929). This is particularly interesting since BDM caused disintegration of the microtubule system co-localized to the F-actin cage during normal nuclear migration. Together with the fact that other microtubules not connected to the F-actin system remained uninfluenced by BDM, this observation is evidence of an integrative function of myosin between the cytoskeleton elements. PMID:14642529

  14. The interplay between cell motility and tissue architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Kandice

    2013-03-01

    Glandular tissue form arboreal networks comprised of acini and tubes. Loss of structure is concomitant with the in vivo pathologic state. In vitro models have been shown to recapitulate the functional units of the mammary gland and other organs. Despite our much improved understanding gleaned from both in vitro and in vivo interrogation, the mechanisms by which cells are able to achieve the correct tissue organization remain elusive. How do single mammary epithelial cells form polarized acini when cultured in a surrogate basement membrane gel but not on 2D surfaces? Simply put, how does a cell know which way is up? Why do malignant breast cells show a differential response in that they form non-polarized aggregates? Recently, it was determined that non-malignant cells undergo multiple rotations to establish acini while tumor cells are randomly motile during tumor formation. Can it be that a tumor cell has simply lost its way. This research was supported by the Intramural Research Program of the NIH, National Cancer Institute.

  15. Influence of Helical Cell Shape on Motility of Helicobacter Pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, Joseph; Martinez, Laura; Salama, Nina; Bansil, Rama; Boston University Collaboration; University of Washington Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria's body shape plays an important role in motility by effecting chemotaxis, swimming mechanisms, and swimming speed. A prime example of this is the bacteria Helicobacter Pylori;whose helical shape has long been believed to provide an advantage in penetrating the viscous mucus layer protecting the stomach lining, its niche environment. To explore this we have performed bacteria tracking experiments of both wild-type bacteria along with mutants, which have a straight rod shape. A wide distribution of speeds was found. This distribution reflects both a result of temporal variation in speed and different shape morphologies in the bacterial population. Our results show that body shape plays less role in a simple fluid. However, in a more viscous solution the helical shape results in increased swimming speeds. In addition, we use experimentally obtained cell shape measurements to model the hydrodynamic influence of cell shape on swimming speed using resistive force theory. The results agree with the experiment, especially when we fold in the temporal distribution. Interestingly, our results suggest distinct wild-type subpopulations with varying number of half helices can lead to different swimming speeds. NSF PHY

  16. Ursodeoxycholic acid improves gastrointestinal motility defects in gallstone patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Colecchia; G Mazzella; L Sandri; F Azzaroli; M Magliuolo; P Simoni; ML Bacchi-Reggiani; E Roda; D Festi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To simultaneously evaluate the presence of defects in gallbladder and gastric emptying, as well as in intestinal transit in gallstone patients (GS) and the effect of chronic ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) administration on these parameters and on serum bile acids and clinical outcome in GS and controls (CTR).METHODS: After a standard liquid test meal, gallbladder and gastric emptying (by ultrasound), oroileal transit time (OI∏) (by an immunoenzymatic technique)and serum bile acids (by HPLC) were evaluated before and after 3 mo of UDCA (12 mg/kg bw/d) or placebo administration in 10 symptomatic GS and 10 matched healthy CTR.RESULTS: OI∏ was longer in GS than in CTR (P <0.0001); UDCA significantly reduced OI∏ in GS (P <0.0001), but not in CTR. GS had longer gastric halfemptying time (t1/2) than CTR (P < 0.0044) at baseline;after UDCA, t1/2 significantly decreased (P < 0.006) in GS but not in CTR. Placebo administration had no effect on gastric emptying and intestinal transit in both GS and CTR.CONCLUSION: The gallstone patient has simultaneous multiple impairments of gallbladder and gastric emptying, as well as of intestinal transit. UDCA administration restores these defects in GS, without any effect in CTR. These results confirm the pathogenetic role of gastrointestinal motility in gallstone disease and suggest an additional mechanism of action for UDCA in reducing bile cholesterol supersaturation.

  17. Panic Disorder among Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ...

  18. Antisocial Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ...

  19. Bipolar Disorder Among Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ...

  20. Any Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ... Children Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Eating Disorders Among Adults - Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorders Among Adults - Binge Eating Disorder Eating ...