WorldWideScience

Sample records for ciliary disease genes

  1. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii identifies orthologs of ciliary disease genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolc, Viktor; Samanta, Manoj Pratim; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2005-01-01

    The important role that cilia and flagella play in human disease creates an urgent need to identify genes involved in ciliary assembly and function. The strong and specific induction of flagellar-coding genes during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii suggests that transcriptional profiling of such cells would reveal new flagella-related genes. We have conducted a genome-wide analysis of RNA transcript levels during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas by using maskless photolithography method-produced DNA oligonucleotide microarrays with unique probe sequences for all exons of the 19,803 predicted genes. This analysis represents previously uncharacterized whole-genome transcriptional activity profiling study in this important model organism. Analysis of strongly induced genes reveals a large set of known flagellar components and also identifies a number of important disease-related proteins as being involved with cilia and flagella, including the zebrafish polycystic kidney genes Qilin, Reptin, and Pontin, as well as the testis-expressed tubby-like protein TULP2.

  2. Finding ciliary genes: a computational approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksson, Johan; Piasecki, Brian P; Lend, Kristina; Bürglin, Thomas R; Swoboda, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans and several other animal species, many ciliary genes are regulated by RFX (Regulatory Factor binding to the X-box) transcription factors (TFs), which bind to X-box promoter motifs and thereby directly activate ciliary gene expression. This setup (RFX TF/X-box/ciliary gene) makes it possible to search for novel ciliary gene candidates genome-wide by using the X-box promoter motif as a search parameter. We present a computational approach that (i) identifies and extracts from whole genomes genes and the corresponding promoter sequences and annotations; (ii) searches through promoters for regulatory sequence elements (like promoter motifs) by using training sets of known instances of these elements; (iii) scores (evaluates) and sorts all positive hits in a database; and (iv) outputs a list of candidate genes and promoters with a given regulatory sequence element. Evolutionary conservation across species (orthology) of genes, promoters, or regulatory sequence elements is used as an important strengthening feature during the overall search approach. Our computational approach is set up in a modular fashion: not every part needs to be used for a particular search effort. In principle, our approach has broad applications. It applies to any group of genes that share common (conserved) regulation through common (conserved) regulatory sequence elements. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Gene expression studies in cells from primary ciliary dyskinesia patients identify 208 potential ciliary genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geremek, Maciej; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Zietkiewicz, Ewa; Pogorzelski, Andrzej; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witt, Michal

    Cilia are small cellular projections that either act as sensors (primary cilia) or propel fluid over the epithelia of various organs (motile cilia). The organellum has gained much attention lately because of its involvement in a group of human diseases called ciliopathies. Primary ciliary dyskinesia

  4. In vivo gene transfer into the ocular ciliary muscle mediated by ultrasound and microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczuk, Laura; Boudinet, Michèle; El Sanharawi, Mohamed; Touchard, Elodie; Naud, Marie-Christine; Saïed, Amena; Jeanny, Jean-Claude; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Laugier, Pascal

    2011-11-01

    This study aimed to assess application of ultrasound (US) combined with microbubbles (MB) to transfect the ciliary muscle of rat eyes. Reporter DNA plasmids encoding for Gaussia luciferase, β-galactosidase or the green fluorescent protein (GFP), alone or mixed with 50% Artison MB, were injected into the ciliary muscle, with or without US exposure (US set at 1 MHz, 2 W/cm(2), 50% duty cycle for 2 min). Luciferase activity was measured in ocular fluids at 7 and 30 days after sonoporation. At 1 week, the US+MB treatment showed a significant increase in luminescence compared with control eyes, injected with plasmid only, with or without MB (×2.6), and, reporter proteins were localized in the ciliary muscle by histochemical analysis. At 1 month, a significant decrease in luciferase activity was observed in all groups. A rise in lens and ciliary muscle temperature was measured during the procedure but did not result in any observable or microscopic damages at 1 and 8 days. The feasibility to transfer gene into the ciliary muscle by US and MB suggests that sonoporation may allow intraocular production of proteins for the treatment of inflammatory, angiogenic and/or degenerative retinal diseases. Copyright © 2011 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Regulatory Factor X (RFX)-mediated transcriptional rewiring of ciliary genes in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasecki, Brian P; Burghoorn, Jan; Swoboda, Peter

    2010-07-20

    Cilia were present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) and were retained by most organisms spanning all extant eukaryotic lineages, including organisms in the Unikonta (Amoebozoa, fungi, choanoflagellates, and animals), Archaeplastida, Excavata, Chromalveolata, and Rhizaria. In certain animals, including humans, ciliary gene regulation is mediated by Regulatory Factor X (RFX) transcription factors (TFs). RFX TFs bind X-box promoter motifs and thereby positively regulate >50 ciliary genes. Though RFX-mediated ciliary gene regulation has been studied in several bilaterian animals, little is known about the evolutionary conservation of ciliary gene regulation. Here, we explore the evolutionary relationships between RFX TFs and cilia. By sampling the genome sequences of >120 eukaryotic organisms, we show that RFX TFs are exclusively found in unikont organisms (whether ciliated or not), but are completely absent from the genome sequences of all nonunikont organisms (again, whether ciliated or not). Sampling the promoter sequences of 12 highly conserved ciliary genes from 23 diverse unikont and nonunikont organisms further revealed that phylogenetic footprints of X-box promoter motif sequences are found exclusively in ciliary genes of certain animals. Thus, there is no correlation between cilia/ciliary genes and the presence or absence of RFX TFs and X-box promoter motifs in nonanimal unikont and in nonunikont organisms. These data suggest that RFX TFs originated early in the unikont lineage, distinctly after cilia evolved. The evolutionary model that best explains these observations indicates that the transcriptional rewiring of many ciliary genes by RFX TFs occurred early in the animal lineage.

  6. Gene Expression and Functional Annotation of the Human Ciliary Body Epithelia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.F. Janssen (Sarah); T.G.M.F. Gorgels (Theo); K. Bossers (Koen); J.B. ten Brink (Jacoline); A.H.W. Essing (Anke); M.H. Nagtegaal (Marleen); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); N.M. Jansonius (Nomdo); A.A.B. Bergen (Arthur)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: The ciliary body (CB) of the human eye consists of the non-pigmented (NPE) and pigmented (PE) neuro-epithelia. We investigated the gene expression of NPE and PE, to shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the most important functions of the CB. We also developed

  7. A case report of primary ciliary dyskinesia, laterality defects and developmental delay caused by the co-existence of a single gene and chromosome disorder.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Casey, Jillian P

    2015-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterised by abnormal ciliary motion and impaired mucociliary clearance, leading to recurrent respiratory infections, sinusitis, otitis media and male infertility. Some patients also have laterality defects. We recently reported the identification of three disease-causing PCD genes in the Irish Traveller population; RSPH4A, DYX1C1 and CCNO. We have since assessed an additional Irish Traveller family with a complex phenotype involving PCD who did not have any of the previously identified PCD mutations.

  8. Convergent evolution of RFX transcription factors and ciliary genes predated the origin of metazoans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Nansheng

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intraflagellar transport (IFT genes, which are critical for the development and function of cilia and flagella in metazoans, are tightly regulated by the Regulatory Factor X (RFX transcription factors (TFs. However, how and when their evolutionary relationship was established remains unknown. Results We have identified evidence suggesting that RFX TFs and IFT genes evolved independently and their evolution converged before the first appearance of metazoans. Both ciliary genes and RFX TFs exist in all metazoans as well as some unicellular eukaryotes. However, while RFX TFs and IFT genes are found simultaneously in all sequenced metazoan genomes, RFX TFs do not co-exist with IFT genes in most pre-metazoans and thus do not regulate them in these organisms. For example, neither the budding yeast nor the fission yeast possesses cilia although both have well-defined RFX TFs. Conversely, most unicellular eukaryotes, including the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, have typical cilia and well conserved IFT genes but lack RFX TFs. Outside of metazoans, RFX TFs and IFT genes co-exist only in choanoflagellates including M. brevicollis, and only one fungus Allomyces macrogynus of the 51 sequenced fungus genomes. M. brevicollis has two putative RFX genes and a full complement of ciliary genes. Conclusions The evolution of RFX TFs and IFT genes were independent in pre-metazoans. We propose that their convergence in evolution, or the acquired transcriptional regulation of IFT genes by RFX TFs, played a pivotal role in the establishment of metazoan.

  9. A novel domain suggests a ciliary function for ASPM, a brain size determining gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponting, Chris P

    2006-05-01

    The N-terminal domain of abnormal spindle-like microcephaly-associated protein (ASPM) is identified as a member of a novel family of ASH (ASPM, SPD-2, Hydin) domains. These domains are present in proteins associated with cilia, flagella, the centrosome and the Golgi complex, and in Hydin and OCRL whose deficiencies are associated with hydrocephalus and Lowe oculocerebrorenal syndrome, respectively. Genes encoding ASH domains thus represent good candidates for primary ciliary dyskinesias. ASPM has been proposed to function in neurogenesis and to be a major determinant of cerebral cortical size in humans. Support for this hypothesis stems from associations between mutations in ASPM and primary microcephaly, and from the rapid evolution of ASPM during recent hominid evolution. The identification of the ASH domain family instead indicates possible roles for ASPM in sperm flagellar or in ependymal cells' cilia. ASPM's rapid evolution may thus reflect selective pressures on ciliary function, rather than pressures on mitosis during neurogenesis.

  10. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/motor neuron disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongioanni, P; Reali, C; Sogos, V

    2004-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as motor neuron disease, is a fatal neuromuscular disease characterized by progressive muscle weakness resulting in paralysis, which might be treated with ciliary neurotrophic factor. The objective of this review was to examine the efficacy of ciliary neutrophic factor in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group trials register (searched June 2003) for randomized trials, MEDLINE (from January 1966 to October 2003) and EMBASE (from January 1980 to October 2003), checked the reference lists of papers identified and contacted the authors of studies identified to get additional unpublished results. We considered the following selection criteria: Types of studies: randomized controlled clinical trials; adults with a diagnosis of either probable or definite amyotrophic lateral sclerosis according to the El Escorial criteria; Types of interventions: treatment with ciliary neurotrophic factor for at least six months, in a placebo-controlled randomized format; Types of outcome measures Primary: survival; Secondary: muscle strength, respiratory function, changes in bulbar functions, changes in quality of life, proportion of patients with adverse side effects (such as cough, asthenia, nausea, anorexia, weight loss and increased salivation). We identified two randomized trials. The data were extracted and examined independently by the reviewers. Some missing data were obtained from investigators. Two trials, with a total population of 1,300 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients treated with subcutaneous injections of recombinant human ciliary neurotrophic factor, were examined in this review. The methodological quality of these trials was considered adequate. No significant difference was observed between ciliary neurotrophic factor and placebo groups for survival, the primary outcome measure. The relative risk was 1.07 (95% CI 0.81 to 1.41). No significant differences between the groups were

  11. Localization of the gene for the ciliary neutrotrophic factor receptor (CNTFR) to human chromosome 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donaldson, D.H.; Jones, C.; Patterson, D. (Eleanor Roosevelt Institute, Denver, CO (United States) Univ. of Colorado Health Science Center, Denver, CO (United States)); Britt, D.E.; Jackson, C.L. (Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to be important for the survival of motor neurons and has shown activity in animal models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). CNTF therefore holds promise as a treatment for ALS, and it and its receptor (CNTFR) are candidates for a gene involved in familial ALS. The CNTFR gene was mapped to chromosome 9 by PCR on a panel of human/CHO somatic cell hybrids and localized to 9p13 by PCR on a panel of radiation hybrids. 18 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  12. [Primary ciliary dyskinesia with HYDIN gene mutations in a child and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L L; Yang, Y G; Wu, J Z; Chen, X R

    2017-04-02

    Objective: To review children's primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) in the pathogenesis, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment. Method: To summarize and analyze the clinical data of a patient who was admitted to the first affiliated hospital of Xiamen University with primary ciliary dyskinesia in April 2014 while referring to related literature. Result: An 11 years old boy, weighting about 22 kg, had a course of more than 10 years with repeated cough, stuffy and runny nose shortly after the birth. Examinations after admission to hospital showed that he presented with visible clubbing, bilateral paranasal sinus area tenderness, pharynx posterior wall with visible yellow pussy stuff drip and bilateral lung had scattered wet rales. Auxiliary examination revealed bilateral maxillary sinus, ethmoid sinus inflammation and bronchitis with left lower lung bronchiectasis. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy discovered congestion and a lot of sputum; ciliary biopsy pathology displayed that cilia were sparse and partial cilia 9+ 2 microtubules structural abnormalities. Full sequence of exon gene sequencing revealed two mutations located at chromosome 16 chr16: 71061369 (non-coding regions) and chr16: 70993591 (coding). Two novel mutations m. 3362A>G(E20) and c. 6101G>A(E39) in exon 16 of the HYDIN gene were identified. With the" ciliary motility disorder, gene" as keywords , the CNKI, Wanfang digital knowledge service platform and PubMed were searched for relevant articles from the establishment to July 2016. The studies retrieved included 9 cases and these cases were summarized. Comprehensive analysis showed that HYDIN gene mutations related PCD patients had the typical PCD performance such as repeatedly wet cough, sinusitis, bronchiectasis, and otitis media. The majority of patients have a history of acute respiratory distress syndrome in infancy and no visceral dislocation was not found. Most of the patients had no obvious structural abnormalities in cilia electron microscopic

  13. Mutations in ZMYND10, a gene essential for proper axonemal assembly of inner and outer dynein arms in humans and flies, cause primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, Daniel J; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Shoemark, Amelia

    2013-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a ciliopathy characterized by airway disease, infertility, and laterality defects, often caused by dual loss of the inner dynein arms (IDAs) and outer dynein arms (ODAs), which power cilia and flagella beating. Using whole-exome and candidate-gene Sanger...... neurons and sperm. In these cells, P-element-mediated gene silencing caused IDA and ODA defects, proprioception deficits, and sterility due to immotile sperm. Drosophila Zmynd10 with an equivalent c.47T>G (p.Val16Gly) missense change rescued mutant male sterility less than the wild-type did. Tagged...

  14. Pseudotumor of Ciliary Body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Varghese

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Orbital pseudotumor is a benign disease involving the orbital structures. Pseudotumor of the ciliary body is rare. We present a case of a 27-year-old male who presented with gradual visual loss, pain, and redness in his left eye. On examination he was found to have a yellowish white mass at the periphery of anterior chamber in his left eye and ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM revealed a ciliary body mass in the same eye. He was treated with systemic steroids, which was tapered over a period of 8 weeks. His symptoms improved and the ciliary body mass disappeared with no recurrence over the next 6 months. UBM is an important diagnostic tool for diagnosing ciliary body mass. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment with systemic steroids may help resolve pseudotumor of the ciliary body.

  15. Progression of lung disease in primary ciliary dyskinesia: is spirometry less accurate than CT?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Marco; Bush, Andrew; Montella, Silvia; Mollica, Carmine; Manna, Angelo; Esposito, Antonietta; Santamaria, Francesca

    2012-05-01

    Despite its extensive use, there is no evidence that spirometry is useful in the assessment of progression of lung disease in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). We hypothesize that high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) is a better indicator of PCD lung disease progression than spirometry. We retrospectively evaluated two paired spirometry and HRCT examinations from 20 PCD patients (age, 11.6 years; range, 6.5-27.5 years). The evaluations were performed in stable state and during unstable lung disease. HRCT scans were scored blind by two raters. Compared to the first assessment, at the second evaluation spirometry did not change while HRCT scores significantly worsened (P spirometry. In PCD, structural lung disease may worsen despite spirometry being stable. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Gene expression and functional annotation of the human ciliary body epithelia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah F Janssen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The ciliary body (CB of the human eye consists of the non-pigmented (NPE and pigmented (PE neuro-epithelia. We investigated the gene expression of NPE and PE, to shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the most important functions of the CB. We also developed molecular signatures for the NPE and PE and studied possible new clues for glaucoma. METHODS: We isolated NPE and PE cells from seven healthy human donor eyes using laser dissection microscopy. Next, we performed RNA isolation, amplification, labeling and hybridization against 44×k Agilent microarrays. For microarray conformations, we used a literature study, RT-PCRs, and immunohistochemical stainings. We analyzed the gene expression data with R and with the knowledge database Ingenuity. RESULTS: The gene expression profiles and functional annotations of the NPE and PE were highly similar. We found that the most important functionalities of the NPE and PE were related to developmental processes, neural nature of the tissue, endocrine and metabolic signaling, and immunological functions. In total 1576 genes differed statistically significantly between NPE and PE. From these genes, at least 3 were cell-specific for the NPE and 143 for the PE. Finally, we observed high expression in the (NPE of 35 genes previously implicated in molecular mechanisms related to glaucoma. CONCLUSION: Our gene expression analysis suggested that the NPE and PE of the CB were quite similar. Nonetheless, cell-type specific differences were found. The molecular machineries of the human NPE and PE are involved in a range of neuro-endocrinological, developmental and immunological functions, and perhaps glaucoma.

  17. Computational modelling elucidates the mechanism of ciliary regulation in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hundhausen Christian

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ciliary dysfunction leads to a number of human pathologies, including primary ciliary dyskinesia, nephronophthisis, situs inversus pathology or infertility. The mechanism of cilia beating regulation is complex and despite extensive experimental characterization remains poorly understood. We develop a detailed systems model for calcium, membrane potential and cyclic nucleotide-dependent ciliary motility regulation. Results The model describes the intimate relationship between calcium and potassium ionic concentrations inside and outside of cilia with membrane voltage and, for the first time, describes a novel type of ciliary excitability which plays the major role in ciliary movement regulation. Our model describes a mechanism that allows ciliary excitation to be robust over a wide physiological range of extracellular ionic concentrations. The model predicts the existence of several dynamic modes of ciliary regulation, such as the generation of intraciliary Ca2+ spike with amplitude proportional to the degree of membrane depolarization, the ability to maintain stable oscillations, monostable multivibrator regimes, all of which are initiated by variability in ionic concentrations that translate into altered membrane voltage. Conclusions Computational investigation of the model offers several new insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of ciliary pathologies. According to our analysis, the reported dynamic regulatory modes can be a physiological reaction to alterations in the extracellular environment. However, modification of the dynamic modes, as a result of genetic mutations or environmental conditions, can cause a life threatening pathology.

  18. Diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Anne Kowal Olm

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is a genetic disorder of ciliary structure or function. It results in mucus accumulation and bacterial colonization of the respiratory tract which leads to chronic upper and lower airway infections, organ laterality defects, and fertility problems. We review the respiratory signs and symptoms of PCD, as well as the screening tests for and diagnostic investigation of the disease, together with details related to ciliary function, ciliary ultrastructure, and genetic studies. In addition, we describe the difficulties in diagnosing PCD by means of transmission electron microscopy, as well as describing patient follow-up procedures.

  19. Sustained striatal ciliary neurotrophic factor expression negatively affects behavior and gene expression in normal and R6/1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denovan-Wright, Eileen M; Attis, Marissa; Rodriguez-Lebron, Edgardo; Mandel, Ronald J

    2008-06-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by an elongation of CAG repeats in the HD gene, which encodes a mutant copy of huntingtin with an expanded polyglutatmine repeat. Individuals who are affected by the disease suffer from motor, cognitive, and emotional impairments. Levels of certain striatal-enriched mRNAs decrease in both HD patients and transgenic HD mice prior to the development of motor symptoms and neuronal cell death. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has been shown to protect neurons against chemically induced toxic insults in vitro and in vivo. To test the hypothesis that CNTF might protect neurons from the negative effects of the mutant huntingtin protein in vivo, CNTF was continuously expressed following transduction of the striatum by recombinant adeno-associated viral vectors (rAAV2). Wild-type and R6/1 HD transgenic (R6/1) mice that received bilateral or unilateral intrastriatal injections of rAAV2-CNTF experienced weight loss. The CNTF-treated R6/1 HD transgenic mice experienced motor impairments at an earlier age than expected compared with age-matched control R6/1 HD transgenic animals. CNTF also caused abnormal behavior in WT mice. In addition to behavioral impairments, in situ hybridization showed that, in both WT and R6/1 mice, CNTF expression caused a significant decrease in the levels of striatal-enriched transcripts. Overall, continuous expression of striatal CNTF at the dose mediated by the expression cassette used in this study was detrimental to HD and wild-type mice. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Ciliary neurotrophic factor cell-based delivery prevents synaptic impairment and improves memory in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Pierre; Youssef, Ihsen; Utvik, Jo K; Florent-Béchard, Sabrina; Barthélémy, Vanassa; Malaplate-Armand, Catherine; Kriem, Badreddine; Stenger, Christophe; Koziel, Violette; Olivier, Jean-Luc; Escanye, Marie-Christine; Hanse, Marine; Allouche, Ahmad; Desbène, Cédric; Yen, Frances T; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Oster, Thierry; Niclou, Simone P; Pillot, Thierry

    2010-06-02

    The development of novel therapeutic strategies for Alzheimer's disease (AD) represents one of the biggest unmet medical needs today. Application of neurotrophic factors able to modulate neuronal survival and synaptic connectivity is a promising therapeutic approach for AD. We aimed to determine whether the loco-regional delivery of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) could prevent amyloid-beta (Abeta) oligomer-induced synaptic damages and associated cognitive impairments that typify AD. To ensure long-term administration of CNTF in the brain, we used recombinant cells secreting CNTF encapsulated in alginate polymers. The implantation of these bioreactors in the brain of Abeta oligomer-infused mice led to a continuous secretion of recombinant CNTF and was associated with the robust improvement of cognitive performances. Most importantly, CNTF led to full recovery of cognitive functions associated with the stabilization of synaptic protein levels in the Tg2576 AD mouse model. In vitro as well as in vivo, CNTF activated a Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription-mediated survival pathway that prevented synaptic and neuronal degeneration. These preclinical studies suggest that CNTF and/or CNTF receptor-associated pathways may have AD-modifying activity through protection against progressive Abeta-related memory deficits. Our data also encourage additional exploration of ex vivo gene transfer for the prevention and/or treatment of AD.

  1. Injury-induced CRMP4 expression in adult sensory neurons; a possible target gene for ciliary neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, So Young; Shin, Yoon Kyung; Jung, Junyang; Lee, Sang Hwa; Seo, Su-Yeong; Suh, Duk Joon; Park, Hwan Tae

    2010-11-12

    Neurotrophic cytokines, such as ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) play an important role in the development and regeneration of the nervous system. In the present study, we screened gene expression induced by CNTF in adult dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons using the Illumina microarray. We found that the expression of both short and long forms of collapsin response-mediator protein 4 (CRMP4) was increased in cultured primary sensory neurons by CNTF. In addition, sciatic nerve injury induced the expression of CRMP4 mRNA and protein in DRG neurons. Finally, the increased CRMP4 protein was transported into peripheral axons following nerve injury. These findings indicate that CRMP4 may be a target gene for CNTF in the regenerative axon growth of DRG neurons after injury. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Genomic organization and chromosomal localization of the human and mouse genes encoding the {alpha} receptor component for ciliary neurotrophic factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valenzuela, D.M.; Rojas, E.; McClain, J. [Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., Tarrytown, NY (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has recently been found to share receptor components with, and to be structurally related to, a family of broadly acting cytokines, including interleukin-6, leukemia inhibitory factor, and oncostatin M. However, the CNTF receptor complex also includes a CNTF-specific component known as CNTF receptor {alpha} (CNTFR{alpha}). Here we describe the molecular cloning of the human and mouse genes encoding CNTFR. We report that the human and mouse genes have an identical intron-exon structure that correlates well with the domain structure of CNTFR{alpha}. That is, the signal peptide and the immunoglobulin-like domain are each encoded by single exons, the cytokine receptor-like domain is distributed among 4 exons, and the C-terminal glycosyl phosphatidylinositol recognition domain in encoded by the final coding exon. The position of the introns within the cytokine receptor-like domain corresponds to those found in other members of the cytokine receptor superfamily. Confirming a recent study using radiation hybrids, we have also mapped the human CNTFR gene to chromosome band 9p13 and the mouse gene to a syntenic region of chromosome 4. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  3. [Bone marrow stromal cells transfected with ciliary neurotrophic factor gene ameliorates the symptoms and inflammation in C57BL/6 mice with experimental allergic encephalomyelitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zheng-qi; Hu, Xue-qiang; Zhu, Can-sheng; Zheng, Xue-ping; Wan, Dun-jing; Liu, Ran-yi; Huang, Bi-jun; Huang, Wen-lin

    2009-12-01

    To investigate the anti-inflammatory effect of bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs) transfected with recombinant adenovirus-mediated ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) gene in C57BL/6 mice with experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE). An adenovirus vector containing CNTF gene Ad-CNTF-IRES-GFP was constructed and transfected in the MSCs (MSC-CNTF). After examination of CNTF expression, the transfected cells were transplanted in C57BL/6 mice with MOG 35-55-induced EAE, which were monitored for the changes in the symptoms scores. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), inteferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin-12P35 (IL-12P35), and IL-10 in the peripheral blood of the mice were detected, and the number of MSC-CNTF cells in the spleen and spinal cord was counted. CD3+ T cell infiltration and TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma expressions in the lesions were also observed after the cell transplantation. CNTF gene transfection resulted in significantly increased CNTF expression in the MSCs. The mice receiving MSC-CNTF transplantation exhibited significantly improved symptoms with shortened disease course and lessened disease severity. The cell transplantation also resulted in significantly decreased peripheral blood TNF-alpha levels, ameliorated CD3+T cell infiltrations and lowered TNF-alpha expression in the lesions, while the levels of IFN-gamma underwent no significant changes. Transplantation of CNTF gene-transfected MSCs results in decreased peripheral blood TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma levels and reduced inflammatory cells, CD3-positive cells and TNF-alpha expression in the lesion of EAE, therefore providing better effect than MSCs in relieving the symptoms of EAE in mice.

  4. The anorexigenic cytokine ciliary neurotrophic factor stimulates POMC gene expression via receptors localized in the nucleus of arcuate neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvreur, Odile; Aubourg, Alain; Crépin, Delphine; Degrouard, Jéril; Gertler, Arieh; Taouis, Mohammed; Vacher, Claire-Marie

    2012-02-15

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a neural cytokine that reduces appetite and body weight when administrated to rodents or humans. We have demonstrated recently that the level of CNTF in the arcuate nucleus (ARC), a key hypothalamic region involved in food intake regulation, is positively correlated with protection against diet-induced obesity. However, the comprehension of the physiological significance of neural CNTF action was still incomplete because CNTF lacks a signal peptide and thus may not be secreted by the classical exocytosis pathways. Knowing that CNTF distribution shares similarities with that of its receptor subunits in the rat ARC, we hypothesized that CNTF could exert a direct intracrine effect in ARC cells. Here, we demonstrate that CNTF, together with its receptor subunits, translocates to the cell nucleus of anorexigenic POMC neurons in the rat ARC. Furthermore, the stimulation of hypothalamic nuclear fractions with CNTF induces the phosphorylation of several signaling proteins, including Akt, as well as the transcription of the POMC gene. These data strongly suggest that intracellular CNTF may directly modulate POMC gene expression via the activation of receptors localized in the cell nucleus, providing a novel plausible mechanism of CNTF action in regulating energy homeostasis.

  5. Introduction of the Serine Green Fluorescent Protein (SGFP) Gene Into Pyricularia Grisea Race Dc4 Isolated From Digitaria Ciliaris Using Agrobacterium Tumefaciens-mediated Genetic Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    Stephanie, Stephanie; Widyastuti, Utut; Wiyono, Suryo

    2015-01-01

    Gene serin Green Fluorescent Protein (sGFP) has been used to monitor gene expression specific tagged proteins that has implication for fungal cell study. This research aimed to introduce sGFP gene into genome of P. grisea dc4 from D. ciliaris using A. tumefaciens. Plasmid sGFP was introduced into A. tumefaciens by triparental mating method (TPM). Genetic transformation was performed by co-cultivating spore P. grisea dc4 with A. tumefaciens LBA4404–pCAMB-sGFP. Pyricularia grisea dc4 transforma...

  6. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor X (RFX) transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammimies, Kristiina; Bieder, Andrea; Lauter, Gilbert; Sugiaman-Trapman, Debora; Torchet, Rachel; Hokkanen, Marie-Estelle; Burghoorn, Jan; Castrén, Eero; Kere, Juha; Tapia-Páez, Isabel; Swoboda, Peter

    2016-10-01

    DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 are three of the most replicated dyslexia candidate genes (DCGs). Recently, these DCGs were implicated in functions at the cilium. Here, we investigate the regulation of these DCGs by Regulatory Factor X transcription factors (RFX TFs), a gene family known for transcriptionally regulating ciliary genes. We identify conserved X-box motifs in the promoter regions of DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 and demonstrate their functionality, as well as the ability to recruit RFX TFs using reporter gene and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Furthermore, we uncover a complex regulation pattern between RFX1, RFX2, and RFX3 and their significant effect on modifying the endogenous expression of DYX1C1 and DCDC2 in a human retinal pigmented epithelial cell line immortalized with hTERT (hTERT-RPE1). In addition, induction of ciliogenesis increases the expression of RFX TFs and DCGs. At the protein level, we show that endogenous DYX1C1 localizes to the base of the cilium, whereas DCDC2 localizes along the entire axoneme of the cilium, thereby validating earlier localization studies using overexpression models. Our results corroborate the emerging role of DCGs in ciliary function and characterize functional noncoding elements, X-box promoter motifs, in DCG promoter regions, which thus can be targeted for mutation screening in dyslexia and ciliopathies associated with these genes.-Tammimies, K., Bieder, A., Lauter, G., Sugiaman-Trapman, D., Torchet, R., Hokkanen, M.-E., Burghoorn, J., Castrén, E., Kere, J., Tapia-Páez, I., Swoboda, P. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor (RF) X transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs. © The Author(s).

  7. Automated identification of abnormal respiratory ciliary motion in nasal biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Shannon P; Zahid, Maliha J; Durkin, John R; Francis, Richard J; Lo, Cecilia W; Chennubhotla, S Chakra

    2015-08-05

    Motile cilia lining the nasal and bronchial passages beat synchronously to clear mucus and foreign matter from the respiratory tract. This mucociliary defense mechanism is essential for pulmonary health, because respiratory ciliary motion defects, such as those in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) or congenital heart disease, can cause severe sinopulmonary disease necessitating organ transplant. The visual examination of nasal or bronchial biopsies is critical for the diagnosis of ciliary motion defects, but these analyses are highly subjective and error-prone. Although ciliary beat frequency can be computed, this metric cannot sensitively characterize ciliary motion defects. Furthermore, PCD can present without any ultrastructural defects, limiting the use of other detection methods, such as electron microscopy. Therefore, an unbiased, computational method for analyzing ciliary motion is clinically compelling. We present a computational pipeline using algorithms from computer vision and machine learning to decompose ciliary motion into quantitative elemental components. Using this framework, we constructed digital signatures for ciliary motion recognition and quantified specific properties of the ciliary motion that allowed high-throughput classification of ciliary motion as normal or abnormal. We achieved >90% classification accuracy in two independent data cohorts composed of patients with congenital heart disease, PCD, or heterotaxy, as well as healthy controls. Clinicians without specialized knowledge in machine learning or computer vision can operate this pipeline as a "black box" toolkit to evaluate ciliary motion. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Ciliary neurotrophic factor induces genes associated with inflammation and gliosis in the retina: a gene profiling study of flow-sorted, Müller cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xue

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, a member of the interleukin-6 cytokine family, has been implicated in the development, differentiation and survival of retinal neurons. The mechanisms of CNTF action as well as its cellular targets in the retina are poorly understood. It has been postulated that some of the biological effects of CNTF are mediated through its action via retinal glial cells; however, molecular changes in retinal glia induced by CNTF have not been elucidated. We have, therefore, examined gene expression dynamics of purified Müller (glial cells exposed to CNTF in vivo.Müller cells were flow-sorted from mgfap-egfp transgenic mice one or three days after intravitreal injection of CNTF. Microarray analysis using RNA from purified Müller cells showed differential expression of almost 1,000 transcripts with two- to seventeen-fold change in response to CNTF. A comparison of transcriptional profiles from Müller cells at one or three days after CNTF treatment showed an increase in the number of transcribed genes as well as a change in the expression pattern. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed that the differentially regulated genes belong to distinct functional types such as cytokines, growth factors, G-protein coupled receptors, transporters and ion channels. Interestingly, many genes induced by CNTF were also highly expressed in reactive Müller cells from mice with inherited or experimentally induced retinal degeneration. Further analysis of gene profiles revealed 20-30% overlap in the transcription pattern among Müller cells, astrocytes and the RPE.Our studies provide novel molecular insights into biological functions of Müller glial cells in mediating cytokine response. We suggest that CNTF remodels the gene expression profile of Müller cells leading to induction of networks associated with transcription, cell cycle regulation and inflammatory response. CNTF also appears to function as an inducer of gliosis in the retina.

  9. Ciliary neurotrophic factor induces genes associated with inflammation and gliosis in the retina: a gene profiling study of flow-sorted, Müller cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wei; Cojocaru, Radu I; Dudley, V Joseph; Brooks, Matthew; Swaroop, Anand; Sarthy, Vijay P

    2011-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a member of the interleukin-6 cytokine family, has been implicated in the development, differentiation and survival of retinal neurons. The mechanisms of CNTF action as well as its cellular targets in the retina are poorly understood. It has been postulated that some of the biological effects of CNTF are mediated through its action via retinal glial cells; however, molecular changes in retinal glia induced by CNTF have not been elucidated. We have, therefore, examined gene expression dynamics of purified Müller (glial) cells exposed to CNTF in vivo. Müller cells were flow-sorted from mgfap-egfp transgenic mice one or three days after intravitreal injection of CNTF. Microarray analysis using RNA from purified Müller cells showed differential expression of almost 1,000 transcripts with two- to seventeen-fold change in response to CNTF. A comparison of transcriptional profiles from Müller cells at one or three days after CNTF treatment showed an increase in the number of transcribed genes as well as a change in the expression pattern. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed that the differentially regulated genes belong to distinct functional types such as cytokines, growth factors, G-protein coupled receptors, transporters and ion channels. Interestingly, many genes induced by CNTF were also highly expressed in reactive Müller cells from mice with inherited or experimentally induced retinal degeneration. Further analysis of gene profiles revealed 20-30% overlap in the transcription pattern among Müller cells, astrocytes and the RPE. Our studies provide novel molecular insights into biological functions of Müller glial cells in mediating cytokine response. We suggest that CNTF remodels the gene expression profile of Müller cells leading to induction of networks associated with transcription, cell cycle regulation and inflammatory response. CNTF also appears to function as an inducer of gliosis in the retina.

  10. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: clinical and genetic aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. D’Auria

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is a rare, genetically heterogeneous disease, characterized by ciliary disfunction and impaired mucociliary clearance, resulting in a range of clinical manifestations such as chronic bronchitis, bronchiectasis, chronic rhino-sinusitis, chronic otitis media, situs viscerum inversus in almost 40-50% of cases and male infertility. The triad situs viscerum inversus, bronchiectasis and sinusitis is known as Kartagener syndrome. Up to now little is known about genetic, diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of primary motile ciliary diseases in children: for this reason, diagnosis is generally delayed and almost all treatments for PCD are not based on randomized studies but extrapolated from cystic fibrosis guidelines. The aim of this review is to propose to pediatricians a summary of current clinical and diagnostic evidence to obtain better knoledwge of this condition. The earlier diagnosis and the right treatment are both crucial to improve the prognosis of PCD.

  11. CCDC65 mutation causes primary ciliary dyskinesia with normal ultrastructure and hyperkinetic cilia.

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    Amjad Horani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is a genetic disorder characterized by impaired ciliary function, leading to chronic sinopulmonary disease. The genetic causes of PCD are still evolving, while the diagnosis is often dependent on finding a ciliary ultrastructural abnormality and immotile cilia. Here we report a novel gene associated with PCD but without ciliary ultrastructural abnormalities evident by transmission electron microscopy, but with dyskinetic cilia beating. METHODS: Genetic linkage analysis was performed in a family with a PCD subject. Gene expression was studied in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and human airway epithelial cells, using RNA assays and immunostaining. The phenotypic effects of candidate gene mutations were determined in primary culture human tracheobronchial epithelial cells transduced with gene targeted shRNA sequences. Video-microscopy was used to evaluate cilia motion. RESULTS: A single novel mutation in CCDC65, which created a termination codon at position 293, was identified in a subject with typical clinical features of PCD. CCDC65, an orthologue of the Chlamydomonas nexin-dynein regulatory complex protein DRC2, was localized to the cilia of normal nasal epithelial cells but was absent in those from the proband. CCDC65 expression was up-regulated during ciliogenesis in cultured airway epithelial cells, as was DRC2 in C. reinhardtii following deflagellation. Nasal epithelial cells from the affected individual and CCDC65-specific shRNA transduced normal airway epithelial cells had stiff and dyskinetic cilia beating patterns compared to control cells. Moreover, Gas8, a nexin-dynein regulatory complex component previously identified to associate with CCDC65, was absent in airway cells from the PCD subject and CCDC65-silenced cells. CONCLUSION: Mutation in CCDC65, a nexin-dynein regulatory complex member, resulted in a frameshift mutation and PCD. The affected individual had altered cilia beating patterns, and

  12. Ciliary neurotrophic factor upregulates follistatin and Pak1, causes overexpression of muscle differentiation related genes and downregulation of established atrophy mediators in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsompanidis, Alexandros; Vafiadaki, Elizabeth; Blüher, Susann; Kalozoumi, Georgia; Sanoudou, Despina; Mantzoros, Christos S

    2016-06-01

    The Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF) is a pluripotent cytokine with anorexigenic actions in the hypothalamus that improves insulin sensitivity, increases energy expenditure and induces weight loss. Since CNTF also has an established myotrophic role, we sought to examine whether skeletal muscle contributes to the CNTF-induced metabolic improvement and identify the molecular mechanisms mediating these effects. We used a mouse model of diet-induced obesity, to which high or low CNTF doses were administered for 7days. Whole transcriptome expression levels were analyzed in dissected soleus muscles using microarrays and data were then confirmed using qRT-PCR. We demonstrate that CNTF administration significantly downregulates leptin, while it upregulates follistatin and Pak1; a molecule associated with insulin sensitization in skeletal muscle. A significant overexpression of muscle differentiation related genes and downregulation of established atrophy mediators was observed. The overall gene expression changes suggest an indirect, beneficial effect of CNTF on metabolism, energy expenditure and insulin sensitivity, exerted by the pronounced stimulation of muscle growth, with similarities to the described effect of follistatin and the activation of the Akt pathway in skeletal muscle. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Localization and expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) in postmortem sciatic nerve from patients with motor neuron disease and diabetic neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.A. [Univ. Medical Center, New Orleans, LA (United States); Gross, L.; Wittrock, D.A.; Windebank, A.J. [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is thought to play an important role in the maintenance of the mature motor system. The factor is found most abundantly in myelinating Schwann cells in the adult sciatic nerve. Lack of neuronal growth factors has been proposed as one possible etiology of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). Growth factor replacement therapies are currently being evaluated as a treatment for motor neuron disease. In this report we determined whether the expression of CNTF in sciatic nerve differed in patients with motor neuron disease compared to controls or patients with another form of axonopathy. We identified 8 patients (7 with ALS and 1 with SMA) with motor neuron disease and 6 patients with diabetic motor neuropathy who had autopsy material available. Immunoperoxidase staining showed reduced CNTF expression in nerves of patients with motor neuron disease but not in patients with diabetic motor neuropathy. Decreased CNTF appears be associated with primary motor neuron disease rather than a generalized process of axon loss. This result supports suggestions that CNTF deficiency may be an important factor in the development of motor neuron disease. 20 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Pompe disease gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Barry J.; Falk, Darin J.; Pacak, Christina A.; Nayak, Sushrusha; Herzog, Roland W.; Elder, Melissa E.; Collins, Shelley W.; Conlon, Thomas J.; Clement, Nathalie; Cleaver, Brian D.; Cloutier, Denise A.; Porvasnik, Stacy L.; Islam, Saleem; Elmallah, Mai K.; Martin, Anatole; Smith, Barbara K.; Fuller, David D.; Lawson, Lee Ann; Mah, Cathryn S.

    2011-01-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive metabolic myopathy caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase and results in cellular lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen accumulation. A wide spectrum of disease exists from hypotonia and severe cardiac hypertrophy in the first few months of life due to severe mutations to a milder form with the onset of symptoms in adulthood. In either condition, the involvement of several systems leads to progressive weakness and disability. In early-onset severe cases, the natural history is characteristically cardiorespiratory failure and death in the first year of life. Since the advent of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), the clinical outcomes have improved. However, it has become apparent that a new natural history is being defined in which some patients have substantial improvement following ERT, while others develop chronic disability reminiscent of the late-onset disease. In order to improve on the current clinical outcomes in Pompe patients with diminished clinical response to ERT, we sought to address the cause and potential for the treatment of disease manifestations which are not amenable to ERT. In this review, we will focus on the preclinical studies that are relevant to the development of a gene therapy strategy for Pompe disease, and have led to the first clinical trial of recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene-based therapy for Pompe disease. We will cover the preliminary laboratory studies and rationale for a clinical trial, which is based on the treatment of the high rate of respiratory failure in the early-onset patients receiving ERT. PMID:21518733

  15. An international registry for primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werner, Claudius; Lablans, Martin; Ataian, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder leading to chronic upper and lower airway disease. Fundamental data on epidemiology, clinical presentation, course and treatment strategies are lacking in PCD. We have established an international PCD registry to realise an u...

  16. Bug22 influences cilium morphology and the post-translational modification of ciliary microtubules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Mendes Maia

    2014-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are organelles essential for motility and sensing of environmental stimuli. Depending on the cell type, cilia acquire a defined set of functions and, accordingly, are built with an appropriate length and molecular composition. Several ciliary proteins display a high degree of conservation throughout evolution and mutations in ciliary genes are associated with various diseases such as ciliopathies and infertility. Here, we describe the role of the highly conserved ciliary protein, Bug22, in Drosophila. Previous studies in unicellular organisms have shown that Bug22 is required for proper cilia function, but its exact role in ciliogenesis has not been investigated yet. Null Bug22 mutant flies display cilia-associated phenotypes and nervous system defects. Furthermore, sperm differentiation is blocked at the individualization stage, due to impaired migration of the individualization machinery. Tubulin post-translational modifications (PTMs such as polyglycylation, polyglutamylation or acetylation, are determinants of microtubule (MT functions and stability in centrioles, cilia and neurons. We found defects in the timely incorporation of polyglycylation in sperm axonemal MTs of Bug22 mutants. In addition, we found that depletion of human Bug22 in RPE1 cells resulted in the appearance of longer cilia and reduced axonemal polyglutamylation. Our work identifies Bug22 as a protein that plays a conserved role in the regulation of PTMs of the ciliary axoneme.

  17. A novel mouse model of anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD: conditional deletion of Tsc1 disrupts ciliary body and iris development

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    Anna-Carin Hägglund

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of the cornea, lens, ciliary body and iris within the anterior segment of the eye involves coordinated interaction between cells originating from the ciliary margin of the optic cup, the overlying periocular mesenchyme and the lens epithelium. Anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD encompasses a spectrum of developmental syndromes that affect these anterior segment tissues. ASD conditions arise as a result of dominantly inherited genetic mutations and result in both ocular-specific and systemic forms of dysgenesis that are best exemplified by aniridia and Axenfeld–Rieger syndrome, respectively. Extensive clinical overlap in disease presentation amongst ASD syndromes creates challenges for correct diagnosis and classification. The use of animal models has therefore proved to be a robust approach for unravelling this complex genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. However, despite these successes, it is clear that additional genes that underlie several ASD syndromes remain unidentified. Here, we report the characterisation of a novel mouse model of ASD. Conditional deletion of Tsc1 during eye development leads to a premature upregulation of mTORC1 activity within the ciliary margin, periocular mesenchyme and lens epithelium. This aberrant mTORC1 signalling within the ciliary margin in particular leads to a reduction in the number of cells that express Pax6, Bmp4 and Msx1. Sustained mTORC1 signalling also induces a decrease in ciliary margin progenitor cell proliferation and a consequent failure of ciliary body and iris development in postnatal animals. Our study therefore identifies Tsc1 as a novel candidate ASD gene. Furthermore, the Tsc1-ablated mouse model also provides a valuable resource for future studies concerning the molecular mechanisms underlying ASD and acts as a platform for evaluating therapeutic approaches for the treatment of visual disorders.

  18. A novel mouse model of anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD): conditional deletion of Tsc1 disrupts ciliary body and iris development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hägglund, Anna-Carin; Jones, Iwan; Carlsson, Leif

    2017-03-01

    Development of the cornea, lens, ciliary body and iris within the anterior segment of the eye involves coordinated interaction between cells originating from the ciliary margin of the optic cup, the overlying periocular mesenchyme and the lens epithelium. Anterior segment dysgenesis (ASD) encompasses a spectrum of developmental syndromes that affect these anterior segment tissues. ASD conditions arise as a result of dominantly inherited genetic mutations and result in both ocular-specific and systemic forms of dysgenesis that are best exemplified by aniridia and Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome, respectively. Extensive clinical overlap in disease presentation amongst ASD syndromes creates challenges for correct diagnosis and classification. The use of animal models has therefore proved to be a robust approach for unravelling this complex genotypic and phenotypic heterogeneity. However, despite these successes, it is clear that additional genes that underlie several ASD syndromes remain unidentified. Here, we report the characterisation of a novel mouse model of ASD. Conditional deletion of Tsc1 during eye development leads to a premature upregulation of mTORC1 activity within the ciliary margin, periocular mesenchyme and lens epithelium. This aberrant mTORC1 signalling within the ciliary margin in particular leads to a reduction in the number of cells that express Pax6, Bmp4 and Msx1 Sustained mTORC1 signalling also induces a decrease in ciliary margin progenitor cell proliferation and a consequent failure of ciliary body and iris development in postnatal animals. Our study therefore identifies Tsc1 as a novel candidate ASD gene. Furthermore, the Tsc1-ablated mouse model also provides a valuable resource for future studies concerning the molecular mechanisms underlying ASD and acts as a platform for evaluating therapeutic approaches for the treatment of visual disorders. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Gene Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

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    Rachel Denyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Current pharmacological and surgical treatments for Parkinson's disease offer symptomatic improvements to those suffering from this incurable degenerative neurological disorder, but none of these has convincingly shown effects on disease progression. Novel approaches based on gene therapy have several potential advantages over conventional treatment modalities. These could be used to provide more consistent dopamine supplementation, potentially providing superior symptomatic relief with fewer side effects. More radically, gene therapy could be used to correct the imbalances in basal ganglia circuitry associated with the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, or to preserve or restore dopaminergic neurons lost during the disease process itself. The latter neuroprotective approach is the most exciting, as it could theoretically be disease modifying rather than simply symptom alleviating. Gene therapy agents using these approaches are currently making the transition from the laboratory to the bedside. This paper summarises the theoretical approaches to gene therapy for Parkinson's disease and the findings of clinical trials in this rapidly changing field.

  20. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: a report from ATS 2001, May 18–23, San Francisco

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    Noone Peadar G

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is a genetic disorder of abnormal ciliary structure and function that leads to defective mucociliary clearance, resulting in oto-sino-pulmonary disease, and infertility. The disease is currently under intense investigation by a number of research groups worldwide. At the recent American Thoracic Society meeting in San Francisco in May 2001, two sessions focused on PCD; a symposium session on May 21 with several featured expert speakers was followed by a mini-symposium on Tuesday May 22, with one featured speaker and presentation of nine abstracts covering a range of research topics. Mattias Salathe (University of Miami, USA and Stephen Brody (Washington University, St Louis, USA chaired the symposium session. Presentations focused on the clinical spectrum of PCD, the genetics of PCD, a proteomics approach to detail the structure of cilia, the role of cilia in the embryology of situs laterality, and airway epithelial cell biology. The mini-symposium was chaired by Peadar Noone (University of North Carolina, USA and Malcolm King (University of Alberta, USA and included presentations on the use of PCD as a human disease model, accurate definition of the phenotype using clinical and cell biologic markers, and molecular studies. The latter reports ranged from isolation of a protein involved in ciliary structure and function to genetic studies using linkage analysis and the candidate gene approach. Clinicians and scientists alike displayed considerable interest at both sessions, and there were several lively question–answer sessions.

  1. Lung disease assessment in primary ciliary dyskinesia: a comparison between chest high-field magnetic resonance imaging and high-resolution computed tomography findings

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    Iacotucci Paola

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is associated with pulmonary involvement that requires periodical assessment. Chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT has become the method of choice to evaluate chronic lung disease, but entails exposure to ionizing radiation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI has been proposed as a potential radiation-free technique in several chest disorders. Aim of our study is to evaluate whether high-field MRI is as effective as HRCT in identifying PCD pulmonary abnormalities. We also analyzed the relationships between the severity and extension of lung disease, and functional data. Methods Thirteen PCD patients (8 children/5 adults; median age, 15.2 yrs underwent chest HRCT and high-field 3T MRI, spirometry, and deep throat or sputum culture. Images were scored using a modified version of the Helbich system. Results HRCT and MRI total scores were 12 (range, 6–20 and 12 (range, 5–17, respectively. Agreement between HRCT and MRI scores was good or excellent (r > 0.8. HRCT and MRI total scores were significantly related to forced vital capacity (r = -0.5, p = 0.05; and r = -0.7, p = 0.009, respectively and forced expiratory volume at 1 second (r = -0.6, p = 0.03; and r = -0.7, p = 0.009, respectively. Conclusion Chest high-field 3T MRI appears to be as effective as HRCT in assessing the extent and severity of lung abnormalities in PCD. MRI scores might be used for longitudinal assessment and be an outcome surrogate in future studies.

  2. Two-year intraocular delivery of ciliary neurotrophic factor by encapsulated cell technology implants in patients with chronic retinal degenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauper, Konrad; McGovern, Cahil; Sherman, Sandy; Heatherton, Pam; Rapoza, Rob; Stabila, Paul; Dean, Brenda; Lee, Alice; Borges, Suzanna; Bouchard, Bruce; Tao, Weng

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the pharmacokinetics of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) delivered over a period of up to 2 years by an intraocular encapsulated cell technology (ECT) implant in patients with retinitis pigmentosa (RP) and geographic atrophy (GA). Patients from phase 1 RP (CNTF1); phase 2 GA (CNTF2); and phase 2 late and early stage RP (CNTF3, and CNTF4) studies received an ECT-CNTF implant, designated as "NT-501," in one eye. Per protocol, all implants (n = 10) were removed at 6 months from the CNTF1 study patients. Explant for the phase 2 studies was optional, but several patients were explanted at 12, 18, and 24 months post implant. A small amount of vitreous sample was collected at the time of explant. The rate of CNTF secretion from the explants and the corresponding vitreous CNTF levels were evaluated for each time point. Serum samples from these patients were evaluated for CNTF, anti-CNTF antibodies, and antibodies to the encapsulated cells. NT-501 implants produced CNTF consistently over a 2-year period. The calculated half-life of CNTF in the vitreous continuously delivered by ECT implants was 51 months, with CNTF levels statistically equivalent between the 6- and 24-month implant period. CNTF, anti-CNTF antibodies, and antibodies to the encapsulated cells were not detected in the serum of patients. This retrospective study demonstrated that the intraocular ECT implant has a favorable pharmacokinetic profile for the treatment of chronic retinal degenerative diseases without systemic exposure. (ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT00063765, NCT00447954, NCT00447980, NCT00447993.).

  3. Photoreceptor Sensory Cilium: Traversing the Ciliary Gate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemant Khanna

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cilia are antenna-like extensions of the plasma membrane found in nearly all cell types. In the retina of the eye, photoreceptors develop unique sensory cilia. Not much was known about the mechanisms underlying the formation and function of photoreceptor cilia, largely because of technical limitations and the specific structural and functional modifications that cannot be modeled in vitro. With recent advances in microscopy techniques and molecular and biochemical approaches, we are now beginning to understand the molecular basis of photoreceptor ciliary architecture, ciliary function and its involvement in human diseases. Here, I will discuss the studies that have revealed new knowledge of how photoreceptor cilia regulate their identity and function while coping with high metabolic and trafficking demands associated with processing light signal.

  4. Ciliary neurotrophic factor null alleles are not a risk factor for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, hereditary neuropathy with pressure palsies and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vught, Paul W. J.; van Wijk, Joost; Bradley, Ted E. J.; Plasmans, Dagmar; Jakobs, Marja E.; Veldink, Jan H.; de Jong, J. M. B. Vianney; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Baas, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Growth factors, such as ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), have been implicated in neuronal survival and proliferation. About 2% of the human population is homozygous for a polymorphism that induces truncated and biologically inactive CNTF but does not obviously change the phenotype. In a

  5. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: a consensus statement on diagnostic and treatment approaches in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barbato, A.; Frischer, T.; Kuehni, C. E.; Snijders, D.; Azevedo, I.; Baktai, G.; Bartoloni, L.; Eber, E.; Escribano, A.; Haarman, E.; Hesselmar, B.; Hogg, C.; Jorissen, M.; Lucas, J.; Nielsen, K. G.; O'Callaghan, C.; Omran, H.; Pohunek, P.; Strippoli, M.-P. F.; Bush, A.

    2009-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is associated with abnormal ciliary structure and function, which results in retention of mucus and bacteria in the respiratory tract, leading to chronic oto-sino-pulmonary disease, situs abnormalities and abnormal sperm motility. The diagnosis of PCD requires the

  6. Conservation of ciliary proteins in plants with no cilia

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    Hodges Matthew E

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic cilia are complex, highly conserved microtubule-based organelles with a broad phylogenetic distribution. Cilia were present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor and many proteins involved in cilia function have been conserved through eukaryotic diversification. However, cilia have also been lost multiple times in different lineages, with at least two losses occurring within the land plants. Whereas all non-seed plants produce cilia for motility of male gametes, some gymnosperms and all angiosperms lack cilia. During these evolutionary losses, proteins with ancestral ciliary functions may be lost or co-opted into different functions. Results Here we identify a core set of proteins with an inferred ciliary function that are conserved in ciliated eukaryotic species. We interrogate this genomic dataset to identify proteins with a predicted ancestral ciliary role that have been maintained in non-ciliated land plants. In support of our prediction, we demonstrate that several of these proteins have a flagellar localisation in protozoan trypanosomes. The phylogenetic distribution of these genes within the land plants indicates evolutionary scenarios of either sub- or neo-functionalisation and expression data analysis shows that these genes are highly expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana pollen cells. Conclusions A large number of proteins possess a phylogenetic ciliary profile indicative of ciliary function. Remarkably, many genes with an ancestral ciliary role are maintained in non-ciliated land plants. These proteins have been co-opted to perform novel functions, most likely before the loss of cilia, some of which appear related to the formation of the male gametes.

  7. Patching genes to fight disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzman, D.

    1990-09-03

    The National Institutes of Health has approved the first gene therapy experiments, one of which will try to cure cancer by bolstering the immune system. The applications of such therapy are limited, but the potential aid to people with genetic diseases is great.

  8. Bacteriology and treatment of infections in the upper and lower airways in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alanin, Mikkel Christian

    2017-01-01

    The respiratory tract is lined with motile cilia that transport respiratory mucus. Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a chronic genetic disease caused by mutations in genes responsible for ciliary structure and function. Non-functional airway cilia impair the mucociliary clearance (MCC), causing...... mucostasis, lung infections and destruction, chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and hearing impairment. It is of paramount importance to postpone chronic lung infection mainly with Gram-negative bacteria (GNB) in patients with an impaired MCC. When successful, lung function can be stabilized and quality of life...... airway cultures and better lung function; approximately one out of four operated patients, in search of an infectious focus, remained free of lung colonization with P. aeruginosa during follow-up for at least six months. Based on these results, it is tempting to speculate that ESS with adjuvant therapy...

  9. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia: An Update on Clinical Aspects, Genetics, Diagnosis, and Future Treatment Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Mirra

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is an orphan disease (MIM 244400, autosomal recessive inherited, characterized by motile ciliary dysfunction. The estimated prevalence of PCD is 1:10,000 to 1:20,000 live-born children, but true prevalence could be even higher. PCD is characterized by chronic upper and lower respiratory tract disease, infertility/ectopic pregnancy, and situs anomalies, that occur in ≈50% of PCD patients (Kartagener syndrome, and these may be associated with congenital heart abnormalities. Most patients report a daily year-round wet cough or nose congestion starting in the first year of life. Daily wet cough, associated with recurrent infections exacerbations, results in the development of chronic suppurative lung disease, with localized-to-diffuse bronchiectasis. No diagnostic test is perfect for confirming PCD. Diagnosis can be challenging and relies on a combination of clinical data, nasal nitric oxide levels plus cilia ultrastructure and function analysis. Adjunctive tests include genetic analysis and repeated tests in ciliary culture specimens. There are currently 33 known genes associated with PCD and correlations between genotype and ultrastructural defects have been increasingly demonstrated. Comprehensive genetic testing may hopefully screen young infants before symptoms occur, thus improving survival. Recent surprising advances in PCD genetic designed a novel approach called “gene editing” to restore gene function and normalize ciliary motility, opening up new avenues for treating PCD. Currently, there are no data from randomized clinical trials to support any specific treatment, thus, management strategies are usually extrapolated from cystic fibrosis. The goal of treatment is to prevent exacerbations, slowing the progression of lung disease. The therapeutic mainstay includes airway clearance maneuvers mainly with nebulized hypertonic saline and chest physiotherapy, and prompt and aggressive administration of

  10. [Gene therapy for Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Shin-Ichi

    2012-01-01

    The current clinical trials of gene therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD) are based on three strategies. 1. To restore the local production of dopamine by introducing genes associated with dopamine-synthesizing enzymes into the putamen. 2. To protect nigrostriatal projection by delivering the neurturin gene, a trophic factor for dopaminergic neurons, both in the putamen and the substantia nigra. 3. To modulate the neural activity by transducing the subthalamic nucleus with vectors expressing glutamic acid decarboxylase. A phase I clinical study was initiated in 2007 to determine the safety of intra-putaminal infusion of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector encoding aromatic (L)-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC). All six patients enrolled in the trial showed improvements from baseline in the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor scores in the OFF medication state at 36 months after treatment. Although this trial was a small, open-label study and the use of a non-blinded, uncontrolled analysis limits interpretation, the efficacy outcomes are encouraging and indicate that the AAV vector-mediated gene transfer of AADC may benefit advanced PD patients. A similar approach, delivering AAV vector carrying AADC gene into the putamen ameliorated the symptoms in children with AADC deficiency.

  11. Progressive hemifacial atrophy with ciliary body atrophy and ocular hypotony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Ashwini Kini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Progressive hemifacial atrophy (PHA is a disease of unknown etiology affecting one-half of the face. Ocular involvement is uncommon. Atrophy of iris is rare, with only a few cases of partial atrophy being reported in the literature. We report a case of total atrophy of iris and ciliary body with associated ocular hypotony in a 16-year-old girl with PHA. We believe this is the first reported case of complete atrophy of iris and ciliary body in PHA. Ocular hypotony in PHA was thought to be due to intra-ocular inflammation. However in our case it appears to be secondary to severe atrophy of the ciliary body.

  12. ciliary body tumour occuring in a nigerian - a case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR OKONKWO_

    Uveal melanomas, including ciliary body melanomas are mostly a disease of Caucasians, particularly those of northern European descent. It is rarely seen among non white people. The incidence of ocular melanoma amongst black peoples is extremely rare.3. CASE REPORT. A 33-year old female Nigerian presented to ...

  13. Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia-Causing Mutations in Amish and Mennonite Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferkol, Thomas W.; Puffenberger, Erik G.; Lie, Hauw; Helms, Cynthia; Strauss, Kevin A.; Bowcock, Anne; Carson, John L.; Hazucha, Milan; Morton, D. Holmes; Patel, Anand C.; Leigh, Margaret W.; Knowles, Michael R.; Zariwala, Maimoona A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether individuals with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) from unrelated Amish and Mennonite families harbor a single and unique founder mutation. Study design Subjects from Amish and Mennonite communities in several states were enrolled in the study. All subjects were clinically characterized, and nasal nitric oxide levels were measured. Nasal epithelial scrapings were collected from several subjects for ciliary ultrastructural analyses. DNA was isolated from patients with PCD and their unaffected first- and second-degree relatives. Genome-wide homozygosity mapping, linkage analyses, targeted mutation analyses, and exome sequencing were performed. Results All subjects from Old-Order Amish communities from Pennsylvania were homozygous for a nonsense mutant DNAH5 allele, c.4348C>T (p.Q1450X). Two affected siblings from an unrelated Mennonite family in Arkansas were homozygous for the same nonsense DNAH5 mutation. Children with PCD from an Amish family from Wisconsin had biallelic DNAH5 mutations, c.4348C>T (p.Q1450X) and c.10815delT (p.P3606HfsX23), and mutations in other genes associated with PCD were also identified in this community. Conclusion The Amish and Mennonite subjects from geographically dispersed and socially isolated communities had the same founder DNAH5 mutation, owing to the common heritage of these populations. However, disease-causing mutations in other PCD-associated genes were also found in affected individuals in these communities, illustrating the genetic heterogeneity in this consanguineous population. PMID:23477994

  14. Primary ciliary dyskinesia-causing mutations in Amish and Mennonite communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferkol, Thomas W; Puffenberger, Erik G; Lie, Hauw; Helms, Cynthia; Strauss, Kevin A; Bowcock, Anne; Carson, John L; Hazucha, Milan; Morton, D Holmes; Patel, Anand C; Leigh, Margaret W; Knowles, Michael R; Zariwala, Maimoona A

    2013-08-01

    To determine whether individuals with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) from unrelated Amish and Mennonite families harbor a single and unique founder mutation. Subjects from Amish and Mennonite communities in several states were enrolled in the study. All subjects were clinically characterized, and nasal nitric oxide levels were measured. Nasal epithelial scrapings were collected from several subjects for ciliary ultrastructural analyses. DNA was isolated from patients with PCD and their unaffected first- and second-degree relatives. Genome-wide homozygosity mapping, linkage analyses, targeted mutation analyses, and exome sequencing were performed. All subjects from Old-Order Amish communities from Pennsylvania were homozygous for a nonsense mutant DNAH5 allele, c.4348C>T (p.Q1450X). Two affected siblings from an unrelated Mennonite family in Arkansas were homozygous for the same nonsense DNAH5 mutation. Children with PCD from an Amish family from Wisconsin had biallelic DNAH5 mutations, c.4348C>T (p.Q1450X) and c.10815delT (p.P3606HfsX23), and mutations in other genes associated with PCD were also identified in this community. The Amish and Mennonite subjects from geographically dispersed and socially isolated communities had the same founder DNAH5 mutation, owing to the common heritage of these populations. However, disease-causing mutations in other PCD-associated genes were also found in affected individuals in these communities, illustrating the genetic heterogeneity in this consanguineous population. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ciliary photoreceptors in the cerebral eyes of a protostome larva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passamaneck Yale J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eyes in bilaterian metazoans have been described as being composed of either ciliary or rhabdomeric photoreceptors. Phylogenetic distribution, as well as distinct morphologies and characteristic deployment of different photopigments (ciliary vs. rhabdomeric opsins and transduction pathways argue for the co-existence of both of these two photoreceptor types in the last common bilaterian ancestor. Both receptor types exist throughout the Bilateria, but only vertebrates are thought to use ciliary photoreceptors for directional light detection in cerebral eyes, while all other invertebrate bilaterians studied utilize rhabdomeric photoreceptors for this purpose. In protostomes, ciliary photoreceptors that express c-opsin have been described only from a non-visual deep-brain photoreceptor. Their homology with vertebrate rods and cones of the human eye has been hypothesized to represent a unique functional transition from non-visual to visual roles in the vertebrate lineage. Results To test the hypothesis that protostome cerebral eyes employ exclusively rhabdomeric photoreceptors, we investigated the ultrastructure of the larval eyes in the brachiopod Terebratalia transversa. We show that these pigment-cup eyes consist of a lens cell and a shading pigment cell, both of which are putative photoreceptors, deploying a modified, enlarged cilium for light perception, and have axonal connections to the larval brain. Our investigation of the gene expression patterns of c-opsin, Pax6 and otx in these eyes confirms that the larval eye spots of brachiopods are cerebral eyes that deploy ciliary type photoreceptors for directional light detection. Interestingly, c-opsin is also expressed during early embryogenesis in all potential apical neural cells, becoming restricted to the anterior neuroectoderm, before expression is initiated in the photoreceptor cells of the eyes. Coincident with the expression of c-opsin in the presumptive neuroectoderm

  16. Bioinformatics methods for identifying candidate disease genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Driel Marc A

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract With the explosion in genomic and functional genomics information, methods for disease gene identification are rapidly evolving. Databases are now essential to the process of selecting candidate disease genes. Combining positional information with disease characteristics and functional information is the usual strategy by which candidate disease genes are selected. Enrichment for candidate disease genes, however, depends on the skills of the operating researcher. Over the past few years, a number of bioinformatics methods that enrich for the most likely candidate disease genes have been developed. Such in silico prioritisation methods may further improve by completion of datasets, by development of standardised ontologies across databases and species and, ultimately, by the integration of different strategies.

  17. CCDC103 mutations cause primary ciliary dyskinesia by disrupting assembly of ciliary dynein arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panizzi, Jennifer R.; Becker-Heck, Anita; Castleman, Victoria H.; Al-Mutairi, Dalal; Liu, Yan; Loges, Niki T.; Pathak, Narendra; Austin-Tse, Christina; Sheridan, Eamonn; Schmidts, Miriam; Olbrich, Heike; Werner, Claudius; Häffner, Karsten; Hellman, Nathan; Chodhari, Rahul; Gupta, Amar; Kramer-Zucker, Albrecht; Olale, Felix; Burdine, Rebecca D.; Schier, Alexander F.; O’Callaghan, Christopher; Chung, Eddie MK; Reinhardt, Richard; Mitchison, Hannah M.; King, Stephen M.; Omran, Heymut; Drummond, Iain A.

    2012-01-01

    Cilia are essential for fertilization, respiratory clearance, cerebrospinal fluid circulation, and to establish laterality1. Cilia motility defects cause Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD, MIM 242650), a disorder affecting 1:15-30,000 births. Cilia motility requires the assembly of multisubunit dynein arms that drive cilia bending2. Despite progress in understanding the genetic basis of PCD, mutations remain to be identified for several PCD linked loci3. Here we show that the zebrafish cilia paralysis mutant schmalhanstn222 (smh) mutant encodes the coiled-coil domain containing 103 protein (Ccdc103), a foxj1a regulated gene. Screening 146 unrelated PCD families identified patients in six families with reduced outer dynein arms, carrying mutations in CCDC103. Dynein arm assembly in smh mutant zebrafish was rescued by wild-type but not mutant human CCDC103. Chlamydomonas Ccdc103 functions as a tightly bound, axoneme-associated protein. The results identify Ccdc103 as a novel dynein arm attachment factor that when mutated causes Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia. PMID:22581229

  18. Standardized phenotyping enhances Mendelian disease gene identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, L.E.L.M.; Veltman, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing has revolutionized the identification of genes with dominant disease-associated variants for rare clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders, but the identification of genes with recessive disease-associated variants has been less successful. A new study now provides a

  19. Ciliary ultrastructure of polyplacophorans (Mollusca, Amphineura, Polyplacophora).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundin, K; Schander, C

    2001-01-01

    This study is part of a series of papers aiming to investigate the phylogenetic significance of ciliary ultrastructure among molluscs and to test the hypothesis of a relationship between Xenoturbella and the molluscs. The ultrastructure of the ciliary apparatus on the gills of the polyplacophorans Leptochiton asellus and Tonicella rubra was studied. The gill cilia of the two species are similar in shape. The free part of the cilium is long with a slender distal part. There are two ciliary rootlets. One of them is short, broad and placed on the anterior face of the basal body. The other rootlet is conical and has a vertical orientation. Among the mollusca, two ciliary rootlets in the ciliary apparatus of multiciliate ectodermal cells have only been reported from the Chaetodermomorpha and Neomeniomorpha. This character state is likely plesiomorphic for the Mollusca and indicates a basal (nonderived) position of these taxa among the molluscs. No possible synapomorphic character with Xenoturbella bocki was found.

  20. Network topology reveals key cardiovascular disease genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anida Sarajlić

    Full Text Available The structure of protein-protein interaction (PPI networks has already been successfully used as a source of new biological information. Even though cardiovascular diseases (CVDs are a major global cause of death, many CVD genes still await discovery. We explore ways to utilize the structure of the human PPI network to find important genes for CVDs that should be targeted by drugs. The hope is to use the properties of such important genes to predict new ones, which would in turn improve a choice of therapy. We propose a methodology that examines the PPI network wiring around genes involved in CVDs. We use the methodology to identify a subset of CVD-related genes that are statistically significantly enriched in drug targets and "driver genes." We seek such genes, since driver genes have been proposed to drive onset and progression of a disease. Our identified subset of CVD genes has a large overlap with the Core Diseasome, which has been postulated to be the key to disease formation and hence should be the primary object of therapeutic intervention. This indicates that our methodology identifies "key" genes responsible for CVDs. Thus, we use it to predict new CVD genes and we validate over 70% of our predictions in the literature. Finally, we show that our predicted genes are functionally similar to currently known CVD drug targets, which confirms a potential utility of our methodology towards improving therapy for CVDs.

  1. Conserved Genetic Interactions between Ciliopathy Complexes Cooperatively Support Ciliogenesis and Ciliary Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E Yee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in genes encoding cilia proteins cause human ciliopathies, diverse disorders affecting many tissues. Individual genes can be linked to ciliopathies with dramatically different phenotypes, suggesting that genetic modifiers may participate in their pathogenesis. The ciliary transition zone contains two protein complexes affected in the ciliopathies Meckel syndrome (MKS and nephronophthisis (NPHP. The BBSome is a third protein complex, affected in the ciliopathy Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS. We tested whether mutations in MKS, NPHP and BBS complex genes modify the phenotypic consequences of one another in both C. elegans and mice. To this end, we identified TCTN-1, the C. elegans ortholog of vertebrate MKS complex components called Tectonics, as an evolutionarily conserved transition zone protein. Neither disruption of TCTN-1 alone or together with MKS complex components abrogated ciliary structure in C. elegans. In contrast, disruption of TCTN-1 together with either of two NPHP complex components, NPHP-1 or NPHP-4, compromised ciliary structure. Similarly, disruption of an NPHP complex component and the BBS complex component BBS-5 individually did not compromise ciliary structure, but together did. As in nematodes, disrupting two components of the mouse MKS complex did not cause additive phenotypes compared to single mutants. However, disrupting both Tctn1 and either Nphp1 or Nphp4 exacerbated defects in ciliogenesis and cilia-associated developmental signaling, as did disrupting both Tctn1 and the BBSome component Bbs1. Thus, we demonstrate that ciliary complexes act in parallel to support ciliary function and suggest that human ciliopathy phenotypes are altered by genetic interactions between different ciliary biochemical complexes.

  2. Ciliary muscle thickness in anisometropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchem, Mallory K; Sinnott, Loraine T; Kao, Chiu-Yen; Bailey, Melissa D

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between ciliary muscle thickness (CMT), refractive error, and axial length both across subjects and between the more and less myopic eyes of adults with anisometropia. Both eyes of 29 adult subjects with at least 1.00 D of anisometropia were measured. Ciliary muscle thickness was measured at the maximum thickness (CMTMAX) and at 1.0 (CMT1), 2.0 (CMT2), and 3.0 mm (CMT3) posterior to the scleral spur, and also at the apical region (Apical CMTMAX = CMTMAX - CMT2, and Apical CMT1 = CMT1 - CMT2). Multilevel regression models were used to determine the relationship between the various CMT measures and cycloplegic refractive error or axial length, and to assess whether there are CMT differences between the more and less myopic eyes of an anisometropic adult. CMTMAX, CMT1, CMT2, and CMT3 were negatively associated with mean refractive error (all p ≤ 0.03), and the strongest association was in the posterior region (CMT2 and CMT3). Apical CMTMAX and Apical CMT1, however, were positively associated with mean refractive error (both p anisometropia, an eye can grow longer and more myopic than its fellow eye without resulting in an increase in CMT.

  3. Robust gene dysregulation in Alzheimer's disease brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xuemei; Bai, Zhouxian; Wang, Jiajia; Xie, Bin; Sun, Jiya; Han, Guangchun; Song, Fuhai; Crack, Peter J; Duan, Yong; Lei, Hongxing

    2014-01-01

    The brain transcriptome of Alzheimer's disease (AD) reflects the prevailing disease mechanism at the gene expression level. However, thousands of genes have been reported to be dysregulated in AD brains in existing studies, and the consistency or discrepancy among these studies has not been thoroughly examined. Toward this end, we conducted a comprehensive survey of the brain transcriptome datasets for AD and other neurological diseases. We first demonstrated that the frequency of observed dysregulation in AD was highly correlated with the reproducibility of the dysregulation. Based on this observation, we selected 100 genes with the highest frequency of dysregulation to illustrate the core perturbation in AD brains. The dysregulation of these genes was validated in several independent datasets for AD. We further identified 12 genes with strong correlation of gene expression with disease progression. The relevance of these genes to disease progression was also validated in an independent dataset. Interestingly, we found a transcriptional "cushion" for these 100 genes in the less vulnerable visual cortex region, which may be a critical component of the protection mechanism for less vulnerable brain regions. To facilitate the research in this field, we have provided the expression information of ~8000 relevant genes on a publicly accessible web server AlzBIG (http://alz.big.ac.cn).

  4. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2007-01-01

    A central issue in autoimmune disease is whether the underlying inflammation is a repeated stereotypical process or whether disease specific gene expression is involved. To shed light on this, we analysed whether genes previously found to be differentially regulated in rheumatoid arthritis (RA......) patients and healthy individuals were specific for the arthritic process or likewise altered in other chronic inflammatory diseases such as chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, HT) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using qPCR for 18 RA-discriminative genes, there were no significant...... differences in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (MNC) gene expression patterns between 15 newly diagnosed HT patients and 15 matched healthy controls. However, the MNC expression levels of five genes were significantly upregulated in 25 IBD patients, compared to 18 matched healthy controls (CD14, FACL2, FCN1...

  5. [A rare case of primary ciliary dyskinesia with heterotaxy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintela, Cátia; Meireles, Cláudia; Bettencourt, Maria João; Ribeirinho, Augusto; Bentes, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia is an autosomal recessive disease with a clinical history of upper and lowers respiratory infections, rhinosinusitis and bronquitis associated with complete or partial situs inversus. The authors present a 78 -year -old male caucasian patient with rhinosinusitis, lower respiratory tract infection and dyspnea, chronic otitis with hearing deficit and infertility followed in Gastroenterology for dyspepsia and constipation. The radiological studies revealed agenesis of right frontal sinus; bronchial wall thickening; bronchiectasis; cecum and ascending colon located on the left and small bowel occupies right side of abdomen. He had no immunodeficiency, allergies, cystic fibrosis and others. We concluded primary ciliary dyskinesia with heterotaxy. For the rarity of this case we decided to present it.

  6. Gene-Environment Interaction in Parkinson's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chuang, Yu-Hsuan; Lill, Christina M; Lee, Pei-Chen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Drinking caffeinated coffee has been reported to provide protection against Parkinson's disease (PD). Caffeine is an adenosine A2A receptor (encoded by the gene ADORA2A) antagonist that increases dopaminergic neurotransmission and Cytochrome P450 1A2 (gene: CYP1A2) metabol......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Drinking caffeinated coffee has been reported to provide protection against Parkinson's disease (PD). Caffeine is an adenosine A2A receptor (encoded by the gene ADORA2A) antagonist that increases dopaminergic neurotransmission and Cytochrome P450 1A2 (gene: CYP1A2...

  7. Parkinson's disease and mitochondrial gene variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andalib, Sasan; Vafaee, Manouchehr Seyedi; Gjedde, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common disorder of the central nervous system in the elderly. The pathogenesis of PD is a complex process, with genetics as an important contributing factor. This factor may stem from mitochondrial gene variations and mutations as well as from nuclear gene variations...

  8. Regulation of ciliary retrograde protein trafficking by the Joubert syndrome proteins ARL13B and INPP5E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Shohei; Katoh, Yohei; Terada, Masaya; Michisaka, Saki; Funabashi, Teruki; Takahashi, Senye; Kontani, Kenji; Nakayama, Kazuhisa

    2017-02-01

    ARL13B (a small GTPase) and INPP5E (a phosphoinositide 5-phosphatase) are ciliary proteins encoded by causative genes of Joubert syndrome. We here showed, by taking advantage of a visible immunoprecipitation assay, that ARL13B interacts with the IFT46 -: IFT56 (IFT56 is also known as TTC26) dimer of the intraflagellar transport (IFT)-B complex, which mediates anterograde ciliary protein trafficking. However, the ciliary localization of ARL13B was found to be independent of its interaction with IFT-B, but dependent on the ciliary-targeting sequence RVEP in its C-terminal region. ARL13B-knockout cells had shorter cilia than control cells and exhibited aberrant localization of ciliary proteins, including INPP5E. In particular, in ARL13B-knockout cells, the IFT-A and IFT-B complexes accumulated at ciliary tips, and GPR161 (a negative regulator of Hedgehog signaling) could not exit cilia in response to stimulation with Smoothened agonist. This abnormal phenotype was rescued by the exogenous expression of wild-type ARL13B, as well as by its mutant defective in the interaction with IFT-B, but not by its mutants defective in INPP5E binding or in ciliary localization. Thus, ARL13B regulates IFT-A-mediated retrograde protein trafficking within cilia through its interaction with INPP5E. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Gene therapy for CNS diseases – Krabbe disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Rafi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This is a brief report of the 19th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy that took place from May 4th through May 7th, 2016 in Washington, DC, USA. While the meeting provided many symposiums, lectures, and scientific sessions this report mainly focuses on one of the sessions on the "Gene Therapy for central nervous system (CNS Diseases" and specifically on the "Gene Therapy for the globoid cell leukodystrophy or Krabbe disease. Two presentations focused on this subject utilizing two animal models of this disease: mice and dog models. Different serotypes of adeno-associate viral vectors (AAV alone or in combination with bone marrow transplantations were used in these research projects. The Meeting of the ASGCT reflected continuous growth in the fields of gene and cell therapy and brighter forecast for efficient treatment options for variety of human diseases.

  10. Ciliary Blood Flow and Aqueous Humor Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, J.W.; Hollingsworth, M.; Rao, R.; Chen, M.; Reitsamer, H.A.

    2010-01-01

    Aqueous humor production is a metabolically active process sustained by the delivery of oxygen and nutrients and removal of metabolic waste by the ciliary circulation. This article describes our investigations into the relationship between ciliary blood flow and aqueous humor production. The results presented indicate that there is a dynamic relationship between ciliary blood flow and aqueous humor production, with production being blood flow independent above a critical level of perfusion, and blood flow dependent below it. The results also show that the plateau portion of the relationship shifts up or down depending on the level of secretory stimulation or inhibition, and that oxygen is one critical factor provided by ciliary blood flow. Also presented is a theoretical model of ocular hydrodynamics incorporating these new findings. PMID:20801226

  11. Arf4 is required for Mammalian development but dispensable for ciliary assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A Follit

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The primary cilium is a sensory organelle, defects in which cause a wide range of human diseases including retinal degeneration, polycystic kidney disease and birth defects. The sensory functions of cilia require specific receptors to be targeted to the ciliary subdomain of the plasma membrane. Arf4 has been proposed to sort cargo destined for the cilium at the Golgi complex and deemed a key regulator of ciliary protein trafficking. In this work, we show that Arf4 binds to the ciliary targeting sequence (CTS of fibrocystin. Knockdown of Arf4 indicates that it is not absolutely required for trafficking of the fibrocystin CTS to cilia as steady-state CTS levels are unaffected. However, we did observe a delay in delivery of newly synthesized CTS from the Golgi complex to the cilium when Arf4 was reduced. Arf4 mutant mice are embryonic lethal and die at mid-gestation shortly after node formation. Nodal cilia appeared normal and functioned properly to break left-right symmetry in Arf4 mutant embryos. At this stage of development Arf4 expression is highest in the visceral endoderm but we did not detect cilia on these cells. In the visceral endoderm, the lack of Arf4 caused defects in cell structure and apical protein localization. This work suggests that while Arf4 is not required for ciliary assembly, it is important for the efficient transport of fibrocystin to cilia, and also plays critical roles in non-ciliary processes.

  12. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 1 reverses alcohol-induced ciliary dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Michael E; Pavlik, Jacqueline A; Sisson, Joseph H; Wyatt, Todd A

    2015-03-15

    Airway mucociliary clearance is a first-line defense of the lung against inhaled particles and debris. Among individuals with alcohol use disorders, there is an increase in lung diseases. We previously identified that prolonged alcohol exposure impairs mucociliary clearance, known as alcohol-induced ciliary dysfunction (AICD). Cilia-localized enzymes, known as the ciliary metabolon, are key to the pathogenesis of AICD. In AICD, cyclic nucleotide-dependent ciliary kinases, which modulate phosphorylation to regulate cilia beat, are desensitized. We hypothesized that alcohol activates cilia-associated protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) activity, driving phosphorylation changes of cilia motility regulatory proteins. To test this hypothesis we identified the effects of prolonged alcohol exposure on phosphatase activity, cilia beat, and kinase responsiveness and cilia-associated phosphorylation targets when stimulated by β-agonist or cAMP. Prolonged alcohol activated PP1 and blocked cAMP-dependent cilia beat and protein kinase A (PKA) responsiveness and phosphorylation of a 29-kDa substrate of PKA. Importantly, prolonged alcohol-induced phosphatase activation was inhibited by the PP1 specific inhibitor, inhibitor-2 (I-2), restoring cAMP-stimulated cilia beat and PKA responsiveness and phosphorylation of the 29-kDa substrate. The I-2 inhibitory effect persisted in tissue, cell, and isolated cilia-organelle models, highlighting the association of ciliary metabolon-localized enzymes to AICD. Prolonged alcohol exposure drives ciliary metabolon-localized PP1 activation. PP1 activation modifies phosphorylation of a 29-kDa protein related to PKA activity. These data reinforce our previous findings that alcohol is acting at the level of the ciliary metabolon to cause ciliary dysfunction and identifies PP1 as a therapeutic target to prevent or reverse AICD.

  13. Disease gene prioritization using network and feature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Bingqing; Agam, Gady; Balasubramanian, Sandhya; Xu, Jinbo; Gilliam, T Conrad; Maltsev, Natalia; Börnigen, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    Identifying high-confidence candidate genes that are causative for disease phenotypes, from the large lists of variations produced by high-throughput genomics, can be both time-consuming and costly. The development of novel computational approaches, utilizing existing biological knowledge for the prioritization of such candidate genes, can improve the efficiency and accuracy of the biomedical data analysis. It can also reduce the cost of such studies by avoiding experimental validations of irrelevant candidates. In this study, we address this challenge by proposing a novel gene prioritization approach that ranks promising candidate genes that are likely to be involved in a disease or phenotype under study. This algorithm is based on the modified conditional random field (CRF) model that simultaneously makes use of both gene annotations and gene interactions, while preserving their original representation. We validated our approach on two independent disease benchmark studies by ranking candidate genes using network and feature information. Our results showed both high area under the curve (AUC) value (0.86), and more importantly high partial AUC (pAUC) value (0.1296), and revealed higher accuracy and precision at the top predictions as compared with other well-performed gene prioritization tools, such as Endeavour (AUC-0.82, pAUC-0.083) and PINTA (AUC-0.76, pAUC-0.066). We were able to detect more target genes (9/18/19/27) on top positions (1/5/10/20) compared to Endeavour (3/11/14/23) and PINTA (6/10/13/18). To demonstrate its usability, we applied our method to a case study for the prediction of molecular mechanisms contributing to intellectual disability and autism. Our approach was able to correctly recover genes related to both disorders and provide suggestions for possible additional candidates based on their rankings and functional annotations.

  14. Gene-environment interaction in autoimmune disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Justine A; Kemp, Andrew S; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise

    2014-03-07

    Autoimmune disease manifests in numerous forms, but as a disease group is relatively common in the population. It is complex in aetiology, with genetic and environmental determinants. The involvement of gene variants in autoimmune disease is well established, and evidence for significant involvement of the environment in various disease forms is growing. These factors may act independently, or they may interact, with the effect of one factor influenced by the presence of another. Identifying combinations of genetic and environmental factors that interact in autoimmune disease has the capacity to more fully explain disease risk profile, and to uncover underlying molecular mechanisms contributing to disease pathogenesis. In turn, such knowledge is likely to contribute significantly to the development of personalised medicine, and targeted preventative approaches. In this review, we consider the current evidence for gene-environment (G-E) interaction in autoimmune disease. Large-scale G-E interaction research efforts, while well-justified, face significant practical and methodological challenges. However, it is clear from the evidence that has already been generated that knowledge on how genes and environment interact at a biological level will be crucial in fully understanding the processes that manifest as autoimmunity.

  15. Ciliary neurotrophic factor receptor regulation of adult forebrain neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy; Batt, Myra K; Cronier, Brigitte A; Jackson, Michele C; Bruno Garza, Jennifer L; Trinh, Dennis S; Mason, Carter O; Spearry, Rachel P; Bhattacharya, Shayon; Robitz, Rachel; Nakafuku, Masato; MacLennan, A John

    2013-01-16

    Appropriately targeted manipulation of endogenous neural stem progenitor (NSP) cells may contribute to therapies for trauma, stroke, and neurodegenerative disease. A prerequisite to such therapies is a better understanding of the mechanisms regulating adult NSP cells in vivo. Indirect data suggest that endogenous ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) receptor signaling may inhibit neuronal differentiation of NSP cells. We challenged subventricular zone (SVZ) cells in vivo with low concentrations of CNTF to anatomically characterize cells containing functional CNTF receptors. We found that type B "stem" cells are highly responsive, whereas type C "transit-amplifying" cells and type A neuroblasts are remarkably unresponsive, as are GFAP(+) astrocytes found outside the SVZ. CNTF was identified in a subset of type B cells that label with acute BrdU administration. Disruption of in vivo CNTF receptor signaling in SVZ NSP cells, with a "floxed" CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα) mouse line and a gene construct driving Cre recombinase (Cre) expression in NSP cells, led to increases in SVZ-associated neuroblasts and new olfactory bulb neurons, as well as a neuron subtype-specific, adult-onset increase in olfactory bulb neuron populations. Adult-onset receptor disruption in SVZ NSP cells with a recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV-Cre) also led to increased neurogenesis. However, the maintenance of type B cell populations was apparently unaffected by the receptor disruption. Together, the data suggest that endogenous CNTF receptor signaling in type B stem cells inhibits adult neurogenesis, and further suggest that the regulation may occur in a neuron subtype-specific manner.

  16. Curing genetic disease with gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David A

    2014-01-01

    Development of viral vectors that allow high efficiency gene transfer into mammalian cells in the early 1980s foresaw the treatment of severe monogenic diseases in humans. The application of gene transfer using viral vectors has been successful in diseases of the blood and immune systems, albeit with several curative studies also showing serious adverse events (SAEs). In children with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), chronic granulomatous disease, and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, these SAEs were caused by inappropriate activation of oncogenes. Subsequent studies have defined the vector sequences responsible for these transforming events. Members of the Transatlantic Gene Therapy Consortium [TAGTC] have collaboratively developed new vectors that have proven safer in preclinical studies and used these vectors in new clinical trials in SCID-X1. These trials have shown evidence of early efficacy and preliminary integration analysis data from the SCID-X1 trial suggest an improved safety profile.

  17. Quantitative optical coherence tomography imaging of intermediate flow defect phenotypes in ciliary physiology and pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Brendan K.; Gamm, Ute A.; Jonas, Stephan; Khokha, Mustafa K.; Choma, Michael A.

    2015-03-01

    Cilia-driven fluid flow is a critical yet poorly understood aspect of pulmonary physiology. Here, we demonstrate that optical coherence tomography-based particle tracking velocimetry can be used to quantify subtle variability in cilia-driven flow performance in Xenopus, an important animal model of ciliary biology. Changes in flow performance were quantified in the setting of normal development, as well as in response to three types of perturbations: mechanical (increased fluid viscosity), pharmacological (disrupted serotonin signaling), and genetic (diminished ciliary motor protein expression). Of note, we demonstrate decreased flow secondary to gene knockdown of kif3a, a protein involved in ciliogenesis, as well as a dose-response decrease in flow secondary to knockdown of dnah9, an important ciliary motor protein.

  18. Founder mutation in RSPH4A identified in patients of Hispanic descent with Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, M. Leigh Anne; Leigh, Margaret W.; Davis, Stephanie D.; Armstrong, Michael C.; Carson, Johnny L.; Hazucha, Milan; Dell, Sharon D.; Eriksson, Maria; Collins, Francis S.; Knowles, Michael R.; Zariwala, Maimoona A.

    2013-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a rare, autosomal recessive, genetically heterogeneous disorder characterized by ciliary dysfunction resulting in chronic oto-sino-pulmonary disease, respiratory distress in term neonates, laterality (situs) defects, and bronchiectasis. Diagnosis has traditionally relied on ciliary ultrastructural abnormalities seen by electron microscopy. Mutations in radial spoke head proteins occur in PCD patients with central apparatus defects. Advances in genetic testing have been crucial in addressing the diagnostic challenge. Here, we describe a novel splice-site mutation (c.921+3_6delAAGT) in RSPH4A, which leads to a premature translation termination signal in nine subjects with PCD (seven families). Loss-of-function was confirmed with quantitative ciliary ultrastructural analysis, measurement of ciliary beat frequency and waveform, and transcript analysis. All nine individuals carrying c.921+3_6delAAGT splice-site mutation in RSPH4A were Hispanic with ancestry tracing to Puerto Rico. This mutation is a founder mutation and a common cause of PCD without situs abnormalities in patients of Puerto Rican descent. PMID:23798057

  19. Gene-environment interaction in atopic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kahr, Niklas; Naeser, Vibeke; Stensballe, Lone Graff

    2015-01-01

    stratified by exposure status showed no significant change in the heritability of asthma according to the identified risk factors. CONCLUSION: In this population-based study of children, there was no evidence of genetic effect modification of atopic diseases by several identified early-life risk factors....... The causal relationship between these risk factors and atopic diseases may therefore be mediated via mechanisms different from gene-environment interaction....

  20. Ciliary Body Tumour Occurring in a Nigerian - A case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ciliary body mass could be a ciliary melanoma (ciliary body lesion being rarer than a choroidal mass) but other benign differential diagnoses must be borne in mind. Enucleation and histological assessment of the specimen will give the definitive diagnosis. Difficulties with patient acceptance of enucleating a non seeing ...

  1. Disease gene identification strategies for exome sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilissen, C.; Hoischen, A.; Brunner, H.G.; Veltman, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Next generation sequencing can be used to search for Mendelian disease genes in an unbiased manner by sequencing the entire protein-coding sequence, known as the exome, or even the entire human genome. Identifying the pathogenic mutation amongst thousands to millions of genomic variants is a major

  2. Quantifying differential gene connectivity between disease states for objective identification of disease-relevant genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey Vincent J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Network modeling of whole transcriptome expression data enables characterization of complex epistatic (gene-gene interactions that underlie cellular functions. Though numerous methods have been proposed and successfully implemented to develop these networks, there are no formal methods for comparing differences in network connectivity patterns as a function of phenotypic trait. Results Here we describe a novel approach for quantifying the differences in gene-gene connectivity patterns across disease states based on Graphical Gaussian Models (GGMs. We compare the posterior probabilities of connectivity for each gene pair across two disease states, expressed as a posterior odds-ratio (postOR for each pair, which can be used to identify network components most relevant to disease status. The method can also be generalized to model differential gene connectivity patterns within previously defined gene sets, gene networks and pathways. We demonstrate that the GGM method reliably detects differences in network connectivity patterns in datasets of varying sample size. Applying this method to two independent breast cancer expression data sets, we identified numerous reproducible differences in network connectivity across histological grades of breast cancer, including several published gene sets and pathways. Most notably, our model identified two gene hubs (MMP12 and CXCL13 that each exhibited differential connectivity to more than 30 transcripts in both datasets. Both genes have been previously implicated in breast cancer pathobiology, but themselves are not differentially expressed by histologic grade in either dataset, and would thus have not been identified using traditional differential gene expression testing approaches. In addition, 16 curated gene sets demonstrated significant differential connectivity in both data sets, including the matrix metalloproteinases, PPAR alpha sequence targets, and the PUFA synthesis pathway

  3. Cyanide levels found in infected cystic fibrosis sputum inhibit airway ciliary function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Chandrika; Shoemark, Amelia; Chan, Mario; Ollosson, Sarah; Dixon, Mellissa; Hogg, Claire; Alton, Eric W F W; Davies, Jane C; Williams, Huw D

    2014-11-01

    We have previously reported cyanide at concentrations of up to 150 μM in the sputum of cystic fibrosis patients infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and a negative correlation with lung function. Our aim was to investigate possible mechanisms for this association, focusing on the effect of pathophysiologically relevant cyanide levels on human respiratory cell function. Ciliary beat frequency measurements were performed on nasal brushings and nasal air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures obtained from healthy volunteers and cystic fibrosis patients. Potassium cyanide decreased ciliary beat frequency in healthy nasal brushings (n = 6) after 60 min (150 μM: 47% fall, pcyanide as a key component inhibiting the ciliary beat frequency. If cyanide production similarly impairs mucocilliary clearance in vivo, it could explain the link with increased disease severity observed in cystic fibrosis patients with detectable cyanide in their airway. ©ERS 2014.

  4. Induction of Functional 3D Ciliary Epithelium-Like Structure From Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Hirofumi; Suzuma, Kiyoshi; Kaneko, Jun; Mandai, Michiko; Kitaoka, Takashi; Takahashi, Masayo

    2016-01-01

    To generate ciliary epithelium (CE) from mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Recently, a protocol for self-organizing optic cup morphogenesis in three-dimensional culture was reported, and it was suggested that ocular tissue derived from neural ectoderm could be differentiated. We demonstrated that a CE-like double-layered structure could be induced in simple culture by using a modified Eiraku differentiation protocol. Differentiation of a CE-like double-layered structure could be promoted by glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK-3β) inhibitor. Connexin43 and aquaporin1 were expressed in both thin layers, and induced CE-like cells expressed ciliary marker genes, such as cyclinD2, zic1, tgfb2, aldh1a3, wfdc1, otx1, BMP4, and BMP7. Increases in cytoplasmic and nuclear β-catenin in aggregates of the CE-like double-layered structure were confirmed by Western blot analysis. In addition, tankyrase inhibitor prevented the induction of the CE-like double-layered structure by GSK-3β inhibitor. Dye movement from pigmented cells to nonpigmented cells in the mouse iPS cell-derived CE-like structure was observed in a fluid movement experiment, consistent with the physiological function of CE in vivo. We could differentiate CE from mouse iPS cells in the present study. In the future, we hope that this CE-like complex will become useful as a graft for transplantation therapy in pathologic ocular hypotension due to CE dysfunction, and as a screening tool for the development of drugs for diseases associated with CE function.

  5. A longitudinal evaluation of hearing and ventilation tube insertion in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Tobias Nicolai; Alanin, Mikkel Christian; von Buchwald, Christian

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an autosomal recessive genetic disease, which primarily manifests with oto-sino-pulmonary symptoms. Otitis media with effusion (OME) is common from early childhood. The existing literature on OME management in PCD is conflicting. The goals of the ...

  6. Surfactant gene polymorphisms and interstitial lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelidis Panagiotis

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins, which is present in the alveolar lining fluid and is essential for normal lung function. Alterations in surfactant composition have been reported in several interstitial lung diseases (ILDs. Furthermore, a mutation in the surfactant protein C gene that results in complete absence of the protein has been shown to be associated with familial ILD. The role of surfactant in lung disease is therefore drawing increasing attention following the elucidation of the genetic basis underlying its surface expression and the proof of surfactant abnormalities in ILD.

  7. Automatic analysis of ciliary beat frequency using optical flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figl, Michael; Lechner, Manuel; Werther, Tobias; Horak, Fritz; Hummel, Johann; Birkfellner, Wolfgang

    2012-02-01

    Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) can be a useful parameter for diagnosis of several diseases, as e.g. primary ciliary dyskinesia. (PCD). CBF computation is usually done using manual evaluation of high speed video sequences, a tedious, observer dependent, and not very accurate procedure. We used the OpenCV's pyramidal implementation of the Lukas-Kanade algorithm for optical flow computation and applied this to certain objects to follow the movements. The objects were chosen by their contrast applying the corner detection by Shi and Tomasi. Discrimination between background/noise and cilia by a frequency histogram allowed to compute the CBF. Frequency analysis was done using the Fourier transform in matlab. The correct number of Fourier summands was found by the slope in an approximation curve. The method showed to be usable to distinguish between healthy and diseased samples. However there remain difficulties in automatically identifying the cilia, and also in finding enough high contrast cilia in the image. Furthermore the some of the higher contrast cilia are lost (and sometimes found) by the method, an easy way to distinguish the correct sub-path of a point's path have yet to be found in the case where the slope methods doesn't work.

  8. Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarbell, John M; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

    2014-01-01

    This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flow-induced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial) cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid me chanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs.

  9. Primary ciliary dyskinesia: mechanisms and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damseh N

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Nadirah Damseh,1 Nada Quercia,1,2 Nisreen Rumman,3 Sharon D Dell,4 Raymond H Kim5 1Division of Clinical and Metabolic Genetics, 2Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Pediatric Department, Makassed Hospital, Jerusalem, Palestine; 4Division of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Child Health Evaluative Sciences, Hospital for Sick Children, 5Fred A Litwin Family Centre in Genetic Medicine, University Health Network and Mount Sinai Hospital, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Primary ciliary dyskinesia is a genetically heterogeneous disorder of motile cilia that is predominantly inherited in an autosomal-recessive fashion. It is associated with abnormal ciliary structure and/or function leading to chronic upper and lower respiratory tract infections, male infertility, and situs inversus. The estimated prevalence of primary ciliary dyskinesia is approximately one in 10,000–40,000 live births. Diagnosis depends on clinical presentation, nasal nitric oxide, high-speed video-microscopy analysis, transmission electron microscopy, genetic testing, and immunofluorescence. Here, we review its clinical features, diagnostic methods, molecular basis, and available therapies. Keywords: genetic testing, Kartagener’s syndrome, primary ciliary dyskinesia

  10. Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Progress Towards a Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A van Heel

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of ulcerative colitis (UC and Crohn’s disease (CD is still unknown, but the importance of genetic susceptibility has been clearly shown by epidemiological data from family and twin studies. Linkage studies have identified two susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD on chromosomes 12 and 16. Importantly, these linkages have been replicated by independent investigators, and studies of positional candidates within these regions continue, together with fine mapping strategies. Regions of ’suggestive’ linkage on chromosomes 1, 3, 4, 6, 7, 10, 22 and X have also been reported in individual studies. Other important candidate genes investigated include the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, MUC3 and genes of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA system. The apparently conflicting data in different studies from around the world may be explained by ethnic differences, case mix and genetic heterogeneity. Replicated class II HLA associations include HLA DRB1*0103 and DR2 (DRB1*1502, involved in UC susceptibility, and HLA DRB1*03 and DR4 as resistance alleles for CD and UC respectively. Animal studies have provided insights from targeted mutations and quantitative trait locus analysis. The goals of continuing research include narrowing the regions of linkages and analysis of candidate genes, and possibly the application of newly developed methods using single nucleotide polymorphisms. Advances in IBD genetics hold the potential to provide knowledge about the disease pathogenesis at the molecular level, with ensuing benefits for clinical practice.

  11. Acute versus chronic loss of mammalian Azi1/Cep131 results in distinct ciliary phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma A Hall

    Full Text Available Defects in cilium and centrosome function result in a spectrum of clinically-related disorders, known as ciliopathies. However, the complex molecular composition of these structures confounds functional dissection of what any individual gene product is doing under normal and disease conditions. As part of an siRNA screen for genes involved in mammalian ciliogenesis, we and others have identified the conserved centrosomal protein Azi1/Cep131 as required for cilia formation, supporting previous Danio rerio and Drosophila melanogaster mutant studies. Acute loss of Azi1 by knock-down in mouse fibroblasts leads to a robust reduction in ciliogenesis, which we rescue by expressing siRNA-resistant Azi1-GFP. Localisation studies show Azi1 localises to centriolar satellites, and traffics along microtubules becoming enriched around the basal body. Azi1 also localises to the transition zone, a structure important for regulating traffic into the ciliary compartment. To study the requirement of Azi1 during development and tissue homeostasis, Azi1 null mice were generated (Azi1(Gt/Gt. Surprisingly, Azi1(Gt/Gt MEFs have no discernible ciliary phenotype and moreover are resistant to Azi1 siRNA knock-down, demonstrating that a compensation mechanism exists to allow ciliogenesis to proceed despite the lack of Azi1. Cilia throughout Azi1 null mice are functionally normal, as embryonic patterning and adult homeostasis are grossly unaffected. However, in the highly specialised sperm flagella, the loss of Azi1 is not compensated, leading to striking microtubule-based trafficking defects in both the manchette and the flagella, resulting in male infertility. Our analysis of Azi1 knock-down (acute loss versus gene deletion (chronic loss suggests that Azi1 plays a conserved, but non-essential trafficking role in ciliogenesis. Importantly, our in vivo analysis reveals Azi1 mediates novel trafficking functions necessary for flagellogenesis. Our study highlights the

  12. Gene regulatory networks elucidating huanglongbing disease mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Martinelli

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing was exploited to gain deeper insight into the response to infection by Candidatus liberibacter asiaticus (CaLas, especially the immune disregulation and metabolic dysfunction caused by source-sink disruption. Previous fruit transcriptome data were compared with additional RNA-Seq data in three tissues: immature fruit, and young and mature leaves. Four categories of orchard trees were studied: symptomatic, asymptomatic, apparently healthy, and healthy. Principal component analysis found distinct expression patterns between immature and mature fruits and leaf samples for all four categories of trees. A predicted protein - protein interaction network identified HLB-regulated genes for sugar transporters playing key roles in the overall plant responses. Gene set and pathway enrichment analyses highlight the role of sucrose and starch metabolism in disease symptom development in all tissues. HLB-regulated genes (glucose-phosphate-transporter, invertase, starch-related genes would likely determine the source-sink relationship disruption. In infected leaves, transcriptomic changes were observed for light reactions genes (downregulation, sucrose metabolism (upregulation, and starch biosynthesis (upregulation. In parallel, symptomatic fruits over-expressed genes involved in photosynthesis, sucrose and raffinose metabolism, and downregulated starch biosynthesis. We visualized gene networks between tissues inducing a source-sink shift. CaLas alters the hormone crosstalk, resulting in weak and ineffective tissue-specific plant immune responses necessary for bacterial clearance. Accordingly, expression of WRKYs (including WRKY70 was higher in fruits than in leaves. Systemic acquired responses were inadequately activated in young leaves, generally considered the sites where most new infections occur.

  13. OFD1, as a Ciliary Protein, Exhibits Neuroprotective Function in Photoreceptor Degeneration Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wang

    Full Text Available Ofd1 is a newly identified causative gene for Retinitis pigmentosa (RP, a photoreceptor degenerative disease. This study aimed to examine Ofd1 localization in retina and further to investigate its function in photoreceptor degeneration models. Ofd1 localization in rat retina was examined using immunofluorescence. N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU-induced rats and Royal College of Surgeons (RCS rats were used as photoreceptor degeneration models. The expression pattern of Ofd1, other ciliary associated genes and Wnt signaling pathway genes were examined in rat models. Furthermore, pEGFP-Ofd1-CDS and pSUPER-Ofd1-shRNA were constructed to overexpress and knockdown the expression level in 661W and R28 cells. MNU was also used to induce cell death. Cilia formation was observed using immunocytochemistry (ICC. Reactive oxygen species (ROS were detected using the 2', 7'-Dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA assay. Apoptosis genes expression was examined using qRT-PCR, Western blotting and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. Ofd1 localized to outer segments of rat retina photoreceptors. Ofd1 and other ciliary proteins expression levels increased from the 1st and 4th postnatal weeks and decreased until the 6th week in the RCS rats, while their expression consistently decreased from the 1st and 7th day in the MNU rats. Moreover, Wnt signaling pathway proteins expression was significantly up-regulated in both rat models. Knockdown of Ofd1 expression resulted in a smaller population, shorter length of cell cilia, and lower cell viability. Ofd1 overexpression partially attenuated MNU toxic effects by reducing ROS levels and mitigating apoptosis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating Ofd1 localization and its function in rat retina and in retinal degeneration rat models. Ofd1 plays a role in controlling photoreceptor cilium length and number. Importantly, it demonstrates a neuroprotective function by protecting the photoreceptor

  14. Defining the Role of Essential Genes in Human Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, David L.; Hentges, Kathryn E.

    2011-01-01

    A greater understanding of the causes of human disease can come from identifying characteristics that are specific to disease genes. However, a full understanding of the contribution of essential genes to human disease is lacking, due to the premise that these genes tend to cause developmental abnormalities rather than adult disease. We tested the hypothesis that human orthologs of mouse essential genes are associated with a variety of human diseases, rather than only those related to miscarriage and birth defects. We segregated human disease genes according to whether the knockout phenotype of their mouse ortholog was lethal or viable, defining those with orthologs producing lethal knockouts as essential disease genes. We show that the human orthologs of mouse essential genes are associated with a wide spectrum of diseases affecting diverse physiological systems. Notably, human disease genes with essential mouse orthologs are over-represented among disease genes associated with cancer, suggesting links between adult cellular abnormalities and developmental functions. The proteins encoded by essential genes are highly connected in protein-protein interaction networks, which we find correlates with an over-representation of nuclear proteins amongst essential disease genes. Disease genes associated with essential orthologs also are more likely than those with non-essential orthologs to contribute to disease through an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern, suggesting that these diseases may actually result from semi-dominant mutant alleles. Overall, we have described attributes found in disease genes according to the essentiality status of their mouse orthologs. These findings demonstrate that disease genes do occupy highly connected positions in protein-protein interaction networks, and that due to the complexity of disease-associated alleles, essential genes cannot be ignored as candidates for causing diverse human diseases. PMID:22096564

  15. Diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia: summary of the ERS Task Force report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Jane S.

    2017-01-01

    Key points Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a genetically and clinically heterogeneous disease characterised by abnormal motile ciliary function. There is no “gold standard” diagnostic test for PCD. The European Respiratory Society (ERS) Task Force Guidelines for diagnosing PCD recommend that patients should be referred for diagnostic testing if they have several of the following features: persistent wet cough; situs anomalies; congenital cardiac defects; persistent rhinitis; chronic middle ear disease with or without hearing loss; or a history, in term infants, of neonatal upper and lower respiratory symptoms or neonatal intensive care admission. The ERS Task Force recommends that patients should be investigated in a specialist PCD centre with access to a range of complementary tests: nasal nitric oxide, high-speed video microscopy analysis and transmission electron microscopy. Additional tests including immunofluorescence labelling of ciliary proteins and genetic testing may also help determine the diagnosis. Educational aims This article is intended for primary and secondary care physicians interested in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD), i.e. those who identify patients for testing, and those involved in diagnosing and managing PCD patients. It aims: to inform readers about the new European Respiratory Society Task Force Guidelines for diagnosing patients with PCDto enable primary and secondary care physicians to: identify patients who need diagnostic testing; understand the diagnostic tests that their patients will undergo, the results of the tests and their limitations; and ensure that appropriate care is subsequently delivered. PMID:28894478

  16. Biomedical Information Extraction: Mining Disease Associated Genes from Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Disease associated gene discovery is a critical step to realize the future of personalized medicine. However empirical and clinical validation of disease associated genes are time consuming and expensive. In silico discovery of disease associated genes from literature is therefore becoming the first essential step for biomarker discovery to…

  17. Personalized gene silencing therapeutics for Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, C; Skotte, N H; Southwell, A L; Hayden, M R

    2014-07-01

    Gene silencing offers a novel therapeutic strategy for dominant genetic disorders. In specific diseases, selective silencing of only one copy of a gene may be advantageous over non-selective silencing of both copies. Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by an expanded CAG trinucleotide repeat in the Huntingtin gene (HTT). Silencing both expanded and normal copies of HTT may be therapeutically beneficial, but preservation of normal HTT expression is preferred. Allele-specific methods can selectively silence the mutant HTT transcript by targeting either the expanded CAG repeat or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in linkage disequilibrium with the expansion. Both approaches require personalized treatment strategies based on patient genotypes. We compare the prospect of safe treatment of HD by CAG- and SNP-specific silencing approaches and review HD population genetics used to guide target identification in the patient population. Clinical implementation of allele-specific HTT silencing faces challenges common to personalized genetic medicine, requiring novel solutions from clinical scientists and regulatory authorities. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Pheno-morphological variation, genetic diversity and population structure of Tunisian Echinus Medic (Medicago ciliaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabri, C; Sbei, H; Zitouna, N; Trifi-Farah, N; Zoghlami Khelil, A

    2016-08-26

    Medicago ciliaris L., considered as a valuable genetic resource, is a good candidate for the improvement of marginal or degraded lands with low fertility or high salinity. In this study, the pheno-morphological and genetic diversity were investigated in 14 Tunisian populations of M. ciliaris for the first time. Fourteen morphological traits showed significant differentiation between populations and high levels of diversity. Two amplified fragment length polymorphism primer combinations (E-AGC/M-CAA; E-AAG/M-CTG) were analyzed using an automated capillary electrophoresis system. A total of 528 loci were generated, of which 54% were polymorphic. Allelic polymorphism ranged from 0.02 to 0.5. Significant variation between populations was found for gene diversity, mean number of alleles per locus and Shannon index for which mean values were 0.17, 0.26, and 1.57, respectively. Analysis of molecular variance revealed a high rate of genetic variation within populations. Principal component analysis and genotypic clustering discriminated M. ciliaris populations according to their geographical origin. M. ciliaris clustered into three main groups. The first group was associated with high inland and cold areas, the second was defined by low areas with mild winters while the third described low coastal areas. Similarity of morphological and molecular results indicated that either markers could be used for the study of genetic diversity in this species.

  19. Predicting disease-related genes using integrated biomedical networks

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Jiajie; Bai, Kun; Shang, Xuequn; Wang, Guohua; Xue, Hansheng; Jin, Shuilin; Cheng, Liang; Wang, Yadong; Chen, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Background Identifying the genes associated to human diseases is crucial for disease diagnosis and drug design. Computational approaches, esp. the network-based approaches, have been recently developed to identify disease-related genes effectively from the existing biomedical networks. Meanwhile, the advance in biotechnology enables researchers to produce multi-omics data, enriching our understanding on human diseases, and revealing the complex relationships between genes and diseases. Howeve...

  20. Mapping gene associations in human mitochondria using clinical disease phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curt Scharfe

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear genes encode most mitochondrial proteins, and their mutations cause diverse and debilitating clinical disorders. To date, 1,200 of these mitochondrial genes have been recorded, while no standardized catalog exists of the associated clinical phenotypes. Such a catalog would be useful to develop methods to analyze human phenotypic data, to determine genotype-phenotype relations among many genes and diseases, and to support the clinical diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders. Here we establish a clinical phenotype catalog of 174 mitochondrial disease genes and study associations of diseases and genes. Phenotypic features such as clinical signs and symptoms were manually annotated from full-text medical articles and classified based on the hierarchical MeSH ontology. This classification of phenotypic features of each gene allowed for the comparison of diseases between different genes. In turn, we were then able to measure the phenotypic associations of disease genes for which we calculated a quantitative value that is based on their shared phenotypic features. The results showed that genes sharing more similar phenotypes have a stronger tendency for functional interactions, proving the usefulness of phenotype similarity values in disease gene network analysis. We then constructed a functional network of mitochondrial genes and discovered a higher connectivity for non-disease than for disease genes, and a tendency of disease genes to interact with each other. Utilizing these differences, we propose 168 candidate genes that resemble the characteristic interaction patterns of mitochondrial disease genes. Through their network associations, the candidates are further prioritized for the study of specific disorders such as optic neuropathies and Parkinson disease. Most mitochondrial disease phenotypes involve several clinical categories including neurologic, metabolic, and gastrointestinal disorders, which might indicate the effects of gene defects

  1. Prioritization of Disease Susceptibility Genes Using LSM/SVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Lejun; Yang, Ronggen; Yan, Qin; Sun, Xiao

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the role of genetics in diseases is one of the most important tasks in the postgenome era. It is generally too expensive and time consuming to perform experimental validation for all candidate genes related to disease. Computational methods play important roles for prioritizing these candidates. Herein, we propose an approach to prioritize disease genes using latent semantic mapping based on singular value decomposition. Our hypothesis is that similar functional genes are likely to cause similar diseases. Measuring the functional similarity between known disease susceptibility genes and unknown genes is to predict new disease susceptibility genes. Taking autism as an instance, the analysis results of the top ten genes prioritized demonstrate they might be autism susceptibility genes, which also indicates our approach could discover new disease susceptibility genes. The novel approach of disease gene prioritization could discover new disease susceptibility genes, and latent disease-gene relations. The prioritized results could also support the interpretive diversity and experimental views as computational evidence for disease researchers.

  2. Activation of the ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) signalling pathway in cortical neurons of multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Ranjan; McDonough, Jennifer; Chang, Ansi; Swamy, Lakshman; Siu, Alan; Kidd, Grahame J; Rudick, Richard; Mirnics, Karoly; Trapp, Bruce D

    2007-10-01

    Neuronal and axonal degeneration results in irreversible neurological disability in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. A number of adaptive or neuroprotective mechanisms are thought to repress neurodegeneration and neurological disability in MS patients. To investigate possible neuroprotective pathways in the cerebral cortex of MS patients, we compared gene transcripts in cortices of six control and six MS patients. Out of 67 transcripts increased in MS cortex nine were related to the signalling mediated by the neurotrophin ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF). Therefore, we quantified and localized transcriptional (RT-PCR, in situ hybridization) and translational (western, immunohistochemistry) products of CNTF-related genes. CNTF-receptor complex members, CNTFRalpha, LIFRbeta and GP130, were increased in MS cortical neurons. CNTF was increased and also expressed by neurons. Phosphorylated STAT3 and the anti-apoptotic molecule, Bcl2, known down stream products of CNTF signalling were also increased in MS cortical neurons. We hypothesize that in response to the chronic insults or stress of the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, cortical neurons up regulate a CNTF-mediated neuroprotective signalling pathway. Induction of CNTF signalling and the anti-apoptotic molecule, Bcl2, thus represents a compensatory response to disease pathogenesis and a potential therapeutic target in MS patients.

  3. Recruitment of β-Arrestin into Neuronal Cilia Modulates Somatostatin Receptor Subtype 3 Ciliary Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jill A; Schmid, Cullen L; Bley, Elizabeth; Monsma, Paula C; Brown, Anthony; Bohn, Laura M; Mykytyn, Kirk

    2016-01-01

    Primary cilia are essential sensory and signaling organelles present on nearly every mammalian cell type. Defects in primary cilia underlie a class of human diseases collectively termed ciliopathies. Primary cilia are restricted subcellular compartments, and specialized mechanisms coordinate the localization of proteins to cilia. Moreover, trafficking of proteins into and out of cilia is required for proper ciliary function, and this process is disrupted in ciliopathies. The somatostatin receptor subtype 3 (Sstr3) is selectively targeted to primary cilia on neurons in the mammalian brain and is implicated in learning and memory. Here, we show that Sstr3 localization to cilia is dynamic and decreases in response to somatostatin treatment. We further show that somatostatin treatment stimulates β-arrestin recruitment into Sstr3-positive cilia and this recruitment can be blocked by mutations in Sstr3 that impact agonist binding or phosphorylation. Importantly, somatostatin treatment fails to decrease Sstr3 ciliary localization in neurons lacking β-arrestin 2. Together, our results implicate β-arrestin in the modulation of Sstr3 ciliary localization and further suggest a role for β-arrestin in the mediation of Sstr3 ciliary signaling. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Expression Sensitivity Analysis of Human Disease Related Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Xiao Ma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have shown its revolutionary power in seeking the influenced loci on complex diseases genetically. Thousands of replicated loci for common traits are helpful in diseases risk assessment. However it is still difficult to elucidate the variations in these loci that directly cause susceptibility to diseases by disrupting the expression or function of a protein currently. Results. We evaluate the expression features of disease related genes and find that different diseases related genes show different expression perturbation sensitivities in various conditions. It is worth noting that the expression of some robust disease-genes doesn’t show significant change in their corresponding diseases, these genes might be easily ignored in the expression profile analysis. Conclusion. Gene ontology enrichment analysis indicates that robust disease-genes execute essential function in comparison with sensitive disease-genes. The diseases associated with robust genes seem to be relatively lethal like cancer and aging. On the other hand, the diseases associated with sensitive genes are apparently nonlethal like psych and chemical dependency diseases.

  5. Gene Sequencing May Reveal Risks for Rare Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166875.html Gene Sequencing May Reveal Risks for Rare Diseases But ... this study, the researchers analyzed nearly 5,000 genes associated with rare genetic conditions in 50 healthy ...

  6. Evolutionary signatures amongst disease genes permit novel methods for gene prioritization and construction of informative gene-based networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolan Priedigkeit

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Genes involved in the same function tend to have similar evolutionary histories, in that their rates of evolution covary over time. This coevolutionary signature, termed Evolutionary Rate Covariation (ERC, is calculated using only gene sequences from a set of closely related species and has demonstrated potential as a computational tool for inferring functional relationships between genes. To further define applications of ERC, we first established that roughly 55% of genetic diseases posses an ERC signature between their contributing genes. At a false discovery rate of 5% we report 40 such diseases including cancers, developmental disorders and mitochondrial diseases. Given these coevolutionary signatures between disease genes, we then assessed ERC's ability to prioritize known disease genes out of a list of unrelated candidates. We found that in the presence of an ERC signature, the true disease gene is effectively prioritized to the top 6% of candidates on average. We then apply this strategy to a melanoma-associated region on chromosome 1 and identify MCL1 as a potential causative gene. Furthermore, to gain global insight into disease mechanisms, we used ERC to predict molecular connections between 310 nominally distinct diseases. The resulting "disease map" network associates several diseases with related pathogenic mechanisms and unveils many novel relationships between clinically distinct diseases, such as between Hirschsprung's disease and melanoma. Taken together, these results demonstrate the utility of molecular evolution as a gene discovery platform and show that evolutionary signatures can be used to build informative gene-based networks.

  7. Long-term outcome of Tunisian children with primary ciliary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Theegarten D, Ebsen M. Ultrastructural pathology of primary ciliary dyskinesia: report about 125 cases in Ger- many. Diagn Pathol. 2011;24:115. 21. Davis SD, Ferkol TW, Rosenfeld M, et al. Clinical fea- tures of childhood primary ciliary dyskinesia by genotype and ultrastructural phenotype. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2015 ...

  8. The effect of phenylephrine on the ciliary muscle and accommodation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richdale, Kathryn; Bailey, Melissa D; Sinnott, Loraine T; Kao, Chiu-Yen; Zadnik, Karla; Bullimore, Mark A

    2012-10-01

    To objectively measure changes in the human ciliary muscle dimensions in vivo after instillation of topical phenylephrine, a mydriatic and vasodilating agent. A cross-sectional study of 25 healthy young adults was conducted. Measurements of pupil size, accommodation, and ciliary muscle thickness were made both before and 30 min after instillation of 1% proparacaine and 2.5% phenylephrine. Accommodation was measured in three ways: subjectively using a push-up technique and Royal Air Force (RAF) rule, and objectively using both the Grand Seiko autorefractor and PowerRefractor. Images of the temporal ciliary muscle were acquired using the Visante Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomographer (OCT). Ciliary muscle images were objectively analyzed using a computer-based segmentation technique. Amplitude of accommodation using the push-up test was reduced by about 1 D with phenylephrine (p 0.30). There was statistically significant thickening of the anterior region and thinning of the posterior region of the ciliary muscle with accommodation (p affect either baseline ciliary muscle thickness or the accommodative contraction of the muscle (p > 0.09). Low-dose phenylephrine does not affect ciliary muscle dimensions, ciliary muscle contractility, or accommodative response to a 4 D near target.

  9. The centriolar satellite protein AZI1 interacts with BBS4 and regulates ciliary trafficking of the BBSome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xitiz Chamling

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS is a well-known ciliopathy with mutations reported in 18 different genes. Most of the protein products of the BBS genes localize at or near the primary cilium and the centrosome. Near the centrosome, BBS proteins interact with centriolar satellite proteins, and the BBSome (a complex of seven BBS proteins is believed to play a role in transporting ciliary membrane proteins. However, the precise mechanism by which BBSome ciliary trafficking activity is regulated is not fully understood. Here, we show that a centriolar satellite protein, AZI1 (also known as CEP131, interacts with the BBSome and regulates BBSome ciliary trafficking activity. Furthermore, we show that AZI1 interacts with the BBSome through BBS4. AZI1 is not involved in BBSome assembly, but accumulation of the BBSome in cilia is enhanced upon AZI1 depletion. Under conditions in which the BBSome does not normally enter cilia, such as in BBS3 or BBS5 depleted cells, knock down of AZI1 with siRNA restores BBSome trafficking to cilia. Finally, we show that azi1 knockdown in zebrafish embryos results in typical BBS phenotypes including Kupffer's vesicle abnormalities and melanosome transport delay. These findings associate AZI1 with the BBS pathway. Our findings provide further insight into the regulation of BBSome ciliary trafficking and identify AZI1 as a novel BBS candidate gene.

  10. Severe impaired respiratory ciliary function in Wegener granulomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, S; Gustke, H; Lamprecht, P; Gross, W L; Schumacher, U; Ambrosch, P; Laudien, M

    2009-06-01

    The pathogenesis of granulomatous inflammation in the respiratory tract and autoimmunity in Wegener granulomatosis (WG) are poorly understood. Since mucociliar clearance represents the first major line of defence in the respiratory tract and its breakdown facilitates chronic inflammation, we investigated ciliary beat frequency (CBF) in WG. Nasal epithelial cells were obtained from 30 patients with WG with involvement of the upper respiratory tract, 12 patients with other inflammatory rheumatic disease and 10 healthy controls. CBF was measured at 5 and 24 h after collection. were correlated with clinical data. Results: CBF was significantly reduced in WG compared to disease and healthy controls after 5 and 24 h. In WG, CBF almost stagnated after 24 h. Reduction of CBF correlated with the cumulative number of immunosuppressive agents in WG, but not in disease controls. No correlation was found between CBF impairment and cyclophosphamide levels, disease extent, disease activity, disease duration, serological and microbiological findings, or inflammation markers. CBF is severely impaired in WG, potentially influenced by immunosuppressive treatment. To what extent CBF impairment and subsequent barrier dysfunction are caused by other factors still has to be elucidated. Supportive measures to improve mucociliary clearance should be discussed in patients with WG.

  11. Artificial ciliary bundles with nano fiber tip links

    CERN Document Server

    Asadnia, Mohsen; Miao, Jianmin; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Mechanosensory ciliary bundles in fishes are the inspiration for carefully engineered artificial flow sensors. We report the development of a new class of ultrasensitive MEMS flow sensors that mimic the intricate morphology of the ciliary bundles, including the stereocilia, tip links, and the cupula, and thereby achieve threshold detection limits that match the biological example. An artificial ciliary bundle is achieved by fabricating closely-spaced arrays of polymer micro-pillars with gradiating heights. Tip links that form the fundamental sensing elements are realized through electrospinning aligned PVDF piezoelectric nano-fibers that link the distal tips of the polymer cilia. An optimized synthesis of hyaluronic acid-methacrylic anhydride hydrogel that results in properties close to the biological cupula, together with drop-casting method are used to form the artificial cupula that encapsulates the ciliary bundle. In testing, fluid drag force causes the ciliary bundle to slide, stretching the flexible nan...

  12. Cri du chat syndrome and primary ciliary dyskinesia: a common genetic cause on chromosome 5p.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Adam J; Weck, Karen E; Chao, Kay C; Rosenfeld, Margaret; Nygren, Anders O H; Knowles, Michael R; Leigh, Margaret W; Zariwala, Maimoona A

    2014-10-01

    Cri du chat syndrome (CdCS) and primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) are rare diseases that present with frequent respiratory symptoms. PCD can be caused by hemizygous DNAH5 mutation in combination with a 5p segmental deletion attributable to CdCS on the opposite chromosome. Chronic oto-sino-pulmonary symptoms or organ laterality defects in CdCS should prompt an evaluation for PCD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. On ciliary pumping and sieving in bryozoans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Poul Scheel; Riisgård, H. U.

    2002-01-01

    Based on video-microscope observations of trajectories of particles in the feeding currents of individual isolated bryozoans Bowerbankia imbricata, Flustrellidra hispida and Electra pilosa the velocity fields above and in the lophophore have been determined. The flow into the lophophore, which...... in the absence of a particle. This is hypothesised to stimulate the sensing mechanism triggering observed flicks. The energy cost of pumping is estimated at 1 to 4% of the metabolic power of a "standard" zooid. Keywords: Feeding in bryozoans; Flow in lophophore; Ciliary sieving; Particle retention; Bryozoan...

  14. Machine Learning-Based Gene Prioritization Identifies Novel Candidate Risk Genes for Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakov, Ofer; Dotan, Iris; Ben-Shachar, Shay

    2017-09-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are chronic inflammatory disorders, associated with genetic, immunologic, and environmental factors. Although hundreds of genes are implicated in IBD etiology, it is likely that additional genes play a role in the disease process. We developed a machine learning-based gene prioritization method to identify novel IBD-risk genes. Known IBD genes were collected from genome-wide association studies and annotated with expression and pathway information. Using these genes, a model was trained to identify IBD-risk genes. A comprehensive list of 16,390 genes was then scored and classified. Immune and inflammatory responses, as well as pathways such as cell adhesion, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, and sulfur metabolism were identified to be related to IBD. Scores predicted for IBD genes were significantly higher than those for non-IBD genes (P genes had a high prediction score (>0.8). A literature review of the genes, excluding those used to train the model, identified 67 genes without any publication concerning IBD. These genes represent novel candidate IBD-risk genes, which can be targeted in future studies. Our method successfully differentiated IBD-risk genes from non-IBD genes by using information from expression data and a multitude of gene annotations. Crucial features were defined, and we were able to detect novel candidate risk genes for IBD. These findings may help detect new IBD-risk genes and improve the understanding of IBD pathogenesis.

  15. Gene therapy for cardiovascular disease mediated by ultrasound and microbubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy provides an efficient approach for treatment of cardiovascular disease. To realize the therapeutic effect, both efficient delivery to the target cells and sustained expression of transgenes are required. Ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) technique has become a potential strategy for target-specific gene and drug delivery. When gene-loaded microbubble is injected, the ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction may spew the transported gene to the targeted cells or organ. Meanwhile, high amplitude oscillations of microbubbles increase the permeability of capillary and cell membrane, facilitating uptake of the released gene into tissue and cell. Therefore, efficiency of gene therapy can be significantly improved. To date, UTMD has been successfully investigated in many diseases, and it has achieved outstanding progress in the last two decades. Herein, we discuss the current status of gene therapy of cardiovascular diseases, and reviewed the progress of the delivery of genes to cardiovascular system by UTMD. PMID:23594865

  16. Evolutionary dynamics of human autoimmune disease genes and malfunctioned immunological genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podder Soumita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the main issues of molecular evolution is to divulge the principles in dictating the evolutionary rate differences among various gene classes. Immunological genes have received considerable attention in evolutionary biology as candidates for local adaptation and for studying functionally important polymorphisms. The normal structure and function of immunological genes will be distorted when they experience mutations leading to immunological dysfunctions. Results Here, we examined the fundamental differences between the genes which on mutation give rise to autoimmune or other immune system related diseases and the immunological genes that do not cause any disease phenotypes. Although the disease genes examined are analogous to non-disease genes in product, expression, function, and pathway affiliation, a statistically significant decrease in evolutionary rate has been found in autoimmune disease genes relative to all other immune related diseases and non-disease genes. Possible ways of accumulation of mutation in the three steps of the central dogma (DNA-mRNA-Protein have been studied to trace the mutational effects predisposed to disease consequence and acquiring higher selection pressure. Principal Component Analysis and Multivariate Regression Analysis have established the predominant role of single nucleotide polymorphisms in guiding the evolutionary rate of immunological disease and non-disease genes followed by m-RNA abundance, paralogs number, fraction of phosphorylation residue, alternatively spliced exon, protein residue burial and protein disorder. Conclusions Our study provides an empirical insight into the etiology of autoimmune disease genes and other immunological diseases. The immediate utility of our study is to help in disease gene identification and may also help in medicinal improvement of immune related disease.

  17. The Implicitome: A Resource for Rationalizing Gene-Disease Associations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M Hettne

    Full Text Available High-throughput experimental methods such as medical sequencing and genome-wide association studies (GWAS identify increasingly large numbers of potential relations between genetic variants and diseases. Both biological complexity (millions of potential gene-disease associations and the accelerating rate of data production necessitate computational approaches to prioritize and rationalize potential gene-disease relations. Here, we use concept profile technology to expose from the biomedical literature both explicitly stated gene-disease relations (the explicitome and a much larger set of implied gene-disease associations (the implicitome. Implicit relations are largely unknown to, or are even unintended by the original authors, but they vastly extend the reach of existing biomedical knowledge for identification and interpretation of gene-disease associations. The implicitome can be used in conjunction with experimental data resources to rationalize both known and novel associations. We demonstrate the usefulness of the implicitome by rationalizing known and novel gene-disease associations, including those from GWAS. To facilitate the re-use of implicit gene-disease associations, we publish our data in compliance with FAIR Data Publishing recommendations [https://www.force11.org/group/fairgroup] using nanopublications. An online tool (http://knowledge.bio is available to explore established and potential gene-disease associations in the context of other biomedical relations.

  18. The Implicitome: A Resource for Rationalizing Gene-Disease Associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Horst, Eelke; Kaliyaperumal, Rajaram; Mina, Eleni; Tatum, Zuotian; Laros, Jeroen F. J.; van Mulligen, Erik M.; Schuemie, Martijn; Aten, Emmelien; Li, Tong Shu; Bruskiewich, Richard; Good, Benjamin M.; Su, Andrew I.; Kors, Jan A.; den Dunnen, Johan; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; Roos, Marco; ‘t Hoen, Peter A.C.; Mons, Barend; Schultes, Erik A.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput experimental methods such as medical sequencing and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identify increasingly large numbers of potential relations between genetic variants and diseases. Both biological complexity (millions of potential gene-disease associations) and the accelerating rate of data production necessitate computational approaches to prioritize and rationalize potential gene-disease relations. Here, we use concept profile technology to expose from the biomedical literature both explicitly stated gene-disease relations (the explicitome) and a much larger set of implied gene-disease associations (the implicitome). Implicit relations are largely unknown to, or are even unintended by the original authors, but they vastly extend the reach of existing biomedical knowledge for identification and interpretation of gene-disease associations. The implicitome can be used in conjunction with experimental data resources to rationalize both known and novel associations. We demonstrate the usefulness of the implicitome by rationalizing known and novel gene-disease associations, including those from GWAS. To facilitate the re-use of implicit gene-disease associations, we publish our data in compliance with FAIR Data Publishing recommendations [https://www.force11.org/group/fairgroup] using nanopublications. An online tool (http://knowledge.bio) is available to explore established and potential gene-disease associations in the context of other biomedical relations. PMID:26919047

  19. Properties of human disease genes and the role of genes linked to Mendelian disorders in complex disease aetiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spataro, Nino; Rodríguez, Juan Antonio; Navarro, Arcadi; Bosch, Elena

    2017-02-01

    Do genes presenting variation that has been linked to human disease have different biological properties than genes that have never been related to disease? What is the relationship between disease and fitness? Are the evolutionary pressures that affect genes linked to Mendelian diseases the same to those acting on genes whose variation contributes to complex disorders? The answers to these questions could shed light on the architecture of human genetic disorders and may have relevant implications when designing mapping strategies in future genetic studies. Here we show that, relative to non-disease genes, human disease (HD) genes have specific evolutionary profiles and protein network properties. Additionally, our results indicate that the mutation-selection balance renders an insufficient account of the evolutionary history of some HD genes and that adaptive selection could also contribute to shape their genetic architecture. Notably, several biological features of HD genes depend on the type of pathology (complex or Mendelian) with which they are related. For example, genes harbouring both causal variants for Mendelian disorders and risk factors for complex disease traits (Complex-Mendelian genes), tend to present higher functional relevance in the protein network and higher expression levels than genes associated only with complex disorders. Moreover, risk variants in Complex-Mendelian genes tend to present higher odds ratios than those on genes associated with the same complex disorders but with no link to Mendelian diseases. Taken together, our results suggest that genetic variation at genes linked to Mendelian disorders plays an important role in driving susceptibility to complex disease. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  20. The systematic functional characterisation of Xq28 genes prioritises candidate disease genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiemann Stefan

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Well known for its gene density and the large number of mapped diseases, the human sub-chromosomal region Xq28 has long been a focus of genome research. Over 40 of approximately 300 X-linked diseases map to this region, and systematic mapping, transcript identification, and mutation analysis has led to the identification of causative genes for 26 of these diseases, leaving another 17 diseases mapped to Xq28, where the causative gene is still unknown. To expedite disease gene identification, we have initiated the functional characterisation of all known Xq28 genes. Results By using a systematic approach, we describe the Xq28 genes by RNA in situ hybridisation and Northern blotting of the mouse orthologs, as well as subcellular localisation and data mining of the human genes. We have developed a relational web-accessible database with comprehensive query options integrating all experimental data. Using this database, we matched gene expression patterns with affected tissues for 16 of the 17 remaining Xq28 linked diseases, where the causative gene is unknown. Conclusion By using this systematic approach, we have prioritised genes in linkage regions of Xq28-mapped diseases to an amenable number for mutational screens. Our database can be queried by any researcher performing highly specified searches including diseases not listed in OMIM or diseases that might be linked to Xq28 in the future.

  1. Polymorphisms of alpha-actinin-3 and ciliary neurotrophic factor in national-level Italian athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persi, A; Maltese, P E; Bertelli, M; Cecchin, S; Ciaghi, M; Guarnieri, M C; Agnello, L; Maggioni, M A; Merati, G; Veicsteinas, A

    2013-06-01

    The R577X polymorphism of the alpha-actinin-3 (ACTN3) gene and the IVS1-6G>A polymorphism of the ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) gene have been associated with a favourable muscle phenotype (more muscle fibres with high glycolytic activity), reduced predisposition for congenital dystrophy and resistance to sarcopenia in old age. The aim of this study was to look for evidence of selective pressure towards genotypes favourable for strong muscle activity in a sample of national-level Italian athletes. We analysed two stop codon polymorphisms in the DNA of 50 Italian athletes, specialised in power or endurance sports, and compared their genotypic distribution with those of a population of 50 controls. In a representative sub-group of athletes (N.=42) we then compared the genetic data with anaerobic threshold, assessed by an incremental exercise test up to exhaustion. The athlete group showed an allelic distribution of ACTN3 (R/R:64%, R/X:16%, X/X:20%) and CNTF (G/G:72%, G/A:26%, A/A:2%), significantly imbalanced towards alleles R/R and G/G, respectively, compared to controls (ACTN3=R/R:40% R/X:22% X/X:38% and CNTF=G/G:52%, G/A:24%, A/A:24%) (p=0.0024 and p=0.0001, respectively). Only the ACTN3 577X/X polymorphism showed a significant association with the anaerobic threshold of athletes (F-ratio= 4.037; p=0.025). Factorial ANOVA demonstrated a non significant interaction between favourable allelic patterns of ACTN3 and CNTF genes on aerobic performance in the athlete group. The relationship found between favourable muscle phenotype and this genetic profile may have interesting implications in sport performance and training, athlete selection and different clinical activities, such as physical rehabilitation and modifying phenotypes associated with neuromuscular diseases.

  2. KIF13B establishes a CAV1-enriched microdomain at the ciliary transition zone to promote Sonic hedgehog signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Kenneth Bødtker; Mogensen, Johanne Bay; Morthorst, Stine Kjær

    2017-01-01

    of Smoothened (SMO), which is disrupted by disease-causing mutations in TZ components. Here we identify kinesin-3 motor protein KIF13B as a novel member of the RPGRIP1N-C2 domain-containing protein family and show that KIF13B regulates TZ membrane composition and ciliary SMO accumulation. KIF13B is upregulated...

  3. Mining disease genes using integrated protein-protein interaction and gene-gene co-regulation information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin; Wang, Limei; Guo, Maozu; Zhang, Ruijie; Dai, Qiguo; Liu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chunyu; Teng, Zhixia; Xuan, Ping; Zhang, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    In humans, despite the rapid increase in disease-associated gene discovery, a large proportion of disease-associated genes are still unknown. Many network-based approaches have been used to prioritize disease genes. Many networks, such as the protein-protein interaction (PPI), KEGG, and gene co-expression networks, have been used. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) have been successfully applied for the determination of genes associated with several diseases. In this study, we constructed an eQTL-based gene-gene co-regulation network (GGCRN) and used it to mine for disease genes. We adopted the random walk with restart (RWR) algorithm to mine for genes associated with Alzheimer disease. Compared to the Human Protein Reference Database (HPRD) PPI network alone, the integrated HPRD PPI and GGCRN networks provided faster convergence and revealed new disease-related genes. Therefore, using the RWR algorithm for integrated PPI and GGCRN is an effective method for disease-associated gene mining.

  4. Gene-disease network analysis reveals functional modules in mendelian, complex and environmental diseases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bauer-Mehren, Anna; Bundschus, Markus; Rautschka, Michael; Mayer, Miguel A; Sanz, Ferran; Furlong, Laura I

    2011-01-01

    .... For some diseases, it has become evident that it is not enough to obtain a catalogue of the disease-related genes but to uncover how disruptions of molecular networks in the cell give rise to disease phenotypes...

  5. Disease candidate gene identification and prioritization using protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aronow Bruce J

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although most of the current disease candidate gene identification and prioritization methods depend on functional annotations, the coverage of the gene functional annotations is a limiting factor. In the current study, we describe a candidate gene prioritization method that is entirely based on protein-protein interaction network (PPIN analyses. Results For the first time, extended versions of the PageRank and HITS algorithms, and the K-Step Markov method are applied to prioritize disease candidate genes in a training-test schema. Using a list of known disease-related genes from our earlier study as a training set ("seeds", and the rest of the known genes as a test list, we perform large-scale cross validation to rank the candidate genes and also evaluate and compare the performance of our approach. Under appropriate settings – for example, a back probability of 0.3 for PageRank with Priors and HITS with Priors, and step size 6 for K-Step Markov method – the three methods achieved a comparable AUC value, suggesting a similar performance. Conclusion Even though network-based methods are generally not as effective as integrated functional annotation-based methods for disease candidate gene prioritization, in a one-to-one comparison, PPIN-based candidate gene prioritization performs better than all other gene features or annotations. Additionally, we demonstrate that methods used for studying both social and Web networks can be successfully used for disease candidate gene prioritization.

  6. Modularity-based credible prediction of disease genes and detection of disease subtypes on the phenotype-gene heterogeneous network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xin; Hao, Han; Li, Yanda; Li, Shao

    2011-05-20

    Protein-protein interaction networks and phenotype similarity information have been synthesized together to discover novel disease-causing genes. Genetic or phenotypic similarities are manifested as certain modularity properties in a phenotype-gene heterogeneous network consisting of the phenotype-phenotype similarity network, protein-protein interaction network and gene-disease association network. However, the quantitative analysis of modularity in the heterogeneous network and its influence on disease-gene discovery are still unaddressed. Furthermore, the genetic correspondence of the disease subtypes can be identified by marking the genes and phenotypes in the phenotype-gene network. We present a novel network inference method to measure the network modularity, and in particular to suggest the subtypes of diseases based on the heterogeneous network. Based on a measure which is introduced to evaluate the closeness between two nodes in the phenotype-gene heterogeneous network, we developed a Hitting-Time-based method, CIPHER-HIT, for assessing the modularity of disease gene predictions and credibly prioritizing disease-causing genes, and then identifying the genetic modules corresponding to potential subtypes of the queried phenotype. The CIPHER-HIT is free to rely on any preset parameters. We found that when taking into account the modularity levels, the CIPHER-HIT method can significantly improve the performance of disease gene predictions, which demonstrates modularity is one of the key features for credible inference of disease genes on the phenotype-gene heterogeneous network. By applying the CIPHER-HIT to the subtype analysis of Breast cancer, we found that the prioritized genes can be divided into two sub-modules, one contains the members of the Fanconi anemia gene family, and the other contains a reported protein complex MRE11/RAD50/NBN. The phenotype-gene heterogeneous network contains abundant information for not only disease genes discovery but also

  7. Isolation of candidate disease resistance genes from enrichment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Full sequencing of a clone revealed a gene similar to a putative brassinosteroid LRR receptor kinase in japonica rice; the protein structure analysis suggested that it may be a disease resistance gene or functionally involved in a signal transduction pathway. These results indicate these clones may include new R genes and ...

  8. Photolysis of caged calcium in cilia induces ciliary reversal in Paramecium caudatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwadate, Yoshiaki

    2003-04-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration controls both the pattern and frequency of ciliary and flagellar beating in eukaryotes. In Paramecium, it is widely accepted that the reversal of the direction of ciliary beating (ciliary reversal) is induced by an increase in intra-ciliary Ca(2+) levels. Despite this, the Ca(2+)-sensitive region of the cilium that initiates ciliary reversal has not been clearly identified. We injected caged calcium into living P. caudatum cells and applied ultraviolet (UV) light to portions of the injected cells to raise artificially the intracellular Ca(2+) level ([Ca(2+)](i)). UV application to the upper ciliary region above the basal body induced ciliary reversal in injected cells. Furthermore, UV application to the tips of cilia induced weak ciliary reversal. Larger areas of photolysis in the cilium gave rise to greater angles of ciliary reversal. These results strongly suggest that the Ca(2+)-sensitive region for ciliary reversal is distributed all over the cilium, above the basal body.

  9. Glutathione S-Transferase Enzyme Gene Polymorphisms and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Yigit

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular diseases still ranks in first place among causes of death around the world. Environmental and genetic factors both play roles in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. One of the genetic changes that are claimed to contribute to the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases is the Glutathione S-Transferase (GST family that has been intensely examined recently. GST gene polymorphisms, which are among antioxidant system enzymes, have a relationship with each of the factors that are considered among the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Consequently, it can be said that the polymorphisms of GST genes are effective both in the risk factors of cardiovascular diseases and directly in cardiovascular diseases.

  10. Constructing an integrated gene similarity network for the identification of disease genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhen; Guo, Maozu; Wang, Chunyu; Xing, LinLin; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Yin

    2017-09-20

    Discovering novel genes that are involved human diseases is a challenging task in biomedical research. In recent years, several computational approaches have been proposed to prioritize candidate disease genes. Most of these methods are mainly based on protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. However, since these PPI networks contain false positives and only cover less half of known human genes, their reliability and coverage are very low. Therefore, it is highly necessary to fuse multiple genomic data to construct a credible gene similarity network and then infer disease genes on the whole genomic scale. We proposed a novel method, named RWRB, to infer causal genes of interested diseases. First, we construct five individual gene (protein) similarity networks based on multiple genomic data of human genes. Then, an integrated gene similarity network (IGSN) is reconstructed based on similarity network fusion (SNF) method. Finally, we employee the random walk with restart algorithm on the phenotype-gene bilayer network, which combines phenotype similarity network, IGSN as well as phenotype-gene association network, to prioritize candidate disease genes. We investigate the effectiveness of RWRB through leave-one-out cross-validation methods in inferring phenotype-gene relationships. Results show that RWRB is more accurate than state-of-the-art methods on most evaluation metrics. Further analysis shows that the success of RWRB is benefited from IGSN which has a wider coverage and higher reliability comparing with current PPI networks. Moreover, we conduct a comprehensive case study for Alzheimer's disease and predict some novel disease genes that supported by literature. RWRB is an effective and reliable algorithm in prioritizing candidate disease genes on the genomic scale. Software and supplementary information are available at http://nclab.hit.edu.cn/~tianzhen/RWRB/ .

  11. Renin-angiotensin system gene expression and neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Benjamin; Speth, Robert C; Trivedi, Malav

    2016-07-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms and altered gene expression of components of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) are associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Drugs that interact with the RAS have been shown to affect the course of neurodegenerative disease, suggesting that abnormalities in the RAS may contribute to neurodegenerative disease. A meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies and gene expression data for 14 RAS-related proteins was carried out for five neurodegenerative diseases: Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, narcolepsy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and multiple sclerosis. No single nucleotide polymorphisms in any of the 14 RAS-related protein genes were significantly associated with the five neurodegenerative diseases investigated. There was an inverse association between expression of ATP6AP2, which encodes the (pro)renin receptor, and multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. An association of AGTR, which encodes the AT1 angiotensin II receptor, and Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease was also observed. To date, no single nucleotide polymorphisms in components of the RAS can be definitively linked to the neurodegenerative diseases evaluated in this study. However, altered gene expression of several components of the RAS is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases, which may indicate that the RAS contributes to the pathology of these diseases. © The Author(s) 2016.

  12. HEATR2 plays a conserved role in assembly of the ciliary motile apparatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine P Diggle

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cilia are highly conserved microtubule-based structures that perform a variety of sensory and motility functions during development and adult homeostasis. In humans, defects specifically affecting motile cilia lead to chronic airway infections, infertility and laterality defects in the genetically heterogeneous disorder Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD. Using the comparatively simple Drosophila system, in which mechanosensory neurons possess modified motile cilia, we employed a recently elucidated cilia transcriptional RFX-FOX code to identify novel PCD candidate genes. Here, we report characterization of CG31320/HEATR2, which plays a conserved critical role in forming the axonemal dynein arms required for ciliary motility in both flies and humans. Inner and outer arm dyneins are absent from axonemes of CG31320 mutant flies and from PCD individuals with a novel splice-acceptor HEATR2 mutation. Functional conservation of closely arranged RFX-FOX binding sites upstream of HEATR2 orthologues may drive higher cytoplasmic expression of HEATR2 during early motile ciliogenesis. Immunoprecipitation reveals HEATR2 interacts with DNAI2, but not HSP70 or HSP90, distinguishing it from the client/chaperone functions described for other cytoplasmic proteins required for dynein arm assembly such as DNAAF1-4. These data implicate CG31320/HEATR2 in a growing intracellular pre-assembly and transport network that is necessary to deliver functional dynein machinery to the ciliary compartment for integration into the motile axoneme.

  13. Loss and gain of cone types in vertebrate ciliary photoreceptor evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, Jacob M; Arendt, Detlev

    2017-11-01

    Ciliary photoreceptors are a diverse cell type family that comprises the rods and cones of the retina and other related cell types such as pineal photoreceptors. Ciliary photoreceptor evolution has been dynamic during vertebrate evolution with numerous gains and losses of opsin and phototransduction genes, and changes in their expression. For example, early mammals lost all but two cone opsins, indicating loss of cone receptor types in response to nocturnal lifestyle. Our review focuses on the comparison of specifying transcription factors and cell type-specific transcriptome data in vertebrate retinae to build and test hypotheses on ciliary photoreceptor evolution. Regarding cones, recent data reveal that a combination of factors specific for long-wavelength sensitive opsin (Lws)- cones in non-mammalian vertebrates (Thrb and Rxrg) is found across all differentiating cone photoreceptors in mice. This suggests that mammalian ancestors lost all but one ancestral cone type, the Lws-cone. We test this hypothesis by a correlation analysis of cone transcriptomes in mouse and chick, and find that, indeed, transcriptomes of all mouse cones are most highly correlated to avian Lws-cones. These findings underscore the importance of specifying transcription factors in tracking cell type evolution, and shed new light on the mechanisms of cell type loss and gain in retina evolution. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ensemble positive unlabeled learning for disease gene identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peng; Li, Xiaoli; Chua, Hon-Nian; Kwoh, Chee-Keong; Ng, See-Kiong

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of genes have been experimentally confirmed in recent years as causative genes to various human diseases. The newly available knowledge can be exploited by machine learning methods to discover additional unknown genes that are likely to be associated with diseases. In particular, positive unlabeled learning (PU learning) methods, which require only a positive training set P (confirmed disease genes) and an unlabeled set U (the unknown candidate genes) instead of a negative training set N, have been shown to be effective in uncovering new disease genes in the current scenario. Using only a single source of data for prediction can be susceptible to bias due to incompleteness and noise in the genomic data and a single machine learning predictor prone to bias caused by inherent limitations of individual methods. In this paper, we propose an effective PU learning framework that integrates multiple biological data sources and an ensemble of powerful machine learning classifiers for disease gene identification. Our proposed method integrates data from multiple biological sources for training PU learning classifiers. A novel ensemble-based PU learning method EPU is then used to integrate multiple PU learning classifiers to achieve accurate and robust disease gene predictions. Our evaluation experiments across six disease groups showed that EPU achieved significantly better results compared with various state-of-the-art prediction methods as well as ensemble learning classifiers. Through integrating multiple biological data sources for training and the outputs of an ensemble of PU learning classifiers for prediction, we are able to minimize the potential bias and errors in individual data sources and machine learning algorithms to achieve more accurate and robust disease gene predictions. In the future, our EPU method provides an effective framework to integrate the additional biological and computational resources for better disease gene predictions.

  15. Associating genes and protein complexes with disease via network propagation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oron Vanunu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental challenge in human health is the identification of disease-causing genes. Recently, several studies have tackled this challenge via a network-based approach, motivated by the observation that genes causing the same or similar diseases tend to lie close to one another in a network of protein-protein or functional interactions. However, most of these approaches use only local network information in the inference process and are restricted to inferring single gene associations. Here, we provide a global, network-based method for prioritizing disease genes and inferring protein complex associations, which we call PRINCE. The method is based on formulating constraints on the prioritization function that relate to its smoothness over the network and usage of prior information. We exploit this function to predict not only genes but also protein complex associations with a disease of interest. We test our method on gene-disease association data, evaluating both the prioritization achieved and the protein complexes inferred. We show that our method outperforms extant approaches in both tasks. Using data on 1,369 diseases from the OMIM knowledgebase, our method is able (in a cross validation setting to rank the true causal gene first for 34% of the diseases, and infer 139 disease-related complexes that are highly coherent in terms of the function, expression and conservation of their member proteins. Importantly, we apply our method to study three multi-factorial diseases for which some causal genes have been found already: prostate cancer, alzheimer and type 2 diabetes mellitus. PRINCE's predictions for these diseases highly match the known literature, suggesting several novel causal genes and protein complexes for further investigation.

  16. Gene-gene and gene-environment interaction on the risk of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neeraj Kumar; Banerjee, Basu Dev; Bala, Kiran; Chhillar, Mitrabasu; Chhillar, Neelam

    2014-01-01

    Even with numerous studies the cause of Parkinson's disease (PD) remains elusive. It has been hypothesized that interactions between genetic and environmental factors may play an important role in the pathogenesis of PD. To examine the gene-gene and gene-environment interaction on PD risk with respect to gene polymorphism of cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) and glutathione S-transferases pi 1 (GSTP1), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and metals. This study included 70 patients of PD and 100 age-matched controls. The restriction fragment length polymorphism was used for analysis of genetic polymorphism. OCPs and serum metal levels were estimated by using gas chromatography and an autoanalyser respectively. The CYP2D6*4 mt and GSTP1 *B allelic variants were significantly associated with increase in PD risk. We found a statistically significant difference in β -hexachlorocyclohexane (β-HCH), dieldrin, 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(pchlorophenyl) ethylene (pp'-DDE) and copper levels between the patients and controls. We found significantly high levels of β-HCH, dieldrin and pp'-DDE in the CYP2D6*4 mt allelic variants, β-HCH and pp'-DDE in the GSTP1*B allelic variants and dieldrin in the GSTP1*C allelic variants when comparing CYP2D6*4 non-mt, GSTP1 non-*B and GSTP1 non-*C allelic variants in patients of PD respectively. This study demonstrates that the CYP2D6*4 and GSTP1 genes may be considered as candidate genes for PD and they may also interact with β- HCH, dieldrin and pp'-DDE to influence the risk for PD.

  17. Gene prioritization for livestock diseases by data integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Li; Sørensen, Peter; Thomsen, Bo Stjerne

    2012-01-01

    . Our study provides a general framework for prioritizing genes associated with various complex traits in different species. To our knowledge this is the first time that gene expression, ortholog mapping, protein interactions, and biomedical text data have been integrated systematically for ranking...... with quantitative traits and diseases in livestock species. The approach uses ortholog mapping and integrates information on disease or trait phenotypes, gene-associated phenotypes, and protein-protein interactions. It was used for ranking all known genes present in the cattle genome for their potential roles...... in bovine mastitis. Gene-associated phenome profile and transcriptome profile in response to Escherichia coli infection in the mammary gland were integrated to make a global inference of bovine genes involved in mastitis. The top ranked genes were highly enriched for pathways and biological processes...

  18. Biomarkers and genes predictive of disease predisposition and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biomarkers and genes predictive of disease predisposition and prognosis in rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis is a debilitating disease which often progresses to relentlessly severe disease. Pieter W A Meyer, NHDip Med Tech, MTech, PhD. Medical Research Council Unit for Inflammation and Immunity, Department ...

  19. BBS4 is necessary for ciliary localization of TrkB receptor and activation by BDNF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen C Leitch

    Full Text Available Primary cilia regulate an expanding list of signaling pathways in many different cell types. It is likely that identification of the full catalog of pathways associated with cilia will be necessary to fully understand their role in regulation of signaling and the implications for diseases associated with their dysfunction, ciliopathies. Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS is one such ciliopathy which is characterized by a spectrum of phenotypes. These include neural defects such as impaired cognitive development, centrally mediated hyperphagia and peripheral sensory defects. Here we investigate potential defects in a signaling pathway associated with neuronal function, brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF signaling. Upon loss of BBS4 expression in cultured cells, we observed decreased phosphorylation and activation by BDNF of its target receptor, TrkB. Assessment of ciliary localization revealed that, TrkB localized to the axonemes or basal bodies of cilia only in the presence of BDNF. Axonemal localization, specifically, was abrogated with loss of BBS4. Finally, we present evidence that loss of the ciliary axoneme through depletion of KIF3A impedes activation of TrkB. Taken together, these data suggest the possibility of a previously uninvestigated pathway associated with perturbation of ciliary proteins.

  20. Prioritization of candidate disease genes by topological similarity between disease and protein diffusion profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jie; Qin, Yufang; Liu, Taigang; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Xiaoqi

    2013-01-01

    Identification of gene-phenotype relationships is a fundamental challenge in human health clinic. Based on the observation that genes causing the same or similar phenotypes tend to correlate with each other in the protein-protein interaction network, a lot of network-based approaches were proposed based on different underlying models. A recent comparative study showed that diffusion-based methods achieve the state-of-the-art predictive performance. In this paper, a new diffusion-based method was proposed to prioritize candidate disease genes. Diffusion profile of a disease was defined as the stationary distribution of candidate genes given a random walk with restart where similarities between phenotypes are incorporated. Then, candidate disease genes are prioritized by comparing their diffusion profiles with that of the disease. Finally, the effectiveness of our method was demonstrated through the leave-one-out cross-validation against control genes from artificial linkage intervals and randomly chosen genes. Comparative study showed that our method achieves improved performance compared to some classical diffusion-based methods. To further illustrate our method, we used our algorithm to predict new causing genes of 16 multifactorial diseases including Prostate cancer and Alzheimer's disease, and the top predictions were in good consistent with literature reports. Our study indicates that integration of multiple information sources, especially the phenotype similarity profile data, and introduction of global similarity measure between disease and gene diffusion profiles are helpful for prioritizing candidate disease genes. Programs and data are available upon request.

  1. Long-term outcome of Tunisian children with primary ciliary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Long-term outcome of Tunisian children with primary ciliary dyskinesia confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. Hamouda Samia, Boussetta Khadija, Hamzaoui Agnes, Khalsi Fatma, Trabelsi Ines, Jaafoura Hafedh, Tinsa Faten ...

  2. Ciliary activity of the middle ear lining in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Y; Nakai, Y; Kihara, S

    1985-01-01

    Since the middle ear lining is an extension and a modification of the respiratory epithelium, it is conceivable that it has a mucociliary system and plays an important role in clearing the middle ear cavity. It has already been noted in morphological investigations that the middle ear mucosa has ciliated cells. To our knowledge, however, ciliary activity has never been observed directly. In our research, we used the photoelectric method to study ciliary activity of the middle ear mucosa directly and quantitatively. We made special reference to the frequency of ciliary beating at various sites within the middle ear cavity. Ciliary activity was found to exist in the eustachian tube and the middle ear, the same as in other respiratory organs, and this activity was stronger in cells distal to the eustachian tube.

  3. Expression of Alzheimer's disease risk genes in ischemic brain degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ułamek-Kozioł, Marzena; Pluta, Ryszard; Januszewski, Sławomir; Kocki, Janusz; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2016-12-01

    We review the Alzheimer-related expression of genes following brain ischemia as risk factors for late-onset of sporadic Alzheimer's disease and their role in Alzheimer's disease ischemia-reperfusion pathogenesis. More recent advances in understanding ischemic etiology of Alzheimer's disease have revealed dysregulation of Alzheimer-associated genes including amyloid protein precursor, β-secretase, presenilin 1 and 2, autophagy, mitophagy and apoptosis. We review the relationship between these genes dysregulated by brain ischemia and the cellular and neuropathological characteristics of Alzheimer's disease. Here we summarize the latest studies supporting the theory that Alzheimer-related genes play an important role in ischemic brain injury and that ischemia is a needful and leading supplier to the onset and progression of sporadic Alzheimer's disease. Although the exact molecular mechanisms of ischemic dependent neurodegenerative disease and neuronal susceptibility finally are unknown, a downregulated expression of neuronal defense genes like alfa-secretase in the ischemic brain makes the neurons less able to resist injury. The recent challenge is to find ways to raise the adaptive reserve of the brain to overcome such ischemic-associated deficits and support and/or promote neuronal survival. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the association of these genes with risk for Alzheimer's disease will provide the most meaningful targets for therapeutic development to date. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  4. Mining tissue specificity, gene connectivity and disease association to reveal a set of genes that modify the action of disease causing genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reverter Antonio

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The tissue specificity of gene expression has been linked to a number of significant outcomes including level of expression, and differential rates of polymorphism, evolution and disease association. Recent studies have also shown the importance of exploring differential gene connectivity and sequence conservation in the identification of disease-associated genes. However, no study relates gene interactions with tissue specificity and disease association. Methods We adopted an a priori approach making as few assumptions as possible to analyse the interplay among gene-gene interactions with tissue specificity and its subsequent likelihood of association with disease. We mined three large datasets comprising expression data drawn from massively parallel signature sequencing across 32 tissues, describing a set of 55,606 true positive interactions for 7,197 genes, and microarray expression results generated during the profiling of systemic inflammation, from which 126,543 interactions among 7,090 genes were reported. Results Amongst the myriad of complex relationships identified between expression, disease, connectivity and tissue specificity, some interesting patterns emerged. These include elevated rates of expression and network connectivity in housekeeping and disease-associated tissue-specific genes. We found that disease-associated genes are more likely to show tissue specific expression and most frequently interact with other disease genes. Using the thresholds defined in these observations, we develop a guilt-by-association algorithm and discover a group of 112 non-disease annotated genes that predominantly interact with disease-associated genes, impacting on disease outcomes. Conclusion We conclude that parameters such as tissue specificity and network connectivity can be used in combination to identify a group of genes, not previously confirmed as disease causing, that are involved in interactions with disease causing

  5. Identifying gene-disease associations using centrality on a literature mined gene-interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozgür, Arzucan; Vu, Thuy; Erkan, Günes; Radev, Dragomir R

    2008-07-01

    Understanding the role of genetics in diseases is one of the most important aims of the biological sciences. The completion of the Human Genome Project has led to a rapid increase in the number of publications in this area. However, the coverage of curated databases that provide information manually extracted from the literature is limited. Another challenge is that determining disease-related genes requires laborious experiments. Therefore, predicting good candidate genes before experimental analysis will save time and effort. We introduce an automatic approach based on text mining and network analysis to predict gene-disease associations. We collected an initial set of known disease-related genes and built an interaction network by automatic literature mining based on dependency parsing and support vector machines. Our hypothesis is that the central genes in this disease-specific network are likely to be related to the disease. We used the degree, eigenvector, betweenness and closeness centrality metrics to rank the genes in the network. The proposed approach can be used to extract known and to infer unknown gene-disease associations. We evaluated the approach for prostate cancer. Eigenvector and degree centrality achieved high accuracy. A total of 95% of the top 20 genes ranked by these methods are confirmed to be related to prostate cancer. On the other hand, betweenness and closeness centrality predicted more genes whose relation to the disease is currently unknown and are candidates for experimental study. A web-based system for browsing the disease-specific gene-interaction networks is available at: http://gin.ncibi.org.

  6. Potential Candidate Genes for Improving Rice Disease Resistance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Delteil, Amandine; Zhang, Jie; Lessard, Philippe; Morel, Jean-Benoit

    2010-01-01

    .... oryzae are responsible for considerable yield loss. Up to now, in rice, the modification of the expression of more than 60 genes from diverse origins has shown beneficial effects with respect to disease resistance...

  7. Environmental exposures and gene regulation in disease etiology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thea M. Edwards; John Peterson Myers

    2008-01-01

    .... Exactly how the environment changes gene expression and how this can lead to disease are being explored in a fruitful new approach to environmental health research, representative studies of which are reviewed here...

  8. Polycystic kidney disease in the medaka (Oryzias latipes pc mutant caused by a mutation in the Gli-Similar3 (glis3 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisashi Hashimoto

    Full Text Available Polycystic kidney disease (PKD is a common hereditary disease in humans. Recent studies have shown an increasing number of ciliary genes that are involved in the pathogenesis of PKD. In this study, the Gli-similar3 (glis3 gene was identified as the causal gene of the medaka pc mutant, a model of PKD. In the pc mutant, a transposon was found to be inserted into the fourth intron of the pc/glis3 gene, causing aberrant splicing of the pc/glis3 mRNA and thus a putatively truncated protein with a defective zinc finger domain. pc/glis3 mRNA is expressed in the epithelial cells of the renal tubules and ducts of the pronephros and mesonephros, and also in the pancreas. Antisense oligonucleotide-mediated knockdown of pc/glis3 resulted in cyst formation in the pronephric tubules of medaka fry. Although three other glis family members, glis1a, glis1b and glis2, were found in the medaka genome, none were expressed in the embryonic or larval kidney. In the pc mutant, the urine flow rate in the pronephros was significantly reduced, which was considered to be a direct cause of renal cyst formation. The cilia on the surface of the renal tubular epithelium were significantly shorter in the pc mutant than in wild-type, suggesting that shortened cilia resulted in a decrease in driving force and, in turn, a reduction in urine flow rate. Most importantly, EGFP-tagged pc/glis3 protein localized in primary cilia as well as in the nucleus when expressed in mouse renal epithelial cells, indicating a strong connection between pc/glis3 and ciliary function. Unlike human patients with GLIS3 mutations, the medaka pc mutant shows none of the symptoms of a pancreatic phenotype, such as impaired insulin expression and/or diabetes, suggesting that the pc mutant may be suitable for use as a kidney-specific model for human GLIS3 patients.

  9. Assessment of gene order computing methods for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Benqiong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational genomics of Alzheimer disease (AD, the most common form of senile dementia, is a nascent field in AD research. The field includes AD gene clustering by computing gene order which generates higher quality gene clustering patterns than most other clustering methods. However, there are few available gene order computing methods such as Genetic Algorithm (GA and Ant Colony Optimization (ACO. Further, their performance in gene order computation using AD microarray data is not known. We thus set forth to evaluate the performances of current gene order computing methods with different distance formulas, and to identify additional features associated with gene order computation. Methods Using different distance formulas- Pearson distance and Euclidean distance, the squared Euclidean distance, and other conditions, gene orders were calculated by ACO and GA (including standard GA and improved GA methods, respectively. The qualities of the gene orders were compared, and new features from the calculated gene orders were identified. Results Compared to the GA methods tested in this study, ACO fits the AD microarray data the best when calculating gene order. In addition, the following features were revealed: different distance formulas generated a different quality of gene order, and the commonly used Pearson distance was not the best distance formula when used with both GA and ACO methods for AD microarray data. Conclusion Compared with Pearson distance and Euclidean distance, the squared Euclidean distance generated the best quality gene order computed by GA and ACO methods.

  10. Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED): a relational database of gene expression profiles in kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingzhou; Yang, Bo; Chen, Xujiao; Xu, Jing; Mei, Changlin; Mao, Zhiguo

    2014-01-01

    We present a bioinformatics database named Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED), which contains comprehensive gene expression data sets from renal disease research. The web-based interface of RGED allows users to query the gene expression profiles in various kidney-related samples, including renal cell lines, human kidney tissues and murine model kidneys. Researchers can explore certain gene profiles, the relationships between genes of interests and identify biomarkers or even drug targets in kidney diseases. The aim of this work is to provide a user-friendly utility for the renal disease research community to query expression profiles of genes of their own interest without the requirement of advanced computational skills. Availability and implementation: Website is implemented in PHP, R, MySQL and Nginx and freely available from http://rged.wall-eva.net. Database URL: http://rged.wall-eva.net PMID:25252782

  11. Alzheimer's Disease: Genes, pathogenesis and risk prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Sleegers (Kristel); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractWith the aging of western society the contribution to morbidity of diseases of the elderly, such as dementia, will increase exponentially. Thorough preventative and curative strategies are needed to constrain the increasing prevalence of these disabling diseases. Better understanding of

  12. Genes, inflammation, and age-related diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trompet, Stella

    2010-01-01

    The general objective of this thesis was to investigate associations between genetic variants involved in inflammation and epigenetics and age-related diseases in an elderly cohort to get more insights in the patho-physiological mechanisms involved in age-related diseases, like cardiovascular

  13. Molecular detection of disease resistance genes to powdery mildew ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to detect the presence of disease resistance genes to infection of wheat powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici) in selected wheat cultivars from China using molecular markers. Genomic DNA of sixty cultivars was extracted and tested for the presence of selected prominent resistance genes to ...

  14. Vitamin D receptor gene variants in Parkinson's disease patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Vitamin D plays an important role in neurodegenerative disorders as a crucial neuro-immunomodulator. Accumulating data provide evidences that vitamin D receptor (VDR) gene is a candidate gene for susceptibility to Parkinson's disease (PD). Aim: To find out whether the risk of the development of sporadic ...

  15. Expression of VP60 gene from rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The VP60 gene from rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) YL strain in Northeast of China, under control of the ats1A promoter from Rubisco small subunit genes of Arabidopsis thaliana, was introduced into the transfer deoxyribonucleic acid (T-DNA) region of plant transfer vector pCAMBIA1300 and transferred to ...

  16. Gene effects for resistance to groundnut rossette disease in exotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The materials were evaluated for biotic and abiotic stresses, but succumbed to groundnut rosette disease (GRD). For these superior lines to find utility in Uganda, they need further improvement by introducing resistance genes to GRD. A study was conducted at NaSARRI to determine nature of gene action controlling ...

  17. Deletions of recessive disease genes: CNV contribution to carrier states and disease-causing alleles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Philip M.; Campbell, Ian M.; Baggett, Brett C.; Soens, Zachry T.; Rao, Mitchell M.; Hixson, Patricia M.; Patel, Ankita; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lalani, Seema R.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Shaw, Chad A.; Lupski, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Over 1200 recessive disease genes have been described in humans. The prevalence, allelic architecture, and per-genome load of pathogenic alleles in these genes remain to be fully elucidated, as does the contribution of DNA copy-number variants (CNVs) to carrier status and recessive disease. We mined CNV data from 21,470 individuals obtained by array-comparative genomic hybridization in a clinical diagnostic setting to identify deletions encompassing or disrupting recessive disease genes. We identified 3212 heterozygous potential carrier deletions affecting 419 unique recessive disease genes. Deletion frequency of these genes ranged from one occurrence to 1.5%. When compared with recessive disease genes never deleted in our cohort, the 419 recessive disease genes affected by at least one carrier deletion were longer and located farther from known dominant disease genes, suggesting that the formation and/or prevalence of carrier CNVs may be affected by both local and adjacent genomic features and by selection. Some subjects had multiple carrier CNVs (307 subjects) and/or carrier deletions encompassing more than one recessive disease gene (206 deletions). Heterozygous deletions spanning multiple recessive disease genes may confer carrier status for multiple single-gene disorders, for complex syndromes resulting from the combination of two or more recessive conditions, or may potentially cause clinical phenotypes due to a multiply heterozygous state. In addition to carrier mutations, we identified homozygous and hemizygous deletions potentially causative for recessive disease. We provide further evidence that CNVs contribute to the allelic architecture of both carrier and recessive disease-causing mutations. Thus, a complete recessive carrier screening method or diagnostic test should detect CNV alleles. PMID:23685542

  18. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) for human retinal degeneration: phase I trial of CNTF delivered by encapsulated cell intraocular implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieving, Paul A; Caruso, Rafael C; Tao, Weng; Coleman, Hanna R; Thompson, Darby J S; Fullmer, Keri R; Bush, Ronald A

    2006-03-07

    Neurotrophic factors are agents with a promising ability to retard progression of neurodegenerative diseases and are effective in slowing photoreceptor degeneration in animal models of retinitis pigmentosa. Here we report a human clinical trial of a neurotrophic factor for retinal neurodegeneration. In this Phase I safety trial, human ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) was delivered by cells transfected with the human CNTF gene and sequestered within capsules that were surgically implanted into the vitreous of the eye. The outer membrane of the encapsulated cell implant is semipermeable to allow CNTF to reach the retina. Ten participants received CNTF implants in one eye. When the implants were removed after 6 months, they contained viable cells with minimal cell loss and gave CNTF output at levels previously shown to be therapeutic for retinal degeneration in rcd1 dogs. Although the trial was not powered to form a judgment as to clinical efficacy, of seven eyes for which visual acuity could be tracked by conventional reading charts, three eyes reached and maintained improved acuities of 10-15 letters, equivalent to two- to three-line improvement on standard Snellen acuity charts. A surgically related choroidal detachment in one eye resulted in a transient acuity decrease that resolved with conservative management. This Phase I trial indicated that CNTF is safe for the human retina even with severely compromised photoreceptors. The approach to delivering therapeutic proteins to degenerating retinas using encapsulated cell implants may have application beyond disease caused by genetic mutations.

  19. Tagging of resistance gene(s) to rhizomania disease in sugar beet ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rhizomania disease is one of the most important diseases in Iran and some other parts of the world which potentially could play a role in decreasing sugar yield in fields. One approach to combat with this disease is the use of resistance varieties. This varieties have been identified which are having resistance genes to ...

  20. Hox Genes in Cardiovascular Development and Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Roux

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Congenital heart defects (CHD are the leading cause of death in the first year of life. Over the past 20 years, much effort has been focused on unraveling the genetic bases of CHD. In particular, studies in human genetics coupled with those of model organisms have provided valuable insights into the gene regulatory networks underlying CHD pathogenesis. Hox genes encode transcription factors that are required for the patterning of the anterior–posterior axis in the embryo. In this review, we focus on the emerging role of anteriorly expressed Hox genes (Hoxa1, Hoxb1, and Hoxa3 in cardiac development, specifically their contribution to patterning of cardiac progenitor cells and formation of the great arteries. Recent evidence regarding the cooperative regulation of heart development by Hox proteins with members of the TALE-class of homeodomain proteins such as Pbx and Meis transcription factors is also discussed. These findings are highly relevant to human pathologies as they pinpoint new genes that increase susceptibility to cardiac anomalies and provide novel mechanistic insights into CHD.

  1. a canvas for disease gene exploration

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-04-09

    Apr 9, 2008 ... well as from published literature. Selection of genes and genomic region. This study was aimed at understanding variability in SNPs across diverse individual ..... (b) Representation of system structure-derived membership information on the linguistic map of India. Blue, brown, green and pink backgrounds ...

  2. [Progress in research on pathogenic genes and gene therapy for inherited retinal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ling; Cao, Cong; Sun, Jiji; Gao, Tao; Liang, Xiaoyang; Nie, Zhipeng; Ji, Yanchun; Jiang, Pingping; Guan, Minxin

    2017-02-10

    Inherited retinal diseases (IRDs), including retinitis pigmentosa, Usher syndrome, Cone-Rod degenerations, inherited macular dystrophy, Leber's congenital amaurosis, Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy are the most common and severe types of hereditary ocular diseases. So far more than 200 pathogenic genes have been identified. With the growing knowledge of the genetics and mechanisms of IRDs, a number of gene therapeutic strategies have been developed in the laboratory or even entered clinical trials. Here the progress of IRD research on the pathogenic genes and therapeutic strategies, particularly gene therapy, are reviewed.

  3. Gene editing as a promising approach for respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yichun; Liu, Yang; Su, Zhenlei; Ma, Yana; Ren, Chonghua; Zhao, Runzhen; Ji, Hong-Long

    2018-01-04

    Respiratory diseases, which are leading causes of mortality and morbidity in the world, are dysfunctions of the nasopharynx, the trachea, the bronchus, the lung and the pleural cavity. Symptoms of chronic respiratory diseases, such as cough, sneezing and difficulty breathing, may seriously affect the productivity, sleep quality and physical and mental well-being of patients, and patients with acute respiratory diseases may have difficulty breathing, anoxia and even life-threatening respiratory failure. Respiratory diseases are generally heterogeneous, with multifaceted causes including smoking, ageing, air pollution, infection and gene mutations. Clinically, a single pulmonary disease can exhibit more than one phenotype or coexist with multiple organ disorders. To correct abnormal function or repair injured respiratory tissues, one of the most promising techniques is to correct mutated genes by gene editing, as some gene mutations have been clearly demonstrated to be associated with genetic or heterogeneous respiratory diseases. Zinc finger nucleases (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) and clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) systems are three innovative gene editing technologies developed recently. In this short review, we have summarised the structure and operating principles of the ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 systems and their preclinical and clinical applications in respiratory diseases. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Alzheimer's Disease: Genes, Proteins, and Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dennis J. Selkoe

    2001-01-01

    Rapid progress in deciphering the biological mechanism of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has arisen from the application of molecular and cell biology to this complex disorder of the limbic and association cortices...

  5. [Apolipoprotein genes in patients with ischemic heart disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baĭtasova, N B; Rysmendiev, A Zh; Shchuratova, S G

    2001-01-01

    The role of allele variants of apoB, apoCIII, and apoE genes in genetical predisposition to coronary disease was studied in Kazakhs and Uigurs. A total of 241 coronary patients and 205 healthy controls (all males) were examined. ApoB, apoCIII, and apoE gene polymorphism was studied by the polymerase chain reaction with thermostable Tag DNA polymerase. No significant relationship between the studied genes polymorphism and coronary disease was detected in the Kazakhs and Uigurs.

  6. Walking on multiple disease-gene networks to prioritize candidate genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rui

    2015-06-01

    Uncovering causal genes for human inherited diseases, as the primary step toward understanding the pathogenesis of these diseases, requires a combined analysis of genetic and genomic data. Although bioinformatics methods have been designed to prioritize candidate genes resulting from genetic linkage analysis or association studies, the coverage of both diseases and genes in existing methods is quite limited, thereby preventing the scan of causal genes for a significant proportion of diseases at the whole-genome level. To overcome this limitation, we propose a method named pgWalk to prioritize candidate genes by integrating multiple phenomic and genomic data. We derive three types of phenotype similarities among 7719 diseases and nine types of functional similarities among 20327 genes. Based on a pair of phenotype and gene similarities, we construct a disease-gene network and then simulate the process that a random walker wanders on such a heterogeneous network to quantify the strength of association between a candidate gene and a query disease. A weighted version of the Fisher's method with dependent correction is adopted to integrate 27 scores obtained in this way, and a final q-value is calibrated for prioritizing candidate genes. A series of validation experiments are conducted to demonstrate the superior performance of this approach. We further show the effectiveness of this method in exome sequencing studies of autism and epileptic encephalopathies. An online service and the standalone software of pgWalk can be found at http://bioinfo.au.tsinghua.edu.cn/jianglab/pgwalk. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Journal of Molecular Cell Biology, IBCB, SIBS, CAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Evolutionary history of human disease genes reveals phenotypic connections and comorbidity among genetic diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Solip; Yang, Jae-Seong; Kim, Jinho; Shin, Young-Eun; Hwang, Jihye; Park, Juyong; Jang, Sung Key; Kim, Sanguk

    2012-10-01

    The extent to which evolutionary changes have impacted the phenotypic relationships among human diseases remains unclear. In this work, we report that phenotypically similar diseases are connected by the evolutionary constraints on human disease genes. Human disease groups can be classified into slowly or rapidly evolving classes, where the diseases in the slowly evolving class are enriched with morphological phenotypes and those in the rapidly evolving class are enriched with physiological phenotypes. Our findings establish a clear evolutionary connection between disease classes and disease phenotypes for the first time. Furthermore, the high comorbidity found between diseases connected by similar evolutionary constraints enables us to improve the predictability of the relative risk of human diseases. We find the evolutionary constraints on disease genes are a new layer of molecular connection in the network-based exploration of human diseases.

  8. Prioritisation and network analysis of Crohn's disease susceptibility genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Muraro

    Full Text Available Recent Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS have revealed numerous Crohn's disease susceptibility genes and a key challenge now is in understanding how risk polymorphisms in associated genes might contribute to development of this disease. For a gene to contribute to disease phenotype, its risk variant will likely adversely communicate with a variety of other gene products to result in dysregulation of common signaling pathways. A vital challenge is to elucidate pathways of potentially greatest influence on pathological behaviour, in a manner recognizing how multiple relevant genes may yield integrative effect. In this work we apply mathematical analysis of networks involving the list of recently described Crohn's susceptibility genes, to prioritise pathways in relation to their potential development of this disease. Prioritisation was performed by applying a text mining and a diffusion based method (GRAIL, GPEC. Prospective biological significance of the resulting prioritised list of proteins is highlighted by changes in their gene expression levels in Crohn's patients intestinal tissue in comparison with healthy donors.

  9. Prioritisation and network analysis of Crohn's disease susceptibility genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, Daniele; Lauffenburger, Douglas A; Simmons, Alison

    2014-01-01

    Recent Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have revealed numerous Crohn's disease susceptibility genes and a key challenge now is in understanding how risk polymorphisms in associated genes might contribute to development of this disease. For a gene to contribute to disease phenotype, its risk variant will likely adversely communicate with a variety of other gene products to result in dysregulation of common signaling pathways. A vital challenge is to elucidate pathways of potentially greatest influence on pathological behaviour, in a manner recognizing how multiple relevant genes may yield integrative effect. In this work we apply mathematical analysis of networks involving the list of recently described Crohn's susceptibility genes, to prioritise pathways in relation to their potential development of this disease. Prioritisation was performed by applying a text mining and a diffusion based method (GRAIL, GPEC). Prospective biological significance of the resulting prioritised list of proteins is highlighted by changes in their gene expression levels in Crohn's patients intestinal tissue in comparison with healthy donors.

  10. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Linking genes to diseases with a SNPedia-Gene Wiki mashup

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background A variety of topic-focused wikis are used in the biomedical sciences to enable the mass-collaborative synthesis and distribution of diverse bodies of knowledge. To address complex problems such as defining the relationships between genes and disease, it is important to bring the knowledge from many different domains together. Here we show how advances in wiki technology and natural language processing can be used to automatically assemble ‘meta-wikis’ that present integrated views over the data collaboratively created in multiple source wikis. Results We produced a semantic meta-wiki called the Gene Wiki+ that automatically mirrors and integrates data from the Gene Wiki and SNPedia. The Gene Wiki+, available at (http://genewikiplus.org/), captures 8,047 distinct gene-disease relationships. SNPedia accounts for 4,149 of the gene-disease pairs, the Gene Wiki provides 4,377 and only 479 appear independently in both sources. All of this content is available to query and browse and is provided as linked open data. Conclusions Wikis contain increasing amounts of diverse, biological information useful for elucidating the connections between genes and disease. The Gene Wiki+ shows how wiki technology can be used in concert with natural language processing to provide integrated views over diverse underlying data sources. PMID:22541597

  12. Adeno-associated viral gene delivery in neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgenstern, Peter F; Marongiu, Roberta; Musatov, Sergei A; Kaplitt, Michael G

    2011-01-01

    The advent of viral gene therapy technology has contributed greatly to the study of a variety of medical conditions, and there is increasing promise for clinical translation of gene therapy into human treatments. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors provide one of the more promising approaches to gene delivery, and have been used extensively over the last 20 years. Derived from nonpathogenic parvoviruses, these vectors allow for stable and robust expression of desired transgenes in vitro and in vivo. AAV vectors efficiently and stably transduce neurons, with some strains targeting neurons exclusively in the brain. Thus, AAV vectors are particularly useful for neurodegenerative diseases, which have led to numerous preclinical studies and several human trials of gene therapy in patients with Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and pediatric neurogenetic disorders. Here, we describe an efficient and reliable method for the production and purification of AAV serotype 2 vectors for both in vitro and in vivo applications.

  13. T-Box Genes in Human Development and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, T K; Brook, J D; Wilsdon, A

    2017-01-01

    T-box genes are important development regulators in vertebrates with specific patterns of expression and precise roles during embryogenesis. They encode transcription factors that regulate gene transcription, often in the early stages of development. The hallmark of this family of proteins is the presence of a conserved DNA binding motif, the "T-domain." Mutations in T-box genes can cause developmental disorders in humans, mostly due to functional deficiency of the relevant proteins. Recent studies have also highlighted the role of some T-box genes in cancer and in cardiomyopathy, extending their role in human disease. In this review, we focus on ten T-box genes with a special emphasis on their roles in human disease. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetics of sputum gene expression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiliang Qiu

    Full Text Available Previous expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL studies have performed genetic association studies for gene expression, but most of these studies examined lymphoblastoid cell lines from non-diseased individuals. We examined the genetics of gene expression in a relevant disease tissue from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients to identify functional effects of known susceptibility genes and to find novel disease genes. By combining gene expression profiling on induced sputum samples from 131 COPD cases from the ECLIPSE Study with genomewide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP data, we found 4315 significant cis-eQTL SNP-probe set associations (3309 unique SNPs. The 3309 SNPs were tested for association with COPD in a genomewide association study (GWAS dataset, which included 2940 COPD cases and 1380 controls. Adjusting for 3309 tests (p<1.5e-5, the two SNPs which were significantly associated with COPD were located in two separate genes in a known COPD locus on chromosome 15: CHRNA5 and IREB2. Detailed analysis of chromosome 15 demonstrated additional eQTLs for IREB2 mapping to that gene. eQTL SNPs for CHRNA5 mapped to multiple linkage disequilibrium (LD bins. The eQTLs for IREB2 and CHRNA5 were not in LD. Seventy-four additional eQTL SNPs were associated with COPD at p<0.01. These were genotyped in two COPD populations, finding replicated associations with a SNP in PSORS1C1, in the HLA-C region on chromosome 6. Integrative analysis of GWAS and gene expression data from relevant tissue from diseased subjects has located potential functional variants in two known COPD genes and has identified a novel COPD susceptibility locus.

  15. Genetics of sputum gene expression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Weiliang; Cho, Michael H; Riley, John H; Anderson, Wayne H; Singh, Dave; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Litonjua, Augusto A; Lomas, David A; Crapo, James D; Beaty, Terri H; Celli, Bartolome R; Rennard, Stephen; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Fox, Steven M; Silverman, Edwin K; Hersh, Craig P

    2011-01-01

    Previous expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have performed genetic association studies for gene expression, but most of these studies examined lymphoblastoid cell lines from non-diseased individuals. We examined the genetics of gene expression in a relevant disease tissue from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients to identify functional effects of known susceptibility genes and to find novel disease genes. By combining gene expression profiling on induced sputum samples from 131 COPD cases from the ECLIPSE Study with genomewide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data, we found 4315 significant cis-eQTL SNP-probe set associations (3309 unique SNPs). The 3309 SNPs were tested for association with COPD in a genomewide association study (GWAS) dataset, which included 2940 COPD cases and 1380 controls. Adjusting for 3309 tests (p<1.5e-5), the two SNPs which were significantly associated with COPD were located in two separate genes in a known COPD locus on chromosome 15: CHRNA5 and IREB2. Detailed analysis of chromosome 15 demonstrated additional eQTLs for IREB2 mapping to that gene. eQTL SNPs for CHRNA5 mapped to multiple linkage disequilibrium (LD) bins. The eQTLs for IREB2 and CHRNA5 were not in LD. Seventy-four additional eQTL SNPs were associated with COPD at p<0.01. These were genotyped in two COPD populations, finding replicated associations with a SNP in PSORS1C1, in the HLA-C region on chromosome 6. Integrative analysis of GWAS and gene expression data from relevant tissue from diseased subjects has located potential functional variants in two known COPD genes and has identified a novel COPD susceptibility locus.

  16. Genetics of Sputum Gene Expression in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Weiliang; Cho, Michael H.; Riley, John H.; Anderson, Wayne H.; Singh, Dave; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Lomas, David A.; Crapo, James D.; Beaty, Terri H.; Celli, Bartolome R.; Rennard, Stephen; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Fox, Steven M.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Hersh, Craig P.

    2011-01-01

    Previous expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have performed genetic association studies for gene expression, but most of these studies examined lymphoblastoid cell lines from non-diseased individuals. We examined the genetics of gene expression in a relevant disease tissue from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients to identify functional effects of known susceptibility genes and to find novel disease genes. By combining gene expression profiling on induced sputum samples from 131 COPD cases from the ECLIPSE Study with genomewide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data, we found 4315 significant cis-eQTL SNP-probe set associations (3309 unique SNPs). The 3309 SNPs were tested for association with COPD in a genomewide association study (GWAS) dataset, which included 2940 COPD cases and 1380 controls. Adjusting for 3309 tests (p<1.5e-5), the two SNPs which were significantly associated with COPD were located in two separate genes in a known COPD locus on chromosome 15: CHRNA5 and IREB2. Detailed analysis of chromosome 15 demonstrated additional eQTLs for IREB2 mapping to that gene. eQTL SNPs for CHRNA5 mapped to multiple linkage disequilibrium (LD) bins. The eQTLs for IREB2 and CHRNA5 were not in LD. Seventy-four additional eQTL SNPs were associated with COPD at p<0.01. These were genotyped in two COPD populations, finding replicated associations with a SNP in PSORS1C1, in the HLA-C region on chromosome 6. Integrative analysis of GWAS and gene expression data from relevant tissue from diseased subjects has located potential functional variants in two known COPD genes and has identified a novel COPD susceptibility locus. PMID:21949713

  17. Genome-Wide Architecture of Disease Resistance Genes in Lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopoulou, Marilena; Wo, Sebastian Reyes-Chin; Kozik, Alex; McHale, Leah K; Truco, Maria-Jose; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Michelmore, Richard W

    2015-10-08

    Genome-wide motif searches identified 1134 genes in the lettuce reference genome of cv. Salinas that are potentially involved in pathogen recognition, of which 385 were predicted to encode nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat receptor (NLR) proteins. Using a maximum-likelihood approach, we grouped the NLRs into 25 multigene families and 17 singletons. Forty-one percent of these NLR-encoding genes belong to three families, the largest being RGC16 with 62 genes in cv. Salinas. The majority of NLR-encoding genes are located in five major resistance clusters (MRCs) on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 and cosegregate with multiple disease resistance phenotypes. Most MRCs contain primarily members of a single NLR gene family but a few are more complex. MRC2 spans 73 Mb and contains 61 NLRs of six different gene families that cosegregate with nine disease resistance phenotypes. MRC3, which is 25 Mb, contains 22 RGC21 genes and colocates with Dm13. A library of 33 transgenic RNA interference tester stocks was generated for functional analysis of NLR-encoding genes that cosegregated with disease resistance phenotypes in each of the MRCs. Members of four NLR-encoding families, RGC1, RGC2, RGC21, and RGC12 were shown to be required for 16 disease resistance phenotypes in lettuce. The general composition of MRCs is conserved across different genotypes; however, the specific repertoire of NLR-encoding genes varied particularly of the rapidly evolving Type I genes. These tester stocks are valuable resources for future analyses of additional resistance phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Christopoulou et al.

  18. Gene-disease relationship discovery based on model-driven data integration and database view definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, S; Jonveaux, P; Bicep, C; Pierron, L; Smaïl-Tabbone, M; Devignes, M D

    2009-01-15

    Computational methods are widely used to discover gene-disease relationships hidden in vast masses of available genomic and post-genomic data. In most current methods, a similarity measure is calculated between gene annotations and known disease genes or disease descriptions. However, more explicit gene-disease relationships are required for better insights into the molecular bases of diseases, especially for complex multi-gene diseases. Explicit relationships between genes and diseases are formulated as candidate gene definitions that may include intermediary genes, e.g. orthologous or interacting genes. These definitions guide data modelling in our database approach for gene-disease relationship discovery and are expressed as views which ultimately lead to the retrieval of documented sets of candidate genes. A system called ACGR (Approach for Candidate Gene Retrieval) has been implemented and tested with three case studies including a rare orphan gene disease.

  19. A novel aspartoacylase (ASPA) gene mutation in Canavan disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmaz, Asude Alpman; Akin, Haluk; Onay, Huseyin; Vahabi, Ali; Ozkinay, Ferda

    2012-08-01

    Canavan disease is a severe autosomal recessive leukodystrophy characterized by macrocephaly, ataxia, severe motor and mental retardation, dysmyelination, and progressive spongial atrophy of the brain. The human aspartoacylase (ASPA) gene, which catalyzes the deacetylation of N-acetyl-L-aspartate, is mutated in Canavan disease. In the presented family sequencing analysis for the aspartoacylase gene was performed on the blood samples of the parents as the affected child had died due to Canavan disease. After the mutation was detected, prenatal diagnosis was also performed and heterozygous Y88X mutation was detected in the fetus. In this report, we present a novel mutation Y88X within the aspartoacylase gene in a consanguineous family with an affected child diagnosed as Canavan disease.

  20. Gene expression of transcription factor NFATc1 in periodontal diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Belibasakis, G N; Emingil, G; Saygan, B; Turkoglu, O; Atilla, G; Bostanci, N

    2011-01-01

    Belibasakis GN, Emingil G, Saygan B, Turkoglu O, Atilla G, Bostanci N. Gene expression of transcription factor NFATc1 in periodontal diseases. APMIS 2011; 119: 167-172. Periodontitis is a disease of infectious aetiology that causes inflammatory destruction of the tooth-supporting tissues. Activated T cells are central to the pathogenesis of the disease, by producing receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL) that stimulates bone resorption. Antigenic activation of T cells ...

  1. Identification and expression analysis of two fish-specific IL-6 cytokine family members, the ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF)-like and M17 genes, in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiehui; Secombes, Christopher J

    2009-07-01

    The mammalian interleukin (IL)-6 family of cytokines consist of eight class-I helical cytokines and are major players in hematopoiesis, as well as in neuroendocrine and immune systems, and have pro- and anti-inflammatory properties. We have identified a novel fish CNTF-like molecule, for the first time, as well as the trout M17 gene. The trout CNTF-like gene encodes a putative 191 amino acid peptide without a signal peptide, and shares high amino acid sequence identities (39-99%) within the fish CNTF-like molecules that we have identified, but only limited identities (21-24%) to higher vertebrate CNTF molecules among the IL-6 family members. The fish CNTF-like gene has two phase 0 introns in the coding region whilst the mammalian CNTF gene has only one phase 0 intron. The trout M17 encodes a peptide of 227 amino acid residues which has a predicted signal peptide of 35 aa and shares the highest identities (38-95%) to other fish M17 molecules, but limited homology to other IL-6 family members. Both of the fish CNTF-like and M17 proteins have four predicted helices and their tertiary structure could be stabilised by multiple conserved disulphide bonds. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the fish CNTF-like and M17 genes may have arisen from ancestral genes that have given rise to mammalian LIF/OSM, and CNTF/CLC/CT-1/CT-2 of the IL-6 family. The trout CNTF-like gene is highly expressed in brain and muscle, whilst the M17 is highly expressed in immune tissues, including gills, spleen and head kidney. Furthermore, immune stimulation of a macrophage cell line and bacterial infection in vivo up-regulated M17 expression but had little effect on CNTF-like expression. These results suggest a major role of the CNTF-like molecule in fish nervous and muscular systems and of M17 in the immune system.

  2. Understanding gene functions and disease mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuchs, Helmut; Aguilar-Pimentel, Juan Antonio; Amarie, Oana V.

    2017-01-01

    Since decades, model organisms have provided an important approach for understanding the mechanistic basis of human diseases. The German Mouse Clinic (GMC) was the first phenotyping facility that established a collaboration-based platform for phenotype characterization of mouse lines. In order...

  3. Gene-wide analysis detects two new susceptibility genes for Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Escott-Price, Valentina; Bellenguez, Céline; Wang, Li-San; Choi, Seung-Hoan; Harold, Denise; Jones, Lesley; Holmans, Peter; Gerrish, Amy; Vedernikov, Alexey; Richards, Alexander; DeStefano, Anita L.; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A.; Naj, Adam C.; Sims, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    PUBLISHED BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease is a common debilitating dementia with known heritability, for which 20 late onset susceptibility loci have been identified, but more remain to be discovered. This study sought to identify new susceptibility genes, using an alternative gene-wide analytical approach which tests for patterns of association within genes, in the powerful genome-wide association dataset of the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project Consortium, comprising over...

  4. Yin and Yang of disease genes and death genes between reciprocally scale-free biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Hyun Wook; Ohn, Jung Hun; Moon, Jisook; Kim, Ju Han

    2013-11-01

    Biological networks often show a scale-free topology with node degree following a power-law distribution. Lethal genes tend to form functional hubs, whereas non-lethal disease genes are located at the periphery. Uni-dimensional analyses, however, are flawed. We created and investigated two distinct scale-free networks; a protein-protein interaction (PPI) and a perturbation sensitivity network (PSN). The hubs of both networks exhibit a low molecular evolutionary rate (P genes but not with disease genes, whereas PSN hubs are highly enriched with disease genes and drug targets but not with lethal genes. PPI hub genes are enriched with essential cellular processes, but PSN hub genes are enriched with environmental interaction processes, having more TATA boxes and transcription factor binding sites. It is concluded that biological systems may balance internal growth signaling and external stress signaling by unifying the two opposite scale-free networks that are seemingly opposite to each other but work in concert between death and disease.

  5. Gene editing for skin diseases: designer nucleases as tools for gene therapy of skin fragility disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Oliver P; Reichelt, Julia; Koller, Ulrich

    2017-03-07

    What is the topic of this review? This review concerns current gene editing strategies for blistering skin diseases with respect to individual genetic constellations and distinct conditions. What advances does it highlight? Specificity and safety dominate the discussion of gene editing applications for gene therapy, where a number of tools are implemented. Recent developments in this rapidly progressing field pose further questions regarding which tool is best suited for each particular use. The current treatment of inherited blistering skin diseases, such as epidermolysis bullosa (EB), is largely restricted to wound care and pain management. More effective therapeutic strategies are urgently required, and targeting the genetic basis of these severe diseases is now within reach. Here, we describe current gene editing tools and their potential to correct gene function in monogenetic blistering skin diseases. We present the features of the most frequently used gene editing techniques, transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9), determining their preferential application for specific genetic conditions, including the type of mutational inheritance, the targeting site within the gene or the possibility to target the mutation specifically. Both tools have traits beneficial in specific situations. Promising developments in the field engender gene editing as a potentially powerful therapeutic option for future clinical applications. © 2017 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  6. Progress in gene therapy of dystrophic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Y; Duan, D

    2012-06-01

    The heart is frequently afflicted in muscular dystrophy. In severe cases, cardiac lesion may directly result in death. Over the years, pharmacological and/or surgical interventions have been the mainstay to alleviate cardiac symptoms in muscular dystrophy patients. Although these traditional modalities remain useful, the emerging field of gene therapy has now provided an unprecedented opportunity to transform our thinking/approach in the treatment of dystrophic heart disease. In fact, the premise is already in place for genetic correction. Gene mutations have been identified and animal models are available for several types of muscular dystrophy. Most importantly, innovative strategies have been developed to effectively deliver therapeutic genes to the heart. Dystrophin-deficient Duchenne cardiomyopathy is associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common lethal muscular dystrophy. Considering its high incidence, there has been a considerable interest and significant input in the development of Duchenne cardiomyopathy gene therapy. Using Duchenne cardiomyopathy as an example, here we illustrate the struggles and successes experienced in the burgeoning field of dystrophic heart disease gene therapy. In light of abundant and highly promising data with the adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector, we have specially emphasized on AAV-mediated gene therapy. Besides DMD, we have also discussed gene therapy for treating cardiac diseases in other muscular dystrophies such as limb-girdle muscular dystrophy.

  7. PCAN: phenotype consensus analysis to support disease-gene association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godard, Patrice; Page, Matthew

    2016-12-07

    Bridging genotype and phenotype is a fundamental biomedical challenge that underlies more effective target discovery and patient-tailored therapy. Approaches that can flexibly and intuitively, integrate known gene-phenotype associations in the context of molecular signaling networks are vital to effectively prioritize and biologically interpret genes underlying disease traits of interest. We describe Phenotype Consensus Analysis (PCAN); a method to assess the consensus semantic similarity of phenotypes in a candidate gene's signaling neighborhood. We demonstrate that significant phenotype consensus (p disease-gene associations, using a combination of high quality String interactions + Metabase pathways and use Joubert Syndrome to demonstrate the ease with which a significant result can be interrogated to highlight discriminatory traits linked to mechanistically related genes. We advocate phenotype consensus as an intuitive and versatile method to aid disease-gene association, which naturally lends itself to the mechanistic deconvolution of diverse phenotypes. We provide PCAN to the community as an R package ( http://bioconductor.org/packages/PCAN/ ) to allow flexible configuration, extension and standalone use or integration to supplement existing gene prioritization workflows.

  8. Exploring the potential relevance of human-specific genes to complex disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper David N

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although human disease genes generally tend to be evolutionarily more ancient than non-disease genes, complex disease genes appear to be represented more frequently than Mendelian disease genes among genes of more recent evolutionary origin. It is therefore proposed that the analysis of human-specific genes might provide new insights into the genetics of complex disease. Cross-comparison with the Human Gene Mutation Database (http://www.hgmd.org revealed a number of examples of disease-causing and disease-associated mutations in putatively human-specific genes. A sizeable proportion of these were missense polymorphisms associated with complex disease. Since both human-specific genes and genes associated with complex disease have often experienced particularly rapid rates of evolutionary change, either due to weaker purifying selection or positive selection, it is proposed that a significant number of human-specific genes may play a role in complex disease.

  9. Innate gene repression associated with Mycobacterium bovis infection in cattle: toward a gene signature of disease

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    O'Farrelly Cliona

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine tuberculosis is an enduring disease of cattle that has significant repercussions for human health. The advent of high-throughput functional genomics technologies has facilitated large-scale analyses of the immune response to this disease that may ultimately lead to novel diagnostics and therapeutic targets. Analysis of mRNA abundance in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from six Mycobacterium bovis infected cattle and six non-infected controls was performed. A targeted immunospecific bovine cDNA microarray with duplicated spot features representing 1,391 genes was used to test the hypothesis that a distinct gene expression profile may exist in M. bovis infected animals in vivo. Results In total, 378 gene features were differentially expressed at the P ≤ 0.05 level in bovine tuberculosis (BTB-infected and control animals, of which 244 were expressed at lower levels (65% in the infected group. Lower relative expression of key innate immune genes, including the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2 and TLR4 genes, lack of differential expression of indicator adaptive immune gene transcripts (IFNG, IL2, IL4, and lower BOLA major histocompatibility complex – class I (BOLA and class II (BOLA-DRA gene expression was consistent with innate immune gene repression in the BTB-infected animals. Supervised hierarchical cluster analysis and class prediction validation identified a panel of 15 genes predictive of disease status and selected gene transcripts were validated (n = 8 per group by real time quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Conclusion These results suggest that large-scale expression profiling can identify gene signatures of disease in peripheral blood that can be used to classify animals on the basis of in vivo infection, in the absence of exogenous antigenic stimulation.

  10. Gene therapy and angiogenesis in patients with coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    -blind placebo-controlled trials could not confirm the initial high efficacy of either the growth factor protein or the gene therapy approaches observed in earlier small trials. The clinical studies so far have all been without any gene-related serious adverse events. Future trials will focus on whether...... an improvement in clinical results can be obtained with a cocktail of growth factors or by a combination of gene and stem cell therapy in patients with severe coronary artery disease, which cannot be treated effectively with current treatment strategies....... of VEGF and FGF in patients with coronary artery disease. The initial small and unblinded studies with either recombinant growth factor proteins or genes encoding growth factors were encouraging, demonstrating both clinical improvement and evidence of angiogenesis. However, subsequent larger double...

  11. [Gene therapy for hereditary ophthalmological diseases: Advances and future perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Camacho, Óscar Francisco; Astorga-Carballo, Aline; Zenteno, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising new therapeutic strategy that could provide a novel and more effective way of targeting hereditary ophthalmological diseases. The eye is easily accessible, highly compartmentalized, and an immune-privileged organ that gives advantages as an ideal gene therapy target. Recently, important advances in the availability of various intraocular vector delivery routes and viral vectors that are able to efficiently transduce specific ocular cell types have been described. Gene therapy has advanced in some retinal inherited dystrophies; in this way, preliminary success is now being reported for the treatment of Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). This review will provide an update in the field of gene therapy for the treatment of ocular inherited diseases.

  12. PIN1 gene variants in Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siedlecki Janusz

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptidyl-prolyl isomerase, NIMA-interacting 1 (PIN1 plays a significant role in the brain and is implicated in numerous cellular processes related to Alzheimer's disease (AD and other neurodegenerative conditions. There are confounding results concerning PIN1 activity in AD brains. Also PIN1 genetic variation was inconsistently associated with AD risk. Methods We performed analysis of coding and promoter regions of PIN1 in early- and late-onset AD and frontotemporal dementia (FTD patients in comparison with healthy controls. Results Analysis of eighteen PIN1 common polymorphisms and their haplotypes in EOAD, LOAD and FTD individuals in comparison with the control group did not reveal their contribution to disease risk. In six unrelated familial AD patients four novel PIN1 sequence variants were detected. c.58+64C>T substitution that was identified in three patients, was located in an alternative exon. In silico analysis suggested that this variant highly increases a potential affinity for a splicing factor and introduces two intronic splicing enhancers. In the peripheral leukocytes of one living patient carrying the variant, a 2.82 fold decrease in PIN1 expression was observed. Conclusion Our data does not support the role of PIN1 common polymorphisms as AD risk factor. However, we suggest that the identified rare sequence variants could be directly connected with AD pathology, influencing PIN1 splicing and/or expression.

  13. KIAA1462, a coronary artery disease associated gene, is a candidate gene for late onset Alzheimer disease in APOE carriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah G Murdock

    Full Text Available Alzheimer disease (AD is a devastating neurodegenerative disease affecting more than five million Americans. In this study, we have used updated genetic linkage data from chromosome 10 in combination with expression data from serial analysis of gene expression to choose a new set of thirteen candidate genes for genetic analysis in late onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD. Results in this study identify the KIAA1462 locus as a candidate locus for LOAD in APOE4 carriers. Two genes exist at this locus, KIAA1462, a gene associated with coronary artery disease, and "rokimi", encoding an untranslated spliced RNA The genetic architecture at this locus suggests that the gene product important in this association is either "rokimi", or a different isoform of KIAA1462 than the isoform that is important in cardiovascular disease. Expression data suggests that isoform f of KIAA1462 is a more attractive candidate for association with LOAD in APOE4 carriers than "rokimi" which had no detectable expression in brain.

  14. Gene suppression strategies for dominantly inherited neurodegenerative diseases: lessons from Huntington's disease and spinocerebellar ataxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Megan S; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; McBride, Jodi L

    2016-04-15

    RNA-targeting approaches are emerging as viable therapeutics that offer an alternative method to modulate traditionally 'undrugable' targets. In the case of dominantly inherited neurodegenerative diseases, gene suppression strategies can target the underlying cause of these intractable disorders. Polyglutamine diseases are caused by CAG expansions in discrete genes, making them ideal candidates for gene suppression therapies. Here, we discuss the current state of gene suppression approaches for Huntington's disease and the spinocerebellar ataxias, including the use of antisense oligonucleotides, short-interfering RNAs, as well as viral vector-mediated delivery of short hairpin RNAs and artificial microRNAs. We focus on lessons learned from preclinical studies investigating gene suppression therapies for these disorders, particularly in rodent models of disease and in non-human primates. In animal models, recent advances in gene suppression technologies have not only prevented disease progression in a number of cases, but have also reversed existing disease, providing evidence that reducing the expression of disease-causing genes may be of benefit in symptomatic patients. Both allele- and non-allele-specific approaches to gene suppression have made great strides over the past decade, showing efficacy and safety in both small and large animal models. Advances in delivery techniques allow for broad and durable suppression of target genes, have been validated in non-human primates and in some cases, are currently being evaluated in human patients. Finally, we discuss the challenges of developing and delivering gene suppression constructs into the CNS and recent advances of potential therapeutics into the clinic. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. HFE gene mutations and Wilson's disease in Sardinia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorbello, Orazio; Sini, Margherita; Civolani, Alberto; Demelia, Luigi

    2010-03-01

    Hypocaeruloplasminaemia can lead to tissue iron storage in Wilson's disease and the possibility of iron overload in long-term overtreated patients should be considered. The HFE gene encodes a protein that is intimately involved in intestinal iron absorption. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of the HFE gene mutation, its role in iron metabolism of Wilson's disease patients and the interplay of therapy in copper and iron homeostasis. The records of 32 patients with Wilson's disease were reviewed for iron and copper indices, HFE gene mutations and liver biopsy. Twenty-six patients were negative for HFE gene mutations and did not present significant alterations of iron metabolism. The HFE mutation was significantly associated with increased hepatic iron content (Pgene wild-type. The HFE gene mutations may be an addictional factor in iron overload in Wilson's disease. Our results showed that an adjustment of dosage of drugs could prevent further iron overload induced by overtreatment only in patients HFE wild-type. 2009. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Gene-disease network analysis reveals functional modules in mendelian, complex and environmental diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bauer-Mehren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scientists have been trying to understand the molecular mechanisms of diseases to design preventive and therapeutic strategies for a long time. For some diseases, it has become evident that it is not enough to obtain a catalogue of the disease-related genes but to uncover how disruptions of molecular networks in the cell give rise to disease phenotypes. Moreover, with the unprecedented wealth of information available, even obtaining such catalogue is extremely difficult. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a comprehensive gene-disease association database by integrating associations from several sources that cover different biomedical aspects of diseases. In particular, we focus on the current knowledge of human genetic diseases including mendelian, complex and environmental diseases. To assess the concept of modularity of human diseases, we performed a systematic study of the emergent properties of human gene-disease networks by means of network topology and functional annotation analysis. The results indicate a highly shared genetic origin of human diseases and show that for most diseases, including mendelian, complex and environmental diseases, functional modules exist. Moreover, a core set of biological pathways is found to be associated with most human diseases. We obtained similar results when studying clusters of diseases, suggesting that related diseases might arise due to dysfunction of common biological processes in the cell. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, we include mendelian, complex and environmental diseases in an integrated gene-disease association database and show that the concept of modularity applies for all of them. We furthermore provide a functional analysis of disease-related modules providing important new biological insights, which might not be discovered when considering each of the gene-disease association repositories independently. Hence, we present a suitable framework for the study of how genetic and

  17. Gene-Disease Network Analysis Reveals Functional Modules in Mendelian, Complex and Environmental Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Mehren, Anna; Bundschus, Markus; Rautschka, Michael; Mayer, Miguel A.; Sanz, Ferran; Furlong, Laura I.

    2011-01-01

    Background Scientists have been trying to understand the molecular mechanisms of diseases to design preventive and therapeutic strategies for a long time. For some diseases, it has become evident that it is not enough to obtain a catalogue of the disease-related genes but to uncover how disruptions of molecular networks in the cell give rise to disease phenotypes. Moreover, with the unprecedented wealth of information available, even obtaining such catalogue is extremely difficult. Principal Findings We developed a comprehensive gene-disease association database by integrating associations from several sources that cover different biomedical aspects of diseases. In particular, we focus on the current knowledge of human genetic diseases including mendelian, complex and environmental diseases. To assess the concept of modularity of human diseases, we performed a systematic study of the emergent properties of human gene-disease networks by means of network topology and functional annotation analysis. The results indicate a highly shared genetic origin of human diseases and show that for most diseases, including mendelian, complex and environmental diseases, functional modules exist. Moreover, a core set of biological pathways is found to be associated with most human diseases. We obtained similar results when studying clusters of diseases, suggesting that related diseases might arise due to dysfunction of common biological processes in the cell. Conclusions For the first time, we include mendelian, complex and environmental diseases in an integrated gene-disease association database and show that the concept of modularity applies for all of them. We furthermore provide a functional analysis of disease-related modules providing important new biological insights, which might not be discovered when considering each of the gene-disease association repositories independently. Hence, we present a suitable framework for the study of how genetic and environmental factors

  18. Relationship between TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X F; Zhang, Y F; Zhao, C F; Liu, M M; Si, J P; Fang, Y F; Xing, W W; Wang, F L

    2016-06-02

    Congenital heart disease in children is a type of birth defect. Previous studies have suggested that the transcription factor, TBX20, is involved in the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease in children; however, the specific regulatory mechanisms are yet to be evaluated. Hence, this study aimed to evaluate the relationship between the TBX20 polymorphism and the occurrence and development of congenital heart disease. The TBX20 gene sequence was obtained from the NCBI database and the polymorphic locus candidate was predicted. Thereafter, the specific gene primers were designed for the restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR) of DNA extracted from the blood of 80 patients with congenital heart disease and 80 controls. The results of the PCR were subjected to correlation analysis to identify the differences between the amplicons and to determine the relationship between the TBX20 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease. One of the single nucleotide polymorphic locus was found to be rs3999950: c.774T>C (Ala265Ala). The TC genotype frequency in the patients was higher than that in the controls, similar to that for the C locus. The odds ratio of the TC genotypes was above 1, indicating that the presence of the TC genotype increases the incidence of congenital heart diseases. Thus, rs3999950 may be associated with congenital heart disease, and TBX20 may predispose children to the defect.

  19. Flagellar Synchronization Is a Simple Alternative to Cell Cycle Synchronization for Ciliary and Flagellar Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Soumita; Avasthi, Prachee

    2017-01-01

    The unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an ideal model organism for studies of ciliary function and assembly. In assays for biological and biochemical effects of various factors on flagellar structure and function, synchronous culture is advantageous for minimizing variability. Here, we have characterized a method in which 100% synchronization is achieved with respect to flagellar length but not with respect to the cell cycle. The method requires inducing flagellar regeneration by amputation of the entire cell population and limiting regeneration time. This results in a maximally homogeneous distribution of flagellar lengths at 3 h postamputation. We found that time-limiting new protein synthesis during flagellar synchronization limits variability in the unassembled pool of limiting flagellar protein and variability in flagellar length without affecting the range of cell volumes. We also found that long- and short-flagella mutants that regenerate normally require longer and shorter synchronization times, respectively. By minimizing flagellar length variability using a simple method requiring only hours and no changes in media, flagellar synchronization facilitates the detection of small changes in flagellar length resulting from both chemical and genetic perturbations in Chlamydomonas. This method increases our ability to probe the basic biology of ciliary size regulation and related disease etiologies. IMPORTANCE Cilia and flagella are highly conserved antenna-like organelles that found in nearly all mammalian cell types. They perform sensory and motile functions contributing to numerous physiological and developmental processes. Defects in their assembly and function are implicated in a wide range of human diseases ranging from retinal degeneration to cancer. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is an algal model system for studying mammalian cilium formation and function. Here, we report a simple synchronization method that allows detection of small

  20. Effects of gender on nigral gene expression and parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantuti-Castelvetri, Ippolita; Keller-McGandy, Christine; Bouzou, Bérengère; Asteris, Georgios; Clark, Timothy W; Frosch, Matthew P; Standaert, David G

    2007-06-01

    To identify gene expression patterns in human dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) of male and female control and Parkinson disease (PD) patients, we harvested DA neurons from frozen SNc from 16 subjects (4 male PDs, 4 female PDs, 4 male and 4 female controls) using Laser Capture microdissection and microarrays. We assessed for enrichment of functional categories with a hypergeometric distribution. The data were validated with QPCR. We observed that gender has a pervasive effect on gene expression in DA neurons. Genes upregulated in females relative to males are mainly involved in signal transduction and neuronal maturation, while in males some of the upregulated genes (alpha-synuclein and PINK1) were previously implicated in the pathogenesis of PD. In females with PD we found alterations in genes with protein kinase activity, genes involved in proteolysis and WNT signaling pathway, while in males with PD there were alterations in protein-binding proteins and copper-binding proteins. Our data reveal broad gender-based differences in gene expression in human dopaminergic neurons of SNc that may underlie the predisposition of males to PD. Moreover, we show that gender influences the response to PD, suggesting that the nature of the disease and the response to treatment may be gender-dependent.

  1. Exploratory analysis of seven Alzheimer's disease genes: disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Agustín; Hernández, Isabel; Ronsende-Roca, Maiteé; González-Pérez, Antonio; Rodriguez-Noriega, Emma; Ramírez-Lorca, Reposo; Mauleón, Ana; Moreno-Rey, Concha; Boswell, Lucie; Tune, Larry; Valero, Sergi; Alegret, Montserrat; Gayán, Javier; Becker, James T; Real, Luis Miguel; Tárraga, Lluís; Ballard, Clive; Terrin, Michael; Sherman, Stephanie; Payami, Haydeh; López, Oscar L; Mintzer, Jacobo E; Boada, Mercè

    2013-04-01

    The relationships between genome wide association study-identified and replicated genetic variants associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) risk and disease progression or therapeutic responses in AD patients are almost unexplored. Seven hundred and one AD patients with at least 3 different cognitive evaluations and genotypic information for APOE and 6 genome wide association study-significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms were selected for this study. Mean differences in Global Deterioration Score and Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) were evaluated using nonparametric tests, general linear model and mixed models for repeated measurements. Each chart was also reviewed for evidence of treatment with any cholinesterase inhibitor, memantine, or both. Relationships between therapeutic protocols, genetic markers, and progression were explored using stratified analysis looking for specific effects on progression in each therapeutic category separately. Neither calculation rendered a Bonferroni-corrected statistically significant difference in any genetic marker. Mixed model results suggested differences in the average point in MMSE test for patients carrying PICALM GA or AA genotype compared with GG carriers at the end of the follow-up (MMSE mean difference = -0.57; 95% confidence interval, -1.145 to 0.009; p = 0.047). This observation remained unaltered after covariate adjustments although it did not achieve predefined multiple testing significance threshold. The PICALM single-nucleotide polymorphism also displayed a significant effect protecting against rapid progression during pharmacogenetic assays although its observed effect displayed heterogeneity among AD therapeutic protocols (p = 0.039). None of the studied genetic markers were convincingly linked to AD progression or drug response. However, by using different statistical approaches, the PICALM rs3851179 marker displayed consistent but weak effects on disease progression phenotypes. Copyright © 2013

  2. Inflammatory bowel disease: the role of inflammatory cytokine gene polymorphisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Balding

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available THE mechanisms responsible for development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD have not been fully elucidated, although the main cause of disease pathology is attributed to up-regulated inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to investigate frequencies of polymorphisms in genes encoding pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in IBD patients and controls. We determined genotypes of patients with IBD (n=172 and healthy controls (n=389 for polymorphisms in genes encoding various cytokines (interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF, IL-10, IL-1 receptor antagonist. Association of these genotypes to disease incidence and pathophysiology was investigated. No strong association was found with occurrence of IBD. Variation was observed between the ulcerative colitis study group and the control population for the TNF-α-308 polymorphism (p=0.0135. There was also variation in the frequency of IL-6-174 and TNF-α-308 genotypes in the ulcerative colitis group compared with the Crohn's disease group (p=0.01. We concluded that polymorphisms in inflammatory genes are associated with variations in IBD phenotype and disease susceptibility. Whether the polymorphisms are directly involved in regulating cytokine production, and consequently pathophysiology of IBD, or serve merely as markers in linkage disequilibrium with susceptibility genes remains unclear.

  3. The Pediatric Choroidal and Ciliary Body Melanoma Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Jamal, Rana'a T; Cassoux, Nathalie; Desjardins, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    to 24 years of age, females, and those with CBI. DESIGN: Retrospective, multicenter observational study. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred ninety-nine patients from 24 ocular oncology centers, of whom 114 were children (median age, 15.1 years; range, 2.7-17.9 years) and 185 were young adults. METHODS: Data were......PURPOSE: To collect comprehensive data on choroidal and ciliary body melanoma (CCBM) in children and to validate hypotheses regarding pediatric CCBM: children younger than 18 years, males, and those without ciliary body involvement (CBI) have more favorable survival prognosis than young adults 18...

  4. Gene pyramiding enhances durable blast disease resistance in rice

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuoka, Shuichi; Saka, Norikuni; Mizukami, Yuko; Koga, Hironori; Yamanouchi, Utako; Yoshioka, Yosuke; Hayashi, Nagao; Ebana, Kaworu; Mizobuchi, Ritsuko; Yano, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Effective control of blast, a devastating fungal disease of rice, would increase and stabilize worldwide food production. Resistance mediated by quantitative trait loci (QTLs), which usually have smaller individual effects than R-genes but confer broad-spectrum or non-race-specific resistance, is a promising alternative to less durable race-specific resistance for crop improvement, yet evidence that validates the impact of QTL combinations (pyramids) on the durability of plant disease resista...

  5. Tuberous sclerosis complex and polycystic kidney disease contiguous gene syndrome with Moyamoya disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jonathan; Modi, Lopa; Ramai, Daryl; Tortora, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) are two diseases sharing close genetic loci on chromosome 16. Due to contiguous gene syndrome, also known as contiguous gene deletion syndrome, the proximity of TSC2 and PKD1 genes increases the risk of co-deletion resulting in a shared clinical presentation. Furthermore, Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare vaso-occlusive disease in the circle of Willis. We present the first case of TSC2/PKD1 contiguous gene syndrome in a patient with MMD along with detailed histopathologic, radiologic, and cytogenetic analyses. We also highlight the clinical presentation and surgical complications in this case. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Identification of susceptibility genes and genetic modifiers of human diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Kenneth; Kammerer, Stefan; Hoyal, Carolyn; Reneland, Rikard; Marnellos, George; Nelson, Matthew R.; Braun, Andreas

    2005-03-01

    The completion of the human genome sequence enables the discovery of genes involved in common human disorders. The successful identification of these genes is dependent on the availability of informative sample sets, validated marker panels, a high-throughput scoring technology, and a strategy for combining these resources. We have developed a universal platform technology based on mass spectrometry (MassARRAY) for analyzing nucleic acids with high precision and accuracy. To fuel this technology, we generated more than 100,000 validated assays for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering virtually all known and predicted human genes. We also established a large DNA sample bank comprised of more than 50,000 consented healthy and diseased individuals. This combination of reagents and technology allows the execution of large-scale genome-wide association studies. Taking advantage of MassARRAY"s capability for quantitative analysis of nucleic acids, allele frequencies are estimated in sample pools containing large numbers of individual DNAs. To compare pools as a first-pass "filtering" step is a tremendous advantage in throughput and cost over individual genotyping. We employed this approach in numerous genome-wide, hypothesis-free searches to identify genes associated with common complex diseases, such as breast cancer, osteoporosis, and osteoarthritis, and genes involved in quantitative traits like high density lipoproteins cholesterol (HDL-c) levels and central fat. Access to additional well-characterized patient samples through collaborations allows us to conduct replication studies that validate true disease genes. These discoveries will expand our understanding of genetic disease predisposition, and our ability for early diagnosis and determination of specific disease subtype or progression stage.

  7. Immune-related gene polymorphisms in pulmonary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dhirendra P; Bagam, Prathyusha; Sahoo, Malaya K; Batra, Sanjay

    2017-05-15

    Between the DNA sequences of two randomly-selected human genomes, which consist of over 3 billion base pairs and twenty five thousand genes, there exists only 0.1% variation and 99.9% sequence identity. During the last couple of decades, extensive genome-wide studies have investigated the association between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), the most common DNA variations, and susceptibility to various diseases. Because the immune system's primary function is to defend against myriad infectious agents and diseases, the large number of people who escape serious infectious diseases underscores the tremendous success of this system at this task. In fact, out of the third of the global human population infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis during their lifetime, only a few people develop active disease, and a heavy chain smoker may inexplicably escape all symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), lung cancer, and other smoke-associated lung diseases. This may be attributable to the genetic makeup of the individual(s), including their SNPs, which provide some resistance to the disease. Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), transcription factors, cytokines and chemokines all play critical roles in orchestrating immune responses and their expression/activation is directly linked to human disease tolerance. Moreover, genetic variations present in the immune-response genes of various ethnicities may explain the huge differences in individual outcomes to various diseases and following exposure to infectious agents. The current review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of pulmonary diseases and the relationship of genetic variations in immune response genes to these conditions. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Retinoids and their target genes in liver functions and diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Goshi; Kanki, Keita

    2013-08-01

    Retinoids have been reported to prevent several kinds of cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Retinoic acid (RA) coupled with retinoic acid receptor/retinoid X receptor heterodimer exerts its functions by regulating its target genes. We previously reported that transgenic mice, in which RA signaling is suppressed in a hepatocyte-specific manner, developed liver cancer at a high rate, and that disruption of RA functions led to the increased oxidative stress via aberrant metabolisms of lipid and iron, indicating that retinoids play an important role in liver pathophysiology. These data suggest that exploring the metabolism of retinoids in liver diseases and their target genes provides us with useful information to understand the liver functions and diseases. Consequently, the altered metabolism of retinoids was observed in liver diseases, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. In this review, we summarize the metabolism of retinoids in the liver, highlight the functions of retinoids in HCC, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and alcoholic liver disease, and discuss the target genes of RA. Investigation of retinoids in the liver will likely help us identify novel therapies and diagnostic modalities for HCC. © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. Analysis of neurodegenerative Mendelian genes in clinically diagnosed Alzheimer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Maria Victoria; Kim, Jong Hun; Budde, John P; Black, Kathleen; Medvedeva, Alexandra; Saef, Ben; Deming, Yuetiva; Del-Aguila, Jorge; Ibañez, Laura; Dube, Umber; Harari, Oscar; Norton, Joanne; Chasse, Rachel; Morris, John C; Goate, Alison; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2017-11-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD), Frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTD), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Parkinson disease (PD) have a certain degree of clinical, pathological and molecular overlap. Previous studies indicate that causative mutations in AD and FTD/ALS genes can be found in clinical familial AD. We examined the presence of causative and low frequency coding variants in the AD, FTD, ALS and PD Mendelian genes, in over 450 families with clinical history of AD and over 11,710 sporadic cases and cognitive normal participants from North America. Known pathogenic mutations were found in 1.05% of the sporadic cases, in 0.69% of the cognitively normal participants and in 4.22% of the families. A trend towards enrichment, albeit non-significant, was observed for most AD, FTD and PD genes. Only PSEN1 and PINK1 showed consistent association with AD cases when we used ExAC as the control population. These results suggest that current study designs may contain heterogeneity and contamination of the control population, and that current statistical methods for the discovery of novel genes with real pathogenic variants in complex late onset diseases may be inadequate or underpowered to identify genes carrying pathogenic mutations.

  10. Th17-related genes and celiac disease susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz María Medrano

    Full Text Available Th17 cells are known to be involved in several autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. In celiac disease (CD, recent studies suggest an implication of those cells in disease pathogenesis. We aimed at studying the role of genes relevant for the Th17 immune response in CD susceptibility. A total of 101 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, mainly selected to cover most of the variability present in 16 Th17-related genes (IL23R, RORC, IL6R, IL17A, IL17F, CCR6, IL6, JAK2, TNFSF15, IL23A, IL22, STAT3, TBX21, SOCS3, IL12RB1 and IL17RA, were genotyped in 735 CD patients and 549 ethnically matched healthy controls. Case-control comparisons for each SNP and for the haplotypes resulting from the SNPs studied in each gene were performed using chi-square tests. Gene-gene interactions were also evaluated following different methodological approaches. No significant results emerged after performing the appropriate statistical corrections. Our results seem to discard a relevant role of Th17 cells on CD risk.

  11. Approaches and methods in gene therapy for kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wouden, Els A; Sandovici, Maria; Henning, Robert H; de Zeeuw, Dick; Deelman, Leo E

    2004-01-01

    Renal gene therapy may offer new strategies to treat diseases of native and transplanted kidneys. Several experimental techniques have been developed and employed using nonviral, viral, and cellular vectors. The most efficient vector for in vivo transfection appears to be adenovirus. Glomeruli,

  12. Vitamin D Receptor Gene Variants in Parkinson's Disease Patients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rokhsareh Meamar

    2016-09-22

    Sep 22, 2016 ... ORIGINAL ARTICLE. Vitamin D receptor gene variants in Parkinson's disease patients. Rokhsareh Meamar a,b. , Seyed Morteza Javadirad ... b Endocrine and Metabolism Research Center, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran .... the length of protein would be three amino acids shorter in.

  13. Understanding gene expression in coronary artery disease through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Molecular mechanism underlying the patho-physiology of coronary artery disease (CAD) is complex. We used global expression profiling combined with analysis of biological network to dissect out potential genes and pathways associated with CAD in a representative case–control Asian Indian cohort. We initially ...

  14. Clonal immunoglobulin gene rearrangements in tissues involved by Hodgkin's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinker, M G; Poppema, S; Buys, C H; Timens, W; Osinga, J; Visser, L

    The nature of Reed-Sternberg cells, the abnormal cells of Hodgkin's disease, is controversial. Morphological and immunologic marker studies suggested different cells of origin. To investigate a possible B or T cell origin, immunoglobulin and T cell receptor gene analyses were performed on tissues

  15. Clipboard: The Indian genetic landscape and disease-related genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2008-11-19

    Nov 19, 2008 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 33; Issue 5. Clipboard: The Indian genetic landscape and disease-related genes. Evelyne Heyer. Volume 33 Issue 5 December 2008 pp 631-633. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/033/05/0631- ...

  16. Genetic anaylsis of a disease resistance gene from loblolly pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yinghua Huang; Nili Jin; Alex Diner; Chuck Tauer; Yan Zhang; John Damicone

    2003-01-01

    Rapid advances in molecular genetics provide great opportunities for studies of host defense mechanisms. Examination of plant responses to disease at the cellular and molecular level permits both discovery of changes in gene expression in the tissues attacked by pathogens, and identification of genetic components involved in the interaction between host and pathogens....

  17. Management of primary ciliary dyskinesia/Kartagener's syndrome in infertile male patients and current progress in defining the underlying genetic mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Wei Sha

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Kartagener's syndrome (KS is an autosomal recessive genetic disease accounting for approximately 50% of the cases of primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD. As it is accompanied by many complications, PCD/KS severely affects the patient's quality of life. Therapeutic approaches for PCD/KS aim to enhance prevention, facilitate rapid definitive diagnosis, avoid misdiagnosis, maintain active treatment, control infection and postpone the development of lesions. In male patients, sperm flagella may show impairment in or complete absence of the ability to swing, which ultimately results in male infertility. Assisted reproductive technology will certainly benefit such patients. For PCD/KS patients with completely immotile sperm, intracytoplasmic sperm injection may be very important and even indispensable. Considering the number of PCD/KS susceptibility genes and mutations that are being identified, more extensive genetic screening is indispensable in patients with these diseases. Moreover, further studies into the potential molecular mechanisms of these diseases are required. In this review, we summarize the available information on various aspects of this disease in order to delineate the therapeutic objectives more clearly, and clarify the efficacy of assisted reproductive technology as a means of treatment for patients with PCD/KS-associated infertility.

  18. MyGeneFriends: A Social Network Linking Genes, Genetic Diseases, and Researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allot, Alexis; Chennen, Kirsley; Nevers, Yannis; Poidevin, Laetitia; Kress, Arnaud; Ripp, Raymond; Thompson, Julie Dawn; Poch, Olivier; Lecompte, Odile

    2017-06-16

    The constant and massive increase of biological data offers unprecedented opportunities to decipher the function and evolution of genes and their roles in human diseases. However, the multiplicity of sources and flow of data mean that efficient access to useful information and knowledge production has become a major challenge. This challenge can be addressed by taking inspiration from Web 2.0 and particularly social networks, which are at the forefront of big data exploration and human-data interaction. MyGeneFriends is a Web platform inspired by social networks, devoted to genetic disease analysis, and organized around three types of proactive agents: genes, humans, and genetic diseases. The aim of this study was to improve exploration and exploitation of biological, postgenomic era big data. MyGeneFriends leverages conventions popularized by top social networks (Facebook, LinkedIn, etc), such as networks of friends, profile pages, friendship recommendations, affinity scores, news feeds, content recommendation, and data visualization. MyGeneFriends provides simple and intuitive interactions with data through evaluation and visualization of connections (friendships) between genes, humans, and diseases. The platform suggests new friends and publications and allows agents to follow the activity of their friends. It dynamically personalizes information depending on the user's specific interests and provides an efficient way to share information with collaborators. Furthermore, the user's behavior itself generates new information that constitutes an added value integrated in the network, which can be used to discover new connections between biological agents. We have developed MyGeneFriends, a Web platform leveraging conventions from popular social networks to redefine the relationship between humans and biological big data and improve human processing of biomedical data. MyGeneFriends is available at lbgi.fr/mygenefriends.

  19. Gene expression profiling in autoimmune diseases: chronic inflammation or disease specific patterns?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovin, Lone Frier; Brynskov, Jørn; Hegedüs, Laszlo

    2007-01-01

    ) patients and healthy individuals were specific for the arthritic process or likewise altered in other chronic inflammatory diseases such as chronic autoimmune thyroiditis (Hashimoto's thyroiditis, HT) and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using qPCR for 18 RA-discriminative genes, there were no significant...... differences in peripheral blood mononuclear cell (MNC) gene expression patterns between 15 newly diagnosed HT patients and 15 matched healthy controls. However, the MNC expression levels of five genes were significantly upregulated in 25 IBD patients, compared to 18 matched healthy controls (CD14, FACL2, FCN1...

  20. An effective combination of sanger and next generation sequencing in diagnostics of primary ciliary dyskinesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djakow, Jana; Kramná, Lenka; Dušátková, Lenka; Uhlík, Jiří; Pursiheimo, Juha-Pekka; Svobodová, Tamara; Pohunek, Petr; Cinek, Ondřej

    2016-05-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is a multigenic autosomal recessive condition affecting respiratory tract and other organs where ciliary motility is required. The extent of its genetic heterogeneity is remarkable. The aim of the study was to develop a cost-effective pipeline for genetic diagnostics using a combination of Sanger and next generation sequencing (NGS). Data and samples of 33 families with 38 affected subjects with PCD diagnosed in childhood were collected over the territory of the Czech Republic. A panel of 18 PCD causative or candidate genes was implemented into an Illumina TruSeq Custom Amplicon NGS assay, and three ancestral mutations in SPAG1 were screened by conventional Sanger sequencing, which was also used for the confirmation of the NGS results and for the analysis of familial segregation. The causative gene was DNAH5 in 11/33 (33%) probands, SPAG1 in 8/33 (24%), and DNAI1, CCDC40, LRRC6 in one family each. If the high proportion of subjects with bi-allelic ancestral mutations in SPAG1 is corroborated in other Caucasian populations, a simple Sanger sequencing test for these three mutations may serve as an effective pre-screening step, being followed by an NGS panel for other, much larger, PCD genes. We present a combination of Sanger sequencing with an NGS panel for known and candidate PCD genes, implemented in a moderate-size national collection of patients. This strategy has proven to be cost-effective, rapid and reliable, and was able to detect the causative gene in two thirds of our PCD patients. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Gene therapy and angiogenesis in patients with coronary artery disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Not all patients with severe coronary artery disease can be treated satisfactorily with current recommended medications and revascularization techniques. Various vascular growth factors have the potential to induce angiogenesis in ischemic tissue. Clinical trials have only evaluated the effect...... of VEGF and FGF in patients with coronary artery disease. The initial small and unblinded studies with either recombinant growth factor proteins or genes encoding growth factors were encouraging, demonstrating both clinical improvement and evidence of angiogenesis. However, subsequent larger double...... an improvement in clinical results can be obtained with a cocktail of growth factors or by a combination of gene and stem cell therapy in patients with severe coronary artery disease, which cannot be treated effectively with current treatment strategies....

  2. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy for neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Marc S; Samulski, R Jude; McCown, Thomas J

    2013-06-01

    Diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) have provided enormous opportunities for the therapeutic application of viral vector gene transfer. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been the vector of choice in recent clinical trials of neurological disease, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, due to the safety, efficacy, and stability of AAV gene transfer to the CNS. This review highlights the strategies employed for improving direct and peripheral targeting of therapeutic vectors to CNS tissue, and considers the significance of cellular and tissue transduction specificity, transgene regulation, and other variables that influence achievement of successful therapeutic goals. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'New Targets and Approaches to the Treatment of Epilepsy'. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Lateral organ boundaries 1 is a disease susceptibility gene for citrus bacterial canker disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Zhang, Junli; Jia, Hongge; Sosso, Davide; Li, Ting; Frommer, Wolf B.; Yang, Bing; White, Frank F.; Wang, Nian; Jones, Jeffrey B.

    2014-01-01

    Citrus bacterial canker (CBC) disease occurs worldwide and incurs considerable costs both from control measures and yield losses. Bacteria that cause CBC require one of six known type III transcription activator-like (TAL) effector genes for the characteristic pustule formation at the site of infection. Here, we show that Xanthomonas citri subspecies citri strain Xcc306, with the type III TAL effector gene pthA4 or with the distinct yet biologically equivalent gene pthAw from strain XccAw, induces two host genes, CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1, in a TAL effector-dependent manner. CsLOB1 is a member of the Lateral Organ Boundaries (LOB) gene family of transcription factors, and CsSWEET1 is a homolog of the SWEET sugar transporter and rice disease susceptibility gene. Both TAL effectors drive expression of CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1 promoter reporter gene fusions when coexpressed in citrus or Nicotiana benthamiana. Artificially designed TAL effectors directed to sequences in the CsLOB1 promoter region, but not the CsSWEET1 promoter, promoted pustule formation and higher bacterial leaf populations. Three additional distinct TAL effector genes, pthA*, pthB, and pthC, also direct pustule formation and expression of CsLOB1. Unlike pthA4 and pthAw, pthB and pthC do not promote the expression of CsSWEET1. CsLOB1 expression was associated with the expression of genes associated with cell expansion. The results indicate that CBC-inciting species of Xanthomonas exploit a single host disease susceptibility gene by altering the expression of an otherwise developmentally regulated gene using any one of a diverse set of TAL effector genes in the pathogen populations. PMID:24474801

  4. Lateral organ boundaries 1 is a disease susceptibility gene for citrus bacterial canker disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yang; Zhang, Junli; Jia, Hongge; Sosso, Davide; Li, Ting; Frommer, Wolf B; Yang, Bing; White, Frank F; Wang, Nian; Jones, Jeffrey B

    2014-01-28

    Citrus bacterial canker (CBC) disease occurs worldwide and incurs considerable costs both from control measures and yield losses. Bacteria that cause CBC require one of six known type III transcription activator-like (TAL) effector genes for the characteristic pustule formation at the site of infection. Here, we show that Xanthomonas citri subspecies citri strain Xcc306, with the type III TAL effector gene pthA4 or with the distinct yet biologically equivalent gene pthAw from strain XccA(w), induces two host genes, CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1, in a TAL effector-dependent manner. CsLOB1 is a member of the Lateral Organ Boundaries (LOB) gene family of transcription factors, and CsSWEET1 is a homolog of the SWEET sugar transporter and rice disease susceptibility gene. Both TAL effectors drive expression of CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1 promoter reporter gene fusions when coexpressed in citrus or Nicotiana benthamiana. Artificially designed TAL effectors directed to sequences in the CsLOB1 promoter region, but not the CsSWEET1 promoter, promoted pustule formation and higher bacterial leaf populations. Three additional distinct TAL effector genes, pthA*, pthB, and pthC, also direct pustule formation and expression of CsLOB1. Unlike pthA4 and pthAw, pthB and pthC do not promote the expression of CsSWEET1. CsLOB1 expression was associated with the expression of genes associated with cell expansion. The results indicate that CBC-inciting species of Xanthomonas exploit a single host disease susceptibility gene by altering the expression of an otherwise developmentally regulated gene using any one of a diverse set of TAL effector genes in the pathogen populations.

  5. Disease Modeling and Gene Therapy of Copper Storage Disease in Canine Hepatic Organoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nantasanti, Sathidpak; Spee, Bart; Kruitwagen, Hedwig S; Chen, Chen; Geijsen, Niels; Oosterhoff, Loes A; van Wolferen, Monique E; Pelaez, Nicolas; Fieten, Hille; Wubbolts, Richard W; Grinwis, Guy C; Chan, Jefferson; Huch, Meritxell; Vries, Robert R G; Clevers, Hans; de Bruin, Alain; Rothuizen, Jan; Penning, Louis C; Schotanus, Baukje A

    2015-01-01

    The recent development of 3D-liver stem cell cultures (hepatic organoids) opens up new avenues for gene and/or stem cell therapy to treat liver disease. To test safety and efficacy, a relevant large animal model is essential but not yet established. Because of its shared pathologies and disease

  6. Continued administration of ciliary neurotrophic factor protects mice from inflammatory pathology in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhlmann, Tanja; Remington, Leah; Cognet, Isabelle

    2006-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that leads to loss of myelin and oligodendrocytes and damage to axons. We show that daily administration (days 8 to 24) of murine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a neurotrophic factor that has been described as a surv......Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that leads to loss of myelin and oligodendrocytes and damage to axons. We show that daily administration (days 8 to 24) of murine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a neurotrophic factor that has been described...... as a survival and differentiation factor for neurons and oligodendrocytes, significantly ameliorates the clinical course of a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. In the acute phase of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced by myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein peptide 35-55, treatment with CNTF did...... not change the peripheral immune response but did reduce the number of perivascular infiltrates and T cells and the level of diffuse microglial activation in spinal cord. Blood brain barrier permeability was significantly reduced in CNTF-treated animals. Beneficial effects of CNTF did not persist after...

  7. Impaired expression of ciliary neurotrophic factor in Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 1A neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobbio, Lucilla; Fiorese, Fulvia; Vigo, Tiziana; Cilli, Michele; Gherardi, Gianfranco; Grandis, Marina; Melcangi, Roberto Cosimo; Mancardi, Gianluigi; Abbruzzese, Michele; Schenone, Angelo

    2009-05-01

    We investigated the contribution of Schwann cell-derived ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) to the pathogenesis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1A (CMT1A) and addressed the question as to whether it plays a role in the development of axonal damage observed in the disease, with aging. Ciliary neurotrophic factor was underexpressed in experimental CMT1A but not in other models of hereditary neuropathies. Sciatic nerve crush experiments and dosage of CNTF at different time points showed that expression of this trophic factor remained significantly lower in CMT1A rats than in normal controls; moreover, in uninjured CMT1A sciatic nerves CNTF levels further decreased with ageing, thus paralleling the molecular signs of axonal impairment, that is increased expression of non-phosphorylated neurofilaments and amyloid precursor protein. Administration of CNTF to dorsal root ganglia cultures reduced dephosphorylation of neurofilaments in CMT1A cultures, without improving demyelination. Taken together, these results provide further evidence that the production of CNTF by Schwann cells is markedly reduced in CMT1A. Moreover, the observations suggest that trophic support to the axon is impaired in CMT1A and that further studies on the therapeutic use of trophic factors or their derivatives in experimental and human CMT1A are warranted.

  8. Measurement of ciliary beat frequency using ultra-high resolution optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jason J.; Jing, Joseph C.; Su, Erica; Badger, Christopher; Coughlan, Carolyn A.; Chen, Zhongping; Wong, Brian J. F.

    2016-02-01

    Ciliated epithelial cells populate up to 80% of the surface area of the human airway and are responsible for mucociliary transport, which is the key protective mechanism that provides the first line of defense in the respiratory tract. Cilia beat in a rhythmic pattern and may be easily affected by allergens, pollutants, and pathogens, altering ciliary beat frequency (CBF) subsequently. Diseases including cystic fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and primary ciliary dyskinesia may also decrease CBF. CBF is therefore a critical component of respiratory health. The current clinical method of measuring CBF is phase-contrast microscopy, which involves a tissue biopsy obtained via brushing of the nasal cavity. While this method is minimally invasive, the tissue sample must be oriented to display its profile view, making the visualization of a single layer of cilia challenging. In addition, the conventional method requires subjective analysis of CBF, e.g., manually counting by visual inspection. On the contrary, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been used to study the retina in ophthalmology as well as vasculature in cardiology, and offers higher resolution than conventional computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Based on this technology, our lab specifically developed an ultra-high resolution OCT system to image the microstructure of the ciliated epithelial cells. Doppler analysis was also performed to determine CBF. Lastly, we also developed a program that utilizes fast Fourier transform to determine CBF under phase-contrast microscopy, providing a more objective method compared to the current method.

  9. A novel cyclin gene (CCNF) in the region of the polycystic kidney disease gene (PKD1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, B.; Pohlschmidt, M.; Leung, L.S. [Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-11-01

    The major locus for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (PKD1) is located in a gene-rich region on chromosome 16p13.3. Recently the identification of the gene responsible for PKD1 has been described. While searching for candidate genes in this region, the authors isolated a new member of the cyclin family. They have characterized the transcript by sequencing, determination of the exon intron boundaries, and Northern blot analysis. Cyclin F is related to A- and B-type cyclins by sequence, but its function is unknown.

  10. Multicavitary ciliary body melanoma presenting as a cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Jang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyst-like cavities in uveal melanoma occur rarely and can simulate a benign intraocular cystic lesion resulting in delayed diagnosis and inappropriate management. Herein, we describe a 66-year-old Caucasian female who presented with a "cystic" ciliary body mass in the right eye oculus dexter (OD. Slit lamp examination OD showed anterior bulging of the iris temporally from an underlying pigmented ciliary body mass and transillumination disclosed slight shadow from the tumor. Ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM revealed multiple cyst-like cavities within a tumor, lined by "thick walls" of at least 200 μm and occupying 80% of the tumor volume. A clinical diagnosis of multi-cavitary ciliary body melanoma was suspected and partial lamellar sclero iridocyclectomy was performed. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of low-grade spindle melanoma of the ciliary body with multiple empty and fluid filled cyst-like cavities without epithelial lining. UBM is an important diagnostic tool in the differentiation of "thick walled" cavitary melanoma from "thin walled" benign pigment epithelial cyst.

  11. Case Report: Primary ciliary dyskinesia: Kartagener syndrome in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Primary ciliary dyskinesia is a genetically heterogeneous autosomal recessive disorder with variable clinical manifestations, including chronic rhinosinusitis, otitis media, bronchitis, pneumonia, bronchiectasis, situs inversus totalis, reduced fertility in female patients and male infertility. The condition occurs as a ...

  12. Development of a ciliary muscle-driven accommodating intraocular lens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, E.A.; Terwee, T.T.; Koopmans, S.A.; Dubbelman, M.; van der Heijde, R.G.L.; Heethaar, R.M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a ciliary muscle-driven accommodating intraocular lens (IOL) that has a large and predictable range of variable power as a step toward spectacle independence. Setting: Department of Physics and Medical Technology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Methods:

  13. Development of a ciliary muscle-driven accommodating intraocular lens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermans, Erik A.; Terwee, Thom T.; Koopmans, Steven A.; Dubbelman, Michiel; van der Heijde, Rob G. L.; Heethaar, Rob M.

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop a ciliary muscle-driven accommodating intraocular lens (IOL) that has a large and predictable range of variable power as a step toward spectacle independence. SETTING: Department of Physics and Medical Technology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. METHODS:

  14. Genetic-Variation-Driven Gene-Expression Changes Highlight Genes with Important Functions for Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Yi-An; Yi, Huiguang; Qiu, Chengxiang; Huang, Shizheng; Park, Jihwan; Ledo, Nora; Köttgen, Anna; Li, Hongzhe; Rader, Daniel J; Pack, Michael A; Brown, Christopher D; Susztak, Katalin

    2017-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a complex gene-environmental disease affecting close to 10% of the US population. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified sequence variants, localized to non-coding genomic regions, associated with kidney function. Despite these robust observations, the mechanism by which variants lead to CKD remains a critical unanswered question. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analysis is a method to identify genetic variation associated with gene expression changes in specific tissue types. We hypothesized that an integrative analysis combining CKD GWAS and kidney eQTL results can identify candidate genes for CKD. We performed eQTL analysis by correlating genotype with RNA-seq-based gene expression levels in 96 human kidney samples. Applying stringent statistical criteria, we detected 1,886 genes whose expression differs with the sequence variants. Using direct overlap and Bayesian methods, we identified new potential target genes for CKD. With respect to one of the target genes, lysosomal beta A mannosidase (MANBA), we observed that genetic variants associated with MANBA expression in the kidney showed statistically significant colocalization with variants identified in CKD GWASs, indicating that MANBA is a potential target gene for CKD. The expression of MANBA was significantly lower in kidneys of subjects with risk alleles. Suppressing manba expression in zebrafish resulted in renal tubule defects and pericardial edema, phenotypes typically induced by kidney dysfunction. Our analysis shows that gene-expression changes driven by genetic variation in the kidney can highlight potential new target genes for CKD development. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Dizeez: an online game for human gene-disease annotation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Loguercio

    Full Text Available Structured gene annotations are a foundation upon which many bioinformatics and statistical analyses are built. However the structured annotations available in public databases are a sparse representation of biological knowledge as a whole. The rate of biomedical data generation is such that centralized biocuration efforts struggle to keep up. New models for gene annotation need to be explored that expand the pace at which we are able to structure biomedical knowledge. Recently, online games have emerged as an effective way to recruit, engage and organize large numbers of volunteers to help address difficult biological challenges. For example, games have been successfully developed for protein folding (Foldit, multiple sequence alignment (Phylo and RNA structure design (EteRNA. Here we present Dizeez, a simple online game built with the purpose of structuring knowledge of gene-disease associations. Preliminary results from game play online and at scientific conferences suggest that Dizeez is producing valid gene-disease annotations not yet present in any public database. These early results provide a basic proof of principle that online games can be successfully applied to the challenge of gene annotation. Dizeez is available at http://genegames.org.

  16. The presence of synaptic and chromosome disjunction mutants in Cenchrus ciliaris (Poaceae: Paniceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. C. Visser

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic mutants are present in  Cenchrus ciliaris L This species, due to the presence of linear bivalents and occasion­al trivalents and quadrivalents, is an intermediate desynaptic species. In addition, geographical distribution and environmental factors, such as high temperatures and low humidity, could also have had an influence on the desynapsis observed.The disjunction of chromosomes during anaphase I was mostly abnormal in this desynaptic species. Precocious disjunction of chromosomes into chromatids occurred during anaphase I Due to the high incidence of this chromosome abnormality, a mutant gene,  'pc'  responsible for the disjunction of chromosomes, must be present. The absence of cytokinesis in one specimen indicates a recessive mutant gene,  'va' to be active in this species.

  17. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zodwa Dlamini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family have alternatively spliced isoforms that lack important active domains. These isoforms can play a negative regulatory role by binding to and inhibiting the pro-apoptotic forms. Alternative splicing is observed to be increased in various cardiovascular diseases with the level of alternate transcripts increasing elevated in diseased hearts compared to healthy subjects. In many cases these isoforms appear to be the underlying cause of the disease, while in others they may be induced in response to cardiovascular pathologies. Regardless of this, the detection of alternate splicing events in the heart can serve as useful diagnostic or prognostic tools, while those splicing events that seem to play a causative role in cardiovascular disease make attractive future drug targets.

  18. Gene Technology for Papaya Ringspot Virus Disease Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Md. Abul Kalam; Sidik, Nik Marzuki

    2014-01-01

    Papaya (Carica papaya) is severely damaged by the papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). This review focuses on the development of PRSV resistant transgenic papaya through gene technology. The genetic diversity of PRSV depends upon geographical distribution and the influence of PRSV disease management on a sequence of PRSV isolates. The concept of pathogen-derived resistance has been employed for the development of transgenic papaya, using a coat protein-mediated, RNA-silencing mechanism and replicase gene-mediated transformation for effective PRSV disease management. The development of PRSV-resistant papaya via post-transcriptional gene silencing is a promising technology for PRSV disease management. PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya is environmentally safe and has no harmful effects on human health. Recent studies have revealed that the success of adoption of transgenic papaya depends upon the application, it being a commercially viable product, bio-safety regulatory issues, trade regulations, and the wider social acceptance of the technology. This review discusses the genome and the genetic diversity of PRSV, host range determinants, molecular diagnosis, disease management strategies, the development of transgenic papaya, environmental issues, issues in the adoption of transgenic papaya, and future directions for research. PMID:24757435

  19. Gene technology for papaya ringspot virus disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Md Abul Kalam; Amin, Latifah; Sidik, Nik Marzuki

    2014-01-01

    Papaya (Carica papaya) is severely damaged by the papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). This review focuses on the development of PRSV resistant transgenic papaya through gene technology. The genetic diversity of PRSV depends upon geographical distribution and the influence of PRSV disease management on a sequence of PRSV isolates. The concept of pathogen-derived resistance has been employed for the development of transgenic papaya, using a coat protein-mediated, RNA-silencing mechanism and replicase gene-mediated transformation for effective PRSV disease management. The development of PRSV-resistant papaya via post-transcriptional gene silencing is a promising technology for PRSV disease management. PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya is environmentally safe and has no harmful effects on human health. Recent studies have revealed that the success of adoption of transgenic papaya depends upon the application, it being a commercially viable product, bio-safety regulatory issues, trade regulations, and the wider social acceptance of the technology. This review discusses the genome and the genetic diversity of PRSV, host range determinants, molecular diagnosis, disease management strategies, the development of transgenic papaya, environmental issues, issues in the adoption of transgenic papaya, and future directions for research.

  20. Significant changes in endogenous retinal gene expression assessed 1 year after a single intraocular injection of AAV-CNTF or AAV-BDNF

    OpenAIRE

    Chrisna J LeVaillant; Sharma, Anil; Muhling, Jill; Wheeler, Lachlan PG; Cozens, Greg S.; Hellström, Mats; Rodger, Jennifer; Harvey, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    Use of viral vectors to deliver therapeutic genes to the central nervous system holds promise for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and neurotrauma. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors encoding brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or ciliary derived neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promote the viability and regeneration of injured adult rat retinal ganglion cells. However, these growth-inducing transgenes are driven by a constitutively active promoter, thus we examined whether long-t...

  1. NDRC: A Disease-Causing Genes Prioritized Method Based on Network Diffusion and Rank Concordance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Minghong; Hu, Xiaohua; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Junmin; Shen, Xianjun; He, Tingting

    2015-07-01

    Disease-causing genes prioritization is very important to understand disease mechanisms and biomedical applications, such as design of drugs. Previous studies have shown that promising candidate genes are mostly ranked according to their relatedness to known disease genes or closely related disease genes. Therefore, a dangling gene (isolated gene) with no edges in the network can not be effectively prioritized. These approaches tend to prioritize those genes that are highly connected in the PPI network while perform poorly when they are applied to loosely connected disease genes. To address these problems, we propose a new disease-causing genes prioritization method that based on network diffusion and rank concordance (NDRC). The method is evaluated by leave-one-out cross validation on 1931 diseases in which at least one gene is known to be involved, and it is able to rank the true causal gene first in 849 of all 2542 cases. The experimental results suggest that NDRC significantly outperforms other existing methods such as RWR, VAVIEN, DADA and PRINCE on identifying loosely connected disease genes and successfully put dangling genes as potential candidate disease genes. Furthermore, we apply NDRC method to study three representative diseases, Meckel syndrome 1, Protein C deficiency and Peroxisome biogenesis disorder 1A (Zellweger). Our study has also found that certain complex disease-causing genes can be divided into several modules that are closely associated with different disease phenotype.

  2. Fibrosis-Related Gene Expression in Single Ventricle Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Stephanie J; Siomos, Austine K; Garcia, Anastacia M; Nguyen, Hieu; SooHoo, Megan; Galambos, Csaba; Nunley, Karin; Stauffer, Brian L; Sucharov, Carmen C; Miyamoto, Shelley D

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate fibrosis and fibrosis-related gene expression in the myocardium of pediatric subjects with single ventricle with right ventricular failure. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed on explanted right ventricular myocardium of pediatric subjects with single ventricle disease and controls with nonfailing heart disease. Subjects were divided into 3 groups: single ventricle failing (right ventricular failure before or after stage I palliation), single ventricle nonfailing (infants listed for primary transplantation with normal right ventricular function), and stage III (Fontan or right ventricular failure after stage III). To evaluate subjects of similar age and right ventricular volume loading, single ventricle disease with failure was compared with single ventricle without failure and stage III was compared with nonfailing right ventricular disease. Histologic fibrosis was assessed in all hearts. Mann-Whitney tests were performed to identify differences in gene expression. Collagen (Col1α, Col3) expression is decreased in single ventricle congenital heart disease with failure compared with nonfailing single ventricle congenital heart disease (P = .019 and P = .035, respectively), and is equivalent in stage III compared with nonfailing right ventricular heart disease. Tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1, TIMP-3, and TIMP-4) are downregulated in stage III compared with nonfailing right ventricular heart disease (P = .0047, P = .013 and P = .013, respectively). Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9) are similar between nonfailing single ventricular heart disease and failing single ventricular heart disease, and between stage III heart disease and nonfailing right ventricular heart disease. There is no difference in the prevalence of right ventricular fibrosis by histology in subjects with single ventricular failure heart disease with right ventricular failure (18%) compared with those with normal right

  3. Allele-selective suppression of mutant genes in polyglutamine diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chia-Rung; Cheng, Tzu-Hao

    2015-01-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases are heritable dominant neurological disorders, caused by abnormal CAG tri-nucleotide expansion in the coding sequence of affected genes. Extension of CAG repeats results in the production of aberrant gene products that are deleterious to neurons, such as transcripts with a CAG stem-loop secondary structure, and proteins containing a long stretch of polyQ residues. Thus, determining methods for the prevention or elimination of these mutant gene products from neuronal cells and translating this knowledge to clinical application are currently important goals in the fields of neurology and neurogenetics. Recently, several studies have revealed intriguing findings related to the allele-selective regulation of CAG-expanded genes, and have proposed novel designs to selectively diminish the mutant polyQ proteins. In this review, we focus on the genes, genetically engineered proteins, and oligonucleotides that show potential to modulate the expression of mutant genes. We also discuss their respective molecular functions at the levels of transcription, translation, and post-translation.

  4. Gene-Wide Analysis Detects Two New Susceptibility Genes for Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harold, Denise; Jones, Lesley; Holmans, Peter; Gerrish, Amy; Vedernikov, Alexey; Richards, Alexander; DeStefano, Anita L.; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A.; Naj, Adam C.; Sims, Rebecca; Jun, Gyungah; Bis, Joshua C.; Beecham, Gary W.; Grenier-Boley, Benjamin; Russo, Giancarlo; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Denning, Nicola; Smith, Albert V.; Chouraki, Vincent; Thomas, Charlene; Ikram, M. Arfan; Zelenika, Diana; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Schmidt, Helena; Kunkle, Brian; Dunstan, Melanie L.; Vronskaya, Maria; Johnson, Andrew D.; Ruiz, Agustin; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Reitz, Christiane; Pasquier, Florence; Hollingworth, Paul; Hanon, Olivier; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Campion, Dominique; Crane, Paul K.; Baldwin, Clinton; Becker, Tim; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Cruchaga, Carlos; Craig, David; Amin, Najaf; Berr, Claudine; Lopez, Oscar L.; De Jager, Philip L.; Deramecourt, Vincent; Johnston, Janet A.; Evans, Denis; Lovestone, Simon; Letenneur, Luc; Hernández, Isabel; Rubinsztein, David C.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Sleegers, Kristel; Goate, Alison M.; Fiévet, Nathalie; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Gill, Michael; Brown, Kristelle; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Keller, Lina; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; McGuinness, Bernadette; Larson, Eric B.; Myers, Amanda J.; Dufouil, Carole; Todd, Stephen; Wallon, David; Love, Seth; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Gallacher, John; George-Hyslop, Peter St; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleo, Alberto; Bayer, Anthony; Tsuang, Debby W.; Yu, Lei; Tsolaki, Magda; Bossù, Paola; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Proitsi, Petra; Collinge, John; Sorbi, Sandro; Garcia, Florentino Sanchez; Fox, Nick C.; Hardy, John; Naranjo, Maria Candida Deniz; Bosco, Paolo; Clarke, Robert; Brayne, Carol; Galimberti, Daniela; Scarpini, Elio; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Siciliano, Gabriele; Moebus, Susanne; Mecocci, Patrizia; Zompo, Maria Del; Maier, Wolfgang; Hampel, Harald; Pilotto, Alberto; Frank-García, Ana; Panza, Francesco; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Caffarra, Paolo; Nacmias, Benedetta; Perry, William; Mayhaus, Manuel; Lannfelt, Lars; Hakonarson, Hakon; Pichler, Sabrina; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Ingelsson, Martin; Beekly, Duane; Alvarez, Victoria; Zou, Fanggeng; Valladares, Otto; Younkin, Steven G.; Coto, Eliecer; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Gu, Wei; Razquin, Cristina; Pastor, Pau; Mateo, Ignacio; Owen, Michael J.; Faber, Kelley M.; Jonsson, Palmi V.; Combarros, Onofre; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Cantwell, Laura B.; Soininen, Hilkka; Blacker, Deborah; Mead, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H.; Bennett, David A.; Harris, Tamara B.; Fratiglioni, Laura; Holmes, Clive; de Bruijn, Renee F. A. G.; Passmore, Peter; Montine, Thomas J.; Bettens, Karolien; Rotter, Jerome I.; Brice, Alexis; Morgan, Kevin; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Kukull, Walter A.; Hannequin, Didier; Powell, John F.; Nalls, Michael A.; Ritchie, Karen; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Kauwe, John S. K.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Boada, Mercè; Hiltunen, Mikko; Martin, Eden R.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rujescu, Dan; Dartigues, Jean-François; Mayeux, Richard; Tzourio, Christophe; Hofman, Albert; Nöthen, Markus M.; Graff, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Lathrop, Mark; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Launer, Lenore J.; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Farrer, Lindsay A.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Ramirez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's disease is a common debilitating dementia with known heritability, for which 20 late onset susceptibility loci have been identified, but more remain to be discovered. This study sought to identify new susceptibility genes, using an alternative gene-wide analytical approach which tests for patterns of association within genes, in the powerful genome-wide association dataset of the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project Consortium, comprising over 7 m genotypes from 25,580 Alzheimer's cases and 48,466 controls. Principal Findings In addition to earlier reported genes, we detected genome-wide significant loci on chromosomes 8 (TP53INP1, p = 1.4×10−6) and 14 (IGHV1-67 p = 7.9×10−8) which indexed novel susceptibility loci. Significance The additional genes identified in this study, have an array of functions previously implicated in Alzheimer's disease, including aspects of energy metabolism, protein degradation and the immune system and add further weight to these pathways as potential therapeutic targets in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24922517

  5. Gene-wide analysis detects two new susceptibility genes for Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Escott-Price

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is a common debilitating dementia with known heritability, for which 20 late onset susceptibility loci have been identified, but more remain to be discovered. This study sought to identify new susceptibility genes, using an alternative gene-wide analytical approach which tests for patterns of association within genes, in the powerful genome-wide association dataset of the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project Consortium, comprising over 7 m genotypes from 25,580 Alzheimer's cases and 48,466 controls.In addition to earlier reported genes, we detected genome-wide significant loci on chromosomes 8 (TP53INP1, p = 1.4×10-6 and 14 (IGHV1-67 p = 7.9×10-8 which indexed novel susceptibility loci.The additional genes identified in this study, have an array of functions previously implicated in Alzheimer's disease, including aspects of energy metabolism, protein degradation and the immune system and add further weight to these pathways as potential therapeutic targets in Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Mendelian genes for Parkinson's disease contribute to the sporadic forms of the disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spataro, Nino; Calafell, Francesc; Cervera-Carles, Laura; Casals, Ferran; Pagonabarraga, Javier; Pascual-Sedano, Berta; Campolongo, Antònia; Kulisevsky, Jaime; Lleó, Alberto; Navarro, Arcadi; Clarimón, Jordi; Bosch, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) can be divided into familial (Mendelian) and sporadic forms. A number of causal genes have been discovered for the Mendelian form, which constitutes 10-20% of the total cases. Genome-wide association studies have successfully uncovered a number of susceptibility loci for sporadic cases but those only explain a small fraction (6-7%) of PD heritability. It has been observed that some genes that confer susceptibility to PD through common risk variants also contain rare causing mutations for the Mendelian forms of the disease. These results suggest a possible functional link between Mendelian and sporadic PD and led us to investigate the role that rare and low-frequency variants could have on the sporadic form. Through a targeting approach, we have resequenced at 49× coverage the exons and regulatory regions of 38 genes (including Mendelian and susceptibility PD genes) in 249 sporadic PD patients and 145 unrelated controls of European origin. Unlike susceptibility genes, Mendelian genes show a clear general enrichment of rare functional variants in PD cases, observed directly as well as with Tajima's D statistic and several collapsing methods. Our findings suggest that rare variation on PD Mendelian genes may have a role in the sporadic forms of the disease. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Modern Approaches to the Diagnosis and Management of Children With Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Baranov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the most modern positions of healthcare delivery for children with primary ciliary dyskinesia. Symptoms of this pathology in clinical practice vary that is conditioned by genetic heterogeneity of the disease. The most common disease manifestation in children is frequent inflammatory diseases of the upper and lower respiratory tract. They are recorded in most patients, especially in young children, and the diagnosis is often determined untimely due to a low awareness of specialists about this nosology. Differential diagnostic approach is described in detail, peculiarities of treatment and management of children with this nosology are specified. The material is based on clinical guidelines developed and approved by the professional association «Union of Pediatricians of Russia».

  8. OFD1 and flotillins are integral components of a ciliary signaling protein complex organized by polycystins in renal epithelia and odontoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerman, Stephanie; Ward, Heather H; Lee, Rebecca; Lopes, Carla A M; Fry, Andrew M; MacDougall, Mary; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Mutation of the X-linked oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1 (OFD1) gene is embryonic lethal in males and results in craniofacial malformations and adult onset polycystic kidney disease in females. While the OFD1 protein localizes to centriolar satellites, centrosomes and basal bodies, its cellular function and how it relates to cystic kidney disease is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that OFD1 is assembled into a protein complex that is localized to the primary cilium and contains the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and domain organizing flotillin proteins. This protein complex, which has similarity to a basolateral adhesion domain formed during cell polarization, also contains the polycystin proteins that when mutant cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). Importantly, in human ADPKD cells where mutant polycystin-1 fails to localize to cilia, there is a concomitant loss of localization of polycystin-2, OFD1, EGFR and flotillin-1 to cilia. Together, these data suggest that polycystins are necessary for assembly of a novel flotillin-containing ciliary signaling complex and provide a molecular rationale for the common renal pathologies caused by OFD1 and PKD mutations.

  9. OFD1 and flotillins are integral components of a ciliary signaling protein complex organized by polycystins in renal epithelia and odontoblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Jerman

    Full Text Available Mutation of the X-linked oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1 (OFD1 gene is embryonic lethal in males and results in craniofacial malformations and adult onset polycystic kidney disease in females. While the OFD1 protein localizes to centriolar satellites, centrosomes and basal bodies, its cellular function and how it relates to cystic kidney disease is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that OFD1 is assembled into a protein complex that is localized to the primary cilium and contains the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and domain organizing flotillin proteins. This protein complex, which has similarity to a basolateral adhesion domain formed during cell polarization, also contains the polycystin proteins that when mutant cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD. Importantly, in human ADPKD cells where mutant polycystin-1 fails to localize to cilia, there is a concomitant loss of localization of polycystin-2, OFD1, EGFR and flotillin-1 to cilia. Together, these data suggest that polycystins are necessary for assembly of a novel flotillin-containing ciliary signaling complex and provide a molecular rationale for the common renal pathologies caused by OFD1 and PKD mutations.

  10. Network-based prediction and knowledge mining of disease genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Matthew B; Lu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, high-throughput protein interaction identification methods have generated a large amount of data. When combined with the results from other in vivo and in vitro experiments, a complex set of relationships between biological molecules emerges. The growing popularity of network analysis and data mining has allowed researchers to recognize indirect connections between these molecules. Due to the interdependent nature of network entities, evaluating proteins in this context can reveal relationships that may not otherwise be evident. We examined the human protein interaction network as it relates to human illness using the Disease Ontology. After calculating several topological metrics, we trained an alternating decision tree (ADTree) classifier to identify disease-associated proteins. Using a bootstrapping method, we created a tree to highlight conserved characteristics shared by many of these proteins. Subsequently, we reviewed a set of non-disease-associated proteins that were misclassified by the algorithm with high confidence and searched for evidence of a disease relationship. Our classifier was able to predict disease-related genes with 79% area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC), which indicates the tradeoff between sensitivity and specificity and is a good predictor of how a classifier will perform on future data sets. We found that a combination of several network characteristics including degree centrality, disease neighbor ratio, eccentricity, and neighborhood connectivity help to distinguish between disease- and non-disease-related proteins. Furthermore, the ADTree allowed us to understand which combinations of strongly predictive attributes contributed most to protein-disease classification. In our post-processing evaluation, we found several examples of potential novel disease-related proteins and corresponding literature evidence. In addition, we showed that first- and second-order neighbors in the PPI network

  11. HLA genes and other candidate genes involved in susceptibility for (pre)neoplastic cervical disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoodsma, M; Nolte, IM; Meerman, GJT; De Vries, EGE; Van Der Zee, AGJ

    This review focuses on common and genetic risk factors such as HLA and other genes that may be involved in susceptibility for (pre)neoplastic cervical disease. The goal of this review is the evaluation of polymorphisms that are either associated with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and/or

  12. Cognitive decline in Huntington's disease expansion gene carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baake, Verena; Reijntjes, Robert H A M; Dumas, Eve M; Thompson, Jennifer C; Roos, Raymund A C

    2017-10-01

    In Huntington's Disease (HD) cognitive decline can occur before unequivocal motor signs become apparent. As cognitive decline often starts early in the course of the disease and has a progressive nature over time, cognition can be regarded as a key target for symptomatic treatment. The specific progressive profile of cognitive decline over time is unknown. The aim of this study is to quantify the progression of cognitive decline across all HD stages, from pre-motormanifest to advanced HD, and to investigate if CAG length mediates cognitive decline. In the European REGISTRY study 2669 HD expansion gene carriers underwent annual cognitive assessment. General linear mixed models were used to model the cognitive decline for each cognitive task across all disease stages. Additionally, a model was developed to evaluate the cognitive decline based on CAG length and age rather than disease stage. There was significant cognitive decline on all administered tasks throughout pre-motormanifest (close to estimated disease onset) participants and the subsequent motormanifest participants from stage 1 to stage 4. Performance on the Stroop Word and Stroop Color tests additionally declined significantly across the two pre-motormanifest groups: far and close to estimated disease onset. The evaluation of cognition performance in relation to CAG length and age revealed a more rapid cognitive decline in participants with longer CAG length than participants with shorter CAG length over time. Cognitive performance already shows decline in pre-motormanifest HD gene expansion carriers and gradually worsens to late stage HD. HD gene expansion carriers with certain CAG length have their own cognitive profile, i.e., longer CAG length is associated with more rapid decline. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Human Disease Insight: An integrated knowledge-based platform for disease-gene-drug information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasleem, Munazzah; Ishrat, Romana; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-01-01

    The scope of the Human Disease Insight (HDI) database is not limited to researchers or physicians as it also provides basic information to non-professionals and creates disease awareness, thereby reducing the chances of patient suffering due to ignorance. HDI is a knowledge-based resource providing information on human diseases to both scientists and the general public. Here, our mission is to provide a comprehensive human disease database containing most of the available useful information, with extensive cross-referencing. HDI is a knowledge management system that acts as a central hub to access information about human diseases and associated drugs and genes. In addition, HDI contains well-classified bioinformatics tools with helpful descriptions. These integrated bioinformatics tools enable researchers to annotate disease-specific genes and perform protein analysis, search for biomarkers and identify potential vaccine candidates. Eventually, these tools will facilitate the analysis of disease-associated data. The HDI provides two types of search capabilities and includes provisions for downloading, uploading and searching disease/gene/drug-related information. The logistical design of the HDI allows for regular updating. The database is designed to work best with Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome and is freely accessible at http://humandiseaseinsight.com. Copyright © 2015 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Locus heterogeneity disease genes encode proteins with high interconnectivity in the human protein interaction network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eKeith

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in genes potentially lead to a number of genetic diseases with differing severity. These disease genes have been the focus of research in recent years showing that the disease gene population as a whole is not homogeneous, and can be categorised according to their interactions. Locus heterogeneity describes a single disorder caused by mutations in different genes each acting individually to cause the same disease. Using datasets of experimentally derived human disease genes and protein interactions, we created a protein interaction network to investigate the relationships between the products of genes associated with a disease displaying locus heterogeneity, and use network parameters to suggest properties that distinguish these disease genes from the overall disease gene population. Through the manual curation of known causative genes of 100 diseases displaying locus heterogeneity and 397 single-gene Mendelian disorders, we use network parameters to show that our locus heterogeneity network displays distinct properties from the global disease network and a Mendelian network. Using the global human proteome, through random simulation of the network we show that heterogeneous genes display significant interconnectivity. Further topological analysis of this network revealed clustering of locus heterogeneity genes that cause identical disorders, indicating that these disease genes are involved in similar biological processes. We then use this information to suggest novel genes that may also contribute to diseases with locus heterogeneity.

  15. Progress in gene therapy of dystrophic heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Y.; Duan, D.

    2012-01-01

    The heart is frequently afflicted in muscular dystrophy. In severe cases, cardiac lesion may directly result in death. Over the years, pharmacological and/or surgical interventions have been the mainstay to alleviate cardiac symptoms in muscular dystrophy patients. Although these traditional modalities remain useful, the emerging field of gene therapy has now provided an unprecedented opportunity to transform our thinking/approach in the treatment of dystrophic heart disease. In fact, the pre...

  16. Rat Models of Cardiovascular Disease Demonstrate Distinctive Pulmonary Gene Expressions for Vascular Response Genes: Impact of Ozone Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparative gene expression profiling of multiple tissues from rat strains with genetic predisposition to diverse cardiovascular diseases (CVD) can help decode the transcriptional program that governs organ-specific functions. We examined expressions of CVD genes in the lungs of ...

  17. Cross-Tissue Regulatory Gene Networks in Coronary Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Husain A; Foroughi Asl, Hassan; Jain, Rajeev K; Ermel, Raili; Ruusalepp, Arno; Franzén, Oscar; Kidd, Brian A; Readhead, Ben; Giannarelli, Chiara; Kovacic, Jason C; Ivert, Torbjörn; Dudley, Joel T; Civelek, Mete; Lusis, Aldons J; Schadt, Eric E; Skogsberg, Josefin; Michoel, Tom; Björkegren, Johan L M

    2016-03-23

    Inferring molecular networks can reveal how genetic perturbations interact with environmental factors to cause common complex diseases. We analyzed genetic and gene expression data from seven tissues relevant to coronary artery disease (CAD) and identified regulatory gene networks (RGNs) and their key drivers. By integrating data from genome-wide association studies, we identified 30 CAD-causal RGNs interconnected in vascular and metabolic tissues, and we validated them with corresponding data from the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel. As proof of concept, by targeting the key drivers AIP, DRAP1, POLR2I, and PQBP1 in a cross-species-validated, arterial-wall RGN involving RNA-processing genes, we re-identified this RGN in THP-1 foam cells and independent data from CAD macrophages and carotid lesions. This characterization of the molecular landscape in CAD will help better define the regulation of CAD candidate genes identified by genome-wide association studies and is a first step toward achieving the goals of precision medicine. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Upcoming treatments in Parkinson's disease, including gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodnitzky, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    Progress is being made in the development of three categories of therapy for Parkinson's disease: (1) Symptomatic, (2) Neuroprotective, (3) Neurorestorative. Evolving approaches to symptomatic therapy, already in clinical trials, include the use of adenosine 2(A) antagonists, novel glutamate antagonists, and serotonin receptor antagonists, the latter for the therapy of Parkinson's psychosis and/or levodopa-induced dyskinesias. Examples of promising neuroprotective therapies under evaluation include the administration of creatine, urate-inducing compounds, calcium channel blockers, and pioglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonist. Cell-based restorative therapies are not the subject of this presentation, but various forms of gene therapy have shown promise in human Parkinson's disease trials. These protocols typically involve gene transfer into the CNS through the use of viral vectors. Currently, the most advanced studies of this technique involve delivery of an adeno-associated viral vector encoding glutamic acid decarboxylase into the subthalamic nucleus. This treatment has shown modest benefit in early clinical trials. Other gene therapies, in various stages of human clinical trials, include gene transfer for the production of trophic factors, for aromatic amino acid decarboxylase alone, and most recently, a lentiviral vector transfer of an enzymatic dopamine "factory" consisting of three essential enzymes required for production for this neurotransmitter. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ultrastructural pathology of primary ciliary dyskinesia: report about 125 cases in Germany

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    Theegarten Dirk

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is a rare genetically induced disorder of cilia inducing mainly respiratory diseases. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis of ciliary ultrastructure is classically used for diagnosis. We report our experience of TEM investigations in a large series of patients. Methods TEM analysis performed of 742 biopsies from patients with suspected PCD was reviewed retrospectively. Ultrastructural defects were analysized further in 125 cases with changes typical for PCD. Results In 18.1% of patients diagnosis of PCD was made because of morphological alterations, in 68.2% secondary changes were seen. In 13.7% material was not feasible for analysis. Mostly defects of dynein arms were detected in PCD (96.8%. In particular defects of the inner arms (51.2% and combined dynein defects (37.6% were found. Total loss of dynein arms was dominant. Only in 3.2% deficiencies of central structures were found alone. Associated situs inversus or dextracardia was reported clinically in 21.4%. Conclusions TEM analysis is possible in most patients and a useful tool for diagnosis of PCD. Functional and genetic analysis should be done additionally. Registers should be installed to collect all available informations and push further research.

  20. C2 Domains as Protein-Protein Interaction Modules in the Ciliary Transition Zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Remans

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available RPGR-interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP1 is mutated in the eye disease Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA and its structural homolog, RPGRIP1-like (RPGRIP1L, is mutated in many different ciliopathies. Both are multidomain proteins that are predicted to interact with retinitis pigmentosa G-protein regulator (RPGR. RPGR is mutated in X-linked retinitis pigmentosa and is located in photoreceptors and primary cilia. We solved the crystal structure of the complex between the RPGR-interacting domain (RID of RPGRIP1 and RPGR and demonstrate that RPGRIP1L binds to RPGR similarly. RPGRIP1 binding to RPGR affects the interaction with PDEδ, the cargo shuttling factor for prenylated ciliary proteins. RPGRIP1-RID is a C2 domain with a canonical β sandwich structure that does not bind Ca2+ and/or phospholipids and thus constitutes a unique type of protein-protein interaction module. Judging from the large number of C2 domains in most of the ciliary transition zone proteins identified thus far, the structure presented here seems to constitute a cilia-specific module that is present in multiprotein transition zone complexes.

  1. Differences in Gene-Gene Interactions in Graves' Disease Patients Stratified by Age of Onset.

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    Beata Jurecka-Lubieniecka

    Full Text Available Graves' disease (GD is a complex disease in which genetic predisposition is modified by environmental factors. Each gene exerts limited effects on the development of autoimmune disease (OR = 1.2-1.5. An epidemiological study revealed that nearly 70% of the risk of developing inherited autoimmunological thyroid diseases (AITD is the result of gene interactions. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of the interactions of multiple loci on the genetic predisposition to GD. The aim of our analyses was to identify pairs of genes that exhibit a multiplicative interaction effect.A total of 709 patients with GD were included in the study. The patients were stratified into more homogeneous groups depending on the age at time of GD onset: younger patients less than 30 years of age and older patients greater than 30 years of age. Association analyses were performed for genes that influence the development of GD: HLADRB1, PTPN22, CTLA4 and TSHR. The interactions among polymorphisms were analyzed using the multiple logistic regression and multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR methods.GD patients stratified by the age of onset differed in the allele frequencies of the HLADRB1*03 and 1858T polymorphisms of the PTPN22 gene (OR = 1.7, p = 0.003; OR = 1.49, p = 0.01, respectively. We evaluated the genetic interactions of four SNPs in a pairwise fashion with regard to disease risk. The coexistence of HLADRB1 with CTLA4 or HLADRB1 with PTPN22 exhibited interactions on more than additive levels (OR = 3.64, p = 0.002; OR = 4.20, p < 0.001, respectively. These results suggest that interactions between these pairs of genes contribute to the development of GD. MDR analysis confirmed these interactions.In contrast to a single gene effect, we observed that interactions between the HLADRB1/PTPN22 and HLADRB1/CTLA4 genes more closely predicted the risk of GD onset in young patients.

  2. Genotype-based association models of complex diseases to detect gene-gene and gene-environment interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobach, Iryna; Fan, Ruzong; Manga, Prashiela

    A central problem in genetic epidemiology is to identify and rank genetic markers involved in a disease. Complex diseases, such as cancer, hypertension, diabetes, are thought to be caused by an interaction of a panel of genetic factors, that can be identified by markers, which modulate environmental factors. Moreover, the effect of each genetic marker may be small. Hence, the association signal may be missed unless a large sample is considered, or a priori biomedical data are used. Recent advances generated a vast variety of a priori information, including linkage maps and information about gene regulatory dependence assembled into curated pathway databases. We propose a genotype-based approach that takes into account linkage disequilibrium (LD) information between genetic markers that are in moderate LD while modeling gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. A major advantage of our method is that the observed genetic information enters a model directly thus eliminating the need to estimate haplotype-phase. Our approach results in an algorithm that is inexpensive computationally and does not suffer from bias induced by haplotype-phase ambiguity. We investigated our model in a series of simulation experiments and demonstrated that the proposed approach results in estimates that are nearly unbiased and have small variability. We applied our method to the analysis of data from a melanoma case-control study and investigated interaction between a set of pigmentation genes and environmental factors defined by age and gender. Furthermore, an application of our method is demonstrated using a study of Alcohol Dependence.

  3. Disease Modeling and Gene Therapy of Copper Storage Disease in Canine Hepatic Organoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathidpak Nantasanti

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of 3D-liver stem cell cultures (hepatic organoids opens up new avenues for gene and/or stem cell therapy to treat liver disease. To test safety and efficacy, a relevant large animal model is essential but not yet established. Because of its shared pathologies and disease pathways, the dog is considered the best model for human liver disease. Here we report the establishment of a long-term canine hepatic organoid culture allowing undifferentiated expansion of progenitor cells that can be differentiated toward functional hepatocytes. We show that cultures can be initiated from fresh and frozen liver tissues using Tru-Cut or fine-needle biopsies. The use of Wnt agonists proved important for canine organoid proliferation and inhibition of differentiation. Finally, we demonstrate that successful gene supplementation in hepatic organoids of COMMD1-deficient dogs restores function and can be an effective means to cure copper storage disease.

  4. Gene-Based Antibody Strategies for Prion Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Cardinale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE are a group of neurodegenerative and infectious disorders characterized by the conversion of a normal cellular protein PrPC into a pathological abnormally folded form, termed PrPSc. There are neither available therapies nor diagnostic tools for an early identification of individuals affected by these diseases. New gene-based antibody strategies are emerging as valuable therapeutic tools. Among these, intrabodies are chimeric molecules composed by recombinant antibody fragments fused to intracellular trafficking sequences, aimed at inhibiting, in vivo, the function of specific therapeutic targets. The advantage of intrabodies is that they can be selected against a precise epitope of target proteins, including protein-protein interaction sites and cytotoxic conformers (i.e., oligomeric and fibrillar assemblies. Herein, we address and discuss in vitro and in vivo applications of intrabodies in prion diseases, focussing on their therapeutic potential.

  5. Phenotype-driven strategies for exome prioritization of human Mendelian disease genes

    OpenAIRE

    Smedley, Damian; Robinson, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing has altered the way in which rare diseases are diagnosed and disease genes identified. Hundreds of novel disease-associated genes have been characterized by whole exome sequencing in the past five years, yet the identification of disease-causing mutations is often challenging because of the large number of rare variants that are being revealed. Gene prioritization aims to rank the most probable candidate genes towards the top of a list of potentially pathogenic variants...

  6. Integration of text- and data-mining using ontologies successfully selects disease gene candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffin, Nicki; Kelso, Janet F; Powell, Alan R; Pan, Hong; Bajic, Vladimir B; Hide, Winston A

    2005-01-01

    Genome-wide techniques such as microarray analysis, Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE), Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS), linkage analysis and association studies are used extensively in the search for genes that cause diseases, and often identify many hundreds of candidate disease genes. Selection of the most probable of these candidate disease genes for further empirical analysis is a significant challenge. Additionally, identifying the genes that cause complex diseases is problematic due to low penetrance of multiple contributing genes. Here, we describe a novel bioinformatic approach that selects candidate disease genes according to their expression profiles. We use the eVOC anatomical ontology to integrate text-mining of biomedical literature and data-mining of available human gene expression data. To demonstrate that our method is successful and widely applicable, we apply it to a database of 417 candidate genes containing 17 known disease genes. We successfully select the known disease gene for 15 out of 17 diseases and reduce the candidate gene set to 63.3% (+/-18.8%) of its original size. This approach facilitates direct association between genomic data describing gene expression and information from biomedical texts describing disease phenotype, and successfully prioritizes candidate genes according to their expression in disease-affected tissues.

  7. Rule extraction in gene-disease relationship discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Wen-Juan; Chen, Hsiao-Yuan

    2013-04-10

    Biomedical data available to researchers and clinicians have increased dramatically over the past years because of the exponential growth of knowledge in medical biology. It is difficult for curators to go through all of the unstructured documents so as to curate the information to the database. Associating genes with diseases is important because it is a fundamental challenge in human health with applications to understanding disease properties and developing new techniques for prevention, diagnosis and therapy. Our study uses the automatic rule-learning approach to gene-disease relationship extraction. We first prepare the experimental corpus from MEDLINE and OMIM. A parser is applied to produce some grammatical information. We then learn all possible rules that discriminate relevant from irrelevant sentences. After that, we compute the scores of the learned rules in order to select rules of interest. As a result, a set of rules is generated. We produce the learned rules automatically from the 1000 positive and 1000 negative sentences. The test set includes 400 sentences composed of 200 positives and 200 negatives. Precision, recall and F-score served as our evaluation metrics. The results reveal that the maximal precision rate is 77.8% and the maximal recall rate is 63.5%. The maximal F-score is 66.9% where the precision rate is 70.6% and the recall rate is 63.5%. We employ the rule-learning approach to extract gene-disease relationships. Our main contributions are to build rules automatically and to support a more complete set of rules than a manually generated one. The experiments show exhilarating results and some improving efforts will be made in the future. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. DISEASES: text mining and data integration of disease-gene associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletscher-Frankild, Sune; Pallejà, Albert; Tsafou, Kalliopi; Binder, Janos X; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2015-03-01

    Text mining is a flexible technology that can be applied to numerous different tasks in biology and medicine. We present a system for extracting disease-gene associations from biomedical abstracts. The system consists of a highly efficient dictionary-based tagger for named entity recognition of human genes and diseases, which we combine with a scoring scheme that takes into account co-occurrences both within and between sentences. We show that this approach is able to extract half of all manually curated associations with a false positive rate of only 0.16%. Nonetheless, text mining should not stand alone, but be combined with other types of evidence. For this reason, we have developed the DISEASES resource, which integrates the results from text mining with manually curated disease-gene associations, cancer mutation data, and genome-wide association studies from existing databases. The DISEASES resource is accessible through a web interface at http://diseases.jensenlab.org/, where the text-mining software and all associations are also freely available for download. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Ciliary function of the frog oro-pharyngeal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiello, E; Sleigh, M

    1977-03-09

    The palate epithelium of the frog was examined by scanning electron microscopy, light microscopy and high speed cine micrography. The cilia remain stationary for much of time in the end-of-effective stroke position. Each beat cycle begins with a forwardly-directed recovery stroke lasting about 60 ms, followed by an effective stroke towards the oesophagus lasting about 12 ms. Activity can often be correlated with the presence of mucus, which is carried as strands on the tips of the ciliary effective strokes whilst the recovery strokes move beneath the mucus. Coordination of ciliary activity was very variable; local antiplectic metachrony of the recovery strokes could almost always be seen, and on very active epithelia effective strokes were associated with approximately diaplectic waves (either to left or right), but any particular pattern of coordinated activity was transient and quickly transformed to another pattern. Beating and coordination of these short cilia were compared with those of cilia propelling water.

  10. Retrograde axonal transport of ciliary neurotrophic factor is increased by peripheral nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, R; Adryan, K M; Zhu, Y; Harkness, P J; Lindsay, R M; DiStefano, P S

    1993-09-16

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes the survival of several populations of neurons, including sensory and motor neurons. Although CNTF is abundant in adult sciatic nerve, the mature protein lacks a signal sequence and is not secreted; therefore, it has been proposed to act as a lesion factor. The identification of a functional CNTF receptor revealed ligand-specific phosphorylation cascades and gene induction. However, it is not clear how these signal-transducing events are elicited in neuronal cell bodies that may be distant from the source of CNTF. We report here that CNTF can be retrogradely transported by adult sensory neurons. More importantly, sensory and motor neurons both show greatly increased transport of CNTF following peripheral nerve lesion. Axotomy-induced increases in retrograde transport of neurotrophic factors may be an important response of neuronal cell bodies during regeneration.

  11. Effect of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) on motoneuron survival

    OpenAIRE

    Sendtner, Michael; Arakawa, Yoshihiro; Stöckli, Kurt A.; Kreutzberg, Georg W.; Thoenen, Hans

    2010-01-01

    We have demonstrated that the extensive degeneration of motoneurons in the rat facial nucleus after transection of the facial nerve in newborn rats can be prevented by local ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) administration. CNTF differs distinctly from known neurotrophic molecules such as NGF, BDNF and NT-3 in both its molecular characteristics (CNTF is a cytosolic rather than a secretory molecule) and its broad spectrum of biological activities. CNTF is expressed selectively by Schwann cell...

  12. A transducin-like gene maps to the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease gene region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinstat-Saslow, D.L.; Reeders, S.T.; Germino, G.G.; Somlo, S. (Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States))

    1993-12-01

    A novel human gene (sazD) that maps to the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease region shares sequence similarity with members of the [beta]-transducin superfamily. The cDNA sazD-c predicts an [approximately]58-kDa protein (sazD) with seven internal repeats, similar to the WD-40 motif of the transducin family. The size of this protein family has been expanding rapidly; however, neither the structure nor the function of this repeated motif is known. Preliminary data do not suggest that sazD is mutated in patients with polycystic kidney disease. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Association of lung function genes with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Woo Jin; Lim, Myoung Nam; Hong, Yoonki; Silverman, Edwin K; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Jung, Bock Hyun; Ra, Seung Won; Choi, Hye Sook; Jung, Young Ju; Park, Yong Bum; Park, Myung Jae; Lee, Sei Won; Lee, Jae Seung; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang Do

    2014-08-01

    Spirometric measurements of pulmonary function are important in diagnosing and determining the severity of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We performed this study to determine whether candidate genes identified in genome-wide association studies of spirometric measurements were associated with COPD and if they interacted with smoking intensity. The current analysis included 1,000 COPD subjects and 1,000 controls recruited from 24 hospital-based pulmonary clinics. Thirteen SNPs, chosen based on genome-wide association studies of spirometric measurements in the Korean population cohorts, were genotyped. Genetic association tests were performed, adjusting for age, sex, and smoking intensity, using models including a SNP-by-smoking interaction term. PID1 and FAM13A were significantly associated with COPD susceptibility. There were also significant interactions between SNPs in ACN9 and FAM13A and smoking pack-years, and an association of ACN9 with COPD in the lowest smoking tertile. The risk allele of FAM13A was associated with increased expression of FAM13A in the lung. We have validated associations of FAM13A and PID1 with COPD. ACN9 showed significant interaction with smoking and is a potential candidate gene for COPD. Significant associations of genetic variants of FAM13A with gene expression levels suggest that the associated loci may act as genetic regulatory elements for FAM13A gene expression.

  14. LGscore: A method to identify disease-related genes using biological literature and Google data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongwoo; Kim, Hyunjin; Yoon, Youngmi; Park, Sanghyun

    2015-04-01

    Since the genome project in 1990s, a number of studies associated with genes have been conducted and researchers have confirmed that genes are involved in disease. For this reason, the identification of the relationships between diseases and genes is important in biology. We propose a method called LGscore, which identifies disease-related genes using Google data and literature data. To implement this method, first, we construct a disease-related gene network using text-mining results. We then extract gene-gene interactions based on co-occurrences in abstract data obtained from PubMed, and calculate the weights of edges in the gene network by means of Z-scoring. The weights contain two values: the frequency and the Google search results. The frequency value is extracted from literature data, and the Google search result is obtained using Google. We assign a score to each gene through a network analysis. We assume that genes with a large number of links and numerous Google search results and frequency values are more likely to be involved in disease. For validation, we investigated the top 20 inferred genes for five different diseases using answer sets. The answer sets comprised six databases that contain information on disease-gene relationships. We identified a significant number of disease-related genes as well as candidate genes for Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, colon cancer, lung cancer, and prostate cancer. Our method was up to 40% more accurate than existing methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparative DNA methylation and gene expression analysis identifies novel genes for structural congenital heart diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunert, Marcel; Dorn, Cornelia; Cui, Huanhuan; Dunkel, Ilona; Schulz, Kerstin; Schoenhals, Sophia; Sun, Wei; Berger, Felix; Chen, Wei; Sperling, Silke R

    2016-10-01

    For the majority of congenital heart diseases (CHDs), the full complexity of the causative molecular network, which is driven by genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors, is yet to be elucidated. Epigenetic alterations are suggested to play a pivotal role in modulating the phenotypic expression of CHDs and their clinical course during life. Candidate approaches implied that DNA methylation might have a developmental role in CHD and contributes to the long-term progress of non-structural cardiac diseases. The aim of the present study is to define the postnatal epigenome of two common cardiac malformations, representing epigenetic memory, and adaption to hemodynamic alterations, which are jointly relevant for the disease course. We present the first analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation data obtained from myocardial biopsies of Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) and ventricular septal defect patients. We defined stringent sets of differentially methylated regions between patients and controls, which are significantly enriched for genomic features like promoters, exons, and cardiac enhancers. For TOF, we linked DNA methylation with genome-wide expression data and found a significant overlap for hypermethylated promoters and down-regulated genes, and vice versa. We validated and replicated the methylation of selected CpGs and performed functional assays. We identified a hypermethylated novel developmental CpG island in the promoter of SCO2 and demonstrate its functional impact. Moreover, we discovered methylation changes co-localized with novel, differential splicing events among sarcomeric genes as well as transcription factor binding sites. Finally, we demonstrated the interaction of differentially methylated and expressed genes in TOF with mutated CHD genes in a molecular network. By interrogating DNA methylation and gene expression data, we identify two novel mechanism contributing to the phenotypic expression of CHDs: aberrant methylation of promoter CpG islands

  16. Lipidomic Evaluation of Feline Neurologic Disease after AAV Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather L. Gray-Edwards

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available GM1 gangliosidosis is a fatal lysosomal disorder, for which there is no effective treatment. Adeno-associated virus (AAV gene therapy in GM1 cats has resulted in a greater than 6-fold increase in lifespan, with many cats remaining alive at >5.7 years of age, with minimal clinical signs. Glycolipids are the principal storage product in GM1 gangliosidosis whose pathogenic mechanism is not completely understood. Targeted lipidomics analysis was performed to better define disease mechanisms and identify markers of disease progression for upcoming clinical trials in humans. 36 sphingolipids and subspecies associated with ganglioside biosynthesis were tested in the cerebrospinal fluid of untreated GM1 cats at a humane endpoint (∼8 months, AAV-treated GM1 cats (∼5 years old, and normal adult controls. In untreated GM1 cats, significant alterations were noted in 16 sphingolipid species, including gangliosides (GM1 and GM3, lactosylceramides, ceramides, sphingomyelins, monohexosylceramides, and sulfatides. Variable degrees of correction in many lipid metabolites reflected the efficacy of AAV gene therapy. Sphingolipid levels were highly predictive of neurologic disease progression, with 11 metabolites having a coefficient of determination (R2 > 0.75. Also, a specific detergent additive significantly increased the recovery of certain lipid species in cerebrospinal fluid samples. This report demonstrates the methodology and utility of targeted lipidomics to examine the pathophysiology of lipid storage disorders.

  17. New Genes and New Insights from Old Genes: Update on Alzheimer Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringman, John M.; Coppola, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of Review: This article discusses the current status of knowledge regarding the genetic basis of Alzheimer disease (AD) with a focus on clinically relevant aspects. Recent Findings: The genetic architecture of AD is complex, as it includes multiple susceptibility genes and likely nongenetic factors. Rare but highly penetrant autosomal dominant mutations explain a small minority of the cases but have allowed tremendous advances in understanding disease pathogenesis. The identification of a strong genetic risk factor, APOE, reshaped the field and introduced the notion of genetic risk for AD. More recently, large-scale genome-wide association studies are adding to the picture a number of common variants with very small effect sizes. Large-scale resequencing studies are expected to identify additional risk factors, including rare susceptibility variants and structural variation. Summary: Genetic assessment is currently of limited utility in clinical practice because of the low frequency (Mendelian mutations) or small effect size (common risk factors) of the currently known susceptibility genes. However, genetic studies are identifying with confidence a number of novel risk genes, and this will further our understanding of disease biology and possibly the identification of therapeutic targets. PMID:23558482

  18. The nphp-2 and arl-13 Genetic Modules Interact to Regulate Ciliogenesis and Ciliary Microtubule Patterning in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton-Pitt, Simon R. F.; Silva, Malan; Nguyen, Ken C. Q.; Hall, David H.; Barr, Maureen M.

    2014-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based cellular organelles that mediate signal transduction. Cilia are organized into several structurally and functionally distinct compartments: the basal body, the transition zone (TZ), and the cilia shaft. In vertebrates, the cystoprotein Inversin localizes to a portion of the cilia shaft adjacent to the TZ, a region termed the “Inversin compartment” (InvC). The mechanisms that establish and maintain the InvC are unknown. In the roundworm C. elegans, the cilia shafts of amphid channel and phasmid sensory cilia are subdivided into two regions defined by different microtubule ultrastructure: a proximal doublet-based region adjacent to the TZ, and a distal singlet-based region. It has been suggested that C. elegans cilia also possess an InvC, similarly to mammalian primary cilia. Here we explored the biogenesis, structure, and composition of the C. elegans ciliary doublet region and InvC. We show that the InvC is conserved and distinct from the doublet region. nphp-2 (the C. elegans Inversin homolog) and the doublet region genes arl-13, klp-11, and unc-119 are redundantly required for ciliogenesis. InvC and doublet region genes can be sorted into two modules—nphp-2+klp-11 and arl-13+unc-119—which are both antagonized by the hdac-6 deacetylase. The genes of this network modulate the sizes of the NPHP-2 InvC and ARL-13 doublet region. Glutamylation, a tubulin post-translational modification, is not required for ciliary targeting of InvC and doublet region components; rather, glutamylation is modulated by nphp-2, arl-13, and unc-119. The ciliary targeting and restricted localization of NPHP-2, ARL-13, and UNC-119 does not require TZ-, doublet region, and InvC-associated genes. NPHP-2 does require its calcium binding EF hand domain for targeting to the InvC. We conclude that the C. elegans InvC is distinct from the doublet region, and that components in these two regions interact to regulate ciliogenesis via cilia placement, ciliary

  19. A Novel Mutation in Aspartoacylase Gene; Canavan Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashrafi, Mahmoudreza; Tavasoli, Alireza; Katibeh, Pegah; Aryani, Omid; Vafaee-Shahi, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective Canavan disease (CD) is a type of vacuolating leukodystrophy with autosomal recessive inheritance. Aspartoacylase deficiency results in decrease of myelin biosynthesis, dysmyelination and brain edema. Although CD is a very common in Ashkenazi Jews patients, several cases have been reported from non-Jewish population. This report is based on a homozygous C.202G>A mutation in the ASPA gene identified from an Iranian patient. To our knowledge, this type of mutation has not been reported in non-Jewish population in the literature.

  20. Multiple common variants for celiac disease influencing immune gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    MCMANUS, ROSS; KELLEHER, DERMOT

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED We performed a second-generation genome-wide association study of 4,533 individuals with celiac disease (cases) and 10,750 control subjects. We genotyped 113 selected SNPs with P(GWAS) < 10(-4) and 18 SNPs from 14 known loci in a further 4,918 cases and 5,684 controls. Variants from 13 new regions reached genome-wide significance (P(combined) < 5 x 10(-8)); most contain genes with immune functions (BACH2, CCR4, CD80, CIITA-SOCS1-CLEC16A, ICOSLG and ZMIZ1), with ETS1, RUNX3, THEMI...

  1. Kif3a regulates planar polarization of auditory hair cells through both ciliary and non-ciliary mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipe, Conor W.; Lu, Xiaowei

    2011-01-01

    Auditory hair cells represent one of the most prominent examples of epithelial planar polarity. In the auditory sensory epithelium, planar polarity of individual hair cells is defined by their V-shaped hair bundle, the mechanotransduction organelle located on the apical surface. At the tissue level, all hair cells display uniform planar polarity across the epithelium. Although it is known that tissue planar polarity is controlled by non-canonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling, the hair cell-intrinsic polarity machinery that establishes the V-shape of the hair bundle is poorly understood. Here, we show that the microtubule motor subunit Kif3a regulates hair cell polarization through both ciliary and non-ciliary mechanisms. Disruption of Kif3a in the inner ear led to absence of the kinocilium, a shortened cochlear duct and flattened hair bundle morphology. Moreover, basal bodies are mispositioned along both the apicobasal and planar polarity axes of mutant hair cells, and hair bundle orientation was uncoupled from the basal body position. We show that a non-ciliary function of Kif3a regulates localized cortical activity of p21-activated kinases (PAK), which in turn controls basal body positioning in hair cells. Our results demonstrate that Kif3a-PAK signaling coordinates planar polarization of the hair bundle and the basal body in hair cells, and establish Kif3a as a key component of the hair cell-intrinsic polarity machinery, which acts in concert with the tissue polarity pathway. PMID:21752934

  2. A Gene Module-Based eQTL Analysis Prioritizing Disease Genes and Pathways in Kidney Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Qu Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC is the most common and most aggressive form of renal cell cancer (RCC. The incidence of RCC has increased steadily in recent years. The pathogenesis of renal cell cancer remains poorly understood. Many of the tumor suppressor genes, oncogenes, and dysregulated pathways in ccRCC need to be revealed for improvement of the overall clinical outlook of the disease. Here, we developed a systems biology approach to prioritize the somatic mutated genes that lead to dysregulation of pathways in ccRCC. The method integrated multi-layer information to infer causative mutations and disease genes. First, we identified differential gene modules in ccRCC by coupling transcriptome and protein-protein interactions. Each of these modules consisted of interacting genes that were involved in similar biological processes and their combined expression alterations were significantly associated with disease type. Then, subsequent gene module-based eQTL analysis revealed somatic mutated genes that had driven the expression alterations of differential gene modules. Our study yielded a list of candidate disease genes, including several known ccRCC causative genes such as BAP1 and PBRM1, as well as novel genes such as NOD2, RRM1, CSRNP1, SLC4A2, TTLL1 and CNTN1. The differential gene modules and their driver genes revealed by our study provided a new perspective for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. Moreover, we validated the results in independent ccRCC patient datasets. Our study provided a new method for prioritizing disease genes and pathways.

  3. A Gene Module-Based eQTL Analysis Prioritizing Disease Genes and Pathways in Kidney Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mary Qu; Li, Dan; Yang, William; Zhang, Yifan; Liu, Jun; Tong, Weida

    2017-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is the most common and most aggressive form of renal cell cancer (RCC). The incidence of RCC has increased steadily in recent years. The pathogenesis of renal cell cancer remains poorly understood. Many of the tumor suppressor genes, oncogenes, and dysregulated pathways in ccRCC need to be revealed for improvement of the overall clinical outlook of the disease. Here, we developed a systems biology approach to prioritize the somatic mutated genes that lead to dysregulation of pathways in ccRCC. The method integrated multi-layer information to infer causative mutations and disease genes. First, we identified differential gene modules in ccRCC by coupling transcriptome and protein-protein interactions. Each of these modules consisted of interacting genes that were involved in similar biological processes and their combined expression alterations were significantly associated with disease type. Then, subsequent gene module-based eQTL analysis revealed somatic mutated genes that had driven the expression alterations of differential gene modules. Our study yielded a list of candidate disease genes, including several known ccRCC causative genes such as BAP1 and PBRM1, as well as novel genes such as NOD2, RRM1, CSRNP1, SLC4A2, TTLL1 and CNTN1. The differential gene modules and their driver genes revealed by our study provided a new perspective for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. Moreover, we validated the results in independent ccRCC patient datasets. Our study provided a new method for prioritizing disease genes and pathways.

  4. Wilson's disease: a new gene and an animal model for an old disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, J A

    1995-08-01

    Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessive, inherited disorder of copper metabolism. In normal individuals, copper homeostasis is controlled by the balance between intestinal absorption of dietary copper and hepatic excretion of excess copper in bile. In Wilson's disease, hepatic copper is neither excreted in bile nor incorporated into ceruloplasmin and copper accumulates to toxic levels. The Wilson's disease gene (WND) encodes a putative copper-transporting protein that is expressed almost exclusively in the liver. The predicted structure of the protein product is that of a P-type ATPase with striking homology to bacterial copper transporters and the gene product of another inherited disorder of copper metabolism, Menkes' disease. A rat model of Wilson's disease has recently been identified. The Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat manifests elevated hepatic copper, defective incorporation of copper into ceruloplasmin, and reduced biliary excretion of copper. The rat homologue of the WND is abnormal in LEC rats. Clinical manifestations of Wilson's disease arise directly from copper-induced damage to hepatocytes (hepatic presentation) or indirectly after the release of copper from the liver with subsequent damage to the brain (neuropsychiatric presentation) and other organs. Genetic heterogeneity (different mutations in a single gene) may account for some of the variability in Wilsonian presentations. The diagnosis of Wilson's disease depends on the demonstration of disordered copper metabolism, manifested as elevated urinary and hepatic copper and low ceruloplasmin levels. However, none of the abnormal findings in Wilson's disease is pathognomonic. Genetic diagnosis, in the absence of family studies, is likely to be difficult since many different mutations result in the disease. Management of Wilson's disease involves decreasing excess levels of copper accumulated in the liver, brain, and other organs. Copper chelation therapy, to increase urinary excretion of copper, is

  5. Informativeness of Early Huntington Disease Signs about Gene Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oster, Emily; Eberly, Shirley W; Dorsey, E Ray; Kayson-Rubin, Elise; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira

    2015-01-01

    The cohort-level risk of Huntington disease (HD) is related to the age and symptom level of the cohort, but this relationship has not been made precise. To predict the evolving likelihood of carrying the Huntington disease (HD) gene for at-risk adults using age and sign level. Using data from adults with early signs and symptoms of HD linked to information on genetic status, we use Bayes' theorem to calculate the probability that an undiagnosed individual of a certain age and sign level has an expanded CAG repeat. Both age and sign levels have substantial influence on the likelihood of HD onset, and the probability of eventual diagnosis changes as those at risk age and exhibit (or fail to exhibit) symptoms. For example, our data suggest that in a cohort of individuals age 26 with a Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS) motor score of 7-10 70% of them will carry the HD mutation. For individuals age 56, the same motor score suggests only a 40% chance of carrying the mutation. Early motor signs of HD, overall and the chorea subscore, were highly predictive of disease onset at any age. However, body mass index (BMI) and cognitive performance scores were not as highly predictive. These results suggest that if researchers or clinicians are looking for early clues of HD, it may be more foretelling to look at motor rather than cognitive signs. Application of similar approaches could be used with other adult-onset genetic conditions.

  6. The Matchmaker Exchange: a platform for rare disease gene discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippakis, Anthony A; Azzariti, Danielle R; Beltran, Sergi; Brookes, Anthony J; Brownstein, Catherine A; Brudno, Michael; Brunner, Han G; Buske, Orion J; Carey, Knox; Doll, Cassie; Dumitriu, Sergiu; Dyke, Stephanie O M; den Dunnen, Johan T; Firth, Helen V; Gibbs, Richard A; Girdea, Marta; Gonzalez, Michael; Haendel, Melissa A; Hamosh, Ada; Holm, Ingrid A; Huang, Lijia; Hurles, Matthew E; Hutton, Ben; Krier, Joel B; Misyura, Andriy; Mungall, Christopher J; Paschall, Justin; Paten, Benedict; Robinson, Peter N; Schiettecatte, François; Sobreira, Nara L; Swaminathan, Ganesh J; Taschner, Peter E; Terry, Sharon F; Washington, Nicole L; Züchner, Stephan; Boycott, Kym M; Rehm, Heidi L

    2015-10-01

    There are few better examples of the need for data sharing than in the rare disease community, where patients, physicians, and researchers must search for "the needle in a haystack" to uncover rare, novel causes of disease within the genome. Impeding the pace of discovery has been the existence of many small siloed datasets within individual research or clinical laboratory databases and/or disease-specific organizations, hoping for serendipitous occasions when two distant investigators happen to learn they have a rare phenotype in common and can "match" these cases to build evidence for causality. However, serendipity has never proven to be a reliable or scalable approach in science. As such, the Matchmaker Exchange (MME) was launched to provide a robust and systematic approach to rare disease gene discovery through the creation of a federated network connecting databases of genotypes and rare phenotypes using a common application programming interface (API). The core building blocks of the MME have been defined and assembled. Three MME services have now been connected through the API and are available for community use. Additional databases that support internal matching are anticipated to join the MME network as it continues to grow. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  7. Alzheimer's disease gene signature says: beware of brain viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ianni Manuela

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent findings from a genome wide association investigation in a large cohort of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD and non demented controls (CTR showed that a limited set of genes was in a strong association (p > l0-5 with the disease. Presentation of the hypothesis In this report we suggest that the polymorphism association in 8 of these genes is consistent with a non conventional interpretation of AD etiology. Nectin-2 (NC-2, apolipoprotein E (APOE, glycoprotein carcinoembryonic antigen related cell adhesion molecule- 16 (CEACAM-16, B-cell lymphoma-3 (Bcl-3, translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 40 homolog (T0MM-40, complement receptor-1 (CR-l, APOJ or clusterin and C-type lectin domain A family-16 member (CLEC-16A result in a genetic signature that might affect individual brain susceptibility to infection by herpes virus family during aging, leading to neuronal loss, inflammation and amyloid deposition. Implications of the hypothesis We hypothesized that such genetic trait may predispose to AD via complex and diverse mechanisms each contributing to an increase of individual susceptibility to brain viral infections

  8. Matrix metalloproteinase gene polymorphisms in patients with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa L.N. Dalepiane

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs play an important role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the pathology underlying the majority of coronary artery disease (CAD. In this study we tested the hypothesis that polymorphic variation in the MMP genes influences the risk of developing atherosclerosis. We analyzed functional polymorphisms in the promoter of the MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-9 and MMP-12 genes in 183 Brazilian Caucasian individuals submitted to coronary angiography, of which 67 (37% had normal coronary arteries (control group and 116 (63% had CAD (CAD patient group. The -1607 1G/2G MMP-1, -1171 5A/6A MMP-3, -1562 C/T MMP-9, -82 A/G MMP-12 polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR followed by restriction digestion. No significant differences were observed in allele frequencies between the CAD patients and controls. Haplotype analysis showed no differences between the CAD patients and controls. There was a significant difference in the severity of CAD, as assessed by the number of diseased vessels, in MMP-1 1G/1G homozygous individuals and in those homozygous for the 6A allele of the MMP-3 polymorphism. However, multivariate analysis showed that diabetes mellitus was the only variable independently associated with CAD severity. Our findings indicated that MMP polymorphisms have no significant impact on the risk and severity of CAD.

  9. Cystic fibrosis gene mutations: evaluation and assessment of disease severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallières E

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Emilie Vallières, Joseph Stuart ElbornCystic Fibrosis and Airways Microbiology Research Group, Queens University Belfast, Belfast, UKAbstract: The cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR gene encodes an ion channel transporter, the CFTR protein. Since its identification in 1989, more than 1,900 sequence variants have been reported, resulting in a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Cystic fibrosis (CF is associated with many CFTR mutants and there is a continuum of disease severity observed. Recent advances in fundamental research have increased our understanding of the consequent molecular defect arising from CF mutations. This knowledge has resulted in the development of CF-specific therapies, targeting either the genetic or the molecular defect. CF care, previously focused on symptom control, is therefore moving toward a "stratified" or "precision" therapeutic approach. This review outlines normal CFTR physiology, the proposed pathologic mechanism underlying CF associated-lung injury, classification of CF mutations, and the CF-specific therapies recently approved or in clinical trials.Keywords: cystic fibrosis, gene mutations, disease severity, evaluation, assessment

  10. Variations in ORAI1 Gene Associated with Kawasaki Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onouchi, Yoshihiro; Fukazawa, Ryuji; Yamamura, Kenichiro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Kakimoto, Nobuyuki; Suenaga, Tomohiro; Takeuchi, Takashi; Hamada, Hiromichi; Honda, Takafumi; Yasukawa, Kumi; Terai, Masaru; Ebata, Ryota; Higashi, Kouji; Saji, Tsutomu; Kemmotsu, Yasushi; Takatsuki, Shinichi; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Kishi, Fumio; Yoshikawa, Tetsushi; Nagai, Toshiro; Hamamoto, Kunihiro; Sato, Yoshitake; Honda, Akihito; Kobayashi, Hironobu; Sato, Junichi; Shibuta, Shoichi; Miyawaki, Masakazu; Oishi, Ko; Yamaga, Hironobu; Aoyagi, Noriyuki; Yoshiyama, Megumi; Miyashita, Ritsuko; Murata, Yuji; Fujino, Akihiro; Ozaki, Kouichi; Kawasaki, Tomisaku; Abe, Jun; Seki, Mitsuru; Kobayashi, Tohru; Arakawa, Hirokazu; Ogawa, Shunichi; Hara, Toshiro; Hata, Akira; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD; MIM#61175) is a systemic vasculitis syndrome with unknown etiology which predominantly affects infants and children. Recent findings of susceptibility genes for KD suggest possible involvement of the Ca(2+)/NFAT pathway in the pathogenesis of KD. ORAI1 is a Ca(2+) release activated Ca(2+) (CRAC) channel mediating store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) on the plasma membrane. The gene for ORAI1 is located in chromosome 12q24 where a positive linkage signal was observed in our previous affected sib-pair study of KD. A common non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism located within exon 2 of ORAI1 (rs3741596) was significantly associated with KD (P = 0.028 in the discovery sample set (729 KD cases and 1,315 controls), P = 0.0056 in the replication sample set (1,813 KD cases vs. 1,097 controls) and P = 0.00041 in a meta-analysis by the Mantel-Haenszel method). Interestingly, frequency of the risk allele of rs3741596 is more than 20 times higher in Japanese compared to Europeans. We also found a rare 6 base-pair in-frame insertion variant associated with KD (rs141919534; 2,544 KD cases vs. 2,414 controls, P = 0.012). These data indicate that ORAI1 gene variations are associated with KD and may suggest the potential importance of the Ca(2+)/NFAT pathway in the pathogenesis of this disorder.

  11. Variations in ORAI1 Gene Associated with Kawasaki Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Onouchi

    Full Text Available Kawasaki disease (KD; MIM#61175 is a systemic vasculitis syndrome with unknown etiology which predominantly affects infants and children. Recent findings of susceptibility genes for KD suggest possible involvement of the Ca(2+/NFAT pathway in the pathogenesis of KD. ORAI1 is a Ca(2+ release activated Ca(2+ (CRAC channel mediating store-operated Ca(2+ entry (SOCE on the plasma membrane. The gene for ORAI1 is located in chromosome 12q24 where a positive linkage signal was observed in our previous affected sib-pair study of KD. A common non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism located within exon 2 of ORAI1 (rs3741596 was significantly associated with KD (P = 0.028 in the discovery sample set (729 KD cases and 1,315 controls, P = 0.0056 in the replication sample set (1,813 KD cases vs. 1,097 controls and P = 0.00041 in a meta-analysis by the Mantel-Haenszel method. Interestingly, frequency of the risk allele of rs3741596 is more than 20 times higher in Japanese compared to Europeans. We also found a rare 6 base-pair in-frame insertion variant associated with KD (rs141919534; 2,544 KD cases vs. 2,414 controls, P = 0.012. These data indicate that ORAI1 gene variations are associated with KD and may suggest the potential importance of the Ca(2+/NFAT pathway in the pathogenesis of this disorder.

  12. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) delivery to retina: an overview of current research advancements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, Maryam; Alizadeh, Effat; Saei Arezoumand, Khatereh; Fallahi Motlagh, Behzad; Zarghami, Nosratollah

    2017-10-24

    The intraocular administration of the ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has been found to attenuate the photoreceptor degeneration and preserve retinal functions in the animal research models of the inherited or induced retinal disease. Studies with the aim of CNTF transfer to the posterior segment inside the eye have been directed to determine the best method for its administration. An ideal delivery method would overcome the eye drug elimination mechanisms or barriers and provide the sustained release of the CNTF into retina in the safest fashion with the minimum harm to the quality of life. This review focuses on the present state of CNTF delivery to retina, also provides an overview of available technologies and their challenges.

  13. Does the Adult Human Ciliary Body Epithelium Contain “True” Retinal Stem Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Frøen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent reports of retinal stem cells being present in several locations of the adult eye have sparked great hopes that they may be used to treat the millions of people worldwide who suffer from blindness as a result of retinal disease or injury. A population of proliferative cells derived from the ciliary body epithelium (CE has been considered one of the prime stem cell candidates, and as such they have received much attention in recent years. However, the true nature of these cells in the adult human eye has still not been fully elucidated, and the stem cell claim has become increasingly controversial in light of new and conflicting reports. In this paper, we will try to answer the question of whether the available evidence is strong enough for the research community to conclude that the adult human CE indeed harbors stem cells.

  14. Lung function in patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia: a cross-sectional and 3-decade longitudinal study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marthin, June K; Petersen, Nadia; Skovgaard, Lene T

    2010-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment is considered important to prevent lung damage in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD).......Early diagnosis and treatment is considered important to prevent lung damage in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD)....

  15. KIR genes and HLA class I ligands in Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vairo, Filippo; Portela, Pâmela; Salim, Patrícia H; Jobim, Mariana; Netto, Cristina; Dorneles, Alicia; Mittlestadt, Suzana; Jobim, Luiz Fernando; Schwartz, Ida Vanessa D

    2013-03-01

    Gaucher disease (GD) is caused by reduced activity of the lysosomal enzyme glucocerebrosidase, which leads to a buildup of glucocerebroside within the cells and chronic stimulation of the immune system. GD is associated with clinical variability even in the same family, which suggests the influence of modifier genes. Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in the immune response, and their number is decreased in GD. Killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) regulate the activity of NK cells through an interaction with specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules on target cells. To analyze the variability of KIR genes in a sample of GD patients from Southern Brazil, and look for associations between variants and clinical manifestations. Thirty-one GD patients (24 mild, 4 moderate, and 3 severe) were included in the study. Fifteen KIR genes, HLA-C and HLA-Bw4 were analyzed using SSP-PCR. Clinical, biochemical, and radiological data were collected by means of a chart review. Age at symptom onset was associated with KIR2DL2 and KIR2DS2 in combination with the ligand HLA-C1 (p=0.038). Patients who have the HLA-C2 variant appear to have more mono- and polyclonal bands on protein electrophoresis (p=0.007, OR 21.3). There was no between-group significant difference in the frequencies of KIR/HLA variants. Although exploratory our data suggest a possible association of KIR/HLA variants and the severity of GD. Further study of KIR/HLA variants is required, as they seem to be a phenotype-modifying factor in this disease. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Regulators of gene expression in Enteric Neural Crest Cells are putative Hirschsprung disease genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriemer, Duco; Sribudiani, Yunia; IJpma, Arne; Natarajan, Dipa; MacKenzie, Katherine C; Metzger, Marco; Binder, Ellen; Burns, Alan J; Thapar, Nikhil; Hofstra, Robert M W; Eggen, Bart J L

    2016-08-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) is required for peristalsis of the gut and is derived from Enteric Neural Crest Cells (ENCCs). During ENS development, the RET receptor tyrosine kinase plays a critical role in the proliferation and survival of ENCCs, their migration along the developing gut, and differentiation into enteric neurons. Mutations in RET and its ligand GDNF cause Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), a complex genetic disorder in which ENCCs fail to colonize variable lengths of the distal bowel. To identify key regulators of ENCCs and the pathways underlying RET signaling, gene expression profiles of untreated and GDNF-treated ENCCs from E14.5 mouse embryos were generated. ENCCs express genes that are involved in both early and late neuronal development, whereas GDNF treatment induced neuronal maturation. Predicted regulators of gene expression in ENCCs include the known HSCR genes Ret and Sox10, as well as Bdnf, App and Mapk10. The regulatory overlap and functional interactions between these genes were used to construct a regulatory network that is underlying ENS development and connects to known HSCR genes. In addition, the adenosine receptor A2a (Adora2a) and neuropeptide Y receptor Y2 (Npy2r) were identified as possible regulators of terminal neuronal differentiation in GDNF-treated ENCCs. The human orthologue of Npy2r maps to the HSCR susceptibility locus 4q31.3-q32.3, suggesting a role for NPY2R both in ENS development and in HSCR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Correcting Neuromuscular Deficits With Gene Therapy in Pompe Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Adrian G.; McElroy, Jessica A.; Grange, Robert W.; Fuller, David D.; Walter, Glenn A.; Byrne, Barry J.; Falk, Darin J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective We have recently reported on the pathology of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) in Pompe disease, reflecting disruption of neuronal and muscle homeostasis as a result of glycogen accumulation. The aim of this study was to examine how the alteration of NMJ physiology contributes to Pompe disease pathology; we performed molecular, physiological, and histochemical analyses of NMJ-related measures of the tibialis anterior muscles of young-, mid-, and late-stage alpha-glucosidase (GAA)-deficient mice. Methods We performed intramuscular injection of an adeno-associated virus (AAV)9 vector expressing GAA (AAV9-hGAA) into the tibialis anterior muscle of Gaa–/– mice at early, mid, and severe pathological time points. We analyzed expression of NMJ-related genes, in situ muscle force production, and clearance of glycogen in conjunction with histological assessment of the NMJ. Results Our data demonstrate that AAV9-hGAA is able to replace GAA to the affected tissue and modify AChR mRNA expression, muscle force production, motor endplate area, and innervation status. Importantly, the degree of restoration for these outcomes is limited by severity of disease. Early restoration of GAA activity was most effective, whereas late correction of GAA expression was not effective in modifying parameters reflecting NMJ structure and function nor in force restoration despite resolution of glycogen storage in muscle. Interpretation Our data provide new mechanistic insight into the pathology of Pompe disease and suggest that early systemic correction to both neural and muscle tissues may be essential for successful correction of neuromuscular function in Pompe disease. PMID:25925726

  18. Foxg1-Cre Mediated Lrp2 Inactivation in the Developing Mouse Neural Retina, Ciliary and Retinal Pigment Epithelia Models Congenital High Myopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Cases

    Full Text Available Myopia is a common ocular disorder generally due to increased axial length of the eye-globe. Its extreme form high myopia (HM is a multifactorial disease leading to retinal and scleral damage, visual impairment or loss and is an important health issue. Mutations in the endocytic receptor LRP2 gene result in Donnai-Barrow (DBS and Stickler syndromes, both characterized by HM. To clearly establish the link between Lrp2 and congenital HM we inactivated Lrp2 in the mouse forebrain including the neural retina and the retinal and ciliary pigment epithelia. High resolution in vivo MRI imaging and ophthalmological analyses showed that the adult Lrp2-deficient eyes were 40% longer than the control ones mainly due to an excessive elongation of the vitreal chamber. They had an apparently normal intraocular pressure and developed chorioretinal atrophy and posterior scleral staphyloma features reminiscent of human myopic retinopathy. Immunomorphological and ultrastructural analyses showed that increased eye lengthening was first observed by post-natal day 5 (P5 and that it was accompanied by a rapid decrease of the bipolar, photoreceptor and retinal ganglion cells, and eventually the optic nerve axons. It was followed by scleral thinning and collagen fiber disorganization, essentially in the posterior pole. We conclude that the function of LRP2 in the ocular tissues is necessary for normal eye growth and that the Lrp2-deficient eyes provide a unique tool to further study human HM.

  19. Sporadic Alzheimer's disease begins as episodes of brain ischemia and ischemically dysregulated Alzheimer's disease genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluta, Ryszard; Jabłoński, Mirosław; Ułamek-Kozioł, Marzena; Kocki, Janusz; Brzozowska, Judyta; Januszewski, Sławomir; Furmaga-Jabłońska, Wanda; Bogucka-Kocka, Anna; Maciejewski, Ryszard; Czuczwar, Stanisław J

    2013-12-01

    The study of sporadic Alzheimer's disease etiology, now more than ever, needs an infusion of new concepts. Despite ongoing interest in Alzheimer's disease, the basis of this entity is not yet clear. At present, the best-established and accepted "culprit" in Alzheimer's disease pathology by most scientists is the amyloid, as the main molecular factor responsible for neurodegeneration in this disease. Abnormal upregulation of amyloid production or a disturbed clearance mechanism may lead to pathological accumulation of amyloid in brain according to the "amyloid hypothesis." We will critically review these observations and highlight inconsistencies between the predictions of the "amyloid hypothesis" and the published data. There is still controversy over the role of amyloid in the pathological process. A question arises whether amyloid is responsible for the neurodegeneration or if it accumulates because of the neurodegeneration. Recent evidence suggests that the pathophysiology and neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease comprises more than amyloid accumulation, tau protein pathology and finally brain atrophy with dementia. Nowadays, a handful of researchers share a newly emerged view that the ischemic episodes of brain best describe the pathogenic cascade, which eventually leads to neuronal loss, especially in hippocampus, with amyloid accumulation, tau protein pathology and irreversible dementia of Alzheimer type. The most persuasive evidences come from investigations of ischemically damaged brains of patients and from experimental ischemic brain studies that mimic Alzheimer-type dementia. This review attempts to depict what we know and do not know about the triggering factor of the Alzheimer's disease, focusing on the possibility that the initial pathological trigger involves ischemic episodes and ischemia-induced gene dysregulation. The resulting brain ischemia dysregulates additionally expression of amyloid precursor protein and amyloid-processing enzyme genes

  20. Ciliary and secretory differentiation of normal human middle ear epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae Young; Kim, Chang-Hoon; Lee, Won-Sang; Kim, Hee-Nam; Song, Kyoung-Seob; Yoon, Joo-Heon

    2002-04-01

    Recent technical advances now permit the serial culture of normal human middle ear epithelial (NHMEE) cells. However, the ciliary differentiation of these cells has not been achieved. The purpose of this study was to establish a culture system in order to differentiate serially cultured NHMEE cells into ciliated cells. If ciliated cells developed, the percentages of ciliated cells and secretory cells were measured throughout the duration of culture. We also examined the levels of mucin and lysozyme secretion and their mRNAs in a time-dependent manner. Human middle ear mucosa with a normal appearance was harvested and serially cultured after enzymatic disaggregation. These cells were cultured in an air-liquid interface (ALI) culture system for 2, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days after confluence. Ciliogenesis usually began 16-18 days after confluence. The percentage of ciliated cells detected by means of immunohistochemical staining increased over time up to a maximum of 10.6% but the percentage of secretory cells remained stable at approximately 40% throughout the duration of culture. By Day 14 after confluence, the amounts of mucin and lysozyme secretion, as measured by dot-blotting analysis, had increased significantly and then remained stable. The expression levels of mucin gene 5B (MUC5B), MUC8 and lysozyme increased with the duration of culture. MUC8 in particular showed a dramatic increase on Day 28 after confluence. In contrast, the level of MUC5AC mRNA peaked on Day 14 after confluence, and then decreased. In conclusion, ciliary differentiation of NHMEE cells can be induced using an ALI culture system. Our study also suggests that secretory function develops earlier than ciliogenesis, and that the expressions of MUC5B and MUC8 mRNAs increase as a function of differentiation.

  1. Gene pyramiding enhances durable blast disease resistance in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Shuichi; Saka, Norikuni; Mizukami, Yuko; Koga, Hironori; Yamanouchi, Utako; Yoshioka, Yosuke; Hayashi, Nagao; Ebana, Kaworu; Mizobuchi, Ritsuko; Yano, Masahiro

    2015-01-14

    Effective control of blast, a devastating fungal disease of rice, would increase and stabilize worldwide food production. Resistance mediated by quantitative trait loci (QTLs), which usually have smaller individual effects than R-genes but confer broad-spectrum or non-race-specific resistance, is a promising alternative to less durable race-specific resistance for crop improvement, yet evidence that validates the impact of QTL combinations (pyramids) on the durability of plant disease resistance has been lacking. Here, we developed near-isogenic experimental lines representing all possible combinations of four QTL alleles from a durably resistant cultivar. These lines enabled us to evaluate the QTLs singly and in combination in a homogeneous genetic background. We present evidence that pyramiding QTL alleles, each controlling a different response to M. oryzae, confers strong, non-race-specific, environmentally stable resistance to blast disease. Our results suggest that this robust defence system provides durable resistance, thus avoiding an evolutionary "arms race" between a crop and its pathogen.

  2. Association study between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphisms and Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Renfang; Fan, Yihui; Zuo, Lulu; Geng, Dongfeng; Meng, Fantao; Zhu, Jing; Li, Qiang; Qiao, Hong; Jin, Yan; Bai, Jing; Fu, Songbin

    2010-10-01

    5,10-Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) catalyzes the metabolism of folate and nucleotides, which are essential for DNA synthesis and methylation. It is highly polymorphic, and its variant genotypes result in lower enzymatic activity and higher plasma homocysteine. Previous studies have provided evidence that a high prevalence of MTHFR gene polymorphisms is frequently detected in patients with autoimmune disease, suggesting a novel genetic association with autoimmune disorders. However, the genetic association between MTHFR and Graves' disease (GD), one of the most common autoimmune diseases, has not been studied. Here, we designed a clinic-based case-control study including 199 GD cases and 235 healthy controls to examine the associations between three common MTHFR polymorphisms (i.e., C677T, A1298C, and G1793A) and GD. Surprisingly, logistic regression analysis shows MTHFR 677CT + TT genotypes are associated with an approximately 42% reduction in the risk of GD in women (adjusted OR = 0.58, 95% CI = 0.3-0.9), compared to the CC genotype, indicating a significant protective effect of 677CT + TT genotypes. Our result provides epidemiological evidence that MTHFR mutation (C677T) protects women from GD. The protective effect, possibly obtained by influencing DNA methylation, should be confirmed in a large number of cohorts. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Predictive gene testing for Huntington disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedderburn, S; Panegyres, P K; Andrew, S; Goldblatt, J; Liebeck, T; McGrath, F; Wiltshire, M; Pestell, C; Lee, J; Beilby, J

    2013-12-01

    Controversies exist around predictive testing (PT) programmes in neurodegenerative disorders. This study sets out to answer the following questions relating to Huntington disease (HD) and other neurodegenerative disorders: differences between these patients in their PT journeys, why and when individuals withdraw from PT, and decision-making processes regarding reproductive genetic testing. A case series analysis of patients having PT from the multidisciplinary Western Australian centre for PT over the past 20 years was performed using internationally recognised guidelines for predictive gene testing in neurodegenerative disorders. Of 740 at-risk patients, 518 applied for PT: 466 at risk of HD, 52 at risk of other neurodegenerative disorders - spinocerebellar ataxias, hereditary prion disease and familial Alzheimer disease. Thirteen percent withdrew from PT - 80.32% of withdrawals occurred during counselling stages. Major withdrawal reasons related to timing in the patients' lives or unknown as the patient did not disclose the reason. Thirty-eight HD individuals had reproductive genetic testing: 34 initiated prenatal testing (of which eight withdrew from the process) and four initiated pre-implantation genetic diagnosis. There was no recorded or other evidence of major psychological reactions or suicides during PT. People withdrew from PT in relation to life stages and reasons that are unknown. Our findings emphasise the importance of: (i) adherence to internationally recommended guidelines for PT; (ii) the role of the multidisciplinary team in risk minimisation; and (iii) patient selection. © 2013 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2013 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  4. Expression of novel Alzheimer's disease risk genes in control and Alzheimer's disease brains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste M Karch

    Full Text Available Late onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD etiology is influenced by complex interactions between genetic and environmental risk factors. Large-scale genome wide association studies (GWAS for LOAD have identified 10 novel risk genes: ABCA7, BIN1, CD2AP, CD33, CLU, CR1, EPHA1, MS4A6A, MS4A6E, and PICALM. We sought to measure the influence of GWAS single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and gene expression levels on clinical and pathological measures of AD in brain tissue from the parietal lobe of AD cases and age-matched, cognitively normal controls. We found that ABCA7, CD33, and CR1 expression levels were associated with clinical dementia rating (CDR, with higher expression being associated with more advanced cognitive decline. BIN1 expression levels were associated with disease progression, where higher expression was associated with a delayed age at onset. CD33, CLU, and CR1 expression levels were associated with disease status, where elevated expression levels were associated with AD. Additionally, MS4A6A expression levels were associated with Braak tangle and Braak plaque scores, with elevated expression levels being associated with more advanced brain pathology. We failed to detect an association between GWAS SNPs and gene expression levels in our brain series. The minor allele of rs3764650 in ABCA7 is associated with age at onset and disease duration, and the minor allele of rs670139 in MS4A6E was associated with Braak tangle and Braak plaque score. These findings suggest that expression of some GWAS genes, namely ABCA7, BIN1, CD33, CLU, CR1 and the MS4A family, are altered in AD brains.

  5. FGF-mediated induction of ciliary body tissue in the chick eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias da Silva, Magnus R; Tiffin, Nicola; Mima, Tatsuo; Mikawa, Takashi; Hyer, Jeanette

    2007-04-01

    Upon morphogenesis, the simple neuroepithelium of the optic vesicle gives rise to four basic tissues in the vertebrate optic cup: pigmented epithelium, sensory neural retina, secretory ciliary body and muscular iris. Pigmented epithelium and neural retina are established through interactions with specific environments and signals: periocular mesenchyme/BMP specifies pigmented epithelium and surface ectoderm/FGF specifies neural retina. The anterior portions (iris and ciliary body) are specified through interactions with lens although the molecular mechanisms of induction have not been deciphered. As lens is a source of FGF, we examined whether this factor was involved in inducing ciliary body. We forced the pigmented epithelium of the embryonic chick eye to express FGF4. Infected cells and their immediate neighbors were transformed into neural retina. At a distance from the FGF signal, the tissue transitioned back into pigmented epithelium. Ciliary body tissue was found in the transitioning zone. The ectopic ciliary body was never in contact with the lens tissue. In order to assess the contribution of the lens on the specification of normal ciliary body, we created optic cups in which the lens had been removed while still pre-lens ectoderm. Ciliary body tissue was identified in the anterior portion of lens-less optic cups. We propose that the ciliary body may be specified at optic vesicle stages, at the same developmental stage when the neural retina and pigmented epithelium are specified and we present a model as to how this could be accomplished through overlapping BMP and FGF signals.

  6. Laser light-scattering spectroscopy: a new application in the study of ciliary activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W I; Verdugo, P

    1976-09-01

    A uniquely precise and simple method to study ciliary activity by laser light-scattering spectroscopy has been developed and validated. A concurrent study of the effect of Ca2+ on ciliary activity in vitro by laser scattering spectroscopy and high speed cinematography has demonstrated that this new method is simpler and as accurate and reproducible as the high speed film technique.

  7. Colour morph of a probable queen angelfish Holacanthus ciliaris from Dry Tortugas, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeley, M W; Luiz, O J; Zurcher, N

    2009-07-01

    An unusual colour morph of a probable Holacanthus ciliaris was observed in Dry Tortugas, Florida, which can possibly be explained by recessive homozygosity, however, further testing is necessary. This variation of H. ciliaris has previously only been described at St Paul's Rocks, Mid-Atlantic Ridge.

  8. Systematic analysis of chromatin interactions at disease associated loci links novel candidate genes to inflammatory bowel disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meddens, Claartje A; Harakalova, Magdalena; van den Dungen, Noortje A M; Foroughi Asl, Hassan; Hijma, Hemme J; Cuppen, Edwin P J G; Björkegren, Johan L M; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Mokry, Michal

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed many susceptibility loci for complex genetic diseases. For most loci, the causal genes have not been identified. Currently, the identification of candidate genes is predominantly based on genes that localize close to or within

  9. Identifying human disease genes through cross-species gene mapping of evolutionary conserved processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Poot

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding complex networks that modulate development in humans is hampered by genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity within and between populations. Here we present a method that exploits natural variation in highly diverse mouse genetic reference panels in which genetic and environmental factors can be tightly controlled. The aim of our study is to test a cross-species genetic mapping strategy, which compares data of gene mapping in human patients with functional data obtained by QTL mapping in recombinant inbred mouse strains in order to prioritize human disease candidate genes.We exploit evolutionary conservation of developmental phenotypes to discover gene variants that influence brain development in humans. We studied corpus callosum volume in a recombinant inbred mouse panel (C57BL/6J×DBA/2J, BXD strains using high-field strength MRI technology. We aligned mouse mapping results for this neuro-anatomical phenotype with genetic data from patients with abnormal corpus callosum (ACC development.From the 61 syndromes which involve an ACC, 51 human candidate genes have been identified. Through interval mapping, we identified a single significant QTL on mouse chromosome 7 for corpus callosum volume with a QTL peak located between 25.5 and 26.7 Mb. Comparing the genes in this mouse QTL region with those associated with human syndromes (involving ACC and those covered by copy number variations (CNV yielded a single overlap, namely HNRPU in humans and Hnrpul1 in mice. Further analysis of corpus callosum volume in BXD strains revealed that the corpus callosum was significantly larger in BXD mice with a B genotype at the Hnrpul1 locus than in BXD mice with a D genotype at Hnrpul1 (F = 22.48, p<9.87*10(-5.This approach that exploits highly diverse mouse strains provides an efficient and effective translational bridge to study the etiology of human developmental disorders, such as autism and schizophrenia.

  10. Application of R to investigate common gene regulatory network pathway among bipolar disorder and associate diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahida Habib

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Depression, Major Depression or mental disorder creates severe diseases. Mental illness such as Unipolar Major Depression, Bipolar Disorder, Dysthymia, Schizophrenia, Cardiovascular Diseases (Hypertension, Coronary Heart Disease, Stroke etc., are known as Major Depression. Several studies have revealed the possibilities about the association among Bipolar Disorder, Schizophrenia, Coronary Heart Diseases and Stroke with each other. The current study aimed to investigate the relationships between genetic variants in the above four diseases and to create a common pathway or PPI network. The associated genes of each disease are collected from different gene database with verification using R. After performing some preprocessing, mining and operations using R on collected genes, seven (7 common associated genes are discovered on selected four diseases (SZ, BD, CHD and Stroke. In each of the iteration, the numbers of collected genes are reduced up to 51%, 36%, 10%, 2% and finally less than 1% respectively. Moreover, common pathway on selected diseases has been investigated in this research.

  11. Effect of Cilia Beat Frequency on Muco-ciliary Clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedaghat, M.H.; Shahmardan, M.M.; Norouzi, M.; Heydari, M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The airway surface liquid (ASL), which is a fluid layer coating the interior epithelial surface of the bronchi and bronchiolesis, plays an important defensive role against foreign particles and chemicals entering lungs. Objective: Numerical investigation has been employed to solve two-layer model consisting of mucus layer as a viscoelastic fluid and periciliary liquid layer as a Newtonian fluid to study the effects of cilia beat frequency (CBF) at various amounts of mucus properties on muco-ciliary transport problem. Methods: Hybrid finite difference-lattice Boltzmann-method (FB-LBM) has been used to solve the momentum equations and to simulate cilia forces, and also the PCL-mucus interface more accurately, immersed boundary method (IBM) has been employed. The main contribution of the current study is to use an Oldroyd-B model as the constitutive equation of mucus. Results: Our results show that increasing CBF and decreasing mucus viscosity ratio have great effects on mucus flow, but the effect of viscosity ratio is more significant. The results also illustrate that the relation between cilia beat frequency and mean mucus velocity is almost linear and it has similar behavior at different values of viscosity ratio. Conclusion: Numerical investigation based on hybrid IB-FD-LBM has been used to study the effect of CBF at various mounts of mucus viscosity ratio on the muco-ciliary clearance. The results showed that the effect of viscosity ratio on the muco-ciliary transport process is more significant compared with CBF. PMID:28144596

  12. Discinesia ciliar primária Primary ciliary dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSÉ WELLINGTON ALVES DOS SANTOS

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Discinesia ciliar primária é uma doença autossômica recessiva caracterizada pela história de infecções repetidas do trato respiratório superior e inferior, otite média, bronquite e rinossinusite, associada a situs inversus na metade dos casos. O diagnóstico é estabelecido pela análise ciliar ultra-estrutural de espécimes respiratórios, após a exclusão inicial de outras doenças, como fibrose cística, deficiência de alfa-1-antitripsina, imunodeficiências (IgG, neutrófilos e complemento e síndrome de Young. O propósito deste artigo é revisar os achados clínicos, o diagnóstico e o manejo da discinesia ciliar primária, incluindo um fluxograma diagnóstico.Primary ciliary dyskinesia is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a history of recurrent upper and lower respiratory tract infections with chronic otitis media, bronchitis and rhinosinusitis, associated with situs inversus in 50% of cases. The diagnosis is established by ciliary ultrastructural analysis of respiratory specimens, after ruling out some disorders as cystic fibrosis, alpha-1 anti-trypsin deficiency, immune deficiencies (IgG, neutrophils and complement and Young's syndrome. The purpose of this paper is to review the clinical features, diagnosis and management of primary ciliary dyskinesia, including a diagnostic algorithm.

  13. Nephrocystin-5, a ciliary IQ domain protein, is mutated in Senior-Loken syndrome and interacts with RPGR and calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Edgar A; Loeys, Bart; Khanna, Hemant; Hellemans, Jan; Sudbrak, Ralf; Fan, Shuling; Muerb, Ulla; O'Toole, John F; Helou, Juliana; Attanasio, Massimo; Utsch, Boris; Sayer, John A; Lillo, Concepcion; Jimeno, David; Coucke, Paul; De Paepe, Anne; Reinhardt, Richard; Klages, Sven; Tsuda, Motoyuki; Kawakami, Isao; Kusakabe, Takehiro; Omran, Heymut; Imm, Anita; Tippens, Melissa; Raymond, Pamela A; Hill, Jo; Beales, Phil; He, Shirley; Kispert, Andreas; Margolis, Benjamin; Williams, David S; Swaroop, Anand; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2005-03-01

    Nephronophthisis (NPHP) is the most frequent genetic cause of chronic renal failure in children. Identification of four genes mutated in NPHP subtypes 1-4 (refs. 4-9) has linked the pathogenesis of NPHP to ciliary functions. Ten percent of affected individuals have retinitis pigmentosa, constituting the renal-retinal Senior-Loken syndrome (SLSN). Here we identify, by positional cloning, mutations in an evolutionarily conserved gene, IQCB1 (also called NPHP5), as the most frequent cause of SLSN. IQCB1 encodes an IQ-domain protein, nephrocystin-5. All individuals with IQCB1 mutations have retinitis pigmentosa. Hence, we examined the interaction of nephrocystin-5 with RPGR (retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator), which is expressed in photoreceptor cilia and associated with 10-20% of retinitis pigmentosa. We show that nephrocystin-5, RPGR and calmodulin can be coimmunoprecipitated from retinal extracts, and that these proteins localize to connecting cilia of photoreceptors and to primary cilia of renal epithelial cells. Our studies emphasize the central role of ciliary dysfunction in the pathogenesis of SLSN.

  14. CCDC39 is required for assembly of inner dynein arms and the dynein regulatory complex and for normal ciliary motility in humans and dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merveille, Anne-Christine; Davis, Erica E; Becker-Heck, Anita; Legendre, Marie; Amirav, Israel; Bataille, Géraldine; Belmont, John; Beydon, Nicole; Billen, Frédéric; Clément, Annick; Clercx, Cécile; Coste, André; Crosbie, Rachelle; de Blic, Jacques; Deleuze, Stephane; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Escalier, Denise; Escudier, Estelle; Fliegauf, Manfred; Horvath, Judith; Hill, Kent; Jorissen, Mark; Just, Jocelyne; Kispert, Andreas; Lathrop, Mark; Loges, Niki Tomas; Marthin, June K; Momozawa, Yukihide; Montantin, Guy; Nielsen, Kim G; Olbrich, Heike; Papon, Jean-François; Rayet, Isabelle; Roger, Gilles; Schmidts, Miriam; Tenreiro, Henrique; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Zelenika, Diana; Zentgraf, Hanswalter; Georges, Michel; Lequarré, Anne-Sophie; Katsanis, Nicholas; Omran, Heymut; Amselem, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) is an inherited disorder characterized by recurrent infections of the upper and lower respiratory tract, reduced fertility in males and situs inversus in about 50% of affected individuals (Kartagener syndrome). It is caused by motility defects in the respiratory cilia that are responsible for airway clearance, the flagella that propel sperm cells and the nodal monocilia that determine left-right asymmetry1. Recessive mutations that cause PCD have been identified in genes encoding components of the outer dynein arms, radial spokes and cytoplasmic pre-assembly factors of axonemal dyneins, but these mutations account for only about 50% of cases of PCD. We exploited the unique properties of dog populations to positionally clone a new PCD gene, CCDC39. We found that loss-of-function mutations in the human ortholog underlie a substantial fraction of PCD cases with axonemal disorganization and abnormal ciliary beating. Functional analyses indicated that CCDC39 localizes to ciliary axonemes and is essential for assembly of inner dynein arms and the dynein regulatory complex. PMID:21131972

  15. Identification of dysfunctional modules and disease genes in congenital heart disease by a network-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Danning

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD is continuously increasing among infants born alive nowadays, making it one of the leading causes of infant morbidity worldwide. Various studies suggest that both genetic and environmental factors lead to CHD, and therefore identifying its candidate genes and disease-markers has been one of the central topics in CHD research. By using the high-throughput genomic data of CHD which are available recently, network-based methods provide powerful alternatives of systematic analysis of complex diseases and identification of dysfunctional modules and candidate disease genes. Results In this paper, by modeling the information flow from source disease genes to targets of differentially expressed genes via a context-specific protein-protein interaction network, we extracted dysfunctional modules which were then validated by various types of measurements and independent datasets. Network topology analysis of these modules revealed major and auxiliary pathways and cellular processes in CHD, demonstrating the biological usefulness of the identified modules. We also prioritized a list of candidate CHD genes from these modules using a guilt-by-association approach, which are well supported by various kinds of literature and experimental evidence. Conclusions We provided a network-based analysis to detect dysfunctional modules and disease genes of CHD by modeling the information transmission from source disease genes to targets of differentially expressed genes. Our method resulted in 12 modules from the constructed CHD subnetwork. We further identified and prioritized candidate disease genes of CHD from these dysfunctional modules. In conclusion, module analysis not only revealed several important findings with regard to the underlying molecular mechanisms of CHD, but also suggested the distinct network properties of causal disease genes which lead to identification of candidate CHD genes.

  16. Ventilation inhomogeneity in children with primary ciliary dyskinesia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Kent; Buchvald, Frederik F; Marthin, June Kehlet

    2012-01-01

    damage in children with cystic fibrosis, which shares features with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Normalised phase III slope indices S(cond) and S(acin) reflect function of the small conducting and acinar airways, respectively. The involvement of the peripheral airways assessed by MBW tests has......The lung clearance index (LCI) derived from the multiple breath inert gas washout (MBW) test reflects global ventilation distribution inhomogeneity. It is more sensitive than forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) for detecting abnormal airway function and correlates closely with structural lung...

  17. Interlocus gene conversion events introduce deleterious mutations into at least 1% of human genes associated with inherited disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casola, Claudio; Zekonyte, Ugne; Phillips, Andrew D; Cooper, David N; Hahn, Matthew W

    2012-03-01

    Establishing the molecular basis of DNA mutations that cause inherited disease is of fundamental importance to understanding the origin, nature, and clinical sequelae of genetic disorders in humans. The majority of disease-associated mutations constitute single-base substitutions and short deletions and/or insertions resulting from DNA replication errors and the repair of damaged bases. However, pathological mutations can also be introduced by nonreciprocal recombination events between paralogous sequences, a phenomenon known as interlocus gene conversion (IGC). IGC events have thus far been linked to pathology in more than 20 human genes. However, the large number of duplicated gene sequences in the human genome implies that many more disease-associated mutations could originate via IGC. Here, we have used a genome-wide computational approach to identify disease-associated mutations derived from IGC events. Our approach revealed hundreds of known pathological mutations that could have been caused by IGC. Further, we identified several dozen high-confidence cases of inherited disease mutations resulting from IGC in ∼1% of all genes analyzed. About half of the donor sequences associated with such mutations are functional paralogous genes, suggesting that epistatic interactions or differential expression patterns will determine the impact upon fitness of specific substitutions between duplicated genes. In addition, we identified thousands of hitherto undescribed and potentially deleterious mutations that could arise via IGC. Our findings reveal the extent of the impact of interlocus gene conversion upon the spectrum of human inherited disease.

  18. Similarity of molecular phenotype between known epilepsy gene LGI1 and disease candidate gene LGI2

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    Eisenhaber Frank

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The LGI2 (leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 2 gene, a prime candidate for partial epilepsy with pericentral spikes, belongs to a family encoding secreted, beta-propeller domain proteins with EPTP/EAR epilepsy-associated repeats. In another family member, LGI1 (leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 mutations are responsible for autosomal dominant lateral temporal epilepsy (ADLTE. Because a few LGI1 disease mutations described in the literature cause secretion failure, we experimentally analyzed the secretion efficiency and subcellular localization of several LGI1 and LGI2 mutant proteins corresponding to observed non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs affecting the signal peptide, the leucine-rich repeats and the EAR propeller. Results Mapping of disease-causing mutations in the EAR domain region onto a 3D-structure model shows that many of these mutations co-localize at an evolutionary conserved surface region of the propeller. We find that wild-type LGI2 is secreted to the extracellular medium in glycosylated form similarly to LGI1, whereas several mutant proteins tested in this study are secretion-deficient and accumulate in the endoplasmic reticulum. Interestingly, mutations at structurally homologous positions in the EAR domain have the same effect on secretion in LGI1 and LGI2. Conclusions This similarity of experimental mislocalization phenotypes for mutations at homologous positions of LGI2 and the established epilepsy gene LGI1 suggests that both genes share a potentially common molecular pathogenesis mechanism that might be the reason for genotypically distinct but phenotypically related forms of epilepsy.

  19. Prioritizing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) candidate genes in COPD-related networks

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yihua; Li, Wan; Feng, Yuyan; Guo, Shanshan; Zhao, Xilei; Wang, Yahui; He, Yuehan; He, Weiming; Chen, Lina

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multi-factor disease, which could be caused by many factors, including disturbances of metabolism and protein-protein interactions (PPIs). In this paper, a weighted COPD-related metabolic network and a weighted COPD-related PPI network were constructed base on COPD disease genes and functional information. Candidate genes in these weighted COPD-related networks were prioritized by making use of a gene prioritization method, respectively. Liter...

  20. Perceptron ensemble of graph-based positive-unlabeled learning for disease gene identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jowkar, Gholam-Hossein; Mansoori, Eghbal G

    2016-10-01

    Identification of disease genes, using computational methods, is an important issue in biomedical and bioinformatics research. According to observations that diseases with the same or similar phenotype have the same biological characteristics, researchers have tried to identify genes by using machine learning tools. In recent attempts, some semi-supervised learning methods, called positive-unlabeled learning, is used for disease gene identification. In this paper, we present a Perceptron ensemble of graph-based positive-unlabeled learning (PEGPUL) on three types of biological attributes: gene ontologies, protein domains and protein-protein interaction networks. In our method, a reliable set of positive and negative genes are extracted using co-training schema. Then, the similarity graph of genes is built using metric learning by concentrating on multi-rank-walk method to perform inference from labeled genes. At last, a Perceptron ensemble is learned from three weighted classifiers: multilevel support vector machine, k-nearest neighbor and decision tree. The main contributions of this paper are: (i) incorporating the statistical properties of gene data through choosing proper metrics, (ii) statistical evaluation of biological features, and (iii) noise robustness characteristic of PEGPUL via using multilevel schema. In order to assess PEGPUL, we have applied it on 12950 disease genes with 949 positive genes from six class of diseases and 12001 unlabeled genes. Compared with some popular disease gene identification methods, the experimental results show that PEGPUL has reasonable performance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. ThePorphyromonas gingivalis/Host Interactome Shows Enrichment in GWASdb Genes Related to Alzheimer's Disease, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Chris J; France, James; Crean, StJohn; Singhrao, Sim K

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal disease is of established etiology in which polymicrobial synergistic ecology has become dysbiotic under the influence of Porphyromonas gingivalis . Following breakdown of the host's protective oral tissue barriers, P. gingivalis migrates to developing inflammatory pathologies that associate with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Periodontal disease is a risk factor for cardiovascular disorders (CVD), type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM), AD and other chronic diseases, whilst T2DM exacerbates periodontitis. This study analyzed the relationship between the P. gingivalis /host interactome and the genes identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for the aforementioned conditions using data from GWASdb ( P periodontitis or P. gingivalis microarray was compared to microarray datasets from the AD hippocampus and/or from carotid artery plaques. The results demonstrated that the host genes of the P. gingivalis interactome were significantly enriched in genes deposited in GWASdb genes related to cognitive disorders, AD and dementia, and its co-morbid conditions T2DM, obesity, and CVD. The P. gingivalis /host interactome was also enriched in GWAS genes from the more stringent NCBI-EBI database for AD, atherosclerosis and T2DM. The misregulated genes in periodontitis tissue or P. gingivalis infected macrophages also matched those in the AD hippocampus or atherosclerotic plaques. Together, these data suggest important gene/environment interactions between P. gingivalis and susceptibility genes or gene expression changes in conditions where periodontal disease is a contributory factor.

  2. Identification of Human Disease Genes from Interactome Network Using Graphlet Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lun; Wei, Dong-Qing; Qi, Ying-Xin; Jiang, Zong-Lai

    2014-01-01

    Identifying genes related to human diseases, such as cancer and cardiovascular disease, etc., is an important task in biomedical research because of its applications in disease diagnosis and treatment. Interactome networks, especially protein-protein interaction networks, had been used to disease genes identification based on the hypothesis that strong candidate genes tend to closely relate to each other in some kinds of measure on the network. We proposed a new measure to analyze the relationship between network nodes which was called graphlet interaction. The graphlet interaction contained 28 different isomers. The results showed that the numbers of the graphlet interaction isomers between disease genes in interactome networks were significantly larger than random picked genes, while graphlet signatures were not. Then, we designed a new type of score, based on the network properties, to identify disease genes using graphlet interaction. The genes with higher scores were more likely to be disease genes, and all candidate genes were ranked according to their scores. Then the approach was evaluated by leave-one-out cross-validation. The precision of the current approach achieved 90% at about 10% recall, which was apparently higher than the previous three predominant algorithms, random walk, Endeavour and neighborhood based method. Finally, the approach was applied to predict new disease genes related to 4 common diseases, most of which were identified by other independent experimental researches. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the graphlet interaction is an effective tool to analyze the network properties of disease genes, and the scores calculated by graphlet interaction is more precise in identifying disease genes. PMID:24465923

  3. Network analysis of genes regulated in renal diseases: implications for a molecular-based classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadish HV

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic renal diseases are currently classified based on morphological similarities such as whether they produce predominantly inflammatory or non-inflammatory responses. However, such classifications do not reliably predict the course of the disease and its response to therapy. In contrast, recent studies in diseases such as breast cancer suggest that a classification which includes molecular information could lead to more accurate diagnoses and prediction of treatment response. This article describes how we extracted gene expression profiles from biopsies of patients with chronic renal diseases, and used network visualizations and associated quantitative measures to rapidly analyze similarities and differences between the diseases. Results The analysis revealed three main regularities: (1 Many genes associated with a single disease, and fewer genes associated with many diseases. (2 Unexpected combinations of renal diseases that share relatively large numbers of genes. (3 Uniform concordance in the regulation of all genes in the network. Conclusion The overall results suggest the need to define a molecular-based classification of renal diseases, in addition to hypotheses for the unexpected patterns of shared genes and the uniformity in gene concordance. Furthermore, the results demonstrate the utility of network analyses to rapidly understand complex relationships between diseases and regulated genes.

  4. Evolutionary profiling reveals the heterogeneous origins of classes of human disease genes: implications for modeling disease genetics in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Evan K; Schnitzler, Christine E; Havlak, Paul; Putnam, Nicholas H; Nguyen, Anh-Dao; Moreland, R Travis; Baxevanis, Andreas D

    2014-10-04

    The recent expansion of whole-genome sequence data available from diverse animal lineages provides an opportunity to investigate the evolutionary origins of specific classes of human disease genes. Previous studies have observed that human disease genes are of particularly ancient origin. While this suggests that many animal species have the potential to serve as feasible models for research on genes responsible for human disease, it is unclear whether this pattern has meaningful implications and whether it prevails for every class of human disease. We used a comparative genomics approach encompassing a broad phylogenetic range of animals with sequenced genomes to determine the evolutionary patterns exhibited by human genes associated with different classes of disease. Our results support previous claims that most human disease genes are of ancient origin but, more importantly, we also demonstrate that several specific disease classes have a significantly large proportion of genes that emerged relatively recently within the metazoans and/or vertebrates. An independent assessment of the synonymous to non-synonymous substitution rates of human disease genes found in mammals reveals that disease classes that arose more recently also display unexpected rates of purifying selection between their mammalian and human counterparts. Our results reveal the heterogeneity underlying the evolutionary origins of (and selective pressures on) different classes of human disease genes. For example, some disease gene classes appear to be of uncommonly recent (i.e., vertebrate-specific) origin and, as a whole, have been evolving at a faster rate within mammals than the majority of disease classes having more ancient origins. The novel patterns that we have identified may provide new insight into cases where studies using traditional animal models were unable to produce results that translated to humans. Conversely, we note that the larger set of disease classes do have ancient origins

  5. The ciliary proteins Meckelin and Jouberin are required for retinoic acid-dependent neural differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romani, Sveva; Illi, Barbara; De Mori, Roberta; Savino, Mauro; Gleeson, Joseph G; Valente, Enza Maria

    2014-01-01

    The dysfunction of the primary cilium, a complex, evolutionarily conserved, organelle playing an important role in sensing and transducing cell signals, is the unifying pathogenetic mechanism of a growing number of diseases collectively termed "ciliopathies", typically characterized by multiorgan involvement. Developmental defects of the central nervous system (CNS) characterize a subset of ciliopathies showing clinical and genetic overlap, such as Joubert syndrome (JS) and Meckel syndrome (MS). Although several knock-out mice lacking a variety of ciliary proteins have shown the importance of primary cilia in the development of the brain and CNS-derived structures, developmental in vitro studies, extremely useful to unravel the role of primary cilia along the course of neural differentiation, are still missing. Mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) have been recently proven to mimic brain development, giving the unique opportunity to dissect the CNS differentiation process along its sequential steps. In the present study we show that mESCs express the ciliary proteins Meckelin and Jouberin in a developmentally-regulated manner, and that these proteins co-localize with acetylated tubulin labeled cilia located at the outer embryonic layer. Further, mESCs differentiating along the neuronal lineage activate the cilia-dependent sonic hedgehog signaling machinery, which is impaired in Meckelin knock-out cells but results unaffected in Jouberin-deficient mESCs. However, both lose the ability to acquire a neuronal phenotype. Altogether, these results demonstrate a pivotal role of Meckelin and Jouberin during embryonic neural specification and indicate mESCs as a suitable tool to investigate the developmental impact of ciliary proteins dysfunction. Copyright © 2014 International Society of Differentiation. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Global analysis of the human pathophenotypic similarity gene network merges disease module components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Palomares, Armando; Rodríguez-López, Rocío; Ranea, Juan A G; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca; Sánchez Jiménez, Francisca; Medina, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    The molecular complexity of genetic diseases requires novel approaches to break it down into coherent biological modules. For this purpose, many disease network models have been created and analyzed. We highlight two of them, "the human diseases networks" (HDN) and "the orphan disease networks" (ODN). However, in these models, each single node represents one disease or an ambiguous group of diseases. In these cases, the notion of diseases as unique entities reduces the usefulness of network-based methods. We hypothesize that using the clinical features (pathophenotypes) to define pathophenotypic connections between disease-causing genes improve our understanding of the molecular events originated by genetic disturbances. For this, we have built a pathophenotypic similarity gene network (PSGN) and compared it with the unipartite projections (based on gene-to-gene edges) similar to those used in previous network models (HDN and ODN). Unlike these disease network models, the PSGN uses semantic similarities. This pathophenotypic similarity has been calculated by comparing pathophenotypic annotations of genes (human abnormalities of HPO terms) in the "Human Phenotype Ontology". The resulting network contains 1075 genes (nodes) and 26197 significant pathophenotypic similarities (edges). A global analysis of this network reveals: unnoticed pairs of genes showing significant pathophenotypic similarity, a biological meaningful re-arrangement of the pathological relationships between genes, correlations of biochemical interactions with higher similarity scores and functional biases in metabolic and essential genes toward the pathophenotypic specificity and the pleiotropy, respectively. Additionally, pathophenotypic similarities and metabolic interactions of genes associated with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) have been used to merge into a coherent pathological module.Our results indicate that pathophenotypes contribute to identify underlying co-dependencies among disease

  7. Global analysis of the human pathophenotypic similarity gene network merges disease module components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Reyes-Palomares

    Full Text Available The molecular complexity of genetic diseases requires novel approaches to break it down into coherent biological modules. For this purpose, many disease network models have been created and analyzed. We highlight two of them, "the human diseases networks" (HDN and "the orphan disease networks" (ODN. However, in these models, each single node represents one disease or an ambiguous group of diseases. In these cases, the notion of diseases as unique entities reduces the usefulness of network-based methods. We hypothesize that using the clinical features (pathophenotypes to define pathophenotypic connections between disease-causing genes improve our understanding of the molecular events originated by genetic disturbances. For this, we have built a pathophenotypic similarity gene network (PSGN and compared it with the unipartite projections (based on gene-to-gene edges similar to those used in previous network models (HDN and ODN. Unlike these disease network models, the PSGN uses semantic similarities. This pathophenotypic similarity has been calculated by comparing pathophenotypic annotations of genes (human abnormalities of HPO terms in the "Human Phenotype Ontology". The resulting network contains 1075 genes (nodes and 26197 significant pathophenotypic similarities (edges. A global analysis of this network reveals: unnoticed pairs of genes showing significant pathophenotypic similarity, a biological meaningful re-arrangement of the pathological relationships between genes, correlations of biochemical interactions with higher similarity scores and functional biases in metabolic and essential genes toward the pathophenotypic specificity and the pleiotropy, respectively. Additionally, pathophenotypic similarities and metabolic interactions of genes associated with maple syrup urine disease (MSUD have been used to merge into a coherent pathological module.Our results indicate that pathophenotypes contribute to identify underlying co

  8. WNT3A gene expression is associated with isolated Hirschsprung disease polymorphism and disease status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Mi, Jie; Liu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Weilin; Gao, Hong

    2014-01-01

    WNT3A has been regarded as an activator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. It has been found Wnt signaling pathway is closely related with embrionic development and Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). A common haplotype consisting of minor SNPs alleles located in the WNT3A gene has been described as a risk factor for various genetic disorders. However, whether WNT3A contributes to the onset of HSCR has not been identified. The present study aims to detect the interactions of genetic variations in the WNT3A gene and examine the biological expression levels with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) in the Chinese people. We analyzed WNT3A gene (rs61743220, rs192966556 and rs145882986) variants in the whole blood samples from HSCR patients and normal children (control groups). WNT3A expression was also examined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), western blotting and immunostaining. Consequently, when rs192966556 and rs145882986 alleles of the WNT3A gene lack the SNPs, they are especially associated with a greater risk of HSCR (OR [95% confidence interval]=1.791, p=0.001; OR [95% confidence interval]=1.556, p=0.003, respectively). The mRNA and protein expressions of WNT3A were higher in the aganglionic colon segment tissues than in the normal ganglionic segments tissues. Immunostaining indicates that the staining of WNT3A was much stronger (brown) in the aganglionic colon segment tissues than that in the normal ganglionic colon segment tissues (colorless or light yellow) in the mucous layer and muscular layer. Although preliminary, these results suggest that WNT3A may play an important role in the pathogenesis of HSCR.

  9. Congenital Tonic Pupils Associated With Congenital Central Hypoventilation Syndrome and Hirschsprung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Viraj J; Ling, Joseph J; Martinez, Elizabeth G; Reddy, Anvesh C; Donahue, Sean P

    2016-12-01

    Autonomic dysfunction can be associated with pupillary abnormalities. We describe a rare association of tonic pupils, congenital central hypoventilation syndrome, and Hirschsprung disease in a newborn with a mutation in the PHOX2B gene, a key regulator of neural crest cells. Hirschsprung disease is characterized by the congenital absence of neural crest-derived intrinsic ganglion cells. Tonic pupils may result from an abnormality of the ciliary ganglion, another structure of neural crest origin. The close association of these conditions in this child suggests a common abnormality in neural crest migration and differentiation.

  10. Myokines (muscle-derived cytokines and chemokines) including ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) inhibit osteoblast differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rachelle W; White, Jason D; Walker, Emma C; Martin, T John; Sims, Natalie A

    2014-07-01

    Muscle and bone are intimately linked by bi-directional signals regulating both muscle and bone cell gene expression and proliferation. It is generally accepted that muscle cells secrete factors (myokines) that influence adjacent bone cells, but these myokines are yet to be identified. We have previously shown that osteocyte-specific deletion of the co-receptor subunit utilized by IL-6 family cytokines, glycoprotein 130 (gp130), resulted in impaired bone formation in the trabecular bone, but enhanced periosteal expansion, suggesting a gp130-dependent periosteum-specific inhibition of osteoblast function, potentially induced by the local muscle fibres. We report here that differentiated primary calvarial osteoblasts cultured in myotube-conditioned media (CM) from myogenic C2C12 cells show reduced mRNA levels of genes associated with osteoblast differentiation. Alkaline phosphatase protein activity and all mRNA markers of osteoblast differentiation in the tested panel (runx2, osterix, alkaline phosphatase, parathyroid hormone (PTH) receptor, osteoprotegerin, osteocalcin, sclerostin) were reduced following culture with myotube CM. The exception was RANKL, which was significantly elevated in differentiated primary osteoblast cultures expressing osteocytic genes. A cytokine array of the C2C12 myotube-conditioned media identified TIMP-1 and MCP-1 as the most abundant myokines, but treatment with recombinant TIMP-1 or MCP-1 did not inhibit osteoblast gene expression. Rather, the IL-6 family cytokine ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), which we found abundantly expressed by mouse muscle at the transcript and protein level, reduced osteoblast gene expression, although not to the same extent as the myotube-conditioned media. These data indicate that muscle cells secrete abundant TIMP-1, MCP-1, and CNTF, and that of these, only CNTF has the ability to suppress osteoblast function and gene expression in a similar manner to myotube-conditioned medium. This suggests that CNTF is

  11. Prediction of drugs having opposite effects on disease genes in a directed network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hasun; Choo, Sungji; Park, Junseok; Jung, Jinmyung; Kang, Yeeok; Lee, Doheon

    2016-01-11

    Developing novel uses of approved drugs, called drug repositioning, can reduce costs and times in traditional drug development. Network-based approaches have presented promising results in this field. However, even though various types of interactions such as activation or inhibition exist in drug-target interactions and molecular pathways, most of previous network-based studies disregarded this information. We developed a novel computational method, Prediction of Drugs having Opposite effects on Disease genes (PDOD), for identifying drugs having opposite effects on altered states of disease genes. PDOD utilized drug-drug target interactions with 'effect type', an integrated directed molecular network with 'effect type' and 'effect direction', and disease genes with regulated states in disease patients. With this information, we proposed a scoring function to discover drugs likely to restore altered states of disease genes using the path from a drug to a disease through the drug-drug target interactions, shortest paths from drug targets to disease genes in molecular pathways, and disease gene-disease associations. We collected drug-drug target interactions, molecular pathways, and disease genes with their regulated states in the diseases. PDOD is applied to 898 drugs with known drug-drug target interactions and nine diseases. We compared performance of PDOD for predicting known therapeutic drug-disease associations with the previous methods. PDOD outperformed other previous approaches which do not exploit directional information in molecular network. In addition, we provide a simple web service that researchers can submit genes of interest with their altered states and will obtain drugs seeming to have opposite effects on altered states of input genes at http://gto.kaist.ac.kr/pdod/index.php/main . Our results showed that 'effect type' and 'effect direction' information in the network based approaches can be utilized to identify drugs having opposite effects on

  12. Human ciliary neurotrophic factor: Localization to the proximal region of the long arm of chromosome 11 and association with CA/GT dinucleotide repeat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lev, A.A.; Rosen, D.R.; Kos, C.; Brown, R.H. Jr.; Clifford, E.; Landes, G.; Hauser, S.L.

    1993-05-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes survival and differentiation of several types of sensory, motor, sympathetic, and parasympathetic neurons. The authors have used the polymerase chain reaction to amplify, clone, and partially sequence CNTF cDNA from human muscle. Using a rodent-human mapping panel and fluorescence in situ hybridization, they have localized a single copy of the gene for human CNTF to the proximal long arm of chromosome 11. They have also identified a polymorphic tandem CA/GT dinucleotide repeat associated with the human CNTF gene. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Co-administration of ciliary neurotrophic factor with its soluble receptor protects against neuronal death and enhances neurite outgrowth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozog, Mark A; Modha, Geetanjalee; Church, John; Reilly, Rayne; Naus, Christian C

    2008-03-07

    Attempts to promote neuronal survival and repair with ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) have met with limited success. The variability of results obtained with CNTF may, in part, reflect the fact that some of the biological actions of the cytokine are mediated by a complex formed between CNTF and its specific receptor, CNTFRalpha, which exists in both membrane-bound and soluble forms. In this study, we compared the actions of CNTF alone and CNTF complexed with soluble CNTFRalpha (hereafter termed "Complex") on neuronal survival and growth. Although CNTF alone produced limited effects, Complex protected against glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity via gap junction-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Further examination revealed that only Complex promoted neurite outgrowth. Differential gene expression analysis revealed that, compared with CNTF alone, Complex differentially regulates several neuroprotective and neurotrophic genes. Collectively, these findings indicate that CNTF exerts more robust effects on neuronal survival and growth when applied in combination with its soluble receptor.

  14. Non-Invasive Gene Therapy of Experimental Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pardridge, William M

    2005-01-01

    ... medicine without the use of viral vectors. The brain gene targeting technology developed in this work creates an "artificial virus" which is comprised of non-immunogenic lipids and proteins, wherein the therapeutic gene is packaged...

  15. DRC2/CCDC65 is a central hub for assembly of the nexin-dynein regulatory complex and other regulators of ciliary and flagellar motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Raqual; Tritschler, Douglas; Mills, Kristyn VanderWaal; Heuser, Thomas; Nicastro, Daniela; Porter, Mary E

    2018-01-15

    The nexin-dynein regulatory complex (N-DRC) plays a central role in the regulation of ciliary and flagellar motility. In most species, the N-DRC contains at least 11 subunits, but the specific function of each subunit is unknown. Mutations in three subunits (DRC1, DRC2/CCDC65, DRC4/GAS8) have been linked to defects in ciliary motility in humans and lead to a ciliopathy known as primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). Here we characterize the biochemical, structural, and motility phenotypes of two mutations in the DRC2 gene of Chlamydomonas Using high-resolution proteomic and structural approaches, we find that the C-terminal region of DRC2 is critical for the coassembly of DRC2 and DRC1 to form the base plate of N-DRC and its attachment to the outer doublet microtubule. Loss of DRC2 in drc2 mutants disrupts the assembly of several other N-DRC subunits and also destabilizes the assembly of several closely associated structures such as the inner dynein arms, the radial spokes, and the calmodulin- and spoke-associated complex. Our study provides new insights into the range of ciliary defects that can lead to PCD. © 2018 Bower et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  16. Altered gene expression in highly purified enterocytes from patients with active coeliac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson John

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coeliac disease is a multifactorial inflammatory disorder of the intestine caused by ingestion of gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. Genes within the HLA-DQ locus are considered to contribute some 40% of the genetic influence on this disease. However, information on other disease causing genes is sparse. Since enterocytes are considered to play a central role in coeliac pathology, the aim of this study was to examine gene expression in a highly purified isolate of these cells taken from patients with active disease. Epithelial cells were isolated from duodenal biopsies taken from five coeliac patients with active disease and five non-coeliac control subjects. Contaminating T cells were removed by magnetic sorting. The gene expression profile of the cells was examined using microarray analysis. Validation of significantly altered genes was performed by real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Results Enterocyte suspensions of high purity (98–99% were isolated from intestinal biopsies. Of the 3,800 genes investigated, 102 genes were found to have significantly altered expression between coeliac disease patients and controls (p Conclusion This study provides a profile of the molecular changes that occur in the intestinal epithelium of coeliac patients with active disease. Novel candidate genes were revealed which highlight the contribution of the epithelial cell to the pathogenesis of coeliac disease.

  17. Rapid cloning of disease-resistance genes in plants using mutagenesis and sequence capture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genetic solutions to protect crops against pests and pathogens are preferable to agrichemicals 1. Wild crop relatives carry immense diversity of disease resistance (R) genes that could enable more sustainable disease control. However, recruiting R genes for crop improvement typically involves long b...

  18. SNP discovery and marker development for disease resistance candidate genes in common carp (Cyprinus carpio)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in immune response genes have been reported as markers of susceptibility to infectious diseases in human and livestock. A disease caused by cyprinid herpes virus 3 (CyHV-3) is highly contagious and virulent in common carp. With the aim to investigate the gene...

  19. Research progress of the association between PAX6 gene and retinal diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Wen Liu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available PAX6 gene plays an important role in embryological development, and the mutation of this gene may result incongenital aniridia, retinoblastoma, macula hypoplasia, Peters' anomaly and so on. A brief introduction of the background PAX6 gene, and the association between PAX6 and retinal diseases were summarized in this review.

  20. Identify Huntington's disease associated genes based on restricted Boltzmann machine with RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xue; Zhang, Han; Duan, Feng; Quan, Xiongwen

    2017-10-11

    Predicting disease-associated genes is helpful for understanding the molecular mechanisms during the disease progression. Since the pathological mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases are very complex, traditional statistic-based methods are not suitable for identifying key genes related to the disease development. Recent studies have shown that the computational models with deep structure can learn automatically the features of biological data, which is useful for exploring the characteristics of gene expression during the disease progression. In this paper, we propose a deep learning approach based on the restricted Boltzmann machine to analyze the RNA-seq data of Huntington's disease, namely stacked restricted Boltzmann machine (SRBM). According to the SRBM, we also design a novel framework to screen the key genes during the Huntington's disease development. In this work, we assume that the effects of regulatory factors can be captured by the hierarchical structure and narrow hidden layers of the SRBM. First, we select disease-associated factors with different time period datasets according to the differentially activated neurons in hidden layers. Then, we select disease-associated genes according to the changes of the gene energy in SRBM at different time periods. The experimental results demonstrate that SRBM can detect the important information for differential analysis of time series gene expression datasets. The identification accuracy of the disease-associated genes is improved to some extent using the novel framework. Moreover, the prediction precision of disease-associated genes for top ranking genes using SRBM is effectively improved compared with that of the state of the art methods.

  1. The contribution of ciliary neurotrophic factor receptors to adult motor neuron survival in vivo is specific to insult type and distinct from that for embryonic motor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy; Rydyznski, Carolyn E; Spearry, Rachel P; Robitz, Rachel; Maclennan, A John

    2013-10-01

    Exogenous ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) promotes motor neuron (MN) survival following trauma and in genetic models of MN disease. Unconditional disruption of the mouse CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα) gene leads to MN loss, demonstrating a developmental role for endogenous CNTF receptor signaling. These data also suggest that CNTF receptors may promote adult MN survival and that appropriately manipulating the receptors could effectively treat adult MN disorders. This effort would greatly benefit from a better understanding of the roles played by CNTF receptors in adult MNs. We have previously found that adult onset disruption of CNTFRα in facial MNs of "floxed CNTFRα" mice by AAV-Cre vector injection leads to significantly more MN loss than in identically treated controls. While indicating that CNTF receptors can promote adult MN survival, the data did not distinguish between potential roles in MN maintenance versus roles in protecting MNs from the injection associated trauma or the toxicity of the chronic Cre recombinase (Cre) produced by the AAV-Cre. Here we used an inducible Cre gene construct to produce adult-onset CNTFRα disruption in facial MNs without the traumatic and toxic effects of the AAV-Cre procedure. The MNs survive without CNTFRα, even when challenged by facial nerve crush or the injection-associated trauma, thereby suggesting, in conjunction with our previous study, that endogenous CNTF receptor signaling can protect MNs against toxic insult, such as that produced by chronic Cre. The data also indicate that in vivo CNTF receptors play very different roles in adult and embryonic MNs. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. EvoTol: a protein-sequence based evolutionary intolerance framework for disease-gene prioritization

    OpenAIRE

    Rackham, Owen?J.?L.; Shihab, Hashem A.; Johnson, Michael R.; Petretto, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Methods to interpret personal genome sequences are increasingly required. Here, we report a novel framework (EvoTol) to identify disease-causing genes using patient sequence data from within protein coding-regions. EvoTol quantifies a gene's intolerance to mutation using evolutionary conservation of protein sequences and can incorporate tissue-specific gene expression data. We apply this framework to the analysis of whole-exome sequence data in epilepsy and congenital heart disease, and demon...

  3. Identification of novel candidate disease genes from de novo exonic copy number variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambin, Tomasz; Yuan, Bo; Bi, Weimin; Liu, Pengfei; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Coban-Akdemir, Zeynep; Pursley, Amber N; Nagamani, Sandesh C S; Marom, Ronit; Golla, Sailaja; Dengle, Lauren; Petrie, Heather G; Matalon, Reuben; Emrick, Lisa; Proud, Monica B; Treadwell-Deering, Diane; Chao, Hsiao-Tuan; Koillinen, Hannele; Brown, Chester; Urraca, Nora; Mostafavi, Roya; Bernes, Saunder; Roeder, Elizabeth R; Nugent, Kimberly M; Bader, Patricia I; Bellus, Gary; Cummings, Michael; Northrup, Hope; Ashfaq, Myla; Westman, Rachel; Wildin, Robert; Beck, Anita E; Immken, LaDonna; Elton, Lindsay; Varghese, Shaun; Buchanan, Edward; Faivre, Laurence; Lefebvre, Mathilde; Schaaf, Christian P; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Yang, Yaping; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Lalani, Seema R; Bacino, Carlos A; Beaudet, Arthur L; Breman, Amy M; Smith, Janice L; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lupski, James R; Patel, Ankita; Shaw, Chad A; Stankiewicz, Paweł

    2017-09-21

    Exon-targeted microarrays can detect small (<1000 bp) intragenic copy number variants (CNVs), including those that affect only a single exon. This genome-wide high-sensitivity approach increases the molecular diagnosis for conditions with known disease-associated genes, enables better genotype-phenotype correlations, and facilitates variant allele detection allowing novel disease gene discovery. We retrospectively analyzed data from 63,127 patients referred for clinical chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) at Baylor Genetics laboratories, including 46,755 individuals tested using exon-targeted arrays, from 2007 to 2017. Small CNVs harboring a single gene or two to five non-disease-associated genes were identified; the genes involved were evaluated for a potential disease association. In this clinical population, among rare CNVs involving any single gene reported in 7200 patients (11%), we identified 145 de novo autosomal CNVs (117 losses and 28 intragenic gains), 257 X-linked deletion CNVs in males, and 1049 inherited autosomal CNVs (878 losses and 171 intragenic gains); 111 known disease genes were potentially disrupted by de novo autosomal or X-linked (in males) single-gene CNVs. Ninety-one genes, either recently proposed as candidate disease genes or not yet associated with diseases, were disrupted by 147 single-gene CNVs, including 37 de novo deletions and ten de novo intragenic duplications on autosomes and 100 X-linked CNVs in males. Clinical features in individuals with de novo or X-linked CNVs encompassing at most five genes (224 bp to 1.6 Mb in size) were compared to those in individuals with larger-sized deletions (up to 5 Mb in size) in the internal CMA database or loss-of-function single nucleotide variants (SNVs) detected by clinical or research whole-exome sequencing (WES). This enabled the identification of recently published genes (BPTF, NONO, PSMD12, TANGO2, and TRIP12), novel candidate disease genes (ARGLU1 and STK3), and further confirmation

  4. Systematic analysis of chromatin interactions at disease associated loci links novel candidate genes to inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meddens, Claartje A; Harakalova, Magdalena; van den Dungen, Noortje A M; Foroughi Asl, Hassan; Hijma, Hemme J; Cuppen, Edwin P J G; Björkegren, Johan L M; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Mokry, Michal

    2016-11-30

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed many susceptibility loci for complex genetic diseases. For most loci, the causal genes have not been identified. Currently, the identification of candidate genes is predominantly based on genes that localize close to or within identified loci. We have recently shown that 92 of the 163 inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)-loci co-localize with non-coding DNA regulatory elements (DREs). Mutations in DREs can contribute to IBD pathogenesis through dysregulation of gene expression. Consequently, genes that are regulated by these 92 DREs are to be considered as candidate genes. This study uses circular chromosome conformation capture-sequencing (4C-seq) to systematically analyze chromatin-interactions at IBD susceptibility loci that localize to regulatory DNA. Using 4C-seq, we identify genomic regions that physically interact with the 92 DRE that were found at IBD susceptibility loci. Since the activity of regulatory elements is cell-type specific, 4C-seq was performed in monocytes, lymphocytes, and intestinal epithelial cells. Altogether, we identified 902 novel IBD candidate genes. These include genes specific for IBD-subtypes and many noteworthy genes including ATG9A and IL10RA. We show that expression of many novel candidate genes is genotype-dependent and that these genes are upregulated during intestinal inflammation in IBD. Furthermore, we identify HNF4α as a potential key upstream regulator of IBD candidate genes. We reveal many novel and relevant IBD candidate genes, pathways, and regulators. Our approach complements classical candidate gene identification, links novel genes to IBD and can be applied to any existing GWAS data.

  5. Correlation of microsynteny conservation and disease gene distribution in mammalian genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiting

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the completion of the whole genome sequence for many organisms, investigations into genomic structure have revealed that gene distribution is variable, and that genes with similar function or expression are located within clusters. This clustering suggests that there are evolutionary constraints that determine genome architecture. However, as most of the evidence for constraints on genome evolution comes from studies on yeast, it is unclear how much of this prior work can be extrapolated to mammalian genomes. Therefore, in this work we wished to examine the constraints on regions of the mammalian genome containing conserved gene clusters. Results We first identified regions of the mouse genome with microsynteny conservation by comparing gene arrangement in the mouse genome to the human, rat, and dog genomes. We then asked if any particular gene types were found preferentially in conserved regions. We found a significant correlation between conserved microsynteny and the density of mouse orthologs of human disease genes, suggesting that disease genes are clustered in genomic regions of increased microsynteny conservation. Conclusion The correlation between microsynteny conservation and disease gene locations indicates that regions of the mouse genome with microsynteny conservation may contain undiscovered human disease genes. This study not only demonstrates that gene function constrains mammalian genome organization, but also identifies regions of the mouse genome that can be experimentally examined to produce mouse models of human disease.

  6. Gene therapy for ocular diseases meditated by ultrasound and microbubbles (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    WAN, CAIFENG; LI, FENGHUA; LI, HONGLI

    2015-01-01

    The eye is an ideal target organ for gene therapy as it is easily accessible and immune-privileged. With the increasing insight into the underlying molecular mechanisms of ocular diseases, gene therapy has been proposed as an effective approach. Successful gene therapy depends on efficient gene transfer to targeted cells to prove stable and prolonged gene expression with minimal toxicity. At present, the main hindrance regarding the clinical application of gene therapy is not the lack of an ideal gene, but rather the lack of a safe and efficient method to selectively deliver genes to target cells and tissues. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD), with the advantages of high safety, repetitive applicability and tissue targeting, has become a potential strategy for gene- and drug delivery. When gene-loaded microbubbles are injected, UTMD is able to enhance the transport of the gene to the targeted cells. High-amplitude oscillations of microbubbles act as cavitation nuclei which can effectively focus ultrasound energy, produce oscillations and disruptions that increase the permeability of the cell membrane and create transient pores in the cell membrane. Thereby, the efficiency of gene therapy can be significantly improved. The UTMD-mediated gene delivery system has been widely used in pre-clinical studies to enhance gene expression in a site-specific manner in a variety of organs. With reasonable application, the effects of sonoporation can be spatially and temporally controlled to improve localized tissue deposition of gene complexes for ocular gene therapy applications. In addition, appropriately powered, focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles can induce a reversible disruption of the blood-retinal barrier with no significant side effects. The present review discusses the current status of gene therapy of ocular diseases as well as studies on gene therapy of ocular diseases meditated by UTMD. PMID:26151686

  7. Bioinformatic screening of autoimmune disease genes and protein structure prediction with FAMS for drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Shigeharu; Umeyama, Hideaki; Iwadate, Mitsuo; Taguchi, Y-H

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are often intractable because their causes are unknown. Identifying which genes contribute to these diseases may allow us to understand the pathogenesis, but it is difficult to determine which genes contribute to disease. Recently, epigenetic information has been considered to activate/deactivate disease-related genes. Thus, it may also be useful to study epigenetic information that differs between healthy controls and patients with autoimmune disease. Among several types of epigenetic information, promoter methylation is believed to be one of the most important factors. Here, we propose that principal component analysis is useful to identify specific gene promoters that are differently methylated between the normal healthy controls and patients with autoimmune disease. Full Automatic Modeling System (FAMS) was used to predict the three-dimensional structures of selected proteins and successfully inferred relatively confident structures. Several possibilities of the application to the drug discovery based on obtained structures are discussed.

  8. Genotypic variation for salinity tolerance in Cenchrus ciliaris L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Iftikhar Hussain

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Scarcity of irrigation water and increasing soil salinization has threatened the sustainability of forage production in arid and semi-arid region around the globe. Introduction of salt-tolerant perennial species is a promising alternative to overcome forage deficit to meet future livestock needs in salt-affected areas. This study presents the results of a salinity tolerance screening trial which was carried out in plastic pots buried in the open field for 160 buffelgrass (Cenchrus ciliaris L. accessions for three consecutive years (2003-2005. The plastic pots were filled with sand, organic, and peat moss mix and were irrigated with four different quality water (EC 0, 10, 15, and 20 dS m-1. The results indicate that the average annual dry weights (DW were in the range from 122.5 – 148.9 g pot-1 in control; 96.4 – 133.8 g pot-1 at 10 dS m-1; 65.6 – 80.4 g pot-1 at 15 dS m-1, and 55.4- 65.6 g pot-1 at 20 dS m-1. The highest DW (148.9 g pot-1 was found with accession 49 and the lowest with accession 23. Principle component analysis shows that PC-1 contributed 81.8 % of the total variability, while PC-2 depicted 11.7% of the total variation among C. ciliaris accessions for DW. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed that a number of accessions collected from diverse regions could be grouped into a single cluster. Accessions 3, 133, 159, 30, 23, 142, 141, 95, 49, 129, 124, and 127 were stable, salt tolerant, and produced good dry biomass yield. These accessions demonstrate sufficient salinity tolerance potential for promotion in marginal land and arid regions to enhance farm productivity and reduce rural poverty.

  9. Successful treatment of chronic lower respiratory tract infection by macrolide administration in a patient with intralobar pulmonary sequestration and primary ciliary dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironobu Tsubouchi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD is a genetic disease associated with abnormalities in ciliary structure and function. Although recurrent respiratory infection associated with ciliary dysfunction is a common clinical feature, there is no standardized treatment or management of respiratory infection in PCD patients. Here, we report that respiratory infection with PCD and intralobar sequestration (ILS were treated successfully with clarithromycin before the surgical resection of ILS. A 15-year-old non-smoking Japanese woman was admitted for productive cough and dyspnea on exertion. Chest CT scan on admission showed complex cystic LESIONS with air-fluid level in the right lower lobe, and diffuse nodular shadows in the whole lobe of the lung. On flexible bronchoscopy examination, sputum and bronchiolar fluid cultures revealed Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus. An electron microscopic examination of the cilia showed inner dynein arm deficiency. Administration of clarithromycin improved the lower respiratory tract infection associated with S. aureus. CT angiography after clarithromycin treatment demonstrated an aberrant systemic artery arising from the celiac trunk and supplying the cystic mass lesions that were incorporated into the normal pulmonary parenchyma without their own pleural covering. Based on these results, the patient was diagnosed with PCD and ILS. Because of the clarithromycin treatment, resection of the ILS was performed safely without any complications. Although further observation of clarithromycin treatment is needed, we believe that clarithromycin may be considered one of the agents for treating PCD.

  10. Glucocerebrosidase 2 gene deletion rescues type 1 Gaucher disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Pramod K; Liu, Jun; Sun, Li; Chuang, Wei-Lien; Yuen, Tony; Yang, Ruhua; Lu, Ping; Zhang, Kate; Li, Jianhua; Keutzer, Joan; Stachnik, Agnes; Mennone, Albert; Boyer, James L; Jain, Dhanpat; Brady, Roscoe O; New, Maria I; Zaidi, Mone

    2014-04-01

    The inherited deficiency of the lysosomal glucocerebrosidase (GBA) due to mutations in the GBA gene results in Gaucher disease (GD). A vast majority of patients present with nonneuronopathic, type 1 GD (GD1). GBA deficiency causes the accumulation of two key sphingolipids, glucosylceramide (GL-1) and glucosylsphingosine (LysoGL-1), classically noted within the lysosomes of mononuclear phagocytes. How metabolites of GL-1 or LysoGL-1 produced by extralysosomal glucocerebrosidase GBA2 contribute to the GD1 pathophysiology is not known. We recently recapitulated hepatosplenomegaly, cytopenia, hypercytokinemia, and the bone-formation defect of human GD1 through conditional deletion of Gba in Mx1-Cre(+):GD1 mice. Here we show that the deletion of Gba2 significantly rescues the GD1 clinical phenotype, despite enhanced elevations in GL-1 and LysoGL-1. Most notably, the reduced bone volume and bone formation rate are normalized. These results suggest that metabolism of GL-1 or LysoGL-1 into downstream bioactive lipids is a major contributor to the bone-formation defect. Direct testing revealed a strong inhibition of osteoblast viability by nanomolar concentrations of sphingosine, but not of ceramide. These findings are consistent with toxicity of high circulating sphingosine levels in GD1 patients, which decline upon enzyme-replacement therapy; serum ceramide levels remain unchanged. Together, complementary results from mice and humans affected with GD1 not only pinpoint sphingosine as being an osteoblast toxin, but also set forth Gba2 as a viable therapeutic target for the development of inhibitors to ameliorate certain disabling consequences of GD1.

  11. The Porphyromonas gingivalis/Host Interactome Shows Enrichment in GWASdb Genes Related to Alzheimer's Disease, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris J. Carter

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is of established etiology in which polymicrobial synergistic ecology has become dysbiotic under the influence of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Following breakdown of the host's protective oral tissue barriers, P. gingivalis migrates to developing inflammatory pathologies that associate with Alzheimer's disease (AD. Periodontal disease is a risk factor for cardiovascular disorders (CVD, type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM, AD and other chronic diseases, whilst T2DM exacerbates periodontitis. This study analyzed the relationship between the P. gingivalis/host interactome and the genes identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS for the aforementioned conditions using data from GWASdb (P < 1E-03 and, in some cases, from the NCBI/EBI GWAS database (P < 1E-05. Gene expression data from periodontitis or P. gingivalis microarray was compared to microarray datasets from the AD hippocampus and/or from carotid artery plaques. The results demonstrated that the host genes of the P. gingivalis interactome were significantly enriched in genes deposited in GWASdb genes related to cognitive disorders, AD and dementia, and its co-morbid conditions T2DM, obesity, and CVD. The P. gingivalis/host interactome was also enriched in GWAS genes from the more stringent NCBI-EBI database for AD, atherosclerosis and T2DM. The misregulated genes in periodontitis tissue or P. gingivalis infected macrophages also matched those in the AD hippocampus or atherosclerotic plaques. Together, these data suggest important gene/environment interactions between P. gingivalis and susceptibility genes or gene expression changes in conditions where periodontal disease is a contributory factor.

  12. DDMGD: the database of text-mined associations between genes methylated in diseases from different species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin Raies, Arwa; Mansour, Hicham; Incitti, Roberto; Bajic, Vladimir B

    2015-01-01

    Gathering information about associations between methylated genes and diseases is important for diseases diagnosis and treatment decisions. Recent advancements in epigenetics research allow for large-scale discoveries of associations of genes methylated in diseases in different species. Searching manually for such information is not easy, as it is scattered across a large number of electronic publications and repositories. Therefore, we developed DDMGD database (http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/ddmgd/) to provide a comprehensive repository of information related to genes methylated in diseases that can be found through text mining. DDMGD's scope is not limited to a particular group of genes, diseases or species. Using the text mining system DEMGD we developed earlier and additional post-processing, we extracted associations of genes methylated in different diseases from PubMed Central articles and PubMed abstracts. The accuracy of extracted associations is 82% as estimated on 2500 hand-curated entries. DDMGD provides a user-friendly interface facilitating retrieval of these associations ranked according to confidence scores. Submission of new associations to DDMGD is provided. A comparison analysis of DDMGD with several other databases focused on genes methylated in diseases shows that DDMGD is comprehensive and includes most of the recent information on genes methylated in diseases. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. DDMGD: the database of text-mined associations between genes methylated in diseases from different species

    KAUST Repository

    Raies, A. B.

    2014-11-14

    Gathering information about associations between methylated genes and diseases is important for diseases diagnosis and treatment decisions. Recent advancements in epigenetics research allow for large-scale discoveries of associations of genes methylated in diseases in different species. Searching manually for such information is not easy, as it is scattered across a large number of electronic publications and repositories. Therefore, we developed DDMGD database (http://www.cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/ddmgd/) to provide a comprehensive repository of information related to genes methylated in diseases that can be found through text mining. DDMGD\\'s scope is not limited to a particular group of genes, diseases or species. Using the text mining system DEMGD we developed earlier and additional post-processing, we extracted associations of genes methylated in different diseases from PubMed Central articles and PubMed abstracts. The accuracy of extracted associations is 82% as estimated on 2500 hand-curated entries. DDMGD provides a user-friendly interface facilitating retrieval of these associations ranked according to confidence scores. Submission of new associations to DDMGD is provided. A comparison analysis of DDMGD with several other databases focused on genes methylated in diseases shows that DDMGD is comprehensive and includes most of the recent information on genes methylated in diseases.

  14. RPGR: Its role in photoreceptor physiology, human disease, and future therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megaw, Roly D; Soares, Dinesh C; Wright, Alan F

    2015-09-01

    Mammalian photoreceptors contain specialised connecting cilia that connect the inner (IS) to the outer segments (OS). Dysfunction of the connecting cilia due to mutations in ciliary proteins are a common cause of the inherited retinal dystrophy retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Mutations affecting the Retinitis Pigmentosa GTPase Regulator (RPGR) protein is one such cause, affecting 10-20% of all people with RP and the majority of those with X-linked RP. RPGR is located in photoreceptor connecting cilia. It interacts with a wide variety of ciliary proteins, but its exact function is unknown. Recently, there have been important advances both in our understanding of RPGR function and towards the development of a therapy. This review summarises the existing literature on human RPGR function and dysfunction, and suggests that RPGR plays a role in the function of the ciliary gate, which controls access of both membrane and soluble proteins to the photoreceptor outer segment. We discuss key models used to investigate and treat RPGR disease and suggest that gene augmentation therapy offers a realistic therapeutic approach, although important questions still remain to be answered, while cell replacement therapy based on retinal progenitor cells represents a more distant prospect. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Using linkage analysis to detect gene-gene interaction by stratifying family data on known disease, or disease-associated, alleles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Corso

    Full Text Available Detecting gene-gene interaction in complex diseases is a major challenge for common disease genetics. Most interaction detection approaches use disease-marker associations and such methods have low power and unknown reliability in real data. We developed and tested a powerful linkage-analysis-based gene-gene interaction detection strategy based on conditioning the family data on a known disease-causing allele or disease-associated marker allele. We computer-generated multipoint linkage data for a disease caused by two epistatically interacting loci (A and B. We examined several two-locus epistatic inheritance models: dominant-dominant, dominant-recessive, recessive-dominant, recessive-recessive. At one of the loci (A, there was a known disease-related allele. We stratified the family data on the presence of this allele, eliminating family members who were without it. This elimination step has the effect of raising the "penetrance" at the second locus (B. We then calculated the lod score at the second locus (B and compared the pre- and post-stratification lod scores at B. A positive difference indicated interaction. We also examined if it was possible to detect interaction with locus B based on a disease-marker association (instead of an identified disease allele at locus A. We also tested whether the presence of genetic heterogeneity would generate false positive evidence of interaction. The power to detect interaction for a known disease allele was 60-90%. The probability of false positives, based on heterogeneity, was low. Decreasing linkage disequilibrium between the disease and marker at locus A decreased the likelihood of detecting interaction. The allele frequency of the associated marker made little difference to the power.

  16. FGF-mediated induction of ciliary body tissue in the chick eye

    OpenAIRE

    Dias da Silva, Magnus R.; Tiffin, Nicola; Mima, Tatsuo; Mikawa, Takashi; Hyer, Jeanette

    2007-01-01

    Upon morphogenesis, the simple neuroepithelium of the optic vesicle gives rise to four basic tissues in the vertebrate optic cup: pigmented epithelium, sensory neural retina, secretory ciliary body and muscular iris. Pigmented epithelium and neural retina are established through interactions with specific environments and signals: periocular mesenchyme/BMP specifies pigmented epithelium and surface ectoderm/FGF specifies neural retina. The anterior portions (iris and ciliary body) are specifi...

  17. The Development of the Ciliary Epithelium in the Embryonic Chicken Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-08-04

    Discussion Light microscopy On day seven, the first ciliary folds appear at stage 31 (figure 3) in the anterior- inferior rim of the optic cup...hippocampal neurons, developing hypoglossal motoneurons , cerebellar neurons, leptomeningeal fibroblasts, I ’ : retinal ganglion cells and retinal...stage 34 (ES). The ciliary folds first began to form in the anterior- inferior rim of the optic cup belqw the closed choroid fissure at stage 31

  18. VisANT 4.0: Integrative network platform to connect genes, drugs, diseases and therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhenjun; Chang, Yi-Chien; Wang, Yan; Huang, Chia-Ling; Liu, Yang; Tian, Feng; Granger, Brian; Delisi, Charles

    2013-07-01

    With the rapid accumulation of our knowledge on diseases, disease-related genes and drug targets, network-based analysis plays an increasingly important role in systems biology, systems pharmacology and translational science. The new release of VisANT aims to provide new functions to facilitate the convenient network analysis of diseases, therapies, genes and drugs. With improved understanding of the mechanisms of complex diseases and drug actions through network analysis, novel drug methods (e.g., drug repositioning, multi-target drug and combination therapy) can be designed. More specifically, the new update includes (i) integrated search and navigation of disease and drug hierarchies; (ii) integrated disease-gene, therapy-drug and drug-target association to aid the network construction and filtering; (iii) annotation of genes/drugs using disease/therapy information; (iv) prediction of associated diseases/therapies for a given set of genes/drugs using enrichment analysis; (v) network transformation to support construction of versatile network of drugs, genes, diseases and therapies; (vi) enhanced user interface using docking windows to allow easy customization of node and edge properties with build-in legend node to distinguish different node type. VisANT is freely available at: http://visant.bu.edu.

  19. Yeast Phenomics: An Experimental Approach for Modeling Gene Interaction Networks that Buffer Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. Hartman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The genome project increased appreciation of genetic complexity underlying disease phenotypes: many genes contribute each phenotype and each gene contributes multiple phenotypes. The aspiration of predicting common disease in individuals has evolved from seeking primary loci to marginal risk assignments based on many genes. Genetic interaction, defined as contributions to a phenotype that are dependent upon particular digenic allele combinations, could improve prediction of phenotype from complex genotype, but it is difficult to study in human populations. High throughput, systematic analysis of S. cerevisiae gene knockouts or knockdowns in the context of disease-relevant phenotypic perturbations provides a tractable experimental approach to derive gene interaction networks, in order to deduce by cross-species gene homology how phenotype is buffered against disease-risk genotypes. Yeast gene interaction network analysis to date has revealed biology more complex than previously imagined. This has motivated the development of more powerful yeast cell array phenotyping methods to globally model the role of gene interaction networks in modulating phenotypes (which we call yeast phenomic analysis. The article illustrates yeast phenomic technology, which is applied here to quantify gene X media interaction at higher resolution and supports use of a human-like media for future applications of yeast phenomics for modeling human disease.

  20. Yeast Phenomics: An Experimental Approach for Modeling Gene Interaction Networks that Buffer Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, John L; Stisher, Chandler; Outlaw, Darryl A; Guo, Jingyu; Shah, Najaf A; Tian, Dehua; Santos, Sean M; Rodgers, John W; White, Richard A

    2015-02-06

    The genome project increased appreciation of genetic complexity underlying disease phenotypes: many genes contribute each phenotype and each gene contributes multiple phenotypes. The aspiration of predicting common disease in individuals has evolved from seeking primary loci to marginal risk assignments based on many genes. Genetic interaction, defined as contributions to a phenotype that are dependent upon particular digenic allele combinations, could improve prediction of phenotype from complex genotype, but it is difficult to study in human populations. High throughput, systematic analysis of S. cerevisiae gene knockouts or knockdowns in the context of disease-relevant phenotypic perturbations provides a tractable experimental approach to derive gene interaction networks, in order to deduce by cross-species gene homology how phenotype is buffered against disease-risk genotypes. Yeast gene interaction network analysis to date has revealed biology more complex than previously imagined. This has motivated the development of more powerful yeast cell array phenotyping methods to globally model the role of gene interaction networks in modulating phenotypes (which we call yeast phenomic analysis). The article illustrates yeast phenomic technology, which is applied here to quantify gene X media interaction at higher resolution and supports use of a human-like media for future applications of yeast phenomics for modeling human disease.

  1. EvoTol: a protein-sequence based evolutionary intolerance framework for disease-gene prioritization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackham, Owen J L; Shihab, Hashem A; Johnson, Michael R; Petretto, Enrico

    2015-03-11

    Methods to interpret personal genome sequences are increasingly required. Here, we report a novel framework (EvoTol) to identify disease-causing genes using patient sequence data from within protein coding-regions. EvoTol quantifies a gene's intolerance to mutation using evolutionary conservation of protein sequences and can incorporate tissue-specific gene expression data. We apply this framework to the analysis of whole-exome sequence data in epilepsy and congenital heart disease, and demonstrate EvoTol's ability to identify known disease-causing genes is unmatched by competing methods. Application of EvoTol to the human interactome revealed networks enriched for genes intolerant to protein sequence variation, informing novel polygenic contributions to human disease. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  2. Prioritizing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) candidate genes in COPD-related networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yihua; Li, Wan; Feng, Yuyan; Guo, Shanshan; Zhao, Xilei; Wang, Yahui; He, Yuehan; He, Weiming; Chen, Lina

    2017-11-28

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multi-factor disease, which could be caused by many factors, including disturbances of metabolism and protein-protein interactions (PPIs). In this paper, a weighted COPD-related metabolic network and a weighted COPD-related PPI network were constructed base on COPD disease genes and functional information. Candidate genes in these weighted COPD-related networks were prioritized by making use of a gene prioritization method, respectively. Literature review and functional enrichment analysis of the top 100 genes in these two networks suggested the correlation of COPD and these genes. The performance of our gene prioritization method was superior to that of ToppGene and ToppNet for genes from the COPD-related metabolic network or the COPD-related PPI network after assessing using leave-one-out cross-validation, literature validation and functional enrichment analysis. The top-ranked genes prioritized from COPD-related metabolic and PPI networks could promote the better understanding about the molecular mechanism of this disease from different perspectives. The top 100 genes in COPD-related metabolic network or COPD-related PPI network might be potential markers for the diagnosis and treatment of COPD.

  3. Ultrasound biomicroscopy value in evaluation of restoration of ciliary muscles contractility after cataract extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayed AA

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Ayser Abd El-Hameed Fayed Ophthalmology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Banha University, Banha, Egypt Purpose: To assess the changes in the contractility of the ciliary muscle in eyes with presbyopia before and after phacoemulsification and intracapsular lens implantation using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM. Patients and methods: This prospective study included 50 eyes of 30 consecutive subjects operated at the Department of Ophthalmology. Patients with any ocular disorder affecting visual acuity, corneal surface irregularities, had posterior capsular perforation or intensive postoperative corneal edema, or were <35 years of age, were excluded. A clear corneal phacoemulsification and posterior chamber intraocular lens were implanted. UBM was performed with and without instilling 2% pilocarpine. Ciliary body axial length (CBAXL, anterior chamber depth, and angle were measured before and 1 month after surgery. Results: The CBAXL showed a greater contractile shortening (P<0.5, with centripetal, contractile shift of ciliary muscle mass. Conclusion: After phacoemulsification and intracapsular lens implantation, ultrasonic biomicroscopy showed significant centripetal movement of the ciliary body compared with that before surgery. This shows that a lenticular sclerotic component may influence both lens movement and the contractility of the ciliary muscle and is believed to be related to the presbyopia. Keywords: ciliary body, presbyopia, accommodation, intraocular lens, pilocarpine

  4. A novel protein LZTFL1 regulates ciliary trafficking of the BBSome and Smoothened.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seongjin Seo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Many signaling proteins including G protein-coupled receptors localize to primary cilia, regulating cellular processes including differentiation, proliferation, organogenesis, and tumorigenesis. Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS proteins are involved in maintaining ciliary function by mediating protein trafficking to the cilia. However, the mechanisms governing ciliary trafficking by BBS proteins are not well understood. Here, we show that a novel protein, Leucine-zipper transcription factor-like 1 (LZTFL1, interacts with a BBS protein complex known as the BBSome and regulates ciliary trafficking of this complex. We also show that all BBSome subunits and BBS3 (also known as ARL6 are required for BBSome ciliary entry and that reduction of LZTFL1 restores BBSome trafficking to cilia in BBS3 and BBS5 depleted cells. Finally, we found that BBS proteins and LZTFL1 regulate ciliary trafficking of hedgehog signal transducer, Smoothened. Our findings suggest that LZTFL1 is an important regulator of BBSome ciliary trafficking and hedgehog signaling.

  5. Leber congenital amaurosis: genes, proteins and disease mechanisms.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollander, A.I. den; Roepman, R.; Koenekoop, R.K.; Cremers, F.P.M.

    2008-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) is the most severe retinal dystrophy causing blindness or severe visual impairment before the age of 1 year. Linkage analysis, homozygosity mapping and candidate gene analysis facilitated the identification of 14 genes mutated in patients with LCA and juvenile

  6. FocusHeuristics - expression-data-driven network optimization and disease gene prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Mathias; Du, Yang; Warsow, Gregor; Hamed, Mohamed; Endlich, Nicole; Endlich, Karlhans; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Sklarz, Lisa-Madeleine; Sender, Sina; Junghanß, Christian; Möller, Steffen; Fuellen, Georg; Struckmann, Stephan

    2017-02-16

    To identify genes contributing to disease phenotypes remains a challenge for bioinformatics. Static knowledge on biological networks is often combined with the dynamics observed in gene expression levels over disease development, to find markers for diagnostics and therapy, and also putative disease-modulatory drug targets and drugs. The basis of current methods ranges from a focus on expression-levels (Limma) to concentrating on network characteristics (PageRank, HITS/Authority Score), and both (DeMAND, Local Radiality). We present an integrative approach (the FocusHeuristics) that is thoroughly evaluated based on public expression data and molecular disease characteristics provided by DisGeNet. The FocusHeuristics combines three scores, i.e. the log fold change and another two, based on the sum and difference of log fold changes of genes/proteins linked in a network. A gene is kept when one of the scores to which it contributes is above a threshold. Our FocusHeuristics is both, a predictor for gene-disease-association and a bioinformatics method to reduce biological networks to their disease-relevant parts, by highlighting the dynamics observed in expression data. The FocusHeuristics is slightly, but significantly better than other methods by its more successful identification of disease-associated genes measured by AUC, and it delivers mechanistic explanations for its choice of genes.

  7. Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction in gene therapy: A new tool to cure human diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Human gene therapy has made significant advances in less than two decades. Within this short period of time, gene therapy has proceeded from the conceptual stage to technology development and laboratory research, and finally to clinical trials for the treatment of a variety of deadly diseases. Cardiovascular disease, cancer, and stroke are leading causes of death worldwide. Despite advances in medical, interventional, radiation and surgical treatments, the mortality rate remains high, and the need for novel therapies is great. Gene therapy provides an efficient approach to disease treatment. Notable advances in gene therapy have been made for genetic disorders, including severe combined immune deficiency, chronic granulomatus disorder, hemophilia and blindness, as well as for acquired diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. However, lack of an efficient delivery system to target cells as well as the difficulty of sustained expression of transgenes has hindered advancements in gene therapy. Ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD is a promising approach for target-specific gene delivery, and it has been successfully investigated for the treatment of many diseases in the past decade. In this paper, we review UTMD-mediated gene delivery for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, cancer and stroke.

  8. Genetics and Genomics of Single-Gene Cardiovascular Diseases: Common Hereditary Cardiomyopathies as Prototypes of Single-Gene Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marian, Ali J; van Rooij, Eva; Roberts, Robert

    2016-12-27

    This is the first of 2 review papers on genetics and genomics appearing as part of the series on "omics." Genomics pertains to all components of an organism's genes, whereas genetics involves analysis of a specific gene or genes in the context of heredity. The paper provides introductory comments, describes the basis of human genetic diversity, and addresses the phenotypic consequences of genetic variants. Rare variants with large effect sizes are responsible for single-gene disorders, whereas complex polygenic diseases are typically due to multiple genetic variants, each exerting a modest effect size. To illustrate the clinical implications of genetic variants with large effect sizes, 3 common forms of hereditary cardiomyopathies are discussed as prototypic examples of single-gene disorders, including their genetics, clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, and treatment. The genetic basis of complex traits is discussed in a separate paper. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The mouse homologue of the polycystic kidney disease gene (Pkd1) is a single-copy gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, P.G.; Loehning, C.; Frischauf, A.M. [Imperial Cancer Research Fund, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-06-01

    The mouse homologue of the polycystic kidney disease 1 gene (PKD1) was mapped to chromosome 17 using somatic cell hybrid, BXD recombinant inbred strains, and FISH. The gene is located within a previously defined conserved synteny group that includes the mouse homologue of tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) and is linked to the {alpha} globin pseudogene Hba-ps4. Although the human genome contains multiple copies of genes related to PKD1, there is no evidence for more than one copy in the mouse genome. Like their human counterparts, the mouse Tsc2 and Pkd1 genes are arranged in a tail-to-tail orientation with a distance of only 63 bp between the polyadenylation signals of the two genes. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Exploring matrix factorization techniques for significant genes identification of Alzheimer’s disease microarray gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Xiaohua

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The wide use of high-throughput DNA microarray technology provide an increasingly detailed view of human transcriptome from hundreds to thousands of genes. Although biomedical researchers typically design microarray experiments to explore specific biological contexts, the relationships between genes are hard to identified because they are complex and noisy high-dimensional data and are often hindered by low statistical power. The main challenge now is to extract valuable biological information from the colossal amount of data to gain insight into biological processes and the mechanisms of human disease. To overcome the challenge requires mathematical and computational methods that are versatile enough to capture the underlying biological features and simple enough to be applied efficiently to large datasets. Methods Unsupervised machine learning approaches provide new and efficient analysis of gene expression profiles. In our study, two unsupervised knowledge-based matrix factorization methods, independent component analysis (ICA and nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF are integrated to identify significant genes and related pathways in microarray gene expression dataset of Alzheimer’s disease. The advantage of these two approaches is they can be performed as a biclustering method by which genes and conditions can be clustered simultaneously. Furthermore, they can group genes into different categories for identifying related diagnostic pathways and regulatory networks. The difference between these two method lies in ICA assume statistical independence of the expression modes, while NMF need positivity constrains to generate localized gene expression profiles. Results In our work, we performed FastICA and non-smooth NMF methods on DNA microarray gene expression data of Alzheimer’s disease respectively. The simulation results shows that both of the methods can clearly classify severe AD samples from control samples, and

  11. Validation of gene expression biomarker analysis for biopsy-based clinical trials in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Brigid S; Boyle, David L; Sandborn, William J; Firestein, Gary S; Levesque, Barrett G; Hillman, Joshua; Zhang, Bing; Proudfoot, James; Eckmann, Lars; Ernst, Peter B; Rivera-Nieves, Jesus; Pola, Suresh; Copur-Dahi, Nedret; Zou, Guangyong; Chang, John T

    2015-02-01

    The ability to measure the expression of proinflammatory cytokines from intestinal biopsies in patients with Crohn's disease in an accurate and reproducible way is critical for proof-of-concept and mechanism-of-action trials; however, the number of biopsies from a segment of the ileum or colon required to yield reproducible results has not been rigorously evaluated. We examined intestinal biopsies from patients with Crohn's disease to validate methods for detecting changes in inflammatory gene expression. To evaluate the reproducibility of gene expression measurements, intestinal biopsies were obtained from designated segments from 6 healthy controls, 6 patients with active Crohn's disease, and 6 patients with inactive Crohn's disease. Disease activity was based on the simple endoscopic score for Crohn's disease. Expression of 7 proinflammatory genes was measured from each biopsy using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Using a linear mixed effects model, the power to detect transcriptional changes corresponding to active and inactive Crohn's disease was calculated. Total simple endoscopic score for Crohn's disease score corresponds with expression of most inflammatory biomarkers. For most genes, 2 to 5 biopsies are needed to reduce sampling error to Crohn's disease, 1 to 2 intestinal biopsies from 3 patients before and after treatment are needed to yield power of at least 80%. Measuring proinflammatory gene expression from mucosal biopsies from patients with Crohn's disease is practicable and provides objective biomarkers that can be used in proof-of-concept and mechanism-of-action trials to assess response to therapy.

  12. deletion polymorphism of ACE gene and Alzheimerв€™s disease

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Omayma M. Hassanin

    2014-06-27

    Jun 27, 2014 ... Abstract Introduction: Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease. Many studies proposed an association of the insertion (I)/deletion (D) polymorphism (indel) in intron 16 of the gene for angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) on chromosome 17q23 with Alz- heimer's disease.

  13. Targeted delivery of genes to endothelial cells and cell- and gene-based therapy in pulmonary vascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suen, Colin M; Mei, Shirley H J; Kugathasan, Lakshmi; Stewart, Duncan J

    2013-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease that, despite significant advances in medical therapies over the last several decades, continues to have an extremely poor prognosis. Gene therapy is a method to deliver therapeutic genes to replace defective or mutant genes or supplement existing cellular processes to modify disease. Over the last few decades, several viral and nonviral methods of gene therapy have been developed for preclinical PAH studies with varying degrees of efficacy. However, these gene delivery methods face challenges of immunogenicity, low transduction rates, and nonspecific targeting which have limited their translation to clinical studies. More recently, the emergence of regenerative approaches using stem and progenitor cells such as endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have offered a new approach to gene therapy. Cell-based gene therapy is an approach that augments the therapeutic potential of EPCs and MSCs and may deliver on the promise of reversal of established PAH. These new regenerative approaches have shown tremendous potential in preclinical studies; however, large, rigorously designed clinical studies will be necessary to evaluate clinical efficacy and safety. © 2013 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 3:1749-1779, 2013.

  14. Identifying Relationships among Genomic Disease Regions: Predicting Genes at Pathogenic SNP Associations and Rare Deletions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Plenge, Robert M.; Rossin, Elizabeth J.; Ng, Aylwin C. Y.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Sklar, Pamela; Scolnick, Edward M.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Altshuler, David; Daly, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    Translating a set of disease regions into insight about pathogenic mechanisms requires not only the ability to identify the key disease genes within them, but also the biological relationships among those key genes. Here we describe a statistical method, Gene Relationships Among Implicated Loci (GRAIL), that takes a list of disease regions and automatically assesses the degree of relatedness of implicated genes using 250,000 PubMed abstracts. We first evaluated GRAIL by assessing its ability to identify subsets of highly related genes in common pathways from validated lipid and height SNP associations from recent genome-wide studies. We then tested GRAIL, by assessing its ability to separate true disease regions from many false positive disease regions in two separate practical applications in human genetics. First, we took 74 nominally associated Crohn's disease SNPs and applied GRAIL to identify a subset of 13 SNPs with highly related genes. Of these, ten convincingly validated in follow-up genotyping; genotyping results for the remaining three were inconclusive. Next, we applied GRAIL to 165 rare deletion events seen in schizophrenia cases (less than one-third of which are contributing to disease risk). We demonstrate that GRAIL is able to identify a subset of 16 deletions containing highly related genes; many of these genes are expressed in the central nervous system and play a role in neuronal synapses. GRAIL offers a statistically robust approach to identifying functionally related genes from across multiple disease regions—that likely represent key disease pathways. An online version of this method is available for public use (http://www.broad.mit.edu/mpg/grail/). PMID:19557189

  15. A computational method based on the integration of heterogeneous networks for predicting disease-gene associations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingli Guo

    Full Text Available The identification of disease-causing genes is a fundamental challenge in human health and of great importance in improving medical care, and provides a better understanding of gene functions. Recent computational approaches based on the interactions among human proteins and disease similarities have shown their power in tackling the issue. In this paper, a novel systematic and global method that integrates two heterogeneous networks for prioritizing candidate disease-causing genes is provided, based on the observation that genes causing the same or similar diseases tend to lie close to one another in a network of protein-protein interactions. In this method, the association score function between a query disease and a candidate gene is defined as the weighted sum of all the association scores between similar diseases and neighbouring genes. Moreover, the topological correlation of these two heterogeneous networks can be incorporated into the definition of the score function, and finally an iterative algorithm is designed for this issue. This method was tested with 10-fold cross-validation on all 1,126 diseases that have at least a known causal gene, and it ranked the correct gene as one of the top ten in 622 of all the 1,428 cases, significantly outperforming a state-of-the-art method called PRINCE. The results brought about by this method were applied to study three multi-factorial disorders: breast cancer, Alzheimer disease and diabetes mellitus type 2, and some suggestions of novel causal genes and candidate disease-causing subnetworks were provided for further investigation.

  16. Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Common Genes, Common Environments?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Dirkje S.; Kerkhof, Marjan; Boezen, H. Marike; Koppelman, Gerard H.

    2011-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) show similarities and substantial differences. The Dutch hypothesis stipulated that asthma and COPD have common genetic and environmental risk factors (allergens, infections, smoking), which ultimately lead to clinical disease depending on the

  17. Up-regulation of Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor in Astrocytes by Aspirin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Khushbu K.; Sendtner, Michael; Pahan, Kalipada

    2013-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a promyelinating trophic factor, and the mechanisms by which CNTF expression could be increased in the brain are poorly understood. Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) is one of the most widely used analgesics. Interestingly, aspirin increased mRNA and protein expression of CNTF in primary mouse and human astrocytes in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Aspirin induced the activation of protein kinase A (PKA) but not protein kinase C (PKC). H-89, an inhibitor of PKA, abrogated aspirin-induced expression of CNTF. The activation of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB), but not NF-κB, by aspirin, the abrogation of aspirin-induced expression of CNTF by siRNA knockdown of CREB, the presence of a consensus cAMP-response element in the promoter of CNTF, and the recruitment of CREB and CREB-binding protein to the CNTF promoter by aspirin suggest that aspirin increases the expression of the Cntf gene via the activation of CREB. Furthermore, we demonstrate that aspirin-induced astroglial CNTF was also functionally active and that supernatants of aspirin-treated astrocytes of wild type, but not Cntf null, mice increased myelin-associated proteins in oligodendrocytes and protected oligodendrocytes from TNF-α insult. These results highlight a new and novel myelinogenic property of aspirin, which may be of benefit for multiple sclerosis and other demyelinating disorders. PMID:23653362

  18. Phylogenetic analysis of the Neks reveals early diversification of ciliary-cell cycle kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D K Parker

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available NIMA-related kinases (Neks have been studied in diverse eukaryotes, including the fungus Aspergillus and the ciliate Tetrahymena. In the former, a single Nek plays an essential role in cell cycle regulation; in the latter, which has more than 30 Neks in its genome, multiple Neks regulate ciliary length. Mammalian genomes encode an intermediate number of Neks, several of which are reported to play roles in cell cycle regulation and/or localize to centrosomes. Previously, we reported that organisms with cilia typically have more Neks than organisms without cilia, but were unable to establish the evolutionary history of the gene family.We have performed a large-scale analysis of the Nek family using Bayesian techniques, including tests of alternate topologies. We find that the Nek family had already expanded in the last common ancestor of eukaryotes, a ciliated cell which likely expressed at least five Neks. We suggest that Neks played an important role in the common ancestor in regulating cilia, centrioles, and centrosomes with respect to mitotic entry, and that this role continues today in organisms with cilia. Organisms that lack cilia generally show a reduction in the number of Nek clades represented, sometimes associated with lineage specific expansion of a single clade, as has occurred in the plants.This is the first rigorous phylogenetic analysis of a kinase family across a broad array of phyla. Our findings provide a coherent framework for the study of Neks and their roles in coordinating cilia and cell cycle progression.

  19. No major genes in autoimmune thyroid diseases: complex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2011-08-19

    Aug 19, 2011 ... The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs) include,. Graves' disease (GD), autoimmune hypothyroidism (AH):. Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and atrophic autoimmune thy- roiditis (AAT). These are prevalent autoimmune diseases, affecting up to 2% of the general population. A widely accepted model for the ...

  20. Gene Therapy-Based Modeling of Neurodegenerative Disorders: Huntington's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Deborah

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by impairments in motor control, and cognitive and psychiatric disturbances. In this chapter, viral vector-mediated approaches used in modeling the key neuropathological features of the disease including the production of abnormal intracellular protein aggregates, neuronal dysfunction and degeneration and motor impairments in rodents are described.

  1. Vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms in Alzheimer's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łaczmański, Łukasz; Jakubik, Marta; Bednarek-Tupikowska, Grażyna; Rymaszewska, Joanna; Słoka, Natalia; Lwow, Felicja

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether polymorphisms of the VDR gene may increase the risk of Alzheimer disease (AD) development in Lower Silesian patients in comparison with other populations. 108 AD patients (aged 73.7±8.6) vs 77 healthy volunteers (aged 64.5±7.8) in the Lower Silesian population were studied. We investigated the frequency of the VDR polymorphisms rs731236 (TaqI), rs7975232 (ApaI), rs10735810 (FokI) and rs1544410 (BsmI) in the AD group vs the healthy group. Afterwards, MEDLINE and ResearchGate were studied to compare our investigation with other populations, due to the relatively small group size in our study. We did not observe any significant differences in frequency of genotypes of rs731236 (TaqI), rs10735810 (FokI) or rs1544410 (BsmI) VDR polymorphisms between the two Lower Silesian groups. Frequency of allele A of ApaI in the control group was significantly higher vs AD patients (p<0.0177) in the Lower Silesian population. Furthermore the difference in the occurrence of allele t in TaqI and allele A in ApaI between AD patients vs the control group was significant (respectively p<0.0056, p<0.0140) in British Europeans. This observation may suggest that allele "a" of the ApaI polymorphism is a risk allele in AD Lower Silesian patients. We compared our results with those obtained for the population of British Europeans. In multivariate stepwise regression, allele "A" of ApaI was associated with 30% lower risk of AD (OR=0.70, p=0.0009) in total treated Polish and British populations. We did not observe similar results in Turkish and Iranian populations. Our data suggest that the allele "A" VDR genotype of ApaI reduces AD risk, probably depending on ethnic origin and climatic conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Recombination Rate Heterogeneity within Arabidopsis Disease Resistance Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyuha Choi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Meiotic crossover frequency varies extensively along chromosomes and is typically concentrated in hotspots. As recombination increases genetic diversity, hotspots are predicted to occur at immunity genes, where variation may be beneficial. A major component of plant immunity is recognition of pathogen Avirulence (Avr effectors by resistance (R genes that encode NBS-LRR domain proteins. Therefore, we sought to test whether NBS-LRR genes would overlap with meiotic crossover hotspots using experimental genetics in Arabidopsis thaliana. NBS-LRR genes tend to physically cluster in plant genomes; for example, in Arabidopsis most are located in large clusters on the south arms of chromosomes 1 and 5. We experimentally mapped 1,439 crossovers within these clusters and observed NBS-LRR gene associated hotspots, which were also detected as historical hotspots via analysis of linkage disequilibrium. However, we also observed NBS-LRR gene coldspots, which in some cases correlate with structural heterozygosity. To study recombination at the fine-scale we used high-throughput sequencing to analyze ~1,000 crossovers within the RESISTANCE TO ALBUGO CANDIDA1 (RAC1 R gene hotspot. This revealed elevated intragenic crossovers, overlapping nucleosome-occupied exons that encode the TIR, NBS and LRR domains. The highest RAC1 recombination frequency was promoter-proximal and overlapped CTT-repeat DNA sequence motifs, which have previously been associated with plant crossover hotspots. Additionally, we show a significant influence of natural genetic variation on NBS-LRR cluster recombination rates, using crosses between Arabidopsis ecotypes. In conclusion, we show that a subset of NBS-LRR genes are strong hotspots, whereas others are coldspots. This reveals a complex recombination landscape in Arabidopsis NBS-LRR genes, which we propose results from varying coevolutionary pressures exerted by host-pathogen relationships, and is influenced by structural heterozygosity.

  3. Reg-2, a downstream signaling protein in the ciliary neurotrophic factor survival pathway, alleviates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong eJiang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF, originally described as a neurocytokine that could support the survival of neurons, has been recently found to alleviate demyelination, prevent axon loss, and improve functional recovery in a rat model of acute experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE. However, poor penetration into the brain parenchyma and unfavorable side effects limit the utility of CNTF. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of a protein downstream of CNTF, regeneration gene protein 2 (Reg-2. Using multiple morphological, molecular biology, and electrophysiological methods to assess neuroinflammation, axonal loss, demyelination, and functional impairment, we observed that Reg-2 and CNTF exert similar effects in the acute phase of EAE. Both treatments attenuated axonal loss and demyelination, improved neuronal survival, and produced functional improvement. With a smaller molecular weight and improved penetration into the brain parenchyma, Reg-2 may be a useful substitute for CNTF therapy in EAE and multiple sclerosis.

  4. Gene Editing and Genetic Lung Disease. Basic Research Meets Therapeutic Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alapati, Deepthi; Morrisey, Edward E

    2017-03-01

    Although our understanding of the genetics and pathology of congenital lung diseases such as surfactant protein deficiency, cystic fibrosis, and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency is extensive, treatment options are lacking. Because the lung is a barrier organ in direct communication with the external environment, targeted delivery of gene corrective technologies to the respiratory system via intratracheal or intranasal routes is an attractive option for therapy. CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing technology is a promising approach to repairing or inactivating disease-causing mutations. Recent reports have provided proof of concept by using CRISPR/Cas9 to successfully repair or inactivate mutations in animal models of monogenic human diseases. Potential pulmonary applications of CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing include gene correction of monogenic diseases in pre- or postnatal lungs and ex vivo gene editing of patient-specific airway stem cells followed by autologous cell transplant. Strategies to enhance gene-editing efficiency and eliminate off-target effects by targeting pulmonary stem/progenitor cells and the assessment of short-term and long-term effects of gene editing are important considerations as the field advances. If methods continue to advance rapidly, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing may provide a novel opportunity to correct monogenic diseases of the respiratory system.

  5. Network analysis of differential expression for the identification of disease-causing genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Nitsch

    Full Text Available Genetic studies (in particular linkage and association studies identify chromosomal regions involved in a disease or phenotype of interest, but those regions often contain many candidate genes, only a few of which can be followed-up for biological validation. Recently, computational methods to identify (prioritize the most promising candidates within a region have been proposed, but they are usually not applicable to cases where little is known about the phenotype (no or few confirmed disease genes, fragmentary understanding of the biological cascades involved. We seek to overcome this limitation by replacing knowledge about the biological process by experimental data on differential gene expression between affected and healthy individuals. Considering the problem from the perspective of a gene/protein network, we assess a candidate gene by considering the level of differential expression in its neighborhood under the assumption that strong candidates will tend to be surrounded by differentially expressed neighbors. We define a notion of soft neighborhood where each gene is given a contributing weight, which decreases with the distance from the candidate gene on the protein network. To account for multiple paths between genes, we define the distance using the Laplacian exponential diffusion kernel. We score candidates by aggregating the differential expression of neighbors weighted as a function of distance. Through a randomization procedure, we rank candidates by p-values. We illustrate our approach on four monogenic diseases and successfully prioritize the known disease causing genes.

  6. Defining the Human Macula Transcriptome and Candidate Retinal Disease Genes UsingEyeSAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, Catherine Bowes; Ebright, Jessica N.; Zavodni, Zachary J.; Yu, Ling; Wang, Tianyuan; Daiger, Stephen P.; Wistow, Graeme; Boon, Kathy; Hauser, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To develop large-scale, high-throughput annotation of the human macula transcriptome and to identify and prioritize candidate genes for inherited retinal dystrophies, based on ocular-expression profiles using serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE). Methods Two human retina and two retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)/choroid SAGE libraries made from matched macula or midperipheral retina and adjacent RPE/choroid of morphologically normal 28- to 66-year-old donors and a human central retina longSAGE library made from 41- to 66-year-old donors were generated. Their transcription profiles were entered into a relational database, EyeSAGE, including microarray expression profiles of retina and publicly available normal human tissue SAGE libraries. EyeSAGE was used to identify retina- and RPE-specific and -associated genes, and candidate genes for retina and RPE disease loci. Differential and/or cell-type specific expression was validated by quantitative and single-cell RT-PCR. Results Cone photoreceptor-associated gene expression was elevated in the macula transcription profiles. Analysis of the longSAGE retina tags enhanced tag-to-gene mapping and revealed alternatively spliced genes. Analysis of candidate gene expression tables for the identified Bardet-Biedl syndrome disease gene (BBS5) in the BBS5 disease region table yielded BBS5 as the top candidate. Compelling candidates for inherited retina diseases were identified. Conclusions The EyeSAGE database, combining three different gene-profiling platforms including the authors’ multidonor-derived retina/RPE SAGE libraries and existing single-donor retina/RPE libraries, is a powerful resource for definition of the retina and RPE transcriptomes. It can be used to identify retina-specific genes, including alternatively spliced transcripts and to prioritize candidate genes within mapped retinal disease regions. PMID:16723438

  7. Contemporary Approaches for Identifying Rare Bone Disease Causing Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Charles R; Clemens, Thomas L

    Recent improvements in the speed and accuracy of DNA sequencing, together with increasingly sophisticated mathematical approaches for annotating gene networks, have revolutionized the field of human genetics and made these once time consuming approaches assessable to most investigators. In the field of bone research, a particularly active area of gene discovery has occurred in patients with rare bone disorders such as osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) that are caused by mutations in single genes. In this perspective, we highlight some of these technological advances and describe how they have been used to identify the genetic determinants underlying two previously unexplained cases of OI. The widespread availability of advanced methods for DNA sequencing and bioinformatics analysis can be expected to greatly facilitate identification of novel gene networks that normally function to control bone formation and maintenance.

  8. Network-Informed Gene Ranking Tackles Genetic Heterogeneity in Exome-Sequencing Studies of Monogenic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dand, Nick; Schulz, Reiner; Weale, Michael E; Southgate, Laura; Oakey, Rebecca J; Simpson, Michael A; Schlitt, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    Genetic heterogeneity presents a significant challenge for the identification of monogenic disease genes. Whole-exome sequencing generates a large number of candidate disease-causing variants and typical analyses rely on deleterious variants being observed in the same gene across several unrelated affected individuals. This is less likely to occur for genetically heterogeneous diseases, making more advanced analysis methods necessary. To address this need, we present HetRank, a flexible gene-ranking method that incorporates interaction network data. We first show that different genes underlying the same monogenic disease are frequently connected in protein interaction networks. This motivates the central premise of HetRank: those genes carrying potentially pathogenic variants and whose network neighbors do so in other affected individuals are strong candidates for follow-up study. By simulating 1,000 exome sequencing studies (20,000 exomes in total), we model varying degrees of genetic heterogeneity and show that HetRank consistently prioritizes more disease-causing genes than existing analysis methods. We also demonstrate a proof-of-principle application of the method to prioritize genes causing Adams-Oliver syndrome, a genetically heterogeneous rare disease. An implementation of HetRank in R is available via the Website http://sourceforge.net/p/hetrank/. © 2015 The Authors. **Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. A tripartite clustering analysis on microRNA, gene and disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Chengcheng; Liu, Ying

    2012-02-01

    Alteration of gene expression in response to regulatory molecules or mutations could lead to different diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been discovered to be involved in regulation of gene expression and a wide variety of diseases. In a tripartite biological network of human miRNAs, their predicted target genes and the diseases caused by altered expressions of these genes, valuable knowledge about the pathogenicity of miRNAs, involved genes and related disease classes can be revealed by co-clustering miRNAs, target genes and diseases simultaneously. Tripartite co-clustering can lead to more informative results than traditional co-clustering with only two kinds of members and pass the hidden relational information along the relation chain by considering multi-type members. Here we report a spectral co-clustering algorithm for k-partite graph to find clusters with heterogeneous members. We use the method to explore the potential relationships among miRNAs, genes and diseases. The clusters obtained from the algorithm have significantly higher density than randomly selected clusters, which means members in the same cluster are more likely to have common connections. Results also show that miRNAs in the same family based on the hairpin sequences tend to belong to the same cluster. We also validate the clustering results by checking the correlation of enriched gene functions and disease classes in the same cluster. Finally, widely studied miR-17-92 and its paralogs are analyzed as a case study to reveal that genes and diseases co-clustered with the miRNAs are in accordance with current research findings.

  10. Gene Therapy of Chronic Granulomatous Disease: The Engraftment Dilemma

    OpenAIRE

    Grez, Manuel; Reichenbach, Janine; Schwäble, Joachim; Seger, Reinhard; Dinauer, Mary C.; Thrasher, Adrian J.

    2010-01-01

    The potential of gene therapy as a curative treatment for monogenetic disorders has been clearly demonstrated in a series of recent Phase I/II clinical trials. Among primary immunodeficiencies, gene transfer into hematopoietic stem (HSC)/progenitor cells has resulted in the long-term correction of immune and metabolic defects in treated patients. In most cases, successes were augmented by a recognized biological selection for successfully treated cells in vivo, perhaps even to some extent at ...

  11. In silico analysis of cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) genes that involved in pathogen and disease responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agung, Muhammad Budi; Budiarsa, I. Made; Suwastika, I. Nengah

    2017-02-01

    Cocoa bean is one of the main commodities from Indonesia for the world, which still have problem regarding yield degradation due to pathogens and disease attack. Developing robust cacao plant that genetically resistant to pathogen and disease attack is an ideal solution in over taking on this problem. The aim of this study was to identify Theobroma cacao genes on database of cacao genome that homolog to response genes of pathogen and disease attack in other plant, through in silico analysis. Basic information survey and gene identification were performed in GenBank and The Arabidopsis Information Resource database. The In silico analysis contains protein BLAST, homology test of each gene's protein candidates, and identification of homologue gene in Cacao Genome Database using data source "Theobroma cacao cv. Matina 1-6 v1.1" genome. Identification found that Thecc1EG011959t1 (EDS1), Thecc1EG006803t1 (EDS5), Thecc1EG013842t1 (ICS1), and Thecc1EG015614t1 (BG_PPAP) gene of Cacao Genome Database were Theobroma cacao genes that homolog to plant's resistance genes which highly possible to have similar functions of each gene's homologue gene.

  12. Acute hypoxemia in a parturient with primary ciliary dyskinesia following the administration of intravenous oxytocin: a case report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nandhakumar, Amar; Silverman, Gregory L

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a parturient diagnosed with primary ciliary dyskinesia with secondary bronchiectasis who developed significant hypoxemia following administration of intravenous oxytocin during...

  13. Inactivation of Ca2+-induced ciliary reversal by high-salt extraction in the cilia of Paramecium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutomi, Osamu; Seki, Makoto; Nakamura, Shogo; Kamachi, Hiroyuki; Noguchi, Munenori

    2013-10-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) induces ciliary reversal and backward swimming in Paramecium. However, it is not known how the Ca(2+) signal controls the motor machinery to induce ciliary reversal. We found that demembranated cilia on the ciliated cortical sheets from Paramecium caudatum lost the ability to undergo ciliary reversal after brief extraction with a solution containing 0.5 M KCl. KNO(3), which is similar to KCl with respect to chaotropic effect; it had the same effect as that of KCl on ciliary response. Cyclic AMP antagonizes Ca(2+)-induced ciliary reversal. Limited trypsin digestion prevents endogenous A-kinase and cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of an outer arm dynein light chain and induces ciliary reversal. However, the trypsin digestion prior to the high-salt extraction did not affect the inhibition of Ca(2+)-induced ciliary reversal caused by the high-salt extraction. Furthermore, during the course of the high-salt extraction, some axonemal proteins were extracted from ciliary axonemes, suggesting that they may be responsible for Ca(2+)-induced ciliary reversal.

  14. A conserved role for Notch in priming the cellular response to Shh through ciliary localisation of the key Shh transducer, Smoothened

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stasiulewicz, Magdalena; Gray, Shona; Mastromina, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    to Shh, leading to the induction of higher expression levels of the Shh target gene Ptc1 and subsequently induction of more ventral cell fates. Furthermore, we demonstrate activated Notch1 leads to pronounced accumulation of Smo within primary cilia and elevated levels of full-length Gli3. Finally, we...... show Notch activity promotes longer primary cilia both in vitro and in vivo. Strikingly, these Notch-regulated effects are Shh-independent. These data identify Notch signalling as a novel modulator of Shh signalling which acts mechanistically via regulation of ciliary localisation of key components...

  15. Diagnosis of Coronary Heart Diseases Using Gene Expression Profiling; Stable Coronary Artery Disease, Cardiac Ischemia with and without Myocardial Necrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabila Kazmi

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (including coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes of death in Europe, and is influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. With the recent advances in genomic tools and technologies there is potential to predict and diagnose heart disease using molecular data from analysis of blood cells. We analyzed gene expression data from blood samples taken from normal people (n = 21, non-significant coronary artery disease (n = 93, patients with unstable angina (n = 16, stable coronary artery disease (n = 14 and myocardial infarction (MI; n = 207. We used a feature selection approach to identify a set of gene expression variables which successfully differentiate different cardiovascular diseases. The initial features were discovered by fitting a linear model for each probe set across all arrays of normal individuals and patients with myocardial infarction. Three different feature optimisation algorithms were devised which identified two discriminating sets of genes, one using MI and normal controls (total genes = 6 and another one using MI and unstable angina patients (total genes = 7. In all our classification approaches we used a non-parametric k-nearest neighbour (KNN classification method (k = 3. The results proved the diagnostic robustness of the final feature sets in discriminating patients with myocardial infarction from healthy controls. Interestingly it also showed efficacy in discriminating myocardial infarction patients from patients with clinical symptoms of cardiac ischemia but no myocardial necrosis or stable coronary artery disease, despite the influence of batch effects and different microarray gene chips and platforms.

  16. FTO gene variation, macronutrient intake and coronary heart disease risk: a gene-diet interaction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsson, Jaana; Mehlig, Kirsten; Leander, Karin; Berg, Christina; Tognon, Gianluca; Strandhagen, Elisabeth; Björck, Lena; Rosengren, Annika; Lissner, Lauren; Nyberg, Fredrik

    2016-02-01

    The fat mass and obesity-associated gene (FTO) is related to obesity and coronary heart disease (CHD). We studied interaction between macronutrient intake and FTO in association with CHD risk or body mass index (BMI). The pooled population-based case-control studies, SHEEP and INTERGENE, included 1,381 first-time CHD patients and 4,290 population controls genotyped for FTO rs9939609 (T/A). Diet data were collected in self-administered food frequency questionnaires. Macronutrients were dichotomized into low/high energy percentages (E%) by median levels in controls. Association of FTO genotype (TA/AA vs. TT) with CHD risk was analysed by multiple logistic regression, and with BMI by multiple linear regression. Interaction between FTO and macronutrient was assessed by introducing an interaction term FTO × macronutrient. Interaction on CHD as deviation from additive effects was assessed by calculating relative excess risk due to interaction. No statistically significant interaction was found between FTO genotype and any macronutrient on CHD risk or BMI on either the multiplicative or additive scale. However, FTO genotype (TA/AA vs. TT) was associated with significantly increased CHD risk only in subjects with low E% from fat (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.11-1.66) or saturated fatty acids (OR 1.36, 95% CI 1.10-1.69), or in subjects with high E% from carbohydrate (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.07-1.61) or protein (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.13-1.75). Mean BMI was 0.3-0.6 kg/m(2) higher in control subjects with TA/AA compared to TT, regardless of macronutrient E%. We found no evidence of interactions between FTO genotype and macronutrient intake on CHD risk or BMI.

  17. HFE gene mutations and iron metabolism in Wilson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhardt, Andreas; Hoffmann, Arne; Hefter, Harald; Häussinger, Dieter

    2002-12-01

    There is increasing evidence for an interaction between iron and copper metabolism. Iron indices (ferritin, transferrin saturation [TS], serum iron), liver parameters, the prevalence and significance of C282Y and H63D HFE mutations were studied in 40 unrelated, Caucasian patients with Wilson's disease and 295 healthy controls. Due to specific treatment Wilson's disease was well controlled in all but one patient. The allele frequencies for the C282Y (11.3% vs. 6.2%) and the H63D (18.8% vs. 16.4%) mutation did not differ between patients with Wilson's disease and healthy controls. One patient with C282Y homozygous HH and Wilson's disease was identified showing progressive liver disease despite reasonable venesection and copper chelation therapy. No differences in iron indices and liver values were seen between HFE heterozygous and HFE wildtype patients with Wilson's disease. Higher serum ferritin levels were noticed in patients with Wilson's disease compared to healthy controls (149 +/- 26 microg/l vs. 87 +/- 8 microg/l; P Wilson's disease in order to detect iron overload. HFE mutations other than C282Y homozygosity seem to have no impact on iron indices and liver parameters as long as Wilson's disease is controlled.

  18. Increased Transcript Complexity in Genes Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lela Lackey

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies aim to correlate genotype with phenotype. Many common diseases including Type II diabetes, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD are complex genetic traits with hundreds of different loci that are associated with varied disease risk. Identifying common features in the genes associated with each disease remains a challenge. Furthermore, the role of post-transcriptional regulation, and in particular alternative splicing, is still poorly understood in most multigenic diseases. We therefore compiled comprehensive lists of genes associated with Type II diabetes, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and COPD in an attempt to identify common features of their corresponding mRNA transcripts within each gene set. The SERPINA1 gene is a well-recognized genetic risk factor of COPD and it produces 11 transcript variants, which is exceptional for a human gene. This led us to hypothesize that other genes associated with COPD, and complex disorders in general, are highly transcriptionally diverse. We found that COPD-associated genes have a statistically significant enrichment in transcript complexity stemming from a disproportionately high level of alternative splicing, however, Type II Diabetes, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease genes were not significantly enriched. We also identified a subset of transcriptionally complex COPD-associated genes (~40% that are differentially expressed between mild, moderate and severe COPD. Although the genes associated with other lung diseases are not extensively documented, we found preliminary data that idiopathic pulmonary disease genes, but not cystic fibrosis modulators, are also more transcriptionally complex. Interestingly, complex COPD transcripts are more often the product of alternative acceptor site usage. To verify the biological importance of these alternative transcripts, we used RNA-sequencing analyses to determine that COPD-associated genes are

  19. Increased Transcript Complexity in Genes Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, Lela; McArthur, Evonne; Laederach, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies aim to correlate genotype with phenotype. Many common diseases including Type II diabetes, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are complex genetic traits with hundreds of different loci that are associated with varied disease risk. Identifying common features in the genes associated with each disease remains a challenge. Furthermore, the role of post-transcriptional regulation, and in particular alternative splicing, is still poorly understood in most multigenic diseases. We therefore compiled comprehensive lists of genes associated with Type II diabetes, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and COPD in an attempt to identify common features of their corresponding mRNA transcripts within each gene set. The SERPINA1 gene is a well-recognized genetic risk factor of COPD and it produces 11 transcript variants, which is exceptional for a human gene. This led us to hypothesize that other genes associated with COPD, and complex disorders in general, are highly transcriptionally diverse. We found that COPD-associated genes have a statistically significant enrichment in transcript complexity stemming from a disproportionately high level of alternative splicing, however, Type II Diabetes, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease genes were not significantly enriched. We also identified a subset of transcriptionally complex COPD-associated genes (~40%) that are differentially expressed between mild, moderate and severe COPD. Although the genes associated with other lung diseases are not extensively documented, we found preliminary data that idiopathic pulmonary disease genes, but not cystic fibrosis modulators, are also more transcriptionally complex. Interestingly, complex COPD transcripts are more often the product of alternative acceptor site usage. To verify the biological importance of these alternative transcripts, we used RNA-sequencing analyses to determine that COPD-associated genes are frequently

  20. The tomato I-3 gene: a novel gene for resistance to Fusarium wilt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; Lim, Ginny T T; Jones, David A

    2015-07-01

    Plant resistance proteins provide race-specific immunity through the recognition of pathogen effectors. The resistance genes I, I-2 and I-3 have been incorporated into cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) from wild tomato species to confer resistance against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) races 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Although the Fol effectors corresponding to these resistance genes have all been identified, only the I-2 resistance gene has been isolated from tomato. To isolate the I-3 resistance gene, we employed a map-based cloning approach and used transgenic complementation to test candidate genes for resistance to Fol race 3. Here, we describe the fine mapping and sequencing of genes at the I-3 locus, which revealed a family of S-receptor-like kinase (SRLK) genes. Transgenic tomato lines were generated with three of these SRLK genes and one was found to confer Avr3-dependent resistance to Fol race 3, confirming it to be I-3. The finding that I-3 encodes an SRLK reveals a new pathway for Fol resistance and a new class of resistance genes, of which Pi-d2 from rice is also a member. The identification of I-3 also allows the investigation of the complex effector-resistance protein interaction involving Avr1-mediated suppression of I-2- and I-3-dependent resistance in tomato. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Ciliary neurotrophic factor protects striatal neurons against excitotoxicity by enhancing glial glutamate uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Beurrier

    Full Text Available Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is a potent neuroprotective cytokine in different animal models of glutamate-induced excitotoxicity, although its action mechanisms are still poorly characterized. We tested the hypothesis that an increased function of glial glutamate transporters (GTs could underlie CNTF-mediated neuroprotection. We show that neuronal loss induced by in vivo striatal injection of the excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QA was significantly reduced (by approximately 75% in CNTF-treated animals. In striatal slices, acute QA application dramatically inhibited corticostriatal field potentials (FPs, whose recovery was significantly higher in CNTF rats compared to controls (approximately 40% vs. approximately 7%, confirming an enhanced resistance to excitotoxicity. The GT inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate greatly reduced FP recovery in CNTF rats, supporting the role of GT in CNTF-mediated neuroprotection. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from striatal medium spiny neurons showed no alteration of basic properties of striatal glutamatergic transmission in CNTF animals, but the increased effect of a low-affinity competitive glutamate receptor antagonist (gamma-D-glutamylglycine also suggested an enhanced GT function. These data strongly support our hypothesis that CNTF is neuroprotective via an increased function of glial GTs, and further confirms the therapeutic potential of CNTF for the clinical treatment of progressive neurodegenerative diseases involving glutamate overflow.

  2. Ciliary neurotrophic factor role in myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein expression in Cuprizone-induced multiple sclerosis mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Zivar; Hadiyan, Sara Pishgah; Navidi, Reza

    2013-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system that leads to loss of myelin and oligodendrocytes and damage to axons. Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) is a minor component of the myelin sheath, but is an important autoantigen linked to the pathogenesis of MS. Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) has been shown to enhance the generation, maturation, and survival of oligodendrocytes in culture medium. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the role of CNTF on MOG expression in the cerebral cortex of Cuprizone-induced MS mice. The mice were treated by Cuprizone for five weeks in order to induce MS. The mice were then divided into 3 groups. The first group was injected subcutaneously (SC) by CNTF in the amount of 250 μg/kg BW per day. The second group (SHAM) was injected SC by normal saline and the third group was left without injection as the control group. After four weeks the mice were killed and the cerebral cortex was harvested and the expression of MOG was studied by Western blotting. The data from this study show that the MOG expression was significantly increased in the CNTF-injected group as compared to the other groups. It is concluded that CNTF increases the MOG expression and may be important in the pathophysiology of MS. It is also concluded that CNTF may play a role in the process of remyelination by inducing the MOG expression.

  3. The effects of the stem cell on ciliary regeneration of injured rabbit sinonasal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavuzlu, Ali; Tatar, Emel Çadallı; Karagöz, Tuğba; Pınarlı, Ferda Alpaslan; Tatar, İlkan; Bayır, Ömer; Korkmaz, Mehmet Hakan

    2017-08-01

    Defects in mucosal healing after sinonasal surgery cause infection, scar formation causing obstruction, relapse of the disease within a shorter period and revision surgery. The present study aimed to create a functional ciliated epithelium using a stem cell and stem cell sheet of adipose tissue origin and to show such regeneration ultra-structurally on experimentally injured rabbit nasal epithelium. This was an experimental animal study and basic research. A total of 18 white New Zealand rabbits were divided into three groups. The medial wall of the maxillary sinus of the subjects was peeled off bilaterally. No additional procedure was applied to the subjects in Group 1. In Group 2, adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cell was implanted on the wound edges of the subjects. In Group 3, a stem cell sheet of three layers was laid onto the defect area. All subjects were killed after 3 weeks. The presence of the stem cell stained with bromo-deoxyuridine was assessed with a light microscope, whereas cilia density, ciliated orientation and cilia structure were evaluated with a scanning electron microscope. Ciliary densities in Group 2 and Group 3 were statistically superior compared to the control group (p stem cell increased the healing of the injured maxillary sinus mucosa of the rabbits in terms of cilia presence, density and morphology regardless of the implementation technique. Level of evidence NA.

  4. IL-13 alters mucociliary differentiation and ciliary beating of human respiratory epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laoukili, Jamila; Perret, Eric; Willems, Tom; Minty, Adrian; Parthoens, Eef; Houcine, Odile; Coste, Andre; Jorissen, Mark; Marano, Francelyne; Caput, Daniel; Tournier, Frédéric

    2001-01-01

    In animal models of asthma, interleukin-13 (IL-13) induces goblet cell metaplasia, eosinophil infiltration of the bronchial mucosa, and bronchial hyperreactivity, but the basis of its effects on airway epithelia remain unknown. Lesions of the epithelial barrier, frequently observed in asthma and other chronic lung inflammatory diseases, are repaired through proliferation, migration, and differentiation of epithelial cells. An inflammatory process may then, therefore, influence epithelial regeneration. We have thus investigated the effect of IL-13 on mucociliary differentiation of human nasal epithelial cells in primary culture. We show that IL-13 alters ciliated cell differentiation and increases the proportion of secretory cells. IL-13 downregulates the actin-binding protein ezrin and other cytoskeletal components. IL-13 also impairs lateral cell contacts and interferes with the apical localization of ezrin seen in differentiated ciliated cells. In addition, an IL-4 antagonistic mutant protein (Y124D), which binds to the IL-4 receptor α subunit, a common chain of IL-4 and IL-13 receptors, inhibits IL-13’s effects. IL-13 also decreases ciliary beat frequency in a time- and dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that, in human allergic asthmatic responses, IL-13 affects both ciliated and secretory cell differentiation, leading to airway damage and obstruction. PMID:11748265

  5. Resequencing analysis of five Mendelian genes and the top genes from genome-wide association studies in Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, Bruno A; Davis, Albert A; Jin, Sheng Chih; Ibanez, Laura; Ortega-Cubero, Sara; Pastor, Pau; Choi, Jiyoon; Cooper, Breanna; Perlmutter, Joel S; Cruchaga, Carlos

    2016-04-19

    Most sequencing studies in Parkinson's disease (PD) have focused on either a particular gene, primarily in familial and early onset PD samples, or on screening single variants in sporadic PD cases. To date, there is no systematic study that sequences the most common PD causing genes with Mendelian inheritance [α-synuclein (SNCA), leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), PARKIN, PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1) and DJ-1 (Daisuke-Junko-1)] and susceptibility genes [glucocerebrosidase beta acid (GBA) and microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT)] identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in a European-American case-control sample (n=815). Disease-causing variants in the SNCA, LRRK2 and PARK2 genes were found in 2% of PD patients. The LRRK2, p.G2019S mutation was found in 0.6 % of sporadic PD and 4.8 % of familial PD cases. Gene-based analysis suggests that additional variants in the LRRK2 gene also contribute to PD risk. The SNCA duplication was found in 0.8 % of familial PD patients. Novel variants were found in 0.8% of PD cases and 0.6 % of controls. Heterozygous Gaucher disease-causing mutations in the GBA gene were found in 7.1 % of PD patients. Here, we established that the GBA variant (p.T408M) is associated with PD risk and age at onset. Additionally, gene-based and single-variant analyses demostrated that GBA gene variants (p.L483P, p.R83C, p.N409S, p.H294Q and p.E365K) increase PD risk. Our data suggest that the impact of additional untested coding variants in the GBA and LRRK2 genes is higher than previously estimated. Our data also provide compelling evidence of the existence of additional untested variants in the primary Mendelian and PD GWAS genes that contribute to the genetic etiology of sporadic PD.

  6. Whole exome sequencing coupled with unbiased functional analysis reveals new Hirschsprung disease genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Hongsheng; Schriemer, Duco; Cheng, William W; Chauhan, Rajendra K; Antiňolo, Guillermo; Berrios, Courtney; Bleda, Marta; Brooks, Alice S; Brouwer, Rutger W W; Burns, Alan J; Cherny, Stacey S; Dopazo, Joaquin; Eggen, Bart J L; Griseri, Paola; Jalloh, Binta; Le, Thuy-Linh; Lui, Vincent C H; Luzón-Toro, Berta; Matera, Ivana; Ngan, Elly S W; Pelet, Anna; Ruiz-Ferrer, Macarena; Sham, Pak C; Shepherd, Iain T; So, Man-Ting; Sribudiani, Yunia; Tang, Clara S M; van den Hout, Mirjam C G N; van der Linde, Herma C; van Ham, Tjakko J; van IJcken, Wilfred F J; Verheij, Joke B G M; Amiel, Jeanne; Borrego, Salud; Ceccherini, Isabella; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Tam, Paul K H; Garcia-Barceló, Maria-Mercè; Hofstra, Robert M W

    2017-03-08

    Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), which is congenital obstruction of the bowel, results from a failure of enteric nervous system (ENS) progenitors to migrate, proliferate, differentiate, or survive within the distal intestine. Previous studies that have searched for genes underlying HSCR have focused on ENS-related pathways and genes not fitting the current knowledge have thus often been ignored. We identify and validate novel HSCR genes using whole exome sequencing (WES), burden tests, in silico prediction, unbiased in vivo analyses of the mutated genes in zebrafish, and expression analyses in zebrafish, mouse, and human. We performed de novo mutation (DNM) screening on 24 HSCR trios. We identify 28 DNMs in 21 different genes. Eight of the DNMs we identified occur in RET, the main HSCR gene, and the remaining 20 DNMs reside in genes not reported in the ENS. Knockdown of all 12 genes with missense or loss-of-function DNMs showed that the orthologs of four genes (DENND3, NCLN, NUP98, and TBATA) are indispensable for ENS development in zebrafish, and these results were confirmed by CRISPR knockout. These genes are also expressed in human and mouse gut and/or ENS progenitors. Importantly, the encoded proteins are linked to neuronal processes shared by the central nervous system and the ENS. Our data open new fields of investigation into HSCR pathology and provide novel insights into the development of the ENS. Moreover, the study demonstrates that functional analyses of genes carrying DNMs are warranted to delineate the full genetic architecture of rare complex diseases.

  7. Oncological implications of RET gene mutations in Hirschsprung's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijmons, RH; Hofstra, RMW; Wijburg, FA; Links, TP; Zwierstra, RP; Vermey, A; Aronson, DC; Tan-Sindhunata, G; Brouwers-Smalbraak, GJ; Maas, SM; Buys, CHCM

    1998-01-01

    Background-Germline mutations of the RET proto-oncogene identical to those found in the tumour predisposition syndrome multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A), were detected in 2.5-5% of sporadic and familial cases of Hirschsprung's disease. Some patients with Hirschsprung's disease may

  8. The Matchmaker Exchange: a platform for rare disease gene discovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Philippakis, A.A.; Azzariti, D.R.; Beltran, S.; Brookes, A.J.; Brownstein, C.A.; Brudno, M.; Brunner, H.G.; Buske, O.J.; Carey, K.; Doll, C.; Dumitriu, S.; Dyke, S.O.M.; Dunnen, J.T. den; Firth, H.V.; Gibbs, R.A.; Girdea, M.; Gonzalez, M.; Haendel, M.A.; Hamosh, A.; Holm, I.A.; Huang, L.; Hurles, M.E.; Hutton, B.; Krier, J.B.; Misyura, A.; Mungall, C.J.; Paschall, J.; Paten, B.; Robinson, P.N.; Schiettecatte, F.; Sobreira, N.L.; Swaminathan, G.J.; Taschner, P.E.M.; Terry, S.F.; Washington, N.L.; Zuchner, S.; Boycott, K.M.; Rehm, H.L.

    2015-01-01

    There are few better examples of the need for data sharing than in the rare disease community, where patients, physicians, and researchers must search for "the needle in a haystack" to uncover rare, novel causes of disease within the genome. Impeding the pace of discovery has been the existence of

  9. Risk factors for motor neuron diseases : genes, environment and lifestyle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutedja, N.A.

    2010-01-01

    The main focus of this thesis is to identify susceptibility factors in diseases affecting the motor neuron: both motor neuron disease (MND), in which primarily the cell body is affected, and multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN), in which primarily the axon is affected, are covered. Due to its

  10. From Gene Discovery to Understanding and Predicting Cardiometabolic Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Willems (Sara)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading cause of morbidity and the number one cause of death worldwide.1 An estimated 17.3 million people died from CVDs in 2008, including an estimated 7.3 million due to coronary heart disease (CHD) and 6.2 million due to

  11. Common variants in mendelian kidney disease genes and their association with renal function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Parsa (Afshin); C. Fuchsberger (Christian); A. Köttgen (Anna); C.M. O'Seaghdha (Conall); C. Pattaro (Cristian); M. de Andrade (Mariza); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); A. Teumer (Alexander); K. Endlich (Karlhans); M. Olden (Matthias); M-H. Chen (Ming-Huei); A. Tin (Adrienne); Y-J. Kim (Yong-Jin); D. Taliun (Daniel); M. Li (Man); M.F. Feitosa (Mary Furlan); M. Gorski (Mathias); Q. Yang (Qiong); C. Hundertmark (Claudia); M.C. Foster (Michael); N. Glazer (Nicole); A.J. Isaacs (Aaron); M. Rao (Madhumathi); G.D. Smith; J.R. O´Connell; M.V. Struchalin (Maksim); T. Tanaka (Toshiko); G. Li (Guo); S.J. Hwang; E.J. Atkinson (Elizabeth); K. Lohman (Kurt); M. Cornelis (Marilyn); A. Johansson (Åsa); A. Tönjes (Anke); A. Dehghan (Abbas); V. Couraki (Vincent); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); R. Sorice; Z. Kutalik (Zoltán); T. Lehtimäki (Terho); T. Esko (Tõnu); H. Deshmukh (Harshal); S. Ulivi (Shelia); A.Y. Chu (Audrey); D. Murgia (Daniela); S. Trompet (Stella); M. Imboden (Medea); B. Kollerits (Barbara); G. Pistis (Giorgio); T.B. Harris (Tamara); L.J. Launer (Lenore); T. Aspelund (Thor); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); B.D. Mitchell (Braxton); E.A. Boerwinkle (Eric); H. Schmidt (Helena); E. Hofer (Edith); F.B. Hu (Frank); A. Demirkan (Ayşe); B.A. Oostra (Ben); S.T. Turner (Stephen); J. Ding (Jinhui); J.S. Andrews (Jeanette); B.I. Freedman (Barry); F. Giulianini (Franco); W. Koenig (Wolfgang); T. Illig (Thomas); A. Döring (Angela); H.E. Wichmann (Heinz Erich); L. Zgaga (Lina); T. Zemunik (Tatijana); M. Boban (Mladen); C. Minelli (Cosetta); H.E. Wheeler (Heather); W. Igl (Wilmar); G. Zaboli (Ghazal); S.H. Wild (Sarah); A.F. Wright (Alan); H. Campbell (Harry); D. Ellinghaus (David); U. Nöthlings (Ute); G. Jacobs (Gunnar); R. Biffar (Reiner); F.D.J. Ernst (Florian); G. Homuth (Georg); H.K. Kroemer (Heyo); M. Nauck (Matthias); S. Stracke (Sylvia); U. Vol̈ker (Uwe); H. Völzke (Henry); P. Kovacs (Peter); M. Stumvoll (Michael); R. Mägi (Reedik); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); F. Rivadeneira Ramirez (Fernando); Y.S. Aulchenko (Yurii); O. Polasek (Ozren); N. Hastie (Nick); V. Vitart (Veronique); C. Helmer (Catherine); J.J. Wang (Jie Jin); B. Stengel (Bernd); D. Ruggiero; S.M. Bergmann (Sven); M. Kähönen (Mika); J. Viikari (Jorma); T. Nikopensius (Tiit); M.A. Province (Mike); H.M. Colhoun (H.); A.S.F. Doney (Alex); A. Robino (Antonietta); B.K. Krämer (Bernhard); L. Portas (Laura); I. Ford (Ian); B.M. Buckley (Brendan M.); M. Adam (Martin); G.-A. Thun (Gian-Andri); B. Paulweber (Bernhard); M. Haun (Margot); C. Sala (Cinzia); P. Mitchell (Paul); M. Ciullo; P. Vollenweider (Peter); O. Raitakari (Olli); A. Metspalu (Andres); C.N.A. Palmer (Colin); P. Gasparini (Paolo); M. Pirastu (Mario); J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); N.M. Probst-Hensch (Nicole M.); F. Kronenberg (Florian); D. Toniolo (Daniela); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A.R. Shuldiner (Alan); J. Coresh (Josef); R. Schmidt (Reinhold); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); I.B. Borecki (Ingrid); S.L.R. Kardia (Sharon); Y. Liu (Yongmei); G.C. Curhan (Gary); I. Rudan (Igor); U. Gyllensten (Ulf); J.F. Wilson (James); A. Franke (Andre); P.P. Pramstaller (Peter Paul); R. Rettig (Rainer); I. Prokopenko (Inga); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); C. Hayward (Caroline); P.M. Ridker (Paul); M. Bochud (Murielle); I.M. Heid (Iris); D.S. Siscovick (David); C.S. Fox (Caroline); W.H.L. Kao (Wen); C.A. Böger (Carsten)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMany common genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies for complex traitsmap to genes previously linked to rare inherited Mendelian disorders. A systematic analysis of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes responsible for Mendelian diseases with

  12. Association of FAS (TNFRSF6)-670 gene polymorphism with villous atrophy in coeliac disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, J; Alizadeh, BZ; Veen, TV; Meijer, JW; Mulder, C.J.J.; Pena, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the association of FAS gene polymorphism with coeliac disease (CD) development. METHODS: FAS-G670A gene polymorphism, located in a gamma interferon activation site, was studied in 146 unrelated CD patients and 203 healthy ethnically matched controls. The restriction fragment

  13. Prediction of human disease genes by human-mouse conserved coexpression analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ala, U.; Piro, R.M.; Grassi, E.; Damasco, C.; Silengo, L.; Oti, M.O.; Provero, P.; Cunto, F Di

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Even in the post-genomic era, the identification of candidate genes within loci associated with human genetic diseases is a very demanding task, because the critical region may typically contain hundreds of positional candidates. Since genes implicated in similar phenotypes tend to share

  14. Congenital cytoplasmic body myopathy with survival motor neuron gene deletion or Werdnig-Hoffmann disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vajsar, J; Balslev, T; Ray, P N

    1998-01-01

    bodies. However, molecular analysis revealed a homozygous deletion of exons 7 and 8 of the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene, suggesting that the patient had Werdnig-Hoffmann disease. We recommend that every patient with congenital cytoplasmic body myopathy be tested for SMN gene deletion....

  15. Large-Scale Identification of Common Trait and Disease Variants Affecting Gene Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauberg, Mads Engel; Zhang, Wen; Giambartolomei, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified a multitude of genetic loci involved with traits and diseases. However, it is often unclear which genes are affected in such loci and whether the associated genetic variants lead to increased or decreased gene function. To mitigate this, we ...

  16. Isolation of a candidate gene for Norrie disease by positional cloning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, W.; Meindl, A.; van de Pol, T. J.; Cremers, F. P.; Ropers, H. H.; Döerner, C.; Monaco, A.; Bergen, A. A.; Lebo, R.; Warburg, M.

    1992-01-01

    The gene for Norrie disease, an X-linked disorder characterized by progressive atrophy of the eyes, mental disturbances and deafness, has been mapped to chromosome Xp11.4 close to DXS7 and the monoamine oxidase (MAO) genes. By subcloning a YAC with a 640 kilobases (kb) insert which spans the

  17. SFM: A novel sequence-based fusion method for disease genes identification and prioritization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Abdulaziz; Moghadam Charkari, Nasrollah

    2015-10-21

    The identification of disease genes from human genome is of great importance to improve diagnosis and treatment of disease. Several machine learning methods have been introduced to identify disease genes. However, these methods mostly differ in the prior knowledge used to construct the feature vector for each instance (gene), the ways of selecting negative data (non-disease genes) where there is no investigational approach to find them and the classification methods used to make the final decision. In this work, a novel Sequence-based fusion method (SFM) is proposed to identify disease genes. In this regard, unlike existing methods, instead of using a noisy and incomplete prior-knowledge, the amino acid sequence of the proteins which is universal data has been carried out to present the genes (proteins) into four different feature vectors. To select more likely negative data from candidate genes, the intersection set of four negative sets which are generated using distance approach is considered. Then, Decision Tree (C4.5) has been applied as a fusion method to combine the results of four independent state-of the-art predictors based on support vector machine (SVM) algorithm, and to make the final decision. The experimental results of the proposed method have been evaluated by some standard measures. The results indicate the precision, recall and F-measure of 82.6%, 85.6% and 84, respectively. These results confirm the efficiency and validity of the proposed method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Targeting New Candidate Genes by Small Molecules Approaching Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hueng-Chuen Fan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases (NDs are among the most feared of the disorders that afflict humankind for the lack of specific diagnostic tests and effective treatments. Understanding the molecular, cellular, biochemical changes of NDs may hold therapeutic promise against debilitating central nerve system (CNS disorders. In the present review, we summarized the clinical presentations and biology backgrounds of NDs, including Parkinson’s disease (PD, Huntington’s disease (HD, and Alzheimer’s disease (AD and explored the role of molecular mechanisms, including dys-regulation of epigenetic control mechanisms, Ataxia-telangiectasia-mutated protein kinase (ATM, and neuroinflammation in the pathogenesis of NDs. Targeting these mechanisms may hold therapeutic promise against these devastating diseases.

  19. Excessive burden of lysosomal storage disorder gene variants in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robak, Laurie A; Jansen, Iris E; van Rooij, Jeroen; Uitterlinden, André G; Kraaij, Robert; Jankovic, Joseph; Heutink, Peter; Shulman, Joshua M

    2017-12-01

    Mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA), which cause Gaucher disease, are also potent risk factors for Parkinson's disease. We examined whether a genetic burden of variants in other lysosomal storage disorder genes is more broadly associated with Parkinson's disease susceptibility. The sequence kernel association test was used to interrogate variant burden among 54 lysosomal storage disorder genes, leveraging whole exome sequencing data from 1156 Parkinson's disease cases and 1679 control subjects. We discovered a significant burden of rare, likely damaging lysosomal storage disorder gene variants in association with Parkinson's disease risk. The association signal was robust to the exclusion of GBA, and consistent results were obtained in two independent replication cohorts, including 436 cases and 169 controls with whole exome sequencing and an additional 6713 cases and 5964 controls with exome-wide genotyping. In secondary analyses designed to highlight the specific genes driving the aggregate signal, we confirmed associations at the GBA and SMPD1 loci and newly implicate CTSD, SLC17A5, and ASAH1 as candidate Parkinson's disease susceptibility genes. In our discovery cohort, the majority of Parkinson's disease cases (56%) have at least one putative damaging variant in a lysosomal storage disorder gene, and 21% carry multiple alleles. Our results highlight several promising new susceptibility loci and reinforce the importance of lysosomal mechanisms in Parkinson's disease pathogenesis. We suggest that multiple genetic hits may act in combination to degrade lysosomal function, enhancing Parkinson's disease susceptibility. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Understanding Epistatic Interactions between Genes Targeted by Non-coding Regulatory Elements in Complex Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Kyung Sung

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies have proven the highly polygenic architecture of complex diseases or traits; therefore, single-locus-based methods are usually unable to detect all involved loci, especially when individual loci exert small effects. Moreover, the majority of associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms resides in non-coding regions, making it difficult to understand their phenotypic contribution. In this work, we studied epistatic interactions associated with three common diseases using Korea Association Resource (KARE data: type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM, hypertension (HT, and coronary artery disease (CAD. We showed that epistatic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were enriched in enhancers, as well as in DNase I footprints (the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements [ENCODE] Project Consortium 2012, which suggested that the disruption of the regulatory regions where transcription factors bind may be involved in the disease mechanism. Accordingly, to identify the genes affected by the SNPs, we employed whole-genome multiple-cell-type enhancer data which discovered using DNase I profiles and Cap Analysis Gene Expression (CAGE. Assigned genes were significantly enriched in known disease associated gene sets, which were explored based on the literature, suggesting that this approach is useful for detecting relevant affected genes. In our knowledge-based epistatic network, the three diseases share many associated genes and are also closely related with each other through many epistatic interactions. These findings elucidate the genetic basis of the close relationship between DM, HT, and CAD.

  1. Paramecium BBS genes are key to presence of channels in Cilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentine Megan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changes in genes coding for ciliary proteins contribute to complex human syndromes called ciliopathies, such as Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS. We used the model organism Paramecium to focus on ciliary ion channels that affect the beat form and sensory function of motile cilia and evaluate the effects of perturbing BBS proteins on these channels. Methods We used immunoprecipitations and mass spectrometry to explore whether Paramecium proteins interact as in mammalian cells. We used RNA interference (RNAi and swimming behavior assays to examine the effects of BBS depletion on ciliary ion channels that control ciliary beating. Combining RNA interference and epitope tagging, we examined the effects of BBS depletion of BBS 7, 8 and 9 on the location of three channels and a chemoreceptor in cilia. Results We found 10 orthologs of 8 BBS genes in P. tetraurelia. BBS1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 8 and 9 co-immunoprecipitate. While RNAi reduction of BBS 7 and 9 gene products caused loss and shortening of cilia, RNAi for all BBS genes except BBS2 affected patterns of ciliary motility that are governed by ciliary ion channels. Swimming behavior assays pointed to loss of ciliary K+ channel function. Combining RNAi and epitope tagged ciliary proteins we demonstrated that a calcium activated K+ channel was no longer located in the cilia upon depletion of BBS 7, 8 or 9, consistent with the cells’ swimming behavior. The TRPP channel PKD2 was also lost from the cilia. In contrast, the ciliary voltage gated calcium channel was unaffected by BBS depletion, consistent with behavioral assays. The ciliary location of a chemoreceptor for folate was similarly unperturbed by the depletion of BBS 7, 8 or 9. Conclusions The co-immunoprecipitation of BBS 1,2,4,5,7,8, and 9 suggests a complex of BBS proteins. RNAi for BBS 7, 8 or 9 gene products causes the selective loss of K+ and PKD2 channels from the cilia while the critical voltage gated calcium channel and a

  2. Identification of two novel mutations in the ATP7B gene that cause Wilson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Wen Zhu; Yu-Min Li; Zhong-Bin Tao; Gang Su; Qiao-Ying Jin; Liang-Tao Zhao; Jia-Rui Zhu; Jun Yan; Tian-Yu Yu; Jie-Xian Ding

    2017-01-01

    Background:Wilson's disease is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by liver disease and/or neurologic deficits due to copper accumulation and is caused by pathogenic mutations in the ATP7B gene.Methods:Two unrelated Chinese patients born to nonconsanguineous parents who were diagnosed with earlyonset Wiison's disease.DNA sequencing and bioinformation analysis were conducted.Results:We have identified four mutations in two family trios,of which two were novel,namely,c.3028A>G(p.K1010E) and c3992T>G (p.Y1331X),in each patient.Conclusions:Gene testing is playing an important role in diagnosis of Wilson's disease.The early-onset of Wilson's disease is apparently not associated with P-ATPase domain in the ATP7B protein.Our findings further widen the spectrum of mutations involving the ATP7B gene.

  3. The roles of MHC class II genes and post-translational modification in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollid, Ludvig M

    2017-08-01

    Our increasing understanding of the etiology of celiac disease, previously considered a simple food hypersensitivity disorder caused by an immune response to cereal gluten proteins, challenges established concepts of autoimmunity. HLA is a chief genetic determinant, and certain HLA-DQ allotypes predispose to the disease by presenting posttranslationally modified (deamidated) gluten peptides to CD4 + T cells. The deamidation of gluten peptides is mediated by transglutaminase 2. Strikingly, celiac disease patients generate highly disease-specific autoantibodies to the transglutaminase 2 enzyme. The dual role of transglutaminase 2 in celiac disease is hardly coincidental. This paper reviews the genetic mapping and involvement of MHC class II genes in disease pathogenesis, and discusses the evidence that MHC class II genes, via the involvement of transglutaminase 2, influence the generation of celiac disease-specific autoantibodies.

  4. Ciliary contact interactions dominate surface scattering of swimming eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantsler, Vasily; Dunkel, Jörn; Polin, Marco; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-01-22

    Interactions between swimming cells and surfaces are essential to many microbiological processes, from bacterial biofilm formation to human fertilization. However, despite their fundamental importance, relatively little is known about the physical mechanisms that govern the scattering of flagellated or ciliated cells from solid surfaces. A more detailed understanding of these interactions promises not only new biological insights into structure and dynamics of flagella and cilia but may also lead to new microfluidic techniques for controlling cell motility and microbial locomotion, with potential applications ranging from diagnostic tools to therapeutic protein synthesis and photosynthetic biofuel production. Due to fundamental differences in physiology and swimming strategies, it is an open question of whether microfluidic transport and rectification schemes that have recently been demonstrated for pusher-type microswimmers such as bacteria and sperm cells, can be transferred to puller-type algae and other motile eukaryotes, because it is not known whether long-range hydrodynamic or short-range mechanical forces dominate the surface interactions of these microorganisms. Here, using high-speed microscopic imaging, we present direct experimental evidence that the surface scattering of both mammalian sperm cells and unicellular green algae is primarily governed by direct ciliary contact interactions. Building on this insight, we predict and experimentally verify the existence of optimal microfluidic ratchets that maximize rectification of initially uniform Chlamydomonas reinhardtii suspensions. Because mechano-elastic properties of cilia are conserved across eukaryotic species, we expect that our results apply to a wide range of swimming microorganisms.

  5. Bio-inspired ciliary force sensor for robotic platforms

    KAUST Repository

    Ribeiro, Pedro

    2017-01-20

    The detection of small forces is of great interest in any robotic application that involves interaction with the environment (e.g., objects manipulation, physical human-robot interaction, minimally invasive surgery), since it allows the robot to detect the contacts early on and to act accordingly. In this letter, we present a sensor design inspired by the ciliary structure frequently found in nature, consisting of an array of permanently magnetized cylinders (cilia) patterned over a giant magnetoresistance sensor (GMR). When these cylinders are deformed in shape due to applied forces, the stray magnetic field variation will change the GMR sensor resistivity, thus enabling the electrical measurement of the applied force. In this letter, we present two 3 mm × 3 mm prototypes composed of an array of five cilia with 1 mm of height and 120 and 200 μm of diameter for each prototype. A minimum force of 333 μN was measured. A simulation model for determining the magnetized cylinders average stray magnetic field is also presented.

  6. Vortical ciliary flows actively enhance mass transport in reef corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Orr H; Fernandez, Vicente I; Garren, Melissa; Guasto, Jeffrey S; Debaillon-Vesque, François P; Kramarsky-Winter, Esti; Vardi, Assaf; Stocker, Roman

    2014-09-16

    The exchange of nutrients and dissolved gasses between corals and their environment is a critical determinant of the growth of coral colonies and the productivity of coral reefs. To date, this exchange has been assumed to be limited by molecular diffusion through an unstirred boundary layer extending 1-2 mm from the coral surface, with corals relying solely on external flow to overcome this limitation. Here, we present direct microscopic evidence that, instead, corals can actively enhance mass transport through strong vortical flows driven by motile epidermal cilia covering their entire surface. Ciliary beating produces quasi-steady arrays of counterrotating vortices that vigorously stir a layer of water extending up to 2 mm from the coral surface. We show that, under low ambient flow velocities, these vortices, rather than molecular diffusion, control the exchange of nutrients and oxygen between the coral and its environment, enhancing mass transfer rates by up to 400%. This ability of corals to stir their boundary layer changes the way that we perceive the microenvironment of coral surfaces, revealing an active mechanism complementing the passive enhancement of transport by ambient flow. These findings extend our understanding of mass transport processes in reef corals and may shed new light on the evolutionary success of corals and coral reefs.

  7. The relationship between ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF genotype and motor unit physiology: preliminary studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferrell Robert

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF is important for neuronal and muscle development, and genetic variation in the CNTF gene has been associated with muscle strength. The effect of CNTF on nerve development suggests that CNTF genotype may be associated with force production via its influence on motor unit size and firing patterns. The purpose of this study is to examine whether CNTF genotype differentially affects motor unit activation in the vastus medialis with increasing isometric force during knee extension. Results Sixty-nine healthy subjects were genotyped for the presence of the G and A (null alleles in the CNTF gene (n = 57 G/G, 12 G/A. They were tested using a dynamometer during submaximal isometric knee extension contractions that were from 10–50% of their maximal strength. During the contractions, the vastus medialis was studied using surface and intramuscular electromyography with spiked triggered averaging to assess surface-detected motor unit potential (SMUP area and mean firing rates (mFR from identified motor units. CNTF genotyping was performed using standard PCR techniques from DNA obtained from leucocytes of whole blood samples. The CNTF G/A genotype was associated with smaller SMUP area motor units and lower mFR at higher force levels, and fewer but larger units at lower force levels than G/G homozygotes. The two groups used motor units with different size and activation characteristics with increasing force generation. While G/G subjects tended to utilize larger motor units with increasing force, G/A subjects showed relatively less increase in size by using relatively larger units at lower force levels. At higher force levels, G/A subjects were able to generate more force per motor unit size suggesting more efficient motor unit function with increasing muscle force. Conclusion Differential motor unit responses were observed between CNTF genotypes at force levels utilized in daily activities.

  8. The relationship between ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) genotype and motor unit physiology: preliminary studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conwit, Robin A; Ling, Shari; Roth, Stephen; Stashuk, Daniel; Hurley, Ben; Ferrell, Robert; Metter, E Jeffrey

    2005-09-23

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is important for neuronal and muscle development, and genetic variation in the CNTF gene has been associated with muscle strength. The effect of CNTF on nerve development suggests that CNTF genotype may be associated with force production via its influence on motor unit size and firing patterns. The purpose of this study is to examine whether CNTF genotype differentially affects motor unit activation in the vastus medialis with increasing isometric force during knee extension. Sixty-nine healthy subjects were genotyped for the presence of the G and A (null) alleles in the CNTF gene (n = 57 G/G, 12 G/A). They were tested using a dynamometer during submaximal isometric knee extension contractions that were from 10-50% of their maximal strength. During the contractions, the vastus medialis was studied using surface and intramuscular electromyography with spiked triggered averaging to assess surface-detected motor unit potential (SMUP) area and mean firing rates (mFR) from identified motor units. CNTF genotyping was performed using standard PCR techniques from DNA obtained from leucocytes of whole blood samples. The CNTF G/A genotype was associated with smaller SMUP area motor units and lower mFR at higher force levels, and fewer but larger units at lower force levels than G/G homozygotes. The two groups used motor units with different size and activation characteristics with increasing force generation. While G/G subjects tended to utilize larger motor units with increasing force, G/A subjects showed relatively less increase in size by using relatively larger units at lower force levels. At higher force levels, G/A subjects were able to generate more force per motor unit size suggesting more efficient motor unit function with increasing muscle force. Differential motor unit responses were observed between CNTF genotypes at force levels utilized in daily activities.

  9. Active transport and diffusion barriers restrict Joubert Syndrome-associated ARL13B/ARL-13 to an Inv-like ciliary membrane subdomain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebiha Cevik

    Full Text Available Cilia are microtubule-based cell appendages, serving motility, chemo-/mechano-/photo- sensation, and developmental signaling functions. Cilia are comprised of distinct structural and functional subregions including the basal body, transition zone (TZ and inversin (Inv compartments, and defects in this organelle are associated with an expanding spectrum of inherited disorders including Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS, Meckel-Gruber Syndrome (MKS, Joubert Syndrome (JS and Nephronophthisis (NPHP. Despite major advances in understanding ciliary trafficking pathways such as intraflagellar transport (IFT, how proteins are transported to subciliary membranes remains poorly understood. Using Caenorhabditis elegans and mammalian cells, we investigated the transport mechanisms underlying compartmentalization of JS-associated ARL13B/ARL-13, which we previously found is restricted at proximal ciliary membranes. We now show evolutionary conservation of ARL13B/ARL-13 localisation to an Inv-like subciliary membrane compartment, excluding the TZ, in many C. elegans ciliated neurons and in a subset of mammalian ciliary subtypes. Compartmentalisation of C. elegans ARL-13 requires a C-terminal RVVP motif and membrane anchoring to prevent distal cilium and nuclear targeting, respectively. Quantitative imaging in more than 20 mutants revealed differential contributions for IFT and ciliopathy modules in defining the ARL-13 compartment; IFT-A/B, IFT-dynein and BBS genes prevent ARL-13 accumulation at periciliary membranes, whereas MKS/NPHP modules additionally inhibit ARL-13 association with TZ membranes. Furthermore, in vivo FRAP analyses revealed distinct roles for IFT and MKS/NPHP genes in regulating a TZ barrier to ARL-13 diffusion, and intraciliary ARL-13 diffusion. Finally, C. elegans ARL-13 undergoes IFT-like motility and quantitative protein complex analysis of human ARL13B identified functional associations with IFT-B complexes, mapped to IFT46 and IFT74

  10. LncRNAs: emerging players in gene regulation and disease ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and Diederichs 2012; Hauptman and Glavac 2013). In low- level DNA damages, p53 induces the expression of PANDA. (P21 associated ncRNA DNA damage activated). PANDA is the next example which interacts with NF-YA, a nuclear transcription factor. NF-YA induces transcription of some apoptotic genes. Accordingly ...

  11. Understanding gene expression in coronary artery disease through ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    or more epicardial arteries and treatment by either percu- .... cell sorter (FACS). Two key genes that were significantly differentially express- ed in the cases as compared to the controls were selected for measuring the corresponding plasma protein levels. ..... circulating stem cells, which directly or indirectly contribute.

  12. Biomarkers and genes predictive of disease predisposition and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    serological marker used, rheumatoid factor. Table 1. The 2010 ... of gene expression, cytokines, acute phase reactants, autoantibodies and ... Circulating cytokines. Cytokines are small protein or glycoprotein molecules which form an integral part of the immune system and have regulatory functions. They are secreted by, ...

  13. Discovering hidden relationships between renal diseases and regulated genes through 3D network visualizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavnani Suresh K

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a recent study, two-dimensional (2D network layouts were used to visualize and quantitatively analyze the relationship between chronic renal diseases and regulated genes. The results revealed complex relationships between disease type, gene specificity, and gene regulation type, which led to important insights about the underlying biological pathways. Here we describe an attempt to extend our understanding of these complex relationships by reanalyzing the data using three-dimensional (3D network layouts, displayed through 2D and 3D viewing methods. Findings The 3D network layout (displayed through the 3D viewing method revealed that genes implicated in many diseases (non-specific genes tended to be predominantly down-regulated, whereas genes regulated in a few diseases (disease-specific genes tended to be up-regulated. This new global relationship was quantitatively validated through comparison to 1000 random permutations of networks of the same size and distribution. Our new finding appeared to be the result of using specific features of the 3D viewing method to analyze the 3D renal network. Conclusions The global relationship between gene regulation and gene specificity is the first clue from human studies that there exist common mechanisms across several renal diseases, which suggest hypotheses for the underlying mechanisms. Furthermore, the study suggests hypotheses for why the 3D visualization helped to make salient a new regularity that was difficult to detect in 2D. Future research that tests these hypotheses should enable a more systematic understanding of when and how to use 3D network visualizations to reveal complex regularities in biological networks.

  14. Genetic Analysis of MEFV Gene Pyrin Domain in Patients With Behçet's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Behçet's disease (BD is a systemic vasculitis with recurrent oral and genital ulcers and uveitis. MEFV gene, which is the main factor in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF, is also reported to be a susceptibility gene for BD. The pyrin domain of MEFV gene is a member of death-domain superfamily and has been proposed to regulate inflammatory signaling in myeloid cells. This study was designed to determine if mutations in pyrin domain of MEFV gene are involved in BD. Methods. We analyzed the pyrin domain of MEFV gene in 54 Turkish patients with BD by PCR-analysis and direct sequencing. Results. Neither deletion or insertion mutations nor point mutations in pyrin domain were found in any patient. Conclusion. Although pyrin gene mutations have been reported in patients with BD, pyrin domain is not mutated. However, alterations in other regions of MEFV gene and interaction between pyrin domains are needed to be further investigated.

  15. Orthologs of Human Disease Associated Genes and RNAi Analysis of Silencing Insulin Receptor Gene in Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zan Zhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The silkworm, Bombyx mori L., is an important economic insect that has been domesticated for thousands of years to produce silk. It is our great interest to investigate the possibility of developing the B. mori as human disease model. We searched the orthologs of human disease associated genes in the B. mori by bi-directional best hits of BLAST and confirmed by searching the OrthoDB. In total, 5006 genes corresponding to 1612 kinds of human diseases had orthologs in the B. mori, among which, there are 25 genes associated with diabetes mellitus. Of these, we selected the insulin receptor gene of the B. mori (Bm-INSR to study its expression in different tissues and at different developmental stages and tissues. Quantitative PCR showed that Bm-INSR was highly expressed in the Malpighian tubules but expressed at low levels in the testis. It was highly expressed in the 3rd and 4th instar larvae, and adult. We knocked down Bm-INSR expression using RNA interference. The abundance of Bm-INSR transcripts were dramatically reduced to ~4% of the control level at 6 days after dsRNA injection and the RNAi-treated B. mori individuals showed apparent growth inhibition and malformation such as abnormal body color in black, which is the typical symptom of diabetic patients. Our results demonstrate that B. mori has potential use as an animal model for diabetic mellitus research.

  16. Cis-regulatory control of the nuclear receptor Coup-TF gene in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus embryo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalampoki, Lamprini G; Flytzanis, Constantin N

    2014-01-01

    ...). The Paracentrotus lividus Coup-TF gene (PlCoup-TF) is expressed throughout embryonic development preferentially in the oral ectoderm of the gastrula and the ciliary band of the pluteus stage. Two overlapping λ...

  17. Genetic Architecture of MAPT Gene Region in Parkinson Disease Subtypes.

    OpenAIRE

    Esterina ePascale; Maria Elena eDi Battista; Alfonso eRubino; Carlo ePurcaro; Marcella eValente; Francesco eFattapposta; Giampiero eFerraguti; Giuseppe eMeco

    2016-01-01

    The microtubule-associated protein tau (MAPT) region has been conceptualized as a model of the interaction between genetics and functional disease outcomes in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson disease. Indeed, haplotype-specific differences in expression and alternative splicing of MAPT transcripts affect cellular functions at different levels, increasing susceptibility to a range of neurodegenerative processes. In order to evaluate a possible link between MAPT variants, PD risk...

  18. Candidate gene associated with a mutation causing recessive polycystic kidney disease in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moyer, J.H.; Lee-Tischler, M.J.; Kwon, H.Y.; Schrick, J.J. (Univ. of Tennessee Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)); Avner, E.D.; Sweeney, W.E. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)); Godfrey, V.L.; Cacheiro, N.L.A.; Woychik, R.P. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Wilkinson, J.E. (Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States))

    1994-05-27

    A line of transgenic mice was generated that contains an insertional mutation causing a phenotype similar to human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. Homozygotes displayed a complex phenotype that included bilateral polycystic kidneys and an unusual liver lesion. The mutant locus was cloned and characterized through use of the transgene as a molecular marker. Additionally, a candidate polycystic kidney disease (PKD) gene was identified whose structure and expression are directly associated with the mutant locus. A complementary DNA derived from this gene predicted a peptide containing a motif that was originally identified in several genes involved in cell cycle control.

  19. [Gene organization of HLA and its association with ocular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuki, N; Ohno, S

    1992-04-01

    It is now evident that the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC), human leucocyte-associated antigen (HLA), regulates the immune response through discrimination between autologous and non autologous substances thereby displaying a high degree of genetic polymorphism. In recent years, the three-dimensional structure of HLA has been clarified by crystal analysis and provides the attractive hypothesis, the so-called hotdog model, explaining the interactions of foreign antigens (or autologous antigens), HLA and T cell receptors and has a great impact on various studies on immunogenetic mechanisms underlying the development of many diseases. Thus, several HLA-associated ocular diseases such as Behçet's disease and Harada's disease have also been analyzed from this point of view by means of recombinant DNA techniques, enabling elucidation of molecular mechanisms of susceptibility to these diseases. This paper describes a general outline of HLA, especially its genetical structure, as well as recent analysis of molecular mechanisms of the predisposition to representative ocular diseases.

  20. Gene-Environment Interactions in the Development of Complex Disease Phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Olden

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The lack of knowledge about the earliest events in disease development is due to the multi-factorial nature of disease risk. This information gap is the consequence of the lack of appreciation for the fact that most diseases arise from the complex interactions between genes and the environment as a function of the age or stage of development of the individual. Whether an environmental exposure causes illness or not is dependent on the efficiency of the so-called “environmental response machinery” (i.e., the complex of metabolic pathways that can modulate response to environmental perturbations that one has inherited. Thus, elucidating the causes of most chronic diseases will require an understanding of both the genetic and environmental contribution to their etiology. Unfortunately, the exploration of the relationship between genes and the environment has been hampered in the past by the limited knowledge of the human genome, and by the inclination of scientists to study disease development using experimental models that consider exposure to a single environmental agent. Rarely in the past were interactions between multiple genes or between genes and environmental agents considered in studies of human disease etiology. The most critical issue is how to relate exposure-disease association studies to pathways and mechanisms. To understand how genes and environmental factors interact to perturb biological pathways to cause injury or disease, scientists will need tools with the capacity to monitor the global expression of thousands of genes, proteins and metabolites simultaneously. The generation of such data in multiple species can be used to identify conserved and functionally significant genes and pathways involved in geneenvironment interactions. Ultimately, it is this knowledge that will be used to guide agencies such as the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in decisions regarding biomedical research funding

  1. AAV Vector-Mediated Gene Delivery to Substantia Nigra Dopamine Neurons: Implications for Gene Therapy and Disease Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina Albert

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gene delivery using adeno-associated virus (AAV vectors is a widely used method to transduce neurons in the brain, especially due to its safety, efficacy, and long-lasting expression. In addition, by varying AAV serotype, promotor, and titer, it is possible to affect the cell specificity of expression or the expression levels of the protein of interest. Dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra projecting to the striatum, comprising the nigrostriatal pathway, are involved in movement control and degenerate in Parkinson′s disease. AAV-based gene targeting to the projection area of these neurons in the striatum has been studied extensively to induce the production of neurotrophic factors for disease-modifying therapies for Parkinson′s disease. Much less emphasis has been put on AAV-based gene therapy targeting dopamine neurons in substantia nigra. We will review the literature related to targeting striatum and/or substantia nigra dopamine neurons using AAVs in order to express neuroprotective and neurorestorative molecules, as well as produce animal disease models of Parkinson′s disease. We discuss difficulties in targeting substantia nigra dopamine neurons and their vulnerability to stress in general. Therefore, choosing a proper control for experimental work is not trivial. Since the axons along the nigrostriatal tract are the first to degenerate in Parkinson′s disease, the location to deliver the therapy must be carefully considered. We also review studies using AAV-a-synuclein (a-syn to target substantia nigra dopamine neurons to produce an α-syn overexpression disease model in rats. Though these studies are able to produce mild dopamine system degeneration in the striatum and substantia nigra and some behavioural effects, there are studies pointing to the toxicity of AAV-carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP, which is often used as a control. Therefore, we discuss the potential difficulties in overexpressing proteins in general in

  2. AAV Vector-Mediated Gene Delivery to Substantia Nigra Dopamine Neurons: Implications for Gene Therapy and Disease Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Katrina; Voutilainen, Merja H; Domanskyi, Andrii; Airavaara, Mikko

    2017-02-08

    Gene delivery using adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors is a widely used method to transduce neurons in the brain, especially due to its safety, efficacy, and long-lasting expression. In addition, by varying AAV serotype, promotor, and titer, it is possible to affect the cell specificity of expression or the expression levels of the protein of interest. Dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra projecting to the striatum, comprising the nigrostriatal pathway, are involved in movement control and degenerate in Parkinson's disease. AAV-based gene targeting to the projection area of these neurons in the striatum has been studied extensively to induce the production of neurotrophic factors for disease-modifying therapies for Parkinson's disease. Much less emphasis has been put on AAV-based gene therapy targeting dopamine neurons in substantia nigra. We will review the literature related to targeting striatum and/or substantia nigra dopamine neurons using AAVs in order to express neuroprotective and neurorestorative molecules, as well as produce animal disease models of Parkinson's disease. We discuss difficulties in targeting substantia nigra dopamine neurons and their vulnerability to stress in general. Therefore, choosing a proper control for experimental work is not trivial. Since the axons along the nigrostriatal tract are the first to degenerate in Parkinson's disease, the location to deliver the therapy must be carefully considered. We also review studies using AAV-a-synuclein (a-syn) to target substantia nigra dopamine neurons to produce an α-syn overexpression disease model in rats. Though these studies are able to produce mild dopamine system degeneration in the striatum and substantia nigra and some behavioural effects, there are studies pointing to the toxicity of AAV-carrying green fluorescent protein (GFP), which is often used as a control. Therefore, we discuss the potential difficulties in overexpressing proteins in general in the substantia nigra.

  3. The novel centriolar satellite protein SSX2IP targets Cep290 to the ciliary transition zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Maren; Wang, Wenbo; Kuhns, Stefanie; Bärenz, Felix; Dräger-Meurer, Stefanie; Pereira, Gislene; Gruss, Oliver J

    2014-02-01

    In differentiated human cells, primary cilia fulfill essential functions in converting mechanical or chemical stimuli into intracellular signals. Formation and maintenance of cilia require multiple functions associated with the centriole-derived basal body, from which axonemal microtubules grow and which assembles a gate to maintain the specific ciliary proteome. Here we characterize the function of a novel centriolar satellite protein, synovial sarcoma X breakpoint-interacting protein 2 (SSX2IP), in the assembly of primary cilia. We show that SSX2IP localizes to the basal body of primary cilia in human and murine ciliated cells. Using small interfering RNA knockdown in human cells, we demonstrate the importance of SSX2IP for efficient recruitment of the ciliopathy-associated satellite protein Cep290 to both satellites and the basal body. Cep290 takes a central role in gating proteins to the ciliary compartment. Consistent with that, loss of SSX2IP drastically reduces entry of the BBSome, which functions to target membrane proteins to primary cilia, and interferes with efficient accumulation of the key regulator of ciliary membrane protein targeting, Rab8. Finally, we show that SSX2IP knockdown limits targeting of the ciliary membrane protein and BBSome cargo, somatostatin receptor 3, and significantly reduces axoneme length. Our data establish SSX2IP as a novel targeting factor for ciliary membrane proteins cooperating with Cep290, the BBSome, and Rab8.

  4. An assay for clogging the ciliary pore complex distinguishes mechanisms of cytosolic and membrane protein entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Daisuke; Dishinger, John F; Kee, H Lynn; Pinskey, Justine M; Allen, Ben L; Verhey, Kristen J

    2014-10-06

    As a cellular organelle, the cilium contains a unique protein composition. Entry of both membrane and cytosolic components is tightly regulated by gating mechanisms at the cilium base; however, the mechanistic details of ciliary gating are largely unknown. We previously proposed that entry of cytosolic components is regulated by mechanisms similar to those of nuclear transport and is dependent on nucleoporins (NUPs), which comprise a ciliary pore complex (CPC). To investigate ciliary gating mechanisms, we developed a system to clog the pore by inhibiting NUP function via forced dimerization. We targeted NUP62, a component of the central channel of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), for forced dimerization by tagging it with the homodimerizing Fv domain. As proof of principle, we show that forced dimerization of NUP62-Fv attenuated (1) active transport of BSA into the nuclear compartment and (2) the kinesin-2 motor KIF17 into the ciliary compartment. Using the pore-clogging technique, we find that forced dimerization of NUP62 attenuated the gated entry of cytosolic proteins but did not affect entry of membrane proteins or diffusional entry of small cytosolic proteins. We propose a model in which active transport of cytosolic proteins into both nuclear and ciliary compartments requires functional NUPs of the central pore, whereas lateral entry of membrane proteins utilizes a different mechanism that is likely specific to each organelle's limiting membrane. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Swimming Speed of Larval Snail Does Not Correlate with Size and Ciliary Beat Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kit Yu Karen; Jiang, Houshuo; Padilla, Dianna K.

    2013-01-01

    Many marine invertebrates have planktonic larvae with cilia used for both propulsion and capturing of food particles. Hence, changes in ciliary activity have implications for larval nutrition and ability to navigate the water column, which in turn affect survival and dispersal. Using high-speed high-resolution microvideography, we examined the relationship between swimming speed, velar arrangements, and ciliary beat frequency of freely swimming veliger larvae of the gastropod Crepidula fornicata over the course of larval development. Average swimming speed was greatest 6 days post hatching, suggesting a reduction in swimming speed towards settlement. At a given age, veliger larvae have highly variable speeds (0.8–4 body lengths s−1) that are independent of shell size. Contrary to the hypothesis that an increase in ciliary beat frequency increases work done, and therefore speed, there was no significant correlation between swimming speed and ciliary beat frequency. Instead, there are significant correlations between swimming speed and visible area of the velar lobe, and distance between centroids of velum and larval shell. These observations suggest an alternative hypothesis that, instead of modifying ciliary beat frequency, larval C. fornicata modify swimming through adjustment of velum extension or orientation. The ability to adjust velum position could influence particle capture efficiency and fluid disturbance and help promote survival in the plankton. PMID:24367554

  6. Calcium regulates independently ciliary beat and cell contraction in Paramecium cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwadate, Yoshiaki; Nakaoka, Yasuo

    2008-08-01

    Intracellular Ca(2+) concentration is a well-known signal regulator for various physiological activities. In many cases, Ca(2+) simultaneously regulates individual functions in single cells. How can Ca(2+) regulate these functions independently? In Paramecium cells, the contractile cytoskeletal network and cilia are located close to each other near the cell surface. Cell body contraction, ciliary reversal, and rises in ciliary beat frequency are regulated by intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. However, they are not always triggered simultaneously. We injected caged calcium into Paramecium caudatum cells and continuously applied weak ultraviolet light to the cells to slowly increase intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. The cell bodies began to contract just after the start of ultraviolet light application, and the degree of contraction increased gradually thereafter. On the other hand, cilia began to reverse 1.4s after the start of ultraviolet application and reversed completely within 100ms. Ciliary beat frequency in the reverse direction was significantly higher than in the normal direction. These results indicate that cell body contraction is regulated by Ca(2+) in a dose-dependent manner in living P. caudatum. On the other hand, ciliary reversal and rise in ciliary beat frequency are triggered by Ca(2+) in an all-or-none manner.

  7. Retinal Diseases Caused by Mutations in Genes Not Specifically Associated with the Clinical Diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Wang

    Full Text Available When seeking a confirmed molecular diagnosis in the research setting, patients with one descriptive diagnosis of retinal disease could carry pathogenic variants in genes not specifically associated with that description. However, this event has not been evaluated systematically in clinical diagnostic laboratories that validate fully all target genes to minimize false negatives/positives.We performed targeted next-generation sequencing analysis on 207 ocular disease-related genes for 42 patients whose DNA had been tested negative for disease-specific panels of genes known to be associated with retinitis pigmentosa, Leber congenital amaurosis, or exudative vitreoretinopathy.Pathogenic variants, including single nucleotide variations and copy number variations, were identified in 9 patients, including 6 with variants in syndromic retinal disease genes and 3 whose molecular diagnosis could not be distinguished easily from their submitted clinical diagnosis, accounting for 21% (9/42 of the unsolved cases.Our study underscores the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of retinal disorders and provides valuable reference to estimate the fraction of clinical samples whose retinal disorders could be explained by genes not specifically associated with the corresponding clinical diagnosis. Our data suggest that sequencing a larger set of retinal disorder related genes can increase the molecular diagnostic yield, especially for clinically hard-to-distinguish cases.

  8. Application of the gene editing tool, CRISPR-Cas9, for treating neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolli, Nivya; Lu, Ming; Maiti, Panchanan; Rossignol, Julien; Dunbar, Gary L

    2018-01-01

    Increased accumulation of transcribed protein from the damaged DNA and reduced DNA repair capability contributes to numerous neurological diseases for which effective treatments are lacking. Gene editing techniques provide new hope for replacing defective genes and DNA associated with neurological diseases. With advancements in using such editing tools as zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), meganucleases, and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), etc., scientists are able to design DNA-binding proteins, which can make precise double-strand breaks (DSBs) at the target DNA. Recent developments with the CRISPR-Cas9 gene-editing technology has proven to be more precise and efficient when compared to most other gene-editing techniques. Two methods, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homology-direct repair (HDR), are used in CRISPR-Cas9 system to efficiently excise the defective genes and incorporate exogenous DNA at the target site. In this review article, we provide an overview of the CRISPR-Cas9 methodology, including its molecular mechanism, with a focus on how in this gene-editing tool can be used to counteract certain genetic defects associated with neurological diseases. Detailed understanding of this new tool could help researchers design specific gene editing strategies to repair genetic disorders in selective neurological diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Isolated polycystic liver disease genes define effectors of polycystin-1 function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besse, Whitney; Dong, Ke; Choi, Jungmin; Punia, Sohan; Fedeles, Sorin V; Choi, Murim; Gallagher, Anna-Rachel; Huang, Emily B; Gulati, Ashima; Knight, James; Mane, Shrikant; Tahvanainen, Esa; Tahvanainen, Pia; Sanna-Cherchi, Simone; Lifton, Richard P; Watnick, Terry; Pei, York P; Torres, Vicente E; Somlo, Stefan

    2017-05-01

    Dominantly inherited isolated polycystic liver disease (PCLD) consists of liver cysts that are radiologically and pathologically identical to those seen in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, but without clinically relevant kidney cysts. The causative genes are known for fewer than 40% of PCLD index cases. Here, we have used whole exome sequencing in a discovery cohort of 102 unrelated patients who were excluded for mutations in the 2 most common PCLD genes, PRKCSH and SEC63, to identify heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in 3 additional genes, ALG8, GANAB, and SEC61B. Similarly to PRKCSH and SEC63, these genes encode proteins that are integral to the protein biogenesis pathway in the endoplasmic reticulum. We inactivated these candidate genes in cell line models to show that loss of function of each results in defective maturation and trafficking of polycystin-1, the central determinant of cyst pathogenesis. Despite acting in a common pathway, each PCLD gene product demonstrated distinct effects on polycystin-1 biogenesis. We also found enrichment on a genome-wide basis of heterozygous mutations in the autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease gene PKHD1, indicating that adult PKHD1 carriers can present with clinical PCLD. These findings define genetic and biochemical modulators of polycystin-1 function and provide a more complete definition of the spectrum of dominant human polycystic diseases.

  10. Alexander disease with periventricular calcification: a novel mutation of the GFAP gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jefferson, Rosalind J.; Absoud, Michael; Jain, Rakesh; Livingston, John H.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Jayawant, Sandeep

    2010-01-01

    Alexander disease is a rare neurodegenerative leucoencephalopathy caused by de novo mutations in the GFAP gene. Infantile, juvenile, and adult subtypes have been described and the clinical and radiological phenotypes are broad. Here we report on a single case of juvenile-onset Alexander disease

  11. Candidate genes for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in two large data sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, P S; Zhu, G; Gulsvik, A

    2011-01-01

    Lack of reproducibility of findings has been a criticism of genetic association studies in complex diseases like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We selected 257 polymorphisms of 16 genes with reported or potential relationshipsto COPD and genotyped these variants in a case...

  12. Neutralizing antibodies against adeno-associated viruses in inflammatory bowel disease patients: implications for gene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Marel, Sander; Comijn, Elisabeth M.; Verspaget, Hein W.; van Deventer, Sander; van den Brink, Gijs R.; Petry, Harald; Hommes, Daniel W.; Ferreira, Valerie

    2011-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs) are comprised of two major disorders: Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). No curative treatment options are available, but gene therapy may offer an alternative therapeutic approach. For this a safe and reliable vector is needed. The adeno-associated

  13. A microarray screen for novel candidate genes in coeliac disease pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diosdado, B; Wapenaar, MC; Franke, L; Duran, KJ; Goerres, MJ; Hadithi, M; Crusius, JBA; Meijer, JWR; Duggan, DJ; Mulder, CJJ; Holstege, FCP; Wijmenga, C

    Background and aims: The causative molecular pathways underlying the pathogenesis of coeliac disease are poorly understood. To unravel novel aspects of disease pathogenesis, we used microarrays to determine changes in gene expression of duodenal biopsies. Methods: cDNA microarrays representing 19

  14. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene I/D polymorphism and renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Navis, G; van der Kleij, FGH; de Zeeuw, D; de Jong, PE

    1999-01-01

    In recent years a vast amount of data has been published on the association between the insertion/deletion (VD) polymorphism of the gene coding for angiotensin-converting enzyme and renal disease. It has be come clear that the polymorphism does not affect the prevalence of renal disease. However,

  15. Gene therapy in large animal models of human cardiovascular genetic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeper, Meg M; Bish, Lawrence T; Sweeney, H Lee

    2009-01-01

    Several naturally occurring animal models for human genetic heart diseases offer an excellent opportunity to evaluate potential novel therapies, including gene therapy. Some of these diseases--especially those that result in a structural defect during development (e.g., patent ductus arteriosus, pulmonic stenosis)--would likely be difficult to treat with a therapeutic gene transfer approach. However, the ability to transduce a significant proportion of the myocardial cells should make the various forms of inherited cardiomyopathy amenable to a therapeutic gene transfer approach. Adeno-associated virus may be the ideal vector for cardiac gene therapy since its low immunogenicity allows for stable transgene expression, a crucial factor when considering treatment of a chronic disease. Cardiomyopathies are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in both children and adults, and large animal models are available for the major forms of inherited cardiomyopathy (dilated cardiomyopathy, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy). One of these animal models, juvenile dilated cardiomyopathy of Portuguese water dogs, offers an effective means to assess the efficacy of therapeutic gene transfer to alter the course of cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Correction of the abnormal metabolic processes that occur with heart failure (e.g., calcium metabolism, apoptosis) could normalize diseased myocardial function. Gene therapy may offer a promising new approach for the treatment of cardiac disease in both veterinary and human clinical settings.

  16. Modulation at Age of Onset in Tunisian Huntington Disease Patients: Implication of New Modifier Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorra Hmida-Ben Brahim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder. The causative mutation is an expansion of more than 36 CAG repeats in the first exon of IT15 gene. Many studies have shown that the IT15 interacts with several modifier genes to regulate the age at onset (AO of HD. Our study aims to investigate the implication of CAG expansion and 9 modifiers in the age at onset variance of 15 HD Tunisian patients and to establish the correlation between these modifiers genes and the AO of this disease. Despite the small number of studied patients, this report consists of the first North African study in Huntington disease patients. Our results approve a specific effect of modifiers genes in each population.

  17. Gene Therapy for PRPH2-Associated Ocular Disease: Challenges and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Shannon M.; Naash, Muna I.

    2014-01-01

    The peripherin-2 (PRPH2) gene encodes a photoreceptor-specific tetraspanin protein called peripherin-2/retinal degeneration slow (RDS), which is critical for the formation and maintenance of rod and cone outer segments. Over 90 different disease-causing mutations in PRPH2 have been identified, which cause a variety of forms of retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration. Given the disease burden associated with PRPH2 mutations, the gene has long been a focus for preclinical gene therapy studies. Adeno-associated viruses and compacted DNA nanoparticles carrying PRPH2 have been successfully used to mediate improvement in the rds−/− and rds+/− mouse models. However, complexities in the pathogenic mechanism for PRPH2-associated macular disease coupled with the need for a precise dose of peripherin-2 to combat a severe haploinsufficiency phenotype have delayed the development of clinically viable genetic treatments. Here we discuss the progress and prospects for PRPH2-associated gene therapy. PMID:25167981

  18. Molecular characterisation of lumpy skin disease virus and sheeppox virus based on P32 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.M.A.Rashid

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV and sheeppox virus (SPV have a considerable economic impact on the cattle and small ruminant industry. They are listed in group A of contagious disease by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE. This study addressed molecular characterisation of first LSDV outbreak and an endemic SPV in Kurdistan region of Iraq based on P32 gene. The results indicated that P32 gene can be successfully used for diagnosis of LSDV. The phylogenic and molecular analysis showed that there may be a new LSDV isolate circulating in Kurdistan which uniquely shared the same characteristic amino acid sequence with SPV and GPV, leucine at amino acid position 51 in P32 gene as well as few genetically distinct SPV causing pox disease in Kurdistan sheep. This study provided sequence information of P32 gene for several LSDV isolates, which positively affects the epidemiological study of Capripoxvirus

  19. The RAR1 interactor SGT1, an essential component of R gene-triggered disease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Cristina; Sadanandom, Ari; Kitagawa, Katsumi; Freialdenhoven, Andreas; Shirasu, Ken; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2002-03-15

    Plant disease resistance (R) genes trigger innate immune responses upon pathogen attack. RAR1 is an early convergence point in a signaling pathway engaged by multiple R genes. Here, we show that RAR1 interacts with plant orthologs of the yeast protein SGT1, an essential regulator in the cell cycle. Silencing the barley gene Sgt1 reveals its role in R gene-triggered, Rar1-dependent disease resistance. SGT1 associates with SKP1 and CUL1, subunits of the SCF (Skp1-Cullin-F-box) ubiquitin ligase complex. Furthermore, the RAR1-SGT1 complex also interacts with two COP9 signalosome components. The interactions among RAR1, SGT1, SCF, and signalosome subunits indicate a link between disease resistance and ubiquitination.

  20. [The CRISPR system can correct or modify the expression of genes responsible for hereditary diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Jacques P

    2015-11-01

    A new technology, called CRISPR, derived from the immune system of bacteria, uses a Cas9 nuclease and a guided RNA complementary to a 20 nucleotides sequence of a gene to induce double strand DNA breaks. This permits to modify specifically the targeted gene in plant, animal and human cells. Variants of the technique also permit to reduce or increase the expression of a selected gene. This technology may thus be used not only to understand the role of a gene but also to develop therapies for hereditary and acquired diseases. © 2015 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  1. PTEN Gene: A Model for Genetic Diseases in Dermatology

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    Corrado Romano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available PTEN gene is considered one of the most mutated tumor suppressor genes in human cancer, and it’s likely to become the first one in the near future. Since 1997, its involvement in tumor suppression has smoothly increased, up to the current importance. Germline mutations of PTEN cause the PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome (PHTS, which include the past-called Cowden, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba, Proteus, Proteus-like, and Lhermitte-Duclos syndromes. Somatic mutations of PTEN have been observed in glioblastoma, prostate cancer, and brest cancer cell lines, quoting only the first tissues where the involvement has been proven. The negative regulation of cell interactions with the extracellular matrix could be the way PTEN phosphatase acts as a tumor suppressor. PTEN gene plays an essential role in human development. A recent model sees PTEN function as a stepwise gradation, which can be impaired not only by heterozygous mutations and homozygous losses, but also by other molecular mechanisms, such as transcriptional regression, epigenetic silencing, regulation by microRNAs, posttranslational modification, and aberrant localization. The involvement of PTEN function in melanoma and multistage skin carcinogenesis, with its implication in cancer treatment, and the role of front office in diagnosing PHTS are the main reasons why the dermatologist should know about PTEN.

  2. DNA mutation motifs in the genes associated with inherited diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Růžička, Michal; Kulhánek, Petr; Radová, Lenka; Čechová, Andrea; Špačková, Naďa; Fajkusová, Lenka; Réblová, Kamila

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in human genes can be responsible for inherited genetic disorders and cancer. Mutations can arise due to environmental factors or spontaneously. It has been shown that certain DNA sequences are more prone to mutate. These sites are termed hotspots and exhibit a higher mutation frequency than expected by chance. In contrast, DNA sequences with lower mutation frequencies than expected by chance are termed coldspots. Mutation hotspots are usually derived from a mutation spectrum, which reflects particular population where an effect of a common ancestor plays a role. To detect coldspots/hotspots unaffected by population bias, we analysed the presence of germline mutations obtained from HGMD database in the 5-nucleotide segments repeatedly occurring in genes associated with common inherited disorders, in particular, the PAH, LDLR, CFTR, F8, and F9 genes. Statistically significant sequences (mutational motifs) rarely associated with mutations (coldspots) and frequently associated with mutations (hotspots) exhibited characteristic sequence patterns, e.g. coldspots contained purine tract while hotspots showed alternating purine-pyrimidine bases, often with the presence of CpG dinucleotide. Using molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations, we analysed the global bending properties of two selected coldspots and two hotspots with a G/T mismatch. We observed that the coldspots were inherently more flexible than the hotspots. We assume that this property might be critical for effective mismatch repair as DNA with a mutation recognized by MutSα protein is noticeably bent.

  3. HapMap and mapping genes for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musunuru, Kiran; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2008-10-01

    A key goal of biomedical science is to understand why individuals differ in their susceptibility to disease. Family history is among the established risk factors for most forms of cardiovascular disease, in part because inherited DNA sequence variants play a causal role in disease susceptibility. Consequently, the search for these variants has intensified over the past decade. One class of DNA sequence variants takes the form of single nucleotide changes(single nucleotide polymorphisms, or SNPs), usually with two variants or alleles for each SNP. SNPs are scattered throughout the 23 pairs of chromosomes of the human genome, and roughly 11 million common polymorphisms (ie,those > 1% frequency) are estimated to exist. A combination of SNP alleles along a chromosome is termed a haplotype. The International Haplotype Map Project was designed to create a public genome-wide database of common SNPs and, consequently, enable systematic studies of most common SNPs for their potential role in human disease. We review the following: (1) the concept of linkage disequilibrium orallelic association, (2) the HapMap project, and (3) several examples of the utility of HapMap data in genetic mapping for cardiovascular disease phenotypes.

  4. Identification of the causative gene for Simmental arachnomelia syndrome using a network-based disease gene prioritization approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Shihui; Chu, Qin; Wang, Yachun; Xie, Zhenquan; Hou, Shiyu; Liu, Airong; Wu, Hongjun; Liu, Lin; Geng, Fanjun; Wang, Congyong; Qin, Chunhua; Tan, Rui; Huang, Xixia; Tan, Shixin; Wu, Meng; Xu, Xianzhou; Liu, Xuan; Yu, Ying; Zhang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Arachnomelia syndrome (AS), mainly found in Brown Swiss and Simmental cattle, is a congenital lethal genetic malformation of the skeletal system. In this study, a network-based disease gene prioritization approach was implemented to rank genes in the previously reported ∼7 Mb region on chromosome 23 associated with AS in Simmental cattle. The top 6 ranked candidate genes were sequenced in four German Simmental bulls, one known AS-carrier ROMEL and a pooled sample of three known non-carriers (BOSSAG, RIFURT and HIRMER). Two suspicious mutations located in coding regions, a mis-sense mutation c.1303G>A in the bystin-like (BYSL) gene and a 2-bp deletion mutation c.1224_1225delCA in the molybdenum cofactor synthesis step 1 (MOCS1) gene were detected. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the mutation in MOCS1 was more likely to be the causative mutation. Screening the c.1224_1225delCA site in 383 individuals from 12 cattle breeds/lines, we found that only the bull ROMEL and his 12 confirmed progeny carried the mutation. Thus, our results confirm the conclusion of Buitkamp et al. that the 2-bp deletion mutation c.1224_1225delCA in exon 11 of the MOCS1 gene is causative for AS in Simmental cattle. Furthermore, a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was developed to detect the causative mutation.

  5. Identification of the causative gene for Simmental arachnomelia syndrome using a network-based disease gene prioritization approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihui Jiao

    Full Text Available Arachnomelia syndrome (AS, mainly found in Brown Swiss and Simmental cattle, is a congenital lethal genetic malformation of the skeletal system. In this study, a network-based disease gene prioritization approach was implemented to rank genes in the previously reported ∼7 Mb region on chromosome 23 associated with AS in Simmental cattle. The top 6 ranked candidate genes were sequenced in four German Simmental bulls, one known AS-carrier ROMEL and a pooled sample of three known non-carriers (BOSSAG, RIFURT and HIRMER. Two suspicious mutations located in coding regions, a mis-sense mutation c.1303G>A in the bystin-like (BYSL gene and a 2-bp deletion mutation c.1224_1225delCA in the molybdenum cofactor synthesis step 1 (MOCS1 gene were detected. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the mutation in MOCS1 was more likely to be the causative mutation. Screening the c.1224_1225delCA site in 383 individuals from 12 cattle breeds/lines, we found that only the bull ROMEL and his 12 confirmed progeny carried the mutation. Thus, our results confirm the conclusion of Buitkamp et al. that the 2-bp deletion mutation c.1224_1225delCA in exon 11 of the MOCS1 gene is causative for AS in Simmental cattle. Furthermore, a polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP was developed to detect the causative mutation.

  6. Network-based association of hypoxia-responsive genes with cardiovascular diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui-Sheng; Oldham, William M.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2014-10-01

    Molecular oxygen is indispensable for cellular viability and function. Hypoxia is a stress condition in which oxygen demand exceeds supply. Low cellular oxygen content induces a number of molecular changes to activate regulatory pathways responsible for increasing the oxygen supply and optimizing cellular metabolism under limited oxygen conditions. Hypoxia plays critical roles in the pathobiology of many diseases, such as cancer, heart failure, myocardial ischemia, stroke, and chronic lung diseases. Although the complicated associations between hypoxia and cardiovascular (and cerebrovascular) diseases (CVD) have been recognized for some time, there are few studies that investigate their biological link from a systems biology perspective. In this study, we integrate hypoxia genes, CVD genes, and the human protein interactome in order to explore the relationship between hypoxia and cardiovascular diseases at a systems level. We show that hypoxia genes are much closer to CVD genes in the human protein interactome than that expected by chance. We also find that hypoxia genes play significant bridging roles in connecting different cardiovascular diseases. We construct a hypoxia-CVD bipartite network and find several interesting hypoxia-CVD modules with significant gene ontology similarity. Finally, we show that hypoxia genes tend to have more CVD interactors in the human interactome than in random networks of matching topology. Based on these observations, we can predict novel genes that may be associated with CVD. This network-based association study gives us a broad view of the relationships between hypoxia and cardiovascular diseases and provides new insights into the role of hypoxia in cardiovascular biology.

  7. Impact of gene patents and licensing practices on access to genetic testing for Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skeehan, Katie; Heaney, Christopher; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2010-04-01

    Genetic testing for Alzheimer disease includes genotyping for apolipoprotein E, for late-onset Alzheimer disease, and three rare autosomal dominant, early-onset forms of Alzheimer disease associated with different genes (APP, PSEN1, and PSEN2). According to researchers, patents have not impeded research in the field, nor were patents an important consideration in the quest for the genetic risk factors. Athena Diagnostics holds exclusive licenses from Duke University for three "method" patents covering apolipoprotein E genetic testing. Athena offers tests for apolipoprotein E and genes associated with early-onset, autosomal-dominant Alzheimer disease. One of those presenilin genes is patented and exclusively licensed to Athena; the other presenilin gene was patented but the patent was allowed to lapse; and one (amyloid precursor protein) is patented as a research tool. Direct-to-consumer testing is available for some Alzheimer disease-related genes, apparently without a license. Athena Diagnostics consolidated its position in the market for Alzheimer disease genetic testing by collecting exclus